Page 1

THE BLUES AT 50

BLUES’ TOP 50 PLAYERS OF ALL TIME STLTODAY.COM/ BLUES50

Get our 48-page special section in this paper

UP TO

$278

OF COUPO NS INSIDE

SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 • $3.00 • EARLY EDITION

LEGACY IN SHAMBLES Checks bounced. Trash piled up. hen the nursing home ran out of food. Festus closure is latest setback for owner of family business beset by lawsuits, accusation

BY JEREMY KOHLER AND BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FESTUS • With its parent company in free fall, and its president facing a mountain of debt and domestic violence charges, Benchmark Healthcare nursing home on Highway TT became a dirty and dangerous place. As bills went unpaid, the phones were shut

“I don’t have an answer. I wish I did.”

of. Paychecks bounced. Trash piled up, and the building was infested with flies. Then the food deliveries stopped. Employees had to dip into their own pockets for grocery runs. Residents complained to state health inspectors that they were hungry. During the inspectors’ visit in July, a Benchmark

Legacy Health Systems president John Sells

See NURSING HOME • Page A12

ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL WITH

CHRIS KOSTER

Political veteran has been inside, out ‘Conservative Democrat’ backed by NRA comes out against term limits

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Mazy Gilleylen, 11, is surrounded by her family Sunday as they walk through the Insectarium at the St. Louis Zoo in Forest Park. With her (from left) are her brother, Seth Phillips, 13, her mother, Amber Gilleylen, and her dad, Donte Gilleylen.

GENDER WARS COVERAGE • STL SUNDAY, B1 VIDEO • STLTODAY.COM/WATCH

TODAY

87°/62°

An 11-year-old girl in Overland forsook her original gender to live a life that represents who she truly is. But with puberty imminent, Mazy Gilleylen is anxious about the future. A Hillsboro attorney and father found himself in the national spotlight after he took the lead in helping his school district figure out what to do after a student came out as transgender and said she wanted to use the girls bathroom. Derrick Good said the new policies in place protect all students. As transgender rights continue to be debated across the country and states push back on a directive from President Barack Obama’s administration that public schools should allow students to use bathrooms of their choice, the Post-Dispatch devotes its STL Sunday section to the issue. It includes profiles on Mazy, Good and a Q&A on what being transgender is — and is not.

Back in blue

Best of the bizarre ‘bikes’

PARTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

Albee’s inner child

72°/51° PARTLY SUNNY

WEATHER A25

Playwright’s ‘hree Tall Women’ opens POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A&E • D1

hrill seekers and leisure lovers alike appreciate something new LIFE STYLE • H1

JEFFER SON CIT Y • In a campaign season dominated by anti-politicians, Democratic candidate for governor Chris Koster has come out strongly against term limits. Although it may seem counterintuitive in a year when political outsiders have risen to the top, the two-term Missouri attorney general says combining a Legislature populated by short-timers with a politically untested rival could be a recipe for disaster in a state facing tough challenges in funding for schools, roads and health care. “To say the answer to an inexperienced Legislature is an inexperienced governor? That cannot possibly be the answer,” Koster told the PostDispatch in a recent interview. See KOSTER • Page A11

1 M Vol. 138, No. 269 ©2016

THIS WEEKEND!

Fabulous Fox Theatre September 30 - October 2 314-534-1111 Metrotix.com


THE BLUES AT 50

BLUES’ TOP 50 PLAYERS OF ALL TIME STLTODAY.COM/ BLUES50

Get our 48-page special section in this paper

UP TO

$278

OF COUPO NS INSIDE

SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 • $3.00 • FINAL EDITION

LEGACY IN SHAMBLES Checks bounced. Trash piled up. hen the nursing home ran out of food. Festus closure is latest setback for owner of family business beset by lawsuits, accusation

BY JEREMY KOHLER AND BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FESTUS • With its parent company in free fall, and its president facing a mountain of debt and domestic violence charges, Benchmark Healthcare nursing home on Highway TT became a dirty and dangerous place. As bills went unpaid, the phones were shut

“I don’t have an answer. I wish I did.”

of. Paychecks bounced. Trash piled up, and the building was infested with flies. Then the food deliveries stopped. Employees had to dip into their own pockets for grocery runs. Residents complained to state health inspectors that they were hungry. During the inspectors’ visit in July, a Benchmark

Legacy Health Systems president John Sells

See NURSING HOME • Page A12

ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL WITH

CHRIS KOSTER

Political veteran has been inside, out ‘Conservative Democrat’ backed by NRA comes out against term limits

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Mazy Gilleylen, 11, is surrounded by her family Sunday as they walk through the Insectarium at the St. Louis Zoo in Forest Park. With her (from left) are her brother, Seth Phillips, 13, her mother, Amber Gilleylen, and her dad, Donte Gilleylen.

GENDER WARS COVERAGE • STL SUNDAY, B1 VIDEO • STLTODAY.COM/WATCH

TODAY

89°/62°

An 11-year-old girl in Overland forsook her original gender to live a life that represents who she truly is. But with puberty imminent, Mazy Gilleylen is anxious about the future. A Hillsboro attorney and father found himself in the national spotlight after he took the lead in helping his school district figure out what to do after a student came out as transgender and said she wanted to use the girls bathroom. Derrick Good said the new policies in place protect all students. As transgender rights continue to be debated across the country and states push back on a directive from President Barack Obama’s administration that public schools should allow students to use bathrooms of their choice, the Post-Dispatch devotes its STL Sunday section to the issue. It includes profiles on Mazy, Good and a Q&A on what being transgender is — and is not.

Back in blue

Best of the bizarre ‘bikes’

STORMS POSSIBLE

TOMORROW

Albee’s inner child

73°/52° CLEARING, COOLER

WEATHER A25

Playwright’s ‘hree Tall Women’ opens POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A&E • D1

hrill seekers and leisure lovers alike appreciate something new LIFE STYLE • H1

JEFFER SON CIT Y • In a campaign season dominated by anti-politicians, Democratic candidate for governor Chris Koster has come out strongly against term limits. Although it may seem counterintuitive in a year when political outsiders have risen to the top, the two-term Missouri attorney general says combining a Legislature populated by short-timers with a politically untested rival could be a recipe for disaster in a state facing tough challenges in funding for schools, roads and health care. “To say the answer to an inexperienced Legislature is an inexperienced governor? That cannot possibly be the answer,” Koster told the PostDispatch in a recent interview. See KOSTER • Page A11

2 M Vol. 138, No. 269 ©2016

THIS WEEKEND!

Fabulous Fox Theatre September 30 - October 2 314-534-1111 Metrotix.com


LOCAL

A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

M 1 • SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

THE TOP 50 PLAYERS IN BLUES HISTORY

THE STORIES BEHIND THE STORIES

VOTE FOR THE CUTEST PET IN TOWN

Jeremy Rutherford gathered a panel of experts to pick the best. You can make your own starting six to share with your friends. stltoday.com/blues50

Our new podcasts feature a look a the Monsanto deal, transgender issues and Week 3 of the NFL season. stltoday.com/podcasts

It’s time to make your pick for the cutest dog, cat or other critter on four legs. stltoday.com/contests

WNBA player continues father’s march, on a knee TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Tamika Catchings recalls sitting on her father’s lap as a child when she first noticed a scar on his leg. She asked if he got it playing basketball. Long before Catchings became known as one of the best players in the short history of the WNBA, her father, Harvey, played in the NBA. But the scar wasn’t an old sports injury. “I put my hand on it,” Catchings says. Then her father told her about Jackson, Miss., in the 1960s. Harvey, now 64, was participating in a civil rights march when police turned on the marchers. Harvey ran and, in the mayhem, a shard of metal sliced the leg above his knee. “It’s a constant reminder of what he fought for as a young man,” Catchings says of her father. On Wednesday night, Catchings continued her father’s long fight for racial justice. In front of a national television audience, in the final game of her storied career, Catchings and her entire Indiana Fever team knelt solemnly and interlocked their arms during the national anthem. It was the most unified display yet by the growing national movement started this month when San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refused to stand for the national anthem in protest of police brutality against African-Americans. Since Kaepernick’s lone protest, dozens of other NFL players have joined him either on a knee or raising a fist into the air during the national anthem, sending a message that for some people of color, the “land of the free” is out of reach. To say the movement started with Kaepernick, though, leaves out some of the story. For months, Catchings says, she and her teammates — black and white — have been talking about racial justice issues. For two years, from St. Louis to Cleveland to Chicago to Tulsa, Okla., and Charlotte,N.C., every police shooting of a black man, some armed, some not, has led to intense discussions about racial equity in America. When St. Louis was filling the national airwaves with nightly protests from Ferguson and elsewhere, Catchings was paying attention. Her brother, Kenyon, lives in O’Fallon, Mo. During the August 2014 protests, they talked about raising young, black boys in an era where black mothers and fathers still have to have that talk when their boys turn 16 about how to act if and when they get pulled over by police.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Members of the Indiana Fever kneel during the playing of the national anthem before the start of a first-round WNBA playof game Wednesday against the Phoenix Mercury in Indianapolis.

They talked about living in a country where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s goals of racial and economic equity are still a dream for too many people. As one of the most famous female professional athletes in the world, Catchings is far removed from the economic struggles facing many blacks who live in urban areas, whether in Indianapolis or St. Louis or Charlotte. But she still knows the sting of being treated diferently for the color of her skin. For most of her career she kept her jet black hair long and straight. But lately she’s let it go to what she calls its more natural state. It’s short and braided. And she’s noticed a diference when she walks into a store and somebody doesn’t recognize her. “People will treat me a certain way until they find out I’m a professional basketball player,” Catchings says. “Then everything changes.” Her fellow professionals didn’t tell their coach what they were planning Wednesday night. When the team discussed it, they knew they were about to embark on a step into an uncomfortable place, but they were willing to do it as long as they stood — or kneeled — together. “For us, one of the things is that it had to be all or nothing,” Catchings said. “I’m really proud of my team. It’s not comfortable.” Talking about race rarely is. But taking it to a national stage brings a new kind of heat. Catchings and her teammates now occupy a space once held by 1968 Olympic athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos. They join Kaepernick and Denver Broncos

linebacker Brandon Marshall, and others, in hoping that their status as professional athletes can spark ongoing conversation about the country’s struggle with racial equity. There will be backlash. Kaepernick has received death threats. Santa Clara police threatened to stop working 49ers games. Marshall lost sponsors after he took a knee. Catchings has already received vile, racist emails and social media posts in response to her protest. There is a cost to discomfort. But getting people out of their comfort zones is the only way to continue a serious conversation about racial injustice, Catchings says. Most of her teammates have friends or relatives who are police officers or in the military. It’s important for people to understand what his sister’s protest is really about, Kenyon says. “It’s not a surprise to see her take such a strong stance. She is probably one of the most strong-minded individuals I’ve ever been around,” he says. He’s not the only one who thinks so. In November, the St. Louis Sports Commission is honoring Catchings with its annual Musial Award for Extraordinary Character. Her “stance is not an un-American one,” Kenyon continues. “It’s about pointing out injustice.” Fifty years ago, Harvey Catchings marched for a justice that hasn’t yet come. His daughter is opening old wounds while continuing the walk, this time by refusing to stand. “We’re fighting the same fight,” she says. “My dad is proud of me.”

WHAT’S UP THIS DAY IN 1975 BOARD MEMBER INDICTED The president of the East St. Louis school board, Charles Merritts Sr., is indicted for conspiracy to murder a fellow board member who had spoken out against district policy.

HEADS UP 9/11 EXHIBIT The “9/11 Never Forget” exhibit will make its first appearance in the St. Louis area next month at Jeferson College. The exhibit features artifacts from 9/11, along with documentary videos, recordings of firstresponder transmissions and interactive exhibits. The traveling exhibit is dedicated to the 414 New York firefighters and police oicers who died when they responded to the attacks on the World Trade Center. For information, go to jefco.edu/911NeverForget. Area first responders will escort the exhibit when it arrives Oct. 3. The three-day exhibit will be located at Jeferson College Arnold, 1687 Missouri State Road, on the lower parking lot near the Arnold Recreation Center outdoor pool. It will be open to the public from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. Admission is free. The Tunnel to Towers Foundation will accept donations for housing badly wounded soldiers and orphaned children. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS GERMAN-AMERICAN FESTIVAL When• Noon until 5 p.m. Saturday Where • German Cultural Hall, 3652 South Jeferson Avenue. How much • Free More info • 636-221-1524. The German Heritage Society of St. Louis will host an open house of exhibits at the hall. The Waterloo German Band will play at 4 p.m. Beer, pretzels and kuchen (cofee with cake) available for purchase. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 01-05-08-25-62 Mega ball: 14

Megaplier: 3

Estimated jackpot: $20 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $50 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.1 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 01-15-32-34-37 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $66,000

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PICK-3 Friday Midday: 761

Evening: 816

PICK-4 Friday Midday: 2954

Evening: 2088

LAW & ORDER ILLINOIS LOTTERIES ST. LOUIS > Woman shot in parked car • A woman, 27, was hospitalized in stable condition Friday after being shot in the head about 1:30 a.m. as she sat in a parked car with her boyfriend in the Bevo Mill neighborhood, police said. It happened in the 4100 block of Neosho Street, near Varrelmann Avenue. The boyfriend told police a silver Acura pulled alongside and a man got out the passenger side and opened fire on her. The boyfriend drove to a gas station at Chippewa Street and Gravois Avenue for help. ALTON > Two bodies found in home • There were no signs of violence or foul play where two bodies were discovered here

Thursday, but drug paraphernalia was found at the scene, according to a statement by Madison County Chief Deputy Coroner Roger Smith. The bodies of Michael A. Smith, 25, and Sara E. Engles, 32, were found on the kitchen floor of an apartment at 1500 Sparks Street about 11 a.m. Smith lived in Carrollton, Ill.; Engles lived in Alton. The cause of death was not determined, pending toxicology tests. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Oicer attacked with cigarette • A St. Louis County woman tried to thwart a traic stop Wednesday by burning the oicer who stopped her with a lit cigarette, charges say.

Denise M. Edwards, 24, of the 7200 block of San Diego Avenue in Norwood Court, was charged Thursday with felony counts of assault on a law enforcement oicer and resisting arrest. Normandy Oicer Charles Messmer stopped Edwards on Wednesday in the 1500 block of South Florissant Road, charges say. During the stop, Edwards took a lit cigarette and burned Messmer’s upper chest with it. Messmer radioed for help as Edwards allegedly resisted arrest. As other oicers took her into custody, Edwards laughed about burning Messmer, charges say. She was jailed in lieu of $40,000 cash-only bail.

Evening: 15-22-25-26-32 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $7.25 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 744 FB: 7

Evening: 883 FB: 5

PICK-4 Friday Midday: 8875 FB: 2 Evening: 8120 FB: 8

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Bill McClellan ........ B1 Books .................... D7 Business ................. E1 Editorial .............. A20 Horoscopes ......... EV4 Movies ................... D6

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 14-31-38-42-44

Obituaries ........... A22 People ................. A26 Puzzles ............. EV3-4 Sports calendar .... C2 Stocks ................... E5 Weather .............. A25

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

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LOCAL

A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

M 2 • SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

THE TOP 50 PLAYERS IN BLUES HISTORY

THE STORIES BEHIND THE STORIES

VOTE FOR THE CUTEST PET IN TOWN

Jeremy Rutherford gathered a panel of experts to pick the best. You can make your own starting six to share with your friends. stltoday.com/blues50

Our new podcasts feature a look a the Monsanto deal, transgender issues and Week 3 of the NFL season. stltoday.com/podcasts

It’s time to make your pick for the cutest dog, cat or other critter on four legs. stltoday.com/contests

WNBA player continues father’s march, on a knee TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Tamika Catchings recalls sitting on her father’s lap as a child when she first noticed a scar on his leg. She asked if he got it playing basketball. Long before Catchings became known as one of the best players in the short history of the WNBA, her father, Harvey, played in the NBA. But the scar wasn’t an old sports injury. “I put my hand on it,” Catchings says. Then her father told her about Jackson, Miss., in the 1960s. Harvey, now 64, was participating in a civil rights march when police turned on the marchers. Harvey ran and, in the mayhem, a shard of metal sliced the leg above his knee. “It’s a constant reminder of what he fought for as a young man,” Catchings says of her father. On Wednesday night, Catchings continued her father’s long fight for racial justice. In front of a national television audience, in the final game of her storied career, Catchings and her entire Indiana Fever team knelt solemnly and interlocked their arms during the national anthem. It was the most unified display yet by the growing national movement started this month when San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refused to stand for the national anthem in protest of police brutality against African-Americans. Since Kaepernick’s lone protest, dozens of other NFL players have joined him either on a knee or raising a fist into the air during the national anthem, sending a message that for some people of color, the “land of the free” is out of reach. To say the movement started with Kaepernick, though, leaves out some of the story. For months, Catchings says, she and her teammates — black and white — have been talking about racial justice issues. For two years, from St. Louis to Cleveland to Chicago to Tulsa, Okla., and Charlotte,N.C., every police shooting of a black man, some armed, some not, has led to intense discussions about racial equity in America. When St. Louis was filling the national airwaves with nightly protests from Ferguson and elsewhere, Catchings was paying attention. Her brother, Kenyon, lives in O’Fallon, Mo. During the August 2014 protests, they talked about raising young, black boys in an era where black mothers and fathers still have to have that talk when their boys turn 16 about how to act if and when they get pulled over by police.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Members of the Indiana Fever kneel during the playing of the national anthem before the start of a first-round WNBA playof game Wednesday against the Phoenix Mercury in Indianapolis.

They talked about living in a country where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s goals of racial and economic equity are still a dream for too many people. As one of the most famous female professional athletes in the world, Catchings is far removed from the economic struggles facing many blacks who live in urban areas, whether in Indianapolis or St. Louis or Charlotte. But she still knows the sting of being treated diferently for the color of her skin. For most of her career she kept her jet black hair long and straight. But lately she’s let it go to what she calls its more natural state. It’s short and braided. And she’s noticed a diference when she walks into a store and somebody doesn’t recognize her. “People will treat me a certain way until they find out I’m a professional basketball player,” Catchings says. “Then everything changes.” Her fellow professionals didn’t tell their coach what they were planning Wednesday night. When the team discussed it, they knew they were about to embark on a step into an uncomfortable place, but they were willing to do it as long as they stood — or kneeled — together. “For us, one of the things is that it had to be all or nothing,” Catchings said. “I’m really proud of my team. It’s not comfortable.” Talking about race rarely is. But taking it to a national stage brings a new kind of heat. Catchings and her teammates now occupy a space once held by 1968 Olympic athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos. They join Kaepernick and Denver Broncos

linebacker Brandon Marshall, and others, in hoping that their status as professional athletes can spark ongoing conversation about the country’s struggle with racial equity. There will be backlash. Kaepernick has received death threats. Santa Clara police threatened to stop working 49ers games. Marshall lost sponsors after he took a knee. Catchings has already received vile, racist emails and social media posts in response to her protest. There is a cost to discomfort. But getting people out of their comfort zones is the only way to continue a serious conversation about racial injustice, Catchings says. Most of her teammates have friends or relatives who are police officers or in the military. It’s important for people to understand what his sister’s protest is really about, Kenyon says. “It’s not a surprise to see her take such a strong stance. She is probably one of the most strong-minded individuals I’ve ever been around,” he says. He’s not the only one who thinks so. In November, the St. Louis Sports Commission is honoring Catchings with its annual Musial Award for Extraordinary Character. Her “stance is not an un-American one,” Kenyon continues. “It’s about pointing out injustice.” Fifty years ago, Harvey Catchings marched for a justice that hasn’t yet come. His daughter is opening old wounds while continuing the walk, this time by refusing to stand. “We’re fighting the same fight,” she says. “My dad is proud of me.”

WHAT’S UP THIS DAY IN 1975 BOARD MEMBER INDICTED The president of the East St. Louis school board, Charles Merritts Sr., is indicted for conspiracy to murder a fellow board member who had spoken out against district policy.

HEADS UP 9/11 EXHIBIT The “9/11 Never Forget” exhibit will make its first appearance in the St. Louis area next month at Jeferson College. The exhibit features artifacts from 9/11, along with documentary videos, recordings of firstresponder transmissions and interactive exhibits. The traveling exhibit is dedicated to the 414 New York firefighters and police oicers who died when they responded to the attacks on the World Trade Center. For information, go to jefco.edu/911NeverForget. Area first responders will escort the exhibit when it arrives Oct. 3. The three-day exhibit will be located at Jeferson College Arnold, 1687 Missouri State Road, on the lower parking lot near the Arnold Recreation Center outdoor pool. It will be open to the public from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. Admission is free. The Tunnel to Towers Foundation will accept donations for housing badly wounded soldiers and orphaned children. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS GERMAN-AMERICAN FESTIVAL When• Noon until 5 p.m. Saturday Where • German Cultural Hall, 3652 South Jeferson Avenue. How much • Free More info • 636-221-1524. The German Heritage Society of St. Louis will host an open house of exhibits at the hall. The Waterloo German Band will play at 4 p.m. Beer, pretzels and kuchen (cofee with cake) available for purchase. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Saturday: 07-15-20-29-41 Powerball: 22

Power play: 2

Estimated jackpot: $50 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 01-05-08-25-62 Mega ball: 14

Megaplier: 3

Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $25 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday: 01-32-38-40-42-44 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.2 million

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 08-20-27-29-36 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $82,000

LAW & ORDER FLORDELL HILLS > Man killed in apparent domestic dispute • A man was killed Friday night in what oicials believe was a domestic dispute. Oicers from Velda City were called to a home about 9:30 p.m. in the 7100 block of West Florissant Avenue, where they found a 36-year-old man who appeared to have sufered a stab wound. He was pronounced dead at the scene. A 40-year-old woman “known to the victim” was taken into custody without incident, according to police. She was not identified. The victim’s name was being withheld pending notification of relatives. The St. Louis County Police Department

Bureau of Crimes Against Persons is assisting Velda City authorities in the investigation. ST. CHARLES > St. Peters man dies in single-vehicle accident • Rodney D. Sterkel, 63, of St. Peters, died after he lost control of his vehicle on westbound Highway 364 about 9:30 p.m. Friday, according to the Missouri Highway Patrol. Sterkel was taken to St. Joseph Hospital in St. Charles, where he was pronounced dead. No other information was available. JEFFERSON COUNTY > Two killed in crash • The driver of one vehicle and a passenger in another were killed Friday night in a

crash in which the driver may have missed a stop sign. The Missouri Highway Patrol said the accident occurred when a southbound 2003 Dodge Grand Caravan driven by Lewis Kinstler of Bonne Terre, Mo., failed to stop at the intersection of Highways P and 110, according to the Missouri Highway Patrol. The Grand Caravan drove into the path of an eastbound 2006 Dodge Ram 3500 on Highway 110 driven by Scott Thole, 33, of St. Peters. Kinstler, 36, was killed along with Lorna Smith, 35, of Festus, a passenger in Thole’s pickup.

Evening: 499

PICK-4 Midday: 1019

Evening: 2503

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 11-28-31-34-36 Evening: 04-10-20-34-39 LOTTO Saturday: 04-10-11-15-20-49 Extra shot: 06 Estimated jackpot: $7.25 million PICK-3 Midday: 512 FB: 6 Evening: 358 FB: 5 PICK-4 Midday: 2145 FB: 1 Evening: 3466 FB: 6

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Bill McClellan ........ B1 Books .................... D7 Business ................. E1 Editorial .............. A20 Horoscopes ......... EV4 Movies ................... D6

PICK-3 Midday: 355

Obituaries ........... A22 People ................. A26 Puzzles ............. EV3-4 Sports calendar .... C2 Stocks ................... E5 Weather .............. A25

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

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LOCAL

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Levee district must give plan to mitigate impact of looding Sny district, stretching from Quincy to Belleview, has been accused by Illinois of building levee too high, possibly afecting Missouri neighbors BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-dispatch

A large Illinois levee district north of St. Louis accused of building its Mississippi River levees too high has until next month to give the state a plan to mitigate flood impacts on its neighbors. The action from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources is the latest from government agencies who say the Sny Island Levee and Drainage District hasn’t complied with state and federal rules meant to manage flooding and levee districts along the river. The Sny stretches from Quincy to Belleview in Illinois. For years, officials with the politically and financially powerful agricultural levee district have argued about levee heights with regulators who have struggled to enforce their rules. Residents across the river in Missouri worry the Sny is illegally pushing floodwater onto their communities, but Sny officials have denied they raised levees above authorized levels. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers estimates the Sny could push an additional 2.5 feet of water onto some areas in the Missouri counties of Marion, Pike, Lincoln and St. Charles. According to an IDNR letter to Sny superintendent Mike Reed dated Aug. 23, the Sny Island Levee and Drainage District’s work to maintain its height after flooding in 2008 was done without a state permit. The department gave the levee district until Oct. 15 to submit a plan and a schedule to fix what it says are unauthorized levee modifications. Except for a permit issued in 1996, no work has been authorized on the Sny levees in recent years, the state letter says.

Sny attorney Karin Jacoby of Husch Blackwell said in an email that the district is “firm in our conviction the Sny acted in accordance with applicable regulations.” “The sharing of preliminary, inaccurate or incomplete information, particularly concerning impacts of the Sny on others, has generated much unnecessary confusion,” Jacoby wrote. It’s not just Illinois that has raised issues with the Sny’s management of its huge levee. The corps has said the Sny’s levees are built above authorized levels, something the Sny denies. River advocates worry the Sny isn’t alone and that there’s little enforcement or incentive for levee districts to follow the law. “It’s really, really shocking to us to see such blatant activities, by the Sny levee district in particular, to just ignore state and federal rules at the peril of the neighbors across the river in Missouri,” said Olivia Dorothy, associate director of Mississippi River management at advocacy group American Rivers. While the corps has authorized the nearly 60-mile long Sny District to maintain 50-year flood protection, the district has managed to win 100-year protection from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The FEMA accreditation means the farmers who own the fertile 115,000 acres of floodplain protected by the Sny levees don’t have to buy flood insurance. It’s not entirely clear how the Sny attained 100-year accreditation from FEMA despite being authorized for 50-year flood protection from the corps. FEMA representatives have said documentation the Sny submitted to them indicated it met the agency’s standards, and the corps has said it as-

sisted with engineering work despite not authorizing higher levee heights. “The Sny just made the modifications without telling anybody,” Dorothy said. “We’re not quite sure what broke down to allow that accreditation to happen, because they should have been required to provide to FEMA all necessary approvals for that accreditation.” A FEMA representative didn’t immediately return a call and email requesting comment. A corps spokesman said there’s little the agency can do to enforce its rules beyond making the district ineligible for federal flood repair funds, an action it took last year. “Our final authority would be to remove them from that program,” corps spokesman Allen Marshall said. Mike Klingner, an engineer who does work for the Sny and is board president of a group representing flood control agencies in the region, said IDNR appears to have “misplaced” permitting documentation for the Sny work. “It’s quite clear they don’t have all the information,” he said. The Sny plans to present more information at a meeting with the state in October, Klingner said. Based on the information Illinois has now, it appears the Sny will have to mitigate its flood impact somehow, said Loren Wobig of IDNR’s water resources office. It could purchase flood easements or engineer its levees so certain areas store water, which would allow the Sny to maintain levee height at other locations. “There’s still options for them,” Wobig said. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

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CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

The John Cochran VA Medical Center on North Grand Boulevard in St. Louis. The local VA health care system has had eight interim directors since 2013.

VA names local health care director St. Louis system has struggled for years with problems in patient care but is showing improvement BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-dispatch

After a three-year search, the Department of Veterans Afairs has named Keith Repko as director of the VA St. Louis Health Care System. Repko has served as interim director since January and will become permanent on Oct. 2. The local VA health care system has had eight interim directors since 2013. A candidate hired in June 2015 backed out. David Shulkin, undersecretary for health at the VA in Washington, said in June that the St. Louis system had one of the longest vacancies for director positions in the country. At the time, 34 out of 168 VA medical centers lacked directors. Job applications at the VA have been down since a 2014 investigation of Repko long wait times for medical appointments across the country. The jobs generally pay significantly less than in the private sector. The St. Louis system has struggled for years with problems in patient care but has recently received satisfactory reports from its annual inspections. Repko’s previous roles at the local VA system include associate director, chief of facilities engineering and chief of biomedical engineering. He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering from North Dakota State University. “We are excited that Keith will become the new director of the VA St. Louis Health Care System,” said Dr. William Patterson, veterans integrated service network director, in a statement. “His sound leadership qualities and proven experience will be valuable assets for the health care system, the employees and volunteers, and most importantly, for the veterans we are honored to serve.” Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., sent a letter last year to the head of the VA complaining about the ongoing vacancy. In a statement, she said Repko’s appointment was “a good step toward ensuring Missouri’s veterans are getting the level of care they deserve and the benefits they’ve earned.” Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Levee district must give plan to mitigate looding Sny oicials have been accused of building levee too high, possibly afecting neighbors BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-dispatch

A large Illinois levee district north of St. Louis accused of building its Mississippi River levees too high has until next month to give the state a plan to mitigate flood impacts on its neighbors. The action from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources is the latest from government agencies who say the Sny Island Levee and Drainage District hasn’t complied with state and federal rules meant to manage flooding and levee districts along the river. The Sny stretches from Quincy to Belleview in Illinois. For years, oicials with the politically and financially powerful agricultural levee district have argued about levee heights with regulators who have struggled to enforce their rules. Residents across the river in Missouri worry the Sny is illegally pushing floodwater onto their communities, but Sny officials have denied they raised levees above authorized levels. The U.S. Army Corps of Engi-

neers estimates the Sny could push an additional 2.5 feet of water onto some areas in the Missouri counties of Marion, Pike, Lincoln and St. Charles. According to an IDNR letter to Sny superintendent Mike Reed dated Aug. 23, the Sny Island Levee and Drainage District’s work to maintain its height after flooding in 2008 was done without a state permit. The department gave the levee district until Oct. 15 to submit a plan and a schedule to fix what it says are unauthorized levee modifications. Except for a permit issued in 1996, no work has been authorized on the Sny levees in recent years, the state letter says. Sny attorney Karin Jacoby of Husch Blackwell said in an email that the district is “firm in our conviction the Sny acted in accordance with applicable regulations.” “The sharing of preliminary, inaccurate or incomplete information, particularly concerning impacts of the Sny on others, has generated much unnecessary confusion,” Jacoby wrote.

It’s not just Illinois that has raised issues with the Sny’s management of its huge levee. The corps has said the Sny’s levees are built above authorized levels, something the Sny denies. River advocates worry the Sny isn’t alone and that there’s little enforcement or incentive for levee districts to follow the law. “It’s really, really shocking to us to see such blatant activities, by the Sny levee district in particular, to just ignore state and federal rules at the peril of the neighbors across the river in Missouri,” said Olivia Dorothy, associate director of Mississippi River management at advocacy group American Rivers. While the corps has authorized the nearly 60-mile-long Sny District to maintain 50year flood protection, the district has managed to win 100year protection from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The FEMA accreditation means the farmers who own the fertile 115,000 acres of floodplain protected by the Sny le-

vees don’t have to buy flood insurance. It’s not entirely clear how the Sny attained 100-year accreditation from FEMA despite being authorized for 50-year flood protection from the corps. FEMA representatives have said documentation the Sny submitted to them indicated it met the agency’s standards, and the corps has said it assisted with engineering work despite not authorizing higher levee heights. “The Sny just made the modifications without telling anybody,” Dorothy said. “We’re not quite sure what broke down to allow that accreditation to happen, because they should have been required to provide to FEMA all necessary approvals for that accreditation.” A FEMA representative didn’t immediately return a call and email requesting comment. A corps spokesman said there’s little the agency can do to enforce its rules beyond making the district ineligible for federal flood repair funds, an action it took last year. “Our final authority would be

to remove them from that program,” corps spokesman Allen Marshall said. Mike Klingner, an engineer who does work for the Sny and is board president of a group representing flood control agencies in the region, said IDNR appears to have “misplaced” permitting documentation for the Sny work. “It’s quite clear they don’t have all the information,” he said. The Sny plans to present more information at a meeting with the state in October, Klingner said. Based on the information Illinois has now, it appears the Sny will have to mitigate its flood impact somehow, said Loren Wobig of IDNR’s water resources oice. It could purchase flood easements or engineer its levees so certain areas store water, which would allow the Sny to maintain levee height at other locations. “There’s still options for them,” Wobig said. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Dog found in Jeferson County reunited with Colorado family BY DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-dispatch

St. Bernard turned up lea-bitten near Festus after ive years away from home

Brenda and Kalli Mahafey were awaiting the delivery Saturday of their St. Bernard, Missy, who turned up in Jeferson County ive years after she went missing. “We are having a welcome back party,” Brenda Mahafey said.

Missy is home. The St. Bernard that went missing from a home in Pueblo, Colo., five years ago was reunited with her gleeful owners Saturday, a week after she turned up stray in Jeferson County. Me l i ssa Wi d e m a n Mo r to n a n d B ra n d i e Tieken, both of Jefferson County, delivered the dog to owners Brenda and Kalli Mahafey at the end of a one-day journey from Missouri. “She just got out of the car. Brenda and Kalli are loving on her,” friend Margie Linder reported

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from Pueblo on Saturday morning. “It’s amazing. They are so excited.” The Mahafeys were up most of the night decorating their residence for Missy’s homecoming. The welcome included posters, hot dogs and chips for a celebration that included family and friends. Media outlets were also on hand. “We greatly appreciate what they did,” Brenda Mahaffey said of the Jefferson County residents who spotted the dog and traced her to Colorado. “We are having a welcome back party. I have a thank-you card for Melissa and Brandi.” Brandi Cross, the Jeferson County resident who made the connection to the Mahaffeys after seeing a post memorializing Missy on Facebook, didn’t make the trip because of a previously scheduled family obligation. The Mahafeys adopted Missy, a 1-year-old St. Bernard, in 2011 as a companion for Kalli Mahafey, who has special needs. A short time later, Missy disappeared from the family’s fenced yard. Brenda Mahaffey believed the family would

never see the St. Bernard again after initial searches proved futile. Another Mahaffey daughter, Tessa Mahaffey, feared the same and posted the Facebook memory that Cross, residing 900 miles away, happened on five years later when Missy turned up matted and flea-bitten near Festus. Cross came upon the Facebook post after a groomer discovered a microchip that helped find the owner of the St. Bernard. “She was a stray dog,” Jefferson County Executive Ken Waller said. “She had not been taken care of well.” Wideman-Morton in a Saturday morning telephone interview said the animal traveled easily between Missouri and Colorado. “She is the best dog,” she said via phone from Colorado. “She was no problem. It’s just amazing how sweet of a dog she is.” Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

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NATION

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

City has heard Trump’s promises before GOP nominee’s appeal to black voters rings hollow in Gary, Ind., where casino riches never materialized BY SOPHIA TAREEN AND MICHAEL BIESECKER Associated Press

GARY, IND. • Donald Trump swooped into Gary, Ind., on his private jet and pledged to make the down-on-its-luck city great again. It was 1993, and the New York mogul was wooing oicials in the mostly black city to support his bid to dock a showboat casino along a Lake Michigan shoreline littered with shuttered factories. Trump and his representatives later told state gaming officials he would leverage his “incomparable experience” to build a floating Shangri-La, with enough slot machines and blackjack tables to fill city cofers and local charities with tens of millions each year, while creating scores of wellpaid jobs for minority residents. “We are looking to make this a real peach here, a real success,” Trump said of the project. Today, as the Republican presidential nominee pursues black voters with vows to fix inner-city troubles, many Gary residents say his pitch to solve the problems of crime and poverty is disturbingly familiar. Like others who have done business with Trump, they say their experience ofers a cautionary tale. Little more than a decade after investing in Gary, Trump’s casino company declared bankruptcy and cashed out his stake in the boat — leaving behind lawsuits and hard feelings in a city where more than one-third of residents live in poverty. Trump’s lawyers later argued in court that his pledges to the city were never legally binding. Trump told The Associated Press that his venture was good for Gary. Local civic leaders disagree. “What you had was a slick business dealer coming in,” said Roy Pratt, a Democratic former Gary city councilman. “He got as much as he could and then he pulled up and left.” Gary is a victim of the eco-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this June 3, 1996, ile photo, the Trump Casino sits on the dock in Buington Harbor in Gary, Ind. Little more than a decade after investing in Gary, Trump’s casino company declared bankruptcy and cashed out his stake in the boat — leaving behind lawsuits and hard feelings in a city where more than one-third of residents live in poverty.

nomic shifts Trump has bemoaned on the campaign trail. Just 30 miles southeast of Chicago, Gary’s fortunes fell with the steel industry. The remaining 77,000 residents abide persistent crime and chronic unemployment. In a presentation to the Indiana Gaming Commission in 1994, Trump’s team touted his “superior marketing and advertising abilities” to pitch a 340foot long vessel called Trump Princess with more than 1,500 slot machines. To sweeten the pot, Trump’s representatives said they would try to ensure that at least twothirds of the casino’s staf would be minority residents from the surrounding area, according to a transcript. He ofered to fund a new charitable foundation endowed with casino stock worth $11.5 million. His official proposal also listed

eight “local minority participants” in the project, a diverse group of Indiana businessmen. The state gaming commission eventually awarded Trump a casino license. A May 1996 agreement signed by the Trump organization said the developer would “endeavor” to fill 70 percent of its 1,200 full-time jobs with minorities. Trump was to invest $153 million. The eight business partners in Trump’s license application had been ofered a chance to buy shares worth more than $1 million, but most didn’t have the money. So both sides negotiated a deal — for no cash up front — ofering the group 7.5 percent of the stock for the riverboat and another 7.5 percent into a trust for charity. However, the men said Trump reneged once the license was approved. None got stock in the casino, and the money for charity

was less than promised. All eight sued for breach of contract, alleging they were dumped after Trump’s license was approved. As construction proceeded in spring 1996, Trump’s company began hiring in advance of the casino’s grand opening in June. But his commitments to hire minorities and local businesses never came to fruition, according to local leaders. “It simply did not happen,” said Richard Hatcher, a Democrat who was Gary’s first African-American mayor. Hatcher helped bring a 1996 lawsuit alleging Trump’s organization had only hired about 20 percent minorities. Though more than half of Trump’s casino staf was eventually made up of racial minorities, the lawsuit said blacks were overwhelmingly relegated to minimum wage jobs, such as valets and janitors.

SENATE’S ODD COUPLE California Democrat Oklahoma Republican ind common ground on protecting the environment

‘VENUS’ AND ‘MARS’ The senators have known each other since their days in the House in the 1980s. “I’ve worked with Barbara a long time. And we like each other person-

Gunmakers join anti-suicide eforts BY PAUL BARRETT Bloomberg

NEW YORK • In what some see as an unlikely move,

BY MATTHEW DALY Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The oddest of Senate odd couples — California Democrat Barbara Boxer and Oklahoma Republican Jim Inhofe — have accomplished something highly unusual in this bitter election year: significant, bipartisan legislation on the environment that has become law. Boxer, a staunch liberal, calls climate change the “greatest challenge to hit the planet,” battles against ofshore drilling, rails about the dangers of nuclear power and has pushed to restrict greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming. Inhofe proudly calls himself an unabashed conservative who dismisses global warming as a hoax and famously tossed a snowball on the Senate floor to prove his point. “It’s very, very cold out,” he said last February as he lobbed the ball toward the Senate president, an incident that makes Boxer cringe. Yet somehow, the two have managed to become friends and political partners, working closely together to find common ground and frequently gushing about the other. Earlier this year, Inhofe and Boxer shepherded a sweeping bill to impose new regulations on tens of thousands of toxic chemicals in everyday products, from household cleaners to clothing and furniture. It was the first update of the law in 40 years. The unlikely alliance played key roles on a five-year, $305 billion bill to address the nation’s aging and congested transportation systems that President Barack Obama signed into law in December. And last week, the pair secured overwhelming support for a $10 billion water projects bill that includes more than $200 million in emergency funds to address a leadcontaminated water crisis in Flint, Mich., and other cities. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., compares Boxer and Inhofe to “an old married couple who’ve sort of learned to live with each other’s idiosyncrasies. They raise their eyebrows, but get past it for the sake of the entire partnership.”

Trump’s lawyers argued the minority hiring goals were not legally binding and succeeded in getting the lawsuit dismissed. The other lawsuit, filed in federal court by the eight jilted business partners, continued. Six of the men dropped out of the case after Trump’s company agreed to pay them a combined $2.2 million, but two refused to settle. The jury awarded them $1.3 million. But Trump appealed, and in 2001 a federal appeals panel overturned the jury’s award, saying their agreements with Trump’s company had not been legally binding. In 2004, Trump Hotel & Casino Resorts Inc., the parent company of the Gary casino, sought Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Trump sought to restructure $1.8 billion in debt, much of it tied to hotels and casinos in New Jersey and New York. Trump sold his company’s stake in the Gary casino the following year for $253 million. According to financial disclosures, the proceeds from the sale were used to shore up the financial condition of Trump’s other casino and resort properties. Through his spokeswoman, Trump told the AP he stood by his record. “It worked out very well and was very good for Gary, Indiana,” Trump said. The riverboat is still docked in Gary’s industrial harbor. On a recent workday, a sparse jeansand-sweatpants crowd lined up for the serve-yourself soda and cofee between games. Asked about Trump’s recent “What do you have to lose?” pitch to black voters, former Indiana gaming commissioner David Ross said it would be a bad bet. “What you have to know is that Trump is for Trump and he’s not for any black voters or anybody,” Ross said. “What he’s looking for is to make some money for Trump.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., embraces the committee’s ranking member Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., in May at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. They shepherded a bill to impose new regulations on toxic chemicals in everyday products.

ally,” says Inhofe, 81. Boxer, 75, says their friendship has its limits, but is real: “One is Venus and one is Mars, let’s be clear,” she said on the Senate floor. “People wonder how can we possibly bridge the divide,” she mused as the Senate debated the water bill. “And it is a fact that on certain issues we can’t. There is a lesson there. ... We have never, ever taken those differences and made them personal. We respect each other and we don’t waste a lot of time arguing.” Or as Inhofe put it in an interview, “She has every right to be wrong.” The alliance’s success stands in stark contrast to the fierce partisanship that has consumed Capitol Hill and grown increasingly worse as the Nov. 8 election approaches. Republicans and Democrats who once had high hopes for criminal justice reform, for instance, and even the basic business of individual spending bills have accepted the reality that little will be done. Meantime, Inhofe and Boxer plow ahead — together. “We both like to finish what we started and get things done,” said Inhofe, a former real estate developer and Tulsa mayor who still pilots a small plane. The pairing “sends an important signal to everybody that you don’t have to make differences personal and attack someone personally,” the Brooklyn-born Boxer said in an interview. Boxer, who carved out time in a two-decade-plus Senate career to write politics-and-power novels, said lawmakers “need to, while holding your ground and not compromis-

ing your core beliefs, find ways to get things done.”

SANDERS LIKES HIM, TOO Inhofe’s status as the Senate’s top climate-change doubter has made him the environmental movement’s archenemy, but his fondness for political give-and-take has won him another unlikely Senate ally: Vermont’s Bernie Sanders. Sanders, like Boxer a passionate advocate for action to slow climate change, lost a hotly contested race for the Democratic presidential nomination this year. He shocked many supporters when he announced at a town hall this spring that the Republican he likes the most is Inhofe. The revelation might ruin Inhofe’s political career, Sanders joked. “There’ll be a 30-second ad: ‘Sanders said he likes this person!’” Sanders said, calling Inhofe “a decent guy” and a friend. Inhofe returns the compliment and said the men became friends after arguing for hours on the Senate floor over a bill on oil drilling. “I won. He lost,” Inhofe said. But he said Sanders later told him: “This is what we should be doing in the Senate — debating issues.” Boxer, who is retiring after a 34-year congressional career, said colleagues from both parties have noticed her partnership with Inhofe and called it a model. One of those admirers is Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican not known as overly sentimental. “I hate to see the Boxer-Inhofe team come to an end,” he said recently.

the gun industry is preparing to get behind a suicideprevention push. The unlikely part is that the industry makes products that enable almost half of all suicides in America. Steve Sanetti, the president of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the industry’s trade group, sees nothing at all surprising about gun and ammunition makers trying to make a dent in the grim count. “We’ve been looking at this issue for years,” he said in a recent interview at NSSF headquarters in Newtown, Conn. “Firearm suicides are two-thirds of the total of all gun deaths,” Sanetti added, and thus a natural focus for responsible gunmakers and owners. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there are about 11,000 firearm homicides a year and 21,000 suicides from firearms. In terms of sheer mortality, gun suicide is the bigger problem. The NSSF, Sanetti said, struggled to find an expert group with which to collaborate on this sensitive topic: “The problem was that, like much of the medical community, suicide-prevention organizations were anti-gun by nature, and their mantra was: ‘The only safe house is a home without a gun.’ That’s obviously not something we could support.” Gun owners, and the companies that make and sell guns, believe that the benefits of firearm possession, — security against intrusion, sport and recreation, exercise of Second Amendment rights — necessitate some downside risk. The question is how to minimize the risk. Last year, the NSSF began talking to the New York-based American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. “They’re leaving politics at the door. We’re leaving politics at the door,” Sanetti said. The AFSP’s chief executive, Robert Gebbia, said his group welcomed conversation with the gun industry as a way to reach firearm owners who might be vulnerable to suicide. “It’s a politically charged issue — the Second Amendment — but that’s not our issue.” This fall, AFSP chapters in four states — Alabama, Kentucky, Missouri and New Mexico — will launch pilot projects under which they will deliver suicideprevention literature to gun retailers, firearm ranges, and other places where gun owners gather. The program will also include the dissemination of hotline numbers that salespeople can call if they see warning signs, Sanetti said. Separately, the NSSF has been conferring with the Department of Veterans Afairs about setting up programs “to address the shocking number of suicides among returning veterans, especially younger males coming back from multiple deployments from the wars” in the Middle East, Sanetti said. Those negotiations have moved slowly. Only now are the NSSF and VA nearing an announcement of a partnership to establish pilot prevention programs at military bases and other places that soldiers and veterans congregate, according to Sanetti. Gun control advocates expressed skepticism about the NSSF’s plans. “While any efort to educate about suicide is deserving of merit, NSSF misses the mark when it comes to recognizing the risk factors that go along with keeping a gun in the home,” Dan Gross, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, said via email.


NATION

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Doubts remain after release of video by Charlotte police

DIGEST 3-year-old among victims in Baltimore shooting A shooting in Baltimore left eight people injured Saturday night including a 3-year-old girl, police said, adding they are seeking three armed suspects who led on foot. The shooting occurred a block from where the city held a party earlier Saturday for a special event. Baltimore police spokesman T.J. Smith said none of the injuries was life-threatening and that the victims included a father and his 3-year-old daughter. Smith tweeted that the suspects ran after the shooting and that one of them was armed with a shotgun and the other two had handguns. 6 are stabbed at party in California • A 21-year-old man stabbed six people Saturday at a California house party, lashing out after he bumped into someone and a ight erupted, authorities said. Two people were critically injured; four others were hospitalized in stable condition, police said. Arriving oicers said they found suspect Aaron Hong Te in front of the Pasadena residence where about 200 people were at the party. Te was taken into custody on suspicion of attempted murder, authorities said. The victims were men ranging in age from 21 to 25.

JEFF SINER • Charlotte Observer via AP

Protesters stand in unity in Romare Bearden Park as they prepare to march through Charlotte, N.C., on Friday. Hundreds protested again on Saturday, calling for release of police footage of the shooting of Keith Scott on Tuesday. That footage was released Saturday night.

Man’s shooting led to protests; probe ongoing ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. • Charlotte

police released dramatic video Saturday that shows officers with guns drawn surrounding a black man with his hands at his side before shots are fired and he falls. It’s unclear if there was anything in the man’s hands in the footage, which has done little to assuage his relatives. The footage of the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott was released amid days of protests, including an outpouring by hundreds Saturday, which coalesced around demands for

the public to see the video. Police said Scott had a gun; residents have said he was unarmed. In the dashboard camera video released Saturday, Scott could be seen backing away from his SUV with his hands down. It’s not apparent if he’s holding anything. Four shots are heard, and he falls to the ground. Police also released photos of a handgun from the scene, saying it was loaded and had Scott’s DNA and fingerprints. They also said Scott had marijuana. The dashboard camera footage starts with a police car pulling up as two oicers point their guns at Scott, who is inside the SUV with the doors closed and windows rolled up. Scott gets out and starts walking backward before shots are fired. From a diferent angle, newly released police body camera

footage shows an officer approach with his gun drawn and another officer already pointing his gun at Scott. When Scott comes into view, his hands are at his side and he’s standing beside his SUV. The body camera footage doesn’t show the moment shots are fired. An attorney for Scott’s family, Justin Bamberg, said the footage leaves questions unanswered more than it provides clarity. “One of the biggest questions,” Bamberg said, “is do those actions, do those precious seconds, justify this shooting?” Ray Dotch, Scott’s brotherin-law, objected to reporters’ questions about Scott’s background, saying he shouldn’t have to “humanize him in order for him to be treated fairly.” Before releasing the footage, Chief Kerr Putney said that he

received assurances from the State Bureau of Investigation that making it public wouldn’t impact the state’s probe. Asked whether he expected the footage to calm protesters, Putney responded: “The footage itself will not create in anyone’s mind absolute certainty as to what this case represents and what the outcome should be. The footage only supports all of the other information” such as physical evidence and statements from witnesses and oicers. Putney said that his officers didn’t break the law but noted the investigation continues. “Officers are absolutely not being charged by me at this point, but again, there’s another investigation ongoing,” he said. Putney said Scott was “absolutely in possession of a handgun” during Tuesday’s incident.

Small town’s ‘world has changed forever’ Suspect arrested in mall shooting that left 5 dead; Washington town’s residents in shock BY PHUONG LE AND GILLIAN FLACCUS Associated Press

BURLINGTON, WASH. • The first 911 call came in just before 7 p.m. on a busy Friday night at the Cascade Mall: A man with a rifle was shooting at people in the Macy’s department store. By the time police arrived moments later, the carnage at the Macy’s makeup counter was complete. Four people were dead and the gunman was gone, last seen walking toward Interstate 5. A fifth victim, a man, died in the early morning hours Saturday as police finished sweeping the 434,000-squarefoot building. “There are people waking up this morning and their world has changed forever. The city of Burlington has probably changed forever, but I don’t think our way of life needs to change,” Burlington Mayor Steve Sexton said Saturday at a news conference. “This was a senseless act. It was the world knocking on our doorstep and it came into our little community.” Authorities said late Saturday that the suspect in the deadly shooting was in custody. The Skagit County Department of Emergency Management said via Twitter on Saturday evening that the suspect had been captured. As the small city absorbed the tragic news and arrest, critical questions remained, including the identity of the gunman and his motive. The FBI said terrorism was not suspected. The gunman was described by witnesses to police as a young Hispanic man dressed in black. Surveillance video captured him entering the mall unarmed and then recorded him about 10 minutes later entering the Macy’s with a “hunting type” rifle in his hand, Mount Vernon police Lt. Chris Cammock said. Authorities believe he acted

WASHINGTON STATE PATROL VIA AP

This frame from surveillance video shows the suspect in a shooting rampage Friday at the Cascade Mall in Burlington, Wash.

alone. The weapon was recovered at the scene. The identities of the victims — four women who ranged in age from a teenager to a senior citizen — were withheld pending autopsies and notification of family. The identity of the man who was fatally shot was also withheld and may not be released until Monday. “Probably one of the most difficult moments for us last night was knowing that there

were family members wondering about their loved ones in there,” Cammock said. As police scrambled throughout the day Saturday to find the shooter, the small city about 60 miles north of Seattle settled into a new and nerve-racking reality. The community of 8,600 people is too far from Seattle to be a commuter town, but its population swells to 55,000 during the day because of a

popular outlet mall, retail stores and other businesses. Burlington is the only major retail center within 30 miles in a region where agriculture is king, said Linda Jones, president of the Burlington Chamber of Commerce. Residents relied on those bonds Saturday to comfort each other at a community gathering in a city park. “It’s too scary. It’s too close to home,” said Maria Elena Vasquez, who attended the gathering with her husband and two young children. Those who survived were still trying to process what happened as their community became the latest entry on a list of places known by the rest of world for mass shootings. As the shots rang out, shoppers hid in dressing rooms and bathrooms and made hushed, terrified phone calls to relatives. Joanne Burkholder, 19, of nearby Mount Vernon, was watching the movie “The Magnificent Seven” in the mall’s theater when security guards came in and told them to evacuate immediately. Dozens of panicked moviegoers gathered in the hallway, and Burkholder heard screaming as the oicers escorted them to safety in a parking lot. As she drove home later, she had to pull over because she was shaking so hard, she told The Associated Press. “I’m just very thankful for my life this morning. I’ve never been so terrified in my life,” she said Saturday, trying to hold back tears as she attended a community vigil. “You’d think it would happen in Everett or Seattle, but a small town of Burlington, I’d never dream something like this would happen.” Emergency management officials started to allow some people to retrieve their vehicles Saturday, though the mall was shuttered through Monday morning.

Suicidal man prompts standof in San Francisco • A police standof with an armed and suicidal man led authorities to evacuate San Francisco’s Civic Center and a public square on Saturday as negotiators tried to talk him down. The man called 911 at noon to say he was going to harm himself or any oicer who got close, police spokesman Carlos Manfredi said. Negotiators who made contact with the man at United Nations Plaza reported seeing a handgun in his pocket, he said. They began talking to the man, who appeared to be in his 40s, as the area around City Hall was emptied of pedestrians and motorists. Police were also trying to talk to the man’s family to understand his mental history, he added. E. coli blamed for illnesses • The Centers for Disease Control says a multistate outbreak of E. coli has sickened seven people, sending ive to the hospital. The CDC said Saturday that the outbreak of E. coli, which can cause intestinal illnesses, likely is linked to beef products from Adams Farms Slaughterhouse in Athol, Mass. People ages 1 to 74 have become sick. They’re from Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The CDC says ive people said they’d eaten ground beef in the week before getting sick. Tests conirmed E. coli. The CDC says Adams Farm Slaughterhouse on Saturday recalled beef, veal and bison products. Dartmouth gets a whif of loral success • A lower that got its nickname from its putrid smell is blooming at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire for the irst time since 2011. Named Morphy, the titan arum — or corpse lower — began opening Friday at the Ivy League college’s greenhouse. The 7½-foot lower is set to collapse Sunday. Dartmouth greenhouse manager Kim DeLong said its odor has been described as a cross between a decaying animal and urine. DeLong plans to pollinate the endangered lower to share seeds and pollen. New name, hardware for Snapchat • Social media app Snapchat is introducing videorecording glasses called Spectacles and is changing its company name to incorporate the new product. The glasses can record video 10 seconds at a time by tapping a button on the device. The glasses will be available in the U.S. in the fall on a limited basis and cost $130. The company says it’s changing its name to Snap Inc. since it now has more than one product. The app will retain the name Snapchat. Iowa braces for more looding • Volunteers illed sandbags and homeowners began moving things out of basements on Saturday, and one town evacuated about 100 homes in preparation for looding along the Cedar River in Iowa. The river is expected to crest Tuesday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa’s second-largest city, with a population of about 130,000. But with more rain expected Saturday night, oicials there warned people to evacuate areas of the city near the river by 8 p.m. Sunday. Just upriver in the small town of Palo, about 100 homes in low-lying areas were evacuated Saturday. City Clerk Trisca Dix told The Associated Press that the mandatory evacuation in the town of about 1,000 took place Saturday afternoon before the river was expected to crest Sunday night at 24.5 feet. From news services


NATION

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 4 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Doubts remain after release of video by Charlotte police

DIGEST 3-year-old among victims in Baltimore shooting A shooting in Baltimore left eight people injured Saturday night including a 3-year-old girl, police said, adding they are seeking three armed suspects who led on foot. The shooting occurred a block from where the city held a party earlier Saturday for a special event. Baltimore police spokesman T.J. Smith said none of the injuries was life-threatening and that the victims included a father and his 3-year-old daughter. Smith tweeted that the suspects ran after the shooting and that one of them was armed with a shotgun and the other two had handguns. 6 are stabbed at party in California • A 21-year-old man stabbed six people Saturday at a California house party, lashing out after he bumped into someone and a ight erupted, authorities said. Two people were critically injured; four others were hospitalized in stable condition, police said. Arriving oicers said they found suspect Aaron Hong Te in front of the Pasadena residence where about 200 people were at the party. Te was taken into custody on suspicion of attempted murder, authorities said. The victims were men ranging in age from 21 to 25.

JEFF SINER • Charlotte Observer via AP

Protesters stand in unity in Romare Bearden Park as they prepare to march through Charlotte, N.C., on Friday. Hundreds protested again on Saturday, calling for release of police footage of the shooting of Keith Scott on Tuesday. That footage was released Saturday night.

Man’s shooting led to protests; probe ongoing ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. • Charlotte

police released dramatic video Saturday that shows officers with guns drawn surrounding a black man with his hands at his side before shots are fired and he falls. It’s unclear if there was anything in the man’s hands in the footage, which has done little to assuage his relatives. The footage of the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott was released amid days of protests, including an outpouring by hundreds Saturday, which coalesced around demands for

the public to see the video. Police said Scott had a gun; residents have said he was unarmed. In the dashboard camera video released Saturday, Scott could be seen backing away from his SUV with his hands down. It’s not apparent if he’s holding anything. Four shots are heard, and he falls to the ground. Police also released photos of a handgun from the scene, saying it was loaded and had Scott’s DNA and fingerprints. They also said Scott had marijuana. The dashboard camera footage starts with a police car pulling up as two oicers point their guns at Scott, who is inside the SUV with the doors closed and windows rolled up. Scott gets out and starts walking backward before shots are fired. From a diferent angle, newly released police body camera

footage shows an officer approach with his gun drawn and another officer already pointing his gun at Scott. When Scott comes into view, his hands are at his side and he’s standing beside his SUV. The body camera footage doesn’t show the moment shots are fired. An attorney for Scott’s family, Justin Bamberg, said the footage leaves questions unanswered more than it provides clarity. “One of the biggest questions,” Bamberg said, “is do those actions, do those precious seconds, justify this shooting?” Ray Dotch, Scott’s brotherin-law, objected to reporters’ questions about Scott’s background, saying he shouldn’t have to “humanize him in order for him to be treated fairly.” Before releasing the footage, Chief Kerr Putney said that he

received assurances from the State Bureau of Investigation that making it public wouldn’t impact the state’s probe. Asked whether he expected the footage to calm protesters, Putney responded: “The footage itself will not create in anyone’s mind absolute certainty as to what this case represents and what the outcome should be. The footage only supports all of the other information” such as physical evidence and statements from witnesses and oicers. Putney said that his officers didn’t break the law but noted the investigation continues. “Officers are absolutely not being charged by me at this point, but again, there’s another investigation ongoing,” he said. Putney said Scott was “absolutely in possession of a handgun” during Tuesday’s incident.

Small town’s ‘world has changed forever’ Suspect arrested in mall shooting that left 5 dead; Washington town’s residents in shock BY PHUONG LE AND GILLIAN FLACCUS Associated Press

BURLINGTON, WASH. • The first 911 call came in just before 7 p.m. on a busy Friday night at the Cascade Mall: A man with a rifle was shooting at people in the Macy’s department store. By the time police arrived moments later, the carnage at the Macy’s makeup counter was complete. Four people were dead and the gunman was gone, last seen walking toward Interstate 5. A fifth victim, a man, died in the early morning hours Saturday as police finished sweeping the 434,000-squarefoot building. “There are people waking up this morning and their world has changed forever. The city of Burlington has probably changed forever, but I don’t think our way of life needs to change,” Burlington Mayor Steve Sexton said Saturday at a news conference. “This was a senseless act. It was the world knocking on our doorstep and it came into our little community.” Authorities said late Saturday that the suspect in the deadly shooting was in custody. He was identified as Arcan Cetin, 20. The Washington State Patrol said via Twitter that Cetin was a resident of Oak Harbor, Washington. As the small city absorbed the tragic news and arrest, critical questions remained, including the identity of the gunman and his motive. The FBI said terrorism was not suspected. The gunman was described by witnesses to police as a young Hispanic man dressed in black. Surveillance video captured him entering the mall unarmed and then recorded him about 10 minutes later entering the Macy’s with a “hunting type” rifle in his hand, Mount Vernon police Lt. Chris Cammock said. Authorities believe he acted

WASHINGTON STATE PATROL VIA AP

This surveillance image shows suspect Arcan Cetin, 20, accused of a shooting rampage Friday at the Cascade Mall in Burlington, Wash.

alone. The weapon was recovered at the scene. The identities of the victims — four women who ranged in age from a teenager to a senior citizen — were withheld pending autopsies and notification of family. The identity of the man who was fatally shot was also withheld and may not be released until Monday. “Probably one of the most difficult moments for us last night was knowing that there

were family members wondering about their loved ones in there,” Cammock said. As police scrambled throughout the day Saturday to find the shooter, the small city about 60 miles north of Seattle settled into a new and nerve-racking reality. The community of 8,600 people is too far from Seattle to be a commuter town, but its population swells to 55,000 during the day because of a

popular outlet mall, retail stores and other businesses. Burlington is the only major retail center within 30 miles in a region where agriculture is king, said Linda Jones, president of the Burlington Chamber of Commerce. Residents relied on those bonds Saturday to comfort each other at a community gathering in a city park. “It’s too scary. It’s too close to home,” said Maria Elena Vasquez, who attended the gathering with her husband and two young children. Those who survived were still trying to process what happened as their community became the latest entry on a list of places known by the rest of world for mass shootings. As the shots rang out, shoppers hid in dressing rooms and bathrooms and made hushed, terrified phone calls to relatives. Joanne Burkholder, 19, of nearby Mount Vernon, was watching the movie “The Magnificent Seven” in the mall’s theater when security guards came in and told them to evacuate immediately. Dozens of panicked moviegoers gathered in the hallway, and Burkholder heard screaming as the oicers escorted them to safety in a parking lot. As she drove home later, she had to pull over because she was shaking so hard, she told The Associated Press. “I’m just very thankful for my life this morning. I’ve never been so terrified in my life,” she said Saturday, trying to hold back tears as she attended a community vigil. “You’d think it would happen in Everett or Seattle, but a small town of Burlington, I’d never dream something like this would happen.” Emergency management officials started to allow some people to retrieve their vehicles Saturday, though the mall was shuttered through Monday morning.

Suicidal man prompts standof in San Francisco • A police standof with an armed and suicidal man led authorities to evacuate San Francisco’s Civic Center and a public square on Saturday as negotiators tried to talk him down. The man called 911 at noon to say he was going to harm himself or any oicer who got close, police spokesman Carlos Manfredi said. Negotiators who made contact with the man at United Nations Plaza reported seeing a handgun in his pocket, he said. They began talking to the man, who appeared to be in his 40s, as the area around City Hall was emptied of pedestrians and motorists. Police were also trying to talk to the man’s family to understand his mental history, he added. E. coli blamed for illnesses • The Centers for Disease Control says a multistate outbreak of E. coli has sickened seven people, sending ive to the hospital. The CDC said Saturday that the outbreak of E. coli, which can cause intestinal illnesses, likely is linked to beef products from Adams Farms Slaughterhouse in Athol, Mass. People ages 1 to 74 have become sick. They’re from Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The CDC says ive people said they’d eaten ground beef in the week before getting sick. Tests conirmed E. coli. The CDC says Adams Farm Slaughterhouse on Saturday recalled beef, veal and bison products. Dartmouth gets a whif of loral success • A lower that got its nickname from its putrid smell is blooming at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire for the irst time since 2011. Named Morphy, the titan arum — or corpse lower — began opening Friday at the Ivy League college’s greenhouse. The 7½-foot lower is set to collapse Sunday. Dartmouth greenhouse manager Kim DeLong said its odor has been described as a cross between a decaying animal and urine. DeLong plans to pollinate the endangered lower to share seeds and pollen. New name, hardware for Snapchat • Social media app Snapchat is introducing videorecording glasses called Spectacles and is changing its company name to incorporate the new product. The glasses can record video 10 seconds at a time by tapping a button on the device. The glasses will be available in the U.S. in the fall on a limited basis and cost $130. The company says it’s changing its name to Snap Inc. since it now has more than one product. The app will retain the name Snapchat. Iowa braces for more looding • Volunteers illed sandbags and homeowners began moving things out of basements on Saturday, and one town evacuated about 100 homes in preparation for looding along the Cedar River in Iowa. The river is expected to crest Tuesday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa’s second-largest city, with a population of about 130,000. But with more rain expected Saturday night, oicials there warned people to evacuate areas of the city near the river by 8 p.m. Sunday. Just upriver in the small town of Palo, about 100 homes in low-lying areas were evacuated Saturday. City Clerk Trisca Dix told The Associated Press that the mandatory evacuation in the town of about 1,000 took place Saturday afternoon before the river was expected to crest Sunday night at 24.5 feet. From news services


09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

EMMY WINS BY NETWORK

18 NETFLIX 9 PBS 8 FOX 7 AMAZON 6 NBC 6 ABC 4 A&E 4 ADULT SWIM 4 COMEDY CENTRAL 4 CARTOON NETWORK 4 CBS 3 AMC 2 CNN 2 CW 2 NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CHANNEL 2 SHOWTIME 2 USA 2 BBC AMERICA 1 NICKELODEON 1 STARZ 1

“FX HAS BUILT ITSELF INTO THE MOST EXCITING NETWORK ON TELEVISION” –ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Keep tabs on crime trends in St. Louis city • stltoday.com/crimetracker

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NATION

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Prescription painkillers more widely used than tobacco, federal study inds BY CHRISTOPHER INGRAHAM Washington Post

More than one in three American adults — 35 percent — were given painkiller prescriptions by medical providers last year. The total rate of painkiller use is even higher — 38 percent — when you factor in the number of adults who got painkillers for misuse via other means, from friends or relatives, or via drug dealers. These numbers come from a recent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration report that highlights the stunning ubiquity of prescription painkillers in modern American life. The report indicates that in 2015, more American adults used prescription painkillers than used cigarettes, smokeless tobacco or cigars — combined. Most painkiller use isn’t misuse, which SAMHSA defines as any use of painkillers in a manner not directed by a doctor. This can include taking painkillers without a prescription for the purpose of getting high, or taking the drugs for a longer period of time or at a higher quantity than recommended by a doctor. Indeed, part of painkillers’ prevalence is because of how efective they are, and the difference they can make in the lives of pain sufferers. It’s hard to imagine recovering from an invasive surgery without having something to treat the residual pain, for instance. And for many people afflicted with chronic pain, proper management with prescription painkillers can mean the difference between debilitating illness and daily functioning. But many prescription painkillers are highly habit-forming, and they can be deadly if taken at high doses, or in conjunction with other drugs such as alcohol. In 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control, opioid painkillers killed nearly 19,000 Americans. That’s greater than the total number of Americans (15,809) who were murdered that year. Those numbers are so high partly because Americans have developed a voracious appetite for painkillers in recent years. A 2008 study estimated that Americans consume roughly 80 percent of the global opioid supply, and 99 percent of the supply of hydrocodone, one of the most p o p u l a r p re sc r i p t i o n painkillers. A recent investigation by the Center for Public Integrity and the Associated Press detailed the intense lobbying efforts pharmaceutical companies have made to keep these drugs lightly regulated and readily available. The investigation found that when it comes to lobbying, pro-painkiller groups outspend groups arguing for tighter restrictions by more than 200 to 1. There are examples of pharmaceutical companies engaging in unscrupulous or illegal behavior to promote opioid drugs. In 2007, Purdue Pharma, maker of Oxycontin, plead guilty to charges that it misled regulators and doctors about the abuse potential of the drug. More recently, employees at Insys Therapeutics, a manufacturer of the powerful painkiller fentanyl, plead guilty to charges involving kickback schemes for fentanyl sales. The company remains the target of numerous state and federal investigations. SAMHSA’s latest numbers indicate that painkillers are still widespread despite recent federal efforts to impose tighter restrictions on their prescription and use. It’s unclear whether the 38 percent of adults using painkillers last year represents an increase or a decrease

over previous years, because SAMHSA only recently added a battery of detailed prescription drug use questions to its annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Reducing the scope of the opioid epidemic has been a priority for President Barack Obama. Earlier this year the White House requested $1.1 billion from Congress for fighting opioid addiction. But critics have argued that Drug Enforcement

Administration policies — some long-standing, some new — are undercutting federal efforts to curb opioid abuse. For instance, earlier this year, the DEA refused to reduce restrictions on marijuana use, arguing that there was insuicient evidence of marijuana’s medical benefits. Multiple studies have found that access to medical marijuana is associated with reductions in prescription painkiller abuse and over-

dose rates. More recently, the DEA announced a plan to ban the use of kratom, a southeast Asian plant with opiate-like qualities. Many users of kratom report that the plant has helped them quit using more powerful prescription painkillers. Researchers are worried that without kratom available to them, these users will return to prescription painkillers or move on to heroin.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hydrocodone and acetaminophen tablets, also known as Vicodin. Many prescription painkillers are highly habitforming, and they can be deadly if taken at high doses, or in conjunction with other drugs such as alcohol. In 2014, according to the CDC, opioid painkillers killed nearly 19,000 Americans. That’s greater than the total number of Americans (15,809) who were murdered that year.

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4

2

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799

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12 MONTHS

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ELLISVILLE

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1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

2801 Veteran Memorial Pkwy (Regency Plaza)

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

STORE HOURS FRI 9-9 • SAT 9-6 SUN 12-5 • MON 9-6

www.EdwardsCarpet.com

*Previous sales excluded. On Approved Credit, 1/3 deposit required, minimum payment. See Store for full details.


LOCAL

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Illinois girl, her infant son found in West Virginia Stepfather is taken into custody; children reported in good condition BY DENISE HOLLINSHED AND TIM O’NEIL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Katherine Derleth, the 13-yearold who police say was abducted by her stepfather from the Edwardsville area last week along with her infant son, has been found in a rural area of West Virginia near Charleston. Officers found the girl, her

son and the girl’s stepfather, Christopher M. Derleth, about 1:30 p.m. Saturday shortly after a tip was Christopher M. called in, acDerleth co rd i n g to Kanawha County Sheriff’s Sgt. Brian Humphreys. The elder Derleth was arrested. He will remain in West Virginia pending extradition, the Madison County Sherif’s Oice said. The Charleston Gazette-Mail reported the girl and her threeweek-old son were in good condition at a hospital where they

were taken for examination. Madison County deputies were with federal marshals and West Virginia police when Derleth and the children were found. Humphreys said the break came when Derleth used his credit card at the convenience store near Cabin Creek on Friday. Cabin Creek is a small community on the Kanawha River, outside the Charleston metro area. Charleston is about 500 miles east of St. Louis. WCHS-TV in Charleston reported the three were found in a remote campsite near Kayford, a mining community about 10 miles south of Cabin Creek that is dotted with strip mines.

The girl and her son disappeared last weekend. Shortly after, Derleth, 39, was charged in Madison County with aggravated kidnapping and child abduction. His minivan was spotted in West Virginia last Sunday, a few hours after a court-appointed guardian near Edwardsville realized the 13-year-old and her son were missing. Officials believe they were taken early last Sunday. They were last seen in the guardian’s home Saturday night. On Thursday, Madison County Sherif John Lakin released medical information on Katherine Derleth to underscore investigators’ concern for her health. She has a congenital heart defect re-

quiring a pacemaker. Equipment to monitor the pacemaker was found in Granite City, where the elder Derleth had an address. The teen delivered her son by cesarean section and was still under a doctor’s care for the surgery, Lakin said. Two weeks before the baby was born, the elder Derleth was named in a protection order barring him from seeing his stepdaughter pending a criminal investigation in Bond County. Derleth also had a residence in Greenville in Bond County; the stepdaughter lived with him before the Aug. 16 protection order.

Car plows into onlookers at homecoming parade in Hazelwood BY DENISE HOLLINSHED AND ASHLEY JOST St. Louis Post-dispatch

HAZELWOOD • Police say

several people were injured Saturday morning when a vehicle spun out of control and into onlookers waiting for the start of the Hazelwood West High School homecoming parade. None of the injuries was life-threatening, according to Hazelwood police. The exact number of people transported to local hospitals was unknown. The incident occurred about 9:45 a.m. near the intersection of Howdershell Road and Lynn Haven Lane when a 2001 Ford Mustang spun out of control after striking a second vehicle. Police took the 17-yearold driver of the Mustang into custody and charged him with careless and imprudent driving and second-degree assault. The accident is under investigation by the Hazelwood police traic unit.

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Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

LUXURY VINYL TILE Reg.

Federal grant to pay for repairs at Lincoln’s law oice ASSOCIATED PRESS

S P R I N G F I E L D, I L L . •

Federal money will pay for restoration work at Abraham Lincoln’s law oice in Springfield. The $166,000 grant will fund work on the deteriorating facade, window repairs and new doors, among other improvements, according to the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency. The Lincoln Herndon Law Oices closed after Labor Day 2014 for what was expected to be a $1.1 million restoration, including the re-creation of a Tinsley Dry Goods store on the bottom floor. The project was one of dozens statewide that were stalled by the state budget impasse. Justin Blandford, superintendent of Springfield historic sites for the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, said the grant will at least pay for repairs needed to reopen the site. “This is the highest priority work for that particular site right now,” Blandford told the State JournalRegister. The rest of the overall restoration project depends on approval of a state capital bill. The agency’s project reviewer, Darius Bryjka, said a variety of historical sources were used as the basis for the restoration design because there weren’t any photos from the era. “There was an advertisement for the S.M. Tinsley Building, a woodcut that was published in the late 1840s,” Bryjka said. “It showed the signs that were painted on the building. That’s the primary evidence that we have.”

699

sq. ft.

Now

4 $499 $ 99

sq. ft.

INSTALLED

60 OZ CARPET

TEXTURED CARPET 20 YR WARRANTY Reg. 99

4

2

$ 99 Now sq. ft.

Reg.

sq. ft.

INCLUDES 8 lb Pad AND Installation

799

sq. ft.

Now

sq. ft.

INCLUDES 8 lb Pad AND Installation

12 MONTHS

FREE

FINANCING!* Removal of regular carpet and furniture moving FREE!

A portion of every sq ft of looring we sell will go to the A.R.C. Angels Foundation to prevent teen suicide. CREVE COEUR

ELLISVILLE

SOUTH COUNTY

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

2801 Veteran Memorial Pkwy (Regency Plaza)

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

STORE HOURS FRI 9-9 • SAT 9-6 SUN 12-5 • MON 9-6

www.EdwardsCarpet.com

*Previous sales excluded. On Approved Credit, 1/3 deposit required, minimum payment. See Store for full details.


LOCAL

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 3

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Illinois girl, her infant son found in West Virginia Stepfather is taken into custody; children reported in good condition BY DENISE HOLLINSHED AND TIM O’NEIL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Katherine Derleth, the 13-yearold who police say was abducted by her stepfather from the Edwardsville area last week along with her infant son, has been found in a rural area of West Virginia near Charleston. Officers found the girl, her

son and the girl’s stepfather, Christopher M. Derleth, about 1:30 p.m. Saturday shortly after a tip was Christopher M. called in, acDerleth co rd i n g to Kanawha County Sheriff’s Sgt. Brian Humphreys. The elder Derleth was arrested. He will remain in West Virginia pending extradition, the Madison County Sherif’s Oice said. The Charleston Gazette-Mail reported the girl and her threeweek-old son were in good condition at a hospital where they

were taken for examination. Madison County deputies were with federal marshals and West Virginia police when Derleth and the children were found. Humphreys said the break came when Derleth used his credit card at the convenience store near Cabin Creek on Friday. Cabin Creek is a small community on the Kanawha River, outside the Charleston metro area. Charleston is about 500 miles east of St. Louis. WCHS-TV in Charleston reported the three were found in a remote campsite near Kayford, a mining community about 10 miles south of Cabin Creek that is dotted with strip mines.

The girl and her son disappeared last weekend. Shortly after, Derleth, 39, was charged in Madison County with aggravated kidnapping and child abduction. His minivan was spotted in West Virginia last Sunday, a few hours after a court-appointed guardian near Edwardsville realized the 13-year-old and her son were missing. Officials believe they were taken early last Sunday. They were last seen in the guardian’s home Saturday night. On Thursday, Madison County Sherif John Lakin released medical information on Katherine Derleth to underscore investigators’ concern for her health. She has a congenital heart defect re-

quiring a pacemaker. Equipment to monitor the pacemaker was found in Granite City, where the elder Derleth had an address. The teen delivered her son by cesarean section and was still under a doctor’s care for the surgery, Lakin said. Two weeks before the baby was born, the elder Derleth was named in a protection order barring him from seeing his stepdaughter pending a criminal investigation in Bond County. Derleth also had a residence in Greenville in Bond County; the stepdaughter lived with him before the Aug. 16 protection order.

Car plows into onlookers at homecoming parade in Hazelwood BY DENISE HOLLINSHED AND ASHLEY JOST St. Louis Post-dispatch

HAZELWOOD • Police say

several people were injured Saturday morning when a vehicle spun out of control and into onlookers waiting for the start of the Hazelwood West High School homecoming parade. None of the injuries was life-threatening, according to Hazelwood police. The exact number of people transported to local hospitals was unknown. The incident occurred about 9:45 a.m. near the intersection of Howdershell Road and Lynn Haven Lane when a 2001 Ford Mustang spun out of control after striking a second vehicle. Police took the 17-yearold driver of the Mustang into custody and charged him with careless and imprudent driving and second-degree assault. The accident is under investigation by the Hazelwood police traic unit.

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Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

LUXURY VINYL TILE Reg.

Federal grant set for repairs at Lincoln site S P R I N G F I E L D, I L L . •

LAW & ORDER St. Louis County > Fire guts condos, but no injuries reported • Fire destroyed four units and damaged several others early Saturday in a condominium complex at Reavis Barracks Road and Interstate 55. Authorities said the fire broke out about 2:30 a.m. at the the Southridge Condomium in the 10000 block of Echoridge Lane. No one was injured, but several residents were awakened by firefighters knocking on their doors. The fire gutted some units, and smoke and water damaged six or eight more, authorities said. Affton Fire Protection District was assisted by several nearby suburban departments and the St. Louis Fire Department.

sq. ft.

Now

4 $499 $ 99

sq. ft.

INSTALLED

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Federal money will pay for restoration work at Abraham Lincoln’s law oice. The $166,000 grant will fund work on the deteriorating facade, window repairs and new doors, according to the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency. The Lincoln Herndon Law Offices closed after Labor Day 2014 for what was expected to be a $1.1 million restoration. The project was one of dozens statewide stalled by the state budget impasse. Justin Blandford, superintendent of Springfield historic sites for the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, said the grant will at least pay for repairs needed to reopen the site.

699

60 OZ CARPET

TEXTURED CARPET 20 YR WARRANTY Reg. 99

4

2

$ 99 Now sq. ft.

Reg.

sq. ft.

INCLUDES 8 lb Pad AND Installation

799

sq. ft.

Now

sq. ft.

INCLUDES 8 lb Pad AND Installation

12 MONTHS

FREE

FINANCING!* Removal of regular carpet and furniture moving FREE!

A portion of every sq ft of looring we sell will go to the A.R.C. Angels Foundation to prevent teen suicide. CREVE COEUR

ELLISVILLE

SOUTH COUNTY

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

2801 Veteran Memorial Pkwy (Regency Plaza)

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

STORE HOURS FRI 9-9 • SAT 9-6 SUN 12-5 • MON 9-6

www.EdwardsCarpet.com

*Previous sales excluded. On Approved Credit, 1/3 deposit required, minimum payment. See Store for full details.


LOCAL

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 4

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Illinois girl, her infant son found in West Virginia Stepfather is taken into custody; children reported in good condition BY DENISE HOLLINSHED AND TIM O’NEIL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Katherine Derleth, the 13-yearold who police say was abducted by her stepfather from the Edwardsville area last week along with her infant son, has been found in a rural area of West Virginia near Charleston. Officers found the girl, her

son and the girl’s stepfather, Christopher M. Derleth, about 1:30 p.m. Saturday shortly after a tip was Christopher M. called in, acDerleth co rd i n g to Kanawha County Sheriff’s Sgt. Brian Humphreys. The elder Derleth was arrested. He will remain in West Virginia pending extradition, the Madison County Sherif’s Oice said. The Charleston Gazette-Mail reported the girl and her threeweek-old son were in good condition at a hospital where they

were taken for examination. Madison County deputies were with federal marshals and West Virginia police when Derleth and the children were found. Humphreys said the break came when Derleth used his credit card at the convenience store near Cabin Creek on Friday. Cabin Creek is a small community on the Kanawha River, outside the Charleston metro area. Charleston is about 500 miles east of St. Louis. WCHS-TV in Charleston reported the three were found in a remote campsite near Kayford, a mining community about 10 miles south of Cabin Creek that is dotted with strip mines.

The girl and her son disappeared last weekend. Shortly after, Derleth, 39, was charged in Madison County with aggravated kidnapping and child abduction. His minivan was spotted in West Virginia last Sunday, a few hours after a court-appointed guardian near Edwardsville realized the 13-year-old and her son were missing. Officials believe they were taken early last Sunday. They were last seen in the guardian’s home Saturday night. On Thursday, Madison County Sherif John Lakin released medical information on Katherine Derleth to underscore investigators’ concern for her health. She has a congenital heart defect re-

quiring a pacemaker. Equipment to monitor the pacemaker was found in Granite City, where the elder Derleth had an address. The teen delivered her son by cesarean section and was still under a doctor’s care for the surgery, Lakin said. Two weeks before the baby was born, the elder Derleth was named in a protection order barring him from seeing his stepdaughter pending a criminal investigation in Bond County. Derleth also had a residence in Greenville in Bond County; the stepdaughter lived with him before the Aug. 16 protection order.

Car plows into onlookers at homecoming parade in Hazelwood BY DENISE HOLLINSHED AND ASHLEY JOST St. Louis Post-dispatch

HAZELWOOD • Police say

several people were injured Saturday morning when a vehicle spun out of control and into onlookers waiting for the start of the Hazelwood West High School homecoming parade. None of the injuries was life-threatening, according to Hazelwood police. The exact number of people transported to local hospitals was unknown. The incident occurred about 9:45 a.m. near the intersection of Howdershell Road and Lynn Haven Lane when a 2001 Ford Mustang spun out of control after striking a second vehicle. Police took the 17-yearold driver of the Mustang into custody and charged him with careless and imprudent driving and second-degree assault. The accident is under investigation by the Hazelwood police traic unit.

FALL FLOORING SALE

e v Sa 40% % 20 Off! WOOD LOOK

Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

LUXURY VINYL TILE Reg.

LAW & ORDER St. Louis County > Fire guts condos, but no injuries reported • Fire destroyed four units and damaged several others early Saturday in a condominium complex at Reavis Barracks Road and Interstate 55. Authorities said the ire broke out about 2:30 a.m. at the Southridge Condomium in the 10000 block of Echoridge Lane. No one was injured, but several residents were awakened by ireighters. The ire gutted some units, and smoke and water damaged six or eight more. Afton Fire Protection District was assisted by several nearby suburban departments and the St. Louis Fire Department. St. Louis > Man rescued from house ire • Fireighters searching a house ire Saturday night found a resident in a basement living room and rescued him, a spokesman said. Fire that broke out about 9:40 p.m. heavily damaged the rear of a one-story frame home in the 5400 block of Elizabeth Avenue in The Hill neighborhood. The victim was conscious and was taken to a hospital for treatment, a department spokesman said. The victim, a middle-aged man, sufered injuries that were not considered lifethreatening, the spokesman said. The ire was quickly extinguished. WARSAW, MO. > Man gets life in girl’s murder • A 51-year-old Springield man already in prison on drug charges has been sentenced to life for killing a 15-yearold girl and dumping her body in Truman Lake. Anthony Balbirnie, 51, had previously been found guilty of second-degree murder, statutory rape and other charges in the 2012 death of Khighla Parks.

699

sq. ft.

Now

4 $499 $ 99

sq. ft.

INSTALLED

60 OZ CARPET

TEXTURED CARPET 20 YR WARRANTY Reg. 99

4

2

$ 99 Now sq. ft.

Reg.

sq. ft.

INCLUDES 8 lb Pad AND Installation

799

sq. ft.

Now

sq. ft.

INCLUDES 8 lb Pad AND Installation

12 MONTHS

FREE

FINANCING!* Removal of regular carpet and furniture moving FREE!

A portion of every sq ft of looring we sell will go to the A.R.C. Angels Foundation to prevent teen suicide. CREVE COEUR

ELLISVILLE

SOUTH COUNTY

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

2801 Veteran Memorial Pkwy (Regency Plaza)

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

STORE HOURS FRI 9-9 • SAT 9-6 SUN 12-5 • MON 9-6

www.EdwardsCarpet.com

*Previous sales excluded. On Approved Credit, 1/3 deposit required, minimum payment. See Store for full details.


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

We flipped when we heard the news. Now Voted America’s Top Free Attraction. When we got the great news, all of us at the Saint Louis Zoo could hardly contain ourselves. There were claps, barks and backflips galore. This is a big splash for the St. Louis area. In a nationwide poll, visitors, readers and travel experts voted for our Saint Louis Zoo— the only zoo nominated—from a list of over 20 popular free attractions across the USA. Quite an honor, if we do say so, ourselves. Of course, extraordinary recognition like this would not be possible without you. All the taxpayers, friends, members, donors, volunteers and employees whose support through the years has helped make us a world-class, FREE zoo. So do a little flip of your own and join us in the celebration.

The Saint Louis Zoo. America’s Top Free Attraction.

stlzoo.org Paid for by the Saint Louis Zoo Association.


09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

Medicare is Complicated (We’re about to make it a whole lot simpler.) You no longer have to pay multiple premiums to multiple companies to get decent Medicare coverage.

In an All-in-One, $0 Premium plan from Essence Healthcare, you’ll get all the coverage you need including: Complete Hospital, Medical and Prescription Drug Coverage $0 Copays on Generic Medications* No Deductibles Extra beneits like Vision, Dental and Health Club Memberships at no added cost Added inancial protection NOT offered by Traditional Medicare plans

It’s that simple. Learn more at a FREE Communtiy Meeting! Find out more about all the savings and beneits available to you through a $0 Premium plan from Essence Healthcare in a casual setting with a group of your peers. Refreshments will be served.

Choose a date and location below and call 1-866-509-1265 to reserve your seat today! Monday, October 3, 2016 10:00 AM Bully’s Smokehouse 1280 Columbia Center Columbia, IL 62236

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:00 AM The Egg and I - O’Fallon 455-D Regency Park Dr. O Fallon, IL 62269

Thursday, October 6, 2016 3:00 PM Chris Pancake & Dining (Atrium Area) 5980 Southwest Ave. Saint Louis, MO 63139

Monday, October 3, 2016 11:30 AM Ponderosa - Arnold 3601 Jeffco Blvd. Arnold, MO 63010

Thursday, October 6, 2016 11:30 AM Brunswick Zone XL - St. Peters 8070 Veteran’s Memorial Pkwy. Saint Peters, MO 63376

Friday, October 7, 2016 11:00 AM Holiday Inn South 6921 S. Lindbergh Blvd. Saint Louis, MO 63125

You can also visit us at www.essencehealthcare.com Other community meetings may be available. Call for a complete schedule. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 1-866-509-1265 (TTY:711). Essence Healthcare is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Essence Healthcare depends on contract renewal. This information is not a complete description of beneits. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Beneits, premiums and/or copayments/co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. *At preferred Pharmacies. Essence Healthcare complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-866-597-9560 (TTY: 711). UWAGA: Jeżeli mówisz po polsku, możesz skorzystać z bezpłatnej pomocy językowej. Dzwoń pod numer 1-866-597-9560 (TTY: 711). Y0027_16-111_MK CMS Accepted 09/05/2016

CMS Accepted 00/00/0000


WORLD

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Britain tests ‘name blind’ university applications to ight bias BY RICK NOACK Washington Post

Britain’s higher education system is considered among the world’s best. At least if you have the right skin color, critics say. British universities have frequently been perceived as elitist — and sometimes as unjust. Pupils from state schools still are less likely to be accepted at betterranked universities than their peers who graduated from private schools. Whereas 23 percent of all black college applicants in Britain receive ofers from top universities, 55 percent of white applicants are successful, numbers released last year showed. Four British universities — situated in Exeter, Huddersfield, Liverpool and Winchester — have launched an experiment to try out “name blind” applications in an efort to tackle ethnic, religious or gender discrimination. It is the first such effort at British higher education institutions, although similar procedures are in place at multiple private and public enterprises. Organizers say that college recruiters may unconsciously be influenced by students’ names, drawing conclusions that prevent promising applicants from being offered spots. The four participating universities said they would continue to make other information — such as family income — available to recruiters.

The idea has been backed by the British Minister of Universities, Jo Johnson, who has said he welcomes eforts to “stamp out inequality,” according to the BBC. Last year, then-Prime Minister David Cameron announced that “name blind” university applications would become the new normal. “Two weeks ago, I spoke about a young black woman who had to put a more white-sounding name on her CV before she started getting called for interviews. Such racism in 21st-century Britain, I said, was a disgrace,” Cameron wrote in an op-ed for The Guardian newspaper. “The reasons are complex, but unconscious bias is clearly a risk. So we have agreed with UCAS that it will make its applications name-blind, too, from 2017,” Cameron announced. The initial plans were supposed to withhold all names until applicants were invited to an interview for a university spot. But UCAS — the organization which processes applications for undergraduate students — said in a response that the acceptance rate of black and ethnic minority group students had already increased by 64 percent between 2006 and 2014. Skepticism was shared by some British universities who warned that Cameron’s plans might backfire, eventually harming diversity on college campuses because anonymous applications would make it

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harder for recruiters to support students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Initial supporters of Cameron’s idea also raised concerns whether hiding names would be sufficient, as other information — such as the names and locations of schools in areas considered problematic — might give away specifics about the likely ethnic or religious backgrounds of applicants. Cameron reacted angrily to that criticism, saying earlier this year: “If you’re a young black man, you’re more likely to be in a prison cell than studying at a top

university.” His comments came after it was reported that out of 2,233 available spots at Oxford University, only 48 had been allocated to African, Caribbean or mixedbackground applicants in 2013. Cameron’s resignation as prime minister and past criticism of his plans by professors and heads of universities may make a rapid national implementation of the program unlikely. But the new pilot program’s universities can give the idea its first real-world test over the next few months.

Do you have medical equipment that is not being used? Do you need medical equipment?

Now there is HELP…

We accept donations of manual and power wheelchairs, electric hospital beds, shower chairs, canes/crutches/walkers, grab bars, elevated toilet seats, portable commodes, lift chairs, seating cushions, back supports, folding ramps - every type of item except oxygen and medications. St. Louis HELP loans the donated home medical items to anyone in need, at no cost or fee.

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT DONATION DRIVE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2016 9 AM through 2 PM Clean the attic, garage or basement and make a tax-deductible donation of your medical equipment at one of the designated Walgreen’s drop off locations on October 8th:

50% OFF (With purchase of any dinner entrée and two beverages)

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A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Black history museum called monument to pain, victory BY JESSE J. HOLLAND AND DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Black history oicially has a new, prominent place in the American story. With hugs, tears and the ringing of church bells, the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture opened its doors Saturday to help this nation understand, reconcile and celebrate African-Americans’ contributions toward making this country what it is today. President Barack Obama, the nation’s first black president, wiped away a tear as he opened the Smithsonian’s 19th museum with an impassioned speech on the National Mall. His audience included two former presidents, leaders from all branches of federal government, and first lady Michelle Obama, whose lineage has been traced back to slaves in the South. “This national museum helps to tell a richer and fuller story of who we are,” Obama said. “It helps us better understand the lives, yes, of the president, but also the slave. The industrialist, but also the porter; the keeper of the status quo, but also of the activist seeking to overthrow that status quo; the teacher or the cook, alongside the statesman. And by knowing this other story, we better under-

stand ourselves and each other.” Ground for the $540 million museum was broken in 2012 on a 5-acre tract near the Washington Monument. Millions contributed $315 million in private funds ahead of the opening. “It’s like walking across the desert and finally getting to a fountain of water to quench your thirst. It’s absolutely breathtaking for me,” said Verna Eggleston, 61, of New York City. The names of some big donors are on prominent spaces inside: Oprah Winfrey Theater; Michael Jordan Hall: Game Changers; and the Robert F. Smith Explore Your Family History Center, named for the CEO of Vista Equity Partners after a $20 million gift announced Monday. With exhibits ranging from the glasstopped casket used to bury lynching victim Emmett Till to a fedora owned by late pop superstar Michael Jackson, the museum helps to complete the American tale by incorporating highs and lows, triumph and trauma experienced by black Americans since the first African slaves arrived on this continent almost 400 years ago. “We’re not a burden on America, or a stain on America, or an object of pity or charity for America. We’re America,” Obama said. Obama was joined on stage by his predecessor, former President George W. Bush, who in 2003 signed legislation es-

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tablishing the museum, and John Lewis, a civil rights activist and longtime Democratic congressman who co-sponsored the bill. Bush, accompanied by his wife, Laura, said the museum tells the unvarnished truth, that a country founded on liberty once held millions of people in chains. Lewis, who is featured in the museum, said he could feel the weight of history around the site, with slave voices whispering of escape and choirs singing of freedom. “All their voices, roaming for centuries, have finally found their home here, in this

great monument to our pain, our sufering and our victory,” Lewis said. Also on hand were former President Bill Clinton, Chief Justice John Roberts and House Speaker Paul Ryan; celebrities including Winfrey, Robert De Niro, Will Smith, and Angela Bassett; and thousands of Americans who just wanted to witness the museum’s opening firsthand. The honor of helping open the doors went to Ruth Bonner, 99, daughter of a Mississippi slave who escaped to freedom. Inside, officials say, are nearly 3,000 items in 85,000 square feet of space.

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FROM A1

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11

Attorney general came through Democratic primary unscathed KOSTER • FROM A1

After cruising unscathed through the primary election season, Koster faces former Navy SEAL Eric Greitens on Nov. 8. Greitens, a newcomer to politics who had to fend of three well-financed opponents en route to winning the GOP contest in August, has campaigned hard on a message that change is needed in Jeferson City. Koster, by contrast, is betting that the outsider storyline of the 2016 campaign season is little more than a convenient narrative to explain primary wins by Republicans like Donald Trump and Greitens. “My view of what is happening in our nation and our state doesn’t buy into it. We are frustrated again with our political class,” said Koster, who has held political oice continuously for 22 years. “I think that there are politicians that are trying to stimulate the extremes of both parties. But I think that could have been stimulated by an insider or an outsider. “Eric with the machine gun ads kindled the same kind of far-right enthusiasm that Donald Trump was banging on,” Koster said. But, he said, “Someone has to know where the Department of Public Safety is. I don’t think that he (Greitens) has anywhere close to the background to understand what it means to be $500 million underwater at MoDOT.” Koster, 52, has been both an insider and an outsider in his more than two decades in politics. After serving as Cass County prosecutor from 1994 to 2004, he was elected to the Missouri Senate as a Republican and rose quickly into the leadership ranks. Within two years, he was plotting a bid for higher office. Koster, however, began to realize some of his positions no

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Attorney General Chris Koster (right) talks with Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon last month at the Governor’s Ham Breakfast at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia, Mo. Koster has held political oice continuously for 22 years.

longer fit the GOP mold. The seeds of his switch began in the state Senate during a debate on legislation that would make a certain form of embryonic stem cell research a felony worth five to 15 years in prison. He filibustered against the measure, putting him in the crosshairs of anti-abortion forces in the Capitol. “It created a rift with Missouri Right to Life that was never going to heal,” Koster said. A second sticking point among his Republican colleagues was his support of labor. “I would routinely work with Democrats when I was in Republican leadership to protect collective bargaining rights, to protect prevailing wage

laws, to filibuster right-towork,” Koster said. His jump to the Democratic Party sent shockwaves through state government. “It really surprised me,” said state Rep. Kevin Engler, R-Farmington, who served with Koster in the Senate. “For the most part, his voting record was pretty conservative. But the abortion thing was not typical. And he was prolabor. You’re not going to describe him as some leftwing nut.” Koster now describes himself as a “Conservative Democrat” who, soon after the primary season ended, surprised political observers by winning key endorsements from the Missouri Farm Bureau and the National Rifle Associa-

tion, two groups that have traditionally favored GOP candidates. With Missouri’s two large urban areas expected to stay on the Democratic side of the ledger in November, the support from the agricultural community and the NRA could help Koster outduel Greitens in the traditionally Republican rural areas of the state. Longtime Koster friend Chuck Hatfield, a Jeferson City attorney, said Koster’s curiosity and his wide circle of friends and advisers may have helped him nail down the endorsements. “He always likes to pick people’s brains,” Hatfield said. “I think Chris has been talking to those folks for years. Chris is not afraid to go in and talk to

anybody.” On labor, Koster is strongly opposed to Republican-led efforts to impose a right-to-work law he says would weaken unions and hurt families. Speaking to 2,000 delegates attending the recent International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers national conference in St. Louis, Koster delivered a passionate 10-minute speech outlining the perils of electing a Republican governor to go with a Republican-controlled Legislature. “Right-to-work is designed to divide and dismantle unions,” he told the crowd. Under a right-to-work law, no person can be compelled to join or not join a union or to pay dues to a

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labor union. “The goal is to reduce wages in the United States of America,” Koster added. But Koster also has roiled some from his party by disagreeing with Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon on a handful of high-profile issues. On a controversial voteridentification proposal vetoed by Nixon, Koster said the changes negotiated by Democrats after numerous filibusters made it more palatable. To the dismay of some of his Democratic counterparts from Missouri’s urban areas, he also said he wouldn’t have vetoed Senate Bill 656, which would loosen the state’s gun law laws by allowing people to carry loaded weapons with first getting a permit or undergoing training. Those disagreements, said union electrician Gary McKay of St. Louis, are actually what make Koster an attractive candidate. “It makes me think he’s even-minded,” McKay said after Koster’s speech. Just as he switched parties, Koster also says he would vote differently on a number of issues now than he did when he was a member of the Senate. In 2005, he voted against a Medicaid expansion proposal, denying 100,000 poor people access to the health care program. Now he’s running ads touting his support for expanding the government-funded health care program for the poor in order to leverage as much as $2 billion in federal aid for the program. “I would not vote for the Medicaid cuts again,” Koster said. In 2008, he voted to remove campaign contribution limits. Now, in an age where Greitens received a $1.975 million contribution during his successful primary run, Koster regrets that vote. If elected, he wants to raise the gas tax to boost spending on road repairs and construction. And, he decries the state of school funding in Missouri, saying it will take cuts in other parts of state government to boost spending on education. “It’s an outrage,” he said. “The hole that has been dug is profound.” He did not say precisely what he would cut in order to divert more money to schools, but suggested the reductions would be felt throughout state government. “We’ll get in there and figure it out. It will not be easy,” Koster said. After eight sometimes tense years between Republicans in the House and Senate and their Democratic chief executive, Koster said his positions on some issues will help him better deal with lawmakers. In addition, he said he would be less formal than Nixon in hopes of forging cooperation with lawmakers. “I think the temperature of the executive branch needs to be lowered,” Koster said. “My hope is to make the role of the chief executive a bit more approachable, a bit less formal.” To get there, Koster must first beat Greitens. Since the Aug. 2 primary, he has kept a limited public schedule, favoring the private fundraising circuit in preparation for a financial onslaught by Republicans looking to pick up a governor’s seat as the term-limited Nixon leaves oice. Along with touting his experience, Koster is hoping he has crossover appeal from the agriculture community and NRA members. Engler, for one, is among those who acknowledges experience is important when it comes to running state government. “That’s not to say you can’t get experience in other areas,” said Engler, who was once a Democrat. “But I’ve seen incompetent people on both sides of the aisle.” Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

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A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 1 • SUNDAY • 09.25.2016

Legacy Health Systems was founded in 1938 NURSING HOME • FROM A1

employee was seen trying to make a smoothie from seven pieces of dry toast. Missouri state health oicials went to court in July to put the nursing home into emergency receivership. They backed down when food deliveries resumed. But at a follow-up visit in August, inspectors found that four residents were not getting medicines they needed for congestive heart failure, epilepsy and schizophrenia because the pharmacy bills hadn’t been paid in months. Finally, on Sept. 13, the state took the rare step of closing the nursing home after relocating 60 residents to other facilities. “It was just a disaster,” said Ann Bickel of the Missouri Coalition for Quality Care, which advocates for residents in nursing homes. “Some nursing homes aren’t as clean, some don’t have as much staf as we’d like them to have, and there is abuse sometimes. But to this extent, I have never heard of this.” It was an ignominious defeat for the home’s owner Legacy Health Systems, a Chesterfieldbased family business established in 1938 in southeast Missouri by Clara Sells that had expanded to a $100 million company with 2,000 patients and 1,600 employees in 27 facilities across Missouri, Kentucky and Tennessee before its collapse. In recent years, Legacy sold almost all of its assets or had them seized by creditors. The Festus location was one of three homes left in the company’s portfolio; about 200 residents live at its two remaining facilities in Sikeston and Puryear, Tenn. Last week, the grandson of Clara Sells, Legacy president John Sells, 52, and his small staf were packing up their oice near Spirit of St. Louis Airport before the bank takes it at the end of the month. A reporter walked into a discussion about how to secure 800 boxes of patient files. Sells lamented it wasn’t so long ago that his was the turnaround company, swooping in to take over and repair struggling nursing homes. He insisted Legacy had always taken good care of its residents, even during its financial troubles. One of those patients was his own father, Connie Mac Sells, who died in April at age 79 at the company’s nursing home in Matthews, Mo. Sells was at a loss to explain how things got so bad in Festus. “I’ve spent days walking through that whole process and trying to figure out exactly where the breakdown was,” said Sells. “And I don’t have an answer. I wish I did. I’ve done this all my life; this is all I’ve ever done.”

