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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 10.19.2018 • $2.00

2018 SENATE DEBATE

President says he believes journalist is dead

CANDIDATES TRADE BARBS, COMPLIMENTS JOSH HAWLEY

CLAIRE McCASKILL

Missouri attorney general opposes cutting Social Security and Medicare to help erase the nation’s ballooning deficits and debt

Incumbent senator says Obamacare should be fixed, not tossed; agrees Social Security and Medicare should not be touched

Saudi Arabia faces ‘severe’ measures as punishment, he warns BY ERIN CUNNINGHAM AND JOHN WAGNER Washington Post

WASHINGTON • President Donald

Trump said Thursday it appeared that Jamal Khashoggi is dead and warned that his administration could consider “very severe” measures against Saudi Arabia, sharply raising pressures on the kingdom as it prepares its own accounting of the journalist’s disappearance. Trump’s remarks reflect the vacillating strategies and views in the White House over its response and possible punishments toward one of its key Middle East allies. Trump has said any U.S. actions over Khashoggi’s disappearance must take into account the security and defense ties the United States has with the kingdom. But Trump also must contend with the interSee TRUMP • Page A7

U.S. general in Afghanistan survives attack by Taliban

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

More than 150 people watch a live broadcast of a debate Thursday between Republican senatorial candidate and Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley and incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill at the Public Media Commons, 3653 Olive Street, outside the Nine Network.

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HAWLEY ON MEDICARE, SOCIAL SECURITY

‘I think it is vital we protect these programs that Americans have paid into with their hardearned cash.’ ON TRADE

‘We are in a trade war. If we’re going to be in the war, I want to win it.’

ST. LOUIS • Republican U.S. Senate candidate Josh Hawley said Thursday night that he opposed cutting Social Security and Medicare to help erase the nation’s ballooning deficits and debt. Breaking with a suggestion by Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, Hawley said that if cuts needed to be made, lawmakers should look at taking federal dollars from the Affordable Care Act. “I do not support cutting Social Security or Medicare. I think it is vital we protect these programs that Americans have paid into with their hard-earned cash,” Hawley said at an hourlong, tele-

vised debate against his rival, Democratic U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill. Hawley, Missouri’s attorney general, and McCaskill, who is seeking her third term, are in a neck-and-neck race that could decide the partisan makeup of the Senate. The candidates clashed on questions about the growing deficit, gun restrictions and the Affordable Care Act among other issues. “Josh’s campaign has a tortured relationship with the truth,” McCaskill said at one point. Hawley, for his part, cast McCaskill as a “good person” who nonetheless “does not represent See DEBATE • Page A6

Area residents tune in, take notes as candidates spar • A6

Justice officials launch clergy abuse probe in Pennsylvania BY MARYCLAIRE DALE AND ERIC TUCKER Associated Press

All Catholic dioceses in Illinois targeted in sex abuse lawsuit • A5

PHILADELPHIA • The U.S.

people familiar with the probe. The subpoenas, served last week, follow a scathing state grand jury report over the summer that found that 301 “predator priests” in Pennsylvania had

Justice Department has opened an investigation of child sexual abuse inside the Roman Catholic Church in Pennsylvania, using subpoenas to demand confidential files and testimony from church leaders, according to two

TODAY

Center stage

56°/48° CLOUDY, SHOWERS

TOMORROW

62°/33° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER C10

See CLERGY • Page A5

Dorsey commits to growth here BUSINESS

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

BY KATHY GANNON AND AMIR SHAH Associated Press

McCASKILL ON DEFICITS

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN • A highlevel meeting to lay out security plans for Afghanistan’s upcoming parliamentary elections had just concluded when an elite Afghan guard turned his gun Thursday on the departing delegation in an attack that killed the powerful Kandahar police chief but missed the top U.S. commander in the country, Gen. Scott Miller. The audacious assassination strike, which killed at least one other senior Afghan official and was claimed by the Taliban, underscored the harrowing lack of security in Afghanistan just two days before national elections and more than 17 years after the militant group was driven from power. A Taliban

‘The Republican Party loves to talk about debt and deficits until they are in charge. Then it’s crickets.’ ON TRADE

‘The tariffs are brutal for Missouri. ... This is where a senator from Missouri has to stand tall for agriculture.’

See AFGHANISTAN • Page A5

Man gets life term in beating death of St. Charles woman, 84 Brian McBenge

Cecil McBenge

BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES • He’s been acquitted in one murder, dismissed from another killing in 1985 and twice found guilty in the beating death in 1984 of an elderly St. Charles woman in her home. On Thursday, Brian McBenge was sentenced to prison.

Circuit Judge Deborah Alessi gave him a life term for beating to death Eleonora Knoernschild, 84, in her St. Charles home in November 1984. Because the crime took place before sentencing guidelines were changed in the mid1990s, McBenge, 56, may not have to serve 85 percent of the See PRISON • Page A6

SLU president named to Bi-State board

• A3

For Cards, accountability starts up front

• C1

SLU picked as favorite to win the A-10

• C1

Knoernschild Elderly woman’s murder went unsolved until 2011, when police linked DNA evidence to each of the McBenge brothers

1 M

Cheap entertainment is easy to find

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M 1 FRIDAY • 10.19.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM 20 YEARS LATER

‘NEWS & BREWS’ QUIZ

UPCOMING CHATS

He was a member of the St. Louis Rams, celebrating his 24th birthday, when he crashed into another car and killed a woman. Look back at the criminal case of Leonard Little. stltoday.com/archives

Take the boozy-news quiz from our national government and politics reporter Chuck Raasch, and you’ll be entered to win tickets to our News & Brews event, Nov. 1 at the Schlafly Tap Room. stltoday.com/contests

Friday

Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Tuesday Columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday

Missouri ballot initiatives offer hope for broken political system TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Tuesday night was a disaster at the Messenger household. The culprit? YouTube. The popular video streaming service was out for more than an hour, causing quite some angst with the 13-year-old boy. Here’s the thing with teens these days: When they aren’t playing Fortnite on Xbox, they’re watching Fortnite videos on YouTube. Like bottle flipping and fidget spinners, this, too, shall pass. But in the meantime, Kyler Perfect (that’s his YouTube name) had to spend some angst-filled time with the family. We were watching a ballgame on TV when the political ads started flowing. One for Democrat Claire McCaskill, followed by one for Republican Josh Hawley. Then two more. Back and forth they went. The boy mimicked all of them. He had them memorized. He was sick of them, many paid for by dark money from outside Missouri. He’s five years from voting age, and yet he was already turned off by the negative nature of political advertising. How did this happen? YouTube. It turns out, the political world knows well where the young people, voters of today and tomorrow, are spending their time. If it’s not Fortnite, it’s reruns of “The Office,” or music videos. My son has likely seen countless more political ads this cycle than I have because most television I watch is recorded. I’m glad he’s paying attention, but that he’s already turned off by the process is a disappointing sign of the times. Our politics are broken. That’s the rare statement these days that likely has full agreement on the left and the right. So how did we get here? Two important initiatives on Missouri’s November ballot offer context. The first is Proposition D, which would increase the state’s gasoline tax — among the lowest in the country — by 10 cents over four years to raise more than $300 million a year for local and state road and bridge projects. Some of the money would be dedicated to the Missouri Highway Patrol, with the expectation that lawmakers would take a similar amount out of general revenue for transportation. Missouri lawmakers have been debating the poor condition of the state’s roads

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

MoDOT workers fill potholes on Interstate 55 in St. Louis in 2014. A gasoline tax hike on the November ballot in Missouri would fund road projects.

and bridges for more than a decade. This year’s proposal, which the Legislature put on the ballot with a bipartisan vote, is a drop in the bucket for what is really needed. Compare it to competing proposals in 2007. That year, state Rep. Neal St. Onge, R-Ballwin, and Sen. Bill Stouffer, R-Marshall, each pitched tax hikes to help increase transportation funding. The two Republicans, chairmen of their respective transportation committees, would have raised $700 million and $800 million a year each, about $8 billion over the length of the tax increases. The proposals died, term limits sent the two men and many of their colleagues packing, and there has been little progress on investment in local or state infrastructure needs in the decade since then. Part of the reason is the Grover Norquist-inspired rise of the “no new taxes” pledge that became theology in the Republican Party. Part of it is the increase in big money in politics, from ideologues like the Koch brothers on the right who are more interested in starving government than making it work. And some of it is tied to the way legislative districts are drawn, where elected politicians are frequently speaking only to the most extreme sliver of the voting population, on the left or on the right. It is this Missouri reality — and one in many other states in the nation — that

Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

helped inspire Amendment 1. Sponsored by the Clean Missouri coalition, with as much bipartisan support as Proposition D, the constitutional amendment would change the way legislative boundaries are drawn, in part by seeking more partisan balance, and reducing the opportunity for political operatives to use behindthe-scenes influence to protect incumbents. The amendment would also limit campaign contributions and lobbyists’ gifts and make lawmakers wait two years before becoming lobbyists. The way I see it, there’s a direct connection between Amendment 1, which seeks to clean up government, and Proposition D, which seeks to fund basic services. The effort to clean up our politics is necessary so our elected officials can get back to developing and debating the sort of serious policy proposals that more than a decade ago were significantly more common than they are today, in a body corrupted by money and pulled apart by partisanship. In that sense, the November ballot provides me hope amid a broken political system that already is turning off the next generation of voters. It might take a little longer than a YouTube outage, but given time, voters can fix that which they currently disdain. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m.

PEOPLE It’s a date: Tony Awards will be handed out in June in New York The Tony Awards are getting ready for their 2019 ceremony. The 73rd annual awards show, celebrating the best of the Broadway season, will take place on June 9, it was announced Thursday. It will again be broadcast live on CBS from Radio City Music Hall in New York City. The 2019 edition of the telecast should be a star-studded one, as the current season includes plays starring Bryan Cranston, Kerry Washington, Armie Hammer, Daniel Radcliffe, Bobby Cannavale, John Lithgow, Laurie Metcalf, Ethan Hawke and Janet McTeer, to name just a few. The host will be announced later. The season also includes musical adaptations of “Pretty Woman,” “King Kong,” “Tootsie,” “Moulin Rouge!” and “Beetlejuice,” plus productions that feature songs of Cher, the Go-Go’s and Temptations. ‘First Reformed’ leads Gotham nominees • Paul Schrader’s religious thriller “First Reformed” is the leading nominee for the 28th annual Gotham Awards, including nods for best feature and best actor for star Ethan Hawke. The Independent Filmmaker Project announced nominations for the 28th annual IFP Gotham Awards on Thursday. Other nominees for best feature include: “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “Madeline’s Madeline” and “The Rider.” The Mr. Rogers film “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” was nominated for best documentary. The awards will be handed out Nov. 26 in New York.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Artist Peter Max is 81. Actor Michael Gambon is 78. Actor John Lithgow is 73. Singer Jennifer Holliday is 58. Actor Jon Favreau is 52. “South Park” co-creator Trey Parker is 49. Singer Pras Michel is 46. Actress Gillian Jacobs is 36. From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday: 03-57-64-68-69 Powerball: 15 Power play: 3 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $430 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday’s estimated jackpot: $970 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Thursday: 04-21-24-30-31 Lucky ball: 16

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday: 02-05-10-20-36-39 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $1 million SHOW ME CASH Thursday: 16-20-21-26-37 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $128,000 PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 541 Evening: 325 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 6848 Evening: 7946

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

DIGEST HAZELWOOD > Fire district battle continues • St. Louis County Circuit Judge Stanley J. Wallich has denied a request by the Robertson Fire Protection District to hold Hazelwood in contempt in a longsimmering legal battle over fire service. But Robertson’s suit against Hazelwood for failing to pay the district about $3.5 million for fire protection service in the part of the city during 2017 continues. In return for allowing a part of the area Robertson covers to be annexed into Hazelwood in 1995, the city agreed to allow the district to provide service in the area. But Hazelwood has been increasingly unhappy about Robertson’s service, particularly its cost. The ongoing debate heated up in December when the Hazelwood City Council passed a resolution canceling its 23-year agreement with Robertson to provide service in the western end of town.

Robertson officials say Hazelwood can’t cancel the service, because it was a part of the agreement to annex the city. ELLISVILLE > Charitable police foundation considered • Ellisville Mayor Mike Roemerman and the City Council have asked staff to gather information so he and the council could vote as early as Nov. 7 on legislation that would create a charitable police foundation to accept donations from local businesses. During Wednesday’s council work session, Police Chief Steve Lewis said that many area police agencies have such a foundation. “A foundation would add more funding — to allow us to do some things better— but not supplant city budget funds,” Lewis said. “Our police department is 100 percent fully funded by the city — we’re not denied anything. However, if, for example, an

officer is injured, the foundation could help with that.” ST. LOUIS > Leak closes art museum • The St. Louis Art Museum closed Thursday and all events were canceled due to a water main break. The news was announced through a tweet from the museum at 1:36 p.m. The break occurred on Fine Arts Drive in front of the museum where resurfacing was underway for a new installation. The only damage was to a globe on a light fixture, a museum spokeswoman said. The road in front of the museum closed in late September to allow installation of Richard Serra’s flush-with-the-pavement sculpture and work on the road. A reopening date was not announced.

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Thursday Midday: 04-07-11-18-28 Evening: 01-07-21-37-38 LOTTO Thursday: 03-13-23-24-50-51 Extra shot: 13 Estimated jackpot: $18 million PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 965 FB: 2 Evening: 877 FB: 6 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 0910 FB: 1 Evening: 0779 FB: 7

CORRECTIONS • John Lakin is sheriff of Madison County. He was identified incorrectly in a story Thursday. • “Muny Magic at the Sheldon” shows were Wednesday and Thursday evening. A story about the Muny on Thursday included incorrect dates for the biannual concert series.

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LOCAL

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

SLU president Pestello named to Bi-State board BY MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

St. Louis University president Fred Pestello was appointed Thursday by Missouri Gov. Mike Parson to the panel that oversees MetroLink and the Metro bus system. P e s te l l o j o i n s t h e board of the Bi-State Development Agency as the 10-member panel searches for a new president and CEO to succeed John Nations, who has an- Pestello nounced his resignation. The appointment of Pestello, who was recommended by St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson, along with the June decision to add Washington University official Rose Windmiller, gives Krewson and St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger two pre-

sumed allies on the board as the CEO selection process continues. Krewson and Stenger, who both had recommended Windmiller, have been pressing for a role in deciding who succeeds Nations. Stenger has clashed publicly over MetroLink security issues and other matters with Nations and former Mayor Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr., who lost his spot on the Bi-State board when Pestello was appointed. A selection committee of the board met Thursday and was scheduled to meet again Friday. Krewson was at the meeting Thursday, her spokesman, Koran Addo, said. In August 2017, Krewson and Stenger announced they wanted to shake up the Bi-State board. They sent panels of nominees to thenGov. Eric Greitens to replace four Mis-

souri members on the board whose terms had expired and to fill one vacancy. Greitens did not act on their request before his resignation in June. After Parson, who had been the lieutenant governor, succeeded Greitens, the county executive and mayor urged him to act on the Bi-State appointments. Pestello wasn’t on the list of nominees originally submitted in 2017 by Krewson for Schoemehl’s seat. He later was added to it, replacing Windmiller on a list of Krewson nominees. Windmiller also had been on a Stenger list for the county seat she now fills. Pestello’s appointment requires Missouri Senate confirmation. But he can start serving now since the Senate won’t be in session again until January. The Senate signed off on Windmiller last month. The Bi-State board is made up of 10

commissioners, five from Missouri and five from Illinois. Two of the Missouri members represent St. Louis, and two represent St. Louis County for five-year terms. The fifth alternates between city and county residents and is named to a three-year term. Commissioners whose terms have expired, such as Schoemehl, are allowed to continue serving until successors are appointed. Schoemehl on Thursday applauded the appointment of Pestello as his replacement. Schoemehl said when he was CEO of the Grand Center arts district before his retirement in 2015, he got to know Pestello well and believes he will do a great job at Bi-State. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

LIVING MEMORY ABOVE • david Sandbach, with the St. Louis County Police Pipes and drums, kneels down to place a patch on the grave of Officer James reifschneider in Calvary Cemetery in St. Louis on Thursday. Members of the group visited the graves and played music for all 10 St. Louis County police officers who died in the line of duty. The musicians held the ceremonies to mark the 15th anniversary of the pipes and drums group’s formation and to let the families of the dead officers know the department still cares. reifschneider was killed by a hit-and-run driver on april 30, 1977, as he was conducting a traffic stop. LEFT • a patch for the St. Louis County Police Pipes and drums rests on the grave of Officer James reifschneider in Calvary Cemetery in St. Louis on Thursday.

Cahokia man admits shooting that targeted witness against him BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-dispatch

EAST ST. LOUIS • A Cahokia man, Ter-

eze L. Fenderson, pleaded guilty to gun charges Thursday and admitted shooting a person in 2017 who he believed had given information to law enforcement. As part of his plea, Fenderson admitted that agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives caught him with a gun and more than four pounds of marijuana on Feb. 5, 2016. They also

found 68 more pounds of pot at his girlfriend’s house. Fenderson, 39, has a prior conviction for involuntary manslaughter after fatally shooting a friend, Michael J. Wilson, of East St. Louis, on Sept. 17, 2004. Fenderson told authorities that the shooting was accidental — that he was playing with a pistol when the weapon fired. He was sentenced to six years in prison. Fenderson accused one of his marijuana dealers of talking to investigators, and found him at an East St. Louis bar,

Spanky’s Lounge at 1434 Piggott Avenue, on Oct. 22, 2017. Fenderson admitted that he and another person fired at Fenderson’s former dealer at least 14 times, hitting him in the hip and leg. The dealer returned fire, scaring his attackers off with his lawfully owned gun, the plea says. Fenderson pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in East St. Louis to being a felon in possession of a firearm, attempting to retaliate against a witness and discharge of a firearm in connection with a crime of violence. He could face at least 19 years in

prison or more when sentenced Jan. 25. “This case should serve as a warning that federal law enforcement will relentlessly pursue those who embrace the ‘code of the street’ by threatening or retaliating against witnesses,” said U.S. Attorney Steven D. Weinhoeft. “This so-called ‘street code’ is contrary to the most basic tenets of society and is calculated to undermine the rule of law.” Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

PERPETUAL MOTION A cyclist makes his way through the Grove, passing a running mural at the corner of Manchester Avenue and Sarah Street on Thursday. The mural, painted by the Design Deli, covers the construction site of the upcoming 4101 Manchester building, a mixed-use apartment and retail project.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Man is sentenced in drug killing • A St. Louis man was sentenced Thursday to life in prison in a deadly drug deal in 2016 in the city’s Tower Grove South neighborhood. Circuit Judge Jason Sengheiser on Thursday sentenced Ricky Bolden to a life term, which is calculated at 30 years. The judge found Bolden, 32, guilty of second-degree murder and 11 other counts at a bench trial in June. Authorities said Bolden fatally shot Steven Sunkel, 55, of Hillsboro, March 30, 2016, when Sunkel went to buy drugs from him. Sunkel Bolden was found in the 3600 block of Winnebago Street, near South Spring Avenue. He was unconscious and not breathing in the driver’s seat of a vehicle. He died at a hospital. A prosecutor said Bolden decided to kill Sunkel when Sunkel tried to drive off with Bolden’s drugs without paying. Bolden’s lawyer said Bolden shot Sunkel in self-defense when Sunkel tried to rob and run over Bolden with a car. On Thursday, a prosecutor asked the judge for the life prison term; Bolden’s lawyer asked for a 15-year sentence. Sunkel’s mother spoke in court and asked for the maximum sentence.“My loss is beyond words,” Dolores Sunkel said. ST. LOUIS > Two are charged in fatal shooting • Prosecutors have charged two men in a deadly shooting in January in the city’s Grove district. Donald Willis, 27, of the 1100 block of Kilgore Drive in Bellefontaine Neighbors, and Richard E. Moore, 26, of the 4200 block of O’Neill Avenue in Northwoods, are charged with firstdegree murder and armed criminal action in the Jan. 29 shooting death of Ollie Coleman. Coleman, 27, of the 1300 block of Wadsworth Drive in Florissant, was found shot to death about 1 a.m. Jan. 29 outside Willis the ShiSha Restaurant & Lounge, at 4229 Manchester Avenue. Charges say Willis was driving with Moore as a passenger when Moore pointed a rifle out of their vehicle and fired multiple times, killing Coleman. Charges do not offer a motive in the killing. A woman was shot in the leg in the incident, but charges against the men say nothing about her. Bail was set for each at $600,000 cash only. Moore was not in custody Thursday. After the shooting, police released surveillance video showing four men arrive in a maroon Chrysler 300. Video showed three of the men inside the restaurant before the shooting. It was not clear whether anyone besides Willis and Moore had been charged in the case. JEFFERSON COUNTY > Man dies trapped under car • A man called 911 early Thursday from the side of a road to say a car had fallen on top of him, but by the time rescuers arrived he had died.

The man, 37, was found with a saw underneath the abandoned vehicle. The saw was stuck in the vehicle’s exhaust pipe, and the man may have been trying to remove the vehicle’s catalytic converter, Jefferson County Sheriff Dave Marshak said. The dead man was identified as Justin Derecskey, of House Springs. The car belonged to someone else, and police are trying to find that person. They found a jack underneath the car. Capt. Gary Higginbotham of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department said the car was near Heads Creek Road and Ruth Drive. The man called 911 about 5:20 a.m. Thursday to report being trapped, Higginbotham said. Rescuers found the car, a blue sedan, along the side of the road. “He passed away pretty quick,” Higginbotham said. The area is near House Springs, west of Highway 21 and just south of Highway MM. EAST ST. LOUIS > Pedestrian killed in hit-and-run • A hitand-run accident claimed the life of a woman Wednesday night, authorities said. The woman was hit by a vehicle in the westbound lane of State Street about 11:15 p.m., according to St. Clair County Coroner Calvin Dye Sr. The woman was identified as Angela L. Polk, 47, of the 1200 block of Kansas Avenue. Polk was pronounced dead at the scene, according to Dye. East St. Louis police are investigating. Anyone with information is asked to contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-3718477. OSAGE BEACH, MO. > Fenton man drowns in lake • Authorities say a man has drowned after falling out of a fishing boat in the Lake of the Ozarks. The Missouri Highway Patrol identified the victim as Ronald Miller, 78, of Fenton. The patrol says he was in the boat with another 78-year-old man when he fell out Wednesday afternoon at the 30.8 mile marker in the main channel near Osage Beach. The patrol says the boat wasn’t moving at the time. WASHINGTON > Ex-St. Louis police chief leaves team for Amtrak job • Former St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson has left his job as the security director for the Washington Nationals baseball team to become an assistant chief of police for Amtrak. Dotson, 49, abruptly retired on Mayor Lyda Krewson’s first day in office in April 2017,

Dotson

walking away with a year’s salary and his police pension. He had been the city’s police chief since January 2013 and served 22 years with the force. The Nationals named him head of security in April. He left that post in August to oversee about 460 officers who patrol Amtrak’s railways and detectives. Federal statute gives Amtrak officers police powers, Dotson said. “I missed law enforcement, and this was an opportunity to work for a law enforcement agency that’s highly focused on terrorism, it’s in the transportation sector and it operates nationwide,” he said. “I’m energized, and I’m excited about it.” He is based in Washington, D.C. FLORISSANT > Student arrested over weapons in backpack • Police arrested a McCluer North Senior High School student Thursday after finding a loaded gun and a razor inside the student’s backpack. Florissant police say another student alerted school staff that a student “might have something in a book bag that shouldn’t be at school,” according to a news release from police. A Florissant police school resource officer searched the student’s book bag and found the weapons. The student has been arrested and referred to juvenile court. NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Body found is believed to be suicide • The remains of what police believe may be a homeless man who committed suicide were found near a liquor store Thursday morning. Police were called about 11:30 a.m. to woods next to Sam’s Market at 9807 Halls Ferry Road. St. Louis County spokesman Sgt. Shawn McGuire did not know how the body was discovered. ST. LOUIS > Shooting victim goes to fire station • A man went to a fire station for help after being shot and critically injured Wednesday in St. Louis. Police were called at 12:16 p.m. Wednesday after the victim showed up at Engine House No. 28, at 4810 Enright Avenue. Police say the victim, 34, drove to the fire house after being shot in the shoulder. Police determined the shooting was in the 5200 block of Lotus Avenue in the Kingsway West neighborhood. Police say they have no suspects. The victim was in critical condition but stable at a hospital.

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NEWS

10.19.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A5

Illinois’ Catholic dioceses targeted in lawsuit Plaintiffs allege cover-up, want names released of every accused priest BY DON BABWIN associated Press

CHICAGO • Three men and one woman who say they were sexually abused by priests decades ago filed a lawsuit Thursday against every diocese in Illinois for an alleged ongoing scheme to cover up sexual assault by priests. The lawsuit was filed in Chicago by lawyer Jeff Anderson, who has represented clergy abuse victims across the country, and seeks to compel dioceses throughout Illinois to provide the names of all their priests accused of child molestation.

“Defendants have, for decades, and continue to adopt policies and practices of covering up criminal activity ... (that) have endangered numerous children in the past and these practices will continue to put children at risk in the future,” reads the lawsuit against all six dioceses in Illinois, as well as the Catholic Conference of Illinois. While the lawsuit does seek damages and only claims instances of abuse against children in three dioceses — Rockford, Peoria and Springfield — all of them have covered up clergy sexual abuse and continue to, Anderson said. He added that a key goal of the suit was to force each diocese to make public the names of all priests, living and dead, accused of child molestation. He pointed to a similar lawsuit filed in Minnesota that eventually forced the Archdiocese of St. Paul to add

officials had not reviewed the lawsuit, the diocese has in recent years taken significant steps to address the issue, including posting the names of priests who have been credibly accused of child sexual abuse on its website. The Chicago diocese has implemented a “stringent monitoring program of clergy with substantiated cases of sexual abuse against them,” the statement said. The Diocese of Joliet disputed any suggestion that it’s withholding information. In a statement, the diocese said that since 2006 it had kept on its website a list of “living and deceased diocesan priests who have been credibly accused of child sexual abuse.” In Peoria, the diocese in a statement defended its handling of allegations against two priests named in the lawsuit. In one case, the diocese said that upon

dozens of names to the list of credibly accused priests. Anderson filed a similar lawsuit in California earlier this month. The lawsuit contends that while some dioceses have turned over information about certain priests accused of sexually molesting children, others refuse to make the names public. The Belleville and Rockford dioceses, the suit said, have not named a combined 53 priests accused of child molestation since 1950. “All of them have covered up and continue to cover up, are guilty of withholding their files and we are seeking to force the bishops to come clean, to require that all of them disclose fully the names of all the offenders they know who have violated children ... in their diocese,” Anderson said. The Archdiocese of Chicago said in a statement that although

learning of the allegations it immediately placed the priest on leave and reported the allegation to police. Only after the police concluded its investigation, and the Diocesan Review commission found the allegation unsubstantiated, was the priest reinstated in ministry. The other priest was removed from all public ministry in 2002, according to the Peoria diocese. Other dioceses did not immediately return calls for comment. The specific allegations cited in the lawsuit against five priests across Illinois, three of whom are still alive and in the priesthood, contain similar details. Darin Buckman, one of the three named plaintiffs, said in the suit that when he was an altar boy at a Peoria church starting about 1979, a priest sexually abused him at a time when his “inappropriate conduct with children was known” to the diocese.

Brazen attack takes place ahead of weekend elections

Federal investigation called ‘groundbreaking’

AFGHANISTAN • FROM A1

spokesman said Miller was the intended target. However, Army Col. David Butler, who attended the Kandahar meeting with Miller, said the region’s powerful police chief, Abdul Raziq, who was killed in the volley of gunfire, was clearly the target, not the U.S. general. “It was pretty clear he was shooting at Raziq,” Butler told The Associated Press, adding that Miller was nearby but not in the line of fire. The delegates had just gathered for a group photo when gunfire broke out inside the provincial governor’s compound in Kandahar City, according to an AP television cameraman who was present when the shooting began. Everyone scattered, and the U.S. participants scrambled toward their nearby helicopter. But a firefight broke out between the U.S. service members and Afghan police when they tried to stop the U.S. delegation from reaching their helicopter, said the cameraman. Besides Raziq, Kandahar’s intelligence chief, Abdul Mohmin was killed in the attack, according to deputy provincial governor Agha Lala Dastageri. He said Kandahar Gov. Zalmay Wesa also died of his wounds after being taken to a local hospital, although security officials in the capital maintained Wesa was wounded but survived. Three Americans — a U.S. service member, a coalition contractor and an American civilian — were injured and in stable condition, said NATO spokesman U.S. Col. Knut Peters. Taliban spokesman Qari Yousuf Ahmadi said the militant group carried out the attack, and that Miller was the target. Butler disputed that, saying the assailant shot at Raziq and then appeared to spray the area with gunfire before he was killed. He said Miller and the Afghan leaders had moved outside the palace after several hours of meetings and were standing in small groups in the compound. He said he heard several shots “and we all took cover. It was over in seconds.” “We stabilized and treated the wounded and secured the area,” said Butler, adding that Miller made sure the scene was secure and the wounded were taken away by medevac before he left the area and returned to Kabul. Razik was a particularly powerful figure in southern Kandahar and a close U.S. ally despite widespread allegations of corruption. He ruled in Kandahar, the former Taliban heartland,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Carolyn Fortney, a survivor of sexual abuse at the hands of her family’s Roman Catholic parish priest as a child, awaits the passage of legislation Wednesday in the Pennsylvania Capitol in response to a landmark state grand jury report on child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

CLERGY • FROM A1

molested more than 1,000 children over seven decades and that church leaders had covered up for the offenders. Now federal prosecutors are bringing the Justice Department’s considerable resources to bear, according to two people who were not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. “It’s groundbreaking if we’re going to see one of the U.S. attorneys pursuing the Catholic cases,” said Marci Hamilton, a University of Pennsylvania professor and chief executive of Child USA, a nonprofit think tank focused on preventing child abuse. “The federal government has so far been utterly silent on the Catholic cases.” At least seven of the state’s eight Roman Catholic dioceses — Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Scranton, Erie, Greensburg, Allentown and Harrisburg — acknowledged receiving subpoenas and said they would cooperate or were working with Justice Department officials. “This subpoena is no surprise considering the horrific misconduct detailed in the statewide grand jury report,” the Greensburg Diocese said in a statement. “Survivors, parishioners and the public want to see proof that every diocese has taken sweeping, decisive and impactful action to make children safer. We see this as another opportunity for the Diocese of Greensburg to be transparent.” There was no indication the Justice Department is planning a

more ambitious investigation of clergy abuse nationwide. U.S. Attorney William McSwain of Philadelphia, who issued the subpoenas, wants to know if priests, bishops, seminarians or others committed any federal crimes. McSwain, appointed by President Donald Trump this year, asked for certain church leaders to testify before a federal grand jury in Philadelphia, though it could be months before that happens because of the time it takes to review the requested documents. McSwain also demanded that bishops turn over evidence that anyone in their ranks took children across state lines for illicit purposes; sent sexual images or messages via phone or computer; instructed anyone not to contact police; reassigned suspected predators; or used money or other assets as part of the scandal. The subpoenas seek documents stored in “Secret Archives,” “Historical Archives” or “Confidential Files,” and records related to the dioceses’ organizational charts, finances, clergy assignments and treatment of priests, according to the people who spoke to the AP. A representative for McSwain declined to comment, as did a Justice Department spokeswoman. “I’m thrilled at hearing this information. We have the full weight and attention of the United States federal government investigating the Roman Catholic Church,” said Shaun Dougherty, 48, of Johnstown, who told authorities he was molested by a priest as a boy in the

Altoona-Johnstown Diocese. Two Eastern Catholic dioceses in Pennsylvania — the Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Philadelphia and the Byzantine Archeparchy of Pittsburgh — also acknowledged they were under investigation. While the subpoenas hint at potential charges of sexual exploitation of minors and fraud, legal experts said that if federal prosecutors could show that church leaders systematically covered up for child-molesting priests in the past five years, dioceses could also be charged under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, or RICO, the law originally passed to bring down the Mafia. The nearly 900-page Pennsylvania grand jury report found that church leaders had engaged in a systematic cover-up by shuffling accused priests around to different parishes and in some cases working to prevent police investigations. Because of the statute of limitations, however, only two priests were charged as a result of the investigation. Many other priests are dead. Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro, who oversaw the state probe, declined to comment. But in the wake of the report’s release, Shapiro said at least a dozen states opened investigations and more than 1,300 accusers contacted his office on a victims’ hot line. The report also led to the resignation last week of Cardinal Donald Wuerl as archbishop of Washington. He was accused of helping to protect some childmolesting priests when he was bishop of Pittsburgh from 1988 to 2006.

AP

Gen. Abdul Raziq, Kandahar’s powerful police chief, shown in 2016, was killed Thursday in an attack in Afghanistan.

and had survived several attempts to kill him, including one last year that resulted in the death of five diplomats from the United Arab Emirates. Raziq’s killing “may have major implications on the security situation in southern Afghanistan. As the chief of police in Kandahar, he has kept a lid on the Taliban’s insurgency, which has intensified over the past several years,” analyst Bill Roggio wrote in the Long War Journal. The Taliban have vowed to disrupt Saturday’s parliamentary elections, warning teachers and students not to allow schools to be used for polling and warning Afghans to stay away from the polls. Within hours of the attack, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani addressed the nation to assure Kandahar residents it was safe to go to the polls. In an AP interview, his adviser, Ziaulhaq Amarkhil said the attack was meant to disrupt elections and urged voters to defy Taliban threats, saying casting their ballot “would be a big slap on the face of the enemy.” At a news conference in the Afghan capital, Afghanistan’s Army Chief Gen. Mohammad Sharif Yaftali said additional troops had been moved from Helmand province to Kandahar. Pakistan’s new prime minister, Imran Khan, and its military chief condemned the assault. “The people and the security forces of Afghanistan have been paying a heavy price due to continued instability and threats from the enemies of peace,” Khan said in a statement. “Pakistan stands by the government and the people of Afghanistan in their quest for lasting peace and stability.” Security has been steadily deteriorating in Afghanistan with increasingly brazen attacks being carried out by insurgents. WILSONLIGHTING.COM

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

McCaskill, Hawley clash in televised debate DEBATE • FROM A1

this state anymore.” “She has become a party-line liberal,” he said. McCaskill is considered vulnerable as one of 10 Senate Democrats up for re-election in states won by President Donald Trump in 2016. Like other members of her party, McCaskill has focused heavily on health care and is hoping dissatisfaction with the president over issues such as tariffs will lift her to victory. Hawley, who is serving in his first political office, has campaigned alongside Trump and is hoping the president’s 19-point victory in 2016 will help send him to Washington after just two years on the job in Missouri. McCaskill also agreed that Social Security and Medicare should not be touched to offset the effects of Republican tax cuts on the deficit. But, she added, “We need to fix the problems in Obamacare, not throw it out.” McCaskill chided Hawley after he said he would not support reversing the Trump tax cuts in order to bring down the deficit. “The Republican Party loves to talk about debt and deficits until they are in charge. Then it’s crickets,” McCaskill said. The sometimes testy exchange came in a week filled with sniping over video footage of McCaskill’s campaign taken by a conservative group known for “sting” videos of liberal organizations. In response, McCaskill called on Hawley to investigate the group behind the video, Project Veritas. Videos show an unidentified man asking McCaskill and staffers about the candidate’s position on banning bump stocks for firearms, Planned Parenthood, the border wall and impeaching Trump. That issue did not come up in the debate, which was dominated by talk of health care. The two also discussed gun control and gun safety. Hawley said he would “fix”

CAROLINA HIDALGO • St. Louis Public radio

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., responds to a question during Thursday’s televised debate with Republican challenger Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley. The debate was moderated by PBS Newshour broadcaster Judy Woodruff. Another is set for Oct. 25 in Kansas City.

the firearms background check system to include more information about mental health issues of potential gun owners. McCaskill said she supported the Second Amendment. “But that doesn’t mean we can’t have gun safety measures,” McCaskill said. She supports a universal background check system and a ban on bump stocks, which can transform a rifle into a near-automatic weapon. On arming teachers to make schools safer, both said that it was a decision for local school districts. “I would never support using federal money to buy guns for schools,” McCaskill said.

Hawley said he wasn’t opposed to using federal money for arming teachers, but only in districts that want it. The two also squared off on the tariffs imposed by Trump on China, showing they are far apart on the issue affecting farmers and other Missouri industries. “The tariffs are brutal for Missouri,” McCaskill said. “These tariffs have killed commodity prices. This is where a senator from Missouri has to stand tall for agriculture.” Hawley said he supported the tariffs as a way to bring China to the negotiating table. “We are in a trade war. If we’re going to be in the war, I want to win it,” Hawley said.

On global warming, Hawley acknowledged that humans had contributed to climate change. But, he said, he nonetheless wants to clamp down on regulations that overburden businesses. “I think this has got to be done in proportion,” Hawley said. McCaskill said the federal government must do better when it came to addressing climate change. “The climate change is real. It’s time to trust our scientists,” McCaskill said. Neither candidate was asked about new Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. Hawley has made his support of Kavanaugh — and McCaskill’s opposi-

tion to his nomination — a centerpiece of his campaign. The debate was moderated by PBS Newshour broadcaster Judy Woodruff and was presented by Nine Network (KETC), St. Louis Public Radio and KSDK (Channel 5). Hawley and McCaskill also will meet in a debate in Kansas City on Oct. 25 hosted by television station KMBC 9 News. Also in the race are independent Craig O’Dear and Libertarian and Green Party candidates, Japeth Campbell and Jo Crain, respectively. None was invited to Thursday’s debate. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Area residents tune in, take notes during debate BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Scores of residents intent on watching Thursday night’s U.S. Senate debate started setting up lawn chairs next to the space heaters and viewing screen in the common area outside the St. Louis Public Radio studio about an hour before it started. Madonna Laws-Lowell, 51, and her husband, David, of Crestwood, were two of the first people at the watch party for the debate, which was co-sponsored by the radio station. Laws-Lowell, bundled up in a jacket and hat, brought a notepad. “If I hear something I like from either side, I’m going to make a mark,” she said before the debate. “Then I’m going to add them up.” The two St. Louis County natives have voted in each election since they were both 18, David Lowell said. They always fill out a ballot before voting and share it with their neighbors; this year there are 49 issues on their ballot. Debates are the most important factors in their decisions because they get to hear directly from the candidates, he said. Though they voted for Claire McCaskill in her run against former U.S. Rep. Todd Akin., they said they had never been straightticket voters. “We feel like we’re right in the middle,” Laws-Lowell said. “I own a gun, and I contribute to the ACLU.” While they’re not happy with President Donald Trump’s ad-

JOHANNA HUCKEBA • jhuckeba@post-dispatch.com

Shraddha Bandaru (right), Lorah Plante (center) and Shivangi Sah (third from right) watch the debate between Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., and Republican challenger Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley at a viewing party at Blueberry Hill on Thursday hosted by the Missouri Science and Technology Policy Fellows.

ministration, they also don’t want to see one party dominate Congress. “I want them to have to sit down, talk through issues and make compromises,” David Lowell said. Kimberly Clark wrapped herself in a blanket as she watched the debate. A Claire McCaskill sign sat at her feet. Clark, 56, has been volunteering for the campaign, knocking on doors and

making phone calls to reach out to potential voters. Her parents were civil rights activists in Mississippi who witnessed the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. They taught her how important voting is. “My family never wanted anyone to be excluded, and one of the best ways to get a seat at the table is to vote,” she said. Clark is fearful the country has

taken “a big 40-year jump backwards” under the Trump administration, she said. “This is the first time in a long time that I’ve felt nervous,” Clark said. She grew up in Clarksdale, Miss., and said she faced discrimination there. “I always knew there was division, but right now it feels like even the White House is spewing the same hatred.” A former social worker and

union organizer, Clark said her most important issue was health care. She works in an area hospital helping the uninsured get more affordable care, and she wants to see Missouri expand Medicaid, she said. “Everyone should have the same health care our elected officials have.” Paul Harris, 62, was one of the outnumbered supporters of Josh Hawley outside the debate Thursday night. He said after the debate that he thought both candidates had an “impressive” performance but that he wished Hawley had attacked McCaskill for her vote against the GOP tax law. “That is more money going to Missouri families, and she didn’t support it,” he said. Critics of the law contend that any boost will be negligible for many families and that the tax cuts had more benefits for the wealthy. Harris grew up in Granite City and recently retired from a marketing career. He said economics was most important to him. He said that Trump had been good for the U.S. economy and that Democrats would further inflate the national debt and raise taxes. He said that he shared Democrats’ views on social issues but that ultimately he felt McCaskill had been in office too long. “It’s time to let someone younger and more vibrant come along,” he said. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

Man is sentenced to life in prison for 1984 killing of elderly St. Charles woman PRISON • FROM A1

life term, which is calculated at 30 years. A St. Charles County jury last month found McBenge guilty of second-degree murder at his retrial, after an appeals court in 2016 ordered new trials for McBenge and his brother, Cecil McBenge. The court said that although there was evidence of deliberation in the brothers’ separate trials in 2014, there was no evidence on which brother beat her, or that either man planned to kill her. Knoernschild’s murder went unsolved until 2011, when police linked DNA on a plastic cheese wrapper in the victim’s kitchen

to Brian McBenge, and DNA on Knoernschild’s nylon stocking to his brother, Cecil McBenge. A prosecutor said at his trial in September that Brian McBenge helped himself to the cheese snack after the brothers murdered the widow, who lived alone and relied on an oxygen tank to breathe. McBenge made no statements during the hearing. His attorney, Kim Freter, said he would appeal. Knoernschild was found dead on the floor of her bedroom, covered with items ransacked from her drawers. She was stabbed with knives and beaten with a flashlight that was later found blocks away. Several ribs were fractured. She also was found

with her bedspread wrapped around her neck. Authorities suspect that the motive for the crime was burglary and that the brothers were looking for valuables including a Calumet baking soda can in which Knoernschild kept cash. Her adopted granddaughter had dated Brian McBenge at least five years earlier, and he had lived in the neighborhood. An impact statement from the victim’s granddaughter, Debbie Churchill, who lives in Florida, was read into the record. Her mother stopped by her grandmother’s house every Sunday, she said. “I remember that morning when my mother discov-

ered glass all over her porch,” Churchill said in the statement. “... The panic and horror she must have had.” Her mother lived in fear the rest of her life, the statement said. Her parents put stronger locks on the doors, secured their windows, added lights around the outside. “They put cow bells on the doors going in and out, so you could hear across the house if anyone opened the doors. “These fears stayed with my mother till she died. Even when she moved to Florida with me, she never felt safe.” “I’m very pleased that after 34 years, the victim’s family finally has some closure,” said Tim Lohmar, St. Charles County

prosecutor. Cecil McBenge, 53, has a plea hearing set for next week. Brian McBenge was previously charged in the 1985 killing of Harold Messler, 75, of St. Charles, but that case was dismissed after his conviction at the first trial in 2014 when a witness refused to testify. Messler had been bludgeoned, stabbed and had his throat slashed in his home in St. Charles. In 2013, Brian McBenge was acquitted by a Crawford County jury in the murder in 1984 of his grandfather, Robert R. Adams, near Steelville. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

10.19.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A7

Saudi report on missing journalist expected soon TRUMP • FROM A1

national furor and calls within Republican ranks to take a harder line on Saudi Arabia. As he boarded a flight to Montana for a political rally, Trump was asked by a journalist whether he believed Khashoggi was dead. “It certainly looks that way to me,” he said. “It’s very sad.” He added that Saudi Arabia could face a “very severe” U.S. response depending on the results of probes that include a self-run investigation by the kingdom into the disappearance of Khashoggi. Khashoggi, a Saudi citizen and Washington Post contributing columnist who lived in the U.S., was last seen in public entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. “I mean, it’s bad, bad stuff. But we’ll see what happens,” Trump said. The United States is caught between two longstanding partners. Turkish officials say evidence indicated that Khashoggi was killed by Saudi agents. Saudi leaders deny having any knowledge of Khashoggi’s fate but promised to conduct their own inquiry into the case. It is uncertain, however, whether a self-run inquest or conclusions by the Saudis could quell international anger over Khashoggi’s disappearance. And any finding by Saudi Arabia could meet immediate skepticism about a country where the rulers typically are involved in every major decision. A person close to the White House said Saudi officials are considering blaming Khashoggi’s

SABAH VIA AP

In a frame from surveillance camera footage taken Oct. 2 and published Thursday by the pro-government Turkish newspaper Sabah, a man identified by Turkish officials as Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb walks toward the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul before writer Jamal Khashoggi disappeared. Mutreb has been linked to Saudi Arabia’s crown prince.

death on Maj. Gen. Ahmed al-Assiri, the deputy head of Saudi intelligence and a close adviser to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Al-Assiri would be accused of mounting a rogue operation to kill Khashoggi, which would deflect blame from the crown prince, who is the de facto ruler of the kingdom. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak on behalf of the administration or the Saudi government. Assiri did not immediately respond to calls and messages seeking comment. Before his intelligence posting, Assiri served for two years as the public face of Saudi Arabia’s military intervention in the war in

Yemen. Assiri, who speaks fluent French and English, held regular news briefings on the state of the battle that were unusual for the Middle East and appeared designed to promote the professionalism of the Saudi war effort. But as the Saudi aerial bombing campaign came under criticism for what human rights groups said was a reckless attitude toward civilian casualties, Assiri’s responses to questions about the civilian toll reinforced the sense that the Saudis were being cavalier. Assiri was replaced as spokesman in July 2017, according to the Saudiowned al-Arabiya news channel. Trump said the White House expected to have

a Saudi account of the Khashoggi case “very soon.” “And I think we’ll be making a statement, a very strong statement. But, we’re waiting for the results of about three different investigations, and we should be able to get to the bottom fairly soon,” said Trump, apparently referring to inquiries by Turkey, Saudi Arabia and the United States. The comments also point to a possible tougher stance by the White House after it sent a range of conflicting signals. In the past week, Trump left open the idea that “rogue killers” had carried out a possible attack on Khashoggi, and also warned against a rush to judgment of the Saudi

rulers. Earlier Thursday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo urged the White House to allow “a few more days” for Saudi Arabia to issue its own report on Khashoggi, even as Turkish police sharply expanded their investigation. Turkish authorities said they will search at least two rural areas outside Istanbul, local news agencies and a Turkish official said. But in the administration’s first formal rebuke of Saudi Arabia over the Khashoggi case, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Thursday that he would join many other political leaders and business executives who are canceling their participation in a major investment forum next week in the Saudi capital, Riyadh. Mnuchin made the announcement after consulting with Trump and Pompeo. Finance chiefs from France, Britain and the Netherlands earlier said that they would not attend the Riyadh conference. Trump eventually signed off on Mnuchin’s skipping the conference. “You can’t give a Good Housekeeping seal of approval to the Saudis by letting Mnuchin go to the conference,” said one administration adviser, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal discussions. Asked why the Saudis should be trusted to conduct a fair investigation, Pompeo — who held talks this week in Riyadh and in the Turkish capital, Ankara — said only that U.S. officials would evaluate the Saudi report as to whether “it’s truly accurate, fair and transparent” as promised during Pompeo’s talks in

Riyadh. In Turkey, meanwhile, police exploring the disappearance of Khashoggi, 59 — who they believe was killed inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul by a team of agents from Saudi Arabia — are reviewing security footage from the entrances to Istanbul’s Belgrad Forest, 10 miles north of the city center, Turkish media reported. They also expect to search farmland in Turkey’s Yalova province, 60 miles from Istanbul. A Turkish official confirmed that investigators had broadened their search for Khashoggi’s body to “gardens” around the Istanbul area. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss details of the case. Up until now, the inquiry has focused on the consulate in Istanbul’s Levent district and the nearby residence of the Saudi consul general, Mohammed al-Otaibi, who left Turkey this week. Turkey’s pro-government Sabah newspaper published Thursday what it said were images from closed-circuit television of Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb — an apparent member of the Saudi security services who may have previously traveled with the crown prince — outside the consulate on the day Khashoggi went missing. Turkish investigators have said they believe that Khashoggi was killed by a 15-man Saudi hit team soon after he entered the consulate on an administrative errand on Oct. 2 and his body dismembered. Turkey has not formally released any evidence to support its claims.

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Turkey should make request, advocates say BY EDITH M. LEDERER associated Press

UNITED

N AT I O N S

Leading human rights and journalists’ organizations urged Turkey on Thursday to ask the United Nations to launch an investigation into the disappearance and “possible extrajudicial execution” of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The Committee to Protect Journalists, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and Reporters Without Borders said at a news conference at U.N. headquarters that Turkey should request that Secretary-General Antonio Guterres initiate a transparent investigation. Turkish reports say Khashoggi was brutally murdered and dismembered inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul by members of an assassination squad with ties to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. The Saudis have dismissed those reports as baseless but have yet to explain what happened to Khashoggi, who was seen on video entering the consulate on Oct. 2 but has not been seen since. Robert Mahoney, deputy executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, said: “U.N. involvement is the best guarantee against a Saudi whitewash or attempts by other governments to sweep the issue under the carpet to preserve lucrative business ties with Riyadh.” The four organizations said an international investigation should probe Saudi Arabia’s role and aim to identify everyone responsible for ordering, planning and executing any operations related to

Khashoggi’s disappearance. “This is not an isolated incident,” Mahoney stressed. “Independent and critical journalism is in a crisis globally. There are more than 250 journalists in jail around the world at the moment — that’s a record. Already this year 44 journalists have been killed, 27 of them murdered. That’s a crisis.” He said journalists are being threatened by repressive governments, militias and organized crime and it takes “just a few thousand dollars to get a journalist killed in many countries,” including Mexico. Mahoney said Khashoggi’s disappearance has generated greater “horror” and more international press coverage than he has seen in many years. “This has touched a nerve because it is Saudi Arabia, it is the United States,” and there are fears he has been killed, Mahoney said. Louis Charbonneau, U.N. director for Human Rights Watch, said the best way to make sense of “this sort of circuslike atmosphere for what seems to be a brutal and tragic occurrence” is for Turkey to ask Guterres to urgently launch a U.N. probe. “We need accountability,” and for that a credible investigation is essential, he said. He said Turkey has “an abysmal record” in treating its own journalists as does Saudi Arabia. But the issue of Khashoggi’s fate is “gathering momentum,” Charbonneau said, “and we hope that the momentum will be such that Turkey will not be able to say no, and will actually have to step forward ... and that the Saudis will be under so much pressure that they will have to cooperate” with a U.N. investigation.


NATION

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

Trump had conflict of interest in FBI move, Democrats say

WET AND MILD

Warmer winter likely for much of the U.S. BY SETH BORENSTEIN Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Win-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

FBI headquarters in Washington is crumbling, and a move to the suburbs had been expected. Congressional Democrats say they have evidence that President Donald Trump directed subordinates to scrap plans for relocation.

House members call president’s involvement in process suspicious BY MATTHEW BARAKAT Associated Press

FALLS CHURCH, VA. • Administration emails show that President Donald Trump intervened personally to keep FBI headquarters in downtown Washington rather than relocate it to the suburbs as had long been planned, congressional Democrats said Thursday. The letter from Democratic lawmakers on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform says Trump’s direct involvement presents a brazen conflict of interest. Trump owns a downtown hotel across the street from FBI headquarters that could face competition if the FBI’s current location is opened to private redevelopment, which could include another hotel. Before running for office, Trump expressed interest in redeveloping the property himself. Trump “was directly involved with the decision to abandon the long-term relocation plan and instead move ahead with the more expensive proposal to construct a new building on the same site, and thereby prevent Trump Hotel competitors from acquiring the land,”

wrote Democratic Reps. Elijah Cummings of Maryland; Gerry Connolly of Virginia; Dina Titus of Nevada; Peter DeFazio of Oregon; and Mike Quigley of Illinois. Thursday’s letter cites correspondence from a senior official at the General Services Administration, which manages real estate for the federal government, outlining a January 2018 Oval Office meeting and describing the headquarters decision as “what POTUS directed everyone to do.” Another email describes steps that will be “necessary to deliver the project the president wants on the timetable he wants it done.” The General Services Administration responded in a written statement, saying that “suggestions that those emails indicate presidential involvement in the location decision are inaccurate.” “As previously testified by GSA and the FBI, the leadership team at the FBI made the decision to keep its headquarters at the current Pennsylvania Avenue location. A number of emails referenced in today’s congressional letter are taken out of context and refer to the project’s funding approach, not the location decision,” GSA said. The Democrats’ letter follows up on an inspector general’s report issued earlier this year that disclosed Trump was participating in meetings in which the FBI headquarters

project was discussed. The inspector general’s report, though, offered no conclusions about whether Trump actively pushed for the downtown location in those meetings. The inspector general concluded that determining Trump’s specific involvement was difficult, in large part because GSA employees were instructed not to discuss any statements Trump made at those meetings. The correspondence cited by Democrats was also available to the inspector general, but Democrats are attaching more significance to the letters than the IG did. Connolly said the letters represent significant circumstantial evidence, given the overall context of the project. For more than a decade, Connolly said, the plan to move FBI headquarters to the suburbs was widely accepted as the logical alternative. The current J. Edgar Hoover building, built in 1974, is crumbling. The space is not big enough to consolidate all FBI personnel, and modern security requirements impose building restrictions that would be difficult to meet at the current location, Connolly said. Advocates of a suburban location say it would be less expensive and more efficient. Given Trump’s financial conflict of interest with his hotel, and his ongoing feud with the FBI, Connolly said Trump’s involvement in the decision was all the more suspicious.

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ter looks wet and especially mild for much of the country, thanks to a weak El Niño brewing, U.S. meteorologists said. The National Weather Service on Thursday predicted a warmer than normal winter for the northern and western threequarters of the nation. The greatest chance for warmer than normal winter weather is in Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, Montana, northern Wyoming and western North Dakota. No place in the United States is expected to be colder than normal, said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the government’s Climate Prediction Center. The Southeast, Ohio Valley and mid-Atlantic can go any which way on temperature, Halpert said. Overall the winter looks a lot like the last few, Halpert said. “The country as a whole has been quite mild since 2014-2105,” Halpert said. Winter weather expert Judah Cohen, of the private company Atmospheric and Environmental Research, uses different indicators to predict winter for the National Science Foundation. He also forecasted a warm winter, heavily based on weak snowfall in Siberia.

PRECIPITATION Halpert said the southern one-third of the United States and much of the East Coast could be hunkering down for a wetter than normal December through January. The

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EL NIÑO Halpert said the biggest factor in the forecast is a likely El Niño, the natural warming of parts of the central Pacific Ocean that influences weather worldwide. The El Niño hasn’t quite formed yet, but it’s almost warm enough. Meteorologists predict there’s a 75 percent chance it’ll be around this winter. But it will be weak, not strong like the El Niño that led to the record warm 20152016 winter, Halpert said. While El Niño is the biggest factor in the forecast, long-term warming from human-caused climate change is a factor, too, Halpert said. “All things being equal, the slight kick we get out of the climate signal does tilt things toward the warm side,” Halpert said. But it’s not enough to outweigh other factors if they push toward cold. “Even on a warming planet,” he said, “it doesn’t mean winter goes away and it’s never cold again.”

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NATION

10.19.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A9

Fear, frustration in ample supply after Michael More than a week after storm, cellphone service still spotty, destruction widespread BY JAY REEVES associated Press

MEXICO BEACH, FLA. • Missing relatives and

worries that looters are just outside the door. Dirty clothes. Hourslong lines for gasoline, insurance adjusters, food and water. No power, no air conditioning, no schools, no information and little real improvement in sight. Daily life is a series of fears and frustrations, both large and small, for thousands of people living on the edge, more than a week after Hurricane Michael flattened thousands of square miles in the hurricane zone of the Florida Panhandle. Erin Maxwell waited in line for fuel for more than an hour Thursday at a gasoline station that never opened. “I’m tired and want to go to sleep. I don’t want to wait in another line,” said Maxwell, eyes closed and her head tilted back on the seat. Meanwhile, M ickey Calhoun fretted over the fate of his mother, Anita Newsome, 74. The retired sheriff’s deputy was last seen when officers took her to a hospital the day before Michael made landfall, her son said. “We can’t find her or

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Ed Kirkpatrick sits shirtless on his sofa because of the heat in his home, which has no electricity, on Wednesday, in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Panama City, Fla. Unseasonably warm temperatures have made the situation worse.

get word anywhere,” said an exasperated Calhoun, 54, wearing stained khaki pants and a dingy towel draped around his neck. A few miles away, Ed Kirkpatrick, 70, and his wife, Sandra Sheffield, 72, huddle together in a splintered mobile home

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Amy Cross (left) sits with her daughter Aleeah Racette, as she receives medical treatment outside Bay Medical Sacred Heart Hospital in Mexico Beach, Fla., on Thursday. The death toll from Hurricane Michael is now at 20 people in Florida, and 30 overall.

southern Georgia, also affecting the Carolinas and Virginia. Florida authorities on Thursday say the storm killed 20 people in the state, bringing the overall death toll to at least 30. With power still out in

much of the Panhandle and thousands of buildings destroyed or damaged by Michael, almost nothing is normal. Even simple tasks are difficult or impossible. Driving times are doubled or tripled because

roads are clogged with police and fire vehicles, utility trucks, returning residents and people seeking help. Lines are long outside a discount store where more than two dozen insurance, financial services and cellphone companies have set up in a temporary village of open-sided tents erected on asphalt. Unseasonably warm temperatures in the 80s are adding to the misery because so few people can cool down with air conditioning. Bottled water is plentiful at roadside aid stations; ice is another matter. Spotty cellphone service leaves those most vulnerable with little information to help them get by. Residents in Panama City eagerly ask for information about what happened about 20 miles away in devastated Mexico Beach, and for tips on finding pharmacies, coinoperated laundries and stores that might sell batteries to power flashlights with fading beams. Kelli Ladik is living with four daughters and her husband in a camper parked outside their bayside home, which has severe water damage from rain that poured in when the roof failed. Ladik says she’s so tired of the grime. “We need running water more than anything. To be able to shower after a full day of cleaning would be great,” Ladik said. Her kids, three of whom are school-age, are all out of class, and it’s unclear when classes might resume. Some school buildings are heavily damaged, and leaders are still trying to account for all the teachers, administrators and others needed to get the system running again.

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A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

Another former U.S. gymnastics official charged in sex abuse scandal

Two workers acquitted in boy’s waterslide death

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

BY WILL HOBSON Washington Post

The former president and chief executive of USA Gymnastics was detained by U.S. marshals Wednesday, authorities announced, in connection with criminal charges of tampering with evidence relating to convicted serial pedophile Larry Nassar. Steve Penny was taken into custody in Gatlinburg, Tenn., and is awaiting extradition to Texas, according to a news release issued by the district attorney of Walker County, home to the Karolyi Ranch, where America’s top female gymnasts trained until earlier this year. A grand jury in Walker County has indicted Penny for tampering with evidence, the district attorney said, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison. The grand jury alleged that Penny — after he knew a law enforcement investigation of Nassar’s abuses of young gymnasts had begun — ordered the removal of documents relating to Nassar’s treatment of gymnasts from the Karolyi Ranch “for the purpose of impairing the ongoing investigation by destroying or hiding the documents,” the news release stated. The documents were delivered to Penny at USA Gymnastics headquarters in Indianapolis, the release stated, and have never been recovered. In a statement early Thursday, Penny’s lawyer denounced the use of U.S. marshals. Penny, who lives in Indianapolis, was on vacation in Tennessee with his wife and three daughters, attorney Edith Matthai wrote. “If Mr. Penny had any idea he was sought in Texas this would have been appropriately handled through counsel,” Matthai wrote. “Mr. Penny is confident that when all the facts are known the allegations against him will be disproven,” Matthai wrote. Penny was indicted by a grand jury examining Nassar’s alleged abuses at Karolyi Ranch, the facility near Huntsville, Texas, run by famed former Olympic coaches Bela and Martha Karolyi, who have declared their innocence of culpability for Nassar’s abuses and have not been charged with a crime. Penny oversaw the Olympic sports organization from 2005 until 2017, when he resigned under criticism for his handling of complaints about Nassar two years earlier. Nassar, the longtime team physician for USA Gymnastics women, continued to treat young girls and women at Michigan State — where he worked full time — until September 2016, when a woman filed a complaint with police and told her story to the Indianapolis Star. More than 330 girls and women have alleged sexual abuse by Nassar, who is serving an effective life sentence for pleading guilty to child pornography crimes, as well as abusing nine girls and women in Michigan. The fallout over the handling of complaints has led to leadership changes at Michigan State, the U.S. Olympic Committee and at USA Gymnastics.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Riders are propelled by jets of water on the Verruckt waterslide at Schlitterbahn Water Park in Kansas City, Kan., in 2014. A boy, 10, was killed on the ride in 2016.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, KAN. •

Two Kansas water park workers were acquitted Thursday of impeding an investigation into the Hughes death of a 10-year-old boy who was decapitated while riding what was billed as the world’s tallest waterslide in 2016. David Hughes and John Zalsman were found not guilty of obstruction of justice in connection with the death of Caleb Schwab, the son of a Kansas legislator. The boy was killed while riding the 17-story Verruckt waterslide at the Schlitterbahn water park in Kansas City. Hughes and Zalsman, both maintenance workers, were the first employees to stand trial in the case. Others have also been charged, including one of Schlitterbahn’s owners and the designer of the slide, who have both pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder. The since-closed ride used rafts that made the 17-story drop at speeds of up to 70 mph, followed by a surge over the hump and a 50-foot descent to a finishing pool. Caleb was in a raft that went airborne and slammed him into a metal pole that supported a net meant to keep riders from flying off the slide. Two women on the raft also were injured. Prosecutors alleged that Hughes and Zalsman failed to replace a brake mat that fell off the slide two weeks earlier but told investigators that the mat had been on the slide only during testing phases. Video evidence showed that the mat was used after the ride opened to customers in 2014, prosecutors said. “This was not a mistake, this was intentional calculated conduct,” said Adam Zentner, assistant Kansas Attorney General. The defense said prosecutors didn’t understand how the slide functioned and questioned the testimony of Jason Diaz, the Kansas Bureau of Investigation agent who interviewed the defendants. The defense also noted that another Schlitterbahn employee who made false statements to investigators wasn’t charged. “These are just two good old boys, they’re hard-working guys and because they’re the only two adults in the room

they get singled out and have to get charged,” said Scott Toth, defense attorney for Hughes, as he addressed jurors. Diaz said he didn’t believe the other employee Zalsman had intentionally misled him. Schlitterbahn has said officials had no reason to believe any employee obstructed justice. “We have maintained our belief in the integrity of our staff and respect the process and decision by the jury,” Winter Prosapio, spokeswoman for Texas-based Schlitterbahn, said after the verdict. The most serious charges in Caleb’s death have been filed against one of Schlitterbahn’s owners, Jeff Henry; Verruckt designer John Schooley; and general contractor Henry & Sons Constructions. Each is charged with second-degree murder, which carries up to 41 years in prison; aggravated battery; and aggravated endangerment of a child. Another employee is charged with involuntary manslaughter. They have all pleaded not guilty. Their trials have not yet been scheduled. The slide was shut down after Caleb was killed. The boy’s father, state Rep. Scott Schwab, a Republican from the Kansas City suburb of Olathe, had no immediate comment after being informed of the verdict Thursday. His son’s death prompted Kansas legislators to strengthen the state’s relatively lax oversight of amusement park rides. Their 2017 law required amusement park rides to be inspected every year by qualified inspectors after previously allowing the parks to do their own. The law also mandated that parks report injuries to the state. But lawmakers delayed criminal penalties for violations and then this year loosened rules for county fairs and other short-term, one-location events run by nonprofit groups. They also exempted attractions such as hay rides. The Schwab family will receive nearly $20 million in legal settlements from companies associated with Schlitterbahn, the general contractor, the raft manufacturer and a company that consulted on the waterslide.

DIGEST Suspect to face death penalty in birthday party attack A man suspected in a stabbing rampage at a children’s party, killing a little girl celebrating her third birthday and wounding eight others, will face the death penalty, prosecutors in Idaho said Thursday. Timmy Kinner, 30, a homeless man who had been asked to leave a Boise apartment complex the day before, returned the next day and began attacking children and others at the outdoor birthday party, police said. A judge this summer entered not-guilty pleas on his behalf to one count of first-degree murder and eight counts of aggravated battery in connection with the June 30 attack. Police have said Kinner didn’t know the victims. Trump’s Russia attorney fills in as White House counsel • The White House says the attorney representing President Donald Trump in the Russia investigation is shifting roles and taking on duties as counsel to the president. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Thursday that Emmet Flood will temporarily serve as White House counsel. That’s until another attorney, Pat Cipollone, officially comes on board in that role. Cipollone will succeed Don McGahn, whose final day as White House counsel was Wednesday. Cipollone is awaiting completion of his background investigation. StarKist faces up to $100 million fine in price-fixing scheme • StarKist Co. agreed to plead guilty to a price-fixing charge as part of a collusion investigation of the canned tuna industry, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday. The Justice Department said StarKist faces up to a $100 million fine. Prosecutors allege that the industry’s top three companies conspired between 2010 and 2013 to keep prices artificially high. The scheme came to light when Thai Union Group’s Chicken of the Sea attempt to buy San Diego-based Bumble Bee failed in 2015, according to court records. Chicken of the Sea executives alerted federal investigators and agreed to cooperate with the investigation. Bumble Bee Foods last year pleaded guilty to the same charge and paid a $25 million fine. Family offers housing help to find son’s killer • A North Carolina woman has made a unique offer in hopes of finding the person who shot and killed her son on Labor Day. WBTV in Charlotte reports Lajuana Hill said she and her family will pay to relocate anyone who provides information in the death of Juordan Malik Hill, and will even pay their first month’s rent, “whatever you need to get you out of that environment.” Charlotte-Mecklenburg police Detective Luke Peden said the suspect fired five shots from more than 30 yards away. Peden said two of those shots hit Juordan Hill. Tennessee may use electric chair in upcoming execution • Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says the state is prepared to execute death row inmate Edmund Zagorski using the electric chair. Haslam says the state has been ready to use the electric chair since Oct. 11 — the day of Zagorski’s original execution. Court documents indicate he could be executed as early as Oct. 28. Zagorski was sentenced to death in 1984 for killing two men he robbed. From news services

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PROPERTY FOR SALE IN ILLINIOS NEW! PERRY COUNTY 160 ACRES — PINCKNEYVILLE Farmstead with beautiful 3-bed, 3.5-bath home and large outbuilding. Crop income and plenty of hunting. NEW! PERRY COUNTY 50 ACRES — COULTERVILLE Wooded hunt property with nice home site, well-maintained trails and timber to harvest. NEW! RANDOLPH COUNTY 60 ACRES — STEELEVILLE Fenced cattle farm with homestead and several outbuildings. NEW! RANDOLPH COUNTY 80 ACRES — STEELEVILLE Cattle farm with several buildings, working cattle pens and lot and home site with a view. NEW! RANDOLPH COUNTY 14.5 ACRES — STEELEVILLE Nice home sites, fenced pasture, pond and barn. REDUCED! RANDOLPH COUNTY 6 ACRES — STEELEVILLE Natural setting with prairie-style, all-brick home (2883 sf). Geothermal heat/cool, 3+ car attached garage, spring-fed 16-ft deep lake, 90% native landscaping. 81 additional acres available.

5657 Hempline Rd., St. Louis, MO 63129 $144,900 - Mehlville Schools, Tons of updates! 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, full walk out basement home in Glenrich Manor Subdivision. Large driveway w/2 car detached garage. Renee Williams, Realty Executives Five Star Homes, Broker/Salesperson, Cell: 314-277-0326

Land for Sale 21 acres of the Mississippi River Bluffs. Only 35 min from downtown St L o u is , 1 5 min So u t h o f J B Bridge. City water. Lots of privacy. Bu ild y o u r d r e a m home here. $549K (618)281-6169 235 Ac. S Zone Hunting SEMO $46,000 rent income, 4 man pit 230 Ac. tillable, 5 ac. timber 38,000 bu storage, 3 wells Half mi border w/ Little River. Cnty Rd access on dead end 235Duck@charter.net

2 5 acres, 1 5 miles from the Arch. Frame 4 bdrm, 1 .5 ba, 1 9 ac. tillable. Outbuildings. Fruit trees & fish pond. $ 3 7 5 ,0 0 0 . Or 1 4 .5 ac. w/ house & buildings for $265,000. Or 10 ac. w/ house & buildings for $ 2 4 0 ,0 0 0 . Contact 618-444-4337 o r e m a i l ZeroDarkThird@gmail.com

Land for Lease Hunting Lease for the 2018-19 season available in Northeast MO, prime hunting with cabin on property, room for 4-5 hunters for self guided hunts, ready to lease Call 660-341-1178

R E Auctions Land Auction

Lewis County, MO Sat., Nov. 17 ï6 PM 397 Acres± ï3 Tracts Productive tillable cropland! Excellent improved pasture land! Hunting/Rec. Acreage! Beautiful stocked lake! Older country home & outbuildings! sullivanauctioneers.com

Sunday, October 21st 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

844-847-2161 Real Estate & Personal Property Auction

Meadow Woods 710 E. Woods • 636-456-0895 Village of Warrenton Southside Court • 636-456-7243 Warrenton I & II N. West & Oak Street • 636-456-7243

Rental-MO

253 acres of recreation/hunting/pasture land in northwest Macon County, Missouri. Rolling hills with beautiful views and building sites. Can divide. $1,800.00/acre. 660-676-0710

Knox County, MO Sat., Nov. 17 ï10 AM 28 Acres± ï2 Tracts Highly Productive Tillable Farmland! Nice Country Home! Machinery/storage building! Also tractors, trucks, hay equip, farm related items & household items.

Open House: Nov. 3 • 12-1 sullivanauctioneers.com

844-847-2161

Rental-MO Ballwin, 2sty, 4bd, 2.5ba, updates, finished LL/walkout, Parkway S, close to Hwy 141 & 44, Parkway South Schools 636-394-7887 B a l l w i n , MO , Pa rkwa y S o u th 3 b r / 2 b a house for re nt, fe nce d yard, ne ighborhood pool, ne ar parks . No pe ts . Non- s moking house. $1100/mo. 636-584-1027.

Mazda '11 Mazda 6 iTouring P lus : Automatic, Bla ck, $9,990 #M18282B

DON'T RENT! RENT TO OWN! We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs.

For more information call or go online at

314-447-1800 nhba.com Free apartment available in the Wentzville area in exchange for c le a n in g and answ ering the phones evenings and weekends. Please call Eric for more info at 636-327-6600

********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $121.00/wk 205 N 9th Street, St. Louis, MO 63101

314-421-2980 ********* St. Charles for Rent: 2 bdrm, 2 bath, LL, secure building, good credit. $750/mo. Call 314-805-2896.

Rental-IL Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments Applicants must be 62 or older. Rent based on income. All 1 bdrm units, great location & located on bus route. Call 618-465-1444, Mon-Fri 9-5. 3113 Washington, Alton, IL

Evergreen Real Estate, LLC

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

Dogs AKC Standard Poodle puppies Cream, White & Apricot Males & Females. Health wrnty. $750. 573-619-3357 Cockalierpoos, Peekapoos, Wheaten Terriers, Cockashihs, Weimaraners, Woodles, Mini Labradoodles, Morkiepoos, Bugs, and Other Cute Poos.

CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OTHERS.

636-978-3647

lovencarepets.org DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: Puppies Ready Now

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com English golden retrievers A K C come w/full breeding, registration &1y r health guar. 12 w ks , 1&2 shots $800 217-259-0423 FRENCH BULLDOG PUPS , cert. pedigree,10wks,1Male-, 1 F e ma le , p a p e r s , s h o t s , $ 8 0 0 . kpallen56@aol.com 314-889-4541 GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. Ready now! 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com Lab Pups, AKC, champ. hunt. line, 1st shots, micro-chipped, ready 10/6. w w w /fox creek labs .c o m 618-783-3375 Maltese and M altipom Puppies, males and females, reg, shots, ready now, call or text for information $700&up 314-574-5449


10.19.2018 • Friday • M 1 Dogs Sheltie Puppy (Mini Collies), Male/Female, Full Blooded, Sable & White, S hots/Vet Check, 8 wks. (618) 615-7955 Siberian Husky Puppies, Champion sired AKC registered, Health guarantee. $700. Call (417)733-3467 White German Shepherd Pups AKC white German shepherds of the lake @ yahoo.com MO breeder $1200 (660)651-5774

Auctions Richard Muehlmann Estate Fall Classic Car Auction Friday,October 26th at 7:00 PM Pre-Sale Reception and Viewing 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM Car Parts Auction Saturday,October 27,2018 Starts at 10:00 AM (Doors open at 9:00 am) Schumacher Auction Service (618)277-6975 1436 East Main Street Belleville, Illinois 62220 www.SchumacherAuctions.com

Garage Sales 63044 - 3679 Var wig Ln ., Sat. 10/20, 8am-2pm, Washer & Dryer, Furn., Collectibles, Etc. 63128: Garage Sale: 10/19 & 10/20. 4807 Morestead 63128. 7am-1pm. A lot of kids items. 63305 - Moving Sale - Everything Must Go! Sat. 10/20, 8am-2pm 17108 Westridge Meadows Dr.

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A11 Public Notices

Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ESTABLISH ZONING CLASSIFICATION OF NEWLY ANNEXED PROPERTY

INVITATION TO BID #18-097 CHEMICAL TREATMENT OF ALLUVIAL WATER WELL #1 CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

The Kirkwood School District R-7 is s e e king qualifie d bids for the N KM S 2 0 1 8 Traffic Control Improvements Project. Bid documents will be available on October 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 . For additional information, please visit our website @ http://www. kirkwoodschools.org and click on “ R F Ps ” within the ìCommunityî section.

T h e P la n n in g a n d Z o n in g Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday November 7, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suema n d y Drive and Grand Teton Drive. The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the zoning classification for the newly annexed property briefly described below. A complete legal description of the property is available for review at City Hall. All interested citizens will have an opportunity to give written and oral comment. Senior citizens are encouraged to attend and comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the government before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator P. O. Box 9 , St. Peters Missouri, 63376, Ph: 477-6600 or 278-2244 extension 1670.

SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE

TWIN CHIMNEY BLVD

O'FALLON, MO 63368 Preview Fri 10/19 6pm-9pm Sat 10/20 7am-1pm LOTS OF EVERYTHING!

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Approximate Acreage 1.0

Recommended Zoning R-1 Single-Family Residential A detailed legal description of this property is available at St. Peters City Hall, One St. Peters Centre Boulevard. Done by order of the Board of Aldermen. Patricia E. Smith Patricia E. Smith, City Clerk

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets Bids/Proposals Belleville Flea Market October 20-21, 2018 Saturday 9am-4pm Sunday 9am-3pm

ONLY at the BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS Belleville, IL 618-233-0052 www.bcfairgrounds.net

ADVERTISEMENT FOR CHESTNUT STREET WATER EXTENSION Notice is hereby given that the City of Cottleville will receive sealed proposals at City Hall, 5490 Fifth S treet, Cottleville, Missouri until 2:00 p.m. local time, November 6, 2018 at which time all bids for the Chestnut Street Water Extension project, will be publicly opened and read. There will be a mandatory pre bid meeting on October 24 at 2: 00 pm at City Hall. The Contract work shall include installing approximately 167 feet of 8" water main and related items. Plans and specifications are available at Cottleville City Hall, 5490 Fifth Street, Cottleville, Mo 63304.

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Public Notices CITY OF O’FALLON 100 North Main Street O’Fallon, Missouri 63366 NOTICE OF ELECTION AND OF THE OPENING AND CLOSING FOR FILING DECLARATIONS OF CANDIDACY FOR ELECTIVE OFFIC ES IN THE C ITY OF O ’ F A L L O N , MIS S OURI, FOR THE ELECTION TO BE HELD APRIL 2, 2019. Pursuant to Section 3.2, Article 8 and Section 14.5 of the Charter of the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, an election will be held on Tuesday, April 2 , 2 0 1 9 , for the purpose of electing one (1) Member of the O’Fallon City Council from each of Wards 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 for a term of three (3) years, and filling a vacancy in Ward 3, for the remaining one (1) year of a three-year term at the general municipal election in April, 2019; and Pursuant to Section 115.347 of the Revised S tatutes of the State of Missouri, and the O’Fallon City Charter no candidate’s name shall be printed on any official ballot unless his/her written, signed and sworn Declaration of Candidacy, including, address, age, length of residency, and the office for which he or she is running, has be e n filed in the office of the city clerk within the time allowed by law. You are hereby advised that the first day for filing a Declaration of Candidacy for the April 2 , 2019, election is from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 1 1 , 2018. Filing will close on the last day for filing for this election at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, January 15, 2019. A filing fee of $25.00 shall accompany each Declaration of Candidacy filed with the City Clerk. Candidates will appear on the ballot in the order they have filed. If you are the first candidate to file for a given position you will be the first candidate on the ballot for that position. The candidate or a person at least 18 years of age designated by the candidate may sit in line in the West City Hall entrance area prior to the opening of filing. At 8 :0 0 a.m. on December 1 1 th applications will be accepted in this location. After December 11th filing will be in the City Clerk’s office. The candidate must be the person in position at 8:00 a.m. on December 11th, 2018. All candidates must file in person; no one else can file for you.

