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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 10.07.2016 • $1.50

OFFICER BLAKE SNYDER

COUNTY OFFICER DIES IN SHOOTING Backup oicer returns ire, wounds suspect 18-year-old had been pounding on door at home in Green Park BY KIM BELL AND CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Two Missouri Highway Patrol oicers salute as police escort a Mehlville ambulance transporting a deceased St. Louis County police oicer, who was shot early Thursday. Blake Snyder, 33, was hit once in the chin and was pronounced dead at St. Anthony’s Medical Center.

Slain oicer had served on force four years BY CHRISTINE BYERS AND JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The St. Louis County police oicer killed in Green Park on Thursday morning was a Metro East native who joined the force in his late 20s. St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar called Blake Snyder a “tremendous police oicer” who was seen as extremely dedicated by his supervisors. Snyder, 33, of Edwardsville, had been with the department about four years and left behind a wife and 2-year-old son. Current and former co-workers said Snyder

was known for making DWI arrests and was drawn into police work after hearing his in-laws talk about the profession. His father-in-law, who is deceased, was a Granite City police oicer, and his brother-in-law is a member of St. Louis County’s tactical operations unit. Family, friends and fellow oicers surrounded Snyder’s widow, Elizabeth, when former St. Louis County police chief and current director of Backstoppers Inc. Ron Battelle met with her to explain the role the nonprofit group will now play in their lives. “He doesn’t know what’s going on, but he’ll eventually learn,”

Battelle said of Snyder’s son. “I assured the family we’d be there to help raise him because that’s what we do.” Battelle said the organization presented Snyder’s widow with a $5,000 check to assist with any initial expenses as is customary, but that all of the family’s debt would be eliminated, including any outstanding credit card bills, car payments or mortgages. Backstoppers also will pay tuition for Snyder’s son. “His fellow officers thought highly of him … and command staff on down spoke highly of See SNYDER • Page A7

FLORIDA FEELS MATTHEW’S FORCE

10 COUNTY OFFICERS HAVE BEEN KILLED IN THE LINE OF DUTY

Profiles > Before Thursday, nine St. Louis County oicers had been killed on the job • A7

Questions raised over tax deduction for stillborn babies

GREEN PARK • A St. Louis County police officer answering a disturbance call here before dawn Thursday was shot to death by a teenager who was then critically wounded by a backup oicer’s return fire. Officer Blake Snyder, 33, was hit once in the chin and was pronounced dead at St. Anthony’s Medical Center. Police Chief Jon Belmar said: “It was an immediately fatal wound.” Trenton Forster, 18, of south St. Louis County, was charged with first-degree murder and armed criminal action, with bail set at $1 million. Prosecuting Atto r n ey Ro b e r t McCulloch said Forster was expected to survive Forster despite being hit by at least four or five shots. McCulloch said Forster’s only criminal past appears to be a felony marijuana charge that, according to court documents, was brought by the same oicer who shot him. Belmar said he had not drawn a connection. The officers were dispatched about 5 a.m. to a home in the 10700 block of Arno Drive in the small city of Green Park, which is northwest of the South County Center mall. Forster allegedly had been beating on the door. Sgt. Shawn McGuire said Forster had a relationship with a girl who lived there. Snyder approached Forster, by then sitting in a car parked outside, and was shot “almost immediately,” officials said. The See SHOOTING • Page A6

Saratoga Lanes celebrates 100 years

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri oicials

than a decade and had already left more than 280 dead in its wake across the Caribbean. “This storm’s a monster,” Gov. Rick Scott warned as it started lashing the state with periodic heavy rains and squalls around nightfall. He added: “I’m going to pray for everybody’s safety.” As it moved north in the evening, Matthew stayed about 100 miles or more of

awarded state tax deductions to 1,400 families who claimed they had a stillborn child in 2015. But a Post-Dispatch review found the state health department recorded only 460 fetal deaths last year, raising questions about which number is correct and whether some families shouldn’t have received a deduction. For now, the state is waiting for a review of federal returns from the Internal Revenue Service before raising red flags about the deductions. “As with all tax deductions, the department will have an opportunity to determine if any of the returns do not qualify for a stillbirth deduction when the IRS provides us data regarding federal returns filed by Missouri residents later this year,” said Missouri Department of Revenue spokeswoman Michele Gleba.

See HURRICANE • Page A10

See BABIES • Page A9

JOE BURBANK • Orlando Sentinel via AP

The first bands of rain from Hurricane Matthew pass over Orlando, Fla., Thursday.

BY MIKE SCHNEIDER AND KELLI KENNEDY Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA. • Hurricane

Matthew pelted Florida with heavy rain as the deadly storm steamed ever closer to the coast with potentially catastrophic winds of 130 mph Thursday night. Two million people across the Southeast were warned to flee inland. It was the most powerful storm to threaten the U.S. Atlantic coast in more

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Former police oicer gets 51 months in prison • A3 Alderman and activist French joins mayoral race • A4 To compete, Save-A-Lot restocks and remodels • B1 The big blow

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M 1 FRIDAY • 10.07.2016 • A2

Woman steps forward with tale of assault Walker’s rape allegation inspires earlier Roberts accuser to speak out on her experience TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

She didn’t even know his name. They met in passing at the Alumni, a restaurant and bar across from St. Louis University Law School. A group of law school students were hanging out after many of them had been to a Cardinals game earlier in the day. She was a 26-year-old student in the final semester of school. He was an assistant prosecutor in St. Louis. They said “hi” and went their separate ways. “It was a real exciting time,” she tells me. Law school was about to end and a bright future awaited. The woman is 27 now. She graduated, passed the bar exam and is working as a lawyer. But much of her past year has been an emotional blur since the night she met Steve Roberts Jr. It was April 16, 2015. After having a drink at the Alumni, the young woman — who asked that I not use her name — and some of her friends went to the Side Bar on Washington Avenue to have drinks and watch the St. Louis Blues on television. It was the first night of the hockey playofs. Roberts showed up with a friend of hers. “He seemed nice enough,” she says. “He was kind of quiet.” Eventually, he moved his chair next to

her, she says. She was boxed in, between Roberts and the wall. He asked if she was interested in him. “I said no,” the woman recalls. “It was an uncomfortable situation.” She says he put his hand on her knee. Then this happened, according to the police report she filed six days later: “The victim described how the suspect touched her on her vaginal region over her clothing as well as attempting to place his hand inside of her pants and underwear.” Two days later, Roberts was arrested on suspicion of second-degree sodomy. He was suspended from his job as an assistant prosecutor in the office of St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce. The case was assigned to Jillian Anderson, a special prosecutor in St. Charles County. Roberts was never charged. Through his attorney, Scott Rosenblum, he maintains his innocence. The woman says she decided to tell her story after reading my column about a police investigation and letter in which attorney Cora Faith Walker of Ferguson accused Roberts of raping her. Last Friday, Walker wrote the letter to Missouri Speaker of the House Todd Richardson asking him to consider taking action to protect her and other women who work in the Capitol from Roberts. Both Walker, 31, and Roberts, 28, are running unopposed in November in their Missouri House districts. Law enforcement sources and Rosenblum have confirmed there is a police investigation into the sexual assault allega-

tion made by Walker against Roberts. In a statement released following my previous column, Roberts said the two Democratic candidates went to his apartment together and their encounter was “consensual.” Walker says she passed out after two glasses of wine while meeting that night with Roberts and woke up the next day in Roberts’ bed. She doesn’t remember what happened, but she believes she was sexually assaulted. For the young lawyer who met Roberts at a bar while she was still a student at SLU, the allegation brings back the intense memories of a night she’d like to forget. After the incident, friends told her who Roberts was, a young prosecutor who was the son and nephew of wealthy, politically connected developers. She texted his name to herself so she would remember. It was 11:16 p.m. “I went home and cried,” she says. And then, she did what so many women do after a sexual assault. She fretted about what to do, as a ball of emotions — sadness, anger, fear — welled up inside of her. “I needed to talk to somebody to know what to do,” she says. She went to see a professor the next day, but the professor was in class. Over the weekend, she talked to a couple of friends, who encouraged her to talk to police. On Monday she had class and work all day. Tuesday, she met with a professor. Wednesday she met with SLU’s Title IX coordinator. The two of them went to the police station together. At the time, the woman says she told

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her story to police knowing that going forward with a prosecution would be “hellish.” “Filing charges was terrifying to me,” she says. “It’s never good for victims.” Indeed, after going to the police and writing her letter to the House speaker, and within 72 hours of telling her story to me, Walker was subjected to a statement from Roberts indicating she was an adulterer who should have known that going to a man’s apartment on a Friday night couldn’t have possibly been about business. It was the classic sort of “victimblaming” that advocacy groups say keeps more women from reporting sexual assaults. Fewer than half of female victims of sexual violence ever report their encounters to police, according to a 2013 Department of Justice study. That makes Walker, and the woman who met Roberts at a bar in April 2015, rarities. Both women used identical words in telling me why they went to police. “This isn’t about me,” they said. And that’s why the 27-year-old attorney whose case was never prosecuted is so sad today. What happened to Walker “was preventable,” she says. “It made me feel I should have done more.” She wipes away the tears. She knows she shouldn’t blame herself. But she can’t help it. “I’m sorry I’m not a perfect victim,” she says. “But nobody is.” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

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THIS DAY IN 1909

He also pleaded guilty to armed robbery

GOLDEN FLYER Glenn Curtiss makes the city’s first airplane flight, piloting the “Golden Flyer” 60 yards. He is in the air for about four seconds. A crowd of 300,000 had gathered to watch him take of.

HEADS UP FROM STAFF REPORTS

EDWARDSVILLE • Terrence T. Lee, 32, was sentenced Thursday to 50 years in prison after admitting in court that he killed a fellow Madison County Jail inmate and previously participated in a robbery in which another man was slain. Lee, of Jennings, pleaded guilty of Lee first-degree murder in the July 18 death of John E. Newsome Sr., 61, at the jail in Edwardsville. He also pleaded guilty Thursday of an armed robbery on May 19, 2014, in which Kenneth Deal, 43, of Madison, was killed. A first-degree murder charge against Lee in that crime, which occurred in Venice, was dropped. Madison County Associate Judge Neil Schroeder sentenced Lee to consecutive terms of 30 years for Newsome’s murder and 20 for Deal’s robbery. “With this lengthy prison sentence, this violent individual will remain locked up behind bars

where he belongs,” State’s Attorney Tom Gibbons said in a statement. “The defendant will be in his seventies before he is first eligible for release.” A co-defendant in the Deal case, Turhan Robinson, 39, of St. Louis, is set for trial Nov. 7 on charges of first-degree murder, attempted murder and armed robbery. Newsome’s daughter recently filed a federal lawsuit against Madison County and others, claiming the jail was negligent in failing to protect her father from Lee. The suit says Lee has an extensive criminal record, including murder, battery and attempted murder of a police oicer. He threatened inmates if they used the day room TV without his “oversight,” the suit says, or didn’t give him their snacks. He allegedly had previously assaulted two other inmates. The suit says Newsome, of Madison, tried to use the TV and was threatened, then tried unsuccessfully to get the attention of jail staf before Lee beat him. It says surveillance cameras caught the assault but that staf did not find the body for two hours.

PARK OPENS Trojan Park — a former vacant lot in Wellston that was transformed into a playground and park — will open oicially at 10 a.m. Saturday. The event will run until noon, and area residents will have the chance to view and experience this new community amenity. St. Louis native and former NBA player Larry Hughes will be on hand to lead a junior basketball clinic. The event will also include free food from area food trucks and music and dance performances. The one-acre park is at the southwest corner of Skinker Parkway and Etzel Avenue. It was built in partnership with the National Recreation and Park Association, Great Rivers Greenway and the city of Wellston as part of the NRPA’s annual Parks Build Community initiative — to demonstrate the transformative value of parks and recreation on communities across the country. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch.com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS FALL FESTIVAL When • 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday Where • Broemmelsiek Park in Defiance How much • Free admission; hayrides are $2 per person, free for those 5 and younger More info • stccparks.org The St. Charles County Parks and Recreation Department’s fourth annual Fall Festival will feature music, games, crafts, food and fresh apple cider. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events. stltoday.com.

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10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1

LOCAL

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Former Pine Lawn police lieutenant gets 51 months in prison

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Former Pine Lawn police Lt. Steven Blakeney (right) enters the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. Courthouse after a lunch break during his sentencing hearing Wednesday in St. Louis.

BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A former Pine Lawn po-

lice lieutenant described by prosecutors as a “loose cannon” and by a judge as a “disgrace” was sentenced Thursday to 51 months in federal prison. U.S. District Judge Stephen N. Limbaugh Jr. said the evidence was “overwhelming” that Steven Blakeney, 36, had “trumped up” evidence and engaged two store owners in conspiring to falsely arrest and jail a Pine Lawn mayoral candidate, Nakisha Ford, on behalf of her rival on Easter night in 2013. Blakeney ordered a store owner to call 911 and falsely report that Ford had stolen a campaign poster for incumbent Mayor Sylvester Caldwell, the owner said at Blakeney’s federal trial in January. Blakeney then returned to the store to take a police report and told the owner he would have to testify in court. Blakeney also tipped off a TV station about the arrest. In a victim’s impact statement quoted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Reggie Harris, Ford said the thought of being arrested in front of her daughter and jailed still “brings me to tears.” Jurors found Blakeney guilty of conspiracy against rights, deprivation of rights under color of law and falsification of records for that arrest. Limbaugh called the crimes “unconscionable” but said he would have given Blakeney less time in prison if his bad behavior were limited to that. Limbaugh cited two witnesses who testified Wednesday about arrests by Blakeney, and a misdemeanor assault case against him, as showing a serious pattern of “misconduct and abuse of authority.” Roy Telano, a U.S. Army captain and lay minister at the time, said he was coming home from a Cardinals game on July 19, 2013, when he encountered Blakeney while merging into traffic. Miles down the road in Pine Lawn, after Telano was stopped by other oicers, Blakeney kneed him in the thigh, pushed him onto a car hood and threw him in jail, he said. Telano and his wife agreed to settle civil claims against Pine Lawn for $225,000 in 2015, one of almost two dozen people paid in total more than $1.3 million in settlements of Blakeney-related claims. Jordan Martner, a college student, was driving to her boyfriend’s home in St. Louis when Blakeney pulled her over. She said he shouted expletives, searched her car without a warrant and damaged a laptop computer and other property in her car. He also threatened to take her to the “ghetto” and texted her worried boyfriend, pretending to be her, before having her jailed, Martner said. Martner said she settled her claims for $163,000. Blakeney did not testify during the

hearing, although his lawyer, Matt Radefeld, did challenge the claims of Telano and Martner, as well as a former Pine Lawn police oicer, Alan Lawson II, who said he saw Blakeney hit Telano and shove him into a ditch. Limbaugh said he twice read transcripts from Blakeney’s trial on a misdemeanor assault charge in St. Louis Circuit Court last week. He said he found the evidence “completely overwhelming” that Blakeney had tried to lure three drunken women into his unmarked patrol car, then sucker-punched one of the women and a man who tried to intervene, all while acting as a police oicer. At the trial, the man, Billy Baker, said he confronted Blakeney and demanded to see his badge. Baker said he was punched when he tried to call 911. A St. Louis jury deadlocked 11-1 in favor of a guilty verdict. Limbaugh did credit Blakeney for awards he had received over the years, as well as Blakeney’s own letter to Limbaugh and letters in support from a former colleague and a therapist. But the judge ordered Blakeney to be taken into custody immediately by U.S. marshals, instead of giving him the opportunity to self-surrender at a federal prison months from now. Harris, the prosecutor, asked Limbaugh for 63 months, the top of the recommended sentencing guidelines of 51 to 63 months. Harris called Blakeney a “loose cannon” and said he “never should have been a police oicer in the first place.” Harris cited a series of negative reports Blakeney had received from a police academy, the military and former employers, and said Blakeney has “always believed that he’s above the law.” Radefeld said many of the claims against Blakeney were “unreliable and conflicting,” and that his sentence was double that received by other officers in situations that involved violence. He cited Blakeney’s cooperation with the FBI in an investigation of former Pine Lawn Mayor Sylvester Caldwell and the plea deal prosecutors ofered before trial that could have netted his client 18-24 months. “He should not be the scapegoat for all the corruption in Pine Lawn,” Radefeld said. After the hearing, Radefeld said Blakeney would appeal both the sentence and jury verdict. Blakeney still faces a pending federal civil suit by two women who say he drugged and abducted them. Blakeney was fired from the Pine Lawn department in December 2014 after being accused of having another oicer take the women home. The department has since been disbanded, and the city is served by the North County Police Cooperative. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

DIGEST COLUMBIA > Enrollment dip revised • Enrollment is still down at the University of Missouri-Columbia, but it’s not down as much as it was on the irst day of school, administrators report. With inal semester numbers in and reported, Mizzou oicials say they gained almost 500 students since the irst day of class. Enrollment overall is still down about 5 percent from fall 2015. “We’re excited to see that since opening day, almost 500 additional students have chosen Mizzou as their home,” interim chancellor Hank Foley said in a statement.

“Mizzou continues to be the premier public higher education institution in the state, and it is clear that students throughout the country believe this university can help them achieve their life goals.” Campus leaders tout a boost in minority student enrollment, particularly a gain in African-American students. Oicials prepared for months for a smaller freshman class after a string of events last fall — including protests centered largely on matters of race — that led to the school’s top two leaders’ stepping down. (Ashley Jost)


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 10.07.2016

Alderman and activist joins mayoral race BY KORAN ADDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Antonio French, al-

derman for the city’s 21st Ward, entered the mayor’s race on Thursday, announcing his candidacy by posting a video on Twitter that was captioned: “I’m in.” French becomes the fourth person to publicly announce a mayoral candidacy since Mayor Francis Slay’s surprise announcement in the spring that he would not seek a fifth term. In 2012, French founded the North Campus, an initiative modeled after New York City’s Harlem Children’s Zone. The model calls for schools to provide mentoring and after-school tutoring in addition to traditional schooling to low-income children. Two years later, French gained a national profile in the imme-

diate aftermath of the Ferguson protests for his tweets showing clashes between police and protesters. His announceFrench ment video has several shots of him playing the peacemaker during those clashes interspersed with clips of him appearing on local and national news stations talking about public safety and the shortcoming of the justice system. French, 38, initially hinted at a mayoral run last month when he began soliciting pledges from donors that he would accept only if he formally entered the race. “I have been publicly contemplating this for a while, and I have been asking how best can I serve the city,” French said. “It’s time for me to move to a diferent office that has more direct control”

over how the city is run. Joining the race is inherently risky for French, a two-term alderman who is serving his eighth year on the board. “I won’t be able to run for my 21st seat while I’m running for mayor, so it’s either up or out for me,” he said. “But I’ve chosen to sacrifice this period of my life in the spirit of community service.” The 21st Ward includes portions of the Penrose, College Hill and O’Fallon neighborhoods. French said the risk of losing his seat at City Hall is worth it. “Not holding public office is not the end of the world for me,” he said. “This was part of my deliberations. How can I serve and have the most impact? It’s from the mayor’s oice.” French said his campaign will be centered on quality of life issues in the city’s neighborhoods. “We’ve reached a point where

people are leaving the city by the dozens,” he said. “We need to refocus our efforts not just in the central corridor — downtown to the Central West End — but to all the other neighborhoods where most people live.” French said crime and neighborhood stability, including increasing job opportunities and finding uses for abandoned properties, will go a long way toward improving the quality of life for the average city resident. But having collected only $3,000 in pledges from a crowdfunding site, and having just $3,000 in his campaign account, French is starting off at a distinct disadvantage compared with other candidates who’ve raised six-figure sums. “It’s not about having more money” than other candidates, French said. “It’s about having enough money. “I have not raised political

money in many years,” he said. “I’ve been focused on raising money for educational programs, but I have name recognition and a large base and a large pool to draw from.” French joins 28th Ward Alderman Lyda Krewson, Aldermanic President Lewis Reed and Police Chief Sam Dotson as the candidates who’ve publicly announced they’re running. Collector of Revenue Gregory F.X. Daly and Treasurer Tishaura Jones have formed exploratory committees and are considering entering the race. The filing period for mayoral candidates runs from Nov. 27 through Jan. 6. The primary election will be held on March 7. The general election is set for April 4. Koran Addo • 314-340-8305 @KoranAddo on Twitter kaddo@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Jeferson County sherif leaves panel on public defenders BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • One of Gov. Jay Nixon’s newest appointees to a commission overseeing the state’s public defender system quit after a little more than a month on the job. According to documents obtained by the Post-Dispatch, Jefferson County Sheriff Oliver “Glenn” Boyer resigned Monday, citing health issues and a possible conflict of interest. Boyer had been appointed Aug. 26 as part of an efort by Nixon to remake the board after a dust-up over funding cuts he imposed in July. The resignation and the ac-

companying documents show that months of turmoil at the agency may not be over. The conflict of interest issue was Boyer outlined in a Sept. 30 letter by Missouri State Public Defender Director Michael Barrett. Barrett, who gained national attention when he tried to appoint Nixon to defend a man in protest of the governor’s budget cuts, said Boyer’s role as a sherif caused a conflict of interest. The appointment “jeopardizes our clients’ constitutional rights to a fair trial in cases which were/ are investigated by the Jeferson

tired investigator for the Missouri attorney general’s office. He also has served as senior vice president for Syn-Cronamics Inc. and was a regional director for the Federal Law Enforcement Assistance Administration. In announcing Bockenkamp’s appointment, Nixon made no mention of Boyer. Boyer has been sheriff of Jefferson County since 1993. He is not seeking re-election and will be out of oice in January. Boyer said the health issue is related to recent back surgery. “I’m not going to be able to travel for a month or so,” he said Thursday. In July, Nixon reduced a $4.5 million budget increase at the

County Sherif’s Department or in which the sheriff or a member of that department are witnesses for the prosecution,” Barrett wrote. In the letter to President Judge Robert Wilkins of the 23rd Judicial Circuit in Hillsboro, Mo., Barrett said the public defender system could no longer defend current and future defendants. Boyer resigned from the seven-member board three days after Barrett’s letter, and Nixon appointed Ronald Bockenkamp of Farmington to the empty slot on Wednesday. Bockenkamp, who served in the Missouri House, is a former St. Louis police detective in the Intelligence Division and a re-

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public defender agency by $3.5 million as part of a budgetcutting maneuver affecting 130 programs. The added money had been inserted by the Republicanled Legislature as a way to grapple with a rising caseload that has staff attorneys handling as many as 200 cases at a time. Citing improved budget numbers, Nixon on Wednesday restored some of the cuts he made in July. None of the money he released this week, however, is earmarked for the public defenders. Nixon’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER O’FALLON, MO. > Suspect in car theft arrested • A man accused of stealing a car he was test driving from an O’Fallon dealership was arrested Tuesday in St. Ann. The man, James David Noel, 46, of the irst block of Dellbrook Court in O’Fallon, Noel was charged Wednesday with felony robbery. He was being held in the St. Charles County Jail with bail set at $100,000. Police had responded to a call of a car stolen from the Marshall Ford dealership on the 1000 block of West Terra Lane shortly before noon Tuesday. A man test driving a car had forced a dealership employee out of the vehicle and driven of, police said. The employee was not injured. The caller saw the suspect drive east. Police gave a description of the vehicle to nearby police departments. The car was eventually stopped by St. Ann police on an eastbound lane of Interstate 70 near the Lindbergh Boulevard entrance ramp. ST. LOUIS > Police identify woman found dead in river • Mansi Flaherty, 22, of the 4100 block of Glendale Road in the House Springs area, was the woman whose body was pulled from the Mississippi River Tuesday, authorities said. Police say the body had no obvious signs of trauma. The case is being handled as a suspicious death. LADUE > Housekeeper reports burglary, attack • Police are investigating after a housekeeper reported she was struck in the head during the burglary of a home in Ladue. Police Chief Rich Wooten said the reported break-in and assault happened at a house on Upper Ladue Road. The residents left the home about 9 a.m. Wednesday. The housekeeper told police she entered the home about 11:45 a.m. and heard voices inside the house. She tried to ind the source of the voice and was struck on the head with an unknown object, according to police. Her injuries were not life-threatening. The woman was unable to give a description of the assailant. Police did not say whether anything had been taken from the home. Sgt. Ray Hahs said police had not received any leads on suspects yet but were checking camera footage from nearby homes as a part of the investigation. LEE’S SUMMIT, MO. > Man fatally shoots brother • Court records say a Missouri man was playing with a gun when he fatally shot his brother. The Jackson County prosecutor’s oice said Thursday that Lawrence Barr, 24, of Lee’s Summit, is charged with irst-degree involuntary manslaughter and armed criminal action. The probable cause statement says Barr told a Lee’s Summit police detective that he had “accidentally” shot his brother, Aaron Elmore, 28, on Wednesday. Barr said he was playing with his gun and didn’t realize a bullet was in the chamber when he pulled the trigger. Elmore was with his son, 2, and was brushing his teeth when he was shot once in the back of the head.


OFFICER DIES IN SHOOTING

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

18-year-old man charged with murder SHOOTING • FROM A1

second officer, who arrived separately, exchanged shots with Forster and was not hurt. Charging documents say a witness saw the shooting and identified Forster as the gunman. Police recovered a pistol. On Forster’s public Twitter account, he has written a lot about drugs — from marijuana to ecstasy — with harsh language and anti-police commentary. In May, he wrote: “I want (expletive) the police carved into my grave.” In early September, he called the court system “twisted” and suggested he was “gonna have the last laugh.” He also made recent references to owning a gun, writing in August that, “The compact .40 (caliber) send all my enemies to hell,” and, in May, “There’s no name on a bullet.” He talks a lot about not feeling understood, and feeling worthless. Police and neighbors said Forster lives in the 9500 block of Sequoia Court, about a mile from the shooting scene. No one answered the door when a reporter visited Thursday. But a woman who said she is Forster’s aunt disputed the address late Thursday. The woman, who declined to give her name, she said she lives in the home with her son but that Forster lives elsewhere. Forster attended Lindbergh High School and was a junior when he withdrew in May, said district spokeswoman Beth Johnston. She could not provide details about his time there. County police arrested Forster in November 2015 on a felony charge of possession of marijuana, according to court records. A caller at his home address had alerted police to drug activity and gave officers consent to search the dwelling. Officers found a backpack containing three glass jars full of marijuana and “a large amount of U.S. currency.” Police said Forster admitted the cash was his and came from the sale of drugs. A settlement conference in his case was set for later this month.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County police Oicer John Cunningham ignores the police tape lapping in the breeze Thursday while watching as a stream of blood and disinfectant is washed away by Mehlville ireighters in the 10700 block of Arno Drive in Green Park, where county Oicer Blake Snyder was shot and killed. A second oicer then shot the suspect, 18-year-old Trenton Forster, who was critically wounded.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County police oicers (from left) Don Mestemacher, Adam Lane and Mike Deck drape black bunting over a precinct car Thursday at the Afton Southwest precinct as a memorial to slain oicer Blake Snyder, 33.

next door called her at work to say the girl’s boyfriend had been shot. “I was shocked,” Kunz said. “People walk this neighborhood day and night, and nothing ever goes on around here.”

‘TREMENDOUS POLICE OFFICER’ Snyder, who lived in Edwardsville, had been with the department at least four years and was assigned to the Affton Southwest precinct. He leaves behind a wife and 2-year-old son. The Backstoppers Inc., a nonprofit group that assists survivors of fallen St. Louis area first responders, already provided the family a check for $5,000, with a promise to do more. In a press conference, Belmar called Snyder a “tremendous police officer” and said it was a “tough day” for his department. Among public officials offering condolences was St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, whose statement said, in part, “This demonstrates the extreme danger that first responders face every day. Our police have my steadfast support, and I pledge to do everything I can to provide them with all the

SHOTS AND YELLING

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Karen Thevel and her daughter Autumn Thevel place lowers at the memorial where St. Louis County police Oicer Blake Snyder was shot and killed Thursday.

resources they need to ensure their safety.” Snyder is the 10th county oicer killed in the line of duty since the department’s inception in 1955. The most recent had been Sgt. Richard Weinhold, 44, shot to death on Halloween afternoon in 2000 at a disturbance call. Forster apparently was in the driver’s seat of a car when Snyder pulled up, Belmar said, and the oicer ordered him to show his hands. The man pulled a 9 mm pistol and fired before being struck by the other

officer’s bullets. All three men are white. Police said they were not looking for any other suspects. Neither the officers nor their cars were equipped with cameras, Belmar said. Jennifer Kunz, 56, who lives beside the home where the killing took place, said an older woman, her daughter and her 16-year-old granddaughter live there. Nothing was amiss when Kunz walked her dog about 4:45 a.m., she said. But later, one of the women

Vicki Englund, a former state representative and a current member of the Lindbergh School Board, lives kitty-corner from the shooting and heard the gunshots. “You think it’s a car backfiring,” she said. “What else could it be?” She said she didn’t see what happened, but, “I heard a couple shots, then a pause, then I heard 10 or so in a row and someone yell, ‘Get back in the house,’ or, ‘Are you gonna get back in the house?’ in a very strong, controlled voice.” She added, “And then a few more shots.” A woman who lives nearby said she’d seen the car where Forster had been sitting on Arno all night, and the night before. Several houses from the scene, Karen Thevel was awakened by her daughter about 5:05 a.m., saying she thought she heard five or

six shots, then two or three more. “We moved here about a month or so ago and we began hearing about how there had been a recent increase in crime,” Thevel said. “My daughter got her wallet stolen from her car, and other cars had been broken into recently. “I grew up in Oakville

and I know this neighborhood; I couldn’t wait to move into here because the crime is like zero — at least until recently,” she said. Jack Buck III, grandson of the famous late sportscaster, lives around the corner and three houses up from the scene and said he was awakened by the commotion. “It was an exchange of pop-pop, poppop-pop,” he said. “Maybe eight to 12 shots.” Buck described Green Park as a small, middleclass community that was relatively free of crime until about a month ago. Last week, someone on a nearby street reported a burglary. And about four weeks ago, nearly every car on his street was broken into, he said. Snyder’s death comes about three months after a Ballwin officer was shot and paralyzed. Oicer Michael Flamion is being treated at a rehabilitation hospital in Colorado. He was shot July 8 while returning to his patrol car during a traffic stop on New Ballwin Road, police said. Antonio Taylor, 31, was charged in the shooting. Denise Hollinshed, Joel Currier, Steve Giegerich, Ashley Jost and Joe Holleman of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

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OFFICER DIES IN SHOOTING

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

18-year-old man charged with murder SHOOTING • FROM A1

second oicer, who arrived separately, exchanged shots with Forster and was not hurt. Charging documents say a witness saw the shooting and identified Forster as the gunman. Police recovered a pistol. On Forster’s public Twitter account, he has written a lot about drugs — from marijuana to ecstasy — with harsh language and anti-police commentary. In May, he wrote: “I want (expletive) the police carved into my grave.” In early September, he called the court system “twisted” and suggested he was “gonna have the last laugh.” He also made recent references to owning a gun, writing in August that, “The compact .40 (caliber) send all my enemies to hell,” and, in May, “There’s no name on a bullet.” He talks a lot about not feeling understood, and feeling worthless. Police, court records and neighbors said Forster lives in the 9500 block of Sequoia Court, about a mile from the shooting scene. No one answered the door when a reporter visited Thursday. But a woman who said she is Forster’s aunt disputed the address late Thursday. The woman, who declined to give her name, said she lives in the home with her son but that Forster lives elsewhere. Forster attended Lindbergh High School and was a junior when he withdrew in May, said district spokeswoman Beth Johnston. She could not provide details about his time there. County police arrested Forster in November 2015 on a felony charge of possession of marijuana, according to court records. A caller at his home address had alerted police to drug activity and gave oicers consent to search the dwelling. Officers found a backpack containing three glass jars full of marijuana and “a large amount of U.S. currency.” Police said Forster admitted the cash was his and came from the sale of drugs. A settlement conference in his case was set for later this month.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County police Oicer John Cunningham ignores the police tape lapping in the breeze Thursday while watching as a stream of blood and disinfectant is washed away by Mehlville ireighters in the 10700 block of Arno Drive in Green Park, where county Oicer Blake Snyder was shot and killed. A second oicer then shot the suspect, 18-year-old Trenton Forster, who was critically wounded.

old granddaughter live there. Nothing was amiss when Kunz walked her dog about 4:45 a.m., she said. But later, one of the women next door called her at work to say the girl’s boyfriend had been shot. “I was shocked,” Kunz said. “People walk this neighborhood day and night, and nothing ever goes on around here.”

SHOTS AND YELLING

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County police oicers (from left) Don Mestemacher, Adam Lane and Mike Deck drape black bunting over a precinct car Thursday at the Afton Southwest precinct as a memorial to slain oicer Blake Snyder, 33.

‘TREMENDOUS POLICE OFFICER’ Snyder, who lived in Edwardsville, had been with the department at least four years and was assigned to the Afton Southwest precinct. He leaves behind a wife and 2-year-old son. The Backstoppers Inc., a nonprofit group that assists survivors of fallen St. Louis area first responders, already provided the family a check for $5,000, with a promise to do more. In a press conference, Belmar called Snyder a “tremendous police officer” and said it was a “tough day” for his department. Among public officials offer-

ing condolences was St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, whose statement said, in part, “This demonstrates the extreme danger that first responders face every day. Our police have my steadfast support, and I pledge to do everything I can to provide them with all the resources they need to ensure their safety.” Snyder is the 10th county oicer killed in the line of duty since the department’s inception in 1955. The most recent had been Sgt. Richard Weinhold, 44, shot to death on Halloween afternoon in 2000 at a disturbance call.

Forster apparently was in the driver’s seat of a car when Snyder pulled up, Belmar said, and the officer ordered him to show his hands. The man pulled a 9 mm pistol and fired before being struck by the other oicer’s bullets. All three men are white. Police said they were not looking for any other suspects. Neither the officers nor their cars were equipped with cameras, Belmar said. Jennifer Kunz, 56, who lives beside the home where the killing took place, said an older woman, her daughter and her 16-year-

Vicki Englund, a former state representative and a current member of the Lindbergh School Board, lives kitty-corner from the shooting and heard the gunshots. “You think it’s a car backfiring,” she said. “What else could it be?” She said she didn’t see what happened, but, “I heard a couple shots, then a pause, then I heard 10 or so in a row and someone yell, ‘Get back in the house,’ or, ‘Are you gonna get back in the house?’ in a very strong, controlled voice.” She added, “And then a few more shots.” A woman who lives nearby said she’d seen the car where Forster had been sitting on Arno all night, and the night before. Several houses from the scene, Karen Thevel was awakened by her daughter about 5:05 a.m., saying she thought she heard five or six shots, then two or three more. “We moved here about a month or so ago and we began hearing about how there had

been a recent increase in crime,” Thevel said. “My daughter got her wallet stolen from her car, and other cars had been broken into recently. “I grew up in Oakville and I know this neighborhood; I couldn’t wait to move into here because the crime is like zero — at least until recently,” she said. Jack Buck III, grandson of the famous late sportscaster, lives around the corner and three houses up from the scene and said he was awakened by the commotion. “It was an exchange of pop-pop, pop-pop-pop,” he said. “Maybe eight to 12 shots.” Buck described Green Park as a small, middle-class community that was relatively free of crime until about a month ago. Last week, someone on a nearby street reported a burglary. And about four weeks ago, nearly every car on his street was broken into, he said. Snyder’s death comes about three months after a Ballwin officer was shot and paralyzed. Officer Michael Flamion is being treated at a rehabilitation hospital in Colorado. He was shot July 8 while returning to his patrol car during a traic stop on New Ballwin Road, police said. Antonio Taylor, 31, was charged in the shooting. Denise Hollinshed, Joel Currier, Steve Giegerich, Ashley Jost and Joe Holleman of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

Vigils honor two area heroes lost to gunire BY KRISTEN TAKETA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The community of Affton mourned two young men — both beloved, both killed by gunfire — on the same high school football field Thursday night in back-to-back vigils. One of the vigils was for St. Louis County police Oicer Blake Snyder, 33, whose death on Thursday morning was grieved across the region. The 18-year-old man from south St. Louis County who allegedly shot him was charged with murder the same day. Immediately before Snyder’s vigil, another one honored another area hero. Esmond Ford, 25, a graduate of Afton High School and two-time wres-

tling state champion, was shot and killed by a stranger when he opened his apartment door on Tuesday in Atlanta, according to his family friends and Ford coach. Many people at the vigil agree that the school lost a role model for its students with Ford’s death. His family has deep connections to the school — his father is the wrestling and track coach, and his brother, now in the Air Force, was a renowned Affton athlete too. “The classroom, the field, wherever he was, he was just trying to be his best,” said Dan Oliver, Affton’s football coach. Twenty minutes after Ford’s vigil,

the same bleachers were filled with hundreds of people again, this time for Snyder. People also carried candles, tiny ones in little tin cups and stick candles with cups twisted around the flame. They, too, propped up a picture in front of the crowd, of a diferent young man — Snyder, smiling in uniform — also claimed by gun violence. “We’re all here for the same reasons: to celebrate the lives that we lost, to express sadness for the senseless violence we witness,” Oliver said, who stayed after Ford’s vigil for Snyder’s. “We’re all suffering the same thing: the loss of good people to senseless acts.” Kristen Taketa @Kristen_Taketa on Twitter ktaketa@post-dispatch.com

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OFFICER DIES IN SHOOTING

10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1

COUNTY OFFICERS WHO HAVE DIED IN THE LINE OF DUTY aPriL 17, 1975 DETECTIVE WAYNE BRADFORD McCLELLAND

JaN. 14, 1991

Detective Wayne McClelland was struck and killed by a drunken driver on Interstate 55, near Green Park Road. He had just pulled over a vehicle for a traic violation and was returning to his patrol car when the drunken driver struck him. The driver led the scene but was arrested a short time later and was convicted of manslaughter. McClelland was an Air Force veteran and had been with the department for nine years.

Oicer JoAnn Liscombe was shot in the back of the head while questioning a suspicious person walking along Old Halls Ferry Road. Liscombe, 38, died three days later. She had been with the department for 16 years, starting as a dispatcher and becoming a police oicer eight years later. Dennis A. Blackman was convicted of second-degree murder in her killing and sentenced to life in prison.

OFFICER JOANN VIRGINIA LISCOMBE

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A7

Snyder grew up in Godfrey, went to high school in Alton Dale Abbott (left) and a young Blake Snyder secure fencing around the Great Godfrey Maze at Glazebrook Park on July 15, 2002, in Godfrey.

JaN. 29, 1997 aPriL 30, 1977 OFFICER JAMES R. REIFSCHNEIDER Oicer James Reifschneider was struck and killed by a drunken driver while making a traic stop on Interstate 270. He was standing by the driver’s side door of a suspect’s vehicle. A drunken driver struck Reifschneider, 37, and dragged him 150 feet down the roadway. The suspect led the scene but was arrested in his vehicle, parked in front of his home. Reifschneider had been with the department for 16 years. He had a wife and three children. May 16, 1981

OFFICER ROBERT T. JORDAN Oicer Robert Jordan was shot and killed when a suspect robbed him at gunpoint and discovered he was a police oicer. Jordan, 46, and his 11-year-old daughter were leaving a store on Shreve Avenue when the suspect demanded Jordan’s wallet. The daughter testiied at trial that Samuel McDonald shot her father in the chest. McDonald was convicted of capital murder and executed in 1997. Jordan had been with the department for 19 years. He had a wife and four other children. OCT. 26, 1984

OFFICER KENNETH A. KOCH Oicer Kenneth Koch sufered a fatal heart attack while he was chasing two youths who were tampering with a vehicle. A witness who saw Koch, 41, collapse called for help. Koch was with the department for 18 years. He had a wife and four children. aPriL 14, 1989

DETECTIVE LAWRENCE J. McCORMACK Detective Lawrence J. McCormack sufered a fatal heart attack while arresting a suspect during an undercover vice operation. McCormack, 50, had been with the department for 22 years. He had a wife, two daughters, a son and a stepson.

OFFICER WILLIE NEAL JR. Oicer Willie Neal Jr. was shot and killed while making an undercover drug deal. Neal, 29, was accidentally struck by a round ired by his partner during the operation. The ofender involved in the drug buy was charged with felony murder; he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to eight years in prison. Neal was married and had two daughters when he died. He had been with the department for six years. dEC 5. 1997 OFFICER THOMAS G. SMITH JR. Patrolman Thomas Smith, 23, was killed after being struck by a motorist while assisting at the scene of a previous accident. He was standing next to a tow truck with the earlier accident victim when a van struck a patch of ice and slid into them. Smith and the earlier victim died on the scene. The driver of the van was taken into custody for suspicion of involuntary manslaughter. The driver was acquitted at trial two years later. Smith had been with the department for three years. OCT. 31, 2000

SGT. RICHARD ERIC WEINHOLD Sgt. Richard Weinhold was shot and killed while attempting to evict a man from a residence. Weinhold and several oicers went to a home where a man was locked inside. The oicers broke into the basement and headed up the stairs with Weinhold in the lead. Thomas Meek was armed with a shotgun when he leaped around a corner at the top of the stairs and blasted a deer slug into Weinhold’s left shoulder. The round pierced his lungs and heart. Weinhold died later that day. Meek was found mentally incompetent to stand trial and committed to a state institution. Weinhold was 44 when he was killed. The year before, he had been named Missouri’s Law Enforcement Instructor of the Year. Last year, Weinhold’s son, David, became a St. Louis County police oicer.

DAVID CARSON • Pd

SNYDER • FROM A1

him,” Battelle said. “He was the prototype county police oicer that reflects what’s all over this nation.” Chris Stocker, who retired in April after nearly three years as commander of the Affton precinct, said Thursday that Snyder had a knack for making drunken driving arrests. Stocker said Snyder preferred to work the midnight shift. Stocker said he believed that, at one point, Snyder conducted more DWI arrests than the rest of the precinct combined. His reports were “pristine,” Stocker said. “He could never be beat in court, and defense attorneys knew that.” Snyder’s last public Facebook post on June 7 makes reference to the death of Memphis Oicer Verdell Smith, who was struck and killed by a shooting suspect’s car. In the post, Smith is pictured in uniform holding up a sign that reads “I Matter.” Many of Snyder’s posts include pictures of his son. Among them is a photo of the boy as a newborn surrounded by his father’s duty belt, handcuffs, badge and police hat. According to his LinkedIn page, Snyder joined the St. Louis County Police Department in July 2012. Before that, he worked as a freelance graphic designer. He also previously served as the creative director and graphic designer at Destiny Church and on the board of directors at Riverbend Family Ministries. In the early 2000s, he worked in the parks and recreation department in Godfrey. Snyder grew up on a quiet,

You’re Inv Invited

tree-lined street in Godfrey. His parents still live there, a neighbor said Thursday afternoon. She described the Snyder family as “just really nice people, and he was a nice kid.” A visibly shaken woman who said she was Snyder’s aunt was in the driveway of the Snyder home. “We don’t know much of anything at all right now,” said the woman, who choked back tears to say, “I know he was such a wonderful boy.” Snyder was a 2001 graduate of Alton High School. He was a soccer player and placekicker on the football team, according to Brad Hasquin, who coached him in football. Hasquin is now an assistant football coach at Granite City High School. Granite City’s football team will host Alton at 7 p.m. Friday, and officials plan a moment of silence beforehand for Snyder. “He was always smiling. That’s what I remember the most about him. Just a good kid to be around,” Hasquin said. “He was always very helpful, and helping people I guess led him to becoming a cop. We were all very proud of that.” Hasquin said he and others who knew Snyder are grappling with his death. “No one’s supposed to go like that,” Hasquin said. “It’s not supposed to end that way.” Visitation for Snyder will be Wednesday from 4 to 9 p.m. at the Kutis Funeral Home Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois Road, south St. Louis County. The funeral will be Thursday at 11 a.m. at the Family Church,17458 Chesterfield Airport Road,Chesterfield. Burial will be at the Valhalla Memorial Park in Godfrey.

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A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

President’s peace prize is still debated Seven years after Obama won, his record on military action is both criticized, praised BY KATHLEEN HENNESSEY Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Seven years ago

this week, when a young American president learned he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize barely nine months into his first term — arguably before he’d made any peace — a somewhat embarrassed Barack Obama asked his aides to write an acceptance speech that addressed the awkwardness of the award. But by the time his speechwriters delivered a draft, Obama’s focus had shifted to another source of tension in his upcoming moment in Oslo: He would deliver this speech about peace just days after he planned to order 30,000 more American troops into battle in Afghanistan. The president all but scrapped the draft and wrote his own version. The speech Obama delivered — a Nobel Peace Prize lecture about the necessity of waging war — now looks like an early sign that the American president would not be the sort of peacemaker the European intellectuals of the Nobel committee had anticipated. On matters of war and peace, Obama has proven to be a confounding and contradictory figure, one who stands to leave behind both devastating and pressing failures, as well as a set of fresh accomplishments whose impact could resonate for decades. He is the erstwhile anti-war candidate, now engaged in more theaters of war than his predecessor. He is the commander-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Barack Obama shows of his medal and diploma at the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize ceremony in Norway.

in-chief who pulled more than a hundred thousand U.S. troops out of harm’s way in Iraq but also began a slow trickle back in. He recoiled against full-scale, conventional war, while embracing the brave new world of drone attacks and proxy battles. He has championed diplomacy on climate change and nuclear proliferation and has torn down walls to Cuba and Myanmar, but he also failed repeatedly to broker a lasting pause to more than six years of slaughter in Syria. If there was consensus Obama had not yet earned his Nobel

Peace Prize when he received it in 2009, there’s little such agreement on whether he deserves it today. “I don’t think he would have been in the speculation of the Nobel committee now, in 2016, even if he had not already won,” said Kristian Berg Harpviken, director of the Peace Research Institute of Oslo, and a close watcher of the Nobel committee. Harpviken said he views Obama’s foreign policy as more conventional and limited than he expected, particularly when it comes to using multilateral co-

operation and institutions. When it comes to finding new instruments for peace, he said, “Obama has been stuck in the old paradigm.” In many respects, Obama’s tenure has been a seven-year debate over whether the president has used the tools of war to try to make peace too much or little. Obama has been sharply criticized for his refusal to use force to depose Syrian President Bashar Assad, cripple his air force or more aggressively engage in diplomatic eforts to end the fighting. Many view Obama’s policies as an unfortunate overcorrection from the President George W. Bush-era Iraq war. “The president correctly wanted to move away from the maximalist approach of the previous administration but in doing so he went to a minimalist, gradualist and proxy approach that is prolonging the war. Where is the justice in that?” said retired Lt. Gen. Jim Dubik, a senior fellow at the Institute for the Study of War and the author of the book, “Just War Reconsidered.” Obama should have worked harder to rally a coalition around a shared vision of a stable Middle East, he said. “Part of the requirement of leadership,” Dubik said, “is to operate in that space between where the world is and where the world ought to go.” The president’s advisers dismiss such critiques as a misguided presumption that more force yields more peace. “In Syria, there is no international basis to go to war against the Assad regime. Similarly,

there’s no clearly articulable objective as to how it would play out. What is the end that we’re seeking militarily?” deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes said. “The president doesn’t believe you can impose order through military force alone.” But Obama has in many other cases been willing to use limited force to achieve limited objectives, even risking unintended consequences. He has ordered drone strikes in Pakistan, Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Syria, actions that have killed civilians and sparked tension in those countries and across the international community. What began as a secret program has become more transparent and Obama has aimed to leave legal limits for his predecessor on the use of unmanned warplanes. But he has left unanswered the question of how or when those actions will lead to peace, some argued. Looking back on his Nobel speech, that dilemma was already there, said Jon Alterman, a Middle East expert and former State Department oicial. “We are engaged in a whole series of infinitely sustainable, low-level actions that have no logical endpoint,” Alterman said. “When do we stop doing drone attacks in Yemen and Pakistan? What level of terrorism is acceptable? … We’re engaged in battles with a whole range of groups that are never going to surrender, so how do you decide to stop it? How do you decide what winning looks like?”

Oicials will ind plans for health care customers

Few oicers are trained to deal with mentally ill

As insurers drop out, people will need new options

Incidents rise as health funding drops, police say

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The HealthCare.gov website, where people can buy health insurance, is displayed on a laptop screen in Washington in this 2015 photo. The Obama administration plans to ind plans for consumers abandoned by insurers.

Robert Mann (third from left), the brother of Joseph Mann, speaks at a news conference Monday in Sacramento, Calif. He said Joseph Mann was mentally ill when he waved a knife in public in July and was then fatally shot by police oicers.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY PAUL ELIAS AND DON THOMPSON Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The Obama admin-

istration is worried that insurers bailing out of the health law’s markets may prompt their customers to drop out, too. So it plans to match afected consumers with remaining insurance companies. The hope is to keep people covered, but there’s concern that the government’s matchmaking will create confusion and even some disappointed customers. The new backstop was outlined in an administration document circulating among insurers, state regulators and consumer groups. It also calls for reaching “discontinued consumers” with a constant stream of reminders as the law’s 2017 sign-up season ramps up. Open enrollment for HealthCare.gov starts Nov. 1 and ends Jan. 31. The insurance markets were envisioned as dynamic engines of private competition. But in many states, they have run into problems. Some consumer advocates say this latest efort will help people retain coverage in a challenging year when premiums also are rising. Other advocates, however, worry it will cause confusion. Insurers fear a backlash from customers disappointed with reduced options. The administration says consumers have the last word on accepting any “alternate” plan they’re ofered. “I’m concerned that the alternative plan will look like a ‘recommended choice’ by the marketplace,” said Elizabeth Colvin, director of Insure Central Texas, an Austin nonprofit that helps people sign up for coverage. “The way it is presented could be interpreted as, ‘This is a plan we recommend,’ or ‘This is a plan we think will work for you,’ or ‘this is one of the better plans,’” Colvin said. The administration said it isn’t able to provide an estimate of the number of people who’ll get notices about their

new plans. It could range from several hundred thousand to 1 million or more, say independent experts. Big-name insurers are leaving the market because of financial losses, and nonprofit insurance co-ops are collapsing. Insurers say customers have turned out to be sicker than expected. Many younger, healthier people have stayed away, even at the risk of fines for being uninsured. Markets such as HealthCare.gov provide subsidized private coverage for people who don’t have a job-based plan. About 11 million people are currently covered. The original idea was that competitive markets would force insurers to offer quality coverage at afordable prices. That tends to work in metro areas. But many rural communities and small cities will have just one carrier next year. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is calling for a stronger government role through the introduction of a public insurance plan. With the markets struggling, administration oicials worry that insurer exits could complicate their desire to deliver strong sign-up numbers in the president’s last year. So they are leaving nothing to chance. The administration document says afected consumers may get 20 or more reminder messages just between Nov. 21 and Dec. 15, which is the deadline for selecting coverage efective Jan. 1. That could lead to problems if the government can’t turn of the notices after a customer has picked a new plan. The earliest notifications will start this month. Around the second week of November, consumers whose insurers are leaving the market will get a notice that HealthCare.gov has matched them to another plan. They also could receive materials from the new insurer, including a welcome kit and a bill.

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. • Many police

departments have specially trained officers and mental health professionals whose job is to help defuse the sometimes-volatile calls that involve people in the throes of mental illness. But those oicers are in short supply, and often they are unavailable in a crisis, as happened in Sacramento and the San Diego suburb of El Cajon, where police encountered men with mental problems and ended up shooting them to death. Both cities would like to add additional resources, but neither has the money. “Funding for mental health services has been cut, and we are responding to more of those types of calls,” El Cajon police Lt. Rob Ransweiler said. El Cajon, a city of 100,000, and Sacramento, the state capital with nearly half a million residents, each has a grand total of one mental health team that pairs a professional counselor and a specially trained oicer. “We can’t really expect that they can cover 100 square miles of the city 24/7. It’s been a very efective program, but it is limited by resources,” Sacramento police spokesman Matthew McPhail said. The National Alliance on Mental Illness, the nation’s largest grass-roots mental health advocacy organization, estimates that only 3,000 of the nation’s 18,000 law enforcement agencies have mental health response teams. The alliance is calling on more departments to adopt so-called crisis intervention teams, often called CITs. “Even in cities where a CIT is in place, you have no guarantees,” said Ron Honberg, a researcher with the alliance. “But it’s always better to have the advanced training than not having it.” In Sacramento, state grants pay for a specially trained officer and mental health professional who respond to-

gether. But the pair is limited to working in areas deemed to have the greatest need for mental health services. Even departments with multiple intervention teams still struggle to answer every call with trained oicers and mental health workers. Oicers with specialized training are often already dealing with another situation or are of-duty at departments that have no backup. “A lot of crises don’t happen between 9 and 5,” Honberg said. Beyond the formal teams, many departments including Sacramento’s are training all officers in “de-escalation” techniques that stress giving an agitated suspect “time and distance” instead of aggressively rushing in for an immediate arrest. San Francisco police spent six hours on Sept. 24 talking with a suicidal man who threatened to kill officers with an assault rifle. The daylong standof shut down a train station, but the incident ended peacefully after crisis negotiators urged the man to surrender. The weapon turned out to be a pellet gun. “As long as we have time to talk to this person, we have hope,” San Francisco oicer Carlos Manfredi said. The Virginia-based Treatment Advocacy Center published a study last year showing that police are 16 percent more likely to shoot and kill mentally ill suspects than other suspects. “It’s one of the biggest nightmares for families of people with mental illness ... and for law enforcement, too,” said John Snook, the center’s executive director. With attention growing after racially charged fatal police shootings of unarmed suspects, the Washington-based Police Executive Research Forum has been training departments in “de-escalation” techniques, teaching officers to give agitated and disturbed suspects “time and distance” to calm down before moving in for the arrest.


LOCAL

10.07.2016 • FriDay • M 1

Missouri Supreme Court hears St. Louis’ minimum wage case BY CELESTE BOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The Missouri Su-

preme Court heard arguments Thursday on the minimum wage law in St. Louis, which was struck down by a circuit judge last year hours before it was to take efect. The city was sued by employers and business organizations, including the Missouri Chamber of Commerce, who wanted to block the city’s attempt to raise the wage to $11 by 2018. State law sets the minimum wage at $7.65. At issue is whether charter cities can approve legislation to raise minimum wages at the local level, despite a law enacted by the Missouri Legislature in May 2015, which prohibits a local minimum wage exceeding the requirements laid out by federal or state law. The bill, which would have taken effect on the same day the city of St. Louis originally adopted its ordinance, began as a prohibition on municipal bans of plastic grocery bags that lawmakers then expanded. The measure was vetoed by Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat. It was eventually overridden by the GOP-led House and Senate. Attorney Jane Dueker, who is representing the business groups, argued before the court Thursday that employers could face criminal penalties for following the St. Louis ordinance instead of what the state requires. “I do think when you criminalize complying with state law, there’s a conflict,” Dueker said. She also argued that the Legislature intended to take cities “out of the minimum wage business completely,” making it a statewide issue for the sake of consistency. “We could have 4,000 diferent minimum wages,” she said.

John Rehmann, the attorney representing the city, pointed to an earlier minimum wage law to argue the Missouri Legislature recognized local authority in these cases. In 1998, the Legislature passed a law that provided no municipality could establish a minimum wage exceeding the state’s minimum wage. Rehmann contended that lawmakers must have recognized cities’ power to raise the wage if they acted again in May 2015. “Why would the General Assembly act twice on the same subject if they’d already done it the first time?” he asked. He also encouraged the court not to look at the minimum wage eforts only in the national scope, but to see how the issue affects St. Louis uniquely. The city has pointed to social issues from unrest in and around Ferguson as one of the reasons to implement the higher wage. “This was passed to address cost-ofliving issues, which by definition is going to be diferent in diferent areas of the state,” Rehmann said. Also on Thursday, the Supreme Court heard a case about an initiative to raise the minimum wage in Kansas City, and will soon rule on whether a circuit court should have removed it from the November ballot. Just outside the courthouse while the hearings were going on, advocates called for higher wages in both cities, wielding signs that read, “St. Louis needs a raise” and “Jobs with justice.” A national movement to raise the minimum wage has seen victories in California, New York and Oregon. Cities such as Seattle, Chicago and Washington have hiked their own minimums. The efort is stalled in Missouri until the Supreme Court rules on both the St. Louis ordinance and the new state law banning local minimum wages.

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DIGEST CHESTERFIELD > City raises some fees • The Chesterield City Council approved on Wednesday night some updated parks and recreation user fees and charges. Councilman Guy Tilman said parks department oicials had reported that fees and charges hadn’t been updated since 2009. Some of the changes include the resident swimming pool fee’s rising to $5 from $3 for children ages 2-17 and for those 62 and older; and to $6 from $4 for others. Pool passes for residents in those age groups, respectively, are going to $80 from $65 and to $90 from $75. Also, a pavilion rental at Central Park will jump to $55 from $32 for weekday use and to $110 from $80 for weekend use. Mayor Bob Nation called the increases “legitimate and reasonable.” (Special to the Post-Dispatch) TWIN OAKS > Village OKs inancing plan for new center • Twin Oaks trustees voted Wednesday night to borrow up to $1.6

million to inance the village’s irst general government building and community center. The unanimous vote followed almost two years of debate and preliminary work. The vote to borrow from Eagle Bank is dependent on inal acceptance of the bank’s proposal and then the awarding of a construction contract. “But for sure we have got past a big hurdle,” Trustee Chair Russ Fortune said. Incorporated in 1938, the village’s board met in private spaces through 1994; it has used leased facilities since then. Plans call for a 1½-story, 5,050-square-foot structure that will include oices, public reception area and meeting rooms. The planned site is on about an acre on Big Bend Boulevard, southwest of the current village hall space. It was donated to the village by a development company. The building could be completed by 2018, according to estimates. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

Large discrepancy between stillborn deaths reported, tax deductions taken BABIES • FROM A1

The exemption is the centerpiece of a 2015 law designed to ease some of the suffering when a family has a stillborn child. The measure had been discussed in Jefferson City for a decade, but was pushed over the finish line last year by Sen. Ed Emery, whose wife had three miscarriages. He said the discrepancy in the numbers is puzzling and will be the subject of a legislative inquiry when the House and Senate return to action in January. “I find it kind of flabbergasting that there were so many more deductions than what the health department reported. Something’s going on I think we’ll need to look into,” Emery said Wednesday. Over the past five years, statistics provided by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services shows there are an average of 405 stillborn children per year. The law, which drew bipartisan support when it moved through the House

and Senate, allows a one-time exemption of $1,200 from a parent’s income — the same amount taxpayers can claim for each dependent on tax returns. Under Missouri law, a parent can apply for a certificate of birth resulting in a stillbirth after 20 weeks of pregnancy or if the fetus reaches a certain weight. It’s generally considered to be a miscarriage if the fetus dies before 20 weeks. Based on the number of deductions allowed by the Department of Revenue, the new law meant a reduction to total state revenue in 2015 of $100,800. When the law was moving through the Legislature, fiscal estimates had put the cost of the exemption at $29,808. “There’s a mystery here,” Emery said. Gleba said the review of the federal data will help the state compare the number of dependents listed on tax returns and check to see if a stillbirth certificate is attached to the return that would support the deduction. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

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A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

HURRICANE MATTHEW

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

Death toll jumps sharply in Haiti 283 died in just one region; number expected to rise as crews reach areas cut of by storm BY DAVID MCFADDEN AND PIERRE RICHARD LUXAMA Associated Press

LES CAYES, HAITI • Haiti’s death toll climbed Thursday as rescue crews began reaching remote corners cut of when Hurricane Matthew slammed into the country’s southwest peninsula, the first Category 4 storm to hit Haiti in more than a half century. At least 283 people died in just one part of Haiti’s southwest, the region that bore the brunt of the storm, Emmanuel Pierre, an Interior Ministry coordinator in Les Cayes, told The Associated Press. The overall death toll in Haiti is not clear. Shortly before Pierre spoke, the headquarters for Haiti’s Civil Protection Agency had put the number of confirmed deaths for the whole country at 122. Authorities expect the number of deaths to rise, with mayors and other local oicials in marooned areas reporting higher numbers. Most deaths are thought to have occurred in the southwest region. Bodies started to appear as waters receded in some areas two days after 145 mph winds smashed concrete walls, flattened palm trees and tore roofs of homes, forcing thousands of Haitians to flee. Those killed in Haiti included a woman and her 6-year-old daughter who frantically abandoned their flimsy home and headed to a nearby church to seek shelter as Matthew surged in early Tuesday, said Ernst Ais, mayor of the town of Cavaillon. “On the way to the church, the wind took them,” Ais said. At least 12 people died in his town, and Ais said he expected the number to increase. Officials were especially concerned about the department of Grand-Anse on the northern tip of the peninsula, where they believe the damage and death toll to be the highest. The 283 deaths reported late Thursday did not include Grand-Anse or other nearby areas. “Devastation is everywhere,” said Pilus Enor, mayor of the town of Camp Perrin. “Every house has lost its roof. All the plantations have been destroyed. ... This is the first time we see something like this.” People faced an immediate hunger crisis in Grand-Anse’s largest city of Jeremie, said Maarten Boute, chairman of telecom Digicel Haiti, who flew there in a helicopter. In the nearby seaport of Les Cayes, many people searched for clean water as

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A girl lugs buckets of drinking water after the passing of Hurricane Matthew on Thursday in Les Cayes, Haiti. Two days after the storm rampaged across the country’s remote southwestern peninsula, authorities still lack a clear picture the extent of the disaster.

they lugged mattresses and other belongings they were able to salvage. “Nothing is going well,” said Jardine Laguerre, a teacher. “The water took what little money we had. We are hungry.” Authorities and aid workers were just beginning to get a clear picture of what they fear is the country’s biggest disaster in years. Interior Minister Francois Anick Joseph said food and water were urgently needed, noting that crops had been leveled, wells inundated by seawater and some water treatment facilities destroyed. Oicials with the Pan American Health Organization warned Thursday about a possible surge in cholera cases because of the widespread flooding caused by Matthew. Haiti’s cholera outbreak has killed roughly 10,000 people and sickened more than 800,000 since 2010, when it was introduced into the country’s biggest river

from a U.N. base where Nepalese peacekeepers were deployed. Before hitting Haiti, the storm was blamed for four deaths in the Dominican Republic, one in Colombia and one in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Haiti’s government has estimated at least 350,000 people need some kind of assistance. International aid groups are already appealing for donations for a lengthy recovery effort in Haiti, the hemisphere’s least-developed and most aid-dependent nation. In the coming days, U.S. military personnel equipped with nine helicopters were expected to help deliver food and water to hard-hit areas. While recovery efforts continued in Haiti, Matthew pummeled the Bahamas on Thursday. There were no immediate reports of casualties in the capital, Nassau,

Evacuations ordered; curfews imposed HURRICANE • FROM A1

South Florida, sparing the 4.4 million people in the Miami and Fort Lauderdale areas from its most punishing efects. By Thursday night, more than 60,000 homes and businesses were without power. Streets in Vero Beach were partially covered with water, and hotel guests in Orlando were told to stay inside, though a few sneaked out to smoke or watch the rain. The lobby of the Loews Sapphire Falls Resort was crowded with people and pets, including dogs occasionally snapping at each other. Some meals were served buffet style, while other people waited more than two hours for a pizza delivery. The hurricane was expected to blow ashore — or come dangerously close to doing so — early Friday north of Palm Beach County, which has about 1.4 million people, and then slowly push north for the next 12 hours along the Interstate 95 corridor, through Cape Canaveral and Jacksonville, according to the National Hurricane Center. Forecasters said it would then probably hug the coast of Georgia and South Carolina over the weekend before veering out to sea — perhaps even looping back toward Florida in the middle of next week as a tropical storm. Millions of people in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina were told to evacuate their homes, and interstate highways were turned into one-way routes to speed the exodus. Florida alone accounted for about 1.5 million of those told to clear out. At least two Florida counties — Orange and Volusia — imposed mandatory curfews until 7 a.m. Saturday. “The storm has already killed people. We should expect the same impact in Florida,” the governor warned. Many boarded up their homes and businesses and left them to the mercy of the storm. “We’re not going to take any chances on this one,” said Daniel Myras, who struggled to find enough plywood to protect his restaurant, the Cruisin Cafe, two blocks from the Daytona Beach boardwalk. He added: “A lot of people here, they laugh, and say they’ve been through storms before and they’re not worried. But I think this is the one that’s going to give us a wake-up call.” The hurricane picked up wind speed as it closed in, growing from a possibly devastating Category 3 storm to a potentially catastrophic Category 4. Forecasters said it could dump up to 15 inches of rain in some spots and cause a storm surge of 9 feet or more. They said the major threat to the Southeast would not be the winds — which newer buildings can withstand — but the massive surge of seawater

but the storm ripped of roofs, uprooted trees and caused flooding that trapped some people in their homes. Authorities urged people to stay indoors while they conducted search and rescue operations. Thursday evening, the Bahamas National Emergency Management Agency said authorities had rescued at least 30 people who were trapped in their homes by floodwater on the island of New Providence, which had been drenched by the storm throughout Thursday. In Cuba, Matthew blew across that island’s sparsely populated eastern tip Tuesday night, destroying dozens of homes and damaging hundreds in the island’s easternmost city, Baracoa. But the government oversaw the evacuation of nearly 380,000 people, and strong measures were taken to protect communities and infrastructure, U.N. officials said.

Pets ride out storm at shelter just for them BY AUDRA D.S. BURCH • Miami Herald

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Marco Beckford rakes up debris from a storm drain as he begins cleanup Thursday near a damaged gas station in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in Nassau, Bahamas.

that could wash over coastal communities along a 500-mile stretch from South Florida to the Charleston, S.C., area. President Barack Obama signed emergency declarations for Florida and South Carolina, ordering federal aid and allowing federal authorities to coordinate disaster relief eforts. Scott had already declared a state of emergency in Florida, as have his counterparts in Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina. Obama spoke by telephone with all four governors Thursday to discuss preparations for the storm, saying he is committed to providing the federal resources needed to respond, the White House said. The Fort Lauderdale airport shut down, and the Orlando airport planned to do so as well. The Palm Beach International Airport reported a wind gust of 50 mph with the center of the storm 70 miles offshore, the National Hurricane Center said. Airlines canceled more than 3,000 flights Thursday and Friday, many of them in or out of Miami and Fort Lauderdale. Amtrak suspended train service between Miami and New York, and cruise lines rerouted ships to avoid the storm, which in some cases will mean more days at sea. Orlando’s world-famous theme parks — Walt Disney World, Universal Studios and SeaWorld — all closed. “I never get time of. I’m a little sad,” tourist Amber Klinkel, 25, of Battle Creek, Mich., lamented at Universal. Patients were transferred from two Florida waterfront hospitals and a nursing home near Daytona Beach to safer locations.

Thousands of people hunkered down in schools converted to shelters, and inland hotels in places such as Charlotte, N.C., reported brisk business. At Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, NASA no longer has to worry about rolling space shuttles back from the launch pad to the hangar because of hurricanes, since the shuttle fleet is now retired. But the spaceflight company SpaceX was concerned about the storm’s efect on its leased seaside pad. As evening fell, the winds picked up along Vero Beach, midway between West Palm Beach and Cape Canaveral, stripping away palm fronds, ripping awnings and blowing sand that stung the face. Waves crashed on the beach, and rain came in short bursts. About 30,000 homes and businesses were in the dark. As people hurried to higher ground, authorities in South Carolina said a motorist died on Wednesday after being shot by deputies in a gunbattle that erupted when he sped away from a checkpoint along an evacuation route. As of 9 p.m. local time, Matthew was about 70 miles east of West Palm Beach, moving toward the northwest at about 13 mph. With hurricane-force winds extending outward up to 60 miles, Matthew could wreak havoc along the coast even if its center stayed ofshore. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal ordered an evacuation of the entire Georgia coast, covering more than a half-million people. It was the first hurricane evacuation along the Georgia coast since 1999, when the state narrowly escaped Floyd. The Washington Post and CNN contributed to this report.

MIAMI • At 10 years old, Little One has been through a storm before but nothing like what Hurricane Matthew promises. “She is scared of loud noises and lightning, and I am too,” said Marie Griin, 63, who raised the miniature Doberman since she was a puppy. “I am handicapped, and I don’t know which way this storm is going to go. I would not have been able to get out of my trailer or take Little One with me. We do everything together, so we are here together.” That sentiment — that pets are family — and the uncertainty of Matthew’s path drove dozens of people to Broward County’s pet-friendly shelter at Millennium Middle School in Tamarac. By Thursday afternoon, the shelter had 55 clients, 18 cats, 27 dogs and two birds — including a plump cat from Dania Beach named Rudy, adopted from the streets a year ago, and a trio of excited Yorkies from Margate named Benji, Big G and Love. The shelter can hold many more: 350 pets, 500 people. “We have never had this response before,” said the Sharron Carmichael, shelter manager who works for the Humane Society. “We know that if it is not safe at your home for you, it is also not safe for your pet.” Addison Chi, 39, and Scott Ritcey, 47, and their sheltie, Maisie, evacuated their home in Hallandale Beach on Thursday morning. “We live in a mobile home so we made the decision to come here,” Chi said. “We could bring Maisie, and it’s the safest thing to do.” The Humane Society of Missouri dispatched a disaster response team Wednesday to help evacuate animals in shelters that could be in the storm’s path. The team, which is headed for the coast of Georgia rather than Florida, has several vehicles and a boat and is capable of transporting as many as 200 animals in climate-controlled trailers. “Should the need arise, our team also is prepared to rescue animals in all types of situations in the aftermath of the storm,” Kathy Warnick, president of the Humane Society of Missouri, said in a statement. In Fort Lauderdale, at a peopleonly shelter, a crowd had gathered on Wednesday night well before the doors opened. With Matthew hours away, about 565 have registered at the shelter with a capacity of 1,300 at the schools combined. The shelter accommodates people in gyms, classrooms and other spaces.


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

HURRICANE MATTHEW

M 2 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

Death toll jumps sharply in Haiti 283 died in just one region; number expected to rise as crews reach areas cut of by storm BY DAVID MCFADDEN AND PIERRE RICHARD LUXAMA Associated Press

LES CAYES, HAITI • Haiti’s death toll climbed Thursday as rescue crews began reaching remote corners cut of when Hurricane Matthew slammed into the country’s southwest peninsula, the first Category 4 storm to hit Haiti in more than a half century. At least 283 people died in just one part of Haiti’s southwest, the region that bore the brunt of the storm, Emmanuel Pierre, an Interior Ministry coordinator in Les Cayes, told The Associated Press. The overall death toll in Haiti is not clear. Shortly before Pierre spoke, the headquarters for Haiti’s Civil Protection Agency had put the number of confirmed deaths for the whole country at 122. Authorities expect the number of deaths to rise, with mayors and other local oicials in marooned areas reporting higher numbers. Most deaths are thought to have occurred in the southwest region. Bodies started to appear as waters receded in some areas two days after 145 mph winds smashed concrete walls, flattened palm trees and tore roofs of homes, forcing thousands of Haitians to flee. Those killed in Haiti included a woman and her 6-year-old daughter who frantically abandoned their flimsy home and headed to a nearby church to seek shelter as Matthew surged in early Tuesday, said Ernst Ais, mayor of the town of Cavaillon. “On the way to the church, the wind took them,” Ais said. At least 12 people died in his town, and Ais said he expected the number to increase. Officials were especially concerned about the department of Grand-Anse on the northern tip of the peninsula, where they believe the damage and death toll to be the highest. The 283 deaths reported late Thursday did not include Grand-Anse or other nearby areas. “Devastation is everywhere,” said Pilus Enor, mayor of the town of Camp Perrin. “Every house has lost its roof. All the plantations have been destroyed. ... This is the first time we see something like this.” People faced an immediate hunger crisis in Grand-Anse’s largest city of Jeremie, said Maarten Boute, chairman of telecom Digicel Haiti, who flew there in a helicopter. In the nearby seaport of Les Cayes, many people searched for clean water as

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A girl lugs buckets of drinking water after the passing of Hurricane Matthew on Thursday in Les Cayes, Haiti. Two days after the storm rampaged across the country’s remote southwestern peninsula, authorities still lack a clear picture of the extent of the disaster.

they lugged mattresses and other belongings they were able to salvage. “Nothing is going well,” said Jardine Laguerre, a teacher. “The water took what little money we had. We are hungry.” Authorities and aid workers were just beginning to get a clear picture of what they fear is the country’s biggest disaster in years. Interior Minister Francois Anick Joseph said food and water were urgently needed, noting that crops had been leveled, wells inundated by seawater and some water treatment facilities destroyed. Oicials with the Pan American Health Organization warned Thursday about a possible surge in cholera cases because of the widespread flooding caused by Matthew. Haiti’s cholera outbreak has killed roughly 10,000 people and sickened more than 800,000 since 2010, when it was introduced into the country’s biggest river

from a U.N. base where Nepalese peacekeepers were deployed. Before hitting Haiti, the storm was blamed for four deaths in the Dominican Republic, one in Colombia and one in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Haiti’s government has estimated at least 350,000 people need some kind of assistance. International aid groups are already appealing for donations for a lengthy recovery effort in Haiti, the hemisphere’s least-developed and most aid-dependent nation. In the coming days, U.S. military personnel equipped with nine helicopters were expected to help deliver food and water to hard-hit areas. While recovery efforts continued in Haiti, Matthew pummeled the Bahamas on Thursday. There were no immediate reports of casualties in the capital, Nassau,

Evacuations ordered; curfews imposed HURRICANE • FROM A1

South Florida, sparing the 4.4 million people in the Miami and Fort Lauderdale areas from its most punishing efects. By Thursday night, more than 60,000 homes and businesses were without power. Streets in Vero Beach were partially covered with water, and hotel guests in Orlando were told to stay inside, though a few sneaked out to smoke or watch the rain. The lobby of the Loews Sapphire Falls Resort was crowded with people and pets, including dogs occasionally snapping at each other. Some meals were served buffet style, while other people waited more than two hours for a pizza delivery. The hurricane was expected to blow ashore — or come dangerously close to doing so — early Friday north of Palm Beach County, which has about 1.4 million people, and then slowly push north for the next 12 hours along the Interstate 95 corridor, through Cape Canaveral and Jacksonville, according to the National Hurricane Center. Forecasters said it would then probably hug the coast of Georgia and South Carolina over the weekend before veering out to sea — perhaps even looping back toward Florida in the middle of next week as a tropical storm. Millions of people in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina were told to evacuate their homes, and interstate highways were turned into one-way routes to speed the exodus. Florida alone accounted for about 1.5 million of those told to clear out. At least two Florida counties — Orange and Volusia — imposed mandatory curfews until 7 a.m. Saturday. “The storm has already killed people. We should expect the same impact in Florida,” the governor warned. Many boarded up their homes and businesses and left them to the mercy of the storm. “We’re not going to take any chances on this one,” said Daniel Myras, who struggled to find enough plywood to protect his restaurant, the Cruisin Cafe, two blocks from the Daytona Beach boardwalk. He added: “A lot of people here, they laugh, and say they’ve been through storms before and they’re not worried. But I think this is the one that’s going to give us a wake-up call.” The hurricane picked up wind speed as it closed in, growing from a possibly devastating Category 3 storm to a potentially catastrophic Category 4. Forecasters said it could dump up to 15 inches of rain in some spots and cause a storm surge of 9 feet or more. They said the major threat to the Southeast would not be the winds — which newer buildings can withstand — but the massive surge of seawater

but the storm ripped of roofs, uprooted trees and caused flooding that trapped some people in their homes. Authorities urged people to stay indoors while they conducted search and rescue operations. Thursday evening, the Bahamas National Emergency Management Agency said authorities had rescued at least 30 people who were trapped in their homes by floodwater on the island of New Providence, which had been drenched by the storm throughout Thursday. In Cuba, Matthew blew across that island’s sparsely populated eastern tip Tuesday night, destroying dozens of homes and damaging hundreds in the island’s easternmost city, Baracoa. But the government oversaw the evacuation of nearly 380,000 people, and strong measures were taken to protect communities and infrastructure, U.N. officials said.

Pets ride out storm at shelter just for them BY AUDRA D.S. BURCH • Miami Herald

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Marco Beckford rakes up debris from a storm drain as he begins cleanup Thursday near a damaged gas station in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in Nassau, Bahamas.

that could wash over coastal communities along a 500-mile stretch from South Florida to the Charleston, S.C., area. President Barack Obama signed emergency declarations for Florida and South Carolina, ordering federal aid and allowing federal authorities to coordinate disaster relief eforts. Scott had already declared a state of emergency in Florida, as have his counterparts in Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina. Obama spoke by telephone with all four governors Thursday to discuss preparations for the storm, saying he is committed to providing the federal resources needed to respond, the White House said. The Fort Lauderdale airport shut down, and the Orlando airport planned to do so as well. The Palm Beach International Airport reported a wind gust of 50 mph with the center of the storm 70 miles offshore, the National Hurricane Center said. Airlines canceled more than 3,000 flights Thursday and Friday, many of them in or out of Miami and Fort Lauderdale. Amtrak suspended train service between Miami and New York, and cruise lines rerouted ships to avoid the storm, which in some cases will mean more days at sea. Orlando’s world-famous theme parks — Walt Disney World, Universal Studios and SeaWorld — all closed. “I never get time of. I’m a little sad,” tourist Amber Klinkel, 25, of Battle Creek, Mich., lamented at Universal. Patients were transferred from two Florida waterfront hospitals and a nursing home near Daytona Beach to safer locations.

Thousands of people hunkered down in schools converted to shelters, and inland hotels in places such as Charlotte, N.C., reported brisk business. At Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, NASA no longer has to worry about rolling space shuttles back from the launch pad to the hangar because of hurricanes, since the shuttle fleet is now retired. But the spaceflight company SpaceX was concerned about the storm’s efect on its leased seaside pad. As evening fell, the winds picked up along Vero Beach, midway between West Palm Beach and Cape Canaveral, stripping away palm fronds, ripping awnings and blowing sand that stung the face. Waves crashed on the beach, and rain came in short bursts. About 30,000 homes and businesses were in the dark. As people hurried to higher ground, authorities in South Carolina said a motorist died on Wednesday after being shot by deputies in a gunbattle that erupted when he sped away from a checkpoint along an evacuation route. As of 9 p.m. local time, Matthew was about 70 miles east of West Palm Beach, moving toward the northwest at about 13 mph. With hurricane-force winds extending outward up to 60 miles, Matthew could wreak havoc along the coast even if its center stayed ofshore. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal ordered an evacuation of the entire Georgia coast, covering more than a half-million people. It was the first hurricane evacuation along the Georgia coast since 1999, when the state narrowly escaped Floyd. The Washington Post and CNN contributed to this report.

MIAMI • At 10 years old, Little One has been through a storm before but nothing like what Hurricane Matthew promises. “She is scared of loud noises and lightning, and I am too,” said Marie Griin, 63, who raised the miniature Doberman since she was a puppy. “I am handicapped, and I don’t know which way this storm is going to go. I would not have been able to get out of my trailer or take Little One with me. We do everything together, so we are here together.” That sentiment — that pets are family — and the uncertainty of Matthew’s path drove dozens of people to Broward County’s pet-friendly shelter at Millennium Middle School in Tamarac. By Thursday afternoon, the shelter had 55 clients, 18 cats, 27 dogs and two birds — including a plump cat from Dania Beach named Rudy, adopted from the streets a year ago, and a trio of excited Yorkies from Margate named Benji, Big G and Love. The shelter can hold many more: 350 pets, 500 people. “We have never had this response before,” said the Sharron Carmichael, shelter manager who works for the Humane Society. “We know that if it is not safe at your home for you, it is also not safe for your pet.” Addison Chi, 39, and Scott Ritcey, 47, and their sheltie, Maisie, evacuated their home in Hallandale Beach on Thursday morning. “We live in a mobile home so we made the decision to come here,” Chi said. “We could bring Maisie, and it’s the safest thing to do.” The Humane Society of Missouri dispatched a disaster response team Wednesday to help evacuate animals in shelters that could be in the storm’s path. The team, which is headed for the coast of Georgia rather than Florida, has several vehicles and a boat and is capable of transporting as many as 200 animals in climate-controlled trailers. “Should the need arise, our team also is prepared to rescue animals in all types of situations in the aftermath of the storm,” Kathy Warnick, president of the Humane Society of Missouri, said in a statement. In Fort Lauderdale, at a peopleonly shelter, a crowd had gathered on Wednesday night well before the doors opened. With Matthew hours away, about 565 have registered at the shelter with a capacity of 1,300 at the schools combined. The shelter accommodates people in gyms, classrooms and other spaces.


NATION

10.07.2016 • FRIDAY • M 1

DIGEST Agents raid Backpage, arrest executive State agents have raided the Dallas headquarters of adult classified ad portal Backpage and arrested Chief Executive Oicer Carl Ferrer. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton alleges that adult and child sex-traicking victims had been forced into prostitution through escort ads posted on the site. Paxton announced that Ferrer had been arrested Thursday on a California warrant after arriving in Houston on a flight from Amsterdam. Senate hearings, led by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., have looked into Backpage’s classified ads, which often promote escort services. Last month, the Supreme Court refused to block a Senate subpoena seeking information on how Backpage screens ads for possible sex traicking. A joint statement from McCaskill and Rob Portman, R-Ohio, of the committee looking into Backpage cited its refusal to cooperate, and said, “we will continue to press forward and complete our long-standing investigation.” Oicials: Train that crashed was speeding • A New Jersey Transit train that crashed into Hoboken’s terminal last week, killing one person and injuring more than 100, was going twice the speed limit at impact, and the train’s engineer hit the emergency brake less than a second before the crash, federal investigators said Thursday. The National Transportation Safety Board said the findings were gleaned from data recorders on the train. The speed limit for the station area is 10 mph. The NTSB said the train was traveling at 8 mph and the throttle was in the idle position less than a minute before the crash. The throttle was increased approximately 38 seconds before the collision and the train speeded up, reaching a maximum of about 21 mph, the agency said. The throttle went back to idle just prior to the collision, and the engineer hit the emergency brake less than a second before the train hit a bumping post at the end of the rail line. Dozens of Afghan soldiers have gone AWOL in the U.S. • Forty-five Afghan soldiers have disappeared in the United States during training on U.S. military installations in the past two years, Pentagon oicials said Thursday, exposing a hole in security as many presumably stay in the country illegally and avoid returning to their military assignments. Twenty-five were reported absent without leave, or AWOL, in 2015, and another 20 have disappeared this year, said Navy Cmdr. Patrick Evans, a Pentagon spokesman. Others have disappeared before, however, including 17 soldiers reported missing from Englishlanguage training at Lackland Air Force in Texas from 2006 to 2010. Since 2007, the United States has trained 2,207 Afghans in U.S.-based programs, Evans said. Evans said the Pentagon is “assessing ways to strengthen eligibility criteria for training in ways that will reduce the likelihood of an individual Afghan willingly absconding from training in the U.S. and going AWOL.” Mall assailant became interested in Islam, FBI says • The man who stabbed 10 people at a Minnesota mall had become interested in Islam in the last several months, withdrew from his friends and encouraged female relatives to be more religious, the FBI said Thursday. “We were told (he) had not previously shown an interest in religion,” but once Dahir Ahmed Adan, 20, had, he went from being a high academic performer to failing out of college “almost overnight,” FBI Special Agent Rick Thornton said at a news conference in which authorities gave the public its first look at surveillance video of some of the Sept. 17 attacks. “The totality of Dahir Adan’s behavior and the actions suggest he may have been radicalized either with the influence of others or on his own,” Thornton said. Defense secretary’s aide under investigation • Defense Secretary Ash Carter’s former senior military aide used his government credit card at strip clubs or gentlemen’s clubs in Rome and Seoul, drank in excess and had “improper interactions” with women during business travel with Carter, according to a report released Thursday by the Defense Department inspector general. The 50-page report describes in detail two strip clubs or show clubs where the aide, Maj. Gen. Ron Lewis, spent more than $1,000 on drinks. It includes conflicting statements that Lewis made to investigators explaining the outings. Lewis, whom Carter fired nearly a year ago, submitted a written rebuttal slamming the investigation, saying the inspector general assembled an inaccurate and inflammatory case. From news services

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Debate mineield: Town hall will test hopefuls’ stagecraft Candidates come out from behind lecterns, engage with voters BY JULIE PACE AND JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

WASHINGTON • President George Bush conspicuously checked his watch. Al Gore got too close for comfort. Mitt Romney strode across stage to confront President Barack Obama face to face. For presidential candidates, a town hall debate is a test of stagecraft as much as substance. When Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump meet Sunday night at Washington University, they’ll be fielding questions from undecided voters seated nearby. In an added dose of unpredictability, the format allows the candidates to move around the stage, putting them in unusually close proximity. “There’s a lot more interaction, physical interaction,” says Judd Gregg, the former New Hampshire senator who helped President George W. Bush prepare for debates. He said a candidate who is too aggressive in a town hall, either with the voters or a rival, “can come across looking really chippy, not looking presidential.” After an uneven showing in his first debate, Trump’s candidacy may rise or fall on his ability to avoid falling into that trap. The Republican repeatedly interrupted Clinton in their opening contest and grew defensive as she challenged his business record and recited his demeaning comments about women. Trump, who prefers drawing big crowds to rallies, has done only sporadic town halls and has rarely been challenged by voters face to face, ex-

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com Anis Mujkanovic (right) of Independents Graphic and Display Co. hangs a Washington University sign on the Sumers Athletic Center on Thursday as a Fox News production crew sets up on campus ahead of Sunday’s debate.

cept when his rallies are interrupted by protesters. In a nod to the challenge posed by Sunday’s format, he agreed to advisers’ suggestion that he get some practice at a real town hall Thursday night in New Hampshire. The GOP nominee has reviewed video of this year’s first presidential debate, and his aides have stressed a need to stay calm and not let Clinton attacks get under his skin in the second of three contests. The campaign has built in more rehearsal time ahead of Sunday’s showdown in St. Louis. Trump has also listened to the counsel of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who excelled at the town hall format during his failed presidential run. Presidential town hall debates are typically serious afairs and lack the liveliness of campaign trail events. Still, Trump adviser Peter Navarro said he believes his candidate will be energized by engaging with voters.

“Everything about that first debate environment was alien to the Trump culture of high energy interaction with people,” said Navarro, who has advised Trump on economic issues. “I think he’ll feel much more comfortable.” Clinton is far more practiced at town halls and prefers smaller events with more direct voter engagement. Aides said she won’t shy away from raising recent revelations about Trump’s tax history or reminding voters of his pre-dawn Twitter attacks on a Miss Universe winner, but will aim to keep her focus more on the voters sitting on stage. The wild card in the town hall debate is the physical choreography on stage. Candidates are seated but with no lectern or table to hide behind. They’re given hand-held microphones and are free to roam the stage to answer questions or challenge each other.

