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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 10.19.2016 • $1.50

THE FINAL DEBATE Trump • Can he steady his campaign, regain ground?

Clinton • Will she focus on rival or on vision for America?

BY GREG BLUESTEIN Atlanta Journal-Constitution

LAS VEGAS • The final presidential debate on Wednesday could be the last chance for Republican Donald Trump to shake up the dynamics of a race that’s tilting toward Democrat Hillary Clinton. Flush with fundraising cash and rising poll numbers, Clinton has largely vanished from the campaign trail as Trump deals with the latest chaos rocking his campaign. The fallout from his incendiary remarks in the “Access Hollywood” videotape prompted a string of women to come forward with claims that he sexually harassed or assaulted them — and also prompted dozens of high-profile Republicans to abandon his campaign. He trails Clinton in both national polls and must-

win battleground states. Trump has responded with a scorchedearth strategy that makes him an even more unpredictable foe. With little left to lose, he has attacked both Clinton and fellow Republicans with a simmering fury that could both enliven his core supporters and turn of undecided voters. Clinton, meanwhile, must wrestle with whether to confront Trump at Wednesday’s debate in Las Vegas, just as she did in the second debate to mixed reviews, or make a broader statement about her vision for the presidency. Her pivot to red-state voters — the campaign said this week that it was intensifying efforts in Arizona and other conservative states — adds another wrinkle to her debate strategy. See DEBATE • Page A4

GOP women not unanimous on Trump BY CELESTE BOTT AND CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Going into the third

and final presidential debate on Wednesday, Donald Trump’s national poll numbers have fallen, in part because he has lost support among women after the release of a 2005 tape featuring the GOP nominee re-

ferring to women in vulgar terms. But for female supporters such as Sara Walsh, a Republican National Convention delegate and state committeewoman for the Missouri Republican Party, questions about his recent rhetoric have been asked and answered enough times already. See WOMEN • Page A4

STEAM AND STEEL CAPTIVATE IN KIRKWOOD

First oice building in 30 years is planned downtown Koman Group has tenant for Cupples X BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

even the small increase will probably be wiped out by an expected increase in Medicare Part B premiums, which are usually deducted from Social Security payments. By law, rising premiums for most Medicare recipients cannot exceed their Social

Downtown St. Louis could soon see its first new commercial oice building in decades if a plan from Koman Group moves forward. Not since Metropolitan Square went up in 1989 has the region’s busiest employment hub added a new office building to its stock. The one proposed at the southeast corner of Spruce and Ninth streets isn’t nearly as large, but it’s still something for a business district that has mostly watched while new oices went up elsewhere. “This is being billed as the first Class A office building to be built downtown in just shy of 30 years,” said Dale Ruthsatz, director of commercial development for the St. Louis Development Corporation, the city’s economic development arm. St. Louis-based Koman Group says it has a tenant lined up for a 100,000-square-foot oice building it plans to construct on a parking lot just west of Busch Stadium. A current downtown business is interested in moving its 310 jobs to the new $43.5 million, five-story office building planned for the

See BENEFITS • Page A5

See CUPPLES • Page A4

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Sam Aufmuth of the Shaw neighborhood in St. Louis climbs a tree to rise above the crowd photographing Union Pacific’s Steam Locomotive No. 844 as it pulls out of Kirkwood Station on Tuesday. The restored 1944 locomotive that used to pull passenger cars is headed to Memphis, Tenn., to celebrate the opening of a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over the Mississippi River. The train was set to stay overnight at Union Station before pulling out Wednesday morning, headed for Southern Illinois.

$4 a month? Social Security recipients to get tiny increase BY STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Millions of Social Secu-

rity recipients and federal retirees will get a 0.3 percent increase in monthly benefits next year, the fifth year in a row that older Americans will have to settle for historically low raises. The adjustment adds up to

TODAY

The X factor

72°/57° STORMS POSSIBLE

TOMORROW

64°/44°

a monthly increase of less than $4 a month for an average recipient. The cost-of-living adjustment, announced by the government Tuesday, will afect more than 70 million people — about 1 in 5 Americans. For recipients, the average monthly Social Security payment now is $1,238. Unfortunately for some older adults,

Police warn of fundraising scam

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Tighter security sought for polls

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GRADUAL CLEARING

Bonds approved to prep NGA site

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LET’S EAT

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WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

SHARING THE QB DUTIES AT MIZZOU

CHAT WITH THE ROAD CREW

Dave Matter says the Tigers’ steadily improving ground game will help Drew Lock and Marvin Zanders better manage the struggling ofense.

Find ways to make getting around town less of a chore by getting expert advice from our Road Crew during Wednesday’s weekly chat. stltoday.com/chats

JOHN STUPER, TOM LAWLESS AND OTHER POSTSEASON HEROES In “Commish’s Classics,” Rick Hummel highlights some of the Cardinals’ most unlikely October stars.

Alton police warn against fake fundraising for fallen oicer

WHAT’S UP THIS DAY IN 2004 PLANE CRASH A commuter plane takes of from Lambert airport and crashes in a field near the Kirksville Regional Airport, killing 13 people.

EVENTS BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ALTON • Police are warning residents

about a fundraising scam preying on people who want to donate money to the family of fallen St. Louis County police Oicer Blake Snyder. Snyder, 33, of Edwardsville, was killed in the line of duty Oct. 6 while responding to a disturbance call in Affton. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth, 24, and their son, Malachi, 2. Snyder The Alton Police Department posted a notice on its Facebook page saying that at least one city employee received a call from someone claiming to be from the Illinois State Police requesting that she donate to the “family of the recently fallen oicer.” The Illinois State Police is not conducting a fundraising campaign of this nature, according to the post. Alton police are urging anyone who may receive a similar call to “simply end the conversation without providing the caller with any personal info or money,”

and said there was no need to report it to police. The St. Louis County Police Welfare Association and BackStoppers Inc. are the only entities that the St. Louis County Police Department says are collecting money on behalf of the family. Most of the dozens of fundraisers that have taken place since Snyder was killed have donated their proceeds to those organizations. BackStoppers has seen donations for Snyder’s family top $200,000, according to oicer manager Jacki Battele. By comparison, the organization’s largest annual fundraiser, the Budweiser Guns ’N Hoses boxing event, garners between $200,000 and $300,000 for the group. The organization aims to eliminate all debt, including house payments, car payments, tuition and health care expenses, for the spouses and children of first responders killed in the line of duty. The St. Louis County Police Welfare Association has raised about $100,000 for the Snyder family, said Lt. Karl Bulla, president of the group. That organization’s largest annual fundraiser, a golf tournament, usually raises

$30,000 to $40,000. The association also has ordered about 30,000 T-shirts memorializing Snyder, Bulla said. Bulla characterized the organization as a mini-BackStoppers for St. Louis County police oicers and civilian staf. It helps financially support families of employees who are experiencing everything from flood damage to injuries to illnesses, he said. At a fundraiser Monday night in Fenton, one of the auction items included a mini battery-powered car that a company made into a replica of Snyder’s police car, complete with his badge number on the license plates. Snyder’s son saw it and said “Daddy,” which led organizers to challenge the crowd to bid on it and sign over the title to the little one. “That car sold for $12,000,” Bulla said. “Two people were bidding against each other, and it got to $6,000, so they decided to both donate together to raise even more money for the family. “It’s been incredible.” Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

GEOTOURISM WEBSITE LAUNCH When • 10 a.m. Wednesday Where • National Great Rivers Museum, No. 2 Lock and Dam Way in East Alton How much • Free More info • 314-581-9056 A celebration will mark the launch of a landmark geotourism website, which highlights communities, attractions and businesses along the Mississippi River. The Mississippi River Geotourism MapGuide (mississippiriver.natgeotourism.com) is a partnership project with National Geographic Maps. YOGA + HISTORY When • 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday Where • Bellefontaine Cemetery, 4947 West Florissant Avenue How much • $25 More info • eventbrite.com/e/yoga-historyat-bellefontaine-cemetery-the-st-louissufragettes-tour-tickets-24331860249 or 314-822-8873 Limitless Planet in partnership with Charge Yoga and Bellefontaine Cemetery presents “Yoga + History: Roots of Feminism — The St. Louis Sufragettes Tour.” The event will start with a class lead by Charge Yoga, with the cemetery tour to follow. Proceeds benefit Bellefontaine Cemetery. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

Starving horses rescued; owners charged with abuse

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES

BY ASHLEY LISENBY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 07-24-28-65-74 Mega ball: 01 Megaplier: 2 Estimated jackpot: $20 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $136 million

ST. LOUIS • The Humane Society of

Missouri says it has rescued eight malnourished horses and mules from a property in north central Missouri. In June, the Humane Society of Missouri’s Animal Cruelty Task Force discovered six horses and two mules were living in poor conditions on property in Sullivan County that was too small to accommodate them, the group said. The Humane Society reported the animals were living on an acre of barren land that contained no food and “filthy water.” The animals were emaciated, according to the group. “Allowing animals to slowly starve to death is the very definition of cruelty,” said Kathy Warnick, president of the Humane Society of Missouri. The Sullivan County sheriff’s office obtained a warrant to remove the animals. The owners of the horses and mules have been charged with six counts of animal abuse and neglect, the Humane Society said. The animals will be moved to the group’s Longmeadow Rescue Ranch near Union for treatment. A hearing to determine the custody of

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.8 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 12-14-20-22-26 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $107,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 805 Evening: 186 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 5552 Evening: 6982

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

HUMANE SOCIETY OF MISSOURI

This horse and seven other equines were rescued in north central Missouri by the Humane Society of Missouri and the Sullivan County sherif’s oice.

the animals is planned for Oct. 24 at the Sullivan County Courthouse in Milan, Mo. People can make donations to help care for the horses by visiting the Long-

meadow website or calling 314-951-1542. Ashley Lisenby • 314-340-8344 @aadlisenby on Twitter alisenby@post-dispatch.com

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 15-33-36-38-45 Evening: 16-17-30-39-41 LOTTO Monday: 02-16-22-47-48-52 Extra shot: 21 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $10 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 859 FB: 3 Evening: 744 FB: 6 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 0067 FB: 7 Evening: 2663 FB: 9

Fair St. Louis will return to Forest Park next summer BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Fair St. Louis is returning to Forest Park for the fourth year. The 2017 dates of Fair St. Louis are July 2, 3 and 4. It’s the 37th annual Independence Day celebration. The move to Forest Park from the Gateway Arch grounds was necessary because of renovations continuing on the Arch grounds.

Fair St. Louis has also announced volunteer leaders James Boldt, 2016 vice chairman, as general chairman for the 2017 event, and David Estes, 2016 venue management chairman, as vice chairman. In a statement, Boldt said: “With nearly 235,000 attendees and a dozen entertainers at Fair Saint Louis 2016, we’re looking forward to an even bigger and better 2017. “Forest Park is truly an incredible

venue to host America’s Biggest Birthday Party, and we’re once again looking forward to showcasing America’s No. 1 city park to St. Louisans and visitors alike during next year’s celebration.” More information is available at fairsaintlouis.org. Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

SIU aloat despite ‘Titanic’ state budget struggle BY ASHLEY JOST st. Louis Post-dispatch

EDWARDSVILLE • The Il-

linois budget crisis has created a “Titanic struggle” for the state’s colleges and universities, Southern Illinois University President Randy Dunn said Tuesday. Dunn still has hope, though, that the state’s financial ship will be righted, and he said SIU’s two campuses, Edwardsville and Carbondale, are in much better shape than some of Illinois’ other public four-year colleges, whose finances might not hold out to the end of the

school year. Dunn spoke to a crowd of about 250 faculty and staff for his “State of the University” address. “If you look at these other institutions, we are not facing that kind of difficulty,” Dunn said after his speech. “For those who are concerned we are going the same direction or will have the same sets of problems, that’s not the case.” He didn’t cite specific schools, but Chicago State University, for example, enrolled less than 100 freshmen this semester. It’s undergraduate enrollment dropped by more

than 30 percent, the president resigned last month and the school declared a financial emergency earlier this year before 40 percent of the staf were laid of. But there is no similar “existential crisis” at the SIU campuses, Dunn told the crowd. So far, much of the effect of the state’s budget crisis has meant a lot of small cost-saving efforts across SIU, Dunn said. While the school is prepared to make it through this academic year following the stopgap state funding approved this spring, it’s hard to predict

what will happen next fall. Dunn is giving some directives to the campuses, including considering whether some academic programs are necessary. The situation at SIUE isn’t bad enough to worry about those conversations, Chancellor Randy Pembrook said. In preparation for the current fiscal year, Pembrook said leaders found ways to cut costs by 9 percent. Similar action might be necessary for next year, and they’re preparing for that, Pembrook said. Dunn said he is calling for more of that “structural

change.” “SIU, historically, has been highly risk averse,” Dunn said. Administrators have to be open to innovative responses if the Legislature and the governor again can’t end their long budget impasse during the spring session, he said. Despite the acrimony, both SIU campuses are continuing to cover the gap in state funding for a needbased scholarship program known as MAP, the Monetary Award Program. Both campuses will give low-income students the amount that they are supposed to receive under the

program next spring. At SIUE, that could be around $3 million. Pembrook joined SIUE as the chancellor in August. Shortly afterward, he talked about his hope to find places where he can create partnerships with local businesses and the community. He recently created a task force to look into new partnership opportunities. These, he said, could fill some budget gaps that are left in limbo from the state. Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

Logan U. accused It’s still shorts weather of ignoring sex harassment Two former students say oicials failed to address stalking complaint BY ASHLEY JOST st. Louis Post-dispatch

CHESTERFIELD • Two former Logan University students have sued the chiropractic college, alleging that school administrators didn’t do their due diligence in investigating at least one case of persistent sexual harassment. Morgan Pearson and Kirsten Kirkpatrick filed the 68-page lawsuit in September. In the lawsuit, Pearson alleges that in the fall of 2015 a 31-year-old male student began stalking and harassing her, although she told him she was not interested and asked him to leave her alone. He would follow her from classes they shared to her job in the library, sit next to or near her at the library, watch her for hours during her shift at work and sometimes show up to other places where she was, Pearson’s suit alleges. Pearson said that in November the man assaulted her during class, pressing his crotch against her from behind while they stood in a laboratory over a cadaver. She brought her issues to the university’s Title IX coordinator the next month after she said the male suspect talked about switching his classes to match her schedule for the following trimester, she says. Title IX refers to a federal law that prohibits discrimination based on sex.

In recent years, the law has become a pinnacle issue for colleges, addressing how they handle sexual discrimination and assault on campus. In her lawsuit, Pearson says that multiple administrators downplayed her allegations and didn’t rigorously investigate her claims. Kirkpatrick, the second plaintiff, alleges she was also harassed by the same male student. Her experience is highlighted briefly in the lawsuit, along with her concerns about the Title IX coordinator’s investigation into Pearson’s case. Kirkpatrick was among the witnesses for Pearson’s complaint. Pearson, of St. Louis, told the Post-Dispatch that she left for a new school because she no longer felt comfortable at Logan. She would be open to going back and finishing her chiropractic degree there, but not until “all of the administrators that are there now are gone.” Mark Goodman, an attorney for Logan University, said he denies claims that the university didn’t respond properly to Pearson’s case. He said the university is compliant with what is mandated in Title IX. The university is due to respond to the lawsuit in November. Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Patrick Bukeweneza pushes his 1-year-old son, Thierry, on the swings Tuesday at the brand new Trojan Park along the St. Vincent Greenway at the corner of North Skinker Parkway and Etzel Avenue in Wellston. The warm weather in mid-October prompted Bukeweneza’s visit to the park. “It’s a good day to come out with my son because it’s not that hot and not that cold,” he said. Trojan Park was named after the mascot at Wellston’s old Eskridge High School and was dedicated by residents on Oct. 8. It has three playgrounds, a family pavilion, a butterly garden, picnic tables and a full-size basketball court. Tuesday’s warm weather won’t stick around for long. After some showers and storms Wednesday, the cooler temperatures of autumn will return. WEATHER • A20

HANDBAG &WATCH TRADE-INEVENT OCTOBER 19-23 Bring in any clean, used handbag or watch and receive a discount on any regular-price handbag, wallet or watch purchase of $75 or more.*

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Self-defense claim sways jurors in pot-related killing BY JOEL CURRIER st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Jurors on

Tuesday believed the selfdefense claim of one man charged with fatally shooting another in an argument over drug money last year. Paul E. Clayton Jr., 30, of the 8800 block of Corwin Drive in Jennings, was acquitClayton ted of firstdegree murder and armed criminal action in the April 2, 2015, shooting death of Clifford Williams in the city’s Mark Twain neighborhood. Williams, 42, was killed at his home in the 5000 block of Queens Avenue. According to police, Williams heard a knock at the door, opened it and was pulled out onto the porch and down the front steps. Clayton then shot Williams five times in the abdomen, arm and leg. Williams’ uncle emerged and shot Clayton in the back as he tried to run, severing his spine and paralyzing him from the waist down.

Clayton’s public defender, Matt Mueller, said his client went to the home to buy marijuana and the men argued over the price. Mueller said “a felony amount” of marijuana was found packaged inside. Clayton testified that it was Williams who brought out the gun and was shot during a struggle, Mueller said. The weapon was never found. “We had confidence in the evidence and we believe the jury reached the right result,” Mueller said. Based on the evidence, the prosecutors disagreed with the self-defense claim, a spokeswoman said. T u e s d a y ’s ve r d i c t marked the second murder trial in St. Louis Circuit Court in less than a week to end in an acquittal. On Friday, jurors found Pierre L. Davis, 37, not guilty of first-degree murder and armed criminal action in the Feb. 14, 2014, shooting death of Antoine Farrell. Davis claimed selfdefense in shooting Farrell 12 times. Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

$ SAVE 40 on a handbag or watch valued at $126-$199. $ SAVE 50 on a handbag or watch valued at $200-$299. $ SAVE 75 on a handbag or watch valued at $300 or more.

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NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

Some Republican women reject hird debate is Trump’s last highTrump; others stand by him

proile opportunity

WOMEN • FROM A1

“On and on that point is hammered. He apologized,” Walsh said. If the controversy has repelled Republican women in Missouri, Walsh hasn’t witnessed it. She said she had largely seen nothing but enthusiasm for Trump, often coming from women who care more about the issues than the latest scandal. “Women are concerned with policy, what the future of America is going to look like,” she said. Overall, Clinton leads Trump by 7 percentage points, 48.9 percent to 41.9 percent, in RealClear Politics’ average of national polls. Trump had been trailing among women nationally, 45 percent to 40 percent, in a Sept. 18 CBS poll, but that had gone to a Clinton advantage of 51 percent to 36 percent among women in the poll released Sunday. And Clinton’s surge to a 6-point lead in 13 swing states in the most recent CBS poll was due almost entirely to Trump’s losing ground among Republican women, which fell from 83 percent before the tape and the allegations of sexual assault to 77 percent afterward. Still, Joyce Mushaben, a professor of comparative politics and gender policies at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, said conservative female voters might find Trump easier to relate to than Clinton. “They see Trump sticking it to Hillary,” Mushaben said. “In his efforts to put down women, he’s putting down women like Hillary.” For the Missouri Federation of Republican Women, a group made up of more than 1,000 conservative women in eight districts, Trump remains the clear choice over Clinton, who will bring more regulations, higher taxes, open borders and an end to civil liberties, said Janice DeWeese, the organization’s vice president. As for controversy over Trump’s treatment of women, DeWeese said that it had already been addressed and that women had to decide individually how they felt. Still, for a number of Trump’s former advocates in Congress, the leaked tape was the last straw. Some local Republicans, most notably Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, took back their endorsements after the leaked tape. Wagner said Trump’s comments on the tape were “predatory and reprehensible,” but she has not spoken publicly about Trump since. “Ann has said everything she is going to say on the presidential race,” Wagner’s communications director, Meghan Burris, said Tuesday. It’s not the worst move, politically, Mushaben said. Wagner and other Republicans have taken the chance to distance themselves from Trump, she said, while still pushing for GOP candidates down the ballot. But others criticized Wagner’s walkback. After praising Trump’s performance in the second debate, Bill Hennessy, co-founder of the St. Louis Tea Party, wrote about a

DEBATE • FROM A1

Here are some of the key questions to watch:

WHAT WILL AN UNSHACKLED TRUMP DO AT THE DEBATE?

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Elisa Patterson of Alamosa, Colo., listens as GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally Tuesday in Colorado Springs, Colo.

“It is so nice that the shackles have been taken off me,” Trump tweeted after House Speaker Paul Ryan in effect conceded the presidential race, saying he would no longer defend the GOP nominee and would instead focus on down-ticket races. There’s no telling what that means for Trump. He has insulted, taunted and shouted over his rivals at almost every other debate — a tactic that helped score points with supporters and rattle his opponents. And before the second presidential debate against Clinton, he appeared with several women who accused her husband of sexual misconduct. He has since upped the ante by sowing doubt about the backbone of the nation’s democracy, claiming that the election is “rigged” at many polling sites across the nation. That brought condemnation from Republican elections officials but also raised questions — and fear — about what he would say next.

WILL CLINTON TAKE THE HIGH ROAD?

Protesters gather Tuesday in front of a campaign oice in Philadelphia for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

In the midst of the second debate, Clinton borrowed a line from first lady Michelle Obama to describe her strategy to combat Trump: “When they go low, you go high.” Yet she has shown little affinity toward staking out higher ground. In the first debate, she tried to needle and provoke him, successfully triggering Trump to launch a damaging rant against a former beauty queen. In the second, she attacked and counterattacked, earning more tepid results. With the political wind at her back, though, she faces a choice. She could joust with Trump for a third time, hoping to energize her more skeptical supporters. Or she could largely ignore her opponent to deliver a more optimistic message, one that dovetails with her recent push to expand her campaign into conservative states.

HOW WILL TRUMP RESPOND TO NEW CLAIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT? fly that repeatedly landed on Clinton during the forum and used it to slam Wagner. “I’m guessing there’s a fly in Ann Wagner’s face tonight. It’s eating the egg,” he wrote. In an earlier post, he said, “Ms. Wagner seems to believe that being a woman gives her some unique moral vantage point. She forgets that she’s not the only woman in America.” Unlike Wagner, the other Republican woman in the Missouri delegation, Rep. Vicky Hartzler, R-Harrisonville, has stuck with Trump. She said that starting with the debate, she believed Trump still had time to make the case that he has the best plan forward for the country, irrespective of the damage that may have been done by the allegations. “I think he needs to separate the allegations from the past with what he wants to do for the county now because his policies are what this country needs,” she said Tuesday. Hartzler said that when she first heard the allegations against Trump and the 2005 tape that surfaced just before the last debate, “I was disgusted.” But Hartzler added that “I was also disgusted with President Bill Clinton’s behavior when he was the president. One of my first thoughts was how ironic I think it is that Hillary Clinton says someone is un-

fit to be president if they say these things, yet when her husband actually did these things it was acceptable.” Hartzler said she didn’t think Trump needed to make genderspecific appeals to women because the case against Clinton was selfevident and strong. “I think we need to focus on what (Trump) wants to do for the country now and how he is going to get it back on the right track,” Hartzler continued. “Hillary Clinton’s policies would be disastrous for this country. And I think it is important for (Trump) to continue to draw” that contrast. Kristen Soltis Anderson, a Republican pollster, said that polling numbers reflected a drop in enthusiasm among Trump supporters but that he might be able to get that back if he focused on issues and populist messages on Wednesday. “The best thing he has going for him is that a lot of people still kind of agree with him on the issues,” said Anderson, who has conducted focus groups on what voters want. “If he in this final debate can resist the temptation to make this all about bad things Bill Clinton has done … I think he will be in a much better place,” Anderson said. Celeste Bott • 573-556-6186 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com

The New York businessman has been besieged by claims of assaulting women since the release of the 2005 video showing him bragging that he can harass women because he’s a star. He’s denied each one of the claims, calling the women “horrible liars” and saying he’s the victim of a “political smear campaign.” But the final debate gives him the biggest platform he’ll have left in the campaign to try to combat the notion that he mistreats women. And two key audiences will be watching intently. Evangelical voters formed the core of his support in the GOP primaries, and some polls show that their support for Trump is starting to slip. Trump is also at risk, unless he can steady his campaign messaging, of becoming the first Republican since Bob Dole in 1996 to lose the vote of married women on Election Day.

WHAT WILL CLINTON SAY ABOUT HER LATEST EMAIL PROBLEMS? It has been overshadowed by Trump’s campaign problems, but the hacking of campaign Chairman John Podesta’s email account has raised new questions about Clinton’s vision. She’s likely to face questions about her cozy relationship with Wall Street and big banks, about her dream of a hemispheric common market with “open trade and open borders” and her campaign aides’ views on religious conservatives. They play into a broader theme championed by Trump and other Republicans that Clinton is profoundly untrustworthy and that the average American voter has been misled about what she really believes about the issues. Wednesday’s debate could be her last chance before the vote to reach a national audience of millions of undecided or skeptical voters and try to convince them otherwise.

New commercial oice building could be irst downtown in nearly 30 years CUPPLES X

CUPPLES • FROM A1

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parking lot just south of the Westin St. Louis hotel. And the business could add up to 280 jobs in ensuing years, Koman representatives told the St. Louis Tax Increment Financing Commission Tuesday. Garrick Hamilton, Koman’s executive vice president and general counsel, said the developer couldn’t reveal the name of the tenant while the business seeks approvals to finalize the deal. But he said more details would be forthcoming in a public hearing set for Dec. 14 in front of the TIF Commission. Koman is asking for $8.7 million in TIF assistance for the project, named Cupples X. Construction could start by late spring 2017 and the building is slated to open in late 2018. “That is an extremely aggressive schedule for a building of this type,” Hamilton said. The planned building’s proximity to the Stadium MetroLink station and the connections that provides to technology centers such as Cortex was an important consideration for the tenant, Hamilton said. Koman’s TIF application to the city describes the building as “millennial-focused” with collaborative working space. The new building will

Koman Group plans to build a new oice building across from Busch Stadium.

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This drawing shows the 100,000-square-foot oice building planned for just west of Busch Stadium, the irst new commercial oice building downtown in decades.

join the Cupples warehouse district, where 20 red brick warehouses surrounding rail lines and factories once contributed to St. Louis’ reputation as one of the nation’s busier commercial centers. When they were built between 1894 and 1917, it was thought to be one of the largest clusters of warehouses, rail lines and manufacturing in the country. Today, only eight of the warehouses remain, including Cupples 9, a Koman Group rehab that now contains its headquarters and other offices, as well as the Flying Saucer

Draught Emporium on the first floor. The new building would be just down the street from the site of Cupples 7, the toppled historic warehouse that riled preservationists three years ago and spurred talk of better preserving St. Louis’ iconic old buildings. Hamilton said the new oice building, which renderings show would include a fair amount of glass rather than the red brick making up the historic warehouses, “is intended to be complementary” to the area, not identical. Still, the new building will add more space to a

downtown office market that has the highest vacancy rates in the region, according to a recent report from commercial real estate firm CBRE. Vacancy is falling downtown but still approaches 25 percent compared with about 11 percent in the suburbs. CBRE includes Cortex and the Highlands in its “downtown” sub market. But the project’s location near Busch Stadium, Highway 40 (Interstate 64) and other full buildings makes sense, especially with a primary tenant, said Rick Messey, a CBRE senior vice president who

Busch Stadium 64

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Post-Dispatch

focuses on downtown office space. Plus, it’s not so huge a project that it will hurt many other owners too much, he said. “All the other Cupples buildings are pretty much fully leased,” Messey said. “There’s a lot of dense traffic foot traffic and you’re right next to the ballpark.” When word of the new Cupples project first went public in May, Koman was seeking tax abatement from the St. Louis Board of Aldermen. It has since pivoted to seek TIF, which allows increases in property taxes and a portion of new earnings and sales taxes on the site to be used to finance development. The incentives are necessary because the rent that the market can bear for oice space downtown

is lower than elsewhere in the region, Hamilton said. Without TIF, the project isn’t feasible, he said. According to CBRE’s report, Class A space in Downtown averages $19.91 per square foot compared with average Class A rental rates of $22.97 per square foot in the suburbs. David Newburger, chairman of the TIF Commission, said he hoped the St. Louis Development Corporation would come back with a detailed analysis of the requested incentives. “The TIF you’re proposing is basically 20 percent of the project” costs, Newburger said, adding that SLDC generally allowed TIFs to cover up to 15 percent of project costs. SLDC Director Otis Williams said that his agency “will be having a discussion” with the developers about the amount of TIF requested. Koman’s Hamilton noted that part of the reason for the TIF request was because the new construction wasn’t eligible for historic tax credits. The proposed building will also include a 3,000-square-foot retail component. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

Tighter security sought for polls St. Louis County oicials move to defend integrity of voting process BY STEVE GIEGERICH st. Louis Post-dispatch

MAPLE WOOD • Moving to

counter possible repercussions from the vitriol at the top of the November general election ticket, the St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners on Tuesday voted to seek additional security for county residents casting ballots when the polls open in three weeks. “Nobody should be intimidated when they go the polls,” said Commission Chair Richard Kellett, a Democrat. “And I think we’re going to see a lot of that.” The commission acted after Acting Republican Elections Director Christian Tolbert indicated that tension had surfaced at the 3232 Laclede Station Road (Deer Creek Shopping Plaza)

satellite office that began serving absentee voters at the end of September. Democratic Elections Director Eric Fey said following the meeting the incidents were prompted by ordinary frustrations over the voting process. He did not elaborate on the incidents. The commissioners nonetheless formally requested that election administrators meet with St. Louis County police officials to map out a strategy for heightened protection of voters reporting to polling places on Nov. 8. Fey said following the meeting that preliminary talks between the elections authority and police are already under way. An Oct. 13 meeting, he said, was rescheduled to allow the department to pay its respects at

the funeral for slain county police Oicer Blake Snyder. Kellett said the tenor of a presidential race that has exposed a deep national divide necessitates taking extraordinary security measures. “I’m sorry to have to say it, but there are a lot of nuts out there,” Kellett said. Republican Commissioner John Maupin capitalized on the security discussion by emphasizing that, the claims of GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump notwithstanding, the county election system is secure from rigging and fraud. “The idea that an election could be stolen in St. Louis County is abhorrent to all of us,” Maupin told the commission. “The manipulation of electronic ballots simply can’t happen

because the system is not connected to the internet. And anyone who suggests anything to the contrary doesn’t know what he’s talking about.” Fey said the county has distributed approximately 24,000 absentee ballots. Of those, about 13,500 have already been returned — a percentage consistent with the number of absentee ballots turned back at this stage prior to the 2008 and 2012 general elections. The elections authority is in talks with county administration officials about recruiting employees from other county departments to count absentee ballots. Steve Giegerich • 314-725-6758 @stevegiegerich on Twitter sgiegerich@post-dispatch.com

Millions of Social Security recipients will get tiny increases BENEFITS • FROM A1

Security cost-of-living increase. That’s known as the “hold harmless” provision. However, new enrollees and high-income retirees are not covered by that provision, so they could face higher Medicare premiums, which will be announced later this year. There was no Social Security benefit increase this year, and next year’s will be small because inflation is low, driven in part by cheaper fuel prices. The low inflation rate should help keep some older people’s bills from rising very rapidly. Don’t tell that to Millicent Graves, a retired veterinary technician, who says Medicare and supplemental insurance premiums eat up nearly a third of her $929 monthly Social Security payment. Grave, 72, of Williamsburg, Va., says her insurance premiums went up by $46.50 this year, and her cable TV, internet and phone bill went up, too. “I just lose and lose and lose

and lose,” Graves said. More than 60 million retirees, disabled workers, spouses and children get Social Security benefits. The COLA also afects benefits for about 4 million disabled veterans, 2.5 million federal retirees and their survivors, and more than 8 million people who get Supplemental Security Income, the disability program for the poor. Many people who get SSI also receive Social Security. Since 2008, the COLA has been above 2 percent only once, in 2011. It’s been zero three times. “This loss of anticipated retirement income compounds every year, causing people to spend through retirement savings far more quickly than planned,” said Mary Johnson of the Senior Citizens League. “Over the course of a 25- or 30-year retirement, it reduces anticipated Social Security income by tens of thousands of dollars.” The cost-of-living adjustment is based on a broad measure of prices generated by the Bureau

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of Labor Statistics. It measures price changes for food, housing, clothing, transportation, energy, medical care, recreation and education. If prices go up, benefits go up. If prices drop or stay flat, benefits stay the same. Gasoline prices have fallen by more than 6 percent over the past year, according to the September inflation report, while the cost of medical care has gone up by more than 5 percent. Older adults who don’t drive much don’t get the full benefit of low gas prices, said Max Gulker, a senior research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research. Many older adults spend more of their income on health care. Graves said that she appreciated lower gas prices but that the higher medical costs were a problem. “I just have to rely more each month on cashing in investments,” Graves said. “I’m lucky I can do that.”

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has embraced the idea of expanded benefits for certain low-income retirees. She says the nation would pay for it by raising taxes on “the highestincome Americans.” Breaking with other Republicans, GOP nominee Donald Trump has pledged not to cut benefits. However, he has ofered few specifics on how he would address Social Security’s longterm financial problems. Social Security is financed by a 12.4 percent tax on the first $118,500 of a person’s annual wages, with the worker paying half and the employer paying the other half. The amount of wages subject to the payroll tax will go up to $127,200 next year, the Social Security Administration said. About 173 million workers will pay Social Security taxes next year, and about 12 million of them will face higher taxes because of the higher cap, the agency said.

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Driver who killed SLU professor was drunk, charges say BY JOEL CURRIER st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A Belleville man’s blood-alcohol content was more than 50 percent beyond the legal limit to drive when he caused a crash April 27 that killed a St. Louis University assistant professor, prosecutors say. Christopher Seals, 35, of the first block of Savannah Court, was charged Tuesday with first-degree involuntary manslaughter in the morning rush-hour crash at the Vandeventer Avenue exit from westbound Interstate 44. A blood sample taken after the collision put Seals’ bloodalcohol at 0.131 percent; the legal limit is 0.08. He was not in custody Tuesday, and no booking photo of him was available. The educa- Patten to r, D o n a l d Patten, 48, had been involved in a crash just before 8:30 a.m. at the exit, stopped to check on damage, then got back in his 2001 Isuzu Rodeo. His Isuzu was then struck from behind by Seals’ 1966 Ford F-150, oicials said. The pickup also struck a man standing near the stopped vehicles, critically injuring him. That man, Patten and the pickup driver all were taken to hospitals, and Patten was pronounced dead. Seals has not been charged with injuring the man who survived. Patten was an assistant professor in the department of theological studies at St. Louis University. Police said he lived in Arnold, although a friend said he had moved to south St. Louis County. He was married and had two children.

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 10.19.2016

LAW & ORDER

DIGEST

GRANITE CITY > Pedestrian killed • Oicials said Willie G. Shores, 44, was hit and killed by an SUV about 10:40 p.m. Monday after being thrown out of the Champion Sports Bar and Grill on Illinois Route 3 and West Chain of Rocks Road. Madison County Coroner Stephen P. Nonn said Shores died on the scene of head and chest injuries after being struck by a 2014 Ford Escape traveling south on Route 3. Toxicology tests were pending. The woman driving the SUV was cooperating with the investigation by Granite City police, oicials said. Nonn said Shores, of Fort Smith, Ark., was an itinerant construction worker on a project in the Edwardsville area. The coroner said Shores was seen leaving the bar property, then he turned back to face it as he stepped into traic.

Work on I-70 near I-170 to slow traic

ST. LOUIS > Bank is robbed • Police are searching for the man who robbed a U.S. Bank at 301 North Tucker Boulevard just before 3:30 p.m. Monday. Police released surveillance photos Tuesday and asked anyone with information to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-3718477. The robber is described as a black man, 30 to 35 years old and 5-foot-6 to 5-foot-8. He had a mustache and goatee. He was wearing a gray T-shirt with white lettering, blue jeans and tan Timberland boots. After he handed the teller a note, she gave him an undisclosed amount of money. He didn’t show a weapon, and no one was hurt in the robbery. When he left the bank, police aren’t sure which way he went.

Drivers on Interstate 70 near Interstate 170 should brace for a two-week lane closure starting Wednesday, the Missouri Department of Transportation said. Westbound I-70 lanes will be reduced from three lanes to two lanes, and traic will shift to the left in the construction zone, the agency said. Crews are repairing bridges at the interchange. (Leah Thorsen)

This man robbed the U.S. Bank at 301 North Tucker Boulevard just before 3:30 p.m. on Monday.

BELLEVILLE > Man killed by car • A pedestrian, David K. Koelker, 55, died at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis after being struck by a vehicle about 8:20 p.m. Monday in the 4200 block of North Belt West, police said. A woman driving the vehicle was not charged. DELLWOOD > Man who stabbed self is safe • A man who disappeared from a home here after stabbing himself early Saturday has been found safe, police said. Oicials had issued an alert for him, saying he left a home in the 1600 block of Mowbry Lane about 3 a.m. after stabbing himself in the abdomen. No other details were available. WASHINGTON PARK > Shooting victim found dead • Investigators with the Illinois State Police say a man’s body was found Monday morning along the shoulder of Kingshighway (Route 111), near Interstate 64. Deandre M. Davidson, 21, of Washington Park, was discovered at about 7 a.m. Sgt. Matt Weller of the Illinois State Police said Davidson died of a gunshot wound. Anyone with information is asked to call Special Agent

Bryant Johnson at 618-3463770. ST. LOUIS > Verdict against oicers stands • U.S. District Judge Ronnie L. White has denied a new trial for two St. Louis police oicers ordered by a jury in August to pay $600,000 in an excessive-force claim. White also ordered the defendants, Nicholas Martorano and John Moton, to pay plaintif Calvin Fletcher’s attorney fees of $186,000. Fletcher, now 39, claimed in a suit in 2014 that four oicers targeted him for false arrest because he is black, beat him and shocked him with a Taser. Damages were awarded only against Martorano and Moton. Prosecutors declined to bring drug possession, assault and resisting charges sought by police against Fletcher. White rejected a defense claim that the oicers were deprived of an opportunity to cross-examine a doctor who testiied for Fletcher, and Moton’s claim that there was no evidence he injured Fletcher. The Missouri attorney general’s oice, which represented the oicers, had no comment.

Illinois agency: YouTube glitch behind porn on training video BY JOHN O’CONNOR AP Political Writer

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. • At

the end of a brief online video promoting an Illinois agency’s training summit, the picture faded to black and, several seconds later, a pornographic clip appeared. Emails obtained by The Associated Press show the Illinois Emergency Management Agency scrambling in late August to disable the video, and its chief of staff ordering an investigation into how the footage was added. Officially, the agency, whose conference last month included a session on cybersecurity, insists no one “hijacked” the website to tag the lewd material on to the end of director James Joseph’s video invitation promot-

ing the summit in Springfield. Agency spokeswoman Patti Thompson blames the foul-up on an unfortunate but random circumstance created by YouTube, the platform storing the IEMA clip, which was ultimately viewed more than 900 times. YouTube policies prohibit pornography and exclude nudity that is provocative or gratuitous. Stephanie Shih, a spokeswoman for the online video company, said the company depends on viewers to flag questionable videos for review and removal. According to the emails, disclosed to the AP under the Illinois Freedom of Information Act, the 2-minute, 17-second video featuring Joseph and assistant director Joe Klinger

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was completed by the first week of August. On Aug. 29, chief of staf Jennifer Ricker emailed Joseph, Klinger and others indicating that she had instructed web developer Brad Brooks to disable the invite.

ST. JOHN > Little library is big hit • Residents have responded favorably to a Little Free Library in Unity Park, Mayor Tom Halaska reported at Monday’s night’s City Council meeting. Little Free Libraries are waterproof boxes that often look like birdhouses and are erected for free book exchange. “Take a book, leave a book” is the philosophy behind the tiny libraries. Members of the volunteer group Rebuilding Together created Unity Park last year on a vacant corner property at Walton Road and Hume Avenue as part of the organization’s Building a Healthy Neighborhood project. In that project, some 600 volunteers descended on the city to make major repairs to 14 pre-selected homes. Lowe’s was a major donor of materials used to build the park. Halaska constructed the Little Free Library with scrap materials he had and installed it in the park about ive weeks ago. “I kind of did it without permission,” he quipped at Monday’s meeting. He says he plans to build and install another one in St. John Park soon. The mayor also said he plans to register the library with littlefreelibrary. org, which says some 40,000 miniature libraries are registered with it worldwide. (Special to the Post-Dispatch) MANCHESTER > Hike in workers’ health insurance costs draws ire • The Board of Aldermen here is under ire for raising some city employees’ health insurance costs by 25

percent. “I’m embarrassed at what we are doing to our employees,” said Tracy Garrett, a Manchester resident, during public comments at Monday’s board meeting. “This is not saving money. This is asking the employees to pay the city’s expenses.” Last month, employees were told that the city’s health care contribution for family plans would drop from 50 percent to 25 percent, said Mark Belpulsi, public works superintendent and a member of Manchester’s city employee committee. He and other employees said the decision was made without public input and behind closed doors. They were told it was done for budgetary reasons. Residents Monday suggested the city could make residents pay $10 or so a month for trash and recycling services to bring in more city revenue. Garrett told the board she knows one city maintenance worker who now has to pay $520 more a month for health insurance, leaving him just $1,052 a month for all his other expenses. No aldermen addressed the residents’ and employees’ public comments at Monday’s meeting. After the meeting, Alderman Mike Clement said that the board is “obviously concerned about what we’re hearing,” but the board also had to weigh increases in insurance costs. The board currently has no plans to revisit the decision. (Special to the Post-Dispatch) LADUE > City says no to smaller lots for subdivision • The City Council on Monday night followed the Zoning & Planning Commission’s recommendation and voted to deny a proposed rezoning that would have allowed homes on smaller lots in the Clayprice subdivision. Developer Scott Runyan had asked for the city’s approval to change the zoning for lots he owns at 3, 4, 5 and 6 Clayprice Court, to drop from 1.8-acre minimum lot size to 30,000 square feet — less than half the current allotment. Runyan told the

council that there’s a “huge demand” among homebuyers for smaller lots, such as on one-acre tracts, for $500,000 to $600,000 homes that don’t require as much yard maintenance. “Some Ladue residents want smaller lots, to be able to downsize,” he said. He said the denial means “there’s no chance this project will be brought back to life” for redevelopment. Councilman John Fox said he feared the rezoning could have accommodated additional homes on the site. Councilman Charles Hiemenz said the proposal wasn’t consistent with the city’s comprehensive plan. City Planning Consultant Andrea Sukanek said that plan indicates the city “would like to maintain the current residential character and spaciousness of the area.” “The community is concerned about McMansions that can dominate the lot and distract from the spacious character of the area,” she said. “Zoning of property should be based on the needs of the community as a whole, rather than the wishes of one or two residents or developers.” (Special to the PostDispatch) BELLEVILLE > Pay hikes approved • The Belleville City Council voted Monday night to raise salaries for the mayor, city treasurer and city clerk 2 percent each year over the next four years. Currently the mayor earns $83,152, and the city treasurer and clerk earn $72,066 each. These pay rates have not increased for four years. The vote was 15-1, with Councilman Mike Buettner opposed. One resident speaker, Michael Hagberg, opposed increases, citing a lack of competition for elected oicials’ seats in recent years and suggested raises be tied to rates of inlation, rather than set at 2 percent. Also Monday, the council declared Shopland Plaza at the corner of West Main Street and Foley Drive blighted. The council also voted to move forward with the completion of a business plan in order to create a business district for the area. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

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NATION

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A7

Several car owners slam VW emissions deal BY SUDHIN THANAWALA associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO • Sev-

eral angry Volkswagen owners told a federal judge on Tuesday that a $10 billion settlement does not adequately compensate them for the automaker’s emissions cheating scandal, part of a vocal minority who objected to the deal as hundreds of thousands of others signed up for payments. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer will determine whether the settlement is fair to consumers and should receive final approval. He said he was “strongly inclined” to approve it but would make a final decision by Oct. 25, giving him time to consider the owners’ objections and

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Volkswagen diesels on a storage lot near a VW dealership in September 2015 in Salt Lake City.

whether he should recommend any changes. “We got played the fool,” Mark Dietrich, an Audi owner from San Francisco, told the judge earlier at a hearing in San Francisco.

DIGEST More Zika mosquitoes are found in Miami A new batch of mosquitoes carrying Zika has been found on South Beach, Miami-Dade oicials reported Tuesday. The new batch of infected mosquitoes is the second positive sample retrieved from a trap at 1236 Drexel Avenue, an eight-unit apartment building, and represents the eighth time county workers have found Zika-infected insects in Miami Beach since August. Zika virus has also been detected in units of donated blood in Florida, federal health oicials said Tuesday. But the number so far is small, and new testing in high-risk areas has kept the virus from entering the U.S. blood supply. Michigan health chief is focus in water investigation • Michigan’s top public health oicial is a target in the criminal investigation of Flint’s water crisis that has led to charges against nine government employees, his attorney said Tuesday. Nick Lyon, director of the state Department of Health and Human Services and a member of Gov. Rick Snyder’s Cabinet, received a letter in early September from investigators indicating he is a focus, attorney Larry Willey said. Eight current or former state employees — including three from Lyon’s agency — and one Flint worker have been charged in Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette’s investigation.

“This settlement does not go far enough.” Dietrich demanded the full purchase price of his car as well as part of his registration fee. The settlement calls for

Man held in Alaska oicer’s shooting • A man has been arrested in a shooting that left an Alaska police oicer seriously injured. Fairbanks police say Anthony George JenkinsAlexie, 29, was arrested Tuesday morning as he was walking on a street. Jenkins-Alexie, of Fairbanks, is facing charges of attempted murder, assault and other counts in connection with the shooting early Sunday of Sgt. Allen Brandt. Police say Brandt is recovering at an Anchorage hospital after he was shot four times in the legs. Police say bullet fragments also struck the oicer’s eye. Slain California oicers are honored, mourned • Thousands of people gathered Tuesday in Palm Springs, Calif., to remember a rookie police oicer just back from maternity leave and a veteran only months away from retirement who were shot to death in what authorities called an ambush by a gang member. Relatives, friends, colleagues and thousands of others from across the country came to honor Palm Springs police Oicer Jose “Gil” Vega, 63; and Oicer Lesley Zerebny, 27.

the German automaker to spend up to $10 billion to buy back or repair about 475,000 Volkswagens and Audi vehicles with 2-liter diesel engines and pay their owners an additional $5,100 to $10,000 each. Any repair options have yet to be finalized. It also includes $4.7 billion for unspecified environmental mitigation to make up for the excess pollution and to promote zero-emissions vehicles. The combined $14.7 billion deal would be the largest auto-scandal settlement in U.S. history. But Blair Stewart, a Volkswagen owner from Palo Alto, said the company engaged in a “program of deception” that should not go unpunished. More than a dozen

signed of on a settlement between environmental groups and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Tainted water from Air Force base runs into Colorado sewers • An Air Force base in Colorado said Tuesday that it accidentally released about 150,000 gallons of water containing toxic chemicals into the sewer system of nearby Colorado Springs, but the potential health hazards weren’t immediately known. Peterson Air Force Base said the water contained perluorinated compounds, or PFCs, which have been linked to prostate, kidney and testicular cancer, along with other illnesses. The Air Force hasn’t said how high the levels were. The chemicals didn’t get into the city’s drinking water, said Steve Berry, a spokesman for Colorado Springs Utilities. Taste for pastry leads to arrest in robbery • A Connecticut bandit with a liking for pastry may have been nabbed because the suspect asked a police oicer for directions to a pastry shop. Stamford police Lt. Thomas Barcello said the robber’s face was covered with a bandanna when he robbed a convenience store of about $800 on Monday. An investigator was responding to the convenience store when Donald Newman-Smith asked him how to get to the pastry shop; the investigator later identiied him while watching surveillance footage of the robbery. Newman-Smith was arrested at the shop.

Gray wolf to get more help • Federal wildlife oicials are now under a court order to update a decades-old recovery plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf, a predator that has struggled to regain a foothold in the American Southwest despite millions of dollars of investment in reintroduction eforts. An Arizona judge dismissed on Tuesday the concerns of ranchers and others and

From news services

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“Certain Women” is set in the state of Montana, what is the state capital of Montana? Winners will be selected at random from all entries. No purchase necessary. While supplies last. One admit-two pass per person. See passes for additional details. Rated R for some language.

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people spoke against the settlement at the hearing, among them people who sold their vehicles and objected that the new owner would get a windfall in the deal. The scandal erupted in September 2015 when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Volkswagen had fitted many of its cars with software to fool emissions tests, putting dirty vehicles on the road. Car owners and the U.S. Department of Justice sued. The software recognized when the cars were being tested on a treadmill and turned on pollution controls. The controls were turned off when the cars returned to the road. The EPA alleged the scheme let the cars pump out more

than 40 times the allowable limit of nitrogen oxide, which can cause respiratory problems in people. Robert Giuffra, an attorney for Volkswagen, said the deal included compromises but provides “massive relief” to consumers. “This settlement is something that I think is very good for consumers,” he said. “It’s good for the environment, and it’s a way for Volkswagen to regain the trust of its customers, the American people, regulators and do right by the environment.” As of last week, more than 330,000 people had signed up for settlement benefits, with about 3,200 opting out, said Elizabeth Cabraser, lead attorney for the plaintifs.

U.S. citizen born in refugee camp sues to marry Man challenges Louisiana law on birth certiicate, marriage license BY MICHAEL KUNZELMAN associated Press

LAFAYETTE, LA. • Two

weeks before their wedding, Viet “Victor” Anh Vo and his fiancée were stunned when a court clerk rejected their application for a marriage license because he couldn’t produce a birth certificate. The couple had spent thousands of dollars on a wedding planner, caterer, florist, disc jockey and a reception hall for 350 guests before they learned that a newly amended Louisiana law would block them from getting married. They went ahead with February’s ceremony without a license to make it official, but they aren’t giving up on legally tying the knot. Vo, 31, a U.S. citizen who was born in an Indonesian refugee camp, sued Tuesday in federal court to challenge a law that has prevented other immigrants from getting married for the same reason he couldn’t. “I don’t understand the law. I just want them to fix it, to make things right,” Vo said in an interview in his hometown of Lafayette. It’s not clear whether the lawsuit could have implications outside of the state. Neither the law’s critics nor officials with the National Conference of State Legislatures are aware of such legislation elsewhere, although NCSL spokesman Mick Bullock noted that the organization didn’t closely track marriage license requirements. In Louisiana, however, the legislation has pitted the rights of immigrants against lawmakers who say they are trying to prevent fraudulent marriages. The Republican legislator who sponsored January’s changes in the state’s marriage laws said it was designed to crack down on people using sham marriages to gain visas and citizenship. Vo’s suit claims the law violates his constitutional rights and was intended to discriminate against foreign-born people. Vo has lived in Louisiana since he was an infant and became a U.S. citizen when he was 8, but he doesn’t have any official record of his birth in 1985 in a refugee camp after his parents fled Vietnam. Vietnamese and Indonesian authorities didn’t officially recognize his birth or issue his family a birth certificate, he said. That wouldn’t have been an insurmountable hurdle for Vo if he and his U.S.-born fiancée, Heather Pham, had applied for a marriage license before the law’s changes took efect on Jan. 1. Before then, they could have petitioned a judge

to waive the birth certificate requirement. But the amended law eliminated the waiver option for foreign-born applicants, whereas U.S.-born applicants who can’t produce a birth certificate are still eligible for judicial waivers. Vo’s lawsuit says the law imposes a “complex web of new and sometimes unobtainable requirements” on foreign-born applicants beyond birth certificates, such as making them present a passport from their country of birth or an unexpired visa. “Without the court’s intervention, Mr. Vo — and others like him across the state — will continue to sufer irreparable injury from his inability to legally marry in his community, or anywhere in the state, under Louisiana state law,” it says. State Health Secretary Rebekah Gee, whose department compiles marriage licenses and other vital records, and the court clerks for three south Louisiana parishes are among the defendants. Vo is represented by attorneys from the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice and the National Immigration Law Center, a Los Angeles-based group that advocates for immigrants’ rights. Alvaro Huerta, a staf attorney for the latter group, said he didn’t know of any other state with a marriage license law like Louisiana’s. The change in the law was sponsored by state Rep. Valarie Hodges, a Republican, and signed into law last year by then-Gov. Bobby Jindal, also a Republican. During a telephone interview after Vo’s suit was filed, Hodges said she would push for an amendment that would allow foreign-born people who are legally in the U.S. to get married here if they can’t produce a birth certificate. She said it was “basically a technical oversight” that they weren’t eligible for judicial waivers under her legislation. “That was never the intent of this law, to block people who were here legally from getting married,” Hodges said. Hodges said in a statement last week that marriage fraud “was and still is a problem,” citing a recent string of arrests in Mississippi of people accused of plotting to obtain citizenship through sham marriages. She also cited the sham marriage arranged for two terrorists who carried out last December’s deadly attack in San Bernardino, Calif. State Sen. Conrad Appel, a Republican who opposed the measure, said he hadn’t seen any evidence that fraudulent marriage was a problem in Louisiana.


LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 10.19.2016

GOP outraises Democrats in most Missouri races ATTORNEY GENERAL

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Most Republicans

running for statewide oices in Missouri are beating their Democratic foes when it comes to raising money. In reports filed this week with the Missouri Ethics Commission, GOP candidates for attorney general, lieutenant governor, secretary of state and treasurer showed a fundraising lead heading toward the Nov. 8 election. That’s not the case in the race for governor, where Democrat Chris Koster had $6.6 million in his bank account, compared to Republican Eric Greitens’ $2.7 million as of the Sept. 30 reporting deadline. The numbers don’t account for large sums coming in since the end of the period, including a $2.7 million contribution received by Greitens on Monday from the Republican Governors Association. Fueled by mega-donors and political action committees, the Republican candidates are attempting to replace four Democratic statewide officeholders who are vacating their posts, Gov. Jay Nixon, Koster, Secretary of State Jason Kander and Treasurer Clint Zweifel. Here’s a rundown:

Republican Josh Hawley entered the final month of the campaign with $4.3 million in his bank account, compared to Democrat Teresa Hensley, who had $1.1 million. Hawley, who is on leave as a University of Missouri law professor, received most of his largesse from the Republican Attorneys General Association, which is now the subject of a formal complaint filed with the Missouri Ethics Commission. The complaint, filed by St. Louis Alderman Scott Ogilvie, alleges that the GOP group failed to register in Missouri and report its donors. The complaint could be heard by the commission as soon as Friday. Hensley, the former Cass County prosecutor, raised $1.1 million during the filing period, but spent $400,928 as she tries to raise her profile with voters. Most of her money went toward a $283,000 ad blitz that is currently airing across the state. The seat is open because Koster is running for governor.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR Republican state Sen. Mike Parson of Bolivar is leading in fundraising Democrat Russ Carnahan in the race to replace Republican Peter Kinder as lieutenant governor. Parson reported $501,066 after rais-

ing $525,183 during the period. Carnahan, a former member of Congress, raised $306,606 and had $209,793 heading into the final weeks of the campaign. Carnahan outspent Parson during the period, with most of it going toward a $445,000 advertising buy.

SECRETARY OF STATE Democrat Robin Smith, a former TV news anchor from Eureka, and Republican Jay Ashcroft are in a virtual tie when it comes to money left to spend in the stretch run of their campaign to replace Kander, who is running for the U.S. Senate. Ashcroft, the son of former U.S. Attor-

ney General John Ashcroft, reported having $397,129 in his war chest, compared to $349,641 for Smith.

TREASURER Republican Eric Schmitt holds a massive fundraising lead over Democrat Judy Baker in the race to replace Zweifel, who is leaving the post because of term limits. Schmitt, a senator from Glendale, has $2.5 million in his account, compared to $350,314 for Baker, a Columbia resident who was a member of the Missouri House. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

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Neuropathy afects every

part of your life - walking, sitting, and even sleeping. Maybe you’ve had multiple tests, only to ind out no one has any idea what you have. Maybe you’ve been put on a drug with heavy side efects. Hi, I am Dr. Matthew Wise, D.C., Clinic Director at Renuva Back & Pain Centers. I have been helping people with neuropathy and nerve problems for many years now. This painful condition interferes with your body’s ability to transmit More than 20 million Americans sufer from peripheral neuropathy, a problem caused by damage to the nerves that supply your arms and legs.

messages to your muscles, skin, joints, or internal organs. If ignored or mistreated, neuropathy can lead to irreversible health conditions. Often neuropathy is caused by a degenerating spine pressing on the nerve roots. This can happen in any of the vertebral joints from the neck all the way down to the tail bone. What is the Single Most Important Solution to Your Neuropathy? By using gentle techniques in our unique CoreCareTM treatment program, we are able to release the pressure on the nerve. This allows the nerve to heal and the symptoms to go away. Numerous studies have proven the therapies we use can be effective in helping nerve conditions.

2 Treatments Included with Exam

Our CoreCare treatments, which include Class IV Deep Tissue Laser Therapy, work to restore the body’s natural ability without painful shots, harmful drugs or surgery. Cleared by the FDA in 2003, Class IV Laser devices have become the standard of care for many musculoskeletal injuries. Before the FDA would clear the Deep Tissue Laser Therapy for human use, they had to see proof that it worked. This lead to two landmark studies. The irst study showed patients who had laser therapy had 53% better improvement than those who had a placebo. The second study showed patients who used the laser therapy had less pain and more range of motion days after treatment. Here is what one of our patients had to say:

“I’ve fought neuropathy for 10-12 years and it’s physically painful. After two weeks of CoreCare treatments I felt a subtle improvement and now most of the pain, if not all, has gone away. Renuva has been a wonderful experience. The staf are great and I’m always welltended to – it’s really an amazing program.” - Bob W. Will This Treatment Work For You? It’s time for you to ind out if this treatment will be your neuropathy solution. For a few days only, $39

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will get you all the services I normally charge new patients $257 for! What does this ofer include? ● An in-depth consultation about your neuropathy and health where I will listen really listen - to the details of your case. ● A complete neuromuscular examination. ● A full set of digital x-rays (if needed) to determine if a spinal problem is contributing to your pain. ● A thorough analysis of your exam indings so we can start mapping out your plan to being pain free. If you’re not a candidate for CoreCare, I promise to tell you. ● Plus, two treatments so you can so you can experience this amazing therapy and learn if this could be your pain solution

like it has been for so many other patients. Call by October 20th and you can get everything I’ve listed here for only $39. The normal price for this type of evaluation, including digital x-rays is $257, so you’re saving over $200. Call 636-487-0616 by October 20th. Our office is conveniently located just south of I-70 off of Veterans Memorial Parkway between the Cave Springs and Zumbehl Road exits. I look forward to helping you live a happier, healthier life. Dr. Matthew Wise, D.C. 190 Spring Drive, Suite 300 St. Charles, MO 63303

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LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WEDNESDAY • 10.19.2016

GOP outraises Democrats in most Missouri races ATTORNEY GENERAL

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Most Republicans

running for statewide oices in Missouri are beating their Democratic foes when it comes to raising money. In reports filed this week with the Missouri Ethics Commission, GOP candidates for attorney general, lieutenant governor, secretary of state and treasurer showed a fundraising lead heading toward the Nov. 8 election. That’s not the case in the race for governor, where Democrat Chris Koster had $6.6 million in his bank account, compared to Republican Eric Greitens’ $2.7 million as of the Sept. 30 reporting deadline. The numbers don’t account for large sums coming in since the end of the period, including a $2.7 million contribution received by Greitens on Monday from the Republican Governors Association. Fueled by mega-donors and political action committees, the Republican candidates are attempting to replace four Democratic statewide officeholders who are vacating their posts, Gov. Jay Nixon, Koster, Secretary of State Jason Kander and Treasurer Clint Zweifel. Here’s a rundown:

Republican Josh Hawley entered the final month of the campaign with $4.3 million in his bank account, compared to Democrat Teresa Hensley, who had $1.1 million. Hawley, who is on leave as a University of Missouri law professor, received most of his largesse from the Republican Attorneys General Association, which is now the subject of a formal complaint filed with the Missouri Ethics Commission. The complaint, filed by St. Louis Alderman Scott Ogilvie, alleges that the GOP group failed to register in Missouri and report its donors. The complaint could be heard by the commission as soon as Friday. Hensley, the former Cass County prosecutor, raised $1.1 million during the filing period, but spent $400,928 as she tries to raise her profile with voters. Most of her money went toward a $283,000 ad blitz that is currently airing across the state. The seat is open because Koster is running for governor.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR Republican state Sen. Mike Parson of Bolivar is leading in fundraising Democrat Russ Carnahan in the race to replace Republican Peter Kinder as lieutenant governor. Parson reported $501,066 after rais-

LAW & ORDER DELLWOOD > Man who stabbed himself, vanished is found safe • A man who disappeared from a Dellwood home after stabbing himself early Saturday morning has been found safe. Police released few details about the man’s discovery Tuesday, saying only that he was located and was safe. The incident happened at 3 a.m. in the 1600 block of Mowbry Lane. St. Louis County police said the man left the home after stabbing himself in the abdomen. They issued an alert for him later in the day. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Remains are identified • The skeletal remains found

behind a church last week were identified Tuesday as a missing man who had been diagnosed with dementia. Ivory O. Kelly, 64, was last seen leaving his residence on the 3000 block of Churchill Drive near Florissant on Aug. 1, according to St. Louis County police. On Oct. 12, a group of lawn care workers found skeletal remains behind the Lutheran Church of the Living Christ, 2725 Concord Drive. Police identified the victim as Kelly on Tuesday. Police said Kelly’s death does not appear to be suspicious, but the investigation is ongoing.

ing $525,183 during the period. Carnahan, a former member of Congress, raised $306,606 and had $209,793 heading into the final weeks of the campaign. Carnahan outspent Parson during the period, with most of it going toward a $445,000 advertising buy.