The bid proposal shall be made on a form of proposal, provided in the specifications and delivered in a sealed envelope clearly marked on the outs ide C H ES TN U T STREET WATER EXTENSION to C ity Hall on or before the time specified above. No facsimiles will be accepted. The proposal shall be accompanied by a bid bond, certified check or cashier's check of a bank or trust company in St. Charles County, City of Cottleville, St. Louis County, or in the City of St. Louis for an amount not less than five (5%) percent of the bid amount. The amount of the check shall be forfeited to the City if the bidder neglects or refuses to enter into a contract or to furnish bond after his proposal has been accepted. The City reserves the right to require the successful bidder to file proof of his ability to properly finance and execute the project together with his record of successful completion of similar projects. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids, offers, or proposals submitted, or to advertise for new bids. The successful bidder to whom the contract has been awarded shall sign the contract and performance bond and other required certificates in triplicate and return the signed documents within seven (7 ) days after the date of their receipt. The successful bidder shall furnish a performance bond and payment bond for one hundred (100%) percent of the contract amount and shall file certificates with the City that he has obtaine d and will continue to carry workmen's compensation insurance, public and private liability, and property damage insurance, and builder's risk insurance in an adequate amount for the duration of the contract. He shall also file a surety bond for the guarantee of the work for a period of one (1) year after the date of acceptance of the work. The City of Cottleville is an equal opportunity employer. The City does not discriminate against any person because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin. Th e s u c c e s s fu l b id d e r a n d contractor will be furnished, without cost, not more than three (3) copies of plan for the project. If more are re que ste d, additional sets will be furnished at a nominal charge. Any plans and specifications required for permits by a municipality or other public agency will be furnished by the City.

INVITATION TO BID #18-096 COOL SPRINGS GUARD RAIL PROJECT CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

2018

The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids for the project known as the Cool Springs Guard Rail Project. The Contract Documents, including specifications, are on file at the office of D r e x e l Te chnologie s at http:// planroom.drexeltech.com and are open for public inspection. Copies of documents may be obtained from Drexel Technologies for the fee listed online. Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ì180 9 6 Cool S prings Guard Rail Project“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 1 0 0 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 1 0 :0 0 A.M. CDT, October 3 1 , 2018. Bids will be publicly opened at that time. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 7, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive.

LOCATION MAP

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on file at the City of St. Peters Planning Department.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 7, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive. The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the rezoning as described below or an alternate zoning category. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244.

INVITATION TO BID #18-098 VEHICLE & POLICE BUILDS CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

Petition 18-16 Chris Huddleston requests a change of zoning from the I-1 Light Industrial District to the I-2 Heavy Industrial District for a .6 acre property. The subject site is located on the west side of Harvestowne Industrial Drive, south of South St. Peters Parkway- 1339 Harvestowne Industrial Drive.

The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids for services related to furnish, installation, and de live ry for vehicle and police builds. Specifications are available at w w w.ofallon.mo .us under Bid Opportunities.

LOCATION MAP

Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ìVehicle & Police Builds ì to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 2:00 P.M. CDT, October 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 . Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

A detailed legal description of this property is available at St. Peters City Hall, One St. Peters Centre Boulevard.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Kirkwood School District R-7 is s e e king qualified bids for the KECC ñ Playground Renovation. Ple as e vis it our w e b s i t e @ http://www. kirkwoodschools.org and click on “ R F Ps ” within the ìCommunityî section.

The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 7 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive. The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the special use permit below. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244.

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

ST. CLAIR TOWNSHIP STREET LIGHTING DISTRICT Annual Statement of Receipts and Distributions The undersigned, as Treasurer of St. Clair Township Street Lighting District, hereby reports receipts and disbursements of the funds of said district for the fiscal year starting May 1, 2017 and ending on April 30, 2018.

PETITION 18-17 Chris Huddleston requests a special use permit for the sale of used vehicles on a .6 acre +/- acre tract in the I-2 Heavy Industrial District. The subject site is located on the west side of Harvestowne Industrial Drive, south of South St. Peters Parkway- 1339 Harvestowne Industrial Drive. LOCATION MAP

Street Lighting Fund A. Receipts 1. Cash on hand at beginning of year 2. St. Clair County Treasurer, Taxes 3. Interest earned on Street Lighting Fund 4. Net transfer from Contingency Fund

$65,329.14 $74,945.37 $0.00 $0.00 $140,274.51

TOTAL RECEIPTS: B. Disbursements 1. Payments to Ameren Illinois Power Company 2. Publication expense 3. Accounting Expense, Harold Hamann, CPA 4. Attorney’s Fees, O’Keefe Law, LLC 5. Telephone/office supplies/miscellaneous administration 6. William Perryman, salary and auto reimbursement 7. Lynwood Mueller, salary and auto reimbursement 8. John Wunderlich, salary and auto reimbursement

$83,385.20 $955.50 $3,940.00 $8,812.00 $479.88 $1,691.88 $1,670.32 $1,687.40 $102,662.18

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS:

$37,612.33

A. Receipts 1. Cash on hand at beginning of year 2. Interest earned

$560,857.59 $2,021.88 $562,879.47

TOTAL RECEIPTS:

R E Q U E S T F O R Q U A L I F I C AT I O N S f o r PROFESSI ONAL PLANNING SERVICES FOR AIRPORT LAYOUT PLAN UPDATE AT ST. LOUIS LAMBERT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 PM CT, OCTOBER 29, 2018 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from BPS w ebsite w w w.stl-bps.org, under On Line Plan Room-Plan Room, or call Board of Public Service at 314622-3535. 15% DBE participation goal.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PETITION 18-15 Lynda Jean Lake requests an Amended Planned Urban Development (PUD) for the sale of used merchandise on a .58+/- acre parcel. The subject site is located on the west side of Jungermann Road, south of Sutters Mill Road, (700 Jungermann Rd.)

Contingency Fund

CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE

@stltoday

All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244.

FUND BALANCE:

For information contact Pamela L. Clement, CMC/MRCC - C City Clerk

Coventry Health Care of Kansas will be offering a Medicare Advantage Dual Eligible Special Needs Plans in Callaway, Crawford, Franklin, Gasconade, Jefferson, Lincoln, St. Charles, St. Louis, St. Louis City and Warren counties in Missouri in 2019. Coventry is looking to identify providers in these counties who are contracted with the State of Missouri to provide Medicaid services, but who are not contracted with Aetna Coventry Medicare Advantage. If interested i n c o n t r a c t in g w it h C o v e n t r y please visit Aetna.com.

The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

CHECK OUT THE 2018 TOP WORKPLACES

Seasoned Oak & Hickory Delivered & Stacked. Over 25 yrs of service 573-513-6510

The Kirkwood School District R-7 is soliciting a Request for Qualifications from Professional Architects and Engineers for miscellaneous services required for capital improve me nts and maintenance projects. For additional information, please visit our website @ http://www. kirkwoodschools.org and click on “ R F Ps ” within the ìCommunityî section.

STLtoday.com/workplaces

Firewood/Fuel

Interested vendors should submit s e ale d b id s cle arly marke d ìChemical Treatment of Alluvial Water Well #1ì to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 1 0 0 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 10:00 A.M. CDT, October 30, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room.

Owner Description

Public Notices

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Mary Marchant

216 Eisenhower

63368

The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids for services related to a chemical treatment of Alluvial Water Well #1. Specifications are available at www.ofallon.mo.us under Bid Opportunities.

Public Notices

B. Disbursements 1. Net transfer to Street Lighting Fund. TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS: FUND BALANCE:

A detailed legal description of this property is available at St. Peters City Hall, One St. Peters Centre Boulevard.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 7, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive. The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the special use permit below. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244. PETITION 18-18

$0.00 $0.00 $562,879.47

Healthy Body Day Spa LLC requests a special use permit for therapeutic massage on a .66 acre +/- acre tract in the C-3 General Commercial District. The subject site is located on the north side of North St. Peters Parkway, west of Woodstream Drive – 4135-4139 North St. Peters Parkway.

LOCATION MAP _________________________________________ Treasurer, St. Clair Township Street Lighting District STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF ST. CLAIR

) ) ss )

Lynwood K. Mueller, Treasurer of the St. Clair Township Street Lighting District, being first duly sworn, deposes and states that the herein report accurately states all receipts and disbursements of said district during the period of May 1, 2017 through April 30, 2018. __________________________________ Subscribed and sworn to before me this ____ day of________________, 2018.

STLtoday.com/jobs

__________________________________ Notary Public

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on file with the City of St. Peters Planning Dept.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 10.19.2018 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Fiscal blind faith Republican worship of tax cuts is again debunked by deficit numbers.

W

hen congressional Republicans last year passed their massive, deficit-funded tax cut, they promised it would help working people and pay for itself with economic growth. Since then, the already-apparent outcome of the cuts has been the rich getting richer as working people’s wages have remained almost stagnant. And now the other shoe drops: The fiscal year that ended last month saw the biggest U.S. deficit in six years, according to new federal data. This isn’t the first time the Republican religion called supply-side economics has been debunked by hard numbers. As is generally the case with true believers, though, they’re not going to be persuaded by facts. Across the nation, Republican congressional incumbents continue to talk about the tax cuts as if they saved the nation from Armageddon. At this point, only a resounding ballot box defeat would shake their unwarranted faith. What former President George H.W. Bush once correctly derided as “voodoo economics” (before later embracing it) is based on an unlikely leap of faith: If you slash taxes for the rich, their re-investment of those savings would so boost the economy that the losses to the federal treasury would be more than offset by revenue from the taxes of newly hired workers and other stimulus-prompted economic activity. The judicious use of tax cuts to spur the economy during troubled times has long been accepted by economists; even President Barack Obama used cuts to help pull the economy out of the nosedive he inherited in 2009. But the notion that cuts automatically pay for themselves, and so should be deployed as often and as deeply as possible, has been repeatedly disproven in practice — starting with huge deficits run up by the original voodoo economics practitioner, President Ronald Reagan. Unlike Obama, Republicans last year

weren’t responding to an economic emergency; the Obama-directed recovery had long been in progress with no sign of slowdown. Their tax cuts weren’t about economics but politics, which is why the largess was so lopsided toward corporations and the wealthy. Much of it was used for record-breaking stock buybacks that primarily enriched already wealthy stockholders. And those promised skyrocketing wages? They’ve barely outpaced inflation.

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and his wife, Louise Linton, hold up a sheet of new $1 bills.

Still, even a little benefit is better than none if it all pays for itself, right? Except that’s not happening. The Treasury’s annual report, released Monday, shows the U.S. deficit widened in fiscal 2018 to $779 billion, some $113 billion more than 2016 and the highest since 2012. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin — who last year blithely declared the tax cut package “will pay for itself with growth” — now says that’s still going to happen, “going forward.” As always, economic salvation is just around the corner. So is Nov. 6.

We recommend Vote yes for all but two St. Louis-area judges.

T

he Nov. 6 ballot includes a long list of yes-or-no options asking voters whether to retain incumbent judges. In St. Louis County’s 21st Circuit, 21 nonpartisan incumbents are up for retention election, along with eight in St. Louis city’s 22nd Circuit. No daily newspaper in the country has the time or resources to sit in courtrooms and evaluate judicial performance, so we can claim no Peebles special insights with which to recommend those incumbents. The Missouri Bar Association, however, does take the time to evaluate them through a 20-member judicial performance committee. For the vast majority of these judges, as well as the appeals court and state Supreme Court options, voters’ safest bet is to trust the bar association’s assessment, which is available online at

yourmissourijudges.org. In all but two cases, the judges on county and city ballots received exemplary reviews, with approval ratings from 90 percent to 100 percent of committee members. Two, however, drew particular skepticism: 22nd Circuit Associate Judge Barbara Peebles and 21st Circuit Associate Judge Judy Draper. Peebles is of particular concern. Eleven of the 20 members voted that she “does not meet” Draper judicial performance standards. She was suspended in 2013 without pay for judicial misconduct. Only 65 percent of committee members voted that Draper substantially meets overall judicial performance standards. Only judges who receive a majority of yes votes will be retained for another term. We do not recommend a yes vote for either Peebles or Draper.

Vote yes for partial smoking bans in St. Louis and St. Charles counties.

V

oters in St.Louis and St.Charles counties will vote Nov.6 on halfmeasure public smoking bans that would create limited smokefree areas in casinos and other public venues.Stronger measures in both counties,which would have completely banned smoking in casinos,have been thrown off the ballot. Since smoke tends to migrate within any venue where it’s allowed,carrying its carcinogens with it,the health benefits are limited with a partial ban.But under the premise that something is better than nothing,we recommend voters in both counties approve the measures. In St.Louis County,Proposition E would have banned smoking in public venues entirely,including throughout casinos,but a judge last month threw it off the ballot for technical reasons.It’s too late to physically

remove it from the ballot,so any votes cast for it just won’t be counted.What will count are the votes for Proposition F,which would allow smoking on up to half the gaming floors.Casinos are currently fully excluded from county smoking bans. In St.Charles County,there’s only one casino,Ameristar, which would have to make half its gaming space smoke-free if county residents pass what will be presented to voters as “Proposition Smoke-Free with Exemptions.” A stronger measure with no exemptions was removed by election officials for failing to specify how the new law would be administered or funded. Health advocates should look to future battles over this issue,and perhaps be more careful in their execution.The current measures,if passed,would nudge both counties toward healthier outcomes.

Wagner’s no-show at candidates’ debate is appalling

Amendment 1 would make Missouri politics more partisan

As a resident of the 2nd Congressional District, I was appalled when U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner failed to appear at the debate of candidates vying to represent us in the House (“Wagner is no-show as rivals for her seat debate,” Oct. 16). I was equally appalled that she blamed her absence on the League of Women Voters, an organization in existence for nearly a century with a stellar record of political neutrality and the encouragement of civil public discourse. Rep. Wagner has not been good for the 2nd District. She has never held a town hall to listen to constituents, unless they happened to be wealthy donors. She has supported, without criticism, every position of the president, however outrageous or ill-conceived it may be. She has never criticized the president for cheating on his wife or on his taxes, for siding with tyrants over our long-term global allies, or for hurting Missouri’s hard-working soybean growers by fomenting tariffs. Because of her behavior, Rep. Wagner does not deserve our vote in November. We need a representative who will listen to us, respond to our needs, and make Missouri into the extraordinary state that we could be. Michael J. Montague • Clayton

Missourians will review many measures on the Nov. 6 ballot, and one of the easiest decisions is to vote no on Amendment 1. While proponents claim it is a cure for what’s wrong with politics, it will actually make politics worse by injecting raw partisanship into our nonpartisan redistricting process. Amendment 1 may appear to be an ethics measure, but most of it is about gerrymandering. Its political backers call it “Clean Missouri.” But Amendment 1 is actually a wolf in sheep’s clothing worthy of the name “Fleece Missouri.” If we move from the nonpartisan redistricting standards of compact and contiguous districts to Amendment 1’s 50-50 mandate, gerrymandering would be enshrined in our constitution, creating long, spaghetti-like districts drawn from the more urban areas into the suburbs and, in some cases, into the surrounding rural areas. The effect would geographically marginalize certain areas of our state. This cynical attempt to trick Missouri voters into supporting gerrymandering by placing it inside a measure supposedly about ethics should tell Missourians everything they need to know. Changes to Missouri’s Constitution should not be made lightly. We encourage Missourians to vote no on Amendment 1. Dan Mehan • Jefferson City President and CEO, Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry

Paper shows bias in reporting about Democrats’ ‘dark money’ I read the Sunday front-page headline “Battle of billionaire donors” and accompanying article with interest. I was curious to see if the Post-Dispatch would continue its rabid condemnation of the outside donations and “dark money” as forcefully as it did when former Gov. Eric Greitens was being tarred and feathered by the editorial writers for his fundraising. I found only a single mention in the paragraph on Page A9: “The most prolific outside spender in Missouri so far has been a political action committee and a separate dark money nonprofit affiliated with Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer. They’re running ads attacking Hawley and praising McCaskill.” And you wonder why many readers find the paper so biased? Tom McCrackin • Wildwood

Turn around young people who get involved in crime Every day I open the paper to find more and more stories of human beings found dead on streets, alleys, lots, etc. I don’t know any of these people, but it still gets me teary and sad each day thinking about not just the loss of these people, but knowing the people doing these killings apparently have no clue (or just no longer care) that this is someone’s son, daughter, husband, wife, friend. When reading the story of this 16-yearold who stole the car with three children in it and then was involved in a chase with St. Ann police, all I could think was, isn’t this once again a reminder of the need to do something to turn these teenagers around before they continue to grow up and make even worse decisions that will eventually make them the lead story in another death? I believe the St. Ann police did the right thing to follow this young man and get him off the streets, but please let this finally be the warning sign that gets parents, preachers, teachers, counselors, police, politicians and everyone else involved in coming up with a way to catch these young people as early as possible and get them turned around before their family gets told sad news no one ever wants to hear. Please work together to do something to fix this. Diane Jennings • St. Ann

Court backs suppression of American Indian voters In 1492, Christopher Columbus opened the door to white Europeans to enslave, murder and steal this country from the indigenous natives. Obviously, nothing much has changed as last week the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against American Indians in North Dakota by refusing to allow them to vote if they have a post office box rather than a house address. This ridiculous ruling shows exactly where the Roberts court will go, and it was the first chance that Justice Brett Kavanaugh had to show he was actually nonpartisan, unbiased and human. He didn’t participate in the decision. Voter suppression has superseded one man, one vote. Ric Haberstroh • Ferguson

Abortion protesters should educate teens, young adults Regarding “Abortion activism intensifies” (Oct. 14): It always amazes me when grown men and women hold up signs “Love Life — Born and Unborn,” standing somewhere on a sidewalk in front of a clinic or elsewhere. For a modern society and perhaps for all societies, abortion should be obsolete; it should not even be a part of the vocabulary. A modern society should be able to generate the lifestyle and environment that would make abortion obsolete. Those who are holding up the signs should be in the trenches to educate and support those who may struggle with decisions in regards to procreation. The sign holders should be in the cities and rural areas to educate teenagers and young adults about safe sex practices to prevent unwanted pregnancies, hence prevent a need for abortions. Those holding up those signs may be as far away from reality as Brett Kavanaugh, a Supreme Court justice who has no clue about life outside a privileged white, sheltered environment. Bernd Faust • Dardenne Prairie Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

10.19.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1

45 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

REVIEWING THE 25TH • The 25th Amendment was called into use sooner than expected with Gerald R. Ford’s nomination as vice president. Rep.

Henry G. Gonzalez, D-San Antonio, opposed the amendment in 1966 and its enactment to be reconsidered. He warns that “we could have a cabal in the Cabinet reaching the conclusion that they wanted to rid themselves of the president.” Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

SAUDI ARABIA

What the Arab world needs most is free expression In many countries, a state-run narrative dominates the public psyche. BY JAMAL KHASHOGGI

A note from Karen Attiah, Washington Post Global Opinions editor: I received this column from Jamal Khashoggi’s translator and assistant the day after Jamal was reported missing in Istanbul.The Post held off publishing it because we hoped Jamal would come back to us so that he and I could edit it together.Now I have to accept: That is not going to happen.This is the last piece of his I will edit for the Post.This column perfectly captures his commitment and passion for freedom in the Arab world. A freedom he apparently gave his life for.I will be forever grateful he chose the Post as his final journalistic home one year ago and gave us the chance to work together. I was recently online looking at the 2018 “Freedom in the World” report published by Freedom House and came to a grave realization. There is only one country in the Arab world that has been classified as “free.” That nation is Tunisia. Jordan, Morocco and Kuwait come second, with a classification of “partly free.” The Khashoggi rest of the countries in the Arab world are classified as “not free.” As a result, Arabs living in these countries are either uninformed or misinformed. They are unable to adequately address, much less publicly discuss, matters that affect the region and their dayto-day lives. A state-run narrative dominates the public psyche, and while many do not believe it, a large majority of the population falls victim to this false narrative. Sadly, this situation is unlikely to change. The Arab world was ripe with hope during the spring of 2011. Journalists, academics and the general population were brimming with expectations of a bright and free Arab society within their respective countries. They expected to be emancipated from the hegemony of their governments and the consistent interventions and censorship of information. These expectations were quickly shattered; these societies either fell back to the old status quo or faced even harsher conditions than before. My dear friend, the prominent Saudi writer Saleh al-Shehi, wrote one of the most famous columns ever published in the Saudi press. He unfortunately is now serving an unwarranted five-year prison sentence for supposed comments contrary to the Saudi establishment. The Egyptian government’s seizure of the entire print run of a newspaper, al-Masry al Youm, did not enrage or provoke a reaction from colleagues. These actions no longer carry the consequence of a backlash from the international community. Instead, these actions may trigger condemnation quickly followed by silence.

As a result, Arab governments have been given free rein to continue silencing the media at an increasing rate. There was a time when journalists believed the internet would liberate information from the censorship and control associated with print media. But these governments, whose very existence relies on the control of information, have aggressively blocked the internet. They have also arrested local reporters and pressured advertisers to harm the revenue of specific publications. There are a few oases that continue to embody the spirit of the Arab Spring. Qatar’s government continues to support international news coverage, in contrast to its neighbors’ efforts to uphold the control of information to support the “old Arab order.” Even in Tunisia and Kuwait, where the press is considered at least “partly free,” the media focuses on domestic issues but not issues faced by the greater Arab world. They are hesitant to provide a platform for journalists from Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Yemen. Even Lebanon, the Arab world’s crown jewel when it comes to press freedom, has fallen victim to the polarization and influence of pro-Iran Hezbollah. The Arab world is facing its own version of an Iron Curtain, imposed not by external actors but through domestic forces vying for power. During the Cold War, Radio Free Europe, which grew over the years into a critical institution, played an important role in fostering and sustaining the hope of freedom. Arabs need something similar. In 1967, The New York Times and The Washington Post took joint ownership of the International Herald Tribune newspaper, which went on to become a platform for voices from around the world. My publication, the Post, has taken the initiative to translate many of my pieces and publish them in Arabic. For that, I am grateful. Arabs need to read in their own language so they can understand and discuss the various aspects and complications of democracy in the United States and the West. If an Egyptian reads an article exposing the actual cost of a construction project in Washington, then he or she would be able to better understand the implications of similar projects in his or her community. The Arab world needs a modern version of the old transnational media so citizens can be informed about global events. More important, we need to provide a platform for Arab voices. We suffer from poverty, mismanagement and poor education. Through the creation of an independent international forum, isolated from the influence of nationalist governments spreading hate through propaganda, ordinary people in the Arab world would be able to address the structural problems their societies face. Jamal Khashoggi is a Saudi journalist and author, and a Washington Post Global Opinions contributing columnist.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A consular staffer is seen behind the entrance of the Saudi Arabia’s Consulate in Istanbul on Wednesday.

Dispatches from the land of no news Read the Saudi press if you want to know what they’re trying to hide. TOD ROBBERSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Saudi Arabia has never been a welcoming place for high-minded concepts like human rights. People in the kingdom who advocate for any of the fundamental freedoms — speech, assembly, press, religion — can, and often do, find themselves in jail. Or beheaded, depending on whom they insult in their advocacy. I lived as a very young journalist in Jeddah in 1980, at a time when controversy surrounded the kingdom. The drama-documentary, “Death of a Princess,” had just debuted. Saudi bases had hosted a botched U.S. military operation to rescue American hostages held in Iran. A group of around 60 Sunni Muslim radicals had seized the Grand Mosque in Mecca, which Saudi Arabia tried but failed to blame on Shiite Iran. Members of the royal family were increasingly involved in scandals around Europe as they were caught on camera spending lavishly on booze, women, penthouse hotel rooms and luxury yachts. Jeddah, like the rest of the country, was experiencing a building boom. The name of the biggest construction company was on billboards everywhere: Saudi bin Ladin Group. At the same time I was observing all this from my perch at the English-language daily Arab News, Osama bin Laden was not far away, watching with increasing skepticism as the royal family’s decadence and heavyhanded rule grew. The sole competitor for Arab news was the daily Okaz/Saudi Gazette, where a young Saudi named Jamal Khashoggi soon would launch his career in journalism. I didn’t know him, although the Khashoggi family name was, at

the time, as well-known as that of the Bin Ladens. Western-educated journalists came to Saudi Arabia to practice our trade and get a rare look at one of the world’s most insular countries. We were quickly disabused of any notion that we’d be allowed to practice Western journalistic freedoms there. For example, all the incidents mentioned above — the royal family boozing,“Death of Princess,” the Mecca siege, the Iran rescue operation — were forbidden topics. Censorship was a daily part of our lives. The world was allowed to know about all of these events, but not the Saudi public. Jamal Khashoggi (correctly pronounced kha-shock-gee) spent most of his career immersed in that nether world of pseudojournalism. He knew exactly where his boundaries were. If he ever decided to go rogue, he also knew exactly what to say and how to say it in order to make the royal family’s blood boil. Back when we were launching our careers, royal family governance was largely a process of consultation, consensus and bribery. Lower princes were assigned tedious tasks that caused them to hold audiences and interact with the peasantry. Money was doled out to keep complainers quiet. A German businessman, Juergen Krabo, once asked me to accompany him to an audience with a Saudi prince, where Krabo wished to present a complaint against another member of the royal family who had swindled him out of several thousand dollars. The prince listened patiently as Krabo stated his case. Some Arabic was spoken. Then police arrived and arrested Krabo, marching him off to jail for slandering a member of the royal family. I ran back to my office, intent on reporting what I’d just witnessed. My Palestinian editor effectively told me to shut up and forget about what I’d seen unless I wanted to wind up in jail, too. Krabo was later

freed and deported. Weeks later, I was sent home for refusing my editor’s orders to doctor an Associated Press story to make Israel look bad. Khashoggi aimed much, much higher. His target was the autocratic Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, infamous for this year’s purported crackdown on corruption that included imprisoning and extorting money from wealthy Saudis and kidnapping the prime minister of Lebanon. Nobody knows exactly what Khashoggi did to earn the crown prince’s enmity, but it was serious enough to get him killed and probably dismembered at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The story has dominated headlines in newspapers worldwide this week. Just for grins, I checked the headlines in Tuesday’s print edition of Arab News to see what Saudi readers were being allowed to know. The lead front-page story: “‘Davos in the Desert’ brings 150 global leaders to Riyadh.” Another top story was about violence in Syria. Way at the bottom was a quote from President Donald Trump about “rogue killers” who might have killed Khashoggi — after he had visited the consulate. Another article inside tried to link Khashoggi with bin Laden and the Islamic State. Wednesday’s front page of Khashoggi’s old newspaper, Okaz, was plastered with photos of a smiling Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meeting with King Salman and the crown prince. There was no mention of the leaders discussing Khashoggi, only that “current situations in the region and joint efforts being exerted towards them were discussed.” If you ever want to know what the Saudis are trying to hide, let their newspapers be your guide. trobberson@post-dispatch.com Twitter: @trobberson 314-340-8382

Democratic voters have to show up this time Who’s responsible for Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court? 4 million voters who stayed home in 2016. BY WILLIAM LACY CLAY

As my fellow progressive Democrats come to grips with the ugly travesty of the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court and the truly dangerous long-term implications of his tenure, liberals are looking for someone to blame, and Clay there are multiple suspects. But if we’re honest, we should start by looking in the mirror. This jam-job, including the ridiculously flawed and intentionally restricted sham FBI investigation into the serious allegations

made by Christine Blasey Ford against Judge Kavanaugh, was fueled by a toxic mixture of white male privilege, misogyny, unbridled ego, unrepentant arrogance and a complete disdain for women demonstrated by both the president and his nominee. President Donald Trump simultaneously mocked a victim of sexual assault while claiming that the real victims of this national disgrace were endangered men. While there is shallow truth in that superficial analysis, there is a deeper and even more painful cause for this self-inflicted wound on the soul of the nation: the 4 million likely Democratic voters who stayed home on Nov. 8, 2016. An independent and exhaustive study of more than 69,000

American voters conducted after the 2016 election by Sean McElwee, president and CEO of Data Progress, as reported by NBC News and The New York Times (March 10, 2018), showed that: “While 9 percent of Obama 2012 voters went for Mr. Trump in 2016, 7 percent — that’s more than four million missing voters — stayed home.” The analysis also concluded that the missing voters “tended to be minorities and millennials” and “51 percent were people of color.” Not voting when so much is at stake is beyond my comprehension, and that is a mistake our nation cannot afford to repeat on Nov. 6. When I cast my first vote in

1976, I was elated to finally exercise the real power of my citizenship. I wasn’t fully enthused about every Democratic candidate, but I understood that supporting an imperfect Democrat was preferable to allowing a Republican extremist to win by default because of my own inaction. I have been honored to serve in elective office for 35 years, and in all that time, our party has never held a flawless primary process or produced a perfect nominee. But we should remember that while progressive politics doesn’t require perfection, it does demand an urgent commitment to show up on Election Day. This year, the choice is so stark and the urgency is so great, we cannot allow the mistakes of 2016

to repeat in the midterms. As young people, even before we were old enough to vote, my two sisters and I were indoctrinated by my parents that voting was not optional, it was an essential part of our citizenship. On Nov. 6, our democracy is on the ballot. So is the future of health care; voting rights; criminal justice reform; protecting the environment; demanding a complete count for Census 2020; passing common sense gun laws; and standing up against hate. I intend to exercise my franchise. I won’t stay home; you shouldn’t either. U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay is a Democrat from St. Louis.


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

Environmental groups sue to stop Texas border wall BY MOLLY HENNESSY-FISKE Los Angeles Times

HOUSTON • A coalition of environmental groups has sued to stop President Donald Trump’s administration from speeding construction of the first phase of southern border wall construction by waiving dozens of landmark environmental laws meant to protect air and water quality, public lands and wildlife. The lawsuit, filed Thursday

in U.S. District Court in Washington, comes as Trump threatened this week to send the U.S. military to the Mexican border to stop a caravan of migrants from Honduras, the latest in a wave of Central American families attempting to cross the border illegally. The federal waivers issued earlier this month concern stretches of added border wall and gates in the Rio Grande Valley, the country’s most heavily traf-

ficked illegal border crossing, where 137,000 immigrants were captured last fiscal year. Officials have said they plan to begin building 37 miles of border barriers there as soon as February. The latest lawsuit was filed by the Animal Legal Defense Fund, Defenders of Wildlife and the Center for Biological Diversity. The three groups argue that the Department of Homeland Security lacks the authority to waive federal environmental laws such

OBITUARIES Bilka, Charles "Charlie" E. - St. Louis Black, Etta I. - Florissant Black, Ronald E. - Florissant Harper, Raymond Franklin Jr. Kohn, John J. - St. Louis Lane, Robert E. - St. Charles

as the Endangered Species, Clean Air and Water acts. “We hope the lawsuit will have a fighting chance of halting the construction” of the border wall, said Jean Su, a Washingtonbased attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. She said the groups offered the same legal arguments in prior challenges to border wall environmental waivers in California and New Mexico. The Texas waivers are espe-

Oetting, Marie Dorothy Prange Marie passed away on Tuesday October 9, 2018, at the age of 91. Loving mother of David Prange Oetting (Mary) and James William Oetting; dear grandmother to Jonathan Oetting (Katie) and David Oetting Jr. As she was affectionately known to friends and family, "Ree Ree" was the daughter of Hilda and Elmer Prange and was married to her loving husband William J. Oetting for 44 years until Bill's death in 1994. Marie lived her life with an open mind, open heart, helping hand, and a passion for learning. Ree had a zest for life, a charming smile and devoted time to the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Edgewood Children's Home and Ladue Chapel. She Bilka, Charles "Charlie" E. was active on the boards of Eden Seminary, Care and Baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection on Counseling, American Youth Foundation among others. She Wednesday, October 17, 2018. Beloved husband of quietly helped individuals who needed a financial boost to reach Patricia "Pat" Bilka (nee Pauly) for 60 years; loving their educational goals. father of Charlie (Anne) Bilka, Chris (Louis) Scott, David Marie was influenced throughout her life by her beloved AYF (Bridget) Bilka, Lisa (Kevin) Kleinschrodt and Michelle (Steve) Camp Miniwanca "My own self at my very best all the time" and Ledbetter; cherished grandfather of 11; great-grandfather of 3; living the four-fold way (Mental, Physical, Social, and Religious) our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. was ingrained in her and, through her, others. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 More recently, Ree Ree was an early supporter of and Lemay Ferry Rd., on Saturday, October 20, 12:30 p.m. to St. passionate volunteer for the Donald Danforth Plant Science Margaret Mary Alacoque Church for 1 p.m. Mass. Interment Center, a founding member of the Friends Committee and a Resurrection Cemetery. Memorials to The American Cancer longtime member of the Plantasia Gala Committee. It thrilled Society appreciated. Visitation Friday, 4-8 p.m. her to introduce friends to the important mission of the Center. Marie's love of and dedication to Washington University has never wavered. She graduated with an economics degree in the Black, Etta I. great class of 1949. Crowned Homecoming Queen her junior 79, Passed Sunday, Sept. 2, 2018. Service: John Calvin Presbyterian Church of Bridgeton, year, Ree Ree was president of the Mortarboard Society, President of the Panhellenic Society, Freshman Orientation CoMemorial Saturday, Oct. 20th 11 a.m. Chairman, President of the Women's Athletic Association and Member of Delta Gamma Sorority. Since then, Marie never Black, Ronald E. really left campus, serving on the Dean's Advisory Committee 81, Passed Monday, Oct. 1, 2018. for Arts & Sciences, Endowed Scholarship Committee and Service: John Calvin Presbyterian Church of Bridgeton, Alumni Board of Governors. She was a lifetime member of the Memorial Saturday, Oct. 20th 11 a.m. Women's Society, Campaign Committee for Planned Giving, Arts & Sciences Scholarship Initiative Committee and the Danforth Circle Eliot Membership Committee. Harper, Raymond Franklin Jr. Marie was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award (1994), Wed., Oct. 17, 2018, born May 2, 1945. Beloved son of the Eliot Society's "Search" Award (2001), and in 2013 she was the late Raymond F. and Louise (Porter) Harper, Sr.; honored by Arts & Sciences with the Dean's Medal at the dear husband of Judy L. Harper; dear father of Distinguished Alumni Awards. Christopher (Ann) Harper, and Douglas (Jennifer) Ree's love, enthusiasm and ready smile will be missed by her Harper; beloved grandfather of Bradley and Tyler; brother of family, friends, and the countless lives she has touched. Her Sarah Lang. Preceded by brothers John and Sam. The family unparalleled dedication to learning and commitment to would like to especially thank the neighbors who helped during personal growth was an inspiration to all who knew her. Ray's illness. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to Services: Memorial services will be held at a later date. In lieu Washington University, the Danforth Plant Science Center, of flowers, donations may be made to Mercy Hospice. Arrange- American Youth Foundation, or Ladue Chapel Presbyterian ments by Mahn Twin City Chapel, Festus, MO Church. Services: A celebration of Marie's life will be in late November, pending arrival of Ree-Ree's first great-grandKohn, John J. Proceeded in death by parents Frank and Minnie Kohn, and child, a girl, in early November. Private Interment. A SERVICE OF sister Marilee Ervin. Brother of Frank (Pat) Kohn and brother-inTHE LUPTON CHAPEL law of Ray Ervin. Uncle, great-uncle, cousin, friend. Services: Memorial Mass, Saturday October 20th, 11:00 A.M. at St. Anthony's Church, High Ridge, MO. Roberts, Patricia E.

Lane, Robert E. Service information at www.newcomerstlouis.com

Lydon, LaVerne B. (nee Krenning), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, October 16, 2018. Beloved wife of the late John J. Lydon; loving mother of Patricia (Michael) Mulligan, Maureen (Larry) King, John (Debbie) Lydon, Theresa (Jim) Sams, M ich a el (Deborah) L y d o n and Sally L yd on ; cherished grandmother of 14; great-grandmother, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, on Monday, October 22 at 10:15 a.m. to Sts. Mary & Joseph Catholic Church for 11 a.m. Mass. Interment at J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Stray Rescue or St. Vincent DePaul appreciated. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m.

Newhouse, Donald D. Oct. 16, 2018. Vis. Oct. 21, 2-5 pm. Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville Pkwy., Serv. Oct. 22, 11 am. St. Patrick Catholic Church, Wentzville. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Lydon, LaVerne B. - St. Louis Newhouse, Donald D. - Foristell Noel, Mary Therese - St. Louis Oetting, Marie Dorothy Prange - Ladue Roberts, Patricia E. - Maryland Heights Schoenfeld, Lillian - St. Louis

Thurs., Oct. 18, 2018. Visitation Sun., Oct. 21, 4-8 p.m. at Colliers Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh. Service Mon., Oct. 22, 9:30 am. at Colliers. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

cially troubling, opponents said, because they allow border barriers and gates to pass through precious habitats for endangered species in a wildlife corridor that includes Bentsen State Park, the World Birding Center and the National Butterfly Center. Carlos Diaz, a spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security, said the department did not comment on pending lawsuits. Border wall design contracts are being awarded Nov. 1.

Tharpe, Olivia "Ebbie" - Florissant Thomas, Tim - House Springs Thompson, Buell J. - St. Louis Wehner, Mary Jeanne - St. Louis Zeiser - see Noel

Thompson, Buell J. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, October 16, 2018. Beloved husband of Mary Ann Thompson (nee Johnson); dear father of Dennis Thompson; dear sibling of 5 brothers and 3 sisters; dear uncle and friend to many. Services: Funeral Mass will be Monday, October 22, 10 a.m. at Ste. Genevieve du Bois Catholic Church. Interment National Cemetery at Jefferson Barracks. Visitation will be Sunday, 4 - 7 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Road in Kirkwood. www.boppchapel.com

Wehner, Mary Jeanne (nee Stuever) Fortified with the Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church, Tuesday, October 16, 2018, at the age of 91. Beloved wife of the late Charles E. "Chub" Wehner; loving mother of Anne (M ike) M cKit rick, S u e (D on ) Montgomery, Janet (Ken) Janovec, Jeanine Horgan, and the l a t e C h a r l e s E . W e h n e r J r; cherished grandmother of Bob (Jackie) McKitrick, Sarah Montgomery, Julie (Joe) Childress, M a t t (Laura) Montgomery, Emily (Jared) Bryson, Katie (fiance Mitch Grewe) McKitrick, Jessica (Jason) Neuman, Jack (fiancee Kendall Jesser) Horgan, Kristen (Mike) Deiters, Ellie (fiance Patrick Maltagliati) Horgan, and Maureen Horgan; adoring great-grandmother of Charlotte, Cecilia, and Daphne McKitrick, Ben Childress, Abigail and Andrew Montgomery, Gus, Lilly and Will Bryson, Kennedy Lindhorst, and Melissa Neuman. Our dearest sister, sister-inlaw, aunt, great-aunt, Godmother, cousin, friend, and teacher. Special thanks to Laclede Groves Care Center. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, October 22, at 10 a.m. to St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church for 10:30 a.m. Mass. Interment at Ressurection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family requests gifts be made to Ursuline Academy, 341 South Sappington Rd., St. Louis, MO 63122. Visitation Sunday 3-7 p.m.

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Schoenfeld, Lillian October 18, 2018 age 93. Beloved wife of the late Sanford Schoenfeld; dear mother and mother-in-law of Marc (Anne) Schoenfeld; dear grandmother of Scott (Lindi) Schoenfeld and Daniel Schoenfeld; dear greatgrandmother of Eden and Emmett Schoenfeld; dear sister and sister-in-law of Louis (late Shirley) Osheroff, late Abe (late Sophie) Osheroff, late Ada (late Manuel) Newman and late Ann (late Meyer) Golder; sister-in-law of late Alex (late Flora) Gottermann; dear aunt, great-aunt , cousin and friend. Services: Graveside service 2:00 p.m., Sunday, October 21, at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Rd., Chesterfield, MO 63017. Memorial contributions preferred to a charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. Berger Memorial Service

STLtoday.com/obits

Tharpe, Olivia "Ebbie"

(nee McKee), of Florissant, MO, at the age of 91, on October 16, 2018 peacefully entered into the presence of the Lord. Ebbie was born December 11, 1926 to the late Jeffie Olivia and William Noel, Mary Therese Ferdinand McKee in southeast Missouri. Ebbie's husband of 70 Age 52, passed from her earthly binds into the hands of God, years, Joe W. Tharpe, preceded her in death. She is survived by surrounded by her loving family and friends on October 16, her daughter, Jeffie Mussman (Galen), and son, Steve Tharpe 2018 after a lengthy illness. Mary was born in St. Louis to Gerald (Deborah); four beloved grandchildren and two great-grand and Adele Zeiser and on May 5, 1990 married the love of her children; numerous nephews, nieces, brothers and sisters inlife, Scott Noel. Scott cared for Mary throughout her illness to law, and countless friends and brothers and sisters in Christ. her death, devoted to the end. Mary and Scott have 4 wonderful After attending Southeast Missouri State, Ebbie became a direcboys, Jacob (Carrie) Noel, Joseph (Ashley) Noel, Joshua Noel and tor of the North County YMCA and served on the U.S. Olympic John Noel who were both the light of her life and the reason for Volleyball Selection Committee. Ebbie lived life to the fullest coining the term "Mighty Mary". Devoted to her boys, Mary was with pride and passion, always putting family first. She was truthe light of their lives as well. Organized chaos was the best way ly loved and will be missed by all who knew her. to describe the warm and loving household of the Noels. The Services: Visitation at 10:00 a.m. followed by funeral service youngest of a large family, Mary leaves numerous brothers and commencing at 10:45 a.m. on Saturday, October 20th at sisters to honor and remember her, including John (Jeanne) Hutchens Mortuary at 675 Graham Road in Florissant. Private Zeiser, Lynne (Michael) Russo, Jim Zeiser, Paul (Karen) Zeiser, internment at Oak Hill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please Carol (Scott) Yanker, Sue (Victor) Gillespie and Jean (Craig) consider a donation to the Greater St. Louis YMCA. Egart. Mary is also survived by her sister-in-law, Melody Noel (Jeffrey Bonner), Stephanie (Al) Hoog and numerous nieces and Thomas, Tim nephews. 68, October 17, 2018. Memorial visitation at SCHRADER Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Saturday, October 20, 9:30 a.m. to St. Francis Funeral Home, Eureka, Sun. 10/21/18, 4-8 p.m. Service 10 of Assisi Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Ceme- a.m., Mon. For more info see Schrader.com. tery. A luncheon will be served immediately after the burial at Budrovich Banquet Hall, 10300 Lake Bluff Dr., St. Louis, MO 63123. Visitation Friday, 4-9 p.m.

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WORLD

10.19.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A15

Trump presses Mexico to stop migrants President threatens to close border as thousands of Hondurans make trek toward U.S. BY SONIA PEREZ D. associated Press

GUATEMALA CITY • As some 3,000

Hondurans made their way through Guatemala, attention — and pressure — turned to Mexico, after President Donald Trump threatened Thursday to close the U.S.-Mexico border if authorities there fail to stop them — a nearly unthinkable move that would disrupt hundreds of thousands of legal freight, vehicle and pedestrian crossings each day. With less than three weeks before the Nov. 6 midterm elections, Trump seized on the migrant caravan to make border security a political issue and energize his Republican base. “I must, in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught — and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!” Trump tweeted on Thursday, adding that he blamed Democrats for what he called “weak laws!” The threat followed another one earlier this week to cut off aid to Central American countries if the migrants weren’t stopped. However, earlier this year Trump made a similar vow over another large migrant caravan, but didn’t follow through and it largely petered out in Mexico. On Thursday, Mexico dispatched additional police to its southern border, after the Casa del Migrante shelter on the Guatemalan side of the border reported that hundreds of Hondurans had already arrived there. Mexican officials say the Hondurans won’t be allowed to enter as a group, and would either have to show a passport and visa — something few have — or apply individually for refugee status, a process that can mean waiting for up to 90 days for approval.

Israeli court sides with U.S. student barred from studying in Jerusalem

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Honduran migrants leave Guatemala City at sunrise Thursday as they continue their way north toward the United States. President Donald Trump has threatened to cut off aid to Central American countries or even close the U.S.-Mexico border if the caravan of thousands isn’t stopped before it reaches the U.S.

Mexico’s ambassador to Guatemala, Luis Manuel Lopez Moreno, met with leaders of the caravan Wednesday and warned them that Hondurans caught without papers in Mexico would be deported. Still, the idea that Mexico could close its porous southern border — or that the United States would choke off the lucrative trade and other traffic between the two nations — strained the imagination. And, much like Guatemala and Honduras, Mexico is itself a country of many migrants, raising the question of whether the political will exists for a confrontation. Mexican President-elect Andres Man-

uel Lopez Obrador, who takes office on Dec. 1, wants to avoid repression against migrants and also avoid angering the United States. He has long pushed economic development as a way to keep people from migrating, and on Wednesday he reached out again. “We will offer jobs, work to Central Americans. Anyone who wants to work in our country will have help, will have a work visa,” he pledged. As the mass of humanity strung out from Guatemala City to the border, it was unclear whether those who made it the farthest would wait for their countrymen to arrive before attempting a mass cross-

Stunned by school rampage, Crimean city mourns dead Motive sought for attack that killed 20, injured dozens

ASSOCIATED PRESS

JERUSALEM • Israel’s Supreme Court overturned on Thursday an appeals court ruling that agreed with the government’s decision to bar an American graduate student from entering the country over her alleged involvement in the boycott movement against the Jewish state. The court accepted Lara Alqasem’s appeal, saying her desire to study in Israel undermined the premise of her alleged support for a boycott. It said that if her deportation was based on her political opinion, then the state’s order was “a radical and dangerous step” that could erode Israeli democracy. Alqasem’s attorneys said she was released from Ben Gurion International airport, where she had been held in detention since arriving in the country on Oct. 2 with a valid student visa to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Alqasem, 22, a Florida native whose father is Palestinian, is a former president of the University of Florida chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine. The group is a branch of the BDS movement, named for its support of boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel. The country’s Strategic Affairs Ministry, which spearheads the government’s efforts against the boycott campaign, describes Alqasem’s group as an extremist organization, and says BDS aims to delegitimize or even destroy the Jewish state. Last year, Israel passed a controversial law banning entry for any foreigner who “knowingly issues a public call for boycotting Israel.” It has come under heavy criticism for its handling of Alqasem’s case. Alqasem has fought her expulsion order for more than two weeks, the longest anyone has been held in a boycott-related case. She turned to the high court on Wednesday after a lower court rejected her appeal, insisting that she no longer participated in boycott activities, and promising not to engage in boycott activities in the future. Her attorneys called the government’s attacks on Alqasem “thought-policing” and said the state failed to present credible evidence against her. State lawyers argued that Alqasem’s deletion of her social media accounts aroused suspicion and that her past affiliation with the BDS movement still made her a threat. In its ruling, the Supreme Court said the state’s evidence was not enough to justify its use of the anti-boycott law. Alqasem’s attorneys lauded the ruling as a victory for free speech, academic freedom and the rule of law. Gilad Erdan, head of Israel’s Strategic Affairs Ministry, said the ruling undermined Israel’s anti-boycott law. “This damages the ability of the state of Israel to combat boycott activists that harm us all,” he said. The Hebrew University, which has backed Alqasem, said they looked forward to welcoming her to classes next week.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kremlin guards march Thursday in the Alexander Garden in Moscow past candles and flowers placed in memory of victims of Wednesday’s attack on a vocational college in Kerch, Crimea. Authorities were investigating the possibility that the suspect, a student at the school, had an accomplice in the rampage.

BY NATALIYA VASILYEVA associated Press

MOSCOW • While Crimean authorities searched for clues that might help explain why a teenager gunned down 20 people at his vocational school before killing himself, the stunned city of Kerch prepared to say farewell to the victims. Thousands of residents were expected to attend the funerals of most of the victims Friday. The burials are taking place in mainland Russia, which annexed Crimea from Ukraine in 2014. Little information has emerged about the gunman, Vladislav Roslyakov, 18. Authorities said they were investigating whether he had an accomplice in Wednesday’s shotgun massacre at Kerch Polytechnic College. Teachers and classmates have described Roslyakov as a shy person with few friends. A computer taken from the home where he lived with his parents revealed little, a Crimean official said Thursday. “When they did a search and saw the computer, all information, messages and such had been deleted,” Crimean human rights ombudswoman Lyudmila Lubina was quoted as saying by Russian news agency Tass. Roslyakov was initially described as the only person involved in the carnage at the school. But Sergei Aksyonov, the Kremlinappointed head of Crimea, told Russian news agencies Thursday it was still possible the student had help. “The point is to find out who was coaching him for this crime,” Aksyonov said. “He was acting on his own here, we know that. But this scoundrel could not have prepared this attack on his own, in my opinion, and according to my colleagues.” Residents brought flowers and toys to a makeshift memorial outside the school on Thursday morning. Many were in tears, struggling to speak. The Kerch attack was by far the deadliest carried out by a student in Russia, raising questions about school security. The

vocational school had a front desk but no security guards. Russia’s National Guard said Thursday that it had now deployed officers and riot police to all schools and colleges in Kerch. President Vladimir Putin portrayed the mass shooting in Kerch as a “result of globalization” — forces that were exporting bad practices into Russia. Speaking at an international policy conference, Putin compared Roslyakov’s assault to school shootings in the United States. In the past few years, authorities have said several school attacks in Russia allegedly were inspired by gun violence in the U.S. Putin said that in his view, teenagers getting guns and going on shooting rampages meant adults had failed to offer them alternatives to violence. Russia has fairly strict gun legislation. Civilians can own only hunting rifles and smoothbore shotguns and must undergo significant background checks. Roslyakov had only recently received a permit to own a shotgun and had bought 150 cartridges just a few days ago, according to local officials. The death toll in Kerch, excluding Roslyakov, climbed Thursday to 20 after one of the wounded died in a hospital, according to Russian news agency Tass. Dozens of people remained hospitalized in Kerch, and at least 10 with severe injuries were being airlifted to top Russian hospitals for surgery, Health Minister Veronika Skvortsova said. Most victims died from gunshot wounds, authorities said. Many others had wounds from an improvised explosive device that went off packed with shrapnel. Skvortsova said some victims had their legs or feet blown off. Taisiya Roslyakova, Roslyakov’s grandmother, told the Komsomolskaya Pravda daily Thursday that her grandson was a kind boy who always helped her with chores — unlike his father. She said Roslyakov did not have many friends and spent all his time indoors playing computer games.

ing into Mexico. By Thursday, the caravan had dispersed a bit, with the youngest and strongest of the migrants walking ahead together, some boarding buses or trying to hitch rides. Mauro Verzzeletti, a priest who runs the Casa del Migrante shelter in the Guatemalan capital, said about 3,000 people slept there overnight and left early to continue the journey, adding that “more are arriving.” On Thursday, Trump said he prioritizes border security over even the recently struck trade deal to replace NAFTA, the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA. “The assault on our country at our Southern Border, including the Criminal elements and DRUGS pouring in, is far more important to me, as President, than Trade or the USMCA. Hopefully Mexico will stop this onslaught at their Northern Border,” Trump tweeted. Marcelo Ebrard, Lopez Obrador’s pick to become foreign relations secretary after he takes office, said Trump’s tweets needed to be understood in the context of the upcoming U.S. midterm elections. “The electoral process is very near, so he is making a political calculation,” Ebrard said in an interview with Radio Centro. Trump’s stance, he said, was “what he has always presented,” adding he saw “nothing surprising in it.” Juan Escobar, 24, who was among the Honduran migrants in the caravan, said such rhetoric would not dissuade them from continuing the journey. “Only God on high can stop us,” Escobar said. Carlos Lopez, 27, said he was hopeful of securing a 40-day work visa in Mexico. He added that he was concerned by the U.S. president’s threats, but “you have to keep fighting.”

DIGEST Ecuador expels Venezuelan envoy after insult of president Officials in Ecuador say they’re expelling Venezuela’s ambassador because an official from the neighboring country called its president a “liar.” The Foreign Ministry office announced its decision Thursday, saying Venezuela’s Communications Minister Jorge Rodriguez called Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno a “liar” for alleging that 140 buses leave Venezuela every day carrying migrants to Ecuador. The rising tension comes as masses of Venezuelans flee a historic crisis that’s led to shortages of food and medicine and crumbling services like electricity and running water. Officials in Ecuador say they won’t tolerate disrespect from Venezuela. U.S. to merge diplomatic mission serving Palestinians • In a move likely to further strain relations between the United States and the Palestinian Authority, the State Department said Thursday that it will merge the diplomatic mission serving Palestinians with the U.S. Embassy in Israel. The head of the consulate, which traditionally dealt with Palestinian affairs, will return to Washington, a State Department spokesman told The Washington Post. Instead, Ambassador to Israel David Friedman will oversee U.S. diplomatic ties with the Palestinians. The merger is just the latest step by the Trump administration that appears to downgrade its diplomatic relations with the Palestinians. Russian opposition leader accepts ‘duel’ proposal • Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny says he accepts the “duel” proposed by the chief of the National Guard — if it’s a televised debate with words as weapons. In a video statement Thursday, Navalny responded to the challenge issued in August by Viktor Zolotov, whom Navalny accuses of profiting from shady deals in his agency. Zolotov is believed to be one of President Vladimir Putin’s closest allies and his outburst underlined the Kremlin’s frustration with Navalny’s opposition. Navalny said, “I accept your call and choose the place and weapons, as proposed ... our duel will take place in the form of a debate” on national television. A guard spokesman, Valery Gribakin, said he had not seen Navalny’s statement but noted Russia’s National Guard was involved in more important matters. 2 dead, dozens hurt in protests in Haiti • At least two people were killed and dozens injured during large protests across Haiti over alleged misuse of government funds, authorities said Thursday. Police spokesman Michel-Ange LouisJeune said 11 civilians were injured by bullets and 11 officers by flying rocks. Saint-Marc Deputy Mayor Frantz Ulysse said 14 people were injured on Wednesday when police opened fire to clear a road for a presidential motorcade as the government commemorated the death of independence hero Jean-Jacques Dessalines. Protesters were demanding more transparency in how the government uses funds from Petrocaribe, an oil assistance program sponsored by Venezuela. An investigation by Haiti’s Senate found that at least 14 former government officials allegedly misused $3.8 billion. From news services


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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 10.19.2018 • B

Steel investors, surprisingly, haven’t benefited from Trump’s tariffs DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A surprising thing happened after President Donald Trump imposed tariffs to help the American steel industry: The steelmakers’ stocks tanked. U.S. Steel got some good press — and a presidential visit — when the tariffs helped it decide to restart a second blast furnace in Granite City, but the company’s shareholders aren’t cheering. Their shares have plunged 36 percent since Feb. 28, the day before the tariffs were announced. Its domestic competitors Nucor Steel, AK Steel and Steel Dynamics are down too. The broader market, even after a downdraft last week, has risen 2 percent in the same period. An old stock market adage advises investors to buy on rumor but sell on news. It appears to have been good advice in this case: Steel stocks had a good run last fall and winter, when the White House was signaling that it would move to restrict steel and aluminum imports, but they peaked about the time the tariffs were announced.

JOHANNA HUCKEBA • jhuckeba@post-dispatch.com

Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey announces a new product, Square Terminal, on Oct. 12 at Square’s Cortex innovation district office.

Dorsey launches device, commits to growth here Square Terminal will connect to Wi-Fi, accept mobile payments BY BRIAN FELDT Special to the Post-Dispatch

Square CEO Jack Dorsey, in town last week to announce a new credit and debit card reading device called Square Terminal, reiterated his commitment to growing his business in St. Louis, alluding to a likely downtown office for the San Franciscobased company and stating his desire to see the company hire a significant number of development professionals. Dorsey said he’d like the number of software developers to account for at least 40 percent of Square’s St. Louis workforce, which today totals nearly 500. Square officials have said they have the capacity for approximately 800 moving forward.

The new Square Terminal will allow merchants to ring up sales, accept multiple forms of payment and print receipts.

Lumière is last local casino property not controlled by Pennsylvania landlord

Square will start small, hiring an engineering manager and two software engineers in St. Louis. Such hiring prospects are significant for St. Louis considering the company moved its operations from St. Louis to the West Coast in 2009 after it struggled to find the needed tech talent to scale the business. Dorsey said the St. Louis office, which initially opened in 2015 with fewer than 200 employees, has followed the blueprint of other satellite offices around the world, which are staffed with a small number of Square employees from San Francisco to start before training and hiring local talent. “We’ve proven (St. Louis) can be sustain-

New Fairfield Inn and Suites breaks ground downtown Hotel won’t interfere with potential MLS stadium

ST. LOUIS CASINO OPERATORS AND LANDLORDS

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The ownership of the St. Louis region’s six casinos has been reshuffled after two deals closed this month. And Missouri regulators made sure that one company — Gaming and Leisure Properties Inc. (GLPI) of Wyomissing, Pa. — won’t own the real estate for every casino here, though it will continue to own or lease five of six casino properties. Penn National Gaming Inc. closed on its purchase of Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. this week, adding River City Casino in Lemay to a local portfolio that also includes Hollywood Casino in Maryland Heights and Casino Argosy Alton. To get over regulatory hurdles, Pinnacle’s Ameristar St. Charles — the top-grossing casino here — was transferred to Boyd Gaming Corp. Along with Ameristar Kansas City and casinos in Indiana and Ohio, the divestiture to Boyd netted $563 million. Penn ended up paying 26.3 million shares of Penn common stock and approximately $1.25

After the completion of two billion-dollar casino deals this month, the St. Louis area’s casinos have four operators ... Penn National Gaming: Casino Argosy Alton, Hollywood Casino, River City Casino Eldorado Resorts, Inc: Lumière Place CQ Holding Company: Casino Queen Boyd Gaming Corp: Ameristar St. Charles

The old Harry’s Restaurant & Bar is gone and work is finally starting on a new $20 million, 136-room Fairfield Inn and Suites at the corner of 22nd and Market streets. And no, if St. Louis manages to land a Major League Soccer franchise, the hotel won’t be in the way of a potential $250 million stadium. It may block the four-story hotel’s view of the Arch, but the developer sees that as a fine trade-off for a major sports venue next door. “We’ve been told they don’t need our property,” said Mike Mullenix, chairman and chief executive officer of Brentwood-based Equis Hotels. “We’re going to be adjacent to this thing if it goes through.” City officials confirmed that the hotel wouldn’t be in the way of an MLS stadium should the ownership group made up of the Taylor family of

See CASINO • Page B4

J.B. FORBES • P-D

U.S. Steel workers in Granite City applaud President Donald Trump in July when he visited after an idled blast furnace was restarted.

See SQUARE • Page B5

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

... but only two companies will control the real estate: Gaming & Leisure Properties Inc: Argosy Alton, Hollywood Casino, River City, Casino Queen, Ameristar St. Charles Eldorado Resorts: Lumière Place

See NICKLAUS • Page B5

Enterprise Holdings and Jim Kavanaugh of World Wide Technology win a franchise. Stadium or no stadium, Mullenix and his team are bullish on the addition of a Fairfield franchise, a Marriott brand, to Downtown West. Equis has actually been looking for a site downtown for over a decade. “There’s so much demand downtown for this type of hotel, but there’s no product,” he said. While there are several historic hotel rehabs underway downtown, the Fairfield Inn would be the first newly constructed downtown hotel in years. The upper-midscale hotel brand is appealing to “road warrior” business travelers who don’t need the frills of a full-service hotel, Mullenix said. And on the weekends, it’s a popular brand for families. “These brands are kind of like cults sometimes,” he said. See HOTEL • Page B4

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NETWORKING

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 10.19.2018

Capital campaign launches to renovate, expand Hope Lodge FROM STAFF REPORTS

Efforts are underway to raise $10 million to renovate and expand the Hope Lodge in St. Louis that provides a place to stay for cancer patients undergoing treatment at nearby medical facilities and patients’ families. Hope Lodge at 4215 Lindell Boulevard in the Central West End plans to renovate an existing office space next to the current Hope Lodge facility. Upgrades include adding 39,000 square feet, more guest suites, ADA accessibility, a conference room and expanded laundry facilities, among other improvements. Seven St. Louis area companies have already pledged half of the project’s amount,

BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD GRANTS AND AWARDS The following first-time entrepreneurs were granted $1,000 BALSA Foundation grants: Anna and Eleuterio Carreon, Elevada; Julius B. Anthony, St. Louis Black Authors of Children’s Literature; Shelby Farr, Luxury Body Bar; Rachael Cross, Simply Chic Jewelry; Whitney Jones, Transitional Homes 4 You; Kita Quinn, 1K Digital Memories; Serrita Sydnor and Alicia Cooper, Butterfly Effect G2W; Deanna Tipton, Byrds of Expression LLC; Charlene Williams, C.H.A.R.M.’D; and Charlene Lopez Young, The Fattened Caf. The Missouri Pharmacy Association awarded its 2018 Technician of the Year Award to Melissa Lynn Barker of Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy in Chesterfield. The 2018 St. Louis College of Pharmacy Faculty Member of the Year Award was presented to Erica Crannage. Nicole Gattas of St. Louis College of Pharmacy received the 2018 Generation Rx Champions Award for her work fighting prescription drug misuse.

$5 million: World Wide Technology, Centene, UMB Bank, Siteman Cancer Center, Edward Jones, Ameren and Lodging Hospitality Management. The American Cancer Society CEOs Against Cancer of Missouri — St. Louis Chapter is spearheading the fundraising, led by campaign chair Jim Kavanaugh, vice-chairman of the St. Louis chapter and co-founder and CEO of World Wide Technology in Maryland Heights. In addition to Kavanaugh, the group is led by Steve O’Loughlin, president of Lodging Hospitality Management and Dave Peacock, president and COO of Schnuck Markets. Last year, Hope Lodge’s St. Louis facility welcomed more than 1,300 guests and their caregivers, saving them more than

A capital campaign is raising funds to build a new Hope Lodge at 4215 Lindell Boulevard.

$1.5 million in lodging expenses, according to the American Cancer Society. “Most of our guests come from communities across Missouri and Illinois, but we’ve welcomed guests from more than 30 other locations across the country and world,” Jason McClelland, senior direc-

tor of regional corporate relations at the American Cancer Society, said in a statement. “In the next 10 years, we anticipate as many as 13,000 patients and caregivers will need to stay at our Hope Lodge, and we need to ensure our facility is capable of meeting that demand.”

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Connelly-Bowen named executive director of Community Builders

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Jenny Connelly-Bowen was promoted to executive director of the Community Builders Network of Metro St. Louis. CBN is a coalition of more than 70 community building organizations comprising lenders, philanthropic organizations, nonprofits, private developers and government entities. It was founded in 2011. ConnellyConnelly-Bowen is Bowen the group’s first executive director. She previously served as a community development specialist. She has a master’s degree in public policy administration from the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

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HELPING OUT The Enterprise Rent-A-Car Foundation donated $500,000 to the American Red Cross to support hurricane relief efforts in the Southeast. World Finance and its parent company, World Acceptance Corp., announced a $75,000 donation to help alleviate hunger in three of the cities — St. Louis, New Orleans and Greenville, S.C. — where the company has operations.

MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS Gold Block Ventures, a Denver-based real estate investment and development firm, along with partners Reiter & Associates and Chase Properties Ltd., acquired the New Town Apartments in St. Charles,

MILESTONES 4M Building Solutions is celebrating 40 years in business.

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PROJECTS Contegra Construction Co. completed the $3.2 million Timberlake Village Retail Center in Edwardsville. The shopping center was developed by Kamadulski Crays Fischer LLC and features Kyoto Japanese Steakhouse as the anchor tenant. Sysco completed a 75,000-square-foot addition of its St. Charles facility to increase its capacity to store and ship frozen and cold foods.

RECOGNITION Luanne Cundiff, president and CEO of First State Bank of St. Charles, and Patricia Kellerhals, executive vice president and director of retail banking at Commerce Bank, were named to American Banker’s 2018 Women to Watch List.

BUSINESS CALENDAR SATURDAY SMALL BUSINESS • Small Business Majority, along with the EDC Business and Community Partners, celebrates National Women’s Small Business Month with this workshop on empowering women in small business. • 8:30 a.m.-noon; EDC Business and Community Partners, 5988 Mid Rivers Mall Drive, St. Peters • Free; register at https://bit.ly/2yJTy7F MONDAY SMALL BUSINESS • Small Business Majority, in partnership with the City of St. Louis’ Office of Financial Empowerment, is celebrating National Women’s Small Business Month with this presentation on accessing capital and building credit and wealth for women in small business. • 9-11:30 a.m., St. Louis City Hall, Room 220, 1200 Market Street, St. Louis • Free; register at https://bit.ly/2CpaOCu

TUESDAY ECONOMY • The Missouri Council on Economic Education’s annual St. Louis Economic Outlook Luncheon features a panel discussion on the future of St. Louis’ economy. • 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., VUE 17, 1034 South Brentwood Boulevard, Richmond Heights • $100; register at https://bit.ly/2yo8xVt WEDNESDAY NETWORKING • St. Louis Business Expo and Business Growth Conference. • 11 a.m.-5 p.m. St. Charles Convention Center, 1 Convention Plaza, St. Charles • Free; register at https://www.stlouisbusinessexpo. com/register/

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SSM Health named Michael Richards as system vice president, government affairs and public policy. Tammy Keesey was named director of patient care services/nurse executive at Shriners Hospitals for Children-St. Louis. Mary Jones, Patrick Serio and Eva Harris joined 4M Building Solutions as account managers. Jon Wolfe was promoted to operational support team manager. McCormack Baron Salazar hired Gary Buechler as chief operating officer. Michael Duffy was promoted to chief investment officer of MBS’ holding company, MBA Properties Inc. Christie Brinkman joined Castle Contracting LLC as business development manager. Samantha Shadrach was appointed director of human resources for St. Charles County. Nonyameko H. Waddell joined Kwame Building Group Inc. as vice president. Black Twig Marketing + Communications added Andy Teague as senior account executive. Manor Real Estate hired Adam Brandvein as director of acquisitions. Purk & Associates promoted T.J. Hoeferlin to principal, assurance services; Taylor Luetkemeyer to tax manager; and Chris Murphy to senior associate. Danna McKitrick PC added Joshua S. Rose to the litigation team. Winco Windows promoted Kurtis Suellentrop to vice president, sales and marketing. Wesley Rarick joined Argos Capital Partners LLC as managing director.


MARKET WATCH

10.19.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed broadly lower Thursday, extending the market’s recent skid as investors increasingly worry about future economic growth. Traders continued to sell shares in technology and internet stocks, and in companies that rely on consumer spending.

Snap-On

85

160

60

40

80

140

50

35

A S 52-week range

O

A S 52-week range

O $72.87

Close: 2,768.78 Change: -40.43 (-1.4%)

2,680

A S 52-week range

$62.35

Vol.: 13.8m (3.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $7.2 b

10 DAYS

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Dec 18 Nov 18 Dec 18

370.75 863.50 513

-3.50 -22.25 -4.50

Wheat

2,960

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

26,400

2,880

Feeder cattle

25,600

2,800

Live cattle

24,800

2,720

24,000

2,640

Oct 18 Oct 18 Dec 18 Oct 18 Oct 18

155.25 113.07 52.30 15.55 273.75

+1.18 +.15 -2.40 -.05 -2.95

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Nov 18 Dec 18 Jan 19

78.05 122.05 25.29

+.13 -.50 +.01

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Nov 18 Nov 18 Nov 18 Nov 18

68.65 1.8911 229.49 3.198

-1.10 -.0276 -1.62 -.122

Hogs

A

M

J

J

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,396 2,233 664 2228 19 149

3,560 3,273 639 2173 8 227

S

2,560

O

Copper

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

A

Milk

HIGH 25691.46 10675.09 738.86 12601.79 7616.86 2806.04 1911.01 29014.66 1588.74

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

LOW 25236.01 10373.43 730.93 12397.25 7452.46 2755.18 1879.24 28492.06 1555.57

CLOSE 25379.45 10404.24 734.83 12445.48 7485.14 2768.78 1884.59 28622.13 1560.75

CHG. -327.23 -279.58 +1.30 -167.57 -157.56 -40.43 -28.83 -434.09 -28.85

%CHG. WK -1.27% s -2.62% s +0.18% s -1.33% s -2.06% s -1.44% s -1.51% s -1.49% s -1.82% s

MO QTR t s t t s s t t t t t t t t t t t t

YTD +2.67% -1.96% +1.58% -2.84% +8.43% +3.56% -0.84% +2.98% +1.64%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

30.13

39.32 32.50

-.07 -0.2 -16.4

Aegion Corp

AEGN

21.16

28.19 23.37

-.72 -3.0

Amdocs

DOX

60.50

71.72 63.30 +.12 +0.2

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

67.06 64.94 +.18 +0.3 +10.1 +9.3 23 1.90f Huttig Building Prod HBP 48.06 46.32

American Railcar

ARII

34.76

ABInBev

BUD

83.55 126.50 83.42

Arch Coal

ARCH

69.36 102.61 93.04 -4.32 -4.4

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

3.98

11.93

-4.6

6

-8.1 +6.2 20 -3.3

-2.9 17

-.94 -2.0 +11.2 +24.2

6

-0.1 +35.7

9

4.20 +.03 +0.7 -48.8 -59.0 dd

Bank of America

BAC

25.81

33.05 28.25

BDC

53.65

87.15 62.74 -1.50 -2.3 -18.7 -23.7 12

Boeing

BA

-.65 -2.2

10.45

8.10

1.00 Home Depot 1.60 Lee Enterprises 1.60 Mallinckrodt plc ... MasterCard

-4.3 +12.3 13 0.60f McDonald’s

254.50 394.28 359.35 -6.15 -1.7 +21.9 +43.9 33 7.25

... General Motors

-.29 -0.3 -25.2 -30.2 21 3.19e Lowes

Belden Inc

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

2.00 FutureFuel

-.24 -2.9 -12.0 +1.1 25

0.20 Olin

52-WK LO HI 11.32

18.97 16.19

-.19 -1.2 +14.9 +8.7 20 0.24a

31.49

46.76 31.08

-.85 -2.7 -24.2 -25.7 dd

160.53 215.43 180.44 -4.73 -2.6

LEE MNK

3.63 +.05 +1.4 -45.4 -53.4 dd

...

1.95

3.30

2.81

...

11.65

36.65 27.20

146.84 178.70 166.81 +.04

-.43 -1.9 -36.6 -31.7

6.84 Peabody Energy

BTU

28.46

47.84 35.86

-.24 -0.7

... Peak Resorts

SKIS

4.25

7

0.80

-8.9 +25.8

0.52

-1.9 +17.5 dd

0.28

31.09 26.09 +.07 +0.3 +36.8 +31.8 42

...

5.78

5.30 +.06 +1.1

-.82 -2.4

-0.7 +23.1 15

0.28 Perficient

PRFT

17.65

-.65 -1.0

+7.2 +8.6 30

1.04 Post Holdings

POST

70.66 101.43 94.96

89.08 148.24 145.90 +.54 +0.4 +44.6 +55.0 22 +4.8 +12.8 20

Citigroup

C

64.38

80.70 68.62 -1.22 -1.7

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

52.07

72.55 63.00

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

72.50 44.30 -1.47 -3.2 -25.4 -35.4 14

Emerson

EMR

57.47

79.70 72.44 -1.56 -2.1

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

65.57 59.28 -2.03 -3.3 +23.6 +35.3 21

-7.8

RGA RELV

0.04 Spire Inc

-1.3 12 1.80f Stifel Financial

-.56 -0.9 +12.8 +19.9 16 0.94f Target Corp.

-.98 -2.0

+3.9 +16.0 23

Enterprise Financial EFSC

41.45

58.15 48.60

Esco Technologies

ESE

51.55

70.20 62.09 -1.10 -1.7

Express Scripts

ESRX

55.80

97.22 96.15 +.38 +0.4 +28.8 +67.4 12

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.28

4.71

... Reinsurance Gp ... Reliv

... UPS B

3.83 +.03 +0.8 -12.4

-4.1 dd

8.44

4.97 +.27 +5.7

-2.7 12 2.00f

+4.2 -20.3 dd

SR

60.09

82.85 73.99 +.11 +0.1

SF

47.29

68.76 47.84 -1.28 -2.6 -19.7

TGT

54.04

90.39 83.36 -1.06 -1.3 +27.8 +44.5 15

UPS

101.45 135.53 114.73 -3.28 -2.8

-1.5

...

-0.4 21

3.64

-.77 -1.5

-2.7 +0.5 14

1.20

1.16 US Steel

X

24.82

47.64 27.92

-.27 -1.0 -20.7 +6.6 16

0.20

VZ

43.97

55.90 54.65 +.69 +1.3

WMT

81.78 109.98 96.17

-.39 -0.4

-2.6 +14.7 23 2.08f

-.40 -0.5

+5.5 +16.7 14 1.76f

+3.2 +16.4

7 2.41f

WBA

59.07

80.68 76.58

WFC

50.26

66.31 53.10 -1.36 -2.5 -12.5 +5.4 13 1.72f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Remaining Shop ’n Save stores to close • Supervalu said Thursday it has been unable to find a buyer for its remaining 16 area Shop ’n Save stores, and they will be closed in mid-November. The move is expected to result in the layoff of more than 1,300 Shop ’n Save cashiers, stockers and other employees. The store closings were expected after Supervalu announced the sale of 19 St. Louis area Shop ’n Save stores to Schnuck Markets. The acquired stores have since been rebranded as Schnucks stores. In addition to the store closings, Supervalu also will close a distribution center on Hazelwood Avenue. Caleres to acquire Vionic Group • Caleres, the Clayton-based footwear conglomerate, said Thursday it plans to acquire Vionic Group — a company that specializes in “stylish, supportive footwear” — for $360 million. The move further expands Caleres’ stable of shoe brands, and provides “additional access to the growing contemporary comfort footwear category,” according to a press release announcing the deal. Caleres said that more details would be disclosed on its upcoming conference call about third-quarter earnings. It said Vionic “derived approximately 25 percent of sales via e-commerce sites over the past 12 months.” ABB weighs possible sale of Power Grids unit • ABB is exploring a sale of its Power Grids business, Reuters reported Thursday, citing three sources familiar with the matter. A decision is likely by early next year, the sources said. ABB declined to comment. ABB’s St. Louis plant made transformers for its Power Grids unit for decades until last year, when the company announced it would lay off some 120 people there as part of a shift of production jobs to other countries and locations in the U.S. It said it would retain engineering and service jobs there. ABB also employs some 875 people at a transformer plant in Jefferson City. Private equity firms eye Acadia Healthcare • Acadia Healthcare Co. Inc., an operator of behavioral health centers, is in talks with private equity firms about selling itself, Reuters reported Thursday, citing sources familiar with the matter. The buyout talks involving Acadia underscore the renewed interest by private equity firms in the sector, following U.S. legislative reforms that expanded insurance coverage for behavioral health and substance abuse treatment. KKR & Co. Inc. and TPG Global are

among the private equity firms that have approached Acadia recently to express interest in acquiring it, the sources said, cautioning there is no certainty of a deal. The companies declined to comment. The Franklin, Tenn.-based company operates a network of 585 behavioral health care facilities with about 17,900 beds in 40 states, including Missouri. Prime Package and Label acquired • Maryland Heights-based Prime Package and Label has been acquired by Connecticut-based Brook & Whittle, the companies announced Thursday. Prime Package and Label makes labels for consumer products and food and beverages as well as coupons. It operates a facility here and in Nashville, Tenn., and employs about 185 people, according to its website. Founded by Mario Gleijeses and Jim Traube in 1994, it was known as LithoFlex Corp. before becoming Prime Package and Label in 2001. Traube will continue to be responsible for Prime Package and Label’s day-today operations along with Jay Olendorff, general manager. Transaction financials were not disclosed. “Prime increases Brook & Whittle’s presence in personal care and household and provides a Midwestern and Southeastern manufacturing footprint that allows us to serve a larger customer base more effectively,” said Don Sturdivant, chairman of Brook & Whittle and operating partner at its parent, New York private equity firm Snow Phipps. Prime is the first add-on acquisition that Brook & Whittle will have completed since Snow Phipps’ initial investment in October 2017. Invesco to buy OppenheimerFunds • Invesco Ltd. said Thursday it has agreed to buy rival Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co.’s OppenheimerFunds Inc. unit for $5.7 billion. The deal would increase Atlantabased Invesco’s assets under management to more than $1.2 trillion as OppenheimerFunds manages more than $246 billion in assets. The transaction is the latest consolidation in the asset management industry, which is experiencing intense pressure on revenues as investors flock to low-fee, passive index and exchange-traded funds. The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of 2019. MassMutual will become a significant shareholder in Invesco with about a 15.5 percent stake. From staff and wire reports

Silver

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note was unchanged at 3.17 percent Thursday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

+2.80 -.06 -9.10

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.25 4.75 4.25

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.30 2.46 2.65 2.86 3.02 3.11 3.17 3.36

... ... ... -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 ... +0.02

1.09 1.24 1.41 1.56 1.99 2.19 2.35 2.85

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS 2.13 1.63 1.13

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.23 3.58 6.54 4.13 4.21 1.06

... +0.02 +0.01 +0.04 +0.02 +0.02

1.60 2.56 5.42 3.54 3.13 .49

GlobalMarkets

2.56

-3.7 +3.3 19

58.50 52.13

... Walgreen Boots

CHG

CLOSE

1226.50 14.53 827.80

Gold

-3.0 15 0.48f

48.49

0.13 Wells Fargo

PreciousMetals

...