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

A view of a resident’s room inside the Benchmark Healthcare nursing home on Highway TT in Festus on Sept. 13, the day the state closed the home. According to inspection reports, the facility was not providing enough food and was violating minimum standards for cleanliness and care.

moved in with an adult daughter from a previous marriage. Sells said on Aug. 1, Close to Home’s transfer to a new owner became final. That night, according to prosecutors in St. Charles County, at a town house in St. Peters, he slammed his girlfriend through a glass cofee table and exposed his genitals to her 12-year-old son. He also left a firearm unsecured in the house; it was located under the boy’s bed. Sells was charged with domestic assault and sexual misconduct; the charges are pending. He is due to appear in court on Nov. 17. “I’ve never been in trouble except for drinking and driving,” he said. “I didn’t beat anybody, OK? I locked somebody out of the house, and it was the same day as the foreclosure sale.”

NEGLECT IN FESTUS An oice is seen inside the Benchmark Healthcare nursing home in Festus on Sept. 13, the day it closed. Benchmark’s owner, Legacy Health Systems, has been sued by a pharmacy, therapy provider and food service provider for allegedly not paying for services.

NURSING HOME RESOURCES • To check inspection reports for nursing homes, visit health.mo.gov/safety/ showmelongtermcare/ • The state’s adult abuse and neglect hotline is 1-800-392-0210.

FAMILY BUSINESS One picture was still hanging in Legacy’s foyer last week. It was of Annie Sells, Clara’s daughterin-law, John’s mother, who took over the family business in the 1960s. In 1971, she built Sells Rest Home in Matthews, about 10 miles south of Sikeston. Annie and Connie Sells had two boys, Johnny Mac and Ronnie Lee. Matthews was the family’s home base — they renamed it to Close To Home Nursing Center. Annie Sells expanded the Sells brand to 15 nursing homes before she retired in 1999 and moved to Arizona. Ronnie moved with her and said he agreed to sell his share of the business to his brother. John Sells took over as president that year and sold all but the Matthews home. Then he rebuilt the franchise by taking over other nursing home chains. He borrowed millions of dollars to expand, and entered longterm contracts with suppliers of food, drugs and therapy services. “Nothing is greater than a person’s right to live comfortably and contentedly in a friendly, caring environment, regardless of their special needs or aliction,” Sells told the Missourian in 2012. Sells said it all fell apart starting in the first quarter of 2014. That’s when his company discovered that its payroll contractor had, for several years, stolen from them by failing to turn payroll taxes over to the IRS. Brad Ferguson, the president of Paymaster Payroll Services, was ordered to make more than $3 million in restitution to dozens of victims. More than $800,000 was to be returned to Sells, who said that was just the amount the government believed it could recover from Ferguson. Sells said his losses were $1.8 million

Food is stored at Benchmark Healthcare nursing home on Sept. 13. At a visit in July, state inspectors found empty freezers and one day’s worth of food in storage. The state requires three days’ worth of perishable food and seven days’ worth of nonperishable food. Residents complained to state health inspectors that they were hungry. The nursing home’s employees said they spent their own money or food stamps to provide food to Benchmark’s residents.

and that he personally owes $1.1 million to the Internal Revenue Service. Paying back the IRS made it diicult to pay the bills, he said. Court records indicate that the company’s problems paying bills started earlier. A lawsuit from an insurance company alleged that Sells had taken out a policy in January 2013 to cover the company for workers compensation claims, but never paid the $62,000 premium while he rang up $493,000 in claims. The sides agreed to settle for $73,000 in April 2016.

A pharmacy claimed in a September 2013 lawsuit that Sells’ nursing homes owed nearly $2 million; the case was settled confidentially. Another suit filed in February 2014 alleged that Sells’ nursing homes were $900,000 in arrears for therapy goods and services. The nursing homes were ordered to pay that amount. A food service provider claimed in federal court that Sells’ companies owed it $900,000 by May 2014; the case was settled for an undisclosed amount. David Zigenhorn, owner of Garage Door Co. of Sikeston

knew the Sells family by reputation and didn’t require a deposit when he installed fire shutters at Heritage Gardens, a Legacy nursing home in Sikeston, in November 2014. “Sometimes I’m too trusting a soul with people I know who I don’t expect to have a problem with,” he said. “I never had this problem with John before. We’ve been in business 32 years, living in the same town there.” But Sells did not pay his $6,500 bill, according to a lawsuit filed in New Madrid County in December 2015. Even Ronnie Sells sued John Sells, claiming his brother still owed him $3.2 million for his shares of the family business. The brothers settled the dispute. In a brief interview, Ronnie said he and his brother were now “quite cohesive.” In August 2015, Sells hired a woman named Toni Travis to run the nursing home in Festus. Within days, she was complaining about paychecks bouncing and unpaid bills that threatened to disconnect gas service. Most troubling, she said, was that Sells wrote a check to himself for $68,000 from patient accounts. In a lawsuit filed in St. Louis County Circuit Court, Travis claimed Sells fired her in retaliation. The suit was settled for $50,000. Sells said the check wasn’t made out to him, and he was moving patient money from one bank account to another. Problems began to avalanche by late 2015. Great Southern Bank took Sells to court in October, claiming he and his companies had failed to pay back $6.2 million in loans. The bank seized four nursing homes, including Close to Home. Sells said the stress was hard on his marriage. He and his wife, Maria, divorced last fall. She got the house in Chesterfield. He

Meanwhile, problems mounted in Festus. Former staff members described a bleak arrangement where residents were given watered-down soup and stale bread for dinner and never allowed to have second helpings. When state inspectors visited on a July morning, there was no food for breakfast. The dietary manager went to buy eggs, toast, cereal and milk with her own money. Staf members said they had been buying food for the residents with their own money or food stamps since June 20, when the food vendor stopped deliveries because of nonpayment, according to state reports. People with diabetes and other nutritional requirements such as pureed foods were not getting their special diets. Staf members took residents’ soiled clothes and sheets to their own houses and laundries after the home’s washing machines broke down. The residents were primarily people with mental health disorders. Most were younger than 50, staff members said. Despite the problems, eight former workers interviewed by the Post-Dispatch said they enjoyed working there and did the best they could. Some said their final paychecks came through last week. “I don’t know how many times I brought clothes and shoes and snacks in for these residents,” said Christine Mueller, a nursing assistant on and off since 1998. “I honestly am glad it got shut down because these people deserve better.” Staf members said residents were taken to other nursing homes around Jeferson County. “We had residents holding you and grabbing on to you saying, ‘Where am I going, are you coming with me?’” said Mary Brakefield, a nursing assistant for more than three years. “They considered that home, even with the flaws.” On a recent day, it was evident how quickly the end came. Clothes were piled up in the laundry room. A half-empty coffee cup remained on a table in the courtyard. A woman who worked as a nursing assistant pulled up in the parking lot. She hadn’t gotten her last paycheck and was scavenging for scrap metal to sell. Jeremy Kohler • 314-340-8337 @jeremykohler on Twitter jkohler@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Guest lineup not available. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Kellyanne Conway, campaign manager for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump; Robby Mook, campaign manager for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton; Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence; Joel Benenson, chief strategist for Clinton; Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.

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THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Conway; Mook; Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson; British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson.

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HEALTH • HAPPINESS • INDEPENDENCE

Fall Seminars SPONSORED BY

HEARING | Tuesday, Oct. 11

I Heard That! When you purchase hearing aids from a strip-mall vendor, are you getting the right technology for your condition or simply the brand they happen to sell? Audiologist Dr. Harris says there are David Harris, PhD more options than ever before, and he will discuss how to find the right technology for you. RADIOLOGY | Wednesday, Oct. 12

Small Wonders Not so long ago, doctors had only a handful of tools to see inside a patient. Today, vascular interventional radiologists, like Dr. Vaheesan, can not only see inside with precision, they can Kirubahara perform a wide range of procedures Vaheesan, MD through tiny incisions — just 3-4 mm — reducing the need for open surgery. GI & GYN | Thursday, Oct. 13

Female Pelvic Pain Pelvic pain can come from diferent sources, to include the reproductive or urinary system, gastrointestinal system or as the Elizabeth Cristian Marsicano, Campian, result of injury. UrogyneMD MD cologist Dr. Campian and gastroenterologist Dr. Marsicano will explain causes, advancements in pelvic pain research, and treatments from their specific medical perspectives.

ORTHOPEDICS | Tuesday, Oct. 18

CANCER | Wednesday, Oct. 26

Sports Medicine for All

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Sports medicine isn’t just for athletes. The goal of sports medicine is to keep people active, says fellowship-trained sports surgeon Dr. Kim. For some that means continuing to play sports, Christopher for others it means climbing up stairs Kim, MD or lifting objects to shoulder-level. He'll discuss the latest treatments to keep you moving, whether that's in the gym or just getting through daily activities comfortably.

A diagnosis of esophageal or lung cancer is devastating. But new research, surgical techniques, drugs and early detection have significantly improved survival rates for these Melanie diseases. Surgeon Dr. Edwards will Edwards, cover the risks associated with these MD cancers, along with treatments and advances. As with all forms of cancer, early detection is crucial.

HEART | Wednesday, Oct. 19

HEART & LUNGS | Thursday, Oct. 27

What Does My Heart Have to Do With My Legs?

Pulmonary Hypertension and Shortness of Breath

You might be surprised to learn that our bodies produce telltale warning signs that something is wrong. Redness, blistering or swelling in the legs tells interventional cardiologists Tarek Helmy, Dr. Helmy and Dr. Anish Thomas a lot MD about a patient’s heart health. Both doctors will delve into field of interventional cardiology, coronary heart disease management and new research.

Pulmonary hypertension is high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs, a cause of shortness of breath. It makes the right side of the heart work harder than normal, and over time, makes John Mwangi, MD that side of the heart larger. Dr. Mwangi will cover symptoms of the disease, tests, treatment options and new research.

Register today for any of our FREE seminars. (Seating is Limited)

slucare.edu/fyh


NEWS

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 2

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) John Podesta, campaign chairman for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton; Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn (Ret.), adviser to Republican nominee Donald Trump STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway; Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook; Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence; Joel Benenson, chief strategist for Clinton; Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

Our Quality Is Timeless. This Price Isn’t! Miracle-Ear Quality For $895. Why Wait?

FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Pence; Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine; House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

Hearing is believing! believing!Right Rightnow, now,for fora avery verylimited limited Hearing is time, you can get a fully digital, genuine Miracle-Ear hearing aid for forless lessthan than$900. $900.This Thisisisone oneofofour our hearing aid smallest, most discreet hearing solutions. Complete Complete with Miracle-Ear sound quality, custom fitting itting and a comprehensive service and warranty program. Don’t wait, this this special specialoffer offerends endsSeptember August 31,30, 2016! 2016!

THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Conway; Mook; Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson; British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

Experience the Brand America Trusts.

Associated Press

At Miracle-Ear, we’ve been helping people hear better** for over 65 years. So when you visit any one of our 1200 locations across America, you’re sure to receive the friendly, professional service and the personalized hearing solutions we’re famous for.

Banish Cracks Forever! Krack Kote® Crack Repair Kit for Drywall & Plaster The specially formulated acrylic emulsion retains its lexibility as it dries, without shrinking.

Getting Started. It’s Free and Easy. At Miracle-Ear, we make our process comfortable and convenient. We also offer you a variety of valuable services–at no charge.

This allows KRACK KOTE® to move as the wall moves, leaving a seamless repair that will not reopen like other illers or putties.

“Once in a while I come across a product I think is excellent, and my Miracle-Ear hearing aids are one of those things.”

Save on one of our smallest custom digital hearing aids!

wned Family-O

Now Only "A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1865!"

BRENTWOOD

DES PERES

8121 Manchester Rd.• 314-645-2020

12017 Manchester Rd.• 314-821-1616

www.reinekedecorating.com

Pro CIC

®

$895!

Valid on model Audiotone Pro CIC

®

HURRY! Offerends endsSeptember August 31, HURRY Offer 30,2016! 2016! Valid at participating Miracle-Ear locations only. Limit one coupon per purchase. May not be combined with other offers and does not apply to prior sales. Cash value 1/20 cent.

FREE RECEIVE THIS HEARING AID CHARGER W/ PURCHASE (Valid with ME-1 Solution)

DON’T WAIT! OFFER ENDS 9/30/16! 8/31/16!

FREE Ear Canal Inspections!

A portion of every purchase benefits

FREE Hearing Test!

Visit one of these 9 Convenient Locations! FLORISSANT 314-236-9888

SOUTH COUNTY 314-236-9877

TOWN & COUNTRY 314-236-9885

CRYSTAL CITY 636-875-7625

BALLWIN ARNOLD ST. PETERS O’FALLON GLENDALE 636-875-7630 636-875-7626 314-236-9882 636-875-7629 636-387-4066

DM0816 *Hearing aids do not restore natural hearing. Individual experiences vary depending on severity of hearing loss, accuracy of evaluation, proper fit and ability to adapt to amplification. †Our hearing test and video otoscopic inspection always free. Hearing test is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnoses nor are they intended to replace a physician’s care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor.

HEALTH • HAPPINESS • INDEPENDENCE

Fall Seminars SPONSORED BY

HEARING | Tuesday, Oct. 11

I Heard That! When you purchase hearing aids from a strip-mall vendor, are you getting the right technology for your condition or simply the brand they happen to sell? Audiologist Dr. Harris says there are David Harris, PhD more options than ever before, and he will discuss how to find the right technology for you. RADIOLOGY | Wednesday, Oct. 12

Small Wonders Not so long ago, doctors had only a handful of tools to see inside a patient. Today, vascular interventional radiologists, like Dr. Vaheesan, can not only see inside with precision, they can Kirubahara perform a wide range of procedures Vaheesan, MD through tiny incisions — just 3-4 mm — reducing the need for open surgery. GI & GYN | Thursday, Oct. 13

Female Pelvic Pain Pelvic pain can come from diferent sources, to include the reproductive or urinary system, gastrointestinal system or as the Elizabeth Cristian Marsicano, Campian, result of injury. UrogyneMD MD cologist Dr. Campian and gastroenterologist Dr. Marsicano will explain causes, advancements in pelvic pain research, and treatments from their specific medical perspectives.

ORTHOPEDICS | Tuesday, Oct. 18

CANCER | Wednesday, Oct. 26

Sports Medicine for All

Lung and Esophageal Cancer: What's My Risk?

Sports medicine isn’t just for athletes. The goal of sports medicine is to keep people active, says fellowship-trained sports surgeon Dr. Kim. For some that means continuing to play sports, Christopher for others it means climbing up stairs Kim, MD or lifting objects to shoulder-level. He'll discuss the latest treatments to keep you moving, whether that's in the gym or just getting through daily activities comfortably.

A diagnosis of esophageal or lung cancer is devastating. But new research, surgical techniques, drugs and early detection have significantly improved survival rates for these Melanie diseases. Surgeon Dr. Edwards will Edwards, cover the risks associated with these MD cancers, along with treatments and advances. As with all forms of cancer, early detection is crucial.

HEART | Wednesday, Oct. 19

HEART & LUNGS | Thursday, Oct. 27

What Does My Heart Have to Do With My Legs?

Pulmonary Hypertension and Shortness of Breath

You might be surprised to learn that our bodies produce telltale warning signs that something is wrong. Redness, blistering or swelling in the legs tells interventional cardiologists Tarek Helmy, Dr. Helmy and Dr. Anish Thomas a lot MD about a patient’s heart health. Both doctors will delve into field of interventional cardiology, coronary heart disease management and new research.

Pulmonary hypertension is high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs, a cause of shortness of breath. It makes the right side of the heart work harder than normal, and over time, makes John Mwangi, MD that side of the heart larger. Dr. Mwangi will cover symptoms of the disease, tests, treatment options and new research.

Register today for any of our FREE seminars. (Seating is Limited)

slucare.edu/fyh


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

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NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

hese crows almost went extinct before scientists discovered they can use tools BY SARAH KAPLAN • Washington Post

When Jane Goodall first encountered chimpanzees using twigs as tools — something that scientists had assumed only humans could do — in 1960, she wrote an excited telegram to her colleague Louis Leakey: “Now we must redefine tool, redefine Man, or accept chimpanzees as humans,” it said. Scientists went with the first option, and half a century later, the list of tool users has expanded to include other primates, elephants, dolphins and sea otters, among others. But the phenomenon is still relatively rare: It’s found in less than 1 percent of all species. Which is why the discovery of a new tool user, reported in the journal Nature, is big news. The Hawaiian crow holds twigs in its teeth to dig insects and other tasty morsels out of hard-to-reach spots — and it’s only the second member of its genus known to do so. “The exciting wider context is, if you have only a single species using tools, you’re trying to explain a singularity, and scientifically you’re not really winning with that,” said Christian Rutz, a behavioral ecologist at the University of St. Andrews and the lead author of the study. “But a second species provides leverage for cautiously asking evolutionary questions about how they evolved ... and perhaps even to start speculating about the origin of tool use in humans. “I think the plot is thickening,” he added. The discovery is the result of “a true eureka moment,” according to Rutz — events that are few and far between in a field characterized by decades of slow, incremental study and unglamorous surveys of data. For more than a decade, Rutz has been studying New Caledonian crows, the first member of the genus Corvus known for natural tool use. Without anyone teaching them how, chicks from the Pacific island species would instinctively pick up twigs with their beaks and use them to scrape up food. They could even break of branches and fashion them into hooks or barbs that suited their needs. But — as far as anyone knew — the birds were a biological oddity. Science had found no other crows like them. Still, “I had a suspicion that there may be undiscovered tool users out there,” Rutz said. “There are over 40 species of crows and ravens, and so many of them are understudied, I thought, ‘OK, maybe one of them.’ ” The trouble was figuring out which one. Corvids are understudied for a reason — many members of the genus live in small, threatened communities on hard-to reach islands. Rutz couldn’t fly around to each one and hope to happen upon an avian tool user by chance. That’s when he had his eureka moment: Unlike many other corvids, New Caledonian crows have straight beaks. Presumably, this is helpful for tool use, because straight beaks make it easier to manipulate twigs than the more common curved ones. They also have incredibly big eyes, resulting in the largest field of binocular vision (the field of view that can be seen by both eyes at the same time, enabling depth perception) of any bird. “I figured, if we search for straight bills and large eyes we can find other candidate species,” Rutz said. A quick image search revealed his best target: the large, all-black Hawaiian crow, known on its home island as ’alala. It has a straight, blunt beak, and although its eyes are relatively small, they are extremely forwardfacing, an adaptation that typically allows for depth perception. Rutz called up the program manager at a captive breeding facility in Hawaii run by the San Diego Zoo. “I said, ‘Look, this may sound a bit crazy but I have a hunch your birds may be tool users,’ ” he recalled. “And the guy replied, ‘Oh, yeah, they do all sorts of funny things with sticks.’ ” A few days later, Rutz was in Hawaii. Though there are plenty of anecdotes about wily birds using sticks, rocks or even cars to help them scoop food out of cracks and break open shells, there are few examples of true species-wide avian tool use. So Rutz and his colleagues designed a series of experiments aimed at testing whether the crows really were natural tool users. First, they observed more than 100 adult crows and found that 93 percent would spontaneously pick up a stick and use it to dig when presented with hard-to-reach food. In another test, hatchlings were kept apart from adults of their species, to determine whether the tool-using behavior was innate or learned. Even without training or an adult to set an example, the young crows first picked up and played with sticks, then started to figure out how to use them. “That strongly suggests that the species has genetic predispositions that lead to development of functional tool use,” Rutz said. This doesn’t mean that the crows have a “tool-use gene,” or that they’re programmed from birth to know how to dig with a stick. “It’s not as simple as that,” Rutz said. “More likely, they have a developmental program that is under genetic influence that makes them engage with objects and explore their environment.” The Hawaiian crows are separated by their New Caledonian brethren by more than 6,000 kilometers of ocean, making it likely that tool use is an example of convergent evolution: two species separately evolving the same trait. The world came dangerously close to never making this discovery at all. Hawaiian crows have been extinct in the wild since the early 2000s — the only representatives of the species remaining are those bred in captivity by conservationists from the San Diego Zoo.

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Bankrupt, hobbled by violence, San Bernardino is still bleeding Reeling from last year’s terrorist attack, city grapples with a spike in killings BY AMY TAXIN Associated Press

SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.

When Betty Sai moved to San Bernardino a year ago, she was thrilled to slash her commute time and slice $400 of her monthly rent. Now, the 57-year-old medical marketing saleswoman is yearning to leave. She said dealers peddle drugs in broad daylight outside her home, a naked woman sifts through a nearby trash bin and she reads news headlines almost daily about shootings in the city 55 miles east of Los Angeles. “There’s killings almost every day,” said Saffi, who moved from neighboring Riverside County. “You just have to watch yourself.” The city of 216,000, which has struggled to emerge from bankruptcy and still is trying to recover from last December’s terrorist attack that killed 14 people, is grappling with a spike in violent crime, homicides especially. So far this year, the city has reported 49 killings, already more than last year’s total, which included the victims killed when a husband and wife inspired by Islamic extremists opened fire on a luncheon of health inspectors. Its homicide rate tops that of Chicago, which has become the poster child for big-city violent crime and is on pace for more than 600 killings this year. San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan said the crime wave isn’t unique to the city, where empty storefronts and pawnshops have long lined downtown streets. While violent crime is nowhere near the levels of the 1990s, many major cities are seeing big jumps in homicides. In San Bernardino, California’s relaxation of certain drug penalties and a shortage of local police oicers have helped fuel the increase, Burguan said. “It was much easier before to flood the streets when we see an increase,” he said, adding that most killings are retaliations for recent crimes. “Right now, we do not have the capacity.” In more than 70 percent of this year’s homicides, the suspect had a criminal record, and in more than 60 percent of cases, so did the person killed, the police chief said. Burguan said he’s fusing his drug

RACHEL LUNA • The Sun via AP

In this photo from March, Francine Prieto-Estrada (left) leads Donald Pride and Elisa Castro in a prayer at a memorial site for 12-year-old shooting victim Jason Spears at a Circle K in San Bernardino, Calif.

and gang teams to try to bolster crime-fighting. He’s also hiring 30 new officers and hopes to bring the 220-oicer force back up to at least 300 once San Bernardino emerges from federal bankruptcy protection. That could happen next year, city spokeswoman Monica Lagos said. San Bernardino already is restoring services lost during the downturn, such as youth sports and economic development. That should help boost public safety, but the rash of killings doesn’t help eforts to draw new businesses, she said, noting the recent additions of a medical center and retail stores. Just Thursday, television news crews converged on a neighborhood where a nearly naked man covered in blood was arrested a night earlier on suspicion of killing a man found in a backyard. Neither one was from San Bernardino, but it happened on a street lined with chain-link fences and broken-down cars — a rundown neighborhood that draws a stark contrast to new developments elsewhere in the sprawling suburbs east of Los Angeles. San Bernardino has long struggled with poverty and was hit hard by foreclosures and dwindling tax revenue following the economic downturn in 2008. About a third of its residents are poor — making its poverty rate twice that of the state of California, according to Census Bureau estimates. The city filed for bankruptcy in 2012 after struggling to pay its em-

ployees despite steep cuts to the budget. Burguan said his department had 350 officers in 2009 but was forced to downsize due to economic woes. Historically, homicides were high during the 1990s and early 2000s but extra policing had helped curtail crime, he said. Not all neighborhoods in San Bernardino are marked by violence but residents everywhere are concerned about the recent spike in killings, said Amelia Lopez, president of the city’s Neighborhood Association Council. She said neighborhood groups are trying to work with local crime watchers to help step up public safety. Restaurant owner Tony Canul has lived in San Bernardino for more than three decades and remembers when life was quieter and neighbors knew each other. After the housing crisis, families lost their homes and moved away, and property companies began renting them to newcomers who brought loud music and trouble, he said. In recent years, business has slowed a little at Canul’s downtown restaurant, Molly’s Cafe, with fewer city employees to feed. In 2011, his teenage nephew was shot and killed. Still, the 52-year-old can’t imagine going anywhere else, saying violence isn’t confined to his hometown but can be seen across the country on nightly newscasts. “It’s scary, but what are you going to do?” Canul said. “There’s no place to hide.”

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A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Syria insists its path will lead to military victory

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

DIGEST

Diplomat addresses U.N. even as new attacks launched on Aleppo BY EDITH M. LEDERER Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS • Syria’s top diplomat told the

world’s nations Saturday that his country’s belief in military victory is greater now because the army “is making great strides in its war against terrorism” with support from Russia, Iran and Lebanon’s Hezbollah fighters. Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem said Syria is more determined than ever to eliminate “terrorism” from the country. The Syrian government refers to all those fighting to overthrow President Bashar Assad as “terrorists,” including Western-backed opposition groups. Al-Moallem accused the “moderate armed opposition” of committing crimes and massacres against Syrians “that are no less barbaric” than those of Islamic State and al-Qaida. The Syrian government in turn has been accused by the U.S. and other Western nations of the indiscriminate killing of civilians, dropping bombs filled with chlorine gas as a chemical weapon, and torturing and killing opponents. The Syrian oicial addressed the U.N. General Assembly’s annual ministerial meeting after frantic but unsuccessful eforts by the U.S. and Russian foreign ministers to revive a cease-fire that came into efect on Sept. 12 but collapsed after a week following attacks by both sides. The truce was aimed at enabling the delivery of desperately needed humanitarian aid and paving the way for a resumption of talks between the government and opposition. Syria was stepping up its military campaign even as talks were taking place between U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on the sidelines of the U.N. meeting on reviving the cease-fire. As of Saturday, rebel-held parts of the city of Aleppo had come under a blistering wave of airstrikes that residents said was without precedent in the 5½-year conflict that has killed over 300,000 people and driven half the country’s population from their homes. The airstrikes killed dozens, toppled buildings and sent wounded people flooding into poorly equipped clinics. Aid was never delivered to Aleppo, and on Saturday government forces captured an area on the edge of the city, tightening their siege around the rebel-held east. Global reaction was swift and condemned the new Syrian ofensive in harsh terms. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon “is appalled by the chilling military escalation” in Aleppo and underlines that the use of indiscriminate weapons including incendiary devices and bunker buster bombs in densely populated areas “may amount to war crimes,” his spokesman said, adding that Ban considers this “a dark day for the global commitment to protect civilians.” U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, called the bombing of Aleppo “beyond the pale,” accusing the Syrian government of “laying siege in medieval terms to an entire community.” Speaking at Tufts University in Boston, he demanded that Russia help bring peace to Syria instead of “an unacceptable precedent ... for the entire world.” Al-Moallem said the Syrian government remains committed to political negotiations in Geneva under U.N. auspices but he stressed that any solution must follow two parallel tracks: intensified counterterrorism eforts and a dialogue that allows Syrians to determine their future “without foreign interference.” He said a political solution should begin “by establishing a government of national unity comprising representatives from the government and the opposition, in all its factions, and tasked with creating a constitution drafting committee.” Once a new constitution is approved by Syrians through a referendum, he said, parliamentary elections should follow leading to formation of a new government. That proposal is contrary to the map for a Syrian political transition adopted by key nations in Geneva in June 2012, including the five permanent U.N. Security Council members — the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France — that has been the basis of subsequent Geneva talks. It starts with the establishment of a transitional governing body, vested with full executive powers, and ends with elections, and requires Assad to relinquish power at some unspecified point. Al-Moallem made no mention of Assad stepping down as president and envisioned a military victory — something Russia, the U.S. and U.N. say is impossible. “Our belief in victory is even greater now that the Syrian Arab Army is making great strides in its war against terrorism, with the support of the true friends of the Syrian people, notably the Russian Federation, Iran and the Lebanese national resistance,” al-Moallem said. He was referring to Lebanon’s Shiite Hezbollah militia. Syria’s uprising began in March 2011 with mostly peaceful protests against the Assad family’s four-decade rule, but escalated into a civil war after a brutal government crackdown and the rise of an armed insurgency.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Demonstrators against same-sex marriage hold up a Mexican national lag in Mexico City on Saturday. Dueling marches, in support and against Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto’s push to legalize same-sex marriage, took place Saturday.

Thousands demonstrate against same-sex marriage Tens of thousands of people marched in Mexico City in opposition to Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto’s push to legalize same-sex marriage. A smaller demonstration by supporters of same-sex marriage also took place. The two sides were kept apart Saturday by hundreds of police and barriers erected around the city’s Angel of Independence monument. Representatives of the National Front for the Family that organized the march say caravans of buses arrived from several states around the country. Demonstrators dressed all in white illed a wide boulevard for many blocks. In May, Pena Nieto proposed legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide. It is legal only in some places including Mexico City and the state of Coahuila. Swiss to vote on government spy powers • Swiss voters will decide on a new law aimed to strengthen the ability of intelligence services to counter rapidly evolving threats posed by spies, criminal hackers and violent extremists. Proponents of a new intelligence law, passed by the Federal Assembly a year ago but not enacted, say the measure is needed to help Switzerland to catch up with countries that have far stronger legal arsenals against cybercrime, snooping or extremist attacks. Sunday’s referendum, part of Switzerland’s system of direct democracy, was called by opponents who fear that the new law will

deplete civil liberties, do little to impede terrorism, and chip away at Switzerland’s long-vaunted neutrality. Under the law, the Federal Intelligence Service and other authorities would be allowed to tap phones, cut through mail, iniltrate email, keep tabs on internet activity, and deploy hidden cameras to monitor suspects deemed a clear threat — but only if authorized. British Labour leader re-elected • Jeremy Corbyn fought of a challenge to his leadership of Britain’s Labour Party, beating his sole rival, Owen Smith, in a party election. Veteran left-winger Corbyn — the strong favorite — won with 313,000 votes to Smith’s 193,000, according to the Labour Party’s oicial Twitter feed. “Now is the time for all of us to focus every ounce of our energy on exposing and defeating the Tories,” he said, referring to the Conservative Party. Corbyn was forced into a contest to remain in power after a revolt against his leadership by most of Labour’s 220 members of Parliament. Explosion in Budapest injures 2 • Hungary’s disaster management agency says that two people were injured in an explosion at a groundloor shop in downtown Budapest and were taken to a hospital. Police and rescue personnel cordoned of the area late Saturday near the Ferenc Liszt Academy of Music. The blast did not set of any ires at the scene. No information was available about what caused the explosion.

Colombian peace pact to be signed Monday • Top Colombian rebel leaders have begun leaving the country’s remote plains for the Caribbean city of Cartagena, where they will sign a peace accord with the government next week. A helicopter operated by the International Committee of the Red Cross transported two groups of a total of about 40 commanders with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia for the Monday ceremony. FARC leader Timoleon Jimenez said peace would begin “on Monday, when President (Juan Manuel) Santos and I shake hands.” A nationwide referendum on the accord will take place on Oct. 2. Hollande vows to close ‘Jungle’ camp • French President Francois Hollande on Saturday conirmed plans to close the squalid Calais migrant camp known as “the Jungle,” saying he hopes authorities can relocate as many as 9,000 migrants to reception centers across France in the coming weeks. Hollande said conditions in the Calais camp are “not acceptable” and “extremely diicult,” especially for those who led war to get there. The camp has become a symbol of his government’s failure to tackle Europe’s migrant crisis. Hollande will visit Calais on Monday. The centers will hold 40-50 people for up to four months while authorities study their cases, he said. Migrants who don’t seek asylum will be deported. From news services

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09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

NEWS

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A17

How scientists read fragile, ancient biblical scroll —

without unrolling it

PHOTO BY SCIENCE ADVANCES, B. SEALES ET AL 2016

The ancient En-Gedi scroll, “virtually” unfurled. It had been found in the Holy Ark of a Jewish settlement dating to about 700 B.C.

Scanning and software unlock fragment’s secrets virtually, uncover Book of Leviticus BY RACHEL FELTMAN Washington Post

When the En-Gedi scroll was discovered in Israel in 1970, it was clearly in no shape to be read: It had been found in the Holy Ark of a Jewish settlement dating to about 700 B.C. and had burned along with the rest of the settlement in the year 600. The scroll was little more than a tiny, charred lump of animal parchment. To unroll those lumps of ancient scroll would be unthinkable, as the gentlest touch might crumble the text to dust. Now, more than 40 years later, re-

searchers at the University of Kentucky have provided Israeli scholars with legible text from inside the scroll — without having to unroll it. The first bits of analysis, published recently in Science Advances, reveal that the 1,500-year-old En-Gedi scroll contains the book of Leviticus written in Hebrew. That makes it the oldest Pentateuchal scroll ever found in Hebrew outside of the Dead Sea Scrolls. “We never dreamed we could bring it back to life,” study co-author Pnina Shor, curator at the Israel Antiquities Authority, said. The researchers involved in the discovery announced their initial findings in July, when the remains of the scroll were put on display in the Israeli Museum in Jerusalem. But it wasn’t until this month that the scientists behind the scroll-saving technology detailed their process, which they hope can be used to virtually unfurl many more “unreadable” texts. To image the words inside the scroll, University of Kentucky scientists led by William Brent Seales started with a simple digital scan of the charred object. But be-

cause of the topography of an old, rolledup scroll, the next steps are more complicated. “The magic — or the secret sauce, if you will — it’s not in the scanning alone,” he said. “Imaging alone is almost never a complete solution, because scrolls are scrolled. The layers with the writing on them are rolled up, they’re stacked, they’re crushed, they’re fused. It’s totally unpredictable, and that structure has to be untangled no matter what the imaging method.” That’s where Seales’ “virtual unwrapping” software comes in. The software is designed to first detect the individual pages based on their expected geometry, then “texture” it, or look for changes in brightness on the surfaces identified as pages. Dense areas — ones covered in ink, for example — appear brighter on the scan. Then the software flattens the rolled-up text, showing the words as they would appear on a two-dimensional surface. “We never needed physical access to the scroll,” Seales said. When the software finished analyzing its first sections of text, he was able to see them long before the scientists who actually had the scroll on hand in Israel. When Shor and the rest of her lab saw the processed images, she said, she “almost dropped of the chair.” “You can’t imagine the joy in the lab,” she said. Not all of the lines of text were recovered. The fire that destroyed En-Gedi engulfed the outer edges of the scroll and burned some outer layers all the way through, so certain spots are missing on every page. But there was enough text for Hebrew University’s Michael Segal to

identify multiple verses from the Book of Leviticus. Aside from the Dead Sea Scrolls, which contain hundreds of religious texts and date to about 400 B.C., the En-Gedi text is the oldest Hebrew biblical tome ever found. “I think we can safely say that since the completion of the publication of the corpus of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the En-Gedi Leviticus scroll is the most extensive and significant biblical text from antiquity that has come to light,” Segal said. Shor added that she found the text itself to be rather symbolic: The opening chapters of Leviticus speak of burned religious oferings, and she and her colleagues were puzzling out the meaning of scrolls left behind when a community burned to the ground. “The burned ofering shall be flayed and cut up into its parts,” one preserved passage reads. “The sons of the priest Aaron shall put fire on the altar and arrange wood on the fire. Aaron’s sons the priests shall arrange the parts, with the head and the suet, on the wood that is on the fire on the altar.” “I think it symbolizes it all very nicely,” Shor said. Crumbling pages may soon be no match for modern technology: Earlier this month, scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced a new imaging method that allows them to virtually pierce the first few pages of delicate books and analyze their text. And Seales is eager to apply his software to other ancient scrolls. “Damage and decay is the natural order of things, but you can see that sometimes you can absolutely pull a text back from the brink of loss,” Seales said.

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POLITICS

09.25.2016 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A17

WILD-CARD DEBATES HARD TO PREDICT Look for trust and temperament themes, unexpected moments in Monday’s faceof BY NANCY BENAC • associated Press

WASHINGTON • The most telling moments in presi-

dential debates often come out of the blue — an ofhand remark or unrehearsed gesture that helps to reveal the essence of a candidate who has already been poked, prod-

ded and inspected for years. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have competing missions heading into Monday night’s leadof debate of the general election campaign: Hers is to overcome the trust questions that have bedeviled her for years. His is to convince voters that he has the good judgment and re-

straint required of a president. Plenty of subtexts will play out as well over 90 minutes of must-see TV before an estimated audience of 75 million or more viewers — an outsized share of them disenchanted with both candidates. Some things to watch for Monday night:

TAKE A DEEP BREATH

POLICY PITFALLS

THOSE ‘DAMN EMAILS’

PUSHUPS ANYONE?

Expect Clinton to try to goad Trump into losing control, perhaps by questioning the size of his wealth and the success of his businesses or by highlighting his past incendiary statements about minorities, women and others. Trump is promising to “stay cool.” But 90 minutes could be a long time for the master of improv and theatrics to hew to a script.

Both candidates have policy gaps to ill in and changes in position to explain. At its best, the debate could help lesh out details of both candidates’ platforms, highlighting similarities and diferences. There are pitfalls here for Trump in particular: Weak on policy, he’s vulnerable to slip-ups that could feed into the not-ready-to-govern line that Clinton is pushing. Trump has been studying up: You can bet he now knows what the nuclear triad is. (During primary debates, he seemed not to understand that it represents weapons in silos, submarines and bombers.)

Clinton got a pass during the Democratic primary debates on her use of a private email system when she was secretary of state. Primary rival Bernie Sanders, in their irst debate, did Clinton a favor when he said that “people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn emails.” Don’t expect Trump to cut Clinton a break. She also has more to answer for since the FBI concluded she was “extremely careless” in her handling of classiied material in emails. Clinton has struggled to ind an efective explanation: Now would be the time for her to nail it.

They can’t exactly drop to the loor for a one-armed pushups contest. But look for both candidates to more subtly project health and stability. After her much-publicized coughing its and recent bout of pneumonia, Clinton will be out to show she’s got the strength and stamina the White House job demands. As for Trump, critics have speculated he has any number of psychiatric disorders. It would be a good time to show a level head and solid grounding.

POINTERS AND PINCERS

FACTIVISM

GENDER DYNAMICS

WHAT TO WEAR

POSTMORTEM

He shrugs. She bobs her head. He waves his arms. She pinches her thumb and index inger. Every wink, nod and idget on Monday will be analyzed for silent messages that can speak volumes. President George Bush caught grief for stealing a look at his watch during a 1992 debate. Al Gore’s audible sighs in a 2000 debate were seen as discourteous to George W. Bush.

The candidates won’t be the only ones under the microscope. Moderator Lester Holt of NBC News will be under enormous pressure to maintain control and act as an objective referee. In the lead-up to the debate, Trump maintained that it would be improper for Holt to try to fact-check the candidates’ statements in real time. Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon tweeted that if debate moderators don’t fact-check the candidates, “it is an unfair advantage to Trump, who is a congenital liar.”

Gender politics will be afoot in the irst general-election debate to feature a woman. Trump had trouble navigating this terrain in the primaries, when he tried to back away from a derogatory comment about rival Carly Fiorina’s looks by declaring in one debate that she had a “beautiful face.” Clinton will be ready. She said earlier this year: “I have a lot of experience dealing with men who sometimes get of the reservation in the way they behave and how they speak.”

Call it frivolous, but people will check out what the candidates wear, especially Clinton. When comic Zach Galiianakis recently asked Clinton what she was going to wear, Clinton said she had no idea and scolded him for “this thing called the double standard.” As for what Trump will wear, Clinton said: “I assume he’ll wear that red power tie.” Alluding to questions about whether Trump courts racist voters, Galiianakis replied: “Or maybe a white power tie.”

Even if you watch the whole debate, its impact may not be completely clear until the postdebate pontiicating plays out. The analysis and selected clips that are highlighted after the debate can have a big inluence on the millions of people who didn’t tune in — or who watched Monday Night Football instead. And why wait for the debate to end? Your Twitter feed will be illed with signiicant moments before you’ve even had time to digest them.

CLINTON VS. MAN OF MYSTERY Just who will show up to debate Clinton? Will it be the sayanything Trump who roiled the primary debates by dishing out a stream of insults and provocations? Or the rein-it-in Trump who has been trying to demonstrate of late that he has the maturity and measured temperament to be president? One possible clue: Watch to see whether Trump trots out the “crooked Hillary” nickname or puts it on ice for 90 minutes.

POLITICAL DIGEST Trump touts support for women Donald Trump is trying to make the case that he’ll do more to help women if he’s elected to the White House than rival Hillary Clinton. The appeal came hours after Trump threatened in a tweet Saturday to invite a woman who had an afair with his rival’s husband, former President Bill Clinton, to Monday’s presidential debate. Speaking in Roanoke, Va., Trump told

supporters that Hillary Clinton likes to say she’s been ighting for women and children for decades. He then asked why 70 million women and children are in poverty or on the brink of poverty. Trump has been criticized for crass comments he has made about women over the years. Earlier, he threatened to bring Gennifer Flowers, who had a relationship with Bill Clinton, to the irst presidential debate and

seat her next to a Clinton guest he doesn’t like. Trump’s warning came on Twitter after Clinton invited businessman Mark Cuban to the debate. He’s a frequent Trump critic. Cruz denies pressure to back Trump • Ted Cruz says his decision to support Donald Trump was “agonizing.” He denies he caved in to Republican pressure when reversed course and announced that he will vote for Trump in the election. He says, “whatever path I went down, there were going to be people dismayed.” He appeared Saturday at a Texas Tribune policy forum in Austin. The Texas senator refused for months to swing behind Trump, saying the Republican nominee went too far in insulting his family during the bitter primaries. Cruz said he spoke to Trump after his decision, but Trump didn’t apologize to him or his family. Pence visits North Carolina • Republican vice presidential hopeful Mike Pence has promised home-school advocates that as president Donald Trump would be their “champion” in the White House. The Indiana governor delivered that assurance Saturday in North Carolina at a convention of home-school activists and families. The home-school movement is driven overwhelmingly by evangelical Christians. Pence also praised North Carolina oicials and “all the good people of Charlotte” for “restoring order” after protests in reaction to the latest high-proile killings of black men by police. The Indiana governor’s appearance comes after four consecutive nights of demonstrations sparked by the killing of Keith Lamont Scott by Charlotte police.

New York Times backs Clinton • The New York Times is endorsing Hillary Clinton for president. The newspaper’s editorial board on Saturday praised Clinton for bringing “a record of service and a raft of pragmatic ideas” to the election. It calls her “one of the most tenacious politicians of her generation, whose willingness to study and correct course is rare in an age of unyielding partisanship.” Donald Trump is described as the worst nominee put forward by a major party in modern times. The Times has endorsed only Democrats for president back to John Kennedy in 1960 and has backed that party’s presidential nominees more often through its history. Its last Republican endorsement for the presidency was Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952 and 1956. And its irst endorsement, in 1860, was for Republican Abraham Lincoln. GOP is pushing hate, Warren says • Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., says Donald Trump and Republicans are “making hate OK.” Hillary Clinton’s campaign sent Warren to New Hampshire for the day to ire up Democrats in the battleground state. Warren is also campaigning Saturday alongside Gov. Maggie Hassan, who is challenging Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte. Warren told reporters that Trump has scapegoated groups of Americans in a way she never expected from a major party candidate. And she’s criticizing Republican Sen. Ted Cruz for saying he’ll vote for Trump, after months of speaking out against the GOP nominee. She asked, “Is that really what your word is worth, Ted Cruz?” From news services

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A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

WRITTEN BY Daniel Puma

Total Wine carries more than 8,000 diferent wines; to whittle that down to the Top 20 for the year is no easy feat. The Top 20 Wines of 2016 list consists of a wide range of varietals, all at accessible prices for casual wine drinkers and connoisseurs alike. Whether it’s red, white, sparkling or rosé, our list has you covered. At Total Wine, the combination of an expansive selection, expert wine enthusiasts and Top-20 criteria make this list unique: The price range doesn’t exceed $40, making these wines delicious options for everyday value. Stop into one of three area Total Wine locations or visit TotalWine.com to peruse the rest of the list and find your new favorite.

CHÂTEAU DALEM FRONSAC

OUR TOP PICK!

Wine Spectator – 91 points, 2014 This French beauty is a little lighter than its dark, inky appearance would indicate, but it still sits in the medium- to heavy-bodied range. The Château Dalem Fronsac is a highly rated Bordeaux blend with flavors of plums and black cherries. This is a great, well-balanced wine; try it on its own or with cheese and charcuterie.

MASCOTA VINEYARDS UNÁNIME GRAN VINO TINTO Wine Enthusiast – 93 points, 2011 Wine Enthusiast – 91 points, 2012 James Suckling – 94 points, 2013 The No. 1 pick comes from Mendoza, Argentina. The largest wine-producing region in Latin America, Mendoza is known for its stellar Malbecs. This wine is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Cabernet Franc, full of dark fruit notes like blueberry and black plum, along with hints of chocolate, tobacco and black pepper. Serve it with a grilled rib-eye or a rack of lamb.

750mL, $24.99

DE MARGERIE GRAND CRU BRUT Beverage Dynamics – 94 pts.

750mL, $24.99

VERADA TRI-COUNTY PINOT NOIR The Veranda Tri-County Pinot Noir is an oak-focused, light-bodied Californian wine with accents of black currant and raspberries. Pinot Noir grapes are hand-picked from Monterey, Sonoma and Santa Barbara counties to give this wine its tri-county namesake. It spends 16 months in French oak barrels, which not only impart stellar flavor, but also add to the wine’s complexity. Incredibly approachable, this Pinot Noir is best served with grilled salmon or pan-roasted duck.

Hailing from the Grand Cru region of Bouzy, France, the De Margerie Brut is a dry sparkling wine consisting of a blend of 90 percent Pinot Noir and 10 percent Chardonnay. Flavors of cherry and assorted berries give it a delicious profile with crowd-pleasing appeal. Serve this bubbly with fresh fruits, cheese or medium-firm fish like halibut.

750mL, $39.99

750mL, $15.59

Y ROCK VIEW CHARDONNAY RESERVE MENDOCINO Another wine coming from the Golden State, this golden-colored Rock View Chardonnay Reserve Mendocino tastes of tropical fruits matched with a rich, buttery finish. Notes of pineapple, mango, citrus, melon and a dash of vanilla bring the full spectrum of this Chardonnay to the forefront. In a world of increasingly unoaked Chardonnay, this wine scofs at that notion and comes marching in, waving a giant flag of oak barrels. Pair this buttery pick with grilled veal, rich fish or foie gras.

750mL, $22.99

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Prices valid thru 10/30/2016 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Same Price Cash or Credit. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2016 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


NATION

09.25.2016 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A19

75 YEARS OF MOUNT RUSHMORE ‘hink bigger,’ sculptor told planners who envisioned monument BY REGINA GARCIA CANO associated Press

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. • It was a

historian’s idea: Carve gigantic sculptures into the granite pinnacles of the Black Hills of South Dakota, significant Western figures such as Lewis and Clark, Buffalo Bill Cody, Fremont, Red Cloud and Sacagawea. “In the vicinity of Harney Peak ... are opportunities for heroic sculpture of unusual character,” South Dakota Department of History Superintendent Doane Robinson wrote to a sculptor in Georgia in 1924. The sculptor, Gutzon Borglum, redefined the project entirely. Using jackhammers and dynamite, he began in 1927, first sculpting President George Washington, then Thomas Jefferson, followed by Abraham Lincoln and finally Theodore Roosevelt. Next month, Mount Rushmore National Memorial marks 75 years of public pervasiveness, ending up in movies and comics and on quarter-dollar coins. “Borglum told Robinson, ‘You are not thinking big enough. Western figures? That’s not going to attract enough people. You need to think bigger,’” said Maureen McGee-Ballinger, the memorial’s chief of interpretation and education. Robinson was looking for ways to promote the state, particularly the Black Hills, McGee-Ballinger said. Plan B surely has served that purpose, with about 3 million people visiting every year. “For the state, and the nation, Mount Rushmore is quite iconic,” South Dakota State Historical Society Director Jay Vogt said. “It definitely put South Dakota on the map as a destination ... Because these are elected

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTOS

Mount Rushmore has become South Dakota’s most famous attraction and draws about 3 million visitors a year. The monument originally was planned to honor signiicant igures of the West.

In this photo from July, 22, 1929, sculptor Gutzon Borglum (left) directs drillers suspended by cables from the top of the mountain as they work on the head of President George Washington at the Mount Rushmore Memorial in the Black Hills area near Keystone, S.D.

individuals on the mountain, who worked hard to preserve a nation whose creation was unique in and of itself, it really speaks to the idea that we are a country of free people.” Along the way, it has also found a place in pop culture. A chase scene in “North by Northwest,” Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 classic starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint, included a death-defying scramble over the presidents’ faces. “Alfred Hitchcock says he expects to realize his long ambition — filming a chase over the Mt. Rushmore Monument,” The Associated Press reported in 1958. “He may be spoofing, but you never can tell with Hitchcock.” Some scenes were filmed at the memorial, but the climbing of the faces were studio shots that used models of the mountain. A 1983 special anniversary issue of the comic “Wonder Woman” features her face next to the stone Lincoln. T-shirts with the faces of superheroes instead of the presidents are available at Target and elsewhere. The memorial is a neverending muse for political cartoonists, and in 2016, there’s been no shortage of memes. The memorial has also been featured in multiple coins, including a quarter issued by the U.S. Mint in 2013 that shows men adding the finishing details to Jefferson’s face. The four faces have also been highlighted in postage stamps, and they are — of course — in the background of South Dakota’s license plates. To celebrate the milestone, the National Park Service held events during the summer in connection with its own 100th birthday. The memorial should be lauded for several reasons, according to Debbie Ketel Speas, communications director for the nonprofit Mount Rushmore Society, especially its impact on the state’s tourism industry and economic development, as well as the eforts of those who worked to make it a reality. “When you look at what they achieved over 75 years ago, it’s quite spectacular,” she said.

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LOCAL

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A19

BLENDING ART, SCIENCE

Siblings (from left) Corey, 5, Matthew, 7, Jackson, 5, Marcus, 5, and Sienna Petri, 7, of Richmond Heights, play with robots Saturday at the Murmuration Festival. The event seeks to blend music, science and art.

At the Coloratura booth, festivalgoers can create and manipulate live music using special paintbrushes. The Murmuration Festival continues Sunday at Duncan and Boyle avenues in St. Louis.

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Finn McNamee, 11, of St. Louis, performs with the St. Louis Arches at the inaugural Murmuration Festival at the Cortex Innovation Community in St. Louis on Saturday.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUNDAy • 09.25.2016 • A20 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Punting justice Missouri Supreme Court blinks on reforming municipal courts.

Punt team. Missouri Supreme Court photo.

T

he Missouri Supreme Court had the chance to right a great wrong. It could have created a single standard of justice throughout St. Louis County’s 81 municipal courts. Instead the court has decided that a few tweaks to the dreadful current system will suffice. On Tuesday, the court quietly issued its long-awaited order setting new standards for the operation of municipal courts in the state. The Supreme Court has authority over all Missouri courts, including the municipal divisions of the state’s 45 circuit courts. Most of the problems are in the 21st circuit, St. Louis County, which contains 16 percent of the state’s population but accounts for half of the state’s municipal courts cases. That lopsided statistic alone says something’s wrong. Reports by the Ferguson Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice, the civic groups Better Together and Arch City Defenders, the St. Louis University Law Clinics and this newspaper have provided voluminous evidence that tweaks aren’t enough. A major overhaul is needed to end the outsized influence wielded by a cabal of lawyers, city officials and police departments feeding off poor people. In the order issued Tuesday, the cabal won. Justice lost. Lawyers who practice in municipal courts — judges in one city, prosecutors in another, defense lawyers in still others — preserve their livelihoods. City officials can still count on revenue from fines and fees to prop up teetering city finances and pay the cops

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS who write the tickets. The court went along with the tame recommendations made last winter by a committee of lawyers and former judges. The best thing that came out of that group’s work was a dissent by one of its members, Washington University Law Professor Kimberly Norwood. She succinctly summed up the problem: “There are two systems of justice in the county — one for white and middleclass residents and the other for poor and mostly black residents.” She and others have proposed that the court create a countywide municipal court, with three or four divisions staffed by full-time judges and court personnel. Not only would this save about half of the $16 million spent on all 81 municipal courts, it would be far more likely to provide justice evenly. The Supreme Court punted its chance for real reform. Instead, it ordered incremental changes, many of which some cities won’t be able to afford, even if they’re willing to comply: Bigger courtrooms; records, rules and dockets posted prominently; good-faith efforts to put court business online; judges available around the clock to sign orders; clerks available to handle questions and collect fines; rules on how long someone can be held in jail on an ordinance violation; and actual training requirements for judges. The saddest thing about this: Missouri’s highest court thinks that’s good enough.

he gun myth Ownership is declining, so why is the lobby so strong?

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or all the political uncertainty of this election season, Americans can rely on one constant: The gun lobby will emerge victorious. Guns and a diminishing percentage of owners hold undue influence at the state and federal levels because voters keep allowing the voices of moderation to be drowned out. It’s time for Americans to recognize the gun lobby for the paper tiger it is. Gun ownership is nowhere near as widespread as the lobby suggests, and the National Rifle Association doesn’t even represent most of the people who do own guns. It’s up to voters to stop electing representatives who yield so willingly to gun lobby demands. A new survey by Harvard and Northeastern universities indicates that half of Americans’ 265 million guns are possessed by a mere 3 percent of adults — so-called super-owners who have an average of 17 guns each. The survey’s findings were reported this week by The Guardian newspaper. The results debunk the notion that gun ownership is so widespread it somehow constitutes a broad and representative undercurrent of American thinking. The NRA works overtime to portray gun owners as conservative patriots who are highly averse to any legislation seeking to restrict how guns are used and what kinds of firearms are available for civilian ownership. The Harvard/Northeastern survey adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting the opposite: The percentage of Americans who own guns has declined from 25 percent to 22 percent. Fewer and fewer Americans are choosing to own guns, and even fewer apparently want the NRA to represent their views on gun control. Why are the voices of the three-quarters of Americans who choose not to have guns in their lives being drowned out so consistently by a small

The new St. Louis University Billiken mascot, shown in a promotional video.

Pestello has damaged character of SLU Regarding “SLU chief sees funny side of mascot” (Sept. 22): As a 1970 graduate of St. Louis University, I would really like to know what is going on in the mind of university President Fred Pestello. Is he purposely trying to drive away all of the SLU alumni? Wow, and all the liberal professors thought Father Lawrence Biondi was bad. This new mascot (I can’t even call it a Billiken) is so hideous it looks like a gargoyle from Dante’s inner circles of hell. If the white and gray coloration is supposed to be about diversity, he has taken poPestello litical correctness to a new level of absurdity. With Pestello’s emphasis on outward symbols of the university, one can only imagine what is now being taught to students at the university. I am sure that if I attended a philosophy or theology class today, I would not recognize my old alma mater. The school’s own website says, “The Billiken is a mythical good-luck figure who represents ‘things as they ought to be.’” Well if this scary, grotesque, Mephistophelian harlequin is an example of how things ought to be at SLU, they can do it without me. I would love to tell Pestello that I can no longer donate to the university, but I have already done that over the dropping of the Air Force ROTC long ago, the statue for the protesters and the removal of the DeSmet statue. What’s next? Is he going to change the name of the university? He might as well as he has certainly changed the character of it. Patrick W. Maloney • St. Louis

Centene could use AT&T building downtown ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the National Rile Association convention in May in Louisville, Ky.

portion of the population? According to The Trace, a nonprofit gun-monitoring organization, NRA financial disclosure forms filed in New York indicate the group’s dues revenue dropped by 27 percent in 2014. Even if we accept NRA chief executive Wayne LaPierre’s assertion to Congress in 2013 that the organization has 4.5 million members, the number still represents only a small percentage of gun owners. State and national lawmakers mistakenly assume that voters want more guns in circulation, greater available killing power from military-style weaponry, and fewer restrictions on how civilians may use their guns. Senate Bill 656, which expands such powers, now will become law because Missouri legislators overrode Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto this month. Police chiefs and mayors had warned it would make officers’ jobs even harder. The politicians behind SB 656 will boast about high NRA ratings in an effort to equate Second Amendment support with patriotism. If they don’t represent your thinking or that of 75 percent of Americans, the answer is simple: Stop electing them to office.

I read Alan J. Ortbals’ commentary (Sept. 21) regarding an alternative location to Clayton for Centene Corp.’s new office project. He suggests a riverfront location north of downtown St. Louis. This location and his position has merit. And, as I recall, Centene was mentioned years ago as possible firm to build an oice building in property now occupied by Ballpark Village. But the general economy, civic plans and other factors erased that possibility. But what about another downtown location not mentioned? As I have read, the 44-story AT&T building in nearly vacant. It was built as a corporate headquarters for one tenant, for which it no longer serves this purpose. I also believe AT&T’s lease on the building is close to expiring. What then will be the future for this structure? So, unless there other plans for the building, why not consider the AT&T building for Centene’s office location? Paul Cretin • Dardenne Prairie

Missouri bill does not apply to federal crop insurance I was disappointed to see the editorial board’s inaccurate comments regarding Senate Bill 641 (“Farm-fresh freebies,” Sept. 22). The bill states: “This act creates an income tax deduction for payments received as part of a program that

compensates agricultural producers who have suffered a loss due to disaster or emergency.” The bill goes on to outline the exact disaster programs that qualify, crop insurance not being one of them. Simply put, the state of Missouri can no longer skim money of the top when Congress allocates relief dollars for a federally declared disaster. Senate Bill 641 applies specifically to livestock farmers struggling to recover from large-scale natural disasters. It does not apply to the federal crop insurance program. When discussing crop insurance, it is important to keep two things in mind. First, just like any other type of insurance, farmers must purchase the policies. If you’ve ever submitted a crop insurance claim, you know the payment in no way makes up for the complete loss. Secondly, taxes must still be paid on that claim even in a disaster. In 2012, we watched corn fields shrivel up, herds of cattle being sold and farms lost. As someone who raises cattle and corn, I don’t feel the state should profit from a major catastrophe like the drought we experienced that year. It undermines the reason federal disaster support is provided in the first place. Senate Bill 641 is a common-sense bill. That is why the Legislature saw fit to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto. Mark Scott • Wentzville

Time for politicians to address hacking epidemic Our tax forms have been submitted during the past two years only to discover someone else had beat us to it. Purchases have been made numerous times over the years on our credit cards that we have never made. And of course our information has been stolen through various companies that we have done business with. In each case, we were ofered methods to resolve the problem. It has taken lots of time, money and stress to work these things through. Now all the hacks are bothering our politicians. And all I can say is: Good. Maybe now they will address this epidemic with teeth. For it takes politicians to feel the pain we feel before they agree to resolve anything. John O’Toole • Manchester

Veterans who run for oice should be problem solvers “Be a problem solver, not just a problem identifier.” In my years as a cadet at West Point, and through two Iraq deployments, that was the best leadership advice I ever received. It is advice that many veterans running for oice fail to heed. In the Army, it means a leader’s job is to come up with concrete plans to make things better. Your job as an Army oicer is to get results, not simply complain about how something is broken. Anyone can identify a problem, my battalion executive oicer once told me, but a leader’s job is to fix it. Fixing the problem requires experience and it requires a plan — the kind of experience that comes from studying the problem, knowing all of the factors that contribute to the problem, and being prepared to present a solution. Too many of my fellow veterans who are running for office simply tell me that they’re a vet, and then identify a problem. They tell me government is broken. We all know it’s broken, but if you’re asking for my vote you need to be more than a problem identifier, you need to be a problem solver. Show me a solution. Sam Gladney • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A21

PERIPATETIC TRENCHES • By the allied soldiers, they are called “tanks” and fanciful names are invented for individual models. By the Germans, they are denounced as barbarous and as a violation of the rules of civilized warfare. Observers, military and civilian, are reminded of extinct prehistoric monsters as they crawl over the earth making a fearful use of their weapons. Access the full item and more at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Black, whites live under diferent gun laws Are all men carrying guns believed to be carrying guns illegally, or just black men? EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

If you are a black man in America, exercising your constitutional right to keep and bear arms can be fatal. You might think the National Rifle Association and its amen chorus would be outraged, but apparently they believe Second Amendment rights are for whites only. In reaching that conclusion I am accepting, for the sake of argument, the account given by the Charlotte, N.C., police of how they came to fatally shoot Keith Lamont Scott on Tuesday. Scott’s killing prompted two nights of violent protests that led Gov. Pat McCrory to declare a state of emergency. This month, police in Tulsa, Okla., shot and killed Terence Crutcher — an unarmed black man — and the two incidents gave tragic new impetus to the Black Lives Matter

movement. Scott’s relatives claim he was unarmed as well. But let’s assume that police are telling the truth and he had a handgun. What reason was there for officers to confront him? North Carolina, after all, is an open-carry state. A citizen has the right to walk around armed if he or she chooses to do so. The mere fact that someone has a firearm is no reason for police to take action. This is crazy, in my humble opinion. I believe that we should try to save some of the 30,000plus lives lost each year to gun violence by enacting sensible firearms restrictions — and that the more people who walk around packing heat like Wild West desperados, the more deaths we will inevitably have to mourn. In its wisdom, however, the state of North Carolina disagrees. We should continue to lobby for tighter gun laws and hope that someday the voices of reason are heard. But at the same time, we should demand that current laws

be enforced fairly even if we don’t like them. Scott’s death is the second recent police slaying to suggest that laws permitting people to carry handguns apparently do not apply to African-Americans. In July, police killed a black man named Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minn., after pulling him over for a traffic stop. When officers approached the car, Castile told them he was licensed to carry a handgun. I can only assume that Castile made this declaration so that the officers would not be surprised upon seeing the gun. But rather than assure them that he was a law-abiding citizen exercising his constitutional right, Castile’s announcement had the opposite effect. The horror that ensued was live-streamed on Facebook by Castile’s girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds. Her cellphone video and calm, composed narration were chilling, especially to those of us who frequently commit the offense of driving while black. One of the officers shot Castile several

times, and Reynolds watched as he slumped next to her, his life bleeding away. Did Castile reach for the gun? Reynolds maintains he was merely reaching for his wallet to get his driver’s license, as the officer had ordered. But we have seen many times, including in the recent Crutcher case, that any perceived sudden movement by a black man under arrest, even if he is not known to have a weapon, can be seen by police as a deadly threat. Disclosure of the gun, meant to avert potential tragedy, seems to have invited it. Afterward, it was confirmed that Castile did indeed have a legal permit to carry a gun. He was not guilty of any crime. He was just 32 — and, incredibly, had in his brief life been stopped a total of 52 times for nickel-and-dime traffic violations. That qualifies as harassment. I know many black men who have been pulled over for some trumped-up excuse and felt threatened by police. This has

happened to me. In the Scott case, according to a Charlotte police department statement, officers said they went to a neighborhood looking for someone else and saw Scott “inside a vehicle in the apartment complex. The subject exited the vehicle armed with a handgun. Officers observed the subject get back into the vehicle at which time they began to approach the subject.” If all they saw was a man with a gun who got out of a car and back in, what illegal activity did they observe? Why did they “approach the subject” instead of going about their business? Did they have any reason to suspect it was an illegal gun? Are all men carrying guns believed to be carrying guns illegally, or just black men? Our gun laws should be changed. Until then, however, they must be enforced equally. Does the NRA disagree? Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

Bluster doesn’t erase Trump’s ignorance Republican candidate represents an extraordinary risk to the nation. MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Spiders await a meal at a fading tribute wall to original personal seat license holders hanging outside America’s Center on Thursday. The series of panels honors the original 28,000 families and corporations that purchased 53,000 seats in the old Trans World Dome to bring the Rams to St. Louis in 1995.

Mass delusion After all these years, Rams PSLs are still a rip-of. KEVIN HORRIGAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It seems like only yesterday that thousands of otherwise sensible St. Louisans were applying for the chance to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars just to have the right to spend more hundreds or thousands of dollars to watch the St. Louis Rams play football. In fact, as a federal district court reminded us last week, it was 21 years ago. An entire generation of children has grown to adulthood, grown facial hair and gotten tattoos since the mad scramble for “personal seat licenses” in January 1995. It seemed like a rip-off then, and sure enough, it was. U.S. District Court Judge Stephen N. Limbaugh Jr. ruled last week that everyone who got one of the original PSLs to watch the Rams play football in St. Louis might be entitled to some sort of refund someday, but they’re not entitled to buy (and presumably, resell at a premium) tickets to watch them play in Los Angeles. It was just another football-related disappointment in a city that should be used to them by now. Given everything that’s happened since, it’s weird to recall how St. Louis lost its collective mind in 1995. Things were kind of desperate. We’d been through the Great Flood of 1993. McDonnell Douglas was being stalked by Boeing. The NFL had abandoned St. Louis in 1987. The Cardinals were on an austerity kick and Major League Baseball players were on strike. But against all odds, the Missouri Legislature had ponied up half the cost

of a new, built-on-spec domed stadium downtown. When St. Louis failed to get an NFL expansion team in 1993, it needed an NFL tenant in the worst sort of way. That’s exactly the way we got the Rams. The late Jerry Clinton, the beer wholesaler who’d gotten the stadium off the ground, had been shoved aside by local bigshots who deemed him insufficiently rich. They formed FANS Inc. (Football At the New Stadium) and began trailing their coat in Los Angeles. They needed a really rich guy to show the NFL, so they signed up a Columbia, Mo., real estate tycoon named Stan Kroenke. Due diligence was in short supply. FANS Inc. had negotiated one of the worst leases in the history of sports. Kroenke spotted the hole in it right away, the part that gave the team permission to move after 20 years if the stadium wasn’t up to the league’s top standards. He bought a minority stake in the Rams that included first right of refusal for the rest. And then he bade his time, because 20 years is nothing to a real estate man. FANS Inc. set about selling PSLs to raise the money it had promised the Rams if they’d move to St. Louis. PSLs were a new concept then. They’d been brought to the NFL a couple of years earlier by Max Muhleman, a Charlotte, N.C., marketing executive. They were used to help finance a stadium for the expansion Carolina Panthers. The NFL loved it — a new way to get richer by using other people’s money. PSLs were an easier sell than taxpayer financing because they were like user fees: Only the people who actually went to the games had to pay. Of course most

new stadiums these days, including the new Busch Stadium in St. Louis, are built with taxpayer money and PSL money, too. In early 1995, FANS Inc. put 46,000 PSLs up for sale and got applications for 73,710. About 53,000 eventually were sold. Most of them were for the cheaper, upper-bowl seats in what would soon become the TWA Dome. But others were for the $4,500 lowerbowl seats. In St. Louis, we’re easy. Most of the money went to the Rams, in one form or another. Part of it paid for Rams Park, the now empty practice facility in Earth City. The lease gives the Rams the option to buy that property for $1 in 2024. If anyone thinks Stan Kroenke won’t try to exercise that option, he hasn’t been paying attention. Even before the Rams’ lease on the stadium, now Edward Jones Dome, hit its 20-year reopener clause, Kroenke was buying property in Inglewood, Calif. It was going to be a Walmart. Sure it was. Meanwhile, as the Rams endured one losing season after another, the bottom fell out of the PSL resale market. The Rams had been selling their own PSLs, creating two classes of PSLs, the original FANS Inc. ones and those sold by the team itself. It turns out the FANS Inc. PSLs have a termination clause in the event the team relocates. The Rams-sold version doesn’t. The judge ruled that fans with the Rams-sold PSLs might be able to apply them in Los Angeles, depriving Kroenke of a few thousand dollars. We can only hope so. Kevin Horrigan • 314-340-8135 @oldsport on Twitter khorrigan@post-dispatch.com

Of all the absurdities in Donald Trump’s rapid political rise, none is more puzzling than his reputation for toughness in the war against terrorism. Trump is a real estate developer who takes any domestic terrorist attack — whatever the actual circumstances — as confirmation of his views on a lax immigration system, as evidence of a law enforcement system hobbled by political correctness and as cause for more aggressive profiling of Muslims, Arabs, or whomever he is currently defining as the threat. Some of his followers seem particularly pleased when he edges toward declaring Islam itself to be the enemy. “Frankly,” Trump has said, “we’re having problems with the Muslims.” This is complete madness. No serious counterterrorism expert (Trump may have unearthed some unserious ones to provide cover) believes that the task of confronting domestic radicalization — of working with communities to identify threats and prevent attacks — is helped by declaring a war on Islam. Those who regard Trump’s use of the words “radical Islamic terrorism” as a counterterrorism victory are engaged in magical foreign policy thinking — the deployment of incantations in a global conflict. Trump has hardly distinguished himself in reacting to that conflict, fed by the radiating disorders of the Middle East. As the Islamic State (also known as ISIS) rose, the GOP nominee said, “That’s not our fight.” And: “Let Syria and ISIS fight. Why do we care?” And: “Let Russia fight ISIS, if they want to fight ’em.” But also: “Bomb the oil and take the oil” — which would seem to require a choice between the two. Incantations are preferable to such gibberish. Trump’s instinct is to lead from behind — the intensification, not repudiation, of Obama-era policy in the Middle East. But one of the leading critics of this policy is also Donald Trump. “If (Obama) had gone in with tremendous force,” he has argued, “you wouldn’t have millions of people displaced all over the world.” Those who believe that preening bluster makes up for willful ignorance and dangerously poor policy judgment have found their man. But this is not the worst of it. Anyone who has spent time working in the

White House would attest that the single most important presidential attribute is leadership in times of crisis. We have no idea what challenges the next president may face — an outbreak of deadly pandemic flu, the collapse of order in nuclear Pakistan, a cyberattack on the U.S. electricity grid. All we know — or try our best to know — is the character, stability and credibility of the president himself (or herself). On current and consistent evidence, Trump would jump to conclusions, entertain conspiracy theories and lash out in rhetoric that seems tough but actually complicates the task of leadership. Conservatives trying to justify a vote for Trump argue that the presidency itself will somehow mature him. Yet the Republican nominee has provided little reason to believe he is truly capable of learning or benefiting from good counsel. “My primary consultant is myself and I have a good instinct for this stuff,” Trump has said. When I asked a former official of George W. Bush’s administration (who wanted to be unnamed in order to speak more freely) about the requirements of presidential leadership in a time of national testing, the list was not a match with the GOP nominee. “It is really important to project a sense of calm,” the official said. “A leader understands that people feed off his emotions in a moment of crisis. If he uses wild or frantic rhetoric, it will risk creating a psychological tsunami.” The president may face simultaneous crises, the official went on, forcing him “to rely on others in the team to give good advice.” And: “If the ego is central to a leader and a crisis occurs, it could lead to rash decision-making.” And: “One cannot solve a crisis by blaming other people. This tone makes it harder to rally the whole nation.” A leader has to “articulate a credible strategy” and honor the “American values that unite us.” By all of these measures, Trump represents an extraordinary risk to the nation. On foreign policy, he is the worst of all worlds — extreme and alienating in his rhetoric, confused, erratic and weak on matters of policy. When some of us talk about presidential temperament, this is what we mean. Trump has not shown the stability, prudence and judgment the presidency requires in moments of national testing. This is not only disturbing; it is disqualifying. Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

OBITUARIES -Holst, Jeffrey Thomas

To Our Readers To place or share an obituary for your loved one, visit us at: www.stltoday.com/obits For more information you can contact us by phone at 800-365-0820 ext 5, or 314-340-8600 or by email at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com Alabach - see Rutledge Arban - see Kahsner Boeddeker, Constance Faye - St. Louis, MO Campbell, James G. - St. Louis Desmuke, Virginia M. - Affton Deutsch - see Hallenberg Dinter, Jonathan Kane - Rocheport, MO

Dodds, Nancy Blache - Clayton, MO and formerly of New York City George, Christopher R. - Mansfield, TN Gillis, Gregory A. - St. Louis Grotpeter - see Krisay

Haas, Sister Joan CSJ (Mary Geraldine) - St. Louis Hallenberg, Sydney M. - St. Louis Hanneken, David Arthur - Osage Beach, MO Hatfield, Dave - St. Louis Heinermann, Nicholas Adam - St. Louis Holst, Jeffrey Thomas - Florissant Huber, Elda S. - St. Louis Hunt, Clark - St. Louis James, Charles Clayton - St. Louis Johnson - see Schmidt Johnston, Lois Virginia - St. Louis Jones, Dennis M., Sr. - Ladue Kahsner, Virginia L. - St. Louis

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Boeddeker, Constance Faye (nee McCollum) left this earthly home to be with her Lord on 9/20/2016. She is preceded in death by her husband of nearly 54 years, Clyde Boeddeker and their daughter, Elizabeth Anne. Connie is survived by her sons, Timothy, Andrew (Nancy), and Daniel; 5 grandchildren; and 5 great grandchildren. Services: Friends may visit on Mon, 9/26 at Alexander-White-Mullen Funeral Home in St. Ann from 3-7 p.m. with service at 7 p.m. Private interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred to Bryan College, PO Box 7000, Dayton, TN 37321-7000 and expressions of condolence are appreciated at www.alexanderstlouis.com

Campbell, James G. on Wednesday, September 21, 2016 at the age of 85. Beloved husband of Virginia L. Campbell (nee Corn). Beloved father of Phyllis Ogden and Cynthia Payne; dear grandfather of 11, great grandfather of 7, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and dear friend to many. Mr. Campbell instate at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes 7027 Gravois on Monday from 10:00am until time of service at 12:00 Noon. Interment: Mt. Hope Cemetery

Desmuke, Virginia M. 87, Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wed. Sept. 21, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Harry C. Desmuke. Loving mother of Steve (Jackie) and Daniel (Barbara) Desmuke. Cherished grandmother of Danielle Baca and Nicholas Desmuke Our dear sister, mother-in-law, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visit. on Mon. Sept. 26th from 10:00am to 1:00pm at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr., Fenton, MO. Service time 1:00pm. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

Dinter, Jonathan Kane Jonathan Kane Dinter of Rocheport, Missouri, formerly of Bridgeton and Ballwin on Tuesday, September 20, 2016. Beloved husband of Jayme Lea Tebbe Dinter; loving father of August Ford Dinter and Bowie Kane Dinter; precious son of Kathryn and Edward Reith and David and Janice Dinter; loving and loved brother of Andrew Reith. Survived by his loving grandmothers, Shirley McNabb and Marian Reith, his aunts, uncles, cousins, many friends and by the Tebbe and Ferguson families. Proud 2002 graduate of Parkway West High School and 2006 graduate of the University of Missouri. Jonathan was a caring and dedicated teacher and assistant football coach at Muriel Battle High School in Columbia, Missouri. He was living his dream. Services: A memorial service was previously held. Memorials to Boone Hospital NICU at www.boone.org/Foundation.

Kaliszewski, Dorothy M. - Maryland Heights Keck, Virginia Ayers - St. Louis Krisay, Wilma E. "Willie" - St. Louis Kunderman, Mary Ann - St. Louis Lahm, Frank J. - St. Louis

McElroy - see Hatfield Minana, Frank J. - St. Louis Palecek, Robert - Lonedell, MO Perkinson, Robert E. - West County, MO Pratt - see Hatfield Prouhet, Theodore C. - St. Charles Ramshaw, Dolores M. - St. Louis

Wednesday, September 14, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Arthur A. Huber; dear mother of Jon (Carmen), Tom (Gail) and Bill Huber and Sue (John) Yarbrough; dear grandmother of 7, great-grandmother of 13. Services: Memorial Mass to be celebrated Saturday, October 1, 10 a.m. at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque. Burial at Lakewood Park Cemetery.

Hunt, Clark Mem. Ser. Tues., 10-11am at STL Dream Center, No Flowers: Donate to STL Dream Ctr www.archwaychapel.com

James, Charles Clayton

Stebe, Clifford C. - Oakville Stelmacki, Melissa Ann - Chesterfield Tourville, Myra Alice - St. Louis

To Remember Someone, Remember Flowers Floral Tributes of Sympathy and Comfort From Walter Knoll Dodds, Nancy Blanche

Gillis, Gregory A. Thurs., Sept. 22, 2016. Visitation Mon., 4-9 p.m. with funeral service Tues., 11:00 a.m. at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois.

Haas, Sister Joan CSJ (Mary Geraldine)

Nancy Blanche Dodds, of Clayton, MO and formerly of New York City passed away on Thursday, September 22, 2016. The daughter of the late Douglas W. Dodds and Lucile Ratz Dodds, she is survived by her brother Douglas W. Dodds, Jr. (Astrid) of Cambridge, MA and sister, Diana Dodds-Hardy (Robert) of Batavia, IL, sister of the late Bruce Henry Dodds. Ms. Dodds, a graduate of Clayton High School, attended the University of Wisconsin and le Sorbonne in Paris before completing her studies at the American Musical and Dramatic Academy in New York City. While in Paris, she took culinary classes at Maxims-de-Paris. Highlights of her professional career included serving as Associate Producer to TV's Gilbert and Joseph Cates in venues in New York, Washington, Nashville and Hollywood and as Director of New York's Circle in the Square Theater. Ms. Dodds developed and produced a year-long celebration of the 100th Anniversary of Carnegie Hall and later served as a member of the Hall's senior staff and as the producer of numerous Carnegie musical specials. For many years, she was also the executive assistant and administrative aide to conductor Erich Leinsdorf. Ms. Dodds retired as the General Manager of The Kaye Playhouse at New York's Hunter College. In addition to her interests in music, opera, ballet, motion pictures and the legitimate theater, she was an avid fan of professional tennis and a supporter of the St. Louis Cardinals. Services: The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Monday, September 26 from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. Private interment Bellefontaine Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the St. Louis Art Museum would be appreciated. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Of Nazareth Living Center on Thurs. Sept. 22, 2016. Beloved daughter of the late Ralph B. and Anna Louise Haas (nee Schlink). Dear sister-in-law of Lois Haas; dear aunt, cousin, friend and Sister in Christ. Services: Memorial Mass at Nazareth Living Center on Wed., September 28 at 10:30 am. Sister Joan donated her body to Saint Louis University School of Medicine. Memorial donations may be given to Sisters of St. Joseph Retirement Fund, 6400 Minnesota Ave., St. Louis, MO 63111. Fey Service

passed away in his sleep on September 22, 2016, at the age of 55. He was the loving husband to Jessica James nee Henry and the beloved son of Charles and Yvonne James. He graduated from the Wentzville School System and attended SMS College in Springfield, MO. He was a member of First Baptist Church in Lake St. Louis, Missouri. Services: Services will be held at the First Baptist Church of Lake St. Louis. The church is located at 2230 Lake St. Louis, Boulevard. Visitation will be from 1:30-3:00 PM and the funeral will be at 3:00 PM on Sunday, September 25, 2016. He will be dearly missed by all who knew him. Memorial contributions may be made to Gideons International or Lake St. Louis Baptist Church building fund in care of Pitman Funeral Home, P.O. Box 248, Wentzville, Missouri 63385. Memories and condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com.

Johnston, Lois Virginia

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on September 20, 2016 at the age of 91. She is survived by her children: Ron Boyd of Hillsboro IL, Joan Compton of Springfield, IL and Rick (Kelli) Johnston of Frontenac, MO; grandchildren Todd Compton, Dionne Manzer, and Peter, Anna and Connor Johnston; and three great grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her parents Daniel Shroyer and Myrtle Shroyer, beloved husband of 65 years, Norman Johnston, and sister Crystal Tanner. Lois retired from Civil Service after 42 years working for the US Army and from Metters Industries in 2005. Services: Funeral Service Friday, September 30, 2016, 10:00 a.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood, MO followed by Interment at National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks. In lieu of flowers memorials preferred to the American Cancer Society or the charity of your choice. Visitation Thursday September 29th, 5-7 pm at Bopp Chapel. www.boppchapel.com

fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, August 9, 2016 in Nashville, TN. Beloved son of Richard and Ann (nee Meyer) George and brother to Paul (Julie), Mark, Mary (Mike Lander), and Kathleen (Mike) Gancarz. Loving uncle to Cooper, Ryder and Eli George-Lander and Drew George. Our dear nephew, cousin, and friend to many. His quick wit and special laughter will be dearly missed. Service: Mass of Christian Burial on October 1, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4200 Delor St., St. Louis, MO 63116. Visitation at 10:00 am. Contributions to a charity of your choice.

(nee Arban) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Carl Kahsner; dearest mother of Dawn (Mark) Tucker; loving grandmother of Dirk, Cole and Dalton (Shannon) Tucker; dear great-grandmother of Owen Tucker; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, September 26, 1:00 p.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 3-8 p.m.

Keck, Virginia Ayers June 16, 2016. Services: Memorial Service Saturday October 1st, 10:00 AM. To be held at the Chapel of Laclede Groves Care Center, 723 S. Laclede Station Rd. Webster Groves, MO 63119 In lieu of flowers: gifts may be made to The Laclede Groves Benevolent Fund at the above address. To be used to assist residents with special needs. www.valhallafunerals.net

at age 54 on Sept. 22, 2016. Find service information at http://www.stygar.com/ or call 636-699-5201

Heinermann, Nicholas Adam Nicholas (Nick) Adam Heinermann was called home to Jesus on 9/15/2016 at age 65. He's survived by a beloved son, Nathan Heinermann & loving companion of 23 years, MaryAnne King. He was a faithful journeyman meatcutter for 41 yrs & very witty & full of life. He retired from Schnucks Markets on August 7th 2016. Services: There will be a memorial on October 1st at The Church of Christ at 830 N. Kirkwood Rd., 63122 from 1-4pm. Service begins at 2pm. KUTIS FUNERAL HOME

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Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection Friday, September 23, 2016. Loving husband of Dolores Lahm (nee Ruzicka) for 59 years. Loving dad of Kathy Zielinski, Laura, Michael (Malinda), Frank III (Dana) Lahm and Maria (Scott) Yaeger; beloved grandpa of 17; great-grandpa of 1, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, September 26, 2016, 9:30 a.m. to Assumption Catholic Church, 10 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Memorial contributions to St. Vincent dePaul Society Assumption Mattese or St. Anthony's Hospice. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m.

Minana, Frank J. 85, passed away at home on September 22. For the full Obituary visit https://www.stlouiscremation. com/obituary/9650

Palecek, Robert of Lonedell, MO, September 22, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Pauline (nee Waldo) Palecek, loving father of Corey Elizabeth (Rick) Nappier and Tracy Ellen (Gerald) Maupin, dear grandfather of Katie (Kent) Miller and Justin Maupin, and friend to many. Services: Services are private. In lieu of flowers memorials may be made to the St. Jude Children's Hospital, P. O. Box 1000, Dept. 142, Memphis TN 38148-0412. Family and friends can review and share stories, photos and condolences online at www.stlfuneral.com.

Perkinson, Robert E.

Krisay, Wilma E. "Willie"

Hanneken, David Arthur 9/18/16. Lake Ozark, relatives Koch, Kloecker, Lurkins. Service 11 a.m. Kirkwood Community of Christ, 10/15. Donate Parkinsons Fdn.

Lahm, Frank J.

Kahsner, Virginia L.

Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016. Visitation Sun., Sep. 25, 4-8 pm at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh. Mass Mon., Sept. 26, 9:30 am at Holy Spirit Church 3130 Parkwood Ln. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Hatfield, Dave

George, Christopher R.

(nee Ruzicka) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Beloved wife of the late John W. Kunderman; loving mother of Vince (Susan), Bill (Suzie) and Paul (Lisa) Kunderman and the late Anne Oxton; mother-in-law to the late Cheryl Kunderman and Rick (Lisa) Oxton; sister-in-law to Rose Marie Ruzicka; proud grandmother of 9 and greatgrandmother of 10; dear sister, dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Mrs. Kunderman raised a loving family, was a graduate of Rosati-Kain Highschool, and was a proud member of Retail Clerks Union 655. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Sunday, September 25, 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Seven Holy Founders Catholic Church Monday at 10 a.m. Interment, Resurrection Cemetery.

Kaliszewski, Dorothy M.

Hallenberg, Sydney M.

(nee Hoffstetter), Passed peacefully at home on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, at the age of 89. Beloved wife of the late Charles F. Hallenberg; mother of Deborah (James) Deutsch, Charles (Jill) Hallenberg and Peggy Hallenberg; grandmother of Mike, Gabe, Leigh, Grace and Sydney; great-grandmother of Zoe; sister of Frederick; dear cousin and friend. Sydney was adventurous and a gracious hostess who enjoyed a lifelong passion of travel, gardening, and bridge. Memorial contributions may be made to NAMI or to Salem Lutheran Church. Services: Family and friends to gather on Saturday, October 1, at Salem Lutheran Church, 8343 Gravois Road (63123), 10:00 a.m., until time of memorial service, 12:00 p.m. Saturday. A service of JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES (314) 352-2600.

of Ladue MO passed away September 20, 2016 at the age of 78. He was preceded by in death by his parents Glenn & Thelma Jones, brothers: Max Jones (Hilda), Robert Jones (Judy Jones Grygiel), and his sister Kathy Cressy. Dennis is survived by his wife of 57 years, Judith Pearce Jones; daughter Denise Jones Franz (Drew); son Dennis Matthew Jones, Jr. (Chrissie); his grandchildren Dennis Matthew Jones III (Samantha), Natalie Franz, Madeline Franz, great grandson Dennis Matthew Jones IV and his brother Sam Jones (Angela). Dennis graduated from Marshall High School in 1956 and enlisted in the United States Marines Corps in 1957. Dennis founded Jones Pharma, Inc. of St. Louis, MO in 1981. He was a generous philanthropist to so many organizations: Connections to Success, Focus Marines Foundation, Forest Park Forever, Junior Achievement, Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation, Our Lady's Inn, Ranken Technical College, Saint Louis Zoo, Variety the Children's Charity and many other deserving charities. The family would like to thank: NURTURE Home Care, Inc., Eileen McCarthy, Beverly, Kelly and Stacey; and the Doctors and Nurses in the ICU at Missouri Baptist Hospital. Services: The family will receive visitors at home Sunday, September 25th from 4-7pm. A Celebration of Dennis Jones' Life will be Monday, September 26th at 11:00am at The Gathering, 2105 McCausland Ave, St. Louis MO 63143.The family requests donations to your favorite charity in lieu of flowers. www.leesmanfuneralhome.com

STYGAR

Reith - see Dinter Rutledge, Stella Marie - Brookfield, WI Ryan, Mary - St. Louis Schmidt, Joan E. - St. Louis

Whiteman, Caryl Ruth - St. Peters Yaeger - see Lahm

Kunderman, Mary Ann

Huber, Elda S.

Redelsheimer, Sigmund Marvin - Yarmouth, ME, formerly of St. Louis County

Tucker - see Kahsner Villhard, Carolyn Elizabeth - Ballwin

Jones, Dennis M., Sr.

Age 73, of metastatic renal cancer. His life's deepest passion was for his daughters, Sydney and Tess. "Blue skies forever, Dad." Please go to www.stygar.com for guestbook and details. Thank you.

98, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Thurs., Sept. 22, 2016. Beloved wife of the late John G. for nearly 46 years. Dear mother of Margaret "Peggy" (the late John) Grotpeter; loving grandmother of Jennifer Grotpeter (Andrew Sundelin) and Becky (Gary) Skaggs; dear great-grandmother of John-Spates, Audrey and Cora; dear aunt and friend. Wilma volunteered for 35 years at Missouri Baptist Med. Ctr. Services: Visitation Sun., Sept. 25, 3-7 p.m. at BOPP CHAPEL, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Funeral Mass Mon. 10 am at St. Peter Church, Kirkwood. Interment, Resurrection. Memorials preferred to Mo. Baptist Cardiac Cath. Lab. See boppchapel.com

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Sept. 21, 2016. Beloved husband of Jane Perkinson (nee Schneeberger) and the late Virginia Perkinson (nee White); dear father and father-in-law of Mary (nee Jungewaelter) and Judge Henry Autrey; step-father of Gary Austin; grandfather of Emily, Frederich "Fritz" Autrey and Christina Austin; brother-in-law of Don and JoAnn Schneeberger; our uncle, cousin and friend. Services: from the Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Mon., Sept. 25, 9:30 a.m. to St. Monica for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery. Visitation from 2-8 p.m. Sunday.

Prouhet, Theodore C. age 83, of Saint Charles, MO, died Thursday, September 22, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit www.baue.com

Ramshaw, Dolores M. Loving mother of Dennis (Patti) & Billy.

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A Beautiful Life Rememered

VISIT:

stltoday.com/obits

Relect on your loved one’s life and compose your thoughts and memories of your departed, privately from the comfort of your home. If you prefer, you may still call our reps at 314.340.8600.

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A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

OBITUARIES Haas, Sister Joan CSJ (Mary Geraldine)

To Our Readers To place or share an obituary for your loved one, visit us at: www.stltoday.com/obits For more information you can contact us by phone at 800-365-0820 ext 5, or 314-340-8600 or by email at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com Adams - see Galibert Alabach - see Rutledge Arban - see Kahsner Boeddeker, Constance Faye - St. Louis, MO Calcaterra, Sr., Robert A. - Florissant Campbell, James G. - St. Louis Desmuke, Virginia M. - Affton Deutsch - see Hallenberg Dinter, Jonathan Kane - Rocheport, MO

Dodds, Nancy Blache - Clayton, MO and formerly of New York City Ernst, Roland P. "Chip" Jr. - St. Louis Finnegan, Janet D. - St. Louis Galibert, Elizabeth J. - Chesterfield George, Christopher R. - Mansfield, TN Gillis, Gregory A. - St. Louis Grotpeter - see Krisay Grubic, Jerry - St. Charles

Haas, Sister Joan CSJ (Mary Geraldine) - St. Louis Hallenberg, Sydney M. - St. Louis Hanneken, David Arthur - Osage Beach, MO Harris, Colby - St. Charles Hatfield, Dave - St. Louis Heim - see Tumminia Heinermann, Nicholas Adam - St. Louis Holst, Jeffrey Thomas - Florissant Huber, Elda S. - St. Louis Hunt, Clark - St. Louis James, Charles Clayton - St. Louis Johnson - see Schmidt Johnston, Lois Virginia - St. Louis Jones, Dennis M., Sr. - Ladue Jones Wrob, Alicia - Eureka Kahsner, Virginia L. - St. Louis Kaliszewski, Dorothy M. - Maryland Heights

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Boeddeker, Constance Faye (nee McCollum) left this earthly home to be with her Lord on 9/20/2016. She is preceded in death by her husband of nearly 54 years, Clyde Boeddeker and their daughter, Elizabeth Anne. Connie is survived by her sons, Timothy, Andrew (Nancy), and Daniel; 5 grandchildren; and 5 great grandchildren. Services: Friends may visit on Mon, 9/26 at Alexander-White-Mullen Funeral Home in St. Ann from 3-7 p.m. with service at 7 p.m. Private interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred to Bryan College, PO Box 7000, Dayton, TN 37321-7000 and expressions of condolence are appreciated at www.alexanderstlouis.com

Calcaterra, Sr., Robert A. age 66, of Florissant, MO, died Thursday, September 22, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Campbell, James G. on Wednesday, September 21, 2016 at the age of 85. Beloved husband of Virginia L. Campbell (nee Corn). Beloved father of Phyllis Ogden and Cynthia Payne; dear grandfather of 11, great grandfather of 7, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and dear friend to many. Mr. Campbell instate at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes 7027 Gravois on Monday from 10:00am until time of service at 12:00 Noon. Interment: Mt. Hope Cemetery

Desmuke, Virginia M. 87, Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wed. Sept. 21, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Harry C. Desmuke. Loving mother of Steve (Jackie) and Daniel (Barbara) Desmuke. Cherished grandmother of Danielle Baca and Nicholas Desmuke Our dear sister, mother-in-law, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visit. on Mon. Sept. 26th from 10:00am to 1:00pm at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr., Fenton, MO. Service time 1:00pm. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

Kardell, Marilyn M. - St. Louis Keck, Virginia Ayers - St. Louis Krisay, Wilma E. "Willie" - St. Louis Kunderman, Mary Ann - St. Louis Lahm, Frank J. - St. Louis McElroy - see Hatfield Minana, Frank J. - St. Louis

Pope, Maxine - St. Peters Pratt - see Hatfield Prouhet, Theodore C. - St. Charles Quirk, Thomas M. - St. Louis Ramshaw, Dolores M. - St. Louis

Raykovich, Glenda Jean "Jeanne" Cochran Hilltop Lakes, TX Redelsheimer, Sigmund Marvin - Yarmouth, ME, formerly of St. Louis County Reith - see Dinter Roberts, Franklin D. - Chesterfield Rutledge, Stella Marie - Brookfield, WI Ryan, Mary - St. Louis Sandstedt, Paul - Metropolis, IL, formerly of St. Louis Schmidt, Joan E. - St. Louis Spellman, Larry - Ballwin Stebe, Clifford C. - Oakville Stelmacki, Melissa Ann - Chesterfield Tourville, Myra Alice - St. Louis Tucker - see Kahsner Tumminia, Edward "Ted" - St. Louis Villhard, Carolyn Elizabeth - Ballwin Whiteman, Caryl Ruth - St. Peters Winter, Mardel E. "Mardy" - St. Charles Yaeger - see Lahm

To Remember Someone, Remember Flowers Floral Tributes of Sympathy and Comfort From Walter Knoll Dodds, Nancy Blanche

Nancy Blanche Dodds, of Clayton, MO and formerly of New York City passed away on Thursday, September 22, 2016. The daughter of the late Douglas W. Dodds and Lucile Ratz Dodds, she is survived by her brother Douglas W. Dodds, Jr. (Astrid) of Cambridge, MA and sister, Diana Dodds-Hardy (Robert) of Batavia, IL, sister of the late Bruce Henry Dodds. Ms. Dodds, a graduate of Clayton High School, attended the University of Wisconsin and le Sorbonne in Paris before completing her studies at the American Musical and Dramatic Academy in New York City. While in Paris, she took culinary classes at Maxims-de-Paris. Highlights of her professional career included serving as Associate Producer to TV's Gilbert and Joseph Cates in venues in New York, Washington, Nashville and Hollywood and as Director of New York's Circle in the Square Theater. Ms. Dodds developed and produced a year-long celebration of the 100th Anniversary of Carnegie Hall and later served as a member of the Hall's senior staff and as the producer of numerous Carnegie musical specials. For many years, she was also the executive assistant and administrative aide to conductor Erich Leinsdorf. Ms. Dodds retired as the General Manager of The Kaye Playhouse at New York's Hunter College. In addition to her interests in music, opera, ballet, motion pictures and the legitimate theater, she was an avid fan of professional tennis and a supporter of the St. Louis Cardinals. Services: The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Monday, September 26 from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. Private interment Bellefontaine Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the St. Louis Art Museum would be appreciated. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Finnegan, Janet D. (nee: Doelling) Entered into Peace on Saturday, September 24, 2016. Loving Mother of Charles (Mary) and Mark Finnegan. Beloved Grandma of Allan, Kelsey, Alex and Katie. If desired, please make expressions of sympathy in memory of Janet to the Alzheimer's Association. Services: The funeral service will be conducted in the Chapel of Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Road on Wednesday, September 28, 2016 at 9:30 a.m. Interment will follow in Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitation at Hoffmeister South County on Tuesday from 4-8 p.m. Please share memories and offer condolences at hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Galibert, Elizabeth J.

/obituaries

(nee Hoffstetter), Passed peacefully at home on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, at the age of 89. Beloved wife of the late Charles F. Hallenberg; mother of Deborah (James) Deutsch, Charles (Jill) Hallenberg and Peggy Hallenberg; grandmother of Mike, Gabe, Leigh, Grace and Sydney; great-grandmother of Zoe; sister of Frederick; dear cousin and friend. Sydney was adventurous and a gracious hostess who enjoyed a lifelong passion of travel, gardening, and bridge. Memorial contributions may be made to NAMI or to Salem Lutheran Church. Services: Family and friends to gather on Saturday, October 1, at Salem Lutheran Church, 8343 Gravois Road (63123), 10:00 a.m., until time of memorial service, 12:00 p.m. Saturday. A service of JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES (314) 352-2600.

Hanneken, David Arthur 9/18/16. Lake Ozark, relatives Koch, Kloecker, Lurkins. Service 11 a.m. Kirkwood Community of Christ, 10/15. Donate Parkinsons Fdn.

Harris, Colby, 39, St. Charles 9/21/16 Services: Visitation Sunday 9/25, 2-4 p.m. Services 4 p.m. Newcomer Funeral Home

Hatfield, Dave at age 54 on Sept. 22, 2016. Find service information at http://www.stygar.com/ or call 636-699-5201

of St. Louis went to the Lord, Sept. 19, 2016. Son of the late Dr. Roland P. Ernst, Sr. and Betty Ernst. Brother of Betsy (Craig) Rebholz; David (Mary) Ernst. Uncle of Dustin, Alexandra, and Michael Ernst; Sarah Rebholz-Mills (Kevin), and Peter Rebholz; greatuncle of Charlie Mills. Chip was a gifted artist, cook, beloved friend, colleague, and mentor to many. Services: Memorial service: 11 a.m., Mon Sept. 26, at St. Margaret of Scotland Church, 3854 Flad Ave. in St. Louis. Reception in church hall after. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Vincent DePaul Society at St. Margarets Conference or a favorite charity.

James, Charles Clayton

passed away in his sleep on September 22, 2016, at the age of 55. He was the loving husband to Jessica James nee Henry and the beloved son of Charles and Yvonne James. He graduated from the Wentzville School System and attended SMS College in Springfield, MO. He was a member of First Baptist Church in Lake St. Louis, Missouri. Services: Services will be held at the First Baptist Church of Lake St. Louis. The church is located at 2230 Lake St. Louis, Boulevard. Visitation will be from 1:30-3:00 PM and the funeral will be at 3:00 PM on Sunday, September 25, 2016. He will be dearly missed by all who knew him. Memorial contributions may be made to Gideons International or Lake St. Louis Baptist Church building fund in care of Pitman Funeral Home, P.O. Box 248, Wentzville, Missouri 63385. Memories and condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com.

Johnston, Lois Virginia

Heinermann, Nicholas Adam Nicholas (Nick) Adam Heinermann was called home to Jesus on 9/15/2016 at age 65. He's survived by a beloved son, Nathan Heinermann & loving companion of 23 years, MaryAnne King. He was a faithful journeyman meatcutter for 41 yrs & very witty & full of life. He retired from Schnucks Markets on August 7th 2016. Services: There will be a memorial on October 1st at The Church of Christ at 830 N. Kirkwood Rd., 63122 from 1-4pm. Service begins at 2pm. KUTIS FUNERAL HOME

-Holst, Jeffrey Thomas Age 73, of metastatic renal cancer. His life's deepest passion was for his daughters, Sydney and Tess. "Blue skies forever, Dad." Please go to www.stygar.com for guestbook and details. Thank you.

Huber, Elda S. Wednesday, September 14, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Arthur A. Huber; dear mother of Jon (Carmen), Tom (Gail) and Bill Huber and Sue (John) Yarbrough; dear grandmother of 7, great-grandmother of 13. Services: Memorial Mass to be celebrated Saturday, October 1, 10 a.m. at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque. Burial at Lakewood Park Cemetery.

Hunt, Clark Mem. Ser. Tues., 10-11am at STL Dream Center, No Flowers: Donate to STL Dream Ctr www.archwaychapel.com

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on September 20, 2016 at the age of 91. She is survived by her children: Ron Boyd of Hillsboro IL, Joan Compton of Springfield, IL and Rick (Kelli) Johnston of Frontenac, MO; grandchildren Todd Compton, Dionne Manzer, and Peter, Anna and Connor Johnston; and three great grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her parents Daniel Shroyer and Myrtle Shroyer, beloved husband of 65 years, Norman Johnston, and sister Crystal Tanner. Lois retired from Civil Service after 42 years working for the US Army and from Metters Industries in 2005. Services: Funeral Service Friday, September 30, 2016, 10:00 a.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood, MO followed by Interment at National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks. In lieu of flowers memorials preferred to the American Cancer Society or the charity of your choice. Visitation Thursday September 29th, 5-7 pm at Bopp Chapel. www.boppchapel.com

Jones Wrob, Alicia

passed away on Friday, September 23, 2016 at the age of 54. Loving mother of beautiful twin girls Erika Alice and Haley Patricia Wrob; beloved daughter of Alice (Bill) Blain and the late Robert E. Jones Sr.; dear sister of Dorcas (David) Sokolow, Margaret (Tim) Gravelle, Robert E. (Susan) Jones Jr. and Raymond E. Jones II; dear stepsister of Kerri Duncan and Denise (Michael) Neilson; loving aunt, she was known as "Fun Aunt Alicia," great aunt, cousin and friend to many. Alicia was a member of the Eureka Elks Lodge, D.A.R. and numerous other charitable organizations. Services: Memorial service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home - Eureka, 108 N. Central Avenue, Saturday, 2 p.m. Interment privately held at Victor Cemetery, Anutt, MO. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to American Cancer Society. Memorial visitation Saturday 1:002:00 p.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Kahsner, Virginia L. (nee Arban) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Carl Kahsner; dearest mother of Dawn (Mark) Tucker; loving grandmother of Dirk, Cole and Dalton (Shannon) Tucker; dear great-grandmother of Owen Tucker; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, September 26, 1:00 p.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 3-8 p.m.