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

Greek mythology’s archetypes shed light on ‘heroes’ of 2016 campaign CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • As the presiden-

tial campaign roared ahead 11 months ago, David Schenker, chairman of the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Missouri, held a seminar on how ancient Greek literature, filled as it was with mythology and outsized characters, could help people understand the election of 2016. “My goal in the Homer and voting talk was entirely selfish,” he said, “trying to get as many people as possible to pay attention to Greek literature. And it worked out OK for that.” The event, entitled “Homer’s Handy Voting Guide: Using the Ancient Epics To Choose Our Next President,” sparked debates about whether Donald Trump was Achilles, the mythological hero of the Trojan War, felled by a poison arrow to his heel. Was Hillary Clinton the Odysseus-like figure, the hero of Homer’s epic poem, “The Odyssey,” who endured shipwrecks and decades of travails before finally going home? Little did Schenker know how prophetic that seminar would turn out to be in the ensuing year of outsized personalities and outrageous claims, of characters and character flaws writ large, many surrounding Trump. It’s been a year in which mythologizing has sometimes trumped truth-telling, and the script can feel like the fantasies of the poet Homer or the comic character Homer Simpson. As an employee of the university, Schenker has to be careful about not

appearing to take sides. He says it’s important to teach students the relevance of Greek, Roman and other ancient literature, because our republican government emanates from those cultures. “Even as the individuals change, the leadership style can be tracked right back to some of these individuals in antiquity,” he said. “Can we see qualities of any of our candidates in these ancient models? If so, does past performance give us any idea about future results?” Schenker asked. “I didn’t draw any firm conclusions, but the ensuing discussion was fun. And I hope a few of those people went back to read Homer.” Almost a year later, Trump makes the comparisons easier. “Donald Trump is such an outsized figure, representative of one particular leadership style and, yeah, that made me think of it,” Schenker said. “He is a guy who makes these extraordinary claims, and that is something we found in antiquities, in some of these heroic figures: Achilles, Agamemnon. ... These characters in (ancient Greece) would make claims to being the very best at certain things. Where there is a diference, though, is that they really were the very best. They had the acts to back them up.” Even the political scientists are struggling to keep their observations within the realm of science. “I’ve seen some strange elections, especially as a scholar of comparative politics, but this one may beat them all,” said Washington University’s Sunita Parikh. She said Americans “are more polarized than ever, and the parties are too, but that has brought greater frustration for voters.”

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“I think the Republican Party’s implosion, especially the fracturing of elite support across conventional candidates, and the anger and frustration of grass-roots primary voters, opened the door” for Trump. Clinton, she said, “exemplifies the status quo political choice, but certainly her gender plays a role.” One real-life historical figure, especially, stands out in the Trumpantiquities comparisons. The born-wealthy Athenian general Alcibiades lived a life that included supreme generalship, messy personal relationships and sex scandals, even surviving charges of “religious impiety.” Alcibiades entered five chariots in the Olympics when others could aford only one. “He was the most incredible egotist by our standards, who was constantly drawing attention to himself as being the most popular, the best speaker, he had all the best things in his life that money could buy,” Schenker said. Sound familiar? Schenker said the last year of the campaign had made him realize, despite the relentless arguing back and forth, how little context has been put around the 2016 campaign and how little we know about how Clinton or Trump “fit into the American story.” He blames the rat-a-tat communications of the age, the constant need to move on to the next most appealing or outrageous thing. “I wonder,” he asked, “if it speaks to a culture that is completely disconnected from its past, a culture that is so immediate, that is always looking for the newest and the brightest and the most recent?” Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

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Washington U. will study superbugs CDC grant funds new research

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As superbugs capture attention as a worldwide health threat, Washington University will be part of a national campaign against drug-resistant bacteria with a $2 million federal grant. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awarded $14 million to 25 medical schools and other organizations for research into how microorganisms in the body, known as the microbiome, can track and prevent infections by outsider, drug-resistant germs. About 2 million Americans catch drug-resistant infections each year, and 23,000 die, according to the CDC. “Understanding the role the microbiome plays in antibiotic-resistant infections is necessary to protect the public’s health,” Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC director, said in a statement. “We think it is key to innovative approaches to combat antibiotic resistance, protect patients, and improve antibiotic use.” The microbiome includes “good” bacteria and other beneficial organisms that live in the skin and in the digestive and respiratory tracts. Antibiotics that are supposed to fight “bad” bacteria can disrupt the natural habitat by unbalancing the good and bad. Then drug-resistant bacteria can take over and create an environment for outof-control bugs, including methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and clostridium diicile (C. dif.). Overexposure to antibiotics has been blamed for the rise in superbugs, with the CDC estimating that one in three antibiotic prescriptions is unnecessary. The research project will look at how early exposure to antibiotics afects the development of the microbiome and whether there are better ways to protect the microbiome. Four teams of researchers at Washington University were named to the local project: • Dr. Jefrey Henderson will lead a team working to identify how diet and metabolism interact with the gut microbiome in a study to combat C. dif. intestinal infections. • A team led by Gautam Dantas will study the long-term efects of antibiotic therapy in premature infants and how their digestive microbiomes are afected. • Dr. Jennie Kwon will study antibiotics and the microbiome as it relates to pneumonia. • Dr. Brian Gage will help look at hemorrhages linked to the use of blood thinners. The United Nations General Assembly focused on superbugs this week in a rare discussion of health issues. The meeting comes after a new superbug resistant to last-resort antibiotics infected a Pennsylvania woman over the summer, and a resistant strain of E. coli was recently found in a 2-year-old Connecticut girl. The CDC recommends increased testing for the superbug gene among certain types of E. coli bacteria that show resistance to the powerful antibiotic colistin. The gene spreads readily among bacteria, and it could make these multi-drug-resistant strains almost impossible to treat. A cluster of gonorrhea infections in Hawaii has shown resistance to all treatments. Doctors are increasingly worried that the common sexually transmitted disease is gaining strength as one of the most urgent superbug threats. If untreated, the disease can lead to infertility.

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NATION

10.07.2016 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A13

Next U.N. chief wants to be a ‘bridge-builder’

‘Honor’ killers now face prison sentence Pakistan closing loophole that freed many BY KATHY GANNON associated Press

ISLAMABAD • Despite objections from religious hardliners, lawmakers Thursday took the first significant move to curb mounting numbers of “honor” killings in Pakistan, stiffening the penalties and closing a loophole that allowed such killers to go free. Public outrage has been growing in Pakistan in the wake of a string of particularly gruesome slayings. More than 1,000 women were killed last year in socalled honor killings in Pakistan, often by fathers, brothers or husbands who believed the victims had tainted the family name by marrying the man of her choice — or even simply meeting or being seen sitting with a man. Those who carry out such killings are almost never punished. In accordance with Islamic Sharia law, Pakistan’s legal code since the 1990s has allowed families of victims to forgive the killer. Since the killers in these cases are usually close relatives, the family almost always forgives them. The measure passed Thursday imposes a mandatory 25year prison sentence for anyone convicted of killing in the name of honor and bans family members from forgiving them. Relatives can only forgive an honor killer who has been condemned to death, in which case the sentence is commuted to prison. Activists and liberal opposition members who backed the law said it was a step in the right direction although they said it should have gone further to eliminate forgiveness. “Remove these clauses which allow the option of forgiveness, otherwise these killings will keep happening,” warned Sherry Rehman, an opposition legislator and fierce champion of women’s rights in a speech to parliament. She pointed to the Oscarwinning documentary “Girl in

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this July 10, 2011, ile photo, U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres is surrounded by Somali refugees as he speaks to reporters in an area of Kenya where arrivals from Somalia have settled.

Portugal’s former premier has won unanimous backing BY EDITH M. LEDERER associated Press

UNITED NATIONS • Portugal’s

former prime minister Antonio Guterres, who is virtually certain to be the next U.N. secretarygeneral, says he wants to be “an honest broker, a bridge-builder and someone who tries to create conditions for consensus.” The veteran politician and diplomat, who won unanimous backing from the U.N. Security Council on Wednesday, said in an interview with The Associated Press and two other news organizations during his campaign that if he got the job his aim would be to work with all countries to help solve the myriad problems on the global agenda. The Security Council met behind closed doors Thursday morning and passed a resolution by acclamation recommending Guterres for a five-year term to replace Ban Ki-moon, whose second five-year term ends Dec.

select a woman as deputy secretary-general and he said in the interview that one of the things that is “crucial” at the maledominated United Nations is “to have gender parity.” He said that his 10 years as the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, which ended in December, were “excellent preparation” for a secretary-general who needs to be an honest broker and be seen by countries as independent in order to overcome crises. “I think we are living in a world where we see a multiplication of new conflicts, and you see an enormous difficulty in solving the conflicts,” Guterres said. “There is a clear lack of capacity in the international community to prevent and to solve conflicts.” What’s needed, he said, is a new “diplomacy for peace” which requires discreet diplomatic contacts and shuttling among key players. The secretary-general should also engage as much as possible and “act with humility to try to create the conditions for member states that are the crucial actors in any process to be able to come together and overcome their diferences,” he said.

31. The General Assembly must vote on the nomination. Guterres topped all six informal polls in the council after receiving high marks from almost every diplomat for his performance in the first-ever Q-andA sessions for candidates in the General Assembly. He was the only candidate of the 10 in the race to receive no “discourage” votes in Wednesday’s poll, which was the first to use colored ballots to distinguish the votes of the five veto-wielding permanent members — the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France. The result disappointed campaigners for a woman or an eastern European to be the world’s top diplomat for the first time. “Antonio Guterres has won this race because he was the best candidate for the race,” Britain’s U.N. Ambassador Matthew Rycroft said before entering the meeting. “It was a crowded field, it was a strong field and I’m delighted that seven of the 13 candidates were women but I and others have always been clear that while now is the right time for a woman that we were going to pick the strongest person.” Guterres will almost certainly

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 10.07.2016 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Trump’s tattered street cred ‘Stop and frisk’ stand underscores his tonedeafness.

S

unday’s town hall-style debate in St. Louis will ofer participants a chance to hammer the two presidential candidates on issues where clarification is required. For starters, we’d like to hear more specificity from Republican Donald Trump about his advocacy of “stop and frisk.” Trump appears to be under the impression that communities like Ferguson remain in a virtual state of war. He stated this week that race riots are occurring in America, on average, once a month. His stated solution, as president, would be to impose stop and frisk as the policing policy across the country. He cites the experience of New York as his basis for expanding the program. The New York Civil Liberties Union reports that, since 2002, New York police have targeted more than 4 million people for stops, searches and interrogations as a way of addressing petty street crimes and getting guns off the street. Police were empowered to stop anyone, with or without cause, and conduct searches for contraband. The practice was a blatant civil rights violation. Nine out of 10 searches victimized entirely innocent people who were just exercising their right to go from one place to another. New York police singled out minorities 90 percent of the time. In 2013, a federal judge ruled that stop-andsearch practices, without cause, violated the Constitution. The New York Times reports that the

stop-and-frisk era praised as successful by Trump actually ended in 2011, a year when there were 515 homicides in the city. Trump asserted in the Sept. 26 debate that crime went up after stop-and-frisk ended. In fact, it dropped. Homicides are down 32 percent. When Democrat Hillary Clinton tried to correct his mischaracterizations of the aftermath when stop and frisk ended, his response was to chant, repeatedly, “Wrong.” Trump’s experience with street life is his ever-so-brief encounter with a public sidewalk between leaving a skyscraper lobby and jumping into a limousine. The chances of him being exposed to a police stop-and-frisk encounter are zero. He has no idea whatsoever the kinds of resentment and humiliation that such encounters inflict on innocent people. He has no idea what it’s like to be singled out for search merely for being dressed in a hoodie or just for being black or Hispanic. Trump seems blind to the harm this program can create within torn communities like Ferguson, where police are working overtime to restore cooperative relations and rebuild trust. National stop and frisk would have disastrous consequences. Trump’s blithe, elitist embrace of this program ignores the harsh reality experienced by thousands whose only “crime” was to walk, talk or stand in the wrong place at the wrong time. It’s another example of his tone-deafness to the limousine-deprived masses who live in the real world.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Rev. Al Sharpton, center, walks with demonstrators during a silent march to end New York’s “stop-and-frisk” program in 2012.

Women in the crossire Legislature’s move against Planned Parenthood punishes poor women.

W

omen’s health care advocates in Missouri are bracing for potentially severe reproductive care consequences as the state patches together plans to fund the Women’s Health Services Program. Some other states that rejected federal money in an efort to punish Planned Parenthood saw a rise in maternal mortality rates, unintended pregnancies and HIV transmission. Legislators intent on pursuing personal political agendas are going to cause a lot of needless suffering. Women who depend on Planned Parenthood and other participating providers for important medical care will see reduced service availability because federal funds are being cut off. The Legislature in April passed a budget that rejected more than $8.3 million in Medicaid funding the state was due to receive for family planning, sexually transmitted disease testing and pelvic exams at county health departments, clinics and Planned Parenthood offices. Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, spearheaded the effort to strip public money from Planned Parenthood, the country’s largest abortion provider. His effort is part of a national conservative movement that seeks to distort Planned Parenthood’s primary health-service mission and focus on the small portion of services related to abortions. Federal law prohibits use of government money for non-emergency abortions, and the funding was used only to provide health care for women who receive Medicaid. States are prohibited from blocking Medicaid dollars from abortion providers for services such as vaccinations and cancer screenings. In turning down the federal

funding and replacing it from Missouri’s general revenue fund, state lawmakers specified that none of it could go to organizations that provide abortions. In Texas, where lawmakers targeted Planned Parenthood and slashed funding for reproductive care clinics, the maternal mortality rate doubled between 2011 and 2012. How’s that “pro-life”? The cuts forced closure of more than 80 family planning clinics. Remaining facilities were able to provide low-cost or free birth control, cancer screening and wellwoman exams to only half as many women as previous. When conservative political forces in Indiana gutted Planned Parenthood’s public funding, forcing the organization to close clinics, citizens in Scott County had nowhere to go for HIV testing and education. They now face an unprecedented HIV outbreak that Republican Gov. Mike Pence characterized as an “epidemic.” Planned Parenthood provides health care and education to more than 50,000 men and women in Missouri. The organization says other federally qualified providers will not be able to easily take care of more than 7,000 Medicaid patients cared for by Planned Parenthood. The health organization will continue serving Medicaid patients while the state Department of Social Services devises plans to suspend the Women’s Health Services Program and replace it with state funding. Missouri legislators owe it to their constituents to understand the full range of crucial services Planned Parenthood provides, and stop punishing poor women in an effort to score political points.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Ask candidates what they will do to alleviate poverty, hunger

Ask VP candidates what they would do as president

Thanks for publishing the commentary by Rush Holt and Marcia McNutt,“Key questions for the next debate” (Oct. 5). They are right on target, and I want to suggest another crucial question that the presidential candidates should be asked: What will you do about poverty and hunger in the U.S.? The first presidential and the only vice presidential debate have completely ignored the outrageous reality that one in six people in our country, the richest nation in the world, is regularly hungry or foodinsecure. No one, not Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump nor the debate moderators, have discussed in any substantial way the question of how to address hunger and poverty. Yet 42 million people in the U.S., including one in seven households in Missouri, struggle with hunger. And 43 million of our citizens, including one in three children in our state, live below the poverty line. As actor and activist Jef Bridges has rightly said,“If another nation was doing this to our children, we’d be at war.” I pray that both Trump and Clinton have developed detailed plans to address these unacceptable realities. We know that ending hunger and poverty is possible in our lifetimes, but we need to elect leaders who will put us on a path toward making it happen. As the second presidential debate arrives at Washington University this Sunday, I urge moderators Martha Raddatz and Anderson Cooper to ask the candidates what they will do as president to alleviate poverty and hunger. Clint McCann • Webster Groves

I was very disappointed in the vice presidential debate because the candidates did not address the most important issue that every voter needed to hear: What will the potential vice presidents do if the president dies and they become president? What I wanted to hear is the vision that Mike Pence and Tim Kaine have for America. I already know what Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton will do. I think it’s time to change any future vice presidential debates to asking the candidates what they will do as president, and not what the person running for president wants to do. Jim Panhorst • O’Fallon, Mo.

Trump represents more of the same divisiveness When it all started, Donald Trump was somewhat of a surprise — entertaining, outlandish, often rude and crude but laughable. However, as spring became summer it was apparent no other candidate could withstand his artfulness. He was not a joke. He had definitely struck a chord with white middle-class workers. They wanted change, and, as an outsider, he was that change agent. Yes, we definitely need to see some changes — the first one being that our elected oicials need to stop their divisive behavior and start working for the people. The nasty divide we are currently seeing in our country can be directly attributed to the outlandish words and actions of the Republican members of both the House and the Senate. The birther movement, calling the president a liar, repeatedly attempting to abolish Obamacare and threatening to impeach President Obama, and a blatant refusal to have hearings on the president’s Supreme Court justice nominee have all contributed to the anger and divide we see today. The Republican Party has nominated an individual for president who divides us even further. He constantly states that practically everything in the United States is “a disaster,” which is a real insult to every hard-working public servant and member of the military. While mudslinging, name-calling and hurtful remarks may get our attention, do we want this type of behavior in a president? Unfortunately, this is Trump’s modus operandi, and it seems impossible to make him understand that it is unacceptable behavior for the highest office in the U.S. He does not represent a change agent; he is more of the same divisiveness that has pervaded Washington for the past six years. Hazel Palmer • Lake Saint Louis

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican vice presidential nominee Gov. Mike Pence (right) and Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine shake hands after the debate Tuesday at Longwood University in Farmville, Va.

Better to put VP candidates at top of the ticket After watching the vice presidential debate, I have come to conclude that the wrong people are on top of each party’s ticket. Is it too late to invert this? Bill Fletcher • Dupo

Editorial belittles seriousness of rape allegation I am shocked and disappointed that the editorial “Predator in the House?” (Oct. 4) regarding the rape allegation against incoming state representative Steven Roberts Jr. is filled with many of the hurtful misconceptions that make it so difficult for people to report sexual assaults, and so easy for others to commit them. First, the editors state that Walker’s fear that her alleged rapist will hurt someone else is “legitimate but unfounded. She and Roberts are Democrats.” What? What does that mean,“legitimate but unfounded”? The editors don’t say why the fear is unfounded. Next, the editors spend two paragraphs admonishing victims not to delay in reporting being raped, suggesting that a survivor who takes a couple of weeks to think and pray about what to do “could leave the attacker free to victimize others.” It’s not the victim’s responsibility to stop a predator. But it is the community’s responsibility to take allegations seriously. Cora Walker risked her professional future as a state representative by reporting the assault, and the editorial belittles the seriousness of the matter. The Legislature should delay swearing in Roberts until after an investigation. Excessive skepticism and blaming the victim make life hard for survivors of rape, and make life dangerous for all women. Talia Linneman • Washington, D.C. Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

10.07.2016 • FRIDAY • M 1

100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

AN UNNECESSARY SACRIFICE • The purpose of both Coroner Padberg and the Board of Aldermen to conduct an exhaustive investigation into the accident by which six firemen were killed and several injured at the fire in the Christian Brothers College has public approval. All testimony makes it evident that the sacrifice of these brave servants of the city was unnecessary. Access the full item and more at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Public policy means so much in job creation Candidates should ofer solutions, not divisiveness, to working-class voters. BY SCOTT PAUL

I may be one of the few people in America who still remembers the opening minutes of the last presidential debate, before it descended into a spectacle that will linger in our collective memories for far too long. But those minutes revealed some of the uncomfortable truths about the American economy today, regardless of which presidential candidate is giving voice to them, and no matter how flawed and warped that voice may be. Our jobs are fleeing the country, said Donald Trump at the very top of the debate. Hyperbole, yes, but it captures an anxiety that many Americans feel. Consider this: Since 2000, America has shed one of every three factory jobs. A team of economists headed by MIT’s David Autor believes that a surge

of Chinese imports has led to over 2 million job losses alone, reduced wages, and stifled communities where recovery seems distant. Meanwhile, health data analyzed by Princeton University researchers indicates that middle-aged white men and women are dying sooner, from causes that can be associated with hopelessness. And unemployment among African-American men remains stubbornly high, in part linked back to the decadeslong deindustrialization of urban centers like St. Louis. More recently, while nearly every private-sector industry has recovered all of the jobs it lost during the Great Recession — and some have even added new jobs at a healthy clip — manufacturing employment is not even half recovered. Manufacturing hasn’t added a net new job since November 2014. A steel mill

across the river from St. Louis in Granite City has laid off 1,800 steelworkers in the past year, and many there are now scraping by on relief provided by the food bank. The cause for these layoffs? Belligerent trade tactics by China. That’s an issue on which Trump, Hillary Clinton and President Obama all largely agree. While some voters in industrial states are interested in Trump’s message on trade and manufacturing, many others reject him as a hypocrite, given his own record of sourcing Trump-branded products from China, Mexico and Bangladesh rather than from American makers. His skeptics in the electorate are buoyed by many journalists and economists who have questioned his solutions, his facts and even the underlying premise that manufacturing jobs matter

at all in today’s rapidly changing economy. I think many of these critics hope the issue will go away with Trump, should he be defeated. I have news to share: It won’t. And the dismissive attitude toward the beleaguered U.S. factory worker is one reason why Trump’s on the ballot this November, and others are not. Plunged beneath the surface of this fight is why factories still matter and what can be done. As it turns out, working-class voters of all ethnic origins face many of the same challenges. They’d be better served by solutions and candidates that can bring them together rather than pull them apart. We’ve always been better off with more productive workers and machines, and this era of industrial robots should be no exception. Yes, some jobs are displaced in this process, but

they’ve always been replaced by new (and sometimes even better) opportunities, assuming two other things: The economy is growing fast enough, and our share of the global economic pie isn’t deteriorating. That’s why public policy matters so much. Policies to boost domestic demand, such as infrastructure investment and the right types of tax incentives, can help ease these transitions. So would a balanced trade policy that puts results ahead of philosophy. Let’s hope the conversation about policy lasts longer than the first couple of minutes in St. Louis. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump must find time to put middle America’s mind at ease — and lay out some clear plans for job creation. Scott Paul is president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing.

he stillborn legacy of Barack Obama Central pillars of his presidency — Obamacare and reoriented foreign policy — are collapsing.

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER Washington Post

POST-DISPATCH

President Ronald Reagan, accompanied by Chrysler chairman Lee Iacocca, visits the assembly line at the Chrysler Corp. plant in Fenton in 1983.

he de-Reaganization of the Republican Party President’s son Michael ofers a resounding rejection of Trump. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

Now that the GOP is the Party of Trump, could Democrats become the party of ... Reagan? That’s a stretch. But Democrats are making a bid for the title. At Tuesday night’s vice presidential debate,the 40th president was name-checked twice — both times by the Democrat, Tim Kaine. “Our plan is like Ronald Reagan’s plan from 1986,” Kaine said on immigration. The Republican, Mike Pence, countered that “Ronald Reagan said a nation without borders is not a nation.” Kaine later said Reagan believed nuclear proliferation could mean “some fool or maniac could trigger a catastrophic event” and said Trump is exactly the type “Reagan warned us about.” Pence responded that “Reagan also said nuclear war should never be fought, because it can never be won.” Reagan did say that, but this only highlights his difference with Donald Trump. Former GOP congressman Joe Scarborough, now an MSNBC host, reported in August that unnamed sources told him Trump had thrice asked his national security experts about nuclear weapons: “Why can’t we use them?” Both Trump and Pence, like most Republicans, routinely claim inspiration from Reagan. Pence even affects the Gipper’s nod and tilt of the head, and on Tuesday he drew groans in the media filing center when he recycled one of Reagan’s best lines — “There you go again” — when he scolded Kaine on Social Security. But the Reaganization of

Trump suffered a serious blow on Monday when Reagan’s son, the conservative commentator Michael Reagan, revoked his earlier endorsement of Trump in a series of tweets after Trump suggested in a speech, without basis, that Hillary Clinton was unfaithful to her husband. “No way do I or would my father support this garbage,” he wrote, saying Nancy Reagan would have voted for Clinton and that she was “appalled” before her death when people likened Trump to her husband.“Not the Party of Reagan,” he tweeted, and, “If this is what the Republican Party wants leave us Reagans out.” The resounding rejection of Trump by one who has some authority to speak for the late president brought to mind the scene in “Annie Hall” when a loudmouth in a movie line pontificates about media theorist Marshall McLuhan — until the Woody Allen character brings over McLuhan himself, who says, “You know nothing of my work.” Ronald Reagan famously said that “I did not leave the Democratic Party — the Democratic Party left me.” Though it’s impossible to know how Reagan’s views might have evolved, Republicans such as former GOP Chairman Michael Steele speculate that Reagan couldn’t win a Republican primary today. His record on immigration, taxes, the debt, gun control and abortion would disqualify him. The most obvious difference may be style: Reagan was sunny and gentlemanly; Trump is gloomy and crude. Trump talks of the American military as a “disaster,” in “shambles,” with generals reduced to “rubble.” Reagan blamed civilian leaders but hailed the generals and their troops as “guardians of freedom, protectors of our heritage ... keepers of the peace.” Trump calls the Iraq War a

“disaster” and a “huge mistake” with “absolutely nothing” to show for thousands of American lives lost. He suggested some U.S. troops stole cash in Iraq. Reagan, by contrast, hailed those who fought in another failed war, the “noble cause” of Vietnam, and said we shouldn’t “dishonor the memory of 50,000 young Americans who died in that cause.” On immigration, Trump talks of building a wall, banning Muslims and Syrian refugees from entering the country and deporting all 11 million illegal immigrants. Reagan supported amnesty for illegal immigrants who put down roots in America, and he memorably called America home “for all the pilgrims from all the lost places who are hurtling through the darkness.” Reagan proudly updated Gen. George Patton’s phrase that wars are “won by men” to “men and women.” Trump derided the “geniuses” who “put men and women together” in the armed forces. And Reagan, of course, spoke with great moral force about the “evil empire” of the Soviet Union and the “barbarism born of a society which wantonly disregards individual rights ... and seeks constantly to expand and dominate other nations.” Now, a Russian dictator, Vladimir Putin, is returning to these Soviet-era abuses, and Trump praises him as a strong leader he can work with, while disputing charges that Putin has killed journalists and meddled in the U.S. election. Does Trump’s abandonment of Republican internationalism and moral leadership give Democrats the Reagan mantle? Not necessarily. But as long as it’s Trump’s GOP, the mantle is for rent. Dana Milbank dana.milbank@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

Only amid the most bizarre, most tawdry, most addictive election campaign in memory could the real story of 2016 be so effectively obliterated, namely, that with just four months left in the Obama presidency, its two central pillars are collapsing before our eyes: domestically, its radical reform of American health care, aka Obamacare; and abroad, its radical reorientation of American foreign policy — disengagement marked by diplomacy and multilateralism. Obamacare. On Monday, Bill Clinton called it “the craziest thing in the world.” And he was only talking about one crazy aspect of it — the impact on the consumer. Clinton pointed out that small business and hardworking employees (“out there busting it, sometimes 60 hours a week”) are “getting whacked ... their premiums doubled and their coverage cut in half.” This, as the program’s entire economic foundation is crumbling. More than half its nonprofit “co-ops” have gone bankrupt. Major health insurers like Aetna and UnitedHealthcare, having lost millions of dollars, are withdrawing from the exchanges. In one-third of the U.S., exchanges will have only one insurance provider. Premiums and deductibles are exploding. Even The New York Times blares “Ailing Obama Health Care Act May Have to Change to Survive.” Young people, refusing to pay disproportionately to subsidize older and sicker patients, are not signing up. As the risk pool becomes increasingly unbalanced, the death spiral accelerates. And the only way to save the system is with massive infusions of tax money. What to do? The Democrats will eventually push to junk Obamacare for a full-fledged, government-run, single-payer system. Republicans will seek to junk it for a more market-based pre-Obamacare-like alternative. Either way, the singular domestic achievement of this presidency dies. The Obama Doctrine. The president’s vision was to move away from a world where stability and “the success of liberty” (JFK, inaugural address) were anchored by American power and move toward a world ruled by universal norms, mutual obligation, international law and multilateral institutions. No more cowboy adventures, no more unilateralism, no more Guantanamo. We would ascend to the higher moral plane of diplomacy. Clean hands, clear conscience, “smart power.” This blessed vision has just

died a terrible death in Aleppo. Its unraveling was predicted and predictable, though it took fully two terms to unfold. This policy of pristine — and preening — disengagement from the grubby imperatives of realpolitik yielded Crimea, the South China Sea, the rise of the Islamic State, the return of Iran. And now the horror and the shame of Aleppo. After endless concessions to Russian demands meant to protect and preserve the genocidal regime of Bashar Assad, last month we finally capitulated to a deal in which we essentially joined Russia in that objective. But such is Vladimir Putin’s contempt for our president that he wouldn’t stop there. He blatantly violated his own cease-fire with an air campaign of such spectacular savagery — targeting hospitals, water pumping stations and a humanitarian aid convoy — that even Barack Obama and John Kerry could no longer deny that Putin is seeking not compromise but conquest. And is prepared to kill everyone in rebel-held Aleppo to achieve it. Obama, left with no options — and astonishingly, having prepared none — looks on. At the outset of the war, we could have bombed Assad’s airfields and destroyed his aircraft, eliminating the regime’s major strategic advantage — control of the air. Five years later, we can’t. Russia is there. Putin has just installed S-300 antiaircraft missiles near Tartus. Yet, none of the rebels have any air assets. This is a warning and deterrent to the only power that could do something — the United States. Obama did nothing before. He will surely do nothing now. For Americans, the shame is palpable. Russia’s annexation of Crimea may be an abstraction, but that stunned injured little boy in Aleppo is not. “What is Aleppo?” famously asked Gary Johnson. Answer: The burial ground of the Obama fantasy of benign disengagement. What’s left of the Obama legacy? Even Democrats are running away from Obamacare. And who will defend his foreign policy of lofty speech and cynical abdication? In 2014, Obama said, “Make no mistake: [My] policies are on the ballot.” Democrats were crushed in that midterm election. This time around, Obama says, “My legacy’s on the ballot.” If the 2016 campaign hadn’t turned into a referendum on character — a battle fully personalized and ad hominem — the collapse of the Obama legacy would indeed be right now on the ballot. And his party would be 20 points behind.

Charles Krauthammer letters@charleskrauthammer.com Copyright The Washington Post


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

REMEMBER THE FALLEN

Learn about men and women with connections to St. Louis who lost their lives serving in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars • http://bit.ly/stlFallen

OBITUARIES To Our Readers To place or share an obituary for your loved one, visit us at: www.stltoday.com/obits For more information you can contact us by phone at 800-365-0820 ext 5, or 314-340-8600 or by email at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com Bannister, Thomas J. - St. Louis Bass, Gregory "Greg" - St. Charles Bauer, Clement L. - Bridgeton Boschert, Mary Ann - St. Charles Broome - see Johnson Brunner, Gustav A. - St. Louis

Graham - see Johnson Hartman, Irma P. - St. Louis

Bass, Gregory "Greg" 64, on Tuesday October 4, 2016. For service information call 636-936-1300 or www.stygar.com

October 4, 2016 Vis 9:30-11:30 Monday, Oct. 10 Funeral at 11:30 at Valhalla www.valhallafunerals.net

Hartman, Irma P.

Kosfeld, Otto Ray - St. Charles

Johnson, Carolyn H.

Mueller, David - Crestwood

(nee Hennessey), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Thursday, October 6, 2016. Beloved wife for 49 years of Douglas Johnson; loving mother of Kelly (Jim) Clauss and Kim (Scott) Graham; dear grandmother of Mackenzie and Mitchell Clauss, Keith and Erik Broome, Colin and Blake Graham; dear sister of Mary (Bob) Charles and Dan (Beth) Hennessey; dear aunt, sister-in-law, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Monday, October 10, 10:30 a.m. to St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church for 11 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Memorials to American Cancer Society appreciated. Visitation Sunday, 4-9 p.m.

Noah, Ralph Louis - St. Louis Spiegel - see Bannister Stanton, Frank L. - Chesterfield Sulima, Evelyn - St. Louis Wood, Barbara - Overland

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Boschert, Mary Ann

Eichelberger, Lorelei M.

(nee Liberton), 83, of St. Charles, MO., died on Wednesday, October 5, 2016. Call (636) 946-7811.

(nee Howarth), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Thursday, October 6, 2016, at the age of 88. Beloved wife of 54 years of the late Albert J. Eichelberger. Loving mother of Sandra (Ed) Billo, Darlene White, Ron (Julie) Eichelberger, Jerry (Joanna) Eichelberger, Robert (Carol) Eichelberger, Karen (Billy) Crowley, William (Patty) Eichelberger, Debbie (Danny III) O'Connor, Lorie (Pete) Caira and Michelle Eichelberger. Grandmother and great-grandmother. Daughter of the late George Howarth and Agnes Hough (nee Pauley). Sister of the late Madeliene (Frank) Hanner. Aunt of Susan Davis (nee Snyder). Dear friend of Michael Stanton. Cousin and friend to many. Lorelei was the best mother, proudly raising 10 children. She loved to dance and sing. Lorelei was very active in many clubs at her church, Blessed Teresa of Calcutta (formerly Sts. John and James). Services: Funeral Monday, 8:30 a.m. from the HUTCHENS MORTUARY, 675 Graham Road, Florissant to Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Catholic Church, Ferguson, for a 9 a.m. Mass. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. If desired, memorial contributions may be made to the Parkinson's Disease Foundation. VISITATION SUNDAY, 4 - 8 p.m.

Brunner, Gustav A.

1934 - 2016, 82, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, October 4th, 2016. Beloved father of Timothy (Michaela), Thomas P. (Virginia) and Michael Bannister, Kary (Daniel) Spiegel and Daniel (Kassie) Bannister; dear step-father of Teresa (Keith) Layton, Jeffrey Bannister, Margaret (Cris) Ferguson; devoted grandfather of 12 and great-grandfather of 3; cherished brother of Dr. Robert (Margaret) Bannister, Barbara (Louis) Galli and Kathleen Brady; dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin, and friend. He was preceded in death by his parents Del L. and Irene Bannister, his sister, Sr. Maureen Bannister, D.C., and his brothers Joseph and Patrick Bannister. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois on Friday, October 7, 3-8 p.m. and at Annunziata Catholic Church on Saturday, 11 a.m. until time of Mass at 12 Noon. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the Del Bannister Scholarship fund at St. Louis University High School or Marian Middle School, 4130 Wyoming Street, 63116.

Sulima, Evelyn

56, of Crestwood, entered into rest on Tuesday, October 4, 2016 at his residence. Loving husband of Kelly Traubitz; beloved son of the late David Mueller and survived by mother Virginia Mueller; dear brother of Debbie (Dean Calvin) Kuenzle; dear uncle, great-uncle and friend. Services: Visitation will be held on Friday, October 7, 2016 from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. at CHAPEL HILL Mortuary, 10301 Big Bend Road, Kirkwood, Missouri. Service will be held Saturday, October 8, 2016 at 10 a.m. at Southminster Presbyterian Church, 10126 East Watson Road, Crestwood, Missouri. Interment to follow services at Oak Hill Cemetery. Family and friends can review and share stories, photos and condolences online at www.stlfuneral.com

Kahre, Helen - St. Peters

Johnson, Patricia E. "GiGi" - St. Louis

Elegant Sprays, Wreaths and Baskets. Same-Day delivery. Bannister, Thomas J.

Mueller II, David Dell

age 94, passed away peacefully September 3, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Joseph Aloysius Gaffney; cherished mother of John (Jack) Gaffney (Jeannie), Richard Gaffney (Kristine); dear sister of the late Charles Gaffney; dear grandmother of Patrick Gaffney (Sarah), Kaitlin Gaffney (Kyle White) and Sean Gaffney (Nicole); loving great-grandmother to six greatgrandchildren. Services: Memorial Mass Sat. Oct. 15th, 10 a.m., Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church, St. Louis MO. Wednesday, October 5, 2016. Visitation Sunday, 4-9 p.m. with service Monday, 11:30 a.m. at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois.

Johnson, Carolyn H. - St. Louis

Bulgaris, George - Gardner, KS, formerly of St. Louis Clauss - see Johnson Dahman, Karen - Kirkwood Eichelberger, Lorelei M. - St. Louis Ellis, Clarence H. - St. Louis Gaffney, Dorothy Marie - St. Louis

Gaffney, Dorothy Marie

of St. Louis, MO, died on Saturday, October 1, 2016, at the age of 96. Beloved son of the late Josef and Theresa Brunner; devoted father of John (Beverly) Brunner, Joan (Philip) Vitale, and Adele (Robert) Beyers; cherished grandfather of Jessica, Lori, Emily, Andrew, Amy, Melissa, Peter, Amanda, and Ryan; treasured great-grandfather of 15; he is also survived by his caregiver Ana, other relatives, and dear friends. He is preceded in death by his daughter Mary Clare Caesar. Gustav enjoyed woodworking. gardening, and attending Mercy's Journey's Program meetings. Gustav's greatest joy was being with his family and friends. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO. Visitation: Saturday, October 8, 2016 from 10:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Funeral Service: Saturday, October 8, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Interment: Friedens Cemetery. Memorials: Alzheimer's Association or Susan G. Komen Foundation. Visit Baue.com

Ellis, Clarence H.

(nee Rein), Tuesday, October 4, 2016. Beloved wife of Joe Johnson; dear mother of Teddi (Mark) Gray, Jay (Trisha) and Danny Petero; dear grandmother of Chris (Shelby) Noll, Cory, Cody and Taylor Petero, Sloan and Claire Gray, Denise and Quinton Jackson; great-grandmother of Christopher, Charlotte and Tyler; dear sister of Karen (Walter) Sawicki; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, greataunt and cousin. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Monday, October 10 at 10:30 a.m. Interment at J.B. National Cemetery. Contributions to Autism Speaks appreciated. Visitation Sunday, 2-7 p.m.

Kahre, Helen (nee Browne), 87, of St. Peters, MO, died on Sat. Oct. 1, 2016. Memorial Service at 11 am on Friday, October 7, 2016 at Calvary Church, St. Peters, MO. Doors open at 10 am. Contact (636) 498-5300 or alternativefuneralcremation.com

Kosfeld, Otto Ray asleep in Jesus, Wednesday, October 5, 2016 at the age of 88. Loving husband of Lois Kosfeld. Services: Memorial service at Village Lutheran Church, 9237 Clayton Road, Ladue, MO 63124, Saturday, October 8, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Friday, October 7, 2016 procession at 12:15 p.m. to Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery for 1:00 p.m. roadside service with full military honors. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Village Lutheran Church Memorial Fund. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Bulgaris, George

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of Gardner, KS passed away peacefully at home on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016 at the age of 76. George "The Greek" was born on April 12, 1940 to Susan and John Bulgaris of Wilkes Barre, PA. Beloved husband of 52 years to Rita. loving father to Susan O'Daniel (Chris), St.Charles, MO , grandchildren Matt (Samantha) and Sarah, Michele Williams (Mike), Lake St. Louis, MO, grandchildren Tara Young (Dallas) and Alex, Kristine Smith, St. Louis, MO, grandchildren Riley, Ashlyn, and Cole, John Bulgaris (Mike Oilar and daughter Lexi), Kenosha, WI, and Jennifer Peters (Vince), Olathe, KS, grandchildren Jacob, Anna, and Aubrey. Brother to Beatrice Peck (Tony) of Ashley, PA. George is preceded in death by his parents, sister Aphie, and brother John. George spent 35 years in the newspaper business. His career included The Washington Post, The Washington Star, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and he was GM and COO of Lerner Newspapers, Inc. in the Chicago suburbs. George was proud to have served in the U.S. Air Force, where he served as a Physical Conditioning Specialist. Services: A Memorial Gathering will be held at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 1355 Motherhead Rd. (Cottleville) on Mon., Oct. 10 from 9:30 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. concluding with a Memorial Mass at 10 a.m. Interment at Cemetery of Our Lady, Lake Saint Louis, MO. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Age 61, of St. Louis. Died Sunday 10/2/16. Our beloved will be missed. A celebration Sat 10/8, 1-5pm at his home, 1064 Mersey Bend Dr, 63129

Stanton, Frank L.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016. Beloved Wife of the late Melvin C. "Bobo" Wood for 54 years; dear mother and mother-in-law of Pam Wood, Jamie Wood, Penny (Jason "Gunner") Lynn; dear grandmother of Kymberly Caitlyn Wood, Jacob Anderson, Brody Lynn and Brennon Lynn all of St. Louis; dear daughter of the late Angelo and Lillian George; dear sister and sister-in-law of Linda (Faro) Maniaci, Donna (Bill) Hanratty, Sharon (Walt) Ryan, Angie (Bill) Smith, the late Connie George and Mary Jo (Rick) Gullet; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Special thanks to the Quarters Des Peres. Barbara was an avid cook, loved to read and coach softball. Service at ORTMANN'S 9222 Lackland, Overland Sun., Oct. 9, 5:30 p.m. Private Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Teen Leaders Club at Carondelet Park Rec Complex YMCA, 930 Holly Hills, St. Louis, MO 63111. Ph. 314-768-9622. Visitation from 2-5:30 p.m. Sunday.

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Johnson, Patricia E. "GiGi"

Bauer, Clement L. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, born January 30, 1922 to Jacob and Frances Bauer, passed away Tuesday, September 27, 2016. Beloved husband of Eugenia P. Bauer (nee Blount) for 73 years; dearest father of Cherrie (Terry) Matter of Reno, NV and La Donna (Michael) Cole of Bridgeton, MO; dear grandfather of Gina Matter Strand, Diane Matter Chapin, Thomas Matter, Jennifer Cole Taylor, Eric Cole and Steven Cole; great-grandfather of Ashley, Amanda, Alyson, Brooke, Thomas, Kolten, Reese, Zachary, Kaitlyn, Madelyn and William; great-greatgrandfather of Trevor and Nolan; our dear uncle, great-uncle and friend to many. Growing up in Odebolt, IA, he went to grade school there and graduated from Odebolt High School in 1940, a class of 59 students. After high school graduation, he moved to St. Louis and lived with his aunts and uncles to search for employment in manufacturing. He met Eugenia Blount in St. Louis through family and friends and married on January 30, 1943 at Blessed Sacrament Church. Entered Army Air Force on August 11, 1945, worked at Curtis Wright and McDonnell Douglas Aircraft and retired in 1984. Hobbies and special interests included playing basketball and softball on league teams. Later he took up golf and was active in the McDonnell Douglas retirees. Clement passed away quietly of natural causes. Services: Visitation Saturday, October 8, 10 a.m. until Mass time 11 a.m. at Holy Spirit Church, 3130 Parkwood Ln., Maryland Heights, 63043. Entombment Calvary Cemetery. Memorials may be given to the charity of your choice. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Noah, Ralph Louis

Wood, Barbara

July 21, 1928 - October 5, 2016 Beloved husband of the late Erma Ellis; dear father of Donna Smith, Julie (Thom) Taylor, Ron Olsen, Cathy Ellis, Renee (David) Mullen, Michael (Diane) Ellis and the late Pat Olsen and John Ellis; dear grandfather of 11; great-grandfather of 19; greatgreat-grandfather of 2; special friend of Sonya Peterson; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry, on Sunday, October 9, 11 a.m. Interment St. Trinity Cemetery. Visitation Saturday, 4-8 p.m.

87, passed away surrounded by family on Oct. 6, 2016 in St. Louis. Frank was a lifelong artist and educator, teaching graphic arts for three decades at Florissant Valley Community College, where he also served as art department chairman. He helped build the young department into the nationally recognized program of today. While teaching, Frank maintained his own illustration business with his wife, Betty, whom he met when both worked at downtown St. Louis studios. Frank also undertook a number of art commissions, including the design of statues and stained-glass windows. His work lives through colorful light cast at Our Lady of Providence, Incarnate Word, St. Monica, and other area churches. Frank's love for art also lives through his daughters, Laura (David LaGesse) and Carol (Kirk Warner), both graphic artists - and through the budding talents of his three grandchildren. Besides his wife, Elizabeth A. (Buehrle) Stanton, with whom he recently celebrated their 50th anniversary, he is survived by a brother, Msgr. William J. Stanton of St. Louis. Frank was born on Feb. 5, 1929 in St. Louis to the late Frank and Rose (Haas) Stanton. He served in the Navy during the Korean War before earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from Washington University and a Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University. We celebrate Frank's life and talents, as well as his infectious and generous laugh. Services: Visitation is Sun., Oct. 9, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur. Funeral Mass is Mon., Oct. 10, 10 a.m., at Incarnate Word Parish. Private interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

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Dahman, Karen After several years of illness, retired teacher Karen Dahman, a Kirkwood resident and 1965 graduate of Kirkwood HS, passed away recently. Services: Memorial services will be at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 9, at First Congregational Church in Webster Groves, 10 W. Lockwood. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Opera Theatre of St. Louis: 130 Edgar Road St. Louis, MO 63119.

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WORLD

10.07.2016 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A17

U.N.’s envoy on Syria warns Aleppo could be ‘destroyed’ Russia cautions U.S. against airstrikes on Assad’s army positions

DIGEST European Parliament member hospitalized after political scule Feuding in Britain’s fractious, right-wing U.K. Independence Party erupted into violence Thursday that left a member of the European Parliament hospitalized with a head injury after an “altercation” with a colleague. Steven Woolfe — the front-runner to be UKIP’s next leader — sufered seizures and lost consciousness after clashing with another lawmaker Thursday morning during a meeting of party lawmakers at the legislative building in Strasbourg, France. UKIP leader Nigel Farage said Woolfe was initially in serious condition and “things were pretty bad.” But he said Thursday afternoon that Woolfe was “in a much better place than he was a few hours ago.” Farage said he was launching an inquiry into the violence, which he said “shouldn’t have happened.” He declined to identify the other party member involved in what he termed “an altercation.” Poll suggests Merkel’s popularity recovering • A new poll suggests that German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s popularity is recovering after hitting a ive-year low last month. The ARD television survey of 1,003 people found 54 percent of respondents were satisied with Merkel’s work, up from 45 percent a month earlier. Merkel’s poll numbers have been volatile in recent months, apparently relecting events surrounding Europe’s refugee crisis. The new poll published Thursday found that satisfaction with Bavarian governor Horst Seehofer, the most prominent domestic critic of the chancellor’s welcoming approach, was down seven points to 37 percent. The poll, conducted by telephone Tuesday and Wednesday, had a margin of error of up to 3.1 percentage points.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Workers from the Syrian Civil Defense group known as the White Helmets remove bodies and look for survivors after airstrikes hit the Bustan al-Basha neighborhood in Aleppo, Syria. BY JAMEY KEATEN AND PHILIP ISSA associated Press

GENEVA • The U.N. envoy for Syria

called on al-Qaida-linked militants to leave the embattled city of Aleppo in exchange for an end to government and Russian bombardment, warning Thursday that thousands of civilians could be killed and the historic city “destroyed” by year end if conditions do not soon change. Special envoy Staffan de Mistura urged fighters from Fatah al-Sham Front to leave the city in exchange for peace. The group was previously known as Nusra Front and changed its name after announcing it had split from al-Qaida earlier this year. The U.N. considers it a terrorist organization. De Mistura entreated both sides to “look at my eyes,” before ofering to “personally” escort the fighters to a refuge of their choosing, provided they agree to lay down their arms. The combined Syrian government and Russian bombardment of the city’s rebel-held east has killed 376 people over the last two weeks, the envoy said. While far fewer have been killed in the western side, which has a population of more than a million, presumed rebel shelling killed at least eight people on Thursday, Syrian state media and observers said. It marked one of the bloodiest days in recent memory for government-held neighborhoods of the city. De Mistura acknowledged that the fighters would “need some guarantees” before an evacuation to another rebel-held part of the country but said these would have to come from the government. He also called for the local administration in opposition-held eastern neighborhoods to remain in place after Fatah al-Sham leaves, with the U.N. establishing a presence there to bring humanitarian supplies to the besieged population. His proposals marked the first

major initiative by the U.N. to help find a way out of the Syria crisis after the United States, citing in part the Aleppo onslaught, suspended its joint effort with Russia to stop the fighting. Those two powers had been leading the diplomatic push. Russia, which currently holds the presidency of the U.N. Security Council, called for de Mistura to brief members on Friday morning. Yet rebel fighters in Aleppo expressed skepticism over the terms of de Mistura’s proposal. They say the Fatah al-Sham Front has been instrumental to the east’s defense, having led an August counteroffensive that briefly broke the government’s siege. The U.N. estimates 275,000 people are trapped in eastern Aleppo. Ammar Sakkar, a military spokesman for Fastiqum rebel group, said the evacuation plan was “a form of trickery” that would allow pro-government forces to carry out a “longer period of killing and crime.” He accused the U.N. of holding a “double standard,” arguing that before calling for fighters to leave, it must “first stop the head of terrorism and stop his own acts of terrorism and crime against the Syrian people,” referring to Syrian President Bashar Assad. While Assad has not commented on de Mistura’s proposals, his remarks during an interview with Denmark’s D2 station Thursday indicated he would not be satisfied with the limited rebel evacuation. Insisting his military would retake the whole of Aleppo, the president rejected any distinctions between the array of nationalist to ultraconservative Islamic factions fighting against his authority. “The moderate opposition is a myth,” he told D2. “That’s why you cannot separate something that doesn’t exist from something that does exists. All of them have the same grass roots.”

RUSSIA WARNS U.S. Meanwhile, on Thursday, the Russian military warned the United States against striking the Syrian army, noting that its air defense weapons in Syria stand ready to fend off any attack. The statement underlined tension between Moscow and Washington after the collapse of the U.S.-Russiabrokered Syria truce and the Syrian army’s offensive on Aleppo backed by Russian warplanes. Russian Defense Ministry spokesman Maj. Gen. Igor Konashenkov said any U.S. strikes on areas controlled by Assad’s government could jeopardize the lives of Russian servicemen. He said Moscow was worried by media reports alleging that Washington was pondering the possibility of striking Syrian army positions. “I would recommend our colleagues in Washington to carefully weigh possible consequences of the fulfillment of such plans,” Konashenkov said. In Washington, State Department spokesman John Kirby said, “We’re looking at the full range of options here and those comments notwithstanding, we still have a responsibility as a government to consider all those options.” “I don’t find them (comments such as the warning) helpful to moving forward, to reach some sort of diplomatic solution here. But the Russians should speak for themselves and why they’re saying that kind of thing,” he said. Konashenkov said the range of Russia’s S-300 and S-400 air defense missile systems deployed to Syria would be a “surprise” to any country operating its aircraft over the country. He added that the Syrian army also has various Soviet- and Russian-built air defense missile systems, which have been modernized over the past year.

Women in Poland savor victory on abortion, ready to push for more

Liberal groups seek equal prayer at Jewish holy site • Groups representing liberal streams of Judaism appealed to Israel’s Supreme Court Thursday to force the government to implement its decision on equal prayer at a key Jewish holy site. Israel’s government agreed in January to enlarge and recognize a mixed-gender prayer area at the Western Wall, in Jerusalem. The wall, believed to be a retaining wall of the Second Temple, is the holiest site where Jews can pray. The compromise came after Israeli and American Jewish leaders negotiated with Israeli authorities for three years. But the prayer site was never established. The groups’ legal petition signals their frustration with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s coalition government, which is propped up by two ultra-Orthodox parties. The Western Wall is run by an ultra-Orthodox rabbi who opposes liberal Jewish customs at the holy site. Pakistan army chief denounces India • Pakistan’s powerful army chief lashed out at India Thursday, warning that any act of aggression from New Delhi would not go unpunished as tension spiked between the two countries over the divided region of Kashmir. Gen. Raheel Sharif said in a televised speech that Pakistan’s armed forces will react with a “beitting response” to aggression from India. His remarks came more than a week after New Delhi launched a cross-border attack that it claimed had destroyed “terrorist launching pads” used by Pakistanbacked militants. Pakistan said the attack killed two of its soldiers. Belgium charges man in alleged terrorist assault • Belgian prosecutors say a suspect has been charged with attempted murder in a terrorist context and participating in the activities of a terrorist group in connection with a stabbing attack that injured two Brussels police oicers. The Federal Prosecutor’s Oice, in a statement Thursday, also said the suspect’s younger brother, identiied only as Aboubaker D., has been detained and that an investigating judge specializing in terrorism cases will decide whether he should be kept in custody Friday. Two police oicers in the Schaerbeek neighborhood of Brussels were attacked on the street Wednesday by a man with a knife, who was overpowered by another police patrol. UNESCO exhibit recreates destroyed ancient treasures • Three archaeological treasures damaged or destroyed by ighting in Syria and Iraq have been reproduced for a UNESCO-sponsored exhibit at the Colosseum in Rome. The exhibit, which opened Thursday, features life-size replicas of the Temple of Bel at Palmyra, the humanheaded bull at Nimrud and the Royal Archives at Ebla. Three Italian companies, guided by archeologists and art historians, used technologies including 3-D printers and materials mimicking sandstone and marble to reconstruct the artifacts. They will be on display until Dec. 16. Islamic State militants destroyed ruins of the 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in Palmyra in August 2015 and bulldozed the archaeological site at Nimrud, in Iraq, a few months earlier. The Royal Archives at Ebla, including thousands of cuneiform tablets, have sufered extensive damage during Syria’s war.

Lawmakers reject ban, which they had backed just two weeks earlier BY VANESSA GERA associated Press

• Polish women are declaring victory in a dramatic showdown that pitted them against an anti-abortion group and the conservative government this week. Three days after the women donned black, boycotted work and staged giant street protests, lawmakers on Thursday voted overwhelming against a complete ban on abortion — a proposal they had supported just two weeks earlier. The victory merely maintains the status quo, which is one of the most restrictive abortion laws in Europe, but feminists hope they have gained the momentum to attack that next. Agnieszka Graff, a prominent feminist commentator, said she and other feminists had struggled in vain for years to reach younger Polish women, and that this was the first time she has seen them mobilized in huge numbers. “The feeling on the street was revolutionary. Women were angry but they were also elated at seeing how many of us there were. The black clothes created this secret-but-open signal that connected strangers on the street,” Graf said.

Mounted Police earmark millions for harassment suits • The head of Canada’s national police force issued an emotional apology Thursday and announced that the government has earmarked $75.7 million in payouts related to the settlement of two class-action lawsuits stemming from sexual harassment allegations by female employees, some of which date back to 1974. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Commissioner Bob Paulson apologized to hundreds of female employees who have alleged they were subjected to harassment dating back 42 years. “You came to the (police force) wanting to personally contribute to your community, and we failed you. We hurt you. For that, I am truly sorry,” said a teary-eyed Paulson. He said the settlements would provide inancial compensation for the women and pave the way to end potential class-action lawsuits.

WAR SAW, POLAND

Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jaroslaw Kaczynski (right), head of the ruling Law and Justice party, votes Thursday in Warsaw to reject a proposal to toughen Poland’s abortion law.

While the women protested to defend the current law, she believes there is a good chance the events might end up creating “a whole generation of pro-choice women.” Members of the ruling Law and Justice party voted two weeks ago to consider the proposal — brought to parliament by an anti-abortion group — sending it to a parliamentary commission for further consideration. At the same time, they voted to refuse to consider a separate proposal to liberalize the law. In a complete reversal, lawmakers voted 352-58 on Thursday to reject the proposal. Law and Justice leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski warned lawmak-

ers that further restrictions risked bringing about the “exact opposite efect.” Abortion is a matter of widespread debate in a way that it hasn’t been since 1993, when the current law took force after diicult negotiations between religious and secular Poles. Often referred to as a “compromise,” the law bans abortion in most cases but does make exceptions in cases of rape or incest, when the woman’s life is in danger or the fetus is badly damaged. In practice, though, many doctors are declared conscientious objectors who refuse to perform even legal abortions.

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NEWS

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

WEATHER • LOW 64, HIGH 70 • WINDS SW/NNW 5-15 MPH

PEOPLE

Cooler air moves in

Fox hunt: Hannity accuses Kelly of backing Clinton

A cold front will push across the St. Louis area early this morning with a few isolated showers possible. Temperatures will be cooler with highs in the lower 70s. A nice stretch of dry and pleasant weather is expected this weekend into early next week. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

65°

69°

67°

55°

Decreasing clouds

Mostly clear

Mostly cloudy, Mostly cloudy isolated shower

4-DAY FORECAST

SATURDAY

Sunny and cooler

H

68 78 63 73 65 64 63 62 63 64 63 70 72

W

mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

61 60 57 62 59 53 50 52 60 56 47 62 60

MONDAY

Sunny

TUESDAY

52°/74° 53°/76° Partly cloudy Partly cloudy

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

SUNDAY

48°/68° 50°/72°

L

H

W

61 61 64 63 63 56 61 59 53 61 62 63

68 79 67 69 73 63 78 64 63 63 64 72

mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Chicago 64 / 67

Kirksville 52 / 62 Kansas City 50 / 63

Springfield 62 / 64

St. Louis 64 / 70 Carbondale 61 / 79

Joplin 53 / 64

Poplar Bluff 60 / 84

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 87° 71° 72° 52° 90° 31° 77° 61°

0.00” Trace 0.63” 33.43” 31.51”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (1:25 p.m.) Low (5:51 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1944) Record Low (1952) High Last Year Low Last Year

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, Oct. 6th Weed - 2 (low), Mold - 15,251 (high) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 0 Month (Total) 0 4 Season 40 Year Ago

SUN & MOON

First Oct 8 Sunrise

Full Oct 15

Last Oct 22

7:03 AM Sunset

New Oct 30

Sean Hannity has hurled what many of his Fox News Channel viewers would consider an insult at colleague Megyn Kelly: He accused her of being a Hillary Clinton supporter. Hannity reacted by Twitter on Wednesday night after Kelly had a segment on her show about the presidential candidates tightly controlling press access. She noted that Republican Donald Trump “will go on Hannity and pretty much only Hannity and will not venture out to unsafe spaces these days.” Hannity responded on Twitter, writing “u should be mad at @HillaryClinton. Clearly you support her. And @realDonaldTrump did talk to u.” When another Twitter user told Hannity he should stand by his colleagues, the host said, “Sure. When they stand by me.” Trump has been a frequent Fox guest in recent months, particularly on Hannity and the morning “Fox & Friends” show. Hannity, a conservative talk-show host, has said he supports Trump and has given him campaign advice. He appeared in a Trump

Rapper packs big wads of cash to pay $360 ine • Fetty Wap says he brought about $165,000 in cash to a New Jersey municipal building where he admitted to charges including driving with tinted windows and a suspended license. The 25-year-old rapper, whose name is Willie Maxwell II, was ordered to pay $360 in ines. The

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 13.43 23 9.15 Jefferson City 21 8.93 Hermann 20 6.10 Washington 25 12.95 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 19.66 Louisiana 15 18.39 Dam 24 25 28.90 Dam 25 26 28.41 Grafton 18 18.98 M.Price, Pool 419 413.70 M.Price, Tail. 21 16.17 St Louis 30 20.29 Chester 27 22.06 Cape Girardeau 32 26.25

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.24 18 12.72 Peoria 14 10.59 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.98 Sullivan 16 - 1.28 Valley Park 24 17.35 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.26 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 23.36

+ 0.64 - 0.27 - 0.30 - 0.13 - 0.07 - 0.02 + 0.06 + 0.05 + 0.14 + 0.20 + 0.10 + 0.18 + 0.22 + 0.15 + 0.20

Associated Press

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Public telescope viewing will be held at the James S. McDonnell Planetarium tonight with the St. Louis Astronomical Society. For more information visit www.slsc.org.

The Year of the Mirror.

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Current Level

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

- 0.30 + 0.41 + 0.14 - 0.01 - 0.11 + 0.18 - 0.03

Looking for an instant update to your décor? Add a statement mirror from the Wilson Lighting Showroom. Our selection includes every style from traditional to transitional to modern.

24-Hr Change

354.94 - 0.09 360.53 - 0.19 494.53 - 0.34 658.47 - 0.27 707.75 + 0.03 657.15 - 0.01 910.61 - 0.10 840.72 - 0.10 599.89 - 0.02 408.02 - 0.06 606.53 - 0.16 445.09 0.00

S I N C E 19 7 5 S. BRENTWOOD BLVD.

Flood Stage

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS TV personality Joy Behar is 74. Drummer Kevin Godley is 71. Musician John Mellencamp is 65. Former “American Idol” judge Simon Cowell is 57. Singer Nathaniel Ratelif is 38.

DONATE YOUR CAR

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Paterson, N.J., native appeared in court on Wednesday with wads of cash sticking out of his pockets. Maxwell also pleaded guilty to failing to replace lost, destroyed or defaced license plates and to false alarms at his home more than twice suggesting a break-in.

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

6:34 PM

Moonrise 12:50 PM Moonset 11:05 PM

campaign video without his network’s knowledge, but he was told not to do that again. Kelly had no response to Hannity on social media. Fox representatives had no immediate response to requests for comment Thursday.

- 0.14

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

N

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L I G H T I N G

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Extremes High: 100° Edinburg, Texas

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Low: 11° Bridgeport, California

Rain

60s

40s 50s 50s

50s

70s

T-storms

70s 60s

70s

50s

80s

60s

60s 80s

90s

Snow

70s

70s 80s

70s

80s 90s

Wintry Mix

Matthew 80s

Jet Stream

Alaska Low: 8°

Hawaii High: 90°

Hurricane Matthew is forecast to move northward along the east coast of Florida toward coastal sections of Georgia and South Carolina. A cold front will continue to push eastward and bring a few showers and storms to the western Great Lakes and also to parts of central and south Texas. Another storm system will bring wet weather to parts of the Pacific Northwest. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 47 Albuquerque 43 Anchorage 31 Atlanta 64 Atlantic City 52 Baltimore 54 Billings 33 Biloxi, Ms. 68 Birmingham 63 Bismarck 30 Boise 45 Boston 56 Buffalo 55 Burlington, Vt. 52 Charleston, S.C. 71 Charleston, W.V. 56 Charlotte 64 Cheyenne 28 Chicago 64 Cincinnati 57 Cleveland 57 Colorado Spgs. 29 Concord, N.H. 44 Dallas 69 Daytona Beach 80 Denver 30 Des Moines 46 73 Destin, Fl. 59 Detroit 60 El Paso 60 Evansville 22 Fairbanks 34 Fargo 31 Flagstaff 77 Fort Myers 31 Great Falls 57 Green Bay 45 Hartford 73 Honolulu 71 Houston 59 Indianapolis 64 Jackson, Ms. 37 Juneau 79 Key West 57 Las Vegas 63 Little Rock 67 Los Angeles 61 Louisville

76 70 47 78 71 72 56 88 87 45 70 74 77 78 78 79 71 58 67 82 80 61 75 75 84 65 61 86 79 75 83 49 47 67 86 53 60 78 88 91 79 90 50 88 83 89 91 83

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny showers mostly cloudy showers sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy showers sunny sunny mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny showers sunny sunny sunny sunny

51 46 29 67 54 61 43 65 64 29 49 54 59 55 73 59 67 34 45 53 54 34 44 60 75 36 43 72 50 59 51 23 31 38 77 42 39 48 73 68 48 64 35 81 61 56 67 56

66 69 48 83 72 69 66 87 85 50 75 68 65 69 79 71 75 67 63 67 63 72 67 79 86 73 69 88 61 71 69 50 48 64 88 61 56 67 88 88 66 85 49 88 86 77 91 70

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

showers mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers showers rain sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny fog mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny

City

Today L H

68 Macon 76 McAllen, Tx. 64 Memphis 78 Miami 61 Milwaukee Minneapolis 40 Missoula, Mt. 38 69 Mobile Montgomery 65 59 Nashville New Orleans 73 New York City 58 Norfolk, Va. 69 Oklahoma City 51 Omaha 39 Orlando 77 Palm Springs 67 Philadelphia 56 Phoenix 67 Pittsburgh 52 Portland, Me. 47 Portland, Or. 53 Providence 51 Raleigh 65 Rapid City 31 Reno 40 Richmond, Va. 63 Sacramento 52 St. Petersburg 77 Salt Lake City 42 San Antonio 73 San Diego 63 San Francisco 55 Santa Fe 35 Savannah 72 Seattle 53 65 Shreveport 33 Sioux Falls 50 Syracuse 73 Tallahassee 77 Tampa 61 Tucson 54 Tulsa 59 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 78 46 Wichita Wilmington, De. 53 67 Yuma

79 96 90 87 64 53 52 88 89 86 91 75 76 65 62 83 92 76 96 74 71 64 76 71 57 76 72 86 83 67 87 84 80 65 79 60 91 57 77 84 83 92 66 72 87 65 74 96

W

Tomorrow L H W

cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny showers sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny showers sunny showers partly cloudy sunny cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny showers showers partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy showers sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy sunny

68 73 57 78 43 35 42 68 67 59 73 59 70 45 43 75 69 59 76 56 51 56 50 67 37 43 66 55 77 45 66 65 58 40 73 52 63 36 56 73 76 68 43 62 77 42 57 72

86 95 77 89 60 54 63 88 90 77 90 69 74 73 71 87 95 72 90 64 68 72 70 71 66 81 72 89 87 71 85 82 83 66 80 64 81 64 64 90 87 87 75 69 89 71 72 96

mostly cloudy mostly sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny cloudy showers sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy sunny showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy showers rain partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers mostly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy

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TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

74 50 64 66 75 80 55 47 35 58 68 27 73 50 50 50

86 59 75 102 91 87 63 56 55 62 90 36 90 65 59 58

W

thunderstorms cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny snow partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

47 81 57 73 60 54 54 52 52 79 54 55 47 80 56 77

58 88 75 91 82 86 78 57 82 101 77 76 52 87 81 85

W

partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny haze sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

42 47 39 67 59 79 46 61 40 58 77 64 60 52 40 35

56 63 53 84 70 87 79 75 52 85 86 77 71 57 54 52

sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy partly cloudy

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BY JOHN HUXHOLD Special to the Post-dispatch

For years, in a collaboration with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, the starkly modern Pulitzer Arts Foundation has proven to be an ideal venue for exploring contemporary music. Wednesday night’s performance was no exception. First on the program was Steve Reich’s “Violin Phase” for three violins from 1967. Lisa Chong stood between two loudspeakers, each playing a separate track she had recorded earlier. Her live playing was the third violin. The three started off played in unison. As the piece proceeded over 15 minutes, each line subtly altered the rhythm or melody, becoming increasingly out of sync, resulting in pleasant harmonic and rhythmic juxtapositions. Chong was an expert technician, matching her recordings through tricky rhythms and multiple repetitions and also providing some soaring obbligatos. Between 1958 and 2002, Luciano Berio composed a series of pieces each with the title “Sequenza” for a variety of instruments, including the human voice. His goal in each piece was to stretch the sound production of each one to its limits and explore as many techniques as possible to that end. Andrew Cuneo came out with his bas-

soon to perform the “Sequenza XII,” with the music spread out before him in a semicircle of eight music stands. Really high notes, really low ones, trombonelike slides between notes, burbles, harmonics sounding like two notes at once, lightning-fast finger work alternating with long, slow sections requiring strong breath control using “circular breathing” — this piece does it all. It felt more like an exercise than actual music, but whatever it was, Cuneo put on a master class of bassoon technique in a dazzling performance. For the finale, Erin Schreiber and Angie Smart (violins), Christ Tantillo (viola) and Bjorn Ranheim (cello) were joined by pianist Orli Shaham to perform “John’s Book of Alleged Dances” by John Adams. The 10 dances have frisky little names such as “Toot Nipple,” “Stubble Crotchet” and “Alligator Escalator” and are “alleged” because it is “music for which a dance has yet to be invented.” Dampers on the piano strings made its part sound like wood blocks being struck, turning it into a percussion instrument instead of a melodic one. The dances were both exciting and musically rich in their own way, with lots of variety among them. The string parts were challenging, requiring ferocious and heroic playing by the quartet. It was a dazzling end to a terrific concert.

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NEWS

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 10.07.2016 • B

SAVE-A-LOT SPRUCES UP TO COMPETE

BY LISA BROWN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As it faces a possible sale or spinof, the Save-A-Lot grocery store chain is boosting the number of national brands on its shelves, remodeling to highlight fresh foods and adding stores. The changes underway at some of the discount chain’s 1,368 stores nationwide come as the Earth Citybased grocer is poised to change ownership and as its discount chain rivals Wal-Mart and Ruler Foods are adding stores and services in the St. Louis region, vying for market share. Eden Prairie, Minn.-based Supervalu, which owns Save-A-Lot, is exploring spinning of Save-A-Lot as a stand-alone company or a sale of the chain amid increased competition

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Expanded oferings

Sale or spinof

Changing landscape

Regional chain brings more national brands into its mix of products

Chain’s owner may sell Save-A-Lot stories or make them an independent entity

Grocer market is changing, with more players vying to win customers

See SAVE-A-LOT • Page B4

GROCER MARKET SHARE IN FISCAL YEAR 2015 Walmart/Sam’s

Schnucks

Save-A-Lot, Shop ’n Save Dierbergs

Costco Other Aldi

28.7 percent

23.7 percent

13.2 percent

4.3%

Ruler Foods

Target

3.3%

2.3%

10 percent

3.9%

Dollar General Trader Joe’s Dollar Tree* Whole Foods 2.0%

1.4%

1.3%

1.0%

3.4%

GFS

Straub’s

Tom’s

0.5%

0.5%

0.5%

GFS

Straub’s

Tom’s

0.5%

0.5%

0.5%

MARKET SHARE IN FISCAL YEAR 2014 Walmart/Sam’s

Schnucks

Save-A-Lot, Shop ’n Save

Dierbergs

Costco Other Aldi

28.8 percent

23.9 percent

13.9 percent

10.3 percent

4.5%

Ruler Foods

Target

1.9%

2.2%

Dollar General Trader Joe’s Dollar Tree* Whole Foods 1.9%

0.2%

1.5%

1.0%

3.3% 3.6%

GROCERY STORES New stores in fiscal year 2015. Walmart/ Sam’s

Schnucks

47 stores

70

Stores closed since fiscal year 2014. Save-A-Lot Costco Shop ’n Save Dierbergs | 68 24 3

Other 90

Aldi 40

Ruler Target 7 22

Dollar General 118

Trader Joe’s 4

Dollar Tree* 129

Whole Foods Straub’s 2 4

GFS 4

Tom’s 4

NOTES * Dollar Tree acquired Family Dollar in July 2015, boosting its local store count. ** Report defines St. Louis region as St. Louis and the Missouri counties of Jeferson, Lincoln, St. Charles, St. Louis, and Warren; and the Illinois counties of Bond, Calhoun, Clinton, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Monroe and St. Clair. SOURCE: Chain Store Guide’s 2016 Grocery Industry Market Share Report

Regulatory burden isn’t only reason for decline of small banks

Progress continues on quarry redevelopment

Community banks struggle amid low rates, slow economy

Post-Dispatch

Higher bar for projects in St. Louis to receive tax breaks New formula helps calculate how much revenue is possible

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A rendering of a hotel planned for Sunset Ridge at Manchester, on Manchester Road at I-270.

Community bankers do a lot of complaining about regulation. They argue that Dodd-Frank and other laws have hurt them disproportionately, even though they didn’t cause the financial crisis. They’d like relief from various Wall Street-inspired rules, from mortgage paperwork to tougher capital requirements. The number of community banks has shrunk to fewer than 6,000 today from nearly 8,000 in 1995, but regulation isn’t the only thing pushing banks to merge. Most of the decline, in fact, may be caused by other economic and technological See NICKLAUS • Page B4

is Alinea’s developer. Balke Brown Transwestern will manage the complex. The project is set for completion by the end of the year. TriStar previously had a plan for the entire site on Manchester Road just west of Interstate 270. That proposal, called the Quarry, included a seven-story hotel, an office building with a bank, restaurants, shops, about 270 apartments and lots of parking.

In an efort to ensure the city is getting its money’s worth, the St. Louis Development Corporation is slowly rolling out a new system to evaluate developments that require public subsidies. Development projects will be scored on how much they are expected to contribute to future city revenue, helping to fund the city’s substantial infrastructure needs. Just to catch up on backlogged maintenance, St. Louis currently needs roughly $75 million more annually, according to a budget expert at SLDC. Under the new criteria, projects proposed in stronger neighborhoods will be expected to contribute

See QUARRY • Page B5

See SUBSIDIES • Page B5

Site west of I-270 will include apartments, hotel, retail BY TIM BRYANT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DE S PERE S • From his third-floor office, Mike Roberts can see apartment buildings under construction on a site that for years was an abandoned rock quarry. Roberts is a principal of Commercial Development Co., which bought the unused quarry in 1994 and then spent more than a decade filling the 150-foot-deep pit with 5.2 million cubic yards of dirt and rock.

The intent was to ready the site for redevelopment. Progress was slow, and various redevelopment plans came and went. Roberts and his older brother Tom Roberts, Commercial Development’s other principal, said Thursday that under multiple owners work on the 28-acre site is finally well underway. Far along is construction of the Alinea apartments, a 254-unit complex in the middle of the site. TriStar Companies, of Earth City,

BUSINESS

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NETWORKING

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

Pinnacle Contracting to build performing arts center

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Overturf taking over as president of design irm Ross & Baruzzini

Overturf Pinnacle Contracting Inc. was selected as construction manager for a performing arts center at Jeferson High School in Festus.

Pinnacle Contracting Inc. was selected as construction manager for a $5.7 million performing arts center at Jefferson High School in Festus.

The single-story, 22,000-square-foot addition will feature a 650-seat auditorium and lobby as well as storage and support areas. The project is expected to be

completed by July. Ebersoldt + Associates is project architect.

BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD AWARDS Edwina Conley, of St. Louis Realtors, was named Realtor of the year by the Missouri Realtors. Janet Judd, of St. Louis Association of Realtors, was named salesperson of the year.

Bade Rooing received a 2016 Firestone Inner Circle of Quality Award for installation and customer service.

INFINITI QX30

NEW 2017

The Yield Lab received the Global Ambassador’s Award from the World Trade Center in St. Louis.

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

LiMiTEd AVAiLAbiLiTy

377

$

Duane Kreuger, corporate operations manager for Geotechnology Inc., was named the winner of the Floyd T. Johnston Service Award by the Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists.

*

A MONTH

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

MOVING Samantha’s Other Place hair salon relocated to 925 DeMun. NAME CHANGE Twenty-two St. Louis-area Paciic Beach Tanning salons are now Palm Beach Tan. NEW BUSINESS Johnson Bender Asset Management, an ailiate of Stifel Financial Corp.’s independent broker/dealer subsidiary Century Securities Associates Inc., was formed by James L. Johnson III and Albert F. Bender III at 9630 Clayton Road. OPENINGS Treats Unleashed opened a new store: • 2520 Highway K, Hutchins Farm Plaza, O’Fallon, Mo. PROJECTS S.M. Wilson & Co. was selected to build 108 independent living apartments in a new four-story building at the Tallgrass Creek retirement community in Overland Park, Kan.

UNINSURED DRIVERS Missouri has no idea how many motorists are driving without car insurance, but experts say it’s a big number. Jim Gallagher and David Nicklaus discuss what the state could do about the problem.

Osborne

Benney

Dirscherl

Schneider

Hoeferlin

Williams

Kertesz

Dunning

Jackson

Aplington

Watts

Presley

2 or More At This Price

427

$

*

A MONTH

NEW 2017

INFINITI Q60 ALL WHEEL DRIVE

LiMiTEd AVAiLAbiLiTy

458

$

*

A MONTH

2 iN STOCK AT THiS PRiCE+

NEW 2016

INFINITI Q50 ALL WHEEL DRIVE

GCS Credit Union employees raised $1,000 for the National Parkinson Foundation. MILESTONES St. Johns Bank marked 90 years in business.

Enchelmaier Koesterer

INFINITI QX60

NEW 2016

Hard Rock Cafe St. Louis and Big Bang Marketing Consultants LLC won the Ampliication Award for public relations at the Hard Rock Cafe’s national sales and marketing conference.

Tony Kreutz, senior vice president of business development/corporate strategies for SCI Engineering, was elected as chairman of the governing board for Make-A-Wish Missouri.

Foster

2 iN STOCK AT THiS PRiCE+

The Safety National Building in Maryland Heights was named the Outstanding Building of the Year by the Building Owners and Managers Association.

HELPING OUT Esse Health sponsored the American Diabetes Association’s 2016 Step Out Walk and raised more than $5,000 to support diabetes research and educational programs.

William H. Overturf III was appointed president of Ross & Baruzzini, an international design and consulting firm. Overturf succeeds Craig Toder, who remains as chairman of the board. Overturf has more than 30 years experience in the industry, 25 with Ross & Baruzzini. Most recently, he was senior vice president and chief operating officer for domestic operations. He is the third president in Ross & Baruzzini’s 63-year history. Overturf holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

2 or More At This Price

338

$ OR JUST ANNOUNCED CHOOSE

0

*

A MONTH

%

72

**

APR FOR

MONTHS

*39 mo. lease -10,000 miles per year. $999 cash down. Tax, title, license, Acquisition fee and dealer fee not included. $0 security deposit.**0% apr for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 financed. For qualified buyers. See dealer for details. + Vin. # SJKCH5CR6HA017563, Vin. # SJKCH5CR3HA016984. ++Vin. # JN1EV7EL1HM551063, Vin. # JN1EV7EL0HM551040. Offers expire 10/31/16.

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2015.

Bommarito INFINITI WEST COUNTY 15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. (636) 391-9400 BommaritoINFINITI.com

Marsha Enchelmaier joined Lutheran Senior Services and its Center For Clinical Excellence as director of clinical resources. RiverVest added Nakul Tandon as an analyst. Jacqueline Koesterer joined the Northwestern Mutual oice in Glen Carbon, Ill. Precoat Metals hired John Osborne as a inancial analyst. Marsha Benney was promoted to executive vice president-risk management at Midwest BankCentre. Argent Capital Management added Stephanie Dirscherl as director of marketing. Abstrakt Marketing Group hired Jamie Schneider as the executive director of human resources. Purk & Associates P.C. added Thomas J. “T.J.” Hoeferlin as director of assurance services.

BUSINESS CALENDAR WEDNESDAY BUSINESS • SCORE presents this workshop on generating a consistent low of business leads. • 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., E3 Wealth, 10825 Watson Road, Suite 100, Sunset Hills • $35 preregistered; $45 at the door. Register: http://conta.cc/2dKb3tQ

Holland Construction Services added Jamie Foster as director of human resources.

FRIDAY, OCT. 14 MANUFACTURING • St. Charles County helps host ProductCamp, a user-driven, collaborative “unconference” for those who build, design, market or manage a product or service. • Noon-5 p.m., Taylor Automotive Center, Ranken Technical College, 751 Parr Road, Wentzville • $20 for attendees, $100 for exhibit booth space. Register: www.growmanufacturing.org

Leon Holschbach, CEO of Midland States Bancorp, was appointed to a two-year term on the Conference of State Bank Supervisors’ bankers advisory board. Chris Williams was promoted to Midwestern regional vice president at Anheuser-Busch. Ari Kertesz was named large format sales lead. Brent Becker was named chief executive oicer and president of Baldwin Technology Inc. Flagstar Banks Home Lending team added John Dunning as a senior loan oicer and Richard Jackson as a loan oicer.

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF ROLAND KLOSE

Business editor

314-340-8128

JACOB BARKER

Economic development

314-340-8291

LISA BROWN

Retail, consumer products and marketing 314-340-8127

TIM BRYANT

Real estate and construction

JIM GALLAGHER

Personal inance and corporate afairs 314-340-8390

BRYCE GRAY

Energy and environment

314-340-8307

SAMANTHA LISS

Business of health

314-340-8017

DAVID NICKLAUS

Business columnist

314-340-8213

SUBMIT AN ITEM Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to:

314-340-8206

biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker

To e-mail a staf member, use the irst initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

BJC HealthCare named David Aplington as BJC senior vice president and general counsel, to succeed Michael DeHaven, who will retire Jan. 1. Chris Watts was appointed president of BJC’s St. Charles County hospitals, Barnes-Jewish St. Peters Hospital and Progress West Hospital. HBM Holdings appointed Michael Chill as vice president of information technology. Gina Presley joined Brighton Agency as account manager on its farm brand builder team.


MARKET WATCH

10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS U.S. stocks regained early losses to finish little changed Thursday. Drugmakers slipped and chemicals companies rose. Oil closed over $50 a barrel for the first time since late June. Gold prices reached a four-month low and bond yields neared four-month highs.

Twitter

20 15

J

A 52-week range

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Dow Jones industrials Close: 18,268.50 Change: -12.53 (-0.1%)

18,220 18,040

$160

$95

140

90

15

120 J

A 52-week range

$22.14

Vol.: 3.4m (6.8x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $525.18 m

2,200

J

A 52-week range

$85.56

PE: 29.8 Yield: ...

80

S $146.76

Vol.: 1.2m (10.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $2.33 b

Close: 2,160.77 Change: 1.04 (flat) 10 DAYS

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Dec 16 Nov 16 Dec 16

340.50 958.50 395.75

-7.25 +1.75 -9.25

Wheat

18,800

2,200

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

18,400

2,150

Feeder cattle

18,000

2,100

Live cattle

17,600

2,050

17,200

2,000

Oct 16 Oct 16 Oct 16 Oct 16 Oct 16

127.82 102.42 50.37 15.04 214.80

+.37 -.43 +2.15 +.13 -.80

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Oct 16 Dec 16 Nov 16

67.71 146.40 28.10

-.32 -1.80 -.43

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Nov 16 Nov 16 Nov 16 Nov 16

50.44 1.4978 159.58 3.049

Hogs

16,800

A

M

J

J

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

NASD 1,608 1,689 1094 1683 76 30

3,319 3,705 1326 1644 94 28

S

1,950

Copper

A

M

J

J

A

S

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

A

Milk

HIGH 18288.12 8140.07 646.41 10684.90 5315.73 2162.93 1545.55 22532.74 1247.77

LOW 18162.97 8087.75 638.22 10627.70 5281.47 2150.28 1534.08 22396.39 1237.41

CLOSE 18268.50 8128.19 642.82 10675.74 5306.85 2160.77 1544.24 22505.51 1246.24

CHG. -12.53 +0.18 -0.47 -8.20 -9.17 +1.04 +2.31 +11.34 -2.13

%CHG. WK -0.07% s ...% s -0.07% t -0.08% s -0.17% s +0.05% s +0.15% s +0.05% s -0.17% s

MO QTR t s s s t t t s s s t s t s t s t s

YTD +4.84% +8.25% +11.25% +5.25% +5.98% +5.72% +10.41% +6.32% +9.72%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

AMD Aegion Allied Health Amdocs Ameren American Railcar Apple Inc AuriniaPh BkofAm Belden Inc Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres CassInfo Centene ChesEng Commerce Banc. Cosi Inc h Coty Edgewell Emerson EnCana g Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts FordM Foresight Energy FrptMcM FrontierCm FutureFuel

AMD AEGN AHPI DOX AEE ARII AAPL AUPH BAC BDC BBW CAL CASS CNC CHK CBSH COSI COTY EPC EMR ECA ENR EFSC ESE ESRX F FELP FCX FTR FF

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

1.75 8.00 6.96 +.18 +2.7 +142.5+276.7 dd ... GenElec 16.00 22.41 19.83 -.02 -0.1 +2.7 +11.0 22 ... Huttig Building Prod 0.50 1.40 .90 -.01 -1.1 -19.5 -24.2 dd ... Isle of Capri 50.06 61.33 59.57 +.90 +1.5 +9.2 +2.0 18 0.78 Kinross g 41.33 54.08 47.59 -.12 -0.3 +10.1 +15.9 19 1.70 LMI Aerospace 36.18 57.93 41.33 +.14 +0.3 -10.7 +7.0 9 1.60 Lee Ent 89.47 123.82 113.89 +.84 +0.7 +8.2 +4.0 13 2.28 Mallinckrodt 1.42 4.49 5.10 +1.05 +25.9 +106.5 +33.7 dd ... MicronT 10.99 18.09 16.22 +.11 +0.7 -3.6 +4.1 13 0.30f Monsanto Co 36.51 75.91 70.14 +.48 +0.7 +47.1 +41.8 16 0.20 NobleCorp 10.01 19.25 10.55 -.02 -0.2 -13.8 -44.9 16 ... Olin 21.27 31.82 26.02 -.22 -0.8 -3.0 -17.0 13 0.28 Panera Bread 45.05 58.64 55.13 -.27 -0.5 +7.1 +9.4 27 0.88 Peak Resorts 47.36 75.57 62.10 +.20 +0.3 -5.6 +11.6 17 ... Perficient 1.50 8.87 6.65 -.15 -2.2 +47.8 -19.2 dd ... Post Holdings 37.44 51.30 49.97 +.39 +0.8 +17.5 +15.9 18 0.90b ProctGam 0.03 1.08 .04 +.01 +26.7 -91.4 -97.1 dd ... ReinsGrp 21.48 31.60 24.76 -.34 -1.4 -3.4 -9.4 39 0.28f RiteAid 67.94 88.00 80.01 +.24 +0.3 +2.1 -5.7 23 ... SiriusXM 41.25 56.82 53.39 -.30 -0.6 +11.6 +20.8 18 1.90 Spire Inc 3.00 11.10 10.73 -.20 -1.8 +110.8 +45.7 cc 0.06 Stifel Financial 28.86 53.41 49.71 +.51 +1.0 +45.9 +20.1 24 1.00 SunEdison Semi 24.54 31.96 32.07 +.37 +1.2 +13.1 +28.0 15 0.44f Twitter 31.50 47.39 46.45 -.11 -0.2 +28.5 +27.4 26 0.32 WalMart 65.55 89.20 70.35 +.01 ... -19.5 -14.3 17 ... WeathfIntl 11.02 15.84 12.39 -.09 -0.7 -12.1 -6.1 6 0.60a WellsFargo 1.07 8.76 3.94 +.04 +1.0 +11.6 -32.6 dd 0.68m WhitingPet 3.52 14.06 10.30 -.37 -3.5 +52.1 -4.1 dd ... WholeFood 3.81 5.85 3.99 -.04 -1.0 -14.6 -13.3 57 0.42 WldPntTm 9.77 16.08 11.69 +.23 +2.0 -13.4 -0.1 9 0.24 Yamana g

$91.99

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

+.61 +.0050 +1.35 +.008

PREV

.0657 .7577 .3100 1.2605 .7560 .1498 1.1141 .0150 .2638 .009602 .051923 .0161 .0719 .000896 1.0189

.0658 .7623 .3104 1.2750 .7594 .1496 1.1212 .0150 .2651 .009649 .051998 .0160 .0729 .000897 1.0265

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

CHG

CLOSE

1249.80 17.29 962.30

Gold Silver Platinum

-15.40 -.34 -10.00

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

GE 27.10 33.00 29.27 -.23 -0.8 -6.0 +13.4 28 0.92 HBP 3.01 7.00 5.54 -.29 -5.0 +45.8 +88.1 5 ... ISLE 10.62 23.32 22.47 +.24 +1.1 +61.3 +17.5 17 ... KGC 1.31 5.82 3.50 -.13 -3.6 +92.3 +78.8 dd ... LMIA 7.01 11.34 7.27 -.02 -0.3 -27.8 -30.3 dd ... LEE 1.15 3.92 3.61 +.09 +2.6 +114.9 +51.7 7 ... MNK 50.90 85.83 69.48 -1.59 -2.2 -6.9 +15.7 ... MU 9.31 19.30 17.73 +.03 +0.2 +25.2 +0.7 dd ... MON 83.73 114.26 103.50 +.32 +0.3 +5.1 +20.7 23 2.16 NE 5.09 14.64 6.29 +.16 +2.6 -40.4 -46.4 dd 0.08 OLN 12.29 26.46 21.07 +.43 +2.1 +22.1 +22.6 46 0.80 PNRA 165.17 224.15 190.13 -2.07 -1.1 -2.4 -2.0 32 ... SKIS 2.60 7.70 5.11 +.19 +3.9 -15.0 -26.3 dd 0.55 PRFT 15.46 22.66 19.87 ... ... +16.1 +22.8 26 ... POST 50.93 89.00 79.85 -.25 -0.3 +29.4 +31.3 dd ... PG 73.50 90.22 89.22 +.37 +0.4 +12.4 +25.0 25 2.68 RGA 76.96 110.89 107.52 -.14 -0.1 +25.7 +19.3 11 1.48 RAD 5.98 8.74 7.37 -.21 -2.8 -6.0 +19.2 49 ... SIRI 3.29 4.44 4.16 -.01 -0.1 +2.1 +7.5 38 ... SR 54.33 71.21 60.21 -.40 -0.7 +1.3 +10.7 18 1.96 SF 25.00 47.17 39.72 -.32 -0.8 -6.2 -7.6 17 ... SEMI 3.24 11.82 11.62 +.03 +0.3 +48.2 +2.7 ... TWTR 13.73 31.87 19.87 -5.00 -20.1 -14.1 -11.7 dd ... WMT 56.30 75.19 69.36 -2.31 -3.2 +13.1 +11.8 15 2.00f WFT 4.71 11.49 5.95 +.24 +4.2 -29.1 ... dd ... WFC 43.55 56.34 45.18 +.19 +0.4 -16.9 -11.3 11 1.52 WLL 3.35 22.39 9.09 +.19 +2.1 -3.7 -52.9 dd ... WFM 27.67 35.58 29.33 +1.37 +4.9 -12.4 -15.8 21 0.54 WPT 11.79 16.49 14.93 -.01 -0.1 +11.4 +14.2 15 1.20 AUY 1.38 5.99 3.67 -.13 -3.4 +97.3 +94.4 dd 0.02m

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury rose to 1.74 percent on Thursday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

3.50 3.50 3.25

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.31 .45 .63 .85 1.28 1.74 2.45

-0.01 -0.01 ... +0.01 +0.03 +0.03 +0.03

... .06 .23 .63 1.37 2.07 2.90

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

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Vol.: 8.6m (2.8x avg.) PE: 26.3 Mkt. Cap: $34.09 b Yield: 2.3%

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$64.58

PE: 43.2 Yield: ...