USB

0.32 WalMart

.0276 .7116 .2717 1.3122 .7685 .1443 1.1507 .0136 .2743 .008890 .053078 .0153 .0705 .000887 1.0051

2.25

1.94 US Bancorp

+7.6 +17.7 15 0.48f Verizon +3.1 +5.7 19

-.99 -1.0 +19.9 +11.2 25

131.72 165.12 135.18 -2.07 -1.5 -13.3 3.72

1.00

-3.1 +3.3 25 4.64f

38.84 22.55

41.09 33.26

163.02 227.13 212.74 +1.54 +0.7

...

22.90

74.49 62.40

CI

...

MCD OLN

26.54

Cigna

-.24 -0.9 +20.6 -15.2

140.61 225.35 203.62 -3.76 -1.8 +34.5 +42.8 47

54.37

-5.3 -10.6 cc

6

+7.3 +28.4 21 1.92f

MA

CAL CNC

-.07 -2.4 +19.6 +25.2

75.36 117.70 99.71 -2.73 -2.7

CASS

CHTR 250.10 396.64 318.10 -1.73 -0.5

4.12

7.75

Caleres Inc. Centene Corp.

PREV

.0272 .7107 .2696 1.3032 .7647 .1441 1.1465 .0136 .2733 .008913 .052308 .0152 .0692 .000878 1.0045

NEW YORK

1.52

-4.8 +15.8 23

3.08

Cass Info. Systems Charter

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

FF

LOW

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Platinum

GM HD

$111.25

Interestrates Interestrates

TKR

O

Vol.: 11.1m (2.1x avg.) PE: 21.2 Mkt. Cap: $136.1 b Yield: 5.2%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

A S 52-week range

ExchangeRates

CHICAGO BOT

Soybeans

J

$76.21

PE: ... Yield: ...

27,200

23,200

75

O

Futures

S&P 500

2,800

J

$35.13

Vol.: 13.5m (9.0x avg.) PE: 32.1 Mkt. Cap: $14.3 b Yield: 0.1%

2,920

10 DAYS

J

$51.07

$189.46

Close: 25,379.45 Change: -327.23 (-1.3%)

24,880

$90

45

J

PM

Close: $87.52 2.96 or 3.5% The cigarette company’s profit and adjusted revenue surpassed Wall Street expectations.

70

Dow Jones industrials

25,780

Philip Morris

AA

Close: $38.85 2.15 or 5.9% The aluminum producer topped expectations in the third quarter and said it will buy back $200 million in stock. $50

180

Vol.: 3.2m (5.6x avg.) PE: 14.5 Mkt. Cap: $8.5 b Yield: 2.2%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Alcoa

TXT

Close: $57.49 -7.29 or -11.3% The aircraft maker said its industrial and aerospace units weakened in the third quarter, leading to disappointing results. $80

$200

$141.63

26,680

Textron

SNA

Close: $151.47 -16.10 or -9.6% The tool and diagnostic products maker reported less revenue than analysts expected.

INDEX

LAST

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

2768.78 11589.21 7026.99 25454.55 5116.79 47024.47 22658.16 83847.12 15404.13 8779.18

CHG

CHG

YTD

-40.43 -125.82 -27.61 -7.71 -28.15 -863.49 -182.96 -1916.83 -125.77 +28.83

-1.44% -1.07% -0.39% -0.03% -0.55% -1.80% -0.80% -2.23% -0.81% +0.33%

+3.56% -10.28% -8.60% -14.92% -3.68% -4.72% -0.47% +9.74% -4.97% -6.42%

Stocks sink on weak industrial earnings; tech skid resumes BY MARLEY JAY associated Press

NEW YORK • U.S. stocks slumped again Thursday as investors continued to sell shares of technology and internet companies, industrials, and companies that rely on consumer spending. Several industrial companies tumbled after releasing weak quarterly reports, and European stocks also fell as European Union leaders criticized Italy’s spending plans. At the start of trading, stocks took small losses as bond prices fell and interest rates spiked. While the gain in interest rates didn’t last, stocks turned lower late in the morning, and by the end of the day they had wiped away most of their big rally from Tuesday. Stocks have skidded over the last two weeks, and there are signs investors are worried about future economic growth. The S&P 500 has fallen 5.5 percent in volatile trading since Oct. 3, and technology, industrial and energy companies have taken some of the biggest losses. Those companies tend to do better when the economy is growing more quickly and consumers and businesses have more money to spend. “If uncertainty starts to creep in around trade or growth, that could be a risk to the recovery in ... corporate spending,” said Jill Carey Hall, senior U.S. equity strategist for Bank of America Merrill Lynch. She said investors will monitor company reports over the next few weeks to learn about their business forecasts and plans. European leaders expressed concern about the Italian government’s proposal to increase spending and widen its budget deficit. European Union budget chief Pierre Moscovici told Italy’s economic minister that the new government’s plans make it unlikely that Italy will be able to reduce its public debt to levels agreed upon by EU countries. The S&P 500 index shed 40.43 points, or 1.4 percent, to 2,768.78. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 327.23 points, or 1.3 percent, to 25,379.45. It was down as much as 470 earlier. The Nasdaq composite sank 157.56 points, or 2.1 percent, to 7,485.14. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks declined 28.85 points, or 1.8 per-

cent, to 1,560.75. Among industrial companies, aircraft maker Textron slid 11.3 percent to $57.49 after its profit and sales fell far short of analyst forecasts. The company said its aerospace and defense business and its industrial business both weakened. Tool and diagnostic equipment company Snap-on lost 9.6 percent to $151.47 after it posted lower revenue than analysts expected. Industrial and basic materials companies have taken bigger losses than any other part of the market over the last month, and one reason is that investors feel they are especially vulnerable in the ongoing trade dispute between the U.S. and China. They’re already dealing with tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, which have increased their costs and can also hurt sales, and if the global economy slows, then manufacturing and construction could slow down, too. Amazon pulled retailers lower as it lost 3.3 percent to $1,770.72. Video game maker Activision Blizzard lost 8.3 percent to $71.81 after it announced early sales numbers from “Call of Duty: Black Ops 4,” and Apple fell 2.3 percent to $216.02. Those are some of the sectors that have fared the worst recently. The stocks that have held up the best include utility and household products companies. They don’t depend as much on economic growth, as consumers are likely to use about the same amount of electricity and buy the same amount of toilet paper or cereal regardless of the state of the economy. The recent gains for those stocks is notable because the market’s slump began when interest rates started rising quickly. Defensive stocks often struggle when interest rates are rising. The companies are known for paying big dividends, similar to bonds, so when rates rise, investors often sell those stocks and buy bonds instead. Carey Hall said that if the economy keeps growing and interest rates rise, investors might not want to choose between growth-oriented stocks or defensive ones. She said companies in the middle might do best, including some industrials, banks and older technology companies. Those companies could still benefit if the economy keeps growing, but they also have enough financial flexibility to raise their dividends to outpace rising interest rates.


BUSINESS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Boeing’s new business seeks to develop brain-like computers Concept forms core of aerospace innovation BY JULIE JOHNSSON Bloomberg

Boeing Co. is creating a new unit to focus on technology that’s seemingly straight out of science fiction, including super-fast computing that mimics the synapses of the human brain and hack-proof communications links based on applied quantum physics. So-called neuromorphic processing and quantum communications, two of the technologies Boeing wants to explore, may seem an odd fit for the world’s largest planemaker. But such concepts increasingly form the core of aerospace innovation, like the networks that may one day manage millions of airborne drones, said Greg Hyslop, Boeing’s chief technology officer. The technology being developed around advanced computing and sensors is going to have a “profound impact” on Boeing, Hyslop said in an interview Wednesday. “We thought it’s time to do this.” The rapid advances in computers and communications are under study by other industrial titans as well. Billionaire Elon Musk’s secretive Neuralink business is developing “brain-machine interfaces to connect humans and computers,” according to its website. Defense contractors Harris Corp. and L3 Technologies Inc. are forming a $33.5 billion behemoth focused on the increasingly complex communications systems embedded in military systems. Chicago-based Boeing is betting that its new unit, known as Disruptive Computing and Networks, will help develop breakthroughs in secure communications and artificial intelligence that bolster its manufacturing — while also honing products for the commercial market. The operation will be based in Southern California, and supported with internal funding by the planemaker, as well as investments made through Boeing HorizonX, the company’s venture capital arm. Hyslop declined to say how much Boeing planned to spend on the advanced computing initiative. As an example of the new technology on the horizon, Hyslop points to the neuromorphic chips that are being developed by HRL Laboratories, the Malibu, Calif.based research center established by Howard Hughes in 1948. The gains to be reaped in processing speed under traditional computer architecture are slowing as researchers reach the physical limits of how many transistors can be squeezed onto a single silicon chip. HRL is working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Pentagon’s research arm, and others to develop computer architecture that operates like a part of a brain and forgoes transistors. HRL, which is jointly controlled by Boeing and General Motors Co., is creating silicon chips that are “wired much like a human brain,” Hyslop said. “It’s trying to mimic how our neurons are connected and interconnected in silicon hardware, and reduce the circuits on this.” Eventually, such chips may be able to perform machine learning instantaneously. Hyslop thinks they could wind up incorporated into Boeing aircraft about a decade from now to support autonomous flying.

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

Bullard says Fed policy raises risk of recession REUTERS

MEMPHIS, TENN. • The Federal Reserve’s

current monetary policy path would raise the risks of recession in an economy where recent, unexpectedly strong growth may start to taper anyway, St. Louis Fed President James Bullard said on Thursday. In remarks to the Economic Club of Memphis, Bullard pointed to a possible next chapter in the central bank’s discussion: What to do if, as expected, the growth rush from recent tax cuts, increased government spending and other positive economic trends begins to fade. The Fed currently expects to continue raising rates until its benchmark overnight lending rate is around 3.40 percent in 2020. As opposed to a mild brake on the economy, Bullard argued that rates that high “would be moving quite a ways into restrictive territory. ... That is where the crux of the debate will be,” as policymakers spar over how aggressively to hold back growth if unemployment remains historically low. Many economists view current growth of around 3 percent and unemployment of 3.7 percent, which is near a 50-year low, as unsustainable and likely to lead to higher inflation. The continued “gradual” rate increases are regarded as insurance against that possibility. But Bullard has taken a different tack, arguing that the Fed rate hikes of the past roughly two years have only been possible because the economy outperformed the central bank’s outlook. “The economy keeps surprising to the upside,” Bullard said. “It has rationalized the (Fed’s) path.”

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

James Bullard, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Like other Fed officials, he said he sees no reason to believe the underlying trend growth has risen beyond the range of 1.7 percent to 2.1 percent that policymakers estimate as the economy’s current potential. As a result, Bullard said the federal funds rate should stay where it is currently, at a range of between 2.00 percent and 2.25 percent, until something clearly changes for better or worse. Along with low unemployment, inflation is roughly at the Fed’s 2 percent target. Further rate increases “would be taking

somewhat more recession risk than otherwise” unless the economy continues to outperform, he said. The possibility of a recession in the next year or two has become a focus of debate as the current U.S. recovery nears the onedecade mark. Bullard also feels the Fed should not “pencil in” rate increases far into the future because of the uncertainty around forecasts, and the confusion that can cause among investors and households. Bullard is not currently on the Fed’s ratesetting committee but will join it in 2019.

GLPI will still hold lien on Lumière under loan terms CASINO • FROM B1

RENDERING VIA ST. LOUIS DEVELOPMENT CORP.

A Fairfield Inn and Suites is being built at the site of the shuttered Harry’s Restaurant and Bar on Market Street downtown.

Fairfield Inn will sit next to redesigned I-64 interchange HOTEL • FROM B1

The project has been a long time coming. Equis first zeroed in on the site shortly after Harry’s Restaurant closed in early 2016. Plans for an MLS stadium over the next year — an effort that ultimately stalled after voters rejected a piece of its public financing — complicated Equis’ preparations. Then, it took some time for financing to come together. But Mullenix said the company closed on financing at the end of August with Royal Banks of Missouri. It has also partnering with Stonehill Strategic Capital out of Atlanta to fund the development. St. Louis chipped in with a five-year property tax abatement of 90 percent and a sales tax exemption on construction materials. The Board of Aldermen passed in March a Community Improvement District allowing a 1 percent sales tax on the site to go toward the project. And it will sit right next to a newly designed interchange of Highway 40 (Interstate 64) and Jefferson Avenue, provid-

ing access in all directions. That’s a key part of the infrastructure work promised to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, which is building a massive $1.7 billion facility with more than 3,000 employees just a mile to the north. Between that, work on an aquarium next door at Union Station, plans to expand America’s Center convention complex, and ever-growing hospital campuses at St. Louis University and Washington University just down the highway, Mullenix thinks the Fairfield Inn will be a success. Equis has experience nearby, having developed the Residence Inn at Jefferson Avenue and Highway 40, which Mullenix said they sold in 2014. He said Equis wanted to get back into downtown and plans to hold this property for a long time. “There’s just a lot of good things happening,” he said. “This is a deal where you really got to have a long-term view.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

billion in cash in the Pinnacle deal, according to a securities filing. And two weeks ago, Eldorado Resorts Inc. finalized its $1.85 billion deal for Tropicana Entertainment, the former owner of Lumière Place in downtown St. Louis. As part of that deal, GLPI, which leases real estate to casino operators, was going to pay $1.21 billion for substantially all of Tropicana’s real estate and lease it to Reno, Nev.-based Eldorado. But Missouri regulators balked, and to close the deal, GLPI entered into an agreement with the Missouri Gaming Commission to lend Eldorado $246 million to purchase Lumière Place’s real estate. GLPI, which was spun off from Penn National in 2013 and also founded by Peter Carlino, will still hold a lien on the property under a loan due in two years, with the possibility of three one-year extensions. GLPI became the landlord for Pinnacle’s casinos in 2016. Missouri regulators approved that year the transfer of the Ameristar Kansas City, Ameristar St. Charles, and River City properties to GLPI (River City’s real estate in Lemay is technically owned by the St. Louis County Port Authority, and GLPI has a 99-year lease for the land for which it pays some $5 million annually into a special fund). GLPI is already the landlord for the Casino Queen, operated by CQ Holding Company, and Ameristar St. Charles, now operated by Boyd. Four operators now run the area’s casinos: Penn National (Argosy, Hollywood, River City), Eldorado (Lumière), CQ Holding Company (Casino Queen) and Boyd (Ameristar). Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


BUSINESS

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

U.S. mortgage industry faces job losses as refinancing dries up BY DAVID HENRY reuters

NEW YORK • With mortgage applica-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

People sit at electronic slot machines recently at the Scientific Games booth during the Global Gaming Expo in Las Vegas.

Sports leagues could see lots of cash from legal betting BY HILARY RUSS reuters

NEW YORK • The four major U.S. professional sports leagues could reap a combined $4.2 billion annually as a result of legal sports betting, most of it indirectly from increased fan engagement, according to a casino industry survey released Thursday. The National Football League stands to make the most, with a projected $2.33 billion of additional annual revenue, according to the study seen by Reuters. Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League would account for the rest. The Nielsen Sports survey was commissioned by the American Gaming Association, which represents the casino industry. The findings could add fuel to a longsimmering feud between the gaming industry and American sports leagues over whether to share revenue.

For years, the leagues fought states’ efforts to legalize sports betting, arguing that it would lead to game-fixing and ruin integrity. But in May, the U.S. Supreme Court threw out a federal ban against sports betting, paving the way for any state to legalize, regulate and tax the activity. Since then, the leagues have sought to glean a portion of the coming windfall. Leagues say legalization means they need to fund additional integrity measures, and that they deserve a portion of wagers because there would be nothing to bet on without their players, their stadiums and the games they put on. Major League Baseball, for instance, has said it wants 1 percent of the total amount of money bet, as a so-called “integrity fee.” Lawmakers in New Jersey, the first major state outside of Nevada to roll out sports betting, flatly rejected that idea. The study found that $596 million of leagues’ total increased annual revenue

would come from gaming services spending on television advertising, $267 million from sponsorship deals with the sports betting industry and $89 million from data and video revenue. But the rest would come if more fans — attracted by the appeal of being able to lay bets — watch games and are drawn into stadiums. The biggest portion of the total increase — nearly $3.3 billion — would come from that indirect revenue, including media rights and more merchandise and ticket sales. For the NFL alone, indirect revenue could grow 13.4 percent to $14.8 billion of annual revenue, the report said. The study has a margin of error of 3 percentage points and surveyed more than 1,000 adult sports fans and those who were self-identified bettors nationwide, asking how a national legal market would affect sports consumption habits. The national market would need to include at least 100 million people for the leagues to fully benefit, Nielsen estimated.

As steelmakers raise their prices, buyers order less NICKLAUS • FROM B1

The 25 percent tariff gave steelmakers a license to raise prices, and they did. Hot-rolled coil, the kind of steel used in auto bodies, went from $660 a ton in early January to $919 in mid-July. It’s now down to $820, and analysts think it has farther to fall. “Flat steel prices have started declining from their peaks,” said an August report from Morgan Stanley analyst Piyush Sood, “and we see gradual price erosion in the coming months/years.” Added production capacity from U.S. Steel and others helped push prices lower, and they may erode more if the Trump administration starts granting exemptions to the tariffs. Analysts also note uncertainty about how long the tariffs will last; Sood expects them to be eased in mid-2019. Customers, predictably, have reacted to high prices by ordering less steel. Joe Terril, president of the Terril & Co. investment firm in Sunset Hills, says steel stocks

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Senior melt operator Randy Feltmeyer inspects a ladle after molten hot iron was emptied from it into vessel of scrap at the U.S. Steel Granite City Works plant in Granite City in June. Feltmeyer has worked at the steel plant in Granite City for 30 years.

are down “mainly because the higher price of steel is destroying demand.” In the short run, Terril says, steel users

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able and will continue to add new jobs,” he said. Dorsey, who said he came to St. Louis three to four times a year, was at Square’s Cortex innovation district office, at 4260 Forest Park Avenue, to introduce Square’s newest product, the Square Terminal. The all-in-one card processing device will allow merchants to ring up sales, accept multiple forms of payment and print receipts. It connects to Wi-Fi so merchants can take the device to a diner’s table, for example, and features a touchscreen about the size of an iPhone. Square’s Head of Hardware Jesse Dorogusker said the device, which will cost $399, was faster than point-of-sale terminals used by most retailers, processing a transaction in about two seconds as opposed to the industry average of up to 15 seconds. The device also charges a flat 2.6 percent transaction fee on top of a 10-cent charge for every payment. Sellers who are new to Square qualify for a $300 processing credit that would drive the cost down to $99. The device has been beta tested with a few dozen small businesses nationally, including DeMun Professional Cleaners in St. Louis. Carrie Green, owner of the cleaners at 726 De Mun Avenue, said the device was

tions falling to their lowest since late2014, the U.S. home lending industry is facing a major overhaul in how it works and manages staffing levels. Call-center employees who handle customer refinance requests are the most vulnerable as rates have started to climb, analysts said. Those applications have fallen to their lowest level since late 2000, according to a seasonally adjusted index by the Mortgage Bankers Association. Refinancing made up about 37 percent of mortgage originations in the first quarter of this year, down from 75 percent at its peak in 2012. That decline has come as interest rates on most 30-year mortgages has climbed to 5.1 percent, the highest since February 2011. Homeowners who have borrowed since then lack the opportunity to save money by refinancing. “We’re going to see people losing their jobs in this industry because of the loss of refinance business,” said Joseph Murin, chairman of JJAM Financial Services LLC and a 46-year veteran of the mortgage business. The industry employs about 350,000 people, the same as in 2002, according to government labor data gathered by the MBA. Employment reached 500,000 at its peak during the housing bubble. JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Wells Fargo & Co. were the two largest U.S. mortgage lenders during the first six months of this year, representing 7 percent of the market, according to Inside Mortgage Finance. The two recently said they had cut 400 and 600 mortgage jobs, respectively. Still, the industry is overstaffed, chief financial officers of the two banks said during earnings conference calls with analysts on Friday. “There’s excess capacity in the market right now,” said JPMorgan CFO Marianne Lake. “It will clear itself over the course of the coming months.”

construction equipment and steel girders will balk at a huge price increase. In the long run, steel-using firms will move production overseas — or they’ll lose market share to competitors that don’t have to pay the tariff. Mid-Continent Nail, the Mexican-owned manufacturer in Poplar Bluff, Mo., says it’s already losing business to foreign nail producers. Fenton-based Laclede Chain says the same thing is happening with imported chain. Terril wouldn’t recommend investing in an industry solely because it was about to benefit from government protection. “If anything, you’d probably want to go the opposite way,” he said. “If they need government intervention to survive, the fundamentals of the industry must be so poor I don’t want anything to do with it.” To be sure, some people involved in the steel industry are benefiting from the tariffs. Union workers at U.S. Steel reportedly are getting raises totaling 14 percent over four years in a new contract, more than double the annual wage increase they got in their previous contract. Several hundred workers in Granite City also are back on the job, and that’s a good thing. The stock market, though, seems to think the tariffs’ benefits for the industry will be far less than advertised. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

faster and less clunky than her previous point-of-sale terminal. “Customers also like that we can accept mobile payments, too,” she said. It’s the first product-launching that Square has hosted in St. Louis, which Dorsey said was symbolic of its commitment to the city. Dorsey said he met with St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson during his trip here and asked her where the city needed investment. Krewson told Dorsey, who also serves as chief executive of Twitter, he could be of most help by adding jobs downtown. Dorsey said that as Square continued to grow, it could be expected that the company would be adding more jobs and office space in St. Louis, in addition to its office in Cortex. The company has previously been connected to downtown buildings such as the Railway Exchange, at 615 Olive, as a potential tenant. And another native St. Louisan, Jim McKelvey, Dorsey’s co-founder at Square who now serves as a board member, recently acquired the St. Louis Post-Dispatch headquarters building at 900 North Tucker Boulevard, with plans of renovating the six-story, 235,000-squarefoot building and leasing out three of the floors to new tenants. The PostDispatch is remaining on two floors of the building as a tenant. Dorsey didn’t detail where Square could expand, noting the company was looking all over the city. “I’m committed to the city,” he said.


BUSINESS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

Sears’ ‘radical’ past changed South How company’s mail-order catalogs subverted the racial hierarchy of Jim Crow era BY ANTONIA NOORI FARZAN Washington Post

The announcement early Monday that Sears would file for bankruptcy and close 142 stores — including a Kmart in Florissant — came as little surprise to anyone who has followed the retail giant’s collapse in recent years. Still, the news inspired a wave of nostalgia for a company that sold an ideal of middleclass life to generations of Americans. A lesser-known aspect of Sears’ 125-year history, however, is how the company revolutionized rural black Southerners’ shopping patterns in the late 19th century, subverting racial hierarchies by allowing them to make purchases by mail or over the phone and avoid the blatant racism that they faced at small country stores. “What most people don’t know is just how radical the catalog was in the era of Jim Crow,” Louis Hyman, an associate professor of history at Cornell University, wrote in a Twitter thread that was shared more than 7,000 times Monday in the wake of the news of Sears’ demise. By allowing African-Americans in Southern states to avoid price-gouging and condescending treatment at their local stores, he wrote, the catalog “undermined white supremacy in the rural South.” As historians of the Jim Crow era have documented, buying everyday household goods was often an exercise in humiliation for African-Americans living in the South. Before the advent of the mail-order catalog, rural black Southerners typically only had the option of shopping at white-owned general stores — often run by the owner of the same farm where they worked as sharecroppers. Those store owners frequently determined what AfricanAmericans could buy by limiting how much credit they would extend. While country stores were one of the few places where whites and blacks routinely mingled, store owners fiercely defended the white supremacist order by making black customers wait until every white customer had been served and forcing them to buy lower-quality goods. In 1894, Sears, Roebuck and Co. began sending out 322-page illustrated catalogs. The year before, Congress had passed the Rural Free Delivery Act, making it possible for the Chicago-based retailer to easily reach communities across the rural South. Notably, the company made an effort to accommodate customers who were barely literate, enacting a policy that the company would

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSEMARY THORNTON

The original depiction of the “Roanoke” home from Sears, Roebuck & Co. catalog.

fill any order it received regardless of the format. But even more importantly, the catalog format allowed for anonymity, ensuring that black customers and white customers would be treated the same way. There isn’t enough data available to determine exactly how much black customers contributed to Sears’ bottom line during the Jim Crow years. And historians have noted that buying from the catalogs was only an option for African-Americans who had access to a phone and enough cash on hand to place an order. Still, Southern merchants clearly felt threatened by the competition from mail-order department stores: As catalogs for Sears and Montgomery Ward made their way into more and more homes, local storekeepers began circulating rumors that the companies were run by black men. By the turn of the century, some merchants were even encouraging people to bring in their catalogs for Saturday night bonfires, and offering bounties of up to $50 for people who collected the most “Wish Books,” historians Stuart and Elizabeth Ewen wrote in “Channels of Desire: Mass Images and the Shaping of American Consciousness.” In response, Sears published photos of

its founders to prove that they were white, while Ward offered a $100 reward in exchange the name of the person who had started a rumor that he had mixed black and white ancestry. Meanwhile, in the ensuing decades, Julius Rosenwald, who had become a part-owner of the company after Alvah Roebuck sold his share of the business in 1895, became a well-known philanthropist to the black community. He donated $4.3 million — the equivalent of more than $75 million today — to open nearly 5,000 “Rosenwald schools” in the rural South between 1912 and 1932, when he died. “These schools were in very, very rural areas, where many AfricanAmerican kids did not go to school. If they went to school, they went to a very ramshackle building,” writer Stephanie Deutsch, who published a book on the history of the schools, told The Washington Post in 2015. “These schools were new and modern, with big tall windows, and lots of light streaming in. They felt special, because they were new and they were theirs.” Though most Rosenwald schools shut down after Brown v. Board of Education mandated an end to segregation, one of every three black children in the South attended a Rosenwald school during the

GOT A STORY TIP? Have the scoop on a local news story? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. Tips are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous. stltoday.com/newstips

1930s. Among the schools’ notable alumni were poet Maya Angelou and Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga. Rosenwald, the son of Jewish immigrants from Germany, became a friend of Booker T. Washington and served on the board of the Tuskegee Institute. He also helped fund black YMCAs and YWCAs. And he provided financial support to black artists and

Women’s hats are pictured in a 1907 Sears Roebuck catalog from the shelves of the Chicago Public Library in a photo taken in 1948.

writers, including opera singer Marian Anderson, poet Langston Hughes, photographer Gordon Parks, and writer James Baldwin. Sears only went so far in subverting racial norms. Up until the middle of the 20th century, the company followed Jim Crow laws in its Atlanta department store, meaning that black employees could only work

in warehouse, janitorial and food service positions. Still, the company allowed both blacks and whites to shop there, which wasn’t the case for other stores in the area at the time. And for a significant portion of American history, the Sears catalog offered black shoppers something that they couldn’t find anywhere else: dignity.

THURSDAY, NOV. 1 5:00 - 7:30 P.M. SCHLAFLY TAP ROOM From St. Louis to Jefferson City to Washington, D.C., join our journalists as they take you behind-the-scenes on the campaign trail and share stories about covering both sides of the aisle. Enjoy local brews and find out what it’s like to cover local, state and national politics during this election season.

F E AT U R I N G

Kevin C. Johnson

GIVEAWAY

CHRISTOPHER AVE

CHUCK RAASCH

Political and National Editor

Reporter, national government and politics Washington, DC

CELESTE BOTT Reporter, local government St. Louis

KURT ERICKSON Reporter, state government and politics Jefferson City

MARK SCHLINKMANN Reporter, local government, politics and transportation

JACK SUNTRUP Reporter, state government and politics Jefferson City

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 10.19.2018 • C

SOX HEADED BACK TO THE SERIES

Less talk, more action

Devers’ three-run shot lifts Boston in ALCS clincher. B3

Cardinals face crucial offseason BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A is for accountability. It appears to be the theme of the Cardinals’ offseason. John Mozeliak ladled it out in hearty doses during this week’s meeting with the media. Marcell Ozuna’s delay in treating a shoulder injury was compared to a thirsty man who was

Blues search for winning combo

led to water yet refused to partake. The president of baseball operations described the outfielder as an occasional “liability because of his inability to throw.” Ozuna’s power outages at the plate earned the tag of “frustrating.” Ouch. Carlos Martinez “definitely has to be diligent” in his recovery from an injury-plagued season, and the team is very glad he is sticking around St. Louis, where he is easier to monitor. Interpret CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com.

See FREDERICKSON • Page C4

The Cardinals’ John Mozeliak speaks to media earlier this week.

WORST TO FIRST

Yeo swaps up lines after another loss

Parker finds his niche at tight end

PH O TO cg S B oo Y de CH n@ RI po ST st IAN -d isp GO at O ch DE .c N om

Freshman was recruited for defense

Senior forward JAVON BESS, 13.3 points/game 7.4 reb./game

ASSOCIATED PRESS

POST-DISPATCH

The Canadiens’ Brendan Gallagher is checked by the Blues’ Brayden Schenn on Wednesday.

Daniel Parker Jr. at the Missouri Class 6 football championship in 2017.

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY ANNE ROGERS Special to the Post-Dispatch

TORONTO • No loss is easy to

COLUMBIA, MO. • Don’t ask

digest, but some are tougher than others. These days, the Blues know better than most. They’ve lost twice in overtime, failed to hold third period leads three times and been plagued with late-game breakdowns. They gave up the game-winner with 11 seconds left in regulation in Wednesday’s 3-2 loss to Montreal. Lost 5-4 on a breakaway goal in overtime Oct. 6 against Chicago. Lost 4-3 with just nine seconds left in OT Oct. 13 against Chicago. In the midst of one of the worst starts in franchise history, they were 28th overall in the NHL standings Thursday with a 1-3-2 record and four points. Next up is the league’s highest-scoring team, the Toronto Maple Leafs, on Saturday and then it’s off to Winnipeg for a Monday contest at one the NHL’s toughest places to win — Bell MTS Place. “Bottom line, we’re faced with some adversity right now,” coach Mike Yeo said. “For me, this is when we’ll really see what people have to bring. This is when you really say something to your teammates. This is when you really show your character. “Obviously, I’ve gotta do a better job as head coach, making sure we’re prepared to play, making sure we’re ready to play

Daniel Parker Jr. to watch football. The Missouri tight end would much rather be playing. “We talk about football, players in the NFL, and he doesn’t know who we’re talking about,” Missouri tight ends coach Joe Jon Finley said. “He loves football, just not watching, which is interesting.” Finley doesn’t have to worry about Parker not watching film, though. “Our games, I can watch it on film because it’s a different perspective and camera view,” Parker said. “And I had to come in for extra film studies to learn (Missouri offensive coordinator Derek) Dooley’s playbook at first.” Parker has had to spend more time in the film room this season, and not just because he’s a freshman. After recruiting Parker as a defensive end, Missouri asked him to switch to tight end during the last week of preseason camp. He hasn’t switched back. Through six games for Missouri (3-3, 0-3 Southeastern Conference), Parker has been used almost exclusively as an extra blocker on the line of scrimmage or in the backfield. As a freshman learning the nuances of college football, switching positions, let alone moving from defense to offense, was a risk. But Parker had experience.

See BLUES • Page C6 > 6 p.m. Saturday at Maple Leafs, FSM

Soph. guard JORDAN GOODWIN, 11.5 points/game 7.5 reb./game

THE OPENER > 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6 vs. SEMO, FSM Plus

Soph. forward HASAHN FRENCH, 9.3 points/game 7.1 reb./game

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

SLU is picked to win A-10 two years after last-place forecast

BROOKLYN, N.Y. • Travis Ford trav-

eled to New York on a commercial flight late Wednesday after wrapping up practice at St. Louis University. And he wasn’t taking any chances on a travel glitch derailing his attendance at the Billikens’ next workout. So, he had a chartered plane waiting See SLU • Page C4

See MU • Page C5 > 3 p.m. Saturday vs. Memphis, SEC Net.

SPORTS

Is it ever okay to encourage kids to “tough it out”?

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For more information, visit ChildrensMD.org/Sports for trusted health advice from pediatricians who are also moms. ©S

1 M


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 10/20 at Maple Leafs 6 p.m. FSM

Monday 10/22 at Jets 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 10/25 vs. Blue Jackets 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 10/27 vs. Blackhawks 7 p.m. FSM

M 1 • FRIDAY • 10.19.2018

MEDIA VIEWS

Pinion, Conners a net loser

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 10/20 vs. Memphis 3 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 10/27 vs. Kentucky 3 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 11/3 at Florida Time TBA TV TBA

Saturday 11/10 vs. Vanderbilt Time TBA TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 10/20 at Wisconsin 11 a.m. Fox Sports 1

Saturday 10/27 at Maryland 2:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 11/3 vs. Minnesota Time TBA TV TBA

Saturday 11/10 at Nebraska Time TBA TV TBA

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 10/20 Playoffs at Orange County, 9 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 9:55 a.m. Formula One: United States Grand Prix, practice 1, ESPNU 1 p.m. NASCAR: Hollywood Casino 400, practice, NBCSN 1:55 p.m. Formula One: United States Grand Prix, practice 2, ESPNU 2 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Kansas Lottery 300, practice, NBCSN 4 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Kansas Lottery 300, final practice, NBCSN 6 p.m. NASCAR: Hollywood Casino 400, qualifying, NBCSN 7:30 p.m. ARCA: Kansas ARCA 150, FS2 BASEBALL 7:39 p.m. NLCS: Dodgers at Brewers, FS1, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 7 p.m. NBA: Celtics at Raptors, ESPN 7 p.m. NBA: Hawks at Grizzlies, FSM Plus 7:30 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Bucks, FSM 9:40 p.m. NBA: Warriors at Jazz, ESPN FOOTBALL 6 p.m. College: Yale at Pennsylvania, ESPNU 8 p.m. College: Colorado State at Boise State, ESPN2 9 p.m. College: Air Force at UNLV, CBSSN 9 p.m. High school: Chaparral (Ariz.) vs. Pinnacle (Ariz.), ESPNU GOLF 8:30 a.m. European PGA: Andalucia Masters, second round, GOLF 1:30 p.m. Champions: Dominion Energy Charity Classic, first round, GOLF 9 p.m. PGA: The CJ Cup at Nine Bridges, third round, GOLF HOCKEY 6:30 p.m. College: Notre Dame at Nebraska-Omaha, CBSSN 7 p.m. Wild at Stars, NBCSN SOCCER 1:30 p.m. Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Fortuna Dusseldorf, FS2 4 p.m. College: Dartmouth at Columbia, ESPNU TENNIS 11:30 a.m. ATP: Stockholm Open, quarterfinals, Tennis Channel VOLLEYBALL 6 p.m. College women: Maryland at Purdue, BTN 6 p.m. College women: Kentucky at LSU, SEC Network 8 p.m. College women: Nebraska at Wisconsin, BTN

DIGEST Loyola picked to repeat as MVC basketball champ The Loyola Chicago men’s basketball team, which last year swept the Missouri Valley Conference regular-season and tournament titles en route to reaching the NCAA Final Four, has been picked by media, coaches and sports information directors to repeat as conference champs. Loyola’s Clayton Custer was chosen to repeat as conference player of the year, while returning teammates Cameron Krutwig and Marques Townes are preseason second-team selections. Loyola received 29 of 43 first-place votes to land ahead of Illinois State (10) and SIU Carbondale (4) in the preseason poll. Missouri State is picked to finish eighth. Indiana State junior guard Jordan Barnes (CBC) and SIUC senior guard Armon Fletcher (Edwardsville) are first-team picks. See the complete poll and preseason teams on C9. (Staff report) SLU women clinch A-10 soccer crown • St. Louis University’s women’s soccer team wrapped up at least a share of the Atlantic 10 Conference title with a 3-0 road win over Massachusetts on Thursday. Olivia Petit, Annabelle Copeland (Alton Marquette) and Maddie Pokorny (Webster Groves) scored, Courtney Reimer (Duchesne) had two assists and Olivia Silverman posted SLU’s 11th shutout. With a program-best 10th consecutive win, SLU improved to 14-3-1 overall and to 9-0 atop the Atlantic 10 Conference. The Billikens lead Virginia Commonwealth by a game with one to play. UMass is 10-5-1 and 5-3-1. SLU closes out the regular season at 1 p.m. Sunday against visiting George Washington. (News services) Isner advances in Stockholm • John Isner was taken all the way by fellow American Bradley Klahn before winning his first match of the week at the Stockholm Open on Thursday. The top-seeded Isner, who can still qualify for the end-of-season ATP Finals in London, toughed out a 7-6 (2), 6-7 (5), 7-6 (5) victory in the second round after receiving a bye in the first round. Fabio Fognini, the second seed, beat Lukas Lacko 6-4, 6-4, and there were also wins in the second round for Philipp Kohlschreiber and Tennys Sandgren. (AP) Sevastova reaches Kremlin Cup semifinals • Anastasija Sevastova reached the Kremlin Cup semifinals by beating Russian veteran Vera Zvonareva 4-6, 7-5, 6-3 on Thursday in Moscow. Sevastova next faces Tunisian qualifier Ons Jabeur. The other semifinal pits Britain’s Johanna Konta against Russian Daria Kasatkina. Nick Kyrgios withdrew from the men’s tournament with an elbow injury. (AP) Soccer celebration Sunday on the Hill • Following 11 a.m. mass Sunday at St. Ambrose Church, 5130 Wilson Ave., on the Hill, a program will be held to honor the 41 St. Louis Soccer Hall of Fame members, living and deceased, at the Hill Neighborhood Center, located at Daggett and Marconi. The plaque to be presented and displayed at the neighborhood center features a photo of the 1950 U.S. squad that knocked off England 1-0 in a World Cup match in Brazil. That squad included five players from the Hill — Bob Annis, Frank Borghi, Charlie Columbo, Gino Pariani and Frank “Pee Wee” Wallace — as well as fellow St. Louisan Harry Keough. (Joe Lyons)

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FILE PHOTOS

KFNS owner Randy Markel says he has broken even financially with the addition of Frank O. Pinion (left), lost a little with Larry Conners (center) and now is talking with Jamie Allman (right) about coming aboard.

KFNS wants sports focus back, but pursues Allman DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It was last October when Randy Markel shook up his radio station, changing it from the all-sports format to a mixture of jock jabber and general talk. Frank O. Pinion and his cast rolled in to man the afternoon drive-time slot at KFNS (590 AM) on Mondays-Thursdays with a popular entertainment-oriented show that had aired on KTRS (550 AM) for two decades. Markel also brought in former local television news anchor Larry Conners and his conservative news-talk program, which had been on KTRS for about three years, to follow Pinion’s show. But the results have been a net loser for the station financially, Markel said this week, saying he is breaking even with Pinion’s show and losing slightly with that of Conners — while acknowledging the advertising staff has done a poor job selling the newcomers’ programming. He added KFNS is making money on its sports shows, with “The Morning After” program the most lucrative “by far,” leading to an overall bottom line that has the station breaking even. “But I’m not in this to play for a tie,” Markel said. “That’s what we’ve been doing (at best) with Frank and Larry.” To that end, he has moved Conners to a less prominent time block (9-11 p.m.). And how would he react if Pinion asked out of his deal, which runs through 2020? “I would say, ‘How much should I make the check out for?’” he said. Markel said ideally Pinion and Conners would return to KTRS. “I’ve told Frank, ‘You need to go home. Imagine what it would be like, the homecoming you would get, the uproar of you coming back to 550. We deserve to be all-sports station, Frank and Larry deserve to be on 550.” Markel said he is planning ahead. “Frank is probably the greatest personality in the history of St. Louis radio,” he added, though cases could be made for Jack Carney, Jack Buck and others. “That being said, I’m not sure how much longer Frank wants to do this. He can leave whenever he wants with no hard feelings. Frank deserves to go out on his own terms. “I’m not looking for Frank to leave me, but Frank has brought it up on a couple occasions about retiring. I like having Frank, but he’s short term.I don’t think he wants to work past the end of next year — if that long. ... I’m always looking six months down the road and I can’t even promise that Frank wants to work past the end of this year.” But Pinion, 68, stated he wants to work much longer than that. “I’ll retire when I’m forced to retire,” he said. “I work three hours a day, four days a week. A Walmart greeter works more than I do. I still make great money. It’s just too easy and too lucrative to stop. “I’ll do this till I’m 85 if there’s a place to do it and there are advertisers who want to support what I do. Now I don’t know that I’ll do it (at KFNS), because I don’t know that the station will be around.” KTRS officials aren’t as keen as Markel is about that possible return of Conners and Pinion, the latter of whom had a bitter falling out with management before he left. “We like the people we have, we like what’s going on,” KTRS general manager Mark Dorsey said. “We have our best lineup ever.” Guy Phillips has replaced Pinion in afternoon drive.

“Guy’s been a win-win all the way around,” Dorsey said. “Guy makes money, we make money. That’s how it’s supposed to be. We never made more than a minimal amount off Frank. Nothing against those guys, but we’re happy with what we’ve got.” Markel has owned KFNS for a little less than three years, and has said he poured about $3 million into it before making the deals with Pinion and Conners. He makes it no secret he’d sell it for the right price, and talks have been taking place off and on for months in which KTRS’ owners would buy KFNS. But KTRS apparently has lost interest. “It’s really kind of gone nowhere because we’re focused on our own business,” Dorsey said. “When there’s no cash flow coming through over there and Randy wants to sell it for X amount, our guys just turned and walked away.”

SHUFFLING THE DECK Some recent KFNS lineup retooling is tied to the monetary issues. Markel moved Conners’ show back three hours in order to put former Blues player Cam Janssen on from 6-7 p.m. with a hockey program. Markel said that gives the station an additional revenue source, because Janssen is popular with listeners and thus the station can sell “remotes” with him. Those entail the show being conducted in a public place, often a bar or restaurant, with the establishment paying a fee in order to gain the publicity of the broadcast originating there. “Larry was a good sport about taking one for the team and moving back,” Markel said. Janssen continues to be on with T.J. Moe from 1-3 p.m. The shifting has moved Charlie “Tuna” Edwards’ show to an earlier slot, now at 7-9 o’clock, and returns KFNS to a sports presence in early and mid evenings. ALLMAN REPORT Despite the financial situation with nonsports programming, Markel hopes to add another conservative political talk-show host to the lineup — Jamie Allman. “We really want him,” Markel said. “He would be a great fit, I’m a big fan of his.” Allman currently is involved in a legal battle over his firing in April from KFTK (97.1 FM) because of a tweet in which he expressed his desire to assault David Hogg with a hot poker. Hogg was a student at the high school in Parkland, Fla., at which a mass shooting took place and became and outspoken advocate of tougher gun laws. Allman is suing KTFK owner Entercom Communications over his dismissal, claiming breach of contract among other things. (He also lost his show on KDNL, Channel 30, but is not suing that station.) Part of his suit challenges a clause that prohibits him from working in St. Louis radio for another six months. “They can’t enslave me and prevent me from working,” he said. Allman said the tweet was not meant to cause harm. “The regret that I have is that it was completely misconstrued and misused in an effort to get me off the air,” he said. “I regret that (Entercom) didn’t have the courage to stand up for me. I didn’t even tweet David Hogg. It was a third-party comment about David Hogg that was said tongue in cheek. The firing was completely unjustified.” Markel is pursuing Allman for the 5-7 a.m. slot, which currently is occupied by network programming, saying he thinks that would be a successful financial arrangement for the station — unlike the one he

has with Pinion and Conners. “This is a whole different animal,” Markel said. “Larry brought a few advertises for himself, none for the station. Frank brought a lot of advertises for himself, none for the station. We just get a small percentage of what he brings in. Jamie would be a revenue share, (like most of KFNS’ sports shows) he will bring in lots of money.” Allman currently is broadcasting on Facebook and via live stream from 6-9 a.m. weekdays, and said he has as many listeners as he did on radio, about 55,000 a week, with about 33,000 downloads of the program a month. “All this with just me and an engineer and no formal promotion,” he said. “With any kind of stable backing at all plus a (radio) dial position I could double or triple the audience and revenue. My audience is fiercely loyal. ... This is why Randy is interested.” What about the baggage? “I think he got a bad deal,” Markel said. “Everyone deserves a second chance.” Another person who could get a second chance at KFNS if the afternoon drive-time slot opens is Dino Costa, who had a brief but rollicking run at the station in 2016. He promised to conquer the market and ripped several prominent members of the local sports media. One of those targets was fellow rabble-rouser Kevin Slaten, who now is on KQQZ (1190 AM). Slaten often seems to be a candidate for his fifth stint at KFNS. “One thing I can’t stand is boring radio,” Markel said.“Those guys certainly aren’t boring.”

THE BOTTOM LINE Markel is pointing fingers at the station, not Pinion and Conners, for KFNS’ failure to capitalize on their presence. “The problem is finding sales people,” Markel said. “Frank’s should have been a profitable show for us, Larry’s should have been a profitable show. We can never find sales people that were worth a damn. I have one as good as they come, after that it’s slim pickings.” Pinion concurs. “I know he’s made generous offers to sales people, and the only people who have bitten couldn’t back up what they said they could do,” Pinion said. “You also have millennials who work at agencies who are directing advertisers to put a disproportionate amount of money into social media. You have to use it if you are a business but I think they’ve oversold it, they certainly have overlooked the baby-boomer crowd. Those people still read the paper, they still watch the news on TV and they still listen to the radio. You need a sales staff that knows how to find the advertisers who want to reach those people. That’s who is listening to what I do.” Pinion said he has no hard feelings about the situation. “Randy has absolutely stood behind everything he said he’d do,” he said. “I’m happy there. I walk in and do pretty much what I’ve done for 35 years — whatever I want to do, the way I want to, and nobody bothers me. There’s nothing to be unhappy with.” Markel,who has given Pinion top play on billboards touting many of KFNS’ broadcasters, concurs. “There’s no rift between us, I’m not sorry I brought Frank over,” he said. “We tried, it hasn’t worked out the way we thought it would. It’s a different time, maybe things aren’t the way they were five and 10 years ago.” Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

NATIONAL LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

DODGERS 3, BREWERS 2

RED SOX DEF. ASTROS 4-1

Game 1

Brewers 6, Dodgers 5 (W: Woodruff, L: Kershaw, S: Knebel)

Game 1

Astros 7, Red Sox 2 • (W: Verlander, L: Kelly)

Game 2

Dodgers 4, Brewers 3 • (W: Baez, L: Jeffress, S: Jansen)

Game 2

Red Sox 7, Astros 5 • (W: Barnes, L: Cole, S: Kimbrel)

Game 3

Brewers 4, Dodgers 0 • (W: Chacin, L: Buehler)

Game 3

Red Sox 8, Astros 2 • (W: Eovaldi, L: Smith)

Game 4

Dodgers 2, Brewers 1, 13 innings • (W: Urias, L: Guerra)

Game 4

Red Sox 8, Astros 6 • (W: Kelly, L: James, S: Kimbrel)

Game 5

Dodgers 5, Brewers 2 • (W: Kershaw, L: Woodruff, S: Jansen)

Game 5

Red Sox 4, Astros 1 • (W: Price, L: Verlander, S: Kimbrel)

Friday

7:39 p.m. at Milwaukee, FS1 • Ryu (7-3, 1.97) vs. Miley (5-2, 2.57)

Saturday

7:09 p.m. at Milwaukee, FS1*

WORLD SERIES

Begins 7 p.m. Tuesday at Boston, KTVI-2

Red Sox advance to Series Price, Devers help power Boston past Houston in ALCS clincher

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Boston Red Sox celebrate after winning 4-1 in Game 5 to wrap up the ALCS on Thursday night.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON • David Price put his

postseason woes behind him, pitching the Boston Red Sox back into another World Series with a 4-1 victory over the defending champion Houston Astros on Thursday night. Rafael Devers hit a three-run homer as the Red Sox stunned Justin Verlander and the Astros in Game 5 of the AL Championship Series to win the bestof-seven set 4-1, a perfect 43rd birthday present for rookie manager Alex Cora. After dropping the opener at home, Boston took four straight — including three in a row at Minute Maid Park to improve to 5-0 on the road in these playoffs. Mookie Betts, Jackie Bradley Jr. and the Red Sox will try to bring Boston its fourth crown in 15 years when they open the World Series on Tuesday night at home in Fenway Park against the Los Angeles Dodgers or Milwaukee Brewers. The Red Sox were last in the World Series when they won it all in 2013. Los Angeles has a 3-2 lead in the NLCS going into Game 6 on Friday night at Miller Park.

ASTROS SHUFFLED ORDER Carlos Correa was moved from

seventh to fourth in the Astros’ batting order for Game 5 as Houston tried to avoid elimination. Astros manager AJ Hinch made the switch after Correa had three hits and drove in two runs in Game 4. It was the first multi-hit game this postseason for Correa, the shortstop who has struggled with back problems for months. “At the end of the day he’s a middle-of-the-order bat. I’ve been wanting to get him back in the middle of the order,” Hinch said. “Why not now? There may be no tomorrow, literally.” Red Sox first baseman Mitch Moreland, who injured his right hamstring in Game 2 of the AL Division Series, got his first start in the ALCS. Alex Bregman was still in the leadoff spot for Houston and Jose Altuve was the designated hitter for the third game in a row because of his bruised right knee. “He’s playing on one leg. If this was the regular season there’s no way he could play,” Hinch said. “He’s not going to hurt himself any further,” the manager said. “He’s part of our heart and soul so you’re going to have to

drag him off the field.” Moreland didn’t play in the ALDS clincher against the Yankees, but made pinch-hitting appearances in each of the first four ALCS games. Second baseman Ian Kinsler was also back in Boston’s starting lineup, batting sixth behind Moreland against Astros righthander Justin Verlander. Third baseman Rafael Devers dropped from fifth to seventh in the order.

SALE GOOD TO GO Red Sox manager Alex Cora says Chris Sale is set to make his next start, lining up the lefty ace for a possible World Series opener. Cora said before Game 5 against Houston on Thursday that Sale threw off flat ground again earlier in the day and was feeling better since the stomach illness that led to him spending a night in a hospital. “So he’s ready for his next start,” Cora said. Sale has been regaining strength since his release Monday from Massachusetts General Hospital, where he spent Sunday night for observation. The club hasn’t specified Sale’s ailment or treatment.

Red Sox 4, Astros 1 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Benintendi lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .208 Martinez dh 3 1 2 1 1 0 .278 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Moreland 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .500 Kinsler 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .182 Devers 3b 4 1 1 3 0 2 .385 Vazquez c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .154 c-Holt ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Leon c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bradley Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Totals 36 4 8 4 2 7 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bregman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .133 Springer rf-cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .381 Altuve dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Correa ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .316 Gurriel 1b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .250 Gonzalez 2b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .200 Kemp lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .273 Maldonado c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .091 a-White ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Reddick ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Marisnick cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 McCann c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 32 1 5 1 2 12 Boston 001 003 000 — 4 8 0 Houston 000 000 100 — 1 5 1 a-pinch hit for Maldonado in the 7th. b-flied out for White in the 7th. c-grounded out for Vazquez in the 8th. E: Bregman (1). LOB: Boston 7, Houston 6. 2B: Moreland (1), Kinsler (1), Gurriel (1). HR: Martinez (1), off Verlander; Devers (1), off Verlander; Gonzalez (2), off Barnes. RBIs: Martinez (3), Devers 3 (6), Gonzalez (4). RLISP: Boston 3 (Betts 2, Holt); Houston 1 (Gonzalez). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price, W, 1-0 6 3 0 0 0 9 93 3.38 2/ 1 1 1 1 0 21 2.08 3 Barnes 1/ Eovaldi, H, 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.45 Kimbrel, S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 1 2 14 4.50 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander, L, 1-1 6 7 4 4 2 4 97 4.50 Osuna 3 1 0 0 0 3 32 12.27 Inherited runners-scored: Eovaldi 1-0. WP: Osuna. Umpires: Home, Chris Guccione; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Vic Carapazza; Right, Mark Carlson; Left, Joe West. T: 3:32. A: 43,210.

* If necessary

MLB NOTEBOOK Decision on Harper will affect Eaton’s situation When the Washington Nationals traded for Adam Eaton two winters ago, the best justification for the deal seemed to linger somewhere in the future — more specifically, a Bryce Harper-free future. By trading for Eaton, logic held, the Nationals had ensured at least one-third of their outfield would be in place long-term. They locked up a reliable leadoff man with plenty of grit, the kind of player as useful in an outfield with Harper as he was without him — a steady force should that outfield fall into the hands of young prospects instead. But now, as Harper’s decision looms and leaves the Nationals outfield in purgatory, Eaton’s role seems somewhat less clear. If Harper signs, he will almost certainly play alongside Juan Soto and Victor Robles, two prospects no one in the Nationals decisionmaking corps would allow to sit idle for Eaton. If that happens, what happens to Eaton? To be clear, far more scenarios exist in which the Nationals very much need Eaton’s services than can find them disposable. If Harper doesn’t re-sign, an outfield of Soto, Robles and Eaton becomes one of the more athletic, exciting and high-energy groups this team has ever compiled out there. Should Michael A. Taylor remain as a fourth outfielder, the Nationals will surrender some power production in Harper’s absence, but greatly increase their speed and collective defensive abilities. General manager Mike Rizzo and manager Dave Martinez have said over and over that they would like the roster to grow more athletic. One can see why that outfield group would appeal to them. Eaton has hit .300 with a .394 on-base percentage when healthy with the Nationals, his everyday peskiness at the top of the order would be a settling and encouraging influence. And even if Harper stays, the Nationals could find themselves needing Eaton. Should Harper stay, and the team commit the tens of millions of dollars required to make that happen, they will have to reboot this roster largely via the trade market. Upgrades to their starting staff, behind the plate, and at second base might come via trade — and if their targets include J.T. Realmuto and/or a front-line starter, Robles and others would almost certainly be an asking price. (The Washington Post) Rosario is Twins MVP • Left fielder Eddie Rosario has won the Calvin R. Griffith Award for the most valuable player of the Minnesota Twins in 2018, after batting .288 with 57 extra-base hits in 138 games. The honors, voted on by the Twin Cities chapter of the Baseball Writers Association of America, were announced Thursday. (AP)

Miley returns as Milwaukee tries to stay alive Starting lefty was lifted after facing one hitter in Game 5 ASSOCIATED PRESS

MILWAUKEE • Wade Miley, take two. And this time, the Milwaukee Brewers lefthander figures to see more than one batter in his next start in the NL Championship Series. It comes on Friday night when Miley will try to help the Brewers stave off elimination, down 3-2 to the Los Angeles Dodgers. Miley goes back to the hill two days after being lifted after facing leadoff hitter Clay Bellinger in Game 5 in a designed move by manager Craig Counsell. The Dodgers are going with lefthander Hyun-Jin Ryu in a rematch of the Game 2 starters. “I think I’ll be fine. Just got to go out and make pitches,” Miley said at Dodger Stadium after the Brewers fell 5-2 Wednesday. The last pitcher to start backto-back games in the same postseason series was George Earnshaw of the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1930 World Series, according to STATS. Earnshaw tossed seven shutout innings in Game 5 before pitching a com-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A member of the Miller Park grounds crew waters the turf on Thursday, an off day in the NLCS, in Milwaukee.

plete game two days later, allowing one run in a win that took the series. Can you top that, Wade? “I started the end of an AllStar break and the other side of it,” Miley said. Not quite the same. Miley got the last start against the Dodgers, and was pulled after a five-pitch walk. Reliever Brandon Woodruff did the bulk of the Brewers’ initial “out-getting” after coming in to face the second batter,

Justin Turner. Woodruff allowed three runs, two earned, along with five hits and a walk while fanning eight in taking the loss after going 5 1/3 innings. Counsell explained that the unconventional move was an effort to get the best matchups. The Dodgers led off with leftyhitting Clay Bellinger before going with three straight righthanders in the lineup. They had one other lefty in the starting

lineup, power hitter Max Muncy. Results were mixed. Los Angeles was held scoreless until the fourth, then broke through with five runs over the next three innings to move within one win of a return trip to the World Series. This was the latest extension of the Brewers’ pitching-bycommittee strategy in the postseason. Milwaukee is playing to one of its strengths, which is a deep, hard-throwing bullpen. More teams around the league picked up on the maneuver after the Tampa Bay Rays started using bullpen days to get through some games this season. When asked, Counsell said he didn’t think that lifting Miley after one batter broke down norms or trust between opposing managers. He pointed to teams using pinch-hitters to replace a starter after just one at-bat, similar to what Dodgers manager Dave Roberts has done with the righthanded hitting David Freese and Muncy at first base. “We’re using our roster, we’re using our full roster, I think that’s what all teams are doing in the playoffs,” Counsell said Thursday, a day off as the series shifts back to Miller Park. In Houston, Astros manager AJ Hinch said such pitching strategies are “fair game” now. “Craig has been doing it since

Sept. 1. (Tampa manager) Kevin Cash has been doing it since May,” Hinch said before Game 5 of the AL Championship Series against the Boston Red Sox. Hinch noted that the Brewers used reliever Dan Jennings to start a game against the Cardinals on Sept. 24 before pulling him after retiring the first batter. “You can’t be caught off guard with that stuff. (The Dodgers) weren’t caught off guard,” Hinch said. “You’re allowed to play all your players whenever you want to. So I think it’s ludicrous to think that it’s ... an ethical issue,” Hinch added. For the 31-year-old Miley, the back-to-back starts are another highlight in a turnaround season with Milwaukee. Miley was 5-2 with a 2.67 ERA over 80-plus innings in 16 regular-season starts after joining the club on a minor league contract in spring training. He hasn’t given up a run in 10 1/3 innings this postseason. If it were up to him, Miley would stay in as long as possible. “Craig’s the manager, he makes the final decision,” Miley said this week, “but at the same time, you want to make it as tough on them as possible. We try to go out there and do the best we can.”


BASEBALL

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

NATIONAL LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

DODGERS 3, BREWERS 2

RED SOX DEF. ASTROS 4-1

Game 1

Brewers 6, Dodgers 5 (W: Woodruff, L: Kershaw, S: Knebel)

Game 1

Astros 7, Red Sox 2 • (W: Verlander, L: Kelly)

Game 2

Dodgers 4, Brewers 3 • (W: Baez, L: Jeffress, S: Jansen)

Game 2

Red Sox 7, Astros 5 • (W: Barnes, L: Cole, S: Kimbrel)

Game 3

Brewers 4, Dodgers 0 • (W: Chacin, L: Buehler)

Game 3

Red Sox 8, Astros 2 • (W: Eovaldi, L: Smith)

Game 4

Dodgers 2, Brewers 1, 13 innings • (W: Urias, L: Guerra)

Game 4

Red Sox 8, Astros 6 • (W: Kelly, L: James, S: Kimbrel)

Game 5

Dodgers 5, Brewers 2 • (W: Kershaw, L: Woodruff, S: Jansen)

Game 5

Red Sox 4, Astros 1 • (W: Price, L: Verlander, S: Kimbrel)

Friday

7:39 p.m. at Milwaukee, FS1 • Ryu (7-3, 1.97) vs. Miley (5-2, 2.57)

Saturday

7:09 p.m. at Milwaukee, FS1*

WORLD SERIES

Begins 7 p.m. Tuesday at Boston, KTVI-2

Red Sox advance to Series Price, Devers help power Boston past Houston in ALCS clincher

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Red Sox celebrate after winning 4-1 in Game 5 to wrap up the ALCS on Thursday night. Boston will open the World Series at home Tuesday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON • David Price put his

postseason woes behind him, pitching the Boston Red Sox back into another World Series with a 4-1 victory over the defending champion Houston Astros on Thursday night. Rafael Devers hit a three-run homer as the Red Sox stunned Justin Verlander and the Astros in Game 5 of the AL Championship Series to win the best-ofseven set 4-1. It was a perfect 43rd birthday present for rookie manager Alex Cora, who became the first skipper from Puerto Rico to take a team to the World Series. ALCS MVP Jackie Bradley Jr., outfielder Mookie Betts and the Red Sox will try to bring Boston its fourth crown in 15 years when they open the World Series on Tuesday night at Fenway Park against the Los Angeles Dodgers or Milwaukee Brewers. The Red Sox were last in the World Series when they won it all in 2013. Los Angeles has a 3-2 lead in the NLCS going into Game 6 on Friday night at Miller Park. “We got four more wins. That was very, very special, absolutely. But we want more,” Price said. After dropping the opener at home, Boston took four straight — including three in a row at Minute Maid Park to improve to

5-0 on the road in these playoffs. Left fielder Andrew Benintendi caught a long fly for the last out — not nearly as dramatic as his game-saving diving grab the previous night. There was a smattering of boos from the home crowd as the Red Sox charged onto the field, embracing as they jumped around near the middle of the diamond. They posed for a team picture on the mound a couple of minutes later as members of Houston’s pitching staff slowly walked by, glancing at the revelry on their way back from the bullpen. “They beat us. We ran out of wins,” Astros manager AJ Hinch said. Despite leading the majors in wins during the regular season with 108, the Red Sox were underdogs against a Houston team that defeated the Dodgers in last year’s World Series and romped past Cleveland in the Division Series this month. But stars Jose Altuve, Carlos Correa and the Astros hobbled to the finish in a humbling defeat. Still, no team has repeated as World Series champs since the New York Yankees won three straight from 1998-2000. Pitching on only three days’ rest after Boston ace Chris Sale was ruled out while recovering from a stomach illness, Price struck out nine in six shutout

innings of three-hit ball. The lefthander, who has had a rough time in Boston since signing a $217 million contract before the 2016 season, entered 0-9 with a 6.16 ERA in 11 career postseason starts. “It felt good. Honestly, it really started last night in the bullpen. Threw quite a few pitches to come in for the next hitter, found something out while doing that and kind of just carried that over to today,” Price said. Price tipped his cap to a few hundred Red Sox fans assembled behind the Boston dugout while they cheered as he walked off the field following postgame interviews. Red Sox slugger J.D. Martinez hit an early homer off Verlander, and Price made the lead stand up into the late innings. Craig Kimbrel worked the ninth for his third save of the series. Martinez reached the World Series by beating the team that released him during spring training four years ago. “It’s a little sweeter, obviously,” he said. “But it’s one of the things where I’m past it, and I’m here because of my struggles and because of my pain that I went through there,” he said. “To win 108 games in a season, you’ve got to have a complete team and I think that was on display this series. The whole playoffs, actually,” he said.

Red Sox 4, Astros 1 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Benintendi lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .208 Martinez dh 3 1 2 1 1 0 .278 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Moreland 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .500 Kinsler 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .182 Devers 3b 4 1 1 3 0 2 .385 Vazquez c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .154 c-Holt ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Leon c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bradley Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Totals 36 4 8 4 2 7 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bregman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .133 Springer rf-cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .381 Altuve dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Correa ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .316 Gurriel 1b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .250 Gonzalez 2b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .200 Kemp lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .273 Maldonado c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .091 a-White ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Reddick ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Marisnick cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 McCann c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 32 1 5 1 2 12 Boston 001 003 000 — 4 8 0 Houston 000 000 100 — 1 5 1 a-pinch hit for Maldonado in the 7th. b-flied out for White in the 7th. c-grounded out for Vazquez in the 8th. E: Bregman (1). LOB: Boston 7, Houston 6. 2B: Moreland (1), Kinsler (1), Gurriel (1). HR: Martinez (1), off Verlander; Devers (1), off Verlander; Gonzalez (2), off Barnes. RBIs: Martinez (3), Devers 3 (6), Gonzalez (4). RLISP: Boston 3 (Betts 2, Holt); Houston 1 (Gonzalez). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price, W, 1-0 6 3 0 0 0 9 93 3.38 2/ 1 1 1 1 0 21 2.08 Barnes 3 Eovaldi, H, 1 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.45 Kimbrel, S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 1 2 14 4.50 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander, L, 1-1 6 7 4 4 2 4 97 4.50 Osuna 3 1 0 0 0 3 32 12.27 Inherited runners-scored: Eovaldi 1-0. WP: Osuna. Umpires: Home, Chris Guccione; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Vic Carapazza; Right, Mark Carlson; Left, Joe West. T: 3:32. A: 43,210.

* If necessary

MLB NOTEBOOK Decision on Harper will affect Eaton’s situation When the Washington Nationals traded for Adam Eaton two winters ago, the best justification for the deal seemed to linger somewhere in the future — more specifically, a Bryce Harper-free future. By trading for Eaton, logic held, the Nationals had ensured at least one-third of their outfield would be in place long-term. They locked up a reliable leadoff man with plenty of grit, the kind of player as useful in an outfield with Harper as he was without him — a steady force should that outfield fall into the hands of young prospects instead. But now, as Harper’s decision looms and leaves the Nationals outfield in purgatory, Eaton’s role seems somewhat less clear. If Harper signs, he will almost certainly play alongside Juan Soto and Victor Robles, two prospects no one in the Nationals decisionmaking corps would allow to sit idle for Eaton. If that happens, what happens to Eaton? To be clear, far more scenarios exist in which the Nationals very much need Eaton’s services than can find them disposable. If Harper doesn’t re-sign, an outfield of Soto, Robles and Eaton becomes one of the more athletic, exciting and high-energy groups this team has ever compiled out there. Should Michael A. Taylor remain as a fourth outfielder, the Nationals will surrender some power production in Harper’s absence, but greatly increase their speed and collective defensive abilities. General manager Mike Rizzo and manager Dave Martinez have said over and over that they would like the roster to grow more athletic. One can see why that outfield group would appeal to them. Eaton has hit .300 with a .394 on-base percentage when healthy with the Nationals, his everyday peskiness at the top of the order would be a settling and encouraging influence. And even if Harper stays, the Nationals could find themselves needing Eaton. Should Harper stay, and the team commit the tens of millions of dollars required to make that happen, they will have to reboot this roster largely via the trade market. Upgrades to their starting staff, behind the plate, and at second base might come via trade — and if their targets include J.T. Realmuto and/or a front-line starter, Robles and others would almost certainly be an asking price. (The Washington Post) Rosario is Twins MVP • Left fielder Eddie Rosario has won the Calvin R. Griffith Award for the most valuable player of the Minnesota Twins in 2018, after batting .288 with 57 extra-base hits in 138 games. The honors, voted on by the Twin Cities chapter of the Baseball Writers Association of America, were announced Thursday. (AP)

Miley returns as Milwaukee tries to stay alive Starting lefty was lifted after facing one hitter in Game 5 ASSOCIATED PRESS

MILWAUKEE • Wade Miley, take two. And this time, the Milwaukee Brewers lefthander figures to see more than one batter in his next start in the NL Championship Series. It comes on Friday night when Miley will try to help the Brewers stave off elimination, down 3-2 to the Los Angeles Dodgers. Miley goes back to the hill two days after being lifted after facing leadoff hitter Clay Bellinger in Game 5 in a designed move by manager Craig Counsell. The Dodgers are going with lefthander Hyun-Jin Ryu in a rematch of the Game 2 starters. “I think I’ll be fine. Just got to go out and make pitches,” Miley said at Dodger Stadium after the Brewers fell 5-2 Wednesday. The last pitcher to start backto-back games in the same postseason series was George Earnshaw of the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1930 World Series, according to STATS. Earnshaw tossed seven shutout innings in Game 5 before pitching a com-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A member of the Miller Park grounds crew waters the turf on Thursday, an off day in the NLCS, in Milwaukee.

plete game two days later, allowing one run in a win that took the series. Can you top that, Wade? “I started the end of an AllStar break and the other side of it,” Miley said. Not quite the same. Miley got the last start against the Dodgers, and was pulled after a five-pitch walk. Reliever Brandon Woodruff did the bulk of the Brewers’ initial “out-getting” after coming in to face the second batter,

Justin Turner. Woodruff allowed three runs, two earned, along with five hits and a walk while fanning eight in taking the loss after going 5 1/3 innings. Counsell explained that the unconventional move was an effort to get the best matchups. The Dodgers led off with leftyhitting Clay Bellinger before going with three straight righthanders in the lineup. They had one other lefty in the starting

lineup, power hitter Max Muncy. Results were mixed. Los Angeles was held scoreless until the fourth, then broke through with five runs over the next three innings to move within one win of a return trip to the World Series. This was the latest extension of the Brewers’ pitching-bycommittee strategy in the postseason. Milwaukee is playing to one of its strengths, which is a deep, hard-throwing bullpen. More teams around the league picked up on the maneuver after the Tampa Bay Rays started using bullpen days to get through some games this season. When asked, Counsell said he didn’t think that lifting Miley after one batter broke down norms or trust between opposing managers. He pointed to teams using pinch-hitters to replace a starter after just one at-bat, similar to what Dodgers manager Dave Roberts has done with the righthanded hitting David Freese and Muncy at first base. “We’re using our roster, we’re using our full roster, I think that’s what all teams are doing in the playoffs,” Counsell said Thursday, a day off as the series shifts back to Miller Park. In Houston, Astros manager AJ Hinch said such pitching strategies are “fair game” now. “Craig has been doing it since

Sept. 1. (Tampa manager) Kevin Cash has been doing it since May,” Hinch said before Game 5 of the AL Championship Series against the Boston Red Sox. Hinch noted that the Brewers used reliever Dan Jennings to start a game against the Cardinals on Sept. 24 before pulling him after retiring the first batter. “You can’t be caught off guard with that stuff. (The Dodgers) weren’t caught off guard,” Hinch said. “You’re allowed to play all your players whenever you want to. So I think it’s ludicrous to think that it’s ... an ethical issue,” Hinch added. For the 31-year-old Miley, the back-to-back starts are another highlight in a turnaround season with Milwaukee. Miley was 5-2 with a 2.67 ERA over 80-plus innings in 16 regular-season starts after joining the club on a minor league contract in spring training. He hasn’t given up a run in 10 1/3 innings this postseason. If it were up to him, Miley would stay in as long as possible. “Craig’s the manager, he makes the final decision,” Miley said this week, “but at the same time, you want to make it as tough on them as possible. We try to go out there and do the best we can.”


SPORTS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

SLU NOTEBOOK

Three Billikens among picks Bess, Goodwin on second team, French selected to third team BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BROOKLYN, N.Y. • St. Louis University

hasn’t had a player honored on the Atlantic 10 all-conference teams for the last four seasons, reflecting the slide the basketball program made after making three consecutive appearances in the NCAA Tournament. Coach Travis Ford’s recruiting prowess is changing that. The Billikens had three players recognized among the top 16 in the A-10 on Thursday when the league’s preseason allconference teams were announced. Senior forward Javon Bess and sophomore guard Jordan Goodwin were voted onto the second team, and sophomore forward Hasahn French was picked for the third team. Additionally, Bess was named to the all-defensive team. “I think some of them should have been first team, obviously,” Ford said. “I think Javon is the best defender in our league. But there’s a lot of talent in the league. Going through and filling out mine, it was hard. Everyone can’t be on the first team.” Bess led SLU in scoring with a 13.3 average last season and was second with 7.4 rebounds and 72 total assists. He was named to the A-10 all-defensive team after his junior year. Goodwin led the Billikens in rebounding with 7.5 per game and assists with 4.0. He was second in scoring with an 11.5 average and had the first triple-double in school history. French averaged 9.3 points and 7.1 rebounds and set a SLU freshman record with 59 blocked shots. He was named to the A-10 all-rookie team.

TWO BACK FOR ST. JOSEPH’S St. Joseph’s was picked to finish second in the league behind SLU largely because of the much-anticipated comebacks of guards Charlie Brown Jr. and Lamarr Kimble, who missed last season with injuries. Both players were named to the pre-

season A-10 third team. Kimble averaged 15.5 points during the 2016-17 season, and Brown averaged 12.8 and was named to the all-rookie team as a freshman. Kimble suffered a foot injury in the season opener, and Brown had a wrist injury. Coach Phil Martelli wants them to take it slow as they return, especially Brown. “He’s the one I’m concerned about,” Martelli said. “He’s going to try to play all 32 games he missed last year (in the season opener). It’s not going to work, and I’m chipping away at that. It’s the first game of his sophomore year, not the 33rd of the season he missed.”

DAVIDSON HAS STAR IN GRADY Davidson guard Kellan Grady is widely regarded as the person to beat for the league’s player of the year award after he averaged 18 points as a freshman. Some of the chatter has coach Bob McKillop wondering how much longer he will have his latest star player. “Kellan has worked feverishly and passionately in the offseason,” McKillop said. “Sometimes he does an extra workout on his own on a day we’ve had a practice. There’s a lot of noise about him. Some analysts believe he’s an NBA pick this year and some believe he’s not. He’s done a marvelous job of not allowing that noise to interrupt his mission.” DUKES TO PLAY GAME IN AKRON Duquesne will play a game in Akron this season because the team’s arena is booked. Coach Keith Dambrot coached at Akron for 13 seasons. It also is the city where he coached LeBron James during his high school days. “Duquesne has the best player in the world attached to us,” Dambrot said. “We may not have the pros that a lot of other teams have, but to have an attachment to him is a huge deal. So, that’s why the game is being played in Akron.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

A-10 PRESEASON POLL Rank, University 1. St. Louis (15) 2. St. Joseph’s (4) 3. Davidson (6) 4. George Mason (1) 5. Rhode Island 6. Dayton 7. VCU 8. Massachusetts 9. St. Bonaventure 10. Richmond 11. Duquesne 12. La Salle 13. George Washington 14. Fordham First-place votes in parentheses

Points 348 324 314 287 221 206 195 175 167 156 146 85 73 33

PRESEASON FIRST TEAM Kellan Grady, Davidson Josh Cunningham, Dayton Otis Livingston II, George Mason Luwane Pipkins, Massachusetts Grant Golden, Richmond SECOND TEAM Eric Williams Jr., Duquesne Pookie Powell, La Salle Jeff Dowtin, Rhode Island Courtney Stockard, St. Bonaventure Javon Bess, SLU Jordan Goodwin, SLU THIRD TEAM Jon Axel Gudmundsson, Davidson Lamarr Kimble, St. Joseph’s Charlie Brown, Jr., St. Joseph’s Hasahn French, SLU De’Riante Jenkins, VCU DEFENSIVE TEAM Jon Axel Gudmundsson, Davidson Terry Nolan, Jr., George Washington Cyril Langevine, Rhode Island Jacob Gilyard, Richmond Javon Bess, SLU

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis University coach Travis Ford runs practice on Sept. 28 at Chaifetz Arena. Ford is entering his third season with the Billikens.

Ford says being picked first better than last SLU • FROM C1

Thursday afternoon after his responsibilities at Atlantic 10 media day had been fulfilled at Barclays Center. Ford is now the coach of the official preseason A-10 Conference favorite. The Billikens were the pick of media and coaches to win the league championship, two years after they were picked to finish in last place. But the whole idea of being the favorite made Ford a bit uneasy as he contemplated the makeup of his team, which includes only four returning players. With progress coming slowly, by his estimation, he couldn’t fathom the idea of missing a practice. “I think being picked first is a lot better than being picked last, but it’s all relative,” Ford said. “None of it matters this time of year. We’ve come a long way in a couple of years from what we took over. We have a long way to go for this team to reach its potential. That’s a great goal for us to reach for.” SLU garnered 15 of the 26 first-place votes to finish ahead of St. Joseph’s, Davidson and George Mason. Ford’s first two SLU teams were widely believed to have over-achieved in finishing 11th and then tied for fifth in the A-10. He said the Billikens are still in the rebuilding stage, but opposing coaches are starting to see what they think could be a finished product. “He’s obviously made an impact on somebody,” Davidson coach Bob McKillop said. “He’s definitely made an impact on the basketball community because he’s put his fingerprints all over the St. Louis program, and he’s done it rather quickly.