SECRETARY OF STATE Democrat Robin Smith, a former TV news anchor from Eureka, and Republican Jay Ashcroft are in a virtual tie when it comes to money left to spend in the stretch run of their campaign to replace Kander, who is running for the U.S. Senate. Ashcroft, the son of former U.S. Attor-

ney General John Ashcroft, reported having $397,129 in his war chest, compared to $349,641 for Smith.

TREASURER Republican Eric Schmitt holds a massive fundraising lead over Democrat Judy Baker in the race to replace Zweifel, who is leaving the post because of term limits. Schmitt, a senator from Glendale, has $2.5 million in his account, compared to $350,314 for Baker, a Columbia resident who was a member of the Missouri House. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

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BEFORE • Gutter Protection • Gutters • Downspouts

• Keeps out leaves & debris • The irst. The best. America’s #1 Choice! • No more dangerous ladders • Installs over new or existing gutters • Prevents structural damage • Lifetime transferable warranty

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Call now for the PERMANENT SOLUTION!

(314) 786-3670 • (618) 223-5603 www.nomoreladders.com PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Dr. Matthew Wise, D.C., Clinic Director

Do You Suffer from

Neuropathy? If you sufer from any of these tortuous symptoms – numbness, tingling, or sharp nerve pain – then the facts below may be the most important you have ever read. By Dr. Matthew Wise, D.C. Renuva Back & Pain Centers

Neuropathy afects every

part of your life - walking, sitting, and even sleeping. Maybe you’ve had multiple tests, only to ind out no one has any idea what you have. Maybe you’ve been put on a drug with heavy side efects. Hi, I am Dr. Matthew Wise, D.C., Clinic Director at Renuva Back & Pain Centers. I have been helping people with neuropathy and nerve problems for many years now. This painful condition interferes with your body’s ability to transmit More than 20 million Americans sufer from peripheral neuropathy, a problem caused by damage to the nerves that supply your arms and legs.

messages to your muscles, skin, joints, or internal organs. If ignored or mistreated, neuropathy can lead to irreversible health conditions. Often neuropathy is caused by a degenerating spine pressing on the nerve roots. This can happen in any of the vertebral joints from the neck all the way down to the tail bone. What is the Single Most Important Solution to Your Neuropathy? By using gentle techniques in our unique CoreCareTM treatment program, we are able to release the pressure on the nerve. This allows the nerve to heal and the symptoms to go away. Numerous studies have proven the therapies we use can be effective in helping nerve conditions.

2 Treatments Included with Exam

Our CoreCare treatments, which include Class IV Deep Tissue Laser Therapy, work to restore the body’s natural ability without painful shots, harmful drugs or surgery. Cleared by the FDA in 2003, Class IV Laser devices have become the standard of care for many musculoskeletal injuries. Before the FDA would clear the Deep Tissue Laser Therapy for human use, they had to see proof that it worked. This lead to two landmark studies. The irst study showed patients who had laser therapy had 53% better improvement than those who had a placebo. The second study showed patients who used the laser therapy had less pain and more range of motion days after treatment. Here is what one of our patients had to say:

“I’ve fought neuropathy for 10-12 years and it’s physically painful. After two weeks of CoreCare treatments I felt a subtle improvement and now most of the pain, if not all, has gone away. Renuva has been a wonderful experience. The staf are great and I’m always welltended to – it’s really an amazing program.” - Bob W. Will This Treatment Work For You? It’s time for you to ind out if this treatment will be your neuropathy solution. For a few days only, $39

Exam Includes: Consultation, Digital X-Rays (if needed) & 2 Treatments (normally $257)

Call

will get you all the services I normally charge new patients $257 for! What does this ofer include? ● An in-depth consultation about your neuropathy and health where I will listen really listen - to the details of your case. ● A complete neuromuscular examination. ● A full set of digital x-rays (if needed) to determine if a spinal problem is contributing to your pain. ● A thorough analysis of your exam indings so we can start mapping out your plan to being pain free. If you’re not a candidate for CoreCare, I promise to tell you. ● Plus, two treatments so you can so you can experience this amazing therapy and learn if this could be your pain solution

like it has been for so many other patients. Call by October 20th and you can get everything I’ve listed here for only $39. The normal price for this type of evaluation, including digital x-rays is $257, so you’re saving over $200. Call 636-487-0616 by October 20th. Our office is conveniently located just south of I-70 off of Veterans Memorial Parkway between the Cave Springs and Zumbehl Road exits. I look forward to helping you live a happier, healthier life. Dr. Matthew Wise, D.C. 190 Spring Drive, Suite 300 St. Charles, MO 63303

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10.19.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016


10.19.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11


M 1 WedneSday • 10.19.2016 • a12

Centene subsidiary awarded expanded Medicaid contract By SaManTHa LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Centene Corp. will expand its presence in Missouri starting in May 2017. The Clayton-based company will soon manage the health care of Missouri’s Medicaid recipients in every county. Currently, Centene’s subsidiary, Home State Health Plan, manages the health insurance for low-income individuals in 54 counties. Now, Centene will have access to Medicaid members in all 114 counties and St. Louis, according to a statement the company released Tuesday. “With our global headquarters in Clayton, Mo., Centene is particularly pleased about this opportunity to expand our health care services across the state of Missouri, reaching families in each of the state’s 114 counties, and the city of St. Louis,” said Michael Neidorff, chairman, president and CEO of Centene.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Beginning in May 2017, Centene, based in Clayton, will manage the health care of Missouri’s Medicaid recipients in every county and the city of St. Louis.

Tampa, Fla.-based WellCare also received notice from Missouri that its subsidiary, Missouri Care, was awarded a statewide contract to expand its services to Medicaid re-

cipients. UnitedHealthcare of the Midwest Inc. was awarded the third contract, according to bid documents with the state, beating out Aetna Bet-

ter Health of Missouri, which was not awarded an expanded contract. Aetna Better Health of Missouri currently serves Medicaid members in the same counties as Centene’s Home State Health Plan and Missouri Care. Aetna has the most Medicaid members in its plans, compared with Centene’s and WellCare’s subsidiaries. As of June 30, Aetna had 274,742 members in three regions. Home State Health Plan had 103,822 members and Missouri Care had 116,819, according to data with the state. “Aetna Better Health of Missouri is disappointed by the news that we received on Friday afternoon and we are currently reviewing the scoring and will evaluate our options,” said Anjie Coplin, director of communications for Aetna. Samantha Liss • 314-340-8017 @samanthann on Twitter sliss@post-dispatch.com

Fed’s regional boards ramp up call for a rate increase BLOOMBeRG

The boards of directors at nine of the 12 regional Federal Reserve banks last month sought an increase in the rate on direct loans from the Fed to 1.25 percent from 1 percent, according to minutes released Tuesday by the U.S. central bank. The Atlanta Fed joined the calls for an increase in the discount rate, pushing the number of regional banks asking for a hike to its highest since December 2015. That month was the last time the Fed

raised the federal funds rate, a separate interest rate that is its primary policy tool. Discount rate votes can be viewed as a signal of whether a bank’s president favors a change in the main rate. “Most directors noted tighter U.S. labor markets across skill levels and different sectors, accompanied by upward pressures on compensation for many categories of workers,” according to the minutes. Most directors recommended the increase “in light of actual and expected

strengthening in economic activity and labor markets, which should foster a gradual return of inflation to 2 percent over the medium term.” Atlanta joined Boston, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Richmond, St. Louis, Kansas City, Dallas, and San Francisco in asking for a discount rate increase. Those banks are home to all four regional presidents, including the St. Louis Fed’s James Bullard, who currently hold rotating votes in the policymaking Federal Open Market Committee. The boards of the New York,

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Minneapolis and Chicago Feds voted to keep the rate unchanged. Of the presidents from those banks, only New York’s William Dudley has a vote on policy. The discount rate is the interest rate charged to banks and depository institutions for loans received from Fed’s lending facility. The Board of Governors in Washington must approve any change in the discount rate. They didn’t approve any change when they met in September and have left it at 1 percent since December.

$120 million in bonds approved for work on NGA site By JaCOB BaRKeR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The St. Louis Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority on Tuesday authorized up to $120 million in bonds to finance site preparation for the new headquarters of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. The bonds will pay for acquiring property, environmental remediation, infrastructure and other work in order to deliver the 100-acre site in north St. Louis to the federal government next year. The NGA plans to build a new, $1.7 billion western headquarters at the intersection of Cass and Jeferson avenues to replace its aging facility on the south St. Louis riverfront. Paying off the principal and interest on the bonds will be the annual $1.5 million pledged by St. Louis in earnings taxes generated from the 3,100 NGA employees. NGA employees currently pay about $2 million to the city per year from the 1 percent earnings tax, a number oicials expect to grow. The state of Missouri has pledged $131 million for the project, and it will make annual bond payments of some $5.75 million by diverting state income tax payments from NGA employees. The bonds are expected to be paid off before their 30-year maturity, bond attorneys told the city’s LCRA board Tuesday. Almost five months after NGA made it official it would stay in St. Louis rather than move to a site near Scott Air Force Base, St. Louis has already acquired title to most of the 551 parcels in the NGA project footprint, some through eminent domain. Some of the initial bond proceeds will go to pay of two $10 million credit lines the city used to finance initial site activities and property acquisition. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

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MARKET WATCH

10.19.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS U.S. stocks closed solidly higher Tuesday after a variety of companies reported strong third-quarter results. Health insurers made some of the largest gains. Chemical and mining companies also made substantial gains. Bond prices rose and yields fell sharply.

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TACO

Close: $13.74 1.11 or 8.8% The restaurant chain raised its annual profit and revenue projections after it reported solid sales in the third quarter. $14

Close: $118.79 18.99 or 19.0% The streaming video company reported strong international subscriber growth, and its U.S. results were better than expected. $140 120 80

J

A S 52-week range

O

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

18,400

Dow Jones industrials

18,160

Close: 18,161.94 Change: 75.54 (0.4%)

Vol.: 4.5m (10.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $521.79 m

PE: 371.2 Yield: ...

$165

$145

160

140

155

135

150

O

J

A S 52-week range

$14.56

$116.90

PE: ... Yield: ...

Vol.: 12.7m (3.8x avg.) PE: 12.3 Mkt. Cap: $144.06 b Yield: 3.7%

$165.00

S&P 500

2,140

Close: 2,139.60 Change: 13.10 (0.6%)

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Dec 16 Nov 16 Dec 16

353.75 972.50 420

-.25 -5.75 -3.75

Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

2,200

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

18,400

2,150

Feeder cattle

18,000

2,100

Live cattle

17,600

2,050

17,200

2,000

Oct 16 Oct 16 Dec 16 Oct 16 Oct 16

122.02 97.75 41.12 14.73 209.80

+.32 +.48 -.48 +.02 -.15

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Dec 16 Dec 16 Jan 17

71.15 158.75 28.56

-.04 +1.65 +.08

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Nov 16 Nov 16 Nov 16 Nov 16

50.29 1.5057 156.86 3.263

Hogs

A

M

J

J

S

1,950

O

Copper

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

Coffee

StocksRecap Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

A

Milk

NYSE

NASD

3,050 2,746 2292 710 66 22

1,410 1,369 1779 987 47 67

HIGH 18223.80 8087.90 662.33 10583.83 5264.27 2144.38 1532.68 22295.02 1222.20

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

LOW 18129.45 8005.00 652.75 10539.80 5239.44 2135.49 1524.06 22200.41 1211.29

CLOSE 18161.94 8008.56 660.91 10567.81 5243.84 2139.60 1527.17 22242.95 1217.30

CHG. +75.54 -0.97 +5.50 +74.95 +44.02 +13.10 +8.98 +143.06 +7.17

%CHG. WK +0.42% s -0.01% t +0.84% s +0.71% s +0.85% t +0.62% s +0.59% s +0.65% s +0.59% t

MO QTR s t s s t t s t s s t t s t t t t s

YTD +4.23% +6.66% +14.38% +4.18% +4.72% +4.68% +9.19% +5.08% +7.17%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

Aegion Allied Health Amdocs Ameren American Railcar Arch Coal Belden Inc Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres CassInfo Centene Commerce Banc. Edgewell Emerson Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts Foresight Energy

AEGN AHPI DOX AEE ARII ARCH BDC BBW CAL CASS CNC CBSH EPC EMR ENR EFSC ESE ESRX FELP

52-WK LO HI 16.00 0.50 50.06 41.33 36.18 59.05 36.51 10.01 21.27 45.05 47.36 37.44 67.94 41.25 28.86 25.01 31.50 65.55 1.07

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

22.41 1.40 61.33 54.08 57.93 70.14 75.91 18.69 31.75 58.64 75.57 51.30 88.00 56.82 53.41 33.37 47.39 89.20 7.91

18.77 .98 59.61 48.91 39.05 69.87 67.33 10.85 25.40 53.89 61.41 48.52 76.99 49.88 48.77 32.45 44.90 70.31 4.34

+.24 -.02 +.05 +.73 ... +.81 +.02 -.10 -.32 -.23 +1.68 +.37 +.29 +.19 +.90 -.05 +.05 +1.09 +.06

+1.3 -2.0 +0.1 +1.5 ... +1.2 ... -0.9 -1.2 -0.4 +2.8 +0.8 +0.4 +0.4 +1.9 -0.2 +0.1 +1.6 +1.4

TKR

-2.8 -0.2 20 ... FutureFuel -12.3 -20.0 dd ... Huttig Building Prod +9.2 +3.2 18 0.78 Isle of Capri +13.1 +14.6 19 1.70 LMI Aerospace -15.6 -12.6 8 1.60 Lee Ent +10.9+1617.1 ... Mallinckrodt +41.2 +33.3 15 0.20 Monsanto Co -11.4 -38.6 16 ... Olin -5.3 -14.2 13 0.28 Panera Bread +4.7 +9.2 26 0.88 Peak Resorts -6.7 +5.8 16 ... Perficient +14.1 +17.9 18 0.90b -1.8 -7.8 22 ... Post Holdings +4.3 +11.9 17 1.90 ReinsGrp +43.2 +14.6 24 1.00 Reliv +14.5 +28.6 15 0.44f Spire Inc +24.2 +21.6 25 0.32 Stifel Financial -19.6 -16.2 17 ... SunEdison Semi +22.9 -34.9 dd 0.68m WldPntTm

-11.3 +66.1 +22.3 -31.3 +40.0 +0.4 +15.5 +16.7 +3.1 -28.9 +18.1 +31.1 +21.4 -1.9 +10.2 -5.6 +2.8 +12.3

9 5 16 dd 6 23 46 32 dd 24 dd 12 18 16 15

0.24 ... ... ... ... ... 2.16 0.80 ... 0.55 ... ... 1.48 ... 1.96 ... ... 1.20

$144.48

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

+.35 +.0133 +1.25 +.019

Silver

.38 .38 .13

+6.40 +.16 +10.30

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.33 .47 .64 .81 1.24 1.74 2.50

+0.03 +0.03 ... -0.01 -0.01 -0.03 -0.02

... .11 .21 .59 1.34 2.02 2.88

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

CHG

CLOSE

1260.80 17.59 943.00

Gold

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 1.74 percent on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

.0658 .7627 .3119 1.2192 .7619 .1484 1.0997 .0150 .2613 .009629 .052980 .0158 .0708 .000880 1.0111

PreciousMetals

Platinum

3.50 3.50 3.25

PREV

.0658 .7666 .3142 1.2297 .7623 .1485 1.0977 .0150 .2614 .009626 .053706 .0159 .0719 .000889 1.0100

NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

FF 9.77 16.08 11.58 +.04 +0.3 -14.2 HBP 3.01 7.00 5.54 +.04 +0.7 +45.8 ISLE 10.62 23.32 21.63 -.13 -0.6 +55.3 LMIA 7.01 10.96 7.32 +.09 +1.2 -27.3 LEE 1.15 3.92 2.92 -.08 -2.7 +73.8 MNK 50.90 85.83 64.17 -.79 -1.2 -14.0 MON 83.73 114.26 102.67 +.50 +0.5 +4.2 OLN 12.29 26.46 21.12 +.44 +2.1 +22.4 PNRA 165.17 224.15 192.21 +1.02 +0.5 -1.3 SKIS 2.60 7.70 4.85 -.05 -1.0 -19.3 PRFT 15.46 22.66 18.84 -.07 -0.4 +10.0 POST 50.93 89.00 81.36 +1.68 +2.1 +31.9 RGA 76.96 111.08 110.03 +.38 +0.3 +28.6 RELV 4.11 55.37 4.40 +.14 +3.3 -84.5 SR 54.33 71.21 61.70 +.40 +0.7 +3.9 SF 25.00 47.17 38.40 +.20 +0.5 -9.3 SEMI 3.24 11.71 11.55 +.02 +0.2 +47.3 WPT 11.79 16.49 15.03 -.02 -0.1 +12.2

O

Vol.: 9.8m (3.4x avg.) PE: 22.4 Mkt. Cap: $136.56 b Yield: 1.7%

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

A S 52-week range

$107.51

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest

J

ExchangeRates

CHICAGO BOT

18,800

16,800

130

O

Futures

2,200

2,080

10 DAYS

A S 52-week range

$8.37

$133.27

Vol.: 41.9m (4.4x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $50.93 b

J

UNH

Close: $143.39 9.26 or 6.9% The largest U.S. health insurer disclosed a bigger-than-expected profit and raised its annual forecast.

12 10

UnitedHealth

IBM

Close: $150.72 -4.05 or -2.6% Analysts said the technology and consulting company’s profit margins were weak in the third quarter.

100

$79.95

17,920

Del Taco Restaurants

NFLX

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.05 +0.01

Barclays LongT-BdIdx

2.14

Barclays USAggregate

2.07 -0.02 2.27

Barclays US High Yield 6.13

...

... 2.66 ... 7.61

Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.52 -0.04 3.92

Barclays CompT-BdIdx

1.22

Barclays US Corp

2.89 -0.03 3.35

... 1.29

MarketSummary Biggest Gainers ($2 or more)

Biggest Losers ($2 or more)

Most Active ($1 or more)

NAME

EX

CLOSE

CHG

%CHG

NAME

EX

CLOSE

CHG

%CHG

NAME

EX VOL (000s) CLOSE

MakeMyTrip Ltd Navios Maritime pfG Navios Mari Hldg pfH Ritter Pharmaceutic Del Taco Rests wt Eleven Biotherap

NA NY NY NA NA NA

29.45 6.63 6.45 2.30 5.03 2.44

+9.05 +1.43 +1.27 +.43 +.93 +.40

+44.4 +27.5 +24.5 +23.0 +22.6 +19.6

Banc of Calif Moleculin Biotech Essa Pharma Inc Immucell Cp HTG Molecular Diag Pernix Therapeutics

NY NA NA NA NA NA

11.26 2.41 2.10 6.65 2.63 3.58

-4.61 -.45 -.36 -1.13 -.37 -.50

-29.0 -15.7 -14.7 -14.5 -12.3 -12.3

Oasis Petroleum Bank of America Sprint Corp Netflix Inc Ford Motor Chesapk Engy

NY NY NY NA NY NY

68,369 67,114 44,958 39,663 38,572 37,275

10.57 16.26 6.86 118.79 11.89 6.52

CHG -.66 +.21 -.06 +18.99 +.01 +.17

NY = NYSE; NA = Nasdaq; MKT = NYSE Mkt Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Trading gains lift Goldman Sachs’ proits • Goldman Sachs’ earnings soared in the third quarter, driven largely by trading and investment gains. The results easily surpassed analysts’ estimates. The New York-based company said Tuesday that it earned $2.1 billion, or $4.88 per share, up from $1.33 billion, or $2.90 per share, in the same period a year earlier. Wall Street analysts were expecting Goldman to earn $3.82 a share, according to FactSet. While the irm’s investment banking division reported lat revenue, Goldman’s trading desks and the division where it invests its own money did exceptionally well. Revenue in Goldman’s ixed income, currencies and commodities division jumped 34 percent to $1.96 billion. UnitedHealth tops expectations • UnitedHealth Group Inc., the largest U.S. health insurer, reported betterthan-expected quarterly proit and revenue. The company also increased its forecast for 2016 adjusted net earnings to about $8.00 per share, from $7.80-$7.95. UnitedHealth’s net earnings attributable to shareholders rose to $1.97 billion, or $2.03 per share, in the third quarter ended Sept. 30, from $1.60 billion or $1.65 per share, a year earlier. On an adjusted basis the health insurer earned $2.17 per share, beating average estimate of $2.08, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S. Total revenue rose to $46.29 billion from $41.49 billion, slightly above analysts’ estimate of $46.09 billion. Hyundai issues air bag-related recall • Hyundai is recalling more than 84,000 cars in the U.S. because a wiring problem can cause the front passenger air bag to malfunction. The recall covers Genesis coupes from the 2010 to 2016 model years. The company says in government documents that an electrical connector for the passenger seat air bag sensor can become disconnected. That can cause the air bag to inlate when a child is in the seat or deploy with too

little force to protect an adult. In both cases, passengers could be hurt. Hyundai says it has no reports of injuries. Consumer prices rose 0.3 percent in September • Higher energy costs fueled U.S. consumer prices in September, but overall inlation remained in check as it has for the past several years. The Labor Department said Tuesday that consumer prices increased 0.3 percent last month. Much of that rise stemmed from energy, housing and prescription drugs. Energy costs surged 2.9 percent in September as oil and gasoline prices rebounded from recent lows. Previous price declines still mean that gas costs 6.4 percent less than a year ago. Inlation has stayed relatively low despite job growth that has brought more workers into the economy. Until last month, the modest levels of inlation largely came from muted oil prices and a stronger dollar. Perdue sells ‘No Antibiotics Ever’ chicken locally • Perdue Farms this week began marketing its chicken products in St. Louis and four other cities as antibiotic free, part of the poultry processor’s push to cut antibiotic use and boost proits. Perdue is not increasing prices as a result of this shift, said spokeswoman Andrea Staub. Perdue’s larger rivals such as Tyson Foods and Pilgrim’s Pride also have set goals for reducing antibiotic use on animals. Massachusetts to stop using Wells Fargo • The state of Massachusetts will stop using Wells Fargo & Co. as a bond underwriter for one year, joining a growing list of state and local governments to suspend business with the bank after revelations it opened millions of unauthorized accounts. Other states that have stopped doing business with Wells Fargo include California, Illinois and Ohio. From staf and wire reports

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2139.60 10631.55 7000.06 23394.39 4508.91 48106.12 16963.61 63782.22 14752.25 8074.69

CHG

CHG

YTD

+13.10 +127.98 +52.51 +356.85 +58.68 +448.79 +63.49 +1086.10 +155.73 +73.73

+0.62% +1.22% +0.76% +1.55% +1.32% +0.94% +0.38% +1.73% +1.07% +0.92%

+4.68% -1.04% +12.14% +6.75% -3.60% +11.93% -10.88% +47.13% +13.39% -8.43%

Merrill Lynch ined $2.8 million for inaccurate iscal reporting Bank of America irm gave regulators errant information on trades REUTERS

NEW YORK • The Financial In-

dustry Regulatory Authority fined Bank of America’s Merrill Lynch $2.8 million on Tuesday for what it called systemic violations in record-keeping and how the firm reported trades and order audit trail system data. The allegations involve trade and order audit data that brokerages submit to FINRA, and which the regulator uses to detect, among other things, possible market manipulation. Merrill Lynch neither admitted nor denied the charges, but consented to FINRA’s findings and agreed to pay the fine.

FINRA accused Merrill Lynch of submitting millions of inaccurate trades, some which listed purchases as sales, broker-dealer trade orders filed as customer orders, inaccurate or incomplete order events and audit data, and several million orders it just did not need to submit, among other things. The problematic reports and record-keeping errors, which afected hundreds of millions of trades, orders and accounts from 2010 to 2015, occurred because of a system configuration error, according to regulatory documents. Bank of America spokesman Bill Halldin said that the firm has

been “working with regulators to improve our processes and systems to address these issues.” The Wall Street regulator claims reporting issues like these make it harder to detect other wrongdoing and can create false red flags, which the agency then has to chase down. “A critical component of market integrity is the ability … to rely on the accuracy of information reported by broker-dealers,” FINRA head of market regulation Thomas Gira said. FINRA said that $1.45 million of the total fine is for books and records violations, one of the highest fines for that type of violation handed down this year.

Ernst & Young to pay $11.8 million to settle charges of ‘failed audits’ SEC says inancial services irm’s reviews disregarded ‘red lags’ REUTERS

Ernst & Young will pay $11.8 million to settle charges over “failed audits” of oil services company Weatherford International, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said on Tuesday. An Ernst & Young partner who coordinated the audits and a former tax partner who was part of the audit team were also charged in the SEC’s order, the agency said in a statement. Under the settlement, both agreed to suspensions from working as accountants in SECrelated matters. The two “disregarded significant red flags during the audits and reviews,” the SEC said.

The charges followed a $140 million penalty on Weatherford announced last month to settle charges it inflated earnings in its 2007-2010 financial statements. Weatherford, which had been promoting its favorable tax rate to analysts, restated its earnings in 2011. Ernst & Young neither admitted nor denied the SEC findings. “Audit quality is central to EY and all of our stakeholders,” said Ernst & Young spokeswoman Amy Call Well in a statement. “Since the time of the Weatherford audits, and as referenced in the SEC Order, EY has taken significant steps in improving audit quality.” The SEC found that Ernst &

Young classified Weatherford audits as high-risk but repeatedly failed to detect the company’s fraud until it had continued for more than four years. The Ernst & Young audit team knew of accounting adjustments that Weatherford was making to significantly lower the amount it set aside at the end of each year for income taxes, but the auditors relied on Weatherford’s “unsubstantiated explanations” instead of performing required audit procedures to scrutinize Weatherford’s accounting, the SEC said. Weatherford became an Ernst & Young client in 2001, quickly gaining a reputation as a “particularly risky and difficult client,” according to the SEC settlement.


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

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NATION

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

“his is the irst time I’ve really said to myself, ‘I can’t cover this election like I want to because it’s not school-appropriate.’ ” KRIS GOLDSTEIN • TOKay HIGH sCHOOL In LOdI, CaLIF.

Teaching moment? Not this election BY MORIAH BALINGIT Washington Post

Social studies teachers have long used presidential elections to provide engaging, real-time lessons about democracy, helping them bring to life what students read in textbooks about American politics, history and civics. But this election cycle, unique in so many ways, also has proved to be a dicey challenge for classroom consumption, with teachers struggling to explain and dissect developments that have at times been far too lurid for young minds. Just the language of the campaign — including allegations of sexual assault, lewd comments about women, attacks on each candidate’s supporters — would be the kind of talk that would land a child in the principal’s oice. “This is the first time I’ve really said to myself, ‘I can’t cover this election like I want to because it’s not school-appropriate,’” said Kris Goldstein, who teaches government to seniors at Tokay High School in Lodi, Calif. It was a realization he had after Republican nominee Donald Trump attacked a critic by urging people to watch her sex tape. “There’s certain things I don’t want to be talking about.” Many teachers say they have shifted their lesson plans to keep things G-rated and to ease anxiety among minority and immigrant students, some of whom feel they are in the line of fire. Some teachers avoid classroom discussion of the election altogether; others say their students are too captivated to avoid it. They want to assign students to watch the third presidential debate Wednesday night, but they also fear what their students may see and hear. At the most recent presidential debate, in St. Louis, audience member Patrice Brock noted that much of the back-and-forth could be rated for “mature audiences,” and she asked Trump and

ASSOCIATED PRESS

GOP nominee Donald Trump speaks in Green Bay, Wis., on Monday.

The presidential debates have provided important teaching moments — but not in the way she would have hoped. Her students noticed that the candidates interrupted each other, Osborne said: “They picked up pretty quickly that’s not how we would do things in our classroom.” And some teachers say the lack of substance in the presidential campaign has been frustrating. Goldstein, in California, asked his students to watch the debate, identify four policy issues and then write each candidate’s stance on them. Several students found they couldn’t complete the assignment, and Goldstein couldn’t blame them: There wasn’t much national policy to analyze. Many civics teachers remain nonpartisan in the classroom and urge their students to do their own research and exploration to develop their views. But now they also have to underscore that children should not necessarily emulate — or even repeat the talking points of — certain candidates. Teachers have cautioned their students against speaking disrespectfully about any group, whether it be emulating Trump by calling Mexicans “rapists” and drug dealers, or parroting Clinton, who called some Trump

Hillary Clinton whether they feel they’re “modeling appropriate and positive behavior for today’s youth,” noting that some teachers assign the debates as homework. Brock, 42, of Eureka, said in an interview that her question arose from concern for her nieces — ages 12 and 15 — who have been watching the debates. Brock said those who sought public office should be role models for children, but the acrimony and lack of manners in the first presidential debate disturbed her. “I want our kids to think that our president is cool — and that they’re good,” Brock said. At Burgundy Farm Country Day in Alexandria, Va., Scout Osborne, who teaches a class of fourth- and fifth-graders, asked students to watch 15 minutes of the debate with their families as homework. She also told parents that they could screen the debate ahead of time and pick which 15 minutes students would watch to avoid inappropriate topics. The election has proved deeply polarizing among her young students, who started the school year bickering about politics in the classroom. She decided to turn the election into an extended lesson on how to “argue respectfully,” including listening to classmates without interrupting and not raising their voices.

supporters “deplorables.” “The challenge that this election has presented is that sometimes the things that are said during the course of the campaign occasionally will conflict with how I like my students to conduct themselves in class, especially with regards to treating each other respectfully,” said Michael Palermo, who teaches government at Yorktown High School in Arlington, Va. “If you’re going to express your views in class, you have to do so in way that is respectful of your classmates and doesn’t demean any individual or any group.” In a post on his blog, where he gave tips for how to teach the election, Palermo said he would still treat a student chanting “Build a wall!” at a group of Hispanic students as bullying, even though it has become a regular chorus at Trump rallies. “Just because it’s part of the political discourse now doesn’t make it any more acceptable,” Palermo said. Teachers cite Trump’s stances on immigration as raising anxiety among immigrant students who fear they could be deported should he be elected president, and Palermo said what they were hearing was “trauma-inducing” to some students. It was such a concern among teachers in Arlington — an overwhelmingly Democratic stronghold with a growing population of immigrant students — that the school system organized a professional development session on how to help teachers whose students might be unsettled. Teachers aiming to elevate the conversation and to focus on the issues are grappling, too, with whether to address comments by the Republican nominee captured in a leaked videotape in which he spoke of groping women. Shannon Geraghty, a teacher at Forest Park High in Woodbridge, Va., said she picked up a copy of the New York Daily News the

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day after the scandal broke and noted that the tabloid’s headline — “GRAB THEM BY THE P--Y,” with images of cats filling the space between the ‘P’ and the ‘Y’ — might be of-limits for the classroom. “When I couldn’t even bring in the newspaper to show my students, that’s just a diferent level, a diferent low,” Geraghty said. Presidential politics has at times been too prurient for the classroom, but rarely during a campaign. Palermo started his teaching career just as the news of President Bill Clinton’s afair with a White House intern was unfolding. He found it diicult to ignore in class when Clinton faced impeachment, but he said he managed to avoid the racier aspects of the story, instead focusing on the mechanics of impeaching a president. For other teachers, the election has proved too polarizing and too juvenile. Mary Akeley, a fifthgrade teacher at Burgundy Farms Country Day, decided to shift from contemporaneous elections and instead focus on elections in the Iroquois nation. And although the election has proven a challenging topic, some teachers admit its unusual nature has had a positive side effect: Students are enthralled in ways teachers have never seen. Geraghty said one student hosted a debate-watching party for his classmates; another came to school early after the first debate, eager to dissect it with her. Osborne said even her most shy students have come out of the woodwork to share their views. Goldstein said he thought an educated citizenry was central to a functioning democracy, but he wishes there were a more civil presidential campaign on which to model it. “It’s not what I would want them to see from our political process, honestly,” Goldstein said. “But it is captivating their attention.”

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

WEDNESDAy • 10.19.2016 • A16 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Diploma deiciencies High school graduation rates are up, but preparedness isn’t.

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higher numbers of underprepared freshissouri ranks among the men mean greater demand for remedial top-performing states in instruction. No wonder the nationwide the nation for boosting high college dropout rate hovers near 50 perschool graduation rates, accent. cording to White House figures released High schools are simply passing the this week. On the face of it, that’s great basic educational burden up the chain to news because the alternative — returnthe college level. Increasingly, university ing to the dropout-factory formula — is professors say they encounter students unacceptable. who cannot read basic texts or compose Missouri has marked steady and dramatic improvement in high school gradua- simple, grammatically correct sentences. It means someone at tion rates during the past the high school level has four years, moving from For states like given those students a 81 percent of students Missouri, student passing grade when it receiving diplomas in underpreparedness wasn’t deserved. the 2010-2011 school Employers must now year to 87.8 percent in matters in terms of question the true worth the 2014-2015 school being able to attract of a high school diploma year. companies that need if they cannot rely on it So why not celebrate as an accurate baromthis achievement with a ready workforce eter of basic skills. The unbridled enthusiasm? to handle complex nation is already flush Our reluctance is production demands. with college graduates based on the fact that who are struggling to test scores for college find employment, givreadiness are either flat ing employers even less of an incentive to or falling nationwide. On the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks, Missouri students treat a high school diploma as a badge of distinction. currently lag behind the national perforFor states like Missouri, student undermance average, and the national average is preparedness matters in terms of being far from inspiring. able to attract companies that need a ready America’s high schools are churning workforce to handle complex production out record numbers of graduates who demands. If employers have to worry still appear unprepared in basic reading, writing and math skills to address the real- about remedial instruction just to ensure their production stays on track, they will world challenges that come with a high gladly choose to be based in other states school degree. or countries where the work force is more “For many students, a high school reliable. diploma is not a passport to opportunity, The terms “college- and career-ready,” it’s a ticket to nowhere,” Michael Cohen, president of Achieve, a national nonprofit, which roll off the tongues of politicians and school superintendents with stunning told National Public Radio. Cohen wants regularity, are meaningless if they don’t higher standards and graduation requireactually apply to the students who proudly ments. don cap and gown to receive their diploThis has broad implications across mas each year. the job and educational spectrum. For junior colleges and four-year universities,

Morality in medicine Technological advances help end medical training with live animals.

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ashington University medical school is weaning itself of the use of cats in medical training after concluding that technological advances in simulators and mannequins reduced the need to use live animals. The transition is a responsible one we can support. The school resisted years of pressure from animals rights groups to use alternative teaching methods and was the last in the country to use animals to train new doctors how to insert breathing tubes. The reason for not changing the training was medically defensible, and patients should appreciate that the university did not cave in to bullying tactics by animal protectionists. Dr. Bo Kennedy, a pediatric emergency specialist with St. Louis Children’s Hospital, has said that the anatomy of a cat’s windpipe most closely mimicked that of a newborn infant. Using cats provided the best training ground for medical students. Any parent who has anxiously waited while a doctor safely inserted a life-saving breathing tube into a newborn’s delicate airway understands the importance of that training. Hostile campaigns by animal rights groups have tried shaming doctors into using less-effective, alternative training methods. The right time to start such a transition is when technological advances permit doctors to simulate medical procedures as precisely as possible using mannequins instead of animals. Intimidation and threats by some animal ethics groups caused some medical schools to lie when answering questions about their teaching methods. The groups often portray scientists and doctors as sadistically using animals in teaching and research labs, but oversight agencies such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture have not found those portrayals to be accurate. Scientific advances and medical training that benefit humans no longer have to come at the expense of animals, and animal experimentation should be avoided whenever possible in favor of alternative research strategies. Most non-human scientific and medical research uses less complex animals, such as rats and mice, which tend not

ROBERT COHEN • P-D

Animal rights activist Adam Ortberg of Washington, D.C., takes part in a rally in front of Washington University in 2012. Activists were calling for an end of the medical school’s use of cats for educating its students. The protest was the end of a weekend convention of animal rights organizers from across the country.

to generate the same levels of protest as procedures involving animals that humans empathize with. Primate research, which is highly controversial, now accounts for less than a half of 1 percent of animal research. It has, nevertheless, led to lifechanging medical advances for serious public health challenges such as a treatment for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease. Safeguards and oversight that ensure animals receive humane treatment in laboratory settings help ease the moral dilemma. Washington University said cats in its training lab will be adopted by medical school employees and that no cats have been injured since the lab opened in 1988. As public awareness increases, and technological developments lead to more lifelike mannequins and simulation devices, the use of live animals almost certainly will decrease. Federal ethical guidelines for the use of humans in research were developed only in 1974. Similar guidelines on animals are long overdue.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS International tension deserves front-page coverage I’m sure there is great interest about the subject of breast-feeding and reporting news for expectant women or those who have recently given birth. That said, the front page of the PostDispatch on Oct. 15 had a brightly colored article that covered at least half of that space on Barnes-Jewish Hospital “providing optimal breast-feeding support.” In view of the recent escalation of Yemeni rebels firing at U.S. warships in the Red Sea, our cruise missile attack of those launch sites, the presence of Iranian warships sent to that area, the Chinese creating fortified islands in the Yellow Sea, and the mass killing of civilians in Syria by Russian planes, one would think that those bellicose actions and possible escalation to the brink of war with Iran would inundate the front page of the paper. The lead article about breast-feeding would have been best presented in another area. Edward Wolfe • Kirkwood

Beneits and hazards of Baby-Friendly initiative Like virtually all pediatricians, I think that strategies to promote breast-feeding are laudable as is the case with the BabyFriendly initiative in maternity hospitals. However, there are associated risks involved that are widely underappreciated. I am aware that “skin to skin” close contact between mothers and their babies as well as bed sharing are encouraged in Baby-Friendly hospitals. In both cases there is a risk of the baby’s nose and mouth being obstructed, leading to life-threatening asphyxiation. Many such infant deaths have been reported in scientific publications in Europe. I personally know of three infant deaths and one near-death in the greater St. Louis area. Although the risk may be low, such deaths or near-deaths are preventable if babies and mothers are closely monitored using noninvasive electronic or other methods. Fatigued mothers in BabyFriendly hospitals should insist that their infants be placed in a crib or other safe place before they plan to go to sleep. Bradley Thach • St. Louis Professor emeritus, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine

Support the police inancially and politically On Friday morning following Officer Blake Snyder’s burial and while raising my front yard American flag to full staff, I reflected on a phrase read in the morning paper about his being an American hero. There cannot be a better individual and profession to deserve that description. He represented not just his profession but more specifically he was representative of the St. Louis region’s police professionals. Having been close to those in the police profession in friendship and in what had been my somewhat related profession, I have witnessed too closely such tragedy. Nothing on my part could approach the anguish I saw in the eyes of family and comrades he left behind. Support the families through donations to BackStoppers and by other means financially and politically. Remember when you are stopped for a speeding ticket or involved in an automobile accident, don’t second-guess that officer but appreciate that the officer could have been risking his or her life to serve you. Mike Brown • Kirkwood

Clinton’s derision of Catholics, evangelicals is revealed Imagine supporting a presidential candidate and then discovering that your preferred candidate and her election team have utter contempt for you and your

dearly held faith-based beliefs. Well, there is no need to resort to your imagination, because a batch of released WikiLeaks emails have torn back the curtain on the religious bigotry of the Hillary Clinton campaign. It is clear: The Clinton team despises Catholics and Christian evangelicals. Among other things, we should ask, what does Clinton’s campaign derision say about her respect for the First Amendment and freedom of religion? In Clinton’s view, her infamous “basket of deplorables” comment seems to include Christians, too. But I have news for her: Those same law-abiding American citizens she arrogantly dismisses as “deplorable” and “irredeemable” have already been deemed to be saved by the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. We don’t want or require Clinton’s imprimatur of governmentsubsidized redemption. But at the very least, she should apologize to Catholics and evangelicals who don’t appreciate her campaign’s ugly comments of religious defamation and intolerance. After all, confession is good for the soul. Larry Blandino • O’Fallon, Mo.

Election ‘rigged’? Only in Trump’s wonderland It’s official: We’ve gone through the looking glass and down a rabbit hole with the headline “Pence: We will abide by results of election” (Oct. 17). Wow, thanks. Spoken like a bona fide banana republic generalissimo. This even as Donald Trump’s pathetic shrieking about election “rigging” continues unabated. I guess we should watch for the grandpas and grandmas who work the polling places to drive home in the Cadillacs they bought with their payoffs. John Terry • Kirkwood

Governor, attorney general should act to protect artifacts Regarding Tony Messenger’s column “Bass Pro billionaire stocks museum with state relics” (Oct. 16): Without a doubt, we should support our state parks and the actions of the state director should not afect our support. However, lending artifacts held in trust for the people of Missouri to a private museum violates the public trust doctrine. The public must now pay a billionaire to see what they own, and there is no guarantee that the artifacts will return to the state in their previous condition. By the state’s own admission, they were lent without compensation and proper review. Both the governor and the attorney general need to take action to protect all Missourians and put the trust back into public trust. Nancy Carver • Kirkwood

Show support, gratitude at Veterans Day parade Every year, St. Louis holds a Veterans Day parade. Every year, there are more participants than attendees. Why is it that people come out in droves for the St. Patrick’s Day parade, the Mardi Gras parade and other events, yet those same people cannot give a day to come out and celebrate and thank our veterans? I challenge the news and television media to promote the Veterans Day parade just as they do other parades. I challenge all St. Louis citizens to come and show their support and gratitude for our men and women who have served and are serving their country. We should join together on Nov. 5 in downtown St. Louis to show how much we appreciate those brave men and women in our military. Kathy Colbeck • Afton Leading knight, Afton Elks No. 2635 Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

10.19.2016 • WEDNESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

COL. T. RIPSNORTER ROOSEVELT • Col. T. Ripsnorter Roosevelt has abandoned reason and argument for unbridled abuse. He is exhausting the vocabulary of epithets and terms of denunciation to express his hatred of President Wilson.He accuses him of cowardice,dishonor,treachery,hypocrisy,bad faith, falsehood, cruelty, disloyalty — everything vile to which a public man can stoop. Access the full item at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Kids Lives Matter Starting with children, we need to discourage segregation of thought. BY KEVIN GORDON

Anxiety and animosity regarding race, gender and inequality are approaching a tipping point. Last month, there was another black person killed by another white police officer. I wish this were an isolated act or a new story, but it’s not; daily, we learn about another horrific act targeting a minority group. And don’t look at social media commentary for a respite; that’s just more of the same, and maybe even worse, since the faceless unaccountability there seems to embolden haters of all types. However, instead of being devastated, we can act. Instead of continuing the divisiveness, we can find commonality, healing and togetherness. We can invoke change that we work together to

facilitate. Instead of arguing whether Black Lives Matter or All Lives Matter, most can agree that Kids Lives Matter. To combat violence and discrimination, we must empower children with cultural competence and incorporate temperance and understanding into our tomorrow. By focusing on youth, we can harness the power of establishing social change so we can move from hating and work toward celebration by cultivating a respectful and appreciative environment. We’ve arrived at a crisis point because of segmentation. Left to our own devices (literally), it is easy for us to be connected only through our electronics, and stay hidden behind screens, where it’s too easy to depersonalize the “other.” It is too easy to

misunderstand when you don’t see actual people on the other side. It’s too easy to reinforce only our narrow viewpoints. I know that Kids Lives Matter and can be the answer; as the owner/director of a multicultural summer camp for children, I’ve seen how direct, early interaction can increase understanding and empathy. I’ve witnessed how kids of various racial, ethnic, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds can live, work and play together. Unlike with most adults, it is easier to challenge kids’ thought processes. Before they become older and less flexible, children can reach their own conclusions and more readily accept, respect and love others. When kids come to camp, we remove those electronic screens and intentionally involve children of diverse

backgrounds with each other. These interactions encompass socio-emotional and physical challenges, forcing them to stretch comfort zones. Indeed, these direct interactions may be the only answer; unless we’re intentional about it, kids are not taught within their school curriculum or elsewhere about cultures beyond the dominant narrative. Kids (and adults) tend to form cliques so they fit in, rather than pushing themselves to stretch uncomfortable cultural, social and sometimes physical boundaries. Because our differences often speak louder than our similarities, this intentionality is key to helping us appreciate our commonalities, thus giving us leeway when differences might be hard. When we’re intentional about

it, like at camp, we see how children can move from fearing difference to embracing it, from gathering based only on surface similarities to going deeper and connecting based on more indepth connections. In this era of segmentation and sequestration, we need to discourage segregation of thought. To move forward powerfully, we need to continue to find answers instead of anger, and engender empowerment instead of resentment. If we focus on bringing kids together to facilitate a better future, we may be alright. We have to do this soon because Kids Lives Matter. Kevin Gordon is the owner/director of Camp Kupugani Multicultural Summer Camp in Leaf River, Ill. He is a former vice president of the American Camp Association Illinois Section.

An open letter to Warren Bufett about Wells Fargo Malfeasance at one of the nation’s largest banks needs to be called out.

Warren Bufett

AP

Warren, where are you?

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trump descends into ideological psychosis Republican nominee is frighteningly unstable under pressure. MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

Given even the lowest expectations, Donald Trump still has the capacity to surprise. In recent days, Trump has sneered at the looks of a woman who accuses him of sexual assault, denigrated the appearance of Hillary Clinton, proposed to drug test his opponent, used his campaign to promote what appears to be a Russian covert operation, asserted that Clinton has held secret meetings with international bankers “to plot the destruction of U.S. sovereignty,” attacked “Saturday Night Live,” promised to jail his opponent and contended that “the whole election is being rigged.” Which means that Trump is sickeningly cruel, boorish, bonkers, subversive, conspiratorial, obsessive, authoritarian and reckless with the reputation of American democracy. This is quite a closing argument for a presidential candidate. I imagine it did not emerge from focus groups. So what does all of this mean? (1) It means that the Republican nominee for president is frighteningly unstable under pressure. He is easily baited, highly sensitive to slights, prone to using faulty information from off the internet, hyperbolic and vengeful. Now imagine those characteristics during a confrontation with China in the South China Sea. (2) It is an indication of the quality of his closest, non-family advisers. Stephen Bannon and Rudy Giuliani are not attempting to keep Trump in check. They are feeding his manias. Trump is completely unmoored from restraining influences, and would be as president. (3) Trump’s closing case is a version, not of movement conservatism or tea party conservatism, but of crackpot conservatism — an alt-right rage against a vast, scheming establishment that includes the liberal media, global financiers and a growing list of women making accusations

of sexual assault. All this was previewed during Trump’s political rise, which included birtherism, vaccine denialism and insinuations of foul play in the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. GOP leaders can hardly pretend to be surprised by this bent given that Trump accused Clinton in May of possible complicity in the death of Vince Foster. (4) It is a further indication (as if we needed it) that Trump has no commitment to the American political system. He is perfectly willing to delegitimize democratic institutions as a campaign tactic, squandering a civic inheritance he does not value. Even before his current troubles, he

Trump is sickeningly cruel, boorish, bonkers, subversive, conspiratorial, obsessive, authoritarian and reckless with the reputation of American democracy. said that an electoral loss would be prima facie evidence of fraud and encouraged supporters to monitor majority-black polling stations in Pennsylvania. Now he is entering uncharted territory. By pre-emptively questioning the legitimacy of his forthcoming shellacking, Trump is stepping outside the four corners of the constitutional order, on the model of autocratic strongmen he has publicly admired. (5) Trump’s descent into ideological psychosis is tainting the reputation of all who were foolish enough to associate with him. Consider vice presidential candidate Mike Pence. Interviewed recently on “Face the Nation,” he defended the Republican nominee’s verbal assault — Trump has called them “sick,” “horrible” and

“phony” — on women who accuse Trump of sexual assault. This reaction is justified, Pence said, because of Clinton’s “deplorables” comment. Here is one of the chief promoters of Christian morality in politics employing the ethical reasoning of 9-yearolds in the schoolyard. Someday Pence (and others) will look back on their shattered standards and ask: For this cause? For this man? (6) Trump’s final appeal is also corrupting a portion of the public and crossing moral lines that won’t be easily uncrossed. There are certain qualities of heart and mind that allow for self-government — civility, tolerance and mutual respect. In his rage and ruthlessness, Trump is inviting Americans to drink from a poisoned well. One problem is the risk of physical violence — the possible influence of unhinged rhetoric on an unbalanced mind. The broader result is radical polarization in which citizens question the legitimacy of elections and view some fellow citizens as enemies. (7) Practically, Trump’s downward spiral means that House Speaker Paul Ryan, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus will need to repudiate the nominee before the end — after they have shed the last of their credibility. The political argument against repudiation is admittedly strong. It could ignite a self-destructive civil war within the GOP just before an election. But history generally does not remember good political arguments. It remembers acts of conscience in the face of them. It is time, and past time, for Republican leaders to do the right thing. Trump’s crackup complicates American political life in a variety of ways but simplifies one point: This man is temperamentally, ideologically and morally unfit to be president of the United States.

Your company, Berkshire Hathaway, is the single largest shareholder in Wells Fargo, which was recently fined $185 million by U.S. regulators for fraudulently opening accounts for millions of customers. CEO John Stumpf announced his resignation last week. Yet, there has been no word from you, one of the most respected investors of all time. You’re a man whose social conscience and impact is among the most enlightened on the planet. You set the example for Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and others, but you have been deafeningly silent about the Wells Fargo culture and action. Many shareholders, customers, city officials, federal legislators and others have publicly expressed their dismay and indignation about Wells’ egregious practices. Some have even stopped doing business with the bank in protest. Published reports say you’ll comment in November, but why wait until then? Isn’t it a matter of principle to take a stand now and say fraud has no place in America and the financial services industry needs to adhere to the fundamental principle that what is good for customers should ultimately be good for employees and shareholders? How could it have happened? In the wake of the financial crisis, few would have thought that such ghastly business practices — incentivizing employees to falsify accounts — would have been tolerated again, but that simply wasn’t the case. This kind of institutional recklessness happened because the bank’s focus was on profits and enhancing profits through employee bonuses. In other words, the culture was that what was good for employees would be good for the bank and its shareholders even if it was not good for customers. In truth, this mentality remains the foundation of the financial services industry today, despite all of the new regulation triggered by the financial crisis to stop it. You simply can’t legislate loyalty to clients. Corporate culture starts at the top. The CEO is accountable to the board and the board is accountable to shareholders. In this case, that puts you and Berkshire at the top. Wells’ careless disregard for clients and communities is the reason that your Berkshire Hathaway, which has created so much wealth for so many people, needs to take a public stand. Malfeasance at one of the nation’s largest banks needs to be called out. Déjà vu all over again The sad truth in America today is that when you put your trust in the hands of a bank like Wells Fargo, you’re likely to get burned. That goes for clients, shareholders (Wells’ stock is down sharply this year), former employees (more than 5,000 were fired over this), and all the current employees who are now tainted by the scandal. In fact, the Wells Fargo affair ends up badly for everyone. Warren, I’m afraid we’re likely to see a repeat of this behavior in the financial services industry, but shouldn’t you do something? Shouldn’t you climb on your bully pulpit, the pulpit as a major shareholder, a citizen who cares, and a sage of Omaha, to say that when the customer is hurt, we are all hurt? To state that we should not tolerate behavior and culture which treats employees and customers with so little regard for their well-being? Sincerely, CHARLES LOWENHAUPT

Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

Charles Lowenhaupt is chairman and founder of Lowenhaupt Global Advisors.


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

OBITUARIES To Our Readers To place or share an obituary for your loved one, visit us at: www.stltoday.com/obits For more information you can contact us by phone at 800-365-0820 ext 5, or 314-340-8600 or by email at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com Alsop, John K. Jr. - St. Louis

Long, Jr., John E. - Saint Charles Manson, Betty J. - Creve Coeur Maute, Betty C. - St. Louis Moore - see Hogan Mullins, Tommy L. - St. Louis Norath, Denise E. - St. Louis Purl, James A. - St. Louis Raftery, Richard F. - St. Charles Reber, Robert N. - Fenton Reh - see Norath Retherford, Dick Darlon - Wright City Schroeder, Charles S. - St. Louis Sherman, Ruth - St. Louis Smith, Christopher M., Sr. - St. Louis Thurman - see Dwyer Vaught - see Reber Wamser, Audrey E. - St. Louis waterwiese, Wolfgang H. - St. Louis

Baker, Evelyn - Rogers, AR, formerly of Jefferson City, MO Beary, Richard M. - Ballwin Becker, Kathryn Lee - St. Louis Berberian, Raffie Harry - St. Louis Bevirt, Donna Marie - St. Louis Drew, June Marie - St. Louis Dwyer, Kathleen "Molly" - St. Louis Hare, Evelyn (Owens) - St. Louis Hogan, Lois F. - St. Louis Hubbs, Justin William - Ballwin Jacobs, Jody (Jo Ann) - St. Louis Kramer, Sr. Marianne C.C.V.I. - Bridgeton Krem, David N. - St. Louis Lane, Katherine - Manchester Lehmen, Delphine "Del" - St. Louis Lindley, Henry Holtevert "Holt" - Ballwin

Krem, David N.

Maute, Betty C.

Purl, James A.

March 19, 1920 - October 15, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Bebe (nee Wool) Krem for 74 years. Dear father of Neal (Charleen) Krem and the late Barry Z. (Christine) Krem. Loving grandfather, great-grandfather, and uncle. Beloved brother and brother-in-law of the late Sam (Ida) Krem and the late Nathan (Anita) Krem. Our dear cousin and friend. He was born in St. Louis, where he attended Ben Blewett High School and Saint Louis University. He was a US Army Veteran and co-founder of Reliable Finishing Company. His great passion was the teaching of Judaism, and he was active in the National Federation of Temple Brotherhoods-Jewish Chautauqua Society in the late 1970s, becoming President in 1980, promoting Jewish education and interfaith activities. He also served locally as the President of B'nai El Congregation in the 1980s. Services: Funeral service Thursday, October 20, 11:00 a.m. at Temple Israel, #1 Rabbi Alvan D. Rubin Drive (Ladue and Spoede Roads) with interment to follow at United Hebrew Cemetery, 7855 Canton Avenue. Visitation for Mr. Krem 10:30 a.m. Thursday at Temple Israel. Contributions in his memory may be made to Hadassah Medical Center, Donors Department, P.O.B. 12000, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE

on Thursday, September 29, 2016. Devoted wife of 64 years to the late William H. Maute. Beloved mother of Mark (Joan) Maute, Martha (Gary) Hawks, Nancy (Robert) Waggener and Paul (Cindy) Maute. Cherished grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of 5. Betty was a wonderful homemaker, knitter, and sewer. She was very active in her church, Bonhomme Presbyterian where she served as director of Sunday school and Senior Elder. Betty was very involved in kid's activities and was an avid Cardinals Fan. Services: A memorial service will be held Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 10am at Friendship Village of Chesterfield, 15201 Olive Blvd, Chesterfield, Mo. Private interment. Memorial donations may be made to Friendship Village Employee Assistance Grant Program. Family and friends can review and share stories, photos and condolences online at www.stlfuneral.com and follow details of this event and others in the community at www.facebook.com/stlchapelhill.

Nov. 12, 1937 - Oct. 16, 2016 Services: Memorial Service Sunday, Oct. 23, 3 p.m. at Gateway Church of the Nazarene, 11703 Old St. Charles Rd., Bridgeton. More info at www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Mullins, Tommy L.

Expressing your thoughtfulness respectfully & gracefully Berberian, Raffie Harry

Alsop, John K. Jr. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Tuesday, October 11, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Patricia J. Alsop (nee Stewart). Dear father of Michael (Diane) Alsop and Linda Marie (Greg) Mauch; grandfather of Daniel, Elizabeth, Abby, Tricia & Buddy; great-grandfather of 7; brother of Carol Morgan & Dudley Alsop. Our dear brother-inlaw, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral Saturday, October 22, 9:30 AM from COLLIER'S Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. (St. Ann) to All Souls Church (Overland) for Mass, 10:00 AM. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be given to the American Cancer Society or charity of your choice. Visitation Friday, 4:00-8:00 PM. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Baker, Evelyn 87, died, October 16, 2016 in Rogers, AR. She was born June 22, 1929, in Jefferson City, Missouri. She is survived by her nieces and nephews, Lynn Wolfe, John Bredeman, Jim Bredeman, Larry Bredeman, Linda Fain, and Scott Shackelford. Services: Memorial service will be held at Village Bible Church, at 12:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct 19, 2016. For on-line condolences and more information: www.funeralmation.com

Our beloved father has passed peacefully from his earthly shell to ascend into heaven. He was 94 years young. He was a WWII Army Combat Veteran. Among his many accomplishments he was a farmer, rancher and fruit packer in CA and AZ. He was a Realtor and business owner. He was a BBB mediator for numerous years and on the board of a not for profit Downs Syndrome organization. He is survived by his children Sheldon, Barclay, Dawn, Raffie Jr, Chere Gianforte, Sandy Head and their families. ST. LOUIS CREMATION

Bevirt, Donna Marie (nee Hubacek) Mon., Oct. 17, 2016. Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois on Sat., Oct 22, 4-8pm. Memorials to Lustgarten Foundation.

Drew, June Marie 92, St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 15, 2016. Visitation 10:30-11:00am Fri. Oct. 21, 2016, Sunset Hill Funeral Home, Glen Carbon, Ill. with Funeral at 11am.