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Close: $87.44 -1.18 or -1.3% The parent of Taco Bell and other chains said slumping sales in China hurt its quarterly results.

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Close: $144.68 18.72 or 14.9% The company agreed to buy an infusion pump business from Pfizer for $1 billion in cash and stock.

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Vol.: 109.0m (3.4x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $14.06 b

ICU Medical

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Close: $21.15 2.88 or 15.8% The teen retailer surprised analysts when it said an important sales measure improved in September.

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TWTR

Close: $19.87 -5.00 or -20.1% The social network’s stock plunged as investors doubted Twitter will be bought by another company.

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AT THE BIG CORNER OF I-270 & NORTH LINDBERGH BLVD. AND NOW A SECOND NISSAN LOCATION IN WEST COUNTY BUSINESS DIGEST Drop in jobless claims points to labor market strength • The number of Americans iling for unemployment beneits unexpectedly fell last week to near a 43-year low, an indication of irmness in the labor market which may support an interest rate increase by the Federal Reserve this year. Initial claims for state unemployment beneits declined 5,000 to a seasonally adjusted 249,000 for the week ended Oct. 1, the Labor Department said on Thursday. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast irst-time applications for jobless beneits rising to 257,000 in the latest week. First-time claims were the lowest since April, when initial applications for aid were at levels not seen since November 1973. Mars to take full control of Wrigley gum • Mars Inc. said on Thursday that it would buy out billionaire investor Warren Bufett’s minority stake in its Wrigley chewing gum business, taking full control. Bufett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. bought into Wrigley in 2008, spending $2.1 billion on preferred stock to help Mars buy Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. for $23 billion. Berkshire had a 19.4 percent stake in the business, the Financial Times reported. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Privately held Mars, the world’s biggest candy maker, said it would unify its chocolate and chewing gum businesses to create a company called Mars Wrigley Confectionary, which will be headquartered in Chicago. At Home adds ifth area store • The At Home chain is expanding with a new store in Town and Country, its ifth in the St. Louis region.

The store opening this month at 13901 Manchester Road is one of ive stores At Home is opening this month. Plano, Texas-based At Home’s other local stores are in O’Fallon, Ill.; Bridgeton, Fenton and O’Fallon, Mo. The chain’s average store has 120,000 square feet and its departments include furniture, garden, home textiles, housewares, rugs and wall décor. Pizer sells infusion therapy business • Pizer Inc. said Thursday that it would sell its global infusion therapy business, a part of its $15 billion Hospira acquisition last year, to ICU Medical Inc. for $1 billion in cash and stock. Pizer’s Hospira Infusion Systems unit makes infusion pumps that provide exact dosages of intravenous drugs, which are used in intensive care, emergency care and neonatal care. ICU makes medical devices used in infusion therapy, oncology and critical care. Cargill launches non-GMO sweeteners and sunlower oil • Cargill Inc. has introduced its irst sweeteners and sunlower oil certiied as not genetically modiied, or non-GMO, it said on Thursday, becoming the latest food company to bolster its roster of ingredients perceived as more natural. The Minneapolis-based global commodities trader is now ofering commercial-scale cane sugar and erythritol, another sweetener, as well as sunlower oil that have been certiied as non-GMO by a third party, it said in a statement. The company has been adding non-GMO products for some time, including a sunlower oil blend launched in March 2015, but this is the irst time Cargill has gotten this outside certiication for its

products. Seed technology thief sentenced • A Chinese man has been sentenced to three years in a U.S. prison for conspiring to steal high-tech U.S. corn seeds with the intention of transporting them to China, the U.S. Justice Department said on Wednesday. Mo Hailong, 46, pleaded guilty in January in federal court in Iowa to conspiring to steal patented corn seeds from DuPont Pioneer and Monsanto Co. Mo was employed as director of the international business of the Beijing Dabeinong Technology Group Co Ltd. Theranos will close labs and Walgreens testing sites • Elizabeth Holmes, founder and chief executive of Theranos, said late Wednesday that the company will close its clinical labs and Walgreens testing centers. At one time, the Silicon Valley company was hailed for developing a simple and inexpensive pinprick blood test, but in a series of skeptical reports starting in October 2015, The Wall Street Journal raised questions about the accuracy of the test results and revealed that government regulators had been looking into the matter. In July, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services imposed harsh sanctions against Theranos, imposing a ine, revoking its certiicate for a lab and banning Holmes from owning, operating or directing a blood testing lab for at least two years. The decision to shutter the consumer-facing operations afects about 340 employees in Arizona, California and Pennsylvania. From staf and wire reports

Mixed close for stocks after clawing back losses on jobs report, Fed fears ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Stocks recov-

ered from a broad decline to end mixed on Thursday, a day ahead of a key jobs report. The market fell from the start, then drifted between gains and losses for much of the afternoon. Yields on Treasury bonds rose again, and the price of oil climbed past $50 a barrel for the first time since June. By the end of trading, seven of the 11 sectors of the Standard and Poor’s 500 index rose, led by suppliers of basic materials. Health care companies and phone companies led the decliners. The S&P 500 inched up 1.04 points, or 0.05 percent, to 2,160.77. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 12.53 points, less than 0.1 percent, to 18,268.50. The Nasdaq composite slipped 9.17 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,306.85. A report showing a low number of Americans seeking jobless benefits last week added to recent data suggesting the economy is strengthening and the Federal Reserve is likely to raise interest rates soon. Super-low rates have helped fuel the seven-year bull market. Investors reacted just as they did to solid numbers on the manufacturing and service sectors earlier in the week: They sold Treasury bonds, sending yields up. Still, investors generally

showed little conviction, with none of the industry groups of the S&P 500 moving more than 0.8 percent in either direction. “Interest rates, presidential elections ... there is a lot of uncertainty,” said Jonathan D. Corpina, senior managing partner at Meridian Equity Partners. “Portfolio managers are still waiting to see how to position themselves.” On Friday, investors will get a clue on how quickly rates may rise when a report on the number of jobs created last month is released. Next week, investors will turn their attention to the start of corporate earnings. Companies in the S&P 500 are expected to report that earnings per share fell 2 percent in the third quarter compared to the year earlier period, according to FactSet, a data provider. That would mark the sixth quarter in a row in declines. That is a remarkable development given that stocks are near record highs, though many investors expect this socalled earnings recession to end in the fourth quarter this year. James Abate, chief investment officer of Centre Asset Management, is not one of them. “The stock market is increasingly becoming detached from the underlying trend in earnings,” he said. Investors, he added, are far too optimistic.


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

BEST OF BUILDING BLOCKS Highlights from our real estate and development blog: STLtoday.com/ buildingblocks. Coolire completes renovation of St. Louis oice • Missouri Department of Economic Development oicials showed up at Coolire Solutions to tour the tech irm’s newly renovated oice in downtown St. Louis. Coolire, a software developer, is adding 11 jobs at its headquarters at 415 North 10th Street, the state

agency said. About 25 people work there now. “The rich tech ecosystem that makes St. Louis a national leader in the industry is good for startups as well as well-established national and global companies,” Mike Downing, the agency’s director, said in a statement. “The success of companies like Coolire Solutions drives the entrepreneurial culture and tech excellence Missouri is well-known for.” Don Sharp, Coolire’s chief

executive, said the company’s growth is possible because of St. Louis’ tech talent and dynamic tech economy as well as Coolire’s irstof-kind product. To help Coolire grow, the state agency has ofered the company $112,000 through the Missouri Works program. The company must meet job creation criteria to be eligible. (10.05) French culture center relocates in U. City • Alliance Française de St.

Louis, a cultural center since 1906 and a language school founded in 1964, is moving to a new location in University City. The organization recently bought for $500,000 the 3,500-squarefoot building at 930 North McKnight Road. After renovating the space, the French cultural center will relocate early next year from 8505 Delmar Boulevard. Since 2013, Alliance Française de St. Louis is the regional center for Diplômes élémentaires/avancés de

Langue Française that the French Ministry of Education awards as a certiication of French luency. The diplomas are often required for school records, college and job applications, and immigration purposes in French-speaking countries. Hilliker Corp. represented the McKnight building’s previous owner, Stephens Developments LLC. Lee & Associates represented the buyer, 3530 Utah LLC. (10.05)

Pressure builds for Save-A-Lot to compete Twitter

plunges on report of little interest

SAVE-A-LOT • FROM B1

and declines in prices for eggs, pork, beef and other foods. Reuters reported last week that Toronto private equity firm Onex Corp. was the leading bidder if Supervalu pursues a sale of Save-A-Lot, with a sale value of up to $1.8 billion. Supervalu is expected to announce Save-ALot’s fate soon, according to Reuters. The company did not respond to requests seeking comment. In a regulatory filing this summer, Save-A-Lot said if it’s spun of, its headquarters would remain in Earth City. Private label foods, which are sold under store brands, account for 60 percent of sales at Save-ALot’s corporate-owned stores and 55 percent at its licensee stores. Founded as a single store in Cahokia in 1977, the chain’s business model has centered on offering low-priced alternatives to national brands but it’s expanding its lineup of national brands. The company said this year that all of its corporate stores and most of its licensed stores recently started carrying 130 “must have” national brand items in a bid to attract and maintain new customers. Save-A-Lot’s private label offerings include maple syrup and biscuits sold under its own “Morning Delight” brand. “Private label branding at Save-ALot has no brand equity with consumers,” said Ajay Jain, a senior analyst at Pivitol Research Group in New York. To attract more brand-conscious customers, Save-A-Lot is carrying more national brands and consolidating its myriad private label oferings to one primary brand, America’s Choice, which it acquired earlier this year. “Over time, we expect that America’s Choice will become the predominant food private label brand in our stores as we seek to consolidate our private label brand offerings by reducing the number of private label brands that we offer while increasing brand recognition and enhancing brand equity,” the company said in the regulatory filing. Save-A-Lot’s current ads show an expanded array of national brands available, including Maxwell House cofee, Totino’s pizza rolls and Lay’s potato chips. “The American consumer does appreciate and demand their brands,” Supervalu’s president and CEO Mark Gross told analysts at the RBC Capital Markets Consumer and Retail Conference in Boston in June, referring to Save-A-Lot’s changes.

Potential bidders are mum as deadline looms REUTERS

Two smaller-format Walmart Neighborhood Markets opened the region in early 2016.

While it adds brands, SaveA-Lot also said it plans to open 75 new stores in fiscal 2017, and “we believe the United States can support more than 3,500 SaveA-Lot stores under our existing store concept and layout,” according to the filing. The grocer also is remodeling its stores to bring its produce departments closer to the front of each store, expanding its fresh cut meat offerings, adding more ethnic foods and expanding its frozen and smoked meat departments. “The merchandising could use a shot in the arm,” Jain said of the remodels the chain is pursuing. “The stores were pretty tired looking.”

CHANGING LANDSCAPE Save-A-Lot is under pressure from rivals that are also expanding their food options, including Wal-Mart, which has been growing its Walmart Neighborhood Markets chain nationally and locally. Walmart Neighborhood Markets have about 41,000 square feet of space, and the grocery stores have fresh produce, pharmacy, deli and bakery departments. That size makes them smaller than most Schnucks stores, but larger than Save-ALot’s average 17,000-squarefoot store. At the Walmart Neighborhood Market in St. Peters, customers can order groceries online and have them delivered curbside to their cars. Wal-

Mart said it plans to have online order pickup available at 600 stores by the end of the year. Combined, Walmart’s Supercenters, Neighborhood Markets and Sam’s Club stores have 28.7 percent market share of grocery sales in the St. Louis region, according to Chain Store Guide’s 2016 Grocery Industry Market Share Report, which reflects fiscal year 2015 sales. Included in Chain Store Guide’s definition of the St. Louis market are the Illinois counties of Bond, Calhoun, Clinton, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Monroe and St. Clair; and the Missouri counties of Jefferson, Lincoln, St. Charles, St. Louis, St. Louis city and Warren. In 2014, Wal-Mart’s local share totaled 28.8 percent. WalMart may put the brakes on adding stores, however. The retailer said Thursday that it plans to slow down its store openings to focus on online sales, store remodels and tech initiatives. Maryland Heights-based Schnuck Markets Inc., the largest locally based, independently owned grocer, has 23.7 percent market share, a drop from 23.9 percent in 2014, according to Chain Store Guide. Supervalu’s Save-A-Lot chain and another chain it owns, Kirkwood-based Shop ’n Save, combined have 13.2 market share — the report does not break down the figures for each chain. Chesterfield-based Dierbergs comes in fourth, with 10 percent market share.

Other chains that are expanding include German-based Aldi, which opened its newest St. Louis area store in Shrewsbury this week and plans to open a location in Wentzville early next year. Aldi had 3.4 percent market share in St. Louis last year, down slightly from 3.6 percent. One of the biggest increases in local market share came from Cincinnati-based Kroger Co., which re-entered the St. Louis market under a subsidiary’s Ruler Foods brand in 2014. Ruler, which has added seven local stores in the past year, now has nine St. Louis area stores. Ruler Foods grew its market share in St. Louis to 3.3 percent in 2015, up from 1.9 percent a year earlier. “We’re constantly looking at sites,” Ruler Foods’ executive director of merchandising, Mark Belleville, said of St. Louis. “We’re very happy with what is happening in the market and how customers are accepting us. We want to continue to grow.” About 85 percent of Ruler Foods’ merchandise is private label, many under the Kroger brand. Belleville said Ruler Foods stocks Kroger-branded food items, which resonate with customers who remember when the chain had stores here in the mid-1980s. “There are people who tell us it’s like an old friend coming home,” Belleville said. Lisa Brown • 314-340-8127 @lisabrownstl on Twitter lbrown@post-dispatch.com

Community banks vital for small businesses NICKLAUS • FROM B1

forces. Jerome Powell, a member of the Federal Reserve board of governors, talked about the disappearing small banks during a recent research conference at the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank. The numbers, he noted, were dwindling long before DoddFrank. He also noted that the number of community banks with assets above $300 million has doubled since 1995. The decline has been in the tiniest banks, those under $100 million in assets, and that in part reflects a lack of new-bank formation. “Although the lack of entry may be due in part to increased regulatory burden, much of it can be explained by very low interest rates and a post-crisis expansion that has been slower than usual,” Powell said.

Michelle Neely, a St. Louis Fed economist, presented research on the size of that regulatory burden. Compliance costs amount to 8.7 percent of non-interest expenses for banks with less than $100 million in assets, she and her colleagues found, but just 2.9 percent for banks in the $1 billion to $10 billion range. That’s a big incentive to grow or merge. Luanne Cundif, president of First State Bank of St. Charles, said her bank saw increased regulation coming after the housing crisis and decided to grow its mortgage business substantially. “To offer the products and services we wanted to ofer as a community bank, we needed to be way more structured in those areas, and residential mortgages was an area where we made that commitment,” Cundif said. First State has $365 million in assets.

Pulaski Bank, with about $1.5 billion in assets, was sold this year to First Busey Corp. of Champaign, Ill. Pulaski President Tom Reeves said regulation was one force driving such deals. “Regulation is a very important issue,” Reeves said. “It is increasing yearly, and that takes more people, more paperwork, more overhead expense and, frankly, more expertise.” He said Busey, with $5.5 billion in assets, was firmly committed to the community bank model. So the St. Louis area lost a bank headquarters, but gained a lender with more financial clout and the ability to make money even in a highly regulated environment. In metro St. Louis, the number of community banks fell to 70 in 2015 from 95 in 1995. Almost all the decline was in the under-$100 million category, which dropped to 19 from 43 banks. Those numbers bring up an

important question: Do community banks matter? The evidence strongly says they do. They made more than half of all small business loans last year, $275 billion worth. Here, too, however, larger community banks seem to do better than the tiniest ones. A paper presented by Julapa Jagtiani, of the Philadelphia Fed, indicates that banks with between $1 billion and $10 billion in assets are in the sweet spot for smallbusiness lending. Clearly, then, we should listen to community banks’ concerns, but the discussion ought to focus on making those sweet-spot lenders more effective, not on saving the very smallest banks from oblivion.

Shopping Center 12 LLC. • CR Chesterield LLC in the lease of 1,625 square feet of retail space at Chesterield Towne Centre, Chesterield, to Hot Pot Smoothie Shop LLC.

• 13831 Manchester Road LLC in the lease of 2,327 square feet of retail space at 13831 Manchester Road, Manchester, to Iconic Mens Hair Salon.

David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

Shares of Twitter Inc. plunged on Thursday as fears mounted that a much-anticipated auction of the social media company will draw minimal interest from potential buyers. With stagnant user growth and continuing losses, Twitter’s board agreed last month to consider a sale, and has told potential acquirers that it wants such deliberations to conclude by the time it reports third-quarter earnings on Oct. 27, Reuters reported on Wednesday. Technology website Recode reported later on Wednesday that Alphabet Inc.’s Google, long considered the most logical buyer for Twitter, and Walt Disney Co. would not bid for the social network, leaving cloud software company Salesforce.com as the only known suitor. Twitter shares fell 20.1 percent on Thursday to close at $19.87, valuing the company at $13.9 billion. Salesforce Chief Executive Mark Benioff has publicly expressed his interest in Twitter in recent days, but stopped short of saying the company had decided on a bid. Analysts said he downplayed the possibility in a meeting with investors on Wednesday, sending Salesforce shares up about 4 percent. “I’m not saying I’m buying it, but I’m not saying I’m not buying it,” Benioff said on Wednesday in an interview with the New York Times. Even at $20, Twitter shares are well above the $14 they were trading at before speculation about a possible acquisition began to emerge this spring. Many investors and analysts believe Twitter remains expensive for most potential buyers, but the company does not have a clear backup plan if it is not acquired. Product initiatives under CEO Jack Dorsey, who returned to the company a year ago but also remains CEO of payment company Square, have borne little fruit. Large amounts of employee stock and options are also considered an obstacle for some potential bidders. The rationale for Salesforce bidding on Twitter is not clear, said Jeferies analyst John DiFucci in a note to clients. Buying Twitter would reduce the value of Salesforce shares by about $11 through dilution, while increased debt could cut another $9.50 from the stock. Other potential bidders beyond Salesforce are taking a look at Twitter, CNBC said, citing sources. Apple Inc. has also been rumored as a possible bidder, though Recode reported that Apple would not move forward.

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE NOTES Intelica CRE represented both parties in the sale of 65,000 square feet of industrial space at 4855 Baumgartner Industrial Road, St. Louis County, by Fred Weber Inc. to Goodwin Construction. Send items to bizrealestate@post-dispatch.com.

L3 Corp. represented parties in these transactions: • Dollar Tree Stores Inc. in the lease of 8,829 square feet of retail space at Cave Springs Crossings, St. Charles, from Cave Springs

• Rave PCS of Mika LLC in the lease of 2,604 square feet of retail space at Plaza on the Boulevard, Ferguson, from Mehmet Dinceroglu, Cuneyt Dinceroglu and Casa de Cinco, LLC.


BUSINESS

10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1

City seeks ample revenue to meet infrastructure needs more revenue; those located in poorer areas will face a lower threshold for approval. The SLDC’s effort to begin scoring developer tax incentive requests follows a city-commissioned report that found between 2000 and 2014, the city and St. Louis Public Schools have done without $709 million in revenue due to the subsidies. In a city once desperate for investment, the initiative signals a changing mindset among some officials and a recognition that too much subsidy could hamper St. Louis’ ability to fund infrastructure and services long term. Credit rating agency Fitch has already indicated as much, citing St. Louis’ prolific use of incentives as one of the reasons behind a credit downgrade this summer. Still, outgoing Mayor Francis Slay defended the city’s use of subsidies intended to lure development during his 15 years as mayor. “Value-capture incentives like (tax increment financing) or tax abatement do not reduce the city’s tax base,” Slay told business and political leaders during his final Business Celebration Luncheon last week. “It increases it. … These subsidized projects would not happen, generally, without these incentives.” However, he said the city is “raising the bar” for developers to win incentives in stabilized neighborhoods while making it easier to qualify in less vibrant ones. How the city determines where that bar is largely is in the hands of Jonathan Ferry, a financial analyst in the city’s development office who has been on the job for a year. Ferry is building a scorecard to grade development projects based on their financial return to the city, while also considering architectural style and urban design. So far, the SLDC is taking an “incremental approach,” Ferry said, applying the new scoring to only a few large projects and presenting its findings to members of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen, which ultimately decides what projects get public help. Already, some aldermen are beginning to take Ferry’s system into account, said Will Winter, a professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis who assisted with the city’s incentive report. “The more vocal voices on the Board of Aldermen are starting to talk about the use of incentives and the scores,” Winter said.

A NEW MEASURE Central to Ferry’s methodology is whether the project will generate more money than the city gives up in future revenue. Those that don’t automatically receive a failing grade. Ferry also runs his own numbers to double-check the assumptions provided by developers. Before, the city relied heavily on numbers provided by developers and its analysis often came up with profit projections based on the lowest annual revenue figures. Ferry has set a city budget target based on what he dubs the “sustainable budget.” It’s derived from the amount of funding he estimates is needed to maintain city roads and other infrastructure over the next 25 years, a shortfall estimated at roughly $75 million more per year. Another $68.5 million is added in to account for estimated funding shortfalls in police and other services. Affluent areas are expected to

meet or exceed the “sustainable budget” threshold in order to win a passing grade from SLDC. Poorer areas have a lower bar to hit. “It becomes a negotiation tool,” Ferry said. “We’ve negotiated incentives down by several million dollars using this tool.” As property is reassessed in the city every couple of years, the formula readjusts, raising the bar for neighborhoods that are seeing rising values. “As the neighborhoods get stronger and stronger, that line gets higher and higher,” Ferry said. Rising property values in the new formula is one of the reasons SLDC plans to discuss ratcheting down incentives in the Forest Park Southeast neighborhood with the Park Central Development Corporation, the nonprofit entity that vets development there. “Right now, they’re authorizing 10 years (property tax abatement) for pretty much everything in the area,” SLDC stafer Michael Griin last month told members of the city’s Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority, which designates properties eligible for tax abatement. Park Central director Brooks Goedeker said it will be harder to qualify for incentives going forward. “We have already started to cut back in Forest Park Southeast and I’m sure we will continue to do so,” he said in an interview.

LinkedIn wants to help you look for a job behind your boss’s back BY JENA MCGREGOR Washington Post

LinkedIn has long been a way to promote your resume to other companies or recruiters without hanging out a “for hire” sign that your boss can see. Now it’s launching a way to let recruiters know you’re open to considering other jobs — and do so privately, the company says. On Thursday, the professional social network announced a new feature it has been testing called Open Candidates, which allows users to flip a switch under the “preferences” tab that tells recruiters they’re open to job opportunities. Recruiters who pay for LinkedIn’s premium service will then see a tab in its search results that lists profiles of those who have turned on the signal, connecting them with what LinkedIn calls “warm” talent. Others won’t be able to see if a user has turned on the feature, and LinkedIn hides the signal from recruiters at an in-

dividual’s own company or its subsidiaries. The move is an interesting one for LinkedIn, which grew into a giant in the recruiting world because of the access it gave recruiters to millions of desirable “passive candidates” who are not actively job hunting. Some 87 percent of recruiters say they use LinkedIn, which Microsoft said in June that it would acquire, to evaluate candidates during the hiring process, more than twice that of any other social network, according to a survey by Jobvite. Now even if they’re “passive,” LinkedIn users will be able to signal a little more active interest in considering opportunities, helping recruiters more accurately target the huge number of employed candidates who might be open to making a move. Estimates from the consulting firm CEB say that about 40 percent of the labor market is made up of people who don’t want to be contacted by recruiters at all, while another 35

percent are not looking but are open to contact. “It should theoretically make it more efective and eicient for recruiters,” said Brian Kropp, CEB’s human resources practice leader. It could also cut down on the deluge of inquiries some users, especially those in high-demand industries, receive from recruiters, which turns some people of, Kropp said, pushing them to more specialized forums, such as GitHub for software professionals. Meanwhile, a crop of startups has begun helping people, particularly in tech jobs, covertly scan for opportunities. Switch, for instance, is an anonymous Tinder-like tool that lets users rate job opportunities by swiping right or left, while Anthology, formerly known as Poachable, acts as an anonymous career matchmaker. A LinkedIn spokesperson said the new feature was not a response, but a way to “improve the experience.”

CONCERNS REMAIN While those who follow the process say the city is moving in the right direction, they say there’s more to consider than just the financial return. Whether developers would build absent the incentives isn’t really answered, Winter, the UMSL professor said. “There’s not a clear quantifiable metric in determining whether developers really need the incentives,” he said. And if the city is serious about viewing everything through a racial lens post-Ferguson, development policy should try and mitigate some of the adverse effects of gentrification, said Molly Metzger, a professor of social work at Washington University. “If TIF or tax abatement is being proposed for multiunit housing development, can we set aside a certain percentage of those units for low-income households?” Metzger said. “Particularly if they’re being proposed for the central corridor to prevent displacement of people and to preserve some diversity and affordability.” Alderman Joe Roddy, who heads the Board of Aldermen committee that deals with development and incentives, said there’s more at play than financial considerations. “If it’s all about making money for the city, then you might very well end up with bad design and bad urban planning,” he said. While Roddy thinks it’s a good step forward and plans to follow the SLDC scoring recommendations, he recently distributed a letter to his colleagues to try and gauge their support. A timehonored tradition in St. Louis is to stay out of the way of other aldermen if they support a development and public incentives in their ward. “It’s certainly going to require some buy-in from some of the aldermen,” Roddy said. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

TIM BRYANT • tbryant@post-dispatch.com

The Alinea apartments are under construction at Manchester Road and Interstate 270.

Assisted living facility is nearing completion QUARRY • FROM B1

Casemark LLC of Clayton was the next developer up after TriStar was unable to pull of its plan for the entire site. It proposed in 2014 a project that included a hotel, an oice building, apartments, a fast food restaurant, a bank branch and a 60-bed assisted-living facility. Nearing completion is the Provision Living assisted-living facility on property it bought from Casemark. Casey Urkevich, Casemark’s principal, said his firm still owns a one-acre site on which it plans to erect a retail building. The former quarry is part of an 82-acre pocket of unincorporated land between Des Peres and Town and Country. Over the years, redevelopment opponents said stores, apartments and a hotel there would clog Des Peres Road with traic. Urkevich said about $4 million was spent on infrastructure on and near the site, including new signal lights to deal with traic. He pointed out the project, renamed Sunset Ridge at Manchester, is going up without public incentives and will eventually cost $100 million. Already nearby are large offices, including Scottrade head-

quarters and an Edward Jones complex. Large-scale development, including the building of West County Center, began soon after the completion of nearby Interstate 270 in 1965. Quarry operation began 1955, according to Post-Dispatch archives, but the site became inactive in 1985. Commercial Development once had its own redevelopment plan for the site but sold the property to Casemark last year. TriStar then acquired the Alinea apartment property from Casemark. Commercial Development reacquired part of the site, on which it plans to build a hotel and an office building. Sitework is underway for the building and the four-story hotel, a 211-room combination Marriott Residence Inn and Courtyard by Marriott. “The area is dying for a hotel,” Mike Roberts said. He said Commercial Development will move its headquarters to the top floor of the company’s three-story office building, which should be completed in about nine months. Commercial Development, with about 50 employees, keeps a low profile in the St. Louis area. The privately held com-

SUNSET RIDGE DEVELOPMENT Town and Country

Former quarry

270

Des Peres Road

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100 100

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West County Center

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pany redevelops underused properties or those with environmental problems. It has done about 300 projects, many of them in the eastern United States or in Canada. Tom Roberts said the quarry redevelopment is one among many. “It’s just another project for us,” he said. “It’s just what we do.” Casemark’s Urkevich was more buoyant. “I think that by this time next year you’ll probably have a completed hotel and oices or a nearly completed hotel and offices,” he said. Tim Bryant • 314-340-8206 tbryant@post-dispatch.com @tbry51 on Twitter


BUSINESS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

Less demand for new cars will put buyers in driver’s seat as prices fall BY TOM KRISHER Associated Press

REUTERS

Customers order meals on tablets and pick up food from small cubicles at Eatsa, a restaurant in the inancial district of San Francisco, on Sept. 28.

Robots aren’t taking a bite out of food jobs Automation has been factor in ight over wage hikes BY LISA BAERTLEIN AND PETER HENDERSON reuters

LOS ANGELES • Clamshell grills are

making burger flipping obsolete at McDonald’s, Johnny Rockets and other burger chains. Digital kiosks, tabletop tablets and mobile phones are taking orders at eateries like Panera, Chili’s Grill & Bar and Domino’s. And at Silicon Valley startup Zume, robots are being programmed to take over pizza assembly. Such labor-saving devices have been held out as counterweights to eforts to raise the wages of the lowest paid workers in the United States. But the early evidence suggests robots and other forms of automation are merely reshaping the work of people in food service. They are not — as they have in banks, on factory floors and in other sectors — replacing them. In spite of improvements in technology, minimum wage hikes between 2000 and 2008 caused little immediate displacement of workers by technology, especially in kitchens, according to a study by economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and DePaul University. There were slightly more workers per restaurant in 2015 than in 2001, according to data compiled for Reuters by the National Restaurant Association, which opposes minimum wage hikes. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has projected leisure industry jobs, a broad category that includes restaurants, will grow at 0.6 percent annually, keeping pace with the national average through 2024. Automation in the restaurant industry looms large in the heated campaign to raise entry-level pay to $15 an hour, more than double what U.S. federal law now mandates. Restaurants employ more low-wage workers than any other industry, and their operators are among the most vocal opponents of minimum wage hikes. Several executives have said major pay hikes would force the fast-food industry to ramp up automation, an investment that would cost thousands of jobs. “The numbers just don’t work for raising the minimum wage this dramatically,” said Andrew Puzder, CEO of Carl’s Jr. parent CKE Restaurants Inc. “It will kill jobs.” Robotics researchers, restaurant executives, industrial engineers, consultants and economists said, however, automation in the restaurant and fastfood sectors is not as simple as installing automatic tellers in banks or employing robots to assemble cars. While any rise in the minimum wage

puts pressure on restaurant operators, they said a robot revolution in the $783 billion U.S. restaurant industry is still years away. Sixteen U.S. states have increased their minimum wages this year, and some, including California and New York, will move over several years to $15 an hour. More states are considering such measures, and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has vowed to increase the federal minimum wage. “It’s not like we’re at the precipice of a revolution where the minimum wage goes up, and all these jobs disappear,” said Ken Goldberg, a professor of engineering and director of the People and Robots Initiative at the University of California, Berkeley. Many kitchen jobs still are too complex for robots, which can’t multitask and don’t necessarily work safely with humans in cramped spaces, experts said. While robots excel at complex calculations and precise, repetitive tasks, they have difficulty doing some things that are easily mastered by small children — such as stacking blocks and sensing objects in space. Moreover, most restaurants serve a range of menu items, each of which might need numerous specialized forms of automation. Sit-down restaurants have additional tasks that are hard to automate, including setting and clearing tables, refilling cofee cups and answering questions about what’s on the menu. Most of the movement toward technology in restaurants has been at the front end. Eatsa, an updated automat, offers its quinoa bowls at outlets that have largely eliminated front-of-therestaurant staff. Customers order on tablets and pick up their food minutes later from small, frosted glass cubicles. Several chains are using kiosks and other technology that allow orders to be placed more rapidly and eiciently. Such systems can pay of in two or three years, according to an analysis by Cornerstone Capital Group analyst Mike Shavel. Panera Bread Co., the Sunset Hillsbased chain that operates locally as St. Louis Bread Co., and Domino’s Pizza say their custom-built ordering and payment systems have removed bottlenecks at peak hours. But the changes have not eliminated jobs; rather, they have shifted them away from counters and into kitchens and delivery, operators said. Digital ordering puts more pressure on the kitchen and delivery stafs, said Panera CEO Ron Shaich. “You better be able to deliver that food,” he said.

DETROIT • While the U.S. inched its way out of the Great Recession, consumers went car shopping in droves. As sales rebounded, the price of cars and trucks rose to record highs. Now, the price trend is set to reverse itself, partly because some buyers are unwilling or unable to pay the high prices and instead are opting for used cars. Although overall industry sales are tracking last year’s record of 17.5 million, many automakers are selling more cars to rental companies to maintain the momentum. Sales to consumers are declining, so companies are ramping up incentives. Discounts in September hit a level not seen since automakers were desperate for sales during the financial crisis in late 2008. “Inherently, you’re seeing a price war,” says John Mendel, executive vice president of Honda North America. “You’re already seeing the pricing pressure.” Analysts say the deals will only get better during the next two years as millions of leased cars flood the used-car market and pull new-car prices down. Auto prices have risen every year since the Great Recession, and hit a record average of $31,825 in December, according to J.D. Power. The average price in September was $30,862, an all-time high for the month. Prices have remained elevated largely because buyers are still paying top dollar for red-hot segments such as crossovers and big SUVs, which cost more than sedans. Now, many analysts say the perfect climate is developing to pull prices lower soon: Slowing sales: It may be high prices or it may be good deals on late-model used cars, but sales of new vehicles have plateaued, and even fallen for the past two months. That is forcing discounts from automakers to keep market share. Sep-

tember incentives hit a record $3,888 per vehicle, beating the old mark set in 2008, according to J.D. Power. Family car blues: Demand for cars has fallen as buyers snap up higher-priced SUVs and pickup trucks. Cars made up only 40 percent of U.S. sales last month, barely above the record low set in July, meaning companies will need to lower prices to move sedans of dealer lots. Analysts say prices of the better-selling vehicles will remain high in the near-term but eventually fall as well. Leases surge: Leasing dried up during the financial crisis, cutting of a main supply of used cars. It recovered to 25 percent of new car sales in 2014, and is now over 30 percent. That means many latemodel cars in good condition are coming to the market. Kelley Blue Book estimates 3.5 million leases expire next year, and as many as 4.5 million expire in 2018. Automakers will offer discounts to move the used vehicles, and prices of new cars will have to drop to stay competitive. “You’re going to see greater and greater pressure put on the used-car market, more significant discounting,” says KBB senior market analyst Alec Gutierrez. As prices hit record levels and household income grew slowly, many buyers were priced out of new cars. Prices are so high now that the average family in the nation’s 50 largest metro areas can’t aford to buy a new vehicle, according to a study by Bankrate.com. That hasn’t stopped some buyers, who are borrowing larger amounts at longer terms to secure that new car, Bankrate says. “Customers have an afordability problem,” says Wes Lutz, owner of a ChryslerDodge-Jeep-Ram dealership in Jackson, Mich., west of Detroit. About one-third of his customers can’t get credit, another third have trouble, and the rest are creditworthy, he said. Even if prices fall, Lutz expects U.S. safety and fuel economy requirements to push them back up, driving more people from new cars to used.

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Everything you need to know about Sunday’s St. Louis showdown between Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton. Make sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live videos and up-to-the-minute updates, from the protests to inside spin alley.

The Blues have given up size for speed entering the 2016-17 season. Read all about it in our 14-page preview section which takes a comprehensive look at this year’s team.

In an age of Google maps and GPS, who knows the streets of St. Louis better than anybody else? You may be surprised. In Sunday Business, meet the local folks who produce the street guides with the trademark yellow pages.

The Rep’s “Until the Flood,” about the events in Ferguson, makes its world premiere starring its playwright, Dael Orlandersmith.

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BUSINESS

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Coming Sunday: 14-page Blues preview section J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 10.07.2016 • C

POWER SHIFT

Curses? his postseason looks special

Assistant coach Kirk Muller, who ran the power play, took a job with Montreal.

JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If the two wild-card games were any indication, the 2016 baseball postseason will be quite thrilling this year. There are plenty of great storylines, none better than the Cubs’ attempt to win the World Series for the first time in 108 years. Ratings should be strong this year with a playof field that includes two of the top three media markets — Los Angeles and Chicago — along with the Boston, San Francisco, Toronto, Dallas-Fort Worth, Cleveland, and Washington markets. The biggest story of the postseason will be at Wrigley Field, where Kris Bryant, Anthony Rizzo, Jon Lester and Kyle Hendricks should cruise in the Division Series against the Giants. It has been 108 years since the North Side of Chicago celebrated a World Series

hen the Blues lost both big-bodied, net-front players to free agency.

David Backes

See ORTIZ • Page C6

New assistant Mike Yeo is tasked with continuing the power-play success. Jays crush Rangers, Indians top BoSox. C4

To do that, Blues like Tarasenko are inding themselves in new places. BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Blues’ power play has ranked in the top six in the NHL the past two years, so there’s no reason to change anything, right? Well, there wouldn’t be if everything about it didn’t change this summer. Assistant coach Kirk Muller, who ran the power play the last two seasons and had the unit clicking at 21.5 percent or better both years, stepped down and took a job with Montreal. Additionally,

the Blues lost both of their big-bodied, net-front players in David Backes and Troy Brouwer to free agency. So the power play will have a diferent look when the 2016-17 season opens in Chicago on Wednesday. Mike Yeo, who was hired as an assistant coach in June, has taken over the duties from Muller and been forced to find a few replacements to play at the top of the crease. That has led to more adjustments since Backes and Brouwer were both right shots, and the Blues’ remaining options are left shots.

Consistent Giants vs. conident Cubs ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO • It’s October in an even-numbered year, and the San Francisco Giants appear to be following their usual routine. The Chicago Cubs think their time is now. Welcome to one intriguing NL Division Series. Fresh of a dramatic wild-card victory in New York, the Giants were brimming with confidence when they arrived in Chicago on Thursday, albeit a bit late due to travel problems. Madison Bumgarner’s four-hitter in Wednesday night’s 3-0 victory against the Mets means he likely is pushed back until at least Game 3, but the Giants have 18-game winner Johnny Cueto ready to go for Friday night’s series

But outside of what became necessary, Yeo knows after facing the Blues’ power play as the former head coach in Minnesota, and watching more video of the unit this ofseason, the less he tinkers, the better. “For me,” Yeo said, “I looked at a great power play and my thought coming in was, ‘Let’s try and keep as many things that we do well consistent.’” The early returns have been promising: the Blues have netted six goals on

See CUBS • Page C5 See BLUES • Page C6 > Game 1 • 8:15 p.m. Friday at Chicago, FS1 > Cueto (18-5, 2.79) vs. Lester (19-5, 2.44)

> Exhibition finale • 7 p.m. Saturday vs. Blackhawks, NHL Network > Season opener • 7 p.m. Wednesday at Chicago, NBCSN

he power of versatility

POWER TRIPPING In this year of increased power throughout baseball, a total of 65 hitters had at least 25 home runs, but only a sliver of them spread their power around the field by playing a variety of positions. At least 10 players had at least one home run while appearing at three diferent positions. Leading slugger Mark Trumbo, who had 47 homers, hit one while playing first, one while in left, 16 at DH, and 29 as a right fielder. Of those 10, only seven had more than one homer at two diferent positions, and Cardinals infielder Jedd Gyorko was the only one to have home runs while playing all four infield positions. The hitters who brought a hammer, wherever they played:

Gyorko has homers, but no home BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

W CHRIS LEE clee@post-dispatch.com

hen the Cardinals acquired last December an infielder only recently removed from a tuneup in the minor leagues, they advertised his “power profile” but offered few guarantees of where Jedd Gyorko fit on their roster. They weren’t sure how much he would play or where he would play, just hoped that when he would play he’d have a blast, or three. What Gyorko gave them was 30 home runs and a pop of history.

Now they wonder if they weren’t greedy enough. “I see there’s more in the tank,” manager Mike Matheny said. “I see if we could have been able to play him more he would have stayed on pace. He made adjustments that have been able to help him improve. Just impressive what Jedd has been able to do and how he’s handled the diferent roles.” As he emerged in the season’s second half as an everyday player without an everyday position, Gyorko hit an NL-best 23 home runs. Only Minnesota’s Brian Dozier and his See CARDINALS • Page C5

—Derrick Goold

Kris Bryant

Yasmany Tomas

Curtis Granderson

Jedd Gyorko

Brad Miller

Brandon Moss

Daniel Murphy

Cubs • 39 home runs 2 1B, 25 3B, 9 LF, 3 RF

D’Backs • 31 home runs 1 1B, 9 LF, 20 RF, 1 PH

Mets • 30 home runs 10 CF, 19 RF, 1 PH

Cards • 30 home runs 1 1B, 13 2B, 9 3B, 7 SS

Rays • 30 home runs 7 1B, 19 SS, 4 DH

Cards • 28 home runs 5 1B, 14 LF, 6 RF, 3 PH

Nats • 25 home runs 4 1B, 20 2B, 1 PH

Source: Baseball-Reference.com, Post-Dispatch research

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 10/8* vs. Chicago 7 p.m. NHL Network

Wednesday 10/12 at Chicago 7 p.m. NBCSN

*Exhibition game

Thursday 10/13 vs. Minnesota 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 10/15 vs. NY Rangers 7 p.m. FSM

MEDIA VIEWS

It’s Cowboys, not Rams, on Ch. 4 LA in 2016 falls short of STL in ’15

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 10/15 at Florida 3 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 10/22 vs. Middle Tenn. Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/29 vs. Kentucky Time/TV TBA

Saturday 11/5 at South Carolina Time/TV TBA

M 1 • FRIDAY • 10.07.2016

DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 10/8 vs. Purdue 2:30 p.m. Big Ten Network

Saturday 10/15 at Rutgers 11 a.m. ESPNews

Saturday 10/22 at Michigan 2:30 p.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/29 vs. Minnesota 11 a.m. TV TBA

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 2:30 p.m. Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500, practice 2, NBCSN 3:30 p.m. XFINITY: Drive For the Cure 300, qualifying, NBCSN 5:30 p.m. Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500, final practice, NBCSN 7 p.m. XFINITY: Drive For the Cure 300, NBCSN 1 a.m. (Sat.) Formula One: Japanese Grand Prix, qualifying, NBCSN BASEBALL Noon ALDS: Blue Jays at Rangers, TBS 3:30 p.m. ALDS: Red Sox at Indians, TBS 4:30 p.m. NLDS: Dodgers at Nationals, FS1 8 p.m. NLDS: Giants at Cubs, FS1, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 9:30 p.m. NBA exhibition: Nuggets at Lakers, NBA FOOTBALL 6:30 p.m. College: Clemson at Boston College, ESPN 7 p.m. College: Southern Methodist at Tulsa, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: Boise State at New Mexico, CBSSN GOLF 7 a.m. European PGA: Dunhill Links Championship, second round, GOLF 2 p.m. Web.com: Tour Championship (final No. 4), second round, GOLF 5 p.m. Champions: Toshiba Classic, first round, GOLF 8 p.m. European PGA: Fiji International, third round, GOLF 11 p.m. LPGA: Fubon Taiwan Championship, third round, GOLF HOCKEY 6:30 p.m. NHL exhibition: Capitals at Hurricanes, NHL Network MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 10 p.m. World Series of Fighting 33, NBCSN SOCCER 7:55 a.m. Women’s FIFA U-17 World Cup: Spain vs. Mexico, FS2 1:30 p.m. FIFA World Cup qualifying: Netherlands vs. Belarus, FS2 3 p.m. International Friendly: United States vs. Cuba, ESPN2 4 p.m. Women’s FIFA U-17 World Cup: Germany vs. Cameroon, FS2 6 p.m. College: Ohio State at Maryland, BTN 6 p.m. College: Syracuse at Louisville, FSM Plus 6 p.m. College women: Oklahoma State at Texas Tech, FSM 6 p.m. College: Ohio State at Maryland, BTN VOLLEYBALL 6 p.m. College women: Georgia vs. South Carolina, SEC Network 10 p.m. College women: Washington at Oregon, ESPNU

DIGEST Florida-LSU postponed; Georgia-S.C. to Sunday No. 18 Florida’s home game against LSU has been postponed because of looming and powerful Hurricane Matthew, which already has been blamed for more than 100 deaths and is threatening the southeastern U.S. coast. The Florida-LSU game was to be played Saturday. The teams were unable to agree on any alternative arrangements to play the game elsewhere this weekend, and the Southeastern Conference said it would try to reschedule — though that seems unlikely since the Gators and Tigers do not have a common open date left this season. Florida athletics director Jeremy Foley said the SEC made the final call on postponing the game. Meanwhile, South Carolina coach Will Muschamp said his team’s home game with Georgia has been moved from Saturday night to Sunday because of the hurricane. The game will start at 1:30 p.m. Day skipping golf events • Jason Day is skipping the Australian Open and World Cup of Golf in his home country because of the back injury that forced him to withdraw during the final two PGA Tour events of the season. Ranked No. 1 in the world, Day said that he has been advised to rest his back and that the November trip to Australia would have conflicted with his rehabilitation and rest periods. He tore a ligament in his back. Harvick captures pole • Kevin Harvick has already proven he’s a factor at Charlotte Motor Speedway. With the top starting spot Saturday night, he’ll be tough to beat in the opening race of the second round of NASCAR’s playofs. Harvick turned a lap at 196.029 mph to earn the top starting spot in Thursday night qualifying. He edged Alex Bowman, the replacement driver for Dale Earnhardt Jr. Kings’ Gaborik goes on IR • The Los Angeles Kings have placed right wing Marian Gaborik on injured reserve with a broken right foot. Gaborik was struck by teammate Mats Zuccarello’s shot while they were playing for Team Europe at the World Cup of Hockey last month. Gaborik is expected to be sidelined for at least eight weeks. Lightning to honor St. Louis • The Tampa Bay Lightning plan to honor franchise scoring leader Martin St. Louis by retiring the No. 26 he wore over 13 seasons with the team he helped win its only Stanley Cup championship in 2004. The club announced that the six-time All-Star, who scored 365 goals from 2000 until March 2014 — when he was traded to the New York Rangers, will have his jersey retired on Jan. 13. Noren takes lead • Alex Noren of Sweden was leading the Dunhill Links Championship after carding 64 at Carnoustie to equal the course record on Thursday. The 34-year-old Noren fired eight birdies to finish at 8 under par. Svitolina beats Kerber • Elina Svitolina beat a No. 1-ranked player for the second time this season, ousting U.S. Open champion Angelique Kerber from the China Open 6-3, 7-5 to reach the quarterfinals. In the men’s draw, second-seeded Rafael Nadal beat qualifier Adrian Mannarino 6-1, 7-6 (6). Associated Press

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Two weeks ago, Channel 2 sacked the Rams. It was the first time in six years one of their regular-season games wasn’t shown locally. This weekend, Channel 4 is doing the same thing. KMOV, the local CBS affiliate, has decided to show the network’s primary game of the day — Cincinnati at Dallas — instead of the Rams’ home contest against Buffalo. Both start at 3:25 p.m. (St. Louis time). The Cowboys-Bengals game ASSOCIATED PRESS goes to 80 percent of the nation, the A grounds crew member on Friday prepares the Los Angeles Coliseum field Rams-Bills to just 7 percent. for Sunday’s Rams-Bills game, which won’t be shown on St. Louis television. The Rams, who left St. Louis for Both those Rams contests were all their games shown in St. Louis Los Angeles in the ofseason, are 3-1 for the first time in a decade in the late-afternoon slot when thus far this season, pulling an avand have drawn decent, but not viewership typically is higher than erage rating of 9.1. great, ratings in their former city for noon games. As a member of the American And that Rams’ average rating Football Conference, the Chiefs for their three games that have of 8.1 for those two contests was primarily are televised by CBS. And been televised in the market. “That was one of the reasons worse than the 8.8 figure the two after they are off this weekend, other games in that later KMOV plans to shown them when we decided (on Cincinspot thus far this sea- they return to action on Oct. 13, nati-Dallas), we just CITY son have averaged in St. against the Oakland Raiders. But didn’t think our viewers BY CITY Louis. would be that excited” TV ratings for Channel 4’s Murphy said the staIn Week 3, when the tion is not tied to Kansas City for about the Rams-Bills the Rams’ first Rams were not shown the rest of the season. game, KMOV general four games here, there was one game manager Mike Murphy of the season “We will evaluate every week in that late-afternoon slot based on the performance in the said Thursday. “We de- last year in St. (Jets-Chiefs, on KMOV). AFC,” he said. “If it plays out that termined it would have Louis, where It drew a 10.0 rating. more interest here be- they then were Kansas City is the best game at that The Rams-Tampa Bay time, we will air it. But there is no cause of Dallas. based, and contest would have been allegiance, there are no contracts.” “Dallas (also 3-1) is this year in Los playing well right now Angeles — their on KTVI at 3:05 p.m. He said there is a vocal group of that day had Channel 2 Chiefs fans that has contacted the and there are a lot of Dal- new home: STL LA officials elected to show las fans here. It was the station, saying the ratio of those 1. 17.7 16.1 it, but they instead aired right thing to do.” who have been heard from “is Ratings for the Rams’ 2. 17.9 12.0 the Detroit-Green Bay 10- or 15-1 ... in favor (of showopener, the finale of a 3. ing the Chiefs) vs. someone who 18.1 6.1 matchup earlier in the Monday Night Football 4. is upset.” 22.5 10.6 day. That generated a hodoubleheader on Sept. 5, Avg. 19.1 11.2 MEMORY LANE hum 6.4 rating. say that it was seen in 8 percent of St. Louis area Dick Vermeil, who coached the homes with a TV — not a bad fig- ST. LOUIS VS. LOS ANGELES Rams to the Super Bowl chamure for a game that didn’t end un- In the bigger picture, the Rams’ pionship for the 1999 season til after midnight on a weeknight. rating last year in St. Louis — when — while they still were based in That is according to Nielsen, speculation about their departure St. Louis — is set to join ESPN’s which measures viewership. was rampant — was much better “Monday Night Countdown” The next two Rams telecasts in through four games than the team next week. St. Louis were on Sunday after- is doing in its honeymoon return He will be the latest in the noons and averaged an 8.1 rating season in Southern California. show’s parade of “NFL legend” — that’s better than the 7.8 ratThe Rams’ first four games in contributors this season. ing all 12 Sunday afternoon games 2015 averaged a 19.1 rating in St. Vermeil is to join host Chris have averaged so far this season in Louis. Their four contests thus far Berman in ESPN’s Bristol, Conn., the market. this season have drawn an 11.2 fig- studios from 5-7:15 p.m., leadThose contests were in Week 2 ure in LA. ing in to the telecast of the Tampa against Seattle and last Sunday, Bay-Carolina game at 7:30 p.m. a Week 4 game against Arizona CHIEF FOCUS Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 that was a matchup of both of St. Meanwhile, the Kansas City @caesardan on Twitter Louis’ former NFL clubs. Chiefs are the only team to have dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

FSM to ofer streaming of Blues telecasts BY DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Blues are coming off their most successful playof run in a decade and a half, reaching the Stanley Cup semifinals, and despite some key roster changes many St. Louisans again are hoping for big things from the team. And it will be easier this season for many to watch the games. For the first time, Fox Sports Midwest will ofer live streaming of its Blues telecasts via the Fox Sports Go website and app. It will be the same system FSM had for Cardinals games this year — the service will be available to those who subscribe to a programming provider that carries Fox Sports Midwest and sign in to Fox Sports Go. (Some Comcast customers will not have access, but none of them are in the St. Louis market.) There is no additional charge to receive the streaming service, but it is not being sold separately to those who do not have FSM. But the Blues’ season opener, Wednesday night in Chicago, won’t be on Fox Sports Midwest or its streaming devices. The game will be shown nationally by NBCSN, which sends its top NHL broadcast team — Mike “Doc” Emrick (play-by-play) along with analysts Pierre McGuire and Eddie Olczyk — to do the contest that is set to start shortly after 7 p.m. Streaming will be available at NBCsports.com and the NBC Sports app. Local rights-holder Fox Sports Midwest takes over for Game 2, at 7 p.m. Thursday at home against Minnesota. John Kelly (play-by-play) and Darren Pang (analysis) are back for another season in the FSM booth. There is a one-hour pregame show scheduled to be shown before that contest. On radio, KMOX (1120 AM) again is the Blues’ flagship station and Chris Kerber (play-byplay) and Kelly Chase (analysis) return.

Cardinals’ TV ratings dip a bit BY DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Substandard home record. Poor fundamentals. Lousy defense. Base running blunders. Shaky bullpen. And a lot of home runs. The “Cardinal Way” became the “Wayward Way,” and as result the Redbirds aren’t in the playofs for the first time in six years. But despite the disappointment, the team’s television ratings held up fairly well. According to Nielsen, which measures viewership, 8.2 percent of homes in the St. Louis market tuned in, on average, to Fox Sports Midwest’s 146 Cardinals telecasts this year. That’s down 18 percent from last season, when FSM had its best season in the ratings with the Cards — a 10.0 figure for a team that won the National League Central Division crown that year. This time the Redbirds finished 17½ games out, though they were in the wild-card hunt until the final day of the season. Overall, St. Louis finished second nationally in ratings for MLB teams’ local telecasts for the second straight season — and both times was just behind Kansas City, making Missouri the king of local baseball TV viewership again. It also was the 17th consecutive year in which the Cardinals finished in the top three nationally, quite a feat. And for ESPN’s “Sunday Night Baseball” national package, St. Louis and KC again were at the top, but this time it wasn’t a 1-2 punch. They tied for first, with all those games this season being seen in 1.4 percent of homes in those markets. When the Cardinals were on Sunday nights, their six appearances had an average rating of 8.7 in St. Louis, second in the local rankings to the 21.1 Sunday night rating the Royals generated in Kansas City. But they had just two such appearances. Meanwhile, after a mid-September rating dip, the Cards finished strong. On Sept. 18, when they played in San Francisco on a Sunday afternoon in a battle among two of the three wildcard contenders, Nielsen says FSM’s telecast was seen in 7.8

CARDINALS TV RATINGS St. Louis ratings for Cardinals locally produced telecasts dating to 1996: CABLE OVER-THE-AIR Rtg Outlet Rtg (outlet) 1996 3.0 PS 10.2 (KPLR) 1997 4.7 FSM 11.8 (KPLR) 1998 7.0 FSM 14.8 (KPLR) 1999 6.4 FSM 11.7 (KPLR) 2000 8.6 FSM 12.8 (KPLR) 2001 7.4 FSM 11.0 (KPLR) 2002 7.7 FSM 10.9 (KPLR) 2003 7.6 FSM 10.3 (KPLR) 2004 8.8 FSN 12.5 (KPLR) 2005 9.2 FSN 12.9 (KPLR) 2006 8.6 FSN 13.4 (KPLR) 2007 7.5 FSN 13.8 (KSDK) 2008 7.9 FSN 12.8 (KSDK) 2009 8.0 FSM 11.8 (KSDK) 2010 9.5 FSM 12.3 (KSDK) 2011 9.0 FSM None 2012 7.7 FSM None 2013 8.8 FSM None 2014 7.9 FSM None 2015 10.0 FSM None 2016 8.2 FSM None Notes • PS is Prime Sports. FSM is Fox Sports Midwest. FSN is Fox Sports Net, which FSM was known as at the time. The rating is the percent of St. Louis area homes with a TV tuning in. Source • Nielsen

percent of St. Louis homes. But two NFL games being shown at the same time (Seahawks-Rams and Colts-Broncos) combined for a 14.4 rating. And two other NFL games that day (Chiefs-Texans and PackersVikings) both outdid the Cards. But the following Sunday, the Cards-Cubs telecast on ESPN drew a 10.6 rating, which was better than any of the four NFL games to air locally that day. Last Sunday the Redbirds drew an 11.9 on FSM for their season finale, against Pittsburgh, But a victory then wasn’t enough to get them into the playoffs because San Francisco also won that day to eliminate the Cards from contention. The top-rated of the five NFL games shown in the market that day (Chiefs-Steelers) was an 8.7. The Cards’ final three games averaged a 10.6 rating and each was the highest-rated programs on St. Louis TV those days.


SPORTS

10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1 NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE EAST

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Home

Philadelphia

3

0

0

Dallas

3

1

0

1.000

92

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101

77

Washington

2

2

NY Giants

2

2

0

.500

99

0

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73

SOUTH

W

L

T

Pct

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE Away

NFC

AFC

Div

EAST

2-0

1-0

1-1

2-0

1-0

2-0

0-0

New England

3-1

0-0

1-1

Bufalo

112

1-2

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85

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Jacksonville

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111

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109

118

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Indianapolis

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108

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New Orleans

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114

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4

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Chicago

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Cincinnati

2

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0

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78

82

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Detroit

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3

0

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95

102

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Cleveland

0

4

0

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74

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0-3

0-2

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3

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76

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4

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0-0

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Oakland

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106

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2

3

0

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101

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1-1

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1-1

Kansas City

2

2

0

.500

83

92

2-0

0-2

2-2

0-0

1-0

San Francisco

1

4

0

.200

111 140

1-2

0-2

1-4

0-0

1-2

San Diego

1

3

0

.250

121

108

1-1

0-2

1-2

0-1

0-1

NY Jets at Pittsburgh, noon Tennessee at Miami, noon Houston at Minnesota, noon Washington at Baltimore, noon Atlanta at Denver, 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Dallas, 3:25 p.m., KMOV-4

Thursday Arizona 33, San Francisco 21 Sunday Philadelphia at Detroit, noon, KTVI-2 New England at Cleveland, noon, KMOV-4 Chicago at Indianapolis, noon

San Diego at Oakland, 3:25 p.m. Bufalo at Los Angeles, 3:25 p.m. NY Giants at Green Bay, 7:30 p.m., KSDK-5 Monday Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

CARDINALS 33, 49ERS 21

Arizona beats sloppy San Francisco

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Arizona receiver Larry Fitzgerald scores on a touchdown catch against San Francisco in the irst half of the Cardinals’ win Thursday night.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA, CALIF. • Drew

Stanton threw two touchdown passes to Larry Fitzgerald in his first start in two years, David Johnson ran for two scores and the Arizona Cardinals capitalized on San Francisco mistakes to beat the 49ers 33-21 on Thursday night. The Cardinals (2-3) got 17 points off three turnovers by the 49ers (1-4) — two interceptions by Blaine Gabbert and a fumbled kickof return by Chris Davis — and also had one drive extended by a running-intothe-kicker penalty. Those three scoring drives totaled just 41 yards, but proved to be enough to beat the sloppy 49ers as the Cardinals survived a week without injured starting quarterback Carson Palmer . Stanton didn’t produce much with Palmer sidelined by a concussion, going 11 for 27 for 124 yards. But Arizona didn’t turn the ball over and got 157 yards rushing from Johnson.

Calais Campbell’s interception of a deflected pass set up Arizona’s first score on a 21-yard pass from Stanton to Fitzgerald late in the second quarter. Davis’ fumble of the second-half kickof then set up Johnson’s 4-yard run that put Arizona up for good. Stanton then led his only long scoring drive of the night capped by a 29-yard pass to Fitzgerald to make it 21-7 and Marcus Cooper’s interception set up a 36-yard field goal by Chandler Catanzaro. There were several thousand empty seats at the game but the fans who did show up were frustrated by what they saw. At one point in the third quarter, a chant of “We want Kap! We want Kap!” started up as fans wanted to give former starter Colin Kaepernick a shot at quarterback. Gabbert responded by leading an 82-yard TD drive fueled in part by his 24-yard run . The chants started again after Gabbert threw his second inter-

ception . Markus Golden (Afton High, Mizzou) and Campbell each had two of Arizona’s seven sacks as the Cardinals put constant pressure on Gabbert. Golden also had 10 tackles and three QB hits. Pass protection had been one of the few positives on offense for the 49ers, who had allowed just three sacks the first four games.

INACTIVE PLAYERS Defensive lineman Glenn Dorsey and tight end Vance McDonald were among the players inactive for the 49ers against the Cardinals. Cornerback Jimmie Ward (quadriceps) and defensive lineman DeForest Buckner (foot) had already been ruled out of Thursday night’s game. Quarterback Carson Palmer (concussion), tight end Darren Fells (shoulder), defensive tackle Ed Stinson (toe) and defensive tackle Josh Mauro (chest) were held out for Arizona.

Cardinals 33, 49ers 21 Arizona 0 7 14 12 — 33 San Francisco 0 7 7 7 — 21 Second Quarter SF: Kerley 9 pass from Gabbert (Dawson kick), 4:12. Ari: Fitzgerald 21 pass from Stanton (Catanzaro kick), 1:40. Third Quarter Ari: Da.Johnson 4 run (Catanzaro kick), 12:45. Ari: Fitzgerald 29 pass from Stanton (Catanzaro kick), 7:35. SF: Hyde 1 run (Dawson kick), 1:54. Fourth Quarter Ari: FG Catanzaro 36, 13:39. Ari: Da.Johnson 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 4:44. SF: Gabbert 1 run (Dawson kick), 1:52. Ari: safety, 1:17. A: 70,178. Ari SF First downs 17 25 Total Net Yards 288 286 Rushes-yards 37-172 36-151 Passing 116 135 Punt Returns 4-25 3-0 Kickoff Returns 2-53 2-31 Interceptions Ret. 2-13 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 11-28-0 18-31-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 7-27 Punts 9-42.4 7-49.9 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards 7-50 4-34 Time of Possession 31:44 28:16 Rushing: Arizona, Da.Johnson 27-157, Ellington 6-19, Taylor 2-(minus 2), Stanton 2-(minus 2). San Francisco, Hyde 22-78, Gabbert 10-70, M.Davis 2-4, Draughn 2-(minus 1). Passing: Arizona, Stanton 11-28-0-124. San Francisco, Gabbert 18-31-2-162. Receiving: Arizona, Fitzgerald 6-81, Da.Johnson 3-28, Jo.Brown 1-11, Gresham 1-4. San Francisco, Kerley 8-102, Hyde 6-36, Patton 2-16, Bell 1-4, Celek 1-4. Missed Field Goals: None.

NFL NOTEBOOK Anderson preparing to make start after Newton sufers concussion Derek Anderson is preparing as if he will start Monday night against the visiting Tampa Bay Buccaneers with starting quarterback Cam Newton still in the league’s concussion protocol. The 33-year-old Anderson took reps with Carolina’s irst-team ofense for the second consecutive day, while Newton did not attend the team’s outdoor practice. Panthers coach Ron Rivera ofered little in terms of an update on Newton’s playing status, saying he won’t make a decision on the 2015 MVP until later this week. “We are not forcing players to get onto the football ield,” Rivera said emphatically Thursday. “We will do exactly as the protocol tells us and what the doctors and experts tell us.” The NFL is still investigating how the Panthers handled a helmet-to-helmet hit Newton took in the fourth quarter of a Week 1 loss to the Denver Broncos. Newton remained in the game until its completion despite a ferocious blow to the head. NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy told The Associated Press on Thursday the league had no update on that investigation. Newton was one of six starters who didn’t practice Thursday.

Three Bills ined • Three Bufalo Bills defensive backs are paying a price for their involvement in a pre-game, on-ield altercation with members of the New England Patriots last weekend. Safety Robert Blanton says the NFL ined him $21,000 and cornerback Nickell RobeyColeman says he was ined $10,000. Safety Aaron Williams was also ined, but wouldn’t reveal how much. “It’s up there,” Williams said. Several punches were thrown during a shoving match between players and coaches that erupted about an hour before kickof.

Falcons penalized by league • The Atlanta Falcons were penalized on Thursday by the NFL for having excessive contact in ofseason workouts. The Falcons must forfeit their irst three days of organized team activities in 2017 as punishment for a workout in May which involved excessive levels of on-ield physical contact. Atlanta’s players will be paid for the canceled sessions. It is the Falcons’ irst violation of the rule, resulting in a less severe penalty than was given Seattle last month.

Revis’ status unknown • New York Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis will likely be a gametime decision to play at Pittsburgh on Sunday while he continues to heal from a hamstring injury. Revis sat out practice for a second straight day, and coach Todd Bowles says he might not know if he’ll have the star of his secondary until shortly before kickof against the Steelers. If Revis can’t play, Marcus Williams, rookie Juston Burris and Darryl Roberts could see increased time opposite Buster Skrine. Wide receiver Eric Decker says his partially torn right rotator cuf is feeling better, but his availability remains uncertain. He sat last Sunday against Seattle, and Bowles says Decker hasn’t progressed enough to practice.

Colts send message • Indianapolis Colts coach Chuck Pagano has seen enough of the defensive woes. The big plays, the missed tackles, the ridiculous penalties all need to stop. If that message didn’t get through before last weekend’s loss, Pagano and general manager Ryan Grigson made it abundantly clear this week when they cut two starters: cornerback Antonio Cromartie and inside linebacker Sio Moore, the team’s leading tackler. The Colts head into Sunday’s game against Chicago (1-3) allowing 31.3 points per game, have struggled to get of the ield, and when they do make a play there always seems to be a hit out of bounds or a late hit on the quarterback. Associated Press

Glavin part of group as new owners of Ambush BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Add a plus-one to Tony Glavin’s many job titles. The head coach of the St. Louis Ambush indoor soccer team and the St. Louis Lions outdoor team as well as the founder and director of the Tony Glavin Soccer Club, Glavin was introduced Thursday along with Shelly and Will Clark and Dr. Elizabeth Perez as the Ambush’s new local ownership group. “It means a little more debt, putting the foot in a little bit more, harder work and probably longer hours,” Glavin kidded following a Thursday morning news conference at the Family Arena in St. Charles. “But this is what I love to do, it’s my passion. When I talked to my wife about it, got her thoughts, she told me it made sense because this is what I love to do. “The risks I take, I like to think they’re calculated risks. I believe in this community and in this team. It won’t be easy, I know that, but I genuinely believe we can pull this off and build a strong team for this community.” The Clarks, of Cottleville, have been with Ambush since its return in 2013; they own Cardinal Surveying and Mapping as well as Cardinal Continuing Education. Dr. Perez, a Fort Zumwalt South grad, joined the ownership group earlier this year and has run Perez Family Chiropractic in St. Charles for more than eight years. Glavin, who took over as head coach of the Ambush in December, said Thursday’s announcement came after a summer of on and off negotiations with majority owners Andrew and Leah Haines, who revived the Ambush in 2013 and who relocated late last season to Florida, where they are launching another Major Arena Soccer League franchise, the expansion Florida Tropics. “I wasn’t sure about (Haines’) absentee ownership, but then I was approached by Shelly, who told me they were looking into buying the team,” Glavin recalled. “I liked that idea, but those talks broke down.” Glavin was then approached by Brian Roth, the Ambush’s general manager of business operations. “Brian was the driving force behind this whole thing,” said Glavin, a 58-year-old Scotland native who won over the hearts of St. Louis soccer fans as a player and coach with the St. Louis Steamers in the 1980s. “I got back with Shelly and Will and we were able to bring it together. Each of the owners brings a little something diferent to the group and we’re definitely excited about the opportunity.” The Ambush finished 4-16 in 2013-14 and 8-12 in 2014-15. Last season, after an 0-6 start, Glavin replaced fellow soccer legend Daryl Doran as head coach and the team went 5-9 the rest of the way. Competing in the Central Division of the 17-team MASL, this Ambush squad figures to be young, fit and hungry for success. “I’d feel a lot better if this were July,” Glavin said. “Because of negotiations, the last month has been pretty hectic. We’re three weeks into training and nowhere near where we need to be, but the guys have really impressed me with their work rate and their enthusiasm. But showing it in practice and in games can be totally diferent. That’s why we’re really looking forward to playing a couple of exhibitions games this weekend. “Those games will give us an idea of where we are and where we need to be.” The Ambush open the 201617 season on the road against the Kansas City Comets on Nov. 13. On Nov. 19, the team will make its home debut against the Tacoma Stars.

SATURDAY FAN FEST The Ambush will kick off their preseason schedule Friday against the Cedar Rapid Rampage in Iowa. On Saturday, the Ambush will host a Fan Fest from 4-6 p.m. featuring inflatables, face-painting and music on the Family Arena parking lot. At 7 p.m. the Ambush and Rampage will meet in a preseason game. There will be no charge for parking or admission to the Fan Fest or the preseason match. After the game, fans will be invited to the turf to meet players and get autographs. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

10.07.2016 • Friday • M 2 NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE EAST

W

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T

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PF

PA

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Philadelphia

3

0

0

Dallas

3

1

0

1.000

92

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.750

101

77

Washington

2

2

NY Giants

2

2

0

.500

99

0

.500

73

SOUTH

W

L

T

Pct

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE Away

NFC

AFC

Div

EAST

2-0

1-0

1-1

2-0

1-0

2-0

0-0

New England

3-1

0-0

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Bufalo

112

1-2

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85

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152

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Houston

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69

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77

128

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Jacksonville

1

3

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84

111

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1-2

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Carolina

1

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109

118

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Indianapolis

1

3

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.250

108

125

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1-2

0-1

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New Orleans

1

3

0

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114

130

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0-2

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Tennessee

1

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62

84

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NORTH

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AFC

Div

NORTH

W

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Minnesota

4

0

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1-0

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Pittsburgh

3

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Green Bay

2

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75

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Baltimore

3

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84

72

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Chicago

1

3

0

.250

62

97

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0-2

1-2

0-1

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Cincinnati

2

2

0

.500

78

82

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0-0

0-1

Detroit

1

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0

.250

95

102

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1-2

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Cleveland

0

4

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Los Angeles

3

1

0

.750

63

76

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3-1

0-0

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Denver

4

0

0

1.000

111

64

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2-0

2-0

2-0

0-0

Seattle

3

1

0

.750

79

54

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1-1

1-1

2-0

1-1

Oakland

3

1

0

.750

108

106

0-1

3-0

2-0

1-1

0-0

Arizona

2

3

0

.400

125

101

1-2

1-1

2-1

0-2

1-1

Kansas City

2

2

0

.500

83

92

2-0

0-2

2-2

0-0

1-0

San Francisco

1

4

0

.200

111 140

1-2

0-2

1-4

0-0

1-2

San Diego

1

3

0

.250

121

108

1-1

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NY Jets at Pittsburgh, noon Tennessee at Miami, noon Houston at Minnesota, noon Washington at Baltimore, noon Atlanta at Denver, 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Dallas, 3:25 p.m., KMOV-4

Thursday Arizona 33, San Francisco 21 Sunday Philadelphia at Detroit, noon, KTVI-2 New England at Cleveland, noon, KMOV-4 Chicago at Indianapolis, noon

San Diego at Oakland, 3:25 p.m. Bufalo at Los Angeles, 3:25 p.m. NY Giants at Green Bay, 7:30 p.m., KSDK-5 Monday Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

CARDINALS 33, 49ERS 21

Arizona beats sloppy San Francisco

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Arizona receiver Larry Fitzgerald scores on a touchdown catch against San Francisco in the irst half of the Cardinals’ win Thursday night.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA, CALIF. • With Carson Palmer sidelined by a concussion, the one-win Arizona Cardinals turned to Larry Fitzgerald, David Johnson and an opportunistic defense for a much-needed victory. Drew Stanton threw two touchdown passes to Fitzgerald in the quarterback’s first start in two years, Johnson ran for two scores and the Cardinals capitalized on San Francisco mistakes to beat the 49ers 33-21 on Thursday night. “We were a hungry team, a team that knows that we dug a hole for ourselves and we had to win this game,” coach Bruce Arians said. The Cardinals (2-3) got 17 points off three turnovers by the 49ers (1-4) — two interceptions by Blaine Gabbert and a fumbled kickof return by Chris Davis — and also had one drive extended by a running-intothe-kicker penalty. Those three scoring drives

totaled just 41 yards, but proved to be enough to beat the sloppy 49ers as the Cardinals survived a week with without Palmer out with a concussion. “I don’t think anybody played well on ofense. Nobody,” Niners coach Chip Kelly said. “I don’t think we protected well enough, I don’t think we threw it well enough and we had too many drops and two interceptions.” Stanton didn’t produce much, going 11 for 28 for 124 yards. But Arizona didn’t turn the ball over and got 157 yards rushing from Johnson to get the win. Johnson added 28 yards receiving, and Fitzgerald caught six passes for 81 yards as that duo combined to gain 266 of the team’s 288 yards from scrimmage. The defense did the rest with the two interceptions and seven sacks. “We’ve been saying all week it just starts with one. Just get one win and try to stack them,” defensive lineman Cal-

ais Campbell said. “We’ve been a team in the past that can rip of a bunch of them. ... Now we have to figure out what we can do to keep that ball rolling.” The game changed in a span of less than 4 minutes starting late in the second quarter. Campbell’s interception of a deflected pass set up Arizona’s first score on a 21-yard pass from Stanton to Fitzgerald with 1:40 left in the half. Davis’ fumble of the second-half kickoff then set up Johnson’s 4-yard run that put Arizona up for good. “We got the momentum going,” Stanton said. “Unfortunately, I think, it’s one of those things as an offense you’re waiting to make a play, and got that spark from the defense. Then to come out in the second half and get the ball right there was huge.” Markus Golden (Afton High, Mizzou) and Campbell each had two of Arizona’s seven sacks as the Cardinals put constant pressure on Gabbert.

Cardinals 33, 49ers 21 Arizona 0 7 14 12 — 33 San Francisco 0 7 7 7 — 21 Second Quarter SF: Kerley 9 pass from Gabbert (Dawson kick), 4:12. Ari: Fitzgerald 21 pass from Stanton (Catanzaro kick), 1:40. Third Quarter Ari: Da.Johnson 4 run (Catanzaro kick), 12:45. Ari: Fitzgerald 29 pass from Stanton (Catanzaro kick), 7:35. SF: Hyde 1 run (Dawson kick), 1:54. Fourth Quarter Ari: FG Catanzaro 36, 13:39. Ari: Da.Johnson 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 4:44. SF: Gabbert 1 run (Dawson kick), 1:52. Ari: safety, 1:17. A: 70,178. Ari SF First downs 17 25 Total Net Yards 288 286 Rushes-yards 37-172 36-151 Passing 116 135 Punt Returns 4-25 3-0 Kickoff Returns 2-53 2-31 Interceptions Ret. 2-13 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 11-28-0 18-31-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 7-27 Punts 9-42.4 7-49.9 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards 7-50 4-34 Time of Possession 31:44 28:16 Rushing: Arizona, Da.Johnson 27-157, Ellington 6-19, Taylor 2-(minus 2), Stanton 2-(minus 2). San Francisco, Hyde 22-78, Gabbert 10-70, M.Davis 2-4, Draughn 2-(minus 1). Passing: Arizona, Stanton 11-28-0-124. San Francisco, Gabbert 18-31-2-162. Receiving: Arizona, Fitzgerald 6-81, Da.Johnson 3-28, Jo.Brown 1-11, Gresham 1-4. San Francisco, Kerley 8-102, Hyde 6-36, Patton 2-16, Bell 1-4, Celek 1-4. Missed Field Goals: None.

NFL NOTEBOOK Anderson preparing to make start after Newton sufers concussion Derek Anderson is preparing as if he will start Monday night against the visiting Tampa Bay Buccaneers with starting quarterback Cam Newton still in the league’s concussion protocol. The 33-year-old Anderson took reps with Carolina’s irst-team ofense for the second consecutive day, while Newton did not attend the team’s outdoor practice. Panthers coach Ron Rivera ofered little in terms of an update on Newton’s playing status, saying he won’t make a decision on the 2015 MVP until later this week. “We are not forcing players to get onto the football ield,” Rivera said emphatically Thursday. “We will do exactly as the protocol tells us and what the doctors and experts tell us.” The NFL is still investigating how the Panthers handled a helmet-to-helmet hit Newton took in the fourth quarter of a Week 1 loss to the Denver Broncos. Newton remained in the game until its completion despite a ferocious blow to the head. NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy told The Associated Press on Thursday the league had no update on that investigation. Newton was one of six starters who didn’t practice Thursday.

Three Bills ined • Three Bufalo Bills defensive backs are paying a price for their involvement in a pre-game, on-ield altercation with members of the New England Patriots last weekend. Safety Robert Blanton says the NFL ined him $21,000 and cornerback Nickell RobeyColeman says he was ined $10,000. Safety Aaron Williams was also ined, but wouldn’t reveal how much. “It’s up there,” Williams said. Several punches were thrown during a shoving match between players and coaches that erupted about an hour before kickof.

Falcons penalized by league • The Atlanta Falcons were penalized on Thursday by the NFL for having excessive contact in ofseason workouts. The Falcons must forfeit their irst three days of organized team activities in 2017 as punishment for a workout in May which involved excessive levels of on-ield physical contact. Atlanta’s players will be paid for the canceled sessions. It is the Falcons’ irst violation of the rule, resulting in a less severe penalty than was given Seattle last month.

Revis’ status unknown • New York Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis will likely be a gametime decision to play at Pittsburgh on Sunday while he continues to heal from a hamstring injury. Revis sat out practice for a second straight day, and coach Todd Bowles says he might not know if he’ll have the star of his secondary until shortly before kickof against the Steelers. If Revis can’t play, Marcus Williams, rookie Juston Burris and Darryl Roberts could see increased time opposite Buster Skrine. Wide receiver Eric Decker says his partially torn right rotator cuf is feeling better, but his availability remains uncertain. He sat last Sunday against Seattle, and Bowles says Decker hasn’t progressed enough to practice.

Colts send message • Indianapolis Colts coach Chuck Pagano has seen enough of the defensive woes. The big plays, the missed tackles, the ridiculous penalties all need to stop. If that message didn’t get through before last weekend’s loss, Pagano and general manager Ryan Grigson made it abundantly clear this week when they cut two starters: cornerback Antonio Cromartie and inside linebacker Sio Moore, the team’s leading tackler. The Colts head into Sunday’s game against Chicago (1-3) allowing 31.3 points per game, have struggled to get of the ield, and when they do make a play there always seems to be a hit out of bounds or a late hit on the quarterback. Associated Press

Glavin part of group as new owners of Ambush BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Add a plus-one to Tony Glavin’s many job titles. The head coach of the St. Louis Ambush indoor soccer team and the St. Louis Lions outdoor team as well as the founder and director of the Tony Glavin Soccer Club, Glavin was introduced Thursday along with Shelly and Will Clark and Dr. Elizabeth Perez as the Ambush’s new local ownership group. “It means a little more debt, putting the foot in a little bit more, harder work and probably longer hours,” Glavin kidded following a Thursday morning news conference at the Family Arena in St. Charles. “But this is what I love to do, it’s my passion. When I talked to my wife about it, got her thoughts, she told me it made sense because this is what I love to do. “The risks I take, I like to think they’re calculated risks. I believe in this community and in this team. It won’t be easy, I know that, but I genuinely believe we can pull this off and build a strong team for this community.” The Clarks, of Cottleville, have been with Ambush since its return in 2013; they own Cardinal Surveying and Mapping as well as Cardinal Continuing Education. Dr. Perez, a Fort Zumwalt South grad, joined the ownership group earlier this year and has run Perez Family Chiropractic in St. Charles for more than eight years. Glavin, who took over as head coach of the Ambush in December, said Thursday’s announcement came after a summer of on and off negotiations with majority owners Andrew and Leah Haines, who revived the Ambush in 2013 and who relocated late last season to Florida, where they are launching another Major Arena Soccer League franchise, the expansion Florida Tropics. “I wasn’t sure about (Haines’) absentee ownership, but then I was approached by Shelly, who told me they were looking into buying the team,” Glavin recalled. “I liked that idea, but those talks broke down.” Glavin was then approached by Brian Roth, the Ambush’s general manager of business operations. “Brian was the driving force behind this whole thing,” said Glavin, a 58-year-old Scotland native who won over the hearts of St. Louis soccer fans as a player and coach with the St. Louis Steamers in the 1980s. “I got back with Shelly and Will and we were able to bring it together. Each of the owners brings a little something diferent to the group and we’re definitely excited about the opportunity.” The Ambush finished 4-16 in 2013-14 and 8-12 in 2014-15. Last season, after an 0-6 start, Glavin replaced fellow soccer legend Daryl Doran as head coach and the team went 5-9 the rest of the way. Competing in the Central Division of the 17-team MASL, this Ambush squad figures to be young, fit and hungry for success. “I’d feel a lot better if this were July,” Glavin said. “Because of negotiations, the last month has been pretty hectic. We’re three weeks into training and nowhere near where we need to be, but the guys have really impressed me with their work rate and their enthusiasm. But showing it in practice and in games can be totally diferent. That’s why we’re really looking forward to playing a couple of exhibitions games this weekend. “Those games will give us an idea of where we are and where we need to be.” The Ambush open the 201617 season on the road against the Kansas City Comets on Nov. 13. On Nov. 19, the team will make its home debut against the Tacoma Stars.

SATURDAY FAN FEST The Ambush will kick off their preseason schedule Friday against the Cedar Rapid Rampage in Iowa. On Saturday, the Ambush will host a Fan Fest from 4-6 p.m. featuring inflatables, face-painting and music on the Family Arena parking lot. At 7 p.m. the Ambush and Rampage will meet in a preseason game. There will be no charge for parking or admission to the Fan Fest or the preseason match. After the game, fans will be invited to the turf to meet players and get autographs. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFFS

BLUE JAYS 1, RANGERS 0

NATIONALS VS. DODGERS

CUBS VS. GIANTS Friday

AMERICAN LEAGUE PLAYOFFS

at Chicago, 8:15 p.m., FS1

Friday

Cueto (18-5, 2.79) vs. Lester (19-5, 2.44)

at Washington, 4:38 p.m., FS1

Game 1

Kershaw (12-4, 1.69) vs. Scherzer (20-7, 2.96)

Friday

Saturday at Chicago, 7:08 p.m., MLB Network

Saturday at Washington, 3:08 p.m., FS1

Monday

Monday

at San Fran., time TBA, FS1 or MLB

at Los Angeles, time TBA, FS1 or MLB

INDIANS 1, RED SOX 0

Blue Jays 10, Rangers 1

Game 1

Indians 5, Red Sox 4

at Texas, 12:08 p.m., TBS

Friday

at Cleveland, 3:38 p.m., TBS Price (17-9, 3.99) vs. Kluber (18-9, 3.14)

Happ (20-4, 3.18) vs. Darvish (7-5, 3.41) Sunday

at Toronto, 6:38 p.m., TBS

Sunday

at Boston, 3:08 p.m., TBS

*Tuesday at San Fran., time TBA, FS1

*Tuesday at Los Angeles, time TBA, FS1

*Monday at Toronto, time TBA, TBS

*Monday at Boston, time TBA, TBS

*Oct. 13

*Oct. 13

*Wed.

*Wed.

at Chicago, time TBA, FS1

at Washington, time TBA, FS1

at Texas, time TBA, TBS

at Cleveland, time TBA, TBS

*If necessary

Blue Jays KO Rangers in opener Blue Jays 10, Rangers 1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Jays’ Troy Tulowitzki (left) and Jose Bautista celebrate Bautista’s three-run home run against the Rangers during the ninth inning of Game 1 on Thursday in Arlington, Texas.

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Travis 2b 5 1 0 0 0 0 .100 Donaldson 3b 4 2 4 2 1 0 .667 Barney 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Encarnacion 1b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .333 Smoak 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bautista dh 4 2 2 4 1 0 .429 Martin c 4 1 0 0 1 2 .000 Tulowitzki ss 5 0 3 3 0 0 .333 Pillar cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Upton lf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .200 Carrera rf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .429 Totals 39 10 13 10 6 2 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gomez lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Desmond cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Beltran dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Beltre 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Andrus ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 .667 Choo rf 3 0 0 1 0 2 .000 Totals 29 1 4 1 0 6 Toronto 005 200 003 — 10 13 0 Texas 000 000 001 — 1 4 1 E: Andrus (1). LOB: Toronto 8, Texas 1. 2B: Donaldson 2 (3). 3B: Tulowitzki (1), Andrus (1). HR: Upton (1), off Hamels; Bautista (2), off Diekman. RBIs: Donaldson 2 (2), Bautista 4 (5), Tulowitzki 3 (3), Upton (1), Choo (1). CS: Andrus (1). RLISP: Toronto 4 (Encarnacion, Pillar, Upton, Carrera). GIDP: Travis, Tulowitzki, Beltre. DP: Toronto 2 (Martin, Tulowitzki), (Tulowitzki, Travis, Encarnacion); Texas 2 (Claudio, Odor, Moreland), (Claudio, Odor, Moreland). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Estrada W, 1-0 81/3 4 1 1 0 6 98 1.08 2/ Tepera 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 3 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels L, 0-1 31/3 6 7 6 3 1 82 16.20 Claudio 32/3 2 0 0 2 0 35 0.00 Barnette 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Diekman 1 4 3 3 1 1 30 27.00 Inherited runners-scored: Claudio 1-0. WP: Hamels. PB: Lucroy (1). Umpires: Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt; Right, Cory Blaser; Left, Joe West. T: 2:58. A: 47,434.