You see the additions to the roster and the development of current players. That’s why he was a success at Oklahoma State and Massachusetts and why he was a great player at Kentucky.” SLU has only one player — Elliott Welmer — remaining from the previous coaching staff. Ford has reconstructed the roster with an array of freshmen and transfers who fit the makeup of the type of team he is trying to build. Focused on physical play, rebounding and defense, SLU has noticeably stronger and more imposing players than it did two years ago. That goes for big men such as 6-foot-7, 235-pound Hasahn French and guards such as 6-3, 210 Jordan Goodwin. “Just looking at them, the bodies of their players are different than most of the Atlantic 10,” St. Bonaventure coach Mark Schmidt said. “They’ve elevated their program. They have a lot of resources. They have probably the best facility in the league, and the school wants to win. There’s a commitment there.” SLU never had been picked to win the A-10 since joining the league for the 200506 season. The Billikens were projected to finish second in 2013-14 and ’14-15 when they ended up at the top of the standings. Ford downplayed the hype surrounding his team Thursday in a building where SLU won the A-10 tournament in 2013. Transfers Tramaine Isabell and Dion Wiley have missed considerable practice with injuries. The coaching staff is behind schedule on the installation of some offensive and defensive basics. How these things progress in coming weeks and months will dictate much, he said. “The vote shows a lot of respect for the

players who are returning, and we know what we’re getting from our returners,” Ford said. “If we can finish near the top or win our league, it’s going to be because of the new guys. It’s how far the new guys are going to come along.” Among the returning players, forward Javon Bess and Goodwin were named to the A-10 preseason second team, and French made the third team. Bess was picked for the all-defensive team. The newcomers include five freshmen. Ford also includes Welmer in the newcomer group after the forward sat out all of last season with a foot injury. “He’s recruited some great players, but the best thing about that situation is that Travis has been through this before,” VCU coach Mike Rhodes said. “He had a plan when he got there, and plans don’t happen overnight.” The A-10 has been a roller coaster for the Billikens in the last decade. They tied for 10th place in 2011 before making three consecutive appearances in the NCAA Tournament. One year after finishing first in the conference, they finished last. Then Jim Crews, who was the national coach of the year during the tournament run, was fired. Ford arrived with a reputation as a toprate recruiter, and a significant upgrade in talent has followed. “We’re still in the rebuilding process,” Ford said. “You can’t do it in three years. I always said it takes four years, even five, to get consistency in your roster. Still, in my mind, we’re trying to figure it out.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals need to be aggressive FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

that as you will. Reliever Brett Cecil had what was deemed “a lost season.” And every single player found himself underneath the new accountability umbrella as Mozeliak described a new approach to monitor players’ progress in multiple phases, from physical therapy to baseball development. “The accountability of this offseason is going to be very real, and our expectations are going to be very clear,” Mozeliak said. Lets keep the accountability rolling. We, meaning media members covering the Cardinals, need to be more accountable. Just ask the fans. We the media should stop mentioning Bryce Harper as the obvious fit for the Cardinals, for example, because a vocal portion of the fan base continues to tell us that’s not realistic, that we are just gassing up the Cardinals for another swing-and-miss. We should be more accountable. Or maybe we the media should only write about Harper and Manny Machado and ignore every other topic until the Cardinals sign one of the freeagent sluggers, because a vocal portion of the fan base continues to holler that any coverage not hinging on Harper (good fit) or Machado (bad fit) is failing to hold the Cardinals accountable. Accountability. Fans demand it. And now the front office does, too. That makes it fair game to expect accountability from the front office, right? Want to hold Mozeliak accountable? He spent an hour Tuesday handing you a how-to list: Expect to see urgency this offseason. Feel wronged if you don’t. Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. is not happy with the three-year postseason absence, Mozeliak shared. And DeWitt himself told the Post-Dispatch he does not want to be a regular wild-card candidate. Six teams have a better winning percentage than the Cardinals’ .551 since the Redbirds last played past Game 162. The organization’s definition of sustained success is slowly slipping. It used to be consecutive postseason appearances. Now it’s consecutive winning seasons. DeWitt sets the tone and unlocks the vault. Mozeliak leads the charge. Actions speak louder than words. Expect the Cardinals to stop talking about the NL Central like they are somehow not a part of it. The existence, improvement and staying power of the Brewers and Cubs has finally been acknowledged. So, toss out that old talking point about the Cardinals only worrying about themselves. It was tired awhile ago. It’s grown mold since. The blinders are off. When the Cubs and Brewers make moves that improve their rosters before and during next season, the Cardinals can no longer shrug. Not if they’re truly tired of watching the Brewers and the Cubs climb over them in the standings. Expect That hitter. That’s how Mozeliak phrased it, as if the “that” deserved to start with a capital. Boosting the middle of the lineup is the top priority, again. Ozuna could have been the guy, but he wasn’t, and it would be hope-based thinking to expect him to carry the lineup in 2019. Mozeliak warned that the moves he makes will aim to satisfy needs, not win popularity contests. Fair enough. But there are not many hitters who do enough damage to fit the description he offered. Expect the front office to conduct itself like it has found its next great manager. Mozeliak believes in Shildt. He envisioned this and enacted his plan. Even more reason to upgrade the talent Shildt manages. Don’t let youth be used as an excuse. The ascension of young players has energized the organization, and rightfully so. But Mozeliak dismissed the notion of sit-back-and-wait. “We certainly understand we need to augment that (youth) in some way,” he said. Don’t let the struggle of some recent free agents convince you the Cardinals should abstain from that market. Mozeliak said it won’t. The pool is talented and deep. Now is not the time to sit out, no matter how bad 2018 went for Dexter Fowler and some others. If anything, the Cardinals should feel encouraged to shop from higher shelves. Contrary to popular belief, the Cardinals could stretch more than ever before financially this offseason and still not drive the team into a flaming hole of dysfunction for the next decade. Honest. Mozeliak was asked what has to give, because this seems to be nearing a breaking point of sorts. The Cardinals want sustained success. They also want to be in every postseason. But it’s been three years. Their aim is off. Their margin for error has been too thin. Their division is too good. “We may have to take some risks,” Mozeliak said. I want to tell you to expect the Cardinals to do just that, but instead I’ll tell you to believe it when you see it. If they do truly stretch, as their past three seasons, fierce division and frustrated fan base suggest they should, and the whole thing flops, well, they can call for accountability from the growing crowd that is rooting for more risk. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 1 NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE EAST

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Thursday Denver 45, Arizona 10 Sunday Tennessee vs. LA Chargers at London, 8:30 a.m., KMOV-4 Carolina at Philadelphia, noon, KTVI-2 New England at Chicago, noon, KMOV-4

COLLEGE NOTEBOOK

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ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

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Home

Away

AFC

NFC

Div

Kansas City

5

1

0

.833

215

172

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3-1

4-1

1-0

2-0

1-1

LA Chargers

4

2

0

.667

175

144

2-1

2-1

3-1

1-1

1-1

0-2

0-1

Denver

3

4

0

.429

165

164

2-2

1-2

1-3

2-1

1-1

0-1

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Oakland

1

5

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110

176

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0-3

1-3

0-2

0-2

Minnesota at NY Jets, noon Cleveland at Tampa Bay, noon Detroit at Miami, noon Houston at Jacksonville, noon Buffalo at Indianapolis, noon New Orleans at Baltimore, 3:05 p.m.

LA Rams at San Francisco, 3:25 p.m., KMOV-4 Dallas at Washington, 3:25 p.m. Cincinnati at Kansas City, 7:20 p.m., KSDK-5 Open: Seattle, Green Bay, Oakland, Pittsburgh Monday NY Giants at Atlanta, 7:15 p.m., ESPN

NFL NOTEBOOK

BRONCOS 45, CARDINALS 10

Cowboys receiver Williams suspended for three games

Broncos blow out Arizona

Dallas wide receiver Terrance Williams has been suspended three games for violating the NFL’s substance-abuse policy, a ban he will serve while on injured reserve because of lingering issues following offseason foot surgery. The league said the suspension will be in effect Sunday when the Cowboys visit Washington. After Dallas’ bye week and a home game against Tennessee, the final game of the ban will be Nov. 11 at Philadelphia. But Williams will miss at least three more games after that while on IR. His first possible game is Dec. 9 at home against the Eagles. Williams was arrested in May on a charge of public intoxication. The case was dismissed after Williams completed a state-mandated alcohol awareness education course. New Orleans’ Ginn Jr. goes on IR • The Saints have placed veteran receiver Ted Ginn Jr., who has been struggling with knee soreness, on injured reserve. Ginn has played in four games this season, catching 12 passes for 135 yards and two touchdowns, but has regularly appeared on New Orleans’ official injury report since early in Week 2. Ginn’s production had largely dipped since Week 2 and he did not have a reception in Week 4 before sitting out in Week 5. The move could mean more opportunities for rookie Tre’Quan Smith, a third-round selection in last spring’s draft who had TD catches of 62 and 35 yards in the team’s last game, a Week 5 Monday Night triumph over the visiting Washington Redskins. In other news • Browns starting cornerback E.J. Gaines, who starred at Mizzou and played for the St. Louis Rams, will miss Sunday’s game at Tampa Bay with a concussion. Gaines practiced on Wednesday, but didn’t show any symptoms until Thursday, when he was placed in the league protocol. ... The Oakland Raiders have been fined $20,000 for not downgrading guard Kelechi Osemele (knee) from questionable to out for a Week 5 game. ... With their secondary depleted by injuries, the Bengals signed CB KeiVarae Russell off the practice squad Thursday for an upcoming game in Kansas City. Russell was the Chiefs’ third-round pick in 2016. He’s played in 13 games for Cincinnati over the past two seasons. The Bengals needed another cornerback with Darqueze Dennard sidelined by a shoulder injury suffered during last week’s loss to the Steelers. Safety Shawn Williams also suffered a concussion during that contest and was limited in practice Thursday. Associated Press

Cardinals’ Rosen struggles under pressure

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Broncos linebacker Von Miller hits Arizona quarterback Josh Rosen as he throws during the second half of Denver’s dominating 45-10 victory on the road Thursday night. ASSOCIATED PRESS

GLENDALE, ARIZ. • Em-

manuel Sanders threw and caught touchdown passes, Denver returned two interceptions for first-quarter touchdowns and the Broncos snapped a four-game losing streak with a 45-10 rout of the Arizona Cardinals on Thursday night. Todd Davis returned rookie Josh Rosen’s deflected pass for a touchdown on the second play of the game and Chris Harris Jr. returned another 53 yards for a score with 2:02 left in the quarter as the Broncos (3-4) opened a quick 21-3 lead. Rosen threw three interceptions and lost a pair of fumbles on a rough night that began badly for him and never got better. He limped off the field after he was sacked for the fifth time, on a fourth-and-16 play late in the game. The Cardinals (1-6), down 35-3 at the half, fell to 0-4 at home for the first time since 1979. Case Keenum completed

14 of 21 passes for 161 yards and a touchdown with one interception for Denver. Phillip Lindsay rushed for 90 yards on 14 carries, including a 28-yard TD run. Rosen had called a timeout after the game’s first play. Then his pass was deflected by the outstretched hand of defensive end Derek Wolfe. The ball dropped into the hands of Davis, who ran it in from there. Arizona followed with a three-and-out and the Broncos quickly made it 14-0 with a six-play, 77yard drive. Sanders took the ball on an end around and threw to a wide-open Courtland Sutton for the 28yard touchdown. The receiver may have run the wrong route on Rosen’s second “pick six.” In a thirdand-one situation from the Arizona 46, Rosen passed but there was no one near the ball except Harris, who returned it 53 yards to make it 21-3. With Denver up 35-3 at the half, Arizona fans booed as their team left the field.

Broncos 45, Cardinals 10 Denver 21 14 7 3 — 45 Arizona 3 0 7 0 — 10 First Quarter Den: Davis 20 interception return (McManus kick), 14:01. Den: Sutton 28 pass from Sanders (McManus kick), 8:38. Ari: FG Dawson 43, 5:18. Den: C.Harris 53 interception return (McManus kick), 2:02. Second Quarter Den: Sanders 64 pass from Keenum (McManus kick), 14:40. Den: Freeman 1 run (McManus kick), :21. Third Quarter Ari: Fitzgerald 4 pass from Rosen (Dawson kick), 8:33. Den: Lindsay 28 run (McManus kick), 3:32. Fourth Quarter Den: FG McManus 41, 5:35. A: 62,359. Den Ari First downs 15 14 Total Net Yards 309 223 Rushes-yards 31-131 21-69 Passing 178 154 Punt Returns 3-23 2-17 Kickoff Returns 2-38 5-77 Interceptions Ret. 3-73 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 15-22-1 21-39-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-11 6-40 Punts 6-43.5 6-50.7 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-2 Penalties-Yards 5-50 7-45 Time of Possession 30:49 29:11 Rushing: Denver, Lindsay 14-90, Freeman 13-37, Keenum 4-4. Arizona, D.Johnson 14-39, Rosen 1-14, Edmonds 5-9, Nelson 1-7. Passing: Denver, Keenum 14-21-1-161, Sanders 1-1-0-28. Arizona, Rosen 21-39-3-194. Receiving: Denver, Sanders 6-102, De.Thomas 5-42, Sutton 1-28, LaCosse 1-12, Lindsay 1-6, Booker 1-(minus 1). Arizona, Fitzgerald 4-40, C.Williams 4-34, Kirk 3-57, D.Johnson 3-31, Edmonds 3-12, Seals-Jones 2-12, Nelson 2-8. Missed field goals: None.

Bentley’s inconsistency a problem for Gamecocks South Carolina hoped to be facing more positive challenges during its off week, not correcting problems the coaching staff believed had been already fixed before the season began. The Gamecocks (3-3, 2-3 Southeastern Conference) expected improved quarterback play, sure-handed receivers and a stronger run game than the first two years under coach Will Muschamp. Instead, South Carolina have not received consistent play from some of its veterans, including junior quarterback Jake Bentley. “Those are the frustrating things to overcome for us right now,” Muschamp said. Bentley’s inconsistent play has been at the top of the list. He had just 9 yards passing in the opening half at No. 14 Kentucky as the Gamecocks fell behind 24-3, a game they would lose 24-10. Last week against Texas A&M, Bentley again had a poor opening half with just 46 yards passing as the Aggies built a 16-0 halftime advantage. Bentley rebounded with 187 yards and three TDs over the final two quarters, but Texas A&M held on 26-23. Bentley’s stats were not helped by first-half drops by receivers Bryan Edwards and Deebo Samuel, both all-SEC candidates when the year began. And South Carolina’s ground game is near the bottom of the SEC, 13th out of 14 teams at 153 yards a game. It’s left the Gamecocks questioning what happened to a season of promise after last year’s breakthrough 9-4 campaign. “We’ve just got to keep fighting in close situations when it gets tough,” defensive tackle Javon Kinlaw said. “We’ve got to keep on doing what we do. Keep being physical and everything else will take care of itself.” Muschamp said the team has hurt itself with mistakes and turnovers. The Gamecocks made eight turnovers in losses to ranked opponents Georgia, Kentucky and Texas A&M. Normally sure-handed receivers like Samuel and Edwards have dropped passes, short-circuiting Gamecocks drives. “Very surprised,” Muschamp said when asked if he imagined those players dropping balls. Muschamp will combine rest and fundamentals during the Gamecocks’ week off. Bentley heard some boos at home against A&M last week. “It was disappointing...,” he said. “but they just want to win, too, and so do I.” Bentley said the goal of the bye week is to get healthy and get players’ minds right for the stretch run. “It’s going to be strictly about us and what we have to do to win football games,” Bentley said. Virginia coach donates $500,000 • Virginia head football coach Bronco Mendenhall and his family have pledged to give $500,000 to the school’s fundraising project. The gift is to support construction of the football program’s new operations center. The school is trying to raise $180 million for various projects, most of which will follow the destruction of University Hall, the former home to basketball and other sports. Besides the football operations center, a master plan still in the design phase will provide for construction of an Olympic sports center and grass practice fields. The school says Mendenhall’s gift will be the largest the school has ever received from one of its coaches. Associated Press

Blocking comes natural to Parker, but he’s yet to catch a pass MU • FROM C1

He was a two-way player for Blue Springs High School in Kansas City, where he started as an offensive lineman his sophomore year for coach Kelly Donohoe and added defensive line duties in 2017, his senior year. “My background has helped me be able to adjust to it and being comfortable with it while also being uncomfortable at the same time,” Parker said. Donohoe said his program doesn’t usually use players on both sides of the ball because they have more than 100 players on the roster. Parker was the exception. “He was just too athletic,” Donohoe said. “We knew he could do it and do a good job with it. It was a struggle early on for him. He realized it was a tough thing to do. But then he was able to understand how hard he had to practice and condition himself to be ready.”

Donohoe was upfront with Parker early. If playing that much started to take a toll on Parker’s performance, the coaching staff would pull him and only play him on offense. “I told him it’s a mindset that you can’t take plays off, and you have to practice really hard,” Donohoe said. “I think that was motivating for him because he wanted to do this for us. He knew we were serious.” Parker draws on that motivation now, as he learns to play on a different side of the ball than he started at Missouri. The blocking part, that’s easy for him. He did that all through high school, and any opportunity he gets to deliver contact, he’ll jump at the chance. The running routes and catching? That’s taken some time to get used to, although he prides himself on having better hands than most linemen, thanks to playing high school basketball. In practice, he turns heads when

“We needed someone who’s really powerful and loved to hit people. That’s what he is. He’s really strong in the weight room, and he’s got the mentality. Last week, he blocked an (Alabama) defensive tackle for us twice. ” Missouri tight ends coach Joe Jon Finley he runs a quick route and catches a pass, prompting teammates to slap his helmet and congratulate him. He wouldn’t say if the catching will translate to games. He’s yet to have a pass thrown his way through MU’s first six games. The Tigers host Memphis (4-3) in Saturday’s 3 p.m. home-

coming game. “All I can say about (catching passes) is to be continued,” Parker said. “I definitely do like catching, but I’m not a selfish person. What comes my way, comes my way.” Finley said that Parker is one of his favorite players to coach because of that selfless mindset. “If we didn’t throw him one ball all year, he wouldn’t care,” Finley said. “He just wants to be on the football field.” Early in preseason camp, the Tigers lost freshman tight end Messiah Swinson to a torn ACL. Before the injury the newcomer was projected to be the third tight end behind veterans Albert Okwuegbunam and Kendall Blanton. At the time, Finley needed a fullback-type body – and someone who liked contact. Enter Parker. “We needed someone who’s really powerful and loved to hit people,” Finley said. “That’s what he is. He’s really strong in

the weight room, and he’s got the mentality. Last week, he blocked an (Alabama) defensive tackle for us twice. He loved it. That’s not natural for most tight ends. He was ready, and he’s doing a great job.” When rookie tight ends come to Finley, his first job is to teach them how to block. Most tight ends also played wide receiver in high school and want to catch passes. When Parker began taking snaps with the tight ends, Finley didn’t have to worry about that. Parker was open to the switch, not only because he helped the team. He still gets to hit opponents — and the move was his fastest path to playing time. “I’m the kind of person who feels like if you give and give, you’ll receive, so why can’t I give?” Parker said. “If they need me to do this, and I’m able, why not?”


SPORTS

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 2 NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE EAST

PF

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE

W

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3

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.600 106 104

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1

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.167

117

162

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W

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Carolina

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2

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Minnesota

3

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Buffalo

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NFC AFC

Div

WEST

Detroit

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LA Rams

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Thursday Denver 45, Arizona 10 Sunday Tennessee vs. LA Chargers at London, 8:30 a.m., KMOV-4 Carolina at Philadelphia, noon, KTVI-2 New England at Chicago, noon, KMOV-4

COLLEGE NOTEBOOK

Div

2-0

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ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

1-2

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Denver

3

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Oakland

1

5

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110

176

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0-3

1-3

0-2

0-2

Minnesota at NY Jets, noon Cleveland at Tampa Bay, noon Detroit at Miami, noon Houston at Jacksonville, noon Buffalo at Indianapolis, noon New Orleans at Baltimore, 3:05 p.m.

LA Rams at San Francisco, 3:25 p.m., KMOV-4 Dallas at Washington, 3:25 p.m. Cincinnati at Kansas City, 7:20 p.m., KSDK-5 Open: Seattle, Green Bay, Oakland, Pittsburgh Monday NY Giants at Atlanta, 7:15 p.m., ESPN

NFL NOTEBOOK

BRONCOS 45, CARDINALS 10

Cowboys receiver Williams suspended for three games

Broncos blow out Arizona

Dallas wide receiver Terrance Williams has been suspended three games for violating the NFL’s substance-abuse policy, a ban he will serve while on injured reserve because of lingering issues following offseason foot surgery. The league said the suspension will be in effect Sunday when the Cowboys visit Washington. After Dallas’ bye week and a home game against Tennessee, the final game of the ban will be Nov. 11 at Philadelphia. But Williams will miss at least three more games after that while on IR. His first possible game is Dec. 9 at home against the Eagles. Williams was arrested in May on a charge of public intoxication. The case was dismissed after Williams completed a state-mandated alcohol awareness education course. New Orleans’ Ginn Jr. goes on IR • The Saints have placed veteran receiver Ted Ginn Jr., who has been struggling with knee soreness, on injured reserve. Ginn has played in four games this season, catching 12 passes for 135 yards and two touchdowns, but has regularly appeared on New Orleans’ official injury report since early in Week 2. Ginn’s production had largely dipped since Week 2 and he did not have a reception in Week 4 before sitting out in Week 5. The move could mean more opportunities for rookie Tre’Quan Smith, a third-round selection in last spring’s draft who had TD catches of 62 and 35 yards in the team’s last game, a Week 5 Monday Night triumph over the visiting Washington Redskins. In other news • Browns starting cornerback E.J. Gaines, who starred at Mizzou and played for the St. Louis Rams, will miss Sunday’s game at Tampa Bay with a concussion. Gaines practiced on Wednesday, but didn’t show any symptoms until Thursday, when he was placed in the league protocol. ... The Oakland Raiders have been fined $20,000 for not downgrading guard Kelechi Osemele (knee) from questionable to out for a Week 5 game. ... With their secondary depleted by injuries, the Bengals signed CB KeiVarae Russell off the practice squad Thursday for an upcoming game in Kansas City. Russell was the Chiefs’ third-round pick in 2016. He’s played in 13 games for Cincinnati over the past two seasons. The Bengals needed another cornerback with Darqueze Dennard sidelined by a shoulder injury suffered during last week’s loss to the Steelers. Safety Shawn Williams also suffered a concussion during that contest and was limited in practice Thursday. Associated Press

Cardinals’ Rosen struggles under pressure

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Broncos linebacker Von Miller hits Arizona quarterback Josh Rosen as he throws during the second half of Denver’s dominating 45-10 victory on the road Thursday night. ASSOCIATED PRESS

GLENDALE, ARIZ . • Von Miller vowed his Denver Broncos would kick the Arizona Cardinals’ behind, except he didn’t say behind. Consider it a promise kept. Emmanuel Sanders threw and caught touchdown passes, Denver returned two interceptions for first-quarter touchdowns and the Broncos snapped a four-game losing streak with a 45-10 rout Thursday night. “It wasn’t even for the Cardinals, it was for my teammates,” Miller said about that rear end-kicking comment. “I just thought what we were missing was the confidence part of it. I thought about it and that is not even like me, but I felt that was the best thing to do to get my teammates going, and it worked.” Todd Davis returned rookie Josh Rosen’s deflected pass for a touchdown on the second play of the game and Chris Harris Jr. took another back 53 yards for a score with 2:02 left in the quarter as the Broncos (3-4) opened a 21-3 lead.

“It has been a tough, tough two weeks,” Denver coach Vance Joseph said. “We had a tough loss on Sunday. We had a short week so it is really good for our football team to win a game. “ Rosen threw three interceptions and fumbled the ball away twice on a rough night that began badly for him and never got better. He limped off the field after he was sacked for the sixth time, on a fourthand-16 play near the end but said afterward he was fine. “I obviously didn’t play up to my standard or even close to it,” Rosen said. The Cardinals, down 35-3 at the half, fell to 0-4 at home for the first time since 1979. “Definitely an embarrassing effort tonight,” Arizona firstyear coach Steve Wilks said. “Our fans deserve more than that. We’ve got to come out and perform better than that.” Case Keenum completed 14 of 21 passes for 161 yards and a touchdown with one interception for Denver. Phillip Lindsay rushed for 90 yards on 14 carries, including a 28yard TD run.

Broncos 45, Cardinals 10 Denver 21 14 7 3 — 45 Arizona 3 0 7 0 — 10 First Quarter Den: Davis 20 interception return (McManus kick), 14:01. Den: Sutton 28 pass from Sanders (McManus kick), 8:38. Ari: FG Dawson 43, 5:18. Den: C.Harris 53 interception return (McManus kick), 2:02. Second Quarter Den: Sanders 64 pass from Keenum (McManus kick), 14:40. Den: Freeman 1 run (McManus kick), :21. Third Quarter Ari: Fitzgerald 4 pass from Rosen (Dawson kick), 8:33. Den: Lindsay 28 run (McManus kick), 3:32. Fourth Quarter Den: FG McManus 41, 5:35. A: 62,359. Den Ari First downs 15 14 Total Net Yards 309 223 Rushes-yards 31-131 21-69 Passing 178 154 Punt Returns 3-23 2-17 Kickoff Returns 2-38 5-77 Interceptions Ret. 3-73 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 15-22-1 21-39-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-11 6-40 Punts 6-43.5 6-50.7 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-2 Penalties-Yards 5-50 7-45 Time of Possession 30:49 29:11 Rushing: Denver, Lindsay 14-90, Freeman 13-37, Keenum 4-4. Arizona, D.Johnson 14-39, Rosen 1-14, Edmonds 5-9, Nelson 1-7. Passing: Denver, Keenum 14-21-1-161, Sanders 1-1-0-28. Arizona, Rosen 21-39-3-194. Receiving: Denver, Sanders 6-102, De.Thomas 5-42, Sutton 1-28, LaCosse 1-12, Lindsay 1-6, Booker 1-(minus 1). Arizona, Fitzgerald 4-40, C.Williams 4-34, Kirk 3-57, D.Johnson 3-31, Edmonds 3-12, Seals-Jones 2-12, Nelson 2-8. Missed field goals: None.

Bentley’s inconsistency a problem for Gamecocks South Carolina hoped to be facing more positive challenges during its off week, not correcting problems the coaching staff believed had been already fixed before the season began. The Gamecocks (3-3, 2-3 Southeastern Conference) expected improved quarterback play, sure-handed receivers and a stronger run game than the first two years under coach Will Muschamp. Instead, South Carolina have not received consistent play from some of its veterans, including junior quarterback Jake Bentley. “Those are the frustrating things to overcome for us right now,” Muschamp said. Bentley’s inconsistent play has been at the top of the list. He had just 9 yards passing in the opening half at No. 14 Kentucky as the Gamecocks fell behind 24-3, a game they would lose 24-10. Last week against Texas A&M, Bentley again had a poor opening half with just 46 yards passing as the Aggies built a 16-0 halftime advantage. Bentley rebounded with 187 yards and three TDs over the final two quarters, but Texas A&M held on 26-23. Bentley’s stats were not helped by first-half drops by receivers Bryan Edwards and Deebo Samuel, both all-SEC candidates when the year began. And South Carolina’s ground game is near the bottom of the SEC, 13th out of 14 teams at 153 yards a game. It’s left the Gamecocks questioning what happened to a season of promise after last year’s breakthrough 9-4 campaign. “We’ve just got to keep fighting in close situations when it gets tough,” defensive tackle Javon Kinlaw said. “We’ve got to keep on doing what we do. Keep being physical and everything else will take care of itself.” Muschamp said the team has hurt itself with mistakes and turnovers. The Gamecocks made eight turnovers in losses to ranked opponents Georgia, Kentucky and Texas A&M. Normally sure-handed receivers like Samuel and Edwards have dropped passes, short-circuiting Gamecocks drives. “Very surprised,” Muschamp said when asked if he imagined those players dropping balls. Muschamp will combine rest and fundamentals during the Gamecocks’ week off. Bentley heard some boos at home against A&M last week. “It was disappointing...,” he said. “but they just want to win, too, and so do I.” Bentley said the goal of the bye week is to get healthy and get players’ minds right for the stretch run. “It’s going to be strictly about us and what we have to do to win football games,” Bentley said. Virginia coach donates $500,000 • Virginia head football coach Bronco Mendenhall and his family have pledged to give $500,000 to the school’s fundraising project. The gift is to support construction of the football program’s new operations center. The school is trying to raise $180 million for various projects, most of which will follow the destruction of University Hall, the former home to basketball and other sports. Besides the football operations center, a master plan still in the design phase will provide for construction of an Olympic sports center and grass practice fields. The school says Mendenhall’s gift will be the largest the school has ever received from one of its coaches. Associated Press

Blocking comes natural to Parker, but he’s yet to catch a pass MU • FROM C1

He was a two-way player for Blue Springs High School in Kansas City, where he started as an offensive lineman his sophomore year for coach Kelly Donohoe and added defensive line duties in 2017, his senior year. “My background has helped me be able to adjust to it and being comfortable with it while also being uncomfortable at the same time,” Parker said. Donohoe said his program doesn’t usually use players on both sides of the ball because they have more than 100 players on the roster. Parker was the exception. “He was just too athletic,” Donohoe said. “We knew he could do it and do a good job with it. It was a struggle early on for him. He realized it was a tough thing to do. But then he was able to understand how hard he had to practice and condition himself to be ready.”

Donohoe was upfront with Parker early. If playing that much started to take a toll on Parker’s performance, the coaching staff would pull him and only play him on offense. “I told him it’s a mindset that you can’t take plays off, and you have to practice really hard,” Donohoe said. “I think that was motivating for him because he wanted to do this for us. He knew we were serious.” Parker draws on that motivation now, as he learns to play on a different side of the ball than he started at Missouri. The blocking part, that’s easy for him. He did that all through high school, and any opportunity he gets to deliver contact, he’ll jump at the chance. The running routes and catching? That’s taken some time to get used to, although he prides himself on having better hands than most linemen, thanks to playing high school basketball. In practice, he turns heads when

“We needed someone who’s really powerful and loved to hit people. That’s what he is. He’s really strong in the weight room, and he’s got the mentality. Last week, he blocked an (Alabama) defensive tackle for us twice. ” Missouri tight ends coach Joe Jon Finley he runs a quick route and catches a pass, prompting teammates to slap his helmet and congratulate him. He wouldn’t say if the catching will translate to games. He’s yet to have a pass thrown his way through MU’s first six games. The Tigers host Memphis (4-3) in Saturday’s 3 p.m. home-

coming game. “All I can say about (catching passes) is to be continued,” Parker said. “I definitely do like catching, but I’m not a selfish person. What comes my way, comes my way.” Finley said that Parker is one of his favorite players to coach because of that selfless mindset. “If we didn’t throw him one ball all year, he wouldn’t care,” Finley said. “He just wants to be on the football field.” Early in preseason camp, the Tigers lost freshman tight end Messiah Swinson to a torn ACL. Before the injury the newcomer was projected to be the third tight end behind veterans Albert Okwuegbunam and Kendall Blanton. At the time, Finley needed a fullback-type body – and someone who liked contact. Enter Parker. “We needed someone who’s really powerful and loved to hit people,” Finley said. “That’s what he is. He’s really strong in

the weight room, and he’s got the mentality. Last week, he blocked an (Alabama) defensive tackle for us twice. He loved it. That’s not natural for most tight ends. He was ready, and he’s doing a great job.” When rookie tight ends come to Finley, his first job is to teach them how to block. Most tight ends also played wide receiver in high school and want to catch passes. When Parker began taking snaps with the tight ends, Finley didn’t have to worry about that. Parker was open to the switch, not only because he helped the team. He still gets to hit opponents — and the move was his fastest path to playing time. “I’m the kind of person who feels like if you give and give, you’ll receive, so why can’t I give?” Parker said. “If they need me to do this, and I’m able, why not?”


HOCKEY

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 10.19.2018

BLUES NOTEBOOK

The Blues’ Pat Maroon moves in on Canadiens goaltender Carey Price as Price’s teammate Mike Reilly (28) helps defend during the second period in Montreal on Wednesday. The Blues lost, 3-2.

Late mistakes lead to Blues’ slow start Parayko looks to move forward BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

TORONTO • Colton Parayko said it’s a play he makes 99 out of 100 times. Wednesday just happened to be that 1 in 100. Parayko’s errant pass intended for fellow Blues defenseman Joel Edmundson was intercepted by Tomas Tatar and resulted in a game-winning goal by Brendan Gallagher with just 11 seconds remaining in Montreal. “(Edmundson) was open,” Parayko said. “I went to play it over, it just kind of rolled off my stick.” Edmundson said following the 3-2 loss that he called for the puck and that it was spinning before Parayko even got his stick on it. “I didn’t try to dust it off (settle the puck),” Parayko said. “I tried to get it over to him as soon as possible, and I think if I would have took an extra second maybe or something like that, obviously it would have stopped spinning. Or I could have maybe ate the puck. There was only 10 seconds. “But that’s the game we play, man. It’s quick decisions. You trust your instincts. Like I said, you make that play probably 99 out of 100. It’s just obviously frustrating, where we were in the game.... But that being said, it’s over and it’s nothing really we can rewind or do anything (about) now. So Toronto Saturday and try to get four points out of this road trip.” After Saturday’s contest against the Maple Leafs, the Blues close out their threegame Canadian swing Monday in Winnipeg. On the decisive sequence, goalie Jake Allen said he was braced for a shot from Tatar in the near slot. “The guy whiffed on his shot, so it just went right to Gallagher,” Allen said. Allen couldn’t quite get over to his right quickly enough to stop Gallagher’s shot from the doorstep of the net. But like Edmundson after the game, Allen didn’t blame Parayko for the miscue. “Mistakes happen. That’s hockey,” Allen said following Thursday’s practice.

“Lots are gonna (blame Parayko) and I know it was an unfortunate time in the game, but we’re here to pick each other up. So we’ll find a way to get it back.”

ABOUT THOSE MISCUES Mistakes, particularly late mistakes, have been killing the Blues so far this season. A turnover by Alex Pietrangelo deep in the St. Louis zone led to the game-winning goal Sunday for Anaheim with 5:16 left in the third period of a 3-2 loss. An ill-advised stretch pass by Pat Maroon was intercepted by Duncan Keith and led to the game-tying goal for Chicago with 6:54 to play in regulation. The Blackhawks won 4-3 in overtime on Oct. 13. A week earlier against Chicago, Vince Dunn shot into traffic during 3-on-3 overtime play. The shot was blocked and led to a breakaway and the game-winning goal by Jonathan Toews in a 4-3 Blues defeat. As for the Parayko pass against Montreal, coach Mike Yeo said: “Listen, it’s obviously a tough play. I feel bad for Colton, but we’re not playing well enough to win hockey games. So when you do that, then yeah, one play could be the difference.” As a team, Yeo said the Blues “don’t have enough urgency. There’s too many breakdowns. Too many bad decisions, and that’s how you don’t win.” BY THE NUMBERS The Blues blocked a seasonhigh 23 shots Wednesday against Montreal, with Pietrangelo leading the way with eight. After a four-game stretch in which the Blues allowed an average of 36 shots on goal, they allowed a season-low 23 shots against the Canadiens. The Blues had a seasonhigh 17 giveaways Wednesday; in their previous five contests they totaled 19, with no more than five giveaways in any one game. Young, quick teams continue to give the Blues problems. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yeo swaps up lines at practice BLUES • FROM C1

the right way. Making sure that guys who aren’t, are held accountable. And making sure that we get the right guys on the ice.” Yeo was true to his word Thursday. It wasn’t as if he pulled names out of a helmet to determine his forward lines and defensive pairings during practice. It just seemed that way. The most eye-opening change came on defense, where veteran Jay Bouwmeester skated on the fourth — or extra — defensive pairing with Jakub Jerabek. So unless Yeo changes his mind between now and Saturday, it looks like Bouwmeester is out of the lineup against the Maple Leafs. “We’ll see,” Yeo said. “Obviously, we’re considering everything right now. Again, the results that we’re getting, we have to consider everything.” Bouwmeester is a two-time NHL all-star and an Olympic gold medalist for Team Canada. At age 35, he’s the oldest player on the Blues’ roster and coming off hip surgery. If he’s indeed a healthy scratch, it’s probably the first time in a long time. Bouwmeester played all 82 games in eight of his previous 13 NHL seasons. His iron man streak of 737 consecutive regular-season games ended Nov. 23, 2014. Last season, he played in only 35 games because of a fractured ankle, then the hip injury. This season, Bouwmeester has one assist and is minus-4. He was caught up ice on Montreal’s first goal Wednesday — a breakaway score by Max Domi. Montreal’s second goal came with Bouwmeester in the penalty box for hooking. During Thursday’s practice at Coca-Cola Coliseum, home of

the American Hockey League’s Toronto Marlies, the rest of the defensive pairings were as follows: • Vince Dunn-Alex Pietrangelo • Joel Edmundson-Robert Bortuzzo • Jordan Schmaltz-Colton Parayko Bortuzzo missed the Montreal game with a lower-body injury, but skated Thursday. As for Dunn, in a week’s time he has gone from being benched for two games to joining Pietrangelo on the team’s top D-pairing. Over the Blues’ first six games, they have had no less than 10 different defensive pairings. If the Thursday’s pairings carry over to Saturday, that number rises to 13. There was much shuffling up front as well on Thursday. Most noteworthy was the reuniting of the Jaden Schwartz-Brayden Schenn-Vladimir Tarasenko line. That trio made beautiful music together early last season, before Schwartz suffered a broken foot Dec. 9 in Detroit and missed the next 20 games. The line of Pat Maroon-Tyler Bozak-Alexander Steen, which made its debut Wednesday in Montreal, remained intact. But a completely new line of Zach Sanford-Ryan O’ReillyDavid Perron skated together on Thursday. Called up Monday from San Antonio, Sanford made his Blues season debut in Montreal and played well in just 9:02 of ice time. Sanford used his big frame (6-4, 200) to win some puck battles behind the net, a commodity that has been in short supply for the Blues so far this season. “He was moving his feet, he was strong on the puck,” Yeo said. “He looked confident in the game, so that’s a good sign.”

The fourth line had Sammy Blais and Jordan Kyrou as wingers, with Ivan Barbashev and Robert Thomas alternating at center. Thomas, a first-round pick in 2017, was a healthy scratch in Montreal. Similar to the musical chairs on defense, Yeo continues to juggle his forward lines, searching for something, anything that can lead to winning hockey. Through the first six games, the Blues have had 14 separate forward line combinations. If Thursday’s lines carry through to Saturday, that number rises to 17. And that’s regardless of whether it’s Barbashev or Thomas at center on the fourth line. Thursday’s practice may not have qualified as a traditional “bag skate,” or punishment skate, but it was a tough session on the heels of a subpar performance against the Canadiens. The Blues did several variations of “battle drills,” where players try to dig the puck out of corners, along the boards or simply try to snatch it from the other guy. And there were sprints on skates to conclude practice. “It was a working day,” Yeo said. “Call it what you want — sending a message. Hopefully, message received. But what it comes down to is just understanding what we’re not doing well enough, and fixing it.” Reiterating a theme he has mentioned on numerous occasions already this season, Yeo said: “I just think we’re not hard enough to play against, whether it’s passing up hits, whether it’s our play with the puck. We’re easy to play against right now. And the results reflect that.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Pens’ Murray shuts out Maple Leafs

NHL SUMMARIES Avalanche 5, Devils 3 Colorado 0 2 3 — 5 New Jersey 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, New Jersey, Hischier 1 (Hall, Zajac), 17:42 (pp). Penalties: Wood, NJ, (hooking), 1:08; Zadorov, COL, (holding), 7:07; Zadorov, COL, Major (fighting), 14:30; Zacha, NJ, Major (fighting), 14:30; Nieto, COL, (hooking), 17:04; Cole, COL, (interference), 19:02; Palmieri, NJ, (interference), 19:37; MacKinnon, COL, (boarding), 19:56. Second period: 2, Colorado, Andrighetto 1 (Cole, Kerfoot), 1:17. 3, Colorado, Landeskog 3 (MacKinnon, Rantanen), 7:08 (pp). 4, New Jersey, Hall 1 (Hischier, Greene), 15:42. Penalties: Palmieri, NJ, (interference), 6:32; Vatanen, NJ, (delay of game), 10:09; Stafford, NJ, (elbowing), 13:22; Wood, NJ, (tripping), 18:13. Third period: 5, New Jersey, Boyle 2 (Hall, Palmieri), 6:22 (pp). 6, Colorado, Landeskog 4 (Cole, Rantanen), 8:08. 7, Colorado, Landeskog 5 (Rantanen, MacKinnon), 16:38. 8, Colorado, Rantanen 2 (MacKinnon), 19:47. Penalties: Johansson, NJ, (holding), 4:01; Wilson, COL, (tripping), 6:04. Shots: Colorado 12-10-12: 34. New Jersey 6-9-15: 30. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 6; New Jersey 2 of 5. Goalies: Colorado, Grubauer 1-1-0 (30 shots27 saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 4-1-0 (33-29). A: 13,374. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Jon Mclsaac. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Ryan Daisy.

Lightning 3, Red Wings 1 Detroit 0 1 0 — 1 Tampa Bay 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Point 4 (Palat, Gourde), 7:33. Penalties: Kronwall, DET, (interference), 5:19; Glendening, DET, (hooking), 9:36; Miller, TB, (hooking), 18:50. Second period: 2, Detroit, Glendening 1 (Abdelkader, Daley), 6:20. 3, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 1 (Sergachev, Kucherov), 15:19. Penalties: Miller, TB, (tripping), 3:56; Paquette, TB, (roughing), 12:08; Bertuzzi, DET, (roughing), 12:08; Paquette, TB, served by Palat, (roughing), 12:08; Palat, TB, (interference), 15:33. Third period: 4, Tampa Bay, Killorn 2 (McDonagh), 18:53. Penalties: Ehn, DET, (holding), 4:13; Kronwall, DET, (holding), 7:40; Coburn, TB, (slashing), 19:21. Shots: Detroit 8-16-6: 30. Tampa Bay 13-6-12: 31. Power-plays: Detroit 0 of 5; Tampa Bay 0 of 4. Goalies: Detroit, Howard 0-3-2 (30 shots-28 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 3-1-0 (30-29). A: 19,092. Referees: Francis Charron, Chris Schlenker. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Kory Nagy.

Jets 4, Canucks 1 Vancouver 0 1 0 — 1 Winnipeg 1 0 3 — 4 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Laine 3 (Byfuglien, Wheeler), 18:56 (pp). Penalties: Wheeler, WPG, (hooking), 16:19; Edler, VAN, (tripping), 17:14. Second period: 2, Vancouver, Horvat 4 (Pouliot), 12:54. Penalties: Edler, VAN, (cross checking), 17:23; Myers, WPG, (roughing), 17:23; Myers, WPG, (interference), 19:36. Third period: 3, Winnipeg, Little 2 (Byfuglien, Ehlers), 4:58 (pp). 4, Winnipeg, Copp 1 (Lowry), 12:46. 5, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 1 (Ehlers, Little), 14:43. Penalties: Edler, VAN, (tripping), 3:21; Gudbranson, VAN, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:04; Hutton, VAN, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:04; Lemieux, WPG, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:04; Chiarot, WPG, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:04. Shots: Vancouver 8-12-7: 27. Winnipeg 11-9-12: 32. Power-plays: Vancouver 0 of 2; Winnipeg 2 of 2. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 3-1-0 (32 shots-28 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 3-2-1 (27-26). A: 15,321. Referees: Dean Morton, Garrett Rank. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Bryan Pancich.

has seven career shutouts. Malkin opened the scoring midway through the first period, six seconds after the Maple Leafs were penalized for too many men on the ice.

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CANADIEN PRESS

Toronto center Zach Hyman (11) is stopped by Pittsburgh goaltender Matt Murray as Penguins’ winger Carl Hagelin defends in a 3-0 Pittsburgh road victory Thursday. Blue Jackets 6, Flyers 3

Penguins 3, Maple Leafs 0

Philadelphia 2 0 1 — 3 Columbus 1 3 2 — 6 First period: 1, Philadelphia, Konecny 1 (Giroux, Hagg), 10:06. 2, Columbus, Duclair 2 (Nutivaara, Murray), 17:53. 3, Philadelphia, Couturier 3 (Provorov, Giroux), 19:10. Penalties: Kukan, CBJ, (delay of game), 4:33; Provorov, PHI, (tripping), 14:03. Second period: 4, Columbus, Atkinson 3 (Panarin), 1:34. 5, Columbus, Atkinson 4 (Panarin), 4:42. 6, Columbus, Foligno 3 (Werenski, Savard), 8:34. Penalties: None. Third period: 7, Philadelphia, Lindblom 2 (Konecny), 1:07. 8, Columbus, Anderson 4, 15:12. 9, Columbus, Milano 1 (Bjorkstrand), 17:48. Penalties: Nash, CBJ, (slashing), 2:27; Weal, PHI, (tripping), 12:39. Shots: Philadelphia 15-12-8: 35. Columbus 12-10-6: 28. Power-plays: Philadelphia 0 of 2; Columbus 0 of 2. Goalies: Philadelphia, Pickard 2-0-0 (28 shots-22 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 1-2-0 (35-32). Referees: Marc Joannette, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Travis Gawryletz. T: 2:20.

Pittsburgh 1 0 2 — 3 Toronto 0 0 0 — 0 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Malkin 2 (Letang, Crosby), 11:42 (pp). Penalties: Toronto bench, served by Gauthier (too many men on the ice), 11:36. Second period: None. Penalties: Hyman, TOR, (tripping), 8:21; Murray, PIT, served by Simon, (delay of game), 9:44. Third period: 2, Pittsburgh, Malkin 3, 17:53. 3, Pittsburgh, Letang 4 (Malkin, Rust), 18:52. Penalties: None. Shots: PIT 17-11-11: 39. Toronto 9-13-16: 38. Power-plays: PIT 1 of 2; TOR 0 of 1. Goalies: PIT, Murray 1-1-0 (39 shots-39 saves). TOR, Andersen 4-1-0 (38-36). T: 2:28.

NHL SCORING LEADERS Through Wednesday’s games Player, team GP G A PTS Auston Matthews, TOR 7 10 6 16 Patrice Bergeron, BOS 6 6 7 13 Morgan Rielly, TOR 7 3 10 13 Sebastian Aho, CAR 7 4 8 12 John Tavares, TOR 7 6 5 11 Mitchell Marner, TOR 7 4 7 11 Brad Marchand, BOS 6 2 9 11 David Pastrnak, BOS 6 7 3 10 Evgeny Kuznetsov, WAS 6 4 6 10 Alexander Radulov, DAL 6 4 6 10 Tyler Seguin, DAL 6 3 7 10 10 tied with 9 pts.

Coyotes 4, Blackhawks 1 Arizona 1 1 2 — 4 Chicago 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Arizona, Crouse 1 (Oesterle, Keller), 11:43. Penalties: Keller, ARI, (tripping), 3:50. Second period: 2, Chicago, Gustafsson 1 (DeBrincat, Toews), 6:34. 3, Arizona, Hinostroza 1 (Demers, Ekman-Larsson), 8:37. Penalties: Ekman-Larsson, ARI, (interference), 5:53; Hayden, CHI, (holding), 5:53. Third period: 4, Arizona, Keller 1, 14:22. 5, Arizona, Hinostroza 2 (Cousins, Connauton), 17:40. Penalties: Connauton, ARI, (delay of game), 10:23. Shots: Arizona 12-10-9: 31. Chicago 13-9-12: 34. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 0; Chicago 0 of 2. Goalies: Arizona, Raanta 1-3-0 (34 shots-33 saves). Chicago, Crawford 0-0-0 (30-27). T: 2:30.

NHL GOALTENDER WINS Through Wednesday’s games Name Team GPI Frederik Andersen, TOR 5 John Gibson, ANA 6 Keith Kinkaid, NJD 4 Craig Anderson, OTT 5 Marc-Andre Fleury, VGK 6 Braden Holtby, WAS 5 Curtis McElhinney, CAR 3 Anders Nilsson, VAN 3 Pekka Rinne, NSH 4 Mike Smith, CGY 5 Semyon Varlamov, COL 5 Cam Ward, CHI 5 Jack Campbell, LAK 5 Devan Dubnyk, MIN 5 Jaroslav Halak, BOS 3 Joonas Korpisalo, CBJ 2 Henrik Lundqvist, NYR 6 Tuukka Rask, BOS 4 Juuse Saros, NSH 2 Cam Talbot, EDM 4

MIN 297 350 239 298 332 301 181 179 239 278 305 309 268 310 152 122 363 206 119 238

W 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

L OT 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 2 3 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 0 0 2 0

Matt Murray made 38 saves for his first shutout of the season and the visiting Pittsburgh Penguins snapped the Toronto Maple Leafs’ winning streak at five games with a stifling 3-0 victory Thursday night. The Blues play in Toronto Saturday night. Evgeni Malkin had two goals and an assist, scoring early and adding an emptynet goal. Kris Letang also had an emptynetter, and Sidney Crosby picked up an assist to tie Darryl Sittler for 60th on the NHL’s career points list with 1,221. Murray returned from a concussion that sidelined him for three games. He

NOTEBOOK Kings activate Quick • The Los Angeles Kings have activated goalie Jonathan Quick from injured reserve. The Kings also sent goalie Peter Budaj back to their AHL affiliate before hosting the New York Islanders. Quick, in his 11th season, played in the Kings’ season opener but missed the next five games with a lower-body injury sustained in practice. Jack Campbell played all five games in Quick’s absence.

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Colorado Winnipeg Chicago Dallas Minnesota Blues Pacific Anaheim Calgary Vancouver Vegas Edmonton Los Angeles San Jose Arizona

GP 6 7 7 6 6 6 6 GP 7 6 7 7 5 6 6 6

W 5 4 4 3 3 2 1 W 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 2

L 1 1 2 1 3 2 3 L 1 2 3 4 2 3 3 4

OT 0 2 1 2 0 2 2 OT 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0

Pts 10 10 9 8 6 6 4 Pts 11 8 8 6 6 5 5 4

GF 19 26 19 23 18 14 17 GF 21 23 23 15 13 12 17 8

GA 12 18 17 25 18 19 23 GA 15 18 23 20 16 16 19 12

Home 3-1-0 2-0-1 3-0-1 1-1-1 3-1-0 2-0-2 1-2-1 Home 2-0-1 2-0-0 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 1-0-1 0-1-0 0-2-0

Away 2-0-0 2-1-1 1-2-0 2-0-1 0-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-1 Away 3-1-0 2-2-0 3-3-0 2-3-0 2-2-0 1-3-0 2-2-1 2-2-0

Div 2-0-0 1-0-0 1-2-0 2-0-1 1-0-0 1-2-0 0-1-2 Div 2-0-1 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-1 1-1-0 1-1-0

L 2 1 2 1 2 3 2 5 L 2 1 2 1 2 4 4 3

OT 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 2 OT 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0

Pts 12 9 9 8 7 6 2 2 Pts 9 8 8 8 7 6 5 4

GF 33 21 26 18 24 12 12 15 GF 25 20 22 20 24 25 18 12

GA 26 15 21 10 22 17 16 33 GA 22 9 22 20 22 31 24 14

Home 2-2-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 4-1-0 2-1-1 2-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-1 Home 2-0-1 4-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-1 3-1-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 1-1-0

Away 4-0-0 1-0-1 1-2-1 0-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-0-2 0-4-1 Away 2-2-0 0-0-0 2-1-0 1-0-1 0-1-1 2-2-0 0-2-1 1-2-0

Div 2-1-0 1-0-1 3-0-0 2-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-1 0-4-0 Div 2-0-1 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 1-1-1 0-1-0 0-1-1 1-0-0

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Montreal Boston Tampa Bay Ottawa Buffalo Florida Detroit Metropolitan Carolina New Jersey Columbus Pittsburgh Washington Philadelphia NY Rangers NY Islanders

GP 8 6 7 5 6 6 4 7 GP 7 5 6 6 6 7 7 5

W 6 4 4 4 3 3 0 0 W 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Thursday Colorado 5, New Jersey 3 Columbus 6, Philadelphia 3 Pittsburgh 3, Toronto 0 Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 1 Winnipeg 4, Vancouver 1 Arizona 4, Chicago 1 Edmonton 3, Boston 2, OT Buffalo at San Jose, late NY Islanders at Los Angeles, late Wednesday Montreal 3, Blues 2 Washington 4, NY Rangers 3, OT Calgary 5, Boston 2 Anaheim 4, NY Islanders 1 Friday Florida at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7 p.m. Nashville at Calgary, 8 p.m. Saturday Colorado at Carolina, noon New Jersey at Philadelphia, noon Buffalo at Los Angeles, 2:30 p.m. Arizona at Winnipeg, 3 p.m. Blues at Toronto, 6 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Detroit at Florida, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Nashville at Edmonton, 9 p.m. Boston at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Anaheim at Vegas, 9 p.m. NY Islanders at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Tampa Bay at Chicago, 6 p.m. Calgary at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Anaheim, 7 p.m.


HOCKEY

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

BLUES NOTEBOOK

The Blues’ Pat Maroon moves in on Canadiens goaltender Carey Price as Price’s teammate Mike Reilly (28) helps defend during the second period in Montreal on Wednesday. The Blues lost, 3-2.

Late mistakes lead to Blues’ slow start Parayko looks to move forward BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

TORONTO • Colton Parayko said it’s a play he makes 99 out of 100 times. Wednesday just happened to be that 1 in 100. Parayko’s errant pass intended for fellow Blues defenseman Joel Edmundson was intercepted by Tomas Tatar and resulted in a game-winning goal by Brendan Gallagher with just 11 seconds remaining in Montreal. “(Edmundson) was open,” Parayko said. “I went to play it over, it just kind of rolled off my stick.” Edmundson said following the 3-2 loss that he called for the puck and that it was spinning before Parayko even got his stick on it. “I didn’t try to dust it off (settle the puck),” Parayko said. “I tried to get it over to him as soon as possible, and I think if I would have took an extra second maybe or something like that, obviously it would have stopped spinning. Or I could have maybe ate the puck. There was only 10 seconds. “But that’s the game we play, man. It’s quick decisions. You trust your instincts. Like I said, you make that play probably 99 out of 100. It’s just obviously frustrating, where we were in the game.... But that being said, it’s over and it’s nothing really we can rewind or do anything (about) now. So Toronto Saturday and try to get four points out of this road trip.” After Saturday’s contest against the Maple Leafs, the Blues close out their threegame Canadian swing Monday in Winnipeg. On the decisive sequence, goalie Jake Allen said he was braced for a shot from Tatar in the near slot. “The guy whiffed on his shot, so it just went right to Gallagher,” Allen said. Allen couldn’t quite get over to his right quickly enough to stop Gallagher’s shot from the doorstep of the net. But like Edmundson after the game, Allen didn’t blame Parayko for the miscue. “Mistakes happen. That’s hockey,” Allen said following Thursday’s practice.

“Lots are gonna (blame Parayko) and I know it was an unfortunate time in the game, but we’re here to pick each other up. So we’ll find a way to get it back.”

ABOUT THOSE MISCUES Mistakes, particularly late mistakes, have been killing the Blues so far this season. A turnover by Alex Pietrangelo deep in the St. Louis zone led to the game-winning goal Sunday for Anaheim with 5:16 left in the third period of a 3-2 loss. An ill-advised stretch pass by Pat Maroon was intercepted by Duncan Keith and led to the game-tying goal for Chicago with 6:54 to play in regulation. The Blackhawks won 4-3 in overtime on Oct. 13. A week earlier against Chicago, Vince Dunn shot into traffic during 3-on-3 overtime play. The shot was blocked and led to a breakaway and the game-winning goal by Jonathan Toews in a 4-3 Blues defeat. As for the Parayko pass against Montreal, coach Mike Yeo said: “Listen, it’s obviously a tough play. I feel bad for Colton, but we’re not playing well enough to win hockey games. So when you do that, then yeah, one play could be the difference.” As a team, Yeo said the Blues “don’t have enough urgency. There’s too many breakdowns. Too many bad decisions, and that’s how you don’t win.” BY THE NUMBERS The Blues blocked a seasonhigh 23 shots Wednesday against Montreal, with Pietrangelo leading the way with eight. After a four-game stretch in which the Blues allowed an average of 36 shots on goal, they allowed a season-low 23 shots against the Canadiens. The Blues had a seasonhigh 17 giveaways Wednesday; in their previous five contests they totaled 19, with no more than five giveaways in any one game. Young, quick teams continue to give the Blues problems. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yeo swaps up lines at practice BLUES • FROM C1

the right way. Making sure that guys who aren’t, are held accountable. And making sure that we get the right guys on the ice.” Yeo was true to his word Thursday. It wasn’t as if he pulled names out of a helmet to determine his forward lines and defensive pairings during practice. It just seemed that way. The most eye-opening change came on defense, where veteran Jay Bouwmeester skated on the fourth — or extra — defensive pairing with Jakub Jerabek. So unless Yeo changes his mind between now and Saturday, it looks like Bouwmeester is out of the lineup against the Maple Leafs. “We’ll see,” Yeo said. “Obviously, we’re considering everything right now. Again, the results that we’re getting, we have to consider everything.” Bouwmeester is a two-time NHL all-star and an Olympic gold medalist for Team Canada. At age 35, he’s the oldest player on the Blues’ roster and coming off hip surgery. If he’s indeed a healthy scratch, it’s probably the first time in a long time. Bouwmeester played all 82 games in eight of his previous 13 NHL seasons. His iron man streak of 737 consecutive regular-season games ended Nov. 23, 2014. Last season, he played in only 35 games because of a fractured ankle, then the hip injury. This season, Bouwmeester has one assist and is minus-4. He was caught up ice on Montreal’s first goal Wednesday — a breakaway score by Max Domi. Montreal’s second goal came with Bouwmeester in the penalty box for hooking. During Thursday’s practice at Coca-Cola Coliseum, home of

the American Hockey League’s Toronto Marlies, the rest of the defensive pairings were as follows: • Vince Dunn-Alex Pietrangelo • Joel Edmundson-Robert Bortuzzo • Jordan Schmaltz-Colton Parayko Bortuzzo missed the Montreal game with a lower-body injury, but skated Thursday. As for Dunn, in a week’s time he has gone from being benched for two games to joining Pietrangelo on the team’s top D-pairing. Over the Blues’ first six games, they have had no less than 10 different defensive pairings. If the Thursday’s pairings carry over to Saturday, that number rises to 13. There was much shuffling up front as well on Thursday. Most noteworthy was the reuniting of the Jaden Schwartz-Brayden Schenn-Vladimir Tarasenko line. That trio made beautiful music together early last season, before Schwartz suffered a broken foot Dec. 9 in Detroit and missed the next 20 games. The line of Pat Maroon-Tyler Bozak-Alexander Steen, which made its debut Wednesday in Montreal, remained intact. But a completely new line of Zach Sanford-Ryan O’ReillyDavid Perron skated together on Thursday. Called up Monday from San Antonio, Sanford made his Blues season debut in Montreal and played well in just 9:02 of ice time. Sanford used his big frame (6-4, 200) to win some puck battles behind the net, a commodity that has been in short supply for the Blues so far this season. “He was moving his feet, he was strong on the puck,” Yeo said. “He looked confident in the game, so that’s a good sign.”

The fourth line had Sammy Blais and Jordan Kyrou as wingers, with Ivan Barbashev and Robert Thomas alternating at center. Thomas, a first-round pick in 2017, was a healthy scratch in Montreal. Similar to the musical chairs on defense, Yeo continues to juggle his forward lines, searching for something, anything that can lead to winning hockey. Through the first six games, the Blues have had 14 separate forward line combinations. If Thursday’s lines carry through to Saturday, that number rises to 17. And that’s regardless of whether it’s Barbashev or Thomas at center on the fourth line. Thursday’s practice may not have qualified as a traditional “bag skate,” or punishment skate, but it was a tough session on the heels of a subpar performance against the Canadiens. The Blues did several variations of “battle drills,” where players try to dig the puck out of corners, along the boards or simply try to snatch it from the other guy. And there were sprints on skates to conclude practice. “It was a working day,” Yeo said. “Call it what you want — sending a message. Hopefully, message received. But what it comes down to is just understanding what we’re not doing well enough, and fixing it.” Reiterating a theme he has mentioned on numerous occasions already this season, Yeo said: “I just think we’re not hard enough to play against, whether it’s passing up hits, whether it’s our play with the puck. We’re easy to play against right now. And the results reflect that.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Pens’ Murray shuts out Maple Leafs

NHL SUMMARIES Avalanche 5, Devils 3 Colorado 0 2 3 — 5 New Jersey 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, New Jersey, Hischier 1 (Hall, Zajac), 17:42 (pp). Penalties: Wood, NJ, (hooking), 1:08; Zadorov, COL, (holding), 7:07; Zadorov, COL, Major (fighting), 14:30; Zacha, NJ, Major (fighting), 14:30; Nieto, COL, (hooking), 17:04; Cole, COL, (interference), 19:02; Palmieri, NJ, (interference), 19:37; MacKinnon, COL, (boarding), 19:56. Second period: 2, Colorado, Andrighetto 1 (Cole, Kerfoot), 1:17. 3, Colorado, Landeskog 3 (MacKinnon, Rantanen), 7:08 (pp). 4, New Jersey, Hall 1 (Hischier, Greene), 15:42. Penalties: Palmieri, NJ, (interference), 6:32; Vatanen, NJ, (delay of game), 10:09; Stafford, NJ, (elbowing), 13:22; Wood, NJ, (tripping), 18:13. Third period: 5, New Jersey, Boyle 2 (Hall, Palmieri), 6:22 (pp). 6, Colorado, Landeskog 4 (Cole, Rantanen), 8:08. 7, Colorado, Landeskog 5 (Rantanen, MacKinnon), 16:38. 8, Colorado, Rantanen 2 (MacKinnon), 19:47. Penalties: Johansson, NJ, (holding), 4:01; Wilson, COL, (tripping), 6:04. Shots: Colorado 12-10-12: 34. New Jersey 6-9-15: 30. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 6; New Jersey 2 of 5. Goalies: Colorado, Grubauer 1-1-0 (30 shots27 saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 4-1-0 (33-29). A: 13,374. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Jon Mclsaac. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Ryan Daisy.

Jets 4, Canucks 1 Vancouver 0 1 0 — 1 Winnipeg 1 0 3 — 4 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Laine 3 (Byfuglien, Wheeler), 18:56 (pp). Penalties: Wheeler, WPG, (hooking), 16:19; Edler, VAN, (tripping), 17:14. Second period: 2, Vancouver, Horvat 4 (Pouliot), 12:54. Penalties: Edler, VAN, (cross checking), 17:23; Myers, WPG, (roughing), 17:23; Myers, WPG, (interference), 19:36. Third period: 3, Winnipeg, Little 2 (Byfuglien, Ehlers), 4:58 (pp). 4, Winnipeg, Copp 1 (Lowry), 12:46. 5, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 1 (Ehlers, Little), 14:43. Penalties: Edler, VAN, (tripping), 3:21; Gudbranson, VAN, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:04; Hutton, VAN, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:04; Lemieux, WPG, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:04; Chiarot, WPG, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:04. Shots: Vancouver 8-12-7: 27. Winnipeg 11-9-12: 32. Power-plays: Vancouver 0 of 2; Winnipeg 2 of 2. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 3-1-0 (32 shots-28 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 3-2-1 (27-26). A: 15,321. Referees: Dean Morton, Garrett Rank. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Bryan Pancich.

Islanders 7, Kings 2 N.Y. Islanders 1 2 4 — 7 Los Angeles 1 0 1 — 2 First Period: 1, NYI, Cizikas 3 (Mayfield), 4:55. 2, LAK, Toffoli 2 (Kovalchuk, Doughty), 14:56 (pp). Penalties: Barzal, NYI, (tripping), 1:18; Komarov, NYI, (slashing), 14:48; Kempe, LA, (hooking), 15:12. Second Period: 3, NYI, Bailey 2 (Barzal, Eberle), 3:43 (pp). 4, NYI, Filppula 3 (Komarov, Ladd), 12:07. Penalties: Kempe, LA, (interference), 1:50; Quick, LA, served by Iafallo, (tripping), 9:28. Third Period: 5, LAK, Carter 2 (Doughty, Iafallo), 2:54 (pp). 6, NYI, Filppula 4 (Ladd), 3:40 (sh). 7, NYI, Martin 2 (Cizikas, Clutterbuck), 4:40. 8, NYI, Komarov 1 (Filppula, Mayfield), 9:20. 9, NYI, Ladd 2 (Mayfield, Barzal), 11:34. Penalties: Ladd, NYI, (hooking), 1:44; Komarov, NYI, (delay of game), 2:18. Shots: NYI 10-14-8: 32. LAK 9-15-11: 35. Power-plays: NYI 1 of 3; LAK 2 of 4. Goalies: NYI, Lehner 2-1-0 (30 shots-28 saves), Greiss 1-2-0 (5-5). LAK, Quick 0-1-1 (29-23), Campbell 2-3-0 (3-2). A: 18,230 (18,230). T: 2:33.

has seven career shutouts. Malkin opened the scoring midway through the first period, six seconds after the Maple Leafs were penalized for too many men on the ice.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CANADIEN PRESS

Toronto center Zach Hyman (11) is stopped by Pittsburgh goaltender Matt Murray as Penguins’ winger Carl Hagelin defends in a 3-0 Pittsburgh road victory Thursday. Blue Jackets 6, Flyers 3

Penguins 3, Maple Leafs 0

Philadelphia 2 0 1 — 3 Columbus 1 3 2 — 6 First period: 1, Philadelphia, Konecny 1 (Giroux, Hagg), 10:06. 2, Columbus, Duclair 2 (Nutivaara, Murray), 17:53. 3, Philadelphia, Couturier 3 (Provorov, Giroux), 19:10. Penalties: Kukan, CBJ, (delay of game), 4:33; Provorov, PHI, (tripping), 14:03. Second period: 4, Columbus, Atkinson 3 (Panarin), 1:34. 5, Columbus, Atkinson 4 (Panarin), 4:42. 6, Columbus, Foligno 3 (Werenski, Savard), 8:34. Penalties: None. Third period: 7, Philadelphia, Lindblom 2 (Konecny), 1:07. 8, Columbus, Anderson 4, 15:12. 9, Columbus, Milano 1 (Bjorkstrand), 17:48. Penalties: Nash, CBJ, (slashing), 2:27; Weal, PHI, (tripping), 12:39. Shots: Philadelphia 15-12-8: 35. Columbus 12-10-6: 28. Power-plays: PHL 0 of 2; CBJ 0 of 2. Goalies: PHL, Pickard 2-0-0 (28 shots-22 saves). CBJ, Bobrovsky 1-2-0 (35-32). T: 2:20.

Pittsburgh 1 0 2 — 3 Toronto 0 0 0 — 0 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Malkin 2 (Letang, Crosby), 11:42 (pp). Penalties: Toronto bench, served by Gauthier (too many men on the ice), 11:36. Second period: None. Penalties: Hyman, TOR, (tripping), 8:21; Murray, PIT, served by Simon, (delay of game), 9:44. Third period: 2, Pittsburgh, Malkin 3, 17:53. 3, Pittsburgh, Letang 4 (Malkin, Rust), 18:52. Penalties: None. Shots: PIT 17-11-11: 39. Toronto 9-13-16: 38. Power-plays: PIT 1 of 2; TOR 0 of 1. Goalies: PIT, Murray 1-1-0 (39 shots-39 saves). TOR, Andersen 4-1-0 (38-36). T: 2:28.

Coyotes 4, Blackhawks 1 Arizona 1 1 2 — 4 Chicago 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Arizona, Crouse 1 (Oesterle, Keller), 11:43. Penalties: Keller, ARI, (tripping), 3:50. Second period: 2, Chicago, Gustafsson 1 (DeBrincat, Toews), 6:34. 3, Arizona, Hinostroza 1 (Demers, Ekman-Larsson), 8:37. Penalties: Ekman-Larsson, ARI, (interference), 5:53; Hayden, CHI, (holding), 5:53. Third period: 4, Arizona, Keller 1, 14:22. 5, Arizona, Hinostroza 2 (Cousins, Connauton), 17:40. Penalties: Connauton, ARI, (delay of game), 10:23. Shots: ARI 12-10-9: 31. Chicago 13-9-12: 34. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 0; Chicago 0 of 2. Goalies: ARI, Raanta 1-3-0 (34 shots-33 saves). CHI, Crawford 0-0-0 (30-27). T: 2:30.

Oilers 3, Bruins 2, OT Boston 0 1 1 0 — 2 Edmonton 0 1 1 1 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Larsson, EDM, (slashing), 6:51; Carlo, BOS, (holding), 15:10. Second period: 1, Boston, Krejci 1 (Grzelcyk, Heinen), 11:17. 2, Edmonton, Yamamoto 1 (Russell, Larsson), 13:24. Penalties: Russell, EDM, (tripping), 6:18. Third period: 3, Edmonton, Nugent-Hopkins 2 (McDavid, Klefbom), 7:33 (pp). 4, Boston, Pastrnak 8 (Marchand, McAvoy), 11:26. Penalties: McAvoy, BOS, (holding stick), 6:31; Nordstrom, BOS, (roughing), 12:31; Wagner, BOS, (roughing), 12:31; Lucic, EDM, (roughing), 12:31; Strome, EDM, (roughing), 12:31; Rieder, EDM, (tripping), 14:37. Overtime: 5, Edmonton, Draisaitl 2 (McDavid), 0:37. Penalties: None. Shots: BOS 12-7-10: 29. EDM 5-10-6-1: 22. Power-plays: BOS 0 of 3; Edmonton 1 of 2. Goalies: BOS, Halak 2-0-0 (22 shots-19 saves). EDM, Talbot 2-2-0 (29-27). T: 2:26.

Lightning 3, Red Wings 1 Detroit 0 1 0 — 1 Tampa Bay 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, TBL, Point 4 (Palat, Gourde), 7:33. Penalties: Kronwall, DET, (interference), 5:19; Glendening, DET, (hooking), 9:36; Miller, TB, (hooking), 18:50. Second period: 2, DET, Glendening 1 (Abdelkader, Daley), 6:20. 3, TBL, Stamkos 1 (Sergachev, Kucherov), 15:19. Penalties: Miller, TB, (tripping), 3:56; Paquette, TB, (roughing), 12:08; Bertuzzi, DET, (roughing), 12:08; Paquette, TB, served by Palat, (roughing), 12:08; Palat, TB, (interference), 15:33. Third period: 4, TBL, Killorn 2 (McDonagh), 18:53. Penalties: Ehn, DET, (holding), 4:13; Kronwall, DET, (holding), 7:40; Coburn, TB, (slashing), 19:21. Shots: DET 8-16-6: 30. TBL 13-6-12: 31. Power-plays: DET 0 of 5; TBL 0 of 4. Goalies: DET, Howard 0-3-2 (30 shots-28 saves). TBL, Vasilevskiy 3-1-0 (30-29). A: 19,092.

Sharks 5, Sabres 1 Buffalo 0 1 0 — 1 San Jose 2 0 3 — 5 First Period: 1, SJS, Donskoi 2 (Kane, E.Karlsson), 3:35 (pp). 2, SJS, Couture 2 (Burns), 4:02 (pp). Penalties: Okposo, BUF, major (high sticking), 1:45; Scandella, BUF, (slashing), 5:54; E.Karlsson, SJ, (hooking), 8:09; McCabe, BUF, (interference), 11:21; Dillon, SJ, (tripping), 15:30; Labanc, SJ, (slashing), 18:52. Second Period: 3, BUF, McCabe 1 (Dahlin, Skinner), 1:35. Penalties: M.Karlsson, SJ, (interference), 2:02; Okposo, BUF, (slashing), 6:29. Third Period: 4, SJS, Couture 3 (Braun, Kane), 4:54. 5, SJS, Pavelski 4 (Labanc, Burns), 11:49 (pp). 6, SJS, Couture 4 (Meier, Hertl), 18:13. Penalties: Labanc, SJ, (tripping), 7:40; Scandella, BUF, (tripping), 11:42; McCabe, BUF, (interference), 12:51. Shots: BUF 9-7-9: 25. SJS 10-9-20: 39. Power-plays: BUF 0 of 5; SJS 3 of 7. Goalies: BUF, Hutton 2-4-0 (38 shots-34 saves). SJS, Jones 2-3-0 (26-25). A: 17,389.

Matt Murray made 38 saves for his first shutout of the season and the visiting Pittsburgh Penguins snapped the Toronto Maple Leafs’ winning streak at five games with a stifling 3-0 victory Thursday night. The Blues play in Toronto Saturday night. Evgeni Malkin had two goals and an assist, scoring early and adding an emptynet goal. Kris Letang also had an emptynetter, and Sidney Crosby picked up an assist to tie Darryl Sittler for 60th on the NHL’s career points list with 1,221. Murray returned from a concussion that sidelined him for three games. He

NOTEBOOK Kings activate Quick • The Los Angeles Kings have activated goalie Jonathan Quick from injured reserve. The Kings also sent goalie Peter Budaj back to their AHL affiliate before hosting the New York Islanders. Quick, in his 11th season, played in the Kings’ season opener but missed the next five games with a lower-body injury sustained in practice. Jack Campbell played all five games in Quick’s absence.

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Colorado Winnipeg Chicago Dallas Minnesota Blues Pacific Anaheim Calgary Vancouver San Jose Vegas Edmonton Los Angeles Arizona

GP 6 7 7 6 6 6 6 GP 7 6 7 7 7 5 7 6

W 5 4 4 3 3 2 1 W 5 4 4 3 3 3 2 2

L 1 1 2 1 3 2 3 L 1 2 3 3 4 2 4 4

OT 0 2 1 2 0 2 2 OT 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0

Pts 10 10 9 8 6 6 4 Pts 11 8 8 7 6 6 5 4

GF 19 26 19 23 18 14 17 GF 21 23 23 22 15 13 14 8

GA 12 18 17 25 18 19 23 GA 15 18 23 20 20 16 23 12

Home 3-1-0 2-0-1 3-0-1 1-1-1 3-1-0 2-0-2 1-2-1 Home 2-0-1 2-0-0 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 1-1-1 0-2-0

Away 2-0-0 2-1-1 1-2-0 2-0-1 0-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-1 Away 3-1-0 2-2-0 3-3-0 2-2-1 2-3-0 2-2-0 1-3-0 2-2-0

Div 2-0-0 1-0-0 1-2-0 2-0-1 1-0-0 1-2-0 0-1-2 Div 2-0-1 1-1-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-1 1-1-0

L 2 1 2 1 2 4 2 5 L 2 1 2 1 2 4 3 4

OT 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 2 OT 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1

Pts 12 9 9 8 7 6 2 2 Pts 9 8 8 8 7 6 6 5

GF 33 21 26 18 24 13 12 15 GF 25 20 22 20 24 25 19 18

GA 26 15 21 10 22 22 16 33 GA 22 9 22 20 22 31 16 24

Home 2-2-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 4-1-0 2-1-1 2-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-1 Home 2-0-1 4-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-1 3-1-0 1-2-0 1-1-0 2-2-0

Away 4-0-0 1-0-1 1-2-1 0-0-0 1-1-0 1-2-0 0-0-2 0-4-1 Away 2-2-0 0-0-0 2-1-0 1-0-1 0-1-1 2-2-0 2-2-0 0-2-1

Div 2-1-0 1-0-1 3-0-0 2-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-1 0-4-0 Div 2-0-1 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 1-1-1 0-1-0 1-0-0 0-1-1

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Montreal Boston Tampa Bay Ottawa Buffalo Florida Detroit Metropolitan Carolina New Jersey Columbus Pittsburgh Washington Philadelphia NY Islanders NY Rangers

GP 8 6 7 5 6 7 4 7 GP 7 5 6 6 6 7 6 7

W 6 4 4 4 3 3 0 0 W 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Thursday Colorado 5, New Jersey 3 Columbus 6, Philadelphia 3 Pittsburgh 3, Toronto 0 Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 1 Winnipeg 4, Vancouver 1 Arizona 4, Chicago 1 Edmonton 3, Boston 2, OT San Jose 5, Buffalo 1 NY Islanders 7, Los Angeles 2 Wednesday Montreal 3, Blues 2 Washington 4, NY Rangers 3, OT Calgary 5, Boston 2 Anaheim 4, NY Islanders 1 Friday Florida at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7 p.m. Nashville at Calgary, 8 p.m. Saturday Colorado at Carolina, noon New Jersey at Philadelphia, noon Buffalo at Los Angeles, 2:30 p.m. Arizona at Winnipeg, 3 p.m. Blues at Toronto, 6 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Detroit at Florida, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Nashville at Edmonton, 9 p.m. Boston at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Anaheim at Vegas, 9 p.m. NY Islanders at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Tampa Bay at Chicago, 6 p.m. Calgary at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Anaheim, 7 p.m.