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fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, August 9, 2016 in Nashville, TN. Beloved son of Richard and Ann (nee Meyer) George and brother to Paul (Julie), Mark, Mary (Mike Lander), and Kathleen (Mike) Gancarz. Loving uncle to Cooper, Ryder and Eli George-Lander and Drew George. Our dear nephew, cousin, and friend to many. His quick wit and special laughter will be dearly missed. Service: Mass of Christian Burial on October 1, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4200 Delor St., St. Louis, MO 63116. Visitation at 10:00 am. Contributions to a charity of your choice.

schnucksfloral.com

Gillis, Gregory A. Thurs., Sept. 22, 2016. Visitation Mon., 4-9 p.m. with funeral service Tues., 11:00 a.m. at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois.

Grubic, Jerry Age 88, of St. Charles, MO, died on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Contact (636) 9401000 or visit baue.com

A Beautiful Life Rememered

of Ladue MO passed away September 20, 2016 at the age of 78. He was preceded by in death by his parents Glenn & Thelma Jones, brothers: Max Jones (Hilda), Robert Jones (Judy Jones Grygiel), and his sister Kathy Cressy. Dennis is survived by his wife of 57 years, Judith Pearce Jones; daughter Denise Jones Franz (Drew); son Dennis Matthew Jones, Jr. (Chrissie); his grandchildren Dennis Matthew Jones III (Samantha), Natalie Franz, Madeline Franz, great grandson Dennis Matthew Jones IV and his brother Sam Jones (Angela). Dennis graduated from Marshall High School in 1956 and enlisted in the United States Marines Corps in 1957. Dennis founded Jones Pharma, Inc. of St. Louis, MO in 1981. He was a generous philanthropist to so many organizations: Connections to Success, Focus Marines Foundation, Forest Park Forever, Junior Achievement, Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation, Our Lady's Inn, Ranken Technical College, Saint Louis Zoo, Variety the Children's Charity and many other deserving charities. The family would like to thank: NURTURE Home Care, Inc., Eileen McCarthy, Beverly, Kelly and Stacey; and the Doctors and Nurses in the ICU at Missouri Baptist Hospital. Services: The family will receive visitors at home Sunday, September 25th from 4-7pm. A Celebration of Dennis Jones' Life will be Monday, September 26th at 11:00am at The Gathering, 2105 McCausland Ave, St. Louis MO 63143.The family requests donations to your favorite charity in lieu of flowers. www.leesmanfuneralhome.com

Beautiful Memorials

George, Christopher R.

Ernst, Roland P. "Chip" Jr.

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STYGAR

(nee Crowley) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church and called home to be with Jesus Christ on Friday, September 23, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Kurt Krieger and Claude Galibert; dear mother of Karen (Greg) Krame, Stephen (Jill) Krieger and Susan (Wayne) Adams; dear step-mother of Gerard (Kathy) Galibert, Martine Saber, Trish (Sam) Kerley and Marie (Dan) Zipf; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sister-in-law, aunt and friend to many. Services: Memorial service will be celebrated at Friendship VillageChesterfield (15201 Olive Blvd., 63017) on Saturday, October 8, 3:00 p.m. Private interment at Sunset Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the American Cancer Society appreciated. KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE

Reflect

Hallenberg, Sydney M.

Nelson, James Smith, M.D. - Virginia Beach, VA, formerly of St. Louis Palecek, Robert - Lonedell, MO Perkinson, Robert E. - West County, MO

Dinter, Jonathan Kane Jonathan Kane Dinter of Rocheport, Missouri, formerly of Bridgeton and Ballwin on Tuesday, September 20, 2016. Beloved husband of Jayme Lea Tebbe Dinter; loving father of August Ford Dinter and Bowie Kane Dinter; precious son of Kathryn and Edward Reith and David and Janice Dinter; loving and loved brother of Andrew Reith. Survived by his loving grandmothers, Shirley McNabb and Marian Reith, his aunts, uncles, cousins, many friends and by the Tebbe and Ferguson families. Proud 2002 graduate of Parkway West High School and 2006 graduate of the University of Missouri. Jonathan was a caring and dedicated teacher and assistant football coach at Muriel Battle High School in Columbia, Missouri. He was living his dream. Services: A memorial service was previously held. Memorials to Boone Hospital NICU at www.boone.org/Foundation.

Of Nazareth Living Center on Thurs. Sept. 22, 2016. Beloved daughter of the late Ralph B. and Anna Louise Haas (nee Schlink). Dear sister-in-law of Lois Haas; dear aunt, cousin, friend and Sister in Christ. Services: Memorial Mass at Nazareth Living Center on Wed., September 28 at 10:30 am. Sister Joan donated her body to Saint Louis University School of Medicine. Memorial donations may be given to Sisters of St. Joseph Retirement Fund, 6400 Minnesota Ave., St. Louis, MO 63111. Fey Service

Jones, Dennis M., Sr.

VISIT:

stltoday.com/obits

Relect on your loved one’s life and compose your thoughts and memories of your departed, privately from the comfort of your home. If you prefer, you may still call our reps at 314.340.8600.


NEWS

09.25.2016 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A23

Deep-sea volcano serves as hotspot for mysterious life Scientists in Hawaii are using a mini-submarine to visit underwater furnaces and unlock their many secrets BY CALEB JONES associated Press

G E O LO G I ST S E A M O U N T S , HAWAII • The turquoise waters

became darker and darker, and squiggly glow-in-dark marine creatures began to glide past in the inky depths like ghosts. The three-man submarine went down, down, down into the abyss and drew within sight of something no human had ever laid eyes on: Cook seamount, a 13,000-foot extinct volcano at the bottom of the sea. Scientists aboard the vessel Pisces V visited the volcano earlier in September to examine its geological features and its rich variety of marine life, and an Associated Press reporter was given exclusive access to the dive. It was the first-ever expedition to the Cook seamount by a manned submersible. Among other things, the researchers from the University of Hawaii and the nonprofit group Conservation International spotted such wonders as a rare type of octopus with big fins that look like Dumbo’s ears, and a potentially new species of violet-hued coral they dubbed Purple Haze. Conservation International hopes to study 50 seamounts, or undersea volcanoes, over the next five years. “We don’t know anything about the ocean floor,” said Peter Seligmann, chairman, CEO and co-founder of Conservation International. “What we know is that each one of those seamounts is a refuge for new species, but we don’t know what they are. We don’t know how they’ve evolved. We don’t know what lessons they have for us.” During the Sept. 6 dive, the submarine splashed into the water, and as it dove, the only sounds were radio communications from the surface, the hum

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Deep sea coral sits at the summit of the Cook seamount, seen from the Pisces V submersible during a dive to the previously unexplored underwater volcano of the coast of Hawaii’s Big Island on Sept. 6. Seamounts are believed to cover about 18 million square miles of the planet.

of an air scrubber that removes carbon dioxide from the passenger chamber, and the voices of the crew. The thick, hot tropical air inside the steel sphere became cooler and drier as the submarine descended. “We don’t know what we’re going to find,” said Conservation International’s Greg Stone, a marine biologist on board. “There will always be the unexpected when you go into the deep ocean.” Halfway to the volcano’s summit, which is 3,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific, no sunlight penetrated. The only light that could be seen from the submarine’s face-sized win-

dows was the bluish glow of the vessel’s own bright lights. Occasionally, bioluminescent creatures drifted past in the darkness. Stone and subpilot Terry Kerby, who helps run the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory at the University of Hawaii, watched as the volcano and its rugged basalt walls hundreds of yards high came into view. Seamounts are either active or dormant volcanoes that rise dramatically from the bottom of the ocean and never reach the surface. They are hotspots for marine life because they carry nutrientrich water upward from the sea

floor. Seamounts are believed to cover about 18 million square miles of the planet. Cook, situated over 100 miles southwest of Hawaii’s Big Island, is part of a group of undersea volcanoes known as the Geologist Seamounts that are about 80 million years old and could hold many new animal species, as well as elements such as nickel and cobalt that mining companies could extract. “My goal today is to ... find out what’s living on them, find out how they support ocean life, what their efect is from ocean currents and essentially what drives the ocean, what makes the ocean what it is,” Stone said.

“Seamounts are a key part of that, and something which humanity knows very little about.” Within minutes of the vessel’s arrival at the summit, life began to appear — a starfish clinging to a rock, joined shortly after by eels, sharks, chimaera (also known as “ghost sharks”), shrimp, crabs and two rare Dumbo octopuses. One of the octopuses changed color from white to pink to reddish brown as it swam by. Several types of deep-sea corals were found along the seamount’s cliffs, including a vibrant purple one. “I need to go home, look through the literature ... and also go and run some genetic analyses,” said Sonia Rowley, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawaii who is taking part in the project. “But as this is a new seamount ... that no one had dived on before, it won’t be any surprise to me whether this is going to be a new species.” Two other seamounts were studied over three days of expeditions: McCall, home to a large number of small deep-sea sharks, and Lo’Ihi, an active volcano. Lo’Ihi has been extensively surveyed by manned submersibles over the past 30 years. The past few times Kerby was there, he saw a large Pacific sleeper shark lurking about the volcano’s crater. As hot vents shot out volcanic gases around them, the team released bait in the water and the 7-foot shark appeared in front of the submarine. Kerby was delighted to see his “old friend.” The team also saw 6-foot eels and a number of new geological formations around the crater. Scientists say Lo’ihi is likely to someday become the newest island in the Hawaii chain as volcanic activity pushes the summit upward.

OBITUARIES Rutledge, Stella Marie Redelsheimer, Sigmund Marvin

87, longtime resident of St. Louis County, died September 15, 2016 at Gosnell Memorial Hospice House in Scarborough, Maine. Born in Jacksonville, Florida, he moved at an early age to Columbus, Georgia where he graduated from Jordan Vocational High School in 1946. Shortly after graduation he joined the U.S. Navy and in 1947 was selected for a Naval ROTC scholarship at Auburn University. He majored in Aeronautical Engineering and was a member of Phi Kappa Tau social fraternity, of which he was president his senior year. He was also a member of the Scabbard and Blade Military Honor Society, Steerage Naval Honor Society, Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honorary, and Blue Key Service Honorary. Upon graduation and commissioning in 1951 he was assigned to the U.S.S. Robert A. Owens DDE 827, aboard which he served until released from active duty in May, 1954. In September of that year he enrolled as a graduate student at the California Institute of Technology and received his Master's degree in Aeronautics in June of 1955. He was hired by McDonnell Aircraft Corp. and did research in high speed aerodynamics for three years. In 1958 he was assigned to the nascent space studies at McDonnell and was instrumental in in the conceptual design of the nation's first manned spacecraft, the Mercury. For the next 29 years he worked on numerous space programs including Air Force Gemini B, NASA Skylab, numerous confidential government programs, was Program Manager of the Space Shuttle Aft Propulsion Subsystem built by McDonnell and retired in 1987 as Director of Space Programs for the St. Louis division of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company. He was a charter member of Forest Hills Country Club in Clarkson Valley, Missouri, an active member of the Grace Methodist Church choir in St. Louis in the 1960s and '70s, and later was active in a local chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. Sig was predeceased by his wife, Shirley, in February 2016, after which he moved to Falmouth, Maine. He is survived by: three children from his first marriage, Sigmund Mark of Las Vegas, Nevada, Carol Leigh of Yarmouth, Maine, and Miles Bruce of Otter Creek, Maine; two granddaughters, Katrina and Elena, who reside in the San Francisco Bay Area of California; and his beloved goddaughter Rebecca Turner Riggs of Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday, September 26, 2016 at 9:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the St. Louis Symphony, St. Louis Zoo, Missouri Botanical Garden, or the Auburn Alumni Association. Visitation at the FAMILY CENTER at Schrader Funeral Home, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016 from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. followed by interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Family requests that if able for friends and veterans to attend the committal service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Stella Rutledge passed away on September 21, 2016 in Brookfield, WI. She was born October 24, 1927 in New Berlin, IL, the daughter of John L. and Cecilia Sullivan Haugh. Beloved wife of the late Leslie Douglas. Loving mother of Douglas (Jo-Marie) and proud grandmother of Jackson. Dear sister of Mary (the late Jim) Alabach. Dear aunt of Anne, Dan, Jim (Melissa), Steve (Nikki), Tom (Maddie) Alabach and Ellen (Loren) Goodman. Great Aunt of Logan & Tyler Alabach and Natalie Goodman. Dear cousin and friend. She was preceded in death by her parents and her brothers, John W. "Jack" and James and sister Jeanette Haugh. After graduating from New Berlin High School, she was employed by the State of Illinois Dept. of Registration and Education. Stella was a long time employee of TWA in St. Louis and Chicago and enjoyed international travel. In Chicago, she also worked in the Cook County Sheriff's Office. As a resident of St. Louis, she was an active member of Bon Vivant Travel and StepUp! St. Louis organizations. She was an excellent cook who loved to entertain and belonged to a gourmet cooking group. Time with family was most precious to her. Services: Visitation at the Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home, Palatine, IL Tuesday, September 27th, 8:30 - 10:30 a.m. Funeral Mass at St. Theresa Catholic Church in Palatine at 11 a.m. followed by burial at St. Michael the Archangel Cemetery. Memorials to Hometown Hospice of Brookfield, WI appreciated.

Sandstedt, Paul 85, of Metropolis, IL, formerly of St. Louis, MO, died on Saturday, September 17, 2016 at Metropolis Nursing and Rehab. Mr. Sandstedt was a retired millwright from National Lead. Surviving is his wife, Catherine Sandstedt; two sons, Kevin and Kenny both of Jefferson County, MO; four daughters, Karen, Kim, Kathy, Kristy, all of Jefferson County, MO; and several grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Wilmer E. Sandstedt and Myrtle Irene Sims-Sandstedt. No services are scheduled at this time. Lindsey Funeral Home of Paducah is in charge of arrangements.

Stelmacki, Melissa Ann baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Monday, September 19, 2016. Beloved daughter of Mike Stelmacki and Darla Stelmacki (nee Vrsnik). Loving sister of Michael Stelmacki and the late Suzanne Stelmacki. Niece of Cindy (the late Dennis) Rohde and Janet Stelmacki. Faithful companion of her puppy Curly. Dear cousin and friend of many. She was a graduate of Maryville University and University of Missouri Columbia. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Tuesday, 9:45 a.m. to St. Clare of Assisi Catholic Church, Ellisville for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be made to American Red Cross or Maryville University. Visitation Monday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Schmidt, Joan E.

Share (nee Johnson) age 77, Thursday, September 22, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Paul Schmidt. Dear sister of Ronald (Phyllis) Johnson; our dear aunt and cousin. Services: Private services will be held at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. A special thank you to the staff at Stonebridge Nursing Home, who cared for Joan.

...the memories of your loved one online with a written message, photo or video.

Stebe, Clifford C. Ryan, Mary

87, Sept 21, 2016. Baptised into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection. Beloved wife of the late John L. Ryan; dear mother of Mary Ann (John) Howard, John W. (Evonne) Ryan, Robert (Kathy) Ryan, Thomas (Kristi) Ryan, Maureen (Tony) Ryan-Jones and Kevin (Melissa) Ryan; dear grandmother of Matthew, Shane, Andrew and Isaac; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial visitation for the celebration of Mary's life Oct 1, 2016, 9:30 am at St. Ferdinand Catholic Church, followed by 10am memorial mass Interment private at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials in Mary's name may be given to The Humane Society of Missouri or American Cancer Society appreciated. HUTCHENS MORTUARY

of Oakville, MO graduate of Central Missouri State University and Bayless High School passed away September 22, 2016 at age 66. Cliff is survived by his loving family of wife Kathy Stebe, mother Deloris Stebe, brother Bob Stebe, sister Kim Bladdick; sons Cliff Stebe Jr. (Sally), David Stebe (Colleen); step daughter Kristi Weiss (Mike) and seven grandchildren Kaitlyn Stebe, Jack Stebe, Carson Weiss, Benjamin Stebe, Anna Stebe, Charlotte Weiss and Nora Stebe and several loving cousins, nieces, and nephews. Services: Funeral at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., 63129, on Monday, September 26 at 10:00 AM. Interment Sunset Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Visitation Sunday evening 4-8 PM.

Visit the online obituaries now at: /obituaries

Tourville, Myra Alice

(nee LoVan), RN, MSW, was born March 15, 1930 and died on September 19, 2016 at the age of 86. She was born near Steelville, Missouri. Her parents were the late Elmer Lovan and Katherine Downey Lovan. Alice was the youngest of eight children. In her teens, she moved to St. Clair, Missouri and graduated from high school in 1947. She moved to St. Louis and graduated from the Deaconess Hospital of Nursing in 1951. She married John L. Casey and they had two children. In 1971, Alice married Lester W. Tourville, who died in 1978. Later in life, Mel Tochtrop was Alice's beloved companion for more than 25 years. She is survived by her daughter, Suzanne K. (Michael) Burnett of Germantown, Tennessee, and her son, Mark E. Casey of Boulder, Colorado. Alice had four grandchildren: Thomas (Alyson) Burnett; Katherine Burnett (Michael) Koss; Caroline M. Casey and W. Evan Casey; and two great-grandchildren, Emma and Ryan Koss. Also surviving are 13 much-loved nieces and nephews and their families: Maxine Anderson; Richard Lovan; Jean Martin; Lawrence Lovan; Maxine Schuman; Judith LeBlanc; Janice Keale; Deborah Compton; Diana Sawyer; Anita Kemp; John Lovan; Pamela Norris; and Leslie Whitley. The seven siblings who preceded her in death were the late Mary E. Lovan, Max Lovan, Eugene Lovan, Elizabeth Martin, Helen J. Evans, Elmer Lovan, and Donna Souder. Alice was member of the Maplewood United Methodist Church and later Concord Trinity United Methodist Church. She was the Occupational Health Nurse at Sunnen Products for 32 years. During that time she started classes at Washington University, earning a B.S. degree in Psychology and a Master's degree from the George Warren Brown School of Social Work where she served as an Adjunct Professor and president of the Alumni Board. She worked part-time at St. Anthony's Medical Center as a counselor in Hyland's Family Program and taught stress management classes. Alice was passionate about her role as the Facilitator of the Missouri Osteoporosis Foundation Support Group from its inception in 1997 until her passing. At Friendship Village, she served on the board and the wellness, caregiver, retired nurses, and VCC committees. Her latest project has been as an ambassador of the Music and Memory program. Alice was surrounded by her loving family when she passed away with congestive heart disease. She participated in the Washington University Memory and Aging Study for 15 years and donated her body to the medical school. Services: Friends are invited to attend a memorial service in the chapel at Friendship Village Sunset Hills, 12563 Village Circle Drive, St. Louis, MO 63127 on October 3 at 1:30. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to The Friendship Foundation, Attention: Kate Myers, for the Music and Memory program at Friendship Village. Donations may also be made to the Mercy Health Foundation, Hospice Memorial Fund, 615 S. New Ballas Road, St. Louis, MO 63141.

Villhard, Carolyn Elizabeth (nee Finder), Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Friday, September 23, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Robert A. Villhard, Sr,. Loving mother of Robert A. (Jan) Villhard, Jr., Christopher A. Villhard, Joy E. (James) Miller and Gayle M. (Tim) Benson. Loved grandmother of Kyle, Brett, Nicholas, Gregory, Angela, Matthew, Briana, Shane and Reid. Great-grandmother of Kaydence and Mia. Dear sister of Joe Finder, Marjorie Butler, Edward Finder, Donald Finder and the late Frank and James Finder. Dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Wednesday, 9:45 a.m. to St. Joseph Catholic Church, Manchester for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment St. Joseph Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to American Cancer Society. Visitation Tuesday 3-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Whiteman, Caryl Ruth 86, of St. Peters, MO. September 20, 2016. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. 636 498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

In Memoriam

Patrick Joseph Hickey III Sept. 25, 1928 - Nov. 23, 2007 It broke our hearts to lose you, but you did not go alone. Part of us went with you the day God called you home. A million times we thought of you, a million times we cried. If loving could have saved you, you never would have died.

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444 800-286-9557

6 adjoining p lo t s , Park Lawn Cemetery, Lemay, section 12, lot 307, $500 each. 480-313-4722 Burial Crypts Deluxe companion sideby-side, Valhalla, Belleville. List $9,995. 618-281-4475

7 grave sites at Bellerive Gardens Cemetery, Creve Coeur in the Rose Hill Garden section. Valued at $6500 apiece, asking $2750 each. Call 270-860-4070. (2) side by side niches located at Baue Funeral Home, off Cave Springs. Whispering Waters E. area. $3000 each. 314-429-6789


09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

OBITUARIES Kaliszewski, Dorothy M. Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016. Visitation Sun., Sep. 25, 4-8 pm at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh. Mass Mon., Sept. 26, 9:30 am at Holy Spirit Church 3130 Parkwood Ln. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Nelson, James Smith, M.D.

Quirk, Thomas M.

passed away in Virginia Beach, VA, September 21, 2016, with his family by his side. Jim was born March 19, 1933 in St. Louis, Mo., to Victor Nelson and Dorothy Smith. He was a graduate of Christian Brothers College High School and St. Louis University School of Medicine. He was a neuropathologist for more than 50 years and also served in the Army and Army Reserve for 20 years, retiring as a colonel. He is survived by his sister, Catharine Basile, of Evergreen Park, Ill.; son Paul and daughter-in-law Helen of Virginia Beach; son Andrew of Brooklyn, N.Y.; grandchildren Sydney Simpson, Samuel Nelson, Gabrielle Nelson, Rachel Bowen and Kelly Hastedt; nephew Joseph Basile, niece Anne Basile; former wife Sandra Nelson and numerous cousins. Jim was a lifelong researcher, having been an author on nearly 100 published papers - the most recent being this year - 24 book chapters and more than 64 abstracts. Areas of investigation included vitamin E, brain tumors and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. He was a professor of pathology at St. Louis University, Washington University and Louisiana State University, among others. He served as the director of neuropathology at Washington University and chairman of neuropathology at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. In 1979, he received a U.S. Senior Scientist award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, which led to a yearlong family adventure in West Berlin. Jim was the author or editor of several books but was most proud of "Principles and Practice of Neuropathology." He also served on editorial boards and committees too numerous to mention - his CV runs for 30 pages. And while his work gave him fulfillment, his greatest joy was being with family and doing things for them. He enjoyed fishing, travel, Cardinals baseball, Notre Dame football, Sherlock Holmes, spy novels, historical biographies, Sunday dinners and a glass of pinot grigio. He also possessed a quiet and sometimes devious sense of humor. Jim battled a variety of health issues over the past few years and never stopped looking for solutions. But when the time of his passing came, he faced it with courage and grace. He was a Roman Catholic and a member of St. Mark's in Virginia Beach. Services: A visitation will be held Tuesday, Sept. 27, at 9 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier College Church at St. Louis University (3628 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Mo., 63108). The funeral mass will be at 10 a.m., followed by interment in Calvary Cemetery. Flowers may be sent to the church, or donations may be made to Freda H. Gordon Hospice & Palliative Care of Tidewater, 757-321-2242. A Kutis South County Chapel Service

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Beloved husband of Debbie Quirk (nee Schowengerdt); dear father of Jamie (Paul) Frala-Cooper and Kate (Tracey) Ennis; dear stepfather of Jason (Suzy) Camenzind and Brandon (Cheryl) Schowengerdt; dear grandfather of Carly and Benton Frala, Kaden and Mila Camenzind, Jakob Fiudo, and Penelope and Elijah Schowengerdt; our dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and a friend to many. Services: Memorial Visitation on Tuesday, September 27 at Kriegshauser West, 9450 Olive Blvd. from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m. A Memorial Mass will be held at All Souls Catholic Church, 9550 Tennyson Ave., Overland, on Wednesday, September 28, at 10:00 a.m. Burial of cremains will be held at a later date in Holy Cross Cemetery Milwaukee, WI.

Redelsheimer, Sigmund Marvin

Rutledge, Stella Marie

Stebe, Clifford C.

Stella Rutledge passed away on September 21, 2016 in Brookfield, WI. She was born October 24, 1927 in New Berlin, IL, the daughter of John L. and Cecilia Sullivan Haugh. Beloved wife of the late Leslie Douglas. Loving mother of Douglas (Jo-Marie) and proud grandmother of Jackson. Dear sister of Mary (the late Jim) Alabach. Dear aunt of Anne, Dan, Jim (Melissa), Steve (Nikki), Tom (Maddie) Alabach and Ellen (Loren) Goodman. Great Aunt of Logan & Tyler Alabach and Natalie Goodman. Dear cousin and friend. She was preceded in death by her parents and her brothers, John W. "Jack" and James and sister Jeanette Haugh. After graduating from New Berlin High School, she was employed by the State of Illinois Dept. of Registration and Education. Stella was a long time employee of TWA in St. Louis and Chicago and enjoyed international travel. In Chicago, she also worked in the Cook County Sheriff's Office. As a resident of St. Louis, she was an active member of Bon Vivant Travel and StepUp! St. Louis organizations. She was an excellent cook who loved to entertain and belonged to a gourmet cooking group. Time with family was most precious to her. Services: Visitation at the Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home, Palatine, IL Tuesday, September 27th, 8:30 - 10:30 a.m. Funeral Mass at St. Theresa Catholic Church in Palatine at 11 a.m. followed by burial at St. Michael the Archangel Cemetery. Memorials to Hometown Hospice of Brookfield, WI appreciated.

of Oakville, MO graduate of Central Missouri State University and Bayless High School passed away September 22, 2016 at age 66. Cliff is survived by his loving family of wife Kathy Stebe, mother Deloris Stebe, brother Bob Stebe, sister Kim Bladdick; sons Cliff Stebe Jr. (Sally), David Stebe (Colleen); step daughter Kristi Weiss (Mike) and seven grandchildren Kaitlyn Stebe, Jack Stebe, Carson Weiss, Benjamin Stebe, Anna Stebe, Charlotte Weiss and Nora Stebe and several loving cousins, nieces, and nephews. Services: Funeral at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., 63129, on Monday, September 26 at 10:00 AM. Interment Sunset Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Visitation Sunday evening 4-8 PM.

Kardell, Marilyn M. (nee Munster) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Friday, September 23, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Richard J. Kardell; dear mother of Donna Kardell, Sherry (Mike) Slyman, Janet (Pat) Kilker, Connie (Joe) Blume and Richard (Sharon) Kardell Jr.; dear grandmother of Christa (David) Hailey, Jenna (Nick) Carter, Paige (fiance Tony Borzillo) and Michael Slyman, Ryan and Mitchell McKibben, Maggie (Steve) Heinze and Jake Blume, Ricky, Jack and Brett Kardell; dear Mookie of Lexi, Bella, Makenzie, Kylie and Elise; dear sister, sister-inlaw, aunt, cousin and friend. She taught us everything, except how to live without her. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, Wednesday, September 28, 9:30 a.m. to St. Catherine Laboure Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Contributions to the Animal Protection Association appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 4-8 p.m.

Keck, Virginia Ayers June 16, 2016. Services: Memorial Service Saturday October 1st, 10:00 AM. To be held at the Chapel of Laclede Groves Care Center, 723 S. Laclede Station Rd. Webster Groves, MO 63119 In lieu of flowers: gifts may be made to The Laclede Groves Benevolent Fund at the above address. To be used to assist residents with special needs. www.valhallafunerals.net

Krisay, Wilma E. "Willie"

98, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Thurs., Sept. 22, 2016. Beloved wife of the late John G. for nearly 46 years. Dear mother of Margaret "Peggy" (the late John) Grotpeter; loving grandmother of Jennifer Grotpeter (Andrew Sundelin) and Becky (Gary) Skaggs; dear great-grandmother of John-Spates, Audrey and Cora; dear aunt and friend. Wilma volunteered for 35 years at Missouri Baptist Med. Ctr. Services: Visitation Sun., Sept. 25, 3-7 p.m. at BOPP CHAPEL, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Funeral Mass Mon. 10 am at St. Peter Church, Kirkwood. Interment, Resurrection. Memorials preferred to Mo. Baptist Cardiac Cath. Lab. See boppchapel.com

Palecek, Robert

Kunderman, Mary Ann

(nee Ruzicka) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Beloved wife of the late John W. Kunderman; loving mother of Vince (Susan), Bill (Suzie) and Paul (Lisa) Kunderman and the late Anne Oxton; mother-in-law to the late Cheryl Kunderman and Rick (Lisa) Oxton; sister-in-law to Rose Marie Ruzicka; proud grandmother of 9 and greatgrandmother of 10; dear sister, dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Mrs. Kunderman raised a loving family, was a graduate of Rosati-Kain Highschool, and was a proud member of Retail Clerks Union 655. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Sunday, September 25, 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Seven Holy Founders Catholic Church Monday at 10 a.m. Interment, Resurrection Cemetery.

Lahm, Frank J. Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection Friday, September 23, 2016. Loving husband of Dolores Lahm (nee Ruzicka) for 59 years. Loving dad of Kathy Zielinski, Laura, Michael (Malinda), Frank III (Dana) Lahm and Maria (Scott) Yaeger; beloved grandpa of 17; great-grandpa of 1, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, September 26, 2016, 9:30 a.m. to Assumption Catholic Church, 10 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Memorial contributions to St. Vincent dePaul Society Assumption Mattese or St. Anthony's Hospice. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m.

of Lonedell, MO, September 22, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Pauline (nee Waldo) Palecek, loving father of Corey Elizabeth (Rick) Nappier and Tracy Ellen (Gerald) Maupin, dear grandfather of Katie (Kent) Miller and Justin Maupin, and friend to many. Services: Services are private. In lieu of flowers memorials may be made to the St. Jude Children's Hospital, P. O. Box 1000, Dept. 142, Memphis TN 38148-0412. Family and friends can review and share stories, photos and condolences online at www.stlfuneral.com.

Perkinson, Robert E.

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Sept. 21, 2016. Beloved husband of Jane Perkinson (nee Schneeberger) and the late Virginia Perkinson (nee White); dear father and father-in-law of Mary (nee Jungewaelter) and Judge Henry Autrey; step-father of Gary Austin; grandfather of Emily, Frederich "Fritz" Autrey and Christina Austin; brother-in-law of Don and JoAnn Schneeberger; our uncle, cousin and friend. Services: from the Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Mon., Sept. 25, 9:30 a.m. to St. Monica for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery. Visitation from 2-8 p.m. Sunday.

Pope, Maxine age 85, of St. Peters, Missouri, died Saturday, September 24, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Minana, Frank J.

Prouhet, Theodore C.

85, passed away at home on September 22. For the full Obituary visit https://www.stlouiscremation. com/obituary/9650

age 83, of Saint Charles, MO, died Thursday, September 22, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit www.baue.com

Ramshaw, Dolores M. Loving mother of Dennis (Patti) & Billy. STYGAR

Raykovich, Glenda Jean "Jeanne" Cochran

73, of Hilltop Lakes, TX (formerly of College Station) went to be with The Lord Friday September 23, 2016. Jeanne was born July 10th, 1943, to James Augustus Fuller Sr. and Esteen Odom Fuller in Conroe, Texas. Jeanne grew up in Conroe and graduated from Conroe High School, apart from a couple years at a Sun Pipeline Oil Co. camp in Silver, Texas. Jeanne told many stories of her time there including riding her bike along the dirt roads with her sister. One of the great joys of Jeanne's childhood was her large family. Besides her parents, Jeanne had eight brothers and sisters, eleven aunts and uncles plus their spouses, and dozens of cousins. Staying close to and being involved with her family was important to Jeanne's parents as her father was considered the patriarch of the family. She told endless stories of when her relatives would gather for various holidays, or when relatives would drop by for a frequent visit. Always a hard worker, Jeanne began working in high school. Her jobs included working at a bank, teaching in the Navasota school district, and several positions with Texas A&M University. These included Texas Agricultural Lifetime Leadership (TALL), Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAEX), the Office of the Commandant for the Corps of Cadets, and in the International Agricultural Programs Department. In 1966 Jeanne married Donald Mason Cochran II. He had an optometry practice in Navasota and Madisonville. While living in Navasota they lived in a turn of the century Victorian house. They had two children, Donald Mason Cochran III and Carol D'Ann Cochran, and three grandchildren, Michael Steven Cochran, Donald Mason Cochran IV, and Curtis Maverick Cochran. Jeanne and Don enjoyed traveling around the United States in their RV. Her husband Don preceded her in death. Jeanne was an active person and loved antiquing and traveling. She could not pass an antique store without going in. Jeanne had many unique collections and her house is filled with many beautiful antiques. She enjoyed cooking and trying new and different activities. Jeanne played the piano, the saxophone and the dulcimer. She was a member of Beta Sigma Phi International Women's Organization for over 40 years. During that time she received honors such as the Order of the Rose and the Silver Circle and served as an officer and committee member many times. At present she was a member of Gamma Gamma Master Chapter. Jeanne had many dear friends in the organization. In 2000 Jeanne married Thomas "Tommy" Edward Raykovich who was preceded in death by his first wife. They lived in College Station before moving to Hilltop Lakes. They enjoyed cooking with a dutch oven cooking group with their friends, RVing around Texas, and traveled to Europe together in their newly found retirement. Tommy has three children by his first wife, Stacy Ann Broussard, Teresa Lillian Black, and Jason Neil Raykovich, and 13 grandchildren. Jeanne is survived by her husband Tommy, all of her children and grandchildren, and her sister Carolyn Irene Popp of St. Peters, MO. She is predeceased by her first husband Donald, her parents, and her siblings Lelia Vee Fuller, Robert Jones Fuller, Alice Louise Fuller, James Carl Fuller, Gwendolyn Lorraign Fuller, James Augustus Fuller Jr., and Ralph Douglas Fuller. Jeanne was a loving person and a good friend to many. Services: Visitation will be held at Hillier Funeral Home in College Station on Tuesday, September 27th from 5-7 p.m. Funeral services will be at Hillier Funeral Home in College Station on Wednesday, September 28th at 11:00 a.m. A reception will follow at 12:00 at the Hillier Funeral Home. Interment will be at Conroe Memorial Park at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Still Creek Ranch. Please visit Jeanne's tribute page at www.hillierfuneralhome.com to share stories and memories.

87, longtime resident of St. Louis County, died September 15, 2016 at Gosnell Memorial Hospice House in Scarborough, Maine. Born in Jacksonville, Florida, he moved at an early age to Columbus, Georgia where he graduated from Jordan Vocational High School in 1946. Shortly after graduation he joined the U.S. Navy and in 1947 was selected for a Naval ROTC scholarship at Auburn University. He majored in Aeronautical Engineering and was a member of Phi Kappa Tau social fraternity, of which he was president his senior year. He was also a member of the Scabbard and Blade Military Honor Society, Steerage Naval Honor Society, Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honorary, and Blue Key Service Honorary. Upon graduation and commissioning in 1951 he was assigned to the U.S.S. Robert A. Owens DDE 827, aboard which he served until released from active duty in May, 1954. In September of that year he enrolled as a graduate student at the California Institute of Technology and received his Master's degree in Aeronautics in June of 1955. He was hired by McDonnell Aircraft Corp. and did research in high speed aerodynamics for three years. In 1958 he was assigned to the nascent space studies at McDonnell and was instrumental in in the conceptual design of the nation's first manned spacecraft, the Mercury. For the next 29 years he worked on numerous space programs including Air Force Gemini B, NASA Skylab, numerous confidential government programs, was Program Manager of the Space Shuttle Aft Propulsion Subsystem built by McDonnell and retired in 1987 as Director of Space Programs for the St. Louis division of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company. He was a charter member of Forest Hills Country Club in Clarkson Valley, Missouri, an active member of the Grace Methodist Church choir in St. Louis in the 1960s and '70s, and later was active in a local chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. Sig was predeceased by his wife, Shirley, in February 2016, after which he moved to Falmouth, Maine. He is survived by: three children from his first marriage, Sigmund Mark of Las Vegas, Nevada, Carol Leigh of Yarmouth, Maine, and Miles Bruce of Otter Creek, Maine; two granddaughters, Katrina and Elena, who reside in the San Francisco Bay Area of California; and his beloved goddaughter Rebecca Turner Riggs of Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday, September 26, 2016 at 9:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the St. Louis Symphony, St. Louis Zoo, Missouri Botanical Garden, or the Auburn Alumni Association. Visitation at the FAMILY CENTER at Schrader Funeral Home, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016 from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. followed by interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Family requests that if able for friends and veterans to attend the committal service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Roberts, Franklin D. 81, passed away peacefully at his home on September 23, 2016 after a valiant year-long battle against cancer. He was the youngest of 10 children born in Pike Co., KY. and grew up in the Ashland, KY area. He was a Naval Aviator for 5 years and flew the P2V airplane all over the world. He graduated from Purdue University with an Aeronautical Engineering degree and retired after a successful 33-year career at McDonnell Douglas. His interests included travel, golf, bridge, and spending time with his extended family. A lifelong Christian, he was a Sunday School teacher at First Baptist Church of Ellisville. Survivors include his beloved wife of 59 years, Virginia Irwin Roberts, and three children: Julie Dawn Bell (John), Kyle Irwin Roberts (Suzanne) and Mark Gregory Roberts (Barb); and 8 grandchildren. Services: Funeral service at First Baptist Church Ellisville, 137 Clarkson Road, Ellisville, Tuesday, 11:00 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Gideon's International, 437 Gabriel Dr., Kirkwood, MO 63122. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday 4-8 p.m. and Tuesday at the church from 10 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Honor

Ryan, Mary

Stelmacki, Melissa Ann baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Monday, September 19, 2016. Beloved daughter of Mike Stelmacki and Darla Stelmacki (nee Vrsnik). Loving sister of Michael Stelmacki and the late Suzanne Stelmacki. Niece of Cindy (the late Dennis) Rohde and Janet Stelmacki. Faithful companion of her puppy Curly. Dear cousin and friend of many. She was a graduate of Maryville University and University of Missouri Columbia. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Tuesday, 9:45 a.m. to St. Clare of Assisi Catholic Church, Ellisville for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be made to American Red Cross or Maryville University. Visitation Monday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Tourville, Myra Alice

87, Sept 21, 2016. Baptised into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection. Beloved wife of the late John L. Ryan; dear mother of Mary Ann (John) Howard, John W. (Evonne) Ryan, Robert (Kathy) Ryan, Thomas (Kristi) Ryan, Maureen (Tony) Ryan-Jones and Kevin (Melissa) Ryan; dear grandmother of Matthew, Shane, Andrew and Isaac; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial visitation for the celebration of Mary's life Oct 1, 2016, 9:30 am at St. Ferdinand Catholic Church, followed by 10am memorial mass Interment private at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials in Mary's name may be given to The Humane Society of Missouri or American Cancer Society appreciated. HUTCHENS MORTUARY

Sandstedt, Paul 85, of Metropolis, IL, formerly of St. Louis, MO, died on Saturday, September 17, 2016 at Metropolis Nursing and Rehab. Mr. Sandstedt was a retired millwright from National Lead. Surviving is his wife, Catherine Sandstedt; two sons, Kevin and Kenny both of Jefferson County, MO; four daughters, Karen, Kim, Kathy, Kristy, all of Jefferson County, MO; and several grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Wilmer E. Sandstedt and Myrtle Irene Sims-Sandstedt. No services are scheduled at this time. Lindsey Funeral Home of Paducah is in charge of arrangements.

Schmidt, Joan E.

(nee Johnson) age 77, Thursday, September 22, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Paul Schmidt. Dear sister of Ronald (Phyllis) Johnson; our dear aunt and cousin. Services: Private services will be held at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. A special thank you to the staff at Stonebridge Nursing Home, who cared for Joan.

Spellman, Larry

...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

passed away on Friday, September 23, 2016. Beloved husband of Judy Spellman (nee Behr); dear father of Laura (Mark) Callen, Steven (Cindy) Spellman and Julie (Skyler) Millburg; grandfather of Olivia, Ben and Charlie Trost, Hattie Callen; Brielle and Nora Sage Spellman, Alyssa, Madelyn and Maci Millburg; brother of Sandy (George) Azzanni, Sue (Mike) Kyle and Scott Spellman; uncle, brother-in-law, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Manchester, Tuesday, 10:00 a.m. Interment Bethel Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made the American Heart Association. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Rd. at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

(nee LoVan), RN, MSW, was born March 15, 1930 and died on September 19, 2016 at the age of 86. She was born near Steelville, Missouri. Her parents were the late Elmer Lovan and Katherine Downey Lovan. Alice was the youngest of eight children. In her teens, she moved to St. Clair, Missouri and graduated from high school in 1947. She moved to St. Louis and graduated from the Deaconess Hospital of Nursing in 1951. She married John L. Casey and they had two children. In 1971, Alice married Lester W. Tourville, who died in 1978. Later in life, Mel Tochtrop was Alice's beloved companion for more than 25 years. She is survived by her daughter, Suzanne K. (Michael) Burnett of Germantown, Tennessee, and her son, Mark E. Casey of Boulder, Colorado. Alice had four grandchildren: Thomas (Alyson) Burnett; Katherine Burnett (Michael) Koss; Caroline M. Casey and W. Evan Casey; and two great-grandchildren, Emma and Ryan Koss. Also surviving are 13 much-loved nieces and nephews and their families: Maxine Anderson; Richard Lovan; Jean Martin; Lawrence Lovan; Maxine Schuman; Judith LeBlanc; Janice Keale; Deborah Compton; Diana Sawyer; Anita Kemp; John Lovan; Pamela Norris; and Leslie Whitley. The seven siblings who preceded her in death were the late Mary E. Lovan, Max Lovan, Eugene Lovan, Elizabeth Martin, Helen J. Evans, Elmer Lovan, and Donna Souder. Alice was member of the Maplewood United Methodist Church and later Concord Trinity United Methodist Church. She was the Occupational Health Nurse at Sunnen Products for 32 years. During that time she started classes at Washington University, earning a B.S. degree in Psychology and a Master's degree from the George Warren Brown School of Social Work where she served as an Adjunct Professor and president of the Alumni Board. She worked part-time at St. Anthony's Medical Center as a counselor in Hyland's Family Program and taught stress management classes. Alice was passionate about her role as the Facilitator of the Missouri Osteoporosis Foundation Support Group from its inception in 1997 until her passing. At Friendship Village, she served on the board and the wellness, caregiver, retired nurses, and VCC committees. Her latest project has been as an ambassador of the Music and Memory program. Alice was surrounded by her loving family when she passed away with congestive heart disease. She participated in the Washington University Memory and Aging Study for 15 years and donated her body to the medical school. Services: Friends are invited to attend a memorial service in the chapel at Friendship Village Sunset Hills, 12563 Village Circle Drive, St. Louis, MO 63127 on October 3 at 1:30. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to The Friendship Foundation, Attention: Kate Myers, for the Music and Memory program at Friendship Village. Donations may also be made to the Mercy Health Foundation, Hospice Memorial Fund, 615 S. New Ballas Road, St. Louis, MO 63141.

Tumminia, Edward "Ted" Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Fri., Sept. 23, 2016. Dear son of Joseph and Ellen; dear brother of Beth (David) Hein; dear uncle of Teddy & David Hein; dear cousin, nephew and beloved friend. Services: Visitation Mon. Sept. 26, 9-10 am followed by 10 am Mass at St. Justin the Martyr Church. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Contributions preferred to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. www.boppchapel.com


J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 1 Sunday • 09.25.2016 • a24

FAITH PERSPECTIVES

What is a ‘Christian American’? Faiths share duty to uphold values of liberty, equality, human rights

faith traditions as well). For example, respect for the rights and dignity of others underlies the Gospel. In Matthew 25 we have the imperative to be generously compassionate to the poor and weak. The best gift given to praise God is a gift that addresses the welfare of others. Another common value between Christianity and the ideals of our nation is that of hospitality for the stranger. We affirm that there is little diference between Moses commanding the Israelites to show kindness to aliens (Deuteronomy 10:19) and the Statue of Liberty bearing the words, “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” So, to me, being a Christian in America means, without apology, endorsing those bedrock values underlying our constitution. It also means using the freedom of expression we have for standing up for those values when we get of course in our nation. When freedom becomes a license to do what I want, regardless of how that may afect oth-

ers, we get of course. When the pursuit of happiness becomes translated as widening the gap between rich and poor, we get of course. When justice is subjugated because some can buy better legal counsel than others, we get off course. I believe it is a privilege to live in a country such as ours. When we embody the ideals of this country, then — like the land God would show Abraham — we will be a blessing to the world. But along with the privilege comes a responsibility. To be a Christian American means to be diligent and vigilant in upholding the core values shared with our faith. Metaxas relates in his book an interesting story about Ben Franklin. When this American patriarch emerged from the convention in Philadelphia that finalized the Constitution, a woman approached him. She asked, “Well, doctor, what have we got? A monarchy or a republic?” Franklin, who was 81 at the

time, replied, “A republic, madam — if we can keep it.” IF we can keep the ideals of a nation grounded in “liberty and justice for all.” IF we can keep the sense of mutual connectedness where, in the words of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” IF we can safeguard the rights of others to think diferently, believe differently, live differently than ourselves. IF we can promote the welfare of others, to have equal access to the resources of life, whether they live at Park and 14th or at Clarkson and Manchester. IF we can do such things, THEN indeed we can preserve the republic. In doing so, we will be true to our calling to a higher purpose, whether we be a Christian American, a Jewish American or a Muslim American.

A minister, a rabbi and an imam walk into a room … which of course sounds like a joke, but on Sunday it wasn’t. The occasion was an interfaith event in which our three different faith communities — the United Hebrew Congregation, the Islamic Foundation of St. Louis, and Manchester United Methodist — came together for an afternoon of learning about each other, sharing prayers and enjoying food (the universal sacrament). The question we three clergy decided to focus upon was eyeopening for me. We would consider what it means to be both

an American and a person from our respective faith communities. For me, that translates into, “What does it mean to be a Christian American?” I’d never really thought of that question before. Frankly, in other contexts, asking that question could imply a Moral Majority type of answer: A Christian American is one who advocates for a staunchly conservative stance on a variety of social issues. Now, in preparation for this event at which I was to share a few remarks, I needed to reflect critically about it. Simplistic answers wouldn’t do. My mind wandered to a recent book by Eric Metaxas titled, “If You Can Keep It.” He describes the founding of our country as an experiment that had never really been tried before. It would be an experiment in self-government, and that government would be grounded in the basic values of liberty, equality and human rights. In reflecting on this, it’s striking how these values are shared by Christianity (and our other

EVENTS

VICTIMS OF 2013 aTTaCK In PaKISTan aRE REMEMBEREd

SaTuRday

People pay tribute Thursday to victims of a 2013 suicide bombing at All Saints Church in Peshawar, Pakistan. More than a hundred Christians were killed and hundreds more injured in the deadliest attack to date on the Christian minority in Pakistan.

REV. GREG WEEKS Manchester United Methodist Church

Class • “Capturing the Heart of Faith in Our Christian Creed” is a three-part class that explores the historical, social and theological contexts that shaped the Nicene Creed, the Apostles Creed and the lesser-known Athanasian Creed. 10 a.m. $10 per session. National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows, 442 South De Mazenod Drive in Belleville. 618-394-6270

Weeks is senior pastor of Manchester United Methodist Church. He is a regular Faith Perspectives contributor to STLtoday.com/ religion.

Sunday Arianna String Quartet • Second Presbyterian Church hosts a free concert at 4501 Westminster Place in the Central West End. 4 p.m. 314-367-0367 Christian Family Night • Edison’s Entertainment Complex will host a Christian Family Night from 4 to 9 p.m. $20 plus tax per guest, and payments will be collected at the door. 2477 South State Route 157 in Edwardsville. 618-307-9020 The Discipleship Project • The Pentecostals of Troy (Ill.), 8965 Route 162, ofers a series of lessons taught for various ages, using the same story line but in an age-appropriate context. 9:30 a.m. 618-667-6054 Puppet performance • Join the H.I.S. Puppeteers of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Des Peres, as they kick-of their 11th year of service with their new program, “Follow the Shepherd.” 10:30 a.m. St. Paul’s Lutheran Church of Des Peres, 12345 Manchester Road. 314-822-2771 Humanity for Children • Teachers Claire Flesch from Sappington School and Dan Harms from Lutheran High School South will talk about their summer missionary experiences in Tanzania and Rwanda at Bethel Lutheran Church in University City, 7001 Forsyth Boulevard. 8:45 a.m. 314-863-3112 Speaker Series • Marie Griith,the director of the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics and the editor of the Center’s journal, Religion & Politics, will be at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 808 North Mason Road, as part of the church’s first annual speaker series. 4 p.m. 314-434-5906

MOnday Luther’s Augustinian Roots • This course for laity and clergy examines how Martin Luther was shaped by and diverged from the theology of St. Augustine of the 4th century. 7 p.m. Christ Lutheran Church, 1 Selma Avenue in Webster Groves. 314918-2556

THuRSday Kabbalah Centre St. Louis Re-Opening • Discover ancient Kabbalistic wisdom in your own backyard. Join Kabbalah Centre at it opens its doors for free seminars including cabalistic astrology and the essentials of kabbalah. Explore our bookstore and learn more about spirituality and the family and Kabbalah’s foundational text, the Zohar. 5:30 p.m. Kabbalah Centre, 8121 Maryland Avenue. 800-522-2252 Submit event listings for free online at events.stltoday.com by registering on the site and following instructions. Only online submissions are accepted.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. religions’ value set at $1.2 trillion American churches are major contributors to local economies, new study calculates By LauREn MaRKOE Religion News Service

WaSHInGTOn • Religion is big

bucks — worth $1.2 trillion annually to the American economy, according to the first comprehensive study to tabulate such a figure. “In perspective, that would make religion the 15th largest national economy in the world, ahead of 180 other countries in terms of value,” said Georgetown University’s Brian Grim, the study’s author. “That would also make American religion larger than the global revenues of the top 10 tech companies, including Apple, Amazon and Google,” he continued. “It would also make it 50 percent larger than the six largest American oil companies’ revenue on an annual basis.” It might seem folly to try to put a number on religion’s value to American society. Even Grim understands why the religious and nonreligious alike might look upon the exercise skeptically. “You may think that’s not possible,” he said at the study’s release on Sept. 14 in Washington, and he compared it to putting a price tag on love. “But if you realize that love often results in marriage and marriages often happen in churches … ” Grim continued. “I can tell you exactly how much money poured into center city Baltimore

when my daughter got married there a year and a half ago.” To put a value on the work of the nation’s 344,000 religious congregations — representing all faiths — Grim looked at the schools they run, the soup kitchens, the addiction recovery programs and their impact on local economies. Churches, synagogues, mosques and other houses of worship mostly spend locally — employing hundreds of thousands of people and buying everything from flowers to computers to snow removal services. Grim came up with three estimates and settled on the middle one — the $1.2 trillion — as what he called a “conservative” appraisal of the work of religious organizations in American society annually. Why crunch these numbers? Grim, an associate scholar at Georgetown’s Religious Freedom Project, said it’s good to know where religion stands. By one of his colleague’s estimates, that $1.2 trillion equates to about 7 percent of the nation’s GDP. But Grim also wants congregations and clergy — and the society that benefits from the charitable work of the religious — to appreciate this generosity. In a culture in which people often hear much more about the evils committed by religious people — from sex abuse scandals to genocide — it’s time for some “balance,” Grim said.

Even clergy often downplay the value of their work, said Ram Cnaan, who directs the Program for Religion and Social Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania and came to Washington to help Grim present the study. Cnaan — though quick to describe himself as secular — hopes Grim’s work boosts the confidence of the religious and allows them to take pride in their contributions to the economy and society. “This is a new day for the people who study congregations,” he said of the study, titled “The Socio-economic Contribution of Religion to American Society: An Empirical Analysis.” “This is the beginning of a national debate — not if religion is important but how much it is important,” Cnaan said. The Rev. Eugene Rivers, a Pentecostal minister from Boston known for his efforts fighting crime and drug abuse, seemed glad for the acknowledgment. When it comes time to deal with the messy drug problems of the inner city, he said to the group of clergy, lay leaders and journalists gathered for the study’s presentation, “none of the the secular left shows up.” Grim put Rivers’ point in context. Secular organizations certainly contribute generously to the social health of the nation, he said. But he also noted a recent Pew Research Center study

that showed that the religious are more likely to volunteer to help others, and give more to charity on average than the nonreligious. Without the charitable work of religiously motivated people, “I don’t think we would see all the good of society disappearing,” said Grim.”But I think it would be significantly less.” Grim’s study notes that congregations and religiously oriented charity groups are responsible for: • 130,000 alcohol and drug abuse recovery programs. • 94,000 programs to support veterans and their families. • 26,000 programs to prevent HIV/AIDS and to support people living with the disease. • 121,000 programs to train and support the unemployed. William A. Galston, a Brookings Institution scholar and former oicial in the administration of President Bill Clinton who writes on religion and society, called the $1.2 trillion “a sensible number.” Faith issues and religious leaders don’t get much attention by senior government officials, continued Galston, who served as a deputy assistant to Clinton for domestic policy and who was invited to speak at the study’s release. Grim’s paper, Galston said, can be used by religious organizations as “a credible calling card to get in the door.”


NEWS

A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

75 YEARS OF MOUNT RUSHMORE ‘hink bigger,’ sculptor told planners who envisioned monument to West BY REGINA GARCIA CANO Associated Press

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. • It was a

historian’s idea: Carve gigantic sculptures into the granite pinnacles of the Black Hills of South Dakota, significant Western figures such as Lewis and Clark, Buffalo Bill Cody, Fremont, Red Cloud and Sacagawea. “In the vicinity of Harney Peak ... are opportunities for heroic sculpture of unusual character,” South Dakota Department of History Superintendent Doane Robinson wrote to a sculptor in Georgia in 1924. The sculptor, Gutzon Borglum, redefined the project entirely. Using jackhammers and dynamite, he began in 1927, first sculpting President George Washington, then Thomas Jeferson, followed by Abraham Lincoln and finally Theodore Roosevelt. Next month, Mount Rushmore National Memorial marks 75 years of public pervasiveness, ending up in movies and comics and on quarter-dollar coins. “Borglum told Robinson, ‘You

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTOS

Mount Rushmore has become South Dakota’s most famous attraction and draws about 3 million visitors a year. The monument originally was planned to honor signiicant igures of the West.

are not thinking big enough. Western figures? That’s not going to attract enough people. You need to think bigger,’” said Maureen McGee-Ballinger, the memorial’s chief of interpretation and education. Robinson was looking for ways to promote the state, particularly the Black Hills, McGee-Ballinger said. Plan B surely has served that purpose, with about 3 million people visiting every year.

“For the state, and the nation, Mount Rushmore is quite iconic,” South Dakota State Historical Society Director Jay Vogt said. “It definitely put South Dakota on the map as a destination ... Because these are elected individuals on the mountain, who worked hard to preserve a nation whose creation was unique in and of itself, it really speaks to the idea that we are a country of free people.” Along the way, it has also found

a place in pop culture. A chase scene in “North by Northwest,” Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 classic starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint, included a death-defying scramble over the presidents’ faces. “Alfred Hitchcock says he expects to realize his long ambition — filming a chase over the Mt. Rushmore Monument,” The Associated Press reported in 1958. “He may be spoofing, but you

never can tell with Hitchcock.” Some scenes were filmed at the memorial, but the climbing of the faces were studio shots that used models of the mountain. A 1983 special anniversary issue of the comic “Wonder Woman” features her face next to the stone Lincoln. T-shirts with the faces of superheroes instead of the presidents are available at Target and elsewhere. The memorial is a never-ending muse for political cartoonists, and in 2016, there’s been no shortage of memes. The memorial has also been featured in multiple coins, including a quarter issued by the U.S. Mint in 2013 that shows men adding the finishing details to Jefferson’s face. The four faces have also been highlighted in postage stamps, and they are — of course — in the background of South Dakota’s license plates. To celebrate the milestone, the National Park Service held events during the summer in connection with its own 100th birthday. The memorial should be lauded for several reasons, according to Debbie Ketel Speas, communications director for the nonprofit Mount Rushmore Society, especially its impact on the state’s tourism industry and economic development, as well as the efforts of those who worked to make it a reality. “When you look at what they achieved over 75 years ago, it’s quite spectacular,” she said.

PHOTO BY SCIENCE ADVANCES, B. SEALES ET AL 2016

The ancient En-Gedi scroll, both as it was found (at right) and “virtually” unfurled. It had been found in the Holy Ark of a Jewish settlement dating to about 700 B.C.

How scientists read fragile, ancient scroll — without unrolling it BY RACHEL FELTMAN Washington Post

When the En-Gedi scroll was discovered in Israel in 1970, it was in no shape to be read: It had been found in the Holy Ark of a Jewish settlement dating to about 700 B.C. and had burned along with the rest of the settlement in the year 600. The scroll was little more than a tiny, charred lump of animal parchment. To unroll the lump would be unthinkable, as the gentlest touch might crumble the text to dust. Now, more than 40 years later, researchers at the University of Kentucky have provided Israeli scholars with legible text from inside the scroll — without having to unroll it. The first bits of analysis, pub-

lished in Science Advances, reveal that the 1,500-year-old scroll contains the book of Leviticus written in Hebrew. That makes it the oldest Pentateuchal scroll ever found in Hebrew outside of the Dead Sea Scrolls. “We never dreamed we could bring it back to life,” study co-author Pnina Shor, curator at the Israel Antiquities Authority, said. The researchers involved in the discovery announced their initial findings in July, when the remains of the scroll were put on display in the Israeli Museum in Jerusalem. But it wasn’t until this month that the scientists behind the scroll-saving technology detailed their process, which they hope can be used to virtually unfurl many more “unreadable” texts. To image the words inside the scroll, U. of Kentucky scientists led by William Brent Seales started with a simple digital scan of the charred object. But because of the topography of an old, rolled-up scroll, the next steps are more complicated. “The magic — or the secret sauce, if you will — it’s not in the scanning alone,” he said.“Imaging alone is almost never a complete solution, because scrolls are scrolled. The layers with the writing on them are rolled up, they’re stacked, they’re crushed, they’re fused. It’s totally unpredictable, and that structure has to be untangled no matter what the imaging method.” That’s where Seales’ “virtual unwrap-

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Stanley “Buckwheat” Dural Jr. • The musician who rose from a cotton-picking family in Louisiana to bring zydeco music to the world through his namesake band, Buckwheat Zydeco, has died. He was 68. Longtime manager Ted Fox said that Mr. Dural died early Saturday (Sept. 24, 2016). He had sufered from lung cancer. Fox said the musician and accordionist died at Our Lady of Lourdes Regional Medical Center in Lafayette, La. He gained fame by introducing zydeco music of Louisiana to the world. “This is one of the world’s true genius musicians. A completely natural musician who could just it in in any scenario,” Fox said. Zydeco music was popular in Louisiana, where people would drive for miles to small dance halls to hear zydeco bands featuring an accordion and a washboard. But Mr. Dural took zydeco music mainstream, launching a major-label album — the Grammy-nominated “On a Night Like This” — with Island Records in 1987. He went on to jam with musical greats including

ping” software comes in. The software is designed to first detect the individual pages based on their expected geometry, then “texture” it, or look for changes in brightness on the surfaces identified as pages. Dense areas — ones covered in ink, for example — appear brighter on the scan. Then the software flattens the rolled-up text, showing the words as they would appear on a two-dimensional surface. “We never needed physical access to the scroll,” Seales said. When the software finished analyzing its first sections of text, he was able to see them long before the scientists who actually had the scroll on hand in Israel. When Shor and the rest of her lab saw the processed images, she said, she “almost dropped of the chair.” “You can’t imagine the joy in the lab,” she said. Not all of the lines of text were recovered. The fire that destroyed En-Gedi engulfed the outer edges of the scroll and burned some outer layers all the way through, so certain spots are missing on every page. But there was enough text for Hebrew University’s Michael Segal to identify multiple verses from the Book of Leviticus. Aside from the Dead Sea Scrolls, which contain hundreds of religious texts and date to about 400 B.C., the En-Gedi text is the oldest Hebrew biblical tome ever found. “I think we can safely say that since the

Villhard, Carolyn Elizabeth Eric Clapton, play at former President Bill Clinton’s inauguration and perform at the 1996 Olympics closing ceremony in Atlanta. Bill Nunn • The veteran character actor, whose credits ranged from the “Spider-Man” movie franchise to such Spike Lee ilms as “Do the Right Thing” and “He Got Game,” has died. His wife, Donna, said Mr. Nunn died Saturday (Sept. 24, 2016) in Pittsburgh. He was 63 and had been battling cancer. Mr. Nunn was the son of a prominent Pittsburgh Steelers scout, also named Bill Nunn, and was a ballboy for the NFL team. He broke into movies in the late 1980s, irst in Lee’s “School Daze,” then in the Oscarnominated “Do the Right Thing,” as Radio Raheem, who dies when choked by police oicers during a street brawl. Mr. Nunn went on to appear in dozen of ilms and TV programs, including “SpiderMan” and “Sister Act.” From news services

(nee Finder), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Friday, September 23, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Robert A. Villhard, Sr,. Loving mother of Robert A. (Jan) Villhard, Jr., Christopher A. Villhard, Joy E. (James) Miller and Gayle M. (Tim) Benson. Loved grandmother of Kyle, Brett, Nicholas, Gregory, Angela, Matthew, Briana, Stephanie, Noah, Shane and Reid. Great-grandmother of Mia, Kaydence, Ryus, Tegan, Benjamin and Landon. Dear sister of Joe Finder, Marjorie Butler, Edward Finder, Donald Finder and the late John and James Finder. Dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Wednesday, 9:45 a.m. to St. Joseph Catholic Church, Manchester for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment St. Joseph Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to American Cancer Society. Visitation Tuesday 3-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Whiteman, Caryl Ruth 86, of St. Peters, MO. September 20, 2016. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. 636 498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

completion of the publication of the corpus of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the En-Gedi Leviticus scroll is the most extensive and significant biblical text from antiquity that has come to light,” Segal said. Shor added that she found the text itself to be rather symbolic: The opening chapters of Leviticus speak of burned religious oferings, and she and her colleagues were puzzling out the meaning of scrolls left behind when a community burned to the ground. “The burned ofering shall be flayed and cut up into its parts,” one preserved passage reads. “The sons of the priest Aaron shall put fire on the altar and arrange wood on the fire. Aaron’s sons the priests shall arrange the parts, with the head and the suet, on the wood that is on the fire on the altar.” “I think it symbolizes it all very nicely,” Shor said. Crumbling pages may soon be no match for modern technology: Earlier this month, scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced a new imaging method that allows them to virtually pierce the first few pages of delicate books and analyze their text. And Seales is eager to apply his software to other ancient scrolls. “Damage and decay is the natural order of things, but you can see that sometimes you can absolutely pull a text back from the brink of loss,” Seales said.

Winter, Mardel E. "Mardy" (nee: Cowell), Age 81, of St. Charles, MO, died on Friday, September 23, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

In Memoriam Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444 800-286-9557

6 adjoining p lo t s , Park Lawn Cemetery, Lemay, section 12, lot 307, $500 each. 480-313-4722

Patrick Joseph Hickey III Sept. 25, 1928 - Nov. 23, 2007 It broke our hearts to lose you, but you did not go alone. Part of us went with you the day God called you home. A million times we thought of you, a million times we cried. If loving could have saved you, you never would have died.

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WEATHER

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

END OF SUMMER SALE!

WEATHER • LOW 70, HIGH 87 • WINDS SE/SW 5-10 MPH Cold front on the way A cold front will gradually move across and bring showers and storms to the St. Louis area later Sunday afternoon into Sunday evening and Sunday night. It will feel more like fall next week as cooler air settles into the region. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

73°

84°

86°

72°

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Few storms possible

Chance of storms

4-DAY FORECAST

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

62°/72°

51°/70°

50°/74° 52°/76°

Partly sunny

Sunny

H

W

83 88 81 84 82 77 73 76 81 78 71 84 84

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

67 66 68 67 69 68 67 67 68 68 65 67 67

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

Sunny

Sunny

Shown are Sunday morning’s lows and Sunday afternoon’s highs.

SUNDAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

L

H

W

67 66 64 67 66 66 64 68 69 64 68 66

85 87 79 86 85 81 86 84 81 79 86 86

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms

Chicago 64 / 79

Kirksville 67 / 76 Kansas City 67 /73

Springfield 68 / 86

St. Louis 70 / 87 Carbondale 66 / 87

Joplin 68 / 77

Poplar Bluff 67 / 88

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 92° 69° 77° 57° 94° 36° 85° 59°

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.00” 4.68” 2.37” 33.16” 30.12”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (2:51 p.m.) Low (3:30 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1891) Record Low (1974) High Last Year Low Last Year

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Sep 23rd Weed - 25 (moderate), Mold - 31,167 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 16 Month (Total) 287 Season 1992 Year Ago 1776

First Oct 8

Full Oct 15

6:51 AM Sunset

Sunrise

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Last Oct 22 6:54 PM

Moonrise 12:37 AM Moonset 3:08 PM

Looking to the west around 9 p.m. tonight you will see a bright orange star called Arcturus. This star is the 4th brightest star in the sky and is part of the constellation Boötes the Herdsman.

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SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 15.21 23 12.65 Jefferson City 21 13.85 Hermann 20 11.01 Washington 25 17.57 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 15.61 Louisiana 15 14.51 Dam 24 25 24.88 Dam 25 26 24.48 Grafton 18 16.86 M.Price, Pool 419 413.50 M.Price, Tail. 21 15.60 St Louis 30 20.64 Chester 27 23.30 Cape Girardeau 32 27.79

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.43 18 12.52 Peoria 14 12.34 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.41 Sullivan 16 0.26 Valley Park 24 17.96 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.99 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 24.42

- 0.71 - 0.52 - 0.58 - 0.66 - 0.86 + 0.01 + 0.06 + 0.12 + 0.10 - 0.03 - 0.30 - 0.44 - 0.58 - 0.05 + 0.25

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Current Level

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

- 0.26 - 0.38 - 0.41 - 0.12 - 0.70 - 0.59 - 0.20

355.76 - 0.05 363.32 - 0.43 496.00 - 0.54 659.49 - 0.08 707.66 - 0.45 658.72 - 0.16 910.75 - 0.10 841.40 + 0.01 600.34 - 0.06 408.89 - 0.05 608.03 0.00 445.28 - 0.10

- 0.04

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 103° McAllen, Texas

Low: 19° Truckee, California

60s Rain

50s 70s 50s

90s

60s

60s

60s

70s

60s T-storms

70s 70s

80s 60s 90s

80s

Snow

80s

70s 90s 80s Wintry Mix

90s Jet Stream

Alaska Low: 28°

Hawaii High: 90°

A cold front will trigger scattered showers and thunderstorms across parts of the Plains that will gradually spread eastward into the Missouri Valley and upper Midwest. Cooler temperatures along with some showers are forecast across the northern Rockies. Much of the East Coast and West Coast will see dry conditions with high pressure in control. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 49 Albuquerque 45 Anchorage 47 Atlanta 70 Atlantic City 65 Baltimore 64 Billings 49 Biloxi, Ms. 75 Birmingham 71 Bismarck 58 Boise 47 Boston 57 Buffalo 48 Burlington, Vt. 45 Charleston, S.C. 71 Charleston, W.V. 62 Charlotte 67 Cheyenne 41 Chicago 64 Cincinnati 66 Cleveland 61 Colorado Spgs. 43 Concord, N.H. 44 Dallas 78 Daytona Beach 73 Denver 45 Des Moines 66 76 Destin, Fl. 57 Detroit 66 El Paso 64 Evansville 36 Fairbanks 61 Fargo 30 Flagstaff 76 Fort Myers 46 Great Falls 55 Green Bay 54 Hartford 75 Honolulu 77 Houston 67 Indianapolis 71 Jackson, Ms. 44 Juneau 79 Key West 62 Las Vegas 72 Little Rock 63 Los Angeles 68 Louisville

67 74 54 91 74 77 59 91 93 73 68 67 67 62 86 86 91 62 76 86 71 68 66 91 90 68 86 90 71 86 91 54 77 63 90 59 69 69 90 90 85 95 51 89 87 93 92 91

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny sunny showers sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

39 50 47 71 50 53 43 76 71 51 48 48 46 42 71 61 67 37 64 63 48 41 37 73 73 43 67 77 53 63 66 35 54 38 75 40 58 42 75 75 64 72 43 80 66 73 65 68

62 74 52 90 73 72 66 89 93 62 74 63 67 60 86 85 85 58 79 85 74 65 62 85 89 64 69 88 73 75 89 46 63 65 90 66 73 65 90 88 84 94 53 89 88 90 97 90

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

sunny windy showers sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny windy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

City

Today L H

67 Macon 79 McAllen, Tx. 76 Memphis 77 Miami 61 Milwaukee Minneapolis 62 Missoula, Mt. 42 73 Mobile Montgomery 71 67 Nashville New Orleans 74 New York City 61 Norfolk, Va. 70 Oklahoma City 71 Omaha 70 Orlando 74 Palm Springs 75 Philadelphia 65 Phoenix 65 Pittsburgh 61 Portland, Me. 46 Portland, Or. 55 Providence 57 Raleigh 66 Rapid City 53 Reno 44 Richmond, Va. 66 Sacramento 59 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 48 San Antonio 76 San Diego 64 San Francisco 58 Santa Fe 39 Savannah 70 Seattle 51 73 Shreveport 67 Sioux Falls 47 Syracuse 73 Tallahassee 77 Tampa 61 Tucson 73 Tulsa 67 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 77 71 Wichita Wilmington, De. 64 65 Yuma

92 97 94 89 68 76 61 93 94 92 91 70 80 86 81 92 90 73 90 75 66 70 70 89 67 78 84 92 91 61 91 85 85 69 87 67 93 77 64 92 91 87 89 79 88 84 74 94

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny

68 79 75 78 62 65 34 72 71 67 75 52 67 68 60 74 75 53 69 51 41 50 45 67 46 48 63 60 79 45 76 67 59 42 72 51 72 54 43 73 77 60 70 58 77 63 51 70

92 99 93 89 73 68 69 91 94 93 91 68 74 76 71 91 90 72 94 74 62 84 65 80 65 83 73 96 89 66 88 92 92 70 87 75 92 65 64 91 90 88 77 73 88 73 72 97

partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy windy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy thunderstorms showers sunny sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

W

87 75 79 96 88 88 84 72 73 64 88 60 89 67 63 75

partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy haze partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

52 80 55 73 62 51 58 53 57 82 55 47 44 80 56 77

75 85 72 91 82 80 86 73 84 106 75 60 54 88 76 93

W

mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers showers showers partly cloudy

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

73 49 61 71 77 80 66 52 49 43 70 44 77 52 61 48

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

Make Sure Your System is Working Properly!

$ 314-991-COOL (2665) 636-923-COOL (2665) 618-248-6400 www.totalcomfort-hvac.com

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

70s

FALL SPECIAL!

24-Hr Change

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

46 55 47 66 61 75 52 63 44 55 77 68 52 50 52 49

62 73 70 84 75 89 79 82 60 72 84 79 64 61 73 66

partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers

79

Reg. $115 Heating Preventative Maintenance Tune-Up

Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 618-248-6400 Residential Units only. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Boilers are extra. Expires 9/30/16


WEATHER

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 2

END OF SUMMER SALE!

WEATHER • LOW 72, HIGH 89 • WINDS S/W 5-10 MPH Fall weather on the way A strong cold front will move across and bring scattered showers and storms to the St. Louis area later today into tonight. Cooler and drier conditions will be in place for much of the upcoming week. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

74°

86°

88°

73°

Partly cloudy

Partly sunny

Few storms possible

Few showers possible

4-DAY FORECAST

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

62°/73°

52°/72°

53°/74° 52°/72°

Clearing and cooler

Sunny

H

85 90 81 88 82 78 71 76 83 81 71 87 86

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

67 67 68 67 69 69 69 68 69 69 67 69 67

W

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms

Sunny

Sunny

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

L

H

W

67 67 63 67 66 67 66 68 69 64 68 65

85 89 80 86 86 82 88 84 84 81 87 86

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms

Chicago 63 / 80

Kirksville 68 / 76 Kansas City 69 / 71

Springfield 68 / 87

St. Louis 72 / 89 Carbondale 67 / 89

Joplin 69 / 78

Poplar Bluff 68 / 91

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 92° 73° 77° 57° 94° 37° 85° 60°

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.00” 4.68” 2.49” 33.16” 30.24”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (2:47 p.m.) Low (5:13 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1891) Record Low (1942) High Last Year Low Last Year

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Sep 23rd Weed - 25 (moderate), Mold - 31,167 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 18 Month (Total) 305 Season 2010 Year Ago 1784

Sunrise

First Oct 8

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New Sep 30

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Full Oct 15

6:52 AM Sunset

Last Oct 22 6:52 PM

Moonrise 1:36 AM Moonset 3:55 PM

A day on Uranus is about 17 hours and 14 minutes long. Neptune has a similar length of day, which lasts about 16 hours long.

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We are a locally owned & operated company with 36 years of experience behind us! Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 14.52 23 12.06 Jefferson City 21 13.35 Hermann 20 10.50 Washington 25 17.15 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 15.58 Louisiana 15 14.47 Dam 24 25 24.83 Dam 25 26 24.51 Grafton 18 16.85 M.Price, Pool 419 413.60 M.Price, Tail. 21 15.31 St Louis 30 20.06 Chester 27 22.60 Cape Girardeau 32 27.41

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 12.76 18 12.03 Peoria 14 11.93 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.33 Sullivan 16 - 0.36 Valley Park 24 17.43 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.82 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 23.80

- 0.69 - 0.59 - 0.50 - 0.51 - 0.42 - 0.03 - 0.04 - 0.05 + 0.03 - 0.01 + 0.10 - 0.29 - 0.58 - 0.70 - 0.38

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

- 0.67 - 0.49 - 0.41 - 0.08 - 0.50 - 0.53 - 0.17

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.76 362.94 496.33 659.54 707.61 658.59 910.77 841.41 600.30 408.84 607.94 445.22

0.00 - 0.38 + 0.33 + 0.05 - 0.05 - 0.13 + 0.02 + 0.01 - 0.04 - 0.05 - 0.09 - 0.06

- 0.62

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 103° McAllen, Texas

Low: 24° Aspen Springs, Colorado

70s

50s

60s 90s

Rain

60s 60s

60s

70s

70s

T-storms

70s

60s

50s

80s

90s

Snow

70s

100s

80s

60s

70s

90s

80s

80s

Wintry Mix

90s Jet Stream

Alaska Low: 24°

Hawaii High: 91°

A cold front will continue to gradually push eastward and trigger showers and storms from parts of the upper Midwest down to portions of the southern Plains and Texas. Parts of Florida will also see a few storms develop. High pressure will be in control across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic as well as throughout much of the western United States. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 40 Albuquerque 48 Anchorage 42 Atlanta 71 Atlantic City 48 Baltimore 52 Billings 44 Biloxi, Ms. 74 Birmingham 74 Bismarck 52 Boise 47 Boston 48 Buffalo 46 Burlington, Vt. 40 Charleston, S.C. 71 Charleston, W.V. 60 Charlotte 68 Cheyenne 39 Chicago 63 Cincinnati 62 Cleveland 51 Colorado Spgs. 42 Concord, N.H. 39 Dallas 77 Daytona Beach 74 Denver 38 Des Moines 66 77 Destin, Fl. 52 Detroit 63 El Paso 67 Evansville 37 Fairbanks 56 Fargo 41 Flagstaff 74 Fort Myers 41 Great Falls 56 Green Bay 41 Hartford 75 Honolulu 75 Houston 64 Indianapolis 71 Jackson, Ms. 43 Juneau 80 Key West 66 Las Vegas 73 Little Rock 66 Los Angeles 68 Louisville

64 73 49 90 73 73 67 90 93 62 74 64 66 60 87 83 84 59 80 84 74 64 63 85 88 64 69 89 73 76 89 46 63 65 91 69 72 66 90 89 82 95 53 88 89 91 98 89

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny partly cloudy showers sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy showers sunny mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

38 49 37 70 46 53 48 74 71 41 53 47 50 38 72 61 68 38 59 65 57 39 37 64 73 38 49 75 59 58 64 31 46 45 75 45 55 39 73 73 61 71 41 79 68 67 71 68

68 69 51 87 72 73 76 88 92 67 82 64 74 65 84 82 82 69 68 76 73 71 64 76 88 73 66 87 70 63 74 47 64 64 90 77 60 67 89 89 66 91 52 88 90 82 101 77

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny showers sunny mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy showers showers sunny sunny cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms showers windy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny windy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy

City

Today L H

69 Macon 80 McAllen, Tx. 75 Memphis 77 Miami 63 Milwaukee Minneapolis 65 Missoula, Mt. 36 72 Mobile Montgomery 71 68 Nashville New Orleans 75 New York City 52 Norfolk, Va. 66 Oklahoma City 69 Omaha 59 Orlando 74 Palm Springs 71 Philadelphia 53 Phoenix 66 Pittsburgh 48 Portland, Me. 42 Portland, Or. 51 Providence 46 Raleigh 68 Rapid City 46 Reno 46 Richmond, Va. 62 Sacramento 58 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 45 San Antonio 76 San Diego 67 San Francisco 59 Santa Fe 43 Savannah 72 Seattle 52 72 Shreveport 53 Sioux Falls 42 Syracuse 73 Tallahassee 77 Tampa 60 Tucson 70 Tulsa 58 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 77 63 Wichita Wilmington, De. 51 69 Yuma

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54 54 47 61 59 78 46 64 45 56 77 70 50 54 49 42

65 77 70 84 78 90 84 82 67 69 84 82 62 67 72 65

partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

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A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ENTERTAINMENT

BRIDAL SHOW Sunday, October 9 Noon - 3:30 p.m. FASHION SHOW STARTS AT 3:30

St. Charles Convention Center

ONE LUCKY BRIDE-TO-BE WILL WIN A

FUNJET VACATION for 2* Free Gift for the first 100 Brides. Special Packages or Discounts from our vendors. Sample delicious hors d’oeuvres. Refreshments available. Guidance and Services of the area’s Best wedding specialists. Runway Fashions (starts @ 3:30), featuring the most Elegant Gowns. Free issues of our latest St. Louis’ Best Bridal Magazine & Planner.

Bride-to-be + 1 Free by pre-registering online

www.stlbestbridal.com MORE FREE PASSES Complimentary tickets are available at area Savvi Formalwear locations, while supplies last. Everyone else pays a $5 entrance fee (cash only) the day of the show. SHOW SPONSORS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

PEOPLE Queen’s May protests dolphin hunting Brian May, guitarist of British rock group Queen, is taking a stand against Japanese dolphin killing, saying the slaughter of animals should end in the same way society has turned against slavery or witchburning. May spoke with The Associated Press on Friday while in Tokyo for a Queen concert. Protesting the dolphin hunts in the Japanese town of Taiji, documented in the Oscar-winning movie “The Cove,” has become a cause for some celebrities, including Sting, Daryl Hannah and drummer Matt Sorum. Ric O’Barry, the dolphin trainer for the “Flipper” TV series, started the protests against the Taiji dolphin kills and starred in “The Cove.” May said he opposes cruelty toward all animals, including Britain’s fox hunt and Spain’s bullights. He hopes more people will become aware of the dolphin hunts. Comic Carmichael to write memoir • Stand-up comic and TV star Jerrod Carmichael is now set to be an author. The creator and star of NBC’s “The Carmichael Show” has signed to write his irst book. The as-yet-untitled memoir will explore his life through the framework of the personal interactions that have shaped his worldview, according to his publisher, Random House. Carmichael said he’s excited to share his perspectives on “some of the most interesting people I’ve encountered, in what I consider the most important medium: the written word.” No release date for the book was disclosed. “The Carmichael Show,” which follows a ictional version of the comedian and his family, premiered in August 2015 and has been renewed for a third season.

Patterson kills ‘The Murder of Stephen King’ • James Patterson has decided that an upcoming novel, “The Murder of Stephen King,” wasn’t a good idea after all and is having the scheduled Nov. 1 publication withdrawn. In a statement released Thursday through Little, Brown and Co., Patterson said he didn’t want to cause King or his family “any discomfort.” The book was intended as a tribute to King, a King-like story of an obsessed fan out to get the writer. But Patterson, who co-authored the 150-page novel with Derek Nikitas, said he had learned that fans in real life had “disrupted” King’s home. “My book is a positive portrayal of a ictional character, and, spoiler alert, the main character is not actually murdered,” he said.

“Nevertheless, I do not want to cause Stephen King or his family any discomfort. Out of respect for them, I have decided not to publish ‘The Murder of Stephen King.’” Despite the jarring title and Patterson’s best-seller status, the novel ranked just No. 30,491 on Amazon.com as of midday Thursday. King had no involvement with the book and declined to comment last week.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Newswoman Barbara Walters is 87. Actor Michael Douglas is 72. Model Cheryl Tiegs is 69. Actor Anson Williams is 67. Actor Mark Hamill is 65. Actress Heather Locklear is 55. Actor-singer Will Smith is 48. Actress Catherine ZetaJones is 47. Rapper T.I. is 36. Actor-rapper Donald Glover is 33. From news services

DONATE YOUR CAR x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri *Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (314) 499-1300

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

How to sell your valuable jewelry with conidence: Choose a buyer like T. Brian Hill who has over 30 years experience buying and selling. Then call for a free verbal estimate.

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WWW.USEDJEWELRYBUYER.COM

122 N. Main in Historic Saint Charles

T. Brian Hill

Sell these valuables today —

*Some restrictions may apply. Must be present and a registered with St. Louis’ Best Bridal.

• Certified diamonds & fine jewelry • Antique & estate jewelry • High grade wrist and pocket watches • Old gold & sterling silver • U.S. gold & silver coins • Private jewelry & coin collections

ENTER TO MAKE EVERY DAY #NationalCoffeeDay -

Win FREE Dunkin’ Donuts Coffee for a year!

PRESENTS THE

2016 ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Halloween Costume Contest

Is your Halloween get-up horrifying or hilarious? Super cute or supremely clever? Enter in one of three categories (adults, kids and pets) for your chance to win Savers gift vouchers! From wigs and wands, to makeup and millions of ideas, you can count on Savers for affordable Halloween inspiration (four St. Louis locations).

We’re partnering with Dunkin’ Donuts to help celebrate

#NationalCoffeeDay

on Sept. 29! Enter daily for your chance to win Dunkin’ Donuts deliciousness that will keep you celebrating all year long. PRIZES INCLUDE: • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts coffee for ONE YEAR (1 med hot/iced coffee per week) • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts breakfast for ONE YEAR (2 combo meals per month) • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts for ONE YEAR (2 dozen a month)

Winners announced on #NationalCoffeeDay!

ENTER TO make EVERY day #NationalCoffeeDay ENTER DAILY NOW THROUGH SEPT. 29 AT NOON:

STLtoday.com/contests om/contests

ENTER NOW AT:

STLtoday.com/contests tests


A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ENTERTAINMENT

BRIDAL SHOW Sunday, October 9 Noon - 3:30 p.m. FASHION SHOW STARTS AT 3:30

St. Charles Convention Center

ONE LUCKY BRIDE-TO-BE WILL WIN A

FUNJET VACATION for 2* Free Gift for the first 100 Brides. Special Packages or Discounts from our vendors. Sample delicious hors d’oeuvres. Refreshments available. Guidance and Services of the area’s Best wedding specialists. Runway Fashions (starts @ 3:30), featuring the most Elegant Gowns. Free issues of our latest St. Louis’ Best Bridal Magazine & Planner.

Bride-to-be + 1 Free by pre-registering online

www.stlbestbridal.com MORE FREE PASSES Complimentary tickets are available at area Savvi Formalwear locations, while supplies last. Everyone else pays a $5 entrance fee (cash only) the day of the show. SHOW SPONSORS

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

PEOPLE Suspect is arrested in alleged hacking of Pippa’s photos London police have made an arrest in the reported hacking of the iCloud account of Pippa Middleton, younger sister of the Duchess of Cambridge, and the alleged theft of 3,000 photographs. The Sun newspaper said Saturday it had been contacted by a purported hacker seeking to sell the images for a minimum of 50,000 pounds ($65,000). It said a seller using the pseudonym “Crafty Cockney” sent photos of Middleton via an encrypted service. Detectives arrested a man, 35, from Northamptonshire in central England on suspicion of a Computer Misuse Act ofense, police said. The Sun said the hacker also claimed to possess Middleton’s photos of her royal sister Kate with her children, Princess Charlotte and Prince George, and naked images of her iancé, James Matthews. Queen’s May protests dolphin hunting • Brian May, guitarist of British rock group Queen, is taking a stand against Japanese dolphin killing, saying the slaughter of animals should end in the same way society has turned against slavery or witch-burning. May spoke with The Associated Press on Friday while in Tokyo for a concert. Protesting the dolphin hunts in the Japanese town of Taiji, documented in the Oscar-winning movie “The Cove,” has become a cause for some celebrities, including Sting and Daryl Hannah. Ric O’Barry, the dolphin trainer for the “Flipper” TV series, started the protests against the Taiji dolphin kills and starred in “The Cove.” Comic Carmichael to write memoir • Stand-up comic and TV star Jerrod Carmichael is now set to be an author. The creator and star of NBC’s “The Carmichael

Show” has signed to write his irst book. The as-yet-untitled memoir will explore his life through the framework of the personal interactions that have shaped his worldview, according to his publisher, Random House. No release date for the book was disclosed. “The Carmichael Show,” which follows a ictional version of the comedian and his family, premiered in August 2015 and has been renewed for a third season. Patterson kills ‘The Murder of Stephen King’ • James Patterson has decided that an upcoming novel, “The Murder of Stephen King,” wasn’t a good idea after all and is having the scheduled Nov. 1 publication withdrawn. In a statement released Thursday through Little,

Brown and Co., Patterson said he didn’t want to cause King or his family “any discomfort.” The book was intended as a tribute to King, a King-like story of an obsessed fan out to get the writer. But Patterson, who co-authored the 150-page novel with Derek Nikitas, said he had learned that fans in real life had “disrupted” King’s home. King had no involvement with the book and declined to comment last week.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Newswoman Barbara Walters is 87. Actor Michael Douglas is 72. Model Cheryl Tiegs is 69. Actor Anson Williams is 67. Actor Mark Hamill is 65. Actor-singer Will Smith is 48. Actress Catherine Zeta-Jones is 47. Rapper T.I. is 36. Actorrapper Donald Glover is 33. From news services

DONATE YOUR CAR x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri *Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (314) 499-1300

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

How to sell your valuable jewelry with conidence: Choose a buyer like T. Brian Hill who has over 30 years experience buying and selling. Then call for a free verbal estimate.

(314) 313-5804 USED JEWELRY BUYER

WWW.USEDJEWELRYBUYER.COM

122 N. Main in Historic Saint Charles

T. Brian Hill

Sell these valuables today —

*Some restrictions may apply. Must be present and a registered with St. Louis’ Best Bridal.

• Certified diamonds & fine jewelry • Antique & estate jewelry • High grade wrist and pocket watches • Old gold & sterling silver • U.S. gold & silver coins • Private jewelry & coin collections

ENTER TO MAKE EVERY DAY #NationalCoffeeDay -

Win FREE Dunkin’ Donuts Coffee for a year!

PRESENTS THE

2016 ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Halloween Costume Contest

Is your Halloween get-up horrifying or hilarious? Super cute or supremely clever? Enter in one of three categories (adults, kids and pets) for your chance to win Savers gift vouchers! From wigs and wands, to makeup and millions of ideas, you can count on Savers for affordable Halloween inspiration (four St. Louis locations).

We’re partnering with Dunkin’ Donuts to help celebrate

#NationalCoffeeDay

on Sept. 29! Enter daily for your chance to win Dunkin’ Donuts deliciousness that will keep you celebrating all year long. PRIZES INCLUDE: • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts coffee for ONE YEAR (1 med hot/iced coffee per week) • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts breakfast for ONE YEAR (2 combo meals per month) • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts for ONE YEAR (2 dozen a month)

Winners announced on #NationalCoffeeDay!

ENTER TO make EVERY day #NationalCoffeeDay ENTER DAILY NOW THROUGH SEPT. 29 AT NOON:

STLtoday.com/contests om/contests

ENTER NOW AT:

STLtoday.com/contests tests


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / M E T R O

SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 • B

VOICES OF GENDER DIVIDE Young people who feel they were born into the wrong body. Parents and schools uncertain how to answer kids’ questions. What science and those on both sides say about transgender issues Jef Childs of Farmington holds a sign in August 2015 on Old Highway 21 as students leave Hillsboro High School. Students had walked out, some in support and others opposing, transgender student Lila Perry’s request to use the girls locker room.

Derrick Good, a Jeferson County lawyer, became a go-to person for Hillsboro schools and parents when questions arose about transgender issues after transgender student Lila Perry sought access to girls facilities. CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Mazy Gilleylen, 11, sits on her bed in her room on Sept. 18 at her home in Overland. She chose how she wanted her room decorated.

‘Just a girl,’ Mazy tries to map path to peace; her parents ight fears

TRANSGENDER EXPLAINED Questions and answers about gender identity issues. B2

BY DOUG MOORE • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BATHROOM RULES

OVERLAND

President’s directive remains in limbo. B3

S

he darted into her bedroom, eager to show off the sanctuary of an 11-year-old girl. It is an infusion of pink and purple, colors replayed in her clothes and highlighted in her hair. Mazy shares the room with two guinea pigs and Squirt, a goldfish that has outgrown its name. Here, she closes of the world when she needs to. Outside of this small house she shares with her parents and brother lies the pain of the past, the hope of the future, the unknown that keeps Mom and Dad awake at night. See MAZY • Page B3

MAZY’S MOVE Bullying, anxiety, depression: Check out a video depicting some highs and lows of Mazy’s transition. STLtoday.com/watch

Parent steps in to help district ind clarity on transgender issues BY JESSE BOGAN • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

D

HILLSBORO

errick Good carries the aura of a fixer. At lunch the other day at the Courthouse Grill, he knew everybody who walked through the door. His waitress even hit him up for legal advice. Good, 42, is a small-town lawyer who is involved in a lot of things. Charities. Baptist church. Republican politics, where he tends to work quietly behind the scenes. One year ago, he dove into the transgender arena after parents, the school district and reporters rushed in for help and public comment on an emotional issue. See GOOD • Page B3

A political thriller about power, lies? hat’s a novel idea BILL McCLELLAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As a semiretired columnist, I have plenty of time to think of novels I should be writing. Let me tell you about a political thriller that would

have been good. Admittedly, the premise is a little far out so bear with me. Imagine a presidential election with two unsavory candidates. One is a former first lady. Her name is Beverly Clifton. She and her husband, Phil, have a weird relationship. He used to cheat on her all the time. She never left him. They’re partners. No, not partners. They are accom-

plices. The Cliftons are always trying to pull something over on somebody. The public intuitively understands this. A majority of voters don’t trust Beverly. The other party is running an even odder candidate. Ronald Plump is a blustery businessman with a long history of shady deals. He was a reality TV star who tried,

unsuccessfully, to copyright the phrase “You’re fired!” He gained his party’s nomination by insulting people. His speaking style, which features much emphatic nodding and jaw-thrusting, seems to have been copied from Benito Mussolini. As do some of his ideas. Plump scares people. The election in our novel would remind old-timers of the 1991

gubernatorial election in Louisiana between the Lizard and the Wizard. Edwin Edwards was considered corrupt. David Duke scared people. Edwards’ supporters had bumper stickers, “Vote for the Crook. It’s Important.” Edwards won. In our novel, Clifton wins. See MCCLELLAN • Page B5

STL SUNDAY

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / M E T R O

SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 • B

VOICES OF GENDER DIVIDE Young people who feel they were born into the wrong body. Parents and schools uncertain how to answer kids’ questions. What science and those on both sides say about transgender issues Jef Childs of Farmington holds a sign in August 2015 on Old Highway 21 as students leave Hillsboro High School. Students had walked out, some in support and others opposing, transgender student Lila Perry’s request to use the girls locker room.

Derrick Good, a Jeferson County lawyer, became a go-to person for Hillsboro schools and parents when questions arose about transgender issues after transgender student Lila Perry sought access to girls facilities. CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Mazy Gilleylen, 11, sits on her bed in her room on Sept. 18 at her home in Overland. She chose how she wanted her room decorated.

‘Just a girl,’ Mazy tries to map path to peace; her parents ight fears

TRANSGENDER EXPLAINED Questions and answers about gender identity issues. B2

BY DOUG MOORE • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BATHROOM RULES

OVERLAND

President’s directive remains in limbo. B2

S

he darted into her bedroom, eager to show off the sanctuary of an 11-year-old girl. It is an infusion of pink and purple, colors replayed in her clothes and highlighted in her hair. Mazy shares the room with two guinea pigs and Squirt, a goldfish that has outgrown its name. Here, she closes of the world when she needs to. Outside of this small house she shares with her parents and brother lies the pain of the past, the hope of the future, the unknown that keeps Mom and Dad awake at night. See MAZY • Page B3

MAZY’S MOVE Bullying, anxiety, depression: Check out a video depicting some highs and lows of Mazy’s transition. STLtoday.com/watch

Parent steps in to help district ind clarity on transgender issues BY JESSE BOGAN • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

D

HILLSBORO

errick Good carries the aura of a fixer. At lunch the other day at the Courthouse Grill, he knew everybody who walked through the door. His waitress even hit him up for legal advice. Good, 42, is a small-town lawyer who is involved in a lot of things. Charities. Baptist church. Republican politics, where he tends to work quietly behind the scenes. One year ago, he dove into the transgender arena after parents, the school district and reporters rushed in for help and public comment on an emotional issue. See GOOD • Page B3

A political thriller about power, lies? hat’s a novel idea BILL McCLELLAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As a semiretired columnist, I have plenty of time to think of novels I should be writing. Let me tell you about a political thriller that would

have been good. Admittedly, the premise is a little far out so bear with me. Imagine a presidential election with two unsavory candidates. One is a former first lady. Her name is Beverly Clifton. She and her husband, Phil, have a weird relationship. He used to cheat on her all the time. She never left him. They’re partners. No, not partners. They are accom-

plices. The Cliftons are always trying to pull something over on somebody. The public intuitively understands this. A majority of voters don’t trust Beverly. The other party is running an even odder candidate. Ronald Plump is a blustery businessman with a long history of shady deals. He was a reality TV star who tried,

unsuccessfully, to copyright the phrase “You’re fired!” He gained his party’s nomination by insulting people. His speaking style, which features much emphatic nodding and jaw-thrusting, seems to have been copied from Benito Mussolini. As do some of his ideas. Plump scares people. The election in our novel would remind old-timers of the 1991

gubernatorial election in Louisiana between the Lizard and the Wizard. Edwin Edwards was considered corrupt. David Duke scared people. Edwards’ supporters had bumper stickers, “Vote for the Crook. It’s Important.” Edwards won. In our novel, Clifton wins. See MCCLELLAN • Page B5

STL SUNDAY

2 M


STL SUNDAY

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Questions and answers about gender identity Directive on BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Transgender is a term used for people who do not identify with the sex they were assigned at birth based on their genitalia. They might explain that they feel like a woman trapped in a man’s body, or the opposite. Less than 1 percent of people or about 1 million Americans are believed to be transgender, although the figure is diicult to measure. The following questions and answers are based on information from the American Psychological Association and studies published by the National Academy of Sciences. Q. What is the diference between gender and sex? Sex is the assignment of male or female status at birth indicated by biological differences in hormones, chromosomes and anatomy. Gender is the socially constructed standards of behavior and appearance deemed appropriate for men or women. Definitions of gender are more fluid both individually and across cultures. Q. What is the diference between gender identity and sexual orientation? Gender identity is a person’s feeling that they are male, female or somewhere in between. Sexual orientation is marked by whom a person is attracted to. Q. Are transgender people also gay? Transgender people, like anyone, can be straight, gay or bisexual. People who are transgender are most often attracted to the sex that is opposite from their own that was assigned at birth. A man who transitions to a woman is likely to remain attracted to women. Q. Are transgender people just confused or experimenting? No. Nearly all transgender people say they have felt more like the opposite sex for as long as they remember. They may have feelings of shame and dissatisfaction, but their gender identity is not something that can be overcome or changed. Q. Are people who cross-dress transgender? Not necessarily. Some people prefer to wear hairstyles and clothing that don’t conform to social norms for gender but that doesn’t mean they feel they are the wrong sex. You can’t tell whether someone is transgender based on their hobbies or activities. For example, a girl is sometimes called a “tomboy” if she prefers toys and clothes that are considered masculine, but that does not mean she feels like she is supposed to be a boy. Most people who cross-dress do not want to change the sex they were born with. Q. What is the diference between transgender and transsexual? Generally, transsexual people have changed their bodies to their preferred sex through hormonal and/or surgical treatments. The surgeries can include facial feminizing procedures, breast augmen-

RESOURCES The Metro Trans Umbrella Group ofers information about support groups, medical care and advocacy for transgender people. For more information: www.stlmetrotrans.com TransParent is a support group for parents of transgender children that meets monthly at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. For more information: www.transparentstl.org The Transgender Health Network ofers lists of medical professionals who work with the transgender community throughout Missouri. For more information: www. transgenderhealthnetwork.org

READ MORE AT STLTODAY.COM Listen: Reporters discuss their work on the “Inside the Post-Dispatch” podcast Discuss: Join the reporters for a chat with readers

tation or reduction, and genital reassignments. Q. What causes people to be transgender? The development of gender identity is highly complex and not well understood. But researchers do not believe that an early childhood trauma or sexual abuse is responsible for a person being transgender. It also does not seem like genetics plays a big role, since a study of transgender people with identical twins showed that only 20 percent were both transgender. More evidence points to biological differences in the brain — that somehow during fetal development the brain did not diferentiate its sexual characteristics in alignment with the rest of the body. Q. Is there a blood test or other physical way to tell if someone is transgender? There is no blood test to indicate a person is transgender, but brain scans might give some clues. While little research has been done in the area, some small studies have shown diferences in the brains of transgender people. The brains of men and women have diferent structures. One study showed that the brains of transgender people looked more like their preferred gender than their anatomical sex. Transgender men (born female and transitioned to male) had thinner subcortical areas of the brain that would indicate a male structure. And transgender women (male to female) had thinner areas in the right hemisphere of the brain, indicative of a female brain. In another small study of autopsied brains of transgender women, a section of the hypothalamus thought to influence gender identity was more similar in size to a woman’s than a man’s. Q. Is being transgender caused by unbalanced hormones? No. Studies have shown that transgender people have estrogen and testosterone (sex hormones) levels that are consistent with their genitalia at birth. Transgender

people who want to transition to the opposite sex take hormone therapy to block their unwanted sexual characteristics. Q. Is intersex the same as transgender? No. A variety of rare medical conditions can cause abnormal development of sexual anatomy, known as intersex. For example, some people are born with ambiguous genitals or external and internal genitalia of opposite sexes. The decisions to assign a gender or perform surgery are first made with a goal of preserving fertility. There is no established time frame for treatments unless the condition is harmful to a child’s health. Most people who are born with an intersex condition are satisfied with their assigned sex. Q. Is being transgender a mental disorder? No. Mental disorders are defined as causing “significant distress or disability,” according to the American Psychological Association. Many transgender people do not consider themselves distressed by their gender identity, however they do experience problems finding medical and social support. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders was changed in 2012 to describe emotional distress caused by incompatible gender identity from ”gender identity disorder” to “gender dysphoria.” Transgender people do experience higher rates of anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts. Q. What is involved in transitioning between sexes? Transgender people who want to live as their preferred gender generally start the process gradually by changing their clothes and appearance when they feel safe to do so. They may also change their name informally or legally. Before any surgical procedures can be performed, the transgender person must go through a certain amount of counseling and hormone therapy. The process is permanent, and usually ends a person’s fertility, so surgeons want to be sure the decision is right. “We are altering their body to go along with their brain,” said Dr. Sherman Leis, founder of the Philadelphia Center for Transgender Surgery. “To me it’s a very rewarding field of medicine. We need more doctors of every type to get involved in the care of transgender people to help them get through life in a happier way.” Q. How can parents support transgender children? Parents should not look at opposite gender identity as a phase the child will grow out of. Do not force the child into more stereotypical gender behavior. Seek out mental health professionals who are experienced in gender identity issues. They should also talk to the child’s school about safety concerns and other special needs. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

Transgender students must be allowed to use bathrooms that align with their gender identity, President Barack Obama’s administration told schools nationwide in May. The notice declared that transgender students were protected under Title IX, the federal law that prohibits sex-based discrimination in federally funded education programs and activities. Also in May, the Justice Department sued North Carolina over its state law that requires people to use public bathrooms that match the sex on their birth certificate. In August, a federal judge in Texas blocked enforcement of Obama’s order while a lawsuit filed by 13 states proceeds. The states contend that the administration exceeded its authority and did not follow proper procedure for writing new rules pertaining to Title IX. Also in August, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a Virginia school board could block a transgender male from using the boys restroom while the court decides whether to take up the issue.