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Hubbs, Justin William passed away, Saturday, October 15, 2016. Beloved son of William (Nancy) Hubbs and Karen (Chris) Kohring. Loving brother of Michael (Lisa) Hubbs, Julie (Tim) Cline, Heather, Robert, Kevin (Kristan), and Christy Hubbs. Loving grandson of the late Jack (Vivian) Hubbs and Charles (Norma) Engelage. Dear uncle, cousin, nephew, and friend of many. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Friday, 11:30 a.m. Interment Laurel Hill Memorial Gardens. If desired, contributions may be made to NCADA, 9355 Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132. Visitation Thursday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Jacobs, Jody (Jo Ann) asleep in Jesus on Monday, Oct. 17, 2016, age 80. Loving wife of 60 years to Jack Jacobs, dear mother to Jackie R. Jacobs and Frank D. Jacobs (Susan). Grandmother of Shane McKinney (Angie), Michael McKinney (Tara), Alysha Patton (Justin), Daniel Jacobs and Bradley Jacobs. Great-grandmother of Gabby, Connor, Liam, Stella and Gracie. Dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt and friend. In lieu of flowers, if desired, donations to IBEW Local 1 Relief Committee, 5850 Elizabeth Ave (63110) are appreciated. Services: Visitation Thursday 3 to 8 pm at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Road (63129). Funeral Friday 10:00 am. Interment Bellerive Gardens Cemetery.

Dwyer, Kathleen "Molly" Beary, Richard M. Entered into the presence of his Savior on Monday, October 17, 2016. Beloved husband of Ellen H. Beary (nee Hiebert); loving father of David M. (Alina), Allison E., Jonathan M. (Cassandra) and Daniel G. (Allison J.) Beary; cherished grandfather of Ethan, Katelyn, Madeline, Hayden, Grenely, Katherine and Elizabeth; dear brother of John R. Beary; Godly brother-in-law, uncle, greatuncle, cousin and friend to many. Rich was an avid student of God's word and a devoted follower of Jesus Christ. Jeremiah 9:23-24. He will be deeply missed. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, October 20, 12:00 Noon. Interment Private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to The Gideons International or Bible Broadcast Network (BBNradio.org) Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

(nee Lawrence) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Sat., Oct. 15, 2016. Beloved wife of Joseph F. Dwyer, Jr., dear mother of Joseph F. (Jeannie) Dwyer, III, Mary Bridget (Greg) Thurman, Daniel G. (Kim) Dwyer, and John P. "Jack" Dwyer, dear grandmother of Mary Ellen and Joseph IV Dwyer; Andrew, William and Patrick Thurman; Nicholas and Lucy Dwyer; and Patrick, Eleanor and Keelie Dwyer; dear sister of Patricia Rebman and the late Joseph Lawrence and Mary Ellen Dames, dear aunt and great-aunt. Services: Visitation and funeral Mass will be held Thurs. Oct. 20 at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, 7148 Forsyth Blvd. Visitation at 10 a.m. with the Mass to follow at 11 a.m. Private interment at Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to a charity of your choice appreciated. KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS www.k-brothers.com

Hare, Evelyn (Owens)

Becker, Kathryn Lee (nee Jones) Monday, October 17, 2016. Loving wife of Steven Becker. Beloved mother of Austin Becker, Rylee Covey, and "Spare Son" Timothy Becker. Beloved daughter of Roger W. and Gayle Jones. Dearest sister of Ryan (Janna Petran) Jones, and Mark Jones. Loving niece of Rhonda (Kenneth) Venezia, John Willis, Tom (Barb) Jones, and Eric (Gail) Jones. Loving aunt of Tala Jones. Our dear great niece, cousin, and friend to many. Services: A Memorial Gathering of family and friends will be held on Thursday, October 20, 5:00 p.m. until the time of the Memorial Service at 7:00 pm at the Stygar Florissant Chapel and Cremation Center, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. Florissant. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

75. Visitation October 20, 4:00-7:00 p.m. Austin Layne Renaissance Chapel, 7302 West Florissant. Funeral Service Friday October 21, at the original chapel of Friendly Temple Baptist Church, 5544 Dr. Martin Luther King Dr. Beginning with a viewing from 10:00-11:00am. Funeral immediately after.

Hogan, Lois F. (nee Woker) Asleep in Jesus on Sun., Oct. 16, 2016. Beloved wife of Carl L. Hogan for over 51 years; dearest mother of Chris Hogan (Cindy Bartlett) and Shawna (Richard) Moore; loving grandmother of Alexander and Lauren Isbell, Justin, Ethan and Mason Moore; dear sister of Martha (Charles) Swain, David (Michelle) and Nathan Woker; our dear sister-inlaw, aunt, niece, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial visitation at Christ Memorial Lutheran Church, 5252 S. Lindbergh on Fri., Oct. 21, 9am until time of service at 10am. Memorials to Nurses for Newborns appreciated. KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel.

Kramer, Sr. Marianne C.C.V.I. entered eternal life on September 30, 2016 in St. Louis, MO. She was born in Jefferson City, Missouri on July 4, 1938 and was preceded in death by her parents Delia Herman and Edwin J. Kramer and a brother, Jerry (Lynn) Kramer. Surviving are her brother, Edwin (Elowese) Kramer of Bunker Hill, IL and her sister Betty (Jerry) Buschman of Jefferson City, MO along with several nieces and nephews. In 1956 she entered the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio. During her years as a professed sister she taught in elementary and secondary schools in Illinois, Missouri and Texas. For several years she taught at Instituto Miguel Angel in Mexico City and at the Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. After completing her Master's degree in Social Work, Sr. Marianne served in Illinois, Missouri and Texas. In 1999 she was one of the founders of El Puente Hispanic Ministry in Jefferson City, MO. Her most recent ministry was the Cardinal Ritter Senior Services in St. Louis. During retirement, Sr. Marianne was an active member of Holy Spirit Parish in St. Louis and volunteered at SSM Health System - DePaul Hospital. Sr. Marianne will be sadly missed by her family and friends and the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, as well as by the many persons she served as she reached out to those in need. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to: El Puente, 1102 E. McCarty St., Jefferson City, MO. 65101. Services: Memorial Visitation Thursday, October 20, 9:30 AM until Mass time 10:30 AM at Holy Spirit Parish, 3130 Parkwood Ln. (Maryland Heights). Interment will be in the Incarnate Word Cemetery's Columbarium. www.colliersfuneralhome. com

Lehmen, Delphine "Del" (nee Huhmann) Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection on Saturday, October 15, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Raymond B. Lehmen; loving mother of Robert (Kathy) Lehmen, Gayle (James) McMahan and the late Fred (survived by Gloria) Lehmen; cherished grandmother of James (Stacey), John (Stephanie), Mark (Kathy), Tom (Courtney), Matt (Sheri) Lehmen, Beth (Alvin) Ruckwardt and Bryan (Lindsey) McMahan; step-grandmother of James, Steve (Mary) McMahan, Connie (Dan) Guenther and Michelle (Bud) Fey; our dear great-grandmother, step-great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, October 21, 11:00 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer's Association or the ALS Association or Masses preferred. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

Lindley, Henry Holtevert "Holt" died peacefully at home October 14, 2016 after a long illness. Preceded in death by his daughter Ellen. Devoted husband of sixty one years of Mary Ann (nee Stockmann). Beloved father of Mary (Jeff) Greene, Charles (Kim) and Paul. Doting and generous grandfather of Nicholas (Meara), Alex, Beth, Sean and Kate. Holt was an Air Force fighter pilot, businessman and avid tennis player. He loved nothing more than taking care of the people he loved. Holt donated his body to Saint Louis University Medical School. Private Memorial. Donations can be made in his memory to Project Wake Up, 918 Olive Street, Apartment 604, St. Louis, MO 63101, a Foundation founded by his grandson Alex. Visit www.projectwakeup.org. for more information SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY Medical School

Long, Jr., John E. Age 62, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Sunday, October 16, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Manson, Betty J. (nee Miller) 90 years, Oct. 16, 2016. Graveside service 11am, Thurs., Oct. 20 at Sacred Heart Cemetery, Florissant.

at home with Jesus on Saturday, October 15, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Joyce L. Mullins (nee Norton); loving father of Michael (Melinda) Mullins and Sandy (Dan) Trott; cherished grandfather of Elise and Sean Mullins, Lindsay (Ryan) Reams and Danielle (Kellen) Summers, Morgan, J.T. and Justin Trott; great-grandfather of Lincoln and Juliette Reams; dearest brother of Nina Jo (the late Robert) Hobgood and Van Kenneth (Bessie) Mullins; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, greatuncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, October 20, 5-8 p.m. Funeral service Friday, October 21, 12:00 Noon at Life Church (Fenton, MO). Interment JB National Cemetery. Contributions in Tommy's memory may be made to the Wounded Warrior Project woundedwarriorproject.org/Donate

Norath, Denise E.

(nee Keppler) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Monday, October 17, 2016 at age 62. Denise was the oldest of six children born to Thomas and Adelaide Keppler. She is survived by her loving husband Leo J. Norath (and the late Daniel G. Norath). Beloved mother of Nicole (E. Paul) Reh and the late Gabriel S. Norath. Devoted NaNa to Nicholas Daniel, Alexander Edward and Gabriel James Reh. Sister of Diane (Mike Phoenix) Frandsen, Chrissie (Walt) Goepel, Tom (Diana), Tim (Gina) and Tony Keppler. Denise took her responsibilities serious when it came to family. She never lost sight of her love for family and friends. She loved chatting with friends and family over past memories. Her three angels, Nicholas, Alexander and Gabriel were the ultimate joy in her life. Denise was proud to be the recipient of a double lung transplant in June 2015. She was a Realtor with Berkshire Hathaway Home Select. She was active listing and selling until the end. Services: Visitation 4-8:00pm on Thurs. Oct. 20, at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., in Kirkwood. Funeral Mass 11am on Fri. Oct. 21, at Incarnate Word Catholic Church, 13416 Olive Blvd., Chesterfield, MO 63017. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Mid-America Transplant Foundation Family House, 1110 Highlands Plaza Dr. E, Ste. 100 St. Louis, MO 63110. www.boppchapel.com

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on Monday Oct. 17, 2016. Beloved husband of Antoinette Raftery (nee Rebello). Loving brother of Mary Jane Miller, Charlie (Katie), F. Ray (Cathy) & Greg (Patty) Raferty and the late Lawrence, Emmett, Joe, Jimmy, Jerry & Merle Raftery and Lil Rankin & Catherine Gray, brother-inlaw of Alice Raftery and the late Ralph Miller, Eileen & Dorothy Raftery & Don Ranken. Our dear uncle, cousin & friend. Geeter loved to build & fly model airplanes and did it all from scratch. Services: The family will receive guests at St. Joseph Church Cottleville, 1355 Motherhead Road on Friday Oct. 21 from 9:30 to 10:30 AM with Celebration of Mass at 10:30. PLEASE MEET AT CHURCH. Internment Our Lady Cemetery in Lake St. Louis. Memorials to Pink Sisters of Mt. Grace Convent, 1438 East Warne Ave, St. Louis, MO 63107, preferred. Services by STYGAR MID RIVERS Funeral Home, PH 636936-1300 or www.stygar.com

Reber, Robert N.

Lane, Katherine 95, passed away on Saturday, October 15, 2016. Katherine was born July 15, 1921 in Pocahontas, AR. She was a member of Manchester United Methodist Church. She was preceded in death by her parents; stepmother Ida Blair; grandson Ethan White; sisters, Doris Ryan, Alvera Seagraves and Mary Helen Promberger. Beloved mother of Loren "Larry" (Melissa) Lane Jr., Marian Houghton, Brenda Forrest; grandchildren David Rush, Brian Rush, Nadine Williams, Dustin White, Logan White, Lauren White; sister Florence Sylvester; and beloved great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and friends. Services: Graveside service will be Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 10 a.m. at Randolph Memorial Gardens in Pocahontas, AR.

Raftery, Richard F.

stltoday.com/obits

Relect on your loved one’s life and compose your thoughts and memories of your departed, privately from the comfort of your home. If you prefer, you may still call our reps at 314.340.8600.

Monday, October 17, 2016. Beloved husband of Holly-Ann Reber (nee Grothe); dear father of Rodney, Adam (Cindy), Robin and Jason (Carrie); our dear grandfather, great-grandfather, brother-in-law, uncle and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, October 21, 10:30 a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. Contributions to St. Jude Children's Hospital appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 3-8 p.m.

Retherford, Dick Darlon 77, Wright City, MO, on 10-15-2016. Funeral: Saturday, October 22, 2016 12:00 pm Visitation: Saturday, October 22, 2016, 10:00-12:00 pm. Interment: private family cemetery. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

Schroeder, Charles S. Monday, Oct. 17, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Marjorie Schroeder; dear father of Charles (Sandi), Steve (Ruth Ann); dear grandfather of Robyn (Ryan) Bradbury; dear great-grandfather, brother. Charles served in the Marine Corps during WWII (Iwo Jima) Private services.

Sherman, Ruth October 17, 2016 Beloved wife of the late Stanley Sherman; dear mother and motherin-law of Steven (Rochelle) Sherman and Barry (Brenda) Sherman; dear sister of the late Ethel Wechter and the late Albert Wean. Services: Graveside service Thursday, October 20, 1:30 p.m., at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Rd. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions preferred to Jewish Family Services of St. Louis or to a charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Smith, Christopher M., Sr.

attorney, judge and native of St. Louis, Missouri, departed this life Sunday, October 16, 2016. He is survived by his loving family: wife, Sharon (Serre); children, Christopher M. II and Shannon; siblings, Wayman F. (Susan) Smith, III and E. Robin (Isaac) Smith Stallworth; loving nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of friends. Services: Visitation, Wednesday, October 19, 2016 from 4:00 P.M. 7:00 P.M. at All Saints Episcopal Church, 2831 North Kingshighway Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63113. Funeral Service: Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 10:00 A.M. at All Saints Episcopal Church. Burial immediately following at St. Peter's Cemetery, St. Louis, MO. Services by Officer


NEWS

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A19

Mosul residents face new fears as Iraqi troops approach homes BY SINAN SALAHEDDIN AND JOSEPH KRAUSS associated Press

BAGHDAD • On the ee-

rily quiet streets of Mosul, fighters from the Islamic State group are killing suspected spies, blocking roads and planting bombs ahead of a showdown with Iraqi forces. Residents who have endured more than two years of militant rule describe a city under siege, and they say a new sense of terror has set in since Iraq announced the start of a long-anticipated operation to liberate its second-largest city. Three residents who spoke with the Associated Press by telephone described a ghost town where people venture out only to buy basic goods, which are increasingly running low. They said large groups of Islamic State militants had left the city in recent weeks, but those who remain have become increasingly brutal, killing anyone suspected of trying to communicate with the outside world. For that reason, the residents spoke on condition of anonymity, fearing for their safety. “The situation inside Mosul is terrifying,” said one of them, a merchant. He said he had stocked food, water and cooking gas for 40 days and bought an oven to bake bread. Islamic State released a propaganda video Tuesday showing bustling streets in Mosul, with residents going about their business, with one grilling meat over open coals, and saying all

WORLD DIGEST Ecuador curbs Assange’s internet Ecuador’s government has acknowledged that it has “temporarily restricted” WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s internet access at its embassy in London after the whistleblowing site published documents from Democrat Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign. The foreign ministry said in a statement Tuesday that although it stands by its decision in 2012 to grant Assange asylum, it doesn’t interfere in foreign elections. Leftist President Rafael Correa’s government said it was acting on its own and not ceding to foreign pressures. More Nigerian schoolgirls may be released • Nigeria’s government is negotiating the release of another 83 of the Chibok schoolgirls taken in a mass abduction 2½ years ago, but more than 100 others appear unwilling to leave their Boko Haram Islamic extremist captors, a community leader said Tuesday. The unwilling girls may have been radicalized by Boko Haram or are ashamed to return home because they were forced to marry extremists and have babies, chairman Pogu Bitrus of the Chibok Development Association said in a telephone interview. U.N. oicial to visit peacekeepers in Western Sahara • The U.N. peacekeeping chief will tour the disputed Western Sahara later this week to visit U.N. troops for the irst time since

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Smoke rises from Islamic State positions after an airstrike by coalition forces in Mosul, Iraq, on Tuesday. Iraqi forces have began pushing toward larger villages.

was well. The people who spoke to reporters painted a very diferent picture. They said Islamic State militants patrolled Mosul’s streets on bicycles or motorbikes to make for smaller targets from the air. Other fighters are preparing for war by closing roads with sand berms and concrete walls, and readying barrels of oil and tires to set ablaze in order to obscure the visibility of warplanes from the U.S.-led coalition. The extremists also have grown increasingly paranoid and violent. On Sunday evening, a resident said the fighters shot a man twice in the head in front of his family and neighbors. His crime: possession of a SIM card for a cellphone.

A few days earlier, five men accused of spying were killed by a firing squad in a public square. Mosul is completely dark at night because Islamic State forbids the use of any generators, fearing the lights could draw airstrikes. “Every minute passes like a year,” said one man, a father of three. Residents heard about the start of the ofensive on the radio, he said, with the city rattled by airstrikes on its outskirts. “We have mixed feelings. We are happy that we will eventually be liberated from Daesh and afraid of what will happen afterward,” the father said, using the Arabic acronym for Islamic State. “The recent airstrikes are really shaking the ground and houses,” an-

other resident said. “My wife prays and recites verses from the holy Quran when airstrikes start, while children cry. We are afraid that one of these airstrikes might hit us.” Fearing a mass exodus from the city, which is still home to 1 million people, the coalition has dropped leaflets telling people to stay inside. Human rights groups worry many will run from Mosul to other areas held by Islamic State out of fear they could be treated even worse by their purported liberators. “A lot of people are going to flee,” said Berkis Wille, the senior Iraq researcher for Human Rights Watch, which also is in contact with people inside the city. “A lot of them are extremely fearful of what the battle might bring.”

Morocco expelled more than 70 U.N. civilian stafers in March to protest comments by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Herve Ladsous said that he would visit Layoune, the largest city in Western Sahara, as well as camps for Sahrawi refugees in neighboring Tindouf, Algeria, and the Moroccan capital, Rabat.

President Joseph Kabila’s mandate expires. But the biggest opposition party, which boycotted the talks, immediately rejected the deal and called for a nationwide general strike for Wednesday. Kabila’s mandate ends in December, and his critics have accused him of orchestrating the delay to stay in power.

on Jerusalem itself, but it aggravated diplomatic tension around the city and within UNESCO, which is also facing a dispute between Japan and China that threatens funding.

Venezuela postpones elections • Venezuela has postponed until next year gubernatorial elections the opposition is heavily favored to win. The governmentstacked electoral council said Tuesday that elections in 23 states that were slated to take place before year’s end will now be held at an unspeciied date in 2017. The move was immediately denounced by the opposition as unconstitutional. Authorities didn’t provide an explanation for the new date but presented it as part of a broader schedule for elections next year. Yemenis agree to 3-day cease-ire • The warring parties in Yemen have agreed to a 72-hour ceaseire that will take efect shortly before midnight Wednesday, the U.N. special envoy to Yemen said. Special Envoy Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed said he hoped the temporary truce could lead to “permanent and lasting end to the conlict.” Vote in Congo may be delayed until 2018 • An opposition leader in Congo says government and other negotiators have signed an agreement calling for the next presidential vote to be held in April 2018 — more than a year after

Protests lead Russian city to cancel ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ • A theater in one of Russia’s largest cities has canceled a planned performance of the musical “Jesus Christ Superstar” after protests by an organization of conservative Orthodox Christians. The show, by a troupe from St. Petersburg, was to have been staged Nov. 1 in Omsk, Russia. But a local group called “Family, Love, and Fatherland” iled a complaint that the musical mocked religious faith, according to Russian news reports. State television reported Tuesday that the performance had been called of. The decision comes amid growing conservative sentiment and resistance to Western popular culture in Russia. UNESCO resolution angers Israel • The executive board of the United Nations Educational, Scientiic and Cultural Organization approved on Tuesday a resolution that Israel says denies the deep historic Jewish connection to holy sites in Jerusalem — and that has angered Israel’s government and many Jews around the world. The resolution is not expected to have concrete impact

Waterwiese, Wolfgang H. (nee Scircle), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, October 11, 2016. Beloved wife of the late John C. "Jack" Wamser; dear mother of Michael J. (Diane) Wamser and the late Joan (Benny) Lane; dear grandmother of Colleen (Joseph) Bonacci, Timothy (Beverly) Power, Michele (Henry) Onians, Ryan (Michelle) Wamser and Matthew (Anne) Wamser; great-grandmother of Michael, Matthew and Katie Bonacci, Hannah and Hudson Onians, Maya, Miles and Gus Wamser; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Church, 4900 Ringer Rd. 63129, Friday, October 21, 10 a.m. until time of Mass at 11:30 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. John The Baptist Catholic Church, 4200 Delor St. 63116.

Robert ‘Big Sonny’ Edwards • An original member of the pioneering Philadelphia-based soul group the Intruders has died. Mr. Edwards was 74. He died Saturday (Oct. 15, 2016) at a hospital in Philadelphia after sufering a heart attack at his home. His death was announced Tuesday by music producers Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huf. After forming in 1960 as a doo-wop group, the Intruders signed with Gamble and Huf in 1966 and helped deine the smooth, soulful Philadelphia Sound. Their 1968 hit “Cowboys to Girls” topped the R&B charts and was the irst hit song for Gamble and Huf. The original lineup of the Intruders disbanded in 1975. Edward Gorman • The mystery and crime iction writer has died of cancer, his publicist said. Mr. Gorman, 74, died Friday (Oct. 14, 2016). Mr. Gorman, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was the author of dozens of mystery novels, including the Sam McCain, Jack Dwyer and Dev Conrad series. He set much of his iction in small Midwestern towns. His novel “The Poker Club” was adapted into a 2008 movie with the same title. During his career, he received the Shamus Award, the Spur Award and the International Fiction Writers Award. He was married to Carol Gorman, a children’s iction writer.

Poles mourn famed moviemaker • Hundreds of Warsaw residents and public igures packed a church Tuesday for a mourning Mass to bid farewell to renowned moviemaker Andrzej Wajda. Wajda, 90, who received an honorary lifetime achievement Oscar in 2000, died in a hospital Oct. 9, just months after inishing “Afterimage,” a movie that will compete for a foreign language Academy Award. Mechanical problem forces plane to land in Greenland • A WestJet light from London to Toronto carrying 250 passengers and nine crew members was diverted to Greenland because of a mechanical issue. WestJet spokesman Robert Palmer said Tuesday that the Boeing 767 landed without incident. From news services

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Pierre Étaix • The French clown and moviemaker, whose stylish acrobatics and melancholy manner made him an Academy Award-winning master of slapstick comedy, died Friday (Oct. 14, 2016) in Paris. He was 87. The cause was complications of an intestinal infection, his wife, Odile Étaix, said. Although Mr. Étaix directed and starred in only ive feature ilms and several shorts — including “Heureux Anniversaire” (“Happy Anniversary”), which won the Oscar for best live-action short in 1963 — he was considered among the brilliant physical comedians of the past half-century. David Antin • The poet and performance artist, known for his so-called talk poems, died Oct. 12, 2016, in San Diego at age 84, according to family members. Mr. Antin, who had Parkinson’s disease, died after a fall at home. Mr. Antin won acclaim for his signature “hybrid of criticism, poetry and storytelling that involved Antin discoursing freely on a subject in front of an audience,” as the foundation described his talk poetry. Artforum pointed to “Talking” from 1972, “Talking at the Boundaries” from 1976 and “What It Means to Be Avant-Garde” from 1993 as some of his best-known works. Patricia Barry • A mainstay of daytime television, who appeared on “Days of Our Lives,” “Guiding Light” and “All My Children,” has died. She was 93. Ms. Barry died at her home in Los Angeles on Oct. 11, 2016, a publicist for the actress said Wednesday. Ms. Barry amassed more than 100 appearances in TV, movies and theater. Joan Marie Johnson • One of the founding members of the New Orleans girl group the Dixie Cups, who had a No. 1 hit in 1964 with “Chapel of Love,” has died at a hospice in New Orleans. She was 72. Ms. Johnson, who was with the group for only its irst few years because she was diagnosed with sickle cell disease, died of congestive heart failure Oct. 3, 2016, according to former bandmate Barbara Ann Hawkins. From news services

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Thom Jones • The acclaimed short story writer who drew upon family tragedy and his own painful struggles for “The Pugilist At Rest” and other collections, has died. Mr. Jones died Friday (Oct. 14, 2016) in Olympia, Wash., his longtime home, according to his literary representatives, the Wylie Agency. He was 71 and died of complications from diabetes. “The Pugilist at Rest,” published in 1993, was his debut book and a inalist for the National Book Award. Its stories of violence, trauma and spiritual striving led to comparisons to Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer and fellow Paciic Northwest resident Raymond Carver among others.

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NEWS

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEATHER • LOW 60, HIGH 72 • WINDS SW/NW 5-12 MPH

PEOPLE

Periods of showers and storms

19 on slate for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

A frontal boundary will be stalled to the south of the region today. An area of low pressure will move along this front and trigger showers along with some storms across the St. Louis area. Cooler air will continue to filter into the area over the next few days. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

62°

69°

70°

64°

Mostly cloudy Slight chance Showers and Showers and of showers storms possible storms possible

4-DAY FORECAST

THURSDAY

Gradual clearing

H

81 80 68 72 70 76 69 68 71 76 70 72 80

W

thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

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L

65 67 55 61 57 61 54 50 59 62 51 58 63

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Mostly sunny Mostly sunny Mostly sunny

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

FRIDAY

57°/64° 44°/60° 45°/68° 51°/74°

L

H

W

54 65 52 54 56 50 62 53 52 48 54 54

72 79 69 73 74 72 75 71 70 69 72 73

mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy

Chicago 52 / 69

Kirksville 50 / 68 Kansas City 54 / 69

Springfield 54 / 72

St. Louis 60 / 72 Carbondale 65 / 79

Joplin 61 / 76

Poplar Bluff 68 / 85

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 85° 73° 68° 48° 87° 27° 63° 36°

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.00” 0.06” 1.93” 33.49” 32.81”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (2:09 p.m.) Low (6:42 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1953) Record Low (1976) High Last Year Low Last Year

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Oct. 18th Weed - 5 (low), Mold - 18,808 (high) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 0 Month (Total) 26 Season 30 Year Ago 92

SUN & MOON

Last Oct 22

New Oct 30

Sunrise

First Nov 7

7:15 AM Sunset

Full Nov 14 6:16 PM

Moonrise 9:33 PM Moonset 11:05 AM

Looking high in the southwest around 6 a.m. in the morning you will see the waning gibbous moon just to the right of Betelgeuse. This red star is part of the constellation Orion the Hunter. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 11.86 23 9.03 Jefferson City 21 9.86 Hermann 20 6.25 Washington 25 12.88 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 13.88 Louisiana 15 12.90 Dam 24 25 23.05 Dam 25 26 22.80 Grafton 18 15.89 M.Price, Pool 419 415.00 M.Price, Tail. 21 11.27 St Louis 30 14.82 Chester 27 17.99 Cape Girardeau 32 23.39

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.42 18 12.67 Peoria 14 10.38 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.89 Sullivan 16 - 3.34 Valley Park 24 12.15 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.08 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 20.13

- 0.21 - 0.13 + 0.67 - 0.23 - 0.58 - 0.25 - 0.02 - 0.18 - 0.31 + 0.29 + 0.10 - 0.81 - 1.24 - 1.17 - 0.99

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

- 0.09 + 0.96 + 0.02 - 0.01 - 0.15 - 1.42 0.00

Current Level

24-Hr Change

354.32 360.08 494.81 658.63 709.76 655.65 910.89 839.22 599.62 407.31 606.94 444.78

- 0.14 0.00 - 0.16 - 0.04 - 0.44 - 0.11 + 0.01 - 0.03 - 0.01 - 0.08 - 0.23 - 0.13

- 0.52

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 100° McAllen, Texas

40s

Rain

60s

40s

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Artist Peter Max is 79. Actor Michael Gambon is 76. Actor John Lithgow is 71. Singer Jeannie C. Riley is 71. Singer Patrick Simmons is 68. Comedian Chris Kattan is 46. Country singer Cyndi Thomson is 40. Actress Gillian Jacobs is 34. Actress Hunter King is 23. From news services

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70s

60s

60s

50s

T-storms

70s

60s

70s

80s

60s 90s

NY court hears arguments in ‘Happy Together’ case • New York’s highest court has heard oral arguments in a case pitting the owner of the Turtles’ 1967 hit “Happy Together” against Sirius XM Radio. The issue in Tuesday’s hearing was whether

the copyright holders of recordings made before 1972 have a common law right to make radio stations and others pay for their use. The lawsuit was iled by Flo & Eddie Inc., a company controlled by two founding members of the band that owns the rights to the recordings. Sirius XM Radio argues it is not required to pay royalties for recordings made before the federal Copyright Act was changed in 1972 to establish limited protections for recordings. The case was referred to the Court of Appeals from a federal appeals court.

50s 40s

80s

more like a dull auburn. On Monday, the Smithsonian asked the public to help save the slippers, launching a Kickstarter campaign to raise $300,000. In addition to keeping the shoes’ color from deteriorating further, the money will go toward a technologically advanced display case that will preserve them for future generations. The shoes are made from about a dozen diferent materials, including wood pulp, silk thread, gelatin, plastic and glass. One shoe is wider than the other, and there are other subtle diferences in their shape and construction. Each has Judy Garland’s name scrawled on the inside.

60s

30s 50s

Smithsonian needs help to refurbish ruby slippers • It will take more than three clicks of the heels to preserve the ruby slippers that whisked Dorothy back to Kansas at the end of “The Wizard of Oz.” The slippers, which for more than 30 years have been one of the most beloved items at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, were crafted almost 80 years ago by the MGM Studios prop department. Like most movie props, they weren’t built to last. Now, the frayed shoes aren’t even rubycolored anymore — they’re

The sequin-covered ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland in “The Wizard of Oz.”

Low: 8° Big Piney, Wyoming

50s 50s

Rapper Tupac Shakur, singer Janet Jackson, grunge-rock band Pearl Jam, pioneering German electronic-rock group Kraftwerk and alternativerock outit Jane’s Addiction top an expanded slate of 19 nominees for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Among irst-time candidates who appear on the ballot are British rock group Depeche Mode, American punk band Bad Brains, English poprock band Electric Light Orchestra, folk-music maven Joan Baez, slick rock band Journey and ’60s heavy rock group Steppenwolf. Previous nominees under consideration include the Cars, Chaka Khan, Jackson, the J. Geils Band, Joe Tex, Detroit proto-punk group MC5, English rock group the Zombies, disco pioneers Chic and English prog-rock band Yes. Shakur and Pearl Jam are irst-time nominees who made the nomination ballot on their initial year of eligibility, having released their debut recordings in 1991. The Rock Hall requires that 25 years pass before an act will be considered for induction. Typically, 10 to 12 names appear on the ballot sent to the Hall of Fame’s 700-plus voting members, but this year that igure has almost doubled.

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

Snow

70s 80s

70s 80s

80s Wintry Mix

90s

80s

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH Jet Stream

Alaska Low: -4°

Hawaii High: 87°

Showers along with some storms are expected across portions of the Ohio Valley and Ozarks in association with a stalled frontal boundary. Parts of the northern Rockies will also see a little light precipitation. Warm conditions will persist across the Southeast, Deep South, and Gulf Coast. Cooler air will continue to settle into the north-central Plains, Midwest, and Great Lakes. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 65 Albuquerque 51 Anchorage 31 Atlanta 65 Atlantic City 64 Baltimore 65 Billings 40 Biloxi, Ms. 70 Birmingham 69 Bismarck 35 Boise 39 Boston 62 Buffalo 55 Burlington, Vt. 60 Charleston, S.C. 62 Charleston, W.V. 64 Charlotte 62 Cheyenne 32 Chicago 52 Cincinnati 65 Cleveland 59 Colorado Spgs. 37 Concord, N.H. 58 Dallas 73 Daytona Beach 68 Denver 36 Des Moines 49 72 Destin, Fl. 52 Detroit 60 El Paso 67 Evansville 10 Fairbanks 37 Fargo 35 Flagstaff 69 Fort Myers 39 Great Falls 47 Green Bay 60 Hartford 74 Honolulu 71 Houston 57 Indianapolis 68 Jackson, Ms. 40 Juneau 78 Key West 61 Las Vegas 67 Little Rock 62 Los Angeles 69 Louisville

73 74 42 88 82 85 54 84 89 51 60 81 69 67 86 83 85 49 69 77 70 57 77 91 83 58 68 84 70 86 80 32 49 62 86 54 65 81 88 91 74 89 47 86 81 88 93 82

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partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy

48 45 32 64 61 63 35 69 66 33 45 54 51 46 63 63 62 27 52 62 53 27 46 64 70 31 45 70 53 57 61 16 31 32 68 35 41 51 74 71 55 68 38 77 58 67 65 65

62 68 41 85 76 80 60 84 86 55 65 59 59 64 84 81 84 57 59 69 62 58 58 73 84 61 56 85 60 72 65 29 46 67 86 58 53 61 88 85 60 82 46 86 83 73 99 72

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showers sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy showers showers sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny showers sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms

City

Today L H

58 Macon 75 McAllen, Tx. 68 Memphis 75 Miami 50 Milwaukee Minneapolis 46 Missoula, Mt. 35 67 Mobile Montgomery 64 66 Nashville New Orleans 74 New York City 66 Norfolk, Va. 65 Oklahoma City 56 Omaha 48 Orlando 68 Palm Springs 66 Philadelphia 65 Phoenix 66 Pittsburgh 63 Portland, Me. 56 Portland, Or. 48 Providence 61 Raleigh 60 Rapid City 38 Reno 35 Richmond, Va. 64 Sacramento 47 St. Petersburg 73 Salt Lake City 39 San Antonio 74 San Diego 63 San Francisco 54 Santa Fe 42 Savannah 62 Seattle 46 71 Shreveport 44 Sioux Falls 58 Syracuse 63 Tallahassee 70 Tampa 57 Tucson 63 Tulsa 67 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 76 53 Wichita Wilmington, De. 63 66 Yuma

89 97 89 86 66 57 51 87 91 88 85 84 83 80 67 85 91 85 92 73 75 59 81 84 55 64 86 79 84 57 90 85 73 70 85 58 91 60 66 89 87 92 81 85 85 73 82 93

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sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny

59 74 68 74 49 36 34 65 64 67 71 60 65 54 44 68 67 63 66 58 47 54 55 61 33 38 65 48 72 36 70 65 55 32 62 51 70 36 48 62 69 61 53 67 75 49 61 66

87 90 74 85 56 49 54 86 90 77 85 68 82 69 58 85 94 77 96 73 56 62 64 84 59 73 84 80 84 61 81 91 77 62 84 62 78 54 61 87 85 93 70 82 84 65 77 95

partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny showers mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny rain thunderstorms partly cloudy rain sunny partly cloudy windy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny

Great Pumpkin Carving Contest

Do you carve a great pumpkin? This year, make sure to submit a photo of your showpiece squash in our Great Pumpkin Carving Contets! Winners take home Savers Thrift Store gift cards and will be published in a special Halloween feature in the Post-Dispatch on Oct. 30.

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

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87 54 71 96 90 88 72 51 51 62 84 50 87 77 56 52

partly cloudy rain mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy cloudy rain sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy cloudy

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Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

43 79 52 73 59 51 47 47 53 74 52 55 34 77 54 66

55 82 63 91 76 70 73 59 68 100 77 60 39 84 81 95

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partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny

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75 46 53 63 77 79 55 48 42 60 66 28 76 57 41 43

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City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

City

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Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

43 44 45 73 51 78 39 55 44 57 77 63 56 48 46 41

47 59 51 90 70 88 64 75 48 72 88 72 65 55 54 50

cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy showers showers showers

Enter now through Oct. 19 9

STLtoday.com/contests contests


NEWS

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A21

Cheer up, Americans, say Canadians — you’re great Social media push aims to ‘try to look at the positive side of things’ during divisive U.S. campaign season BY MARK KENNEDY associated Press

NEW YORK • America’s

neighbors to the north — so often the butt of their jokes — are taking to social media to try to keep spirits up in the U.S. during this divisive election season. Using the hashtag #tellamericaitsgreat, Canadi-

ans have swamped Twitter with compliments about American music, culture, technology and even tailgating. The outpouring of love triggered a reply — #TellCanadaThanks. It’s all an effort started by the Toronto-based ad agency the Garden Collective, which chose its hashtag as a play on Re-

publican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s campaign slogan, “Make America great again.” The firm’s video launching the social media push has gotten more than 752,000 YouTube views and the hashtag has been trending on Twitter for several days. Many Canadians have made their own mini-

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videos, too. Dic Dickerson, managing director of the firm, called it a pet project they devised for no other reason than to just spread love. “We put it out there, and I don’t think any of us expected to get as much traction as it did, but we’re really, really excited by all the positivity,” he said. “A lot of people are talking, which is exactly what we wanted.” The agency was founded about 18 months ago and usually focuses its attention on businesses. Dickerson said they’d never done anything like this. “Every day we come in and the founders and myself and our team, we sit around and sort of talk about what’s new, what’s everybody reading, what are we looking at, and it always sort of came back to this notion of just how negative everything was about this upcoming elec-

tion,” he said. “You can either pile on with the negativity or try to look at the positive side of things.” Some of the things Canadians say they admire about the U.S. are its federal parks, its diversity, its missions to Mars, jazz and Tupac Shakur. One Canadian from Halifax complimented Americans on Tuesday for baseball, “The Catcher in the Rye” and first lady Michelle Obama. Canadians, who have long been mocked by their southern neighbors for their accents (“aboot”), their creation of Justin Bieber and an apparent abundance of moose, have enjoyed some good press recently, largely thanks to their telegenic new prime minister, Justin Trudeau. Americans, meanwhile, have been in the doldrums as Trump and Hillary Clinton face accusations of running a squalid campaign for presidency, not

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to mention several dispiriting Hollywood breakups, including the demise of Brangelina. The land that gave the world Ryan Gosling has now proven as seemingly warm and kind as that sensitive actor in America’s time of need. “Don’t worry neighbors, if the election goes haywire, you can all come and live up here with us, plenty of room!” wrote one Canadian on Twitter. Only the most cynical people would suspect this, but might the cheerup ad campaign be really a massive attempt to troll Americans? Is this just a big mocking of the Yanks? Dickerson said no. “It’s only coming from a place of love,” he said. “We’ve kind of been joking around about it like it’s a collective group hug from your neighbors to the north. It just felt right at this moment to share the love.”

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NEWS

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 10.19.2016

After 16 months, inally one without record heat ... in as little as one day! Before

After

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A young man in Madrid takes a drink on a sizzling day last month. Last month was the second-hottest September on record for the globe, after 16 months of new records.

because it didn’t consider last June as record-hot. “It’s kind of nice to see it cool down a little bit even though it will go back up again,” Blunden said. “It may not be a record now because we have natural variations in weather and climate. There’s always going to be ups and downs, but that doesn’t mean global warming isn’t happening.”

BY SETH BORENSTEIN Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Earth’s 16-month sizzling streak of record high temperatures is finally over, according to one group of federal meteorologists. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said last month’s 60.6 degrees (15.9 Celsius) was just the second-hottest September on record for the globe. That’s slightly cooler — a few hundredths of a degree — than the record set in 2015. But it was quite a bit warmer — 1.6 degrees (0.9 Celsius) — than the 20thcentury average. Global average temperatures include both land and sea surface readings. And while oceans were cooling off a bit, global land temperatures in September still set a record high, NOAA climate scientist Jessica Blunden said. It was an unusually hot month in much of Europe, Asia, Africa and North America. NASA, which averages global temperature diferently, considers last month as record-hot. But the space agency didn’t have a big consecutive hot streak

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 10.19.2016 • B

BLUES ON A BONDING TRIP It’s a ‘quiet time where the leaders can lead’ JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As the Blues began their three-game swing through Western Canada on Tuesday night against the Vancouver Canucks, they hoped the trip

would deliver more than just points. The first extended trip of the season, regardless of the professional sport, usually helps teams build camaraderie necessary in a long season. Especially for teams like the Blues who hold preseason training camps at home, the road is where the See ORTIZ • Page B4

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo is on his first Canadian trip as the team’s captain.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

> 8 p.m. Thursday at Edmonton, FSM (Tuesday night’s game in Vancouver ended too late for this edition. For coverage, go to STLtoday.com/sports.)

Jay Bouwmeester was one of several Blues who played in the World Cup of Hockey.

Curving the path to a title

NLCS • DODGERS 6, CUBS 0

Dodgers go up on Cubs

Wainwright fanned Beltran 10 years ago BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Late in his senior year of high school, Adam Wainwright began toying around with a new breaking pitch. It was harder and firmer and flatter than the one that would make him famous, but it worked. The slider got outs. His home-state Atlanta Braves took notice of the towering righthander in their backyard and drafted Wainwright 29th overall in 2000. After signing Wainwright, Dayton Moore, then an executive with the Braves, See CURVE • Page B6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Dodgers’ Yasmani Grandal celebrates after hitting a two-run home run during the fourth inning Tuesday night in Game 3 of the NLCS.

Blue Jays win to stay alive Donaldson gives team pep talk, then homers to help Toronto avoid ALCS sweep, B6 > ALCS, NLCS scores and schedule, B6

Grandal, Turner hit homers as Los Angeles wins Game 3 ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Jays’ Edwin Encarnacion hits a two-run single against the Indians in Tuesday’s 5-1 victory.

LOS ANGELES • Rich Hill outpitched reigning Cy Young Award winner Jake Arrieta, Yasmani Grandal hit a two-run homer in the fourth inning and the Los Angeles Dodgers defeated the Chicago Cubs 6-0 Tuesday night to take a 2-1 NL Championship Series lead. After winning a big-league

high 103 games during the regular season and sparking belief they could win the World Series for the first time since 1908, the Cubs have been shut out in consecutive games for the first time this year, managing just six hits — five of them singles. Hill, 14 months removed from independent league ball on Long See NLCS • Page B6

Time to get reacquainted PITTSBURGH • There wasn’t much that Travis Ford easily recognized Tuesday at PPG Paints Arena, where the Atlantic 10 will hold its tournament in March. The conference that he left for the Big 12 in 2008 has altered its look dramatically in the past eight years. There’s a new logo, a new commissioner, a few new members and a lot of new coaches. So, making his official return at the league’s media day was not exactly like old-home week. It was a chance to get familiar with a new entity that happens to exist under the old name. St. Joseph’s coach Phil Martelli, who has

Totals with first-place votes in parentheses

been in the A-10 since 1995, laughed when asked what Ford will find diferent. “Everything, probably,” he said. Martelli is one of three coaches who were around when Ford coached Massachusetts for three seasons starting in 2005. Richmond’s Chris Mooney was also on the job those three years, and St. Bonaventure’s Mark Schmidt started in Ford’s last season. Otherwise, there’s a lot to learn. “It’s a little familiar but not so much because there are a lot of new faces,” Ford said. “Schools have come and gone, but there is a familiarity and that’s part of what attracted me to St. Louis. See A-10 • Page B2

MORE AT STLTODAY.COM • Photo gallery: Looking back at Game 7 of the 2006 NLCS. • Molina’s lightning bolt: Read Joe Strauss’ game story. • Pages of history: How the series played out in the PostDispatch.

A-10 PRESEASON RANKINGS

SLU’s Ford will ind a diferent Atlantic 10 BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DERRICK GOOLD • P-D

Adam Wainwright’s curveball grip.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Travis Ford was the coach at Massachusetts for three years before going to Oklahoma State.

School Points 1. Dayton (16) 374 2. Rhode Island (12) 370 3. VCU 340 4. Davidson 302 5. St. Bonaventure 246 6. Richmond 236 7. La Salle 234 8. George Washington 195 9. Saint Joseph’s 161 10. Massachusetts 147 11. Fordham 124 12. George Mason 83 13. Duquesne 73 14. St. Louis U. 55

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WEDNESDAY • 10.19.2016 • B

BLUES LOSE TO START TRIP Canucks score late to tie, then win it in overtime

Travel can be a bonding time for teams JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As the Blues began their threegame swing through Western Canada on Tuesday night against the Vancouver Canucks, they hoped the trip would deliver more than just points. The first extended trip of the season, regardless of the professional sport, usually helps teams

build camaraderie necessary in a long season. Especially for teams like the Blues who hold preseason training camps at home, the road is where the leaders begin to integrate new players into the crucial of-the-ice part of team culture. “We’ve been in the city now for a month for training camp,” veteran Scottie Upshall said before the Blues departed on their trip. “We’ll get a week on the road. We’ll have a chance to get See ORTIZ • Page B4

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA • The night began in Vancouver on

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Vancouver Canucks goalie Jacob Markstrom gets taken out by Blues center Patrik Berglund during the third period.

CANUCKS 2 BLUES 1

Tuesday with the microphone shorting out on St. Louis-born Jim Byrnes. > 8 p.m. Thursday The fans at Rogers Arena finished off at Edmonton, FSM “The Star Spangled Banner,” followed by “Oh Canada,” before the puck dropped between the Blues and Canucks. In the first of a three-game road trip through Western See BLUES • Page B4

Curving the path to a title

NLCS • DODGERS 6, CUBS 0

Dodgers go up on Cubs

Wainwright fanned Beltran 10 years ago BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Late in his senior year of high school, Adam Wainwright began toying around with a new breaking pitch. It was harder and firmer and flatter than the one that would make him famous, but it worked. The slider got outs. His home-state Atlanta Braves took notice of the towering righthander in their backyard and drafted Wainwright 29th overall in 2000. After signing Wainwright, Dayton Moore, then an executive with the Braves, See CURVE • Page B6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Dodgers’ Yasmani Grandal celebrates after hitting a two-run home run during the fourth inning Tuesday night in Game 3 of the NLCS.

Blue Jays win to stay alive Donaldson gives team pep talk, then homers to help Toronto avoid ALCS sweep, B6 > ALCS, NLCS scores and schedule, B6

Hill lifts LA to 2-1 series lead as Cubs are shut out again ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Jays’ Edwin Encarnacion hits a two-run single against the Indians in Tuesday’s 5-1 victory.

LOS ANGELES • Fourteen months removed from independent ball on Long Island, Rich Hill pitched the Los Angeles Dodgers into a 2-1 NL Championship Series lead. Hill allowed two hits in six innings to beat Cy Young Award winner Jake Arrieta, Yasmani Grandal hit a two-run homer in the fourth inning and the Dodg-

ers defeated the Chicago Cubs 6-0 Tuesday night. After winning a big-leaguehigh 103 games during the regular season and sparking belief they could win the World Series for the first time since 1908, the Cubs have been shut out in consecutive games for the first time this year, managing just six hits — five of See NLCS • Page B6

DERRICK GOOLD • P-D

Adam Wainwright’s curveball grip.

MORE AT STLTODAY.COM • Photo gallery: Looking back at Game 7 of the 2006 NLCS. • Molina’s lightning bolt: Read Joe Strauss’ game story. • Pages of history: How the series played out in the PostDispatch.

Time to get reacquainted

A-10 PRESEASON RANKINGS

SLU’s Ford will ind a diferent Atlantic 10

First-place votes in parentheses. School Points 1. Dayton (16) 374 2. Rhode Island (12) 370 3. VCU 340 4. Davidson 302 5. St. Bonaventure 246 6. Richmond 236 7. La Salle 234 8. George Washington 195 9. Saint Joseph’s 161 10. Massachusetts 147 11. Fordham 124 12. George Mason 83 13. Duquesne 73 14. St. Louis University 55

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PITTSBURGH • There wasn’t much that Travis Ford easily recognized Tuesday at PPG Paints Arena, where the Atlantic 10 will hold its tournament in March. The conference that he left for the Big 12 in 2008 has altered its look dramatically in the past eight years. There’s a new logo, a new commissioner, a few new members and a lot of new coaches. So, making his official return at the league’s media day was not exactly like old-home week. It was a chance to get familiar with a new entity that happens to exist under the old name. St. Joseph’s coach Phil Martelli, who has

been in the A-10 since 1995, laughed when asked what Ford will find diferent. “Everything, probably,” he said. Martelli is one of three coaches who were around when Ford coached Massachusetts for three seasons starting in 2005. Richmond’s Chris Mooney was also on the job those three years, and St. Bonaventure’s Mark Schmidt started in Ford’s last season. Otherwise, there’s a lot to learn. “It’s a little familiar but not so much because there are a lot of new faces,” Ford said. “Schools have come and gone, but there is a familiarity and that’s part of what attracted me to St. Louis. See A-10 • Page B2

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Travis Ford was the coach at Massachusetts for three years before going to Oklahoma State.

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B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 10/20 at Edmonton 8 p.m. FSM

Saturday 10/22 at Calgary 9 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 10/25 vs. Calgary 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 10/27 vs. Detroit 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 10/22 vs. Middle Tenn. 3 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 10/29 vs. Kentucky 11 a.m. SEC Network

Saturday 11/5 at South Carolina Time/TV TBA

Saturday 11/12 vs. Vanderbilt Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/29 vs. Minnesota 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 11/5 vs. Michigan St. Time/TV TBA

Saturday 11/12 at Wisconsin 2:30 p.m. TV TBA

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

ATLANTIC 10 NOTEBOOK

SLU shrugs of bottom ranking Ford tells his players that it means little BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Illinois football • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 10/22 at Michigan 2:30 p.m. BTN

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 10.19.2016

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASEBALL 3 p.m. ALCS: Indians at Blue Jays, TBS 7 p.m. NLCS: Cubs at Dodgers, FS1, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. NBA exhibition: Celtics at Knicks, ESPN 9 p.m. NBA exhibition: Warriors vs. Lakers, ESPN GOLF 10 a.m. Ladies European Tour: Xiamen International Open (replay), GOLF 9:30 p.m. PGA: CIMB Classic, irst round, GOLF 5:30 a.m. (Thu.) European PGA: Portugal Masters, irst round, GOLF HOCKEY 7 p.m. Red Wings at Rangers, NBCSN SOCCER 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Paris Saint-Germain FC vs. FC Basel, ESPN2 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Barcelona vs. Manchester City, FS1 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Arsenal vs. PFC Ludogorets Razgrad, FS2 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Bayern Munich vs. PSV Eindhoven, FSM 6 p.m. NASL: Jacksonville vs. Miami, CBSSN 8 p.m. Women: United States vs. Switzerland, ESPN2 VOLLEYBALL 5 p.m. College women: Rutgers at Michigan State, BTN 6 p.m. College women: Baylor at Iowa State, ESPNU 7 p.m. College women: Ohio State at Penn State, BTN 7 p.m. College women: Texas Christian at Texas, FSM 7 p.m. College women: LSU at Missouri, SEC Network 8 p.m. College women: Auburn at Mississippi, ESPNU

DIGEST Illini’s Hill on watch list for Jerry West Award Illinois senior Malcolm Hill (Belleville East) is one of 20 players named to the watch list for the Jerry West Award, which will honor the top guard this season in college basketball. Hill averaged 18.1 points a game last season. Also, Sports Illustrated used computers to simulate the coming college basketball season 10,000 times and from those median stats projected the top 100 scorers. Hill ranked seventh with a projected average of 18.7 points a game. Jack Gibbs of Davidson was projected to be college basketball’s leading scorer with an average of 23.6 points per game. Peter Jok of Iowa was second at 21.4. The magazine looked at players from the top eight conferences (ACC, AAC, Atlantic 10, Big East, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac 12 and SEC) plus several at-large schools (Mark Tupper) MU women’s basketball team loses another player • Another week, another Missouri women’s basketball player is lost for the season with a knee injury. Junior forward Bri Porter tore the ACL in her left knee in recent days, an injury that will likely end her playing career, Tigers coach Robin Pingeton said Tuesday. It’s the second time Porter has torn her left ACL. She’s torn the same ligament in her right knee three times. Earlier this month, Mizzou lost forward Jordan Frericks for the season with a torn ACL. (Dave Matter) Two Vols out for season • Tennessee linebacker Jalen ReevesMaybin has undergone season-ending shoulder surgery and defensive tackle Kahlil McKenzie also will miss the remainder of the year with a torn pectoral muscle. Volunteers coach Butch Jones updated the status of both players Tuesday. Reeves-Maybin, one of four team captains, hurt his shoulder against Ohio last month. The injury caused him to miss the majority of two games and the entirety of three others. After posting more than 100 tackles each of the last two seasons, Reeves-Maybin has 20 tackles in four games this year. (AP) Stanford’s McCafrey hopes to play • Stanford coach David Shaw said running back Christian McCafrey is feeling better and is hopeful that the 2015 Heisman Trophy inalist will be back in the lineup against Colorado on Saturday. McCafrey has been sidelined since sufering an undisclosed injury in the irst half against Washington State on Oct. 8. He did not play in last week’s win against Notre Dame, and the Cardinal (4-2, 2-2 Pac-12) are continuing to take a cautious approach with him. Shaw told reporters that McCafrey was scheduled to do some on-ield work Tuesday. He could be cleared to join practice Wednesday. “We’ll get him on the ield to do some things today but probably won’t get him a chance to practice, if he can practice, until maybe a little bit tomorrow if he feels good today,” Shaw said. “If not, then we’ll do like last week and see if he can go on Friday.” McCafrey leads Stanford with 520 rushing yards and three touchdowns this year in a follow-up to his fantastic sophomore season when he set an FBS record with 3,496 all-purpose yards, including a school-record 2,019 yards on the ground. (AP) Knicks re-sign Early • The New York Knicks have re-signed forward Cleanthony Early. The team announced the move Tuesday and didn’t disclose terms of the deal. Early (Wichita State) averaged 1.8 points in 17 games for New York during his second NBA season in 2015-16, a season shortened after he was shot in the right knee and robbed in December. (AP)

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PITTSBURGH • Travis Ford was

welcomed back to the Atlantic 10 Conference on Tuesday with a rather unceremonious greeting. Minutes before he walked into the media interview room at PPG Paints Arena, the A-10 released its projected standings for the 201617 basketball season with St. Louis University sitting at the bottom. The news didn’t faze Ford, and it won’t surprise his team. Instead of ignoring the preseason poll as most coaches do, the first-year coach had conversations in recent days with the Billikens about his trip to media day. “One thing we talked about was where we’d be picked,” he said. “They all said the same thing: ‘We’re going to be picked at the bottom.’ Then I said, ‘What does that mean? It means nothing. It should not influence how we practice other than make you play harder.’” The standings have seen a downward spiral for SLU since the Billikens occupied the top spot. They were picked ninth for 2014-15 and finished last. They were picked 13th for 2015-16 and finished in that spot. Now they have been projected as the worst team in the A-10 as Ford returns to the conference for the first time since his tenure ended at Massachusetts in 2008. There’s good reason: The Billikens lost their leading scorer to graduation and saw four players transfer, among them their Nos. 4 and 5 scorers. Ford was left with nine scholarship players, including three freshmen. “If I was picking, I’d probably do the same thing,” he said. Ford said he had an “in-depth” conversation about the preseason poll and the lack of impact it should have on players. “We’re in control of how hard we play and how well prepared we are,” Ford said. “We’re in control of what type of shape we’re in. It has nothing to do with where we’re picked. There’s not a rule that says if you’re picked at the bottom, you can’t play as hard. If you’re at the bottom, you’re not allowed to win. You’re not allowed to come out and play as if you were picked to win. When we step on the court (Wednesday) for practice, it shouldn’t influence how we walk on that court. They

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis University basketball coach Travis Ford speaks during his introduction in March at Chaifetz Arena.

have a grasp of it. I do hope it motivates them, but they should be playing that hard anyway.”

TRAINING CAMP COMPLETE Ford took advantage of some days away from the classroom to hold what he called a “training camp” from Saturday through Monday, capped by a scrimmage. The Billikens practiced twice the first two days and then treated Monday as a game day. “It was a good time to go over everything we had put in, and that’s what we spent the weekend doing,” Ford said. “We have a lot to put in the next two weeks but for training we concentrated on becoming good at what we had done. We have two presses put in. How quickly do we change ends ofensively? Spacing. Things like that.” The players spent most of the weekend together, eating meals between the two-a-day practices. Ford also emphasized team bonding through conversations and activities, such as a trip to see “Kevin Hart: What Now?”

The Billikens had a game-day shootaround Monday morning at 10 and a meal at 11 before playing at 3. Ford had oicials arrive early to talk to players about points of emphasis for 2016-17. Ford said the ofense was better than expected in the scrimmage, although many of the points came from transfer guard Adonys Henriquez, who scored 20 in the first half. “It was about where we thought we were,” Ford said. “It wasn’t a big surprise one way or another. We scored a few more points than I thought we would because I think we’ll be challenged to score at times. But I have to watch to see if it was good ofense or bad defense.” Senior Mike Crawford and freshman Jalen Johnson did not play in the scrimmage. Crawford continues to be held back by a hamstring injury, and Johnson dislocated the index finger on his shooting hand late last week. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Ford must get to know the A-10 A-10 • FROM B1

“It was an aggressive, physical league the first time — hardnosed basketball similar to what I’m coming from in the Big 12. I’ve tried to study the league as much as I can but I don’t have a great feel for it.” Ford turned around the UMass program in three years, taking the Minutemen to the NIT twice and posting a 49-20 record in his last two seasons. They never were worse than .500 in the A-10 in that span. The conference had just undergone membership changes and struggled some years to get multiple NCAA Tournament berths. The A-10 received seven berths in Ford’s three seasons and hasn’t had fewer than three since he left, peaking at six in 2014. “When Travis was in the league the first time it was top heavy,” Martelli said. “The middle was soft and the bottom was the bottom. The bottom has moved up and the top is more populated. “Another thing is that people are scheduling (tougher). If your team is good enough, you’re on the (NCAA) board in March. Some of these guys I see in the summer and I say, ‘Do you know what you’re doing?’ But they really do take on a ‘we’ mentality and that’s not the way it was 12 years ago.” Ford had a record of 7-6 while at UMass against the three coaches who have remained in place. He also played Davidson once in nonconference, losing that matchup on the road. Davidson and coach Bob McKillop are among those who weren’t in the league in those days. The league also has added George Mason and Virginia Commonwealth and lost Xavier, Temple and Charlotte. Butler came and went during Ford’s hiatus. Mooney concurred with Martelli’s evaluation of the league’s strength having been upgraded. He added one other diference he has witnessed. “It’s probably not quite as physical a league as it was the first time Travis was here,” Mooney

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In a game last season, SLU’s Reggie Agbeko drives on Jalen Jenkins of George Mason, a school new to the A-10 for Travis Ford.

said. “I don’t think there’s necessarily a reason other than the shift of basketball overall.” Ford will coach in many arenas he recognizes and some he doesn’t. He’ll have to wait another season to get a trip to Amherst, Mass., to play against his former employer, which he left for Oklahoma State. “We loved our time in Amherst and still have a lot of relationships there,” he said. “Someone from Amherst visited in St. Louis two weeks ago. From that standpoint I’m excited about going there. Is it a little weird? Yeah, sure. But I’ll look forward to it because it was a great experience.” Ford has more than two months to get ready for his dive back into A-10 basketball as a competitor. The addition of former La Salle assistant coach Will Bailey to his staf should help that transition.