SPORTS

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 1 NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Boston 1 0 New York 1 0 Toronto 1 0 Philadelphia 1 1 Brooklyn 0 1 Southeast W L Orlando 1 0 Miami 1 1 Charlotte 0 1 Atlanta 0 1 Washington 0 1 Central W L Detroit 1 0 Milwaukee 1 0 Indiana 1 0 Cleveland 0 1 Chicago 0 1

Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .500 .000 Pct 1.000 .500 .000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

GB — — — ½ 1 GB — ½ 1 1 1 GB — — — 1 1

L10 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-1 0-1 L10 1-0 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 L10 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1

Str W-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1

Home 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-0 Home 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-1 Home 1-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0

Away 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 Away 0-0 1-1 0-0 0-1 0-0 Away 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

Conf 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-1 0-1 Conf 1-0 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 Conf 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L New Orleans 1 0 San Antonio 1 0 Memphis 0 1 Dallas 0 1 Houston 0 1 Northwest W L Denver 1 0 Utah 1 0 Portland 0 0 Minnesota 0 1 Oklahoma City 0 1 Pacific W L Phoenix 1 0 Golden State 1 0 LA Lakers 0 0 Sacramento 0 1 LA Clippers 0 1

Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 .000

GB — — 1 1 1 GB — — ½ 1 1 GB — — ½ 1 1

L10 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 0-1 L10 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 L10 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 0-0 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 0-0 L-1 L-1

Home 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 Home 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 Home 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

Away 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 0-0 Away 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 Away 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Conf 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 Conf 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 Conf 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

Thursday Miami 113, Washington 112 Philadelphia 127, Chicago 108 LA Lakers at Portland, late Wednesday Detroit 103, Brooklyn 100 Indiana 111, Memphis 83 Milwaukee 113, Charlotte 112 Orlando 104, Miami 101 New York 126, Atlanta 107 Toronto 116, Cleveland 104 New Orleans 131, Houston 112 San Antonio 112, Minnesota 108 Utah 123, Sacramento 117

Denver 107, LA Clippers 98 Phoenix 121, Dallas 100 Friday Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m. New York at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at Memphis, 7 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

Saturday Brooklyn at Indiana, 6 p.m. Toronto at Washington, 6 p.m. Boston at New York, 6:30 p.m. Orlando at Philadelphia, 6:30 Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Denver, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Portland, 9 p.m. Houston at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Heat sneak past Wizards

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Heat forward Kelly Olynyk (middle) puts up a shot against Wizards forward Jeff Green (right) during the closing seconds Thursday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kelly Olynyk’s putback of Dwyane Wade’s missed jumper produced the go-ahead basket with 0.2 seconds left Thursday night, lifting the Miami Heat to a ragged 113-112 comeback victory over the Washington Wizards, who were without new center Dwight Howard for their season opener. Olynyk was booed every time he touched the ball, on account of a past playoff fracas with the Wizards back when he was with the Boston Celtics. But he certainly got to enjoy the way this game ended, after Miami trailed by as many as nine points. Josh Richardson led Miami with 28 points, Rodney McGruder added 20, and the Heat hit consecutive 3s late in the fourth quarter.

NOTEBOOK G League will offer $125,000 contracts to elite prospects • The G League will begin offering “select contracts” worth $125,000 next year to elite prospects who are not yet eligible for the NBA, a move that could slightly lessen the handful of one-and-done players at the college level. There is no determination yet on how players will be identified. The G League said Thursday that it is establishing a working group to develop that process and other criteria. Players will be eligible to sign the deal if they turn 18 by Sept. 15 prior to the season that they would spend in the G League. The move follows recommendations by the Commission on College Basketball, a group that was tasked with reforming the college game.

NBA SUMMARIES 76ers 127, Bulls 108

NBA SCORING LEADERS

Chicago: Holiday 4-12 0-0 10, Portis 8-15 1-2 20, Carter Jr. 4-10 0-0 8, Payne 0-4 0-0 0, LaVine 11-19 6-7 30, Hutchison 0-1 0-0 0, Parker 7-16 0-0 15, Lopez 1-4 0-0 2, Arcidiacono 3-4 0-0 8, Ulis 0-0 0-0 0, Blakeney 6-16 2-3 15. Totals 44-101 9-12 108. Philadelphia: Covington 6-14 4-4 20, Saric 4-12 3-3 13, Embiid 9-14 12-14 30, Simmons 5-8 3-3 13, Fultz 5-15 1-2 12, Bolden 0-1 0-0 0, Johnson 6-9 1-1 13, McConnell 1-1 2-2 4, Shamet 4-7 0-0 12, Korkmaz 0-1 0-0 0, Redick 4-11 1-1 10. Totals 44-93 27-30 127. Chicago 41 17 18 32 — 108 Philadelphia 38 27 37 25 — 127 3-point goals: Chicago 11-33 (Portis 3-6, Arcidiacono 2-3, LaVine 2-7, Holiday 2-9, Blakeney 1-3, Parker 1-4, Payne 0-1), Philadelphia 12-36 (Shamet 4-7, Covington 4-11, Saric 2-6, Redick 1-3, Fultz 1-3, Bolden 0-1, Korkmaz 0-1, Johnson 0-1, Embiid 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 39 (Portis 11), Philadelphia 55 (Simmons 13). Assists: Chicago 28 (Arcidiacono 8), Philadelphia 30 (Simmons 11). Total fouls: Chicago 23, Philadelphia 17. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second). A: 20,302 (20,478).

Through Wednesday’s games Points scoring G FG Walker, CHA 1 15 Booker, PHX 1 12 Curry, GOL 1 11 Davis, NOR 1 13 Hardaway Jr., NYK 1 10 Mirotic, NOR 1 11 DeRozan, SAN 1 10 Durant, GOL 1 9 George, OKC 1 9 LeVert, Bro 1 10 Lowry, TOR 1 10 Teague, MIN 1 8 Dragic, MIA 1 9 Gordon, ORL 1 9 Griffin, DET 1 8 Antetokounmpo, MIL 1 9 Randle, NOR 1 9 Drummond, DET 1 10 Leonard, TOR 1 9 Mitchell, UTA 1 8

Heat 113, Wizards 112

FG Percentage Davis, Bro Vonleh, NYK Favors, UTA Jones, GOL Gilgeous-Alexander, LA Lowry, TOR Bogdanovic, IND Gobert, UTA Bamba, ORL Ingles, UTA

Miami: McGruder 7-12 3-3 20, Jones Jr. 5-10 6-9 17, Whiteside 3-6 3-5 9, Dragic 3-18 1-1 8, Richardson 8-21 7-8 28, Olynyk 4-6 0-0 9, Adebayo 1-4 2-4 4, T.Johnson 3-9 2-2 9, Wade 4-11 1-2 9. Totals 38-97 25-34 113. Washington: Porter Jr. 3-7 3-4 9, Morris 3-8 3-4 11, Mahinmi 1-2 1-2 3, Wall 9-16 7-10 26, Beal 7-16 4-6 20, Green 6-12 3-3 17, Oubre Jr. 2-8 5-6 9, Smith 2-3 0-0 4, McRae 0-0 0-0 0, Satoransky 1-2 2-2 4, Rivers 4-7 1-2 9. Totals 38-81 29-39 112. Miami 24 34 27 28 — 113 Washington 25 34 30 23 — 112 3-Point Goals: Miami 12-35 (Richardson 5-11, McGruder 3-7, Olynyk 1-2, Jones Jr. 1-2, T.Johnson 1-5, Dragic 1-6, Wade 0-2), Washington 7-26 (Morris 2-3, Green 2-4, Beal 2-7, Wall 1-6, Oubre Jr. 0-3, Rivers 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Miami 55 (Whiteside 10), Washington 40 (Porter Jr. 11). Assists: Miami 25 (Dragic 8), Washington 19 (Wall 9). Total Fouls: Miami 26, Washington 31. Technicals: Dragic, Washington coach Wizards (Defensive three second), Wall, Oubre Jr. A: 20,409 (20,356).

Rebounds Drummond, DET Aldridge, SAN Antetokounmpo, MIL Whiteside, MIA Davis, NOR Gordon, ORL Millsap, DEN Gobert, UTA Sabonis, IND Simmons, PHL

FG 4 5 7 6 5 10 7 7 6 9 G 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

FT 4 5 5 6 8 2 7 9 5 7 2 9 5 4 9 7 5 3 5 5

PTS 41 35 32 32 31 30 28 27 27 27 27 27 26 26 26 25 25 24 24 24

FGA 4 5 8 7 6 12 9 9 8 12

OFF DEF TOT 9 11 20 8 11 19 3 15 18 4 14 18 2 14 16 4 12 16 3 13 16 3 12 15 6 9 15 3 12 15

AVG 41.0 35.0 32.0 32.0 31.0 30.0 28.0 27.0 27.0 27.0 27.0 27.0 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.0 25.0 24.0 24.0 24.0 PCT 1.000 1.000 .875 .857 .833 .833 .778 .778 .750 .750 AVG 20.0 19.0 18.0 18.0 16.0 16.0 16.0 15.0 15.0 15.0

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

Reavie leads at CJ Cup

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brooks Koepka of the U.S. watches his shot on the 10th hole during the first round of the CJ Cup PGA golf tournament at Nine Bridges on Jeju Island, South Korea on Thursday. Koepka shot 71 and is tied for 11th.

Wind makes for tricky back 9 ASSOCIATED PRESS

JEJU ISLAND, SOUTH KOREA • Chez Reavie overcame

cool, windy conditions for a 4-under 68 and a one-stroke lead after the first round of the CJ Cup at Nine Bridges on Thursday. In the breezy conditions, the back nine posed the most difficulty, but the 36-year-old American made two birdies and negotiated it in 35 after starting on the 10th tee, and then picked up three shots on his final nine. Danny Willett and Si Woo Kim shot 69, while the large group at 70 and tied for fourth included Ian Poulter, Nick Watney and Michael Kim. Brooks Koepka, playing in his first tournament since being voted PGA Tour player of the year, shot 71 and was in a group three strokes behind and tied for 11th that included Paul Casey and Hideki Matsuyama. Jason Dufner and Brandt Snedeker shot 72. Defending champion Justin Thomas had a 73, as did Jason Day, Ernie Els and J.B. Holmes. Marc Leishman, who won last week’s CIMB Classic in Malaysia, and Adam Scott had 75s. Reavie’s only PGA Tour win came at the 2008 Canadian Open, and he finished second in back-to-back starts last year in Phoenix and Pebble Beach, losing at Phoenix in a playoff. “It was a great day; I hit the ball really well,” Reavie said of Thursday’s round. “The wind

GOLF ROUNDUP

was blowing really hard all day long so you had to really start the ball well and keep it out of the wind. Luckily, I was able to do that.” Despite the windy conditions, Reavie found all 14 fairways off the tee and hit 15 out of 18 greens in regulation, which he felt was the key to a good score. “It’s tough because once you get above the hole with this wind, it’s really hard to chip it close,” he said. “The more greens you can hit, the better, and that was key to my game.” Willett, who has struggled with injuries and form since winning the 2016 Masters and has dropped to No. 342 in the world, made five birdies and two bogeys in his 69. Willett has just one top-five finish since finishing second in the Italian Open in September 2016. Having committed to play on the PGA Tour by taking up membership this season, Willet said it was important to make a quick start to the season. “I’ve done two tours for a couple of years, and it’s very difficult,” Willett said. “We committed to play on the PGA Tour, to play predominantly over here this year and next. It’s nice to kind of get in and get some points early if you can.” The second of three PGA Tour events in three weeks in Asia has a 78-player field and no cut. Only 19 players broke par on Thursday.

Jutanugarn takes lead at LPGA Shanghai • Ariya Jutanugarn shot a 6-under 66 to take a one-stroke lead after the first round of the Buick LPGA Shanghai tournament on Thursday. Sei Young Kim and Danielle Kang were one shot back, with six other players only two shots off the lead. The tournament is the second of five being played in South Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan in the LPGA’s annual Asian swing. Kang credited her improved play to new coach Butch Harmon. “We just kind of simplify the game a lot,” the American said. “Just trying to calm it down and get back to how I used to play.” Kang tied for third last week at the KEB Hana Bank championship in Incheon, South Korea. Chesters leads at weatheraffected Andalucia • Ashley Chesters was leading on 5-under 66 at the Andalucia Valderrama Masters when play was suspended because of darkness with 60 golfers yet to complete their weather-hit first rounds. More than four hours was lost as play was twice suspended because of stormy conditions at the Real Club Valderrama in southern Spain. English journeyman Chesters collected six birdies and one bogey to lead over Gregory Bourdy of France. Tournament host and defending champion Sergio Garcia was at 68 along with fellow Spaniards Alvaro Quiros and Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, and Australia’s Jason Scrivener. Associated Press

Larson confident about Kansas KANSAS CITY STAR

It was nearly one year ago that Kyle Larson strolled into Kansas City, Kan., full of optimism. He sat in third place in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series playoff standings, a championship within reach. And then: Disaster. Engine failure at Kansas Speedway erased a sizable 29-point cushion and eliminated him from the playoffs. Some 364 days later, he’s back where it all went wrong. With another opportunity to advance in the playoffs. This one will be a bit more challenging. Larson, 26, enters Sunday’s Hollywood Casino 400 at Kansas Speedway on the outside of the bubble. And he’s quite a ways outside — essentially placing him in a must-win scenario to keep his championship hopes alive. Larson is 36 points behind the eighth and final advancing place, but winning drivers are guaranteed one of the spots in the next round. “I definitely think we have to go there and win,” Larson said in a phone interview with The Star this week. “But I’m actually kind of excited to go there and know what we have to do. The two previous years that I’ve been knocked out of the playoffs, each of the rounds I’ve gotten knocked out in, I felt like we were pretty safe to make it through to the next one. “At least this week we know what we have to do. I’m kind of excited for that opportunity.” It comes on a track in which Larson says he’s quite comfortable, last fall’s race notwithstanding. With valid reasoning. Larson has finished top-six in two of his last three races in Kansas. The résumé could have been even better. He led for 101 laps during the spring race earlier this

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyle Larson leads Kurt Busch during the NASCAR Cup series race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., in September. > NASCAR Cup Series at Kansas, 1:30 p.m. Sunday, KSDK (5)

NASCAR CUP SERIES Playoff points leaders Top eight advance to next round. * Advance on race wins. Driver *1. Aric Almirola *2. Chase Elliott 3. Kevin Harvick 4. Kyle Busch 5. Joey Logano 6. Kurt Busch 7. Clint Bowyer 8. Martin Truex Jr.

points 3,087 3,066 3,128 3,111 3,104 3,095 3,086 3,083

9. Brad Keselowski 10. Ryan Blaney 11. Kyle Larson 12. Alex Bowman

3,065 3,061 3,047 3,015

year and won the middle stage. A late crash necessitated a rally to finish fourth. The winner of the race, Kevin Harvick, credited Larson with the fastest car that day. “Kansas suits our team very well,” Larson said. “I feel like we do pretty good with the smooth, high-grip tracks. Also, at Kansas, you can get going right around the walls. Any time we can run the top, that suits my driving style. I’m pretty confident for this weekend and confident anytime we go to Kansas.”

It just hasn’t yet equated to what he needs Sunday afternoon. A victory. Larson had four wins in 2017, a seemingly breakthrough season, though none were in Kansas. The ensuing year has been defined by some transitions, including his car, which is now the No. 42 Chevrolet Camaro. He is yet to win a race in 2018, but nine topfive finishes have kept him alive in the second round of the playoffs. He might have more room for error Sunday had he not endured what he called an “embarrassing” weekend at Talladega, where he finished 11th. Even so, no driver has accumulated more points without a win than the 3,047 from Larson. It’s not exactly a statistic any driver wants to own. But he does have one more shot to change it. “We’ve been close to getting wins there before,” Larson said. “Just gotta hope it all comes together this weekend, and we have a very good race and execute well and put ourselves in a spot at the end of the race to get a win.”


SPORTS

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 2 NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Boston 1 0 New York 1 0 Toronto 1 0 Philadelphia 1 1 Brooklyn 0 1 Southeast W L Orlando 1 0 Miami 1 1 Charlotte 0 1 Atlanta 0 1 Washington 0 1 Central W L Detroit 1 0 Milwaukee 1 0 Indiana 1 0 Cleveland 0 1 Chicago 0 1

Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .500 .000 Pct 1.000 .500 .000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

GB — — — ½ 1 GB — ½ 1 1 1 GB — — — 1 1

L10 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-1 0-1 L10 1-0 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 L10 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1

Str W-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1

Home 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-0 Home 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-1 Home 1-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0

Away 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 Away 0-0 1-1 0-0 0-1 0-0 Away 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

Conf 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-1 0-1 Conf 1-0 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 Conf 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L New Orleans 1 0 San Antonio 1 0 Memphis 0 1 Dallas 0 1 Houston 0 1 Northwest W L Denver 1 0 Utah 1 0 Portland 1 0 Minnesota 0 1 Oklahoma City 0 1 Pacific W L Phoenix 1 0 Golden State 1 0 LA Lakers 0 1 Sacramento 0 1 LA Clippers 0 1

Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 .000

GB — — 1 1 1 GB — — — 1 1 GB — — 1 1 1

L10 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 0-1 L10 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 L10 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 0-1

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1

Home 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 Home 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 Home 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1

Away 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 0-0 Away 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 Away 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-0

Conf 1-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 Conf 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 Conf 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 0-1

Thursday Miami 113, Washington 112 Philadelphia 127, Chicago 108 Portland 128, LA Lakers 119 Wednesday Detroit 103, Brooklyn 100 Indiana 111, Memphis 83 Milwaukee 113, Charlotte 112 Orlando 104, Miami 101 New York 126, Atlanta 107 Toronto 116, Cleveland 104 New Orleans 131, Houston 112 San Antonio 112, Minnesota 108 Utah 123, Sacramento 117

Denver 107, LA Clippers 98 Phoenix 121, Dallas 100 Friday Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m. New York at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at Memphis, 7 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

Saturday Brooklyn at Indiana, 6 p.m. Toronto at Washington, 6 p.m. Boston at New York, 6:30 p.m. Orlando at Philadelphia, 6:30 Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Denver, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Portland, 9 p.m. Houston at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Heat sneak past Wizards

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Heat forward Kelly Olynyk (middle) puts up a shot against Wizards forward Jeff Green (right) during the closing seconds Thursday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kelly Olynyk’s putback of Dwyane Wade’s missed jumper produced the go-ahead basket with 0.2 seconds left Thursday night, lifting the Miami Heat to a ragged 113-112 comeback victory over the Washington Wizards, who were without new center Dwight Howard for their season opener. Olynyk was booed every time he touched the ball, on account of a past playoff fracas with the Wizards back when he was with the Boston Celtics. But he certainly got to enjoy the way this game ended, after Miami trailed by as many as nine points. Josh Richardson led Miami with 28 points, Rodney McGruder added 20, and the Heat hit consecutive 3s late in the fourth quarter.

NOTEBOOK G League will offer $125,000 contracts to elite prospects • The G League will begin offering “select contracts” worth $125,000 next year to elite prospects who are not yet eligible for the NBA, a move that could slightly lessen the handful of one-and-done players at the college level. There is no determination yet on how players will be identified. The G League said Thursday that it is establishing a working group to develop that process and other criteria. Players will be eligible to sign the deal if they turn 18 by Sept. 15 prior to the season that they would spend in the G League. The move follows recommendations by the Commission on College Basketball, a group that was tasked with reforming the college game.

NBA SUMMARIES 76ers 127, Bulls 108

T’Blazers 128, Lakers 119

Chicago: Holiday 4-12 0-0 10, Portis 8-15 1-2 20, Carter Jr. 4-10 0-0 8, Payne 0-4 0-0 0, LaVine 11-19 6-7 30, Hutchison 0-1 0-0 0, Parker 7-16 0-0 15, Lopez 1-4 0-0 2, Arcidiacono 3-4 0-0 8, Ulis 0-0 0-0 0, Blakeney 6-16 2-3 15. Totals 44-101 9-12 108. Philadelphia: Covington 6-14 4-4 20, Saric 4-12 3-3 13, Embiid 9-14 12-14 30, Simmons 5-8 3-3 13, Fultz 5-15 1-2 12, Bolden 0-1 0-0 0, Johnson 6-9 1-1 13, McConnell 1-1 2-2 4, Shamet 4-7 0-0 12, Korkmaz 0-1 0-0 0, Redick 4-11 1-1 10. Totals 44-93 27-30 127. Chicago 41 17 18 32 — 108 Philadelphia 38 27 37 25 — 127 3-point goals: Chicago 11-33 (Portis 3-6, Arcidiacono 2-3, LaVine 2-7, Holiday 2-9, Blakeney 1-3, Parker 1-4, Payne 0-1), Philadelphia 12-36 (Shamet 4-7, Covington 4-11, Saric 2-6, Redick 1-3, Fultz 1-3, Bolden 0-1, Korkmaz 0-1, Johnson 0-1, Embiid 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 39 (Portis 11), Philadelphia 55 (Simmons 13). Assists: Chicago 28 (Arcidiacono 8), Philadelphia 30 (Simmons 11). Total fouls: Chicago 23, Philadelphia 17. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second). A: 20,302 (20,478).

LA Lakers: Ingram 7-15 2-4 16, James 9-16 8-9 26, McGee 5-6 3-4 13, Rondo 6-13 0-0 13, Caldwell-Pope 1-3 2-2 5, Beasley 0-0 0-0 0, Kuzma 5-15 4-5 15, Ball 2-7 2-2 7, Hart 8-12 1-3 20, Stephenson 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 45-93 22-29 119. Portland: Layman 1-4 0-0 3, Aminu 1-10 3-4 5, Nurkic 7-14 2-2 16, Lillard 9-21 8-8 28, McCollum 6-17 6-6 21, Harkless 3-5 0-0 7, Collins 3-4 0-0 6, Leonard 0-0 0-0 0, Curry 2-6 0-0 5, Turner 5-8 3-4 13, Stauskas 7-11 5-5 24. Totals 44-100 27-29 128. L.A. Lakers 31 32 28 28 — 119 Portland 34 31 28 35 — 128 3-Point Goals: L.A. Lakers 7-30 (Hart 3-5, CaldwellPope 1-1, Rondo 1-2, Ball 1-4, Kuzma 1-7, Stephenson 0-3, James 0-4, Ingram 0-4), Portland 13-37 (Stauskas 5-8, McCollum 3-6, Lillard 2-7, Harkless 1-2, Curry 1-2, Layman 1-4, Collins 0-1, Nurkic 0-1, Aminu 0-6). Fouled Out: Rondo. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 46 (James 12), Portland 54 (Nurkic 9). Assists: L.A. Lakers 23 (Rondo 11), Portland 21 (Turner 6). Total Fouls: L.A. Lakers 26, Portland 26. A: 19,996

Heat 113, Wizards 112 Miami: McGruder 7-12 3-3 20, Jones Jr. 5-10 6-9 17, Whiteside 3-6 3-5 9, Dragic 3-18 1-1 8, Richardson 8-21 7-8 28, Olynyk 4-6 0-0 9, Adebayo 1-4 2-4 4, T.Johnson 3-9 2-2 9, Wade 4-11 1-2 9. Totals 38-97 25-34 113. Washington: Porter Jr. 3-7 3-4 9, Morris 3-8 3-4 11, Mahinmi 1-2 1-2 3, Wall 9-16 7-10 26, Beal 7-16 4-6 20, Green 6-12 3-3 17, Oubre Jr. 2-8 5-6 9, Smith 2-3 0-0 4, McRae 0-0 0-0 0, Satoransky 1-2 2-2 4, Rivers 4-7 1-2 9. Totals 38-81 29-39 112. Miami 24 34 27 28 — 113 Washington 25 34 30 23 — 112 3-Point Goals: Miami 12-35 (Richardson 5-11, McGruder 3-7, Olynyk 1-2, Jones Jr. 1-2, T.Johnson 1-5, Dragic 1-6, Wade 0-2), Washington 7-26 (Morris 2-3, Green 2-4, Beal 2-7, Wall 1-6, Oubre Jr. 0-3, Rivers 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Miami 55 (Whiteside 10), Washington 40 (Porter Jr. 11). Assists: Miami 25 (Dragic 8), Washington 19 (Wall 9). Total Fouls: Miami 26, Washington 31. Technicals: Dragic, Washington coach Wizards (Defensive three second), Wall, Oubre Jr. A: 20,409 (20,356).

NBA SCORING LEADERS Through Wednesday’s games Points scoring G FG Walker, CHA 1 15 Booker, PHX 1 12 Curry, GOL 1 11 Davis, NOR 1 13 Hardaway Jr., NYK 1 10 Mirotic, NOR 1 11 DeRozan, SAN 1 10 Durant, GOL 1 9 George, OKC 1 9 LeVert, Bro 1 10 Lowry, TOR 1 10 Teague, MIN 1 8 Dragic, MIA 1 9 Gordon, ORL 1 9 Griffin, DET 1 8 Antetokounmpo, MIL 1 9 Randle, NOR 1 9 Drummond, DET 1 10 Leonard, TOR 1 9 Mitchell, UTA 1 8

FT 4 5 5 6 8 2 7 9 5 7 2 9 5 4 9 7 5 3 5 5

PTS 41 35 32 32 31 30 28 27 27 27 27 27 26 26 26 25 25 24 24 24

AVG 41.0 35.0 32.0 32.0 31.0 30.0 28.0 27.0 27.0 27.0 27.0 27.0 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.0 25.0 24.0 24.0 24.0

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

Reavie leads at CJ Cup

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brooks Koepka of the U.S. watches his shot on the 10th hole during the first round of the CJ Cup PGA golf tournament at Nine Bridges on Jeju Island, South Korea on Thursday. Koepka shot 71 and is tied for 11th.

Wind makes for tricky back 9 ASSOCIATED PRESS

JEJU ISLAND, SOUTH KOREA • Chez Reavie overcame

cool, windy conditions for a 4-under 68 and a one-stroke lead after the first round of the CJ Cup at Nine Bridges on Thursday. In the breezy conditions, the back nine posed the most difficulty, but the 36-year-old American made two birdies and negotiated it in 35 after starting on the 10th tee, and then picked up three shots on his final nine. Danny Willett and Si Woo Kim shot 69, while the large group at 70 and tied for fourth included Ian Poulter, Nick Watney and Michael Kim. Brooks Koepka, playing in his first tournament since being voted PGA Tour player of the year, shot 71 and was in a group three strokes behind and tied for 11th that included Paul Casey and Hideki Matsuyama. Jason Dufner and Brandt Snedeker shot 72. Defending champion Justin Thomas had a 73, as did Jason Day, Ernie Els and J.B. Holmes. Marc Leishman, who won last week’s CIMB Classic in Malaysia, and Adam Scott had 75s. Reavie’s only PGA Tour win came at the 2008 Canadian Open, and he finished second in back-to-back starts last year in Phoenix and Pebble Beach, losing at Phoenix in a playoff. “It was a great day; I hit the ball really well,” Reavie said of Thursday’s round. “The wind

GOLF ROUNDUP

was blowing really hard all day long so you had to really start the ball well and keep it out of the wind. Luckily, I was able to do that.” Despite the windy conditions, Reavie found all 14 fairways off the tee and hit 15 out of 18 greens in regulation, which he felt was the key to a good score. “It’s tough because once you get above the hole with this wind, it’s really hard to chip it close,” he said. “The more greens you can hit, the better, and that was key to my game.” Willett, who has struggled with injuries and form since winning the 2016 Masters and has dropped to No. 342 in the world, made five birdies and two bogeys in his 69. Willett has just one top-five finish since finishing second in the Italian Open in September 2016. Having committed to play on the PGA Tour by taking up membership this season, Willet said it was important to make a quick start to the season. “I’ve done two tours for a couple of years, and it’s very difficult,” Willett said. “We committed to play on the PGA Tour, to play predominantly over here this year and next. It’s nice to kind of get in and get some points early if you can.” The second of three PGA Tour events in three weeks in Asia has a 78-player field and no cut. Only 19 players broke par on Thursday.

Jutanugarn takes lead at LPGA Shanghai • Ariya Jutanugarn shot a 6-under 66 to take a one-stroke lead after the first round of the Buick LPGA Shanghai tournament on Thursday. Sei Young Kim and Danielle Kang were one shot back, with six other players only two shots off the lead. The tournament is the second of five being played in South Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan in the LPGA’s annual Asian swing. Kang credited her improved play to new coach Butch Harmon. “We just kind of simplify the game a lot,” the American said. “Just trying to calm it down and get back to how I used to play.” Kang tied for third last week at the KEB Hana Bank championship in Incheon, South Korea. Chesters leads at weatheraffected Andalucia • Ashley Chesters was leading on 5-under 66 at the Andalucia Valderrama Masters when play was suspended because of darkness with 60 golfers yet to complete their weather-hit first rounds. More than four hours was lost as play was twice suspended because of stormy conditions at the Real Club Valderrama in southern Spain. English journeyman Chesters collected six birdies and one bogey to lead over Gregory Bourdy of France. Tournament host and defending champion Sergio Garcia was at 68 along with fellow Spaniards Alvaro Quiros and Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, and Australia’s Jason Scrivener. Associated Press

Larson confident about Kansas KANSAS CITY STAR

It was nearly one year ago that Kyle Larson strolled into Kansas City, Kan., full of optimism. He sat in third place in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series playoff standings, a championship within reach. And then: Disaster. Engine failure at Kansas Speedway erased a sizable 29-point cushion and eliminated him from the playoffs. Some 364 days later, he’s back where it all went wrong. With another opportunity to advance in the playoffs. This one will be a bit more challenging. Larson, 26, enters Sunday’s Hollywood Casino 400 at Kansas Speedway on the outside of the bubble. And he’s quite a ways outside — essentially placing him in a must-win scenario to keep his championship hopes alive. Larson is 36 points behind the eighth and final advancing place, but winning drivers are guaranteed one of the spots in the next round. “I definitely think we have to go there and win,” Larson said in a phone interview with The Star this week. “But I’m actually kind of excited to go there and know what we have to do. The two previous years that I’ve been knocked out of the playoffs, each of the rounds I’ve gotten knocked out in, I felt like we were pretty safe to make it through to the next one. “At least this week we know what we have to do. I’m kind of excited for that opportunity.” It comes on a track in which Larson says he’s quite comfortable, last fall’s race notwithstanding. With valid reasoning. Larson has finished top-six in two of his last three races in Kansas. The résumé could have been even better. He led for 101 laps during the spring race earlier this

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyle Larson leads Kurt Busch during the NASCAR Cup series race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., in September. > NASCAR Cup Series at Kansas, 1:30 p.m. Sunday, KSDK (5)

NASCAR CUP SERIES Playoff points leaders Top eight advance to next round. * Advance on race wins. Driver *1. Aric Almirola *2. Chase Elliott 3. Kevin Harvick 4. Kyle Busch 5. Joey Logano 6. Kurt Busch 7. Clint Bowyer 8. Martin Truex Jr.

points 3,087 3,066 3,128 3,111 3,104 3,095 3,086 3,083

9. Brad Keselowski 10. Ryan Blaney 11. Kyle Larson 12. Alex Bowman

3,065 3,061 3,047 3,015

year and won the middle stage. A late crash necessitated a rally to finish fourth. The winner of the race, Kevin Harvick, credited Larson with the fastest car that day. “Kansas suits our team very well,” Larson said. “I feel like we do pretty good with the smooth, high-grip tracks. Also, at Kansas, you can get going right around the walls. Any time we can run the top, that suits my driving style. I’m pretty confident for this weekend and confident anytime we go to Kansas.”

It just hasn’t yet equated to what he needs Sunday afternoon. A victory. Larson had four wins in 2017, a seemingly breakthrough season, though none were in Kansas. The ensuing year has been defined by some transitions, including his car, which is now the No. 42 Chevrolet Camaro. He is yet to win a race in 2018, but nine topfive finishes have kept him alive in the second round of the playoffs. He might have more room for error Sunday had he not endured what he called an “embarrassing” weekend at Talladega, where he finished 11th. Even so, no driver has accumulated more points without a win than the 3,047 from Larson. It’s not exactly a statistic any driver wants to own. But he does have one more shot to change it. “We’ve been close to getting wins there before,” Larson said. “Just gotta hope it all comes together this weekend, and we have a very good race and execute well and put ourselves in a spot at the end of the race to get a win.”


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

FOOTBALL • WEEK 9 SPOTLIGHT

Winfield on cusp of history BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

Keith McGlasson knew what he wanted to do but he had to see where his players stood. Literally. The Winfield football coach, McGlasson watched senior quarterback Collin Sutton score a 1-yard touchdown in the first overtime at Warrenton to bring the Warriors within a point of a second extra period. The offense turned to the sideline, remained in place and thrust their fingers into the air. They wanted to go for two. “It wasn’t even a question,” McGlasson said. “They wanted to win.” The Warriors lined up to try for the 2-point conversion only to have McGlasson burn a timeout just before the snap. The coaching staff thought Warrenton’s defense had the play nailed. In the huddle McGlasson asked the players what they saw and changed the play. Sutton carried the ball into the end zone to give Winfield a 43-42 walk-off victory. “It was awesome,” McGlasson said. “I had only had about nine heart attacks in that game.” For a team with “win” in its name, the wins have been hard to come by for Winfield. The current seniors hav never won more than four games until this season. The Warriors have had their share of 0-10 campaigns in recent. This year, though, the tables have turned in record-breaking fashion. Winfield is 6-2 and tied the school record for wins in a season last week. It’s thrilling win over Warrenton was its second Gateway Athletic Conference North victory of the season. They are the only GAC victories for the Warriors since they joined the league in 2012. It’s first league win was just as memorable as its second. Winfield pulled out a 44-42 victory over Orchard Farm on senior night. It was the first time the Warriors beat the Eagles. It sent a clear message that Winfield was different this year and it had the town buzzing. “It meant everything to beat them,” senior offensive lineman Anthony Heintzelman said. Most of the Warriors played to-

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

MICHAEL GULLEDGE • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Winfield’s Collin Sutton (2) has scored an area-best 26 touchdowns this season.

gether in middle school and have only grown closer over the years. “We realized this was a good group in seventh grade when we went undefeated,” senior linebacker Kiyah Christensen said. It took another four years before Winfield put all the pieces together. Now that it has, the Warriors are a threat to score nearly every time they touch the ball. Sutton is among the area’s most prolific offensive players. He’s scored an area-best 26 touchdowns and tacked on another seven 2-point conversions. The 6-foot-1 and 190-pound Sutton has rushed for 1,615 yards, completed 76 of 123 passes for 1,015 yards, 16 touchdowns and been intercepted five times. Sutton took over quarterback duties as a sophomore and gave glimmers of what he could do when he threw for 1,445 yards, 17 touchdowns and rushed for 780 yards and 11 more scores. Last season, he threw for 1,342 yards and 12 touchdowns while rushing for 1,507 yards and another 19 touchdowns. Even as he’s found the end zone more than ever before, Sutton said it hasn’t fazed him. “I haven’t thought about it,” he said. “I just like winning and we’re winning.” The chemistry on the field is evident everywhere, but most prevalent up front on the offensive line. The Warriors aren’t the big-

gest bunch of hogs on the field but they’re cohesive, they communicate and they trust each other. “We’re not an over-sized offensive line,” senior right guard Chuck Lindsay said. Though he did say, “We have so many pancakes they call us Denny’s.” The Warriors have enough depth that most of the roster doesn’t have to play both ways. Senior receiver and linebacker Branden Resto is one of the few who starts on offense and defense. So far he has 76 tackles, 11 tackles for loss and two sacks. He’s also rushed for 374 yards and six touchdowns. Christensen leads the Warriors with 120 tackles, 10 for loss. Resto said time and dedication in the weight room have helped him adjust to playing both ways on varsity. “Size, strength and speed has accounted for a lot of their success,” McGlasson said. Winfield concludes its regular season at 7 p.m. Friday when it hosts Lift For Life (7-1).Winfield has its sights set on breaking its own school record for wins. Should the Warriors emerge victorious, they will be the first team in school history with seven wins. It’s homecoming, the Winfield faithful are fired up and this senior class is ready to set itself apart. “Everyone is going to be excited,” Sutton said. “That energy is going to help us win.”

FOOTBALL • WEEK 9 GAMES TO WATCH LAFAYETTE LANCERS at MARQUETTE MUSTANGS When: 7 p.m. Friday Records: Lafayette 3-5 overall, 1-2 Suburban West American; Marquette 5-3, 3-0 Last week: Lindbergh 30, Lafayette 0; Marquette 13, Eureka 12 On Lafayette: Three wins is the fewest in a season since the Lancers went 2-8 in 2006. That year they beat Marquette in their season finale. ...Junior quarterback Joey Moorkamp has thrown for 802 yards and six touchdowns with four interceptions. Junior running back Caden Phipps has rushed for 605 yards and six touchdowns. Senior receiver Jack Politte has 17 receptions for 260 yards and two touchdowns. ...Junior linebacker Jack Sanders has 83 tackles. Senior defensive lineman Steven Harding has 62 tackles, 11 tackles for loss and three sacks. Senior defensive lineman Darion Baker has 55 tackles, 21 tackles for loss and six sacks. Junior defensive back Antonio Cooper has three interceptions. On Marquette: Beat Eureka for first time in school history last week. Has lost nine of last 10 to Lafayette and are 6-15 since 1999 but did score a 28-20 win in 2016. ...Senior running back Kyle Mill has rushed for 1,100 yards and 13 touchdowns. Junior quarterback George Williams has thrown for 711 yards, six touchdowns and eight interceptions. Senior receiver Marty Carr has caught 11 passes for 141 yards and scored three touchdowns. Senior receiver Presley Ingram has 15 receptions for 202 yards. ...Senior linebacker Geoffrey Meyer has 32 tackles. Junior defensive end Josh Merz has 21 tackles and three sacks. EAST ST. LOUIS FLYERS at ALTON REDBIRDS When: 7 p.m., Friday Records: East St. Louis 6-2, 5-0 Southwestern Conference; Alton 5-3, 3-2 Rankings: East St. Louis No. 2 large school STLhighschoolsports.com, No. 3 Class 7A Illinois AP Last week: East St. Louis 78, O’Fallon 13; Alton 45, Granite City 9 On East St. Louis: Won 19 consecutive Southwestern Conference games and can clinch third consecutive league title with a victory. Won 12 in a row on the field against Alton. Had a forfeit loss to the Redbirds in 2010. ...Sophomore quarterback Tyler Macon has thrown for 1,534 yards, 17 touchdowns and been intercepted four times. He’s rushed for 942 yards and 14 touchdowns. Senior running back Treven Swingler has rushed for 857 yards and 10 touchdowns. Junior running back DeMonta Witherspoon has rushed for 788 yards and 13 touchdowns. Junior receiver Lawaun Powell Jr. has 24 catches for 570 yards and seven touchdowns. Junior Antonio Johnson has caught 22 passes for 387 yards and five touchdowns. Sophomore receiver Kenneth Cotton has 22 catches for 200 yards and a score. ...Senior linebacker Sydney Houston has 95 tackles and three sacks. Senior defensive lineman Demond Taylor has 74 tackles and five tackles. Witherspoon has 72 tackles and three sacks at linebacker. Johnson has four interceptions. Sophomore defensive lineman Kendrick Scarborough has 65 tackles and six sacks. On Alton: On the cusp of securing a second consecutive playoff berth for the first time in 10 years. A win guarantees the Redbirds a playoff spot, but strength of schedule appears to be strong enough to break any ties and put them in regardless of the outcome. Last season’s 22-19 loss to East St. Louis was the closest margin of defeat since they beat East St. Louis 40-32 in 2005. ...Junior quarterback Andrew Jones has thrown for 1,659 yards, 13 touchdowns and

10 interceptions. Sophomore running back Tim Johnson has rushed for 917 yards and six touchdowns. Senior receiver Ahmad Sanders has caught 43 passes for 616 yards and three touchdowns. Senior receiver Terrence Walker has caught 30 passes for 598 yards and six touchdowns. ...Senior linebacker Izeal Terrell has 68 tackles, seven tackles for loss and two sacks. Sanders has 38 tackles and five interceptions. Senior defensive back Ju’Qui Womack has 30 tackles and three interceptions. LADUE RAMS at KIRKWOOD PIONEERS When: 7 p.m. Friday Records: Ladue 8-0; Kirkwood 5-2 Rankings: Ladue No. 4 large school STLhighschoolsports.com, No. 2 Class 4 Missouri Media; Kirkwood No. 10 large school STLhighschoolsports.com, No. 7 Class 6 Missouri Media Last week: Ladue 35, Pattonville 7; Kirkwood was idle On Ladue: First meeting with Kirkwood since 1999 when the Pioneers won 35-3 at Ladue. Due to construction on home campus, Rams have played “home” games at Kirkwood this season and last season. Rams are 8-0 for the first time since 2014 when they advanced to the Class 5 state semifinals. ...Junior quarterback Harry McIntosh has thrown for 1,346 yards and 17 touchdowns with four interceptions. Senior running back Andrew Hunt has rushed for 855 yards and 12 touchdowns. Senior receiver Dale Chesson has 10 rushing attempts for 142 yards and five touchdowns, along with 28 catches for 437 yards and six touchdowns. Junior receiver Mason Player has caught 14 passes for 280 yards and five touchdowns. ...Defense allowed a seasonhigh 14 points to Parkway North on Sept. 27. No other opponent has managed more than seven. Junior linebacker Brock Jones has 58 tackles, two sacks and five tackles for loss. Junior linebacker Callen Morley has 51 tackles. Senior defensive back Jason Garland has 36 tackles and five sacks. Hunt has 36 tackles and three interceptions. Mason Player has three interceptions. Senior defensive end Moses Okpala has 36 tackles, three sacks and seven tackles for loss. On Kirkwood: Off last week to accommodate for Turkey Day Game at Webster Groves on Nov. 22. ...Senior quarterback Cooper Wise has thrown for 1,439 yards, 17 touchdowns and two interceptions. He’s rushed for 506 yards and four touchdowns. Senior running back Martez Jones II has rushed for 729 yards and 10 touchdowns. Senior receiver Maurice Massey has caught 36 passes for 608 yards and eight touchdowns. Junior receiver Jairus Maclin has 25 receptions for 424 yards and four touchdowns. ...Junior linebacker Cameron Macon has 53 tackles, eight tackles for loss and four sacks. Senior defensive end Arvell Ferguson Jr. has 44 tackles, 17 tackles for loss and six sacks. Senior linebacker JaKobee Molett has 48 tackles and five tackles for loss. The Pioneers defense has created 12 turnovers. BELLEVILLE EAST LANCERS at BELLEVILLE WEST MAROONS When: 7 p.m. Friday Records: Belleville East 1-7, 1-4 Southwestern Conference; Belleville West 6-2, 3-2 Rankings: Belleville West No. 5 large school STLhighschoolsports.com Last week: Collinsville 28, Belleville East 26; Edwardsville 37, Belleville West 6 On Belleville East: Have split last four meetings with Belleville West, which has won two in a row. Lancers have been more

competitive than record indicates. East led or was within one score at halftime in four of its losses. Only Quincy, East St. Louis and Edwardsville ran up large margins before halftime. ...Senior quarterback Kienen Waller has thrown for 1,102 yards, seven touchdowns and been intercepted twice. He’s rushed for 281 yards and three touchdowns. Sophomore running back Jeremy Schooler has rushed for 361 yards. Five receivers have caught at least one touchdown pass. Junior receiver Yohance Flagger has 21 receptions for 433 yards and a score. Junior running back Mikey Foster has caught 22 passes for 158 yards. ...Senior defensive lineman Rakweon Ramsey has 49 tackles, seven tackles for loss and two sacks. Junior defensive lineman Hayden Howard has 37 tackles, five tackles for loss and two sacks. Sophomore defensive back Bryson Ivy have three interceptions. On Belleville West: Two losses this season came at East St. Louis and at Edwardsville, both within the last three weeks. Have won last two meetings with Belleville East by a combined score of 63-7. Have not lost to Belleville East at home since 2010. ...Junior quarterback Jackson McCloskey has completed 102 of 167 passes for 1,588 yards, 29 touchdowns and been intercepted five times. Sophomore receiver Dominic Lovett has 33 catches for 720 yards and 17 touchdowns. Senior receiver Will Lanxon has 29 receptions for 458 yards and six scores. Senior running back DJ Johnson has rushed for 828 yards and 10 touchdowns. ...Junior defensive end Ka’lon Carraway has 44 tackles, five tackles for loss and four sacks. Senior defensive end Keith Randolph has 39 tackles, four sacks and four tackles for loss. Senior safety Clarence Davis has three interceptions. MCCLUER NORTH STARS at HAZELWOOD CENTRAL HAWKS When: noon, Saturday Records: McCluer North 4-4, 2-2 Suburban XII North; Hazelwood Central 6-2, 4-0 Last week: Hazelwood West 38, McCluer North 32; Hazelwood Central 44, Riverview Gardens 0 On McCluer North: Four wins is the most for the Stars since the 2014 season. Have lost their last seven in a row to Hazelwood Central and eight of their last nine. Have been shutout in last two meetings. Last win over the Hawks came in 2011. ...Offense leans on rushing attack to put up points. Senior running back Jaamel Smith has rushed for 494 yards and scored seven touchdowns, including three last week against Hazelwood West. Junior running back Tavon Springfield has rushed for four touchdowns and caught three touchdown passes. Senior quarterback Roman Brown has thrown for 482 yards, six touchdowns and six interceptions. On Hazelwood Central: Have won five in a row after losses at De Smet and at Eureka. Senior quarterback Sean Stephens has completed 79 of 155 passes for 1,044 yards, 12 touchdowns and been intercepted five times. Only two of those interceptions have come since the Week 3 loss at Eureka. Stephens has rushed for 280 yards and three touchdowns. Junior receiver Kayden Jackson has caught 23 passes for 372 yards and five touchdowns. Three receivers have caught at least 23 passes and five receivers have scored at least one touchdown. Junior running back Jared Peters leads the Hawks with 403 yards rushing and eight touchdowns. ...Senior safety Keon Cross has 80 tackles and two interceptions. Senior linebacker Darius Watson has 59 tackles. Senior safety Jordan Tate has 48 tackles and four interceptions. The Hawks defense has created 21 turnovers. Dave Kvidahl, STLhighschoolsports.com

Marquette’s Brady Newberry (14) heads the ball away from Summit’s Christian Kraus (14) on Thursday in Chesterfield. The Mustangs won 4-1. Please see story and photos from the game on STLhighschoolsports.com.

THURSDAY’S RESULTS FOOTBALL Troy 10 7 8 14 39 Festus 7 0 23 8 38 T: Hutchison 2 run (Gessert kick), 7:43 F: Brickhaus 2 run (Esparza kick), 0:29 T: Gessert 28 FG, 0:02 T: Walker 10 run (Gessert kick), 10:54 F: Anderson 62 run (J. Rystrom run), 10:39 F: J. Rystrom 76 run (Esparza kick), 6:54 T: Nichols 43 run (Walker run), 5:37 F: J. Rystrom 33 run (Robinson run), 3:13 F: Robinson 9 run (Robinson run), 10:01 T: Hutchison 41 run (Gessert kick), 9:13 T: Hutchison 2 run (Gessert kick), 5:25 Seckman 0 0 8 7 15 Eureka 28 21 6 0 55 E: Asher-Sanders 18 run (Campbell kick), 10:24 E: Taggart 60 pass from C. Davis (Campbell kick), 7:50 E: Taggart 29 pass from C. Davis (Campbell kick), 5:50 E: Taggart 8 pass from C. Davis (Campbell kick), 3:36 E: DuBrock 20 pass from C. Davis (Campbell kick), 11:50 E: Bielecki 18 run (Campbell kick), 10:47 E: Cochren run (Campbell kick), 6:07 S: Hawk run ( run), 11:43 E: Hastings pass from M. Brown (kick failed), 10:14 S: Briggs run ( kick), 2:55 OTHER SCORE Mehlville 44, Oakville 6

BOYS SOCCER Valley Park 5, St. Louis United 2 V: Ian Steinkamp 2, Adam Donnell, Connor Maloney, Justin Maloney McCluer North 3, Haz. East 0 M: Devin Schrage 2, Aaron Hoffman; shutout by Anthony Benz St.Chas. West 2, Westminster 1 S: Nick Schreiber, Adam Mays Metro 6, Carnahan 0 M: Miles Diekemper 2, Trevor Laslo, Kieran Egan, William Mennerick, Nate Scott; shutout by Ben Groth Orchard Farm 3, St. Charles 2 O: Michael Bhat 2, Anthony Dalton; S: Jackson Archie, Kris Holbrook MICDS 3, Kirkwood 0 M: Walter Ralph 2, Hayden Fischer; shutout by Evan Hofer Soldan 6, McKinley 3 M: Jalawn Barragan 2, Hussain Seoud Perryville 6, Windsor 1 P: Jake Untereiner 2, Dayton Strattman 2, Stanley Volansky, Nick Omelchenko W: Tanner Berry FZ South 6, Washington 0 F: Devin Livingstone 3, Braden Johnson 2, Karson Gibbs; shutout by Luke Dillon, Drew Moore. Marquette 4, Summit 1 M: Jake Hansen 2, Nick Boyles, Ian Lynch S: Christian Kraus Union 3, Pacific 1 P: Gavin Bukowsky Ritenour 3, Pky. North 1 R: Fidel Lopez, Yemil Lopez, Dakota Wagster Northwest-CH 6, Fox 1 N: Joe Noah 3, Alex Wigge, Hayden Hately, Brennen Healy Pky. South 2, Pattonville 0

Pr: Kevin Ovalle, Luke Davis; shutout by Brett Hoekstra Howell 3, Timberland 0 F: Tommy Naumann 2, Javier Soto; shutout by Jo Cruz, Justin Olwig. St. Dominic 2, SLUH 1 St: Tony Petruso, Alex Weddle O’F Christian 2, Lutheran SC 0 O: Austin McNeil, Luke McNeil; shutout by Daniel Heinrich Bayless 2, Principia 1 B: Belmin Pajalic, Avdo Sahbaz FZ North 3, Zumwalt East 2 FN: Thomas DeAvilla, Owen Sears, Cole Sutton FH Central 3, FH North 0 FC: Connor Phillips 2, Cameron Blaylock; shutout by Chris Boerding

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Cor Jesu def. Pky. West 25-20, 25-16 Greenville def. Vandalia 25-21, 25-22 FZ West def. FZ North 15-25, 25-17, 25-19 Warrenton def. Sullivan 25-23, 25-23 Ladue def. MICDS 26-28, 25-15, 25-13 Summit def. Affton 25-17, 25-15 Clayton def. Jennings 25-17, 25-19 Lutheran SC def. Burroughs 22-25, 25-23, 25-15 Freeburg def. Salem 25-15, 25-9 Collinsville def. Waterloo 25-18, 22-25, 25-23 Nerinx Hall def. Ursuline 22-25, 25-15, 25-19 FH North def. St. Charles 25-8, 25-17 Bre. Central def. Carlyle 25-15, 25-22 Valmeyer def. Lebanon 25-22, 25-20 Carlinville def. Litchfield 25-9, 25-14 Columbia def. Granite City 25-14, 25-11

FIELD HOCKEY Pattonville 1, St. Dominic 0 P: Kendall Battle; shutout by Mikayla Bridges Westminster 2, Notre Dame 0 W: Morgan Sickels 2; shutout by Meredith Grass John Burroughs 2, Summit 2 S: Lauren Blair, Rylie Morris J: Riley King, Sydney Panagos

BOYS SWIMMING Clayton 99, John Burroughs 86 200 med.relay: 1. John Burroughs, 1:53.73; 200 freestyle: 1. Niko Theodos, John Burroughs, 1:58.55; 200 individual medley: 1. Daniel Cohen, Clayton, 2:06.52; 50 freestyle: 1. Victor Wei, Clayton, 23.99; Diving 6 dives: 1. Eliot Barnes, John Burroughs, 184.7; 100 butterfly: 1. John Woodruff, John Burroughs, 1:01.37; 100 freestyle: 1. Victor Wei, Clayton, 52.6; 500 freestyle: 1. Jiabei Han, Clayton, 5:01.68; 200 freestyle relay: 1. John Burroughs, 1:41.27; 100 backstroke: 1. Michael Tu, John Burroughs, 1:02.05; 100 breaststroke: 1. Ben Blinder, Clayton, 1:08.63; 400 relay: 1. Clayton, 3:35.49

SOFTBALL • STATE TOURNAMENTS CLASS 4

CLASS 2

Quarterfinals, Saturday Oakville (19-8) at Marquette (22-3), noon Blue Springs South (20-6) at Liberty (KC) (26-5), 1 p.m. Francis Howell Central (17-10) at Troy Buchanan (24-4-1), 2 p.m. Ozark (23-9) at Raymore-Pec. (23-7), 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26 at Killian Softball Complex Semifinals, 11 a.m. Third place, 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 Killian Softball Complex Championship, 12 p.m.

Quarterfinals, Saturday Montgomery County (11-10) at East Carter (24-5), 3 p.m. Trenton (25-2) at Holden (25-6), 2 p.m. Tolton (15-6) at Bowling Green (24-4), noon Warsaw (23-3) at Blair Oaks (25-4), 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26 at Killian Softball Complex Semifinals, 2 p.m. Third place, 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 Killian Softball Complex Championship, 4 p.m.

CLASS 3 Quarterfinals, Saturday Hillsboro (20-9) at Notre Dame (12-11-1), 1 p.m. Oak Grove (22-3) at Savannah (17-7), 1 p.m. St. Charles (24-3) at Mexico (2-0), noon Sullivan (26-4) at Bolivar (21-6), noon Friday, Oct. 26 at Killian Softball Complex Semifinals, 10 a.m. Third place, 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 Killian Softball Complex Championship, 10 a.m.

CLASS 1 Quarterfinals, Saturday Weaubleau (20-5) at Norwood (18-7), 1 p.m. Maysville (13-6) at Stanberry (20-2), noon Pilot Grove (23-3) at Salisbury (21-4), 1 p.m. Knox County (17-4-1) at Meadville (9-9), 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26 at Killian Softball Complex Semifinals, 1 p.m. Third place, 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 Killian Softball Complex Championship, 2 p.m.

FRIDAY’S SCHEDULE FOOTBALL Normandy (2-6) at Gateway STEM (3-5), 5 p.m. Northwest-CH (5-3) at Fox (7-1), 7 p.m. Jerseyville (4-4) at Columbia (7-1), 7 p.m. Affton (4-4) vs. Clayton (4-4), at Gay Field, 7 p.m. Valle Catholic (6-2) at St. Pius X (7-1), 7 p.m. Lafayette (3-5) at Marquette (5-3), 7 p.m. East St. Louis (6-2) at Alton (5-3), 7 p.m. Poplar Bluff (3-5) at Hillsboro (4-4), 7 p.m. St. Vincent (3-4) at Jefferson (7-1), 7 p.m. Pinckneyville (3-5) at Carlyle (2-6), 7 p.m. Miller Career (4-4) at Parkway North (4-4), 7 p.m. Duchesne (1-7) at Orchard Farm (4-4), 7 p.m. Summit (3-5) at Webster Groves (0-7), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South (4-4) at Parkway West (5-3), 7 p.m. Sullivan (3-5) at Borgia (7-1), 7 p.m. Charleston at Highland (8-0), 7 p.m. Civic Memorial (3-5) at Taylorville (2-0), 7 p.m. Vianney (6-2) at Elder (Ohio) (3-4), 7 p.m. FH North (0-8) at Washington (2-6), 7 p.m. Union (6-2) at Hermann (3-5), 7 p.m. Greenville (6-2) at Carlinville (8-0), 7 p.m. Chaminade (4-4) at Lutheran North (5-3), 7 p.m. Tolton Catholic (2-6) at O’Fallon Christian (4-4), 7 p.m. Parkway South (1-7) at Lindbergh (5-3), 7 p.m. O’Fallon (1-7) at Cahokia (7-1), 7 p.m. Edwardsville (5-3) at Collinsville (3-5), 7 p.m. Belleville East (1-7) at Belleville West (6-2), 7 p.m. Waterloo (0-8) at Mater Dei (6-2), 7 p.m. Mount Zion at Triad (3-5), 7 p.m. Centralia (Ill.) (1-7) at Mascoutah (5-3), 7 p.m. Red Bud (3-5) at Sparta (1-6), 7 p.m. Breese Central (6-2) at Herrin (2-1), 7 p.m. Carbondale (6-2) at Harrisburg (0-1), 7 p.m. Cardinal Ritter (8-0) at Althoff (1-7), 7 p.m. Wood River (6-3) vs. South Mac (0-9), at Bunker Hill, 7 p.m. Alton Marquette (4-4) at South Fork (2-6), 7 p.m. Farmer City at ME Lutheran (1-5), 7 p.m. Granite City (4-4) at Galesburg, 7 p.m. Pana (7-1) at Vandalia (7-1), 7 p.m. Staunton (4-4) at Roxana (2-6), 7 p.m. Piasa Southwestern (1-7) at Gillespie (3-5), 7 p.m. Litchfield (0-8) at Hillsboro, Ill. (2-6), 7 p.m. Nashville (7-1) at West Frankfort (3-0), 7 p.m. Ladue (8-0) at Kirkwood (5-2), 7 p.m. Ste. Genevieve (6-2) at Brentwood (3-4), 7 p.m. Pattonville (6-2) at Ritenour (4-4), 7 p.m. Crystal City (0-8) at Grandview (0-7), 7 p.m. Potosi (4-4) at De Soto (4-4), 7 p.m. De Smet (6-2) at Helias (3-5), 7 p.m. Farmington (5-3) at Park Hills Central (4-4), 7 p.m. Jackson (8-0) at Parkway Central (3-5), 7 p.m. Priory (6-2) at St. Dominic (4-4), 7 p.m. Lincoln at Freeburg (6-2), 7 p.m. Wright City (2-6) at Mark Twain (3-5), 7 p.m. Battle (4-4) at Hannibal (6-2), 7 p.m. Holt (3-5) at Liberty (3-5), 7 p.m.

Moberly (5-3) at Mexico (5-3), 7 p.m. Carnahan (0-8) at St. Mary’s (3-5), 7 p.m. Bayless (1-6) at Windsor (1-7), 7 p.m. North Callaway (6-2) at South Callaway (7-1), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West (4-4) at Timberland (6-2), 7 p.m. Lift For Life (7-1) at Winfield (6-2), 7 p.m. Roosevelt (6-2) at DuBourg (3-5), 7 p.m. Rock Bridge (6-2) at Francis Howell (6-2), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (7-1) at FH Central (1-7), 7 p.m. Charleston (7-1) at Herculaneum (3-5), 7 p.m. Trinity (6-2) at Cincinnati La Sall (3-3), 7 p.m. Warrenton (1-7) at FZ East (6-2), 7 p.m. Jennings (6-2) at Luth. St. Charles (6-2), 7 p.m. St. James (4-4) at Pacific (1-7), 7 p.m.

FIELD HOCKEY MICDS (17-5) at Visitation (12-6-2), 4 p.m. Lutheran South (5-12-1) at Ladue (9-9), 4:15 p.m. Parkway South (8-10) at Marquette (7-10), 4:30 p.m. Whitfield (4-13-1) at Eureka (4-14), 4:30 p.m. Lafayette (11-7) at Edwardsville (6-11-1), 5:45 p.m.

BOYS SOCCER Cape Notre Dame (3-4-2) at Bayless (20-3), 4:30 p.m. Parkway Central (13-5-2) vs. Clayton (19-1-1), at Gay Field, 3:30 p.m. Pkwy. West (9-7-2) vs. Webster Groves (10-9-1), at Selma Field, 4 p.m. University City (15-5) at Maplewood-RH (8-11-1), 4 p.m. John Burroughs (11-6-1) vs. Whitfield (5-11), at Creve Coeur S, 4:15 p.m. Ladue (10-9) at Eureka (9-8), 4:30 p.m. Christian Fellowsh (8-0) at Christian Academy (8-7), 5 p.m. St. Louis U. High (5-14-1) at Parkway South (15-6-1), 5:45 p.m. Timberland (9-10) at Holt (13-4-2), 6 p.m. Cape Central (5-3) at St. Charles West (18-1), 6 p.m. St. Charles (5-14) at Fort Zumwalt North (7-11), 7 p.m. ILLINOIS REGIONAL FINALS Anna-Jonesboro (1-4) at Carbondale (18-3-1), 6 p.m. O’Fallon (11-8-2) vs. Edwardsville (10-2-2), at O’Fallon, 5 p.m. Triad (16-6-4) vs. Gibault (13-4-5), at Waterloo, 6 p.m.

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Christian Fellowsh (0-1) at Christian Academy (2-2), 5 p.m. Riverview Gardens (6-16) at McCluer (8-10), 5:30 p.m. University City (2-16) at Maplewood-RH (22-1), 6 p.m.

BOYS SWIMMING Hazelwood Central at U.City, 3:30 p.m. Hazelwood West vs. Fort Zumwalt North at Rec-Plex, 3:30 p.m. Summit at Oakville, 4:30 p.m.


SPORTS

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

GIRLS TENNIS • STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS

John Burroughs captures Class 1 title to complete a season of domination Bombers lost only six matches during a 19-0 campaign

MISSOURI TEAM CHAMPIONSHIPS At Cooper Tennis Complex, Springfield

SPRINGFIELD, MO. • Visitation

CLASS 2 Semifinals Lee’s Summit West 5, St. Joseph’s 2 Rock Bridge 5, Springfield Central 0 Third place St. Joseph’s 6, Springfield Central 0 Championship Rock Bridge 5, Lee’s Summit West 1

CLASS 1 Semifinals John Burroughs 5, Pembroke Hill 0 Visitation 5, Springfield Catholic 0 Third place Pembroke Hill 5, Springfield Catholic 1 Championship John Burroughs 5, Visitation 0

athletic director Paul Stoecklin probably had the best description of this season’s John Burroughs girls tennis team. “They are a once-in-a-generation team,” Stoecklin said. The Bombers showed why Thursday, defeating nemesis Pembroke Hill and Visitation by 5-0 scores to capture the Class 1 team title for the third time in four years at Cooper Tennis Complex. “We have a super team and they were ready to get that title back,” Bombers coach Wendi Sock said. The semifinal win over the Raiders was especially satisfying for John Burroughs, which lost in a dramatic championship match 5-4 to Pembroke Hill last season. “We were excited to play them again and we just played incredible tennis,” junior Sami Remis said. Pembroke Hill had played the closest match against John Burroughs this season, losing 7-2 at the season-opening Great Eight Tournament in Columbia in August. John Burroughs swept the three doubles matches in impressive fashion Thursday. Emily Kantrovitz and Sami Remis defeated Randi Hendricks and Adella Castaner 8-4 at No. 1. Defending Class 1 doubles champions Lily Walther and Ainsley Heidbreder beat Lynne Li and Jean Li 8-0 at No. 2 and Gaby Thornton and Stuti Sinha beat Alyssa Turtledove and Lucia Wolfe 8-1 at No. 3. “John Burroughs has a great team,” Pembroke Hill coach Michael Duckworth said. “The only team I have seen who could compete with them is Blue Valley North. Today they jumped on us from the start and took us out of our game.” Thornton and Nina Zhu were the first two off the court at No. 5 and 6 singles, winning convincingly in straight sets, to get the Bombers the

needed five victories. Visitation defeated Springfield Catholic 5-0 in the other Class 1 semfinal match. The Vivettes swept the three doubles matches and got wins from Sophia McLellan at No. 1 singles and Ellie Bacich at No. 5 singles, setting up the all-St. Louis final. The Bombers dominated the championship dual against the Vivettes, losing six total games in the three doubles matches. Thornton and Zhu again were first off in singles. Thornton defeated Bacich 6-0, 6-0 at No. 5 while Zhu beat Shivashri Ananthamurugan 6-0, 6-1 at No. 6 singles. “I’m just thankful that I can be out there and play again,” said Thornton, who missed last season with a torn ACL after winning the individual state singles title two years ago. “We have a very strong team and we just had a lot of fun all season.” The Bombers finished the season 19-0. They lost just six matches in those 19 duals and won their last eight dual matches by 9-0 scores. They also had a 9-0 win in the Great Eight Tournament against Rock Bridge, which won its fifth consecutive Class 2 title Thursday. “It was just amazing to see how relaxed the girls were against Pembroke this morning,” Sock said. “We knew that they would put up a fight, but we came out swinging and played our best. It was an amazing team with such strong players. But it was also one of the most fun years I have had as a coach. This team had a lot to prove and they took nothing for granted, especially after what happened last year.” Visitation was in its first final four since winning consecutive team ti-

tles from 2010-12. The Vivettes finished the season 11-3, two of the losses coming to the Bombers. “We only have two legitimate tournament players and it was a big hurdle to get over to beat John Burroughs,” Visitation coach Kurt Miller said. “It hurts now, but the sting will go away later tonight and these girls will realize what they have accomplished.”

BY BILL HESTER Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

CLASS 2 St. Joseph’s kept alive its string of never finishing fourth in the state tournament. The Angels finished third, falling to Lee’s Summit West 5-2 in the semifinals and then beating Springfield Central 6-0 in the third-place match. Ellie Choate and Lexi Woodman got the Angels started with an impressive 8-1 win at No. 1 doubles against the Titans. But Lee’s Summit West won at Nos. 2 and 3 doubles and didn’t trail again. Woodman won at No. 2 singles, but Lee’s Summit West got straightset wins at No. 3, 4 and 6. The Angels cruised in the thirdplace match, sweeping the doubles and then losing just three games in three singles wins from Shannon Sims at No. 3, Nancy Serafin at No. 4 and Megan Nguyen at No. 6. Two of the singles wins ended simultaneously, thus the 6-0 score instead of the standard 5-0 result in a postseason match. Rock Bridge beat Lee’s Summit West 5-1 in the championship. The individual portion of the tournament is scheduled for Friday and Saturday at Cooper Tennis Complex. Championship matches are scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday.

SCOREBOARD def. Wendle, Alton Marquette, 6-0, 6-1; Nicole Szidik, Marion, def. Roper, Althoff, 1-6, 7-5, 10-4; Fleming, Highland, def. Sonae Shelton, Flora, 6-2, 6-3; Aly Cullotta, Woodstock North, def. Wells, Triad, 6-0, 6-1; Cuartas, Marion, def. Kafer, Triad, 7-6 (5), 6-1 DOUBLES MAIN DRAW First round: Olivia Melichar-Mary Nester, Althoff, def. Noelle Schacht-Ashley Mills, Champaign St. Thomas More, 6-1, 6-1; Caitlyn Smith-Gillian Rockwell, Triad, def. Ashlen Deluca-Ashley Basden, Highland, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2; Hannah Hudson-Chelsea Maag, Jerseyville, def. Emma CrawfordSydney Cochrane, Champaign Central, 6-0, 6-0; Bailey Grigg-Molly Suess, Triad, def. Alyssa Guse-Heidea Vaudt, Rockford Lutheran, 6-1, 7-5 Second round: Melichar-Nester, Althoff, def. Michelle Lynch-Piper Marcum, Centralia, 6-2, 6-3; Sophie Ishiwari-Isabel Kapustka, Chicago Payton, def. Hudson-Maag, Jerseyville, 6-2, 6-1; Emily Sun-Isabella Kellemeier, Chicago University, def. Grigg-Suess, Triad, 6-1, 6-1; Abygale Ahn-Cassandra Lee, Timothy Christian, def. Smith-Rockwell, Triad, 6-0, 6-0 Third round: Melichar-Nester, Althoff, def. Mara Boast-Madi Brinkman, Metamora, 6-1, 6-4 DOUBLES CONSOLATION DRAW First round: Deluca-Basden, Highland, def. Adeline Larsen-Claire Tiemens, Chicago Christian, 6-0, 6-1 Second round: Shaling Reynolds-Bri Williams, Rochester, def. Deluca-Basden, Highland, 6-4, 6-1; Hudson-Maag, Jerseyville, def. Mel Zimmerman-Reilly McGinn, Mundelein Carmel, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 10-6; Grigg-Suess, Triad, def. CrawfordCochrane, Champaign Central, 6-0, 6-0; Celine Feria-MiaBella Provenzano, Boylan, def. Smith-Rockwell, Triad, 6-3, 5-7, 10-5

ILLINOIS CLASS 2A Day 1 of 3; played at various sites in Chicago area TEAM STANDINGS Overall: 1. Hinsdale Central, 22; 2. New Trier, 16; 3. Glenbard West, 14 Area teams: 18. (tie) Edwardsville, 5; 30. (tie) Belleville East, 3; 44. (tie) Belleville West, 2; 54. (tie) Alton; and O’Fallon, 1 GIRLS SINGLES MAIN DRAW First round: Danielle Nenadovich, Benet, def. Hannah Macias, Alton, 6-0, 6-0; Chloe McIsaac, Belleville East, def. Lauren Ellis, Danville, 7-6 (2), 6-3; Steffia Lao, Chicago Van Steuben, def. JoJo Skaer, Belleville East, 6-1, 6-1; Cody Avis, Lake Forest, def. Chloe Trimpe, Edwardsville, 6-1, 7-5 Second round: Alex Savu, Neuqua Valley, def. McIsaac, Belleville East, 6-1, 6-1 GIRLS SINGLES CONSOLATION DRAW First round: Macias, Alton, def. Ruhi Gulati, Huntley, 7-5, 6-3; Sophia de los Reyes, Lake Zurich, def. Skaer, Belleville East, 6-2, 6-3; Lauren Legardy, Homewood-Flossmoor, def. Trimpe, Edwardsville, 1-6, 7-6 (6), 16-14 Second round: Gerda Jucys, Downers Grove South, def. Macias, Alton, 6-2, 6-1; McIsaac, Belleville East, def. Julia Canellis, Sandburg, 6-1, 6-1 GIRLS DOUBLES MAIN DRAW First round: Katie Materick-Lara Moreno, LaGrange Lyons, def. Kaitlyn Fiedler-Taylor Fiedler, Belleville West, 6-1, 6-2; Kavya Rachapalli-Irene Zhang, Naperville North, def. Hannah Colbert-Annie McGinnis, Edwardsville, 6-2, 6-4; Natalie KaribianAbby Cimarolli, Edwardsville, def. Ashley Samuta-Emma Chirila, Glenbard West, 6-0, 6-4; Shalini Sahgal-Layo Adelakun, Hinsdale Central, def. Kate Macaluso-Emiley Fritz, O’Fallon, 6-0, 7-5 Second round: Karibian-Cimarolli, Edwardsville, def. Samantha FrishmanGrace Chatas, Glenbrook North, 6-0, 6-2 Third round: Monique Brual-Samara Michael, Highland Park, def. KaribianCimarolli, Edwardsville, 6-2, 6-3 GIRLS DOUBLES CONSOLATION DRAW First round: Fiedler-Fiedler, Belleville West, def. Micaela Cesta-Lily Malas, Lincoln-Way Central, 6-2, 6-2; Colbert-McGinnis, Edwardsville, def. Aimee Puz-Brigid LoConte, Hinsdale South, 6-2, 6-4; Macaluso-Fritz, O’Fallon, def. Maeve CaseyNina Pasquini, Lake Park, 7-6 (1), 6-0 Second round: Fiedler-Fiedler, Belleville West, def. Anna Wolski-Kiley Nolan, Libertyville, 7-6 (3), 7-5; Hsing-Yng LouhReagan Wells, Hononegah, def. GolbertMcGinnis, Edwardsville, 6-4, 1-6, 10-5; Kayva Rachapalli-Irene Zhang, Naperville North, def. Macaluso-Fritz, O’Fallon, 7-5, 6-3

MISSOURI TEAM TOURNAMENT At Cooper Tennis Complex, Springfield CLASS 1 SEMIFINALS John Burroughs 5, Pembroke Hill 0 Doubles: Emily Kantrovitz-Samantha Pemis, JB, def. Randi Hendricks-Adella Castaner, 8-4; Lily Walther-Ainsley Heidbreder, JB, def. Lynne Li-Jean Li, 8-0; Gabriella Thornton-Stuti Sinha, JB, def. Alyssa Turtledove-Lucia Wolfe, 8-1 Singles: Thornton, JB, def. Turtledove, 6-1, 6-1; Nina Zhu, JB, def. Wolfe, 6-2, 6-1 Visitation 5, Springfield Catholic 0 Doubles: Sophia McLellan-Ashley Hagan, V, def. Claire Griesemer-Ashley Andrews, 8-5; Laura Finnie-Anne Wilkinson, V, def. Erin Jarvis-Casey Lee, 9-7; Ellie Bacich-Holly Hunt, V, def. Lauren Neu-Elizabeth Tynes, 8-2 Singles: McLellan, V, def. Jarvis, 6-0, 6-2; Bacich, V, def. Lee, 6-2, 6-1 CLASS 1 CHAMPIONSHIP John Burroughs 5, Visitation 0 Doubles: Emily Kantrovitz-Samantha Remis, JB, def. Sophia McLellan-Ashley Hagan, 8-1; Lily Walther-Ainsley Heidbreder, JB, def. Laura Finnie-Anne Wilkinson, 8-2; Gabriella Thornton-Stuti Sinha, JB, def. Ellie Bacich-Holly Hunt, 8-3 Singles: Thornton, JB, def. Bacich, 6-0, 6-0; Nina Zhu, JB, def. Shivashri Ananthamuru, 6-0, 6-1 CLASS 2 SEMIFINAL Lee’s Summit West 5, St. Joseph’s 2 Doubles: Elizabeth Choate-Alexis Woodman, SJ, def. Tristen Caskey-Leisana Rector, 8-1; Megan Demo-Raegan McGee, LSW, def. Shannon Sims-Nancy Serafin, 8-6; Chloe Sabin-Sarah Duong, LSW, def. Megan Nguyen-Lily Montano, 8-1 Singles: Woodman, SJ, def. Demo, 6-3, 6-0; Rector, LSW, def. Sims, 6-3, 6-4; Sabin, LSW, def. Serafin, 6-3, 6-2; Duong, LSW, def. Nguyen, 6-0, 6-1 CLASS 2 THIRD PLACE St. Joseph’s 6, Springfield Central 0 Doubles: Elizabeth Choate-Alexis Woodman, SJ, def. Evelyn VanDenBergMadeleine Fulk, 8-0; Shannon Sims-Nancy Serafin, SJ, def. Asha Parvathaneni-Bradley Weimer, 8-5; Megan Nguyen-Lily Montano, SJ, def. Sasha Agarwal-Addison Pearman, 8-3 Singles: Sims, SJ, def. Parvathaneni, 6-1, 6-1; Serafin, SJ, def. Weimer, 6-0, 6-0; Nguyen, SJ, def. Pearman, 6-1, 6-1

ILLINOIS CLASS 1A Day 1 of 3; played at various sites in Chicago area TEAM STANDINGS Overall: 1. (tie) Chicago Latin; and Winnetka North Shore Country Day, 16; 3. Chicago University, 14. Area teams: 6. (tie) Triad, 9; 8. (tie) Althoff, 8; 21. (tie) Highland, 4; 32. (tie) Jerseyville, 3; 56. (tie) Alton Marquette, 1. SINGLES MAIN DRAW First round: Clair Moore, Quincy Notre Dame, def. Maria Wendle, Alton Marquette, 7-6 (5), 6-3; Jordyn Roper, Althoff, def. Lizzie Egerman, Sycamore, 6-1, 6-1; Emilee Mossman, Effingham St. Anthony, def. Kate Feldman, Highland, 6-0, 6-0; Taylor Fleming, Highland, def. Kenya Hill, Chicago Agricultural Science, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4; Sierra Sonnemaker, Washington, def. Ella Mostoller, Mascoutah, 6-2, 6-2; Evelyn Wells, Triad, def. Brooke Akrami, Chicago Christian, 6-2, 6-3; Stephanie Kafer, Triad, def. Chikako Barnes, Champaign Central, 6-1, 6-0 Second round: Emma Davis, Providence Catholic, def. Roper, Althoff, 6-0, 6-3; Lily Schoeck, Rock Island Alleman, def. Fleming, Highland, 6-1, 6-1; Lucy Mitchell, Chicago Latin, def. Wells, Triad, 6-0, 6-1; Jennifer Lewis, Chicago University, def. Kafer, Triad, 6-0, 6-0 SINGLES CONSOLATION DRAW First round: Wendle, Alton Marquette, def. Ayanna King, Chicago Morgan Park, 7-6 (4), 6-1; Ana Cuartas, Marion, def. Feldmann, Highland, 6-2, 6-0; Maria Coulter, Peoria Notre Dame, def. Mostoller, Mascoutah, 6-0, 6-1 Second round: Reagan Ridgway, Herrin,

FOR THE RECORD AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

BOXING REPORT: In the WBC heavyweight title fight on Dec. 1 in Cardiff, Wales, Deontay Wilder is -$180 vs. Tyson Fury at +$160. BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog Dodgers -$118 BREWERS Winning Margin Proposition Dodgers Winning Margin Brewers 7/2 1 run 4/1 8/1 2 runs 8/1 8/1 3 runs 9/1 7/2 4 runs or more 4/1 NFL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Sunday l-Chargers 6.5 6.5 Titans Patriots 3 3 BEARS BUCS 3 3 Browns Lions 2.5 3 DOLPHINS EAGLES 4 4.5 Panthers COLTS 6.5 7 Bills CHIEFS 6 6 Bengals Vikings 3 3 JETS JAGUARS 4.5 5 Texans RAVENS 2.5 2.5 Saints WASHINGTON 1.5 1.5 Cowboys Rams 10 10 49ERS Monday FALCONS 5.5 5 Giants l- London, England Bye: Packers, Raiders, Steelers, Seahawks. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current BOISE ST 24 23.5 Colorado St Air Force 10.5 10 UNLV Saturday KENTUCKY 11 11 Vanderbilt TEMPLE 3.5 3 Cincinnati C Florida 22.5 21.5 E CAROLINA SYRACUSE 10.5 9.5 N Carolina IOWA 12.5 9.5 Maryland DUKE 8 7 Virginia Fla Atlantic 2.5 2.5 MARSHALL Northwestern 20.5 20.5 RUTGERS UMASS 3.5 3 Coastal Caro ARMY 8.5 8 Miami-Ohio Michigan 7 7 MICHIGAN ST Ohio St 13.5 12.5 PURDUE Alabama 28.5 29 TENNESSEE E Michigan 3.5 3 BALL ST Buffalo 2.5 1 TOLEDO Akron 4 4.5 KENT ST Penn St 14 15 INDIANA WISCONSIN 26 25.5 Illinois Houston 12.5 12.5 NAVY LA TECH 24.5 23.5 Utep FLA INT’L 24 23.5 Rice 24 25.5 UL-Lafayette APP’CHIAN ST ARKANSAS 6 7 Tulsa Ga Southern 13 11.5 NEW MEXICO ST Utah St 14.5 14.5 WYOMING Fresno St 15.5 13.5 NEW MEXICO W Michigan 4.5 4 C MICHIGAN UCLA 7 9.5 Arizona WASH ST 1.5 3 Oregon WASHINGTON 17 16.5 Colorado California 7 7 OREGON ST FLORIDA ST 10 10 Wake Forest OHIO U 16.5 16.5 Bowling Green UL-MONROE 11.5 10.5 Texas St NEBRASKA 4 4 Minnesota S FLORIDA 32.5 33.5 Connecticut Oklahoma 7 8 TCU UAB PK 1 N Texas TULANE 7 7 Smu CLEMSON 17 17.5 NC State TEXAS TECH 20.5 19 Kansas SO MISS 17.5 16.5 Utsa MID TENN ST 17 17 Charlotte MISSOURI 8 9.5 Memphis Auburn 3 3.5 MISSISSIPPI W KENTUCKY 5 5 Old Dominion LSU 7 6.5 Miss St UTAH 6.5 7 Usc SAN DIEGO ST 27.5 28 San Jose St HAWAII 3 3 Nevada Note: Toledo and Oregon opened as favorites. NBA Favorite Points Underdog Hornets 2 MAGIC NETS 2.5 Knicks PELICANS 11 Kings RAPTORS 3 Celtics T’WOLVES 8.5 Cavaliers GRIZZLIES 7.5 Hawks BUCKS 3.5 Pacers Warriors 2.5 JAZZ CLIPPERS 1.5 Thunder NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CAPITALS -$170/+$150 Panthers STARS -$160/+$140 Wild FLAMES -$110/-$110 Predators Grand Salami: Over/under 18.5 goals. Home team in CAPS | © 2018 B. Eckstein

BASKETBALL | NBA DENVER NUGGETS — Agreed to a contract extension with coach Michael Malone. FOOTBALL | NFL NFL — Fined Oakland $20,000 for violating the league’s injury report policy by not downgrading G Kelechi Osemele from questionable to out for a Week 5 game. Suspended Dallas Cowboys WR Terrance Williams for three games for violating the NFL’s substance-abuse policy. ARIZONA CARDINALS — Promoted CB Deatrick Nichols from the practice squad. Released WR Kendall Wright. BUFFALO BILLS — Signed WR Cam Phillips from the practice squad. Released WR Robert Foster. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed CB KeiVarae Russell off the practice squad. Waived WR Auden Tate. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed G Zack Golditch to the practice squad. Released G Sean Harlow from the practice squad. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Placed WR Ted Ginn Jr. on injured reserve. Re-signed OT Michael Ola. HOCKEY | NHL ANAHEIM DUCKS — Reassigned C Chase De Leo to San Diego (AHL). Signed D Jake Dotchin to a one-year contract and assigned him to San Diego. Traded C Mitch Hults to Tampa Bay for future considerations. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Activated G Corey Crawford. Reassigned F Luke Johnson to Rockford (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Activated G Jonathan Quick from injured reserve. Assigned G Peter Budaj to Ontario (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled G Marek Mazanec from Hartford (AHL). Assigned G Alexandar Georgiev to Hartford.