GLOSSARY OF TERMS Gender: Socially constructed standards of behavior and appearance deemed appropriate for men or women that can vary across cultures. Sex: The assignment of male or female status based on biological diferences in hormones, chromosomes and anatomy. Transgender: An umbrella term for people who do not identify with the sex associated with their genitalia and reproductive organs. Transvestite: A derogatory term for a person who enjoys wearing the clothes and adopting the appearance of the opposite sex but does not necessarily feel like they were born the wrong sex. More appropriately known as cross-dresser. Hermaphrodite: A stigmatizing, outdated term referring to someone who has both female and male genitalia. The preferred term is intersex. Intersex: Rare medical conditions that can cause abnormal sexual structures in the body, including ambiguous genitals or external and internal sexual organs that don’t match. Transsexual: A person who is transgender and has undergone hormonal and/or surgical treatments to transition to their preferred sex. Transgender man: Born as a female but identiies as a man. Transgender woman: Born as a male but identiies as a woman. Cisgender: A term used to describe anyone who is not transgender. – Blythe Bernhard

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STL SUNDAY

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

Hillsboro landed in national spotlight on transgender issues GOOD • FROM B1

Hillsboro High School senior Lila Perry had shot up a flare from the rural hills of Jeferson County that was seen across the country and beyond. Perry, who was born male but identified as female, was telling news reporters that she would no longer settle for a unisex faculty restroom made especially for her. “I am a girl,” Perry, dressed in a skirt and long wig, said then.“I am not going to be pushed away to another bathroom.” All of a sudden, the school district, which has about 3,500 students, had an enormous situation on its hands. Students walked out. Some in support of Perry, others not. Some parents were caught of guard. Calls and emails backed up from all over. In the mix, three of seven school board members resigned. Good was tapped as an emergency replacement. He would go on to help develop a formal policy on how the school district would handle transgender students even though the law is still unclear. Foremost, Good said he’s the father of two children, ages 14 and 9, in the district. But he became a spokesman for other parents like him who had serious concerns about a student with a penis using their daughters’ restroom without warning. Good gave multiple interviews

ROBERT COHEN • P-d

Controversy erupted in Hillsboro over transgender student Lila Perry, shown in August 2015.

to media outlets, anything from conservative talk radio to the Today Show. “We don’t need freshmen girls showing up on the first day of school with a biological male in the dressing room with them when their parents or they have no idea it could happen,” Good said. “That doesn’t make any sense to me. Kids do better when there are rules, and there were no rules.” And there were no easy answers. “These kids grew up with this guy as a guy who now all of a sudden says: ‘I am a girl,’” Good said. “I would get crucified for saying it that way publicly, but I don’t know how else to look at it. That’s the

circumstance.” Parents such as Good were on edge. As the transgender issue becomes more publicized, it forces parents to have tough conversations with their children before they are ready to do so. They question where parental rights end in dealing with juveniles. And while the rights of one child could be championed, they feel it could trample the rights of others. “What about the physical privacy of the girls who know where they are at?” Good said. “Why does somebody else get to cross the line and force them into a situation that they don’t want to be in?” School districts around the state typically deal with transgender quietly, on a case-by-case basis. Perry, and her willingness to go public, changed the narrative in Hillsboro. Good and others felt that they needed to craft a policy. They were largely on their own. President Barack Obama’s administration has said the failure to allow transgender students use of the bathroom, locker room or name associated with their gender identity amounts to discrimination based on sex. The guidelines are being challenged. The Supreme Court has yet to take a position on transgender in schools. The Missouri School Boards Association ofered Hillsboro two

starkly different model policies: one that follows federal guidelines and one that does not. The association doesn’t recommend either because the law isn’t defined. Regardless, Good said he wanted a policy that Hillsboro and other school districts could adopt. “Every school district is dealing with it, whether you hear about it or not,” he said. Over the summer, Hillsboro finalized two policies. “Anyone who desires greater privacy” can request alternative accommodations so long as the restroom or dressing area doesn’t include that of the opposite sex. Students are allowed one written request for name and associated gender-pronoun change per school year with the support of their parents. The word “transgender” is not mentioned in the policies. “Why am I going to make a policy aimed at one particular group of kids?” Good said. “Isn’t that the definition of an equalprotection problem or discrimination problem? I am not going to make a Baptist-student policy or a Catholic-student policy. Let’s make a facilities-use policy. This applies to all of our kids, not just one.” Regarding special accommodations, Good said: “Whatever your issue is, we’ve now come up with a rule that says we are here to protect you and make you successful. In

my mind that’s what we did. Who is to say there is a right and wrong? What we did is very fair.” He said transgender decisions should be made after graduation. “When people are adults and they have made decisions and there are surgeries available and physical change, that’s different than when you are still in high school,” he said. As his temporary position on the school board came to a close, Good ran for a permanent seat. He said he lost by eight votes. “I am OK with it,” he said. “I really felt like we accomplished what I felt I needed to accomplish.” And new duties arise. He was recently appointed president of the Jefferson County Port Authority. He’s still involved with transgender issues as an attorney ailiated with Alliance Defending Freedom, an Arizona-based organization that weighs in across the country. Though Lila Perry graduated, the superintendent of schools said there are several transgender students in Jeferson County. So far this school year, two Hillsboro students requested name and gender pronoun changes. No one asked for alternative restroom or dressing accommodations. Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

Overland child’s parents choose to let daughter ‘be herself’ MAZY • FROM B1

On a floor lamp in the corner hangs a poster board sign. “I’m just a girl,” it reads. In smaller letters, Mazy added: “... in a boy’s body.” As a fifth-grader, Mazy has now lived nearly a third of her life as the person she says she was supposed to be. Born Malachi, she never identified as a boy. Before she could talk, Mazy would slide into her mom’s high heels and put on her tops, cinching them at the waist for a makeshift dress. When Mazy was 3, she pleaded for a toy kitchen for Christmas, which she got. But when she begged for a princess dress, Mom initially said no. “For me, I gave birth to a son and boys don’t normally wear dresses,” Amber Gilleylen, 35, said. “I didn’t put a lot of stock into it.” Through kindergarten and first grade, while still dressing as a boy, kids at school peppered Mazy with mean comments. She wanted to play with the girls, who told her to go play with the boys. By second grade, she was coming home every afternoon crying. “I want to start over. Be a girl like I’m supposed to be,” Mazy would tell her mom. “I don’t think that’s how it works,” Amber told Mazy. “I just don’t fit in, Mommy, and I need you to help me make this stop.” Mazy’s grades were horrible. She couldn’t sleep at night. “I’m thinking: ‘What am I doing wrong? I want her happy,’” Amber said. The solution was simple, she said. “All I have to do is let her be herself.” But that would be the hardest thing Amber and her husband, Donté, ever had to do.

TURNING POINT As a second-grader, Mazy would come home from school, go into her room and put on girls clothes. Eventually, she began wearing them around the house. Along the way, Mazy was growing out her hair. One day, while her mom was sitting on the front porch, Mazy appeared in a cheerleader uniform. About the same time, Donté drove up. “Uh, what’s going on?” he asked Amber. A few minutes later, Donté, 35, said he was going to get gas. Amber and Mazy jumped in the car. Donté gave Amber a look that said: “Let’s not do this.” Letting her out of the house as a girl was too dangerous. People would not understand. And if her parents were struggling with it, how could they expect those who don’t know Mazy to embrace her new identity? Amber assured Donté it would be fine. Amber and Mazy went inside the convenience store to buy milk, passing a woman who was on her way out. “She’s so beautiful,” the woman said. Mazy looked up at her mom. “She called me a girl. A real girl,” Mazy said. “She doesn’t know.” It was a turning point for

This family photo shows Mazy Gilleylen when she was known as Malachi, at age 6, in irst grade.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Amber Gilleylen helps her daughter, Mazy, into her mermaid outit on Monday at the municipal pool in St. Ann. Mazy said she likes to wear the costume because it helps conceal her gender.

Donté. “You’re right,” he said to Amber. “It’s not so bad.” Inside the car, it became a celebration. “I honestly don’t think she stopped talking about that for weeks,” Amber said. Mazy decided soon thereafter she wanted to go to school as a girl. Amber wrote an email to school administrators, Mazy’s teacher, counselor and social worker. “Mazy wants to come to school as herself. This is not a stunt, and I’m not asking.” Amber received a call from the assistant principal the next day. “We are so excited to meet Mazy. Let us know what we can do to accommodate her,” the assistant principal said. It was a refreshing response after family and friends, more often than not, would suggest Mazy was just going through a phase. And Donté also had reservations: “How do you know this is real? How do you know this is not a mistake?” “Questions,” Amber said, “that were honestly sitting in the back of my mind.” Mazy’s official debut would come on the last day of second grade. She chose a “My Little Pony” outfit from Walmart. Pink striped shirt with pink shorts. “Are you sure you don’t want to be Malachi anymore?” Amber asked one last time. “I don’t want anyone to know I was ever a boy,” Mazy replied. Donté vacillated from supporter to protector. There are people who will not be kind. Daddy’s little girl may not be accepted as such. The worries of her parents were unfounded. At least that day. “Ultimately, she had an amazing day,” Amber said. “It was the first time I saw Mazy smile in I don’t know how long. “We met a whole new person.”

BULLYING AT SCHOOL Mazy was now Mazy. No looking back. With her parents on board, out went the boy clothes. No more mention of Malachi.

But not everyone saw Mazy as a beautiful little girl, like the woman at the gas station had. When Mazy tried to join the Girl Scouts, some parents objected, saying they should not be forced to accept something they do not approve of. Children at school bullied her. One student spit in her food. Another kicked her in the shins. Mazy was falling behind, unable to focus. Her nights included insomnia and panic attacks. In the middle of fourth grade, her parents decided to pull her out of school. Amber would teach her at home. “We have not turned back,” Amber said, sitting in Mazy’s bedroom. While Amber talked about home schooling, Donté pulled in a chair from the kitchen, grabbed a white board and challenged his daughter to a game of tic-tac-toe. “I’ve lost my free time. But that’s OK,” Amber said. “I am more content knowing Mazy will be OK. A big, huge weight is gone. It’s a million times better.” Home schooling, however, may not last beyond fifth grade. Mazy and her parents have talked about going back into the Ritenour School District next year for middle school. “Social environments to navigate are important to her,” Amber said. Mazy’s parents say it is better to confront problems than run away from them. That will include what bathroom Mazy will use. And whether they tell school oicials that their daughter is transgender. But this is the best fit for now. Getting Mazy caught up in her studies. Taking away the anxiety of an unpredictable outside world. “We want to give her a fair chance,” Amber said. Last year, Donté and Amber had Mazy’s name changed on her birth certificate. Mazy Star Maria is the name their daughter chose: Mazy because she liked the way it sounded; Star because “I think they are one of the most beautiful things in the whole world”; and Maria because that was Amber’s grandmother’s name. It was another part of letting go. Malachi Devonté is a name

Mazy’s parents spent a great deal of time selecting. Malachi is a biblical name, a nod to Donté’s Baptist upbringing, the son of a pastor. Devonté was chosen because of its similarity to Donté. The gender marker on the birth certificate remains male. Biologically, that is the correct designation. And Mazy’s parents want to keep it that way for now. In case their daughter has any health problems specific to genitalia, insurance navigation will be less cumbersome. Going from Malachi to Mazy did, however, put a strain on her parents’ marriage, even threatening it. “The D word was definitely on the table for a minute,” Amber said. Stresses remain. They are estranged from family and friends. And Mazy’s parents still worry about her future. “This is an extremely dangerous path for Mazy,” Amber said of her biracial transgender girl. Her parents have seen the statistics regarding hate crimes and suicide when it comes to those who look very much like their daughter. They are worried, but letting Mazy guide them. “Making her be someone she isn’t isn’t going to make her happy,” Amber said. “No good will come from that.”

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? Mazy is concerned. Puberty is imminent and the hormone blockers a therapist has OK’d for her to take are not covered by the family’s insurance. As a result, the process is out of reach for Donté, a fast food restaurant cook and Amber, a stay-at-home mom who has been unable to work since a serious car crash three years ago. “This is a very real struggle in our house right now,” Amber said. “Mazy doesn’t want to transition into a boy and she is freaked out about it. She says: ‘Mommy, don’t let me get hair on my face, get a deep voice.’” Her parents continue looking for ways to get the hormone blockers covered through insurance and hope to find answers from a parent support group they belong to. Meanwhile, Mazy continues to see a therapist twice

This picture of Mazy Gilleylen, which hangs on the wall of her home in Overland, shows her at age 9. It was the irst time she dressed as a girl for costume day at school.

a month. Mazy has purged her bedroom of any sign of Malachi and eschews the name. But Amber has not quite let go. “I still have a bag of Malachi’s clothes. They are for me. Every once in a while, they come out and I smell them.” They are a reminder that the child she gave birth to was a boy. A boy whose parents had to mourn his loss to fully accept they had a girl. It was tough, Dontè said. But necessary. Mazy’s parents have asked her who she is attracted to. Nobody yet, Mazy says. It’s her parents preparing for what could be next. If she likes girls, is she gay? If she likes boys, is she straight? If she likes both, is it OK? Parents pondering. Worrying. Accepting. As Amber shared her family’s story, Mazy sat quietly, playing a video game. “You still miss him don’t you?” Mazy said, catching her mother of guard. Amber paused, looked at her daughter but didn’t answer. She continued talking about Mazy’s home schooling schedule. But a few minutes later, Amber circled back to Mazy’s question, answering it indirectly. “I almost forget she was born a boy. ... She’s a girl. “Just a girl.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 09.25.2016

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Produced by the Niche Department of the Suburban Journals of Greater St. Louis, LLC

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Ashley Scott and Christopher Albin exchanged wedding vows on Saturday, July 2, 2016. The Rev. Richard Hause oiciated at New Horizons Presbyterian Church, Overland, with reception at Moolah Ballroom, St. Louis. The bride’s parents are Mark and Sue Scott, Lake St. Louis, and the groom is the son of Dr. George and Patricia Albin of Overland. Matron of honor was Jamie Scott of Washington, D.C. Bridesmaids were Brittany Hopkin, Heather Johannes, Lindsey Digar and Michelle Albin. The groom’s best man was Edward Albin of Arnold and his other attendants were David Mulholland, Chris McGlynn, Zach Flaxbeard and Joseph Sweet. Ryan Gladstone and Dale Sieber seated guests. After honeymooning in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, the couple makes their home in Overland. Both newlyweds graduated from Ritenour High School. The bride, also a graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia, works for Caleres. Mr. Albin, a business analyst at Express Scripts, graduated from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. !

Laura Katherine Jacobson was married to Arjun Ashok-Kumar Thakkar on Saturday, Aug. 20, at the Andaz Hotel in Maui, Hawaii. The bride is the daughter of Joan and Arnie Jacobson of St. Louis and a graduate of Parsons School of Design, a college of The New School in New York City, N.Y. The groom, son of Rekha and Ashok Thakkar of Sterling Heights, Mich., is a graduate of the University of Michigan. The couple lives and works in San Francisco. !

( ENGAGEMENTS )

Thompson

& Gilliam

Wielansky

Erica Thompson and Joshua Gilliam announce their engagement. The bride-to be is the daughter of William and Barbara Thompson, all of Alton, Ill., and her fiance and his parents, Gregory and Joyce Gilliam, live in Florissant. The bride-to-be received a bachelor of communications degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia. The prospective groom earned a bachelor’s degree in applied management from Hickey College, St. Louis. After dating for two years, Mr. Gilliam proposed to Ms. Thompson in front of friends and family at a surprise engagement party at the Old Spaghetti Factory, downtown St. Louis. They plan to be married May 20, 2017, in St. Louis. !

Stone

Craig and Maureen Wielansky of St. Louis County announce the engagement of their daughter, Samantha Wielansky, to Chris DoCouto, son of Carol and Liz DoCouto of Somerset, Mass. The bride-to-be graduated from Stephens College, Columbia, with a bachelor of science degree in finance and is a senior account executive with Diversant in Irving, Texas. Her fiance received a master’s degree in business administration with an emphasis on finance from the University of North Texas, Denton, and is a senior business analyst at Fidelity. The couple lives in Fort Worth, Texas, and plans to be married May 27, 2017, at Westwood Country Club, Westwood, Mo. !

& Stulebean

Baker

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Cartwright

Alexandria Dotson and Samuel Cunningham announce their engagement and forthcoming wedding. The bride-to-be’s parents are Terrence and Earlena Clark of Creve Coeur and her fiance is the son of Shirley Cunningham, St. Louis, and the late Samuel Barnes. The future bride graduated as a registered medical assistant from Missouri College, Brentwood, and is a medical assistant at Barnes West County, Creve Coeur. The groom-to-be is a cook at TGI Fridays in Creve Coeur. They also live in Creve Coeur. The couple plans to be married June 17, 2017. !

Knobloch

& Baldwin

Scott and Lynne Baker of St. Charles announce the engagement of their daughter, Caitlin Baker, to Andrew Baldwin Jr., son of Andrew and Karen Baldwin of St. Peters. The bride-to-be, of St. Charles, earned a master of arts degree in journalism from Lindenwood University, St. Charles, and is a livestream producer for Newsy in Columbia, Mo. Her fiance, of Maryland Heights, received a bachelor of science degree in biochemistry and is a scientist for Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis. The couple plans to be married June 3, 2017. !

Amanda Stone and Gary Stulebean announce their engagement. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Charles Stone of Springfield, Ill., while her fiance’s parents are Connie and John Stulebean of Granite City. She is a supervisor for B&R Cleaning, Edwardsville, while he is self-employed as a laborer. They live in Collinsville and plan to be married June 10, 2017. !

Dotson

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& Duello

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& Willhite

Williams

Marty and Vicki Knobloch of Wildwood announce the engagement of their daughter, Bailey Lynne Knobloch, to Jake Lee Willhite, son of Bill and Shannon Willhite of Chesterfield. The couple met at Lafayette High School and marked their 10-year dating anniversary on June 23, 2016. The bride-to-be graduated in 2008 and has been employed by Mercy Hospital for 5-1/2 years. Her fiance graduated from Lafayette in 2009 and then attended Jefferson College. He has worked for Dierbergs Market for eight years. The couple plans to be married July 8, 2017, in west St. Louis County. They hope to honeymoon in Maui, Hawaii, where he proposed at the summit of Haleakala volcano. !

& Park

Diana and Brian Williams of Overland Park, Kan., announce the engagement of their daughter, Brittany Williams, to Andrew Park, son of Karen and Randall Park of Coto de Caza, Calif. The couple met while students at Saint Louis University. The bride-to-be graduated in elementary education and teaches kindergarten for Gateway Science Academy of St. Louis, south St. Louis. Her fiance earned a degree in business management with a focus in leadership, minor in Spanish. He is a buyer/merchant for Here Today Stores in Brentwood. The St. Louis residents plan to be married July 22, 2017, at St. Francis Xavier College Church on the university campus. !

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STL SUNDAY

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

hese teachers’ pets help students thrive BY JULIA EVELSIZER The (Bloomington) Pantagraph

BLOOMINGTON, ILL. • Between the guinea pigs, a chinchilla duo, rabbit, hedgehog, gecko, turtle and tank of sea monkeys, some of the halls at Bloomington Junior High School are starting to resemble Noah’s Ark. “Sometimes, school isn’t the place all kids want to be. Having pets in the classroom gets them excited about coming to class,” said sixth-grade teacher Kelly Rosendahl. Rosendahl’s classroom is home to two chinchillas, Moe and Larry, and two guinea pigs, Billie Jean and Pretty Mama. “It’s a great way to teach kids about research; what the animals eat, what kind of homes they live in and what they need in their environment,” Rosendahl said. Rosendahl said guinea pigs are ideal classroom pets because of their mild temperament. “They let the kids hold them. If kids are having a hard day, they can sit in a beanbag chair, hold an

animal and calm down,” she said. After a lunch period last week, sixth-grader Alex Kimmel explained how she plays with and feeds the guinea pigs before class. “They’ll come up to the cage in the morning and look at us,” said Alex as she held Pretty Mama, feeding the guinea pig a handful of carrots. “I want to learn more about chinchillas. I know they have floating rib cages.” Sixth-grader Morgan Masters eased Billie Jean out of her cage and began wiping her belly and paws clean with a cloth. “Pretty Mama likes people and food,” Morgan said. “Billie Jean doesn’t really like people.” Even though he has pets at home, Sean Ndorongo said there’s something diferent about having animals in the classroom. “You can’t pick up a dog like this,” said Sean while playing with the guinea pigs. The students also helped Rosendahl give Moe and Larry a dust bath. She shook some dusting powder into a plastic tub and the students held it up to the

THE PANTAGRAPH VIA AP

Bloomington Junior High School student Damond Price checks out Stella, a gecko, in his classroom.

open cage. Both rodents hopped into the tub and began spinning in the dust, coating their fur. Rosendahl said there are costs involved, for food, bedding,

items for cages and cleansing dust for the chinchillas. “That’s one downside: It can get really expensive,” said Rosendahl. “We do use some of our classroom budget or buy things ourselves.” Rosendahl said her past and current students have hosted fundraisers for pet fees and supplies. Jen Swiderski said the pros outweigh the cons when it comes to having a classroom pet. A Holland Lop rabbit named Harley lives in her sixth-grade classroom at the Bloomington school. “There are lots of benefits for students with a traumatic past,” said Swiderski. “They really form relationships with the animals and it always puts a smile on the kid’s face.” She utilizes the rabbit during teaching time, especially for science and math problems. “A lot of kids shut down for math, but if I can tie the bunny into a word problem, they want to answer it,” said Swiderski. During summer and winter

vacations, students in Rosendahl’s class have to fill out applications to take the pets home and care for them over break. The applications must include why the student wants to take the pet home, a parent’s signature and a letter of recommendation. Swiderski said in order to take the rabbit home, her students must have good grades. “I tell them, ‘If you can’t remember to turn in an assignment, how will you remember to feed the rabbit?’ The kids get really excited about taking care of them,” said Swiderski. Many other schools in the Bloomington area are using classroom reptiles, rodents, fish and therapy dogs in their teaching curriculum. For 20 years, Britta Armstrong has kept mice as pets in her kindergarten classroom at Prairieland Elementary School. “We use the mice to talk about how all living things need water, food and shelter,” said Armstrong. “It’s something fun they will remember.

With these political truths, who needs iction? MCCLELLAN • FROM B1

Unknown to the public, she is seriously ill. Shortly after taking the oath of office, she becomes incapacitated. But so strong and loyal are the Clifton insiders that they are able to keep this news secret. The public is only told that Beverly is “not feeling well.” She is occasionally trotted out for brief and orchestrated “photo ops.” Mostly, she communicates with the public through Phil. The vice president is suspicious, but is unable to penetrate the Clifton defenses. These Cliftonites have been out of power too long. They are not going to relinquish it easily. (Editor’s note here: I know this all sounds outlandish — the candidates, the illness, everything. So at this point, to add a touch of realism to the novel, I use a real person, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, as the vice president.) Kaine has Missouri roots. He grew up in the Kansas City area

and he graduated from Rockhurst High School, a Jesuit preparatory school. He went to the University of Missouri. As a young man, he spent some time working with the Jesuits in Honduras and Nicaragua. While in Central America, he met the Rev. James Carney. Carney grew up in St. Louis. He graduated from St. Louis University High School. After serving in the Army during World War II, he entered St. Stanislaus Seminary in Florissant and became a Jesuit. He was sent to Honduras. He took his vows of poverty seriously. He lived with the poor. He practiced what was called “liberation theology.” In so doing, he was at odds with the Honduran government, the U.S. government and the church. He didn’t care. He lived his faith. He was kicked out of Honduras and ended up in Nicaragua. Kaine visited him there in a remote village in 1982. A year later, Carney,

who was then 58, accompanied a band of Honduran revolutionaries back into Honduras. These rebels were routed by the Honduran army. Carney was never seen again. Later, Honduran officials presented Carney’s family with his priestly stole and a chalice. (Editor’s note again: The preceding four paragraphs are all true. For more information on Kaine’s relationship with the Jesuits and his meeting with Carney in Nicaragua, I suggest a story by Jason Horowitz in the New York Times last month. What is also true is that Carney’s brother-in-law lives in St. Louis. With all these St. Louis connections, it seems only right that the hero of our novel should come from here. Why could that be? Let’s return to the book.) An aging, but still debonair semiretired newspaper columnist in St. Louis happens to know Carney’s brother-in-law. Also, the columnist spent several

FILE PHOTO

The Rev. James Carney (center) is shown in Honduras in 1979. Carney grew up in St. Louis, and later crossed paths with Sen. Tim Kaine, the Democratic vice presidential nominee.

months in Mexico right around the time Kaine was first in Honduras. Because of these connections, the columnist, who admires Kaine, is drawn into the situation, goes to Washington and uncovers the truth. Of course, it is a harrowing, dangerous job, and I have no

room to get into details here. Suice it to say that Kaine assumes the presidency, and the semiretired columnist goes back to thinking about novels he should be writing. Bill McClellan • 314-340-8143 @Bill_McClellan on Twitter bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

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MOOD LIGHTING Hit a junkyard-found chandelier with a can of colorful spray paint to make it spotlight-ready. Add round white bulbs for modern flair. Jordan’s tips for secondhand lighting: Ensure it works safely before purchasing, and tape off sockets and clean the piece before painting.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 • C

OVER IN THE FIRST INNING Cubs fan just can’t help it, even in Cardinals territory BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DESLOGE, MO. • Down here in Cardinals country,

KMOX crackles. Sixty-three miles south of Busch Stadium, they fervently follow their Cardinals in an old Missouri mining town called Desloge. And near the water tower and the Walmart is a pleasant neighborhood of septuagenarians. Curl around the back road and there’s a sweet brick house with white shutters but two contradictory signs posted. One has a picture of pumpkins and says: “WELCOME.” The other? “RESERVED PARKING — CUBS FANS ONLY.” Sure enough, Jake Arrieta’s grandmother lives here. See HOCHMAN • Page C10

Mistakes help Chicago race away to a 4-0 lead

CUBS 5 CARDINALS 0 SATURDAY: 12:05 p.m. TV • KTVI (2) Reyes (3-1, 1.08) vs. Hammel (15-9, 3.56)

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

SUNDAY: 7:08 p.m. TV • ESPN Martinez (15-8, 3.16) vs. Lester (18-4, 2.36) NL WILD CARD Team W L NYM 82 72 *SFG 81 72 STL 80 73

CHICAGO • The gulf in the standings between the

GB +.5 — 1.0

> Garcia is back in rotation. C5 * Standings are before Giants’ late game had ended.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Mike Leake sits after being removed in the fourth inning.

Cardinals and the runaway rivals Cubs revealed itself in the difference on the scoreboard Friday, summed up in an all too familiarly forgettable first inning. Before starter Mike Leake got his first out of the game, the Cardinals had already walked the leadof batter, permitted two extra bases with faulty defense, uncorked the first of two wild pitches, and fallen behind, right there, on the hand-operated Wrigley Field scoreboard. The Cubs did none of those things. Every bit as sharp and opportunistic as last year’s 100-win Cardinals team was, the Cubs scored four runs in the first and gave ace Jake Arrieta a tailwind he barely needed for a 5-0 victory. See CARDS • Page C5

Scherer comes in for plenty of praise

STEEN STAYS HOME

DAVID CARSON • P-D

Missouri Tigers linebacker Michael Scherer. BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • MICDS ath-

Forward’s desire to be in St.t. Louis leads to a deal BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

On the fi rst day of a training camp fixated fixated on whether first Vladimir Sobotka will ever show up, the news involved a Blue who will be here for an additional four years. Alexander Steen showed how much he wants to be in St. Louis by taking what was widely seen as a hometown discount, agreeing to a four-year, $23 million contract extension. He has one more season remaining on his current deal, which has a salary-cap hit of $5.8 million, and then would have been eligible for unrestricted free agency. Many believe he could have commanded between $6 million and $7 million in the open market, but instead he’ll take $5.75 million on his new deal. “I’m extremely happy to be staying in St. Louis,” Steen said. “It’s become my home now. I feel extremely attached to St. Louis and the community. When we talked, I mentioned we wanted to be here and that was something that was mutual and made things fairly easy. We’re extremely happy and very grateful. “It would have been extremely tough to leave here, and now I don’t have to worry about that. I don’t think I could have seen myself throwing anything else over my shoulders than the Bluenote. It takes some time to grow attached like this. For me, it’s nothing that I take lightly, and I’m extremely happy to stay here.” See STEEN • Page C10

letics director Josh Smith had one person in mind when he needed a keynote speaker at Thursday’s groundbreaking ceremony for new sports facilities on the school’s West County campus. It would take some haggling to get Missouri linebacker Michael Scherer in town 48 hours before the Tigers’ next game, but he’s the guy Smith wanted. “Truth be told, Michael Scherer is just a great ambassador for us,” Smith said. “He represents everything we want from our student-athletes.” Mizzou coach Barry Odom gave Scherer his blessing to attend the event at his alma mater. In his speech, Scherer challenged MICDS students to resist being average in everything they do and told them to always be thankful to those who help make it possible. “Personally,” Smith said, “I expected him to be great. He exceeded that.” In his final season at Missouri, Scherer’s out to leave his mark as he did at MICDS, where he was a two-way force at linebacker and running back, earned 2011 All-Metro first-team honors and shared ABC League player of the year honors with John Burroughs running back Ezekiel Elliott. See MIZZOU • Page C9

> 3 p.m. Saturday vs. Delaware State, SEC Network

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 • C

MU’s Beckner is turning heads Tigers expect big things from E. St. Louis product BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Football gives us superstars who are conspicuous spectacles, and as such, there’s something fascinating about defensive tackles; the blobs are blips. You can watch an entire game

“He expects to be great, and and not realize they’re out there. I’m hesitant to use that Sure, they’re the bigword too many times — gest and the baddest but, but I’ve got the same exquick, name a big play pectation for him,” said made by a DT? You recall Mizzou coach Barry Odom the defensive end’s sack after the Tigers scored 79 and the cornerback’s pick, points, Beckner’s uniform but what about the defennumber, in the shutout sive tackle maintaining his Beckner of Delaware State. “He’s gap integrity? As such, one of Mizzou’s most got a tremendous ability level — talented players is oft missed by maybe the strongest guy on the Mizzou’s most ardent fans. Terry Beckner Jr. See HOCHMAN • Page C8

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri wide receiver J’Mon Moore (right) is tackled by Delaware State’s Logan Wescott just short of the goal line on Saturday. > MIZZOU DOMINATES • Lock, Moore tie school records in 79-0 victory. C9

STEADY AS HE GOES Reyes shows his ability to handle pressure against the Cubs

Blues focusing on evaluating young players

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues coach Ken Hitchcock leads training camp on Friday at Scottrade Center. BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Cardinals rookie pitcher Alex Reyes went five innings Saturday and picked up his fourth victory despite a high pitch count.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CARDINALS 10 CUBS 4

CHICAGO • With each assignment, the

next one more challenging than the last, rookie Alex Reyes has been measured all season by the Cardinals for moments like Saturday. The early relief assignments, the late-inning spots, the bases-loaded jam against an MVP candidate, and even last weekend’s start against wild-card challenger San Francisco all fed into his first career start at Wrigley Field. The Cardinals accompanied him with a steady backbeat of offense for a 10-4 victory against the archrival Cubs, but the game hinged around Reyes’ ability to get key outs when he couldn’t get quick outs. See CARDINALS • Page C5

> 7:08 Sunday at Cubs, ESPN > Martinez (15-8, 3.16) vs. Lester (18-4, 2.36) NL WILD CARD NYM 82 73 +0.5 SFG 81 73 — STL 81 73 — Does not inlcude Saturday’s late Giants game. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Randal Grichuk hits a two-run single against the Cubs during the first inning. > Cardinals Insider • A look at the future of the NL Central. C7 > MLB Insider • Examining the efects of bloated rosters. C7

> Exhibition opener: Peralta forced to be a contact hitter as injury limits his power. C5

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The quality of Sam Bradford’s play went largely unnoticed in 2013. St. Louis was in one of those autumn baseball comas, with the Cardinals having just clinched their 19th National League pennant and preparing for a World Series date with the Boston Red Sox. When the Rams played at Carolina on

Oct. 20 of that year, Bradford was in the midst of his best NFL season. He had a passer rating slightly over 90, and was on pace for 3,900 yards, 32 touchdowns and just nine interceptions when he went scrambling out of bounds with 5½ minutes to play. Carolina safety Mike Mitchell shoved Bradford hard to the ground. After Bradford landed awkwardly out of bounds, Mitchell stuck his chest out and raised his arms in triumph just a few yards away. With Bradford writhing in pain, See NFL • Page C11

> SEVEN FOR SUNDAY • What to watch. C11 > SUNDAY’S GAMES • Breaking down every game. C12

See BLUES • Page C14 > Exhibition opener: Noon Sunday vs. Columbus

SECTION K

48-PAGE SECTION ON THE BLUES’ 50TH ANNIVERSARY

hese Blues have uninished business JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Bradford comfortable with Vikes Ex-Ram is coming of one of his better NFL games

In Ken Hitchcock’s previous four training camps with the Blues, his system was already in place, and with every player accounted for on the ice, the practices were used to knock the rust of. This camp is diferent. The Blues are tweaking their system, so more teaching has been incorporated into the first two days. And with eight regulars either still playing at the World Cup of Hockey or on their way back from the tournament in Toronto, they’ll have to wait to put everything into place. But the Blues, however, don’t see this as a disadvantage. The club believes players such as Alex Pietrangelo, Jay Bouwmeester and Vladimir Tarasenko will be able to quickly adjust to the changes when they do arrive. Their respective

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Minnesota’s Sam Bradford is second in the NFL with a 121.2 passer rating.

The sting remains. It has softened a bit, but it is still there. It lingers amid the justified pride the Blues have after getting within two victories of the last Stanley Cup Final. The Blues picked up valuable experience on their march to the 2016 Western Conference Final, a stage they had not visited in 15 years. Sure, there were regrets this ofseason, but not nearly as many as the previous four that ended once in the second round and thrice in the opening round. Only one team can truly finish a season See ORTIZ • Page C14

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 • C

MU’s Beckner is turning heads Tigers expect big things from E. St. Louis product BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Football gives us superstars who are conspicuous spectacles, and as such, there’s something fascinating about defensive tackles; the blobs are blips. You can watch an entire game

“He expects to be great, and and not realize they’re out there. I’m hesitant to use that Sure, they’re the bigword too many times — gest and the baddest but, but I’ve got the same exquick, name a big play pectation for him,” said made by a DT? You recall Mizzou coach Barry Odom the defensive end’s sack after the Tigers scored 79 and the cornerback’s pick, points, Beckner’s uniform but what about the defennumber, in the shutout sive tackle maintaining his Beckner of Delaware State. “He’s gap integrity? As such, one of Mizzou’s most got a tremendous ability level — talented players is oft missed by maybe the strongest guy on the Mizzou’s most ardent fans. Terry Beckner Jr. See HOCHMAN • Page C8

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri wide receiver J’Mon Moore (right) is tackled by Delaware State’s Logan Wescott just short of the goal line on Saturday. > MIZZOU DOMINATES • Lock, Moore tie school records in 79-0 victory. C9

STEADY AS HE GOES Reyes shows his ability to handle pressure against the Cubs

Blues focusing on evaluating young players

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues coach Ken Hitchcock leads training camp on Friday at Scottrade Center. BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Cardinals rookie pitcher Alex Reyes went five innings Saturday and picked up his fourth victory despite a high pitch count.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CARDINALS 10 CUBS 4

CHICAGO • With each assignment, the

next one more challenging than the last, rookie Alex Reyes has been measured all season by the Cardinals for moments like Saturday. The early relief assignments, the late-inning spots, the bases-loaded jam against an MVP candidate, and even last weekend’s start against wild-card challenger San Francisco all fed into his first career start at Wrigley Field. The Cardinals accompanied him with a steady backbeat of offense for a 10-4 victory against the archrival Cubs, but the game hinged around Reyes’ ability to get key outs when he couldn’t get quick outs. See CARDINALS • Page C5

> 7:08 Sunday at Cubs, ESPN > Martinez (15-8, 3.16) vs. Lester (18-4, 2.36) NL WILD CARD NYM 82 73 — SFG 82 73 — STL 81 73 0.5

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Randal Grichuk hits a two-run single against the Cubs during the first inning.

> Exhibition opener: Peralta forced to be a contact hitter as injury limits his power. C5

> Cardinals Insider • A look at the future of the NL Central. C7 > MLB Insider • Examining the efects of bloated rosters. C7

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The quality of Sam Bradford’s play went largely unnoticed in 2013. St. Louis was in one of those autumn baseball comas, with the Cardinals having just clinched their 19th National League pennant and preparing for a World Series date with the Boston Red Sox. When the Rams played at Carolina on

Oct. 20 of that year, Bradford was in the midst of his best NFL season. He had a passer rating slightly over 90, and was on pace for 3,900 yards, 32 touchdowns and just nine interceptions when he went scrambling out of bounds with 5½ minutes to play. Carolina safety Mike Mitchell shoved Bradford hard to the ground. After Bradford landed awkwardly out of bounds, Mitchell stuck his chest out and raised his arms in triumph just a few yards away. With Bradford writhing in pain, See NFL • Page C11

> SEVEN FOR SUNDAY • What to watch. C11 > SUNDAY’S GAMES • Breaking down every game. C12

See BLUES • Page C14 > Exhibition opener: Noon Sunday vs. Columbus

SECTION K

48-PAGE SECTION ON THE BLUES’ 50TH ANNIVERSARY

hese Blues have uninished business JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Bradford comfortable with Vikes Ex-Ram is coming of one of his better NFL games

In Ken Hitchcock’s previous four training camps with the Blues, his system was already in place, and with every player accounted for on the ice, the practices were used to knock the rust of. This camp is diferent. The Blues are tweaking their system, so more teaching has been incorporated into the first two days. And with eight regulars either still playing at the World Cup of Hockey or on their way back from the tournament in Toronto, they’ll have to wait to put everything into place. But the Blues, however, don’t see this as a disadvantage. The club believes players such as Alex Pietrangelo, Jay Bouwmeester and Vladimir Tarasenko will be able to quickly adjust to the changes when they do arrive. Their respective

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Minnesota’s Sam Bradford is second in the NFL with a 121.2 passer rating.

The sting remains. It has softened a bit, but it is still there. It lingers amid the justified pride the Blues have after getting within two victories of the last Stanley Cup Final. The Blues picked up valuable experience on their march to the 2016 Western Conference Final, a stage they had not visited in 15 years. Sure, there were regrets this ofseason, but not nearly as many as the previous four that ended once in the second round and thrice in the opening round. Only one team can truly finish a season See ORTIZ • Page C14

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C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 9/24 at Cubs 12:05 p.m. KTVI (2)

Sunday 9/25 at Cubs 7:08 p.m. ESPN

Monday 9/26 vs. Cincinnati 7:15 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 9/27 vs. Cincinnati 7:15 p.m. FSM

UPDATE

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 9/25* Columbus (SS) Noon at STL 6 p.m. at CBJ

Monday 9/26* at Dallas 7:30 p.m.

*Exhibition game

Friday 9/30* vs. Dallas 7 p.m.

Saturday 10/1* at Chicago 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 10/1 at LSU 6:30 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 10/15 at Florida Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/22 vs. Middle Tenn. Time/TV TBA

Illinois football • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 10/1 at Nebraska 2:30 p.m., KDNL, ESPN or ESPN2

GOLF PGA TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP NHRA •MIDWEST NATIONALS

hedline Johnson takes one-shot lead Chappell is second; No. 1 Day withdraws ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/24 vs. Delaware St. 3 p.m. SEC Network

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Saturday 10/8 vs. Purdue Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/15 at Rutgers 11 a.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/22 at Michigan 2:30 p.m. TV TBA

OTHER EVENTS UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS FC (home games: KTRS-550) Saturday 9/24: at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals ON THE314-345-9000 AIR

Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 Blues 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 AUTO RACING SLU 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 1 p.m. NHRA: AAA Insurance NHRA Midwest Nationals, FS1 Raiders 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 1 p.m. Sprint Cup: New England 300, NBCSN Fairmount 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300 BASEBALL 12 p.m. Yankees at Blue Jays, TBS 3 p.m. Rockies at Dodgers, MLB 7:08 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) SATURDAY BASKETBALL AUTO RACING 12 p.m. WNBA Chicago, ESPN2 8 a.m. Sprint playofs: Cup: New Atlanta Englandat300, practice, CNBC FOOTBALL • NFL 9 a.m. Camping World: UNOH 175, qualifying, FS1 Noon at Bengals, KMOV300, (4) inal practice, CNBC 10:30 a.m. Broncos Sprint Cup: New England Noon Lions at Packers, KTVI (2), WXOS 12 p.m. Camping World: UNOH 175, FS1 (101.1 FM) Noon Cardinals at Bills, KFNS (590 AM)300, qualifying, NBCSN 3:30 p.m. XFINITY: Visitmyrtlebeach.com 3:25 p.m. Jets at Chiefs, KMOV (4) 7 p.m. XFINITY: Visitmyrtlebeach.com 300, NBCSN 3:25 p.m. Chargers at Colts, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASEBALL 7:20 at Cowboys, KSDK(2), (5) KMOX (1120 AM) 12:05p.m. p.m. Bears Cardinals at Cubs, KTVI GOLF 3 p.m. Yankees at Blue Jays, MLB Network 11 a.m. PGA: Tour inal round, GOLF 6 p.m. Phillies at Championship, Mets, MLB Network 12:30 p.m. PGA: Tour Championship, inal round, KSDK 9 p.m. Rockies at Dodgers (joined in progress), MLB(5) 12:30 p.m. Web.com: Children’s Hospital Championship, inal round, GOLF BASKETBALL 56 p.m. Champions: Bear Mountain Championship, inal round, GOLF p.m. WNBA playofs: Phoenix at New York, NBA HOCKEY FOOTBALL • College 12 p.m. NHL exhibition: BluesFlorida, vs. BlueKDNL Jackets, 11 a.m. Florida State at South (30)KMOX (1120 AM) 12 p.m. World semiinal, Europe vs. Sweden, ESPN 11 a.m. GeorgiaCup: at Mississippi, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) MOTORCYCLE RACING 11 a.m. Iowa at Rutgers, ESPN2 6 Motocross of Michigan Nations, CBSSN 11a.m. a.m. Wisconsin at State, BTN SOCCER 11 a.m. Kent State at Alabama, SEC Network 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Hofenheim vs. Schalke, FS1 11 a.m. San Jose StateTSG at Iowa State, FSM 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: West Ham United vs. Southampton, NBCSN 11 a.m. Colorado State at Minnesota, ESPNU 10:20 Cologne vs. RB Leipzig, FS2 11 a.m.a.m. Bundesliga: Nevada at Purdue, ESPNews 211:30 p.m.a.m. College women: Arkansas vs. Mississippi, East Carolina at Virginia Tech, KPLR (11) SEC Network 311:30 p.m.a.m. MLS: Seattle at Los Central Michigan at Angeles, Virginia, ESPN FSM Plus 3:25 p.m. FIFA Futsal World Cup: quarterinal, Argentina vs. Egypt, FS2 12 p.m. Syracuse at Connecticut, CBSSN 4 p.m. College women: Tennessee vs. Florida, SEC Network 2:30 p.m. Penn State at Michigan, KDNL (30) 6 p.m. MLS: New England at Columbus, FS1 2:30 p.m. Florida at Tennessee, KMOV (4) 8:30 p.m. NWSL: vs. Seattle, FS1 2:30 p.m. Duke atHouston Notre Dame, KSDK (5) TENNIS 2:30 p.m. West Virginia vs. Brigham Young, ESPN2 11 p.m. Wuhan Early round, 2:30 p.m. WTA: Boise State atOpan, Oregon State, FS1 Tennis Channel 52:30 a.m.p.m. Wake (Mon.) WTA:atWuhan Open, Forest Indiana, BTNEarly round, Tennis Channel VOLLEYBALL 2:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at North Carolina, ESPNU 12 p.m. College(Ohio) women: Florida vs.ESPNews Alabama, SEC Network 2:30 p.m. Miami at Cincinnati, 12 p.m. College women: Mississippi ESPNU 3 p.m. Missouri vs. Delaware State, at SECMissouri, Network, KTRS (550 AM) 23:30 p.m.p.m. College women: Kansas State at Baylor, FSM Plus Vanderbilt at Western Kentucky, CBSSN 25 p.m. College women: Auburn at Texas A&M, ESPNU p.m. LSU at Auburn, ESPN 4 p.m. College women: 6 p.m. Houston at Texas Texas State,Christian ESPNU at Iowa State, ESPNU

ON THE AIR

6 p.m. Louisiana Tech at Middle Tennessee State, KDNL (DT-3, Charter 199) 6 p.m. Missouri State at Kansas State, KZQZ (1430 AM), KYRO (1280 AM) 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma State at Baylor, KTVI (2) 6:30 p.m. Nebraska at Northwestern, BTN 6:30 p.m. South Carolina at Kentucky, SEC Network 7 p.m. Stanford at UCLA, KDNL (30) 7 p.m. Louisville at Marshall, CBSSN 7 p.m. Bowling Green at Memphis, ESPNews 8 p.m. Arkansas vs. Texas A&M, ESPN 9 p.m. California at Arizona State, ESPN2 9:15 p.m. Air Force at Utah State, ESPNU GOLF 6 a.m. European PGA: Porsche European Open, Golf Channel 9 a.m. PGA: Tour Championship, Golf Channel 11 a.m. PGA: Tour Championship, KSDK (5) 2:30 p.m. Web.com: Children’s Hospital Championship, Golf Channel 5 p.m. Champions: Bear Mountain Championship, Golf Channel 5:30 a.m. (Sun.) European PGA: Porsche European Open, Golf Channel HOCKEY 6 p.m. World Cup: Semiinal, Canada vs. Russia, ESPN2, WXOS (101.1 FM) MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 7 p.m. UFC Fight Night: Cyborg vs. Lansberg, prelims FS1 9 p.m. UFC Fight Night: Cyborg vs. Lansberg FS1 SOCCER 6:25 a.m. English Premier League: Manchester U. vs. Leicester City, NBCSN 8:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Hamburg SV vs. Bayern Munich, FS2 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Hull City AFC, NBCSN 11:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Werder Bremen vs. Wolfsburg, FS2 11:25 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Chelsea, NBCSN 3:25 p.m. FIFA Futsal World Cup: quarterinal, Paraguay vs. Iran, FS2

ATLANTA • Dustin Johnson is playing better than anyone in the world, and Kevin Chappell can’t wait to watch him at the Tour Championship. Even if that means having to beat him. Johnson powered his way down the fairways and occasionally out of the brutal rough at East Lake on Friday for a 3-under 67, giving him a one-shot lead over Chappell and moving him one round closer to the $10 million FedEx Cup prize. The U.S. Open champion is on a diferent level at the moment. Even on a demanding test like East Lake this year — only 10 players remain under par — Johnson is hitting his driver long and straight. His wedge game has gone from a weakness to a strength. A new putter he put in play two weeks ago when he won the BMW Championship is giving him a better feel for alignment. Small wonder that this was his seventh straight round at 68 or better during the FedEx Cup playofs. “The game is never easy. I wish it Johnson said. “Obviously, BYwas, STU”DURANDO I’m playing good right now. I’ve got St. Louis Post-Dispatch a lot of confidence in my game. Every week, I feel like I bring the same Stu Durando game, which is nice. But I put in a @studurando on Twitter lot of work to get to where I am.” sdurando@post-dispatch.com Johnson was at 7-under 133. Chappell, one of two players at the Tour Championship who has yet to win on the PGA Tour, was just as solid, even if it doesn’t look as spectacular. He has made only one bogey in 36 holes. He shot a 68 and will be in the final group of a playof event for the second time this year. Kevin Kisner (70) and Hideki Matsuyama (71) were four shots behind, while Rory McIlroy overcame another rough start on the front nine to post a 70. He was in the group five shots behind, which isn’t much of a deficit at the halfway point except for Johnson being the one they have to chase. If nothing else, Johnson all but eliminated nearly everyone not among the top five seeds vying for the FedEx Cup. McIlroy is No. 6 and still has a chance, though he would have to win the Tour Championship and Johnson would have to finish third. Jason Day is out of the picture.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dustin Johnson hits from the tee on the 12th hole during the second round of play on Friday at East Lake in Atlanta.

The world’s No. 1 player withdrew in the middle of a round at the second straight tournament, citing the same nagging back issues that he hopes will be cured by rest. By Day withdrawing, Johnson won the points-based PGA player of the year award and is likely to win the player vote as PGA Tour player of the year because of his three victories, with perhaps another to follow. But there is still work ahead of him, and that starts with Chappell. Chappell has been a runner-up three times this season and keeps running into the wrong guys — Kisner at Sea Island, Day at Bay Hill and The Players Championship. He also was in the mix at the TPC Boston until McIlroy pulled away. “It seems I like going against the hot player at the time,” he said. Russell Knox matched the low score of the tournament with a 66 that allowed him to get back under par at 1-under 139, along with Justin Thomas, who is still hopeful of a Ryder Cup pick at the end of the week. Thomas lost a shot when his ball moved right as he set his putter down behind a short par putt on the 11th hole. The PGA Tour reviewed it on videotape and gave him a oneshot penalty under Rule 18-2, the same penalty applied to Johnson at Oakmont in the U.S. Open. Thomas disagreed with, but accepted, the penalty. His argument was it was not a flat surface and the greens were running fast. “It’s nothing against the rules officials. It’s a godawful rule,” Thomas said. “It’s very fortunate it didn’t cost Dustin a major championship. I hope it doesn’t cost me anything. I don’t feel like I did anything wrong.”

GOLF ROUNDUP Levy sets course record at the European Open Frenchman Alexander Levy set a course record and opened up a CAPTION_JUMP six-shot lead before fading light shortened the second round of the European Open on Friday in Bad Griesbach, Germany. Levy will have to complete his round on the ninth hole on Saturday. Half the ield will go out early Saturday for the second round, before the third round can start. Morning fog delayed start of play on both days so far. Levy was 9 under in the morning for a course-record 62 as he completed the irst round and was at 17 under when play was halted in the evening. He made 17 birdies in 35 holes to open up a commanding lead over German Martin Kaymer, who also has one hole to play. McCarron leads event in Canada • Scott McCarron birdied ive of the irst six holes and inished with an 8-under 62 to take the irst-round lead in the Paciic Links Bear Mountain Championship in Victoria, British Columbia. The 51-year-old McCarron birdied all four par-5 holes in chilly conditions at Bear Mountain Resort, the irst-year venue in the PGA Tour Champions event, which was played in Hawaii from 2012-14. Doug Garwood and Jerry Smith were tied for second at 64. Garwood played the back nine in 6-under 30. Associated Press

DIGEST

DIGEST

SUNDAY’S HIGHLIGHTS AUTO RACING 1 p.m. NHRA: AAA Insurance NHRA Midwest Nationals, FS1 1:15 p.m. Sprint Cup: New England 300, NBCSN BASEBALL 7:08 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) FOOTBALL • NFL Noon Broncos at Bengals, KMOV (4) Noon Lions at Packers, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) Noon Cardinals at Bills, KFNS (590 AM) 3:25 p.m. Jets at Chiefs, KMOV (4) 3:25 p.m. Chargers at Colts, WXOS (101.1 FM) 7:30 p.m. Bears at Cowboys, KSDK (5)

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Blackhawks’ Keith returns to the ice Duncan Keith was back on the ice for the Chicago Blackhawks’ irst practice of preseason camp. The two-time Norris Trophy winner as the NHLs top defenseman took part in the team’s practice Friday. Keith withdrew from Team Canada at the World Cup of Hockey to continue rehabbing his right knee, and went through a workout that lasted roughly 25 minutes. He NHRA NOTEBOOK said he’s been skating this month “just trying to get going” and that he is happy with “the progression that it’s been, basically since I started skating again.” Assistant coach Mike Kitchen — who’s running the team while coach Joel Quenneville is with the Canadian team at the World Cup of BY STU DURANDO Hockey said the plan is for Keith to St. Louis—Post-Dispatch “come along at his own pace.” “He’ll let us know when he’s ready Stu Durando to step in on and we @studurando on scrimmage, Twitter can kind of rev it up a little bit in sdurando@post-dispatch.com practice doing some individual drills with him, if it gets to that point,” Kitchen said.

MOTORS ROUNDUP

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Crosby going on a stamp • Sidney Crosby and ive former Canadian hockey greats are being immortalized on their own postage stamps. Canada Post unveiled the fourth issue in its ive-year NHL stamp series Friday at the Hockey Hall of Fame. The series also features Hall of Famers Phil Esposito, Guy Lafleur, Darryl Sittler, Mark Messier and Steve Yzerman. Crosby captained the Pittsburgh Penguins to the Stanley Cup title last season and has helped lead Canada to the World Cup of Hockey semiinals against Russia. “This talented group of star forwards has contributed to our national story beyond the goals they’ve scored and the trophies they’ve won,” Canada Post President and CEO Deepak Chopra said. “They are heroes for what they stand for. They are men of honor and character and represent the best of who we are as Canadians.” Kessel addresses controversy • Phil Kessel returned to work hoping to talk about his blessedly short summer after helping the

ASSOCIATED PRESS ASSOCIATED PRESS

Team Canada’s Sidney Crosby celebrates a goal against Team Europe during the World Cup of Hockey on Wednesday.

Pittsburgh Penguins to their fourth Stanley Cup in June. Instead, the forward ended up discussing a critical tweet about Team USA following its disappointing performance in the World Cup of Hockey. Kessel, the leading scorer for the Americans during the 2014 Winter Olympics, was not invited to join this time. While he said all the right things last spring after getting passed over, his frustration bubbled up while watching the U.S. lose to Canada on Tuesday. “Just sitting around the house tonight w/my dog,” Kessel posted on his account. “Felt like I should be doing something important, but couldn’t put my inger on it.” Kessel didn’t delete the tweet even after some members of the U.S. team took exception. But he made clear Friday, as the Penguins reported for training camp, that it wasn’t a personal attack on the group that went winless in three games and failed to advance to the medal round. “Obviously I meant no disrespect to any of the players,” Kessel said. “I have a ton of respect for all those guys there. I played with a lot of those guys. They’re great players and great guys. I know this game is hard. I know it’s not an easy one to play.” Kessel would rather focus on the 2016-17 season as the Penguins try to become the irst team in nearly 20 years to repeat as champs. He’ll spend the early days of camp seeing

how his surgically repaired hand is responding after undergoing a minor procedure in July. Season finale for STLFC • St. Louis FC (8-12-9) will close out its second United Soccer League season Saturday at 6 p.m. when it takes on the host Oklahoma City Energy FC (10-7-12). The teams have played to 2-2, 0-0 and 1-1 draws in earlier meetings this season. The Energy, who have clinched a Western Conference playof spot, enter the weekend in seventh place. With a win, they’d have a shot at the No. 6 playof seed. STLFC’s Irvin Herrera enters Saturday’s action with 14 goals, one back of FC Cincinnati’s Sean Okoli and Jack McBean of the LA Galaxy II in the race for the USL Golden Boot award. (Joe Lyons) Fury calls of fight again • The rematch between Tyson Fury and Wladimir Klitschko for the world heavyweight title has been called of for a second time. Fury’s management company, Hennessy Sports, said that the British boxer has “been declared medically unit to ight” and the Oct. 29 bout in Manchester “will not be going ahead.” No further details were immediately given in the statement as to Fury’s medical condition. Associated Press


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 9/25 at Cubs 7:08 p.m. ESPN

Monday 9/26 vs. Cincinnati 7:15 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 9/27 vs. Cincinnati 7:15 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 9/25* Columbus (SS) Noon at STL 6 p.m. at CBJ

Monday 9/26* at Dallas 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 9/28 vs. Cincinnati 7:15 p.m. FSM

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

NHRA MIDWEST NATIONALS

Changes keep Force going

*Exhibition game

Friday 9/30* vs. Dallas 7 p.m.

Saturday 10/1* at Chicago 7:30 p.m.

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 10/1 at LSU 6:30 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 10/15 at Florida Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/22 vs. Middle Tenn. Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/29 vs. Kentucky Time/TV TBA

Illinois football • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 10/1 at Nebraska 2:30 p.m., KDNL, ESPN or ESPN2

Saturday 10/8 vs. Purdue Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/15 at Rutgers 11 a.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/22 at Michigan 2:30 p.m. TV TBA

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 1:15 p.m. NHRA: AAA Insurance NHRA Midwest Nationals, FS1 1 p.m. Sprint Cup: New England 300, NBCSN BASEBALL 12 p.m. Yankees at Blue Jays, TBS 3 p.m. Rockies at Dodgers, MLB Network 7:08 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) BASKETBALL 12 p.m. WNBA playofs: Atlanta at Chicago, ESPN2 FOOTBALL • NFL Noon Broncos at Bengals, KMOV (4) Noon Lions at Packers, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) Noon Cardinals at Bills, KFNS (590 AM) 3:25 p.m. Jets at Chiefs, KMOV (4) 3:25 p.m. Chargers at Colts, WXOS (101.1 FM) 7:20 p.m. Bears at Cowboys, KSDK (5) GOLF 11 a.m. PGA: Tour Championship, inal round, Golf Channel 12:30 p.m. PGA: Tour Championship, inal round, KSDK (5) 12:30 p.m. Web.com: Children’s Hospital Championship, inal round, Golf Channel 5 p.m. Champions: Bear Mountain Championship, inal round, Golf Channel HOCKEY Noon NHL exhibition: Blues vs. Blue Jackets, KMOX (1120 AM) Noon World Cup: semiinal, Europe vs. Sweden, ESPN MOTORCYCLE RACING 6 a.m. Motocross of Nations, CBSSN SOCCER 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: TSG Hofenheim vs. Schalke, FS1 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: West Ham United vs. Southampton, NBCSN 10:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Cologne vs. RB Leipzig, FS2 2 p.m. College women: Arkansas vs. Mississippi, SEC Network 3 p.m. MLS: Seattle at Los Angeles, ESPN 3:25 p.m. FIFA Futsal World Cup: quarterinal, Argentina vs. Egypt, FS2 4 p.m. College women: Tennessee vs. Florida, SEC Network 6 p.m. MLS: New England at Columbus, FS1 8:30 p.m. NWSL: Houston vs. Seattle, FS1 TENNIS 11 p.m. WTA: Wuhan Opan, Early round, Tennis Channel 5 a.m. (Mon.) WTA: Wuhan Open, Early round, Tennis Channel VOLLEYBALL 12 p.m. College women: Florida vs. Alabama, SEC Network 12 p.m. College women: Mississippi at Missouri, ESPNU 2 p.m. College women: Kansas State at Baylor, FSM Plus 2 p.m. College women: Auburn at Texas A&M, ESPNU 4 p.m. College women: Texas Christian at Iowa State, ESPNU

DIGEST STLFC, Oklahoma City play to another draw For the fourth time in as many meetings, St. Louis FC and Oklahoma City FC have played to a draw. The United Soccer League regularseason inale for both clubs Saturday night at Taft Stadium in Oklahoma inished in a 2-2 tie. The teams tied 2-2, 0-0 and 1-1 in previous 2016 matches. Saturday night’s draw ends STLFC’s second season at 8-12-10. Oklahoma City (10-7-13) moves on to playofs as the No. 7 seed in the Western Conference. The Energy’s 13 ties establish a USL record. Saturday’s regular-season inale featured a wild irst half and a scoreless second. The home team scored just 20 seconds into the match when Timo Pitter received a pass from Kyle Hyland on the right side and scored on a left-footed shot just inside the left post. STLFC responded midway through the half as Schillo Tshuma knocked in a rebound in the 20th minute and teammate Tyler David put the visitors on top with a redirection of a Patrick Doody corner and a A.J. Cochran header in the 23rd. But the Energy tied it less than three minutes later when Danni Konig scored on a header following a long throw-in into the STLFC goal area. (News services) Linares wins WBA lightweight title • With a unanimous decision, Jorge Linares took the WBA lightweight belt from hometown ighter Anthony Crolla at Manchester Arena in England Saturday night. Linares, the Venezuelan who ights out of Tokyo, hurt a knuckle in his right hand in the sixth round but wasn’t being hurt by Crolla, and inished stronger to earn his fourth world title. It was the same right hand which Linares (41-3) hurt previously, and which forced him to give up the WBC belt after his second defense almost a year ago. It was the second title defense for Manchester’s Crolla (31-5-1). (AP) Wozniacki advances to tennis inal in Tokyo • Former champion Caroline Wozniacki continued her late-season resurgence by beating second-seeded Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland Saturday to advance to the inal of the Pan Paciic Open in Tokyo. Radwanska was close to victory, leading 5-3 in the second set, but Wozniacki seized momentum when she broke her opponent twice to win the last four games on her way to a 4-6, 7-5, 6-4 victory. The U.S. Open semiinalist also came from 3-1 down in the third set, once again winning four straight games before closing out the match when Radwanska’s return went into the net. “It was a tough match against a great player,” said Wozniacki, who will face Japan’s Naomi Osaka in the inal Sunday. “We always have tough matches. I was happy to ight back even though I was down a break in the second set.” (AP)

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Racing legend John Force heads back toward the start line Saturday night at Gateway Motorsports Park.

Healthier lifestyle helped fuel on-track resurgence BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

John Force wanted to resist, but he knew what needed to be done. It was Friday morning before a day of racing and the thought of trudging to a gym near his St. Louis hotel was not the most appealing of thoughts. But he went anyway, joining several members of his race team. Bike, curls, treadmill, elliptical. All of it was foreign to the NHRA legend 10 years ago, but he’s 67 now, and the gym represents a multitude of changes in his life and career. Exercise has replaced the time he spent drinking. Exercise has helped ward of bouts of depression. Exercise has helped his body recover from a vicious crash in 2007 and allowed him to continue to compete for Funny Car championships as he is doing this weekend at Gateway Motorsports Park. “I joke that I used to spend two hours a day in a bar and now I spend it in the gym,” Force said. “I never recovered (from the crash) like I would if I was 25, but if I work out, keep in shape and keep my mind fresh, that’s what I have to do to change my lifestyle. “I’m in better shape than when I crashed because I was drinking and partying. I thought I was Superman and I was still winning.” Before breaking both arms and both legs in Dallas, Force endured a period when he was thrown out of the house by his wife, Laurie. He rebounded from his injuries, remained married and embraced life and racing with his drag-racing daughters, two of whom are still competing. He’s done OK for a guy whose ability to walk after the crash was

questioned, winning championships in 2010 and 2013 to reach 16 for his 40-year career. He’s challenging again this year, entering the weekend third in the standings. Retirement has never been a topic of discussion. He has contracts with various sponsors that stretch for five years. His contract with No. 1 sponsor PEAK has three years remaining, but he anticipates an extension. “He doesn’t plan on ever retiring or getting out of the seat,” said Courtney Force, a Funny Car driver. “My mom would go crazy if he was ever at home all the time. A long time ago he used to say, ‘Maybe I’ll be done in a few years.’ All of a sudden his daughters came into it and he said, ‘I’m not going to sit at home when you’re all out there.’ He wanted to be out here racing with us.” To do so, Force had to change. He now has a gym at his house in Yorba Linda, Calif. His personal life was in disarray. When angry or drinking, he was apt to punch holes in the wall and Laurie would cover them with paintings. He moved into a condominium near the home that his career had built. “Laurie said, ‘You think you’re Elvis, James Dean and Superman rolled into one,’” Force said. “She threw me out.” During that time, Force and his family were the focus of the reality show “Driving Force,” which lasted for a year. Eventually, 10 years after being shown the door, he moved back to the house and had all of his daughters, including Top Fuel driver Brittany and former Funny Car driver Ashley, living within minutes. He said he largely gave up drinking but discovered he had depression. Refusing to take med-

ication, he turned to the gym not only for workouts but for therapy. “I’ve never taken medication for it because I’m afraid of that stuff. You get dependent on it,” Force said. “That’s one reason I didn’t want to drink beer. My dad was addicted (to gambling) and lost a lot of money. I have a fear of that. That’s why I do so good at racing. Once I do something, I get addicted. I’m an addict and knew if I got on pills I’d never get of. I knew what beer did to me.” Since the crash, Force has endured some rather un-Force-like seasons. He finished ninth in points three times, something he hadn’t done since 1984. This is a guy who dominated NHRA from 1993 to 2002 like few athletes have dominated a sport, winning 10 consecutive championships. But those who thought he was fading with some of his recent down years were quick to learn otherwise. “I thought multiple times he was there, but the guy re-invents himself,” said defending Funny Car champion Del Worsham. “Several times the last 10 years you’d think he was finally at a point that someone can do better or didn’t need to take him as serious. He just rebounds like nothing I’ve ever seen.” Getting Force out of the car for good will be difficult. It’s something that not even a month-long stay in the hospital could accomplish. “I’m not going to think retirement,” he said. “I don’t want to plan a retirement tour or milk the thing. I’ll still be out there with my teams. No one knows these cars better than me.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

NHRA NOTEBOOK

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Karamesines, 84, earns spot in Top Fuel eliminations

Byron wins trucks race at New Hampshire

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Chris Karamesines made his NHRA debut in 1964 after winning his first major national title at the World Series of Drag Racing five years earlier. He has dabbled with NHRA appearances ever since and, at the age of 84, has qualified for Sunday’s elimination round in Top Fuel by posting a time of 3.979 seconds at 301 mph for the No. 15 spot. He’ll face Tony Schumacher. Karamesines, known as “The Greek,” has been racing since 1950. He made his mark in Alton in 1960 when he became the first driver to hit 200 mph at the Alton Dragway, which closed in 1972. Karamesines embarked on barnstorming tours through the years and ran a limited schedule of NHRA events in most seasons. He has run in 231 events in his career but has never won.

we left a little on the table and Aaron is pulling his hair out right now. I don’t think we were trying anything out of the ordinary. We were just a little underpowered on both sessions. Maybe we were trying to tread a little bit too lightly.” Four-time defending event champion Antron Brown qualified No. 12 and will try to add another Gateway win from the lower half of the bracket.

STAR-STUDDED MATCHUP Defending Funny Car champ Del Worsham qualified seventh. His reward: a first-round matchup with John Force, who overcame a poor day Friday to move up to No. 10. Force won last week in Charlotte, N.C. Force is 52-28 all time in headto-head matchups with Worsham. They have split two meetings this season. Robert Hight maintained his top spot in Funny Car.

CRAMPTON STILL NO. 1

ENDERS IN TOUGH SPOT

Richie Crampton maintained the top spot for Top Fuel eliminations after Saturday’s qualifying on a slow track. His time of 3.733 seconds at 323.5 mph from Friday withstood all challenges. However, his car came nowhere close to matching its runs from the previous day, leaving crew chief Aaron Brooks some work to do. “It was a good run (Friday) and I’m glad we got that run on the board,” Crampton said. “I’m sure

Erica Enders won the Pro Stock division at Gateway in 2012 and ’13 and won the championship the last two seasons. But she has struggled this year, entering the Midwest Nationals in 10th place. After qualifying 11th, her road to another title at Gateway begins against Jason Line in the first round of eliminations. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

William Byron aced the inaugural Chase race in NASCAR’s Trucks Series. The Liberty University freshman dominated Saturday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway and won for a whopping sixth time this season. This win came with extra credit: The 18-year-old Byron became the irst driver to advance to the second round of the Chase. “It’s a great run for our team,” he said. “We needed this to get back into Chase form.” NASCAR expanded its Chase format this season to include the feeder Xinity and Trucks Series, its champions now crowned in a four-driver shootout at the season inale. The format mostly mirrors the playof setup used to determine the Sprint Cup champion the last two years. The Trucks Series will use a seven-race Chase to decide a champ. The format is eight drivers cut down to six and then a inal four at Homestead. Byron led 161 of 175 laps and was never seriously challenged in a lawless win. His Kyle Busch Motorsports teammate Christopher Bell was second. Matt Crafton, non-Chase driver Tyler Reddick and Timothy Peters completed the top ive. Before he took the wheel, Busch told Byron: “Go fast and turn left.” Associated Press


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Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 9/25 at Cubs 7:08 p.m. ESPN

Monday 9/26 vs. Cincinnati 7:15 p.m. FSM

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Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 9/25* Columbus (SS) Noon at STL 6 p.m. at CBJ

Monday 9/26* at Dallas 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 9/28 vs. Cincinnati 7:15 p.m. FSM

M 4 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

NHRA MIDWEST NATIONALS

Changes keep Force going

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Friday 9/30* vs. Dallas 7 p.m.

Saturday 10/1* at Chicago 7:30 p.m.

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ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 1:15 p.m. NHRA: AAA Insurance NHRA Midwest Nationals, FS1 1 p.m. Sprint Cup: New England 300, NBCSN BASEBALL 12 p.m. Yankees at Blue Jays, TBS 3 p.m. Rockies at Dodgers, MLB Network 7:08 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) BASKETBALL 12 p.m. WNBA playofs: Atlanta at Chicago, ESPN2 FOOTBALL • NFL Noon Broncos at Bengals, KMOV (4) Noon Lions at Packers, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) Noon Cardinals at Bills, KFNS (590 AM) 3:25 p.m. Jets at Chiefs, KMOV (4) 3:25 p.m. Chargers at Colts, WXOS (101.1 FM) 7:20 p.m. Bears at Cowboys, KSDK (5) GOLF 11 a.m. PGA: Tour Championship, inal round, Golf Channel 12:30 p.m. PGA: Tour Championship, inal round, KSDK (5) 12:30 p.m. Web.com: Children’s Hospital Championship, inal round, Golf Channel 5 p.m. Champions: Bear Mountain Championship, inal round, Golf Channel HOCKEY Noon NHL exhibition: Blues vs. Blue Jackets, KMOX (1120 AM) Noon World Cup: semiinal, Europe vs. Sweden, ESPN MOTORCYCLE RACING 6 a.m. Motocross of Nations, CBSSN SOCCER 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: TSG Hofenheim vs. Schalke, FS1 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: West Ham United vs. Southampton, NBCSN 10:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Cologne vs. RB Leipzig, FS2 2 p.m. College women: Arkansas vs. Mississippi, SEC Network 3 p.m. MLS: Seattle at Los Angeles, ESPN 3:25 p.m. FIFA Futsal World Cup: quarterinal, Argentina vs. Egypt, FS2 4 p.m. College women: Tennessee vs. Florida, SEC Network 6 p.m. MLS: New England at Columbus, FS1 8:30 p.m. NWSL: Houston vs. Seattle, FS1 TENNIS 11 p.m. WTA: Wuhan Opan, Early round, Tennis Channel 5 a.m. (Mon.) WTA: Wuhan Open, Early round, Tennis Channel VOLLEYBALL 12 p.m. College women: Florida vs. Alabama, SEC Network 12 p.m. College women: Mississippi at Missouri, ESPNU 2 p.m. College women: Kansas State at Baylor, FSM Plus 2 p.m. College women: Auburn at Texas A&M, ESPNU 4 p.m. College women: Texas Christian at Iowa State, ESPNU

DIGEST STLFC, Oklahoma City play to another draw For the fourth time in as many meetings, St. Louis FC and Oklahoma City FC have played to a draw. The United Soccer League regularseason inale for both clubs Saturday night at Taft Stadium in Oklahoma inished in a 2-2 tie. The teams tied 2-2, 0-0 and 1-1 in previous 2016 matches. Saturday night’s draw ends STLFC’s second season at 8-12-10. Oklahoma City (10-7-13) moves on to playofs as the No. 7 seed in the Western Conference. The Energy’s 13 ties establish a USL record. Saturday’s regular-season inale featured a wild irst half and a scoreless second. The home team scored just 20 seconds into the match when Timo Pitter received a pass from Kyle Hyland on the right side and scored on a left-footed shot just inside the left post. STLFC responded midway through the half as Schillo Tshuma knocked in a rebound in the 20th minute and teammate Tyler David put the visitors on top with a redirection of a Patrick Doody corner and a A.J. Cochran header in the 23rd. But the Energy tied it less than three minutes later when Danni Konig scored on a header following a long throw-in into the STLFC goal area. (News services) Linares wins WBA lightweight title • With a unanimous decision, Jorge Linares took the WBA lightweight belt from hometown ighter Anthony Crolla at Manchester Arena in England Saturday night. Linares, the Venezuelan who ights out of Tokyo, hurt a knuckle in his right hand in the sixth round but wasn’t being hurt by Crolla, and inished stronger to earn his fourth world title. It was the same right hand which Linares (41-3) hurt previously, and which forced him to give up the WBC belt after his second defense almost a year ago. It was the second title defense for Manchester’s Crolla (31-5-1). (AP) Wozniacki advances to tennis inal in Tokyo • Former champion Caroline Wozniacki continued her late-season resurgence by beating second-seeded Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland Saturday to advance to the inal of the Pan Paciic Open in Tokyo. Radwanska was close to victory, leading 5-3 in the second set, but Wozniacki seized momentum when she broke her opponent twice to win the last four games on her way to a 4-6, 7-5, 6-4 victory. The U.S. Open semiinalist also came from 3-1 down in the third set, once again winning four straight games before closing out the match when Radwanska’s return went into the net. “It was a tough match against a great player,” said Wozniacki, who will face Japan’s Naomi Osaka in the inal Sunday. “We always have tough matches. I was happy to ight back even though I was down a break in the second set.” (AP)

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Racing legend John Force heads back toward the start line Saturday night at Gateway Motorsports Park.

Healthier lifestyle helped fuel on-track resurgence BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

John Force wanted to resist, but he knew what needed to be done. It was Friday morning before a day of racing and the thought of trudging to a gym near his St. Louis hotel was not the most appealing of thoughts. But he went anyway, joining several members of his race team. Bike, curls, treadmill, elliptical. All of it was foreign to the NHRA legend 10 years ago, but he’s 67 now, and the gym represents a multitude of changes in his life and career. Exercise has replaced the time he spent drinking. Exercise has helped ward of bouts of depression. Exercise has helped his body recover from a vicious crash in 2007 and allowed him to continue to compete for Funny Car championships as he is doing this weekend at Gateway Motorsports Park. “I joke that I used to spend two hours a day in a bar and now I spend it in the gym,” Force said. “I never recovered (from the crash) like I would if I was 25, but if I work out, keep in shape and keep my mind fresh, that’s what I have to do to change my lifestyle. “I’m in better shape than when I crashed because I was drinking and partying. I thought I was Superman and I was still winning.” Before breaking both arms and both legs in Dallas, Force endured a period when he was thrown out of the house by his wife, Laurie. He rebounded from his injuries, remained married and embraced life and racing with his drag-racing daughters, two of whom are still competing. He’s done OK for a guy whose ability to walk after the crash was

questioned, winning championships in 2010 and 2013 to reach 16 for his 40-year career. He’s challenging again this year, entering the weekend third in the standings. Retirement has never been a topic of discussion. He has contracts with various sponsors that stretch for five years. His contract with No. 1 sponsor PEAK has three years remaining, but he anticipates an extension. “He doesn’t plan on ever retiring or getting out of the seat,” said Courtney Force, a Funny Car driver. “My mom would go crazy if he was ever at home all the time. A long time ago he used to say, ‘Maybe I’ll be done in a few years.’ All of a sudden his daughters came into it and he said, ‘I’m not going to sit at home when you’re all out there.’ He wanted to be out here racing with us.” To do so, Force had to change. He now has a gym at his house in Yorba Linda, Calif. His personal life was in disarray. When angry or drinking, he was apt to punch holes in the wall and Laurie would cover them with paintings. He moved into a condominium near the home that his career had built. “Laurie said, ‘You think you’re Elvis, James Dean and Superman rolled into one,’” Force said. “She threw me out.” During that time, Force and his family were the focus of the reality show “Driving Force,” which lasted for a year. Eventually, 10 years after being shown the door, he moved back to the house and had all of his daughters, including Top Fuel driver Brittany and former Funny Car driver Ashley, living within minutes. He said he largely gave up drinking but discovered he had depression. Refusing to take med-

ication, he turned to the gym not only for workouts but for therapy. “I’ve never taken medication for it because I’m afraid of that stuff. You get dependent on it,” Force said. “That’s one reason I didn’t want to drink beer. My dad was addicted (to gambling) and lost a lot of money. I have a fear of that. That’s why I do so good at racing. Once I do something, I get addicted. I’m an addict and knew if I got on pills I’d never get of. I knew what beer did to me.” Since the crash, Force has endured some rather un-Force-like seasons. He finished ninth in points three times, something he hadn’t done since 1984. This is a guy who dominated NHRA from 1993 to 2002 like few athletes have dominated a sport, winning 10 consecutive championships. But those who thought he was fading with some of his recent down years were quick to learn otherwise. “I thought multiple times he was there, but the guy re-invents himself,” said defending Funny Car champion Del Worsham. “Several times the last 10 years you’d think he was finally at a point that someone can do better or didn’t need to take him as serious. He just rebounds like nothing I’ve ever seen.” Getting Force out of the car for good will be difficult. It’s something that not even a month-long stay in the hospital could accomplish. “I’m not going to think retirement,” he said. “I don’t want to plan a retirement tour or milk the thing. I’ll still be out there with my teams. No one knows these cars better than me.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

NHRA NOTEBOOK

MOTORS ROUNDUP

Karamesines, 84, earns spot in Top Fuel eliminations

Byron wins trucks race at New Hampshire

CRAMPTON STILL NO. 1

ENDERS IN TOUGH SPOT

William Byron aced the inaugural Chase race in NASCAR’s Trucks Series. The Liberty University freshman dominated Saturday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway and won for a whopping sixth time this season. This win came with extra credit: The 18-year-old Byron became the irst driver to advance to the second round of the Chase. “It’s a great run for our team,” he said. “We needed this to get back into Chase form.” NASCAR expanded its Chase format this season to include the feeder Xinity and Trucks Series, its champions now crowned in a four-driver shootout at the season inale. The format mostly mirrors the playof setup used to determine the Sprint Cup champion the last two years. The Trucks Series will use a seven-race Chase to decide a champ. The format is eight drivers cut down to six and then a inal four at Homestead.

Richie Crampton maintained the top spot for Top Fuel eliminations after Saturday’s qualifying on a slow track. His time of 3.733 seconds at 323.5 mph from Friday withstood all challenges. However, his car came nowhere close to matching its runs from the previous day, leaving crew chief Aaron Brooks some work to do. “It was a good run (Friday) and I’m glad we got that run on the board,” Crampton said. “I’m sure

Erica Enders won the Pro Stock division at Gateway in 2012 and ’13 and won the championship the last two seasons. But she has struggled this year, entering the Midwest Nationals in 10th place. After qualifying 11th, her road to another title at Gateway begins against Jason Line in the first round of eliminations.

Sadler tops Xinity • Elliott Sadler took the lead with four laps remaining and held of Daniel Suarez by 0.246 seconds to win the inaugural NASCAR Xinity Series Chase race at Kentucky Speedway. Ryan Blaney was third, followed by Sam Hornish Jr. and Matt Tift.

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Chris Karamesines made his NHRA debut in 1964 after winning his first major national title at the World Series of Drag Racing five years earlier. He has dabbled with NHRA appearances ever since and, at the age of 84, has qualified for Sunday’s elimination round in Top Fuel by posting a time of 3.979 seconds at 301 mph for the No. 15 spot. He’ll face Tony Schumacher. Karamesines, known as “The Greek,” has been racing since 1950. He made his mark in Alton in 1960 when he became the first driver to hit 200 mph at the Alton Dragway, which closed in 1972. Karamesines embarked on barnstorming tours through the years and ran a limited schedule of NHRA events in most seasons. He has run in 231 events in his career but has never won.

we left a little on the table and Aaron is pulling his hair out right now. I don’t think we were trying anything out of the ordinary. We were just a little underpowered on both sessions. Maybe we were trying to tread a little bit too lightly.” Four-time defending event champion Antron Brown qualified No. 12 and will try to add another Gateway win from the lower half of the bracket.

STAR-STUDDED MATCHUP Defending Funny Car champ Del Worsham qualified seventh. His reward: a first-round matchup with John Force, who overcame a poor day Friday to move up to No. 10. Force won last week in Charlotte, N.C. Force is 52-28 all time in headto-head matchups with Worsham. They have split two meetings this season. Robert Hight maintained his top spot in Funny Car.

Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Associated Press


MOTOR SPORTS

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

Antron Brown seeks ifth win But Top Fuel star says earlier success not a factor here BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-dispatch

From St. Charles to Alton to Wood River, Antron Brown’s travels have provided an extensive look at the St. Louis region in recent days, with the main stop coming at Gateway Motorsports Park. When the NHRA Top Fuel leader showed up at a WalMart to sign autographs Thursday night, he was surprised to see a line of fans that was longer than he has come to expect. Brown is a significant entity anywhere in the NHRA world. When he’s in St. Louis for the Midwest Nationals his profile seems to expand each time he adds a victory at the track. The resident of Indianapolis has won the last four Midwest Nationals and five of the last six, a run of success that is beyond his ability to explain. “I love the atmosphere of the track,” Brown said, searching for some type of reasoning for the streak. “The setting is kind of at ease, almost like a home race for us. I hop in my pickup and drive over. It’s a home away from home for sure. When I showed up at Walmart, they had a line all the way down the middle of the store. Sometimes there might be 20 people waiting. That’s the atmosphere we get when we come into this area.” Brown has dominated at Gateway since the track reopened in 2012, sweeping 16 head-to-head races in the elimination round with amazing consistency. During the same stretch, the Funny Car and Pro Stock Motorcycle divisions have been won by four diferent drivers. Erica Enders in Pro Stock is the only other driver with more than one win (two) at Gateway since 2012. In 2012 and 2015, those wins for Brown helped him on the way to Top Fuel season championships. He entered the weekend atop the standings again but struggled on the first day of qualifying. Brown emerged from his two runs Friday at No. 12 and in need of improvements Saturday to have a chance for another Gateway win. Brown is coming of a win in the Carolina Nationals, which he hopes bodes well for his team entering a race he is now expected to win. “When we come here, it’s that time of year when we’re really focused,” he said. “We’re coming of Charlotte and the car usually runs good in Charlotte. So, we come and have a good setup for this type of weather. Our engine power level runs good here. It’s like our team is in that zone.” Brown always has been about speed. As a sprinter he was thought good enough to have a chance to reach the Olympic trials in the 100 meters. But he turned down a

JAMES R. COMPTON JR.

Four-time winner Antron Brown helps to ready his Top Fuel dragster on Friday at Gateway Motorsports Park.

“It’s always been close here,” he said. “You have to claw for every little bit. No one is going to win by three, four, five hundredths or three car lengths. You’re going to win by two feet, a foot, sometimes three inches. In qualifying you always have bad runs but in eliminations, if you’re going to win, you can’t.” Brown doesn’t have consistent weather to thank for his success because he recalls racing in extreme heat at least one year at Gateway and relatively cool conditions the last two. He said his team has always made solid adjustments to the car for diferent weather conditions, although he prefers less heat than the area is getting this weekend. But that isn’t going to decide if he wins or not. And, he contends, the last four wins at Gateway will have nothing to do with how he performs the next two days. “I don’t think about it but everyone else brings it up,” Brown said. “Whatever happened previous years doesn’t have anything to do with this year. You never get ahead of the game. A lot of little things happen to make those wins happen.”

college scholarship to race on wheels. Brown has not always enjoyed success at Gateway. Competing in Pro Stock Motorcycle from 1998 to 2007, he didn’t have any wins at the track during a stretch when he finished in the top four in season points six times and won 16 events. That changed when he moved to Top Fuel. His runs on the final day at Gateway the last four years have looked remarkably similar, with times ranging from 3.721 seconds to 3.846. That’s a diference of 0.125 over 16 trips down the track.

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NHRA NOTEBOOK Hight is getting results from extra Funny Car work Robert Hight has been looking to qualify No. 1 for an NHRA Funny Car event all season, but more than that, he’s just looking for answers to improve his performances. He remained in Charlotte, N.C., on Monday to test for a day with John Force before returning home to prepare for this weekend’s Midwest Nationals at Gateway Motorsports Park. The extra work seemed to help as Hight emerged as the top qualiier Friday with an elapsed time of 3.893 seconds at 328.38 mph on his second pass. He also was No. 1 in the afternoon session, when the track was running slower, at 3.941 and 325.61. “This was a big day for us but I know it’s only one day,” Hight said. “When you test it’s really hard to judge your performance because there aren’t other cars there. You don’t know until you go to the next track. To go out with two No. 1 runs in a row with all that we changed in this car shows how good my team is.” Hight, one of three Funny Car drivers for John Force Racing, has qualiied No. 1 for the elimination round 47 times in his career but has done so only one time in each of the last two years. He is seventh in the points standings but knows that large jumps can be made in the countdown to the championship, which includes the inal six races. He entered the countdown in 10th place in 2009 and ended up winning the championship. Jack Beckman qualiied second, followed by Tim Wilkerson (Springield, Ill.). Courtney Force was ifth and John Force struggled to 15th after winning last week in Charlotte.

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Brown struggles • Four-time defending champion Top Fuel driver Antron Brown has ground to make up after qualifying 12th on the opening day. Australian Richie Crampton was No. 1 at 3.733 and 323.50 mph and hopes to maintain that position Saturday. “You can’t start the weekend much better than being on the pole,” Crampton said. “Hopefully it will give us a softer irst-round draw on Sunday but we can’t take anyone lightly either. But it is pretty cool to be back on the pole. It’s been a long time.” Greg Anderson was irst in Pro Stock at 6.607 and 209.56 mph and Chip Ellis was No. 1 in Pro Stock Motorcycle at 6.850 and 196.53.

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Driver survives crash • Pro Modiied driver Jay Payne lost control of his car during qualifying and ran it head irst into the retaining wall but was able to walk away despite massive damage to his Camaro. Payne has been involved in a number of serious crashes in recent years, including one in 2015 in Las Vegas, where he spun at the starting line, destroyed the tree and then rolled as his car separated.

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ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

Johnson, Chappell tied for lead For irst time since 2009, FedEx and Tour Championship winners could be diferent ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATLANTA • Dustin Johnson had a reasonable lie in the rough and only a few pine tree branches blocking his path to the 17th green. Neither seemed like a problem until he played the wrong shot, clipped the tree and wound up with a double bogey Saturday in the Tour Championship. It was an example of how one hole can change everything at East Lake. And it’s why the final round of the PGA Tour season suddenly has more scenarios than Johnson cares to consider. Johnson recovered with a birdie from the bunker on the par-5 18th for a 1-under 69, giving him a share of the lead with Kevin Chappell (68) going into the last round that will determine who wins the Tour Championship and the FedEx Cup. For the first time since 2009, there’s a chance it might not be the same player. “There’s a lot of scenarios that could happen,” Johnson said. “But yeah, I’m still going to go out and try to shoot as low a score as possible.” Johnson only has to win or finish second alone to claim the $10 million bonus as the FedEx Cup champion. Rory McIlroy, who has gone 28 holes without a bogey at East Lake, had three birdies over his last six holes for a 66 and was two shots behind. If he were to win the Tour Championship and Johnson finished in a two-way tie for second or worse, McIlroy would claim the FedEx Cup. “It would just be great to try to win the Tour Championship, and if the chips fall my way, then so be it,” McIlroy said. The winner of the Tour Championship has won the FedEx Cup every year since 2009, when Phil Mickelson won the tournament and Tiger Woods won the FedEx Cup. Johnson led by as many as four shots when he ran of three straight birdies on the front nine, and he really didn’t do much wrong to give up the size of that lead. He had a three-putt from 70 feet on No. 13, and missed the fairway by a few

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kevin Chappell watches his bunker shot during the third round at the Tour Championship at East Lake Golf Club on Saturday. Chappell had a 68 and is tied for the lead.

feet on the next hole, enough that his ball was buried so deep that even Johnson and his power couldn’t advance more than about 135 yards. It was the 17th hole that reshaped the tournament. Johnson tried to play a fade from a flyer lie in the rough, and the ball came out high and hit a branch, leaving him in more rough about 60 yards short of the green. He put that in the bunker, blasted out to

6 feet and missed the putt to make double bogey. Chappell rolled in a 10-foot birdie putt for a three-shot swing on the hole and suddenly had the lead, only for Johnson to catch him with the final birdie. They were at 8-under 202. Chappell, a runner-up three times this season who has never won on the PGA Tour, has made only one bogey in 54 holes this week, a show of consistency, disci-

pline and a few good breaks when he does miss the fairway. His next chance at a breakthrough victory is to face golf’s best player at the moment (Johnson), with McIlroy and Ryan Moore (66) two shots behind. “I’ve always kind of been the underdog, so it’s a role I’m comfortable in,” Chappell said. Moore went out in 31 until he was slowed by a pair of bogeys, though very much in the mix just two shots out of the lead. The mystery is whether anything he does on Sunday — even if that means a victory — is enough for Davis Love III to use his last captain’s pick on Moore for the Ryder Cup. “I came here this week to win a golf tournament, and I’m 100 percent focused on that,” Moore said, adding that the Ryder Cup is “completely out of my control.” And that’s how the last day is shaping up for everyone — post a score and see where it leads. Johnson, for a moment, looked as though he might take all the drama out of the season-ender when he made a 15-foot par putt early in his round and then ran of three straight birdies on the front nine to go four shots clear. The putter cooled off, however, and Chappell stayed in range. Chappell chipped in on No. 12 to match birdies and stay three shots behind, and then he quickly closed the gap when Johnson made back-to-back bogeys, only to respond with a 4-iron over the water to a peninsula green on the par-3 15th to 15 feet for birdie. The 17th hole changed everything. “I thought about just trying to hit it in the front bunker, which I probably should have done — probably would have made 4 if I’d have done that,” Johnson said. “But it is what it is. I came back and birdied the last hole, tied for the lead going into tomorrow. I like my position.” And he doesn’t need a degree in math to figure out the easiest scenario — just win.

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Dustin Johnson had a 1-under 69 in the third round of the Tour Championship at East Lake Golf Club.

GOLF ROUNDUP McCarron’s 66 leads Champions Tour event Scott McCarron eagled the par-5 12th and shot a 5-under 66 on Saturday to take a two-stroke lead in the Paciic Links Bear Mountain Championship. The 51-year-old McCarron made an 8-foot putt for the eagle and added a birdie on the par-3 16th in chilly, overcast conditions at scenic Bear Mountain Resort, the irst-year venue in the PGA Tour Champions event that was played in Hawaii from 2012-14. McCarron had a 14-under 128 total after shooting a courserecord 62 on Friday. The three-time PGA Tour winner won the Principal Charity Classic in June in Iowa for his irst senior victory. Doug Garwood was second after a 66. Winless on the 50-and-over tour, Garwood played the front nine in 6-under 20, birdieing the irst three holes and the last three. He lost the lead with a bogey and McCarron’s eagle on 12, had a double bogey on the par-3 14th and birdies 17 and 18. Colin Montgomerie was 11 under. The Scot birdied the inal two holes for a bogey-free 67. Scott Dunlop birdied the last two holes for a 65 to reach 10 under, and Jef Maggert, Mark O’Meara and Brian Henninger each shot 64 to join Olin Browne (67) and Jef Sluman (68) at 9 under.

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European Open shortened • French golfer Alexander Levy took a four-shot lead going into the third and inal round of the European Open after the event was shortened to 54 holes on Saturday. Morning fog delayed the start of play again for the third day, forcing organizers to cut the event to three rounds. Levy, who was at 17 under when play was halted on Friday evening, completed the inal hole of his second round with a par on the ninth. Eight birdies earlier gave him a lawless 63 to stay 17 under after his course-record opening 62. Michael Jonzon of Sweden also carded a 63 to move to second at 13 under.

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Flores leads Web.com • Martin Flores birdied ive of the last seven holes for a 5-under 66 and a three-stroke lead Saturday in the Web.com Tour Finals’ Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship.