Hamels has rough outing and Bautista adds late three-run homer ASSOCIATED PRESS

ARLINGTON, TEXAS • Jose

Bautista hit another long, punctuating home run for the Toronto Blue Jays in the playofs against the Texas Rangers. Only this time, Bautista simply dropped the bat softly near home plate and rounded the bases after a 425-foot, three-run blast in the ninth inning of the Blue Jays’ 10-1 romp Thursday in their AL Division Series opener. “I have a couple of home runs in my career and I think I’ve only flipped it once,” Bautista said. “Just kind of been blown out of proportion because of the moment last year.” “So I don’t think there was anything too special about laying it down the way I did, because that’s the way that 99.9-plus percent of the time I do it,” he said. Bautista had that emphatic bat flip after his tiebreaking homer in the ALDS Game 5 clincher last October against the Rangers. The two-time major league homer champion got punched the last

time the Blue Jays played in Texas in May. Bautista drove in four runs this time, including an RBI single in Toronto’s five-run third off AllStar lefty Cole Hamels. Marco Estrada took a shutout into the ninth inning. The AllStar righthander with an impressive changeup, who won Game 3 in last year’s ALDS after Toronto lost the first two at home, struck out six without a walk. “He’s mastered his craft,” manager John Gibbons said. “He’s a very calm guy. ... He doesn’t get down on himself. As well as he’s pitched in two years here, really no need.” Estrada has never pitched a complete game in the majors and the Blue Jays didn’t throw one this season. No matter, Estrada gave them all they needed to start this best-of-five series. “Who cares? We won,” Estrada said. Game 2 is Friday afternoon at Texas. J.A. Happ starts for the Blue Jays against Yu Darvish. The last of the Rangers’ four

hits of Estrada was Elvis Andrus’ leadoff triple in the ninth. Gibbons removed the righthander after Shin-Soo Choo’s RBI grounder ended the shutout bid. Troy Tulowitzki hit a basesloaded triple for the Blue Jays. Toronto has won four straight overall, including an 11-inning, 5-2 victory over Baltimore in the AL wild-card game Tuesday night that included a home run by Bautista. Bautista was booed heartily during pregame introductions and while he batted in the first inning. There also were chants of “Rougie! Rougie!” — those were for Rougned Odor, the second baseman who punched Bautista and ignited a bench-clearing brawl in their last meeting May 15. Odor was suspended seven games. By the time Bautista led of the seventh with a walk, the ballpark was quiet with the Rangers down 7-0. After he homered, a fan threw the ball almost back to the infield. Hamels, the MVP of the 2008

World Series and NLCS for Philadelphia, threw 42 of his 82 pitches in the third. He allowed seven runs (six earned) with three walks in 3 1/3 innings. “When you give up the amount of runs that I did early in the game, it can kind of deflate anything and everything of what home-field advantage really is,” Hamels said. “It was a major letdown for what I was able to not do.” Ezequiel Carrera was on second base with two outs in the third when Josh Donaldson hit a liner toward third base. Donaldson, who had four hits, had even stopped running, assuming that Adrian Beltre would catch the ball — instead, the rising liner ricocheted off the mitt of the fourtime Gold Glover and into left field for an RBI double that made it 1-0. Encarnacion then had a single on a liner off Hamels’ outstretched glove, before Bautista’s run-scoring single and Russell Martin’s walk to load the bases. Tulowitzki followed with a three-run triple deep into the right-center gap.

hree-homer inning lifts Indians in Game 1 walk before getting Ortiz to swing at a low third strike. Cleveland tacked on another run in the fifth, helped by Perez’s alert baserunning. The slowfooted catcher tagged and took second on a fly to left and scored on Kipnis’ single to make it 5-3. Before the game, Farrell was confident Benintendi could handle October’s stage following his rapid rise through the minors — he skipped Triple-A. Benintendi didn’t show any nerves in his first postseason atbat, jumping on Bauer for a leadoff homer in the third for a 2-1 lead. The enigmatic Bauer, who began the season in the bullpen, was in trouble in the first inning but emerged from a two-on, none-out situation only down 1-0.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND • Francisco Lin-

dor’s homer capped Cleveland’s three-homer rampage in the third inning against 22-game winner Rick Porcello, and the Indians held on for a 5-4 win over the Boston Red Sox on Thursday night in their AL Division Series opener. Lindor, Jason Kipnis and Robert Perez went deep in the third of Porcello, who lasted 4 1/3 innings in his shortest outing this year. Before a sea of red-towel waving, screaming fans, the Indians landed the first blow in the bestof-5 series against David Ortiz and the AL East champions. Andrew Miller, acquired by Cleveland in a July trade for an October night like this, pitched two scoreless innings for the win. Summoned by manager Terry Francona earlier than usual, the lefty struck out Ortiz with two on to end the fifth and threw a season-high 40 pitches. Bryan Shaw gave up a leadoff homer to Boston’s Brock Holt in the eighth that made it 5-4 before Cody Allen struck out Xander Bogaerts with the potential tying run at third to end the inning. Boston put a runner on with two outs in the ninth but Allen fanned Dustin Pedroia on a full-count checked-swing, his 40th pitch, for the save. Pedroia was livid, and Red Sox manager John Farrell went onto the field to question plate umpire Brian Knight. Ortiz went 1 for 4 with a double in the first game of his final postseason. Rookie Andrew Benintendi and Sandy Leon also homered for the Red Sox, who will start David

PRICE FEELS RIGHT

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Indians’ Francisco Lindor celebrates his solo home run in the third inning, one of three long balls hit by Cleveland in the inning.

Price in Game 2 in the shadows Friday afternoon against Cleveland ace Corey Kluber. Cleveland unloaded on Porcello in the third, connecting for the three homers in a nine-pitch span. Perez started the salvo with just his second homer in 82 atbats at home this season. One out later, Kipnis drove a pitch over the wall in right-center, giving Cleveland a 3-2 lead and sending the raucous crowd of 37,763 into delirium. Kipnis had just finished getting a celebratory ride through the dugout when Lindor’s shot to

right barely cleared a leaping attempt by Mookie Betts. Porcello was clearly rocked by the barrage, and as Progressive Field shook, Boston’s infielders gathered around their ace, who went 11-2 after the All-Star break. Leon’s homer pulled the Red Sox to 4-3 in the fifth. Francona, who won two World Series with the Red Sox before coming to Cleveland, pulled starter Trevor Bauer for Miller, who hadn’t come in earlier than the sixth all season. Miller gave up a double and

David Price wants to make his next postseason start unlike all his others. “I want to go out there and win,” he said. “I want to be dominant. I want to have that really good postseason game, and I know that I’m capable of doing that.” That would be a first. Boston’s lefthander is 0-7 in the postseason going into Friday’s start in Game 2 of the AL Division Series, where he faces the Indians and righthander Corey Kluber. The 30-year-old has pitched in the playofs since 2010, when he was with Tampa Bay. He went 0-4 with the Rays, 0-1 with Detroit and 0-2 in two starts last year for Toronto after he was traded to the Blue Jays at the July 31 deadline.

NOTEBOOK Murphy says he’s ready for Game 1 of NLDS Dusty Baker expects injured second baseman Daniel Murphy to play for the Nationals in Game 1 of the NL Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, but Washington’s manager still didn’t announce his Game 2 starter. After Thursday’s workout, a little more than 24 hours before the series opens, Baker explained Murphy “says he’s ready, so therefore we think he’s ready.” Murphy hasn’t started a game since Sept. 17 because of a strained glute muscle. Murphy said he is conident he will play after working out Thursday. “It was good to hit the bases, cut, and I felt really good out there,” Murphy said. “I’m going to try everything I can to be in there tomorrow. These guys, my teammates, have really grinded and it’s been fun to watch while I’m out. I want to be in there and be in the ire with them.” Rosters don’t need to be set until Friday, when Washington hosts Game 1. Baker revealed a little, saying backup inielder Wilmer Difo will be among his 25 players, Pedro Severino will start at catcher and that the Nationals will carry three lefty relievers, but he wouldn’t say which ones. Sammy Solis, Marc Rzepczynski, Oliver Perez and Sean Burnett are the lefties available. With All-Star Wilson Ramos out because of a torn ACL in his right knee, Severino got the nod at catcher because Baker said Jose Lobaton was a little injured. Max Scherzer pitches for Washington against Clayton Kershaw on Friday, and Rich Hill will start for Los Angeles in Game 2 on Saturday. Baker said Thursday the Nationals haven’t decided who will start the second game. Toronto can thrower charged • The man who threw a beer at Baltimore outielder Hyun Soo Kim during the seventh inning of Tuesday night’s AL wild-card game has been charged with mischief. Ken Pagan, a 41-year-old copy editor for Postmedia, reported to a police precinct Thursday evening. He was later released and is due in court in late November. Pagan contacted police Wednesday evening after police released a photo of him. Toronto police said Thursday they are sure they have the right man. Pitching coach retires • Dave Wallace is retiring as the Baltimore Orioles pitching coach. The 69-year-old Wallace spent three years at the position and has been in coaching for 36 years. Orioles manager Buck Showalter made the announcement Thursday. Showalter says Wallace hopes to work as a part-time pitching instructor in the big leagues. Baltimore went 89-73 this season, reaching the playofs for the third time in ive years before being eliminated by Toronto on Tuesday in the AL wild-card game. The Orioles posted a 4.22 ERA, 19th among the 30 major league teams. MLB targets London in 2018 • Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred remains hopeful the sport can play regular-season games in London for the irst time in 2018. Baseball had hoped to play at Olympic Stadium next season, possibly with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox, but said in July that it ran out of time. Manfred met last month with London Mayor Sadiq Khan. “I want to be really, really optimistic about it,” Manfred said Wednesday before the NL wild card game. “I think it’s an important thing for us to do. I think it’s feasible in terms of facility. That’s always question one, do you have someplace to play?” Associated Press


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFFS

BLUE JAYS 1, RANGERS 0

NATIONALS VS. DODGERS

CUBS VS. GIANTS Friday

AMERICAN LEAGUE PLAYOFFS

at Chicago, 8:15 p.m., FS1

Friday

Cueto (18-5, 2.79) vs. Lester (19-5, 2.44)

at Washington, 4:38 p.m., FS1

Game 1

Kershaw (12-4, 1.69) vs. Scherzer (20-7, 2.96)

Friday

Saturday at Chicago, 7:08 p.m., MLB Network

Saturday at Washington, 3:08 p.m., FS1

Monday

Monday

at San Fran., time TBA, FS1 or MLB

at Los Angeles, time TBA, FS1 or MLB

INDIANS 1, RED SOX 0

Blue Jays 10, Rangers 1

Game 1

Indians 5, Red Sox 4

at Texas, 12:08 p.m., TBS

Friday

at Cleveland, 3:38 p.m., TBS Price (17-9, 3.99) vs. Kluber (18-9, 3.14)

Happ (20-4, 3.18) vs. Darvish (7-5, 3.41) Sunday

at Toronto, 6:38 p.m., TBS

Sunday

at Boston, 3:08 p.m., TBS

*Tuesday at San Fran., time TBA, FS1

*Tuesday at Los Angeles, time TBA, FS1

*Monday at Toronto, time TBA, TBS

*Monday at Boston, time TBA, TBS

*Oct. 13

*Oct. 13

*Wed.

*Wed.

at Chicago, time TBA, FS1

at Washington, time TBA, FS1

at Texas, time TBA, TBS

at Cleveland, time TBA, TBS

*If necessary

Blue Jays KO Rangers in opener Blue Jays 10, Rangers 1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Jays’ Troy Tulowitzki (left) and Jose Bautista celebrate Bautista’s three-run home run against the Rangers during the ninth inning of Game 1 on Thursday in Arlington, Texas.

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Travis 2b 5 1 0 0 0 0 .100 Donaldson 3b 4 2 4 2 1 0 .667 Barney 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Encarnacion 1b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .333 Smoak 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bautista dh 4 2 2 4 1 0 .429 Martin c 4 1 0 0 1 2 .000 Tulowitzki ss 5 0 3 3 0 0 .333 Pillar cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Upton lf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .200 Carrera rf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .429 Totals 39 10 13 10 6 2 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gomez lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Desmond cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Beltran dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Beltre 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Andrus ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 .667 Choo rf 3 0 0 1 0 2 .000 Totals 29 1 4 1 0 6 Toronto 005 200 003 — 10 13 0 Texas 000 000 001 — 1 4 1 E: Andrus (1). LOB: Toronto 8, Texas 1. 2B: Donaldson 2 (3). 3B: Tulowitzki (1), Andrus (1). HR: Upton (1), off Hamels; Bautista (2), off Diekman. RBIs: Donaldson 2 (2), Bautista 4 (5), Tulowitzki 3 (3), Upton (1), Choo (1). CS: Andrus (1). RLISP: Toronto 4 (Encarnacion, Pillar, Upton, Carrera). GIDP: Travis, Tulowitzki, Beltre. DP: Toronto 2 (Martin, Tulowitzki), (Tulowitzki, Travis, Encarnacion); Texas 2 (Claudio, Odor, Moreland), (Claudio, Odor, Moreland). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Estrada W, 1-0 81/3 4 1 1 0 6 98 1.08 2/ Tepera 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 3 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels L, 0-1 31/3 6 7 6 3 1 82 16.20 Claudio 32/3 2 0 0 2 0 35 0.00 Barnette 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Diekman 1 4 3 3 1 1 30 27.00 Inherited runners-scored: Claudio 1-0. WP: Hamels. PB: Lucroy (1). Umpires: Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt; Right, Cory Blaser; Left, Joe West. T: 2:58. A: 47,434.

Hamels has rough outing and Bautista adds late three-run homer ASSOCIATED PRESS

ARLINGTON, TEXAS • Jose

Bautista hit another long, punctuating home run for the Toronto Blue Jays in the playofs against the Texas Rangers. Only this time, Bautista simply dropped the bat softly near home plate and rounded the bases after a 425-foot, three-run blast in the ninth inning of the Blue Jays’ 10-1 romp Thursday in their AL Division Series opener. “I have a couple of home runs in my career and I think I’ve only flipped it once,” Bautista said. “Just kind of been blown out of proportion because of the moment last year.” “So I don’t think there was anything too special about laying it down the way I did, because that’s the way that 99.9-plus percent of the time I do it,” he said. Bautista had that emphatic bat flip after his tiebreaking homer in the ALDS Game 5 clincher last October against the Rangers. The two-time major league homer champion got punched the last

time the Blue Jays played in Texas in May. Bautista drove in four runs this time, including an RBI single in Toronto’s five-run third off AllStar lefty Cole Hamels. Marco Estrada took a shutout into the ninth inning. The AllStar righthander with an impressive changeup, who won Game 3 in last year’s ALDS after Toronto lost the first two at home, struck out six without a walk. “He’s mastered his craft,” manager John Gibbons said. “He’s a very calm guy. ... He doesn’t get down on himself. As well as he’s pitched in two years here, really no need.” Estrada has never pitched a complete game in the majors and the Blue Jays didn’t throw one this season. No matter, Estrada gave them all they needed to start this best-of-five series. “Who cares? We won,” Estrada said. Game 2 is Friday afternoon at Texas. J.A. Happ starts for the Blue Jays against Yu Darvish. The last of the Rangers’ four

hits of Estrada was Elvis Andrus’ leadoff triple in the ninth. Gibbons removed the righthander after Shin-Soo Choo’s RBI grounder ended the shutout bid. Troy Tulowitzki hit a basesloaded triple for the Blue Jays. Toronto has won four straight overall, including an 11-inning, 5-2 victory over Baltimore in the AL wild-card game Tuesday night that included a home run by Bautista. Bautista was booed heartily during pregame introductions and while he batted in the first inning. There also were chants of “Rougie! Rougie!” — those were for Rougned Odor, the second baseman who punched Bautista and ignited a bench-clearing brawl in their last meeting May 15. Odor was suspended seven games. By the time Bautista led of the seventh with a walk, the ballpark was quiet with the Rangers down 7-0. After he homered, a fan threw the ball almost back to the infield. Hamels, the MVP of the 2008

World Series and NLCS for Philadelphia, threw 42 of his 82 pitches in the third. He allowed seven runs (six earned) with three walks in 3 1/3 innings. “When you give up the amount of runs that I did early in the game, it can kind of deflate anything and everything of what home-field advantage really is,” Hamels said. “It was a major letdown for what I was able to not do.” Ezequiel Carrera was on second base with two outs in the third when Josh Donaldson hit a liner toward third base. Donaldson, who had four hits, had even stopped running, assuming that Adrian Beltre would catch the ball — instead, the rising liner ricocheted off the mitt of the fourtime Gold Glover and into left field for an RBI double that made it 1-0. Encarnacion then had a single on a liner off Hamels’ outstretched glove, before Bautista’s run-scoring single and Russell Martin’s walk to load the bases. Tulowitzki followed with a three-run triple deep into the right-center gap.

hree-homer inning lifts Indians in Game 1

Murphy says he’s ready for Game 1 of NLDS Dusty Baker expects injured second baseman Daniel Murphy to play for the Nationals in Game 1 of the NL Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, but Washington’s manager still didn’t announce his Game 2 starter. After Thursday’s workout, a little more than 24 hours before the series opens, Baker explained Murphy “says he’s ready, so therefore we think he’s ready.” Murphy hasn’t started a game since Sept. 17 because of a strained glute muscle. Murphy said he is conident he will play after working out Thursday. “It was good to hit the bases, cut, and I felt really good out there,” Murphy said. “I’m going to try everything I can to be in there tomorrow. These guys, my teammates, have really grinded and it’s been fun to watch while I’m out. I want to be in there and be in the ire with them.” Rosters don’t need to be set until Friday, when Washington hosts Game 1. Baker revealed a little, saying backup inielder Wilmer Difo will be among his 25 players, Pedro Severino will start at catcher and that the Nationals will carry three lefty relievers, but he wouldn’t say which ones. Sammy Solis, Marc Rzepczynski, Oliver Perez and Sean Burnett are the lefties available. With All-Star Wilson Ramos out because of a torn ACL in his right knee, Severino got the nod at catcher because Baker said Jose Lobaton was a little injured. Max Scherzer pitches for Washington against Clayton Kershaw on Friday, and Rich Hill will start for Los Angeles in Game 2 on Saturday. Baker said Thursday the Nationals haven’t decided who will start the second game. Toronto can thrower charged • The man who threw a beer at Baltimore outielder Hyun Soo Kim during the seventh inning of Tuesday night’s AL wild-card game has been charged with mischief. Ken Pagan, a 41-year-old copy editor for Postmedia, reported to a police precinct Thursday evening. He was later released and is due in court in late November. Pagan contacted police Wednesday evening after police released a photo of him. Toronto police said Thursday they are sure they have the right man.

Indians 5, Red Sox 4

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND • Boom! Bang!

Pow! Nine pitches, three homers, one devastating inning. Back in October’s spotlight, the Cleveland Indians rocked Rick Porcello for three long balls in the third inning in their AL Division Series opener. Francisco Lindor’s homer capped the rampage of the 22-game winner, and the Indians held on to beat the Boston Red Sox 5-4 Thursday night. Lindor, Jason Kipnis and Robert Perez went deep in the third of Porcello, who lasted 4 1/3 innings in his shortest outing this year. “We were up in the strike zone and they made us pay for it,” Red Sox manager John Farrell said. Before a sea of red-towel waving, screaming fans, the Indians got a jump in the best-of-5 series against David Ortiz and the AL East champions. “That’s never how you want to start of a playof series,” Porcello said.“It is what it is.” Andrew Miller, acquired by Cleveland in a July trade for an October night like this, pitched two scoreless innings for the win. Summoned by manager Terry Francona earlier than usual, the lefty struck out Ortiz with two on to end the fifth and threw a season-high 40 pitches. Bryan Shaw gave up a leadoff homer to Boston’s Brock Holt in the eighth that made it 5-4 before Cody Allen struck out Xander Bogaerts with the potential tying run at third to end the inning. Boston put a runner on with two outs in the ninth but Allen fanned Dustin Pedroia on a full-count checkedswing, his 40th pitch, for the save. Pedroia was livid, and Farrell went onto the field to question plate umpire Brian Knight.

NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Indians’ Francisco Lindor celebrates his solo home run in the third inning, one of three long balls hit by Cleveland in the inning.

Pedroia fired his helmet in disgust on his way into the dugout. “In real time, it’s a borderline call,” Farrell said. “Looking at it later, he swung.” Ortiz went 1 for 4 with a double in the first game of his final postseason. Rookie Andrew Benintendi and Sandy Leon also homered for the Red Sox, who will start David Price in Game 2 in the shadows Friday afternoon against Cleveland ace Corey Kluber. Cleveland unloaded on Porcello in the third, connecting for the three homers that shook Progres-

sive Field. Perez started the salvo with just his second homer in 82 at-bats at home this season. One out later, Kipnis drove a pitch over the wall in right-center, giving Cleveland a 3-2 lead and sending the raucous crowd of 37,763 into delirium. Kipnis had just finished getting a celebratory ride through the dugout when Lindor’s shot to right barely cleared a leaping attempt by Mookie Betts. “By the third one, our dugout was losing it,” Kipnis said. Porcello was clearly staggered by the barrage, and as Cleveland

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pedroia 2b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .200 Holt 3b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .750 Betts rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 1-Hernandez pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 --H.Ramirez 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .500 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Bradley Jr. cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Leon c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .250 Benintendi lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .500 Totals 36 4 10 4 1 14 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Santana dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kipnis 2b 4 1 3 2 0 1 .750 Lindor ss 4 1 1 1 0 2 .250 Napoli 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 J.Ramirez 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .667 Chisenhall rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .250 Crisp lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Martinez cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Naquin cf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 a-Davis ph-cf-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Perez c 3 2 2 1 0 1 .667 Totals 32 5 10 5 1 12 Boston 101 010 010 — 4 10 0 Cleveland 013 010 00x — 5 10 0 a-struck out for Naquin in the 6th. 1-ran for Ortiz in the 8th. LOB: Boston 6, Cleveland 5. 2B: Pedroia (1), Holt (1), Ortiz (1), H.Ramirez 2 (2), Napoli (1), J.Ramirez (1). HR: Benintendi (1), off Bauer; Leon (1), off Bauer; Holt (1), off Shaw; Perez (1), off Porcello; Kipnis (1), off Porcello; Lindor (1), off Porcello. RBIs: Holt (1), H.Ramirez (1), Leon (1), Benintendi (1), Kipnis 2 (2), Lindor (1), Chisenhall (1), Perez (1). RLISP: Boston 3 (Ortiz, Bogaerts, Bradley Jr.); Cleveland 2 (Chisenhall 2). GIDP: Chisenhall. DP: Boston 1 (Pedroia, Bogaerts, H.Ramirez). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello L, 0-1 41/3 6 5 5 0 6 72 10.38 Pomeranz 21/3 3 0 0 1 5 51 0.00 1/ Kelly 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 3 Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bauer 42/3 6 3 3 0 6 78 5.79 Miller W, 1-0 2 1 0 0 1 4 40 0.00 2/ Shaw 1 1 1 0 0 13 13.50 3 Allen S, 1-1 12/3 2 0 0 0 4 40 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Pomeranz 1-1, Kelly 1-0. PB: off Pomeranz (J.Ramirez). HBP: Porcello (Santana). Umpires: Home, Brian Knight; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Paul Emmel; Right, Vic Carapazza; Left, Bill Miller. T: 3:33. A: 37,763 .

fans jumped for joy, Boston’s infielders gathered around their ace, who went 11-2 after the All-Star break. Leon’s homer pulled the Red Sox to 4-3 in the fifth. Francona, who won two World Series with the Red Sox before coming to Cleveland, pulled starter Trevor Bauer for Miller, who hadn’t come in earlier than the sixth all season. Miller gave up a double and walk before getting Ortiz to swing at a low third strike.

Pitching coach retires • Dave Wallace is retiring as the Baltimore Orioles pitching coach. The 69-year-old Wallace spent three years at the position and has been in coaching for 36 years. Orioles manager Buck Showalter made the announcement Thursday. Showalter says Wallace hopes to work as a part-time pitching instructor in the big leagues. Baltimore went 89-73 this season, reaching the playofs for the third time in ive years before being eliminated by Toronto on Tuesday in the AL wild-card game. The Orioles posted a 4.22 ERA, 19th among the 30 major league teams. MLB targets London in 2018 • Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred remains hopeful the sport can play regular-season games in London for the irst time in 2018. Baseball had hoped to play at Olympic Stadium next season, possibly with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox, but said in July that it ran out of time. Manfred met last month with London Mayor Sadiq Khan. “I want to be really, really optimistic about it,” Manfred said Wednesday before the NL wild card game. “I think it’s an important thing for us to do. I think it’s feasible in terms of facility. That’s always question one, do you have someplace to play?” Associated Press


BASEBALL

10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

Oh a lifesaver for Cards’ bullpen Korean righthander went from set-up man to closer without a hitch this season BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Seung Hwan Oh was a rookie reliever in the Cardinals’ bullpen this season. He also was the oldest reliever in the bullpen. In a season that almost defied description, the 34-year-old South Korean who had considerable success both in the Korean League (nine years) and the Japanese League (two years), was just as good in the States as he went from Semifinal Boss to Final Boss, all while remaining the Stone Buddha. Oh, dominant in the seventh and eighth innings early in the season, didn’t get a chance to close until July. But then he racked up 19 saves and struck out 103 batters for the season while walking only 18. It could be explained that the righthander would have early success against National League hitters because none of them had seen him before, other than video where they apparently couldn’t tell how hard Oh could really throw or the variety of his repertoire. By the midpoint of the season or, certainly by the end, though, one would think the scales would be more balanced but Oh adjusted along with the hitters, most of whom never did catch up to him. Manager Mike Matheny said he thought Oh’s “newness,” would be to his advantage against hitters — for a while. “It’s like with some of these young starters,” said Matheny. “Teams will bring up a kid and we can’t figure him out but if stays in the game for long, we’ve got him. “I never saw that with Oh because of his pitch-ability. He’s got a real good idea where he wants to put it. And he puts it there.” The Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds did the best jobs, tagging Oh for three of the five homers he allowed, with Oh having earned run averages of 5.40 and 4.09 against those two clubs. Against all other major league teams, Oh had an ERA of 0.93. Among all National League relievers, Oh ranked sixth in WHIP (hits and walks per innings pitched), fourth in strikeouts and third in ERA (1.92). He worked 79 2/3 innings in 76 games and only once did he miss any appreciable time, sitting out a week with a groin strain in September. It was probably the best performance by a Cardinals’ first-year reliever since Todd

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In his irst season in Major League Baseball, Seung Hwan Oh picked up 19 saves after taking over the closer’s role in July for the Cardinals.

Worrell, the league Rookie of the Year in 1986, had a league-leading 36 saves and a 2.08 ERA. To say that the Cardinals were pleasantly surprised by Oh’s performance would be an understatement, and Oh said he could see why people might say that. Through translator Eugene Koo, Oh said, “It wasn’t suspected or predicted that I would have that kind of success this year.” General manager John Mozeliak said, “I felt like Oh definitely exceeded expectations. When we originally signed him, we saw him as an extra arm in the bullpen,

and then he ended up being our closer. For him to step up and do what he did ... in a lot of ways, he was one of the guys who saved us. He had a fabulous year. It’s hard to imagine he can build on it, but he may get that opportunity.” Oh was a rapt student as he tried to assimilate American culture and the sporting life. He said baseball itself wasn’t that much diferent here from Asia but that the lead-up was. In Korea and Japan, Oh said, the atmosphere in the clubhouse is much more serious before a game. “In the clubhouse

here, you’re all free and easy-going,” he said, “but when you’re up on the mound or on the field, then it’s game time and everyone is taking their business very seriously. “That’s one of the things I learned the most.” Oh likely is the Cardinals’ closer heading into next spring although defrocked closer Trevor Rosenthal likely will get a chance to compete again for that job if he isn’t converted to a starter. “It’s not my call,” said Oh, “but I’d like to be in the mix of competition in spring training.” But Matheny said, “He was pretty good and there’s no reason to take anything away from him, that’s for certain. We’ll see how everything looks in spring training.” Like the rest of the Cardinals’ staf, Oh trusted completely in catcher Yadier Molina. “There’s nothing more I can say,” Oh said. “Everyone knows how good Yadier is. Without Yadi, this wouldn’t have happened at all.” Koo almost always was involved in discussions at the mound among Molina, Matheny and Oh. When it was just Oh and Molina, the two managed to understand enough. Asked if Molina could speak Korean, Oh smiled and held his thumb and forefinger an inch or so apart and said, “A little bit.” And, asked how much Spanish he could speak, Oh held the two fingers at the same angle. “A little bit,” he said. A little went a long way. Oh’s $2.5 million contract for 2016 rolled over to $2.75 million for next year because Oh finished at least 30 games this season. “I’ll be better prepared for next year,” said Oh, although Matheny surely would settle for what he saw this year. Matheny said, “I thought we had an option with Oh for the seventh and the eighth and if we needed help in the ninth (for Rosenthal), we’d be looking at a (Jonathan) Broxton with the wild card (Jordan) Walden and a (Kevin) Siegrist. “Oh had closed before. It might not be in the big leagues, but he has closed games. But I didn’t anticipate that we’d see what we saw. We knew we were getting a good pitcher. We didn’t know how good. “I was beyond impressed.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Gyorko has power, versatility CARDINALS • FROM C1

berserker blitz to 28 second-half homer runs had more. Gyorko’s career-high 30 homers led the Cardinals and set a niche major-league record. Gyorko became the first player in the modern era, according to research using Baseball-Reference.com’s Play Index, to hit 30 home runs and play all four infield positions. The previous record was 27, set by the paragon of utility fielders, Ben Zobrist, back in 2009. Gyorko is the first Cardinal since Rogers Hornsby in 1921 to play all four infield positions regularly and hit more than 20 homers. Horsnby had 21. As the Cardinals sifted through the residue of a disappointing 86-76 finish, two wins short of a certain playof berth, the front oice acknowledged how, at times, the Cardinals search for ofense meant defense “sometimes takes a back seat.” That proved detrimental. The team’s goal is to improve its defense this ofseason, though around the horn that could mean just stabilizing roles, such as Matt Carpenter at first base and Aledmys Diaz’s seasoning at short. Gyorko’s place in a reordered infield could be a complement at second, an alternate at third, a starter when needed, a dependable glove at short or first, and a bat that brings power to them all. “I’d say yes to all of the above,” general manager John Mozeliak said. “That’s the great things about Jedd – you can play him almost anywhere and the fact he’s a very productive ofensive player. Maybe it becomes a little bit more of a platoon, too. But I think Jedd gives us ultimately flexibility.” He could be the adroit fielder they’re looking for. While Zobrist has been the most celebrated of the super utility fielders in recent years, he’s far from the first and wasn’t always the best. The Cubs second baseman – he’s found a home, now – started at six diferent positions in the field in 2009 when he hit 27 homers. But at five of those positions he started six or fewer games. The year before, in 2008, Mark DeRosa and Casey Blake also appeared at all four infield spots and hit more than 20 homers. DeRosa had 10 or more starts at four different positions. The interest in carrying an everyday, anywhere player has grown in baseball as teams have studied and adjusted for fatigue. This past season, 12 players appeared at least once at all four different infield positions. The Pirates’ Sean Rodriguez, like Gyorko, hit at least one home run at each infield position (he finished with only 18), and the year previous two players did that, Marwin Gonzalez and Ryan Flaherty. In a series against the Cardinals, Milwaukee’s Hernan Perez started the first three games at three diferent positions: second, right field, and first. “I put a premium on it,” Brewers manager Craig Counsell said of such versatility. “It provides so much flexibility and allows you to have a choice in your decisions and that’s not even speaking of how

it allows you cover for injuries. More than anything that’s what versatility really allows. … There’s just not many players that can do it. That’s the big thing because you start creating a long list of skills that a player has to have and not many players have that long list of skills. It’s not easy to do.” The Cardinals did not know if Gyorko could until he did. After hitting 23 homers for San Diego as a rookie in 2013, Gyorko was demoted in 2015 to find his swing at Class AAA. He returned to find playing time at shortstop, a new spot for him as a pro. The Cardinals saw him as an option there, and then momentarily turned to him as a starter there when Jhonny Peralta was injured. Atop that list Counsell’s talking about for a super utility player is the ability to play shortstop. (“It starts with shortstop,” he said.) Gyorko was a minus-3 Runs Saved at shortstop, same as Diaz, though in fewer innings. Gyorko was a plus fielder at second (plus-6) and third (plus-2), according to Bill James Online. The test for him and the Cardinals is to learn where that ideal equilibrium is for him, and it’s the same question at the plate. Was this season the sweet spot for starts, for at-bats, for top production? “Once you find that comfort level and then you try to stay with it,” Gyorko said. “It’s a good situation here. I think I fit in here with the guys very well, the coaches and I see eye to eye on a bunch of things. There is definitely that comfort level. I would be naïve to think that doesn’t have something to do with the production. … You take advantage of the opportunity you get and you build trust with Mike so that he’s more comfortable putting you in there. I think it’s been a great mix.” Unsure of how many starts he would get with his new team, Gyorko purposefully simplified his swing, reducing the need for playing time to “always get that timing back.” When the at-bats increased and the playing time became more certain, he kept the swing and felt the results. He had 247 of his career-low 400 at-bats after the All-Star break, and yet hit .243 with a .547 slugging percentage and a .855 OPS. He and Curtis Granderson became the first players to hit more than 30 homers and have less than 60 RBIs. They each had 59. That’s part of the goal with Gyorko: finding the blend of positions to maximize his versatility, finding the amount of atbats to tap his power, and finding a spot in the lineup to exploit it. The Cardinals have more to go on now than just a “power profile.” Their leader in home runs may not return to a starting position in 2017. He’ll just be able to start at any of them. “Everywhere on the infield. Anywhere on the infield,” Matheny said. “I’ve seen him catch. I wouldn’t put (outfield) past him. For a good bat, you do just about anything.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Giants Game 1 starter Johnny Cueto throws in a workout Thursday at Wrigley Field.

Cubs rested, ready for Giants CUBS • FROM C1

opener at Wrigley Field. San Francisco stumbled in the second half of the season, then closed with five wins in six games to hold onto the second NL wild card. The Giants won the World Series in 2010, 2012 and 2014, and manager Bruce Bochy and company feel this is their part of the calendar — again. “The moment won’t bother these guys,” Bochy said. The Giants’ sustained success is exactly what the Cubs are hoping to string together. It has been 108 years since the North Siders last won the World Series in 1908 — a number that will chase them around for as long as they stick around in this year’s playofs — but the Cubs made it to the NL Championship Series in 2015 and led the majors with 103 wins this season. With a deep rotation and young sluggers in Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo, the Cubs are positioned to challenge for titles for years to come. They want to start right now, and the Giants are standing in their way. “Every year they’re in it. Every year they’re contending. Every year they have a chance to win the World Series,” said lefthander Jon Lester, who will start Game 1 for the Cubs. “So I think that’s what every team wants, not just us. I think they’re an organization that a lot of teams look after to figure out how, why, how to get to that point. “It’s a model of consistency. It’s impressive to see what they do.” The Cubs clinched the NL Central title way back on Sept. 15, giving them a couple weeks to rest a few bumps and bruises and get their pitching staf ready for the playofs. Even manager Joe Maddon is interested to see how they respond after four days of. “Yeah, we’re going to find out,” Maddon said. “I thought we handled the last couple days well.” One of the key moments in Chicago’s run to a wild card last season was a fourgame sweep of San Francisco in August. If this year’s seven-game season series is any indication of what the playofs will

look like, get ready for a string of tight, low-scoring matchups. The final five games were decided by one run, including Chicago taking three of four at home last month. The Cubs won four times and outscored the Giants 23-17 this year, but one of their wins was an 8-1 victory. “We’ve got our work cut out for us,” said Jake Arrieta, who likely will match up with Bumgarner in Game 3. “We’ve had a nice amount of time of. Now it’s going to be nice to get back on the field and playing some meaningful games.” Cueto made one start against Chicago this year, pitching seven solid innings in a no-decision on Sept. 4. The righthander, who helped Kansas City win the World Series last season, is very familiar with the Cubs and Wrigley Field after spending the first 7 ½ years of his major league career with Cincinnati. “I like to pitch when it’s a sold-out crowd with everybody cheering for me or against me, and that kind of motivates me,” Cueto said through a translator. Lester had one of his worst starts of the year at San Francisco on May 21, lasting just 2 2/3 innings in a 5-3 loss. He responded with five consecutive wins and went 15-2 with a 2.38 ERA in his final 23 starts. After Lester makes his 17th career postseason appearance, major league ERA leader Kyle Hendricks gets the ball in Game 2, followed by Arrieta and John Lackey. The Giants had not set their series rotation, but Jeff Samardzija could pitch on Saturday night against the team that gave him his start in the majors. The status of All-Star Eduardo Nunez also was unclear. Nunez missed the wild-card win with a strained right hamstring, and Conor Gillaspie delivered in his absence with a three-run homer in the ninth — just another example of San Francisco’s even-year magic. “Can he start tomorrow? No,” Bochy said while providing an update on Nunez’s status. “But it’s a five-game series, if we think he can help coming of the bench, maybe start the back end of this series then we probably would activate him.”


SPORTS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

A special kind of postseason

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

BLUES NOTEBOOK

he less the better for Reaves

ORTIZ • FROM C1

title, but these Cubs appear primed to break the Curse of the Billy Goat. The Lovable Losers are no longer. The Cubs are hardly the only intriguing storyline, though. Let’s break down the postseason field and chart the path to the Cubs’ title. The NL West champion Dodgers and NL East champion Nationals both appear strong enough to give the Cubs a run, but first they must get through each other in the Division Series. Is this the year that ace Clayton Kershaw finally makes it to the World Series? The Nationals’ Dusty Baker and the Dodgers’ Dave Roberts will make history in the first postseason series pitting two African-American managers. “It’s important, and it doesn’t go unnoticed or underappreciated,” Roberts told reporters Thursday. “I think speaking for Dusty, myself, what it means to the game of baseball, to society. You know, but I think when it comes down to it, right now, he and I, we’re just focused on winning a series. “I think that when we look back, it’s really, it’s going to be more special, but I definitely know it’s certainly noted, and not to go unappreciated.” In another October, the Blue JaysRangers series might be the one with the least national interest. This October is different, though, because many folks want to see if the fireworks return in the first meeting between the teams since Rangers infielder Rougned Odor delivered the punch heard ‘round the world to Blue Jays slugger Jose Bautista. In a season defined by recordbreaking home run totals, the most memorable blow may have been delivered in May when Odor slugged Bautista. That storyline will be one to watch throughout the Division Series that started Thursday in Arlington. Rangers manager Jeff Banister is quite fiery. He’s not above getting into the middle of the fray to defend his players. Blue Jays manager John Gibbons is also the type of manager willing to get into it, whether it’s with his own players or defending them. As much as Banister and Gibbons may want to bottle up the hatred, it will be interesting to see how the best-of-five series plays out. “Well, you know, really, games are too important,” Gibbons told the media in Arlington on Wednesday. “I wouldn’t expect anything. But nobody seems to want to let it go. I’m talking about the media spotlight. It’s kind of fun. “It gets frowned upon what happens and every time you turn on the TV it’s a replay after replay after replay. But too much at stake. Two great ball clubs, two very competitive ball clubs, two emotional ball clubs. But in no way I would expect anything like that.” The Rangers must hope their starting pitching doesn’t flop as badly as Cole Hamels did Thursday in Game 1. In the other AL Division Series, between the Red Sox and Indians, much focus will be paid to David Ortiz as the slugger plays the final postseason of his brilliant career. He’ll face Indians manager Terry Francona, who managed the Red Sox when they ended the Curse of the Bambino in 2004. In helping the Red Sox win the World Series title for the first time in 86 years, Ortiz and Francona secured their legacies in New England. Now they’ll face each other in the Division Series for the first time. “There’s a lot of history there, a lot of people I really care about,” Francona told the media before the series. “But I’ve been here four years and you get every bit as close to — it’s not a bad thing when you move on. Sometimes it’s just time to move on.” Now for some predictions: The Rangers were the best team in the AL for much of the year. They should be good enough to get past the Blue Jays, but Toronto might be more primed for success after playing in a playof-type atmosphere for the past three weeks. The Red Sox shouldn’t have a problem getting past the Indians. The Red Sox should have more than enough to handle the Blue Jays, setting up what could be a dream Cubs-Red Sox World Series. The Cubs have just too much firepower for the Giants, who will likely be able to start ace Madison Bumgarner only once in the series after using him for a complete game in the wildcard game. If fully healthy, you might have to give the Nationals the edge over the Dodgers, but I have to go with Clayton Kershaw and Co. in this series. The Dodgers haven’t won the World Series since 1988, a long 28year wait for Los Angeles. That wait will continue at least one more year because they’re not strong enough to get past the stacked Cubs, who will then end their 108-year drought by beating the Red Sox in the World Series. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

In search of speed, he came into camp lighter than in the past BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Ryan Reaves expects to lose weight every training camp, but it didn’t happen last year. A knee injury that kept him off the ice was partly to blame, but over the next seven months it never came of. “It was weird,” Reaves said. “I usually come in at 230 pounds and lose about five to eight in the first month and then stay around 220. Last year for some reason I wasn’t losing anything. Being in and out of the lineup, I was working out a little bit more, so I guess that’s why I kept it on.” When the season ended, Blues coach Ken Hitchcock told Reaves he wanted him to be able to play faster in 2016-17 and losing weight would help. So the 6-foot-1 right winger did less lifting this ofseason, more skating, and reported to camp at 225. “I kind of fought that (knee injury) all year and my speed just wasn’t there all season,” Reaves said. “I let that heal the first couple weeks (this summer) and then really worked on my speed. A lot less throwing up weight and just getting big. I’m still strong, but I worked on a little more explosive stuf.” Reaves has always been considered a hard skater on the forecheck, but he wants to play faster within the system. “When I’m playing my best, I’m not looking for hits,” he said. “That’s been a big focus of mine this preseason. You’ve probably seen I haven’t had as many big hits so far this preseason, but I think my reads and my positioning has been a lot better.” The change has been noticeable, Hitchcock said. “Even in the drill today that was an endurance, checking drill, he didn’t just stop playing because he was exhausted,” he said. “He’s quicker, he’s faster, he’s got more endurance, he’s able to sustain his shift length with better quality play and it’s going to allow him to be able to play more.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues are putting more emphasis on Ryan Reaves’ speed, rather than his size, and the veteran right wing reported to camp ive pounds lighter than in the past.

AGOSTINO, BARBASHEV CUT The Blues assigned forwards Kenny Agostino and Ivan Barbashev to the Chicago Wolves of the American Hockey League. Agostino played five preseason games and remains tied for third in the NHL with six points. Asked if either Agostino or Barbashev showed the Blues something, Hitchcock replied: “At times, but they need more coaching. But both looked like they could come and play games for us.” With those cuts, it appears that if the Blues keep 14 forwards both Ty Rattie and Landon Ferraro have made the roster. Hitchcock didn’t deny that, but did say he

wants to see more production from the forwards battling for spots on the back end of the roster. “I’m really looking at seeing if they’re going to earn it,” Hitchcock said. “Basically not give it to them by default, but are they going to go out and take it? We’re giving them the opportunity and quite frankly, there’s a regular spot and there’s a depth spot wide open and whoever grabs it is going to get it. But I can’t tell you right now that anybody has gone out and grabbed it yet. Our hope is that they do that. If they do that, they can have it. But right now, we’re not going to give it away. We’ll see.”

BLUENOTES Defenseman Joel Edmundson was injured in Wednesday’s 4-2 loss to Washington and didn’t skate Thursday. “He took a shot on the leg and we just felt it was best that he took today of, and back at it tomorrow,” Hitchcock said. ... The Blues had been whistled for the second-most minor penalties (36) and third-most penalty minutes (102) in NHL preseason games before Thursday’s action. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kevin Shattenkirk is still on the point on the power play, but this time he’ll be on the left side instead of the right.

New faces mean a new look for power play BLUES • FROM C1

19 chances in the preseason (31.6 percent), which ranks fourth in the NHL. But the teams knows those numbers could change quickly when the stakes change next week, so it continues to spend a considerable amount of time in camp working with the two groups, including the entire second half of Thursday’s practice. The No. 1 unit could be dubbed the “Letter People,” as each of the five members — Kevin Shattenkirk (A), Alex Pietrangelo (C), Alexander Steen (A), Paul Stastny (A) and Vladimir Tarasenko (A) — has a letter on their sweater recognizing their leadership role. The absence of Backes and Brouwer has altered where a few of those players are lining up. Steen, who has spent time on the point and the wing, is now taking turns with Stastny in front of the net. “That’s what we’re working on right now,” Yeo said. “We’ve got one combination of Steen and Stastny playing in that area. That’s diferent for them, so we have to see how that works.” With Steen and Stastny both being left shots, the opposite of Backes and Brouwer, that changes which side of the ice the Blues can run certain “set” plays. “We had Backes here, so he would pop of and we would have that play to (Jaden Schwartz),” Shattenkirk said. “The other group had Brouwer for that quick onetimer. Having a (left shot) doesn’t allow those plays. That extra second to get that shot of allows the PK to stop it. So we’re having to work it from the other side.” “It’s going to be diferent,” Blues coach

Ken Hitchcock said, “because there aren’t going to be those bang-bang plays that we had with the other two guys. So there’s going to be a different type of goal scoring. Movement is going to be the same, but we’re going to have more movement through the crease area than through the slot area.” Meanwhile, Shattenkirk, who was previously on the right point, is now on the left, making room on the right for Pietrangelo. “It’s diferent,” Shattenkirk said. “But we can change at any point, which is nice, to have that fluidity.” It’s a promotion for Pietrangelo, who played on the second unit. Why not use Colton Parayko on the right point, where he’s forces penalty killers to stare death in the face with his slap shot? “One (reason) is the unit that Petro plays on, the shot comes mostly from Vladi,” Hitchcock said. “Vladi and Shattenkirk, they’re the most accurate shooters we’ve got on the team. You can’t have like three shooters on the power play because nobody’s going to know when it’s coming to the net.” It’s no surprise that Tarasenko is the triggerman, but after parking on the right side for the majority of his career, he can now be seen sizing up shots on the left in practice. “When I looked at the video last year, whether he’s attacking down of the top of the circles from the left or the right side, he’s equally dangerous from either side,” Yeo said. The No. 2 unit features Parayko, David Perron, Patrik Berglund, Robby Fabbri and Jori Lehtera, with Dmitrij Jaskin also

getting reps. Lehtera and Jaskin are going through tryouts in the net-front role. “There’s no guarantee that this is where we’ll be when we start the season,” Yeo said. “But any power play that has success, you have two units that contribute and this is a group that last year had that.” The only major changes Yeo has made outside of necessity have involved breaking out of the zone and with zone entries. “Our exit can work against different schemes that teams throw at us,” Shattenkirk said. “If it’s a 1-1-2 in the neutral zone, or it’s a box, there are ways to cut through it by running the same exact routes.” And then once they get through the neutral zone, they want to skate the puck smoothly into the ofensive zone. “Some times you have to dump the puck in,” Yeo said, “but we’d much rather be a team that gains the zone with control and that’s the goal here.” But otherwise, Yeo doesn’t want to change much with a power play that has scored many goals the past few years. “We’ve been so successful for so long now, Coach Yeo has realized that,” Shattenkirk said. “He’s luckily someone that has seen it work first-hand, so he’s not trying to change much. He’s not trying to reinvent the wheel, which I think is great. “At the same time, he saw what our weaknesses were last year and he knows how to change those. That’s what we all have respected about him. Everything he has said, we all agreed with right from the start, and that’s important.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com


10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1

WEEK 8 GAMES TO WATCH ROCKHURST HAWKLETS at CBC CADETS When: 7 p.m. Friday. Records: Rockhurst 5-1; CBC 6-1. Rankings: Rockhurst, No. 4 Class 6 Missouri Media; CBC, No. 2 large school STLhighschoolsports.com and No. 1 Class 6 Missouri Media. Last week: Rockhurst was idle; CBC 65, Jeferson City 59. On Rockhurst: The Hawklets were of last week after taking their irst loss of the season in a 24-7 setback against rival and Kansas City powerhouse Blue Springs. ... This is a rematch of the 2014 Class 6 title game, which CBC won 31-24. While CBC inished as the Class 6 runner-up last season, Rockhurst inished 4-6 and lost in the irst round of district play. ... Rockhurst’s defense has been solid all season. Blue Springs scored 24 while Bentonville (Ark.) put up 21. In three of its ive wins this season Rockhurst has allowed seven points or less. ... Rockhurst hasn’t fared well in the St. Louis area as it has lost its last two games here. CBC won the 2014 Class 6 at Edward Jones Dome. East St. Louis beat Rockhurst 19-14 at Clyde C. Jordan Stadium in 2013. On CBC: CBC has won four in a row since its 34-28 loss at East St. Louis. ... The Cadets survived last week’s shootout at Jeferson City but they did not come out unscathed. Top recruit and standout junior receiver Kamryn Babb sufered an injury in that game. CBC coach Scott Pingel said his status is uncertain for this game. Babb is CBC’s best player with 13 total touchdowns and 847 combined rushing and receiving yards. He also has four interceptions. ... Sophomore quarterback Brett Gabbert continues to impress as he’s thrown for 1,534 yards, 17 touchdowns and been intercepted three times. ... Junior receiver Cameron Brown has 28 receptions 516 yards and six touchdowns. Senior running back Justin Williams has rushed for 799 yards and 11 touchdowns. Senior running back Kaleb Allen had a breakout game against Jeferson City as he rushed for 146 yards and four touchdowns. … Senior defensive back Brent Bledsoe has 38 tackles and three interceptions. Senior linebacker Brandon Zmuda has 36 tackles. Senior linebacker Benji Gormley has 30 tackles and an interception. LUTHERAN NORTH CRUSADERS at MATER DEI KNIGHTS When: 7 p.m. Friday. Records: Lutheran North 6-1; Mater Dei 3-3. Rankings: Lutheran North, No. 3 small school STLhighschoolsports.com and No. 4 Class 2 Missouri Media; Mater Dei, No. 7 small school STLhighschoolsports.com. Last week: Lutheran North 57, Priory 7; Mater Dei 55, Quincy Notre Dame 14. On Lutheran North: Crusaders have won three in a row after losing at MICDS and are the runner-up in the powerful Metro League. ... Senior quarterback Aqeel Glass has thrown for 1,560 yards, 16 touchdowns and six interceptions. ... Junior running back Donovan Marshall has rushed for 1,029 yards and 10 touchdowns, with 583 yards and eight of those scores in the last three games. ... Senior receiver Jordan Sommerville has 42 receptions for 906 yards and nine touchdowns. ... Sophomore defensive lineman D’Vion Harris has 39 tackles and two sacks. Junior linebacker Devin Ruin has 33 tackles and four interceptions. On Mater Dei: The Knights snapped a three-game losing streak with a road win at Quincy Notre Dame. ... Senior dual threat quarterback Colin Schuetz has thrown for 894 yards, 13 touchdowns and been intercepted four times. He’s rushed for 512 yards and six scores. ... Senior Jake Wieter has rushed for 549 yards and four touchdowns. Senior receiver Lucas Theising has caught 21 passes for 276 yards and ive scores. Senior Jake Timmermann has 18 receptions for 220 yards and ive touchdowns. ... Senior linebacker Trever Johnson has 43 tackles and two sacks. Sophomore linebacker Nic Seelhoefer has 35 tackles, one sack and one interception. ST. CHARLES PIRATES at ST. CHARLES WEST WARRIORS When: 7 p.m. Friday. Records: St. Charles 3-4 overall, 1-2 GAC North; St. Charles West 3-4, 2-1. Last week: Orchard Farm 45, St. Charles 8; Borgia 17, St. Charles West 14. On St. Charles: The Pirates have lost 10 consecutive meetings with their crosstown rival. Their last two wins in the series came in 2004 and 2005 by a combined two points. St. Charles escaped with a 10-9 win in 2005. Last season was particularly cruel for the Pirates as they were outscored 20-12 in the second half as the Warriors scored late in the game and won 33-32. ... Sophomore quarterback Cody Thorn has thrown for 859 yards, nine touchdowns and six interceptions. Senior running back Jordan Gladney has run for 381 yards and seven touchdowns. Junior running back Michah Hughes has rushed for 412 yards and ive touchdowns. He’s also caught 10 passes for 231 yards and four scores. ... Gladney has 85 tackles as a linebacker. Hughes is second on the team with 46 tackles. On St. Charles West: Junior quarterback Cameren Jett has thrown for 464 yards, seven touchdowns and three interceptions. Senior running back Alarenz Stanton and junior running back Brandon Cabray have rushed for a combined 368 yards and 13 touchdowns. Senior receiver Rashad Chatman has caught 13 passes for 313 yards and ive touchdowns. ... Junior Demetrius Lane has 51 tackles. Senior linebacker Tre Kelly has 39 tackles and six sacks. Cabray has 45 tackles and Stanton has 42 tackles and three sacks. TRIAD KNIGHTS at HIGHLAND BULLDOGS When: 7 p.m. Friday. Records: Triad 5-1 overall, 2-1 Mississippi Valley; Highland 5-1, 3-0. Rankings: Triad, No. 10 Class 5A Illinois AP; Highland, No. 10 small school STLhighschoolsports.com and No. 7 Class 5A Illinois AP. Last week: Triad 56, Mascoutah 7; Highland 26, Civic Memorial 21. On Triad: Since 2006, Triad is 7-3 against Highland. The Knights won last year’s meeting 13-3 to break a two-year losing streak to the Bulldogs and win the league title. ... Triad is a power run team. Senior quarterback Tommy Bauer has rushed for 833 yards and 18 touchdowns. He’s attempted nine passes this year and completed two of them. Senior fullback Tom Kraudel has rushed for 624 yards and eight touchdowns. ... Triad allowed a season-high 23 points to Mattoon in its season opener. No other opponent has scored more than 21 since. ... Junior linebacker Nathan Clark has 53 tackles and ive sacks. Senior defensive back Jeron Pino has three interceptions. On Highland: Bulldogs have won ive in a row after losing season opener at Cahokia. ... The Bulldogs will have to igure out how to manage without starting senior running back and safety Trent Rakers, who sufered a season-ending injury in last week’s win over Civic Memorial. Rakers rushed for a team-high 653 yards and nine touchdowns. ... Junior quarterback Garrett Marti is expected to return after missing the last two games with an injury. He has thrown for 853 yards and four touchdowns. ... With Marti out, sophomore receiver Sam LaPorta stepped in under center and attempted 16 passes in two games. LaPorta has 22 receptions for 415 yards and three touchdowns. ... Junior linebacker Kyle Lane has 54 tackles. Rakers is second on the team with 29 tackles. ST. DOMINIC CRUSADERS at MICDS RAMS When: 1 p.m. Saturday. Records: St. Dominic 7-0; MICDS 5-2. Rankings: St. Dominic, No. 6 small school STLhighschoolsports. com and No. 6 Class 4 Missouri Media; MICDS No. 9 small school STLhighschoolsports.com and No. 10 Class 4 Missouri Media. Last week: St. Dominic 51, St. Mary’s 13; MICDS 33, Westminster 14. On St. Dominic: This is the ifth time since 1999 that St. Dominic has been unbeaten through seven games. It reached 8-0 in 2011 and did so again in 2012 when it beat MICDS on the road. ... The option ofense is the Crusaders’ bread and butter. Senior running back Jacob Larson has rushed for 995 yards and nine touchdowns. ... Senior quarterback Dominic Demerath has rushed for 536 yards and 10 touchdowns. Demerath also has thrown for 409 yards and seven scores. ... Senior receiver Alex Hof has a team-high seven receptions for 166 yards and three touchdowns. ... St. Dominic’s defense has been stellar. It allowed John Burroughs to score 26 points in Week 1 but hasn’t allowed another opponent to break 14 points. ... Senior linebacker Jacob Jones has 42 tackles. On MICDS: The Rams have won ive in a row and wrapped up their irst Metro League championship since 2011. This is their best start to a season since they reached the Class 4 title game that same season. ... Sophomore quarterback Graham Bundy Jr. runs a balanced ofense. He’s rushed for 273 yards and three touchdowns and thrown for 864 yards, 12 touchdowns and six interceptions. ... Junior running back Preston Buchanan has rushed for 252 yards and two scores. Junior receiver Ryan Thompson has a team-high 15 receptions for 298 yards and four touchdowns. ... Senior Keiondre Jordan has bounced between running back and wide receiver. He has 426 combined rushing and receiving yards and scored three total touchdowns. ... Senior defensive end Teddy Schmid has 40 tackles and 10 sacks. Junior linebacker Ford Maune has a team-high 66 tackles and is one of three Rams with 60 or more. The others are Jordan (62) at safety and junior linebacker Jayson Love (60).

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

MORE DISTRICT SOFTBALL COVERAGE ONLINE Check out our brackets, schedules and scores for all of the area’s Missouri softball tournaments.

GORDON RADFORD • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Festus sophomore Erica Fletcher beats the tag from DuBourg freshman Rachel McCloskey during a Class 3 District 3 softball semiinal game on Thursday.

WEEK 8 • FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT

DOUBLE DUTY Columbia linebacker Suedkamp gladly helps on ofensive line BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

Owen Suedkamp rampaged through whatever or whoever stood in his way. Just a freshman, Suedkamp lined up against the varsity starters as the Columbia High football team prepared for its next opponent. Suedkamp made it look like the 1985 Chicago Bears were coming to town. “The thing that stood out for us was we couldn’t block him on scout team,” Columbia coach Scott Horner said. “He was making every tackle on the scout team and he was getting after our kids a little bit. He kind of has a knack for it.” Suedkamp A year later, Suedkamp started at linebacker and has been handing out the hits ever since. Now a senior, the 6-foot and 220-pound Suedkamp leads Columbia into its stiffest test this season. The No. 8 small school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Columbia (6-0 overall, 4-0 league) travels to No. 4 small school Breese Central (6-0, 4-0) for a 7 p.m. kickof Friday. The victor will all but lock up the Cahokia Conference championship. Columbia is riding a 28-game unbeaten streak in the conference and is the four-time reigning champ. The last team to win the league title? Central, which ran the table in 2011. As if there wasn’t enough riding on Friday’s showdown, Columbia beat Central twice last season by a combined two points. The second meeting was in the first round of the Class 4A playofs. Columbia escaped with a 21-20 victory when the Cougars went for a 2-point conversion with just more than

four minutes to play and didn’t convert. “There is no question they’re going to be excited,” Horner said. “There are 20 seniors in that group and I guarantee you they did not forget about last year. We have to be prepared for that.” Columbia’s preseason was dotted with question marks. Junior running back Colton Byrd has been a revelation as he’s rushed for 793 yards and 13 touchdowns. He set the school’s singlegame scoring record when he exploded for six touchdowns and rushed for 172 yards on 10 carries in a 55-6 win over Carlyle. Senior quarterback Greg Long attempted two passes as a junior. He did most of his best work as a defensive back. This season he’s completed 63 of 81 passes for 894 yards and 13 touchdowns. He’s rushed for 179 yards and seven touchdowns, too. One of the many reasons the ofense has been so efective is the play of the ofensive line. An ofensive line that added Suedkamp as a right guard during preseason workouts. After 10 years of hunting running backs and quarterbacks, Suedkamp spends half the game protecting them. “I haven’t done that since I was 8 years old,” Suedkamp said. “That’s what I played when I first started. It all kind of came full circle, I guess.” It wasn’t something Horner and the Columbia coaches wanted to do. Suedkamp had 163 tackles last season and earned all-state and All-Metro honors. But they needed him to sacrifice personal statistics and playing one way for the good of the team. Suedkamp never batted an eye. “Playing on both sides of the ball, I’m not sure his tackle totals are close to where they were at this time last year,” Horner said. “He was more than willing to do whatever he had to do to make our team better.”

THURSDAY’S RESULTS SOFTBALL Pky. North 002 310 0 6 9 0 FH North 002 033 0 8 11 0 W-Elizabeth Davis. HR-F Austyn Rowan Fulton 011 000 2 1 0 Warrenton 221 104 10 14 2 W-Kaylee Anderson. Liberty 000 000 0 0 1 0 Troy 000 000 0 5 11 0 W-Kiersten Nixon. Afton 000 000 0 0 5 2 Union 000 000 0 5 7 0 L-Emelie Mandernach. Howell 031 24 10 28 0 FZ South 000 00 0 4 5 W-Whitney Boschert. L-Bri Dunn. HR-Fr Regan Gremaud -; Gateway STEM 011 20 4 4 0 Soldan 363 02 14 18 0 W-Jashay Wallace. L-Olivia Martinez. Clayton 000 200 0 2 3 0 In. Word 300 043 0 10 10 1 W-Lexi Becker. HR-I Grace Paez Metro 311 003 0 8 7 3 Kennedy 342 405 0 18 15 0 L-Maude Wilkinson. Valley Park 329 4 18 15 1 Principia 200 0 2 2 0 W-Amanda Kraus. Fox 000 00 0 1 0 Seckman 000 00 12 8 0 W-Zoe Martin. HR-S McCorkell -Kamryn Sloan DuBourg 000 000 0 1 0 Festus 100 432 10 13 0 W-Sara Hofman. Battle 001 010 0 2 7 0 Holt 021 003 0 6 8 0 W-Sydney Hansen. HR-H Riley Eagan -Marissa Peek FZ West 000 000 0 10 9 0 FH Central 000 000 0 7 9 0 W-Lexi Barnes. HR-Fo Kelsey Etling -Keira Hance -; McCluer 000 0 1 0 Haz. West 492 15 15 0 W-Chloe Johnson. HR-H Desirae Yost 2-Chloe Johnson Pattonville 000 00 0 3 0 Pky. Central 000 00 12 14 0 W-Elizabeth Millner. Pky. South 000 000 0 0 8 0 Marquette 101 020 0 4 4 0 W-Annah Junge. L-Mary Burkhalter. HR-M Annah Junge Ursuline 100 000 0 1 6 4 Cor Jesu 100 005 0 6 5 0 L-Maddy Schneider. Oakville 001 110 0 3 Poplar Bluf 000 002 0 2 W-Sarah Pattillo. L- Stuckey. Central 000 000 0 2 6 0 De Soto 000 000 0 7 0 0 L-Kimmy Wallen. Wright City 052 022 0 11 16 0 Elsberry 000 003 2 5 9 0 W-Madelyn Webb. Orchard Farm 000 00 10 8 0 O’F Christian 000 00 0 9 4 W-Marina Heitmann. L-Caitlin Rodriguez.

BOYS SOCCER Haz. Central 3, McCluer 2 (H: Jarame Crawford 2;M: Joey Skees, Matt Skees) De Smet 4, Poplar Bluf 1 (D: Jack Klingler, Simon Benben, TJ Burke, Nick Grewe) Lafayette 3, Pky. South 0 (L: Dominic Deprospero, Camden Jaggie, Jarid Morton ; shutout by Scott Caraway) Haz. West 4, Westminster 2 (H: Zack Lyeki 3, Andrew Heider) Breese C. 2, Wesclin 1 (B: Coty Boruf;W: Trent Calvert) Mater Dei 3, Olney 0 (M: Drew Tonnies 2, Branden Billhartz ; shutout by Justin Fritch) FZ North 3, St.Chas. West 0 (F: Matt Bennick, Blaine Pagano, Cole Sutton ; shutout by David Schroeter)

Windsor 3, Kennedy 1 (W: Michael Eby, Isaac Rocheville, Gary Ziegler ;K: Patrick Wisnewski) Litchield 4, Roxana 2 (L: Spencer Bloome 3;R: Jordan Katzmarek, Tyler Svoboda) Triad 1, Jerseyville 0 (T: Darien Ellis; shutout by John McGee) Highland 3, Waterloo 3 (W: Ben Huels, Philip Most, Andrew Yount;H: Lucas Ammann 2, Evan Herman) Summit 4, Ladue 2 (S: Christian Kraus 2, Billy Hency, Jake Pilla) Perryville 2, Hillsboro 0 (P: Aaron Mueller, Cole Gerstenberger) St. Dominic 2, Duchesne 1 (D: Jimmy Choinka) Columbia 1, Alton 0 (C: Jake Bridges ; shutout by Jon Kuebler) O’Fallon 1, Gibault 0 (O: Austin Wilkerson; shutout by Joe Guithues) Oakville 2, Mehlville 1 (O: Adam Leeker, Dominic Riggio; M: Josh Richter)

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Notre Dame def. Festus 25-20, 25-14 Hancock def. Tower Grove 25-9, 25-13 St. Joseph’s def. Nerinx Hall 25-22, 25-18 Edwardsville def. Bellvl. East 25-8, 25-20 New Haven def. Paciic 25-19, 25-19 FH Central def. FZ South 21-25, 25-20, 25-13 Hermann def. Sullivan 25-19, 25-18 Timberland def. FZ North 25-13, 16-25, 26-24 St. Clair def. St. James 25-14, 21-25, 25-15 Orchard Farm def. Principia 25-15, 25-9 Maplewood-RH def. North Tech 25-20, 25-21 Bayless def. Jennings 25-12, 25-17 Lindbergh def. Westminster 25-18, 25-21 McCluer North def. McCluer 25-17, 25-23 Pky. Central def. Summit 25-21, 16-25, 25-17 JohnBurroughs def. Ritenour 25-18, 25-19 Northwest-CH def. Seckman 24-26, 25-17, 25-21 Columbia def. Wesclin 25-7, 25-10 Luth. South def. St. Pius X 25-15, 19-25, 27-25 Mater Dei def. Alton 25-17, 25-17 Luth. North def. Crossroads 25-22, 25-13 Christ Our Sa def. Fath.McGivney 25-23, 25-19 Cor Jesu def. In. Word 25-21, 25-21 Civic Mem. def. ME Lutheran 25-14, 25-21 Waterloo def. Gibault 25-17, 25-15 New Athens def. Valmeyer 23-25, 25-21, 25-23 Roxana def. A. Marquette 25-17, 25-16 Collinsville def. Carlyle 25-11, 25-19 Jeferson def. De Soto 25-14, 25-16

FIELD HOCKEY Webster Groves 5, Eureka 3 Ladue 2, Edwardsville 1 University City 4, Parkway West 3 Marquette 2, Summit 0

GIRLS TENNIS Collinsville 8, Granite City 1

BOYS SWIMMING Westminster 100, McCluer North 76 200 medley relay: 1. McCluer North, 2:02.59 200 freestyle: 1. Gabe Kaedge, McCluer North, 2:15.79 200 im: 1. Brian Garrett, McCluer North, 2:30.06 50 freestyle: 1. Connor Evans, Westminster, 26.12 Diving: 1. Chris Kirby, Westminster, 194.85 100 butterfly: 1. Brian Garrett, McCluer North, 59.84 100 freestyle: 1. Connor Evans, Westminster, 57.85 500 freestyle: 1. Gabe Kaedge, McCluer North, 6:13.89 200 freestyle relay: 1. Westminster, 1:50.55 100 backstroke: 1. Griin Jones, McCluer North, 1:12.67 100 breaststroke: 1. Jacob Reeve, Westminster, 1:18.22 400 freestyle relay: 1. McCluer North, 4:04.72 John Burroughs 103, De Smet 70 200 medley relay: D, 1:50.30 200 freestyle: x-Michael Franz, D, 1:49.61 200 individual medley: Charlie Baldwin, JB, 2:24.72 50 freestyle: Matt Woodruf, JB, 23.91 Diving: Hunter Sigmund, JB, 160.50 100 butterly: Matthew Gelfman, JB, 1:02.50 100 freestyle: Matt Woodruf, JB, 52.54

500 freestyle: Eddie Ko, JB, 5:26.80 200 freestyle relay: JB, 1:39.51 100 backstroke: Michael Franz, D, 58.12 100 breaststroke: Carter, D, 1:10.73 400 freestyle relay: JB, 3:58.89 Ladue 105, Parkway West 78 200 medley relay: 1. Ladue, 1:45.09 200 freestyle: 1. Bezzant, Ladue, 2:01.62 200 IM: Ogbevoen, Ladue, 2:09.41 50 freestyle: 1. Mitch Griin, Parkway West, 23.27 Diving: 1. Nick Applebaum, Parkway West, 170.40 100 butterly: 1. Rogers, Ladue, 56.26 100 freestyle: 1. Mitch Griffin, Parkway West, 57.67 500 freestyle: 1. John Ransom, Parkway West, 5:17.35 200 freestyle relay: 1. Ladue, 1:37.35 100 backstroke: 1. Benduski, Ladue, 57.15 100 breaststroke: 1. Zhou, Parkway West, 1:05.04 400 freestyle relay: 1. Ladue, 3:33.79 SUMMIT INVITATIONAL (x-state qualifying performance) 200 medley relay: 1. Eureka, 1:48.33; 2. Webster Groves, 1:49.73 200 freestyle: x-1. Jake Haefner, Eureka, 1:48.18; x-2. Tyler Lewis, Lindbergh, 1:48.37 200 individual medley: x-1. Mason White, Lindbergh, 2:04.24; x-2. Gabriel Fels, Parkway North, 2:05.33 50 freestyle: x-1. Mason Jung, Eureka, 22.26; 2. Myles Dean, Lindbergh, 22.93 Diving: x-1. Matt Maher, Eureka, 275.75; x-2. Nate Kappler, Summit, 341.25 100 butterly: x-1. Mason White, Lindbergh, 55.08; x-2. Myles Dean, Lindbergh, 56.01 100 freestyle: x-1. Jake Haefner, Eureka, 49.94; 2. Brad Bauer, Lindbergh, 50.56 500 freestyle: x-1. Jake Gauvain, Vianney, 5:04.36; 2. Michael Ney, Parkway North, 5:09.78 200 freestyle relay: x-1. Eureka, 1:31.62; x-2. Lindbergh, 1:33.81; x-3. Webster Groves, 1:34.12 100 backstroke: x-1. Tyler Lewis, Lindbergh, 56.42; 2. Bartek Blaszcyk, Eureka, 58.45 100 breaststroke: x-1. Gabriel Fels, Parkway North, 1:03.63; 2. A.J. Kohler, Mehlville, 1:05.39 400 freestyle relay: x-1. Eureka, 3:23.24; x-2. Lindbergh, 3:24.21

BOYS CROSS COUNTRY GAC South Championships 1. Fort Zumwalt West 40, 2. Francis Howell North 61, 3. Francis Howell 73, 4. Timberland 88, 5. Francis Howell Central 121, 6. Troy Buchanan 132 Top 10 individuals: 1. Bryan Chac, Howell North, 17:08.36; 2. Tristan Baze, Zumwalt West, 17:21.51; 3. Marshall Vaccaro, Zumwalt West, 17:25.83; 4. Andrew Berndt, Timberland, 17:32.49; 5. Jace Nielsen, Timberland, 17:36.63; 6. Jake Oppenborn, Howell North, 17:37.04; 7. Anthony Giacalone, Howell, 17:39.43; 8. Jason Brown, Zumwalt West, 17:40.53; 9. Joel Talley, Troy, 17:42.55; 10. Jackson Foster, Howell, 17:49.09.

GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY GAC South Championships 1. Francis Howell 28, 2. Fort Zumwalt West 57, 3. Francis Howell North 68, 4. Francis Howell Central 97, 5. Troy Buchanan 101 Top 10 individuals: 1. Madison Leigh, Howell, 19:18.48; 2. Jane Boessen, Troy, 20:01.23; 3. Heidi Hauptman, Howell North, 20:29.40; 4. Erin Gilbert, Howell, 20:30.65; 5. Jenna Wescott, Zumwalt West, 20:39.02; 6. Kalleigh Linthicum, Timberland, 20:45.64; 7. Caroline Duboeuf, Howell, 21:05.57; 8. Grace Wright, Zumwalt West, 21:09.60; 9. Isabelle Daab, Howell, 21:15.26; 10. Chloe Figgins, Howell, 21:18.42. MWAA Championships 1. Nerinx Hall 30, 2. Cor Jesu 62, 3. Ursuline 83, 4. St. Joseph’s 85, 5. Incarnate Word 120, 6. Visitation 137 Top 10 individuals: 1. Bella Racette, Nerinx Hall, 20:21.51; 2. Emma McAtee, Nerinx Hall, 20:26.53; 3. Elena Coleman, Cor Jesu, 20:40.80; 4. Kimberle Sewester, Ursuline, 20:43.77; 5. Danielle Wright, Ursuline, 20:45.43; 6. Anna Greene, Nerinx Hall, 20:52.50; 7. Brook Frederickson, Incarnate Word, 21:04.44; 8. Erin Smith, Nerinx Hall, 21:07.67; 9. Catherine Dulle, Ursuline, 21:09.99; 10. Emma Mohrmann, Cor Jesu, 21:21.21.

SOFTBALL DISTRICT SCHEDULES (Semifinal scores, unless noted) -CLASS 4 DISTRICT 1 Seckman 12, Fox 0 Oakville 3, Poplar Bluff 2 Championship Oakville (21-5) vs Seckman (20-4) at Poplar Bluff, 1 p.m. Saturday. -CLASS 4 DISTRICT 2 Cor Jesu 6, Ursuline 1 Mehlville 12, Lindbergh 1 Championship Mehlville (9-11) vs Cor Jesu (13-11) at Lindbergh, 4:15 p.m. -CLASS 4 DISTRICT 3 Marquette 4, Parkway South 0 Summit 9, Kirkwood 7 Championship Summit (17-9) vs Marquette (25-2), 4:15 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 4 DISTRICT 4 Northwest Cedar Hill 8, Eureka 3 Washington 9, Lafayette 4 Championship Washington (17-8) vs Northwest-CH (16-11) at Lafayette, 4:15 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 4 DISTRICT 5 Francis Howell North 8, Parkway North 6 Parkway Central 12, Pattonville 0 Championship Parkway Central (13-10) at Francis Howell North (13-7), 4 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 4 DISTRICT 6 Hazelwood West 15, McCluer 0 McCluer North 14, Hazelwood Central 12 Championship McCluer North (12-11) at Hazelwood West (19-2), 4:15 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 4 DISTRICT 7 Francis Howell 10, Fort Zumwalt South 0 Fort Zumwalt West 10, Francis Howell Central 7 Championship Zumwalt West (16-10) vs Howell (17-8) at Zumwalt South, 4 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 4 DISTRICT 8 Troy 5, Liberty 0 Holt 6, Battle 2 Championship Troy (25-3) vs Holt (25-3), 4 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3 DISTRICT 2 Farmington 7, Hillsboro 5 De Soto 7, Park Hills Central 2 Championship De Soto (11-12) vs Farmington (14-8) at Potosi, 4 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3 DISTRICT 3 Windsor 11, Lutheran South 6 Festus 10, DuBourg 0 Championship Festus (18-7) vs Windsor (13-12) at Notre Dame, 4 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3 DISTRICT 4 Union 5, Affton 0; Pacific 3, Borgia 0 Championship Pacific (15-7) at Union (17-1), 4 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3 DISTRICT 5 Soldan 14, Gateway STEM 4 Rosati-Kain 17, Roosevelt 0 Championship Rosati-Kain (6-12) vs Soldan (7-1) at 12th and Park Field, 4:15 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3 DISTRICT 6 Incarnate Word 25, Jennings 0 Clayton 11, McCluer South-Berkeley 0 Championship Incarnate Word 10, Clayton 2 -CLASS 3 DISTRICT 7 St. Dominic 14, St. Charles 0 Orchard Farm 10, O’Fallon Christian 0 Championship Orchard Farm (15-6) vs St. Dominic (12-10) at Lindenwood, 4:15 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3 DISTRICT 8 Warrenton 10, Fulton 2 Hannibal 7, Mexico 6 Championship Hannibal at Warrenton (22-1), 4:15 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3 DISTRICT 9 Helias 3, Salem 0 Sullivan 3, Southern Boone 0 Championship Helias at Sullivan (18-10), 5 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 2 DISTRICT 3 Kelly 9, Twin Rivers 3 Jefferson 10, Saxony Lutheran 0 Championship Jefferson (16-8) vs Kelly (3-1), 10 a.m. Saturday -CLASS 2 DISTRICT 4 St. Pius X 17, Carnahan 0 Herculaneum 8, Hancock 5 Championship Herculaneum (1-9) at St. Pius X (7-15), 4:30 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 2 DISTRICT 5 Kennedy 18, Metro 8 Valley Park 18, Principia 2 Championship Valley Park (12-8) at Kennedy (14-7), 4 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 2 DISTRICT 6 Bowling Green 10, Lutheran St. Charles 0 Wright City 11, Elsberry 5 Championship Bowling Green at Wright City (13-10), 4:30 p.m. Friday.

FRIDAY’S SCHEDULE FIELD HOCKEY Whitield at Nerinx Hall, 4 p.m. Lutheran South at Westminster, 4 p.m. Villa Duchesne at Cor Jesu, 4 p.m. MICDS at Visitation, 4:15 p.m. Alton Marquette at Ursuline, 4:45 p.m.

FOOTBALL Timberland at FH North, 7 p.m. Parkway North at Webster Groves, 7 p.m. Parkway South at Marquette, 7 p.m. Westminster at O’Fallon Christian, 7 p.m. Cape Central at Chaminade, 7 p.m. South Fork at Wood River, 7 p.m. Waterloo at Civic Memorial, 7 p.m. Francis Howell at FH Central, 7 p.m. Owensville at Sullivan, 7 p.m. Dupo at Carlyle, 7 p.m. Paciic at Hermann, 7 p.m. Borgia at Festus, 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt East at Holt, 7 p.m. Rock Bridge at St. Louis U. High, 7 p.m. DuBourg at Lutheran South, 7 p.m. Washington at Liberty, 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West at Troy, 7 p.m. Parkway Central at Parkway West, 7 p.m. Chafee at Jeferson, 7 p.m. Kirkwood at Summit, 7 p.m. Cahokia at Mount Vernon, 7 p.m. Zumwalt North at Zumwalt South, 7 p.m. Seckman at Oakville, 7 p.m. Orchard Farm at Warrenton, 7 p.m. Vashon at Vianney, 7 p.m. Jackson at De Smet, 7 p.m. Rockhurst at CBC, 7 p.m. Northwest-CH at Mehlville, 7 p.m. Triad at Highland, 7 p.m. Portageville at Red Bud, 7 p.m. Eureka at Lindbergh, 7 p.m. Lafayette at Fox, 7 p.m. De Soto at Ste. Genevieve, 7 p.m. Clayton at Farmington, 7 p.m. Poplar Bluf at Hillsboro, 7 p.m. St. Pius X at Crystal City, 7 p.m. Grandview at St. Vincent, 7 p.m. Herculaneum at Valle Catholic, 7 p.m. St. Mary’s at Fredericktown, 7 p.m. Perryville at Windsor, 7 p.m. Lift For Life at Luth. St. Charles, 7 p.m. St. Clair at Duchesne, 7 p.m. Jerseyville at Mascoutah, 7 p.m. Pattonville at Ritenour, 7 p.m. St. James at Union, 7 p.m. Brentwood at Conluence, 7 p.m. Alton at Granite City, 7 p.m. Columbia at Breese Central, 7 p.m. McCluer S-Berkeley at Afton, 7 p.m. O’Fallon at Collinsville, 7 p.m. Freeburg at Wesclin, 7 p.m. Althof at Carbondale, 7 p.m. Lutheran North at Mater Dei, 7 p.m. Miller Career at Gateway STEM, 7 p.m. Carnahan at Sumner, 7 p.m. Edwardsville at Belleville West, 7 p.m. Ladue at University City, 7 p.m. Montgomery County at Wright City, 7 p.m. St. Charles at St. Charles West, 7 p.m.

BOYS SOCCER Marquette at Jeferson City, 1:30 p.m. Kickapoo vs. CBC, at Jef City, 3:30 p.m. Parkway North at Whitield, 4 p.m. Valley Park at Hancock, 4 p.m. McCluer North at Pattonville, 4 p.m. Crossroads at Maplewood-RH, 4 p.m. Parkway Central at John Burroughs, 4 p.m. Kirkwood vs. Ladue, at Ladue West Ca, 4:15 p.m. North Tech at Orchard Farm, 4:15 p.m. Centralia, Illinoi at Mascoutah, 4:15 p.m. Richland vs. Sullivan, at Belle, 4:30 p.m. Parkway West vs. Clayton, at Gay Field, 5:30 p.m. Chaminade vs. Rockhurst, at Jef City, 5:30 p.m. FH Central at Francis Howell, 5:45 p.m. Holt at Fort Zumwalt North, 5:45 p.m. Brentwood at Bayless, 6 p.m. Parkway South at Eureka, 6 p.m. Hazelwood Central at Trinity, 6 p.m. Springield Cath. at Seckman, 6 p.m. St. Louis U. High at O’Fallon, 6:30 p.m. Luth. St. Charles at FZ East, 6:30 p.m. Winield at Kennedy, 7 p.m. SpringieldCentral at Northwest-CH, 7 p.m.

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Breese Central vs. Carbondale at Highland, 5 p.m. Sumner at Carnahan, 4:15 p.m. Lutheran North at Whitield, 5 p.m. St. Charles at Fort Zumwalt East, 5 p.m. Valley Park at Hancock, 5 p.m. Bayless at Brentwood, 5 p.m. Gateway STEM at Metro, 5 p.m. Alton at Highland, 5 p.m. Lincoln-Way Cent. vs. Edwardsville, at St. Charles E, 5 p.m. DuBourg at Luth. St. Charles, 5:15 p.m. Roosevelt at Miller Career, 5:15 p.m. Parkway North at Hazelwood East, 5:30 p.m. Ladue at Mehlville, 5:30 p.m. Fox at Parkway Central, 5:30 p.m. Webster Groves at Pattonville, 5:30 p.m. Maplewood-RH at Crossroads, 6 p.m. Breese Central vs. Alton, at Highland, 6 p.m. East St. Louis vs. Vandalia at Highland, 6 p.m. East St. Louis vs. Carbondale at Highland, 7 p.m. Vandalia at Highland, 7 p.m. Marissa at New Athens, 7 p.m.


FOR THE RECORD

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Red Sox -$120 INDIANS American League RANGERS -$125 Blue Jays National League Dodgers -$145 NATIONALS Series price: Dodgers -$160 vs. Nationals +$140. National League CUBS -$180 Giants Series price: Cubs -$280 vs. Giants +$240. NFL Favorite Points Underdog Open/Current Sunday VIKINGS 6/7 Texans DOLPHINS 3.5/3.5 Titans Patriots 10/10.5 BROWNS STEELERS 7/7 Jets RAVENS 3.5/4 Washington Eagles 2.5/3 LIONS COLTS 4.5/4 Bears BRONCOS 5.5/5 Falcons RAMS 3/2.5 Bills RAIDERS 4/4 Chargers Bengals 1/1 COWBOYS PACKERS 7/7 Giants Monday PANTHERS NL/6 Bucs Bye week: Jaguars, Chiefs, Saints, Seahawks. Note: The after the opening line denotes that Dallas opened as a favorite. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open/Current C FLORIDA 13/PPD Tulane Clemson 16.5/17 BOSTON COLL TULSA 16/17 Smu Boise St 17/17.5 NEW MEXICO Write-In Game OLD DOMINION 7/8 Massachusetts Saturday AKRON 7.5/7.5 Miami-Ohio Kent St PK/1.5 BUFFALO W MICHIGAN 19/20 No Illinois MICHIGAN ST 5.5/6 Byu PITTSBURGH 7.5/6.5 Ga Tech Maryland PK/1.5 PENN ST OKLAHOMA ST 16.5/17 Iowa St Cincinnati 3.5/3 CONNECTICUT Tcu 29/29 KANSAS DUKE 4/4.5 Army WAKE FOREST 2.5/2.5 Syracuse KANSAS ST 7/8 Texas Tech Iowa 2/1.5 MINNESOTA OHIO ST 31/29.5 Indiana ILLINOIS 8/10 Purdue N CAROLINA 3/2 Va Tech NC STATE 1/2 Notre Dame OHIO U 14/12.5 Bowling Green Toledo 17/17 E MICHIGAN Houston 18/17 NAVY S FLORIDA 20/20 E Carolina d-Oklahoma 10/11 Texas MIAMI-FLA 2.5/3 Florida St GEORGIA ST 9.5/10 Texas St FLA ATLANTIC 14.5/PPD Charlotte Ucla 7/9.5 ARIZONA ST C MICHIGAN 11.5/12.5 Ball St Air Force 11/10.5 WYOMING Georgia 7/7.5 S CAROLINA TEXAS A&M 6.5/6.5 Tennessee KENTUCKY 2.5/3 Vanderbilt Auburn 2/2.5 MISS ST NEVADA 9.5/8.5 Fresno St Washington 8/9.5 OREGON USC 4.5/5 Colorado Michigan 26/29.5 RUTGERS Marshall 10.5/10.5 N TEXAS So Miss 15.5/16.5 UTSA Lsu 1/PPD FLORIDA UL-MONROE 4/5 Idaho UTEP 4/5 Florida Int’l Alabama 13.5/14 ARKANSAS UTAH 9/10 Arizona SAN DIEGO ST 15/15 Unlv STANFORD 8.5/7.5 Washington St California 12/13.5 OREGON ST Utah St 6/6 COLORADO ST SAN JOSE ST 3.5/3 Hawaii d — Dallas, TX. Note: The after the opening line denotes that Notre Dame opened as a favorite. WNBA FINALS Favorite Points Underdog Sunday MINNESOTA 5.5 Los Angeles Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Announced the retirement of pitching coach Dave Wallace. NEW YORK YANKEES — Announced OF Eric Young Jr. declined an outright assignment and elected to become a free agent. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Assigned RHPs Donn Roach, Fernando Rodriguez and J.B. Wendelken, INFs Tyler Ladendorf and Eric Sogard and OF Andrew Lambo outright to Nashville (PCL). National League CINCINNATI REDS — Claimed INF-OF Arismendy Alcantara off waivers from Oakland. Designated INF-OF Patrick Kivlehan for assignment.

FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Announced the Atlanta Falcons must forfeit their first three days of organized team activities in 2017 as punishment for having excessive contact in offseason workouts in May. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed DL Gabe Wright to the practice squad. Released WR Darius Jennings from the practice squad. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Activated LB Aaron Lynch from the roster exemption list. Placed LB NaVorro Bowman on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA COYOTES — Signed D Jalen Smereck to an entry-level contract. DALLAS STARS — Loaned Fs Remi Elie, Travis Morin and Cole Ully and G Maxime Lagace to Texas (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned LW Dylan Sadowy to Grand Rapids (AHL). Released D Connor Allen. LOS ANGELES KINGS — Placed RW Marian Gaborik on injured reserve. NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Loaned Ds Kyle Burroughs, Matt Finn, Jesse Graham, Ross Johnston and Devon Johnston, Fs Michael Dal Colle and Josh Ho-Sang and G Stephon Williams to Bridgeport (AHL). Released Fs Tanner Fritz, Colim Markison, Dan Correale, Rocco Carzo and Shawn Pauly, Ds Derik Johnson and Sam Noreau and G Clay Witt. COLLEGE HOFSTRA — Named Jamie Franco volunteer assistant wrestling coach. MINNESOTA — Agreed to terms with men’s hockey coach Don Lucia on a two-year contract extension through the 2018-19 season. OKLAHOMA CITY — Named Doug Waters assistant sports information director. TULANE — Signed women’s basketball coach Lisa Stockton to a contract extension through the 2020-21 season.