BASEBALL WEDNESDAY’S LATE ALCS BOX SCORE

Red Sox 8, Astros 6 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 2 1 0 0 1 .278 Benintendi lf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .263 Martinez dh 4 2 2 1 1 1 .200 Bogaerts ss 4 0 2 2 1 1 .333 Devers 3b 5 0 1 2 0 3 .444 Kinsler 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Pearce 1b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .214 Holt 2b-3b 4 0 1 1 1 0 .125 Vazquez c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .100 a-Moreland ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Leon c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bradley Jr. cf 2 1 1 2 2 0 .250 Totals 37 8 11 8 7 8 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bregman 3b 5 1 0 0 0 1 .182 Springer cf 4 1 3 1 1 0 .412 Altuve dh 5 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Gonzalez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .188 Gurriel 1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .176 Reddick rf 4 1 2 1 1 1 .200 Correa ss 4 0 3 2 1 1 .400 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .111 b-White ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 McCann c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kemp lf 3 1 2 1 2 1 .375 Totals 39 6 13 6 5 6 Boston 201 012 110 — 8 11 1 Houston 012 110 010 — 6 13 0 a-grounded out for Vazquez in the 7th. b-struck out for Maldonado in the 7th. E: Porcello (1). LOB: Boston 11, Houston 13. 2B: Benintendi 2 (2), Bogaerts (1), Vazquez (1), Springer (3), Altuve (1), Reddick (1), Correa (1). HR: Bradley Jr. (2), off James; Springer (1), off Porcello; Kemp (1), off Porcello. RBIs: Martinez (2), Bogaerts 2 (3), Devers 2 (3), Holt (1), Bradley Jr. 2 (9), Springer (5), Altuve (2), Reddick (2), Correa 2 (3), Kemp (1). SB: Springer (1). CS: Bradley Jr. (1). RLISP: Boston 5 (Betts 2, Pearce, Moreland 2); Houston 7 (Bregman 2, Altuve, Gonzalez, Gurriel, White 2). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello 4 7 4 4 1 3 68 7.20 Kelly, W, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 25 3.00 Rodriguez 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 0.00 Brasier, 12/3 2 0 0 0 0 23 0.00 1/ 0 0 1 5 0.00 Barnes, 3 0 0 Kimbrel, S, 2-2 2 2 1 1 3 1 35 6.00 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton 21/3 3 3 3 2 2 53 11.57 James, L, 0-1 32/3 4 3 3 1 5 51 7.71 2/ Pressly 1 2 0 23 3.38 3 1 1 McCullers 11/3 2 1 1 1 0 33 3.00 1/ 0 1 1 14 0.00 Sipp 3 1 0 2/ 0 0 0 7 0.00 McHugh 3 0 0 Rodriguez pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. IRS: Brasier 1-0, Barnes 2-0, James 1-0, McCullers 3-1, McHugh 2-0. HBP: Morton (Betts), Porcello (Gonzalez), Kimbrel (Bregman), McHugh (Bradley Jr.). WP: Morton 2, Kelly, McCullers. T: 4:33. A: 43,277.

GOLF LPGA | Buick Shanghai Thursday | Shanghai Purse: $2.1 million Yardage: 6,541; Par: 72 (36-36) Firstd Round Ariya Jutanugarn 32-34 Sei Young Kim 33-34 Danielle Kang 34-33 Minjee Lee 34-34 Lizette Salas 34-34 Paula Creamer 34-34 Lydia Ko 33-35 Wenbo Liu 33-35 Ryann O’Toole 34-34 Wei-Ling Hsu 37-32 Yu Liu 33-36 Brittany Lincicome 33-36 So Yeon Ryu 37-32 Su Oh 35-34 Annie Park 35-34 Bronte Law 36-33 Jane Park 36-33 Carlota Ciganda 35-35 Nelly Korda 36-34 Amy Yang 35-35 Sakura Yokomine 36-34 Jacqui Concolino 36-35 Pernilla Lindberg 35-36 Brittany Altomare 37-34 Aditi Ashok 36-35 Jeong Eun Lee 35-36 Ally McDonald 36-35 Pornanong Phatlum 34-37 Mariah Stackhouse 36-35 Mi Hyang Lee 38-33 Azahara Munoz 34-37 Megan Khang 34-37 Shanshan Feng 36-36 Jin Young Ko 37-35 Marina Alex 35-37 Caroline Masson 36-36 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 36-36 Ashleigh Buhai 33-39 Lindy Duncan 38-34 Jenny Shin 35-37 Charley Hull 37-36 Sung Hyun Park 39-34 Anna Nordqvist 36-37 Xiang Sui 38-35 Angel Yin 35-38 Chella Choi 40-33 Yan Liu 37-36 Ying Luo 36-37 Mo Martin 36-37 Weiwei Zhang 37-36 Jennifer Song 36-37 Haeji Kang 38-35 Jaye Marie Green 38-35 Mirim Lee 36-37 Sarah Jane Smith 37-37 Ruixin Liu 37-37 Hyo Joo Kim 39-35 Jienalin Zhang 38-36 Katherine Kirk 39-35 Xiyu Lin 37-38 Yuting Shi 37-38 Brooke M. Henderson 36-39 Emma Talley 40-35 Thidapa Suwannapura 37-38 Eun-Hee Ji 37-38 a-Lei Ye 38-37 Moriya Jutanugarn 38-38 Sandra Gal 38-38 In-Kyung Kim 39-37 Taoli Yang 37-39 Ayako Uehara 39-37 Mohan Du 39-37 Peiyun Chien 38-39 Jiayun Li 39-38 Mariajo Uribe 40-38 Amy Olson 41-38 Yunjie Zhang 40-39 a-Jingfan Deng 41-38 Liqing Chen 40-43 a-Xiaowen Yin 46-38 a-Baining Wang 41-43

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66 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 77 78 79 79 79 83 84 84

-6 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +7 +7 +7 +11 +12 +12

Thursday; second round early Friday morning | Jeju Island, South Korea Purse: $9.5 million Yardage: 7,196; Par: 72 (36-36) Firstd Round Chez Reavie 33-35 — 68 33-36 — 69 Danny Willett Si Woo Kim 35-34 — 69 Byeong Hun An 33-37 — 70 Rod Pampling 35-35 — 70 Michael Kim 35-35 — 70 Ian Poulter 34-36 — 70 Scott Piercy 34-36 — 70 Nick Watney 35-35 — 70 Austin Cook 36-34 — 70 Brooks Koepka 35-36 — 71 Patton Kizzire 36-35 — 71 Dong Seop Maeng 37-34 — 71 Graeme McDowell 36-35 — 71 J.J. Spaun 35-36 — 71 Adam Hadwin 33-38 — 71 Hideki Matsuyama 34-37 — 71 Paul Casey 35-36 — 71

-4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

PGA TOUR | CJ Cup

Jamie Lovemark Louis Oosthuizen Ryan Palmer Doyeob Mun Tae Hee Lee Tyrrell Hatton Pat Perez Charles Howell III Kyle Stanley Ryan Moore Joel Dahmen Jimmy Walker Brandt Snedeker Jason Dufner J.B. Holmes Peter Uihlein Justin Thomas Sungjae Im Gary Woodland Emiliano Grillo Rafa Cabrera Bello Ernie Els Kevin Na Brice Garnett Jason Day Andrew Putnam Kevin Tway Ryan Armour Brendan Steele Alex Noren Cameron Smith Billy Horschel Hyungjoon Lee Brian Gay Shubhankar Sharma Beau Hossler Branden Grace Joaquin Niemann Abraham Ancer Sanghyun Park Chesson Hadley Keith Mitchell Marc Leishman Adam Scott Sung Kang Charley Hoffman Kevin Chappell Brian Harman Charl Schwartzel James Hahn C.T. Pan Xander Schauffele Whee Kim Jason Kokrak Hyun-woo Ryu Stewart Cink Ted Potter Jr. Brian Stuard Kyoung-Hoon Lee Minchel Choi

35-36 36-36 38-34 34-38 36-36 35-37 36-36 33-39 37-35 38-34 36-36 38-34 37-35 35-37 36-36 36-37 36-37 35-38 39-34 36-37 36-37 37-36 38-35 36-37 38-35 36-37 36-37 36-37 39-35 38-36 37-37 37-37 37-37 36-38 37-37 42-33 40-35 37-38 41-34 36-39 34-41 35-40 37-38 38-37 37-38 34-42 39-37 38-38 40-36 39-37 34-42 39-37 40-36 39-38 40-37 34-43 36-41 38-39 39-39 41-41

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71 -1 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 77 +5 77 +5 77 +5 77 +5 77 +5 78 +6 82 +10

EURO | Andalucia leaders Thursday | Sotogrande, Spain Purse: $2.3M | Yardage: 6,991; Par: 71 Partial First Round Ashley Chesters, England 66 Gregory Bourdy, France 67 Jason Scrivener, Australia 68 Sergio Garcia, Spain 68 Richie Ramsey, Scotland 69 Jorge Campillo, Spain 69 Shane Lowry, Ireland 69 Jason Norris, Australia 69 Mikko Korhohen, Finland 69 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 69 Matthew Nixon, England 69 Nino Bertasio, Italy 70 Cho Rak-hyun, South Korea 70 Also David Lipsky, United States 73 Daniel Im, United States 74 Leaderboard Golfer Score Thru Ashley Chesters, England -5 F Gregory Bourdy, France -4 F Jason Scrivener, Australia -3 F Sergio Garcia, Spain -3 F Alvaro Quiros, Spain -3 8 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano, Spain -3 6 Richie Ramsey, Scotland -2 F Jorge Campillo, Spain -2 F Shane Lowry, Ireland -2 F Jason Norris, Australia -2 F Mikko Korhohen, Finland -2 F Darren Fichardt, South Africa -2 F Matthew Nixon, England -2 F Richard McEvoy, England -2 8 Pontus Widegren, Sweden -2 6 Also Padraig Harrington, Ireland E 8 Paul Peterson, United States E 4 Chase Koepka, United States E 4

HOLES-IN-ONE Birch Creek • Mark Denbow, hole No. 16, 117 yards, wedge, Oct. 18 Bellerive • Martin Kerckhoff, hole No. 3, 140 yards, 6-iron, Oct. 18 Forest Park • Nick Pelon, hole No. 3 Redbud, 171 yards, 7-iron, Oct. 18

SOCCER

COLLEGES

Major League Soccer

Area scores

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 20 6 6 66 67 39 New York 20 7 5 65 60 33 New York City FC 15 9 8 53 55 41 Philadelphia 15 12 5 50 48 46 Columbus 13 10 9 48 39 41 D.C. United 13 11 8 47 57 49 Montreal 13 15 4 43 45 52 New England 9 13 11 38 48 55 Toronto FC 9 17 6 33 55 61 Chicago 8 17 7 31 47 59 Orlando City 7 21 4 25 41 72 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 16 7 9 57 51 39 Sporting K.C. 16 8 8 56 60 39 Los Angeles FC 16 8 8 56 65 48 Seattle 16 11 5 53 47 34 Portland 14 9 9 51 50 46 Real Salt Lake 14 12 7 49 55 55 LA Galaxy 12 11 9 45 61 60 Vancouver 12 13 7 43 50 64 Minnesota United 11 18 3 36 46 65 Houston 9 15 8 35 53 53 Colorado 7 19 6 27 34 62 San Jose 4 20 8 20 48 69 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Thursday Real Salt Lake 4, New England 1 Sunday Chicago at Atlanta United FC, 2 p.m. Columbus at Orlando City, 2 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. New York City FC at D.C. United, 2 p.m. Toronto FC at Montreal, 2 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 4 p.m. LA Galaxy at Minnesota United, 4 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Portland, 4 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 4 p.m. Sporting K.C. at FC Dallas, 4 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles FC, 4 p.m. Sunday Atlanta United FC at Toronto FC, 3:30 p.m. D.C. United at Chicago, 3:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Colorado, 3:30 p.m. Houston at LA Galaxy, 3:30 p.m. Los Angeles FC at Sporting K.C., 3:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Columbus, 3:30 p.m. Montreal at New England, 3:30 p.m. Orlando City at New York, 3:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New York City FC, 3:30 p.m. Portland at Vancouver, 3:30 p.m. San Jose at Seattle, 3:30 p.m.

Women’s soccer SLU 3, Massachusetts 0 Belmont 2, SE Missouri State 1 Northwestern 2, Illinois 1 South Carolina 1, Missouri 0 Webster U. 5, Spalding 0 Women’s volleyball Webster U. def. Blackburn 3-0 Men’s soccer Spalding 2, Webster U. 1

College football TOP 25 SCHEDULE Saturday No. 1 Alabama at Tennessee, 2:30 p.m. No. 2 Ohio State at Purdue, 6:30 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 16 NC State, 2:30 p.m. No. 5 LSU vs. No. 22 Miss. State, 6 p.m. No. 6 Michigan at No. 24 Michigan State, 11 a.m. No. 9 Oklahoma at TCU, 11 a.m. No. 10 UCF at East Carolina, 6 p.m. No. 12 Oregon at No. 25 Washington State, 6:30 p.m. No. 14 Kentucky vs. Vanderbilt, 6:30 p.m. No. 15 Washington vs. Colorado, 2:30 p.m. No. 18 Penn State at Indiana, 2:30 p.m. No. 19 Iowa vs. Maryland, 11 a.m. No. 20 Cincinnati at Temple, 11 a.m. No. 21 South Florida vs. UConn, 6 p.m. No. 23 Wisconsin vs. Illinois, 11 a.m.

THURSDAY’S FBS SCORES Arkansas State 51, Georgia State 35 Arizona State vs. Stanford, late

College basketball MVC PRESEASON POLL As voted by league coaches, media and sports information directors. First-place votes in parenthesis. Rank, school Total 1. Loyola (29) ..............................................410 2. Illinois State (10)..................................... 374 3. SIU Carbondale (4)................................. 362 4. Bradley ...................................................305 5. Northern Iowa ........................................248 6. Indiana State .......................................... 210 7. Valparaiso ................................................173 8. Missouri State..........................................125 9. Drake......................................................... 92 10. Evansville ................................................66 FIRST TEAM G Jordan Barnes, 5-11, jr., Indiana State G Clayton Custer, 6-1, sr., Loyola (POY) F Phil Fayne, 6-8, sr., Illinois State G Armon Fletcher, 6-5, sr., SIU Carbondale G Milik Yarbrough, 6-6, sr., Illinois State SECOND TEAM G Darrell Brown, 5-10, jr., Bradley G Keyshawn Evans, 6-0, sr., Illinois State C Cameron Krutwig, 6-9, so., Loyola C Kavion Pippen, 6-10, sr., SIU Carbondale G Marques Townes, 6-4, sr., Loyola

USL playoffs Western Conference quarterfinals Friday Portland at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Saturday Reno at Salt Lake City, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Orange County, 9 p.m. Kansas City at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m.

Eastern Conference quarterfinals Saturday Nashville at Cincinnati, 3 p.m. New York at Charleston, 6 p.m. Bethlehem at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Indy at Louisville, 6:30 p.m.

BLUES STATISTICS Player-pos. Brayden Schenn—F Ryan O’Reilly—F David Perron—F Alexander Steen—F Vladimir Tarasenko—F Patrick Maroon—F Ivan Barbashev—F Tyler Bozak—F Vince Dunn—D Joel Edmundson—D Colton Parayko—D Jaden Schwartz—F Jay Bouwmeester—D Jordan Kyrou—F Jordan Schmaltz—D Robert Thomas—F Sammy Blais—F Robert Bortuzzo—D Jakub Jerabek—D Alex Pietrangelo—D Zach Sanford—F Goalie Jake Allen 31 Chad Johnson

GP 5 1

GP 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 4 6 4 6 6 4 5 6 4 1 6 1 MINS 306 57

G 3 0 4 2 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

A 3 5 1 3 3 3 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 AVG 3.91 3.10

PTS 6 5 5 5 5 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

+/-1 -5 -4 -2 -6 -5 -1 -3 -2 -1 0 0 -4 -1 0 -1 -2 -2 -3 -6 0

PIM 2 6 0 2 0 7 0 0 2 8 0 2 8 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0

PP 2 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

W 1 0

L 2 1

OT 2 0

GA 20 3

SA 162 31

GW 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SV% .877 .903

PCTG .167 .000 .444 .167 .063 .000 .000 .111 .200 .125 .077 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 G 0 0


SPORTS

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

GIRLS TENNIS • STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS

John Burroughs captures Class 1 title to complete a season of domination Bombers lost only six matches during a 19-0 campaign

MISSOURI TEAM CHAMPIONSHIPS At Cooper Tennis Complex, Springfield

SPRINGFIELD, MO. • Visitation

CLASS 2 Semifinals Lee’s Summit West 5, St. Joseph’s 2 Rock Bridge 5, Springfield Central 0 Third place St. Joseph’s 6, Springfield Central 0 Championship Rock Bridge 5, Lee’s Summit West 1

CLASS 1 Semifinals John Burroughs 5, Pembroke Hill 0 Visitation 5, Springfield Catholic 0 Third place Pembroke Hill 5, Springfield Catholic 1 Championship John Burroughs 5, Visitation 0

athletic director Paul Stoecklin probably had the best description of this season’s John Burroughs girls tennis team. “They are a once-in-a-generation team,” Stoecklin said. The Bombers showed why Thursday, defeating nemesis Pembroke Hill and Visitation by 5-0 scores to capture the Class 1 team title for the third time in four years at Cooper Tennis Complex. “We have a super team and they were ready to get that title back,” Bombers coach Wendi Sock said. The semifinal win over the Raiders was especially satisfying for John Burroughs, which lost in a dramatic championship match 5-4 to Pembroke Hill last season. “We were excited to play them again and we just played incredible tennis,” junior Sami Remis said. Pembroke Hill had played the closest match against John Burroughs this season, losing 7-2 at the season-opening Great Eight Tournament in Columbia in August. John Burroughs swept the three doubles matches in impressive fashion Thursday. Emily Kantrovitz and Sami Remis defeated Randi Hendricks and Adella Castaner 8-4 at No. 1. Defending Class 1 doubles champions Lily Walther and Ainsley Heidbreder beat Lynne Li and Jean Li 8-0 at No. 2 and Gaby Thornton and Stuti Sinha beat Alyssa Turtledove and Lucia Wolfe 8-1 at No. 3. “John Burroughs has a great team,” Pembroke Hill coach Michael Duckworth said. “The only team I have seen who could compete with them is Blue Valley North. Today they jumped on us from the start and took us out of our game.” Thornton and Nina Zhu were the first two off the court at No. 5 and 6 singles, winning convincingly in straight sets, to get the Bombers the

needed five victories. Visitation defeated Springfield Catholic 5-0 in the other Class 1 semfinal match. The Vivettes swept the three doubles matches and got wins from Sophia McLellan at No. 1 singles and Ellie Bacich at No. 5 singles, setting up the all-St. Louis final. The Bombers dominated the championship dual against the Vivettes, losing six total games in the three doubles matches. Thornton and Zhu again were first off in singles. Thornton defeated Bacich 6-0, 6-0 at No. 5 while Zhu beat Shivashri Ananthamurugan 6-0, 6-1 at No. 6 singles. “I’m just thankful that I can be out there and play again,” said Thornton, who missed last season with a torn ACL after winning the individual state singles title two years ago. “We have a very strong team and we just had a lot of fun all season.” The Bombers finished the season 19-0. They lost just six matches in those 19 duals and won their last eight dual matches by 9-0 scores. They also had a 9-0 win in the Great Eight Tournament against Rock Bridge, which won its fifth consecutive Class 2 title Thursday. “It was just amazing to see how relaxed the girls were against Pembroke this morning,” Sock said. “We knew that they would put up a fight, but we came out swinging and played our best. It was an amazing team with such strong players. But it was also one of the most fun years I have had as a coach. This team had a lot to prove and they took nothing for granted, especially after what happened last year.” Visitation was in its first final four since winning consecutive team ti-

tles from 2010-12. The Vivettes finished the season 11-3, two of the losses coming to the Bombers. “We only have two legitimate tournament players and it was a big hurdle to get over to beat John Burroughs,” Visitation coach Kurt Miller said. “It hurts now, but the sting will go away later tonight and these girls will realize what they have accomplished.”

BY BILL HESTER Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

CLASS 2 St. Joseph’s kept alive its string of never finishing fourth in the state tournament. The Angels finished third, falling to Lee’s Summit West 5-2 in the semifinals and then beating Springfield Central 6-0 in the third-place match. Ellie Choate and Lexi Woodman got the Angels started with an impressive 8-1 win at No. 1 doubles against the Titans. But Lee’s Summit West won at Nos. 2 and 3 doubles and didn’t trail again. Woodman won at No. 2 singles, but Lee’s Summit West got straightset wins at No. 3, 4 and 6. The Angels cruised in the thirdplace match, sweeping the doubles and then losing just three games in three singles wins from Shannon Sims at No. 3, Nancy Serafin at No. 4 and Megan Nguyen at No. 6. Two of the singles wins ended simultaneously, thus the 6-0 score instead of the standard 5-0 result in a postseason match. Rock Bridge beat Lee’s Summit West 5-1 in the championship. The individual portion of the tournament is scheduled for Friday and Saturday at Cooper Tennis Complex. Championship matches are scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday.

SCOREBOARD def. Wendle, Alton Marquette, 6-0, 6-1; Nicole Szidik, Marion, def. Roper, Althoff, 1-6, 7-5, 10-4; Fleming, Highland, def. Sonae Shelton, Flora, 6-2, 6-3; Aly Cullotta, Woodstock North, def. Wells, Triad, 6-0, 6-1; Cuartas, Marion, def. Kafer, Triad, 7-6 (5), 6-1 DOUBLES MAIN DRAW First round: Olivia Melichar-Mary Nester, Althoff, def. Noelle Schacht-Ashley Mills, Champaign St. Thomas More, 6-1, 6-1; Caitlyn Smith-Gillian Rockwell, Triad, def. Ashlen Deluca-Ashley Basden, Highland, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2; Hannah Hudson-Chelsea Maag, Jerseyville, def. Emma CrawfordSydney Cochrane, Champaign Central, 6-0, 6-0; Bailey Grigg-Molly Suess, Triad, def. Alyssa Guse-Heidea Vaudt, Rockford Lutheran, 6-1, 7-5 Second round: Melichar-Nester, Althoff, def. Michelle Lynch-Piper Marcum, Centralia, 6-2, 6-3; Sophie Ishiwari-Isabel Kapustka, Chicago Payton, def. Hudson-Maag, Jerseyville, 6-2, 6-1; Emily Sun-Isabella Kellemeier, Chicago University, def. Grigg-Suess, Triad, 6-1, 6-1; Abygale Ahn-Cassandra Lee, Timothy Christian, def. Smith-Rockwell, Triad, 6-0, 6-0 Third round: Melichar-Nester, Althoff, def. Mara Boast-Madi Brinkman, Metamora, 6-1, 6-4 DOUBLES CONSOLATION DRAW First round: Deluca-Basden, Highland, def. Adeline Larsen-Claire Tiemens, Chicago Christian, 6-0, 6-1 Second round: Shaling Reynolds-Bri Williams, Rochester, def. Deluca-Basden, Highland, 6-4, 6-1; Hudson-Maag, Jerseyville, def. Mel Zimmerman-Reilly McGinn, Mundelein Carmel, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 10-6; Grigg-Suess, Triad, def. CrawfordCochrane, Champaign Central, 6-0, 6-0; Celine Feria-MiaBella Provenzano, Boylan, def. Smith-Rockwell, Triad, 6-3, 5-7, 10-5

ILLINOIS CLASS 2A Day 1 of 3; played at various sites in Chicago area TEAM STANDINGS Overall: 1. Hinsdale Central, 22; 2. New Trier, 16; 3. Glenbard West, 14 Area teams: 18. (tie) Edwardsville, 5; 30. (tie) Belleville East, 3; 44. (tie) Belleville West, 2; 54. (tie) Alton; and O’Fallon, 1 GIRLS SINGLES MAIN DRAW First round: Danielle Nenadovich, Benet, def. Hannah Macias, Alton, 6-0, 6-0; Chloe McIsaac, Belleville East, def. Lauren Ellis, Danville, 7-6 (2), 6-3; Steffia Lao, Chicago Van Steuben, def. JoJo Skaer, Belleville East, 6-1, 6-1; Cody Avis, Lake Forest, def. Chloe Trimpe, Edwardsville, 6-1, 7-5 Second round: Alex Savu, Neuqua Valley, def. McIsaac, Belleville East, 6-1, 6-1 GIRLS SINGLES CONSOLATION DRAW First round: Macias, Alton, def. Ruhi Gulati, Huntley, 7-5, 6-3; Sophia de los Reyes, Lake Zurich, def. Skaer, Belleville East, 6-2, 6-3; Lauren Legardy, Homewood-Flossmoor, def. Trimpe, Edwardsville, 1-6, 7-6 (6), 16-14 Second round: Gerda Jucys, Downers Grove South, def. Macias, Alton, 6-2, 6-1; McIsaac, Belleville East, def. Julia Canellis, Sandburg, 6-1, 6-1 GIRLS DOUBLES MAIN DRAW First round: Katie Materick-Lara Moreno, LaGrange Lyons, def. Kaitlyn Fiedler-Taylor Fiedler, Belleville West, 6-1, 6-2; Kavya Rachapalli-Irene Zhang, Naperville North, def. Hannah Colbert-Annie McGinnis, Edwardsville, 6-2, 6-4; Natalie KaribianAbby Cimarolli, Edwardsville, def. Ashley Samuta-Emma Chirila, Glenbard West, 6-0, 6-4; Shalini Sahgal-Layo Adelakun, Hinsdale Central, def. Kate Macaluso-Emiley Fritz, O’Fallon, 6-0, 7-5 Second round: Karibian-Cimarolli, Edwardsville, def. Samantha FrishmanGrace Chatas, Glenbrook North, 6-0, 6-2 Third round: Monique Brual-Samara Michael, Highland Park, def. KaribianCimarolli, Edwardsville, 6-2, 6-3 GIRLS DOUBLES CONSOLATION DRAW First round: Fiedler-Fiedler, Belleville West, def. Micaela Cesta-Lily Malas, Lincoln-Way Central, 6-2, 6-2; Colbert-McGinnis, Edwardsville, def. Aimee Puz-Brigid LoConte, Hinsdale South, 6-2, 6-4; Macaluso-Fritz, O’Fallon, def. Maeve CaseyNina Pasquini, Lake Park, 7-6 (1), 6-0 Second round: Fiedler-Fiedler, Belleville West, def. Anna Wolski-Kiley Nolan, Libertyville, 7-6 (3), 7-5; Hsing-Yng LouhReagan Wells, Hononegah, def. GolbertMcGinnis, Edwardsville, 6-4, 1-6, 10-5; Kayva Rachapalli-Irene Zhang, Naperville North, def. Macaluso-Fritz, O’Fallon, 7-5, 6-3

MISSOURI TEAM TOURNAMENT At Cooper Tennis Complex, Springfield CLASS 1 SEMIFINALS John Burroughs 5, Pembroke Hill 0 Doubles: Emily Kantrovitz-Samantha Pemis, JB, def. Randi Hendricks-Adella Castaner, 8-4; Lily Walther-Ainsley Heidbreder, JB, def. Lynne Li-Jean Li, 8-0; Gabriella Thornton-Stuti Sinha, JB, def. Alyssa Turtledove-Lucia Wolfe, 8-1 Singles: Thornton, JB, def. Turtledove, 6-1, 6-1; Nina Zhu, JB, def. Wolfe, 6-2, 6-1 Visitation 5, Springfield Catholic 0 Doubles: Sophia McLellan-Ashley Hagan, V, def. Claire Griesemer-Ashley Andrews, 8-5; Laura Finnie-Anne Wilkinson, V, def. Erin Jarvis-Casey Lee, 9-7; Ellie Bacich-Holly Hunt, V, def. Lauren Neu-Elizabeth Tynes, 8-2 Singles: McLellan, V, def. Jarvis, 6-0, 6-2; Bacich, V, def. Lee, 6-2, 6-1 CLASS 1 CHAMPIONSHIP John Burroughs 5, Visitation 0 Doubles: Emily Kantrovitz-Samantha Remis, JB, def. Sophia McLellan-Ashley Hagan, 8-1; Lily Walther-Ainsley Heidbreder, JB, def. Laura Finnie-Anne Wilkinson, 8-2; Gabriella Thornton-Stuti Sinha, JB, def. Ellie Bacich-Holly Hunt, 8-3 Singles: Thornton, JB, def. Bacich, 6-0, 6-0; Nina Zhu, JB, def. Shivashri Ananthamuru, 6-0, 6-1 CLASS 2 SEMIFINAL Lee’s Summit West 5, St. Joseph’s 2 Doubles: Elizabeth Choate-Alexis Woodman, SJ, def. Tristen Caskey-Leisana Rector, 8-1; Megan Demo-Raegan McGee, LSW, def. Shannon Sims-Nancy Serafin, 8-6; Chloe Sabin-Sarah Duong, LSW, def. Megan Nguyen-Lily Montano, 8-1 Singles: Woodman, SJ, def. Demo, 6-3, 6-0; Rector, LSW, def. Sims, 6-3, 6-4; Sabin, LSW, def. Serafin, 6-3, 6-2; Duong, LSW, def. Nguyen, 6-0, 6-1 CLASS 2 THIRD PLACE St. Joseph’s 6, Springfield Central 0 Doubles: Elizabeth Choate-Alexis Woodman, SJ, def. Evelyn VanDenBergMadeleine Fulk, 8-0; Shannon Sims-Nancy Serafin, SJ, def. Asha Parvathaneni-Bradley Weimer, 8-5; Megan Nguyen-Lily Montano, SJ, def. Sasha Agarwal-Addison Pearman, 8-3 Singles: Sims, SJ, def. Parvathaneni, 6-1, 6-1; Serafin, SJ, def. Weimer, 6-0, 6-0; Nguyen, SJ, def. Pearman, 6-1, 6-1

ILLINOIS CLASS 1A Day 1 of 3; played at various sites in Chicago area TEAM STANDINGS Overall: 1. (tie) Chicago Latin; and Winnetka North Shore Country Day, 16; 3. Chicago University, 14. Area teams: 6. (tie) Triad, 9; 8. (tie) Althoff, 8; 21. (tie) Highland, 4; 32. (tie) Jerseyville, 3; 56. (tie) Alton Marquette, 1. SINGLES MAIN DRAW First round: Clair Moore, Quincy Notre Dame, def. Maria Wendle, Alton Marquette, 7-6 (5), 6-3; Jordyn Roper, Althoff, def. Lizzie Egerman, Sycamore, 6-1, 6-1; Emilee Mossman, Effingham St. Anthony, def. Kate Feldman, Highland, 6-0, 6-0; Taylor Fleming, Highland, def. Kenya Hill, Chicago Agricultural Science, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4; Sierra Sonnemaker, Washington, def. Ella Mostoller, Mascoutah, 6-2, 6-2; Evelyn Wells, Triad, def. Brooke Akrami, Chicago Christian, 6-2, 6-3; Stephanie Kafer, Triad, def. Chikako Barnes, Champaign Central, 6-1, 6-0 Second round: Emma Davis, Providence Catholic, def. Roper, Althoff, 6-0, 6-3; Lily Schoeck, Rock Island Alleman, def. Fleming, Highland, 6-1, 6-1; Lucy Mitchell, Chicago Latin, def. Wells, Triad, 6-0, 6-1; Jennifer Lewis, Chicago University, def. Kafer, Triad, 6-0, 6-0 SINGLES CONSOLATION DRAW First round: Wendle, Alton Marquette, def. Ayanna King, Chicago Morgan Park, 7-6 (4), 6-1; Ana Cuartas, Marion, def. Feldmann, Highland, 6-2, 6-0; Maria Coulter, Peoria Notre Dame, def. Mostoller, Mascoutah, 6-0, 6-1 Second round: Reagan Ridgway, Herrin,

FOR THE RECORD AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

BOXING REPORT: In the WBC heavyweight title fight on Dec. 1 in Cardiff, Wales, Deontay Wilder is -$180 vs. Tyson Fury at +$160. BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog Dodgers -$118 BREWERS Winning Margin Proposition Dodgers Winning Margin Brewers 7/2 1 run 4/1 8/1 2 runs 8/1 8/1 3 runs 9/1 7/2 4 runs or more 4/1 NFL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Sunday l-Chargers 6.5 6.5 Titans Patriots 3 3 BEARS BUCS 3 3 Browns Lions 2.5 3 DOLPHINS EAGLES 4 4.5 Panthers COLTS 6.5 7 Bills CHIEFS 6 6 Bengals Vikings 3 3 JETS JAGUARS 4.5 5 Texans RAVENS 2.5 2.5 Saints WASHINGTON 1.5 1.5 Cowboys Rams 10 10 49ERS Monday FALCONS 5.5 5 Giants l- London, England Bye: Packers, Raiders, Steelers, Seahawks. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current BOISE ST 24 23.5 Colorado St Air Force 10.5 10 UNLV Saturday KENTUCKY 11 11 Vanderbilt TEMPLE 3.5 3 Cincinnati C Florida 22.5 21.5 E CAROLINA SYRACUSE 10.5 9.5 N Carolina IOWA 12.5 9.5 Maryland DUKE 8 7 Virginia Fla Atlantic 2.5 2.5 MARSHALL Northwestern 20.5 20.5 RUTGERS UMASS 3.5 3 Coastal Caro ARMY 8.5 8 Miami-Ohio Michigan 7 7 MICHIGAN ST Ohio St 13.5 12.5 PURDUE Alabama 28.5 29 TENNESSEE E Michigan 3.5 3 BALL ST Buffalo 2.5 1 TOLEDO Akron 4 4.5 KENT ST Penn St 14 15 INDIANA WISCONSIN 26 25.5 Illinois Houston 12.5 12.5 NAVY LA TECH 24.5 23.5 Utep FLA INT’L 24 23.5 Rice 24 25.5 UL-Lafayette APP’CHIAN ST ARKANSAS 6 7 Tulsa Ga Southern 13 11.5 NEW MEXICO ST Utah St 14.5 14.5 WYOMING Fresno St 15.5 13.5 NEW MEXICO W Michigan 4.5 4 C MICHIGAN UCLA 7 9.5 Arizona WASH ST 1.5 3 Oregon WASHINGTON 17 16.5 Colorado California 7 7 OREGON ST FLORIDA ST 10 10 Wake Forest OHIO U 16.5 16.5 Bowling Green UL-MONROE 11.5 10.5 Texas St NEBRASKA 4 4 Minnesota S FLORIDA 32.5 33.5 Connecticut Oklahoma 7 8 TCU UAB PK 1 N Texas TULANE 7 7 Smu CLEMSON 17 17.5 NC State TEXAS TECH 20.5 19 Kansas SO MISS 17.5 16.5 Utsa MID TENN ST 17 17 Charlotte MISSOURI 8 9.5 Memphis Auburn 3 3.5 MISSISSIPPI W KENTUCKY 5 5 Old Dominion LSU 7 6.5 Miss St UTAH 6.5 7 Usc SAN DIEGO ST 27.5 28 San Jose St HAWAII 3 3 Nevada Note: Toledo and Oregon opened as favorites. NBA Favorite Points Underdog Hornets 2 MAGIC NETS 2.5 Knicks PELICANS 11 Kings RAPTORS 3 Celtics T’WOLVES 8.5 Cavaliers GRIZZLIES 7.5 Hawks BUCKS 3.5 Pacers Warriors 2.5 JAZZ CLIPPERS 1.5 Thunder NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CAPITALS -$170/+$150 Panthers STARS -$160/+$140 Wild FLAMES -$110/-$110 Predators Grand Salami: Over/under 18.5 goals. Home team in CAPS | © 2018 B. Eckstein

BASKETBALL | NBA DENVER NUGGETS — Agreed to a contract extension with coach Michael Malone. FOOTBALL | NFL NFL — Fined Oakland $20,000 for violating the league’s injury report policy by not downgrading G Kelechi Osemele from questionable to out for a Week 5 game. Suspended Dallas Cowboys WR Terrance Williams for three games for violating the NFL’s substance-abuse policy. ARIZONA CARDINALS — Promoted CB Deatrick Nichols from the practice squad. Released WR Kendall Wright. BUFFALO BILLS — Signed WR Cam Phillips from the practice squad. Released WR Robert Foster. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed CB KeiVarae Russell off the practice squad. Waived WR Auden Tate. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed G Zack Golditch to the practice squad. Released G Sean Harlow from the practice squad. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Placed WR Ted Ginn Jr. on injured reserve. Re-signed OT Michael Ola. HOCKEY | NHL ANAHEIM DUCKS — Reassigned C Chase De Leo to San Diego (AHL). Signed D Jake Dotchin to a one-year contract and assigned him to San Diego. Traded C Mitch Hults to Tampa Bay for future considerations. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Activated G Corey Crawford. Reassigned F Luke Johnson to Rockford (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Activated G Jonathan Quick from injured reserve. Assigned G Peter Budaj to Ontario (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled G Marek Mazanec from Hartford (AHL). Assigned G Alexandar Georgiev to Hartford.

BASEBALL WEDNESDAY’S LATE ALCS BOX SCORE

Red Sox 8, Astros 6 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 2 1 0 0 1 .278 Benintendi lf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .263 Martinez dh 4 2 2 1 1 1 .200 Bogaerts ss 4 0 2 2 1 1 .333 Devers 3b 5 0 1 2 0 3 .444 Kinsler 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Pearce 1b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .214 Holt 2b-3b 4 0 1 1 1 0 .125 Vazquez c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .100 a-Moreland ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Leon c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bradley Jr. cf 2 1 1 2 2 0 .250 Totals 37 8 11 8 7 8 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bregman 3b 5 1 0 0 0 1 .182 Springer cf 4 1 3 1 1 0 .412 Altuve dh 5 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Gonzalez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .188 Gurriel 1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .176 Reddick rf 4 1 2 1 1 1 .200 Correa ss 4 0 3 2 1 1 .400 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .111 b-White ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 McCann c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kemp lf 3 1 2 1 2 1 .375 Totals 39 6 13 6 5 6 Boston 201 012 110 — 8 11 1 Houston 012 110 010 — 6 13 0 a-grounded out for Vazquez in the 7th. b-struck out for Maldonado in the 7th. E: Porcello (1). LOB: Boston 11, Houston 13. 2B: Benintendi 2 (2), Bogaerts (1), Vazquez (1), Springer (3), Altuve (1), Reddick (1), Correa (1). HR: Bradley Jr. (2), off James; Springer (1), off Porcello; Kemp (1), off Porcello. RBIs: Martinez (2), Bogaerts 2 (3), Devers 2 (3), Holt (1), Bradley Jr. 2 (9), Springer (5), Altuve (2), Reddick (2), Correa 2 (3), Kemp (1). SB: Springer (1). CS: Bradley Jr. (1). RLISP: Boston 5 (Betts 2, Pearce, Moreland 2); Houston 7 (Bregman 2, Altuve, Gonzalez, Gurriel, White 2). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello 4 7 4 4 1 3 68 7.20 Kelly, W, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 25 3.00 Rodriguez 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 0.00 Brasier, 12/3 2 0 0 0 0 23 0.00 1/ 0 0 1 5 0.00 Barnes, 3 0 0 Kimbrel, S, 2-2 2 2 1 1 3 1 35 6.00 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton 21/3 3 3 3 2 2 53 11.57 James, L, 0-1 32/3 4 3 3 1 5 51 7.71 2/ Pressly 1 2 0 23 3.38 3 1 1 McCullers 11/3 2 1 1 1 0 33 3.00 1/ 0 1 1 14 0.00 Sipp 3 1 0 2/ 0 0 0 7 0.00 McHugh 3 0 0 Rodriguez pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. IRS: Brasier 1-0, Barnes 2-0, James 1-0, McCullers 3-1, McHugh 2-0. HBP: Morton (Betts), Porcello (Gonzalez), Kimbrel (Bregman), McHugh (Bradley Jr.). WP: Morton 2, Kelly, McCullers. T: 4:33. A: 43,277.

GOLF LPGA | Buick Shanghai Thursday | Shanghai Purse: $2.1 million Yardage: 6,541; Par: 72 (36-36) Firstd Round Ariya Jutanugarn 32-34 Sei Young Kim 33-34 Danielle Kang 34-33 Minjee Lee 34-34 Lizette Salas 34-34 Paula Creamer 34-34 Lydia Ko 33-35 Wenbo Liu 33-35 Ryann O’Toole 34-34 Wei-Ling Hsu 37-32 Yu Liu 33-36 Brittany Lincicome 33-36 So Yeon Ryu 37-32 Su Oh 35-34 Annie Park 35-34 Bronte Law 36-33 Jane Park 36-33 Carlota Ciganda 35-35 Nelly Korda 36-34 Amy Yang 35-35 Sakura Yokomine 36-34 Jacqui Concolino 36-35 Pernilla Lindberg 35-36 Brittany Altomare 37-34 Aditi Ashok 36-35 Jeong Eun Lee 35-36 Ally McDonald 36-35 Pornanong Phatlum 34-37 Mariah Stackhouse 36-35 Mi Hyang Lee 38-33 Azahara Munoz 34-37 Megan Khang 34-37 Shanshan Feng 36-36 Jin Young Ko 37-35 Marina Alex 35-37 Caroline Masson 36-36 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 36-36 Ashleigh Buhai 33-39 Lindy Duncan 38-34 Jenny Shin 35-37 Charley Hull 37-36 Sung Hyun Park 39-34 Anna Nordqvist 36-37 Xiang Sui 38-35 Angel Yin 35-38 Chella Choi 40-33 Yan Liu 37-36 Ying Luo 36-37 Mo Martin 36-37 Weiwei Zhang 37-36 Jennifer Song 36-37 Haeji Kang 38-35 Jaye Marie Green 38-35 Mirim Lee 36-37 Sarah Jane Smith 37-37 Ruixin Liu 37-37 Hyo Joo Kim 39-35 Jienalin Zhang 38-36 Katherine Kirk 39-35 Xiyu Lin 37-38 Yuting Shi 37-38 Brooke M. Henderson 36-39 Emma Talley 40-35 Thidapa Suwannapura 37-38 Eun-Hee Ji 37-38 a-Lei Ye 38-37 Moriya Jutanugarn 38-38 Sandra Gal 38-38 In-Kyung Kim 39-37 Taoli Yang 37-39 Ayako Uehara 39-37 Mohan Du 39-37 Peiyun Chien 38-39 Jiayun Li 39-38 Mariajo Uribe 40-38 Amy Olson 41-38 Yunjie Zhang 40-39 a-Jingfan Deng 41-38 Liqing Chen 40-43 a-Xiaowen Yin 46-38 a-Baining Wang 41-43

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

66 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 77 78 79 79 79 83 84 84

-6 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +7 +7 +7 +11 +12 +12

Thursday; second round early Friday morning | Jeju Island, South Korea Purse: $9.5 million Yardage: 7,196; Par: 72 (36-36) Firstd Round Chez Reavie 33-35 — 68 33-36 — 69 Danny Willett Si Woo Kim 35-34 — 69 Byeong Hun An 33-37 — 70 Rod Pampling 35-35 — 70 Michael Kim 35-35 — 70 Ian Poulter 34-36 — 70 Scott Piercy 34-36 — 70 Nick Watney 35-35 — 70 Austin Cook 36-34 — 70 Brooks Koepka 35-36 — 71 Patton Kizzire 36-35 — 71 Dong Seop Maeng 37-34 — 71 Graeme McDowell 36-35 — 71 J.J. Spaun 35-36 — 71 Adam Hadwin 33-38 — 71 Hideki Matsuyama 34-37 — 71 Paul Casey 35-36 — 71

-4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

PGA TOUR | CJ Cup

Jamie Lovemark Louis Oosthuizen Ryan Palmer Doyeob Mun Tae Hee Lee Tyrrell Hatton Pat Perez Charles Howell III Kyle Stanley Ryan Moore Joel Dahmen Jimmy Walker Brandt Snedeker Jason Dufner J.B. Holmes Peter Uihlein Justin Thomas Sungjae Im Gary Woodland Emiliano Grillo Rafa Cabrera Bello Ernie Els Kevin Na Brice Garnett Jason Day Andrew Putnam Kevin Tway Ryan Armour Brendan Steele Alex Noren Cameron Smith Billy Horschel Hyungjoon Lee Brian Gay Shubhankar Sharma Beau Hossler Branden Grace Joaquin Niemann Abraham Ancer Sanghyun Park Chesson Hadley Keith Mitchell Marc Leishman Adam Scott Sung Kang Charley Hoffman Kevin Chappell Brian Harman Charl Schwartzel James Hahn C.T. Pan Xander Schauffele Whee Kim Jason Kokrak Hyun-woo Ryu Stewart Cink Ted Potter Jr. Brian Stuard Kyoung-Hoon Lee Minchel Choi

35-36 36-36 38-34 34-38 36-36 35-37 36-36 33-39 37-35 38-34 36-36 38-34 37-35 35-37 36-36 36-37 36-37 35-38 39-34 36-37 36-37 37-36 38-35 36-37 38-35 36-37 36-37 36-37 39-35 38-36 37-37 37-37 37-37 36-38 37-37 42-33 40-35 37-38 41-34 36-39 34-41 35-40 37-38 38-37 37-38 34-42 39-37 38-38 40-36 39-37 34-42 39-37 40-36 39-38 40-37 34-43 36-41 38-39 39-39 41-41

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 -1 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 72 E 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 73 +1 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 74 +2 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 75 +3 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 76 +4 77 +5 77 +5 77 +5 77 +5 77 +5 78 +6 82 +10

EURO | Andalucia leaders Thursday | Sotogrande, Spain Purse: $2.3M | Yardage: 6,991; Par: 71 Partial First Round Ashley Chesters, England 66 Gregory Bourdy, France 67 Jason Scrivener, Australia 68 Sergio Garcia, Spain 68 Richie Ramsey, Scotland 69 Jorge Campillo, Spain 69 Shane Lowry, Ireland 69 Jason Norris, Australia 69 Mikko Korhohen, Finland 69 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 69 Matthew Nixon, England 69 Nino Bertasio, Italy 70 Cho Rak-hyun, South Korea 70 Also David Lipsky, United States 73 Daniel Im, United States 74 Leaderboard Golfer Score Thru Ashley Chesters, England -5 F Gregory Bourdy, France -4 F Jason Scrivener, Australia -3 F Sergio Garcia, Spain -3 F Alvaro Quiros, Spain -3 8 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano, Spain -3 6 Richie Ramsey, Scotland -2 F Jorge Campillo, Spain -2 F Shane Lowry, Ireland -2 F Jason Norris, Australia -2 F Mikko Korhohen, Finland -2 F Darren Fichardt, South Africa -2 F Matthew Nixon, England -2 F Richard McEvoy, England -2 8 Pontus Widegren, Sweden -2 6 Also Padraig Harrington, Ireland E 8 Paul Peterson, United States E 4 Chase Koepka, United States E 4

HOLES-IN-ONE Birch Creek • Mark Denbow, hole No. 16, 117 yards, wedge, Oct. 18 Bellerive • Martin Kerckhoff, hole No. 3, 140 yards, 6-iron, Oct. 18 Forest Park • Nick Pelon, hole No. 3 Redbud, 171 yards, 7-iron, Oct. 18

SOCCER

COLLEGES

Major League Soccer

Area scores

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 20 6 6 66 67 39 New York 20 7 5 65 60 33 New York City FC 15 9 8 53 55 41 Philadelphia 15 12 5 50 48 46 Columbus 13 10 9 48 39 41 D.C. United 13 11 8 47 57 49 Montreal 13 15 4 43 45 52 New England 9 13 11 38 48 55 Toronto FC 9 17 6 33 55 61 Chicago 8 17 7 31 47 59 Orlando City 7 21 4 25 41 72 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 16 7 9 57 51 39 Sporting K.C. 16 8 8 56 60 39 Los Angeles FC 16 8 8 56 65 48 Seattle 16 11 5 53 47 34 Portland 14 9 9 51 50 46 Real Salt Lake 14 12 7 49 55 55 LA Galaxy 12 11 9 45 61 60 Vancouver 12 13 7 43 50 64 Minnesota United 11 18 3 36 46 65 Houston 9 15 8 35 53 53 Colorado 7 19 6 27 34 62 San Jose 4 20 8 20 48 69 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Thursday Real Salt Lake 4, New England 1 Sunday Chicago at Atlanta United FC, 2 p.m. Columbus at Orlando City, 2 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. New York City FC at D.C. United, 2 p.m. Toronto FC at Montreal, 2 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 4 p.m. LA Galaxy at Minnesota United, 4 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Portland, 4 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 4 p.m. Sporting K.C. at FC Dallas, 4 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles FC, 4 p.m. Sunday Atlanta United FC at Toronto FC, 3:30 p.m. D.C. United at Chicago, 3:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Colorado, 3:30 p.m. Houston at LA Galaxy, 3:30 p.m. Los Angeles FC at Sporting K.C., 3:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Columbus, 3:30 p.m. Montreal at New England, 3:30 p.m. Orlando City at New York, 3:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New York City FC, 3:30 p.m. Portland at Vancouver, 3:30 p.m. San Jose at Seattle, 3:30 p.m.

Women’s soccer SLU 3, Massachusetts 0 Belmont 2, SE Missouri State 1 Northwestern 2, Illinois 1 South Carolina 1, Missouri 0 Webster U. 5, Spalding 0 Women’s volleyball Webster U. def. Blackburn 3-0 Men’s soccer Spalding 2, Webster U. 1

College football TOP 25 SCHEDULE Saturday No. 1 Alabama at Tennessee, 2:30 p.m. No. 2 Ohio State at Purdue, 6:30 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 16 NC State, 2:30 p.m. No. 5 LSU vs. No. 22 Miss. State, 6 p.m. No. 6 Michigan at No. 24 Michigan State, 11 a.m. No. 9 Oklahoma at TCU, 11 a.m. No. 10 UCF at East Carolina, 6 p.m. No. 12 Oregon at No. 25 Washington State, 6:30 p.m. No. 14 Kentucky vs. Vanderbilt, 6:30 p.m. No. 15 Washington vs. Colorado, 2:30 p.m. No. 18 Penn State at Indiana, 2:30 p.m. No. 19 Iowa vs. Maryland, 11 a.m. No. 20 Cincinnati at Temple, 11 a.m. No. 21 South Florida vs. UConn, 6 p.m. No. 23 Wisconsin vs. Illinois, 11 a.m.

THURSDAY’S FBS SCORES Arkansas State 51, Georgia State 35 Stanford 20, Arizona State 13

College basketball MVC PRESEASON POLL As voted by league coaches, media and sports information directors. First-place votes in parenthesis. Rank, school Total 1. Loyola (29) ..............................................410 2. Illinois State (10)..................................... 374 3. SIU Carbondale (4)................................. 362 4. Bradley ...................................................305 5. Northern Iowa ........................................248 6. Indiana State .......................................... 210 7. Valparaiso ................................................173 8. Missouri State..........................................125 9. Drake......................................................... 92 10. Evansville ................................................66 FIRST TEAM G Jordan Barnes, 5-11, jr., Indiana State G Clayton Custer, 6-1, sr., Loyola (POY) F Phil Fayne, 6-8, sr., Illinois State G Armon Fletcher, 6-5, sr., SIU Carbondale G Milik Yarbrough, 6-6, sr., Illinois State SECOND TEAM G Darrell Brown, 5-10, jr., Bradley G Keyshawn Evans, 6-0, sr., Illinois State C Cameron Krutwig, 6-9, so., Loyola C Kavion Pippen, 6-10, sr., SIU Carbondale G Marques Townes, 6-4, sr., Loyola

USL playoffs Western Conference quarterfinals Friday Portland at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Saturday Reno at Salt Lake City, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Orange County, 9 p.m. Kansas City at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m.

Eastern Conference quarterfinals Saturday Nashville at Cincinnati, 3 p.m. New York at Charleston, 6 p.m. Bethlehem at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Indy at Louisville, 6:30 p.m.

BLUES STATISTICS Player-pos. Brayden Schenn—F Ryan O’Reilly—F David Perron—F Alexander Steen—F Vladimir Tarasenko—F Patrick Maroon—F Ivan Barbashev—F Tyler Bozak—F Vince Dunn—D Joel Edmundson—D Colton Parayko—D Jaden Schwartz—F Jay Bouwmeester—D Jordan Kyrou—F Jordan Schmaltz—D Robert Thomas—F Sammy Blais—F Robert Bortuzzo—D Jakub Jerabek—D Alex Pietrangelo—D Zach Sanford—F Goalie Jake Allen 31 Chad Johnson

GP 5 1

GP 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 4 6 4 6 6 4 5 6 4 1 6 1 MINS 306 57

G 3 0 4 2 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

A 3 5 1 3 3 3 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 AVG 3.91 3.10

PTS 6 5 5 5 5 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

+/-1 -5 -4 -2 -6 -5 -1 -3 -2 -1 0 0 -4 -1 0 -1 -2 -2 -3 -6 0

PIM 2 6 0 2 0 7 0 0 2 8 0 2 8 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0

PP 2 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

W 1 0

L 2 1

OT 2 0

GA 20 3

SA 162 31

GW 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SV% .877 .903

PCTG .167 .000 .444 .167 .063 .000 .000 .111 .200 .125 .077 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 G 0 0


C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

TODAY

TONIGHT

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Cloudy, a shower or two WIND SW 7-14 mph

Patchy clouds

Mostly sunny and windy WIND NW 12-25 mph

Sunny, but cool

Mostly sunny

WIND WSW 4-8 mph

WIND SSW 7-14 mph

Increasing cloudiness WIND NNW 4-8 mph

56°

48°

A swath of clouds and rain will extend from Texas to Michigan today. Some rain on the southern end will be heavy. Showers and spotty thunderstorms are forecast to extend from the immediate Gulf coast to across the Florida Peninsula. Most other areas will be dry. The air will turn milder in the Northeast and colder over the Plains. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND W 7-14 mph

80

Peoria 57/42

74

55

Macomb 59/41 Bloomington 54/41

Kirksville 61/42

Urbana 58/44

Quincy 59/43

Decatur 57/44

Springfield 57 59/43 Effingham 70 55 57/46

35

Columbia 57/45 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 56/48 City 56/45 55 57/45 Union 55/46 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 53/46 58/48 Farmington 56/46 Cape Girardeau 60/47 Springfield 55/46 Poplar Bluff West Plains 59/47 55 55/49 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

21.82 20.38 21.77 18.16 25.47

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

-0.37 -2.24 -1.74 -1.77 -0.73

16 23.47 -0.45 15 22.18 -0.23 25 32.65 -0.18 26 33.18 -0.02 18 25.11 +0.07 419 423.04 -0.06 21 26.68 -0.09 30 32.42 -0.13 27 33.77 +0.04 32 36.75 +0.27 20 18 14

13.62 -0.37 11.85 +0.48 12.73 -0.07

15 16 24 15 40

2.73 -0.04 11.34 -0.12 29.61 -0.07 1.59

Forecast Temperature

38.06 +0.99 355.16 +0.02 359.81 -0.01 494.50 -0.11 658.10 -0.31 710.66 -0.07 655.14 -0.18 912.11 -0.07 839.74 none 599.82 -0.02 407.48 -0.02 611.74 +0.05 445.02 +0.03

Average High

Temperature High/low 61°/37° Normal high/low 68°/48° Last year high/low 75°/50° Record high 87° (1953) Record low 27° (1976) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Thu. 0.00” Month to date (normal) 1.69” (1.93”) Year to date (normal) 34.37” (32.81”) Record for this date 2.21” (1883)

Pollen Yesterday

Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Thursday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

16 130 106 137 145

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

45° 8 a.m.

52° noon

49° 4 p.m.

49° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

Average Low

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

Skywatch Rise

Sun Moon

Set

7:15 a.m. 4:06 p.m.

6:18 p.m. 2:04 a.m.

80 70 60 50 40

56 46 41

50 43 S

S

64

61

51

65

62

42

38

36

M

T

W

39

37 T

F

65

56

56 48

47

30

F

59

33 S

S

43

41

M

T

61

57

44

45

W

T

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Oct 24

Oct 31

Nov 7

Nov 15

©2018; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Washington 65/57

Atlanta 69/61 El Paso 70/58

Chihuahua 72/55

-10s -0s

0s

Houston 78/65

Miami 88/75

Monterrey 75/64

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Warm front

Stationary front

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

61/46/s 67/46/pc 47/40/r 69/61/pc 65/60/r 64/53/pc 78/61/pc 69/44/s 62/52/s 76/66/pc 66/52/pc 70/58/s 57/42/pc 59/48/pc 59/49/pc 59/55/r 85/72/t 65/37/s 65/40/pc 83/72/t 58/44/pc 61/47/s 86/73/sh 78/65/c 56/46/pc 64/43/pc 81/59/s 63/53/r

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

59/34/sh 67/45/pc 49/43/r 70/45/sh 68/59/r 66/43/pc 67/42/sh 71/43/s 65/43/c 84/53/c 58/33/pc 72/42/r 50/29/sn 59/32/pc 55/38/sh 70/51/c 87/69/pc 66/40/s 50/29/s 85/61/c 54/31/sh 64/39/c 85/74/t 74/60/c 57/31/pc 60/30/s 79/63/pc 71/41/pc

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

89/64/s 65/51/pc 69/53/c 88/75/s 56/41/sh 63/35/pc 82/67/pc 73/53/c 86/73/pc 60/54/s 60/49/r 70/43/s 89/71/t 62/54/s 88/71/s 59/47/pc 56/46/pc 74/45/s 84/48/s 65/42/s 68/62/t 85/63/s 74/53/s 65/46/pc 91/75/pc 84/66/s 65/57/pc 68/44/r

88/64/s 63/36/pc 69/40/pc 89/72/pc 48/29/c 42/29/s 78/49/sh 66/37/pc 84/62/c 64/44/sh 68/40/s 55/33/s 90/70/pc 65/43/c 91/69/pc 54/36/sh 62/37/pc 74/45/s 85/48/s 69/48/s 69/59/r 83/63/s 72/53/s 62/46/s 89/73/pc 85/65/pc 67/46/pc 68/36/s

National Extremes

Thursday in the 48 contiguous states High: 94 Winter Haven, Fla. Low: 4 Bodie State Park, Calif.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

New York 60/54

Detroit 58/44

Kansas City 64/43

Los Angeles 89/64

Cold front

Absent Absent Absent Moderate - 7907

Chicago 57/42

Denver 65/37

Statistics through 5 p.m. Thursday

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Montreal 59/45

Minneapolis 63/35

Toronto 58/45 San Francisco 74/53

-0.05

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Billings 61/37

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

A weak cold front will push through the area today with some showers around the area. Though it will be a bit warmer on Saturday, it will be chilly at night.

Joplin 57/45

Winnipeg 47/25

Seattle 65/46

62° 33° 56° 39° 65° 43° 65° 41°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 64/43

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

58/40/pc 75/60/pc 91/72/c 91/78/t 67/38/s 57/38/pc 70/54/pc 86/69/s 83/76/t 58/49/pc 81/73/pc 74/61/pc 82/57/pc 59/44/pc 66/53/r 98/79/s

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

60/46/pc 76/60/s 92/74/c 89/76/t 64/42/c 55/43/pc 63/56/c 89/72/pc 86/76/t 63/54/c 81/75/pc 73/59/pc 75/45/t 62/47/s 71/55/c 100/80/t

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

71/55/t 59/45/pc 63/37/pc 88/77/pc 78/57/pc 92/69/pc 67/45/s 79/70/r 76/59/s 87/77/pc 73/44/pc 66/42/s 81/65/s 67/61/r 58/45/c 57/43/pc

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

68/58/sh 53/31/r 47/36/c 87/77/pc 80/56/pc 92/67/pc 66/43/s 75/65/c 76/57/pc 86/76/pc 73/43/s 66/42/s 83/60/t 69/57/pc 52/32/sh 57/44/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


Friday, October 19, 2018

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WINDOW TREATMENTS Continued from Page 1

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legant 3-bedroom villa in Meadowbrook Country Club with breathtaking view of the golf course’s 3rd green. Inviting foyer opens to custom stained wood floors, coffered ceiling, and double coat closets. Open concept chef’s kitchen with vaulted ceiling, custom Beck Allen cabinetry, Wolf double ovens, drawer microwave, gas cooktop, range hood, 42o sub-zero fridge. Choose to enjoy your meals in the breakfast room with bay windows and French doors overlooking the course or in separate dining room with coffered ceiling and custom window treatments. Entertain in your Great Room with 12’ ceilings, wall to wall bay windows, electronic window treatments, custom fireplace. Main floor master has bay windows with Hunter Douglas blinds and walkin closet. On suite has enclosed glass shower, oversized soaking tub, double sink, floating Beck Allen cabinetry. Use the other main bedroom as an office or den with custom fireplace mantel, walk-in closet, and full bath. Don’t miss this turn key home! For more information contact Kelli Ewen at 314-221-6927.

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s more homeowners opt to remodel their current homes for accessibility and safety, those concerns are taken into consideration especially for kitchens or bathrooms. Special considerations often should be made for those falling in the Baby Boomer age group, who especially should take into account the accessibility of their homes and improvements that can be made. Incorporate universal design strategies into your next remodeling project with this five-step guide from the experts at the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI), which offers certification in universal design to provide contractors with the knowledge and training to ensure accessibility in kitchen and bathroom designs. 1. Understand Your Needs Before starting any remodeling project, take the time to define your needs. Ask simple questions such as: • How do you live in your current home? • What health issues – current and future – should be considered? • How can a remodel help make your space safer and easier to use? 2. Identify Structural Mobility Changes Mobility addresses the ability to move freely

in a space. While mobility issues can impact older adults, it is not limited to only the elderly. While you might not need mobility assistance today, take a walk through your home and identify structural items that should be addressed, such as: Doorways • Widening doorways to 32-36 inches so walkers, wheelchairs or even large household items may easily move through • Removing thresholds that may create a tripping hazard Hallways • Expanding hallway widths to 36-42 inches • Well-lit hallways can improve safety Clear Space • Incorporating clear space, especially in front of kitchen appliances • Best practices suggest clear space of 30-by-48 inches to allow for easy access 3. Safety First Stairs pose a considerable hazard for those with decreased mobility. Ensure the first level of your home provides space for sleeping, eating and has at least one full bathroom. Other safety considerations include: • Incorporating non-slip flooring surfaces • Removing the need to go up or down stairs

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• Creating well-lit rooms 4. Kitchen Updates for Ease of Use Cabinets and counter heights, as well as the location of appliances, can improve the cooking experience. Other checklist items include: • Dishwashers in drawer units eliminate the need to bend over when loading or unloading • Push button controls for dishwashers for easier use • Refrigerators with drawer unit options or sideby-side models • Ovens and microwaves placed in the wall at appropriate heights 5. Bathroom Best Practices Adjusting counter and toilet heights are two ways to make bathrooms more accessible. Wall-hung toilets should be approximately two inches higher. A first floor or main floor bathroom should incorporate: • Structural bracing around the tub, shower and toilet for grab bars • Walk-in tub or curbless stand-up shower with no threshold • Levered handles for faucets • Adjustable showerhead For more information or ideas to incorporate universal design, visit NARI.org.


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

MICHAEL MYERS SLASHES AGAIN IN ‘HALLOWEEN’ Page 18

LILIANA’S IS AN OLDSCHOOL ITALIAN CHARMER Page 28

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10.19.18–10.25.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

JAKE OWEN GIVES FANS ‘BADASS’ SONGS Page 6

R O R

S E L


10.19.18–10.25.18 ▼

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10

SUNDAY, MARCH 24

TONIGHT

TOMORROW NIGHT

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2

Visit EnterpriseCenter.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. Candy for sale at How Sweet is This in Clayton

Cover story

with friends. Page 7

What can you do in St. Louis for a quarter or less? We tracked down a few options. Page 15

Max Frost ditches his own tour to hit the road with Twenty One Pilots. Page 7

Datebook

Peabo Bryson shows the R&B scene that he’s still relevant. Page 8

Rupert Everett transforms into Oscar Wilde in a sentimental portrait of the famed Irish wit. Page 20 Recently reviewed movies. Page 21

Ticket Tracker. Page 10

Finally, a movie that’s set in Missouri is also filmed in Missouri. Page 24

St. Louisan Jamal Green is still starstruck by his job: dancing with Nicki Minaj. Page 11

Sarah Jeffery loves the sisterhood of rebooted “Charmed.” Page 25 TV Q&A. Page 25

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Alice Cooper at Stifel Theatre, Jon Batiste at the Sheldon Concert Hall, Fleetwood Mac at Enterprise Center and “Kehinde Wiley: St. Louis” at the St. Louis Art Museum. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks. Page 4

Music & Clubs SATURDAY, MAY 4

FRIDAY, MARCH 8

ON SALE TODAY AT NOON (4:30PM SHOW ADDED)

Country music star Jake Owen releases “badass songs” en route to an upcoming album. Page 6 Oak Ridge Boys welcome the chance to perform

“Orange Is the New Black” actress Henny Russell returns to the stage. Page 12

Fuel

Wentzville cat named Midnight inspires author’s new picture book. Page 13 Recently reviewed theater. Page 13

Screens David Gordon Green resurrects John Carpenter’s classic for a “Halloween” sequel that lives up to its name. Page 18 “The Oath” is a political satire that’s ripped, like a Band-Aid, from today’s headlines. Page 19

Liliana’s Italian Kitchen is an old-school pizza-andpasta charmer. Page 28 Recently reviewed restaurants. Page 30 Brewers team with players for hockey-inspired beers. Page 31

ON THE COVER • 123rf.com stock photo SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18 (1PM & 4:30PM)

TONIGHT

TOMORROW NIGHT

Visit StifelTheatre.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. EnterpriseCenter.com StLouisBlues.com StifelTheatre.com Enterprise Center Group Sales: 314-622-5454 | Stifel Theatre Group Sales: 314-499-7676 Ticketmaster: 800-745-3000

2

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.19.18-10.25.18

WHAT’S HOT AT STLTODAY.COM ➨ Readers and members of our staff savor memorable meals at iconic St. Louis-area restaurants. stltoday.com/dining ➨ Register through Oct. 28 to win a pair of tickets to see Blues Traveler on Nov. 2 at the Pageant. stltoday.com/contests ➨ Celebrate this spooky season with haunted houses, festivals and other Halloween happenings. stltoday.com/go ➨ “Halloween” is the latest fearsome film to make a comeback. See how it ranks with the rest. stltoday.com/movies

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : J O H A N N A H U C K E B A / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( C A N D Y ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( A L I C E C O O P E R )

See & Do


HERE’S WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS WEEK ▼

“I’m going to go shoot zombies at the Haunted Paintball Park in Millstadt.” • “Getting caught up with all my fall TV. And then brunching with friends on Sunday.” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com Jon Naso • photo editor, 314-340-8775, jnaso@post-dispatch.com

“Hoping to head outdoors if weather cooperates.” •

Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com “Seeing ‘The Nun’ on Friday — and having my pants scared off!” •

Emily Tintera • event and sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischoff • Post-Dispatch vice president of sales and marketing, 314-340-8529, dbischoff@post-dispatch.com

CONTRIBUTORS

“Seeing Fleetwood Mac on Saturday night at Enterprise Center for another opportunity to see my Stevie Nicks — Lindsey Buckingham’s absence notwithstanding.” •

Cara DeMichele • designer Brian Feldt • beer writer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Jon Lewis • features intern Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • theater critic

“This weekend’s concerts by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra include music from Wagner’s ‘Ring’ cycle, including ‘The Ride of the Valkyries.’ Hearing it live is the best way to hear it!” •

CONTACT US Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • stltoday.com/events Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise “Screaming (with laughter?) at ‘Evil Dead: The Musical’ at Stray Dog Theatre.” •

Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us ae@post-dispatch.com Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

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COPYRIGHT 2018 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

stltoday.com/go

10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


STLTODAY.COM/EVENTS ▼

Alice Cooper

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

BEST BETS

SATURDAY Veterans Tribute Park opening WHEN 1:15 p.m. Saturday • WHERE 1031 Kisker Road, Weldon Spring • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO sccmo.org/232/Parks-Recreation

FRIDAY Seven Lions Presents: The Journey 2 Tour with MitiS, Jason Ross

This new 120-acre park in Weldon Spring includes a destination playground for children of all abilities, walking and biking trails, fishing lakes, a dog park and more. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at the Sammelmann Shelter.

WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$32 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Dance music DJ and producer Seven Lions looks to continue challenging himself on his new music, which includes an EP, “Start Again.” “Since artists aren’t releasing proper albums anymore, it makes sense to create something that’s digitally artistic with real cohesion as opposed to tossing out singles and just haphazardly seeing what sticks,” he says. “I wanted to start making the music more thematic, interesting and part of something larger.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

‘Redemption of a Dogg’ WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Stifel Theatre, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $59.50.$99.50 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Fans of plays by Je’Caryous Johnson know there is always a new work right around the corner. His latest is “Redemption of a Dogg,” starring none other than Snoop Dogg, along with Tamar Braxton, Eric Benet, Demetria McKinney, Omar Gooding and Lil’ JJ. The show follows “Set If Off,” which was based

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Legends & Lanterns WHEN 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday, 5-8 p.m. Oct. 26, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Oct. 27, noon-5 p.m. Oct. 28 • WHERE Historic Main Street in St. Charles • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO discoverstcharles.com

on the popular movie. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

‘Kehinde Wiley: St. Louis’ WHEN Friday through Feb. 10; hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. TuesdayThursday and Saturday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday • WHERE St. Louis Art Museum, 1 Fine Arts Drive, Forest Park • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-721-0072; slam.org

Kehinde Wiley is well-known in the art world, especially since the unveiling of his portrait of former President Barack Obama for the National Portrait Gallery. For his new exhibit, he chose St. Louisans from Ferguson and north St. Louis, creating large oil paintings that show these

contemporary subjects posed in ways that suggest historic portraits. His work draws attention to the traditional lack of people of color represented in artwork. As inspiration for the historic portraits, he used paintings from the St. Louis Art Museum’s own collection. Wiley’s speech Friday night is sold out. BY JANE HENDERSON

‘Silent Sky’ WHEN 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, through Nov. 4; additional performances at 8 p.m. Thursday and Nov. 1 • WHERE Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $15-$35 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Lauren Gunderson’s “Silent Sky” is the true story of an amateur astronomer who contributed significantly to our knowledge of the universe. Insight Theatre Company’s production is directed by Maggie Ryan. BY CALVIN WILSON

Ruf Records’ Blues Caravan WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Old Rock House, 1200 South Seventh Street • HOW MUCH $15 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Ruf Records is taking some of its key artists — Mike Zito, Ally Venable and Bernard Allison — and putting them together on the road. The tour began in 2015. Zito, who hails

from St. Louis, makes his Ruf Records debut with his new album, “First Class Life.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Not-So-Haunted House WHEN Friday, Saturday and Sunday; Friday through Oct. 28 • WHERE The Magic House, 516 South Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • HOW MUCH $11 • MORE INFO magichouse.org

Come face-to-face with beloved children’s book characters as the Magic House becomes a dress-up playground. Unfortunately for children with a taste for sweets, the event is candy-free, but there will still be plenty of kid-friendly Halloween fun. BY JON LEWIS

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: Beethoven’s Triple Concerto WHEN 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$110 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

Most concertos feature one soloist; Beethoven’s rarely performed Triple Concerto demands three. This weekend at Powell Hall, they are SLSO second associate concertmaster Celeste Golden Boyer, associate principal cello Melissa Brooks and pianist Elizabeth Joy Roe. Conductor Jun Märkl also leads “The Ring: An Orchestral Journey,” with all the big tunes from the

St. Charles becomes a ghost town when villains, witches and spirits invade the streets to offer treats and tricks. The festival channels the vintage charm of Halloween from the 1910s to the ’30s, and organizers say “it’s a little bit silly. It’s a little bit macabre. But it’s all fun.” BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Cathedral Concerts: The Queen’s Six WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, 4431 Lindell Boulevard • HOW MUCH $19-$42 • MORE INFO 314533-7662; cathedralconcerts.org

Cathedral Concerts of St. Louis continues its season with a performance by the British male a cappella group Queen’s Six. Established in 2008,

the members of the ensemble are all lay clerks in St. George’s Chapel in Windsor, singing with the choir’s treble choristers at eight services a week and for other occasions. Their program includes music by Palestrina, Lotti, Byrd, Tallis and King Henry VIII. It should sound glorious in the resonant space of the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

St. Louis Classical Guitar Society: Tengyue Zhang WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Ethical Society, 9001 Clayton Road • HOW MUCH $28 • MORE INFO 314-567-5566; guitarstlouis.net

For its first concert of the season, the St. Louis Classical Guitar Society presents Tengyue Zhang, in his St. Louis debut. Known as “TY,” he’s a native of Hebei, China, who came to the United States in 2012 to study at the Juilliard School. Last year he won the Guitar Foundation of America’s International Competition, among the world’s most prestigious competitions for classical guitar. A part of his prize is a concert tour through the U.S. and abroad, including this performance in St. Louis. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Paranormal Evening With Alice Cooper’ WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Stifel Theatre, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $26.75$176.50 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Halloween is near, and Michael Myers isn’t the only creeper who’s back. Classic rocker Alice Cooper is making the rounds as well. His latest album is “Paranormal.” EVIN C. JOHNSON BY KEVIN

Michael James Scott “Aladdin”

FAST FORWARD “Into the Breeches!,” Oct. 28-Nov. 24 at the Grandel: Shakespeare Festival St. Louis kicks off its new “In the Works” program with a new play written by George Brant and directed by Nancy Bell • “Romeo and Juliet,” Nov. 2-4 at the Touhill Performing Arts Center: The St. Louis Ballet season begins with a full-length ballet featuring original choreography by Gen Horiuchi and a score by Sergei Prokofiev • “Lord of the Dance: Dangerous Games,” Nov. 4 at Stifel Theatre: In this updated production by Michael Flatley, the Lord of the Dance embarks on a journey filled with energy and passion to fight against evil and defeat the Dark Lord • “Aladdin,” Nov. 7-25 at the Fox Theatre: The stage adaptation of Disney’s popular animated musical is sure to delight children and parents alike 4

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P H O T O S : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( C O O P E R ) ; D E E N VA N M E E R ( “A L A D D I N ” )

four-part cycle “Der Ring des Nibelungen,” including “The Ride of the Valkyries,” for what should be a thrilling musical experience.


Nicholas McGegan returns to St. Louis to lead the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra — and the Chamber Music Society of St. Louis. This week, McGegan and a cadre of gifted St. Louis musicians will perform a program called “Go for Baroque” in the intimate space of the Sheldon Concert Hall Ballroom. You can sip a drink while you enjoy music by Albinoni, Telemann, Handel and J.S. Bach. BY

Jon Batiste

SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Jon Batiste WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Gallery, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$50 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Piano virtuoso Jon Batiste, who leads house band Stay Human on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert,” performs as part of the Sheldon’s Rhythm & Jazz series. Batiste recently released his solo album, “Hollywood Africans.” A video for the single “Don’t Stop” was filmed on the roof of New York’s Ed Sullivan Theater, where Colbert broadcasts. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Kansas WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $45-$125 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Veteran band Kansas performs its “Point of Know Return” album in its entirety for its first time on tour. Fan favorites and deep cuts will also be performed. The album was released in 1977. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

‘An Evening With Fleetwood Mac’

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WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Enterprise Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $46-$196 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Heard anything about Fleetwood Mac lately? The classic rock band has been in the national headlines, primarily because of the dismissal of longtime member Lindsey Buckingham and the fallout that followed. Friday night, St. Louis will see how the band fares without Buckingham. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

BandTogether: ‘Masquerade’ WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue, University City • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO bandtogetherstl.com

BandTogether begins its 22nd season with a Halloween-appropriate program. Artistic directors Gary Reynolds and Jeff Girard will direct the ensemble of more than 100 members in selections from shows including “The Phantom of the Opera” and “Candide,” as well as “The Procession of the Sorcerers,” “La Fiesta Mexicana” and more. The BandTogether Colorguard, directed by Michael Melton, will perform a program called “Spellbound” during the intermission. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $23.50-$27 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Rock band the Struts follows up its debut album, “Everybody Wants,” with the new “Young & Dangerous.” “I personally feel I’ve grown as a songwriter,” lead singer Luke Spiller told the PostDispatch. “I’ve gotten more confident about what I’m writing. Part of that is in the arrangements, which is now more than just verse, chorus, verse, chorus. When it came to writing the second album, there’s an element in there where I shook things up. Why should we have to stick to a traditional format?” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SUNDAY ‘Kidz Bop Live’ WHEN 4 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Stifel Theatre, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $20-$75 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Get Tubthumping, parents: A ’90s-hits parent lip-sync battle awaits at this “Kidz Bop Live” tour, where kids sing the biggest hits for other kids. The show is filled with special effects and fan interaction. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

MONDAY Chamber Music Society of St. Louis: ‘Go for Baroque’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Monday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $38 • MORE INFO 314-941-6309; chambermusicstl.org

Every season, conductor

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TUESDAY The Struts

WEDNESDAY Julia Bullock in recital WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$35, $15 for students • MORE INFO thesheldon.org

Soprano Julia Bullock of St. Louis has made a name for herself in the world of opera, concerts and recitals. She performs around the globe; this week, she’s coming home for a residency that includes Wednesday’s recital and the kickoff of Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ new “Representation and Responsibility” series. Bullock has both a terrific voice and commanding stage presence. She’s one of the stars of OTSL’s 2019 season world premiere opera “Fire Shut Up

in My Bones”; this is a chance to hear her up close and personal. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Macbeth: Come Like Shadows’ WHEN Wednesday-Saturday; Wednesday through Nov. 10 (arrive no later than 7:20 p.m. for buses to and from performance site) • WHERE Pickup location is 1615 South Broadway • HOW MUCH $35-$45 • MORE INFO rebelandmisfitsproductions.com.

Shakespeare’s drama about Scottish general Macbeth, whose ambition leads him astray, is the inspiration for the third installment in Rebel & Misfits’ Immersive Theatre Project. The production is described as a “high-octane, dangerous, and sexy world, where nothing is ever quite what it seems.” BY CALVIN WILSON

Bernie Federko WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Ethical Society of St. Louis, 9001 Clayton Road • HOW MUCH $30-$35, includes 1-2 tickets and a copy of book • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

Bernie Federko, one of the Blues’ favorite players (he has a statue in front of Enterprise Center), will talk about his new memoir, “My Blues Note.” Written with former Post-Dispatch sportswriter Jeremy Rutherford, Federko reflects on his career and his life off the ice. He will sign copies of the book purchased from Left Bank Books but no memorabilia.

MUSTARD SEED THEATRE PRESENTS

All IsCalm The Christm s Truce of 1914 by Peter Rothstein

A concert version of the a capella musical, the true story of WWI soldiers who laid down their arms and celebrated together on Christmas Day. Museum galleries will remain open for viewing until 7pm prior to evening performances.

NOVEMBER 5–7 • 3pm and 7pm $10 per person • FREE for veterans and active military Tickets: mohistory.org/all-is-calm or 314.361.9017 Seating is limited. Advance reservations encouraged for both paid and free tickets. 1315 Chestnut St. 314.818.6780 mohistory.org/memorial

BY JANE HENDERSON

THURSDAY Mildred Thimes Foundation 14th Annual Benefit Concert WHEN 7:30 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$75 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Whenever St. Louis jazz dynamo Denise Thimes decides to devote a show to a particular artist, you’re assured she’s going to totally embody the artist while also making the performance her own. This concert is a showcase of music by Luther Vandross and Chaka Khan. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

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Jake Owen performs at the 2018 CMA Music Festival in Nashville, Tenn.

Country star Jake Owen readies new ‘badass songs’ Listeners are overwhelmed by options, he says, so he’s releasing new songs slowly, hoping fans can ‘spend time’ with them BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

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onsumers have an abundance of music at their fingertips nowadays. It’s a great problem to have — for music fans and artists alike. “I love music; I listen to everyone,” says country music star Jake Owen (“Barefoot Blue kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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Jean Night,” “Beachin’”). “There’s so much now. I listen to something, fall in love with it and a week later forget about it because there’s so much music at once and so many places to get it.” Because of this, he says, “it’s important to me every song we release is a badass song.” That’s his approach to recording and releasing music, including his latest hit, “Down

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to the Honky Tonk.” The tongue-in-cheek ode to the Broadway Historic District in Nashville, Tenn., is the kind of song that puts smiles on folks’ faces, he says. The lyrics include: I might not end up in the Hall of Fame With a star on the sidewalk with my name Or a statue in my hometown when I’m gone Nobody gonna name their babies after me I might not go down in history But I’ll go down to the honkytonk Another song he wrote with this in mind is “I Was Jack (You Were Diane),” a spinoff of John Mellencamp’s classic “Jack and Diane.” “I brought back the idea of two young kids growing up in America and learning about love,” he says. Instead of dumping a new album of unfamiliar songs on fans, Owens plans to release his songs individually. He likes the idea of “every few weeks dropping a song and giving

them something new. It allows you to spend time with that one song.” Eventually, the songs will culminate in Owen’s next album, his sixth. The untitled project will land in 2019 and is the follow-up to “American Love” (2016). He’s not sure what direction the album will take, but he expects it to be “all over the map. That’s who I am as a person. I think the main focus is the fact all the songs on their own are super engaging and entertaining and different.” He’s bringing some of the songs and more to Chaifetz Arena on Saturday for his “Life’s Whatcha Make It” tour. “It’s a big deal — something we’re proud of,” Owen says of the leap from small venues to arenas. He attributes the change to his supportive fans. “You have to rely on entertainment value no matter what the size show we play,” he says. “We always bring the entertainment aspect, even if I’m just sitting on a stool. The difference in playing larger venues is making people feel you’re just accessible. That’s an art that a lot of entertainers have the ability to do and what we do.” The tour’s title relates to a philosophy Owens furthers: that, in the grand scheme of things, people don’t actually have to attend concerts. “People are paying for things on a daily basis that are really important to life — bills, car payments, putting food in your mouth, house notes,” he says. “Something you don’t have to do is come out to a show on the weekend and spend money on the concert, beer and parking. If you come to the show, it’s going to be a great time — something you deserve. “I always believe life is what you make it. Most likely whatever you decide that morning is how the day is going to roll. You have to make it great. It goes hand in hand with people making a decision to go to a concert and have a good time.” WHAT Jake Owen, David Lee Murphy, Morgan Wallen • WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Chaifetz Arena, 1 South Compton Avenue • HOW MUCH $25.50-$60.25 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

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P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S


The Oak Ridge Boys

Oak Ridge Boys welcome the chance to perform with fellow country friends BY AMANDA ST. AMAND ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

P H O T O S : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( O A K R I D G E B O Y S ) ; A J FAV I C C H I O ( F R O S T )

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n 1973, a gallon of gas cost 40 cents, Secretariat won the Triple Crown and the Oak Ridge Boys’ current lineup was cemented. Forty-five years later, gas is closing in on $3 a gallon again, Secretariat is long gone and the Oak Ridge Boys are still making music with the same four-man lineup: Joe Bonsall, Duane Allen, Richard Sterban and William Lee Golden. (Nevermind a change here and there in the intervening years.) You aren’t likely to hear the Oak Ridge Boys on the radio outside of oldies country stations, but their music has survived the generational shift. “I think it’s families passing it along to the next generation,” says Sterban, the band’s bass voice. “It’s a combination. With social media, we have kids who tweet us, and we’ll see them sitting on the front row singing along to our songs. You ask some of these kids, and they’ll say, ‘We rode in the car with our parents or grandparents and heard you.’” Sterban said the group has astamand@post-dispatch.com

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been invited on short notice to sing with acts including Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert. What song? Almost without fail: “Elvira,” The group’s monster award-winning 1981 hit. Lambert is enough of a fan that her tour bus is named Elvira. While Lambert is more of a traditionalist country singer, Shelton has more of the pop and “bro country” in his song catalog. That’s not a problem for Sterban, who says he welcomes the new sounds of country music. “Today’s country music has become today’s pop music,” Sterban says. “I have a daughter who’s still in college, and they listen to country, and they think it’s cool. I don’t know if they would have thought that when it was Hank Williams or Waylon doing it.” Whether the Oak Ridge Boys’ latest album, “17th Avenue Revival,” falls into that cool category isn’t Sterban’s call. But it was produced by Dave Cobb, the most sought-after producer in Nashville, Tenn., whose client list includes Chris Stapleton and Jason Isbell. The album didn’t happen @mandystlpd

overnight. The Oak Ridge Boys had worked with Cobb on their 2009 album, “The Boys Are Back,” and approached him again shortly after they were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2015. “Finally he called us and said he was ready to work,” Sterban says, adding that Cobb said he had a vision of an album with a gospel/revival feeling — but not strictly gospel music. “He’s a master at taking old stuff and marrying it with today’s country music,” he says. The album’s title refers not only to the revival/gospel sound but also to the Nashville studio where it was produced — a piece of music history where artists including Willie Nelson, George Strait and Loretta Lynn have recorded. Fans who come out to see the band can expect at least a dose of the new along with the hits that have been around for decades: “Elvira,” “Thank God for Kids” and “Come on In.” They’ll be joined by Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers and Tanya Tucker — all stalwarts of the 1970s and ’80s. Sterban says the band has no idea who will perform first or last, but he did guarantee one thing: “I would be very surprised if we didn’t end up singing together with the Gatlin Brothers,” he says. “They’re probably our best friends growing up.” And chances to perform with your best friend don’t always come around. Just like Sterban knows the Oak Ridge Boys can’t tour forever. They range in age from 70 (Joe Bonsall) to 79 (William Lee Golden). Sterban is 75. “We have to be realistic. Nothing lasts forever. But if the good Lord above lets us enjoy good health, even for a few more years, we’re going to keep doing it,” he says. WHAT Oak Ridge Boys, the Gatlin Brothers, Tanya Tucker • WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $50-80 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Max Frost

was like, “Nobody wants to hear me sing over this.” I didn’t see a way to find my lane on it. I don’t consider myself a rapper. I have too much respect for the art form to pick it up and do it. Q • What was your takeaway in opening for Panic! at the Disco?

Q&A ▼

Max Frost ditches his own tour to join Twenty One Pilots BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

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inger Max Frost had been all set to headline his “Gold Rush” tour, which was scheduled to come to Off Broadway, when he pulled the plug. The reason was a good one. The “Good Morning” singer landed a spot opening on the Twenty One Pilots tour, which comes Friday night to Enterprise Center. Frost’s new album is “Gold Rush.”

Q • What was going through your head as you canceled your own tour to join Twenty One Pilots’ tour? A • I believe in jinxes. When I first started hearing about this, I didn’t say a word about it. I didn’t think it was true. My career has had a few moments where I’ve heard little murmurs that something might happen, and this was definitely one of them. I thought it wasn’t going to happen. Then it happened. It was an incredible moment. Q • Were you a Twenty One Pilots fan before this? A • I was. That’s part of the reason why it was so unbelievable. When I started hearing their

records and looking them up, my mind was blown. Q • Was it tough canceling your tour? A • I spent energy and time preparing for it. Both acts opening for me had been preparing. It wasn’t easy to do. Q • How much did you have to adjust your set as it changed from a headlining set to a supporting set? A • I do a one-man show with a drum kit onstage, bass, keyboards, microphone and a reel-toreel tape player. I explain it’s a loop show, more of a science project than a rock show. I’m sticking to that. That’s not changing. My set list is a lot shorter

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now, so I have to figure out what songs am I going to deliver to show who I am as an artist while giving the nod to the new album. Q • What’s the “Gold Rush” album all about? A • It’s kind of chronicling my move from Austin to Los Angeles in search of creatively bettering myself. It’s stepping into the next chapter of life. Each song is focused onto a literal moment of my life, literally what I was feeling — money problems, talking about being on the cusp of living my dreams and doing amazing things and meeting amazing people while still living near broke. Q • What are you most excited about regarding the album? A • When you’re making an album, you have so much behind a curtain you’re living with. You go in and out of phases of loving it and not being sure. Here it is. All I can do is let the sunlight hit it and let it be what it’s going to be. Q • Talk about the song “Good Morning.” A • That was the first song I made for this album. I made it with Augie Ray, an amazing producer. I had been in LA for a week and went to his house. We were messing around, and he came up with that piano over the groove. I was hesitant to jump on it. When you strip off my vocals and just listen to the beat, it’s a very hip-hop beat. At first I

A • Playing an arena feels like you’re skydiving. I’ve never been skydiving, but it must feel something like that. You run up there, and you’re off. It’s such an amazing, intense moment. Brendon Urie is maybe one of the best live singers I’ve ever heard. I wasn’t that familiar with the music before doing their shows. Now I’m taking what I do live to another level. But playing an arena is still just a show. It’s not like the rules are different. Q • What was it like working with Michael Fitzpatrick (Fitz and the Tantrums), who executive produced the album? A • It was amazing. I’ve really been hoping to have a creative mentor for a long time. It doesn’t necessarily mean that someone is helping me decide who I am as an artist but someone navigating the difficulties of making an album. He’s been through it. Q • What’s the story behind working with Elton John on “Feel the Night”? A • I had a song I thought was really moving but wasn’t sure if it was right for me, so I sent it out there. It got back to me, and DJ Mustard was interested, though that sounded unlikely. Then they said Elton John was interested, and I remember literally laughing out loud. “That’s ridiculous. That’s not going to happen.” Then I got a call and needed to book a flight to London the next week. Whether the song will see the light of day, I’m not sure. But it was worth it to step in a room with him and catch a piece of history. WHAT Twenty One Pilots with AWOLNATION, Max Frost • WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE Enterprise Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

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“YOU CAN MAKE THE GREATEST MUSIC ON THE PLANET, BUT THAT DOESN’T MEAN ANYBODY’S GONNA EMBRACE IT. THEY MAY NOT FEEL THE SONGS THE WAY YOU WROTE THEM. YOU CAN’T CONTROL THAT. YOU CAN ONLY DO YOUR BEST.”

Peabo Bryson shows the R&B scene that he’s still relevant Soul music veteran says he took some time off to gain a fresh perspective on life BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

t had been a while since soul music veteran Peabo Bryson released an album — 2007’s “Missing You,” to be exact. Fans of the Grammy-winning Bryson have a new album, “Stand for Love,” featuring the singles “Love Like Yours and Mine” and “All She Wants to Do Is Me.” The

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kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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album, released in August, was produced by the famed Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis. Bryson — known for “A Whole New World,” “I’m So Into You,” “Feel the Fire” and more — says he never really went away. Instead, he took time off to get a fresh perspective on life and to figure out what’s important and what’s not. Coming back wasn’t difficult, he says. He had to determine when it was his time to share the gifts God has given him. “He decides when those gifts erode,” Bryson says. “No one gets to stand over me and count to 10.” Of course, there was no guarantee Bryson’s new sounds would be welcomed. “You can make the greatest music on the planet, but that doesn’t mean anybody’s gonna embrace it,” Bryson says.“They may not feel the songs the way you wrote them. You can’t control that. You can only do your best.” But fans stood by Bryson. “If I’m honest, there’s a certain vindication in that — a validation,” he says. “Those are the two strongest emotions — gratitude and humility. Because statistically, I’m an anomaly. I’m not supposed to exist.” In deciding to return, he had to put his ego aside and acknowledge he doesn’t have all

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the answers. He consulted two people whom he feels do have the answers: Jam and Lewis, who’ve worked with Boyz II Men, Janet Jackson, Usher, Mariah Carey and others. He asked them where they saw him now and whether they could make him current. “They didn’t even blink,” he says. “The first thing I noticed working with them was the absence of ego and self-importance, and the level of their authenticity. They weren’t trying to make a cookie-cutter of themselves, extensions of ‘What Have You Done for Me Lately’ (the early Jam/Lewis hit for Jackson). And they want you to be as involved as your skill set will take you.” He says Jam and Lewis challenged and stretched him into different genres. “I ain’t never said ‘gon get it’ in a lyric.” He says “Stand for Love” is an album that “reminds us what’s truly important between human beings at the end of the day — what kind of relationship will truly float your boat.” The album reflects the fact “we can write about love every single day and not repeat ourselves. We’ve all felt it, and know we’ll feel it again. As far as providing subject matter, writing about love is infinite. I look at the music as a reminder of what’s truly important in a relationship.” He believes relationships are suffering, and hookups are more common, making his al-

bum even more necessary. “It’s insulting to me what a relationship is now,” he says. “Now it’s about ‘How well do you navigate Tinder?’ Music is a reminder that, at the end of the day, it’s not always about wanting what’s available at the moment. At some point you’re going to want someone who has your back, who’s going to look at you and see no one else.” Bryson will deliver some of his new material Friday at the Fox Theatre. “I have all this great new music I can do now — all this fresh music, a new look,” Bryson says. “I place the new music in all the right places so it flows really well together.” He also gets to occasionally jump on the keyboards or guitar, showing concertgoers something they may not have seen. Bryson thinks it’s great that he gets to share the bill with Gladys Knight, whom he considers an icon. “There’s no other way to describe her,” Bryson says. “She’s one of the few people that still sounds the same now as she did in the beginning. To maintain that over the span of decades is extraordinary, and it’s an honor to share the stage with her.” WHAT Gladys Knight, Peabo Bryson • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $47.50-$152.50 • More info 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

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P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

PEABO BRYSON


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The Ambassador metrotix.com • Lil Duval’s Comedy Laughaganza, 8 p.m. Nov. 18, $40-$62.50.

Delmar Hall

Old Rock House metrotix.com • Somebody to Love: A Tribute to Queen, 8 p.m. Nov. 15, $15. • Ward Davis, 8 p.m. Nov. 23, $20. • Tab Benoit, 8 p.m. Dec. 19, $22-$25.

ticketmaster.com

The Pageant

• “An Evening With Jake’s Leg,” 8 p.m. Nov. 23, $20.

ticketmaster.com

• Neal Morse Band, 8 p.m. Feb. 27, $30-$50.

Duck Room at Blueberry Hill ticketmaster.com • Radar State, 8 p.m. Feb. 3, $12-$14.

Enterprise Center

• J.B. Smoove’s “Lollygagging Tour,” 8 p.m. April 12, $35, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Boney James’ “Honestly Tour,” 8 p.m. April 26, $35-$50.

livenation.com

Pop’s ticketweb.com

ticketmaster.com • Dennis DeYoung’s “The Grand Illusion 40th Anniversary Album Tour,” 8 p.m. Feb. 15, $45-$65, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

FOO FIGHTERS • OCT. 13 • ENTERPRISE CENTER 1 Kevin and Stephanie Peralez of Granite City 2 Thomas Holland and Erica Hearty, both of St. Louis 3 Laurie and Dan Ising of Florissant 4 Darrell and Maci Hutson of Herrin, Ill. 5 Mike and Carla Muniz of Marine 6 Morgan Kinder and Stephen Fetrow, both of Springfield, Mo. 4U: A SYMPHONIC CELEBRATION OF PRINCE • OCT. 14 • FOX THEATRE 7 Lorenzo Nicholson and Gwen Jenkins, both of Swansea 8 Kim Hoeflein of Trenton and Cooper Smith of Belleville 9 Rachel Ketchens of Belleville and Nia Owens of Shiloh 10 Kenneth and Sharon Washington of Hazelwood 11 From left: Angela Laiben of Festus, Nicole Sheets of Bonne Terre and Alexandria Evans of Pevely 12 Erin Connelly of Chesterfield and Derrick Thornton of O’Fallon, Mo.

• El Monstero, 8 p.m. Dec. 20, Dec. 21, Dec. 22, Dec. 27, Dec. 28, Dec. 29, $27.50-$45.50.

• Drake’s “Aubrey & the Three Migos Tour,” 7 p.m. Nov. 10, $49.50-$179.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Event Center at River City Casino

SEEN ON THE SCENE ▼

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• Arin Ray, 8 p.m. Nov. 29, $15.

The Ready Room ticketfly.com • Travis Greene & Mosaic MSC, 8 p.m. Feb. 16, $25.50-$75, on sale at 9 a.m. Friday. • STRFKR, Shy Boys, 9 p.m. March 3, $20-$24.

The Firebird

Stifel Theatre

ticketfly.com

ticketmaster.com

• The Midnight Hour with Ali Muhammad and Adrian Younge, Black Spade, Mathias and the Pirates, 7 p.m. Dec. 1, $22.50-$25.

• Sebastian Maniscalco’s “2019 Stay Hungry Tour,” 7 p.m. May 4, $44-$67, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( S E E N ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( D R A K E )

TICKET TRACKER

Drake Find more photos from these events and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/photos

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THE BLENDER ▼

St. Louis native in awe of dancing with Minaj Nerves got the best of Jamal Green during an audition, but fate intervened

PHOTOS: HANDOUT

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

As a fan of Nicki Minaj, Jamal Green landed the perfect job: The St. Louis native is one of the core dancers backing Minaj in videos and live performances in support of her new album, “Queen,” released Aug. 10, Green’s 26th birthday. Green has danced with Minaj at the MTV Video Music Awards and the Made in America Festival in Philadelphia, on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” at a Tidal event in Brazil and in Minaj’s video for “Ganja Burns.” The 2010 Vashon High School graduate, technically trained in hip-hop, jazz, funk and contemporary, has come a long way. He’s still shocked by his success. “I’m in awe every day,” Green says. “Ever since I can remember I’ve been a huge fan. Everybody knows how much I love Nicki Minaj.” Green, who lives in Los Angeles, says he learned about Minaj at age 13. He and a friend listened to one of her early mixtapes. “I looked up other mixtapes. I thought she was great, and she got better and stltoday.com/go

“She said, ‘You’re beautiful, you can dance and I want to work with you.’ I said, ‘If I never get to work with you, the fact you said that means more to me than you know,’” he recalls. Two days later, while heading to an interview at Walmart, he got a call for a second audition with Minaj. (He never made it to Walmart.) “There was no way God put me in a position to audition twice and not get it,” Green says. Jamal Green (left) He gained a lot of confidence at Vashon, where with Nicki Minaj he was the only guy on the school’s majorette at the MTV Video team. Music Awards “I was the only boy, so I had to sell it and still be the best,” he says. “It really helped me build my ego.” better,” he says. “She’s smart and funny, and Green says the 22-hour shoot for “Ganja I’m attracted to anybody with a tenacity and Burn” in April included dancing around fire dedication to their craft. She’s a hardworking, on a cold set while wearing very little while strong woman, and I appreciate that. Now I’m painted head-to-toe in mud. able to work with somebody I’ve looked up to Green has danced since age 6. He studied for a long time. jazz, tap and ballet at COCA. He stopped “I was starstruck at the auditions, and I still training when he thought he wanted to be a feel starstruck every time I see her.” Green is poised to see more of her once fashion designer but realized dance is his calling. the “NickiHndrxx Tour” with Future He didn’t study hip-hop until age takes shape. It was scheduled to start 19, at the instruction of in September in Baltimore, but the COCA’s Anthony “Redd” Williams, U.S. leg has been bumped to May. who has worked with Lady Gaga “I wasn’t disappointed,” he says. and Jennifer Lopez. “It means it’s more time to rehearse “His movement is totally different and perfect the show everyone wants Jamal Green to see.” from anything I’ve ever done,” Green says. “It was hard to get used to. He’s a The European leg of the tour begins in tough person, but he’s the best at what he February; he’s waiting for rehearsals to start. does, and he instilled a lot of things in me as far Green was dancing in Russia with Cirque du as dedication and hard work and humility and Soleil this year when his agent told him auditions were being held for Minaj in Los Angeles. professionalism.” Green is also inspired by dancers Kendrick “They knew to send me to that audition,” he Mart (Janet Jackson, Brandy), Bianca Brewton says. (Beyoncé, Jay-Z, Janet Jackson, Miley Cyrus) At the “Barbie Tingz” audition, his nerves and Tremon Richard (Katy Perry, Kehlani). He got the best of him. “I couldn’t remember any eventually would like to work with Beyoncé, of the moves. I let my body do what I felt was Janet Jackson, Usher and Chris Brown. right.” He may already have an in with Brown: One Green was cut. But as he left the audition, he of his dancers, Delaney Glazer, was Green’s realized he’d forgotten his hat. He went back roommate in Los Angeles. for it and ran into Minaj. kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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STLTODAY.COM/ARTS ▼

‘Orange’ actor stars with her husband at the Rep “CAROL IS UNAPOLOGETICALLY HERSELF. SHE’S A MURDERER AND A PSYCHOPATH, BUT SHE IS WHO SHE IS, SHE WANTS WHAT SHE WANTS, AND SHE DOESN’T TAKE CRAP FROM ANYBODY.” HENNY RUSSELL ON HER CHARACTER IN “ORANG HE NEW BLACK” “ORANGE IS THE

Henny Russell, who appears this season on “Orange Is the New Black,” stars in “Admissions” at the Rep (above).

Henny Russell plays a prep school admissions director in studio season opener ‘Admissions’ BY CALVIN WILSON | POST-DISPATCH THEATER CRITIC

H

enny Russell is on a roll. The actress, who has appeared in films and TV shows including “Bridge of Spies,” “Elementary” and “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” is experiencing a breakthrough as Carol Denning, a new character on the Netflix series “Orange Is the New Black.” Russell also has a starring role in “Admissions,” the play that opens the studio season next week at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis. Recently, Russell spoke with Go! Magazine about the comedydrama by Joshua Harmon and her accelerating career. Q • Carol Denning, your character on the women’s prison drama “Orange Is the New Black,” has become a fan favorite. Denning is the no-nonsense boss of C Block. What went into landing the role? A • Luck. I happened to be in New York when they were casting it. I never thought I had a chance. I thought, “They’re going to get somebody tougher and scarier. That’s not me, but I’m just going cwilson@post-dispatch.com

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.19.18-10.25.18

to go in and do the best I can.” The next day, when I got the call that I got the part, my jaw hit the table. I couldn’t believe it. Q • Why do you think the character is so popular? A • Carol is unapologetically herself. She’s a murderer and a psychopath, but she is who she is, she wants what she wants, and she doesn’t take crap from anybody. Q • In “Admissions,” you play prep school admissions director Sherri Rosen-Mason, who’s committed to diversity and at odds with her son, who’s applying to college and opposes affirmative action. How did you become part of the production? A • My husband, R. Ward Duffy, is playing Bill, my husband in the play. I’ve worked at the Rep once before, in “Frozen” in 2005, and we both have known Steve Woolf (Rep artistic director and director of “Admissions”) for a long time. So when they were casting the show, they asked us to audition together, and luckily we were cast. Q • Your stage background is impressive, including roles in J.T. Rogers’ acclaimed political drama “Oslo,” which last year won the Tony Award for best play. A • “Oslo” was amazing. My mother was from Norway, and that was actually the first play that I did after she passed away. I was playing Norwegian characters with a Norwegian accent, and I had been hearing the accent my whole life, so I knew how to do it. The best part was, I played three different characters, which was just fun in and of itself. And that show was such a special experience for me, because I was honoring my mother’s memory every performance. WHAT “Admissions” • WHEN Previews at 7 p.m. Wednesday and 8 p.m. Thursday, opens at 8 p.m. Oct. 26; through Nov. 11 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $46-$71 • MORE INFO 314-968-4925; repstl.org

@calvinwilsonstl

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P H O T O S : N E T F L I X ( R U S S E L L I N “ O I T N B ” ) ; PAT R I C K L A N H A M ( R U S S E L L I N “A D M I S S I O N S ” )

Q&A


Wentzville cat Midnight is inspiration for a new picture book

Sheree K. Nielsen

BY JANE HENDERSON POST-DISPATCH BOOK EDITOR

P H O T O S : M E L I S S A S K I D M O R E P H O T O G R A P H Y ( N I E L S E N ) ; T H A E M E R T P H O T O G R A P H Y ( WA H L E R ) ; N AT E S A N T O Y O ( D I M M E T T ) ; P E T E R W O C H N I A K ( “ D O L L’ S H O U S E ” )

T

he real Midnight has two working eyes, thank you very much. But if she cared to critique her namesake picture book, the black feline might recognize herself. “The resemblance to Midnight is amazing,” Sheree K. Nielsen says. Nielsen’s story of her new picture book, “Midnight the One-Eyed Cat,” sounds like one of those legends of sudden inspiration. She dreamed her beloved cat had only one eye. After Nielsen woke, she wrote down a story in about 15 minutes. But even if the main story came quickly, the details took more work. So Nielsen called a friend, Pat Wahler, to help her hammer out some tough spots. When they were satisfied, they found a publisher, who connected them with an illustrator, Janelle Dimmett. Midnight aged three years in jhenderson@post-dispatch.com

RECENTLY REVIEWED THEATER ▼

‘A Doll’s House, Part 2’ WHEN Through Nov. 4 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $19-$92 • MORE INFO repstl.org

Playwright Lucas Hnath’s sequel to the classic Ibsen drama, presented by the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, is clever, provocative and terrifically entertaining. Directed by Timothy Near. BY CALVIN WILSON

stltoday.com/go

Pat Wahler

Janelle Dimmett

‘MIDNIGHT THE ONE-EYED CAT’ By Sheree K. Nielsen and Pat Wahler; illustrated by Janelle Dimmett Published by Treehouse, 32 pages, $16.95; ages 4-6

the process (she’s now 18). But her creative team will happily celebrate the finished product Saturday at a launch party at Main Street Books in St. Charles. The book, geared toward children ages 4-6, lets kids know they are all “beautiful, no matter who they are,” Nielsen says. “They can be friends no @STLbooks

Caralyn Kozlowski (left) and Andrea Abello in “A Doll’s House, Part 2” at the Rep

matter what their disabilities are. Everybody can get along.” In “Midnight the One-Eyed Cat,” the feline is bullied for her vision issue. Her best friend, however, a three-legged rat named Starlight, decides to help out by knitting a beret: “It will cover the scar where your eye used to be./A fuzzy new hat hides what others might see.” The jaunty cap is adorned

with feathers from bird friends, and Midnight’s confidence rises enough that she decides she doesn’t need to hide part of her face. Nielsen felt that a rhyming text seemed most natural, but literary agents seemed less sure. When an editor with Treehouse, an imprint of the local Amphorae Publishing Group, read the text, the

‘Evil Dead: The Musical’

‘The Last Days of Judas Iscariot’

WHEN Through Oct. 27 • WHERE Tower Grove Abbey, 2336 Tennessee Avenue • HOW MUCH $25-$45 • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

Sam Raimi’s cult horror franchise inspired this musical about mayhem at a cabin in the wilderness. Stray Dog Theatre’s enjoyable production is pitched somewhere between a live-action cartoon and a “Saturday Night Live” sketch. Directed by Justin Been. BY CALVIN WILSON

verse was appreciated. Nielsen and Wahler also hoped for a Missouri illustrator, whom they found in Dimmett of Union. “We loved her style. She reminded us of Mary Engelbreit,” hiding “little things in her illustrations.” Dimmett also creates coloring books, and “Midnight,” with its intricate ink line drawing, may suggest one.

Within grasses and on flowers are colorful insects and other animals. Both Nielsen and Wahler have written other books and have a passion for animals. Wahler has a new historical novel, “I Am Mrs. Jesse James,” and a collection of Christmasthemed essays and stories, “Let Your Heart Be Light.” Nielsen won a Di Vinci Eye Award for a “healing” coffee-table book of verse and photography, “Folly Beach Dances,” which discussed her ongoing battle with lymphoma. Her new book of essays, “Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits,” also finds healing in the sea. She and her husband, Russell, have been avid travelers, scuba divers and underwater photographers. Like Wahler of St. Peters, Nielsen lives with rescue animals. Her three-acre property in Wentzville is home to two dogs, four cats and a variety of re-homed squirrels and opossums from Wildlife Rescue Center in Ballwin. “I’m a treehugger,” she says, placing insects outside when she finds them in her home. Her ethos clearly seems reflected in her book’s theme: “It’s all about friendship and love and being there for each other.” WHAT Sheree K. Nielsen, Pat Wahler and Janelle Dimmett • WHEN 10:30 a.m. Saturday • WHERE Main Street Books, 307 South Main Street, St. Charles • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 636-949-0105

‘Raging Skillet’

‘The Tempest’

WHEN Through Oct. 28 • WHERE Fontbonne University, Fine Arts Building, 6800 Wydown Boulevard • HOW MUCH $15-$35 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

WHEN Through Sunday • WHERE Wool Studio Theatre, Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone Campus Drive • HOW MUCH $42-$45 • MORE INFO newjewishtheatre.org

WHEN Through Oct. 21 • WHERE Ivory Theatre, 7620 Michigan Avenue • HOW MUCH $15-$20 • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

Mustard Seed Theatre has mounted an outstanding production of the irreverent Stephen Adly Guirgis play that puts Judas Iscariot on trial. Intellectually stimulating, richly theatrical and outrageously hilarious. And not to be missed. Directed by Adam Flores. BY CALVIN WILSON

Sarajane Alverson, Kathleen Sitzer and Erin Renée Roberts star in Jacques Lamarre’s adaptation of a memoir by celebrity caterer Chef Rossi. The play is as deliciously subversive as any Rossi dish. Directed by Lee Anne Matthews at New Jewish Theatre. BY CALVIN WILSON

St. Louis Shakespeare’s exuberant production of one of the Bard’s autumnal works puts a fresh spin on its fantastical spirit. Directed by Patrick Siler. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘The Zombies of Penzance’ WHEN Through Saturday • WHERE The Marcelle, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive • HOW MUCH $20-$30 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Gilbert & Sullivan’s classic operetta gets an offbeat redo as a zombie story. In the irreverent New Line tradition, the show codirected by Scott Miller and Mike Dowdy-Windsor has a disarming sense of fun. BY CALVIN WILSON

10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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6–10:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 20 $6 pre-registered, $10 at the door

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.19.18-10.25.18

Shop from 45+ area vendors, enjoy brunch bites and sip on cozy cocktails provided by Beam Suntory. PLUS live music by Wayward Souls.

Walk through lantern-lit paths in the historic park, listen to murder ballads and tales of the 1800s, and, if you dare, hear the eerie Legend of Sleepy Hollow! To register or for more information, call or visit us online. • 636-949-7535 • stccparks.org •

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P H O T O S : J O H A N N A H U C K E B A / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( T I M E K E E P E R S , C A N D Y ) ; B E T H A N Y O T T E N S / M I S S O U R I B O TA N I C A L G A R D E N ( K O I ) ; 1 2 3 R F. C O M ( P I N B A L L )

A Violana-Virtuoso, a self-playing piano and violin, at Timekeepers

Koi in the Japanese Garden at the Missouri Botanical Garden

CHEAP THRILLS

Wax bottles arei sold for 14 centsi each at How Sweeti Is This in Clayton.i

Most pinball i games onlyi require a quarter.i

What can you do in St. Louis for a quarter or less? BY JON LEWIS | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

stltoday.com/go

10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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“A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.” • Yogi Berra may or may not have actually coined that famous phrase, but it still rings

FEED THE BOTANICAL GARDEN’S FISH Usually admission to the Missouri Botanical Garden costs more than 25 cents, which should disqualify feeding its fish from our list. But before noon Saturdays and Wednesdays, St. Louis city and county residents get in for free. If you time it right, this activity will only set you back a quarter. The garden’s Japanese Garden is one of the largest in the country, and at its heart is a 4½-acre koi pond. The koi themselves are huge fish, and the ones in the Missouri Botanical Garden’s pond generally reach 3 to 4 feet in length and weigh 25 to 30 pounds. The best way to get a look at these spectacular fish is by feeding them. To do that, pop a quarter into the food dispenser on the Togetsukyo Flat Bridge, and watch as the hungry koi swim toward you.

WHERE Lion’s Choice, several locations throughout St. Louis area • HOURS Hours vary • MORE INFO lionschoice.com

WHERE St. Louis Science Center, 5050 Oakland Avenue • HOURS 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sunday • MORE INFO slsc.org

WHERE Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard • HOURS 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily • MORE INFO mobot.org

BEGINS IN TWO WEEKS!

P H O T O S : J O H A N N A H U C K E B A / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( T I M E K E E P E R S , C A N D Y ) ; G A B E H A R T W I G / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( P I N B A L L )

ENJOY A BITE-SIZE TREAT Lion’s Choice is all about tradition. The local sandwich chain has stuck to its same roast beef sandwich since 1967 and offers a real blast from the past for dessert: a 25-cent frozen custard cone. The Lion’s Choice cones come in a variety of sizes, but a small one is still just 25 cents, and they all come dipped in chocolate. There are 28 locations in and around St. Louis, so chances are, at any given time, you’re not too far from an affordable treat.

DROP A COIN INTO A WELL Here’s a way to literally turn a quarter — or any coin — into entertainment. Admission to the St. Louis Science Center is free, and nestled in the lobby is something called a gravity well, which looks like a giant bowl but is in fact the most entertaining way to make a donation to one of the city’s most popular institutions. Place a coin at the top of the bowl and watch it spin around, making increasingly smaller loops until it eventually falls through the hole at the bottom. You can drop a penny if you want a truly cheap thrill, or drop a few coins and see which one gets to the bottom first. You’re not alone if you find yourself dropping coin after coin down the well: The science center estimates that it collects $1,500 from the gravity well each year, all of which goes into its general operating fund.

P H O T O S : L I O N S C H O I C E ( I C E C R E A M ) ; S T. L O U I S S C I E N C E C E N T E R ( G R AV I T Y W E L L ) ; P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( K O I )

true. While once upon a time a couple of quarters and some loose nickels could get you a night at the movies, these days it seems like the only thing your coins are good for is feeding parking meters. • But hidden around St. Louis, there are still a few spots where a little change can go a long way. Here are some places where a quarter or less will get you something to eat, something to do, or at least something more memorable than 30 minutes of parking.

HEAR A PLAYER VIOLIN-PIANO

INDULGE THAT SWEET TOOTH

TRY AN OLD-SCHOOL ARCADE GAME

Located in downtown Clayton, Timekeepers is a clock store specializing in the appraisal, repair and sale of antique watches, clocks and jewelry. As such, it is decorated with neat old antiques, including an early technological marvel that will treat you to one of the cheapest concerts you’ll ever see. While you might be familiar with the player piano, Timekeepers does one better, with its Violana-Virtuoso, a combination piano-violin. It plays in exchange for a nickel. Built at the turn of the 20th century, the machine plays popular songs of the time with spinning wheels replacing the violin’s bow. The music might not be your taste, but seeing the mechanics in action is certainly worth the 5-cent investment.

A tiny storefront in the DeMun neighborhood, How Sweet Is This is a great place to get a classic variety bag of candies. However, if you’re looking for sweets on a budget, you can also pick up individual candies for 25 cents or less. To name a few options: Tootsie Pops, Mary Janes, bubble gum and Frooties are all available for just a quarter. How Sweet Is This also directly borders DeMun Park and Concordia Seminary, so you can enjoy your cheap treat in the park.

Most pinball machines require more than a single quarter to operate. But compared to other forms of entertainment, they’re still pretty affordable, so we’re putting them on our list. Here are some recommendations specifically for pinball, but if you want a full map of nearly every store with a machine in St. Louis, visit pinballmap.com, which lists everything from arcades to laundromats.

WHERE How Sweet Is This, 804 DeMun Avenue, Clayton • HOURS 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. Sunday • MORE INFO howsweetisthis.com

Moscow Ballet’s GREAT RUSSIAN NUTCRACKER • December 2 & 3

fox box office 314-534-1111 metroTix.com more info at fabulousfox.com

A CHRISTMAS CAROL December 6-9 STRAIGHT NO CHASER December 18 RUDOLPH The Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical • December 22-23

NOVEMBER 7-25 • THE FABULOUS FOX THEATRE • 314-534-1111 • METROTIX.COM GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.19.18-10.25.18

WHERE The Silver Ballroom, 4701 Morganford Road • HOURS 3 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Monday-Friday, noon-1:30 a.m. Saturday, noon-midnight Sunday • MORE INFO thesilverballroom.com WHERE Parlor, 4170 Manchester Avenue • HOURS 3 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-1:30 a.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-midnight Sunday • MORE INFO parlorstl.com

WHERE Timekeepers, 17 North Meramec Avenue, Clayton • HOURS 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday • MORE INFO timekeepersclayton.com

A MAGICAL CIRQUE CHRISTMAS December 4

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WHERE Orbit Pinball Lounge, 7401 Hazel Avenue, Maplewood • HOURS 5 p.m.-1 a.m. daily • MORE INFO 314-769-9954

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stltoday.com/go

December 11-16

December 26January 6 10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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STLTODAY.COM/MOVIES

Jamie Lee Curtis in “Halloween”

40 years later, Michael Myers slashes again in ‘Halloween’ David Gordon Green resurrects John Carpenter’s eerie classic for a sequel that lives up to its name ★★★ BY JAKE COYLE | ASSOCIATED PRESS

ith hollow eyes and sagging cheeks, the flabby, white mask of Michael Myers is horror’s great blank slate. Project your fears here, it says. Myers doesn’t speak. His movements never rise beyond a deliberate gait (well, aside from all the stabbing and strangling). Even his name is purposefully bland. Decades after John Carpenter’s slasher landmark, David Gordon Green has resurrected the faceless boogeyman of “Halloween” and set him loose on another Halloween night, 40 years later. Time has

W

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done little for Michael’s personality. He is still a poor conversationalist. (He hasn’t uttered a word in the intervening decades, says a doctor at the sanatorium that holds him.) He is still handy with a knife. There are no Roman numerals in the title of Green’s film, nor any of those dopey subtitles like 1998’s “Halloween H20,” which presumably delved into the very real fears of dehydration. As if to draw closer to the original (and to ignore the nine sequels and reboots in between), this “Halloween” has simply taken Carpenter’s 1978 title. And with gliding cameras, Carpenter’s score and original cast members Jamie Lee Curtis and Nick Castle (the man under the mask), it has tried very hard to take much more, too.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.19.18-10.25.18

But while Green’s “Halloween,” which he penned with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley, has faithfully adopted much of what so resonated in Carpenter’s genre-creating film — the stoic killer, the gruesome executions, the suburban nightmares — what makes his “Halloween” such a thrill is how it deviates from its long-ago predecessor. Setting the template for countless slashers to follow, Carpenter’s film often reserved its most painful endings for more promiscuous girls or drug-using teens. As a grim reaper carrying out a metaphorical reckoning, Michael had questionable biases. But what Carpenter did do was equate sex with violence, a connection that Green has elaborated on with a more feminist streak. Having survived the “Babysitter Murders” of 40 years ago, Laurie Strode (a fabulously fierce Jamie Lee Curtis, reprising the role that was her film debut) is now a self-described “twice-divorced basket case” living in a rundown house on the outskirts of the fictional Haddonfield, Ill. She has turned her home into a training ground and domestic fortification (beneath the kitchen island is a well-armed shelter) for the second coming of Michael,

which she’s always been sure will happen. Her daughter (Judy Greer) and son-in-law (Toby Huss) have grown tired of Strode’s fanatical survivalist paranoia. Certain that the world isn’t so bad a place as Strode insists, they plead for her to get over it. Their highschool daughter, Allyson (Andi Matichak), isn’t so sure, and she naturally gravitates to the grandmother she’s been shielded from. The curiosity of “Serial”-like podcast journalists (Jefferson Hall, Rhian Rees) introduces us to both the locked-up Myers and the withdrawn Strode. Before curtly dismissing them, Strode insists their investigation into Myers is pointless. “There’s nothing to learn,” says Strode, surely no fan of, say, neo-Nazi newspaper features. Hunt evil, she believes; don’t analyze it. It’s a message peppered throughout “Halloween” with clear reference to today (and to some of the earlier “Halloween” installments that sought to understand Michael). Needless to say, both those who dismiss Strode’s deep-seated trauma and those who would rather study evil than confront it are going to get their comeuppance. When Michael is transferred to another facility, hell breaks loose. Once Michael is again stalking the suburban streets of Haddonfield, custom kitchens start seeing their cutlery disappear, and the shadows and closets of seemingly safe neighborhoods are again rife with danger. Evil — soulless and unkillable — lurks everywhere, even if it does wear a silly mask. Green, the sometimes brilliant, sometimes confounding filmmaker of art-house indies (“George Washington”), broader comedies (“Pineapple Express”) and, more recently, a few starry studio projects (“Our Brand Is Crisis”), can’t re-create the eeriness of Carpenter’s original. But he pumps more blood into the story, both literally and figuratively. Foggy nights and gas-station restrooms turn predictably gory, more so than the original. But the scenes that fall between those foreboding, twinkling piano notes have far more warmth and spirit than you’d expect. You almost wish Green — easily the most talented filmmaker in the franchise since Carpenter — was instead making something original here on the same streets, with the same cast (including the scene-stealing Miles Robbins) and none of the skull crushing. But there are rituals to observe, and this “Halloween” lives up to its name. WHAT “Halloween” • RUN TIME 1:44 • RATING R • CONTENT Horror violence and bloody images, language, brief drug use and nudity

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

PHOTO: UNIVERSAL PICTURES


From left: Meredith Hagner, Jon Barinholtz, Carrie Brownstein, Ike Barinholtz, Tiffany Haddish, Nora Dunn and Chris Ellis in “The Oath”

Blistering satire feels ripped from the headlines ‘The Oath’ imagines a future where civilians are pressed to declare loyalty to a thin-skinned despot ★★½

P H O T O : T O P I C S T U D I O S - R O A D S I D E AT T R A C T I O N S

BY MICHAEL O’SULLIVAN | WASHINGTON POST

ow here’s a great idea for a movie: What would happen if, in a test of patriotism, American citizens were asked to pledge their allegiance to a despotic U.S. president? Can’t you just imagine the comic possibilities: the breakdown in civility and social norms that might result, driving a wedge between family members of different political persuasions — over Thanksgiving dinner, no less? Huh-larious. Too soon? Too real?

N

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With the bruising battle over Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation still a fresh memory for many, those last two questions are likely to linger in the mind as lefty moviegoers settle in to enjoy “The Oath,” a blistering political satire that may rip the bandage and the scab, as well as a lot of the skin, off a political wound that has barely had time to heal. Yes, lefties are this film’s target audience; if you’re not a compulsive consumer of “Saturday Night Live’s” cold open or Stephen Colbert’s “Late Show” monologue, this movie is not for you. Come to think of it, it may not even be for you. The laughter it

evokes — and it is, at times, pretty funny — is the kind that hurts. Written and directed by Ike Barinholtz, an actor and writer known for “The Mindy Project,” “The Oath” imagines a plausibly dystopian near future, one in which civilians have been enjoined to publicly declare their loyalty to a thin-skinned, conservative commander in chief. (Officially, there’s no penalty for not signing the titular oath, but there are financial incentives for doing so, not to mention the peer pressure and shaming directed toward those who don’t.) As Thanksgiving arrives for Barinholtz’s Chris, a confirmed member of the #resistance and a compulsive news junkie who has so far scorned the new presidential edict, he and his wife, Kai (Tiffany Haddish), prepare to welcome Chris’ family members into their home. This includes Chris’ likeminded sister (Carrie Brownstein); their cantankerous father and his peacekeeping wife (Chris Ellis and Nora Dunn); and Chris’ younger bother and his girlfriend (played by Barinholtz’s real-life sibling Jon Barinholtz

and a Tomi Lahren-esque Meredith Hagner). So far, so good. In its broad contours, “The Oath” hews to many a Thanksgiving-themed comedy before it, superficially aping the well-worn genre in which long-simmering disputes between relatives boil over at the annual holiday gathering. Here however, the yuks and high jinks quickly get uglier than usual, despite Kai’s efforts to keep things cordial. It’s a brilliant decision by Barinholtz to cast Haddish, against type, in the role of the family diplomat. The actress is better known for playing characters who do not suppress their opinions, to put it mildly. When Chris, who can’t help checking Twitter at the dinner table, announces, in outrage, the news that a liberal congressman has just been arrested and that Seth Rogen has been detained at the border (one of the film’s better jokes), arguments become volcanic, leading someone in the room to make a call, summoning agents from the Citizen’s Protective Unit — a Homeland Security-style police force — to the house. This is where things get really interesting, and, for better or worse, more problematic. The CPU agents include a violent, farright hothead (Billy Magnussen) and his more sensible partner (John Cho). Their unwelcome presence — along with the likelihood that it was one of Chris’ guests who ratted him out to the latter-day Gestapo — inflames Chris, who is soon engaged in a confrontation with the lawmen that turns regrettably vituperative and surprisingly violent. It feels all too possible. And the echoes of such real-world events as the anger that exploded in the aftermath of Donald Trump’s inauguration, and the whitesupremacist violence in Charlottesville, Va., lend the film’s final act a disturbing verisimilitude that casts a noticeable pall over the proceedings (mostly silly, but with a substantive subtext). To be sure, the comedy of “The Oath” is heightened, with slapstick histrionics reminding us that the shouting — and spurting blood — isn’t real. Barinholtz’s screenplay is clever and sharp, and he certainly knows his way around a camera. But the overheated tone of “The Oath” is occasionally hot enough to leave third-degree burns, rather than merely singe. Going to the movies is often viewed as a form of escapism. As over the top as it may be, the at times all-too-true-to-life “The Oath” is one case where escaping from the frying pan feels like diving headfirst into the fire. WHAT “The Oath” • RUN TIME 1:33 • RATING R • CONTENT Crude language throughout, violence and some drug use

10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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‘The Happy Prince’ explores Wilde’s triumphs and despair Rupert Everett transforms into Oscar Wilde in a sentimental portrait of the famed Irish wit ★★½ BY MARK JENKINS | SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST

atching “The Happy Prince,” writerdirector-star Rupert Everett’s account of an older Oscar Wilde, ungenerous viewers may think of someone who would have disdained the movie: the younger Oscar Wilde. Victorian London’s brattiest wit, Wilde once remarked, of Dickens’ “The Old Curiosity Shop,” that “one must have a heart of stone to read the death of little Nell without laughing.” It would be stone-hearted to laugh

W

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at “The Happy Prince,” but its level of sentimentality is nearly Dickensian. Fortunately, the maudlin moments are offset by fine performances, flashes of humor and a visual sense that’s more astute than the script. Everett’s drama charts the period from 1897, when Wilde was released from the British prison where he served time for “gross indecency,” to his death in 1900 in Paris. With barely a franc or a lira in his pocket, the author travels through France and Italy, sometimes joined by such benefactors as Robbie Ross (Edwin Thomas) and Reggie Turner (Colin Firth). More problematic are the visits from Alfred

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.19.18-10.25.18

“Bosie” Douglas (Colin Morgan), the young lover who led Wilde down the road to ruin. The movie leaps through time and across the channel, not very gracefully, to show us Wilde’s wife (Emily Watson) and the two young sons for whom he wrote the story that provides the film’s title. There are also flashbacks to moments of literary triumph and to an incident where Wilde was attacked by a homophobic mob at a London railway station. With its panicky point-of-view shots, the latter sequence plays like something from “The Elephant Man.” Everett isn’t as unrecognizable as John Hurt was in that film, but he does wear a fake nose and jowls. Although these are distracting at first, the actor inhabits Wilde so fully that the prosthetics are forgotten. Everett, who’s played Wilde — and Wildean roles — onstage, gives an assured and affecting performance. If it’s also a bit theatrical, that’s apt for a biopic about an author who wrote his best work for the stage. “The Happy Prince” conveys the declining Wilde’s pain, despair and self-pity, but also

the writer’s defiant banter. The script includes such well-known quips as “I am dying beyond my means,” as well as comic scenes. In one, a bacchanal in Naples is interrupted by a local matron who’s indignant at the potential immorality but apologizes when she finds out there are no women present. Even Wilde’s final moments are played partly for laughs, with the entrance of a grumpy Irish priest summoned to offer last rites. (He’s played by Tom Wilkinson, one of several major actors in minor roles.) Wilde’s religious ideas go unexplored, although they’re most conspicuous in such children’s parables as “The Selfish Giant” and “The Happy Prince.” Everett is more interested in emotion and mood, the latter exemplified by cinematographer John Conroy’s evocative use of red-gold light and deep shadows. Wilde is slipping into darkness, and the transition is as lovely as it is sad and unjust. WHAT “The Happy Prince” • RUN TIME 1:45 • RATING R • CONTENT Sexual material, graphic nudity, coarse language and brief drug use • LANGUAGE In English, French and Italian with some subtitles

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

PHOTO: SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Rupert Everett in “The Happy Prince”


‘Pick of the Litter’ ★★★

journey is worth watching.

NR • 1:20 • Excessively cute

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

documentary follows five puppies born at Guide Dogs for the Blind, a guide dog school in San Rafael, Calif. It teaches viewers a lot about the training process and about the everyday miracles the trained dogs bring for their humans. SEATTLE TIMES

‘The Predator’ ★★

‘Tea With the Dames’ NR • 1:21 • British acting

incarnation of the franchise is a killer when it comes to action, but the script is dead on arrival.

royalty and longtime friends Eileen Atkins, Judi Dench, Joan Plowright and Maggie Smith swap gossip and stories in this documentary directed by Roger Michell. Not reviewed.

‘Private Life’ ★★½ R • 2:07 • A deeply personal

look at the challenges facing one privileged, artsy New York couple, played perfectly by Kathryn Hahn and Paul Giamatti, who are hoping to get pregnant. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Searching’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:41 • Smart and

Cummings), who reminds him what really matters in life. WASHINGTON POST

‘22 July’ ★★★½

‘Colette’ ★★½

R • 2:23 • This powerful,

R • 1:51 • Keira Knightley

must-see film — written and directed by Paul Greengrass — explores several of the lives altered when a right-wing extremist went on a deadly rampage in Norway in 2011, killing 77. ASSOCIATED PRESS

stars as Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, the prolific and trailblazing author whose life is condensed in this sprightly, relevant biopic.

ALSO IN THEATERS

‘Bad Times at the El Royale’ ★★

PHOTO: T WENTIETH CENTURY FOX

R • 2:22 • Screenwriterturned-director Drew Goddard’s pulpy but artificial motel thriller is kind of a slog. It may be the unusual Hollywood thriller to not live up to the reallife drama of its pseudo setting. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Christopher Robin’ ★★½ PG • 1:44 • Now all grown

up and frustrated by life, Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor) is reunited with his stuffed childhood pal Winnie the Pooh (voiced by Jim

‘Free Solo’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 1:37 • Jimmy Chin and

Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi chronicle the exploits of champion climber Alex Honnold as he sets out to be the first person to solo climb El Capitan in Yosemite National Park. WASHINGTON POST

‘The Equalizer 2’ ★★★

‘Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween’ ★★

R • 2:01 • An intense Denzel

PG • 1:30 • The follow-up to

Washington as Robert McCall saves this sequel from its painful writing ills. Also starring Melissa Leo and Bill Pullman.

“Goosebumps” (2015) is a serious disappointment, mostly because it doesn’t include Jack Black. The plot, which involves a scary ventriloquist dummy, is of little consequence.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘First Man’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:21 • Director Damien Chazelle’s tense, distinctive Neil Armstrong biopic manages to offer some fresh points of view on its famously tight-lipped subject. Starring Ryan Gosling. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

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TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘The Hate U Give’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 2:12 • This powerful,

timely and deeply moving tale — based on Angie Thomas’ acclaimed young adult best-seller — is a powerful look at Black Lives Matter and an essential movie for 2018. WASHINGTON POST

‘Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation’ ★★★ PG • 1:37 • Dracula returns in this second sequel to the 2012 animated hit. Directed by Genndy Tartakovsky. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘The House With a Clock in Its Walls’ ZERO STARS PG • 1:39 • Supernatural

thriller manages to find the perfect un-sweet spot — it’s too scary for little kids, not scary enough for older ones, not funny or clever enough for their parents, and too redundant for everyone. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Incredibles 2’ ★★★½ PG • 1:58 • Holly Hunter

and Catherine Keener are among the voice talent in this fine sequel to the 2004 film about a superpowered family. Directed by Brad Bird. CALVIN WILSON

‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:54 • A silly movie

that feels and sounds like a summer vacation

should: fizzy, lively and low-stakes. With most of the stars from the first movie, including Meryl Streep, Colin Firth and Christine Baranski, and the welcome addition of Lily James and Cher. ASSOCIATED PRESS

carry the movie through its bumpy patches. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘The Nun’ ★★½

‘The Meg’ ★★★

R • 1:36 • Spinoff takes on the backstory of the demon in a habit that terrorized a real-life ghost hunter depicted in “The Conjuring.”

PG-13 • 1:53 • Our hero Jonas

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

(Jason Statham) takes on a prehistoric shark bigger than a tour bus. Based on the novel “Meg” by Steve Alten. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Mission: Impossible — Fallout’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:27 • Christopher

McQuarrie’s second “M:I” assignment comes with just enough twists in the narrative to justify 147 minutes of summer movie. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Night School’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:51 • Kevin Hart is

funny as a night-school student in a class led by a shockingly violent teacher (Tiffany Haddish). But it’s the group of beloved comic character actors surrounding them who

‘The Old Man and the Gun’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:33 • Robert Redford

and Sissy Spacek star in a low-keyed outing written and directed by David Lowery, who has yet to make an uninteresting picture. If this is actually Redford’s farewell film, it’s a pretty fetching one. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Peppermint’ ★★ R • 1:42 • Jennifer Garner

plays a mother who transforms herself into a vigilante after her family is brutally murdered. With John Ortiz, John Gallagher Jr., Juan Pablo Raba. Directed by Pierre Morel. ASSOCIATED PRESS

makes his directorial debut with a lavishly delightful remake that stars Lady Gaga as an unknown singer who becomes a pop sensation. WASHINGTON POST

R • 1:48 • The latest

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Jeff Bridges and Cynthia Erivo in “Bad Times at the El Royale”

‘A Star Is Born’ ★★★½ R • 2:17 • Bradley Cooper

fascinating thriller starring John Cho and Debra Messing immerses the viewer in the action as a mystery is unraveled. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘A Simple Favor’ ★★★ R • 1:57 • Anna Kendrick

and Blake Lively star as fast friends whose bond is put to the test in this soapy, stylized and sexy female-driven thriller. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘The Sisters Brothers’ ★★★ R • 2:01 • Joaquin Phoenix

and John C. Reilly make sense of two skilled but simple assassins in this unconventional Western directed by Jacques Audiard. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Skyscraper’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:42 • Dwayne Johnson

brings his usual charisma to this ridiculous film about a security consultant’s struggle to rescue his family from a blazing skyscraper. “Die Hard” it ain’t. Directed by Rawson Marshall Thurber. CW

‘Teen Titans Go! to the Movies’ ★★★ PG • 1:28 • A silly film to

enjoy with kids. Animated, escapist fun with voices including Shia LaBoeuf, Will Arnett and Jimmy Kimmel. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Venom’ PG-13 • 1:52 • Tom Hardy

stars as a journalist who becomes the host to an extraterrestrial Symbiote giving him superpowers and a terrifying alter ego. Directed by Ruben Fleischer. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘White Boy Rick’ ★★★ R • 1:46 • Newcomer Richie

Merritt stars as 15-year-old Rick Wershe, who sells guns to drug dealers, sells drugs for the dealers and then acts as an informant for the FBI. Remarkably, his is a true story. DANIEL NEMAN

‘The Wife’ ★★★½ R • 1:40 • The effortless

interaction of Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce make this unusually good adaptation of an unusually good novel seem like a two-person show. CHICAGO TRIBUNE Use our calendar to find theaters and showtimes near you. stltoday.com/events

‘Smallfoot’ ★★½ PG • 1:36 • In a reverseBigfoot tale, a happygo-lucky Himalayan Yeti (voiced by Channing Tatum) finds evidence of humans. It’s predictable, but the

10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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SEND US YOUR BEST RECIPES

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It’s contest time! At this time of year, we ask you, the readers, to share your favorite holiday recipes to win fame and semi-valuable prizes. This year, both of our contests are sweet. • Pie goes with Thanksgiving like cranberry sauce goes with turkey. But this year we thought we’d switch things around a bit and ask for your best Thanksgiving dessert that is not a pie. A pumpkin mousse, perhaps, or a nutmeg cake (with caramel icing? Yum!). We will accept recipes for non-pie desserts through Nov. 4. • Our Christmas contest, as always, is cookies. Submit your best cookie recipes through Nov. 11. Find out more information and submit recipes to stltoday.com/contests

“AS OSCAR WILDE, RUPERT EVERETT LIFTS THE HAPPY PRINCE INTO THE STRATOSPHERE.” -David Edelstein, NEW YORK MAGAZINE

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the legendary

2018 Relleke's BAC K TO SC HOOL TOU RS

RELLEKE PUMPKIN PATCH SCHOOL TOURS 473 Sand Prairie Lane, Pontoon Beach,IL

➨ Tour packages available Tuesday through Friday ➨ Picnic areas available. Lunches available upon advanced request

all day!

➨ Activities offered to school groups include: Small pumpkin for each child, play in jungle maze, feed the goats, play on the pyramid slide, play in the Huge Korny Korn Palace, hay ride through the pumpkin patch ➨ Face Painting and Pony Rides can also be scheduled

Reserve your tour today - tours start Tuesday Oct 2nd. Call 618-823-3434

Printable Flyer for school tours on our website.

11 AM KIDS’ COSTUME PARADE

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October 20th & 21st This is Child Safety Weekend with activities provided by our local heroes. Bring the kids out to meet with the Long Lake Fire Department. Kids learn about fire safety and how to protect themselves. The Arch helicopters will be landing both days and you can get a close up look at them and kids can have pictures taken with them. Also the Shriners will be doing a finger print safety pkg for the parents to have of their children. The BayWolf Band plays on Saturday from 12-5. On Sunday, the Lamont Hadley Band will make their debut on the farm performing from 12-5. There will be other activities along with plenty of pumpkins for the picking. October 27th & 28th Come on out this weekend and relax – take a break from the daily rush of schedules. The Buffalo Road Band will play from 12-5 Saturday. Sunday is Halloween Fun with Hunter Sharp playing from 12-5. There are still plenty of farm activities to savor this weekend while wrapping up a month long Fall celebration. If you haven't made it out to the farm yet this year, don't miss your last chance to enjoy a good time! Relleke's is open daily from September 17th to October 31st from 9 a.m. To 6 p.m. and we have festivals every weekend! Relleke's is located at 473 Sand Prairie Lane in Pontoon Beach, Illinois.

CALL 618-797-6858 6 miles from downtown St. Louis 1 mile North of Cahokia Mounds - from 1-55/70 take Rt. 111 North to Sand Prarie Lane. from 270 go South on 111 to Sand Prarie Lane. www.rellekepumpkinpatch.com

10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Clayne Crawford in “Above Ground”

“I DIDN’T PAY A PENNY FOR THE LOCATION. WE HAD THE RUN OF THE TOWN. I COULD JUST CALL UP THE SHERIFF, AND HE WOULD SHUT DOWN ANYTHING WE NEEDED SHUT DOWN.” THOMAS RENNIER

Rennier joined them when he was older and estimates that together they shot about 40 short films. A middle brother, Michael, was not bitten by the movie bug and is now a priest. Thomas Rennier took film classes at Southwest Missouri State University (now named Missouri State University), and he moved to California after graduation. For what he calls his day job, he works as an editor at Tastemade, a digital food-content company. He has also worked as an editor for such reality television shows as “Bar Rescue.” For their movies, he sticks to directing and producing and lets his brother write the script. “He’ll pitch me ideas, and I’ll pitch him ideas, and we’ll come up with something. He writes the whole script because I can’t write dialogue to save my life,” Thomas Rennier said. As director, one of Thomas Rennier’s most important responsibilities is to be accommo$600,000 to make “Above Ground,” and dating while still serving the interest of the Rennier estimated that only about $200 of it project. For instance, the lead actor, Crawwent to pay for the locations. ford, is from Alabama and is a big fan of “It’s much easier for pre-production the University of Alabama football to go to my in-laws’ house and scout team. for locations. I storyboarded and “He literally shows up the secshot-listed every single shot in the Brothers from St. Charles wrote, directed and produced ond day of shooting, which was movie,” he said. neo-noir thriller ‘Above Ground’ for Showtime a Saturday, and we had to change But making a movie in Missouri our shooting schedule so he could had its problems, too. The state go across the street to a restaurant does not offer tax credits to filmstarted a family. BY DANIEL NEMAN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH Christopher Rennier that had a TV and watch the game,” makers, as do other states such as “Above Ground” was screened at the 2017 he said. Georgia and Louisiana. Because there St. Louis International Film Festival with the hree Billboards Outside Meanwhile, as producer, perhaps Rennier’s are so few production houses here, it is acname “The Weight.” It stars Clayne Crawford Ebbing, Missouri” was biggest job is to raise money. Their first pic(of the television version of “Lethal Weapon”) tually more expensive to rent equipment in filmed in North Carolina. ture made a profit, which helped him raise the Missouri than Los Angeles (they ended as a drug transporter for a weight-loss The hit television show $600,000 it cost to make “Above Ground” flying guru who becomes mixed up in a “Ozark” is shot in Georgia. up fl ying in 20 boxes full of camera from private investors — some of whom he met equipment from California). And in brutal story of murder, corruption, But “Above Ground,” which is also set in while riding his bicycle around Los Angeles. LA, you don’t have to put up LAsleaze and love. Missouri, was actually shot in Missouri. “Above Ground” has already returned a based actors and crew in a hotel. The Rennier brothers shot The neo-noir thriller, which can be seen profit to these investors from the deal with “The biggest obstacle was the their first film, an extremely lowon Showtime at least through the end of the weather. It was freezing. We had to Showtime, and a bigger contract is pending budget comedy called “Lionhead,” year, was written and directed by a pair of change some scenes. We were going with 20th Century Fox for international telein Los Angeles. But it made sense to brothers from St. Charles. Christopher RenThomas Rennier to have some people in the water, and vision rights. nier (Lutheran High School class of ’97) wrote bring their second film back to MisWith such a track record, it should not be we had to rewrite those scenes on the souri. the film; his brother Thomas (St. Charles hard to find investors for their upcoming third set,” Rennier said. “We shot it in my wife’s hometown” of West High School class of ’03) produced and project, a coming-of-age story about a high“We had one night that was so miserable. Greenfield, in southwest Missouri, Thomas directed. school freshman who tries to cheer up his Clayne and Todd Gillenardo … have a shootRennier said. “I didn’t pay a penny for the “It’s an indie film … about a man who goes band teacher, who is in mourning. out in the woods. It was 18 degrees. It was so location. We had the run of the town. I could missing in the backwoods of Missouri and his “It’s kind of like ‘Little Miss Sunshine,’ in a miserable, we had one crew member quit.” just call up the sheriff, and he would shut wife who tries to find him,” Thomas Rennier way, or ‘Mr. Holland’s Opus.’ I think it’s defiThe Rennier brothers began making movsaid on the phone from Los Angeles, where he down anything we needed shut down.” nitely more of a dry comedy,” he said. ies when they were young. The family had a Every dollar counts when you are making now lives. Christopher Rennier had also lived VHS camcorder, and Christopher, the olda low-budget picture. “Lionhead” was made in LA but moved back to St. Charles when he WHAT “Above Ground” • WHEN Available on demand and est brother, started shooting films with his for just $60,000, and $10,000 of that went streaming • WHERE Showtime • MORE INFO sho.com friends when they were 15 or 16. Thomas to pay for locations. They had a still-paltry dneman@post-dispatch.com @dnemanfood

Finally, a movie that’s set and filmed in Missouri

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PHOTO: SHOWTIME

‘T


Sarah Jeffery loves the sisterhood of rebooted ‘Charmed’ BY RICK BENTLEY | TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

S

arah Jeffery is living a “Charmed” life. “I feel really lucky to be telling this story at this time,” she says. “We understand that it’s such a sacred thing to so many people, not only the cast, but the fans. So we’re very gracious and grateful.” Jeffery joins the sisterhood of witches in the updated version of “Charmed,” which debuted Sunday on the CW. She plays bubbly, kindhearted Maggie Vera, a college freshman and a sorority pledge. Her mother’s death rocks her confidence and her relationship with her older sister, Mel (Melonie Diaz). Things get more complicated when she learns of another sister, Macy (Madeleine Mantock). Getting along with siblings is nothing new for Jeffery, who has two sisters, a halfsister and a half-brother. The sibling bond was one she feels with her co-stars. “We get along so well,” Jeffery says. “It doesn’t feel

TV Q&A ▼

PHOTOS: CW (“CHARMED”); CBS (“MOM”)

Q • How many Oscar winners have had their own TV shows? A • Would you believe dozens? While there was a time when a major movie was thought as higher status than a TV role, even acclaimed actors have long gone to whichever form offered work. In fact, we can break the Oscar/TV names into categories: people who won Oscars and then did TV, people who were TV actors and went on to win Oscars,

From left: Melonie Diaz, Madeleine Mantock and Sarah Jeffery in “Charmed”

forced at all. We hang out. We have wine nights. We watch ‘Charmed’ clips together. I think we are lucky that there was a natural connection.” Unlike her real-life siblings, the “Charmed” sisters have powers: Mel can freeze time, Maggie can hear the thoughts

and even some who won Oscars while working in TV. That last category includes three winners of supporting actress Oscars: Allison Janney, who won for “I, Tonya,” while starring on “Mom”; Viola Davis, with “Fences” and “How to Get Away With Murder”; and Patricia Arquette, who won her Oscar for “Boyhood” about two weeks before her series “CSI: Cyber” premiered. Another supporting actress winner, Lee Grant in “Shampoo,” picked up her Oscar about five

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of others and Macy has telekinetic powers. Hearing others’ thoughts would be a burden, Jeffery says, but knowing going what’s going on in another person’s mind could be a bonus when acting. The new “Charmed,” based on the series of the

months after her short-lived sitcom “Fay” was taken off the air. NBC showed some leftover episodes after Grant’s Oscar win. As for Oscar winners who afterward had TV series, the long list goes back at least 65 years, when Loretta Young hosted an anthology drama and goes on to Walter Brennan, Shirley Booth, Donna Reed, Anthony Quinn, Shirley Jones, Broderick Crawford, Patty Duke, Cloris Leachman, Timothy Hutton, Marlee Matlin, Mary Steenburgen,

Dorothy Malone, Maggie Smith, Anna Paquin, Reese Witherspoon and Whoopi Goldberg, among others. People who were famous first on TV and then won Oscars include Sally Field, George Clooney, Art Carney, Martin Landau, Robin Williams, Jamie Foxx, Mo’nique, Melissa Leo, Denzel Washington, Red Buttons, Lee Marvin and Henry Fonda. (Fonda, one of our greatest actors, did not win an Oscar until shortly before his death in 1982, and he’d starred in several TV series before then.)

same name that aired from 1998 to 2008, includes many elements from the original. This time around, the casting of the three sisters is more diverse. “I didn’t feel a backlash against them being not white,” says executive producer

Q • What happened to “The Blacklist”? NBC listed it as renewed, yet it’s nowhere on the schedule. A • NBC did order another season of the thriller starring James Spader, but the network is holding it until January 2019. It then plans to put “Blacklist” on Friday nights, paired with another series, action drama “Blindspot.” Q • Long ago, on “In the Heat of the Night,” Althea Tibbs left the show

Jennie Snyder Urman. “I felt a backlash about it not being a revival of the original.” Jeffery admits there is trepidation when bringing a character back to life, but it wasn’t as daunting with “Charmed” because the three stars are playing different

with the explanation two weeks later that she’d taken the kids and moved back to Philadelphia. I don’t remember hearing any reason for her leaving the series. What happened? A • Anne-Marie Johnson, who played Althea on the 1988-94 drama (inspired by the movie of the same name), reportedly decided to “pursue other challenges” when she left the series in 1993. But she told the show’s fan club in a 2013 interview that “I knew Howard (Rollins, who played

characters. She mostly wants to be respectful of the foundation of the original series and to stick with the mythology. This isn’t the first time Jeffery has taken on a character that has been portrayed on TV before. She played Daphne Blake in “Daphne & Velma,” a live-action film featuring the two female members of the Scooby-Doo squad. “I grew up watching ScoobyDoo and was an avid fan of Daphne. She was my favorite, and I named my first stuffed animal after her,” Jeffery says. “I had a good grasp of who the character was, and all I wanted to do was bring more layers into her so she wasn’t just the cute, ditzy one. “I wanted to be smart and have heart and be curious.” Jeffery’s acting career hasn’t been limited to remakes and reimagined series. The Canadian, who started dancing at age 3, spent three seasons playing the daughter to Jennifer Lopez’s character on “Shades of Blue.” Jeffery almost didn’t get the role on “Charmed” because she was busy with “Shades,” but the latter ended in time for her to join the “Charmed” cast. Her other credits include “Aliens in the House,” “Be Somebody,” “The X-Files,” “Rogue” and “Wayward Pines.” WHAT “Charmed” • WHEN 8 p.m. Sundays • WHERE The CW • MORE INFO cwtv.com/charmed

Althea’s husband Virgil) was moving on and storylines were being created for other characters. … I had a great run and I wanted to leave before Althea was phased out.” In the same interview, though, she said “there were other factors I won’t go into, but the timing was right and I was fortunate to move on to other respected projects.” Q • I have recently been bingeing the series “Heartland.” I was wondering if the lead actors Amy and Ty are

really a couple. They are great together. A • Amber Marshall, who plays Amy Fleming on the Canadian drama, and Graham Wardle, who plays Ty Borden, are impressing you with their acting. They are not a real-life couple. Marshall, in fact, is married to Shawn Turner, a photographer. BY RICH HELDENFELS, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Send questions to Rich Heldenfels, P.O. Box 417, Mogadore, OH 44260, or brenfels@gmail.com.

10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Eggpant lasagna at Liliana’s Italian Kitchen

Liliana’s Italian Kitchen is a pizza-and-pasta charmer Old-school restaurant captures the essence of home cooking in a space that evokes a sense of family ★★ BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

he first time I walked into Liliana’s Italian Kitchen, Frank Sinatra was playing on the sound system. OK. As I waddle into middle age, I’m willing to grant one on-the-nose detail to a new restaurant. Then I noted Liliana’s

T

ifroeb@post-dispatch.com

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sandwiches: the Tony, the Anthony Jr., the Paulie. OK. I also love “The Sopranos,” and softened by parenthood as well as middle-age, I can let a second cliché slide. You can push me only so far, though. Was there a candle stuck inside a Chianti bottle on my table? There wasn’t. I probably would have forgiven it if there were.

stltoday.com/offthemenu

@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.19.18-10.25.18

Three-month-old Liliana’s doesn’t lean so much as bound into the St. Louis tradition of Italian-American dining. The restaurant’s bona fides begin with its unremarkable shopping-strip storefront on Tesson Ferry Road, roughly halfway between South Lindbergh Boulevard and Interstate 270. Fittingly, on my first visit I spotted the shopping strip’s electronic sign advertising Liliana’s as family-friendly before I saw Liliana’s itself. The dining room features low lighting and a warm red paint scheme. The effect is cozy, even homey — to a point. A chalkboard listing daily specials and the beer and wine selection covers much of one long wall. The previous tenant was a deli, and the deli counter still stands in front of the opposite wall, repurposed as the kitchen pass. A sense of home and family is what owners Tim and Kathy Pieri want Liliana’s to evoke.

They named the restaurant after their teenage daughter, and the food captures the essence of home-cooking with only a slight professional gloss: generously portioned, clearly and boldly flavored, the special touches as unobtrusive as they are vital. (Liliana’s scale is a big change for Tim Pieri, a 30year veteran of the restaurant industry. Most recently, he was a co-owner of Harry’s Restaurant & Bar, which at the time of its closing in early 2016 was known more as a dance club than a dining destination.) As familiar and welcome as Sinatra or “The Sopranos” is a complimentary serving of crusty garlic bread. You can also order the bread with mozzarella melted atop its garlic-Parmesan butter ($5), but fair warning: You will want to conserve calories for the substantial main courses. Still, the appetizers do display the little touches that help to distinguish Liliana’s, from the decision to pair toasted ravioli (from Mama Toscano’s on the Hill, not housemade, $10) with a spicy aioli instead of marinara sauce to the flashfried spinach that gives tender fried calamari ($10) a crackling, verdant counterpoint. Accents like that spicy aioli or a salsa verde help spark Liliana’s sandwich menu, but these succeed for a far more basic reason: Each is based around meat (pork, beef, turkey or pastrami) roasted in house. The Anthony Jr. ($10) is a typical combination of ingredients — and a far better sandwich than its ne’erdo-well namesake Soprano deserves — with bacon, cheddar, giardiniera and the spicy aioli dressing the tender pork. Liliana’s is unabashedly meaty in its offerings. A meat sauce with a rumor of tomato accompanies many of the pasta dishes here. With the spaghetti served alongside a classic beef spiedini ($18), it makes for two main courses on one plate. To my surprise, the sauce made a meatier impression than the spiedini’s beef rolled with prosciutto as well as mozzarella, spinach and garlic. (Contributing to that impression, possibly: The spiestltoday.com/go ★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary

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dini’s breadcrumb crust wasn’t as crisp as I would have liked.) Yet the kitchen can also deliver an elegant vegetable lasagna ($13): eggplant slivers layered with a blend of fresh mozzarella, Parmesan and a little ricotta. The lasagna’s tomato-basil sauce balances eggplant’s astringency with summery sweetness. In last week’s column, I observed with concern how many contemporary restaurants seem to be converging in their approach, a ubiquitous wood-fired gastropub and bourbon bar. I could make — and for any number of years could have made — a similar argument about Italian restaurants in St. Louis. Why open another one, especially one so old-school in its approach? I found one answer in Liliana’s St. Louisstyle pizza. Tim Pieri found “a guy,” his The beef spiedini is served with spaghetti.

phrasing, who makes him crust three times a week. While as thin as is typical, this crust does not display the usual sub-saltine blandness. It shows a flakiness and butteriness reminiscent of phyllo, and there is even a little chew for textural contrast. It makes for a fine bed for a basic pizza (12-inch $10, 16-inch $15) or a specialty pie like the Italiano (12-inch $16, 16-inch $22), which pairs a trio of prosciutto, salami and the housemade pastrami with mozzarella, roasted red peppers, artichoke hearts and (as smart here as with the calamari) fried spinach. The pizza, and Liliana’s in general, proves that even in the old school you can find the new and improved. WHERE Liliana’s Italian Kitchen, 11836 Tesson Ferry Road • MORE INFO 314-729-1800; lilianasitalinakitchen.com • MENU Pizza, pasta and sandwiches • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday, closed Monday

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Hugo’s Pizzeria ★★½ WHERE 3135 Olive Street • MORE INFO 314-896-4846; hugospizzeria.com • MENU Pizzas both conventional and creative • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Iron Barley High Hog Ridge ★★½ WHERE 3367 High Ridge Boulevard, High Ridge • MORE INFO 636-6719911; ironbarleyshighhogridge. com • MENU Hearty comfort fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySaturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

J. Devoti Trattoria ★★★ RECENTLY REVIEWED RESTAURANTS

fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Saturday, brunch Sunday

Brick River Cider Co. ★★

1764 Public House ★½ WHERE 39 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314-405-8221; 1764pub.com • MENU Upscale St. Louis- and New Orleans-influenced fare • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch MondayFriday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

WHERE 2000 Washington Avenue • MORE INFO 314-224-5046; brickrivercider.com • MENU Brewpub fare and cider made on site • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

Cafe Piazza ★★ The Benevolent King ★★★ WHERE 7268 Manchester Road, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-8990440; thebenevolentking.com • MENU Moroccan-inspired cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

MENU American-Chinese and traditional Chinese fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Club Taco ★½

Grace Meat + Three ★★★

WHERE 200 North Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • MORE INFO 314-858-1488; clubtacostl.com • MENU Tacos with a variety of fillings drawn from various cuisines • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Cork & Barrel Chophouse ★½ WHERE 7337 Mexico Road, St. Peters • MORE INFO 636-387-7030; corkandbarrel.com • MENU Steaks, chops and pizza • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sunday

Carnivore ★★

Das Bevo ★★

WHERE 5257 Shaw Avenue • MORE INFO 314-449-6328; carnivore-stl.com • MENU Steaks, with Italian-American dishes • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday, brunch Saturday and Sunday

WHERE 4749 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-832-2251; dasbevo. com • MENU German fare with contemporary flair HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday, lunch MondayFriday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern ★★

Del Pietro’s ★★½

Bing Bing ★★ WHERE 567A Melville Avenue, University City • MORE INFO 314-669-9229; facebook.com/ bingbingstl • MENU Jianbing and other Chinese fare • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. daily

WHERE 2101 Chouteau Avenue • More info 314-241-4677; charlevillebeer.com • MENU Hearty pub fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

WHERE 1059 South Big Bend Boulevard, Richmond Heights • MORE INFO 314-224-5225; mikedelpietros.com • MENU Traditional Italian fare • HOURS Dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

The Blue Duck ★

Cibare Italian Kitchen ★½

El Toluco Taqueria & Grocery ★★

WHERE 777 River City Casino Boulevard • MORE INFO 314388-3777; www.rivercity.com/ dining/cibare-italian-kitchen • MENU Pasta, pizza and more Italian fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

WHERE 14234 Manchester Road, Manchester • MORE INFO 636-686-5444; facebook.com/ eltolucotaqueria • MENU Tacos, tortas and more taqueria fare • HOURS 9 a.m.-9 p.m. MondaySaturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (no restaurant service on Tuesday)

Billie-Jean ★★★½ WHERE 7610 Wydown Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7978484; billiejeanstl.com • MENU Contemporary American and Southeast Asian cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

WHERE 2661 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314769-9940; blueduckstl.com • MENU Contemporary American food • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

The Boathouse at Forest Park ★★ WHERE 6101 Government Drive, Forest Park • MORE INFO 314366-1555; boathousestl.com • MENU Sandwiches, flatbread pizzas and more casual American

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WHERE 1900 Arsenal Street • MORE INFO 314-343-0294; cafepiazza.com • MENU Pizza as well as panini and breakfast fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

thecloverandthebee.com • MENU Casual bistro fare • HOURS Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wednesday-Sunday

The Clover and the Bee ★★

Good Fortune ★½

WHERE 100 West Lockwood Avenue, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-942-1216;

WHERE 1641D Tower Grove Avenue • MORE INFO 314-7264666; goodfortunestl.com •

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.19.18-10.25.18

WHERE 4270 Manchester Avenue • MORE INFO 314-5332700; stlgrace.com • MENU Traditional Southern main dishes and sides • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday and Tuesday)

Handcrafted by Bissinger’s ★ WHERE 32 Maryland Plaza • MORE INFO 314-367-7750; handcraftedbybissingers.com • MENU Light breakfast, lunch and dinner fare, plus chocolate • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

Herbie’s ★★½ WHERE 8100 Maryland Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7699595; herbies.com • MENU Classic American and French bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch MondayFriday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Hi-Pointe Drive-In ★★ WHERE 1033 McCausland Avenue • MORE INFO 314-3492720; hipointedrivein.com • MENU Fast-casual burgers, sandwiches and milkshakes • HOURS 10 a.m.-10 p.m. daily

Himalayan Yeti ★★ WHERE 3515 South Kingshighway • MORE INFO 314-354-8338; himalayanyetistlouis.com • MENU Indian and Nepalese cuisine • HOURS Lunch buffet and dinner daily

Hofbräuhaus ONE-HALF STAR WHERE 123 St. Eugene Drive, Belleville • MORE INFO 618800-2337; haufbrauhausstlouis.

WHERE 5100 Daggett Avenue • MORE INFO 314-7735553; jdevoti.com • MENU Contemporary American fare, with Italian influences • HOURS Dinner Wednesday-Saturday (closed Sunday-Tuesday)

J. Smugs GastroPit ★★½ WHERE 2130 Macklind Avenue • MORE INFO 314-499-7488; jsmugsgastropit.com • MENU Barbecue, including pork ribs and beef brisket • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday, noon-7 p.m. Sunday

Kalbi Taco Shack ★★ WHERE 2301 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314-240-5544; kalbitacoshack.com • MENU Korean-Mexican fusion • HOURS 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

Knead Bakehouse + Provisions ★★½ WHERE 3467 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314-376-4361; kneadbakehouse.com • MENU Breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday- Sunday (closed Monday)

L’Acadiane ★½ WHERE 1915 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-875-0108; lacadiane.com • MENU Creole- and Cajun-inspired fare • HOURS Lunch WednesdayFriday, dinner Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Lemmons by Grbic ★★½ WHERE 5800 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-899-9898; lemmonsrestaurant.com • MENU American fare with a Balkan accent • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Sunday, lunch SaturdaySunday (closed Monday)

Levant ★★½ WHERE 386 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314-833-4400; levantstl.com • MENU Homestyle Syrian fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Friday-Sunday

Like Home French Cafe & Pastry ★★½ WHERE 3855 Lindell Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-319-0099; likehomecommeal amaison.com • MENU French cafe fare and pastries • HOURS 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Louie ★★★ WHERE 706 DeMun Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-3008188; louiedemun.com • MENU Rustic Italian fare • HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday (closed Sunday)

One Way Mexican Restaurant ★★ WHERE 5912 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314-833-5550; onewaycafeandbar.business.site • MENU Traditional Mexican fare • HOURS 10 a.m.-10 p.m. daily

Pangea ★★½ WHERE 3245 Rue Royale, St. Charles • MORE INFO 636757-3579; pangeaworldfusion. com • MENU Contemporary bistro fare with global accents • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Parigi ★★★ WHERE 8025 Bonhomme Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-8999767; parigistl.com • MENU Elegant versions of classic Italian dishes • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner Monday-Saturday, brunch Sunday

Mac’s Local Eats ★★

Pizza Head ★★

WHERE Inside Tamm Avenue Bar, 1225 Tamm Avenue • MORE INFO 314-479-8155; macslocalbuys.com • MENU Burgers and fries • HOURS 3-9 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 3-10 p.m. Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday, noon-9 p.m. Sunday (Tamm Avenue Bar open 3 p.m.-1 a.m. Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-midnight Sunday)

WHERE 3196 South Grand Boulevard • MORE INFO 314266-5400; pizzaheadstl.com • MENU New York-style pizza by the slice or whole pie • HOURS Lunch Tuesday-Saturday, dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

The Mad Crab ★★ WHERE 8080 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-801-8698; facebook.com/ madcrabstl • MENU Seafood boils featuring shrimp, crab and crawfish • HOURS 3-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Majeed Mediterranean Restaurant ★★ WHERE 4658 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-282-0981; facebook.com/majeed mediterraneanrestaurant • MENU Syrian cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Nippon Tei ★★★ WHERE 14025 Manchester Road • MORE INFO 636-386-8999; nippon.teistl.com • MENU Sushi and other traditional Japanese fare • HOURS Lunch Tuesday-Friday, dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Nudo House ★★★ WHERE 11423 Olive Boulevard, Creve Coeur • MORE INFO 314-274-8046; facebook.com/ nudohousestl • MENU Ramen and pho • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Saturday (closed Sunday)

Polite Society ★★★ WHERE 1923 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-325-2553; politesocietystl. com • MENU Contemporary and classic bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Privado ★★★★ WHERE 6665 Delmar Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-899-9221; privadostl.com • MENU A ticketed tasting menu of progressive American cuisine • HOURS Dinner Friday and Saturday

Sardella ★★★½ WHERE 7734 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7737755; sardellastl.com • MENU Contemporary fare with Italian and Californian influences • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday

Simba Uganda Restaurant ★★ WHERE 8531 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-475-5630; facebook.com/ simbaugandanrestaurant • MENU Traditional Ugandan fare • HOURS Lunch buffet and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Sister Cities Cajun ★★½

Squatter’s Cafe ★★½ WHERE 3524 Washington Boulevard • MORE INFO 314925-7556; squatterscafe.com • MENU Creative modern breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

The Stellar Hog ★★ WHERE 5623 Leona Street • MORE INFO 314-481-8448; thestellarhog. com • MENU Barbecue featuring beef brisket and pork ribs • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Wednesday)

The Stone Turtle ★★ WHERE 6355 Clayton Avenue • MORE INFO 314-349-1933; stoneturtlestl.com • MENU Gastropub fare • HOURS Lunch Monday-Saturday, dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

The Taco & Ice Cream Joint ★★½ WHERE 2738 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314224-5799; facebook.com/ tacoandicecreamjoint • MENU Tacos and other taqueria fare, ice cream and popsicles • HOURS 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday

Vicia ★★★★ WHERE 4260 Forest Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-553-9239; viciarestaurant.com • MENU Modern, progressive cuisine with an emphasis on vegetables • HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Saturday

VP Square ★★½ WHERE 3611 Juniata Street • MORE INFO 314-833-4838; facebook.com/vpsquarestl • MENU Pan-Asian cuisine, including Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese dishes • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

The Wood Shack ★★½ WHERE 1862 South 10th Street • MORE INFO 314-833-4770; thewoodshacksoulard.com • MENU Sandwiches featuring smoked meats • HOURS 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday) BY IAN FROEB

Search Ian Froeb’s STL 100 to find the best restaurants in St. Louis. stltoday.com/stl100

WHERE 3550 South Broadway • MORE INFO 314-405-0447; sistercitiescajun.com • MENU Gumbo, po’boys and more • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

stltoday.com/go ★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary

P H O T O : H I L L A R Y L E V I N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

com • MENU Traditional Bavarian fare, with an emphasis on pork • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Smoked chicken at the Stone Turtle


HIP HOPS ▼

Brewers team with players for hockeyinspired beers Blues-themed brews are big business, with new homages to Tony Twist and Kelly Chase BY BRIAN FELDT | SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

P H O T O : O ’ FA L L O N B R E W E R Y

Normally, we here at Hip Hops don’t encourage consuming alcohol and fighting. But we’re willing to make an exception for O’Fallon Brewery’s latest offerings, which could appropriately be called brewser beers. stltoday.com/hiphops

stltoday.com/go

@bfeldt

O’Fallon will soon begin selling Twister Knockout Golden Ale and Chase’r Left Hook Lager. Both are homages to legendary St. Louis Blues brawlers Tony Twist and Kelly Chase, who collectively spent more than 3,000 penalty minutes and 600 career fights, a few of them with each other. Another tough guy, Cam Janssen, an equally furious fighter (albeit less of a cult hero in St. Louis), also has his own beer, an amber ale called Round-House. And O’Fallon will add in Whistler Wheat, which features a label adorned with a referee, to form a 12-pack sampler called the Penalty Box. Each of the beers clocks in at 5 percent alcohol by volume, and they’ll undoubtedly play well with the hockey crowd. O’Fallon, with its brewery and tasting room out in Maryland Heights near Westport Plaza, also sells a lager in conjunction with former Blues forward Keith Tkachuk, called Big Walt. Closer to Enterprise Center, Center Ice Brewery in midtown has an entire brewery set to a hockey theme, with a bar made of reclaimed wood from the St. Louis Arena and a beer lineup full of hockey references. There’s Red Line Ale, Puck O’ the Irish Stout and the Hockey De Saison. The brewery, founded two years ago by Steve Albers, has also formed a partnership with former St. Louis Blues basher Ryan Reaves called the Grim Reaver. Reaves now plays for the Las Vegas Golden Knights but spent his first seven seasons with the Blues and racked up nearly 700 penalty minutes in the process. Without doing any research on the matter, I can’t imagine another city that has more hockey beers than St. Louis. The hockey-inspired beers are just the tipping point when it comes to breweries big and small partnering with personalities, organizations or companies to more broadly market their product. Anheuser-Busch InBev has for decades tied itself to the sports world to drive sales and in more recent years has issued cans with team logos on them. The St. Louis beer giant just a few weeks ago partnered with whiskey-maker Jim Beam to co-brand a Budweiser Copper Lager beer, which is aged in Jim Beam barrels. Other partnerships aren’t so obvious. Such as dogs and beer. For the last two years, St. Louis-based Purina has lent its brand name to beer packaging for Urban Chestnut’s Urban Underdog American Lager, which sees a portion of its sales go to the Petfinder Foundation. Schlafly this year followed suit and partnered with the Watering Bowl to brew

SINGLE HOPS ▼

New brewery planned at old Lemp • Bluewood Brewing, a microbrewery that specializes in barrel-aged and wild fermentation ales, plans to open next year in the old Lemp brewery stables at 1821 Cherokee Street. Bluewood was founded in 2015 and has its roots in Rolla, Mo., where cofounder Cameron Lund founded Bray Avenue Brew Co. in 2012. St. Louis breweries go winless at GABF • For the first time in nearly two decades, no St. Louis beermaker received a medal at this year’s Great American Beer Festival

in Denver. Last year, Perennial Artisan Ales, Side Project Brewing, Schlafly Beer and Charleville each earned medals in various categories. This year, fewer breweries entered the annual event seen by many as one of the more prestigious beer events in the world. New beer tour launches • A new brewery tour service called Brew Hop STL is up and running. The shuttle, which costs $55 and includes a full pint at each of the four stops along with a tour of one of those breweries, operates two Saturdays each month. Upcoming tours and details can be found at brewhopstl.com.

Uncaged Ale, an American pale ale that will have some of its revenue go to benefit the Animal Protective Association of Missouri. Schlafly has also made beers in collaboration with St. Louis FC, the professional soccer team that plays in Fenton, and Pi Pizzeria. “The St. Louis FC was a partnership where it was a beer-drinking crowd already, so there was no question,” said Will Rodgers, Schlaly’s brand director. “With the APA, it was more about trying to align our two partners, craft beer drinkers and supporting local organizations and helping spread the word to those groups.” Of St. Louis’ brewers, O’Fallon has been the most active, most recently launching its limited-edition Tribute golden ale to benefit Backstoppers, a nonprofit that financially supports families of first responders killed or catastrophically injured in the line of duty. O’Fallon has also partnered with radio station KSHE for a number of years on the I Am K-SHE Kolsch and with 105.7 The Point to make the Rizzuto Show Amber Ale. “These aren’t necessarily money makers, but they are collaborations that really help connect you to the community,” said Jim Gorczyca, O’Fallon Brewery president and CEO. “You’re connecting people who normally aren’t working together and cooperating on a product that is better than what you can create alone. And it’s looking for a way to find customers who aren’t normally buying your product. It’s trying to find a way to make one and one equal three instead of two.”

10.19.18-10.25.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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C H R I S T M A S T O U R 2018

DAVEKOZ .COM

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FEATURES

AS SEEN ON THE COVER POWERFUL PRESENCE Refined strength defines the XC90. This is an SUV that combines powerful, distinctive looks with beautiful Scandinavian design that projects elegance. The upright grille and strong shoulder line convey confidence. At the rear, the tail lights frame the shape of the car, creating an unmistakable outline.

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RESPONSIVE POWER TheEvery XC90 provides strong performance, thanks to state-of-the-art gasoline engines. These compact, lightweight engines help to improve agility, while low-friction technology helps to balance smooth power with exceptional efficiency. The T6 adds a supercharger, for even stronger low-rev responses.

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2019 Volvo XC90 T6 AWD

DRIVING WITH DAN

It crosses over with self-assured elegance

Brand Ave. Studios Contributing Writer drivingwithdan@gmail.com

Crossovers are called crossovers because they cross over. (Hey, where else you gonna get this kind of nuanced automotive analysis I ask you?) That is to say, crossovers cross over from their car-platform origins to the sport-utility realm -- a segment originally limited to truckbased vehicles -- through beefed up structures, raised ride heights, four-corner tractive talent and, compared to their passenger-car source material, more robust hauling and towing capabilities. And few make that crossing with more panache than the 2019 Volvo XC90. Volvo's largest crossover, XC90, which boasts standard all-wheel drive, is a capable, elegant and unique example of its breed. For starters, this guy wears about as stylish a wardrobe as a three-row, seven-passenger people hauler can wear. Its haberdashery is highlighted by a "Thor's Hammer" headlight design (gotta love that marketing moniker), purposeful profile, south-to-north "running river" tail lights and a countenance square-jawed enough to star in a movie remake of "Dick Tracy." It's also loaded with you-won't-find-thisanywhere-else stuff. To wit: • The keyless-start isn't a button, it's a twist knob on the center console. • The three-section second row can be had with a deployable, factory-installed child booster seat. • The center-stack touch screen, rather than horizontal, is vertical, like an iPad. • The engine in this nearly 2.5-ton vehicle is -- gasp! -- a four-cylinder. But, whoa! Wait! Hold on! Before panic sets in, we should note T6's 2.0-liter four generates -- wait for it -- 316 hp, magic wrought via two boosters: a turbocharger and a supercharger. The supercharger kicks in at launch, using its belt-driven fan to deliver a blast of fresh air to the cylinders with immediacy, banishing turbo-lag while serving up 295 lb.-ft. of torque at just 2,200 rpm. Once the engine is breath-

By DAN WIESE

2019 VOLVO XC90 T6 AWD

We drove a 316-hp XC90 T6. XC90 also can be had as the 250-hp T5 and 400-(total-system)-hp T8 plug-in hybrid.

ing robustly, the turbo takes over to ensure the power party continues all the way to a 5,700rpm peak. Add a standard eight-speed automatic, engine stop/start and driver-selectable chassis modes of Eco, Comfort, Dynamic and Off Road, and you get an EPA rating of 26 hwy/22 combined in an AWD vehicle that'll tow 5,000 pounds, carry up to 86 cu. ft. of cargo and hit 60 mph in the mid 6’s. Also worth noting, the cargo-bay lift gate in our Inscription was hands-free, opening with a swift kick under the bumper. On the road, our T6's Pirelli Scorpions, hugging handsome (and Ferris Wheel-sized) 21-inch V-Spoke alloy wheels, sent some road 04

RIDES MAGAZINE

noise to the cabin but, otherwise, this guy is a marvelously quiet and composed highway companion. In a 175-mile round trip to Steeleville, Mo., we got 23 mpg. Available in Momentum, R-Design and Inscription trims, room inside T6 is great in rows one and two; row three is kid stuff. That said, the decor in our Inscription -creamy Nappa leather, real walnut inlays -was gorgeous. Only the panoramic moonroof's gauzy power shade, which failed to fully block sunlight -- an issue on very hot days -- is a candidate for improvement. Regarding safety, XC90 not only has all the usual suspects -- stability control, ABS, air bags galore -- but also Pedestrian & Cyclist Detection and, should the driver manage to defeat XC90's Lane Keep Assist, "Run-off Road Protection" that cinches belts tighter and beefs up seat cushions to better absorb under-carriage impacts. Oh, and the park-itself function in T6 is im-

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

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DRIVE FORMAT: All-wheel drive BASE PRICE: Momentum: $56,695; R-Design: $61,645; Inscription: $62,745 (Note: pricing is for T6 model; a base FWD XC90 T5 has a base price of $48,195) PRICE AS DRIVEN: $70,940; Inscription with $3,200 Bowers & Wilkins Premium Sound; $2,500 Advanced Pkg. (Park Assist Pilot, Active Bending Lights, more); $800 21-inch wheels; $750 heated rear seats and steering wheel; $945 in additional minor options ENGINE: 2.0L turbo- and supercharged I-4 HORSEPOWER: 316 hp at 5700 rpm TORQUE: 295 lb.-ft. at 2200 rpm RECOMMENDED FUEL: Premium TRANSMISSION: Eight-speed automatic EPA MPG: 19 city/26 hwy/22 combined WHEELBASE: 117.5 inches LENGTH: 194.9 inches CURB WEIGHT: 4,738 lbs. CARGO: (behind 3rd/2nd/1st rows): 16 cu. ft./42 cu. ft./86 cu. ft. TOWING MAX.: 5,000 lbs. WHERE BUILT: Gothenburg, Sweden pressively effective and easy to use. Also available as the 250-hp T5 and 400hp T8 hybrid, XC90 is a crossover unlikely to ever make its driver cross. *** This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@ stltoday.com.


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Only real advantage of synthetic blend oil is the cost DEAR CAR TALK: I have a 2015 Nissan Rogue with 30,000 miles on it. I’ve done all the oil changes as called for. So far, I’ve always used a synthetic blend oil. At my last oil change, however, they used a full synthetic oil. I want to go back to the synthetic blend next time. Any problem with that? Thanks. -- Al.

CAR TALK By RAY MAGLIOZZI King Features Content cartalk@gmail.com

expensive, since you change them about half

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Ray in care of King Features, 628 Virginia

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many oil changes, half as many oil disposal

oil-change place.

Berman. Distributed by King Features Syn-

fees, and half as many oil filters. So, technically, there’s no problem with you switching

*** Got a question about cars? Write to

DEAR AL: No. As an American, you have a constitutional right to switch oils, Al. There are three types of oil out there these days. There’s conventional oil, which comes from decomposed dinosaurs and is pumped out of the ground. That’s what we’ve been using for decades. And it’s been constantly improved over the years. Sometime in the 1970s, Mobil One became the first widely available synthetic motor oil. Synthetic oils also have been improved over the years. Then there is what’s called a synthetic blend, which is the material your leisure suit was made out of in 1979, Al. Actually, a blend is exactly what it sounds like: It’s a mix of synthetic oil and conventional oil. And the only real advantage of a synthetic blend is that it’s a little cheaper than a pure synthetic. In terms of its longevity and its ability to lubricate, conventional oil is the least effective, a blend would be next best, and a synthetic would be best of all. And, in fact, over the past decade in particular, we’ve seen car manufacturers really embrace synthetic oils because, since they help engines last longer, they cut down on warranty costs. And bad Yelp reviews. And even though synthetic oils are more 06

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dicate, Inc.


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BEST OF ST. CHARLES 3 YEARS IN A ROW BOMMARITO ST. PETERS Winner St. Charles County Reader's Choice Poll

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SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$30,990

$31,990

$32,490

$34,990

2017 Lexus RC 200t

2015 Ram 1500 Laramie

2016 Land Rover Discovery

2017 GMC Yukon XL SLT

#B9509

#C18245A

#B9387

#B9438

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$35,490

$35,490

$35,990

$40,490

2018 Audi Q5 Premium Plus

2013 Ford F150 Raptor

2016 Ford F150 Lariat

2015 Cadillac CTS-V Coupe

#C18154B1

#M18349B

#C9357A

#C9488

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$41,490

$42,490

$42,490

$42,990

2017 Lexus RX350 S-Sport

2017 Chevy Express

2016 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat

2016 GMC Yukon Denali

#M18226A

#B9468

#B9463

#B8560

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$46,990

$49,990

$53,990

$56,490

2017 Chevy Corvette Gr. Sport

2017 Cadillac Escalade

2018 Ford Expedition MAX

2017 BMW M3

#B9462

#C9318

#B9437

#B9425

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$56,490

$56,990

Bommarito "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

$59,990

St. Peters Pre-Owned Super Center 4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs

(636) 928-2300

Bommaritostpeters.com 09

RIDES MAGAZINE

$64,990

Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers. ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


Find your next certified pre-owned vehicle at

Lou Fusz Chevrolet PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER Over 900 Pre-owned to choose from at Fusz.com $

13,500

$

$

14,239

15,381

$

15,578

2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU LTZ

2016 CHEVROLET CRUZE LS

2015 CHEVROLET TRAX LS

14K Miles, Stk# C11786DTP

2017 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

59K Miles, Stk# C181229A

12K Miles, Stk# C118001CO

39K Miles, Clean Carfax Stk# C11777DTP

15,687

$

$

15,818

$

15,999

16,300

$

2017 CHEVROLET CRUZE PREMIER

2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

2017 CHEVROLET CRUZE PREMIER

2014 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT

8K Miles, Stk# C11726P

11K Miles, Clean Carfax, Stk# C11747JEP

14K Miles, Stk# C11725P

42K Miles, Clean Carfax Stk# C11801P

$

16,500

$

17,163

18,341

$

18,777

$

2017 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

2018 CHEVROLET TRAX LT

2016 CHEVROLET COLORADO 2WD WT

2015 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE LS

44K Miles, Stk# C11787JEP

10K Miles, Clean Carfax, Stk# C180895A

27K Miles, Stk# C180727B

40K Miles, Clean Carfax,Stk# C181515B

23,600

$

$

30,000

$

26,273

2017 CHEVROLET CAMARO LT

2015 BUICK ENCLAVE

24K Miles, Stk# C18016XP

40K Miles, Clean Carfax Stk# C18015XP

5120 N Service Rd. St. Peters, MO

2015 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 LT

2016 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 LTZ

22K Miles, Stk# C11793JEP

24K Miles, Stk# C180214A

CALL (636) 875-5374

www.LouFuszChevrolet.com 10

RIDES MAGAZINE

39,085

$

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


2009 Mazda 5 Sport

2010 Toyota Camry SE

2004 Chrysler Crossfire

Stk# 12477A

Stk# 12440A

Stk# P9515A

Stk# 97417B

Stk# 97025B

$

4,808

SALE PRICE

$

4,900

SALE PRICE

$

SALE PRICE

4,900

2012 Ford Fusion SEL

2007 Ford Edge SEL

2010 Mazda 3 i Touring

Stk# P9324A

Stk# 12531B

Stk# 12558A

$

6,900

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

7,111

SALE PRICE

$

7,400

$

6,333

SALE PRICE

2011 Mercury Milan Premier Stk# 98158A

$

6,808

SALE PRICE

$

SALE PRICE

6,808

2008 Buick Enclave CXL

2009 Jeep Patriot Sport

2006 BMW 325Ci

Stk# P9373A

Stk# 97054C

Stk# 28646A, Convertible

$

SALE PRICE

7,808

SALE PRICE

$

7,808

$

SALE PRICE

8,111

2004 Ford Mustang GT Deluxe

2012 Buick Verano

2013 Dodge Dart Rallye

2013 Chrysler 200 Touring

2009 GMC Acadia SLT2

2011 Hyundai Sonata SE

Stk# 40117B, Convertible

Stk# 40289A

Stk# 12467A

Stk# P9529A

Stk# P9494

Stk# 12573A

SALE PRICE

$

8,556

$

SALE PRICE

8,808

2008 Nissan Armada LE

2011 Mazda CX-9 Touring

Stk# 97189C

Stk# 12394A

$

9,808

SALE PRICE

$

9,900

SALE PRICE

$

SALE PRICE

8,808

SALE PRICE

$

8,808

$

9,250

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

9,556

2009 Infiniti G37 x

2008 Mazda CX-9 Touring

2011 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring

2015 Ford Taurus SE

Stk# 28973A

Stk# 28869B

Stk# 98041A

Stk# 11524M

SALE PRICE

$

10,400

SALE PRICE

$

10,556

SALE PRICE

$

10,556

$

SALE PRICE

10,556

2015 Mini Cooper

2008 Mercedes Benz SLK

2012 Nissan Rogue SV

2011 Kia Optima SX

2010 Jeep Commander Sport

2013 BMW X5 xDrive35i

Stk# P9457

Stk# P9396

Stk# P9509A

Stk# P9469A

Stk# 28958A

Stk# 98159A

SALE PRICE

$

10,808

SALE PRICE

$

10,808

SALE PRICE

$

11,111

2009 Lexus RX 350

2014 Chevy Equinox LT

2012 GMC Terrain SLE-2

Stk# P9504A

Stk# 79782B

Stk# 97015M

SALE PRICE

$

11,808

SALE PRICE

$

12,000

SALE PRICE

$

12,111

SALE PRICE

$

11,111

SALE PRICE

$

11,500

SALE PRICE

$

11,808

2009 Infiniti EX35 Journey

2014 VW Routan SE

2013 Toyota Camry XLE

Stk# P9474A

Stk# 79265A

Stk# 12299A

SALE PRICE

$

12,400

SALE PRICE

$

12,556

• We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition.

SALE PRICE

$

12,808

*Excludes model year 2008 and older and any vehicle with 80,000 or more miles.

Bommarito

2010 Ford Focus SE

West County Pre-Owned Center

AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

CERTIFIED VEHICLES

2009 Pontiac G5

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 636-391-7200 11

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

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2015 FORD ESCAPE $

2010 FORD MUSTANG $

12,995

Stk. #70019-1

2015 KIA SOUL

2013 HYUNDAI TUCSON $

10,697

Stk. #68742-1, Limited

10,997

Stk. #95647-1, SE

Stk. #68907-1, FWD

$

11,697

2014 HYUNDAI TUCSON$

10,397

2008 DODGE DAKOTA SLT $

2012 HONDA CR-V $

13,697

2008 HONDA PILOT

Stk. #69362-1

Stk. #69465-1

Stk. #51275-1, EX-L, AWD

Stk. #68752-2, EX-L

ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

5,397

$

6,997

2005 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $

2009 VOLVO C70

2017 NISSAN VERSA $

2001 DODGE DAKOTA $

6,995

Stk. #95859-1, Limited

Stk. #95560SL, Note S

12,995

2008 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR $

9,397

Stk. #95595-1, SUV

2007 AUDI Q7

$

Stk. #95788-1, 3.6 Premium

8,397

370

70 270

HYUNDAI 40/64

12

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

Stk. #51329-2, T5 M Conv.

$

8,397

5,397

Stk. #68890-2

2015 HYUNDAI SANTA FE $

13,297

Stk. #70084-1, Sport

2016 FORD FOCUS $ Stk. #95915, SE

13,797


StCharlesHyundai.com 2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU 1LT Stk. #69184-1

844-467-9452

2014 HYUNDAI SONATA

$8,995

Stk. #69312-1

$11,297

$9,995

Stk. #95647-1

$11,697

Stk. #51218-2, Touring

$10,397

Stk. #95810-2

$12,197

Stk. #50686-1

2014 HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS Stk. #69362-1

$11,397

2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SPORT

2016 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GT Stk. #95349-1

$8,995

2014 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5

2013 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS Stk. #95373-1

$10,997

2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY

2015 KIA SOUL Stk. #68907-1

2015 FORD ESCAPE SE

2010 HONDA CR-V LX Stk. #69379-1

Family Owned and Operated Since 1979!

844-467-9452

$10,397

ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

StCharlesHyundai.com

$12,397

2012 BUICK REGAL

370

Stk. #69234-1

$9,297

70 270 40/64

5701 Veterans Memorial Pkwy Saint Peters, MO 63376

2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 3.5 SR Stk. #51325-1

$10,995

Stk. #69850-1

2011 FORD TAURUS LIMITED

2015 NISSAN SENTRA SR Stk. #95735

2010 HYUNDAI SONATA

$12,897

Stk. #70011-2

13

RIDES MAGAZINE

$8,995

2015 NISSAN SENTRA SL Stk. #51080-5

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

$12,697

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$9,397

2012 FORD FOCUS TITANIUM Stk. #51198-1

$9,397


14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011 SALES (636) 200-2822 SERVICE (877) 589-2738 • PARTS (877) 606-3265 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE

Suntrup 100K warranty 2.9% aPr Financing on all 2015 & 2016 Certified Volvos

$5,000

$6,755

$10,000

$11,475

2006 merCeDeS-benz

2007 VolVo XC90

2008 VolVo C70 T5 m

2011 bUiCK enClaVe

Stk # L14771

Stk # L14252

Stk # 194421

Stk # L15001

$12,832

$16,500

$18,500

$19,500

2012 mini CooPer

2011 VolVo C70 T5 ConVerTible

2013 bmw 335i

2003 CHeVroleT CorVeTTe ConVerTible

Stk # 192502

Stk # L14651

Stk # 195511

Stk # P43201

$21,500

$22,832

$23,821

$26,850

2016 VolVo S60 T5 DriVe-e Premier

2015 CaDillaC XTS lUXUry

2016 VolVo S60 T5

2015 niSSan PaTHFinDer PlaTinUm

Stk # L1473

Stk # L14961

Stk # L1476

Stk # P4325

$30,000

$30,820

$39,850

$56,800

2016 VolVo XC90 T5 momenTUm

2015 ToyoTa HiGHlanDer lTD V6

2017 GmC Sierra 1500 SlT Crew Cab

Stk # 196451

Stk # 192052

Stk # 195402

2012 maSeraTi GranTUriSmo mC CoUPe

www.wcvolvo.com 14

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

Stk# P4300


Bommarito GM D! IFIE R E C T

2016 Chevy Cruze LS

A MAZDIFIED! T R CE

Pre-Owned Center 2015 Mazda 3 i Sport

GM D! IFIE CERT

2015 Buick Regal Premium

Stk. #420071A, GM Certified

Stk. #P6581, Auto, Mazda Certified

Stk. #P6550, Clean Carfax, GM Certified

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$14,763

$13,250 GM D! IFIE R E C T

South County

2015 Chevrolet Equinox LT

GM D! IFIE R CE T

2016 GMC Terrain SLE

$16,496 GM D! IFIE CERT

2015 Chevy Traverse LT

Stk. #44044A, 42K Miles, GM Certified

Stk. #P6548, 30K Miles, GM Certified

Stk. #P6427A, 58K Miles, GM Certified

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$17,469 UNDER $10,000 2007 Pontiac Vibe Stk. #42495A ............. SALE PRICE $4,490 2005 GMC Envoy XL Stk. #420128A ...... SALE PRICE $6,550 2006 Toyota RAV4 Stk. #420011A............ SALE PRICE $7,440 2006 Chevy Impala LTZ Stk. #420098A SALE PRICE $7,990 2012 Nissan Altima S Stk. #420080A....... SALE PRICE $9,440

UNDER $15,000 2014 VW Passat Stk. #42917B.............. SALE PRICE $10,972 2013 Chevy Sonic RS Stk. #420197A .. SALE PRICE $11,776 2014 Chevy Equinox LS Stk. #420039A SALE PRICE $12,990 2016 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #420071A SALE PRICE $13,250 2014 Ford Escape S Stk. #44006A..... SALE PRICE $13,469 2011 Jeep Liberty Limited Stk. #P6627 SALE PRICE $13,690 2015 Chevy Cruze LTD Stk.#P6593.. SALE PRICE $13,890 2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #42973A.. SALE PRICE $13,990 2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #42889A.. SALE PRICE $13,990 2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #42793A.. SALE PRICE $13,990 2014 Nissan Rogue SV Stk. #35524A. SALE PRICE $14,220 2016 Nissan Sentra SV Stk. #P6608 SALE PRICE $14,697 2016 Chevy Cruze LT Stk. #P6547 .... SALE PRICE $14,750 2015 Mazda 3 i Sport Stk. #P6581 .... SALE PRICE $14,763 2016 Nissan Sentra S Stk. #P6607.... SALE PRICE $14,770 2015 Nissan Altima SV Stk. #P6609. SALE PRICE $14,990

UNDER $20,000 2015 Nissan NV200 S Stk.#P6594..... SALE PRICE $15,250 2014 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #44093A SALE PRICE $15,469 2014 Dodge Challenger SXT Stk. #P6496A SALE PRICE $15,990

$17,650 2015 Chevy Equinox LS Stk.#42994A ...SALE PRICE $16,450 2015 Buick Regal Premium Stk. #P6550 SALE PRICE $16,496 2017 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #P6564 SALE PRICE $16,776 2015 Mazda 5 Gr. Touring Stk. #35145A SALE PRICE $16,993 2016 Mazda 6 i Sport Stk. #P6560 .... SALE PRICE $16,997 2016 Mazda 3 i Sport Stk. #P6604 .... SALE PRICE $17,463 2016 Mazda 6 i Touring Stk. #P6529 SALE PRICE $17,463 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #44044A SALE PRICE $17,469 2016 GMC Terrain SLE Stk. #P6548 SALE PRICE $17,650 2015 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #P6427A SALE PRICE $17,770 2016 GMC Terrain SLE Stk. #P6546. SALE PRICE $18,462 2014 Mazda CX-5 Gr. Touring Stk. #35241A SALE PRICE $18,493 2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #42587A SALE PRICE $18,590 2016 Ford Edge SEL Stk. #35180A .... SALE PRICE $18,690 2015 Jeep Renegade Trailhawk Stk. #42839A SALE PRICE $18,770 2017 Chevy Equinox LS Stk. #P6565 SALE PRICE $18,890 2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #420151A SALE PRICE $18,990 2015 Buick Regal GS Stk. #420074A. SALE PRICE $18,990 2018 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #P6524 .... SALE PRICE $18,990 2017 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6606 .. SALE PRICE $18,990 2016 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6614 SALE PRICE $18,990 2011 Jeep Wrangler Unltd Stk.#44076A SALE PRICE $18,990 2015 Dodge Charger Stk. #P6612..... SALE PRICE $18,990 2015 Chevy Camaro LT Stk. #420100A SALE PRICE $19,450 2016 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6623 SALE PRICE $19,490 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35435A SALE PRICE $19,673 2016 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6615 SALE PRICE $19,690 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35364A SALE PRICE $19,739

$17,770 2018 Ford Escape SE Stk. #P6596.... SALE PRICE $19,750 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35332A SALE PRICE $19,769 2015 Jeep Renegade Stk. #42839A..... SALE PRICE $18,770 2017 Dodge Gr. Caravan SE Stk.#420041A .SALE PRICE $19,990 2017 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6570 SALE PRICE $19,990 2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #42405A SALE PRICE $19,990

UNDER $25,000 2014 Chevy Impala Stk.#44078A ........ SALE PRICE $20,750 2017 Chevy Equinox LT Stk.#P6620 SALE PRICE $20,760 2016 Mazda CX-5 Touring Stk. #P6602 SALE PRICE $20,793 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35290A SALE PRICE $20,973 2017 Nissan Pathfinder SV Stk. #P6589 SALE PRICE $20,990 2014 Mercedes Benz GLK 350 Stk.#35382A SALE PRICE $20,990 2014 Chevy Impala LTZ Stk.#400124A...SALE PRICE $21,790 2018 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6598 .. SALE PRICE $21,890 2018 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6586 .. SALE PRICE $21,992 2016 Ford Transit XLT Stk. #42823A . SALE PRICE $22,790 2018 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #P6601 SALE PRICE $22,990 2015 GMC Canyon SLT Stk. #44028A SALE PRICE $23,569 2018 Mazda CX-3 Gr. Touring Stk. #35334A SALE PRICE $24,593 2017 Chevy Express Passenger Stk. #P6535 ... SALE PRICE $24,990

OVER $25,000 2014 Chevy Suburban LTZ Stk. #P6555 SALE PRICE $25,990 2017 Chevy Traverse Stk. #P6574..... SALE PRICE $27,250 2018 Chevy Traverse Stk.#420054A ........SALE PRICE $29,750 2016 Mazda CX-9 Stk. #310178A........... SALE PRICE $32,977 2015 GMC Yukon Denali Stk. #420141B SALE PRICE $44,990

6127 S. Lindbergh Blvd. • BommaritoChevy.com • 314-487-9800 15

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


E N T E R

T O

W I N

MIZZOU’S MOST FANTASTIC

FAN PHOTO CONTEST Hey Tiger fans: it’s time to show your tails, your stripes, your colors, signs and MIGHT! Upload a photo that captures your Mizzou pride. The winner will receive either: FOUR TICKETS MIZZOU VS. ARKANSAS NOVEMBER 23 PLUS A TAILGATE SPOT

OR

FOUR TICKETS MIZZOU AT TENNESSEE NOVEMBER 17 PLUS MIZZOU SWAG

BOTH WINNERS RECEIVE A $100 GIFT CARD TO THE MIZZOU STORE!

ENTER THROUGH OCTOBER 28 AT:

STLtoday.com/contests 16

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Acura 1LX

2018 Audi A4 Premium Plus

2018 Audi Q5 Premium Plus

2018 Audi Q5

2016 Audi S5 Prestige

2017 BMW M4 Coupe

Premium Pkg, 28K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #B9181

2.0T Quattro, AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 9K Miles #28083L

8K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #28430L

#C18154B1

$41,490

AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Quattro, #27796A

17K Miles, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28748B

$38,900

$44,400

$59,808

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$36,111

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2016 Acura ILX

2014 Audi A7

2016 Audi Q5

2017 Audi Q7

2018 Audi S5 Cabriolet

2016 BMW 6 Series

Automatic, 4WD, Clean Carfax, #V18376B

Prestige #C18277B

Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 15K Miles #28814A

Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD, Graphite Gray #P9385

Prestige, 4K Miles, Tango Red Metallic #P9434

Alpina B6, xDrive, AWD, 8 Cyl. 4.4L, 56K Miles, #P9314

$19,490

$61,900

$30,990

$37,111

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2002 Acura MDX

2015 Audi A8

2018 Audi Q5 Premium Plus

2017 Audi Q7

2018 Audi S7

2015 BMW X5 35d

2 Owners. Dealer maintained. 179,000 miles.

Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats #27112A

Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified #28175L

Premium Plus, 8K Miles, AWD, Backup Camera #P9564

Prestige, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 3K Miles #P9563

AWD, 30K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, #P9574

$18,990

$53,400

$83,900

$52,808

$39,999

$44,234

314-952-8016

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2017 Acura MDX

2018 Audi Q3 Quattro

2018 Audi Q5

2017 Audi Q7

2018 BMW 430i

2013 Buick Encore

Advanced Entertainment Package, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #98144A

7K Miles, Utopia Blue Metallic, AWD, #28209L

2.0T Quattro, Ibis White, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28326L

Premium Plus, AWD, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 owner #28833A

RWD, Convertible, Clean Carfax, One Owner, #P9568

Convenience, FWD, Clean Carfax #M18516A

$3800

$48,900

$33,808

$40,808

$35,900

$43,400

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2018 Audi A3

2018 Audi Q5 Premium Plus

2018 Audi Q5 2.0T

2011 Audi R8

2014 BMW I3

2018 Buick Envision

Premium Plus, AWD, Certified, One Owner #28281L

Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 9K Miles, AWD #28392L

Premium Plus, Quattro, 10K Miles, AWD. Clean Carfax #P9573

Manual, AWD, 54K Miles, 2 Door, Clean Carfax #P9496

Range, 19K Miles #196541

$66,750

$17,800

Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, #P9356

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$40,808

$33,111 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$44,400

$44,111

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

17

RIDES MAGAZINE

$46,900

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$9,990

$39,808


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2009 Buick LaCrosse

2013 Cadillac CTS-V

2007 Cadillac STS

2017 Chevy Camaro SS

2018 Chevy Camaro

2003 Chevy Corvette

Stock #181111A

Coupe, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 19K Miles #P9507

White Diamond, V6, Just Arrived #C18090B

Manual, RWD, 29K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #P9436

LT, Low Miles, Sunroof, Backup Camera #C180221A

Anniversary, 55K Miles #P43201

$27,400

Call us!

$19,500

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$40,808

$7,990

$32,900

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2009 Buick LaCrosse

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2017 Cadillac XTS

2010 Chevy Camaro

1995 Chevy C/K 1500

2018 Chevy Cruze

CXL, White Opal, FWD, #C9353A

Platinum Edition, AWD, Clean Carfax #P9477

Stock #P06963

1LT Stk #P06852

Stock #P06908

LT, Stock #P06956

$7,990

$31,808

$24,100

$12,975 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$12,996 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$16,692

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2012 Buick Regal

2015 Cadillac Escalade

2015 Cadillac XTS

2012 Chevy Camaro

2015 Chevy Colorado

2016 Chevy Cruze

Leather, Auto, Just Arrived #B9322

Luxury, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD #98139A

Premium, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #C18253A

2LT, Stock #181105A

Z71, Crew Cab Long Box, #P06854

LT Stock #P06967

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$47,808

$23,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2004 Cadillac CTS

2018 Cadillac Escalade

2009 CHARGER

2015 Chevy Camaro

2017 Chevy Colorado

$7,490

$15,647

$24,876

$13,187 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

TAKE US WITH YOU! LT, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 28K Miles, #420100A

Extended Cab Stock #P06941

Call for Price

$19,450

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

(314) 479 - 1710

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 Cadillac CTS

2014 Cadillac Escalade

2013 Chevy Avalanche

2014 Chevy Camaro

2016 Chevy Colorado

3K Miles, Savings #C16150R

Premium, AWD, Certified, Black #C9319A

LT, Crew Cab, Leather, Loaded #P6584

Certified, V6, Auto, Red and Ready #C18260C

4x4 #192382

$37,490

$26,569

$17,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

V6, Auto, Maroon, Clean Carfax, #C9284B

Luxury Package, 4WD, 20K Miles #P9311

White, 119k Miles, 1 Owner, Like New,

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$63,808

$5,990

$32,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

18

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

$20,011

$28,800

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2011 Chevy Equinox

2014 Chevy Impala

2018 Chevy Malibu

Stock #P07005

#P42451

$8,800

LTZ, 2LZ, One Owner, Clean Carfax, 24K Miles #400124A

1LT, #P06861

$19,742

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$21,790 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Cruze

2012 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Equinox

LT, Stock #P06968

1LT, FWD, 6-Speed, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #M18445B

$4,990

$13,986

$17,995

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Express 3500

2012 Chevy Impala

2016 Chevy Malibu

LTD, LS, Loaded, One Owner, GM Certified, #P6593

17K, Auto, Black #B9215

LS, Only 27K Miles, GM Certified! #42994A

LT, 15 Passenger Van, GM Certified! #P6535

#V18588B

$6,990

New Tires, Backup Camera, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #C11787JEP

$16,450

$24,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$13,890

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2016 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Cruze

2014 Chevy Equinox

2014 Chevy Impala

2014 Chevy Impala

2015 Chevy Silverado 2500

LS, GM Certified, Loaded #420071A

Premier, Red Hot, 8K Miles, Certified , Clean Carfax 1 Owner #C11726P

LS, One Owner, Clean Carfax #420039A

2LT, Stock #P06958

$14,127

2LT. V6 - Champagne, many options. 52xxx miles. VERY clean.

HD, LTZ, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD #79680A

$13,250

$14,990

$16,500

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$15,787

$12,990

$54,900

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$15,250.00

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

(314) 329-1166

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2018 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Equinox

2015 Chevy Equinox

2013 Chevy Impala

2016 Chevy Malibu

2017 Chevy Silverado 1500

LS, 3K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax #42965A

LT, Stock #P06990

LS, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Fuel Efficient, #C11812DTP

Stock #P06747

1LT Stock #P06978

$15,018

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2018 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Equinox

2014 Chevy Equinox

LS, Auto, Only 3K Miles, #42817A

1LT, Stock #P06948

$13,990

$16,421

LT, Clean Carfax One Owner, Remote Start #C11801P

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$16,300

$13,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

19

$13,300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

RIDES MAGAZINE

$15,685

LT, 4WD, 19K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9535

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2014 Chevy Impala

2017 Chevy Malibu

2016 Chevy Silverado

LTZ, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, FWD #44078A

1LT, Stock #P06942

1500, Stock #P06792

Contact Us!

$20,750 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

$36,900

$14,694

$27,800

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2014 Chevy Silverado

2013 Chevy Sonic

2014 Chevy Tahoe

2012 Chevy Traverse

2015 Chevy Volt

2016 Dodge Caravan

3500HD, Stock #P06727

RS, One Owner, Leather, Clean Carfax #420197A

LT, Stock #P06879

$17,714

SE, 37K Miles, 1 Owner, Grey, #V18457A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$11,776

$46,977

LT, Silver, Loaded, Clean Carfax #44009A

Stock #P06928

$27,300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Only $15,990 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Suburban

2018 Chevy Tahoe

2018 Chevy Traverse

2015 Chrysler 200

2014 Dodge Challenger

Crew Cab, High Country, One Owner, Only 14K Miles #P6541A

LT, Stock #P06912

LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified #P6600

Only 9K Miles, One Owner, GM Certified #420054A

LTD, FWD, Stk #P06975A

$12,558

SXT, Auto, Loaded, Clean Carfax #P6496A

$43,990

$34,982 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$29,750

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2017 Chevy Sonic

2015 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Traverse

2009 Chevy Traverse

2015 Chrysler 200

2010 Dodge Challenger

LT, Stock #P06977

LTZ, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 91K Miles #P9461

LS, Stock #P06974

S, Low Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, #C11805P

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$36,900

$16,096

V6, FWD, Local Trade #V8872A

R/T #C9433A

$11,913

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$9,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Chevy Sonic

2018 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Traverse

2012 Chevy Traverse

2014 Chrysler 300

2015 Dodge Challenger

Stock #P06982

LT, 4WD, 8 Cyl-5.3L, Black #P9316

FWD, 2LT, Stock #P06949

$13,379

LT, Heated Front Seats, Remote Start #C181482A

$19,990

$34,490

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$45,500

$23,900

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Chevy Sonic

2016 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Traverse

2015 Chevy Trax

2014 Chrysler 300C

2016 Dodge Charger

LT, #P06987

LT, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #79595A

AWD, 2LT, Stock #P06945

SXT, Stock #P06922

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$41,566

$26,714

LT, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Only 33K Miles #420159A

AWD, Stock #180928B

$11,991

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$15,490

$45,550

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

20

RIDES MAGAZINE

$11,800

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

$14,499

#B9227A

$18,990

$15,990

$17,990

#B9465

$18,026

$10,074

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2011 Dodge Charger

2014 Ford Escape

2015 Ford Explorer

2016 Ford Fiesta

2012 Ford Mustang

2016 GMC Acadia Denali

SE, Redline, 5-Speed Auto, RWD #B9332A

One Owner, Clean Carfax #44006A

XLT, 3rd Row Seating, Parking Assist, #C190621A

SE, Stock #P06889

Stock #P06592B

$9,495

$9,978

Ebony Twilight,AWD, 24K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9478

$10,890

$13,469

$19,291

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2016 Dodge Dart

2015 Ford Escape

2015 Ford F-150 Lariat

2011 Ford Fiesta

2015 Ford Mustang

2016 GMC Acadia Denali

Stock #P06922

Titanium #194821

Super Crew Cab Styleside, 67K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9460

SE, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Fuel Efficient #C11769JEQ

AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 49K Miles #79772A

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$33,400

$6,400

2 Door, Fastback, EcoBoost Stock #180732A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$19,700

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2017 Dodge Grand Caravan

2017 Ford Expedition

2018 Ford F-150

2013 Ford Focus

2015 Ford Mustang

2015 GMC Acadia

SXT, FWD, Carfax 1,50K Miles, #P6564

Stock #P06965

4WD, Platinum Super Crew, 5K Miles, Clean Carfax #79725A

Stock #P06991

Fastback Ecoboost, #180732A

FWD, Stock #P06884

$54,234

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$10,074

$16,776

$25,200

$10,288

$16,945

$16,945

$36,000

$31,556

$22,175

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

1998 Dodge Ram 1500

2017 Ford Expedition

2014 Ford F-150 XL

2010 Ford Fusion

2017 Ford T-250

2005 GMC Envoy

2WD Reg Cab Stock #P07008

EL Stock #P06965

$25,200

4WD, Supercrew, 29K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28954A

Hybrid #V19090A

#B9367

Call Us!

XL, Black, 4 Door #420128A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$30,990

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2012 Ford Edge

2013 Ford Explorer

2013 Ford F-150

2013 Ford Fusion

2016 Ford Transit 350

2016 GMC Sierra 1500

#L14845

$12,775

AWD, V6, Tow Package, Local Trade #B9196A

Rapter, Crew Cab, 4WD, Nav, Sunroof #M18349B

SE, FWD, Carfax One Owner #V18579A

XLT, Pass Van, Very Clean, #42823A

SLT, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #79838A

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$31,556

$13,490

21

$8,490

$6,550

$42,490

$8,220

$22,790

$34,111

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 GMC Sierra 2500HD

2015 GMC Terrain

2017 GMC Yukon

2014 Honda CR-V

2010 Hyundai Elantra

2015 Hyundai Sonata

Denali, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #79844A

SLE2 #C18043RA

XL Denali, 36K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner 4WD, #80112A

EX, AWD, 17K Miles #C18230A2

SE, FWD, Clean Carfax #V18330B

Limited, 31K, Red, Local Trade #V17800A

$54,111

$14,220 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$53,556

$19,490

$5,490

$14,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 GMC Terrain

2018 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon

2014 Honda CR-V

2013 Hyundai Genesis

2017 Hyundai Veloster

SLE-2, Stock #P06970B

1K Miles, FWD, White #B9076B

Denali, White, GM Certified, Loaded #420141AA

#C18230A2

Black, 32K, Loaded, Well Cared For #B9360

Stock #P06931

$17,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$17,600

$18,490

$12,310

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$26,490

$44,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon Denali

1991 Harley Softtail

2009 Honda Pilot

2009 Hyundai Genesis

2009 Infiniti G37x

SLE-2, Stock #P06880

$16,775

4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, White Diamond #P9552

SPRINGER, saddlebags, sport windshield, new battery

EX-L, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #V18615A

Silver, Auto, Leather, Sunroof, #B9132B

Automatic, AWD, Clean Carfax, #B9395

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$43,400

$3500

$10,990

$6,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

618-973-6050

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 GMC Terrain

2017 GMC Yukon

1993 Honda Accord

2018 Hyunda Elantra

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe

2017 Infiniti Q50

FWD Stock #P06970B

SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4, #P9277

108k mi, original owner excellent . running condition,

SEL Stock #P06992

Stock #P06966

$17,600

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$2800

$18,863

3.0t Premium, AWD, 10K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner #96318L

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$15,182

636-484-4586

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2016 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon Denali

2008 Honda CRV

2008 Hyundai Accent

2015 Hyundai Sonata

2018 Infiniti QX60

SLE, 18K Miles, FWD, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #P6546

59K Miles, 4WD, 8 Cyl 6.2L, Carfax 1 Owner, #79759A

AWD, Loaded, Very Clean,

3 Door Hatchback, Stock #181159A

Stock #P06804

$13,996

AWD, 7K Miles, Certified, Carfax 1 Owner #97179L

$41,900

$6,997

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$18,462 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$46,400

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

22

$8,997

RIDES MAGAZINE

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

stltoday.com/RIDES

$10,990

$31,900

$41,500 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2018 Infiniti QX60

2015 Infiniti QX80

2016 Jeep Cherokee

2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2014 Jeep Wrangler

2014 Lexus ES 350

AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #P9543

AWD, Clean Carfax, Majestic Wheat, 8 Cyl 5.6L, #P9479

Stock #180069A

High Altitude, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #97365A

Unlimited, Saraha, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #V18400B

#V18497A

$36,556

$32,000

$18,741

$34,808

$23,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2018 Infiniti QX60

2018 Infiniti QX80

2015 Jeep Cherokee

2016 Jeep Patriot

2010 Jeep Wrangler

2017 Lexus ES350

Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 22K Miles, AWD, #P9500

33K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9495

Latitude, 26K Miles, Backup Camera, Carfax 1 Owner, #C11806P

SE, Stock #P06919

$13,661

Sahara, Auto, Soft Top, 4WD #C9282A

FWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 12K Miles #P9498

$17,300

$37,000

$22,990

$33,808

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chewy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$18,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2018 Infiniti QX60

2014 Infiniti QX80

2015 Jeep Cherokee

2015 Jeep Renegade

2018 Kia Rio

2014 Lexus ES350

AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, 20K Miles #P9551

AWD, Black Obsidian, 71K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #P9432

Trailhawk, 39K Miles #196111

Trailhawk, Loaded, Very Clean, M/R #42839A

2xxx Miles, 4 Door, Hatchback, Auto, #V18419A

Black w/ Black Leather, 1 Owner, Local Trade, #V18497A

$33,900

$39,900

$51,250

$25,000

$19,990 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$22,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$15,890

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Infiniti QX80

2014 Infiniti QX80

2008 Jeep Commander

2011 Jeep Wrangler

2015 Kia Sorento

2013 Lexus ES350

4WD, 4 Door, Carfax One Owner, #98091A

Sport, 4WD #V18496A

Unlimited, 4x4, Sport, Auto, Hard/Soft Top #44076A

Pano Roof, Black w/ tan, 1 Owner #V18537A

Loaded!! Just Arrived #C9118A

AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 48K Miles #P9546

$41,556

$18,990

$18,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$20,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2014 Infiniti QX80

2014 Infiniti QX80

2016 Jeep Compass

2015 Jeep Wrangler

2017 Kia Soul

2016 Lexus NX 200t

4WD, 43K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, #P9472

4WD, 4 Door, Auto, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #79329A

Latitude, One Owner, Clean Carfax #420059A

Loaded, Full Power, Auto, Must See! #P6545

Low Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, 6-Speed Manual #C11809ICO

4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 32K Miles #P9448

$38,500 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$33,556

$32,556 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

23

$7,490

$12,990 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

RIDES MAGAZINE

$23,750

$13,806

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$31,808

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

10-19-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Lexus NX

2013 Lincoln MKX

2009 Mazda 6i

2012 Mazda CX-9

2015 Mini Cooper S

2017 Nissan 370Z

F Pace #196411

21K Miles, #196751

$33,500

$20,855

Touring, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, FWD #M18396A

Touring #M18259C

Hardtop, Hatchback, FWD, 20K Miles #B9326

8K Miles, Keyless Start, Brilliant Silver #C11798Q

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$9,990

$18,990

$23,850

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2017 Lexus RC

2016 LR Range Rover

2015 Mazda CX-5

2006 Mazda 3

2015 Mini Cooper

2012 Nissan Altima

Black w/Red Leather, 21K Miles #B9509

Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax #79760A

Backup Camera, One Owner, Blind Spot Sensor #C11774Q

S, Grand Touring, #M18286A

Countryman, Auto, "S" Pkg, Leather #B9243

2.5S, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax #420080A

$7,990

$35,490

$44,900

$5,990

$17,990

$9,440

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2017 Lexus RX 350

2013 LR Range Rover HSE

2011 Mazda CX-7

2015 Mazda 3 i Sport

2015 Mini Cooper

2006 Nissan Altima

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2018 Volkswagen Beetle S

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EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠J 2 ♥3 2 ♦7 5 4 2 ♣9 8 7 6 5 WEST EAST ♠K 6 4 ♠A 9 8 7 5 3 ♥A K Q 10 9 8 7 4 ♥J 5 ♦Void ♦J 8 ♣J 2 ♣Q 10 3 SOUTH ♠Q 10 ♥6 ♦A K Q 10 9 6 3 ♣A K 4 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♦ 4♥ Pass Pass 5♦ All pass Opening lead: Ace of ♥ There is an old maxim in bridge — “They don’t know what you hold.” Experts are well aware of this maxim and will look for opportunities to exploit it The five-diamond contract looks hopeless, with four seemingly certain losers. Watch what happens. West continued with the king of hearts at trick two and South calmly discarded his low club! What would you do next as West? Another heart would yield a ruff-sluff. It would cost a trick, but it wouldn’t give the contract. West couldn’t know that, of course, so he shifted to

the safe-looking jack of clubs. It wasn’t safe. South won with his ace and cashed the ace and king of diamonds, drawing trumps. He then cashed the king of clubs and crossed to dummy by leading the six of diamonds to the seven. A club was ruffed high, establishing the suit, and dummy was re-entered by leading the three of diamonds to the five. Both of declarer’s spade losers went on the long clubs. Very well played! We know, we know, you would have shifted to a spade at trick three. Well done on this deal, but what if South started with the ace doubleton of clubs and the ace-queensmall of spades? In that case, you had better play a club. Credit declarer for taking advantage of the fact that West didn’t know what he held. (10/19/18)

Across 1 Differences between colors 12 Duchamp contemporary 15 “Well, what do you know?!” 16 Accessory for Miss Piggy 17 Six-time Grammy winner who is half of the group Gnarls Barkley 18 Some buzzer followers, for short 19 End of a count? 20 Toil and trouble 21 MTV toon teen 23 Reebok rival 24 Most clipped 25 “Fiddler on the Roof” setting 28 Embarrassed 29 Net ___

30 Establish 31 Shorts go-with 32 Still vying 33 Bits of sweat 34 Offensive line 35 Natl. Library Card Sign-Up Month 36 Desktop accessories 37 Novelist Ephron 38 Course outline 40 Helen who helped establish the 46-Down 41 School copier, maybe 42 Minute Rice instruction 43 Like Mercury vis-à-vis Mars 44 Future reporter 45 Shepard of “Parenthood”

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME October 19 WORD — OUTLYING (OUTLYING: OUT-lye-ing: Relatively distant or remote from the center.) Average mark 27 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 44 or more words in OUTLYING? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — AIMLESS sale mile aisle same miss alms seal missal amiss seam lame isle seism lase mail semi lass male sisal lassie mass slam less meal slim lime mesa slime email mesial smile sail mess RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

48 Darth Vader’s boyhood nickname 49 Type unprofessionally 52 Sleep study acronym 53 “Hallelujah!” 54 Change the locks? 55 “Brilliant!”

Down 1 Extensive 2 Reddit Q&A sessions, briefly 3 Circlers at airports 4 Oocyte, e.g. 5 Rest on, as chances 6 Register 7 Where Hercules slew the lion 8 Some Pontiacs 9 Night that “Friends” aired: abbr. 10 Distant stars? 11 Led 12 Supercilious 13 Spit spot 14 Become legally certified 22 “My baby at my breast,” to Shakespeare’s Cleopatra 23 Boba ___, “Star Wars” bounty hunter

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ Focus on what you need to complete, and make sure that it happens. How you deal with a loved one could substantially change as a result of an unexpected insight. Tonight: Flow with the moment.

If Oct. 19 is your birthday • This year you use the unexpected to your benefit. If you are single, someone who you think is perfect for you could turn out to be quite the opposite. If you are attached, you and your partner might use some unexpected developments to empower your bond. Pisces encourages you to take a second look at situations.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ When you wake up, your playfulness emerges with you. Nevertheless, you could deny all the work, errands and other such details that need completion. Tonight: Celebrate a friendship.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★ The unexpected runs wild through your plans. You might find that a loved one is helpful but also might be part of the problem. Use care with your finances. Tonight: What starts out as casual could become intimate. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ Although everything seems to fall into place, you still might view your world as unpredictable. Know that, to many people, you seem to be the source of instability. Tonight: In the whirlwind of the moment, a party erupts. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ You receive several calls that encourage a trip in the near future. Ultimately, you will follow through, but know that plans made now could be subject to change. Tonight: You can be counted on. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ The unexpected continues to be a theme throughout your day. You might wonder about alternatives or ways to make your life somewhat less affected by others. Tonight: Where a spontaneous happening occurs. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Others continue to be highly responsive. Toward midday, you see the need for one-on-one conversations at work or in your social life. You get a stronger sense of what is happening around you. An authority figure does a reversal. Tonight: Go on a good, oldfashioned date.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ Use someone else’s unpredictability to your advantage. You could be very tired and withdrawn. How you see what goes on down the path has a lot to do with the present moment. Tonight: Love blossoms.

Puzzle by John Guzzetta

24 Sounds of failure 25 Leafy vegetable related to a beet 26 1974 ABBA hit 27 Mazurka meter 28 Individually wrapped hotel amenities 30 Pelvis-patella connector

33 Member of the 1920s Murderers’ Row 34 Bout ender 36 Grounds for a 15-yard penalty 37 Tragic heroine of Irish legend 39 Muscle used in pull-ups, briefly 40 Sarah who hosted the podcast “Serial”

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0914

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ Make an important call in the morning, when the other party will be more receptive. Even if you receive a vague answer at first, allow this person to change his or her mind. Make relaxing plans. Tonight: The spotlight is on you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Remain aware of your finances and spending. As the day ages, money matters tend to become less important. Understand what is motivating another person. You have the capability of saying “no,” but why not try to be open to this person’s energy? Tonight: Hang out late. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ You love being the big personality of your social group. However, you discover that the role is less appealing as the day progresses. Tonight: Let someone else take the lead.

42 Support pieces 44 Saves or assists 45 Liter lead-in 46 See 40-Across 47 Classic Jaguars 50 DOD division 51 ★✩✩✩, e.g.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★ You might feel off. However, once you relax, your energy restores itself. Others sense a difference in you and seek you out. Your smile goes a long way. Tonight: Do not be alone. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

10.19.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Grown child meets with ex-stepfather

Dear Forgive • Go with your gut. As an adult, you do have the right

to choose with whom you associate, and your mother should not be insisting upon it with no explanation. Dear Abby • I have an etiquette question I can’t find an answer to on the internet. My family travels a great deal, and there are always unattended wheelchairs parked around the airport. My teenage brother thinks it’s perfectly fine to get in them and start playing with them, because “no one’s using them.” The rest of my family thinks it’s rude to use a wheelchair as a toy. How do you view this and how should my parents explain it to him? Thanks. — CLAIRE IN FLORIDA Dear Claire • Assistive devices are not toys, and they should not be “played with” by those who don’t need to use them. That’s how I view it. Have your parents actually TOLD your brother “No”? If they have and he does it it anyway, it’s time for them to act like parents, make clear that there are consequences for disobedience

and follow through. Dear Abby • My son recently graduated with a master’s degree. He’s a fine young man, did extremely well all through his schooling and has never given his father or me a second of worry. He has not been able to find a job. It’s frustrating for him and discouraging, but we know he will, and we encourage him any way we can. My question is how do I deal with the barrage of inquiries from neighbors, hairstylist, co-workers and friends who constantly ask if he has found a job yet? I am sick of it! It’s none of their business, and I never ask them anything about their families’ employment. Please help. — MISSOURI MOM Dear Mom • Handle it this way. Say, “When he does, I’ll let you know.” Then change the subject. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Newspaper is wider. 2. Huose is missing. 3. Hair is different. 4. Cap is reversed. 5. Doorway is wider. 6. Line is added to sidewalk.

Dear Abby • When I was in my first year of college, my mother divorced my stepdad. “Charlie” was part of my life for 12 years, but since their divorce, she insists I have no contact with him. Charlie visits the state where I now live several times a year to see a friend and invites me to have dinner with him. I do, but because of Mom’s demand, I ask him to keep our time together a secret. If she knew we were in contact, I think she would cut me out of her life. Growing up, Charlie was a father figure to me. Spending time with him is awkward, but it would feel wrong to never see him again. I feel that as an adult, I should be able to decide for myself who I stay in contact with. I don’t know the whole story about their breakup. Should I honor my mother’s wishes and have no more contact with him, or go with my gut and keep him in my life? — FORGIVE OR FORGET OUT WEST

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Prodding a niece to write thank-yous

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • When my niece graduated from high school last year, my brother sent out all her party invitations, sent thankyou notes as if they were written and signed by her, and even endorsed the back of the checks she received. Of course, I recognized his handwriting. When I questioned him, he said she was “too busy getting ready for college.” Her sister will graduate next year, and I’m sure my brother will do the same thing for her. Am I wrong to be offended at how lazy these girls are? Shouldn’t a graduate have the courtesy to send a thank-you note when someone sends a gift? Gentle Reader • Especially, Miss Manners notes, if said graduate wants another one. As their aunt, you might point this out, cheekily noting that you plan on giving future presents directly to their

father, since he is the one acknowledging them. He will likely need the money for bail when he is imprisoned for check forgery. Dear Miss Manners • Starting a few months ago, I began working in a public-service setting with one other person, a much older male. Whenever a customer asks for help, my co-worker jumps in. He frequently jumps to the conclusion that I have made mistakes, and when I explain my actions, he never apologizes. When I talk to him, sometimes he literally waves me away or turns his back on me. This co-worker has been an employee for years, was recently promoted to shift supervisor and is well-liked by most of the customers. I do not wish to complain about him to my superior, nor do I think it would do any good. Can you think of something polite but effective I could say to get this re-

tirement-age man to change his behavior toward me? Gentle Reader • “When can we throw your retirement party?” Miss Manners jests, of course, but she does encourage you to be generous, not only because the retirement may be imminent, but also because flattery tends to be more effective: “You know so much, I would love to learn from you. However, I wonder if in doing so, you could give me a chance to occasionally work with our customers on my own, and then we could talk about it afterward — either alone or in a formal review with our boss.” Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106. Miss Manners’ son, Nicholas Ivor Martin, and her daughter, Jacobina Martin, contribute to this column.

10/19/18

7:00

7:30

FOX Last Man 2 Standing (N)

The Cool Kids (N)

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Hell’s Kitchen Ramsay FOX 2 News at 9:00pm makes a change in the (N) (cc) teams. (N)

CBS MacGyver Driving liquid Hawaii Five-0 McGar- Blue Bloods New York 4 oxygen to a hospital. rett and Danny discover City experiences a (N) (cc) a body. (N) blackout. (N) NBC Blindspot Jane double- Dateline NBC (N) (cc) 5 crosses Patterson. (N) (cc) PBS Washing9 ton Week (cc) CW 11

Living St. Louis

Father Brown Father Brown is drawn into boxing. (cc)

Midsomer Murders Crime during the election. (cc)

Dynasty Fallon resorts Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Nato desperate measures. thaniel wants to prove (N) (cc) himself. (N)

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC Fresh Off 30 the Boat (N)

Speechless Child Support Contes- 20/20 (9:01) (N) (cc) (N) tants vie for a $200,000 prize. (N)

Law & Order: Dignity. Law & Order: Human ION Law & Order Mother 46 of 10 children is found Detectives investigate a Flesh Search Engine. dead. (cc) protester. Suspicious web site.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.19.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Hierarchy, science behind oils in your food FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • Please write about the increasing use of “fashionable” coconut oil and coconut milk. I am on a plant-based diet, approaching vegan, and I see more products with high amounts of saturated fat, which seems to be due to increased use of coconut. I see this used in yogurts (where soy used to be more common), frozen vegan meals (where I would have expected olive oil), etc. One vegan slice of cake (which I did not buy) contained 113 percent of the daily allotment of saturated fat — made with coconut oil. — G.W.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

Answer • It sounds like you have made up your mind about coconut oil, but the science isn’t entirely settled. Most authorities have recommended avoiding tropical oils, including palm oil and coconut oil, but feel they are not as unhealthy as meat-based saturated fats. I also recommend against large amounts of coconut and palm oil. In my opinion, vegetable oils, olive and canola oils and nut oils are better choices for health.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Dear Dr. Roach • I would very much like to stop using warfarin. I underwent a successful ablation surgery (maze procedure) to correct my atrial fibrillation, and my valve replacement surgeries also were successful (mitral and aortic). At that time, they also did a closure of the left atrial appendage where the blood pools and possibly clots. It’s been a year on the blood thinner, but I would like to stop. Do you think that would be safe? — G.M.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Answer • The combination of atrial fibrillation with both mitral and aortic valve repair makes me concerned that you may have had rheumatic fever as the underlying cause. Atrial fibrillation is a common rhythm disturbance, where the normal, regular rhythm of the heart is disrupted by chaotic electrical activity in the upper chambers of the heart. This leads to an irregular, sometimes too fast, heartbeat. This, in turn, increases the risk of stroke. The electrical abnormalities of atrial fibrillation can be treated with antiarrhythmic drugs or with surgery. The maze procedure is about 60 percent effective in restoring normal heart rhythm. In people who have been successfully treated and have remained in normal heart rhythm for at least three months, with no recurrence of atrial fibrillation, and who have had the left atrial appendage closed, anticoagulation can be stopped, particularly in people who are not good candidates for long-term oral anticoagulants, such as warfarin, due to bleeding risk or some other reason. So, it’s entirely reasonable to ask your cardiologist about it.

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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