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Friday Cubs 5, Cardinals 0 Baltimore 3, Arizona 2, 12 inn. Pittsburgh 6, Washington 5, 11 inn. Atlanta 3, Miami 2 NY Mets 10, Philadelphia 5 Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 4 Colorado at LA Dodgers, late San Francisco at San Diego, late Thursday Atlanta 6, Miami 3 NY Mets 9, Philadelphia 8, 11 inn. Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 1 LA Dodgers 7, Colorado 4 San Francisco 2, San Diego 1

z-clinched playof berth • x-clinched division • y-clinched wildcard

CENTRAL W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Cleveland 90 63 .588 — — 7-3 W-4 53-26 Detroit 83 70 .542 7 — 6-4 W-5 43-32 Kansas City 77 77 .500 13½ 6½ 3-7 L-4 45-30 Chicago 72 81 .471 18 11 3-7 L-6 41-33 Minnesota 55 99 .357 35½ 28½ 2-8 L-7 29-50 EAST W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Boston 90 64 .584 — — 9-1 W-9 46-32 Toronto 84 69 .549 5½ — 5-5 W-1 43-32 Baltimore 83 71 .539 7 ½ 4-6 W-1 48-31 New York 79 74 .516 10½ 4 3-7 L-2 44-31 Tampa Bay 65 88 .425 24½ 18 5-5 L-1 36-43 WEST W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home x-Texas 91 63 .591 — — 6-4 W-1 50-25 Seattle 81 72 .529 9½ 2 6-4 W-2 42-35 Houston 81 73 .526 10 2½ 6-4 L-2 41-35 Los Angeles 68 86 .442 23 15½ 5-5 W-3 35-40 Oakland 66 87 .431 24½ 17 5-5 L-4 33-46

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z-clinched playof berth • x-clinched division • y-clinched wildcard

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Conforto’sPRESS homer ASSOCIATED

Mets 10, Phillies 5 1 Mariners 7, Athletics

Tigers 8, Royals 3

Indians 10, White Sox 4

Rangers 3, Athletics 0

Philadelphia AB RRH BI BBBBSO Seattle AB H BI SO Avg. Hernandez 2b M.Saunders cf-rf 44 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 00 .293 .125 Quinn rf-lf Seager 3b 35 0 2 2 31 1 0 2 00 .239 .571 Herrera cf dh K.Morales 44 0 1 1 01 1 1 1 10 .287 .125 Francorf-lf 3b .251 Morse 44 1 2 2 21 4 1 0 00 .375 Howardlf1b .194 Ibanez 33 0 00 0 0 1 1 00 .000 1-Bourjos pr-rf .251 F.Gutierrez cf 10 0 00 01 0 0 0 00 .400 g-Paredes .221 Smoak 1b ph 31 0 00 0 1 0 2 11 .167 Rupp c c J.Montero 55 0 00 01 0 0 0 20 .252 .111 Galvis ss .241 Ackley 2b 54 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 20 .000 Aschesslf .220 Ryan 32 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 01 .250 c-Joseph ph-1b 0 7 0 8 02 .260 Totals 351 0 70 9 Hellickson p 0 BI 0BB SO 1 Avg. .151 Oakland AB2 0R0 H b-Rufcf ph .176 Crisp 41 1 0 1 02 0 0 0 00 .000 Blanco Jaso c 1b 31 0 00 0 0 0 0 11 .250 .167 Totals 37 a-D.Norris ph 1 5 010 05 0 5 0 80 .000 New York AB BB 0SO1 .000 Avg. Reddick rf 4 R 0H BI 0 0 Reyes 3b lf Cespedes 45 0 10 01 1 0 0 03 .263 .125 Cabrerassss .281 Lowrie 33 1 0 1 01 0 1 0 01 .167 Reynolds .221 Moss 1b ss 31 0 00 0 0 0 0 01 .000 Donaldson 34 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 11 .000 Cespedes lf3b .287 S.Smith dh cf-rf 23 2 0 1 01 0 1 1 11 .400 Granderson .225 Sogard 33 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 00 .200 Johnson2b2b .267 Totals 3 1 0 1 09 .243 d-Lagares ph-cf 300 1 10 0 Seattle 0033 010 0 Conforto rf 2 2 1113 — 0 7 09 .222 Oakland 0 e-Campbell ph-1b0101000 0 000 1 1 — 0 1 03 .179 a-flied Duda 1bout for Jaso in3the 0 9th. 1 0 0 1 .228 LOB: Seattle 10, Oakland f-T.Rivera ph-2b 0 0 3.02B:1Seager 0 0 .338 2d’Arnaud (2), F.Gutierrez (1). HR: c 2 0 Morse 1 1 (1),0off 0 .248 Parker; (2), off1Balfour; Cespedes SmokerMorse p 0 0 0 0 1(1),.000 off Iwakuma. RBIs: Seager Robles p 1 0 0(1),0K.Morales 0 1 .000 (1), Morse a-Kelly ph 4 (4), Smoak 0 0(1),0Cespedes 0 1 (1). 0 .222 SB: M.Saunders 2 (2).3RLISP: R.Rivera c 1 1 Seattle 0 0 7 0 .219 (Morse, 2, K.Morales, Totals Ryan 2, J.Montero 33 10 10 8 4 5 Ackley); Oakland021 1 (Crisp). Philadelphia 002 GIDP: 000 Morse. — 5 10 2 DP: Sogard, NewOakland York 1 (Lowrie, 010 060 30xMoss). — 10 10 1 Seattle H 2nd. R ER BB SO forERA a-walked for YnoaIP in the b-homered Iwakuma 6 c-grounded 2 1 1 out 0 for7 Asche 1.50 HerrmannW, in1-0 the 6th. Capps 12/3sacrifice 1 0 bunt 0 for 1 Johnson 1 0.00 in the 7th. d-out on in 1/3 Conforto O.Perez 0 0 0in the 0 7th.1 f-out 0.00 the 7th. e-singled 1for Oakland H inRthe ER7th.BB SO out ERA on sacrifice fly for IP Duda g-struck Parker L, 0-1 5 1-ran 5 4 for4Howard 3 in 1 the 7.20 for Bourjos in the 9th. 1/3 0 0 Blevins 0 1(2). 1LOB: 0.00 7th. E: Quinn (1), Rupp (5), Reynolds 2 Neshek /3 York 1 05. 2B: 0 Cespedes 0 0 0.00 Philadelphia 10, New CookConforto (20),2/3Duda 0 (6), 1 d’1Arnaud 3 (7). 0 13.50 (25), HR: Scribner 11/3 1 Ruf 1 (1),1off Smoker; 1 0 6.75 Franco (24), off Verrett; Balfour 1 2 1 1 0 0 9.00 Conforto (12), off Herrmann. RBIs: Hernandez Inherited (38), Quinnrunners-scored: (6), Franco (84), Ruf 2 (5), O.Perez 1-0, (55), Neshek 1-0, Scribner Granderson Johnson (34), Conforto 3 (39), 3-0. HBP:(15), by Cook (Morse). d’ Arnaud Campbell (7), T.Rivera (11). SB: Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; Quinn (4), Herrera (25). SF: T.Rivera. First, S: Lagares. Doug Eddings; Second, John Tumpane; RLISP: Philadelphia 5 (Herrera 2, Franco 2, Third, Dana DeMuth. T: 3:16. d’ A:A15,315. Howard); New York 2 (Reyes, rnaud). GIDP: Joseph. DP: New York 1 (Reyes, Duda). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Giants 3, Dodgers 0 Hellickson L, 12-10 41/3 7 6 6 3 1 89 3.78 2/ San Francisco AB SO Avg. 1 1 H 0BI BB 2 14 7.82 Herrmann 3 1 R Pagan cf 41 1 01 1 2 00 00 150 .500 Murray 5.88 Scutaro 2b 40 1 0 .125 Schuster 2 1 1 10 00 8036.00 Sandoval 3b 32 0 0 0 0 00 2 1240 .286 Gonzalez 5.35 PoseyYork c 4 H R1 ER BB 1 0SO0NP1 ERA .143 New IP Pence rf 42 5 0 .286 Ynoa 2 2 2 10 10432 9.00 Arias 1b 42 2 1 1 2 2 1 20460 .400 Verrett 5.20 Torres lfW, 3-0 41 1 21 2 1 10 20321 5.40 .143 Smoker 1/ B.Crawford ss 4.36 Goeddel 14 3 1 0 0 0 10 00262 .000 Bumgarner p 30 1 0 0 1 0 1 00 21 6.75 .333 Edgin Romo pS, 1-3 --Robles 220/3 0 00 0 0 00 30200 3.54 Totals pitched to 34 3 in10the2 6th. 1 Edgin 7 Smoker 2 batters Los Angeles H BI BBpitched SO Avg. pitched to 1 batter AB in the R 7th. Murray Hairston 0 0pitched 0 0 to03.000 to 1 batterJr.inlfthe 7th.3Schuster c-C.Crawford 1 0 runners-scored: 0 0 0 0 .400 batters in theph 7th. Inherited M.Ellis 2b 2-2, Schuster 4 1-1, 0 Gonzalez 0 0 02-1,1 .286 Herrmann Kemp 2-0, cf Robles 3-0. 3 T: 3:40. 0 0 0 1 .000 Edgin A: 0 37,873. Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .200 L.Cruz 3b-ss 3, Diamondbacks 3 0 0 0 0 02.000 Orioles Ethier rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Arizona AB 3 R H A.Ellis c 0 BI1 BB 0 0SO 1 Avg. .143 Segura 2b 5 2 0 01 10 00 0 0 1 .000 .317 Sellers ss Owings 5 1 0 02 00 00 0 2 1 .000 .278 a-Puntoss ph-3b Goldschmidt 1b 4 2 1 01 00 01 0 10 .000 .298 Ryu p Castillo 5 0 0 02 00 00 0 00 .267 Belisarioc p --Lamb 5 0 0 01 10 00 0 10 .249 Jansen3bp --Tomas rf p 5 0 0 01 00 00 0 10 .272 P.Rodriguez --Drury lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .277 b-Schumaker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Brito 1 0 0 0 02 00 0 07 .185 Totalslf 29 Jensen dh 4 0100 0 200 0 —1 3 310 .278 San Francisco 000 0 Haniger cf 5 0000 0 000 0 —0 0 3 2 .2472 Los Angeles 000 Totals 43 San 2 9Francisco 2 25, 13 E: Sellers 2 (2). LOB: Baltimore ABEthier R H BB SO Avg. Los Angeles 2. 2B: (1),BI A.Ellis Kim lf 0 0 0 (1).2 1 .303 (1). RBIs: Arias (1), 2Bumgarner a-Bourn ph-lf 1 0 0 0 RLISP: San Francisco 2 (Posey, 0 0 .250 Jones cf 4 0 21 (A.Ellis, 0 1 0 .273 B.Crawford); Los Angeles Machado 3b Scutaro, 5 0 Posey 1 02, Torres. 1 1 .300 Punto). GIDP: Davis 1b 5 0 0 0 1 2 .220 DP: Los Angeles 4 (L.Cruz, M.Ellis, Trumbo rf 5 1M.Ellis), 2 1(L.Cruz, 1 M.Ellis, 1 .246 Ad.Gonzalez), (L.Cruz, Alvarez dh (Sellers, 5 1M.Ellis, 1 1Ad.Gonzalez). 0 2 .249 Ad.Gonzalez), Schoop 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO .269 ERA Wieters c W, 1-0 5 8 1 23 0 1 0 00 06 0.00 .235 Bumgarner 1-Stubbs pr 0 .177 Romo S, 1-1 10 00 0 0 0 00 01 0.00 Joseph c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .178 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hardy 461/3010 1 3 0 1 00 15 .274 Ryu L, ss 0-1 1.42 Totals 41 2/3 3 09 0 3 0 60 80 0.00 Belisario Arizona 110 000 9 2 Jansen 1 0000 0 000 0 1— 21 0.00 Baltimore 9 0 P.Rodriguez 000 000 1 0011 0 001 0 0— 31 0.00 No outs when winning run scored. a-popped Inherited runners-scored: Belisario 2-2. out for KimHome, in the 9th. for Wieters Umpires: Paul1-ran Emmel; First, in the 11th. Lamb (19), Second, Godley (1). LOB: Arizona 7, BruceE:Dreckman; Clint Fagan; Baltimore 2B: Segura (38),A:Lamb (29), Tomas Third, Gary14.Darling. T: 2:44. 45,431. (28), Drury (26), Trumbo (24). HR: Alvarez (21), off Burgos; Wieters (14), off Hudson; Trumbo Rockies Brewers (43), off Koch.8, RBIs: Segura (59),4 Lamb (88), Trumbo (102), Alvarez (60). Avg. Colorado AB(48),R Wieters HBIBBSO S: Hardy, Bourn. RLISP: Arizona 5 Fowler cf 4 1 1 0(Owings, 1 1 .444 Tomas 3, Drury); Baltimore Rutledge 2b 4 28 (Machado, 2 1 0 Davis 1 .333 3, Alvarez 2,lfSchoop 2). C.Gonzalez 5 GIDP: 2 Goldschmidt. 2 2 0 2 .400 DP: Baltimore 1 (Hardy, Schoop, Davis). Tulowitzki ss 4 1 1 2 0 1 .333 Arizona rf IP H R ERA Cuddyer 5 ER1 BB3 SO 1 0NP1 .300 Miller 1b 6 3 0 Helton 5 00 32 1 3 0 970 6.90 .250 Delgado3b 1 0 4 0 00 12 1 1 0 171 4.46 Nelson .375 1/ 0 00 00 0 1 0 50 4.97 3 0 0 Hathaway Belisle p --2/ 1 1 1 0 1 11 Burgos 3 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 5.67 --Hudson p 1 3 01 01 0 1 0 1 0 280 5.46 Brothers --0 00 0 1 0 1 0 210 6.62 Godley 12p/3 1 0 R.Betancourt --7.66 Escobar c 1/3 0 0 Torrealba 3 01 00 0 0 1 31 .000 Koch 0.00 De La Rosa p 0 1 21 01 00 0 0 0 42 .000 Baltimore SO 0NP1 .000 ERA Escalona p IP H R1 ER0 BB0 0 Gallardo3b 6 6 21 0 2 21 0 5 0 9901.000 5.77 Brignac O’Day 1 0 38 0 08 14 0 8 1 2 14 Totals 11 4.03 Brach 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 1.69 Milwaukee AB R HBIBBSO Avg. Givens 1 0 0 Aoki rf 5 0 0 02 0 2 0 12 0 3.34 .333 Britton2b 1 0 0 0.58 Weeks 3 01 01 0 2 2 19 0 .429 Hunter 1 2 0 0 0 1 20 2.61 Braun lf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .250 Drake Ar.Ramirez 3b 1 0 0 3 01 01 0 1 1 81 4.60 .429 Inherited runners-scored: Escobar 3-0. Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 PB: off Godley Ale.Gonzalez 1b(Jones). 4 HBP: 0 Delgado 0 0 0 0 .000 (Jones). WP: C.Gomez cf Hudson.4 T: 4:00. 1 A: 1 137,815. 0 0 .125 Segura ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .571 Red Sox 2, Rays Estrada p 2 01 1 1 0 1 .500 Kintzler --Boston p AB0 R 0H BI0 0 BB 0SO0 Avg. a-K.Davis Pedroia 2bph 51 0 00 00 0 0 0 11 .000 .317 Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bogaerts ss 4 1 1 0 1 0 .295 Badenhop --Ortiz dh p 50 1 02 20 0 0 0 00 .319 Gorzelanny p --Betts rf 40 0 03 00 0 1 0 00 .321 Narveson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --H.Ramirez 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .292 b-L.Schafer Shaw 3b ph 40 0 00 00 0 0 0 0 1 .000 .246 c-Y.Betancourt Bradley Jr. cf ph 31 0 00 00 0 1 0 0 1 .000 .273 Totals 34 4 9 4 4 5 Holaday c 2 0 1 0 1 1 .219 Colorado 2 b-Benintendi ph 011 0 020 0 0 310 0 — 1 8 14 0 .318 Milwaukee 022000000 0 Vazquez c 0 0 0 0 — 0 4 09 .224 a-struck Holt lf out for Kintzler 4 0 in 1the06th.0b-was 1 .260 announced for Narveson Totals 35 2 in9 the2 9th.5 7 c-flied for L.Schafer Tampaout Bay AB RinHtheBI9th. BB SO Avg. E: Cuddyer Forsythe 2b(1), Brignac 3 0(1).0LOB: 0 Colorado 1 0 7,.275 Milwaukee 7. 2B: Ar.Ramirez Kiermaier cf 4 0 0 (2), 0 C.Gomez 0 1 (1). .246 HR: Tulowitzki (2), off Estrada; C.Gonzalez Longoria 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 (2), .278 off Estrada; Miller 1b Braun (1), 4 off 0 De 1 La 0 Rosa. 0 RBIs: 0 .250 Rutledge Mahtook (1), rf C.Gonzalez 4 1 2 2(3), Tulowitzki 1 0 2 .182 2Dickerson (4), Cuddyer lf (1), Helton 3 0 (1), 1 Nelson 0 1 (1),1 .244 Braun 2 (3),ssC.Gomez2 (1), A.Ramirez 0 Estrada 0 0 (1). 0 SF:0 .207 Rutledge, Tulowitzki. RLISP: Colorado a-Franklin ph 1 0 0 0 0 30 .277 (Fowler, Nelson, Querecuto ss C.Gonzalez); 1 0 0 Milwaukee 0 0 1 .000 5Wilson (Aoki,cLucroy, K.Davis, 3 0Weeks 0 02). GIDP: 0 2 .237 Nelson, Weeks, Braun. DP: Colorado Maile dh 2 0 1 0 0 3 1 .229 (Tulowitzki, Rutledge, c-Decker ph-dh 1 Helton), 0 0 0(Tulowitzki, 0 1 .118 Helton), Tulowitzki); Totals (Cuddyer, 32 1 6 1Milwaukee 2 9 1Boston (Badenhop, Weeks, Ale.Gonzalez). 200 000 000 — 2 9 0 Colorado H R ER BB SO NP Tampa Bay 010 IP 000 000 — 1 6ERA0 De La Rosa 4 1/3 5 4in the 4 7th. 3 3b-walked 77 8.31 a-popped out for A.Ramirez 2 Escalona W,in1-0 /3 1 0 0 1 Maile 1 27 in0.00 for Holaday the 8th.1 c-struck out for the Belisle H, 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 21 0.00 8th. LOB: Boston 11, Tampa Bay 6. 2B: Longoria 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 4 20.25 W.Lopez (37), Miller (27), Dickerson (35), Maile (6). HR: 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Brothers Ortiz (37), off Archer; Mahtook (2), off Pomeranz. 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 R.Betancourt S, 1-1Mahtook 3 0.00 RBIs: Ortiz 2 (124), (10). RLISP: Boston Milwaukee R ER BB NP ERA 4 (Pedroia, Shaw, HoltIP 2);HTampa BaySO 3 (Kiermaier, Estrada 5 9 4 4 0 8 89 Franklin, Querecuto). GIDP: Dickerson. DP: 7.20 Kintzler 1 0 0H.Ramirez). 0 0 3 11 0.00 Boston 1 (Bogaerts, Pedroia, Mic.Gonzalez L, 0-1IP0H2R3ER3 BB1 SO 0 NP 7 ERABoston Badenhop 1 2 0 0 0 14 Pomeranz W, 11-12 5 4 1 1 00 4 78 0.00 4.68 Gorzelanny 1 1 1 1 1 0 17 Kelly 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 9.00 5.71 Narveson 2/ 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 0.00 1 13 3.23 3 1 0 0 0 Ross Jr. Mic.Gonzalez pitched1 to 7th. Barnes 0 30batters 0 1 in 2the14 4.02 Inherited runners-scored: Escalona 5 0.00 1/ Scott 3 0 0 0 0 0 1-0, Brothers 1-0, R.Betancourt Ziegler S, 22-28 1 1 0 0 2-0, 1 2 21 1.40 Badenhop 3-3. IBB: off De La Tampa Bay IP H R ERRosa BB SO NP ERA (Segura). Archer L, WP: 8-19 Gorzelanny 6 7 2 2. 2 2 7 105 4.02 Umpires: Vanover; 2/ 8 4.29 Garton Home, Larry 3 0 0 0 0 0 First, Tony Randazzo; 1/ Second, Manny 1 8.34 Eveland 3 1 0 0 0 0 Gonzalez; Farquhar Third, Wally 1 0Bell. 0 0 3 0 23 3.06 T: 3:22. A: 24,753. 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 5.06 Boxberger Inherited runners-scored: Barnes 1-0, Scott 1-0. PB: off Farquhar (Bradley Jr.), off Ziegler (Dickerson).T: 2:52. A: 20,543.

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dyson cf 5 0 1 2 0 1 .264 Merrifield 2b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .282 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268 Nava 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Morales dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .261 Orlando rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .293 Gordon lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .218 Escobar ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .266 Mondesi ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .186 Cuthbert 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .276 Butera c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .264 Totals 37 3 11 3 1 12 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 3 3 2 0 2 1 .279 McGehee 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Maybin cf 5 1 1 2 0 0 .317 Cabrera 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .307 1-Machado pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111 V.Martinez dh 2 1 2 2 2 0 .291 a-Moya ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 J.Martinez rf 4 0 0 1 0 1 .309 Upton lf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .239 Aybar 3b-2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .242 Saltalamacchia c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .176 Iglesias ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .248 Romine ss-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Totals 33 8 9 7 7 9 Kansas City 000 001 002 — 3 11 3 Detroit 202 202 00x — 8 9 0 a-struck out for V.Martinez in the 8th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 8th. E: Duffy (3), Cuthbert (16), Butera (6). LOB: Kansas City 8, Detroit 9. 2B: Kinsler (27), Upton (25), Iglesias (23). 3B: Dyson (7). HR: V.Martinez (26), off Duffy; Upton (27), off Duffy; Maybin (4), off Duffy. RBIs: Dyson 2 (23), Orlando (40), Maybin 2 (41), V.Martinez 2 (82), J.Martinez (63), Upton 2 (81). SF: J.Martinez. RLISP: Kansas City 2 (Merrifield, Gordon); Detroit 4 (Cabrera, Upton, Aybar 2). GIDP: Orlando. DP: Detroit 2 (Iglesias, Cabrera), (Cabrera, Iglesias, Fulmer). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy L, 12/3 32/3 7 6 6 4 4 99 3.43 McCarthy 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 15 6.35 Moylan 1 1 2 0 2 1 27 3.61 Young 2 1 0 0 1 3 26 6.31 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fulmer W, 11-7 7 8 1 1 0 9 102 2.95 Hardy 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.97 2/ Lowe 2 1 1 18 7.12 3 2 2 1/ Greene 0 0 1 6 5.34 3 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: McCarthy 1-0, Greene 1-0. WP: Duffy, Moylan. Umpires: Home, Laz Diaz; First, Bob Davidson; Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 3:10. A: 29,480.

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .283 L.Garcia cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Anderson ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .278 Cabrera lf 3 1 2 2 1 0 .297 Coats lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .297 Morneau dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .256 Frazier 3b 3 1 2 0 1 1 .224 A.Garcia rf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .248 Narvaez c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Smith c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Sanchez 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Totals 32 4 7 4 2 8 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Santana dh 4 2 3 0 1 0 .257 Kipnis 2b 4 1 0 0 0 2 .277 Almonte lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Lindor ss 3 1 0 1 1 0 .303 E.Gonzalez ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Napoli 1b 5 3 3 2 0 0 .245 Aguilar 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ramirez 3b 5 3 2 4 0 0 .315 Chisenhall rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .294 Crisp lf 4 0 3 3 0 0 .237 Martinez lf-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Naquin cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .170 Moore c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 37 10 13 10 3 4 Chicago 200 020 000 — 4 7 2 Cleveland 000 244 00x — 10 13 0 E: Frazier (11), A.Garcia (2). LOB: Chicago 3, Cleveland 8. 2B: Cabrera (38), Frazier (18), Santana (28), Ramirez (44), Crisp (27). 3B: Anderson (4). HR: Cabrera (13), off Bauer; A.Garcia (12), off Bauer; Ramirez (11), off M.Gonzalez. RBIs: Cabrera 2 (78), A.Garcia 2 (50), Lindor (72), Napoli 2 (100), Ramirez 4 (75), Crisp 3 (53). SB: Napoli (5). CS: Frazier (5). SF: Lindor. RLISP: Chicago 2 (Abreu, Morneau); Cleveland 6 (Napoli, Naquin 4, Perez). GIDP: A.Garcia. DP: Cleveland 1 (Lindor, Kipnis, Napoli). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Gonzalez L, 4-8 41/3 8 5 4 0 2 88 3.98 Minaya 1 2 2 1 0 1 20 1.04 1/ Jennings 3 2 1 19 2.12 3 3 3 Ynoa 11/3 0 0 0 1 0 27 3.00 Turner 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 7.36 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bauer W, 12-8 72/3 7 4 4 2 6 110 4.26 McAllister 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.62 Inherited runners-scored: Minaya 1-1, Jennings 1-1, Ynoa 2-0, McAllister 2-0. HBP: M.Gonzalez (Kipnis). WP: M.Gonzalez. Umpires: Home, Brian Knight; First, Jim Wolf; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Tony Randazzo. T: 3:02. A: 18,937.

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gomez lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .260 Desmond cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .287 Beltran dh 3 0 0 1 1 0 .285 1-DeShields pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Beltre 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .298 Odor 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Lucroy c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Mazara rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Hoying rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Andrus ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .297 Totals 31 3 4 3 1 3 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .231 Eibner cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .187 Healy 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .300 Davis lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .251 Valencia 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .290 Vogt c 2 0 1 0 2 1 .255 Smolinski rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .244 a-Alonso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Nunez dh 3 0 1 0 0 1 .143 Pinder 2b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .220 Totals 31 0 7 0 3 10 Texas 000 000 300 — 3 4 0 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 a-out on fielder’s choice for Smolinski in the 9th. 1-ran for Beltran in the 9th. LOB: Texas 2, Oakland 7. 2B: Pinder 2 (4). HR: Beltre (31), off Graveman. RBIs: Beltran (92), Beltre 2 (100). RLISP: Oakland 3 (Eibner, Valencia, Alonso). GIDP: Smolinski 2. DP: Texas 2 (Beltre, Moreland), (Beltre, Odor, Moreland). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels W, 15-5 7 6 0 0 2 7 109 3.30 Bush 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 2.56 Dyson S, 36-41 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 2.50 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Graveman L, 10-11 7 4 3 3 0 3 77 4.19 Axford 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.10 Smith 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 3.22 Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Paul Nauert. T: 2:19. A: 26,367 .

helps Mets prevail Michael Conforto hit a threerun homer to capa six-run rally in the fifth inning to help New York beat visiting Philadelphia 10-5 Friday night and stay atop the National League wild-card race. The Mets began the day tied with San Francisco for the wild-card lead. The Giants had a late game in San Diego. The Cardinals lost and now trail the Mets by 1½ games. With his team competing for a playof spot, Mets manager Terry Collins yanked starter Gabriel Ynoa after just two shaky innings. Pirates 6, Nationals 5 • Rookie Jacob Stallings’ pinch-hit single in the 11th inning lifted visiting Pittsburgh, preventing Washington from clinching a postseason berth. Braves 3. Marlins 2 • Adonis Garcia hit a tiebreaking single in the top of the ninth inning to boost Atlanta to its seventh straight win. Teammate Freddie Freeman extended his hitting streak to 27 games with a double. Brewers 5, Reds 4 • Chris Carter homered, Ryan Braun delivered a late clutch hit and Milwaukee won at home after turning a triple play. With Reds on first and second bases in the first inning, Joey Votto hit a shot down the first base line that Carter snagged. He stepped on first, then lobbed the ball to shortstop Orlando Arcia — who stepped on second for the third out.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Rangers 3, Athletics 0. • Adrian Beltre hit a tworun homer in the seventh inning to help visiting Texas win and secured its second straight AL West title. Beltre’s homer came in a three-run seventh after Oakland starter Kendall Graveman began with six perfect innings. Red Sox 2, Rays 1 • David Ortiz hit a two-run homer in the first inning to set the RBIs record for a player in his final season, and visiting Boston went on to win. His 37th homer raised his RBIs total to 124, one more than Shoeless Joe Jackson had in 1920. The 40-year-old’s 540th homer was his 300th on the road. Angels 10, Astros 6 • Albert Pujols had three hits and scored three runs, and Yunel Escobar hit a two-run homer to lift visiting Los Angeles. Tigers 8, Royals 3 • Michael Fulmer pitched seven sharp innings for his first win in over a month and host Detroit got homers from Justin Upton, Victor Martinez and Cameron Maybin to win. Mariners 10, Twins 1 • Nelson Cruz had towering two-run homer among his four RBIs to help Seattle romp on the road. Blue Jays 9, Yankees 0 • Francisco Liriano plus three relievers combined on a three-hitter and Troy Tulowitzki had four RBIs to boost host Toronto. Indians 10, White Sox 4 • Jose Ramirez hit a two-run homer and drove in four runs to help Cleveland win at home.

INTERLEAGUE Orioles 3, Diamondbacks 2 • Mark Trumbo led of the bottom of the 12th inning with his major-league leading 44th home run to win the game for Baltimore. Associated Press

Friday Baltimore 3, Arizona 2, 12 inn. Toronto 9, NY Yankees 0 Boston 2, Tampa Bay 1 Cleveland 10, White Sox 4 Detroit 8, Kansas City 3 LA Angels 10, Houston 6 Seattle 10, Minnesota 1 Texas 3, Oakland 0 Thursday Boston 5, Baltimore 3 Cleveland 5, Kansas City 2 Tampa Bay 2, NY Yankees 0 G1: Detroit 9, Minnesota 2 G2: Detroit 4, Minnesota 2 LA Angels 2, Houston 0

Saturday’s Sunday’s pitching matchups

Blue Jays 9, Yankees 0 Brewers 5, Reds 4 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 1 2 3 0 1 .327 Schebler cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Votto 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .319 Duvall lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Phillips 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .290 Suarez 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .247 Selsky rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .258 Barnhart c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .253 DeSclafani p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .132 c-Iribarren ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .391 Totals 35 4 9 4 0 5 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .281 Gennett 2b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .267 Braun lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .307 Carter 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .224 Santana rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .259 Perez cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Arcia ss 3 0 1 0 1 2 .214 Susac c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Davies p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .094 a-Elmore ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 b-Pinto ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 --Totals 31 5 8 5 4 7 Cincinnati 000 030 001 — 4 9 1 Milwaukee 010 001 30x — 5 8 2 a-grounded out for Davies in the 5th. b-walked for Suter in the 7th. c-struck out for Diaz in the 9th. E: Phillips (14), Villar (29), Gennett (12). LOB: Cincinnati 5, Milwaukee 6. 2B: Suarez (24), Arcia (8), Susac (1). HR: Peraza (3), off Davies; Carter (38), off DeSclafani. RBIs: Peraza 3 (24), Barnhart (47), Gennett (55), Braun 2 (90), Carter 2 (90). SB: Phillips (11), Braun (16), Perez (32). S: DeSclafani. RLISP: Cincinnati 3 (Suarez, Selsky, Barnhart); Milwaukee 4 (Arcia, Susac 3). DP: Cincinnati 1 (Phillips, Votto). TP: Milwaukee 1 (Carter, Arcia). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA DeSclafani L, 8-5 6 6 5 5 3 4 103 3.38 Cingrani 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 4.20 Wood 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 4.00 Diaz 1 1 0 0 0 3 20 3.23 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davies 5 7 3 3 0 3 75 3.97 Marinez 12/3 1 0 0 0 1 23 2.96 1/ Suter W, 2-1 3 2.46 3 0 0 0 0 0 Knebel 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.80 Thornburg S, 13-18 1 1 1 1 0 1 12 1.67 DeSclafani pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Cingrani pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Cingrani 3-1, Wood 3-2. WP: DeSclafani. Umpires: Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Ben May; Third, Eric Cooper. T: 2:48. A: 35,364.

Braves 3, Marlins 2 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .293 Garcia 3b 5 0 3 1 0 1 .274 Freeman 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .303 Kemp lf 1 1 0 0 1 1 .293 Smith lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Markakis rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .270 Flowers c 4 0 2 2 0 2 .267 Peterson 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Swanson ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .302 Wisler p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .133 b-Lalli ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 d-Bonifacio ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .206 Totals 34 3 9 3 5 10 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dietrich 2b 1 1 0 0 2 0 .287 c-Rojas ph-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Ozuna lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .268 Prado 3b 4 0 1 2 0 2 .308 Yelich cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .296 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .241 e-Francoeur ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .326 1-Perez pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bour 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .306 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Cashner p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .214 a-Gordon ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Suzuki rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .291 Totals 28 2 3 2 4 8 Atlanta 010 001 001 — 3 9 0 Miami 200 000 000 — 2 3 2 a-grounded out for Cashner in the 5th. b-struck out for Wisler in the 7th. c-out on sacrifice bunt for Dietrich in the 8th. d-singled for Cunniff in the 9th. e-walked for Ramos in the 9th. 1-ran for Francoeur in the 9th. E: Stanton (4), Realmuto (10). LOB: Atlanta 9, Miami 4. 2B: Garcia (29), Freeman (43), Flowers (17), Prado (37). RBIs: Garcia (63), Flowers 2 (37), Prado 2 (73). SB: Bonifacio (1). CS: Perez (1). S: Rojas. RLISP: Atlanta 5 (Markakis 2, Swanson, Smith 2); Miami 3 (Prado, Stanton, Bour). GIDP: Peterson 2. DP: Miami 2 (Hechavarria, Dietrich, Bour), (Dietrich, Hechavarria, Bour). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wisler 6 2 2 2 3 5 99 4.86 Krol 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 3.24 Cunniff W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 4.20 Cabrera S, 6-7 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 2.87 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner 5 3 1 1 3 6 86 5.73 Dunn 1 3 1 1 0 0 21 3.15 Phelps 1 1 0 0 2 1 29 2.37 Barraclough 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.80 Ramos L, 1-4 1 2 1 0 0 0 19 2.95 Krol pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Cunniff 1-0. PB: off Cashner (Freeman), off Phelps (Freeman). PB: Realmuto (7). Umpires: Home, Adam Hamari; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 3:08. A: 23,924.

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Ellsbury cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .262 Sanchez dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .337 Butler 1b 2 0 0 0 1 2 .400 d-Austin ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .278 Headley 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .253 e-Refsnyder ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Hicks rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .216 Romine c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .237 a-McCann ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Torreyes 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Totals 30 0 3 0 3 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Travis 2b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .308 Donaldson 3b 4 2 1 2 1 0 .283 Barney 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Encarnacion 1b 3 2 1 1 2 0 .266 Smoak 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Bautista dh 4 1 1 2 0 1 .230 Martin c 3 0 1 0 2 1 .237 Tulowitzki ss 4 0 2 4 0 0 .253 c-Goins ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Saunders rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .256 b-Upton ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .201 Pillar cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .267 Carrera lf-rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .242 Totals 34 9 13 9 6 5 New York 000 000 000 — 0 3 2 Toronto 210 000 42x — 9 13 1 a-grounded out for Romine in the 7th. b-singled for Saunders in the 7th. c-struck out for Tulowitzki in the 8th. d-grounded out for Butler in the 9th. e-struck out for Headley in the 9th. E: Butler (3), McCann (4), Tulowitzki (9). LOB: New York 6, Toronto 9. 2B: Sanchez (12), Travis (26), Bautista (23). HR: Donaldson (36), off Heller. RBIs: Donaldson 2 (96), Encarnacion (124), Bautista 2 (62), Tulowitzki 4 (77). CS: Pillar (6). S: Travis. RLISP: New York 3 (Gregorius, Headley 2); Toronto 3 (Saunders, Carrera 2). GIDP: McCann, Bautista, Tulowitzki. DP: New York 2 (Torreyes, Gregorius, Butler), (Gregorius, Torreyes, Butler); Toronto 1 (Encarnacion, Donaldson). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mitchell L, 1-2 6 6 3 1 4 2 93 4.50 1/ 4 2 0 26 5.52 Parker 3 4 4 2/ 0 0 1 12 10.80 Pazos 3 1 0 Heller 1 2 2 2 0 2 27 7.50 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano W, 8-13 6 3 0 0 2 6 100 3.35 Benoit 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 0.40 Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.93 Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.46 Inherited runners-scored: Pazos 2-0. PB: off Parker (Encarnacion). HBP: Heller (Bautista). Umpires: Home, Tom Hallion; First, Dan Bellino; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Todd Tichenor. T: 3:06. A: 47,016.

Angels 10, Astros 6 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Escobar 3b 4 1 1 2 1 1 .310 Calhoun rf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .262 Trout cf 3 2 1 0 2 0 .316 Pujols dh 4 3 3 0 1 0 .269 Cron 1b 5 2 3 2 0 0 .277 Simmons ss 4 1 0 1 1 1 .282 Buss lf 3 0 1 2 2 1 .216 Robinson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .170 Perez c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .206 b-Choi ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .168 Graterol c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .375 c-Ortega ph 1 0 1 3 0 0 .215 Bandy c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Pennington 2b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .213 Totals 38 10 12 10 7 9 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Gurriel 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .274 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .338 Correa ss 3 2 1 0 1 0 .272 Reed 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .175 Gattis dh 2 1 0 0 2 2 .245 Gonzalez 1b-ss 2 1 1 3 1 0 .251 Kemp lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .228 a-White ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .220 1-Marisnick pr-cf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .212 Castro c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .215 Hernandez cf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Totals 32 6 8 4 5 5 Los Angeles 020 001 016 — 10 12 2 Houston 010 005 000 — 6 8 0 a-singled for Kemp in the 6th. b-struck out for Perez in the 8th. c-doubled for Graterol in the 9th. 1-ran for White in the 6th. E: Escobar (18), Cron (5). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Houston 5. 2B: Pujols (18), Cron 2 (21), Buss (7), Ortega (6), Correa (35). HR: Escobar (5), off Giles. RBIs: Escobar 2 (38), Cron 2 (67), Simmons (40), Buss 2 (8), Ortega 3 (13), Gonzalez 3 (48), White (27). SB: Trout (27). CS: Buss (1). SF: Gonzalez. RLISP: Los Angeles 6 (Cron, Perez 2, Pennington 2, Choi); Houston 2 (Springer, Altuve). GIDP: Altuve, Castro. DP: Los Angeles 2 (Simmons, Pennington, Cron), (Pennington, Simmons, Cron). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Meyer 51/3 4 4 4 3 4 82 4.58 Guerra 0 3 2 0 0 0 15 3.16 2/ 0 0 0 5 4.31 Morin 3 0 0 Achter 1 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.18 1/ 0 1 1 13 5.70 Rasmus 3 1 0 2/ 0 0 0 2 1.35 Ege W, 1-0 3 0 0 Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.91 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister 5 5 2 2 1 3 75 4.42 Hoyt 1 1 1 1 2 1 27 4.91 Harris 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 2.20 Gregerson 1 2 1 1 0 1 14 3.04 1/ 6 3 0 30 4.31 Giles L, 2-5 3 3 6 2/ 0 0 2 16 4.43 Feliz 3 1 0 Guerra pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Inh. runners-scored: Guerra 3-3, Morin 2-1, Ege 2-0, Feliz 3-3. PB: off Giles (Pujols). WP: Meyer, Hoyt, Giles. PB: Perez (4). T: 3:24. A: 29,429 .

Pirates 6, Nationals 5 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner cf 6 0 1 0 0 2 .338 Werth lf 5 0 1 1 1 2 .247 Harper rf 6 0 3 0 0 1 .243 Rendon 3b 5 0 0 0 1 1 .269 Ramos c 6 1 2 1 0 3 .304 Drew 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .274 e-Robinson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Zimmerman 1b 5 2 2 1 0 2 .218 Espinosa ss 4 1 1 2 1 2 .213 Gonzalez p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .137 a-Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Difo 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .296 Totals 47 5 13 5 3 15 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b-lf-2b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .320 Cervelli c 6 1 1 0 0 2 .261 McCutchen cf 4 1 2 0 2 0 .259 Kang 3b 3 0 0 1 2 1 .255 1-Florimon pr-ss 0 1 0 0 1 0 .500 Rodriguez ss-3b 6 0 2 1 0 2 .267 Polanco lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Hanson 2b 3 2 2 0 0 0 .357 c-Jaso ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .264 d-Mercer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 f-Fryer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .180 g-Stallings ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .222 Freese 1b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .268 Bell rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .291 Taillon p 2 0 1 1 0 1 .100 b-Rogers ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .095 Joyce lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Totals 43 6 12 6 7 10 Washington 030 002 000 00 — 5 13 0 Pittsburgh 021 001 001 01 — 6 12 3 Two outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Gonzalez in the 6th. b-walked for Phillips in the 6th. c-pinch hit for Hanson in the 7th. d-popped out for Jaso in the 7th. e-grounded out for Kelley in the 9th. f-flied out for Nicasio in the 9th. g-singled for LeBlanc in the 11th. 1-ran for Kang in the 9th. E: Kang (14), Freese (10), Hanson (2). LOB: Washington 12, Pittsburgh 13. 2B: Harper (23), Drew (10), Zimmerman 2 (18), Gonzalez (2), Difo (3), Cervelli (13), Rodriguez (15). 3B: McCutchen (3). HR: Espinosa (23), off Taillon; Ramos (22), off Bastardo. RBIs: Werth (67), Ramos (80), Zimmerman (46), Espinosa 2 (69), Frazier 2 (11), Kang (56), Rodriguez (55), Taillon (2), Stallings (2). SF: Frazier. RLISP: Washington 9 (Turner, Werth, Harper 2, Rendon, Ramos, Zimmerman, Robinson 2); Pittsburgh 4 (Cervelli 2, Freese, Fryer). GIDP: Drew. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Hanson, Rodriguez, Freese). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez 5 5 3 3 3 5 91 4.51 Glover 0 2 1 1 0 0 7 4.74 2/ 0 1 0 9 1.69 Rzepczynski 3 0 0 2/ 0 1 1 22 2.24 Treinen 3 1 0 1/ 0 0 0 6 5.16 Perez 3 0 0 Kelley 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.78 Melancon 2 2 1 1 0 1 27 2.19 2/ 1 2 2 27 4.00 Petit L, 3-5 3 2 1 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon 5 6 3 3 0 7 87 3.49 1/ 2 1 1 13 3.00 Bastardo 3 2 2 1/ 0 1 1 16 3.02 Hughes 3 1 0 1/ 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Phillips 3 Coke 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Rivero 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.44 Nicasio 1 2 0 0 0 1 21 4.41 Watson 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 3.10 LeBlanc W, 4-0 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 0.00 Glover pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Rzepczynski 2-1, Treinen 2-0, Perez 2-0, Kelley 2-0, Hughes 2-1, Phillips 3-0. PB: off Petit (McCutchen). Umpires: Home, Tim Timmons; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Jordan Baker; Third, Mark Wegner. T: 4:36. A: 29,513 .

NL

Pitcher

StL Chi

Reyes (R) Hammel (R)

Time

W-L

ERA

12:05

3-1 15-9

1.03 3.56

Was Ross (R) Pit Nova (R)

6:05

7-5 12-7

3.48 4.19

Atl Blair (R) Mia Chen (L)

6:10

1-6 5-4

7.71 5.04

Phi NY

Asher (R) Gilmartin (L)

6:10

1-0 0-0

2.16 4.76

Cin Mil

Straily (R) Jungmann (R) 6:10

13-8 0-4

3.83 8.34

SF SD

Bumgarner (L) Cosart (R) 7:40

14-9 0-4

2.57 5.63

Col LA

Bettis (R) Kershaw (L)

8:10

13-7 11-3

4.79 1.73

AL

Pitcher

Time

W-L

ERA

12:05

11-11 3-2

4.35 3.63

5-5 1-1

3.81 5.65

KC Ventura (R) Det Norris (L)

Tex Darvish (R) Oak Alcantara (R) 3:05 NY Tor

Sabathia (L) Stroman (R)

3:07

8-12 9-9

4.19 4.50

Bos Porcello (R) TB Andriese (R)

5:10

21-4 8-7

3.08 4.41

Quintana (L) Anderson (R) 6:10

12-11 2-4

3.26 6.24

Chi Cle

LA Chacin (R) Hou Peacock (R)

6:10

5-8 0-0

5.29 2.86

Sea Miranda (L) Min Duffey (R)

6:10

5-1 8-11

3.88 6.39

IL

Pitcher

Time

W-L

ERA

Ari Bal

Ray (L) Miley (L)

6:05

8-13 8-13

4.66 5.65

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LATE THURSDAY

Giants 2, Padres 1 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nunez 3b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .266 Pagan lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .271 Posey c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .289 Pence rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .292 Hernandez cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .293 Belt 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .272 Adrianza ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Panik 2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .241 Samardzija p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .161 a-Tomlinson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .295 Law p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Span ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 2 6 2 3 9 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jankowski lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .245 d-Rosales ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Margot cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Myers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .259 Schimpf 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .220 Renfroe rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .500 Asuaje 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hedges c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .333 Sardinas ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .267 b-Jay ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Friedrich p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .057 Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Dickerson ph-lf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .259 Totals 33 1 6 1 0 11 San Francisco 000 000 020 — 2 6 1 San Diego 000 000 010 — 1 6 0 a-singled for Samardzija in the 8th. b-flied out for Sardinas in the 8th. c-homered for Hand in the 8th. d-struck out for Jankowski in the 8th. e-struck out for Smith in the 9th. E: Samardzija (1). LOB: San Francisco 7, San Diego 5. 2B: Pence (22), Hernandez (4), Belt (38), Panik (19), Schimpf (16). HR: Dickerson (10), off Law. RBIs: Pagan (50), Pence (53), Dickerson (35). CS: Hedges (1). RLISP: San Francisco 6 (Hernandez 2, Adrianza, Samardzija 2, Span); San Diego 2 (Schimpf, Asuaje). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Samardzija W, 12-10 7 4 0 0 0 9 105 3.83 1/ 1 0 0 6 2.22 Law 3 1 1 2/ 1 11 3.45 Smith 3 0 0 0 0 Romo S, 2-2 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.04 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Friedrich L, 5-11 7 3 2 2 3 6 92 4.66 Hand 1 2 0 0 0 1 18 2.93 Torres 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Friedrich pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Hand 2-1. Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mike Winters; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Clint Fagan. T: 2:55. A: 25,789.

Mariners 10, Twins 1

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki lf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .276 a-Heredia ph-lf 1 1 0 0 2 1 .228 Smith rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .259 b-Gutierrez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .257 1-Gamel pr-rf 2 1 0 0 0 1 .167 Cano 2b 5 2 4 2 0 0 .296 Freeman 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cruz dh 5 2 2 4 0 0 .282 Seager 3b 3 2 1 1 2 1 .283 O’Malley 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Lind 1b 4 1 1 0 1 3 .234 Martin cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Zunino c 5 0 2 2 0 0 .218 Marte ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .259 Totals 40 10 13 9 7 8 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Beresford 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Polanco ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Grossman lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Sano dh 3 1 2 0 1 1 .239 Vargas 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .256 Suzuki c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Schafer rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .233 Buxton cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Totals 31 1 5 1 1 11 Seattle 001 100 620 — 10 13 0 Minnesota 000 000 100 — 1 5 2 a-walked for Aoki in the 7th. b-singled for Smith in the 7th. 1-ran for Gutierrez in the 7th. E: Grossman 2 (8). LOB: Seattle 10, Minnesota 4. 2B: Cruz (26), Seager (35). 3B: Sano (1). HR: Cruz (38), off Milone. RBIs: Cano 2 (92), Cruz 4 (96), Seager (96), Zunino 2 (29), Vargas (17). RLISP: Seattle 5 (Cruz, Lind 2, Heredia, Gamel). GIDP: Suzuki. DP: Seattle 1 (Seager, Cano, Lind). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paxton W, 5-7 7 5 1 1 0 9 85 3.72 Altavilla 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.00 Caminero 1 0 0 0 1 1 24 3.86 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson L, 6-11 5 5 2 2 4 2 99 5.04 O’Rourke 1 2 3 3 1 0 27 4.09 Chargois 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 5.23 1/ 1 1 1 20 4.59 Boshers 3 2 2 Milone 12/3 2 2 2 0 4 30 5.64 Albers 1 1 0 0 1 1 32 5.82 O’Rourke pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Chargois pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Chargois 2-2, Boshers 1-1, Milone 1-0. Umpires: Home, Toby Basner; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T: 3:04. A: 22,683 .

BATTING: LeMahieu, Colorado, .352; Murphy, Washington, .347; Blackmon, Colorado, .322; Votto, Cincinnati, .319; Segura, Arizona, .316; Seager, Los Angeles, .315; Marte, Pittsburgh, .311; Prado, Miami, .308; Braun, Milwaukee, .307; Realmuto, Miami, .306. RUNS: Bryant, Chicago, 118; Arenado, Colorado, 111; Blackmon, Colorado, 109; LeMahieu, Colorado, 103; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 101; Seager, Los Angeles, 101; Freeman, Atlanta, 95; Votto, Cincinnati, 93; Myers, San Diego, 92; Segura, Arizona, 91. RBI: Arenado, Colorado, 128; Rizzo, Chicago, 105; Murphy, Washington, 104; Kemp, Atlanta, 104; Gonzalez, Colorado, 99; Bryant, Chicago, 99; Yelich, Miami, 95; Russell, Chicago, 93; Duvall, Cincinnati, 92; Bruce, New York, 91. HITS: Segura, Arizona, 192; LeMahieu, Colorado, 189; Seager, Los Angeles, 187; Murphy, Washington, 184; Prado, Miami, 179; Blackmon, Colorado, 174; Bryant, Chicago, 172; Freeman, Atlanta, 172; Arenado, Colorado, 171; Votto, Cincinnati, 166. DOUBLES: Murphy, Washington, 47; Freeman, Atlanta, 43; Rizzo, Chicago, 42; Seager, Los Angeles, 40; Gonzalez, Colorado, 39; Segura, Arizona, 39; Belt, San Francisco, 38; Markakis, Atlanta, 38; Prado, Miami, 37; Kemp, Atlanta, 37; Yelich, Miami, 37; Rendon, Washington, 37. TRIPLES: Owings, Arizona, 11; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 11; Lamb, Arizona, 9; Crawford, San Francisco, 9; LeMahieu, Colorado, 8; Turner, Washington, 7; Belt, San Francisco, 7; Revere, Washington, 7; Inciarte, Atlanta, 7; Harrison, Pittsburgh, 7; Bourjos, Philadelphia, 7. HOME RUNS: Arenado, Colorado, 39; Carter, Milwaukee, 38; Bryant, Chicago, 38; Kemp, Atlanta, 33; Rizzo, Chicago, 31; Duvall, Cincinnati, 31; Freeman, Atlanta, 31; Braun, Milwaukee, 30; Cespedes, New York, 30; Granderson, New York, 29; Bruce, New York, 29; Tomas, Arizona, 29. STOLEN BASES: Hamilton, Cincinnati, 58; Villar, Milwaukee, 58; Marte, Pittsburgh, 47; Nunez, San Francisco, 38; Perez, Milwaukee, 32; Segura, Arizona, 30; Jankowski, San Diego, 30; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Turner, Washington, 27; Myers, San Diego, 26. PITCHING: Scherzer, Washington, 18-7; Lester, Chicago, 18-4; Arrieta, Chicago, 18-7; Cueto, San Francisco, 17-5; Maeda, Los Angeles, 16-9; Fernandez, Miami, 16-8; Martinez, Cardinals, 15-8; Roark, Washington, 15-9; Hammel, Chicago, 15-9; Hendricks, Chicago, 15-8.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL W x-Chicago 98 Cardinals 81 Pittsburgh 77 Milwaukee 70 Cincinnati 64 EAST W Washington 90 New York 82 Miami 77 Philadelphia 70 Atlanta 63 WEST W Los Angeles 88 San Francisco 81 Colorado 73 San Diego 65 Arizona 64

L 56 73 77 85 90 L 64 73 78 85 92 L 66 73 81 89 90

Pct .636 .526 .500 .452 .416 Pct .584 .529 .497 .452 .406 Pct .571 .526 .474 .422 .416

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

AMERICAN LEAGUE GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 6-4 L-1 56-24 42-32 17 — 5-5 W-1 33-41 48-32 21 4 7-3 L-1 37-39 40-38 28½ 11½ 6-4 L-1 41-39 29-46 34 17 2-8 W-1 37-41 27-49 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 4-6 W-1 46-28 44-36 7½ — 6-4 L-1 43-36 39-37 13½ 4½ 5-5 W-1 39-38 38-40 20½ 11½ 5-5 W-1 37-42 33-43 27½ 18½ 7-3 L-1 26-49 37-43 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 7-3 W-3 51-28 37-38 7 — 4-6 L-1 40-35 41-38 15 8 4-6 L-2 41-37 32-44 23 16 5-5 W-1 36-40 29-49 24 17 4-6 L-2 30-48 34-42

Saturday Cardinals 10, Cubs 4 Baltimore 6, Arizona 1 Washington 6, Pittsburgh 1 Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 1 Miami 6, Atlanta 4 Philadelphia 10, NY Mets 8 San Francisco at San Diego, (n) Colorado at LA Dodgers, (n) Friday Cubs 5, Cardinals 0 Baltimore 3, Arizona 2, (12) Pittsburgh 6, Washington 5, (11) Atlanta 3, Miami 2 NY Mets 10, Philadelphia 5 Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 4 LA Dodgers 5, Colorado 2 San Diego 7, San Francisco 2

z-clinched playof berth • x-clinched division • y-clinched wildcard

CENTRAL Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Chicago Minnesota EAST z-Boston Toronto Baltimore New York Tampa Bay WEST x-Texas Seattle Houston Los Angeles Oakland

W 90 83 78 73 56 W 91 85 84 79 65 W 92 81 81 68 66

L 64 71 77 81 99 L 64 69 71 75 89 L 63 73 73 86 88

Pct .584 .539 .503 .474 .361 Pct .587 .552 .542 .513 .422 Pct .594 .526 .526 .442 .429

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 7-3 L-1 53-27 37-37 7 ½ 6-4 L-1 43-33 40-38 12½ 6 4-6 W-1 45-30 33-47 17 10½ 3-7 W-1 41-33 32-48 34½ 28 2-8 W-1 30-50 26-49 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 10-0 W-10 46-32 45-32 5½ — 6-4 W-2 44-32 41-37 7 — 4-6 W-2 49-31 35-40 11½ 4½ 2-8 L-3 44-31 35-44 25½ 18½ 4-6 L-2 36-44 29-45 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 6-4 W-2 50-25 42-38 10½ 2½ 5-5 L-1 42-35 39-38 10½ 2½ 6-4 L-2 41-35 40-38 23½ 15½ 5-5 W-3 35-40 33-46 25½ 17½ 4-6 L-5 33-47 33-41

z-clinched playof berth • x-clinched division • y-clinched wildcard

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Orioles win, slip ahead of the Tigers

Rangers 5, Athletics 0

Twins 3, Mariners 2

Angels 10, Astros 4

Reds 6, Brewers 1

Trey Mancini hit his third homer in nine major league at-bats and Mark Trumbo connected for his leagueleading 45th homer as the Baltimore Orioles won at home Saturday against the Arizona Diamondbacks. The Orioles pulled a halfgame ahead of the Tigers for the AL’s second wild card and trail the Toronto Blue Jays by 1 1/2 games for the top spot. Baltimore lefthander Wade Miley (9-13) dominated his former team. He allowed one run and seven hits and tied a career high with 11 strikeouts over 8 2/3 innings. It was Miley’s second win in 10 starts since he was acquired by the Orioles from Seattle on Aug. 1. Mancini is the third player ever to homer in his irst three starts, joining Arizona’s Carlos Quentin (2006) and Colorado’s Trevor Story (2016), according to STATS LCC.

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Profar 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Mazara rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Gallo dh 3 0 0 0 1 3 .050 Rua 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .255 Hoying lf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .214 Andrus ss 4 2 2 4 0 0 .299 Chirinos c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .218 Alberto 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .146 Totals 36 5 9 5 1 8 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wendle 2b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .275 b-Pinder ph-2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Valencia rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .288 Vogt dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .255 Davis lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .251 Healy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Alonso 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .253 c-Eibner ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .187 Semien ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Maxwell c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .257 a-Nunez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133 McBride c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209 Smolinski cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Totals 32 0 5 0 3 9 Texas 020 002 001 — 5 9 0 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 a-out on fielder’s choice for Maxwell in the 8th. b-singled for Wendle in the 8th. c-walked for Alonso in the 9th. E: Semien (21). LOB: Texas 5, Oakland 8. 2B: Hoying 2 (2), Chirinos 2 (11), Davis (22). HR: Andrus (7), off Alcantara; Andrus (8), off Alcantara. RBIs: Andrus 4 (68), Chirinos (19). SB: DeShields (8). RLISP: Texas 3 (DeShields, Gallo, Hoying); Oakland 4 (Vogt 2, Smolinski, McBride). DP: Oakland 1 (Wendle, Davis). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish W, 6-5 7 2 0 0 1 9 99 3.53 2/ Claudio 0 0 0 15 2.86 3 2 0 2/ Scheppers 0 1 0 18 2.70 3 1 0 2/ Diekman 0 1 0 13 3.29 3 0 0 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Alcantara L, 1-2 6 7 4 4 1 6 79 5.75 Neal 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.79 Coulombe 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.84 Hendriks 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 3.80 Inherited runners-scored: Scheppers 2-0, Diekman 1-0. Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Gabe Morales; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 2:58. A: 16,736 .

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Blue Jays 3, Yankees 0

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 b-Gutierrez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Heredia lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Smith rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .257 c-Lee ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Gamel rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Cano 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .297 1-Freeman pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cruz dh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .284 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .281 Lind 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Martin cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Marte ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 a-O’Malley ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Totals 32 2 5 2 0 7 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Polanco ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .283 Grossman dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Sano 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .240 Vargas 1b 2 1 0 0 1 1 .252 Kepler rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .233 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .134 Schafer lf 3 0 0 1 0 2 .217 Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Totals 27 3 3 3 1 6 Seattle 000 200 000 — 2 5 0 Minnesota 110 100 00x — 3 3 2 a-struck out for Marte in the 8th. b-struck out for Aoki in the 8th. c-struck out for Smith in the 8th. 1-ran for Cano in the 9th. E: Polanco (12), Sano (18). LOB: Seattle 4, Minnesota 1. 2B: Cruz (27). HR: Cruz (39), off Duffey; Polanco (3), off Miranda; Sano (24), off Miranda. RBIs: Cruz 2 (98), Polanco (22), Sano (61), Schafer (1). S: Marte. RLISP: Seattle 4 (Smith, Lind, Martin 2); Minnesota 1 (Buxton). GIDP: Seager. DP: Minnesota 1 (Sano, Vargas). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miranda L, 5-2 4 3 3 3 1 0 52 3.73 Storen 2 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.94 Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 0.00 Wilhelmsen 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.75 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffey W, 9-11 7 4 2 2 0 4 85 6.18 Rogers 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 3.53 Kintzler S, 15-18 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.98 WP: Miranda, Duffey. Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Toby Basner. T: 2:06. A: 24,749 .

Reds 6, Brewers 1 • Dan Straily pitched into the seventh inning and Joey Votto hit a two-run homer to help Cincinnati win at Milwaukee. Continuing his dominance of the Brewers this season, Straily (14-8) allowed just one run on ive hits with ive strikeouts over 6 2/3 innings.

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .256 Ellsbury cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Sanchez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .330 Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Hicks rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .217 McCann c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .239 Torreyes 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Austin 1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .197 a-Butler ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .381 Teixeira 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .197 Solano 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .235 Totals 27 0 3 0 3 7 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Travis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .305 Donaldson 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .285 Encarnacion 1b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .267 Bautista rf 4 1 2 3 0 0 .233 Carrera rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Martin dh 2 0 1 0 2 0 .238 Tulowitzki ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Upton lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .199 Navarro c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Totals 28 3 6 3 5 2 New York 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 Toronto 000 000 03x — 3 6 0 a-struck out for Austin in the 8th. LOB: New York 3, Toronto 6. 2B: Bautista (24). 3B: Torreyes (4). HR: Bautista (20), off Clippard. RBIs: Bautista 3 (65). CS: Gardner (4). RLISP: New York 2 (Gregorius, Butler); Toronto 2 (Upton, Navarro). GIDP: McCann, Torreyes, Encarnacion, Tulowitzki. DP: New York 2 (Gregorius, Solano, Austin), (Torreyes, Solano, Austin); Toronto 2 (Encarnacion, Donaldson), (Tulowitzki, Travis, Encarnacion). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 7 4 0 0 3 2 91 4.02 Clippard L, 3-5 1 2 3 3 2 0 26 2.42 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman 7 1 0 0 3 5 97 4.34 Grilli W, 7-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 23 2.46 Osuna S, 35-38 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 2.38 WP: Clippard. PB: Navarro (6). Umpires: Home, Dan Bellino; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Tom Hallion. T: 2:34. A: 47,828 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Escobar 3b 4 1 1 0 1 2 .310 Calhoun rf 5 2 3 2 0 1 .264 Trout cf 3 3 2 2 2 0 .318 Pujols dh 4 1 2 2 1 0 .270 Cron 1b 4 0 1 2 0 3 .277 Simmons ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .279 Buss lf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .208 Pennington 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .210 Bandy c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .239 Petit 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .249 a-Ortega ph-lf 2 2 2 1 0 0 .224 Totals 38 10 12 9 4 12 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 5 1 4 1 0 0 .255 Gurriel 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .338 Correa ss 2 0 0 0 2 2 .271 Gattis dh 3 0 0 1 0 1 .244 Gonzalez lf-1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 White 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .221 Hernandez lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209 Castro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .213 b-Stassi ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Marisnick cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .210 Totals 34 4 8 3 4 8 Los Angeles 000 100 045 — 10 12 1 Houston 002 000 200 — 4 8 2 a-singled for Petit in the 8th. b-out on fielder’s choice for Castro in the 8th. E: Escobar (19), Altuve (7), Gonzalez (7). LOB: Los Angeles 6, Houston 8. 2B: Calhoun (29), Trout (32), Pujols (19), Bandy (8), Ortega (7), Altuve (41). 3B: Springer (5). RBIs: Calhoun 2 (70), Trout 2 (97), Pujols 2 (118), Cron 2 (69), Ortega (14), Springer (79), Gurriel (15), Gattis (68). SF: Cron, Gattis. RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Pujols, Cron, Simmons, Pennington 2); Houston 3 (Gonzalez 3). GIDP: Calhoun, Marisnick.DP: Los Angeles 2 (Chacin, Petit, Cron), (Chacin, Petit, Cron); Houston 1 (Altuve, Correa, White). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin 6 4 2 0 3 5 99 4.98 Valdez W, 2-3 1 2 2 2 1 2 22 4.95 2/ Achter 0 0 0 16 3.12 3 1 0 1/ Alvarez 0 0 0 3 3.58 3 0 0 Bailey 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.89 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peacock 5 1 1 1 2 7 69 2.67 Devenski 21/3 4 3 3 1 5 52 2.19 1/ Gregerson L, 4-2 3 2 1 1 0 0 17 3.18 Gustave 1 2 2 2 0 0 16 3.65 Chapman 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 5.06 1/ Neshek 1 1 0 19 2.60 3 2 2 Chapman pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Alvarez 1-0, Gregerson 2-2, Gustave 1-0, Chapman 1-1, Neshek 1-1. PB: off Chacin (Correa), off Neshek (Pujols). WP: Chacin, Gregerson. T: 3:32. A: 27,565 .

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 2 2 0 1 0 .330 Schebler cf 5 2 3 0 0 2 .259 Votto 1b 2 1 1 2 3 0 .320 Duvall lf 4 1 1 2 1 0 .237 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .288 Suarez 3b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .249 Iribarren rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .370 Barnhart c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .251 Straily p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .020 Lorenzen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 c-De Jesus ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Totals 34 6 10 6 7 6 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .280 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .306 Carter 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Santana rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .259 Pina c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Arcia ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .215 Reed cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .154 Jungmann p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Cravy p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 a-Pinto ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Scahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Perez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Boyer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blazek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 6 1 2 8 Cincinnati 200 001 102 — 6 10 0 Milwaukee 010 000 000 — 1 6 1 a-struck out for Cravy in the 5th. b-struck out for Scahill in the 7th. c-lined out for Lorenzen in the 9th. E: Gennett (13). LOB: Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 6. 2B: Schebler (11), Duvall (29), Pina (4). HR: Votto (26), off Jungmann; Santana (10), off Straily. RBIs: Votto 2 (89), Duvall 2 (94), Phillips (60), Suarez (65), Santana (27). SB: Duvall (5), Suarez (10), Villar (59). CS: Peraza (8), Braun (4). SF: Phillips. RLISP: Cincinnati 4 (Phillips 2, Suarez, Straily); Milwaukee 3 (Villar, Gennett, Perez). GIDP: Iribarren, Barnhart. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Gennett, Arcia, Carter), (Gennett, Arcia, Carter). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily W, 14-8 62/3 5 1 1 2 5 96 3.74 Lorenzen 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 30 2.87 Iglesias 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.21 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jungmann L, 0-5 4 3 2 2 4 3 71 7.76 Cravy 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.70 Barnes 1 3 1 1 0 1 18 3.00 Scahill 1 2 1 1 1 0 22 3.14 Boyer 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 4.08 Blazek 1 1 2 1 2 0 22 5.66 Inherited runners-scored: Lorenzen 2-0. PB: off Jungmann (Barnhart), off Blazek (Votto). Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Ben May; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Ryan Blakney. T: 3:01. A: 31,398 .

AMERICAN LEAGUE Blue Jays 3, Yankees 0 • Jose Bautista hit a three-run homer of Tyler Clippard in the eighth inning, and Toronto sent visiting New York to its third consecutive shutout defeat. New York has been blanked in three straight games for the irst time July 27-28, 1975. The Yankees, who have lost 10 of 13 following a seven-game winning streak, dropped 4 1/2 games back for the AL’s second wild card with eight games left and likely will miss the playofs for the third time in four years. Red Sox 6, Rays 4 • Dustin Pedroia hit his fourth career grand slam to help Rick Porcello get his major league-leading 22nd win, and AL East-leading Boston won at Tampa Bay for its 10th consecutive victory. Boston maintained a 5½-game lead over Toronto for the division title and clinched a playof berth. Royals 7, Tigers 4 • Paulo Orlando hit a tying, two-run double and Eric Hosmer followed with a three-run homer against Francisco Rodriguez, capping a ninthinning comeback that led Kansas City to a win at Detroit. Given a 4-2 lead, Rodriguez (3-4) allowed singles to Alex Gordon and Hunter Dozier before Orlando’s double. Cheslor Cuthbert walked and Hosmer hit his 24th homer. Rangers 5, Athletics 0 • The lone veteran in the lineup a day after Texas won another AL West title, Elvis Andrus hit a pair of two-run homers as the Rangers won on the road. Twins 3, Mariners 2 • Miguel Sano hit a tiebreaking homer in the fourth inning and Tyler Dufey pitched seven strong innings for his best start in more than a month for host Minnesota. Associated Press

Royals 7, Tigers 4 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Orlando cf-rf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .295 Cuthbert 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .276 Hosmer dh 5 1 1 3 0 3 .268 Morales 1b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .263 Perez c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Gordon lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .218 Escobar ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .267 Dozier rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .286 2-Gore pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Dyson cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Mondesi 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .181 a-Nava ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Merrifield 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Totals 37 7 10 7 3 8 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 3 0 1 0 .282 Maybin cf 5 2 3 2 0 0 .321 Cabrera 1b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .307 V.Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 1 2 .291 1-Jones pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 J.Martinez rf 4 0 2 2 1 1 .311 Upton lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .240 McCann c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .220 b-Aybar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Romine 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .237 Iglesias ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .248 Totals 41 4 14 4 4 10 Kansas City 010 001 005 — 7 10 1 Detroit 002 101 000 — 4 14 1 a-struck out for Mondesi in the 9th. b-grounded out for McCann in the 9th. 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 8th. 2-ran for Dozier in the 9th. E: Ventura (4), Kinsler (9). LOB: Kansas City 7, Detroit 14. 2B: Orlando (21), Upton (26). HR: Morales (30), off Norris; Hosmer (24), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Orlando 2 (42), Hosmer 3 (100), Morales (90), Escobar (53), Maybin 2 (43), J.Martinez 2 (65). SF: Escobar. RLISP: Kansas City 2 (Hosmer, Mondesi); Detroit 8 (J.Martinez 2, Upton, McCann 3, Iglesias 2). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ventura 4 10 3 3 2 6 85 4.40 Moylan 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 3.53 2/ Strahm 1 2 1 35 1.37 3 1 1 1/ McCarthy 1 7 6.00 3 1 0 0 0 Soria 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 4.06 Davis W, 2-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 2.06 Herrera S, 12-15 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.21 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris 52/3 6 2 2 2 6 100 3.59 1/ A.Wilson 2 2.83 3 0 0 0 0 0 J.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.13 Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.97 Rodriguez L, 3-4 2/3 4 5 5 1 1 26 3.30 1/ Hardy 6 3.91 3 0 0 0 0 0 Ventura pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Moylan 1-0, McCarthy 2-0, A.Wilson 1-0. PB: off Ventura (Cabrera). WP: Davis. PB: Perez (5). Umpires: Home, Bob Davidson; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, Lance Barrett; Third, Laz Diaz. T: 3:50. A: 31,721 .

Saturday Kansas City 7, Detroit 4 Texas 5, Oakland 0 Toronto 3, NY Yankees 0 Boston 6, Tampa Bay 4 Baltimore 6, Arizona 1 White Sox 8, Cleveland 1 LA Angels 10, Houston 4 Minnesota 3, Seattle 2 Friday Baltimore 3, Arizona 2, 12 innings Toronto 9, NY Yankees 0 Boston 2, Tampa Bay 1 Cleveland 10, White Sox 4 Detroit 8, Kansas City 3 LA Angels 10, Houston 6 Seattle 10, Minnesota 1 Texas 3, Oakland 0

Sunday’s pitching matchups

Red Sox 6, Rays 4 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pedroia 2b 4 1 2 4 0 1 .319 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .318 Betts rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .321 H.Ramirez 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .294 Holt 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .264 Young lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Bradley Jr. cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .271 Leon c 3 1 0 0 0 2 .318 Totals 33 6 8 6 2 7 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Forsythe 2b 5 1 1 1 0 3 .274 Kiermaier cf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .248 Longoria 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Miller 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .250 Dickerson lf 4 0 3 1 0 0 .248 Franklin dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .282 Mahtook rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .177 A.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Casali c 4 1 2 0 0 2 .170 Totals 37 4 11 4 1 12 Boston 010 100 400 — 6 8 0 Tampa Bay 003 000 001 — 4 11 0 LOB: Boston 2, Tampa Bay 7. 2B: Holt (16), Miller (28), Dickerson (36), Franklin (10). HR: Pedroia (14), off Farquhar; Forsythe (20), off Kimbrel. RBIs: Pedroia 4 (71), H.Ramirez (110), Holt (34), Forsythe (52), Miller 2 (80), Dickerson (66). SB: Betts (26). RLISP: Boston 1 (Bradley Jr.); Tampa Bay 4 (Miller, Franklin, A.Ramirez 2). GIDP: Betts, Holt. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (A.Ramirez, Miller), (A.Ramirez, Forsythe, Miller). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello W, 22-4 61/3 8 3 3 1 9 116 3.11 Scott 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 1/ Ziegler 0 0 1 1.38 3 0 0 0 1/ Ross Jr. 0 0 2 3.21 3 0 0 0 Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.60 Kimbrel S, 30-32 1 1 1 1 0 2 19 2.65 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Andriese 6 4 2 2 1 5 76 4.34 1/ Garton L, 1-2 2 0 0 15 4.75 3 2 2 Eveland 0 0 1 1 1 0 4 8.74 2/ Farquhar 1 0 1 15 3.27 3 1 1 Gamboa 2 1 0 0 0 1 25 1.23 Eveland pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Scott pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Scott 1-0, Ziegler 2-0, Ross Jr. 2-0, Eveland 2-0, Farquhar 3-2. Umpires: Home, Carlos Torres; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Paul Emmel; Third, Scott Barry. T: 3:10. A: 25,641 .

Orioles 6, Diamondbacks 1 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .314 Owings ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .301 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 Tomas rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Brito rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .179 Drury 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .276 Jensen lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .192 Haniger cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Gosselin dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Totals 34 1 7 1 0 11 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 3 1 0 0 2 0 .271 Davis 1b 5 0 2 2 0 2 .220 Machado 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .300 Trumbo rf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .250 1-Bourn pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Mancini dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .364 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Wieters c 3 2 1 0 1 0 .240 Hardy ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .274 Stubbs lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .150 Totals 32 6 9 6 4 8 Arizona 000 000 001 — 1 7 3 Baltimore 110 310 00x — 6 9 0 1-ran for Trumbo in the 7th. E: Segura (10), Tomas (6), Drury (5). LOB: Arizona 6, Baltimore 8. 2B: Goldschmidt (33), Drury (28), Wieters (17), Hardy (27). HR: Mancini (3), off Ray; Trumbo (45), off Bracho. RBIs: Drury (49), Davis 2 (84), Machado (94), Trumbo (104), Mancini (5), Hardy (47). SF: Hardy. RLISP: Arizona 4 (Segura, Tomas, Jensen, Brito); Baltimore 2 (Machado, Hardy). GIDP: Schoop, Wieters. DP: Arizona 2 (Ray, Castillo, Goldschmidt), (Goldschmidt, Owings, Leone). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray L, 8-14 32/3 6 5 4 4 5 87 4.77 Bracho 11/3 1 1 1 0 1 26 8.18 Leone 2 2 0 0 0 2 25 6.33 Koch 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.29 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 2/ Miley W, 9-13 8 3 7 1 1 0 11 116 6.38 1/ Wilson 0 0 0 2 5.32 3 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Bracho 2-0, Wilson 1-0. PB: off Ray (Jones). HBP: Koch (Stubbs). WP: Ray. Umpires: Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Gary Cederstrom; First, Ed Hickox; Third, Greg Gibson. T: 2:36. A: 40,610 .

White Sox 8, Indians 1 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. T.Anderson ss 5 1 1 0 0 3 .277 Cabrera lf 5 1 2 2 0 1 .298 Abreu 1b 5 0 3 1 0 1 .299 Morneau dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 1-Shuck pr-dh 1 1 0 0 0 0 .210 Frazier 3b 5 2 2 1 0 1 .225 A.Garcia rf 4 1 1 1 1 2 .248 Avila c 5 0 0 0 0 5 .222 Sanchez 2b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .200 L.Garcia cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .261 Totals 42 8 15 7 1 15 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Davis cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .255 Moore c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .277 Martinez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Lindor ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .302 b-Gonzalez ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Napoli dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .244 c-Aguilar ph-dh-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Ramirez 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .317 Gimenez 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Guyer rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .333 Crisp lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .225 Almonte lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .274 Perez c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .168 a-Naquin ph-cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .298 Totals 33 1 8 1 3 6 Chicago 200 011 040 — 8 15 1 Cleveland 010 000 000 — 1 8 3 a-grounded out for Perez in the 7th. b-struck out for Lindor in the 8th. c-grounded out for Napoli in the 8th. 1-ran for Morneau in the 8th.E: Sanchez (3), Lindor (12), Perez (2), Adams (1). LOB: Chicago 8, Cleveland 9. 2B: Cabrera (39), Frazier (19), Sanchez 2 (8), Ramirez (45), Guyer (17), Almonte (20). HR: Frazier (39), off Armstrong. RBIs: Cabrera 2 (80), Abreu (97), Frazier (96), A.Garcia (51), Sanchez (15), L.Garcia (2), Davis (47). SB: L.Garcia (2), Davis (41), Kipnis (15). RLISP: Chicago 5 (Cabrera, Morneau, Avila, L.Garcia 2); Cleveland 6 (Kipnis 2, Guyer, Perez, Moore 2). GIDP: Santana. DP: Chicago 1 (T.Anderson, Sanchez, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Quintana W, 13-11 6 6 1 1 3 2 103 3.21 2/ Kahnle 3 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.92 1/ Jennings 4 2.11 3 0 0 0 0 0 Jones 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.36 Robertson 1 1 0 0 0 3 18 3.56 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Anderson L, 2-5 2 4 2 2 0 3 40 6.34 Manship 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 23 3.21 1/ Crockett 1 4 5.06 3 0 0 0 0 Garner 1 3 1 1 0 1 20 4.32 Armstrong 1 2 1 1 0 2 27 3.12 Colon 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 5.19 1/ Adams 3 0 1 17 8.83 3 3 4 Plutko 12/3 2 0 0 1 2 34 0.00 Plutko 12/3 2 0 0 1 2 34 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Jennings 1-0, Plutko 2-2, Plutko 2-2. HBP: Robertson (Guyer). WP: C.Anderson, Plutko. PB: Perez (3). T: 3:28. A: 32,088 .

Nationals 6, Pirates 1 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .336 Werth lf 4 2 2 1 1 0 .249 Harper rf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .243 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Ramos c 5 0 3 0 0 1 .307 Drew 2b 4 0 2 2 1 0 .281 Zimmerman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Espinosa ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .213 Ross p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 a-Goodwin ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .310 Lopez p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Totals 37 6 12 6 2 9 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .311 Bell rf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .287 McCutchen cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Kang 3b 3 0 3 0 0 0 .263 Jaso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .263 Rodriguez ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .264 Joyce lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .235 Cervelli c 3 0 2 0 1 1 .265 Nova p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .150 b-Hanson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 c-Rogers ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Locke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 d-Florimon ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .455 Totals 35 1 8 1 3 10 Washington 300 300 000 — 6 12 0 Pittsburgh 001 000 000 — 1 8 3 a-singled for Burnett in the 4th. b-grounded out for Nova in the 4th. c-grounded out for Hutchison in the 6th. d-struck out for Locke in the 9th. E: Frazier (5), Rodriguez (6), Cervelli (7). LOB: Washington 10, Pittsburgh 11. 2B: Werth (28), Kang 2 (19). HR: Bell (3), off Ross. RBIs: Werth (68), Harper 2 (84), Rendon (79), Drew 2 (19), Bell (18). CS: Drew (1). SF: Harper, Rendon. RLISP: Washington 4 (Harper, Rendon, Ramos, Zimmerman); Pittsburgh 7 (Bell, McCutchen, Jaso, Rodriguez, Joyce 3). GIDP: Espinosa. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Nova, Cervelli, Jaso). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ross 22/3 5 1 1 1 4 63 3.48 1/ Burnett 0 0 0 3 0.00 3 0 0 Lopez W, 4-3 51/3 3 0 0 2 6 85 4.54 Rzepczynski 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1.64 1/ Treinen 0 0 0 4 2.23 3 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova L, 12-8 4 8 6 3 0 2 69 3.18 Hutchison 2 1 0 0 2 4 48 6.30 Phillips 2 1 0 0 0 2 27 0.00 Locke 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 5.44 Inherited runners-scored: Burnett 3-0, Rzepczynski 2-0, Treinen 2-0. HBP: Nova 2 (Rendon,Zimmerman), Ross (Kang). WP: Nova. T: 3:28. A: 30,137 .

Marlins 6, Braves 4 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 1 3 0 0 2 .296 Garcia 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Freeman 1b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .305 Kemp lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .287 Markakis rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .271 Recker c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .282 Swanson ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Beckham 2b 2 0 0 1 0 1 .217 e-Peterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Blair p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .050 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Ruiz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 De La Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .188 d-Smith ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .241 Gant p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Bonifacio ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Totals 33 4 8 3 2 11 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 3 2 2 0 2 0 .257 Ozuna lf 2 0 0 1 1 0 .267 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Francoeur lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .326 Dietrich 3b-1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .286 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yelich cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .294 Stanton rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .241 1-Perez pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Johnson 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Bour 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Rojas 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Realmuto c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .308 Hechavarria ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .236 Chen p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Hood ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Brice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cervenka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ellington p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Suzuki ph-lf-rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Totals 31 6 9 5 6 2 Atlanta 110 001 100 — 4 8 0 Miami 201 200 10x — 6 9 0 a-singled for Chen in the 4th. b-popped out for Bradley in the 5th. c-grounded out for Ellington in the 6th. d-walked for De La Cruz in the 7th. e-struck out for Beckham in the 9th. f-flied out for Gant in the 9th. 1-ran for Stanton in the 7th. LOB: Atlanta 6, Miami 9. 2B: Recker (8), Realmuto (31). 3B: Hechavarria (6). HR: Freeman (32), off Cervenka; Dietrich (7), off Blair. RBIs: Freeman 2 (87), Beckham (30), Ozuna (74), Dietrich 2 (42), Stanton (74), Realmuto (47). SB: Smith (15), Gordon 3 (26), Realmuto (12), Perez (4). CS: Francoeur (2). SF: Beckham, Ozuna. RLISP: Atlanta 1 (Beckham); Miami 7 (Yelich 2, Realmuto 2, Hechavarria, Chen, Suzuki). GIDP: Garcia. DP: Atlanta 1 (Recker, Swanson); Miami 1 (Hechavarria, Gordon, Bour). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blair L, 1-7 31/3 6 5 5 3 0 80 8.02 2/ Bradley 0 0 0 10 5.14 3 0 0 De La Cruz 2 1 0 0 2 1 32 4.92 Gant 2 2 1 1 1 1 38 5.10 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen 4 4 2 2 0 3 62 5.02 Brice 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.55 1/ Cervenka 1 0 1 5 6.75 3 2 1 2/ Ellington W, 4-2 3 1 0 0 0 2 13 1.52 Rodney 1 0 1 1 2 2 19 6.23 Barraclough 1 0 0 0 0 0 18 2.76 Ramos S, 39-42 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.90 Inherited runners-scored: Bradley 2-1, Ellington 1-0. PB: off Blair (Bour). HBP: Blair (Dietrich), Chen (Markakis). WP: Bradley, Rodney. Umpires: Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Doug Eddings; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Adam Hamari. T: 3:21. A: 26,178 .

NL

Pitcher

StL Chi

Martinez (R) Lester (L)

Time

W-L ERA

7:08

15-8 18-4

Atl Teheran (R) Mia Fernandez (R) 12:10 Phi NY

3.16 2.36

6-10 3.10 16-8 2.86

Thompson (R) Gsellman (R) 12:10

3-5 2-2

5.62 3.13

Was TBD Pit Glasnow (R)

12:35

— 0-1

— 4.11

Cin Mil

Finnegan (L) Peralta (R)

1:10

9-11 7-10

4.10 5.21

Col LA

Anderson (L) McCarthy (R)

3:10

5-6 2-2

3.58 3.63

SF SD

TBD Richard (L)

3:40

— — 3-3 3.04

AL

Pitcher

Time

W-L ERA

NY Tor

Pineda (R) Estrada (R)

12:07

6-11 4.89 9-9 3.62

Bos Rodriguez (L) TB Odorizzi (R)

12:10

3-7 4.84 9-6 3.73

Chi Cle

12:10

7-10 4.29 12-8 4.61

Rodon (L) Tomlin (R)

KC Volquez (R) Det Boyd (L)

12:10

10-11 6-4

5.25 4.16

LA Wright (R) Hou Musgrove (R)

1:10

0-4 7.76 3-4 4.42

Sea Walker (R) Min Santiago (L)

1:10

6-11 4.32 12-9 4.82

Tex Lewis (R) Oak Cotton (R)

3:05

6-3 3.40 1-0 1.50

IL

Pitcher

Time

W-L ERA

Ari Bal

Shipley (R) Bundy (R)

12:35

4-4 5.49 9-6 4.13

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Dodgers 5, Rockies 2 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .323 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .349 Arenado 3b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .292 C.Gonzalez rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .299 Raburn lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222 c-Dahl ph-lf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .318 Murphy c 3 0 1 1 1 1 .303 Cardullo 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .220 Adames ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .216 Gray p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .133 b-Valaika ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Hoffman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Tapia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 g-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Totals 33 2 8 2 2 11 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Utley 2b 4 1 0 0 0 3 .252 Seager ss 4 1 0 0 1 2 .313 Turner 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .270 A.Gonzalez 1b 2 0 1 1 1 1 .285 Grandal c 3 0 1 2 1 2 .231 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .241 Toles lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .326 Pederson cf 2 1 1 1 2 1 .245 Kazmir p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .116 Stripling p 0 0 0 0 1 0 .083 a-Ethier ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .177 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Kendrick ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Dayton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Puig ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Totals 29 5 8 5 6 14 Colorado 000 002 000 — 2 8 0 Los Angeles 200 200 10x — 5 8 2 a-homered for Stripling in the 4th. b-struck out for Gray in the 5th. c-singled, advanced to 2nd for Raburn in the 6th. d-flied out for Fields in the 6th. e-struck out for Hoffman in the 7th. f-doubled for Dayton in the 8th. g-struck out for Motte in the 9th. E: Utley (5), Seager (17). LOB: Colorado 7, Los Angeles 9. 2B: C.Gonzalez (40), Puig (12). HR: Arenado (40), off Fields; Pederson (24), off Gray; Ethier (1), off Gray. RBIs: Arenado (129), Murphy (12), A.Gonzalez (86), Grandal 2 (71), Pederson (61), Ethier (1). SB: Blackmon (17), Murphy (1). CS: Toles (1). SF: A.Gonzalez. S: Gray. RLISP: Colorado 5 (Arenado 2, Murphy, Adames 2); Los Angeles 3 (Seager, Reddick, Toles). DP: Colorado 1 (Arenado, Murphy). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray L, 10-9 4 3 4 4 3 10 106 4.54 Hoffman 2 2 0 0 1 2 27 5.55 Estevez 1 1 1 1 1 1 26 5.09 Motte 1 2 0 0 1 1 20 5.09 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kazmir 1 2 0 0 0 0 19 4.56 Stripling W, 5-8 3 2 0 0 2 4 57 3.99 Avilan 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.57 Fields 1 3 2 1 0 0 26 3.24 Baez 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.15 2/ Dayton 0 0 2 14 1.82 3 1 0 Jansen S, 47-53 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.76 HBP: Gray (Turner), Estevez (Utley). WP: Stripling. T: 3:39. A: 52,320 .

Padres 7, Giants 2 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pagan lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .269 Posey c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .289 Pence rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .291 Belt 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .270 Nunez 3b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .260 Panik 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .242 Adrianza ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 d-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Suarez p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .191 a-Parker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .236 b-Gillaspie ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 e-Tomlinson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .292 Span cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .261 Totals 31 2 4 2 5 6 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf-lf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .289 Asuaje 2b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .222 Myers 1b 3 2 2 3 1 0 .261 Schimpf 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .221 Dickerson lf 3 0 1 2 1 0 .259 Jankowski cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Renfroe rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Hedges c 3 0 0 1 0 2 .167 Sardinas ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Jackson p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .200 c-Wallace ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .191 Totals 30 7 8 7 3 3 San Francisco 000 020 000 — 2 4 0 San Diego 300 040 00x — 7 8 0 a-struck out for Suarez in the 5th. b-flied out for Kontos in the 6th. c-struck out for Jackson in the 6th. d-popped out for Casilla in the 9th. e-struck out for Gillaspie in the 9th. LOB: San Francisco 7, San Diego 3. 2B: Posey (33), Panik (20), Suarez (2), Asuaje 2 (2). HR: Myers (28), off Suarez. RBIs: Posey 2 (70), Myers 3 (91), Schimpf (48), Dickerson 2 (37), Hedges (1). SF: Hedges. RLISP: San Francisco 5 (Posey, Belt, Adrianza 3); San Diego 1 (Renfroe). DP: San Francisco 1 (Panik, Pagan). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Suarez L, 3-5 4 5 3 3 1 1 69 4.29 Reynolds 0 3 4 4 2 0 20 7.50 Kontos 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.41 Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Osich 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.33 Casilla 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.65 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson W, 5-6 6 4 2 2 5 5 103 5.75 2/ Torres 0 0 0 4 0.00 3 0 0 2/ Morrow 0 0 0 5 2.02 3 0 0 2/ Baumann 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 25 5.14 Reynolds pitched to 5 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Kontos 2-1. PB: off Reynolds (Myers). T: 2:54. A: 28,404 .


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL x-Chicago Cardinals Pittsburgh Milwaukee Cincinnati EAST z-Washington New York Miami Philadelphia Atlanta WEST Los Angeles San Francisco Colorado San Diego Arizona

W 98 81 77 70 64 W 90 82 77 70 63 W 88 81 73 65 64

L 56 73 77 85 90 L 64 73 78 85 92 L 66 73 81 89 90

Pct .636 .526 .500 .452 .416 Pct .584 .529 .497 .452 .406 Pct .571 .526 .474 .422 .416

M 3 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

AMERICAN LEAGUE GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 6-4 L-1 56-24 42-32 17 — 5-5 W-1 33-41 48-32 21 4 7-3 L-1 37-39 40-38 28½ 11½ 6-4 L-1 41-39 29-46 34 17 2-8 W-1 37-41 27-49 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 4-6 W-1 46-28 44-36 8½ — 5-5 L-1 43-37 39-36 13½ 4½ 5-5 W-1 39-38 38-40 20½ 11½ 6-4 W-1 36-42 34-43 27½ 18½ 7-3 L-1 26-49 37-43 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 7-3 W-3 51-28 37-38 7 — 4-6 L-1 40-35 41-38 15 8 4-6 L-2 41-37 32-44 23 16 5-5 W-1 36-40 29-49 24 17 4-6 L-2 30-48 34-42

Saturday Cardinals 10, Cubs 4 Baltimore 6, Arizona 1 Washington 6, Pittsburgh 1 Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 1 Miami 6, Atlanta 4 Philadelphia 10, NY Mets 8 San Francisco at San Diego, (n) Colorado at LA Dodgers, (n) Friday Cubs 5, Cardinals 0 Baltimore 3, Arizona 2, (12) Pittsburgh 6, Washington 5, (11) Atlanta 3, Miami 2 NY Mets 10, Philadelphia 5 Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 4 LA Dodgers 5, Colorado 2 San Diego 7, San Francisco 2

z-clinched playof berth • x-clinched division • y-clinched wildcard

CENTRAL Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Chicago Minnesota EAST z-Boston Toronto Baltimore New York Tampa Bay WEST x-Texas Seattle Houston Los Angeles Oakland

W 90 83 78 73 56 W 91 85 84 79 65 W 92 81 81 69 66

L 64 71 77 81 99 L 64 69 71 75 89 L 63 73 74 86 88

Pct .584 .539 .503 .474 .361 Pct .587 .552 .542 .513 .422 Pct .594 .526 .523 .445 .429

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 7-3 L-1 53-27 37-37 7 ½ 6-4 L-1 43-33 40-38 12½ 6 4-6 W-1 45-30 33-47 17 10½ 3-7 W-1 41-33 32-48 34½ 28 2-8 W-1 30-50 26-49 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 10-0 W-10 46-32 45-32 5½ — 6-4 W-2 44-32 41-37 7 — 4-6 W-2 49-31 35-40 11½ 4½ 2-8 L-3 44-31 35-44 25½ 18½ 4-6 L-2 36-44 29-45 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 6-4 W-2 50-25 42-38 10½ 2½ 5-5 L-1 42-35 39-38 11 3 6-4 L-3 41-36 40-38 23 15 6-4 W-4 35-40 34-46 25½ 17½ 4-6 L-5 33-47 33-41

z-clinched playof berth • x-clinched division • y-clinched wildcard

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Mets fall behind Phils 10-0, lose 10-8

Rangers 5, Athletics 0

Red Sox 6, Rays 4

Angels 10, Astros 4

Reds 6, Brewers 1

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Profar 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Mazara rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Gallo dh 3 0 0 0 1 3 .050 Rua 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .255 Hoying lf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .214 Andrus ss 4 2 2 4 0 0 .299 Chirinos c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .218 Alberto 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .146 Totals 36 5 9 5 1 8 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wendle 2b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .275 b-Pinder ph-2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Valencia rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .288 Vogt dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .255 Davis lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .251 Healy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Alonso 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .253 c-Eibner ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .187 Semien ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Maxwell c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .257 a-Nunez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133 McBride c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209 Smolinski cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Totals 32 0 5 0 3 9 Texas 020 002 001 — 5 9 0 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 a-out on fielder’s choice for Maxwell in the 8th. b-singled for Wendle in the 8th. c-walked for Alonso in the 9th. E: Semien (21). LOB: Texas 5, Oakland 8. 2B: Hoying 2 (2), Chirinos 2 (11), Davis (22). HR: Andrus (7), off Alcantara; Andrus (8), off Alcantara. RBIs: Andrus 4 (68), Chirinos (19). SB: DeShields (8). RLISP: Texas 3 (DeShields, Gallo, Hoying); Oakland 4 (Vogt 2, Smolinski, McBride). DP: Oakland 1 (Wendle, Davis). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish W, 6-5 7 2 0 0 1 9 99 3.53 2/ Claudio 0 0 0 15 2.86 3 2 0 2/ Scheppers 0 1 0 18 2.70 3 1 0 2/ Diekman 0 1 0 13 3.29 3 0 0 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Alcantara L, 1-2 6 7 4 4 1 6 79 5.75 Neal 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.79 Coulombe 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.84 Hendriks 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 3.80 Inherited runners-scored: Scheppers 2-0, Diekman 1-0. Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Gabe Morales; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 2:58. A: 16,736 .

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pedroia 2b 4 1 2 4 0 1 .319 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .318 Betts rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .321 H.Ramirez 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .294 Holt 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .264 Young lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Bradley Jr. cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .271 Leon c 3 1 0 0 0 2 .318 Totals 33 6 8 6 2 7 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Forsythe 2b 5 1 1 1 0 3 .274 Kiermaier cf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .248 Longoria 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Miller 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .250 Dickerson lf 4 0 3 1 0 0 .248 Franklin dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .282 Mahtook rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .177 A.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Casali c 4 1 2 0 0 2 .170 Totals 37 4 11 4 1 12 Boston 010 100 400 — 6 8 0 Tampa Bay 003 000 001 — 4 11 0 LOB: Boston 2, Tampa Bay 7. 2B: Holt (16), Miller (28), Dickerson (36), Franklin (10). HR: Pedroia (14), off Farquhar; Forsythe (20), off Kimbrel. RBIs: Pedroia 4 (71), H.Ramirez (110), Holt (34), Forsythe (52), Miller 2 (80), Dickerson (66). SB: Betts (26). RLISP: Boston 1 (Bradley Jr.); Tampa Bay 4 (Miller, Franklin, A.Ramirez 2). GIDP: Betts, Holt. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (A.Ramirez, Miller), (A.Ramirez, Forsythe, Miller). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello W, 22-4 61/3 8 3 3 1 9 116 3.11 Scott 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 1/ Ziegler 0 0 1 1.38 3 0 0 0 1/ Ross Jr. 0 0 2 3.21 3 0 0 0 Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.60 Kimbrel S, 30-32 1 1 1 1 0 2 19 2.65 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Andriese 6 4 2 2 1 5 76 4.34 1/ Garton L, 1-2 2 0 0 15 4.75 3 2 2 Eveland 0 0 1 1 1 0 4 8.74 2/ Farquhar 1 1 1 0 1 15 3.27 3 Gamboa 2 1 0 0 0 1 25 1.23 Eveland pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Scott pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Scott 1-0, Ziegler 2-0, Ross Jr. 2-0, Eveland 2-0, Farquhar 3-2. T: 3:10. A: 25,641 .

Royals 7, Tigers 4

Marlins 6, Braves 4

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Orlando cf-rf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .295 Cuthbert 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .276 Hosmer dh 5 1 1 3 0 3 .268 Morales 1b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .263 Perez c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Gordon lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .218 Escobar ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .267 Dozier rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .286 2-Gore pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Dyson cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Mondesi 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .181 a-Nava ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Merrifield 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Totals 37 7 10 7 3 8 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 3 0 1 0 .282 Maybin cf 5 2 3 2 0 0 .321 Cabrera 1b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .307 V.Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 1 2 .291 1-Jones pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 J.Martinez rf 4 0 2 2 1 1 .311 Upton lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .240 McCann c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .220 b-Aybar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Romine 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .237 Iglesias ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .248 Totals 41 4 14 4 4 10 Kansas City 010 001 005 — 7 10 1 Detroit 002 101 000 — 4 14 1 a-struck out for Mondesi in the 9th. b-grounded out for McCann in the 9th. 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 8th. 2-ran for Dozier in the 9th. E: Ventura (4), Kinsler (9). LOB: Kansas City 7, Detroit 14. 2B: Orlando (21), Upton (26). HR: Morales (30), off Norris; Hosmer (24), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Orlando 2 (42), Hosmer 3 (100), Morales (90), Escobar (53), Maybin 2 (43), J.Martinez 2 (65). SF: Escobar. RLISP: Kansas City 2 (Hosmer, Mondesi); Detroit 8 (J.Martinez 2, Upton, McCann 3, Iglesias 2). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ventura 4 10 3 3 2 6 85 4.40 Moylan 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 3.53 2/ Strahm 1 2 1 35 1.37 3 1 1 1/ McCarthy 1 7 6.00 3 1 0 0 0 Soria 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 4.06 Davis W, 2-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 2.06 Herrera S, 12-15 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.21 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris 52/3 6 2 2 2 6 100 3.59 1/ A.Wilson 2 2.83 3 0 0 0 0 0 J.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.13 Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.97 Rodriguez L, 3-4 2/3 4 5 5 1 1 26 3.30 1/ Hardy 6 3.91 3 0 0 0 0 0 Ventura pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Moylan 1-0, McCarthy 2-0, A.Wilson 1-0. PB: off Ventura (Cabrera). WP: Davis. PB: Perez (5). Umpires: Home, Bob Davidson; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, Lance Barrett; Third, Laz Diaz. T: 3:50. A: 31,721 .

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 1 3 0 0 2 .296 Garcia 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Freeman 1b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .305 Kemp lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .287 Markakis rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .271 Recker c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .282 Swanson ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Beckham 2b 2 0 0 1 0 1 .217 e-Peterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Blair p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .050 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Ruiz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 De La Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .188 d-Smith ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .241 Gant p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Bonifacio ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Totals 33 4 8 3 2 11 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 3 2 2 0 2 0 .257 Ozuna lf 2 0 0 1 1 0 .267 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Francoeur lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .326 Dietrich 3b-1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .286 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yelich cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .294 Stanton rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .241 1-Perez pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Johnson 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Bour 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Rojas 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Realmuto c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .308 Hechavarria ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .236 Chen p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Hood ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Brice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cervenka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ellington p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Suzuki ph-lf-rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Totals 31 6 9 5 6 2 Atlanta 110 001 100 — 4 8 0 Miami 201 200 10x — 6 9 0 a-singled for Chen in the 4th. b-popped out for Bradley in the 5th. c-grounded out for Ellington in the 6th. d-walked for De La Cruz in the 7th. e-struck out for Beckham in the 9th. f-flied out for Gant in the 9th. 1-ran for Stanton in the 7th. LOB: Atlanta 6, Miami 9. 2B: Recker (8), Realmuto (31). 3B: Hechavarria (6). HR: Freeman (32), off Cervenka; Dietrich (7), off Blair. RBIs: Freeman 2 (87), Beckham (30), Ozuna (74), Dietrich 2 (42), Stanton (74), Realmuto (47). SB: Smith (15), Gordon 3 (26), Realmuto (12), Perez (4). CS: Francoeur (2). SF: Beckham, Ozuna. RLISP: Atlanta 1 (Beckham); Miami 7 (Yelich 2, Realmuto 2, Hechavarria, Chen, Suzuki). GIDP: Garcia. DP: Atlanta 1 (Recker, Swanson); Miami 1 (Hechavarria, Gordon, Bour). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blair L, 1-7 31/3 6 5 5 3 0 80 8.02 2/ Bradley 0 0 0 10 5.14 3 0 0 De La Cruz 2 1 0 0 2 1 32 4.92 Gant 2 2 1 1 1 1 38 5.10 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen 4 4 2 2 0 3 62 5.02 Brice 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.55 1/ Cervenka 1 0 1 5 6.75 3 2 1 2/ Ellington W, 4-2 3 1 0 0 0 2 13 1.52 Rodney 1 0 1 1 2 2 19 6.23 Barraclough 1 0 0 0 0 0 18 2.76 Ramos S, 39-42 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.90 Inherited runners-scored: Bradley 2-1, Ellington 1-0. PB: off Blair (Bour). HBP: Blair (Dietrich), Chen (Markakis). WP: Bradley, Rodney. T: 3:21. A: 26,178 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Escobar 3b 4 1 1 0 1 2 .310 Calhoun rf 5 2 3 2 0 1 .264 Trout cf 3 3 2 2 2 0 .318 Pujols dh 4 1 2 2 1 0 .270 Cron 1b 4 0 1 2 0 3 .277 Simmons ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .279 Buss lf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .208 Pennington 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .210 Bandy c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .239 Petit 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .249 a-Ortega ph-lf 2 2 2 1 0 0 .224 Totals 38 10 12 9 4 12 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 5 1 4 1 0 0 .255 Gurriel 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .338 Correa ss 2 0 0 0 2 2 .271 Gattis dh 3 0 0 1 0 1 .244 Gonzalez lf-1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 White 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .221 Hernandez lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209 Castro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .213 b-Stassi ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Marisnick cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .210 Totals 34 4 8 3 4 8 Los Angeles 000 100 045 — 10 12 1 Houston 002 000 200 — 4 8 2 a-singled for Petit in the 8th. b-out on fielder’s choice for Castro in the 8th. E: Escobar (19), Altuve (7), Gonzalez (7). LOB: Los Angeles 6, Houston 8. 2B: Calhoun (29), Trout (32), Pujols (19), Bandy (8), Ortega (7), Altuve (41). 3B: Springer (5). RBIs: Calhoun 2 (70), Trout 2 (97), Pujols 2 (118), Cron 2 (69), Ortega (14), Springer (79), Gurriel (15), Gattis (68). SF: Cron, Gattis. RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Pujols, Cron, Simmons, Pennington 2); Houston 3 (Gonzalez 3). GIDP: Calhoun, Marisnick.DP: Los Angeles 2 (Chacin, Petit, Cron), (Chacin, Petit, Cron); Houston 1 (Altuve, Correa, White). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin 6 4 2 0 3 5 99 4.98 Valdez W, 2-3 1 2 2 2 1 2 22 4.95 2/ Achter 0 0 0 16 3.12 3 1 0 1/ Alvarez 0 0 0 3 3.58 3 0 0 Bailey 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.89 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peacock 5 1 1 1 2 7 69 2.67 Devenski 21/3 4 3 3 1 5 52 2.19 1/ Gregerson L, 4-2 3 2 1 1 0 0 17 3.18 Gustave 1 2 2 2 0 0 16 3.65 Chapman 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 5.06 1/ Neshek 1 1 0 19 2.60 3 2 2 Chapman pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Alvarez 1-0, Gregerson 2-2, Gustave 1-0, Chapman 1-1, Neshek 1-1. PB: off Chacin (Correa), off Neshek (Pujols). WP: Chacin, Gregerson. T: 3:32. A: 27,565 .

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 2 2 0 1 0 .330 Schebler cf 5 2 3 0 0 2 .259 Votto 1b 2 1 1 2 3 0 .320 Duvall lf 4 1 1 2 1 0 .237 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .288 Suarez 3b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .249 Iribarren rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .370 Barnhart c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .251 Straily p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .020 Lorenzen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 c-De Jesus ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Totals 34 6 10 6 7 6 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .280 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .306 Carter 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Santana rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .259 Pina c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Arcia ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .215 Reed cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .154 Jungmann p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Cravy p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 a-Pinto ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Scahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Perez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Boyer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blazek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 6 1 2 8 Cincinnati 200 001 102 — 6 10 0 Milwaukee 010 000 000 — 1 6 1 a-struck out for Cravy in the 5th. b-struck out for Scahill in the 7th. c-lined out for Lorenzen in the 9th. E: Gennett (13). LOB: Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 6. 2B: Schebler (11), Duvall (29), Pina (4). HR: Votto (26), off Jungmann; Santana (10), off Straily. RBIs: Votto 2 (89), Duvall 2 (94), Phillips (60), Suarez (65), Santana (27). SB: Duvall (5), Suarez (10), Villar (59). CS: Peraza (8), Braun (4). SF: Phillips. RLISP: Cincinnati 4 (Phillips 2, Suarez, Straily); Milwaukee 3 (Villar, Gennett, Perez). GIDP: Iribarren, Barnhart. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Gennett, Arcia, Carter), (Gennett, Arcia, Carter). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily W, 14-8 62/3 5 1 1 2 5 96 3.74 Lorenzen 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 30 2.87 Iglesias 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.21 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jungmann L, 0-5 4 3 2 2 4 3 71 7.76 Cravy 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.70 Barnes 1 3 1 1 0 1 18 3.00 Scahill 1 2 1 1 1 0 22 3.14 Boyer 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 4.08 Blazek 1 1 2 1 2 0 22 5.66 Inherited runners-scored: Lorenzen 2-0. PB: off Jungmann (Barnhart), off Blazek (Votto). Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Ben May; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Ryan Blakney. T: 3:01. A: 31,398 .

The Mets fell behind by 10 runs early and inished just short of what would have been the largest comeback victory in team history, losing 10-8 to the Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday night in New York. Philadelphia’s Maikel Franco and Darin Ruf each hit long a home run for the second consecutive night as Philadelphia built a 10-0 lead by the fourth. Sean Gilmartin (0-1) fell behind 3-0 after 12 pitches and left having allowed ive runs in two-thirds of an inning. Nationals 6, Pirates 2 • Washington clinched its third National League East title in ive years, winning at Pittsburgh behind 5 1/3 scoreless innings from rookie reliever Reynaldo Lopez. Reds 6, Brewers 1 • Dan Straily pitched into the seventh inning and Joey Votto hit a two-run homer to help Cincinnati win at Milwaukee. Marlins 6, Braves 4 • Derek Dietrich hit a two-run homer to help Miami end visiting Atlanta’s winning streak at seven games.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Blue Jays 3, Yankees 0 • Jose Bautista hit a three-run homer of Tyler Clippard in the eighth inning, and Toronto sent visiting New York to its third consecutive shutout defeat. New York has been blanked in three straight games for the irst time July 27-28, 1975. Red Sox 6, Rays 4 • Dustin Pedroia hit a grand slam to help Rick Porcello get his major league-leading 22nd win, and AL East-leading Boston won at Tampa Bay for its 10th consecutive victory. Boston clinched a playof berth. Royals 7, Tigers 4 • Paulo Orlando hit a tying, two-run double and Eric Hosmer followed with a three-run homer against Francisco Rodriguez, capping a ninthinning comeback that led Kansas City to a win at Detroit. Rangers 5, Athletics 0 • The lone veteran in the lineup a day after Texas won another AL West title, Elvis Andrus hit a pair of two-run homers as the Rangers won on the road. Twins 3, Mariners 2 • Miguel Sano hit a tiebreaking homer in the fourth inning and Tyler Dufey pitched seven strong innings for his best start in more than a month for host Minnesota. Angels 10, Astros 4 • Kole Calhoun had three hits and two RBIs, and Los Angeles scored nine runs in the inal two innings to win at Houston. White Sox 8, Indians 1 • Cleveland blew some early scoring chances and lost at home, keeping the Indians from getting closer to an AL Central title.

INTERLEAGUE Orioles 6, D’backs 1 • Trey Mancini hit his third homer in nine major league at-bats and Mark Trumbo connected for his league-leading 45th as Baltimore won at home. The Orioles pulled a halfgame ahead of the Tigers for the AL’s second wild card. Associated Press

Twins 3, Mariners 2 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 b-Gutierrez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Heredia lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Smith rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .257 c-Lee ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Gamel rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Cano 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .297 1-Freeman pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cruz dh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .284 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .281 Lind 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Martin cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Marte ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 a-O’Malley ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Totals 32 2 5 2 0 7 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Polanco ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .283 Grossman dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Sano 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .240 Vargas 1b 2 1 0 0 1 1 .252 Kepler rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .233 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .134 Schafer lf 3 0 0 1 0 2 .217 Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Totals 27 3 3 3 1 6 Seattle 000 200 000 — 2 5 0 Minnesota 110 100 00x — 3 3 2 a-struck out for Marte in the 8th. b-struck out for Aoki in the 8th. c-struck out for Smith in the 8th. 1-ran for Cano in the 9th. E: Polanco (12), Sano (18). LOB: Seattle 4, Minnesota 1. 2B: Cruz (27). HR: Cruz (39), off Duffey; Polanco (3), off Miranda; Sano (24), off Miranda. RBIs: Cruz 2 (98), Polanco (22), Sano (61), Schafer (1). S: Marte. RLISP: Seattle 4 (Smith, Lind, Martin 2); Minnesota 1 (Buxton). GIDP: Seager. DP: Minnesota 1 (Sano, Vargas). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miranda L, 5-2 4 3 3 3 1 0 52 3.73 Storen 2 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.94 Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 0.00 Wilhelmsen 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.75 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffey W, 9-11 7 4 2 2 0 4 85 6.18 Rogers 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 3.53 Kintzler S, 15-18 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.98 WP: Miranda, Duffey. Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Toby Basner. T: 2:06. A: 24,749 .

Saturday Kansas City 7, Detroit 4 Texas 5, Oakland 0 Toronto 3, NY Yankees 0 Boston 6, Tampa Bay 4 Baltimore 6, Arizona 1 White Sox 8, Cleveland 1 LA Angels 10, Houston 4 Minnesota 3, Seattle 2 Friday Baltimore 3, Arizona 2, (12) Toronto 9, NY Yankees 0 Boston 2, Tampa Bay 1 Cleveland 10, White Sox 4 Detroit 8, Kansas City 3 LA Angels 10, Houston 6 Seattle 10, Minnesota 1 Texas 3, Oakland 0

Sunday’s pitching matchups

Orioles 6, Diamondbacks 1 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .314 Owings ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .301 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 Tomas rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Brito rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .179 Drury 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .276 Jensen lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .192 Haniger cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Gosselin dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Totals 34 1 7 1 0 11 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 3 1 0 0 2 0 .271 Davis 1b 5 0 2 2 0 2 .220 Machado 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .300 Trumbo rf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .250 1-Bourn pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Mancini dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .364 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Wieters c 3 2 1 0 1 0 .240 Hardy ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .274 Stubbs lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .150 Totals 32 6 9 6 4 8 Arizona 000 000 001 — 1 7 3 Baltimore 110 310 00x — 6 9 0 1-ran for Trumbo in the 7th. E: Segura (10), Tomas (6), Drury (5). LOB: Arizona 6, Baltimore 8. 2B: Goldschmidt (33), Drury (28), Wieters (17), Hardy (27). HR: Mancini (3), off Ray; Trumbo (45), off Bracho. RBIs: Drury (49), Davis 2 (84), Machado (94), Trumbo (104), Mancini (5), Hardy (47). SF: Hardy. RLISP: Arizona 4 (Segura, Tomas, Jensen, Brito); Baltimore 2 (Machado, Hardy). GIDP: Schoop, Wieters. DP: Arizona 2 (Ray, Castillo, Goldschmidt), (Goldschmidt, Owings, Leone). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray L, 8-14 32/3 6 5 4 4 5 87 4.77 Bracho 11/3 1 1 1 0 1 26 8.18 Leone 2 2 0 0 0 2 25 6.33 Koch 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.29 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley W, 9-13 82/3 7 1 1 0 11 116 6.38 1/ Wilson 0 0 0 2 5.32 3 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Bracho 2-0, Wilson 1-0. PB: off Ray (Jones). HBP: Koch (Stubbs). WP: Ray. T: 2:36. A: 40,610 .