AREA COLLEGES Late Wednesday scores Men’s soccer Missouri St. 3, Eastern Illinois 0 Westminster College 1 Webster University 0 Women’s soccer Webster University 5 Westminster College 0

HOCKEY NHL Thursday’s Games Boston 2, Columbus 1 Philadelphia 4, NY Rangers 2 Montreal 6, Toronto 1 Tampa Bay at Florida, ppd Winnipeg at Edmonton, late Calgary at Vancouver, late Wednesday’s Games Carolina 3, Buffalo 2, SO NY Islanders 3, New Jersey 2 Detroit 5, Pittsburgh 2 Washington 4, St. Louis 2 Colorado 1, Dallas 0 Calgary 2, Arizona 1, SO Anaheim 2, San Jose 0 Friday’s Games Washington at Carolina, 6 p.m. Detroit vs. Toronto at Hamilton, Ontario, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Dallas vs. Los Angeles at Las Vegas, 9 p.m. San Jose at Arizona, 9 p.m.

FOOTBALL Top 25 Schedule Friday No. 3 Clemson at Boston College, 6:30 p.m. No. 19 Boise State at New Mexico, 8 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama at No. 16 Arkansas, 6 p.m. No. 2 Ohio State vs. Indiana, 2:30 p.m. No. 4 Michigan at Rutgers, 6 p.m. No. 5 Washington at Oregon, 6:30 p.m. No. 6 Houston at Navy, 2 p.m. No. 8 Texas A&M vs. No. 9 Tennessee, 2:30 p.m. No. 10 Miami vs. No. 23 Florida State, 7 p.m. No. 15 Stanford vs. Washington State, 9:30 p.m. No. 17 North Carolina vs. No. 25 Virginia Tech, 2:30 p.m. No. 18 Florida vs. LSU, ppd No. 20 Oklahoma vs. Texas at Dallas, 11 a.m. No. 21 Colorado at Southern Cal, 3 p.m. No. 24 Utah vs. Arizona, 9 p.m.

College Football Schedule (Subject to change) Thursday scores South The Citadel 38, North Greenville 14 NC A&T 35, Norfolk St. 0 W. Kentucky (3-2) at Louisiana Tech (2-3), late Temple (3-2) at Memphis (3-1), late Friday games East Clemson (5-0) at Boston College (3-2), 6:30 p.m. South Tulane (3-2) at UCF (3-2), 7 p.m. Southwest SMU (2-3) at Tulsa (3-1), 7 p.m. Far West Boise St. (4-0) at New Mexico (2-2), 8 p.m.

NFL Injury Report NEW YORK (AP) — The National football League injury report, as provided by the league (DNP — Did not practice; LIMITED — Limited Participation in Practice; FULL — Full Participation in Practice): Sunday ATLANTA FALCONS at DENVER BRONCOS — FALCONS: DNP: P Matt Bosher (right hamstring), LB De’Vondre Campbell (ankle), DE Dwight Freeney (not injury related), LB Deion Jones (ankle), LB Paul Worrilow (groin). LIMITED: K Matt Bryant (right hamstring), G Chris Chester (knee), WR Justin Hardy (shoulder), WR Mohamed Sanu (shoulder), TE Jacob Tamme (hip). FULL: DE Brooks Reed (shoulder). BRONCOS: DNP: QB Trevor Siemian (left shoulder), LB DeMarcus Ware (forearm), CB Kayvon Webster (hamstring). LIMITED: TE Virgil Green (calf), S Shiloh Keo (knee), T Donald Stephenson (calf), WR Demaryius Thomas (hip). FULL: C James Ferentz (knee), WR Bennie Fowler (elbow), S Justin Simmons (hand), LB Dekoda Watson (elbow), DE Billy Winn (back). BUFFALO BILLS at LOS ANGELES RAMS — BILLS: DNP: TE Charles Clay (knee), T Cordy Glenn (ankle), T Cyrus Kouandjio (ankle), C Patrick Lewis (knee), WR Greg Salas (groin), CB Corey White (shoulder). LIMITED: RB Jerome Felton (back), CB Stephon Gilmore (ankle), S Jonathan Meeks (foot). RAMS: Practice Not Complete. CHICAGO BEARS at INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — BEARS: DNP: QB Jay Cutler (right thumb), LB Leonard Floyd (calf), DT Eddie Goldman (ankle), RB Jeremy Langford (ankle), TE Zach Miller (ribs), WR Eddie Royal (calf), WR Kevin White (ankle). LIMITED: DE Jonathan Bullard (shoulder), RB Ka’Deem Carey (hamstring), WR Alshon Jeffery (knee), LB Nick Kwiatkoski (elbow), CB Sherrick McManis (hamstring), CB Tracy Porter (knee), G Josh Sitton (shoulder), LB Danny Trevathan (thumb), LB Willie Young (knee). COLTS: DNP: RB Frank Gore (chest), C Jonotthan Harrison (illness), LB Robert Mathis (not injury related), WR Donte Moncrief (shoulder), LB Erik Walden (chest). LIMITED: CB Darius Butler (hamstring), T Denzelle Good (back), T Joe Reitz (back). CINCINNATI BENGALS at DALLAS COWBOYS — BENGALS: DNP: TE Tyler Eifert (back, ankle). LIMITED: G Clint Boling (shoulder), RB Rex Burkhead (hamstring), T Jake Fisher (back), RB Jeremy Hill (chest), S Shawn Williams (thigh), WR James Wright (hamstring). FULL: CB Dre Kirkpatrick (hamstring). COWBOYS: DNP: K Dan Bailey (back), WR Dez Bryant (knee), RB Lance Dunbar (knee), T Chaz Green (foot), DE David Irving (concussion), QB Tony Romo (back). LIMITED: CB Orlando Scandrick (hamstring, hamstring), T Tyron Smith (back). FULL: DE Jack Crawford (shoulder), LB Andrew Gachkar (neck), LB Mark Nzeocha (achilles). HOUSTON TEXANS at MINNESOTA VIKINGS — TEXANS: DNP: TE Stephen Anderson (hamstring), RB Jonathan Grimes (ankle). LIMITED: G Oday Aboushi (toe), T Duane Brown (knee), TE C.J. Fiedorowicz (knee), CB Kareem Jackson (hamstring), WR Braxton Miller (hamstring), T Derek Newton (knee). FULL: LB Brian Cushing (knee), CB Charles James (hand). VIKINGS: Practice Not Complete. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at CLEVELAND BROWNS — PATRIOTS: DNP: RB Brandon Bolden (knee), LB Shea McClellin (concussion), DT Vincent Valentine (back). LIMITED: RB LeGarrette Blount (hip), QB Jacoby Brissett (right thumb), T Marcus Cannon (calf), LB Jonathan Freeny (shoulder), QB Jimmy Garoppolo (right shoulder), TE Rob Gronkowski (hamstring), LB Dont’a Hightower (knee), G Joe Thuney (shoulder). BROWNS: DNP: WR Corey Coleman (hand), TE Seth DeValve (knee), C Cameron Erving (chest, lung), QB Josh McCown (left shoulder), C Austin Reiter (knee), TE Randall Telfer (ankle), T Joe Thomas (not injury related). LIMITED: S Ibraheim Campbell (hamstring), CB Joe Haden (groin, thigh), DE Carl Nassib (hand), CB Tramon Williams (shoulder). FULL: WR Andrew Hawkins (calf). NEW YORK JETS at PITTSBURGH STEELERS — JETS: DNP: TE Braedon Bowman (knee), WR Eric Decker (shoulder), WR Jalin Marshall (shoulder), QB Bryce Petty (right shoulder), CB Darrelle Revis (hamstring), G Brian Winters (concussion). LIMITED: T Ryan Clady (shoulder), RB Matt Forte (knee, ribs). FULL: WR Robby Anderson (back), WR Brandon Marshall (foot), LB Lorenzo Mauldin (illness), WR Jeremy Ross (hamstring), DE Muhammad Wilkerson (ankle). STEELERS: DNP: T Marcus Gilbert (ankle), CB Senquez Golson (foot), T Ryan Harris (shin), LB Jarvis Jones (ankle), WR Eli Rogers (toe), LB Ryan Shazier (knee), C Cody Wallace (knee), RB DeAngelo Williams (not injury related). LIMITED: CB Justin Gilbert (knee), S Robert Golden (hamstring). FULL: LB Anthony Chickillo (knee), G Ramon Foster (chest), WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (shoulder), RB Roosevelt Nix (back). PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at DETROIT LIONS — EAGLES: FULL: TE Zach Ertz (rib), S Chris Maragos (elbow), RB Ryan Mathews (ankle), CB Leodis McKelvin (hamstring), G Isaac Seumalo (pectoral). LIONS: DNP: DE Ezekiel Ansah (ankle), S Don Carey (ribs), TE Eric Ebron (ankle, knee), WR Marvin Jones (foot), CB Nevin Lawson (illness), LB DeAndre Levy (quadricep, knee), RB Dwayne Washington (ankle). LIMITED: S Antwione Williams (neck), S Tavon Wilson (neck). SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at OAKLAND RAIDERS — CHARGERS: Practice Not

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

Complete. RAIDERS: Practice Not Complete. TENNESSEE TITANS at MIAMI DOLPHINS — TITANS: DNP: CB Cody Riggs (hamstring), S Da’Norris Searcy (ankle), DT Al Woods (calf). LIMITED: TE Jace Amaro (shoulder), T Jack Conklin (shoulder). DOLPHINS: DNP: T Branden Albert (ankle, illness), TE Jordan Cameron (concussion), CB Xavien Howard (knee), LB Jelani Jenkins (groin). LIMITED: RB Arian Foster (hamstring), LB Koa Misi (neck), C Mike Pouncey (hip), G Anthony Steen (ankle). WASHINGTON REDSKINS at BALTIMORE RAVENS — REDSKINS: DNP: CB Bashaud Breeland (ankle), S Su’a Cravens (concussion), WR Josh Doctson (achilles), CB Dashaun Phillips (hamstring). LIMITED: DE Chris Baker (elbow, toe), LB Ryan Kerrigan (elbow), G Shawn Lauvao (ankle), T Trent Williams (knee). FULL: RB Rob Kelley (finger), LB Trent Murphy (shoulder), CB Josh Norman (hand). RAVENS: DNP: CB Maurice Canady (thigh), WR Devin Hester (thigh), T Ronnie Stanley (foot), TE Maxx Williams (knee). LIMITED: CB Sheldon Price (thigh). FULL: RB Kenneth Dixon (knee). NEW YORK GIANTS at GREEN BAY PACKERS — GIANTS: DNP: CB Eli Apple (hamstring), S Nat Berhe (concussion), TE Larry Donnell (concussion), T Marshall Newhouse (calf), S Darian Thompson (foot). LIMITED: RB Rashad Jennings (thumb), CB Dominique RodgersCromartie (groin), DT Robert Thomas (illness). FULL: DE Olivier Vernon (wrist). PACKERS: DNP: TE Jared Cook (ankle), CB Sam Shields (concussion). LIMITED: DT Letroy Guion (knee), LB Clay Matthews (ankle, hamstring), CB Damarious Randall (groin). FULL: S Morgan Burnett (groin), LB Datone Jones (knee), RB Aaron Ripkowski (back).

WNBA Playof Glance

SOCCER

GOLF

Major League Soccer

Hole in One

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York 14 9 9 51 56 42 New York City FC 14 9 9 51 57 53 Toronto FC 13 9 10 49 46 35 Montreal 11 10 11 44 47 48 D.C. United 10 9 13 43 48 42 Philadelphia 11 12 9 42 52 51 New England 10 13 9 39 40 52 Columbus 8 12 11 35 45 49 Orlando City 7 11 14 35 49 58 Chicago 6 16 9 27 36 52 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 16 8 8 56 48 39 Colorado 13 5 12 51 33 27 Los Angeles 11 6 15 48 53 39 Real Salt Lake 12 11 9 45 43 44 Seattle 13 13 5 44 41 40 Sporting K.C. 12 13 7 43 40 41 Portland 11 13 8 41 46 49 San Jose 8 10 13 37 31 36 Vancouver 9 15 8 35 41 51 Houston 7 12 11 32 36 40 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday, October 8 Colorado at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 12 Houston at Seattle, 9:30 p.m. Thursday, October 13 Columbus at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m. Sunday, October 16 Columbus at New York, 2 p.m. New England at Chicago, 2 p.m. New York City FC at D.C. United, 2 p.m. Orlando City at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Toronto FC at Montreal, 2 p.m. Colorado at Portland, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Houston, 4 p.m. Seattle at FC Dallas, 4 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Real Salt Lake, 4 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 4 p.m.

Tapawingo • John Cosgrove, hole No. 6, 129 yards, 9-iron, Oct. 3.

BASKETBALL NBA Thursday’s Games Washington 125, Philadelphia 119 Indiana 115, Chicago 108 Brooklyn 101, Detroit 94 Boston 107, Charlotte 92 Atlanta 104, Memphis 83 Sacramento vs. Golden State at San Jose, Calif., late Wednesday’s Games Oklahoma City 92, FC Barcelona 89 Cleveland 117, Orlando 102 Utah 104, Phoenix 99 L.A. Clippers 104, Toronto 98 Friday’s Games Phoenix at Portland, 9 p.m. Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Charlotte vs. Boston at Uncasville, Conn., 2:30 p.m. Brooklyn at New York, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota vs. Miami at Kansas City, Mo., 7:30 p.m. Dallas vs. Milwaukee at Madison, Wis., 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games New Orleans vs. Houston at Shanghai, 6:30 a.m. Denver vs. L.A. Lakers at Ontario, Calif., 8:30 p.m.

First Round Winner advances Wednesday, Sept. 21 Phoenix 89, Indiana 78 Atlanta 94, Seattle 85 Second Round Winner advances Saturday, Sept. 24 Phoenix 101, New York 94 Sunday, Sept. 25 Chicago 108, Atlanta 98 Third Round (Best-of-5) (x-if necessary) Minnesota 3, Phoenix 0 Wednesday, Sept. 28: Minnesota 113, Phoenix 95 Friday, Sept. 30: Minnesota 96, Phoenix 86 Sunday, Oct. 2: Minnesota 82, Phoenix 67 Los Angeles 3, Chicago 1 Wednesday, Sept. 28: Los Angeles 95, Chicago 75 Friday, Sept. 30: Los Angeles 99, Chicago 84 Sunday, Oct. 2: Chicago 70, Los Angeles 66 Tuesday, Oct. 4: Los Angeles 95, Chicago 75 Finals (Best-of-5) Minnesota vs. Los Angeles Sunday, Oct. 9: Los Angeles at Minnesota, 2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11: Los Angeles at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 14: Minnesota at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 16: Minnesota at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 20: Los Angeles at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

European Tour Dunhill Links Thursday | s-St. Andrews (Old Course), 7,307 yards; Par: 72 c-Carnoustie, 7,345 yards; Par: 72 k-Kingsbarns Golf Links, 7,227 yards; Par: 72 Carnoustie, Scotland Purse: $5 million First Round, Leading Scores Alex Noren, Sweden 31-33 — 64c Ross Fisher, England 30-35 — 65k Matt Ford, England 31-35 — 66k Joakim Lagergren, Sweden 33-33 — 66c Callum Shinkwin, England 32-35 — 67s Tyrrell Hatton, England 33-34 — 67c Raphael Jacquelin, France 32-35 — 67s Jbe Kruger, South Africa 34-34 — 68k Eddie Pepperell, England 33-35 — 68s Alejandro Canizares, Spain 33-35 — 68k Florian Fritsch, Germany 34-34 — 68k Rikard Karlberg, Sweden 32-36 — 68s David Bransdon, Australia 34-35 — 69k Edoardo Molinari, Italy 31-38 — 69s Rhys West, South Africa 34-35 — 69k Richard Sterne, South Africa 35-34 — 69c Bradley Dredge, Wales 33-36 — 69s Craig Lee, Scotland 35-34 — 69k Nathan Holman, Australia 33-36 — 69s Gregory Bourdy, France 33-36 — 69c Michael Hoey, N.Ireland 34-35 — 69k Matthew Guyatt, Australia 33-36 — 69s Daniel Brooks, England 34-35 — 69k Ulrich Van den Berg 34-35 — 69k Americans Paul Peterson 34-36 — 70k Daniel Im 35-35 — 70k Zac Blair 36-36 — 72s Troy Merritt 35-37 — 72k David Lipsky 36-37 — 73c Sean O’Hair 35-41 — 76s

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C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Red Sox -$120 INDIANS American League RANGERS -$125 Blue Jays National League Dodgers -$145 NATIONALS Series price: Dodgers -$160 vs. Nationals +$140. National League CUBS -$180 Giants Series price: Cubs -$280 vs. Giants +$240. NFL Favorite Points Underdog Open/Current Sunday VIKINGS 6/7 Texans DOLPHINS 3.5/3.5 Titans Patriots 10/10.5 BROWNS STEELERS 7/7 Jets RAVENS 3.5/4 Washington Eagles 2.5/3 LIONS COLTS 4.5/4 Bears BRONCOS 5.5/5 Falcons RAMS 3/2.5 Bills RAIDERS 4/4 Chargers Bengals 1/1 COWBOYS PACKERS 7/7 Giants Monday PANTHERS NL/6 Bucs Bye week: Jaguars, Chiefs, Saints, Seahawks. Note: The after the opening line denotes that Dallas opened as a favorite. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open/Current C FLORIDA 13/PPD Tulane Clemson 16.5/17 BOSTON COLL TULSA 16/17 Smu Boise St 17/17.5 NEW MEXICO Write-In Game OLD DOMINION 7/8 Massachusetts Saturday AKRON 7.5/7.5 Miami-Ohio Kent St PK/1.5 BUFFALO W MICHIGAN 19/20 No Illinois MICHIGAN ST 5.5/6 Byu PITTSBURGH 7.5/6.5 Ga Tech Maryland PK/1.5 PENN ST OKLAHOMA ST 16.5/17 Iowa St Cincinnati 3.5/3 CONNECTICUT Tcu 29/29 KANSAS DUKE 4/4.5 Army WAKE FOREST 2.5/2.5 Syracuse KANSAS ST 7/8 Texas Tech Iowa 2/1.5 MINNESOTA OHIO ST 31/29.5 Indiana ILLINOIS 8/10 Purdue N CAROLINA 3/2 Va Tech NC STATE 1/2 Notre Dame OHIO U 14/12.5 Bowling Green Toledo 17/17 E MICHIGAN Houston 18/17 NAVY S FLORIDA 20/20 E Carolina d-Oklahoma 10/11 Texas MIAMI-FLA 2.5/3 Florida St GEORGIA ST 9.5/10 Texas St FLA ATLANTIC 14.5/PPD Charlotte Ucla 7/9.5 ARIZONA ST C MICHIGAN 11.5/12.5 Ball St Air Force 11/10.5 WYOMING Georgia 7/7.5 S CAROLINA TEXAS A&M 6.5/6.5 Tennessee KENTUCKY 2.5/3 Vanderbilt Auburn 2/2.5 MISS ST NEVADA 9.5/8.5 Fresno St Washington 8/9.5 OREGON USC 4.5/5 Colorado Michigan 26/29.5 RUTGERS Marshall 10.5/10.5 N TEXAS So Miss 15.5/16.5 UTSA Lsu 1/PPD FLORIDA UL-MONROE 4/5 Idaho UTEP 4/5 Florida Int’l Alabama 13.5/14 ARKANSAS UTAH 9/10 Arizona SAN DIEGO ST 15/15 Unlv STANFORD 8.5/7.5 Washington St California 12/13.5 OREGON ST Utah St 6/6 COLORADO ST SAN JOSE ST 3.5/3 Hawaii d — Dallas, TX. Note: The after the opening line denotes that Notre Dame opened as a favorite. WNBA FINALS Favorite Points Underdog Sunday MINNESOTA 5.5 Los Angeles Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Announced the retirement of pitching coach Dave Wallace. NEW YORK YANKEES — Announced OF Eric Young Jr. declined an outright assignment and elected to become a free agent. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Assigned RHPs Donn Roach, Fernando Rodriguez and J.B. Wendelken, INFs Tyler Ladendorf and Eric Sogard and OF Andrew Lambo outright to Nashville (PCL). National League CINCINNATI REDS — Claimed INF-OF Arismendy Alcantara off waivers from Oakland. Designated INF-OF Patrick Kivlehan for assignment.

FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Announced the Atlanta Falcons must forfeit their first three days of organized team activities in 2017 as punishment for having excessive contact in offseason workouts in May. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed DL Gabe Wright to the practice squad. Released WR Darius Jennings from the practice squad. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Activated LB Aaron Lynch from the roster exemption list. Placed LB NaVorro Bowman on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA COYOTES — Signed D Jalen Smereck to an entry-level contract. DALLAS STARS — Loaned Fs Remi Elie, Travis Morin and Cole Ully and G Maxime Lagace to Texas (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned LW Dylan Sadowy to Grand Rapids (AHL). Released D Connor Allen. LOS ANGELES KINGS — Placed RW Marian Gaborik on injured reserve. NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Loaned Ds Kyle Burroughs, Matt Finn, Jesse Graham, Ross Johnston and Devon Johnston, Fs Michael Dal Colle and Josh Ho-Sang and G Stephon Williams to Bridgeport (AHL). Released Fs Tanner Fritz, Colim Markison, Dan Correale, Rocco Carzo and Shawn Pauly, Ds Derik Johnson and Sam Noreau and G Clay Witt. COLLEGE HOFSTRA — Named Jamie Franco volunteer assistant wrestling coach. MINNESOTA — Agreed to terms with men’s hockey coach Don Lucia on a two-year contract extension through the 2018-19 season. OKLAHOMA CITY — Named Doug Waters assistant sports information director. TULANE — Signed women’s basketball coach Lisa Stockton to a contract extension through the 2020-21 season.

AREA COLLEGES Late Wednesday scores Men’s soccer Missouri St. 3, Eastern Illinois 0 Westminster College 1 Webster University 0 Women’s soccer Webster University 5 Westminster College 0

HOCKEY NHL Thursday’s Games Boston 2, Columbus 1 Philadelphia 4, NY Rangers 2 Montreal 6, Toronto 1 Tampa Bay at Florida, ppd Edmonton 5, Winnipeg 2 Vancouver 4, Calgary 0 Wednesday’s Games Carolina 3, Buffalo 2, SO NY Islanders 3, New Jersey 2 Detroit 5, Pittsburgh 2 Washington 4, St. Louis 2 Colorado 1, Dallas 0 Calgary 2, Arizona 1, SO Anaheim 2, San Jose 0 Friday’s Games Washington at Carolina, 6 p.m. Detroit vs. Toronto at Hamilton, Ontario, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Dallas vs. Los Angeles at Las Vegas, 9 p.m. San Jose at Arizona, 9 p.m.

FOOTBALL Top 25 Schedule Friday No. 3 Clemson at Boston College, 6:30 p.m. No. 19 Boise State at New Mexico, 8 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama at No. 16 Arkansas, 6 p.m. No. 2 Ohio State vs. Indiana, 2:30 p.m. No. 4 Michigan at Rutgers, 6 p.m. No. 5 Washington at Oregon, 6:30 p.m. No. 6 Houston at Navy, 2 p.m. No. 8 Texas A&M vs. No. 9 Tennessee, 2:30 p.m. No. 10 Miami vs. No. 23 Florida State, 7 p.m. No. 15 Stanford vs. Washington State, 9:30 p.m. No. 17 North Carolina vs. No. 25 Virginia Tech, 2:30 p.m. No. 18 Florida vs. LSU, ppd No. 20 Oklahoma vs. Texas at Dallas, 11 a.m. No. 21 Colorado at Southern Cal, 3 p.m. No. 24 Utah vs. Arizona, 9 p.m.

College Football Schedule (Subject to change) Thursday scores South The Citadel 38, North Greenville 14 NC A&T 35, Norfolk St. 0 Memphis 34, Temple 27 Louisiana Tech 55, W. Kentucky 52 Friday games East Clemson (5-0) at Boston College (3-2), 6:30 p.m. South Tulane (3-2) at UCF (3-2), 7 p.m. Southwest SMU (2-3) at Tulsa (3-1), 7 p.m. Far West Boise St. (4-0) at New Mexico (2-2), 8 p.m.

NFL Injury Report NEW YORK (AP) — The National football League injury report, as provided by the league (DNP — Did not practice; LIMITED — Limited Participation in Practice; FULL — Full Participation in Practice): Sunday ATLANTA FALCONS at DENVER BRONCOS — FALCONS: DNP: P Matt Bosher (right hamstring), LB De’Vondre Campbell (ankle), DE Dwight Freeney (not injury related), LB Deion Jones (ankle), LB Paul Worrilow (groin). LIMITED: K Matt Bryant (right hamstring), G Chris Chester (knee), WR Justin Hardy (shoulder), WR Mohamed Sanu (shoulder), TE Jacob Tamme (hip). FULL: DE Brooks Reed (shoulder). BRONCOS: DNP: QB Trevor Siemian (left shoulder), LB DeMarcus Ware (forearm), CB Kayvon Webster (hamstring). LIMITED: TE Virgil Green (calf), S Shiloh Keo (knee), T Donald Stephenson (calf), WR Demaryius Thomas (hip). FULL: C James Ferentz (knee), WR Bennie Fowler (elbow), S Justin Simmons (hand), LB Dekoda Watson (elbow), DE Billy Winn (back). BUFFALO BILLS at LOS ANGELES RAMS — BILLS: DNP: TE Charles Clay (knee), T Cordy Glenn (ankle), T Cyrus Kouandjio (ankle), C Patrick Lewis (knee), WR Greg Salas (groin), CB Corey White (shoulder). LIMITED: RB Jerome Felton (back), CB Stephon Gilmore (ankle), S Jonathan Meeks (foot). RAMS: Practice Not Complete. CHICAGO BEARS at INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — BEARS: DNP: QB Jay Cutler (right thumb), LB Leonard Floyd (calf), DT Eddie Goldman (ankle), RB Jeremy Langford (ankle), TE Zach Miller (ribs), WR Eddie Royal (calf), WR Kevin White (ankle). LIMITED: DE Jonathan Bullard (shoulder), RB Ka’Deem Carey (hamstring), WR Alshon Jeffery (knee), LB Nick Kwiatkoski (elbow), CB Sherrick McManis (hamstring), CB Tracy Porter (knee), G Josh Sitton (shoulder), LB Danny Trevathan (thumb), LB Willie Young (knee). COLTS: DNP: RB Frank Gore (chest), C Jonotthan Harrison (illness), LB Robert Mathis (not injury related), WR Donte Moncrief (shoulder), LB Erik Walden (chest). LIMITED: CB Darius Butler (hamstring), T Denzelle Good (back), T Joe Reitz (back). CINCINNATI BENGALS at DALLAS COWBOYS — BENGALS: DNP: TE Tyler Eifert (back, ankle). LIMITED: G Clint Boling (shoulder), RB Rex Burkhead (hamstring), T Jake Fisher (back), RB Jeremy Hill (chest), S Shawn Williams (thigh), WR James Wright (hamstring). FULL: CB Dre Kirkpatrick (hamstring). COWBOYS: DNP: K Dan Bailey (back), WR Dez Bryant (knee), RB Lance Dunbar (knee), T Chaz Green (foot), DE David Irving (concussion), QB Tony Romo (back). LIMITED: CB Orlando Scandrick (hamstring, hamstring), T Tyron Smith (back). FULL: DE Jack Crawford (shoulder), LB Andrew Gachkar (neck), LB Mark Nzeocha (achilles). HOUSTON TEXANS at MINNESOTA VIKINGS — TEXANS: DNP: TE Stephen Anderson (hamstring), RB Jonathan Grimes (ankle). LIMITED: G Oday Aboushi (toe), T Duane Brown (knee), TE C.J. Fiedorowicz (knee), CB Kareem Jackson (hamstring), WR Braxton Miller (hamstring), T Derek Newton (knee). FULL: LB Brian Cushing (knee), CB Charles James (hand). VIKINGS: Practice Not Complete. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at CLEVELAND BROWNS — PATRIOTS: DNP: RB Brandon Bolden (knee), LB Shea McClellin (concussion), DT Vincent Valentine (back). LIMITED: RB LeGarrette Blount (hip), QB Jacoby Brissett (right thumb), T Marcus Cannon (calf), LB Jonathan Freeny (shoulder), QB Jimmy Garoppolo (right shoulder), TE Rob Gronkowski (hamstring), LB Dont’a Hightower (knee), G Joe Thuney (shoulder). BROWNS: DNP: WR Corey Coleman (hand), TE Seth DeValve (knee), C Cameron Erving (chest, lung), QB Josh McCown (left shoulder), C Austin Reiter (knee), TE Randall Telfer (ankle), T Joe Thomas (not injury related). LIMITED: S Ibraheim Campbell (hamstring), CB Joe Haden (groin, thigh), DE Carl Nassib (hand), CB Tramon Williams (shoulder). FULL: WR Andrew Hawkins (calf). NEW YORK JETS at PITTSBURGH STEELERS — JETS: DNP: TE Braedon Bowman (knee), WR Eric Decker (shoulder), WR Jalin Marshall (shoulder), QB Bryce Petty (right shoulder), CB Darrelle Revis (hamstring), G Brian Winters (concussion). LIMITED: T Ryan Clady (shoulder), RB Matt Forte (knee, ribs). FULL: WR Robby Anderson (back), WR Brandon Marshall (foot), LB Lorenzo Mauldin (illness), WR Jeremy Ross (hamstring), DE Muhammad Wilkerson (ankle). STEELERS: DNP: T Marcus Gilbert (ankle), CB Senquez Golson (foot), T Ryan Harris (shin), LB Jarvis Jones (ankle), WR Eli Rogers (toe), LB Ryan Shazier (knee), C Cody Wallace (knee), RB DeAngelo Williams (not injury related). LIMITED: CB Justin Gilbert (knee), S Robert Golden (hamstring). FULL: LB Anthony Chickillo (knee), G Ramon Foster (chest), WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (shoulder), RB Roosevelt Nix (back). PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at DETROIT LIONS — EAGLES: FULL: TE Zach Ertz (rib), S Chris Maragos (elbow), RB Ryan Mathews (ankle), CB Leodis McKelvin (hamstring), G Isaac Seumalo (pectoral). LIONS: DNP: DE Ezekiel Ansah (ankle), S Don Carey (ribs), TE Eric Ebron (ankle, knee), WR Marvin Jones (foot), CB Nevin Lawson (illness), LB DeAndre Levy (quadricep, knee), RB Dwayne Washington (ankle). LIMITED: S Antwione Williams (neck), S Tavon Wilson (neck). SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at OAKLAND RAIDERS — CHARGERS: Practice Not

M 2 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

Complete. RAIDERS: Practice Not Complete. TENNESSEE TITANS at MIAMI DOLPHINS — TITANS: DNP: CB Cody Riggs (hamstring), S Da’Norris Searcy (ankle), DT Al Woods (calf). LIMITED: TE Jace Amaro (shoulder), T Jack Conklin (shoulder). DOLPHINS: DNP: T Branden Albert (ankle, illness), TE Jordan Cameron (concussion), CB Xavien Howard (knee), LB Jelani Jenkins (groin). LIMITED: RB Arian Foster (hamstring), LB Koa Misi (neck), C Mike Pouncey (hip), G Anthony Steen (ankle). WASHINGTON REDSKINS at BALTIMORE RAVENS — REDSKINS: DNP: CB Bashaud Breeland (ankle), S Su’a Cravens (concussion), WR Josh Doctson (achilles), CB Dashaun Phillips (hamstring). LIMITED: DE Chris Baker (elbow, toe), LB Ryan Kerrigan (elbow), G Shawn Lauvao (ankle), T Trent Williams (knee). FULL: RB Rob Kelley (finger), LB Trent Murphy (shoulder), CB Josh Norman (hand). RAVENS: DNP: CB Maurice Canady (thigh), WR Devin Hester (thigh), T Ronnie Stanley (foot), TE Maxx Williams (knee). LIMITED: CB Sheldon Price (thigh). FULL: RB Kenneth Dixon (knee). NEW YORK GIANTS at GREEN BAY PACKERS — GIANTS: DNP: CB Eli Apple (hamstring), S Nat Berhe (concussion), TE Larry Donnell (concussion), T Marshall Newhouse (calf), S Darian Thompson (foot). LIMITED: RB Rashad Jennings (thumb), CB Dominique RodgersCromartie (groin), DT Robert Thomas (illness). FULL: DE Olivier Vernon (wrist). PACKERS: DNP: TE Jared Cook (ankle), CB Sam Shields (concussion). LIMITED: DT Letroy Guion (knee), LB Clay Matthews (ankle, hamstring), CB Damarious Randall (groin). FULL: S Morgan Burnett (groin), LB Datone Jones (knee), RB Aaron Ripkowski (back).

WNBA Playof Glance

SOCCER

GOLF

Major League Soccer

Hole in One

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York 14 9 9 51 56 42 New York City FC 14 9 9 51 57 53 Toronto FC 13 9 10 49 46 35 Montreal 11 10 11 44 47 48 D.C. United 10 9 13 43 48 42 Philadelphia 11 12 9 42 52 51 New England 10 13 9 39 40 52 Columbus 8 12 11 35 45 49 Orlando City 7 11 14 35 49 58 Chicago 6 16 9 27 36 52 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 16 8 8 56 48 39 Colorado 13 5 12 51 33 27 Los Angeles 11 6 15 48 53 39 Real Salt Lake 12 11 9 45 43 44 Seattle 13 13 5 44 41 40 Sporting K.C. 12 13 7 43 40 41 Portland 11 13 8 41 46 49 San Jose 8 10 13 37 31 36 Vancouver 9 15 8 35 41 51 Houston 7 12 11 32 36 40 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday, October 8 Colorado at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 12 Houston at Seattle, 9:30 p.m. Thursday, October 13 Columbus at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m. Sunday, October 16 Columbus at New York, 2 p.m. New England at Chicago, 2 p.m. New York City FC at D.C. United, 2 p.m. Orlando City at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Toronto FC at Montreal, 2 p.m. Colorado at Portland, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Houston, 4 p.m. Seattle at FC Dallas, 4 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Real Salt Lake, 4 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 4 p.m.

Tapawingo • John Cosgrove, hole No. 6, 129 yards, 9-iron, Oct. 3.

BASKETBALL NBA Thursday’s Games Washington 125, Philadelphia 119 (2OT) Indiana 115, Chicago 108 Brooklyn 101, Detroit 94 Boston 107, Charlotte 92 Atlanta 104, Memphis 83 Golden State 105, Sacramento 96 Wednesday’s Games Oklahoma City 92, FC Barcelona 89 Cleveland 117, Orlando 102 Utah 104, Phoenix 99 L.A. Clippers 104, Toronto 98 Friday’s Games Phoenix at Portland, 9 p.m. Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Charlotte vs. Boston at Uncasville, Conn., 2:30 p.m. Brooklyn at New York, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota vs. Miami at Kansas City, Mo., 7:30 p.m. Dallas vs. Milwaukee at Madison, Wis., 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games New Orleans vs. Houston at Shanghai, 6:30 a.m. Denver vs. L.A. Lakers at Ontario, Calif., 8:30 p.m.

First Round Winner advances Wednesday, Sept. 21 Phoenix 89, Indiana 78 Atlanta 94, Seattle 85 Second Round Winner advances Saturday, Sept. 24 Phoenix 101, New York 94 Sunday, Sept. 25 Chicago 108, Atlanta 98 Third Round (Best-of-5) (x-if necessary) Minnesota 3, Phoenix 0 Wednesday, Sept. 28: Minnesota 113, Phoenix 95 Friday, Sept. 30: Minnesota 96, Phoenix 86 Sunday, Oct. 2: Minnesota 82, Phoenix 67 Los Angeles 3, Chicago 1 Wednesday, Sept. 28: Los Angeles 95, Chicago 75 Friday, Sept. 30: Los Angeles 99, Chicago 84 Sunday, Oct. 2: Chicago 70, Los Angeles 66 Tuesday, Oct. 4: Los Angeles 95, Chicago 75 Finals (Best-of-5) Minnesota vs. Los Angeles Sunday, Oct. 9: Los Angeles at Minnesota, 2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11: Los Angeles at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 14: Minnesota at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 16: Minnesota at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 20: Los Angeles at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

European Tour Dunhill Links Thursday | s-St. Andrews (Old Course), 7,307 yards; Par: 72 c-Carnoustie, 7,345 yards; Par: 72 k-Kingsbarns Golf Links, 7,227 yards; Par: 72 Carnoustie, Scotland Purse: $5 million First Round, Leading Scores Alex Noren, Sweden 31-33 — 64c Ross Fisher, England 30-35 — 65k Matt Ford, England 31-35 — 66k Joakim Lagergren, Sweden 33-33 — 66c Callum Shinkwin, England 32-35 — 67s Tyrrell Hatton, England 33-34 — 67c Raphael Jacquelin, France 32-35 — 67s Jbe Kruger, South Africa 34-34 — 68k Eddie Pepperell, England 33-35 — 68s Alejandro Canizares, Spain 33-35 — 68k Florian Fritsch, Germany 34-34 — 68k Rikard Karlberg, Sweden 32-36 — 68s David Bransdon, Australia 34-35 — 69k Edoardo Molinari, Italy 31-38 — 69s Rhys West, South Africa 34-35 — 69k Richard Sterne, South Africa 35-34 — 69c Bradley Dredge, Wales 33-36 — 69s Craig Lee, Scotland 35-34 — 69k Nathan Holman, Australia 33-36 — 69s Gregory Bourdy, France 33-36 — 69c Michael Hoey, N.Ireland 34-35 — 69k Matthew Guyatt, Australia 33-36 — 69s Daniel Brooks, England 34-35 — 69k Ulrich Van den Berg 34-35 — 69k Americans Paul Peterson 34-36 — 70k Daniel Im 35-35 — 70k Zac Blair 36-36 — 72s Troy Merritt 35-37 — 72k David Lipsky 36-37 — 73c Sean O’Hair 35-41 — 76s

ilable

ava Gift ates olidays! cCertiicates H ertiiAvailable e C h t t f i r G ct fo

LPGA Fubon Taiwan Championship Thursday | At Miramar Resort and CC Taipei, Taiwan Purse: $2 million Yardage: 6,425; Par: 72 (36-36) (a-amateur) First Round Sakura Yokomine 35-32 — 67 Brooke M. Henderson 35-33 — 68 Paula Creamer 34-34 — 68 Amy Yang 35-33 — 68 Ha Na Jang 34-35 — 69 Ai Miyazato 33-36 — 69 Lee-Anne Pace 34-35 — 69 Beatriz Recari 34-35 — 69 Hee Young Park 36-33 — 69 Lydia Ko 36-34 — 70 Shanshan Feng 34-36 — 70 Hyo Joo Kim 36-34 — 70 Eun-Hee Ji 35-35 — 70 a-Ya-Chun Chang 33-38 — 71 Haru Nomura 35-36 — 71 So Yeon Ryu 35-36 — 71 Azahara Munoz 33-38 — 71 Mika Miyazato 34-37 — 71 Jenny Shin 33-38 — 71 Catriona Matthew 35-36 — 71 Mi Hyang Lee 36-35 — 71 Caroline Masson 35-36 — 71 Pei-Ying Tsai 35-36 — 71 Candie Kung 36-36 — 72 Alison Lee 35-37 — 72 Anna Nordqvist 34-38 — 72 Carlota Ciganda 36-36 — 72 Minjee Lee 35-37 — 72 Mo Martin 37-35 — 72 Yu-Ling Hsieh 36-36 — 72 Pernilla Lindberg 37-35 — 72 Mi Jung Hur 36-36 — 72 Su Oh 35-37 — 72 Pornanong Phatlum 36-36 — 72 Jacqui Concolino 35-37 — 72 In-Kyung Kim 36-37 — 73 Mirim Lee 37-36 — 73 a-Yu-Chiang Hou 33-40 — 73 Xi Yu Lin 36-37 — 73 Nontaya Srisawang 35-38 — 73 Kelly W Shon 37-36 — 73 Doris Chen 35-38 — 73 Ssu-Chia Cheng 38-35 — 73 Danielle Kang 35-38 — 73 Kim Kaufman 38-35 — 73 Ryann O’Toole 36-37 — 73 Megan Khang 36-37 — 73 Austin Ernst 39-35 — 74 Jennifer Song 38-36 — 74 Moriya Jutanugarn 36-38 — 74 Katie Burnett 37-37 — 74 Cristie Kerr 39-35 — 74 Phoebe Yao 36-38 — 74 Sarah Jane Smith 35-39 — 74 Karine Icher 36-38 — 74 Kris Tamulis 38-36 — 74 Morgan Pressel 37-38 — 75 Wei-Ling Hsu 39-36 — 75 Brittany Lang 36-39 — 75 I-Wen Chen 38-37 — 75 Marina Alex 37-39 — 76 Chella Choi 40-36 — 76 Paula Reto 37-39 — 76 Jing Yan 36-40 — 76 Lizette Salas 38-39 — 77 Christina Kim 39-38 — 77 Meng Chu Chen 41-36 — 77 Tzu-Chi Lin 38-40 — 78 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 40-38 — 78 Alena Sharp 41-37 — 78 Lee Lopez 40-38 — 78 Yu-Ju Chen 40-38 — 78

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FRIDAY

10.07.2016

fall HOME TOUR Sat, Oct 15 | 12-4 PM

WILDWooD HoMe FOR SALE

2107 Babler Ridge Lane Offering a $2500 BUYER CLOSING COST CREDIT and a $2500 AGENT BONUS if closed before December 31!

w

indo Van Go sells vinyl/composite shutters as well as wood shutters. Vinyl/composite shutters are practically maintenance free and indistinguishable from wood. Plantation shutters offer lexibility with privacy at the bottom while allowing light in at the top and provide excellent insulation. Shutters come in 2-1/2”, 3-1/2” and 4-1/2” louver sizes. Windo Van Go makes choosing window coverings, shades, shutters, blinds and draperies easy and eficient. Their experts will visit your home to discuss your window

covering choices, take measurements, show samples and follow up with a price quote. “Making a selection from home is convenient, and it allows the customer to see how the treatments will really look in their space,” Julie says. Windo Van Go sells major brands such as Hunter Douglas, Skandia and Kathy Ireland Home with deeply discounted prices. For 25 years Julie and Philippe have taken great pride in their personal service, expert installation and client satisfaction, Call (636) 394-3411 to schedule an in-home consultation and visit their website at www. windovangostl.com.

Order Now & Pay ZERO Sales Tax — 8% Value! FREE Measuring — FREE Installation 636-394-3411 • WindoVanGoSTL.com

Come see the beautiful colors of Wildwood, and while there, view the extraordinary home located on 3 Acres of private wooded property. Located in a wonderful family neighborhood, yet close to every amenity, it is truly the best of both worlds. This 5 BR/3.5 BA two story home is in the Rockwood School District. Featuring Brazilian Cherry Wood Floors, extensive mill work, cased doorways and an open loor plan, you will be impressed as you walk in the door.

THIS HoMe WILL Be oPeN oN SUNDAY

oCToBeR 9

FRoM 1-3 P.M.

Please stop in for food and beverages while driving the incredible scenery this area has to offer.

MOTIVATED SELLER

Affordably priced at $450,000

Paige Hellmann • Keller Williams Realty Chesterield

Ofice: 636-534-8309 Cell: 314-606-7409

GRAND OPENING

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3

47 Hibernation Hollow, Wentzville, MO 63385 PRICE REDUCED!

BEAR CREEK SUBDIVISION! Amazing 1.5 story 2800 sq. ft. home w/5 BR, 4 full BA & inished walk-out LL. Main loor with rare master suite, 2-story kitchen w/new stainless steel French door refrigerator & stove, GR w/stunning wood burning ireplace, formal DR, home ofice, laundry & full BA. Master suite w/studio vault leads in to a luxurious BA w/his & hers sinks, jetted tub, separate shower & walk-in closet. UL has 3 large BRs and full BA. LL w/walk-out is a perfect in-law’s suite w/BR, full BA, closet, tons of storage space, media rm w/electric ireplace, rec area, kitchenette w/bar height seating & dining, two 50-gal hot water heaters & 2nd w/d hook up. Steps away from the upscale Bear Creek Golf Course & pool.

35% OFF the First $75,000 in Options

$292,400

Yard Maintenance pkg now available! OPEN 11 – 5 or by Appt

Shari Wynn NMLS# 260167 • 314-889-0680 swynn@gershman.com

636-265-2646

Jennifer Smerek

www.KempHomes.com

NMLS# 260971 • 314-889-0667 jsmerek@gershman.com

Nickolas A. Dalba, Jr.

Cell: 314-574-8304

Nick@NickDalba.com www.stcharlesrealestatesearch.com

Call Terra Ritchie 314-456-9951 www.investors-title.com.

Stunning Lakefront Luxury on Display It’s almost time for one of the most premier events in St. Louis real estate — the annual Innsbrook Fall Home Tour. Located less than an hour west of St. Louis, Innsbrook invites you to explore its 7,500-acre community by touring a number of stunning lakefront estates, charming wooded cabins and a contemporary cottage from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15. Pack up the family for this exciting event — a self-guided driving tour that starts with registration at Innsbrook’s brand new amenity complex, opened to Innsbrook property owners for the first time in 2016. After enjoying live music, beautiful autumn scenery and a bite to eat, you’ll be ready to explore a number of properties in the area of Innsbrook’s 236-acre Alpine Lake — a sparkling body of water that boasts incredible sailing, fishing and other recreational activities. Because of Innsbrook’s no-wake and no-gas-powered motors regulations, Alpine Lake, along with all of Innsbrook’s more than 100 total lakes, are safe and serene. Jaws will drop at the sight of one of this year’s tour stops: A majestic lakeside estate, covered in wood from top to bottom, is a luxury lodge on Alpine Lake. The soaring ceiling peaks at 26’ and the stone fireplace towers over the great room, drawing your attention to the large windows and a picture perfect view. Family is never far away in this home with its enviable, completely open floor plan. The lovely kitchen overlooks the great room and features a breakfast bar, custom cabinets and granite countertops. Be inspired by the lake-friendly décor as you explore each of the rooms in this immaculately maintained home — truly one of Innsbrook’s most premier properties. Then you’ll experience chalet chic in a gorgeous cabin at another stop on Innsbrook’s Fall Home Tour. Top features include an open great room with a stone fireplace and panoramic lake views. The cabin’s cedar walls and ceilings, hardwood floors, six-panel wood doors and architectural shingles all add up to a stunning design.

In addition to those two amazing properties, you’ll be able to walk through a charming, contemporary cottage and two more beautiful homes on scenic Alpine Lake. With an 18-hole public golf course, on-site restaurant and new amenity complex, there’s something for everyone at Innsbrook, whether you’re looking for the ultimate in relaxation or recreation. Hiking trails wind alongside babbling creeks and wet-weather waterfalls and birdsong combine to create a soothing symphony of nature’s wonders.

Innsbrook has a variety of properties from which to choose — from recreational A-frame chalets and cottages to full-time residences — ranging in price from $79,900 to $947,500. Or create your own dream home on an Innsbrook building site, currently available beginning at $29,900. Can’t make it to the Fall Home Tour? You can explore Innsbrook seven days a week at innsbrook-resort.com. For directions and information, call 636-928-3366, ext. 9199, or email property@innsbrook-resort.com.

fall HOME TOUR Saturday, October 15 | 12-4 PM

INNSBROOK-RESORT.COM/FALL


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preview THIS YEAR’S TOUR

Lakeside Cottage Retreat Tranquil setting | Primary or secondary residence

fall HOME TOUR Saturday, October 15 | 12-4 PM

At our Fall Home Tour, you’ll get a chance to tour several properties and experience Innsbrook’s relaxed atmosphere and beautiful fall scenery. On this year’s self-guided tour, there’s something for everyone to explore, whether you’re looking for a weekend place at the lake or a full-time residence. Don’t miss your chance to discover the lake community that St. Louis families have been falling in love with for more than 45 years. No reservations required!

Lakeside Paradise Stunning recreational chalet on scenic lake

100 Lakes, 30 Minutes West of Chesterield RESIDENTIAL & VACATION HOMES | A-FRAME CHALETS | CONDOS & VILLAS

Rustic & Reined Getaway Amazing home for year-round or recreational use

learn more INNSBROOK-RESORT.COM/FALL

contact our sales team (636)928-3366 ext. 9199


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Explore Lake Living at Innsbrook Innsbrook invites you to explore lake living at one of this weekend’s open houses. Open from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8, the chalet at 46 Brenner Ridge Dr. is tucked quietly into the woods and overlooks the shores of peaceful Brenner Lake. An ideal weekend getaway retreat, this 1-bath chalet with a sleeping loft is surrounded by 2.85 tranquil acres and listed for $184,500. Displaying another style of Innsbrook living, the 5-bed, 3-bath custom home at 2105 Meadow Ridge Dr. is open for touring from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8. Listed for $485,000, this attractive home is close to many top Innsbrook amenities, including the new swimming pool and fitness center, as well as riding stables, sandy beaches and beautiful lakes. From noon to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9, walk through a beautifully renovated A-frame cabin on 45-acre Lake St. Gallen at Innsbrook. Listed for $325,900, the

2-bed, 2-bath chalet at 772 St. Gallen Oaks Dr. oozes charm and is set up beautifully for living the lake lifestyle. The beadboard ceilings brighten the chalet and give it that “cottage feel.” The oversized deck is perfect for family and friends to relax and enjoy beautiful views of the water! This cabin is a unique and rare find — a dream second home with incredible privacy and all the Innsbrook resort amenities! All properties are listed by Innsbrook Properties Inc. Innsbrook is quiet times on the lake shore and delighting in the simplicity of a family weekend away in the woods. Both relaxation and recreation are available in abundance. Choose from Innsbrook’s recreational cabins, resort-style condos, golf course villas, contemporary cottages or custom lake homes. Explore Innsbrook’s available properties and open houses online at innsbrook-resort.com.

YOUR DESTINATION FOR EVERYTHING ST. LOUIS ORDER ONLINE 24/7

thepost-dispatchstore.com 1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

List Your OPEN HOUSE! Call 314.340.8651

MISTY HOLLOW FLORISSANT, MO 63034 • $176,810 5461 MISTY CROSSING COURT

HAWKINS RIDGE 4319 HAWKINS RIDGE DR. ST LOUIS, MO 63129 • $396,900

NEW CONSTRUCTION!

NEW CONSTRUCTION!

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 10-2 GALLERY 1014

Gallery 1014 at the Alverne! Gallery 1014 is a luxury community featuring front loader washer & dryers, granite counter tops, jacuzzi tubs, and stainless steel appliances in two-story and now single story luxury apartments with ten foot ceilings. Our community amenities include a beautiful courtyard, a Mezzanine Lounge, and a rooftop pet park coming soon!

Pet FriendLy - Ask ABOut Our current Pre-LeAsinG sPeciALs!

3 BEDS, 2.5 BATHS 1518 SQ FT, UPSTAIRS MASTER, LOT # 30, PLAN: CAMDEN FOR MORE INFO CALL 314-503-5500 JIM WANNSTEDT

CONSORT-HOMES.COM

OPEN DAILY- JUST CALL!

WILLOWBROOKE CREVE COEUR, MO 63146 • $499,829 1577 WILLOWBROOKE MANORS COURT NEW CONS TRUC TION !

3 BEDS, 2 BATHS, 2240 SQ FT , 3 CAR GARAGE, LOT #44, PLAN: SIERRA MOVE IN READY! FOR MORE INFO CALL 314-845-1881 ANDREW FOX OPEN EVERY DAY FROM NOON -5PM

1 Bedroom $950 | 2 Bedrooms $1895 3 Bedrooms $2195

1014 Locust St., St Louis, MO

CONSORT-HOMES.COM

314-241-3800

VILLAGE OF PROVENCE ST CHARLES, MO 63301 2321 CHEMIN AVENUE • $394,900 NEW CONSTRUCTION!

POST-DISPATCH STORE BOOKS JUST CAN’T STOP READING ’EM 4 BEDS, 3.5 BATHS, 3 CAR GARAGE, 2 STORIES, 3375 SQ FT, LOT #84 MOVE IN READY! FOR MORE INFO CALL ERIN WHITEHEAD 314-993-2600 Open Sat. & Sun. Call for showing.

4 BEDS, 3.5 BATHS, 3 CAR GARAGE, 2 STORIES, 3215 SQ FT, LOT#112

SHOP ONLINE 24/7

FOR MORE INFO CALL ERIN WHITEHEAD 636-236-2032

CONSORT-HOMES.COM

vacation hold put your newspaper on hold go on vacation support local schools By putting your Post-Dispatch delivery on vacation hold, you provide local students and teachers free access to the newspaper through our Newspapers In Education (NIE) program. NIE enables students to enhance their learning through application of real-world news.

Go to STLtoday.com/services, log into Subscriber Services or call 314-340-8888.

OPEN EVERYDAY FROM NOON - 5PM

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1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.


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St. Louis Post Dispatch Check rates daily at http://stltoday.interest.com Institution

30 yr APR

30 yr Fixed

3.268% 30yr Fixed APR

LenderCity Home Loans

Product

Rate

Points

Fees % Down

APR

Phone / Website

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Rate: 3.250

20 yr fixed

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3.018

Points: 0.000

15 yr fixed

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$0

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2.638

Fees: $0

5/1 ARM

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% Down: 5%

Legend: The rate and annual percentage rate (APR) are effective as of 10/5/16. © 2016 Bankrate, LLC . http://www.interest.com. The APR may increase after consummation and may vary. Payments do not include amounts for taxes and insurance. The fees set forth for each advertisement above may be charged to open the plan (A) Mortgage Banker, (B) Mortgage Broker, (C) Bank, (D) S & L, (E) Credit Union, (BA) indicates Licensed Mortgage Banker, NYS Banking Dept., (BR) indicates Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Banking Dept., (loans arranged through third parties). “Call for Rates” means actual rates were not available at press time. All rates are quoted on a minimum FICO score of 740. Conventional loans are based on loan amounts of $165,000. Jumbo loans are based on loan amounts of $435,000. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Lock Days: 30-60. Annual percentage rates (APRs) are based on fully indexed rates for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). The APR on your specific loan may differ from the sample used. Fees reflect charges relative to the APR. If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. FHA Mortgages include both UFMIP and MIP fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. VA Mortgages include funding fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. Bankrate, LLC . does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates and fees in this table. All rates, fees and other information are subject to change without notice. Bankrate, LLC . does not own any financial institutions. Some or all of the companies appearing in this table pay a fee to appear in this table. If you are seeking a mortgage in excess of $417,000, recent legislation may enable lenders in certain locations to provide rates that are different from those shown in the table above. Sample Repayment Terms – ex. 360 monthly payments of $5.29 per $1,000 borrowed ex. 180 monthly payments of $7.56 per $1,000 borrowed. We recommend that you contact your lender directly to determine what rates may be available to you. To appear in this table, call 800-509-4636. To report any inaccuracies, call 888-509-4636. • http://stltoday.interest.com All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise 'any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate whichh is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

St. Francois County Resort, Lake and River 0790 0100 Property For Sale For Sale By Owner:

103 Benham St., Bonne Terre, MO., Nice Ranch, Corner Lot, 2000+ sq ft, Liv. R m ., F a m . R m ., Kit ch., 3 BR, L a u n r e y Rm., 2.5 BA with Walkout Bsmnt , Fenced Back Yard, Deck, Covered Patio, $155,000. Call (573) 518-4852 or (573) 9152074

Out Of Area Property

1190

Bond Count y, Illinois 8 acres, 3 bedrooms, 2- full b a t h s , st ocked pond, storm shelter, full basement, 2 car garage, 2 sheds, 3 carports contact Cisler realtor, Don Will 618 635 2244 or 618 531 2126 CHALET 46 Nestled on the shores of one of Innsbrook's more than 100 lakes, this spacious recreational cabin offers a tranquil setting, open floor plan and wrap around deck. The 1BA cabin has a large sleeping loft. Some furniture available! Open house 10/8, 12-2pm. $184,500

R E Auctions

Rent Apts/Flats Furnished Downtown

Call 314-621-6666. Or log on to stltoday.com/classifieds

Westport/Lindbergh/Page 1 MONTH FREE Near I-64, 270, 170 or 70 Clean, safe, quiet building, great landlord. 1BR $545 special. w/d, storage locker, off-street prkg. Q 314-995-1912Q

Rent Clayton

2325

Heart of Clayton 1 bedroom ($700 a mo.) 2 bedrooms, ($800 a mo.) Call for more info 314-423-9200

Rent Florissant

DON'T RENT! RENT TO OWN! We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs.

2160

2190

Mobile Home - 3 BR, 2 BA in quiet Granite city park Ez com to St. Louis rent or sale $525 mo 618 6880005

2385

For more information call or go online at

314-447-1800 nhba.com

Auctions, Estate Sales & Antiques Rent Illinois HOME2105 This attractive home is close to all the amenities and boasts tremendous privacy. Surrounded by 3.55 acres of forest, the 5BR/3BA home has a brand new HVAC system and an indoor, in-ground pool! Open house 10/8, 2-4pm. $485,000

CHALET 772 This beautifully remodeled A-frame cabin on Innsbrook's Lake St. Gallen is a unique and rare find!The 2BD/2BR vacation getaway boasts hardwood floors, updated kitchen and baths, and a fabulous lakeside recreation area. Open house 10/9, 122pm. $325,900

To place your ad, call 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820, ext. 6666. Antiques Wanted

6290 Estate Sale

Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

INNSBROOK Properties, Inc. (636) 928-3366 ext. 9199 www.innsbrookresort.com

Condos/Townhomes

0210

US Treasury Dept. Public Auction 5 Condo Units in Plaza Square Blue Condos, 210 N. 17th St. ST. Louis MO Studio Style, 1 BA each. Bid Online Wed. 10/12 for: Unit 907, 909 & 1009 Bid Online Thurs, 10/13 for: Units 505 & 801 Inspect: Sun. 10/2 & 10/9 from 1-4PM. cwsmarketing.com 703-273-7373

Creve Coeur

Executive Homes

HOBBITS ESTATE SALE S a t . & Su n . 9 - 4 , 7 4 5 Hidden Lake Dr, 63376 7' Case clock, vint. 5pc bdr., lots of golden oak furn.-pristine, Clarks spool cab., dzs Ger. beer steins, taxidermy, depr glass, oak iceb ox, L o n g a b e r g e r , crocks, Nordic Track, Waverly Comf., folding outbrd motor, speakers, coffee maker s, bar wr, W W I I medals, lrg enamel stove, woodwrkng tools Pics @estatesales.net

0510

1 9 4 6 S ugar S prings Rd, Festus; All Brick Ranch, Pool, Pond, S ynthetic Golf Green, Detached Garages, Green House, 6 0 1 8 Sq. ft, 4b/7ba; 33+ Acres; R-7 Jefferson Sch Dist; $ 9 9 7 ,5 0 0 . 224-3330062

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

314-447-1800 nhba.com Rent St. Charles

2605

ST. CHARLES CITY FOR LEASE STUDIOS, 1BR APT'S OR HOMES NO PETS CALL 636-946-4161 FOR INFO.

Invest your time with us and we’ll have you nesting in no time!

2450

Applicants must be 62 or older. Rent based on income. All 1 bdrm units, great location & located on bus route. Call 877-390-0454, Mon-Fri 9-5, sky022@ metroplexinc.com Apply online at: skylinetowersapts.com 3113 Washington, Alton

Dogs

5005 Dogs

AKC ROTTWEILER PUPPIES Call Fred (314)406-9727

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DOODLES: Puppies Ready Now & thru Christmas

GOLDENDOODLES LABRADOODLES & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. $500 & Up Top Rated Breeder

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314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes

5005

English Pointer pups, l&w. Rotts pups for sell. Parents on site. Leave voicemail. Exc. bloodlines -- FDSB $1200-$1000 636-281pedigr ees. $500 (314) 6782 854-8677

French Bulldog puppies AKC, $500. .E-mail petadr3@ mail.com for a pup. 573-698-6690

G E R M A N SH E P H E R D PUPPIES FOR SALE Call for price 618-419-2911 or 618-610-3669 Labrador Retriever Puppies, White, AKC reg., eskerwhitelabs.com $750 618-410-5140

Shihpoos, Maltese, Wheatens, Cavapoos, Cockers, Chiweines, Kyileo, Golden Doodles, Golden Retriever & lots of Poos

A 636-240-3647 A LoveNCarePets.org

West Highland Terrier, AKC Male, 12 wks, Home Raised. All shots, $1300. (660) 248-3898 or (660) 728-2898

Garage Sales Garage Sales 6325 MISSOURI

Garage Sales 6325 MISSOURI

63005 Villas at Chesterfield Bluffs, 127 Chesterfield 63017: Twin Estates at Bluffs Dr., Sat, 10/8, 9 Mead owb roo k - 15579 a.m. to noon. Meadowbrook Cr Ln, 63010: Villas at Palmer Sat. 10/8 - 7am-12pm Pl. 10/8, 7-2, 55 to Richardson, N on Jeffco, R. to Industrial, R. to sub. <nm>63026 Winter Valley Subdivision Annual Fall Sale 6 3 0 1 1 -4 6 4 Wildwood Saturday, October 8, Pkwy, 1 0 /8 , 7 - 2 , Lots Shop early, stay late Furn., Home Decor, Baby lots of homes Items, & More! participate thru-out the 63017-Stonebriar subdivi500 home subdivision. Toys, clothes, home s ion s ale , C orne r of decor, appliances, Clarkson/Kehrs Mill Look for balloons/signs.8am- furniture & much more! Sponsored by 5pm Sat 10/8 Christine Mastis, 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds Berkshire Hathway Alliance, REALTORS 636-680-8310

63301

ST. ANDREWS

SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE Saturday, October 8th 7 am - 12 pm Directions: Directions: I-70 to North on Zumbehl, left on West Clay, right on Sawyer Blvd. Follow to St. Andrews.

Sponsored by: Linda & Kelly Boehmer 314-740-5435 Ofice: 636-720-1128

'09 Chevy Corvette Z06 23xxx Mi., 7.0L V8, #C61756B, $41,357 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '11 Chevy Cruze 1LT: Clean Carfax, 4 Cyl, FWD, Keyless Entry, Turbocharged, Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $10,990 #38138B

Audi

Garage Sales 6325 MISSOURI

63028: 1516 St. Mary's Ln. S at 1 0 /8 , 8 a m - 1 p m , House Goods & More! 63031, Sat 10/8, 7-2pm, 1005 N. Park Ln . Lots hsehld items and tons of misc stuff. 63033: 4015 Meadowland Dr., 10/8, 8-1, Massive Moving Sale! Everything must go 63125: 823 Virgo, Sat., Oct. 8, 8am, MOVING: Fur n ., Clothes, Christmas, & Misc. 6 3 1 3 2 : 9 2 9 1 O ld B o n h o m m e Rd, 10/8, 8-1, Xmas, art, furn, collectibles, hsehld, Star Wars 63134: 9233 Stansberry Ave, 8-3, Moving after 30 years sale; furniture, dishes, pictures, misc. 63137. Chambers at Hwy 367. Early Bird Sale 10/7, 5-8pm & Regular Sale 10/8; 8:30am-1 pm Grace Chapel Rummage Sale $1 bag sale 12:30pm Supports Youth Join us for our Fall Fest on Friday, 10/7 - Food + Fun for the family. 6 3 3 0 1 - S t. Charles Hills Subd. Sale (off Zumbehl N) on Bolton,Fleet, Orton, Golfway, Lyme, & St. Alban, Sat.10/8, 7-? Look for signs/ balloons.

63368 - Twin Chimneys Twin Chimney Blvd Preview Fri 10/7 4-9 pm and Sat 10/8 @ 7 am Little of everything.

4040

'11 Audi Q7 Prestige Quattro, 55K Mi, Has It All! #B7926, $34,990

'13 Chevy Cruze LT: Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Motor Trend Certified, Balance of Factory Warranty, $12,990 #95063B

BMW

4050

'12 BMW 650xi Convertible, Spt Pkg, 41K, Black, #B7997, $46,900

'11 BMW 328i xDrive: Clean CARFAX, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $16,990 #10772A

'12 BMW 528i BMW Certified, Like New, $22,580

'08 BMW 328 xi Moonroof, AWD, Low Miles, #X16642A, $11,388 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

4055

'15 Buick LaCrosse: 2.4L, Hybrid, Leather, 11K Miles, GM Certified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Buick Regal: 4 Door, 17K Miles, Leather, Sunroof, GM Certified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Buick Verano: 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, Alloys, 33K Miles, One Owner, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Buick Verano Intellink, Dual Climate Control, Alloys, 46K, #M16939A, $14,131 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Cadillac

4060

'11 CAD CTS-V Sedan, Auto, Two to Choose, #C8178, CALL!

'13 Cadillac CTS: 4 Door, V6, 30k Miles, Leather, One Owner, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '08 Cadillac CTS: 4 Dr, Sunroof, Navigation, Black, Sharp, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Malibu LS 1LS 88xxx Miles, CD Player, ABS, $9,995 #UH5264EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Chevrolet

4065

'14 Chevy Sonic LT: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Bluetooth, New Arrival, $11,990 #P8670C

Call 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820 for our Garage Sale Package. Garage Sales MISSOURI

'04 MDX AWD One Owner $3,950 #160589F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/ homes

6325

Village of Winding Trails Clayton Rd., west of Strecker Rd. To left on Prospector Ridge. (Follow the signs)

'15 Sonic LTZ, 4 Dr, Leather, 11xxx Miles, GM Certified, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Sonic LTZ, 4 Dr, Leather, 11xxx Miles, GM Certified, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Spark LT: 5 Dr, 21K Miles, GM Certified, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Spark 2LT Auto, 20xxx Miles, GM Certified, Stk #C161857A $9,514 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

Tall Oaks Of Winding Trails Clayton Rd., East of HWY 109 to right on Westglen Farms Dr. (Follow the signs)

'13 Camaro ZL1 10K Mi., Loaded, Fresh Tires, Local Trade, $42,490

Multi-Subdivision Annual Fall Garage Sale! Saturday, October 8 From 8:00 AM to ? Westglen Farms Manchester Rd. West of Clarkson Rd. To right on Westglen Farms Dr . (Follow the signs)

Sponsored by The Sharon Hutson Team BHHS Alliance Real Estate 636-227-3456

Garage Sales ILLINOIS

6330

62239: Yard Sale. Christ United Church of C h r is t , 200 S. 3rd S t ., D u p o ; S a t . O c t . 8th, 9am-3pm

4065 Dodge

'14 Chevy Corvette Triple Black, 3LT, 6K Mi., Auto, $54,990

'11 Buick LaCrosse CXL: 4 Dr Sedan, FWD, 3.6L 6 Cyl, 85K Miles, Carbon Black, Call Today, $12,399 #H170054A

5005 Dogs

French Bulldog Puppies, CreamFemale $1500 and B r i n d l e M a l e $1300(636)364-3066

4025 Chevrolet

'08 Acura TL 3.2: Clean CARFAX, Lthr Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $8,990 #10834A

Buick

To place your ad, call at 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820, ext. 6666.

0475

w w w .1757schuetz.com. Move in ready. New carpet & paint. Fenced yard w/deck. Appliances incld. Air cond/ f ur n w/ humidifier, replaced 2010. Roof 2012. Water heater 2015. 314-753-3671

We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs.

Pets & Stuff

Boston Terriers puppies (1) male (3) females. vet checked, free worming, first shots. $450 Call 314-520-1537. Chi-poo Puppies: 10 wks, Females $300; 1 Male $275. Also, 1 yr. R e g . Male Toy Poodle $300. Call (618)334-5928

CHALET 2350 This amazing 3BR/2BA recreational cabin overlooks a peaceful lake. The large, expanded kitchen and great room with cedar walls and ceilings create plenty of space for family and friends. Cabin is being sold fully furnished! $269,900

DON'T RENT! RENT TO OWN!

Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments 6307

cars cars cars cars cars cars cars cars cars cars Acura

For more information call or go online at

CONDO FOR RENT 210 N. 17th St., 63103 Downtown 17th & Olive 1 BR, new carpet, new washer. Fitness rm., $800 mo. utilities incl. except electricity. 618-558-9597

Rent Houses Illinois

2245 Rent Richmond Heights 2570

2120

********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $110.50/wk Call 314-421-2980 *********

Rent Condos/ Manufactured/Mobile 1210 Townhomes Homes For Rent 2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes off Hwy W at Mansion Road Estates AND Farmview Est. on Hwy Y. Both located between Troy & Winfield 636-566-6456

1234 Rent Suburban West

S exton Auction and Real Estate, public real estate and pe rsonal prope rty auction October 1 5 th at 4919 Mccausland Ave, St Louis M o . 6 3 1 0 9 . This outstanding 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath home offers an array of amenities. Nestled in the beautiful St Louis hills area of STL and within close proximity to shopping, Universities, and restaurants. Entire household contents will be sold. Open house Oct 2 & 9 from 1:00-3:00 pm. Go to www.sextonauction.com or call Tyler Sexton at 314-529-0124.

'15 Chevy Camaro Z28 Rare Car! 500 Mi., #C10673P, $50,979 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Chevy Camaro ZL1 6,2L V8, 6 Speed Manual, 9xxx Mi., C10736XP, $41,501 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '05 Chevy Cobalt: $6,995 #KB2404A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '08 Cobalt LS Red, 110xxx Miles, State Safety & Emissions Tested! Value Priced At $5,299, Stk #DL1135

'11 Chevy Cruze LT: Turbo, 53K Miles, Alloys, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Equinox 2LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Remote Start, $14,990 #26062M

'14 Equinox AWD Gray Metallic, Balance of Factory Warranty, Hurry In! #H170023A $17,499

'09 Chevy HHR LS: 2.2L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $7,990 #78081C

'10 Chevy HHR LT: Sunroof, 62K Miles, Warranty, Black, $8,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Impala LT: Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Low Miles, Bluetooth, Call Today, $12,490 #8857A

'16 Chevy Impala 2LT: V6, 10K Miles, GMCertified, $25,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Chevy Impala LT: V6, Alloys, 89K Miles, Sharp, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '15 Chevy Impala LS: 4 Cyl, One Owner, GM Certified, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Impala LS: Limited, 20K Miles, GM Certified, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'14 Chevy Malibu LTZ, A lot of car for little money, #B7653B, $15,990 '11 Chevy Malibu LT: Clean CARFAX, Heated Front Leather Seats, Remote Engine Start, Prem Sound, $9,990 #10250C

'11 Chevy Malibu 1LT: Bluetooth, Flex Fuel, Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $9,990 #38111D

'13 Chevy Malibu ECO 2.4L, Auto, GM Certified, Warranty, #C10721XQ, $10,991 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '16 Chevy Malibu LT 2xxx Miles, #C160918L $20,699 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '16 Chevy Malibu LTZ: Leather, 27K Miles, GM Certified, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Malibu LS 2.5L, 34xxx Mi., GM Certified Warranty, #C10785P, $12,675 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Malibu LT 12xxx Mi., 2.5L, GM Certified Warranty, #C1077XP, $16,838 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Volt: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, Premium Sound System, Keyless Entry, $13,990 #26148A

'06 Malibu Clean CarFax $2,995 #160529F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236 '06 Malibu Clean CarFax $2,995 #160529F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236 '96 Beretta 102xxx Miles, Cean CarFax $1,550 #160688F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

Chrysler

4085 Honda

'15 Challenger SXT Nav, V6, 30xxx Miles , $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Dodge Dart SXT: 4 Door, Ralleye, 10K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Dodge Cha llenge r R/T: Only 16K Mi, 5.7L HEMI, Loa de d, Leathr, Moonroof, Mine ra l Gra y, Ca ll Toda y, $22,999 #X2957

'08 Dodge Avenger SE: 2.4L, 4 Cyl, Auto, FWD, Power Windows & Locks, Remote Keyless Entry, Call Today, $7,990 #P8346B

'14 Dodge Avenger SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $12,990 #77321A

Ford

4110

'10 Ford Focus SE FWD, CD, Blue, 34MPG, #U5085R, $6,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '14 Ford Fiesta SE $11,695 #K1829P 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Ford Fiesta SE: 5 Dr, 33K Miles, One Owner, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Ford Focus $9,975 #G310147A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '12 Ford Focus SE: $8,695 #GD16106A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'13 Ford Focus ST Roof, Leather, #B7855, $20,990

'15 Ford Focus SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Balance of Factory Warranty, $14,990 #P8655

'14 Ford Fusion SE $13,795 #E42536 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'13 Ford Fusion Hybrid: 46K Mi., Sunroof, #V15493B, $18,490 '13 Ford Fusion Hybrid SE, #V15493B, $16,490 '12 Ford Fusion SE: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Remote Start, Alloy Wheels, $11,990 #95218A

'15 Fusion SE Stk #P8580 $19,160

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'16 Ford Mustang ECO $27,995 #E47233 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '07 Ford Mustang Convertible: Keyless Entry, Priced Below Avg, #UH5144EP, $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

'04 Ford Mustang Convertible, 60K, Premium Pkg, Auto, #M16647B, $10,990

'05 Ford Mustang: V6 Deluxe, Low Miles, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Security System, $8,990 #77187A

'06 Ford Mustang Convertible, 4.0 V6, White, Only 79k Miles! Fun in the Sun! $10,999 #DL1187

'15 Ford Taurus Lmtd $19,798 #E7153E 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'14 Ford Taurus "SHO", Loaded, 38K, #C15246RA, $27,480

4070

'14 300S, AWD, Sunroof, Nav, 21xxx Miles, One Owner, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chrys ler 200: Touring, Dee p Auburn, Moonroof, Bluetooth, One Owne r, 52K Miles , Ca ll Toda y, Now $9,999 #H161660A

'05 300 Single Owner, Rear A/C, CD $8,995 #UH513EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

'10 Ford Taurus SHO: Clean CARFAX, AWD, Navigation/GPS, Sunroof, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, $12,990 #95188B

4120

'13 Honda Fit Auto, Power Windows/Locks, $13,990 '03 Accord EX-L: Coupe, 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $5,990 #75838C

'12 Honda Accord EX-L Sedan: Leather, Heated Seats, Moonroof, #X17081A, $13,387 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Honda Accord LX: 4 Dr, Silver Metallic, 51K Miles, Bluetooth, Alloys, B/U Camera, Auto Climate Control, $15,899 #H160886B

'14 Honda Civic LX: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $15,490 #26544A

'12 Honda Civic LX Traction Control, Keyless Entry, #X2740P, $12,628 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '12 Honda Civic EX: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Premium Sound, Keyless Entry, $13,999 #H162017A

'09 Honda Civic EX: Crystal Black, Sunroof, Alloys, Only 77K Miles, Call Today, $10,999 #H170033B

'13 Honda Civic LX: 21 To Choos e , Bluetooth, La rge s t S e le ction in Midwest!! S ta rting At $14,099 #X2997

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

HUGE FALL SALES EVENT LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN MIDWEST! 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '14 Accord EXL: 4 Cyl, Hematite Metallic, 49K Miles, Display Audio, 2 Cameras, $18,999 #H160914A '13 Civic LX: 4 DR's, 21 To Choose, Polished Metal, B/U Camera, Bluetooth, 43K Miles, Largest Inventory in Midwest Starting at $14,099 '13 CRV EX: AWD, Crystal Black, 41K Miles, Alloys, Moonroof, Bluetooth, BackUp Camera, $19,499 #X3012 '16 Pilot EXL: 4WD, Obsidian Blue Pearl, Only 3,603 Miles, Like New But Longer Warranty, $36,499 #H162029A '14 Accord Sport: White Pearl, 41K Miles, 18" Alloys, Fog Lamps, Spoiler, Sharp, $18,699 #H170045A '14 CRV LX: AWD, Pearl White, 34K Miles, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, $19,499 #H161558C '13 Accord LX: 4 Door, Silver Metallic, Bluetooth, Alloys, B/U Camera, Auto Climate, Priced To Sell Fast, $15,899 #H160886A '12 Odyssey: Touring Elite, Nav, DVD, Only 44K Miles, Smokey Topaz w/Truffle Heated, Power, Leather Seats, Moonroof, Loaded, Hurry In! $28,799 #H162055A '13 Civic EX: Coupe, Polished Metal Metallic, , Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Bluetooth, Camera, 38K Miles, $15,499 #X2980 '14 Accord LX: Crystal Black, 29K Miles, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Alloys, $17,499 #H161062A '00 Civic Cold Air, Clean CarFax $1,950 #160469 Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

Hyundai

4125

'13 Accent GLS: $9,695 #KP23791 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Hyundai Accent $9,695 #KP23791 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Hyundai Accent GLS, Pacific Blue, Late Model, Low Payment Ca r! 35K Miles, Now $10,999 #SC1294

'15 Taurus Limited Stk #P8601, $21,305

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds of South County 1-855-903-8696


Classified Hyundai

4125 Mercedes Benz

'11 Hyundia Elantra: Limited, V6, RWD, Heated Front Seats, Navigation/GPS, Sunroof/Moonroof, $9,990 #10580A

'13 Hyundai Elantra GLS: Silver, Only 18,180 Miles, $13,499 #SC1361

4190 Toyota

'06 Mercedes Benz E350: V6, FWD, Navigation/GPS, Leather Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #94563A

Misc. Autos

4210

Bommarito St. Peters '16 Hyundai Elantra SE: 4 Door, 29K Miles, One Owner, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Hyundai Sonata SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Balance of Factory Warranty, $15,990 #P8657

M 1 4300 Ford Trucks

NEW ARRIVALS!!

'15 F150 XLT Stk #P8474A $33,067

1-866-2449085 '13 Subaru XV: Orange, 30K, Manual, Hard to Find

of South County 1-855-903-8696¢ '13 Camry XLE Stk #P8607, $16,784

'16 Dodge Charger: Scat Pak Edt, 14K, Local Trade '04 Chrysler Sebring: Convertible, 55K, Local Trade '13 Infiniti FX37: Navigation, Roof, AWD, $31,990 '15 Ford T-250 Cargo Van's, White, 2 to Choose

of South County 1-855-903-8696 '15 Toyota Corolla $13,195 #KE66473 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Corolla S Re d, Only 76xxx Mile s , Will S e ll Fa s t At $10,899 #H161845B

'13 Lexus GX460 Black w/Tan, AWD, 36K, $39,980

Ininiti

4130

'13 Infiniti QX 56 White, Loaded, New Car Trade, Call!!

'07 Honda Odyssey Local Trade, Well Maintained '11 CAD, CTS-V Sedan: Auto, Black on Black, 19K Miles, $43,990 '13 Infiniti EX37:

Mitsubishi Jeep

4145

'15 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk $26,895 #ET86199 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Jeep Cherokee: Latitude, Nav, 25K Miles, One Owner, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '04 Jeep Liberty Sport: 3.7L V6, 4x4, Low Miles, Rear Seat Pass Through, Call Today, $5,990 #8843A

'03 Jeep Liberty: Limited, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, 4WD, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $5,490 #10525A

'16 Jeep Patriot $15,495 #KTE12540 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Kia

4155

'11 Kia Forte EX: 60K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $9,490 #M16413A '14 Kia Forte : S e da ns , (4) To Choos e From, Bla ck, 21K Miles , #SC1273 Ca ll Toda y S ta rting At $12,999

'15 Kia Optima $14,995 #KE52599 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'14 Kia Sorento LX Gray, Only 21xxx Miles, Bluetooth, 17" Alloys, Nice Price, Call Now ! #SC1362 $17,999

'15 Kia Soul: FWD, Hatchback, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Call Today, $13,490 #77063A

Lexus

4165

'10 RX350 light blue, like new, 93,000, $18,499, 314-517-1289 '06 Lexus GS300: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Call Today, $11,990 #95216A

'05 Lexus ES 330: Base, FWD, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Leather, Sunroof, $10,990 #26314A

Lincoln

4170

2006 Lincoln Town Car Signature, Call Today, $5,450 Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236 '09 Lincoln MKS 3.7: Nav, Roof, Heated Leather, Silver, 74K Miles, New 20" Tires, BU Camera, Bluetooth, $14,299 #DL1225

'10 Lincoln MKZ Sat Radio, CD Player, Dual Climate Controls, Moonroof, 41K, #M393XP, $13,683 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Mazda

4185

'11 Mazda Mazda CX-7i: Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Call Today, $12,990 #95278B

'14 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sport, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Mazda Certified, Low Miles, Premium Sound, $15,990 #10705A

'15 Mazda Mazda5: Sport Wagon, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Call Today, $14,990 #P8677

'12 Mazda Mazda3 i: Touring, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Balance of Factory Warranty, $12,990 #P8670A

'15 Mazda 5 Sport Wagon, White, 37K Miles, 6 Pass, 3rd Row, Sliding Side Doors, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $14,299 #SC1300

'14 Mazda CX-5: AWD, Gra nd Touring, Naviga tion, Le a the r, S ilve r Me tallic, 46K Miles , Ca ll Toda y, $21,999 #SC1262

'13 Mazda Mazda 3: Sedans, 2 To Choose From, Silver, Only 26K Miles, Call Now, Starting At $13,499 #sc1326

'16 Mazda 6i Grand Touring: Leather, Bluetooth, Auto, Nav, 6K, #M16520L, $28,152 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes

4220

'11 Nissan Altima 2.5 S: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,990 #26063B

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $13,990 #94710C

'10 Volkswagen CC Luxury, Leather, Roof, Alloys, Auto, 91K, #MS17234C, $10,745 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Bommarito ST. PETERS Volkswagen 1-866-2449085

4345

'14 GMC Sierra A Must Sell, Very Cheap, #V16121A, $19,990

Nissan/Datsun Trucks 4380 '10 Titan SE Stk #P8604, $15,995

of South County 1-855-903-8696

Toyota Trucks

4385

'14 Pre-Runner Stk #P8616 $24,766

of South County 1-855-903-8696 '04 Toyota Tacoma PreRunner: Extended Cab, V6, Access Cab, V6, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, $15,990 #77005A

'14 VW Tiquon S: 27K, Black, $22,990 '16 VW Golf Wagon!! 4K, $20,990

'15 VW Passat SE: Roof & Nav, $20,490

'15 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Silver, 33K Miles, Bluetooth, Fog Lamps, One Owner Clean Carfax,Call Today, $13,499 #SC1193

'15 VW GTI: 1 Owner, White, $20,490 '15 VW Passat S: 14K, Auto, $19,490 '14 VW Jetta Wagon SE: Sunroof, 32K, $17,990

of South County 1-855-903-8696

Crossovers

4387

'10 Audi Q5 Quattro, AWD, Roof, Nav, $19,990

'13 Ford Edge SEL AWD, Roof, Nav, White, $28,490

'15 VW Passat Ltd: 17K, Red, $17,490 '15 VW Passat "S": Auto, White, $16,990

'13 Altima SV Stk #P8504, $17,727

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'15 Tahoe LTZ 20xxx Miles, Every Option, White!! Stk #C16349A $56,490 '15 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4x4, Sunroof, DVD, 22K Miles, GM Certified, $45,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Tahoe LT 4x4 Heated Leather, 82K Miles, 3rd Row, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'13 Chevy Traverse LTZ: AWD, Loaded, $32,490 #B8065

'07 Ford Edge SEL Plus, AWD, White, $9,400

'12 VW Beetle 2.0 Turbo: Sunroof & Nav, $15,990

'07 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SL: 3.5L V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Mi, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $8,490 #27141A

'09 VW Raton SE: 62K, Local Trade, $13,990

'14 Nissan Murano AWD S, White Pearl, 39k Miles, Wont Be Here Long! $18,999 #H161712A

'14 Murano SL Leather, AWD, Bluetooth, Alloy Wheels, 69xxx Miles, Stk #M340XP $20,790 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Nissan Sentra $12,995 #KE38070 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Nissan Versa $11,795 #KE77276 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Nissan Versa 1.8 S Only 50xxx Miles, Silver, 32 MPG Hwy, stk #X17019A $8,359 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

Pontiac

4280

'08 Saturn Vue XE: FWD, Keyless Entry, New Tires, 26 MPH, $6,995 #UH4865EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Scion

4283

'13 S cion FR-S : 17" Alloy Whe e ls , P re mium P ione e r Audio, Bluetooth, Only 21K Miles , $17,999 #SC1270

Subaru

'12 Volkswagen Jetta Sedan, 2.5L SE, 31 MPG, Traction Control, #X161009A, $10,688 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 VW Passat $14,695 #KE34825 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 VW Passat Wolfsburg $14,695 #KE13968 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Volvo

4315

'11 Volvo XC60 T6: White, AWD, Roof, 68K Miles, $22,990 #B8096

4250

'05 Pontiac Bonneville SE, 105K, Keyless Entry, #UH5323EP, $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Saturn

45 PreOwned Volkswagens In Stock Starting At

4290

'13 XV Crosstrek P re mium AWD Cros s ove r, P e a rl White, Only 24xxx Miles , #SC1327 $21,999

'13 Subaru WRX White, Local Trade, Call!