He won a lot of games in eight years at Oklahoma State and went to the NCAA Tournament five times. A lot of coaches in the A-10 have done just as well or better in that span, whether in the conference or at other schools before moving into the league. Ford will soon find out just how much his A-10 experience is going to help. “I’ve watched him from afar and admired him when he was in high school as well as at Kentucky,” McKillop said. “He’s been around the block and has enjoyed success everywhere. I think he’s going to give it a jolt of adrenaline, energy and inspiration, and I think that will be seen on the court as well as on the recruiting trail.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

Tigers’ ground game shows signs of life hough running backs feasted mostly on Florida backups, attack has made progress BY DAVE MATTER st. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The last

time a Southeastern Conference team ran for more yards against Florida than Missouri did Saturday, Hillary Clinton was the First Lady, Barry Odom was fresh out of college, Mark McGwire and Will Clark played for the Cardinals, and “Remember the Titans” ruled the box oice. Not since Mississippi State swamped the Gators for 351 rushing yards on Sept. 30, 2000 had a team run through the Florida defense like the Tigers did in Saturday’s waterlogged game in Gainesville. Splitting touches in their backfield timeshare, Damarea Crockett and Ish Witter garnered 265 yards on 46 carries, MU’s best rushing performance in an SEC game since 2014. But the Tigers’ rushing prowess was more footnote than headline. A chunk of the yardage came after Florida built a comfortable lead and emptied its bench in the 40-14 win. Crockett finished with a career-best 145 yards on just 14 carries, built mostly on second-half runs of 21, 36 and 38 yards. Witter chipped in 82 yards and a touchdown on 15 carries. Missouri’s passing game was dead on arrival — Drew Lock completed just four passes to Tigers and two to Gators — but the tailback tandem had measured success against Florida’s defensive starters. Crockett and Witter ran 20 times for 119 yards against the Gators’ first unit (6.0 yards per carry), then feasted on UF backups for 118 yards on nine carries in the fourth quarter (13.1 per carry). For a running game that barely broke the line of scrimmage in other games this season, Missouri could appreciate the success, especially against a formidable SEC defense. Two weeks earlier, Mizzou fell behind too quickly at Louisiana State to develop its ground game, but Crockett and Witter still squeezed through some running lanes. In the two lopsided losses, the two backs ran for 310 yards on 46 attempts, a healthy average of 6.7 yards per carry.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri running back Damarea Crockett prances into the end zone as he scores on a 26-yard run against Eastern Michigan last month at Faurot Field. Crockett leads the Tigers with 390 yards on 54 carries (7.2 yards per carry).

If you’re looking for a silver lining in Mizzou’s bleak 2-4 start, there it is. “We’ve come a long way (in the running game),” offensive coordinator Josh Heupel said after Tuesday’s practice. “We ran it at times better at LSU than I anticipated going into the game. Last week I thought we finished well. We didn’t do a great job in the second quarter. But that’s the run game a little bit. Sometimes it doesn’t pop right away. You’ve got to feed them the ball a little bit. “Obviously I think we’re light years ahead of where we were when we started the year.” With Florida’s defense designed to smother Missouri’s vertical routes in the three- and four-receiver formations, the Tigers faced mostly six-man defensive fronts Saturday, four linemen and two linebackers. The big runs usually came with tight end Sean Culkin attached

to the line of scrimmage or in the backfield as an extra blocker. Late in the second quarter, Witter found a crease for 19 yards when right tackle Paul Adams drove lineman CeCe Jefferson into linebacker Jarrad Davis to pave a runway into the secondary. On Crockett’s 36-yard run to open the third quarter, he ran between left guard Kevin Pendleton and Bailey, who flattened linebacker Alex Anzalone to the turf, clearing an inside path. The same lanes haven’t arrived consistently this season, but that’s the north-south running game Odom envisioned when he formed his staf and hired Heupel to install a more rugged ground game. “I’ve talked over the last couple of weeks (that) we’ve got to be able to run the football,” Odom said. “We’ve got to find a way to do that. That’s going to relieve some things in the pass game. Hopefully at some point we’ll get

both of them going at the same time. That’ll be fun.” Maybe that day is Saturday. The Tigers get a break from conference play with a visit from Middle Tennessee (4-2). In back-to-back games last month, Vanderbilt and Bowling Green ambushed the Blue Raiders for 535 rushing yards and eight rushing touchdowns. Through six games, if you subtract yards lost by sacks from MU’s rushing total, the run game has averaged 171.8 yards per game and 4.6 per carry — both up from last year’s averages of 100.8 and 3.3. There’s one catch with the improved production: 32.1 percent of the rushing yardage has come when the Tigers are down by more than two touchdowns, according to cfbstats.com. Mizzou needs to discover a running game not just often but early. Crockett leads the Tigers with 390 yards on 54 carries —

29 fewer attempts than Witter — and ranks fourth in the SEC in yards per carry (7.2) among backs with 50 carries. While ankle injuries have sidelined fellow newcomers Alex Ross and Nate Strong, Missouri’s back of the future is already the back of now. “We’re finally seeing some big runs,” right guard Alec Abeln said. “Honestly, I wish we’d be better up front, more physical at the point of attack and better finishers.” Ofensive line coach Glen Elarbee wasn’t thrilled with Saturday’s blocking but said he felt better Tuesday night. With half a season left, the Tigers might have discovered something at The Swamp. “Today was our best Tuesday practice of the year by far,” he said. “It’s the best I’ve felt walking of the practice field.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

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CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • Lovie Smith is lowkey, laid-back, happy to skip the spotlight. Jim Harbaugh is full throttle, front page and if it helped him land a recruit, he’d sprawl naked in the public spotlight. These are the polar-opposite head coaches this week when Smith and the Illini head to Ann Arbor, Mich., to meet Harbaugh and the Michigan Wolverines. During Illinois’ bye week in late September, Smith ducked questions about where he’d go on his first of-campus recruiting jaunt since he took over the Illini in March. He was happy to walk in the shadows, not creating a stir as he tip-toed around a couple high school campuses in Florida. During Michigan’s bye week last weekend, Harbaugh made national headlines every day. He went recruiting in California and made sure everyone knew he was at Antioch High School on Friday, checking up on a 5-star running back who’d already committed to Alabama. At halftime, Harbaugh announced the homecoming queen. The next day, at a high school game in Albany, Calif., Harbaugh helped on the chain gang while he checked out El Cerrito’s heralded offensive tackle, Aaron Banks. Harbaugh said they ofered him a tri-tip steak sandwich to help move the down markers and he just couldn’t resist. Fans at each game were mesmerized. Also last week, he and his wife, Sarah, showed up at the Ann Arbor Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse to show their appreciation for a promotion that was still celebrating Michigan’s 78-0 victory over Rutgers. The restaurant owner ran an ad promising Michigan’s margin of victory would become the percentage off dinners that week. Wisely, he capped the offer at 50 percent. But hungry diners lined up to devour half-price steaks and in a conveniently staged photo, Harbaugh appeared ready to tackle a monstrous bone-in ribeye accompanied by a wine glass filled with milk. Wherever Harbaugh goes, the cameras follow. Wherever Lovie Smith goes, he winces in a way that makes you believe he wishes the cameras would disappear. Diferent guy. Diferent approach. I was there in Ann Arbor on Dec. 30, 2014, when Harbaugh was introduced as Michigan’s new head football coach. It was the craziest introductory press conference I’ve ever seen with lines of TV

cameras stretching in multiple rows across the back of the room, looking very much like a football team lined up for its pregame stretch. The room was crackling with excitement as Michigan welcomed back its prodigal son, the one-time Wolverine quarterback who revered Bo Schembechler and who now has his own children attending the same elementary school where he walked the halls. If Harbaugh is a one-man circus, Michigan Stadium is his big top, and it is there at 2:30 p.m., Saturday where Illinois will try to spoil what looks and feels like a Wolverine team sprinting to daylight. Unless something goes terribly wrong, Michigan is headed to an 11-0 start and an inevitable collision Nov. 26 with its undefeated rival: No. 3 Michigan vs. No. 2 Ohio State. That game will be played in Columbus, Ohio, and no stadium in the land could contain all the hype and hoopla that will accompany that one. On the Big Ten’s weekly teleconference call Tuesday, Harbaugh said he knew Lovie Smith “professionally pretty well,” from their days as NFL head coaches when Smith was leading the Chicago Bears and Harbaugh was coaching the San Francisco 49ers. “I coached against him that one time in 2012,” Harbaugh said. That was an important season for each coach. Lovie Smith was headed to a 10-6 record, which nowadays sounds like a glorious season for the Bears. Trouble was, the Bears fired him at the end of that year. Harbaugh was headed for the Super Bowl. His 49ers beat Smith’s Bears 32-7 and would go on to lose to Harbaugh’s brother, John, and the Baltimore Ravens in the big game. Two years later Harbaugh was done with the 49ers, in part, some say, because people found his eccentric style exhausting. That’s why college — especially Michigan — could be the perfect landing spot for Harbaugh. Players cycle through every four or five years, the Ann Arbor faithful adore him and his energy to stay in the recruiting spotlight seems to know no bounds. On Tuesday, Harbaugh praised Smith’s performance the job Smith is doing in his first season with the Illini. “They’re improving,” he said. It should be noted that he also praised Rutgers a few days before the wipeout that wrote another Ann Arbor headline: Welcome to half-price steaks.


BLUES

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 10.19.2016

NOTEBOOK

Rattie is in lineup sooner than expected Injuries give him a chance to play on a line with Stastny and Fabbri vs. Vancouver BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA • Ty Rattie’s best

chance to crack the Blues’ opening-night lineup went out the window six nights before Game 1 when the team traded for Edmonton’s Nail Yakupov. It pushed the right winger off the third line and into the pressbox as a healthy scratch. Rattie, a second-round pick in 2011 who has played in just 26 NHL games, took the news in stride. The day after the Yakupov deal, he said that Blues general manager Doug Armstrong “made a move to help out the organization, and everyone agrees that it’s a good move.” Rattie sat out of the Blues’

first three games, watching them start 3-0 for just the third time in franchise history. The Calgary, Alberta, native was told he’d probably play on the three-game road trip, but perhaps have to wait until games in Edmonton on Thursday or in his hometown on Saturday. But after having his season debut pushed back three games, Rattie had his first appearance bumped up to Tuesday, when the Blues traveled to Vancouver for a 9 p.m. start at Rogers Arena. With Jori Lehtera left back in St. Louis with an upper-body injury, and Jaden Schwartz still on the mend with an elbow issue, Rattie got his assignment. And what an assignment it was, playing on a line with Paul Stastny and Robby Fabbri.

“Really looking forward to it,” Rattie said before the game. “It’s exciting to get your first game of the season. Obviously playing in the top six, you’re going to have to perform like a top-six player. I want to take care my (defensive) zone first and foremost and in the (offensive) zone, I just want to help out my linemates, who are two very skilled guys. So looking forward to it, excited and I can’t wait.” That line had featured Stastny, Fabbri and Alexander Steen, who was on the right wing. But Steen moved to center to replace Lehtera, creating a hole. Blues coach Ken Hitchcock filled it with Rattie, who has been limited to a bottom-six role in previous NHL stints. “Hopefully he takes advantage

of it,” Hitchcock said. “A lot of these young guys ... because of where we’re at injury-wise, they get a chance to play and hopefully they take advantage of it.”

SCHWARTZ CLOSER Schwartz took part in the Blues’ optional skate Tuesday morning, but afterward Hitchcock said the left winger, who missed his fourth game with an elbow injury, still had a final hurdle to clear. “He’s close,” Hitchcock said. “Today was the second fitness skate. If he passed the fitness skate, then it’s time to evaluate him to see if he’s ready to play. If I get the numbers back that I want, after the skate evaluation today, then we’ll look to put him as a full-practice player tomorrow to

evaluate him for a game player.” Neither center Kyle Brodziak nor defenseman Carl Gunnarsson, who also left Saturday’s games with upper-body injuries, played Tuesday. Dmitrij Jaskin replaced Brodziak and Robert Bortuzzo came in for Gunnarsson.

BLUENOTES Through three games, Stastny was averaging 21:59 of ice time per game. That was second in the NHL among all forwards, trailing Anaheim’s Corey Perry by one second. ... The Blues were seeking the second 4-0 start in franchise history Tuesday; the other was in 2013-14. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Trip will give Blues chance for time together of ice

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo (27) tries to clear the puck away from goaltender Carter Hutton in Saturday night’s victory over the New York Rangers.

ORTIZ • FROM B1

leaders begin to integrate new players into the crucial off-the-ice part of team culture. “We’ve been in the city now for a month for training camp,” veteran Scottie Upshall said before the Blues departed on their trip. “We’ll get a week on the road. We’ll have a chance to get to know your teammates a little better, get out there and laugh, be on the plane, get in road buildings, play in hard road games, go in and steal points.” Points remain the top priority, whether at Scottrade Center in downtown St. Louis or Vancouver’s Rogers Arena, Edmonton’s Rogers Place or Calgary’s Scotiabank Saddledome. But the Blues will also try to strengthen their team bonds as they visit the Canucks on Tuesday, the Oilers on Thursday night and the Flames on Saturday night. The Blues return most of the same roster that got within two victories of the Stanley Cup Finals, so there isn’t much need for introductions. That doesn’t mean a leadership void isn’t being filled this season. The Blues’ leadership is different now that David Backes is playing with the Boston Bruins. This is Alex Pietrangelo’s first extended trip as the 21st captain in Blues franchise history. His good friend Backes held that role the previous five years before leaving St. Louis to

sign with the Bruins this summer. Pietrangelo was an assistant captain last year, so he obviously knows the core group. He normally would have settled in as captain during training camp. This year was different. He missed most of training camp while helping Team Canada win the World Cup of Hockey in September. Pietrangelo didn’t make his first preseason appearance for the Blues until the penultimate game of training camp. He played only two preseason games. Actually, a little more than a third of the Blues’ roster missed a large portion of training camp because of the World Cup of Hockey, including the new captain and one of the new assistant captains, superstar forward Vladimir Tarasenko. Pietrangelo and Jay Bouwmeester were with Team Canada, Tarasenko was with Team Russia, Jori Lehtera was with Team Finland, Dmitrij Jaskin was with Team Czech Republic, Patrik Berglund was with Team Sweden and Colton Parayko was with Team North America. Tarasenko, Paul Stastny and Kevin Shattenkirk joined Alexander Steen as assistant captains this year. Coach Ken Hitchcock can communicate to his entire team through his captain and assistant captains. The long trip will give Pietrangelo and the assistant captains a chance to bring the group together of the ice.

“I just think it leads to quiet time where the leaders can lead,” Hitchcock said. “I think this is a great opportunity for the leaders to really grab the team and make it their own. That’s what we’re looking for, seeing where the leaders grab it.” Hitchcock praised his captain and four assistant captains for the way they began to exert their authority during the Blues’ team meeting Monday in St. Louis and then during that morning’s practice. “It was real good to see,” Hitchcock said. “I think that’s going to be a real focus for us. This is the leader’s time. This is the time for the players to follow the appropriate direction that we need to go on, on and of the ice, and we’re going to do that.” The Blues arrived in Vancouver on Monday afternoon. They won’t spend more than two days at any of the three cities. They’ll be in and out as they play in Edmonton and then Calgary. Of those three cities, Vancouver is the one with the most to do near the team hotel, according to Shattenkirk. Shattenkirk appreciates the variety of restaurant choices at his disposal when he walks down the boardwalk in Vancouver. He also enjoys shopping at the mall by the hotel in Vancouver. “Edmonton and Calgary don’t really have much of that, but it’s more so you’re just kind of getting out and about,” he said. “Certain

cities you can explore a little more. “You’re on the bus together every day. You’re in the locker together most of the day. And again, when you leave the rink you’re all going back to the hotel together planning out what you’re going to do the rest of day together rather than someone going home

to their wife and kids and they have their duties there when you’re in St. Louis.” The Blues opened the season on the road against the Chicago Blackhawks at the United Center. They hardly had much free time to get together as a team of the ice because that was a quick trip before they returned home for the next

two games. They left St. Louis on Monday with a perfect 3-0 record. They hope to return next week feeling good about the team and each other on and of the ice. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

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BLUES

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WEDnESDAy • 10.19.2016

NOTEBOOK

Rattie is in lineup sooner than expected Injuries give him a chance to play on a line with Stastny and Fabbri vs. Vancouver BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA • Ty Rattie’s best

chance to crack the Blues’ opening-night lineup went out the window six nights before Game 1 when the team traded for Edmonton’s Nail Yakupov. It pushed the right winger off the third line and into the pressbox as a healthy scratch. Rattie, a second-round pick in 2011 who has played in just 26 NHL games, took the news in stride. The day after the Yakupov deal, he said that Blues general manager Doug Armstrong “made a move to help out the organization, and everyone agrees that it’s a good move.” Rattie sat out of the Blues’

first three games, watching them start 3-0 for just the third time in franchise history. The Calgary, Alberta, native was told he’d probably play on the three-game road trip, but perhaps have to wait until games in Edmonton on Thursday or in his hometown on Saturday. But after having his season debut pushed back three games, Rattie had his first appearance bumped up to Tuesday, when the Blues traveled to Vancouver for a 9 p.m. start at Rogers Arena. With Jori Lehtera left back in St. Louis with an upper-body injury, and Jaden Schwartz still on the mend with an elbow issue, Rattie got his assignment. And what an assignment it was, playing on a line with Paul Stastny and Robby Fabbri.

“Really looking forward to it,” Rattie said before the game. “It’s exciting to get your first game of the season. Obviously playing in the top six, you’re going to have to perform like a top-six player. I want to take care my (defensive) zone first and foremost and in the (offensive) zone, I just want to help out my linemates, who are two very skilled guys. So looking forward to it, excited and I can’t wait.” That line had featured Stastny, Fabbri and Alexander Steen, who was on the right wing. But Steen moved to center to replace Lehtera, creating a hole. Blues coach Ken Hitchcock filled it with Rattie, who has been limited to a bottom-six role in previous NHL stints. “Hopefully he takes advantage

of it,” Hitchcock said. “A lot of these young guys ... because of where we’re at injury-wise, they get a chance to play and hopefully they take advantage of it.”

SCHWARTZ CLOSER Schwartz took part in the Blues’ optional skate Tuesday morning, but afterward Hitchcock said the left winger, who missed his fourth game with an elbow injury, still had a final hurdle to clear. “He’s close,” Hitchcock said. “Today was the second fitness skate. If he passed the fitness skate, then it’s time to evaluate him to see if he’s ready to play. If I get the numbers back that I want, after the skate evaluation today, then we’ll look to put him as a full-practice player tomorrow to

evaluate him for a game player.” Neither center Kyle Brodziak nor defenseman Carl Gunnarsson, who also left Saturday’s games with upper-body injuries, played Tuesday. Dmitrij Jaskin replaced Brodziak and Robert Bortuzzo came in for Gunnarsson.

BLUENOTES Through three games, Stastny was averaging 21:59 of ice time per game. That was second in the NHL among all forwards, trailing Anaheim’s Corey Perry by one second. ... The Blues were seeking the second 4-0 start in franchise history Tuesday; the other was in 2013-14. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Trip will give Blues chance for time together of ice ORTIZ • FROM B1

to know your teammates a little better, get out there and laugh, be on the plane, get in road buildings, play in hard road games, go in and steal points.” Points remain the top priority, whether at Scottrade Center in downtown St. Louis or Vancouver’s Rogers Arena, Edmonton’s Rogers Place or Calgary’s Scotiabank Saddledome. But the Blues will also try to strengthen their team bonds as they visit the Canucks on Tuesday, the Oilers on Thursday night and the Flames on Saturday night. The Blues return most of the same roster that got within two victories of the Stanley Cup Finals, so there isn’t much need for introductions. That doesn’t mean a leadership void isn’t being filled this season. The Blues’ leadership is different now that David Backes is playing with the Boston Bruins. This is Alex Pietrangelo’s first

extended trip as the 21st captain in Blues franchise history. His good friend Backes held that role the previous five years before leaving St. Louis to sign with the Bruins this summer. Pietrangelo was an assistant captain last year, so he obviously knows the core group. He normally would have settled in as captain during training camp. This year was different. He missed most of training camp while helping Team Canada win the World Cup of Hockey in September. Pietrangelo didn’t make his first preseason appearance for the Blues until the penultimate game of training camp. He played only two preseason games. Actually, a little more than a third of the Blues’ roster missed a large portion of training camp because of the World Cup of Hockey, including the new captain and one of the new assistant captains, superstar forward Vladimir Tarasenko. Pietrangelo and Jay Bouw-

meester were with Team Canada, Tarasenko was with Team Russia, Jori Lehtera was with Team Finland, Dmitrij Jaskin was with Team Czech Republic, Patrik Berglund was with Team Sweden and Colton Parayko was with Team North America. Tarasenko, Paul Stastny and Kevin Shattenkirk joined Alexander Steen as assistant captains this year. Coach Ken Hitchcock can communicate to his entire team through his captain and assistant captains. The long trip will give Pietrangelo and the assistant captains a chance to bring the group together of the ice. “I just think it leads to quiet time where the leaders can lead,” Hitchcock said. “I think this is a great opportunity for the leaders to really grab the team and make it their own. That’s what we’re looking for, seeing where the leaders grab it.” Hitchcock praised his captain and four assistant captains for the way they began to exert their

authority during the Blues’ team meeting Monday in St. Louis and then during that morning’s practice. “It was real good to see,” Hitchcock said. “I think that’s going to be a real focus for us. This is the leader’s time. This is the time for the players to follow the appropriate direction that we need to go on, on and of the ice, and we’re going to do that.” The Blues arrived in Vancouver on Monday afternoon. They won’t spend more than two days at any of the three cities. They’ll be in and out as they play in Edmonton and then Calgary. Of those three cities, Vancouver is the one with the most to do near the team hotel, according to Shattenkirk. Shattenkirk appreciates the variety of restaurant choices at his disposal when he walks down the boardwalk in Vancouver. He also enjoys shopping at the mall by the hotel in Vancouver. “Edmonton and Calgary don’t really have much of that, but it’s

Blues allow late goal, then lose in overtime BLUES • FROM B1

Canada, the offense then shorted out on the Blues. A team that had netted 11 goals in a 3-0 start came up with just one Tuesday, from Vladimir Tarasenko. It looked like that would be enough, but Vancouver scored with 2 minutes, 55 seconds remaining in regulation, sending the game to overtime, and Henrik Sedin finished of the Blues in OT. Sedin’s goal just 1:40 into the 3-on-3 overtime provided Vancouver with a 2-1 win over the Blues, improving the Canucks to 3-0 on the season. They have rallied to win all three games, trailing at the second intermission, something the team did only three times all of last season. To put this in even greater perspective, the Blues were on the verge of shutting out Vancouver for the third consecutive game, but after going 177:34 without a goal, the Canucks scored twice in 4:35. It cost the Blues their second 4-0 start in franchise history, dropping them to 3-0-1 before heading to Edmonton on Thursday. “I think when they got that goal, they were coming,” Blues forward David Perron said. “They found a way to get one in. Then in the OT, you just jump on the ice and try to backcheck, and be desperate. Jake (Allen) is on one side and I know that the net is open, so I’m trying to put my leg out so it goes of my heel and it goes in. That’s 3-on-3 hockey for you. Mistakes are going to happen. That was on us tonight.” The Blues were about to leave Vancouver with a 1-0 win, but late in regulation, Canucks defenseman Erik Gudbranson released a big shot from the point. Jake Allen made the save, but center Bo Horvat was on the doorstep to knock in

the rebound for a 1-1 score. “There was a lot going on,” Blues defenseman Colton Parayko said. “The guy (Gudbranson) made a good shot from the point and it was just kind of sitting there. The guy (Horvat) had good stick and good body position and pretty much just an easy (goal).” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said his club had several chances to clear themselves from danger before the goal. “The puck was on our stick three times when we gave up the goal,” Hitchcock said. “If we would have skated with it three times, it’s out. But we just shoveled it and made it someone else’s problem. It ended up in the back of our net. Too many shovel plays, nobody taking charge. Tough goal.” Then in OT, Henrik Sedin finished off another play on Allen’s doorstep, this time ending the evening. He had a tap-in at the side of the net. Tarasenko was on the ice for the entire extra frame. “Overtime was a mistake,” Hitchcock said. “We stayed on the ice too long and we forced it at one end. We haven’t done that all last year. We’ll correct that problem tomorrow.” Vancouver outshot the Blues 26-24 and the teams were a combined zero for seven on the power play. The Blues were missing all three players who left Saturday’s game against the New York Rangers with upper-body injuries. Center Jori Lehtera didn’t make the trip to Vancouver, and while center Kyle Brodziak and defenseman Carl Gunnarsson did travel, they did not suit up Tuesday. Ty Rattie took Lehtera’s spot in the lineup and went into his season debut on a line with Paul Stastny and Robby Fabbri, while Dmitrij Jaskin stepped into Brodziak’s role on the fourth line. That primetime assignment didn’t

more so you’re just kind of getting out and about,” he said. “Certain cities you can explore a little more. “You’re on the bus together every day. You’re in the locker together most of the day. And again, when you leave the rink you’re all going back to the hotel together planning out what you’re going to do the rest of day together rather than someone going home to their wife and kids and they have their duties there when you’re in St. Louis.” The Blues opened the season on the road against the Chicago Blackhawks at the United Center. They hardly had much free time to get together as a team of the ice because that was a quick trip before they returned home for the next two games. They left St. Louis on Monday with a perfect 3-0 record. They hope to return next week feeling good about the team and each other on and of the ice. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

CANUCKS 2, BLUES 1, OT Blues 0 1 0 0 — 1 Vancouver 0 0 1 1 — 2

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues left winger David Perron (57) can’t stop the gamewinning goal by Vancouver Canucks center Henrik Sedin (33) in overtime Tuesday night.

last long for Rattie, who found himself strapped to the bench at the end of the period and on a different line in the second period. The first period was scoreless, but only after an official review negated a would-be Vancouver goal. The Blues carried a shutout streak of 120:29 into the game, and that appeared to be over just 6:10 into the game when a puck went in of the skate of Luca Sbisa. Allen signaled his thoughts to oicials, kicking his leg in the air after the goal, and following a video review, they agreed that it was a distinct kicking motion. Vancouver had three power plays in the first period, and a Blues penalty-killing unit missing both Brodziak and Lehtera erased them all, including one that carried over into the second period. The Canucks couldn’t convert on the man-advantage, but they began applying more pressure. Horvat got through the Blues’ defense and hit the post, and a minute later Allen had to swallow up a shot by Daniel Sedin to keep the game scoreless. The Blues, meanwhile, changed up their line combinations early in the second period. Rattie lasted only a handful of shifts before Hitchcock swapped him with Nail Yakupov, placing the newcomer with Stastny and Fabbri and slipping Rattie down the lineup with Magnus Paa-

jarvi and Patrik Berglund. The Blues’ offensive spark, though, would come from save by Allen. Henrik Sedin got behind the defense, but Allen turned him away. Seconds later, Alexander Steen sprung

FIRST PERIOD None. Penalties: Steen, STL, (cross checking), 7:12; Granlund, VAN, (hooking), 9:17; Stastny, STL, (hooking), 13:50; Hansen, VAN, (tripping), 16:32; Upshall, STL, (high sticking), 19:55. SECOND PERIOD B: Tarasenko 4 (Steen), 10:23. Penalties: Edler, VAN, (interference), 7:52. THIRD PERIOD V: Horvat 2 (Baertschi, Gudbranson), 17:05. Penalties: Shattenkirk, STL, (holding), 6:39. OVERTIME V: Sedin 1 (Tanev, Sedin), 16:40. Penalties: None. Shots on goal Blues 4 8 10 2 24 Vancouver 7 6 12 1 26 Power-plays Blues 0 of 3; Vancouver 0 of 4. Goaltenders Blues, Allen 2-0-1 (26 shots-24 saves). Vancouver, Markstrom 2-0-0 (24-23). A: 17,568. Referees: Mike Leggo, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Trent Knorr.

tea m m a te Ta ra se n ko on a 2-on-1 with Scottie Upshall the other way. Tarasenko took one look toward Upshall and then ripped a shot past Vancouver goalie Jacob Markstrom.

Markstrom got the surprise start in place of former Blue Ryan Miller, who arrived at Rogers Arena with “stifness,” according to the Canucks. They had to bring in a goalie from a local university to be the emergency backup. That Tarasenko had the first goal of the game came as no surprise. His fourth of the season, tying him for the NHL lead with three other players, handed the Blues a 1-0 lead with 9:37 left in the second period. The game stayed that way until late in the third period, when things started to short out for the Blues. “But you move on,” Hitchcock said. “Getting points on the road is key. Scoring one goal and getting points is a good thing.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

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SPORTS

10.19.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Oshie scores two goals to help Caps win player to reach 500 career goals. The 37-year-old Hossa slid a powerplay backhander through the legs of Philadelphia goaltender Michal Neuvirth at 5:04 of the second period, giving the host Blackhawks a 4-0 lead on Tuesday night. He then skated over to Chicago’s bench, where he was greeted with smiles, handshakes and hugs. The crowd of 21,263 at the United Center roared when the milestone goal was announced, and Hossa waved his stick to acknowledge the standing ovation. Hossa, who signed a 12-year, $62.8 million contract with Chicago in July 2009, is beginning his eighth season with the Blackhawks.

Ovechkin also scores as Washington power play gets going against the Avs ASSOCIATED PRESS

T.J. Oshie scored twice and Alex Ovechkin picked up his first goal of the season, helping the host Washington Capitals beat the Colorado Avalanche 3-0 on Tuesday night. Ovechkin and Oshie each scored on the power play to end Washington’s manadvantage scoring drought, and the Avalanche lost for the first time under new coach Jared Bednar. Goaltender Semyon Varlamov was sharp in stopping 37 of 40 shots behind Colorado teammates who were noticeably tired playing the second half of a back-to-back and their third game in four days. Washington backup Philipp Grubauer only needed 18 saves for his first career shutout because Washington had the puck for most of the game. The Capitals entered the game 0 for eight on the power play and lacking production from the first line, but those problems went away in quick succession. Sharks 3, Islanders 2 • Joe Pavelski scored with 2:11 left to lift San Jose to a victory over the host New York Islanders.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington Capitals right winger T.J. Oshie (left) celebrates his irst goal Tuesday night with center Nicklas Backstrom during the second period against Colorado.

it in. It gave Pavelski his fifth point in two games after he had a goal and three assists in the Sharks’ 7-4 loss to the New York Rangers on Monday.

Melker Karlsson and Tomas Hertl also scored to help the Sharks win for the third time in four games. Joe Thornton and Brent Burns had two assists each, giving both five on the season. Aaron Dell stopped 20 shots to win his NHL debut. On the tiebreaking goal, Thornton sent a pass into the slot and Pavelski deflected

NOTEBOOK Hossa gets goal No. 500 • Blackhawks forward Marian Hossa became the 44th NHL

NHL SUMMARIES

NHL STANDINGS

Senators 7, Coyotes 4

Capitals 3, Avalanche 0

Canadiens 4, Penguins 0

Arizona 1 0 3 — 4 Ottawa 2 1 4 — 7 First period: 1, Arizona, Rieder 1 (Strome, Murphy), 12:18. 2, Ottawa, Ryan 2 (Karlsson, Hoffman), 13:41 (pp). 3, Ottawa, Pyatt 2, 15:16. Penalties: Phaneuf, OTT, (hooking), 6:50; White, ARI, (interference), 13:37. Second period: 4, Ottawa, Smith 2 (Pyatt, Ceci), 13:04 (sh). Penalties: Stone, OTT, (tripping), 2:00; Murphy, ARI, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:00; Neil, OTT, (interference), 12:40; Smith, OTT, (roughing), 14:05; Ekmanlarsson, ARI, (roughing), 14:05; Ryan, OTT, (hooking), 19:15; Kelly, OTT, (tripping), 19:54. Third period: 5, Arizona, Ekman-larsson 2 (Goligoski, Doan), 1:01 (pp). 6, Ottawa, Kelly 1, 7:30. 7, Ottawa, Stone 1 (Turris, Hoffman), 8:11. 8, Arizona, Martinook 1 (Goligoski), 10:07. 9, Ottawa, Turris 3 (Hoffman, Stone), 18:13. 10, Arizona, Martinook 2 (Richardson, Murphy), 18:43. 11, Ottawa, Karlsson 2 (Kelly), 19:47. Penalties: Arizona bench, served by Duclair (too many men on the ice), 4:28; Ceci, OTT, (interference), 12:02. Shots: Arizona 16-11-8: 35. Ottawa 13-11-18: 42. Power-plays: Arizona 1 of 5; Ottawa 1 of 2. Goalies: Arizona, Domingue 0-1-0 (11 shots-8 saves), Smith 1-0-0 (30-27). Ottawa, Anderson 3-0-0 (35-31). A: 11,061.

Colorado 0 0 0 — 0 Washington 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Washington, Ovechkin 1 (Johansson, Orlov), 15:44 (pp). Penalties: Zadorov, COL, (tripping), 3:51; Ovechkin, WSH, (cross checking), 8:43; Comeau, COL, (cross checking), 13:50. Second period: 2, Washington, Oshie 1 (Backstrom, Johansson), 11:32 (pp). Penalties: Duchene, COL, (tripping), 1:35; Eller, WSH, (hooking), 5:34; Wilson, WSH, Major (fighting), 11:20; Iginla, COL, served by Mcleod, (instigator), 11:20; Iginla, COL, Misconduct (misconduct), 11:20; Iginla, COL, Major (fighting), 11:20; Ovechkin, WSH, (roughing), 19:50; Landeskog, COL, (roughing), 19:50. Third period: 3, Washington, Oshie 2 (Kuznetsov, Ovechkin), 13:35. Penalties: Ovechkin, WSH, (slashing), 8:06; Bourque, COL, (cross checking), 8:54. Shots: Colorado 5-7-6: 18. Washington 20-9-11: 40. PP: Colorado 0 of 3; Washington 2 of 5. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 1-1-0 (40 shots37 saves). Washington, Grubauer 1-0-0 (18-18). A: 18,506. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Evgeny Romasko. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Tim Nowak.

Pittsburgh 0 0 0 — 0 Montreal 1 1 2 — 4 First period: 1, Montreal, Pacioretty 1 (Petry), 0:23. Penalties: Pacioretty, MTL, (holding), 9:52; Radulov, MTL, (interference), 18:35. Second period: 2, Montreal, Desharnais 1 (Pacioretty), 12:07. Penalties: Radulov, MTL, major (high sticking), 7:02; Bonino, PIT, (delay of game), 7:07; Letang, PIT, (holding stick), 14:02; Flynn, MTL, (high sticking), 19:23; Malkin, PIT, (hooking), 19:25. Third period: 3, Montreal, Radulov 1 (Galchenyuk, Montoya), 4:31 (pp). 4, Montreal, Desharnais 2 (Markov, Petry), 13:44. Penalties: Schultz, PIT, (tripping), 0:33; Fehr, PIT, (boarding), 1:26; Weber, MTL, (tripping), 1:41; Pacioretty, MTL, served by Radulov, (tripping), 2:15; Letang, PIT, (slashing), 2:27; Pittsburgh bench, served by Wilson (too many men on the ice), 7:40; Beaulieu, MTL, (delay of game), 15:43. Shots: Pittsburgh 17-10-9: 36. Montreal 13-8-11: 32. PP: Pittsburgh 0 of 8; Montreal 1 of 6. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Fleury 2-1-1 (32 shots-28 saves). Montreal, Montoya 2-0-1 (36-36). A: 21,288.

Devils 2, Ducks 1 Anaheim 1 0 0 — 1 New Jersey 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, Anaheim, Vatanen 1 (Perry, Fowler), 9:03 (pp). Penalties: Fiddler, NJ, Major (fighting), 0:30; Kesler, ANA, Major (fighting), 0:30; Henrique, NJ, (slashing), 3:55; Palmieri, NJ, (tripping), 7:15; Larsson, ANA, (interference), 18:33. Second period: 2, New Jersey, Hall 1 (Zajac, Cammalleri), 12:35 (pp). 3, New Jersey, Hall 2 (Palmieri, Severson), 16:46 (pp). Penalties: Boucher, NJ, (high sticking), 6:29; Etem, ANA, (high sticking), 10:15; Vermette, ANA, (tripping), 11:42; Sorensen, ANA, (tripping), 15:31; Kesler, ANA, (high sticking), 17:15; Henrique, NJ, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 18:49; Bieksa, ANA, (holding), 19:50. Third period: None. Penalties: Perry, ANA, (interference), 5:39; Moore, NJ, (delay of game), 16:56. Shots: Anaheim 10-5-9: 24. New Jersey 11-12-5: 28. PP: Anaheim 1 of 4; New Jersey 2 of 7. Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 0-2-1 (28 shots-26 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 1-1-1 (24-23). A: 16,514.

Sharks 3, Islanders 2 San Jose 1 1 1 — 3 NY Islanders 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, San Jose, Karlsson 1 (Wingels, Haley), 5:36. Penalties: NY Islanders bench, served by Strome (too many men on the ice), 12:27. Second period: 2, NY Islanders, Beauvillier 1 (Bailey, Tavares), 9:39. 3, NY Islanders, Lee 1 (Chimera, Nelson), 11:49. 4, San Jose, Hertl 1 (Burns, Thornton), 18:03. Penalties: Ward, SJ, (interference), 12:33. Third period: 5, San Jose, Pavelski 2 (Thornton, Burns), 17:49. Penalties: Pavelski, SJ, (delay of game), 18:54. Shots: San Jose 10-9-8: 27. NY Islanders 4-13-6: 23. Power-plays: San Jose 0 of 1; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies: San Jose, Dell 1-0-0 (23 shots-21 saves). NY Islanders, Halak 1-2-0 (27-24). A: 10,772. Referees: Marc Joannette, Tom Kowal. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, David Brisebois.

Crosby might practice • Sidney Crosby could resume practicing as early as Wednesday. Maybe. It all depends, coach Mike Sullivan said, on how Crosby responds to a workout Tuesday in Pittsburgh. “There’s a possibility, yes,” Sullivan said. “That’s something we certainly will evaluate overnight, and we’ll see where it goes from there. “Obviously, that’s the next step in his progression, that he joins the team.” Crosby, who has missed the first four games of the season while recovering from a concussion, did not accompany the Penguins to Montreal for their game Tuesday. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

Lightning 4, Panthers 3, SO Florida 0 1 2 0 — 3 Tampa Bay 0 2 1 0 — 4 Tampa Bay won shootout 2-1. First period: None. Penalties: Paquette, TB, (hooking), 12:11. Second period: 1, Florida, Sceviour 2 (Mackenzie), 2:38 (sh). 2, Tampa Bay, Killorn 3 (Kucherov), 6:18. 3, Tampa Bay, Palat 1 (Stamkos, Drouin), 16:21. Penalties: Trocheck, FLA, (slashing), 1:45; Nesterov, TB, (holding), 18:37. Third period: 4, Florida, Trocheck 2 (Smith, Jokinen), 5:26. 5, Florida, Matheson 1 (Mckegg, Demers), 15:52. 6, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 2 (Filppula, Hedman), 19:54. Penalties: Yandle, FLA, (roughing), 5:45; Brown, TB, (roughing), 5:45; Yandle, FLA, served by Jagr, (holding), 5:45; Drouin, TB, (hooking), 9:39. Overtime: None. Penalties: Jagr, FLA, (tripping), 17:11. Shootout: Florida 1 (Marchessault NG, Barkov NG, Trocheck G, Jokinen NG, Ekblad NG), Tampa Bay 2 (Kucherov NG, Drouin G, Hedman NG, Point G). Shots: Florida 8-8-13-2: 31. Tampa Bay 10-12-6: 28. Power-plays: Florida 0 of 3; Tampa Bay 0 of 3. Goalies: Florida, Reimer 0-0-1 (28 shots-25 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 2-0-0 (31-28). A: 19,092. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Garrett Rank. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Tony Sericolo.

Stars 2, Predators 1 Dallas 0 1 1 — 2 Nashville 0 1 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Johansen, NSH, (high sticking), 12:04. Second period: 1, Dallas, Cracknell 2 (Oduya, Mckenzie), 2:55. 2, Nashville, Fisher 2 (Forsberg, Johansen), 4:27 (pp). Penalties: Sharp, DAL, (hooking), 3:55; Ellis, NSH, (roughing), 4:48; Korpikoski, DAL, (interference), 4:48; Ritchie, DAL, (high sticking), 14:41. Third period: 3, Dallas, Spezza 1 (Roussel), 9:15. Penalties: Oduya, DAL, (hooking), 0:34; Josi, NSH, (holding stick), 4:15. Shots: Dallas 16-10-11: 37. Nashville 4-14-10: 28. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 2; Nashville 1 of 3. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 1-1-0 (28 shots-27 saves). Nashville, Rinne 1-1-0 (37-35). A: 17,113. Referees: Kyle Rehman, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Mark Wheler.

Leaders

*Through Monday’s games

GOAL SCORING Auston Matthews Toronto Richard Panik Chicago Joe Colborne Colorado Connor McDavid Edmonton David Pastrnak Boston Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis David Backes Boston Aleksander Barkov Florida Troy Brouwer Calgary Andrew Cogliano Anaheim Sean Couturier Philadelphia Cam Fowler Anaheim Michael Frolik Calgary Brad Marchand Boston Jonathan MarchessaultFlorida Matt Moulson Buffalo Brock Nelson New York Tyler Seguin Dallas Kyle Turris Ottawa Thomas Vanek Detroit

GP 2 3 1 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2

G 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

ASSISTS Brad Marchand Boston Rasmus Ristolainen Buffalo Paul Stastny St. Louis Mikael Backlund Calgary Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Patrick Eaves Dallas Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Marian Hossa Chicago Ryan Johansen Nashville Erik Karlsson Ottawa Duncan Keith Chicago Travis Konecny Philadelphia Brandon Manning Philadelphia Connor McDavid Edmonton Kris Russell Edmonton Alexander Steen St. Louis Mika Zibanejad New York Nick Cousins Philadelphia Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh David Pastrnak Boston PLUS/MINUS Nathan Beaulieu Montreal David Pastrnak Boston David Backes Boston Aleksander Barkov Florida Brandon Carlo Boston Zach Hyman Toronto Brad Marchand Boston Jonathan MarchessauFlorida Zdeno Chara Boston Erik Karlsson Ottawa Auston Matthews Toronto Connor McDavid Edmonton Marc Methot Ottawa William Nylander Toronto Alex Pietrangelo St. Louis Brett Ritchie Dallas Kris Russell Edmonton Mark Scheifele Winnipeg Devin Shore Dallas Shea Weber Montreal GOALS AGAINST Chad Johnson CAL Kari Lehtonen DAL Jonathan Quick LAK Thomas Greiss NYI Carter Hutton STL Roberto Luongo FLA Michal Neuvirth PHI Pekka Rinne NAS

BLUES STATISTICS Player F 26 Paul Stastny F 91 Vladimir Tarasenko F 20 Alexander Steen Kevin Shattenkirk F 21 Patrik Berglund F 15 Robby Fabbri Colton Parayko Alex Pietrangelo F 64 Nail Yakupov F 56 Magnus Paajarvi F 10 Scottie Upshall Robert Bortuzzo Jay Bouwmeester F 28 Kyle Brodziak Joel Edmundson Carl Gunnarsson F 23 Dmitrij Jaskin F 12 Jori Lehtera F 57 David Perron F 75 Ryan Reaves Goalie Jake Allen 40 Carter Hutton

GP 2 1

GP 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 1 3 3 3 2 1 3 3 3

G 2 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

MINS 120 59

GP 2 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 2 2

A 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2

GP 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 2

+/5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

GPI MINS GA AVG 1 1 1 0.92 1 1 1 1.88 1 1 1 3.00 1 1 2 2.07 1 1 2 2.00 2 2 2 0.98 1 1 2 2.00 1 1 2 2.00

* Prior to Tuesday night’s game. A 4 2 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 AVG 2.00 2.00

PTS 6 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 2 1

+/2 1 2 0 1 1 0 3 1 1 -2 0 2 0 0 -1 0 1 0 -2

PIM 2 0 0 0 2 4 6 0 2 0 2 0 2 4 0 0 0 0 2 0

PP 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

L 0 0

OT 0 0

GA 4 2

SH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SA 40 35

GW 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

PCTG .500 .231 .143 .167 .000 .000 .000 .143 .250 .500 .333 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

SV% .900 .943

G 0 0

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Blues Dallas Minnesota Colorado Chicago Winnipeg Nashville Paciic San Jose Vancouver Edmonton Arizona Calgary Anaheim Los Angeles

GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 3 3 0 0 6 11 6 2-0-0 1-0-0 3 2 1 0 4 11 9 1-0-0 1-1-0 3 2 1 0 4 12 9 2-0-0 0-1-0 3 2 1 0 4 10 11 1-0-0 1-1-0 4 2 2 0 4 16 15 2-1-0 0-1-0 3 1 2 0 2 9 12 1-1-0 0-1-0 3 1 2 0 2 7 9 1-1-0 0-1-0 GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 4 3 1 0 6 12 12 1-0-0 2-1-0 2 2 0 0 4 6 4 2-0-0 0-0-0 3 2 1 0 4 14 13 1-1-0 1-0-0 2 1 1 0 2 8 10 1-0-0 0-1-0 3 0 2 1 1 8 14 0-1-0 0-1-1 4 0 3 1 1 7 12 0-0-0 0-3-1 3 0 3 0 0 6 12 0-1-0 0-2-0

Div 2-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 1-2-0 0-1-0 1-2-0 Div 1-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 0-0-0 0-2-1 0-0-0 0-1-0

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Tampa Bay 3 3 0 0 6 13 9 3-0-0 0-0-0 2-0-0 Ottawa 4 3 1 0 6 17 16 3-0-0 0-1-0 2-1-0 Florida 3 2 0 1 5 9 6 2-0-0 0-0-1 1-0-1 Montreal 3 2 0 1 5 11 5 1-0-0 1-0-1 1-0-1 Boston 3 2 1 0 4 11 8 0-0-0 2-1-0 0-1-0 Toronto 2 1 0 1 3 8 6 1-0-0 0-0-1 1-0-1 Bufalo 2 1 1 0 2 7 6 0-1-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 Detroit 3 1 2 0 2 10 11 1-0-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Washington 3 2 0 1 5 7 4 2-0-0 0-0-1 1-0-1 Pittsburgh 4 2 1 1 5 9 12 2-0-1 0-1-0 1-0-0 NY Rangers 3 2 1 0 4 14 10 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 New Jersey 3 1 1 1 3 5 6 1-0-0 0-1-1 0-0-0 Philadelphia 3 1 1 1 3 11 13 0-0-0 1-1-1 0-0-0 Carolina 2 0 0 2 2 7 9 0-0-0 0-0-2 0-0-0 NY Islanders 4 1 3 0 2 9 12 1-1-0 0-2-0 0-2-0 Columbus 2 0 2 0 0 5 9 0-2-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Tuesday Blues at Vancouver, late San Jose 3, NY Islanders 2 Washington 3, Colorado 0 New Jersey 2, Anaheim 1 Ottawa 7, Arizona 4 Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 0 Tampa Bay 4, Florida 3, SO Minnesota 6, Los Angeles 3 Dallas 2, Nashville 1 Chicago 7, Philadelphia 4 Buffalo at Calgary, late Carolina at Edmonton, late Monday Colorado 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT NY Rangers 7, San Jose 4 Detroit 5, Ottawa 1 Boston 4, Winnipeg 1

Wednesday Toronto at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Detroit at NY Rangers, 7 p.m. Thursday Anaheim at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Boston, 6 p.m. San Jose at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Arizona at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Blues at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Carolina at Calgary, 8 p.m. Buffalo at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Friday Arizona at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.

NFL NOTEBOOK Packers get running back Davis for draft pick in deal with Chiefs The Kansas City Chiefs have traded backup running back Knile Davis to the Green Bay Packers, who desperately need to add depth to their injury-riddled backield. The Packers gave up a conditional draft pick Tuesday for Davis, who has already started practicing with his new team. The Packers needed help at running back with Eddie Lacy nursing a bothersome ankle and James Starks undergoing knee surgery. Lacy was their only active running back against Dallas on Sunday, when he rushed for 65 yards on 17 carries in a 30-16 loss. Starks will be out a couple of weeks. Lacy was being held out of practice Wednesday because the ankle was “very sore,” coach Mike McCarthy said. Top cornerback Sam Shields, who has been out since the season opener with a concussion, was placed on injured reserve to make room for Davis on the active roster. Davis had been passed over by Spencer Ware and Charcandrick West on the Chiefs’ depth chart, and the return of Jamaal Charles from his knee injury made him expendable. “I feel like I’m of the reins,” Davis said after practice Tuesday. “I’m just excited to be a part of Green Bay and do what I can here. Hopefully my role is bigger.” Roethlisberger ruled out • Ben Roethlisberger might be a fast healer, but his aching left knee won’t be ready in time to face the New England Patriots. Steelers coach Mike Tomlin oicially ruled out Roethlisberger for Sunday’s showdown with the Patriots. Roethlisberger underwent arthroscopic surgery on Monday to repair cartilage in his knee sufered in a miserable loss to Miami last weekend.

Falcons place Shelby on IR • The Atlanta Falcons have placed defensive end Derrick Shelby on injured reserve with a torn Achilles tendon, ending his season. Shelby left Sunday’s loss at Seattle with what was initially announced as a calf injury. He had eight tackles in six games, including four starts, this season. He left the Dolphins to sign a four-year, $18 million deal with Atlanta in March. Atlanta lists Brooks Reed and Tyson Jackson as its starting defensive ends. The backups are Adrian Clayborn, Dwight Freeney and Ra’Shede Hageman. The Falcons promoted safety Sharrod Neasman to the active roster.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Knile Davis had dropped to fourth on the depth chart at running back in Kansas City before his trade to the Packers, who need help due to injuries at the position.

Landry Jones will make the third start of his career for Pittsburgh (4-2). Jones went 1-1 last season, though he was injured early in the one victory and Roethlisberger came on in relief. The Steelers will also be without defensive end Cam Heyward for a third straight week. Tomlin said there’s a chance linebacker Ryan Shazier could return to the lineup for the irst time since Week 3. Colts sign MU’s Cofman • Indianapolis signed tight end Chase Cofman (Mizzou)

on Tuesday, two days after losing starter Dwayne Allen with an injured right ankle. Coach Chuck Pagano did not provide an update on Allen’s injury Monday and there was no scheduled availability Tuesday. Cofman signed with the Colts just before the start of training camp in July and was released in the inal round of cuts. Before signing with Indy, Cofman played in 37 NFL games with Cincinnati, Atlanta, Tennessee and most recently Seattle last season. He has 18 receptions, 177 yards and two touchdowns in six NFL seasons.

Belichick done with tablets • Bill Belichick is throwing in the towel in his ongoing ight with the use of tablets on the sideline. Responding to a question in a conference call Tuesday about headset issues the Patriots had during last week’s win over the Bengals, Belichick said he “can’t take it anymore” with the tablets, adding there isn’t enough consistency in the performance of the devices. He also railed for several minutes about on-going issues with NFL technology, including the communication system between coaches in the press box and those on the ield, as well as the coach-toquarterback play calling system, which Belichick said “fail on a regular basis.” Earlier this season Belichick was caught on camera slamming down a sideline tablet following a Bills touchdown. Belichick said going forward he’s going to stick with low tech — printed images taken of plays during the game to help strategize on the sideline. Associated Press


SPORTS

10.19.2016 • WedneSday • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Oshie scores two goals to help Caps win player to reach 500 career goals. The 37-year-old Hossa slid a powerplay backhander through the legs of Philadelphia goaltender Michal Neuvirth at 5:04 of the second period, giving the host Blackhawks a 4-0 lead on Tuesday night. He then skated over to Chicago’s bench, where he was greeted with smiles, handshakes and hugs. The crowd of 21,263 at the United Center roared when the milestone goal was announced, and Hossa waved his stick to acknowledge the standing ovation. Hossa, who signed a 12-year, $62.8 million contract with Chicago in July 2009, is beginning his eighth season with the Blackhawks.

Ovechkin also scores as Washington power play gets going against the Avs ASSOCIATED PRESS

T.J. Oshie scored twice and Alex Ovechkin picked up his first goal of the season, helping the host Washington Capitals beat the Colorado Avalanche 3-0 on Tuesday night. Ovechkin and Oshie each scored on the power play to end Washington’s manadvantage scoring drought, and the Avalanche lost for the first time under new coach Jared Bednar. Goaltender Semyon Varlamov was sharp in stopping 37 of 40 shots behind Colorado teammates who were noticeably tired playing the second half of a back-to-back and their third game in four days. Washington backup Philipp Grubauer only needed 18 saves for his first career shutout because Washington had the puck for most of the game. The Capitals entered the game 0 for eight on the power play and lacking production from the first line, but those problems went away in quick succession. Sharks 3, Islanders 2 • Joe Pavelski scored with 2:11 left to lift San Jose to a victory over the host New York Islanders.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington Capitals right winger T.J. Oshie (left) celebrates his irst goal Tuesday night with center Nicklas Backstrom during the second period against Colorado.

Melker Karlsson and Tomas Hertl also scored to help the Sharks win for the third time in four games. Joe Thornton and Brent Burns had two assists each, giving both five on the season. Aaron Dell stopped 20 shots to win his NHL debut. On the tiebreaking goal, Thornton sent a pass into the slot and Pavelski deflected

it in. It gave Pavelski his fifth point in two games after he had a goal and three assists in the Sharks’ 7-4 loss to the New York Rangers on Monday.

NOTEBOOK Hossa gets goal No. 500 • Blackhawks forward Marian Hossa became the 44th NHL

NHL SUMMARIES

NHL STANDINGS

Blackhawks 7, Flyers 4

Capitals 3, Avalanche 0

Canadiens 4, Penguins 0

Wild 6, Kings 3

Philadelphia 0 1 3 — 4 Chicago 3 1 3 — 7 First period: 1, Chicago, Kane 1 (Anisimov, Seabrook), 0:56. 2, Chicago, Rasmussen 1, 17:26. 3, Chicago, Panarin 1 (Seabrook, Keith), 18:12 (pp). Penalties: Motte, CHI, (hooking), 6:37; Gostisbehere, PHI, (closing hand on the puck), 17:59. Second period: 4, Chicago, Hossa 1 (Campbell, Anisimov), 5:04 (pp). 5, Philadelphia, Read 2 (Voracek, Giroux), 18:23 (pp). Penalties: Gordon, PHI, (hooking), 3:07; Manning, PHI, (interference), 12:48; Kane, CHI, (interference), 17:31. Third period: 6, Philadelphia, Read 3 (Gostisbehere, Giroux), 0:37. 7, Philadelphia, Couturier 3 (Konecny, Schultz), 1:54. 8, Philadelphia, Simmonds 2 (Giroux, Voracek), 3:49 (pp). 9, Chicago, Anisimov 1 (Kane, Panarin), 10:24. 10, Chicago, Panarin 2 (Kane), 16:03. 11, Chicago, Anisimov 2 (Kane, Seabrook), 19:15. Penalties: Kempny, CHI, (high sticking), 3:03; Motte, CHI, (hooking), 11:20. Shots: PHI 8-10-9: 27. Chicago 11-11-6: 28. Power-plays: PHI 2 of 4; CHI 2 of 3. Goalies: Philadelphia, Mason 0-1-1 (11 shots-9 saves), Neuvirth 1-0-0 (16-12). Chicago, Crawford 1-2-0 (27-23). A: 21,263.

Colorado 0 0 0 — 0 Washington 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Washington, Ovechkin 1 (Johansson, Orlov), 15:44 (pp). Penalties: Zadorov, COL, (tripping), 3:51; Ovechkin, WSH, (cross checking), 8:43; Comeau, COL, (cross checking), 13:50. Second period: 2, Washington, Oshie 1 (Backstrom, Johansson), 11:32 (pp). Penalties: Duchene, COL, (tripping), 1:35; Eller, WSH, (hooking), 5:34; Wilson, WSH, Major (fighting), 11:20; Iginla, COL, served by Mcleod, (instigator), 11:20; Iginla, COL, Misconduct (misconduct), 11:20; Iginla, COL, Major (fighting), 11:20; Ovechkin, WSH, (roughing), 19:50; Landeskog, COL, (roughing), 19:50. Third period: 3, Washington, Oshie 2 (Kuznetsov, Ovechkin), 13:35. Penalties: Ovechkin, WSH, (slashing), 8:06; Bourque, COL, (cross checking), 8:54. Shots: Colorado 5-7-6: 18. Washington 20-9-11: 40. PP: Colorado 0 of 3; Washington 2 of 5. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 1-1-0 (40 shots37 saves). Washington, Grubauer 1-0-0 (18-18). A: 18,506. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Evgeny Romasko. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Tim Nowak.

Pittsburgh 0 0 0 — 0 Montreal 1 1 2 — 4 First period: 1, Montreal, Pacioretty 1 (Petry), 0:23. Penalties: Pacioretty, MTL, (holding), 9:52; Radulov, MTL, (interference), 18:35. Second period: 2, Montreal, Desharnais 1 (Pacioretty), 12:07. Penalties: Radulov, MTL, major (high sticking), 7:02; Bonino, PIT, (delay of game), 7:07; Letang, PIT, (holding stick), 14:02; Flynn, MTL, (high sticking), 19:23; Malkin, PIT, (hooking), 19:25. Third period: 3, Montreal, Radulov 1 (Galchenyuk, Montoya), 4:31 (pp). 4, Montreal, Desharnais 2 (Markov, Petry), 13:44. Penalties: Schultz, PIT, (tripping), 0:33; Fehr, PIT, (boarding), 1:26; Weber, MTL, (tripping), 1:41; Pacioretty, MTL, served by Radulov, (tripping), 2:15; Letang, PIT, (slashing), 2:27; Pittsburgh bench, served by Wilson (too many men on the ice), 7:40; Beaulieu, MTL, (delay of game), 15:43. Shots: PIT 17-10-9: 36. MON 13-8-11: 32. PP: Pittsburgh 0 of 8; Montreal 1 of 6. Goalies: PIT, Fleury 2-1-1 (32 shots-28 saves). MON, Montoya 2-0-1 (36-36). A: 21,288.

Los Angeles 1 0 2 — 3 Minnesota 2 3 1 — 6 First period: 1, Los Angeles, Pearson 1 (Carter), 0:50. 2, Minnesota, Haula 1 (Niederreiter, Pominville), 1:36. 3, Minnesota, Pominville 1 (Haula), 19:48. Penalties: Folin, MIN, (holding), 12:31; Zucker, MIN, (hooking), 14:36. Second period: 4, Minnesota, Coyle 2 (Parise, Suter), 12:38 (pp). 5, Minnesota, Koivu 1 (Granlund, Stewart), 16:11. 6, Minnesota, Pulkkinen 1 (Brodin, Dalpe), 17:08. Penalties: Carter, LA, (holding), 4:05; Minnesota bench, served by Stewart (too many men on the ice), 8:10; Parise, MIN, (tripping), 9:21; Kopitar, LA, (cross checking), 12:01; Andreoff, LA, (cross checking), 18:04. Third period: 7, Los Angeles, Kopitar 1 (Gilbert, Toffoli), 6:42. 8, Los Angeles, Pearson 2 (Carter, Setoguchi), 14:35. 9, Minnesota, Spurgeon 1 (Suter), 17:42. Penalties: Shore, LA, (cross checking), 0:57; Parise, MIN, (hooking), 8:37. Shots: LAK 7-8-15: 30. MIN 5-11-10: 26. Power-plays: LAK 0 of 5; MIN 1 of 4. Goalies: LAK, Budaj 0-0-0 (9 shots-9 saves), Zatkoff 0-3-0 (16-11). MIN, Kuemper 1-0-0 (30-27). A: 18,644.

Senators 7, Coyotes 4 Arizona 1 0 3 — 4 Ottawa 2 1 4 — 7 First period: 1, Arizona, Rieder 1 (Strome, Murphy), 12:18. 2, Ottawa, Ryan 2 (Karlsson, Hoffman), 13:41 (pp). 3, Ottawa, Pyatt 2, 15:16. Penalties: Phaneuf, OTT, (hooking), 6:50; White, ARI, (interference), 13:37. Second period: 4, Ottawa, Smith 2 (Pyatt, Ceci), 13:04 (sh). Penalties: Stone, OTT, (tripping), 2:00; Murphy, ARI, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:00; Neil, OTT, (interference), 12:40; Smith, OTT, (roughing), 14:05; Ekmanlarsson, ARI, (roughing), 14:05; Ryan, OTT, (hooking), 19:15; Kelly, OTT, (tripping), 19:54. Third period: 5, Arizona, Ekman-larsson 2 (Goligoski, Doan), 1:01 (pp). 6, Ottawa, Kelly 1, 7:30. 7, Ottawa, Stone 1 (Turris, Hoffman), 8:11. 8, Arizona, Martinook 1 (Goligoski), 10:07. 9, Ottawa, Turris 3 (Hoffman, Stone), 18:13. 10, Arizona, Martinook 2 (Richardson, Murphy), 18:43. 11, Ottawa, Karlsson 2 (Kelly), 19:47. Penalties: Arizona bench, served by Duclair (too many men on the ice), 4:28; Ceci, OTT, (interference), 12:02. Shots: Arizona 16-11-8: 35. Ottawa 13-11-18: 42. Power-plays: Arizona 1 of 5; Ottawa 1 of 2. Goalies: Arizona, Domingue 0-1-0 (11 shots-8 saves), Smith 1-0-0 (30-27). Ottawa, Anderson 3-0-0 (35-31). A: 11,061.

Sharks 3, Islanders 2 San Jose 1 1 1 — 3 NY Islanders 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, San Jose, Karlsson 1 (Wingels, Haley), 5:36. Penalties: NY Islanders bench, served by Strome (too many men on the ice), 12:27. Second period: 2, NY Islanders, Beauvillier 1 (Bailey, Tavares), 9:39. 3, NY Islanders, Lee 1 (Chimera, Nelson), 11:49. 4, San Jose, Hertl 1 (Burns, Thornton), 18:03. Penalties: Ward, SJ, (interference), 12:33. Third period: 5, San Jose, Pavelski 2 (Thornton, Burns), 17:49. Penalties: Pavelski, SJ, (delay of game), 18:54. Shots: San Jose 10-9-8: 27. NY Islanders 4-13-6: 23. Power-plays: San Jose 0 of 1; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies: San Jose, Dell 1-0-0 (23 shots-21 saves). NY Islanders, Halak 1-2-0 (27-24). A: 10,772.

Crosby might practice • Sidney Crosby could resume practicing as early as Wednesday. Maybe. It all depends, coach Mike Sullivan said, on how Crosby responds to a workout Tuesday in Pittsburgh. “There’s a possibility, yes,” Sullivan said. “That’s something we certainly will evaluate overnight, and we’ll see where it goes from there. “Obviously, that’s the next step in his progression, that he joins the team.” Crosby, who has missed the first four games of the season while recovering from a concussion, did not accompany the Penguins to Montreal for their game Tuesday. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

Lightning 4, Panthers 3, SO Florida 0 1 2 0 — 3 Tampa Bay 0 2 1 0 — 4 Tampa Bay won shootout 2-1. First period: None. Penalties: Paquette, TB, (hooking), 12:11. Second period: 1, Florida, Sceviour 2 (Mackenzie), 2:38 (sh). 2, Tampa Bay, Killorn 3 (Kucherov), 6:18. 3, Tampa Bay, Palat 1 (Stamkos, Drouin), 16:21. Penalties: Trocheck, FLA, (slashing), 1:45; Nesterov, TB, (holding), 18:37. Third period: 4, Florida, Trocheck 2 (Smith, Jokinen), 5:26. 5, Florida, Matheson 1 (Mckegg, Demers), 15:52. 6, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 2 (Filppula, Hedman), 19:54. Penalties: Yandle, FLA, (roughing), 5:45; Brown, TB, (roughing), 5:45; Yandle, FLA, served by Jagr, (holding), 5:45; Drouin, TB, (hooking), 9:39. Overtime: None. Penalties: Jagr, FLA, (tripping), 17:11. Shootout: Florida 1 (Marchessault NG, Barkov NG, Trocheck G, Jokinen NG, Ekblad NG), Tampa Bay 2 (Kucherov NG, Drouin G, Hedman NG, Point G). Shots: Florida 8-8-13-2: 31. Tampa Bay 10-12-6: 28. Power-plays: Florida 0 of 3; Tampa Bay 0 of 3. Goalies: Florida, Reimer 0-0-1 (28 shots-25 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 2-0-0 (31-28). A: 19,092. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Garrett Rank. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Tony Sericolo.

Stars 2, Predators 1 Dallas 0 1 1 — 2 Nashville 0 1 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Johansen, NSH, (high sticking), 12:04. Second period: 1, Dallas, Cracknell 2 (Oduya, Mckenzie), 2:55. 2, Nashville, Fisher 2 (Forsberg, Johansen), 4:27 (pp). Penalties: Sharp, DAL, (hooking), 3:55; Ellis, NSH, (roughing), 4:48; Korpikoski, DAL, (interference), 4:48; Ritchie, DAL, (high sticking), 14:41. Third period: 3, Dallas, Spezza 1 (Roussel), 9:15. Penalties: Oduya, DAL, (hooking), 0:34; Josi, NSH, (holding stick), 4:15. Shots: Dallas 16-10-11: 37. Nashville 4-14-10: 28. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 2; Nashville 1 of 3. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 1-1-0 (28 shots-27 saves). Nashville, Rinne 1-1-0 (37-35). A: 17,113. Referees: Kyle Rehman, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Mark Wheler.

Flames 4, Sabres 3 Buffalo 1 1 1 0 — 3 Calgary 1 0 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Girgensons 1 (Ennis), 7:25. 2, Calgary, Frolik 3 (Backlund, Kulak), 16:12. Penalties: Gorges, BUF, (interference), 3:12; Mccabe, BUF, (holding), 18:33. Second period: 3, Buffalo, O’reilly 3 (Ristolainen, Okposo), 11:41 (pp). Penalties: Gorges, BUF, (interference), 4:24; Foligno, BUF, (high sticking), 4:24; Giordano, CGY, (high sticking), 5:27; Stajan, CGY, (interference), 10:44; Bennett, CGY, (hooking), 12:02. Third period: 4, Calgary, Ferland 1, 1:10. 5, Buffalo, Foligno 1 (Larsson, Gionta), 3:49. 6, Calgary, Tkachuk 1 (Giordano, Stajan), 4:52. Penalties: Deslauriers, BUF, (roughing), 9:24; Tkachuk, CGY, (roughing), 9:24; Deslauriers, BUF, served by Reinhart, (roughing), 9:24; Giordano, CGY, (hooking), 10:09; Bennett, CGY, (high sticking), 10:14; Larsson, BUF, (tripping), 13:05. Overtime: 7, Calgary, Monahan 2 (Gaudreau, Giordano), 17:26. Penalties: None. Shots: BUF 6-4-9-2: 21. CAL 15-8-6-5: 34. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 5; Calgary 0 of 6. Goalies: Buffalo, Lehner 1-1-1 (34 shots-30 saves). Calgary, Johnson 1-0-1 (21-18). A: 19,289.

Devils 2, Ducks 1 Anaheim 1 0 0 — 1 New Jersey 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, Anaheim, Vatanen 1 (Perry, Fowler), 9:03 (pp). Penalties: Fiddler, NJ, Major (fighting), 0:30; Kesler, ANA, Major (fighting), 0:30; Henrique, NJ, (slashing), 3:55; Palmieri, NJ, (tripping), 7:15; Larsson, ANA, (interference), 18:33. Second period: 2, New Jersey, Hall 1 (Zajac, Cammalleri), 12:35 (pp). 3, New Jersey, Hall 2 (Palmieri, Severson), 16:46 (pp). Penalties: Boucher, NJ, (high sticking), 6:29; Etem, ANA, (high sticking), 10:15; Vermette, ANA, (tripping), 11:42; Sorensen, ANA, (tripping), 15:31; Kesler, ANA, (high sticking), 17:15; Henrique, NJ, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 18:49; Bieksa, ANA, (holding), 19:50. Third period: None. Penalties: Perry, ANA, (interference), 5:39; Moore, NJ, (delay of game), 16:56. Shots: Anaheim 10-5-9: 24. New Jersey 11-12-5: 28. PP: Anaheim 1 of 4; New Jersey 2 of 7. Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 0-2-1 (28 shots-26 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 1-1-1 (24-23). A: 16,514.

Oilers 3, Hurricanes 2 Carolina 0 0 2 — 2 Edmonton 2 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, Edmonton, Slepyshev 1 (Draisaitl), 1:51. 2, Edmonton, Eberle 3 (Fayne), 9:22. Penalties: Hainsey, CAR, (hooking), 3:19; Mcdavid, EDM, (cross checking), 18:01. Second period: 3, Edmonton, Pitlick 2 (Letestu, Lander), 2:35. Penalties: Slavin, CAR, (high sticking), 16:28. Third period: 4, Carolina, Stempniak 2 (Rask, Faulk), 3:18. 5, Carolina, Stempniak 3 (Skinner, Rask), 4:14. Penalties: Stempniak, CAR, (high sticking), 5:00; Larsson, EDM, (high sticking), 16:24. Shots: CAR 13-7-13: 33. Edmonton 11-9-8: 28. Power-plays: CAR 0 of 2; Edmonton 0 of 3. Goalies: CAR, Ward 0-1-1 (28 shots-25 saves). Edmonton, Talbot 3-1-0 (33-31). A: 18,347.

BLUES STATISTICS Through Tuesday’s game. Player Stastny Tarasenko Steen Shattenkirk Berglund Fabbri Parayko Pietrangelo Yakupov Paajarvi Upshall Bortuzzo Bouwmeester Brodziak Edmundson Gunnarsson Jaskin Lehtera Perron Rattie Reaves

GP 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 2 4 3 4 2 2 3 4 1 4

G 2 4 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

A PTS +/- PIM PP GW 4 6 1 4 1 1 2 6 1 0 1 0 4 5 3 2 0 0 2 3 0 2 1 0 2 2 1 2 0 0 2 2 1 4 0 0 2 2 -1 6 0 0 1 2 3 0 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 -2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 -1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -2 0 0 0

Goalie GP MN AVG W-L-OT GA SA SV% Allen 3 181 1.98 2-0-1 6 66 .909 Hutton 1 59 2.00 1-0-0 2 35 .943

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Blues Minnesota Dallas Colorado Chicago Winnipeg Nashville Paciic Vancouver San Jose Edmonton Calgary Arizona Anaheim Los Angeles

GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 4 3 0 1 7 12 8 2-0-0 1-0-1 3 2 1 0 4 12 9 2-0-0 0-1-0 3 2 1 0 4 11 9 1-0-0 1-1-0 3 2 1 0 4 10 11 1-0-0 1-1-0 4 2 2 0 4 16 15 2-1-0 0-1-0 3 1 2 0 2 9 12 1-1-0 0-1-0 3 1 2 0 2 7 9 1-1-0 0-1-0 GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 3 3 0 0 6 8 5 3-0-0 0-0-0 4 3 1 0 6 12 12 1-0-0 2-1-0 4 3 1 0 6 17 15 2-1-0 1-0-0 4 1 2 1 3 12 17 1-1-0 0-1-1 2 1 1 0 2 8 10 1-0-0 0-1-0 4 0 3 1 1 7 12 0-0-0 0-3-1 3 0 3 0 0 6 12 0-1-0 0-2-0

Div 2-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 1-2-0 0-1-0 1-2-0 Div 1-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 0-2-1 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Tampa Bay 3 3 0 0 6 13 9 3-0-0 0-0-0 2-0-0 Ottawa 4 3 1 0 6 17 16 3-0-0 0-1-0 2-1-0 Montreal 3 2 0 1 5 11 5 1-0-0 1-0-1 1-0-1 Florida 3 2 0 1 5 9 6 2-0-0 0-0-1 1-0-1 Boston 3 2 1 0 4 11 8 0-0-0 2-1-0 0-1-0 Toronto 2 1 0 1 3 8 6 1-0-0 0-0-1 1-0-1 Bufalo 3 1 1 1 3 10 10 0-1-0 1-0-1 0-1-0 Detroit 3 1 2 0 2 10 11 1-0-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Washington 3 2 0 1 5 7 4 2-0-0 0-0-1 1-0-1 Pittsburgh 4 2 1 1 5 9 12 2-0-1 0-1-0 1-0-0 NY Rangers 3 2 1 0 4 14 10 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 Philadelphia 3 1 1 1 3 11 13 0-0-0 1-1-1 0-0-0 New Jersey 3 1 1 1 3 5 6 1-0-0 0-1-1 0-0-0 Carolina 3 0 1 2 2 9 12 0-0-0 0-1-2 0-0-0 NY Islanders 4 1 3 0 2 9 12 1-1-0 0-2-0 0-2-0 Columbus 2 0 2 0 0 5 9 0-2-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday Vancouver 2, Blues 1, OT San Jose 3, NY Islanders 2 Washington 3, Colorado 0 New Jersey 2, Anaheim 1 Ottawa 7, Arizona 4 Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 0 Tampa Bay 4, Florida 3, SO Minnesota 6, Los Angeles 3 Dallas 2, Nashville 1 Chicago 7, Philadelphia 4 Calgary 4, Buffalo 3, OT Edmonton 3, Carolina 2 Monday Colorado 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT NY Rangers 7, San Jose 4 Detroit 5, Ottawa 1 Boston 4, Winnipeg 1

Wednesday Toronto at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Detroit at NY Rangers, 7 p.m. Thursday San Jose at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Boston, 6 p.m. Colorado at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Arizona at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Blues at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Carolina at Calgary, 8 p.m. Buffalo at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Friday Arizona at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.

NFL NOTEBOOK Packers get running back Davis for draft pick in deal with Chiefs The Kansas City Chiefs have traded backup running back Knile Davis to the Green Bay Packers, who desperately need to add depth to their injury-riddled backield. The Packers gave up a conditional draft pick Tuesday for Davis, who has already started practicing with his new team. The Packers needed help at running back with Eddie Lacy nursing a bothersome ankle and James Starks undergoing knee surgery. Lacy was their only active running back against Dallas on Sunday, when he rushed for 65 yards on 17 carries in a 30-16 loss. Starks will be out a couple of weeks. Lacy was being held out of practice Wednesday because the ankle was “very sore,” coach Mike McCarthy said. Top cornerback Sam Shields, who has been out since the season opener with a concussion, was placed on injured reserve to make room for Davis on the active roster. Davis had been passed over by Spencer Ware and Charcandrick West on the Chiefs’ depth chart, and the return of Jamaal Charles from his knee injury made him expendable. “I feel like I’m of the reins,” Davis said after practice Tuesday. “I’m just excited to be a part of Green Bay and do what I can here. Hopefully my role is bigger.” Roethlisberger ruled out • Ben Roethlisberger might be a fast healer, but his aching left knee won’t be ready in time to face the New England Patriots. Steelers coach Mike Tomlin oicially ruled out Roethlisberger for Sunday’s showdown with the Patriots. Roethlisberger underwent arthroscopic surgery on Monday to repair cartilage in his knee sufered in a miserable loss to Miami last weekend.

Falcons place Shelby on IR • The Atlanta Falcons have placed defensive end Derrick Shelby on injured reserve with a torn Achilles tendon, ending his season. Shelby left Sunday’s loss at Seattle with what was initially announced as a calf injury. He had eight tackles in six games, including four starts, this season. He left the Dolphins to sign a four-year, $18 million deal with Atlanta in March. Atlanta lists Brooks Reed and Tyson Jackson as its starting defensive ends. The backups are Adrian Clayborn, Dwight Freeney and Ra’Shede Hageman. The Falcons promoted safety Sharrod Neasman to the active roster.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Knile Davis had dropped to fourth on the depth chart at running back in Kansas City before his trade to the Packers, who need help due to injuries at the position.

Landry Jones will make the third start of his career for Pittsburgh (4-2). Jones went 1-1 last season, though he was injured early in the one victory and Roethlisberger came on in relief. The Steelers will also be without defensive end Cam Heyward for a third straight week. Tomlin said there’s a chance linebacker Ryan Shazier could return to the lineup for the irst time since Week 3. Colts sign MU’s Cofman • Indianapolis signed tight end Chase Cofman (Mizzou)

on Tuesday, two days after losing starter Dwayne Allen with an injured right ankle. Coach Chuck Pagano did not provide an update on Allen’s injury Monday and there was no scheduled availability Tuesday. Cofman signed with the Colts just before the start of training camp in July and was released in the inal round of cuts. Before signing with Indy, Cofman played in 37 NFL games with Cincinnati, Atlanta, Tennessee and most recently Seattle last season. He has 18 receptions, 177 yards and two touchdowns in six NFL seasons.

Belichick done with tablets • Bill Belichick is throwing in the towel in his ongoing ight with the use of tablets on the sideline. Responding to a question in a conference call Tuesday about headset issues the Patriots had during last week’s win over the Bengals, Belichick said he “can’t take it anymore” with the tablets, adding there isn’t enough consistency in the performance of the devices. He also railed for several minutes about on-going issues with NFL technology, including the communication system between coaches in the press box and those on the ield, as well as the coach-toquarterback play calling system, which Belichick said “fail on a regular basis.” Earlier this season Belichick was caught on camera slamming down a sideline tablet following a Bills touchdown. Belichick said going forward he’s going to stick with low tech — printed images taken of plays during the game to help strategize on the sideline. Associated Press


MLB PLAYOFFS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016 AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP

DODGERS 2, CUBS 1 Game 1

INDIANS 3, BLUE JAYS 1

Cubs 8, Dodgers 4

Game 1

Indians 2, Blue Jays 0

Game 2

Dodgers 1, Cubs 0

Game 2

Indians 2, Blue Jays 1

Tuesday

Dodgers 6, Cubs 0

Game 3

Indians 4, Blue Jays 2

Wednesday

7 p.m. at Los Angeles Lackey (11-8, 3.35) vs. Urias (5-2, 3.39)

TV: Fox Sports 1

Tuesday

Blue Jays 5, Indians 1

Wednesday

7 p.m. at Los Angeles

TV: Fox Sports 1

3 p.m. at Toronto Merritt (1-0, 1.64) vs. Estrada (1-1, 1.65)

TV: TBS

Thursday Saturday

Time TBA at Chicago (if necessary)

TV: Fox Sports 1

Friday

7 p.m. at Cleveland (if necessary)

TV: TBS

Sunday

Time TBA at Chicago (if necessary)

TV: Fox Sports 1

Saturday

Time TBA at Cleveland (if necessary)

TV: TBS

ALCS • BLUE JAYS 5, INDIANS 1

Blue Jays get bats going, avoid sweep Donaldson gives team pep talk, then homers to spark Toronto to a Game 4 victory Blue Jays 5, Indians 1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORONTO • Just in time, Josh Donaldson and the Toronto Blue Jays broke out the bats to save their season. Now they have a chance to really make things interesting in this AL Championship Series. Donaldson backed up his fiery pep talk to teammates before the game, hitting a home run and turning in a timely diving stop Tuesday to help the Blue Jays avert a sweep with a 5-1 win over the Cleveland Indians. The Indians still lead the matchup 3-1, but with a couple of big hits and a strong outing by Aaron Sanchez, Toronto handed them their first loss of this postseason. “I’m not going to give too much away of what I had to say, but just more so getting everybody’s attention and focus and understanding,” Donaldson said. “I mean, everybody knew coming into today how important today was. But at the same time I just wanted to kind of reiterate that and let the boys know that I was coming to play today.” Cleveland will try again Wednesday to earn its first World Series trip since 1997, but the big concern for the Indians coming into the series — an injury-riddled rotation — still lingers. In Game 5, Cleveland will start Ryan Merritt, who has pitched just 11 innings in the majors, against Marco Estrada. It was an emotional day all around at Rogers Centre, where the home crowd had fallen silent watching the season slipping away because of a slumbering offense that totaled only three runs in the first three games of the series.

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Santana dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .067 Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .167 Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Chisenhall rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .333 a-Davis ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Crisp lf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Naquin cf-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .222 b-Guyer ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Perez c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .182 Totals 28 1 2 1 2 9 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bautista rf 5 1 0 0 0 1 .071 Upton lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Donaldson 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .357 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .267 Tulowitzki ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .143 Martin c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .071 Saunders dh 4 0 2 0 0 2 .385 Carrera lf-rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .286 Pillar cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .077 Goins 2b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .200 Totals 32 5 9 5 4 8 Cleveland 000 010 000 — 1 2 1 Toronto 001 100 21x — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Chisenhall in the 7th. b-grounded out for Naquin in the 8th. E: Shaw (1). LOB: Cleveland 3, Toronto 8. 2B: Naquin (2), Perez (1). 3B: Carrera (2). HR: Donaldson (1), off Kluber. RBIs: Perez (1), Donaldson (2), Encarnacion 2 (2), Carrera (1), Pillar (1). SF: Pillar. S: Perez. RLISP: Cleveland 2 (Santana, Kipnis); Toronto 3 (Martin, Pillar, Goins). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber L, 1-1 5 4 2 2 2 7 89 1.59 Otero 1 2 0 0 0 0 18 3.86 1/ Shaw 2 2 1 1 0 15 3.86 3 Clevinger 12/3 1 1 1 1 1 26 5.40 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 1-0 6 2 1 1 2 5 95 1.50 Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Osuna 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Clevinger 1-0. PB: off Shaw (Donaldson). WP: Sanchez, Clevinger. Umpires: Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Mark Wegner; Right, Brian Gorman; Left, Jim Wolf. T: 3:01. A: 49,142 .

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blue Jays relief pitcher Roberto Osuna celebrates after getting the inal out in a 5-1 victory Tuesday against the Indians to avoid a fourgame sweep in the ALCS.

“I thought we battled pretty good today, with the bats,” Toronto manager John Gibbons said. “Naturally, when you score, which we haven’t been doing, it always looks good.” Donaldson’s solo shot to leftcenter field off Corey Kluber in the third put the Blue Jays ahead for the first time all series. Two innings after that, the star third baseman made an outstanding play to preserve a one-run edge.

Sanchez, the American League ERA champion, allowed a run and two hits in six innings, and the bullpen finished with three perfect innings. Kluber was starting on three days’ rest for the first time. “I felt fine. I don’t think it physically afected me. I made a mistake to Donaldson,” Kluber said. “We’re one win away from the World Series and that’s what we’re focused on.”

Kluber hadn’t allowed a run in either of his first two starts this postseason. Donaldson, the reigning AL MVP and sporting a still freshly shaved face, opened the scoring with his first home run of these playofs. The wild-card Blue Jays made it 2-0 in the fourth when Ezequiel Carrera’s blooper fell among three Cleveland fielders in left-center for an RBI single. Roberto Perez hit an RBI double in the fifth of Sanchez. Carlos Santana’s two-out grounder to the left side might have had a

Hill stellar for LA in Game 3 NLCS • FROM B1

Island, allowed two hits in six innings, struck out six and walked two. Joe Blanton, Grant Dayton and Kenley Jansen finished, giving the Dodgers consecutive postseason shutouts for the first time.

URIAS-LACKEY IN GAME 4 Julio Urias finally is getting to start for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the postseason. The 20-year-old rookie from Mexico came on in relief in a decisive Game 5 of the NL Division Series, helping the Dodgers beat Washington to advance. Now, he’ll take the mound Wednesday in Game 4 of the Championship Series against the Chicago Cubs, the youngest starting pitcher in major league postseason history. “I felt the adrenaline when I was on the bench,” Urias said through a translator. “I felt it in

Washington, but then I knew that it was something that I could handle and something I could do. I know that I can do it again.” He’s already the youngest Dodgers pitcher to appear in a postseason game and the youngest on any team to pitch in the postseason since 1970. Urias made his highly anticipated big league debut on May 27 in New York against the Mets. At the time, he was 19 and the second teenager to start in the majors this century, joining Felix Hernandez, who debuted at the same age in 2005. Now, Urias will face of against Cubs veteran John Lackey, who leads all active pitchers with 21 postseason starts, going 8-5 with a 3.22 ERA in 24 total playof appearances. Lackey was four days past his 24th birthday when he started Game 7 of the 2002 World Series for the Los Angeles Angels, who beat San Francisco for the title.

It’s 10 years since magic curve CURVE • FROM B1

sat down with Wainwright and mapped his early development. Moore gave the prospect a pointer. Retire the slider. Go with the curveball. “I can see Adam Wainwright’s breaking ball like it was yesterday,” said Moore, who is now Kansas City’s general manager. He recalled the pitch Tuesday, during a phone interview from the Dominican Republic. “I can still see him warming up on the third-base side of his high school field, and then that pitch – it just falls of the table. The spin, the velocity of it – all of that stood out. It was hard. It had a lot of depth. He could naturally really spin the ball, and that’s a swing-and-miss breaking ball.” On Oct. 19, 2006, 10 years ago Wednesday, that breaking ball Moore saw in coastal southern Georgia was watched by millions at home on TV, 56,357 at a rainy, rocking Shea Stadium in Queens, and, most improbably, one batter

at the plate, Carlos Beltran. Wainwright’s swing-and-miss curve didn’t get a swing at all. It was the pitch that froze New York and still illuminates a career. The 83-win Cardinals limped into that postseason with an injury-pocked lineup and a rookie closer. They emerged with a World Series trophy. Their run through October peaked with Game 7 of the NLCS against the New York Mets. The game, one of the mostriveting Game 7s ever, ended with the bases loaded and what Hall of Famer John Smoltz would later call “the perfect pitch at the perfect time to the perfect place.” In the 10 years since Beltran took a called strike three, that curve gained added dimensions with the directions it sent the game’s principals. Beltran would not appear in the postseason again until joining the Cardinals for 2012. Catcher Yadier Molina, just 24, hinted at his All-Star future by influencing every sway of that Game 7, from his decisive home run to calling that last pitch.

Dodgers 6, Cubs 0

“Sometimes it can be good to be young. You don’t know what you’re getting into,” Lackey said. “You can just go out there and let your talent take over. And, obviously, he has a lot of that. Back then I was just worried about not messing it up for the older guys.”

HEYWARD OUT OF LINEUP Cubs manager Joe Maddon made some changes in Chicago’s starting lineup for Game 3, dropping slumping outfielder Jason Heyward. Heyward was one for six in the first two games of the series. He was replaced by Jorge Soler, who was 0 for two in the NLCS. Heyward struck out as a pinch hitter in the seventh inning Tuesday night.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cubs’ Jason Heyward walks away after striking out during the seventh inning Tuesday night.

Hall of Fame manager Tom Lasorda was at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday for Game 3, a day after being released from a hospital.

The 89-year-old former manager, who currently serves as senior adviser to chairman Mark Walter, left a hospital on Monday after a 10-day stay caused by back and shoulder issues in addition to an extensive checkup. Lasorda guided the Dodgers to World Series titles in 1981 and ’88, the last time Los Angeles has won the title.

Jef Suppan, moments away from winning the NLCS MVP for his start that night, did not return to the dugout. He instead found a spot nearby, in a cluster of New York police oicers. He could see Chris Carpenter’s face, not the field. He followed the final inning through the chatter on police radio and Carpenter’s reaction. Years later Suppan finally saw the whole inning on video. “I just remember the curveball,” Suppan said Tuesday from Southern California. “I saw that a million times.” The curve from Wainwright’s fingers that night got its start in his backyard on St. Simon’s Island, Ga. His older brother Trey constructed a mound and set up a net to serve as a strike zone. Adam fiddled with grips, once mimicking the knuckle curve of a hotshot Mets rookie, Jason Isringhausen, whose injury made Wainwright the Cardinals closer in 2006. A feel for the curve came quickly. The index finger lifting off the ball like a pinkie of a teacup came early. Atlanta built a division dynasty

out of an ability to identify and unleash elite pitching. Moore explained how the organization’s philosophy preferred a curve to sliders for young pitchers. A slider would too often veer into the power zone for a lefthanded batter. Better to have a curve plummet. Best to have one like Wainwright. “To me, the ability to spin the ball is an exceptional trait for a pitcher,” Moore said. “It’s the same as great speed. If you want it, you’ve got to draft it. Hitting for power — you have to draft it if you want it. Same things goes for spin like Wainwright’s. If you want the natural ability to spin like he has, you have to draft it.” All of the stats available now can demystify pitches. Pitch F/x spread in 2007 and StatCast started during 2015, so Wainwright’s signature curve landed before the metrics so common today. There’s no measure of its magic. When Beltran came to the plate, Wainwright had allowed two hits and walked a batter. He had two outs, both on curves. Molina came to the mound and

LASORDA MAKES GAME

chance to score him, but Donaldson made the play to his left, then popped up and danced off the field with a bit of a fist pump. “I was locked in,” Donaldson said. “It helps when you have a guy like Sanchez in the zone, where you can really focus in on a certain area of the strike zone. And I was able to get a really good read of the bat, and I was fortunate enough to be able to make the play.” The Indians didn’t have another baserunner after that. Brett Cecil, Jason Grilli and Roberto Osuna pitched an inning each in relief for Toronto. Taking no chances, Gibbons brought in Osuna, his closer, in a non-save situation to finish of Cleveland. The Indians were trying to become the third team to sweep a Division Series and Championship Series in the same postseason. The 2007 Colorado Rockies and 2014 Kansas City Royals both did it. Cleveland had won nine in a row, including three straight over Boston in the ALDS. The Indians had a chance to take the lead in the third when Tyler Naquin hit a leadof double and went to third on a sacrifice. Sanchez retired Santana on a soft grounder with the infield in, and then Jason Kipnis also grounded out. Kluber was pulled after 89 pitches. He allowed two runs and four hits in five innings. The Blue Jays added two more runs in the seventh after a throwing error by reliever Bryan Shaw. Edwin Encarnacion’s hard grounder skipped of the mound and into center field for a tworun single to make it 4-1.

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Bryant 3b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .333 Zobrist lf-2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Rizzo 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .091 Baez 2b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Soler rf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 c-Coghlan ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Russell ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 d-Heyward ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Montero c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .250 f-Contreras ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Arrieta p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Totals 31 0 4 0 2 10 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Seager ss 4 0 3 1 0 1 .364 Turner 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .200 Gonzalez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Reddick rf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .333 a-Puig ph-rf 2 1 2 0 0 0 .286 Pederson cf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .182 Grandal c 3 1 1 3 1 1 .167 Toles lf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500 b-Kendrick ph-lf-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Hill p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 34 6 10 6 1 8 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 Los Angeles 001 201 02x — 6 10 0 a-singled for Reddick in the 6th. b-grounded out for Toles in the 6th. c-grounded out for Soler in the 7th. d-struck out for Russell in the 7th. f-struck out for Montero in the 8th. LOB: Chicago 6, Los Angeles 5. 2B: Fowler (1), Pederson (1). HR: Grandal (1), off Arrieta; Turner (1), off Arrieta. RBIs: Seager (1), Turner (1), Pederson (1), Grandal 3 (3). SB: Rizzo (1), Reddick 2 (2), Pederson (2).RLISP: Chicago 4 (Bryant, Montero 2, Coghlan); Los Angeles 2 (Turner, Kendrick). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta L, 0-1 5 6 4 4 0 5 83 7.20 2/ Wood 1 0 0 1 1 19 0.00 3 Grimm 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Montgomery 1 2 2 2 0 1 21 11.57 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hill W, 1-0 6 2 0 0 2 6 93 0.00 Blanton 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 27.00 2/ Dayton 1 0 0 0 1 16 0.00 3 Jansen 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 21 0.00 Arrieta pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Grimm 2-0, Jansen 1-0. PB: Grandal (1). T: 3:18. A: 54,269 .

told Wainwright to start Beltran with a sinker. By the time Molina got behind the plate and spied Beltran, the catcher changed his mind. He called for a changeup. Beltran took it for strike one. Batting lefthanded, Beltran was one of those hitters who could launch a slider, like the Braves once cautioned Wainwright about. He got an 0-1 curve. Fouled it of. Then Wainwright would later say he threw “the best pitch I’d ever thrown. If he beats me, I will know he did it against my best.” Beltran took. Molina rushed him. Suppan ran out with the police. Eight days later, on Oct 27, 2006, at Busch Stadium, Wainwright closed out a World Series title to cap his rookie season against a righthanded batter from Detroit. He got Brandon Inge swinging on a pitch he still had to end the game. That was a slider. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


MLB PLAYOFFS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016 AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP

DODGERS 2, CUBS 1 Game 1

INDIANS 3, BLUE JAYS 1

Cubs 8, Dodgers 4

Game 1

Indians 2, Blue Jays 0

Game 2

Dodgers 1, Cubs 0

Game 2

Indians 2, Blue Jays 1

Tuesday

Dodgers 6, Cubs 0

Game 3

Indians 4, Blue Jays 2

Wednesday

7 p.m. at Los Angeles Lackey (11-8, 3.35) vs. Urias (5-2, 3.39)

TV: Fox Sports 1

Tuesday

Blue Jays 5, Indians 1

Wednesday

7 p.m. at Los Angeles

TV: Fox Sports 1

3 p.m. at Toronto Merritt (1-0, 1.64) vs. Estrada (1-1, 1.65)

TV: TBS

Thursday Saturday

Time TBA at Chicago (if necessary)

TV: Fox Sports 1

Friday

7 p.m. at Cleveland (if necessary)

TV: TBS

Sunday

Time TBA at Chicago (if necessary)

TV: Fox Sports 1

Saturday

Time TBA at Cleveland (if necessary)

TV: TBS

ALCS • BLUE JAYS 5, INDIANS 1

Blue Jays get bats going, avoid sweep Donaldson gives team pep talk, then homers to spark Toronto to a Game 4 victory Blue Jays 5, Indians 1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORONTO • Just in time, Josh Donaldson and the Toronto Blue Jays broke out the bats to save their season. Now they have a chance to really make things interesting in this AL Championship Series. Donaldson backed up his fiery pep talk to teammates before the game, hitting a home run and turning in a timely diving stop Tuesday to help the Blue Jays avert a sweep with a 5-1 win over the Cleveland Indians. The Indians still lead the matchup 3-1, but with a couple of big hits and a strong outing by Aaron Sanchez, Toronto handed them their first loss of this postseason. “I’m not going to give too much away of what I had to say, but just more so getting everybody’s attention and focus and understanding,” Donaldson said. “I mean, everybody knew coming into today how important today was. But at the same time I just wanted to kind of reiterate that and let the boys know that I was coming to play today.” Cleveland will try again Wednesday to earn its first World Series trip since 1997, but the big concern for the Indians coming into the series — an injury-riddled rotation — still lingers. In Game 5, Cleveland will start Ryan Merritt, who has pitched just 11 innings in the majors, against Marco Estrada. It was an emotional day all around at Rogers Centre, where the home crowd had fallen silent watching the season slipping away because of a slumbering offense that totaled only three runs in the first three games of the series.

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Santana dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .067 Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .167 Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Chisenhall rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .333 a-Davis ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Crisp lf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Naquin cf-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .222 b-Guyer ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Perez c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .182 Totals 28 1 2 1 2 9 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bautista rf 5 1 0 0 0 1 .071 Upton lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Donaldson 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .357 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .267 Tulowitzki ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .143 Martin c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .071 Saunders dh 4 0 2 0 0 2 .385 Carrera lf-rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .286 Pillar cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .077 Goins 2b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .200 Totals 32 5 9 5 4 8 Cleveland 000 010 000 — 1 2 1 Toronto 001 100 21x — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Chisenhall in the 7th. b-grounded out for Naquin in the 8th. E: Shaw (1). LOB: Cleveland 3, Toronto 8. 2B: Naquin (2), Perez (1). 3B: Carrera (2). HR: Donaldson (1), off Kluber. RBIs: Perez (1), Donaldson (2), Encarnacion 2 (2), Carrera (1), Pillar (1). SF: Pillar. S: Perez. RLISP: Cleveland 2 (Santana, Kipnis); Toronto 3 (Martin, Pillar, Goins). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber L, 1-1 5 4 2 2 2 7 89 1.59 Otero 1 2 0 0 0 0 18 3.86 1/ Shaw 2 2 1 1 0 15 3.86 3 Clevinger 12/3 1 1 1 1 1 26 5.40 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 1-0 6 2 1 1 2 5 95 1.50 Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Osuna 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Clevinger 1-0. PB: off Shaw (Donaldson). WP: Sanchez, Clevinger. Umpires: Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Mark Wegner; Right, Brian Gorman; Left, Jim Wolf. T: 3:01. A: 49,142 .

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blue Jays relief pitcher Roberto Osuna celebrates after getting the inal out in a 5-1 victory Tuesday against the Indians to avoid a fourgame sweep in the ALCS.

“I thought we battled pretty good today, with the bats,” Toronto manager John Gibbons said. “Naturally, when you score, which we haven’t been doing, it always looks good.” Donaldson’s solo shot to leftcenter field off Corey Kluber in the third put the Blue Jays ahead for the first time all series. Two innings after that, the star third baseman made an outstanding play to preserve a one-run edge.

Sanchez, the American League ERA champion, allowed a run and two hits in six innings, and the bullpen finished with three perfect innings. Kluber was starting on three days’ rest for the first time. “I felt fine. I don’t think it physically afected me. I made a mistake to Donaldson,” Kluber said. “We’re one win away from the World Series and that’s what we’re focused on.”

Kluber hadn’t allowed a run in either of his first two starts this postseason. Donaldson, the reigning AL MVP and sporting a still freshly shaved face, opened the scoring with his first home run of these playofs. The wild-card Blue Jays made it 2-0 in the fourth when Ezequiel Carrera’s blooper fell among three Cleveland fielders in left-center for an RBI single. Roberto Perez hit an RBI double in the fifth of Sanchez. Carlos Santana’s two-out grounder to the left side might have had a

Grandal, Turner homer for LA the Dodgers consecutive postseason shutouts for the first time. Julio Urias starts Game 4 for the Dodgers on Wednesday and at 20 years, 68 days will become the youngest starting pitcher in postseason history. John Lackey starts for the Cubs. “He’s not scared of the moment,” fellow Dodgers rookie Corey Seager said. “He’s not scared of anything.” Hill, acquired along with Josh Reddick at the Aug. 1 trade deadline, was strong from the start against one of his former teams, retiring the side to open the game and later eight in a row. Hill has given up one run in 23 innings over four home starts for the Dodgers, lowering his ERA to 0.39. “Changing speeds, pitching of the breaking ball, mixing in the fastball, yeah, he kept them off balance all night,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. Seager, who had three hits, put

the Dodgers ahead with an RBI single in the third, ending an 0-for-15 slide with runners in scoring position in postseason play. Grandal was 0 for five with three strikeouts against Arrieta in his career before he launched a 3-2 pitch into the right-field seats in the fourth for a 3-0 lead. Grandal drove in Reddick, who singled and stole second and third. Justin Turner homered on the first pitch leading of the sixth to chase Arrieta, who gave up four runs and six hits in five innings. He dominated the Dodgers in his previous two starts against them, including a no-hitter at Dodger Stadium on Aug. 30, 2015. Los Angeles had gone two for 51 against him in the two games. Joc Pederson doubled in a run in the eighth and Grandal hit a run-scoring groundout. Maddon moved struggling Anthony Rizzo from third to the cleanup spot and Addison Rus-

It’s 10 years since magic curve

Jef Suppan, moments away from winning the NLCS MVP for his start that night, did not return to the dugout. He instead found a spot nearby, in a cluster of New York police oicers. He could see Chris Carpenter’s face, not the field. He followed the final inning through the chatter on police radio and Carpenter’s reaction. Years later Suppan finally saw the whole inning on video. “I just remember the curveball,” Suppan said Tuesday from Southern California. “I saw that a million times.” The curve from Wainwright’s fingers that night got its start in his backyard on St. Simon’s Island, Ga. His older brother Trey constructed a mound and set up a net to serve as a strike zone. Adam fiddled with grips, once mimicking the knuckle curve of a hotshot Mets rookie, Jason Isringhausen, whose injury made Wainwright the Cardinals closer in 2006. A feel for the curve came quickly. The index finger lifting off the ball like a pinkie of a teacup came early. Atlanta built a division dynasty

NLCS • FROM B1

them singles. “More than anything, I think we need to get a couple runs and hits and runs early to try to get that kind of feeling back,” Cubs manager Joe Maddon said, “because, obviously, when you’re not scoring any runs, it makes it even more diicult in the dugout.” Hill, who pitched for the Atlantic League’s Long Island Ducks in August 2015, struck out six and walked two. “I knew there was going to be an opportunity to get back to the big leagues as long as I stayed healthy and I felt strong,” he said. “Just perseverance. That’s it. Just continue to keep pushing through no matter what, even if you feel like you’re almost ready to give up. You never know, that next door you open might be the one that makes the diference.” Joe Blanton, Grant Dayton and Kenley Jansen finished, giving

CURVE • FROM B1

sat down with Wainwright and mapped his early development. Moore gave the prospect a pointer. Retire the slider. Go with the curveball. “I can see Adam Wainwright’s breaking ball like it was yesterday,” said Moore, who is now Kansas City’s general manager. He recalled the pitch Tuesday, during a phone interview from the Dominican Republic. “I can still see him warming up on the third-base side of his high school field, and then that pitch – it just falls of the table. The spin, the velocity of it – all of that stood out. It was hard. It had a lot of depth. He could naturally really spin the ball, and that’s a swing-and-miss breaking ball.” On Oct. 19, 2006, 10 years ago Wednesday, that breaking ball Moore saw in coastal southern Georgia was watched by millions at home on TV, 56,357 at a rainy, rocking Shea Stadium in Queens, and, most improbably, one batter

at the plate, Carlos Beltran. Wainwright’s swing-and-miss curve didn’t get a swing at all. It was the pitch that froze New York and still illuminates a career. The 83-win Cardinals limped into that postseason with an injury-pocked lineup and a rookie closer. They emerged with a World Series trophy. Their run through October peaked with Game 7 of the NLCS against the New York Mets. The game, one of the mostriveting Game 7s ever, ended with the bases loaded and what Hall of Famer John Smoltz would later call “the perfect pitch at the perfect time to the perfect place.” In the 10 years since Beltran took a called strike three, that curve gained added dimensions with the directions it sent the game’s principals. Beltran would not appear in the postseason again until joining the Cardinals for 2012. Catcher Yadier Molina, just 24, hinted at his All-Star future by influencing every sway of that Game 7, from his decisive home run to calling that last pitch.

chance to score him, but Donaldson made the play to his left, then popped up and danced off the field with a bit of a fist pump. “I was locked in,” Donaldson said. “It helps when you have a guy like Sanchez in the zone, where you can really focus in on a certain area of the strike zone. And I was able to get a really good read of the bat, and I was fortunate enough to be able to make the play.” The Indians didn’t have another baserunner after that. Brett Cecil, Jason Grilli and Roberto Osuna pitched an inning each in relief for Toronto. Taking no chances, Gibbons brought in Osuna, his closer, in a non-save situation to finish of Cleveland. The Indians were trying to become the third team to sweep a Division Series and Championship Series in the same postseason. The 2007 Colorado Rockies and 2014 Kansas City Royals both did it. Cleveland had won nine in a row, including three straight over Boston in the ALDS. The Indians had a chance to take the lead in the third when Tyler Naquin hit a leadof double and went to third on a sacrifice. Sanchez retired Santana on a soft grounder with the infield in, and then Jason Kipnis also grounded out. Kluber was pulled after 89 pitches. He allowed two runs and four hits in five innings. The Blue Jays added two more runs in the seventh after a throwing error by reliever Bryan Shaw. Edwin Encarnacion’s hard grounder skipped of the mound and into center field for a tworun single to make it 4-1.

Dodgers 6, Cubs 0

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cubs’ Jason Heyward walks away after striking out during the seventh inning Tuesday night.

sell from fifth to seventh in the order. Jason Heyward didn’t start and struck out as a pinch-hitter. Chicago’s 3-4-5 hitters went one for 11 in the game and are two for 32 in the series without an RBI. Dexter Fowler’s two-out double in the eighth provided Chicago’s first extra-base hit since Game 1.

out of an ability to identify and unleash elite pitching. Moore explained how the organization’s philosophy preferred a curve to sliders for young pitchers. A slider would too often veer into the power zone for a lefthanded batter. Better to have a curve plummet. Best to have one like Wainwright. “To me, the ability to spin the ball is an exceptional trait for a pitcher,” Moore said. “It’s the same as great speed. If you want it, you’ve got to draft it. Hitting for power — you have to draft it if you want it. Same things goes for spin like Wainwright’s. If you want the natural ability to spin like he has, you have to draft it.” All of the stats available now can demystify pitches. Pitch F/x spread in 2007 and StatCast started during 2015, so Wainwright’s signature curve landed before the metrics so common today. There’s no measure of its magic. When Beltran came to the plate, Wainwright had allowed two hits and walked a batter. He had two outs, both on curves. Molina came to the mound and

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Bryant 3b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .333 Zobrist lf-2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Rizzo 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .091 Baez 2b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Soler rf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 c-Coghlan ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Russell ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 d-Heyward ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Montero c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .250 f-Contreras ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Arrieta p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Totals 31 0 4 0 2 10 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Seager ss 4 0 3 1 0 1 .364 Turner 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .200 Gonzalez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Reddick rf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .333 a-Puig ph-rf 2 1 2 0 0 0 .286 Pederson cf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .182 Grandal c 3 1 1 3 1 1 .167 Toles lf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500 b-Kendrick ph-lf-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Hill p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 34 6 10 6 1 8 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 Los Angeles 001 201 02x — 6 10 0 a-singled for Reddick in the 6th. b-grounded out for Toles in the 6th. c-grounded out for Soler in the 7th. d-struck out for Russell in the 7th. f-struck out for Montero in the 8th. LOB: Chicago 6, Los Angeles 5. 2B: Fowler (1), Pederson (1). HR: Grandal (1), off Arrieta; Turner (1), off Arrieta. RBIs: Seager (1), Turner (1), Pederson (1), Grandal 3 (3). SB: Rizzo (1), Reddick 2 (2), Pederson (2).RLISP: Chicago 4 (Bryant, Montero 2, Coghlan); Los Angeles 2 (Turner, Kendrick). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta L, 0-1 5 6 4 4 0 5 83 7.20 2/ Wood 1 0 0 1 1 19 0.00 3 Grimm 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Montgomery 1 2 2 2 0 1 21 11.57 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hill W, 1-0 6 2 0 0 2 6 93 0.00 Blanton 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 27.00 2/ Dayton 1 0 0 0 1 16 0.00 3 Jansen 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 21 0.00 Arrieta pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Grimm 2-0, Jansen 1-0. PB: Grandal (1). T: 3:18. A: 54,269 .

told Wainwright to start Beltran with a sinker. By the time Molina got behind the plate and spied Beltran, the catcher changed his mind. He called for a changeup. Beltran took it for strike one. Batting lefthanded, Beltran was one of those hitters who could launch a slider, like the Braves once cautioned Wainwright about. He got an 0-1 curve. Fouled it of. Then Wainwright would later say he threw “the best pitch I’d ever thrown. If he beats me, I will know he did it against my best.” Beltran took. Molina rushed him. Suppan ran out with the police. Eight days later, on Oct 27, 2006, at Busch Stadium, Wainwright closed out a World Series title to cap his rookie season against a righthanded batter from Detroit. He got Brandon Inge swinging on a pitch he still had to end the game. That was a slider. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


10.19.2016 • WEdnESday • M 1 MISSOURI FOOTBALL POSTSEASON SCHEDULE

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

All games 7 p.m. Friday, unless noted CLASS 6 First round Seckman (0-9) at Kirkwood (7-1) Northwest Cedar Hill (4-5) at Fox (6-3) Mehlville (2-7) at Lafayette (6-3) Lindbergh (3-6) at Eureka (8-1) Lee’s Summit North (2-7) at Kickapoo (8-1) Park Hill (6-3) at Rockhurst (6-2) Joplin (5-4) at Lee’s Summit West (6-2) Ray-Pec (5-4) at Lee’s Summit (7-2) McCluer North (1-8) at Hazelwood Central (9-0), 1:30 p.m. Saturday. SLUH (5-4) at Ritenour (7-2) De Smet (2-7) at CBC (8-1) Hazelwood West (4-5) at Marquette (7-2) Howell Central (2-7) at Blue Springs (7-2) Blue Springs South (4-5) at Jef. City (5-4) Rock Bridge (2-7) at Zumwalt West (5-4) Troy (3-6) at Francis Howell (7-2) CLASS 5 First round 1. Oakville (2-7) at Summit (3-6) 2. Webster Groves (3-5) at Pattonville (3-6) 3. Parkway South (2-7) at Howell North (5-4) 4. North Kansas City (2-7) at Truman (3-6) 5. Oak Park (0-9) at Liberty N. (4-6) at Staley 6. Holt (2-7) at Washington (5-4) 7. Waynesville (0-9) at Branson (2-7) 8. Springield Central (0-9) at Lebanon (6-3) 9. Parkview (2-7) at Willard (3-6) 10. Republic (2-7) at Neosho (5-4) 11. Ruskin (2-7) at Raytown (2-7) 12. Hickman (1-9) at Smith-Cotton (4-5) District semiinals, Friday, October 28 Game 2 winner at Jackson (7-2) Vianney (4-5) at Poplar Bluf (8-1) Game 6 winner at Chaminade (7-1) Game 8 winner at Haz. East (7-2), 1 p.m. 10/29. Game 10 winner at Park Hill South (8-1) William Chrisman (8-1) at Fort Osage (4-5) Game 14 winner at Staley (7-2) St. Joseph Cen. (4-5) at Liberty (KC) (6-3) Game 18 winner at Zumwalt North (8-1) Zumwalt South (4-5) at Timberland (6-3) Game 22 winner at Glendale (9-0) Game 24 winner at Ozark (7-2) Game 26 winner at Carthage (8-1) Game 28 winner at Nixa (5-4) Game 30 winner at Battle (9-0) Game 32 winner at Belton (6-3) CLASS 4 First round Perryville (2-7) at Farmington (6-3) Cape Central (4-5) at North County (6-3) De Soto (5-4) at Hillsboro (7-2) Festus (5-4) at Sikeston (6-3) DuBourg (0-9) at Ladue (8-1) at SLUH Windsor (Imperial) (4-5) at St. Mary’s (6-3) Afton (2-7) at MICDS (7-2), 2 p.m. Saturday. Clayton (2-7) at Gateway STEM (6-3) Marshall (1-9) at Hannibal (7-2) Liberty (Wentzville) (2-7) at Moberly (3-5) Warrensburg (3-6) at Helias (5-4) Saturday. Kirksville (4-5) at Warrenton (5-4) Savannah (1-8) at Kearney (8-1) Excelsior Springs (6-3) at St. Joseph Lafa. (6-3) Winnetonka (1-8) at Platte County (6-3) St. Joseph Benton (4-5) at Smithville (7-2) Univ. City (0-9) at Parkway North (7-2) Riverview(3-6)atMcCluer(3-6),1:30pmSaturday St. Charles (3-6) at Parkway Central (7-2) FZ East (4-5) at St. Dominic (8-1) Priory (0-9) at Parkway West (5-4) Borgia (5-4) at Westminster (3-6), 3 p.m. Saturday. Paciic (0-9) at Union (6-3) Rolla (1-8) at St. Clair (5-4) McDonald Co. (0-9) at Carl Junction (7-2) Bolivar (5-4) at Hillcrest (4-5) Marshield (2-7) at Webb City (6-3) West Plains (4-5) at Camdenton (6-3) KC Northeast (1-8) at Harrisonville (6-3) Nevada (2-7) at Grandview (0-8) Van Horn (1-8) at Raytown South (5-4) KC East (1-8) at Grain Valley (6-3) CLASS 3 First round New Madrid CC (1-7) at Park Hills Cen. (8-1) 2. Salem (5-4) at Potosi (4-5) Fredericktown (2-7) at Ste. Genevieve (5-4) Dexter (2-7) at Kennett (5-4) Conluence (5-4) at John Burroughs (3-6), 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Roosevelt (1-8) at Lutheran South (6-3) Lift For Life (2-7) at Vashon (4-5), 1 p.m. Saturday. Boonville (2-6) at KC Center (9-0) Oak Grove (4-5) at Pleasant Hill (4-5) KC Southeast (2-7) at Hogan Prep (8-1) Odessa (4-5) at Clinton (7-2)

Cameron (0-9) at Maryville (9-0) Pembroke Hill (5-4) at St. Pius X-KC (6-3) KC Central Academy (4-5) at Richmond (9-0) Lincoln College Prep (6-3) at Chillicothe (8-1) Bufalo (2-7) at Owensville (9-0) Logan-Rogersville (4-5) at Sullivan (4-5) St. James (4-5) at Osage (8-1) Eldon (5-4) at Springield Catholic (6-3) Aurora (2-7) at Reeds Spring (8-1) Hollister (5-4) at Mount Vernon (5-4) Seneca (3-6) at Monett (8-1) East Newton (3-6) at Cassville (6-3) Soldan (3-6) at MS-Berkeley (8-0), 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Normandy (4-5) at Luth. St. Charles (7-2) Duchesne (3-6) at Orchard Farm (7-2) Jennings (4-5) at St. Charles West (5-4) Winield (3-5) at Fulton (4-5) O’Fallon Christian (1-8) at Mexico (7-2) Wright City (3-6) at Southern Boone (7-2) Second round Conluence/John Burroughs winner plays at Miller Career at 7 p.m., October 28 Fulton/Winield winner at Blair Oaks, Oct. 28 CLASS 2 First round Charleston (3-6) at Jeferson (6-3) Kelly (0-9) at Caruthersville (6-3) St. Pius X (2-7) at East Prairie (5-4) Sumner (2-5) at Carnahan (4-3), 1 p.m. Saturday. Cleveland (2-6) at Lutheran North (7-2), 2 p.m. Saturday. Herculaneum (3-6) at Cardinal Ritter (4-4) Sherwood (0-9) at Summit Christian (8-1) O’Hara (2-7) at St. Paul Lutheran (6-3) Knob Noster (2-7) at Butler University Academy (3-6) at Holden (5-4) Carrollton (4-5) at Lexington (7-1) Trenton (6-3) at Lathrop (7-2) Lafayette County (5-4) at Lawson (7-2) Brookield (5-4) at LeBlond Houston (1-8) at Mt. View-Liberty (9-0) Willow Springs (5-4) at Diamond (7-2) Cuba (1-6) at Mountain Grove (8-1) Straford (3-6) at Ava (7-2) Warsaw (0-9) at Lamar (8-0) Versailles (3-6) at Stockton (5-4) California (2-7) at Fair Grove (9-0) El Dorado Springs (3-6) at Cole Camp (6-2) Principia (1-7) at Brentwood (7-1) Tolton (4-5) at North Callaway (7-2) Montg. County (2-7) at South Callaway (9-0) Hallsville (4-5) at Hermann (6-3) Highland, (1-8) at Macon (9-0) Bowling Green (1-8) at Palmyra (6-3) Clark County (2-7) at Centralia (6-3) Van-Far (2-7) at Clopton (6-3) Second round Carnahan/Sumner winner plays at Trinity at 7 p.m. October 28 Jeferson/Charleston winner plays at Malden October 28 CLASS 1 First round Portageville (3-6) at St. Vincent (6-3) Crystal City (3-6) at Hayti (8-1) Chafee (4-5) at Scott City (6-3) Miller (2-7) at Ash Grove (6-3) Cabool (0-9) at Sarcoxie (5-3) Pleasant Hope (1-8) at Thayer (4-5) Marionville (2-7) at Pierce City (6-3) Concordia (0-9) at Wellington-Nap. (8-1) West Platte (1-8) at Plattsburg (3-6) North Platte (2-7) at East Buchanan (5-4) Orrick (2-7) at Mid-Buchanan (4-5) South Harrison (0-9) at Hamilton (9-0) Putnam County (4-5) at Gallatin (6-3) Milan (1-8) at Maysville (7-2) Princeton (2-7) at Polo (6-3) Rich Hill (1-8) at Cass Midway (8-1) Archie (2-7) at Drexel (6-3) Liberal (2-7) at Lockwood (7-2) Jasper (3-6) at Adrian (5-4) Osceola (0-9) at Lincoln (9-0) Tipton (3-6) at Appleton City (7-2) Lone Jack (2-7) at Skyline (6-3) Windsor (Sedalia) (4-5) at Crest Ridge (7-2) Louisiana (0-9) at Mark Twain (6-3) Knox County (6-3) at Scotland County (6-3) Paris (2-7) at Monroe City (6-3) Schuyler County (2-7) at South Shelby (5-4) Harrisburg, (1-8) at Marceline (9-0) Santa Fe (5-4) at Fayette (5-4) Slater (1-7) at Westran (6-3) Salisbury (3-6) at Sweet Springs (5-4) Second round Portageville/St. Vincent winner plays Valle Catholic at 7 p.m. on October 28

FAMILIAR FOES Rematches dot irst round of district tournaments BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

The sequel never lives up to the original. At least that’s what some area teams are hoping when they see a familiar foe when Missouri’s district tournaments get underway Friday and Saturday. At least 11 games will be rematches from the regular season — including two from last week. The No. 10 small school in the final regular season STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Orchard Farm (7-2) hosts Duchesne (36), which it beat 14-0 at home. On Saturday, Westminster (3-6) hosts Borgia (5-4), which it beat on the road 46-35. Kickoff is set for 3 p.m. Playing the same opponent two weeks in a row is a twist rarely seen on the gridiron. “It’s definitely different,” Orchard Farm coach Eric Schroer said. “Playing them back to back is definitely a diferent feeling.” Borgia has a familiar feeling against Westminster, and not just from last week. This will be the fourth consecutive season the teams will play in the district tournament. These two have a long regular season rivalry that, when combined with their postseason meetings, has grown a bit one-sided. “Eight times we’ve gotten our fanny kicked by them,” longtime Borgia coach Dale Gildehaus said. “We haven’t beaten them

since 2011. We hope the ninth time is the charm.” Another terrifying aspect for coaches is rivalry rematches. De Soto (5-4) plays at Hillsboro (7-2) at 7 p.m. Friday. On Saturday, top seed Hazelwood Central (9-0, No. 4 LS) hosts No. 8 seed McCluer North (1-8) at 1:30 p.m. Sure Hazelwood Central and McCluer North looks like it should be a walk for Central, which throttled North 66-13 on Sept. 17. But that was then. “This is a playof game. We have to take care of business. On any given Saturday (anyone can lose),” Central coach Van Vanatta said. “Those guys are going to come out to play. It’s hard to play somebody twice.” It’s hard to beat them twice, which is what De Soto coach Chris Johnson has been drilling into his team this week. When De Soto travels to Hillsboro for its 7 p.m. kickoff Friday, Johnson said his team will be playing with house money. After Hillsboro’s 46-22 regular-season win, there will be an expectation for the home team to win again. “What are some of the things we can do to give us a better chance to win the game?” Johnson said. “That cat-and-mouse game part is exciting as a coach.”

CAHOKIA CHASES PLAYOFFS When John Clay took over as Cahokia’s coach this offseason, his first and

REMATCHES Regular-season rematches set for the irst-round of district tournaments and the number of weeks since their irst meeting. Class 3 District 5: Duchesne (3-6) at Orchard Farm (7-2), one week. Class 4 District 4: No. 5 Borgia (5-4) at No. 4 Westminster (3-6), one week. Class 6 District 1: No. 6 Lindbergh (3-6) at No. 3 Eureka (8-1), two weeks. Class 4 District 1: No. 7 De Soto (5-4) at No. 2 Hillsboro (7-2), three weeks. Class 6 District 2: No. 8 McCluer North (1-8) at No. 1 Hazelwood Central (9-0), ive weeks. Class 6 District 1: No. 5 Northwest-Cedar Hill (4-5) at No. 4 Fox (6-3), ive weeks. Class 6 District 2: No. 7 De Smet (2-7) at No. 2 CBC (8-1), ive weeks. Class 5 District 2: No. 5 Webster Groves (3-5) at No. 4 Pattonville (3-6), ive weeks. Class 5 District 3: No. 5 Holt (2-7) at No. 4 Washington (5-4), six weeks. Class 4 District 3: No. 8 University City (0-9) at No. 1 Parkway North (7-2), seven weeks.

foremost goal was to get the Comanches into the playofs. In the final week of the regular season that goal is still attainable. If Cahokia (4-4) can find its way past Crete-Monee (6-2), it will be eligible for the playoffs for the first time since 2009. It will be a considerable challenge for the Comanches. CreteMonee has qualified for the playoffs every year since 2005 and won the Class 6A title in 2012. The No. 7 team in the Class 7A Illinois AP poll, Crete-Monee has won five in a row. K ickoff is set for 7:30 p.m. Friday at Cahokia. “It’s a big deal for us. We still have an opportunity,” Clay said. “I’m proud of the kids.”

GRID BITS • To be eligible for the Illinois High School Association playoffs, teams have to finish better than .500. Here are the Metro East teams that have clinched a berth or are still eligible with one regular-season game remaining. IHSA will announce the qualifiers and the state tournament brackets at 8 p.m. Saturday

live on IHSA.tv: Clinched: Althoff (8-0), Alton Marquette (6-2), Breese Central (7-1), Columbia (8-0), East St. Louis (8-0), Edwardsville (7-1), Highland (7-1), Red Bud (6-2), Triad (6-2). Still eligible: Belleville West (4-4), Cahokia (44), Civic Memorial (5-3), Granite City (4-4), Mater Dei (4-4). • The Missouri postseason format factors in head-to-head results when teams in the same district finish within one place of each other. The winner of the head-to-head regularseason meeting is granted the higher seed regardless of points accumulated. Area teams afected by the head-to-head factor were: Class 3 District 5: No. 2 Orchard Farm (41.91), No. 3 St. Charles West (42.23). Class 4 District 3: No. 4 McCluer (38.46), No. 5 Riverview Gardens (39.27). Class 4 District 4: No. 4 Westminster (26.14), No. 5 Borgia (32.58). Class 6 District 1: No. 2 Lafayette (37.16), No. 3 Eureka (43.47). Class 6 District 3: No. 2 Fort Zumwalt West (33.97), No. 3 Francis Howell (39.97).

POSTSEASON SCHEDULES, RESULTS BOYS SOCCER ILLINOIS -Class 3A-O’Fallon Regional Semifinals Quincy 4, Belleville East 1 O’Fallon 1, Belleville West 0 (PKs) Championship | Saturday Quincy vs. O’Fallon, 5 p.m. -Class 3A-Granite City Regional Semifinals Edwardsville 5, Granite City 0 Collinsville 4, Alton 1 Championship | Friday Edwardsville vs. Collinsville, 5 p.m. -Class 2A-Jacksonville Regional Semifinals Jacksonville 9, Civic Memorial 0 Highland 2, Jerseyville 1 Championship | Friday Highland vs. Jacksonville, 6 p.m. -Class 1A Gibault Sectional At Oerter Park Semifinals Althoff 4, Mater Dei 0 Gibault 3, Breese Central 0 Championship | Friday Althoff vs. Gibault, 6 p.m. MISSOURI -Class 2 District 1 Tournament At Perryville | Semifinals Cape Notre Dame 7, Fredericktown 0 Perryville 2, St. Pius X 0 Championship | Wednesday Cape Notre Dame vs. Perryville, 6 p.m. -Class 2 District 2 Tournament At Lutheran South | Semifinals Lutheran South 6, St. Clair 0 Hancock 1, Sullivan 0 (PKs) Championship | Thursday Hancock vs. Lutheran South, 6 p.m. -Class 2 District 3 Tournament At Bayless | Semifinals DuBourg 2, Affton 1 Bayless vs. Carnahan, 4 p.m. Wednesday Championship | Friday DuBourg vs. Bayless/Carnahan winner, 4 pm -Class 2 District 4 Tournament At Sumner | Semifinals Lift for Life 2, Roosevelt 1 Soldan wins by forfeit over Vashon Championship, Wednesday Soldan vs. Lift for Life, 5 p.m. -Class 2 District 5 Tournament At John Burroughs | Semifinals John Burroughs 10, North Tech 0 Lutheran North 2, Trinity 0 Championship | Wednesday Lutheran North vs. John Burroughs, 4 p.m. -Class 2 District 6 Tournament At Principia | Semifinal Priory 7, Whitfield 0 Principia 2, Kennedy 1 Championship, Thursday Principia vs. Priory, 6 p.m. -Class 2 District 7 Tournament At Lutheran St. Charles | Semifinals Duchesne 2, Orchard Farm 0 St. Charles West 5, Lutheran St. Charles 1 Championship, Thursday Duchesne vs. St. Charles West, 6 p.m. -Class 2 District 8 Tournament At Winfield | Semifinal O’Fallon Christian 11, Elsberry 1 Missouri Military 4, Winfield 0 Championship, Thursday O’Fallon Christian vs. Missouri Military, 4:30 pm -Class 1 District 1 Tournament At Gateway STEM First round, Tuesday Cleveland 3, St. Paul Lutheran 2 (PKs) Semifinals, Wednesday Saxony Lutheran vs. Cleveland, 5 p.m. Gateway STEM vs. McKinley, 7 p.m. Championship, Thursday Semifinal winners, 5:30 p.m. -Class 1 District 2 Tournament At Maplewood-RH | First Round Crossroads 5, Med. and Bioscience 2 Semifinals, Tuesday Maplewood 7, Crossroads 0 Brentwood 2, Metro 1 Championship, Thursday Maplewood vs. Brentwood, 4 p.m. -Class 1 District 3 Tournament At Belle | Semifinals Canton, Calvary Lutheran 0 Valley Park at Belle, (n) Championship, Thursday Canton vs. TBA, 4 p.m.

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL -Class 4 District 1 Tournament At Sikeston Championship, Wednesday Farmington vs. Poplar Bluff, 6 p.m. -Class 4 District 2 Tournament At Oakville | First round Oakville def. Seckman 25-22, 25-20 Lindbergh def. Fox 25-19, 25-16 Mehlville def. Hillsboro 25-22, 22-25, 25-21 Semifinals, Wednesday Oakville vs. Cor Jesu, 4:30 p.m. Lindbergh vs. Mehlville, 5:30 p.m. Championship, Wednesday Semifinal winners, 6:30 p.m. -Class 4 District 3 Tournament At Eureka Semifinals, Tuesday Lafayette def. Summit 25-8, 25-16 Eureka def. Northwest-CH 25-17, 25-17 Championship, Tuesday Lafayette def. Eureka 25-20, 25-12 -Class 4 District 4 Tournament At Webster Groves | Semifinals St. Joseph’s def. Webster Groves 25-15, 25-14 Nerinx Hall def. Ursuline 20-25, 25-16, 25-20 Championship | Wednesday

St. Joseph’s vs. Nerinx Hall, 5:30 p.m. -Class 4 District 5 Tournament At McCluer Semifinals | Wednesday Haz. East vs. Ritenour, 4 p.m. Haz. West vs. Haz. Central, 5:30 p.m. Championship | Wednesday Semifinal winners, 7 p.m. -Class 4 District 6 Tournament At Parkway West Semifinals, Wednesday Westminster vs. Marquette, 4:30 p.m. Parkway Central. vs. Parkway West, 6 p.m. Championship, Wednesday Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m. -Class 4 District 7 Tournament At Fort Zumwalt East | Semifinals Francis Howell def. FZ North 25-17, 25-18 St. Dominic def. FZ West 25-15, 25-21 Championship, Wednesday Francis Howell vs. St. Dominic, 6 p.m. -Class 4 District 8 Tournament At Holt | Semifinals Timberland def. Battle 25-20, 25-14 Holt def. Liberty 25-13, 25-21 Championship, Wednesday Timberland vs. Holt, 6:30 p.m. -Class 3 District 2 Tournament At Park Hills Central | First round Festus def. Park Hills Central, 25-16, 25-18 Ste. Genevieve def. North County, 25-17, 25-8 Herculaneum def. Potosi, 25-16, 25-19 Semifinals, Tuesday Windsor def. Festus, 25-15, 25-14 Ste. Genevieve def. Herculaneum 25-17, 25-16 Championship, Tuesday Ste. Genevieve def. Windsor 25-20, 19-25, 27-25 -Class 3 District 3 Tournament At Affton | First round DuBourg def. Notre Dame, 24-26, 25-15, 26-16 Affton def. Bayless, 25-19, 25-7 Semifinals, Wednesday DuBourg vs. Lutheran South, 4:30 p.m. Affton vs. Pacific, 6 p.m. Championship, Wednesday Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m. -Class 3 District 4 Tournament At Miller Career | First round Lift For Life def. Vashon 25-9, 25-9 Soldan def. Confluence 25-13, 25-12 Rosati-Kain def. Roosevelt 25-3, 25-11 Semifinals, Wednesday Lift for Life vs. Miller Career, 4:30 p.m. Soldan vs. Rosati-Kain, 5:30 p.m. Championship, Wednesday Semifinal winners, 7 p.m. -Class 3 District 5 Tournament at Villa Duchesne | First round Visitation def. University City, 25-8, 25-12 John Burroughs def. Clayton 25-13, 25-13 MICDS def. Normandy 25-14, 25-9 Semifinals | Wednesday Villa Duchesne vs. Visitation, 5 p.m. John Burroughs vs. MICDS, 6:30 p.m. Championship | Wednesday Semifinal winners, 8 p.m. -Class 3 District 6 Tournament at St. Charles | First round Orchard Farm def. MS-Berkeley 25-8, 25-9 Duchesne def. Jennings 25-10, 25-7 Semifinals, Wednesday Orchard Farm vs. Incarnate Word, 5 p.m. St. Charles vs. Duchesne, 6 p.m. -Class 3 District 7 Tournament At Lutheran St. Charles | First round Warrenton def. Winfield, 25-23, 25-22 Borgia def. St. Charles West, 25-7, 25-4 O’Fallon Christian def. Wright City, 25-9, 25-14 Semifinals, Tuesday Luth.St. Charles def. Warrenton 25-12, 25-21 Borgia def. O’Fallon Christian 25-20, 15-25, 25-19 Championship, Tuesday Borgia def. Luth. St. Charles 25-11, 25-19 -Class 3 District 9 Tournament At Sullivan Semifinals, Tuesday Union def. Owensville 25-19, 25-15, 25-23 Sullivan def. St. Clair 25-13, 25-14 Championship, Tuesday Sullivan def. Union 25-13, 25-19 -Class 2 District 3 Tournament At West County Semifinals | Wednesday Jefferson vs St. Pius X, 4 p.m. Arcadia Valley vs. Saxony Lutheran, 5:15 p.m. Championship | Wednesday Semifinal winners, 7 p.m. -Class 2 District 4 Tournament At Metro | First round Cardinal Ritter def. Carnahan, 25-11, 25-18 McKinley def. Cleveland, 22-25, 25-8, 25-16 Semifinals | Tuesday Metro vs. Cardinal Ritter, (n) Hancock vs. McKinley, (n) Championship, Tuesday Semifinal winners -Class 2 District 5 Tournament At Crossroads | Semifinals Trinity def. North Tech 25-4, 25-12 Crossroads def. Lutheran North 17-25, 25-18, 25-18 Championship, Wednesday Trinity vs. Crossroads, 5 p.m. -Class 2 District 6 Tournament At Brentwood | First round Brentwood def. Principia, 22-25, 25-17, 25-15 Maplewood def. Valley Park, 25-17, 27-29, 25-12 Semifinals, Tuesday Whitfield def. Brentwood, 25-15, 25-20 Kennedy def. Maplewood-RH 25-19, 25-15 Championship, Wednesday Whitfield vs. Kennedy, 5 p.m. -Class 2 District 7 Tournament At Tolton | First round Hermann def. Tolton 25-14, 25-13

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL • CLASS 3 DISTRICT 7 CHAMPIONSHIP

Borgia ousts Lutheran St. Charles BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

ST. PETERS • Borgia senior outside hitter Audrey Arand couldn’t quite put her finger on it. But sometime during a lengthy practice session Saturday morning, the light bulb came on for the Knights. “We just felt something,” Arand recalled. “All of a sudden, our energy was high and everything was falling into place. We came together and said, ‘We can do this.’ “ That watershed moment apparently changed the entire season for the Washington-based school. Borgia turned in a near-flawless performance in knocking off defending state champion Lutheran St. Charles 25-11, 25-19 on Tuesday in the championship match of the Class 3 District 7 Tournament in St. Peters. The Knights (19-13-1) will host a four-team sectional Saturday, with the semifinals set for 3 p.m. and 4:30 and the championship slated for 6. Arand and Co. bolted out to a 9-2 lead in the first set and never looked back in turning in their finest match of an up-and-down season. Coach Andrea Beaty agreed something happened during that fateful a.m. workout. “I think they just came together and realized what was possible,” Beaty said. “And they’ve just been running off of that. I couldn’t be more blessed or feel more grateful.” Borgia won its 28th district title in the last 30 years. But none was

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

The Borgia girls volleyball team celebrates their district championship by hoisting the trophy during the Class 3 District 7 tournament.

tougher than this one. Lutheran St. Charles, the Class 2 state champion, was bumped up this season and came into the district final on an eight-match win streak. But Borgia took control early and never let up on the gas during what turned into a 49-minute beat down. “We were confident that we could do this,” Borgia freshman setter Abby Linn said. “But, I think the way we did it, and how well we played, might have even been a surprise to us.” Lynn helped lead a strong defensive performance with 17 digs. Senior Natalie Ruether had 21 digs as the Knights frustrated the Cougars (25-5) and standout hitter Tori Vogt.

Arand, a 5-11 jumping jack, had seven kills and spearheaded a balanced ofensive attack. Senior Alexis Oetterer also had seven kills and senior Meredith Roach chipped in six. “We definitely picked things up the whole week both in practice and tonight,” Roach said. “It feels good.” Lutheran knocked off Borgia in a three-set thriller in Washington on Sept. 4. Vogt went wild in that match. But the Knights threw a double block at her in the rematch. “They were just better than we were tonight,” Lutheran St. Charles coach Sasa Vasiljevic said. “No doubt about it. We weren’t bad, they were just real good.”

FOOTBALL • FINAL REGULAR SEASON RANKINGS

TUESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS SOCCER

BOYS SWIMMING

Maplewood-RH 7, Crossroads 0 (M: Joseph Barron 2, Zach Barton 2, Isaac Pearson 2, Dawson Cordia ; shutout by Marlon Ramirez) St. Dominic 1, Westminster 0 (S: Jacob Grabenhorst ; shutout by Eric Bauche) Edwardsville 5, Granite City 0 (E: Mohamad Hamad, Alec Mills, Michael Pichiotti, Josh Reed, John Wasmuth) Duchesne 2, Orchard Farm 0 (D: Jimmy Choinka, Brandon Moeller ; shutout by Ethan Cowell) FZ West 2, CBC 1 (F: Keegan Dankenbring; C: EJ Verhulst) FH Central 3, Timberland 2 (F: CJ Brown 2, Tony Nicastro) Marquette 2, SLUH 1 (M: Trent Dolson, Tyler Sieli) Kirkwood 5, Fox 0 (K: Cam Saunders 2, Drew Travis, Brad Lay, Patrick McLaughlin ; shutout by Ryan Gaines, Alec Redington) Pky. Central 5, Pky. West 2 (PC: Luke Trail 5) Oakville 4, Eureka 2 (O: Jacob Bilyeu 2, Samed Ganibegovic, Logan Hankamer) Luth. South 6, St. Clair 0 (L: Jake Reis, Jake Bacon, Bradley Fritsche, Ben Lee, Carl Paetow, Brendan Shawcross ; shutout by Austin Cheeley) Priory 7, Whitield 0 (P: John Forshaw 2, Jack Hopson, Harry Lindmark, Dominic Young, Drew Ahlering, Mark Ciapciak ; shutout by Tyler Bealke, Andrew Stange) Mehlville 2, St. Mary’s 1 (M: Aner Dubinovic, Josh Richter; S: Dyan Chapa) Highland 2, Jerseyville 1 (H: Evan Herman, Brendan Schrage)

Westminster 103, Borgia 61 200 medley relay: 1. Westminster, 2:02.80 200 freestyle: 1. Derek Van Booven, Borgia, 2:11.95 200 IM: 1. Daniel Fox, Westminster, 2:36.56 50 free: 1. Connor Evans, Westminster, 25.72 Diving: 1. Chris Kirby, Westminster, 198.10 100 butterly: 1. Reid St. John, Westminster, 1:09.70 100 freestyle: 1. Andrew Simily, Borgia, 54.45 500 free: 1. Caleb Terschak, Westminster, 5:31.64 200 freestyle relay: 1. Westminster, 1:51.08 100 backstroke: 1. Caleb Terschak, Westminster, 1:08.38 100 breaststroke: 1. Andrew Simily, Borgia, 1:12.83 400 freestyle relay: 1. Borgia, 4:11.36

FIELD HOCKEY Ursuline 4, Barat 2 Visitation 1, Nerinx Hall 0 University City 4, Westminster 2

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Bellvl. East def. Breese C. 25-13, 25-17 Edwardsville def. Bellvl. West 22-25, 25-17, 25-19 O’Fallon def. E. St. Louis 25-10, 25-15 Triad def. Jerseyville 25-17, 25-20 Valmeyer def. Steeleville 25-19, 25-21 Marissa def. Lebanon 25-16, 25-20 Waterloo def. Highland 25-20, 22-25, 25-23 Mascoutah def. Civic Mem. 25-17, 25-16 New Athens def. Dupo 25-20, 25-13 ME Lutheran def. Mount Olive 21-25, 25-20, 25-10 Columbia def. Collinsville 25-10, 25-16

LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. East St. Louis 8-0 2. CBC 8-1 3. Hazelwood Central 9-0 4. Chaminade 7-1 5. Edwardsville 7-1 6. Kirkwood 7-1 7. Eureka 8-1 8. Fort Zumwalt North 8-1 9. Parkway North 7-2 10. Ladue 8-1

LW 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 NR

SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. Althof 8-0 2. Trinity 8-0 3. McCluer South-Berkeley 8-0 4. Columbia 8-0 5. MICDS 7-2 6. Highland 7-1 7. Breese Central 7-1 8. Lutheran North 7-2 9. St. Dominic 8-1 10. Orchard Farm 7-2

LW 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 NR

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS SOCCER

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Westminster at McCluer North, 4 p.m. Kirkwood at Pattonville, 4:15 p.m. Ritenour at Parkway North, 4:15 p.m. Paciic at Washington, 5 p.m. FZ North vs. Clayton, at Gay Field, 5:45 p.m. McCluer at Liberty, 6 p.m. Hazelwood West at Parkway Central, 6 p.m. CBC at De Smet, 6 p.m. Farmington at Seckman, 6 p.m. MICDS at Lafayette, 6 p.m. Lindbergh at Parkway South, 6 p.m. Union at Windsor, 6 p.m. Battle at Warrenton, 6:30 p.m.

ME Lutheran at Roxana, 5 p.m. Jerseyville at Hardin Calhoun, 6:15 p.m. Cahokia at Lovejoy, 6:30 p.m. Freeburg at Gibault, 7 p.m.

BOYS SWIMMING Fort Zumwalt West vs. Francis Howell Central at Rec-Plex, 3:30 p.m. FZNorthatMcCluerNorthatCivicCenter,3:30p.m. Parkway Quad, 3:30 p.m. Hazelwood East, Ritenour at Clayton, 4 p.m. De Smet at Pattonville, 4 p.m. Washington at Afton, 4:15 p.m. Lindbergh at Oakville, 4:30 p.m. Mehlville at Eureka, 4:30 p.m.

HOW TO SUBMIT ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS Coaches and athletic directors, send all-conference selections to chollway@stltoday.com, in a digital format, spreadsheet or word document. No faxes or PDFs, please. In order to expedite publication, please send as soon as they are selected and indicate a publication date if they are not to be released immediately. Please submit in this style: Pos., John Brown, sr. (or jr., so., fr.), School


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INJURY REPORT • On the NFL board, Pittsburgh QB Ben Roethlisberger is out. POLITICAL REPORT Odds to win the 2016 Presidential election Hillary Clinton 1/5 Donald Trump 9/2 DEBATE PROPS Trump to walk out during debate: 8/1 Clinton to take a drug test before the debate: 15/1 Trump to not attend debate: 25/1 BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Championship Series BLUE JAYS -$170 Indians National League Championship Series Cubs -$110 DODGERS NFL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Thursday PACKERS 9 8 Bears Sunday l-Giants 3 3 Rams Vikings 2.5 2.5 EAGLES CHIEFS 6.5 6.5 Saints LIONS 1.5 1.5 Washington BENGALS 10 10 Browns Bills 3 3 DOLPHINS JAGUARS 1.5 1 Raiders TITANS 2.5 2.5 Colts JETS 1 1 Ravens FALCONS 6 6.5 Chargers Bucs 2 2 49ERS Patriots 7.5 7.5 STEELERS CARDS 1.5 1.5 Seahawks Monday BRONCOS 7 7 Texans Bye week: Panthers, Cowboys. l- London, England. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Thursday VA TECH 4 6 Miami-Florida Troy 8.5 9.5 S ALABAMA BOISE ST 8 7 Byu Friday S Florida 6.5 7 TEMPLE CALIFORNIA 2.5 3 Oregon SAN DIEGO ST 22.5 23.5 San Jose St Saturday ARMY 17 18.5 N Texas W MICHIGAN 22.5 23.5 E Michigan BOSTON COLL 5.5 5 Syracuse MINNESOTA 17 17 Rutgers CINCINNATI 1.5 2 E Carolina W VIRGINIA 4.5 5 Tcu NORTHWESTERN 3 1.5 Indiana NEBRASKA 24 24 Purdue Oklahoma St 25 24 KANSAS Wisconsin 3 3.5 IOWA N Carolina 9.5 8 VIRGINIA LOUISVILLE 17.5 20 Nc State TOLEDO 10 10.5 C Michigan BALL ST 2 3 Akron La Tech 14 16.5 FLA INT’L AIR FORCE 16.5 16.5 Hawaii UL-Lafayette 6.5 6.5 TEXAS ST APP’CHIAN ST 21 21 Idaho S CAROLINA 20.5 20.5 Massachusetts MARSHALL 18 13 Charlotte NEW MEXICO 13 17 UL-Monroe NO ILLINOIS 20 21.5 Buffalo C Florida 2.5 4 CONNECTICUT Ohio U 3 3 KENT ST Wash St 6.5 7 ARIZONA ST Oklahoma 13.5 14 TEXAS TECH MICHIGAN 35 35.5 Illinois Houston 21.5 21.5 SMU Memphis 2 2.5 NAVY Wyoming 3.5 4 NEVADA TULSA 11 11.5 Tulane WASHINGTON 32 37.5 Oregon St BOWL GREEN 4 4.5 Miami-Ohio Miss St 3 3 KENTUCKY UTSA 10 10 Utep W KENTUCKY 13.5 13.5 Old Dominion KANSAS ST 3 3 Texas STANFORD 2.5 2.5 Colorado Michigan St 2.5 2.5 MARYLAND MISSOURI 5.5 6.5 Mid Tenn St Ga Southern 14.5 14 NEW MEXICO ST Utah NL NL UCLA LSU 4.5 5.5 Mississippi AUBURN 7.5 9.5 Arkansas Ohio St 19.5 19.5 PENN ST ALABAMA 17 19 Texas A&M UNLV 2 2.5 Colorado St UTAH ST 15 16 Fresno St NHL Favorite Odds Underdog RANGERS -$150/+$130 Red Wings JETS -$125/+$105 Maple Leafs Grand Salami: Over/under 11.5 goals. WNBA Finals Favorite Points Underdog Thursday MINNESOTA 6 Los Angeles Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

NFL STANDINGS

ilable

ava Gift ates olidays! cCertiicates H ertiiAvailable e C h t t f i r G ct fo

AMERICAN CONFERENCE EAST W L T Pct PF New England 5 1 0 .833 149 Buffalo 4 2 0 .667 162 Miami 2 4 0 .333 118 N.Y. Jets 1 5 0 .167 95 SOUTH W L T Pct PF Houston 4 2 0 .667 108 Tennessee 3 3 0 .500 120 Jacksonville 2 3 0 .400 101 Indianapolis 2 4 0 .333 160 NORTH W L T Pct PF Pittsburgh 4 2 0 .667 154 Baltimore 3 3 0 .500 117 Cincinnati 2 4 0 .333 109 Cleveland 0 6 0 .000 113 WEST W L T Pct PF Oakland 4 2 0 .667 152 Denver 4 2 0 .667 140 Kansas City 3 2 0 .600 109 San Diego 2 4 0 .333 173 NATIONAL CONFERENCE EAST W L T Pct PF Dallas 5 1 0 .833 159 Washington 4 2 0 .667 142 Philadelphia 3 2 0 .600 135 N.Y. Giants 3 3 0 .500 116 SOUTH W L T Pct PF Atlanta 4 2 0 .667 199 Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 94 New Orleans 2 3 0 .400 155 Carolina 1 5 0 .167 161 NORTH W L T Pct PF Minnesota 5 0 0 1.000 119 Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 114 Detroit 3 3 0 .500 150 Chicago 1 5 0 .167 101 WEST W L T Pct PF Seattle 4 1 0 .800 105 Los Angeles 3 3 0 .500 110 Arizona 3 3 0 .500 153 San Francisco 1 5 0 .167 127 Thursday Chicago at Green Bay, 7:25 p.m. Sunday N.Y. Giants at Los Angeles, 8:30 a.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, Noon New Orleans at Kansas City, Noon Oakland at Jacksonville, Noon Baltimore at N.Y. Jets, Noon Washington at Detroit, Noon Indianapolis at Tennessee, Noon Buffalo at Miami, Noon Cleveland at Cincinnati, Noon Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. San Diego at Atlanta, 3:05 p.m. New England at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m. Seattle at Arizona, 7:30 p.m. Open: Dallas, Carolina Monday Houston at Denver, 7:30 p.m.

PA 91 103 134 164 PA 127 127 127 174 PA 123 115 145 176 PA 163 108 102 155 PA 107 142 78 131 PA 166 142 168 176 PA 63 113 153 143 PA 78 137 104 185

MONDAY’S LATE BOX SCORE

Cardinals 28, NY Jets 3 N.Y. Jets 0 3 0 0 — 3 Arizona 7 7 7 7 — 28 First Quarter Ari: D.Johnson 58 run (Catanzaro kick), 9:51. Second Quarter NYJ: FG Folk 39, 12:06. Ari: D.Johnson 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 6:43. Third Quarter Ari: D.Johnson 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 5:24. Fourth Quarter Ari: Floyd 9 pass fr. Palmer (Catanzaro), 8:20. A: 64,709. NYJ Ari First downs 11 28 Total Net Yards 230 396 Rushes-yards 14-33 35-171 Passing 197 225 Punt Returns 0-0 3-4 Kickoff Returns 0-0 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-16 Comp-Att-Int 20-37-2 24-35-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 0-0 Punts 7-42.1 5-40.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-0 Penalties-Yards 10-83 9-64 Time of Possession 23:58 36:02 Rushing: NYJ, Forte 9-19, Powell 3-10, Fitzpatrick 1-2, Smith 1-2. ARI, D.Johnson 22-111, Ellington 5-25, Nelson 2-23, Taylor 2-14, Stanton 1-(minus 1), Palmer 3-(minus 1). Passing: NYJ, Fitzpatrick 16-31-1-174, Smith 4-61-31. ARI, Palmer 23-34-0-213, Stanton 1-1-0-12. Receiving: NYJ, Peake 5-43, Anderson 4-24, B.Marshall 3-70, Enunwa 3-42, Powell 3-12, J.Marshall 1-11, Forte 1-3. ARI, Fitzgerald 6-49, Jo.Brown 5-54, Ja.Brown 4-35, D.Johnson 3-27, Floyd 2-22, Nelson 2-16, Gresham 1-14, Fells 1-8.

NFL LEADERS SCORING NON-KICKERS David Johnson, ARI Gordon, SD L. McCoy, BUF C. Hyde, SNF Blount, NE D. Murray, TEN Crabtree, OAK

TDRusRecRetX2Pts 8 8 0 0 0 48 7 6 1 0 0 42 7 6 1 0 0 42 6 6 0 0 1 38 6 6 0 0 0 36 6 4 2 0 0 36 5 0 5 0 1 32

KICKERS Du. Hopkins, WAS Lambo, SD Tucker, BAL D. Bailey, DAL Nugent, CIN Sturgis, PHL McManus, DEN Novak, HOU Gostkowski, NE

PAT 13/14 18/19 8/8 18/18 10/10 13/14 12/13 9/10 16/17

FG 15/16 13/14 15/15 11/13 13/15 12/13 12/14 13/16 9/12

Lg 50 47 53 56 47 53 46 53 53

Pts 58 57 53 51 49 49 48 48 43

PASSERS Att Cmp Yds TD Int Rat M. Ryan, ATL 210 143 2075 15 3 117.9 Bradford, MIN 125 88 990 6 0 109.7 M. Stafford, DET 212 146 1648 14 4 106 Rivers, SD 201 135 1647 12 3 105.9 Prescott, DAL 182 125 1486 7 1 103.9 Brees, NOR 225 150 1734 14 4 103.1 Hoyer, CHI 189 130 1396 6 0 100.8 Wentz, PHL 157 102 1186 7 1 99.9 Roethlis.., PIT 226 145 1685 16 6 99.2 D. Carr, OAK 227 151 1608 12 3 99.1 Dalton, CIN 218 147 1757 6 2 97.2 R. Wilson, SEA 170 112 1334 5 1 97 Luck, IND 237 152 1721 11 4 94.2 Kessler, CLE 122 80 865 4 1 93.8 Siemian, DEN 151 98 1054 7 3 92.4 T. Taylor, BUF 165 103 1076 8 2 92.4 Al. Smith, KC 190 128 1297 5 2 91.1 Cousins, WAS 226 147 1695 9 6 89.7 Manning, NYG 233 151 1788 8 6 88.8 A. Rodgers, GBY 181 109 1170 10 4 88.4 Mariota, TEN 189 117 1372 10 6 88.3 Tannehill, MIA 188 124 1524 6 7 85.9 Keenum, LA 184 115 1417 7 6 85.3 C. Palmer, ARI 187 113 1363 7 5 84.1 C. Newton, CAR 180 104 1296 8 6 81.2 Bortles, JAC 193 118 1321 8 7 80.3 Flacco, BAL 264 164 1589 5 4 78.9 J. Winston, TAM 207 121 1327 9 8 75.9 Osweiler, HOU 227 134 1402 8 8 74.1 Gabbert, SNF 150 87 890 5 6 69.6 Fitzpatrick, NYJ 223 127 1441 5 11 63.4 RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS A. Green, CIN Landry, MIA Anto. Brown, PIT Olsen, CAR Hilton, IND Fitzgerald, ARI A. Cooper, OAK Sanders, DEN Beckham, NYG Pitta, BAL T. Pryor, CLE C. Beasley, DAL Jo. Reed, WAS YARDS Ju. Jones, ATL Olsen, CAR A. Green, CIN A. Cooper, OAK Beckham, NYG Hilton, IND Mar. Jones, DET Landry, MIA K. Britt, LA Jeffery, CHI

No Yds Avg Long TD 42 606 14.4 54t 2 41 494 12.0 42t 1 41 486 11.9 38t 5 39 610 15.6 78t 2 38 556 14.6 63t 3 37 410 11.1 29t 5 36 585 16.2 64t 1 36 413 11.5 41t 3 35 581 16.6 75t 3 34 295 8.7 30 0 33 413 12.5 44 3 33 390 11.8 47 3 33 316 9.6 26 2 Yds No Avg Long TD 656 31 21.2 75t 4 610 39 15.6 78t 2 606 42 14.4 54t 2 585 36 16.2 64t 1 581 35 16.6 75t 3 556 38 14.6 63t 3 529 29 18.2 73t 4 494 41 12.0 42t 1 492 30 16.4 47 2 487 29 16.8 54 0

RUSHERS AttYards Avg Long TD E. Elliott, DAL 137 703 5.1 60t 5 L. McCoy, BUF 104 587 5.6 53 6 David Johnson, ARI 113 568 5.0 58t 8 D. Murray, TEN 114 526 4.6 67 4 L. Miller, HOU 125 520 4.2 23 1 D. Freeman, ATL 90 450 5.0 48 2 Blount, NE 119 439 3.7 41t 6 Gore, IND 100 434 4.3 22 2 Mat. Jones, WAS 89 433 4.9 57 3 Crowell, CLE 83 432 5.2 85t 3 TOTAL YARDS David Johnson, ARI E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN L. McCoy, BUF Ju. Jones, ATL S. Ware, KC L. Miller, HOU Olsen, CAR A. Green, CIN A. Cooper, OAK PUNT RETURNS Crowder, WAS A. Roberts, DET Sherels, MIN Ty. Hill, KC Weems, ATL J. Grant, MIA Richard, OAK Lockett, SEA Royal, CHI

Total Rush 833 568 801 703 698 526 684 587 656 0 646 415 631 520 610 0 606 0 585 0 No Yards 10 207 8 142 11 181 12 197 9 138 8 118 8 116 11 139 13 153

INTERCEPTIONS M. Peters, KC M. Cooper, ARI Talib, DEN Hayward, SD Mosley, BAL

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL

BASKETBALL

BASEBALL • AL OAKLAND — Named Chip Hale 3B coach, Jeff Collins assistant athletic trainer and Josh Cuffe strength and conditioning coach. BASKETBALL • NBA NY KNICKS — Re-signed F Cleanthony Early. FOOTBALL • NFL CLEVELAND— Placed DB Jordan Poyer on IR. Signed DB Ed Reynolds from the practice squad. Signed DB Darius Hillary and WR Jordan Leslie to PS. Released TE E.J. Bibbs from PS. DETROIT — Signed OL Brian Mihalik from PS. Signed LB Brandon Chubb to PS. INDIANAPOLIS — Signed TE Chase Coffman. GREEN BAY — Released G Blake Muir from PS. Signed DT Brian Price to PS. Acquired RB Knile Davis from Kansas City for a conditional draft pick. Placed CB Sam Shields on IR. MINNESOTA — Released G Isame Faciane from PS. Signed CB Tre Roberson to PS. SOCCER • MLS PORTLAND — Announced the retirement of MF Ned Grabavoy at the end of the season. TENNIS INTEGRITY UNIT • Suspended tennis player Daniel Garza for six months and fined him $5,000 after being found guilty of a match-fixing offense.

LATE MONDAY

WNBA inals

SOCCER • MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York 15 9 9 54 59 44 New York City FC 14 10 9 51 58 56 Toronto FC 13 9 11 50 48 37 D.C. United 11 9 13 46 51 43 Montreal 11 10 12 45 49 50 Philadelphia 11 13 9 42 52 53 New England 10 14 9 39 41 54 Orlando City 8 11 14 38 51 58 Columbus 8 13 12 36 49 54 Chicago 7 16 10 31 40 55 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 17 8 8 59 50 40 Colorado 15 6 12 57 38 31 Los Angeles 12 6 15 51 54 39 Real Salt Lake 12 11 10 46 43 44 Seattle 13 14 6 45 42 42 Sporting K.C. 12 13 8 44 40 41 Portland 12 13 8 44 47 49 San Jose 8 11 14 38 32 38 Vancouver 9 15 9 36 41 51 Houston 7 14 12 33 38 44 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Sunday, October 23 Chicago at Toronto FC, 3 p.m. Columbus at New York City FC, 3 p.m. D.C. United at Orlando City, 3 p.m. FC Dallas at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 3 p.m. Montreal at New England, 3 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Portland at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Seattle, 3 p.m. San Jose at Sporting K.C., 3 p.m.

Blue Jays 5, Indians 1 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Santana dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .067 Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .167 Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Chisenhall rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .333 a-Davis ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Crisp lf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Naquin cf-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .222 b-Guyer ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Perez c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .182 Totals 28 1 2 1 2 9 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bautista rf 5 1 0 0 0 1 .071 Upton lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Donaldson 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .357 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .267 Tulowitzki ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .143 Martin c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .071 Saunders dh 4 0 2 0 0 2 .385 Carrera lf-rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .286 Pillar cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .077 Goins 2b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .200 Totals 32 5 9 5 4 8 Cleveland 000 010 000 — 1 2 1 Toronto 001 100 21x — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Chisenhall in the 7th. b-grounded out for Naquin in the 8th. E: Shaw (1). LOB: Cleveland 3, Toronto 8. 2B: Naquin (2), Perez (1). 3B: Carrera (2). HR: Donaldson (1), off Kluber. RBIs: Perez (1), Donaldson (2), Encarnacion 2 (2), Carrera (1), Pillar (1). SF: Pillar. S: Perez. RLISP: CLE 2 (Santana, Kipnis); TOR 3 (Martin, Pillar, Goins). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber L, 1-1 5 4 2 2 2 7 89 1.59 Otero 1 2 0 0 0 0 18 3.86 1/ Shaw 1 1 0 15 3.86 3 2 2 Clevinger 12/3 1 1 1 1 1 26 5.40 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 1-0 6 2 1 1 2 5 95 1.50 Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Osuna 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.00 IRS: Clevinger 1-0. PB: off Shaw (Donaldson). WP: Sanchez, Clevinger. T: 3:01. A: 49,142 .

AREA GOLF Double eagle Forest Park • Jim Brennan, hole No. 8, 427 yards, driver/8-iron, Oct. 10.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Thursday No. 14 Boise State vs. BYU, 9:15 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 6 Texas A&M, 2:30 p.m. No. 2 Ohio State at Penn State, 7 p.m. No. 3 Michigan vs. Illinois, 2:30 p.m. No. 5 Washington vs. Oregon State, 5:30 p.m. No. 7 Louisville vs. NC State, 11 a.m. No. 8 Nebraska vs. Purdue, 2:30 p.m. No. 10 Wisconsin at Iowa, 11 a.m. No. 11 Houston at SMU, 6 p.m. No. 12 West Virginia vs. TCU, 2:30 p.m. No. 16 Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 7 p.m. No. 17 Arkansas at No. 21 Auburn, 5 p.m. No. 19 Utah at UCLA, 3 p.m. No. 20 W. Michigan vs. E. Michigan, 2:30 p.m. No. 22 North Carolina at Virginia, 2 p.m. No. 23 Mississippi at No. 25 LSU, 8 p.m. No. 24 Navy vs. Memphis, 2:30 p.m.

Los Angeles 2, Minnesota 2 G1 • Los Angeles 78, Minnesota 76 G2 • Minnesota 79, Los Angeles 60 G3 • Los Angeles 92, Minnesota 75 G4 • Minnesota 85, Los Angeles 79 Los Angeles at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Thursday

NBA preseason standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct Boston 5 1 .833 Toronto 3 2 .600 New York 2 2 .500 Brooklyn 1 4 .200 Philadelphia 1 5 .167 Southeast W L Pct Atlanta 4 2 .667 Miami 4 2 .667 Washington 3 3 .500 Charlotte 2 3 .400 Orlando 1 5 .167 Central W L Pct Indiana 3 2 .600 Detroit 3 2 .600 Chicago 3 3 .500 Milwaukee 2 3 .400 Cleveland 2 4 .333 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct Memphis 4 1 .800 Houston 4 1 .800 San Antonio 3 2 .600 Dallas 2 3 .400 New Orleans 1 4 .200 Northwest W L Pct Portland 3 2 .600 Minnesota 3 2 .600 Utah 3 2 .600 Oklahoma City 3 3 .500 Denver 3 3 .429 Pacific W L Pct Golden State 4 1 .800 Phoenix 3 2 .600 Sacramento 3 2 .600 L.A. Clippers 2 3 .400 L.A. Lakers 2 4 .333 Monday Boston 120, Brooklyn 99 Detroit 102, Milwaukee 78 Charlotte 108, Chicago 104 Utah 104, L.A. Clippers 78 Tuesday Washington 96, Cleveland 91 Atlanta 96, New Orleans 89 Miami 107, Orlando 77 Oklahoma City 97, Denver 87 L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, late Wednesday New York at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Utah, 8 p.m. Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.

GB — 1½ 2 3½ 4 GB — — 1 1½ 3 GB — — ½ 1 1½ GB — — 1 2 3 GB — — — ½ 1 GB — 1 1 2 2½

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Rec 265 98 172 97 656 231 111 610 606 585

Avg Long TD 20.7 85t 1 17.8 85t 1 16.5 79t 2 16.4 50 0 15.3 73 0 14.8 74t 1 14.5 47 0 12.6 62 0 11.8 65t 1

Int Yds Long TD 5 47 28 0 3 95 60t 1 3 86 46t 1 3 50 31 0 3 12 12 0

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INJURY REPORT • On the NFL board, Pittsburgh QB Ben Roethlisberger is out. POLITICAL REPORT Odds to win the 2016 Presidential election Hillary Clinton 1/5 Donald Trump 9/2 DEBATE PROPS Trump to walk out during debate: 8/1 Clinton to take a drug test before the debate: 15/1 Trump to not attend debate: 25/1 BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Championship Series BLUE JAYS -$170 Indians National League Championship Series Cubs -$110 DODGERS NFL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Thursday PACKERS 9 8 Bears Sunday l-Giants 3 3 Rams Vikings 2.5 2.5 EAGLES CHIEFS 6.5 6.5 Saints LIONS 1.5 1.5 Washington BENGALS 10 10 Browns Bills 3 3 DOLPHINS JAGUARS 1.5 1 Raiders TITANS 2.5 2.5 Colts JETS 1 1 Ravens FALCONS 6 6.5 Chargers Bucs 2 2 49ERS Patriots 7.5 7.5 STEELERS CARDS 1.5 1.5 Seahawks Monday BRONCOS 7 7 Texans Bye week: Panthers, Cowboys. l- London, England. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Thursday VA TECH 4 6 Miami-Florida Troy 8.5 9.5 S ALABAMA BOISE ST 8 7 Byu Friday S Florida 6.5 7 TEMPLE CALIFORNIA 2.5 3 Oregon SAN DIEGO ST 22.5 23.5 San Jose St Saturday ARMY 17 18.5 N Texas W MICHIGAN 22.5 23.5 E Michigan BOSTON COLL 5.5 5 Syracuse MINNESOTA 17 17 Rutgers CINCINNATI 1.5 2 E Carolina W VIRGINIA 4.5 5 Tcu NORTHWESTERN 3 1.5 Indiana NEBRASKA 24 24 Purdue Oklahoma St 25 24 KANSAS Wisconsin 3 3.5 IOWA N Carolina 9.5 8 VIRGINIA LOUISVILLE 17.5 20 Nc State TOLEDO 10 10.5 C Michigan BALL ST 2 3 Akron La Tech 14 16.5 FLA INT’L AIR FORCE 16.5 16.5 Hawaii UL-Lafayette 6.5 6.5 TEXAS ST APP’CHIAN ST 21 21 Idaho S CAROLINA 20.5 20.5 Massachusetts MARSHALL 18 13 Charlotte NEW MEXICO 13 17 UL-Monroe NO ILLINOIS 20 21.5 Buffalo C Florida 2.5 4 CONNECTICUT Ohio U 3 3 KENT ST Wash St 6.5 7 ARIZONA ST Oklahoma 13.5 14 TEXAS TECH MICHIGAN 35 35.5 Illinois Houston 21.5 21.5 SMU Memphis 2 2.5 NAVY Wyoming 3.5 4 NEVADA TULSA 11 11.5 Tulane WASHINGTON 32 37.5 Oregon St BOWL GREEN 4 4.5 Miami-Ohio Miss St 3 3 KENTUCKY UTSA 10 10 Utep W KENTUCKY 13.5 13.5 Old Dominion KANSAS ST 3 3 Texas STANFORD 2.5 2.5 Colorado Michigan St 2.5 2.5 MARYLAND MISSOURI 5.5 6.5 Mid Tenn St Ga Southern 14.5 14 NEW MEXICO ST Utah NL NL UCLA LSU 4.5 5.5 Mississippi AUBURN 7.5 9.5 Arkansas Ohio St 19.5 19.5 PENN ST ALABAMA 17 19 Texas A&M UNLV 2 2.5 Colorado St UTAH ST 15 16 Fresno St NHL Favorite Odds Underdog RANGERS -$150/+$130 Red Wings JETS -$125/+$105 Maple Leafs Grand Salami: Over/under 11.5 goals. WNBA Finals Favorite Points Underdog Thursday MINNESOTA 6 Los Angeles Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

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AMERICAN CONFERENCE EAST W L T Pct PF New England 5 1 0 .833 149 Buffalo 4 2 0 .667 162 Miami 2 4 0 .333 118 N.Y. Jets 1 5 0 .167 95 SOUTH W L T Pct PF Houston 4 2 0 .667 108 Tennessee 3 3 0 .500 120 Jacksonville 2 3 0 .400 101 Indianapolis 2 4 0 .333 160 NORTH W L T Pct PF Pittsburgh 4 2 0 .667 154 Baltimore 3 3 0 .500 117 Cincinnati 2 4 0 .333 109 Cleveland 0 6 0 .000 113 WEST W L T Pct PF Oakland 4 2 0 .667 152 Denver 4 2 0 .667 140 Kansas City 3 2 0 .600 109 San Diego 2 4 0 .333 173 NATIONAL CONFERENCE EAST W L T Pct PF Dallas 5 1 0 .833 159 Washington 4 2 0 .667 142 Philadelphia 3 2 0 .600 135 N.Y. Giants 3 3 0 .500 116 SOUTH W L T Pct PF Atlanta 4 2 0 .667 199 Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 94 New Orleans 2 3 0 .400 155 Carolina 1 5 0 .167 161 NORTH W L T Pct PF Minnesota 5 0 0 1.000 119 Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 114 Detroit 3 3 0 .500 150 Chicago 1 5 0 .167 101 WEST W L T Pct PF Seattle 4 1 0 .800 105 Los Angeles 3 3 0 .500 110 Arizona 3 3 0 .500 153 San Francisco 1 5 0 .167 127 Thursday Chicago at Green Bay, 7:25 p.m. Sunday N.Y. Giants at Los Angeles, 8:30 a.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, Noon New Orleans at Kansas City, Noon Oakland at Jacksonville, Noon Baltimore at N.Y. Jets, Noon Washington at Detroit, Noon Indianapolis at Tennessee, Noon Buffalo at Miami, Noon Cleveland at Cincinnati, Noon Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. San Diego at Atlanta, 3:05 p.m. New England at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m. Seattle at Arizona, 7:30 p.m. Open: Dallas, Carolina Monday Houston at Denver, 7:30 p.m.

PA 91 103 134 164 PA 127 127 127 174 PA 123 115 145 176 PA 163 108 102 155 PA 107 142 78 131 PA 166 142 168 176 PA 63 113 153 143 PA 78 137 104 185

MONDAY’S LATE BOX SCORE

Cardinals 28, NY Jets 3 N.Y. Jets 0 3 0 0 — 3 Arizona 7 7 7 7 — 28 First Quarter Ari: D.Johnson 58 run (Catanzaro kick), 9:51. Second Quarter NYJ: FG Folk 39, 12:06. Ari: D.Johnson 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 6:43. Third Quarter Ari: D.Johnson 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 5:24. Fourth Quarter Ari: Floyd 9 pass fr. Palmer (Catanzaro), 8:20. A: 64,709. NYJ Ari First downs 11 28 Total Net Yards 230 396 Rushes-yards 14-33 35-171 Passing 197 225 Punt Returns 0-0 3-4 Kickoff Returns 0-0 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-16 Comp-Att-Int 20-37-2 24-35-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 0-0 Punts 7-42.1 5-40.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-0 Penalties-Yards 10-83 9-64 Time of Possession 23:58 36:02 Rushing: NYJ, Forte 9-19, Powell 3-10, Fitzpatrick 1-2, Smith 1-2. ARI, D.Johnson 22-111, Ellington 5-25, Nelson 2-23, Taylor 2-14, Stanton 1-(minus 1), Palmer 3-(minus 1). Passing: NYJ, Fitzpatrick 16-31-1-174, Smith 4-61-31. ARI, Palmer 23-34-0-213, Stanton 1-1-0-12. Receiving: NYJ, Peake 5-43, Anderson 4-24, B.Marshall 3-70, Enunwa 3-42, Powell 3-12, J.Marshall 1-11, Forte 1-3. ARI, Fitzgerald 6-49, Jo.Brown 5-54, Ja.Brown 4-35, D.Johnson 3-27, Floyd 2-22, Nelson 2-16, Gresham 1-14, Fells 1-8.

NFL LEADERS SCORING NON-KICKERS David Johnson, ARI Gordon, SD L. McCoy, BUF C. Hyde, SNF Blount, NE D. Murray, TEN Crabtree, OAK

TDRusRecRetX2Pts 8 8 0 0 0 48 7 6 1 0 0 42 7 6 1 0 0 42 6 6 0 0 1 38 6 6 0 0 0 36 6 4 2 0 0 36 5 0 5 0 1 32

KICKERS Du. Hopkins, WAS Lambo, SD Tucker, BAL D. Bailey, DAL Nugent, CIN Sturgis, PHL McManus, DEN Novak, HOU Gostkowski, NE

PAT 13/14 18/19 8/8 18/18 10/10 13/14 12/13 9/10 16/17

FG 15/16 13/14 15/15 11/13 13/15 12/13 12/14 13/16 9/12

Lg 50 47 53 56 47 53 46 53 53

Pts 58 57 53 51 49 49 48 48 43

PASSERS Att Cmp Yds TD Int Rat M. Ryan, ATL 210 143 2075 15 3 117.9 Bradford, MIN 125 88 990 6 0 109.7 M. Stafford, DET 212 146 1648 14 4 106 Rivers, SD 201 135 1647 12 3 105.9 Prescott, DAL 182 125 1486 7 1 103.9 Brees, NOR 225 150 1734 14 4 103.1 Hoyer, CHI 189 130 1396 6 0 100.8 Wentz, PHL 157 102 1186 7 1 99.9 Roethlis.., PIT 226 145 1685 16 6 99.2 D. Carr, OAK 227 151 1608 12 3 99.1 Dalton, CIN 218 147 1757 6 2 97.2 R. Wilson, SEA 170 112 1334 5 1 97 Luck, IND 237 152 1721 11 4 94.2 Kessler, CLE 122 80 865 4 1 93.8 Siemian, DEN 151 98 1054 7 3 92.4 T. Taylor, BUF 165 103 1076 8 2 92.4 Al. Smith, KC 190 128 1297 5 2 91.1 Cousins, WAS 226 147 1695 9 6 89.7 Manning, NYG 233 151 1788 8 6 88.8 A. Rodgers, GBY 181 109 1170 10 4 88.4 Mariota, TEN 189 117 1372 10 6 88.3 Tannehill, MIA 188 124 1524 6 7 85.9 Keenum, LA 184 115 1417 7 6 85.3 C. Palmer, ARI 187 113 1363 7 5 84.1 C. Newton, CAR 180 104 1296 8 6 81.2 Bortles, JAC 193 118 1321 8 7 80.3 Flacco, BAL 264 164 1589 5 4 78.9 J. Winston, TAM 207 121 1327 9 8 75.9 Osweiler, HOU 227 134 1402 8 8 74.1 Gabbert, SNF 150 87 890 5 6 69.6 Fitzpatrick, NYJ 223 127 1441 5 11 63.4 RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS A. Green, CIN Landry, MIA Anto. Brown, PIT Olsen, CAR Hilton, IND Fitzgerald, ARI A. Cooper, OAK Sanders, DEN Beckham, NYG Pitta, BAL T. Pryor, CLE C. Beasley, DAL Jo. Reed, WAS YARDS Ju. Jones, ATL Olsen, CAR A. Green, CIN A. Cooper, OAK Beckham, NYG Hilton, IND Mar. Jones, DET Landry, MIA K. Britt, LA Jeffery, CHI

No Yds Avg Long TD 42 606 14.4 54t 2 41 494 12.0 42t 1 41 486 11.9 38t 5 39 610 15.6 78t 2 38 556 14.6 63t 3 37 410 11.1 29t 5 36 585 16.2 64t 1 36 413 11.5 41t 3 35 581 16.6 75t 3 34 295 8.7 30 0 33 413 12.5 44 3 33 390 11.8 47 3 33 316 9.6 26 2 Yds No Avg Long TD 656 31 21.2 75t 4 610 39 15.6 78t 2 606 42 14.4 54t 2 585 36 16.2 64t 1 581 35 16.6 75t 3 556 38 14.6 63t 3 529 29 18.2 73t 4 494 41 12.0 42t 1 492 30 16.4 47 2 487 29 16.8 54 0

RUSHERS AttYards Avg Long TD E. Elliott, DAL 137 703 5.1 60t 5 L. McCoy, BUF 104 587 5.6 53 6 David Johnson, ARI 113 568 5.0 58t 8 D. Murray, TEN 114 526 4.6 67 4 L. Miller, HOU 125 520 4.2 23 1 D. Freeman, ATL 90 450 5.0 48 2 Blount, NE 119 439 3.7 41t 6 Gore, IND 100 434 4.3 22 2 Mat. Jones, WAS 89 433 4.9 57 3 Crowell, CLE 83 432 5.2 85t 3 TOTAL YARDS David Johnson, ARI E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN L. McCoy, BUF Ju. Jones, ATL S. Ware, KC L. Miller, HOU Olsen, CAR A. Green, CIN A. Cooper, OAK PUNT RETURNS Crowder, WAS A. Roberts, DET Sherels, MIN Ty. Hill, KC Weems, ATL J. Grant, MIA Richard, OAK Lockett, SEA Royal, CHI

Total Rush 833 568 801 703 698 526 684 587 656 0 646 415 631 520 610 0 606 0 585 0 No Yards 10 207 8 142 11 181 12 197 9 138 8 118 8 116 11 139 13 153

INTERCEPTIONS M. Peters, KC M. Cooper, ARI Talib, DEN Hayward, SD Mosley, BAL

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL

BASKETBALL

BASEBALL • AL OAKLAND — Named Chip Hale 3B coach, Jeff Collins assistant athletic trainer and Josh Cuffe strength and conditioning coach. BASKETBALL • NBA NY KNICKS — Re-signed F Cleanthony Early. FOOTBALL • NFL CLEVELAND— Placed DB Jordan Poyer on IR. Signed DB Ed Reynolds from the practice squad. Signed DB Darius Hillary and WR Jordan Leslie to PS. Released TE E.J. Bibbs from PS. DETROIT — Signed OL Brian Mihalik from PS. Signed LB Brandon Chubb to PS. INDIANAPOLIS — Signed TE Chase Coffman. GREEN BAY — Released G Blake Muir from PS. Signed DT Brian Price to PS. Acquired RB Knile Davis from Kansas City for a conditional draft pick. Placed CB Sam Shields on IR. MINNESOTA — Released G Isame Faciane from PS. Signed CB Tre Roberson to PS. SOCCER • MLS PORTLAND — Announced the retirement of MF Ned Grabavoy at the end of the season. TENNIS INTEGRITY UNIT • Suspended tennis player Daniel Garza for six months and fined him $5,000 after being found guilty of a match-fixing offense.

LATE MONDAY

WNBA inals

SOCCER • MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York 15 9 9 54 59 44 New York City FC 14 10 9 51 58 56 Toronto FC 13 9 11 50 48 37 D.C. United 11 9 13 46 51 43 Montreal 11 10 12 45 49 50 Philadelphia 11 13 9 42 52 53 New England 10 14 9 39 41 54 Orlando City 8 11 14 38 51 58 Columbus 8 13 12 36 49 54 Chicago 7 16 10 31 40 55 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 17 8 8 59 50 40 Colorado 15 6 12 57 38 31 Los Angeles 12 6 15 51 54 39 Real Salt Lake 12 11 10 46 43 44 Seattle 13 14 6 45 42 42 Sporting K.C. 12 13 8 44 40 41 Portland 12 13 8 44 47 49 San Jose 8 11 14 38 32 38 Vancouver 9 15 9 36 41 51 Houston 7 14 12 33 38 44 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Sunday, October 23 Chicago at Toronto FC, 3 p.m. Columbus at New York City FC, 3 p.m. D.C. United at Orlando City, 3 p.m. FC Dallas at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 3 p.m. Montreal at New England, 3 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Portland at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Seattle, 3 p.m. San Jose at Sporting K.C., 3 p.m.

Blue Jays 5, Indians 1 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Santana dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .067 Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .167 Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Chisenhall rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .333 a-Davis ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Crisp lf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Naquin cf-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .222 b-Guyer ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Perez c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .182 Totals 28 1 2 1 2 9 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bautista rf 5 1 0 0 0 1 .071 Upton lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Donaldson 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .357 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .267 Tulowitzki ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .143 Martin c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .071 Saunders dh 4 0 2 0 0 2 .385 Carrera lf-rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .286 Pillar cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .077 Goins 2b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .200 Totals 32 5 9 5 4 8 Cleveland 000 010 000 — 1 2 1 Toronto 001 100 21x — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Chisenhall in the 7th. b-grounded out for Naquin in the 8th. E: Shaw (1). LOB: Cleveland 3, Toronto 8. 2B: Naquin (2), Perez (1). 3B: Carrera (2). HR: Donaldson (1), off Kluber. RBIs: Perez (1), Donaldson (2), Encarnacion 2 (2), Carrera (1), Pillar (1). SF: Pillar. S: Perez. RLISP: CLE 2 (Santana, Kipnis); TOR 3 (Martin, Pillar, Goins). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber L, 1-1 5 4 2 2 2 7 89 1.59 Otero 1 2 0 0 0 0 18 3.86 1/ Shaw 1 1 0 15 3.86 3 2 2 Clevinger 12/3 1 1 1 1 1 26 5.40 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 1-0 6 2 1 1 2 5 95 1.50 Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Osuna 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.00 IRS: Clevinger 1-0. PB: off Shaw (Donaldson). WP: Sanchez, Clevinger. T: 3:01. A: 49,142 .

AREA GOLF Double eagle Forest Park • Jim Brennan, hole No. 8, 427 yards, driver/8-iron, Oct. 10.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Thursday No. 14 Boise State vs. BYU, 9:15 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 6 Texas A&M, 2:30 p.m. No. 2 Ohio State at Penn State, 7 p.m. No. 3 Michigan vs. Illinois, 2:30 p.m. No. 5 Washington vs. Oregon State, 5:30 p.m. No. 7 Louisville vs. NC State, 11 a.m. No. 8 Nebraska vs. Purdue, 2:30 p.m. No. 10 Wisconsin at Iowa, 11 a.m. No. 11 Houston at SMU, 6 p.m. No. 12 West Virginia vs. TCU, 2:30 p.m. No. 16 Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 7 p.m. No. 17 Arkansas at No. 21 Auburn, 5 p.m. No. 19 Utah at UCLA, 3 p.m. No. 20 W. Michigan vs. E. Michigan, 2:30 p.m. No. 22 North Carolina at Virginia, 2 p.m. No. 23 Mississippi at No. 25 LSU, 8 p.m. No. 24 Navy vs. Memphis, 2:30 p.m.

Los Angeles 2, Minnesota 2 G1 • Los Angeles 78, Minnesota 76 G2 • Minnesota 79, Los Angeles 60 G3 • Los Angeles 92, Minnesota 75 G4 • Minnesota 85, Los Angeles 79 Los Angeles at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Thursday

NBA preseason standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct Boston 5 1 .833 Toronto 3 2 .600 New York 2 2 .500 Brooklyn 1 4 .200 Philadelphia 1 5 .167 Southeast W L Pct Atlanta 4 2 .667 Miami 4 2 .667 Washington 3 3 .500 Charlotte 2 3 .400 Orlando 1 5 .167 Central W L Pct Indiana 3 2 .600 Detroit 3 2 .600 Chicago 3 3 .500 Milwaukee 2 3 .400 Cleveland 2 4 .333 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct Memphis 4 1 .800 Houston 4 1 .800 San Antonio 3 2 .600 Dallas 2 3 .400 New Orleans 1 4 .200 Northwest W L Pct Portland 3 2 .600 Minnesota 3 2 .600 Utah 3 2 .600 Oklahoma City 3 3 .500 Denver 3 3 .429 Pacific W L Pct Golden State 4 1 .800 Phoenix 3 2 .600 L.A. Clippers 3 3 .500 Sacramento 3 3 .500 L.A. Lakers 2 4 .333 Monday Boston 120, Brooklyn 99 Detroit 102, Milwaukee 78 Charlotte 108, Chicago 104 Utah 104, L.A. Clippers 78 Tuesday Washington 96, Cleveland 91 Atlanta 96, New Orleans 89 Miami 107, Orlando 77 Oklahoma City 97, Denver 87 L.A. Clippers 92, Sacramento 89 Wednesday New York at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Utah, 8 p.m. Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.

GB — 1½ 2 3½ 4 GB — — 1 1½ 3 GB — — ½ 1 1½ GB — — 1 2 3 GB — — — ½ 1 GB — 1 1½ 1½ 2½

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Rec 265 98 172 97 656 231 111 610 606 585

Avg Long TD 20.7 85t 1 17.8 85t 1 16.5 79t 2 16.4 50 0 15.3 73 0 14.8 74t 1 14.5 47 0 12.6 62 0 11.8 65t 1

Int Yds Long TD 5 47 28 0 3 95 60t 1 3 86 46t 1 3 50 31 0 3 12 12 0

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DRIVING WITH DAN:

Happy Birthday, Camaro! Chevy’s iconic sporty car turns 50 When the Ford Mustang made its global debut at the New York World’s Fair on April 17, 1964, the car caught chief rival Chevrolet completely flat-footed. GM’s bowtie division had nothing with which to compete. And when Ford’s pony car drew 22,000 orders within 24 hours, GM knew Chevy had to answer. Thanks to a whirlwind development schedule — just over two years from sanction to showroom — Chevy had the Camaro, which Dan Wiese arrived in the fall of 1966 for the Automotive Writer 1967 model year. In 2017, Camaro is celebrating its 50th birthday. Here’s a look at six generations.

Generation 2 (1970-1981): Despite evolving emissions regulations that seriously eroded Camaro performance during Gen. 2’s life, its 11-year run was a record. Pictured is a 1970 Z28. Generation 1 (1967-1969): Like the first Mustang, which was built on the Falcon platform, the first Camaro co-opted an existing foundation — that of the second-generation Chevy Nova, dubbed Chevy II. Available power ranged from a 140-hp straight six to a 375-hp big-block 396 V-8. Pictured above are two ‘67s — an RS Z/28 and an SS convertible (top photo). Generation 5 (2010-2015): Pictured is a 2010 SS.

Generation 4 (1993-2002): It appeared Gen 4 was going to be Camaro’s swan song, despite renewed performance emphasis with a snappy new, 305-hp LS1 V-8 in 1998. Pictured is a 2002 35th anniversary convertible.

Generation 3 (1982-1992): All-new from rubber to roof and, for the first time, boasting a hatchback, the third generation Camaro offered four-, six- and eight-cylinder power.

Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive writer. He is a regular contributor to the Post-Dispatch and to AAA Midwest Traveler magazine’s online Web Bonus. You can email him at drivingwithdan@gmail.com.

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'11 BMW 328i xDrive: Clean CARFAX, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $16,990 #10772A

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'12 BMW 528i BMW Certified, Like Acura 4025 New, $22,580 '14 Acura MDX, Te c h pkg, Blac k, Lo c al Trade . '08 BMW 328 xi Moonroof, AWD, Low $36,490 #C7998B Miles, #X16642A, $11,388 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

ADAM'S AUCTIONS 618-234-8751

'08 Acura TL 3.2: Clean CARFAX, Lthr Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $8,990 #10834A

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE AUCTION Thur., Oct 17 at 10AM 5820 & 5824 Florissant Ave, ST. LOUIS, MO Held On Site 5 8 2 0 Florissant, sgl fam r e s w/ 2 b r , 1 b a brick home w/walk out bsmt. 5 8 2 4 Florissant, comm bldg w/2,500sf, former car wash/auto repair. adamsauctions.com

'04 MDX AWD One Owner $3,950 #160589F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

Audi

4040

'13 A6 2.0T Premium Sedan Stk#184031 $19,800 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

ADAM'S AUCTIONS 618-234-8751

'11 Audi Q7 Prestige Quattro, 55K Mi, Has It All! #B7926, $34,990

Ollis real estate auction November 5th at 10:00 A M : 3 1 6 Wabash Ave, Belleville, IL 62220 is a historic brick Victorian home on a wooded corner lot. Original amenities: grand staircase, beautiful fireplace, formal dining, hardwood floors & separate pantry. Features: full basement, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, maid's room, large closets & detached 2 car garage. Call Alex at 618-833-2227 or go t o www.ollisauction.com for more information.

Buick

'16 Lacrosse, V6, Heated Leather, 26K Miles, GM Certified, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '1 3 Buick Verano: 4 Dr, 4 Cy l, Allo y s , 2 1 K Mile s , On e Ow n e r, $ 1 5 ,9 9 5 Do n Bro w n Ch e v ro le t '13 Buick Verano Intellink, Dual Climate Control, Alloys, 46K, #M16939A, $14,131 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Cadillac

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

4055

'11 Buick LaCrosse CXL: 4 Dr Sedan, FWD, 3.6L 6 Cyl, 85K Miles, Carbon Black, Call Today, $12,399 #H170054A

4060

'13 Cadillac CTS: 4 Door, V6, 30k Miles, Leather, One Owner, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '08 Cadillac CTS: 4 Dr, Sunroof, Navigation, Black, Sharp, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

4060 Chevrolet

'13 Cadillac ATS 3.6L, Luxury Pkg, 40xxx Miles, Stk #C160111A $19,478 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '10 Malibu LS 1LS 88xxx Miles, CD Player, ABS, $9,995 #UH5264EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Chevrolet

4065 Chevrolet

4065 Ford

'08 Cobalt LS Red, 110xxx Miles, State Safety & Emissions Tested! Value Priced At $5,299, Stk #DL1135

'12 Chevy Equinox 2LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Remote Start, $14,990 #26062M

'0 5 Cobalt Base Stk #P8645A $ 6 ,5 0 0

'14 Equinox AWD Gray Metallic, Balance of Factory Warranty, Hurry In! #H170023A $17,499

4065

'15 Chevy Malibu LT 12xxx Mi., 2.5L, GM Certified Warranty, #C1077XP, $15,999 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '09 Chevy Corvette Z06 23xxx Mi., 7.0L V8, #C161756B, $40,958 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Camaro Z28 Rare Car! 500 Mi., #C10673P, $49,449 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Chevy Camaro ZL1 6,2L V8, 6 Speed Manual, 9xxx Mi., C10736XP, $40,699 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'14 Chevy Sonic LT: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Bluetooth, New Arrival, $11,990 #P8670C

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'14 Chevy Corvette Triple Black, 3LT, 6K Mi., Auto, $54,990

'13 Chevy Cruze Lmtd $16,995 #KE17080 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Chevy Cruze 1LT: Clean Carfax, 4 Cyl, FWD, Keyless Entry, Turbocharged, Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $10,990 #38138B

'15 Sonic LTZ, 4 Dr, Leather, 11xxx Miles, GM Certified, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Spark LT: 5 Dr, 21K Miles, GM Certified, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'13 Camaro ZL1 10K Mi., Loaded, Fresh Tires, Local Trade, $42,490

'13 Chevy Cruze LT: Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Motor Trend Certified, Balance of Factory Warranty, $12,990 #95063B

'11 Chevy Cruze LT: Turbo, 53K Miles, Alloys, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Cruze LT 33K Miles, One Owner, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Cruze LT: Turbo, 8K Miles, GM Certified, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'1 3 Cam aro LS, V6 Co up e , 2 4 K Mile s, One Ow ne r, $ 1 7 ,9 9 5 Do n Bro w n Che v ro le t 1 -8 6 6 -8 8 3 -8 8 4 1

'09 Chevy HHR LS: 2.2L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $7,990 #78081C

'12 Chevy Impala LT: Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Low Miles, Bluetooth, Call Today, $12,490 #8857A

'16 Chevy Impala 2LT: V6, 10K Miles, GMCertified, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Chevy Impala LT: V6, Alloys , 89K Miles , Sharp, $8,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '15 Chevy Impala LS: 4 Cyl, One Owner, GM Certified, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Impala LS: V6, Alloys, Warranty, 91K Miles, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '1 6 Impala LT Stk #P8 6 4 7 , $ 2 1 ,2 7 2

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'14 Chevy Malibu LTZ, A lot of car for little money, #B7653B, $15,990 '11 Chevy Malibu LT: Clean CARFAX, Heated Front Leather Seats, Remote Engine Start, Prem Sound, $9,990 #10250C

'11 Chevy Malibu 1LT: Bluetooth, Flex Fuel, Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $9,990 #38111D

2016 SONATA SE

$

175 PER MONTH

ZERO DOWN 2017 ELANTRA SE

'16 Chevy Malibu LT: 2K Miles, $20,000 #C160918L LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '16 Chevy Malibu LTZ: Leather, 27K Miles, GM Certified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Volt: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, Premium Sound System, Keyless Entry, $13,990 #26148A

'06 Malibu Clean CarFax $2,995 #160529F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236 '06 Malibu Clean CarFax $2,995 #160529F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236 '96 Beretta 102xxx Miles, Cean CarFax $1,550 #160688F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

Chrysler

4070

'14 300S, AWD, Sunroof, Nav, 21xxx Miles, One Owner, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chrys ler 200: Touring, Dee p Auburn, Moonroof, Bluetooth, One Owne r, 52K Miles , Ca ll Toda y, Now $9,499 #H161660A

'05 300 Single Owner, Rear A/C, CD $8,995 #UH513EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Corvette

$

144 PER MONTH

ZERO DOWN IN WEST COUNTY 14754 Manchester Rd., Ballwin, MO 63011

636-591-0500 www.deanteamhyundai.com 36 month lease, 12k miles per year, payments include all applicable rebates and incentives. Including but not limited to lease cash, valued owner, competitive owner, fall sales cash, U. S. military coupon, Hyundai Motor Finance’s recent college graduate. Please contact the dealership for programs on exact vehicles. MSRP may not be the price at which the vehicle is sold in the trade area. Must qualify for all rebates, 36 months, 12,000 miles per year

4080

'16 Corvette Z06 2LS Auto , Bla ck , 6 K Mile s, GM Ce rtifie d , $ 7 5 ,9 9 5 Do n Bro w n Che v ro le t 1 -8 6 6 -8 8 3 -8 8 4 1

Dodge

4085

'15 Challenger SXT Nav, V6, 30xxx Miles , $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Dodge Dart SXT: 4 Door, Ralleye, 10K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '08 Dodge Avenger SE: 2.4L, 4 Cyl, Auto, FWD, Power Windows & Locks, Remote Keyless Entry, Call Today, $7,990 #P8346B

'14 Dodge Avenger SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $12,990 #77321A

Ford

4110

'10 Ford Focus SE FWD, CD, Blue, 34MPG, #U5085R, $6,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '14 Ford Fiesta SE $10,990 #K1829P 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Ford Fiesta SE: 5 Dr, 33K Miles, One Owner, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Ford Focus $10,995 #G310147A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

4110 Honda

'12 Ford Focus SE: $9,995 #GD16106A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'13 Ford Focus ST Roof, Leather, #B7855, $20,990

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

FALL CERTIFIED BLOWOUT SALE

'15 Ford Focus SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Balance of Factory Warranty, $14,990 #P8655

'14 Ford Fusion S $14,995 #E68066 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'13 Ford Fusion Hybrid SE, #V15493B, $16,490 '12 Ford Fusion SE: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Remote Start, Alloy Wheels, $11,990 #95218A

'1 6 Fusion SE Stk #P8 6 6 2 $ 1 6 ,3 6 4

4120 Jeep

LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN MIDWEST! 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty 1.9% APR Available On Certified Accord, Pilot & Odyssey Ends 10/31/16 '13 Fit Hatchback: (4) to choose from starting at $13,980 Crystal Black, only 24K miles! #H160695A '13 Civic LX: 4 DR's, 21 To Choose, Kona Coffee, B/U Camera, Bluetooth, 40K Miles, Largest Inventory in Midwest Starting at $12,999 #X2996 '13 CRV EX: AWD, Crystal Black, 41K Miles, Alloys, Moonroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $19,499 #X3012

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'16 Ford Mustang ECO $27,995 #E47233 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '07 Ford Mustang Convertible: Keyless Entry, Priced Below Avg, #UH5144EP, $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

'04 Ford Mustang Convertible, 60K, Premium Pkg, Auto, #M16647B, $10,990

'05 Ford Mustang: V6 Deluxe, Low Miles, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Security System, $8,990 #77187A

'06 Ford Mustang Convertible, 4.0 V6, White, Only 79k Miles! Fun in the Sun! $9,999 #DL1187

'11 Ford Taurus SEL $14,775 #G141452A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'14 Ford Taurus "SHO", Loaded, 38K, #C15246RA, $27,480 '10 Ford Taurus SHO: Clean CARFAX, AWD, Navigation/GPS, Sunroof, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, $12,990 #95188B

'13 Accord EX: 2Dr. Coupe, Taffeta White, 33K Miles Bluetooth, Camera, Alloys, Moonroof, $17,999 #X2970 '14 CRV LX: AWD, Pearl White, 34K Miles, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, $19,499 #H161558C '13 Accord LX: 4 Door, Silver Metallic, Bluetooth, Alloys, B/U Camera, Auto Climate, Priced To Sell Fast, $15,899 #H160886B '14 Odyssey: Touring Elite, Nav, DVD, Only 50K Miles, Smokey Topaz w/Truffle Heated, Power, Leather Seats, Moonroof, Loaded, Hurry In! $29,999 #H162128A '13 Civic EX: Coupe, Polished Metal Metallic, Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Bluetooth, Camera, 38K Miles, $14,999 #X2980 '13 Pilot EXL: 4WD, Dark Amber, Heated. Power Leathr, Moonroof, 41K Miles $28,999 #H161944A

'00 Civic Cold Air, Clean CarFax $1,950 #160469 Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

Hyundai

4125

'16 Hyundai Accent SE $12,995 #KE67832 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Hyundai Elantra $13,995 #E64396 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Hyundia Elantra: Limited, V6, RWD, Heated Front Seats, Navigation/GPS, Sunroof/Moonroof, $9,990 #10580A

'1 0 Taurus SEL Stk #4 5 5 9 2 A, $ 1 0 ,4 7 1

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Honda

4120

'13 Honda Fit; 5 Dr. Ha tchba ck, Honda Ce rtifie d, X2908 S ilve r, Only 15k mile s $14,499 #X2908

'03 Accord EX-L: Coupe, 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $5,990 #75838C

'12 Honda Accord EX-L Sedan: Leather, Heated Seats, Moonroof, #X17081A, $13,387 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Honda Accord LX: 4 Dr, Silver Metallic, 51K Miles, Bluetooth, Alloys, B/U Camera, Auto Climate Control, $15,699 #H160886B

'14 Honda Civic LX: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $15,490 #26544A

'12 Honda Civic LX Traction Control, Keyless Entry, #X2740P, $12,628 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '12 Honda Civic EX: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, S unroof, P re mium S ound, Keyless Entry, Now $13,699

'09 Honda Civic EX: Crystal Black, Sunroof, Alloys, Only 77K Miles, Call Today, $10,999 #H170033B

'13 Honda Civic LX: 21 To Choos e , Kona Coffe e ; Bluetooth, La rge s t S e le ction in Midwest!! S ta rting At $12,999 #X2996

Kia

4155

'16 Kia Ca de nza P re mium, Navi, (2) Moonroofs, Bla ck on Bla ck, Only 7,382 mile s $24,999 #AT1640

'11 Kia Forte EX: 60K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $9,490 #M16413A '14 Kia Forte : S e da ns , (4) To Choos e From, Bla ck, 21K Miles , #SC1328 Ca ll Toda y S ta rting At $11,899

'15 Kia Optima $15,995 #KE52599 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Kia Optima LX: 19K Miles, Gray, $13,999 SC1377 2 others to choose from

'14 Kia Sorento LX Gray, Only 21xxx Miles, Bluetooth, 17" Alloys, Nice Price, Call Now ! #SC1362 $17,999

'15 Kia Soul: FWD, Hatchback, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Call Today, $13,490 #77063A

Lexus

'16 Hyundai Elantra SE: 4 Door, 29K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Hyundai Sonata SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Balance of Factory Warranty, $15,990 #P8657

'13 Sonata GLS Leather, Heated Seats, 24K Miles, 35 MPG, Stk #X2712BMP $15,188 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '11 Hyundai Sonata Leather Seats, Keyless Entry, 35 MPG, #X17064A, $12,055 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '14 Sonata GLS Pearl White, 30xxx Miles, Has Bluetooth + Alloys #SC1301 $13,499

'11 Hyundai Sonata LTD, Indigo Blue, Leather, Moonroof, Only 36,xxx Miles, Only $12,999 #H161960A

Jeep

4165

'06 Lexus GS300: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Call Today, $11,990 #95216A

'05 Lexus ES 330: Base, FWD, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Leather, Sunroof, $10,990 #26314A

'09 RX350 Stk#18170-2 $18,980 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Lincoln

4170

2006 Lincoln Town Car Signature, Call Today, $5,450 Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236 '09 Lincoln MKS 3.7: Nav, Roof, He a te d Le a the r, Silve r, 74K Miles , Ne w 20" Tire s , BU Ca me ra , Bluetooth, $13,999 #DL1225

'10 Lincoln MKZ Sat Radio, CD Player, Dual Climate Controls, Moonroof, 41K, #M393XP, $13,683 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Mazda '13 Hyundai Elantra GLS: Silver, Only 18,180 Miles, $13,499 #SC1361

4145

'12 Wrangler Sport Stk#P4093 $26,850 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352 '12 Wrangler Sport Stk#P4095 $23,880 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

4185

'11 Mazda Mazda CX-7i: Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Call Today, $12,990 #95278B

'14 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sport, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Mazda Certified, Low Miles, Premium Sound, $15,990 #10705A

'15 Mazda Mazda5: Sport Wagon, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Call Today, $14,990 #P8677

'12 Mazda Mazda3 i: Touring, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Balance of Factory Warranty, $12,990 #P8670A

'15 Mazda 5 S port Wa gon, White , 37K Miles , 6 P a s s , 3rd Row, Sliding S ide Doors , One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax, $12,999 #SC1300

'14 Mazda CX-5: AWD, Gra nd Touring, Naviga tion, Le a the r, S ilve r Me tallic, 46K Miles , Ca ll Toda y, $20,999 #SC1262

4145

'15 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk $26,895 #ET86199 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Jeep Cherokee: Latitude, Nav, 25K Miles, One Owner, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '04 Jeep Liberty Sport: 3.7L V6, 4x4, Low Miles, Rear Seat Pass Through, Call Today, $5,990 #8843A

'13 Mazda Mazda 3: Sedans, 2 To Choose From, Silver, Only 26K Miles, Call Now, Starting At $12,699 #SC1338

'16 Mazda 6i Grand Touring: Leather, Bluetooth, Auto, Nav, 6K, #M16520L, $28,152 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Mercedes Benz '03 Jeep Liberty: Limited, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, 4WD, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $5,490 #10525A

'16 Jeep Patriot $16,995 #KTE12540 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Wrangler Sahara, 19xxx Mi. 4WD, Auto, #C10819P, $28,669 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

4190

'06 Mercedes Benz E350: V6, FWD, Navigation/GPS, Leather Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #94563A


Classified

M 1

NEW 2017 INFINITI

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

QX30

LIMITED AVAILABILITY

377

$

WEDNESDAY

OCTOBER 19, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

C3

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

*

A MONTH

2 IN STOCK AT THIS PRICE+

NEW 2016 INFINITI

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

427

$

QX60

2 or More At This Price

*

A MONTH

NEW 2017 INFINITI

Q60

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

LIMITED AVAILABILITY

458

$

*

A MONTH 2 IN STOCK AT THIS PRICE+

NEW 2016 INFINITI

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

338

$

OR JUSTANNOUNCED CHOOSE

Q50

2 or More At This Price

*

A MONTH

0

%

72

**

APR FOR

MONTHS

FINANCING % .99 AVAILABLE UPTO 6 YEARS/100,000 MILE FACTORYWARRANTY

2004 INFINITI G35 P8689A, Willow...........................$8,990 2012 INFINITI EX35 96054A, Wheat.................... $24,990 2013 INFINITI JX35 94945A, Black Obsidian ...... $29,990 2012 INFINITI QX56 95208A, Wheat ....................$37,990 2010 INFINITI G37x 8905A, Graphite.................... $12,990 2013 INFINITI JX35 95284A ....................................$28,990 2014 INFINITI QX60 95173A, Black Obsidian..... $29,990 2015 INFINITI QX60 P8726, Black Obsidian ........$37,990 2013 INFINITI G37x P8582, Moonlight White.....$21,490 2013 INFINITI JX35 95243A, Black Obsidian ......$28,990 2015 INFINITI Q50 94457L, Chestnut ................... $32,990 2015 INFINITI QX60 3.5 94319L, Graphite....... $39,990 2013 INFINITI G37x P8681, Moonlight White..... $21,990 2013 INFINITI JX35 P8724, Graphite..................... $29,990 2015 INFINITI Q50 94615L,Moonlight White .... $32,990 2015 INFINITI Q70L 3.7 94412L, Graphite........$41,990 2013 INFINITI G37x P8592A, Graphite Shadow. $21,990 2014 INFINITI QX60 95173A, Black Obsidian..... $29,990 2016 INFINITIQX60 3.5 P9734, Wheat..............$36,990 2013 INFINITI QX56 95302A, Black Obsidian ... $43,990 *39 mo. lease -10,000 miles per year. $999 cash down. Tax, title, license, Acquisition fee and dealer fee not included. $0 security deposit. **0% apr for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 financed. For qualified buyers. See dealer for details. + Vin. # SJKCH5CR6HA017563, Vin. # SJKCH5CR3HA016984. ++Vin. # JN1EV7EL1HM551063, Vin. # JN1EV7EL0HM551040. Offers expire 10/31/16.

MISSOURI'S #1 INFINITI RETAILER Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2015.

Bommarito INFINITI WEST COUNTY BommaritoINFINITI.com 15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • (636) 391-9400

Misc. Autos

4210 Nissan/Datsun

Bommarito St. Pe te rs All Jus t Reduced!!

1-866-2449085 '12 Toyota Avalon LTD: 50K, Loaded $18,400 '13 Ford Focus: ST, 11K, Leather, Roof $20,990 '07 Cad CTS: Auto, Leather, 76K $11,400 '13 Chevy Camero ZT1: 10K, Local Trade $41,400 '11 Audi Q7 S-Line: Quattro, Blk, 55K $34,900 '13 Ford Edge SEL: AWD, White, Roof & Nav $24,700

4220 Toyota

'0 2 Nissan Xterra, All new brake s & tire s , $ 3 0 0 0 (314)285-7980

Pontiac

4250

'05 Pontiac Bonneville SE, 105K, Keyless Entry, #UH5323EP, $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Saturn

4280

'08 Saturn Vue XE: FWD, Keyless Entry, New Tires, 26 MPH, $6,995 #UH4865EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Scion

4283

'1 6 iM Base Stk #4 5 8 4 4 A, $ 1 8 ,9 9 5

'14 Honda CRV EX-V: Roof, Nav, White $21,900 '13 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, Auto, HardTop, 40K $31,990 '12 BMW 650xi Convert. 41K, Auto, Like

Mitsubishi

Subaru

4290

'13 Subaru WRX White, Local Trade, 4215 Call!

'10 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS: Auto, Roof, Alloys, Spoiler, 94K, #M161095B, $11,362 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Mitsubishi Mirage FWD, Traction Control, #U5188P, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Nissan/Datsun

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

4220

'11 Nissan Altima 2.5 S: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,990 #26063B

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $13,990 #94710C

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,990 #94062M

'15 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Silver, 33K Miles, Bluetooth, Fog Lamps, One Owner Clean Carfax,Call Today, Now $12,999! #SC1193

'15 Nissan Altima 2.5S: 37K Miles, One Owner, Black, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '07 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SL: 3.5L V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Mi, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $8,490 #27141A

'14 Nissan Murano AWD S, White Pearl, 39k Miles, Wont Be Here Long! $17,999 #H161712A

'14 Murano SL Leather, AWD, Bluetooth, Alloy Wheels, 69xxx Miles, Stk #M340XP $20,790 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Nissan Sentra $12,995 #KE38070 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Nissan Versa $12,795 #KE77276 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Nissan Versa 1.8 S Only 50xxx Miles, Silver, 32 MPG Hwy, stk #X17019A $8,359 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'13 Subaru XV Crosstrek Premium AWD Crossover, Pearl White, Only 24xxx Miles, #SC1327 $19,999

4300 Volvo

'15 Toyota Corolla $13,995 #KE66473 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Corolla S Re d, Only 76xxx Mile s , Will S e ll Fa s t At $10,899 #H161845B

'07 Toyota Corolla LE Manual, CD Player, Power Windows,117K, #MS17230A, $7,637 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Toyota Corolla LE: 4 Door, 39K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Volkswagen

4310

Bommarito ST. P ETERS Dis count Corne r 1-866-2449085 '13 Infiniti FX37: Roof, NAV $27,990 '13 Chevy Traverse LTZ: AWD, 44K, Loaded. $28,990 '11 Honda CR-V EX-L: 4WD, 47K, AWD $17,400 '88 Ford Mustang McClaren: 19K, Auto. $10,900 '13 Mercedes CLS550: Black, 4matic. $37,400

'13 Subaru Impreza Hatchback, Alloy Wheels, Heated Seats, One Owner, Certified, 29K Mi., #MS350BMP, $18,693 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '16 Subaru Legacy Ltd Nav, Certified, Leather, Roof, 10K, #MS383L, $27,989 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '16 Subaru Legacy Low Miles, Leather, Heated Seats, Certified, #MS334P, $28,816 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Outback 2.5I Limited Stk#L-1176-1 $22,764 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Toyota

4300

'16 Sienna XLE 8 Passenger Stk#P4100 $30,875 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352 '13 Toyota Venza LE $17,995 #KTE75818 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Toyota Prius II: Hybrid, FWD, Hatchback, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Call Today, $10,990 #26599B

'12 Toyota Avalon Limite d: Ha s It All!, Ce rtifie d, $18,400

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6 ¢

Chevrolet Trucks

4330

'12 Chevy Colorado LT Crew Cab, 4WD, GM Certified Warranty, #C161610C, $17,297 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '04 Chevy Silverado1500 4X4, ABS, Priced Below Avg, #UH5332EP, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '14 Chevy 1500 LT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V8, 28K Miles, GM Certified, $32,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy 1500 LT: Double Cab, 4x4, V6, 11K Miles, GM Certified, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT: 4WD, Crew Cab, 5.3L V8, #C161817A, $22,401 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '12 Chevy Silverado LT Crew Cab, 4WD, 5.3LV8, 47xxx Mi., #C10724Q, $26,651 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'07 Silverado 4WD, Bla ck, 72K #C8240A, $19,490

'12 Toyota Rav 4 Sport: 43K, 4WK, Black. $17,900 '12 VW CC R-Line $11,400

'13 Silverado 1500 LT Stk #P8583, $19,433

'14 Subaru Legacy: 3.6, Auto, Full Power. $20,900 '14 GMC Sierra: 16K, Local Trade. $19,800 '14 Honda Ridgeline SE: Leather, Nav. $31,990 '09 VW EOS: Auto, 75K. $11,990

4347 Sport Utilitiy

'1 3 Ridgeline RTL Stk #4 5 6 6 0 A $ 3 1 ,2 4 8

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Nissan/Datsun Trucks 4380 '16 Maxima Stk #P8659, $25,422

of South County 1-855-903-8696

Toyota Trucks

4385

'04 Toyota Tacoma PreRunner: Extended Cab, V6, Access Cab, V6, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, $15,990 #77005A

'13 Toyota Ta coma Stk #P8638, $32,725

o f So uth Co unty 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6 '1 4 Toyota Tundra Stk #P8 6 3 0 , $ 3 9 ,1 0 6

o f So uth Co unty 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335 '16 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT: Quad Cab, 4x4, Big Horn, HEMI, $29,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'13 Chevy Equinox LT FWD, 31xxx Mi., GM Certified Warranty, #C10764P, $16,614 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'14 Escalade White Diamond, AWD, Chromes, 36xxx Miles, Stk #C8211 $49,980

'14 Escalade AWD, White, DVD, Certified, $49,980

'16 Hyundai Tucson SE: AWD, 4 Cyl, 17K Miles, One Owner, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Buick Encore: 1.4L Turbo, 20K Miles, One Owner, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Equinox LT Carfax, 1 Owner, 32 MPG, #UH5094EP, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '10 Chevy Equinox LTZ: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Mi, Leather Heated Front Seats, Surnoof, $15,990 #77496A

'12 Chevy Equinox LS: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Remote Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $10,990 77269A

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'12 Tundra Stk #43499B $32,220

'11 Volvo XC60 (T6): 68K, White AWD. $20,900

of South County 1-855-903-8696 '14 Toyota Tundra Stk #45331B, $29,472

'11 Chevy Equinox 1LT: Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, Remote Start, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $14,490 #95259B

'12 Chevy Equinox 2LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $14,990 #26062M

'14 Mazda CX-5 Touring:

'09 VW EOS Luxury, Auto, Black, $11,400

'1 5 Ram 2 5 0 0 Laramie, Stk #P8 5 9 6 $ 4 4 ,7 0 0 o f So uth Co un ty 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Crossovers '12 Volkswagen Jetta Sedan, 2.5L SE, 31 MPG, Traction Control, #X161009A, $10,688 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 VW Passat $15,995 #KE34825 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 VW Passat Wolfsburg $14,695 #KE13968 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Volvo

4315

'14 S60 T5 Sedan Stk#L1183 $21,851 Suntrup West County Vol'10 Avalon XLS vo 1-877-557-2352 3.5V6, Auto, FWD #C10725A, $9,471 '16 S60 T5 Drive E Premier LOU FUSZ CHEVY Sedan Stk#L1214 $27(866) 602-1770 ,880 Suntrup West County Vol'05 Toyota Camry LE vo 1-877-557-2352 FWD, Priced Below Avg., #UH4996EP, '11 Vo lvo XC60 T6: $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot White , AWD, Ro o f, West (636) 200-2129 68K Mile s , '13 Toyota Camry LE, $20,400 #B8096 Bla ck, Only 33k Miles , Now $14,299 #SC1372

'1 5 Camry LE Stk #P8 6 5 1 $ 1 6 ,0 3 0

4315 Honda Trucks

'10 XC60 T6 SUV Stk#18238-1 $15,762 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352 '13 XC90 3.2 SUV Stk#L1177 $26,700 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352 '13 XC90 3.2 SUV Stk#P4051 $24,890 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

'15 XC60 T5 Premier SUV Stk#P4062 $29,800 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352 '15 XC60 T5 Premier SUV Stk#P4063 $29,800 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352 '13 XC60 T6 SUV Stk#L1169 $27,870 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Ford Trucks

4340

'12 Chrys le r 200 To uring Co nvertible $12,284 #E92077A 1-866-311-8350 Fo r de tails g o to www.cerame.com '06 Ranger V6 3.0L, Black, 131K Miles, Stk #UH5108EP $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '15 Ford F-250 Lariat $44,995 #T3786E 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '95 Ranger Only 174xxx Miles, Clean CarFax $1,550 #160375F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

GMC Trucks

4387

'10 Audi Q5 Quattro, AWD, Roof, Nav, $19,990

'13 Ford Edge SEL AWD, Roof, Nav, White, $28,490 '07 Ford Edge SEL Plus, AWD, White, $9,400

'14 Nissan Juke 900 Mi. Like New!! #C16244RA, $20,490

4345

'11 Acadia Stk#17529-2 $16,800 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

'14 GMC Sierra A Must Sell, Very Cheap, #V16121A, $19,400

'13 Chevy Equinox AWD, Leather, Roof, 28K, $22,990

'14 Nissan Murano AWD, Roof, Local Trade, $26,990

'14 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring, One Owner, AWD, Leather, 34K, M373P, $24,199 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Subaru Outback LTD, Heated Seats, Power Liftgate, AWD, Certified, 16K, #MS17197A, $28,255 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'16 Chevy Equinox LT Backup Camera, Bluetooth, 5K, 32 MPG, #X17050A, $21,999 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '11 Chevy Equinox LT Sat Radio, 1 Owner, Bluetooth, 32 MPG, #X17073A, $11,699 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '08 Equinox Sport AWD, One Owner, Leather, Alloys, 102K, #KD77002A, $11,795 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '13 Chevy Equinox LT 2.4L 20xxx Miles, GM Certified Warranty, #C10770P, $16,994 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Equinox LTZ: AWD, V6, Nav, 12K Miles, GM Certified, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '1 3 Eq uino x LS, 4 Cyl, One Ow ne r, 3 2 K Mile s, $ 1 5 ,9 9 5 Do n Bro w n Che v ro le t 1 -8 6 6 -8 8 3 -8 8 4 1 '15 Chevy Suburban LT: 4x4, Sunroof, Heated Leather, Dual DVD, GM Certified, $46,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'15 Tahoe LTZ 20xxx Miles, Every Option, White!! Stk #C16349A $56,490

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'15 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4x4, Sunroof, DVD, 22K Miles, GM Certified, $45,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Tahoe LT 4x4 Heated Leather, 82K Miles, 3rd Row, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'06 Chevy Trailblaze r, DVD, Le athe r, 3rd Ro w $6,490

'13 Chevy Traverse LTZ: AWD, Loaded, $32,490 #B8065 '12 Chevy Traverse LT: V6, 3rd Row, Local Trade, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '09 Ford Escape XLT FWD, Keyless Entry, #UH4883EP, $6,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '08Jeep Comma nde r Ca ndy Red, 4WD, LTD., Sunroof, DVD, Loa de d! Ca ll Toda y, $10,999 #DL1340

'10 Dodge Nitro SXT: 3.7L V6, Auto, 4x4, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Premium Sound, $11,490 #77410A

'14 Do dg e Durango Limite d, AWD, NAV $31,490

'13 Infiniti EX-37 J ourne y: Loa de d, #B8167, $27,990

'10 Journey SXT NHTSA 5-Star Rating, Sat Radio, Red, Stk #X17016A $12,412 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '10 Dodge Journey SXT 62K Mi., Red Crystal Pearl, #X17016A, $11,291 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '11 Escape Hybrid Stk#185011 $15,920 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352 '11 Ford Edge Sport $21,995 #TGB15739A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '07 Ford Edge SEL: 3.5L V6, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Call ASAP! $11,990 #95179B

'13 Ford Edge Sport Black¤ V6, Navi, 2 Sunroofs, 12 Speaker Premium Audio, Only 34k Miles $25,499 #H161943A

'15 Ford Edge, AWD SEL, White Pearl, (2)x Moonroof, 28K mi, $25,999 #H162211A

'13 Ford Escape Titanium $19,995 #T3780X 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '08 Ford Escape XLT: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Roof Rack, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $8,990 #27164A

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'13 Ford Escape SEL: FWD, Turbocharged, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Leather Trimmed Seats, $13,990 #26668B

'10 Ford Escape XLT: 4x4, 4 Cyl, Clean CARFAX, AWD, Low Miles, Roof Rack, Premium Sound Syst, $10,990 #10268B

'16 Expedition EL, 4WD, Leather, Roof, $40,990 '14 Ford Explorer XLT $24,995 #TE17991 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Ford Explorer Ltd $36,995 #TE45305 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Roof, Qua d S e a ts , $28,900 #B8066

'11 GMC Acadia SLT Stk #45198B $15,250

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'16 GMC Terrain $27,995 #TE69971 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 GMC Terrain SLE-1: FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Back Up Camera, Won't Last, Call Today, $12,990 #95297C

'11 GMC Terrain SLT-2: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heatd Front Seats, Snroof, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, Remote Start, $14,990 #10815A

'15 GMC Terrain SL2: AWD, V6, Sunroof, 17K Miles, GM Certified, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 GMC Yukon XL SLT, 4WD, #C161161A, $26,466 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '11 Honda CR-V EX-L: AWD, Navigation/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, Bluetooth, Won't Last, $15,990 #10710A

'11 Honda CR-V AWD, 54K Mi., Cle a n top to Bottom, #B8166, $15,900

'14 CR-V EX Moonroof, Backup Camera, Electronic Stability, 30 MPG, Stk #X17104A $20,988 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '11 CRV AWD EX Crystal Black, 47xxx Miles, Moonroof, Alloys, Honda Quality #H161420A $17,999

'08 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Balance of Factory Warranty, Call Today, $10,490 #10555A

4390

'15 Hyundai Sonata White w/Tan, Auto, 10K Mi., #B8010, $23,990

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland, Nav, Auto, 4X4, 41K, #M478JCP, $32,364 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '12 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo: 4WD, Power Windows, 93K, M457BMP, $18,818 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'13 Je e p Wrang le r S ahara, Auto , Hard To p, #B7990, $31,400

'11 Kia Sorento Priced Below Avg, Keyless Entry, #UH5172EP, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '15 Kia Sorrento $29,995 #KE56079 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'13 Kia Sorento EX Nav, AWD, Pano Roof, V6, $23,990

'13 Kia Sorento LX Heated Seats, 28K Mi., Backup Camera, #X2725P, $17,240 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 2002 GMC Envoy SLE 4WD, As Low As $59/Mo, #160614F $3,850 Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236 '07 Lincoln Navigator $14,995 #KT79980B 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Mazda Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, One Owner Clean CARFAX, heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $10,490 #10458A

'12 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring: AWD, $26,490

'1 4 Mitsubishi Outlander S port ES, 23K Mi., FWD, T ra c t i o n C o n t ro l , #X2730P, $14,830 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE: CD Player, Alloys, Auto, 13K Mi., #M420XP, $18,989 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '06 Nissan Murano AWD Priced Below Average, $7,995 #UH5325EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '15 Nissan Murano Platinum, lthr., backup camera, 28 mpg, stk# X17166A $24,319 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Nissan Pathfinder $27,995 #KTE34632 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Nissan Pathfinder SV, 3rd row seating, backup camera, parking sensors, stk# X17140A $18,325 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'13 Nissan Rogue SL, AWD, Roof, Nav, Leather, #B8163, $18,990

'14 Rogue S L Navi, He a te d Le a the r, Bose 9 S pe a ke r Audio! #H161896A Now $20,999


Classified

C4

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

The NISS NISSAN SS Store

OCTOBER 19, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

Convenient Saturday Service

Bommarito NISSAN

Missouri’s

NISSAN Dealer!

17 Cons Consecutive Years††

SUPERSTORES A

Bommarito EXCLUSIVE

10 YEAR/ 200,000 MILE

2017 NISSAN ARMADA IS HERE!

0

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ON ALL NEW 2016 NISSANS

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ENDS MON., OCT. 24TH AT 9PM

2016 NISSAN VERSA S

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2016 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5

2016 NISSAN ROGUE

2016 NISSAN PATHFINDER

AUTOMATIC A/C, BLUETOOTH

AUTOMATIC, BLUETOOTH, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS

BLUETOOTH, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS

BACKUP CAMERA, CRUISE, SATELLITE RADIO

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MSRP $18,835

MSRP $23,535

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MSRP $31,100

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MSRP $15,245

$

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MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

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Versa Model #11126, Vin. #907910. Sentra Model #12016, Vin. #237935. Rogue Model #22116, Vin. #617267. Pathfinder Model #25116, Vin. #657096. Altima Model #13016, Vin. #109787 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

2Year Maintenance,Oil Changes, Tire Rotations+ (NO EXTRA CHARGE) ComplimentaryTank of Gas (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

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Bommarito NISSAN WEST

Bommarito NISSAN 661 Dunn Rd. BIG CORNER OF I-270 & N. LINDBERGH

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

314-731-2228

14747 Manchester Rd. BALLWIN, MISSOURI

Hablamos Español llama Ivette Kincade 314-642-5895 o Dennis Olson 314-814-5580

BommaritoNissan.com

636-346-9640

636-394-0330

• ILLINOIS BUYERS WE WILL PROCESS SALES TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE PLATES †Sale on in stock units only. Prior sales excluded. Includes all rebates and incentives with approved credit. Dealer added options additional. No dealers while supplies last. Tax, title, destination & license not included in sale prices. See dealer for details. ††Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration. Nissan North American, ‘98, ‘99, ‘00, ‘01, ‘02, ‘03, ‘04, ‘05, ‘06, ‘07, ‘08, ‘09, ‘10, ‘11, ‘12, ‘13, ‘14, ‘15 Calendar Year to Date results for Missouri. **0% apr for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 financed. Special financing in lieu of rebates. Deferred payments on finance deals only. See sales consultant for details. *Bommarito advantage offer with every new Nissan purchase. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 10/24/16.

2016 Audi Q3 quattro 2016 Audi A3 2.0T quattro

$ 349

$ 279

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

per month*

per month*

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

2016 Audi Q5 2.0T Premium Plus

Technology Package, Navigation, Back-up Camera, Blind Spot Monitoring, Bang and Olufsen Sound System

month* $439 per 10,000 MILES PER YEAR Up To 6 years/100,000 Mile Factory Warranty 27159A •2011 Audi A5 2.0T Premium Cabriolet, Meteor Gray Pearl . . . $16,490 95065A •2010 Audi Q5 3.2 Premium, Brilliant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,490 26304A •2010 Audi A5 3.2 Premium Plus, Brilliant Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,990 25639B •2012 Audi Q5 2.0T Premium Plus, White. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,990 P8711 •2012 Audi Q7 3.OT Premium Plus SUV Orca Black . . . . . . . . . $19,990 P8711 •2012 Audi Q7 3.0T Premium Plus, Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,990 26050M •2013 Audi A6 2.0T Premium, Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,990

P8720 27088A 26388L 27255A 26565L 26260L P8700

•2014 Audi A3 1.8T Premium, Brilliant Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,990 •2014 Audi Q7 3.0T Premium, Daytona Gray Pearl . . . . . . . . . . $29,990 •2016 Audi A5 2.0T Premium, Brilliant Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,990 •2015 Audi A4 2.0T Premium, Tornado Gray Metallic . . . . . . . . $30,490 •2016 Audi A3 2.0T Premium, Brilliant Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,990 •2016 Audi A3 2.0T Premium, Monsoon Gray Metallic . . . . . . . $30,990 •2013 Audi S4 3.0T Phantom Black Pearl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,990

26253A •2015 Audi allroad 2.0T Premium, Tornado gray metallic . . . . $35,990 94426M•2014 Audi 3.0T Glacier White Metallic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,990 P8718 •2016 Audi Q5 2.0T Premium, Lbis White. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,990 27258A •2014 Audi Q7 QUATTRO 3.0L TDI Premium Plus SUV, Orca Blk Met $39,990 26434L •2016 Audi Q5 2.0T Premium, Florett Silver Metallic . . . . . . . . $41,990 P8736 •2015 Audi S4 S TronicPremium Plus, Grey Pearl . . . . . . . . . . . $43,990 26622A •2016 Audi A6 QUATTRO 2.0 Premium, Glacier White Met. . . . $45,990

*36 month closed end lease, 10,000 miles per year, more miles available. Audi A3, Q3 and Q5 include loyalty or general market aquisition program incentives. $999 cash down on A3, Q3 and Q5. Taxes, title, license and fees not included. Offers expire 10/31/16.

MISSOURI'S #1 AUDI RETAILER Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2015.

Bommarito Audi West County 15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 1-877-756-8753 • audiwestcounty.com


Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

OCTOBER 19, 2016

C5

STLTODAY.COM

Bommarito WEST COUNTY 2016 BUICK ENCORE *

149 9

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2009 2010 2012 2006 2012 2010 2014 2013 2014 2012

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GMC Canyon EXT CAB 78010A, Black...........................$9,490 GMC Terrain SLE-1 95297C, Black ..................................... $10,490 GMC Terrain SLT-1 94710C, Gray Green .............................. $11,990 GMC Yukon Denali 77686A, Silver Birch.............................. $11,990 GMC Terrain SLT-1 #77070A, Red.......................................... $15,490 Buick Enclave 1XL #38118A, Quicksilver............................... $16,990 GMC Terrain SLE-1 Jet Black, #26325C............................... $18,990 GMC Terrain AWD SLT-2 26598A, Gray................... $18,990 GMC Terrain SLE-1 P8569A, Jet Black.................................. $19,490 GMC Acadia SLT Red #77232A.................................................. $20,990

2009 2011 2008 2013 2016 2014 2015 2015 2014 2016

GMC Yukon XL #77645A, Beige..................................................... $22,990 GMC Acadia Denali White Diamond Tricoat, #95360A ........ $23,990 GMC Yukon Denali Gold Mist, #77675A ............................. $24,490 GMC Acadia SLT-1 26766B, Cyber Gray Metallic ................... $24,990 GMC Terrain SLT Jet Black, #P8665 .......................................... $25,990 Buick Enclave Premium #27167A, Gray.................... $32,990 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT Crew Cab, Silver, #78000B ........... $37,490 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT Crew Cab, White, #77381A........... $38,990 GMC Yukon XL Denali #77601A.................................... $40,990 GMC Yukon Denali #P8691................................................... $53,990

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

Bommarito 636-391-7200

15736 Manchester Rd. at Clarkson Rd. (just east of Clarkson)

Toll Free

1-888-387-5234

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*39 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Buick Encore has $0 down with approved credit through GM financial. Offer limited to dealer selected vehicles in stock while they last. Not compatible with some other offers. In stock only. See dealer for details. Offer expires 10/31/16.

Convenient Saturday Service

Bommarito Honda SUPERSTORE

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$

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Nationwide Warranty With Every New Honda Purchase!

139

169

PER MO.

36 Month Lease

2017 Honda

PER MO.

ACCORD LX

36 Month Lease AUTOMATIC

*36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $6,504 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

AUTOMATIC *36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $7,584 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

2 Year Maintenance With Every New Honda Purchase!††

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636-346-9640

Bommarito N

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S

I-270 & N. LINDBERGH, 12 MINUTES FROM 40 & I-270 • www.BommaritoHonda.com Welcome All Illinois Shoppers To Simplify Your Buying Experience, Bommarito Honda Will Process Your Illinois Sales Tax, Title Fees And License Plates

*Price includes all factory and dealer incentives with approved credit. †Available w/approved credit excludes leases new Hondas only. On select models. Deferred payments on finance deals only. Excludes leases. ++Bommarito advantage offer with every new Honda purchase. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 10/31/16.

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4390 Antiques Wanted

'04 Nissan Xterra XE, Auto, Power Pkg, Very Clean, $6,490 '10 Saturn OUTLOOK XE: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, 3rd Row Seating, Bluetooth, Call Today, $11,990 #77225A

6290 Legal Notices

Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Firewood/Fuel

6095

Seasoned Oak and Hickory Delivered & Stacked. 23yrs of Service. 573-513-6510

Legal Notices

9000

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING '15 Subaru Forester Premium, Roof, Heated Seats, Auto, Rev Camera, 7K, #MS161243A, $26,785 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '06 Toyota Highlander: Limited, Hybrid, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $8,990 #27123A

'08 Toyota Highlander: 3.5L V6, AWD, Backup Camera, 3rd Row Seat, Premium Sound System, Call Today, $12,990 #10983A

'13 Toyota Highla nde r S E: V6, Htd Le a the r, Moonroof, S ilve r Me tallic, Bluetooth, BU Ca me ra , Clea n Carfx, $24,499 #SC1202

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of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

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of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

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'15 Toyota RAV4 $22,695 #KTE89534 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Rav4 Limited AWD Auto, Roof, Nav, Stk #C8109A $24,990

'1 2 RAV4 Limited Stk #P8 6 2 9 $ 2 2 ,2 5 2

OCTOBER 19, 2016

The He alth and Educational Facilities Authority of the State of Missouri (the "Authority") will hold a public hearing at 1 5 4 5 0 S . Oute r Forty Road, Suite 230 in Chesterfield, Missouri, on Nove mbe r 3 , 2 0 1 6 , commencing at 1 0 :0 0 A.M., regarding the proposed issuance by the Authority of its revenue bonds in one or more series in an a g g re g a te p rin c ip a l amount not to exceed $9,500,000 (the "Bonds"), for the purpose of making a l o a n to R a n k e n Technical College, a Miss o u ri n o n p ro fit corporation, to refund the Authority's Educational Facilities Revenue Bonds (Ranken Technical College), Series 2011A, the proceeds of which were used by the College to finance , refinance and reimburse the costs of certain of its educational facilities at 4400-26 and 4 4 0 1 -4 4 4 1 Page Bouleva rd , 1 3 2 3 - 1 3 2 5 N. N e w s t e a d and 4 4 0 0 Evans, which property consists of approximately one city block bounded by Page Boulevard, Newstead and Evans, and at its campus located at 4431 F i n n e y Ave nue in S t . Louis, Missouri. Th e h e a rin g will be open to the public. The hearing is required by S e ction 1 4 7 (f) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Prior to the date of the hearing written comments may be s ubmitte d to the Authority's Executive Director at the above listed address of the Authority. MICHAEL J. STANARD Executive Director

9000 Legal Notices

PETITION OF VACATION OF EASEMENT

The He alth and Educational Facilities Authority of the State of Missouri will hold a public hearing at 1 5 4 5 0 S outh Outer Forty Road, Suite 230 in Chesterfield, Missouri, on November 2 , 2 0 1 6 , at 1 0 :0 0 A.M., regarding the issuance by th e Authority o f its re ve n u e b o n d s (the "Bonds"), pursuant to a plan of finance in an aggregate principal amount n o t to e xce e d $ 3 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 , for the purpose of making a loan to A.T. Still University of He alth S cie nce s (the "University"), a Missouri nonprofit corporation. The proceeds of the loan will b e u s e d b y th e University to finance, refinance and reimburse the costs of certain health and educational facilities, including the costs of acquiring, cons tructing, equipping and furnishing (1 ) three buildings to be used for educational and clinical space located at 5 8 3 5 , 5 8 4 5 , and 5 8 5 5 East Still Circle in the Arizona Health and Technology Park in Mesa, Ariz o n a , (2 ) c a p i t a l improvements to the University-owned building used for educational and clinical space located at 5 8 5 0 East S till Circle in the Arizona Health and Technology Park in Mesa, Arizona, (3 ) capital improvements to the University's educational dental clinic located at 1 5 0 0 Park Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri, and (4) capital improvements to the facilities on the University's main campus located at 8 0 0 W. Je ffe rs on St ., Kirksville, Missouri (collectively, the "Project").The University is the owner and operator of the Project.

Not ice is hereby given pursuant to Section 02-11 of the City of Chesterfield Unif ied Development Code, that a petition has been filed to vacate easements on Lot 4B of the Spirit Valley Business Park sub- division. The legal description of the easement to be vacated is as follows:

'03 Toyota Sequoia SR5: Limited, 4WD, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $6,990 #8862B

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The St. Louis Airport Police Department will release for auction items of unclaimed personal property recovered at the Airport between January, 2 0 1 5 a n d Decemb er , 2015. A claim to any item of personal property will be honored with proper identification of the date of loss and description of it em. Claims mus t be made within 30 days of the date of this notice. Contact Airport Police Property Officer Monday through Friday from 9 : 0 0 a m. - 4:00p.m. at 314-426-8126.

Bids/Proposals

4430

9005

DOWNTOWN VENDING DISTRICT The City of St. Louis purs u a n t to O rd in a n c e 6 8 6 0 3 , is s e e kin g ve n d o rs fo r th e Downtown Vending District, which includes both street and parks locations. The pe rmits are for a three (3) year period from January 1, 2017 through December 31, 2019. The minimum annual fee is $ 5 0 0 . Vendors shall be selected based upon the criteria set forth in the Solicitation for Permit Applications, which may be obtaine d from the Parks Department at 5600 Clayton Avenue, 3 1 4 -2 8 95344, or the Department of Streets at 1900 Hampton Avenue, 3 1 4 -6 4 7 3111, Sta. 1009 or download from the city's webs i t e at h t t p : / / s t l o u i s m o .gov/ g o v e r n m e n t / parks. The last day for filing applications for the Vending District is Friday, November 4, 2016.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Lincoln University of Missouri is accepting sealed bids for Myrtle Smith Livingston Park Tennis Court Replacement on the campus of Lincoln University. Bids will be re ce ive d Thursday, November 3 , 2016 at 2:00 p.m. A prebid meeting will be held Thursday, October 2 0 , 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at 300 Young Hall, 820 Chestnut S treet, Jefferson City, Missouri. A full copy of the bid notice is available at https:// bluetigerportal .lincolnu.edu/web/designand-construction/ noticeto-contractors

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the FLOOR CRACKING IN WEIGHT ROOM, HAMMONS STUDENT CENTER will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on NOVEMBER 1, 2016 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted. Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon r e c e i p t o f a $25. 00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder's expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at www.plans.missouristate. edu. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications M S U is an A A / E O institution.

Sealed bids for Exterior Lighting, Brick Facade & Tunnel Repairs, Various, Farmington Correctional Center, Farmington, Missouri, Project No. C16050 1 will be receive d by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 11/10/2016. For specific project information and ordering plans , go to: h t t p : / / o a.mo.gov/ facilities

Today’s Classified section:

Stuff. Homes. Rides. Jobs. In print and online.

314-621-6666

5000

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Kittens FREE black and white colored 5 1/2 months old 636-462-4534 Troy, MO

Dogs

9005

Bids will be received by the Hazelwood School District for Painting of Metal Lockers at Hazelwood West High School. A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be he ld at 9 : 0 0 a. m. on October 2 0 , 2 0 1 6 at the H a z e l w o o d S chool District Learning Center, 1 5 9 5 5 New Halls Ferry Road, F l o r i s s a n t MO 6 3 0 3 1 . Bids are due in the Business Office no later than 2:30 p.m. CDT on October 25, 2016. Bid specifications are available at the Hazelwood S chool District Business Office, 15955 New Halls Ferry Road, Florissant MO 6 3 0 3 1 (3 1 4 ) 9 5 3 5019 or visit our website at www.hazelwoodschools.org.

'16 2500 Express Van LT: 12 Passenger, 24K Miles, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Ford T250 Cargo Van $25,995 #TE32065 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Chevy City Express LS: 400 Miles, Cargo Van, #C10747Q, $17,277 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

Cats

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH OBITUARIES

4420

'07 Chrysler T & C LWB Touring: 3rd Row Seating, Backup Camera, #UH5267EP, $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '16 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, Rear DVD, Leather, 4 TO CHOOSE! $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT: Stow 'N Go, 32K Miles, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '09 Grand Caravan SE 3rd Row Seating Back up Camera $8,995 #UH5319EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '05 Odyssey One Owner, Clean CarFax $4,950 #160279F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

Vans

Copies of the petition are available for review in the Planning and Development Services Division at the Chesterfield City Hall, 690 Chesterfield Parkway West during weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. If you should need additional information about this request, please contact Justin Wyse, Senior Planner, by telephone at 636-5374 7 3 4 o r b y e m a i l at j w y s e @ chesterfield.mo.us

PROPOSAL TO BE SUBMITTED BY 1 PM NOVEMBER 15, 2016 TO ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF OPERATIONS 3855 Lucas and Hunt Road ST. LOUIS, MO 63121

Email Address: Mini vans

Beginning at the southwestern corner of Lot 4 of above said Spirit Valley Business Park, said point also being located on the northern right-of-way line o f S p i r i t V a l l e y West Drive, 40 feet wide; thence along the west line of said Lot 4, North 12 degrees 22 minutes 59 seconds West, 462.23 feet; thence departing said west line, North 77 degrees 37 minutes 01 seconds East, 20.00 feet to the eastern line of above said Chesterfield Valley Storm Water Easement; thence along said east line, South 12 degrees 22 minutes 59 seconds East, 462.54 feet to the north right-of-way line of above said Spirit Valley West Drive; thence along said north right-of-way line, South 78 degrees 30 minutes 01 seconds West, 20 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 9,248 square feet according to calculations performed by Stock & Associates Con sult ing Engineers, Inc. on August 16, 2016.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR HVAC SYSTEM REPAIRS FOR NORMANDY SCHOOLS COLLABORATIVE ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

MAILING ADDRESS

Legal Description: Part of the Twenty (20) feet wide Chesterfield Valley Storm Water Easement as established by Spirit Valley Business Park according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat book 356, Page 177, located in Township 45 North, Range 5 East of the Fifth Principal Meridian, City of Chesterfield, St. Louis County, Missouri, being more particularly described as follows:

MICHAEL J. STANARD Executive Director

Amount enclosed: $ An enclosed payment of $9.75 is required to begin your subscription.

9000 Bids/Proposals

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

All interested persons may attend the hearing a n d will h a ve a n opportunity to express their views with respect to the Bonds and project, including the location and nature of the proposed project and the issuance of the Bonds to pay the cos ts thereof. Written comments with respect to the proposed project and the Bonds may be sent to the undersigned prior to the he aring at 1 5 4 5 0 South Outer Forty Road, S uite 2 3 0 , Chesterfield, Mi s s o u ri 6 3 0 1 7 . Additional information regarding the propos ed proje ct and plan of finance may be obtained in advance of the hearing from the University at 800 W. Jefferson St., Kirksville, Missouri 63501, Attention: Chief Financial Officer.

C7

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5005

STLTODAY.COM/OBIT 1st Golden Retrievers Golden Doodles, Yo-Chons, Hava Poos, Cockers, Chiweines, Kyileo, Lhasa Poos, Teddy Bears, Cockawoodles & lots of Poos

A 636-240-3647 A LoveNCarePets.org

AKC POODLES - Toy, 9 weeks, health guaranteed, wo rme d . Fe male s & males. $ 5 0 0 . S mart & adorable. 636-537-3797 CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES Male & Female 8 Weeks Old, $150 ea. Call (314)477-0321

DOODLES: Puppies Ready Now & thru Christmas

GOLDENDOODLES LABRADOODLES & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. $500 & Up Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com G E R M A N SH E P H E R D PUPPIES FOR SALE Call for price 618-419-2911 or 618-610-3669 G E R M A N SH E P H E R D PUPS: 2 girls, 6 boys. A K C registered. $500 573-915-8735 GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES, Registered, 12 weeks. Asking $450 Call (636)357-2691 or (573)384-5324 GREAT DANE AKC pups, Fe Har ls $1200 Merle $1000 Blk $800. 417-8382212 417-830-0230

Lab puppies, AKC Registred. Black, 1st shots/wormed. Newton, IL $400. 618-783-3492 LAB PUPS-AKC, OFA Chocolate, Yellow & Black. See parents, calm. shots, wormed, health guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com Rotts pups for sell. Parents on site. Leave voicemail. $1200-$1000 636-2816782

Garage Sales MISSOURI

6325

63034- BarringtonDowns HOA Subdivision wide Garage Sale. Area of Grand National & New Halls Ferry Wednesday, October 19 & Saturday, October 22 @ 7 am. Everything! Adult, children's clothes, furniture, collectibles. 6 3 1 4 6 , 1 1 7 1 4 Westpor t Crossing Drive. 10/21, 8a3p; 10/22, 8a-1p. Garage S ale : A s m t of hous e hold ite ms and clothing, etc.

PUBLIC NOTICE AUCTION PUBLIC NOTICE AUCTION If payment is not received, PS OrangeCo, Inc. will sell the entire contents of rental spaces at the following locations to the highest bidder on: October 27th, 2016, starting at 8:30 a.m. The undersigned will sell personal property including furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items. (Auctions will start at the 3rd Street Property and run in order as listed.) 1250 S Third Street, St. Louis, MO 63104 905 Jamison, C14 Johnson, C45 Brown, C79 Dinwiddie, C81 Hemphill, D19 Williams, E34 Jones, E92 Cox, F39 Holt, G52 Sanilippo 11 North Vandeventer Ave St Louis MO 63108 156 White, 158 Love, 173 Quarells, 231 Bell, 423 Whitt, 442 Williams, 465 Anderson, 536 Crawford, 569 Rozier, 626 Lee, 628 Freeny, 631 Jackson, 649 Marshall

If payment is not received, PS OrangeCo, Inc. will sell the entire contents of rental spaces at the following locations to the highest bidder on: October 28, 2016, starting at 8:30 a.m. The undersigned will sell personal property including furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items. (Auctions will start at the Ellisville, MO property and run in order as listed.) 16230 Truman Road, Ellisville, MO 63011 2106 Gilyard, 3049 Wright, 3054 Cova 2211 Barrett Station Rd Ballwin MO 63021 B171 Johnson , B229 Baldridge, C007 Emmenegger 831 Meramec Station Road, Valley Park, MO 63088 A011 Gardner 3850 Forder Road, St. Louis, MO 63129 E005 Alamo, G016 Martin, J001 Giles, J016 Beganovic, M010 Fahad Hossain Pappu, M020 Danner, P010 Sanders, P015 Giles

5801 Wilson Rd St Louis MO 63110 1028 Mersinger, 1151 Robinson, 2015 Nivison, 2024 Allen, 2230 Shelton, 2270 Warren, 2280 Graumenz, 2335 Casciaro, 3313 Moore, B051 McKinney, B079 Cobbs, B086 Becker, B087 Lee, B093 Cox, B102 Morris, P001 Allen-Mann

3940 Reavis Barracks, St. Louis, MO 63125 A058 Dunham, C335 Speaks, C353 Matzker, C291 Mcnail, D444 Sargent

8691 Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132 119 Evans, 372 Bullard, 550 White, 719 Moore, 1052 Brown, 2026 Thomas, 2126 Cunningham, 2224 Williams, B3054 Stewart

9722 Gravois, Affton, MO 63123 A006 Kathy Roberts, B058 Obenhaus, B089 Sanders, C034 Saito, D077 Martin, D233 Palos, D235 Breyfogle, D289 Vinyard, E009 Braun

4653 World Pkwy, St. Louis, MO 63134 1004 Ponder, 1012 Esters, 1013 Bruton, 1023 Sanders, 2014 Davis, 3004 Sseremba, 3016 Nesbitt, 3023 Johnson, 3064 Moore, 3068 White, 3088 Williams, 4001 Hall, 4008 Murray, 4066 Roy-Holman, 4067 Redmond, 4099 Butler, 5020 Sucher, 6028 Bates, 6063 Gregory

9030 Watson Rd. Crestwood, MO 63126 E040 Shelton, F308 Paszkiewicz, F342 Carpenter, F413 Tatum, F416 Paszkiewicz, F434 Jackson, G003 Hefner

9291W Florissant, St. Louis, MO 63136 202 Fellows, 210 Preston, 217 Allen, 221 Haughton, 255 Wells, 281 Alexander, 314 Mcdonald, 320 Mosby, 332 Brown, 354 Huntley, 409 Jones-Burns, 418 Barge, 445 Williams, 508 Saffold, 519 Lucious, 522 Duret, 600 Whittier, 607 Key, 608 Givans, 610 Townley, 631 Rockett, 660 Johnson, 661 Brown, 694 Taylor, 731 Roache, 737 Washington, 750 Wallace 11575 New Halls Ferry, Florissant, MO 63033 102 Lewis, 208 Brenston, 227 Robinson, 322 Guzman, 345 Washington, 357 Baker, 445 Wilkerson, 506 Coats, 513 Brown, 514 Moore, 540 Voigt, 614 McDufie, 620 Page, 703 Jackson, 731 Key, 739 Sanders, 749 McReynolds, 802 Dyson, 817 Woods, 841 Brown, 918 Wallace, 919 Williams, 925 Trust, 1003 Spann, 1007 McKinnie, 1009 Huggans, 1111 Harris, 1141 Culpepper, 1226 Jackson 11837 Benham Road, St. Louis, MO 63138 B013 Cleveland, C029 James, C068 Thomas, C073 Harvey, C124 Evans, D042Cousett, E043 Mershon, F048 Culton, G010 Spears, G024 McCaw

3192 S Brentwood Blvd. St. Louis, MO, 63119 D005 Barton, D009 Barton, J006 Tharpe, J031 Colton 11580 Page Service Road, St. Louis, MO 63146 C001 Duncan, D023 James, D036 Carbon, D100 Bostic, D172 Stevenson 1550 N Lindbergh, St. Louis 63132 116 Schindler, 135 Walker, 292 Edwards, 412 Hearns, 423 Greene, 488 Bauer, 617 Yildrim, 684 Collins, 801 Feldman 2956 N Lindbergh, St. Ann, MO 63074 203 Rice, 221 Carr, 249 Hollis, 285 Marler, 286 Brown, 316 Mccray, 388 Williams 6030 N Lindbergh Hazelwood, MO, 63042 B009 LINDSAY, C023 Moore, C055 Lundy, D089 Holloway, D107 Townsend, E011 Lyles, E030 Nash, E056 Walters, F024 Burress, F042 Daniels, F117 Winters, F137 Moore, F158 Mertens, P012 Nunn 3760 Pennridge, Bridgeton, MO 63044 B006 Hamilton, E022 Miller, E062 Purnell, F006 Blassingame, F012 Higgs, F024 Wood, F046 Walton, G003 Walker, G064 Riley

14249 New Halls Ferry, St. Louis, MO 63033 1023 Jackson, 1079 Taylor, 1165 Love, 2084 Baskets for all / Nelson, 2194 Nelson

1539 Old Hwy 94 South, St. Charles, MO 63303 D008 Sykes, D069 Adams, D075 Latimer, D172 Bumbales, E044 Baalman, E051 Avitt, E057 Clair, E062 Martin, E092 Arellano, F007 Drysdale, G026 King, G039 Thaxton, H028 Griggs, H055 Capstick, H106 Sullivan, H108 Lane.

1795 N Hwy 67, Florissant, MO 63033 109 Jones, 138 Fingers, 143 Wood, 160 Brown, 181 McClain, 305 Boyd, 325 Muhaimin, 521 Lange, 601 Boone, 639 Warner, 741 Williams, 749 Van-Lare, 753 White, 811 Johnson, 919 Baker

3777 Veterans Memorial, St. Charles, MO 63303 10-243 Hutch, 9-193 Shelby, 9-201 Faughn, 9-209 Williams


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WEDNESDAY • 10.19.2016 • L

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

FEAST YOUR

EYES ON THESE TREATS

BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

L

et’s face it: Nobody really gets scared on Halloween. We all know that those ghosts and witches and vampires flying around aren’t there to haunt us or to drink our blood; they’re just children looking for a good time and a lot of candy. In a similar vein, so to speak, Halloween party food that claims to be frightening, isn’t. It is merely meant to be enjoyable, something to evoke the idea of horror. And yet, there is something … unnerving … about eating something that is looking back at you. Even when it’s all in fun. This Halloween, the eyes have it.

6 RECIPES • Jalapeño Popper Mummies (top) • Screaming Pretzels (far left) • Monster Doughnuts (above) • Black Cat Oreos (left) • Bloodshot Deviled Eyeballs • Cheese Monsters PAGE L4

See HALLOWEEN • Page L4

he corner grocery: A tough way to make a living DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

One story goes like this: A heavyset woman came to the butcher counter and ordered a ham. It was a busy day, probably close to the holidays, when they sold the

most hams. The butcher cut the ham to order and handed it to her. Later, as the woman started walking toward the front door, the butcher noticed she was walking funny. He asked her to jump up and down. When she did, the ham fell out from between her thighs. “And that’s what shrinkage is about,” said Stu Katz, whose father was the butcher and

co-owner of the Regal Market at the corner of Sarah Street and Maffitt Avenue in the Ville from the late 1940s through 1968. “We couldn’t sell that ham again.” My column from a couple of weeks ago about why corner grocery stores are more expensive than the big chains awakened some powerful memories in Katz, who worked at the store as a teenager and young man. He

wanted me to know just how difficult it is to run a corner grocery. “The thing that most people don’t understand is how brutal the hours were. We left the house at 6 o’clock (a.m.), picked up his partner and were at the store by 6:30 or 6:35. We opened at 6:45. … We closed the store at 6:30 (p.m.) and we’d get home at 7:15, 7:30, which made it tough on Saturday nights for dates. Can

you imagine 35 years of working 72 hours a week? Both my dad and his partner had heart attacks,” Katz said. Because there was a corner market on nearly every corner at the time, they had to do something to set themselves apart. So they took 40 orders a week on the phone, put together the requested See NEMAN • Page L4

LET’S EAT

1 M


LET’S EAT

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 10.19.2016

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat and features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

BEST BITES: CHEEZ-IT SNACK MIX SWEET & SALTY

Cabernet franc goes solo BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

The dark-skinned French wine grape cabernet franc is believed to be a parent of cabernet sauvignon, but it can produce very charming, fragrant wines that are gentler and less tannic than its offspring. Cabernet franc is best known for its important role in red blends from Bordeaux and as a key player in Loire Valley reds. Although it’s also grown in other regions throughout the world, finding single varietal bottlings of cabernet franc can be challenging. But they’re worth the search. The following two French reds are Vin de Pays or Indication Géographique Protégée (IGP) wines, meaning they are representative of their areas but were made outside the restrictions of traditional Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC) laws.

LAPORTE LE BOUQUET 2012 CABERNET FRANC

DOMAINE LAROQUE 2014 CITÉ DE CARCASSONNE IGP

Bought • Starrs, 1135 South Big Bend Boulevard, in October for $15.99 Description • This very aromatic wine comes from Laporte, a certified organic producer. Light- to mediumbodied, this intriguing wine has a distinctive smoky flavor along with a combination of red berry fruit and a touch of spice. Very easy to drink, this delicate red is well-balanced with lots of finesse. It would go well with white meats, cheese and grilled vegetables.

Bought • Starrs, 1135 South Big Bend Boulevard, in October for $11.99 Description • Made from 100 percent cabernet franc, this medium-bodied red from southern France is bigger and more complex than the Laporte. Fresh and fruity, it has concentrated flavors of raspberries and cranberries with spicy notes. This is a flavorful wine with soft tannins that needs food. It would go well with a range of dishes including pasta and burgers.

There is a ringer in this snack mix from Cheez-It, a surprise that brings an unexpected flavor to the mix. Along with the usual cheese crackers, pretzels, corn squares and M&M’s, this blend also includes caramel popcorn. The addition of the caramel flavor, which rubs of on everything, makes this snack mix one to go back to again and again. And again. Size • 8 ounces Price • $2.67 Available • Grocery stores everywhere — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Make your own knife holder On a budget? You can make your own knife-holder for practically no money at all. Daniel Neman shows you a cheap (and cool!) way to store your knives in a favorite Prep School video.

stltoday.com/food

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

What your chop or steak really needs is an easy, warm salad

WHAT’S FRESH

Turnips, winter squash and more This week at area farmers markets, look for pumpkins, turnips, radishes, sweet corn, winter squash, watermelon, okra, sweet peppers and hot peppers, cured garlic, cantaloupes, peaches, blackberries, raspberries, assorted salad greens, bok choy, romaine lettuce, head lettuce, onions, tomatoes, local honey, local free-range eggs, duck eggs, mushrooms, carrots, kale, Swiss chard, arugula, beets, kohlrabi, fennel, green beans, cabbage, potatoes, scallions and a variety of herbs. If you would like to find a good use for those turnips, here is a recipe from last year’s Let’s Eat for Roasted Garlic, Turnips and Sweet Potato Soup. Information provided by the Lake Saint Louis Farmers and Artists Market

• Find our guide to area farmers markets at stltoday.com/ farmersmarkets.

ROASTED GARLIC, TURNIPS AND SWEET POTATO SOUP Yield: 6 servings

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY SARA MOULTON Associated Press

This recipe is a template for topping sauteed steaks or chops of most any kind with a wilted salad, a splendid dish for an early fall dinner. Mostly, I’m taking my cues here from the Italians. In Florence, they like to pep up their grilled steaks with a drizzle of olive oil and a spritz of lemon, which cuts through the meat’s fattiness. Then there’s veal Milanese, a breaded chop with a salad on top. But the latter dish doesn’t marry the salad dressing to the chops, as I do here, and my chop isn’t breaded. Also, Caesar dressing is rooted in Mexico, not Italy. All of which is to say I guess my inspirations were pretty diverse. How to marry the meat to the salad? By taking advantage of the concentrated bits of reduced meat juices at the bottom of the pan, as well as the juices from the resting chops after they have been cooked. It’s then that the salad’s flavors — anchovies, garlic and shallots — are added to the skillet, followed by chicken broth, lemon juice and olive oil. As noted, these are basically the

ingredients for a Caesar dressing with a little chicken broth added. (The broth amps up the meat flavor while cutting down on the need for more olive oil.) If the very thought of anchovies sends you screaming for the exit, steel yourself and add them to the recipe as called for. Try it that way just once. You assume that the little devils are going to overwhelm the dish, adding nothing but fishiness. Not true. In this context, the anchovies are surprisingly modest; they provide salt and depth of flavor, but no obvious fishiness. As for the greens, feel free to experiment. If you prefer them to be more crispy and less wilted, don’t add them to the pan; just toss them with the warm dressing. Finally, I have called for lamb shoulder chops because they’re more affordable than rib or loin chops. They’re every bit as tasty as the pricier chops, even if they’re also marginally chewier. Of course, if you feel like splurging, reach for the more expensive cuts. And know that this recipe works just as well with steak, pork chops and chicken on the bone as it does with lamb chops.

LAMB CHOPS WITH WARM CAESAR SALAD Yield: 4 servings 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 4 (½-inch-thick) lamb shoulder or round bone chops Kosher salt and ground black pepper 4 anchovy fillets, chopped 2 tablespoons minced shallots 1 teaspoon minced garlic ¼ cup low-sodium chicken broth 2 tablespoons lemon juice 4 cups chopped escarole, dandelion greens (tough stems removed) or romaine 1 ounce shaved Parmesan cheese 1. In a large skillet over medium-high, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil. Reduce the heat to medium and add 2 of the lamb chops, sprinkled with salt and pepper. Cook until lightly browned on both sides, 5 to 6 minutes total for medium-rare. Transfer to a plate and cover loosely with foil. Repeat with the remaining 2 chops in the oil remaining in the pan. 2. Return the skillet to the heat and reduce to medium-low. Add 1 tablespoon of the remaining oil, the anchovies, shallots and garlic, then cook, stirring, for 1 ½ minutes. Add the broth and lemon juice and cook, scraping up the brown bits on the bottom, for 1 minute. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil, the greens, and a hefty pinch each of salt and pepper. Cook, stirring until the greens are slightly wilted, about 2 minutes. Add the juices from the resting lamb and remove from the heat. 3. To serve, transfer the chops to each of 4 plates and top each chop with a quarter of the dressed wilted greens and the cheese. Per serving: 500 calories; 43g fat; 90mg cholesterol; 620mg sodium; 5g carbohydrate; 2g fiber; 1g sugar; 26g protein.

FOOD FEEDBACK We love hearing from our readers. Here are a few of your latest helpful comments and questions. »» MIKE WEATHERBY: Al’s — One of my most favorite places to dine. »» CAREY DULLE: I also am unable to find anyone who has dined at Al’s. My husband and I have been going there since the early ’80s and have never been disappointed. For some reason, this wonderful place never is found on a list of great restaurants in St. Louis. I’m so very glad we discovered it years ago. »» PATRICIA MARINO: I was salivating by the end of your column this morning! Haven’t been to Al’s for many years. Glad you brought this up as I think I (and my friends) will be making a stop there soon.

1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced 1 large turnip, peeled and diced 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 8 cloves garlic, whole and peeled 2 shallots, sliced 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme 4 cups low-sodium chicken or vegetable stock ¼ cup white wine 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar Salt and ground black pepper ½ cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt Chopped chives or scallions, for garnish 1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil and mist with cooking spray. 2. In a large bowl, combine the sweet potato and turnip. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Spread the sweet potatoes and turnip in an even layer on the prepared baking sheet. Roast for 15 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, in the same bowl, toss the garlic, shallots and thyme with the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil. After the sweet potatoes and turnip have roasted for 15 minutes, use a spatula to turn the pieces. Add the garlic and shallot mixture to the pan, then roast for 20 more minutes. 4. In a large saucepan over medium heat, combine the stock and wine and bring to a gentle simmer. Add the roasted vegetable mixture and simmer until the sweet potatoes are very tender, about 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Working in batches if necessary, transfer the mixture to a blender. Using caution when blending hot liquids, blend until smooth. 5. Return the soup to the pan and reheat for several minutes, if needed, over medium. Stir in the vinegar, then season with salt and pepper. Add water if soup is too thick. Ladle the soup into serving bowls, top each serving with a bit of yogurt and chives or scallions. Per serving: 140 calories; 8g fat; 5mg cholesterol; 13g carbohydrate; 2g fiber; 5g sugar; 4g protein; 270mg sodium.


LET’S EAT

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L3

SPECIAL REQUESTS

Bacon is reason diners love Eclipse’s Mushroom Soup ECLIPSE RESTAURANT MUSHROOM SOUP Yield: 8 cups ½ pound fatty thick-cut bacon, diced 1 medium onion, diced in ¼-inch pieces 1 rib celery, diced in ¼-inch pieces 1 pound mixed mushrooms (cremini, shiitake, Portobello and oyster), sliced 5 to 6 tablespoons all-purpose lour 4 cups half-and-half 2 cups heavy cream 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1½ teaspoons ground coriander 1½ teaspoons ground thyme Salt and coarse pepper to taste 8 tablespoons grated smoked Gouda, for garnish 1. Preferably a day before serving, slowly cook bacon on medium heat in a large, heavy pot until fat renders and meat turns golden and crisps up; take your time, you want the fat to render before the bacon turns dark and overly crisp. Pour fat and cooked bacon through a ine-mesh strainer. Set aside bacon, leaving ½ cup fat. (Save any excess for another purpose.) 2. Return fat to pot and gently bring back to medium temperature. Stir in onion and celery and cook just until beginning to soften, stirring occasionally. 3. Stir in mushrooms and cook for several minutes; take your time, you want the mushroom liquid to be released and then reabsorbed. 4. Stir in lour a tablespoon at a time until a paste forms. Let cook for a couple of minutes to cook of loury taste. 5. Whisk in half-and-half a splash at a time at irst, fully incorporating each addition before adding more. Stir in cream. Bring soup to a simmer but do not allow to boil; take your time, stir often to avoid scorching, you should see subtle movement in the soup but no bubbles; don’t be surprised when the soup billows up. The soup should become thick enough to coat a spoon. (If soup isn’t thick enough, remove 2 cups soup and mix with 1 tablespoon lour, whisk back into pot. Repeat as necessary.) 6. Stir cooked bacon into soup and let simmer for a minute or two. 7. Stir in soy sauce. Bring almost to a boil but don’t allow to boil. 8. Stir in coriander, thyme, salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasoning. 9. Let cool, cover and refrigerate overnight. Gently reheat, without boiling, before serving. 10. To serve Eclipse-style, divide among 8 ovenproof bowls and top each with 1 tablespoon Gouda. Place bowls under broiler until Gouda begins to brown. Serve hot. Per serving: 521 calories; 42g fat; 25g saturated fat; 121mg cholesterol; 20g protein; 16g carbohydrate; 8g sugar; 2g iber; 718mg sodium; 182mg calcium. Recipe adapted for home kitchens by the Post-Dispatch.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com Mushroom soup is often ordered with the Eclipse Chicken Sandwich that is double breaded and served with Japanese mayo, bacon and brioche spread.

ECLIPSE RESTAURANT

BY ALANNA KELLOGG special to the Post-dispatch

6177 Delmar Boulevard 314-726-2222; eclipsestlouis.com

Q • The cream of mushroom soup at Eclipse is the best I’ve ever tasted. — Vikki Harris, St. Louis

A • It’s a vision, the streetscape emerging along the Delmar Loop, a mélange of old and new and brand-new old. Last month, the new music venue Delmar Hall opened its doors. Next spring, the Loop will get its loop back with the return of a trolley connecting the Loop and Forest Park. Overlooking the Loop universe is the boutique Moonrise Hotel and Eclipse, the hotel’s street-level restaurant and rooftop terrace. Eclipse just got a makeover, too. Downstairs, the look is chic and comfortable,

casual but classy, inviting for street traffic and hotel guests plus meetings and events. “It has more of a lounge feel now,” says Mark Peralta, Eclipse’s executive chef. “We’re really proud of it.” On the roof, the skyline views are among the best in the city. The two spaces have entirely different menus. Downstairs opens early for breakfast, fills up for lunch and dinner, then stays open late. Upstairs is geared for cocktails plus lighter fare. Peralta says that Eclipse’s new cold-weather menu is more of an “American” menu, a melting pot of everything from shrimp

and grits from Mississippi to “super personal” family dishes representing his own Filipino heritage. Eclipse’s Mushroom Soup is creamy and substantial with bites of bacon and mushroom in every spoonful. The ingredients are simple, so each one matters. Thyme unleashes mushroom earthiness. Soy sauce adds color, salt and umami. Still, Peralta says, there’s no surprise that it’s bacon that makes Eclipse’s soup a year-round staple and a particular favorite for hotel guests dining in-room. Plus, he says, Eclipse gets “awesome mushrooms” from local supplier Ozark Forest Mushrooms. Special Request is written by Town & Country resident Alanna Kellogg, author of the online recipe column KitchenParade.com and “veggie evangelist” at the food blog about vegetables, A Veggie Venture.

TO REQUEST A RECIPE Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name and the city you live in to reciperequest@ post-dispatch.com.

PICK UP the newissue of

Spiced walnuts replace beef in vegetarian tacos

DEB LINDSEY • For The Washington Post BY JOE YONAN The Washington Post

When I was a kid, ground-beef tacos were on my mother’s regular dinner rotation. Any time-stressed cook knows why: All she had to do was quickly fry up some ground beef, grate some cheese, chop an onion and set out bowls of all those plus some salsa, sour cream and taco shells, and let her kids make their own. Is there an equivalent vegetarian taco filling, something just as easy and satisfying? I think I’ve found it: coarsely ground and heavily spiced walnuts, whose crumbly texture resembles that of ground beef. I swear I put this together as quickly as Mom used to in West Texas and without even applying heat. The filling is raw — in fact, it’s a thing in vegan cooking circles — and requires nothing more than to be quickly blitzed together in a food processor. You could sprinkle it on a salad, fold it into an omelet, use it as a soup garnish or scoop it up with any vessel besides a tortilla, if you want.

Visit feastmagazine.com to see when Feast TV airs on your local PBS station and to watch past episodes.

Where can you ind FEAST? Use the issue locator on our website.

feastmagazine.com

WALNUT TACOS Yield: 6 servings For the illing 2 cups coarsely chopped raw walnuts 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon inely chopped fresh cilantro 1 tablespoon water 1 ½ teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon chili powder ¼ teaspoon chipotle chili powder (may substitute ground cayenne pepper) ½ teaspoon ine sea salt, or more as needed ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper For assembly 12 (6-inch) corn tortillas, warmed 1 cup chopped fresh tomato 1 cup thinly sliced red cabbage Flesh of 2 medium avocados, sliced ½ cup store-bought or homemade salsa verde ½ cup Greek-style yogurt (may substitute nondairy yogurt or nondairy sour cream) 12 cilantro sprigs 2 limes, cut into wedges 1. For the illing: Combine the walnuts, lime juice, cilantro, water, ground cumin, chili powders, salt and black pepper in a food processor; pulse frequently for a minute or so, until the nuts are reduced to pebble size. Do not overprocess. Taste, and add more salt as needed. 2. To assemble the tacos, divide the corn tortillas among serving plates. Spoon about 2 tablespoons of the illing on each tortilla, then add some tomato, a few slivers of cabbage, a couple slices of avocado, a spoonful of salsa verde, a dollop of yogurt and some cilantro. 3. Serve with lime wedges for last-minute squeezing. Per serving (using nonfat yogurt): 410 calories; 11g protein; 29g carbohydrates; 31g fat; 3g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 260mg sodium; 8g iber; 4g sugar Adapted from “Healing the Vegan Way,” by Mark Reinfeld


L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LET’S EAT

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

Eat something that’s looking back at you HALLOWEEN • FROM L1

For a lighthearted Halloween party this year, we made food that really has its eyes open. Candy eyeballs, painted eyeballs, googly eyeballs — they are all essential parts of a happy Halloween feast. And they’re all so deliciously easy to make. Chocolate-covered pretzels have been popular for years. The crisp pretzel base and sprinkling of salt bring out the very best in chocolate. Nothing can beat it, unless you put candy eyeballs on them and call them Screaming Pretzels. It’s all in the marketing. Who could resist something called Screaming Pretzels? They’re a snap to make, and they are so much more giddy fun to eat than regular chocolatecovered pretzels. Monster doughnuts are, if possible, even easier to make. Simply take a glazed doughnut and put vampire teeth in the hole and candy eyeballs above them. Like magic, you have turned a regular doughnut into a monster doughnut. You have made a doughnut even better. It is as if you have improved on perfection. Continuing the monster theme, Cheese Monsters are actually kind of healthy, or at least they are not unhealthy. You take those miniature rounds of cheese wrapped in red wax — they are made by Babybel — and cut scary or funny teeth in the middle of the wax, where the pull-apart strip is found. A couple of googly eyes on top completes the treat, but if you really want to have fun, use just one eye. Or three. Or maybe 15. These are monsters, after all.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

If you enjoy playing with your food, and you don’t mind things a bit spicy, you will love Jalapeño Popper Mummies. These begin with the familiar jalapeño popper beloved by patrons of every sports bar in America. But instead of frying them, you wrap them in mummy-like strips of refrigerated crescent dough and bake them. Add a couple of candy eyeballs

just for spooky fun, and you have a spicy treat that will make you run screaming for your mummy. By this time, you may be tired of candy eyeballs. So why not make a party treat that actually resembles an eye? Better still, a bloodshot eye. All you need are deviled eggs, slices of black olives for the pupils, and thin strips of pimento radiating from them across the

yolk. What could be tastier? — in a slightly gross way, of course. Finally, you’re sure to delight when you combine eyes with America’s favorite cookie — and then make it even cuter by turning it into a cat. Black Cat Oreos begin with an Oreo. A couple of green M&M’s with black pupils painted with edible marker become the eyes. An orange sprinkle serves as the

cat’s little orange nose, and its cat ears are created by a couple of chocolate chips on top. It looks too good to eat, but I don’t think your guests will have a problem with it. If only those unsettling green eyes weren’t looking at you. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

SCREAMING PRETZELS Yield: 7 servings ½ bag dark cocoa candy melts 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 35 mini twist pretzels 70 small candy eyeballs

CHEESE MONSTERS Yield: 10 servings 1 package Mini Babybel Cheese Googly eyeballs Remove wax strip from the middle of each cheese. Use a knife or scissors to cut scary or funny teeth in the wax. Using nontoxic PVA glue such as Elmer’s, aix 2 googly eyes (or 1 or 3 or more) above the mouth to make a scary cheese monster. Per serving: 74 calories; 6g fat; 4g saturated fat; 20mg cholesterol; 5g protein; 1g carbohydrate; 1g sugar; no iber; 172mg sodium; 152mg calcium. Recipe from danyabanya.com

JALAPEÑO POPPER MUMMIES Yield: 8 servings 8 jalapeño peppers 4 ounces softened cream cheese 4 ounces pepper jack cheese, shredded 1 scallion, minced

1. Melt the chocolate candy melts according to the directions on the package, adding vegetable oil to the mixture for easy dipping. 2. Dip the pretzels into the candy melts, coating both sides. Place pretzels on waxed paper, making sure the bottom section of the pretzel is not illed with chocolate. Insert melted chocolate into the top two sections of the pretzel. When the chocolate has almost set, place a candy eyeball into the top two sections. Allow to set until irm. Per serving: 194 calories; 10g fat; 7g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 1g protein; 26g carbohydrate; 19g sugar; 1g iber; 175mg sodium; no calcium. Recipe adapted from orientaltrading. com

¼ teaspoon minced garlic Pinch salt Pinch ground black pepper 16 candy eyeballs 1 tube crescent rolls

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Slice jalapeños in half lengthwise and scoop out the interiors. 2. Place cream cheese, pepper jack cheese, scallions, garlic, salt and pepper in a large bowl and mix thoroughly. Fill the jalapeño halves with this mixture. 3. Unroll crescent rolls into rectangles consisting of 2 triangles each, pinching together the seams. With a pizza cutter, slice each rectangle lengthwise into 4 even strips. 4. Wrap 1 or 2 pieces around each pepper, leaving a small opening for the eyes. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes until golden brown. Immediately place 2 candy eyes in each opening. Per serving: 167 calories; 11g fat; 5g saturated fat; 14mg cholesterol; 3g protein; 13g carbohydrate; 4g sugar; no iber; 265mg sodium; 17mg calcium. Adapted from frugalcouponliving.com

MONSTER DOUGHNUTS

BLOODSHOT DEVILED EYEBALLS Yield: 6 servings 6 eggs Pinch table salt ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon goodquality mayonnaise

1 teaspoon lemon juice 12 black olive slices 1 pimento or jarred roasted red pepper

1. To hard-cook eggs: Bring a pot of water to a full boil. Gently lower the eggs into the water and immediately drop the temperature down to a low simmer. Cook for 11 to 14 minutes. Immediately place the eggs in ice water and allow to cool at least 15 minutes. Peel eggs. 2. Cut eggs in half crosswise; carefully remove the yolks, leaving the whites intact. 3. Place yolks in a bowl; mash with the salt, mayonnaise and lemon juice until blended and fairly smooth. Using 2 spoons or a small ice cream scoop, scoop yolk mixture into small balls and position in hollows of whites to resemble eyeballs. 4. Press an olive slice into center of each yolk eyeball. Cut pimento into very thin 2-inch long strips for veins. Decorate eyeballs with bloodshot veins. 5. Cover and refrigerate up to 6 hours before serving. Egg yolk mixture can be prepared 1 day ahead and refrigerated. Fill egg whites, decorate and refrigerate up to 6 hours before serving. Per serving: 161 calories; 14g fat; 3g saturated fat; 191mg cholesterol; 6g protein; 1g carbohydrate; 1g sugar; no iber; 201mg sodium; 33mg calcium. Recipe adapted from Women’s Day

Yield: 4 servings 4 glazed doughnuts 4 sets monster teeth 8 candy eyeballs Place monster teeth (or vampire teeth) in the hole of each doughnut. Press 2 candy eyeballs above them. Per serving: 272 calories; 15g fat; 6g saturated fat; 19mg cholesterol; 4g protein; 31g carbohydrate; 15g sugar; 1g iber; 202mg sodium; 65mg calcium. Recipe from atimeforallseasons.net

BLACK CAT OREOS Yield: 5 servings 15 Oreos ½ tablespoon chocolate frosting 30 green M&M’s, see note 15 pumpkin or orange sprinkles or

edible pearls 1 tablespoon chocolate chips Black edible marker or decorating gel

Note: Single-color M&M’s can be found at some party supply stores. Frost the back of the M&M’s and attach 2 to each cookie for the eyes. Dip a toothpick in the frosting and smear on half of a sprinkle or pearl. Attach to the cookie underneath the eyes for a nose. Dip the lat part of the chocolate chips in the frosting and attach to the top of the cookie for the ears. With the black edible marker, draw the center of the eyes on the M&M’s. Per serving: 189 calories; 8g fat; 3g saturated fat; 1mg cholesterol; 1g protein; 29g carbohydrate; 18g sugar; 1g iber; 146mg sodium; 5mg calcium. Recipe from partypinching.com

Corner store was tough work NEMAN • FROM L1

items and delivered them — for free — as far as 10 miles away. This service created customer loyalty, but ate into profits. “There were some years my dad didn’t make minimum wage,” Katz said. Although the neighborhood was “very stable,” he said, some elements in it were less so. The store was repeatedly robbed at gunpoint. His father was once badly beaten while making a night deposit at the bank. And they were broken into at least six times that Katz can recall. Burglars broke in through the windows, doors and walls, because the walls did not have a burglar alarm.

One thief drove a car — a stolen car — through the doors. The burglars invariably headed straight for the liquor and cigarettes, which were easily portable and could be taken before the arrival of the police. “The Deer Street District. That was the most wonderful group of cops you’d ever want to meet,” Katz said. “Even with all the break-ins and the hold-ups, we had great police protection. In gratitude, my dad and his partner made sure every year the police Christmas party was well-stocked. You will never find anyone more grateful to the police than a grocer.” Other losses also added up. In the days before credit cards, credit

was extended — at no extra charge — to people whose names and amounts owed were entered in two large ledgers. Katz When they paid some or all of their debt, someone at the store would have to take the time and effort to keep the books straight. And the debts were not always paid. “On grocery items, the markup was less than 5 percent. If you lost $10, you lost a lot,” Katz said. When his father sold the store in 1968, they took a $40,000 hit on credit that could not be collected. As a service to customers, the store also wrote money orders for a minimal fee and cashed personal and payroll checks for free.

Once again, the loyalty these services generated came with a cost. “If a person’s checking account or payroll check bounced, we had to go out and try to collect it. And the bank charged us enormous fees every time a check bounced. So Lindell Trust (now Lindell Bank and Trust) loved us,” Katz said. In a different case of building customer loyalty, the store used Lindell Trust because it was open on Saturdays and was open late on Fridays. Working at the store was hard, physical labor, Katz said. Heavy cases had to be brought up from storage in the basement, and he almost lost part of a finger while working as a butcher. But it had its advantages, too. Katz said he learned more about marketing at the store than he

did when he was studying it at school. And because of the relationship his father had with liquor distributors in town, Katz had an impressive assortment of clocks and other paraphernalia (a lighted, 6-foot Beefeater Gin figure, a reproduction of the Budweiser Clydesdales) to decorate his apartment at Mizzou. And what of the Regal Market itself? It’s still in business on the corner of Sarah Street and Maffitt Avenue. It boasts a full line of groceries and meats, plus liquor, beer, cigarettes and lottery tickets. It still sells money orders and cashes checks. It’s open daily, including all holidays. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com


LET’S EAT

10.19.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L5

Build a better burger with our mix-and-match guide BY JOSEPH HERNANDEZ Chicago Tribune

A good burger is a glorious thing. The confluence of savory meat, fresh toppings, soft bread and flavorful condiments creates a nearly perfect bite. I say “nearly” because the burger-eating experience can’t go on forever. Eventually, you’ve eaten the thing, and that’s when the sadness sets in (that is, until you fix yourself another). The thing about burgers is that burger nirvana teeters on the knife’s edge of mediocrity and greatness. Of course it’s easy to make an OK burger, but making a great one is — surprisingly — just as simple. The blueprint for a great burger starts with — what else? — the meat. We won’t condescend to you: You probably know better than cooking from frozen: those dry, relatively tasteless pucks. The heart and soul of a burger, after all, is its juiciness. And while prepacked ground beef will do in a pinch, it’s not always clear when it was ground. Your best bet? Ask your butcher or someone at the meat counter to grind your preferred meat blend. Whether you opt for chuck, brisket or a combination of meats, keep in mind fat content: You want at least 15 percent fat. But why stop there? Go for the gold with an 80-20 ratio for maximum juiciness. When it comes to seasoning, salt and pepper are all you’ll need. You’re not mixing meatloaf, so don’t bother gilding the lily. Tenderly, gingerly flatten your patty to be just larger than your bun (burgers contract!), about 4 inches in diameter. Or smash it. At this point, you’re either going to grill or griddle the burger. Sure, a searing hot grill imparts smoky flavors, but the loss of liquid seems a terrible waste; a flat surface cooks the burger in its own juices. Whatever method you decide, season the meat generously on both sides and throw it on the hot surface. Sear each side to desired doneness. Personally, rare to medium rare are ideal, but I don’t know your life … you may like it well-done. (The quote “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it,” comes to mind.) For a bun, you can go standard. Or pick a potato roll, brioche, rye or pretzel bun: No matter how you roll, butter the insides and throw it on the grill or grill pan. Don’t argue. And you’re done! Or are you? If the patty is the canvas, the condiments are your colors. Of course you can go classic: Cheese (American or cheddar), crisp iceberg lettuce and a just ripe summer tomato, plus ketchup, mustard and mayo — like the Three Musketeers of Flavortown, they’ll never betray you. But we’re here to up your burger game. Get artistic with our mix-and-match categories here. Pick a cheese, a topping, a sauce. Layer as you like.

CHEESE Put down the basic American cheese. You’ve had enough burgers with the stuf, and it’s deinitely not going anywhere. It’s time to branch out. 1. Go for the gold with oozy, gooey raclette, the Swiss cow’s-milk cheese that is, in a word, molten. It’s basically like pouring a cauldron of fondue on your burger, and what’s wrong with that? 2. If you’re looking for something less messy (napkins were invented for burgers, according to history, probably), opt for another Swiss cheese, Gruyere. Sweet and nutty when young, aged Gruyere would contribute rich, earthy lavors to your burger. 3. While raclette and Gruyere complement the meat, Stilton is an assertive choice that will reward you with creaminess, funky aromatics and an injection of salty goodness (and it goes great with sweeter toppings).

TOPPINGS If you’re grilling, take advantage of the already-hot

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL TERCHA • Chicago Tribune (Tns)

Beefy burgers can beneit from chimichurri, a green herb sauce, or top it with bacon jam.

Take the marrow from roasted bones and stir it into your favorite mayo for marrownaise. You’ll love the beef-on-beef lavor. Or top your burger with a grilled pineapple and jalapeno salsa.

pickle allows you to play with diferent veggies, slices and lavors. Think of it this way: A quick pickle is basically a marinade for vegetables. Sliced red onion on a burger can be too acidic and astringent, an aggressive component that can throw a burger’s lavors out of whack. Some time in a brine, though, softens its lavors while still keeping its crunch. In a clean jar, add 1 cup apple cider vinegar and dissolve 1 teaspoon each salt and brown sugar. Add 6 white or black peppercorns, 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper and 1

a caramelly sauce — are perfect on a burger. Rather than prepare the dish just for the sauce, it’s easier to saute earthy mushrooms in butter with a sliced shallot, inished of with a glug of brandy (or even a nutty, semidry sherry). The alcohol contributes a little more richness to the topping, marrying its lavors with the mushrooms and helping deepen the caramelization in the pan. 3. Pickling can be quite a chore, but “quick pickling” is a handy skill for any home cook. While store-bought pickles are great, the quick

surface to char some toppings and thereby add deeper smoky lavors with each bite. 1. First, seed and core a jalapeño (or any pepper) before blistering it over the lame (a vegetable grate will come in handy here), which will tame the pepper’s heat while coaxing out sweet, smoky lavors. Grill a slice or more of fresh pineapple. Then chop and mix with the pepper for an easy salsa upgrade. 2. Steak Diane is one of those ’70s-era dishes that have gone out of fashion, but its lavors — thanks to

sliced red onion. Set aside for a minimum of 30 minutes to allow lavors to marry. Pickled onions can be prepared days in advance; they will keep for 3 weeks refrigerated.

SAUCE Burgers should be juicy enough to stand on their own, but if you’re looking to amp up the lavor quotient, a sauce is your best bet. They can be mayo, mustard or ketchup, of course, or go more exotic and chefy. 1. Argentinians swear by chimichurri, the piquant, green herb sauce found on

100 YEARS IN BUSINESS

many a steak throughout the country. Beefy burgers beneit from the bright addition of chimichurri, and with market season in full swing, it’s easy to adapt your inds into the sauce. A favorite is blending a bunch of garlic scapes — milder than their mature counterparts — with a handful each of parsley and cilantro, juice from half a lemon, a glug of red wine vinegar and enough olive oil to yield a chunky, aromatic puree. 2. Double down on the beef lavor with a little something my partner’s family likes to call “marrownaise,” essentially an aioli boosted by extra-savory roasted marrow. After sourcing two or three (go crazy!) 4-inch pieces of marrow from your butcher, roast in a 425-degree oven for 30 minutes. Allow to cool, then scoop out the marrow into 2 cups of your favorite mayo, along with one clove inely minced garlic and 1 tablespoon minced parsley. Apply liberally to your burger. 3. Bacon on a burger is done, it’s old, stop it now. I don’t mean it, of course, because bacon on a burger is just one of those things that never go out of fashion. That said, it’s always OK to mix things up. One way is with bacon jam, a saltysweet hit of meaty bacon and caramelized alliums (the family of vegetables made up of onions, shallots and garlic). And while it takes a little bit of time to make some at home, you can easily ind jars of the stuf in grocery stores and specialty markets.

Store Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9am-8pm Sun. 9am-5:30pm

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October 1st - October 31st


NEWS

L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

CLOUD BREAK RED BLEND BLACK CLOUD Cloud Break, based out of Parlier, California, makes this full-bodied blend reminiscent of, yes, a black cloud. Its dark, inky complexion combined with a satiny texture on the palate brings thoughts of the darkest clouds just before a strong rain. Dark fruits with hints of oak shine through, making it an ideal pairing with barbecue and grilled meats.

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750mL, $8.99

es

r b and

WRITTEN BY Daniel Puma

7 DEADLY ZINS Dante’s travels through purgatory would have been eased a little had he brought a bottle of this with him. An amalgam of Zinfandel grapes from seven vineyards on the Lodi Appellation in California, 7 Deadly Zins is filled with flavors of pepper, licorice, clove, dried cranberry and date. Devilish in taste, the 7 Deadly Zins will make you greedy for more.

750mL, $10.57

RADIUS RED ECLIPSE

October 31st is coming up quickly: If you’re hosting or attending a Halloween party, make sure a stop into Total Wine & More is on your agenda. The aisles are full of a slew of wines and beer with delightfully spooky names. The devilish wines can be enjoyed by themselves or in a delicious sangria; take advantage of the last week of October with local pumpkin ales.

Radius Red Eclipse hails from California and is a darker version of the winery’s Red Blend out of Washington state. Rich in dark fruits, berries, maple and vanilla, the wine is rounded out with a touch of baking spices, making it a great wine for the fall months or on a Halloween night with a little chill in the air. Velvety smooth, Red Eclipse will please the palate of anyone looking for an easy drinking, full-flavored wine.

750mL, $11.99

APOTHIC DARK RED

HOB NOB WICKED RED LIMITED EDITION

Release your inner dark side with this medium-bodied blend out of California. The combination of Petite Sirah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Petit Verdot and Teroldego melds together into a flavor blend of chocolate-covered berries, cofee, oak and vanilla. The wine pours a deep, opaque reddish-purple, living up to its name.

Kick of a Dia De Los Muertos-themed party with this French wine. It’s not just about the label art, though: Hob Nob Wicked Red is a blend of Grenache, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Pinot Noir. The limited-edition wine is fruit forward with blackberries mixed with hints of chocolate, espresso and oak resulting a bold wine with a smooth finish.

750mL, $7.07

750mL, $12.49

WITCHING HOUR RED BLEND

SCHLAFLY BEER PUMPKIN ALE

Another California red, Witching Hour produces this medium-bodied blend filled with notes of dark cherry and vanilla. Its versatility makes it ideal to serve with a variety of Halloween treats – with this filling everyone’s cups, your party will last through the witching hour on Halloween night.

Schlafly Beer Pumpkin Ale has become one of the St. Louis brewery’s most popular seasonal releases. It's brewed with a malty foundation of pumpkin accented by cinnamon, clove, nutmeg and ginger. An audacious pumpkin taste sets up this slightly bittered beer with a big backbone.

750mL, $7.99

6 12-oz bottles, $8.99

O'FALLON PUMPKIN BEER

check feastmagazine.com & stltoday.com

for great new recipes every week

A local favorite, O’Fallon brewery uses 120 pounds of real pumpkin in its three-barley mash to produce this unapologetically pumpkin-spiked beer. While the flavor is pumpkin through and through, nothing about the beer comes across as gimmicky; instead, it smells, tastes and drinks of an artisanal-made flavored ale.

6 12-oz bottles, $7.99

SPOOKY SANGRIA Serves | 8 | 2 bottles Witching Hour Red Blend 1 cup brandy 1 cup club soda ¾ cup freshly squeezed orange juice ½ apple,diced ½ pear,diced 1 orange, sliced 1 lemon, sliced 1 lime, sliced

BUD LIGHT, BUDWEISER ½ keg, $109.00

COORS LIGHT, MILLER LIGHT

| Preparation | In a large pitcher or punch bowl, combine all ingredients, and let sit for at least 30 minutes before serving. Serve over ice, and garnish with citrus wheels or diced fruit.

½ keg, $99.99

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Wednesday • 10.19.2016 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, North deals. NORTH ♠K Q ♥Q J 8 ♦A 7 6 5 4 2 ♣9 6 WEST EAST ♠10 8 3 2 ♠9 7 5 ♥3 ♥9 6 4 2 ♦K J 10 8 3 ♦Q 9 ♣10 5 2 ♣K J 4 3 SOUTH ♠A J 6 4 ♥A K 10 7 5 ♦Void ♣A Q 8 7 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♦ Pass 1♥ Pass 2♦ Pass 2♠ Pass 3♥ Pass 4♣ Pass 4♦ Pass 4♠ Pass 6♥ Pass 7♥ All pass Opening lead: Jack of ♦ An expert looks at bridge in the “long run,” the long run, of course, being the rest of his life. As long as he is sure that he made the correct percentage play on a hand, he is satisfied with his efort even if a diferent, inferior play, would have succeeded when his play failed. He knows that he will come out ahead in the long run. South won the opening lead with dummy’s ace of diamonds, shedding a club from

his hand, and stopped to plan his play. He could have simply taken the club finesse, but no expert wants to risk a grand slam on a finesse when a better chance is available elsewhere. Declarer cashed dummy’s king and queen of spades, crossed to his hand with the ace of clubs, and discarded dummy’s remaining club on the ace of spades. He rufed a club in dummy, rufed a diamond in his hand, and rufed his last club with dummy’s jack of hearts. Needing only to draw the trumps at this point, South overtook the queen of hearts with his ace and cashed the king. The unlucky 4-1 trump split ended his chances and he finished down one. Our good friend Abner, the great mathematician, tells us that a 3-2 trump split is a 68 percent chance — much better than the 50 percent club finesse, but South also needed a 4-3 spade split, reducing his chance to about 41 percent. South slept poorly that night, worrying about the long run. (10/19/16)

Across 1 Gamer’s representation 7 “We choose to go to the moon” speech giver, informally 10 Wines said to go well with steak 14 Make do 15 Granola morsel 16 Emollient source 17 Wrangled 18 Words on a pink cigar band 20 Losing effort? 21 Cacophony 23 “Money talks,” e.g. 24 Fish that may be jellied or smoked 25 With 36-Across, what this puzzle features, literally 28 Give ___ go 29 Gas or water 31 College player, e.g. 33 Yemeni capital

34 35 36 38 41 43 45 47 49 50

52 53 55 56 57 60

A vital sign “Wee” fellow See 25-Across Japanese masked drama Respected tribesman Faux money Appear gradually, on film It occurs twice in “chalk talk” Miracle-___ (garden care brand) Organization that honored those referenced in the 25-/36-Across, with “the” “Bingo!” Angels’ instruments Camcorder brand “How ___ Your Mother” En route “O tempora! O mores!” orator

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME October 19 WORD — PEASANT (PEASANT: PEZ-ent: An agricultural laborer of low social status.) Average mark 26 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 38 or more words in PEASANT? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — GNOSTIC tocsin gist tongs otic tonic scion icon sign ingot sing into snit cist song coin sonic cosign sting cost stoic costing tigon ting RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

62 Whole bunch 63 The whole shebang 64 Willing to try 65 ___ Trueheart, Dick Tracy’s sweetheart 66 Bit of hope, in an expression 67 U.S. general who was a pentathlete in the 1912 Olympics

Down 1 Mozart’s middle name 2 Wine from a single type of grape 3 Jolie of “Maleficent” 4 Ready to snap, maybe 5 Match.com datum 6 Website with “Ask Me Anything” interviews 7 Like some custody or tax returns 8 Budgetary excess 9 Jewelers’ purity measures: abbr. 10 Ravi Shankar’s music 11 Magic potion 12 Triangular chip 13 March locale of note 19 Cries from a flock 22 Very standoffish 25 Actress Zadora 26 “One,” in a coin motto

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ You can be quite intellectual and witty. You’ll see a diicult situation through new eyes after a conversation with a close friend. You understand exactly what to do; however, staying still and remaining quiet might be more efective. Tonight: Decide on a trip in the near future.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ You have a lot to share, but so does a key individual in your life. Schedule enough time to catch up on this person’s news. You’ll see how a changeable situation in your community might afect you. Tonight: Spontaneity works.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★★ You could be too tired to deal with a talkative associate. You will listen anyway, just to see if there is anything you need to know. Follow your instincts, especially with someone you meet in the near future. Tonight: Out late.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ Be aware of your spending. You could go overboard when out buying your usual weekly goods. You can open up your thinking more easily than you realize. As a result, you will start seeing new paths. Tonight: Pay bills irst.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You could be confused by everything that is happening around you. You might hear some information about a family member that you know is wrong. Be more open to others’ input. Tonight: Listen to what a friend suggests.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ Some people think you are just lucky, but the truth is that you simply have an excellent sense of timing. You also read people well. Confusion could surround a professional. Do your best to sort it out. Tonight: Happy at home.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★ You have a lot of ground to cover. You might opt to change direction, especially if it points to more success. You express more and more lexibility. Tonight: Know when to call it a night.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Be willing to go out of your way to reach out to a friend. This person has a way of reinvigorating you mentally and emotionally with his or her enthusiasm. A haze might surround a joint inancial matter. Tonight: Be more upbeat.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

27 Auditioner’s hope 30 Put on, as cargo 32 2016 running mate 34 72, on many courses 36 Savings acct. protector 37 Sofer of “General Hospital” 39 The jaguar on a Jaguar’s hood, e.g.

40 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49

Thus far Paper for a pad Like a fox It’s smaller than a company New Caledonia is a territory of it Major vessels Brief time, in brief Sgt. Friday’s introduction Quickie Halloween costume

51 In a deadpan manner 54 Degs. for many professors 56 “Law & Order: SVU” co-star 58 Subject of 12/8/1941 headlines 59 Reminiscent of 61 Bitter brew, briefly

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0914

WORD SCRIMMAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ You can adjust to change. Your inances will become even stronger than in the recent past. Try not to let go of your budget. Don’t spend any money before the check has cleared at the bank. Tonight: Dinner for two.

If Oct. 19 is your birthday • This year you push hard to clear up misunderstandings. Others simply have a very diferent perspective from yours. If you are single, you could become involved with someone who is very exotic. If you are attached, the two of you spend more time together dreaming up fantasy scenarios. Gemini often taunts you.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★ Take some long-overdue personal time. Fatigue or boredom could interfere with your routine. You understand the need for a change of pace. Tonight: A loved one does the unexpected. Be surprised yet delighted.

Puzzle by Dan Schoenholz

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★★ You have a childlike side that is impossible to ignore. You might become somber in a very serious situation, but not today. Tonight: Embrace impulsiveness.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★ Tension seems to surround a personal matter. It appears that what you need and what someone else needs could be on opposite ends of the spectrum. Tonight: Cocoon at home. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

10.19.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Woman wants boyfriend to focus on her Dear Out • You are entitled to your feelings, and they may be justified. Because you identify this man as your boyfriend, I assume you have an exclusive relationship. There will always be women around who are younger and prettier. That’s life. Because you can’t control his taste in subjects, my advice is to quit downloading his pictures for him if they make you uncomfortable. Dear Abby • My fiance and I have a loving relationship. He is afectionate — hugging, kissing, etc. But he doesn’t have a high libido, which I am concerned about because he’s only 26. He has confessed to me he’s had relations with men in the past, and I’m thinking he may be bisexual. While that does not concern me whatsoever (after all, it’s one thing to be attracted to someone and another thing entirely to cheat), I worry that he thinks he couldn’t share this with me, and that it may lead to lies. I am also worried that if I confront him with this, he may be

ofended or think I think less of him. What should I do? — LOVING RELATIONSHIP IN MICHIGAN Dear Loving • You and your fiance are overdue for a frank talk. He has told you that he has had more than one same-sex relationship, so it’s fair to consider him to be bisexual. That he didn’t use that word doesn’t mean he was dishonest. We communicate with our actions as well as verbally. That you have continued your relationship after learning about his sexual history should indicate to him that you don’t think less of him. As to the strength of his libido, no two individuals are alike. If he is able to provide you with what you need, I don’t think you need to be concerned. If not — as I said before, you have to talk with him about it. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Hand is moved. 2. Man is taller. 3. Arrow is moved. 4. Hair is diferent. 5. Sleeve is longer. 6. Mouth is diferent.

Dear Abby • My boyfriend and I are mature adults who enjoy photography. He brings his camera when we go to the beach or sporting events — even to the store. He’s learning all the time about how to use light correctly and his zoom lens. When we get back and I download the pics from his camera, the majority of shots are of women’s chests, behinds and pretty faces. He has snapped many of them while they were standing right next to me. (There are very few shots of me — ever.) When I ask if he wants me to delete the photos, he says no. I don’t understand why he would keep pictures of strangers. He says he’s like any photographer — he likes to review his photos. I tell him it hurts my feelings to think he enjoys looking at other women more than at me. It would be different if they were beautiful portraits, but they’re not. It is painful that I’m not included. Am I wrong to feel unimportant and ignored? — OUT OF THE PICTURE

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

He wishes wife would get career started

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Carolyn Hax is on leave. This column originally ran on Jan. 7, 2013. Dear, Carolyn • My wife and I have been married nine years, and it’s starting to bother me that she has not begun her career yet. Following college, she got a master’s degree and then started her Ph.D. She’s now six years into her four-year program and has hinted that she may not want to work after she graduates. As far as duties around the house, we split them; she cooks because I’m horrible at it, while I take care of laundry. We’ve got no kids and a cleaning service that comes twice a week. This is such a big deal for me because I saw what my mother went through with my father. He was lazy and had zero ambition, making my mother work atrocious hours for us to get by before she’d had enough and they divorced. I told myself I would never

marry a housewife. We discussed all of this prior to getting married, and I wouldn’t have asked her to marry me had we not agreed that both of us would have our own careers. I’m growing resentful as I feel like I’m the only one putting in efort. — J. Answer • First, please sort your concerns about your marriage from your old childhood wounds. One thing to consider is that “hinting” at a preference for the future is not the same thing as “making my mother work atrocious hours for us to get by.” Your emotions might not be able to tell the diference, but don’t let your mind conflate the two. Maybe you saw signs that her degree-chasing was about avoiding entry into the workforce, but that’s still about her, not your dad. Meanwhile, people do change. Could that just be her excuse for dodging accountability? Abso-

lutely — but it could also reflect a true change of heart that you ignore at the expense of your marriage; “housewife” — or -husband — has no inherent connection to “lazy.” She could also be working mentally through doubts about her career. Figure out where these nine years have taken both of you before you make any momentous decisions. Then, you talk. I do get that it can be daunting to break a habit of not communicating, especially on your hot topic. There are moments, however, when the barriers to entry are lower. Please know, too, that it’s not a conversation you can postpone much longer. Even if you swapped roles tomorrow, a mutual failure to keep the other involved in these important and intimate aspects of your lives together would be your undoing all the same. tellme@washpost.com

10/19/16

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

FOX Lethal Weapon The duo Presidential Debate University of 2 pursues a former Navy Nevada, Las Vegas. (N) (cc) SEAL. (N) CBS 4

Survivor (N) (cc)

9:30 ÍFox 2

News at 9:00pm

Presidential Debate University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (N) (cc)

NBC Blindspot Weller and Presidential Debate University of Nevada, Las 5 Nas hunt for a fugitive. Vegas. (N) (cc) (N) (cc) PBS Feast TV: 9 Pizza! CW 11

SciTech Now

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

Presidential Debate University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (N) (cc) Arrow Wild Dog goes after Garret Runnels. (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

ABC It’s the 30 Great Pumpkin

Toy Story OF TERROR!

MYTV Law & Order A body46 armor executive is gunned down. (cc)

Frequency Raimy finds new evidence. (N) (cc) Here’s Help The Andy Griffith Show

Presidential Debate University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (N) (cc) Law & Order Police pull Law & Order: Release. over a drunken celeb- Chris Drake finds his rity. (cc) friend dead.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 10.19.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Basic pain drug is safe, efective Dear Dr. Roach • You recently wrote an article on the risk of heart disease with aspirin and anti-inflammatory drugs. What about acetaminophen (Tylenol)? I have been taking this for many years of pain following spinal surgeries. — C.S.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • There have been some studies that have shown a mild increase in risk of heart disease among chronic heavy users of acetaminophen. However, most of the data have shown that among people who use it every other day or less (on average), if there is a risk, it probably is small. Heavy users of antiinflammatory medicines such as naproxen probably are at a higher-than-average risk for heart disease as well. Acetaminophen is considered to be one of the safest medications for pain relief, but all medicines have the potential for side efects.

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Dear Dr. Roach • I’m a 67-year-old man in fairly good health, but I was diagnosed with celiac sprue over 10 years ago by a blood test. I maintain a glutenfree diet the best I can, but I’m sure occasionally I get some gluten. How close are we to a cure or some type of medicine that one can take to break down gluten? Are there diferent levels of gluten intolerance? I have eaten food containing gluten with no side efects. — R.F.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Answer • Celiac disease, also called “celiac sprue” or “gluten-sensitive enteropathy,” is an immune disorder triggered by gliadin, a component of gluten, which is found in wheat, rye and barley, and in some other grains. The definitive treatment is meticulous, strict compliance with a completely gluten-free diet, as minuscule amounts (as little as 30 mg) of gliadin can trigger a reaction in the gut. This leads to the inability to absorb nutrients, and possibly predisposes one to development of lymphoma and gastrointestinal cancer. However, you are right that some people are more tolerant than others and can tolerate amounts of gluten that would cause symptoms in others. Nonetheless, I recommend a strict gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease. A new medication, larazotide, is being developed not to break down gliadin, but to reduce the body’s response to gliadin. It is in late-stage clinical trials.

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

10.19.16  

10.19.16 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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