White Sox 8, Indians 1 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. T.Anderson ss 5 1 1 0 0 3 .277 Cabrera lf 5 1 2 2 0 1 .298 Abreu 1b 5 0 3 1 0 1 .299 Morneau dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 1-Shuck pr-dh 1 1 0 0 0 0 .210 Frazier 3b 5 2 2 1 0 1 .225 A.Garcia rf 4 1 1 1 1 2 .248 Avila c 5 0 0 0 0 5 .222 Sanchez 2b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .200 L.Garcia cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .261 Totals 42 8 15 7 1 15 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Davis cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .255 Moore c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .277 Martinez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Lindor ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .302 b-Gonzalez ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Napoli dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .244 c-Aguilar ph-dh-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Ramirez 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .317 Gimenez 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Guyer rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .333 Crisp lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .225 Almonte lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .274 Perez c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .168 a-Naquin ph-cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .298 Totals 33 1 8 1 3 6 Chicago 200 011 040 — 8 15 1 Cleveland 010 000 000 — 1 8 3 a-grounded out for Perez in the 7th. b-struck out for Lindor in the 8th. c-grounded out for Napoli in the 8th. 1-ran for Morneau in the 8th.E: Sanchez (3), Lindor (12), Perez (2), Adams (1). LOB: Chicago 8, Cleveland 9. 2B: Cabrera (39), Frazier (19), Sanchez 2 (8), Ramirez (45), Guyer (17), Almonte (20). HR: Frazier (39), off Armstrong. RBIs: Cabrera 2 (80), Abreu (97), Frazier (96), A.Garcia (51), Sanchez (15), L.Garcia (2), Davis (47). SB: L.Garcia (2), Davis (41), Kipnis (15). RLISP: Chicago 5 (Cabrera, Morneau, Avila, L.Garcia 2); Cleveland 6 (Kipnis 2, Guyer, Perez, Moore 2). GIDP: Santana. DP: Chicago 1 (T.Anderson, Sanchez, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Quintana W, 13-11 6 6 1 1 3 2 103 3.21 2/ Kahnle 3 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.92 1/ Jennings 4 2.11 3 0 0 0 0 0 Jones 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.36 Robertson 1 1 0 0 0 3 18 3.56 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Anderson L, 2-5 2 4 2 2 0 3 40 6.34 Manship 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 23 3.21 1/ Crockett 1 4 5.06 3 0 0 0 0 Garner 1 3 1 1 0 1 20 4.32 Armstrong 1 2 1 1 0 2 27 3.12 Colon 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 5.19 1/ Adams 3 0 1 17 8.83 3 3 4 Plutko 12/3 2 0 0 1 2 34 0.00 Plutko 12/3 2 0 0 1 2 34 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Jennings 1-0, Plutko 2-2, Plutko 2-2. HBP: Robertson (Guyer). WP: C.Anderson, Plutko. PB: Perez (3). T: 3:28. A: 32,088 .

Nationals 6, Pirates 1 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .336 Werth lf 4 2 2 1 1 0 .249 Harper rf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .243 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Ramos c 5 0 3 0 0 1 .307 Drew 2b 4 0 2 2 1 0 .281 Zimmerman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Espinosa ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .213 Ross p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 a-Goodwin ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .310 Lopez p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Totals 37 6 12 6 2 9 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .311 Bell rf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .287 McCutchen cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Kang 3b 3 0 3 0 0 0 .263 Jaso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .263 Rodriguez ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .264 Joyce lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .235 Cervelli c 3 0 2 0 1 1 .265 Nova p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .150 b-Hanson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 c-Rogers ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Locke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 d-Florimon ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .455 Totals 35 1 8 1 3 10 Washington 300 300 000 — 6 12 0 Pittsburgh 001 000 000 — 1 8 3 a-singled for Burnett in the 4th. b-grounded out for Nova in the 4th. c-grounded out for Hutchison in the 6th. d-struck out for Locke in the 9th. E: Frazier (5), Rodriguez (6), Cervelli (7). LOB: Washington 10, Pittsburgh 11. 2B: Werth (28), Kang 2 (19). HR: Bell (3), off Ross. RBIs: Werth (68), Harper 2 (84), Rendon (79), Drew 2 (19), Bell (18). CS: Drew (1). SF: Harper, Rendon. RLISP: Washington 4 (Harper, Rendon, Ramos, Zimmerman); Pittsburgh 7 (Bell, McCutchen, Jaso, Rodriguez, Joyce 3). GIDP: Espinosa. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Nova, Cervelli, Jaso). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ross 22/3 5 1 1 1 4 63 3.48 1/ Burnett 0 0 0 3 0.00 3 0 0 Lopez W, 4-3 51/3 3 0 0 2 6 85 4.54 Rzepczynski 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1.64 1/ Treinen 0 0 0 4 2.23 3 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova L, 12-8 4 8 6 3 0 2 69 3.18 Hutchison 2 1 0 0 2 4 48 6.30 Phillips 2 1 0 0 0 2 27 0.00 Locke 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 5.44 Inherited runners-scored: Burnett 3-0, Rzepczynski 2-0, Treinen 2-0. HBP: Nova 2 (Rendon,Zimmerman), Ross (Kang). WP: Nova. T: 3:28. A: 30,137 .

Phillies 10, Mets 8 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Hernandez 2b 3 1 2 0 3 1 .295 Quinn rf-lf 6 1 1 0 0 5 .231 Herrera cf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .290 Franco 3b 5 2 2 3 0 1 .253 Joseph 1b 4 2 1 2 1 1 .260 Ruf lf 5 2 3 3 0 1 .203 Galvis ss 5 0 2 0 0 1 .243 Alfaro c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .077 Altherr rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .198 Asher p 3 0 1 2 0 1 .111 Ellis c 2 0 2 0 0 0 .286 Totals 42 10 17 10 5 13 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cabrera ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Nimmo cf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .254 Cespedes lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Kelly lf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .232 Granderson cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .225 a-Loney ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Smoker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-De Aza ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .197 d-Bruce ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .179 Johnson 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .264 b-Campbell ph-3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .174 Conforto rf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .220 Duda 1b 4 3 1 0 1 0 .229 d’Arnaud c 4 1 1 0 1 1 .248 Cecchini ss 3 1 2 2 0 0 .400 Reyes 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Rivera 3b-2b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .350 Totals 37 8 11 7 5 4 Philadelphia 510 400 000 — 10 17 2 New York 000 042 011 — 8 11 0 a-grounded out for Edgin in the 5th. b-flied out for Johnson in the 6th. c-flied out for Smoker in the 7th. d-homered for Goeddel in the 9th. E: Franco (13), Galvis (8). LOB: Philadelphia 10, New York 9. 2B: Cecchini 2 (2), Nimmo (1). 3B: Herrera (6). HR: Franco (25), off Gilmartin; Ruf (2), off Montero; Bruce (30), off Mariot. RBIs: Franco 3 (87), Joseph 2 (47), Ruf 3 (8), Asher 2 (2), Cecchini 2 (2), Nimmo (6), Kelly (7), Rivera 2 (13), Bruce (92). SB: Ellis (2). CS: Galvis (6). SF: Kelly. RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Quinn 3, Franco); New York 6 (Johnson, d’Arnaud, Nimmo 3, Loney). GIDP: Cabrera, Campbell. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Asher, Joseph), (C.Hernandez, Galvis, Joseph); New York 1 (Kelly, d’Arnaud). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Asher W, 2-0 5 5 4 0 0 1 76 1.66 Rodriguez 1 3 2 2 1 2 29 2.84 D.Hernandez 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 3.75 Neris 1 1 1 1 2 1 38 2.53 Mariot S, 2-3 1 1 1 1 2 0 27 5.68 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gilmartin L, 0-1 2/3 4 5 5 3 0 39 7.13 Montero 31/3 7 5 5 1 7 67 8.50 Edgin 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 6.00 Henderson 1 2 0 0 0 3 28 4.36 Smoker 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 5.02 Salas 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.19 Goeddel 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 4.24 Henderson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Montero 2-0, Smoker 1-0. PB: off Gilmartin (Alfaro). HBP: Asher (Granderson). WP: Montero. T: 3:47. A: 39,995 .

Blue Jays 3, Yankees 0 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .256 Ellsbury cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Sanchez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .330 Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Hicks rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .217 McCann c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .239 Torreyes 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Austin 1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .197 a-Butler ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .381 Teixeira 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .197 Solano 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .235 Totals 27 0 3 0 3 7 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Travis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .305 Donaldson 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .285 Encarnacion 1b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .267 Bautista rf 4 1 2 3 0 0 .233 Carrera rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Martin dh 2 0 1 0 2 0 .238 Tulowitzki ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Upton lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .199 Navarro c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Totals 28 3 6 3 5 2 New York 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 Toronto 000 000 03x — 3 6 0 a-struck out for Austin in the 8th. LOB: New York 3, Toronto 6. 2B: Bautista (24). 3B: Torreyes (4). HR: Bautista (20), off Clippard. RBIs: Bautista 3 (65). CS: Gardner (4). RLISP: New York 2 (Gregorius, Butler); Toronto 2 (Upton, Navarro). GIDP: McCann, Torreyes, Encarnacion, Tulowitzki. DP: New York 2 (Gregorius, Solano, Austin), (Torreyes, Solano, Austin); Toronto 2 (Encarnacion, Donaldson), (Tulowitzki, Travis, Encarnacion). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 7 4 0 0 3 2 91 4.02 Clippard L, 3-5 1 2 3 3 2 0 26 2.42 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman 7 1 0 0 3 5 97 4.34 Grilli W, 7-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 23 2.46 Osuna S, 35-38 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 2.38 WP: Clippard. PB: Navarro (6). T: 2:34. A: 47,828 .

NL

Pitcher

StL Chi

Martinez (R) Lester (L)

Time

W-L ERA

7:08

15-8 18-4

Atl Teheran (R) Mia Fernandez (R) 12:10 Phi NY

3.16 2.36

6-10 3.10 16-8 2.86

Thompson (R) Gsellman (R) 12:10

3-5 2-2

5.62 3.13

Was TBD Pit Glasnow (R)

12:35

— 0-1

— 4.11

Cin Mil

Finnegan (L) Peralta (R)

1:10

9-11 7-10

4.10 5.21

Col LA

Anderson (L) McCarthy (R)

3:10

5-6 2-2

3.58 3.63

SF SD

TBD Richard (L)

3:40

— — 3-3 3.04

AL

Pitcher

Time

W-L ERA

NY Tor

Pineda (R) Estrada (R)

12:07

6-11 4.89 9-9 3.62

Bos Rodriguez (L) TB Odorizzi (R)

12:10

3-7 4.84 9-6 3.73

Chi Cle

12:10

7-10 4.29 12-8 4.61

Rodon (L) Tomlin (R)

KC Volquez (R) Det Boyd (L)

12:10

10-11 6-4

5.25 4.16

LA Wright (R) Hou Musgrove (R)

1:10

0-4 7.76 3-4 4.42

Sea Walker (R) Min Santiago (L)

1:10

6-11 4.32 12-9 4.82

Tex Lewis (R) Oak Cotton (R)

3:05

6-3 3.40 1-0 1.50

IL

Pitcher

Time

W-L ERA

Ari Bal

Shipley (R) Bundy (R)

12:35

4-4 5.49 9-6 4.13

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates. FRIDAY BOX SCORES

Dodgers 5, Rockies 2 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .323 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .349 Arenado 3b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .292 C.Gonzalez rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .299 Raburn lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222 c-Dahl ph-lf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .318 Murphy c 3 0 1 1 1 1 .303 Cardullo 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .220 Adames ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .216 Gray p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .133 b-Valaika ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Hoffman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Tapia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 g-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Totals 33 2 8 2 2 11 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Utley 2b 4 1 0 0 0 3 .252 Seager ss 4 1 0 0 1 2 .313 Turner 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .270 A.Gonzalez 1b 2 0 1 1 1 1 .285 Grandal c 3 0 1 2 1 2 .231 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .241 Toles lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .326 Pederson cf 2 1 1 1 2 1 .245 Kazmir p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .116 Stripling p 0 0 0 0 1 0 .083 a-Ethier ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .177 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Kendrick ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Dayton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Puig ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Totals 29 5 8 5 6 14 Colorado 000 002 000 — 2 8 0 Los Angeles 200 200 10x — 5 8 2 a-homered for Stripling in the 4th. b-struck out for Gray in the 5th. c-singled, advanced to 2nd for Raburn in the 6th. d-flied out for Fields in the 6th. e-struck out for Hoffman in the 7th. f-doubled for Dayton in the 8th. g-struck out for Motte in the 9th. E: Utley (5), Seager (17). LOB: Colorado 7, Los Angeles 9. 2B: C.Gonzalez (40), Puig (12). HR: Arenado (40), off Fields; Pederson (24), off Gray; Ethier (1), off Gray. RBIs: Arenado (129), Murphy (12), A.Gonzalez (86), Grandal 2 (71), Pederson (61), Ethier (1). SB: Blackmon (17), Murphy (1). CS: Toles (1). SF: A.Gonzalez. S: Gray. RLISP: Colorado 5 (Arenado 2, Murphy, Adames 2); Los Angeles 3 (Seager, Reddick, Toles). DP: Colorado 1 (Arenado, Murphy). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray L, 10-9 4 3 4 4 3 10 106 4.54 Hoffman 2 2 0 0 1 2 27 5.55 Estevez 1 1 1 1 1 1 26 5.09 Motte 1 2 0 0 1 1 20 5.09 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kazmir 1 2 0 0 0 0 19 4.56 Stripling W, 5-8 3 2 0 0 2 4 57 3.99 Avilan 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.57 Fields 1 3 2 1 0 0 26 3.24 Baez 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.15 2/ Dayton 0 0 2 14 1.82 3 1 0 Jansen S, 47-53 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.76 HBP: Gray (Turner), Estevez (Utley). WP: Stripling. T: 3:39. A: 52,320 .

Padres 7, Giants 2 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pagan lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .269 Posey c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .289 Pence rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .291 Belt 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .270 Nunez 3b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .260 Panik 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .242 Adrianza ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 d-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Suarez p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .191 a-Parker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .236 b-Gillaspie ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 e-Tomlinson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .292 Span cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .261 Totals 31 2 4 2 5 6 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf-lf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .289 Asuaje 2b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .222 Myers 1b 3 2 2 3 1 0 .261 Schimpf 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .221 Dickerson lf 3 0 1 2 1 0 .259 Jankowski cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Renfroe rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Hedges c 3 0 0 1 0 2 .167 Sardinas ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Jackson p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .200 c-Wallace ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .191 Totals 30 7 8 7 3 3 San Francisco 000 020 000 — 2 4 0 San Diego 300 040 00x — 7 8 0 a-struck out for Suarez in the 5th. b-flied out for Kontos in the 6th. c-struck out for Jackson in the 6th. d-popped out for Casilla in the 9th. e-struck out for Gillaspie in the 9th. LOB: San Francisco 7, San Diego 3. 2B: Posey (33), Panik (20), Suarez (2), Asuaje 2 (2). HR: Myers (28), off Suarez. RBIs: Posey 2 (70), Myers 3 (91), Schimpf (48), Dickerson 2 (37), Hedges (1). SF: Hedges. RLISP: San Francisco 5 (Posey, Belt, Adrianza 3); San Diego 1 (Renfroe). DP: San Francisco 1 (Panik, Pagan). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Suarez L, 3-5 4 5 3 3 1 1 69 4.29 Reynolds 0 3 4 4 2 0 20 7.50 Kontos 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.41 Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Osich 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.33 Casilla 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.65 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson W, 5-6 6 4 2 2 5 5 103 5.75 2/ Torres 0 0 0 4 0.00 3 0 0 2/ Morrow 0 0 0 5 2.02 3 0 0 2/ Baumann 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 25 5.14 Reynolds pitched to 5 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Kontos 2-1. PB: off Reynolds (Myers). T: 2:54. A: 28,404 .


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL x-Chicago Cardinals Pittsburgh Milwaukee Cincinnati EAST x-Washington New York Miami Philadelphia Atlanta WEST Los Angeles San Francisco Colorado San Diego Arizona

W 98 81 77 70 64 W 90 82 77 70 63 W 89 82 73 65 64

L 56 73 77 85 90 L 64 73 78 85 92 L 66 73 82 90 90

Pct .636 .526 .500 .452 .416 Pct .584 .529 .497 .452 .406 Pct .574 .529 .471 .419 .416

M 4 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

AMERICAN LEAGUE GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 6-4 L-1 56-24 42-32 17 ½ 5-5 W-1 33-41 48-32 21 4½ 7-3 L-1 37-39 40-38 28½ 12 6-4 L-1 41-39 29-46 34 17½ 2-8 W-1 37-41 27-49 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 4-6 W-1 46-28 44-36 8½ — 5-5 L-1 43-37 39-36 13½ 5 5-5 W-1 39-38 38-40 20½ 12 6-4 W-1 36-42 34-43 27½ 19 7-3 L-1 26-49 37-43 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 7-3 W-4 52-28 37-38 7 — 5-5 W-1 40-35 42-38 16 9 4-6 L-3 41-37 32-45 24 17 4-6 L-1 36-41 29-49 24½ 17½ 4-6 L-2 30-48 34-42

Saturday Cardinals 10, Cubs 4 Baltimore 6, Arizona 1 Washington 6, Pittsburgh 1 Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 1 Miami 6, Atlanta 4 Philadelphia 10, NY Mets 8 San Francisco 9, San Diego 6, (10) LA Dodgers 14, Colorado 1 Friday Cubs 5, Cardinals 0 Baltimore 3, Arizona 2, (12) Pittsburgh 6, Washington 5, (11) Atlanta 3, Miami 2 NY Mets 10, Philadelphia 5 Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 4 LA Dodgers 5, Colorado 2 San Diego 7, San Francisco 2

z-clinched playof berth • x-clinched division • y-clinched wildcard

CENTRAL Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Chicago Minnesota EAST z-Boston Toronto Baltimore New York Tampa Bay WEST x-Texas Seattle Houston Los Angeles Oakland

W 90 83 78 73 56 W 91 85 84 79 65 W 92 81 81 69 66

L 64 71 77 81 99 L 64 69 71 75 89 L 63 73 74 86 88

Pct .584 .539 .503 .474 .361 Pct .587 .552 .542 .513 .422 Pct .594 .526 .523 .445 .429

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 7-3 L-1 53-27 37-37 7 ½ 6-4 L-1 43-33 40-38 12½ 6 4-6 W-1 45-30 33-47 17 10½ 3-7 W-1 41-33 32-48 34½ 28 2-8 W-1 30-50 26-49 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 10-0 W-10 46-32 45-32 5½ — 6-4 W-2 44-32 41-37 7 — 4-6 W-2 49-31 35-40 11½ 4½ 2-8 L-3 44-31 35-44 25½ 18½ 4-6 L-2 36-44 29-45 GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away — — 6-4 W-2 50-25 42-38 10½ 2½ 5-5 L-1 42-35 39-38 11 3 6-4 L-3 41-36 40-38 23 15 6-4 W-4 35-40 34-46 25½ 17½ 4-6 L-5 33-47 33-41

z-clinched playof berth • x-clinched division • y-clinched wildcard

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Mets fall behind Phils 10-0, lose 10-8

Rangers 5, Athletics 0

Red Sox 6, Rays 4

Angels 10, Astros 4

Reds 6, Brewers 1

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Profar 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Mazara rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Gallo dh 3 0 0 0 1 3 .050 Rua 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .255 Hoying lf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .214 Andrus ss 4 2 2 4 0 0 .299 Chirinos c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .218 Alberto 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .146 Totals 36 5 9 5 1 8 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wendle 2b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .275 b-Pinder ph-2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Valencia rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .288 Vogt dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .255 Davis lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .251 Healy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Alonso 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .253 c-Eibner ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .187 Semien ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Maxwell c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .257 a-Nunez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133 McBride c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209 Smolinski cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Totals 32 0 5 0 3 9 Texas 020 002 001 — 5 9 0 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 a-out on fielder’s choice for Maxwell in the 8th. b-singled for Wendle in the 8th. c-walked for Alonso in the 9th. E: Semien (21). LOB: Texas 5, Oakland 8. 2B: Hoying 2 (2), Chirinos 2 (11), Davis (22). HR: Andrus (7), off Alcantara; Andrus (8), off Alcantara. RBIs: Andrus 4 (68), Chirinos (19). SB: DeShields (8).RLISP: Texas 3 (DeShields, Gallo, Hoying); Oakland 4 (Vogt 2, Smolinski, McBride). DP: Oakland 1 (Wendle, Davis). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish W, 6-5 7 2 0 0 1 9 99 3.53 2/ Claudio 0 0 0 15 2.86 3 2 0 2/ Scheppers 0 1 0 18 2.70 3 1 0 2/ Diekman 0 1 0 13 3.29 3 0 0 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Alcantara L, 1-2 6 7 4 4 1 6 79 5.75 Neal 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.79 Coulombe 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.84 Hendriks 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 3.80 Inherited runners-scored: Scheppers 2-0, Diekman 1-0. T: 2:58. A: 16,736 .

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pedroia 2b 4 1 2 4 0 1 .319 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .318 Betts rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .321 H.Ramirez 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .294 Holt 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .264 Young lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Bradley Jr. cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .271 Leon c 3 1 0 0 0 2 .318 Totals 33 6 8 6 2 7 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Forsythe 2b 5 1 1 1 0 3 .274 Kiermaier cf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .248 Longoria 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Miller 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .250 Dickerson lf 4 0 3 1 0 0 .248 Franklin dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .282 Mahtook rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .177 A.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Casali c 4 1 2 0 0 2 .170 Totals 37 4 11 4 1 12 Boston 010 100 400 — 6 8 0 Tampa Bay 003 000 001 — 4 11 0 LOB: Boston 2, Tampa Bay 7. 2B: Holt (16), Miller (28), Dickerson (36), Franklin (10). HR: Pedroia (14), off Farquhar; Forsythe (20), off Kimbrel. RBIs: Pedroia 4 (71), H.Ramirez (110), Holt (34), Forsythe (52), Miller 2 (80), Dickerson (66). SB: Betts (26). RLISP: Boston 1 (Bradley Jr.); Tampa Bay 4 (Miller, Franklin, A.Ramirez 2). GIDP: Betts, Holt. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (A.Ramirez, Miller), (A.Ramirez, Forsythe, Miller). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello W, 22-4 61/3 8 3 3 1 9 116 3.11 Scott 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 1/ Ziegler 0 0 1 1.38 3 0 0 0 1/ Ross Jr. 0 0 2 3.21 3 0 0 0 Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.60 Kimbrel S, 30-32 1 1 1 1 0 2 19 2.65 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Andriese 6 4 2 2 1 5 76 4.34 1/ Garton L, 1-2 2 0 0 15 4.75 3 2 2 Eveland 0 0 1 1 1 0 4 8.74 2/ Farquhar 1 1 1 0 1 15 3.27 3 Gamboa 2 1 0 0 0 1 25 1.23 Eveland pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Scott pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Scott 1-0, Ziegler 2-0, Ross Jr. 2-0, Eveland 2-0, Farquhar 3-2. T: 3:10. A: 25,641 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Escobar 3b 4 1 1 0 1 2 .310 Calhoun rf 5 2 3 2 0 1 .264 Trout cf 3 3 2 2 2 0 .318 Pujols dh 4 1 2 2 1 0 .270 Cron 1b 4 0 1 2 0 3 .277 Simmons ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .279 Buss lf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .208 Pennington 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .210 Bandy c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .239 Petit 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .249 a-Ortega ph-lf 2 2 2 1 0 0 .224 Totals 38 10 12 9 4 12 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 5 1 4 1 0 0 .255 Gurriel 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .338 Correa ss 2 0 0 0 2 2 .271 Gattis dh 3 0 0 1 0 1 .244 Gonzalez lf-1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 White 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .221 Hernandez lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209 Castro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .213 b-Stassi ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Marisnick cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .210 Totals 34 4 8 3 4 8 Los Angeles 000 100 045 — 10 12 1 Houston 002 000 200 — 4 8 2 a-singled for Petit in the 8th. b-out on fielder’s choice for Castro in the 8th. E: Escobar (19), Altuve (7), Gonzalez (7). LOB: Los Angeles 6, Houston 8. 2B: Calhoun (29), Trout (32), Pujols (19), Bandy (8), Ortega (7), Altuve (41). 3B: Springer (5). RBIs: Calhoun 2 (70), Trout 2 (97), Pujols 2 (118), Cron 2 (69), Ortega (14), Springer (79), Gurriel (15), Gattis (68). SF: Cron, Gattis. RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Pujols, Cron, Simmons, Pennington 2); Houston 3 (Gonzalez 3). GIDP: Calhoun, Marisnick.DP: Los Angeles 2 (Chacin, Petit, Cron), (Chacin, Petit, Cron); Houston 1 (Altuve, Correa, White). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin 6 4 2 0 3 5 99 4.98 Valdez W, 2-3 1 2 2 2 1 2 22 4.95 2/ Achter 0 0 0 16 3.12 3 1 0 1/ Alvarez 0 0 0 3 3.58 3 0 0 Bailey 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.89 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peacock 5 1 1 1 2 7 69 2.67 Devenski 21/3 4 3 3 1 5 52 2.19 1/ Gregerson L, 4-2 3 2 1 1 0 0 17 3.18 Gustave 1 2 2 2 0 0 16 3.65 Chapman 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 5.06 1/ Neshek 1 1 0 19 2.60 3 2 2 Chapman pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Alvarez 1-0, Gregerson 2-2, Gustave 1-0, Chapman 1-1, Neshek 1-1. PB: off Chacin (Correa), off Neshek (Pujols). WP: Chacin, Gregerson. T: 3:32. A: 27,565 .

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 2 2 0 1 0 .330 Schebler cf 5 2 3 0 0 2 .259 Votto 1b 2 1 1 2 3 0 .320 Duvall lf 4 1 1 2 1 0 .237 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .288 Suarez 3b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .249 Iribarren rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .370 Barnhart c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .251 Straily p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .020 Lorenzen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 c-De Jesus ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Totals 34 6 10 6 7 6 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .280 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .306 Carter 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Santana rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .259 Pina c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Arcia ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .215 Reed cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .154 Jungmann p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Cravy p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 a-Pinto ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Scahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Perez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Boyer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blazek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 6 1 2 8 Cincinnati 200 001 102 — 6 10 0 Milwaukee 010 000 000 — 1 6 1 a-struck out for Cravy in the 5th. b-struck out for Scahill in the 7th. c-lined out for Lorenzen in the 9th. E: Gennett (13). LOB: Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 6. 2B: Schebler (11), Duvall (29), Pina (4). HR: Votto (26), off Jungmann; Santana (10), off Straily. RBIs: Votto 2 (89), Duvall 2 (94), Phillips (60), Suarez (65), Santana (27). SB: Duvall (5), Suarez (10), Villar (59). CS: Peraza (8), Braun (4). SF: Phillips. RLISP: Cincinnati 4 (Phillips 2, Suarez, Straily); Milwaukee 3 (Villar, Gennett, Perez). GIDP: Iribarren, Barnhart. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Gennett, Arcia, Carter), (Gennett, Arcia, Carter). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily W, 14-8 62/3 5 1 1 2 5 96 3.74 Lorenzen 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 30 2.87 Iglesias 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.21 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jungmann L, 0-5 4 3 2 2 4 3 71 7.76 Cravy 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.70 Barnes 1 3 1 1 0 1 18 3.00 Scahill 1 2 1 1 1 0 22 3.14 Boyer 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 4.08 Blazek 1 1 2 1 2 0 22 5.66 Inherited runners-scored: Lorenzen 2-0. PB: off Jungmann (Barnhart), off Blazek (Votto). Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Ben May; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Ryan Blakney. T: 3:01. A: 31,398 .

The Mets fell behind by 10 runs early and inished just short of what would have been the largest comeback victory in team history, losing 10-8 to the Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday night in New York. Philadelphia’s Maikel Franco and Darin Ruf each hit long a home run for the second consecutive night as Philadelphia built a 10-0 lead by the fourth. Sean Gilmartin (0-1) fell behind 3-0 after 12 pitches and left having allowed ive runs in two-thirds of an inning. Giants 9, Padres 6 • San Francisco blew a six-run lead before scoring three times in the 10th to win at San Diego. Dodgers 14, Rockies 1 • Clayton Kershaw scattered three hits over seven scoreless innings, and Los Angeles won at home to move within a game of clinching its fourth consecutive NL West title. Nationals 6, Pirates 1 • Washington clinched its third National League East title in ive years, winning at Pittsburgh behind 5 1/3 scoreless innings from rookie reliever Reynaldo Lopez. Reds 6, Brewers 1 • Dan Straily pitched into the seventh inning and Joey Votto hit a two-run homer to help Cincinnati win at Milwaukee. Marlins 6, Braves 4 • Derek Dietrich hit a two-run homer to help Miami end visiting Atlanta’s winning streak at seven games.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Blue Jays 3, Yankees 0 • Jose Bautista hit a three-run homer of Tyler Clippard in the eighth. Visiting New York has been blanked in three straight games for the irst time since July 27-28, 1975. Red Sox 6, Rays 4 • Dustin Pedroia hit a grand slam to help Rick Porcello get his major league-leading 22nd win, and AL East-leading Boston won at Tampa Bay and clinched a playof berth. Royals 7, Tigers 4 • Paulo Orlando hit a tying, two-run double and Eric Hosmer followed with a three-run homer against Francisco Rodriguez as Kansas City won at Detroit. Rangers 5, Athletics 0 • The lone veteran in the lineup a day after Texas won the AL West title, Elvis Andrus hit a pair of two-run homers in a road victory. Twins 3, Mariners 2 • Miguel Sano hit a tiebreaking homer in the fourth inning for host Minnesota. Angels 10, Astros 4 • Kole Calhoun had three hits and two RBIs, and Los Angeles scored nine runs in the inal two innings to win at Houston. White Sox 8, Indians 1 • Cleveland blew some early scoring chances and lost at home, keeping the Indians from getting closer to an AL Central title.

INTERLEAGUE Orioles 6, D’backs 1 • Trey Mancini hit his third homer in nine major league at-bats and Mark Trumbo connected for his league-leading 45th as Baltimore won at home. Associated Press

Royals 7, Tigers 4 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Orlando cf-rf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .295 Cuthbert 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .276 Hosmer dh 5 1 1 3 0 3 .268 Morales 1b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .263 Perez c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Gordon lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .218 Escobar ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .267 Dozier rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .286 Dyson cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Mondesi 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .181 a-Nava ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Merrifield 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Totals 37 7 10 7 3 8 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 3 0 1 0 .282 Maybin cf 5 2 3 2 0 0 .321 Cabrera 1b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .307 V.Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 1 2 .291 1-Jones pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 J.Martinez rf 4 0 2 2 1 1 .311 Upton lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .240 McCann c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .220 b-Aybar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Romine 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .237 Iglesias ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .248 Totals 41 4 14 4 4 10 Kansas City 010 001 005 — 7 10 1 Detroit 002 101 000 — 4 14 1 a-struck out for Mondesi in the 9th. b-grounded out for McCann in the 9th. 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 8th. 2-ran for Dozier in the 9th.E: Ventura (4), Kinsler (9). LOB: Kansas City 7, Detroit 14. 2B: Orlando (21), Upton (26). HR: Morales (30), off Norris; Hosmer (24), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Orlando 2 (42), Hosmer 3 (100), Morales (90), Escobar (53), Maybin 2 (43), J.Martinez 2 (65). SF: Escobar. RLISP: Kansas City 2 (Hosmer, Mondesi); Detroit 8 (J.Martinez 2, Upton, McCann 3, Iglesias 2). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ventura 4 10 3 3 2 6 85 4.40 Moylan 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 3.53 2/ Strahm 1 2 1 35 1.37 3 1 1 1/ McCarthy 1 7 6.00 3 1 0 0 0 Soria 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 4.06 Davis W, 2-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 2.06 Herrera S, 12-15 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.21 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris 52/3 6 2 2 2 6 100 3.59 1/ A.Wilson 2 2.83 3 0 0 0 0 0 J.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.13 Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.97 Rodriguez L, 3-4 2/3 4 5 5 1 1 26 3.30 1/ Hardy 6 3.91 3 0 0 0 0 0 Ventura pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Moylan 1-0, McCarthy 2-0, A.Wilson 1-0. PB: off Ventura (Cabrera). WP: Davis. PB: Perez (5). T: 3:50. A: 31,721 .

Giants 9, Padres 6 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 2 1 2 1 0 .261 Belt 1b 5 1 1 0 1 2 .270 Posey c 6 1 1 1 0 0 .287 Pence rf 3 1 0 1 2 0 .289 Nunez 3b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .264 Panik 2b 5 0 1 2 0 0 .241 Pagan lf 5 1 3 1 0 0 .273 Adrianza ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Bumgarner p 3 1 2 0 0 1 .171 Gearrin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Law p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Williamson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Tomlinson 2b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .299 Totals 43 9 12 8 4 4 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .111 Jay lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .285 Amarista 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .257 Myers 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Renfroe rf 4 2 2 1 0 1 .333 Rosales 3b-ss 4 1 1 2 0 2 .231 Sardinas ss 2 1 0 0 1 0 .253 e-Schimpf ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Norris c 4 1 1 2 0 2 .184 Asuaje 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Cosart p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .100 a-Wallace ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .190 b-Hedges ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 c-Solarte ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286 1-Jankowski pr-lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .247 Totals 38 6 8 6 1 10 San Francisco 300 300 000 3 — 9 12 1 San Diego 000 122 100 0 — 6 8 2 a-struck out for Hessler in the 3rd. b-flied out for Campos in the 5th. c-singled for Villanueva in the 7th. d-struck out for Law in the 8th. e-flied out for Sardinas in the 9th. 1-ran for Solarte in the 7th. E: Adrianza (2), Renfroe (1), Rosales (8). LOB: San Francisco 9, San Diego 3. 2B: Bumgarner 2 (5), Renfroe (1). HR: Span (11), off Quackenbush; Renfroe (1), off Bumgarner; Norris (14), off Bumgarner; Rosales (12), off Bumgarner. RBIs: Span 2 (51), Posey (71), Pence (54), Nunez (67), Panik 2 (60), Pagan (51), Margot (1), Renfroe (1), Rosales 2 (34), Norris 2 (41). SB: Nunez (39), Pagan (14), Myers (27). S: Adrianza. RLISP: San Francisco 5 (Span, Posey, Panik 2, Adrianza); San Diego 1 (Renfroe). GIDP: Myers. DP: San Francisco 1 (Nunez, Tomlinson, Belt). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner 6 4 5 5 1 5 99 2.71 1/ Gearrin 1 6 4.12 3 0 0 0 0 1/ Lopez 1 0 0 5 4.10 3 1 1 1/ Law 3 1 0 0 0 0 6 2.21 Strickland 12/3 0 0 0 0 3 19 3.15 1/ Smith W, 2-4 3 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.38 Romo S, 3-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 7 2.93 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cosart 1 3 3 3 2 0 33 6.03 Hessler 2 1 0 0 0 0 31 3.64 Dominguez 1 3 3 3 1 0 27 5.34 Campos 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 4.95 Villanueva 2 0 0 0 1 1 23 5.96 Hand 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.89 Maurer 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 4.59 Quackenbush L, 7-7 1 3 3 3 0 0 21 3.88 Smith pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored: Law 1-0, Romo 1-0. WP: Law. T: 3:43. A: 31,171 .

Saturday Kansas City 7, Detroit 4 Texas 5, Oakland 0 Toronto 3, NY Yankees 0 Boston 6, Tampa Bay 4 Baltimore 6, Arizona 1 White Sox 8, Cleveland 1 LA Angels 10, Houston 4 Minnesota 3, Seattle 2 Friday Baltimore 3, Arizona 2, (12) Toronto 9, NY Yankees 0 Boston 2, Tampa Bay 1 Cleveland 10, White Sox 4 Detroit 8, Kansas City 3 LA Angels 10, Houston 6 Seattle 10, Minnesota 1 Texas 3, Oakland 0

Sunday’s pitching matchups

Marlins 6, Braves 4 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 1 3 0 0 2 .296 Garcia 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Freeman 1b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .305 Kemp lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .287 Markakis rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .271 Recker c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .282 Swanson ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Beckham 2b 2 0 0 1 0 1 .217 e-Peterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Blair p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .050 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Ruiz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 De La Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .188 d-Smith ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .241 Gant p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Bonifacio ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Totals 33 4 8 3 2 11 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 3 2 2 0 2 0 .257 Ozuna lf 2 0 0 1 1 0 .267 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Francoeur lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .326 Dietrich 3b-1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .286 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yelich cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .294 Stanton rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .241 1-Perez pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Johnson 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Bour 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Rojas 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Realmuto c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .308 Hechavarria ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .236 Chen p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Hood ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Brice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cervenka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ellington p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Suzuki ph-lf-rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Totals 31 6 9 5 6 2 Atlanta 110 001 100 — 4 8 0 Miami 201 200 10x — 6 9 0 a-singled for Chen in the 4th. b-popped out for Bradley in the 5th. c-grounded out for Ellington in the 6th. d-walked for De La Cruz in the 7th. e-struck out for Beckham in the 9th. f-flied out for Gant in the 9th. 1-ran for Stanton in the 7th. LOB: Atlanta 6, Miami 9. 2B: Recker (8), Realmuto (31). 3B: Hechavarria (6). HR: Freeman (32), off Cervenka; Dietrich (7), off Blair. RBIs: Freeman 2 (87), Beckham (30), Ozuna (74), Dietrich 2 (42), Stanton (74), Realmuto (47). SB: Smith (15), Gordon 3 (26), Realmuto (12), Perez (4). CS: Francoeur (2). SF: Beckham, Ozuna. RLISP: Atlanta 1 (Beckham); Miami 7 (Yelich 2, Realmuto 2, Hechavarria, Chen, Suzuki). GIDP: Garcia. DP: Atlanta 1 (Recker, Swanson); Miami 1 (Hechavarria, Gordon, Bour). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blair L, 1-7 31/3 6 5 5 3 0 80 8.02 2/ Bradley 0 0 0 10 5.14 3 0 0 De La Cruz 2 1 0 0 2 1 32 4.92 Gant 2 2 1 1 1 1 38 5.10 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen 4 4 2 2 0 3 62 5.02 Brice 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.55 1/ Cervenka 1 0 1 5 6.75 3 2 1 2/ Ellington W, 4-2 3 1 0 0 0 2 13 1.52 Rodney 1 0 1 1 2 2 19 6.23 Barraclough 1 0 0 0 0 0 18 2.76 Ramos S, 39-42 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.90 Inherited runners-scored: Bradley 2-1, Ellington 1-0. PB: off Blair (Bour). HBP: Blair (Dietrich), Chen (Markakis). WP: Bradley, Rodney. T: 3:21. A: 26,178 .

Orioles 6, Diamondbacks 1 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .314 Owings ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .301 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 Tomas rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Brito rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .179 Drury 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .276 Jensen lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .192 Haniger cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Gosselin dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Totals 34 1 7 1 0 11 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 3 1 0 0 2 0 .271 Davis 1b 5 0 2 2 0 2 .220 Machado 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .300 Trumbo rf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .250 1-Bourn pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Mancini dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .364 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Wieters c 3 2 1 0 1 0 .240 Hardy ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .274 Stubbs lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .150 Totals 32 6 9 6 4 8 Arizona 000 000 001 — 1 7 3 Baltimore 110 310 00x — 6 9 0 1-ran for Trumbo in the 7th. E: Segura (10), Tomas (6), Drury (5). LOB: Arizona 6, Baltimore 8. 2B: Goldschmidt (33), Drury (28), Wieters (17), Hardy (27). HR: Mancini (3), off Ray; Trumbo (45), off Bracho. RBIs: Drury (49), Davis 2 (84), Machado (94), Trumbo (104), Mancini (5), Hardy (47). SF: Hardy. RLISP: Arizona 4 (Segura, Tomas, Jensen, Brito); Baltimore 2 (Machado, Hardy). GIDP: Schoop, Wieters. DP: Arizona 2 (Ray, Castillo, Goldschmidt), (Goldschmidt, Owings, Leone). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray L, 8-14 32/3 6 5 4 4 5 87 4.77 Bracho 11/3 1 1 1 0 1 26 8.18 Leone 2 2 0 0 0 2 25 6.33 Koch 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.29 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley W, 9-13 82/3 7 1 1 0 11 116 6.38 1/ Wilson 0 0 0 2 5.32 3 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Bracho 2-0, Wilson 1-0. PB: off Ray (Jones). HBP: Koch (Stubbs). WP: Ray. T: 2:36. A: 40,610 .

White Sox 8, Indians 1 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. T.Anderson ss 5 1 1 0 0 3 .277 Cabrera lf 5 1 2 2 0 1 .298 Abreu 1b 5 0 3 1 0 1 .299 Morneau dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 1-Shuck pr-dh 1 1 0 0 0 0 .210 Frazier 3b 5 2 2 1 0 1 .225 A.Garcia rf 4 1 1 1 1 2 .248 Avila c 5 0 0 0 0 5 .222 Sanchez 2b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .200 L.Garcia cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .261 Totals 42 8 15 7 1 15 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Davis cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .255 Moore c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .277 Martinez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Lindor ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .302 b-Gonzalez ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Napoli dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .244 c-Aguilar ph-dh-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Ramirez 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .317 Gimenez 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Guyer rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .333 Crisp lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .225 Almonte lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .274 Perez c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .168 a-Naquin ph-cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .298 Totals 33 1 8 1 3 6 Chicago 200 011 040 — 8 15 1 Cleveland 010 000 000 — 1 8 3 a-grounded out for Perez in the 7th. b-struck out for Lindor in the 8th. c-grounded out for Napoli in the 8th. 1-ran for Morneau in the 8th.E: Sanchez (3), Lindor (12), Perez (2), Adams (1). LOB: Chicago 8, Cleveland 9. 2B: Cabrera (39), Frazier (19), Sanchez 2 (8), Ramirez (45), Guyer (17), Almonte (20). HR: Frazier (39), off Armstrong. RBIs: Cabrera 2 (80), Abreu (97), Frazier (96), A.Garcia (51), Sanchez (15), L.Garcia (2), Davis (47). SB: L.Garcia (2), Davis (41), Kipnis (15). RLISP: Chicago 5 (Cabrera, Morneau, Avila, L.Garcia 2); Cleveland 6 (Kipnis 2, Guyer, Perez, Moore 2). GIDP: Santana. DP: Chicago 1 (T.Anderson, Sanchez, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Quintana W, 13-11 6 6 1 1 3 2 103 3.21 2/ Kahnle 3 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.92 1/ Jennings 4 2.11 3 0 0 0 0 0 Jones 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.36 Robertson 1 1 0 0 0 3 18 3.56 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Anderson L, 2-5 2 4 2 2 0 3 40 6.34 Manship 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 23 3.21 1/ Crockett 1 4 5.06 3 0 0 0 0 Garner 1 3 1 1 0 1 20 4.32 Armstrong 1 2 1 1 0 2 27 3.12 Colon 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 5.19 1/ Adams 3 0 1 17 8.83 3 3 4 Plutko 12/3 2 0 0 1 2 34 0.00 Plutko 12/3 2 0 0 1 2 34 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Jennings 1-0, Plutko 2-2, Plutko 2-2. HBP: Robertson (Guyer). WP: C.Anderson, Plutko. PB: Perez (3). T: 3:28. A: 32,088 .

Nationals 6, Pirates 1 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .336 Werth lf 4 2 2 1 1 0 .249 Harper rf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .243 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Ramos c 5 0 3 0 0 1 .307 Drew 2b 4 0 2 2 1 0 .281 Zimmerman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Espinosa ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .213 Ross p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 a-Goodwin ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .310 Lopez p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Totals 37 6 12 6 2 9 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .311 Bell rf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .287 McCutchen cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Kang 3b 3 0 3 0 0 0 .263 Jaso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .263 Rodriguez ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .264 Joyce lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .235 Cervelli c 3 0 2 0 1 1 .265 Nova p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .150 b-Hanson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 c-Rogers ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Locke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 d-Florimon ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .455 Totals 35 1 8 1 3 10 Washington 300 300 000 — 6 12 0 Pittsburgh 001 000 000 — 1 8 3 a-singled for Burnett in the 4th. b-grounded out for Nova in the 4th. c-grounded out for Hutchison in the 6th. d-struck out for Locke in the 9th. E: Frazier (5), Rodriguez (6), Cervelli (7). LOB: Washington 10, Pittsburgh 11. 2B: Werth (28), Kang 2 (19). HR: Bell (3), off Ross. RBIs: Werth (68), Harper 2 (84), Rendon (79), Drew 2 (19), Bell (18). CS: Drew (1). SF: Harper, Rendon. RLISP: Washington 4 (Harper, Rendon, Ramos, Zimmerman); Pittsburgh 7 (Bell, McCutchen, Jaso, Rodriguez, Joyce 3). GIDP: Espinosa. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Nova, Cervelli, Jaso). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ross 22/3 5 1 1 1 4 63 3.48 1/ Burnett 0 0 0 3 0.00 3 0 0 Lopez W, 4-3 51/3 3 0 0 2 6 85 4.54 Rzepczynski 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1.64 1/ Treinen 0 0 0 4 2.23 3 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova L, 12-8 4 8 6 3 0 2 69 3.18 Hutchison 2 1 0 0 2 4 48 6.30 Phillips 2 1 0 0 0 2 27 0.00 Locke 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 5.44 Inherited runners-scored: Burnett 3-0, Rzepczynski 2-0, Treinen 2-0. HBP: Nova 2 (Rendon,Zimmerman), Ross (Kang). WP: Nova. T: 3:28. A: 30,137 .

Phillies 10, Mets 8 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Hernandez 2b 3 1 2 0 3 1 .295 Quinn rf-lf 6 1 1 0 0 5 .231 Herrera cf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .290 Franco 3b 5 2 2 3 0 1 .253 Joseph 1b 4 2 1 2 1 1 .260 Ruf lf 5 2 3 3 0 1 .203 Galvis ss 5 0 2 0 0 1 .243 Alfaro c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .077 Altherr rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .198 Asher p 3 0 1 2 0 1 .111 Ellis c 2 0 2 0 0 0 .286 Totals 42 10 17 10 5 13 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cabrera ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Nimmo cf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .254 Cespedes lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Kelly lf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .232 Granderson cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .225 a-Loney ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Smoker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-De Aza ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .197 d-Bruce ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .179 Johnson 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .264 b-Campbell ph-3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .174 Conforto rf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .220 Duda 1b 4 3 1 0 1 0 .229 d’Arnaud c 4 1 1 0 1 1 .248 Cecchini ss 3 1 2 2 0 0 .400 Reyes 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Rivera 3b-2b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .350 Totals 37 8 11 7 5 4 Philadelphia 510 400 000 — 10 17 2 New York 000 042 011 — 8 11 0 a-grounded out for Edgin in the 5th. b-flied out for Johnson in the 6th. c-flied out for Smoker in the 7th. d-homered for Goeddel in the 9th. E: Franco (13), Galvis (8). LOB: Philadelphia 10, New York 9. 2B: Cecchini 2 (2), Nimmo (1). 3B: Herrera (6). HR: Franco (25), off Gilmartin; Ruf (2), off Montero; Bruce (30), off Mariot. RBIs: Franco 3 (87), Joseph 2 (47), Ruf 3 (8), Asher 2 (2), Cecchini 2 (2), Nimmo (6), Kelly (7), Rivera 2 (13), Bruce (92). SB: Ellis (2). CS: Galvis (6). SF: Kelly. RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Quinn 3, Franco); New York 6 (Johnson, d’Arnaud, Nimmo 3, Loney). GIDP: Cabrera, Campbell. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Asher, Joseph), (C.Hernandez, Galvis, Joseph); New York 1 (Kelly, d’Arnaud). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Asher W, 2-0 5 5 4 0 0 1 76 1.66 Rodriguez 1 3 2 2 1 2 29 2.84 D.Hernandez 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 3.75 Neris 1 1 1 1 2 1 38 2.53 Mariot S, 2-3 1 1 1 1 2 0 27 5.68 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gilmartin L, 0-1 2/3 4 5 5 3 0 39 7.13 Montero 31/3 7 5 5 1 7 67 8.50 Edgin 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 6.00 Henderson 1 2 0 0 0 3 28 4.36 Smoker 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 5.02 Salas 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.19 Goeddel 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 4.24 Henderson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Montero 2-0, Smoker 1-0. PB: off Gilmartin (Alfaro). HBP: Asher (Granderson). WP: Montero. T: 3:47. A: 39,995 .

Blue Jays 3, Yankees 0 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .256 Ellsbury cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Sanchez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .330 Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Hicks rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .217 McCann c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .239 Torreyes 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Austin 1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .197 a-Butler ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .381 Teixeira 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .197 Solano 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .235 Totals 27 0 3 0 3 7 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Travis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .305 Donaldson 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .285 Encarnacion 1b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .267 Bautista rf 4 1 2 3 0 0 .233 Carrera rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Martin dh 2 0 1 0 2 0 .238 Tulowitzki ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Upton lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .199 Navarro c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Totals 28 3 6 3 5 2 New York 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 Toronto 000 000 03x — 3 6 0 a-struck out for Austin in the 8th. LOB: New York 3, Toronto 6. 2B: Bautista (24). 3B: Torreyes (4). HR: Bautista (20), off Clippard. RBIs: Bautista 3 (65). CS: Gardner (4). RLISP: New York 2 (Gregorius, Butler); Toronto 2 (Upton, Navarro). GIDP: McCann, Torreyes, Encarnacion, Tulowitzki. DP: New York 2 (Gregorius, Solano, Austin), (Torreyes, Solano, Austin); Toronto 2 (Encarnacion, Donaldson), (Tulowitzki, Travis, Encarnacion). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 7 4 0 0 3 2 91 4.02 Clippard L, 3-5 1 2 3 3 2 0 26 2.42 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman 7 1 0 0 3 5 97 4.34 Grilli W, 7-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 23 2.46 Osuna S, 35-38 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 2.38 WP: Clippard. PB: Navarro (6). T: 2:34. A: 47,828 .

NL

Pitcher

StL Chi

Martinez (R) Lester (L)

Time

W-L ERA

7:08

15-8 18-4

Atl Teheran (R) Mia Fernandez (R) 12:10 Phi NY

3.16 2.36

6-10 3.10 16-8 2.86

Thompson (R) Gsellman (R) 12:10

3-5 2-2

5.62 3.13

Was TBD Pit Glasnow (R)

12:35

— 0-1

— 4.11

Cin Mil

Finnegan (L) Peralta (R)

1:10

9-11 7-10

4.10 5.21

Col LA

Anderson (L) McCarthy (R)

3:10

5-6 2-2

3.58 3.63

SF SD

TBD Richard (L)

3:40

— — 3-3 3.04

AL

Pitcher

Time

W-L ERA

NY Tor

Pineda (R) Estrada (R)

12:07

6-11 4.89 9-9 3.62

Bos Rodriguez (L) TB Odorizzi (R)

12:10

3-7 4.84 9-6 3.73

Chi Cle

12:10

7-10 4.29 12-8 4.61

Rodon (L) Tomlin (R)

KC Volquez (R) Det Boyd (L)

12:10

10-11 6-4

5.25 4.16

LA Wright (R) Hou Musgrove (R)

1:10

0-4 7.76 3-4 4.42

Sea Walker (R) Min Santiago (L)

1:10

6-11 4.32 12-9 4.82

Tex Lewis (R) Oak Cotton (R)

3:05

6-3 3.40 1-0 1.50

IL

Pitcher

Time

W-L ERA

Ari Bal

Shipley (R) Bundy (R)

12:35

4-4 5.49 9-6 4.13

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Dodgers 14, Rockies 1 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .321 Tapia cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Descalso ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Butler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Dahl rf-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .316 Arenado 3b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .294 Patterson lf-rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286 Raburn lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .220 b-Garneau ph-c 2 0 1 0 0 1 .234 Parra rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Bergman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 h-Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Cardullo 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .227 Valaika 2b-3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .333 Wolters c-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Bettis p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .042 a-Adames ph-ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Totals 32 1 6 1 0 8 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Seager ss 5 0 0 1 0 1 .310 g-Segedin ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Turner 3b 3 2 3 2 2 0 .274 Taylor 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .218 Gonzalez 1b 5 1 1 2 0 1 .284 Barnes c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Grandal c 3 2 1 0 2 0 .232 Reddick rf 4 3 3 5 1 0 .255 Kendrick lf 5 1 1 0 0 3 .265 Pederson cf 1 3 1 2 2 0 .247 d-Toles ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .323 Kershaw p 1 0 1 1 0 0 .182 c-Ethier ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Utley 2b 4 2 1 0 1 1 .252 f-Culberson ph-ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Totals 36 14 13 13 8 7 Colorado 000 000 010 — 1 6 3 Los Angeles 040 211 60x — 14 13 0 a-flied out for Carasiti in the 6th. b-struck out for Raburn in the 7th. c-struck out for Kershaw in the 7th. d-grounded out for Pederson in the 8th. e-grounded out for Chavez in the 8th. f-singled, advanced to 2nd for Utley in the 8th. g-popped out for Seager in the 8th. h-lined out for Bergman in the 9th. E: Raburn (3), Cardullo (2), Valaika (1). LOB: Colorado 4, Los Angeles 9. 2B: Cardullo (2), Reddick (17). HR: Valaika (1), off Chavez; Reddick (10), off Bergman. RBIs: Valaika (1), Seager (70), Turner 2 (89), Gonzalez 2 (88), Reddick 5 (37), Pederson 2 (63), Kershaw (3). SB: Turner (4). S: Kershaw 2. RLISP: Colorado 2 (Wolters, Murphy); Los Angeles 4 (Gonzalez, Kendrick, Utley, Segedin). DP: Los Angeles 1 (Grandal, Utley). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bettis L, 13-8 42/3 8 7 5 4 3 105 4.92 1/ Carasiti 0 0 4 11.08 3 0 0 0 Butler 12/3 3 5 5 3 4 56 7.88 Bergman 11/3 2 2 2 1 0 31 8.51 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw W, 12/3 7 3 0 0 0 6 91 1.65 Chavez 1 1 1 1 0 1 14 3.80 Liberatore 1 2 0 0 0 1 15 3.02 Inherited runners-scored: Carasiti 2-0, Bergman 2-2. PB: off Bettis (Pederson). HBP: Butler (Pederson).T: 3:04. A: 53,299 .

Twins 3, Mariners 2 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 b-Gutierrez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Heredia lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Smith rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .257 c-Lee ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Gamel rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Cano 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .297 1-Freeman pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cruz dh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .284 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .281 Lind 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Martin cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Marte ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 a-O’Malley ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Totals 32 2 5 2 0 7 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Polanco ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .283 Grossman dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Sano 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .240 Vargas 1b 2 1 0 0 1 1 .252 Kepler rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .233 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .134 Schafer lf 3 0 0 1 0 2 .217 Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Totals 27 3 3 3 1 6 Seattle 000 200 000 — 2 5 0 Minnesota 110 100 00x — 3 3 2 a-struck out for Marte in the 8th. b-struck out for Aoki in the 8th. c-struck out for Smith in the 8th. 1-ran for Cano in the 9th. E: Polanco (12), Sano (18). LOB: Seattle 4, Minnesota 1. 2B: Cruz (27). HR: Cruz (39), off Duffey; Polanco (3), off Miranda; Sano (24), off Miranda. RBIs: Cruz 2 (98), Polanco (22), Sano (61), Schafer (1). S: Marte. RLISP: Seattle 4 (Smith, Lind, Martin 2); Minnesota 1 (Buxton). GIDP: Seager. DP: Minnesota 1 (Sano, Vargas). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miranda L, 5-2 4 3 3 3 1 0 52 3.73 Storen 2 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.94 Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 0.00 Wilhelmsen 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.75 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffey W, 9-11 7 4 2 2 0 4 85 6.18 Rogers 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 3.53 Kintzler S, 15-18 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.98 WP: Miranda, Duffey. Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Toby Basner. T: 2:06. A: 24,749 .


CARDINALS

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

The

NOTEBOOK

BIG SCORE

Cards put Garcia back in rotation

Brought to you by:

Mattress Direct CUBS 5, CARDINALS 0 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .273 Gyorko ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Piscotty rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .270 Adams 1b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .252 Molina c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .296 Grichuk cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .243 Peralta 3b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .243 Wong lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Leake p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .146 Kiekhefer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Socolovich p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Garcia ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Rosenthal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Tuivailala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Moss ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 28 0 5 0 2 13 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 1 0 0 1 0 .271 Bryant 3b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .297 Rizzo 1b 5 1 3 1 0 1 .295 Zobrist 2b-lf 3 0 1 2 1 0 .267 Russell ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Heyward rf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .230 Coghlan lf 2 0 1 1 2 0 .253 Baez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Montero c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .217 b-Soler ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Edwards p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Arrieta p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .270 Contreras c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Totals 33 5 9 4 6 4 Cardinals 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Chicago 400 100 00x — 5 9 0 a-singled for Socolovich in the 6th. b-struck out for Montero in the 7th. c-grounded out for Duke in the 8th. LOB: Cardinals 3, Chicago 10. 2B: Rizzo 2 (42), Coghlan (12). RBIs: Rizzo (105), Zobrist 2 (70), Coghlan (27). SB: Zobrist (6), Heyward (9). RLISP: Cardinals 1 (Carpenter); Chicago 6 (Russell 2, Montero 3, Soler). GIDP: Molina, Leake, Moss. DP: Chicago 3. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 3 1/3 7 5 5 3 1 77 4.72 Kiekhefer 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 6.38 Socolovich 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 21 2.25 Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 4.95 2/ Tuivailala 0 2 0 21 6.75 3 0 0 1/ Duke 0 0 1 5 1.29 3 0 0 Williams 1 1 0 0 0 1 24 6.06 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta 7 5 0 0 1 10 99 2.85 Strop 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.82 1/ 0 0 1 7 3.10 Wood 3 0 0 2/ 0 0 1 8 3.31 Edwards 3 0 0 Kiekhefer pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. W: Arrieta 18-7. L: Leake 9-11. Inherited runners-scored: Kiekhefer 2-0, Socolovich 3-1, Duke 2-0. WP: Leake 2. Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Manny Gonzalez. T: 2:53. A: 40,791 (41,072).

HOW THEY SCORED Cubs irst Fowler walks. Bryant singles, Fowler to third. On a wild pitch, Fowler scores, Bryant to second. Rizzo doubles, Bryant scores. On a wild pitch, Rizzo to third. Zobrist singles, Rizzo scores. Russell grounds into a force out. Heyward grounds into a force out. Coghlan doubles, Heyward scores. Four runs. Cubs 4, Cards 0. Cubs fourth Arrieta singles. Bryant singles, Arrieta to second. Rizzo singles, Arrieta to third, Bryant to second. Zobrist grounds into a force out, Arrieta scores. One run. Cubs 5, Cards 0. SEASON SERIES The Cardinals are in danger of dropping the season series vs. the Cubs for the irst time since 2010. A look: Year

W

L

2016

8

9

2015

11

8

2014

10

9

2013

12

7

2012

10

7

2011

10

5

2010

6

9

Lefthander will start Monday against Reds BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

CHICAGO • What the Cardinals saw

from Jaime Garcia in four scoreless innings of relief at altitude was familiar enough that they’re putting him back in a familiar role. One week after being removed from the rotation, Garcia will start Monday against Cincinnati when the Cardinals return to Busch Stadium for the final homestand of the season. Garcia’s start will allow the team to move Adam Wainwright’s scheduled start back to Tuesday. That gives the veteran an extra day of rest without costing him a start — and it sets up him, not Garcia, to start the final game of the regular season. Garcia is set for two starts, rebooted by two relief appearances. “We all know and we say it because it’s just been true over the years,” manager Mike Matheny said. “When he’s right he needs to be on the mound. Just got to try and figure out when he’s right.” Garcia and Michael Wacha were the only pitchers at Coors Field to throw multiple innings for the Cardinals and not allow a run. In relief of Luke Weaver on Wednesday, Garcia struck out five and allowed one hit through four innings. It was his sharpest turn in weeks, and it essentially allowed him to do what rookie Alex Reyes did to him. Reyes pitched strong in relief of Garcia to elbow him from the rotation, only to see Garcia pitch solidly in relief of Weaver and do the same a few days later. Garcia draws the Reds in his return, and he’s 1-1 with a 4.34 ERA in three previous starts against Cincinnati. Colorado had a substantial lead when Garcia entered the game, lessening the pressure of his appearance, but Garcia’s success also could be traced to a breather. By skipping one start, Garcia was able to steal two extra days of rest, and the freshness may have helped. Garcia acknowledged that he had made a few corrections to his delivery, and that he felt like he was able to keep his arm

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals pitcher Jaime Garcia improved his standing with a strong relief appearance earlier this week against Colorado.

from drifting and maintain a snap to his pitches.

HOLLIDAY FACES MAYERS Early Friday morning, before many of the Cubs had even arrived at Wrigley Field, Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday faced teammate Mike Mayers in the live batting practice session that could lead to the former batting champ rejoining the roster. Holliday simulated at-bats against Mayers, who was asked to throw at game speed. Holliday wanted to see how his right thumb, fractured last month, responded to a game-speed fastball in on his hands or a foul tip. He nicked a slider that left his hand stinging at one point and had to step away to collect himself. He hit a line drive soon after. “Took some real good swings,” Matheny said. “I think that would have buzzed no matter when it was or how he was feeling. He blistered a couple balls, which is exciting to see.” The greater test will be how Holliday’s hand recovers from facing Mayers. Holliday had a pin inserted in the right thumb, but the fracture continues to heal. He’s had soreness and swelling around the area in previous attempts to take BP. Matheny said it’s likely Holliday will go through another live BP outing before the team considers adding him to the active roster.

DIAZ GETS A BREAK When Class AA Springfield’s postseason run ended, so too did the Cardinals’ chance to help shortstop Aledmys Diaz build up stamina and strength for everyday play. The team realized it would have to happen while he played in the majors. While not ideal, that has meant spotting their rookie All-Star days of. For the second time in three games and a third day in the past four, Diaz got a break Friday and did not appear in the Cardinals’ 5-0 loss at Wrigley Field. Matheny said concern about Diaz’s throwing arm — which has been receiving treatment — was only part of the decision. “You could see just some frustration (at the plate),” Matheny said. “You see him trying to get his timing back with one swing. The arm is typically (the tipof) and has been the first thing that has kept us aware. Also, I think there’s some timing issues where he doesn’t feel good in the box.” Diaz is three for 22 (.136) on this road trip and five for 27 (.185) with two home runs since returning from the hairline fracture that cost him six weeks. His forearm weakened during that time because he was unable to do much in a cast. Diaz said his arm felt “good, ready” on Friday. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Diaz Molina Carpenter Piscotty G. Garcia Adams Grichuk Peralta Hazelbaker Gyorko Wong Moss Pham Kelly Rosario Pena Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .375 8 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 .303 380 66 115 26 3 16 61 36 58 4 16 .296 500 50 148 33 1 7 49 39 61 3 2 .273 447 77 122 34 6 19 62 73 101 0 13 .270 548 80 148 33 2 21 81 49 128 7 4 .269 201 32 54 11 0 3 17 37 46 1 6 .252 286 35 72 17 0 15 50 25 78 0 7 .243 411 62 100 27 3 23 62 26 127 5 1 .243 255 29 62 15 1 7 24 17 51 0 4 .242 194 35 47 7 3 12 28 18 64 5 4 .241 378 53 91 9 1 27 54 34 88 0 10 .238 311 39 74 7 6 5 23 34 52 7 8 .232 384 61 89 18 2 27 65 36 133 1 4 .226 155 25 35 7 0 9 17 20 69 2 0 .200 10 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 .189 37 3 7 2 0 0 2 2 5 0 0 .182 11 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 .254 5245 728 1331 281 30 212 697 497 1252 35 105

Pitching W L ERA G GS Reyes 3 1 1.03 10 3 Duke 0 1 1.29 23 0 Oh 5 3 1.79 72 0 Socolovich 1 0 2.25 13 0 Siegrist 5 3 2.97 63 0 C. Martinez 15 8 3.16 29 29 Bowman 2 5 3.79 54 0 Broxton 3 2 4.26 62 0 Weaver 1 4 4.54 8 8 Wacha 7 7 4.56 25 23 Wainwright 12 9 4.57 31 31 J. Garcia 10 12 4.59 31 29 Leake 9 11 4.72 29 29 Rosenthal 2 4 4.95 43 0 Williams 0 0 6.06 10 0 Kiekhefer 0 0 6.38 23 0 Tuivailala 0 0 6.75 11 0 Mayers 1 1 40.50 3 1 Team 80 73 4.06 153 153

SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 1 35.0 20 4 4 1 18 40 1 21.0 13 3 3 0 11 23 18 75.1 49 18 15 4 18 98 0 16.0 5 4 4 2 5 14 3 57.2 40 20 19 10 26 61 0 182.1 158 66 64 14 65 159 0 61.2 55 31 26 4 20 44 0 57.0 49 30 27 6 24 50 0 35.2 42 24 18 6 11 44 0 134.1 148 76 68 13 44 112 0 187.0 204 101 95 20 54 147 0 170.2 175 92 87 24 57 150 0 171.2 198 99 90 20 30 119 14 36.1 44 22 20 3 28 51 0 16.1 21 15 11 4 6 8 0 18.1 22 13 13 2 6 12 0 8.0 12 6 6 0 6 7 0 3.1 13 15 15 3 3 1 37 1368.1 1339 673 617 149 454 1202

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Cardinals manager Mike Matheny argues that Mike Leake was hit by a pitch from Chicago starter Jake Arrieta in the third inning.

Cardinals have terrible start in losing to the Cubs CARDS • FROM C1

“You’re going to have to be very clean,” Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. “We don’t have the first inning we have and we’re able to hold them close, you never know what happens with our club. He was not giving a lot of anything. He had his good stuff. We had our hands full. Being down four to a good team puts your back against the wall.” In the mad stumble for the National League’s two wild-card berths, the Cardinals (80-73) slipped to a game back of the Giants and the Mets. Both teams played later Friday. Not one of the teams has shown an inkling of separation. While the Cardinals play the NL Central champion Cubs this weekend, the Mets and Giants play lower-tier teams — the Phillies and Padres, respectively — and yet each does so with a recurring issue. For the Mets, it’s fraying starting pitching. For the Giants, it’s a Rube Goldberg bullpen. For the Cardinals, it’s potholes like Friday. “We’ve been playing (the Cubs) basically just how we’ve been

playing the whole year,” left fielder Kolten Wong said. “We haven’t gotten into our groove, getting anything going.” After taking an 11-1 thumping Wednesday in Colorado, the Cardinals awoke Friday in Chicago to stories about their impending role as spoilers to Joe Maddon’s electric Kool-Aid summer of love and ivy. The two major Chicago newspaper each had columns addressing how “losing to the hated Cardinals would be nuclear winter for Cubs fans” (Chicago Sun-Times) and that “local instinct urges the Cubs to apply the dagger and kill all Cardinal hope” (Chicago Tribune). The Cubs, playing now for a 100 win season, are set to host the wild-card winner in the National League division series, as the Cardinals did a year ago when losing to the Cubs. The Cubs have an 18-game edge on the Cardinals in the standings, though a better measure of the diference between these two archrivals is 360 feet. That’s the distance Dexter Fowler ran around the bases in the first inning. Fowler got the first 90 feet from a leadoff walk. Leake (9-11) has

complicated his first season with the Cardinals with flare-up innings, sparks that turn into rallies he cannot quell. The Cardinals signed Leake to a five-year, $80 million contract believing the younger righthander could give them exactly the consistency that veteran righthander John Lackey did. Lackey signed with the Cubs and has given them 20 quality starts in 28 appearances, while Leake failed to finish the fourth Friday and has given the Cardinals 16 quality starts. In one more appearance (29), Leake has thrown 12 fewer innings than Lackey. Single-inning issues are a reason. “It’s part of the game and part of being a ground-ball pitcher,” Leake said. “You’re going to get balls that go through holes. I don’t see a rhyme or reason to it. I think it increases with a ground-ball pitcher.” A ground ball like he’s talking about got through for a base hit from the second batter of the game, Kris Bryant. That allowed Fowler to take his next 180 feet. It should have been 90. To get lefthanded hitters Matt Adams, Kolten Wong and Matt

Carpenter all in the lineup against Arrieta (18-7), Matheny had to put Wong in left. A “game-changer” at second base recently, Matheny said, Wong moonlighted briefly as an outfielder earlier this season. With a day game and no batting practice, he did not have a chance to take fly balls or see any liners Friday before starting in left. Like so many times this season, the Cardinals had a fielder in a new position and a hiccup happened. Wong’s play on Bryant’s single allowed Fowler to take the extra 90 feet, rounding second and testing Wong’s throw to third. A batter later, Wrigley’s new turf — rolled out after a recent Pearl Jam concert — gave way beneath Wong’s cleats, allowing a single to become a double for Anthony Rizzo. Fowler had already scored. He did so on a wild pitch. Of the 360 feet Fowler ran, only 90 came as a result of a hit. The other 270 came because of his ability to take advantage of the 2016 Cardinals. A season in miniature. Arrieta struck out the first three batters he faced and would finish with 10. The Cardinals’ best chance to crack the righthander came in the third inning, and it

ended with a call by the umpires that Matheny could not challenge no matter how much technology would have helped. Jhonny Peralta and Wong opened with back-toback singles, and Leake turned to bunt them over. Arrieta’s fastball came in tight, and Leake pulled back his bat. The pitch pegged his right hand. A hit batter would have loaded the bases with no outs. Instead, home-plate umpire C.B. Bucknor and crew said Leake was offering at the pitch and therefore struck while attempting to bunt. That judgment call cannot be reviewed. Matheny referred several times to that “pivotal” moment. But he was also careful to point out that while the inning turned on Bucknor’s call, the game did not. Six Cardinals relievers had to throw 4 2/3 shutout innings. Arrieta didn’t allow a runner to see second base after Leake’s next bunt attempt, a good one, was turned by Rizzo into a double play. That’s how the game went. Even the best intentions encountered the better team. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

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Mattress Direct CARDINALS 10, CUBS 4 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Piscotty rf 5 2 3 2 0 0 .273 Moss lf-1b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .229 Peralta 3b 4 3 3 0 1 0 .251 Adams 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .253 1-Pham pr-lf-lf 1 1 0 0 0 1 .224 Molina c 4 1 3 4 0 0 .300 Kelly c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Grichuk cf 5 0 2 3 0 3 .245 Diaz ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .301 Garcia ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Reyes p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .083 b-Hazelbaker ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 c-Gyorko ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Bowman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Martinez ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .444 Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-B.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 40 10 14 10 4 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 5 1 3 1 0 1 .275 Bryant 3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .295 Rizzo 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .293 e-Baez ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Zobrist 2b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .268 Coghlan 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Russell ss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .244 Szczur rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Heyward rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Kawasaki 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Soler lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .240 Contreras c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .270 Hammel p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Montgomery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 a-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Cahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 d-Montero ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 F.Pena p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Zastryzny p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Patton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 h-Almora ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Totals 34 4 8 4 3 10 Cardinals 411 000 310 — 10 14 0 Chicago 210 000 001 — 4 8 1 a-grounded out for Montgomery in the 4th. b-pinch hit for Reyes in the 6th. c-struck out for Hazelbaker in the 6th. d-grounded out for Wood in the 6th. e-grounded out for Rizzo in the 7th. f-doubled for Bowman in the 8th. g-out on fielder’s choice for Duke in the 9th. h-flied out for Patton in the 9th. 1-ran for Adams in the 7th. E: Baez (13). LOB: Cardinals 8, Chicago 6. 2B: Piscotty (34), Adams (18), Molina (34), Grichuk (28), Martinez (1), Fowler (24). 3B: Fowler (7), Zobrist (3). HR: Piscotty (22), off Hammel; Contreras (11), off Oh. RBIs: Piscotty 2 (83), Adams (51), Molina 4 (53), Grichuk 3 (65), Fowler (47), Zobrist 2 (72), Contreras (32). RLISP: Cardinals 2 (Diaz, B.Pena); Chicago 4 (Bryant, Rizzo 2, Heyward). GIDP: Adams, Reyes, Montero. DP: Cardinals 1; Chicago 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Reyes 5 6 3 3 3 6 115 1.58 Bowman 2 1 0 0 0 2 18 3.68 Duke 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.23 Oh 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 1.89 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Hammel 2 3 6 6 6 1 2 53 3.83 Montgomery1 2/3 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.03 Cahill 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 1 18 2.69 2/ 0 0 1 7 3.07 Wood 3 0 0 1/ 3 1 0 26 2.96 Rondon 3 3 3 2/ F.Pena 0 0 1 10 4.32 3 0 0 Zastryzny 1 2 1 1 0 0 21 1.46 Patton 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 5.48 W: Reyes 4-1. L: Hammel 15-10. H: Bowman 12. Inherited runners-scored: Montgomery 2-1, Wood 1-0, F.Pena 1-0. HBP: Hammel (Adams), F.Pena (Grichuk). WP: Hammel. Umpires: Home, J. Reynolds; First, F. Culbreth; Second, M. Gonzalez; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 3:19. A: 40,785 (41,072).

HOW THEY SCORED Cards irst Moss walks. Peralta singles, Moss to third. Adams hit by pitch, Peralta to second. Molina doubles, Moss and Peralta score, Adams to third. Grichuk singles, Adams and Molina score. Four runs. Cards 4, Cubs 0. Cubs irst Fowler singles. Bryant walks, Fowler to second. Zobrist triples, Fowler and Bryant score. Two runs. Cards 4, Cubs 2. Cards second Piscotty homers. One run. Cards 5, Cubs 2. Cubs second Soler walks. Hammel singles, Soler to third. Fowler doubles, Soler scores. One run. Cards 5, Cubs 3. Cards third Peralta singles. Molina singles, Peralta to second. Grichuk doubles, Peralta scores. One run. Cards 6, Cubs 3. Cards seventh Piscotty doubles. Moss grounds out, Piscotty to third. Peralta walks. Adams doubles, Piscotty scores, Peralta to third. Pham runs for Adams. Molina singles, Pham scores. Three runs. Cards 9, Cubs 3. Cards eighth J.Martinez doubles. Piscotty singles, J.Martinez scores. One run. Cards 10, Cubs 3. Cubs ninth Contreras homers. One run. Cards 10, Cubs 4.

Lingering injury limits his power at the plate BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

CHICAGO • As he has tried to work his way back from injury and into a consistent feel at the plate, Cardinals third baseman Jhonny Peralta had to find both his timing and his strength. One is close. The other may have to wait till 2017. “I don’t want to say I feel 100 percent with my hand,” said Peralta, who had surgery in March to repair a tear in his left thumb. “It’s not the same as it was before. It’s kind of weak. I try to work every day with that. … I hope to be strong, 100 percent, so I can start hitting homers again, too. I feel like the home run for me — it’s not working.” Peralta had three hits, all singles, on Saturday and scored a career-high three runs during the Cardinals’ 10-4 victory against the Cubs. Peralta reached base four times, and each of his singles revealed how he’s improved his timing at the plate. “Contact,” he said, has become his goal because he’s been unable to consistently drive the ball. The Cardinals have moved Peralta in, out, and around the lineup as he’s worked on his swing. He didn’t start Wednesday, he hit seventh Friday, and on Saturday manager Mike Matheny greeted him with the news he’d bat cleanup. His success (nine for 29, .310) against Cubs starter Jason Hammel helped guide Matheny’s pen, but so too did how Peralta has recently looked at the plate. It’s been the contact. “Numbers can be deceptive at times,” Matheny said. Peralta and Hammel “track back pretty far and what does a guy look like right now? If the numbers support it and they guys has some confidence those, to me, help make decisions. But not the whole story.” Since returning from a second stint on the disabled list to address his hand, Peralta has hit .261 with a .314 on-base percentage. He’s had 11 extra-base hits in that stretch and only two homers in his past 145 at-bats. He continues to work with the training staff to rebuild

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Johnny Peralta celebrates with Tommy Pham after Pham scored in the seventh inning on a single by Yadier Molina.

strength in his left hand and forearm, but he’s going through a stretch similar to what Yadier Molina did when recovering from a similar injury. Peralta has had to find a way to be productive without the power. He hopes that he’ll gain strength as October arrives and that will join the rhythm he’s found with his swing

in the joint. His sudden departure from the team in March led to some shifting of roles on Matheny’s coaching staff. Mozeliak said because of the familiarity and instincts that come from more than a decade of experience in his role at third base and infield instruction there were times “we really missed Oquendo.”

HOLLIDAY SESSION CANCELLED OQUENDO TO COACH YOUNG PROSPECTS This past week, during player development meetings in Jupiter, Fla., general manager John Mozeliak met with coach Jose Oquendo to discuss his role with the team, and while nothing was finalized about the future, the present was determined. Oquendo will work with some of the Cardinals’ best prospects during instructional league play, Mozeliak said. The group of infielders that Oquendo will tutor includes shortstop Delvin Perez, the Cardinals’ first pick in the recent draft and perhaps their top position player prospect. Instructs begin soon at the team’s spring training complex. Oquendo, the team’s third-base coach, took a medical leave of absence for this season when it became apparent during spring training that he’ll need knee replacement surgery. Oquendo had two operations on his knee this past ofseason to address lingering discomfort

Outfielder Matt Holliday had enough discomfort in his right hand Saturday to force the team to rethink its immediate plans for the former All-Star. A live batting practice session set for Sunday afternoon at Wrigley Field was cancelled, and now the Cardinals will wait for the results of a previously scheduled appointment Monday in St. Louis with a hand specialist. The team hopes that Holliday could face pitching as early as that afternoon, but even if he’s activated Tuesday that leaves only six games remaining in the regular season. Holliday had a pin inserted into his right thumb to give it stability as a fracture healed, and any return he’s able to make will be based on pain tolerance. “It was probably false expectations to feel that he would feel perfectly fine,” Matheny said. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Diaz Molina Piscotty G. Garcia Carpenter Adams Peralta Grichuk Hazelbaker Gyorko Wong Moss Pham Rosario Kelly Pena Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B .444 9 2 4 1 0 .301 382 66 115 26 3 .300 504 51 151 34 1 .273 553 82 151 34 2 .272 202 32 55 11 0 .270 452 77 122 34 6 .253 289 36 73 18 0 .251 259 32 65 15 1 .245 416 62 102 28 3 .242 194 35 47 7 3 .240 379 53 91 9 1 .238 311 39 74 7 6 .229 388 62 89 18 2 .224 156 26 35 7 0 .189 37 3 7 2 0 .182 11 1 2 1 0 .167 12 0 2 1 0 .254 5285 738 1345 286 30

HR RBI BB SO SB E 0 1 0 0 0 0 16 61 38 59 4 16 7 53 39 61 3 2 22 83 49 128 7 4 3 17 37 46 1 6 19 62 73 102 0 13 15 51 25 78 0 7 7 24 18 51 0 4 23 65 26 130 5 1 12 28 18 64 5 4 27 54 34 89 0 10 5 23 34 52 7 8 27 65 37 134 1 4 9 17 20 70 2 0 0 2 2 5 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 213 707 501 1260 35 105

Pitching Duke Reyes Oh Socolovich Siegrist C. Martinez Bowman Broxton Weaver Wacha Wainwright J. Garcia Leake Rosenthal Williams Kiekhefer Tuivailala Mayers Team

W 0 4 5 1 5 15 2 3 1 7 12 10 9 2 0 0 0 1 81

H 13 26 50 5 40 158 56 49 42 148 204 175 198 44 21 22 12 13 1347

L 1 1 3 0 3 8 5 2 4 7 9 12 11 4 0 0 0 1 73

ERA 1.23 1.58 1.89 2.25 2.97 3.16 3.68 4.26 4.54 4.56 4.57 4.59 4.72 4.95 6.06 6.38 6.75 40.50 4.06

G 24 11 73 13 63 29 55 62 8 25 31 31 29 43 10 23 11 3 154

GS SV 0 1 4 1 0 18 0 0 0 3 29 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 23 0 31 0 29 0 29 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 154 37

IP 22.0 40.0 76.1 16.0 57.2 182.1 63.2 57.0 35.2 134.1 187.0 170.2 171.2 36.1 16.1 18.1 8.0 3.1 1377.1

R 3 7 19 4 20 66 31 30 24 76 101 92 99 22 15 13 6 15 677

ER 3 7 16 4 19 64 26 27 18 68 95 87 90 20 11 13 6 15 621

HR 0 1 5 2 10 14 4 6 6 13 20 24 20 3 4 2 0 3 150

BB 11 21 18 5 26 65 20 24 11 44 54 57 30 28 6 6 6 3 457

SO 25 46 98 14 61 159 46 50 44 112 147 150 119 51 8 12 7 1 1212

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Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina hits a two-run single against the Cubs during the seventh inning of Saturday’s game.

Reyes rises to the occasion again CARDINALS • FROM C1

He’s no longer being tested. He’s being counted on. “I don’t need to keep having him answer that question for me about being able to handle the intensity and the magnitude of where we are in the season or who it is we’re playing,” manager Mike Matheny said. “That’s something that he’s got. And it’s just now about making good pitches and being consistent. He’s got a great knack of trusting himself and an extreme amount of confidence as he stands on the mound. That’s a gift.” The 22-year-old righthander has been more than that for the Cardinals, pitching perhaps the two most pivotal games of the season to date. With the Cardinals on the outer rim of the wildcard race, Reyes provided seven shutout innings against the Giants that gave the Cardinals the single biggest jump in their playof chances this season. Six days later, the Cardinals risked losing a third straight game, dropping a series to the Cubs and giving the Mets and Giants another chance to lurch ahead. Didn’t happen.

Reyes did. Reyes (4-1) struck out six and needed 115 pitches to get through five innings. But he overpowered the Cubs when he had to, as he did striking out Kris Bryant in the fourth inning. By the time he yielded to the bullpen the Cardinals had pulled away. Yadier Molina had four RBIs and Randal Grichuk three as the Cardinals scored 10 runs despite hitting only one homer, a solo shot by Stephen Piscotty. Five of their first six runs came with two outs, and a four-run first inning echoed what the Cubs did in their shutout win Friday. “Kind of felt like (Friday), just flip-flopped,” Grichuk said. “They try to rally up and we kept putting it on them whenever they would score. Never really gave them a chance to gain momentum. Eventually ran away with it.” The win tied the Cardinals (8173), momentarily, with the Giants. San Francisco and the New York Mets had late games Saturday. Both of those teams will play earlier Sunday before the Cardinals conclude their regular-season road schedule with a nationally televised night game against

the Cubs at Wrigley. They have already clinched something at the Friendly Confines that they won’t have at home — a winning record. After Saturday’s win, the Cardinals are 6-3 on the North Side, and after getting an eyeful of what the Cubs do well on Friday, the Cardinals tickled the ivy with what they do best Saturday. They hit. They hit throughout the lineup. Matheny calls it a “relentlessstyle” ofense. The depth of the production from the lineup has been the Cardinals’ signature this season, as much a part of their year as any defensive foibles. Seven Cardinals scored runs Saturday; five Cardinals had extra-base hits. The Nos. 5-7 hitters combined to go five for five with runners in scoring position. Against Cubs starter Jason Hammel (15-10), the Cardinals first stirred with two outs in the first. Brandon Moss drew a walk, and Jhonny Peralta followed with the first of his three singles. Molina skipped a double down the left-field line to score two, and Grichuk followed with a two-RBI single. Piscotty’s homer, his 22nd

of the season, came in the second inning of Hammel, and Piscotty’s double ignited a three-run seventh four innings after Hammel had taken a seat. “Got the ofense going — and it became contagious,” Matheny said. “That’s something that we have to do. We just have to be a team that’s going to go out there and slug. And play as clean baseball as we can.” The Cubs answered with two runs in the bottom of the first and another in the bottom of the second, but at each point the NL Central champs could have swung back into the game, Reyes turned them back to the dugout. The Cardinals’ top prospect regained control of the first inning when he struck out Addison Russell on a 97 mph fastball. In the second, Reyes ended the inning when he got Anthony Rizzo to strike out with two runners in scoring position. Rizzo missed an 88 mph changeup. By the end of the third inning, Reyes had thrown 71 pitches and fallen into the deep counts that concerned the Cardinals when they removed him from the rotation. It’s been that kind of season for the Cardinals’ top prospect, with the team reading his responses to problems and instruction, starts

and even a suspension to know what Reyes can be relied on to do. He started the season serving a 50-game suspension for using marijuana, and Matheny said Reyes “wouldn’t be here if the (front office) felt like he didn’t mature through that process.” He wouldn’t have started if he hadn’t been dynamic in relief against the Cubs on Sept. 13. He entered the game with the bases loaded and Kris Bryant up, and Reyes struck out the MVP favorite to end the inning. At Class AAA, backup catcher Brayan Pena gave Reyes a bit of advice that he carried to the majors: “Trusting my abilities,” he said. It was there with him in the fourth inning as Bryant again came to the plate to face Reyes with a chance to spin the game. Dexter Fowler had just tripled. Reyes’ pitch count was climbing into the 90s. A 6-2 lead could be cut in half with a swing. Bryant didn’t take it. Reyes got him looking at a full-count, 82 mph slider. That’s not even his best breaking ball. Having passed everything thrown at him, Reyes is now doing the testing. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

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Peralta forced to be contact hitter

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Mattress Direct CARDINALS 10, CUBS 4 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Piscotty rf 5 2 3 2 0 0 .273 Moss lf-1b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .229 Peralta 3b 4 3 3 0 1 0 .251 Adams 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .253 1-Pham pr-lf-lf 1 1 0 0 0 1 .224 Molina c 4 1 3 4 0 0 .300 Kelly c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Grichuk cf 5 0 2 3 0 3 .245 Diaz ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .301 Garcia ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Reyes p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .083 b-Hazelbaker ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 c-Gyorko ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Bowman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Martinez ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .444 Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-B.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 40 10 14 10 4 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 5 1 3 1 0 1 .275 Bryant 3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .295 Rizzo 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .293 e-Baez ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Zobrist 2b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .268 Coghlan 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Russell ss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .244 Szczur rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Heyward rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Kawasaki 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Soler lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .240 Contreras c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .270 Hammel p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Montgomery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 a-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Cahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 d-Montero ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 F.Pena p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Zastryzny p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Patton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 h-Almora ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Totals 34 4 8 4 3 10 Cardinals 411 000 310 — 10 14 0 Chicago 210 000 001 — 4 8 1 a-grounded out for Montgomery in the 4th. b-pinch hit for Reyes in the 6th. c-struck out for Hazelbaker in the 6th. d-grounded out for Wood in the 6th. e-grounded out for Rizzo in the 7th. f-doubled for Bowman in the 8th. g-out on fielder’s choice for Duke in the 9th. h-flied out for Patton in the 9th. 1-ran for Adams in the 7th. E: Baez (13). LOB: Cardinals 8, Chicago 6. 2B: Piscotty (34), Adams (18), Molina (34), Grichuk (28), Martinez (1), Fowler (24). 3B: Fowler (7), Zobrist (3). HR: Piscotty (22), off Hammel; Contreras (11), off Oh. RBIs: Piscotty 2 (83), Adams (51), Molina 4 (53), Grichuk 3 (65), Fowler (47), Zobrist 2 (72), Contreras (32). RLISP: Cardinals 2 (Diaz, B.Pena); Chicago 4 (Bryant, Rizzo 2, Heyward). GIDP: Adams, Reyes, Montero. DP: Cardinals 1; Chicago 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Reyes 5 6 3 3 3 6 115 1.58 Bowman 2 1 0 0 0 2 18 3.68 Duke 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.23 Oh 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 1.89 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Hammel 2 3 6 6 6 1 2 53 3.83 Montgomery1 2/3 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.03 Cahill 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 1 18 2.69 2/ 0 0 1 7 3.07 Wood 3 0 0 1/ 3 1 0 26 2.96 Rondon 3 3 3 2/ F.Pena 0 0 1 10 4.32 3 0 0 Zastryzny 1 2 1 1 0 0 21 1.46 Patton 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 5.48 W: Reyes 4-1. L: Hammel 15-10. H: Bowman 12. Inherited runners-scored: Montgomery 2-1, Wood 1-0, F.Pena 1-0. HBP: Hammel (Adams), F.Pena (Grichuk). WP: Hammel. Umpires: Home, J. Reynolds; First, F. Culbreth; Second, M. Gonzalez; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 3:19. A: 40,785 (41,072).

HOW THEY SCORED Cards irst Moss walks. Peralta singles, Moss to third. Adams hit by pitch, Peralta to second. Molina doubles, Moss and Peralta score, Adams to third. Grichuk singles, Adams and Molina score. Four runs. Cards 4, Cubs 0. Cubs irst Fowler singles. Bryant walks, Fowler to second. Zobrist triples, Fowler and Bryant score. Two runs. Cards 4, Cubs 2. Cards second Piscotty homers. One run. Cards 5, Cubs 2. Cubs second Soler walks. Hammel singles, Soler to third. Fowler doubles, Soler scores. One run. Cards 5, Cubs 3. Cards third Peralta singles. Molina singles, Peralta to second. Grichuk doubles, Peralta scores. One run. Cards 6, Cubs 3. Cards seventh Piscotty doubles. Moss grounds out, Piscotty to third. Peralta walks. Adams doubles, Piscotty scores, Peralta to third. Pham runs for Adams. Molina singles, Pham scores. Three runs. Cards 9, Cubs 3. Cards eighth J.Martinez doubles. Piscotty singles, J.Martinez scores. One run. Cards 10, Cubs 3. Cubs ninth Contreras homers. One run. Cards 10, Cubs 4.

Lingering injury limits his power at the plate BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

CHICAGO • As he has tried to work his way back from injury and into a consistent feel at the plate, Cardinals third baseman Jhonny Peralta had to find both his timing and his strength. One is close. The other may have to wait till 2017. “I don’t want to say I feel 100 percent with my hand,” said Peralta, who had surgery in March to repair a tear in his left thumb. “It’s not the same as it was before. It’s kind of weak. I try to work every day with that. … I hope to be strong, 100 percent, so I can start hitting homers again, too. I feel like the home run for me — it’s not working.” Peralta had three hits, all singles, on Saturday and scored a career-high three runs during the Cardinals’ 10-4 victory against the Cubs. Peralta reached base four times, and each of his singles revealed how he’s improved his timing at the plate. “Contact,” he said, has become his goal because he’s been unable to consistently drive the ball. The Cardinals have moved Peralta in, out, and around the lineup as he’s worked on his swing. He didn’t start Wednesday, he hit seventh Friday, and on Saturday manager Mike Matheny greeted him with the news he’d bat cleanup. His success (nine for 29, .310) against Cubs starter Jason Hammel helped guide Matheny’s pen, but so too did how Peralta has recently looked at the plate. It’s been the contact. “Numbers can be deceptive at times,” Matheny said. Peralta and Hammel “track back pretty far and what does a guy look like right now? If the numbers support it and they guys has some confidence those, to me, help make decisions. But not the whole story.” Since returning from a second stint on the disabled list to address his hand, Peralta has hit .261 with a .314 on-base percentage. He’s had 11 extra-base hits in that stretch and only two homers in his past 145 at-bats. He continues to work with the training staff to rebuild

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Johnny Peralta celebrates with Tommy Pham after Pham scored in the seventh inning on a single by Yadier Molina.

strength in his left hand and forearm, but he’s going through a stretch similar to what Yadier Molina did when recovering from a similar injury. Peralta has had to find a way to be productive without the power. He hopes that he’ll gain strength as October arrives and that will join the rhythm he’s found with his swing

in the joint. His sudden departure from the team in March led to some shifting of roles on Matheny’s coaching staff. Mozeliak said because of the familiarity and instincts that come from more than a decade of experience in his role at third base and infield instruction there were times “we really missed Oquendo.”

HOLLIDAY SESSION CANCELLED OQUENDO TO COACH YOUNG PROSPECTS This past week, during player development meetings in Jupiter, Fla., general manager John Mozeliak met with coach Jose Oquendo to discuss his role with the team, and while nothing was finalized about the future, the present was determined. Oquendo will work with some of the Cardinals’ best prospects during instructional league play, Mozeliak said. The group of infielders that Oquendo will tutor includes shortstop Delvin Perez, the Cardinals’ first pick in the recent draft and perhaps their top position player prospect. Instructs begin soon at the team’s spring training complex. Oquendo, the team’s third-base coach, took a medical leave of absence for this season when it became apparent during spring training that he’ll need knee replacement surgery. Oquendo had two operations on his knee this past ofseason to address lingering discomfort

Outfielder Matt Holliday had enough discomfort in his right hand Saturday to force the team to rethink its immediate plans for the former All-Star. A live batting practice session set for Sunday afternoon at Wrigley Field was cancelled, and now the Cardinals will wait for the results of a previously scheduled appointment Monday in St. Louis with a hand specialist. The team hopes that Holliday could face pitching as early as that afternoon, but even if he’s activated Tuesday that leaves only six games remaining in the regular season. Holliday had a pin inserted into his right thumb to give it stability as a fracture healed, and any return he’s able to make will be based on pain tolerance. “It was probably false expectations to feel that he would feel perfectly fine,” Matheny said. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Diaz Molina Piscotty G. Garcia Carpenter Adams Peralta Grichuk Hazelbaker Gyorko Wong Moss Pham Rosario Kelly Pena Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B .444 9 2 4 1 0 .301 382 66 115 26 3 .300 504 51 151 34 1 .273 553 82 151 34 2 .272 202 32 55 11 0 .270 452 77 122 34 6 .253 289 36 73 18 0 .251 259 32 65 15 1 .245 416 62 102 28 3 .242 194 35 47 7 3 .240 379 53 91 9 1 .238 311 39 74 7 6 .229 388 62 89 18 2 .224 156 26 35 7 0 .189 37 3 7 2 0 .182 11 1 2 1 0 .167 12 0 2 1 0 .254 5285 738 1345 286 30

HR RBI BB SO SB E 0 1 0 0 0 0 16 61 38 59 4 16 7 53 39 61 3 2 22 83 49 128 7 4 3 17 37 46 1 6 19 62 73 102 0 13 15 51 25 78 0 7 7 24 18 51 0 4 23 65 26 130 5 1 12 28 18 64 5 4 27 54 34 89 0 10 5 23 34 52 7 8 27 65 37 134 1 4 9 17 20 70 2 0 0 2 2 5 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 213 707 501 1260 35 105

Pitching Duke Reyes Oh Socolovich Siegrist C. Martinez Bowman Broxton Weaver Wacha Wainwright J. Garcia Leake Rosenthal Williams Kiekhefer Tuivailala Mayers Team

W 0 4 5 1 5 15 2 3 1 7 12 10 9 2 0 0 0 1 81

H 13 26 50 5 40 158 56 49 42 148 204 175 198 44 21 22 12 13 1347

L 1 1 3 0 3 8 5 2 4 7 9 12 11 4 0 0 0 1 73

ERA 1.23 1.58 1.89 2.25 2.97 3.16 3.68 4.26 4.54 4.56 4.57 4.59 4.72 4.95 6.06 6.38 6.75 40.50 4.06

G 24 11 73 13 63 29 55 62 8 25 31 31 29 43 10 23 11 3 154

GS SV 0 1 4 1 0 18 0 0 0 3 29 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 23 0 31 0 29 0 29 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 154 37

IP 22.0 40.0 76.1 16.0 57.2 182.1 63.2 57.0 35.2 134.1 187.0 170.2 171.2 36.1 16.1 18.1 8.0 3.1 1377.1

R 3 7 19 4 20 66 31 30 24 76 101 92 99 22 15 13 6 15 677

ER 3 7 16 4 19 64 26 27 18 68 95 87 90 20 11 13 6 15 621

HR 0 1 5 2 10 14 4 6 6 13 20 24 20 3 4 2 0 3 150

BB 11 21 18 5 26 65 20 24 11 44 54 57 30 28 6 6 6 3 457

SO 25 46 98 14 61 159 46 50 44 112 147 150 119 51 8 12 7 1 1212

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Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina hits a two-run single against the Cubs during the seventh inning of Saturday’s game.

Reyes rises to the occasion again CARDINALS • FROM C1

He’s no longer being tested. He’s being counted on. “I don’t need to keep having him answer that question for me about being able to handle the intensity and the magnitude of where we are in the season or who it is we’re playing,” manager Mike Matheny said. “That’s something that he’s got. And it’s just now about making good pitches and being consistent. He’s got a great knack of trusting himself and an extreme amount of confidence as he stands on the mound. That’s a gift.” The 22-year-old righthander has been more than that for the Cardinals, pitching perhaps the two most pivotal games of the season to date. With the Cardinals on the outer rim of the wildcard race, Reyes provided seven shutout innings against the Giants that gave the Cardinals the single biggest jump in their playof chances this season. Six days later, the Cardinals risked losing a third straight game, dropping a series to the Cubs and giving the Mets and Giants another chance to lurch ahead. Didn’t happen.

Reyes did. Reyes (4-1) struck out six and needed 115 pitches to get through five innings. But he overpowered the Cubs when he had to, as he did striking out Kris Bryant in the fourth inning. By the time he yielded to the bullpen the Cardinals had pulled away. Yadier Molina had four RBIs and Randal Grichuk three as the Cardinals scored 10 runs despite hitting only one homer, a solo shot by Stephen Piscotty. Five of their first six runs came with two outs, and a four-run first inning echoed what the Cubs did in their shutout win Friday. “Kind of felt like (Friday), just flip-flopped,” Grichuk said. “They try to rally up and we kept putting it on them whenever they would score. Never really gave them a chance to gain momentum. Eventually ran away with it.” In the wild-card race, the win tied the Cardinals (81-73), temporarily, with the Giants, who played a late game at San Diego. The New York Mets lost to the Phillies. Both the Mets and Giants will play earlier Sunday before the Cardinals conclude their regular-season road schedule

with a night game against the Cubs. They have already clinched something at the Friendly Confines that they won’t have at home — a winning record. After Saturday’s win, the Cardinals are 6-3 on the North Side, and after getting an eyeful of what the Cubs do well on Friday, the Cardinals tickled the ivy with what they do best Saturday. They hit. They hit throughout the lineup. Matheny calls it a “relentlessstyle” ofense. The depth of the production from the lineup has been the Cardinals’ signature this season, as much a part of their year as any defensive foibles. Seven Cardinals scored runs Saturday; five Cardinals had extra-base hits. The Nos. 5-7 hitters combined to go five for five with runners in scoring position. Against Cubs starter Jason Hammel (15-10), the Cardinals first stirred with two outs in the first. Brandon Moss drew a walk, and Jhonny Peralta followed with the first of his three singles. Molina skipped a double down the left-field line to score two, and Grichuk followed with a two-RBI

single. Piscotty’s homer, his 22nd of the season, came in the second inning of Hammel, and Piscotty’s double ignited a three-run seventh four innings after Hammel had taken a seat. “Got the ofense going — and it became contagious,” Matheny said. “That’s something that we have to do. We just have to be a team that’s going to go out there and slug. And play as clean baseball as we can.” The Cubs answered with two runs in the bottom of the first and another in the bottom of the second, but at each point the NL Central champs could have swung back into the game, Reyes turned them back to the dugout. The Cardinals’ top prospect regained control of the first inning when he struck out Addison Russell on a 97 mph fastball. In the second, Reyes ended the inning when he got Anthony Rizzo to strike out with two runners in scoring position. Rizzo missed an 88 mph changeup. By the end of the third inning, Reyes had thrown 71 pitches and fallen into the deep counts that concerned the Cardinals when they removed him from the rotation. It’s been that kind of season for the Cardinals’ top prospect, with the team reading his responses to

problems and instruction, starts and even a suspension to know what Reyes can be relied on to do. He started the season serving a 50-game suspension for using marijuana, and Matheny said Reyes “wouldn’t be here if the (front office) felt like he didn’t mature through that process.” He wouldn’t have started if he hadn’t been dynamic in relief against the Cubs on Sept. 13. He entered the game with the bases loaded and Kris Bryant up, and Reyes struck out the MVP favorite to end the inning. At Class AAA, backup catcher Brayan Pena gave Reyes a bit of advice that he carried to the majors: “Trusting my abilities,” he said. It was there with him in the fourth inning as Bryant again came to the plate to face Reyes with a chance to spin the game. Dexter Fowler had just tripled. Reyes’ pitch count was climbing into the 90s. A 6-2 lead could be cut in half with a swing. Bryant didn’t take it. Reyes got him looking at a full-count, 82 mph slider. That’s not even his best breaking ball. Having passed everything thrown at him, Reyes is now doing the testing. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

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CARDINALS

09.25.2016 • Sunday • M 4

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

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Peralta forced to be contact hitter

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Mattress Direct CARDINALS 10, CUBS 4 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Piscotty rf 5 2 3 2 0 0 .273 Moss lf-1b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .229 Peralta 3b 4 3 3 0 1 0 .251 Adams 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .253 1-Pham pr-lf-lf 1 1 0 0 0 1 .224 Molina c 4 1 3 4 0 0 .300 Kelly c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Grichuk cf 5 0 2 3 0 3 .245 Diaz ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .301 Garcia ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Reyes p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .083 b-Hazelbaker ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 c-Gyorko ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Bowman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Martinez ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .444 Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-B.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 40 10 14 10 4 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 5 1 3 1 0 1 .275 Bryant 3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .295 Rizzo 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .293 e-Baez ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Zobrist 2b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .268 Coghlan 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Russell ss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .244 Szczur rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Heyward rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Kawasaki 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Soler lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .240 Contreras c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .270 Hammel p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Montgomery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 a-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Cahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 d-Montero ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 F.Pena p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Zastryzny p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Patton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 h-Almora ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Totals 34 4 8 4 3 10 Cardinals 411 000 310 — 10 14 0 Chicago 210 000 001 — 4 8 1 a-grounded out for Montgomery in the 4th. b-pinch hit for Reyes in the 6th. c-struck out for Hazelbaker in the 6th. d-grounded out for Wood in the 6th. e-grounded out for Rizzo in the 7th. f-doubled for Bowman in the 8th. g-out on fielder’s choice for Duke in the 9th. h-flied out for Patton in the 9th. 1-ran for Adams in the 7th. E: Baez (13). LOB: Cardinals 8, Chicago 6. 2B: Piscotty (34), Adams (18), Molina (34), Grichuk (28), Martinez (1), Fowler (24). 3B: Fowler (7), Zobrist (3). HR: Piscotty (22), off Hammel; Contreras (11), off Oh. RBIs: Piscotty 2 (83), Adams (51), Molina 4 (53), Grichuk 3 (65), Fowler (47), Zobrist 2 (72), Contreras (32). RLISP: Cardinals 2 (Diaz, B.Pena); Chicago 4 (Bryant, Rizzo 2, Heyward). GIDP: Adams, Reyes, Montero. DP: Cardinals 1; Chicago 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Reyes 5 6 3 3 3 6 115 1.58 Bowman 2 1 0 0 0 2 18 3.68 Duke 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.23 Oh 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 1.89 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Hammel 2 3 6 6 6 1 2 53 3.83 Montgomery1 2/3 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.03 Cahill 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 1 18 2.69 2/ 0 0 1 7 3.07 Wood 3 0 0 1/ 3 1 0 26 2.96 Rondon 3 3 3 2/ F.Pena 0 0 1 10 4.32 3 0 0 Zastryzny 1 2 1 1 0 0 21 1.46 Patton 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 5.48 W: Reyes 4-1. L: Hammel 15-10. H: Bowman 12. Inherited runners-scored: Montgomery 2-1, Wood 1-0, F.Pena 1-0. HBP: Hammel (Adams), F.Pena (Grichuk). WP: Hammel. Umpires: Home, J. Reynolds; First, F. Culbreth; Second, M. Gonzalez; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 3:19. A: 40,785 (41,072).

HOW THEY SCORED Cards irst Moss walks. Peralta singles, Moss to third. Adams hit by pitch, Peralta to second. Molina doubles, Moss and Peralta score, Adams to third. Grichuk singles, Adams and Molina score. Four runs. Cards 4, Cubs 0. Cubs irst Fowler singles. Bryant walks, Fowler to second. Zobrist triples, Fowler and Bryant score. Two runs. Cards 4, Cubs 2. Cards second Piscotty homers. One run. Cards 5, Cubs 2. Cubs second Soler walks. Hammel singles, Soler to third. Fowler doubles, Soler scores. One run. Cards 5, Cubs 3. Cards third Peralta singles. Molina singles, Peralta to second. Grichuk doubles, Peralta scores. One run. Cards 6, Cubs 3. Cards seventh Piscotty doubles. Moss grounds out, Piscotty to third. Peralta walks. Adams doubles, Piscotty scores, Peralta to third. Pham runs for Adams. Molina singles, Pham scores. Three runs. Cards 9, Cubs 3. Cards eighth J.Martinez doubles. Piscotty singles, J.Martinez scores. One run. Cards 10, Cubs 3. Cubs ninth Contreras homers. One run. Cards 10, Cubs 4.

Lingering injury limits his power at the plate BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

CHICAGO • As he has tried to work his way back from injury and into a consistent feel at the plate, Cardinals third baseman Jhonny Peralta had to find both his timing and his strength. One is close. The other may have to wait till 2017. “I don’t want to say I feel 100 percent with my hand,” said Peralta, who had surgery in March to repair a tear in his left thumb. “It’s not the same as it was before. It’s kind of weak. I try to work every day with that. … I hope to be strong, 100 percent, so I can start hitting homers again, too. I feel like the home run for me — it’s not working.” Peralta had three hits, all singles, on Saturday and scored a career-high three runs during the Cardinals’ 10-4 victory against the Cubs. Peralta reached base four times, and each of his singles revealed how he’s improved his timing at the plate. “Contact,” he said, has become his goal because he’s been unable to consistently drive the ball. The Cardinals have moved Peralta in, out, and around the lineup as he’s worked on his swing. He didn’t start Wednesday, he hit seventh Friday, and on Saturday manager Mike Matheny greeted him with the news he’d bat cleanup. His success (nine for 29, .310) against Cubs starter Jason Hammel helped guide Matheny’s pen, but so too did how Peralta has recently looked at the plate. It’s been the contact. “Numbers can be deceptive at times,” Matheny said. Peralta and Hammel “track back pretty far and what does a guy look like right now? If the numbers support it and they guys has some confidence those, to me, help make decisions. But not the whole story.” Since returning from a second stint on the disabled list to address his hand, Peralta has hit .261 with a .314 on-base percentage. He’s had 11 extra-base hits in that stretch and only two homers in his past 145 at-bats. He continues to work with the training staff to rebuild

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Johnny Peralta celebrates with Tommy Pham after Pham scored in the seventh inning on a single by Yadier Molina.

strength in his left hand and forearm, but he’s going through a stretch similar to what Yadier Molina did when recovering from a similar injury. Peralta has had to find a way to be productive without the power. He hopes that he’ll gain strength as October arrives and that will join the rhythm he’s found with his swing

in the joint. His sudden departure from the team in March led to some shifting of roles on Matheny’s coaching staff. Mozeliak said because of the familiarity and instincts that come from more than a decade of experience in his role at third base and infield instruction there were times “we really missed Oquendo.”

HOLLIDAY SESSION CANCELLED OQUENDO TO COACH YOUNG PROSPECTS This past week, during player development meetings in Jupiter, Fla., general manager John Mozeliak met with coach Jose Oquendo to discuss his role with the team, and while nothing was finalized about the future, the present was determined. Oquendo will work with some of the Cardinals’ best prospects during instructional league play, Mozeliak said. The group of infielders that Oquendo will tutor includes shortstop Delvin Perez, the Cardinals’ first pick in the recent draft and perhaps their top position player prospect. Instructs begin soon at the team’s spring training complex. Oquendo, the team’s third-base coach, took a medical leave of absence for this season when it became apparent during spring training that he’ll need knee replacement surgery. Oquendo had two operations on his knee this past ofseason to address lingering discomfort

Outfielder Matt Holliday had enough discomfort in his right hand Saturday to force the team to rethink its immediate plans for the former All-Star. A live batting practice session set for Sunday afternoon at Wrigley Field was cancelled, and now the Cardinals will wait for the results of a previously scheduled appointment Monday in St. Louis with a hand specialist. The team hopes that Holliday could face pitching as early as that afternoon, but even if he’s activated Tuesday that leaves only six games remaining in the regular season. Holliday had a pin inserted into his right thumb to give it stability as a fracture healed, and any return he’s able to make will be based on pain tolerance. “It was probably false expectations to feel that he would feel perfectly fine,” Matheny said. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Diaz Molina Piscotty G. Garcia Carpenter Adams Peralta Grichuk Hazelbaker Gyorko Wong Moss Pham Rosario Kelly Pena Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B .444 9 2 4 1 0 .301 382 66 115 26 3 .300 504 51 151 34 1 .273 553 82 151 34 2 .272 202 32 55 11 0 .270 452 77 122 34 6 .253 289 36 73 18 0 .251 259 32 65 15 1 .245 416 62 102 28 3 .242 194 35 47 7 3 .240 379 53 91 9 1 .238 311 39 74 7 6 .229 388 62 89 18 2 .224 156 26 35 7 0 .189 37 3 7 2 0 .182 11 1 2 1 0 .167 12 0 2 1 0 .254 5285 738 1345 286 30

HR RBI BB SO SB E 0 1 0 0 0 0 16 61 38 59 4 16 7 53 39 61 3 2 22 83 49 128 7 4 3 17 37 46 1 6 19 62 73 102 0 13 15 51 25 78 0 7 7 24 18 51 0 4 23 65 26 130 5 1 12 28 18 64 5 4 27 54 34 89 0 10 5 23 34 52 7 8 27 65 37 134 1 4 9 17 20 70 2 0 0 2 2 5 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 213 707 501 1260 35 105

Pitching Duke Reyes Oh Socolovich Siegrist C. Martinez Bowman Broxton Weaver Wacha Wainwright J. Garcia Leake Rosenthal Williams Kiekhefer Tuivailala Mayers Team

W 0 4 5 1 5 15 2 3 1 7 12 10 9 2 0 0 0 1 81

H 13 26 50 5 40 158 56 49 42 148 204 175 198 44 21 22 12 13 1347

L 1 1 3 0 3 8 5 2 4 7 9 12 11 4 0 0 0 1 73

ERA 1.23 1.58 1.89 2.25 2.97 3.16 3.68 4.26 4.54 4.56 4.57 4.59 4.72 4.95 6.06 6.38 6.75 40.50 4.06

G 24 11 73 13 63 29 55 62 8 25 31 31 29 43 10 23 11 3 154

GS SV 0 1 4 1 0 18 0 0 0 3 29 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 23 0 31 0 29 0 29 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 154 37

IP 22.0 40.0 76.1 16.0 57.2 182.1 63.2 57.0 35.2 134.1 187.0 170.2 171.2 36.1 16.1 18.1 8.0 3.1 1377.1

R 3 7 19 4 20 66 31 30 24 76 101 92 99 22 15 13 6 15 677

ER 3 7 16 4 19 64 26 27 18 68 95 87 90 20 11 13 6 15 621

HR 0 1 5 2 10 14 4 6 6 13 20 24 20 3 4 2 0 3 150

BB 11 21 18 5 26 65 20 24 11 44 54 57 30 28 6 6 6 3 457

SO 25 46 98 14 61 159 46 50 44 112 147 150 119 51 8 12 7 1 1212

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Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina hits a two-run single against the Cubs during the seventh inning of Saturday’s game.

Reyes rises to the occasion again CARDINALS • FROM C1

He’s no longer being tested. He’s being counted on. “I don’t need to keep having him answer that question for me about being able to handle the intensity and the magnitude of where we are in the season or who it is we’re playing,” manager Mike Matheny said. “That’s something that he’s got. And it’s just now about making good pitches and being consistent. He’s got a great knack of trusting himself and an extreme amount of confidence as he stands on the mound. That’s a gift.” The 22-year-old righthander has been more than that for the Cardinals, pitching perhaps the two most pivotal games of the season to date. With the Cardinals on the outer rim of the wildcard race, Reyes provided seven shutout innings against the Giants that gave the Cardinals the single biggest jump in their playof chances this season. Six days later, the Cardinals risked losing a third straight game, dropping a series to the Cubs and giving the Mets and Giants another chance to lurch ahead. Didn’t happen.

Reyes did. Reyes (4-1) struck out six and needed 115 pitches to get through five innings. But he overpowered the Cubs when he had to, as he did striking out Kris Bryant in the fourth inning. By the time he yielded to the bullpen the Cardinals had pulled away. Yadier Molina had four RBIs and Randal Grichuk three as the Cardinals scored 10 runs despite hitting only one homer, a solo shot by Stephen Piscotty. Five of their first six runs came with two outs, and a four-run first inning echoed what the Cubs did in their shutout win Friday. “Kind of felt like (Friday), just flip-flopped,” Grichuk said. “They try to rally up and we kept putting it on them whenever they would score. Never really gave them a chance to gain momentum. Eventually ran away with it.” In the wild-card race, the Giants won and the Mets lost, leaving them tied at 82-73, with the Cardinals half a game back at 81-73. Both the Mets and Giants have day games Sunday before the Cardinals conclude their regular-season road schedule with a night game against the Cubs.

They have already clinched something at the Friendly Confines that they won’t have at home — a winning record. After Saturday’s win, the Cardinals are 6-3 on the North Side, and after getting an eyeful of what the Cubs do well on Friday, the Cardinals tickled the ivy with what they do best Saturday. They hit. They hit throughout the lineup. Matheny calls it a “relentlessstyle” ofense. The depth of the production from the lineup has been the Cardinals’ signature this season, as much a part of their year as any defensive foibles. Seven Cardinals scored runs Saturday; five Cardinals had extra-base hits. The Nos. 5-7 hitters combined to go five for five with runners in scoring position. Against Cubs starter Jason Hammel (15-10), the Cardinals first stirred with two outs in the first. Brandon Moss drew a walk, and Jhonny Peralta followed with the first of his three singles. Molina skipped a double down the left-field line to score two, and Grichuk followed with a two-RBI single. Piscotty’s homer, his 22nd

of the season, came in the second inning of Hammel, and Piscotty’s double ignited a three-run seventh four innings after Hammel had taken a seat. “Got the ofense going — and it became contagious,” Matheny said. “That’s something that we have to do. We just have to be a team that’s going to go out there and slug. And play as clean baseball as we can.” The Cubs answered with two runs in the bottom of the first and another in the bottom of the second, but at each point the NL Central champs could have swung back into the game, Reyes turned them back to the dugout. The Cardinals’ top prospect regained control of the first inning when he struck out Addison Russell on a 97 mph fastball. In the second, Reyes ended the inning when he got Anthony Rizzo to strike out with two runners in scoring position. Rizzo missed an 88 mph changeup. By the end of the third inning, Reyes had thrown 71 pitches and fallen into the deep counts that concerned the Cardinals when they removed him from the rotation. It’s been that kind of season for the Cardinals’ top prospect, with the team reading his responses to problems and instruction, starts

and even a suspension to know what Reyes can be relied on to do. He started the season serving a 50-game suspension for using marijuana, and Matheny said Reyes “wouldn’t be here if the (front office) felt like he didn’t mature through that process.” He wouldn’t have started if he hadn’t been dynamic in relief against the Cubs on Sept. 13. He entered the game with the bases loaded and Kris Bryant up, and Reyes struck out the MVP favorite to end the inning. At Class AAA, backup catcher Brayan Pena gave Reyes a bit of advice that he carried to the majors: “Trusting my abilities,” he said. It was there with him in the fourth inning as Bryant again came to the plate to face Reyes with a chance to spin the game. Dexter Fowler had just tripled. Reyes’ pitch count was climbing into the 90s. A 6-2 lead could be cut in half with a swing. Bryant didn’t take it. Reyes got him looking at a full-count, 82 mph slider. That’s not even his best breaking ball. Having passed everything thrown at him, Reyes is now doing the testing. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

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C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds............ Underdog American League TIGERS.....................-$130.....................Royals BLUE JAYS ...............-$185..................Yankees Rangers..................... NL .............................A’S Red Sox ...................-$152 ....................... RAYS ASTROS ...................-$155 .....................Angels INDIANS ..................-$108............... White Sox Mariners..................-$125 .....................TWINS National League CUBS........................-$145...................... Cards Nationals................... NL ....................PIRATES MARLINS.................-$142.....................Braves METS .......................-$150....................Phillies BREWERS................-$107........................Reds Giants......................-$210.................. PADRES DODGERS ............... -$300................... Rockies Interleague ORIOLES..................-$132 ...................D’backs NFL Favorite ........Open/current ..... Underdog Sunday BENGALS...............3.5.... 3.................. Broncos TITANS...................PK.....1................... Raiders Cards.....................5.5.... 4...................... BILLS Ravens.................... 1 ......1................ JAGUARS DOLPHINS.............. 7....9.5 ................. Browns GIANTS ...................4..... 4............ Washington PACKERS ...............7.5.... 7.......................Lions PANTHERS ............. 7..... 7....................Vikings SEAHAWKS............ 10...9.5 .................... 49ers BUCS.......................4..... 5.......................Rams Steelers.................3.5...3.5 .................EAGLES CHIEFS...................3.5.... 3......................... Jets COLTS ....................2.5... 1.5 ...............Chargers COWBOYS..............7.5.... 7...................... Bears Monday SAINTS ...................3..... 3................... Falcons COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite ........Open/current ..... Underdog C Michigan ............3.5...3.5 ...............VIRGINIA Ball St....................3.5...3.5 ...... FLA ATLANTIC C Florida................. 7..... 7................FLA INT’L Army ....................15.5...14............... BUFFALO VA TECH ................ 11 ....12..............E Carolina CONNECTICUT........6..... 3.................Syracuse MICHIGAN ............16.5...18..................Penn St Iowa....................... 14 ..14.5 ............. RUTGERS INDIANA................7.5.... 7........... Wake Forest IOWA ST.................. 7..... 7............. San Jose St Miss St..................23.5.22.5 ................U MASS MINNESOTA........... 16 ....17............Colorado St l-W Virginia ...........5.5.... 7..........................Byu RICE........................ 7.... 7.5 ................. N Texas App’chian St..........NL.... 6....................AKRON W MICHIGAN ..........8..... 7........... Ga Southern TEMPLE................28.5 27.5 ............. Charlotte N CAROLINA........... 7..... 7.............. Pittsburgh So Miss.................10.5.10.5 ....................UTEP BAYLOR .................9.5...8.5 ........ Oklahoma St Louisville..............24.5 26.5 .......... MARSHALL ALABAMA..............43... 44 ..................Kent St NOTRE DAME .......21.5.. 20 ..................... Duke TROY...................... 18 ..20.5.....New Mexico St W KENTUCKY ........7.5.... 8.............. Vanderbilt MICHIGAN ST ........NL...3.5 ............. Wisconsin a-Texas A&M ..........6..... 6................ Arkansas PURDUE .................3....5.5 ................. Nevada TULANE................ 4.5 ... 5...........UL-Lafayette

OREGON ................NL..10.5 ..............Colorado Washington...........NL.. 13.5 ..............ARIZONA MISSISSIPPI ..........7.5.... 7...................Georgia CINCINNATI ...........20.. 17.5.......... Miami-Ohio MID TENN ST.......... 5....5.5 ................. La Tech OLD DOMINION......3....4.5...................... Utsa KENTUCKY ............1.5...2.5 .............S Carolina TENNESSEE...........7.5...5.5 ..................Florida MEMPHIS .............. 16 ....17............Bowl Green Florida St ...............6..... 5.............. S FLORIDA Nebraska................ 7..... 8....NORTHWESTERN Houston ................34... 34 .............. TEXAS ST Lsu.........................3.5...3.5 ............... AUBURN Boise St ................. 14 .. 13.5 ..........OREGON ST Air Force ................3..... 4..................UTAH ST UNLV...................... 14 ....15..................... Idaho ARIZONA ST ..........3.5.... 4................California Stanford.................3..... 3.......................UCLA Tulsa...................... 13 ..14.5 .......... FRESNO ST l- Landover, MD. a — Arlington, TX. SOCCER • ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE Everton ...................................................+$105 BOURNEMOUTH .................................... +$240 Draw....................................................... +$250 Over/under goal total........................ 2.5 goals ARSENAL................................................. +$135 Chelsea....................................................+$195 Draw....................................................... +$240 Over/under goal total........................ 2.5 goals LIVERPOOL ............................................ -$400 Hull City................................................ +$1200 Draw....................................................... +$520 Over/under goal total........................3.0 goals MANCHESTER UNITED.............................-$145 Leicester City ......................................... +$410 Draw....................................................... +$280 Over/under goal total........................ 2.5 goals Tottenham ...............................................-$110 MIDDLESBROUGH..................................+$300 Draw....................................................... +$250 Over/under goal total........................ 2.5 goals STOKE CITY ............................................. +$135 West Bromwich Albion...........................+$210 Draw........................................................+$225 Over/under goal total........................ 2.5 goals Crystal Palace.........................................+$150 SUNDERLAND.........................................+$190 Draw........................................................+$210 Over/under goal total........................ 2.5 goals Manchester City...................................... -$250 SWANSEA CITY........................................+$725 Draw....................................................... +$380 Over/under goal total........................3.0 goals Sunday Southampton..........................................+$150 WEST HAM UNITED.................................+$180 Draw........................................................+$225 Over/under goal total........................ 2.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL — Suspended Chicago White Sox minor league LHP Yojensy Arias 71 games after testing positive for hydrochlorothiazide, a performance-enhancing substance in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League

LHP Phil Coke from Indianapolis (IL). Placed RHP A.J. Schugel on the 60-day DL. BASKETBALL • NBA DETROIT — Promoted Pat Garrity to associate general manager, Adam Glessner to director of player personnel and J.R. Holden to director of international scouting, Jorge Costa to director of research and technology, Aaron Gray to assistant coach, Ryan Winters to scout, Jordan Sabourin to head strength coach, T.J. Saint to head video coordinator and Jordan Brink to assistant video coordinator. Named Aaron Blackshear analytics systems coordinator and Louis Thompson assistant strength and conditioning coach. Announced director of player development Quentin Richardson will become pro scout. Named Courtney Havens-Mitchell athletic

SEATTLE — Suspended C Steve Clevenger for the rest of the season for his tweets regarding a recent police shooting in Charlotte, North Carolina, and the Black Lives Matter movement. Named Justin Hollander director of baseball operations. TEXAS — Recalled LHP Andrew Faulkner from Round Rock (PCL). Announced MLB has reinstated RHP Jeremy Jeffress from the restricted list and he has been added to the active roster. National League CHICAGO — Activated RHP Pedro Strop off the 15-day DL. LOS ANGELES — Reinstated LHP Scott Kazmir from the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Chris Taylor from Oklahoma City (PCL). PITTSBURGH — Selected the contract of

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M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016 trainer and Evarist Akujobi strength and conditioning coach for Grand Rapids (NBADL). LA LAKERS — Re-signed F Metta World Peace. MINNESOTA — Announced the retirement of C Kevin Garnett. FOOTBALL • National Football League NFL — Fined Oakland P Marquette King (horse-collar tackle), Chicago DL Akiem Hicks (hit to quarterback’s head), and Green Bay DL Mike Daniels (roughing the passer) $18,231 each. Fined Minnesota WR Stefon Diggs $12,154 for joining an altercation in a game against Green Bay and Houston CB Kevin Johnson and Carolina WR Devin Funchess $12,154 each for unsportsmanlike conduct (excessive celebration). Fined New York Jets DL Sheldon Richardson and WR Eric Decker $9,115

each for taunting, and Buffalo CB Stephon Gilmore $9,115 for a face-mask tackle on New York Jets WR Brandon Marshall. Fined Kansas City CB Marcus Peters (taunting) and Denver S Darian Stewart (forearm shot to the quarterback) $9,115 apiece. LOS ANGELES — Waived CB Steve Williams. Signed DB Isaiah Johnson from the practice squad. MINNESOTA — Placed RB Adrian Peterson on injured reserve. NY JETS — Signed TE Braedon Bowman from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT — Re-signed D Ryan Sproul to a two-year contract.

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BASEBALL

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Astros closer hurt by batting practice liner Houston closer Ken Giles injured his right wrist when he was hit by a line drive during batting practice Saturday. Manager A.J. Hinch said it was already starting to bruise minutes after Giles was struck. Trainers ran to the righthander after he was hit and he remained on his knees on the ield for a while before being carted of. X-rays were negative and the team called his injury a bruised right wrist. Giles picked up his ifth blown save this season Friday night when he gave up six runs in the ninth inning of a 10-6 loss to the Los Angeles Angels. Sandoval still a possibility • Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell has not ruled out injured third baseman Pablo Sandoval returning this year should an injury replacement be required. Sandoval was not expected back until 2017 following a left shoulder injury that sent him to the disabled list after just three games in April. “We’re staying open-minded,” Farrell said before Saturday night’s game at Tampa Bay. “If something was to happen, does he make himself an option? That door has not been closed.” Sandoval has been the designated hitter with the Red Sox’s instructional league team in Fort Myers, Fla., and is expected soon to play in the ield. Sandoval worked out with the AL East leaders Saturday, taking batting practice and doing defensive drills. Girardi explains hasty exit • New York manager Joe Girardi said he walked out of Friday’s postgame media session because he was upset by questions about his bullpen usage, not because the slumping Yankees lost ground in the AL wild card race and were eliminated from the AL East. “That’s a sign of some of the questions I was asked,” Girardi said before Saturday’s game. “There’s some things I don’t like. If I don’t like it, I’m not going to deal with it, bottom line.” The Yankees lost 9-0 in Toronto on Friday, their ninth defeat in 12 games following a seven-game winning streak. Girardi got up and angrily walked out after being pressed on

in the sixth inning of Friday’s 5-2 loss. Eaton stayed down for several minutes before he was helped to the dugout.

his decision to use righthander Blake Parker in the seventh inning with his team trailing 3-0. Toronto scored four runs in one-third of an inning against Parker to blow the game open.

Blister will keep Hill out • The Dodgers have scratched Rich Hill from his scheduled start Sunday in the series inale against Colorado because of a blister that forced him to miss a month earlier in the season. The blister also caused Hill to leave a perfect game after seven innings on Sept. 11.

Eaton is sidelined • Chicago White Sox center ielder Adam Eaton will sit out at least the two games after crashing into the padded wall Friday night. Eaton is still undergoing tests. He was shaken up after he raced back and caught a drive by Cleveland’s Roberto Perez

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BASEBALL

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C7 MLB INSIDER • BY RICK HUMMEL • rhummel@post-dispatch.com

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NL BATTING LeMahieu, COL................. .352 Murphy, WAS.................... .347 Blackmon, COL ................. .322 Votto, CIN.......................... .319 Segura, ARI....................... .316 Seager, LAD ...................... .315 Marte, PIT ......................... .311 Prado, MIA....................... .308 Braun, MIL ....................... .307 Realmuto, MIA................. .306 HOME RUNS Arenado, COL.......................39 Bryant, CHC ......................... 38 Carter, MIL ........................... 38 Kemp, ATL............................ 33 Duvall, CIN ............................31 Freeman, ATL........................31 Rizzo, CHC.............................31 Braun, MIL ...........................30 Cespedes, NYM ....................30 Bruce, NYM.......................... 29 Granderson, NYM ................ 29 Tomas, ARI........................... 29 RUNS BATTED IN Arenado, COL......................128 Rizzo, CHC.......................... 105 Kemp, ATL..........................104 Murphy, WAS......................104 Bryant, CHC .........................99 Gonzalez, COL......................99 Yelich, MIA ........................... 95 Russell, CHC......................... 93 Duvall, CIN ........................... 92 Bruce, NYM.......................... 91 STOLEN BASES Hamilton, CIN ...................... 58 Villar, MIL............................. 58 Marte, PIT ............................47 Perez, MIL............................ 32 Jankowski, SD......................30 Segura, ARI..........................30 Goldschmidt, ARI................. 27 Turner, WAS ......................... 27 Myers, SD............................. 26 Herrera, PHI......................... 25 SLUGGING PERCENTAGE Murphy, WAS......................596 Arenado, COL.....................569 Freeman, ATL.....................564 Bryant, CHC .......................564 Blackmon, COL ................. .555 Rizzo, CHC......................... .552 Braun, MIL .........................545 Cespedes, NYM ..................545 Votto, CIN.......................... .527 Seager, LAD ...................... .522 ON-BASE PERCENTAGE Votto, CIN............................431 LeMahieu, COL.................. .422 Goldschmidt, ARI................413 Freeman, ATL................... .400 Murphy, WAS..................... .391 Rizzo, CHC..........................390 Bryant, CHC .......................388 Belt, SF...............................388 Fowler, CHC........................386 Blackmon, COL ...................381 RUNS SCORED Bryant, CHC ........................118 Arenado, COL.......................111 Blackmon, COL .................. 109 LeMahieu, COL................... 103 Goldschmidt, ARI................101 Seager, LAD ........................101 Freeman, ATL....................... 95 Votto, CIN............................. 93 Myers, SD............................. 92 Segura, ARI.......................... 91 HITS Segura, ARI.........................192 LeMahieu, COL................... 189 Seager, LAD ........................187 Murphy, WAS...................... 184 Prado, MIA..........................179 Blackmon, COL ...................174 Bryant, CHC ........................172 Freeman, ATL......................172 Arenado, COL...................... 171 Votto, CIN........................... 166 BASES ON BALLS Goldschmidt, ARI............... 107 Harper, WAS....................... 106 Votto, CIN........................... 103 Belt, SF.................................96 Zobrist, CHC ......................... 91 Freeman, ATL....................... 85 Villar, MIL............................. 75 Carpenter, STL ..................... 73 Fowler, CHC.......................... 73 Rizzo, CHC............................ 73 DOUBLES Murphy, WAS........................47 Freeman, ATL.......................43 Rizzo, CHC............................42 Seager, LAD .........................40 Gonzalez, COL......................39 Segura, ARI..........................39 Belt, SF................................. 38 Markakis, ATL ...................... 38 Kemp, ATL............................ 37 Prado, MIA........................... 37 Rendon, WAS ....................... 37 Yelich, MIA ........................... 37

TRIPLES Hernandez, PHI .................... 11 Owings, ARI.......................... 10 Crawford, SF .......................... 9 Lamb, ARI .............................. 9 LeMahieu, COL....................... 8 Belt, SF................................... 7 Bourjos, PHI........................... 7 Harrison, PIT.......................... 7 Inciarte, ATL........................... 7 Revere, WAS........................... 7 Turner, WAS ........................... 7 TOTAL BASES Arenado, COL..................... 333 Bryant, CHC ....................... 327 Freeman, ATL.....................320 Murphy, WAS...................... 316 Seager, LAD ....................... 310 Rizzo, CHC..........................307 Blackmon, COL ..................300 Kemp, ATL..........................299 Segura, ARI........................294 Gonzalez, COL.................... 282 EARNED RUN AVERAGE Hendricks, CHC .................2.06 Lester, CHC........................ 2.36 Bumgarner, SF.................. 2.57 Syndergaard, NYM ........... 2.63 Roark, WAS ....................... 2.70 Cueto, SF........................... 2.79 Scherzer, WAS................... 2.82 Arrieta, CHC...................... 2.85 Fernandez, MIA ................2.86 Teheran, ATL..................... 3.10 WON-LOST Lester, CHC........................18-4 Arrieta, CHC.......................18-7 Scherzer, WAS....................18-7 Cueto, SF............................17-5 Fernandez, MIA ................ 16-8 Maeda, LAD ......................16-9 Strasburg, WAS................. 15-4 Hendricks, CHC ................. 15-8 Martinez, STL.................... 15-8 Hammel, CHC.................... 15-9 Roark, WAS ....................... 15-9 GAMES PITCHED Hand, SD .............................. 77 Neris, PHI............................. 76 Reed, NYM ........................... 76 Delgado, ARI........................ 74 Familia, NYM........................ 74 Barraclough, MIA ................ 73 Blanton, LAD........................ 73 Wood, CHC ........................... 73 Oh, STL................................. 72 Rivero, PIT ........................... 72 SAVES Familia, NYM........................49 Jansen, LAD .........................46 Melancon, WAS....................42 Ramos, MIA.......................... 38 Gomez, PHI .......................... 37 Casilla, SF..............................31 Rodney, MIA......................... 25 Oh, STL..................................18 Rondon, CHC.........................18 Cingrani, CIN.........................17 Johnson, ATL.........................17 INNINGS PITCHED Scherzer, WAS...................217.1 Bumgarner, SF................. 213.1 Cueto, SF..........................212.2 Roark, WAS ..................... 200.1 Samardzija, SF..................197.1 Arrieta, CHC..................... 192.1 Lester, CHC.......................191.0 Eickhoff, PHI .....................187.1 Wainwright, STL...............187.0 Hellickson, PHI.................185.2 STRIKEOUTS Scherzer, WAS.................... 267 Fernandez, MIA ................. 253 Bumgarner, SF....................241 Ray, ARI.............................. 210 Syndergaard, NYM ............ 210 Cueto, SF.............................187 Arrieta, CHC....................... 186 Lester, CHC......................... 184 Strasburg, WAS...................183 Lackey, CHC.........................177 COMPLETE GAMES Cueto, SF................................ 5 Bumgarner, SF.......................4 Kershaw, LAD......................... 3 Hendricks, CHC ...................... 2 Lester, CHC............................. 2 Nova, PIT................................ 2 16 tied .....................................1 SHUTOUTS Kershaw, LAD......................... 3 Cueto, SF................................ 2 14 tied .....................................1

AL BATTING Altuve, HOU ..................... .338 Betts, BOS......................... .321 Ortiz, BOS ......................... .319 Pedroia, BOS..................... .317 Trout, LAA......................... .316 Ramirez, CLE..................... .315 Escobar, LAA.................... .310 Martinez, DET.................. .309 Cabrera, DET.................... .307 Lindor, CLE....................... .303 HOME RUNS Trumbo, BAL........................44 Dozier, MIN ..........................42 Encarnacion, TOR................42 Davis, OAK ...........................40 Cruz, SEA.............................. 38 Davis, BAL............................ 38 Frazier, CHW ........................ 38 Ortiz, BOS ............................ 37 Donaldson, TOR...................36 Longoria, TB ........................36 Machado, BAL......................36 RUNS BATTED IN Encarnacion, TOR...............124 Ortiz, BOS ...........................124 Pujols, LAA..........................116 Ramirez, BOS..................... 109 Betts, BOS.......................... 108 Trumbo, BAL...................... 103 Beltre, TEX .........................100 Napoli, CLE.........................100 Davis, OAK ...........................99 Dozier, MIN ..........................99 STOLEN BASES Davis, CLE ............................40 Dyson, KC............................. 28 Altuve, HOU ......................... 27 Trout, LAA............................ 27 Betts, BOS............................ 25 Andrus, TEX ......................... 24 Ramirez, CLE........................ 22 Martin, SEA...........................21 Desmond, TEX .....................20 Kiermaier, TB.......................20 SLUGGING PERCENTAGE Ortiz, BOS ..........................634 Dozier, MIN ....................... .567 Trout, LAA..........................554 Donaldson, TOR.................554 Cabrera, DET......................545 Encarnacion, TOR..............545 Machado, BAL....................544 Betts, BOS..........................543 Martinez, DET....................542 Altuve, HOU ...................... .539 ON-BASE PERCENTAGE Trout, LAA......................... .437 Ortiz, BOS ........................ .406 Donaldson, TOR................ .401 Altuve, HOU .......................396 Cabrera, DET..................... .387 Martinez, DET................... .377 Pedroia, BOS..................... .377 Ramirez, CLE..................... .367 Seager, SEA....................... .365 Betts, BOS......................... .365 RUNS SCORED Donaldson, TOR..................118 Betts, BOS........................... 117 Trout, LAA........................... 117 Bogaerts, BOS..................... 112 Springer, HOU......................111 Kinsler, DET........................ 109 Desmond, TEX ................... 105 Machado, BAL.................... 103 Altuve, HOU ....................... 102 Dozier, MIN ........................100 HITS Betts, BOS..........................207 Altuve, HOU .......................206 Pedroia, BOS.......................191 Bogaerts, BOS.....................183 Cano, SEA............................183 Machado, BAL.....................182 Lindor, CLE..........................179 Abreu, CHW.........................176 Cabrera, DET.......................173 Desmond, TEX ....................173 BASES ON BALLS Trout, LAA.......................... 108 Donaldson, TOR................. 102 Santana, CLE........................94 Springer, HOU...................... 87 Davis, BAL............................ 83 Encarnacion, TOR................ 79 Bautista, TOR....................... 78 Mauer, MIN .......................... 78 Ortiz, BOS ............................ 77 Correa, HOU......................... 73 DOUBLES Ortiz, BOS ............................47 Ramirez, CLE........................44 Altuve, HOU .........................40 Betts, BOS............................40 Machado, BAL......................39 Cabrera, CHW ...................... 38 Kipnis, CLE ........................... 37 Longoria, TB ........................ 37 Schoop, BAL.........................36 Correa, HOU......................... 35 Dickerson, TB....................... 35 Dozier, MIN .......................... 35 Seager, SEA.......................... 35

TRIPLES Eaton, CHW............................ 9 Andrus, TEX ........................... 7 Bradley Jr., BOS ..................... 7 Dyson, KC............................... 7 Escobar, KC ............................6 Gardner, NYY .........................6 Miller, TB................................ 6 10 tied .................................... 5 TOTAL BASES Betts, BOS..........................350 Dozier, MIN ........................334 Machado, BAL.....................331 Altuve, HOU ....................... 328 Ortiz, BOS .......................... 322 Longoria, TB ......................320 Cano, SEA........................... 316 Encarnacion, TOR............... 311 Cabrera, DET......................307 Donaldson, TOR.................303 Trumbo, BAL......................303 EARNED RUN AVERAGE Fulmer, DET ...................... 2.95 Tanaka, NYY...................... 3.07 Porcello, BOS....................3.08 Kluber, CLE......................... 3.11 Sanchez, TOR.....................3.12 Verlander, DET...................3.21 Sale, CHW.......................... 3.23 Quintana, CHW ................. 3.26 Happ, TOR......................... 3.28 Hamels, TEX......................3.30 WON-LOST Porcello, BOS.................... 21-4 Happ, TOR........................ 20-4 Kluber, CLE........................ 18-9 Price, BOS ..........................17-8 Tillman, BAL......................16-6 Sale, CHW..........................16-9 Iwakuma, SEA..................16-12 Hamels, TEX.......................15-5 Verlander, DET.................. 15-8 Tanaka, NYY......................14-4 GAMES PITCHED Shaw, CLE............................. 73 Dyson, TEX............................71 Betances, NYY .....................70 Pressly, MIN .........................70 Brach, BAL ...........................68 Herrera, KC ..........................68 Jones, CHW ..........................68 Dull, OAK.............................. 67 6 tied....................................66 SAVES Britton, BAL .........................45 Rodriguez, DET....................44 Dyson, TEX...........................36 Colome, TB........................... 35 Robertson, CHW .................. 35 Osuna, TOR ..........................34 Madson, OAK .......................30 Allen, CLE............................. 29 Kimbrel, BOS ....................... 29 Cishek, SEA .......................... 25 Davis, KC .............................. 25 INNINGS PITCHED Price, BOS ........................218.2 Sale, CHW.........................214.2 Verlander, DET.................213.0 Kluber, CLE.......................211.0 Porcello, BOS...................210.2 Tanaka, NYY.....................199.2 Quintana, CHW ............... 196.0 Archer, TB ....................... 194.2 Hamels, TEX.....................193.2 Stroman, TOR .................190.0 STRIKEOUTS Verlander, DET...................234 Archer, TB .......................... 228 Kluber, CLE......................... 224 Price, BOS .......................... 222 Sale, CHW...........................220 Pineda, NYY........................195 Hamels, TEX....................... 194 Duffy, KC .............................185 Kennedy, KC........................176 Porcello, BOS......................174 COMPLETE GAMES Sale, CHW............................... 6 Wright, BOS ...........................4 Kluber, CLE............................. 3 Porcello, BOS......................... 3 Graveman, OAK ..................... 2 Price, BOS .............................. 2 Santana, MIN ......................... 2 Ventura, KC............................ 2 Verlander, DET....................... 2 16 tied .....................................1 SHUTOUTS Kluber, CLE............................. 2 Andriese, TB ...........................1 Carrasco, CLE..........................1 Fulmer, DET ............................1 Graveman, OAK ......................1 Keuchel, HOU..........................1 Miley, BAL ...............................1 Nolasco, LAA...........................1 Sale, CHW................................1 Santana, MIN ..........................1 Walker, SEA.............................1 Weaver, LAA............................1 Wright, BOS ............................1

aseball has this arcane rule where rosters can be expanded to as many as 40 players after Sept. 1. The purpose, many years ago, was to reward an organization’s top minor-league players with a September promotion so that said players could have an idea what to expect as they tried to make their major-league clubs next year. But the playing field can become awfully uneven. Some teams choose to promote a number of players, or, like the Cardinals, promote a couple of players and have another group coming of the disabled list and onto the roster, with no moves having to be made to accommodate them. Other clubs choose not to add many players for financial reasons, whether those players come from within or without the organization. And whether or not one team has 40 players and the other 33, games are managed much diferently, much more free-wheeling, with bullpens and benches completely stocked, contrary to the previous five months of the season. Just look at how San Francisco’s Bruce Bochy, one of the top managers ever, went through relievers like M&Ms last weekend. Or Cleveland’s Terry Francona using 10 pitchers in a 1-0, 10-inning win over Detroit. Managers can do things in September they wouldn’t have been able to do all season. For instance, Cardinals manager Mike Matheny employed backto-back pinch runners in the ninth inning in San Francisco on Saturday and both those pinch runners — Tommy Pham, who would have been here under the April-August rules, and Jose Martinez, who wouldn’t have been — delivered by taking extra bases in what, at the time, was the Cardinals’ most important win of the season. Baseball is the only major league sport where the same number of players active for any game can be different for two opposing teams in September. And, whether or not you believe that to be fair, there have been some noteworthy accomplishments by September roster additions who may never again have played for that team. Consider one Ivan Cruz, a journeyman outfielder who had a couple of brief shots with the New York Yankees and Pittsburgh but was a Cardinals callup from the system in September 2002. Cruz had only three runs batted in for the month but one came in the 13th inning on Sept. 7 when he beat the Chicago Cubs with a pinch single. Another moment came about 10 days later when Cruz hit a pinch homer as part of a five-run ninth inning to break open a tie game in Colorado. The next day, Cruz drove in another run with a pinch single against the Rockies. The Cardinals, who had been ravaged that year by the deaths of Darryl Kile and Jack Buck, went on to win the division title. Cruz, then 34, finished that season five for 14 but was injured and didn’t participate in the playofs. The next season, his last as a professional, he played for the Chunichi Dragons in the Japanese League. In 2001, veteran lefthander Jeff Tabaka, who had bounced around among several teams, was brought up the Cardinals’ system for September/October specialized work and did relatively well, with one notable exception. On the last weekend of the season, when the winner of the Houston/

Jose Martinez had played nearly 900 games in the minors before getting a September call-up. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals series would have the division title, with the other team slipping to the wild-card ranks, Tabaka allowed a gametying homer in the eighth inning to Lance Berkman. The Astros went on to a 2-1 win and the division crown. It was the last pitch Tabaka threw as a Cardinal. Does anybody remember that long-time Baltimore and California third baseman Doug DeCinces was signed for lastweek protection in the 1987 divisional race and finished his career with the Cardinals? DeCinces, who had been released a couple of days earlier by the Angels, pinch hit in the Cardinals’ division-clinching win against Montreal and then played in the last three games of the season with the New York Mets, who had been eliminated when Montreal lost. He wound up two for nine, was not eligible for the playofs because he got here so late, and never played again. With one week to go in their desperate wild-card chase this year, the Cardinals already have received some modest contributions from September callups. Lefthanded reliever Dean Kiekhefer had been up and down a couple of times this season but was thrust into more prominence in the last week in Colorado and performed well for two games but not nearly as well when used for a third day in a row. Martinez, who had played nearly 900 games in the minors before getting a September callup, had three hits of the bench in his first couple of weeks, besides going from first to third on a single and scoring on a sacrifice fly last Saturday. Were it not for the expanded rosters, neither would be here. The Cardinals are just taking advantage of the rules. One of the most notable September call-ups — twice — in the last decade was veteran first baseman Dan Johnson, who spent some time here last year. In September 2008, Johnson, playing for Tampa Bay, hit a game-tying pinch-hit home run at Boston of Red Sox relief ace Jonathan Papelbon. The Rays went on to win the game and, ultimately, the American League pennant. Fast forward to Sept. 28, 2011, the last day of the regular season when Johnson, again a September call-up by the Rays, pinchhit a game-tying homer of the New York Yankees in the bottom of the ninth. The Rays won in extra innings to sneak into the playofs. But why should the rules be any diferent in September than they are in August? Or May? At least for September, a better solution would be to adopt the hockey or football regulation of dressing the required number of players for a game and having any number of other players out of uniform that day. Baseball teams could be more creative and have a starting pitcher or two not active for a particular game. But there would never be more than 25 players in uniform on any day. For any game. For any month. You may see something like this in the wild-card game, should the Cardinals arrive there. Rosters are different for each round of the playoffs and the wild-card game counts as one round, so the Cardinals, for instance, could take only two starting pitchers — the one who actually is starting the game and the one who might have to be a long reliever in an extrainning game. In the Cardinals’ only other one-game wild-card shootout in Atlanta in 2012, their 25man roster was laden with extra bench men and relievers. They had 15 position players instead of the normal 13 and had eight relievers and only two rotation starters. Those two were Kyle Lohse, who started the game, and Lance Lynn, who was used to coming out of the bullpen anyway, as he had several times in the World Series the year before, once when Tony La Russa didn’t even want him to.


BASEBALL

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C7

CARDINALS INSIDER • BY DERRICK GOOLD • @dgoold on Twitter • dgoold@post-dispatch.com

MLB INSIDER • BY RICK HUMMEL • rhummel@post-dispatch.com

@cmshhummel on Twitter

Built for the long haul

September roster limits should be same as August Managers tend to take advantage of rules

B ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Cubs prospect Eloy Jimenez (left) and Brewers pitcher Zach Davies are part of a wave of young talent.

NL Central teams aim to contend year after year HICAGO • The Chicago Cubs were already the National League Central champions and about to clinch home-field advantage throughout the league’s playoffs when the team’s brain trust walked to home plate Friday afternoon with two talents in tow. Before a sold-out Wrigley Field crowd, they introduced their minor-league player and pitcher of the year, ages 19 and 21, respectively. The Cubs have had impact hitter after impact hitter graduate to the majors in the past two seasons and yet there stood 6-foot-4 outfielder Eloy Jimenez. The 19-year-old and Futures Game star with the .901 OPS at Class A is one of the Cubs’ three players in the top 50 prospects in baseball. Sure, they’ve already won the race. But the Cubs are in it for the marathon. And they’re not alone. “I think we all understand that in some ways the cycles of the game allow there to be two, three teams in the division competing at once, but usually not all of them,” Cubs general manager Jed Hoyer said. “We might have a situation on the horizon where all of them are in the top part of their valley. All five teams who have a winning mentality — the idea you might beat each other up all year is not that appealing.” The Cubs, with their young, gunning lineup and title this summer, are the clear and present threat to the Cardinals’ dynastic hold on the division. Milwaukee manager Craig Counsell said he doesn’t spend a lot of time auditing division rivals but knows this: “The Cubs are really good and really young and the other teams, the rest of us, we’ve got to get better to catch them.” That standard was the Cardinals. In the 17 seasons since 2000, the Cardinals have

C

won nine division titles, more than twice as many as any other team. The NL Central produced 27 playoff teams from 20002015, and 12 of them were the Cardinals. No other team had six. A year ago, the division sent three teams with at least 97 wins into October, and that was a hint of what’s to come. Not just because of the teams at the top end. It was how the Cardinals and wild-card teams Cubs and Pirates could inflate those records by getting fat of the rebuilding Brewers and Reds. “They both have done well to stockpile (talent),” Hoyer said. “The days of them sort of being teams thinking about the future is not going to go on much longer. We know their time is coming.” The Cubs can sense it because they did it. Five years ago, the Cubs underwent a teardown that has become the trend-setter. They would trade of whatever talent they had and accumulate young, high-end talent. Luck helped. Jake Arrieta happened. They drafted Kris Bryant No. 2 overall because Houston passed on him. Reaching the National League championship series a year ago affirmed the Cubs as a template for other meandering teams to follow. Their neighbors have. In the past two seasons, the Brewers and Reds have hoarded youth. The Brewers landed outfielder Domingo Santana and current starter Zach Davies in deals at the 2015 deadline. The Reds had a rookie rotation for 40 percent of last season. When Baseball America released its midseason Top 100 this summer, the five teams in the NL Central had 22 players ranked, the most of any division. But each team has built for contention diferently. The Cubs have their team centered on young hitters. They have had to

purchase pitching. The Cardinals remain one of the best teams in baseball when it comes to acquiring, developing, and deploying pitching. They’ll need a hitter. Milwaukee has wowed opponents this month with its athletic ability, the Reds have tried to gather pitching, and the Pirates hope to have a mix of both. “When you identify what you’re good at you’ve got become great at that,” said Bucs infielder David Freese, a former Cardinal. “There’s no one-size-fits-all,” Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak said. “If you want to build your team around ‘X,’ well, there’s only so much of ‘X’ to go around. We are very pipelinedriven. … Our pipeline, from a strategic standing, is as strong as it’s been for the last five or six years. We intend to compete. Our veteran players may be on the back half of their careers, but we see our next group coming. Some are already here.” The Cardinals have defied the cycles of their division rivals, contending without the rebuilding. Proof: If the Cardinals claim a wild-card berth this season it will be their fourth since 2001, and four diferent teams won the division in those years. The Cardinals had four prospects ranked in the Top 100 by Baseball America, including the highest-rated prospect in the division. A day after the Cubs showcased their two minor-league standouts, the Cardinals got a rebuttal. Out to the mound on Saturday they sent Alex Reyes, the top pitching prospect in the game this summer. He threw five innings and struck out six. He got the win. The future is just getting started. “I don’t care what those other teams do,” ace Adam Wainwright said, “as long as we’re the constant.”

2020 FORESIGHT While so much attention has been heaped upon the Cubs and their rise as a challenger to the Cardinals’ decade-long dynastic hold on the National League Central, other division rivals are stocking up, too, and could be contenders in the coming years. To get a sense of what the division will look like in the year 2020, The PostDispatch reached out to baseball writers at major newspapers in the other four NL Central cities and asked for a lineup featuring the eight position players and the top three starters for the local team in 2020. The guidelines were simple: Include any player who is under contract through 2020, under control through 2020, or is currently a leading prospect in the system. The results reveal the direction each division team is headed, and how many of them are already populated with the young cores that will define the next several years.

CUBS The new division champs will be able to keep their MVP duo, Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo, in place through 2020, and outfit them with a maturing cavalcade of hitters. The question for the Cubs will be whether they can develop the pitching necessary to hold on to the division or if they’ll just throw money at the yearly free agent and run an ad hoc bullpen. Lineup: Gordon Wittenmyer, Chicago Sun-Times.

PIRATES It’s possible by 2020 the Pirates could see the departure of former MVP Andrew McCutchen just as Neil Walker and other standards of their rebirth have either moved on or been priced out of the market. An overhaul is apparently ahead, though with talent featuring seven of their current top 10 prospects. Lineup: Rob Biertempfel, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review:

BREWERS One of the most intriguing teams in baseball this September, the Brewers have followed some of the Cubs’ blueprints — only at an accelerated pace, especially on the field. Milwaukee has rebuilt around athletic ability, and nine of the 11 players picked as featured performers in 2020 have already played a regular role this season in the majors. Lineup: Tom Haudricourt, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel:

REDS In a series of trades that started in 2015, the Reds have reorganized around the idea that they should trade players of value now for young players who can help them the next time a window to win opens. That sank the average age of spring training to less than 26, and their top five prospects will all be fixtures by 2020. Lineup: C. Trent Rosecrans, Cincinnati Enquirer:

CARDINALS Pitching — identifying it, acquiring it and developing it — remains the Cardinals’ specialty, and the benefit could be twofold. Two pitchers who are under control for 2020, Mike Leake and Luke Weaver, could fill out a quality rotation, or they and prospects could be the makings of the trade the Cardinals are likely to need to fortify their core with an impact position player.

aseball has this arcane rule where rosters can be expanded to as many as 40 players after Sept. 1. The purpose, many years ago, was to reward an organization’s top minor-league players with a September promotion so that said players could have an idea what to expect as they tried to make their major-league clubs next year. But the playing field can become awfully uneven. Some teams choose to promote a number of players, or, like the Cardinals, promote a couple of players and have another group coming of the disabled list and onto the roster, with no moves having to be made to accommodate them. Other clubs choose not to add many players for financial reasons, whether those players come from within or without the organization. And whether or not one team has 40 players and the other 33, games are managed much diferently, much more free-wheeling, with bullpens and benches completely stocked, contrary to the previous five months of the season. Just look at how San Francisco’s Bruce Bochy, one of the top managers ever, went through relievers like M&Ms last weekend. Or Cleveland’s Terry Francona using 10 pitchers in a 1-0, 10-inning win over Detroit. Managers can do things in September they wouldn’t have been able to do all season. For instance, Cardinals manager Mike Matheny employed backto-back pinch runners in the ninth inning in San Francisco on Saturday and both those pinch runners — Tommy Pham, who would have been here under the April-August rules, and Jose Martinez, who wouldn’t have been — delivered by taking extra bases in what, at the time, was the Cardinals’ most important win of the season. Baseball is the only major league sport where the same number of players active for any game can be different for two opposing teams in September. And, whether or not you believe that to be fair, there have been some noteworthy accomplishments by September roster additions who may never again have played for that team. Consider one Ivan Cruz, a journeyman outfielder who had a couple of brief shots with the New York Yankees and Pittsburgh but was a Cardinals callup from the system in September 2002. Cruz had only three runs batted in for the month but one came in the 13th inning on Sept. 7 when he beat the Chicago Cubs with a pinch single. Another moment came about 10 days later when Cruz hit a pinch homer as part of a five-run ninth inning to break open a tie game in Colorado. The next day, Cruz drove in another run with a pinch single against the Rockies. The Cardinals, who had been ravaged that year by the deaths of Darryl Kile and Jack Buck, went on to win the division title. Cruz, then 34, finished that season five for 14 but was injured and didn’t participate in the playofs. The next season, his last as a professional, he played for the Chunichi Dragons in the Japanese League. In 2001, veteran lefthander Jeff Tabaka, who had bounced around among several teams, was brought up the Cardinals’ system for September/October specialized work and did relatively well, with one notable exception. On the last weekend of the season, when the winner of the Houston/Cardinals

Lineup: Derrick Goold, Post-Dispatch

POS.

CUBS

PIRATES

BREWERS

REDS

CARDINALS

C

Willson Contreras

Elias Diaz

Martin Maldonado

Tyler Stephenson

Carson Kelly

1B

Anthony Rizzo

Josh Bell

Chris Carter

Joey Votto

Matt Carpenter

2B

Javier Baez

Kevin Newman

Scooter Gennett

Jose Peraza

Kolten Wong

3B

Kris Bryant

Connor Joe

Jonathan Villar

Nick Senzel

Aledmys Diaz

SS

Addison Russell

Cole Tucker

Orlando Arcia

Alfredo Rodriguez

Delvin Perez

OF

Kyle Schwarber

Gregory Polanco

Ryan Braun

Jesse Winker

Randal Grichuk

OF

Albert Almora

Austin Meadows

Keon Broxton

T.J. Friedl

Magneuris Sierra

OF

Jason Heyward

Wily Garcia

Domingo Santana

Aristides Aquino

Stephen Piscotty

SP

Jon Lester, LHP

Jameson Taillon, RHP

Wily Peralta, RHP

Amir Garrett, LHP

SP Alex Reyes, RHP

SP

Kyle Hendricks, RHP

Tyler Glasgow, RHP

Zach Davies, RHP

Cody Reed, LHP

Carlos Martinez, RHP

SP

Rob Zastryzny, LHP

Nick Kingham, RHP

Junior Guerra, RHP

Rob Stephenson, RHP

Jack Flaherty, RHP

Jose Martinez had played nearly 900 games in the minors before getting a September call-up. ASSOCIATED PRESS

series would have the division title, with the other team slipping to the wild-card ranks, Tabaka allowed a game-tying homer in the eighth inning to Lance Berkman. The Astros went on to a 2-1 win and the division crown. It was the last pitch Tabaka threw as a Cardinal. Does anybody remember that long-time Baltimore and California third baseman Doug DeCinces was signed for lastweek protection in the 1987 divisional race and finished his career with the Cardinals? DeCinces, who had been released a couple of days earlier by the Angels, pinch hit in the Cardinals’ division-clinching win against Montreal and then played in the last three games of the season with the New York Mets, who had been eliminated when Montreal lost. He wound up two for nine, was not eligible for the playofs because he got here so late, and never played again. With one week to go in their desperate wild-card chase this year, the Cardinals already have received some modest contributions from September callups. Lefthanded reliever Dean Kiekhefer had been up and down a couple of times this season but was thrust into more prominence in the last week in Colorado and performed well for two games but not nearly as well when used for a third day in a row. Martinez, who had played nearly 900 games in the minors before getting a September callup, had three hits of the bench in his first couple of weeks, besides going from first to third on a single and scoring on a sacrifice fly last Saturday. Were it not for the expanded rosters, neither would be here. The Cardinals are just taking advantage of the rules. One of the most notable September call-ups — twice — in the last decade was veteran first baseman Dan Johnson, who spent some time here last year. In September 2008, Johnson, playing for Tampa Bay, hit a game-tying pinch-hit home run at Boston of Red Sox relief ace Jonathan Papelbon. The Rays went on to win the game and, ultimately, the American League pennant. Fast forward to Sept. 28, 2011, the last day of the regular season when Johnson, again a September call-up by the Rays, pinchhit a game-tying homer of the New York Yankees in the bottom of the ninth. The Rays won in extra innings to sneak into the playofs. But why should the rules be any diferent in September than they are in August? Or May? At least for September, a better solution would be to adopt the hockey or football regulation of dressing the required number of players for a game and having any number of other players out of uniform that day. Baseball teams could be more creative and have a starting pitcher or two not active for a particular game. But there would never be more than 25 players in uniform on any day. For any game. For any month. You may see something like this in the wild-card game, should the Cardinals arrive there. Rosters are different for each round of the playoffs and the wild-card game counts as one round, so the Cardinals, for instance, could take only two starting pitchers — the one who actually is starting the game and the one who might have to be a long reliever in an extra-inning game. In the Cardinals’ only other one-game wild-card shootout in Atlanta in 2012, their 25man roster was laden with extra bench men and relievers. They had 15 position players instead of the normal 13 and had eight relievers and only two rotation starters. Those two were Kyle Lohse, who started the game, and Lance Lynn, who was used to coming out of the bullpen anyway, as he had several times in the World Series the year before, once when Tony La Russa didn’t even want him to.


FOR THE RECORD

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH HOCKEY World Cup At Air Canada Centre, Toronto SEMIFINALS Saturday Canada vs. Russia, 6 p.m. Sunday Sweden vs. Europe, Noon FINAL (best-of-three) Tuesday, Sept. 27 Game 1, 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29 Game 2, 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 Game 3, 6 p.m., if necessary

SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York City FC 13 9 9 48 55 53 Toronto FC 13 8 8 47 44 32 New York 12 9 9 45 52 40 Philadelphia 11 11 8 41 49 47 Montreal 9 9 11 38 43 46 New England 9 12 9 36 37 49 D.C. United 7 9 13 34 39 40 Orlando City 7 9 13 34 48 53 Columbus 6 11 11 29 40 46 Chicago 6 14 9 27 36 48 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 15 8 7 52 47 39 Los Angeles 11 4 15 48 51 34 Colorado 12 5 11 47 29 24 Real Salt Lake 12 10 8 44 42 42 Portland 11 11 8 41 45 45 Sporting K.C. 11 12 7 40 37 37 Seattle 10 13 5 35 34 37 Vancouver 9 14 7 34 37 46 San Jose 7 8 13 34 27 30 Houston 6 11 11 29 33 37 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Friday New York City FC 4, Chicago 1 Saturday Philadelphia at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 6 p.m. Montreal at New York, 6 p.m. Orlando City at D.C. United, 6 p.m. Portland at Houston, 8 p.m. FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 8:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Seattle at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. New England at Columbus, 6 p.m.

GOLF Tour Championship Friday at East Lake Golf Club, Atlanta Purse: $8.5 million; Yards: 7,385; Par: 70 Second Round Dustin Johnson 66-67 — 133 -7 Kevin Chappell 66-68 — 134 -6 Kevin Kisner 67-70 — 137 -3 Hideki Matsuyama 66-71 — 137 -3 Ryan Moore 70-68 — 138 -2 Paul Casey 68-70 — 138 -2 Rory McIlroy 68-70 — 138 -2 Russell Knox 73-66 — 139 -1 Justin Thomas 68-71 — 139 -1 Si Woo Kim 67-72 — 139 -1 Jason Dufner 73-67 — 140 E Adam Scott 69-71 — 140 E Jordan Spieth 68-72 — 140 E Charl Schwartzel 74-67 — 141 +1 Brandt Snedeker 72-69 — 141 +1 Sean O’Hair 74-68 — 142 +2 Gary Woodland 72-70 — 142 +2 Matt Kuchar 69-73 — 142 +2 Daniel Berger 74-69 — 143 +3 Patrick Reed 73-70 — 143 +3 Emiliano Grillo 73-70 — 143 +3 Roberto Castro 73-70 — 143 +3 Jhonattan Vegas 70-73 — 143 +3 J.B. Holmes 73-71 — 144 +4 Bubba Watson 72-73 — 145 +5 William McGirt 77-69 — 146 +6 Phil Mickelson 74-72 — 146 +6 Jimmy Walker 74-74 — 148 +8 Kevin Na 77-74 — 151 +11

Euro: Porsche Open Friday at Golf Resort Bad Griesbach, Bad Griesbach, Germany Purse: $2.23 million; Yards: 7,188; Par: 71 (35-36) First Round 138 golfers did not finish second round, suspended by darkness Alexander Levy, France 31-31 — 62 Bernd Weisberger, Austria 32-31 — 63 Jason Scrivener, Australia 33-31 — 64 Ross Fisher, England 31-34 — 65 Renato Paratore, Italy 34-31 — 65 Jean Hugo, South Africa 31-35 — 66 Soomin Lee, South Korea 32-34 — 66 Mikael Lundberg, Sweden 33-33 — 66 Justin Walters, South Africa 32-34 — 66 Oliver Fisher, England 32-34 — 66 Paul Dunn, Ireland 33-33 — 66 Steve Webster, England 35-31 — 66 Daniel Im, U.S. 33-33 — 66

L. Bjerregaard, Denmark Michael Jonzon, Sweden Also Bud Cauley, U.S. Paul Peterson, U.S. Lee McCoy, U.S. Chase Koepka, U.S. Charlie Danielson, U.S. Peter Uihlein, U.S. Matt Every, U.S. David Lipsky, U.S. Luke List, U.S. Leaderboard Second Round Alexander Levy, France Martin Kaymer, Germany Ross Fisher, England Robert Karlsson, Sweden Jean Hugo, South Africa Jason Scrivener, Australia Matthew Southgate, England Soomin Lee, South Korea Mikael Lundberg, Sweden

30-36 — 66 31-35 — 66 34-34 34-34 35-35 35-37 36-36 36-37 34-41 34-34 33-35

— 68 — 68 — 70 — 72 — 72 — 73 — 75 — 78 — 78

-17 -11 -11 -11 -10 -10 -9 -9 -9

THRU 17 17 15 15 13 10 18 15 9

Champions: Paciic Links Friday at Bear Mountain Resort, Victoria, British Columbia Purse: $2.5 mill.; Yards: 6,881; Par: 71 (35-36) First Round Scott McCarron 30-32 — 62 -9 Doug Garwood 34-30 — 64 -7 Jerry Smith 32-32 — 64 -7 Woody Austin 32-33 — 65 -6 Jeff Sluman 32-33 — 65 -6 Olin Browne 33-33 — 66 -5 Wes Short, Jr. 31-35 — 66 -5 Scott Parel 32-35 — 67 -4 Jose Coceres 33-34 — 67 -4 Tim Petrovic 33-34 — 67 -4 Willie Wood 33-34 — 67 -4 Jay Don Blake 33-34 — 67 -4 Fred Funk 34-33 — 67 -4 Joe Daley 36-31 — 67 -4 Kirk Triplett 33-34 — 67 -4 Scott Dunlap 32-35 — 67 -4 Russ Cochran 34-33 — 67 -4 Colin Montgomerie 33-34 — 67 -4 Vijay Singh 33-34 — 67 -4 Tom Byrum 33-35 — 68 -3 Duffy Waldorf 33-35 — 68 -3 John Cook 32-36 — 68 -3 Marco Dawson 35-33 — 68 -3 Lee Janzen 36-32 — 68 -3 Joe Durant 35-33 — 68 -3 Miguel Angel Martin 36-33 — 69 -2 Mike Goodes 34-35 — 69 -2 Mark Brooks 33-36 — 69 -2 Brian Henninger 36-33 — 69 -2 Scott Simpson 33-36 — 69 -2 Jeff Hart 33-36 — 69 -2 Jeff Maggert 34-35 — 69 -2 Mark O’Meara 37-32 — 69 -2 Miguel Angel Jimenez 35-34 — 69 -2 Paul A. Broadhurst 35-34 — 69 -2

Area holes in one Aberdeen • Pete Kelly, hole No. 5, 106 yards, 8-iron, Sept. 20. Pheasant Run • Jane Stuckenschneider, hole No. 2, 116 yards, 6-iron, Sept. 17. Pheasant Run • Ken Karsten, hole No. 18, 102 yards, pitching wedge, Sept. 18. Berry Hill • John Siterlet, hole No. 2, 106 yards, pitching wedge, Sept. 23.

2. (78) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 135.212. 3. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 134.896. 4. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 134.858. 5. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 134.796. 6. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 134.682. 7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 134.477. 8. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 134.363. 9. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 134.221. 10. (24) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 133.901. 11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 133.694. 12. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 133.445. 13. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 134.359. 14. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 134.354. 15. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 134.184. 16. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 134.108. 17. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 134.032. 18. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 133.750. 19. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 133.717. 20. (95) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet, 133.133. 21. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 133.031. 22. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 132.980. 23. (23) David Ragan, Toyota, 132.776. 24. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 131.815. 25. (44) Brian Scott, Ford, 132.966. 26. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 132.887. 27. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 132.688. 28. (34) Chris Buescher, Ford, 132.618. 29. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 132.595.

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

30. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 132.586. 31. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 132.485. 32. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 132.177. 33. (83) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, 131.952. 34. (38) Landon Cassill, Ford, 131.624. 35. (46) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 131.528. 36. (98) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 131.510. 37. (15) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 131.031. 38. (55) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 130.693. 39. (30) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 129.503. 40. (32) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 127.701.

NHRA: Midwest Nationals Qualifying After Friday qualifying. qualifying continues Saturday At Gateway Motorsports Park, Madison, Ill. Top Fuel 1. Richie Crampton, 3.733 seconds, 323.50 mph. 2. Doug Kalitta, 3.752, 325.92. 3. Tony Schumacher, 3.757, 322.19. 4. J.R. Todd, 3.772, 322.04. 5. Leah Pritchett, 3.773, 322.42. 6. Shawn Langdon, 3.783, 325.30. 7. Brittany Force, 3.790, 320.20. 8. Clay Millican, 3.798, 323.35. 9. Wayne Newby, 3.801, 318.69. 10. Steve Torrence, 3.805, 323.19. 11. Pat Dakin, 3.805, 309.06. 12. Antron Brown, 3.808, 314.39.

209.43. 5. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.621, 209.36. 6. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.622, 209.30. 7. Allen Johnson, Dodge Dart, 6.625, 208.46. 8. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.636, 208.20. 9. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.646, 207.91. 10. Jeg Coughlin, Dart, 6.648, 207.46. 11. Erica Enders, Dart, 6.667, 206.95. 12. Deric Kramer, Dart, 6.695, 206.57. Not Qualified: 13. Mark Hogan, 6.783, 203.09. 14. Dave River, 6.925, 198.93. 15. Aaron Strong, 7.407, 135.27. 16. Alan Prusiensky, 7.489, 144.35. Pro Stock Motorcycle 1. Chip Ellis, Buell, 6.850, 196.53. 2. Hector Arana, Buell, 6.880, 195.34. 3. Jerry Savoie, Suzuki, 6.881, 194.88. 4. Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 6.884, 193.88. 5. Angelle Sampey, Buell, 6.893, 195.87. 6. Andrew Hines, Harley-Davidson, 6.897, 193.65. 7. Cory Reed, Buell, 6.915, 194.13. 8. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 6.930, 193.32. 9. Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.950, 193.57. 10. Jim Underdahl, Suzuki, 6.955, 193.05. 11. Angie Smith, Victory, 6.968, 191.35. 12. Hector Arana Jr, Buell, 6.974, 194.83. Not Qualified: 13. LE Tonglet, 7.000, 193.68. 14. Melissa Surber, 7.071, 191.19. 15. Joe DeSantis, 7.111, 187.99. 16. Matt Smith, 7.149, 162.88.

Not Qualified: 13. Kyle Wurtzel, 3.898, 307.79. 14. Kebin Kinsley, 3.901, 307.16. 15. Luigi Novelli, 4.106, 263.92. 16. Terry McMillen, 4.294, 201.73. 17. Scott Palmer, 4.307, 198.67. 18. Troy Buff, 6.333, 95.96. Funny Car 1. Robert Hight, Chevy Camaro, 3.893, 328.38. 2. Jack Beckman, Dodge Charger, 3.907, 325.22. 3. Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 3.912, 325.61. 4. Matt Hagan, Charger, 3.914, 327.51. 5. Courtney Force, Camaro, 3.918, 324.36. 6. Del Worsham, Toyota Camry, 3.929, 324.75. 7. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.933, 322.81. 8. Alexis DeJoria, Camry, 3.974, 323.27. 9. Chad Head, Camry, 3.994, 320.36. 10. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.009, 314.68. 11. Brian Stewart, Mustang, 4.009, 290.82. 12. John Bojec, Toyota Solara, 4.037, 293.22. Not Qualified: 13. John Hale, 4.177, 279.09. 14. Brandon Welch, 4.257, 290.07. 15. John Force, 4.440, 193.29. 16. Tommy Johnson Jr., 4.470, 189.15. 17. Dale Creasy Jr., 4.559, 192.06. 18. Jack Wyatt, 11.019, 86.08. Pro Stock 1. Greg Anderson, Chevy Camaro, 6.607, 209.56. 2. Shane Gray, Camaro, 6.609, 209.65. 3. Alex Laughlin, Camaro, 6.610, 209.14. 4. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 6.611,

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COLLEGES Area scores Men’s soccer Maryville 3, William Jewell 2, OT Wash. U. 3, Illinois Wesleyan 0 Women’s soccer Rockhurst 1, UMSL 0 Wash. U. 2, Rose-Hulman 0 Maryville 1, William Jewell 0 Women’s volleyball Lewis def. UMSL 25-16, 19-25, 25-12, 25-13. Missouri baptist def. Lyon 25-12, 25-14, 22-25, 25-14. St. Louis U. def. George Mason 25-19, 25-23, 31-29. THURSDAY’S LATE SCORES Women’s volleyball Washington def. Webster 25-23, 25-8, 22-25, 25-21 Women’s tennis Webster 9, Fontbonne 0

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Sprint Cup: Bad Boy 300 Lineup After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At New Hampshire Motor Speedway Loudon, N.H. Lap length: 1.058 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (19) Carl Edwards, Toyota, 135.453 mph.

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

Beckner adds exceptional athleticism to Mizzou defense HOCHMAN • FROM C1

field.” Perhaps you remember his name from when he was a recruiting coup. He was ESPN’s No. 2 overall recruit in the land. In the heartbreaking loss to Georgia, one week ago, the 6-foot-4, 290-pound sophomore actually made six tackles. And on Saturday in mid-Missouri, the man in the middle tallied two tackles and recovered a fumble, too. He’s a havoc addict. “Terry is just a freak … God gave him a really good gift to play football,” Mizzou linebacker Michael Scherer said. “You see him make some plays, and you can’t believe it — I’m serious. Last week (against Georgia), I saw him swim (move) past two guys and then circle back into the gap he was supposed to be in and make the play. He did that last year, too.” Harith Mitchom remembers the realization. It was the 2010-11 school year. The East St. Louis High assistant football coach attended a middle school track meet. Eighth-grader Terry Beckner Jr. was running the 100-yard dash. “He got third in the race,” Mitchom said Saturday by phone. “Nate Strong (a current Mizzou running back) actually ran the race. Now, he was a distant third, he wasn’t neck-and-neck with Strong, but I remember — that big kid can run. “Our original thought was that he would play tight end. He’s about 6-2, 220 pounds — and we didn’t know he’d gain another 50-60 pounds in high school. He was a lot leaner and he was very athletic. But through the years, he spread it out a little wider. … A lot of kids are weightroom kids, they have the strength, they can lift, they can bench-press 300 pounds. But they don’t play with that same power and aggression on the field. Terry does.” In local football circles, the myth of Beckner Jr. ballooned. The blur in the middle of the line blurred the line between reality and fantasy. Asked his favorite Terry moment, Mitchom said: “Sophomore year. It was 3-4 plays in a row when he was 5-6 yards into the backfield — almost at the snap of the ball. The quarterback was in shotgun, and by the time he caught the snap and looked up, Terry was right there, whether Terry was on top of him, flung him down or laid him down. It was against Belleville West. It was almost like you throw your hands up and say, ‘What can you do?’ It was at that point that we knew we had a future bright star. “He’s so athletic, we even had him at outside linebacker for a day or two.” He was a star the day he signed. Then, late last season, he tore the ACL and MCL in his right knee in the game against Brigham Young. He’s still a kid. In January, he was arrested on suspicion of marijuana possession. Odom suspended him. Would he recover from the injury? Would he mature? “After the surgery, I was down,” he said after Saturday’s game. “I just watched the video to get my motivation back.” The video was from middle school. No, not the race. It was a DVD of a football game (by the way, we’re getting old when players dig up old videos of middle school, and it’s on DVD not VHS). Third down. Play-action. Beckner Jr. torpedoed into the backfield. “Lincoln Middle School — he got a sack,” his father, Terry Sr., said by phone. “I was thinking — he’ll be good one day,” as Pops began to chuckle. It’s funny how people get when asked about Terry Beckner Jr. His dad, the old coach, Scherer, they all find themselves laughing at the absurdity of this young man’s

ability. I have memories of the tone of coach Gary Pinkel’s voice when talking about No. 79. It was as if to say: This is some special stuf. Some accelerated acceleration. When asked Saturday, Scherer seemed almost honored to talk about Beckner Jr. “After the injury, he realized it’s going to take a lot of work to get back — and Terry really matured up,” Scherer said. “When you’re a freshman, highly touted, you can let things go by and not be mature. This summer, Terry grew a lot as a person, and that’s why Terry is doing so well this year. “There was a time this (ofseason), he was coming back from the knee injury, hadn’t conditioned much, and we’re doing really tough conditioning drills. He’s pushing a sled and (strength and conditioning coach Rohrk Cutchlow)

wanted to help him. He’s dragging behind, but he said, ‘No coach, I got this.’ And that’s kind of when I knew that Terry had grown up.” Last season, Beckner earned freshman All-American honors. There is so much football to be played — this season, next season and then his senior season. It’s unfair to sit here and preordain the guy as the next big thing for the NFL. But he is the current big thing in the SEC. And you know that Louisiana State University’s Tigers are more intimidated by Mizzou’s No. 79 than the 79 points Mizzou put up against Delaware State. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

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• The two major obstacles you’ll face

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You are age 50-65 You are apprehensive about investing You want to avoid the most common mistakes investors make You want to secure your financial future for yourself and your family

Tune in to Ric’s radio show every Saturday, 2pm to 4pm.

1

A fast 90 minutes – b informativ oth ea entertainin nd g!

Tuesday, September 27 at 7pm in Chesterfield Wednesday, September 28 at 7pm in St. Louis

Reserve your seat today! www.EdelmanFinancial.com/SLPD1 888-PLAN-RIC (888-752-6742)

TheWashingtonPost,WashingtonBestsellersPaperbackNoniction/General.March29,2009.RicEdelman,ExecutiveChairmanofEdelmanFinancial Services, LLC, a Registered Investment Advisor, is an Investment Advisor Representative who ofers advisory services through EFS and is a Registered Representative and Registered Principal of, and ofers securities through, EF Legacy Securities, LLC, an ailiated broker/dealer, member FINRA/SIPC.

$15/person • $25/couple, Use code SLPD1 This educational event is presented by Ric’s Financial Education Team. Our dedicated instructors are devoted to teaching financial education full-time.


SEC FOOTBALL

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 1

Vols brace for Gators’ defense

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C9

MIZZOU VS. DELAWARE STATE

5 THINGS TO WATCH Ish Witter

Florida is allowing 4.7 points a game ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tennessee coach Butch Jones has faced one eventual national champion, two other College Football Playof semifinalists and another team that reached the BCS championship game since his arrival in Knoxville. But he doesn’t believe any of his Tennessee teams ever have matched up against a defense as potent as the one they’ll encounter Saturday when the 14thranked Volunteers (3-0, 0-0 Southeastern Conference) host No. 19 Florida (3-0, 1-0). “They make you earn everything that you get,” Jones said. Florida is allowing the fewest points (4.7) and yards (129.7) per game of any Football Bowl Subdivision team. The Gators also have an FBS-leading 16 sacks. They haven’t given up a touchdown pass and are allowing foes to complete just 34 percent of their pass attempts. In a 32-0 victory over North Texas last week, Florida gave up 53 total yards — the lowest total the Gators ever have allowed in a game. “We’ve just been motivated to really hold ourselves to a higher standard and just show everybody across the nation that we’re not coming to play any funny games,” Florida linebacker Jarrad Davis said. Arkansas, Texas A&M tangle • Say this about Arkansas and Texas A&M: The schools have provided plenty of entertainment value since returning to AT&T Stadium, in Arlington, Texas, two years ago. Well, for the Aggies and their fans, at least. The No. 17 Razorbacks (3-0) would like nothing more than to enjoy their own celebration at the giant home of the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys when the two SEC foes meet Saturday night. They’d also like to end their skid of four straight losses to No. 10 Texas A&M (3-0, 1-0 SEC), the last two of which have come in overtime. “It wasn’t a happy plane ride home for us the last two years,” said quarterback Austin Allen of Arkansas, which will be playing its first SEC game of the season. “We need to get a happy plane ride home this year.” While the Razorbacks are focused on ending their recent woes against their former Southwest Conference rival, both schools hope to turn into SEC party crashers this weekend. At the very least, a victory would give both a strong case as the early season second-best-inthe-West behind No. 1 Alabama.

SATURDAY’S SEC GAMES 11 a.m.

Kent State at Alabama

SEC Net.

11 a.m.

Georgia at Mississippi

ESPN

2:30 p.m.

Florida at Tennessee

2:30 p.m.

Mississippi State at UMass

3 p.m.

Delaware State at Missouri SEC Net.

3:30 p.m.

Vanderbilt at W. Kentucky

5 p.m.

LSU at Auburn

6:30 p.m.

South Carolina at Kentucky SEC Net.

8 p.m.

Arkansas vs. Texas A&M

KMOV-4

CBSSN ESPN

ESPN

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

DAVE MATTER • dmatter@post-dispatch.com > 314-340-8508

MISSOURI OFFENSE

Are the Tigers born to run? The Missouri running game sputtered through the first three Saturdays, but along come the Delaware State Hornets, who only gave up 601 rushing yards combined against Delaware and Monmouth. This figures to be the day the Tigers’ run game breaks out, perhaps with MU’s first 100-yard rusher – or maybe two. Will Alex Ross be on the field? The graduate transfer from Oklahoma left the Eastern Michigan game two weeks ago with an ankle injury and didn’t take a snap against Georgia last week. If he’s not on the field Saturday, could freshman Damarea Crockett steal some snaps from veteran Ish Witter? Nate Strong, from East St. Louis, hasn’t cracked the regular rotation but should get some second-half touches Saturday.

QB RB WR WR WR TE LT LG C RG RT

Drew Lock Ish Witter J’Mon Moore Johnathon Johnson Emanuel Hall Sean Culkin Tyler Howell Kevin Pendleton Samson Bailey Alec Abeln Paul Adams

3 21 6 12 84 80 76 71 56 57 77

DEFENSE 2. Next man up? If Barry Odom wants to give his younger backups some valuable playing experience, this figures to be the game. The Hornets have just one previous matchup against a power conference FBS team: Michigan took their stingers out and demolished DSU 63-6 in 2009. Otherwise, they beat Akron in 1987. And that’s it when it comes to FBS opponents the Hornets have defeated. With a huge game at Louisiana State next week, expect to see lots of backup quarterback Marvin Zanders in the second half and some liberal substitutions at other positions.

DE DT DT DE LB LB LB CB CB SS FS

Charles Harris

5. More empty seats at Memorial Stadium? Missouri’s attendance against Eastern Michigan was the program’s lowest in 10 years for the first game of the season, followed by a crowd of

91 95 96 55 25 30 34 11 5 22 8

SPECIALISTS PK P H LS KR PR

3. Problems solved along Mizzou front seven? Missouri’s defenders seemed to embrace new coordinator DeMontie Cross’ gap-control scheme last week and stayed in their lanes against the Georgia running game. It was the best MU’s front seven looked this season — or front eight when the Tigers dropped a safety into the box for run support. Will there be a carryover Saturday? That’s hard to measure considering Delaware State isn’t exactly the Georgia Bulldogs, but this should be a matchup Mizzou dominates if the defense stays disciplined. Defensive end Charles Harris could have another fine performance, lined up against freshman left Joshua Fala. 4. Can McCann do it again? Odom figured out the best way to handle a kicker with the yips is to leave him alone. When freshman kicker Tucker McCann struggled in the opener West Virginia, Odom responded with lots of encouragement. When McCann missed a PAT the next week, Odom tried another approach: He stayed quiet. McCann tweaked his mechanics and last week scored nine vital points against Georgia, including two field goals. He’s among the nation’s best kickof specialists as MU sports a touchback percentage of 64.6, tied for sixth nationally. He probably won’t face any highpresser kicks Saturday, but Odom will want to see the freshman get some experience before next week’s game at LSU.

Charles Harris Rickey Hatley A.J. Logan Jordan Harold Donavin Newsom Michael Scherer Joey Burkett Aarion Penton John Gibson Anthony Sherrils Thomas Wilson Tucker McCann Corey Fatony Jake Brents Jake Hurrell Alex Ross Johnathon Johnson

98 26 26 86 5 12

DELAWARE STATE OFFENSE

57,098 for the Georgia game, about 14,000 short of capacity and the smallest crowd among MU’s 17 SEC home games. Will more fans show up this week after watching the Tigers nearly topple the Bulldogs? Will more stay away because the opponent? Delaware State doesn’t figure to travel with a large gathering, which means attendance could dip below 50,000, something the Tigers haven’t had for a home game since 2005. Prediction Missouri 56, Delaware State 3 The Hornets could be the worst team to visit Mizzou’s Memorial Stadium in the program’s modern era. Expect big numbers by the MU running backs. Expect Drew Lock to watch the second half from the bench. And expect a big, big number on one half of the scoreboard. Dave Matter

QB RB WR WR WR TE LT LG C RG RT

Daniel Epperson Brycen Alleyne Jerimiah Williams Aris Scott Mason Rutherford Dominic Floyd Joshua Fala Cade Pedro Ernest Mengoni Chuka Ezeuzoh Peter Borum

11 6 13 7 18 33 72 64 77 75 76

DEFENSE T DE T OLB MLB MLB OLB CB CB S S

Damon Atwater-Stephens Dominique Drewery Javon Barnes Rashawn Barrett Brian Cavicante Malik Harris Denzel Burgette Keyjuan Selby Gary Melton Xavier Wilcher Logan Wescott3

55 90 52 17 43 24 15 20 26 31 37

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Wisdom Nzidee Fidel Romo Martinez Daniel Epperson Jonathan Scandrett Brycen Alleyne Aris Scott

1 32 11 41 6 7

Missouri’s Scherer ‘deserves everything he gets’ MIZZOU • FROM C1

As his career winds down in Columbia, one personal accolade matters most to Scherer. This week it reads 125. That’s how many tackles he needs to surpass Odom on Mizzou’s career list. Odom, like Scherer, a middle linebacker from 1996-99, fought through enough injuries to fill a separate column and finished with 362 stops, which ranks No. 7 all-time at Mizzou. Scherer enters Saturday’s game against visiting Delaware State (0-2) with 238 tackles — probably too far away to catch his coach but close enough to push him harder. Each week Scherer updates a sheet of paper that hangs by his bedroom door with the tackles left in his pursuit. It’s the last thing he sees when he leaves for practice or games. Why the reminder? “To make sure I’m doing the right things every day to get there,” he said. Ask Odom and there’s not a

player on Mizzou’s roster who spends more time doing the right things every day. The first-year coach gave his middle linebacker the ultimate compliment this week. “I’ve got two sons,” Odom said, “and if they grow up and they’re like Michael Scherer, I know I did something right as a dad.” “Such an unbelievable kid, ambassador for our program, ambassador for the state of Missouri,” Odom continued. With longtime sidekick Kentrell Brothers gone to the NFL, Scherer returned this season as Missouri’s most experienced front-seven player — Scherer and cornerback Aarion Penton share the team lead with 29 career starts — and vowed to finish his career with his best season. That should be easier now that he’s intact more than any point last season when Scherer played through what he’s described as “a cracked hand,” a “completely demolished” groin, a jammed wrist and a popped elbow.

Through three games, he shares the team lead with 25 tackles and has two stops behind the line and two pass break-ups. Before last Saturday’s game against Georgia, Odom visited with Bulldogs ofensive line coach Sam Pittman, who’s faced the Tigers each of the last two years while coaching at Arkansas. “He said, ‘I’d wish you’d hurry up and graduate (number) 30,’” Odom recalled. “He said, ‘You sure you and Scherer didn’t play together?’ “When you’re a good player and you’ve played as good as Mike has on that level, you get some recognition. He deserves everything he gets.” Patrolling the middle of Missouri’s defense hasn’t always been easy for Scherer, considering he’s on his third coordinator and position coach in three years. He joined the program when Dave Steckel ran the defense, and when he left for the head-coaching job at Missouri State after the 2014 season, MU hired Odom

from Memphis to coordinate the defense and coach linebackers. One of Odom’s first hires as head coach was defensive coordinator and linebackers coach DeMontie Cross, his former Mizzou teammate who spent the last three years at Texas Christian University. Three systems in three years might scramble the average player’s brain, but Scherer relishes the variety. “For me, it’s been awesome because I had Stec who was really, really hard on me, which is what I needed when I was young, when I thought I knew a whole lot but didn’t know a whole lot,” Scherer said. “Then I had Odom last year and he’s got an unreal defensive mind. People saw that with the stuff we did last year. And now having Coach Cross come in, he can teach me new things and he’s looking at what I did last year with a blank slate.” Scherer grew especially close to Odom and his family, wife Tia and their boys, J.T. and Garyt. Sure enough, Scherer was among

the last players on the practice field Tuesday while goofing around with the Odom boys. “Since he’s gotten here he’s been like a father away from home,” said Scherer, whose parents, Joe and Dori, live in South County. “I consider his family my family. I’ve got a very close relationship with both of his sons. It’s awesome that we can have the relationship we do.” Twenty years after Odom began his career at Mizzou, Scherer is putting the final touches on his own. He calls his head coach the best leader he’s known. As players celebrated the season’s first victory in the locker room two weeks ago, Scherer spoke up and silenced the room. From one leader to another, Scherer clutched a football and stufed it in Odom’s gut. “First of many, but this is this man’s first win as the head man,” Scherer yelled. “Here’s the ball.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SEC FOOTBALL

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 2

SEC ROUNDUP

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C9 KELLY POWERS REBELS Mississippi quarterback CHAD KELLY threw for two touchdowns and ran for another as the Rebels dominated No. 12 Georgia. He passed Archie Manning for sixth place in school history with 5,901 yards of total ofense.

TOP PLAYER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mizzou dominates in record fashion

LSU quarterback Danny Etling (center) is tackled by Auburn linebacker Tre’ Williams (left) on Saturday.

Daniel Carlson kicked six field goals and Auburn beat No. 18 LSU 18-13 on Saturday night after oicials ruled Danny Etling’s apparent last-gasp scoring pass came after time expired. Etling rolled to his right and found D.J. Shark on a 15-yard pass, setting of a celebration by LSU players. Oicials ruled time expired before Etling took the snap. The celebration shifted to the Auburn sideline when oicials announced the decisive ruling. It was an important win for host Auburn (2-2, 1-1 Southeastern Conference) and coach Gus Malzahn, who faced increased criticism following losses to Top 25 opponents Clemson and Texas A&M. An illegal shift penalty against LSU (2-2, 1-1 SEC) left the Tigers with a fourthdown play from the 15 with 5 seconds remaining, setting up the final-play drama. No. 1 Alabama 48, Kent State 0 • Jalen Hurts ran and passed for a touchdown and tailback sub Joshua Jacobs scored his first two career touchdowns in host Alabama’s win. The Crimson Tide (4-0) dominated coach Nick Saban’s alma mater from the start while scoring on a kickof return and even a short touchdown throw to freshman linebacker Mack Wilson. The bad news for Alabama is starting tailback Damien Harris went down on the opening drive with an apparent right ankle injury and didn’t return. Harris was hardly needed in this game, when No. 2 quarterback Blake Barnett played much of the way and the emerging freshman Jacobs ran for 97 yards. No. 23 Ole Miss 45, No. 12 Georgia 14 • Chad Kelly threw for 282 yards and two touchdowns and ran for another score to lead Mississippi to a win at home. The Rebels (2-2, 1-1) dominated every phase of the game, building a lead of 31-0 by halftime and 45-0 by midway through the third quarter. Ole Miss broke a 10-game losing streak in the series dating to 1996. Georgia (3-1, 1-1) lost its first game under new coach Kirby Smart and looked overmatched. To make matters worse, star running back Nick Chubb injured an ankle in the second quarter and didn’t return. It was an impressive win for the Rebels, who finally built a big lead they didn’t give away. Ole Miss led Florida State by 22 points and Alabama by 21 this season before losing both games. Mississippi State 47, Massachusetts 35 • Aeris Williams ran for a 16-yard touchdown and Jamoral Graham returned an interception 38 yards for a score on the next play from scrimmage to help visiting Mississippi State erase a third-quarter deficit and beat Massachusetts. The two scores 17 seconds apart were followed four minutes later by a 13-yard touchdown pass from Nick Fitzgerald to Farrod Green that made it 41-21 just before the end of the third quarter. Fitzgerald completed 25 of 38 passes for 299 yards and three touchdowns, and he also ran for 110 yards for the Bulldogs (2-2). Vanderbilt 31, Western Kentucky 30 • Vanderbilt’s defense turned away a 2-point conversion play at the end of the first overtime as the Commodores escaped with a victory at Western Kentucky. Kyle Shurmur’s 5-yard pass to Nathan Marcus on the first possession of overtime gave Vanderbilt (2-2) its first lead of the game, and Tommy Openshaw added the point after for the Commodores. Western Kentucky (2-2) answered quickly, needing just two plays to find the end zone on Mike White’s 8-yard pass to Shaquille Johnson. Associated Press

SEC STANDINGS EAST Tennessee Florida Georgia South Carolina Missouri Vanderbilt Kentucky WEST Alabama Texas A&M Auburn LSU Mississippi State Mississippi Arkansas

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WR Moore rebounds from gafe BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Carlson’s six field goals lift Auburn past No. 18 LSU

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NEXT SATURDAY’S GAMES Texas A&M at South Alcorn State at Carolina, 3 p.m. Arkansas, 11 a.m. Kentucky at Alabama, Florida at Vanderbilt, 6 p.m. 11 a.m. Memphis at Tennessee at Georgia, Mississippi, 6 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Missouri at LSU, La.-Monroe at 6:30 p.m. Auburn, 2:30 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Delaware State QB Daniel Epperson (right) is hit by Mizzou’s Charles Harris on Saturday.

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Things couldn’t have started worse for Missouri on Saturday in a game that was supposed to be a mismatch from every angle. Johnathon Johnson hesitated when he picked up Delaware State’s opening kickoff around the goal line and managed just a short return — all negated by a block in the back penalty. The Tigers’ first drive would start on their 6-yard line. “That opening kickoff,” Mizzou coach Barry Odom later said, “against a really good team you’re putting your offense in a bad, bad spot. That’s not acceptable.” It was about the only nit Odom could pick. Realistically, Saturday’s game was over when the schools signed the contract that paid Delaware State $525,000 to take a beating on Faurot Field. After the first hiccup, both teams held up their end of the bargain. The Tigers needed only a minute and 54 seconds and nine plays to move the ball 94 yards for the game-opening and game-winning points. The rest was just details as the Football Championship Subdivision Hornets earned their payday in a 79-0 annihilation. A week after a crushing one-point loss to Georgia, Mizzou surged ahead 30-0 after the first quarter, 58-0 at halftime and by the third quarter had most of its starters on the sideline. At halftime, Delaware State agreed to a shortened second half with 10-minute quarters. As the seconds ticked off, Mizzou’s only real challenge was trying not to score 100 points. “Personally, I like to run up,” MU safety Cam Hilton said. “But I don’t think we’ve got three digits on the scoreboard.” The Tigers had to settle for a record-setting performance, albeit against what might have been the most overmatched team to visit Memorial Stadium since its construction in 1926. Before Saturday, Missouri’s single-game scoring record in the modern era was 69, set three times, most recently in a 69-0 win over Western Illinois in 2011. In the team’s third game in the program’s inaugural season in 1890, MU beat a team of engineering students 90-0, but because it wasn’t an intercollegiate contest Mizzou doesn’t count that game as the most lopsided win — even though

Missouri 79, Delaware St. 0 Delaware St. 0 0 0 0 — 0 Missouri 30 28 14 7 — 79 First Quarter MIZ: Witter 2 run (McCann kick), 13:17 MIZ: J’.Moore 4 pass from Lock (kick failed), 9:19 MIZ: FG McCann 31, 5:41 MIZ: J’.Moore 6 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 4:15 MIZ: J’.Moore 9 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 2:26 Second Quarter MIZ: Crockett 2 run (McCann kick), 11:02 MIZ: J’.Moore 1 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 7:23 MIZ: Crockett 11 run (McCann kick), 5:29 MIZ: E.Hall 35 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 2:24 Third Quarter MIZ: Zanders 11 run (McCann kick), 5:57 MIZ: Laurent 2 pass from Zanders (McCann kick), 3:18 Fourth Quarter MIZ: Zanders 14 run (McCann kick), 8:24 A: 53,472. DLS MIZ First downs 8 34 Rushes-yards 26-44 39-268 Passing 96 430 Comp-Att-Int 12-27-2 29-39-0 Return Yards 137 79 Punts-Avg. 10-30.2 1-45.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-0 Penalties-Yards 6-45 6-60 Time of Possession 25:01 34:59 Rushing: Delaware St., Waters 7-31, Alleyne 9-21, S.Bendolph 3-6, Lain 1-0, Rivera 2-(minus 4), Hannah 1-(minus 5), Epperson 3-(minus 5). Missouri, Crockett 12-115, Zanders 7-83, R.Williams 9-51, Witter 9-40, (Team) 2-(minus 21). Passing: Delaware St., Lain 7-15-1-82, Epperson 3-9-1-7, Rivera 2-3-0-7. Missouri, Lock 26-36-0-402, Zanders 2-2-0-17, Fatony 1-1-0-11. Receiving: Delaware St., Scott 2-32, Sua-Godinet 2-29, Waters 2-11, Alleyne 2-7, I.Williams 2-4, Rutherford 1-10, Hannah 1-3. Missouri, Mason 8-120, J’.Moore 8-114, E.Hall 7-122, C.Black 2-29, J.Johnson 1-22, Sherrils 1-11, Scales 1-10, Laurent 1-2. Missed Field Goals: None.

the victory is counted in the school’s all-time total. By the third quarter, Odom did his best to empty his bench as the Tigers simplified their ofense and defense to melt time of the clock as fast as possible. “They didn’t give me any book on how to handle that in the second half,” Odom said. Odom’s team will snap back to reality this week when it prepares for Saturday’s game against Louisiana State at Tiger Stadium, Mizzou’s first visit to Baton Rouge, La. LSU (2-2) is the only Southeastern Conference team the Tigers haven’t played since joining the league in 2012. For senior linebacker Michael Scherer, LSU was on his mind all of last week, even though the Tigers strictly prepared for Delaware State and didn’t sneak a peek at LSU’s schemes and formations during practice. “No offense to (Delaware State),” Scherer said, “but when you play a team like this you’ve got to have something that gets you up and going and ready to practice.” M issouri director of football operations Mike McHugh approached Odom late in the second quarter about asking Delaware State to play shorter quarters in the second half. The Hornets obliged. NCAA rules allow teams to mutually agree to shorten the game time but prohibit using a running

clock. Clemson and South Carolina State made a similar arrangement last week, cutting the third and fourth quarters to 12 minutes in Clemson’s 59-0 win. “I didn’t even know (the officials) can do that,” Mizzou receiver J’Mon Moore said. “I was like, ‘Cool.’” As an announced crowd of 53,472 filed into Memorial Stadium for what turned into a gloried scrimmage, Drew Lock’s record-tying day was already underway with three touchdown passes in the game’s first 13 minutes, with all three going to Moore. Lock was lifted for good late in the second quarter and finished with 402 yards passing and five touchdowns, matching the single-game school record he also set two weeks ago against Eastern Michigan. Moore, also playing just the first half, caught eight balls for 114 yards and four touchdowns, which tied the team’s single-game record, set by Dorial Green-Beckham at Kentucky in 2013. Lock kept his other outside receivers busy, too. Emanuel Hall caught seven passes for 122 yards and a score. Dimetrios Mason added seven catches for 105 yards. Hall and Mason gave Mizzou six receivers to log 100-yard games through the season’s first four games. Saturday’s game also marked the first time since 2008 when the Tigers produced three 100yard receivers in one game. The defense contributed to the thrashing with four takeaways, including interceptions by Scherer and John Gibson. In the victory, Missouri outgained the Hornets in yardage 698-140 and allowed only 7 yards in the second half. The Tigers pulled of their first 99-yard touchdown drive since 2006, ending with Lock’s first touchdown pass to Moore. MU’s 79 points were the most scored by a Football Bowl Subdivision team this season. The backups had less time on the clock to pile up stats in the second half, but No. 2 quarterback Marvin Zanders made the most of his abbreviated play. He ran for two touchdowns and tossed a touchdown to Eric Laurent. By then, most Tigers had already turned their attention to next week. “My mind’s on LSU right now,” Hilton said. “Big preparation starting tonight and all through the week.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

C O LU M B I A , M O. • J’Mon Moore’s first play Saturday ended much like the last time he touched the ball on Faurot Field. Missouri’s junior wide receiver fumbled on the Tigers’ last play from scrimmage in last week’s 28-27 loss to Georgia, spoiling an otherwise dominant performance from the wideout. On Saturday, with Delaware State in town for what figured to be an epic mismatch, Moore dropped a simple pass from Drew Lock on the game’s first play from scrimmage. “That’s when I knew I was too comfortable,” Moore said. “When I dropped it, I was like, OK, I felt like I was trying to do something before I had it.” He made amends the rest of the night, finishing with eight catches for 114 yards and a team record-tying four touchdowns. Moore did all his damage in just two quarters of the Tigers’ 79-0 victory. He watched the second half from the sideline along with most of MU’s starters. How many touchdowns would he have scored had he played the whole game? “I don’t know. Probably eight or nine,” he said. Moore said he beat himself up after last week’s costly fumble, even though he was a big reason the Tigers kept pace with Georgia most of the night. He had eight catches for a careerbest 196 yards and a touchdown against the Bulldogs and climbed to the top of the SEC leaderboard for receiver statistics.

HILTON PROMOTED After his breakout game against Georgia, sophomore safety Cam Hilton found himself in the starting lineup Saturday at free safety, replacing multiyear starter Anthony Sherrils. It wasn’t anything Sherrils did wrong in practice, MU coach Barry Odom said. Hilton was just better. “It’s a great honor. It’s a dream of mine,” said Hilton, the former Webster Groves star who came to Mizzou last year to play safety, switched to receiver midseason then back to safety when Odom took over as head coach. He had an interception and pass breakup against Georgia. Hilton led MU’s secondary with four tackles Saturday and added a breakup. “Every once in a while a player needs something to get his swag back, get his feet back underneath him,” Lock said of Hilton. “He started to be confident again. It’s time for him to take of.”

RUNNING LOW ON RUNNING BACKS Ankle injuries to Alex Ross and Nate Strong left Mizzou with just three scholarship running backs Saturday. Ish Witter got the start but wasn’t very productive with 40 yards on nine carries. Instead, freshman Damarea Crocket had his best college game, breaking out with 115 yards and two touchdowns on just 12 carries. Ryan Williams played most of the second half and ran for 51 yards on nine carries. Odom’s only other option was walk-on freshman Dawson Downing, but he prefers to preserve his redshirt season. “I didn’t want to (play him) because he’s got a chance over five years to help our program,” Odom said.

INJURIES PILE UP The Tigers had to shuffle their offensive line a couple of times with injuries to interior linemen. Samson Bailey was held out with a sprained ankle he sufered last week against Georgia, forcing Alec Abeln (St. Louis U. High) to move from from right guard to center. Adam Ploudre, a walkon from Marquette High, made his first start at right guard. But Abeln came out of the game in the second quarter, also with an ankle injury. Jonah Dubinski and Michael Stannard split the center duties in the second half. Odom didn’t seem worried about Abeln’s availability longterm. Abeln “is not a very good dancer, but he was dancing in the locker room afterward, so I think he’s OK,” Odom said. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SEC FOOTBALL

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 3

SEC ROUNDUP

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C9 KELLY POWERS REBELS Mississippi quarterback CHAD KELLY threw for two touchdowns and ran for another as the Rebels dominated No. 12 Georgia. He passed Archie Manning for sixth place in school history with 5,901 yards of total ofense.