Chevrolet Trucks

4330

'04 Chevy Silverado1500 4X4, ABS, Priced Below Avg, #UH5332EP, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '15 Chevy 1500 LT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V6, 15K Miles, GMCertified, $29,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Chevy 1500 LT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V8, 25K Miles, GM Certified, $32,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy 1500 LT: Double Cab, 4x4, V6, 11K Miles, GM Certified, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Colorado LT Crew Cab, 4WD, GM Certified Warranty, #C161610C, $18,699 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '10 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT: 4WD, Crew Cab, 5.3L V8, #C161817A, $22,401 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '12 Chevy Silverado LT Crew Cab, 4WD, 5.3LV8, 47xxx Mi., #C10724Q, $27,415 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335 '13 Subaru Impreza Hatchback, Alloy Wheels, Heated Seats, One Owner, Certified, '15 Ddg 2500 Laramie 29K Mi., #MS350BMP, #P8596 $48,117 $18,693 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Subaru Impreza One Owner, Certified, Premium, Heated of South County Seats, 21K, #M415BMP, 1-855-903-8696 $20,565 LOU FUSZ SUBARU '16 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT: (888) 681-8298 Quad Cab, 4x4, Big Horn, '16 Subaru Legacy HEMI, $30,995 Ltd Nav, Certified, Don Brown Chevrolet Leather, Roof, 10K, 1-866-883-8841 #MS383L, $27,989 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '07 Ram 2500 Big Horn, Stk #45331A $22,372 '16 Subaru Legacy Low Miles, Leather, Heated Seats, Certified, #MS334P, $28,816 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 Toyota

4300

'13 Prius C Hatchback, Magnetic Gray, Only 28xxx Miles, High Quality, High MPG! $14,299

'13 Toyota Venza LE $17,995 #KTE75818 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Toyota Prius II: Hybrid, FWD, Hatchback, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Call Today, $10,990 #26599B

of South County 1-855-903-8696 '10 Ram 1500 Stk #P8474A $20,426

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'15 Ram 2500 Laramie Stk #P8595, $46,149

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'12 Toyota Avalon Limited: Has It All!, Certified, $18,990

Ford Trucks

4340

'06 Ranger V6 3.0L, Black, 131K Miles, Stk #UH5108EP $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

'14 Nissan Juke 900 Mi. Like New!! #C16244RA, $20,490

'14 Nissan Murano AWD, Roof, Local Trade, $26,990

'14 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring, One Owner, AWD, Leather, 34K, M373P, $24,199 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Subaru Outback LTD, Heated Seats, Power Liftgate, AWD, Certified, 16K, #MS17197A, $28,255 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Sport Utilitiy

4390

'14 Escalade White Diamond, AWD, Chromes, 36xxx Miles, Stk #C8211 $49,980

'14 Escalade AWD, White, DVD, Certified, $49,980

'16 Hyundai Tucson SE: AWD, 4 Cyl, 17K Miles, One Owner, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Buick Encore: 1.4L Turbo, 20K Miles, One Owner, GM Certified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Equinox LT Carfax, 1 Owner, 32 MPG, #UH5094EP, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '10 Chevy Equinox LTZ: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Mi, Leather Heated Front Seats, Surnoof, $15,990 #77496A

'12 Chevy Equinox LS: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Remote Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $10,990 77269A

'11 Chevy Equinox 1LT: Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, Remote Start, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $14,490 #95259B

'12 Chevy Equinox 2LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $14,990 #26062M

'13 Kia Sorento LX Heated Seats, 28K Mi., Backup Camera, #X2725P, $17,240 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 2002 GMC Envoy SLE 4WD, As Low As $59/Mo, #160614F $3,850 Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236 '07 Lincoln Navigator $14,996 #KT79980A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Mazda Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, One Owner Clean CARFAX, heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $10,490 #10458A

'13 Ford Edge Sport Black¤ V6, Navi, 2 Sunroofs, 12 Speaker Premium Audio, Only 34k Miles $25,499 #H161943A

'13 Ford Escape Titanium $19,995 #T3780X 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '08 Ford Escape XLT: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Roof Rack, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $8,990 #27164A

'13 Ford Escape SEL: FWD, Turbocharged, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Leather Trimmed Seats, $13,990 #26668B

'10 Ford Escape XLT: 4x4, 4 Cyl, Clean CARFAX, AWD, Low Miles, Roof Rack, Premium Sound Syst, $10,990 #10268B

'16 Expedition EL, 4WD, Leather, Roof, $40,990 '14 Ford Explorer XLT $24,995 #TE17991 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Ford Explorer Ltd $34,795 #TE45305 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Roof, Quad Seats, $32,989 #B8066 '11 GMC Acadia SLE Rear DVD, Only121k Miles $12,499 #DL1247

'15 Rogue AWD S L Navi + Roof, Ca me ra , Loa de d, Ca ye nne Re d Me ta llic, Only 15xxx Mile s ,

'14 Rogue S L Navi, He a te d Le a the r, Bose 9 S pe a ke r Audio! #H161896A Now $21,299

'15 Nissan Rogue S: 2.5L, 24K Miles, One Owner, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'04 Nissan Xterra XE, Auto, Power Pkg, Very Clean, $6,490 '10 Saturn OUTLOOK XE: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, 3rd Row Seating, Bluetooth, Call Today, $11,990 #77225A

'15 Subaru Forester Premium, Roof, Heated Seats, Auto, Rev Camera, 7K, #MS161243A, $26,785 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '06 Toyota Highlander: Limited, Hybrid, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $8,990 #27123A

'08 Toyota Highlander: 3.5L V6, AWD, Backup Camera, 3rd Row Seat, Premium Sound System, Call Today, $12,990 #10983A

'13 Toyota Highla nde r S E: V6, Htd Le a the r, Moonroof, S ilve r Me tallic, Bluetooth, BU Ca me ra , Clea n Carfx, $25,499 #SC1202

'16 GMC Terrain $26,995 #TE69971 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 GMC Terrain SLE-1: FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Back Up Camera, Won't Last, Call Today, $12,990 #95297C

'15 Toyota RAV4 $22,695 #KTE89534 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Rav4 Limited AWD Auto, Roof, Nav, Stk #C8109A $24,990

'11 GMC Terrain SLT-2: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heatd Front Seats, Snroof, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, Remote Start, $14,990 #10815A

'12 RAV4 Limited Stk #P8629 $23,417

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'15 GMC Terrain SL2: AWD, V6, Sunroof, 17K Miles, GM Certified, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 GMC Yukon XL SLT, 4WD, #C161161A, $26,995 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '11 Honda CR-V EX-L: AWD, Navigation/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, Bluetooth, Won't Last, $15,990 #10710A

'11 Honda CR-V AWD, 54K Mi., Clean top to Bottom, #B8166, $17,990

'14 CR-V EX Moonroof, Backup Camera, Electronic Stability, 30 MPG, Stk #X17104A $20,988 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '11 CRV AWD EX Crystal Black, 47xxx Miles, Moonroof, Alloys, Honda Quality #H161420A $17,999

'03 Toyota Sequoia SR5: Limited, 4WD, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $6,990 #8862B

Mini vans

'16 Chevy Equinox LT Backup Camera, Bluetooth, 5K, 32 MPG, #X17050A, $21,999 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '11 Chevy Equinox LT Sat Radio, 1 Owner, Bluetooth, 32 MPG, #X17073A, $11,699 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Chevy Equinox LT 2.4L 20xxx Miles, GM Certified Warranty, #C10770P, $16,994 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Equinox LTZ: AWD, V6, Nav, 12K Miles, GM Certified, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox LT: 4 Cyl, 15K Miles, GMCertified, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Equinox LT FWD, 31xxx Mi., GM Certified Warranty, #C10764P, $16,999 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Suburban LT: 4x4, Sunroof, Heated Leather, Dual DVD, GM Certified, $47,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

4420

'07 Chrysler T & C LWB Touring: 3rd Row Seating, Backup Camera, #UH5267EP, $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '16 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, Rear DVD, Leather, 5 TO CHOOSE! $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT: Stow 'N Go, 32K Miles, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '09 Grand Caravan SE 3rd Row Seating Back up Camera $8,995 #UH5319EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '05 Odyssey One Owner, Clean CarFax $4,950 #160279F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

Vans

'13 Chevy Equinox AWD, Leather, Roof, 28K, $22,990

4390 Firewood/Fuel

'13 Kia Sorento EX Nav, AWD, Pano Roof, V6, $23,990

Leather, #B8163, $18,990

'16 VW Jetta: 6K, White, Auto, $16,490 of South County 1-855-903-8696

FRIDAY

'12 Chevy Traverse LT: V6, 3rd Row, Local Trade, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet '12 Mazda CX-9 1-866-883-8841 Grand Touring: '09 Ford Escape XLT FWD, Keyless Entry, AWD, $26,490 #UH4883EP, $6,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '10 Dodge Nitro SXT: '1 4 Mitsubishi Outlander 3.7L V6, Auto, 4x4, S port ES, 23K Mi., FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low T ra c t i o n C o n t ro l , Miles, Keyless Entry, Pre#X2730P, $14,830 mium Sound, LOU FUSZ SUBARU $11,490 #77410A (888) 347-0701 '13 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE: CD Player, Alloys, '13 Infiniti EX-37 Auto, 13K Mi., #M420XP, $18,989 Journey: LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 Loaded, #B8167, '06 Nissan Murano $28,490 AWD Priced Below Average, $7,995 #UH5325EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '10 Journey SXT NHTSA 5-Star Rating, '15 Nissan Murano Sat Radio, Red, Stk Platinum, lthr., backup #X17016A $12,412 camera, 28 mpg, LOU FUSZ SUBARU stk# X17166A $24,319 (888) 347-0701 LOU FUSZ SUBARU '10 Dodge Journey SXT (888) 347-0701 62K Mi., Red Crystal '15 Nissan Pathfinder Pearl, #X17016A, $27,995 #KTE34632 $11,291 1-866-311-8350 LOU FUSZ SUBARU For details go to (888) 347-0701 www.cerame.com '11 Ford Edge Sport '13 Nissan Pathfinder $21,995 #TGB15739A SV, 3rd row seating, 1-866-311-8350 backup camera, For details go to parking sensors, www.cerame.com stk# X17140A $18,325 '07 Ford Edge SEL: LOU FUSZ SUBARU 3.5L V6, FWD, (888) 347-0701 Clean CARFAX, Low '13 Nissan Rogue Miles, Heated Front Seats, Call ASAP! SL, AWD, Roof, Nav, $11,990 #95179B

'12 Tundra Stk #43499B $32,220

'16 VW Jetta SE: Auto, 5K, $20,490

'13 VW Beetle: Convertible 2.07, Auto, $20,490

'15 Nissan Altima 2.5S: 30K Miles, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'15 Ford F-250 Lariat $41,995 #T3786E 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '95 Ranger Only 174xxx Miles, Clean CarFax $1,550 #160375F Continental Sales, Inc. 314-699-4236

4310

'09 VW EOS Luxury, Auto, Black, $13,490

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,990 #94062M

'12 Optima EX Stk #P8548, $14,995

of South County 1-855-903-8696

4215 Volkswagen

'10 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS: Auto, Roof, Alloys, Spoiler, 94K, #M161095B, $11,362 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Mitsubishi Mirage FWD, Traction Control, #U5188P, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Nissan/Datsun

'07 Toyota Corolla LE Manual, CD Player, Power Windows,117K, #MS17230A, $7,637 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Toyota Corolla LE: 4 Door, 39K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

of South County 1-855-903-8696

GMC Trucks

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

4340 Sport Utilitiy

'05 Toyota Camry LE ' 0 4 F o r d 7 50 X L T , 1 6 ' FWD, Priced Below Alum. Flat Bed, 3126 Cat, 115K mi ., New Tires & Avg., #UH4996EP, C l u t c h , A l u m . W h l s ., $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot $28,500. Call (636)3951604 West (636) 200-2129 '13 Toyota Camry LE, '14 Ford F150 Platinum Black, Only 33k Miles, $36,995 #GA54038A $14,699 #SC1372 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford F-150 STX: Extended Cab, 4x4, V6, 12K Miles, $28,995 '13 Camry Don Brown Chevrolet Stk #P8587 $18,938 1-866-883-8841

'11 Honda Civic Si: Certified, Local Trade, $14,890 '13 Sonata GLS Leather, Heated Seats, 24K Miles, 35 MPG, Stk #X2712BMP $15,188 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '11 Hyundai Sonata Leather Seats, Keyless Entry, 35 MPG, #X17064A, $12,055 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '14 Sonata GLS Pearl White, 30xxx Miles, Has Bluetooth + Alloys #SC1301 $13,799

●●●

4430

'08 Hyundai Santa Fe '16 2500 Express Van LT: GLS: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Balance of Fac- 12 Passenger, 24K Miles, tory Warranty, $25,995 Call Today, Don Brown Chevrolet $10,490 #10555A 1-866-883-8841 '16 Ford T250 Cargo Van $25,995 #TE32065 1-866-311-8350 '15 Hyundai Sonata For details go to www.cerame.com White w/Tan, Auto, '15 Chevy City Express 10K Mi., #B8010, LS: $23,990 400 Mi., Cargo Van, #C10747Q, $17,801 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland, Nav, Auto, 4X4, 41K, #M478JCP, $32,364 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'13 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, Auto, Hard Top, #B7990, $33,990 '11 Kia Sorento Priced Below Avg, Keyless Entry, #UH5172EP, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '15 Kia Sorrento $28,695 #KE56079 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Travel Trailers/ Campers

4455

'07 Sunlight Cab Over, 10' 5'' Long Bed, Fully Loade d , U s e d V e r y Lit t le, $13,500; Call (636)3951604

Find your perfect pet in Classified. 314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

OCTOBER 7, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

6095 Legal Notices

Seasoned Oak and Hickory Delivered & Stacked. 23yrs of Service. 573-513-6510

9000 Bids/Proposals

CITY OF ST. LOUIS

Public Hearing Notice and Draft 2017 Annual Action 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds Plan Available for Review and Comment

Legal Notices

9000

CITY OF ST. CHARLES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City of St .Charles, Missouri will conduct a public hearing before the Planning and Zoning Commission on Monday, October 24, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. and before the City Council on Tuesday, November 1, 2016, at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth floor of City Hall, 200 North Second Street in the City of St. Charles, Missouri for the purpose of giving interested parties and citizens an opportunity to be heard on the following matters: 1.Case No. Z-2016-12. (THD Design Group) An application to rezone upon annexation a 9.62 acre tract of land known as 500 Blanche Drive, from St. Charles County R1E Single-Family Residential District to City of St. Charles R-1D SingleFamily Residential District. The property will be located in Ward 3 upon annexation. 2.Case No. Z-2016-13. (St. Charles Properties) An application to rezone a tract of land known as 625 North Main Center, from I-2 Heavy Industrial District within the FPD Frenchtown Preservation District to I-1 Light Industrial District within the F P D Fr enc ht own Preservation District. The subject property is 7.42 acres in size and is located in Ward 1. 3.Case No. Z-2016-14. (St. Charles Properties) An application to rezone a tract of land known as 625 North Main Center, from I-1 Light Industrial District within the FPD F r e n c h t o w n Preservation District to PD-MU Planned Development Mixed Use Dist r ict wit hin t he F P D Frenchtown Preservation Dist rict. The subject property is 7.42 acres in size and is located in Ward 1. 4.Case No. CU-2016-31 (Spire Wireless) An application for a Conditional Use Permit from §400.220(C)(1)(a) for a telecommunication antenna on the roof of an existing building within the C-2 General Business District located at 1551 Wall Street. The subject property is 3.92 acres and is located in Ward 4. 5.Case No. CU-2016-32 (Cliff Heitmann - Bax Engineering) An application for a Conditional Use Permit from §400.220(C)(1)(a) for In-Vehicle Sales and Service associated with a new bank and drivethru ATM on property immediately south of 1731 Z u m b e h l Roa d within the C-2 General Business District. The proposed subject property is 2.00 acres and is located in Ward 4. 6.Case No. TA-2016-5. (City of St. Charles). An application to amend Chapter 400 of the Code of Ordinances by amending §400.1670 Prohibited Signs relat ive t o Perimeter Window Lighting. The applications, maps and plans for the above items, as received from t he applicants, ar e available in the offices of the Department of C o m m u n i t y Development, 200 North Second Street, Suite 303, St. Charles, Missouri during regular business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. If you have any questions r e g a r d i n g t h e above items scheduled for the public hearing, please contact the Department of Community Development at (636) 949-3222. The City of St. Charles offers all interested citizens the opportunity to attend public meetings and comment on public matters. If you wish to attend this public meeting and require an accommodation due to a disability, please contact the Office of the City Clerk to coordinate an accommodation at least two (2) business days in advance of the scheduled meeting at 636949-3282 or 636-9493 2 8 9 ( T T Y - f o r t he hearing impaired). The City of St. Charles, Missouri fully complies with Tit le VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and related statutes and regulations in all programs and activities. For more information or to obtain a Title VI Complaint For m, please call the City Clerk's Office at 636-949-3282 or visit City Hall located at 200 North Second Street, St. Charles, Missouri, 63301.

The City of St. Louis is soliciting comments on its draft 2017 Annual Action Plan, which includes annual priorities for the Community Development Block Gr ant ( C D B G ) , HOME Investment Partnership (HOME), E m e r g e n c y S o l u t i o ns Grant (ESG), and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) programs. Public Hearing Notice / Public Comment Period The Communit y D e v e l o p m e n t Administration (CDA) will conduct a public hearing on October 27, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. at 1520 Market - Suite 2000, St. Louis, MO 63103. The purpose of this hearing is to solicit public comments and answer questions pertaining to the draft 2017 Annual Action Plan. Documents Available for Review The 2017 Annual Action Plan will be available in draft form for review by any interested citizen beginning at 12:00 p.m. CST on October 13, 2016. The plan will be available at the Central Branch of the St . Louis Public Library, located at 1301 Olive Street and on the City of St. Louis website, h t t p : / / w w w. st louismo.gov/cda/. The plan will also be available for review at CDA's office, 1520 Market Street, Suite 2000. Written comments will be accepted until 12:00 p.m. CST on November 13, 2016. Written Comments The views of citizens, public agencies and other interested parties are encouraged and comments or questions with respect to the draft 2017 Annual Action Plan should be addr essed t o Ms. Alana Green, Acting Executive D i r e c t o r , C o m m u n i ty Development Administration, 1520 Market Street, Suite 2000, St. Louis, MO 63103, or via email at GreenA@ stlouis-mo.gov. Other Information Persons with special needs or accommodations relating to handicapped accessibility or foreign language should contact Ms. Green via email at GreenA@ stlouis-mo.gov or by phone at (314)6573835 or (314) 589-6000 (TDD). Interpreting services are available upon request for persons with hearing disabilities. Interested persons should contact the Office on the Disabled at (314)6223686 (voice) or (314)6223693 (TTY). C D A is an equal opportunity agency (employer). Minority participation is encouraged.

D5 9005

CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE R E Q U E S T F O R QUA L I F I CA TI ONS for PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, AND LAND SURVEYING SERVICES FOR RECREATIONAL FIELD, STREET, AND TRAIL IMPROVEMENTS AVIATION FIELD PHASE II & STABLE ROAD, CONCOURSE & CARR LANE (ROADWAY & CROSS PARK TRAIL CONNECTION), FOREST PARK, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 P.M., CT, OCTOBER 26, 2 0 1 6 at Board of Public S ervice, 1 2 0 0 Market, Room 3 0 1 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from website www.stl-bps.org, under On Line Plan Room - Plan Room, or call Board of Public Service at 3 1 4 -6 2 2 -3 5 3 5 . 2 5 % MBE and 5% WBE participation goals.

Request for Qualifications Organizational Alignment Study Great Rivers Greenway requests services of qualified professionals/firms to develop an organizational alignment study. Full RFQ is available at www.greatriversgreenway.org/jobs. Questions or information relat ed to this request should be directed to: Michael Sorth at msorth@ grgstl.org. Submissions are due electronically or to Great Rivers Greenway, 6178 Delmar, St. Louis, MO 63112 by 4:00 pm CST, on Monday, October 17, 2016. GRG reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. EOE

Sealed bids for a Post Bid Addendum on the St. Louis County Library Master Plan Phase 2A project are being received by Brinkmann Constructors on Oct 7, at 10 AM All sealed bids to be hand delivered to Daniel Boone Branch 300 Clarkson Rd Ellisville, MO Atn Steve Hunter, St Louis County Library on Sept 12 at 10 AM Plans may be viewed or downloaded at https://secure.smart bidnet.com/External/ PublicPlanRoom.aspx?Id= 251617&i=1 Contact Brinkmann Constructors for further details on the project or obtaining plans at 636-537-9700 *All bidders must be in compliance with the Fair Employment Practices Commission *This project is a Missouri Public Works Project

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE M a p l e w o o d City Council will hold a public hearing on 10/25/16 at 7:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers, 7601 Manchester Rd., Maplewood, MO 63143, to hear citizen's comments on a request b y C h r is t Church t o operate a commissary to prepare food for food trucks at 2200 Bellevue Ave. St. Charles City-County Library District Kathryn Linnemann Branch - HVAC Project The S t . C harle s Cit yCount y Library District seeks bid for HVAC replace me nt at Kathryn L i n n e m a n n Branch Library. Bids are due by 1 0 :0 0 a.m. Wednesday, October 19 . For information, please contact Rachel Satterfield, Purchasing and Building Project Manager at rsatterfield @stchlibrary.org

*St. Louis County Library & Brinkmann Constructors are Equal Opportunity Employers

The City of Hazelwood, Missour i is r equest ing traffic engineering services for the 2016 Phantom Drive Project. The solicitation form can be found on the City's webs i t e at w w w . hazelwoodmo.org. Letters of interest must be submitted by 10:00 a.m., October 27, 2016.

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Personals

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St Jude Novina May the S acred Heart of Jesus be Adored, Glorified, Loved & Preserved throughout the world, now & forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, please pray for me. Saint Jude, Worker of Miracles, please pray for me. Saint Jude, Helper of the Hopeless, please pray for me. S ay this prayer 9 times a day for 9 days and publish, your prayers will be answered. Amen, TAA

Bids/Proposals

9005

BID 4207 FLOORING REPLACEMENT1ST FLOOR, POLICE DEPARTMENT The City of St. Charles, Missouri is seeking bids from qualified vendors to provide and install selected areas of existing flooring and wall base, of the St . Charles Police Department Center. Bid documents can be downl o a d e d a t stcharlescitymo.gov/ bids.aspx. Bids are to be returned to Purchasing prior to 2:00 p.m. October 21, 2016. All bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at 2:30 p.m. in Conference Room A on the 4th floor of City Hall. For additional information, cont act Purchasing at 636-940-4668. The City reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Annual Wage Order No. 23 as of S e p t e m b e r 2 6 , 2 0 1 6, shall be used for the project. The City reserves the right to reject any or all bids. The City of St. Charles is an EOE; and fully complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and related statutes and regulations in all programs and activities. For more information, or to obtain a Title VI Complaint Form, call the City Clerk's Office at 636949-3282.

Bid 4211 ROCK & STONE SUPPLIER FOR STREET DIVISION The City of St. Charles, Missouri is seeking sealed bids from qualified companies to provide rock, gravel, and sand for the City's Street Division. Bid documents can be downl o a d e d a t stcharlescitymo.gov/bids.a spx. Bids are to be returned to Purchasing prior to 2:00 p.m., Friday, October 21, 2014. All bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at 3:00 p.m. in Conference Room A on the 4th floor of City Hall. For additional information, contact Purchasing at 636-940-4668. The Cit y reserves the right to reject any or all bids. The City is an equal opportunity employer. The City fully complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and related statutes and regulations in all programs and activities. For more information, or to obtain a Title VI Complaint Form, call the City Clerk's Office at 636-949-3282 or visit City Hall at 200 North 2nd Street, St. Charles, MO 63301.


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OCTOBER 7, 2016 FRIDAY

STLTODAY.COM ●

10.07.2016

CLICK & CLACK

Whack-a-fan ix won’t last very long Dear Car Talk: ”I have a 2007 Toyota 4Runner. Two or three years ago, the blower went out. I called my service advisor at the Toyota place and asked what I should check before I brought it in. He said, ‘’Reach under the dash on the passenger side and give the blower motor cover a hard whack.’’ I did, and it started right up. This happened a couple more times, so I took to carrying a persimmon shillelagh in the car to whack the thing with whenever it failed to work. It worked like a charm every time. Eventually, the problem disappeared. No problem for two or three years — until today, when I got back into the vehicle at the grocery store. It was 104 outside, and the AC wouldn’t blow. So I whack the sucker with my hand and, bingo, it comes on! So what gives? Do I continue whacking it until it no longer responds? Or do I go ahead and get a new blower motor now? I still have the persimmon shillelagh.” — Dale Well, you can keep whacking it if you want to. The reason that works is when an electric motor fails, it’s often because there’s a bad connection, or the brushes are worn out and Ray Magliozzi not making good contact. And giving it a physical jolt often can get it moving again and then momentum takes over. But eventually, whacking it will stop working. And you know as well as I do it’ll be 114 degrees out the day that happens.So, my advice would be to just go ahead and replace it. You know it’s going to fail permanently at some point — why not replace it now and never have to worry about it again? Or, if you’re really curious about how long you can go on like this, at least buy the motor and keep it in the car, along with a set of socket wrenches. You probably can get a new blower motor for less than 100 bucks. And then, when that day comes and the shillelagh doesn’t work, you’ll be ready. The blower is just held in place by three screws. You’ll have to pull it out, unplug it and swap out the fan itself, which is attached to the shaft of the blower motor. Then you replace the screws, plug it back in and you’re good to go. Of course, you’ll be doing this under the dashboard, with your head upside down in 114-degree weather, Dale. and Clack’s guide ‘’How to Buy a Great Used Car: Secrets Talk website at www.cartalk.com. So, like I said, I’d just do it now. Only Your Mechanic Knows.’’ Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Car Talk/Used Car, 628 Virginia Drive, © 2016 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman Why do unmitigated cheapskates like Ray continue to Orlando, FL 32803. buy nothing but old clunkers? Find out by ordering Click Got a question about cars? Email by visiting the Car Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

KALBI TACO SHACK IS FLAVORFUL, LOW-STAKES FUSION FUN

SLSO GETS SET FOR ITS BIG TRIBUTE TO PRINCE

10.07.16–10.13.16 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

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L L I ST L L O R A ON

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10.07.16–10.13.16

20 All aboard Emily Blunt is a woman who can’t get her life back on track in “The Girl on the Train.” BY JANE HENDERSON 22 To tell the truth The fact-based “Denial” is a well-crafted and skillfully acted drama about the Holocaust. BY CALVIN WILSON TUESDAY, DEC. 27

23 Extra scrutiny “The Birth of a Nation” lacks originality but ofers the opportunity to continue a necessary discussion about racism.

FRIDAY, OCT. 14

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FUEL

SATURDAY, NOV. 12

SUNDAY, DEC. 4

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit

28 Shack attack Kalbi Taco Shack’s KoreanMexican fusion is flavorful, low-stakes fun. BY IAN FROEB

DECEMBER 8 - 11

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STAYING IN

Blues Home Opener

31 New voice In “Insecure,” on HBO following “Divorce,” Issa Rae plays a mom struggling with career and relationships.

Thursday, Oct. 13 at 7pm

BY GAIL PENNINGTON

Plaza Party begins at 4:30PM! presented by Dobbs Tire & Auto Centers (all fans)

COVER STORY

stlouisblues.com/tickets

PEABODY OPERA HOUSE

15 Still rolling Maplewood’s upstairs bowling alley, Saratoga Lanes, celebrates 100 years of elevating the sport. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

UPCOMING EVENTS CALENDAR presented by 105.7 THE POINT HO HO SHOW: THE 1975

105.7 THE POINT HO HO SHOW: BASTILLE

TUESDAY, NOV. 29 ON SALE TODAY AT 11 AM!

FRIDAY, DEC. 16 ON SALE TODAY AT NOON!

24•7 4 Best Bets Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Vanilla Ice at Chaifetz Arena, “Macbeth” at St. Louis Shakespeare, Saint Motel at Delmar Hall and “Until the Flood” at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks.

MUSIC+CLUBS THURSDAY, MAY. 18

FRIDAY, OCT. 21

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12

ON SALE TODAY AT 10 AM!

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit PeabodyOperaHouse.com

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

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6 Musical activism Steve Earle, Emmylou Harris and others put on a show to benefit Jesuit Refugee Service. BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ

7 Greatest hits Windborne’s “Music of Prince” makes its world premiere Sunday night with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

8 Flipping classics The People’s Key celebrates a new album with two nights of shows at Ferring Jazz Bistro. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON 11 Message of hope Cedric Shannon Rives & the Brothers aim to “celebrate the black man” with new music. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

ON THE COVER ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

TEAM CALENDAR GIVEAWAY Presented by

TAKE A TENSE RIDE WITH ‘THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN’

KALBI TACO SHACK IS FLAVORFUL, LOW-STAKES FUSION FUN

SLSO GETS SET FOR ITS BIG TRIBUTE TO PRINCE

10.07.16–10.13.16 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

VS.

Bowler Dawn Carr glances back at the pins at Saratoga Lanes

STILLL ROL A N O

Y, LING ALLE AIRS BOW 100 YEARS OD’S UPST BRATES THE SPORT MAPLEWO LANES, CELE Hahn ATING OF ELEV By Valerie Schremp SARATOGA

Danielle Maschmeier, known in the league for her unique step, releases the ball Sept. 26 at Saratoga Lanes in Maplewood. PHOTO BY LAURIE SKRIVAN, POST-DISPATCH

SEE+DO 12 Stylish connection St. Louis Ballet pairs choreographers and fashion designers for “Vision: Where Ballet + Fashion Meet.” BY CALVIN WILSON

COPYRIGHT 2016 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

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Here’s what we’re looking forward to in the coming week

“Catching up on my stories! I’ve fallen behind on so many Netflix and Amazon series.” “I may be too chicken for this, but I really want to check out the ghost tours at the Fox Theatre.”

“Dragging out the Halloween decorations to start celebrating the best time of the year.”

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com Hillary Levin • photo editor, 314-340-8118, hlevin@post-dispatch.com Elaine Vydra • digital marketing manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com Emily Tintera • event & sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischof • Post-Dispatch vice president of advertising, 314-340-8529, dbischof@post-dispatch.com CONTRIBUTORS

“Reading Emma Donoghue’s ‘The Wonder’ before she’s in town Tuesday.”

Cara DeMichele • designer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Judith Newmark • theater critic Gail Pennington • television critic Calvin Wilson • arts writer

“The Beer Barons Tour Saturday and Sunday at Bellefontaine Cemetery!”

“Seeing how the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra meshes with Prince’s music Sunday night at Powell Hall.”

CONTACT US Get your events listed events.stltoday.com Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise “‘Macbeth’ in the style of a graphic novel? I’m definitely curious!”

Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101 stltoday.com/apps

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“Nic McGegan is always great fun, and this weekend he’s conducting two programs with two diferent groups.”

@gostl

OVERHEARD ONLINE On the new Delmar Hall in the Loop GREG TURNER, VIA FACEBOOK: “Seems like once capacity is over 500 or so, St. Louis is only capable of supporting one venue per size. The Pageant’s got the 2,000+ market cornered, the Peabody’s got the 3,000+ market and the Fox has the 4,000+ one. I’m hoping the opening of the Delmar Hall doesn’t lead to the closing of the Ready Room. Anyone remember Plush? The American?” ➙ J.P. KRETSCHMER, VIA FACEBOOK: “Was not a fan of the Rock House layout — a long, narrow bar where you spent much time watching it on the TV. This is the place that will poach the bands that would have played there.”

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BETS FRIDAY ‘Macbeth’ WHEN Friday through Oct. 16; performances at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Ivory Theatre, 7620 Michigan Avenue • HOW MUCH $15$20 • MORE INFO 314-3615664; stlshakespeare.org

Louis ✔ St. Shakespeare stages the Scottish play with a fresh twist: It’s in the style of modern graphic novels. Ben Ritchie and Michelle Hand star as the noble couple who destroy themselves in their quest for greatness; Suki Peters directs. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

‘Suspended’ WHEN Friday-Sunday, and Oct. 13-16 and Oct. 20-23; performances at 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, 7 p.m. Sundays • WHERE Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $20$30 • MORE INFO 314-6696382; upstreamtheater.org

Two window-washers, both refugees from war, have agreed not

These events are Editor’s Picks

Charlaine Harris WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO slcl.org

took ✔ HBO Charlaine Harris’ Sookie Stackhouse series and turned it into “True Blood.” Meanwhile, NBC is transforming three of her other books into another supernatural series, “Midnight, Texas.” Now the author returns to an earlier series, one she calls more traditional mystery. In “All the Little Liars,” four students disappear, and librarian Aurora Teagarden, along with her new husband, must investigate. Harris will sign copies of “Liars” and up to three older books per person. BY JANE HENDERSON

Vanilla Ice

FRIDAY ‘I Love the ’90s’ tour WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Chaifetz Arena, 1 South Compton Avenue • HOW MUCH $29-$79 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

Who doesn’t love the 1990s? We sure do. Headlining the “I Love the ’90s” tour are Vanilla Ice, apparently taking some quick time of from “Dancing With the Stars,” and rap act Salt-N-Pepa with Spinderella. Also featuring Kid ’n Play, All-4-One, Coolio and Young MC. BY KEVIN C.

JOHNSON

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: All-Mozart WHEN 10:30 a.m. Friday, 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$111 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; stlsymphony.org

weekend’s ✔ This concerts by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra contain music by just one composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The three works on the program are charming but haven’t been performed

Louis ofers enjoyable, intimate concerts, and the Sheldon is the perfect place in which to hear this music. BY

screech owl and several large pixie frogs. Jonathan Oi and his dogs will also perform three stunt shows. BY

SARAH BRYAN MILLER

VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

SATURDAY

Harvest Festival at Broemmelsiek Park

WHEN 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Endangered Wolf Center, 6750 Tyson Valley Road, Eureka • HOW MUCH $25 per carload • MORE INFO 636-938-5900; endangeredwolfcenter.org

WHEN 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Broemmelsiek Park, 1795 Highway DD, Defiance • HOW MUCH Free, $2 per person for hayride through the park, children under 5 free • MORE INFO 636949-7535; stccparks.org

Perk up your ears, throw back your head and look for the moon: Wolf Fest is one of the few days of the year where visitors can tour the Endangered Wolf Center without making reservations. Exotic animal trainer David Jackson will lead three shows featuring an American alligator, a raven, a coyote, a

This harvest festival has a historic twist: You can hand-dip a candle, watch wool spinners and blacksmiths, and see how members of the Illinois-Missouri Tractor and Engine Club turn grain into bird seed. Play games like pumpkin bowling, and listen to the 4th Street Band

Wolf Fest 2016 by the SLSO in years. The conductor is the ever-engaging Nicholas McGegan; the soloist in the Violin Concerto No. 1 is Jennifer Koh. And this is your chance to hear the orchestra’s splendid principal trumpet, Karin Bliznik, solo on the posthorn in the Serenade No. 9. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘If it ain’t Baroque, don’t fix it’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $19

• MORE INFO 314-941-6309; chambermusicstl.org

On Friday evening, conductor Nicholas McGegan moves back in time to music of the Baroque and across Grand Boulevard to the Sheldon Concert Hall, for an evening of chamber music. The performers include a selection of musicians from the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and the noted harpsichordist Charles Metz. The Chamber Music Society of St.

from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pumpkins, jams and other items will be available for purchase. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Trojan Park opening in Wellston WHEN 10 a.m.-noon Saturday • WHERE North Skinker Parkway and Etzel Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO greatriversgreenway. org/trojanpark

The people who brought this one-acre park together on a formerly vacant lot hope it also brings people together. The fitness equipment and three playgrounds are designed for diferent ages, and the park sits within the larger St. Vincent Greenway, a seven-mile corridor that will stretch from the North Hanley MetroLink Station to Forest Park. The grand opening

FAST FORWARD Barktoberfest, Oct. 18 at Urban Chestnut Brewing Co.: You don’t have to dress up, but your canine companion could win prizes for his or her Halloween costume • Boo at the Zoo, Oct. 19-30 at the St. Louis Zoo: Little ones and their families can enjoy some low-key Halloween fun after-hours at the zoo • Freakshow, Oct. 29 at Ballpark Village: Put on your spookiest get-up for a carnival-themed Halloween party featuring Creepy Clown DJ, fire breathers, “freak” performers and more • David Koechner, Nov. 3-5 at the Funny Bone: The Tipton, Mo., native — you’ve seen him in “Anchorman,” “The Oice” and more — returns for three nights of comedy

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ events.stltoday.com stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( VA N I L L A I C E ) ; P O S T- D I S PAT C H F I L E P H O T O ( D O G )

BEST

to talk about the past. Through the plate-glass windows they clean, the men see a prosperous world they can’t join. They have to remain outside it, poised over an abyss. “Suspended,” by Israeli writer Maya Arad Yasur, makes its world premiere at Upstream, under the direction of Linda Kennedy. Reginald Pierre and Phillip Dixon star. BY JUDITH NEWMARK


CELEBRATE MADCO’S 40TH ANNIVERSARY!

MONDAY Saint Motel, Jr Jr, Weathers WHEN 8 p.m. Monday • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $24.50-$27 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

Angeles indie-pop band Saint Motel comes to Delmar Hall in ✔ Los advance of its “saintmotelevision” album, which will be released Oct. 21. The irst single from the set is “Move.” The album was recorded this year in Los Angeles with production from Lars Stalfors (Cold War Kids, Matt & Kim), Tim Pagnotta (Walk the Moon) and the band’s own A/J Jackson. If case you miss the band, it opens in April for Panic! At the Disco at Scottrade Center. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

festivities include free eats from food trucks, basketball activities, and music and dance performances. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

SUNDAY Florissant Old Town Fall Festival WHEN 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Rue St. Francois, Florissant • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO lorissantoldtown.com

Florissant is one of the oldest settlements in the state, with its irst civil government forming in 1786. You can enjoy the oldtown feel of the place during its 19th annual Florissant Old Town Fall Festival, held on Rue St. Francois. The event features a craft fair, lea market, car show, chili cook-of, lower show and competition, a Fido Follies dog show and several activities at the St. Ferdinand Shrine. BY VALERIE

P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

SCHREMP HAHN

Mozart’s Great C minor Mass WHEN 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE First Presbyterian Church, 100 East Adams Avenue, Kirkwood • HOW MUCH $25-$45 •

stltoday.com/go

MORE INFO 314-6522224; bachsociety.org

The Bach Society of St. Louis opens its 76th season on Sunday with Mozart’s Great C minor Mass and a selection of shorter works by Bach, Handel, Mozart and Beethoven, in the acoustically friendly conines of First Presbyterian Church. director A. Dennis Sparger leads a quartet of soloists and the Bach Society Chorus and Orchestra. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

MONDAY Rae Sremmurd WHEN 8 p.m. Monday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$32.50 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

Rap duo Rae Sremmurd, Mississippi’s own, makes its Pageant headlining debut with a show Monday night. The act is supporting its “SremmLife” album that features “Look Alive” and “Black Beatles.” Rae Sremmurd is also known for “No Flex Zone,” “No Type” and “Throw Sum Mo.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

TUESDAY Emma Donoghue WHEN 7 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Maryville University auditorium, 650 Maryville University Drive • HOW MUCH Free, but reservations requested • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

The author of “Room,” which became an acclaimed movie, sets her new historical novel in another conined space. In “The Wonder,” a “fasting girl” in 19thcentury Ireland draws visitors to her home to see the “miracle” of a thriving child who doesn’t eat. A nurse comes to watch the girl in this psychological thriller. Donoghue is likely to talk about her historical inspiration for the new novel. BY JANE HENDERSON

WEDNESDAY ‘Until the Flood’ WHEN Previews at 8 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday; opens Oct. 14, through Nov. 6 • WHERE Browning Mainstage, Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $18-$81 • MORE INFO 314-968-4925; repstl.org

the wake of ✔ Inevents in

Ferguson, the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis commissioned writer/actor Dael Orlandersmith to create a theater piece dealing with social unrest here. She plays eight diferent characters in “Until the Flood,” a mosaic that allows many points of view to emerge. This world-premiere production had its irst, early airing in March, at the Rep’s Ignite! Festival of New Plays. Neel Keller directs. BY JUDITH

MADCO: INVITATION TO DANCE FEATURING THE ARIANNA STRING QUARTET

OCTOBER 14 & 15

NEWMARK

THURSDAY Ann Patchett WHEN 7 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Ethical Society, 9001 Clayton Road • HOW MUCH $31 for one or two, includes copy of book • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

SENSORY-FRIENDLY PERFORMANCE SATURDAY OCTOBER 15 2PM

Ann Patchett’s “Commonwealth” has shot up best-seller lists. Although it’s a novel, Patchett has said that it touches elements of her own childhood, which was disrupted by her parents’ divorce and then, later, a new stepfamily. She’ll no doubt talk about the intersection of life and iction in this popular new book. BY JANE HENDERSON

‘The Rocky Horror Show’ WHEN Thursday through Oct. 29 • WHERE Tower Grove Abbey, 2336 Tennessee Avenue • HOW MUCH $20$25 • MORE INFO 314-8651995; straydogtheatre.org

Stray Dog does the time warp again, opening its new season with a Halloween favorite. Richard O’Brien’s raucous musical about innocent sweethearts who stumble into cross-dressing Dr. Frank N. Furter’s eerie mansion isn’t for kids, but it’s been known to bring out the kid in theater-goers. Some of them are bound to show up in costume. BY

JUDITH NEWMARK

OCTOBER 8 AT 8:00PM TICKETS: TOUHILL.ORG 314.516.4949

The professional ballet company of Saint Louis kicks of its season with contemporary pieces by some of NYC’s hottest choreographers, working in tandem with NYC’s up-and-coming fashion designers. One night only!

Lori Wilson, Saint Louis Ballet Photo by Pratt Kreidich

A/J Jackson of Saint Motel

In partnership with Saint Louis Fashion Fund

10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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MOST-SHAZAMED SONGS FOR OCT. 4 1 “Broccoli” (D.R.A.M. feat. Lil Yachty) 2 “Tru” (Lloyd) 3 “Otw” (DJ Luke Nasty) 4 “Luv” (Tory Lanez) 5 “Pick Up the Phone” (Young Thug & Travis Scott feat. Quavo) 6 “Gold” (Kiiara) 7 “Closer” (The Chainsmokers feat. Halsey) 8 “Wat U Mean (Aye, Aye, Aye)” (Dae Dae) 9 “Permission” (Ro James) 10 “Grass Ain’t Greener” (Chris Brown)

about terrorism has muddied the waters concerning the refugee issue in the U.S., but he thinks the country is overreacting. “Bad guys get in anyway,” he says. “The idea that we’re going to make ourselves more secure by limiting the influx of people that are just trying to find a better way of life or trying to escape the bad guys is ridiculous. We need better security, but we need real security.” “In the end,” he adds, “I can’t help but think that we’re going to come out of this and do the right thing.” The tour is named after a small Mediterranean island whose immigrant reception center serves as a primary transit point for refugees from Africa, the Middle East and Asia. The JRS Global Education Initiative is not specifically about the issue of refugees in America, but instead, according to its website, “in 2015 … provided educational services to more than 141,000 people in 38 countries.” The efort has been endorsed by Pope Francis. Earle, meanwhile, is no stranger to political activism. He notes that, at age 14, he railed against the Vietnam War, singing Country Joe and the Fish’s “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-to-Die Rag” from the back of a flatbed truck parked in front of the Alamo. His father, an air traic controller, was called before his supervisor, who saw it on the news. “He knew who I was because I had been to their barbecues,” Earle says with a laugh. These days many artists don’t come

Steve Earle performs at the Americana Music Association Honors & Awards Show.

Voices for refugees Steve Earle, Emmylou Harris and others put on a show to beneit Jesuit Refugee Service BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ / SPECIAL TO GO! MAGAZINE

he plight of refugees — people displaced by natural disasters, political unrest, religious persecution, war or any number of other reasons — has been an issue throughout history. But in this particularly volatile political season, it has caused tempers to flare and rhetoric to rage, accompanied by proposals that range from accepting refugees into the U.S. to caring for them elsewhere to shutting them out entirely. “It’s a big deal for everybody, and it’s gonna continue to be a big deal for all the wrong reasons in this election cycle,” says singer/songwriter Steve Earle by phone as he prepares to drive

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from Montrose, Colo., to a solo show in Telluride. Two days later, Earle will join Emmylou Harris, Patty Griin, Buddy Miller and the Milk Carton Kids in Boulder for the first performance of “Lampedusa: Concerts for Refugees,” a series of shows benefiting Jesuit Refugee Service’s Global Education Initiative. The St. Louis show is Tuesday at the Sheldon Concert Hall. “When people hear the word ‘refugee,’ they translate that to mean ‘immigrant,’ Earle says. “But the thing is, they’re immigrants under duress. They’ve been displaced from where they live. We’re probably seeing more refugees now than there’s ever been in the history of the world.” Earle acknowledges that concern

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

out for causes, he says, because “people are just scared. The music business is shrinking so much, and it’s so much harder to make a living and reach an audience and maintain it. “And not everybody is comfortable talking about stuf like this. Not everybody can write songs about it. I don’t know why I can, but I can. And I still piss people of when I do it. But I don’t care.” One of the most recent examples of that is the folk/spiritual “Tell Moses,” from “Colvin & Earle,” his recent album-length collaboration with singer/songwriter Shawn Colvin. The song features a verse about the unrest in Ferguson. “Ferguson, Missouri, people in the streets/Hands above their head standing up to the police/ “Waiting for a hero to step into the breach/Ain’t nobody coming so it’s up to you and me.” “Look, I don’t often quote Condoleezza Rice,” Earle says, “but she once said that this country sufers from a birth defect, and it’s slavery. It’s in our DNA. It’s one of the reasons we exist. We’ve left this issue of race unsettled. But now enough people have died that people are sick of it. And there’s people in the streets in their own communities standing up about it. “Missouri is, like, literally the heart of the country. It makes perfect sense, if you really understand what this country is, that it happens there. “And you know what? It’s something to be proud of. It’s something I think will eventually turn into something positive. We’re having to at least talk about it. ’Cause we stopped for a long time. We’ve gotta talk about it.” WHAT “Lampedusa: Concerts for Refugees, featuring Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Patty Griin, Buddy Miller and the Milk Carton Kids” • WHEN 8 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE The Sheldon, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $65-$100 • MORE INFO metrotix.com

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P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

SHAZAM ST. LOUIS TOP 10


Jason Tenner as Prince

‘Music of Prince’ promises ‘great renderings’ of the Purple One’s hits BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

ne of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra’s most anticipated shows, Windborne’s “Music of Prince,” continues the symphony’s popular practice of performing tributes to pop icons. The show, making its world premiere Sunday night in St. Louis before traveling to other cities, recasts the late Prince’s biggest hits in a symphonic setting with conductor Brent Havens and singer Jason Tenner. Tenner, in the unenviable position of singing the familiar songs of Prince, isn’t new to the Purple One’s catalog. For nearly 20 years, he has portrayed Prince in his Las Vegas show “Purple Reign.” But this will be his irst time singing Prince with an orchestra. “If any artist’s music can lend itself to that, his can,” Tenner says. The show also includes a band. Tenner promises songs such as “Little Red Corvette,” “Raspberry Beret” and of course

PHOTO: HANDOUT

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“Purple Rain,” among many others. Without giving away the full show, he says the others are hits fans would expect. “These are absolutely beautiful, great renderings,” he says. “It’s going to be absolutely beautiful. The challenge is re-creating that feeling of Prince in that atmosphere.” Tenner won’t be in costume; he instead will perform the songs in a straightforward fashion. That’s also the approach taken with the SLSO’s Michael Jackson tributes. While Tenner is used to going all out when he performs as Prince — he actually prefers it that way — he considers this a refreshing take. “It’s a new thing, and I’m looking forward to doing it,” he says. “I’m really excited about it. I jumped right in and got involved (when it was presented), though I prefer my live band, electric guitar, the dancers and choreography, and getting onstage and being Prince.” His own

show includes bits from tribute artists doing acts associated with Prince, such as Morris Day, Jerome Benton and Vanity 6. Tenner’s Vegas show, which has been expanded since Prince’s death in April, runs four days a week. He’s performing with symphonies on dates that don’t conlict. Though singing the music of Prince has been Tenner’s bread and butter, he is an artist in his own right and says he has a pair of original albums in the can awaiting release. He released a single, “Shake,” in 2015. But being “Jason Tenner the artist,” when folks know you as a top Prince tribute artist, isn’t easy. “When people hear my music, they think, ‘Oh, that sounds like Prince.’ They’re expecting me to want to be Prince. Prince is my acting job.” Tenner says strangers have actually approached him to say things like, “‘How does it feel impersonating Prince, knowing your music will never make it?’ You have a warped perception of what that is,” he says. “I think Prince sounds like so many people. And you’ll hear those inluences in me, especially if you’re looking for them. But in my personal opinion, my tone and message and voice are diferent. That’s my perspective on it.” WHAT Windborne’s “Music

of Prince” with conductor Brent Havens and singer Jason Tenner • WHEN 7 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $45-$85 • MORE INFO stlsymphony.org

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The People’s Key

The People’s Key lip classics inside-out on new project ‘Within You’ DIRECT FROM SHANGHAI, THE P.R. OF CHINA, SHANGHAI ACROBATS OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA

PERFORM

SHANGHAI NIGHTS SATURDAY OCTOBER 15 2 & 8PM Presented by The Touhill and UMSL International Studies and Programs

Welcomed by Dance St. Louis

The People’s Key knows a little something about taking the hits of popular artists and giving them a jazz twist. The St. Louis act did it on its last album, “Heal the World,” taking on the music of Michael Jackson, and before that on “The Shawn Carter Jazz Suite,” a tribute to Jay-Z that was a collaboration with Lamar Harris. The group’s new album is “Within You.” Ryan Marquez, who plays organ, keyboards and more, talked about the band. • What are some of the songs re-created on “Within You”? We have a Jimi Hendrix tribute. We have a Beatles tribute and

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

’90s alternative things on there that we’re lipping into jazz arrangements. We lipped “Black Hole Sun” by Soundgarden, an iconic tune for the alternative grunge scene. We lipped that and made it our own — put a swing twist to it. We’re fans of Nirvana, another iconic band from the scene. We did “In Bloom.” • How would you describe a People’s Key twist on a song? We always try to pick songs we feel an emotional connection to. The songs are a part of our lives, so it’s a little bit nostalgic. Those are the tunes we gravitate toward. As far as developing a sound, the organ is the center of the group’s sound. It starts with the traditional

jazz sound, the iconic Hammond sound of Dr. Lonnie Smith, Jimmy Smith, Joey DeFrancesco, Booker T. & the M.G.’s. We were thinking, “How can we take this sound and make it something that is familiar to the listener but maintain the integrity of our own artistry, inding ways to manipulate time or alter the groove?” • How drastic are the recreations? I would say it’s drastic in the sense that they don’t sound similar. But there’s a certain familiarity in the sound. We wanted to make sure it’s still recognizable, that there are parts of it you can grab onto. • Would you call your twists on the songs accessible? It’s very accessible to the general listener. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON WHAT The People’s Key • WHEN

7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday through Thursday • WHERE Ferring Jazz Bistro, 3536 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $15 • MORE INFO jazzstl.org

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PHOTO: HANDOUT

Q&A


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10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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The Ambassador metrotix.com • Meek Mill, 9 p.m. Nov. 19, the Ambassador, $40-$60. • R&B Legends with Miki Howard, Lenny Williams, Surface, 8:30 p.m. Dec. 3, $30-$40. Chaifetz Arena ticketmaster.com • Gateway Gospelfest 2k16 with Yolanda Adams, Alexis Spight, Tye Tribbett, Erica Campbell, 6 p.m. Nov. 19, $22-$42, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com • Playing With a Purpose with Mama’s Pride, Soul Cracker, the Pour, Jeni Voss and Rob McDonnell, Tony Campanella with the Sliders, 2 p.m. Oct. 23, $15. • Lola and the Kickbacks, Jesse Gannon, 8 p.m. Nov. 4, $10-$12. • Shakey Deal: A Neil Young Tribute Band, 8 p.m. Nov. 11, $12. Duck Room at Blueberry Hill ticketmaster.com • Aquitaine, 9 p.m. Nov. 11, $8. • The Strumbellas, Dec. 17, $22, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday (HoHo Show) Fox Theatre metrotix.com • Celtic Woman, 7:30 p.m. June 16, $45-$105. Of Broadway ticketly.com

iPARTY STIR • SEPT. 10 • GRAND OPENING OF DELMAR HALL 1 Tim and Lesley Zickus of O’Fallon, Ill. 2 Patrick and Suzy Mahoney of Bloomington, Ill. 3 Tammy and Scott Ehlmann of St. Charles 4 Jason and Shelley Watts of Fairview Heights 5 Daniel and Jen Hohm of St. Louis 6 Beth Ewing and Dwight Carter, both of St. Louis ANDRA DAY AND CORINNE BAILEY RAE • OCT. 4 • THE PAGEANT 7 Joseph and Mary Houston of Mascoutah 8 LaTasha Talton and Tai Seddens, both of St. Louis 9 Angel Jones and Latoya Hicks, both of St. Louis 10 Scott and Lana Hilliard of St. Louis 11 Traycee and E’Lon Chapman of St. Louis 12 Derek Braddix and John Wallace, both of St. Louis

• The Mystery Lights, Warbly Jets, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 4, $10-$12. The Pageant ticketmaster.com • Band of Horses, the Shelters, Nov. 30, the Pageant, $32.50-$40, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday (HoHo Show). • Nathaniel Ratelif & the Night Sweats, Dec. 4, $27.50$32.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday (HoHo Show).

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• Grouplove, Dec. 6, $30-$35, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday (HoHo Show). • Foxing, So Many Dynamos, Say Panther, Berlin Whale, Why Not, 7 p.m. Dec. 10, $15. • Drive-By Truckers, 8 p.m. Jan. 27, $25-$28, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. Peabody Opera House ticketmaster.com • The 1975, Phantogram, Nov. 29, Peabody Opera House, $39.50 and up, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday (HoHo Show). • Bastille, Dec. 16, Peabody Opera House, $25 and up, on sale at noon Friday (HoHo Show). The Ready Room ticketly.com • The Story So Far, 7 p.m. Oct. 31, $19.99-$23. Scottrade Center ticketmaster.com • Tim McGraw and Faith Hill’s “Soul2Soul The World Tour 2017,” April 27, prices and on-sale information to be announced.

Find iParty photos from this event and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/iparty

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PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF

TICKET TRACKER

• Cold, Cold Heart: A Tribute to Hank Williams with Colonel Ford Duo, Letter to Memphis, Cara Louise Band, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 11, $10.


A positive light

tour slated for just after Thanksgiving. They’ve already performed in Switzerland, Rome, Sardinia, Milan, Germany, The Blender Cedric Shannon Rives & the Prague and Czech Republic. Brothers aim to ‘celebrate the black man’ While on that first European tour, in the middle of concerts, Rives would BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM write songs. He recorded in February and March, says he was tired of singing at funerals St. Louis gospel funding the project mostly on his own. for young people. That feeling inspired singer Cedric He had a listening party in July and will the new CD. Shannon Rives have a CD release concert Saturday “Some of the funerals were just takes a diferent senseless. I want to go to some gradua- at the Sun Theatre. The show will be turn on his fifth recorded for a future airing on tions,” he says. album, “Cedric Charter’s GOTV. The first step was gatherShannon Rives & the Brothers.” The new CD, which foling the other St. Louis-area Rives is at the center of the Brothers, lows releases such as “Songs singers who’d make up the a new group influenced by acts he reof Deliverance” (1999) and Brothers — Cleo Robinson spects, such as Commissioned and the “Sing You Out the 4 Walls” III, DeJuan Bingham, Mitchel Winans, but with a modern spin. (2011), is produced by Levi Ford Jr. and Cory Fuller. It’s a first for Rives, folding himself Cedric Shannon Rives “Too” King, who produced “I wanted to celebrate into a group, not to mention the alevery Rives CD. the black man — put us in a positive bum’s reliance on more R&B-flavored, Bullock, who won Season 4 of BET’s light,” Rives says. “We have another contemporary gospel sounds. “Sunday Best,” is featured on “Nothperspective. We’re grinding, we’re “I’m dancing and learning choreoging Without You.” “We were just committed and we’re working hard raphy,” he says, laughing. “I’m going after a diferent audience, but the mes- every day. The way we’re being gunned having fun in the studio, and we said, ‘Let’s come out with this track,’ and it down, I wanted to reinforce positive sage of faith is still the same.” turned out to be a great skating track, images of us in the hopes that it’s conRives hopes to attract younger a feel-good summer jam you listen to tagious. I want them to find their paslisteners with the Brothers’ project. riding down the street bobbing your sion, whatever it may be.” “That’s my heart,” he says of young head.” Cedric Shannon Rives & the Brothpeople. “There’s like a wind or push Rives will go between solo and group ers oicially formed a year ago. The for me in that direction, to give them a releases. He’ll also help Brothers’ singintent wasn’t to record an album but to message of hope. But I’ve learned the ers with their solo projects. methods have to change to get their at- spread a message through performing “We can make a bigger impact on the and touring. “I wanted to expose them tention.” world together, and not just locally,” to what it’s like to sing in other parts of Rives, who has traveled the world as Rives sasy. “There’s a hole. There are the world. We were never a hometown a solo artist and written for national no male groups right now. We can fill band.” gospel acts such as Bishop Paul Morthat gap.” Rives booked the Brothers’ shows ton, DeWayne Woods, Darwin Hobbs, in Europe for December with more the Pace Sisters, Le’Andria Johnson, WHAT The Brothers’ CD Release Concert • WHEN dates in May and August, with another Amber Bullock and Chrystal Rucker, 6:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Sun Theatre, 3625 stltoday.com/blender

@kevincjohnson

@blenderpd

@kevincjohnson

Grandel Square • HOW MUCH $40; VIP available • MORE INFO 314-252-8864; metrotix.com

36th ANNUAL

PHOTO: HANDOUT

MORE THAN 50 ARTISANS & DEALERS Folk Art • Antiques Wood Carvings • Mums Artists • Soaps • Rugs Upcycled Items • Crafts Country Store • Pumpkins Hand Painted Furniture

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SUN., OCT. 9, 2016 By The Rock Bridge 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. PLENTY TO EAT Bratwurst • Pies • Potato Pancakes Kettle Popcorn • Ribeye Sandwiches Homemade Apple Butter • And lots more!

Be Kind To Your Pets And Leave Them At Home When Visiting The Oktoberfest • No Alcoholic Beverages Allowed • Handicapped Parking Available.

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2016 Relleke's BACK TO SCHOOL TOURS RELLEKE PUMPKIN PATCH SCHOOL TOURS 473 Sand Prairie Lane, Pontoon Beach,IL ~ Tour packages available Tuesday through Friday ~ Picnic areas available. Lunches available upon advanced request ~ Activities offered to school groups include: Small pumpkin for each child, play in jungle maze, feed the goats, play on the pyramid slide, play in the Huge Korny Korn Palace, hay ride through the pumpkin patch ~ Face Painting and Pony Rides can also be scheduled

Reserve your tour today - tours start September 27th. Call 618-823-3434 October 8th & 9th - Bond County Antique Tractor Association display Oct 8th - Jennifer Thompson & The Harvest Drive Band Saturday from 12-5 Oct 9th - "Miss Jubilee," a Jazz, Swing, and Rhythm and Blues Band from 12-5. COLUMBUS DAY, October 10th – Open all day October 15th & 16th –This is Child Safety Weekend Tribute to Willie Nelson, "Me & Paul" by Paul Jarvis & The Old Barn Boys Saturday from 12-5. The Beaucoup Bottom Band Sunday from 12-5. Also on Sunday, bring your camera and come out to see the Arch Helicopter up close beginning at 12. Relleke's is open daily from September 20th to October 31st from 9 a.m. To 6 p.m. and we have festivals every weekend! Relleke's is located at 473 Sand Prairie Lane in Pontoon Beach, Illinois.

CALL 618-797-6858 6 miles from downtown St. Louis 1 mile North of Cahokia Mounds - from 1-55/70 take Rt. 111 North to Sand Prarie Lane. from 270 go South on 111 to Sand Prarie Lane.

www.rellekepumpkinpatch.com

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How will you spend all that time now that the Cardinals aren’t in the postseason? We came up 20 ways to fill the days and nights. stltoday.com/hotlist

COMING NEXT WEEK

COMING SUNDAY

If you like Halloween, and you like history, check our list of spooky attractions where you can also learn a little something. Oct. 14 in Go! Magazine

A new play about Ferguson commissioned by the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis makes its debut, starring its author, Dael Orlandersmith. Sunday in A&E

St. Louis Ballet’s “Vision: Where Ballet + Fashion Meet”

Stepping with style St. Louis Ballet pairs choreographers and fashion designers for ‘Vision: Where Ballet + Fashion Meet’ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

D

ance is a largely visual experience, with much of the viewer’s attention focused on movement. But how the dancers look definitely contributes to the impact of a piece.

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Of course, that has a lot to do with costumes and whether they enhance the experience or detract from it. And what better way to up the visual ante than to enlist the talents of fashion designers? St. Louis Ballet will make that styl-

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

ish connection on Saturday evening with its latest program: “Vision: Where Ballet + Fashion Meet.” The concert at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center will showcase collaborations between three choreographers — Emery LeCrone, Tom Gold and St. Louis Ballet artistic director Gen Horiuchi — and three designers. Horiuchi says he’s long been impressed with what professional fashion designers can bring to the realm of ballet, going back to his days as a principal

dancer with New York City Ballet. “This is our second year of expanding our series to October, and fall is fashion season,” he says, adding that such big-name designers as Valentino Garavani and Isaac Mizrahi have lent their talents to dance. The designers selected for “Vision” — Emily Brady Koplar of St. Louis; Hillary Taymour of Brooklyn; and Jordana Warmflash, a Washington University alumnus based in New York — came to Horiuchi’s attention through the St. Louis Fashion Fund. The program is comprised of Horiuchi’s “Haydn Cello Concerto,” set to music by the classical composer with costumes by Koplar; LeCrone’s “And My Beloved,” with music by David Lang and costumes by Taymour; and Gold’s “Oasis,” featuring a John Zorn score and costumes by Warmflash. Gold says he was impressed by Warmflash’s talent after seeing some of her work on the internet. “She wasn’t afraid of color, it had beautiful line and symmetry, and it really spoke to me and my aesthetics,” he says. “So I thought it would be a good match, and it’s been a great experience.” Horiuchi describes LeCrone’s piece as “very romantic” and Gold’s as “fun and creative.” In contrast, he says, his own contribution to the program is — as the Haydn score would suggest — “very classical.” Koplar, whose fashion line is called Wai Ming, says she had never designed for a dance company before. “I was very excited to have the opportunity,” she says. “Because I love dance, and it’s fun to work outside of my normal parameters.” WHAT St. Louis Ballet: “Vision: Where Ballet + Fashion Meet” • WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, University of Missouri-St. Louis, 8001 Natural Bridge Road • HOW MUCH $24-$59 • MORE INFO 314-516-4949; touhill.org

Find more events, reviews and blogs by our critics ➙ stltoday.com/arts stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : P R AT T K R E I D I C H

SORRY, CARDINALS


TM & © 2016 A CBS COMPANY. CHEERS AND RELATED MARKS AND LOGOS ARE TRADEMARKS OF A CBS COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. SARAH SIROTA (CARLA), JILLIAN LOUIS (DIANE), BARRY PEARL (COACH), BUZZ RODDY (CLIFF) FROM CHEERS LIVE ON STAGE. PHOTO BY JOHN HALBACH.

T V’s # 1 COMEDY is now live on stage!

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Acoustic Living Room Kathy Mattea with Bill Cooley October 14 at 8 p.m. Part of the St. Louis Arts Experience Sponsored by JPL Development LLC | Welcomed by KDHX

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Art of Time Ensemble Andrew Burashko, artistic director

October 17 at 8 p.m. Sponsored by Bull Moose Industries

ArtSounds featuring James Carter Organ Trio October 22 at 8 p.m. Made possible by The Steward Family Foundation and World Wide Technology, Inc., Nancy and Kenneth Kranzberg, and Missy and Greg Hill

Call MetroTix at 314.534.1111 or visit THESHELDON.ORG

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COME OUT BEFORE OCT 31st AND TRY OUR VELVET TWIST AT THE TERRACE! Live music every Sat-Sun 1-5pm Food, Fun, & good Wine.

Band Schedule All bands play from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The Sappingtones Band Saturday, Oct 1

Teddy McCready Sunday, Oct 2

Crossire Band Todays Greatest Hits Saturday, Oct. 8

The Stingers Sunday, Oct. 9

Ron Sallee & the Convertibles Sunday, Oct 16

The Band Medallion 40th reunion party Saturday, Oct 22

ClusterPluck Sunday, Oct 23

The Blue Shadows Saturday, Oct 29

Close Enough for Country

Grass Fed Mule Band

Saturday, Oct 15

Sunday, Oct 30

6188 Hwy Y, French Village, MO 63036

573-358-7177 Theterrace.com

o Tw ds 9 l a en Fin eek r 8 & W obe Free Wine Tastings • Fantasy Mask Competition t Oc Wooing Contest • Chocolate Pie Eating • Marriage De Masse

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Fantasy Mask Competition October 8 & 9 FREE Admission

Free Parking! • STLRenFest.com O p e n We e ke n d s t h r o u g h O c t o b e r 1 6 1 0 a m - 6 p m • R a i n o r S h i n e • Ro t a r y P a r k , We n t z v i l l e, M O Discount Coupons Available At:

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SUBWAY® is a Registered Trademark of Subway IP Inc. ©2016 Subway IP Inc

Discount Tickets Available Online & At Participating

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Show off your best mask, have fun with a character! This contest is free to participate and all participants will receive FREE admission into the Festival with their Mask.

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Twenty-six concrete stairs lead up to the eight-lane bowling alley at Saratoga Lanes.

UP FOR A GAME X X X X X X X X X X BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN / PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN / ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH X X X X X X X X X X

Maplewood’s upstairs bowling alley, Saratoga Lanes, celebrates 100 years of elevating the sport

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t’s the time capsule bowling alley. The “Cheers” bowling alley. It’s the upstairs bowling alley where you can stand in the parking lot and hear pins clattering, a satisfying sound that has echoed above this block of Sutton Boulevard in downtown Maplewood for 100 years now. • Saratoga Lanes, which bills itself as the oldest bowling alley west of the Mississippi River and the only upstairs alley left in the area, celebrates with a birthday bash Saturday.

10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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xxxxxxxxxxxx “It’s a special vibe here,” says Lana Rottler, 24, of St. Louis, amid the louder clatter of pins in the room. She’s bowled since she was a kid, in an Optimist Club league, and is the only woman bowling in Saratoga’s Tuesday night league. “Everybody seems to know everybody and is very accepting. I felt like I was at home that first night.” It takes a bit of determination to lug a bowling ball up the 26 concrete steps to get to the alley, housed in a craftsman-style, red-brick building. (For the less determined but still curious, you can use one of the balls already upstairs.) The building’s ground floor houses surveying and engineering offices. There are only eight lanes in the place and five pool tables in the front. A square bar divides the room. The vending machine is probably the only one in the area that sells chili cheese Fritos, Camel cigarettes, rosin bags and bowling socks. Behind the bar are bowling shoes and the drinks people want — hard liquor for the old-timers and Pabst Blue Ribbon for the hipsters.

Team Pancakes members Mark Povich (center) and Brian Knox celebrate teammate Rebekah Wessels’ first strike.

It’s intimate enough that you can get to know the folks in your league but big enough to mix and mingle for a private party. Owners Jim Barton, 49, and Tom Buck, 61, have updated the place to reflect a 1950s renovation but have been careful not to strip away its charm. Old wood paneling was replaced with newer wood paneling, and there are several flat-screen TVs and a jukebox with a touch screen.

The only original parts of the alley are the wooden gutters. The woodand-metal ball returns swoop and curve with a 1950s Sputnik vibe, as do the turquoise and white fiberglass benches and the chrome ashtrays and beverage holders hooked behind them. Yes, smoking is still allowed here, though there’s a newer outdoor balcony now, and you can request no smoking for private events. And don’t look too hard for any fancy scoring

Bob Adams of the Smokey Treat Tricyle team tries unsuccessfully to coax a spare out of his throw at Saratoga Lanes.

Sunday, November 6

Nov. 9

Tomorrow Night! October 8 16

In Two Weeks! October 23

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Saturday, November 12 stltoday.com/go


A vending machine in the pool hall sells snacks and cigarettes, along with bowling socks and rosin bags.

xxxxxxxxxxxx “SOME GUYS WOULD THROW THE BALL SO HARD THAT IT WOULD SPLATTER THE PINS AROUND; IT WAS LIKE BEING IN A SHOOTING GALLERY. WE’D SHOUT DOWN THE ALLEY, ‘SLOW THE BALL DOWN.’ AND THEY’D GIVE US THE FINGER.” SARATOGA LANES PINBOY BOB WERNING IN A 1996 INTERVIEW

Much of the interior maintains its kitschy ’50s charm.

screens; you have to keep score by hand. The way the lanes are configured, it would be diicult to install automatic scoring anyway. There are instructions on the scoring sheets. And helpful people. And apps. “If you can count to 10 and can count to 300, you’re good,” says Alan Young, 63, of St. Louis, who has been bowling since sixth grade and has been in a league here for three years. ELEVATING A SPORT

Charm and good people aren’t the only things that help Saratoga Lanes endure. Like Barton and Buck, the owners through the years have innovated and treated their people well. The bowling alley was built in 1916 and commissioned by the Maplewood Planing Mill and Stair Co., which had

oices on the first floor. It was part of a bowling heyday in the St. Louis area: More than 20 new alleys were built in that decade. Bowling was popular among German immigrants who came to the Midwest in the middle of the 19th century, one reason why it’s so ingrained in the culture of so many Midwestern cities. Back then, because many saloon owners installed alleys as a way to make extra money, bowling was associated with drinking and seediness. But the Saratoga Lanes being built on the second floor was a way of elevating the sport — not just literally. Basement bowling alleys in saloons were seen as dark and unsanitary, so the upstairs lanes appealed to women. Mill and bowling alley owner Albert Blood had a bowling league playing at the alley from its opening, and Saratoga Lanes encouraged women to play there as early as 1917. Weekly ads went in the local paper: “The Thursday Afternoon Ladies Club is increasing

every week. Everybody seems to enjoy the pastime and the scores are getting better.” The leagues and its elevated status helped Saratoga endure Prohibition, which closed many saloon alleys. When Blood retired, his family got the Stein family to take over. Otto Stein had bowling management experience and was one of the best bowlers in the country. His brother Clarence took the helm at Saratoga, using his connections to bring in prestigious leagues, paying the tabs of World War II servicemen returning home and overseeing the 1950s renovations. The automatic pinsetter was invented in 1952, eliminating the need for pinboys, who also sometimes sullied the sport’s reputation. “Some guys would throw the ball so hard that it would splatter the pins around; it was like being in a shooting gallery,” said former Saratoga pinboy Bob Werning in a 1996 interview with the Post-Dispatch. “We’d shout down the alley, ‘Slow the ball down.’ And they’d give us the finger. So before we’d roll their ball back, we’d spit in

Fabulousfox.com

Fox Box Office 314-534-1111 MetroTix.com

NOVEMBER 15-27 stltoday.com/go

December 2-4

December 6-18 10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

17


the thumb, and give them the same gesture. They couldn’t get to us.” Pinsetters also added a high-tech element to the freestanding bowling multiplexes sprouting up in the suburbs. They often were too heavy or large for upstairs alleys to support. But the concrete shell housing Saratoga Lanes could. Clarence Stein installed a pinsetter and renovated the alley, adding the ball returns and seats that remain today. His sons ran the lanes after his death, and Barton and Buck took over in 1986. “When I got there, I looked at it not just as a bowling alley; it was a cool spot. A destination — a location,” Barton says. Leagues dominate the alley on weeknights, and the alley started marketing to businesses for booking private parties. Last year Saratoga Lanes hosted 400 events, with 100 of them in December alone. “Everybody likes to bowl,” says Barton, noting the appeal of old-time carnival games with stacked-up cans or milk bottles. “We like to knock things down, right?” Saratoga still has open bowling times, but it’s best to call ahead. Maplewood has celebrated Saratoga’s centennial all year, with a parade through town in July and giant bowling pins decorated by area businesses on display in shop

Jake Solomon (left) leads Luke Zeller, Bob Adams and Aimee Zeller, all of the Smokey Treat Tricycle team, in a dance during league play at Saratoga Lanes.

windows. On Saturday, a big party in the parking lot marks the alley’s original opening day, Oct. 14. There will be bands, a classic car display and an auction of the giant bowling pins. It will be a celebration that could

herald another 100 years. “It doesn’t matter who you are,” says 34-year-old Jake Morgan, who has bowled in a league for about five years. “You’re just here to have fun. That’s what everybody does here.”

• Then credit is given for 10 plus the number of pins knocked down with that next ball.

Thus, the bowler who rolls three strikes in a row in the irst three frames gets credit for 30 points in the irst frame.

• If a bowler gets a strike, it is recorded with an X in the small square, the score being 10 plus the total number of pins knocked down in the next two rolls.

• A perfect score, 300, represents 12 strikes in a row — a total of 120 pins knocked down. Why 12 strikes, instead of 10? Because, if a bowler

WHAT Saratoga Lanes Birthday Bash • WHEN 2-8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE The lot next to

2725 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood (party continues inside afterward) • MORE INFO 314-645-5308; facebook.com/saratogalanes

xxxxxxxxxxxx

P H O T O S : L A U R I E S K R I VA N / S T. L O U I S P O S T- D I S PAT C H

HOW TO KEEP SCORE

• If pins remain standing after two throws (an open frame), a bowler simply gets credit for the number of pins knocked down. In the case of a spare (knocking down 10 pins in two throws), a slash mark is recorded in the small square in the upper-right corner of that frame, and no score is entered until the irst ball of the next frame is rolled.

18

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

gets a strike in the last frame, the score for that frame can’t be recorded before rolling twice more. Similarly, if a bowler rolls a spare in the last frame, one more roll is required before the inal score can be tallied. Sources: PBA, Saratoga Lanes

stltoday.com/go


presents

WHAT:

4th Annual “Brew in the Lou”

WHEN:

Saturday, October 15, 2016 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm

WHERE:

Francis Park, the Lilly Pond 5399 Donovan • St. Louis, MO 63109 Adjacent to Word of Life Lutheran School

WHO:

Sponsored by 103.3 KLOU to Beneit the Lutheran Elementary School Association

Wristbands are $40 each and includes tastings of beer, spirits, wine, coffee, and food, along with a commemorative glass. Proceeds beneit the 8,500 students served by the Lutheran Elementary School Association.

Festivities include the Deutschmeister German Brass Band and other live entertainment, arts and craft vendors, the “People’s Choice” Home Brew, Bratwurst and Chili Contest, and special food exhibits.

For more information or to purchase a wristband,please call: 314-200-0797 or visit LESA’s website at: www.LESAstl.org. Wristbands can be purchased at www.LESAstl.org or at these participating restaurants:

Fa1 Harvest Festival in Broemmelsiek Park

Saturday, October 8 10am to 4pm | FREE LIVE MUSIC / CRAFTS DEMONSTRATIONS / HAYRIDES LEARN HOW TO MAKE APPLE BUTTER

Open Weekends through October 16 Rotary Park / Wentzville www.stlrenfest.com

ing of te list se visit le p m lea co For a ventures, p M LES.CO fall ad

CHAR RICST O T S I H

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10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

19


THIS!

Emily Blunt in “The Girl on the Train”

A tense ride Emily Blunt is a woman who can’t get her life back on track in ‘he Girl on the Train’ ★★★ BY JANE HENDERSON / JHENDERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

T

he girl on the train isn’t really a girl. She’s a woman. A troubled, soused woman. In the new movie based on the best-selling book, Emily Blunt, 33, is Rachel, who commutes to Manhattan along the Hudson River. On her way to the city, she forlornly looks out the window, keeping tabs on a loving young couple and other apparently happy families. On her ride home, eyes blurry after

20

martinis at Grand Central Station, she sips a water bottle full of mixer and more liquor, slurring as she admires a wary passenger’s child. The genius of author Paula Hawkins’ novel “The Girl on the Train” is that she made a rather pitiful woman — one guilty of drinking, lying and virtually stalking her ex-husband’s new family — into a character readers will stay with and even eventually like. And Blunt, with her red nose and mascara-smeared face, is mesmerizing

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

as weepy Rachel, even as we watch her do nothing to get her life back on track. Director Tate Taylor (with screenplay by Erin Cressida Wilson) stays close to the original story, which besides Rachel involves two women she watches from the train. Haley Bennett is young, beautiful Megan. She’s married to Scott (Luke Evans), a man who can’t keep his hands of her and may veer toward possessiveness. A couple of doors away are Anna (Rebecca Ferguson), another lovely blonde, her husband, Tom, and their baby, Evie. Tom (Justin Theroux) is Rachel’s ex-husband. He apparently tired of her drinking and blames her for sloppily embarrassing him at a work party. But when Anna complains that Rachel keeps calling the house and

OUR MOVIE RATINGS ★ Skip it ★★ So-so ★★★ Good ★★★★ Excellent

hanging up, Tom at times comes to her defense, telling his wife that Rachel isn’t dangerous, just “sad.” Anna, wearing a delicate wishbone necklace, has everything Rachel wants: Tom, a baby, the furnishings she chose for the house. Even her complexion glows, especially compared to Rachel’s blotchy skin. Not one of the three women, though, is completely happy, and as afairs are revealed along with the specter of children born and unborn, tension among them rises. Megan’s disappearance leads Rachel to try to regain some of her blacked-out memory, wondering if she could be culpable. The movie has moved the setting from the U.K. to the U.S., a bit disappointing for those who liked the London environs, and it upped the posh factor with Westchester County homes. Some of the story has been tightened, of course, but nothing important seems missing. The book’s narrative alternates among the women and goes back and forth in time, which keeps nerves on edge as more of the story is revealed or remembered. Still, at times Rachel’s bad judgment, the idyllic suburbs and background violin music combine for “Fatal Attraction”-like melodrama. “The Girl on the Train” is a taut psychological thriller, just as tense for those who already know its conclusion. WHAT “The Girl on the Train” • RUN TIME 1:52 • RATING R • CONTENT Sex, violence, language

Find more reviews, theaters and movie news ➙ stltoday.com/movies stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

RENT

TOP REDBOX RENTALS FOR SEPT. 26–OCT. 2 1 “The Shallows” (Sony) 2 “Me Before You” (Warner) 3 “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows” (Paramount) 4 “The Huntsman: Winter’s War” (Universal) 5 “The Nice Guys” (Warner) 6 “Now You See Me 2” (Lionsgate) 7 “Captain America: Civil War” (Disney) 8 “Money Monster” (Sony) 9 “The Jungle Book” (Disney) 10 “Cell” (Lionsgate)


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Truth on trial he fact-based ‘Denial’ is a well-crafted and skillfully acted drama about the Holocaust ★★★ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

eborah Lipstadt (Rachel Weisz) is lecturing on the Holocaust to a classroom of rapt students at Atlanta’s Emory University when she’s interrupted by an unexpected guest. His name is David Irving (Timothy Spall), and he’s not there to audit the course. Irving objects to Lipstadt’s portrayal of him in her book, “Denying

D 22

the Holocaust” — which is just what she accuses him of doing. Irving, a British historian, indeed casts doubt on the systematic genocide of European Jews during World War II. But he insists that Lipstadt has defamed him and ruined his career. Indignant and spoiling for a public fight, he sues the author and her publisher, Penguin Books, for libel. At first, Lipstadt figures she has little to worry about — the truth is clearly on

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

her side. But the lawsuit has been filed not in the United States but in England, where the defendant is guilty until proven innocent. Irving has contrived to put the Holocaust on trial. With Irving acting as his own lawyer, Lipstadt seeks the expert counsel of solicitor Anthony Julius (Andrew Scott) and barrister Richard Rampton (Tom Wilkinson). But she’s troubled by their strategy: Neither she, nor any Holocaust survivors, will be allowed to testify. The fact-based “Denial” is a wellcrafted and skillfully acted drama about standing up for the truth, regardless of how challenging that might be. Working from a screenplay by David Hare (“The Hours”), director Mick

Jackson (“Temple Grandin”) delivers a film that gets a bit bogged down in legal specifics but resonates with moral urgency. Weisz, an Oscar winner for “The Constant Gardener,” has one of her best roles as the determined Lipstadt. Wilkinson (“Michael Clayton”) brings an avuncular charm to Rampton. And Spall, who is perhaps best known for his work with director Mike Leigh, comes close to stealing the film as the self-righteously despicable Irving. “Denial” is a flawed but impassioned film that deals in big ideas. WHAT “Denial” • RUN TIME 1:50 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Thematic material and brief strong language

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

Rachel Weisz in “Denial”


Nate Parker (center) in “The Birth of a Nation”

Diverted attention ‘he Birth of a Nation’ lacks originality but ofers the opportunity to continue a necessary discussion ★★½ BY KATIE WALSH / TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

“T

he Birth of a Nation” arrives on screens amid celebration and backlash. The indie historical epic about the bloody 1831 slave rebellion led by Nat Turner is written, produced and directed by Nate Parker, who also stars in the film. After the Sundance premiere in January, it was snapped up for a record-breaking $17.5 million by Fox Searchlight (no doubt with hopes of little gold men) during the height of the #OscarsSoWhite controversy.

stltoday.com/go

But when Parker’s 2001 Penn State rape trial (in which he was acquitted) resurfaced in the media, attention was directed away from the movie itself and onto Parker’s character. In fairness, the story of “The Birth of a Nation” is born singularly from his vision — with the notable exception of Jean McGianni Celestin, who shares a “story by” credit. Celestin was convicted of rape in the same incident in which Parker was accused. (The conviction was later overturned.) Can “The Birth of a Nation” withstand the scrutiny? It both can and cannot. Parker is a better actor than

writer or director in this particular project. In an emotionally detailed performance, he plays slave preacher Turner with a flinching self-efacement that evolves into horror, sorrow, rage and then possession by the blood of the Holy Spirit. He often grins with an eerie sense of torment behind his mask. But as a director, he’s far too fond of heavy-handed film school symbolism, magical realism and a color palette so desaturated that it’s diicult to discern the time of day. In Parker’s embodiment of Turner, he’s a pious, loving, devoted man, driven to extreme violence by systemic oppression and dehumanization. Parker dutifully walks us through the physical horrors of slavery, presented in the perfunctorily horrifying manner that we’re accustomed to. He wields shock value as a weapon against the audience, which is sober-

ing, if not entirely innovative. What’s troubling in light of their shared past is that Parker and Celestin utilize not one, not two, but three incidents of sexual violence against women as a storytelling device within this imagining of the Turner rebellion. Rape was a dark reality of slavery, but no evidence of it exists in the historical account of Turner’s actions. In this invention, it’s hard not to find a disturbing resonance to Parker’s personal history, especially in a scene of Turner weeping over the violated body of his wife, Cherry (Aja Naomi King), vowing revenge after she is gang-raped by a group of white men. But in this film, rape is not about women, but its efect on men. It’s clearly a convenient way to motivate and justify the mass murder that our hero commits, while maintaining audience allegiance to him. It’s the kind of cheap and easy storytelling that is all too ubiquitous. There are many accoutrements that lend the appearance of importance and urgency that are perhaps style over substance — the title appropriated from D.W. Griith’s racist early cinema epic, the poster of Parker lynched by an American flag, its anachronistic use of Nina Simone’s “Strange Fruit.” Placed under the microscope, “The Birth of a Nation” lacks some originality of thought, but it nonetheless ofers the opportunity for necessary discussion as we continue to wrestle with the racist history of this nation and its continuing efects. WHAT “The Birth of a Nation” • RUN TIME 2:00 • RATING R • CONTENT Disturbing violence and some brief nudity

10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

23


AT THE BOX OFFICE The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Sept. 30 through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by comScore: 1. ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children’ 20th Century Fox, $28,871,140, 3,522 locations, $8,197 average, $28,871,140, 1 week. 2. ‘Deepwater Horizon’ Lionsgate, $20,223,544, 3,259 locations, $6,205 average, $20,223,544, 1 week.

3. ‘The Magniicent Seven’ Sony, $15,626,883, 3,674 locations, $4,253 average, $61,532,784, 2 weeks. 4. ‘Storks’ Warner Bros., $13,476,141, 3,922 locations, $3,436 average, $38,487,415, 2 weeks.

7. ‘Queen of Katwe’ Disney, $2,495,427, 1,242 locations, $2,009 average, $2,898,436, 2 weeks.

12. ‘Blair Witch’ Lionsgate, $1,580,468, 1,828 locations, $865 average, $19,137,556, 3 weeks.

8. ‘Don’t Breathe’ Sony, $2,381,769, 1,653 locations, $1,441 average, $84,741,706, 6 weeks.

13. ‘When the Bough Breaks’ Sony, $1,200,166, 901 locations, $1,332 average, $28,514,082, 4 weeks.

9. ‘Bridget Jones’s Baby’ Universal, $2,335,320, 2,055 locations, $1,136 average, $20,987,055, 3 weeks.

5. ‘Sully’ Warner Bros., $8,272,713, 3,717 locations, $2,226 average, $105,260,176, 4 weeks.

10. ‘Snowden’ Open Road, $1,966,630, 1,821 locations, $1,080 average, $18,666,877, 3 weeks.

6. ‘Masterminds’ Relativity Media, $6,541,205, 3,042 locations, $2,150 average, $6,541,205, 1 week.

11. ‘Suicide Squad’ Warner Bros., $1,917,283, 1,638 locations, $1,171 average, $320,857,912, 9 weeks.

Asa Butterield (left) and Ella Purnell in “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children”

14. ‘M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story’ Fox International Productions, $1,108,650, 256 locations, $4,331 average, $1,108,650, 1 week. 15. ‘Hell or High Water’ Lionsgate, $501,935, 520 locations, $965 average, $25,764,061, 8 weeks. 16. ‘Bad Moms’ STX Entertainment, $474,513, 559 locations, $849 average, $112,513,973, 10 weeks.

17. ‘Kubo and the Two Strings’ Focus Features, $469,431, 526 locations, $892 average, $46,743,207, 7 weeks.

19. ‘No Manches Frida’ Lionsgate, $378,075, 256 locations, $1,477 average, $10,898,847, 5 weeks.

18. ‘The Secret Life of Pets’ Universal, $443,300, 462 locations, $960 average, $364,929,500, 13 weeks.

20. ‘The Dressmaker’ Broad Green Pictures, $365,856, 159 locations, $2,301 average, $630,447, 2 weeks. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALSO IN THEATERS

“KATE WINSLET HAS US IN HER PALM FROM THE MOMENT SHE STEPS INTO FRAME.”

Reviews of “Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life” and “Operation Avalanche” were not available for this issue.

- Justin Chang, VARIETY

- John Powers, VOGUE

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS CREVE COEUR Matt Johnson and Owen Williams in “Operation Avalanche”

24

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

NOW PLAYING

FRONTENAC AMC West Olive 16 Landmark’s Plaza Frontenac Cinema amctheatres.com (314) 994-3733 ★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

P H O T O S : J AY M A I D M E N T ( P E R E G R I N E ) ; Z A P R U D E R F I L M S ( AVA L A N C H E )

“Broad comedy, over-the-top passion, exuberant small-town pettiness and startling plot twists.”


THE MOST IMPORTANT AND URGENT FILM OF 2016!” DEADLINE

!!!!

ONE OF THE MOST POWERFUL AND RIVETING COURTROOM DRAMAS EVER MADE. Timothy Spall’s performance is a quiet, smoldering force.” “

ESSENTIAL VIEWING. Rachel Weisz is a knockout. Tom Wilkinson is perfection.”

“‘

DENIAL’ IS A SIREN CALL FOR TRUTH.”

“A New LANdmARk iN AmeRicAN ciNemA”

Picks

“BeAutifuL ANd PoweRfuL” ACADEMY AWARD® WINNER

ACADEMY AWARD® NOMINEE

BAFTA NOMINEE

RACHEL WEISZ

TOM WILKINSON

TIMOTHY SPALL

“A RALLyiNg cRy of A fiLm” BASED ON A TRUE STORY Screenplay by DAVID HARE Directed by MICK JACKSON THEMATIC MATERIAL AND BRIEF STRONG LANGUAGE

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK AVAILABLE FROM

ARTWORK © 2016 BLEECKER STREET MEDIA LLC. MOTION PICTURE © 2016 DENIAL FILM, LLC AND BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

STARTS TODAY stltoday.com/go

CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES

STARTSCHECK TODAY AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATRES & SHOWTIMES 10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

25


100716

() ! CC DVS OC DP

Showtimes and movies change daily and are provided by the theaters.

Friday, October 7, 2016

Central

St. Charles / O’Fallon

Chase Park Plaza (St. Louis Cinemas)

St. Charles Stadium 18 Cine (Wehrenberg)

Kingshighway & Lindell 314-367-0101 1830 First Capitol Dr. ! The Girl on the Train (R) DP (11:30 AM 2:00 4:30) 7:00 9:30 www.wehrenberg.com

Masterminds (PG-13) DP

(12:30 2:45 5:00) 7:20 9:55

(1:00 3:50) 6:50 9:40 (10:50 AM 4:00) 6:40 9:20

Galleria 6 (St. Louis Cinemas)

11:00 AM 2:00 5:00 7:50 9:30 10:40

! The Girl on the St. Louis Galleria 314-725-0808 Train (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM ! The Birth of a Nation (R) DP 11:30 AM 12:15 2:10 2:55 4:50 5:30 6:10 7:30 8:10 8:50 10:10 10:50 11:25

(10:30 AM 1:15 4:00) 6:45 9:30 ! The Girl on the Train (R) DP (11:15 AM 1:50 4:30) 7:10 9:40 Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) DP (11:10 AM 1:40 4:05) 6:40 9:05

! Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (PG) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) DP (10:45 AM 1:25 4:10) 7:00 9:45

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) DP (11:00 AM 2:00 5:00) 8:00

11:00 AM 11:45 AM 1:25 2:10 3:50 4:35 7:00 9:30

! Premam (Telugu) (NR) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 11:30 AM 2:45 6:00 9:15

Storks (PG) DP (10:20 AM 12:25 2:40 4:55) 7:05 9:15

Hi-Pointe Theatre 314-995-6273

! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM,ATMOS 11:15 AM 1:50 4:30 7:10 10:00

! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

The Girl on the Train (R) DP (2:00) 4:30 7:00 9:30

12:15 2:50 5:30 8:10 11:00

314-995-6273 ! Masterminds (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

Sully (PG-13) DP

10:35 AM 1:05 3:40 6:05 8:35 11:05

(3:00) 5:30 7:45

Moolah Theatre & Lounge (St. Louis Cinemas)

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 10:30 AM 1:30 4:30 6:20 7:30 9:30 10:30

Lindell & Vandeventer 314-446-6868 ! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar ! The Birth of a Nation (R) DP Children 3D (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM (1:30 4:15) 7:00 9:45

5050 Oakland Ave.

314-289-4400

A Beautiful Planet (G) 11:00 AM 4:00

10:40 AM 1:45 4:50 8:00 11:00

! Queen of Katwe (PG) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

Storks (PG) DVS,CC

1:00 PM

11:15 AM 1:40 4:05 6:30 9:00

Fly Me to the Moon (G) 3:00 PM

National Parks Adventure (America Wild) (NR) 10:00 AM 12:00 2:00

Sully (PG-13) DVS,CC 11:00 AM 1:30 4:05 6:30 9:00 11:30

Don’t Breathe (R) DVS,CC

Tivoli Theatre (Landmark) 6350 Delmar in the Loop ! Operation Avalanche (R)

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) DVS,CC

11:55 AM 3:15 6:30

D-Day: Normandy 1944 (NR)

5:00 10:30 11:20

314-727-7271 Suicide Squad (PG-13) DVS,CC

(12:25) 2:35 4:45 7:00 9:10

! Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (PG-13)

11:10 AM 2:05 7:30

(12:35) 2:45 4:55 7:10 9:20

! Young Frankenstein (PG) 11:55 PM

26

Town Square 12 Cine

40 & Winghaven Blvd.

(Wehrenberg)

636-300-9900

The Birth of a Nation (R) DVS,CC (11:20 AM 1:20) 4:20 7:20 10:20

! Middle School: The Worst Years of My

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

! The Birth of a Nation (R) No VIP after 6PM (11:00 AM 1:50) 4:50 7:50 10:45

Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (PG) CC (10:50 AM 2:15) 4:40 7:10 9:40

! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 11:10 AM 1:50 4:30 7:10 9:50

! Masterminds (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) CC (10:55 AM 1:30) 4:10 7:00 9:50

Masterminds (PG-13) CC

11:15 AM 1:50 4:30 7:05 9:35

1:45 4:30 7:20 10:05

! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM 1:45 2:30 4:20 5:05 7:00 7:45 9:40 10:15

! Middle School: The Worst Years of My

Life (PG) No VIP after 6PM 2:10 4:40 7:05 9:25

(11:20 AM 2:25) 5:10 8:00 10:50

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar

Children (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 10:30 AM 11:45 AM 1:30 4:30 7:30 10:30

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar

! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM ! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar

Children (PG-13) CC (11:25 AM 3:20) 6:40

1:55 4:35 7:15 9:55

! Masterminds (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

Children 3D (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 2:45 5:45

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13)

Children 3D (PG-13) DVS,CC

10:20 AM 1:20 4:20 7:20 10:20

(1:00) 4:00 7:30 9:35 10:30

Storks (PG)

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) CC

11:30 AM 1:55 4:20 6:45 9:10

2:30 5:00 7:25 9:45

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar

Children (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 1:00 2:00 4:05 7:00 8:00 9:55

(11:40 AM 12:40 3:40) 6:50 10:10

Sully (PG-13) 11:15 AM 1:45 4:15 6:50 9:20

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar

Storks (PG) CC Children 3D (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

10:00 PM

Suicide Squad (PG-13)

(11:20 AM 1:40) 4:05 6:45 9:45

Bridget Jones’s Baby (R) CC (11:05 AM 1:55) 4:45 7:35 10:25

5:05 PM

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13)

3:00 6:05

Nerve (PG-13) 11:00 AM 1:30 4:05 6:35

The Secret Life of Pets (PG)

Snowden (R) CC (1:35) 6:55

Sully (PG-13)

1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00

Storks (PG) 1:55 4:20 6:45 9:05

10:05 AM 12:30 (11:30 AM 2:20) 5:00 7:40 10:40

! Abhinetri (Telugu) (NR) No VIP after 6PM 9:00 PM

! Apparition Hill (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

! Devi(L) (NR) No VIP after 6PM

3:20 4:30 6:10 7:15 9:00 10:00

www.wehrenberg.com

! The Girl on the Train (R) DVS,CC

11:20 AM 1:45 4:15 6:40 9:05

11:00 AM 1:45 4:30 7:15

! The Girl on the Train (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

7805 Hwy N.

Life (PG) No VIP after 6PM

WEHRENBERG

(12:30) 2:40 4:50 7:05 9:15

! Don’t Think Twice (R)

9:30 10:15

Sausage Party (R)

12:15 3:15

Omnimax St. Louis Science Center

10:50 AM 11:35 AM 1:30 2:15 4:10 4:55 6:50 7:35

St. Charles / O’Fallon

O’Fallon Stadium 14 (Regal)

! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM ! The Birth of a Nation (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

Queen of Katwe (PG) DP

St. Charles / O’Fallon

1220 Mid Rivers Mall Dr.

10:45 AM 1:35 4:25 7:15 10:05

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) DP

1002 Hi-Pointe Place

(Wehrenberg)

! The Birth of a Nation (R) No VIP after 6PM

(11:00 AM 1:40 4:20) 7:10 9:50

Hi-Pointe Backlot

Mid Rivers 14 Cine

www.wehrenberg.com

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) DP

Clayton & Skinker

St. Charles / O’Fallon

All Showtimes are p.m. unless otherwise noted

Bargain Shows No Passes Allowed Closed Captioning Descriptive Video Service Open Captioning Digital Projection

Snowden (R)

Sausage Party (R) DVS,CC 1:15 7:10 (11:15 AM) 4:35 10:15

Suicide Squad (PG-13) CC (1:45) 4:35 7:25 10:35

Sully (PG-13) 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30

9:00 PM

! Remo (Tamil) (NR) No VIP after 6PM 9:00 PM

Jason Bourne (PG-13) DVS,CC (1:10) 4:15 7:05 10:05

Suicide Squad (PG-13) 4:15 10:10

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100716

() ! CC DVS OC DP

Showtimes and movies change daily and are provided by the theaters. All Showtimes are p.m. unless otherwise noted

South

South

West

Ronnies 20 Cine (Wehrenberg) Arnold 14 Cine (Wehrenberg) 5320 S Lindbergh Blvd. www.wehrenberg.com ! Deepwater Horizon: The IMAX 2D

Experience (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 11:30 AM 2:10 4:50 7:30 10:10

! The Birth of a Nation (R) No VIP after 6PM 12:20 3:15 6:10 7:35 9:10 10:25 ! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:15 AM 11:45 AM 12:15 1:50 2:20 2:50 4:25 5:05 5:25 7:20 7:45 8:15 10:00 10:30 11:00

! Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (PG) No VIP after 6PM 11:40 AM 12:10 2:15 2:40 4:40 5:10 7:15 9:40

! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 12:15 2:50 5:35 8:15 11:00

! Masterminds (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 11:30 AM 2:00 4:25 7:00 9:30

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 11:00 AM 12:45 3:45 4:40 7:00 10:00 10:35

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children 3D (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 1:50 7:40

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) 11:45 AM 3:05 6:30 9:35

! Queen of Katwe (PG) No VIP after 6PM 12:45 3:40 6:35 9:25

Storks (PG) 11:00 AM 3:50 8:30 10:50

Storks 3D (PG) 1:25 6:15

Blair Witch (R) 5:15 10:30

Bridget Jones’s Baby (R)

1912 Richardson Rd. www.wehrenberg.com ! The Birth of a Nation (R) No VIP after 6PM 1:20 4:20 7:10 10:00

! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM 1:35 2:20 4:15 5:00 7:00 7:45 9:35 10:20

! Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (PG) No VIP after 6PM 1:10 1:55 3:40 4:15 6:05 6:55 9:25 ! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 1:50 4:30 7:15 10:05 ! Masterminds (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 2:30 5:05 7:30 9:55

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 1:00 2:10 3:50 6:45 8:10 9:45 5:10 PM

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) 1:00 4:05 7:10 10:15

10:35 11:25

Suicide Squad (PG-13) 12:30 3:55 7:15 10:15

Bad Moms (R) 11:50 AM 2:20 4:50 7:50 10:15 ! Apparition Hill (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 11:00 AM 1:50 4:40 7:30

Gravois Bluffs Stadium 12(Regal) Hwy 30 @ Gravois Bluff by JC Penny 636-326-2862

The Birth of a Nation (R) DVS,CC (11:35 AM 2:50) 7:25 10:15

! The Girl on the Train (R) DVS,CC (11:15 AM 2:00) 4:15 4:55 7:05 7:40 10:00 10:35

Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (PG) CC (11:25 AM 2:10) 4:45 7:15 9:55

Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) CC (11:10 AM 1:50) 4:50 7:45 10:30 Masterminds (PG-13) CC (11:35 AM 2:10) 5:05 7:55 10:40

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) CC (11:55 AM 3:00) 7:00

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children 3D (PG-13) DVS,CC (1:00) 4:20 7:30 10:10 10:40

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) CC (11:20 AM 2:40) 7:20 10:25

Storks (PG) CC (11:00 AM 1:30) 4:00 6:50 9:20

Sully (PG-13) (11:30 AM 2:05) 4:30 7:10 9:40 Don’t Breathe (R) CC (2:30) 7:35 Sausage Party (R) DVS,CC (11:45 AM) 5:00 9:50

The Secret Life of Pets (PG) CC (11:05 AM 1:40)

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! The Birth of a Nation (R) No VIP after 6PM 1:20 4:10 7:15 10:05

! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM

1:45 4:20 6:45 9:15

Chesterfield Galaxy 14 Cine (Wehrenberg)

! Middle School: The Worst Years of My

Life (PG) No VIP after 6PM

Sully (PG-13)

11:40 AM 2:10 4:50 7:30 10:10

1:40 4:10 6:40 9:10

Don’t Breathe (R) ! Masterminds (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

5:00 10:20

Sausage Party (R) 8:35 PM

12:35 3:00 5:25 7:50 10:15

Suicide Squad (PG-13) ! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar

North

Children (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

! The Birth of a Nation (R) No VIP after 6PM

The Wild Life (Robinson Crusoe) (PG)

1:00 4:05 6:00 9:05

1:05 4:10 7:10 10:10

1:10 3:35 7:25 9:50

! The Girl on the Train: Mega Screen (R) No VIP after 6PM

War Dogs (R) 1:20 4:15 7:00 9:45

1:45 4:20 7:00 9:40

Florence Foster Jenkins (PG-13)

12:45 3:45 6:45

(314)227-5503 ! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar

The Birth of a Nation (R) DVS,CC (11:20 AM 12:30 1:00 3:30 4:00) 6:30 7:00 9:30 10:00 ! The Girl on the Train (R) DVS,CC (11:00 AM 1:40 4:30) 7:20 10:10

Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (PG) CC (12:00 2:30 5:00) 7:30 9:55

Children 3D (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

1:50 4:30 7:05 9:35

! Premam (Telugu) (NR) No VIP after 6PM ! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

12:15 3:30 6:30 9:45

Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) CC (11:10 AM 2:00 4:50) 7:40 10:25

! Deepwater Horizon: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) DVS,CC 1:30 4:20 7:05 9:50

1:20 4:15 7:00 9:45

1:25 4:20 7:10 10:05

! Masterminds (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

Masterminds (PG-13) CC (12:15 2:50 5:25) 8:00 10:20

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children 3D (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) CC

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) 1:05 4:20 7:20 10:15

Storks (PG) 1:15 3:50 6:20 8:45

(12:40 3:45) 6:50 9:45 10:05

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) CC (12:10 3:20) 6:40 9:50

Queen of Katwe (PG) DVS,CC (12:20 3:40) 6:45 9:40 Storks (PG) CC (11:40 AM 2:10 4:45) 7:25 9:45 Blair Witch (R) DVS,CC (12:25 3:00 5:20) 7:50 10:15

11:00 AM 2:25 5:00 7:35 10:00

11:00 AM 1:50 2:50 4:40 7:30 8:30 10:20

WEHRENBERG

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children 3D (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

Sully (PG-13)

5:45 PM

(11:05 AM 1:45 4:25) 7:15 10:00 Don’t Breathe (R) CC (2:35 5:05) 7:55 10:30 Sausage Party (R) DVS,CC (2:45 5:15) 7:45 10:25 Suicide Squad (PG-13) CC (12:50 3:50) 6:55 10:15

314-994-3733

! The Birth of a Nation (R) DVS (11:05 AM) 1:10 1:40 3:50 4:10 6:50 7:10 9:25

! Denial (PG-13) ! The Dressmaker (R)

WEHRENBERG

(1:30) 4:20

! Queen of Katwe (PG) DVS ! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM 1:30 3:15 4:15 6:00 7:00 8:45 9:45

(1:00) 4:00 7:00 9:30

! Hell or High Water (R) DVS (11:10 AM) 7:20 9:35

11:55 AM 5:40 11:20

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13) 11:15 AM 1:15 4:15 7:15 10:15

Plaza Frontenac (Landmark)

(11:00 AM) 1:05 1:35 3:45 4:15 6:45 7:15 9:20

(11:50 AM 2:40 5:10) 7:35 10:10

When the Bough Breaks (PG-13) DVS,CC

! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM

11:30 AM 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:25

Jason Bourne (PG-13)

11:00 AM 12:15 1:45 3:00 4:30 5:45 7:15 8:30 10:00 11:15 ! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:35 AM 12:35 2:10 3:10 4:45 5:45 7:20 8:20 9:55 10:55

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

3:30 6:15 9:00

12:45 3:15 8:45

! The Birth of a Nation (R) No VIP after 6PM

11:40 AM 2:15 4:50 7:25 10:00

Sausage Party (R)

Lindbergh & Clayton

1320 Central Park Dr. O’Fallon www.wehrenberg.com

! Masterminds (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

12:30 3:30 6:30 9:25

Hell or High Water (R)

O’Fallon 15 Cine (Wehrenberg)

11:55 AM 2:20 4:40 7:00 9:20

10:10 PM

Sully (PG-13)

1:45 4:30 7:15 9:55

! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

7:05 PM

(11:30 AM 1:10 4:15) 7:10

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children 3D (PG-13) DVS,CC

Finding Dory (PG)

! Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (PG) No VIP after 6PM

Snowden (R)

Bridget Jones’s Baby (R)

The Secret Life of Pets (PG) 1:30 4:00 6:25 8:50

1:55 4:40 7:15 9:45

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

1:30 4:15 7:00 9:35

11:30 AM 1:50 4:10 6:30 8:50

3:50 8:35 1:35 6:20

Sully (PG-13)

Storks (PG)

1:05 4:10 7:05 10:00

Nerve (PG-13)

Ghostbusters (PG-13)

1:05 4:05

The Magnificent Seven (PG-13)

1:15 3:55 6:30 9:10

Jason Bourne (PG-13)

Lights Out (PG-13)

Bridget Jones’s Baby (R)

9:45 PM

1:40 4:25 7:20 10:10

Bad Moms (R)

2:45 5:20 8:00

2:45 6:00 9:00

St. Louis Mills Stadium 18 (Regal)

50 Ludwig Dr. Fairview Heights www.wehrenberg.com

Snowden (R)

1:00 4:10 7:15 10:20

1:00 3:55 6:50 9:45

St. Clair 10 Cine (Wehrenberg)

450 THF Blvd. www.wehrenberg.com

! Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (PG) No VIP after 6PM

! Deepwater Horizon (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

2:00 7:20

5555 St. Louis Mills Blvd.

Illinois

! The Girl on the Train (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:45 AM 1:00 2:20 3:40 4:55 6:15 7:30 9:00

11:45 AM 2:05 4:25 6:45 9:05

Bridget Jones’s Baby (R)

11:10 AM 1:40 4:05 6:30 9:00

Sausage Party (R)

www.wehrenberg.com

West

1:30 4:45 8:00

Storks (PG)

Sully (PG-13) 11:10 AM 1:30 3:45 6:15 8:45 11:00

12701 Manchester Rd.

10:05

! Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children 3D (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

11:30 AM 2:25 7:30

Don’t Breathe (R)

Des Peres 14 Cine (Wehrenberg)

Bargain Shows No Passes Allowed Closed Captioning Descriptive Video Service Open Captioning Digital Projection

! Queen of Katwe (PG) No VIP after 6PM 11:30 AM 1:20 4:10 7:00 9:50

Storks (PG) 11:00 AM 2:25 4:45 7:05 9:25

Bridget Jones’s Baby (R) 11:00 AM 1:50 4:40

Sully (PG-13) 11:45 AM 2:15 4:45 7:15 9:45

When the Bough Breaks (PG-13) 11:05 AM 4:30 10:00

Don’t Breathe (R) 7:40 10:05

Suicide Squad (PG-13) 1:40 7:10

10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

27


OFF THE

MENU

From left: teriyaki chicken, sweet and spicy pork, and boneless beef short rib tacos at Kalbi Taco Shack

Shack attack Kalbi Taco Shack’s Korean-Mexican fusion is lavorful, low-stakes fun ★★ BY IAN FROEB / RESTAURANT CRITIC / IFROEB@POST-DISPATCH.COM

W

hen I reviewed Louie’s Wine Dive last month, I made the observation — neither original nor profound — that a true dive bar would never refer to itself as such. Putting the word dive in the name of your restaurant stltoday.com/ofthemenu

28

or bar is a signifier, a pretense of casualness. That isn’t a capital crime, but it’s definitely a gimmick. This week, we must confront a thornier description: the shack, lately invigorated by superstar restaurateur and St. Louis native Danny Meyer’s Shake Shack. While Shake Shack is a slickly conceived, wildly successful

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@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

international brand, it’s also exactly the burger, fries and frozen-custard joint it purports to be. So I walked into the 3-month-old Cherokee Street restaurant Kalbi Taco Shack unsure of the stakes. It doesn’t ofer table service. The average diner will spend about $10 on a meal. Yet the past few years have proven again and again that such operations — fastcasual restaurants, food trucks and the like — are dishing up some of the most enjoyable, exciting and innovative fare in St. Louis. The best example of this trend is Guerrilla Street Food, which I included in the Top 25 of my annual STL 100 when it was only a food truck. Last

OUR FOOD RATINGS ★ Fair ★★ Good ★★★ Excellent ★★★★ Extraordinary

year, when Guerrilla Street Food opened a small, fast-casual brickand-mortar restaurant, I awarded it three stars. Just last week, I gave a 2½-star review to tiny, carryout-only Kounter Kulture, and I even flirted with a full three stars but couldn’t pull the trigger on a restaurant without seats. (Yet.) Spoiler alert: Kalbi Taco Shack doesn’t rise to the level of exciting or innovative, but there are enjoyable moments here. Kalbi follows the Korean-Mexican-fusion template made famous by Los Angeles chef Roy Choi and introduced to St. Louis by Seoul Taco. And if the idea of filling tacos and burritos with kalbi (marinated and then grilled beef short ribs) and other traditional Korean preparations isn’t new, at this modest, family-run spot, it doesn’t yet feel played out. Kalbi is the first restaurant for married owners Sue Wong-Shackelford and Mark Shackelford, though WongShackelford is no stranger to the industry. Her mother was the chef at a Chinese restaurant, her father at a Polynesian restaurant, and at home her parents cooked dishes from those and other Pacific Asian cuisines. For Kalbi, Wong-Shackelford and her older daughter have tweaked some of those recipes. The format is simple. Choose a dish (taco, burrito, quesadilla, rice bowl or banh mi) and then a protein (kalbi, sweet-spicy pork, sweet-spicy chicken, teriyaki chicken or tofu). The

Find more restaurant news and reviews ➙ stltoday.com/dining stltoday.com/go

PHOTOS: ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ

THE LATEST FROM STLTODAY.COM/OFFTHEMENU Charleville Vineyard, Winery and Microbrewery will expand its brewing operation from Ste. Genevieve County to St. Louis with Charleville Brewing Co. & Restaurant, which aims to open by spring at 2101 Chouteau Avenue in Downtown West. The Ste. Genevieve facility currently includes both a 30-barrel and a seven-barrel brewhouse. Charleville will move the seven-barrel system to St. Louis, where it will be used to brew draft and limited-release beers. “The whole idea is to connect with the (St. Louis) community,” says Tait Russell, director of operations for Charleville and the son of its founders, Jack and Joal Russell. For the new brewery and restaurant, Charleville is partnering with Paul and Wendy Hamilton, owners of Eleven Eleven Mississippi, Vin de Set, PW Pizza and 21st Street Brewers Bar. BY IAN FROEB


BUY 1 GET 1 50% OFF (With purchase of any dinner entrée and two beverages)

Valid ValidMonday Mondaythru thruThursday Thursday only. only. Equal Equal or or lesser lesser value. value. Cannot combine any other coupon, special Cannot combine with with Any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. Expires 7/11/16. Ad Pages 9/11/16 discount or promotion. Expires 11/15/16.

KIDS EAT FREE! (With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included) Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult adultdinner dinnerentree entreeand andaabeverage. beverage.Kids Kids meal meal up up to to a a$9/= $9/=value valueper perentrée. entrée.No NoCash CashValue. Value. Must Must present present paper Cannotcombine combinewith withany anyother otheroffers. offers. paper coupon. Cannot Expires 7/11/16. Ad Pages Expires 11/15/16. 9/11/16

25% OFF SUSHI

A sweet and spicy chicken burrito

Quesadillas

kalbi is the standout, with a full flavor from its traditional sweet-savory soy-sauce-based marinade. To my taste, at least, both the sweet-spicy chicken and pork could be spicier. This could be the fault of my assumptions, though. I think I expected — or hoped for — the fermented funk and chile heat of Korean gochujang paste. As at Seoul Taco, the best example of Korean-Mexican fusion at Kalbi isn’t the titular taco — a relatively straightforward afair here, your choice of protein, a crisp vegetable

slaw and the “Kalbi aioli,” a garlicky, sour cream-based sauce — but the burrito. My order was plump, but not collapsingly overstufed, with pork and jasmine rice, and each accent (cheddar and Jack cheeses, lettuce, sour cream and, especially, pickled carrots and the aforementioned aioli) was in the exact proportion to be distinct but still in harmony with the rest. The banh mi is a welcome curveball. Here, at least, is the chile heat I craved from other dishes, with jalapeño slices to balance the cool, crisp cucumber, daikon and pickled carrot. The rice bowl also packs a chile punch, thanks to the little cup of sweet-and-spicy sauce served on the side. This is far more pungent than what seasons the chicken and pork, with a fizzy tang not unlike Sriracha’s. As it stands, Kalbi serves fun, flavorful food — more than enough to earn two stars in this brave new world of ever more casual, democratic dining. But those last two dishes I mentioned suggest some quirks beyond Kalbi’s basic Korean-Mexican concept that could, if nudged forward, push this unassuming restaurant even further. WHERE Kalbi Taco Shack, 2301 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314-240-5544; kalbitacoshack. com • MENU Korean-Mexican fusion • HOURS 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary stltoday.com/go

ValidMonday Mondaythru thru Thursday only. Cannot combine Valid Thursday only. Cannot combine with withany anyother othercoupon, coupon, special discount or promotion. special, discount or promotion. Expires 7/11/16. Ad Pages Expires 11/15/16. 9/11/16

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

Original Costume Shop The

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® mersgoodwill.org 10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

29


st. louis’ best bridal

BRIDAL SHOW The Best Weddings Start Here Before you go out, check restaurant critic Ian Froeb’s guide to the 100 best spots in St. Louis. You’ll find great options for every taste and price range.

! IAN W TION A VAC FOR 2

*

Sunday, October 9 Noon to 3:30 p.m. FASHION SHOW STARTS AT 3:30

St. Charles Convention Center Endless Inspirations

HAND-CRAFTED SMOKED MEATS AND BREWS

20 South Belt West • Belleville • IL • 62220 Phone: 618 • 257 • 9000

www.beastcraftbbq.com

'(&$ )+$* %(#!"

ONE LUCKY COUPLE WILL

WIN A FUNJET VACATION for 2* First 100 brides-to-be receive a FREE GIFT! :7"8 +. '72 3 #3+8,"8% -#7/"+. 5#7,7175 0*, (!,# 4 &$2) 67781$59

FREE SHOW PASSES & TICKET INFO Complimentary tickets are available at area Savvi Formalwear locations, while supplies last. Everyone else pays a $5 entrance fee (cash only) the day of the show.

2 Free tickets when you preregister online at

STLBESTBRIDAL.COM SHOW SPONSORS

*Must be present and a registered with St. Louis’ Best Bridal at the Oct. 9, 2016 St. Louis’ Best Bridal Show.

30

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OVERHEARD

ON TV

“We should be talking about the important issues like Rosie O’Donnell. She’s a fat loser, and everyone agrees with me.”

“Don’t elect me, and I will continue to run for president until the day I die, and I will never die.”

ALEC BALDWIN, as Donald Trump, on “Saturday Night Live”

KA McKINNON, as Hillary Clinton, KATE on “Saturday Night Live”

Yvonne Orji (left) and Issa Rae in “Insecure”

A fresh new voice Tube Talk In ‘Insecure,’ on HBO following ‘Divorce,’ Issa

Rae plays a mom struggling with career and relationships

PHOTOS: HBO; NBC (SNL)

BY GAIL PENNINGTON / TV CRITIC / GPENNINGTON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

In June 1998, Sarah Jessica Parker debuted as Carrie Bradshaw, eternally searching for true love and great shoes on HBO’s “Sex and the City.” On Sunday, Parker returns to series TV, but this time she’s looking for her freedom. In the dark “Divorce” (9 p.m.), Parker is Frances, who has had it with husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church). Everything about him annoys her, up to and including his mustache. When she abruptly tells him she wants a divorce, the drama (sorry, this is a comedy) is underway, drawing in their teenage kids (Sterling Jerins and stltoday.com/tubetalk

@gailpennington

Charlie Kilgore) and married friends Diane and Nick (Molly Shannon and Tracy Letts). “Divorce” was created by Sharon Horgan, who co-created and stars in Amazon’s “Catastrophe,” my favorite current comedy. (Season 3 should arrive sometime next year.) “Catastrophe” is also frequently abrasive and raw, but “Divorce” in the early going is not just dark but also slow and mopey — sometimes downright depressing. Part of the problem is that Parker plays Frances as so chilly and of-putting that we’re not inclined to make an efort to understand her. The characters in an HBO comedy don’t have to be likable, as “Girls” proved. But as viewers, we have to care @tubetalkpd

Find weekly TV picks, live chats and celeb news ➙ stltoday.com/tv

enough about them to come back week after week. “Divorce” might not be as painful as a real divorce. But it could be just about as funny. Hang on, though, because HBO brings a fresh new voice and powerful performance to the new comedy that follows. “Insecure” (9:30 p.m. Sunday) was created by Issa Rae (with Larry Wilmore), and Rae stars as a version of herself, conveniently named Issa. Haven’t heard of her? The writer-producer-actress gained a lot of fans via her web series “Awkward Black Girl,” but “Insecure” should land her a lot more. Issa struggles with career (she fell into a job with a nonprofit, motivating kids to stay in school, but doesn’t love it) and relationships (her live-in boyfriend isn’t going anywhere, even of the couch). Her best friend, Molly (Yvonne Orji) is hugely successful at work but repeatedly crushed by men she tries to build something with. All this is told through the perspective of educated black women, but many of the themes will resonate with anyone who has ever dated. At the same time, “Insecure” knows itself and its world well and depicts it vividly, acquainting viewers who aren’t part of that world with everything from on-the-nose slang to dating and marriage protocols. Throughout, frank social commentary lurks just below the humor. The opening scene sets the tone. Issa, as a representative of the organization “We Got Y’all,” meets with black middle schoolers to launch a motivational program.

“Why you talk like a white girl?” one immediately demands, followed by insults, thinly masked as questions, about her hair, her wardrobe and her marital status. Marital status is a sore subject for Issa, who is turning 29. A man from her past, her “what if” guy, has sent her a birthday text. Meanwhile, her boyfriend has spent the best part of four years finding himself, with no result. His idea of a birthday celebration is a Redbox movie, as soon as he finishes watching a workout infomercial. Increasingly panicky, Issa zones out during a routine work meeting, hearing her supervisor say things like, “Educated black women are highly unlikely to get married.” At a club on open-mic night, she indulges her closet passion for rapping, setting herself on a bumpy new course. Speaking of rap, “Insecure” is full of it, including all the F-words and other profanities of a typical rap track. Even Issa’s club rap, which is hilarious, has a key phrase that can’t be printed. Everything about “Insecure,” though, is not just palatable but completely charming, thanks to Rae’s relatable honesty and irrepressible humor. As viewers, we may be infuriated that a woman this spectacular finds Mr. Right so elusive, but that just makes “Insecure” more likely to run a long time. And that’s something to feel secure about. WHAT “Divorce” • TWO STARS out of four • WHEN 9 p.m. Sunday • WHERE HBO • MORE INFO hbo.com/divorce WHAT “Insecure” • THREE STARS out of four • WHEN 9:30 p.m. Sunday • WHERE HBO • MORE INFO hbo.com/insecure

GET MORE GAIL Gail talks TV Monday mornings with McGraw Milhaven on KTRS-AM and at stltoday.com/mcgraw — and with readers at 1 p.m. Thursdays at stltoday.com/chats.

10.07.16-10.13.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 10.07.16-10.13.16

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COLLEGE CONNECTION

stltoday.com/collegeconnection • October 2016

ST. LOUIS NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR Saint Louis University — Simon Recreation Center Gym

Sunday Oct. 16, 2016, 1-4 p.m. Register Now at www.gotomyncf.com

INSIDE: 2016 SA INT LOUIS NATIONA L COLLEGE FA IR TIPS GUIDE TO EXHIBITORS A ND FLOOR PL A N M A K E THE MOST OF YOU R COLLEGE FA IR V ISIT TIPS FOR ENSU R ING A SMOOTH TR A NSITION TO COLLEGE Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Produced by the Suburban Journals of St. Louis, LLC


2016 sAinT loUis nATionAl CollEgE FAiR sponsored by the National Association for College Admission Counseling Date: Sunday, October 16, 2016 Place: Saint Louis University, Simon Recreation Center, 3639 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, MO 63108

CollEgE ConnECTion ConTEnTs

tiMe: 1 to 4 p.m.

NACAC National College Fair

4 4

Workshops offer useful information

6

Make the most of your college fair visit

Learn more about financial aid, selecting a college

Tips for attending a college fair Simple steps to make things easier

Tips to get prepared for the big day

Learn more : mobap.edu

8-9 9

Exhibitors list and floorplan Help to find everything at the fair

Use your phone to register Find a QR code for easy registration

CAMPUsnews Special Promotional Section

7 7 10 10 11

Fall Schedule

13

Monday, Nov. 7 & Friday, Dec. 9 Whether you are currently in high school or planning to transfer to Webster University, there’s no better way to learn about all that Webster has to offer than to attend a Webster Preview Day. At each event you’ll have the chance to speak with current students and faculty, as well as ask your questions about financial aid, scholarships and the admissions process. Plus, you can tour the campus and lunch is on us! Discover more and register: webster.edu/previewdays

2

OCTOBER 2016 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

stltoday.com/collegeconnection

Maryville offers students unparalleled real-world experience Marquette University — Be The Difference here SIUE provides easy adjustment to college life Southeast STEM programs preparing grads for next generation technologies Southern Illinois University Carbondale: We’re all about experience UMSL can be your educational home away from home

ADVERTising sAlEs DiRECToR

Susan Eckert seckert@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8587

MEDiA sPECiAlisT Charles Mems cmems@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8033

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Produced by the Suburban Journals of Greater St. Louis, LLC 11675 Fairgrove Industrial Blvd. Maryland Heights, MO 63043 Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Produced by the Suburban Journals of St. Louis, LLC


WE ARE SIU. A NATIONALLY RANKED,TOP-TIER PUBLIC INSTITUTION giving you hands-on experiences to shape your future. Our Saluki spirit inspires art, sparks debate, creates possibilities and fuels innovation. With more than 200 programs and 300 student organizations, we have countless ways for you to gain experience at SIU. Discover more and schedule your visit at

siu.edu/visit

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COLLEGE CONNECTION | OCTOBER 2016

3


2016 St. Louis National College Fair Local Arrangements Committee Beth Brasel Crossroads College Preparatory School — NCF Co-Chair Heather Brock Saint Louis University — NCF Co-Chair Todd Burrell Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville Meredith Rauscher St. Louis Community College

TIPS FOR ATTENDING A NACAC NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR ere are some useful tips from the National Association for College Admission Counseling for students planning to attend one of its college fairs.

H

BEFORE THE FAIR: Answer the following questions and take the following actions to help determine what kind of school would be best for you: • Do you want to attend a two- or four-year institution? Co-ed or single sex? • What size school do you want to attend? • What programs of study are you considering? • How far from home do you want to go? • Do you wish to participate in any specific extracurricular activities or athletics? • Do you want to attend a school in an urban, suburban or rural environment? • Do you require any special services

WORKSHOPS HOW TO CHOOSE A COLLEGE 1:30-2:00 p.m. 2:30-3:00 p.m. FINANCIAL AID 101 2:00-2:30 p.m. 3:00-3:30 p.m.

examinations. 4. Register before heading to the fair. Watch the video about student registration at www.nacacnet.org/ ncfstudent. 5. Watch a video for more information about what happens at a NACAC College Fair at www.nacacnet.org/ ncfstudent. 6. Download and print the checklist to take with you to the fair.

AT THE FAIR:

• Pick up a bag and a fair directory. • Visit with colleges and universities (i.e. tutoring, note takers, readers, TDD you feel meet your criteria. or interpreters)? • Talk with a college counselor at the Counseling Center if you have any questions or need help with your colALSO: lege search. 1. Discuss your college plans with • Attend a workshop. your guidance counselor, family, teachers and friends. 2. Research your colleges of interest AFTER THE FAIR: on the Internet and in your guidance • Be sure to watch the videos about office or library. preventing anxiety during your col3. Check dates and registralege search and financial aid options at tion deadlines for college entrance www.nacacnet.org/ncfstudent.

COLLEGE CATEGORIES NACAC would like to thank the following companies for their support of the 2016 Saint Louis National College Fair.

4

OCTOBER 2016 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

• rely on private funds, which leads As you plan for college you have to a higher average cost many options. Listed below are the • offer financial aid opportunities college categories that describe the different types of institutions available to reduce the total cost to you. Public These colleges and universities: NON-PROFIT • receive a large part of funding Private from state or local taxes. Some fundThese colleges and universities: ing comes from tuition and endow• receive funding primarily from ments student tuition and endowments. • follow performance standards set Some funding comes from governby the state mental support in the form of tax • are, in many cases, state-run, breaks and student loans. which lowers the tuition for in-state • follow the leadership of a board students of trustees • typically categorized as two-year, • develop own institutional plans since they operate mostly on private four-year, research, comprehensive or community colleges support

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FOR-PROFIT/PROPRIETARY These colleges and universities: • receive up to 90 percent of their revenue from federal student aid • operate under the demands of investors and stockholders • usually offer a non-traditional format • have come under federal scrutiny for high pressure sales/recruitment tactics A close examination of the academic, social and financial factors will lead you to a best-fit college. To read more on the differences in college categories, please visit our website at www.nacacnet.org/ncfstudent and click on the NACAC icon.

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UMSL DAY is Nov. 12th See first-hand why UMSL is a great choice for you. To register visit: umslday.com

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Produced by the Suburban Journals of St. Louis, LLC

stltoday.com/collegeconnection

COLLEGE CONNECTION | OCTOBER 2016

5


How to Finance a college education or many college-bound students, savings, family contributions, scholarships, grants and a parttime job won’t be enough to pay for college, and borrowing may be the only way to make up the difference. The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that more than 60 percent of America’s 20 million college students rely on student loans to finance their education. A college student today graduates with an average of $24,301 in student loan debt, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. While many students believe that loans are worth the investment in their future, a growing number of borrowers are defaulting on their student loan debt. A father and daughter go over finances. To help parents and students learn more about college financing, FindLaw. Here are some additional tips: com, a website for free legal information, offers a free, downloadable miniStart early. From the moment your guide on student loan debt. child is born, start putting away a little bit each month toward education. Use a state-run 529 plan or an IRA Coverdell account to save for college education tax-free.

college years to defray expenses. Keep your eyes open for opportunities.

F

Consider the job prospects for your major: Before declaring a major, research post-college career prospects. For example, if you need to take out $50,000 in student loans to obtain a degree that results in a job that typically pays about $35,000 per year, you may want to rethink your major.

COURTESY OF CREATAS IMAGES

Research and apply for all financial aid opportunities, even if you think you may not qualify. You can apply for federal student loans by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

Compare financial aid packages: As you receive acceptance packages from colleges and universities, pay close Apply to colleges you can afford: attention to the financial aid programs Carefully weigh the costs and benefits offered by each school to determine of an expensive school to a less costly institution. Students who graduate with which offers the best option to finance little or no debt may have more freedom your college education. to take career risks. Research scholarships: Continuously apply for scholarships throughout your Explore financial aid options:

Understand your loans: Some have higher interest rates. Some offer different terms to defer payment while a student is pursuing another degree. Some allow you to start paying the interest immediately, while you’re still in college, to lower the loan’s overall cost. Before considering student loans from a private lender, seek information and apply for federal student loans such as Stafford, Perkins and PLUS loans. Also talk to your college to see if it offers an institutional student loan program. Think twice, parents: Parents who co-sign for a child’s loan are responsible for that debt in the event that their child can’t pay it. Instead, help your child start building a positive credit history in the teenage years, and teach kids to take financial responsibility for the debt they incur. To learn more, visit FindLaw.com. BRANDPOINT

Make the right choice for your future

I 800-SLU-FOR-U /// slu.edu /// beabilliken.com

6

OCTOBER 2016 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

t just keeps getting earlier and earlier that young people are asked “What are you going to do with you life?” For those who are in the midst of their high-school education, the time is now to act on those plans and pick a college to set them on the path for the career of their choice. Many will take an important step in that direction by attending the 2016 St. Louis National College Fair, stltoday.com/collegeconnection

sponsored by the National Association for College Admission Counseling. The fair will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. Oct. 16, in the Simon Recreation Center at Saint Louis University. Parents and students will be able to meet with representatives from various colleges and universities to discuss admission and financial aid at those institutions. Counselors will be onsite to help students find colleges

that suit their interests. Admission representatives will discuss course offerings, college life and financial aid requirements. The fair will include workshops on financial aid, how to choose a college, how to write a college essay, and information about the NCAA and NAIA. The fair will bring together students with the resources they need to set them on the path to their futures.

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Special advertiSing Section

Maryville offers students unparalleled real-world experience Did you know that nearly 1 in 5 employers worldwide have difficulty filling positions because of potential employees’ lack of experience? The good news is that Maryville University’s partnerships throughout metropolitan St. Louis offer unparalleled real-world experience to help students develop market-ready skills prior to entering the workforce. For example, Maryville recently announced an unprecedented opportunity for students interested in sales and marketing careers. Abstrakt Marketing Group — a St. Louis-based firm — recently opened a satellite office on Maryville’s campus, and has created a paid internship opportunity. The internship gives students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in a real agency environment. In addition, Maryville’s new oncampus Cyber Fusion Center gives students enrolled in designated cyber

75 + ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

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security classes the opportunity to work in an educational environment while providing information security for real client nonprofit organizations. The Center is even equipped with such state-of-the-art devices as a telepresence robot so clients can “meet” with students and faculty in real time. Through similar innovative partnerships within each academic program, Maryville students are given a competitive edge in the job market upon graduation.

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Marquette University — Be The Difference here At Marquette University, the search for and sharing of knowledge are important parts of what we do. As a Catholic, Jesuit university, faith serves as the foundation for the way we teach and the values we instill. Here, you’ll be pushed to think critically within the context of using that knowledge for the greater good. After the transformative experience of a Marquette education, you will Be The Difference. Our students tell us that a Marquette education is worth the investment, and we’re proud to be ranked 50th in Best Value Schools by U.S. News and World Report. Here, you’re admitted into one of our seven colleges and the program or department of your major. We offer 83 majors and 78 minors and professional programs, including pre-dental, pre-law and premed.

We encourage our students to lead by serving others, and 80 percent of our undergrads participate in community service. We also have more than 300 clubs, organizations and activities. Marquette’s campus is located near downtown Milwaukee, home to worldclass festivals, professional sports, several Fortune 500 companies and plenty of internship opportunities.

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23

94%

NCAA DIVISION II ATHLETIC TEAMS

JOB PLACEMENT RATE

MARYVILLE. MANY CONNECTIONS. ONE U. 650 Maryville University Drive, St. Louis, MO 63141 314.529.9350 or 800.627.9855 admissions@maryville.edu • maryville.edu

stltoday.com/collegeconnection

COLLEGE CONNECTION | OCTOBER 2016

7


EXHIBITORS & BOOTH NUMBERS INTERNATIONAL • St. Mary’s University London ........................ 273

ST. LOUIS NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR OCTOBER 16, 2016

ALABAMA • Auburn University*......220 • Spring Hill College ....... 221 • The University of Alabama*................. 130 • University of Alabama at Birmingham*................139 • The University of Alabama in Huntsville* ................. 50

MAIN ENTRANCE

HANDBALL-COURTS Student Lead Retrieval

STORAGE

ARKANSAS • Hendrix College ............149 • University of Arkansas at Little Rock ......................74 • University of Arkansas* .216

22

ILLINOIS • Augustana College*......175

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12

11

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72 442 74 438 75 436 76 434 73 440 71 444 77 432 78 79 446

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COUNSELING CENTER

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WOMEN

11' AISLE 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 320 318 316 314 312 310 308 306 304 302 146 145 144 143 142 141 140 139 138 137

117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 156 155 154 153 152 151 150 149 148 147

11’AISLE 349 347 159 345 160 343 161 341 162 337 164 335 333 331 167 168 339 163 165 166 157 158

315 174 313 175 311 176 309 307 169 170 171 172 173 180 177 305 178 303 179 301

250 248 202 246 201 244 200 242 199 240 238 204 203 198 236 197 234 196 232 195 220 194 218 193

216 214 1220 92 1218 91 220 190 218 189 188 187 212 186 210 185 208 184 206 183 204 182 202 181

MEN

10' AISLE

COLORADO • Colorado State University*..................... 27 • Regis University* .......... 131 • University of Colorado Boulder ........................135

GEORGIA • Georgia College and State University* ....30 • Georgia State University*................... 224 • Morehouse College..... 259 • Savannah College of Art and Design ..................... 41 • Spelman College........... 98

19

10' AISLE

CALIFORNIA • FIDM .............................. 99 • University of CaliforniaBerkeley ......................209 • University of San Francisco*............. 100

FLORIDA • Eckerd College* ............218 • Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University*....................132 • Florida Institute of Technology ................................. 92 • Florida Southern College ..56 • Nova Southeastern University*..................... 42 • Saint Leo University .....142 • University of Miami*.....168 • The University of Tampa* 88

20

10' AISLE

ARIZONA • Arizona State University*..59 • The University ofArizona*..12 • University of Advancing Technology*................... 96

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA • American University* ... 171

21

205 249 252 150

206 247 251 148

207 245 250 146

208 243 249 144

209 241 248 142

210 239 247 140

211 237 246 138

212 235 245 136

213 233 244 134

214 231 243 132

215 229 242 130

216 225 241 126

226 203 217 221 221 222 211 227 201 228 218 219 219 2220 223 209 224 207 225 205 223 17 2 15 213 234 110 233 108 232 106 231 104 230 102 229 237 116 236 114 235 112 240 122 239 238 118 124

WORKSHOPS

10' AISLE 253 254 255 256 141 257 258 259 135 260 261 270 113 271 111 272 109 273 107 274 105 275 103 276 277 145 143 121 1268 19 1269 17 115 139 137 133 262 131 263 129 264 127 265 123 267 125 266 101 149 147

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY SIMON GYM

• Blackburn College ...... 269 • Bradley University* ......129 • Chicago State University ....................200 • Columbia College Chicago ....................... 222 • Concordia University Chicago* ........................ 46 • DePaul University* ......264 • Dominican University* 106 • Eastern Illinois University*................... 232 • Elmhurst College* ....... 188 • Greenville College........ 150 • Illinois College*.............. 37 • Illinois Institute of Technology*............. 104 • Illinois Wesleyan University ...................... 77

OCTOBER 2016 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

277-7' X 8' BOOTHS Prepared by

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Knox College ................. 55 Lake Forest College ....... 48 Lewis University .......... 246 Lincoln College ........... 242 Lindenwood University — Belleville ...................... 276 Loyola University Chicago ....................... 244 MacMurray College*.... 210 McKendree University*..214 Millikin University ........ 173 Monmouth College ......123 North Central College..... 4 North Park University... 223 Northern Illinois University*..................... 62 Parkland College*.........144 Quincy University .............1 Robert Morris University

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Illinois ............................ 95 • Rockford University .....136 • Roosevelt University ... 103 • Southern Illinois University Carbondale* .............60, 61 • Southern Illinois University Edwardsville*........ 186, 187 • University of Illinois at Springfield* ................. 238 • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ..... 163 • Western Illinois University .....................195

• Indiana State University*..93 • Indiana University Bloomington* ...............179 • Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis*.146 • Marian University*..........17 • Oakland City University..122 • Purdue University* ........90 • Saint Joseph’s College*. 57 • Saint Mary’s College..... 34 • University of Evansville* 226 • University of Indianapolis ................... 36 • University of Southern INDIANA Indiana* ....................... 199 • Anderson University ... 262 • Valparaiso University*..133 • Ball State University* ..... 11 • Butler University ..........185 IOWA • DePauw University....... 108 • Coe College*.................. 32 • Earlham College............. 47 • Cornell College .............219

REVISED 06/07/16

• Drake University* ............ 2 • Iowa State University*... 43 • Saint Ambrose University*................... 194 • Simpson College ........... 89 • University of Iowa* ....... 191 • Upper Iowa University ..128 • Wartburg College .........176 KANSAS • Baker University* .........197 • Benedictine College..... 145 • Kansas State University*...................266 • MidAmerica Nazarene University .................... 247 • University of Kansas*...147 • University of Saint Mary..196

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Produced by the Suburban Journals of St. Louis, LLC


(*) NACAC member colleges marked with an asterisk have voluntarily begun using the U.S. Department of Education’s Financial Aid Shopping Sheet as the method they will use to let you know about your financial aid package. You will be able to make direct, clear comparisons between financial aid award letters for colleges using the Shopping Sheet. For more information about the Shopping Sheet and the colleges using it, visit the NACAC webpage at www.nacacnet.org.

• University of Missouri* .... 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87 • University of MissouriKansas City .........239, 240 • University of MissouriSaint Louis* . 229, 230, 231 • Washington University Army ROTC ..................271 • Washington University in St. Louis .......................215 • Webster University*.. 38, 39 • Wentworth Military Academy & College ......148 • Westminster College*...137 • William Jewell College.. 235 • William Woods University .................... 105

KENTUCKY • Bellarmine University* 233 • Brescia University*...... 180 • Eastern Kentucky University*....................241 • Murray State University*............274, 275 • University of Kentucky* ..234 • University of Louisville*..125 • Western Kentucky University .....................101

• • • • •

University*..................... 79 Michigan State University*..................... 94 Spring Arbor University. 28 Western Michigan University*..................... 29

MINNESOTA • University of MinnesotaTwin Cities*.................... 54 MISSISSIPPI • Mississippi State University .......................31 • University of Mississippi* .192

LOUISIANA • Loyola University New Orleans .................. 75 • Tulane University* ........212 MISSOURI • Avila University ............ 211 • Xavier University of Louisiana.......................124 • Barnes-Jewish College Goldfarb School MARYLAND of Nursing ....................110 • Washington College..... 245 • Central Methodist University .....................152 MICHIGAN • Columbia College ............ 3 • Central Michigan

• Cottey College ..............107 • Culver-Stockton College .........................193 • Drury University ...........213 • Fontbonne University .....91 • Hannibal-LaGrange University ..................... 121 • Lincoln University of Missouri ...................... 272 • Lindenwood University ..277 • Logan University ............ 73 • Maryville University..140, 141 • Midwestern College .....172 • Missouri Baptist University ....................260 • Missouri Southern State University*................... 263 • Missouri State University ........158, 159, 160, 161, 162 • Missouri University of Science and Technology ................ 181,182, 183, 184

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Produced by the Suburban Journals of St. Louis, LLC

• Missouri Western State University* .......... 58 • Northwest Missouri State University ............189 • Park University*...........268 • Rockhurst University ...5, 6 • Saint Louis University ........................13, 14, 15, 16 • Southeast Missouri State University ............7, 8, 9, 10 • Southwest Baptist University .......................18 • St. Louis College of Pharmacy .....................217 • St. Louis Community College ........................ 243 • Truman State University .............................. 169, 170 • UMKC School of Computing and Engineering*....126 • University of Central Missouri* .............. 165, 166

stltoday.com/collegeconnection

PENNSYLVANIA • La Salle University ...... 236 • Penn State University* .. 35 • University of Pittsburgh ...167 • Villanova University .... 270 SOUTH CAROLINA • The Citadel.................... 33 • Clemson University* ....153 • University of South Carolina ....................... 227 SOUTH DAKOTA • South Dakota School of Mines and Technology*..267

TENNESSEE • Austin Peay State University*................... 102 • Fisk University ............. 261 NEBRASKA • Creighton University*...164 • The University of Memphis .......................111 NEW JERSEY • University of Tennessee ...127 • Seton Hall University .... 49 • University of Tennessee at Martin ........................ 63 NEW YORK • LIU — Brooklyn & Post ..143 • Vanderbilt University .. 228 • SUNY College of TEXAS Environmental Science & • Southern Methodist Forestry*....................... 112 University .................... 237 • United States Military • St. Mary’s University ..... 64 Academy ......................154 • Texas Christian • University of Rochester*..174 University*.....................40

• Trinity University ......... 265 NORTH CAROLINA • Belmont Abbey College ...76 VIRGINIA • High Point University .. 225 • Roanoke College ..........155 • Sweet Briar College ..... 177 OHIO • Virginia Military Institute ..198 • Cleveland Institute of Art ...............................138 WASHINGTON • Miami University*........ 190 • DigiPen Institute of • Ohio University* ............ 53 Technology*................... 44 • Otterbein University ..... 78 • University of Dayton* ...134 WISCONSIN • Xavier University .......... 151 • Alverno College*............ 45 • Concordia University OKLAHOMA Wisconsin*....................178 • University of Oklahoma ...97 • Marquette University .....51 • The University of Tulsa*..80 • Ripon College .................10 COLLEGE CONNECTION | OCTOBER 2016

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Special advertiSing Section

SIUE provides an easy adjustment to typical college life You probably have endless questions about going away to college. How will you spend your time outside of class? Where do you go if you feel sick? Who will be there to answer your questions? All of these concerns are natural. When I first came to Southern Illinois University Edwardsville as a freshman, I was intimidated by all the newness, but I soon settled in and the campus became a home away from home. SIUE faculty and staff make an effort to show support for their students, providing an easier adjustment to college life. For this to happen, it’s important to get involved and become a part of the community. Utilize the resources

that are available to you on campus, through the Student Success Center, the Kimmel Student Involvement Center, University Housing, Campus Recreation, Health Service and more. These locations all have individuals whose job is to make your time at SIUE the best it can be. Knowing you have someone to turn to makes a world of difference when coming to college. SIUE makes every effort to make this new chapter in your life a seamless transition. In my experience, taking advantage of campus resources available to students makes this adjustment immeasurably easier. — Emma Adkisson, Sullivan, Ill. Mass Communications

Southeast STEM programs preparing grads for future tech “Innovation is the key to the future,” says Southeast Missouri State University president Carlos Vargas. “I want Southeast graduates to leave this institution with the ability to innovate by developing or applying new and emerging technologies and solve real-life problems.” Southeast is investing in groundbreaking science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) academic programs to propel students on that path. Southeast is launching two new academic programs in fall 2017 — in unmanned aircraft systems (drones) and Geographic Information Science (GIS) — to meet the future demand anticipated for graduates skilled in

next-generation and rapidly expanding technologies. Southeast also leads the way with its cybersecurity program. Cybersecurity graduates are in high demand among employers seeking techsavvy employees who rely on cyber-infrastructure for their operations. Employment in STEM occupations is projected to grow to more than 9 million through 2022. Southeast is prepared to meet that demand with additional STEM degree programs in physics and engineering physics and a biomedical scholars program for pre-med majors. For post-graduates, Southeast also now offers the only Master of Natural Science in STEM Education program in Missouri.

WE MADE CONCRETE FLOAT. SIUE’s hands-on learning and top-rated programs help students rise to the top. Check out SIUE, and immerse yourself in new challenges. Visit us at booth 186 and 187 See how it ends.

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OCTOBER 2016 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

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Special advertiSing Section

Southern Illinois University Carbondale:

We’re all about experience At Southern Illinois University Carbondale, we know real-world experience in college will give our students an edge after they graduate. From internships to leadership roles to community service to hands-on research, our students gain confidence and skills to embark on their careers. At SIU, you’ll gain all of the advantages of a small college, plus the brains — and experiences — of a major research university. Here’s proof: • We’re ranked in the top tier of “Best National Universities” by

U.S. News & World Report 2016 Edition. • There are fewer than 30 students in 81 percent of our undergraduate courses, and 55 percent of our classes have 19 or fewer students. • The student-to-faculty ratio is 15-to-1. We believe an outstanding education should be within your reach and our students have access to more than 200 programs — one of the two most diverse academic program selections in Illinois. SIU boasts nine colleges,

two professional schools (law and medicine) and 300 registered student organizations. For students who have the talent and determination, SIU offers an array of generous scholarships — more than 700 in all — ranging from $16,000 to more than $92,000 in total four-year value. More than 2,500 incoming students are awarded scholarships each year through the Academic Scholarship Office and more than 90 percent of our students receive some form of financial aid. SIU also offers tuition rates equal

to those paid by in-state students to incoming freshmen, transfer and graduate students from Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee and Wisconsin. This special tuition rate amounts to an average savings of more than $13,000 per year for full-time students. Seeing is believing. If you haven’t done so already, schedule an on-campus visit and see for yourself where the future will lead. Get a true feel for the big things that soon will be within your reach. Gain experience. Experience SIU.

Find A BetterYou McKendree University is committed to providing students with a high quality, affordable, undergraduate and graduate education. With more than 48 undergraduate majors to choose from, McKendree’s rigorous academic programs coupled with our strong intellectual climate sets us apart in the St. Louis region. Visit our website and discover more today!

1.800.BEARC AT • McKendree .edu M

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Making the Most oF youR visit to a nationaL coLLege FaiR eady to take the next step in your education? There’s no better place to explore your options than at a NACAC National College Fair. Admission representatives from schools across the country are all gathered in one place. Their goal: To encourage you to learn more about their institutions and help you sort through the qualities you’re looking for in a college. Take advantage of their expertise and make the most of your time by following these simple steps.

R

cement your own preferences, Kaan noted. “It’s just as important to figure out what you don’t want as it is to figure out what is really attractive to you,” she said.

private schools or large, public universities? Which of the institutions in attendance offer your projected major? “Planning ahead can help you stay focused,” said Cynthia Kaan, a Ferris State University (Mich.) admission officer. “If you have certain schools you know you are interested in, don’t limit yourself, but make learning about those schools your priority.”

LeaRn aBout the pRocess.

Make youR questions count.

Like so many other things in life, a successful visit to a National College Fair is marked by quality, not quantity. In other words: Rather than focusBe pRepaRed. Before the big day, visit nationalcol- ing on collecting a brochure from every college booth, make it your goal to have legefairs.org and scan through the list of colleges and universities that will be in-depth conversations with a few of represented. Make a note of the schools the college reps on hand. “I encourage students to not just that interest you the most and plan to stop by the table and pick up a brovisit their booths at the fair. chure, but rather engage the repreAre you looking for colleges that sentative with a few questions,” said are close to home or those that are Valencia Hamman, co-director of far away? Are you interested in small,

®

Learn More. Be More.

In and out of Fontbonne University’s classrooms, you’ll grow as an individual, a teammate, a leader, a friend and a global citizen. Set up a personal campus visit to explore for yourself how you can learn more and be more at Fontbonne.

www.fontbonne.edu/connection

college counseling at La Jolla (Calif.) Country Day School. “That means you want to come into the fair with a list of questions so you’re ready for that opportunity.” Don’t waste time on softball queries, such as “Is your nursing program good?” “That’s not a good question because it gets you nowhere ... no one is going to tell you that their program is terrible or that it is struggling,” Kaan said. “If you’re interested in a specific program, like nursing, ask college reps what sets their program apart from other colleges or ask them to compare their nursing program with one at another college that you’re considering.”

What’s the deal with college entrance tests? What do admission officers look for in a college essay? How can I find out if I’m eligible for financial aid? No matter where you end up enrolling, you’ll likely encounter at least one of these questions during the college application process. Use your visit to a National College Fair to get a head start. Check out the fair’s education sessions, covering topics ranging from college costs to student athlete eligibility and college selectivity. Each fair also includes a counseling center, oftentimes an invaluable resource for students with specialized interests. Do you love hands-on learning? Counselors can help you pinpoint colleges that provide research opportunities for undergraduates. “There are resources available and there are people available who can help answer very individualized questions about the college search process,” said Dana Lambert, a counselor at West Milford Township (N.J.) High School. “Take advantage of their expertise.”

FoLLow up. Stop by our booth to get more info!

An education is a powerful thing that will expand your horizons if you allow it. At Fontbonne, I’ve found that keeping an open mind and staying curious can take you to places you never thought you could go. - Havanna Deaf Education Major

12

OCTOBER 2016 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

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keep an open Mind. Take time to do a little exploring. Yes, it’s important to plan ahead and select a few colleges you know you want to visit. But each fair draws representatives from 175 to 400 campuses. The schools are located throughout the U.S. and from around the globe. You owe it to yourself to follow-up with colleges that catch your eye. “Do your research, but also have an open mind,” Hamman said. “Sometimes students take time to talk with a representative from a school that they really hadn’t considered before and it becomes a part of their list.” Chatting with representatives from a variety of colleges can also help you

Ask college reps for their contact information and be sure to follow up. “Not always, but often, the representative that is attending the college fair is the representative that will end up reading your application,” Hamman said. “Keep in touch with them; reach out with thoughtful, intelligent questions. That demonstrates interest.” For the colleges you want to know more about, schedule campus visits. Remember: Your trip to a college fair is the beginning — not the end — of your college search. “Visiting a campus is by far the most important aspect of looking for a college,” Kaan said. “There’s no other experience like it. It’s the best way to find your perfect fit.”

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Special advertiSing Section

UMSL can be your educational home away from home You may have heard U.S. News and World Report ranked the University of Missouri-St. Louis among its top schools for programs in Business, Criminology, Nursing, Education and Engineering. Or maybe you’ve read Forbes Magazine named us as one of “America’s Best Colleges.” But UMSL is more than just a serious education; it’s an experience — a serious metropolitan experience. Spread across 470 acres, UMSL is an eclectic mix of historic buildings and new facilities, including the Wellness and Recreation Center, Science Learning Building, Patient Care Center and Anheuser-Busch Hall — new home to the College of Business Administration. It’s the perfect setting for students to gain unique insights from outstanding faculty, as well as work

experience through internships at companies and organizations found only in the St. Louis area. This is more than a college town. No other place blends the excitement of a metropolitan region with the vibe of a knowyour-neighbors community like St. Louis and no university is a better conduit of that energy than UMSL. But words and pictures only go so far. Why not see for yourself? UMSL Day is on Nov. 12. Visit our campus and talk with faculty, chat with students already enrolled in our nationally ranked programs, or visit the Pierre Laclede Honors College. See first-hand what makes UMSL an exceptional metropolitan university for you. Register at UMSLDay.com. Visit us at our booth #229231.

SO MUCH MORE THAN

AFFORDABLE Explore STLCC’s 100+ career paths that will have you job ready in two years or less. Spring enrollment begins November 7.

STOP BY BOOTH #243 AT THE NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR ON 10/16 AT SLU.

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COLLEGE CONNECTION | OCTOBER 2016

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YOU’RE ALREADY SMART, TALENTED AND MULTIINTERESTED. WHO YOU WILL BE IS WIDE OPEN.

SHARE TODAY’S NEWS WITH STUDENTS Newspapers in Education (NIE) is a FREE classroom program that encourages teachers to use the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as a living textbook in the classroom. Through NIE, students use the Post-Dispatch to learn a variety of skills from math, reading and character education to science, social studies and the ine arts. REFER A TEACHER TODAY!

the bi-state

NewspapersinEducation(NIE)IMPACT The potential you have is virtually limitless. But one thing is certain: After the transformative experience of a Marquette education, you will Be The Difference. Visit our booth to learn more.

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DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO CHANGE THE WORLD? We think so!

Employment in occupations related to STEM is projected to grow by more than 9 million between 2012 and 2022. / Meet the future with innovation in Missouri’s only bachelor’s degree in UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS. Use your drone to support law enforcement, improve agriculture, and help companies deliver online purchases. / Our bachelor’s degree in GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE — the only one in Missouri — puts you at the heart of the command and control center as you follow patterns of criminal activity or help protect our military. / Prepare for the exam to become a registered professional engineer by majoring in ENGINEERING PHYSICS or studying PRE-ENGINEERING. / It’s part of our culture to stay ahead of market trends, which is why we were the first in our state to ofer a bachelor’s degree in CYBERSECURITY.

COME TO SHOW ME DAY:

/ Enhance your chance to get into medical school in our biomedical scholars program that puts you with medical professionals and your own PRE-MED advisor.

Saturday, November 12 Monday, November 14 Saturday, February 18 Monday, February 20 Saturday, March 25

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10.07.2016 • Friday • i 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • S1

DELINQUENT TAX LIST ST. CLAIR COUNTY

ST. CLAIR Continued...

(NOTE: IF THROUGH SOME UNAVOIDABLE ERROR YOUR PROPERTY IS ADVERTISED, PLEASE CONTACT THE COUNTY TREASURER’S OFFICE IMMEDIATELY. PHONE (618) 825-2707.Due to the fact that tax payments have been received by this ofice after the copy was forwarded to the newspaper on September 26, 2016 names of certain individuals who have paid, will appear on this list.) STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF ST. CLAIR

) )SS )

Public notice is hereby given that I, Charles Suarez, County Collector of St. Clair County, shall apply in the Circuit Court in the 20th Judicial Circuit on the twenty irst (21st) day of October, 2016, for Judgment against the lands and lots mentioned and described in the following list of delinquent lands and lots for taxes, interest and costs due for 2015 and back taxes for 2004 to 2014 and for an order to sell said lands and lots for the satisfaction thereof, on the irst Monday in November, A.D., 2016 to wit: on the seventh (7th) day of November, 2016 all lands and lots for the sale of which an order shall be made, and will be exposed at public sale at the St. Clair County Building, in Belleville, Illinois, for the amount of taxes, interest and costs due thereon. ABBREVIATIONS: The Permanent Property Number listed is broken down as follows:1st and 2nd numbers represent the Township in which the parcel is located; 3rd and 4th numbers represent the section in said Township; 5th, 6th and 7th numbers represent which quarter section said parcel is in and numbers 8, 9 and 10 represent the location within the quarter section.If a B prints next to the total then back taxes are included with current year taxes shown in the total. If an * prints next to the total then only 2nd installment is past due. An additional charge of $10.00 is added to unpaid taxes and interest owing on each piece of real estate listed below to cover the cost of publication and mailing delinquent notices thereof.The $10.00 is in addition to unpaid taxes and interest on the irst installment after the 1st day of July 2016 and the second installment after the 1st day of September 2016 at the rate of one and one-half percent per 30 days until paid or forfeited. Parts of fractions of a 30 day period are regarded as 30 days. Delinquent Tax List for ST CLAIR. Parcel Count: 555 BENEDICK, THOMAS TRUSTEE ODELL, KATHLEEN DAHAL DIWAKAR & KHANAL SWE HELLE, DALE KEENAN, BRENT KUEKER, SHAWN & SHAYNA ROTZ, SUSAN ELIZABETH LEFAVE, KATHY HEISSERER, MELVIN R & SHIR GASS, CHRISTOPHER J & SARA WALKER EDWIN & LENDIA & BE HARMON, KATRINA & JEREMY HARTMAN LAND TRUST MIZE, ROBERT K TRUSTEE MATHIS TAMIYA, BLAYLOCK VI MCMULLEN, MELISSA J & JOSH ST TIMOTHY MISSIONARY BAPT KIMBROUGH MILTON & HENDREE BEETZ, REBECCA B & D RAVENELL LLC HEAVENS, MARGIE ELLIS, MARILYN FRANKLIN, STANLEY W & ROND PARADISE, RAYMOND C & CURT GARZA, LOUIS A & SONJA A BASHIR, TALAT M & NAHEED MAUE, HARRY J & PATRICIA A YOVANDICH, LARRY M & CAROL HARRINGTON, JAY & PATTI GOYEA, ERNEST & UMORU BENE BURNS, MICHAEL R & LINDA K HARTUNG, DOUGLAS L & JILL SCHMIDT, WILLIAM T SATTERLEE, KUM SU PEABODY COAL COMPANY PEABODY COAL COMPANY PEABODY COAL COMPANY MILLER DEVELOPMENT INC SHELTON, CHESTER L & KIMBE STEWART, KARA GLAESER, DANIEL & PAMELA MACKIN, PAMELA WILSON, RANDALL & DAWN ALTEPETER, TODD A & CORINE SCHNARRE, KEVIN S & TANYA LEHR, ALAN & CAROL THOMURE, GREGORY H & ANNE RAFFERTY, JAMES WHITE, KELLY ZHAO, YAO HAN & DIE LING SCALES, VIRGINIA SAPONAR, ALAN J & KATHY M FOUTZ, CHRISTOPHER K & TRA EWUZIE, CAROLYN N BUNFILL, PATRICIA BALDRIDGE, ROGER L & SUSAN WARD, ANGELA LINDEMANN, LORI ANN KDNB REAL ESTATE LLC TSC INTERPRISES LLC C/O TO HUBBARD, INVESTMENT FUND HUBBARD, INVESTMENT FUND MILLER, KENT A & TAMMY A ENGEMAN HOLDINGS LLC ENGEMAN HOLDINGS LLC LEHR, ALAN & CAROL TRIEX MISSOURI PROPERTY LL CALDWELL, CHRIS A & CATHY VANDIVER, MARK LEHR, PAULA IRONS, IRVING DAVIS DENISE L & MCQUARRIE MILLER, STEVEN KEILMAN, AL R & PAULETTE NEEDHAM, CLARENCE & PAMELA TEMPLE, EVERETT & TANYA TEDESCO, DENISE KLUMP STEVE & KLUMP CAMILL RIODEWALD, KENNETH KLEIN, DAVID RAUCKMAN, JAMES & SHIRLEY HARTUNG, JILL L & DOUGLAS RAUCKMAN, JAMES & SHIRLEY FLESHREN, HELEN ESTATE TRUMPET, DONALD G & SHIRLE LEWIS, ALONZO A & ROSEMARY MILES, DARIUS MILES, DARIUS DOWNS SHAUN & STEWARD ROBE OWENS, LATOYA SANFORD, CEDRIC V & ANGELA JEANS, CLYDE M & MONIQUE GRAY, DUANE T. BOW INC. T BOW INC DEAN, JUNE HAMILTON- ET AL JOHNSON, NATHAN F & KINYA NEELY, ANTHONY & TRINAS KOCHANSKI, JOHN FULFORD HOMES LLC BEERS, DAVID BREWER, LAWRENCE FISHER, JERRY FISHER, JERRY WILSON, PAMELA DELEE, CAESARE MANLEY, STEVE & LINDA MANLEY, STEVE & LINDA KOPP, ROBERT D & LORI L KERNAN, RONALD WILSON, EDWARD K & PAMELA BAUERS, JOHN WALLER, HENRY WALLER, HENRY RUSHING, FABLE & BRANDON TARVIN, DAVID A & BRENDA G WB LAND TRUSTC/O WOLFGAN COLE, BOBBY PIERCE, MARY PIERCE, MARY CROOK, DAVID HAMPTON, BRUCE CROOK, DAVID A & SHARON K SCHNEIDER, RICHARD & MARY STEELE, THERESE M KWENTUS BANKS, WILLIAM & OK HWA BANKS, WILLIAM & OK HWA DARUNGA, SKYLAR WRIGHT, SUSAN & CELEO SALEH, LARRIELL ERWIN, JAMES HAMPTON, BRUCE PARRONE, MARC & ANNE STRINGER, EDWARD CHILDRESS, KRISTI

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LOFLIN, MICHAEL WEIMER, JACOB & ANN T GASS, DONALD L & MARITA A $3,761.96 GASS, DONALD L & MARITA $2,446.50 SAAD, FARRIS A. & GERADETT $3,140.98 DIEHL, DENNIS J & SUSAN M $2,653.56 ESTES, ANTHONY $2,633.59 ROBINSON, JENNIFER $684.32 ARENDELL, JOSEPH $2,156.81 BAUER, JOYCE $2,545.09 KING, FREDDIE L & NORA $1,641.41 ALLEN, KEITH $3,432.38 BROWN, LOWELL $2,074.77 JONES JEANNE S & JAMES TRA $4,305.51 AMULET HARBOR LLC $6,050.45 BUMPUS, LINDA ALDEN $1,653.13 RDS DEVELOPMENT CORP $97.55 SIMMS, DAVID J & BRUCE A & $1,625.67 MEGAHY, DIANE A & HASSAN $475.81 PETERS, ARTHUR H & CAROL J $1,594.49 WENZEL, SANDRA $1,368.02 MAHAR, MARK & DONALD M. KL $1,390.59 CARLYLE PROPERTIES LLC $2,157.43 STINES, THOMAS III & CONNI $250.52 MILLER, JOHN $2,042.70 SMITH, GAINES B TR - PLUM $3,047.90 SMITH, GAINES B TR - PLUM $1,776.97 SMITH, GAINES B TR - PLUM $2,112.25 SCHANUEL, MARK $957.01 JONES, PETER $1,917.95 CRINVESTMENTS LLC $528.07 REEB, BEVERLY & STEVE $57.14 ZWIBELMAN, CAROLINE ANN $549.11 HAYES, DWAINE & BETTY J $2,136.63 MOORE THOMICA &HARRIS PA $2,057.78 BURNS, MICHAEL & DIANE $2,214.61 TART, LAMARCE $635.15 HARLEN, BRANDEN $1,229.56 JOHNSON, ESTA $1,825.70 PETTY ANN L & ROBERSON ROD $2,529.55 TUTOR, GERALD $1,188.48 MILLER, MILDRED $1,995.50 HIBBLER, ORLANDO C & CELES $2,769.12 PELLMAN, RANDY & LALAINE $2,030.32 ATWATER, ROBERT C JR & KAR $4,957.14 WHITFIELD, WILEY JR & CARO $3,430.90 ACCETTA, SUE $1,116.57 KENDELL, BARBARA $2,924.73 LEE, PHYLLIS $3,485.82 SHORES, JONELLE $21,133.79 KENDELL, BARBARA $692.19 DAUGHRITY, ROSE $32.04 LAIRD, RANDALL W & MELISSA $99.53 KOENIG, MICHAEL E & MARILY $25.00 GINWRIGHT, BARBARA $1,640.49 HILTON, EDWARD L & DEBRA S $2,115.89 SMYLES, DELORES $130.82 ROSCIGLIONE, MICHAEL $809.36 RAKO, VALERIE S & ANDREA L $1,856.73 RAUCKMAN, MICHAEL $775.98 RAUCKMAN, MICHAEL $1,471.85 MEEKS, MICHAELA $1,090.06 PAULE, JOHN $988.64 HICKEY, PATRICK $1,981.96 AAR HOLDINGS LLC $3,084.17 AAR HOLDINGS LLC $3,815.48 AAR HOLDINGS LLC $2,746.07 REEB, STEVE & BEVERLY $1,562.94 EGLSEDER, MICHAEL R & DELO $736.75 $1,836.99 13 12 11 ARMSTRONG, KRIS DIETZEL, MARK $460.40 WEIK, MARGARET $2,261.19 DORIS, DETERMAN $4,762.76 DORIS, DETERMAN $392.73 GROMER, THOMAS & FERN $105.88 GROMER, THOMAS & FERN $2,305.06 JACO, ROBERT & BARBARA $2,552.25 GROMER, THOMAS & FERN $3,269.29 HEMANN, MARY $23,329.06 WOLF ERNEST R SR $5,329.73 TIEMANN, PAUL $1,557.86 TIEMANN, PAUL $3,934.61 TIEMANN, PAUL $5,417.53 HEESE, WILLIAM & MELODY $3,363.80 PARR, TRACY $2,415.75 TAYLOR, ANGELA $176.00 PARR, TRACY $1,788.77 COX, ROBERT L & JANET $2,933.19 ELMORE, JAMES $4,286.25 MCKENZIE, CYNTHIA $3,809.23 MIDDENDORF, RONNIE $213.73 ALEXANDER, LORA $1,502.97 ALEXANDER, LORA $648.79 ALEXANDER, LORA $1,095.27 HANVEY, KENNETH & LEOTA $2,239.39 PONDER, PAMELA $1,935.44 BOLDT, DAVID $49.14 KAUFMAN, TIMOTHY $2,184.73 SICKA, LOUIS $1,963.59 BLUS, BERTHA JANE $1,241.33 WEBB, BRIAN $507.30 CAREL, KENAN R & DIANE M $31,148.13 KENNEY, AARON $2,458.52 BERKEL, JOSEPH $368.48 YOUNG, GEORGE H & JOYCE E $1,954.11 LUAN, WILLIAM $1,941.10 COLEMAN, ANGELA $1,541.99 HUETTNER, JUERGEN & MARY J $1,711.99 MOORE, SHARON $1,735.23 TYGRACON PROPERTIES INC $3,116.89 MUELLER, LISA $1,364.07 ROGIER, DAVID J & ERNA J T $1,427.23 WIENSTROER, STEVE & MARGAR $294.38 SANTANELLO, TODD $1,249.82 HAMDAN, NADIA NESSER $3,727.68 BUESCHER, MARK L & LONG CH $3,492.84 FOOTE, JAMES $2,761.73 FOOTE, JAMES R & BARBARA J $1,459.41 WEIK, RALPH L & E ALICE $612.17 LUCAS, HARRY $2,705.94 POLANC, FRANK & IRMA $799.18 KUNI, GUY $1,367.91 BURCH, ROBERT & HEATHER $226.25 SWOGGER, MALCOLM & LISA $923.27 PEABODY COAL COMPANY $143.61 PEABODY COAL COMPANY $228.55 KING, JOHN W JR & CAROLYN $91.57 PEABODY COAL COMPANY $1,170.62 PEABODY COAL COMPANY $2,066.95 GROMER, THOMAS & FERN $526.87 SINOVIC, JOSEPH $566.26 FEY, JIMMY $1,148.97 ZEITER, DAVID E & LORI L $1,773.41 DEMOND, TIMOTHY $2,587.01 PAULE, JOHN $1,176.16 PAULE, JOHN $897.67 PAULE, JOHN $117.36 PAULE, JOHN $1,869.30 PAULE, JOHN $225.37 PAULE, JOHN $1,972.99 SCHWEISS, MICHAEL J & PAME $912.03 $2,195.67 Total Parcel Count: 553 $716.89 $135.27

08-21.0-207-001 08-21.0-207-005 08-21.0-207-006 08-21.0-207-007 08-21.0-207-023 08-21.0-208-009 08-21.0-208-013 08-21.0-210-004 08-21.0-211-002 08-21.0-213-033 08-21.0-213-035 08-21.0-214-003 08-21.0-214-009 08-23.0-110-033 08-23.0-113-027 08-23.0-114-072 08-23.0-200-120 08-23.0-201-013 08-23.0-201-043 08-23.0-203-013 08-23.0-209-005 08-23.0-401-030 08-23.0-402-019 08-23.0-406-002 08-24.0-102-013 08-24.0-102-028 08-24.0-102-029 08-24.0-102-045 08-24.0-105-011 08-24.0-108-066 08-24.0-110-006 08-24.0-110-036 08-24.0-201-026 08-24.0-206-057 08-24.0-301-020 08-24.0-301-028 08-24.0-301-030 08-24.0-301-043 08-24.0-301-045 08-24.0-301-056 08-24.0-301-065 08-24.0-301-083 08-24.0-302-002 08-24.0-303-003 08-24.0-303-033 08-24.0-303-034 08-24.0-305-020 08-24.0-305-026 08-24.0-306-014 08-24.0-308-007 08-24.0-309-001 08-24.0-309-003 08-24.0-309-027 08-24.0-309-045 08-24.0-312-008 08-24.0-314-005 08-24.0-400-009 08-24.0-401-002 08-24.0-402-022 08-24.0-405-015 08-24.0-410-007 08-24.0-413-005 08-27.0-321-021 08-27.0-400-031 08-28.0-110-001 08-28.0-110-005 08-28.0-110-006 08-28.0-110-022 08-28.0-406-001 08-28.0-406-004 08-28.0-406-005 08-28.0-412-013 08-28.0-412-014 08-28.0-412-015 08-28.0-412-017 08-28.0-412-018 08-28.0-412-022 08-28.0-412-030 08-29.0-100-004 08-29.0-100-005 08-29.0-100-021 08-29.0-100-022 08-29.0-100-023 08-29.0-100-038 08-29.0-200-007 08-29.0-200-013 08-29.0-201-001 08-29.0-201-008 08-29.0-202-018 08-29.0-204-007 08-29.0-204-016 08-29.0-204-018 08-29.0-204-019 08-29.0-204-020 08-29.0-206-008 08-29.0-206-014 08-29.0-206-016 08-29.0-206-019 08-29.0-207-005 08-29.0-207-009 08-29.0-207-014 08-29.0-214-018 08-29.0-214-031 08-29.0-215-002 08-29.0-215-003 08-29.0-223-037 08-29.0-302-011 08-29.0-302-030 08-29.0-304-004 08-29.0-305-018 08-29.0-309-005 08-29.0-309-009 08-29.0-309-045 08-29.0-309-050 08-29.0-312-015 08-29.0-313-008 08-29.0-400-019 08-29.0-400-020 08-29.0-400-043 08-29.0-404-052 08-29.0-406-027 08-29.0-407-001 08-29.0-407-003 08-29.0-416-007 08-31.1-100-002 08-31.1-400-004 08-32.0-102-003 08-32.1-100-003 08-32.1-100-004 08-33.0-200-006 08-33.0-200-032 08-33.0-201-015 08-33.0-400-020 08-34.0-100-022 08-34.0-200-002 08-34.0-200-007 08-34.0-200-011 08-34.0-200-012 08-34.0-200-013 08-34.0-200-034 08-34.0-301-019

$781.31 $27.23 $154.34 $152.90 $1,507.08 $958.09 $268.48 $635.87 $928.80 $1,754.10 $2,625.47 $2,105.07 $1,268.61 $1,876.63 $2,027.69 $1,770.07 $916.32 $3,798.21 $2,726.48 $1,276.19 $1,374.35 $2,325.44 $27,484.82 $1,176.99 $3,313.27 $3,756.79 $56.17 $73.26 $3,876.67 $80.08 $3,047.35 $2,163.89 $4,580.89 $2,681.37 $628.22 $2,647.85 $28.16 $1,186.27 $2,803.07 $3,099.03 $1,630.30 $3,001.47 $1,032.64 $2,386.00 $3,227.88 $772.22 $3,403.77 $1,530.68 $3,480.65 $3,694.60 $1,816.66 $1,483.33 $3,682.81 $1,784.93 $4,252.30 $549.98 $2,726.58 $3,093.91 $58.27 $3,793.11 $2,443.76 $2,042.15 $3,764.54 $2,891.08 $592.54 $928.01 $136.78 $1,547.52 $950.74 $1,163.74 $1,115.23 $1,085.40 $64.09 $11.74 $158.39 $36.28 $1,333.64 $34.03 $1,632.75 $443.27 $154.75 $2,597.11 $154.75 $2,544.61 $184.17 $357.15 $212.55 $717.08 $891.72 $47.26 $698.01 $393.10 $390.35 $356.34 $1,007.96 $1,336.29 $1,481.23 $1,184.45 $85.54 $2,083.15 $987.34 $707.71 $467.63 $735.15 $1,508.61 $852.61 $1,150.14 $3,739.86 $1,942.36 $3,566.29 $2,327.55 $1,473.16 $1,553.07 $2,045.12 $1,704.83 $4,693.99 $2,229.45 $2,541.67 $1,644.81 $1,312.15 $719.20 $2,714.30 $905.40 $3,165.21 $322.25 $94.51 $1,482.75 $106.34 $94.51 $21.33 $501.75 $920.95 $233.01 $1,623.54 $121.30 $339.74 $1,348.41 $622.79 $646.15 $94.71 $1,247.37


S2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

I 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016 SHILOH VALLEY Continued...