TOP PLAYER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mizzou dominates in record fashion

LSU quarterback Danny Etling (center) is tackled by Auburn linebacker Tre’ Williams (left) on Saturday.

Daniel Carlson kicked six field goals and Auburn beat No. 18 LSU 18-13 on Saturday night after oicials ruled Danny Etling’s apparent last-gasp scoring pass came after time expired. Etling rolled to his right and found D.J. Shark on a 15-yard pass, setting of a celebration by LSU players. Oicials ruled time expired before Etling took the snap. The celebration shifted to the Auburn sideline when oicials announced the decisive ruling. It was an important win for host Auburn (2-2, 1-1 Southeastern Conference) and coach Gus Malzahn, who faced increased criticism following losses to Top 25 opponents Clemson and Texas A&M. An illegal shift penalty against LSU (2-2, 1-1 SEC) left the Tigers with a fourthdown play from the 15 with 5 seconds remaining, setting up the final-play drama. No. 1 Alabama 48, Kent State 0 • Jalen Hurts ran and passed for a touchdown and tailback sub Joshua Jacobs scored his first two career touchdowns in host Alabama’s win. The Crimson Tide (4-0) dominated coach Nick Saban’s alma mater from the start while scoring on a kickof return and even a short touchdown throw to freshman linebacker Mack Wilson. The bad news for Alabama is starting tailback Damien Harris went down on the opening drive with an apparent right ankle injury and didn’t return. No. 23 Ole Miss 45, No. 12 Georgia 14 • Chad Kelly threw for 282 yards and two touchdowns and ran for another score to lead Mississippi to a win at home. The Rebels (2-2, 1-1) dominated every phase of the game, building a lead of 31-0 by halftime and 45-0 by midway through the third quarter. Ole Miss broke a 10-game losing streak in the series dating to 1996. Georgia (3-1, 1-1) lost its first game under new coach Kirby Smart and looked overmatched. To make matters worse, star running back Nick Chubb injured an ankle in the second quarter and didn’t return. Mississippi State 47, Massachusetts 35 • Aeris Williams ran for a 16-yard touchdown and Jamoral Graham returned an interception 38 yards for a score on the next play from scrimmage to help visiting Mississippi State erase a third-quarter deficit and beat Massachusetts. The two scores 17 seconds apart were followed four minutes later by a 13-yard touchdown pass from Nick Fitzgerald to Farrod Green that made it 41-21 just before the end of the third quarter. Fitzgerald completed 25 of 38 passes for 299 yards and three touchdowns, and he also ran for 110 yards for the Bulldogs (2-2). Vanderbilt 31, Western Kentucky 30 • Vanderbilt’s defense turned away a 2-point conversion play at the end of the first overtime as the Commodores escaped with a victory at Western Kentucky. Kyle Shurmur’s 5-yard pass to Nathan Marcus on the first possession of overtime gave Vanderbilt (2-2) its first lead of the game, and Tommy Openshaw added the point after for the Commodores. Kentucky 17, South Carolina 10 • Benny Snell Jr. scored the go-ahead touchdown from 1 yard midway through the fourth quarter, Boom Williams broke a 43-yard TD and host Kentucky held of South Carolina for its third straight series victory over the Gamecocks (2-2, 1-2). Inconsistent ofensively in the first half, the Wildcats (2-2, 1-1) got going after halftime with another strong performance by their hard-charging backfield tandem. Associated Press

SEC STANDINGS EAST Tennessee Florida Georgia Kentucky Missouri Vanderbilt South Carolina WEST Alabama Texas A&M Auburn LSU Mississippi State Mississippi Arkansas

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WR Moore rebounds from gafe BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Carlson’s six field goals lift Auburn past No. 18 LSU

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MU NOTEBOOK

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NEXT SATURDAY’S GAMES Texas A&M at South Alcorn State at Carolina, 3 p.m. Arkansas, 11 a.m. Kentucky at Alabama, Florida at Vanderbilt, 6 p.m. 11 a.m. Memphis at Tennessee at Georgia, Mississippi, 6 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Missouri at LSU, La.-Monroe at 6:30 p.m. Auburn, 2:30 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Delaware State QB Daniel Epperson (right) is hit by Mizzou’s Charles Harris on Saturday.

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Things couldn’t have started worse for Missouri on Saturday in a game that was supposed to be a mismatch from every angle. Johnathon Johnson hesitated when he picked up Delaware State’s opening kickoff around the goal line and managed just a short return — all negated by a block in the back penalty. The Tigers’ first drive would start on their 6-yard line. “That opening kickoff,” Mizzou coach Barry Odom later said, “against a really good team you’re putting your offense in a bad, bad spot. That’s not acceptable.” It was about the only nit Odom could pick. Realistically, Saturday’s game was over when the schools signed the contract that paid Delaware State $525,000 to take a beating on Faurot Field. After the first hiccup, both teams held up their end of the bargain. The Tigers needed only a minute and 54 seconds and nine plays to move the ball 94 yards for the game-opening and game-winning points. The rest was just details as the Football Championship Subdivision Hornets earned their payday in a 79-0 annihilation. A week after a crushing one-point loss to Georgia, Mizzou surged ahead 30-0 after the first quarter, 58-0 at halftime and by the third quarter had most of its starters on the sideline. At halftime, Delaware State agreed to a shortened second half with 10-minute quarters. As the seconds ticked off, Mizzou’s only real challenge was trying not to score 100 points. “Personally, I like to run up,” MU safety Cam Hilton said. “But I don’t think we’ve got three digits on the scoreboard.” The Tigers had to settle for a record-setting performance, albeit against what might have been the most overmatched team to visit Memorial Stadium since its construction in 1926. Before Saturday, Missouri’s single-game scoring record in the modern era was 69, set three times, most recently in a 69-0 win over Western Illinois in 2011. In the team’s third game in the program’s inaugural season in 1890, MU beat a team of engineering students 90-0, but because it wasn’t an intercollegiate contest Mizzou doesn’t count that game as the most lopsided win — even though

Missouri 79, Delaware St. 0 Delaware St. 0 0 0 0 — 0 Missouri 30 28 14 7 — 79 First Quarter MIZ: Witter 2 run (McCann kick), 13:17 MIZ: J’.Moore 4 pass from Lock (kick failed), 9:19 MIZ: FG McCann 31, 5:41 MIZ: J’.Moore 6 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 4:15 MIZ: J’.Moore 9 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 2:26 Second Quarter MIZ: Crockett 2 run (McCann kick), 11:02 MIZ: J’.Moore 1 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 7:23 MIZ: Crockett 11 run (McCann kick), 5:29 MIZ: E.Hall 35 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 2:24 Third Quarter MIZ: Zanders 11 run (McCann kick), 5:57 MIZ: Laurent 2 pass from Zanders (McCann kick), 3:18 Fourth Quarter MIZ: Zanders 14 run (McCann kick), 8:24 A: 53,472. DLS MIZ First downs 8 34 Rushes-yards 26-44 39-268 Passing 96 430 Comp-Att-Int 12-27-2 29-39-0 Return Yards 137 79 Punts-Avg. 10-30.2 1-45.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-0 Penalties-Yards 6-45 6-60 Time of Possession 25:01 34:59 Rushing: Delaware St., Waters 7-31, Alleyne 9-21, S.Bendolph 3-6, Lain 1-0, Rivera 2-(minus 4), Hannah 1-(minus 5), Epperson 3-(minus 5). Missouri, Crockett 12-115, Zanders 7-83, R.Williams 9-51, Witter 9-40, (Team) 2-(minus 21). Passing: Delaware St., Lain 7-15-1-82, Epperson 3-9-1-7, Rivera 2-3-0-7. Missouri, Lock 26-36-0-402, Zanders 2-2-0-17, Fatony 1-1-0-11. Receiving: Delaware St., Scott 2-32, Sua-Godinet 2-29, Waters 2-11, Alleyne 2-7, I.Williams 2-4, Rutherford 1-10, Hannah 1-3. Missouri, Mason 8-120, J’.Moore 8-114, E.Hall 7-122, C.Black 2-29, J.Johnson 1-22, Sherrils 1-11, Scales 1-10, Laurent 1-2. Missed Field Goals: None.

the victory is counted in the school’s all-time total. By the third quarter, Odom did his best to empty his bench as the Tigers simplified their ofense and defense to melt time of the clock as fast as possible. “They didn’t give me any book on how to handle that in the second half,” Odom said. Odom’s team will snap back to reality this week when it prepares for Saturday’s game against Louisiana State at Tiger Stadium, Mizzou’s first visit to Baton Rouge, La. LSU (2-2) is the only Southeastern Conference team the Tigers haven’t played since joining the league in 2012. For senior linebacker Michael Scherer, LSU was on his mind all of last week, even though the Tigers strictly prepared for Delaware State and didn’t sneak a peek at LSU’s schemes and formations during practice. “No offense to (Delaware State),” Scherer said, “but when you play a team like this you’ve got to have something that gets you up and going and ready to practice.” M issouri director of football operations Mike McHugh approached Odom late in the second quarter about asking Delaware State to play shorter quarters in the second half. The Hornets obliged. NCAA rules allow teams to mutually agree to shorten the game time but prohibit using a running

clock. Clemson and South Carolina State made a similar arrangement last week, cutting the third and fourth quarters to 12 minutes in Clemson’s 59-0 win. “I didn’t even know (the officials) can do that,” Mizzou receiver J’Mon Moore said. “I was like, ‘Cool.’” As an announced crowd of 53,472 filed into Memorial Stadium for what turned into a glorified scrimmage, Drew Lock’s record-tying day was already underway with three touchdown passes in the game’s first 13 minutes, with all three going to Moore. Lock was lifted for good late in the second quarter and finished with 402 yards passing and five touchdowns, matching the single-game school record he also set two weeks ago against Eastern Michigan. Moore, also playing just the first half, caught eight balls for 114 yards and four touchdowns, which tied the team’s single-game record, set by Dorial Green-Beckham at Kentucky in 2013. Lock kept his other outside receivers busy, too. Emanuel Hall caught seven passes for 122 yards and a score. Dimetrios Mason added seven catches for 105 yards. Hall and Mason gave Mizzou six receivers to log 100-yard games through the season’s first four games. Saturday’s game also marked the first time since 2008 when the Tigers produced three 100yard receivers in one game. The defense contributed to the thrashing with four takeaways, including interceptions by Scherer and John Gibson. In the victory, Missouri outgained the Hornets in yardage 698-140 and allowed only 7 yards in the second half. The Tigers pulled of their first 99-yard touchdown drive since 2006, ending with Lock’s first touchdown pass to Moore. MU’s 79 points were the most scored by a Football Bowl Subdivision team this season. The backups had less time on the clock to pile up stats in the second half, but No. 2 quarterback Marvin Zanders made the most of his abbreviated play. He ran for two touchdowns and tossed a touchdown to Eric Laurent. By then, most Tigers had already turned their attention to next week. “My mind’s on LSU right now,” Hilton said. “Big preparation starting tonight and all through the week.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

C O LU M B I A , M O. • J’Mon Moore’s first play Saturday ended much like the last time he touched the ball on Faurot Field. Missouri’s junior wide receiver fumbled on the Tigers’ last play from scrimmage in last week’s 28-27 loss to Georgia, spoiling an otherwise dominant performance from the wideout. On Saturday, with Delaware State in town for what figured to be an epic mismatch, Moore dropped a simple pass from Drew Lock on the game’s first play from scrimmage. “That’s when I knew I was too comfortable,” Moore said. “When I dropped it, I was like, OK, I felt like I was trying to do something before I had it.” He made amends the rest of the day, finishing with eight catches for 114 yards and a team record-tying four touchdowns. Moore did all his damage in just two quarters of the Tigers’ 79-0 victory. He watched the second half from the sideline along with most of MU’s starters. How many touchdowns would he have scored had he played the whole game? “I don’t know. Probably eight or nine,” he said. Moore said he beat himself up after last week’s costly fumble, even though he was a big reason the Tigers kept pace with Georgia most of the night. He had eight catches for a careerbest 196 yards and a touchdown against the Bulldogs and climbed to the top of the SEC leaderboard for receiver statistics.

HILTON PROMOTED After his breakout game against Georgia, sophomore safety Cam Hilton found himself in the starting lineup Saturday at free safety, replacing multiyear starter Anthony Sherrils. It wasn’t anything Sherrils did wrong in practice, MU coach Barry Odom said. Hilton was just better. “It’s a great honor. It’s a dream of mine,” said Hilton, the former Webster Groves star who came to Mizzou last year to play safety, switched to receiver midseason then back to safety when Odom took over as head coach. He had an interception and pass breakup against Georgia. Hilton led MU’s secondary with four tackles Saturday and added a breakup. “Every once in a while a player needs something to get his swag back, get his feet back underneath him,” Lock said of Hilton. “He started to be confident again. It’s time for him to take of.”

RUNNING LOW ON RUNNING BACKS Ankle injuries to Alex Ross and Nate Strong left Mizzou with just three scholarship running backs Saturday. Ish Witter got the start but wasn’t very productive with 40 yards on nine carries. Instead, freshman Damarea Crocket had his best college game, breaking out with 115 yards and two touchdowns on just 12 carries. Ryan Williams played most of the second half and ran for 51 yards on nine carries. Odom’s only other option was walk-on freshman Dawson Downing, but he prefers to preserve his redshirt season. “I didn’t want to (play him) because he’s got a chance over five years to help our program,” Odom said.

INJURIES PILE UP The Tigers had to shuffle their offensive line a couple of times with injuries to interior linemen. Samson Bailey was held out with a sprained ankle he sufered last week against Georgia, forcing Alec Abeln (St. Louis U. High) to move from from right guard to center. Adam Ploudre, a walkon from Marquette High, made his first start at right guard. But Abeln came out of the game in the second quarter, also with an ankle injury. Jonah Dubinski and Michael Stannard split the center duties in the second half. Odom didn’t seem worried about Abeln’s availability longterm. Abeln “is not a very good dancer, but he was dancing in the locker room afterward, so I think he’s OK,” Odom said. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SEC FOOTBALL

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 4

SEC ROUNDUP

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C9 KELLY POWERS REBELS Mississippi quarterback CHAD KELLY threw for two touchdowns and ran for another as the Rebels dominated No. 12 Georgia. He passed Archie Manning for sixth place in school history with 5,901 yards of total ofense.

TOP PLAYER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mizzou dominates in record fashion

LSU quarterback Danny Etling (center) is tackled by Auburn linebacker Tre’ Williams (left) on Saturday.

Daniel Carlson kicked six field goals and Auburn beat No. 18 LSU 18-13 on Saturday night after oicials ruled Danny Etling’s apparent last-gasp scoring pass came after time expired. Etling rolled to his right and found D.J. Shark on a 15-yard pass, setting of a celebration by the LSU Tigers (2-2, 1-1 Southeastern Conference). Oicials ruled time expired before Etling took the snap. The celebration shifted to the Auburn Tigers’ (2-2, 1-1) sideline when oicials announced the decisive ruling. No. 1 Alabama 48, Kent State 0 • Jalen Hurts ran and passed for a touchdown and tailback sub Joshua Jacobs scored his first two career touchdowns in host Alabama’s win. The Crimson Tide (4-0) dominated coach Nick Saban’s alma mater from the start while scoring on a kickof return and even a short touchdown throw to freshman linebacker Mack Wilson. The bad news for Alabama is starting tailback Damien Harris went down on the opening drive with an apparent right ankle injury and didn’t return. No. 10 Texas A&M 45, No. 17 Arkansas 24 • Trevor Knight had two long touchdowns before halftime and threw a 92-yard pass to Josh Reynolds right after visiting Arkansas was stopped three times from the 1, and Texas A&M beat the Razorbacks. Reynolds caught the ball in stride just short of midfield, and quickly shed defensive back DJ Dean on his way to the end zone to break a 17-all tie and put the Aggies (4-0, 2-0) ahead to stay. Texas A&M has won five straight against the Razorbacks (3-1, 0-1), all since joining the SEC in 2012. No. 23 Ole Miss 45, No. 12 Georgia 14 • Chad Kelly threw for 282 yards and two touchdowns and ran for another score to lead Mississippi to a win at home. The Rebels (2-2, 1-1) dominated every phase of the game, building a lead of 31-0 by halftime and 45-0 by midway through the third quarter. Georgia (3-1, 1-1) lost its first game under new coach Kirby Smart and looked overmatched. To make matters worse, star running back Nick Chubb injured an ankle in the second quarter and didn’t return. Mississippi State 47, Massachusetts 35 • Aeris Williams ran for a 16-yard touchdown and Jamoral Graham returned an interception 38 yards for a score on the next play from scrimmage to help visiting Mississippi State (2-2) erase a thirdquarter deficit and beat Massachusetts. The two scores 17 seconds apart were followed four minutes later by a 13-yard touchdown pass from Nick Fitzgerald to Farrod Green that made it 41-21 just before the end of the third quarter. Vanderbilt 31, Western Kentucky 30 • Vanderbilt’s defense turned away a 2-point conversion play at the end of the first overtime as the Commodores escaped with a victory at Western Kentucky. Kyle Shurmur’s 5-yard pass to Nathan Marcus on the first possession of overtime gave Vanderbilt (2-2) its first lead of the game, and Tommy Openshaw added the point after for the Commodores. Kentucky 17, South Carolina 10 • Benny Snell Jr. scored the go-ahead touchdown from 1 yard midway through the fourth quarter, Boom Williams broke a 43-yard TD and host Kentucky held of South Carolina for its third straight series victory over the Gamecocks (2-2, 1-2). Inconsistent ofensively in the first half, the Wildcats (2-2, 1-1) got going after halftime with another strong performance by their hard-charging backfield tandem. Associated Press

SEC STANDINGS EAST Tennessee Florida Georgia Kentucky Missouri Vanderbilt South Carolina WEST Texas A&M Alabama Auburn LSU Mississippi State Mississippi Arkansas

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WR Moore rebounds from gafe BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Carlson’s six field goals lift Auburn past No. 18 LSU

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MU NOTEBOOK

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Total W 4 3 3 2 2 2 2

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NEXT SATURDAY’S GAMES Texas A&M at South Alcorn State at Carolina, 3 p.m. Arkansas, 11 a.m. Kentucky at Alabama, Florida at Vanderbilt, 6 p.m. 11 a.m. Memphis at Tennessee at Georgia, Mississippi, 6 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Missouri at LSU, La.-Monroe at 6:30 p.m. Auburn, 2:30 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Delaware State QB Daniel Epperson (right) is hit by Mizzou’s Charles Harris on Saturday.

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Things couldn’t have started worse for Missouri on Saturday in a game that was supposed to be a mismatch from every angle. Johnathon Johnson hesitated when he picked up Delaware State’s opening kickoff around the goal line and managed just a short return — all negated by a block in the back penalty. The Tigers’ first drive would start on their 6-yard line. “That opening kickoff,” Mizzou coach Barry Odom later said, “against a really good team you’re putting your offense in a bad, bad spot. That’s not acceptable.” It was about the only nit Odom could pick. Realistically, Saturday’s game was over when the schools signed the contract that paid Delaware State $525,000 to take a beating on Faurot Field. After the first hiccup, both teams held up their end of the bargain. The Tigers needed only a minute and 54 seconds and nine plays to move the ball 94 yards for the game-opening and game-winning points. The rest was just details as the Football Championship Subdivision Hornets earned their payday in a 79-0 annihilation. A week after a crushing one-point loss to Georgia, Mizzou surged ahead 30-0 after the first quarter, 58-0 at halftime and by the third quarter had most of its starters on the sideline. At halftime, Delaware State agreed to a shortened second half with 10-minute quarters. As the seconds ticked off, Mizzou’s only real challenge was trying not to score 100 points. “Personally, I like to run up,” MU safety Cam Hilton said. “But I don’t think we’ve got three digits on the scoreboard.” The Tigers had to settle for a record-setting performance, albeit against what might have been the most overmatched team to visit Memorial Stadium since its construction in 1926. Before Saturday, Missouri’s single-game scoring record in the modern era was 69, set three times, most recently in a 69-0 win over Western Illinois in 2011. In the team’s third game in the program’s inaugural season in 1890, MU beat a team of engineering students 90-0, but because it wasn’t an intercollegiate contest Mizzou doesn’t count that game as the most lopsided win — even though

Missouri 79, Delaware St. 0 Delaware St. 0 0 0 0 — 0 Missouri 30 28 14 7 — 79 First Quarter MIZ: Witter 2 run (McCann kick), 13:17 MIZ: J’.Moore 4 pass from Lock (kick failed), 9:19 MIZ: FG McCann 31, 5:41 MIZ: J’.Moore 6 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 4:15 MIZ: J’.Moore 9 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 2:26 Second Quarter MIZ: Crockett 2 run (McCann kick), 11:02 MIZ: J’.Moore 1 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 7:23 MIZ: Crockett 11 run (McCann kick), 5:29 MIZ: E.Hall 35 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 2:24 Third Quarter MIZ: Zanders 11 run (McCann kick), 5:57 MIZ: Laurent 2 pass from Zanders (McCann kick), 3:18 Fourth Quarter MIZ: Zanders 14 run (McCann kick), 8:24 A: 53,472. DLS MIZ First downs 8 34 Rushes-yards 26-44 39-268 Passing 96 430 Comp-Att-Int 12-27-2 29-39-0 Return Yards 137 79 Punts-Avg. 10-30.2 1-45.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-0 Penalties-Yards 6-45 6-60 Time of Possession 25:01 34:59 Rushing: Delaware St., Waters 7-31, Alleyne 9-21, S.Bendolph 3-6, Lain 1-0, Rivera 2-(minus 4), Hannah 1-(minus 5), Epperson 3-(minus 5). Missouri, Crockett 12-115, Zanders 7-83, R.Williams 9-51, Witter 9-40, (Team) 2-(minus 21). Passing: Delaware St., Lain 7-15-1-82, Epperson 3-9-1-7, Rivera 2-3-0-7. Missouri, Lock 26-36-0-402, Zanders 2-2-0-17, Fatony 1-1-0-11. Receiving: Delaware St., Scott 2-32, Sua-Godinet 2-29, Waters 2-11, Alleyne 2-7, I.Williams 2-4, Rutherford 1-10, Hannah 1-3. Missouri, Mason 8-120, J’.Moore 8-114, E.Hall 7-122, C.Black 2-29, J.Johnson 1-22, Sherrils 1-11, Scales 1-10, Laurent 1-2. Missed Field Goals: None.

the victory is counted in the school’s all-time total. By the third quarter, Odom did his best to empty his bench as the Tigers simplified their ofense and defense to melt time of the clock as fast as possible. “They didn’t give me any book on how to handle that in the second half,” Odom said. Odom’s team will snap back to reality this week when it prepares for Saturday’s game against Louisiana State at Tiger Stadium, Mizzou’s first visit to Baton Rouge, La. LSU (2-2) is the only Southeastern Conference team the Tigers haven’t played since joining the league in 2012. For senior linebacker Michael Scherer, LSU was on his mind all of last week, even though the Tigers strictly prepared for Delaware State and didn’t sneak a peek at LSU’s schemes and formations during practice. “No offense to (Delaware State),” Scherer said, “but when you play a team like this you’ve got to have something that gets you up and going and ready to practice.” M issouri director of football operations Mike McHugh approached Odom late in the second quarter about asking Delaware State to play shorter quarters in the second half. The Hornets obliged. NCAA rules allow teams to mutually agree to shorten the game time but prohibit using a running

clock. Clemson and South Carolina State made a similar arrangement last week, cutting the third and fourth quarters to 12 minutes in Clemson’s 59-0 win. “I didn’t even know (the officials) can do that,” Mizzou receiver J’Mon Moore said. “I was like, ‘Cool.’” As an announced crowd of 53,472 filed into Memorial Stadium for what turned into a glorified scrimmage, Drew Lock’s record-tying day was already underway with three touchdown passes in the game’s first 13 minutes, with all three going to Moore. Lock was lifted for good late in the second quarter and finished with 402 yards passing and five touchdowns, matching the single-game school record he also set two weeks ago against Eastern Michigan. Moore, also playing just the first half, caught eight balls for 114 yards and four touchdowns, which tied the team’s single-game record, set by Dorial Green-Beckham at Kentucky in 2013. Lock kept his other outside receivers busy, too. Emanuel Hall caught seven passes for 122 yards and a score. Dimetrios Mason added seven catches for 105 yards. Hall and Mason gave Mizzou six receivers to log 100-yard games through the season’s first four games. Saturday’s game also marked the first time since 2008 when the Tigers produced three 100yard receivers in one game. The defense contributed to the thrashing with four takeaways, including interceptions by Scherer and John Gibson. In the victory, Missouri outgained the Hornets in yardage 698-140 and allowed only 7 yards in the second half. The Tigers pulled of their first 99-yard touchdown drive since 2006, ending with Lock’s first touchdown pass to Moore. MU’s 79 points were the most scored by a Football Bowl Subdivision team this season. The backups had less time on the clock to pile up stats in the second half, but No. 2 quarterback Marvin Zanders made the most of his abbreviated play. He ran for two touchdowns and tossed a touchdown to Eric Laurent. By then, most Tigers had already turned their attention to next week. “My mind’s on LSU right now,” Hilton said. “Big preparation starting tonight and all through the week.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

C O LU M B I A , M O. • J’Mon Moore’s first play Saturday ended much like the last time he touched the ball on Faurot Field. Missouri’s junior wide receiver fumbled on the Tigers’ last play from scrimmage in last week’s 28-27 loss to Georgia, spoiling an otherwise dominant performance from the wideout. On Saturday, with Delaware State in town for what figured to be an epic mismatch, Moore dropped a simple pass from Drew Lock on the game’s first play from scrimmage. “That’s when I knew I was too comfortable,” Moore said. “When I dropped it, I was like, OK, I felt like I was trying to do something before I had it.” He made amends the rest of the day, finishing with eight catches for 114 yards and a team record-tying four touchdowns. Moore did all his damage in just two quarters of the Tigers’ 79-0 victory. He watched the second half from the sideline along with most of MU’s starters. How many touchdowns would he have scored had he played the whole game? “I don’t know. Probably eight or nine,” he said. Moore said he beat himself up after last week’s costly fumble, even though he was a big reason the Tigers kept pace with Georgia most of the night. He had eight catches for a careerbest 196 yards and a touchdown against the Bulldogs and climbed to the top of the SEC leaderboard for receiver statistics.

HILTON PROMOTED After his breakout game against Georgia, sophomore safety Cam Hilton found himself in the starting lineup Saturday at free safety, replacing multiyear starter Anthony Sherrils. It wasn’t anything Sherrils did wrong in practice, MU coach Barry Odom said. Hilton was just better. “It’s a great honor. It’s a dream of mine,” said Hilton, the former Webster Groves star who came to Mizzou last year to play safety, switched to receiver midseason then back to safety when Odom took over as head coach. He had an interception and pass breakup against Georgia. Hilton led MU’s secondary with four tackles Saturday and added a breakup. “Every once in a while a player needs something to get his swag back, get his feet back underneath him,” Lock said of Hilton. “He started to be confident again. It’s time for him to take of.”

RUNNING LOW ON RUNNING BACKS Ankle injuries to Alex Ross and Nate Strong left Mizzou with just three scholarship running backs Saturday. Ish Witter got the start but wasn’t very productive with 40 yards on nine carries. Instead, freshman Damarea Crocket had his best college game, breaking out with 115 yards and two touchdowns on just 12 carries. Ryan Williams played most of the second half and ran for 51 yards on nine carries. Odom’s only other option was walk-on freshman Dawson Downing, but he prefers to preserve his redshirt season. “I didn’t want to (play him) because he’s got a chance over five years to help our program,” Odom said.

INJURIES PILE UP The Tigers had to shuffle their offensive line a couple of times with injuries to interior linemen. Samson Bailey was held out with a sprained ankle he sufered last week against Georgia, forcing Alec Abeln (St. Louis U. High) to move from from right guard to center. Adam Ploudre, a walkon from Marquette High, made his first start at right guard. But Abeln came out of the game in the second quarter, also with an ankle injury. Jonah Dubinski and Michael Stannard split the center duties in the second half. Odom didn’t seem worried about Abeln’s availability longterm. Abeln “is not a very good dancer, but he was dancing in the locker room afterward, so I think he’s OK,” Odom said. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.25.2016

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Paul Stastny, Shattenkirk bemoan World Cup losses Veterans left of squad feel bad for Team USA

the decision-makers who chose the roster, didn’t go over so well with some of the U.S. players, including former Blue David Backes. “Those comments don’t get lost in the fray and those comments are there, and have been read and I think will be remembered when whatever happens going forward happens going forward,” he said. Did Shattenkirk consider tweeting anything? “No,” he said, chuckling. “I value my relationship with USA Hockey a little too much.”

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Between them, the Blues’ Paul Stastny and Kevin Shattenkirk have represented the United States in three Olympics and four world championships, so they’re no strangers when it comes to the Stars and Stripes and international hockey. And while they weren’t chosen this time for the United States team at the World Cup of Hockey, both watched the event — and the American team going 0-3 in group play — with interest. “I think it’s, not sad, it’s shocking,” said Stastny, who was on the Olympic team in 2010 and ’14. “No one expected that. If they win that first game (against Team Europe), everything is completely different. ... Obviously (Canada), they’re the favorites (in the group), but maybe they were underestimating Europe, or maybe looking ahead. Those are the mistakes teams make. If I’m on that team, I’m probably thinking more about Canada because … you know that’s your big game because you think if you

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Yan Stastny (left) jokes with Kevin Shattenkirk during the irst day of Blues training camp Friday at Scottrade Center. Eight players were absent from the irst day because of the World Cup; four others weren’t on the ice because of minor injuries.

beat them you’re going to win the group. Europe played a smart game, kind of a savvy, played like Sweden almost.” “It’s unfortunate,” said Shattenkirk, who was at the Sochi Games in 2014. “I have a lot of buddies on that team and I feel for them. It’s obviously not the result they wanted. They were hoping to play a different style of game, and it didn’t work out. I know if I were in that situation and in that locker room it would be a pretty low feeling. It’s a tough one to see, especially when

you know some of the guys on that team.” Both Stastny and Shattenkirk were mentioned after the U.S. team was eliminated as players whose presence could have helped the Americans. Phil Kessel, another American who was left off the team, tweeted after the Canada loss that knocked out the U.S. team: “Just sitting around the house tonight w my dog. Felt like I should be doing something important, but couldn’t put my finger on it.” That line, though directed at

TAKING ATTENDANCE In addition to the eight players who were absent from the first day of camp because of the World Cup, four other players weren’t on the ice because of minor injuries. Goalie Luke Opilka has been out since having offseason hip surgery and won’t be back for at least another month. Three other prospects got banged up while playing for the Blues’ team at the just-concluded prospects tournament in Traverse City, Mich., and are considered day-to-day: defensemen Vince Dunn and Thomas Vannelli and forward Filip Helt. Dunn sat out two of the four games at Traverse City; Vannelli and Helt played in each. “We’ll see in the morning which guys can join us,” coach

Ken Hitchcock said. “Obviously by them all being here they’re expected in some period of time to be back on the ice. But right now, none of them can skate today, and we’ll evaluate that day to day now.” Three of the four Blues who have already been eliminated from the World Cup — Jori Lehtera, Dmitrij Jaskin and Colton Parayko — were scheduled to fly back to St. Louis on Friday (Vladimir Sobotka’s status remains uncertain), but after playing in a high-level competition for two weeks, there’s no rush to get them on the ice here. Hitchcock said it won’t be until next week. “We’ll see how they feel physically,” he said. “We’re not in any hurry. We don’t need them on the ice right now. We’ve got lots of guys we need to evaluate so they can stay of the ice through the weekend and we’ll see how it is the first of next week.”

OPEN HOUSE Saturday’s practice session is open to the public at Scottrade Center. Doors open at 9:30 and practices will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free; parking is $5 in the Kiel Center garage. Concession stands will be open. Tom Timmermann @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Steen is one of four under contract for 2020-21 STEEN • FROM C1

The breakdown of Steen’s front-loaded extension: $7 million in 2017-18, $7 million in 2018-19, $5.5 million in 2019-20 and $3.5 million in 2020-21. It will make him one of four Blues already under contract for that season, including Vladimir Tarasenko, Jaden Schwartz and Jake Allen. “It says a lot about what’s important to him,” Blues general manager Doug Armstrong said. “We all know that free agency was an option for him, but he stepped up and over the course of the summer made it clear he wanted to find a solution to stay in St. Louis, and from our perspective we made it clear he was a player we wanted to keep here in St. Louis. We’re excited to have him on board. He’s a big part of our leadership group now and in the future.” Of those Blues signed to the lengthiest term, Steen is 6 years older than Allen and 8 years older than both Tarasenko and Schwartz. His signing thus comes of as a strong endorsement for the Blues’ imme-

diate future, which has come into question with the exits of David Backes, Troy Brouwer and Brian Elliott. “The big thing is you want to win, and you want to make sure you’re in a position to challenge for the (Stanley) Cup, not just once but on a year-to-year basis,” Steen said. “Part of the business is changing the outlook of the team sometimes. Chicago has gone through it, and this was kind of our turn. It was obviously disappointing to lose guys like we did, but that’s part of the business. “I like where we’re at. We’ve got some young guys that are going to move up, that bring a diferent dynamic to our team, and we’ll be leaning on them a lot more than we might have in the past. They’re not just ready, but they’re itching to have that responsibility. It’s up to myself and some of the veteran guys to help them along the way, but they’re ready.” One veteran who had held that responsibility was Backes, who went to Boston in free agency. Both Backes and Steen are

32, and while the Blues wouldn’t match the Bruins’ five-year deal for Backes at $6 million per season, they are giving Steen a similar deal that will take him to age 37. Armstrong cited the difference in Steen’s style of play. The more physical Backes has 2,061 hits in the NHL and Steen has 361, which could lead to a quicker decline for Backes. “(Steen’s) style, it’s a 200-foot game, but it’s based on skating,” Armstrong said. “So he plays the game diferently than a north-south and arrive there with ill-will (player). There’s always risk when you’re going out (to age 37), but he was certainly someone that I felt very comfortable that if you’re going assume these risks, he’s the player that we wanted to assume it with.” The deal overshadowed the wait for Sobotka, whose participation in the World Cup of Hockey ended with the Czech Republic’s elimination. But whether he will be coming to St. Louis or back to Russia for the final year of his contract with Omsk of the Kontinental Hockey League

remains unclear. Sources say Sobotka wants to be a Blue again, but the KHL has yet to release him. “I met with he and his agent here, and it’s complicated to say the least with the Russians,” Armstrong said. “They’re dealing with it again (Friday) and hopefully we’re going to have this resolved one way or the other certainly by Sunday. It’s more complicated than I was led to believe over the summer and that part’s disappointing. They’re working on getting something done, and I’m hoping they can. “He’s either got to come to our camp and start playing or got to go back to the KHL and start playing. We want him back, and the conversations are he wants to come back. ... Ultimately, they’re working on trying to get something done and I’m hoping they can.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Cubs fan has a good reason for her allegiance HOCHMAN • FROM C1

The reigning Cy Young Award winner and Cubs star starter was born 30 years ago in nearby Farmington. New parents Lou and Lynda Arrieta moved to Texas four months later, but Lynda’s mother remained in Missouri. And now, at 76, Nancy Sheets is probably the biggest Cubs fan in Cardinals country. She watches every single Cubs game — not just every fifth one — sometimes in her light-blue Cubs T-shirt or bundled in her Cubs blanket, but always wearing her baseball-glove necklace, a gift from Jake. “I put it on the first day of spring training,” Nancy said, “and I don’t take it of until the season is over.” On Friday afternoon, Arrieta pitched in Chicago against the Cardinals. “I’ve said several prayers,” Nancy said, moments before the first pitch. “I started last night.” In the carpeted living room, there are two plush chairs and a couch, but it does not matter – Nancy will be standing. Well, pacing. Her hair is as white as home plate, and as she spots her grandson, her smile is as wide as a strike zone. Jake’s grandfather died in 2003. Nancy married Jerry Sheets three years later. They knew each other from church. Today, Jerry is controlling the remote, while Nancy tries to control her emotions. “Nervous, nervous, nervous!” she said. “You’d think I wouldn’t be nervous because I watched him all these years.” When she cheers, she often repeats a word – “Yes! Yes!” – or a sound – “Woo! Woo!” She watches pitches with her left hand gently pressed upon her chin. And when she celebrates, as when Jake struck out the first two batters in the first, she sticks her right arm in the air and opens her palm, like she’s trying to get the teacher’s attention. “She was over at her sister’s one night, and tore up the light!” Jerry said. “I didn’t mean to!” Nancy replied. “I jumped up and ilable

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BENJAMIN HOCHMAN • bhochman@post-dispatch.com

Nancy Sheets, the grandmother of Cubs star pitcher Jake Arrieta, at her home in Desloge, Mo.

the light was kind of low. And I broke it. It was glass.” “I was sittin’ there on the couch!” Jerry said. “Couldn’t believe it.” Two outs, two strikes on Stephen Piscotty. “Come on, one more,” Nancy said, as a fastball froze the Cardinal to end the inning. “He’s listening to his Nanny! He calls me Nanny.”

GETTING TOGETHER Nancy and Jerry’s first date was in Festus. “Pogolino’s Pizza Place,” Nancy said. Jerry Sheets lost his wife in 2004. In due time, he felt comfortable with Nancy. “We started going to church together,” Jerry said. “And we got married down in Branson in 2006.” Jerry used to play his acoustic guitar at church, years ago. Now he plays at home for Nancy — perhaps some Merle Haggard or Don Williams — or at local nursing homes, performing bluegrass, gospel or country. “He sings well,” Nancy said. The two occasionally go out to dinner, and seemingly every time that Nancy wears a Cubs shirt, someone will say, as Nancy excitedly imitated in a high-pitched voice: “What are you doing wearing?” She’ll politely explain to the Cardinals fans that her grandson is a Cub. “They can’t believe it sometimes!” she said. “They’ll want their picture taken with me.” It happens at Colton’s Steak House & Grill. And The Pasta House Co. Even at the service station at Cherokee Pass, where Jerry parked his motorcycle, “And a lady comes out and jumped all over me: ‘Whuddya wearing a Cubs shirt in here for?’” It gives the proud grandmother and step-grandfather a chance to show of. “And for a long time,” she said, “the days that he pitched, I would get blue helium balloons and tie them

outside our house, on our little bench.” They don’t like the Cubs down in Desloge, but they do like Jake Arrieta. OK, but maybe just a little less on Friday. Nancy’s grandson struck out 10 Cardinals in his seven scoreless innings pitched, as he earned his 18th win of the season. Jake’s earned run average dipped to 2.85. And he allowed just five hits, so his opponents’ batting average is .186, the lowest of any starting pitcher in Major League Baseball.

DEEP ROOTS When Arrieta was a boy, his grandfather would pick him up in a plane. Nancy’s first husband, Sonny, was a pilot of a small aircraft. Sonny would scoop up his first grandson in Texas and bring him to Missouri. And then sometimes, before they’d fly back to Texas, they’d first play catch in a nearby ballyard. “My late husband would have been so proud,” Nancy said. Nancy’s father has since passed, too. Herschel. He lived on a farm in Frankclay, an unincorporated community five miles west of the Flat River. On a wall near her living room, Nancy pointed out important family photos — Sonny, with his distinguished mustache; Jake, just married with his wife and a smile; Herschel, an elderly man next to a horse. Jake’s mother and little Jake sat atop. Turns out Arrieta’s great-grandpa, who died about two decades ago, was a huge Cardinals fan. “My dad was a farmer, an old-time farmer,” Nancy said, “and wore bibbed overalls with a long-sleeved shirt. But when then the Cardinals played, he’d put a Cardinals shirt on – and tennis shoes.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

TOP 25 ROUNDUP

M 2 • SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 REALLY COOKING

TOP PLAYER

Florida State junior Dalvin Cook ran for a career-high 267 yards and scored twice as the Seminoles routed previously unbeaten South Florida in Tampa.

Tennessee rally stuns Gators Volunteers score 38 consecutive points after falling behind 21-0 early ASSOCIATED PRESS ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan back De’Veon Smith (4) tries to rush by Penn State linebacker Jake Cooper (33) in the Wolverines’ Big Ten win over Nittany Lions on Saturday.

No. 4 Michigan rushes past Penn State Michigan quarterback Wilton Speight took a beating last week against Colorado. This week, he spent most of the day standing back and watching his teammates do all the work. De’Veon Smith led an overwhelming ground game with 107 yards rushing and a touchdown and Karan Higdon ran for two scores as fourth-ranked Michigan routed visiting Penn State 49-10 Saturday in both teams’ Big Ten opener. “We were looking for a way to be more careful out there so I wasn’t getting hit as much as I did last week,” Speight said. “Luckily, our ofensive line and our running backs were great. I think there was one time where we called the same play eight straight times, just flipping the sides, and we were picking up nine or 10 yards a pop. I was just laughing every time I got the same signal.” Michigan (4-0, 1-0 Big Ten) finished with 326 yards rushing and ran for six of its seven touchdowns. “I was really impressed by all of our running backs,” coach Jim Harbaugh said. “We were moving the chains and breaking of big runs.” The Nittany Lions (2-2, 0-1) were simply running out of bodies on defense. They came into the game missing three starting linebackers, lost Brandon Smith to a second-quarter targeting penalty then lost Jan Johnson to injury. “I don’t know if I’ve ever been through or seen anything like this,” Penn State coach James Franklin said. Penn State was overmatched on the other side of the ball as well. Saquon Barkley rushed for 59 yards and caught five passes for 77 more, but no one stepped up to help. “They are just physical on both fronts,” Franklin said. “The ofensive line is big and strong, and their defensive line is more of the same. Plus they’ve got one of the most talented secondaries in the country.” No. 13 Florida State 55, South Florida 35 • Dalvin Cook rushed for a career-high 267 yards and two touchdowns as the Seminoles rebounded from the most lopsided loss in school history with a rout of previously unbeaten South Florida. Cook scored on a 75-yard run on the Seminoles’ first play from scrimmage, an immediate response to USF starting the game with Quinton Flowers and Rodney Adams teaming on an 84-yard catch-and-run for a quick 7-0 lead. The 213-pound junior’s rushing total on 28 carries topped his previous best of 266 yards against South Florida last year. “It was very important to answer back. USF came out with a very aggressive game plan and we had to respond with points,” Cook said. “The ofensive line did a good job of giving me space, and I was one-on-one with the safety and I had to beat him.” Florida State (3-1) bounced back from being trounced 63-20 by Louisville, a road shellacking that dropped the Seminoles 11 spots in the AP Top 25 from No. 2. South Florida (3-1) is of to its fastest start since 2011, however the Bulls were no match for a talented bunch that began the season with expectations of contending for its second national title in four years. “I looked at this game as an opportunity for our football team to get a little more respect nationally,” South Florida coach Willie Taggart said. “We didn’t take advantage of that.”

OTHER NOTABLE GAMES Duke 38, Notre Dame 35 • AJ Reed kicked a 19-yard field goal with 84 seconds left as Duke rallied back from an early two-touchdown deficit to win in South Bend, Ind. Reed had missed all three of his field goal attempts this season before kicking the game winner. Daniel Jones threw for three touchdowns, including a 64-yard scoring pass to Anthony Nash midway through the fourth quarter to tie the score. Shaun Wilson returned a kickof 96 yards for a score to spark the Blue Devils (2-2) after they fell behind 14-0. The Duke defense set up the final touchdown when it sacked DeShone Kizer for a 7-yard loss at the 5-yard line and Deondre Singleton intercepted a pass at the Notre Dame 45. The Irish defense continued to struggle, giving up 30 or more points against Power Five teams for the seventh time in their last nine games. The student section chanted “Fire VanGorder,” referring to defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder. Jones was 24 of 32 passing for 290 yards. Nash had six catches for 123 yards. Jela Duncan ran for 121 yards and a touchdown on 21 carries. Kizer was 22 of 37 passing for 381 yards with two touchdowns, an intercepton and a fumble for the Irish (1-3). He threw a TD pass midway through the fourth quarter that put Notre Dame ahead for the first time since squandering a 14-0 lead, but the Irish couldn’t hang on. Syracuse 31, Connecticut 24 • Amba Etta-Tawo caught 12 passes for a school-record 270 yards and two touchdowns and visiting Syracuse beat UConn. The graduate transfer from Maryland scored twice in the game’s first five minutes on touchdown receptions of 57 and 30 yards. His 59-yard catch on third down from the shadow of his team’s goal line highlighted a 12-play 99-yard fourth quarter drive that put the game away for the Orange (2-2). Syracuse quarterback Eric Dungey threw for 407 yards. Associated Press

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KNOXVILLE, TENN. • This time, Tennessee delivered the comeback. And in the process, the Volunteers took out 11 years’ worth of frustration on Florida. Joshua Dobbs accounted for five second-half touchdowns Saturday and No. 14 Tennessee erased a 21-point deficit to beat No. 19 Florida 38-28 and end their 11-game losing streak in the annual series. “I didn’t see anybody blink,” Tennessee coach Butch Jones said. “Nobody flinched. They just kept playing.” This marks the first time Tennessee (4-0, 1-0 SEC) has beaten Florida (3-1, 1-1) since 2004. The Volunteers had lost to Florida by one point each of the last two years despite leading in the fourth quarter of both games. Florida was so confident it would continue the streak that Gators cornerback Quincy Wilson boldly said this week that “nobody has ever seen a duck pull a truck . Florida Gators are going to win, simple as that.” Tennessee silenced the Gators by reeling of 38 consecutive points. “I just kept looking at their body language on the sideline, and it was bad,” said Tennessee defensive end Derek Barnett, who recorded two sacks. “I think they worried about talking too much (rather than) focusing on playing football, and it showed at the end.” Tennessee safety Todd Kelly Jr. added that “it just looked like we took their soul, really.” Dobbs went 16 of 32 for 319 yards with four touchdowns and two interceptions. He also rushed for 80 yards and a touchdown. Trailing 21-0 early against the nation’s top-ranked defense, Tennessee stormed back and pulled ahead for good 24-21 with 12:45 left on Dobbs’ 67-yard completion to a wide-open Jauan Jennings, who bobbled the ball a few times near the right sideline before making the catch while staying inbounds. “They came in and took it to us,” Florida coach Jim McElwain said. “It’s disappointing. We’ve got a bunch of guys hurting in the locker room. ... These are life lessons. Not every day does everything go just like you wanted. I think the key is what you learn from it and how you’re going to respond.” Florida took an early 21-0 advantage on a pair of Austin Appleby

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tennessee quarterback Joshua Dobbs is tackled in the air by Florida defensive back Marcus Maye during the second half Saturday.

touchdown passes and a 1-yard run by Jordan Scarlett. Both Appleby touchdown passes were set up by long completions from Appleby to Antonio Callaway. The Gators led 21-3 at halftime. Appleby threw three touchdown passes and one interception while starting in place of Luke Del Rio, who injured his left knee last week in a 32-0 rout of North Texas. Twice in the first half, Tennessee got inside Florida’s 5-yard line and failed to score.

Wisconsin makes test on road look easy, routs Michigan State

“We came into the locker room and we said, ‘Don’t panic,’” Dobbs said. “It was simple. We’ve just got to execute. We’ve just got to play our brand of football. We were moving the ball on them the whole game.” Perhaps the Gators’ defense isn’t quite as good as its statistics suggested. A defense that had been allowing just 4.7 points and 129.7 yards per game couldn’t keep Tennessee’s offense out of the end zone in the second half.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED No. 1 Alabama (4-0) beat Kent State 48-0. Next: vs. Kentucky, Saturday. No. 2 Ohio State (3-0) idle. Next: vs. Rutgers, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 3 Louisville (3-0) at Marshall. Next: at No. 5 Clemson, Saturday. No. 4 Michigan (4-0) beat Penn State 49-10. Next: vs. No. 11 Wisconsin, Saturday. No. 5 Clemson (4-0) beat Georgia Tech 26-7, Thursday. Next: vs. No. 3 Louisville, Saturday. No. 6 Houston (4-0) beat Texas State 64-3. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday, Sept. 29. No. 7 Stanford (2-0) at UCLA. Next: at No. 9 Washington, Friday, Sept. 30. No. 8 Michigan State (2-1) lost to No. 11 Wisconsin 30-6. Next: at Indiana, Saturday. No. 9 Washington (3-0) at Arizona. Next: vs. No. 7 Stanford, Friday, Sept. 30. No. 10 Texas A&M (3-0) vs. No. 17 Arkansas at Arlington, Texas. Next: at South Carolina, Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Corey Clement (right) celebrates a touchdown with teammates (from left) Michael Deiter, Olive Sagapolu and Beau Benzschawel.

No. 11 Wisconsin (4-0) beat No. 8 Michigan State 30-6. Next: at No. 4 Michigan, Saturday. No. 12 Georgia (3-1) lost to No. 23 Mississippi

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EAST LANSING, MICH. • By the

time Alex Hornibrook’s first start was over, there wasn’t much question about whether he could handle one of the toughest road tests in the Big Ten. Hornibrook threw for 195 yards and a touchdown, and 11th-ranked Wisconsin turned its early-season showdown with No. 8 Michigan State into a rout, beating the Spartans 30-6 on Saturday. “You’ve got to have respect for a guy whose first start is against a Michigan State defense,” Wisconsin running back Corey Clement said. “He’s going to come out the next game and do even better. I think he’s just getting his feet wet.” The freshman quarterback outplayed fifth-year senior Tyler O’Connor, his Michigan State counterpart. The Badgers (4-0, 1-0 Big Ten) were the better team in the first half and then outscored the Spartans 17-0 in the third quarter. Michigan State (2-1, 0-1) was down 13-6 early in the third and had the ball in Wisconsin territory when LJ Scott’s fumble bounced to Wisconsin’s Leo Musso in the second-

ary. O’Connor was the only player with a decent shot at him on the return, and Musso spun past the quarterback and went all the way to the end zone for a 66-yard touchdown. O’Connor finished 18 of 38 for 224 yards with three interceptions. “People have been saying a lot of good things about us lately,” Spartans coach Mark Dantonio said. “And now we’ll take some shots.” A win at Notre Dame last weekend looked like business as usual for the Spartans, but their outlook changes considerably now. This was their most lopsided defeat at Spartan Stadium since they lost 42-14 to Penn State in 2009. Clement ran for two touchdowns for Wisconsin, which went with Hornibrook at quarterback after Bart Houston started the first three games. Hornibrook wasn’t spectacular, but he kept his cool. “That’s something that I take pride in, just staying the same level, not going too far up or too far down,” he said. There should be no denying the Badgers a spot in the top 10 after this victory. There were four Big Ten teams in the top 11 before this game.

45-14. Next: vs. 14 Tennesee, Saturday. No. 13 Florida State (3-1) beat South Florida 55-35. Next: vs. North Carolina, Saturday. No. 14 Tennessee (4-0) beat No. 19 Florida 38-28. Next: at No. 12 Georgia, Saturday. No. 15 Miami (3-0) idle. Next: at Georgia Tech, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 16 Baylor (3-0) vs. Oklahoma State. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. No. 17 Arkansas (3-0) vs. No. 10 Texas A&M at Arlington, Texas. Next: vs. Alcorn State, Saturday. No. 18 LSU (2-2) lost to Auburn 18-13. Next: vs. Missouri, Saturday. No. 19 Florida (3-1) lost to No. 14 Tennessee 38-28. Next: at Vanderbilt, Saturday. No. 20 Nebraska (3-0) at Northwestern. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday. No. 21 Texas (2-1) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 22 San Diego State (3-0) idle. Next: at South Alabama, Oct. 1. No. 23 Mississippi (2-2) beat No. 12 Georgia 45-14. Next: vs. Memphis, Saturday. No. 24 Utah (4-0) beat Southern Cal 31-27, Friday. Next: at California, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 25 Oklahoma (1-2) idle. Next: at TCU, Saturday, Oct. 1.


C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

TOP 25 ROUNDUP

M 3 • SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 REALLY COOKING

TOP PLAYER

Florida State junior Dalvin Cook ran for a career-high 267 yards and scored twice as the Seminoles routed previously unbeaten South Florida in Tampa.

Tennessee rally stuns Gators Volunteers score 38 consecutive points after falling behind 21-0 early ASSOCIATED PRESS ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan back De’Veon Smith (4) tries to rush by Penn State linebacker Jake Cooper (33) in the Wolverines’ Big Ten win over Nittany Lions on Saturday.

No. 4 Michigan rushes past Penn State Michigan quarterback Wilton Speight took a beating last week against Colorado. This week, he spent most of the day standing back and watching his teammates do all the work. De’Veon Smith led an overwhelming ground game with 107 yards rushing and a touchdown and Karan Higdon ran for two scores as fourth-ranked Michigan routed visiting Penn State 49-10 Saturday in both teams’ Big Ten opener. “We were looking for a way to be more careful out there so I wasn’t getting hit as much as I did last week,” Speight said. “Luckily, our ofensive line and our running backs were great. I think there was one time where we called the same play eight straight times, just flipping the sides, and we were picking up nine or 10 yards a pop. I was just laughing every time I got the same signal.” Michigan (4-0, 1-0 Big Ten) finished with 326 yards rushing and ran for six of its seven touchdowns. “I was really impressed by all of our running backs,” coach Jim Harbaugh said. “We were moving the chains and breaking of big runs.” The Nittany Lions (2-2, 0-1) were simply running out of bodies on defense. They came into the game missing three starting linebackers, lost Brandon Smith to a second-quarter targeting penalty then lost Jan Johnson to injury. No. 6 Houston 64, Texas State 3 • D’Eriq King caught a touchdown pass, threw for a TD and returned a kickof for another score as the Cougars cruised to a road win. King, a freshman recruited to play quarterback, is playing at wide receiver while Cougars star Greg Ward Jr. directs the ofense. Ward passed for two touchdowns and ran for one before leaving the game after playing one series in the third quarter. He completed 20 of 26 passes for 289 yards. Houston (4-0) gained 563 yards while limiting Texas State (1-2) to 142. No. 7 Stanford 22, UCLA 13 • J.J. Arcega-Whiteside caught an 8-yard touchdown pass from Ryan Burns with 24 seconds to play as Stanford rallied on its final drive for its ninth consecutive victory. Christian McCafrey rushed for 138 yards for the visiting Cardinal (3-0, 2-0 Pac-12), who haven’t lost to UCLA (2-2, 0-1) since 2008. No. 13 Florida State 55, South Florida 35 • Dalvin Cook rushed for a career-high 267 yards and two touchdowns as the Seminoles (3-1) rebounded from the most lopsided loss in school history with a rout of previously unbeaten South Florida. Cook scored on a 75-yard run on the Seminoles’ first play from scrimmage, an immediate response to USF starting the game with Quinton Flowers and Rodney Adams teaming on an 84-yard catch-and-run for a quick 7-0 lead. The 213-pound junior’s rushing total on 28 carries topped his previous best of 266 yards against South Florida last year. “It was very important to answer back. USF came out with a very aggressive game plan and we had to respond with points,” said Cook, whose team was coming of a humbling 63-20 loss to Louisville. No. 20 Nebraska 24, Northwestern 13 • Tommy Armstrong Jr. threw for 246 yards and ran for a careerhigh 132 to lead visiting Nebraska to a win in both teams’ Big Ten opener. The Cornhuskers (4-0) remained unbeaten coming of a tight win over Oregon that vaulted them into the Associated Press Top 25 for the first time since December 2014. They lost two fumbles near the Northwestern goal line in the first half, but scored two touchdowns in the third quarter to stretch their lead from three to 11. The Wildcats (1-3) matched their loss total from last year when they went 10-3.

KNOXVILLE, TENN. • This time, Tennessee delivered the comeback. And in the process, the Volunteers took out 11 years’ worth of frustration on Florida. Joshua Dobbs accounted for five second-half touchdowns Saturday and No. 14 Tennessee erased a 21-point deficit to beat No. 19 Florida 38-28 and end their 11-game losing streak in the annual series. “I didn’t see anybody blink,” Tennessee coach Butch Jones said. “Nobody flinched. They just kept playing.” This marks the first time Tennessee (4-0, 1-0 SEC) has beaten Florida (3-1, 1-1) since 2004. The Volunteers had lost to Florida by one point each of the last two years despite leading in the fourth quarter of both games. Florida was so confident it would continue the streak that Gators cornerback Quincy Wilson boldly said this week that “nobody has ever seen a duck pull a truck . Florida Gators are going to win, simple as that.” Tennessee silenced the Gators by reeling of 38 consecutive points. “I just kept looking at their body language on the sideline, and it was bad,” said Tennessee defensive end Derek Barnett, who recorded two sacks. “I think they worried about talking too much (rather than) focusing on playing football, and it showed at the end.” Tennessee safety Todd Kelly Jr. added that “it just looked like we took their soul, really.” Dobbs went 16 of 32 for 319 yards with four touchdowns and two interceptions. He also rushed for 80 yards and a touchdown. Trailing 21-0 early against the nation’s top-ranked defense, Tennessee stormed back and pulled ahead for good 24-21 with 12:45 left on Dobbs’ 67-yard completion to a wide-open Jauan Jennings, who bobbled the ball a few times near the right sideline before making the catch while staying inbounds. “They came in and took it to us,” Florida coach Jim McElwain said. “It’s disappointing. We’ve got a bunch of guys hurting in the locker room. ... These are life lessons. Not every day does everything go just like you wanted. I think the key is what you learn from it and how you’re going to respond.” Florida took an early 21-0 advantage on a pair of Austin Appleby

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tennessee quarterback Joshua Dobbs is tackled in the air by Florida defensive back Marcus Maye during the second half Saturday.

touchdown passes and a 1-yard run by Jordan Scarlett. Both Appleby touchdown passes were set up by long completions from Appleby to Antonio Callaway. The Gators led 21-3 at halftime. Appleby threw three touchdown passes and one interception while starting in place of Luke Del Rio, who injured his left knee last week in a 32-0 rout of North Texas. Twice in the first half, Tennessee got inside Florida’s 5-yard line and failed to score.

Wisconsin makes test on road look easy, routs Michigan State

Associated Press

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HOW THE TOP 25 FARED No. 1 Alabama (4-0) beat Kent State 48-0. Next: vs. Kentucky, Saturday. No. 2 Ohio State (3-0) idle. Next: vs. Rutgers, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 3 Louisville (4-0) beat Marshall 59-28. Next: at No. 5 Clemson, Saturday. No. 4 Michigan (4-0) beat Penn State 49-10. Next: vs. No. 11 Wisconsin, Saturday. No. 5 Clemson (4-0) beat Georgia Tech 26-7, Thursday. Next: vs. No. 3 Louisville, Saturday. No. 6 Houston (4-0) beat Texas State 64-3. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday, Sept. 29.

ANOTHER NOTABLE GAME Duke 38, Notre Dame 35 • AJ Reed kicked a 19-yard field goal with 84 seconds left as Duke rallied back from an early two-touchdown deficit to win in South Bend, Ind. Reed had missed all three of his field goal attempts this season before kicking the game winner. Daniel Jones threw for three touchdowns, including a 64-yard scoring pass to Anthony Nash midway through the fourth quarter to tie the score. Shaun Wilson returned a kickof 96 yards for a score to spark the Blue Devils (2-2) after they fell behind 14-0. The Duke defense set up the final touchdown when it sacked DeShone Kizer for a 7-yard loss at the 5-yard line and Deondre Singleton intercepted a pass at the Notre Dame 45. The Irish defense continued to struggle, giving up 30 or more points against Power Five teams for the seventh time in their last nine games. The student section chanted “Fire VanGorder,” referring to defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder. Jones was 24 of 32 passing for 290 yards. Nash had six catches for 123 yards. Jela Duncan ran for 121 yards and a touchdown on 21 carries. Kizer threw a TD pass midway through the fourth quarter that put Notre Dame (1-3) ahead for the first time since squandering a 14-0 lead, but the Irish couldn’t hang on.

“We came into the locker room and we said, ‘Don’t panic,’” Dobbs said. “It was simple. We’ve just got to execute. We’ve just got to play our brand of football. We were moving the ball on them the whole game.” Perhaps the Gators’ defense isn’t quite as good as its statistics suggested. A defense that had been allowing just 4.7 points and 129.7 yards per game couldn’t keep Tennessee’s offense out of the end zone in the second half.

No. 7 Stanford (3-0) beat UCLA 22-13. Next: at No. 9 Washington, Friday, Sept. 30. No. 8 Michigan State (2-1) lost to No. 11 Wisconsin 30-6. Next: at Indiana, Saturday. No. 9 Washington (3-0) at Arizona. Next: vs. No. 7 Stanford, Friday, Sept. 30. No. 10 Texas A&M (3-0) vs. No. 17 Arkansas at Arlington, Texas. Next: at South Carolina, Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Corey Clement (right) celebrates a touchdown with teammates (from left) Michael Deiter, Olive Sagapolu and Beau Benzschawel.

No. 11 Wisconsin (4-0) beat No. 8 Michigan State 30-6. Next: at No. 4 Michigan, Saturday. No. 12 Georgia (3-1) lost to No. 23 Mississippi

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EAST LANSING, MICH. • By the

time Alex Hornibrook’s first start was over, there wasn’t much question about whether he could handle one of the toughest road tests in the Big Ten. Hornibrook threw for 195 yards and a touchdown, and 11th-ranked Wisconsin turned its early-season showdown with No. 8 Michigan State into a rout, beating the Spartans 30-6 on Saturday. “You’ve got to have respect for a guy whose first start is against a Michigan State defense,” Wisconsin running back Corey Clement said. “He’s going to come out the next game and do even better. I think he’s just getting his feet wet.” The freshman quarterback outplayed fifth-year senior Tyler O’Connor, his Michigan State counterpart. The Badgers (4-0, 1-0 Big Ten) were the better team in the first half and then outscored the Spartans 17-0 in the third quarter. Michigan State (2-1, 0-1) was down 13-6 early in the third and had the ball in Wisconsin territory when LJ Scott’s fumble bounced to Wisconsin’s Leo Musso in the second-

ary. O’Connor was the only player with a decent shot at him on the return, and Musso spun past the quarterback and went all the way to the end zone for a 66-yard touchdown. O’Connor finished 18 of 38 for 224 yards with three interceptions. “People have been saying a lot of good things about us lately,” Spartans coach Mark Dantonio said. “And now we’ll take some shots.” A win at Notre Dame last weekend looked like business as usual for the Spartans, but their outlook changes considerably now. This was their most lopsided defeat at Spartan Stadium since they lost 42-14 to Penn State in 2009. Clement ran for two touchdowns for Wisconsin, which went with Hornibrook at quarterback after Bart Houston started the first three games. Hornibrook wasn’t spectacular, but he kept his cool. “That’s something that I take pride in, just staying the same level, not going too far up or too far down,” he said. There should be no denying the Badgers a spot in the top 10 after this victory. There were four Big Ten teams in the top 11 before this game.

45-14. Next: vs. 14 Tennesee, Saturday. No. 13 Florida State (3-1) beat South Florida 55-35. Next: vs. North Carolina, Saturday. No. 14 Tennessee (4-0) beat No. 19 Florida 38-28. Next: at No. 12 Georgia, Saturday. No. 15 Miami (3-0) idle. Next: at Georgia Tech, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 16 Baylor (3-0) vs. Oklahoma State. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. No. 17 Arkansas (3-0) vs. No. 10 Texas A&M at Arlington, Texas. Next: vs. Alcorn State, Saturday. No. 18 LSU (2-2) lost to Auburn 18-13. Next: vs. Missouri, Saturday. No. 19 Florida (3-1) lost to No. 14 Tennessee 38-28. Next: at Vanderbilt, Saturday. No. 20 Nebraska (4-0) beat Northwestern 24-13. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday. No. 21 Texas (2-1) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 22 San Diego State (3-0) idle. Next: at South Alabama, Oct. 1. No. 23 Mississippi (2-2) beat No. 12 Georgia 45-14. Next: vs. Memphis, Saturday. No. 24 Utah (4-0) beat Southern Cal 31-27, Friday. Next: at California, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 25 Oklahoma (1-2) idle. Next: at TCU, Saturday, Oct. 1.


C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

TOP 25 ROUNDUP

M 4 • SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 REALLY COOKING

TOP PLAYER

Florida State junior Dalvin Cook ran for a career-high 267 yards and scored twice as the Seminoles routed previously unbeaten South Florida in Tampa.

Tennessee rally stuns Gators Volunteers score 38 consecutive points after falling behind 21-0 early ASSOCIATED PRESS ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan back De’Veon Smith (4) tries to rush by Penn State linebacker Jake Cooper (33) in the Wolverines’ Big Ten win over Nittany Lions on Saturday.

No. 4 Michigan rushes past Penn State De’Veon Smith led an overwhelming ground game with 107 yards rushing and a touchdown and Karan Higdon ran for two scores as fourth-ranked Michigan routed visiting Penn State 49-10 Saturday in both teams’ Big Ten opener. “We were looking for a way to be more careful out there so I wasn’t getting hit as much as I did last week,” said Michigan quarterback Wilton Speight, who took a beating last week against Colorado. “Luckily, our ofensive line and our running backs were great. I think there was one time where we called the same play eight straight times, just flipping the sides, and we were picking up nine or 10 yards a pop. I was just laughing every time I got the same signal.” Michigan (4-0, 1-0 Big Ten) finished with 326 yards rushing and ran for six of its seven touchdowns. The Nittany Lions (2-2, 0-1) were simply running out of bodies on defense. They came into the game missing three starting linebackers, lost Brandon Smith to a second-quarter targeting penalty then lost Jan Johnson to injury. No. 3 Louisville 59, Marshall 28 • Lamar Jackson threw five touchdown passes and ran for two more as the visiting Cardinals breezed past Marshall Saturday night. The sophomore completed 24 of 44 passes for a careerhigh 417 yards against a Marshall secondary whose most experienced player had five starts. Jackson also ran for 62 yards. Louisville (4-0) didn’t slow down against an opponent on the road a week after beating Florida State 63-20 at home. No. 6 Houston 64, Texas State 3 • D’Eriq King caught a touchdown pass, threw for a TD and returned a kickof for another score as the Cougars cruised to a road win. King, a freshman recruited to play quarterback, is playing at wide receiver while Cougars star Greg Ward Jr. directs the ofense. Ward passed for two touchdowns and ran for one before leaving the game after playing one series in the third quarter. He completed 20 of 26 passes for 289 yards. Houston (4-0) gained 563 yards while limiting Texas State (1-2) to 142. No. 7 Stanford 22, UCLA 13 • J.J. Arcega-Whiteside caught an 8-yard touchdown pass from Ryan Burns with 24 seconds to play as Stanford rallied on its final drive for its ninth consecutive victory. Christian McCafrey rushed for 138 yards for the visiting Cardinal (3-0, 2-0 Pac-12), who haven’t lost to UCLA (2-2, 0-1) since 2008. No. 13 Florida State 55, South Florida 35 • Dalvin Cook rushed for a career-high 267 yards and two touchdowns as the Seminoles (3-1) rebounded from the most lopsided loss in school history with a rout of previously unbeaten South Florida. Cook scored on a 75-yard run on the Seminoles’ first play from scrimmage, an immediate response to USF starting the game with Quinton Flowers and Rodney Adams teaming on an 84-yard catch-and-run for a quick 7-0 lead. His previous best rushing total (266) came against South Florida last year. No. 16 Baylor 35, Oklahoma State 24 • Seth Russell threw four touchdown passes, including an 89-yarder to Chris Platt for the go-ahead score in the third quarter as the host Bears won in the weather-delayed Big 12 opener for both teams. Ishmael Zamora had career highs of 175 yards receiving and two touchdowns on eight catches in his season debut for the Bears after a three-game suspension over a video of him whipping his dog that surfaced during the summer. Platt also had two TDs. Baylor earned its fourth consecutive 4-0 start.

KNOXVILLE, TENN. • This time, Tennessee delivered the comeback. And in the process, the Volunteers took out 11 years’ worth of frustration on Florida. Joshua Dobbs accounted for five second-half touchdowns Saturday and No. 14 Tennessee erased a 21-point deficit to beat No. 19 Florida 38-28 and end their 11-game losing streak in the annual series. “I didn’t see anybody blink,” Tennessee coach Butch Jones said. “Nobody flinched. They just kept playing.” This marks the first time Tennessee (4-0, 1-0 SEC) has beaten Florida (3-1, 1-1) since 2004. The Volunteers had lost to Florida by one point each of the last two years despite leading in the fourth quarter of both games. Florida was so confident it would continue the streak that Gators cornerback Quincy Wilson boldly said this week that “nobody has ever seen a duck pull a truck . Florida Gators are going to win, simple as that.” Tennessee silenced the Gators by reeling of 38 consecutive points. “I just kept looking at their body language on the sideline, and it was bad,” said Tennessee defensive end Derek Barnett, who recorded two sacks. “I think they worried about talking too much (rather than) focusing on playing football, and it showed at the end.” Tennessee safety Todd Kelly Jr. added that “it just looked like we took their soul, really.” Dobbs went 16 of 32 for 319 yards with four touchdowns and two interceptions. He also rushed for 80 yards and a touchdown. Trailing 21-0 early against the nation’s top-ranked defense, Tennessee stormed back and pulled ahead for good 24-21 with 12:45 left on Dobbs’ 67-yard completion to a wide-open Jauan Jennings, who bobbled the ball a few times near the right sideline before making the catch while staying inbounds. “They came in and took it to us,” Florida coach Jim McElwain said. “It’s disappointing. We’ve got a bunch of guys hurting in the locker room. ... These are life lessons. Not every day does everything go just like you wanted. I think the key is what you learn from it and how you’re going to respond.” Florida took an early 21-0 advantage on a pair of Austin Appleby

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tennessee quarterback Joshua Dobbs is tackled in the air by Florida defensive back Marcus Maye during the second half Saturday.

touchdown passes and a 1-yard run by Jordan Scarlett. Both Appleby touchdown passes were set up by long completions from Appleby to Antonio Callaway. The Gators led 21-3 at halftime. Appleby threw three touchdown passes and one interception while starting in place of Luke Del Rio, who injured his left knee last week in a 32-0 rout of North Texas. Twice in the first half, Tennessee got inside Florida’s 5-yard line and failed to score.

Wisconsin makes test on road look easy, routs Michigan State

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No. 1 Alabama (4-0) beat Kent State 48-0. Next: vs. Kentucky, Saturday. No. 2 Ohio State (3-0) idle. Next: vs.

No. 3 Louisville (4-0) beat Marshall 59-28. Next: at No. 5 Clemson, Saturday. No. 4 Michigan (4-0) beat Penn State 49-10. Next: vs. No. 11 Wisconsin, Saturday. No. 5 Clemson (4-0) beat Georgia Tech 26-7, Thursday. Next: vs. No. 3 Louisville, Saturday. No. 6 Houston (4-0) beat Texas State 64-3. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday, Sept. 29. No. 7 Stanford (3-0) beat UCLA 22-13. Next: at No. 9 Washington, Friday, Sept. 30. No. 8 Michigan State (2-1) lost to No. 11 Wisconsin 30-6. Next: at Indiana, Saturday. No. 9 Washington (3-0) at Arizona. Next: vs. No. 7 Stanford, Friday, Sept. 30. No. 10 Texas A&M (3-0) beat No. 17 Arkansas 45-24. Next: at South Carolina, Saturday.

ANOTHER NOTABLE GAME

Associated Press

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

Rutgers, Saturday, Oct. 1.

No. 20 Nebraska 24, Northwestern 13 • Tommy Armstrong Jr. threw for 246 yards and ran for a careerhigh 132 to lead visiting Nebraska to a win in both teams’ Big Ten opener. The Cornhuskers (4-0) remained unbeaten coming of a tight win over Oregon that vaulted them into the Associated Press Top 25 for the first time since December 2014. They lost two fumbles near the Northwestern goal line in the first half, but scored two touchdowns in the third quarter to stretch their lead from three to 11. Duke 38, Notre Dame 35 • AJ Reed kicked a 19-yard field goal with 84 seconds left as Duke rallied back from an early two-touchdown deficit to win in South Bend, Ind. Reed had missed all three of his field goal attempts this season before kicking the game winner. Daniel Jones threw for 290 yards and three TDs, including a 64-yard scoring pass to Anthony Nash midway through the fourth quarter to tie the score for the Blue Devils (2-2). The Duke defense set up the final touchdown when it sacked DeShone Kizer and Deondre Singleton intercepted a pass at the Notre Dame 45. The Irish defense continued to struggle, giving up 30 or more points against Power Five teams for the seventh time in their last nine games.

“We came into the locker room and we said, ‘Don’t panic,’” Dobbs said. “It was simple. We’ve just got to execute. We’ve just got to play our brand of football. We were moving the ball on them the whole game.” Perhaps the Gators’ defense isn’t quite as good as its statistics suggested. A defense that had been allowing just 4.7 points and 129.7 yards per game couldn’t keep Tennessee’s offense out of the end zone in the second half.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Corey Clement (right) celebrates a touchdown with teammates (from left) Michael Deiter, Olive Sagapolu and Beau Benzschawel.

No. 11 Wisconsin (4-0) beat No. 8 Michigan State 30-6. Next: at No. 4 Michigan, Saturday. No. 12 Georgia (3-1) lost to No. 23 Mississippi 45-14. Next: vs. 14 Tennesee, Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EAST LANSING, MICH. • By the

time Alex Hornibrook’s first start was over, there wasn’t much question about whether he could handle one of the toughest road tests in the Big Ten. Hornibrook threw for 195 yards and a touchdown, and 11th-ranked Wisconsin turned its early-season showdown with No. 8 Michigan State into a rout, beating the Spartans 30-6 on Saturday. “You’ve got to have respect for a guy whose first start is against a Michigan State defense,” Wisconsin running back Corey Clement said. “He’s going to come out the next game and do even better. I think he’s just getting his feet wet.” The freshman quarterback outplayed fifth-year senior Tyler O’Connor, his Michigan State counterpart. The Badgers (4-0, 1-0 Big Ten) were the better team in the first half and then outscored the Spartans 17-0 in the third quarter. Michigan State (2-1, 0-1) was down 13-6 early in the third and had the ball in Wisconsin territory when LJ Scott’s fumble bounced to Wisconsin’s Leo Musso in the second-

ary. O’Connor was the only player with a decent shot at him on the return, and Musso spun past the quarterback and went all the way to the end zone for a 66-yard touchdown. O’Connor finished 18 of 38 for 224 yards with three interceptions. “People have been saying a lot of good things about us lately,” Spartans coach Mark Dantonio said. “And now we’ll take some shots.” A win at Notre Dame last weekend looked like business as usual for the Spartans, but their outlook changes considerably now. This was their most lopsided defeat at Spartan Stadium since they lost 42-14 to Penn State in 2009. Clement ran for two touchdowns for Wisconsin, which went with Hornibrook at quarterback after Bart Houston started the first three games. Hornibrook wasn’t spectacular, but he kept his cool. “That’s something that I take pride in, just staying the same level, not going too far up or too far down,” he said. There should be no denying the Badgers a spot in the top 10 after this victory. There were four Big Ten teams in the top 11 before this game.

No. 13 Florida State (3-1) beat South Florida 55-35. Next: vs. North Carolina, Saturday. No. 14 Tennessee (4-0) beat No. 19 Florida 38-28. Next: at No. 12 Georgia, Saturday. No. 15 Miami (3-0) idle. Next: at Georgia Tech, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 16 Baylor (4-0) beat Oklahoma State 35-24. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. No. 17 Arkansas (3-0) vs. No. 10 Texas A&M at Arlington, Texas. Next: vs. Alcorn State, Saturday. No. 18 LSU (2-2) lost to Auburn 18-13. Next: vs. Missouri, Saturday. No. 19 Florida (3-1) lost to No. 14 Tennessee 38-28. Next: at Vanderbilt, Saturday. No. 20 Nebraska (4-0) beat Northwestern 24-13. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday. No. 21 Texas (2-1) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 22 San Diego State (3-0) idle. Next: at South Alabama, Oct. 1. No. 23 Mississippi (2-2) beat No. 12 Georgia 45-14. Next: vs. Memphis, Saturday. No. 24 Utah (4-0) beat Southern Cal 31-27, Friday. Next: at California, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 25 Oklahoma (1-2) idle. Next: at TCU, Saturday, Oct. 1.


NFL

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C11

WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK • BY JIM THOMAS • jthomas@post-dispatch.com • @jthom1 on Twitter

7 FOR SUNDAY

Will they behave? The last time wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. and cornerback Josh Norman were on the field together, the game became almost secondary to their own personal battle. They pushed, shoved, gouged, and exchanged cheap shots all the way to a combined five unnecessary roughness penalties — three against Beckham and two against Norman. A helmet-to-helmet hit on Norman helped put the situation over the top, with Beckham given a onegame suspension by the NFL. Now, after an offseason of taking verbal shots at each other, Norman and Beckham square of for the first time since that Dec. 20 donnybrook. Only this time, Norman plays for division rival Washington, not Carolina. Beckham did his best to downplay the

Norman reunion when he met with New York Giants reporters Wednesday. “Honestly, there really is a bigger concern,” he said. “Division game, 2-0 start to the year. Really focused on going 3-0. Wherever I go, wherever I line up, that’s my job.” Beckham said he’s matured since last year’s game, particularly after sitting out the next contest (against Minnesota) because of the suspension. “It felt like if any of you have ever been suspended at elementary school or whatever,” he said. “It really felt like that. I was out and I remember I was going to the facility to pick up my stuf and they said you can’t be here. ... Since then, I really have learned a lot.” We’ll see.

Giants receiver Odell Beckham Jr. (left) and Panthers cornerback Josh Norman wrap one another up during a game late last season. CHARLOTTE OBSERVER

Alex Smith

CHIEFS LOOK TO REBOUND The Chiefs were strangely out of sync in last week’s 19-12 loss in Houston. A couple of lost fumbles led to 10 points for the Texans. Penalties help short-circuit drives. And there were communication problems between quarterback Alex Smith and his receivers. “We haven’t had a day like that in a long time,” Smith told KC reporters. “I can’t remember the last time. I was going through missed connections — there were probably seven or eight of them, and a lot of yards.” The Chiefs almost certainly will need more than 12 points to beat a New York Jets ofense that can stack up the yards. Quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick, the former Ram, likes to get the ball downfield and will surely take some shots at Chiefs corners Marcus Peters and Philips Gaines. Peters had a feast-or-famine game against the Texans. He was beaten for two long completions, one of which went for a touchdown, and was flagged for taunting. But he also intercepted two passes. Following Sunday’s game at Arrowhead Stadium, the Chiefs won’t return to the Sea of Red until Oct. 23 when James Laurinaitis and the New Orleans Saints come to town. They have two road games sandwiched around a bye over those next three Sundays.

TOUGH TIMES IN TAMPA Jef Fisher has beaten Tampa Bay in each of his four previous seasons as Rams coach. It looks like the timing is good to be meeting the Buccaneers again Sunday at Raymond James Stadium. Two-time Pro Bowl running back Doug Martin is out with a hamstring injury, and starting defensive end Robert Ayers (ankle), veteran wide receiver Cecil Shorts (hamstring), and tight end Luke Stocker (ankle) also have been ruled out. But the week’s most unsettling news came when oncepromising tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins was released by the Bucs hours after his Friday DUI arrest.

EX-RAM ALERT Just when it looked like Greg Salas was running out of chances, he popped up in a big way in Buffalo’s Week 2 loss to the New York Jets. Salas, a fourthround draft pick by the Rams in 2011, caught four passes Greg Salas for 89 yards against the Jets including a 71-yard touchdown from quarterback Tyrod Taylor. Buffalo is Salas’ sixth club, and prior to the Jets game he had caught only 19 passes since his rookie year in St. Louis playing for Steve Spagnuolo. The touchdown against the Jets was the first of his career.

FOURTH-QUARTER LEAGUE

FEELING THE BREES

MIXED COMPANY

Of the 32 games played over the first two weeks of the season, 27 were one-score afairs at some point in the fourth quarter. That’s tied for the most in league history (with the opening two weeks of 2013).

New Orleans QB Drew Brees has moved past Hall of Famer Dan Marino into third place on the NFL’s career passing list. With 61,589 yards, Brees still has some throwing to do before he reaches the top spots. Peyton Manning is first on the career list at 71,940 yards, followed by Brett Favre’s 71,838.

Philadelphia’s Carson Wentz is only the fifth rookie quarterback since the AFLNFL merger in 1970 to win his first two starts to begin a season. The others: John Elway, Joe Flacco, Ryan Leaf, and Mark Sanchez. The presence of Leaf and Sanchez on the list is a pretty good hint that greatness isn’t necessarily assured for Wentz.

Brees

Vikings’ Bradford won’t be seeing ghosts at Carolina BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The quality of Sam Bradford’s play went largely unnoticed in 2013. St. Louis was in one of those autumn baseball comas, with the Cardinals having just clinched their 19th National League pennant and preparing for a World Series date with the Boston Red Sox. When the Rams played at Carolina on Oct. 20 of that year, Bradford was in the midst of his best NFL season. He had a passer rating slightly over 90, and was on pace for 3,900 yards, 32 touchdowns and just nine interceptions when he went scrambling out of bounds with 5½ minutes to play. Carolina safety Mike Mitchell shoved Bradford hard to the ground. After Bradford landed awkwardly out of bounds, Mitchell stuck his chest out and raised his arms in triumph just a few yards away. With Bradford writhing in pain, teammate Harvey Dahl angrily went after Mitchell, incurring a personal foul. Bradford was carted off the field, his season over with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee “To see how hard Sam prepares ... first in, last out, and to truly become the leader on that side of the ball,” linebacker James Laurinaitis said at the time. “It’s heartbreaking to see him go

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Minnesota quarterback Sam Bradford throws a pass last Sunday against Green Bay.

down.” Thus began the downward spiral in Bradford’s career. You know the rest of his story. Another torn ACL, in the same knee, 10 months later in a 2014 preseason game at Cleveland. After an offseason of telling everyone who would listen that Bradford was not on the trading block, coach Jeff Fisher and the Rams shipped him off to Philadelphia on March 10, 2015. After an up-and-down 2015 season with Philadelphia, the

Eagles traded up to No. 2 overall for North Dakota State’s Carson Wentz. Bradford asked to be traded, but the Eagles declined to do so ... until, that is, they sent him on Sept. 3 to a Minnesota team desperate to keep its season afloat following the injury to Teddy Bridgewater. Fifteen days later, after much cramming to learn the Vikings’ playbook, Bradford played one of the best games of his career leading Minnesota to a 17-14 victory over rival Green Bay. For one of the few times during his time in the NFL, Bradford was showered in national acclaim. On Sunday, Bradford comes full circle. He returns to Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, N.C., for the Vikings’ game against defending NFC champion Carolina. Only four defensive starters remain from the 2013 Panthers defense. Mitchell now plays for Pittsburgh. And Bradford even had the experience of playing at Carolina last Oct. 25 as an Eagle. So the ghosts may already be exorcised from that day three years ago. Maybe he’ll glance at that sideline when he walks out for warmups. But he’ll have a lot of other things to occupy his mind. Now three weeks into his time as a Viking, he’s still on a crash course learning coordinator Norv Turner’s ofense.

“Obviously, going out the other night and playing the way we did and executing, I think that does give me and this group more confidence,” Bradford told Minnesota reporters Wednesday. “But I just think having the time, these practices for the past couple weeks, I just feel more comfortable now.” Bradford completed 22 of 31 passes for 286 yards and two touchdowns against the Packers in what was his Minnesota and his 2016 season debut. His passer rating of 121.2 ranks second-best in the NFL. Turner was asked Thursday what impressed him most about Bradford’s performance. “His composure. His ability to see the field. His ability to get the ball out quick,” Turner said. “He made great throws under pressure while he was getting hit. That’s what you have to do to play at a high level in this league.” Kudos aside, a knee injury to Adrian Peterson, which could sideline him for much if not all of this season, presents another set of challenges for Bradford and the Vikings. “Obviously, it’s hard to replace a player like Adrian,” Bradford said. “He’s the best running back in the NFL.” Bradford knows Peterson. Bradford was being redshirted as a freshman in 2006, Peterson’s final season at Oklahoma. But he doesn’t really know Peterson’s

replacements at running back, be they Jerick McKinnon and Matt Asiata, or Ronnie Hillman — the former Denver Bronco who was signed of the street Wednesday. “We’d love to have (Peterson) still playing, but I think it’s just an opportunity for the next guy — next guys — to step up,” Bradford said. “We can’t let that affect us. If you spend too much time dwelling on that, or let that bring you down, it’s going to affect your play.” The Vikings (2-0) must play at a high level to hang with the Panthers, who have won 14 in a row at Bank of America and averaged 40.4 points a game over their last seven home contests. On the other side of the ball, Carolina led the league with 39 takeaways last season, and already has six in two games this season. Instead of looking over his shoulder for Mike Mitchell, Bradford must worry about linebackers Luke Kuechly and Thomas Davis and the rest of the Panthers’ defense. As Vikings coach Mike Zimmer put it, “I don’t think many people think we can win this game. I don’t think many people thought we could win the last game (against Green Bay). ... We’re just trying to see if we can play with the big boys.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


NFL

09.25.2016 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C11

WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK • BY JIM THOMAS • jthomas@post-dispatch.com • @jthom1 on Twitter

7 FOR SUNDAY

Will they behave? The last time wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. and cornerback Josh Norman were on the field together, the game became almost secondary to their own personal battle. They pushed, shoved, gouged, and exchanged cheap shots all the way to a combined five unnecessary roughness penalties — three against Beckham and two against Norman. A helmet-to-helmet hit on Norman helped put the situation over the top, with Beckham given a onegame suspension by the NFL. Now, after an offseason of taking verbal shots at each other, Norman and Beckham square of for the first time since that Dec. 20 donnybrook. Only this time, Norman plays for division rival Washington, not Carolina. Beckham did his best to downplay the

Norman reunion when he met with New York Giants reporters Wednesday. “Honestly, there really is a bigger concern,” he said. “Division game, 2-0 start to the year. Really focused on going 3-0. Wherever I go, wherever I line up, that’s my job.” Beckham said he’s matured since last year’s game, particularly after sitting out the next contest (against Minnesota) because of the suspension. “It felt like if any of you have ever been suspended at elementary school or whatever,” he said. “It really felt like that. I was out and I remember I was going to the facility to pick up my stuf and they said you can’t be here. ... Since then, I really have learned a lot.” We’ll see.

Giants receiver Odell Beckham Jr. (left) and Panthers cornerback Josh Norman wrap one another up during a game late last season. CHARLOTTE OBSERVER

Alex Smith

CHIEFS LOOK TO REBOUND The Chiefs were strangely out of sync in last week’s 19-12 loss in Houston. A couple of lost fumbles led to 10 points for the Texans. Penalties help short-circuit drives. And there were communication problems between quarterback Alex Smith and his receivers. “We haven’t had a day like that in a long time,” Smith told KC reporters. “I can’t remember the last time. I was going through missed connections — there were probably seven or eight of them, and a lot of yards.” The Chiefs almost certainly will need more than 12 points to beat a New York Jets ofense that can stack up the yards. Quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick, the former Ram, likes to get the ball downfield and will surely take some shots at Chiefs corners Marcus Peters and Philipp Gaines. Peters had a feast-or-famine game against the Texans. He was beaten for two long completions, one of which went for a touchdown, and was flagged for taunting. But he also intercepted two passes. Following Sunday’s game at Arrowhead Stadium, the Chiefs won’t return to the Sea of Red until Oct. 23 when James Laurinaitis and the New Orleans Saints come to town. They have two road games sandwiched around a bye over those next three Sundays.

TOUGH TIMES IN TAMPA Jef Fisher has beaten Tampa Bay in each of his four previous seasons as Rams coach. It looks like the timing is good to be meeting the Buccaneers again Sunday at Raymond James Stadium. Two-time Pro Bowl running back Doug Martin is out with a hamstring injury, and starting defensive end Robert Ayers (ankle), veteran wide receiver Cecil Shorts (hamstring), and tight end Luke Stocker (ankle) also have been ruled out. But the week’s most unsettling news came when oncepromising tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins was released by the Bucs hours after his Friday DUI arrest.

EX-RAM ALERT Just when it looked like Greg Salas was running out of chances, he popped up in a big way in Buffalo’s Week 2 loss to the New York Jets. Salas, a fourthround draft pick by the Rams in 2011, caught four passes Greg Salas for 89 yards against the Jets including a 71-yard touchdown from quarterback Tyrod Taylor. Buffalo is Salas’ sixth club, and prior to the Jets game he had caught only 19 passes since his rookie year in St. Louis playing for Steve Spagnuolo. The touchdown against the Jets was the first of his career.

FOURTH-QUARTER LEAGUE

FEELING THE BREES

MIXED COMPANY

Of the 32 games played over the first two weeks of the season, 27 were one-score afairs at some point in the fourth quarter. That’s tied for the most in league history (with the opening two weeks of 2013).

New Orleans QB Drew Brees has moved past Hall of Famer Dan Marino into third place on the NFL’s career passing list. With 61,589 yards, Brees still has some throwing to do before he reaches the top spots. Peyton Manning is first on the career list at 71,940 yards, followed by Brett Favre’s 71,838.

Philadelphia’s Carson Wentz is only the fifth rookie quarterback since the AFLNFL merger in 1970 to win his first two starts to begin a season. The others: John Elway, Joe Flacco, Ryan Leaf, and Mark Sanchez. The presence of Leaf and Sanchez on the list is a pretty good hint that greatness isn’t necessarily assured for Wentz.

NFL NOTEBOOK Packers’ Matthews ruled out Pass-rushing linebacker Clay Matthews will miss the Green Bay Packers’ game on Sunday against Detroit because of ankle and hamstring injuries. The Packers downgraded Matthews’ status for the home opener from questionable to out after practice on Saturday. Matthews has not practiced all week. Green Bay also will be without Morgan Burnett after the starting safety was ruled out on Saturday with a groin injury. Two other key defensive players with knee injuries were downgraded from questionable to doubtful on Saturday: defensive tackle Letroy Guion and defensive end/linebacker Datone Jones. Top cornerback Sam Shields (concussion) already has been ruled out for a second straight game. Banged-up Browns sign new kicker • Already down, the Browns have been kicked again by the injury bug. Kicker Patrick Murray was placed on injured reserve Saturday after hurting his surgically repaired left knee in practice, forcing the Browns to sign Cody Parkey to handle their kicking duties in Sunday’s game at Miami. With Murray’s injury, the Browns have lost six starters after just the first two games this season. Quarterbacks Robert Griin III (broken hand) and Josh McCown (broken collarbone), center Cam Erving (bruised lung), wide receiver Corey Coleman (broken hand) and defensive end Carl Nassib (broken hand) are all out this week and a few of them will be sidelined for several more games. Murray got hurt during Friday’s walkthrough. He missed last season with Tampa Bay after tearing an ACL and beat out incumbent Travis Coons in training camp. Associated Press

Brees

Vikings’ Bradford ready for Carolina test NFL • FROM C1

teammate Harvey Dahl angrily went after Mitchell, incurring a personal foul. Bradford was carted off the field, his season over with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee “To see how hard Sam prepares ... first in, last out, and to truly become the leader on that side of the ball,” middle linebacker James Laurinaitis said at the time. “It’s heartbreaking to see him go down.” Thus began the downward spiral in Bradford’s career. You know the rest of his story. Another torn ACL, in the same knee, 10 months later in a 2014 preseason game at Cleveland. After an ofseason of telling everyone who would listen that Bradford was not on the trading block, coach Jeff Fisher and the Rams shipped him of to Philadelphia on March 10, 2015. After an up-and-down 2015 season with Philadelphia, the Eagles traded up to No. 2 overall for North Dakota State’s Carson Wentz. Bradford asked to be traded, but the Eagles declined to do so ... until, that is, they sent him on Sept. 3 to a Minnesota team desperate to keep its season afloat following the season-ending injury to Teddy Bridgewater. Fifteen days later, after much cramming to learn the Vikings’ playbook, Bradford played one of the best games of his career leading Minnesota to a 17-14 victory over rival Green Bay. For one of the few times during his time in the NFL, Bradford was showered in national acclaim. On Sunday, Bradford comes full circle.

He returns to Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, N.C., for the Vikings’ game against defending NFC champion Carolina. Only four defensive starters remain from the 2013 Panthers defense. Mitchell now plays for Pittsburgh. And Bradford even had the experience of playing at Carolina last Oct. 25 as an Eagle. So the ghosts may already be exorcised from that day three years ago. Maybe he’ll glance at that sideline when he walks out for warmups. But he’ll have a lot of other things to occupy his mind. Now three weeks into his time as a Viking, he’s still on a crash course learning coordinator Norv Turner’s ofense. “Obviously, going out the other night and playing the way we did and executing, I think that does give me and this group more confidence,” Bradford told Minnesota reporters on Wednesday. “But I just think having the time, these practices for the past couple weeks, I just feel more comfortable now.” Bradford completed 22 of 31 passes for 286 yards and two touchdowns against the Packers in what was his Minnesota and his 2016 season debut. His passer rating of 121.2 ranks second-best in the NFL. Turner was asked Thursday what impressed him most about Bradford’s performance. “His composure. His ability to see the field. His ability to get the ball out quick,” Turner said. “He made great throws under pressure while he was getting hit. That’s what you have to do to play at a high level in this league.” Kudos aside, a knee injury to Adrian Peterson that could sideline the star back for much if not all of this season, presents

another set of challenges for Bradford and the Vikings. “Obviously, it’s hard to replace a player like Adrian,” Bradford said. “He’s the best running back in the NFL.” Bradford knows Peterson. Bradford was being redshirted as a freshman in 2006, Peterson’s final season at Oklahoma. But he doesn’t really know Peterson’s replacements at running back, be they Jerick McKinnon and Matt Asiata, or Ronnie Hillman — the former Denver Bronco who was signed of the street Wednesday. “We’d love to have (Peterson) still playing, but I think it’s just an opportunity for the next guy — next guys — to step up,” Bradford said. “We can’t let that afect us. If you spend too much time dwelling on that, or let that bring you down, it’s going to afect your play.” The Vikings (2-0) must play at a high level to hang with the Panthers, who have won 14 in a row at Bank of America and averaged 40.4 points a game over their last seven home contests. On the other side of the ball, Carolina led the league with 39 takeaways last season and already has six in two games this season. Instead of looking over his shoulder for Mike Mitchell, Bradford must worry about linebackers Luke Kuechly and Thomas Davis and the rest of the Panthers’ defense. As Vikings coach Mike Zimmer put it, “I don’t think many people think we can win this game. I don’t think many people thought we could win the last game (against Green Bay). ... We’re just trying to see if we can play with the big boys.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


NFL

C12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE EAST NY Giants Philadelphia Dallas Washington SOUTH Tampa Bay Carolina Atlanta New Orleans NORTH Minnesota Green Bay Detroit Chicago WEST San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona Seattle

W 2 2 1 0 W 1 1 1 0 W 2 1 1 0 W 1 1 1 1

L 0 0 1 2 L 1 1 1 2 L 0 1 1 2 L 1 1 1 1

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 1.000 .500 .000 Pct .500 .500 .500 .000 Pct 1.000 .500 .500 .000 Pct .500 .500 .500 .500

PF 36 58 46 39 PF 38 66 59 47 PF 42 41 54 28 PF 55 9 61 15

PA 32 24 43 65 PA 64 48 59 51 PA 30 40 51 52 PA 46 31 30 19

Home 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-2 Home 0-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 Home 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-1 Home 1-0 1-0 1-1 1-0

Away 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-0 Away 1-1 0-1 1-0 0-1 Away 1-0 1-1 1-0 0-1 Away 0-1 0-1 0-0 0-1

NFC 2-0 1-0 1-1 0-1 NFC 1-1 1-0 0-1 0-1 NFC 1-0 0-1 0-0 0-1 NFC 1-1 1-1 1-0 0-1

AFC 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-1 AFC 0-0 0-1 1-0 0-1 AFC 1-0 1-0 1-1 0-1 AFC 0-0 0-0 0-1 1-0

Div 1-0 0-0 1-1 0-1 Div 1-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 Div 1-0 0-1 0-0 0-0 Div 1-0 1-1 0-0 0-1

Thursday New England 27, Houston 0 Sunday Washington at NY Giants, noon Cleveland at Miami, noon Detroit at Green Bay, noon, KTVI-2 Minnesota at Carolina, noon Denver at Cincinnati, noon, KMOV-4 Arizona at Bufalo, noon Baltimore at Jacksonville, noon Oakland at Tennessee, noon San Francisco at Seattle, 3:05 p.m. Los Angeles at Tampa Bay, 3:05 p.m. San Diego at Indianapolis, 3:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 3:25 p.m. NY Jets at Kansas City, 3:25 p.m., KMOV-4 Chicago at Dallas, 7:30 p.m., KSDK-5 Monday Atlanta at New Orleans, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

M 1 • SUNDAY • 09.25.2016 AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE EAST New England NY Jets Miami Bufalo SOUTH Houston Tennessee Indianapolis Jacksonville NORTH Pittsburgh Baltimore Cincinnati Cleveland WEST Denver Kansas City San Diego Oakland

W 3 1 0 0 W 2 1 0 0 W 2 2 1 0 W 2 1 1 1

L 0 1 2 2 L 1 1 2 2 L 0 0 1 2 L 0 1 1 1

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .500 .000 .000 Pct .667 .500 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .500 .000 Pct 1.000 .500 .500 .500

PF 81 59 34 38 PF 42 32 55 37 PF 62 38 39 30 PF 55 45 65 63

WEEK THREE THE NFL • BY JIM THOMAS • jthomas@post-dispatch.com • @jthom1 on Twitter

WASHINGTON (0-2) AT NEW YORK GIANTS (2-0)

Div 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 Div 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 Div 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 Div 0-0 1-0 0-1 0-0

INJURY REPORT

DETROIT at GREEN BAY — LIONS: OUT: DE Ezekiel Ansah (Ankle). DNP: OLB DeAndre Levy (Quadricep), DE Devin Taylor (Ankle), MLB Leander Williams (Hamstring). LIMITED: CB Adairius Barnes (Ankle), TE Eric Ebron (Back), DE Wallace Gilberry (Abdomen), T Riley Reiff (Ankle), OLB Kyle Van Noy (Calf), DT Tyrunn Walker (Calf). FULL: TE Cole Wick. PACKERS: OUT: CB Samuel Shields (Concussion). DNP: SS Morgan Burnett (Groin), NT Letroy Guion (Knee), OLB Datone Jones (Knee), G Thomas Lang (Hip), OLB William Matthews (Ankle). FULL: FS Ayorunmi Banjo, OLB Jayrone Elliott, CB Joshua Hawkins, SS Micah Hyde, WR Jeff Janis.

DETROIT (1-1) AT GREEN BAY (1-1) CARSON WENTZ

BALTIMORE at JACKSONVILLE — RAVENS: OUT: RB Kenneth Dixon (Knee). DNP: OLB Terrell Suggs, G Marshal Yanda. LIMITED: OLB Elvis Dumervil (Foot). FULL: T Ronnie Stanley (Foot), G John Urschel (Shoulder). JAGUARS: OUT: T Kelvin Beachum (Concussion), TE Benjamin Koyack (Knee). DNP: CB Prince Amukamara (Hamstring), CB Davon House, G Brandon Linder (Knee), DE Jared Odrick (Triceps). FULL: SS Johnathan Cyprien, RB Christopher Ivory (Not Injury Related), T Jermey Parnell, WR Allen Robinson. CLEVELAND at MIAMI — BROWNS: OUT: SS Ibraheim Campbell (Hamstring), WR Corey Coleman (Hand), C Cameron Erving (Chest), QB Joshua McCown (left Shoulder), DE Carl Nassib (Hand). FULL: DE Stephen Paea, NT Danny Shelton, TE Randall Telfer, T Joe Thomas. DOLPHINS: OUT: RB Arian Foster (Groin), C James Pouncey (Hip). LIMITED: CB Xavien Howard (Knee), OLB Jelani Jenkins (Knee), DE Jason Jones (Ankle), OLB Nawa’akoa Misi (Shoulder), WR DeVante Parker (Hamstring), OLB Spencer Paysinger (Neck).

MINNESOTA (2-0) AT CAROLINA (1-1)

MARQUEE MATCHUP PITTSBURGH (2-0) AT PHILADELPHIA (2-0) Time • 3:25 p.m. Fast Facts • We’ll get a better read on whether Carson Wentz is for real in the Battle of Pennsylvania. ... The Quaker State rivals haven’t met in Philadelphia since 2008. ... Wentz, the No. 2 overall draft pick from North Dakota State, has been poised and eicient in two opening victories. But they came against woeful Cleveland and Chicago. ... The Steelers should post a much stifer challenge, even though they are ranked 31st in passing defense. ... The Eagles’ fourth-ranked defense faces tough test in QB Ben Roethlisberger, who has a league-best six TD passes, and RB DeAngelo Williams, who leads the NFL with 237 yards rushing. PHILADEPHIA INQUIRER PHOTO

ARIZONA (1-1) AT BUFFALO (0-2)

BALTIMORE (2