DELINQUENT TAX LIST ST. CLAIR COUNTY (NOTE: IF THROUGH SOME UNAVOIDABLE ERROR YOUR PROPERTY IS ADVERTISED, PLEASE CONTACT THE COUNTY TREASURER’S OFFICE IMMEDIATELY. PHONE (618) 825-2707.Due to the fact that tax payments have been received by this ofice after the copy was forwarded to the newspaper on September 26, 2016 names of certain individuals who have paid, will appear on this list.) STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF ST. CLAIR

) )SS )

Public notice is hereby given that I, Charles Suarez, County Collector of St. Clair County, shall apply in the Circuit Court in the 20th Judicial Circuit on the twenty irst (21st) day of October, 2016, for Judgment against the lands and lots mentioned and described in the following list of delinquent lands and lots for taxes, interest and costs due for 2015 and back taxes for 2004 to 2014 and for an order to sell said lands and lots for the satisfaction thereof, on the irst Monday in November, A.D., 2016 to wit: on the seventh (7th) day of November, 2016 all lands and lots for the sale of which an order shall be made, and will be exposed at public sale at the St. Clair County Building, in Belleville, Illinois, for the amount of taxes, interest and costs due thereon. ABBREVIATIONS: The Permanent Property Number listed is broken down as follows:1st and 2nd numbers represent the Township in which the parcel is located; 3rd and 4th numbers represent the section in said Township; 5th, 6th and 7th numbers represent which quarter section said parcel is in and numbers 8, 9 and 10 represent the location within the quarter section.If a B prints next to the total then back taxes are included with current year taxes shown in the total.If an * prints next to the total then only 2nd installment is past due. An additional charge of $10.00 is added to unpaid taxes and interest owing on each piece of real estate listed below to cover the cost of publication and mailing delinquent notices thereof. The $10.00 is in addition to unpaid taxes and interest on the irst installment after the 1st day of July 2016 and the second installment after the 1st day of September 2016 at the rate of one and one-half percent per 30 days until paid or forfeited.Parts of fractions of a 30 day period are regarded as 30 days. Delinquent Tax List for MILLSTADT. Parcel Count: 169 KNYSAK, JOSEPH J & TIMOTHY KNYSAK, JOSEPH J & TIMOTHY JOHNSON, ROBERT STOLL, NORMAN HEINLEIN, RANDY & SHAWN OSICK, SCOTT E & SHANON A DOERR, DANIEL & CHRISTINA HAYDEN, JEFFREY S & KENDRA DUNN, ROBERT D & LAURA A GAITHER, AARON & AMBER BOARDMAN, WILLIAM & CHRIST BOARDMAN, WILLIAM & CHRIST FULTON, DAVID J & RITA A BURTON PROP BURTON PROP CLEVELAND, LONNIE & JOANN DITCH, WILLIAM F & EDNA MCFARLAND, THERESA HEBERER, JAMES & MARY HELFRICH, JAMES D & MELISS GASSER, JOHN FIREBALL 1960 LLC 5 STEELE, CHAD & STACY E GASSER, SUSAN& HENRY& ERLE KECK, DONALD ROBINSON, ANDREW A & LAURE HARPER, ASHLEY HARPER, ASHLEY SKAER ERNEST A KOSSINA, JAY & JUNE & SIMM KOSSINA, JAY & JUNE & SIMM KECK, DONALD DRENNAN, SANDRA HAASE , JOHN C & LINDA K C KARCHER, RONALD JR & LOTIN ROHWEDDER, LYNN ROHWEDDER, LYNN VANDALIA BUS LINES INC VANDALIA BUS LINES INC FIREBALL 1960 LLC 1 ROHWEDDER, LYNN PAULE, GERALD PAULE, GERALD PAULE, GERALD HANDY FEED/HANDYSCAPES INC PAULE, GERALD PAULE, GERALD PAULE, GERALD ROHWEDDER, LYNN KOSYDOR, WALTER J & JANICE THIELEMANN, ROGER E & ELIZ SKAER, ERNEST CLIFTON, DON & TINA K & W DEVELOPMENT INC K & W DEVELOPMENT INC WATTERS, BONNIE SCOTT, DON HOFFMANN, JERRY E & SUSAN SCHRAUTH, RONALD BURNS, ELVERA SCHALTENBRAND, RICHARD W & ANDERSON, ROBIN & MICHAEL CISSELL, STEVEN T HELFRICH, JAMES & MELISSA WESTWOOD WASHS LLC SCHALTENBRAND, RICHARD & K SCHALLER, KATHLEEN MC CORMACK, SHARON & JAMES RAMSDELL, MARGARET RAMSDELL, MARGARET VOGEL LORRAINE F & DOMYAN STANKOVIC, MICHAEL & DEANA TALLARINO, NATALE HANDY FEED/HANDYSCAPES INC HANDY FEED/HANDYSCAPES INC IN-LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP L KUNZ, DONALD W ET AL IN-LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP L PAPACHRISANTHOU, GEORGE & RULE, TIMOTHY & SARA KRAFT, MATHEW FARNSWORTH, ALLEN & MARILY LAWLOR, KAREN BOLD, IAN R & CHRISTINA A BRAND, SARAH HAYDEN, JEFF

12-01.0-100- 013 12-01.0-100-015 12-01.0-100-022 12-01.0-400-012 12-02.0-301-003 12-02.0-400-005 12-03.0-300-036 12-03.0-401-013 12-06.0-200-021 12-06.0-302-011 12-07.0-100-002 12-07.0-200-001 12-07.0-200-009 12-09.0-101-001 12-09.0-101-002 12-09.0-216-002 12-09.0-219-011 12-09.0-219-016 12-09.0-221-002 12-09.0-300-062 12-09.0-302-013 12-09.0-305-001 12-09.0-404-003 12-09.0-406-018 12-09.0-407-018 12-09.0-407-019 12-09.0-408-007 12-09.0-408-008 12-09.0-415-001 12-09.0-416-007 12-09.0-416-008 12-09.0-421-012 12-09.0-423-013 12-09.0-423-015 12-09.0-424-024 12-09.0-427-005 12-09.0-427-006 12-09.0-428-001 12-09.0-428-002 12-09.0-432-007 12-09.0-432-029 12-09.0-436-003 12-09.0-436-006 12-09.0-436-007 12-09.0-436-012 12-09.0-436-013 12-09.0-436-014 12-09.0-436-015 12-09.0-443-004 12-09.0-445-014 12-09.0-456-013 12-09.0-456-014 12-09.0-459-013 12-09.0-464-001 12-09.0-464-003 12-10.0-100-028 12-10.0-103-004 12-10.0-104-018 12-10.0-109-001 12-10.0-113-011 12-10.0-201-009 12-10.0-202-007 12-10.0-202-019 12-10.0-303-027 12-10.0-304-017 12-10.0-304-023 12-10.0-304-050 12-10.0-304-067 12-10.0-309-009 12-10.0-309-010 12-10.0-311-009 12-10.0-313-014 12-10.0-313-024 12-10.0-314-001 12-10.0-314-016 12-10.0-317-013 12-10.0-321-021 12-10.0-323-069 12-10.0-402-016 12-10.0-402-048 12-10.0-402-052 12-10.0-404-014 12-10.0-404-024 12-10.0-406-010 12-10.0-418-001 12-11.0-205-006

$3,479.60 $251.07 $3,130.74 $576.99 $8,379.40 $889.22 $1,503.28 $805.58 $91.93 $510.51 $235.11 $1,340.83 $4,291.06 $2,296.69 $2,255.97 $3,328.33 $375.74 $1,383.24 $2,226.05 $3,958.94 $4,880.26 $7,375.28 $1,614.59 $4,523.18 $431.66 $3,218.91 $2,410.86 $395.25 $989.28 $192.70 $2,472.23 $1,278.09 $2,508.45 $5,340.33 $3,695.86 $103.16 $3,119.02 $1,687.72 $230.16 $3,200.51 $2,724.17 $194.23 $277.18 $2,451.77 $3,612.22 $1,281.05 $101.60 $101.60 $1,950.52 $2,820.15 $1,337.57 $892.51 $1,357.72 $197.15 $4,722.14 $1,393.80 $3,273.44 $1,638.30 $1,296.02 $2,838.29 $524.16 $3,841.48 $3,354.79 $4,453.07 $3,116.66 $3,141.81 $3,664.69 $376.21 $94.57 $2,136.93 $1,857.73 $2,343.57 $712.52 $55.73 $2,339.54 $12,374.33 $253.06 $4,392.94 $4,186.29 $964.04 $2,991.08 $762.45 $2,952.85 $2,597.19 $2,520.18 $9,303.27

GREENFIELD, ANDREW GAUCH, TODD & JUDITH A PAULE, GERALD PAULE, GERALD ODONNELL, THOMAS JOSHU, ALEX MIKES AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE S ECCHER PROPERTIES INC KREHER, DEAN R & SUE E HANKAMMER, GLEN MAUL, PATRICIA KRIM, CHARLES & BRAQUETTA HARASHE, THOMAS MAUL, JULIE ANN & PATRICIA LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH OF C CROMWELL, RICHARD L & VEIT EILERS, KAREN LEINGANG, LORRAINE LEINGANG, LORRAINE KAISER, JEFFREY M & KAREN PAUKETAT, EILEEN H & BAGWE KLOTZ, LORI A & JERRY BASS, JOHN CROCKETT, KEITH & LOREEN BAGSBY, TIM GODSY, MONNIE D TRUSTEE & POOLE ROBERT & MARIE& BU ZENAROSA, NESTOR KRUPPS CROPS LLC KRUPPS CROPS LLC ECCHER, MARSHALL & SHELLEY THOMAS, PATRICIA ILL STATE TR CO 5044 GASSER, HENRY GASSER, HENRY GASSER, HENRY J & ERLENE L MEHRTENS, DUSTIN MEHRTENS, DUSTIN & RYAN MEHRTENS, DUSTIN & RYAN MEHRTENS, DUSTIN & RYAN MATHEWS, HAROLD & JANICE SICKMEIER, JERRY SICKMEIER, JERRY SICKMEIER, JERRY BAILEY, JOHN ADAMS, GALEANW & KATHERI ADAMS, GALEAN & KATHERINE DEMICK, FRANCIS B & JOYCE KILGALLON, JOHN A & CHALIC GRAVES, GARY M & CONNIE S GRAVES, GARY M & CONNIE S CHINN, JUDY V & KENNETH W ROHWEDDER, LYNN ROHWEDDER, LYNN SICKMEIER, JERRY DUNCAN, RICKY A & ANNETTE HELFRICH, KEVIN RUSSELL, PAUL REHG, EDWARD SKAER ERNEST A JOELLENBECK, TONIA RIEBELING, RENEE KIRLEIS, OSMAR & ELSIE KIRLEIS, OSMAR & ELSIE SCHAEFER, PHILIP E & ANDRE SCHRAND, TIMOTHY SEC OF HUD SEC OF HUD SEC OF HUD SEC OF HUD KLEIN, DEAN S & MARY ANN WACHTEL, MARK WACHTEL, MARK CLOSSEN, JOHN FAUKE, MARK E & VICTORIA SCHNEIDER, LYNNE & LORI TATE, JUDY A TRUSTEE TATE, JENNIFER & JUDITH A AHRENS, TIM RUHMAN, RICHARD MUETH, DEREK LEWIS, DEBRA SMITH MICHAEL & SMITH CHAR

12-12.0-200-033 12-12.0-300-010 12-12.0-400-006 12-12.0-400-019 12-13.0-200-007 12-13.0-400-004 12-15.0-101-007 12-15.0-102-014 12-16.0-207-005 12-16.0-300-008 12-18.0-100-012 12-18.0-100-014 12-18.0-200-010 12-18.0-400-009 12-18.0-401-004 12-19.0-200-003 12-20.0-200-010 12-20.0-300-003 12-20.0-400-001 12-21.0-100-026 12-21.0-200-016 12-21.0-200-047 12-21.0-201-001 12-21.0-226-004 12-21.0-400-004 12-22.0-100-007 12-22.0-303-010 12-24.0-400-015 12-26.0-100-003 12-26.0-200-006 12-26.0-200-016 12-26.0-400-027 12-27.0-200-009 12-28.0-100-005 12-28.0-100-007 12-28.0-300-021 12-29.0-100-011 12-29.0-300-007 12-29.0-300-010 12-29.0-400-010 12-31.0-400-010 12-32.0-300-006 12-32.0-308-008 12-32.0-308-011 12-34.0-302-006 12-35.0-100-020 12-35.0-102-001 12-35.0-201-001 16-02.0-200-026 16-02.0-200-033 16-02.0-200-034 16-02.0-400-002 16-03.0-100-008 16-03.0-200-001 16-05.0-100-006 16-10.0-300-006 16-10.0-400-006 16-11.0-200-010 16-11.0-201-001 16-11.0-204-011 16-11.0-206-013 16-11.0-207-010 16-11.0-208-003 16-11.0-208-005 16-11.0-210-005 16-11.0-211-013 16-11.0-212-005 16-11.0-212-006 16-11.0-212-012 16-11.0-212-013 16-12.0-100-007 16-13.0-100-005 16-13.0-200-010 16-13.0-400-023 16-13.0-401-004 16-14.0-400-009 16-23.0-100-007 16-23.0-100-016 16-24.0-100-005 16-24.0-100-014 16-24.0-200-008 16-24.0-400-010 16-24.0-400-012

$2,326.36 $1,742.61 $3,992.38 $387.38 $2,683.83 $203.64 $2,669.90 $2,495.20 $8,455.43 $103.75 $2,275.48 $1,062.11 $4,150.31 $1,296.66 $6,099.07 $1,868.79 $1,879.74 $160.45 $1,149.20 $1,655.67 $2,345.27 $5,535.00 $6,284.78 $113.48 $2,241.87 $83.07 $4,932.12 $436.09 $79.73 $1,432.57 $4,642.24 $3,205.51 $3,684.62 $3,456.93 $562.43 $3,807.88 $94.52 $3,404.90 $1,995.62 $25.07 $1,229.43 $591.85 $187.51 $950.16 $1,460.42 $1,734.85 $214.03 $6,933.13 $2,012.55 $637.05 $5,982.21 $1,468.18 $1,592.19 $8,582.26 $4,455.20 $482.02 $1,172.02 $31.79 $2,519.04 $357.91 $1,647.11 $2,881.80 $77.66 $238.82 $146.93 $864.94 $86.15 $2,828.30 $86.15 $162.36 $3,756.41 $314.05 $1,397.39 $1,477.25 $1,322.76 $1,066.19 $2,865.71 $307.75 $95.86 $2,308.34 $3,081.69 $1,118.21 $272.46

Total Parcel Count: 169

DELINQUENT TAX LIST ST. CLAIR COUNTY (NOTE: IF THROUGH SOME UNAVOIDABLE ERROR YOUR PROPERTY IS ADVERTISED, PLEASE CONTACT THE COUNTY TREASURER’S OFFICE IMMEDIATELY. PHONE (618) 825-2707.Due to the fact that tax payments have been received by this ofice after the copy was forwarded to the newspaper on September 26, 2016 names of certain individuals who have paid, will appear on this list.) STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF ST. CLAIR

) )SS )

Public notice is hereby given that I, Charles Suarez, County Collector of St. Clair County, shall apply in the Circuit Court in the 20th Judicial Circuit on the twenty irst (21st) day of October, 2016, for Judgment against the lands and lots mentioned and described in the following list of delinquent lands and lots for taxes, interest and costs due for 2015 and back taxes for 2004 to 2014 and for an order to sell said lands and lots for the satisfaction thereof, on the irst Monday in November, A.D., 2016 to wit: on the seventh (7th) day of November, 2016 all lands and lots for the sale of which an order shall be made, and will be exposed at public sale at the St. Clair County Building, in Belleville, Illinois, for the amount of taxes, interest and costs due thereon. ABBREVIATIONS:The Permanent Property Number listed is broken down as follows:1st and 2nd numbers represent the Township in which the parcel is located; 3rd and 4th numbers represent the section in said Township; 5th, 6th and 7th numbers represent which quarter section said parcel is in and numbers 8, 9 and 10 represent the location within the quarter section. If a B prints next to the total then back taxes are included with current year taxes shown in the total.If an * prints next to the total then only 2nd installment is past due. An additional charge of $10.00 is added to unpaid taxes and interest owing on each piece of real estate listed below to cover the cost of publication and mailing delinquent notices thereof. The $10.00 is in addition to unpaid taxes and interest on the irst installment after the 1st day of July 2016 and the second installment after the 1st day of September 2016 at the rate of one and one-half percent per 30 days until paid or forfeited. Parts of fractions of a 30 day period are regarded as 30 days. Delinquent Tax List for SHILOH VALLEY. Parcel Count: 112 LANG, TIMOTHY R JR & JODI HARRIS, RALEIGH & NAOMI CO MANNING, DAVID & ROBIN ANDREWS, JERRY & KI SUN LANG, TIMOTHY R JR & JODI BAIN, FRED B & KAY L PATRICK, LAURENCE & CHRIST PEABODY COAL COMPANY REEB, DIXIE BROWN, BENJAMIN R & ROBERT BROWN, BENJAMIN R & ROBERT SHOVLIN, MARY CASEY PROPERTIES LLC PORTZ, GEORGE COX CHARLOTTE A & SARKESIA POTRZ, GEORGE PORTZ, GEORGE PORTZ, GEORGE PORTZ, GEORGE PORTZ, GEORGE WOODS, WANDA LOU WINGS OF SHILOH INC WINGS OF SHILOH INC MANNING, DAVID & ROBIN SHILOH UNITED METHODIST CH

09-04.0-101-011 09-04.0-101-035 09-04.0-101-036 09-04.0-101-045 09-04.0-102-002 09-04.0-300-035 09-04.0-400-050 09-04.1-400-019 09-05.0-101-017 09-05.0-200-029 09-05.0-200-041 09-05.0-201-029 09-05.0-206-004 09-05.0-401-016 09-05.0-401-022 09-05.0-402-003 09-05.0-402-015 09-05.0-402-023 09-05.0-402-024 09-05.0-403-029 09-05.0-404-012 09-05.0-405-005 09-05.0-405-009 09-05.0-406-020 09-05.0-409-016

$2,724.21 $1,106.16 $1,276.48 $2,350.06 $1,960.02 $145.53 $586.74 $65.69 $6,345.43 $307.30 $228.63 $1,256.01 $12,207.14 $4,478.49 $1,081.46 $1,889.68 $2,391.16 $2,874.70 $3,092.76 $1,372.95 $610.42 $653.12 $2,368.98 $423.36 $1,134.90

BRANDT, WILLIAM SHILOH UNITED METHODIST CH DAUPHIN, DONALD WARCHOL, BRITTANEY M HUBBARD CONSTRUCTION INC COATES, JESSICA MEYERS, AARON J & MARY E SIEGLER, TODD & JULIE TOOLEN, ANDREW STEIGER, ANTHONY M & ASHLE MEISE, JOHN BURTON, JEFFREY & MICHELLE TURNER, STEVEN & KATHY MOSELY, CEDRIC T SR & BARB HEIMANN, STEVEN A & JENIFE IVERY, ERWIN & MICHELLE LEMON, STEPHEN SR & BRENDA KURTZ, MARK J & JEANETTE MADURI, DOMINIC & JANE FEDERAL NATIONAL MORGAGE A RICE, PHILIP & TERRI MOHLER JUSTIN & HUDSON ANG SCHROEDER, JEAN & FELLNER HACKMANN, CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS DAVID C & CHRISTI AMES, JAMES W III & CHERYL

09-05.0-409-056 09-05.0-409-065 09-05.0-410-008 09-05.0-411-003 09-06.0-100-005 09-06.0-302-001 09-06.0-303-023 09-07.0-101-002 09-07.0-107-001 09-07.0-107-002 09-07.0-201-006 09-07.0-206-029 09-07.0-206-030 09-07.0-206-037 09-07.0-208-009 09-07.0-209-006 09-07.0-209-007 09-07.0-210-019 09-07.0-210-059 09-07.0-212-003 09-07.0-215-024 09-07.0-222-008 09-07.0-300-026 09-07.0-301-026 09-07.0-304-029 09-07.0-304-035

$329.06 $152.63 $2,157.88 $1,646.30 $2,962.84 $6,397.63 $6,162.28 $2,475.22 $183.51 $2,496.80 $3,537.07 $1,481.50 $3,191.64 $6,422.04 $2,287.11 $2,693.72 $2,558.04 $6,620.85 $7,310.07 $2,375.65 $3,291.12 $4,270.57 $167.20 $2,256.46 $989.13 $5,233.32

PRINDABLE , DENNIS & LAURA PRINDABLE , DENNIS & LAURA MUNOZ, ALFONSO JR & JOYCE GOTHARD, MICHAEL D & VICKI HILL, PATRICK R & KATHLEEN ERP MINERAL RESERVES LLC % EDINGER, WILLIAM R & SANDR WERNER, KURT MDD ENTERPRISESLLC SERES, JUDITH PROPER, ROBERT W & THERESE LOEPKER, BRENT MCCOTTRELL, SHAKIRA MEINKOTH, KELLEY HARRISON, JOHN C & JULIE HARRISON, JOHN C & JULIE GROSS, MARTIN SYLER, DOUGLAS C & IN SOON FERRELL, PATRICK J & MERCY KLAAS, RICHARD C & JAN L WUEBBELS, MICHAEL C & ALLY PEABODY COAL COMPANY BAIN, FRED B & KAY L BAIN, FRED B & KAY L CLINTON, GARY A JR & SUE C RICHARDSON, DARRELL W & JI DRAKE, MARK & MARY ANN SMZ CORPORATION ROTH FAMILY LTD PARTNERSHI ROTH FAMILY LTD PARTNERSHI CPR PROPERTIES LLC

09-07.0-305-001 09-07.0-305-004 09-07.0-307-001 09-07.0-404-010 09-07.0-408-002 09-07.1-400-001 09-08.0-100-012 09-08.0-100-016 09-08.0-100-023 09-08.0-100-049 09-08.0-101-008 09-08.0-103-002 09-08.0-205-068 09-08.0-205-125 09-08.0-206-007 09-08.0-206-008 09-08.0-207-009 09-08.0-209-012 09-08.0-210-013 09-08.0-404-006 09-08.0-408-018 09-08.1-200-002 09-09.0-100-009 09-09.0-100-010 09-10.0-301-003 09-15.0-300-010 09-16.0-400-002 09-17.0-400-022 09-18.0-302-001 09-18.0-302-003 09-18.0-404-002

$3,466.90 $3,269.04 $3,723.33 $5,550.11 $3,912.04 $32.20 $1,568.20 $3,139.29 $2,046.81 $2,382.57 $1,794.87 $1,843.11 $3,314.87 $5,333.07 $1,220.82 $257.80 $2,224.34 $2,546.01 $5,536.44 $6,446.97 $7,561.42 $26.62 $880.56 $97.34 $8,721.78 $4,018.22 $2,310.33 $1,729.92 $620.07 $150.76 $42.73

ELLETT, JAMES D & MICHELLE HANNES LLC KNOWLES ROBIN & KENT GWEN EAGLE SOLUTIONS LLC EAGLE SOLUTIONS LLC EAGLE SOLUTIONS LLC PASCOE, JUSTIN & JESSICA MCBRIDE & SON RESIDENTIAL POHZEHL, ANDREA CENTRAL STATES COAL RESERV ISOM, DAVID BIEKERT, KEVIN J & MADELIN KING, HARLEY C & WON-SUK WILLIAMSON, WAYNE A & VIRG ROBINSON, SHARON SCHEMPP , JENNIFER & JASON ZIPFEL BRYAN R &ZIPFEL T SCHROEDER, ROBERT SCHROEDER, ROBERT PRUETT, STEVEN TURNER, JAMES CENTRAL STATES COAL RESERV RASCH BRET & SAX DOUG & HA CONKLIN, KENNETH DEPRENGER, BETTY D & CLIFF ERP MINERAL RESERVES LLC % SAX DOUGLAS A & AMBER N & BIEBEL, MARY LOU SAX DOUGLAS A & AMBER N & SAX DOUGLAS A & AMBER N &

09-20.0-200-017 09-23.0-103-007 09-24.0-300-010 09-27.0-200-012 09-27.0-200-015 09-27.0-200-016 09-29.0-306-003 09-29.0-306-024 09-30.0-402-010 09-30.1-100-001 09-31.0-400-010 09-32.0-100-012 09-33.0-201-002 09-33.0-300-011 09-34.0-101-011 09-34.0-101-018 09-34.0-101-022 09-34.0-102-010 09-34.0-102-011 09-34.0-103-001 09-34.0-400-003 09-34.1-400-001 09-35.0-300-012 09-35.0-302-014 09-35.0-302-017 09-35.1-300-002 09-36.0-300-001 09-36.0-300-002 09-36.0-300-004 09-36.0-300-007

$603.10 $571.38 $231.33 $4,348.81 $163.50 $394.29 $2,369.92 $22.74 $3,139.53 $25.26 $816.25 $300.10 $415.64 $223.95 $1,663.05 $916.47 $32.52 $884.91 $105.84 $2,635.86 $2,425.99 $22.11 $1,615.52 $928.67 $21.34 $258.91 $21.64 $25.11 $21.64 $21.64

Total Parcel Count: 112

DELINQUENT TAX LIST ST. CLAIR COUNTY (NOTE: IF THROUGH SOME UNAVOIDABLE ERROR YOUR PROPERTY IS ADVERTISED, PLEASE CONTACT THE COUNTY TREASURER’S OFFICE IMMEDIATELY. PHONE (618) 825-2707.Due to the fact that tax payments have been received by this ofice after the copy was forwarded to the newspaper on September 26, 2016 names of certain individuals who have paid, will appear on this list.) STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF ST. CLAIR

) )SS )

Public notice is hereby given that I, Charles Suarez, County Collector of St. Clair County, shall apply in the Circuit Court in the 20th Judicial Circuit on the twenty irst (21st) day of October, 2016, for Judgment against the lands and lots mentioned and described in the following list of delinquent lands and lots for taxes, interest and costs due for 2015 and back taxes for 2004 to 2014 and for an order to sell said lands and lots for the satisfaction thereof, on the irst Monday in November, A.D., 2016 to wit: on the seventh (7th) day of November, 2016 all lands and lots for the sale of which an order shall be made, and will be exposed at public sale at the St. Clair County Building, in Belleville, Illinois, for the amount of taxes, interest and costs due thereon. ABBREVIATIONS:The Permanent Property Number listed is broken down as follows:1st and 2nd numbers represent the Township in which the parcel is located; 3rd and 4th numbers represent the section in said Township; 5th, 6th and 7th numbers represent which quarter section said parcel is in and numbers 8, 9 and 10 represent the location within the quarter section.If a B prints next to the total then back taxes are included with current year taxes shown in the total. If an * prints next to the total then only 2nd installment is past due. An additional charge of $10.00 is added to unpaid taxes and interest owing on each piece of real estate listed below to cover the cost of publication and mailing delinquent notices thereof. The $10.00 is in addition to unpaid taxes and interest on the irst installment after the 1st day of July 2016 and the second installment after the 1st day of September 2016 at the rate of one and one-half percent per 30 days until paid or forfeited. Parts of fractions of a 30 day period are regarded as 30 days. Delinquent Tax List for STOOKEY. Parcel Count: 286 NESTER, GREGORY & CHRISTIN 07-01.0-105-006 CHRISTMANN, ELIZABETH 07-01.0-110-043 ORCHARD, RICHARD & KAREN R 07-01.0-111-010 DAHL, RONALD 07-01.0-112-018 BOATMAN, DONALD 07-01.0-113-052 BOATMAN, DONALD 07-01.0-113-053 BOATMAN, DONALD 07-01.0-113-054 BOATMAN, DONALD 07-01.0-113-055 HAGERTY JOEL L & LOWELL VE 07-01.0-115-067 ARMBRISTER, ROGER D & PATR 07-01.0-119-003 ELITE PROPERTY MAN GROUP L 07-01.0-119-004 TOUCHETTE, ROBERT 07-01.0-200-002 KNAPP, STEVEN R & COLLEEN 07-01.0-200-034 STEVENS, ROBERT ET AL 07-01.0-201-011 NIX, BRENT J & HANNAH E 07-01.0-201-015 NIX, BRENT J & HANNAH E 07-01.0-201-016 NIX, BRENT J & HANNAH E 07-01.0-201-017 FOSTER, DANNY 07-01.0-201-029 WILLIAMS, NATHANIEL W & OL 07-01.0-202-012 WALKER STEVEN & WALTER MAR 07-01.0-203-003 US BANK TRUST NA TRUSTEE 07-01.0-205-022 PARKER, ROBERT & CONNIE 07-01.0-206-038 PARKER, ROBERT & CONNIE 07-01.0-206-039 PARKER, ROBERT & CONNIE 07-01.0-206-040 STOMPER, JEFF & PAULA 07-01.0-206-055 ROBERTS, VIRGINIA 07-01.0-206-070 ESSIEN, ANGELA 07-01.0-206-072 EASTER, JASON 07-01.0-206-125 LASETER, JOHNNIE 07-01.0-206-126 THRELKELD, MICHAEL 07-01.0-207-016 LANDRETH, KENNETH P & JOEL 07-01.0-300-004 HUSTON, RUTH 07-01.0-312-003 MOHAMAD, MAJEDA 07-01.0-312-004 WELLS FARGO BANK 07-01.0-400-001 REEVE, ERIC 07-01.0-400-005 ALLEGIANCE PROP MANAGEMENT 07-01.0-402-010 WEAVER, DANIEL 07-01.0-403-024 RDS DEVELOPMENT CORP 07-01.0-403-025 KEARNS, KATHERINE 07-01.0-404-001 WEAVER, DANIEL 07-01.0-404-012 WEAVER, DANIEL 07-01.0-404-013 JACKSON, ADRIENNE 07-01.0-404-039 WEAVER, DANIEL 07-01.0-411-012 US BANK TRUST NATIONAL ASS 07-01.0-412-011 PETIT-HOMME, BRUNO 07-01.0-412-023 DANCY, TAULTON JR & MARSHA 07-01.0-413-006 WOOLARD, VIRGINIA 07-01.0-413-039 TYGRACON PROPERTIES INC 07-01.0-413-043 FREEDOM CONST & PROP MAN L 07-01.0-422-006 RIEDEL, RITA MARIE 07-02.0-100-018 COLLINS, KIMBERLY 07-02.0-103-010 FEDERAL NATL MORTGAGE ASSO 07-02.0-103-020 MARTIN, JOHN F & WENDY 07-02.0-201-002 KRONENBERGER, SCOTT & ANDR 07-02.0-201-003 KRONENBERGER, SCOTT & ANDR 07-02.0-201-004 THOMAS, MARCENA R MARTIN 07-02.0-204-005 NORTON, HOLLY 07-02.0-206-001 HAMMEL, JEFFERY & BRENDA 07-02.0-209-002 HAAR JOHN &MASON MELISSA 07-02.0-214-009 STATHIS, CHARLES J & LORI 07-02.0-214-015 GREEN, JAMES 07-02.0-305-001 LUAN, YUANQUAN 07-02.0-305-011 HARRIS, SAMUEL 07-02.0-403-012 CHADWICK, MARDELL J TRUSTE 07-02.0-411-007 MITCHOM, GEORGE 07-02.0-411-027 MOURY, BRIAN 07-09.0-101-002 07-09.0-101-005 TOUCHETTE, GEORGE MOURY, BRIAN 07-09.0-102-001 ALLEN, WOODROW J & GAIL M 07-09.0-102-002 BROWN, FRED L & JANET L 07-09.0-202-002 GREEN, CHARLOTTE 07-09.0-301-017 THOMAS, ADAM 07-09.0-301-021 MOURY, BRIAN 07-09.0-302-003 HAAS, LARRY E 07-10.0-101-002 HAAS, LARRY E 07-10.0-101-003 SCHWENDEMAN, DANNY R & KAR 07-10.0-200-015 FULTS, KENNETH L & BOBBI J 07-10.0-301-008 HERBERT, CHRISTOPHER 07-10.0-304-005 RATLIFF, MARK W SR & VIVIA 07-10.0-304-017 SCHWENDEMAN, DANNY R & KAR 07-10.0-400-002 RUSSELL, DENNIS D & PHYLLI 07-10.0-402-004 KIRBY, JAMES 07-10.0-405-015 KIRBY, JAMES 07-10.0-405-016 RUSSELL, PHYLLIS 07-10.0-406-019 DARNSTAEDT, WAYNE A & SOND 07-10.0-407-005 KASSING, CLAUDENE 07-10.0-407-008 BANI FADEL, SAEF A& HANE 07-10.0-407-022 STEVENS-MITCHELL, LYNN 07-10.0-408-015 KIRCHOEFER, SCOTT 07-10.0-408-022 WILLMANN, SCOTT 07-10.0-408-042 WILLMANN, SCOTT 07-10.0-408-043 RICHARDSON, DARRELL & JILL 07-10.0-411-003 REEB, STEPHEN & BEVERLY 07-10.0-413-013 RUHMAN, RICHARD 07-10.0-413-030 MC WILLIAMS FERN 07-10.0-413-035 DELL, JEFF & TRACEY 07-10.0-413-043 TIERNEY, JOHN M JR 07-11.0-202-016 MISSISSPII VALLEY PROPERTI 07-11.0-205-010 SINGH SATINDER & KAUR BALJ 07-11.0-206-013 SCHROEDER, VICKY 07-11.0-210-001 WELLS FARGO BANK NA 07-11.0-210-004 WEBB, BRIAN 07-11.0-302-002 KASSEBAUM, MARVIN & MARLEN 07-11.0-405-011 SALE, SCOTT 07-12.0-102-002 BAUER, CARL 07-12.0-103-006 HUMPHREY, JUDY 07-12.0-103-007 BROWN, ROLLIE & VERA 07-12.0-103-013 MCELROY, RICHARD W & DAWN 07-12.0-103-014 SUMNER, ROBERT A & KIMBERL 07-12.0-103-015

$5,689.65 $837.90 $3,865.75 $817.87 $272.52 $198.17 $257.66 $216.97 $2,893.32 $1,516.92 $1,516.92 $2,028.53 $1,476.04 $2,320.59 $1,916.94 $278.01 $260.50 $2,749.51 $2,242.11 $3,249.93 $1,600.23 $83.29 $640.20 $84.16 $1,238.30 $992.98 $2,896.06 $57.17 $3,062.13 $1,468.82 $149.62 $2,380.91 $1,237.33 $157.55 $58.74 $1,693.64 $2,352.87 $626.73 $2,200.96 $2,387.91 $1,453.30 $536.19 $1,968.19 $1,975.58 $1,714.66 $3,623.56 $3,704.94 $2,812.81 $2,439.42 $1,375.68 $2,655.04 $8,177.34 $158.48 $155.50 $622.02 $1,826.36 $5,306.80 $7,015.41 $432.13 $12,644.01 $50,185.06 $1,454.48 $1,188.11 $3,159.00 $9,163.08 $1,370.37 $2,576.94 $1,918.36 $1,891.14 $142.72 $768.53 $495.37 $2,472.59 $268.41 $276.17 $438.14 $2,389.76 $41.91 $129.86 $4,854.31 $2,090.55 $563.81 $397.91 $32.38 $1,449.46 $1,669.81 $3,446.49 $2,036.78 $3,292.10 $986.81 $121.66 $96.87 $1,342.52 $657.66 $3,793.05 $941.39 $5,027.40 $3,247.54 $2,247.87 $1,166.67 $2,788.60 $1,634.95 $21.14 $2,664.81 $2,442.46 $2,462.67 $1,264.57 $1,020.09 $2,229.89

HAUPT, MILDRED 07-12.0-104-001 REUSS, PAULA 07-12.0-105-008 METCALF, TERENCE 07-12.0-108-007 DIVITTORIO, DOMINIC A & ST 07-12.0-109-015 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOC 07-12.0-110-007 LANTER, JO ANN 07-12.0-112-011 WELLS FARGO BANK NA 07-12.0-112-020 OBANNON, ARNISSA 07-12.0-113-008 WATSON, CYRILLA 07-12.0-114-001 PITTS, LEE A & KATIE M 07-12.0-115-001 PITTMAN, CREMONIA 07-12.0-115-006 MILES, JULIA 07-12.0-115-007 GREASCHEL, MCKENZI & DAVID 07-12.0-115-010 SKORTZ, JOSEPH & LISA 07-12.0-117-002 WILSON, DEBRA 07-12.0-117-006 WILSON, DEBRA 07-12.0-117-019 JONES, DEBRA 07-12.0-119-001 FOX, JOANN 07-12.0-119-011 FOX, JASMINE 07-12.0-119-012 ALLEN, GAIL 07-12.0-121-001 JACKSON, DWAYNE 07-12.0-124-007 RYAN, MATTHEW T & ATEFEH A 07-12.0-129-007 STEWART, KARA 07-12.0-300-015 STEWART, KARA 07-12.0-300-016 KARFS, JOSEPH G & FRANCES 07-12.0-301-003 MEIDINGER, MADONNA 07-12.0-305-001 RITTENHOUSE , PATRICIA 07-12.0-305-012 SMITH, GAVIN M & AMY L 07-12.0-308-016 SMITH, GAVIN M & AMY L 07-12.0-308-017 HILL, VELMA 07-12.0-309-004 RICHARDSON, JILL & DARRELL 07-13.0-101-005 MANNON, STEVE 07-13.0-101-008 RICHARDSON, JILL & DARRELL 07-13.0-101-052 RICHARDSON, DARRELL & JILL 07-13.0-101-053 JAMES MICHAEL REAL ESTATE 07-13.0-102-034 WATKINS, JACK D JR & CATHE 07-13.0-105-003 COLE, JAMES J & DIANE F 07-13.0-105-006 TYGRACON PROPERTIES INC 07-13.0-106-018 HARRIS, JILL 07-13.0-202-007 T BOW INC 07-13.0-204-022 JT DELL PROPERTIES INC 07-13.0-205-011 SINGER, SAMANTHA 07-13.0-205-014 REEB, STEPHEN E & BEVERLY 07-13.0-205-018 WHITE, SANDREA 07-13.0-205-020 QUASS, ROBERT 07-13.0-208-015 MURRAY, GARY 07-13.0-209-025 BOSICK, LISA 07-13.0-211-011 TATALOVICH, MICHAEL 07-13.0-212-001 GALATI, TERRY & DENISE 07-13.0-213-002 JOHNSON, ROBERT & ANNA 07-13.0-214-036 REEB, STEPHEN & BEVERLY 07-13.0-214-041 REEB, STEPHEN E & BEVERLY 07-13.0-214-042 REEB, STEVE & BEVERLY 07-13.0-214-044 VERDU, ANDREW 07-13.0-214-048 BOUL THOMAS R &HIX MARY 07-13.0-215-032 LUCKY BREAK INVESTMENTS LL 07-13.0-218-002 LUCKY BREAK INVESTMENTS LL 07-13.0-218-013 BABINSKY, ANDREW & JANET 07-13.0-301-008 LANCASTER, STEPHEN & LATOY 07-13.0-302-009 WATKINS PATRICIA & , PECK 07-13.0-400-025 REEB, STEPHEN & BEVERLY 07-13.0-400-064 PROPERTIES HOLDING MANAGEM 07-13.0-400-070 MAGNA TRUST CO 01-90-W324- 07-13.0-404-033 SYKES, CHARLES E & KATHERI 07-13.0-407-008 ACKERMAN, THOMAS 07-13.0-409-001 EDMONDS, RON 07-14.0-101-001 LANCER RENTALS LLC 07-14.0-101-002 LANCER RENTALS LLC 07-14.0-101-007 GIBSON, CARMEN 07-14.0-102-005 BRADSHAW, PATRICK 07-14.0-103-003 SCHAUB, KIMBERLY 07-14.0-104-001 ALEXANDER, LORA WASKO07-14.0-104-004 NORDMAN, CHRISTOPHER 07-14.0-106-001 BUTTRY, ROY 07-14.0-106-009 SPREHE RICHARD L & KHAZAEL 07-14.0-302-002 COURTNEY, CARRIE 07-15.0-102-028 HIGGERSON, CYNTHIA 07-15.0-104-031 RICHARDSON, JAMES 07-15.0-105-005 FERRER, ARTURO & POPPY 07-15.0-106-014 GUINN, STEPHEN & GINA 07-15.0-106-023 SMITH, DAWN M & MICHAEL 07-15.0-106-024 MAYO, SHARON 07-15.0-200-002 CITIZENS COMMUNITY BANK 07-15.0-200-015 ERVIN, ALLEN D & KAY & MIC 07-15.0-201-022 SMITH, LARRY J & LINDA 07-15.0-201-035 BUTTRY, ROY 07-15.0-201-041 LATINETTE, DENNIS L & JUDY 07-15.0-203-009 ANDERSON, ROGER D & STARLA 07-15.0-203-014 ANDERSON, ROGER D & STARLA 07-15.0-203-015 SUMNLER, JAMES 07-15.0-203-017 TRAVOUS, JULIA E & JASON D 07-15.0-204-009 COX, BRIAN & LISA 07-15.0-204-015 KOPP, ROBERT 07-15.0-205-005 BARKER, MARY ANN 07-15.0-205-007 CEBULSKE, NATHANIEL 07-15.0-205-013 MILLER, DALE & HEATHER 07-15.0-205-021 MENEES, LLOYD 07-15.0-206-010 DEANES, RUBY 07-15.0-207-004 WINTERBAUER, BREAN 07-15.0-208-015 WINTERBAUER, BREAN 07-15.0-208-016 SATTLEFIELD, GENE JR & DAM 07-15.0-208-027 WALTA, SUSY A & SHIRLEY 07-15.0-209-008 HUELSMAN, RICHARD 07-15.0-210-013 MORELAND, EDWARD M & DOROT 07-15.0-211-016 LYNCH, AMY C & WENDELL 07-15.0-212-004 MOORE, SHARON 07-15.0-212-018 WEIK JOSEPH & WALLER MARY 07-15.0-213-004 MATTHEWS, ANTHONY M & SHER 07-15.0-213-005 EDMISTON, JOHN 07-15.0-215-002

$971.32 $1,102.36 $42.40 $1,075.79 $2,774.99 $1,895.41 $3,199.48 $1,981.60 $534.74 $1,261.44 $2,397.48 $686.22 $2,869.73 $1,147.48 $1,746.24 $98.58 $2,815.40 $2,118.89 $640.91 $2,757.75 $1,608.59 $2,382.60 $53.92 $3,641.83 $2,178.00 $2,287.33 $1,108.85 $965.34 $991.03 $3,699.47 $3,004.60 $1,198.06 $132.23 $2,116.96 $3,574.50 $1,587.28 $31.27 $2,681.37 $2,080.24 $3,131.33 $1,239.18 $3,325.07 $1,604.86 $1,605.28 $3,294.70 $1,146.46 $2,533.53 $778.44 $1,108.74 $18.64 $1,840.31 $1,795.16 $2,127.24 $1,401.71 $1,094.86 $695.63 $5,434.70 $3,813.47 $1,386.88 $1,392.24 $1,431.56 $33,139.21 $15,562.28 $3,871.05 $3,712.77 $1,730.30 $1,354.65 $1,970.45 $257.96 $417.38 $3,078.26 $297.45 $1,908.55 $674.60 $5,618.60 $1,934.04 $2,080.52 $1,451.17 $2,049.32 $2,335.43 $3,669.86 $1,164.36 $780.99 $772.32 $1,098.14 $1,612.40 $1,409.93 $192.79 $1,386.05 $386.06 $1,980.83 $1,421.47 $1,671.72 $270.85 $1,081.47 $1,033.10 $889.60 $621.85 $314.31 $323.57 $1,644.22 $618.45 $606.11 $601.18 $643.88 $2,171.77 $786.26 $247.05 $98.07

11


10.07.2016 • Friday • i 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • S3

MUELLER, KIMBERLY & WILSON 06-16.0-405-020 BARLOW, WILLIAM R & COURTN 06-16.0-405-028 BARLOW, WILLIAM R & COURTN 06-16.0-405-029 BARLOW, WILLIAM R & COURTN 06-16.0-405-030 HILL, GAIL 06-16.0-406-018 HILL, GAIL 06-16.0-406-019 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 06-16.0-406-020 WATSON, JEANNETTE 06-16.0-406-021 WILLIAMS, RANDY 06-16.0-407-001 CARNER, DAVID L & SUSIE M 06-16.0-407-007 ERKFITZ, MICHELLE 06-16.0-407-008 DUPO MARINE HOLDING LLC 06-16.0-409-004 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS DEVEL LL 06-16.0-409-005 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE AND S 06-17.0-100-011 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE DIST 06-17.0-100-012 WILLIAMS, TAMI L & EDWARD 06-17.0-101-006 CHARTRAND, MICHAEL 06-17.0-101-012 MCPEAK, JOHN J & JULIE 06-17.0-101-018 CHARTRAND, MICHAEL 06-17.0-109-004 PANNIER, RUDY & KATHERINE 06-17.0-117-001 HORTON, ROBERT D SR & TINA 06-17.0-117-002 SOUTHWESTERN IL PROP LLC 06-17.0-117-013 KIDD, WILLIE 06-17.0-120-001 MCMANNIS JENNIFER M & , CO 06-17.0-120-004 MCMANNIS JENNIFER & , CONK 06-17.0-120-006 NEAL, CHANIE 06-17.0-121-001 STEWART, TERESA 06-17.0-125-004 CASEY, JERRY 06-17.0-126-002 HEBEL, RICHARD 06-17.0-126-007 HEARTY, TOBY 06-17.0-127-006 V GUPTA INC 06-17.0-128-020 HUBBARD, SELMA 06-17.0-130-006 BLANQUART, VICKIE & JOSEPH 06-17.0-130-009 GILLESPIE, OLLIE MAE 06-17.0-130-011 Total Parcel Count: 286 LAMASTUS, DAVID C & ALICE 06-17.0-131-007 ADAMS, KIMBERLY 06-17.0-204-001 GILL, TERRY & MC NAIR MELV 06-17.0-204-008 SYMMETRIC INVESTORS INC 06-17.0-205-005 FARRELL, MARCELLA 06-17.0-205-012 DELINQUENT TAX LIST THORNTON, MICHELE 06-17.0-206-011 ST. CLAIR COUNTY THORNTON, MICHELE 06-17.0-206-012 06-17.0-206-013 (NOTE: IF THROUGH SOME UNAVOIDABLE ERROR YOUR PROPERTY IS ADVERTISED, PLEASE CONTACT THE COUNTY TREASURER’S OFFICE THORNTON, MICHELE 06-17.0-207-014 IMMEDIATELY. PHONE (618) 825-2707.Due to the fact that tax payments have been received by this ofice after the copy was forwarded to the HART, RICHARD & MARY WHITAKER RAY P & WHITAKER 06-17.0-209-006 newspaper on September 26, 2016 names of certain individuals who have paid, will appear on this list.) BOYKIN, JIMMIE 06-17.0-210-008 BOYKIN, JIMMIE 06-17.0-210-009 STATE OF ILLINOIS ) BOYKIN, JIMMIE 06-17.0-210-010 )SS BOYKIN, JIMMIE 06-17.0-210-015 COUNTY OF ST. CLAIR ) BOYKIN, ABRIN & JOYCE & JI 06-17.0-210-016 PARRON, BRENT 06-17.0-212-011 Public notice is hereby given that I, Charles Suarez, County Collector of St. Clair County, shall apply in the Circuit Court in the 20th Judicial Circuit on 06-17.0-212-012 the twenty irst (21st) day of October, 2016, for Judgment against the lands and lots mentioned and described in the following list of delinquent lands PARRON, BRENT 06-17.0-212-013 and lots for taxes, interest and costs due for 2015 and back taxes for 2004 to 2014 and for an order to sell said lands and lots for the satisfaction PARRON, BRENT 06-17.0-212-014 thereof, on the irst Monday in November, A.D., 2016 to wit: on the seventh (7th) day of November, 2016 all lands and lots for the sale of which an PARRON, BRENT 06-17.0-300-027 order shall be made, and will be exposed at public sale at the St. Clair County Building, in Belleville, Illinois, for the amount of taxes, interest and OKEEFE VERNA FREMONT, JOHN & WANDA 06-17.0-407-003 costs due thereon. BROOKS, MINNIE 06-17.0-407-004 06-17.0-407-005 ABBREVIATIONS: The Permanent Property Number listed is broken down as follows:1st and 2nd numbers represent the Township in which the parcel BROOKS, MINNIE FREMONT, JOHN & WANDA 06-17.0-407-009 is located; 3rd and 4th numbers represent the section in said Township; 5th, 6th and 7th numbers represent which quarter section said parcel is in 06-17.0-407-011 and numbers 8, 9 and 10 represent the location within the quarter section. If a B prints next to the total then back taxes are included with current year GRIFFIN, MATTIE FOUTCH, DENNIS E & KIMBERL 06-17.0-407-026 taxes shown in the total.If an * prints next to the total then only 2nd installment is past due. RAYMER, GROVER R & JOHNNA 06-17.0-407-038 06-17.0-407-040 An additional charge of $10.00 is added to unpaid taxes and interest owing on each piece of real estate listed below to cover the cost of publication WATTS, ANDREW 06-17.0-408-004 and mailing delinquent notices thereof. The $10.00 is in addition to unpaid taxes and interest on the irst installment after the 1st day of July 2016 BIVINS, TRENT 06-17.0-408-007 and the second installment after the 1st day of September 2016 at the rate of one and one-half percent per 30 days until paid or forfeited. Parts of KRAEMER, WILBERT & LINDA LEWIS, JULIE 06-17.0-408-008 fractions of a 30 day period are regarded as 30 days. FILLINGER JERRY & MORRIS D 06-17.0-408-009 REEVES, JAMES & THERESA 06-17.0-408-012 Delinquent Tax List for SUGARLOAF. Parcel Count: 413 LONG, JAMES 06-17.0-408-016 FOUTCH, DENNIS 06-17.0-409-010 RANDOLPH, JOE 06-15.0-106-007 $2,732.93 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE DIST 06-04.0-300-011 $270.73 SPRY, DANA 06-17.0-411-009 KLOS RITA A & SCOTT CHELSE 06-15.0-106-018 $1,828.56 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE DIST 06-08.0-300-006 $53.07 MURPHY, DOUGLAS STEVEN 06-17.0-411-010 FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD CAHO 06-15.0-107-032 $37.90 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE DIST 06-08.0-312-001 $27.17 AUSTIN, DAMIEN 06-17.0-411-012 BARTH, PAMELA 06-15.0-108-006 $2,578.14 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE DIST 06-08.0-312-002 $26.54 AUSTIN, DAMIEN 06-17.0-411-013 MASON, HERMAN & DEBORAH 06-15.0-109-004 $3,318.72 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE DIST 06-08.0-312-003 $27.17 RANGE, RICKY & KARMEN M 06-17.0-411-027 CROWDER NANCEE L & DAVIS J 06-15.0-109-006 $2,951.35 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE DIST 06-08.0-312-004 $27.17 CROWELL, CAROLYN 06-17.0-411-036 SHEARER, EVAN P & GINGER L 06-15.0-200-016 $809.43 PRAIRIE DUPONT LEVEE DIST 06-08.0-312-005 $28.28 SADLER, CHARLES 06-17.0-411-037 GOULD MATTHEW, MORTON ASHL 06-15.0-201-024 $788.48 CHARTRAND, MICHAEL 06-08.0-312-024 $76.54 RANGE, BARNEY D & PATRICIA 06-17.0-411-040 ROBERTS, JOSEPH 06-15.0-201-025 $377.52 LORE JUDITH S & MITCHELL D 06-08.0-400-004 $541.93 RANDOLPH, JOEY RAY 06-17.0-411-044 INGRAM, RUBY 06-15.0-201-036 $399.95 SCHMID, RAYMOND 06-09.0-300-025 $1,217.15 WAGNER, MARK 06-17.0-414-001 ALLEN, GAIL 06-15.0-201-045 $1,227.43 MCCRACKEN, MICHAEL 06-09.0-405-005 $806.50 THOMPSON, SHAWN 06-17.0-414-006 FARHNER, CHRIS 06-15.0-201-051 $179.32 BURKE, EDWARD 06-09.0-406-007 $710.66 SEYMOUR HOLDING CORP 06-17.0-414-007 TODD, STEVEN 06-15.0-201-052 $179.32 LEVIN, WILLIAM L & JUDITH 06-09.0-406-008 $330.33 TAYLOR, JAMES & HELEN 06-18.0-400-011 FARHNER, CHRIS 06-15.0-201-053 $514.44 VOELKER, ALBERT J & DONALD 06-09.0-406-012 $204.27 STATE STREET INVESTMENTS L 06-18.0-400-039 ALLEN, WOODROW & GAIL 06-15.0-201-122 $2,041.63 BRINKMAN, TONY 06-09.0-407-007 $622.69 PRAIRIE DU PONT LEVEE DIST 06-18.0-400-069 MEYERS, ROBERT 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$835.76 BRANNAN, JEFFREY 06-10.0-302-010 $503.66 ROBERTS, RONNIE D & ALICE 06-21.0-100-004 EICHHOLZ, DEBORAH 06-15.0-202-051 $184.31 NOBBE, TODD 06-10.0-304-007 $1,810.15 MANNING SHARON & TEGEL ELO 06-21.0-100-005 HARBOUR PORTFOLIO VIII LP 06-15.0-202-062 $804.58 GOSS, CHRISTOPHER & JENNIF 06-10.0-305-001 $388.76 WETZEL, DWAYNE EDWARD 06-21.0-101-004 JUDY, BARBARA 06-15.0-202-063 $105.72 HIRSCH, ARCHIE 06-10.0-306-003 $1,238.39 LIVIGNI, RICHARD 06-21.0-101-007 RICHARDSON, JOHNIE W SR & 06-15.0-202-077 $108.37 GREEN, LARRY 06-10.0-306-010 $215.15 BOYKIN, THERESA 06-21.0-101-008 HORNE, DALE 06-15.0-300-001 $1,376.89 HTC PROPERTIES LLC 06-10.0-306-012 $1,244.67 FOUTCH, BRUCE WAYNE 06-21.0-101-009 LITTLE, VIRGIL R & NANCY P 06-15.0-300-010 $644.39 GREEN, LARRY 06-10.0-306-016 $2,481.86 THIELEMANN, GARY D & LORI 06-21.0-102-010 LITTLE, VIRGIL R & NANCY P 06-15.0-300-011 $166.52 BREGEN, CONRAD 06-10.0-306-017 $861.88 THOMAS, TERRY 06-21.0-104-002 DIXON, STACEY L TRUSTEE 06-15.0-300-031 $2,382.09 WERNER, DAVID 06-10.0-306-018 $418.96 ALLEN, REGINALD 06-21.0-104-011 DIXON, STACEY 06-15.0-300-032 $522.76 CAPPER, AARON 06-10.0-309-004 $595.97 SOUTHWESTERN IL PROP LLC06-21.0-104-012 MCMANN, REBECCA & THOMAS 06-15.0-300-033 $78.41 GILLAM, DON 06-10.0-309-031 $495.25 CENTRAL IL R E HOLDINGS LL 06-21.0-104-019 SCHAUB, RAYMOND 06-15.0-301-001 $1,790.31 GILLAM, DON 06-10.0-309-032 $606.93 SIMPSON, KRISTY 06-21.0-201-002 MMB REAL ESTATE LLC 06-15.0-301-004 $717.98 CHESTER, CHARLES 06-10.0-310-009 $694.71 SIMPSON, KRISTY 06-21.0-201-003 MUSSKOPF, CAROL 06-15.0-301-006 $894.11 CHESTER, CHARLES 06-10.0-310-010 $102.39 HAZEL, VANESA 06-21.0-202-003 MALDONADO, MICHELLE & HECT 06-15.0-302-001 $551.78 LITTLE , VIRGIL RAY & NANC 06-10.0-310-016 $750.79 KARNBRADFORD A TRUSTEE 06-21.0-202-015 OSBORNE, CLARENCE & LINDA 06-15.0-303-002 $254.48 SPRY, DANA 06-10.0-310-017 $918.74 WALSTER RUSSELL A KNAUST E 06-21.0-204-001 STEPHENS, LARINDA & SCOTT 06-15.0-303-009 $860.94 PULCHER, CHRISTOPHER 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$2,598.63 MSM INVESTMENTS 06-21.0-212-033 MOORE, REBECCA & JUDY & DU 06-15.0-403-013 $97.70 GILLAM, DON 06-10.0-316-003 $1,499.72 MSM INVESTMENTS 06-21.0-212-034 INGRAM, RUSSELL & ROSE 06-15.0-407-006 $966.72 MATHES, WILLIS & DALE 06-10.0-318-003 $418.72 MSM INVESTMENTS 06-21.0-212-035 ALLEN, WOODY & GAIL 06-15.0-407-018 $1,537.21 06-10.0-318-004 $1,722.86 MATHES, WILLIS & DALE CRAWFORD, GREGG L ET AL 06-21.0-212-037 ALLEN, WOODY & GAIL 06-15.0-407-019 $447.21 LACROIX, JAMES N & NORA 06-10.0-318-009 $1,155.99 MSM INVESTMENTS 06-21.0-212-039 LOCKETT, JOHN 06-15.0-407-020 $901.52 LACROIX, JAMES N & NORA 06-10.0-318-015 $632.55 FORD, WALTER & LOUISE 06-21.0-214-017 LARUE, AMY & RICKY 06-16.0-100-011 $406.13 LACROIX, JAMES N & NORA 06-10.0-318-017 $438.39 HENKE, STEPHANIE 06-21.0-215-004 REA, ROY & ELIZABETH 06-16.0-200-012 $167.69 LACROIX, JAMES N & NORA L 06-10.0-319-009 $1,704.37 SPIER, HELEN CHARLENE 06-21.0-215-012 PASLEY, ONDREA 06-16.0-303-004 $1,370.94 ROBERTS, TAMMY 06-10.0-320-012 $200.95 SPIER, HELEN CHARLENE 06-21.0-215-013 PASLEY, ONDREA 06-16.0-303-005 $289.58 DAVIS, RONALD & PEGGY 06-10.0-321-005 $108.27 FORD, JEFFREY 06-21.0-215-014 CAMPBELL, SUSAN 06-16.0-303-006 $605.00 MACK, KEITH 06-10.0-321-007 $725.73 FARR, ROBERT LEE 06-21.0-217-001 CAMPBELL, SUSAN 06-16.0-303-007 $108.80 BOYKIN, CECIL 06-10.0-322-009 $178.35 FARR, ROBERT LEE 06-21.0-217-002 ALLEN, GAIL 06-16.0-401-007 $1,523.11 ERKFITZ, MICHELLE 06-10.0-325-012 $512.58 FARR, ROBERT LEE 06-21.0-217-003 ALLEN, REGGIE 06-16.0-402-006 $1,362.71 MYER, JACQUELINE 06-10.0-325-018 $353.06 FARR, ROBERT LEE 06-21.0-217-004 BENJAMIN, JOHN 06-16.0-402-007 $1,811.35 ERKFITZ, MICHELLE R & LOUI 06-10.0-325-028 $627.45 RODENBURG, KENNETH W 06-21.0-220-007 HASTY PAMELA DUCK & HASTY 06-16.0-402-008 $565.27 HEIKE, STEPHEN A & DIXIE A 06-10.0-326-011 $1,156.28 GOSHEN, CAROLYN 06-21.0-400-001 ANDERSON CHARLES W & GRAMM 06-16.0-403-008 $432.03 HEIKE, STEPHEN A & DIXIE A 06-10.0-326-012 $470.59 GOSHEN, 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07-15.0-215-003 07-15.0-215-008 07-15.0-215-030 07-15.0-217-004 07-15.0-219-008 07-15.0-219-009 07-15.0-301-006 07-15.0-402-006 07-15.0-402-019 07-15.0-402-027 07-15.0-404-010 07-15.0-404-011 07-15.0-404-022 07-15.0-404-023 07-16.0-100-009 07-16.0-104-017 07-16.0-107-007 07-16.0-107-008 07-16.0-108-006 07-16.0-301-008 07-16.0-302-001 07-16.0-302-004 07-16.0-303-006 07-16.0-303-022 07-16.0-304-003 07-16.0-304-004 07-16.0-304-005 07-16.0-304-006 07-16.0-400-018 07-17.0-300-007 07-17.0-400-010 07-17.0-400-015 07-19.0-300-014 07-20.0-200-016 07-21.0-100-017 07-21.0-100-056

$1,107.92 $2,478.72 $2,171.34 $356.00 $2,131.70 $790.56 $1,885.97 $2,488.92 $504.55 $4,508.30 $2,641.62 $386.47 $2,339.61 $1,772.96 $1,317.36 $1,913.01 $323.88 $467.23 $853.54 $1,298.23 $1,618.73 $1,477.79 $2,608.84 $1,324.07 $3,143.06 $583.44 $1,881.66 $2,339.33 $325.08 $1,146.13 $2,132.50 $81.17 $350.69 $644.28 $2,824.39 $114.81

WAELTI, RICHARD G J WAELTI, RICHARD G J WAELTI, RICHARD WAELTI, RICHARD G J WAELTI, RICHARD G J WAELTI, RICHARD G J JANSEN, VERNON KENNEDY, TODD HARRIS, GREGORY & STAR KUJAWA, LEONARD D & SHARON LOPINOT, DOUGLAS & APRIL NEUBAUER, TERRY J TRUSTEE COPELAND, JEFF S & LYNN M DOCKINS, RICK & DONNA FURRER, MARK E & MARY KIM LADEWIG, ERNEST & MILDRED HASAMEAR, DENNIS & JANE FURRER, MARK E & MARY K TR WEST, JOHN E. & BARBARA A. DAVIS, JOANN HOPPES, CURT DAVIS, JOANN TOUCHETTE, ROBERT CRAFTON, JAMES WILLIAMS, BRYAN & DEBORAH TOUCHETTE, ROBERT NEUNER, WARREN & JOYCE CRAFTON, JAMES IBERIABANK MORTGAGE CO PETERS, JASPER LAUKO, EDWARD & MARY ETTA ESCHMANN, RUTH

07-21.0-200-002 07-21.0-200-004 07-21.0-200-014 07-22.0-100-001 07-22.0-100-002 07-22.0-100-003 07-22.0-200-006 07-22.0-200-007 07-24.0-101-026 07-24.0-201-002 07-24.0-201-009 07-26.0-200-008 07-27.0-300-003 07-29.0-100-025 07-30.0-100-002 07-30.0-200-015 07-30.0-200-016 07-30.0-200-018 07-30.0-300-005 07-30.0-300-015 07-30.0-300-016 07-30.0-300-039 07-31.0-200-024 07-31.0-400-021 07-32.0-100-017 07-32.0-100-020 07-32.0-200-020 07-32.0-300-023 07-34.0-300-007 07-34.0-300-013 07-35.0-100-025 07-35.0-400-032

$85.22 $43.31 $431.39 $2,580.09 $293.47 $27.83 $1,845.25 $1,430.28 $1,438.69 $4,998.89 $52.28 $2,960.29 $1,943.63 $258.31 $188.62 $300.90 $6,681.61 $1,714.10 $1,589.17 $1,650.69 $594.75 $50.92 $24.20 $2,106.34 $2,642.33 $1,616.98 $570.82 $138.82 $764.46 $212.00 $233.76 $489.71

$744.66 $253.25 $2,131.46 $257.15 $377.34 $584.45 $612.19 $1,237.82 $557.15 $866.18 $1,390.84 $3,830.69 $40.70 $100.08 $604.47 $1,542.57 $42.56 $254.82 $628.53 $345.81 $2,076.24 $904.19 $162.60 $162.81 $132.31 $156.81 $1,081.40 $180.07 $2,067.73 $816.05 $1,051.68 $155.46 $162.03 $91.92 $1,441.27 $223.95 $130.14 $3,262.31 $129.35 $509.85 $129.02 $129.12 $428.06 $316.09 $39.62 $69.00 $69.00 $179.15 $118.56 $68.20 $68.20 $68.20 $68.20 $1,117.59 $129.02 $156.35 $129.47 $565.61 $192.19 $798.83 $327.17 $538.05 $1,072.90 $487.64 $1,061.28 $1,598.28 $238.45 $715.56 $3,740.06 $746.40 $14.34 $476.06 $326.43 $328.97 $495.55 $490.31 $1,728.54 $964.85 $1,191.33 $28.50 $109.67 $472.65 $1,816.20 $257.42 $679.58 $513.04 $954.12 $1,345.29 $1,877.38 $1,875.75 $2,622.12 $1,210.88 $1,206.29 $128.49 $636.87 $308.00 $62.85 $1,008.98 $860.05 $140.42 $959.91 $1,455.80 $783.4211 $435.97 $154.33 $527.03 $1,018.48 $3,044.34 $309.39 $2,223.40 $169.78 $380.45 $2,462.20 $1,549.37 $1,969.57 $147.34 $1,318.21 $1,211.79 $89.12 $2,049.63 $25.77 $1,264.96 $144.72 $467.29 $1,112.08 $1,092.30 $129.61 $146.80 $1,636.64 $147.34 $1,293.90 $49.35 $306.71 $207.48 $1,352.01 $1,247.85 $238.26 $33.05

REYNOLDS, DIRK & WILLIAM VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC DUPONT CAPITAL LLC DUPONT CAPITAL LLC DUPONT CAPITAL LLC DUPONT CAPITAL LLC DUPONT CAPITAL LLC DUPONT CAPITAL LLC BRINKER ESTER & LORD LOREN MILLER, LARRY FREDERICK, MARILYN SIMMONS, JACQUELINE SIMMONS, JACQUELINE DUNLOP, BRUCE WEAVER, DANIEL ADAMS NICHOLAS & VAIL-ASH SCHANUEL, DONALD VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC SIEDLE, KIMBERLY & SCOTT HERMANN, CHERYL POHLE, JOSHUA A & RUBY A CHERRY, TYANN AGEE, DEBRA COUNSELL, REBECCA LEVIN, JUDITH ANN LEE, KEVIN P & NANCY SPIER VILLAGE OF DUPO NOBBE, BRIAN & TODD MICK, MARY L KILLY, WILLIAM E JR THIELMANN, LUCIUS F & MARI THIELEMANN, MARY ILLINOIS BECKNELL INVESTOR LEVIN, JULE & JUNE SAUER, MILTON & FAYE WETZEL, ELMER C & DEBRA KOHL, JOHN & BRENDA KOHL, JOHN & BRENDA BOOKER, MICHELLE DEVINWOOD FARMS INC HAAS, CURTIS PULCHER, KENNETH L & TEENA SCHAEFER, FRIEDA FISHER, THOMAS RICHARDSON, WILLIAM & MAMI DRURY SEAN M & ANDREA M, L NOBBE, BRIAN & TODD JOHNSON, TERRY J JR & MALI WATSON JERRY &BEAUDREAU WATSON JERRY &BEAUDREAU BOHN, TIMOTHY GOULD, MICHAEL & PHYLLIS WATSON JERRY &BEAUDREAU SNELLENBERGER , DON K & AU NOBBE, BRAIN G & TODD L NOBBE, BRIAN G & TODD L NOBBE BRIAN & NOBBE TODD EMRY, L ANN TR LOURWOOD, ALLAN & HEATHER EL CONCEPT LLC C/O NATIONW RAGSDALE, CHRIS & CRYSTAL HENSON JOHN & MARILYN JOIN HENSON JOHN & MARILYN JOIN MITCHELL, MARY PENCE, ALMA PELATE, CURTIS & ANDREA BIGGS, LARRY LOVINS, JEFFREY BUSH MELVIN & BEGGS CHRIST CREASY, MARK A & KATHLEEN WESTERN ILLINOIS INVESTMEN STANEK, CHRISTOPHER & WEND PHELPS, WM ROBERT GILLAN, BUDDY & ERIC GILLAN, BUDDY & ERIC LAMEAR, JIM PROP INVESTMENTS LLC KEYS REX II & KEYS DEANN KEYS, DOUGLAS W & DAWN KEYS, DOUGLAS W & DAWN KEYS, REX ALLEN & DEANN MOORE, BARBARA ODEHNAL, JIM L & PHYLLIS A ODEHNAL, JIM L & PHYLLIS A PELATE, LAVERNE REIMLER, ARTHUR F & REBACC ELIA, FOUAD LITTLE, VIRGIL RIESE, ROGER & HIGGERSON T HAMONTREE, KENNY HAMONTREE, KENNY ZDROJ, JOHN P & VIRGINIA F HULL, RONALD G & ROBERTA HULL, RONALD THURMAN, LAWRENCE MUND, LOUIS PULCHER, KENNETH WHITE, JAMES RAKER, DAVIE SUE FLYNN, JAMES & ANNETTE MUSICK, RICHARD & DONNA MUSICK, RICHARD & DONNA VAN METER, KENNETH & FRANK MARLEN, RYAN OSTERAGE, JOHN ERVIN & PHY NOLTE, MARK & SUSAN SONCASIE, ROBERT NOLTE, MARK W & SUSAN R CREASY, MARK & KATHLEEN VOLPP INVESTMENT GROUP LLC PHELPS, DENNIS P & ELIZABE HORNBOSTEL, BRADFORD & JUL EVERETT, BRAD FORD, DAVID A & TRINA M BECKER, BRITTANY BIFFAR ALEX T & COTTON SAR HARASHE, MICHAEL STERNAU, STEVE & JULIA STERNAU, STEVEN R & JULIA CHOUINARD, JOHN & CHRISTIN FULTON, KENNETH E JR & VIC TOLLETT, MARLA J & RABAGO CLEVELAND, MICHAEL D & AMY WEILBACHER, DAVID WEILBACHER, DAVID FIORE, MARK V & BARBARA LAVOIE, MICHAEL & PATRICIA KINNEY, MYRON & CYNTHIA Total Parcel Count: 412

06-21.0-404-010 06-21.0-404-020 06-21.0-404-021 06-21.0-404-022 06-21.0-404-023 06-21.0-404-024 06-21.0-404-025 06-21.0-404-026 06-21.0-404-027 06-21.0-404-028 06-21.0-404-029 06-21.0-404-030 06-21.0-404-031 06-21.0-404-032 06-21.0-404-037 06-21.0-405-027 06-21.0-406-002 06-21.0-407-004 06-21.0-407-005 06-21.0-408-004 06-21.0-408-037 06-21.0-409-017 06-21.0-410-014 06-21.0-410-020 06-21.0-411-009 06-21.0-414-009 06-21.0-416-005 06-21.0-416-009 06-21.0-416-010 06-21.0-418-002 06-21.0-418-012 06-21.0-419-003 06-21.0-421-004 06-21.0-421-009 06-21.0-422-015 06-21.0-426-012 06-22.0-100-002 06-22.0-100-065 06-22.0-202-009 06-22.0-202-011 06-23.0-400-004 06-25.0-300-008 06-25.0-300-011 06-25.0-300-036 06-25.0-300-049 06-25.0-300-051 06-26.0-100-010 06-26.0-100-050 06-26.0-300-025 06-26.0-300-033 06-26.0-301-004 06-26.0-400-001 06-28.0-101-001 06-28.0-101-006 06-28.0-102-001 06-28.0-102-002 06-28.0-102-005 06-28.0-102-007 06-28.0-102-013 06-28.0-103-031 06-28.0-104-001 06-28.0-104-002 06-28.0-104-003 06-28.0-104-006 06-28.0-104-013 06-28.0-104-017 06-28.0-105-024 06-28.0-109-001 06-28.0-109-003 06-28.0-109-004 06-28.0-109-007 06-28.0-112-007 06-28.0-113-006 06-28.0-114-010 06-28.0-200-015 06-28.0-200-016 06-28.0-201-003 06-28.0-202-002 06-28.0-202-014 06-28.0-203-024 06-28.0-203-025 06-28.0-203-030 06-28.0-203-032 06-28.0-203-035 06-28.0-205-003 R06-28.0-205-004 06-28.0-205-008 06-28.0-207-023 06-28.0-400-030 06-28.0-400-034 06-28.0-400-054 06-29.0-100-021 06-29.0-400-004 06-32.0-100-009 06-32.0-200-013 06-32.0-203-001 06-32.0-203-003 06-32.0-400-024 06-32.0-401-001 06-32.0-401-011 06-32.0-403-013 06-32.0-406-004 06-33.0-100-020 06-33.0-102-004 06-33.0-102-009 06-33.0-103-005 06-33.0-200-004 06-33.0-200-005 06-33.0-200-006 06-33.0-200-028 06-33.0-201-019 06-33.0-202-003 06-33.0-202-008 06-33.0-202-009 06-33.0-204-006 06-33.0-300-004 06-33.0-300-015 06-33.0-301-008 06-33.0-301-009 06-33.0-301-047 06-33.0-302-012 06-33.0-303-010 06-35.0-100-007 06-35.0-300-004 11-01.0-401-003 11-01.0-401-004 11-02.0-201-005 11-03.0-300-022 11-04.0-401-005 11-11.0-100-002 11-11.0-100-003 11-13.0-400-021 11-14.0-400-015 11-24.0-200-013

$11,880.75 $90.05 $90.05 $90.05 $90.05 $90.05 $90.05 $218.21 $218.31 $218.41 $218.41 $218.41 $7,212.49 $218.51 $279.39 $3,171.77 $1,528.98 $2,547.30 $359.85 $2,628.58 $5,373.54 $2,165.72 $2,114.10 $1,271.95 $1,183.61 $2,427.29 $2,220.12 $2,537.40 $1,700.70 $1,608.08 $529.82 $2,475.39 $16,617.06 14 13 12 $2,188.49 $2,117.62 $1,822.51 $317.80 $2,667.83 $145,507.95 $1,083.76 $2,904.01 $1,673.22 $148.14 $1,192.88 $3,112.95 $1,436.93 $457.55 $1,137.80 $2,587.41 $44.23 $777.89 $1,045.47 $1,844.10 $161.63 $104.89 $3,031.78 $690.33 $1,397.62 $44.00 $139.24 $5,215.00 $200.27 $1,864.70 $3,652.24 $1,856.45 $1,726.67 $3,594.14 $122.80 $941.48 $320.60 $1,240.85 $3,203.82 $2,715.63 $4,302.58 $1,770.35 $241.70 $2,268.89 $2,549.03 $64.91 $547.23 $3,381.41 $475.53 $1,261.96 $466.21 $212.85 $3,037.74 $1,532.62 $805.26 $1,619.96 $145.63 $660.28 $698.25 $750.91 $465.71 $1,048.35 $566.50 $170.39 $890.84 $240.87 $363.34 $1,017.51 $112.51 $2,301.30 $426.79 $498.92 $241.78 $288.73 $935.05 $670.80 $1,316.55 $1,152.41 $2,358.79 $713.15 $2,055.22 $3,704.67 $1,919.85 $606.97 $958.08 $2,240.91 $2,007.44 $63.23 $656.43 $2,898.50 $292.15 $35.16 $33.11 $98.83 $4,120.79 $1,746.29 $351.00 $3,757.97 $3,032.33 $1,076.58 $2,469.03


S4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

I 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

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AT A CROSSR CROSSROADS? Su Tuesday coul Super could be game-changer for split lititt GOP, GO Democrats emocrats ra rats

TRUMP

BY JULIE PACE AND JILL COLVIN Associated Press Asso ed Pres

V ALDOSTA, GA. • On the VALDOSTA,

ev of Super T eve uesday’s cruuesday’ Tuesday’s cial primaries, a sharp ne new divide erupted bet een between Republicans who pledge to fall all in line behind Donald onald

CRUZ

RUBIO

Trump rump if he wins their party’s nomination and others who insist nsist they can an never ack the bombastic billionback aire. The fissure could ould have major implications beyond the primaries, exposing xposing the looming challenges in uniting the party arty after the elec-

tion, no matter who wins. Nebraska’s Ben Sasse, a rising star among conservatives, became the first sitting senator to publicly raise the prospect of backing a third party option if Trump clinches the nomination. In a letter posted on Facebook late Sunday, Sasse

CLINTON

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urged Republicans to connsider whether hether a party arty led by y Trump w would ould still represent epresentt erests. their interests. “If our party arty is no longer working king for or the things we believe in — like defending the sanctity anctity of life, stopping Obamacare, protecting the Second ond Amendment,

SANDERS

etc. etc. — then et then peop people peo le of good good conscience onscience should ould stop st supporting that at party until nti it is reformed, reformed,” hee wrote. wrot Thee Associated ssociate Press Pres asked Republican senators senator ac ss the and governors across country supountry if they ey would w See e TUESDAY DA • Page A7

TAKE US WITH YOU

Donor nor ors are are Donors sw et o sweet on Gi rl Sc Scouts ou outs Girl record at rec ord or fundraiser fundraise aiser ise Carlson’s censure cens nsure nsur doesn’t stem gifts gift giift fts event at annual event BY NANCY CY CAMBRI CAMBRIA St. Louis Post Post-Dispatch

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com ooden@post-d pa h.

Kerri Schnell of St. Peters holds baby A Aubrey on Monday. Schnell had a C-section on Leap Day because the hospital scheduling worked out.

BABIES LEAP A INTO WORLD WORL

BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ubrey, Eden, Amelia and Evelyn will have good reason to

Kerri Schnell of St. Peters schedor Leap Day, uled a C-section for w mainly because that’s when the hosor’s schedules chedules pital’s and her doctor’s lined up.

The Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri reports eports a record co haul at its annual fundraiser Thursday night — a week eek after the Archdiocese of St. Louis formally ormally suggested loormall al Girl Scouts troops ought cal to not be a part art of its parishes. ishes The “Dessert First” ev event at the Chase Park Plaza in St. Louis netted more than $350,000 $35 000 from about 500 guests as they enjoyed a va variety of elaborate sweets inspired by Girl Sc Scouts cookies, said aid spokes oman Aurspokeswoman rice Duke-Rollings. was Much of the money wa collected ollected during the tradiwhere tional paddle addle raise, aise, wher

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Friday • 10.07.2016 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Neither vulnerable, East deals. NORTH ♠9 2 ♥5 3 2 ♦A K J 10 7 ♣A K 9 WEST EAST ♠Q 10 5 3 ♠7 6 ♥10 9 8 7 ♥A K Q J 6 ♦6 5 ♦4 3 2 ♣6 3 2 ♣Q J 10 SOUTH ♠A K J 8 4 ♥4 ♦Q 9 8 ♣8 7 5 4 The bidding: EAST SOUTH WEST NORTH 1♥ 1♠ Pass 2♥ Pass 2♠ Pass 4♠ All pass Opening lead: 10 of ♥ North-South had a mix-up in the auction. North wasn’t sure that a two-diamond bid would be forcing, so he cue bid two hearts, trying to show a strong hand. South thought North was showing an invitational hand with a spade fit, so he rebid two spades to show a minimum overcall. North thought South was showing a six-card suit and raised to four spades. Problems in the auction can sometimes be overcome in the play. When you look at both hands, there is no better game for North-South than four spades. South needs

to be aware that they have landed in a pretty good spot and play the hand carefully. The defense started with two rounds of hearts, South ruffing the second round. The normal play in the trump suit is to take a finesse for the queen. Should this lose, the defense will play another heart. South might survive if he discards a club on the third heart and finds the spades splitting 3-3, but why risk that. The correct play on this deal is to cash the ace and king of spades, then start running the diamonds. The opponents will score both of their spades, but the contract is assured. The defense cannot prevent declarer from discarding two clubs on the good diamonds. This line of play will even pick up an overtrick when the queen of spades is doubleton. Not bad after an accident in the auction. (10/07/16)

Across 1 Ultimate necessity 8 Needs grease, maybe 14 Cup holder 15 School whose mascot is Riptide the Pelican 16 Became untied 17 Intro to Comp Sci, for Data Structures, e.g. 18 Push away 19 Giant in sports entertainment 20 Made new? 21 Something you might take a pass on 22 Valuable diamond 24 Hosp. readout 25 Bigwig 28 One ___ (multivitamin)

29 Highly soughtafter things 31 Foucault’s “This Is Not ___” 32 This 36 Certain powerful engines, briefly 37 Warrants 38 Newswoman Burnett 39 Guiding light? 40 Writes to briefly? 43 Replies of understanding 44 Month with two natl. holidays 45 Auto name discontinued in 1986 48 One is a prize for scoring 50 Endowed with from the start, as money 52 Nobody special 53 Mace and shield, e.g.

54 Took for a ride 55 Hopeful 56 Closely following 57 Order that’s rarely followed?

Down 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 11

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

12 13 14 21 23 26

WORD GAME October 7 WORD — PARANOID (PARANOID: PAR-uh-noyd: Suffering from delusions of persecution.) Average mark 28 words. Time limit 45 minutes. Can you find 40 or more words in PARANOID? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — CRYSTALS stray satyr cart stylar says cast talc scaly clary trass scar class tray scary clay tsar scat crass arty slat crassly lacy slaty cyst lass slay racy last star salt stay salty RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

Play Fair, e.g. Key Gem Place for a long run, maybe Big ___ Conference Summer Olympics event “A Prairie Home Companion” broadcast site Becomes a traitor “Where Is the Life That Late ___?” (“Kiss Me, Kate” number) One with connections to traveling speakers? Largest sesamoid bones Et ___ (footnote abbr.) Not one’s best effort, in coachspeak Ache They can turn red in a flash Contract employee?

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

If Oct. 7 is your birthday • This year you open up to new solutions for old problems. You will try to express yourself in a more authentic way. You seem to be able to buck authority and still land well. If you are single, several special people could enter your life. If you are attached, the two of you often seem to speak diferent languages. Capricorn annoys you with his or her need for exactness. ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★ You might feel pressured by a person who you feels assumes too much. You can’t sit on your distain any more than the other party can sit on his or hers. If there is a run-in, it could be bad. Tonight: Till the wee hours. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ Use your ability to empathize and understand how others feel. You might be at the point of frustration that could cause you to lose your temper. Try to be more distant. Tonight: Rethink plans if need be. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ One-on-one relating could be more volatile than you had anticipated. In fact, a ight could ensue, and you could be shocked by what you hear. Tonight: Forget problems. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Others play a more dominant role than in the recent past. You could be surprised by what comes up for you. Allow your sense of humor to deine a diicult situation. Tonight: Go along with someone else’s plans. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★ Focus on your work and what is needed to complete a certain project. Try to be present in a discussion, even though your thoughts are elsewhere. A situation might be transforming right in front of you. Conversations could add to the present confusion. Tonight: Do only what you want.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by David Liben-Nowell

27 Actor with the title role in “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” 28 Loan figs. 29 Beam 30 Some linemen: abbr. 31 Just do it 32 Baseball exec Epstein 33 What to call Judge Judy

34 Words of longing 35 Some help from above 39 Southernmost city on I-35 40 Looms 41 Wolverine of Marvel Comics, e.g. 42 Derisive reaction 44 Reno, for one

46 They’re not pros 47 Animal in un parc zoologique 49 Old “Red, White & You” sloganeer 50 Small nail 51 River to the Seine 52 “What you can get away with,” according to Andy Warhol

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0902

WORD SCRIMMAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★★ You might want to keep things light and humorous, but many people won’t share that same mood. Accept this fact rather than annoy others by trying to make them smile and laugh. Tonight: Paint the town red. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★ You naturally feel tense, no matter what is happening around you. Some unexpected actions might hold a surprise or two for you. Tonight: Don’t let a diicult situation color your night. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ You will want to express your feelings in a new way. The problem could be that you aren’t getting conirmation that others are really hearing your message. Tonight: Meet up with a pal and/ or a loved one.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★ Be aware of the limits that you have imposed upon yourself. A child or loved one might react in a surprising way, which is likely to set you back. Use caution with all inancial matters at this point. Tonight: Make it your treat. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★★ You feel more energetic and upbeat than you have in a considerable amount of time. Take your time accepting a new responsibility. You might be carrying too much on your shoulders. Tonight: Out on the town. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★ You could feel out of sorts and might not know why. On a subconscious level, you are processing a change that is afecting your life in various ways. Tonight: Make sure you have time to relax.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ Take the opportunity to stand up for what you want. This type of experience could occur at home and/or at work. Maintain a sense of humor, and you will bypass a problem. Tonight: Where the crowds are. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

10.07.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Temper tantrum puts end to friendship Dear Breaking Away • If you feel it is better for you to distance yourself from this “friend,” then that’s what you should do. He may be a jackass; however, it is unwise to label someone who hasn’t been FORMALLY diagnosed as having a personality disorder. Dear Abby • A year ago we had a house fire. While insurance put us up in housing, it took a while to find a place. That first month I didn’t know if I was coming or going. Dealing with insurance, contractors, family and a job was almost more than I could handle. The last thing I needed to hear was, “What’s for dinner?” If I have one piece of advice to ofer to people who want to help friends, it would be, “Give them gift cards from local restaurants.” I know how much I hated to speak up and say I needed help, so don’t ask, just DO if you see something needs to be done. This idea also works well in lieu of flowers or home-cooked meals when someone dies. —

HOPEFULLY HELPFUL Dear Hopefully Helpful • People are often at a loss about how to help during a crisis, and this isn’t something that usually comes to mind. Your suggestion is a good one. Thank you for writing. Dear Abby • Is there a proper way for a man to introduce himself to an attractive woman in a public place like a store or a museum? — DAN IN SAN FRANCISCO Dear Dan • It’s not diicult. If you’re in a store, ask for her advice about a product. If you’re in a museum, strike up a conversation about an artist or a painting, sculpture, etc. Then introduce yourself and keep talking. If she’s receptive, she’ll give you her name. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Flag is lower. 2. Sign is higher. 3. Ear is smaller. 4. Bush is moved. 5. Hole is larger. 6. Mouth is diferent.

Dear Abby • I am having to part ways with someone I have known for 15 years. This person has done many good things for me. On the other hand, he has also thrown more insults at me than anyone else in my lifetime. At the snap of a finger, this normally good-hearted person has insulted me, insisted I was wrong (when I wasn’t) or dumped cold water on something I was enthusiastic about. A week ago, I approached him calmly and told him I was uncomfortable with his putdowns. Well, he threw an overthe-top temper tantrum the likes of which I have never seen, accused me of being “weakkneed” and stomped away. I have finally had it. I mentioned it to a friend who is a psychologist and he said this person has all the character traits of a raging narcissist. I’m now convinced this person will never change, and I cannot understand the pettiness he reverts to. Can you comment? — BREAKING AWAY IN MIAMI

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Use hotel manners when renting home

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • I have started using a website that enables travelers to rent private homes directly from the owners. I enjoy staying in someone’s house much more than in a hotel. However, I am not 100 percent clear on the etiquette diferences between this versus a hotel or the private house of friend. I do know (or guess, rather) that a hostess gift is not needed; however, as I would in a private house of a friend, I do strip the bed prior to departing. Are there any specific rules Miss Manners recommends for travelers using such services? Gentle Reader • With limited exceptions, good hotel manners are sufficient. Note, however, that Miss Manners’ idea of good hotel manners includes not stealing the unused toiletries, rearranging the furniture or scratching the end tables. The diferences will be for any

reasonable requests made by the renter and clearly necessary to the functioning of the arrangement. This can include taking one’s trash out, cleaning the dishes one uses and admitting the maid, but should not extend to repairing the plumbing. Stripping the bed is polite although not required. Dear Miss Manners • We were at a high-end, but small, group cocktail party. One of the guests promptly sat down on the sofa, poured himself another glass of wine and kicked off his shoes. I viewed this as inappropriate but couldn’t find an etiquette rule. Gentle Reader • It is difficult for Miss Manners to think of a form of entertaining that occurs around meal time — but without providing either sustenance or a place to sit down — as a formal event, no matter the price tags on

10/7/16

the dresses. To her mind, a highend cocktail party is either a tea or a dinner party. She therefore empathizes with the guest who prefers sitting to looking over the shoulder of his current conversation partner in hopes of finding a better one. Removing one’s shoes, however, is a step too far. Written etiquette is light on the subject because until relatively recently, it seemed obvious that guests were expected to keep their clothes on, an assumption that began to erode when hosts started asking guests to leave their shoes at the door.

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The Exorcist: Chapter Fox 2 News at 9:00pm Three: Let ’Em In. (8:01) (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

CBS MacGyver: AWL. The 4 team nabs a terror group’s broker. (N)

Hawaii Five-0 A profiler Blue Bloods A hostage finds a corpse in her victim won’t press bed. (N) (cc) charges. (N)

NBC Timeless: Pilot. A fugi- Dateline NBC (N) (cc) 5 tive time travels back to 1937. (cc) PBS Staytuned Washing9 ton Week CW 11

Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106. Miss Manners’ son, Nicholas Ivor Martin, and her daughter, Jacobina Martin, contribute to this column.

The

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FOX Hell’s Kitchen Teams 2 create dishes with ostrich meat. (N)

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

Father Brown Father Brown is trapped. (cc)

Midsomer Murders A council clerk is found dead. (cc)

iHeartradio Music Festival - Night Two Highlights of the event from Las Vegas. (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

Here’s Help The Beverly Hillbillies

ABC Last Man 30 Standing (N) (cc)

Dr. Ken (7:31) (N) (cc)

20/20 (9:01) (N) (cc)

Shark Tank Cookies; swimsuits; safety light clips. (N)

MYTV Criminal Minds Murder Criminal Minds Pursu- Criminal Minds A 46 victim on the Appala- ing a killer who targets recently paroled man chian Trail. (cc) women. (cc) commits murder.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 10.07.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Figuring the right amount of sleep Dear Dr. Roach • I am a male in overall good health. I am in my early 80s. I see an increasing number of health articles emphasizing the importance of getting a good six to eight hours of sleep per night. My question: Is this continuous, nonstop sleep for the six to eight hours, or is it with interruptions? I find it necessary to urinate several times a night. If I have to get up after three hours, then I get another three hours of sleep, does this constitute three or six hours of sleep? What effect does this have on the role of sleep in maintaining healthy brain function? On another note, if sleep interruptions do restrict the brain-maintenance functions of sleep, what are your thoughts on using disposable catheters during the sleeping hours? Such use would, if nothing else, allow a lot of people to get a better night’s rest. — Anon.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • Although large trials do show that people who get seven or eight hours of sleep at night, on average, have better health including less depression and fewer heart attacks than those who get less (or much more, curiously enough) — for any given individual, it isn’t always clear what the optimum amount is. Some people do very well on six hours; some people really don’t feel well unless they have eight or nine. Further, sleep needs change over a lifetime, with adolescents generally sleeping more and older adults sleeping less. I have found that people worrying about not sleeping enough, paradoxically, makes it harder for them to sleep! As far as interrupted sleep goes, it is not generally a problem, as long as you have no trouble getting right back to sleep. Some sleep experts have recommended segmented sleep, not a single continuous sleep. Again, I see this as more individual-specific and not appropriate for a blanket recommendation. Disposable catheters, however, I cannot recommend. Although some people need urinary catheters for a wide variety of medical conditions, they do greatly increase the risk of infection. My advice is to try to ensure a good night’s sleep by staying away from bright lights (including televisions, computers, tablets and phones) for at least an hour or two before bed; keep your sleeping area cool; avoid caffeine in the late afternoon or evening; and don’t worry if you sleep six or seven hours, as long as you feel well during the day.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics