9.20.17

Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 09.20.2017 • $1.50

KREWSON CALLS INTERIM CHIEF’S COMMENTS

‘INFLAMMATORY’ BUT STILL BACKS HIM: ‘I DO HAVE CONFIDENCE. I DO.’

Trump threatens to ‘totally destroy’ N. Korea

AP

In U.N. speech, he also takes swipes at Iran and Venezuela BY JONATHAN LEMIRE AND DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS • President

unity, peace and justice Tuesday at an interfaith prayer service in Kiener Plaza. “Each one of us brings a heavy heart but also a faithful heart,” said the Rev. Art Cavitt, pastor of St. Nicholas parish in downtown St. Louis, who led the service for a crowd of a few hundred. “Let our hope be the guide in troubled times.” The service was organized by the Archdiocese of St. Louis after the acquittal Friday of former St. Louis police Officer Jason Stockley in the 2011 shooting death

Donald Trump, in a combative debut speech to the U.N. General Assembly, threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea if the nation’s “Rocket Man” leader does not abandon his drive toward nuclear weapons. Trump, who has ramped up his rhetoric throughout the escalating crisis with North Korea, told the murmuring crowd of world leaders on Tuesday that “it is far past time for the nations of the world to confront” Kim Jong Un and said that Kim’s “reckless pursuit of nuclear weapons” poses a threat to “the entire world with an unthinkable loss of human life.” “Rocket Man is on a suicide mission for himself and his regime,” said Trump, using a belittling nickname for the North Korean leader. He said of the U.S.: “If it is forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.” In dark language reminiscent of his “American carnage” inaugural address, Trump touched upon hot spots around the globe, declaring, “The scourge of our planet is a group of rogue regimes.” Elected on the nationalist slogan “America First,” Trump argued that individual nations should act in their own self-interest, yet rally together when

See PRAYER • Page A8

See TRUMP • Page A7

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Clergy members march together Tuesday after an interfaith prayer service at Kiener Plaza calling for peace and solidarity. The area has seen daily protests since Jason Stockley, a former police oicer, was acquitted in the 2011 shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith.

POLICE CHANGE ISN’T ONLY FIX NEEDED, SHE NOTES

CLERGY HOLD INTERFAITH PRAYER SERVICE FOR PEACE

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Mayor Lyda Krewson said Tuesday that the city’s interim police chief’s comments after a third night of protesting were “inflammatory,” but she is standing by him. Throughout the protests, which began Friday after a white police oicer was found not guilty of murdering a black drug suspect after a car chase, Krewson has been measured in her comments, careful to show support for the police department she oversees and for the protesters who have peacefully demonstrated.

ST. LOUIS • Clergy members spoke of

DAVID CARSON • P-D

St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson holds a news conference Tuesday.

See KREWSON • Page A8

More than 100 dead in Mexico earthquake

Blues show of Scottrade upgrades

PAGE A7

PAGE A6

CHRIS LEE • P-D

AP

Greitens’ bid to oust school leader lounders

A bakery tradition for 80 years is closing • A4

Of chief concern

TODAY

94°/73° SUNNY

BY KURT ERICKSON AND KRISTEN TAKETA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • First-year

Gov. Eric Greitens’ attempt to remake the state school board hit another roadblock Tuesday. For the third time, one of the governor’s appointees to the eight-member board withdrew

from consideration, further delaying his attempt to replace current and well-liked Education Commissioner Margie Vandeven with his own top school pick. The State Board of Education has never before removed the education commissioner. One current board member says the political newcomer’s

behavior has been “incompetent.” “When you elect amateurs to public office, what you get is an amateur performance,” said Michael Jones, who was appointed to represent the St. Louis area by then-Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat. See GREITENS • Page A6

Hurricane Maria takes aim at Puerto Rico • A19 Cards erase early deficit to down Reds, 8-7 • B1 Rustic Japanese is simple but elegant • Let’s Eat

TOMORROW

93°/71° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER A19 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

1 M Vol. 139, No. 263 ©2017

OP 24 E /7 N

BommaritoBuickGMC.com


M 1 WEDNESDAY • 09.20.2017 • A2

Police, not protesters, scare one resident TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Gabriela Canchola lives downtown. She’s not afraid. The 33-year-old digital marketing professional walks downtown with her 15-year-old son, and their dog, Ducky, a wire-haired terrier mix. They walk at night. In the morning. Whenever. When interim St. Louis Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole says police were keeping downtown safe amid protests following the acquittal of Jason Stockley, a former police oicer, Canchola is the target audience. Or she was, anyway. Thanks to the actions of some of the police under O’Toole’s command, she doesn’t feel safe anymore. “I’ve never felt insecure before,” Canchola says. “Now I don’t feel safe because of the cops.” It started Sunday night. She came home after a date and had dinner with her son. She heard some of the protests going on and wanted to take a walk to see what was happening.

Canchola isn’t a protester. She grew up in Wentzville, spending some of her summers in Mexico, where she has family. Since 2012, she has lived in the city, first on the South Side and then downtown. She recently finished a master’s degree in new media production from Webster University. She has followed the protests from afar. On Sunday, she wanted to see what they were about close up. Canchola, her son and Ducky started walking toward the sound. It was around 8:30 p.m., she remembers. At Ninth and Olive streets they were stopped in their tracks. Twenty or so police oicers on bicycles blocked her way. “They came out of nowhere,” she says. “They were starting to form a line and they told me to go away.” Canchola isn’t shy. I figured that out when I met her a few months ago while speaking to her class at Webster. If she has a question, she’s going to ask it. She asked a police oicer what he and his cohorts were doing. He told her they were about to tear gas the protesters, she says. But why? It was an unlawful assembly, they told her.

Canchola looked around. She saw a couple of broken windows, and overturned planters on the sidewalk. She sent her son and dog back to their apartment. And she stood her ground. “I didn’t see any violence happening,” she says. “I just continued to stand there. This is my neighborhood. I was bewildered.” Canchola took out her phone and started texting. She said she felt a light flashed her direction every time she held her phone up to her face, as if they were trying to stop her from videoing what was happening. The incident took her back to 2014. It was the last time she recalls an encounter with police. A neighbor who was a black activist was being arrested in the southern part of the city. She remembers standing outside and watching. “When the cop knew I was watching him, he behaved differently,” Canchola says. “There is a diference between how I’m treated and a black person is treated.” On Sunday, the night O’Toole said “police owned,” something changed in Canchola. Police were just plain rude to her, she says. They pushed her back. They stopped

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

her neighbors, some of them walking around in their socks after a quick trip outside with the dog, from getting to their homes. By the time the night was over, 123 people had been arrested, nearly all for “failure to disperse.” Among those arrested were reporters and livestreamers, photographers, neighbors. They weren’t arrested for breaking windows or threatening violence, but for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Canchola was not among them. She eventually made it back to her home before it was impossible to do so. But the night won’t soon be forgotten. “I just couldn’t believe they were so set on tear-gassing people,” she says. “I thought it was crazy, their attitude toward me. Before last night, the protests were merely eye-opening. Now I’m outraged. I feel the injustice.” On Monday morning she became a protester, joining the march to City Hall, elevating justice over her own sense of peace. “I feel what my neighbors feel for the first time,” Canchola says. “I understand.” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

PREP SCHOOL LIBATIONS

ROAD CREW CHAT

THE 100 BEST AMERICAN MOVIES

Learn to make a drink called the “Southside Strangler” in our Prep School video — but don’t ask about the name. stltoday.com/multimedia

Every week, our Road Crew experts from MoDOT, St. Louis and St. Louis County answer your questions. Join the chat at 1 p.m. Wednesday. stltoday.com/chats

Wonder how many of the best American movies you’ve seen? A former movie critic made his picks — see how they stack up to yours. stltoday.com/entertainment

LOTTERY

DIGEST

MULTISTATE GAMES

ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Two more cities take stand on merger vote • Oicials in two more St. Louis County cities on Monday night approved resolutions urging the County Council and the St. Louis Board of Aldermen to oppose a statewide vote on a city-county merger. The Chesterfield City Council and the Manchester aldermen gave unanimous support to a resolution against a statewide merger vote. Other cities, including Sunset Hills and Olivette, also have approved a similar resolution. Webster Groves was expected to vote on it Tuesday night. The resolution passed in Chesterfield states that “certain legislators and other individuals seek to impose significant and potentially damaging changes to the governmental structure of St. Louis city and St. Louis County, including the municipalities in the county (and) such persons believe that their scheme would not be favorably received by the voters of the city or the county.” The resolution says those leaders might “seek a statewide vote on a constitutional amendment, or some form of legislative mandate, to accomplish their scheme and dilute the votes of or totally bypass the voters of (St. Louis) city and county.” It urges that any votes on changing local governmental structure be cast only by residents of the city and county. A city-county merger has been discussed for years. Supporters say it could not only reunify the St. Louis region but reduce the cost of providing public services and end infighting among cities for regional and national projects. The region’s two top local leaders in June endorsed a report showing upwards of $1 billion a year in waste from ineiciency due to the city-county split, and they announced a task force to create a proposal to change that. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 09-28-31-50-61 Mega ball: 10 Megaplier: 2 Estimated jackpot: $94 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $4.1 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 01-12-31-32-36 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $132,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 849 Evening: 255 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 4478 Evening: 5858

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 19-21-30-32-42 Evening: 08-09-21-44-45 LOTTO Monday: 08-16-27-28-32-51 Extra shot: 14 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $7.25 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 933 FB: 4 Evening: 622 FB: 0 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 5495 FB: 9 Evening: 3330 FB: 0

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CORRECTIONS • Many urgent care operators locally and nationally accept patients with Medicaid, the government-run health insurance for the poor. A front-page story Friday was incorrect.

COLLINSVILLE > Another shutdown on I-55/70 • Westbound lanes of Interstate 55/70 under Interstate 255 near Collinsville will again be shut down for bridge painting this weekend, beginning at 9 p.m. Friday. The Illinois Department of

Transportation said the work wasn’t finished during a shutdown last weekend. During the closure, all westbound I-55/70 traic must exit onto I-255. The highway will reopen by 5 a.m. Monday. Also to be closed then are the ramp from northbound I-255 to westbound I-55/70 and the entrance ramp from Route 157 to westbound I-55/70. (Mark Schlinkmann) JEFFERSON CITY > AGs from Missouri, Illinois pile on Equifax • The attorneys general for Missouri and Illinois have signed onto a letter criticizing Equifax for its handling of a data security breach that has potentially exposed the personal information of 143 million Americans. Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley and Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan signed on to the letter, dated Tuesday. Attorneys general from 43 states, and Washington, D.C., signed the letter. The three-page letter to an Equifax attorney lays out several concerns, among them that the company initially attached a complicated terms of service agreement to free credit-monitoring services in which customers were asked to waive their rights. “It was not until after urging from our oices and public condemnation that Equifax withdrew these objectionable terms from its ofer of free credit monitoring,” the letter says. The letter also criticizes Equifax’s marketing of fee-based credit monitoring services after the breach and that other companies are charging for credit freezes that customers would not have bought had their information not been potentially compromised. (Jack Suntrup) LADUE > City names new police chief • Ken Andreski Jr. was sworn in Monday as Ladue’s new police chief. Andreski, 41, has been with the city’s department for about 15 years, having started as a patrol oicer and reaching the rank of lieutenant before being tapped for the top post. He’ll oversee a department with 34 oicers. Among those attending the ceremony was his wife, Beth, a sergeant in the Olivette Police Department. Andreski replaces Rich Wooten, 55, who had been chief for eight years. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

Billy Joel concert Thursday at Busch Stadium is still a go Billy Joel is still scheduled to perform Thursday at Busch Stadium, his first solo stadium appearance in St. Louis and his only Missouri show this year, the Post-Dispatch’s Aisha Sultan reported Tuesday. “Preparations are well underway to get ready for the Billy Joel concert on Thursday,” Cardinals spokesman Ron Waterman said Tuesday. “Our security team has been in frequent communication with law enforcement to ensure we take every step necessary to assure the safety of concertgoers.” Joel and Elton John played the old Busch Stadium together in 1994. The most recent concert at Busch Stadium was by Metallica in June. Fired U.S. attorney Bharara begins podcast • New York’s Preet Bharara is about to step back into the spotlight with a podcast on justice issues. The podcast, “Stay Tuned with Preet,” opens Wednesday with Leon Panetta as the first guest. Bharara was the U.S. attorney for New York’s Southern District, where he prosecuted Wall Street insiders and New York politicians. He was fired by President Donald Trump on March 11, after refusing to resign, as part of a sweep of U.S. attorneys by the new administration. The move would not have seemed unusual had Bharara not been told by Trump shortly after the election that he would be kept on. Former TV host Bush, wife splitting • Former TV host Billy Bush and his wife, Sydney Davis, are separating. The news comes almost a year after Bush’s career imploded in the wake of the surfacing of a tape showing the then-“Access Hollywood” host cracking up with Donald Trump as the real estate mogul boasted of his lewd treatment of women (the money line: “grab them by the (expletive)”).

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actress Sophia Loren is 83. Actor Gary Cole is 61. Actress Kristen Johnston is 50. Actress Enuka Okuma is 45. Singer The Dream is 40. Rapper Yung Joc is 35. From news services

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business .............. A10 Editorial .............. A14 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A14 Obituaries ........... A16 People ................... A2

PEOPLE

Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks .................. A11 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A19

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $8.92, Sunday-Friday $9.10, Monday-Friday $6.88, Thursday-Sunday $7.09, Sat-Mon $6.16, Fri-Sun $6.16, Sun-Mon $5.62, Sat-Sun Only $5.62, Sunday Only $4.09. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 07/16/17, 08/27/17, 09/17/17, 09/24/17, 10/15/17, 11/23/17, 12/24/17, 01/14/18, 02/18/18, 03/18/18, 04/15/18, 05/20/18, 06/24/18, 07/15/18, 08/26/18, 09/09/18, 09/23/18, 10/14/18 and timing of these charges may afect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666 314-340-8664

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

STLtoday.mycapture.com

Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284 Local news, Business: Adam Goodman...........314-340-8258 Online: Bob Rose............................................... 314-340-8333 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Council weighs suing Stenger in auditor lap Members have approved hiring of ‘several’ stafers, but executive refuses BY JACOB BARKER st. Louis Post-dispatch

The St. Louis County Council could lawyer up in its fight with St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger over staffing in the county auditor’s oice. A resolution from Council Chairman Sam Page would let the council hire an outside law firm to try to persuade a judge to order Stenger’s administration to hire additional auditing staf. It says that the council has appropriated funds for “several” audit staffers and accuses Stenger and his administration of obstructing “the interview and hiring process of budgeted audit staf.” Stenger’s oice has cited a hiring freeze in blocking an internal auditor to serve under St. Louis County Auditor Mark Tucker. And Stenger has called for fir-

ing Tucker himself, pointing to a $91,000 personal federal tax lien first reported by KMOV-TV last month and criticizing his lack of accounting experience. Stenger also criticized Tucker for not conducting any audits since his hiring. “I refuse to expend taxpayer dollars for a third audit staf member so long as the County Council continues to insist on retaining Mark Tucker as head auditor,” Stenger said in a statement before Tuesday night’s council meeting. “I also refuse to expend taxpayer dollars to sue the county in an efort to conceal such blatant incompetence. The office of the auditor has employed a staff of two for nearly a decade and has been able to complete all of its audits efectively prior to the council’s hiring of Tucker.” Page, a personal friend of Tucker’s who nominated him for the job, has argued that Tucker has experience overseeing large budgets from his prior job working as a legislative liaison in the administration of former Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon. But Page argues Tucker can’t do his job efectively without additional employees in his oice.

Trooper gets jail, probation in man’s drowning at Lake of Ozarks

“The County Council intends to seek judicial relief to direct that the county executive proceed with the hiring of sufficient audit staff and any other budgeted positions in the legislative branch of county government,” Page’s resolution reads. The resolution contends the St. Louis County counselor has a conflict of interest and can’t represent both the council and the executive branch in the dispute. The county would hire Bick and Kistner, a Clayton law firm that has experience litigating local governance issues. The fight over staing up the auditor’s oice comes amid reports of county contracts going to Stenger’s campaign contributors. The auditor’s oice can launch its own audits or do so at the request of the council. The county auditor’s oice has been politicized since earlier this year, when the county cut ties with former auditor David Makarewicz and reached a monetary settlement that included a gag order. The county charter calls for the county auditor to have five years of accounting experi-

ence, prompting some on the council to balk at Tucker’s hiring, which narrowly passed on a 4-3 vote in February. Meanwhile, Page said Tucker has no staff and that other jurisdictions such as St. Charles County and the city of St. Louis have larger auditing stafs than St. Louis County, which has far more residents than either. His resolution also cites a special countywide audit from December 2015 that calls for additional auditing staf. The council took no action on the resolution, with Page saying he wanted to give the administration time to remove the hold on the audit position and “avoid a trip to court.” The resolution is the latest fight between Stenger and Page, who leads a block of opposition to the county executive despite being a fellow Democrat. The council and Stenger have clashed recently over a proposed four-rink practice facility in Creve Coeur Lake Memorial Park pushed by the St. Louis Blues and a change in the pension formula for County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch, a Stenger ally.

THE WALK TO FAME

He’ll serve 10 days ‘shock time’; life vest was improperly secured ASSOCIATED PRESS

VERSAILLES, MO. • More than three years after an

Iowa man fell out of a Missouri Highway Patrol boat and drowned while handcuffed and wearing an improperly secured life vest, the trooper who was driving the boat was sentenced Tuesday to 10 days in jail and two years of probation. Trooper Anthony Piercy will serve the “shock time” in the Morgan County jail for the May 31, 2014, death of Brandon Ellingson, 20, an Arizona State University student who was pulled over for suspicion of boating while intoxicated while partying on the Lake of the Ozarks. His father, Craig Ellingson, of Clive, Iowa, read a statement at the sentencing while several family members looked on, The Kansas City Star reported. “Anthony Piercy, it has been almost 3½ years that I’ve waited to tell you face to face that you’re the reason why my son Brandon is dead,” the father said. “You had no compassion for my son.” Piercy later apologized for “the loss I caused the Ellingson family.” “Brandon should be here with them today,” he said. During the stop, Piercy handcuffed Ellingson’s hands behind his back and placed a buckled life vest — the wrong one for a handcufed person — over his head. Ellingson was thrown from the boat when it hit a wave, and his improperly secured life vest came of. Piercy jumped in the water and unsuccessfully tried to save him. Ellingson’s body was recovered 18 hours later. Piercy avoided an involuntary manslaughter trial by pleading guilty in June to a misdemeanor charge of negligent operation of a vessel. The special prosecutor wanted Piercy to be barred from law enforcement for life, but Judge Roger Prokes said that decision is up to the state. Nearly four months after Ellingson drowned, a coroner’s inquest determined the death was accidental and the special prosecutor declined to file charges. The case was later reopened and Piercy was charged with involuntary manslaughter. An investigation by The Star found that some troopers who patrolled the state’s roads weren’t adequately trained to work on the water after the Missouri Water Patrol merged with the Highway Patrol in 2011. Piercy had worked on the state’s roads for 18 years but received just two days of field training before he was cleared to patrol the water alone. Before the merger, Water Patrol recruits received at least two months of field training. Ellingson’s family fought for three years to uncover what happened, alleging the state and the patrol initially covered up the drowning by claiming an intoxicated Brandon may have jumped into the water. His family received a $9 million settlement from the state last year and earlier won a lawsuit over the patrol’s initial handling of the case.

You're invited to educational events on Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

WHO

Barbara Green, MD MS Services, Mercy Hospital

WHEN

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 5:30 PM Arrival Time 6:00 PM Presentation

WHERE

The Old Spaghetti Factory 17384 Chesterfield Airport Road Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 536-9522 Venue ofers handicap accessibility. Refreshments will be provided.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Fans congratulate musician T Bone Burnett after his induction into the St. Louis Walk of Fame on Tuesday in the Loop. Burnett was born in St. Louis and grew up in Fort Worth, Texas, where he began making records in 1965. Burnett has won 13 Grammy Awards, including ive in 2001 for the “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” soundtrack, and received an Academy Award in 2010 as co-writer of the Best Original Song “The Weary Kind” from the ilm “Crazy Heart.”

Cardmember Preview Shopping Day!

Wednesday, Sept. 20 Use your Dillard’s Credit Card on Wednesday’s purchases and

take an extra

40

%

off

entire stock

...of all permanently reduced merchandise throughout the store.

SIGN UP NOW! To register, learn more, or find other events:

1-844-627-3887

www.genemsevents.com

Space is limited and advanced registration is strongly recommended.

©2017 Genentech USA, Inc. | All rights reserved. | OCR/052217/0121a 08/17

Don’t have a Dillard’s Credit Card? Apply to take advantage of the Dillard’s Cardmember Preview Shopping Day. Receive a 10% Off All-Day Welcome Shopping Pass in your 1st statement when you spend $100 on your Dillard’s Card the day you open your account. Maximum discount $100. Offer good only when using your Dillard’s Credit Card.


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 09.20.2017

Lubeley’s, a bakery tradition for 80 years, is closing BY LISA BROWN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The parking lot at Lubeley’s Bakery & Deli was packed Tuesday afternoon after longtime patrons learned the family-owned bakery will be closing on Sept. 30, after 80 years of business. Some were there to stock up on favorite treats, including a customer who placed an order for three white birthday cakes — pineapple filling, of course — with plans to freeze them for future use. Others were there to thank the Lubeley family and reminisce. Co-owner Helen Lubeley-Murray, 67, could barely cross the bakery floor without customers stopping to tell her thank you and ofer good wishes. “It’s a very demanding business,” she told a reporter in between orders. “The holidays are just getting harder and harder, and we just looked at each other and said how long can we do this? We’re the second generation, and we don’t have a third generation to take it over, which is not uncommon in mom-and-pop businesses.” Lubeley-Murray’s parents, Helen and Ed Lubeley, opened the original bakery in 1937 near Kingshighway and Christy Boulevard. The business changed locations a few times, and after Lubeley-Murray and her brother, Bob Lubeley, took over in 1980, they moved the business to 7815 Watson Road, in Marlborough. Bob Lubeley is now 64. Helen, the matriarch of the baking family, continued to work well into her 90s, ringing up orders, icing cakes and chatting up customers. In 2009, she told the Post-Dispatch, “If I miss a day, there’ll be a whole group in the next day asking, ‘Helen, what happened to you?’” She died in 2014, at age 101. Lubeley’s is known for its variety of German-style cakes, danishes, stollens and breads, as well as wedding cakes, themed cookies, holiday goods and doughnuts. On Tuesday, the bakery’s window display fea-

DIGEST MANCHESTER > Tree-friendly ordinance passes • Manchester now has a tree maintenance code in place, designed to encourage keeping them in new residential developments as well as the removal of nuisance trees in existing areas. Developers are required to present a tree preservation plan, or possibly pay up to $10,000 per acre to the city’s Tree Fund. Also, trees in public rights of way — but still on private property — can be declared nuisances to be remedied at the expense of the property owner. That includes dead, diseased, noxious, hazardous or otherwise

tured seven multitier wedding cakes with delicately iced pink roses and ribbons. Inside, boxes of cinnamon sugar cookies and pumpkin bread on display tables were quickly snapped up by shoppers. At the store and on social media, customers waxed eloquent about the bakery items they’ll miss, from Spingerle cookies to split lemon cake. Steve Baker, 66, of St. Louis Hills, said his family bought cakes celebrating big events, from confirmations to birthdays, from Lubeley’s for decades, dating to the Kingshighway location. “They’re like family,” Baker said of bakery’s staff and owners. “They know my name when I come in, and even if they’re busy they take time to talk.” Once, a customer went home with a cake meant for Baker’s oldest daughter’s first communion, Baker recounted. “Somebody else picked up our cake and Bob stopped what he was doing and made us another cake right away. That’s the kind of people they are.” Many customers remembered the great pains Lubeley’s staff took to personalize cakes. Ruth Flanagan, 63, of Webster Groves, said when her husband Tom was a cross country coach at St. Louis University High School, she’d leave it to Lubeley’s to create a birthday cake for him served at a barbecue at their home for the athletes every year. “I never knew what they’d make, and each one was more breathtaking than the last,” Flanagan said, adding one Lubeley’s cake was decorated with runners on a track, depicting all of St. Louis’ Catholic high schools. “It’s heartbreaking,” Flanagan said of Lubeley’s closure. “We’ve been going there for 40 years, and I’ve never gone to another bakery. We will miss them so dearly. Not just the baked goods and the cakes, we will miss the people.”

PHOTO BY JERRY NAUNHEIM JR.

Helen Lubeley-Murray (left), co-owner of Lubeley’s Bakery & Deli in Marlborough, takes an order Tuesday from Silvija Coric, of the Afton area. “I’ve ordered cakes here for nine years,” Coric said. “Every cake, birthdays and baptisms, any occasion. I’ve always gotten them here.” The bakery, which opened in 1937, said it is closing its doors on Sept. 30.

fr b

a gr

ba

n io at l al st in

ee

ith rw

Barrier Free Showers solutions for safe independent living

Lisa Brown • 314-340-8127 @lisabrownstl on Twitter lbrown@post-dispatch.com

unsuitable trees. Enforcement can be complaint driven. Resident Mike Romney on Monday night strenuously argued against the measure, as he had in earlier discussions, saying it is too burdensome on potential developers who may not even know their inal costs. But all six aldermen supported it, after changes that lowered the requirements on developers to retain some of the existing woodland that would be slated for removal. The code works in conjunction with a Tree Resource Improvement and Maintenance grant the city got from the Missouri Department of Conservation last year. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

The Area’s Largest Fall Home Event

SM

Veteran-owned and Va Certiied Call today and reCeiVe a free in home quote

314-758-0594 618-857-3458

HEAR BETTER. LIVE BETTER. GUARANTEED.

BUY GET ONE ONE

FREE

“Heartland Hearing didn’t sell us hearing aids, they corrected our hearing so we can enjoy church again.” - Leland and Lawrence

SEPTEMBER 22-24 St. Charles Convention Center INVISI EAR HHC 36

Inspiration

TRY THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY FREE 60 DAY TRIAL

200 companies sho showcasing casing the latest home products, services, innovations and ideas

Expert Advice • Get tips and tricks for f remodeling emodeling lik like a pro from Jeff Devlin, licensed contractor and host of DIY Network’s Stone House Revival • Walter Knoll Fall Floral Seminars

“APPOINTMENTS FILL UP FAST, CALL FOR YOURS NOW!”

FREE HEARING TEST

Products WIN Great • Visit the Party Flavors Sampling Event R Register to win a $500 Show Shopping Spree!

CALL YOUR NEAREST LOCATION FOR APPOINTMENT Hearing Aids start at $299.99 each, including warranty and insurance. Every hearing loss is different. To determine the best options for you we will gather data during the exam and enter it into our system which will enable us to show personalized recommendations. The average cost without insurance beneits is between $995 and $1995, depending on your needs and lifestyle. If you have insurance or medicare complete plans, your out of pocket cost can be as low as $0

FREE VIDEO OTOSCOPE EXAM

• Get great deals at the Spa Sale

Family Fun! Entertaining do dog sho shows, fr free pumpkin painting, crafts and games for kids

Exam Value $400 - FREE! HOURS Friday 11 am - 8 pm Saturday 11 am - 8 pm Sunday 11 am - 5 pm

DIRECTIONS I-70 to Convention Center Blvd. exit.

0

% INTEREST $ AVAILABLE

0

DOWN PAYMENT AVAILABLE

8 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS SOUTH COUNTY 314-325-8222 SWANSEA 618-857-3299 FARMINGTON 573-837-4722 COLUMBIA 573-705-9900

Produced by

STLHomeShow.com FREE ADMISSION & FREE PARKING

ROYCE R. LAMARR, BC-HIS

JEFFERSON CITY 573-818-3318 ALTON 618-857-3323 CHESTERFIELD 636-203-7056 CREVE COEUR 314-202-4822


LOCAL

09.20.2017 • WedneSday • M 1 ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

LAW & ORDER

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

New Fast Acting Arthritis Painkiller Stops Pain on Contact New cream works faster and is more targeted than oral medications. Key ingredients penetrate the skin within seconds to relieve joint arthritis pain. Users report significant immediate relief. By Robert Ward Associated Health Press BOSTON – Innovus Pharmaceuticals has introduced a new arthritis pain relief treatment that works in seconds. Sold under the brand name Apeaz™, the new pain relief cream numbs the nerves right below the skin. When applied to an arthritic joint, or a painful area on the body, it delivers immediate relief that lasts for hours and hours.

Apeaz™: Quick Acting Pain and Arthritis Cream is Now Available Without a Prescription

The powerful painkilling effect is created by the creams active ingredient, a special medical compound.

medications, Apeaz™ is a fraction of the cost. At less than $2 a day, the cream quickly is becoming a household name.

Anesthetics are used in hospitals during surgery. They block nerve signals from the brain so that patients don’t feel pain and they work fast.

Those with terrible arthritis in their hands .+) 8+<#!;( 0%4# :%2 easy Apeaz™ is to open. 1:# 5.! 89; 7+ 9:# $.0of the hand, which makes it much easier to use.

The anesthetic found in Apeaz™ is the strongest available without a prescription. The cream form allows users to directly target their area of pain. It works where it is applied. The company says this is why the product is so effective and fast acting. “Users can expect to feel relief immediately after applying,” explains Dr. Bassam Damaj, President of Innovus Pharmaceuticals. “There will a pleasant warming sensation that is followed by a cool, soothing one. This is how you know that the active ingredients have reached the infected joint and tissue.”

Works In Seconds For arthritis suffers, Apeaz offers impressive advantages over traditional medications. The most obvious is how quickly it relieves discomfort. The cream contains the maximum approved dose of a top anesthetic, which penetrates the skin in a matter of seconds to numb the

Instant Pain Relief Without a Prescription Many Apeaz™ users re$%!9 ;7<+78*.+9 7-$!%4#ments in daily aches and pain. Many more report 7+*!#.;#) '#/7,7079& .+) less stiffness. They are moving pain free for the 8!;9 97-# 7+ &#.!;( 073# Henry Esber, and early user of Apeaz™. “I’ve tried more pills than I can count. I’ve also had a handful of cortisone shots. Nothing is as effective as this product. With Apeaz™, I get relief right away. I rub a little on my knees and some through my hands. It keeps the pain away. It also prevents the pain from getting really bad. It’s completely changed my life.”

How It Works “Apeaz™ contains the highest, non-prescription dose of a medical *%-$%6+) 9:.9 8<:9; pain on contact. When applied to the skin it goes to work within seconds by penetrating right to the source of your pain, numbing the nerve endings.”

Apeaz™ is an FDA drug with approved claims for the pain relief of the following conditions: • Arthritis pain • Simple back pain • Strains • Sprains • Athletic injuries • Muscle stiffness and pain • Wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, foot, muscle or joint pain

area that’s in pain. This relief lasts for several hours. Additional ingredients in the cream help ;6$$!#;; 7+'.--.tion around tissues and joints. Published pre-clinical studies have shown that the ingredients in Apeaz™ can also prevent further bone and cartilage destruction. There are also no negative side effects from the oral medication. Apeaz™ delivers its ingredients through the skin. Oral medications are absorbed in the digestive tract. Overtime, the chemicals in pills can tear the delicate lining of the stomach, causing ulcers and bleeding. to

When other

compared arthritis

“This is why Apeaz™ is so effective for people with arthritis. It reduces pain while adding an additional layer of joint protection,” explains Damaj.

A New Way to Treat Pain Although Dr. Damaj and his team say that their cream is the fastest and most effective way to relieve arthritis pain, they believe there is still a reason to take joint pills. The most effective are those which help to further strengthen and support the joints. That’s why every container of Apeaz™ comes with ArthriVarx™, a breakthrough pill that’s taking on joint support in an entirely new way. ArthriVarx™ works on your joints, making it

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

the perfect companion to Apeaz™. “ArthriVarx™ contains special compounds published to lubricate the joints and connective tissues that surrounds them. With daily use, they improve joint health and can give an extra cushion,” explains Dr. Damaj. “When combined with Apeaz™, it becomes the perfect system to tackle arthritis. While the anesthetic component of Apeaz™ is working on the outside, relieving pain on contact, ArthriVarx™ is working on the inside, adding cushioning to the joints”’

A Powerful Combination For Arthritis and Joint Pain With daily use, Apeaz™ plus ArthriVarx™ helps users live a more vital, pain free life without any of the negative side effects or interactions associated with oral drugs. By delivering fast, long-lasting, and targeted relief from joint pain and reducing 7+'.--.97%+ .+) swelling that causes joint damage, Apeaz™ and ArthriVarx™ is the newest, most effective way to tackle your arthritis pain. You can now enjoy an entirely new level of comfort that’s both safe and affordable. It is also extremely effective, especially if nothing else has worked well for you.

UNIVERSITY CITY > Reward is ofered for information on vandals • CrimeStoppers is ofering a reward for information that leads to the arrest of protesters who smashed windows of businesses in the Delmar Loop on Saturday night. The reward is for up to $1,000. Tipsters can remain anonymous. Police on Tuesday released a photo of one vandal. St. Louis police Oicer Lisa Pisciotta said the person is wanted for vandalizing multiple businesses near Delmar Boulevard and Leland Avenue. The property damage was part of latenight violence that followed peaceful daytime protests related to Friday’s acquittal of a white former police oicer in the shooting death of a black suspect. On Monday, oicials charged ive people with rioting and property damage in the Loop protest. ST. LOUIS > Rapist gets 18-year sentence • A St. Louis man has been sentenced to 18 years in prison after pleading guilty to charges he raped an unconscious woman — who later was found dead. Kenneth R. Middleton, 19, of the 7800 block of Ivory Avenue, pleaded guilty Sept. 11 in St. Louis Circuit Court to charges of rape, stealing and theft of a irearm as part of an agreement with Middleton prosecutors. St. Louis Circuit Judge Steven Ohmer followed terms of the agreement by sentencing Middleton to 18 years in prison. Middleton raped Kelli Pound, 47, who was found dead Sept. 13, 2015, in a Patch neighborhood community garden in the 8200 block of Alabama Avenue. A man waiting at a nearby bus stop spotted her body. The contents of Pound’s purse were found along a nearby sidewalk, and Middleton later admitted taking her cellphone. He was recorded by a store’s surveillance camera near Pound’s body. Two months later, the St. Louis Medical Examiner ruled Pound’s death an accidental heroin overdose. The gun theft charge said Middleton took a .357 Magnum revolver from a diferent woman Aug. 28, 2015, in the 2400 block of North Broadway. Middleton told police he took the gun to sell it for drugs or money. O’FALLON, MO. > Suspect pleads guilty in robbery • A man who robbed a gas station in 2015 in O’Fallon, Mo., at gunpoint while wearing a chimpanzee mask has pleaded guilty. William J. Brown, 23, of Brown the irst block of Painted Pony Drive, pleaded guilty Monday of irst-degree robbery and armed criminal action. He was sentenced to 10 years and seven years in prison respectively, with the sentences to run at the same time.

CrimeStoppers is seeking information on this person, seen vandalizing businesses in the Delmar Loop on Saturday.

Police say Brown admitted going into the Midwest Petroleum gas station at 1060 Bryan Road on Nov. 29, 2015, displaying a black semi-automatic handgun and announcing a robbery. He told police he did it because he “needed money.” Brown ordered the clerk to empty both registers and took about $280 cash. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > One charged in armed carjacking • Men wearing surgical masks robbed a man who was with his 3-year-old child of his car at gunpoint early Tuesday in north St. Louis County, then led police on a chase into St. Louis. The suspects crashed, and police arrested two men. Police said that Darron Scott, 27, had been charged with robbery, armed criminal action and resisting arrest. He is being held in lieu of $100,000 cash-only bail. He lives in the 1600 block of Hogan Street. No one else had been charged as of Scott Tuesday night, police said. Just before 4 a.m., police said, a man was robbed at gunpoint in the 11100 block of Oak Parkway Lane, an area in north St. Louis County near Bellefontaine Road and Interstate 270. Men wearing masks confronted him and demanded that he give up his car, a 2007 Mazda 6. One had a handgun. The victim told police that he dropped his keys in response. One of the men patted his pockets and took his mobile phone and wallet. The robbers agreed to let the man get his 3-year-old son out of the car, police said, before driving away. A short time later, police spotted a car that matched the description of the man’s car, although it had diferent license plates, said St. Louis County police Oicer Benjamin Granda. Police tried to stop the driver, but the car sped of with the oicer in pursuit, Granda said. The chase, covering about ive miles, went from North County to Jennings and into Bellefontaine Neighbors. The driver collided with several other cars. The chase continued into St. Louis, where the suspects hit a curb and crashed into a utility pole near Switzer Avenue and Drury Lane. Granda said police recovered a gun and the surgical masks inside the car.

Want Great Rates + Safety? It’s a day at the beach.

How to Get Apeaz™ in Missouri 1:7; 7; 9:# %"8*7.0 public release of Apeaz™. As such, the company is offering a special discounted supply to any joint-pain arthritissufferer who calls within the next 48 hours. A special hotline number and discounted pricing has been created for all Missouri residents. Discounts will be available starting today at 6:00AM and will automatically be applied to all callers. Your Toll-Free hotline number is 1-800-706-7516 and will only be open for the next 48 hours. Only a limited discounted supply of Apeaz™ is currently available in your region. Consumers who miss out on our current product inventory will have to wait until more becomes available and that could take weeks. Experience the guaranteed Apeaz™ relief already enjoyed by thousands of consumers. The company advises not to wait. Call 1-800-706-7516 today.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY.

12-MONTH CD

% 1.40

APY *

$2,000 minimum opening deposit

Relax with an award-winning product from Synchrony Bank.

Visit us at synchronybank.com or call 1-800-753-6870 to get started. * Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of 9/1/17 and subject to change at any time without notice. A minimum of $2,000 is required to open a CD and must be deposited in a single transaction. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawals. Fees may reduce earnings. After maturity, if you choose to roll over your CD, you will earn the base rate of interest in effect at that time. Visit synchronybank.com for current rates, terms and account requirements. Offer applies to personal accounts only. © 2017 Synchrony Bank


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 09.20.2017

Scottrade ready for debut Blues will play preseason home opener Wednesday in refurbished arena BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Several events have been canceled downtown and elsewhere in the area since former St. Louis police Oicer Jason Stockley was found not guilty in the murder of Anthony Lamar Smith. But there will be a hockey game played Wednesday night at Scottrade Center — a preseason contest between the Blues and the visiting Columbus Blue Jackets. As such it will be one of the few events held at a public facility downtown, and the first event at spiffed up Scottrade, since Friday’s verdict. Blues president and CEO of business operations Chris Zimmerman said the thought of cancellation never entered the mind of anyone in the organization. “Obviously, when you get in situations like this, you’re dealing with an evolving situation,” Zimmerman said. “It’s front and center to me. We’re not immune to this, and obviously we’re disappointed that we needed to cancel the (Ed Sheeran) concert that we had scheduled here Sunday. “But we’re just focused on helping the city and helping the people start to move forward. I always say the nice thing about sports is, as much as you may have lots of diferent political interests and views, that sports is one of the great uniters. “We know we can’t solve every problem for the city, but hopefully we can start to give people another outlet to create some diferent emotions.” Actually, one of those city problems is funding the ongoing renovations of Scottrade. But while that dispute continues, the Blues have used a bridge loan to pay for upgrades. The first phase of those renovations — $34 million worth — will be on display in Wednesday’s 7 p.m. faceof against Columbus. The renovations touched on many aspects in the building, including new restrooms, three new concession stands, new LED lighting, a new sound system, and many less obvious infrastructure improvements. But the first thing most fans will notice is the new video board. It’s big. OK, not Jerry Jones/Dallas Cowboys stadium big. But it’s big. “It’s actually the eighth-largest,” Zimmerman said, speaking

PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis Blues season ticket holders on Tuesday attend a preview of Scottrade Center renovations completed in the ofseason. The centerpiece of the renovations is the new scoreboard over center ice. It is the league’s eighth-largest video board.

of venues that host NHL teams. “We went and looked at them all. We’ve looked at some of the bigger ones, but ... you don’t want it too big.” The previous video board was the second-smallest in the NHL. “Some people joked that we had a ‘minitron,’” Zimmerman said. “And we’ve now moved up to a jumbotron.” It weighs 3 tons, which the Blues calculated as the equivalent weight of 1.75 million toasted raviolis. (Minus the mar-

inara sauce.) “It’s huge,” Blues goalie Carter Hutton said. “I might need the blinders when I’m backing up Jake (Allen) here. I think the fans are gonna love it. I think it’s gonna be a treat for them coming down here and seeing all the upgrades.” Allen said he occasionally gets “jumbotron neck” on the bench from looking up at the video board too often. That could be a real problem with this one. Hutton and the rest of the

Blues season ticket holders sit in the new theater box seating area Tuesday during a preview of Scottrade Center renovations completed in the ofseason. The Blues got a new locker room, and the arena got 30 new restrooms.

Blues who made the trip to Dallas for Tuesday’s preseason opener got their first look at the refurbished Scottrade during a skate Tuesday morning. Several hundred Blues ticketholders and sponsors got a sneak peek at the new Scottrade on Tuesday night, watching the Blues-Stars game from the video board. “This is nice. This is really nice,” coach Mike Yeo said, standing in the middle of a new, more spacious Blues locker room

before heading for Dallas later in the afternoon. “This is going to be great for us. It’s going to be great for St. Louis, concerts, everything. The lighting. I’m excited to hear the sound. The scoreboard is unreal. So, yeah, we’re all excited.” Perhaps even Madonna will be impressed at some point in the future. The pop diva used the old Blues locker room for a previous concert, complete with red carpet in the shower area where she warmed up her voice. (You know, better acoustics.) The Blues are quick to point out that only 40 percent of the dates in the arena are used for their games. The other 60 percent are for concerts, other sporting events, etc. The impetus for the improvements, Zimmerman said, came when the Southeastern Conference agreed to hold its 2018 men’s basketball tournament here. “Gosh, it was back in 2014, and they were saying, ‘Guys, we’ve just been in your building. You’re falling behind significantly,’” Zimmerman said. “And they really set the bar around fan amenities, around technology, as well what we would call team services — which is the locker room areas, the press room. All of those elements that lead to putting on a first-class championship tournament.” All the work has taken place since the end of June, basically a 10-week period that included everything from construction of a new floor with capabilities for an Olympic-size ice surface, to new boilers to help with heating, and the new restrooms. That’s 30 restrooms, by the way, comprising approximately 240 sinks and 600 stalls/fixtures according to Alex Rodrigo, group vice president and arena general manager for the Blues. Rodrigo said there have been subtle touches added in the renovation to add a feel for St. Louis. “So you’re going to see, feel, hear, and taste a little bit of St. Louis in here without putting an Arch in the middle of the arena,” Rodrigo said. Speaking of taste, among the concession upgrades are food and beverage offerings from several local establishments, including the Hi-Point Drive-In, Byrd & Barrel and Sugarfire. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

“I can’t imagine a bigger scoreboard than that,” said Mike Abfall, a Blues season ticket holder from Fenton, as he looked over the lower bowl with his son, Drew, during a preview of Scottrade Center renovations Tuesday. “What they have done is awesome.”

hird of governor’s state board appointees withdraws GREITENS • FROM A1

BOARD OF EDUCATION MEMBERS

Jones’ comments came after Springfield, Mo., resident Heidi Crane declined to accept Greitens’ appointment to the board. Crane was a last-minute choice to replace Springfield resident Melissa Gelner on the board after Gelner’s nomination was withdrawn by Greitens. Gelner wrote that she was being pressured by Greitens’ administration to dump Vandeven. A third appointee, Delbert Scott, withdrew after it was learned his job barred him from sitting on the board. Crane could not be reached for comment Tuesday and a spokesman for Greitens declined to discuss the withdrawal and the circumstances surrounding the state board membership. Having thus far replaced only three members of the board means Greitens is short of having the votes to bring in his own person to run the agency. “First of all, the governor has got to be able to count to five,” Jones said. “Right now, I don’t think there are five votes for that.” Board President Charles Shields agreed. “It has been made very clear that the governor’s oice would like to have their own commissioner. They have somebody

Mike Jones (D) of St. Louis: Appointed by Gov. Jay Nixon. Term expires 2018. Victor Lenz (R) of St. Louis: Appointed by Gov. Jay Nixon. Term expires 2019. Joseph Driskill (D) of Jeferson City: Appointed by Gov. Jay Nixon. Term expires 2021. Doug Russell (R) of Lebanon: Appointed by Gov. Eric Greitens. Term expires 2025. Claudia Onate Greim (D) of Kansas City: Appointed by Gov. Eric Greitens. Term expires 2022. Charlie Shields (R) of St. Joseph: Appointed by Gov. Jay Nixon. Term expires 2020. Eddy Justice (R) of Poplar Bluf: Appointed by Gov. Eric Greitens. Term expires 2024. The last state board position is vacant.

in mind. That is their prerogative,” Shields said. “I don’t see any indication from the board members that have just been seated and the existing board members that we’re anywhere close to making that decision.” Both Shields and Jones said Greitens’ attempts to stack the board with his appointees is perfectly legal under state law. Both also said it is uncommon for a governor to try to influence those appointees to

fire someone. “The State Board of Education is designed by the constitution to be somewhat independent,” Shields said. “I’ve been in politics for 35 years. I have never had an elected oicial ask me to go get someone fired,” Jones said. “On top of being wrong, it was just incompetent and not very well done.” Melissa Randol, executive director of the Missouri School Boards Association, said it was crucial that the board maintain its independence and not become a partisan body. “Their focus is exclusively on children and serving children,” she said. “It’s not unusual for a governor to share his or her perspective on public education, but it would be unusual for a governor to dictate a personnel matter.” Vandeven, who earns $191,544 annually, took the helm as commissioner in January 2015, replacing Chris Nicastro. Her goals then included expanding access to early childhood education, improving teacher quality and increasing accountability for teaching colleges. During Vandeven’s tenure, the state board has given accreditation upgrades to two St. Louis-area districts that have long been targeted for improvement: St. Louis Public Schools in January and Riverview

Gardens in December. Those districts earned enough points to earn upgrades by improving their attendance and graduation rates, despite having a large majority of students who are not proficient on state reading and math tests. Vandeven has also long worked toward this year’s debut of Missouri’s first rating system for teaching colleges. Experts have said Missouri is one of the few states to have such an accountability system. In recent months, Vandeven, the state education department and state board have also taken a hard hand in demanding charter school quality by heightening pressure on charter school sponsors. While the state board virtually has little power to close a charter school — unless the board itself is the sponsor of the school — the board approves new charter school applications. Randol said she thinks most educators will say Vandeven is a competent commissioner. “She’s an extraordinary commissioner and, without hesitation, I can say she has done an excellent job of advancing the agenda of improving opportunities for children,” Randol said. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com


WORLD

09.20.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

Strong quake rattles Mexico Buildings collapse, scores are killed and trapped in debris as thousands lee in fear

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Volunteers search a building that collapsed after an earthquake Tuesday in the Roma neighborhood of Mexico City. The magnitude 7.1 quake rocked central Mexico.

BY MARK STEVENSON, CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN AND PETER ORSI Associated Press

MEXICO CITY • A magnitude 7.1 earthquake stunned central Mexico on Tuesday, killing at least 149 people as buildings collapsed in plumes of dust. Thousands fled into the streets in panic, and many stayed to help rescue those trapped. Dozens of buildings tumbled into mounds of rubble or were severely damaged in densely populated parts of Mexico City and nearby states. Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera said buildings fell at 44 places in the capital alone as high-rises across the city swayed sickeningly. The quake is the deadliest in Mexico since a 1985 quake on the same date killed thousands. It came less than two weeks after another powerful quake caused 90 deaths in the country’s south. Mexico City’s mayor said at least 30 died in the capital, and oicials in Morelos state, just to the south, said 54 died there. At least 26 others died in Puebla state, state disaster prevention chief Carlos Valdes said. Gov. Alfredo del Mazo said at least nine died in the State of Mexico, which also borders the capital.

U.S.

MEXICO

Gulf of Mexico

Magnitude 7.1 quake Mexico City OAXACA CHIAPAS GUA. Epicenter of Sept. 8 magnitude 8.1 quake

Pacific Ocean

200 MILES

Washington Post

Officials in Oaxaca reported one quake-related death in that southern state, which is far from the quake’s epicenter. Mancera said 50 to 60 people were rescued alive by residents and emergency workers in Mexico City. Authorities said at least 70 people in the capital had been hospitalized for injuries. The federal interior minister, Miguel Angel Osorio Chong, said authorities had reports of people still being trapped in collapsed buildings. He said search eforts were slow because of the fragility of rubble. “It has to be done very carefully,” he said. “Time is against us.” At one site, reporters saw onlookers cheer as a woman was pulled from the rubble. Rescuers immediately called for silence so they could listen for others who

might be trapped. Mariana Morales, 26, a nutritionist, was one of many who spontaneously participated in rescue eforts. She wore a paper face mask, and her hands were still dusty from having joined a rescue brigade to clear rubble from a building that fell in a cloud of dust before her eyes, about 15 minutes after the quake. Morales said she was in a taxi when the quake struck, and she got out and sat on a sidewalk to try to recover from the scare. Then, just a few yards away, the three-story building fell. Carlos Mendoza, 30, said that he and other volunteers had been able to pull two people alive from the ruins of a collapsed apartment building after three hours of efort. “We saw this and came to help,” he said. “It’s ugly, very ugly.” Alma Gonzalez was in her fourth-floor apartment in the Roma neighborhood when the quake pancaked the ground floor of her building, leaving her no way out — until neighbors set up a ladder on their roof and helped her slide out a side window. Gala Dluzhynska was taking a class with 11 other women on the second floor of a building on trendy Alvaro Obregon street

when the quake struck and window and ceiling panels fell as the building began to tear apart. She said she fell on the stairs and people began to walk over her, before someone finally pulled her up. “There were no stairs anymore. There were rocks,” she said. They reached the bottom only to find it barred. A security guard finally came and unlocked it. The quake sent people throughout the city fleeing from homes and offices, and many people remained in the streets for hours, fearful of returning to the structures. Alarms blared and traffic stopped around the Angel of Independence monument on the iconic Reforma Avenue. Electricity and cellphone service was interrupted in many areas, and traic was snarled as signal lights went dark. The U.S. Geological Survey said the magnitude 7.1 quake hit at 1:14 p.m. and was centered near the Puebla state town of Raboso, about 76 miles southeast of Mexico City. Puebla Gov. Tony Gali tweeted that there were damaged buildings, including collapsed church steeples, in the city of Cholula. Earlier in the day, workplaces across Mexico City held earth-

quake readiness drills on the anniversary of the 1985 quake, a magnitude 8.0 shake that killed thousands of people and devastated large parts of the capital. In that disaster, too, ordinary people played a crucial role in rescue eforts that overwhelmed oicials. Local media broadcast video of whitecap waves churning the city’s normally placid canals of Xochimilco as boats bobbed up and down. Mexico City’s international airport suspended operations and was checking facilities for damage. Much of Mexico City is built on a former lakebed, and the soil can amplify the efects of earthquakes centered hundreds of miles away. The new quake appeared to be unrelated to the magnitude 8.1 temblor that hit in the early hours of Sept. 8 off Mexico’s southern coast and also was felt strongly in the capital. U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Paul Earle noted that the epicenters of the two quakes were 400 miles apart and said most aftershocks were within 60 miles. There have been 19 earthquakes of magnitude 6.5 or larger within 150 miles of Tuesday’s quake over the past century, Earle said.

At U.N., Trump threatens to ‘totally destroy’ North Korea TRUMP • FROM A1

faced with a common threat. He urged nations to join to stop Iran’s nuclear program — he declared the deal to restrain it an “embarrassment” for the United States — and defeat “loser terrorists” who have struck violence across the globe. He denounced “radical Islamic terrorism,” the inflammatory label he has recently shied away from. He denounced the Syrian government and warned that some violence-plagued portions of the world “are going to hell.” He made little mention of Russia. North Korea drew most of Trump’s attention and anger. His lashing was a vigorous restatement of what has been said by U.S. leaders before, but was likely to hit home harder for being intensely delivered in diplomatic prime time at the U.N. General Assembly. After a litany of accusations — the starvation of millions, the abduction of a Japanese girl — he questioned the legitimacy of the communist government by referring to it as a “band of criminals.” Though he used bellicose rhetoric rare for a U.S. president at the rostrum of the United Nations, the speech was textbook Trump, a stark depiction of good vs. evil and a broadside against America’s foes. Trump, who has previously warned of “fire and fury” if Pyongyang does not back down, claimed that “no one has shown more contempt for other nations and for the well-being of their own people than the depraved regime in North Korea.” And he scolded nations, saying that it was “an outrage” to enable and trade with North Korea, seeming to slight China, though he did not mention it by name.

Trump, however, stopped short of calling for regime change, which North Korea regards as the ultimate American intention and treats as a reason for its development of nuclear weapons. That may ofer some reassurance to China and Russia, which have urged the U.S. to tone down its rhetoric and restart dialogue with North Korea.

COMMON DANGER Addressing the General Assembly is a milestone moment for any president, but one particularly significant for Trump, a relative newcomer to foreign policy who has at times rattled other nations with his unpredictability. He has pulled the United States out of multinational agreements, considered shrinking the U.S. military footprint in the world and deployed bombastic language on North Korea that has been criticized by other world leaders. Trump frequently belittled the U.N. as a candidate, and some within his White House believe the U.N. acts as a global bureaucracy that infringes on the sovereignty of individual countries. He urged the world leaders to embrace their own national sovereignty to do more to ensure the prosperity and security of their own countries. But the president stood before world leaders and a global audience and declared that U.N. members, acting as a collection of self-interested nations, should unite to confront global dangers. “I will always put America first. Just like you, the leaders of your countries, should and always put your countries first,” said Trump, who assured the U.N. that the United States would not abdicate its leadership position in the world but needed other countries to contribute more.

“We can no longer be taken advantage of or enter into a one-sided deal in which the United States gets nothing in return,” he said.

lomatic ties. The White House deflected any concerns, saying the high-profile absences won’t hurt the work being conducted.

ATTENTION, ABSENCE World leaders, many of whom were seeing Trump in person for the first time, were certain to take the measure of the man and parse his every word for clues on how he views the U.S. role in the world. His remarks sometimes produced surprised chatter in the crowd. As he lambasted North Korea, the nation’s two front seats for delegation leaders were empty. Two oicials sat a row back, one taking notes. Leaders of some of the world’s most influential — or controversial — countries are skipping the meeting or have sent underlings to fill the chairs. Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping are two of the highest-profile absences. Others include Germany’s Angela Merkel, England’s Theresa May, Venezuela’s Nicolas Maduro and Mexico’s Enrique Peña Nieto. Putin and Merkel sent their foreign ministers. May chose to travel to Florence, Italy, to deliver a “major address” on Brexit instead of visiting New York. Diplomats say they’ve learned it can be risky to share the spotlight with Trump, who can turn even the most well-intentioned exchange into an international spectacle, such as his notorious call with the Australian prime minister about refugees or the dressing down of NATO leaders at the unveiling of a new headquarters. “Even meetings that should be a good meeting can veer off into bizarre directions,” said a former U.S. oicial with dip-

IRAN, THE ‘RECKLESS REGIME’ On Iran, Trump called the government a “reckless regime” that is running an “economically depleted rogue state” whose chief export is “violence, bloodshed and chaos.” He accused Tehran of squandering Iran’s wealth by supporting Syrian President Bashar Assad, Lebanon’s Hezbollah militia and Yemen’s Houthi rebel group. Trump called the U.N.-backed Iran nuclear deal “an embarrassment” to the United States and suggested it was “one of the worst” international pacts ever struck. And he hinted that his administration, which has accused Tehran of aiding terrorism in the Middle East, could soon declare Iran out of compliance with the deal, which could unravel it. “I don’t think you’ve heard the end of it,” Trump said. “Believe me.” The administration must decide in midOctober whether it will certify that Iran is still in compliance with the agreement. Trump vowed again to take the fight to terrorists but warned that parts of the world were so plagued by violence and poverty, they were “going to hell.” He also decried the “disastrous rule” of Venezuela’s Nicolas Maduro and urged the U.N. to step in. “To put it simply, we meet at a time of both immense promise and of great peril,” he said. “It is entirely up to us whether we lift the world to new heights or let it fall into a valley of disrepair.” The McClatchy Washington Bureau contributed to this report.


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 09.20.2017

Krewson criticizes O’Toole’s remarks but stands by him

Prayer service calls for peace and justice PRAYER • FROM A1

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

More than 250 students walked out of Webster University on Tuesday to protest the acquittal of Jason Stockley and staged a die-in at the student center. The students want the university to condemn police brutality and criticized the omission of Anthony Lamar Smith’s name from a memo.

KREWSON • FROM A1

Her unwavering support for the police altered slightly Tuesday during a press briefing and a follow-up interview with the Post-Dispatch. Krewson said she had met with the chief and told him that his remarks and those chanted by his oicers were inappropriate and certainly nothing that she supported. About 1 a.m. Monday, a few hours after more than 100 people were arrested and downtown business windows were shattered, Interim Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole said that police “owned tonight.” “We’re in control. This is our city, and we’re going to protect it,” O’Toole said at a news conference, Krewson by his side. His comments came a few hours after officers facing off with protesters chanted “Whose streets? Our streets,” co-opting a popular phrase used by demonstrators during marches. “I wish they wouldn’t have said that,” Krewson said. In a statement she released a few hours before calling a news conference, Krewson said intimidation by police “is not conduct that lives up to the standard of behavior expected by city police oicers or any city employee.” On Tuesday, when asked by the Post-Dispatch if she still believed in O’Toole to run the police department, Krewson replied: “I do have confidence. I do.” O’Toole has served as interim chief since the abrupt resignation of Sam Dotson, whose departure was announced on Krewson’s first day in oice five months ago. A national search is underway for Dotson’s replacement, which is still a few months away, the mayor said. “Many people are calling on me to name a police chief (now),” Krewson told the paper. “Many people called up to tell me that.” But she said now was not the

LAW & ORDER ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Mom whose child died as she did drugs gets 21-year sentence • The mother of a 2-year-old boy who died after being left alone near a space heater for 38 hours while she and the boy’s father used methamphetamine was sentenced Tuesday to 21 years Peacock in prison. Kathleen Marie Peacock, 24, of the 3700 block of Baden Street in St. Charles, pleaded guilty in February to two felonies: child abuse/neglect and manufacturing methamphetamine. St. Charles County Circuit Judge Jon Cunningham delivered Peacock’s sentence. Her son, Braydon Barnes, died of hyperthermia, or overheating, in December 2015. She and the boy’s father were accused of leaving the boy in his crib in a back room of the family’s mobile home near a space heater that did not have a thermostat to shut it of when it got too hot. The boy’s father, Lucas Russell Barnes, 27, of St. Charles, pleaded guilty in July to the same charges as Peacock. His sentencing is set

time to rush a process that includes a 13-member citizen advisory committee, public meetings and the hiring of a search firm. That firm, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, is hosting a town hall meeting Wednesday night at O’Fallon Recreation Complex. The firm is seeking public input “as they develop their candidate profile and recruitment strategy,” a flier states. Krewson said consideration would be given to internal candidates as well as those from outside the St. Louis Police Department. “We have to give this our full consideration. It’s a very important position,” Krewson said. Protesters in the streets and on social media have called for the ouster of O’Toole, who is white, and say new leadership is necessary to change the culture of the police department and improve relationships with AfricanAmericans. Krewson said in her interview that the problems with the city went much deeper than a change at the top of the police department. She cited a lack of jobs for young adults and cuts in social services provided to them. Police need to be part of the solution to fix the deep-rooted disparity issues of the city, she said, “but we have to do more.” The recent turmoil has included marches through downtown, the Delmar Loop and the Central West End, where Krewson’s house was vandalized. At the end of the two-page release she issued Tuesday, Krewson said she was postponing three town halls planned for this week “because they are happening in the streets and in my inbox and on social media right now.” Asked to elaborate on the decision to postpone the meetings, Krewson said the gatherings would not have been “productive” during a time of unrest that has included five days of protests

so far. “I just thought, not tonight. Not this week,” Krewson said of the meetings, which had been scheduled before Friday’s notguilty verdict in the case of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police oicer who fatally shot Anthony Lamar Smith in 2011. “I want to begin by being clear that I hear you,” she said in her Tuesday statement titled: “St. Louis holds an opportunity to lead the way.” Krewson said in the statement that she had read posts on Facebook and Twitter, emails and texts. She knows the city is filled with anger, hurt and confusion. And while she supports peaceful protests, “destruction of property and violence toward others will not be tolerated,” she said. She also said that all complaints of misconduct by police that had been made were being reviewed by the police department’s internal affairs division. She said the problems of the city went well beyond a police shooting case. “What we have is a legacy of policies that disproportionately impact people along racial and economic lines,” she said in her statement. “This is institutional racism.” Race and representation was an issue during the mayoral campaign, which saw Krewson as the sole major white candidate against four black candidates, including three who still hold elected oice. Blacks make up 49 percent of the city’s population, whites 43 percent. “I understand that I now sit in a seat that is accountable for some of the needed change,” Krewson said in her statement. “I understand that I will face people who do not agree that these changes are a priority. I understand that I will need collaboration and cooperation from other elected oicials.” Krewson said she had not met

with protesters but planned to, although she would not elaborate. She said she was concerned about the economic loss that the protests have caused, including the cancellation of several events such as concerts by U2 and Ed Sheeran, the drop in business for stores and restaurants and the vandalism some of them have endured. “In the short term, this is not good for the convention and hotel business,” Krewson said. She has talked with those who market the city as a place to visit and hopes that as the region comes together to address its challenges, St. Louis will rebound. Asked about Gov. Eric Greitens’ announcement before the Stockley verdict that he had the Missouri National Guard on standby if things got out of control in St. Louis, Krewson said the use of guardsmen had been limited to stationing them at firehouses throughout the city in case there was a major event requiring all firefighters to respond. “Fortunately, we’ve not had that situation,” Krewson said. And if the National Guard is needed in an expanded role, that decision will come from O’Toole and St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar, not Greitens, she said. Despite the unrest and the region’s being once again in the national spotlight because of it three years after Ferguson, St. Louis has to use this time to make itself better, the mayor said. “The only option is to move forward,” Krewson said near the end of her statement. “Not because of the protests, not because of the Stockley case, but because it is past time. Because it is necessary for St. Louis to grow and thrive. “Because it’s my job.”

for Sept. 29 before St. Charles County Circuit Judge Ted House. Peacock also was sentenced Tuesday to 45 days of jail time already served for misdemeanor child endangerment for driving while intoxicated with Braydon in the car in August 2015. Charges say that after police stopped her car in the 1000 block of South Fifth Street in St. Charles, she agreed to a breath test that revealed a bloodalcohol content of 0.187 percent, more than twice the legal limit.

one count of statutory rape, one count of distributing a controlled substance and one count of witness tampering. Court documents say Nebel admitted having sex with the boy at her home and at another home where he lived. The teen told police the sex with Nebel took place between June and August 2015.

Wayne A. Kreitler, 42, of Ste. Genevieve, died at the scene, which was east of Farmington, Mo., the Missouri Highway Patrol said. Police say the collision happened at 5:25 a.m. Tuesday on Highway 32, about a quarter-mile east of Sand Creek Road. Kreitler was not wearing a seat belt, the patrol said. Kreitler was driving a 2004 GMC Yukon west on Highway 32. His vehicle crossed the center line and struck the driver’s side of one oncoming dump truck, according to the Highway Patrol. Kreitler’s vehicle then hit a second eastbound dump truck head-on. The drivers of the dump trucks were both wearing seat belts, police say. They were uninjured.

ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Woman gets 7 years in sex case involving teen boy • An O’Fallon, Mo., woman was sentenced Tuesday to seven years in prison for multiple sexual encounters with a 14-year-old boy. Lisa D. Nebel, 44, of the 400 block of Tailor Lane, pleaded no contest in July to four counts of statutory sodomy, two counts of statutory rape and one count of harassment. Nebel St. Charles County Circuit Judge Deborah Alessi delivered Nebel’s prison sentence Tuesday, following terms of a plea agreement. The plea deal with prosecutors dropped two counts of statutory sodomy,

ST. LOUIS > Shooting victim identiied • Police have identiied a man who died at a hospital after he was shot Saturday night in the city’s Hamilton Heights neighborhood. Paul Mondaine, 39, was shot in the 5800 block of Ridge Avenue, just west of Goodfellow Boulevard, police say. He lived on that block, but it wasn’t immediately clear where he was when he was shot. The shooting was about 8:30 p.m., police said. When oicers arrived, Mondaine had already been taken to a hospital by others. He was pronounced dead there. Police say Mondaine was shot by someone who led in a car, but had no description of the shooter. STE. GENEVIEVE COUNTY > Driver killed in crash • A man was killed Tuesday morning when his SUV crashed into two oncoming dump trucks, police say.

Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS > Man says teen daughter shot him in head • A man was shot in the head by his 16-year-old daughter late Sunday, police said. The victim, 61, was in critical but stable condition after the shooting. The victim told police the girl shot him in the back of the head about 11:45 p.m. Sunday at a home in the 8700 block of Goodfellow, then ran of. Police were searching for the teen. They gave no information about a motive and did not release the name of the girl they were

of Anthony Lamar Smith. Peaceful protests, some acts of vandalism and more than 120 arrests have followed in the aftermath of the notguilty verdict. Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders also spoke at the service. Afterward, they linked arms and marched down Market Street toward City Hall. The faith community can be “a place of hope and a resource for help,” said the Rev. Willis Johnson of Wellspring Church in Ferguson. Religious groups must lead the conversations and actions to help white and black people in St. Louis work toward really living together, he said. The Rev. Sheila Sledge, pastor at Salem United Methodist Church in Ladue, said she felt compelled to come to the service because “prayer does work.” Sledge, who is black, said the members of the mostly white and wealthy congregation “listen and realize they have a load to carry in this. This is all of our jobs. It’s all of our world. We’re passing this on to our grandkids.” The Rev. Cassandra Gould, pastor of Quinn Chapel AME Church in St. Louis, pointed to the Old Courthouse where the enslaved African-American Dred Scott “asked to be recognized as a child of God.” “Here we are in that same place, in that same city,” Gould said. “I stand here in a city that still has the same problems. Segregation used to be legal, now it’s just buried in policies.” Several of the speakers talked about inadequate public schools and a lack of access to health care in the black community as barriers to equality. “We need a justice that makes us all feel at home in the city of St. Louis, a city we love,” said the Rev. Ronald Mercier, the Jesuit provincial of the Central and Southern province. White people can help by validating that the social system has created disadvantages for minority groups, said Naomi See, 17, a student at Cor Jesu Academy in south St. Louis County. See filmed the service through her work with the Archdiocese’s Peace and Justice Commission. “The facts don’t matter. The case doesn’t matter,” See said. “What can’t be disputed is that people are hurting, and that is enough justification to do anything.” Earlier in the day, students at Webster University staged a walkout and “die-in,” and briefly shut down an intersection near the college. At one point, students gathered on campus to chant “Say his name,” protesting the fact that a university memo about the verdict and its aftermath didn’t mention the name of Smith, the shooting victim. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

seeking. EAST ST. LOUIS > Suit alleges IHOP workers were sexually harassed • Employees at two Metro East International House of Pancakes franchises were sexually harassed, a lawsuit iled by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in federal court here Tuesday claims. One suit says that more than 11 female employees at a Glen Carbon IHOP “were subjected to unlawful sexual harassment including regular and repeated sexual touching and grabbing, lewd sexual comments and requests for sex, and ofensive and threatening gestures,” the EEOC said. Two of those employees, including a 17-year-old high school student, were forced to resign by the conduct, the agency said. The suit also says that the general manager of the Alton IHOP sexually harassed a male employee. It also says that the owner and managers of the franchises were aware of the “pervasive and egregious” harassment but failed to stop it. The owner of the franchises could not be reached for comment.


LOCAL

09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

Judge lauds progress so far on Ferguson consent decree BY ROBERT PATRICK st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The federal judge oversee-

ing the 2016 consent decree between Ferguson and the Justice Department said Tuesday that all parties were working in

“good faith” and making “good progress.” U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry also said that she had repeatedly been assured by Assistant U.S. Attorney Jude Volek that the Justice Department was still “absolutely committed” to the process, even though that process was being carried out

ASK THE EXPERTS Dr. Barry Brace, DMD

Dr. Tim Grayem, DDS

Implant and Cosmetic Dentistry O'Fallon, MO 636-206-4376 myofallondds.com

Kirkwood, MO 314-474-7401 mystldds.com

&

Q: My dentist wants to refer me to a specialist for my implants. Are you implant specialists?

A:

That is an excellent question. Actually the ADA has recognized no specialty in Implant Dentistry. However, we are, in fact, experts in Implant Dentistry and we would love to meet you. When we use the word “expert”, according to www.DifferenceBetween.com, we mean that the person has excelled in his chosen ield or profession. One can become a specialist simply by passing certiications and getting degrees but he will not qualify as an expert until he is referred to as such by his clients or patients. Thus specialist is a tangible asset in the form or a certiicate or degree while expert is an intangible attribute one earns by showing or demonstrating his expertise to his clients. If you visit the corporate implant center that has the slick television commercials for one day dental implants you might see as many as 3 or 4 different specialists without ever meeting an expert. You’ll meet a sales specialist for sure, and an oral surgeon, a prosthodontist and probably a laboratory specialist. Each specialist is responsible for a portion of your treatment but none is responsible for your overall care. Hundreds of thrilled implant patients from all over the bistate area and as far away as Canada and Central America consider us implant experts but we are not specialists. Legal Notice: Our success is built on long term relationships with our patients though genuine caring and unrivaled excellence in value, comfort, and service and the relentless quest for improvement. However, nothing stated herein should be construed as a claim of secret, superior or exclusive techniques, ability or equipment. All are well documented in the literature and training is widely available to any dentist who cares to pursue these goals. Our doctors are General Dentists. Cosmetic and Implant Dent-istry are non-specialty interest areas not recognized by the ADA that require no speciic educational training to advertise these services.

under a new administration. Volek was first to speak at a hearing on the decree in federal court downtown reporting on 19 different areas covered by the decree. Volek said progress was being made in some areas but many needed multiple rounds of approval, meetings or review by multiple parties to be complete. He vowed that each part of the decree would be “fully implemented.” Municipal ordinances have been appealed or revised, he said, and Ferguson police were receiving more training and more money. Policies or plans on issues including the police use of force, body cameras, police dash cameras, hiring more police and a civilian review board were all progressing, he said. But the most progress seemed to have been made on municipal court reform. Volek said the court had a new prosecutor, a new judge and new court staf and was now under the authority of the city manager, marking key advancements. Apollo Carey, Ferguson’s city attorney, said the prosecutor and the judge have been made independent of each other and the city. Old cases are being dismissed if there is not “good cause” to continue prosecuting them, he said, citing the dismissal of a five-year-old case against a Navy veteran, Fred Watson, last week.

Before

Trusted Since 1987

Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

Driver gets 3 years in DWI crash that killed man and his daughter He reared-ended car at a traic light after night out BY JOEL CURRIER st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS •

A St. Louis m a n wh o was drunk and driving at least 70 mph Wolf when he rear-ended a man and his infant daughter in their car, killing them, has been sentenced to three years in prison. Eric Wolf, 30, of the 200

Save Money, Time & No Mess! FREE Estimates!

The city website has been updated to make it easier to find information about court payment options including community service, he said. Under questioning by Perry, Carey acknowledged that many of the thousands of backlogged court cases were still in boxes. “There are just so many of them,” he said, and only one prosecutor. He did say the city was looking into getting more help. Natashia Tidwell, a former police oicer and federal prosecutor who is now leading the independent monitoring team, said the review of older cases was the “most pressing issue.” She said thousands of arrest warrants related to older cases are still outstanding, potentially leaving people in “constant fear” of arrest and afecting their job searches. But she called Judge Terry Brown a “breath of fresh air” and said that he showed empathy in court and left people feeling respected. The consent decree resulted from the protests that followed the 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson and a Justice Department investigation that harshly criticized Ferguson’s police and municipal court.

Jones

Scarlett Rose

block of Bellerive Boulevard, pleaded guilty Monday to two counts of involuntary manslaughter and two counts of armed criminal action. Wolf was driving a Ford Mustang about 12:45 a.m. March 24, 2016, when it rear-ended a Subaru WRX driven by Antwon Jones, 40, who was stopped at a light at Vandeventer and McRee avenues. Jones’ Subaru spun into the inter-

After

Why Replace? SIMPLY RESURFACE! Our Pebblestone/Epoxy is a permanent and durable resurfacing product (available in many colors) that can be applied directly over existing concrete- NO NEED TO REPLACE!

What Makes Archway Industrial Different? Our Dream Team with

636-946-6464 Military & Senior Citizen Discounts!

Huge Spring Discounts!

Any New Installation $

Over 170 Years Combined Experience!

250-$1500 OFF Limit 1 coupon per job. Not valid with jobs in progress. Min. apply. Not valid with other offers. Expires 10/20/17 POST.

See Our Customer Reviews At: www.archwaycoatings.com

$79 DOWN / $79 MONTH!

Borders Also Available!

We Resurface... Driveways • Steps • Patios • Porches • Pool Decks • Garages & More!

$250 FALL BONUS GIFT CARD with Purchase!

ArchwayCoatings.com

$50 RESTAURANT.COM VOUCHER with FREE in-home estimate!

AVAILABLE WINDOWS AND MORE!

section and caught fire. He died, along with 2-monthold Scarlett Rose Jones. Three years in prison is the minimum sentence for armed criminal action. The circuit attorney’s office asked for 20 years. St. Louis Circuit Judge David Dowd’s sentence also includes five years of probation. If Wolf violates that, he could go to prison for up to 10 years. Dowd also gave Wolf until Nov. 2 to surrender to sheriff’s deputies and put him on house arrest until then. When police arrested Wolf, he declined an officer’s request for a blood sample, so police obtained a search warrant to get one. Court documents said Wolf’s blood-alcohol content was 0.12 percent — 50 percent over the legal limit — “several hours after the accident.” Wolf had been drinking at the Atomic Cowboy, 4140 Manchester Avenue, before the crash, according to a pending civil suit against the bar filed by Jones’ fiancée, the mother of Scarlett Rose. Wolf’s lawyer, Scott Rosenblum, said Wolf has shown a willingness to cooperate with the plaintiffs in that lawsuit. Rosenblum called the crash a “horrific tragedy” and said Wolf is remorseful for his actions. A lawyer for the Jones family declined to comment. Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

A window for every climate!

Banish Cracks Forever!

® Crack Repair Kit for Drywall & Plaster Krack Kote®

Easy to open, easy to clean!

DOUBLE HUNG PICTURE

SLIDING

BAY

CASEMENT

AWNING

• Energy Star – Built to code • Safety – Dual locking mechanism and night latches • Warranty – Glass Breakage and all Moving Parts • Noise Reduction – Relaxed atmosphere

BOW

SPECIALTY

CALL NOW Expires September 30th!

314-754-8441 (314) 254-6003 618-744-1755

New orders only. Voucher valued at $50 with in-home estimate to homeowner(s). Gift Card ($250) with purchase will be mailed after install and payment in full. Limit one Voucher and Gift Card per household. Other restrictions may apply. Payment options available with minimum purchase and approved credit. All advertised inancing is provided by an unailiated third-party lender, arranged and negotiated directly between the customer and such lenders. Estimated advertised inancing assumes special Enerbank inancing available to wellqualiied buyers on approved credit. Loans provided by EnerBank USA, Member FDIC, (1245 Brickyard Rd., Suite 600, Salt Lake City, UT 84106) on approved credit, for a limited time. Repayment terms vary from 12 to 144 months depending on loan amount. 9.99% ixed APR, efective as of September 1, 2017, subject to change. First monthly payment will be due 30 days after the loan closes. $79 per month based on sale amount of $4,750. Exp 9/30/17. NEW ORDERS ONLY.

PROVEN LOW PRICE AND HIGH QUALITY* We Service All Brands

0% APR for 72 Months on Qualifying Systems**

The specially formulated acrylic emulsion retains its lexibility as it dries, without shrinking. This allows KRACK KOTE® to move as the wall moves, leaving a seamless repair that will not reopen like other illers or putties.

$3100 in Utility & Manufacturer Instant Rebates on Qualifying HVAC System

Hurry! Offers expire soon!

$

29Service Fee With repair purchase

Additional diagnostic charges may apply To be performed during normal business hours. May not be combined with other offers. One coupon per customer. Expires 9/30/17.

$

Furnace & AC Tune-up

Furnace AND AC Tune-Up Together Tune up includes both furnace and A/C. To be performed during normal business hours. May not be combined with other offers. One coupon per customer. Expires 9/30/17.

CALL 314-236-9887 & 618-215-7388 All offers limited to supply and could expire at any time. ** The special terms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. The monthly payment for this purchase will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the promotional (special terms) period. Expires 9/30/17.

Installed starting at:

++ 1499 Furnace

$

++Offer is for Trane Furnace TUE1A040A924. Price shown is to connect to existing fuel lines, electrical, ducting, and piping. Other sizes and conigurations can be purchased at the discounted rate shown plus an additional discounted upgrade fee. Picture may not represent inal equipment selection.

*According to a recent study comparing the price of furnace and air conditioning installation between Dunn Heating and Cooling, LLC and 22 other major, reputable companies holding a HVAC license in the St. Louis County area.

GET IT DUNN RIGHT OR YOUR MONEY BACK Now Hiring Experienced Technicians

Free Consultation

BRENTWOOD 8121 Manchester Rd.• 314-645-2020

DES PERES 12017 Manchester Rd.• 314-821-1616

www.reinekedecorating.com


M 1 WedneSday • 09.20.2017 • a10

Toys R Us gets loan to purchase holiday inventory FROM STaFF and WIRe RePORTS

Toys R Us Inc. received bankruptcy court permission on Tuesday to borrow more than $2 billion to pay suppliers and stock up for the holiday season. The approval came the day after the nation’s biggest toy store chain filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, seeking to restructure $5 billion of long-term debt and gain some breathing room. Among the largest ever submitted by a specialty retailer, the bankruptcy filing casts doubt over the future of the company’s 64,000 employees and nearly 1,600 stores, including nine in the St. Louis area. The company’s collapse came swiftly. News reports this month that Toys R Us hired a law firm that specializes in corporate restructuring and was seeking a bankruptcy loan set of “a dangerous game of dominoes,” David Brandon, the company’s chief executive and chairman, said in a court filing. Ten days later, nearly all the company’s vendors refused to ship products without cash in advance, forcing Toys R Us to scramble to raise $1 billion for its suppliers, according to court filings. The timing could not be worse. Toys R

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman leaves a Toys R Us store Tuesday in Elizabeth, N.J. The nation’s biggest toy store chain iled for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, seeking to restructure its long-term debt.

Us is building inventory for the holiday season and fourth quarter, which accounts

Walgreens pact to buy fewer Rite Aid stores wins U.S. nod CHICaGO TRIBUne

CHICaGO • After years of trying, Wal-

greens Boots Alliance has received clearance from the Federal Trade Commission to expand its business through the purchase of 1,932 Rite Aid stores for $4.38 billion. The FTC had long resisted a deal between Walgreens and competitor Rite Aid, forcing the two to revise terms of a transaction several times since they proposed their merger in 2015. Originally, Walgreens, based in suburban Chicago, had hoped to buy all of Rite Aid, America’s third-largest drugstore chain, in a deal then valued at $17.2 billion, including debt. The deal announced Tuesday is smaller than the most recent agreement reached in June, which had Walgreens buying 2,186 Rite Aid stores (about half of Rite Aid’s locations), three distribution centers and other inventory for $5.18 billion. The distribution centers and inventory remain part of the deal. Most of the stores it will buy are in the Northeastern and Southern U.S., and will be converted to Walgreens stores over time. The transaction could increase Walgreens’ ability to negotiate lower prices

on products, including drugs, which could mean lower prices on some drugs for consumers, said Vishnu Lekraj, a senior analyst with Morningstar. It also allows the chain to expand its market share and go into new markets more cheaply than if it had opened its own stores. The smaller deal was “based on ongoing conversations with the FTC,” said Walgreens spokesman Michael Polzin in an email. Walgreens expects to wrap up the store purchases by spring 2018. Asked whether Walgreens plans to close any stores, Polzin said Walgreens will review its new network of stores “with a focus on customer access to convenient care,” and provide more information as decisions are made. Walgreens had 8,175 stores before the Rite Aid deal, meaning it will have more locations than rival CVS if it keeps all its current stores and those it’s acquiring. “This is a significant moment for our company, and we are excited about the opportunities this agreement will deliver for our customers and patients, employees and investors,” said Stefano Pessina, Walgreens executive vice chairman and CEO, in a news release.

Had it with dentures? Dental implants are more affordable than ever. Left: upper denture Right: upper implant denture

Starting at $17,500

for 40 percent of net sales. The company said it received a com-

mitment for up to $3.1 billion in debtorin-possession financing from lenders including a bank syndicate led by JPMorgan Chase & Co. and certain existing lenders. The Wayne, N.J.-based company, which also operates the Babies R Us chain, can return to court to seek approval to borrow the entire loan commitment. Brandon said in the court filings that he hoped Chapter 11 would enable the company to address the financial constraints that “have held us back” in a “lasting and efective way.” Toys R Us, which like other traditional brick-and-mortar retailers has struggled with online competitors, is taking steps to entice people to its stores. By 2022, the company plans to spend around $1 billion to transform its big-box stores by adding event space, increasing staf and wages for in-store product demonstrations and combining its flagship stores with Babies R Us stores. Brandon said Toys R Us was not going to engage in an “unrelenting race to the bottom” by trying to slash prices to compete with Amazon.com Inc., the only company that sells more toys. Reuters and the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

Brentwood-based Post Holdings to buy Bob Evans Farms for $1.5 billion FROM STaFF and WIRe RePORTS

Post Holdings Inc., the Brentwood-based company behind Honey Bunches of Oats and Grape-Nuts cereals, said Tuesday it will buy Bob Evans Farms Inc. for about $1.5 billion, adding vegetable-based side dishes and breakfast sausages to its portfolio. Bob Evans shares rose 6.1 percent to close at $77.41, exceeding Post’s offer of $77 per share. The deal comes months after Post agreed to buy British breakfast cereal brand Weetabix for $1.8 billion. Bob Evans sells frozen foods such as refrigerated potato, pasta and pork sausages under Bob Evans, Owens, Country Creek and Pineland Farms brands. The company also has a food service business, representing about 35 percent of sales volume. Post, which said it would fund the deal through cash on hand and debt, estimated

cost savings of $25 million following the deal. The company said the transaction was expected to close by the end of Post’s second quarter of fiscal 2018. Once the transaction closes, Post Holdings said it plans to combine its own refrigerated retail egg, potato and cheese business with Bob Evans. The refrigerated retail business will be led by Bob Evans President and CEO Mike Townsley. The boards of both companies have approved the sale, which is targeted to close in Post’s second quarter next year. Bob Evans’ shareholders must still sign of on the deal. Post Holdings was spun off from St. Louis-based Ralcorp in 2012. Through a number of acquisitions, it has evolved from a cereal brands business to a diversified consumer products holding company. Shares of Post Holdings closed Tuesday at $86.36, up 52 cents.

SHUBERT DESIGN FURNITURE GET READY FOR THE HOLIDAYS! CUSTOM DINING TABLE SALE!!

45-50% OFF RETAIL! ALL IN-STOCK AND SPECIAL ORDERS YOU PICK THE FINISH, SIZE, AND STYLE!! CANADEL MADE IN NORTH AMERICA!

SALOOM MADE IN USA!

Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

1

$

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Call Now Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office

(314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office

(636) 200-2664 Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no speciic educational training to advertise this service.

this year— tists eers again p is h y Top Den b Voted agazine’s M is u o L one of St.

Honor their sacriice on Veteran’s Day SPECIAL FINANCING IS AVAILABLE. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS.

SHUBERT DESIGN FURNITURE 161 Gaywood Dr., Manchester, MO 63021

(636) 394-2220 Sun 12pm - 5pm • Monday-Saturday 10am - 6pm

STLtoday.com/memorials

www.shubertdesign.com *All items subject to availability. Discounts taken from MSRP. Some restrictions may apply. See Store For Details.


MARKET WATCH

09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Synchronoss

Wall Street capped a day of mostly listless trading Tuesday with a slight gain, good enough to lift U.S. indexes to another set of all-time highs. Banks, insurers and other financial companies led the gainers. Technology companies also rose.

4

90

10

3

80

J

J A 52-week range

Vol.: 21.6m (18.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $455.37 m

21,720

PE: ... Yield: ...

70

S $8.77

2,440

J

J A 52-week range

$98.72

Vol.: 4.7m (3.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $15.48 b

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Dec 17 Nov 17 Dec 17

348.25 965.50 443

-3.25 -2.25 -.50

Wheat CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

22,000

2,500

Feeder cattle

21,500

2,450

Live cattle

2,400

20,500

2,350

151.57 107.97 60.12 16.27 294.95

+.77 +.40 +.12

21,000

Sep 17 Oct 17 Oct 17 Sep 17 Sep 17

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Oct 17 Sep 17 Nov 17

69.98 133.95 27.09

-.43 -5.00 +.07

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Oct 17 Oct 17 Oct 17 Oct 17

49.48 1.6550 177.26 3.122

-.43 -.0136 -.70 -.024

Hogs

A

M

J

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 1,742 1,778 1449 1417 196 29

3,136 3,034 1538 1367 164 20

A

2,300

S

Copper

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

J

Milk

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 22386.01 9549.18 739.88 12137.60 6467.79 2507.84 1764.80 26033.75 1442.57

LOW 22340.71 9486.86 735.46 12116.63 6446.75 2503.25 1761.05 25988.65 1438.29

CLOSE 22370.80 9507.08 736.69 12131.74 6461.32 2506.65 1761.52 26023.23 1440.40

CHG. +39.45 -7.56 -2.02 +20.29 +6.68 +2.78 -0.70 +60.95 -0.68

%CHG. WK +0.18% s -0.08% t -0.27% t +0.17% s +0.10% s +0.11% s -0.04% s +0.23% s -0.05% s

MO QTR s s s s t s s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +13.20% +5.12% +11.69% +9.72% +20.03% +11.96% +6.08% +11.09% +6.14%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

35.10

43.03 38.21 +.79 +2.1 -10.2

Aegion Corp

AEGN

17.39

26.68 22.60 +.47 +2.1

-4.6 +27.0 18

Amdocs

DOX

54.91

67.98 64.00

+9.9 +9.6 18

Ameren Corp

AEE

46.84

60.91 59.25

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

51.10 36.07 +.19 +0.5 -20.4

ABInBev

BUD

98.28 136.08 120.08

Arch Coal

ARCH

59.05

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

8.14

-.13 -0.2 ...

... +12.9 +23.6 21

-.09 -0.1 +13.9

86.47 72.53 -1.71 -2.3 14.15

-2.1 14

-7.1

-6.3 13 ...

1.96 General Motors

GM

... Home Depot

HD

52-WK LO HI 30.21

39.18 38.70 +.11 +0.3 +11.1 +29.5

119.20 161.38 157.66

6

1.52 3.56

6.65 +.04 +0.6

1.76 Lee Ent

1.75

3.92

2.00

... McDonald’s

LEE

...

+0.6 +15.6

7

...

... -31.0 -36.7

4

...

LOW

64.87

86.25 77.49

MNK

33.63

76.23 34.07 +.31 +0.9 -31.6 -55.6

-.18 -0.2

MA

99.51 143.52 142.49 +1.09 +0.8 +38.0 +43.2 37

0.88

MCD

110.33 161.72 157.43 +.75 +0.5 +29.3 +39.2 27

3.76

+9.0 +11.5 18 1.64f ...

Bank of America

BAC

14.81

25.80 24.86 +.16 +0.6 +12.5 +61.7 15 0.48f Monsanto Co

MON

97.35 119.59 119.41 +.29 +0.2 +13.5 +17.2 23

2.16

Belden Inc

BDC

60.06

81.33 79.43 +.06 +0.1

OLN

18.52

33.88 33.71 +.25 +0.7 +31.6 +83.8 50

0.80

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

129.86 253.79 252.46 8.05

15.85

9.00

+6.2 +25.2 15

-.62 -0.2 +62.2+104.0 26 ...

... -34.5 -13.5 20

0.20 Olin 5.68 Peabody Energy

BTU

... Peak Resorts

22.58

30.95 29.32 4.30

...

SKIS

3.90

CAL

22.39

36.61 28.47

-.08 -0.3 -13.3 +15.6 14

0.28 Perficient

PRFT

14.15

20.25 18.20

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

52.69

74.83 60.96

-.46 -0.7 -17.1 +17.4 31

0.92 Post Holdings

POST

68.76

89.04 86.36 +.52 +0.6

Centene Corp.

CNC

50.00

98.72 89.78 -4.80 -5.1 +58.9 +40.5 19

Charter

CHTR 241.50 408.83 364.02 -4.15 -1.1 +26.4 +38.4 20

... ReinsGrp

RGA RELV

39.69

...

... -22.5 -10.7 dd

-.04 -0.2

106.12 141.89 136.50 +.88 +0.6 3.84

+6.4 +4.1

+7.4 +6.3 50

...

+8.5 +29.4 15 2.00f

7.14

-.24 -3.3 +53.9 +28.6 32

...

-.05 -0.1 +16.7 +21.5 22

2.10

C

45.16

70.93 71.15 +.55 +0.8 +19.7 +53.8 14

CBSH

45.37

60.61 55.89 +.11 +0.2

-3.3 +22.1 20 0.90b Stifel Financial

Edgewell

EPC

69.63

84.45 74.08 +.11 +0.1

+1.5

Emerson

EMR

49.22

64.36 63.21 +.22 +0.3 +13.4 +27.1 27

1.92 UPS B

UPS

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.98

60.07 46.70

-.30 -0.6

+4.7 +6.1 16

1.10 US Bancorp

USB

42.17

56.61 53.16 +.78 +1.5

Enterprise Financial EFSC

30.59

46.25 40.05 +.25 +0.6

-6.9 +30.9 18

0.44 US Steel

X

16.17

41.83 25.65 +.12 +0.5 -22.3 +61.7 dd

Esco Technologies

ESE

42.95

63.80 57.85 +.70 +1.2

+2.1 +26.9 33

0.32 Verizon

Express Scripts

ESRX

57.80

77.50 61.00 -1.01 -1.6 -11.3 -11.7 10

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.45

FutureFuel

FF

10.24

8.33

4.26

-.09 -2.1 -34.2 +5.1 dd

16.58 15.03 +.12 +0.8

SR

59.54

78.00 75.35

SF

36.71

56.62 49.61 +.21 +0.4

TGT

48.56

79.33 59.35 +.26 +0.4 -17.8 -11.2 12 2.48f

102.12 120.44 116.97

-.62 -0.5

-0.7 +31.2 16 +2.0 +13.1 20

3.32

+3.5 +25.6 16 1.20f 0.20

VZ

42.80

54.83 49.34 +1.25 +2.6

WMT

65.28

81.99 80.05 +.05 +0.1 +15.8 +12.6 18

... Walgreen Boots

WBA

75.18

88.00 81.21 -1.39 -1.7

-1.9 +3.2 17 1.60f

WFC

43.55

59.99 53.36 +.65 +1.2

-3.2 +19.4 13

-7.6

-2.9 10 2.36f 2.04 1.52

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Venator to close pigment plant in Lemay • Venator Materials is closing color pigment manufacturing plants in St. Louis County and Easton, Pa. The United Kingdom-based company said the closures will happen before the end of the year. The number of afected employees was not immediately available. Venator, previously known as Huntsman Pigments & Additives, said the plant closures are part of a $90 million “business improvement plan” that’s set to be completed by the end of next year. Venator spun of from Huntsman Corp., based in The Woodlands, Texas, this year. Venator operates 27 facilities worldwide and has 4,500 employees. The St. Louis-area plant afected by the closing is at 303 East Hofmeister Avenue in Lemay. Barry-Wehmiller ailiate acquires PC Industries • Baldwin Technology Co. Inc., owned by Clayton-based Barry-Wehmiller’s investment arm, has added to its products for the printing and packaging industry with the acquisition of PC Industries. PC Industries, based in the Chicago suburbs, makes vision inspection systems for printing and packaging systems. Claytonbased Baldwin Technology, owned by Barry-Wehmiller’s BW Forsyth Partners, focuses on the printing and packaging industry and has acquired four companies since moving under the BW Forsyth umbrella in 2012. A purchase price for PC industries was not disclosed. Kohl’s to take Amazon returns at LA, Chicago stores • Kohl’s, which is opening some in-store Amazon shops, will start accepting returns for the online retailer at some of its stores in Los Angeles and Chicago starting next month. Kohl’s Corp. said Tuesday it will pack and ship eligible Amazon return items for free at the 82 stores ofering the service. There will be designated parking spots near the Kohl’s store entrances for those doing Amazon returns. While the service will allow Kohl’s customers to skip their local post oice for Amazon returns, it also gets them into Kohl’s stores — where they might then shop.

Lion’s Choice chain adds food truck • Customers no longer have to drive to Lion’s Choice 25 restaurant locations to buy roast beef sandwiches. With the chain’s new food truck, the food will come to them. Town and Country-based Lion’s Choice said the food truck is making stops at St. Louis area food truck events and private functions. Customers can ind the food truck’s location on the company’s Facebook page or on Twitter at @ LionsChoice. Ram trucks recalled for safety issue • Fiat Chrysler said Tuesday it is recalling almost half a million Ram heavy-duty pickups and medium-duty trucks because their water pumps could be defective. The recall involves Ram 2500 and 3500 pickups and Ram 3500, 4500 and 5500 chassis cabs from the 2013 to 2017 model years. All 494,417 of the vehicles involved have 6.7-liter engines. Fiat Chrysler says a water pump bearing can overheat under certain conditions, potentially leading to an engine ire. The company said it isn’t aware of any injuries or accidents related to the defect. It no longer uses the type of water pump involved in the recall. Homebuilding slides for second straight month • U.S. homebuilding fell for a second straight month in August as a rebound in the construction of single-family houses was ofset by persistent weakness in the volatile multifamily home segment. Housing starts slipped 0.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.18 million units, the Commerce Department said on Tuesday. July’s sales pace was revised up to 1.19 million units from the previously reported 1.16 million units. Building permits surged 5.7 percent to a rate of 1.30 million units in August, the highest level since January. Single-family home permits fell 1.5 percent, while permits for the construction of multifamily homes soared 19.6 percent. From staf and wire reports

.0584 .7954 .3196 1.3489 .8126 .1524 1.1953 .0156 .2834 .008971 .056280 .0172 .0751 .000885 1.0400

PreciousMetals CHG

CLOSE

1306.20 17.20 951.20

Gold Silver

-.10 +.13 -9.90

1.13 .88 .38

4.25 4.00 3.50

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.03 1.18 1.29 1.40 1.83 2.25 2.82

-0.01 +0.07 -0.01 ... ... +0.02 +0.02

.27 .50 .60 .78 1.22 1.71 2.46

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

TREASURIES

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.25

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.58 +0.01

... 1.88

Barclays USAggregate

2.50 +0.01 2.04

...

Barclays US High Yield 5.49 -0.03 6.48 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.67 +0.04 3.51

Barclays US Corp

3.14 +0.01 2.93

10-Yr. TIPS

.37 +0.02

.20

...

... WalMart

+8.1 +65.5 18 0.24a Wells Fargo

PREV

.0583 .8012 .3192 1.3524 .8147 .1518 1.1997 .0156 .2848 .008968 .056267 .0172 .0751 .000884 1.0386

NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.25 percent on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

0.28 ...

Citigroup

... Target Corp.

+.05

...

-6.9 35

Commerce Banc.

-2.2 18

1.28 Spire Inc

6.20

-.49 -1.6

Caleres Inc.

... Reliv

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Platinum

-.15 -0.1 +17.6 +27.8 23

9.24

1.60 Lowes

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

4.65

3.19e Mallinckrodt plc

$49.01

Interestrates Interestrates

0.88 Huttig Building Prod HBP

... dd 0.35p MasterCard

9.28 +.06 +0.7 -10.7 -32.0 15

TKR

S

Vol.: 6.5m (1.8x avg.) PE: 20.3 Mkt. Cap: $27.68 b Yield: 1.4%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

J A 52-week range

ExchangeRates

CHICAGO BOT

Soybeans

10 DAYS

J

$30.63

PE: 19.4 Yield: ...

2,550

M

40

S

22,500

20,000

$50

Futures

Close: 2,506.65 Change: 2.78 (0.1%)

PGR

Close: $47.63 1.32 or 2.9% The insurance company took a loss in August but said premiums increased.

45

$50.00

PE: ... Yield: ...

S&P 500

2,480

10 DAYS

J A 52-week range

Vol.: 102.6m (2.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $2.53 b

2,520

Close: 22,370.80 Change: 39.45 (0.2%)

J

$2.21

$49.94

Dow Jones industrials

22,060

2

S

Progressive

CNC

Close: $89.78 -4.80 or -5.1% The Medicaid program administrator slumped as Senate Republicans sought to roll back President Barack Obama’s health care law. $100

15

$9.76 Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Centene

RAD

Close: $2.40 -0.33 or -12.1% Regulators approved a deal in which Walgreens will buy 1,932 Rite Aid stores, fewer than the companies had planned. $5

$20

5

22,400

Rite Aid

SNCR

Close: $9.82 -6.93 or -41.4% The mobile services company said Siris Capital Group is no longer interested in buying it.

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2506.65 12561.79 7275.25 28051.41 5237.44 50265.47 20299.38 75974.18 15292.97 9093.20

CHG

CHG

YTD

+2.78 +2.40 +21.97 -108.36 +8.12 +7.04 +389.88 -16.26 +56.30 +45.09

+0.11% +0.02% +0.30% -0.38% +0.16% +0.01% +1.96% -0.02% +0.37% +0.50%

+11.96% +9.41% +1.85% +27.50% +7.72% +10.13% +6.20% +26.15% +0.04% +10.62%

EU agrees to extend investigation on Bayer purchase of Monsanto REUTERS

BRUSSELS • German drugs and pesticides group Bayer said it would likely take until early next year to complete its $66 billion acquisition of Creve Coeurbased Monsanto, which it had previously expected to be under wraps by the end of 2017. On Tuesday, the European Commission approved Bayer’s request for a two-week extension of its investigation of the deal, which was originally set to conclude on Jan. 8. “An anticipated closing of the deal in early 2018 is now more likely than end of the 2017,” said Liam Condon, head of Bayer’s

Crop Science division. The Commission last month started an in-depth investigation of the takeover, saying it was worried about competition in various pesticide and seeds markets. Among a slew of markets where competition was at risk, the EU Commission at the time named Monsanto’s weedkiller glyphosate, or Roundup, which competes with Bayer’s glufosinate; vegetable and canola seeds; and licensing of cottonseed technology to peers. More broadly, it said the deal might slow the race to develop new products, and that the European Union would try to pre-

vent Bayer from becoming too dominant in combined oferings of seeds and pesticides with the help of digital farming tools such as connected sensors, software and precision machines. Bayer, which was holding a media event on its Crop Science business on Tuesday, also said the division would face volatile global markets for the rest of the year but would slowly return to growth from 2018, including its embattled Brazilian business. Bayer warned in June that poor sales at crop protection distributors in Brazil would hit full-year earnings. Shares of Monsanto closed Tuesday at $119.41, up 29 cents.

EPA looks to allow use of dicamba next year, with more safeguards BY TOM POLANSEK Reuters

WASHINGTON • The Environmental Protection Agency is aiming to allow farmers to spray the controversial weedkiller dicamba next year, but with additional rules for its use, an oicial with the agency said on Tuesday. Reuben Baris, acting chief of the herbicide branch of the EPA Oice of Pesticide Programs, said the agency had not determined what steps it would take to mitigate problems associated with dicamba. The herbicide, which fights weeds resistant to another herbicide called glyphosate, was linked to widespread crop damage this summer. The EPA has been discussing with state regulators ways to prevent such crop damage. Use of dicamba, which is produced by BASF SE and Monsanto Co., spiked after U.S. regulators last year approved a new formulation that allowed farmers to ap-

ply it to soybean plants that were engineered to resist the chemical while it killed weeds. Previously it had been sprayed on fields prior to planting. Farmers say the chemical caused damage by drifting away from where it was sprayed to fields of soybeans and other plants that could not tolerate it. Baris told a meeting of state regulatory oicials in Washington, D.C., that the agency was “very concerned with what has occurred and transpired in 2017.” “We’re committed to taking appropriate action for the 2018 growing season with an eye toward ensuring that the technology is available, number one, to growers but that it is used responsibly,” he said. The EPA is in negotiations with Monsanto and BASF, which sell dicamba herbicides under diferent brands, to make changes regarding how they are used, Baris said. State regulators previously

told Reuters the EPA was considering establishing a set date after which the spraying of dicamba weed killers on growing crops would not be allowed. Arkansas is independently weighing an April 15, 2018, deadline. But Tony Cofer of the Alabama Department of Agriculture said such a cutof date would not match Baris’ goal of maintaining dicamba’s usefulness. “That type of restriction would not be something they’re probably considering, in all practicality, if they wanted to continue use of the product,” said Cofer, director of the state’s Pesticide Management Division. Monsanto has said the April 15, 2018, date would amount to a ban in Arkansas because the chemical was designed to be sprayed over the genetically engineered crops during the summer growing season. Arkansas previously blocked sales of Monsanto’s dicamba herbicide in the state.


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 09.20.2017

Bommarito Pre-Owned Centers 9 Convenient Locations

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

1000's

OF VEHICLES, EVERY MODEL, ALL PRICE RANGES,

EVERY MANUFACTURER

Bommarito Is The Only St. Louis Dealer Awarded Motor Trend’s Pre-Owned Vehicle Certiication. WE HAVE Scan with your smartphone to learn more.

Bommarito Pre-Owned Centers

AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

Bommarito WILL BUY YOUR CAR OUTRIGHT...Even if you don't buy a car from us! • We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition. • The sale of your vehicle can take as little as 20 minutes, just sign the paperwork and walk away with payment in hand. • We will handle your loan payoff if needed - It's easy - No private party issues - Hassle Free.

• $500 MORE FOR YOUR TRADE GUARANTEE • 72 HOUR EXCHANGE POLICY See dealer for details.

Visit Any Of Our 9 Bommarito Certified Pre-Owned Center Locations;

West County, South County, St. Peters & Hazelwood OR SHOP US ONLINE AT:

.com


NATION

09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

FEMA isn’t relying on trailers to house hurricane victims BY MICHAEL KUNZELMAN AND MICHAEL BIESECKER associated Press

BATON ROUGE, LA. • The hur-

ricanes that battered Texas and Florida have spawned what is probably the worst disaster-created housing crisis since Hurricane Katrina left hundreds of thousands of Gulf Coast residents without homes more than a decade ago. The Federal Emergency Management Agency said it was not borrowing from its much-maligned Katrina playbook to rely on government-issued trailers or mobile homes to shelter residents displaced by hurricanes Harvey and Irma. “We don’t have enough FEMA trailers for all the homes that were destroyed,” FEMA Administrator Brock Long said last week at a briefing in Washington. “If you combine Harvey and Irma, this is an extraordinary event that is going to require innovative solutions when it comes to housing.” After Katrina struck in 2005, federal lawsuits accused FEMA of recklessly providing scores of storm victims with shoddily constructed trailers that exposed occupants to toxic fumes. FEMA, which stopped using the cramped travel trailers, has touted the safety features of its latest generation of mobile homes. Long, however, said manufactured housing would not be the primary way people in Texas and Florida are provided temporary housing in the coming months. Harvey flooded more than 79,000 homes with at least 18 inches of water, according to a FEMA oicial. More than 740,000 households have registered for FEMA aid, such as rental assistance and money for damage repairs. The agency already is paying for tens of thousands of Harvey victims to stay in hotels and motels in 33 states. Long is working with Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to find ways to get people back in their flooddamaged homes more quickly, without using manufactured

ORLANDO SENTINEL VIA AP

Workers from Chattanooga, Tenn., arrive at Shawnee Trail in Maitland, Fla., on Tuesday to help restore power. More than a week after Hurricane Irma struck, downed trees and power lines littered streets.

housing. “The way we’ve done business in the past has not necessarily been successful. It’s been a frustrating road,” Long said Friday. During a record-setting hurricane season in 2005, Katrina’s devastation sent FEMA scrambling to meet the unprecedented need for temporary housing in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Less than one month after Katrina’s landfall, Hurricane Rita roared ashore and demolished roughly 23,000 more homes in Texas and Louisiana. FEMA purchased more than 140,000 new trailers and mobile homes to house Katrina and Rita victims near their storm-shattered properties or in makeshift trailer parks. By March 2006, FEMA learned of concern that travel trailers were exposing occupants to elevated formaldehyde levels. Formaldehyde, a chemical commonly found in building materials, can cause breathing problems and is classified as a carcinogen. Many trailer occupants began complaining of headaches, nosebleeds and difficulty breathing. Government tests on hundreds of trailers in Louisiana and Mississippi found formaldehyde levels that were, on average, about five times higher than in most modern homes. Storm victims’ attorneys ac-

cused the trailer makers of using substandard building materials and methods in a rush to fill FEMA’s orders. The lawyers also claimed FEMA downplayed the formaldehyde concerns for months and initially balked at air quality tests to avoid legal liability. A team of attorneys sued the federal government and travel manufacturers on behalf of tens of thousands of storm victims. But a federal judge dismissed all claims against the federal government, ruling FEMA couldn’t be held liable for deciding to use travel trailers after Katrina and Rita. “They’re basically bulletproof when it comes to deciding the type of emergency housing they provide,” said Gerald Meunier, who was one of the lead plaintifs’ attorneys for the litigation. “We said, ‘It was a dumb choice. You just picked the wrong kind of housing.’” Michael Byrne, FEMA’s federal disaster recovery coordinator for Harvey, said the agency would be moving manufactured housing units into the flood-ravaged region “as the demand presents itself” to help state and local officials “fill the gap.” “We’re not going to put people in anything that’s substandard,” Byrne said. “We’ve learned lessons.”

DIGEST White House appeals ‘sanctuary cities’ ruling

homeless man and a dishwasher who was walking to work.

The administration of President Donald Trump is appealing a judge’s ruling that blocks its efort to withhold funding from “sanctuary cities” that limit cooperation with U.S. immigration authorities. The administration iled the appeal with the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday. U.S. District Judge William Orrick has temporarily halted President Donald Trump’s order in two lawsuits — one brought by the city of San Francisco, the other by Santa Clara County. The judge rejected the administration’s argument that the executive order applies only to a relatively small pot of money and said Trump cannot set new conditions on spending approved by Congress. The administration has since moved to withhold one particular law enforcement grant from sanctuary cities, prompting a new round of lawsuits. A federal judge in Illinois blocked that move Friday.

Schools face audit after suing public records requesters • Oregon’s secretary of state says his oice will audit spending by Portland Public Schools, in part because of the district’s decision to sue people who requested public records. The Associated Press featured the district in a story over the weekend about government agencies iling lawsuits against people who seek documents. Secretary of State Dennis Richardson told the Oregonian/Oregon Live that Portland residents had complained to him about the district’s problems and that the public records lawsuit was one reason why it deserved an audit.

Three congressmen arrested at Trump Tower protest • Three Democratic members of Congress have been arrested on disorderly conduct charges at a protest outside Trump Tower. Reps. Raul Grijalva of Arizona, Luis Gutierrez of Illinois and Adriano Espaillat of New York were among a small group of demonstrators who sat down in the street on New York’s Fifth Avenue on Tuesday and refused to move. The protesters were demanding that Congress pass legislation protecting thousands of young immigrants from deportation. White man arrested in attacks on blacks • A white man was arrested Tuesday and accused of cold-bloodedly killing two black men and shooting up a black family’s home in a string of attacks last week that police say may have been racially motivated. A law enforcement oicial said authorities found a handwritten copy of an Adolf Hitler speech at the home of Kenneth James Gleason, 23, and investigators said surveillance footage and DNA on a shell casing linked him to the crimes. Authorities said he would be charged with irst-degree murder in the shooting deaths of a

Arkansas must disclose execution drug labels • Arkansas’ intent to shield much of its execution procedure from public view took another hit Tuesday when a second judge ruled that the state’s prison system must disclose labels that will identify the manufacturer of a lethal injection drug. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Mackie Pierce told the Arkansas Department of Correction to give lawyer Steven Shults unredacted package inserts for recently acquired midazolam by Sept. 28. Appeals court blocks soda warnings • A federal appeals court on Tuesday blocked a San Francisco law requiring a health warning on soda ads, saying the measure was misleading and would suppress free speech. A unanimous, three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals stopped the 2015 ordinance from going into efect until a lawsuit iled by the American Beverage Association and other groups is resolved. Hepatitis A strikes LA County • Public health authorities have declared an outbreak of the highly contagious liver disease hepatitis A in Los Angeles County, the third California region to see signiicant infections this year. Nearby San Diego has had more than 420 cases and 16 deaths since early this year. Vaccinations are urged as the best way to prevent spread of the disease. From news services

ONE DAY UNIVERSITY

PRESENTS

NO HOMEWORK NO TESTS JUST THE PURE JOY OF LEARNING SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28 | 9:30 AM – 4:00 PM Marriott St. Louis West | 660 Maryville Centre Drive | St. Louis Ready to learn something new, get inspired, and at the same time, be totally entertained? One Day University brings together professors from the country’s top schools to present thoughtprovoking talks and countless fascinating ideas all in just a single day. Below is our next unique and captivating event in St. Louis, featuring four award-winning teachers who are like rock stars on their campuses. Best of all, at One Day U there are no grades, no tests, no homework – just the pure joy of learning!

AMERICAN HISTORY 9:30 AM 10:45 AM

LITERATURE 11:00 AM 12:15 PM

THE CIVIL WAR AND ABRAHAM LINCOLN: What’s Fact and What’s Fiction? Louis Masur / Rutgers University Clive Prize for Teaching Excellence

Four Books that Changed the World Seth Lerer / University of California at San Diego Outstanding Teaching Award

LUNCH BREAK: 12:15 PM - 1:15 PM

Full Price $195 Next 90 Readers Pay

ONLY $119 Use Discount Code SL119 Sponsored by

WORLD HISTORY 1:15 PM 2:30 PM

PSYCHOLOGY 2:45 PM 4:00 PM

What Can We Learn From The Ancient Egyptians? Kara Cooney / UCLA Villa Scholars Program Chair

THE ART OF AGING: Discovering New Sources of Creativity Brian Carpenter / Washington University in St. Louis David Hadas Teaching Award

Register Today To Lock In Your Discount For This Remarkable Event

OneDayU.com or 800-300-3438


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

WEDNESDAy • 09.20.2017 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Over the line he protests are about police abuse. he response must not be more abuse.

N

o, the police don’t own the streets. They do not own the night. Any law enforcer, from interim St. Louis Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole on down to the rawest probationary oicer, who suggests otherwise needs a refresher course on the role of police in a democracy. Re-reading the Bill of Rights might also help. O’Toole took an overtly political stand after police arrested more than 100 people in downtown St. Louis Sunday night by stating that “police owned tonight.” In his apparent attempt to boost morale, O’Toole encouraged the kinds of abusive policing actions that are the focus of the protests themselves. Officers in riot gear stepped over the line Sunday and might well have opened the door to expensive legal action against the city. Protesters had been doing exactly what they’ve done every day since Friday’s verdict in the trial of former police Officer Jason Stockley. They gathered to denounce the exoneration of a white officer who, during a hot pursuit in 2011, stated an intent to kill a black suspect, and then seconds later did exactly that. Multiple abuses of Stockley’s policing authority were the focus of his trial, which is why the verdict has prompted such a public outcry. As in previous days, violence broke out Sunday, prompting police to clear a downtown area where the windows of various buildings were broken. A Post-Dispatch photographer heard police chanting, “Whose streets? Our streets,” mimicking

an oft-used protest chant. Some protesters regrouped nearby at Washington Avenue and Tucker Boulevard. Members of the news media followed them, as did nonprotesting legal observers. At the same time, residents of nearby buildings were arriving home and trying to get into their buildings. Police corralled them all utilizing a technique called kettling. The nonparticipants got caught in the middle with no option to leave when ordered to do so because police left them no exit point. Some were doused with pepper spray. Mass arrests followed. It was a form of collective punishment that rested on the flimsiest of legal foundations. Police earned praise after protests started Friday morning for responding like true professionals. Patience now appears to be wearing thin as 12-hour shifts and five continuous days on full alert take their toll. Some protesters have shouted in officers’ faces and hurled abuse. Police say they’ve been assaulted with bricks, paint and a vinegar-type liquid. Find those breaking the law and arrest them. Good policing requires incredible patience and restraint. Mass arrests that punish law-abiding protesters and journalists is not good policing. It is an abuse of authority. The worst possible response to a protest against police abuse is more police abuse. Mayor Lyda Krewson tried to draw the line with a statement Tuesday condemning police misconduct. It’s now up to O’Toole to restore discipline in his ranks.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Post-Dispatch reporter Mike Faulk was caught in the sweep when police arrested dozens of people at the corner of Washington Avenue and Tucker Boulevard after telling protesters to disperse late on Sunday.

Last-ditch cruelty Graham-Cassidy is the worst GOP health care bill yet.

U

nder cover of a fog of news, Senate Republicans have been trying to round up enough votes for yet another bid to repeal and replace the Afordable Care Act. The bill they have in mind is in many ways worse than any of the three bills that failed this summer. After a dramatic thumbs-down “no” vote by Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., killed the GOP’s third ACA replacement bill, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said it was time to move on. Congress went into recess until after Labor Day, and the nation’s attention turned to hurricanes, immigration, budget matters and rapprochement between President Donald Trump and Democrats. But Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Bill Cassidy, R-La., weren’t ready to give up on replacing Obamacare, a key GOP promise since it passed in 2010. The effort faces a daunting Sept. 30 deadline to pass as a 2017 budgetary reconciliation bill. Under reconciliation, only 51 votes are needed. McConnell said the Senate calendar was too crowded. But when Trump reached a deal with Democratic leaders on a 90-day deal to raise the debt ceiling and extend budgetary authority, it opened a narrow window. McConnell said if sponsors can round up 50 votes, he’d bring it to the floor by Sept. 22. This even though the bill will not be fully vetted by the Congressional Budget Office for weeks. The bill basically would outsource Obamacare to state governments along

with $1.2 trillion in federal block grants between 2020 and 2026.After 2026,funding for the ACA’s expansion of Medicaid in the 31 states that adopted it would disappear, costing 9.6 million working poor Americans their health insurance. The subsidies that help 9.2 million low-income Americans afford insurance also would disappear. States could choose to continue subsidies or not. But states would not have to require insurers to cover pre-existing conditions like cancer, diabetes or birth defects, or the 10 essential health care benefits that Obamacare requires. States could impose premium surcharges on the sickest Americans, up to $142,650 for a 40-yearold with metastatic cancer. Women 50 and younger with breast cancer would have to pay a $28,660 surcharge. Children up to age 26 would still be allowed on their parents’ policies, but gone would be the individual and employer mandates for coverage, poisoning the insurance pool. The CBO may release a preliminary analysis next week, but a full score of the bill’s impact will take weeks. Both numbers are likely to be high, but the Senate may vote without knowing how high. Polls show a majority of Americans support keeping the ACA, but two in three Republicans still want it repealed. Graham-Cassidy is a sneaky and cynical political ploy that will crush millions of America’s sickest and most vulnerable citizens.“Shameful” hardly covers it.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Peace will not come quietly nor quickly in St. Louis Words have power. From Gov. Eric Greitens to Mayor Lyda Krewson, local and state officials have asked for peace with the promise of the rule of law if peace is not given. They should have expected that peace was not going to come quietly nor quickly. How do you ask for peace when families of color have to raise another generation of children who will learn that their bodies may be worth less than the bodies of other children? How does peace come from such a tumultuous reckoning, not just by those children, but by those parents who attempt to shield their children from reality and to still instill hope? How do you ask for peace when an interim police chief praises oicers for showing “great restraint” but not reminding communities it is their First Amendment right to protest? When people see the law seemingly holds no one accountable for the death of another person, how can you ask people to be peaceful in that moment, and in the moments to come? What our local and state oicials are asking for is for the people to return to the status quo. And if the status quo is the valuing of the law over justice, turning a blind eye and a deaf ear to communities in pain, and only worrying about the loss of property and economic power and not worrying about the loss of life, do not expect peace. Ask for healing. Ask each of us to seek the humanity in others. But don’t ask for peace right now. Christopher Fan • St. Louis

No reasonable actions by protesters, suspect “Reasonable doubt, reasonable outrage” (Sept. 16), so read the title of an editorial. What’s reasonable about damaging property and harming police officers by protesters? What was reasonable about a paroled felon with heroin in his car, ramming a police vehicle and another car, and driving 87 mph endangering the lives of other drivers and pedestrians? What world are we living in? Well, evidently a very dangerous one that also accounts for so many black victims of crime. Perhaps it’s time to call for equality. If law oicers risk their lives every day performing their duties, perhaps criminals should be willing to risk their lives every day performing their crimes. That seems to be an equal playing field, doesn’t it? No one wants to see anyone senselessly killed, but both duty and behaviors appear to account for such deaths. The former can’t be helped, but the latter can be addressed by all, and especially by the media. Is it possible there is a growing fatigue over public protesters? Is it possible there is a growing fatigue over public predators? Isn’t the public weary of the killings and the rioting? The public might prefer to see a return of “reasonable peace,” “reasonable value of life” and especially “reasonable editorializing and reporting.” I would. Helen Louise Herndon • Kirkwood

Important to learn about systemic oppression, racism For those who are upset at the demonstrators because you’re not able to attend the U2 and Ed Sheeran concerts, that’s a good thing. That means the demonstrators got your attention. No, they are not “playing the victim

game.” They are trying to be heard. Think about yourself when you feel unheard. You get frustrated, don’t you? Angry, right? Now that the protesters have your attention, listen. Get past the violence, which has taken place on the edges of the protests; it’s absolutely inexcusable, of course. And move beyond being defensive about the police; of course we’re grateful for the many heroic deeds done by the men and women in blue. Roll up your sleeves, lean forward and listen with willing ears, an open mind and a compassionate heart. When you do, you’ll learn about systemic legal, economic, political, social and educational oppression that, in your white world, you never knew existed. Now that you’re truly listening, you’ll understand that it’s not straightforward. The unjust racial biases and policies toward African-Americans leave them no choice but to live lives filled with complexities and moving parts so diicult we can’t imagine. And once you’ve heard, really heard, you’ll understand why they’re sick of it and are trying to get your attention. Once you’ve truly listened, you can’t unhear. You can’t unknow. Have the courage to take action, for heaven’s sake. Being silent is being complicit. Let’s make St. Louis a city Bono no longer cries for, but is proud of. Elizabeth Terry • Ballwin

Black pastors need to rethink their message The next time black pastors and other sheep use the tiresome “stop killing us” slogan, do that while looking into a mirror and change the wording to “stop killing ourselves.” Steve Farrow • St. Charles

It is never wise to run from police There are some things that are not negotiable in life. Reality No. 1: Even if we are innocent of a crime, it is never wise to run from the police. Failing to stop in response to an oicer’s command causes more than a validation of guilt. Reality No. 2: Resisting an arrest rarely, if ever, ends well. Reality No. 3: Once commanded to stop, just stop. Consider the present moment an unpleasant and temporary inconvenience. Reality No. 4: There is no lasting benefit to any other choice. These realities do not change based on race/ethnicity, religion, color, national origin, age, sexual orientation, disabilities, veteran status, sex, height, weight, marital status, gender identity, genetic information, etc. Our personal choices do matter. Dale Fanetti • Creve Coeur

Paper should not showcase the protesters’ activities Why does the Post-Dispatch give so much coverage to the disruptive protesters as they march around and cause damage to property and police officers? If the paper would simply stop sensationalizing their activities and instead concentrate on reporting news without a slant, the disruptive protesters would be without a window to showcase their activities. Show some integrity and honesty in the paper’s reporting. Patti Jobes • Webster Groves Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

09.20.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

BOOTLEGGING BY AIRPLANE • If it came from any other Prohibition state but Oklahoma, that story about airplane bootlegging would scarcely be credible. As the tale runs, the airplane hovered mysteriously over a dark field until two autos appeared, when it landed its cargo of booze. The point is that no one knows how thirsty they are in Oklahoma. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

A chilling study shows how hostile college students are toward free speech A ifth of undergrads now say it’s acceptable to use physical force to silence a speaker. CATHERINE RAMPELL Washington Post

ROBERT COHEN • rohen@post-dispatch.com

A police oicer raises his baton to a person who was arrested in the Loop on Saturday.

Post-Stockley:

here’s an elephant in the room We have allowed police error in the use of lethal force to become frequent and inevitable. BY MARY EDWARDS WERTSCH

In the loud clamor of opinions both for and against the notguilty verdict for Jason Stockley last Friday, something extremely important is being overlooked. It has been overlooked in the public dialogue following every case of police shooting or police abuse of civilians. The elephant in the room is this: We Americans have allowed systems to be put in place in which police error in the use of lethal force, resulting in unnecessary civilian death, will never be the extremely rare event we have a right to expect. Instead, it will be frequent and inevitable. And until we acknowledge this and push for the systemic safeguards we need, such killings will go on relentlessly, our social fabric will be torn apart by rage and grief, and all police officers — including the many who are responsible and non-racist — will suffer distrust. In our country, police kill about a thousand people a year. In nearly every case, the police or the courts or both would have us believe that the death was justifiable. I am in no way contending that none are justified. But I am asking, how can we reasonably accept that they were? For that we would need to be able to point to credible and effective systems of checks and balances, but we can’t. For one thing, the judicial system should act as a check and balance on the use of lethal force by police. But where is the evidence that it ever has? If our courts across this country had histories of convicting the bad apples on

the police force, the good ones would not have to face derision or mistrust. Hasn’t it been clear from all we’ve seen by this time? What it boils down to is that all across this nation, new police are trained in programs that are likely too brief, empowered with lethal force, and told to shoot to kill if they feel threatened. Then when an officer kills someone, that perception of threat becomes not just the motivation but the vindication for the act: I did it because I decided it was right, and it’s right because I did it. That empowerment to kill and the implicit godlike permission to use it at will, added to the now-realistic expectation that no court will hold a police officer accountable, is a virtual guarantee that the societal norm is weighted toward police error in the use of lethal force. There are two systemic problems here. One lies in the norms and practices in police departments all across this country. The other is the favorable weight the judicial system gives to police performing their jobs. I want to assert that many upstanding, responsible individuals choose police work as a way to give back to their communities. They wear the uniform proudly, and energize every day with the desire to serve and protect the public. They want to be the allies of our civil society, not its underminers. We need these people desperately. Unfortunately for them, their own police departments let them down. How? By providing

zero or very little training in how to de-escalate volatile situations and how to eliminate threats without using lethal force. By providing insufficient training in how to deal with suspects who are obviously mentally ill or high. By tolerating racist remarks and behavior. By nurturing an atmosphere in which loyalty to other officers, regardless of what they have done or are likely to do, outweighs the need to hold them accountable through the department’s own disciplinary processes or through the courts. The other systemic problem is the bias of the judicial system. Numerous studies have made it indisputable that our judicial system is biased against individuals of color. Too often they receive poor legal representation. They are convicted more often, and receive harsher sentences. The other is the bias in favor of police. Sympathy for the police who bravely put their lives at risk every day should not extend to rubberstamping the “perception of threat” defense every time it is raised. What can we do about this? Demand — civilly, nonviolently — real systemic change. One avenue would be to pressure our elected federal representatives to investigate the situation, then come up with federal standards for police training and behavior, among other things, tied to all federal grants to police departments. Tell them: We deserve better. So do our police. Mary Edwards Wertsch of University City is a freelance editor and author of “Military Brats: Legacies of Childhood Inside the Fortress.”

Here’s the problem with suggesting that upsetting speech warrants “safe spaces,” or otherwise conflating mere words with physical assault: If speech is violence, then violence becomes a justifiable response to speech. Just ask college students. A fifth of undergrads now say it’s acceptable to use physical force to silence a speaker who makes “offensive and hurtful statements.” That’s one finding from a disturbing new survey of students conducted by John Villasenor, a Brookings Institution senior fellow and University of California at Los Angeles professor. In August, motivated by concerns about the “narrowing window of permissible topics” for discussion on campuses, Villasenor conducted a nationwide survey of 1,500 undergraduate students at four-year colleges. Financial support for the survey was provided by the Charles Koch Foundation, which Villasenor said had no involvement in designing, administering or analyzing the questionnaire; as of this writing, the foundation had also not seen his results. Many of Villasenor’s questions were designed to gauge students’ understanding of the First Amendment.Colleges,after all,pay a lot of lip service to “freedom of speech,” despite high-profile examples of civil-liberty-squelching on campus. The survey suggests that this might not be due to hypocrisy so much as a misunderstanding of what the First Amendment actually entails. For example, when students were asked whether the First Amendment protects “hate speech,” 4 in 10 said no. This is, of course, incorrect. Speech promoting hatred — or at least, speech perceived as promoting hatred — may be abhorrent, but it is nonetheless constitutionally protected. There were no statistically significant differences in response to this question based on political affiliation. But there were significant differences by gender: Women are more likely than men to believe hate speech is not constitutionally protected (49 percent vs. 38 percent, respectively). Students were asked whether the First Amendment requires that an offensive speaker at a public university be matched with one with an opposing view. Here, 6 in 10 (mistakenly) said that, yes, the First Amendment requires balance. The most chilling findings, however, involved how students think repugnant speech should be dealt with. Villasenor offered a hypothetical that may sound familiar to those who recall recent fracases at California State University at Los Angeles, Middlebury College,

Claremont McKenna College and other institutions: Let’s say a public university hosts a “very controversial speaker,” one “known for making offensive and hurtful statements.” Would it be acceptable for a student group to disrupt the speech “by loudly and repeatedly shouting so that the audience cannot hear the speaker”? Astonishingly, half said that snuffing out upsetting speech — rather than, presumably, rebutting or even ignoring it — would be appropriate. Democrats were more likely than Republicans to find this response acceptable (62 percent to 39 percent), and men were more likely than women (57 percent to 47 percent). Even so, sizable shares of all groups agreed. It gets even worse. Respondents were also asked if it would be acceptable for a student group to use violence to prevent that same controversial speaker from talking. Here, 19 percent said yes. There were no statistically significant differences in response by political party affiliation. Men, however, were three times as likely as women to endorse using physical force to silence controversial views (30 percent of men vs. 10 percent of women). None of this bodes well for the alt-right’s Berkeley Free Speech Week events next week. Judging from the lineup — which includes professional troll Milo Yiannopoulos and Pizzagate conspiracy theorist Mike Cernovich — the apparent goal of this event is not to help students face hard truths or grapple with thoughtful conservative viewpoints. It’s to say disgusting things in an attempt to provoke liberals into doing something stupid, surrendering any claim to the moral high ground. If that happens, President Trump’s “both sides” comments will ring a little truer, while liberals and colleges are further cemented as whataboutist bogeymen for the right. In truth, lefties can do more to call out threats to civil liberties perpetrated by their ideological allies. And colleges can do more to promote freer debate. But many of Villasenor’s results — like those from other data sources — show that the right is also astonishingly open to shutting down speech. What’s more, colleges alone are not to blame for these findings. Other data suggest that freshmen are arriving on campus with more intolerant attitudes toward free speech than their predecessors did, and that Americans of all ages have become strikingly hostile toward basic civil and political liberties. Colleges provide a crucible for America’s increasingly strained attitudes toward free discourse. But they are just the canaries in the coal mine. Catherine Rampell rampell@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

Trump lawyer caught gabbing about Russia racks up the errors Attorney with a famous name is caught in his third indiscretion in the past two weeks. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

Ty Cobb is really batting a thousand. The White House lawyer, who shares a name with the baseball legend he claims as a distant relative, has earned fame in his own right this week. He has set Washington atwitter because he had a loud conversation while lunching al fresco outside BLT Steak, a downtown D.C. restaurant, with Trump’s personal lawyer — and within earshot of fellow diner Ken Vogel of The New York Times, which has offices just steps from the restaurant. Vogel heard Cobb, who is overseeing the White House response to the Russia probe, say, among other things, that one White House lawyer was a “spy” for White House counsel Don McGahn and that McGahn has “a couple documents locked in a safe” related to the Russia inquiry. Cobb’s indiscretion raises a number of questions:

What did Vogel order? (The tuna nicoise.) Did he try the popovers? (Yes.) Did Cobb get food caught in his handlebar mustache? (Probably.) And: What the hell was Cobb thinking? The original Ty Cobb, who played a century ago, still has the title for highest career batting average. Less well known: He also holds the record for most career errors by an American League outfielder. The latest Cobb seems to have inherited the error gene. This was his third indiscretion in the past two weeks, the second involving a D.C. restaurant. Two weeks earlier, Cobb got himself in a late-night email tangle with Jeff Jetton, who owns the D.C. ramen shop Toki Underground. Jetton goaded Cobb into an exchange by making obscene references to Cobb performing a particular sex act on Trump. In emails laced with typos, Cobb referred to the probe as “bulls--- Russian bulls---” and said, against the available evidence, that he is one of the “adults in the room.” Cobb also fell for a prankster pretending to be White House

Cobb

social media director Dan Scavino and using an account from “@ emailprankster.co.uk.” In that exchange, Cobb joked about using drones to attack a Business Insider reporter, Natasha Bertrand, whom Cobb had previously asked,“Are you on drugs?” (Cobb didn’t respond to my email; perhaps I should have used an “emailprankster” account.) Cobb’s boss has been known to commit the occasional blunder himself. As I wrote earlier this year, McGahn, when representing the Trump campaign, filed virtually the same brief to the Federal Election Commission that another lawyer had filed earlier, an action election lawyers called highly unusual. And the indiscretions of some of Cobb’s colleagues are legendary, none more so than Anthony

Scaramucci’s profanity-laced tirade to The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza during the Mooch’s glorious one-week White House career. But until now, nobody in the White House but Cobb has been caught discussing sensitive matters within easy earshot of strangers while dining outdoors. Well, nobody except the president, who handled nuclear strategy with the Japanese prime minister while dining outdoors at Mar-a-Lago among members and guests. Somebody posted on social media a photo of the man who carries the nuclear football. Trump’s misjudgments are as legendary as Cobb’s batting. Just this weekend he retweeted a doctored GIF of him hitting Hillary Clinton with a golf tee shot that originated with an anti-Semitic conspiracy theorist using an obscene Twitter handle. And we’re only eight months in! It won’t be long, at this rate, before Cobb tries to address a sensitive email to White House colleague Stephen Miller but accidentally sends it to Robert Mueller. Or he leaves his briefcase in a taxi and the next passenger is Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) of the

House Intelligence Committee. Or he has an incriminating phone conversation with Trump while in an Uber driven by Vogel, who is moonlighting to pay off his BLT Steak tab. Eventually, the defense secretary will butt-dial Al Jazeera from the Situation Room. And the CIA director, at a Nationals game with the NSA chief, will discover with horror that their entire conversation about covert agents has been filmed by the “Kiss Cam.” Trump chief of staff John Kelly reportedly reprimanded Cobb over BLT-gate. But he deserves a commendation. If there is anything that has saved the country from the full force of Trump’s madness, it is good, old-fashioned incompetence. He hasn’t been able to hire people for many administration jobs, and many of those he has hired have proved to be secondrate, botching everything from handling the Russia probe to repealing Obamacare. No runs, no hits — and lots of errors. Dana Milbank dana.milbank@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 09.20.2017

OBITUARIES Bowzer, Jimmy - St. Charles Cagle, Hancel Loyd - Chesterfield DeVinney,Doris C. - St. Louis Downer, Hubert "Dean" - Bethalto Ewing, Cleodora T. - St. Louis Feldt, Helen Ann (Kurtz) - Shrewsbury, MO Fitzgerald, Barbara J. - St. Peters Gardner, Helen G. - St. Louis Gebken - see DeVinney Goodman - see DeVinney Hensiek, Nellie B. - Edwardsville

Bowzer, Jimmy age 50, of Saint Charles, MO, September 17, 2017. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Cagle, Hancel Loyd Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection Friday, September 15, 2017 at the age of 82. Beloved husband for 61 years of Rosemary Bommarito Cagle; dear son of the late Haskel and Almar Cagle (nee Bridgemon); brother of t h e l a t e J oyce Gray and Bob Cagle; brother-in-law of Lloyd Gray; uncle of Gail Wyss, Rick Gray and Cheryl Jacobs L o y d w a s a ret ired U n ion Electrician. He began his career at Hussman Refrigeration Corporation and retired from Schaeffer Electric after 26 years of employment. Loyd loved all things electrical, his home and gardens, his wife's cooking, and his beloved pets. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Anselm Parish, St. Louis, Friday, 10:00 a.m. Entombment at Holy Cross Mausoleum with a luncheon to follow at the Olive Garden, 17198 Chesterfield Airport Rd., Chesterfield. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Thursday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Celebrations of Life

Hoffmann, Enid Rose - Chesterfield Holdsworth - see DeVinney Horner - see DeVinney Kanaday, Ethel "Lois" D. - St. Louis Kayser, Ralph - Troy, MO King, Paul A. - Kirkwood Kopman, John L. - St. Louis La Forest, Joseph George - Galt, CA, formerly of St. Louis LeBouef, Robert - St. Louis McPeak, Russell Dale - Chesterfield Nicholas, William M. - St. Louis

Hoffmann, Enid Rose (nee Frommer), born on October 25, 1923, Asleep in Jesus, Friday, September 15, 2017. Daughter of the late Walter O. and Honora R. Frommer (nee Kummer). Beloved wife of the late Arnold K. Hoffmann. Dear Mother of Karen R (Larry) Arft, Shirley A (Dale) Langewisch, Nancy L. Mathis. Loving Grandmother of Laura (Tom) Orr, Derek (Melanie), Danika Mathis, Kyra Mathis, Amy Langewisch. Greatgrandmother to Ethan Arft and Ireland Arft. Sister of Carol (Dave) Froesel, the late Donald (Barbara) Frommer, Walter (Vivian) Frommer. Dear sister in law, cousin, aunt, and friend to many. Enid was a "Rosie the Riveter" during WWII working at CurtisWright Aircraft Co. After the war, she married and spent the rest of her life as a loving mother and homemaker Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Saturday, 11:30 a.m. Interment Bellerive Gardens. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to King of Kings Lutheran Church, Chesterfield, MO. Visitation Friday, 4-8 p.m. and Saturday, 10:30 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Noteis - see DeVinney Parres, Dennis F. - St. Louis Riley, Bryant H. - University City Thiemann, Mary Elizabeth "Betty" - St. Louis Wahle, Frances - St. Louis Warner, Charles Richard - St. Louis Watson - see DeVinney Weeks, Joan M. - Waterloo, IL Wolf, Dorothy Dorsey - St. Louis Wolk, Robert - St. Louis Ziegler, David M. - Manchester

Parres, Dennis F. 60, September 16, 2017. Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Thurs. 9/21/2017, 4-7 p.m. For more info see Schrader.com.

Riley, Bryant H.

at the age of 38 on Monday September 18, 2017. Beloved son of Judy A. Riley and Ellis M. McMurtry; loving brother of Matthew C. J. Riley (Rachele); dear nephew of Michael and Marbie Reap; cousin and friend. Grateful acknowledgment goes to Bryant's lifelong caregiver, Carolyn S. Jones. Services: The family with receive friends at LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd, University City, on Sunday September 24, 2017 from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Private Interment. Friends may visit www.LuptonChapel.com to give their online condolences A SERVICE Kanaday, Ethel "Lois" D. OF (nee Parker), 84, passed away on Sept. 18, 2017. LUPTON CHAPEL Beloved wife of the late Joseph F. Kanaday Jr.; loving mother of Michael Sallee, Sheila Wright (Tony), Anthony "Joe", Steven, Cindy (Steve) Bates, Scott and the late Wally Ka n a d a y Thiemann, Mary Elizabeth "Betty" (Margaret); cherished grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, (nee Vohsen) was called home to the Lord on September 16, mother-in-law, aunt and friend to many. Services: Vis. Thurs. Sept. 21, 2017 4:00PM to 8:00PM at Jay B. 2017, from complications due to Alzheimer's at the age of 78. Betty will be lovingly remembered by her family Ron Smith Funeral Home Maplewood Chapel 7456 Manchester Funeral Fri. 1:00PM Interment at Jefferson Barracks National Thiemann; son Charlie (Elaina) Thiemann; son Ed (Nancy) Thiemann; daughter Susan Thiemann; granddaughters Jessie, Cemetery DeVinney, Doris C. Becca, Maggie,sisters Catherine Vohsen, Leona (Bob) Palmer, (nee Gebken) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Fran (Len) Ross; and brother Clarence (Pat) Vohsen. Church, Mon., Sept. 18, 2017. Beloved mother of Michele Horner Betty was born on January 30, 1939 to Clarence and Marie Kayser, Ralph D. and William (Brenda) DeVinney; loving grandmother of Maureen 83, of Troy, MO, passed 9/18/17. Vohsen. She lived in Kirkwood, MO for most of her life and was (Jonathan) Horner-Watson, Christina (Adam) Noteis & Haley Beloved father of Sandra Gerhart, Peggy Rockwell, Scott a loving wife, mother, aunt and friend to many. DeVinney; great-grandmother of Beau Noteis; dear sister of Kayser, Gary Kayser and Bill Kayser. Services: Funeral Mass will be held at St. Clement Catholic Thomas (Sue) Gebken, Claire Goodman, the late Jane (the late Services: Vis-9/19/17 from 4-8 p.m. McCoy-Blossom Chapel Church in Des Peres, MO at 10:30 am on Friday, September 22, Arthur "Bud") Holdsworth and the late Robert Gebken; beloved T r o y M a s s - 9 / 2 0 / 1 7 a t 1 0 a . m. S a c r e d H e a r t T r o y . 2017, with visitation one hour prior to service. Burial will be daughter of the late Clarence and Helen (nee Slyman) DeVinney; www.mccoyblossomfh.com 1-636-528-8244 at St. Peter's cemetery in Kirkwood. In lieu of flowers, our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin & friend. memorials may be made to the Alzheimer's Association of Services: Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. on Sat., Missouri. Arrangements by BOPP Chapel. King, Paul A. Sept. 23 at Ascension Catholic Church, 230 Santa Maria Dr., Chesterfield. Visitation 9:15 a.m. until time of Mass at Church. 9/15/17. Husband to Lisa & father of Matthew & Peter. Son of Wahle, Frances In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Vincent DePaul Society. Inter- Raymond & Mary Louise King. Beloved by Betty A. King & Verla ment Calvary Cemetery. Arrangements by Kevin and Ellen Boes. Brother of Forrest, Faith, Christopher, Jennifer & David (nee Jezich) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Boes. Nephew of David & Linda King & Barbara Neil. Services: Church, Friday, September 15, 2017. O'Sullivan. Beloved wife of the late Lawrence J. Wahle; loving mother of Oct. 4th, 3:00 p.m., Kirkwood Methodist (201 W. Adams). Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com Gary (Cyndi), Mark (Mary) and John (Renee) Wahle; adoring grandmother of Kristina (Nick) Hampton, Bryan (Lauren) Wahle, Kopman, John L. Monica (Pat) Bradley, Mitchell, Maggie, Ethan and Hannah Downer, Hubert "Dean" September 17, 2017. Wahle; cherished great-grandmother of Olivia, Emma, Patrick, 84, passed away Mon., Sept. 18, 2017, at St. Luke's Hospital in Beloved son of the late Ely and the late Ethel Kopman; dear Madeline and Henry; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt Chesterfield, MO. Services: Visitation will be 4-7pm on Thurs., brother and brother-in-law of Charles (Sally) Kopman; dear and friend to many. father of Adam Kopman and Amy Kopman. Sept. 21, at Elias, Kallal & Schaaf Funeral Home in Bethalto. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd., A private service was held. Memorial contributions preferred to on Saturday, September 23 at 10 am. (Concludes). The Humane Society of Missouri or the Animal Protective Interment J.B. Cemetery in private. Visitation Friday, 4-8 Ewing, Cleodora T. Association of Missouri. pm. Retired St. Louis Public School Teacher, 92, 9/12/17. Dear mothBERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE er of Renee (Charles Davis) Ewing, M.D., 2 grandchildren. Services Sept 22, Pleasant Green MBC. visit 10 a.m., service 11 a.m. Warner, Charles Richard La Forest, Joseph George 88, passed away on July 25, 2017. See full obit at September 13, 2017. Dear husband of Francine Gardener La www.stlouiscremation.com Feldt, Helen Ann (Kurtz) Forest; dear father of Angelique; dear step-father of Nathan Helen Ann Feldt, March 19, 1939-September 16, 2017. Loving Gardener; dear son of the late Eugene and Catherine La Forest; wife of Harry Feldt; Beloved sister of Kay (Jim) Poorbaugh. dear brother of Tom, Mary Mick, Louis, Beth (Bud) Gansner, Cherished mother of Nancy (Ed) Ferguson, Julie (Rick) Wilson, Angelo, Jean Dantzler and Ann (David) Westmoreland; our dear Weeks, Joan M. Laurie Sullivan, Theresa (Marty) Dintleman and Bradley Feldt cousin, uncle and friend to many. (nee Paul), asleep in Jesus, Sun. Sept. 17, 2017. Beloved wife of (deceased). Treasured grandmother of Nolan, Rachel, Sophia, Gerald "Jerry" F. Weeks for 61 years; dearest mother of Services will be held in Lodi, CA. Chloe, Max, Michael and Ryan. Adoring great grandmother of Christine (Jim) Bivens and Nancy Weeks; dear sister of George Chance, Sloan, Elouise, and Charlotte. (Dale) Wood; dear cousin of Laura Brown; dear friend of the LeBouef, Robert Services: A Mass will be held Saturday, Sept. 23, at 10:30 a.m. Three Rivers Chapter of the Good Sam R.V. Club; our dear aunt, 62, Sept 15, 2017. at St. Michael the Archangel Church, Shrewsbury, Mo., luncheon cousin, sister-in-law and friend. Dear husband of the following. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay late Joyce; survived Canterbury Enterprise, or Pujols Family Foundation. Ferry Road, on Thurs. Sept. 21, 9:00 am until time of service by daughter Liz (William) Johnson; 10:00 am. Interment JB National Cemetery. In lieu of dear grandfather of Lawrence flowers, memorials to the Shriner's Hospital for Children or Fitzgerald, Barbara J. Benz, Robert Johnson and Betty Siteman Cancer Center (for Brain Tumor research). 75, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Johnson; dear brother of Linda Monday, September 18, 2017. Loving wife of the late David Moss and Peggy Tissot; brotherFitzgerald Sr. for 43 years; beloved mother of Dave (Becky) in-law of Tammy (Joe) Pizzimenti; Wolf, Dorothy Dorsey Fitzgerald, Dan (Michele) Fitzgerald, and Susan (Satish) other beloved family members Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. Loving wife of the late Francis W. Wolf; Pardeshi; dear grandmother to Daniel, Elli, Claire, David, Molly, Amanda (Jim) Malawey, Natalie beloved mother of Catherine (Brian) Minnihan, Fran Wolf, and Davi, and Raj; dear sister to Dan DeNike, Ron (Kris) DeNike, and Pizzimenti and Jax; Joe Pizzimenti Mary (Greg) Gray; devoted grandmother of Ellen and Steven Rick (Marci) DeNike. Dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Minnihan, and Connor Gray; dear aunt, cousin, and friend. III. Barbara loved people. She had several groups of friends, Services: Visitation Saturday, In accordance with her wishes, her body was donated to stayed very busy, and kept a full social calendar. Above all, she September 23, 1:00-5:00 p.m. at Hutchens Mortuary, followed Washington University School of Medicine. A memorial service loved her family. Barb never missed sporting events or a family by a 6:00 p.m. Celebration of Life. will be held at a later date. get together. Barb taught at Sacred Heart as a kindergarten teacher for many years. She will be greatly missed by all who Wolk, Robert McPeak, Russell Dale knew her. Fortified with the Sacraments of Services: Funeral on Friday, September 22, 2017 at 9:15 a.m. Ru s s el l D a l e M c P e a k , f r o m Holy Mother Church, Monday from Hutchens-Stygar Funeral and Cremation Center, 5987 Mid Chesterfield, MO, transitioned September 18, 2017. Rivers Mall Dr., (St. Charles) to Immaculate Conception Catholic peacefully Saturday morning Beloved husband of the late Church Chapel - Dardenne, 7701 St. Hwy N, (Dardenne Prairie) surrounded by his loving family. Patricia Wolk; dear father of for a 10:30 Funeral Mass. Interment to take place at Our Lady "Dale" as he was affectionately Christine (Leonard) Appelbaum, Cemetery. VISITATION Thursday, September 21, 2017 from known, was born in St. Louis on Robert (Janet), Brian 4-8 p.m. at Hutchens-Stygar. September 24, 1938 to Effie Mary (Jacqueline), Gary (Michelle), In lieu of flowers, memorial donations appreciated to The (Lockhart) and Russell Sage Glenn (Lori) and Michael American Cancer Society or The American Heart Association. McPeak. Dale's career prior to (Marjorie) Wolk, Julia (Robert) O n l in e con d ol en ces and g u e s t b o o k ma y b e fou n d a t retirement in 2003 was as a Mense, Amy (David) McBride and www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com salesman in the tech industry. the late Catherine Wolk; our dear His family remain grateful for his grandfather of 27, great drive & dedication. When Dale Gardner, Helen G. grandfather of 4, uncle, great wasn't "Closing The Deal" he was (nee Sadowski) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother either on the tennis court, watching Cardinal baseball, or uncle, cousin and friend. Church on Sunday, September 17, 2017. Beloved wife of the late beachside with family at his favorite destination, Longboat Key, Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Edward W. Gardner; loving mother of Thomas (Mary), James Florida. Most recently his biggest joy included spending time Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, September 22, 9:15 am to St. Elizabeth (Mary) and Gregory (Pam) Gardner, Mary (Alan) Myers and Mimi with his three grandchildren. of Hungary for 10 am Mass. Interment Resurrection (Randy) Richardson; dear sister of John Sadowski; our dearest Those left to cherish his memory include: Nancy (Wheeler), his Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Disabled grandmother, great-grandmother, aunt, cousin and friend to devoted wife of 50 years; Daughter Michele and her son Trey of American Veterans appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 many. Redondo Beach, CA; Son Mark and his wife Susan, along with pm. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois their two children Madden and Quinn of Ballwin, MO; and his Rd., on Friday, September 22, at 10:30 a.m. to St. Catherine sister Judy McPeak of O'Fallon, MO. Ziegler, David M. Laboure Catholic Church for 11 a.m. Mass. Interment at J.B. Contributions in his memory may be made to The American Monday, September 18, 2017. Services: Funeral service at National Cemetery. Mrs. Gardner helped operate E.F. Lung Association. Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Friday, 10:00 am. Gardner Plumbing with her husband Edward. Visitation Services: Private family service only. For more info see Schrader.com Thurs., 3-8 p.m.

Hensiek, Nellie B.

Nicholas, William M.

Monday, September 18, (nee Miller) 89, passed away Sept. 18, 2017. Beloved wife of the 2017. late Donald Hensiek; mother of Edward and Joseph Hensiek Beloved husband of the and Mary Walsh; Mother-in-law, grandmother and great-grand- late Mary Nicholas (nee Musteen); mother.Services: Vis. Thurs. 9/21, Saksa Mateer Funeral Home, loving father of Mary Catherine 210 N. Kansas St., Edwardsville, 62025. Funeral Mass, 10:30 am, (Dan Meehan) Nicholas, Sharon 9/22, St. Boniface Catholic Ch., Edwardsville. Donations to Nicholas, Thelma Sue (Howard) Daughters of Charity or Main St. Sr. Citizens Ctr., Edwardsville. Lowry and Paul Nicholas; dear grandfather of 7 and great grandfather of 12; dear brotherin-law of Zania Musteen; dear uncle, great uncle and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES Rd., Saturday, September 23, 11 am. Interment St. Trinity Cemetery. Visitation Friday, 3-8 pm.

STLtoday.com/obits

“To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL

“The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen, nor touched, but are felt in the heart.” HELEN KELLER


09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

NATION

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A17

GOP strains for Obamacare repeal votes Sen. McConnell is praising revived Republican efort to uproot ACA BY ERICA WERNER associated Press

WASHINGTON • Time growing short, President Donald Trump and Republican Senate leaders dove into a frantic hunt for votes Tuesday in a last-ditch efort to repeal and replace the Afordable Care Act, often called Obamacare. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, whose failure to pass an Obamacare repeal bill in July opened a bitter public rift with Trump, pressed hard for the newly revived effort, which had been left for dead as recently as a week or two ago. But in a sign he remained short of votes, McConnell refused to commit to bringing the legislation to the floor. As in July, much of the focus was on Arizona Sen. John McCain. Would he step back in line with fellow Republicans now that there was a bill co-written by Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, his best friend in the Senate? McCain wasn’t saying. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, another crucial vote, wasn’t talking either. Republicans must act by Sept. 30 in the Senate or face the prospect of a Democratic filibuster. That blocking action is currently staved off by budget rules that will expire at the end of the fiscal year. The new legislation, by Graham and Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, would undo the central pillars of former President Barack Obama’s health care law and replace them with block grants to the states so they could make their own health care coverage rules. “Governors and state legislators of both parties would have both the opportunity and the responsibility to help make quality and afordable health care available to their citizens in a way that works for their own particular states,” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “It’s an intriguing idea and one that has a great deal of support.” Democrats are unanimously opposed, arguing that the legislation would cause millions of Americans to lose health insurance, decrease access to aford-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks Tuesday at a rally of health care advocates, grass-roots activists and others outside the Capitol in Washington.

able care and damage the Medicaid health program for the poor. So McConnell must win the votes of 50 of the 52 Senate Republicans. That would amount to victory in the 100-member Senate, because GOP Vice President Mike Pence would then break a tie. Pence appeared Tuesday at the Capitol and declared the Trump administration was “all-in” on the efort. The president himself was closely in touch with Graham and others. If the bill does pass, Speaker Paul Ryan has committed to pushing it through the House asis and straight to the president’s desk, according to Graham. After seven years of promises to get rid of Obamacare, Republicans would have finally succeeded. It would be a promise kept to the GOP base, yet one with uncertain and potentially devastating political consequences for the Republican Party given that millions might lose their coverage entirely and others might have skimpier care. The bill would let states set

their own coverage requirements, allow insurers to boost prices on people with serious medical conditions, end Obama’s mandates that most Americans buy insurance and that companies offer coverage to workers, and cut and reshape Medicaid. The bill’s full impacts are diicult to predict because the Congressional Budget Oice has not had time to assess it. But senators plan to move forward without a complete CBO “score,” heightening outrage from Democrats. By Tuesday evening the legislation remained at least one or two votes short. The situation is nearly identical to that in which Republicans found themselves in July when McConnell tried to pass a stripped-down repeal bill. It failed in a tense late-night session, with McCain, newly diagnosed with brain cancer, casting the decisive “no” vote. McCain is once again at the center of the drama. But now there’s a twist: His best friend in the Senate, Graham, is an author of the bill.

McCain has been more than willing to buck his party’s leadership over the years, and to defy Trump. Undercutting Graham might be a different issue, and McCain brusquely refused Tuesday to tip his hand. “I don’t have anything to say,” McCain said repeatedly. Graham made clear he was arguing the case forcefully to his longtime friend, with whom he’s partnered on any number of policy initiatives over the years and rarely parted ways. A hearing on the legislation was scheduled for next week after McCain had complained that there weren’t any. “I’m not speaking for Sen. McCain,” Graham said. “I know he likes federalism, I know he wants bipartisanship, but I just don’t personally see a bipartisan proposal that’s got a snowball’s chance in hell of doing anything other than propping up Obamacare.” “It’s either this or a march toward Bernie-care,” Graham said, in a reference to the Medicarefor-all bill ofered by Sen. Bernie

Sanders, I-Vt. GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky has announced his opposition to the legislation, saying it doesn’t go far enough in repealing Obamacare, while moderate GOP Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, who opposed earlier repeal bills, also sounded like a “no” Tuesday. She said the Graham-Cassidy bill could be worse than earlier versions because of potential harm to people with pre-existing conditions. In addition to McCain, the focus was on moderate Murkowski, who was the third “no” vote on the earlier bill along with Collins and McCain. Murkowski kept a low profile Tuesday; but in what could be a significant factor for her, Alaska’s independent governor, Bill Walker, joined a bipartisan letter with other governors in opposition to the bill, asking senators to instead focus on bipartisan approaches. And a pair of potent interest groups, the American Medical Association and AARP, also declared their opposition.

White House gets DHS report that will shape travel ban’s future BY MATT ZAPOTOSKY Washington Post

The Department of Homeland Security has submitted to the White House a classified report on screening foreign travelers wanting to enter the United States — a key document that President Donald Trump is likely to rely on as he decides the future of his controversial travel ban. With a major portion of the ban set to expire Sunday, DHS officials in recent days sent a report to the White House that “meets the requests that the president laid out in the executive order in an effort to establish better screening and vetting of persons to the United States,” department spokesman Jonathan Hofman said.

Hoffman declined to say exactly what the report recommended, though he asserted it was not meant to form the basis of a permanent ban. Last week, citing an attack in London, Trump had written on Twitter that his ban should be “far larger, tougher and more specific.” “The intention of it is not to create a ban of any sort,” Hoffman said. “It is to ensure that we have the ability to screen and vet people traveling to the United States.” Trump’s travel ban — which barred the issuance of new visas to residents of six Muslimmajority countries and blocked the entry of all refugees — was contemplated as a temporary measure, designed to give DHS oicials time to assess the infor-

mation the United States is able to get about those coming to the country. The portion of the ban afecting citizens of the six countries was to expire in 90 days, and the portion afecting refugees was to expire in 120 days. The 90-day period expires Sunday, according to spokesmen for the Justice Department and the DHS. While the ban was in effect, DHS and other officials were to assess the information other countries provided to the United States to help with vetting. Those countries that could not produce the necessary information or come up with a plan to do so were to be included on a list sent to the president. Those on the list risked being named in “a Presidential proclamation that would

OBITUARIES

prohibit the entry of appropriate categories of foreign nationals,” according to Trump’s executive order. Hoffman declined to say whether the report to the president included such a list, though he said it was created in response to the executive order’s demand for one. He also declined to say what officials would do after Sunday. “Everybody is aware of the timeline, and we are focused on ensuring that persons traveling to the United States are properly vetted and screened before coming here, regardless of where they’re coming from,” he said. The White House declined to comment on the future of the ban, offering only that the administration would “ensure we

Celebrations of Life

only admit those who can be properly vetted and will not pose a threat to national security or public safety.” The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear on Oct. 10 arguments on whether the travel ban is legal. In the meantime, oicials have been allowed to impose only a limited version of the measure, exempting those with a bona fide connection to the United States, such as a job or family member here. The refugee portion of the ban is set to expire on Oct. 24, probably before the Supreme Court will have made a decision. The case could be moot, and the Trump administration will impose new restrictions that could be met with fresh legal challenges.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Fraternal Notices

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Hancel L. Cagle Journeyman Wireman Member 64 Years September 15, 2017 Visitation Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017 from 4-8pm Schrader Funeral Home 14960 Manchester Rd., Ballwin, MO 63011 Funeral Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, St. Anselm Parish, 530 S. Mason Rd., St. Louis, MO 63141 Frank D. Jacobs, B.M.J James C. Douglas, F.S.

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. David P. Luaders Journeyman Wireman Member 43 Years September 17, 2017 Services will be private. Frank D. Jacobs, B.M.J James C. Douglas, F.S.

Florists Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staf of loral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


WORLD

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 09.20.2017

DIGEST Congo’s president opens peace conference Congolese President Joseph Kabila declared Tuesday that “justice must be done” as he opened a peace conference in the bloody Kasai region where thousands of people have died in a year of ighting among government troops and militias. The ighting in the Kasai provinces in Congo’s south began in August 2016 after Congolese troops killed the leader of the Kamwina Nsapu militia. More than 3,300 people have died since then, according to the Catholic church, and the United Nations says more than 1.4 million people have been displaced.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Supporters of Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, angry at the Supreme Court’s nulliication this month of the August presidential election, protest Tuesday in Nairobi.

remove Chief Justice David Maraga, Deputy Chief Justice Philomena Mwilu and Justice Isaac Lenaola. The petitions claim misconduct and bias. Maraga and three other justices ruled 4-2 to annul Kenyatta’s re-election and call for a new election, which is set for Oct. 17.

Kenyan judges who nulliied vote face threats • Attempts to intimidate Kenya’s Supreme Court judges after they nulliied President Uhuru Kenyatta’s re-election have been “unlawful and savage in nature,” the nation’s judiciary said Tuesday, as ruling party supporters protested outside the court demanding the judges’ removal. The protests came after petitions were iled asking the Judicial Service Commission to

Third arrest in British subway bombing • British police have arrested a third suspect in connection with the bomb that partially exploded on a London subway last week. Police said they arrested a man, 25, in Wales on Tuesday evening under the Terrorism Act. They say a property in Newport, Wales was being searched.

OVER

27 YEARS EXPERIENCE!

Two other men arrested over the weekend — a man, 18, who is a refugee from Iraq and a man, 21, from Syria — remain in custody. Neither has been charged. The partially exploded bomb injured 30 people when it detonated inside a crowded subway car on Friday. Islamic State extremists have claimed responsibility. Germany arrests two Iraqis for alleged terrorist ties • Two Iraqi men have been arrested in the German capital on suspicion of membership in a terrorist organization and war crimes as part of the Islamic State group, federal prosecutors said Tuesday. A 31-year-old,

identiied only as Raad Riyadh A.A. in line with privacy laws, and 19-yearold Abbas R. were both arrested Monday in Berlin, prosecutors’ spokeswoman Frauke Koehler said. They’re both alleged to have joined Islamic State in Mosul in June 2014 and participated in the killing of two Shiite Muslims. Four months later, prosecutors said, they were involved in the execution of a captured Iraqi military oicer. Teen arrested in British kayaker’s death in Amazon • Brazilian police have conirmed the death of a British woman, 43, who disappeared while kayaking

Ugly Concrete?

in the Amazon. Ivo Martins, head of the Amazonas state police homicide division, said Tuesday that a teenager had been arrested in connection with the case. He did not disclose woman’s name. Martins said that the victim’s body was yet to be found, but that the teenager confessed to taking part in the slaying. She was kayaking on the Solimoes River in the northern jungle state on Sept. 13, when she activated an emergency beacon. Her kayak and some personal belongings have been recovered. Suu Kyi defends Myanmar’s actions • With a mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims sparking accusations of ethnic cleansing from the United Nations and others, Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi said Tuesday that her country did not fear international scrutiny and invited diplomats to see some areas for themselves. Though an estimated 421,000 Rohingya have led to Bangladesh in less than a month as their villages burned and hundreds were killed, Suu Kyi said the “great majority” of Muslims within the conlict zone stayed and that “more than 50 percent of their villages were intact.” France ousts migrants from camp • French police encircled a makeshift migrant camp in woods near Dunkirk on Tuesday, removing 557 people, the prefecture of the Nord

region said. It was the second such operation in two days in northern France, where asylum-seekers and migrants gather in hopes of making it across the English Channel to Britain. Sixty children were among the hundreds of people removed from the camp. Seven of them had been living on their own and were turned over to a youth association, the prefecture said. EU budget oicials scrutinize project in Hungary • European Parliament members who oversee the EU’s budget visited on Tuesday a threestation railroad that links three Hungarian villages and has close ties to the country’s prime minister. Committee members led by chairwoman Inge Grassle are reviewing EU-funded projects in Hungary. Critics of Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s say the railroad is a vanity project with no practical use. Poland searches for newborn, parents who led hospital • In a widely debated case, Polish police are seeking the couple who led from a hospital in Bialogard, in northwestern Poland, with their newborn daughter on Friday. The couple had protested against the baby’s being subjected to routine procedures — including vaccination against tuberculosis, a vitamin shot, eye drops and being wiped clean right after birth. From news services

The beautiful and durable

Pebblestone/Epoxy System goes on top of your existing concrete! • Patio • Porch and Walkway • Pool Deck • Basement Floor • Driveway • Garage Floor • And More!

How to sell your valuable jewelry with conidence: Choose a buyer like T. Brian Hill who has over 30 years experience buying and selling. Then call for a free verbal estimate.

Available in 15 Beautiful Colors!

FREE ESTIMATES!

Senior & Military Discounts

(314) 313-5804

END OF SEASON SPECIAL! ACT NOW! BEFORE

AFTER

SAVE $500 - $1,500 SAVINGS BASED ON JOB SIZE

St. Louis Resurfacing, Inc. is Re

t Lou

90 S

©19

ing surfac

314-576-9220 1-800-283-6234

www.stlresurfacing.com

CHECK OUT OUR EXCELLENT A+ RATING WITH THE BBB!

USED JEWELRY BUYER

WWW.USEDJEWELRYBUYER.COM

122 N. Main in Historic Saint Charles

T. Brian Hill

Sell these valuables today —

• Certified diamonds & fine jewelry • Antique & estate jewelry • High grade wrist and pocket watches • Old gold & sterling silver • U.S. gold & silver coins • Private jewelry & coin collections

ENTER TO MAKE EVERY DAY #NationalCoffeeDay -

Win FREE Dunkin’ Donuts Coffee for a year!

We’re partnering with Dunkin’ Donuts to help celebrate

#NationalCoffeeDay

on Sept. 29! Enter daily for your chance to win Dunkin’ Donuts deliciousness that will keep you celebrating all year long.

PRIZES INCLUDE: • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts coffee for ONE YEAR (1 med hot/iced coffee per week) • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts breakfast for ONE YEAR (2 combo meals per month) • FREE Dunkin’ Donuts for ONE YEAR (2 dozen a month)

Winners announced on #NationalCoffeeDay!

ENTER TO make EVERY day #NationalCoffeeDay ENTER DAILY NOW THROUGH SEPT. 29 AT NOON:

STLtoday.com/contests


NEWS

09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

WEATHER • Low 71, High 95 • Winds S 5-12 mph

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A19 National Extremes High: 103° Death Valley, California

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Low: 20° Chilly Barton Flat, Idaho

All about summer in September It will be all about summer heat and humidity across the St. Louis area during the next few days. Highs will be in the low-to-mid 90s. Mainly dry conditions are also expected through the upcoming weekend.

40s

Rain

60s

60s

50s

50s

70s 60s

70s __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

74°

90°

94°

81°

Lots of sun

Lots of sun

Mostly sunny

Partly cloudy

4-DAY FORECAST

72 69 71 70 71 74 75 71 71 71 72 70 69

92 91 91 91 92 91 88 87 90 90 86 93 89

W

partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

70s 80s

FRIDAY

73°/94°

73°/93°

SATURDAY

Flood Stage

0.20” 0.27” 1.95” 30.57” 29.70” Current Level

SUNDAY

Alaska Low: 25°

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

Chicago 65 / 88

H

W

66 70 65 66 65 66 67 67 70 64 67 65

91 90 88 91 90 89 90 90 90 87 92 91

partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny

Kirksville 71 / 87 Kansas City 75 / 88

Joplin 74 / 91

Springfield 67 / 92

St. Louis 71 / 95 Carbondale 70 / 90 Poplar Bluff 69 / 90

- 0.04 - 0.16 - 0.04 + 0.43 - 0.28 - 0.20 + 1.91 + 1.55 - 0.12 - 0.10

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Sep 19th Weed - 12 (moderate), Mold - 33,854 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS 13 Yesterday 133 Month (Total) 1735 Season 1927 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 11.04 18 12.12 Peoria 14 9.68 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.25 Sullivan 16 - 2.84 Valley Park 24 5.60 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.66 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 12.55

24-Hr Change

- 0.27 - 0.01 - 0.09 + 0.01 + 0.10 + 0.04 + 0.01

SUN & MOON

New Sep 20 Sunrise

First Sep 27

Full Oct 5

6:47 AM Sunset

Last Oct 12 7:01 PM

Moonrise 7:05 AM Moonset 7:36 PM

New moon for the month of September occurs today. This marks the beginning of lunation 1172.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.35 359.92 496.65 659.40 706.70 663.39 916.68 839.29 599.22 405.29 602.24 444.68

+ 0.20 + 0.03 - 0.05 - 0.38 + 0.08 - 0.29 - 0.03 + 0.01 + 0.01 - 0.01 0.00 - 0.02

+ 0.50

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 90°

Jet Stream

Jose is forecast to remain offshore and will bring some gusty winds and showers to coastal sections of New England. A frontal boundary will trigger a few storms across portions of the upper Midwest, Missouri Valley, and central Plains. Parts of the northern Rockies and Pacific Northwest will also see wet weather. Above average temperatures will be in place from the Great Lakes down to the Deep South and southern Plains. City

L

Wintry Mix

90s

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 64 Albuquerque 56 Anchorage 39 Atlanta 70 Atlantic City 66 Baltimore 65 Billings 40 Biloxi, Ms. 74 Birmingham 70 Bismarck 45 Boise 47 Boston 64 Buffalo 62 Burlington, Vt. 62 Charleston, S.C. 70 Charleston, W.V. 62 Charlotte 67 Cheyenne 41 Chicago 64 Cincinnati 64 Cleveland 64 Colorado Spgs. 49 Concord, N.H. 62 Dallas 77 Daytona Beach 72 Denver 47 Des Moines 70 76 Destin, Fl. 64 Detroit 73 El Paso 68 Evansville 35 Fairbanks 52 Fargo 43 Flagstaff 74 Fort Myers 41 Great Falls 57 Green Bay 66 Hartford 76 Honolulu 77 Houston 66 Indianapolis 71 Jackson, Ms. 46 Juneau 81 Key West 70 Las Vegas 72 Little Rock 68 Los Angeles 68 Louisville

78 85 53 87 82 87 66 88 87 70 60 73 83 77 90 82 88 73 88 86 84 73 74 96 88 79 85 86 81 92 90 51 70 71 91 54 81 77 89 90 86 91 62 90 91 92 78 88

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny showers sunny sunny mostly sunny rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

62 58 37 69 65 66 44 73 70 49 42 65 62 59 71 63 66 46 69 66 63 52 60 77 73 52 64 75 65 69 70 36 53 44 74 35 58 65 76 77 69 71 46 81 69 72 67 70

80 86 48 87 84 85 56 89 88 73 54 75 83 79 88 85 87 80 88 87 85 82 77 93 87 88 89 87 84 93 90 53 79 68 90 53 79 80 88 89 89 91 58 90 85 91 73 89

sunny sunny rain thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy showers cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms showers thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy showers partly cloudy windy mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms cloudy mostly sunny windy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

City

Today L H

68 Macon 80 McAllen, Tx. 73 Memphis 77 Miami 62 Milwaukee Minneapolis 66 Missoula, Mt. 38 72 Mobile Montgomery 72 68 Nashville New Orleans 76 New York City 68 Norfolk, Va. 68 Oklahoma City 74 Omaha 65 Orlando 73 Palm Springs 68 Philadelphia 68 Phoenix 73 Pittsburgh 62 Portland, Me. 62 Portland, Or. 53 Providence 65 Raleigh 66 Rapid City 40 Reno 50 Richmond, Va. 66 Sacramento 59 St. Petersburg 77 Salt Lake City 47 San Antonio 77 San Diego 67 San Francisco 60 Santa Fe 47 Savannah 70 Seattle 49 74 Shreveport 56 Sioux Falls 60 Syracuse 72 Tallahassee 75 Tampa 69 Tucson 77 Tulsa 70 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 77 71 Wichita Wilmington, De. 65 73 Yuma

90 100 92 89 81 75 53 89 90 89 90 80 85 93 80 91 91 84 100 81 74 58 72 90 74 68 89 76 90 76 95 74 70 81 90 59 92 73 83 90 92 95 93 87 88 90 83 98

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy showers thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny showers sunny partly cloudy sunny

69 79 74 78 65 55 34 71 71 69 75 68 71 75 63 73 68 69 73 62 60 50 65 67 49 41 66 52 77 53 77 67 56 49 71 49 73 53 61 71 75 70 75 67 77 71 67 72

89 99 93 89 78 82 52 89 91 90 90 84 84 91 90 89 83 86 97 84 75 62 75 88 76 59 88 73 89 58 93 72 68 82 89 62 92 85 83 89 90 94 92 85 88 93 85 94

thunderstorms partly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny showers thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers sunny sunny showers rain thunderstorms mostly cloudy windy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms showers sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms windy partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

74 50 68 82 81 80 57 45 50 63 73 35 77 55 55 47

84 63 97 114 93 86 81 64 64 75 95 55 87 68 63 63

W

thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms showers sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

45 77 70 79 68 52 57 50 54 80 55 65 46 80 57 79

64 84 94 91 86 82 83 63 80 100 79 77 63 90 75 95

W

partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny haze sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 0.10 - 0.18 + 0.15 - 0.09 - 0.10

90s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 10.34 23 6.71 Jefferson City 21 5.89 Hermann 20 3.19 Washington 25 10.27 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 11.11 Louisiana 15 11.86 Dam 24 25 15.33 Dam 25 26 15.12 Grafton 18 15.52 M.Price, Pool 419 418.90 M.Price, Tail. 5.15 21 St Louis 30 3.91 Chester 27 5.75 Cape Girardeau 32 11.92

24-Hr Change

80s

Partly cloudy Mostly sunny Mostly sunny Partly cloudy and hot and hot and hot

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

RIVER STAGES

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

89° 66° 79° 59° 96° 42° 88° 62°

Snow

71°/93° 70°/91°

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:51 p.m.) Low (5:54 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1955) Record Low (1938) High Last Year Low Last Year

70s 90s

THURSDAY

80s

80s

60s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

T-storms

Jose

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

70s

70s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

44 43 45 61 52 79 44 59 42 50 79 70 65 48 50 45

54 66 61 88 72 81 66 77 56 68 91 84 76 61 54 63

showers partly cloudy partly cloudy haze partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly sunny

Maria slams Dominica, takes aim at Puerto Rico Hurricane spurs warnings of yet more devastation, loss of life and livelihoods, need for massive rebuilding BY DANICA COTO AND CARLISLE JNO BAPTISTE associated Press

S A N J U A N , P U E R TO RICO • Hurricane Maria

barreled toward Puerto Rico on Tuesday night after wreaking widespread devastation on Dominica and leaving the small Caribbean island virtually incommunicado. As rain began to lash Puerto Rico, Gov. Ricardo Rossello warned that Maria could hit “with a force and violence that we haven’t seen for several generations.” “We’re going to lose a lot of infrastructure in Puerto Rico,” Rossello said, adding that a likely islandwide power outage and communication blackout could last for days. “We’re going to have to rebuild.” Authorities warned that people in wooden or flimsy homes should find safe shelter before the storm’s expected arrival Wednesday. “You have to evacuate. Otherwise, you’re going to die,” said Hector Pesquera, the island’s public safety commissioner. “I don’t know how to make this any clearer.” The warnings came after Dominica Prime Minister

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This photo provided by Frank Phazian shows looding caused Tuesday by Hurricane Maria near Le Raizet, Guadeloupe.

Roosevelt Skerrit sent out a series of dramatic posts on his Facebook page as the storm blew through that tiny country late Monday — but then stopped suddenly as phone and internet connections with the country were cut. In the last message before falling silent, he appealed for international aid: “We will need help, my friends, we will need help of all kinds.” The storm knocked out

DONATE YOUR CAR x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri *Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (314) 499-1300

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

communications for the entire country, leaving anyone outside Dominica struggling to determine the extent of damage, though it was clearly widespread. “The situation is really grave,” Consul General Barbara Dailey said in a telephone interview from New York. She said she lost contact with the island about 4 a.m. At that point, officials had learned that 70 percent of homes, including her own, had lost their roofs. “I lost everything,” she said, adding there had been no word on casualties. “As a Category 5 it would be naive not to expect any (injuries), but I don’t know how many,” she said. The island’s broadcast service was also down Tuesday, and Akamai Technologies, a company that tracks the status of the internet around the world, said most of Dominica’s internet service appeared to have been lost by midday. Dominica is particularly vulnerable to flooding be-

cause of its steep mountains, cut through with rivers that rage even after a heavy rain. It was still recovering from Tropical Storm Erika, which killed 30 people and destroyed more than 370 homes in August 2015. Officials on the neighboring French island of Guadeloupe reported at least one death: a person hit by a falling tree. They said two other people were reported missing after their boat sank of La Desirade island, just east of Guadeloupe. About 40 percent of the island — 80,000 homes — were without power, and flooding was reported in several towns. Next in the storm’s path was St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, where the storm was expected to hit late Tuesday. The island was largely spared the widespread damage caused by Hurricane Irma on the chain’s St. Thomas and St. John islands just two weeks ago. In the Puerto Rican capital, San Juan, nor-

mally crowded streets and beaches were empty by Tuesday afternoon as families heading to safe shelter packed up their cars and pets or secured windows and doors around their homes to prepare for severe wind expected to lash the island for 12 to 24 hours. Nearly 2,800 people, along with 105 pets, were in shelters across Puerto Rico, oicials said. “We’re definitely afraid,” said Erica Huber, 33, a teacher from Venice, Fla., who moved to Puerto Rico a month ago with her daughter, 12. “I’m more worried about the aftermath: Is there going to be enough food and water?” she said. In shops across the island, shelves were bare after people filled shopping carts with the limited amount of water, batteries, baby formula, milk and other items they could find. Iris Tosado, 64, a widow, scanned the nearly empty shelves before heading back home. She and her

disabled son planned to spend the storm with relatives because their home is made of wood, and she prayed that it would not be destroyed. “God, it’s the only thing I have,’” she said. “This is not looking good.” By Tuesday evening, the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said Maria’s wind had intensified to 175 mph and additional strengthening was possible. At 7 p.m., Maria was centered about 165 miles southeast of San Juan and was moving west-northwest at 10 mph. Maria ties for the eighth strongest storm in Atlantic history, when measured by wind speed. This year’s Irma, which had 185 mph wind, ranks second. Hurricane center forecasters said it “now appears likely” that Maria would still be at Category 5 intensity when it moved over the U.S. Virgin Islands on Tuesday night and Puerto Rico on Wednesday, bringing with it “lifethreatening” flooding from rain and storm surge. Forecasters said the storm surge could raise water levels by 6 to 9 feet near the storm’s center. The storm was predicted to bring 10 to 15 inches of rain across the islands, with more in isolated areas. To the north, Hurricane Jose stirred up dangerous surf and rip currents along the U.S. East Coast, though forecasters said the storm was unlikely to make landfall. Big waves caused by Jose swept five people of a coastal jetty in Rhode Island, and they were hospitalized after being rescued. A tropical storm warning was posted for coastal areas in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and tropical storm watches were up for parts of New York’s Long Island and Connecticut.


WORLD

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 09.20.2017

Pope overhauls key institute on marriage, family New degrees will seek to address vision, reality of today’s Catholics BY NICOLE WINFIELD Associated Press

ROME • Pope Francis has overhauled the Vatican institute most closely associated with the conservative sexual morals promoted by St. John Paul II, saying it was necessary to adapt and expand its mission to address the reality of today’s Catholics. Officials said Tuesday the revamped John Paul II Theological Institute for the Marriage and Family Sciences will ofer degrees

in the social sciences — such as sociology, anthropology, psychology — as well as biology and other sciences, reflecting a vision of the family that goes well beyond strict Catholic theology. The new mission takes its inspirational cues from the vision of marriage and family life contained in Francis’ controversial 2016 document “The Joy of Love.” That document called for the church to accompany even those Catholics living in “imperfect” family situations such as divorce and cohabitation, confirming Francis’ vision of the church as more of a “field hospital” for wounded souls than a privileged home for the perfect.

As a result, speculation had mounted about the fate of the John Paul II institute. Its founding 1982 mission statement said it was needed to “illustrate to the faithful the most perfect image of marriage and family.” The institute is affiliated with the Pontifical Lateran University in Rome, but has branches around the world, including in the United States and Australia. Its new mission statement says the church, while remaining faithful to Christ’s teaching, must look “with the understanding of love and wise realism, to the reality of families today in all their complexities, in their light and shadows.” The inclusion of biological sciences in the curricu-

lum, and a mission statement that cites a focus on human “regeneration” and care for the planet, suggests that the revamped institute will address human sexuality, the environment and the church’s position on artificial contraception. Already, Francis has authorized a historical study of the 1968 document “Humanae Vitae,” which

isn’t just tolerated but is relaunched,” said the president, Monsignor Pierangelo Sequeri. It wasn’t clear how the changes would affect the institute’s international branches, some of which have already started the 2017-2018 academic year and ofer graduate degrees in theological-focused disciplines that will apparently longer exist.

articulated the church’s opposition to artificial contraception at a time when the church was under attack by population control activists. The institute’s leadership insisted that Francis’ reboot was evidence of his firm dedication to the institute and not a break from its past. “It’s a strong gesture that means the institute

SAVE YOUR HAIR It’s Never Too Late!

Laser Hair Therapy is the Latest Technology to Help Slow the Process of Further Hair Loss and Restore Your Hair to a Healthier, Fuller Condition. Find out WHY you are losing your hair and what options WILL WORK for YOU! Call and Schedule Your FREE MICROSCOPIC HAIR AND SCALP EVALUATION TODAY

Get Ready for the Rainy season and End the damp basement musty smell! Get a Aprilaire Whole Home DEHUMIDIFIER Installed

ARMSTRONG

$150 OFF

Heating and Air Conditioning System!

Installed without ductwork using existing electric. Cannot be combined with any other offers.

CALL NOW FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

314-236-3352 Save Big on our Complete Furnace or Air Conditioner Maintenance Service

Installation starting at

$3580.00 (Based on a 2 ton system)

$42.00 OFF

• PRP – Platelet Rich Plasma • Laser Hair Therapy • Hair Restoration • ARTAS® Robotic FUE Hair Transplants

The regular price of a complete furnace or air conditioner service. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires 9-30-2017

SAVE YOUR HAIR AND YOUR MONEY! FREE HAIR AND SCALP EVALUATION

Have complete control of your homes comfort while you are away. Blue Link Smart WIFI Thermostat with Phone/Tablet App! Total Installation and set up

$289.00 Installed

4SCU13LB124P A80UH1E070B12

PROMO PD 4

40% OFF SALE

GOING ON NOW!

Restrictions Apply. Offer Good for Non-Medical Solutions Only Expires 9/30/17

Installation includes new lue pipe for furnace only and lushed line set. Any upgrades will be an additional charge. Existing electrical, gas line shutoff and union will be reused.

PLEASE MENTION COUPON WHEN SCHEDULING APPOINTMENT

Offer Expires on 9-30-2017

5 year parts warranty

618-215-7398 314-236-9884

(Any wiring upgrade required is an extra charge)

Technology Meets the Art of Hair Restoration!

W E

BU Y

CA RS

NEW VEHICLES ARRIVING DAILY

1080 W. TERRA LANE O’FALLON, MO 63366 GMTAUTOWEST.COM (636) 542-4962

5 LOCATIONS 22 YEARS IN BUSINESS LOCALLY OWNED

1000+ CARS AND TRUCKS

IN INVENTORY! Chrysler • Ford • Chevrolet • Dodge • Lexus • Mercedes Benz • BMW

WATCH OUR SHOW ON KPLR 11 TV THIS SATURDAY AT 12PM.

1080 W. TERRA LANE O’FALLON, MO 63366 gmtautowest.com (636) 542-4962

2008 RANGE ROVER SPORT HSE

2014 MERCEDES CLA250

2017 CHEVY EXPRESS 3500

Only 43xxx miles, Fully Loaded and Fully Serviced! WONT LAST!

Full Power, Only 25xxx miles, Serviced & Inspected, Clean Carfax. REDUCED!

V-8, 15 passenger, Factory Warranty, Hard to Find. 2 TO CHOOSE FROM.

225 NORTH HWY 67 FLORISSANT, MO 63031 gmtautosales.com (314) 266-6577

2016 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT

2015 HONDA PILOT TOURING

2014 HONDA CIVIC EX

R-Line, Heated & Cooled Leather Seats,

Auto, Low miles, Factory Warranty, Super Clean. Only $236 month!

Only $266 a month. !

V-6, Navigation, Pano Roof, Leather, Rear Enterance, 3rd Row Seating. $399 a month

2016 FORD MUSTANG GT

2017 DODGE RAM 2500 CREW CAB SLT

5.0 liter, V-8, Only 6xxx miles with Factory Warranty!

Super Duty, 6.7 liter, V-8, Diesel, Fully Loaded, Factory Warranty.

2016 FORD F350 LARIAT 4WD CREW CAB Only 23xxx miles, Diesel, Factory Warranty. SAVE THOUSANDS!

Back Up Camera, Alloys, Super Clean. 2783 DUNN ROAD ST. LOUIS, MO 63136 stlmotorcity.com (314) 768-3921

18155 HISTORIC ROUTE 66 EUREKA, MO 63025 traversautoplex.com (636) 549-4498

7800 N. LINDBERGH BLVD HAZELWOOD, MO 63042 stlouisautostop.com (314) 227-0440

FINANCING FOR EVERYONE | GMTAUTOWEST.COM


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 09.20.2017 • B

THEY ARE WHO WE THOUGHT THEY WERE CHICAGO TRIBUNE

A BIT ABOVE AVERAGE Cardinals can’t compete with the top-tier teams.

JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BIG HOLE REMAINS Redbirds still need power in the middle of the lineup.

In many regards, the Cardinals are who we thought they were at the start of the season. They’re a slightly above average team likely to miss the playofs for the second consecutive season. The Cardinals are on pace to win

Tigers meet to talk about saving season

84 games this season, playing just well enough to remain in the NL Central race because the Cubs have underachieved terribly this season. Yet again they do not stack up well in comparison to their rivals from the North Side of Chicago. Owner Bill DeWitt Jr., president of baseball operations John Mozeliak and general manager Michael Girsch must make some major additions to reward the sheep who religiously pack Busch Stadium on a nightly basis. This is the roster they

Fowler powers up again Home run, double help Cards win in 10

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dexter Fowler (center) celebrates with Stephen Piscotty (55) and Tommy Pham after the win. CO LUM B I A , M O. • A new

> 6:30 p.m. Saturday vs. Auburn, ESPNU

Blues have roster spots open early

Blues players celebrate after a goal by Wade Megan (second from left) in Tuesday night’s exhibition game at Dallas.

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See MU • Page B2

See ORTIZ • Page B6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri receiver J’Mon Moore sits on the bench Saturday.

NCAA rule mandates that college football players must have one day a week free from all team obligations, and for the Missouri Tigers that day is Monday. Barry Odom’s team still managed to have a productive Monday. Coming off Saturday’s 35-3 loss to Purdue, Mizzou players requested a meeting with Odom, after which they met voluntarily without any coaches present to discuss their suddenly spiraling season. Senior receiver J’Mon Moore described the players-only meeting as “some venting, a little bit of (ticked) of, a little bit of aggravation, a little bit of urgency, a little bit of everything.”

put together, and they must accept some blame for the major shortcomings. As we noted last winter while some rushed to defend DeWitt’s bottom line and Mozeliak’s track record, the Cardinals blew an opportunity to fix the lineup when they punted on slugger Edwin Encarnacion. The additions of Dexter Fowler and Brett Cecil were never going to be enough to push the Cardinals

CARDINALS 8 REDS 7 PLAYOFF PICTURE Central CHI MIL STL

W-L 84-66 81-70 78-72

GB — 3.5 6

Wild card W-L GB *ARI 87-64 +4.5 *COL 82-68 — MIL 81-70 1.5 STL 78-72 4 * Late games > 6:10 p.m. Wednesday at Reds, FSM > Weaver (6-1, 1.89) vs. Davis (1-2, 7.71)

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CINCINNATI • When the Car-

dinals chased him as a free agent they viewed Dexter Fowler as the leadoff hitter who would ignite their ofense and elevate them in the division race. He’s not hitting where they imagined in the lineup and they’re certainly not where they hoped to be in the standings, and yet along the way something may have been unlocked in Fowler’s game, something predicted a few years ago by, of all people, Barry Bonds. Fowler homered to tie Tuesday’s game and then doubled and scored in the 10th inning to secure an 8-7 victory for the Cardinals against the Reds at Great American Ball Park. “You want to be that guy,” said Fowler, who also had a game-tying home run Sunday at Wrigley

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Field, “all the time.” The Cardinals trailed by four runs early, one run late, and then had to hold off an 10th-inning answer from the Reds. Juan Nicasio landed the win for his work in the ninth inning, and after he allowed a solo home run to Scooter Gennett, the Cardinals turned to Tyler Lyons to close the game. It took the Cardinals eight pitchers to get through the game’s 10 innings, and a total of 16 pitchers were used by both teams. With the Cubs’ victory in Tampa Bay, the Cardinals’ elimination number from the division race dropped to seven and held there with the win. “Shows, to me and everybody else, the kind of club this is,” manager Mike Matheny said. “We talk about sticking your head in

See BLUES • Page B3

See CARDINALS • Page B5

> Revamped Scottrade ready. A1

DALLAS • Before the Blues even

took the ice for their first preseason game Tuesday, the auditions for a spot on the roster took on added intensity. The Blues learned Tuesday morning that workhorse defenseman Jay Bouwmeester would be out at least three weeks with a fractured left ankle sufered in Sunday’s scrimmage and that forward Zach Sanford would miss five to six months with a dislocated shoulder that will require surgery. The math on those injuries are that Bouwmeester will miss at least the first week of the season while Sanford will miss almost all of the season. While Bouwmeester’s absence

SPORTS

THE ALL-NEW DISCOVERY

Land Rover St. Louis 11654 Olive Boulevard, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 (314) 485-4926 | LandRoverStLouis.com

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 09.20.2017 • B

THEY ARE WHO WE THOUGHT THEY WERE CHICAGO TRIBUNE

A BIT ABOVE AVERAGE Cardinals can’t compete with the top-tier teams.

JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BIG HOLE REMAINS Redbirds still need power in the middle of the lineup.

In many regards, the Cardinals are who we thought they were at the start of the season. They’re a slightly above average team likely to miss the playofs for the second consecutive season. The Cardinals are on pace to win

Tigers meet to talk about saving season

84 games this season, playing just well enough to remain in the NL Central race because the Cubs have underachieved terribly this season. Yet again they do not stack up well in comparison to their rivals from the North Side of Chicago. Owner Bill DeWitt Jr., president of baseball operations John Mozeliak and general manager Michael Girsch must make some major additions to reward the sheep who religiously pack Busch Stadium on a nightly basis. This is the roster they

Fowler powers up again Home run, double help Cards win in 10

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dexter Fowler (center) celebrates with Stephen Piscotty (55) and Tommy Pham after the win. CO LUM B I A , M O. • A new

> 6:30 p.m. Saturday vs. Auburn, ESPNU

Blues have roster spots open early

Blues players celebrate after a goal by Wade Megan (second from left) in Tuesday night’s exhibition game at Dallas.

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See MU • Page B2

See ORTIZ • Page B6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri receiver J’Mon Moore sits on the bench Saturday.

NCAA rule mandates that college football players must have one day a week free from all team obligations, and for the Missouri Tigers that day is Monday. Barry Odom’s team still managed to have a productive Monday. Coming off Saturday’s 35-3 loss to Purdue, Mizzou players requested a meeting with Odom, after which they met voluntarily without any coaches present to discuss their suddenly spiraling season. Senior receiver J’Mon Moore described the players-only meeting as “some venting, a little bit of (ticked) of, a little bit of aggravation, a little bit of urgency, a little bit of everything.”

put together, and they must accept some blame for the major shortcomings. As we noted last winter while some rushed to defend DeWitt’s bottom line and Mozeliak’s track record, the Cardinals blew an opportunity to fix the lineup when they punted on slugger Edwin Encarnacion. The additions of Dexter Fowler and Brett Cecil were never going to be enough to push the Cardinals

CARDINALS 8 REDS 7 PLAYOFF PICTURE Central CHI MIL STL

W-L 84-66 81-70 78-72

GB — 3.5 6

Wild card W-L GB ARI 87-65 +4.5 COL 82-69 — MIL 81-70 1 STL 78-72 3.5 > 6:10 p.m. Wednesday at Reds, FSM > Weaver (6-1, 1.89) vs. Davis (1-2, 7.71)

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CINCINNATI • When the Car-

dinals chased and wooed Dexter Fowler as a free agent they viewed him as the elite leadof hitter who could ignite the ofense and send them soaring ahead in the division race. He’s not hitting where they imagined in the lineup and the team certainly isn’t where he imagined in the standings, and yet the unexpected twists and unplanned turns of the season may have unlocked something in Fowler’s game that is certainly a fit for right now. It could be for the future. With the Cardinals’ postseason aspirations carrying only a faint pulse, Fowler homered to tie Tuesday’s game and then doubled and scored in the 10th inning to secure the Cardinals’ 8-7 victory

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

against the Reds. One of three hits for him Tuesday, the home run was his second in as many games and it tied his career high. The RBIs gave him 57. That’s already a career high. “I think he’s adapting to the need of the club,” manager Mike Matheny said. “What’s been the one missing element? It’s been that big hit. Put guys in the middle of the order with guys on base and players like Dex can get it done in those situations.” Said Fowler: “You want to be that guy, all the time.” The Cardinals trailed at Great American Ball Park by four runs early, fell behind again late, and then had to hold of a 10th-inning answer from the Reds before securing their first win of this road trip. Juan Nicasio landed the win

See BLUES • Page B3

See CARDINALS • Page B5

> Revamped Scottrade ready. A1

DALLAS • Before the Blues even

took the ice for their first preseason game Tuesday, the auditions for a spot on the roster took on added intensity. The Blues learned Tuesday morning that workhorse defenseman Jay Bouwmeester would be out at least three weeks with a fractured left ankle sufered in Sunday’s scrimmage and that forward Zach Sanford would miss five to six months with a dislocated shoulder that will require surgery. The math on those injuries are that Bouwmeester will miss at least the first week of the season while Sanford will miss almost all of the season. While Bouwmeester’s absence

SPORTS

THE ALL-NEW DISCOVERY

Land Rover St. Louis 11654 Olive Boulevard, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 (314) 485-4926 | LandRoverStLouis.com

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Wednesday 9/20 at Reds 6:10 p.m. FSM

Thursday 9/21 at Reds 6:10 p.m. FSM

Friday 9/22 at Pirates 6:05 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 9/20 Friday 9/22 vs. Blue Jackets* at Capitals* 6 p.m. 7 p.m. NHL Network

Saturday 9/23 at Pirates 6:05 p.m. FSM

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 09.20.2017

Illini quiet on QB situation Team has a week of to decide on Crouch, George

*Exhibition game

Saturday 9/23 vs. Stars* 7 p.m.

Sunday 9/24 at Penguins* 7 p.m. NBCSN

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 9/23 vs. Cincinnati 7:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 9/30 at Harrisburg 6 p.m.

Saturday 10/7 vs. Richmond 7:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Sunday 10/15 at Bethlehem 2 p.m.

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/23 vs. Auburn 6:30 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 10/7 at Kentucky Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/14 at Georgia Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/21 vs. Idaho Time/TV TBA

Illinois football • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Friday 9/29 vs. Nebraska 7 p.m. Fox Sports 1

Saturday 10/7 at Iowa 11 a.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/14 vs. Rutgers Time/TV TBA

Saturday 10/21 at Minnesota 2:30 or 3 p.m. TV TBA

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 7:30 p.m. Saturday (last day of season). Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STL FC 636-680-0997

Rascals Illinois SIUE Fairmount

636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Noon Twins at Yankees, ESPN 2:30 p.m. Rockies at Giants, MLB 6 p.m. Red Sox at Orioles, ESPN 6:10 p.m. Cardinals at Reds, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 9 p.m. Indians at Angels, ESPN GOLF 5:30 a.m. (Thu.) European PGA: Portugal Masters, irst round, GOLF HOCKEY 6 p.m. Exhibition: Capitals at Canadiens, NHL Network 8:30 p.m. Exhibition: Canucks at Flames (joined in progress), NHL Network SOCCER 11:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Cologne vs. Eintracht Frankfurt, FS2 1:30 p.m. Bundesliga: Hamburg vs. Borussia Dortmund, FS1 1:30 p.m. Bundesliga: Hertha Berlin vs. Bayer Leverkusen, FS2 6 p.m. MLS: LA Galaxy at Atlanta, ESPN2 8 p.m. MLS: New York at Sporting KC, ESPN2 VOLLEYBALL 6 p.m. College women: Northwestern at Purdue, BTN 7 p.m. College women: Kentucky at Missouri, SEC Network 8 p.m. College women: Tennessee at Arkansas, ESPNU 10 p.m. College women: USC at UCLA, ESPNU

DIGEST NASCAR penalty hurts Elliott’s title hopes Chase Elliott sufered a setback to his championship hopes when NASCAR penalized his Hendrick Motorsports team Tuesday for a modiication to his Chevrolet in the opening round of the playofs. The aerodynamic modiication was found in post-race inspection following Elliott’s second-place inish on Sunday at Chicagoland. The inish is now considered “encumbered” by NASCAR. Crew chief Alan Gustafson was ined $25,000 and suspended one race, and car chief Joshua Kirk also was suspended one race. The team was docked 15 driver points and 15 owner points. The loss in driver points dropped Elliott from sixth place to eighth place in the postseason standings. There are two races remaining in the opening round of the playofs. Hendrick Motorsports says it won’t appeal the penalty and Kenny Francis will step in for Gustafson. (AP) Kahne will drive for Leavine • Kasey Kahne will drive for Leavine Family Racing in the No. 95 Chevrolet Camaro next season. He’ll replace Michael McDowell, who has driven that car since 2014. Kahne has been with Hendrick Motorsports since 2012. The team bought him out of his contract for next season, which made him a free agent. Kahne had a rough opening round to the playofs at Chicagoland, where he inished 21st and is 15th in the 16-driver ield. (AP) Mizzou football announces 2018 schedule dates • Missouri’s football opponents for the 2018 season have been locked in for years, but now, with the Southeastern Conference announcing its dates for league games on Tuesday, the Tigers’ schedule and dates have been inalized. Mizzou opens with three nonconference games, the Sept. 1 opener against Tennessee-Martin, followed by a Sept. 8 visit from Wyoming then a trip to Purdue on Sept. 15. Mizzou begins SEC play Sept. 22 at home against Georgia, followed by a bye week. The season resumes Oct. 6 at South Carolina then the Tigers’ irst ever trip to Tuscaloosa, Ala., to face Alabama on Oct. 13. Mizzou played a regular-season game against the Crimson Tide in 1975, a 20-7 win over No. 2 Alabama, but that game was played in Birmingham, Ala. The Tigers host Memphis for homecoming on Oct. 20, followed by ive straight SEC games: at home against Kentucky on Oct. 27, at Florida on Nov. 3, at home against Vanderbilt on Nov. 10, at Tennessee on Nov. 17 and the regular-season inale against Arkansas on Nov. 24 at home. Starting in 2014, the inal game against Arkansas has been moved up a day to the Friday after Thanksgiving and selected for a national broadcast on CBS. CBS could again pick up that game for a Nov. 23 kickof. (Dave Matter) Winless Baylor gets football reinforcements • Baylor will get a boost for its Big 12 opener Saturday against third-ranked Oklahoma (3-0) with the season debuts of 1,000-yard rusher Terence Williams and two defenders who were expected to be starters. Williams will be back in the lineup after missing the irst three games while recovering from ofseason shoulder surgery. Senior safety Taion Sells has completed a three-game suspension for an unspeciied ofseason incident and cornerback Grayland Arnold is back after breaking his left arm during a preseason scrimmage. (AP) U.S. women beat New Zealand • Alex Morgan scored twice and the U.S. women’s national soccer team beat New Zealand 5-0 at Nippert Stadium on Tuesday night in Cincinnati. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for veriication. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Of St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use irst initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois quarterback Chayce Crouch throws a pass in Friday’s 47-23 loss at South Florida. BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • If coaches

and players know who will start at quarterback for the Illini a week from Friday, no one is saying. Not coach Lovie Smith. Not ofensive coordinator Garrick McGee. Not the guy who finished Illinois’ last game at quarterback, Jef George Jr. Mum was the word after practice Tuesday, the only time the media will have access to coaches and players this week. Since there is no game this weekend, it’s an important time for recruiting with coaches hitting the road Friday and Saturday to see committed prospects and to scout players who could still be added to the mix. “We are going to flood our recruiting areas this weekend,” Smith said. “I have a full slate, we all have a full slate.” What Smith didn’t say is whether they are inclined to go with Chayce Crouch or George at quarterback when Illinois opens the Big Ten Conference season with a home game against Nebraska at 7 p.m., Friday, Sept. 29. Crouch played all of Illinois’ first two games, victories over Ball State and Western Kentucky. But he was pulled in the third quarter of last week’s 47-23 loss at South Florida after completing eight of

18 passes for 76 yards and an interception. George completed 12 of 22 for 211 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions. “I haven’t made any changes to my depth chart,” Smith said earlier in the day on the Big Ten coaches’ teleconference. After practice Tuesday, McGee said he didn’t know which player will direct the ofense against Nebraska. “The best part is that we don’t have a game this week so we don’t have to have a conversation about who is going to play because we’re not playing anybody this week. “We’re going to look at the practice sessions and evaluate the meetings. We grade every practice session and we’ll see what the best thing is for the University of Illinois.” George said the coaches have not told him or Crouch anything about their plans. “We’re just spending this week trying to get better and prepare for Nebraska,” he said, taking a diplomatic course in answering all questions. Crouch had a post-practice meeting and was unavailable to the media. Smith didn’t discount the possibility of using two quarterbacks. “I believe you do whatever you need to do in that moment to win the football game,” he said. “If you don’t like the play you’re getting

at a position, not just quarterback, look for option two.” McGee said regardless of who plays quarterback, the mood around the ofense was up-beat. “I think we’re confident about the opportunities and the possibilities,” he said. He said his true freshmen, of which he has started five on offense, are doing well, even if they’re taking on a big workload. He mentioned freshman wideout Ricky Smalling, who started at South Florida and who had three catches for 99 yards. “Ricky is a good player,” McGee said. “He’s like most of these freshmen. There’s a lot going on, a lot of academics, tests they have to take, a lot of meetings they have to get to, just a lot going on. And they have to play and prepare and play well. “This is what it’s like being a freshman who is starting in a Big Ten program.”

BLACK HAS SURGERY Illini basketball player Leron Black had elbow surgery last Wednesday and is expected to miss about three weeks, coach Brad Underwood said. If Black can return three weeks after the date of his surgery, he’ll be back in action Oct. 4, less than a week after the official start of team practices. Illinois opens the season Nov. 10.

Mizzou holds an emotional meeting MU • FROM B1

“Some emotions were flaring all over the place,” he added. “It was something we definitely needed.” During the meeting, players took themselves to task for the way they’ve competed in practice and games, senior tight end Jason Reese said. “It hasn’t been good enough,” he said. That goes for both sides of the ball. Missouri (1-2, 0-1 Southeastern Conference) has scored just one touchdown in 25 possessions the last two weeks against South Carolina and Purdue, both losses. The subtle progress Missouri’s defense made against South Carolina quickly fizzled when Purdue imposed its will on three touchdown drives to open Saturday’s game. The Tigers enter Saturday’s 6:30 p.m. game against No. 15 Auburn (2-1) last in the SEC in total defense and scoring defense, yielding 442.7 yards and 36.3 points a game. For junior linebacker Brandon Lee the core message of Monday’s meeting was accountability. “The point of emphasis was guys got to understand how important doing your job solely is to make the team work,” Lee said. “I’ve alluded it to a puzzle. If you’re putting together an entire puzzle and you’re missing one piece, the puzzle isn’t complete. That’s the same way with our defense. When 10 guys do their job and one guy doesn’t do his job the ofense can break out and score on us.” For junior linebacker Terez Hall the missing ingredients are energy and efort. “You either want to play or you don’t want to play,” Hall said.

“It’s all about putting the players who want to be out on the field out there. They’ve got to want to go out there and play. The energy part will come when you’re out there making plays. You’ve got to want to do these things.” The player who made the strongest impression on his teammates during Monday’s meeting wasn’t a senior, wasn’t a captain, wasn’t a starter. Freshman linebacker Aubrey Miller, a regular on several special teams units, talked the most and the loudest, Hall said. “He was telling us about our energy levels,” Hall said, “how he wants to be on the field.” “He doesn’t have a very big role on defense,” Reese added, “but his special teams role is very large and he does a great job of playing with enthusiasm. I would like to say I’m a leader on this team, but I haven’t been doing my job well enough. He’s one of the guys I’m looking up to now even though I’m a senior.” What does it say about Mizzou’s veteran leadership that a freshman special teams player had the strongest voice in Monday’s meeting? Perhaps the Tigers needed to hear it from someone new. “Anybody can lead,” senior safety Anthony Sherrils said. “It’s not just an older guy thing. If you’re leading by example and doing the right thing, we need you.” What the Tigers need Saturday is a stronger start. Purdue seized control midway through the second quarter and held a threetouchdown lead for the game’s final 41 minutes. “We need to have a sense of urgency and start fast,” Sherrils said. “It’s a mindset we need to

have going into each game, consciously trying to start fast.” As gloomy as things seem around a program that’s lost 16 of 22 games dating back to October 2015, the Tigers have only played a quarter of the season, a point Odom and his coaches made several times Tuesday. “I still believe,” Odom said, “with very strong conviction that we’re going to be all right. We’ll keep working. I know that.” “I believe in this team. I believe in this program,” secondary coach Ryan Walters said. “I believe with everything in me and trust that things are going to turn. Obviously you’d like them to turn three games ago, but I do believe it’s going to happen. I think the kids are still believing it’s going to happen. To me, that’s been the most exciting thing we can draw from. I’ve been around programs where you hit adversity this early and you start hearing bickering and start seeing lethargy. But I feel like these guys still have energy, still have hope. And they should. It’s only been three games into the season.” That said, Mizzou’s biggest challenges lie ahead, starting with Saturday’s visit from Auburn. A sluggish start against what might be the most complete team on the schedule could bury the Tigers before the sun sets over Faurot Field. “I feel like the most important thing we can do is trust in each other,” Moore said, “trust in each other and go out and play, not worry about anything outside of this team. Control what we can control and see what happens.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

Blais scores twice in Blues’ loss to Stars Younger lineup mostly for road game with home game set for Wednesday night BY TOM TIMMERMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

BLUES NOTEBOOK

DA L L A S • Early preseason

of emphasis this season, and referees didn’t waste any time in cracking down. In the first night of preseason games, there were more than 58 slashing penalties called in the league’s first 11 preseason games. Yeo screened the league’s video on the subject with the players on Tuesday morning. “I think it’s good,” Yeo said. “It’s going to force us to get ready. I know there’s going to be a lot of special teams play, and so that’s OK, I’m good with the work for both the power play and the penalty kill. It’s an important part to get ready for the start of the season. These are going to be habits. For me, it’s always about stick on puck. To slash on the hand, you get a good player, you’re slashing on the hands, he’s still going to be able to make a play. He’s still going to be able to make a pass and put the puck in the net. The stick on puck is going to be crucial as far as staying out of the penalty box.” The league is also cracking down on faceof violations, such as when a center falls on the puck to keep the other team from getting it. “Faceoffs will be a good challenge for our centermen,” Yeo said. “If you want to win faceofs during the year, you better get ready for it right now.” The no-slashing message was largely heard, but the Blues were called for one in the first two periods, on veteran center Kyle Brodziak.

hockey games, especially early preseason road games, are mostly about kids. With plenty of hockey still to come, teams give their veterans the luxury of not making an out-and-back oneday trip. Some of the Blues’ young players got their chance in the preseason opener on Tuesday night and Samuel Blais continues to command attention. Blais, a 2014 draft pick who’s getting a good look in camp, made the night’s nicest play, with a sweet backhand pass in the slot to another youngster, 2017 draft pick Klim Kostin, for a goal in the Blues’ 5-3 loss in Ken Hitchcock’s return behind the bench for the Stars. Blais then scored another goal, showing some patience in front of the net before shooting high on Dallas goalie Ben Bishop on a play that began with another prospect, Tage Thompson, zigzagging through the Dallas defense during a two-man advantage. The Blues are back in action on Wednesday, with a whole diferent group of players taking the ice against Columbus at the new and improved Scottrade Center. In addition to being involved in two goals, Blais drew three penalties as the Stars pulled out the stops to try and slow him. Blais had 26 goals last season in the AHL with Chicago and has kept that scoring in training camp with a goal in the team’s scrimmage on Sunday. The Blues got their first goal from Wade Megan, who scored

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Samuel Blais (left), Tage Thompson (center) and Jake Walman celebrate a goal by Blais in the second period of Tuesday night’s game in Dallas.

with one second to go on a power play when he put in a rebound of his own shot on a breakaway. That wasn’t the only late goal for the Blues. Blais’ came with 3 seconds to go on a 5-on-3. Penalties were the order of business in the first period, with Dallas getting called for four (one of them a double minor) and the Blues being called for three. Of the first 20 minutes of the game, 13:46 was played with at least one player in the penalty box.

The Blues had 11 power plays, and scored on only two of them. On No. 10, the Blues couldn’t score and Dallas’ Brett Ritchie came out of the box to score and tie the game. Bishop, a St. Louis product, played the first two periods in goal for Dallas and gave up three goals on 15 shots.

Tuesday, but he was scratched. It wasn’t injury related — he was a full participant in the morning skate before the team flew to Dallas — but coach Mike Yeo wanted to hold of his return to the ice. That left Robert Thomas, Vladimir Sobotka, Ivan Barbashev and Kyle Brodziak as the centers for the game.

FABBRI SITS Robby Fabbri had been listed on the travel roster for the game

WATCH YOUR STICK The NHL has made slashing an opposing player’s hands a point

Sanford will miss most of season BLUES • FROM B1

figures to be brief, it opens a spot in what had been a battle with minimal openings. The Blues looked set at six of their seven defenseman spots, but now, they have a place on the opening night roster for someone else, most likely a left-sided defenseman, and two of the players in that situation who were on the ice Tuesday figure in the equation. Carl Gunnarsson, the veteran, who played Tuesday, may find himself moving up to the second pair, alongside Colton Parayko, while newcomers Vince Dunn and Jake Walman now see a spot in the third pairing open. The Blues have another left-side defenseman, Petteri Lindbohm, who will get his first action Wednesday night. “Obviously that’s a tough one for us,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “Bo’s a big part of our group. But part of the reason we were talking about (Jordan) Schmaltz, (Nate) Prosser, Walman, Dunn, is you always need depth, and you need guys that are going to have to come in and play games for you, whether it’s September, October, or later in the season. “It’s up to these guys to see who is going to solidify their position and some of the guys we have in our group are going to have to step up. A guy like Gunny, maybe he’s going to have to bite of a little more, or maybe somebody else jumps in there. It’s no diferent than last year. We saw a lot of that last year. Injuries are part of the game and we have capable players. We’ll get through it.” Bouwmeester took a puck to his foot in the scrimmage and, as often happens with foot injuries in hockey, the severity didn’t show up until later. Replacing him isn’t easy. He was second on the team in ice time at 22:24 and regularly went out against the opponent’s top line. He also anchors the team’s penalty kill. The most likely short-term solution has Joel Edmundson moving up to play alongside Alex Pietrangelo, a combination that Yeo had taken a look at in camp even before the injury. Going into camp, the intrigue on the blue line was if one of the youngsters would fight his way into the top six and who would be the seventh defenseman.

Now, someone new is guaranteed to be in the lineup when the season starts. “I don’t think it really changes anything that I do,” said Dunn, a secondround pick in the 2015 draft. “I came in with the same attitude that I still have now with Bo being out that long. It’s obviously another spot … or they need a couple guys at the start of the season, I’ve got to work toward that. It’s something to work towards. I don’t think it changes my attitude that much.” Walman said much the same thing, that while there was now an opening on the blue line, he needed to make sure his focus was on himself. “We focus on what we have to do and not worry about the situation,” said Walman, the team’s third-round pick in 2014. “The whole summer and this whole camp I’ve been thinking about battling myself. I know there’s an opportunity and there’s a competition for it. My biggest opponent is myself and I’m going to work as hard as I can to get it.” Sanford’s injury simplifies the math at forward, though newcomers Tage Thompson and Samuel Blais could still play their way into the picture. Sanford figured in a battle for ice time on one of the bottom two lines, but in the first 15 minutes or so of the team’s first practice, he was hit into the boards and went to the ice in pain. “That one’s tough,” Yeo said. “I feel really bad for him. He worked hard this summer. You could see physically, he looked more ready, more prepared for the NHL game. He looked bigger, stronger, and it’s a tough break, the first day. You put in all that work, you have all these high hopes and expectations. I was really excited about his potential for us this year. Now, he’s got some work ahead of him, but his season’s not over. If he can put in the work and get through the surgery and rehab properly, then you never know. I don’t know exactly the time frame, you don’t know how things can work out. Certainly a big blow.” Sanford had two goals and three assists in 13 games after coming over from Washington in the Kevin Shattenkirk trade. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

We can help. We can deliver immediate results for men experiencing Erectile Dysfunction. • ED treatment by licensed Physicians • See results on your irst visit or no charge • Works for men with a range of medical conditions including diabetes, prostate problems, vascular disease, etc.

314.282.8080 stlmensclinic.com Call/Visit our clinic today – Improve your performance, Improve your life.

Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Two Blues exhibitions to be on TV BY DAN CAESAR st. Louis Post-dispatch

Telecasts of Blues exhibition games have been few and far between over the years, but two of their practice games this month are scheduled to be shown on cable outlets. And two more are set to be available via video streaming. NHL Network shows their exhibition contest Friday, at Washington, beginning at 6 p.m. (St. Louis time). And NBCSN carries their contest on Sunday, against Pittsburgh, at 7 o’clock. That contest is to be played in Belle Vernon, Pa., the NHL’s “Hockeyville” game played in a small arena. And although Fox Sports Midwest won’t have any of the practice games on its television outlet, it plans live streaming on its Fox Sports Go outlet for two contests — home

games Wednesday, against Columbus, and Saturday, vs. Dallas. These are available only to FSM subscribers and both start at 7 o’clock. Fewer cameras than normal are expected to be in place for these productions, and the radio play-by-play is to be used instead of the regular FSM announcers. But the radio broadcasts of those games won’t be available on regular stations. They will be limited to KMOX.com as well as the HD3 version of KYKY (98.3 FM). However, two of the team’s exhibition contests will air on conventional radio — the aforementioned “Hockeyville” game Sunday will be on KMOX (1120 AM) and the contest on Sept. 28, against Minnesota in Kansas City, is set for KYKY. Both start at 7 p.m. Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

NHL NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brian Boyle, who signed a two-year deal with the New Jersey Devils in the ofseason, has vowed to return as quickly as possible after being diagnosed with leukemia.

New Jersey’s Boyle has cancer Brian Boyle hopes to play hockey again soon after being diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia, a type of bone-marrow cancer that the New Jersey Devils’ team doctor said can largely be treated with medication. The 32-year-old forward was diagnosed with CML after bloodwork at the start of training camp showed irregularities from last season. Boyle said based on what team doctor Michael Farber and others have told him, he expects to live his life under normal conditions. That includes getting on the ice with his new team after signing a $5.5 million, twoyear contract in the ofseason. Boyle said on a conference call Tuesday that he feels as close to normal as possible, and Farber expects treatment to begin as soon as some further tests come back. “We have a good plan of attack here, and I’m looking forward to getting on the ice and playing,” Boyle said. “When that happens I don’t know, but my mindset is Oct. 7.” The Devils open the regular season at home Oct. 7 against the Colorado Avalanche. That might be an aggressive target date, but Boyle said he expects only minor side efects even while he is being treated. Boyle, who played last season with the Tampa Bay Lightning and Toronto Maple Leafs and whose wife, Lauren, had a baby girl in May, said he felt mostly fatigued but chalked it up to life events. Moving forward, he lamented his wife not letting him eat Skittles anymore but is glad that

there shouldn’t be any short- or long-term problems. “In a serious way, I’ve been told the treatment, it’s supposed to work,” Boyle said. “Relative to the big ugly ‘L’ word leukemia, it’s good news.” Boyle is a veteran of 624 NHL games with the Los Angeles Kings, New York Rangers, Lightning and Maple Leafs and has 93 goals and 76 assists. The Devils signed him for his veteran leadership and faceof and penaltykilling abilities. Josi named Preds’ captain • The Nashville Predators have named defenseman Roman Josi as the eighth captain in the franchise’s history, replacing Mike Fisher, who retired last month. The Predators announced their newest captain Tuesday before a doubleheader kicking of their preseason. “Roman has played with and mentored under two of our best captains ever in Shea Weber and Mike Fisher,” general manager David Poile said Tuesday. “He was also always part of the leadership group when those two guys were captains.” Josi, 27, is the only the second player from Switzerland to be named a captain in the NHL, joining Mark Streit, who captained the Islanders in 2011. Ryan Ellis is the team’s associate captain, with Mattias Ekholm, Filip Forsberg and Ryan Johansen as alternates. Associated Press


HOCKEY

09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 2

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

Blais scores twice in Blues’ loss to Stars Road game features a younger lineup, with a home game set for Wednesday night BY TOM TIMMERMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

BLUES NOTEBOOK

DA L L A S • Early preseason

It wasn’t injury related — he was a full participant in the morning skate before the team flew to Dallas — but Yeo wanted to hold of his return to the ice. “No issues there,” Yeo said. “I just decided to keep him out.” That left Robert Thomas, Vladimir Sobotka, Ivan Barbashev and Kyle Brodziak as the centers for the game.

hockey games, especially early preseason road games, are mostly about kids. With plenty of hockey still to come, teams give their veterans the luxury of not making an out-and-back oneday trip. Some of the Blues’ young players got their chance in the preseason opener Tuesday night, and Samuel Blais continues to command attention. Blais, a 2014 draft pick who’s getting a good look in camp, made the night’s nicest play, with a sweet backhand pass in the slot to another youngster, 2017 draft pick Klim Kostin, for a goal in the Blues’ 5-3 loss in Ken Hitchcock’s return behind the bench for the Stars. Blais then scored another goal, showing some patience in front of the net before shooting high on Dallas goalie Ben Bishop on a play that began with another prospect, Tage Thompson, zigzagging through the Dallas defense during a two-man advantage. “I’m seeing progress from him,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “Some parts of his game, he has to show us he can develop and improve on through the course of training camp. In all honesty, a lot of veterans are like that. Some of the plays he made with the puck, some of the poise he had, I felt he was trying to make a difference out there. A real strong game from him.” Blais had 26 goals last season in the AHL with Chicago and has kept that scoring in training camp with a goal in the team’s

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Samuel Blais (left), Tage Thompson (center) and Jake Walman celebrate a goal by Blais in the second period of Tuesday night’s game in Dallas.

scrimmage Sunday. In addition to being involved in two goals, Blais drew three penalties as the Stars pulled out the stops to try and slow him. “Just moving my feet, I think that’s what made them take the penalties on me,” he said. “When I move my feet, I’m at my best. I think that’s what I did tonight.” “The way they’re calling things now,” Yeo said, “you need guys who have an ability to get the puck. Certain people want the

puck only in certain situations, some want it all the time. For me, I felt he had the puck more than a lot of other guys.” Penalties were the order of business in the first period, with Dallas getting called for four (one of them a double minor) and the Blues being called for three. Of the first 20 minutes of the game, 13:46 was played with at least one player in the penalty box. Ultimately, more than half the game was played with

Sanford will miss most of season BLUES • FROM B1

figures to be brief, it opens a spot in what had been a battle with minimal openings. The Blues looked set at six of their seven defenseman spots, but now, they have a place on the opening night roster for someone else, most likely a left-sided defenseman, and two of the players in that situation who were on the ice Tuesday figure in the equation. Carl Gunnarsson, the veteran, who played Tuesday, may find himself moving up to the second pair, alongside Colton Parayko, while newcomers Vince Dunn and Jake Walman now see a spot in the third pairing open. The Blues have another leftside defenseman, Petteri Lindbohm, who will get his first action Wednesday night. “Obviously that’s a tough one for us,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “Bo’s a big part of our group. But part of the reason we were talking about (Jordan) Schmaltz, (Nate) Prosser, Walman, Dunn, is you always need depth, and you need guys that are going to have to come in and play games for you, whether it’s September, October, or later in the season. “It’s up to these guys to see who is going to solidify their position and some of the guys we have in our group are going to have to step up. A guy like Gunny, maybe he’s going to have to bite of a little more, or maybe somebody else jumps in there. It’s no different than last year. We saw a lot of that last year. Injuries are part of the game and we have capable players. We’ll get through it.” Neither figured in the scoring in Tuesday’s 5-3 loss to Dallas. Walman, playing in his first exhibition game, played 24 minutes, 15 seconds, getting time on both the power play and the penalty kill, while Dunn played 17:32 and didn’t kill penalties. Each took a penalty, Dunn for boarding and Walman for delay of game. “I thought there was some good moments, but too much inconsistency (for Walman),” Yeo said.“That was very similar to the rest of our group. It was a first step, so you kind of expect that, but you can see the good things he does when he’s on top of his game, his skating ability, his puck movement, his shot, his instincts. There are some things I think we can correct as we move along.”

Bouwmeester took a puck to his foot Sunday and, as often happens with foot injuries in hockey, the severity didn’t show up until later. Replacing him isn’t easy. He was second on the team in ice time at 22:24 and regularly went out against the opponent’s top line. He also anchors the team’s penalty kill. The most likely short-term solution has Joel Edmundson moving up to play alongside Alex Pietrangelo, a combination that Yeo had taken a look at in camp even before the injury. Going into camp, the intrigue on the blue line was if one of the youngsters would fight his way into the top six and who would be the seventh defenseman. Now, someone new is guaranteed to be in the lineup when the season starts. “I don’t think it really changes anything that I do,” said Dunn, a second-round pick in the 2015 draft. “I came in with the same attitude that I still have now with Bo being out that long. It’s obviously another spot … or they need a couple guys at the start of the season, I’ve got to work toward that. It’s something to work towards. I don’t think it changes my attitude that much.” Walman said much the same thing, that while there was now an opening on the blue line, he needed to make sure his focus was on himself. “We focus on what we have to do and not worry about the situation,” said Walman, the team’s third-round pick in 2014. “The whole summer and this whole camp I’ve been thinking about battling myself. I know there’s an opportunity and there’s a competition for it. My biggest opponent is myself and I’m going to work as hard as I can to get it.” Sanford’s injury simplifies the math at forward, though newcomers Tage Thompson and Samuel Blais could still play their way into the picture. Sanford figured in a battle for ice time on one of the bottom two lines, but in the first 15 minutes or so of the team’s first practice, he was hit into the boards and went to the ice in pain. “That one’s tough,” Yeo said. “I feel really bad for him. He worked hard this summer. You could see physically, he looked more ready, more prepared for the NHL game. ” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

We can help. We can deliver immediate results for men experiencing Erectile Dysfunction. • ED treatment by licensed Physicians • See results on your irst visit or no charge • Works for men with a range of medical conditions including diabetes, prostate problems, vascular disease, etc.

314.282.8080 stlmensclinic.com Call/Visit our clinic today – Improve your performance, Improve your life.

someone having at least a oneman advantage. The Blues had 11 power plays, and scored on only two of them, and one of those came with a second to go in the power play. On No. 10, the Blues couldn’t score and Dallas’ Brett Ritchie came out of the box to score and tie the game.

FABBRI SITS Robby Fabbri had been listed on the travel roster for the game Tuesday, but he was scratched.

WATCH YOUR STICK The NHL has made slashing an opposing player’s hands a point of emphasis this season, and referees didn’t waste any time in cracking down. In the first night of preseason games, there were more than 58 slashing penalties called in the league’s first 11 preseason games. Yeo screened the league’s video on the subject with the players on Tuesday morning. “I think it’s good,” Yeo said. “It’s going to force us to get ready. I know there’s going to be a lot of special teams play, and so that’s OK, I’m good with the work for both the power play and the penalty kill. It’s an important part to get ready for the start of the season.” The league is also cracking down on faceof violations, such as when a center falls on the puck to keep the other team from getting it. “Faceoffs will be a good challenge for our centermen,” Yeo said. “If you want to win faceofs during the year, you better get ready for it right now.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Two Blues exhibitions to be on TV BY DAN CAESAR st. Louis Post-dispatch

Telecasts of Blues exhibition games have been few and far between over the years, but two of their practice games this month are scheduled to be shown on cable outlets. And two more are set to be available via video streaming. NHL Network shows their exhibition contest Friday, at Washington, beginning at 6 p.m. (St. Louis time). And NBCSN carries their contest on Sunday, against Pittsburgh, at 7 o’clock. That contest is to be played in Belle Vernon, Pa., the NHL’s “Hockeyville” game played in a small arena. And although Fox Sports Midwest won’t have any of the practice games on its television outlet, it plans live streaming on its Fox Sports Go outlet for two contests — home

games Wednesday, against Columbus, and Saturday, vs. Dallas. These are available only to FSM subscribers and both start at 7 o’clock. Fewer cameras than normal are expected to be in place for these productions, and the radio play-by-play is to be used instead of the regular FSM announcers. But the radio broadcasts of those games won’t be available on regular stations. They will be limited to KMOX.com as well as the HD3 version of KYKY (98.3 FM). However, two of the team’s exhibition contests will air on conventional radio — the aforementioned “Hockeyville” game Sunday will be on KMOX (1120 AM) and the contest on Sept. 28, against Minnesota in Kansas City, is set for KYKY. Both start at 7 p.m. Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

NHL NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brian Boyle, who signed a two-year deal with the New Jersey Devils in the ofseason, has vowed to return as quickly as possible after being diagnosed with leukemia.

New Jersey’s Boyle has cancer Brian Boyle hopes to play hockey again soon after being diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia, a type of bone-marrow cancer that the New Jersey Devils’ team doctor said can largely be treated with medication. The 32-year-old forward was diagnosed with CML after bloodwork at the start of training camp showed irregularities from last season. Boyle said based on what team doctor Michael Farber and others have told him, he expects to live his life under normal conditions. That includes getting on the ice with his new team after signing a $5.5 million, twoyear contract in the ofseason. Boyle said on a conference call Tuesday that he feels as close to normal as possible, and Farber expects treatment to begin as soon as some further tests come back. “We have a good plan of attack here, and I’m looking forward to getting on the ice and playing,” Boyle said. “When that happens I don’t know, but my mindset is Oct. 7.” The Devils open the regular season at home Oct. 7 against the Colorado Avalanche. That might be an aggressive target date, but Boyle said he expects only minor side efects even while he is being treated. Boyle, who played last season with the Tampa Bay Lightning and Toronto Maple Leafs and whose wife, Lauren, had a baby girl in May, said he felt mostly fatigued but chalked it up to life events. Moving forward, he lamented his wife not letting him eat Skittles anymore but is glad that

there shouldn’t be any short- or long-term problems. “In a serious way, I’ve been told the treatment, it’s supposed to work,” Boyle said. “Relative to the big ugly ‘L’ word leukemia, it’s good news.” Boyle is a veteran of 624 NHL games with the Los Angeles Kings, New York Rangers, Lightning and Maple Leafs and has 93 goals and 76 assists. The Devils signed him for his veteran leadership and faceof and penaltykilling abilities. Josi named Preds’ captain • The Nashville Predators have named defenseman Roman Josi as the eighth captain in the franchise’s history, replacing Mike Fisher, who retired last month. The Predators announced their newest captain Tuesday before a doubleheader kicking of their preseason. “Roman has played with and mentored under two of our best captains ever in Shea Weber and Mike Fisher,” general manager David Poile said Tuesday. “He was also always part of the leadership group when those two guys were captains.” Josi, 27, is the only the second player from Switzerland to be named a captain in the NHL, joining Mark Streit, who captained the Islanders in 2011. Ryan Ellis is the team’s associate captain, with Mattias Ekholm, Filip Forsberg and Ryan Johansen as alternates. Associated Press


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE L

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

Chicago

84 66 .560

7-3 W-7 46-32 38-34

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away 1½

8-2 W-3 43-34 38-36

Milwaukee

81 70 .536

Cardinals

78 72 .520

6

Pittsburgh

68 84 .447

17

15

1-9

L-7 39-36 29-48

Cincinnati

66 85 .437 18½

16½

5-5

L-1

EAST

W

L

Pct

4 6-4 W-1

42-32 36-40 39-37 27-48

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

y-Washington 91 59 .607

5-5 W-2

45-32 46-27

Miami

71 80 .470 20½

11½

3-7 W-2

38-35 33-45

Atlanta

67 82 .450 23½

14½

5-5

L-3 34-42 33-40

New York

65 86 .430 26½

17½

3-7

L-2

Philadelphia 60 91 .397 31½

22½

7-3 W-2 34-39

WEST

W

L

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 09.20.2017

Pct

33-41 32-45 26-52

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

x-Los Angeles 96 55 .636

— 4-6

L-3

Arizona

87 64 .576

9

5-5

L-2 48-27

Colorado

82 68 .547 13½

7-3

L-1

San Diego

67 83 .447 28½

15

5-5 W-2 40-35 27-48

San Francisco 58 93 .384

38

Tuesday Cardinals 8, Cincinnati 7, 10 inn. Milwaukee 1, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 6, LA Dodgers 2 Miami 5, NY Mets 4, 10 inn. Cubs 2, Tampa Bay 1 Washington 4, Atlanta 2 Arizona at San Diego, late Colorado at San Francisco, late Monday Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 4, LA Dodgers 3 Miami 13, NY Mets 1 San Diego 4, Arizona 2

52-23 44-32 39-37

24-51

W

L

x - clinched playoffs | y - clinched division

Pct

y-Cleveland 93 57 .620

GB WCGB L10 —

.517 15½

Str Home

Away

9-1 W-2 45-30 48-27

Minnesota

78 73

Kansas City

73 77 .487

Detroit

62 89

Chicago

60 90 .400

33

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

Away

Boston

87 64

.576

7-3 W-2 46-28

41-36

New York

84 67 .556

3

8-2 W-2

45-28 39-39

Tampa Bay

73 78 .483

14

5

3-7

L-1

38-39

Baltimore

73 79 .480 14½

2-8

L-2 44-32 29-47

Toronto

71 80 .470

16

WEST

W

GB WCGB L10

y-Houston

92 58

20

.411 31½

L

Los Angeles 76 73

43-32 39-36

24½ 4-6 W-1 34-42

CENTRAL

Pct .613

.510 15½

— 4-6 4½ 4-6 16

L-2 39-39 39-34 L-3 39-36

34-41

2-8

L-2 34-42 28-47

17½ 6-4

L-2 34-40 26-50

7

7-3 W-1 40-36 Str Home

35-39 31-44 Away

— 6-4 W-5

45-31

47-27

1 4-6

41-34

35-39

5-5

L-1

Seattle

74 76 .493

18

Texas

73 76 .490 18½

4

3-7 W-1

L-3 39-36 35-40 39-35

Oakland

68 83 .450 24½

10

7-3 W-3

42-33 26-50

34-41

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Cubs win Maddon’s return to Tampa

Cubs 2, Rays 1

Blue Jays 5, Royals 2

Phillies 6, Dodgers 2

This Date In Baseball

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .283 Martin lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Zobrist lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Almora cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .299 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .279 Contreras c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .278 Schwarber dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .208 Happ 2b 4 0 1 0 0 3 .251 Heyward rf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .263 Russell ss 3 1 0 0 0 0 .244 Baez 3b 3 0 2 1 0 0 .273 Totals 32 2 6 2 1 9 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Longoria 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Morrison 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Ramos c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Duda dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .223 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Dickerson lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Miller 2b 3 1 1 1 0 2 .193 Totals 28 1 1 1 0 11 Chicago 010 010 000 — 2 6 1 Tampa Bay 000 001 000 — 1 1 0 E: Russell (12). LOB: Chicago 4, Tampa Bay 1. 2B: Contreras (21), Baez (23). HR: Schwarber (28), off Archer; Miller (8), off Montgomery. RBIs: Schwarber (53), Baez (71), Miller (32). SB: Baez (10). CS: Kiermaier (6). RLISP: Chicago 3 (Zobrist, Rizzo, Happ); Tampa Bay 1 (Morrison). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Montgomery, W, 7-8 6 1 1 1 0 6 81 3.47 Strop, 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.98 Edwards, 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.23 Davis, S, 32-32 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.01 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Archer, L, 9-11 6 4 2 2 1 6 98 4.02 2/ 3 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.95 Alvarado Kittredge 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.25 2/ Jennings 3 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.62 2/ Roe 3 1 0 0 0 2 14 2.84 HBP: Montgomery (Kiermaier). Umpires: Home, Mark Carlson; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 2:45. A: 25,046 .

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .287 Cain cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Cabrera rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .284 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .323 Perez c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .264 Moustakas 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .271 Moss dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .208 Escobar ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Gordon lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .209 30 2 6 2 2 7 Totals Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .255 Donaldson 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Bautista rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .205 Morales dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .249 1-Refsnyder pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .167 Pillar cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .258 Martin c 3 1 1 2 0 0 .224 Goins ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .227 Barney 2b 3 1 2 3 0 0 .237 Totals 31 5 8 5 0 8 Kansas City 000 000 110 — 2 6 1 Toronto 000 002 30x — 5 8 0 1-ran for Morales in the 7th. E: Moustakas (12). LOB: Kansas City 4, Toronto 2. 2B: Moustakas (23), Smoak (27), Pillar (36), Martin (10). HR: Gordon (8), off Tepera; Barney (5), off Kennedy. RBIs: Moustakas (82), Gordon (44), Martin 2 (30), Barney 3 (23). SF: Moustakas. RLISP: Kansas City 1 (Escobar); Toronto 1 (Bautista). LIDP: Hernandez. GIDP: Cain, Perez, Smoak. DP: Kansas City 2 (Cain, Escobar), (Escobar, Merrifield, Hosmer); Toronto 2 (Donaldson, Barney, Smoak), (Donaldson, Barney, Smoak). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy, L, 4-12 5 3 2 2 0 2 63 5.39 1/ Moylan 1 5 3.70 3 1 0 0 0 Alexander 11/3 3 3 3 0 2 22 2.59 1/ Maurer 1 7 6.52 3 1 0 0 0 Morin 1 0 0 0 0 2 21 5.94 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman, W, 12-8 7 4 1 1 2 5 92 3.01 Tepera 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 3.50 Osuna, S, 37-47 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.54 Kennedy pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Alexander 1-0, Maurer 1-1. Umpires: Home, Joe West; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Ben May; Third, Pat Hoberg. T: 2:27. A: 33,554 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .292 Seager ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .300 Turner 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .324 Bellinger 1b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .275 Granderson rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .208 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .233 Grandal c 3 1 1 1 1 0 .244 Ethier lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .292 Darvish p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .067 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Verdugo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Cingrani p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stewart p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 d-Barnes ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 9 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 3 2 1 0 1 0 .289 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Herrera cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .288 Hoskins 1b 3 0 2 4 1 0 .299 Williams rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Altherr lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .276 Crawford 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .261 Alfaro c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .295 Nola p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .087 b-Franco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Kim ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 6 8 6 4 9 Los Angeles 001 100 000 — 2 9 1 Philadelphia 000 001 41x — 6 8 0 a-grounded out for Watson in the 7th. b-popped out for Nola in the 7th. c-struck out for Garcia in the 8th. d-flied out for Stewart in the 9th. E: Bellinger (5). LOB: Los Angeles 7, Philadelphia 6. 2B: Granderson (23), Herrera (40), Hoskins (5). 3B: Crawford (1). HR: Grandal (20), off Nola; Altherr (18), off Stewart. RBIs: Granderson (62), Grandal (52), Herrera (51), Hoskins 4 (43), Altherr (56). RLISP: Los Angeles 2 (Granderson, Grandal); Philadelphia 3 (Williams, Altherr, Crawford). GIDP: Seager, Verdugo, Altherr, Alfaro. DP: Los Angeles 2 (Seager, Utley, Bellinger), (Seager, Utley, Bellinger); Philadelphia 2 (Crawford, Hoskins), (Hernandez, Galvis, Hoskins). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish 5 1/3 4 1 0 1 7 97 3.96 2/ Watson, 0 0 0 6 3.57 3 1 0 Baez, L, 3-6, 2/3 2 4 4 2 0 36 3.17 1/ Cingrani 0 0 1 3 4.54 3 0 0 Stewart 1 1 1 1 1 1 16 3.62 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nola, W, 12-10 7 5 2 2 2 8 94 3.56 Garcia, 1 3 0 0 0 0 8 2.43 Neris 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.23 Inherited runners-scored: Watson 2-0, Cingrani 1-0. HBP: Baez (Alfaro). Umpires: Home, Paul Emmel; First, Chad Whitson; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Brian O’Nora. T: 3:23. A: 20,145 .

Compiled by PAUL MONTELLA Sept. 20 1902: Chicago’s Jim Callaghan tossed the White Sox’s first no-hitter, beating Detroit 2-0. 1908: Frank Smith of the Chicago White Sox threw his second career no-hitter for a 1-0 victory over the Philadelphia Athletics. 1912: The Detroit Tigers ended Joe Wood’s 16-game win streak with a 6-4 win over the Boston Red Sox. 1924: Grover Cleveland Alexander won his 300th game, and the Chicago Cubs beat the New York Giants 7-3 in 12 innings. 1958: Hoyt Wilhelm of the Baltimore Orioles pitched a 1-0 no-hitter against the New York Yankees at Memorial Stadium, the only run coming on a homer by Gus Triandos. 1968: Mickey Mantle hit his last home run in the major leagues, a solo shot against Boston’s Jim Lonborg. Mantle had 536 homers. 1969: Bob Moose of the Pittsburgh Pirates pitched a 4-0 no-hitter against the New York Mets at Shea Stadium. 1988: Wade Boggs became the first player this century to get 200 hits in six consecutive seasons, and the Boston Red Sox pounded Toronto 13-2. Boggs also joined Lou Gehrig as the only players with 200 hits and 100 walks in three consecutive years. 1992: Philadelphia second baseman Mickey Morandini made the first unassisted triple play in the National League in 65 years, the ninth in major league history, in the Phillies’ 3-2, 13-inning loss to Pittsburgh. 1998: Cal Ripken took himself out of the starting lineup and did not play in the Baltimore Orioles’ loss to the New York Yankees, ending his consecutive-game streak at 2,632 games. After nearly 16 years, Ripken said he decided the time was right to end the streak, which began on May 30, 1982. 2005: Colorado tied a franchise record scoring 20 runs on 23 hits in a 20-1 victory over San Diego. Matt Holliday homered twice and drove in a career-high eight runs, tying a franchise record. 2008: Francisco Rodriguez recorded his 60th save in Los Angeles’ 7-3 victory over Texas. 2012: The Washington Nationals brought postseason baseball back to the nation’s capital for the first time since 1933, earning a playoff spot with a 4-1 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers. The city of Washington was last in the postseason 79 years ago, when player-manager Joe Cronin and the Senators lost to the New York Giants in five games in the World Series. 2012: San Francisco’s Pablo Sandoval homered from both sides of the plate as the Giants beat Colorado 9-2. 2013: Alex Rodriguez set a major league record with his 24th career grand slam, passing Lou Gehrig with a tiebreaking shot in the seventh inning that sent New York Yankees to a 5-1 victory over San Francisco. Today’s birthdays: Ken Giles, 27; Steve Lombardozzi, 29; A.J. Ramos, 31; Ian Desmond, 32.

Mike Montgomery took a no-hit bid into the sixth inning, Kyle Schwarber hit his 28th home run and Chicago extended its winning streak to a seasonhigh seven with a 2-1 win over the Tampa Bay Rays Tuesday night in manager Joe Maddon’s return to Tropicana Field. Maddon managed the Rays from 2006-14, then left to manage Chicago and last year led the Cubs to their irst World Series title since 1908.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Brewers 1, Pirates 0 • Chase Anderson struck out eight over six innings, Domingo Santana homered and visiting Milwaukee shut out Pittsburgh for the second straight day. The Brewers won for the ninth time in 11 games, keeping pace in the NL Central and wild-card races. Pittsburgh has lost a seasonhigh seven consecutive games and 12 of 13. Nationals 4, Braves 2 • Max Scherzer allowed ive hits in seven innings, and Washington tuned up for the playofs with a win over the host Braves. Scherzer (15-6) bounced back from his worst start of the season, also against the Braves last week, when he walked six and was roughed up for seven runs in an 8-2 loss. Phillies 6, Dodgers 2 • Rhys Hoskins had four RBIs, including a tiebreaking, three-run double of Pedro Baez in seventh inning that led host Philadelphia past Los Angeles. The Dodgers’ magic number to clinch a ifth straight division title remained at three. Los Angeles has lost three straight and 19 of 24. Marlins 5, Mets 4 • J.T. Realmuto homered in the 10th inning and Miami beat visiting New York after rallying for three runs in the ninth against former teammate A.J. Ramos.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Red Sox 1, Orioles 0 • Jackie Bradley Jr. scored the lone run on a wild pitch by Brad Brach in the 11th inning, and visiting Boston used six pitchers to silence the Baltimore bats. Boston has won 10 of 13 to move a season-high 23 games over .500 (87-64) and draw closer to clinching a postseason berth. The Red Sox started the day with a three-game lead over New York in the AL East. Blue Jays 5, Royals 2 • Marcus Stroman pitched seven innings to win for the irst time in six starts, Darwin Barney hit a two-run homer and host Toronto beat Kansas City. Barney went 2 for 3 with three RBIs as the Blue Jays opened their inal homestand on a winning note. Astros 3, White Sox 1 • Jose Altuve homered, Alex Bregman hit an RBI double and AL West champion Houston extended its winning streak to ive games with a win over visiting Chicago. A’s 9, Tigers 8 • Jed Lowrie hit a grand slam in the eighth and drove in ive runs as Oakland rallied for the win in Detroit. Associated Press

Brewers 1, Pirates 0 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .241 Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Broxton cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Braun lf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .279 Shaw 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 D.Santana rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .279 1-Berry pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vogt c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Pina c 0 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Arcia ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .272 Phillips cf-rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .232 Anderson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .149 b-Villar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Swarzak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Sogard ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Totals 30 1 6 1 5 9 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Marte lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .251 McCutchen cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Polanco rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Mercer ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Diaz c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Moroff 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .194 Williams p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .051 a-Jaso ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Neverauskas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hudson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --E.Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Bostick ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 33 0 6 0 0 11 Milwaukee 000 100 000 — 1 6 1 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 a-struck out for Williams in the 5th. b-out on fielder’s choice for Anderson in the 7th. c-singled for E.Santana in the 8th. d-popped out for Swarzak in the 9th. 1-ran for D.Santana in the 9th. E: Anderson (1). LOB: Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 6. HR: D.Santana (26), off Williams. RBIs: D.Santana (78). SB: Berry (1), Marte 2 (18). CS: Braun (4). S: Arcia. RLISP: Milwaukee 4 (Thames, Anderson, Sogard 2); Pittsburgh 3 (Bell, Polanco 2). GIDP: Shaw. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Frazier, Mercer, Bell). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson, W, 11/3 6 5 0 0 0 8 99 2.74 Swarzak, 2 1 0 0 0 1 18 2.15 Knebel, S, 37-42 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.29 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, L, 6-9 5 3 1 1 2 6 87 4.18 Neverauskas 11/3 1 0 0 2 1 30 2.95 2/ 1 7 4.50 Hudson 3 0 0 0 0 E.Santana 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.50 Kontos 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 3.65 Inherited runners-scored: Hudson 2-0. Umpires: Home, Tony Randazzo; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Roberto Ortiz. T: 3:04. A: 13,929 .

Nationals 4, Braves 2 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 2 2 1 1 0 .281 Werth rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .234 1-De Aza pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .149 Rendon 3b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .305 Zimmerman 1b 5 0 3 2 0 2 .304 Kendrick lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .322 Difo 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268 Wieters c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .226 Scherzer p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .169 a-Lind ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .305 Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 4 11 4 2 6 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Peterson lf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .205 Albies 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Freeman 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .317 Markakis rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Suzuki c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .267 Ruiz 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .205 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Garcia ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Adams lf-cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .297 Swanson ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .234 Gohara p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Camargo 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .306 Totals 31 2 5 2 2 9 Washington 002 010 100 — 4 11 0 Atlanta 000 110 000 — 2 5 0 a-grounded out for Scherzer in the 8th. b-popped out for Motte in the 9th. 1-ran for Werth in the 9th. LOB: Washington 9, Atlanta 5. 2B: Turner (21), Werth (8), Rendon (39), Zimmerman (30), Taylor (22), Wieters (20), Swanson (23). RBIs: Turner (42), Rendon (95), Zimmerman 2 (101), Suzuki (43), Swanson (48). SB: Turner 2 (42), Adams (9), Peterson (3). S: Scherzer, Gohara. RLISP: Washington 5 (Kendrick, Difo 2, Taylor, Scherzer); Atlanta 3 (Albies, Markakis, Ruiz). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, W, 15-6 7 5 2 2 1 7 112 2.59 Madson, 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 1.76 Doolittle, S, 22-23 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.61 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gohara, L, 1-2 61/3 11 4 4 0 4 93 6.06 Winkler 12/3 0 0 0 1 1 27 1.54 Motte 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 3.79 Inherited runners-scored: Winkler 1-0. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Nic Lentz; Third, Kerwin Danley. T: 3:01. A: 26,709 .

Tuesday NY Yankees 5, Minnesota 2 Boston 1, Baltimore 0, 11 inn. Toronto 5, Kansas City 2 Cubs 2, Tampa Bay 1 Oakland 9, Detroit 8 Houston 3, White Sox 1 Cleveland at LA Angels, late Texas at Seattle, late Monday Boston 10, Baltimore 8, 11 inn. NY Yankees 2, Minnesota 1 Oakland 8, Detroit 3

x - clinched playoffs | y - clinched division

Wednesday’s pitching matchups

Red Sox 1, Orioles 0 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bogaerts ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Benintendi lf 3 0 1 0 2 1 .278 Betts rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .262 Moreland 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Vazquez c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Devers 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .293 Travis dh 3 0 1 0 0 2 .300 1-R.Davis pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228 a-Pedroia ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Holt 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .190 Bradley Jr. cf 4 1 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 37 1 6 0 3 7 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham ss 5 0 0 0 0 4 .279 Machado 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .264 Schoop 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .298 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Mancini lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .291 Trumbo dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .237 C.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Hays rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .304 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .262 b-Alvarez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .308 Castillo c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Totals 38 0 5 0 2 13 Boston 000 000 000 01 — 1 6 1 Baltimore 000 000 000 00 — 0 5 0 a-grounded out for R.Davis in the 10th. b-struck out for Joseph in the 10th. 1-ran for Travis in the 8th. E: Devers (13). LOB: Boston 6, Baltimore 8. 2B: Benintendi (26), Machado (32), Hays (2). SB: Jones (2). RLISP: Boston 4 (Betts, Moreland 3); Baltimore 3 (Beckham, Mancini, Trumbo). GIDP: Bradley Jr., Pedroia. DP: Baltimore 2 (Beckham, C.Davis), (Beckham, Schoop, C.Davis). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz 61/3 5 0 0 2 5 98 3.15 2/ Smith 0 0 2 7 0.00 3 0 0 Reed 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.97 Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 0 1 21 1.38 Kelly, W, 4-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 18 2.63 Barnes, S, 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 3.82 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 8 3 0 0 1 7 106 4.61 Gausman O’Day 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 3.59 Brach, L, 4-5 2 2 1 1 2 0 27 2.60 HBP: Kimbrel (Jones). WP: Brach. Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Marty Foster. T: 3:27. A: 21,449 .

Marlins 5, Mets 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Reyes ss 5 2 4 2 0 1 .244 Cabrera 3b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .278 Smith 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .218 d’Arnaud c 5 1 2 2 0 0 .240 Nimmo lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .269 Lagares cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Evans 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .294 Lugo p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Smoker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Cecchini ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Reynolds ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .225 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 40 4 11 4 2 6 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Suzuki lf 5 0 1 1 0 0 .263 Stanton rf 1 0 0 0 4 1 .278 Yelich cf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .285 Bour 1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .297 Realmuto c 5 2 3 1 0 1 .277 Dietrich 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .241 Anderson 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .268 Aviles ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .241 b-Ozuna ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .305 Rojas ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .270 e-Gordon ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .307 Despaigne p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Ellington p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Tazawa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Telis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Ellis ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .194 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 36 5 10 5 5 9 New York 100 002 001 0 — 4 11 0 Miami 000 100 003 1 — 5 10 0 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for Smoker in the 7th. b-struck out for Aviles in the 7th. c-flied out for Tazawa in the 8th. d-out on sacrifice bunt for Blevins in the 9th. e-struck out for Rojas in the 9th. f-singled for Guerra in the 9th. LOB: New York 9, Miami 8. 2B: Realmuto (29), Dietrich (20). HR: Reyes (14), off Despaigne; d’Arnaud (13), off Despaigne; Yelich (18), off Lugo; Bour (22), off Ramos; Realmuto (17), off Sewald. RBIs: Reyes 2 (55), d’Arnaud 2 (47), Suzuki (20), Yelich (78), Bour (69), Realmuto (63), Ellis (10). S: Reynolds. RLISP: New York 4 (Smith 2, Lagares 2); Miami 5 (Yelich 2, Bour, Dietrich, Anderson). GIDP: Yelich, Realmuto. DP: New York 2 (Smith, Reyes, Lugo), (Reyes, Evans, Smith). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lugo 5 4 1 1 1 3 83 5.03 Smoker, 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 5.43 Familia, 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 4.87 Blevins, 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 3.04 2/ Ramos, 1 2 32 4.08 3 5 3 3 2/ 1 19 4.57 Sewald, L, 0-6 3 1 1 1 0 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Despaigne 6 6 3 3 1 2 81 4.37 Ellington 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 6.35 Tazawa 1 2 0 0 1 2 29 5.12 Guerra 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 4.11 Barraclough, W, 6-2 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.14 Inherited runners-scored: Sewald 3-0. WP: Smoker. Umpires: Home, Stu Scheurwater; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Larry Vanover. T: 3:22. A: 16,405 .

Astros 3, White Sox 1 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sanchez 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .263 Moncada 2b 4 1 3 0 0 1 .241 Abreu 1b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .306 Delmonico lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Garcia rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .333 Davidson dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .221 Anderson ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .262 Smith c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .278 a-Hanson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .183 b-Narvaez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Totals 35 1 6 1 2 14 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .291 Reddick rf 3 0 2 0 0 1 .317 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .348 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .302 Gonzalez lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .293 Bregman 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .279 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Gurriel 1b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .295 McCann c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Totals 29 3 8 3 1 3 Chicago 001 000 000 — 1 6 0 Houston 000 200 01x — 3 8 2 a-struck out for Smith in 9th. b-struck out for Engel in 9th. E: Correa (9), Bregman (12). LOB: Chicago 9, Houston 4. 2B: Abreu (39), Springer (28), Bregman (36), Gurriel (38). HR: Altuve (24), off Giolito. RBIs: Abreu (98), Altuve 2 (79), Bregman (60). SB: Moncada (3), Abreu (3). CS: Reddick (3). S: Reddick. RLISP: Chicago 6 (Sanchez, Delmonico 2, Garcia, Davidson, Smith); Houston 3 (Gonzalez, Beltran, McCann). DP: Chicago 2 (Anderson, Abreu), (Abreu, Smith, Sanchez). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Giolito, L, 2-3 62/3 7 2 2 1 3 100 2.58 1/ Bummer 3 5.50 3 0 0 0 0 0 Farquhar 1 1 1 1 0 0 11 4.53 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McHugh, W, 3-2 5 5 1 1 1 5 87 3.44 Harris, 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.12 Gregerson, 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 4.40 Devenski, 1 0 0 0 1 3 20 2.68 Giles, S, 32/36 1 1 0 0 0 3 15 2.41 Inherited runners-scored: Bummer 1-0. WP: McHugh, Giolito, Giles. Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Bruce Dreckman. T: 2:47. A: 23,293 .

Athletics 9, Tigers 8 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Barreto ss 6 1 1 0 0 2 .197 Pinder cf 5 1 2 0 0 3 .243 Lowrie 2b 5 2 3 5 0 0 .279 Davis lf 4 0 1 0 1 3 .242 Olson 1b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .267 Healy dh 5 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Chapman 3b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .231 Canha rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .225 b-Joyce ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Smolinski rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Garneau c 2 1 1 0 1 0 .190 c-Wendle ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .400 Phegley c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .203 Totals 42 9 14 9 4 14 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 5 1 1 1 1 2 .236 Presley lf 6 1 4 1 0 1 .322 2-Jones pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .170 Cabrera dh 5 1 3 0 0 1 .249 1-Romine pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Castellanos rf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .271 Candelario 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .277 Navarro 1b 3 2 1 0 2 2 .206 McCann c 5 1 2 3 0 2 .263 Collins cf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .199 a-Mahtook ph-cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .277 Iglesias ss 4 0 1 1 1 0 .259 Totals 41 8 15 8 7 9 Oakland 021 001 140 — 9 14 0 Detroit 001 142 000 — 8 15 1 a-pinch hit for Collins in 5th. b-flied out for Canha in 7th. c-singled for Garneau in 8th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 8th. 2-ran for Presley in the 9th. E: Iglesias (7). LOB: Oakland 10, Detroit 13. 2B: Lowrie (47), Healy (27), Presley (10), Cabrera (22), Castellanos (34), Navarro (1), Iglesias (31). 3B: McCann (2). HR: Olson (23), off Bell; Chapman (13), off Bell; Lowrie (14), off Wilson; Kinsler (20), off Gossett; Presley (2), off Gossett; Castellanos (24), off Brady. RBIs: Lowrie 5 (64), Olson (43), Healy (76), Chapman (34), Canha (12), Kinsler (47), Presley (15), Castellanos 2 (94), McCann 3 (48), Iglesias (54). RLISP: Oakland 5 (Pinder, Healy 2, Joyce 2); Detroit 6 (Kinsler 2, Presley 2, Mahtook 2). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gossett 42/3 9 6 6 3 3 90 5.38 1/ Coulombe 2 1 16 3.65 3 1 0 0 Brady 1 2 2 2 1 1 24 6.51 Casilla, W, 4-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.34 Hatcher, 1 2 0 0 1 2 20 3.95 Treinen, S, 12-17 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 4.20 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bell 31/3 5 3 3 3 5 76 6.52 Saupold 2 2 1 1 0 3 35 4.68 VerHagen, 1 2 1 1 0 2 22 5.46 Stumpf 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 2.73 Wilson, L, 2-5, 1 4 4 4 0 2 32 4.42 Hardy 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 19 5.64 1/ Greene 3 2.67 3 0 0 0 0 0 Stumpf pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inh. rnnrs-scored: Coulombe 1-1, Saupold 2-0, VerHagen 1-0, Stumpf 2-0, Wilson 3-1. Umpires: Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Chris Conroy. T: 3:58. A: 23,460 .

LATE MONDAY

Padres 4, Diamondbacks 2 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 2 0 1 1 1 0 .292 Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Blanco ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 c-Rosales ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Sherfy p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-Walker ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 1-Hazelbaker pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .318 Marte ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .266 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .305 Martinez rf 3 0 1 1 1 2 .298 Descalso 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .243 Lamb 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .247 Pollock cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .262 Herrmann c 2 1 0 0 1 1 .174 e-Drury ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Corbin p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 a-Fuentes ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .238 f-Iannetta ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Totals 30 2 5 2 6 8 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .265 Aybar ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .232 Myers 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .242 Solarte 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .251 Renfroe rf 3 1 1 3 0 1 .231 Villanueva 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Szczur lf 1 0 0 0 2 0 .223 Hedges c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .211 Perdomo p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .095 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Baumann p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Asuaje ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Yates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 26 4 4 4 5 6 Arizona 002 000 000 — 2 5 1 San Diego 310 000 00x — 4 4 0 a-popped out for Corbin in the 6th. b-pinch hit for Hoover in the 7th. c-struck out for Blanco in the 7th. d-popped out for Baumann in the 7th. e-singled for Herrmann in the 9th. f-struck out for Fuentes in the 9th. g-hit by pitch for Hernandez in the 9th. 1-ran for Walker in the 9th. E: Hoover (1). LOB: Arizona 9, San Diego 4. 2B: Margot (17), Myers (26). HR: Renfroe (21), off Corbin; Hedges (18), off Corbin. RBIs: Peralta (50), Martinez (91), Renfroe 3 (50), Hedges (53). CS: Aybar (4), Szczur (2). S: Corbin. RLISP: Arizona 4 (Marte, Descalso, Fuentes 2); San Diego 1 (Solarte). GIDP: Lamb, Hedges. DP: Arizona 2 (Lamb, Descalso, Goldschmidt), (Lamb, Descalso, Goldschmidt); San Diego 1 (Villanueva, Myers). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Corbin, L, 14-13 5 4 4 4 3 3 81 4.14 Hoover 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 3.79 Sherfy 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 Hernandez 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.98 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perdomo, W, 8-10 51/3 4 2 2 6 2 89 4.57 2/ Stammen, 7 3.05 3 0 0 0 0 0 Baumann, 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.23 Yates, 1 0 0 0 0 3 17 3.83 Hand, S, 19-24 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.27 Inherited runners-scored: Stammen 3-0. HBP: Corbin (Renfroe), Hand (Walker). PB: Herrmann (3). Umpires: Home, Greg Gibson; First, Ramon De Jesus; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 3:02. A: 20,199 .

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .331; Harper, Washington, .325; JTurner, Los Angeles, .324; Murphy, Washington, .318; Freeman, Atlanta, .317; Votto, Cincinnati, .317; LeMahieu, Colorado, .315; Posey, San Francisco, .313; Arenado, Colorado, .308; Gordon, Miami, .307. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 131; Stanton, Miami, 115; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 109; Bryant, Chicago, 104; Gordon, Miami, 103; Votto, Cincinnati, 100; Rizzo, Chicago, 97; Arenado, Colorado, 93; LeMahieu, Colorado, 93; Harper, Washington, 92. RBI: Arenado, Colorado, 125; Stanton, Miami, 117; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 115; Ozuna, Miami, 113; Rizzo, Chicago, 106; Lamb, Arizona, 101; Zimmerman, Washington, 101; Duvall, Cincinnati, 97; Shaw, Milwaukee, 96; Votto, Cincinnati, 96. HITS: Blackmon, Colorado, 199; Inciarte, Atlanta, 190; Gordon, Miami, 185; LeMahieu, Colorado, 178; Arenado, Colorado, 175; Ozuna, Miami, 175; Votto, Cincinnati, 165; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 160; Yelich, Miami, 160; Murphy, Washington, 159. DOUBLES: Arenado, Colorado, 42; Herrera, Philadelphia, 40; Murphy, Washington, 40; Rendon, Washington, 39;

NL

Pitcher

StL Cin

Weaver (R) Davis (R)

Time W-L

ERA

6-1 1-2

1.89 7.71

5-10 12:10 13-6

4.99 3.62

Col SF

Chatwood (R) 8-12 Moore (L) 2:45 5-14

4.57 5.39

LA Phi

Wood (L) 15-3 Thompson (R) 6:05 2-2

2.69 4.46

Mil Pit

Wilkerson (R) 0-0 0.00 Brault (L) 6:05 1-0 4.38

NY Montero (R) Mia Urena (R)

6:10

Was Gonzalez (L) Atl Sims (R)

6:35

14-7 2-5

2.68 5.52

Ari SD

Ray (L) Lamet (R)

8:10

14-5 7-7

2.74 4.15

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Min Colon (R) NY Severino (R)

6-13 12:05 13-6

6.39 2.93

Oak Mengden (R) Det Sanchez (R)

1-1 12:10 3-4

4.30 7.03

Bos Sale (L) Bal Miley (L)

16-7 6:05 8-13

2.86 5.32

KC Tor

Junis (R) Anderson (L) 6:07

7-2 3-3

4.15 5.73

Chi Shields (R) Hou Peacock (R)

7:10

4-6 11-2

5.43 2.98

Cle LA

9-9 9:07 6-14

5.04 5.11

Tex Cashner (R) 9-10 Sea Hernandez (R) 9:10 5-4

3.40 4.19

IL

Time W-L

ERA

11-7 3-6

4.30 4.25

Tomlin (R) Nolasco (R)

Pitcher

ChC Lester (L) TB Snell (L)

6:10

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

Bryant, Chicago, 36; Markakis, Atlanta, 36; Drury, Arizona, 35; Yelich, Miami, 35; Duvall, Cincinnati, 34; 3 tied at 33. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 14; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 9; Fowler, Cardinals, 8; Gordon, Miami, 8; Arenado, Colorado, 7; Cozart, Cincinnati, 7; Reyes, New York, 7; 6 tied at 6. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 55; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 38; Blackmon, Colorado, 35; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 35; Votto, Cincinnati, 35; Arenado, Colorado, 34; Ozuna, Miami, 34; Zimmerman, Washington, 33; Rizzo, Chicago, 32; 2 tied at 31. STOLEN BASES: Hamilton, Cincinnati, 58; Gordon, Miami, 55; TTurner, Washington, 42; Villar, Milwaukee, 23; Inciarte, Atlanta, 22; Peraza, Cincinnati, 22; Reyes, New York, 22; Pham, Cardinals, 21; Myers, San Diego, 20; 2 tied at 19. PITCHING: Davies, Milwaukee, 17-9; Greinke, Arizona, 17-6; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 17-4; Scherzer, Washington, 15-6; Wood, Los Angeles, 15-3; deGrom, New York, 15-9; 5 tied at 14. ERA: Kershaw, Los Angeles, 2.26; Scherzer, Washington, 2.59; Strasburg, Washington, 2.60; Gonzalez, Washington, 2.68; Ray, Arizona, 2.74; Greinke, Arizona, 2.87; Lynn, Cardinals, 3.09; Arrieta, Chicago, 3.48; Nelson, Milwaukee, 3.49; deGrom, New York, 3.55. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 253; deGrom, New York, 228; Greinke, Arizona, 208; Ray, Arizona, 206; Martinez, Cardinals, 205; Nelson, Milwaukee, 199; Samardzija, San Francisco, 197; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 194; Strasburg, Washington, 190; Cole, Pittsburgh, 184.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Altuve, Houston, .347; Garcia, Chicago, .333; Hosmer, Kansas City, .323; Reddick, Houston, .316; Ramirez, Cleveland, .313; Mauer, Minnesota, .306; Abreu, Chicago, .305; Andrus, Texas, .300; Cain, Kansas City, .300; Schoop, Baltimore, .297. RUNS: Judge, New York, 117; Altuve, Houston, 104; Springer, Houston, 103; Ramirez, Cleveland, 98; Andrus, Texas, 96; Upton, Los Angeles, 94; Betts, Boston, 93; Abreu, Chicago, 91; Dozier, Minnesota, 91; 4 tied at 90. RBI: Cruz, Seattle, 110; Schoop, Baltimore, 105; Upton, Los Angeles, 103; KDavis, Oakland, 102; Abreu, Chicago, 98; Judge, New York, 97; Pujols, Los Angeles, 96; Betts, Boston, 94; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 94; Mazara, Texas, 94. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 194; Hosmer, Kansas City, 182; Abreu, Chicago, 178; Andrus, Texas, 178; Schoop, Baltimore, 174; Ramirez, Cleveland, 171; Lindor, Cleveland, 169; Cabrera, Kansas City, 165; Cain, Kansas City, 164; Jones, Baltimore, 162. DOUBLES: Ramirez, Cleveland, 50; Lowrie, Oakland, 46; Betts, Boston, 44; Andrus, Texas, 42; Upton, Los Angeles, 42; Lindor, Cleveland, 40; Abreu, Chicago, 39; Altuve, Houston, 38; Gurriel, Houston, 38; 4 tied at 36. TRIPLES: Castellanos, Detroit, 10; Sanchez, Chicago, 8; Abreu, Chicago, 6; Bogaerts, Boston, 6; Buxton, Minnesota, 6; Mahtook, Detroit, 6; Merrifield, Kansas City, 6; Ramirez, Cleveland, 6; 4 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Judge, New York, 44; KDavis, Oakland, 39; Gallo, Texas, 38; Smoak, Toronto, 38; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 36; Morrison, Tampa Bay, 36; Moustakas, Kansas City, 36; Cruz, Seattle, 33; 3 tied at 32. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 31; Maybin, Houston, 31; Merrifield, Kansas City, 30; RDavis, Boston, 28; DeShields, Texas, 28; Dyson, Seattle, 28; Buxton, Minnesota, 26; Andrus, Texas, 24; Betts, Boston, 24; Cain, Kansas City, 24. ERA: Kluber, Cleveland, 2.35; Sale, Boston, 2.86; Severino, New York, 2.93; Stroman, Toronto, 3.01; Pomeranz, Boston, 3.15; Santana, Minnesota, 3.34; Gray, New York, 3.38; Cashner, Texas, 3.40; Carrasco, Cleveland, 3.48; Verlander, Houston, 3.50.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE L

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

Chicago

84 66 .560

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

7-3 W-7 46-32 38-34

1

8-2 W-3 43-34 38-36

Milwaukee

81 70 .536

Cardinals

78 72 .520

6

Pittsburgh

68 84 .447

17

14½

1-9

L-7 39-36 29-48

Cincinnati

66 85 .437 18½

16

5-5

L-1

EAST

W

L

Pct

3½ 6-4 W-1

42-32 36-40 39-37 27-48

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

y-Washington 91 59 .607

5-5 W-2

45-32 46-27

Miami

71 80 .470 20½

11

3-7 W-2

38-35 33-45

Atlanta

67 82 .450 23½

14

5-5

L-3 34-42 33-40

New York

65 86 .430 26½

17

3-7

L-2

Philadelphia 60 91 .397 31½

22

7-3 W-2 34-39

WEST

W

L

Pct

87 65 .572

33-41 32-45 26-52

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

x-Los Angeles 96 55 .636 Arizona

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 09.20.2017

— 9½

— 4-6

L-3

L-3 48-27 39-38

5-5

Colorado

82 69 .543

14

— 6-4

San Diego

68 83 .450

28

14

San Francisco 59 93 .388 37½

L-2

5-5 W-3

Tuesday Cardinals 8, Cincinnati 7, 10 inn. Milwaukee 1, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 6, LA Dodgers 2 Miami 5, NY Mets 4, 10 inn. Cubs 2, Tampa Bay 1 Washington 4, Atlanta 2 San Diego 6, Arizona 2 San Francisco 4, Colorado 3 Monday Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 4, LA Dodgers 3 Miami 13, NY Mets 1 San Diego 4, Arizona 2

52-23 44-32 43-32

39-37 24-51

W

L

x-clinched playoffs | y-clinched division

Pct

y-Cleveland 93 57 .620

GB WCGB L10 —

.517 15½

Str Home

Away

9-1 W-2 45-30 48-27

Minnesota

78 73

Kansas City

73 77 .487

Detroit

62 89

Chicago

60 90 .400

33

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

Away

Boston

87 64

.576

7-3 W-2 46-28

41-36

New York

84 67 .556

3

8-2 W-2

45-28 39-39

Tampa Bay

73 78 .483

14

5

3-7

L-1

38-39

Baltimore

73 79 .480 14½

2-8

L-2 44-32 29-47

Toronto

71 80 .470

16

WEST

W

GB WCGB L10

y-Houston

92 58

20

.411 31½

L

Los Angeles 76 73

41-35 27-48

23½ 4-6 W-2 35-42

CENTRAL

Pct .613

.510 15½

Texas

74 76 .493

Seattle

74 77 .490 18½

18

Oakland

68 83 .450 24½

— 4-6 4½ 4-6 16

L-2 39-39 39-34 L-3 39-36

34-41

2-8

L-2 34-42 28-47

17½ 6-4

L-2 34-40 26-50

7

7-3 W-1 40-36 Str Home

35-39 31-44 Away

— 6-4 W-5

45-31

47-27

1 4-6

L-1

41-34

35-39

3-7 W-2

39-35

35-41

4 4-6 10

L-4

39-37 35-40

7-3 W-3

42-33 26-50

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Cubs win as Maddon returns to Tampa

Cubs 2, Rays 1

Blue Jays 5, Royals 2

Phillies 6, Dodgers 2

Yankees 5, Twins 2

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .283 Martin lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Zobrist lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Almora cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .299 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .279 Contreras c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .278 Schwarber dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .208 Happ 2b 4 0 1 0 0 3 .251 Heyward rf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .263 Russell ss 3 1 0 0 0 0 .244 Baez 3b 3 0 2 1 0 0 .273 Totals 32 2 6 2 1 9 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Longoria 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Morrison 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Ramos c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Duda dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .223 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Dickerson lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Miller 2b 3 1 1 1 0 2 .193 Totals 28 1 1 1 0 11 Chicago 010 010 000 — 2 6 1 Tampa Bay 000 001 000 — 1 1 0 E: Russell (12). LOB: Chicago 4, Tampa Bay 1. 2B: Contreras (21), Baez (23). HR: Schwarber (28), off Archer; Miller (8), off Montgomery. RBIs: Schwarber (53), Baez (71), Miller (32). SB: Baez (10). CS: Kiermaier (6). RLISP: Chicago 3 (Zobrist, Rizzo, Happ); Tampa Bay 1 (Morrison). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Montgomery, W, 7-8 6 1 1 1 0 6 81 3.47 Strop, 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.98 Edwards, 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.23 Davis, S, 32-32 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.01 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Archer, L, 9-11 6 4 2 2 1 6 98 4.02 2/ 3 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.95 Alvarado Kittredge 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.25 2/ Jennings 3 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.62 2/ Roe 3 1 0 0 0 2 14 2.84 HBP: Montgomery (Kiermaier). Umpires: Home, Mark Carlson; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 2:45. A: 25,046 .

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .287 Cain cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Cabrera rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .284 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .323 Perez c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .264 Moustakas 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .271 Moss dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .208 Escobar ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Gordon lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .209 30 2 6 2 2 7 Totals Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .255 Donaldson 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Bautista rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .205 Morales dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .249 1-Refsnyder pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .167 Pillar cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .258 Martin c 3 1 1 2 0 0 .224 Goins ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .227 Barney 2b 3 1 2 3 0 0 .237 Totals 31 5 8 5 0 8 Kansas City 000 000 110 — 2 6 1 Toronto 000 002 30x — 5 8 0 1-ran for Morales in the 7th. E: Moustakas (12). LOB: Kansas City 4, Toronto 2. 2B: Moustakas (23), Smoak (27), Pillar (36), Martin (10). HR: Gordon (8), off Tepera; Barney (5), off Kennedy. RBIs: Moustakas (82), Gordon (44), Martin 2 (30), Barney 3 (23). SF: Moustakas. RLISP: Kansas City 1 (Escobar); Toronto 1 (Bautista). LIDP: Hernandez. GIDP: Cain, Perez, Smoak. DP: Kansas City 2 (Cain, Escobar), (Escobar, Merrifield, Hosmer); Toronto 2 (Donaldson, Barney, Smoak), (Donaldson, Barney, Smoak). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy, L, 4-12 5 3 2 2 0 2 63 5.39 1/ Moylan 1 5 3.70 3 1 0 0 0 Alexander 11/3 3 3 3 0 2 22 2.59 1/ Maurer 1 7 6.52 3 1 0 0 0 Morin 1 0 0 0 0 2 21 5.94 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman, W, 12-8 7 4 1 1 2 5 92 3.01 Tepera 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 3.50 Osuna, S, 37-47 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.54 Kennedy pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Alexander 1-0, Maurer 1-1. Umpires: Home, Joe West; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Ben May; Third, Pat Hoberg. T: 2:27. A: 33,554 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .292 Seager ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .300 Turner 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .324 Bellinger 1b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .275 Granderson rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .208 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .233 Grandal c 3 1 1 1 1 0 .244 Ethier lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .292 Darvish p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .067 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Verdugo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Cingrani p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stewart p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 d-Barnes ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 9 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 3 2 1 0 1 0 .289 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Herrera cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .288 Hoskins 1b 3 0 2 4 1 0 .299 Williams rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Altherr lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .276 Crawford 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .261 Alfaro c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .295 Nola p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .087 b-Franco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Kim ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 6 8 6 4 9 Los Angeles 001 100 000 — 2 9 1 Philadelphia 000 001 41x — 6 8 0 a-grounded out for Watson in the 7th. b-popped out for Nola in the 7th. c-struck out for Garcia in the 8th. d-flied out for Stewart in the 9th. E: Bellinger (5). LOB: Los Angeles 7, Philadelphia 6. 2B: Granderson (23), Herrera (40), Hoskins (5). 3B: Crawford (1). HR: Grandal (20), off Nola; Altherr (18), off Stewart. RBIs: Granderson (62), Grandal (52), Herrera (51), Hoskins 4 (43), Altherr (56). RLISP: Los Angeles 2 (Granderson, Grandal); Philadelphia 3 (Williams, Altherr, Crawford). GIDP: Seager, Verdugo, Altherr, Alfaro. DP: Los Angeles 2 (Seager, Utley, Bellinger), (Seager, Utley, Bellinger); Philadelphia 2 (Crawford, Hoskins), (Hernandez, Galvis, Hoskins). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish 5 1/3 4 1 0 1 7 97 3.96 2/ Watson, 0 0 0 6 3.57 3 1 0 Baez, L, 3-6, 2/3 2 4 4 2 0 36 3.17 1/ Cingrani 0 0 1 3 4.54 3 0 0 Stewart 1 1 1 1 1 1 16 3.62 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nola, W, 12-10 7 5 2 2 2 8 94 3.56 Garcia, 1 3 0 0 0 0 8 2.43 Neris 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.23 Inherited runners-scored: Watson 2-0, Cingrani 1-0. HBP: Baez (Alfaro). Umpires: Home, Paul Emmel; First, Chad Whitson; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Brian O’Nora. T: 3:23. A: 20,145 .

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .259 Mauer 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .308 Polanco ss 4 0 2 0 0 2 .253 Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .251 Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .254 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .292 Grossman dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Gimenez c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .217 Kepler rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .243 Totals 34 2 8 1 2 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 0 3 2 0 0 .265 Judge rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .276 Sanchez c 5 0 1 0 0 2 .277 Gregorius ss 4 0 1 0 1 1 .292 Headley dh 4 1 0 0 0 3 .278 Castro 2b 4 1 3 1 1 0 .301 Ellsbury cf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .267 Frazier 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .213 Bird 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .144 Totals 35 5 11 4 6 7 Minnesota 101 000 000 — 2 8 1 New York 010 211 00x — 5 11 0 E: Mauer (2). LOB: Minnesota 7, New York 14. 2B: Gimenez (8), Gardner (23), Gregorius (27), Ellsbury (18). HR: Kepler (18), off Sabathia. RBIs: Kepler (64), Gardner 2 (60), Judge (98), Castro (57). SB: Polanco (11), Gardner (23). SF: Judge. RLISP: Minnesota 5 (Mauer, Buxton, Rosario 2, Kepler); New York 10 (Gardner 2, Judge 2, Sanchez, Headley, Castro, Frazier 2, Bird). GIDP: Escobar. DP: New York 1 (Gregorius, Castro, Bird). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Berrios, L, 12-8 31/3 5 3 3 4 4 90 3.94 2/ Busenitz 3 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.61 2/ 1 0 19 3.77 Gee 3 1 1 0 1/ Boshers 3 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.03 Pressly 1 3 1 1 1 1 26 4.89 1/ Turley 3 1 0 0 0 0 9 10.47 2/ Curtiss 3 0 0 0 0 1 12 16.62 Moya 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia, W, 12-5 6 6 2 2 1 5 77 3.81 Green, 1 1 0 0 1 0 19 1.93 Robertson, 1 0 0 0 0 3 12 1.99 Chapman, S, 20-24 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 3.50 Inherited runners-scored: Busenitz 2-1, Boshers 3-1, Curtiss 1-0. HBP: Gee (Headley). WP: Busenitz, Pressly, Curtiss. Umpires: Home, Gabe Morales; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Eric Cooper. T: 3:30. A: 30,218 .

Mike Montgomery took a no-hit bid into the sixth inning, Kyle Schwarber hit his 28th home run and Chicago extended its winning streak to a seasonhigh seven with a 2-1 win over the Tampa Bay Rays Tuesday night in manager Joe Maddon’s return to Tropicana Field. Maddon managed the Rays from 2006-14, then left to manage Chicago and last year led the Cubs to their irst World Series title since 1908.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Brewers 1, Pirates 0 • Chase Anderson struck out eight over six innings, Domingo Santana homered and visiting Milwaukee shut out Pittsburgh for the second straight day. The Brewers won for the ninth time in 11 games. Nationals 4, Braves 2 • Max Scherzer allowed ive hits in seven innings, and Washington tuned up for the playofs with a win over the host Braves. Giants 4, Rockies 3 • Hunter Pence drove in the winning run with a sacriice ly in the bottom of the ninth. Phillies 6, Dodgers 2 • Rhys Hoskins had four RBIs, including a tiebreaking, three-run double of Pedro Baez in seventh inning that led host Philadelphia past Los Angeles. The Dodgers’ magic number to clinch a ifth straight division title remained at three. Los Angeles has lost three straight and 19 of 24. Marlins 5, Mets 4 • J.T. Realmuto homered in the 10th inning and Miami beat visiting New York after rallying for three runs in the ninth against former teammate A.J. Ramos. Padres 6, D’backs 2 • Travis Wood pitched six eicient innings and contributed two RBIs as San Diego won at home.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Red Sox 1, Orioles 0 • Jackie Bradley Jr. scored the lone run on a wild pitch by Brad Brach in the 11th inning, and visiting Boston used six pitchers to silence the Baltimore bats. Yankees 5, Twins 2 • CC Sabathia recovered from a shaky start to pitch six innings and host New York beat Minnesota to ensure its sixth straight series win. Blue Jays 5, Royals 2 • Marcus Stroman pitched seven innings to win for the irst time in six starts, Darwin Barney hit a two-run homer and host Toronto beat Kansas City. Astros 3, White Sox 1 • Jose Altuve homered, Alex Bregman hit an RBI double and AL West champion Houston extended its winning streak to ive games with a win over visiting Chicago. Rangers 3, Mariners 1 • Mike Leake had another strong outing for host Seattle, but Texas scored twice of reliever Nick Vincent in the eighth to win. A’s 9, Tigers 8 • Jed Lowrie hit a grand slam in the eighth and drove in ive runs as Oakland rallied for the win in Detroit. Associated Press

Brewers 1, Pirates 0 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .241 Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Broxton cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Braun lf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .279 Shaw 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 D.Santana rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .279 1-Berry pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vogt c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Pina c 0 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Arcia ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .272 Phillips cf-rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .232 Anderson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .149 b-Villar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Swarzak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Sogard ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Totals 30 1 6 1 5 9 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Marte lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .251 McCutchen cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Polanco rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Mercer ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Diaz c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Moroff 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .194 Williams p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .051 a-Jaso ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Neverauskas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hudson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --E.Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Bostick ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 33 0 6 0 0 11 Milwaukee 000 100 000 — 1 6 1 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 a-struck out for Williams in the 5th. b-out on fielder’s choice for Anderson in the 7th. c-singled for E.Santana in the 8th. d-popped out for Swarzak in the 9th. 1-ran for D.Santana in the 9th. E: Anderson (1). LOB: Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 6. HR: D.Santana (26), off Williams. RBIs: D.Santana (78). SB: Berry (1), Marte 2 (18). CS: Braun (4). S: Arcia. RLISP: Milwaukee 4 (Thames, Anderson, Sogard 2); Pittsburgh 3 (Bell, Polanco 2). GIDP: Shaw. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Frazier, Mercer, Bell). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson, W, 11/3 6 5 0 0 0 8 99 2.74 Swarzak, 2 1 0 0 0 1 18 2.15 Knebel, S, 37-42 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.29 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, L, 6-9 5 3 1 1 2 6 87 4.18 Neverauskas 11/3 1 0 0 2 1 30 2.95 2/ 1 7 4.50 Hudson 3 0 0 0 0 E.Santana 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.50 Kontos 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 3.65 Inherited runners-scored: Hudson 2-0. Umpires: Home, Tony Randazzo; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Roberto Ortiz. T: 3:04. A: 13,929 .

Nationals 4, Braves 2 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 2 2 1 1 0 .281 Werth rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .234 1-De Aza pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .149 Rendon 3b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .305 Zimmerman 1b 5 0 3 2 0 2 .304 Kendrick lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .322 Difo 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268 Wieters c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .226 Scherzer p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .169 a-Lind ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .305 Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 4 11 4 2 6 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Peterson lf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .205 Albies 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Freeman 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .317 Markakis rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Suzuki c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .267 Ruiz 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .205 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Garcia ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Adams lf-cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .297 Swanson ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .234 Gohara p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Camargo 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .306 Totals 31 2 5 2 2 9 Washington 002 010 100 — 4 11 0 Atlanta 000 110 000 — 2 5 0 a-grounded out for Scherzer in the 8th. b-popped out for Motte in the 9th. 1-ran for Werth in the 9th. LOB: Washington 9, Atlanta 5. 2B: Turner (21), Werth (8), Rendon (39), Zimmerman (30), Taylor (22), Wieters (20), Swanson (23). RBIs: Turner (42), Rendon (95), Zimmerman 2 (101), Suzuki (43), Swanson (48). SB: Turner 2 (42), Adams (9), Peterson (3). S: Scherzer, Gohara. RLISP: Washington 5 (Kendrick, Difo 2, Taylor, Scherzer); Atlanta 3 (Albies, Markakis, Ruiz). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, W, 15-6 7 5 2 2 1 7 112 2.59 Madson, 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 1.76 Doolittle, S, 22-23 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.61 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gohara, L, 1-2 61/3 11 4 4 0 4 93 6.06 Winkler 12/3 0 0 0 1 1 27 1.54 Motte 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 3.79 Inherited runners-scored: Winkler 1-0. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Nic Lentz; Third, Kerwin Danley. T: 3:01. A: 26,709 .

Tuesday NY Yankees 5, Minnesota 2 Boston 1, Baltimore 0, 11 inn. Toronto 5, Kansas City 2 Cubs 2, Tampa Bay 1 Oakland 9, Detroit 8 Houston 3, White Sox 1 Texas 3, Seattle 1 Cleveland at LA Angels, late Monday Boston 10, Baltimore 8, 11 inn. NY Yankees 2, Minnesota 1 Oakland 8, Detroit 3

x-clinched playoffs | y-clinched division

Wednesday’s pitching matchups

Red Sox 1, Orioles 0 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bogaerts ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Benintendi lf 3 0 1 0 2 1 .278 Betts rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .262 Moreland 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Vazquez c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Devers 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .293 Travis dh 3 0 1 0 0 2 .300 1-R.Davis pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228 a-Pedroia ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Holt 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .190 Bradley Jr. cf 4 1 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 37 1 6 0 3 7 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham ss 5 0 0 0 0 4 .279 Machado 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .264 Schoop 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .298 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Mancini lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .291 Trumbo dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .237 C.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Hays rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .304 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .262 b-Alvarez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .308 Castillo c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Totals 38 0 5 0 2 13 Boston 000 000 000 01 — 1 6 1 Baltimore 000 000 000 00 — 0 5 0 a-grounded out for R.Davis in the 10th. b-struck out for Joseph in the 10th. 1-ran for Travis in the 8th. E: Devers (13). LOB: Boston 6, Baltimore 8. 2B: Benintendi (26), Machado (32), Hays (2). SB: Jones (2). RLISP: Boston 4 (Betts, Moreland 3); Baltimore 3 (Beckham, Mancini, Trumbo). GIDP: Bradley Jr., Pedroia. DP: Baltimore 2 (Beckham, C.Davis), (Beckham, Schoop, C.Davis). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz 61/3 5 0 0 2 5 98 3.15 2/ Smith 0 0 2 7 0.00 3 0 0 Reed 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.97 Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 0 1 21 1.38 Kelly, W, 4-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 18 2.63 Barnes, S, 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 3.82 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 8 3 0 0 1 7 106 4.61 Gausman O’Day 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 3.59 Brach, L, 4-5 2 2 1 1 2 0 27 2.60 HBP: Kimbrel (Jones). WP: Brach. Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Marty Foster. T: 3:27. A: 21,449 .

Marlins 5, Mets 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Reyes ss 5 2 4 2 0 1 .244 Cabrera 3b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .278 Smith 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .218 d’Arnaud c 5 1 2 2 0 0 .240 Nimmo lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .269 Lagares cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Evans 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .294 Lugo p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Smoker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Cecchini ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Reynolds ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .225 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 40 4 11 4 2 6 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Suzuki lf 5 0 1 1 0 0 .263 Stanton rf 1 0 0 0 4 1 .278 Yelich cf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .285 Bour 1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .297 Realmuto c 5 2 3 1 0 1 .277 Dietrich 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .241 Anderson 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .268 Aviles ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .241 b-Ozuna ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .305 Rojas ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .270 e-Gordon ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .307 Despaigne p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Ellington p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Tazawa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Telis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Ellis ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .194 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 36 5 10 5 5 9 New York 100 002 001 0 — 4 11 0 Miami 000 100 003 1 — 5 10 0 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for Smoker in the 7th. b-struck out for Aviles in the 7th. c-flied out for Tazawa in the 8th. d-out on sacrifice bunt for Blevins in the 9th. e-struck out for Rojas in the 9th. f-singled for Guerra in the 9th. LOB: New York 9, Miami 8. 2B: Realmuto (29), Dietrich (20). HR: Reyes (14), off Despaigne; d’Arnaud (13), off Despaigne; Yelich (18), off Lugo; Bour (22), off Ramos; Realmuto (17), off Sewald. RBIs: Reyes 2 (55), d’Arnaud 2 (47), Suzuki (20), Yelich (78), Bour (69), Realmuto (63), Ellis (10). S: Reynolds. RLISP: New York 4 (Smith 2, Lagares 2); Miami 5 (Yelich 2, Bour, Dietrich, Anderson). GIDP: Yelich, Realmuto. DP: New York 2 (Smith, Reyes, Lugo), (Reyes, Evans, Smith). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lugo 5 4 1 1 1 3 83 5.03 Smoker, 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 5.43 Familia, 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 4.87 Blevins, 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 3.04 2/ Ramos, 1 2 32 4.08 3 5 3 3 2/ 1 19 4.57 Sewald, L, 0-6 3 1 1 1 0 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Despaigne 6 6 3 3 1 2 81 4.37 Ellington 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 6.35 Tazawa 1 2 0 0 1 2 29 5.12 Guerra 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 4.11 Barraclough, W, 6-2 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.14 Inherited runners-scored: Sewald 3-0. WP: Smoker. Umpires: Home, Stu Scheurwater; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Larry Vanover. T: 3:22. A: 16,405 .

Astros 3, White Sox 1 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sanchez 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .263 Moncada 2b 4 1 3 0 0 1 .241 Abreu 1b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .306 Delmonico lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Garcia rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .333 Davidson dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .221 Anderson ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .262 Smith c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .278 a-Hanson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .183 b-Narvaez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Totals 35 1 6 1 2 14 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .291 Reddick rf 3 0 2 0 0 1 .317 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .348 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .302 Gonzalez lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .293 Bregman 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .279 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Gurriel 1b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .295 McCann c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Totals 29 3 8 3 1 3 Chicago 001 000 000 — 1 6 0 Houston 000 200 01x — 3 8 2 a-struck out for Smith in 9th. b-struck out for Engel in 9th. E: Correa (9), Bregman (12). LOB: Chicago 9, Houston 4. 2B: Abreu (39), Springer (28), Bregman (36), Gurriel (38). HR: Altuve (24), off Giolito. RBIs: Abreu (98), Altuve 2 (79), Bregman (60). SB: Moncada (3), Abreu (3). CS: Reddick (3). S: Reddick. RLISP: Chicago 6 (Sanchez, Delmonico 2, Garcia, Davidson, Smith); Houston 3 (Gonzalez, Beltran, McCann). DP: Chicago 2 (Anderson, Abreu), (Abreu, Smith, Sanchez). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Giolito, L, 2-3 62/3 7 2 2 1 3 100 2.58 1/ Bummer 3 5.50 3 0 0 0 0 0 Farquhar 1 1 1 1 0 0 11 4.53 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McHugh, W, 3-2 5 5 1 1 1 5 87 3.44 Harris, 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.12 Gregerson, 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 4.40 Devenski, 1 0 0 0 1 3 20 2.68 Giles, S, 32/36 1 1 0 0 0 3 15 2.41 Inherited runners-scored: Bummer 1-0. WP: McHugh, Giolito, Giles. Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Bruce Dreckman. T: 2:47. A: 23,293 .

Athletics 9, Tigers 8 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Barreto ss 6 1 1 0 0 2 .197 Pinder cf 5 1 2 0 0 3 .243 Lowrie 2b 5 2 3 5 0 0 .279 Davis lf 4 0 1 0 1 3 .242 Olson 1b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .267 Healy dh 5 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Chapman 3b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .231 Canha rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .225 b-Joyce ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Smolinski rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Garneau c 2 1 1 0 1 0 .190 c-Wendle ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .400 Phegley c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .203 Totals 42 9 14 9 4 14 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 5 1 1 1 1 2 .236 Presley lf 6 1 4 1 0 1 .322 2-Jones pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .170 Cabrera dh 5 1 3 0 0 1 .249 1-Romine pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Castellanos rf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .271 Candelario 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .277 Navarro 1b 3 2 1 0 2 2 .206 McCann c 5 1 2 3 0 2 .263 Collins cf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .199 a-Mahtook ph-cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .277 Iglesias ss 4 0 1 1 1 0 .259 Totals 41 8 15 8 7 9 Oakland 021 001 140 — 9 14 0 Detroit 001 142 000 — 8 15 1 a-pinch hit for Collins in 5th. b-flied out for Canha in 7th. c-singled for Garneau in 8th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 8th. 2-ran for Presley in the 9th. E: Iglesias (7). LOB: Oakland 10, Detroit 13. 2B: Lowrie (47), Healy (27), Presley (10), Cabrera (22), Castellanos (34), Navarro (1), Iglesias (31). 3B: McCann (2). HR: Olson (23), off Bell; Chapman (13), off Bell; Lowrie (14), off Wilson; Kinsler (20), off Gossett; Presley (2), off Gossett; Castellanos (24), off Brady. RBIs: Lowrie 5 (64), Olson (43), Healy (76), Chapman (34), Canha (12), Kinsler (47), Presley (15), Castellanos 2 (94), McCann 3 (48), Iglesias (54). RLISP: Oakland 5 (Pinder, Healy 2, Joyce 2); Detroit 6 (Kinsler 2, Presley 2, Mahtook 2). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gossett 42/3 9 6 6 3 3 90 5.38 1/ Coulombe 2 1 16 3.65 3 1 0 0 Brady 1 2 2 2 1 1 24 6.51 Casilla, W, 4-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.34 Hatcher, 1 2 0 0 1 2 20 3.95 Treinen, S, 12-17 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 4.20 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bell 31/3 5 3 3 3 5 76 6.52 Saupold 2 2 1 1 0 3 35 4.68 VerHagen, 1 2 1 1 0 2 22 5.46 Stumpf 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 2.73 Wilson, L, 2-5, 1 4 4 4 0 2 32 4.42 Hardy 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 19 5.64 1/ Greene 3 2.67 3 0 0 0 0 0 Stumpf pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inh. rnnrs-scored: Coulombe 1-1, Saupold 2-0, VerHagen 1-0, Stumpf 2-0, Wilson 3-1. Umpires: Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Chris Conroy. T: 3:58. A: 23,460 .

Padres 6, Diamondbacks 2 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pollock cf 3 2 3 2 1 0 .268 Rosales 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .231 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Martinez rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .295 Iannetta c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Drury 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Marte ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Negron lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .125 Godley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .049 a-Vargas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McFarland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 c-Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bracho p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 2 4 2 2 6 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 3 2 2 0 1 1 .268 Asuaje 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .278 Myers 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .244 Solarte ss 3 1 1 2 0 1 .251 Spangenberg 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .260 Renfroe rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .229 Jankowski lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .148 Hedges c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .208 Wood p 2 0 1 2 0 1 .235 b-Szczur ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Maton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Baumann p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Villanueva ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 31 6 9 6 4 9 Arizona 100 001 000 — 2 4 1 San Diego 203 001 00x — 6 9 1 a-grounded out for Godley in the 6th. b-popped out for Wood in the 6th. c-struck out for McFarland in the 8th. d-grounded out for Baumann in the 8th. E: Godley (2), Solarte (7). LOB: Arizona 2, San Diego 6. 2B: Pollock (33), Myers (27). HR: Pollock (11), off Wood; Pollock (12), off Wood. RBIs: Pollock 2 (44), Asuaje (20), Myers (72), Solarte 2 (61), Wood 2 (6). SB: Margot (15). SF: Solarte. S: Godley. RLISP: Arizona 1 (Martinez); San Diego 4 (Margot, Asuaje, Jankowski, Hedges). GIDP: Rosales, Martinez, Marte. DP: Arizona 1 (Drury, Goldschmidt); San Diego 3 (Solarte, Asuaje, Myers), (Solarte, Asuaje, Myers), (Asuaje, Solarte, Myers). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Godley, L, 8-8 5 8 5 5 3 6 103 3.20 Barrett 1 1 1 1 1 0 15 5.09 McFarland 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 5.44 Bracho 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 5.71 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wood, W, 4-6 6 3 2 2 2 3 83 6.55 Maton 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 4.31 Baumann 1 0 0 0 0 1 23 1.15 Torres 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 4.28 WP: Godley, Barrett. Umpires: Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Greg Gibson. T: 2:45. A: 20,101 .

Rangers 3, Mariners 1 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .281 Choo rf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .260 Andrus ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .302 Beltre dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .312 Mazara lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 Rua lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Gallo 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .212 Chirinos c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Odor 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .209 Robinson 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .203 b-Gomez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .253 1-Middlebrooks pr-3b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .238 Totals 34 310 3 0 7 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Haniger rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .277 Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .283 Cruz dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .285 2-Hannemann pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .251 Valencia 1b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .259 a-Alonso ph-1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .264 c-Ruiz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Zunino c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 Heredia cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .259 Gamel lf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .278 Totals 31 1 6 1 3 5 Texas 010 000 020 — 3 10 0 Seattle 000 010 000 — 1 6 0 a-walked for Valencia in the 7th. b-doubled for Robinson in the 8th. c-grounded out for Alonso in the 9th. 1-ran for Gomez in the 8th. 2-ran for Cruz in the 8th. LOB: Texas 5, Seattle 7. 2B: Mazara (30), Odor (20), Gomez (21), Gamel (23). RBIs: Choo (73), Andrus (86), Gallo (76), Gamel (55). SB: DeShields (29). CS: Andrus (9). SF: Choo. RLISP: Texas 3 (Mazara, Odor, Robinson); Seattle 3 (Segura, Seager, Gamel). GIDP: Seager. DP: Texas 1 (Gallo); Seattle 1 (Gamel, Valencia). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perez 61/3 4 1 1 1 4 98 4.70 Barnette, W, 2-1 2/3 2 0 0 1 0 24 4.58 1/ Bush, 0 0 6 3.49 3 0 0 0 2/ 1 1 12 3.38 Diekman, 3 0 0 0 Claudio, S, 9-13 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.65 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 62/3 6 1 1 0 5 93 3.91 1/ Rzepczynski 0 0 3 3.82 3 0 0 0 Vincent, L, 3-3 1 3 2 2 0 1 15 2.87 Pazos 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.57 Inherited runners-scored: Diekman 1-0. HBP: Bush (Haniger). Umpires: Home, James Hoye; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Will Little; Third, Tim Timmons. T: 2:54. A: 17,251 .

NL

Pitcher

StL Cin

Weaver (R) Davis (R)

Time W-L

ERA

6-1 1-2

1.89 7.71

5-10 12:10 13-6

4.99 3.62

Col SF

Chatwood (R) 8-12 Moore (L) 2:45 5-14

4.57 5.39

LA Phi

Wood (L) 15-3 Thompson (R) 6:05 2-2

2.69 4.46

Mil Pit

Wilkerson (R) 0-0 0.00 Brault (L) 6:05 1-0 4.38

NY Montero (R) Mia Urena (R)

6:10

Was Gonzalez (L) Atl Sims (R)

6:35

14-7 2-5

2.68 5.52

Ari SD

Ray (L) Lamet (R)

8:10

14-5 7-7

2.74 4.15

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Min Colon (R) NY Severino (R)

6-13 12:05 13-6

6.39 2.93

Oak Mengden (R) Det Sanchez (R)

1-1 12:10 3-4

4.30 7.03

Bos Sale (L) Bal Miley (L)

16-7 6:05 8-13

2.86 5.32

KC Tor

Junis (R) Anderson (L) 6:07

7-2 3-3

4.15 5.73

Chi Shields (R) Hou Peacock (R)

7:10

4-6 11-2

5.43 2.98

Cle LA

9-9 9:07 6-14

5.04 5.11

Tex Cashner (R) 9-10 Sea Hernandez (R) 9:10 5-4

3.40 4.19

IL

Time W-L

ERA

11-7 3-6

4.30 4.25

Tomlin (R) Nolasco (R)

Pitcher

ChC Lester (L) TB Snell (L)

6:10

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .331; Harper, Washington, .325; JTurner, Los Angeles, .324; Murphy, Washington, .318; Freeman, Atlanta, .317; Votto, Cincinnati, .317; LeMahieu, Colorado, .315; Posey, San Francisco, .313; Arenado, Colorado, .308; Gordon, Miami, .307. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 131; Stanton, Miami, 115; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 109; Bryant, Chicago, 104; Gordon, Miami, 103; Votto, Cincinnati, 100; Rizzo, Chicago, 97; Arenado, Colorado, 93; LeMahieu, Colorado, 93; Harper, Washington, 92. RBI: Arenado, Colorado, 125; Stanton, Miami, 117; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 115; Ozuna, Miami, 113; Rizzo, Chicago, 106; Lamb, Arizona, 101; Zimmerman, Washington, 101; Duvall, Cincinnati, 97; Shaw, Milwaukee, 96; Votto, Cincinnati, 96. HITS: Blackmon, Colorado, 199; Inciarte, Atlanta, 190; Gordon, Miami, 185; LeMahieu, Colorado, 178; Arenado, Colorado, 175; Ozuna, Miami, 175; Votto, Cincinnati, 165; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 160; Yelich, Miami, 160; Murphy, Washington, 159. DOUBLES: Arenado, Colorado, 42; Herrera, Philadelphia, 40; Murphy, Washington, 40; Rendon, Washington, 39; Bryant, Chicago, 36; Markakis, Atlanta, 36; Drury, Arizona, 35; Yelich, Miami, 35; Duvall, Cincinnati, 34; 3 tied at 33. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 14; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 9; Fowler, Cardinals, 8; Gordon, Miami, 8; Arenado, Colorado, 7; Cozart, Cincinnati, 7; Reyes, New York, 7; 6 tied at 6. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 55; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 38; Blackmon, Colorado, 35; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 35; Votto, Cincinnati, 35; Arenado, Colorado, 34; Ozuna, Miami, 34; Zimmerman, Washington, 33; Rizzo, Chicago, 32; 2 tied at 31. STOLEN BASES: Hamilton, Cincinnati, 58; Gordon, Miami, 55; TTurner, Washington, 42; Villar, Milwaukee, 23; Inciarte, Atlanta, 22; Peraza, Cincinnati, 22; Reyes, New York, 22; Pham, Cardinals, 21; Myers, San Diego, 20; 2 tied at 19. ERA: Kershaw, Los Angeles, 2.26; Scherzer, Washington, 2.59; Strasburg, Washington, 2.60; Gonzalez, Washington, 2.68; Ray, Arizona, 2.74; Greinke, Arizona, 2.87; Lynn, Cardinals, 3.09; Arrieta, Chicago, 3.48; Nelson, Milwaukee, 3.49; deGrom, New York, 3.55. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 253; deGrom, New York, 228; Greinke, Arizona, 208; Ray, Arizona, 206; Martinez, Cardinals, 205; Nelson, Milwaukee, 199; Samardzija, San Francisco, 197; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 194; Strasburg, Washington, 190; Cole, Pittsburgh, 184.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Altuve, Houston, .347; Garcia, Chicago, .333; Hosmer, Kansas City, .323; Reddick, Houston, .316; Ramirez, Cleveland, .313; Mauer, Minnesota, .307; Abreu, Chicago, .305; Andrus, Texas, .300; Cain, Kansas City, .300; Schoop, Baltimore, .297. RUNS: Judge, New York, 118; Altuve, Houston, 104; Springer, Houston, 103; Ramirez, Cleveland, 98; Andrus, Texas, 96; Upton, Los Angeles, 94; Betts, Boston, 93; Dozier, Minnesota, 92; Abreu, Chicago, 91; 4 tied at 90. RBI: Cruz, Seattle, 110; Schoop, Baltimore, 105; Upton, Los Angeles, 103; KDavis, Oakland, 102; Abreu, Chicago, 98; Judge, New York, 98; Pujols, Los Angeles, 96; 4 tied at 94. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 194; Hosmer, Kansas City, 182; Abreu, Chicago, 178; Andrus, Texas, 178; Schoop, Baltimore, 174; Ramirez, Cleveland, 171; Lindor, Cleveland, 169; Cabrera, Kansas City, 165; Cain, Kansas City, 164; Jones, Baltimore, 162. DOUBLES: Ramirez, Cleveland, 50; Lowrie, Oakland, 47; Betts, Boston, 44; Andrus, Texas, 42; Upton, Los Angeles, 42; Lindor, Cleveland, 40; Abreu, Chicago, 39; Altuve, Houston, 38; Gurriel, Houston, 38; 4 tied at 36. TRIPLES: Castellanos, Detroit, 10; Sanchez, Chicago, 8; Abreu, Chicago, 6; Bogaerts, Boston, 6; Buxton, Minnesota, 6; Mahtook, Detroit, 6; Merrifield, Kansas City, 6; Ramirez, Cleveland, 6; 4 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Judge, New York, 44; KDavis, Oakland, 39; Gallo, Texas, 38; Smoak, Toronto, 38; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 36; Morrison, Tampa Bay, 36; Moustakas, Kansas City, 36; Cruz, Seattle, 33; 3 tied at 32. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 31; Maybin, Houston, 31; Merrifield, Kansas City, 30; RDavis, Boston, 28; DeShields, Texas, 28; Dyson, Seattle, 28; Buxton, Minnesota, 26; Andrus, Texas, 24; Betts, Boston, 24; Cain, Kansas City, 24. ERA: Kluber, Cleveland, 2.35; Sale, Boston, 2.86; Severino, New York, 2.93; Stroman, Toronto, 3.01; Pomeranz, Boston, 3.15; Santana, Minnesota, 3.34; Gray, New York, 3.38; Cashner, Texas, 3.40; Carrasco, Cleveland, 3.48; Verlander, Houston, 3.50. STRIKEOUTS: Sale, Boston, 287; Kluber, Cleveland, 252; Archer, Tampa Bay, 241; Severino, New York, 218; Carrasco, Cleveland, 206; Verlander, Houston, 202; Bauer, Cleveland, 183; Tanaka, New York, 173; Pomeranz, Boston, 171; 2 tied at 170.


09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1 CARDINALS 8, REDS 7 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wong 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .291 Pham lf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .305 Fowler cf 4 3 3 2 1 0 .266 Martinez 1b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .309 Molina c 4 1 1 3 1 0 .276 DeJong ss 5 1 2 2 0 1 .285 Gyorko 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Mejia 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Piscotty rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .243 Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Voit ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Gant p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Garcia ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Cecil p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Bader ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Sherriff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bowman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Carpenter ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lyons p Totals 38 8 8 8 4 3 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker rf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .283 Cozart ss 5 1 2 2 0 1 .303 Votto 1b 3 1 1 1 2 2 .317 Gennett 2b 5 2 2 1 0 0 .298 Duvall lf 2 1 0 1 2 1 .247 Schebler cf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .235 Kivlehan 3b 4 0 0 1 0 3 .201 Turner c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .135 Stephens p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Wojciechowski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Reed p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Vincej ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Barnhart ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Shackelford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Lorenzen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 g-Peraza ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Adleman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .103 Totals 33 7 8 7 5 11 Cardinals 000 500 010 2 — 8 8 0 Cincinnati 112 002 000 1 — 7 8 1 a-grounded out for Flaherty in the 3rd. b-popped out for Gant in the 4th. c-struck out for Reed in the 5th. d-grounded out for Cecil in the 7th. e-hit by pitch for Peralta in the 7th. f-popped out for Bowman in the 9th. g-lined out for Lorenzen in the 9th. E: Duvall (6). LOB: Cardinals 5, Cincinnati 6. 2B: Fowler (20), Winker (4), Gennett (21). HR: Molina (18), off Stephens; DeJong (23), off Stephens; Fowler (17), off Shackelford; Cozart (23), off Gant; Gennett (26), off Nicasio. RBIs: Fowler 2 (57), Martinez (41), Molina 3 (78), DeJong 2 (59), Cozart 2 (62), Votto (96), Gennett (89), Duvall (97), Schebler (61), Kivlehan (24). SB: Wong (8), Cozart (3). SF: Duvall, Schebler, Kivlehan. RLISP: Cardinals 3 (Molina, Mejia 2); Cincinnati 3 (Votto 2, Turner). GIDP: Gennett 2. DP: Cardinals 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Flaherty 2 3 2 2 1 2 34 6.46 Gant 1 2 2 2 1 1 21 3.86 Cecil 3 1 2 2 1 4 37 4.04 Brebbia 0 0 0 0 1 0 13 2.35 Sherriff 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.60 2/ 0 0 1 11 4.04 Bowman 3 0 0 Nicasio 1 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 29 2.82 2/ Lyons 0 0 1 10 2.68 3 0 0 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 2/ Stephens 3 3 5 5 5 1 2 70 4.80 Wojcchwski 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 5 6.25 Reed 1 0 0 0 2 0 23 5.51 Hernandez 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 19 6.63 2/ Peralta 0 0 0 6 3.88 3 0 0 Shackelford 1 1 1 1 0 0 12 5.68 Lorenzen 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.99 Adleman 1 2 2 2 1 0 25 5.52 Brebbia pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. W: Nicasio 4-5. L: Adleman 5-11. S: Lyons 3-4. BS: Shackelford 1-1. H: Peralta 14. Inherited runners-scored: Sherriff 2-0, Bowman 2-0, Wojciechowski 1-0. HBP: Brebbia (Barnhart), Sherriff (Schebler), Adleman (Wong). Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Chris Segal; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Dan Iassogna. T: 3:23. A: 17,165 (42,319).

CARDINALS

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

Carpenter’s shoulder still an issue If Cardinals are eliminated, he might be done for season BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

CINCINNATI • Facing what may have been the Cardinals’ last gasp at slowing the Cubs and raising their chances, Cubs manager Joe Maddon chose to load the bases and send a lefty against leadoff hitter Matt Carpenter late in Sunday’s game. The reason, known only to Maddon, could have been Carpenter’s numbers against lefties this season or how he looked playing Sunday through persisting soreness in his right shoulder. The result was a strikeout, and renewed concern for the Cardinals. “I know he’s frustrated,” manager Mike Matheny said. “We have a group of guys who have been our go-to players in big situations — not just to come through but to talk about previous success and what it should look like this time of year. You want that current success to match up with the message that you’re giving. That’s frustrating for a guy like Matt. He puts a lot of this on his shoulders.” With Jedd Gyorko available to play in the field for the first time since tearing his hamstring last month, Matheny opted to keep Carpenter out of the lineup Tuesday, though Carpenter pinch-hit in the ninth and popped out. The manager said he’s had similar talks with a few regulars who are grimacing through soreness at this point. Carpenter has bursitis in his right shoulder, and he has experienced some bone-on-bone grinding when trying to play. A cortisone shot tamed the pain for a stretch, but he acknowledged Tuesday that he’ll be managing the pain and playing with some of it for the remainder of the season. If the Cardinals are eliminated from the playoff race, the team will consider sitting Carpenter down for the remaining games, if they don’t have importance to the standings. That would allow Carpenter to start on what he and the team have agreed is the only surefire way to heal his shoulder — rest. “If we can get on a run, I want to be a part of that and do whatever I can,” said Carpenter, who struck out four times in Sunday’s loss. He pointed to his shoulder: “This isn’t going to be a crutch for me. I could have been fully healthy and struck out 10 times in a row. That’s not how I’m going to look at things, not when I know I can contribute.”

Matheny told Carpenter about stacking a day of onto Monday’s of day and suggested it was a chance to get Gyorko in the lineup and also ready Carpenter for the last stretch. The Cardinals close the regular season with 13 games in 13 days. Carpenter had found ways on base around his shoulder with 13 walks in his first nine games back after the cortisone shot. At Wrigley Field on Saturday he was encouraged when he drilled his 20th home run of the season to the left-field bleachers, and mixed in the four strikeouts Sunday was a double. Tuesday was “a little reminder to catch your breath,” Matheny said. “Figure out a way to get that shoulder better and figure out a way to finish strong for us here and not wear all the weight of this on your shoulders.”

MARTINEZ ON THE MEND The Cardinals do not expect a flu-like bug that sent Carlos Martinez back home to St. Louis on Sunday to linger long enough to interrupt his scheduled start Thursday in Cincinnati. At some point Sunday, the Cardinals were concerned that Martinez’s illness might spread to the rest of the team, so he flew home to St. Louis and did not join the team on the flight Sunday from Chicago to Cincinnati. Matheny said the righthander had improved by Tuesday and was expected to join the team at Great American Ball Park, cleared of the bug and available. WAINWRIGHT IS BACK As planned, the Cardinals activated veteran starter Adam Wainwright (elbow) from the 10-day disabled list Tuesday and assigned him a seat in the bullpen. Although the Cardinals have reserved the right to rethink their use of the righthander, Wainwright and the club expect him to be used as a primarily a reliever in the season’s final weeks. His role could be offering long relief, or even offering a tag-team partner for rookie Jack Flaherty in the closing week or so of the season. Matheny mused Wainwright could even draw matchup assignments. “He’s not going to scare,” Matheny said. “If we’ve got guys he has a history against and we need somebody to come in and throw some big pitches, I’m not going to limit him. If we get down to it and he’s our best option, I’m not going to rule it out.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Paul DeJong runs the bases after hitting a solo home run Tuesday night in Cincinnati.

AVERAGES Batting Sierra J. Martinez Pham Wong DeJong Molina Gyorko Bader Fowler Voit Garcia Piscotty Carpenter Grichuk Kelly Mejia Rosario Team

AVG .345 .310 .307 .295 .283 .276 .271 .261 .261 .250 .249 .245 .239 .238 .171 .114 .000 .259

Pitching W L Weaver 6 1 Nicasio 0 0 Gant 0 0 Brebbia 0 0 Lyons 4 1 Tuivailala 3 3 Lynn 11 7 Alcantara 0 0 C. Martinez 11 11 Oh 1 5 Cecil 2 4 Wacha 12 8 Bowman 3 5 Sherrif 1 1 Duke 0 1 Wainwright 12 5 Flaherty 0 1 Team 77 72

AB 55 245 401 329 371 482 399 69 380 104 221 310 468 391 41 35 1 5032

Prior to Tuesday’s game R H 2B 10 19 0 44 76 12 86 123 19 53 97 26 48 105 22 58 133 25 48 108 20 9 18 3 61 99 19 17 26 9 23 55 8 37 76 14 83 112 30 50 93 25 3 7 2 5 4 0 0 0 0 702 1301 263

3B 0 1 2 3 1 1 2 0 8 0 2 1 2 2 0 0 0 26

HR 0 13 21 4 22 17 18 3 16 3 2 9 20 20 0 1 0 179

RBI 5 40 66 41 57 75 64 8 55 17 18 37 66 55 6 2 0 672

BB SO SB E 3 11 2 2 26 54 3 3 62 109 21 1 40 59 7 10 17 115 1 10 25 74 9 7 44 99 6 9 4 17 2 2 58 91 5 1 6 28 0 0 34 57 2 6 46 77 3 2 102 118 2 13 24 125 6 3 4 7 0 0 1 13 0 1 0 0 0 0 539 1249 73 87

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 1.89 10 7 0 47.2 38 11 10 4 11 58 2.08 4 0 2 4.1 4 1 1 0 0 4 2.16 4 0 0 8.1 5 2 2 2 4 7 2.35 43 0 0 46.0 32 13 12 6 9 45 2.72 46 0 2 49.2 38 15 15 3 17 58 2.80 31 0 0 35.1 31 11 11 4 11 29 3.09 31 31 0 180.2 142 71 62 26 72 147 3.38 3 0 0 2.2 2 1 1 1 2 5 3.57 30 30 0 194.1 166 86 77 25 66 205 3.83 59 0 20 56.1 65 28 24 9 13 53 3.94 67 0 1 59.1 65 28 26 6 15 57 4.02 28 28 0 154.2 160 75 69 16 53 146 4.09 70 0 2 55.0 49 28 25 4 17 41 4.15 8 0 0 8.2 8 4 4 2 3 9 5.11 21 0 0 12.1 11 7 7 2 6 6 5.12 23 23 0 121.1 137 72 69 14 44 96 6.08 3 3 0 13.1 15 9 9 3 7 13 3.90 149 149 40 1332.1 1278 632 577 166 445 1234

HOW THEY SCORED Reds irst • Winker doubles. Cozart grounds out, Winker to third. Votto singles, Winker scores. One run. Reds 1, Cardinals 0. Reds second • Duvall walks. Schebler singles, Duvall to third. Kivlehan hits a sacriice ly, Duvall scores. One run. Reds 2, Cardinals 0. Reds third • Winker singles. Cozart homers, Winker scores. Two runs. Reds 4, Cardinals 0. Cardinals fourth • Pham singles. Fowler singles, Pham to third. J.Martinez singles, Pham scores, Fowler to third. Molina homers, Fowler and J.Martinez score. DeJong homers. Five runs. Cardinals 5, Reds 4. Reds sixth • Votto walks. Gennett doubles, Votto to third. Duvall hits a sacriice ly, Votto scores, Gennett to third. Schebler hits a sacriice ly, Gennett scores. Two runs. Reds 6, Cardinals 5. Cardinals eighth • Fowler homers. One run. Cardinals 6, Reds 6. Cardinals 10th • Wong hit by a pitch. Wong steals second. Fowler doubles, Wong scores. Molina walks. DeJong singles, Fowler scores, Molina to third, DeJong to second on an error. Two runs. Cardinals 8, Reds 6. Reds 10th • Gennett homers. One run. Cardinals 8, Reds 7. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Kolten Wong celebrates in the dugout after scoring the go-ahead run on an RBI double by Dexter Fowler in the 10th inning Tuesday night.

Fowler, Molina have big hits as Redbirds rally against Reds CARDINALS • FROM B1

there and just keep fighting, keep swinging. Coming from behind like that is such a hard thing to do at any time of the season. But right now guys are pushing hard. Big hits. A couple big innings.” Fowler led of the eighth with a home run to center field that gave him 17 for the season. That ties his career high and makes good on a prediction made by his friend and instructor Bonds that he would someday morph into a middle-order hitter. The Cubs’ mantra last season with Fowler was “he go, we go” and their leadoff hitter had a celebrated on-base percentage greater than .390. He opened the season as the Cardinals’ leadof hitter, but that didn’t go anywhere and soon Matt Carpenter was back atop the lineup. Fowler was recast as the No. 3 hitter and then later the cleanup hitter, maybe No. 5 hitter, and then on Tuesday back at No. 3. He has been able to work around a series of injuries – swollen left knee and swollen right hand just this past week – to be one of the most productive hitters for the Cardinals in the second half and again Tues-

day. In the 10th, Kolten Wong, the Cardinals’ leadof hitter, got hit by a pitch, stole second, and then scored on Fowler’s double. Paul DeJong singled home Fowler for the insurance run they would need. “Right on time,” Matheny said. Still shaking free from the repercussions of a misspent weekend at Wrigley Field, it took the Cardinals a few innings to find their footing at GABP and three to lose it again. Having lifted starter Jack Flaherty after two innings and looking up from a 4-0 deficit after three, the Cardinals needed only a second look at Reds righty Jackson Stephens to start taking advantage of the cozy ballpark. Three consecutive singles, including one by Fowler and an RBI shot by Jose Martinez, started the scoring. Then the homers started. Yadier Molina, a nuisance for the Reds his entire career and greeted as such before every at-bat, lifted a three-run homer into the left-field seats to tie the score at 4-4. The homer gave him the 600th run of his career. He’s the 23rd Cardinal to score that many with the franchise, and as a catcher only Ted Sim-

Cardinals starting pitcher Jack Flaherty sits in the dugout after being relieved in the second inning.

mons has scored more, with 736. DeJong, relocated Tuesday to the No. 6 spot after two months of batting third, followed Molina with a notable home run of his own. DeJong’s homer broke a tie in the game and the history books. His 23rd homer as a rookie put him ahead of Chris Duncan’s 22 and, in Cardinals history, be-

hind only Albert Pujols’ 37 in 2001. The lead didn’t hold. Although the Cardinals had a bullpen stocked with options for September, lefty Brett Cecil was rolling well enough that Matheny went to him for a third inning. The Cardinals had retaken the lead and Cecil had held it with

two perfect innings. He struck out four batters, and the Reds had back-to-back lefthanded hitters coming up in the sixth inning. The allure of Cecil vs. those lefties, including Joey Votto, was too much to not press the lefty for an extra inning. “Someone was going to have to carry it,” Matheny said. It faltered. Votto took a walk, and Gennett followed with a double to put them both in scoring position. Still, the Cardinals pressed ahead with Cecil. A team that had played the early innings defensively like it didn’t want to give up a run for a tight game, had to now play like a team that expected to score some more runs to get back ahead. Two sacrifice flies put the Reds ahead and erased the benefit of those backto-back homers. Cecil finished the inning, and then it was back to waiting for the hit that the Cardinals couldn’t find too often this past weekend. Fowler, as he did Sunday, provided. This time the Cardinals made it matter. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 2 CARDINALS 8, REDS 7 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wong 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .291 Pham lf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .305 Fowler cf 4 3 3 2 1 0 .266 Martinez 1b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .309 Molina c 4 1 1 3 1 0 .276 DeJong ss 5 1 2 2 0 1 .285 Gyorko 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Mejia 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Piscotty rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .243 Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Voit ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Gant p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Garcia ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Cecil p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Bader ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Sherriff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bowman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Carpenter ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lyons p Totals 38 8 8 8 4 3 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker rf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .283 Cozart ss 5 1 2 2 0 1 .303 Votto 1b 3 1 1 1 2 2 .317 Gennett 2b 5 2 2 1 0 0 .298 Duvall lf 2 1 0 1 2 1 .247 Schebler cf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .235 Kivlehan 3b 4 0 0 1 0 3 .201 Turner c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .135 Stephens p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Wojciechowski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Reed p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Vincej ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Barnhart ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Shackelford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Lorenzen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 g-Peraza ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Adleman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .103 Totals 33 7 8 7 5 11 Cardinals 000 500 010 2 — 8 8 0 Cincinnati 112 002 000 1 — 7 8 1 a-grounded out for Flaherty in the 3rd. b-popped out for Gant in the 4th. c-struck out for Reed in the 5th. d-grounded out for Cecil in the 7th. e-hit by pitch for Peralta in the 7th. f-popped out for Bowman in the 9th. g-lined out for Lorenzen in the 9th. E: Duvall (6). LOB: Cardinals 5, Cincinnati 6. 2B: Fowler (20), Winker (4), Gennett (21). HR: Molina (18), off Stephens; DeJong (23), off Stephens; Fowler (17), off Shackelford; Cozart (23), off Gant; Gennett (26), off Nicasio. RBIs: Fowler 2 (57), Martinez (41), Molina 3 (78), DeJong 2 (59), Cozart 2 (62), Votto (96), Gennett (89), Duvall (97), Schebler (61), Kivlehan (24). SB: Wong (8), Cozart (3). SF: Duvall, Schebler, Kivlehan. RLISP: Cardinals 3 (Molina, Mejia 2); Cincinnati 3 (Votto 2, Turner). GIDP: Gennett 2. DP: Cardinals 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Flaherty 2 3 2 2 1 2 34 6.46 Gant 1 2 2 2 1 1 21 3.86 Cecil 3 1 2 2 1 4 37 4.04 Brebbia 0 0 0 0 1 0 13 2.35 Sherriff 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.60 2/ 0 0 1 11 4.04 Bowman 3 0 0 Nicasio 1 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 29 2.82 2/ Lyons 0 0 1 10 2.68 3 0 0 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 2/ Stephens 3 3 5 5 5 1 2 70 4.80 Wojcchwski 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 5 6.25 Reed 1 0 0 0 2 0 23 5.51 Hernandez 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 19 6.63 2/ Peralta 0 0 0 6 3.88 3 0 0 Shackelford 1 1 1 1 0 0 12 5.68 Lorenzen 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.99 Adleman 1 2 2 2 1 0 25 5.52 Brebbia pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. W: Nicasio 4-5. L: Adleman 5-11. S: Lyons 3-4. BS: Shackelford 1-1. H: Peralta 14. Inherited runners-scored: Sherriff 2-0, Bowman 2-0, Wojciechowski 1-0. HBP: Brebbia (Barnhart), Sherriff (Schebler), Adleman (Wong). Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Chris Segal; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Dan Iassogna. T: 3:23. A: 17,165 (42,319).

CARDINALS

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

Carpenter’s shoulder still an issue If Cardinals are eliminated, he might be done for season BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

CINCINNATI • Facing what may have been the Cardinals’ last gasp at slowing the Cubs and raising their chances, Cubs manager Joe Maddon chose to load the bases and send a lefty against leadoff hitter Matt Carpenter late in Sunday’s game. The reason, known only to Maddon, could have been Carpenter’s numbers against lefties this season or how he looked playing Sunday through persisting soreness in his right shoulder. The result was a strikeout, and renewed concern for the Cardinals. “I know he’s frustrated,” manager Mike Matheny said. “We have a group of guys who have been our go-to players in big situations — not just to come through but to talk about previous success and what it should look like this time of year. You want that current success to match up with the message that you’re giving. That’s frustrating for a guy like Matt. He puts a lot of this on his shoulders.” With Jedd Gyorko available to play in the field for the first time since tearing his hamstring last month, Matheny opted to keep Carpenter out of the lineup Tuesday, though Carpenter pinch-hit in the ninth and popped out. The manager said he’s had similar talks with a few regulars who are grimacing through soreness at this point. Carpenter has bursitis in his right shoulder, and he has experienced some bone-on-bone grinding when trying to play. A cortisone shot tamed the pain for a stretch, but he acknowledged Tuesday that he’ll be managing the pain and playing with some of it for the remainder of the season. If the Cardinals are eliminated from the playoff race, the team will consider sitting Carpenter down for the remaining games, if they don’t have importance to the standings. That would allow Carpenter to start on what he and the team have agreed is the only surefire way to heal his shoulder — rest. “If we can get on a run, I want to be a part of that and do whatever I can,” said Carpenter, who struck out four times in Sunday’s loss. He pointed to his shoulder: “This isn’t going to be a crutch for me. I could have been fully healthy and struck out 10 times in a row. That’s not how I’m going to look at things, not when I know I can contribute.”

Matheny told Carpenter about stacking a day of onto Monday’s of day and suggested it was a chance to get Gyorko in the lineup and also ready Carpenter for the last stretch. The Cardinals close the regular season with 13 games in 13 days. Carpenter had found ways on base around his shoulder with 13 walks in his first nine games back after the cortisone shot. At Wrigley Field on Saturday he was encouraged when he drilled his 20th home run of the season to the left-field bleachers, and mixed in the four strikeouts Sunday was a double. Tuesday was “a little reminder to catch your breath,” Matheny said. “Figure out a way to get that shoulder better and figure out a way to finish strong for us here and not wear all the weight of this on your shoulders.”

MARTINEZ ON THE MEND The Cardinals do not expect a flu-like bug that sent Carlos Martinez back home to St. Louis on Sunday to linger long enough to interrupt his scheduled start Thursday in Cincinnati. At some point Sunday, the Cardinals were concerned that Martinez’s illness might spread to the rest of the team, so he flew home to St. Louis and did not join the team on the flight Sunday from Chicago to Cincinnati. Matheny said the righthander had improved by Tuesday and was expected to join the team at Great American Ball Park, cleared of the bug and available. WAINWRIGHT IS BACK As planned, the Cardinals activated veteran starter Adam Wainwright (elbow) from the 10-day disabled list Tuesday and assigned him a seat in the bullpen. Although the Cardinals have reserved the right to rethink their use of the righthander, Wainwright and the club expect him to be used as a primarily a reliever in the season’s final weeks. His role could be offering long relief, or even offering a tag-team partner for rookie Jack Flaherty in the closing week or so of the season. Matheny mused Wainwright could even draw matchup assignments. “He’s not going to scare,” Matheny said. “If we’ve got guys he has a history against and we need somebody to come in and throw some big pitches, I’m not going to limit him. If we get down to it and he’s our best option, I’m not going to rule it out.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Paul DeJong runs the bases after hitting a solo home run Tuesday night in Cincinnati.

AVERAGES Batting Sierra J. Martinez Pham Wong DeJong Molina Gyorko Fowler Bader Garcia Voit Piscotty Carpenter Grichuk Kelly Mejia Rosario Team

AVG AB .345 55 .309 249 .305 406 .291 333 .285 376 .276 486 .268 403 .266 384 .257 70 .248 222 .248 105 .243 313 .239 469 .238 391 .171 41 .111 36 .000 1 .258 5070

Pitching W L Weaver 6 1 Brebbia 0 0 Lyons 4 1 Tuivailala 3 3 Lynn 11 7 Nicasio 1 0 Alcantara 0 0 C. Martinez 11 11 Sherrif 1 1 Oh 1 5 Gant 0 0 Wacha 12 8 Bowman 3 5 Cecil 2 4 Duke 0 1 Wainwright 12 5 Flaherty 0 1 Team 78 72

R H 2B 10 19 0 45 77 12 87 124 19 54 97 26 49 107 22 59 134 25 48 108 20 64 102 20 9 18 3 23 55 8 17 26 9 37 76 14 83 112 30 50 93 25 3 7 2 5 4 0 0 0 0 710 1309 264

3B 0 1 2 3 1 1 2 8 0 2 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 26

HR RBI BB SO 0 5 3 11 13 41 27 54 21 66 62 109 4 41 40 59 23 59 17 116 18 78 26 74 18 64 44 99 17 57 59 91 3 8 4 17 2 18 34 57 3 17 6 28 9 37 47 79 20 66 102 118 20 55 24 125 0 6 4 7 1 2 1 13 0 0 0 0 182 680 543 1252

SB 2 3 21 8 1 9 6 5 2 2 0 3 2 6 0 0 0 74

E 2 3 1 10 10 7 9 1 2 6 0 2 13 3 0 1 0 87

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 1.89 10 7 0 47.2 38 11 10 4 11 58 2.35 44 0 0 46.0 32 13 12 6 10 45 2.68 47 0 3 50.1 38 15 15 3 17 59 2.80 31 0 0 35.1 31 11 11 4 11 29 3.09 31 31 0 180.2 142 71 62 26 72 147 3.18 5 0 2 5.2 6 2 2 1 0 5 3.38 3 0 0 2.2 2 1 1 1 2 5 3.57 30 30 0 194.1 166 86 77 25 66 205 3.60 9 0 0 10.0 8 4 4 2 4 10 3.83 59 0 20 56.1 65 28 24 9 13 53 3.86 5 0 0 9.1 7 4 4 3 5 8 4.02 28 28 0 154.2 160 75 69 16 53 146 4.04 71 0 2 55.2 49 28 25 4 17 42 4.04 68 0 1 62.1 66 30 28 6 16 61 5.11 21 0 0 12.1 11 7 7 2 6 6 5.12 23 23 0 121.1 137 72 69 14 44 96 6.46 4 4 0 15.1 18 11 11 3 8 15 3.92 150 150 41 1342.1 1286 639 584 168 450 1245

HOW THEY SCORED Reds irst • Winker doubles. Cozart grounds out, Winker to third. Votto singles, Winker scores. One run. Reds 1, Cardinals 0. Reds second • Duvall walks. Schebler singles, Duvall to third. Kivlehan hits a sacriice ly, Duvall scores. One run. Reds 2, Cardinals 0. Reds third • Winker singles. Cozart homers, Winker scores. Two runs. Reds 4, Cardinals 0. Cardinals fourth • Pham singles. Fowler singles, Pham to third. J.Martinez singles, Pham scores, Fowler to third. Molina homers, Fowler and J.Martinez score. DeJong homers. Five runs. Cardinals 5, Reds 4. Reds sixth • Votto walks. Gennett doubles, Votto to third. Duvall hits a sacriice ly, Votto scores, Gennett to third. Schebler hits a sacriice ly, Gennett scores. Two runs. Reds 6, Cardinals 5. Cardinals eighth • Fowler homers. One run. Cardinals 6, Reds 6. Cardinals 10th • Wong hit by a pitch. Wong steals second. Fowler doubles, Wong scores. Molina walks. DeJong singles, Fowler scores, Molina to third, DeJong to second on an error. Two runs. Cardinals 8, Reds 6. Reds 10th • Gennett homers. One run. Cardinals 8, Reds 7. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Kolten Wong celebrates in the dugout after scoring the go-ahead run on an RBI double by Dexter Fowler in the 10th inning Tuesday night.

Fowler, Molina have big hits as Redbirds rally against Reds CARDINALS • FROM B1

for his work in the ninth and his strikeout of Joey Votto with the winning run on base. Nicasio (45) was the seventh of eight pitchers used by the Cardinals, and after he allowed a solo homer in the 10th, lefty Tyler Lyons retired both of the batters he faced to secure the save, his third. The Cubs’ victory against Tampa Bay on Tuesday night shaved the Cardinals’ elimination number down to seven, and the Cardinals’ win held it there. Any combination of Cubs wins or Cardinals losses that equals seven and the Cardinals are bounced from the division race. The Cardinals did move to 3½ back in the wild-card race when Colorado lost late Tuesday night. That’s the backdrop for how Matheny described Fowler’s production. “Right on time,” he said. Still shaking free from the repercussions of a misspent weekend at Wrigley Field, it took the Cardinals a few innings to find their footing at GABP, and then three to lose it again. Rookie Jack Flaherty was lifted after two innings and the Cardinals trailed 4-0 after three. Zack

Cozart’s two-run homer off reliever John Gant doubled the Reds’ lead before the Cardinals’ leadof hitter, Kolten Wong, had a second at-bat. The Cardinals answered swiftly. Three consecutive singles, including one by Fowler and an RBI lash from Jose Martinez, gave the Cardinals’ their first run. Yadier Molina, who torments the Reds and is greeted with boos before every at-bat as a result, drilled a threerun homer to tie the game. That hit yielded his 600th career run. He’s the 23rd in club history with that many for the Cardinals. Paul DeJong followed with a solo home run, his 23rd of the season. That shot broke the tie in the game and a tie in the history books. DeJong moved ahead of Chris Duncan’s 22 homers as a rookie and sits behind only Albert Pujols’ 37 in 2001 in Cardinals history. DeJong had been the Cardinals’ No. 3 hitter for the past two months, but on Tuesday the manager reshuffled. DeJong dropped to sixth. Fowler, fresh from a three-run homer that briefly tied Sunday’s game, was back at third. “A different look,” Matheny said.

Cardinals starting pitcher Jack Flaherty sits in the dugout after being relieved in the second inning.

It’s one Barry Bonds, the seven-time MVP, saw coming. A mentor and friend of Fowler, Bonds has been predicting the past few offseasons that Fowler would morph into a middle-order hitter. The switch-hitter has described being a leadof hitter as if

it’s a trait, as defining for him as his eye color or Air Jordan shoe size. But steadily, over the past few years, his power has improved. Fowler came to the Cardinals after a year when the Cubs’ mantra was “he go, we go.” That didn’t go anywhere with the Cardinals, and Matt Carpenter was back at leadof before the All-Star break. As a Cardinal, it’s been “he go, it’s gone.” Fowler had 14 homers at the break, and though he’s dealt with a series of injuries — swollen left knee and swollen right hand to go with sore feet in the past week — he’s been one of the Cardinals’ most productive hitters in the second half. His on-base percentage is better than .400. His OPS is nosing closer to .875. “It’s about adjustments. It’s about adjustment and the quicker we do that, the better off we’ll be,” Fowler said. “It helps when you’re hurt. When you’re hurt and you’ve got to go out and play, it just builds mental toughness.” After getting two perfect innings and four strikeouts from lefty Brett Cecil, the Cardinals pressed him into duty for a third inning. Even with an overpopu-

lated bullpen, Flaherty’s abbreviated start meant someone had to go extra, Matheny said, and that was Cecil. The allure of back-toback lefties to start the sixth was too much. He didn’t retire either of them. Votto walked, and Scooter Gennett doubled to get them both in scoring position. Cecil stayed in. Two sacrifice flies later the Reds led, 6-5. Fowler’s home run led off the eighth to tie the score, and in the 10th, Wong got hit by a pitch. Once he got the green light, he took second. That allowed him to score easily on Fowler’s RBI double into the right-field corner. DeJong’s single drove him home for a run the Cardinals had to have for a win they had to have. It’s not the spot Fowler and the Cardinals wanted, just what they need. “He’s putting together atbats that we need if we’re going to make this push for the playoff run,” Wong said. “We’re not out. People believe we’re out. We don’t believe that. We know we’ve got 12 games left. We’re going to see what we can do in 12 games.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 09.20.2017

MLB NOTEBOOK

Season record for homers falls

Durham wins Triple-A title over Memphis

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kansas City’s Alex Gordon hit Major League Baseball’s record 5,694th home run of 2017, breaking the season mark. Gordon’s home run of Toronto’s Ryan Tepera on Tuesday night raised the total to one more than the 5,693 set in 2000 at the height of the Steroids Era. The record was broken with less than two weeks remaining in the regular season. There were 5,610 homers last year, an average of 2.31 per game, and this year’s average of 2.53 entering Tuesday’s action projects to 6,139. That would be up 47 percent from 4,186 in 2014. Power subsided after the start of drug testing with penalties in 2004. The home run average dropped in 2014 to its lowest level since 1992, then started rising during the second half of the 2015 season. Along with sailing shots come strikeouts, which will set a record for the 10th consecutive year. There were 36,964 whiffs through Sunday, an average of 8.25 per team per game that translates to 40,099. “The focus is hitting homers and tolerating strikeouts,” Reggie Jackson said. “I don’t really like all the strikeouts, and I was the king.” Baseball oicials are worried about decreasing action and have been alarmed by the strikeout rise. This year’s total is up from 38,982 last year and an increase of nearly 8,000 from the 32,189 in 2007. “These bullpens are making it extremely difficult. From basically the starter on you’re going to have elite, hard-throwing guys that are looking to strike you out every single time,” said Baltimore’s Mark Trumbo, last year’s home run champion. Jackson set a record with 2,597 career strikeouts, maxing out at 171 in 1968. Six players already have reached 171 this year. Yankees adjust rotation • Luis Severino was moved up two days by the New York Yankees and is scheduled to start Wednesday against Minnesota. Yankees manager Joe Girardi said Tuesday the move was made to give Severino three more regular-season starts as New York tries to overtake Boston in the AL East. A 23-year-old righthander, Severino is 13-6 with a 2.93 ERA in 29 starts this season, and has not allowed more than one earned run in nine of 12 outings since the All-Star break. “Our goal is still to win the division. We’ve clinched nothing at this point,” Girardi said. “We still have a lot of work to do in front of us so it gives us the ability to start him three more times.” Severino will be pitching on regular four days’ rest. “If I had to choose, I’d choose tomorrow,” Severino said. “I like to pitch on five days. When I rest a lot my arm feels very good, so I can’t control my fastball. I feel better with five days.” Severino has never faced the Twins, a

BY BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kansas City’s Alex Gordon, shown earlier in the season, hit Major League Baseball’s record-breaking 5,694th homer of 2017 on Tuesday with an eighth-inning shot in Toronto.

potential opponent in the AL wild-card game. “I can see their weakness and I can face all their hitters and see what I can do with their lineup,” he said. “When I face them tomorrow, we’ll see what happens so I can have a plan if we go to the wild-card game.” Cubs’ Arrieta targeting Thursday return • After throwing a 25-pitch bullpen session with no pain, Cubs righthander Jake Arrieta is ready to rejoin the Cubs rotation Thursday night in Milwaukee. “The idea is just to see how I bounce back and respond,” Arrieta said Tuesday. “And I anticipate to feeling very good, and the plan is to be out there Thursday.” If Arrieta reports Wednesday that he’s pain-free, he will make his first start since sufering a Grade 1 strain of his right hamstring on Sept. 4. Arrieta said his arm feels fresh as the result of the layof. Arrieta said he’s scheduled to throw 75 to 80 pitches Thursday, and that a gradual increase in work on Sept. 26 at St. Louis should put him at full strength for the Cubs’ regular-season finale against the Reds on Oct. 1. “He looked very good,” Cubs president Theo Epstein said after witnessing Arrieta’s bullpen session. “He was me-

chanically sound, executed his pitches and didn’t feel anything.” Braves get approval for new spring complex • Atlanta has received final approval for a new spring training complex near Sarasota, Fla. The team plans to break ground next month after city commissioners in North Port voted 3-2 Tuesday to approve the $100 million complex, which was initially estimated to cost between $75 and $80 million. The facility is set to open in 2019, meaning the Braves will spend one more year at their current Disney World complex where they have trained since 1998. The team needed a new facility closer to other Grapefruit League sites, which are now largely bunched along the Gulf Coast and in South Florida. Detroit’s facility in Lakeland is the only one within an hour’s drive of Disney World. The Braves’ new facility will be near Baltimore’s complex in Sarasota and Tampa Bay’s facility in Port Charlotte. It will be less than an hour’s drive from Fort Myers, where both the Boston Red Sox and Minnesota Twins train, as well as the Pittsburgh Pirates complex in Bradenton. From news services

Many times this season it has been wondered where the Cardinals would be without the steady stream of impact additions from Memphis. The Cardinals kept calling up Class AAA reinforcements. And somehow the Redbirds kept rolling. The inspiring team led by former Cardinals fan favorite and first-year manager Stubby Clapp shattered records, earned awards, claimed a Pacific Coast League championship and looked to be on their way to winning Tuesday night’s Class AAA National Championship — until a Cardinal’s younger brother stole the show. Kean Wong — perhaps you’ve heard of his older brother, Kolten — swung a damaging bat and flashed a masterful glove as he willed the Tampa Bay Rays’ Durham Bulls to a comeback 5-3 win over the Redbirds in the one-game championship at PNC Field in Moosic, Pa. The 22-year-old Wong was named the game’s MVP after he went three for four with a single, a double and a game-flipping, fourth-inning grand slam. He also turned in three impressive plays at second base to help hold the Redbirds scoreless after his slam made Redbirds reliever Josh Zeid the game’s losing pitcher. Three times, including in the ninth, the Redbirds saw the tying run reach the plate, but a combination of winning pitcher Brent Honeywell and Diego Castillo, who earned the save, teamed up to deliver four scoreless innings. The Redbirds initially secured a 3-1 lead for starter Dakota Hudson, who allowed one earned run on a ground out, walked two and struck out five in three innings. Jacob Wilson’s first-inning double off Durham starter Ryan Yarbrough scored both Tyler O’Neill, who singled, and right fielder Jose Adolis Garcia, who turned a hit-by-pitch into a showcase of his elite speed. He also flashed his impressive arm. And perhaps kick-started Wong. Before the Redbirds and Bulls traded sacrifice flies to make it 3-1, Garcia threw out Wong as he attempted to go from first to third on a teammate’s first-inning single. Memphis third baseman Aledmys Diaz’s tag left Wong slow to get up, and broadcasters wondered if he was injured. He stayed in, and wreaked havoc. Despite a revolving door of players, the Redbirds won 91 games, more than any of their predecessors. They were left wanting one more. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

Cards are having the season fans should have expected ORTIZ • FROM B1

ahead of the Cubs even if Fowler hadn’t been injury plagued and Cecil hadn’t been such a disappointment. The Cardinals needed Encarnacion’s bat desperately and still need such a bat in the middle of the lineup. That’s not to say that the Cardinals couldn’t and shouldn’t have played better this season. “I feel like we have underachieved,” Mozeliak said. “I feel like we made a lot of our problems. And when you look to next year we have to solve some of them. We have to have a cleaner team, a smarter team. “We’re going to have to add some bullpen help. And if there’s a way to find a more impact position player it has to be something to consider.” Some critics have ripped manager Mike Matheny often this year for the inability to fix the team’s embarrassing lack of fundamentals. We kept judging this team by the standards set by great Cardinals teams, but is it really fair to compare this sloppy and young team in any way to the rosters Tony LaRussa had? Which of these guys would start for the 2006 or 2011 Cardinals other than Yadier Molina? One loud section of the peanut gallery has even suggested that Class AAA Memphis manager Stubby Clapp should be promoted to manage the Cardinals. Clapp could have a bright future as a major league manager, but it’s also important to realize that he had much better talent than his PCL opponents. Matheny’s job has been tremendously more diicult

TEE IT UP Find the perfect place to play. STLtoday.com/ golfguide

because his young roster doesn’t exactly stack up with the best in baseball or in the NL Central, and many of his veterans were hampered by injuries, ineffectiveness or both. Nobody in the Cubs’ organization would trade rosters with the Cardinals right now. It’s not just Anthony Rizzo and Kris Bryant although the Cardinals’ lineup would definitely appear much stronger with Bryant or Rizzo anchoring the middle of the batting order. Where would the Cardinals be without Tommy Pham or Paul DeJong, two players who weren’t expected to have the impact they have had this season? Fowler has put together an OPS higher than .800 this season, so he has definitely helped ofensively. His 1.4 Wins Above Replacement, though, pales in comparison to the teamhigh 5.4 WAR Pham has this season. No other Cardinals outfielder has a WAR above Randal Grichuk’s 0.8. Stephen Piscotty has a 0.7 WAR. Harrison Bader (0.3) and Magneuris Sierra (0.2) haven’t been up long enough to truly judge their wins above replacement. Kolten Wong has a decent 1.9 WAR. DeJong has a 2.4 in a season worthy of NL Rookie of the Year votes. Matt Carpenter has a 2.5 WAR even though he has dealt with shoulder problems. Molina, one of the Cardinals’ two All-Stars, has a 1.9 WAR. Jedd Gyorko has the second highest WAR on the Cardinals at 3.4. Clapp’s Memphis Redbirds have reminded us all season that the future is bright in terms of prospects. That’s the good news. Help is definitely on the way from the farm system.

ilable s ava idays! Gift Certiicates e t a c ertii r the Hol Gift C ect fAvailable o Perf

Is there a transcendent figure on the way in the farm system, though? The next Albert Pujols doesn’t appear on the horizon. Unfortunately for the Cardinals, they don’t have a young position player who would fit into that category. Even worse for the Cardinals, that type of player won’t be on the market this winter in a rather weak free agent class. The truly big names won’t hit the market until after the 2018 season when Bryce Harper of the Nationals and Manny Machado of the Orioles are expected to become free agents. The Cardinals cannot aford to wait until Machado and Harper hit free agency. They need to pounce and figure out a way to acquire Giancarlo Stanton from the Marlins this winter.

$ 10 Year Parts Warranty!

Fly Tying & Casting Lessons

Call to sign up. It’s just too much fun to miss out on!

8307 Manchester Rd.

314-963-7884 • www.feather-craft.com

Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

FREE

Our FFF Certiied instructors have been teaching ly casting and ly tying in the St. Louis area for over 35 year...FREE!

They should have no untouchables other than Molina. Adam Wainwright is essentially an untouchable because of his contract. Mozeliak owes it to the Cardinals to see if Fowler and Cecil would consider waiving their no-trade clauses in the manner they persuaded Mike Leake to waive it. Nothing should be of the table if Mozeliak is committed to bridge the talent gap between the Cubs and Cardinals while the young Brewers also start to flex their muscles. The Cardinals are who we thought they were. That is not good enough, again.

R-410A

2,895 Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of $1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

Expires Expires5/15/15 9/30/17

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM 314-993-1110

SINCE 1950


BASEBALL

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WEDNESDAY • 09.20.2017

MLB NOTEBOOK

Season record for homers falls

Durham wins Triple-A title over Memphis

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kansas City’s Alex Gordon hit Major League Baseball’s record 5,694th home run of 2017, breaking the season mark. Gordon’s home run of Toronto’s Ryan Tepera on Tuesday night raised the total to one more than the 5,693 set in 2000 at the height of the Steroids Era. The record was broken with less than two weeks remaining in the regular season. There were 5,610 homers last year, an average of 2.31 per game, and this year’s average of 2.53 entering Tuesday’s action projects to 6,139. That would be up 47 percent from 4,186 in 2014. Power subsided after the start of drug testing with penalties in 2004. The home run average dropped in 2014 to its lowest level since 1992, then started rising during the second half of the 2015 season. Along with sailing shots come strikeouts, which will set a record for the 10th consecutive year. There were 36,964 whiffs through Sunday, an average of 8.25 per team per game that translates to 40,099. “The focus is hitting homers and tolerating strikeouts,” Reggie Jackson said. “I don’t really like all the strikeouts, and I was the king.” Baseball oicials are worried about decreasing action and have been alarmed by the strikeout rise. This year’s total is up from 38,982 last year and an increase of nearly 8,000 from the 32,189 in 2007. “These bullpens are making it extremely difficult. From basically the starter on you’re going to have elite, hard-throwing guys that are looking to strike you out every single time,” said Baltimore’s Mark Trumbo, last year’s home run champion. Jackson set a record with 2,597 career strikeouts, maxing out at 171 in 1968. Six players already have reached 171 this year. Yankees adjust rotation • Luis Severino was moved up two days by the New York Yankees and is scheduled to start Wednesday against Minnesota. Yankees manager Joe Girardi said Tuesday the move was made to give Severino three more regular-season starts as New York tries to overtake Boston in the AL East. A 23-year-old righthander, Severino is 13-6 with a 2.93 ERA in 29 starts this season, and has not allowed more than one earned run in nine of 12 outings since the All-Star break. “Our goal is still to win the division. We’ve clinched nothing at this point,” Girardi said. “We still have a lot of work to do in front of us so it gives us the ability to start him three more times.” Severino will be pitching on regular four days’ rest. “If I had to choose, I’d choose tomorrow,” Severino said. “I like to pitch on five days. When I rest a lot my arm feels very good, so I can’t control my fastball. I feel better with five days.” Severino has never faced the Twins, a

BY BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kansas City’s Alex Gordon, shown earlier in the season, hit Major League Baseball’s record-breaking 5,694th homer of 2017 on Tuesday with an eighth-inning shot in Toronto.

potential opponent in the AL wild-card game. “I can see their weakness and I can face all their hitters and see what I can do with their lineup,” he said. “When I face them tomorrow, we’ll see what happens so I can have a plan if we go to the wild-card game.” Cubs’ Arrieta targeting Thursday return • After throwing a 25-pitch bullpen session with no pain, Cubs righthander Jake Arrieta is ready to rejoin the Cubs rotation Thursday night in Milwaukee. “The idea is just to see how I bounce back and respond,” Arrieta said Tuesday. “And I anticipate to feeling very good, and the plan is to be out there Thursday.” If Arrieta reports Wednesday that he’s pain-free, he will make his first start since sufering a Grade 1 strain of his right hamstring on Sept. 4. Arrieta said his arm feels fresh as the result of the layof. Arrieta said he’s scheduled to throw 75 to 80 pitches Thursday, and that a gradual increase in work on Sept. 26 at St. Louis should put him at full strength for the Cubs’ regular-season finale against the Reds on Oct. 1. “He looked very good,” Cubs president Theo Epstein said after witnessing Arrieta’s bullpen session. “He was me-

chanically sound, executed his pitches and didn’t feel anything.” Braves get approval for new spring complex • Atlanta has received final approval for a new spring training complex near Sarasota, Fla. The team plans to break ground next month after city commissioners in North Port voted 3-2 Tuesday to approve the $100 million complex, which was initially estimated to cost between $75 and $80 million. The facility is set to open in 2019, meaning the Braves will spend one more year at their current Disney World complex where they have trained since 1998. The team needed a new facility closer to other Grapefruit League sites, which are now largely bunched along the Gulf Coast and in South Florida. Detroit’s facility in Lakeland is the only one within an hour’s drive of Disney World. The Braves’ new facility will be near Baltimore’s complex in Sarasota and Tampa Bay’s facility in Port Charlotte. It will be less than an hour’s drive from Fort Myers, where both the Boston Red Sox and Minnesota Twins train, as well as the Pittsburgh Pirates complex in Bradenton. From news services

Often this season it has been wondered where the Cardinals would be without a steady stream of impact additions from Memphis. The Cardinals kept calling up Class AAA reinforcements. And somehow the Redbirds kept rolling. The inspiring team led by former Cardinals fan favorite and first-year manager Stubby Clapp shattered records, earned awards, claimed a Pacific Coast League championship and looked to be on their way to winning Tuesday night’s Class AAA National Championship — until a Cardinals’ younger brother stole the show. Kean Wong, perhaps you’ve heard of his older brother Kolten, swung a damaging bat and flashed a masterful glove as he willed the Tampa Bay Rays’ Durham Bulls to a 5-3 comeback win against the Redbirds in the one-game, winner-take-all championship at PNC Field in Moosic, Pa. The 22-year-old Wong was named the game’s MVP after he went threefor-four with a single, a double and a game-flipping, fourth-inning grand slam. He also turned in three impressive plays at second base to help hold the Redbirds scoreless after his slam made Memphis reliever Josh Zeid the losing pitcher. News spread quickly to the Cincinnati Reds’ visiting clubhouse. “Congratulations to Memphis on a great season,” Kolten Wong said there. “They did an amazing job. But proud of my brother, man. Blood is always thicker than anything else. To hear what he did, I’m definitely proud of him. I hope the Rays see something in him and give him a chance.” Three times, including in the ninth, the Redbirds saw the tying run reach the plate, but a combination of winning pitcher Brent Honeywell and Diego Castillo, who earned the save, teamed up to deliver four scoreless innings. The Redbirds had secured a 3-1 lead for starter Dakota Hudson, who allowed one earned run on a groundout, walked two and struck out five in three innings. Jacob Wilson’s first-inning double off Durham starter Ryan Yarbrough scored both Tyler O’Neill, who singled, and speedy right fielder Jose Adolis Garcia, who turned a hit-by-pitch into a showcase of his elite speed. Before the Redbirds and Bulls traded sacrifice flies to make it 3-1, Garcia threw out Wong as he attempted to spring from first to third on a teammate’s first-inning single. Memphis third baseman Aledmys Diaz’s tag left Wong slow to get up, and broadcasters wondered if he was injured. He was just getting started

Cards are having the season fans should have expected ORTIZ • FROM B1

ahead of the Cubs even if Fowler hadn’t been injury plagued and Cecil hadn’t been such a disappointment. The Cardinals needed Encarnacion’s bat desperately and still need such a bat in the middle of the lineup. That’s not to say that the Cardinals couldn’t and shouldn’t have played better this season. “I feel like we have underachieved,” Mozeliak said. “I feel like we made a lot of our problems. And when you look to next year we have to solve some of them. We have to have a cleaner team, a smarter team. “We’re going to have to add some bullpen help. And if there’s a way to find a more impact position player it has to be something to consider.” Some critics have ripped manager Mike Matheny often this year for the inability to fix the team’s embarrassing lack of fundamentals. We kept judging this team by the standards set by great Cardinals teams, but is it really fair to compare this sloppy and young team in any way to the rosters Tony LaRussa had? Which of these guys would start for the 2006 or 2011 Cardinals other than Yadier Molina? One loud section of the peanut gallery has even suggested that Class AAA Memphis manager Stubby Clapp should be promoted to manage the Cardinals. Clapp could have a bright future as a major league manager, but it’s also important to realize that he had much better talent than his PCL opponents. Matheny’s job has been tremendously more diicult

TEE IT UP Find the perfect place to play. STLtoday.com/ golfguide

because his young roster doesn’t exactly stack up with the best in baseball or in the NL Central, and many of his veterans were hampered by injuries, ineffectiveness or both. Nobody in the Cubs’ organization would trade rosters with the Cardinals right now. It’s not just Anthony Rizzo and Kris Bryant although the Cardinals’ lineup would definitely appear much stronger with Bryant or Rizzo anchoring the middle of the batting order. Where would the Cardinals be without Tommy Pham or Paul DeJong, two players who weren’t expected to have the impact they have had this season? Fowler has put together an OPS higher than .800 this season, so he has definitely helped ofensively. His 1.4 Wins Above Replacement, though, pales in comparison to the teamhigh 5.4 WAR Pham has this season. No other Cardinals outfielder has a WAR above Randal Grichuk’s 0.8. Stephen Piscotty has a 0.7 WAR. Harrison Bader (0.3) and Magneuris Sierra (0.2) haven’t been up long enough to truly judge their wins above replacement. Kolten Wong has a decent 1.9 WAR. DeJong has a 2.4 in a season worthy of NL Rookie of the Year votes. Matt Carpenter has a 2.5 WAR even though he has dealt with shoulder problems. Molina, one of the Cardinals’ two All-Stars, has a 1.9 WAR. Jedd Gyorko has the second highest WAR on the Cardinals at 3.4. Clapp’s Memphis Redbirds have reminded us all season that the future is bright in terms of prospects. That’s the good news. Help is definitely on the way from the farm system.

ilable s ava idays! Gift Certiicates e t a c ertii r the Hol Gift C ect fAvailable o Perf

Is there a transcendent figure on the way in the farm system, though? The next Albert Pujols doesn’t appear on the horizon. Unfortunately for the Cardinals, they don’t have a young position player who would fit into that category. Even worse for the Cardinals, that type of player won’t be on the market this winter in a rather weak free agent class. The truly big names won’t hit the market until after the 2018 season when Bryce Harper of the Nationals and Manny Machado of the Orioles are expected to become free agents. The Cardinals cannot aford to wait until Machado and Harper hit free agency. They need to pounce and figure out a way to acquire Giancarlo Stanton from the Marlins this winter.

$ 10 Year Parts Warranty!

Fly Tying & Casting Lessons

Call to sign up. It’s just too much fun to miss out on!

8307 Manchester Rd.

314-963-7884 • www.feather-craft.com

Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

FREE

Our FFF Certiied instructors have been teaching ly casting and ly tying in the St. Louis area for over 35 year...FREE!

They should have no untouchables other than Molina. Adam Wainwright is essentially an untouchable because of his contract. Mozeliak owes it to the Cardinals to see if Fowler and Cecil would consider waiving their no-trade clauses in the manner they persuaded Mike Leake to waive it. Nothing should be of the table if Mozeliak is committed to bridge the talent gap between the Cubs and Cardinals while the young Brewers also start to flex their muscles. The Cardinals are who we thought they were. That is not good enough, again.

R-410A

2,895 Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of $1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

Expires Expires5/15/15 9/30/17

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM 314-993-1110

SINCE 1950


SPORTS

09.20.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

NFL NOTEBOOK

Miami suspends veteran LB Timmons AWOL linebacker Lawrence Timmons wanted to rejoin the Miami Dolphins. Instead, they suspended him indefinitely and traded for a replacement, moves that signal his disappearance from the Dolphins’ defense may be permanent. The Dolphins announced Timmons’ suspension Tuesday and also acquired linebacker Stephone Anthony from the New Orleans Saints for a fifth-round draft pick in 2018. Anthony, who has been nursing a sprained ankle, fell out of favor with the Saints after they took him with the 31st overall pick in the 2015 draft. Miami coach Adam Gase was angered by the disappearance of Timmons, an 11th-year veteran. The Dolphins filed a missing person report before making contact with Timmons, who apparently was dealing with a personal matter. He wasn’t with the Dolphins for Sunday’s game at the Los Angeles Chargers and didn’t fly back to South Florida on the team plane after Miami’s 19-17 win. After starting 16 games as a rookie, Anthony was mostly a reserve for the Saints last season. He had yet to play this season. Undrafted rookie free agent Chase Allen started in Timmons’ place and made three tackles Sunday. Timmons signed a $12 mil-

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES ................ -$200.......................Twins A’s ............................-$120 .................... TIGERS Red Sox .................. -$200..................ORIOLES BLUE JAYS ...............-$118 ..................... Royals ASTROS .................. -$270................White Sox Indians ....................-$120 ...................ANGELS MARINERS...............-$150 ...................Rangers National League MARLINS.................-$158 ........................ Mets Rockies....................-$132 ....................GIANTS Dodgers.................. -$230................. PHILLIES Brewers...................-$110 .................. PIRATES Cards.......................-$158 ....................... REDS Nationals.................-$155 ...................BRAVES D’backs....................-$145 ...................PADRES Interleague Cubs ........................-$132 ........................RAYS NFL Favorite Open/current Underdog Thursday Rams ......................3....2.5 ................... 49ERS Sunday l-Ravens .................4..... 4................... Jaguars Browns..................1.5.....1......................COLTS Steelers.................7.5... 7.5 ................... BEARS Dolphins............... 6.5 ... 6.........................JETS Broncos.................. 2..... 3.......................BILLS PATRIOTS .............. 13 ....13....................Texans PANTHERS .............6..... 6...................... Saints VIKINGS.................NL... NL ...................... Bucs LIONS .....................3..... 3....................Falcons EAGLES...................6..... 6......................Giants TITANS...................2.5...2.5 ..............Seahawks Chiefs ....................2.5.... 3..............CHARGERS PACKERS ................9..... 9................... Bengals Raiders..................3.5.... 3......... WASHINGTON Monday Cowboys................3.5.... 3.....................CARDS l- London, England. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Open/current Underdog Thursday S FLORIDA.............20... 20 .................. Temple Friday BOISE ST................ 13 ....12.................. Virginia Utah...................... 4.5 ..3.5 ...............ARIZONA Saturday Wake Forest..........3.5...4.5.......APP’CHIAN ST Duke......................2.5...2.5 ......... N CAROLINA Michigan ............... 10... 10................. PURDUE GA TECH ................7.5... 7.5 .............Pittsburgh Penn St.................. 12 .. 12.5 .................... IOWA CLEMSON ..............34... 34 ............Boston Coll FLORIDA ST........... 12 .. 12.5 ...............NC State GEORGIA ................ 5....5.5 ...................Miss St S CAROLINA .......... 11 ...8.5 ..................La Tech TENNESSEE..........26.5.. 28.................... UMass W Virginia ............. 21 ....22..................KANSAS Florida....................3..... 3.............. KENTUCKY MARYLAND ............4....3.5 ................C Florida LOUISVILLE...........39... 43................... Kent St E MICHIGAN ..........2.5...2.5 ................... Ohio U C MICHIGAN ........... 2....2.5 ...........Miami-Ohio VA TECH ...............26.5 28.5 ...... Old Dominion Georgia St ..............3......1............ CHARLOTTE INDIANA...............22.5.. 24...........Ga Southern BUFFALO ................3..... 3............. Fla Atlantic NEBRASKA............ 14 ....13.................. Rutgers MIAMI-FLA ............ 13 .. 13.5 .................. Toledo Washington........... 10..10.5 ...........COLORADO NEW MEX ST ......... 18 ....18....................... Utep NAVY ....................11.5. 11.5..............Cincinnati OHIO ST................39.5.40.5......................Unlv Notre Dame ..........3.5.... 4.......... MICHIGAN ST WYOMING............... 7....6.5...................Hawaii TULSA.................... 12 .. 12.5 ......... New Mexico LSU........................ 23..23.5 .............. Syracuse TROY...................... 15 .. 15.5 ................... Akron MID TENN ST........10.5..9.5 ......Bowling Green Auburn.................17.5. 18.5 .............MISSOURI HOUSTON...............6..... 6.............. Texas Tech SMU...................... 4.5 ..5.5 ...........Arkansas St Alabama................ 19 .. 18.5 ........ VANDERBILT TULANE.................1.5... 1.5 ..................... Army OKLAHOMA ST...... 12 ....12..........................Tcu W KENTUCKY .........9.... 7.5 ....................Ball St N TEXAS ...............10.5...11.........................Uab Utsa....................... 14 .. 13.5 ..............TEXAS ST S Diego St............... 5....3.5 ............ AIR FORCE a-TEXAS A&M.........3....2.5 ...............Arkansas RICE.......................2.5... 1.5 ...........Florida Int’l S ALABAMA............4..... 4.......................Idaho UL-LAFAYETTE ......5.5...5.5 ............UL-Monroe Oklahoma .............26... 28..................BAYLOR Usc......................... 16 ..16.5 .........CALIFORNIA WASH ST...............27.5.. 28...................Nevada Oregon .................15.5. 15.5 ......... ARIZONA ST STANFORD ............. 7.... 7.5 .......................Ucla Utah St ...................3..... 3........... SAN JOSE ST Sunday CONNECTICUT........ 5..... 5............... E Carolina a- Arlington, TX. SOCCER • ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE, Sat. Tottenham ............................................... -$170 WEST HAM UNITED................................ +$480 Draw: +$320 | Over/under: 2.5 goals SWANSEA CITY........................................ +$130 Watford ................................................... +$210 Draw: +$230 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Chelsea..................................................... -$165 STOKE CITY .............................................+$470 Draw: +$290 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Manchester United..................................-$130 SOUTHAMPTON ......................................+$380 Draw: +$250 | Over/under: 2.5 goals MANCHESTER CITY..................................-$740 Crystal Palace.......................................+$1800 Draw: +$750 | Over/under: 3.5 goals EVERTON..................................................-$160 Bournemouth .........................................+$450 Draw: +$290 | Over/under: 2.0 goals BURNLEY..................................................+$110 Huddersfield Town .................................+$265 Draw: +$215 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Liverpool...................................................-$115 LEICESTER CITY ......................................+$290 Draw: +$260 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Sunday BRIGHTON & HOVE ALBION ................... +$165 Newcastle United ....................................+$175 Draw: +$205 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

FAIRMOUNT PARK Tuesday’s results First (6f) Time: 1:11:88 My Little Darling (Victor Santiago), 2.60, 2.20, 2.10 Rosie’s Relish (Reynier Arrieta), 4.20, 2.60 Royal City (Uriel Lopez), 2.60 Exacta (6-5) $10.40 Trifecta (6-5-1) $14.70 Superfecta (6-5-1-4) $28.90

Another broken hand for Browns’ Coleman • Cleveland wide receiver Corey Coleman has been placed on injured reserve after having surgery on his broken right hand — again. The injury, sufered Sunday in Baltimore, came almost exactly a year to the day from when he broke his hand during practice as a rookie. The No. 15 overall pick in 2016 can return to practice in six weeks and would be eligible to play in a game after eight weeks. After missing six games last season, Coleman was determined to become a game-changing playmaker for the Browns, who are 1-17 over the past two seasons. This season, he’d caught six passes for 62 yards and a touchdown.

eight games after Carolina placed the three-time Pro Bowl tight end on injured reserve with a broken right foot Tuesday. The earliest Olsen is eligible to return is Nov. 26 at the Jets. Panthers trainer Ryan Vermillion told the team website that Olsen broke the fifth metatarsal in his right foot in Carolina’s 9-3 win over Bufalo and had surgery on Monday. The injury ends Olsen’s streak of 160 consecutive games played. It’s the second-longest active streak among tight ends behind Dallas’ Jason Witten (221).

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Linebacker Lawrence Timmons, in his 11th NFL season, was a no-show for Miami’s 19-17 season-opening road win over the Chargers Sunday.

lion, two-year deal with Miami in March after 10 seasons with Pittsburgh, where he won a Super Bowl ring in 2009 and made

Second (1m) Time 1, 42, 36 A Stormy Cape (Reynier Arrieta), 39.60, 9.60, 5.60 6 -Silent Congrats (Victor Santiago), 2.40, 2.10 The Ridge (Juan De La Cruz), 3.40 Exacta (3-6) $118.80 Trifecta (3-6-4) $230.90 Superfecta (3-6-4-5) $515.40 Daily Double (6-3) $56.00 Third (6f) Time: 1:12:72 Heidi Who (Victor Santiago), 5.40, 3.60, 2.20 Boohoo Sue (Juan De La Cruz), 3.60, 2.40 Infinitive (Javier Diego), 3.00 Exacta (5-7) $16.80 Trifecta (5-7-1) $52.50 Superfecta (5-7-1-2) $203.90 Daily Double (3-5) $157.60 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (6-3-3,5) $79.50 Scratched: Flying Phoebe Fourth (6f) Time: 1:11:50 Green Means Go (Uriel Lopez), 11.80, 5.40, Refunded Shanghai Red (Javier Diego), 3.00, Refunded Smart Alex’s Posse (Victor Santiago), Refunded Exacta (2-1) $33.40 Trifecta (2-1-3) $48.90 Superfecta (2-1-3-6) $87.10 Daily Double (5-2) $72.60 Pick 3, 2 of 3, (3-3,5-2) $13.40 Scratched: Shestoyoungforubro Fifth (6f) Time: 1:13:86 Barton attack (Francisco Giles), 65.20, 14.00, 7.60 Dayjur Best (Victor Bailon), 2.80, 2.40 Graduate Cat (Victor Santiago), 4.40 Exacta (6-8) $143.20 Trifecta (6-8-7) $435.60 Superfecta (6-8-7-1) $3686.30 Daily Double (2-6) $345.60 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (3,5-2-6) $148.50 Scratched: Thunderbuck, Oklahoma Lizzie Sixth (6f) Time: 1:10:89 D’ Rapper (Victor Santiago), 3.80, 2.60, No Show Purging the Stone (Uriel Lopez), 3.80, No Show Internet Success (Juan Molina, Jr.), No Show Exacta (2-3) $12.40 Trifecta (2-3-5) $22.90 Daily Double (6-2) $283.60 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (2-6-2) $85.15 Seventh (1m) Time: 1:40:06 Bold Ransom (Javier Diego), 4.80, 3.00, 2.20 Nafir’s Best (Uriel Lopez), 3.00, 2.80 Briar Hll Baron (Juan Molina, Jr.), 2.80 Exacta (2-3) $14.20 Trifecta (2-3-7) $31.40 Superfecta (2-3-7-5) $89.60 Daily Double (2-2) $12.00 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (6-2-2) $86.20 Eighth (6f) Time: 1:13:23 Ice Attack (Juan Molina, Jr.), 6.60, 3.20, 2.80 Ahniwake (Victor Santiago), 3.40, 2.80 Illini Kitten (Javier Diego), 7.20 Exacta (9-4) $18.80 Trifecta (9-4-8) $176.30 Superfecta (9-4-8-7) $843.50 Daily Double (2-9) $18.20 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (2-2-9) $11.70 Pick 4, 4 of 4, (6-2-2-9) $342.30

COLLEGES 2018 MU football schedule Sept. 1 ............................ vs. Tennessee Martin Sept. 8.......................................... vs. Wyoming Sept. 15..............................................at Purdue Sept. 22 ...........................................vs. Georgia Oct. 6.................................... at South Carolina Oct. 13 ............................................ at Alabama Oct. 20...........................................vs. Memphis Oct. 27.......................................... vs. Kentucky Nov. 3 ................................................ at Florida Nov. 10 ....................................... vs. Vanderbilt Nov. 17..........................................at Tennessee Nov. 24 ......................................... vs. Arkansas

Area scores Womens soccer St. Louis CC 4, Central Methodist JV 0 Mens soccer St. Louis CC 4, Jefferson College 0 Women’s volleyball Webster def. Illinois College, 25-27, 25-14, 25-11, 26-24

GOLF MGA Senior Amateur Tuesday | Bogey Hills Final round Jay Gregory Charles Schorgl David Johnson Don Kuehn Jeff Johnson Timothy Holmes Bill Anderson Bobby Godwin Kevin Handlan Ron Eilers Steve Groom Bob Hanneken Buddy Allen David Teel Robert Trittler Brad E Dixon David Bremer Jim Beatson Didier Villard Don Bliss Scott Edwards David Pfeil Harry Roberts Jack Dixon II Mike Domenick Rick Barks Bruce Rehmer Jeff Spies Mark Bolhofner Scott Whittaker Skip Wilson Tom Barry Bernie McGuire Bob McKay Jim Greenstein Lewis Hart Scott Hays John Shock Mike Wilson Brett Allen Ed Brown Ian Soutar John McCulloch Tom Pruden Anthony Brown David Estes Joseph Correnti III Mark Wethington

70-71 73-69 71-73 70-75 73-72 74-73 77-71 71-77 75-73 72-76 75-73 79-71 77-73 75-75 74-76 77-75 79-73 80-72 76-77 74-79 74-79 75-79 78-76 78-76 78-76 78-76 77-78 81-74 79-76 77-78 77-78 77-78 78-78 77-79 77-79 82-74 78-78 74-83 80-77 80-78 77-81 76-82 80-78 83-75 78-81 76-83 80-79 80-80

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

141 142 144 145 145 147 148 148 148 148 148 150 150 150 150 152 152 152 153 153 153 154 154 154 154 154 155 155 155 155 155 155 156 156 156 156 156 157 157 158 158 158 158 158 159 159 159 160

Glen Hall James Dunn Pat O’Neill Robert Meeh Jeff Echelmeier Ken Horn Larry Shelley Ted Roberts Tom Viers Robert Nelson II Robert Wysong Bob Crockett Brent Johnson Dewey Jones Pat Ross Rusty Shelley Brett Combs Chuck Admire Mark Sissom Michael Dallmeyer

the Pro Bowl in 2014. Panthers’ TE Olsen to IR • Greg Olsen will miss a minimum of

78-83 83-78 85-76 73-88 78-84 79-83 85-77 82-87 81-88 86-84 85-87 84-89 85-88 85-88 85-88 91-82 76-WD 85-WD 78-WD 80-WD

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

161 161 161 161 162 162 162 169 169 170 172 173 173 173 173 173 WD WD WD WD

SOCCER • MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Toronto FC 18 3 8 62 63 26 New York City FC 15 8 6 51 50 37 Chicago 14 9 6 48 52 37 Columbus 13 12 5 44 45 45 Atlanta United FC 12 8 7 43 57 35 New York 12 10 6 42 41 36 Montreal 10 12 6 36 44 46 New England 10 14 5 35 45 51 Orlando City 9 12 8 35 32 47 Philadelphia 8 12 9 33 37 39 D.C. United 8 17 4 28 23 49 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Vancouver 13 9 6 45 45 39 Sporting K.C. 11 6 11 44 35 22 Seattle 11 7 11 44 42 35 Portland 12 10 8 44 50 47 San Jose 11 12 6 39 32 48 FC Dallas 9 8 11 38 39 38 Houston 10 10 8 38 46 39 Real Salt Lake 11 14 5 38 44 52 Minnesota United 8 15 5 29 36 58 Los Angeles 7 15 6 27 36 52 Colorado 7 16 5 26 26 42 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday Los Angeles at Atlanta United FC, 6 p.m. Montreal at Toronto FC, 6:30 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL National League CINCINNATI — Claimed 1B/3B D.J. Peterson off waivers from the Chicago White Sox and assigned him outright to Louisville (IL). CARDINALS — Activated RHP Adam Wainwright from the 10-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association BROOKLYN — Named Olivier Sedra public address announcer. CHICAGO — Named Doug Collins senior adviser of basketball operations. Women’s National Basketball Association CONNECTICUT — Signed coach Curt Miller to a contract extension through the 2021 season. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA — Released TE Jim Dray. BALTIMORE — Placed LB Bam Bradley and OL Marshal Yanda on injured reserve. Signed OL Matt Skura from the practice squad, OT Dieugot Joseph from Chicago’s practice squad and LB Nicholas Grigsby, OT Arie Kouandjio and RB Jeremy Langford to the practice squad. BUFFALO — Released S Trae Elston and LB Jelani Jenkins. CAROLINA — Placed TE Greg Olsen on injured reserve. Signed FB Alex Armah from the practice squad. CHICAGO — Waived WR Tanner Gentry. Terminated the practice squad contract of RB Josh Rounds. Signed DB DeAndre Houston-Carson from the practice squad and DL Mike Purcell to the practice squad. CLEVELAND — Placed WR Corey Coleman on injured reserve. Released DBs Najee Murray and Channing Stribling from the practice squad. Signed DL Jhaustin Thomas and Tyrone Holmes and WR Jordan Leslie to the practice squad. DALLAS — Waived LB Jayrone Elliott. Released G Nate Theaker from the practice squad. Signed S Jameill Showers to the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE — Claimed WR Jaelen Strong off waivers from Houston. Placed DT Michael Bennett on injured reserve. MIAMI — Suspended LB Lawrence Timmons indefinitely after he went AWOL on the eve of the team’s season opener. Acquired LB Stephone Anthony from New Orleans for an undisclosed 2018 draft pick. NY JETS — Waived WR Kalif Raymond. Signed DL Claude Pelon to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT — Assigned RW Givani Smith to Guelph (OHL). NEW JERSEY — Assigned G Evan Cormier to Saginaw (OHL), D Jocktan Chainey to Halifax (QMJHL) and Colby Sissons to Swift Current (WHL) and Fs Nikita Popugaev to Prince George (WHL) and Marian Studenic to Hamilton (OHL). Released F Nicolas Guay from an amateur tryout. NY RANGERS — Assigned F Robin Kovacs, RW Adam Chapie and D Brenden Kotyk to Hartford (AHL); LW Tim Gettinger to Sault Ste. Marie (OHL); and RW Ty Ronning to Vancouver (WHL). TAMPA BAY — Named Casey Rodgers chief financial officer for the club and Tampa Bay Sports & Entertainment. MOTORSPORTS NASCAR — Docked Monster Energy Cup driver Chase Elliott 15 driver points, The Hendrick Motorsports team 15 owner points, Elliott’s crew chief Alan Gustafson $25,000 and suspended Gustafson and car chief Joshua Kirk one race for an aerodynamic modification found in a post-race inspection following Elliott’s second-place finish on Sunday. SOCCER U.S. SOCCER FEDERATION — Agreed to terms with youth technical director and men’s Under-20 national team coach Tab Ramos on a contract extension. Major League Soccer MINNESOTA — Named Chris Wright CEO. NEW ENGLAND — Fired coach Jay Heaps. Promoted assistant coach Tom Soehn to head coach. COLLEGE AUBURN — Announced DL Byron Cowart left the football program and been granted his release.

Jets cut Raymond after fumbled punt • The New York Jets have waived wide receiver Kalif Raymond, two days after his fumbled punt changed momentum in the team’s loss at Oakland. Raymond was claimed off waivers by the Jets on Sept. 3 after he played his rookie season with Denver last year. He served as New York’s primary returner on punts and kickofs in the first two games, but had ball security issues. Raymond mishandled two punts in the opener at Buffalo, but recovered both fumbles. Sunday against the Raiders, he fumbled a punt with 1:50 left in the opening half and the Jets trailing 14-10. The Raiders scored three plays later and went on to a 45-20 win that dropped the Jets to 0-2.

Jags claim WR Strong of waivers • Jacksonville has claimed WR Jaelen Strong off waivers from the Houston Texans, providing some depth with Allen Robinson and rookie Dede Westbrook on injured reserve. The make room on the roster, the Jaguars placed defensive tackle Michael Bennett on IR with a pectoral injury. A third-round draft pick in 2015, Strong has 28 receptions for 292 yards and three touchdowns in 19 games. The Texans waived him Monday. He was suspended for the season opener for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy.

FOOTBALL NFL LEADERS

National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Miami 1 0 0 1.000 Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 New England 1 1 0 .500 NY Jets 0 2 0 .000 L T 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0

PF 19 24 63 32

PA 17 21 62 66

South Tennessee Jacksonville Houston Indianapolis

W 1 1 1 0

North Baltimore Pittsburgh Cincinnati Cleveland

W L T Pct PF 2 0 0 1.000 44 2 0 0 1.000 47 0 2 0 .000 9 0 2 0 .000 28

PA 10 27 33 45

West Denver Oakland Kansas City LA Chargers

W L T Pct 2 0 0 1.000 2 0 0 1.000 2 0 0 1.000 0 2 0 .000

PF 66 71 69 38

PA 38 36 47 43

Pct PF .500 50 .500 36 .500 44 .000 13

PA 44 45 50 43

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Philadelphia 1 1 0 Dallas 1 1 0 Washington 1 1 0 NY Giants 0 2 0

Pct PF PA .500 53 42 .500 45 44 .500 20 38 .000 22 62

South Atlanta Carolina Tampa Bay New Orleans

W L T Pct 2 0 0 1.000 2 0 0 1.000 1 0 0 1.000 0 2 0 .000

North Detroit Minnesota Green Bay Chicago

W 2 1 1 0

L 0 1 1 2

T 0 0 0 0

PF 57 32 29 39

PA 40 6 7 65

Pct PF 1.000 59 .500 38 .500 40 .000 24

PA 33 45 43 52

West W L T Pct PF PA Seattle 1 1 0 .500 21 26 LA Rams 1 1 0 .500 66 36 Arizona 1 1 0 .500 39 48 San Francisco 0 2 0 .000 12 35 Thursday LA Rams at San Francisco, 7:25 p.m., NFL Net. Sunday Baltimore vs Jacksonville at London, 8:30 a.m. New Orleans at Carolina, Noon Tampa Bay at Minnesota, Noon, KTVI-2 Denver at Buffalo, Noon Pittsburgh at Chicago, Noon, KMOV-4 Miami at NY Jets, Noon NY Giants at Philadelphia, Noon Atlanta at Detroit, Noon Houston at New England, Noon Cleveland at Indianapolis, Noon Seattle at Tennessee, 3:05 p.m. Kansas City at Chargers, 3:25 p.m., KMOV-4 Cincinnati at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. Oakland at Washington, 7:30 p.m., KSDK-5 Monday Dallas at Arizona, 7:30 p.m., ESPN LATE MONDAY

Lions 24, Giants 10 Detroit 7 10 0 7 — 24 New York 0 7 3 0 — 10 First Quarter Det: M.Jones 27 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), 4:00. Second Quarter NYG: Engram 18 pass from Manning (Rosas kick), 14:55. Det: Ebron 7 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), 8:43. Det: FG Prater 56, :30. Third Quarter NYG: FG Rosas 25, 4:58. Fourth Quarter Det: Agnew 88 punt return (Prater kick), 12:56. A: 77,004. Det NYG First downs 12 14 Total Net Yards 257 270 Rushes-yards 32-138 18-62 Passing 119 208 Punt Returns 3-101 2-9 Kickoff Returns 1-15 1-21 Interceptions Ret. 1-18 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 15-21-0 22-32-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-3 5-31 Punts 5-41.8 5-47.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-50 7-50 Time of Possession 32:47 27:13 Rushing: Detroit, Abdullah 17-86, Stafford 3-23, Riddick 9-20, D.Washington 3-9. New York, Vereen 6-28, Darkwa 3-17, Perkins 7-10, Shepard 2-7. Passing: Detroit, Stafford 15-21-0-122. New York, Manning 22-32-1-239. Receiving: Detroit, Ebron 5-42, Tate 4-25, Riddick 3-17, M.Jones 1-27, Golladay 1-8, Fells 1-3. New York, Engram 4-49, Beckham 4-36, Vereen 3-27, Shepard 2-23, Ellison 2-21, Lewis 2-13, Perkins 2-12, J.Adams 1-38, Marshall 1-17, Darkwa 1-3. Missed Field Goals: None.

LEADING SCORERS, NONKICKERS SCORING TD Rus Rec Ret K. Hunt, KC 5 3 2 0 Gillislee, NE 4 4 0 0 Crabtree, OAK 3 0 3 0 D. Freeman, ATL 3 3 0 0 Gurley, LA 3 2 1 0 Montgomery, GBY 3 2 1 0 C. Thompson, WAS 3 2 1 0 Agholor, PHL 2 0 2 0 C.. Anderson, DEN 2 1 1 0 S. Diggs, MIN 2 0 2 0 Fleener, NOR 2 0 2 0 Fournette, JAC 2 2 0 0 Fowler III, DEN 2 0 2 0 Golladay, DET 2 0 2 0 Gordon, LAC 2 1 1 0 Je. James, PIT 2 0 2 0 M. Jones, DET 2 0 2 0 Je. Kearse, NYJ 2 0 2 0 Maclin, BAL 2 0 2 0 J.. Nelson, ARI 2 0 2 0 Sanders, DEN 2 0 2 0 T. West, BAL 2 2 0 0 Witten, DAL 2 0 2 0 LEADING PASSERS Bradford, MIN Al. Smith, KC D. Carr, OAK Stafford, DET M. Ryan, ATL Siemian, DEN Rivers, LAC Brady, NE Goff, LA Brees, NOR Cutler, MIA Roethlisberger, PIT Winston, TAM Wentz, PHL A. Rodgers, GBY Flacco, BAL Ty. Taylor, BUF Newton, CAR Manning, NYG Cousins, WAS Glennon, CHI Mariota, TEN McCown, NYJ Prescott, DAL Ru. Wilson, SEA Bortles, JAC Des. Watson, HOU Keenum, MIN Palmer, ARI Brissett, IND Hoyer, SNF Kizer, CLE

Att 32 63 60 62 58 60 72 75 54 82 33 71 30 85 92 51 53 57 70 67 85 68 64 89 66 55 47 37 84 40 62 61

X2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Pts 30 24 18 18 18 18 18 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

Comp 27 49 45 44 40 39 53 46 36 54 24 47 18 51 61 34 33 34 51 41 57 40 43 54 37 31 27 20 46 22 39 35

Pct. 84.4 77.8 75.0 71.0 69.0 65.0 73.6 61.3 66.7 65.9 72.7 66.2 60.0 60.0 66.3 66.7 62.3 59.6 72.9 61.2 67.1 58.8 67.2 60.7 56.1 56.4 57.4 54.1 54.8 55.0 62.9 57.4

LEADING PASS RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS No Yds Witten, DAL 17 156 Anto. Brown, PIT 16 244 Cohen, CHI 16 102 Cobb, GBY 15 145 Thielen, MIN 14 201 K. Allen, LAC 14 135 G. Tate, DET 14 132 De. Hopkins, HOU 14 128 Ertz, PHL 13 190 T. Kelce, KC 13 143 Landry, MIA 13 78 Crabtree, OAK 12 163 Gordon, LAC 12 90 Vereen, NYG 12 78 T. Hill, KC 11 176 D. Adams, GBY 11 146 Dem. Thomas, DEN 11 138 Del. Walker, TEN 11 137 Sanu, ATL 11 132 Je. Kearse, NYJ 11 123 J. White, NE 11 115 Jo. Reed, WAS 11 84 L. McCoy, BUF 11 83

Avg 9.2 15.2 6.4 9.7 14.4 9.6 9.4 9.1 14.6 11.0 6.0 13.6 7.5 6.5 16.0 13.3 12.5 12.5 12.0 11.2 10.5 7.6 7.5

LEADING RUSHERS Att Yards K. Hunt, KC 30 229 C.. Anderson, DEN 45 199 D. Cook, MIN 34 191 C. Hyde, SNF 24 169 Fournette, JAC 40 140 Ja. Allen, BAL 35 137 Carson, SEA 26 132 Gurley, LA 35 128 L. Miller, HOU 35 126 Ajayi, MIA 28 122 D. Freeman, ATL 31 121 M. Lynch, OAK 30 121 L. Bell, PIT 37 119 L. McCoy, BUF 34 119 D. Henry, TEN 20 117 Abdullah, DET 32 116 Gillislee, NE 33 114 E. Elliott, DAL 33 112 Kelley, WAS 22 108 J. Stewart, CAR 33 105 T. West, BAL 27 102 Ty. Taylor, BUF 16 93 Montgomery, GBY 29 89 Gore, IND 24 88

Avg Long TD 7.6 58 3 4.4 28 1 5.6 33 0 7.0 61 0 3.5 17 2 3.9 37 0 5.1 30 0 3.7 18 2 3.6 19 0 4.4 20 0 3.9 17 3 4.0 14 1 3.2 15 0 3.5 27 0 5.8 17t 1 3.6 34 0 3.5 16 4 3.4 10 0 4.9 21 0 3.2 10 0 3.8 12 2 5.8 14 0 3.1 8 2 3.7 16 1

Long 28t 50 19t 29 44 24 19 25 53 44 18 26t 16 20 75t 33t 29 23 24 34t 26 16 21

LEADING SCORERS, KICKERS SCORING PAT FG Succop, TEN 5/5 6/7 Tavecchio, OAK 8/8 5/5 Zuerlein, LA 7/7 5/5 Gostkowski, NE 6/7 5/5 Lutz, NOR 3/3 6/7 Gano, CAR 2/2 6/6 D. Bailey, DAL 3/3 5/5 Boswell, PIT 5/5 4/4 Dawson, ARI 3/3 4/6 Myers, JAC 3/4 4/5 Santos, KC 9/9 2/2 Walsh, SEA 0/1 5/5 Catanzaro, NYJ 2/2 4/4 Forbath, MIN 2/4 4/4 Du. Hopkins, WAS 5/5 3/4 Tucker, BAL 5/5 3/4 Parkey, MIA 1/1 4/4 McManus, DEN 9/9 1/3 Folk, TAM 2/3 3/3 Prater, DET 5/5 2/2 Crosby, GBY 4/4 2/2 Sturgis, PHL 1/2 3/3

TD 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

Yds 346 619 492 414 573 450 523 714 530 647 230 506 204 640 654 338 349 399 459 419 514 471 353 506 356 348 227 167 600 267 292 404

TD 3 5 5 6 2 6 4 3 2 3 1 4 1 4 3 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 1

YARDS Anto. Brown, PIT Thielen, MIN Ertz, PHL T. Hill, KC Ju. Jones, ATL Crabtree, OAK J.. Nelson, ARI Witten, DAL Gronkowski, NE D. Adams, GBY Cobb, GBY T. Kelce, KC A. Green, CIN Dem. Thomas, DEN Del. Walker, TEN K. Allen, LAC Hooper, ATL Michael Thomas, NOR G. Everett, LA G. Tate, DET Sanu, ATL Jeffery, PHL De. Hopkins, HOU K. Hunt, KC Cooks, NE

Yds 244 201 190 176 174 163 163 156 149 146 145 143 141 138 137 135 135 134 134 132 132 130 128 126 125

Int 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 0 2 1 0 4 1 2 4 No 16 14 13 11 9 12 10 17 8 11 15 13 10 11 11 14 4 10 4 14 11 10 14 8 5

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 1 1 0 0 2 5 2 Dallas 1 1 0 0 2 5 3 Minnesota 1 1 0 0 2 3 2 Nashville 2 1 1 0 2 6 7 Winnipeg 1 0 0 1 1 2 3 Colorado 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis 1 0 1 0 0 3 5 Pacific GP W L OT Pts GF GA Edmonton 2 2 0 0 4 10 6 Vegas 1 1 0 0 2 9 4 Vancouver 2 1 1 0 2 8 12 Los Angeles 1 0 0 1 1 3 4 San Jose 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Anaheim 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Calgary 2 0 2 0 0 6 10

Pts 23 23 22 21 21 20 18 17 15 15 15 15 14 14 14 14 13 12 11 11 10 10

Points 143.0 134.1 126.5 114.6 112.2 106.9 106.4 106.2 103.2 102.0 101.8 99.9 91.5 89.3 88.8 88.5 86.1 85.3 83.0 82.9 81.2 78.7 78.5 78.2 76.3 72.4 68.3 65.9 65.6 65.3 60.7 55.6

Avg Long TD 15.2 50 0 14.4 44 0 14.6 53 0 16.0 75t 1 19.3 34 0 13.6 26t 3 16.3 45t 2 9.2 28t 2 18.6 53t 1 13.3 33t 1 9.7 29 0 11.0 44 1 14.1 50 0 12.5 29 0 12.5 23 0 9.6 24 1 33.8 88t 1 13.4 33 0 33.5 69 0 9.4 19 0 12.0 24 0 13.0 24 1 9.1 25 1 15.8 78t 2 25.0 54 0

TOTAL YARDS FROM SCRIMMAGE Total Rush K. Hunt, KC 355 229 Anto. Brown, PIT 244 0 C.. Anderson, DEN 242 199 Gurley, LA 232 128 C. Hyde, SNF 220 169 Montgomery, GBY 203 89 L. McCoy, BUF 202 119 D. Cook, MIN 201 191 Thielen, MIN 201 0 Ertz, PHL 190 0 T. Hill, KC 187 11 Fournette, JAC 185 140 L. Miller, HOU 183 126 Cohen, CHI 181 79 Ju. Jones, ATL 174 0 Ja. Allen, BAL 172 137 J. White, NE 164 49 Crabtree, OAK 163 0 J.. Nelson, ARI 163 0 E. Elliott, DAL 162 112 C. Thompson, WAS 162 81 Gordon, LAC 157 67 Witten, DAL 156 0 Cobb, GBY 155 10

HOCKEY • NHL PRESEASON EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Ottawa 2 2 0 0 4 11 4 Boston 2 2 0 0 4 7 4 Florida 2 1 0 1 3 7 6 Buffalo 2 1 0 1 3 6 6 Detroit 1 0 1 0 0 2 4 Tampa Bay 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 Montreal 1 0 1 0 0 2 3 Toronto 2 0 2 0 0 4 11 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Carolina 2 2 0 0 4 5 3 NY Islanders 2 1 0 1 3 3 3 NY Rangers 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 New Jersey 1 1 0 0 2 4 1 Philadelphia 1 0 0 1 1 2 3 Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1 1 3 4 Columbus 1 0 1 0 0 2 5 Washington 1 0 1 0 0 1 4

Lg 52 52 50 32 46 39 56 46 40 43 39 41 52 45 41 28 54 20 50 58 40 50

Tuesday Florida 5, Nashville 3 Chicago 5, Columbus 2 Buffalo 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Boston 4, Detroit 2 Ottawa 5, Toronto 2 Carolina 2, Tampa Bay 1 Nashville 3, Florida 2, OT Dallas 5, St. Louis 3 Vegas at Colorado, late Anaheim at San Jose, late Wednesday New Jersey at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Washington at Montreal, 6 p.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 6 p.m. Columbus at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Calgary, 8 p.m. Arizona at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

Rec 126 244 43 104 51 114 83 10 201 190 176 45 57 102 174 35 115 163 163 50 81 90 156 145


SPORTS

09.20.2017 • WedneSday • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

NFL NOTEBOOK

Miami suspends veteran LB Timmons AWOL linebacker Lawrence Timmons wanted to rejoin the Miami Dolphins. Instead, they suspended him indefinitely and traded for a replacement, moves that signal his disappearance from the Dolphins’ defense may be permanent. The Dolphins announced Timmons’ suspension Tuesday and also acquired linebacker Stephone Anthony from the New Orleans Saints for a fifth-round draft pick in 2018. Anthony, who has been nursing a sprained ankle, fell out of favor with the Saints after they took him with the 31st overall pick in the 2015 draft. Miami coach Adam Gase was angered by the disappearance of Timmons, an 11th-year veteran. The Dolphins filed a missing person report before making contact with Timmons, who apparently was dealing with a personal matter. He wasn’t with the Dolphins for Sunday’s game at the Los Angeles Chargers and didn’t fly back to South Florida on the team plane after Miami’s 19-17 win. After starting 16 games as a rookie, Anthony was mostly a reserve for the Saints last season. He had yet to play this season. Undrafted rookie free agent Chase Allen started in Timmons’ place and made three tackles Sunday. Timmons signed a $12 mil-

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES ................ -$200.......................Twins A’s ............................-$120 .................... TIGERS Red Sox .................. -$200..................ORIOLES BLUE JAYS ...............-$118 ..................... Royals ASTROS .................. -$270................White Sox Indians ....................-$120 ...................ANGELS MARINERS...............-$150 ...................Rangers National League MARLINS.................-$158 ........................ Mets Rockies....................-$132 ....................GIANTS Dodgers.................. -$230................. PHILLIES Brewers...................-$110 .................. PIRATES Cards.......................-$158 ....................... REDS Nationals.................-$155 ...................BRAVES D’backs....................-$145 ...................PADRES Interleague Cubs ........................-$132 ........................RAYS NFL Favorite Open/current Underdog Thursday Rams ......................3....2.5 ................... 49ERS Sunday l-Ravens .................4..... 4................... Jaguars Browns..................1.5.....1......................COLTS Steelers.................7.5... 7.5 ................... BEARS Dolphins............... 6.5 ... 6.........................JETS Broncos.................. 2..... 3.......................BILLS PATRIOTS .............. 13 ....13....................Texans PANTHERS .............6..... 6...................... Saints VIKINGS.................NL... NL ...................... Bucs LIONS .....................3..... 3....................Falcons EAGLES...................6..... 6......................Giants TITANS...................2.5...2.5 ..............Seahawks Chiefs ....................2.5.... 3..............CHARGERS PACKERS ................9..... 9................... Bengals Raiders..................3.5.... 3......... WASHINGTON Monday Cowboys................3.5.... 3.....................CARDS l- London, England. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Open/current Underdog Thursday S FLORIDA.............20... 20 .................. Temple Friday BOISE ST................ 13 ....12.................. Virginia Utah...................... 4.5 ..3.5 ...............ARIZONA Saturday Wake Forest..........3.5...4.5.......APP’CHIAN ST Duke......................2.5...2.5 ......... N CAROLINA Michigan ............... 10... 10................. PURDUE GA TECH ................7.5... 7.5 .............Pittsburgh Penn St.................. 12 .. 12.5 .................... IOWA CLEMSON ..............34... 34 ............Boston Coll FLORIDA ST........... 12 .. 12.5 ...............NC State GEORGIA ................ 5....5.5 ...................Miss St S CAROLINA .......... 11 ...8.5 ..................La Tech TENNESSEE..........26.5.. 28.................... UMass W Virginia ............. 21 ....22..................KANSAS Florida....................3..... 3.............. KENTUCKY MARYLAND ............4....3.5 ................C Florida LOUISVILLE...........39... 43................... Kent St E MICHIGAN ..........2.5...2.5 ................... Ohio U C MICHIGAN ........... 2....2.5 ...........Miami-Ohio VA TECH ...............26.5 28.5 ...... Old Dominion Georgia St ..............3......1............ CHARLOTTE INDIANA...............22.5.. 24...........Ga Southern BUFFALO ................3..... 3............. Fla Atlantic NEBRASKA............ 14 ....13.................. Rutgers MIAMI-FLA ............ 13 .. 13.5 .................. Toledo Washington........... 10..10.5 ...........COLORADO NEW MEX ST ......... 18 ....18....................... Utep NAVY ....................11.5. 11.5..............Cincinnati OHIO ST................39.5.40.5......................Unlv Notre Dame ..........3.5.... 4.......... MICHIGAN ST WYOMING............... 7....6.5...................Hawaii TULSA.................... 12 .. 12.5 ......... New Mexico LSU........................ 23..23.5 .............. Syracuse TROY...................... 15 .. 15.5 ................... Akron MID TENN ST........10.5..9.5 ......Bowling Green Auburn.................17.5. 18.5 .............MISSOURI HOUSTON...............6..... 6.............. Texas Tech SMU...................... 4.5 ..5.5 ...........Arkansas St Alabama................ 19 .. 18.5 ........ VANDERBILT TULANE.................1.5... 1.5 ..................... Army OKLAHOMA ST...... 12 ....12..........................Tcu W KENTUCKY .........9.... 7.5 ....................Ball St N TEXAS ...............10.5...11.........................Uab Utsa....................... 14 .. 13.5 ..............TEXAS ST S Diego St............... 5....3.5 ............ AIR FORCE a-TEXAS A&M.........3....2.5 ...............Arkansas RICE.......................2.5... 1.5 ...........Florida Int’l S ALABAMA............4..... 4.......................Idaho UL-LAFAYETTE ......5.5...5.5 ............UL-Monroe Oklahoma .............26... 28..................BAYLOR Usc......................... 16 ..16.5 .........CALIFORNIA WASH ST...............27.5.. 28...................Nevada Oregon .................15.5. 15.5 ......... ARIZONA ST STANFORD ............. 7.... 7.5 .......................Ucla Utah St ...................3..... 3........... SAN JOSE ST Sunday CONNECTICUT........ 5..... 5............... E Carolina a- Arlington, TX. SOCCER • ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE, Sat. Tottenham ............................................... -$170 WEST HAM UNITED................................ +$480 Draw: +$320 | Over/under: 2.5 goals SWANSEA CITY........................................ +$130 Watford ................................................... +$210 Draw: +$230 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Chelsea..................................................... -$165 STOKE CITY .............................................+$470 Draw: +$290 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Manchester United..................................-$130 SOUTHAMPTON ......................................+$380 Draw: +$250 | Over/under: 2.5 goals MANCHESTER CITY..................................-$740 Crystal Palace.......................................+$1800 Draw: +$750 | Over/under: 3.5 goals EVERTON..................................................-$160 Bournemouth .........................................+$450 Draw: +$290 | Over/under: 2.0 goals BURNLEY..................................................+$110 Huddersfield Town .................................+$265 Draw: +$215 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Liverpool...................................................-$115 LEICESTER CITY ......................................+$290 Draw: +$260 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Sunday BRIGHTON & HOVE ALBION ................... +$165 Newcastle United ....................................+$175 Draw: +$205 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

FAIRMOUNT PARK Tuesday’s results First (6f) Time: 1:11:88 My Little Darling (Victor Santiago), 2.60, 2.20, 2.10 Rosie’s Relish (Reynier Arrieta), 4.20, 2.60 Royal City (Uriel Lopez), 2.60 Exacta (6-5) $10.40 Trifecta (6-5-1) $14.70 Superfecta (6-5-1-4) $28.90

Another broken hand for Browns’ Coleman • Cleveland wide receiver Corey Coleman has been placed on injured reserve after having surgery on his broken right hand — again. The injury, sufered Sunday in Baltimore, came almost exactly a year to the day from when he broke his hand during practice as a rookie. The No. 15 overall pick in 2016 can return to practice in six weeks and would be eligible to play in a game after eight weeks. After missing six games last season, Coleman was determined to become a game-changing playmaker for the Browns, who are 1-17 over the past two seasons. This season, he’d caught six passes for 62 yards and a touchdown.

eight games after Carolina placed the three-time Pro Bowl tight end on injured reserve with a broken right foot Tuesday. The earliest Olsen is eligible to return is Nov. 26 at the Jets. Panthers trainer Ryan Vermillion told the team website that Olsen broke the fifth metatarsal in his right foot in Carolina’s 9-3 win over Bufalo and had surgery on Monday. The injury ends Olsen’s streak of 160 consecutive games played. It’s the second-longest active streak among tight ends behind Dallas’ Jason Witten (221).

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Linebacker Lawrence Timmons, in his 11th NFL season, was a no-show for Miami’s 19-17 season-opening road win over the Chargers Sunday.

lion, two-year deal with Miami in March after 10 seasons with Pittsburgh, where he won a Super Bowl ring in 2009 and made

Second (1m) Time 1, 42, 36 A Stormy Cape (Reynier Arrieta), 39.60, 9.60, 5.60 6 -Silent Congrats (Victor Santiago), 2.40, 2.10 The Ridge (Juan De La Cruz), 3.40 Exacta (3-6) $118.80 Trifecta (3-6-4) $230.90 Superfecta (3-6-4-5) $515.40 Daily Double (6-3) $56.00 Third (6f) Time: 1:12:72 Heidi Who (Victor Santiago), 5.40, 3.60, 2.20 Boohoo Sue (Juan De La Cruz), 3.60, 2.40 Infinitive (Javier Diego), 3.00 Exacta (5-7) $16.80 Trifecta (5-7-1) $52.50 Superfecta (5-7-1-2) $203.90 Daily Double (3-5) $157.60 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (6-3-3,5) $79.50 Scratched: Flying Phoebe Fourth (6f) Time: 1:11:50 Green Means Go (Uriel Lopez), 11.80, 5.40, Refunded Shanghai Red (Javier Diego), 3.00, Refunded Smart Alex’s Posse (Victor Santiago), Refunded Exacta (2-1) $33.40 Trifecta (2-1-3) $48.90 Superfecta (2-1-3-6) $87.10 Daily Double (5-2) $72.60 Pick 3, 2 of 3, (3-3,5-2) $13.40 Scratched: Shestoyoungforubro Fifth (6f) Time: 1:13:86 Barton attack (Francisco Giles), 65.20, 14.00, 7.60 Dayjur Best (Victor Bailon), 2.80, 2.40 Graduate Cat (Victor Santiago), 4.40 Exacta (6-8) $143.20 Trifecta (6-8-7) $435.60 Superfecta (6-8-7-1) $3686.30 Daily Double (2-6) $345.60 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (3,5-2-6) $148.50 Scratched: Thunderbuck, Oklahoma Lizzie Sixth (6f) Time: 1:10:89 D’ Rapper (Victor Santiago), 3.80, 2.60, No Show Purging the Stone (Uriel Lopez), 3.80, No Show Internet Success (Juan Molina, Jr.), No Show Exacta (2-3) $12.40 Trifecta (2-3-5) $22.90 Daily Double (6-2) $283.60 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (2-6-2) $85.15 Seventh (1m) Time: 1:40:06 Bold Ransom (Javier Diego), 4.80, 3.00, 2.20 Nafir’s Best (Uriel Lopez), 3.00, 2.80 Briar Hll Baron (Juan Molina, Jr.), 2.80 Exacta (2-3) $14.20 Trifecta (2-3-7) $31.40 Superfecta (2-3-7-5) $89.60 Daily Double (2-2) $12.00 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (6-2-2) $86.20 Eighth (6f) Time: 1:13:23 Ice Attack (Juan Molina, Jr.), 6.60, 3.20, 2.80 Ahniwake (Victor Santiago), 3.40, 2.80 Illini Kitten (Javier Diego), 7.20 Exacta (9-4) $18.80 Trifecta (9-4-8) $176.30 Superfecta (9-4-8-7) $843.50 Daily Double (2-9) $18.20 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (2-2-9) $11.70 Pick 4, 4 of 4, (6-2-2-9) $342.30

COLLEGES 2018 MU football schedule Sept. 1 ............................ vs. Tennessee Martin Sept. 8.......................................... vs. Wyoming Sept. 15..............................................at Purdue Sept. 22 ...........................................vs. Georgia Oct. 6.................................... at South Carolina Oct. 13 ............................................ at Alabama Oct. 20...........................................vs. Memphis Oct. 27.......................................... vs. Kentucky Nov. 3 ................................................ at Florida Nov. 10 ....................................... vs. Vanderbilt Nov. 17..........................................at Tennessee Nov. 24 ......................................... vs. Arkansas

Area scores Womens soccer St. Louis CC 4, Central Methodist JV 0 Mens soccer St. Louis CC 4, Jefferson College 0 Women’s volleyball Webster def. Illinois College, 25-27, 25-14, 25-11, 26-24

GOLF MGA Senior Amateur Tuesday | Bogey Hills Final round Jay Gregory Charles Schorgl David Johnson Don Kuehn Jeff Johnson Timothy Holmes Bill Anderson Bobby Godwin Kevin Handlan Ron Eilers Steve Groom Bob Hanneken Buddy Allen David Teel Robert Trittler Brad E Dixon David Bremer Jim Beatson Didier Villard Don Bliss Scott Edwards David Pfeil Harry Roberts Jack Dixon II Mike Domenick Rick Barks Bruce Rehmer Jeff Spies Mark Bolhofner Scott Whittaker Skip Wilson Tom Barry Bernie McGuire Bob McKay Jim Greenstein Lewis Hart Scott Hays John Shock Mike Wilson Brett Allen Ed Brown Ian Soutar John McCulloch Tom Pruden Anthony Brown David Estes Joseph Correnti III Mark Wethington

70-71 73-69 71-73 70-75 73-72 74-73 77-71 71-77 75-73 72-76 75-73 79-71 77-73 75-75 74-76 77-75 79-73 80-72 76-77 74-79 74-79 75-79 78-76 78-76 78-76 78-76 77-78 81-74 79-76 77-78 77-78 77-78 78-78 77-79 77-79 82-74 78-78 74-83 80-77 80-78 77-81 76-82 80-78 83-75 78-81 76-83 80-79 80-80

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

141 142 144 145 145 147 148 148 148 148 148 150 150 150 150 152 152 152 153 153 153 154 154 154 154 154 155 155 155 155 155 155 156 156 156 156 156 157 157 158 158 158 158 158 159 159 159 160

Glen Hall James Dunn Pat O’Neill Robert Meeh Jeff Echelmeier Ken Horn Larry Shelley Ted Roberts Tom Viers Robert Nelson II Robert Wysong Bob Crockett Brent Johnson Dewey Jones Pat Ross Rusty Shelley Brett Combs Chuck Admire Mark Sissom Michael Dallmeyer

the Pro Bowl in 2014. Panthers’ TE Olsen to IR • Greg Olsen will miss a minimum of

78-83 83-78 85-76 73-88 78-84 79-83 85-77 82-87 81-88 86-84 85-87 84-89 85-88 85-88 85-88 91-82 76-WD 85-WD 78-WD 80-WD

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

161 161 161 161 162 162 162 169 169 170 172 173 173 173 173 173 WD WD WD WD

SOCCER • MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Toronto FC 18 3 8 62 63 26 New York City FC 15 8 6 51 50 37 Chicago 14 9 6 48 52 37 Columbus 13 12 5 44 45 45 Atlanta United FC 12 8 7 43 57 35 New York 12 10 6 42 41 36 Montreal 10 12 6 36 44 46 New England 10 14 5 35 45 51 Orlando City 9 12 8 35 32 47 Philadelphia 8 12 9 33 37 39 D.C. United 8 17 4 28 23 49 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Vancouver 13 9 6 45 45 39 Sporting K.C. 11 6 11 44 35 22 Seattle 11 7 11 44 42 35 Portland 12 10 8 44 50 47 San Jose 11 12 6 39 32 48 FC Dallas 9 8 11 38 39 38 Houston 10 10 8 38 46 39 Real Salt Lake 11 14 5 38 44 52 Minnesota United 8 15 5 29 36 58 Los Angeles 7 15 6 27 36 52 Colorado 7 16 5 26 26 42 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday Los Angeles at Atlanta United FC, 6 p.m. Montreal at Toronto FC, 6:30 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL National League CINCINNATI — Claimed 1B/3B D.J. Peterson off waivers from the Chicago White Sox and assigned him outright to Louisville (IL). CARDINALS — Activated RHP Adam Wainwright from the 10-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association BROOKLYN — Named Olivier Sedra public address announcer. CHICAGO — Named Doug Collins senior adviser of basketball operations. Women’s National Basketball Association CONNECTICUT — Signed coach Curt Miller to a contract extension through the 2021 season. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA — Released TE Jim Dray. BALTIMORE — Placed LB Bam Bradley and OL Marshal Yanda on injured reserve. Signed OL Matt Skura from the practice squad, OT Dieugot Joseph from Chicago’s practice squad and LB Nicholas Grigsby, OT Arie Kouandjio and RB Jeremy Langford to the practice squad. BUFFALO — Released S Trae Elston and LB Jelani Jenkins. CAROLINA — Placed TE Greg Olsen on injured reserve. Signed FB Alex Armah from the practice squad. CHICAGO — Waived WR Tanner Gentry. Terminated the practice squad contract of RB Josh Rounds. Signed DB DeAndre Houston-Carson from the practice squad and DL Mike Purcell to the practice squad. CLEVELAND — Placed WR Corey Coleman on injured reserve. Released DBs Najee Murray and Channing Stribling from the practice squad. Signed DL Jhaustin Thomas and Tyrone Holmes and WR Jordan Leslie to the practice squad. DALLAS — Waived LB Jayrone Elliott. Released G Nate Theaker from the practice squad. Signed S Jameill Showers to the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE — Claimed WR Jaelen Strong off waivers from Houston. Placed DT Michael Bennett on injured reserve. MIAMI — Suspended LB Lawrence Timmons indefinitely after he went AWOL on the eve of the team’s season opener. Acquired LB Stephone Anthony from New Orleans for an undisclosed 2018 draft pick. NY JETS — Waived WR Kalif Raymond. Signed DL Claude Pelon to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT — Assigned RW Givani Smith to Guelph (OHL). NEW JERSEY — Assigned G Evan Cormier to Saginaw (OHL), D Jocktan Chainey to Halifax (QMJHL) and Colby Sissons to Swift Current (WHL) and Fs Nikita Popugaev to Prince George (WHL) and Marian Studenic to Hamilton (OHL). Released F Nicolas Guay from an amateur tryout. NY RANGERS — Assigned F Robin Kovacs, RW Adam Chapie and D Brenden Kotyk to Hartford (AHL); LW Tim Gettinger to Sault Ste. Marie (OHL); and RW Ty Ronning to Vancouver (WHL). TAMPA BAY — Named Casey Rodgers chief financial officer for the club and Tampa Bay Sports & Entertainment. MOTORSPORTS NASCAR — Docked Monster Energy Cup driver Chase Elliott 15 driver points, The Hendrick Motorsports team 15 owner points, Elliott’s crew chief Alan Gustafson $25,000 and suspended Gustafson and car chief Joshua Kirk one race for an aerodynamic modification found in a post-race inspection following Elliott’s second-place finish on Sunday. SOCCER U.S. SOCCER FEDERATION — Agreed to terms with youth technical director and men’s Under-20 national team coach Tab Ramos on a contract extension. Major League Soccer MINNESOTA — Named Chris Wright CEO. NEW ENGLAND — Fired coach Jay Heaps. Promoted assistant coach Tom Soehn to head coach. COLLEGE AUBURN — Announced DL Byron Cowart left the football program and been granted his release.

Jets cut Raymond after fumbled punt • The New York Jets have waived wide receiver Kalif Raymond, two days after his fumbled punt changed momentum in the team’s loss at Oakland. Raymond was claimed off waivers by the Jets on Sept. 3 after he played his rookie season with Denver last year. He served as New York’s primary returner on punts and kickofs in the first two games, but had ball security issues. Raymond mishandled two punts in the opener at Buffalo, but recovered both fumbles. Sunday against the Raiders, he fumbled a punt with 1:50 left in the opening half and the Jets trailing 14-10. The Raiders scored three plays later and went on to a 45-20 win that dropped the Jets to 0-2.

Jags claim WR Strong of waivers • Jacksonville has claimed WR Jaelen Strong off waivers from the Houston Texans, providing some depth with Allen Robinson and rookie Dede Westbrook on injured reserve. The make room on the roster, the Jaguars placed defensive tackle Michael Bennett on IR with a pectoral injury. A third-round draft pick in 2015, Strong has 28 receptions for 292 yards and three touchdowns in 19 games. The Texans waived him Monday. He was suspended for the season opener for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy.

FOOTBALL NFL LEADERS

National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Miami 1 0 0 1.000 Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 New England 1 1 0 .500 NY Jets 0 2 0 .000 L T 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0

PF 19 24 63 32

PA 17 21 62 66

South Tennessee Jacksonville Houston Indianapolis

W 1 1 1 0

North Baltimore Pittsburgh Cincinnati Cleveland

W L T Pct PF 2 0 0 1.000 44 2 0 0 1.000 47 0 2 0 .000 9 0 2 0 .000 28

PA 10 27 33 45

West Denver Oakland Kansas City LA Chargers

W L T Pct 2 0 0 1.000 2 0 0 1.000 2 0 0 1.000 0 2 0 .000

PF 66 71 69 38

PA 38 36 47 43

Pct PF .500 50 .500 36 .500 44 .000 13

PA 44 45 50 43

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Philadelphia 1 1 0 Dallas 1 1 0 Washington 1 1 0 NY Giants 0 2 0

Pct PF PA .500 53 42 .500 45 44 .500 20 38 .000 22 62

South Atlanta Carolina Tampa Bay New Orleans

W L T Pct 2 0 0 1.000 2 0 0 1.000 1 0 0 1.000 0 2 0 .000

North Detroit Minnesota Green Bay Chicago

W 2 1 1 0

L 0 1 1 2

T 0 0 0 0

PF 57 32 29 39

PA 40 6 7 65

Pct PF 1.000 59 .500 38 .500 40 .000 24

PA 33 45 43 52

West W L T Pct PF PA Seattle 1 1 0 .500 21 26 LA Rams 1 1 0 .500 66 36 Arizona 1 1 0 .500 39 48 San Francisco 0 2 0 .000 12 35 Thursday LA Rams at San Francisco, 7:25 p.m., NFL Net. Sunday Baltimore vs Jacksonville at London, 8:30 a.m. New Orleans at Carolina, Noon Tampa Bay at Minnesota, Noon, KTVI-2 Denver at Buffalo, Noon Pittsburgh at Chicago, Noon, KMOV-4 Miami at NY Jets, Noon NY Giants at Philadelphia, Noon Atlanta at Detroit, Noon Houston at New England, Noon Cleveland at Indianapolis, Noon Seattle at Tennessee, 3:05 p.m. Kansas City at Chargers, 3:25 p.m., KMOV-4 Cincinnati at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. Oakland at Washington, 7:30 p.m., KSDK-5 Monday Dallas at Arizona, 7:30 p.m., ESPN LATE MONDAY

Lions 24, Giants 10 Detroit 7 10 0 7 — 24 New York 0 7 3 0 — 10 First Quarter Det: M.Jones 27 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), 4:00. Second Quarter NYG: Engram 18 pass from Manning (Rosas kick), 14:55. Det: Ebron 7 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), 8:43. Det: FG Prater 56, :30. Third Quarter NYG: FG Rosas 25, 4:58. Fourth Quarter Det: Agnew 88 punt return (Prater kick), 12:56. A: 77,004. Det NYG First downs 12 14 Total Net Yards 257 270 Rushes-yards 32-138 18-62 Passing 119 208 Punt Returns 3-101 2-9 Kickoff Returns 1-15 1-21 Interceptions Ret. 1-18 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 15-21-0 22-32-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-3 5-31 Punts 5-41.8 5-47.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-50 7-50 Time of Possession 32:47 27:13 Rushing: Detroit, Abdullah 17-86, Stafford 3-23, Riddick 9-20, D.Washington 3-9. New York, Vereen 6-28, Darkwa 3-17, Perkins 7-10, Shepard 2-7. Passing: Detroit, Stafford 15-21-0-122. New York, Manning 22-32-1-239. Receiving: Detroit, Ebron 5-42, Tate 4-25, Riddick 3-17, M.Jones 1-27, Golladay 1-8, Fells 1-3. New York, Engram 4-49, Beckham 4-36, Vereen 3-27, Shepard 2-23, Ellison 2-21, Lewis 2-13, Perkins 2-12, J.Adams 1-38, Marshall 1-17, Darkwa 1-3. Missed Field Goals: None.

LEADING SCORERS, NONKICKERS SCORING TD Rus Rec Ret K. Hunt, KC 5 3 2 0 Gillislee, NE 4 4 0 0 Crabtree, OAK 3 0 3 0 D. Freeman, ATL 3 3 0 0 Gurley, LA 3 2 1 0 Montgomery, GBY 3 2 1 0 C. Thompson, WAS 3 2 1 0 Agholor, PHL 2 0 2 0 C.. Anderson, DEN 2 1 1 0 S. Diggs, MIN 2 0 2 0 Fleener, NOR 2 0 2 0 Fournette, JAC 2 2 0 0 Fowler III, DEN 2 0 2 0 Golladay, DET 2 0 2 0 Gordon, LAC 2 1 1 0 Je. James, PIT 2 0 2 0 M. Jones, DET 2 0 2 0 Je. Kearse, NYJ 2 0 2 0 Maclin, BAL 2 0 2 0 J.. Nelson, ARI 2 0 2 0 Sanders, DEN 2 0 2 0 T. West, BAL 2 2 0 0 Witten, DAL 2 0 2 0 LEADING PASSERS Bradford, MIN Al. Smith, KC D. Carr, OAK Stafford, DET M. Ryan, ATL Siemian, DEN Rivers, LAC Brady, NE Goff, LA Brees, NOR Cutler, MIA Roethlisberger, PIT Winston, TAM Wentz, PHL A. Rodgers, GBY Flacco, BAL Ty. Taylor, BUF Newton, CAR Manning, NYG Cousins, WAS Glennon, CHI Mariota, TEN McCown, NYJ Prescott, DAL Ru. Wilson, SEA Bortles, JAC Des. Watson, HOU Keenum, MIN Palmer, ARI Brissett, IND Hoyer, SNF Kizer, CLE

Att 32 63 60 62 58 60 72 75 54 82 33 71 30 85 92 51 53 57 70 67 85 68 64 89 66 55 47 37 84 40 62 61

X2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Pts 30 24 18 18 18 18 18 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

Comp 27 49 45 44 40 39 53 46 36 54 24 47 18 51 61 34 33 34 51 41 57 40 43 54 37 31 27 20 46 22 39 35

Pct. 84.4 77.8 75.0 71.0 69.0 65.0 73.6 61.3 66.7 65.9 72.7 66.2 60.0 60.0 66.3 66.7 62.3 59.6 72.9 61.2 67.1 58.8 67.2 60.7 56.1 56.4 57.4 54.1 54.8 55.0 62.9 57.4

LEADING PASS RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS No Yds Witten, DAL 17 156 Anto. Brown, PIT 16 244 Cohen, CHI 16 102 Cobb, GBY 15 145 Thielen, MIN 14 201 K. Allen, LAC 14 135 G. Tate, DET 14 132 De. Hopkins, HOU 14 128 Ertz, PHL 13 190 T. Kelce, KC 13 143 Landry, MIA 13 78 Crabtree, OAK 12 163 Gordon, LAC 12 90 Vereen, NYG 12 78 T. Hill, KC 11 176 D. Adams, GBY 11 146 Dem. Thomas, DEN 11 138 Del. Walker, TEN 11 137 Sanu, ATL 11 132 Je. Kearse, NYJ 11 123 J. White, NE 11 115 Jo. Reed, WAS 11 84 L. McCoy, BUF 11 83

Avg 9.2 15.2 6.4 9.7 14.4 9.6 9.4 9.1 14.6 11.0 6.0 13.6 7.5 6.5 16.0 13.3 12.5 12.5 12.0 11.2 10.5 7.6 7.5

LEADING RUSHERS Att Yards K. Hunt, KC 30 229 C.. Anderson, DEN 45 199 D. Cook, MIN 34 191 C. Hyde, SNF 24 169 Fournette, JAC 40 140 Ja. Allen, BAL 35 137 Carson, SEA 26 132 Gurley, LA 35 128 L. Miller, HOU 35 126 Ajayi, MIA 28 122 D. Freeman, ATL 31 121 M. Lynch, OAK 30 121 L. Bell, PIT 37 119 L. McCoy, BUF 34 119 D. Henry, TEN 20 117 Abdullah, DET 32 116 Gillislee, NE 33 114 E. Elliott, DAL 33 112 Kelley, WAS 22 108 J. Stewart, CAR 33 105 T. West, BAL 27 102 Ty. Taylor, BUF 16 93 Montgomery, GBY 29 89 Gore, IND 24 88

Avg Long TD 7.6 58 3 4.4 28 1 5.6 33 0 7.0 61 0 3.5 17 2 3.9 37 0 5.1 30 0 3.7 18 2 3.6 19 0 4.4 20 0 3.9 17 3 4.0 14 1 3.2 15 0 3.5 27 0 5.8 17t 1 3.6 34 0 3.5 16 4 3.4 10 0 4.9 21 0 3.2 10 0 3.8 12 2 5.8 14 0 3.1 8 2 3.7 16 1

Long 28t 50 19t 29 44 24 19 25 53 44 18 26t 16 20 75t 33t 29 23 24 34t 26 16 21

LEADING SCORERS, KICKERS SCORING PAT FG Succop, TEN 5/5 6/7 Tavecchio, OAK 8/8 5/5 Zuerlein, LA 7/7 5/5 Gostkowski, NE 6/7 5/5 Lutz, NOR 3/3 6/7 Gano, CAR 2/2 6/6 D. Bailey, DAL 3/3 5/5 Boswell, PIT 5/5 4/4 Dawson, ARI 3/3 4/6 Myers, JAC 3/4 4/5 Santos, KC 9/9 2/2 Walsh, SEA 0/1 5/5 Catanzaro, NYJ 2/2 4/4 Forbath, MIN 2/4 4/4 Du. Hopkins, WAS 5/5 3/4 Tucker, BAL 5/5 3/4 Parkey, MIA 1/1 4/4 McManus, DEN 9/9 1/3 Folk, TAM 2/3 3/3 Prater, DET 5/5 2/2 Crosby, GBY 4/4 2/2 Sturgis, PHL 1/2 3/3

TD 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

Yds 346 619 492 414 573 450 523 714 530 647 230 506 204 640 654 338 349 399 459 419 514 471 353 506 356 348 227 167 600 267 292 404

TD 3 5 5 6 2 6 4 3 2 3 1 4 1 4 3 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 1

YARDS Anto. Brown, PIT Thielen, MIN Ertz, PHL T. Hill, KC Ju. Jones, ATL Crabtree, OAK J.. Nelson, ARI Witten, DAL Gronkowski, NE D. Adams, GBY Cobb, GBY T. Kelce, KC A. Green, CIN Dem. Thomas, DEN Del. Walker, TEN K. Allen, LAC Hooper, ATL Michael Thomas, NOR G. Everett, LA G. Tate, DET Sanu, ATL Jeffery, PHL De. Hopkins, HOU K. Hunt, KC Cooks, NE

Yds 244 201 190 176 174 163 163 156 149 146 145 143 141 138 137 135 135 134 134 132 132 130 128 126 125

Int 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 0 2 1 0 4 1 2 4 No 16 14 13 11 9 12 10 17 8 11 15 13 10 11 11 14 4 10 4 14 11 10 14 8 5

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 1 1 0 0 2 5 3 Minnesota 1 1 0 0 2 3 2 Chicago 1 1 0 0 2 5 2 Nashville 2 1 1 0 2 6 7 Winnipeg 1 0 0 1 1 2 3 Colorado 1 0 1 0 0 1 4 Blues 1 0 1 0 0 3 5 Pacific GP W L OT Pts GF GA Edmonton 2 2 0 0 4 10 6 Vegas 2 2 0 0 4 13 5 San Jose 1 1 0 0 2 5 0 Vancouver 2 1 1 0 2 8 12 Los Angeles 1 0 0 1 1 3 4 Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Anaheim 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 Calgary 2 0 2 0 0 6 10

Pts 23 23 22 21 21 20 18 17 15 15 15 15 14 14 14 14 13 12 11 11 10 10

Points 143.0 134.1 126.5 114.6 112.2 106.9 106.4 106.2 103.2 102.0 101.8 99.9 91.5 89.3 88.8 88.5 86.1 85.3 83.0 82.9 81.2 78.7 78.5 78.2 76.3 72.4 68.3 65.9 65.6 65.3 60.7 55.6

Avg Long TD 15.2 50 0 14.4 44 0 14.6 53 0 16.0 75t 1 19.3 34 0 13.6 26t 3 16.3 45t 2 9.2 28t 2 18.6 53t 1 13.3 33t 1 9.7 29 0 11.0 44 1 14.1 50 0 12.5 29 0 12.5 23 0 9.6 24 1 33.8 88t 1 13.4 33 0 33.5 69 0 9.4 19 0 12.0 24 0 13.0 24 1 9.1 25 1 15.8 78t 2 25.0 54 0

TOTAL YARDS FROM SCRIMMAGE Total Rush K. Hunt, KC 355 229 Anto. Brown, PIT 244 0 C.. Anderson, DEN 242 199 Gurley, LA 232 128 C. Hyde, SNF 220 169 Montgomery, GBY 203 89 L. McCoy, BUF 202 119 D. Cook, MIN 201 191 Thielen, MIN 201 0 Ertz, PHL 190 0 T. Hill, KC 187 11 Fournette, JAC 185 140 L. Miller, HOU 183 126 Cohen, CHI 181 79 Ju. Jones, ATL 174 0 Ja. Allen, BAL 172 137 J. White, NE 164 49 Crabtree, OAK 163 0 J.. Nelson, ARI 163 0 E. Elliott, DAL 162 112 C. Thompson, WAS 162 81 Gordon, LAC 157 67 Witten, DAL 156 0 Cobb, GBY 155 10

HOCKEY • NHL PRESEASON EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 2 2 0 0 4 7 4 Ottawa 2 2 0 0 4 11 4 Buffalo 2 1 0 1 3 6 6 Florida 2 1 0 1 3 7 6 Montreal 1 0 1 0 0 2 3 Tampa Bay 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 Detroit 1 0 1 0 0 2 4 Toronto 2 0 2 0 0 4 11 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Carolina 2 2 0 0 4 5 3 NY Islanders 2 1 0 1 3 3 3 New Jersey 1 1 0 0 2 4 1 NY Rangers 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 Philadelphia 1 0 0 1 1 2 3 Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1 1 3 4 Columbus 1 0 1 0 0 2 5 Washington 1 0 1 0 0 1 4

Lg 52 52 50 32 46 39 56 46 40 43 39 41 52 45 41 28 54 20 50 58 40 50

Tuesday Dallas 5, Blues 3 Florida 5, Nashville 3 Chicago 5, Columbus 2 Buffalo 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Boston 4, Detroit 2 Ottawa 5, Toronto 2 Carolina 2, Tampa Bay 1 Nashville 3, Florida 2, OT Vegas 4, Colorado 1 San Jose 5, Anaheim 0 Wednesday New Jersey at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Washington at Montreal, 6 p.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 6 p.m. Columbus at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Calgary, 8 p.m. Arizona at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

Rec 126 244 43 104 51 114 83 10 201 190 176 45 57 102 174 35 115 163 163 50 81 90 156 145


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

TUESDAY’S RESULTS SOFTBALL Duchesne 200 110 0 4 4 Lutheran SC 000 202 1 5 5 W-Molly Clift. McCluer North 000 200 2 7 Haz. West 115 113 12 11 W-Alexandria Cafolla. U. City 000 0 0 Metro (14)70 21 14 W-Jyanna Faller. HR-M Jyanna Faller Pattonville 000 00 1 4 Pky. Central 000 00 11 17 W-Elizabeth Millner. L-Courtney Faasen. HR-Pr Talia Emch -Emily West Trinity 010 03 4 6 Valley Park 443 03 14 19 L-Saana Khan. Warrenton 131 031 8 17 13 St.Chas. West 000 000 1 1 4 W-Destinee Frost. Bayless 000 0 0 Hancock (11)13 15 8 W-Christine Vineyard. Mehlville 012 102 6 9 Kirkwood 224 122 13 15 W-Rayne Grus. In. Word 141 07 13 13 Ursuline 000 03 3 5 L-Maddy Schneider. FH Central 001 100 1 3 5 Troy 024 131 0 11 13 W-Kiersten Nixon. HR-T Haleigh Hunt Webster 140 021 0 8 10 Northwest-CH 100 000 1 2 9 W-Maddie Buske. L-Maddison Welker. Fox 300 004 7 7 Pky. South 106 208 17 19 W-Mary Burkhalter. HR-P Lauren Kehlenbrink -Katy Moran Marquette 311 021 1 9 14 Lindbergh 000 000 0 0 4 W-Eileen McGinnis. L-Ryanne Morgan. Liberty 000 002 0 2 2 Holt 022 002 0 6 11 W-Carly Nolde. L-Gabbi Evans. HR-H Bailee Zemianek Washington 212 003 1 9 6 FZ South 000 000 0 0 3 L-Lindsay Picha. Seckman 010 100 2 5 Festus 011 212 7 12 W-Sara Hofman. HR-F Sara Hofman -

0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2

Luth. North def. Principia 25-18, 25-13 New Athens def. Dupo 25-6, 25-15 Althof def. Edwardsville 25-20, 12-25, 27-25 Borgia def. Owensville 25-13, 25-13 Breese C. def. Wesclin 25-17, 25-18 Borgia Tied Hermann 25-23, 18-25

BOYS GOLF Alton Marquette 169, Jerseyville 174 Alton Marquette (169): 1. Kolten Bauer, 36 Jerseyville (174): 3. Cole Quinn, 41

GIRLS GOLF 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 2 0 0

BOYS SOCCER McCluer North 5, U. City 4 (M: Emmanuel Ochepa 3, Devin Schrage; U: Nate Martin, Jalen Corn, De’Leon Fitzgerald, Marco Gillispie) John Burroughs 2, Principia 0 (J: Armando Sanchez, Chase Warner ; shutout by John Nash) Haz. West 8, McCluer 1 (H: Bryan Carroll 3, Dominic Holland 2, Zack Lyeki 2, Anthony Lingle) Valley Park 3, Hancock 2 (V: Timmy Ballard 2, Adam Donnell) Westminster 2, MICDS 0 (W: Frankie Sacco, Zach Cancila ; shutout by Joey Keane) Highland 4, Jerseyville 2 (H: Wes McMillan 2, Andrew Roach, Cory Stieb; J: David Rogers, Logan Simpson) Priory 4, Luth. North 0 (P: Walker VonderHaar 2, Joe Hunt, Patrick Smith ; shutout by Sean McAtee) Haz. Central 3, DuBourg 0 (H: Ester III 2, Lallis ; shutout by Matteoni) Seckman 6, Luth. South 2 (L: Jake Reis, Bradley Fritsche) Mater Dei 3, Greenville 0 (M: Tonnies 2, Hitpas; shutout by Kuhl) Wesclin 2, ME Lutheran 0 (W: Trent Calvert, Cameron Harbour ; shutout by Bernie Thiebeau) Bellvl. West 6, Trinity 2 (B: Easton Jaromin 2, Xavier Brown 2, Garrett Bass, Isaac Goodman; T: Austin Franklin, Jimmy Doherty) Staunton 2, Carlinville 1 (S: Brady Kinder; C: Matt Schmidt) Marquette 3, Eureka 1 (M: Tyler Sieli, Trent Dolson, Hunter Hartmann; E: Nathan Traylor) Windsor 7, Festus 0 (W: Connor Portlock 2, Cody Wilson 2, Cole Stelling, Cameron Gay, Grant Siegel ; shutout by Austin Bagley) Perryville 11, De Soto 1 (P: Austin Welk 4, Cole Gerstenberger 3, Kwaid Fears, Austin Schamburg, Stanley Volansky, Quint Schamburg; D: Nick Reiser) FZ West 2, FH North 1 (Fo: Mitch Vaughn, Kyle Weinhold) Mascoutah 6, Afton 0 (M: Malik Wilkes 3, Lane Hoelscher 2, Sam Schiller ; shutout by Stephen Schulte) Lafayette 3, Pky. West 1 (L: Colin Carnahan, Michael Drbul, Kyle Mazza) SLUH 3, Waterloo 0 (S: William Rudder, Reid Horton, Louis Vacca ; shutout by Alec Meissner) Ladue 2, Lindbergh 0 (La: Powell, Sewing ; shutout by Lorenz) Timberland 3, Triad 2 (Tr: Jaden Deatherage, Lucas Howard) Duchesne 1, Borgia 0 (D: Cooper Tune; shutout by Brendan Wuller) St. Dominic 8, Lutheran SC 0 (S: Alex Weddle 2, Collin McDonough, Collin Chrun, Zach Worster, Nathen Gober, Jacob Mock, Max Sengl ; shutout by Eric Bauche, Ryan Box) Columbia 2, Clayton 0 (Co: Riley Hubler, Brennen vanBruesegen ; shutout by Jon Kuebler) CBC 4, Mehlville 1 (C: Nate Temm 2, Cade Walsh, Sam Benoist)

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL John Burroughs def. St. Charles 25-20, 26-28, 25-19 Hermann def. Owensville 25-19, 25-14 Holt def. FZ North 25-23, 25-21 FZ West def. FH North 27-25, 25-17 Westminster def. Whitield 25-22, 25-16 Brentwood def. Bayless 20-25, 25-5, 25-11 Borgia def. Montgomery Co 25-11, 25-9 Haz. Central def. McCluer North 25-17, 25-11 Metro def. Cleveland 25-2, 25-8 St. Pius X def. Grandview 25-14, 25-18 Notre Dame def. Trinity 25-7, 25-17 McCluer def. Riverview 24-26, 25-20, 25-20 MICDS def. Pky. North 16-25, 25-17, 25-17 Freeburg def. Columbia 25-16, 25-18 Webster def. Pky. West 25-18, 25-23 Mascoutah def. Waterloo 22-25, 25-18, 25-14 Collinsville def. Alton 27-25, 25-20 Timberland def. FH Central 25-21, 25-20 Lafayette def. Mehlville 25-15, 25-14 Highland def. Jerseyville 25-17, 25-11 Maplewood-RH def. Crossroads 25-21, 25-14 Hermann def. Montgomery Co 25-14, 25-15 Fath.McGivney def. Barat 25-14, 25-11 Red Bud def. Lebanon 25-16, 26-24

GAC North-Central Championships 1. Liberty (Wentzville) 326, 2. Washington 367, 3. Holt 403, 4. Fort Zumwalt North 406, 5. Fort Zumwalt South 413 Liberty (Wentzville) (326) 1. Madeline Larouere, 75; 2. Zoee Harrington, 81; 3. Maya Schnable, 82; 5. Kelly Karre, 88; 19. Kelsey Fletcher, 107; Washington (367) 4. Madison Sprung, 87; 8. Bria Hasenjaeger, 92; 11. Nichole Brinker, 94; 11. Jordan Aholt, 94; 14. Emmy Hopkins, 99; Holt (403) 7. Ashlyn Sanders, 90; 8. Alex Hiebert, 92; 20. Sophie Williams, 108; 23. Mackenzie Pyatt, 113; 23. Kaiya Corbett, 113; Fort Zumwalt North (406) 6. Jessica Koscelny, 89; 17. Emily Brown, 102; 17. Charlee Hofman, 102; 21. Kiersten Oderman, 110; 25. Kaylee Dumay, 120; Fort Zumwalt South (413) 10. Hannah Harty, 93; 13. Alyssa Herrmann, 98; 15. Haley Kaiser, 100; 27. Morgan Picht, 122; 27. Sophia Welch, 122; SIRR Conference-Mississippi Division 1. Nashville 347, 2. Pinckneyville 359, 3. Carterville 409, 4. Anna-Jonesboro 433, 5. Sparta 516 Nashville (347) 4. Hope Rueter, 84; 5. Rachael Kell, 87; 5. Brooke Bartling, 87; 7. Jordan Stiegman, 89; 12. Sydney Gordon, 108; 15. Hannah Harris, 112; Pinckneyville (359) 1. Megan Breslin, 78; 3. Sarah Breslin, 83; 8. Graci McDaniel, 91; 11. Taylor Wildermuth, 107; 14. Kally Mayo, 109; 23. Kayla Alms, 121; Carterville (409) 1. Avery Rea, 78; 10. Ali Lamb, 98; 15. Alexis Nolen, 112; 23. Heidi Gentry, 121; 29. Lilie Floyd, 137; Anna-Jonesboro (433) 9. Molly Ellis, 95; 12. Emma Ray, 108; 17. Tobie Treece, 113; 19. Connar Hadley, 117; 22. Britini Helton, 119; 25. Hannah Hileman, 124; Sparta (516) 21. Isabella Jones, 118; 26. Rylie Manker, 132; 26. Skylar Manker, 132; 28. Payton Manker, 134; 30. Claire Baue, 147; SIRR Conference-Ohio Division 1. Massac County 356, 2. Herrin 453, 3. Harrisburg, Illinois 495 Massac County (356) 1. Millie Lawson, 80; 3. Mady Blair, 89; 4. Madie Coakley, 93; 6. Emma Korte, 94; 8. Madison Cunningham, 96; 9. Lauren Coakley, 97; Herrin (453) 11. Sydney Nugent, 107; 14. Jodi Harmon, 113; 15. Paige Wieland, 115; 16. Joely Winn, 118; 17. Zoe Williams, 121; GAC South Championships 1. Francis Howell 340, 2. Fort Zumwalt West 358, 3. Troy Buchanan 393, 4. Francis Howell North 402, 5. Timberland 410, 6. Francis Howell Central 418 Francis Howell (340) 4. Sydney Rogers, 83; 5. Kylee Hormuth, 85; 5. Sammie Markus, 85; 7. Jessica Fisher, 87; 9. Alison Moore, 92; Fort Zumwalt West (358) 1. Leigha Kelly, 77; 2. McKenna Chapman, 78; Troy Buchanan (393) 10. Nadia Banks, 94; 12. Paige Willman, 97; Francis Howell North (402) 3. Jessica Qian, 82; 8. Briana Schmidt, 90; Timberland (410) 10. Mallory Beattie, 94; Francis Howell Central (418) Ladue 193, Kirkwood 203, Ritenour 272 Ladue (193): 1. Grace Clancy, 39; Kirkwood (203): 2. Morgan Gindler, 41; Ritenour (272): 3. Kili Garcia, 64; Roxana Quad 1. Althof 165, 2. Triad 215, 3. Roxana 216, 4. Waterloo 223 Althof (165): 1. Megan Lewis, 30 Edwardsville 151, Granite City 207 Edwardsville (151): 1. Paige Hamel, 37; Granite City (207): 2. Megan Keel, 43; Seckman 196, Lindbergh 198 Seckman (196): 1. Claire Solovic, 35; Lindbergh (198): 2. Soia Gamayo, 40; St. Dominic 205, Notre Dame 214 St. Dominic (205): 1. Meredith Drummond, 48; Notre Dame (214): 2. Elizabeth Applebaum, 51; John Burroughs 169, Incarnate Word 192 John Burroughs (169): 1. Ingrid Keane, 38; Incarnate Word (192): 2. Ashley Fite, 44; Eureka 166, Fox 178 Eureka (166): 1. Ellie Frichtel, 39; 1. Sarah Biscan, 39; Fox (178): 3. Sydney Young, 41; Nerinx Hall 173, Cor Jesu 178 Nerinx Hall (173): 1. Caroline Lynch, 41; Cor Jesu (178): 2. Elizabeth McGuire, 43; 2. Hannah Wahle, 43;

BOYS SWIMMING Westminster 102, John Burroughs 82 100 backstroke: 1. Caleb Terschak, Westminster, 1:00.77; 100 breaststroke: 1. Michael Tu, John Burroughs, 1:11.31; 100butterfly:1.ReidSt.John,Westminster,1:02.43; 100 freestyle: 1. Hunter Sigmund, John Burroughs, 54.73; 200 Freestyle Relay: 1. John Burroughs, 1:43.17; 200 freestyle: 1. Dylan Meyer, John Burroughs, 2:10.88; 200 individual medley: 1. Michael Tu, John Burroughs, 2:15.73; 200 medley relay: 1. John Burroughs, 1:54.52; 400 relay: 1. Westminster, 3:54.8; 50 freestyle: 1. Hunter Sigmund, John Burroughs, 24.87; 500 freestyle: 1. Daniel Fox, Westminster, 6:10.96; Diving 6 dives: 1. Chris Kirby, Westminster, 160.25;

FIELD HOCKEY Summit 5, Rosati-Kain 1 Visitation 2, John Burroughs 1 Westminster 5, University City 1 Eureka 2, Parkway West 0 Pattonville 1, Lindbergh 0 Oakville 4, Alton Marquette 0

GIRLS TENNIS Belleville East 8, O’Fallon 1 St. Joseph’s 9, Incarnate Word 0 Jerseyville 6, Alton Marquette 3 Marquette 8, Lindbergh 1

FOOTBALL • AREA RANKINGS, WEEK 6 LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. East St. Louis 3-1 2. CBC 4-1 3. Eureka 5-0 4. Vianney 5-0 5. Fort Zumwalt North 5-0 6. Kirkwood 3-1 7. Parkway North 3-1 8. Lindbergh 5-0 9. Ritenour 5-0 10. Parkway Central 4-1

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 09.20.2017

LW 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. Trinity 4-0 2. Lutheran North 5-0 3. Althof 4-0 4. Highland 4-0 5. McCluer South-Berkeley 4-0 6. Alton Marquette 4-0 7. Borgia 5-0 8. Cardinal Ritter 4-1 9. MICDS 3-2 10. St. Mary’s 4-1

LW 1 2 3 4 5 7 NR 8 9 6

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

Althof’s Leighten Kaiser (10) and Mary Wessel (9) go up for a block on Edwardsville’s Rachel Pranger (17) during a volleyball game on Tuesday. See story online.

SLUH gears up for CBC with big win over Jeferson City BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

Mike Jones spent six seasons as a football coach at Lincoln University in Jefferson City. But his most significant win in Missouri’s capital came as the visiting head coach Friday night. In Jones’ first season at the helm, St. Louis U. High beat Jeferson City 38-20. It’s the first win for the Junior Billikens over the Jays since 1985 and snapped a nine-game losing streak to the historic powerhouse. That it happened in Jefferson City made it that much sweeter. “They get up for (high school football),” SLUH senior running back Jared Scott said. “They had a big crowd out.” SLUH (3-2) scored on its first possession when Scott rushed 31 yards for a touchdown. It’s the first time in four games SLUH cashed in on its first drive. The players said that was not an insignificant factor on the road against a good opponent. “It gives us momentum right away,” senior linebacker Sean Bender said. “Against Ladue, we were down 14-0. Against Chaminade we were down 14-0 in the first quarter. In the back of our mind we knew we could do this.” It had been a rocky start for SLUH and Jones. The Jr. Billikens opened the season with a 42-0 victory over Gateway STEM followed by losses to Ladue and Chaminade. They held on for a 28-24 win over De Smet. Finding a way to beat Jeferson City on the road gave SLUH a shot of confidence. “This was one of the games where they see what we’re talking about as coaches,” Jones said. “Seeing yourselves playing well, executing and winning games, that’s when they realize, ‘Coach is right.’ We can beat anybody on the schedule and we can lose to anybody on the schedule. It’s what we do, not what they do. That’s what we’re working on, making sure we play to the best of our abilities.” SLUH will have to be at the peak of its powers on Friday when it welcomes its old rival. The No. 2 large school in the STLhighschoolsports. com rankings, CBC (4-1) has won its last 13 against SLUH including a pair of playof matchups. The last time the Jr. Billikens beat their Metro Catholic Conference nemesis was 2005. Kickof is set for 7 p.m. Friday. It’s just one of many rivalry games on tap for this weekend. Others include St. Mary’s at DuBourg, Lutheran South at Lutheran North, Francis Howell at Fort Zumwalt West, Marquette at Lafayette and Breese Central at Mater Dei. On Saturday, John Burroughs plays at MICDS at 2 p.m.

THINGS GET PERSONAL IN METRO LEAGUE SHOWDOWN For the second time this season, Lutheran North broke its own scoring record. The No. 2 small school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Lutheran North (5-0) powered its way to an 8214 win over Metro League rival John Burroughs (2-3).

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

SLUH lineman Kameron Bowdry runs through a ladder to warm up during a practice at St. Louis University High School in St. Louis, Mo. Under new coach and former NFL linebacker Mike Jones, the Jr. Billikens are 3-2 this season.

It had broken the school record for most points in a 79-13 win over Orchard Farm on Aug. 28. It’s the most points given up by John Burroughs since at least 1999. The 82 points scored is tied with three other schools for 10th most in state history, according to the Missouri State High School Activities Association record book. Hillsboro scored 82 against Windsor in 1986. Riverview Gardens set the area record for most points in a game when it scored 90 against Normandy in 1999, according to the record book. Lincoln Prep Academy in Kansas City set the state record with 138 points in 1985. On Saturday, Lutheran North senior running back Canaan Brooks rushed for 138 yards and five touchdowns. Senior running back Donovan Marshall rushed for 176 yards and two touchdowns. Junior running back Isaiah Azubuike rushed four times for 43 yards and two touchdowns. Senior receiver Nick Lotts rushed for 176 and a score. He also caught a 29-yard touchdown pass. The contributions of Brooks and Lotts to the Lutheran North team were a bone of contention for John Burroughs’ coach John Merritt. In an email addressed to the football coaches and other administrators in the Metro League dated April 24, 2017, Merritt wrote Lutheran North coach Carl Reed and Lutheran North had “undue influence” on Brooks, Lotts and other players who transferred to Lutheran North. Brooks played at Hazelwood West last year, and Lotts played at Vashon. All of the transfers Merritt cites in his email are eligible to play this season at Lutheran North. Merritt wrote, “The simple reality is that the recent activities at Lutheran North are irresponsible. They are irresponsible to the Lutheran Schools Association, irresponsible to the Metro League and irresponsible to every private school in Missouri.” Merritt declined comment when asked about the email. Reed said the email did not sit well with him, his players or their parents. “He said a lot of derogatory things about them,” Reed said. “What he did is motivate our players and coaches.”

PARKWAY N. STUCK WITH STRANGE LOSS Parkway North and Kirkwood made it through one quarter Monday night before severe weather forced the rest of their rescheduled Suburban XII South game was canceled. Only it wasn’t. Kirkwood’s Martez Jones scored a 13-yard touchdown late in the first quarter to give the Pioneers a 7-0 lead. The game went into a weather delay before the first play of the second quarter. During the delay, Kirkwood and Parkway North agreed to not wait out what would be a long thunderstorm on a school night and parted ways expecting Monday’s result to not count as an official game. The Missouri State High School Activities Association, however, will count it. Citing National Federation of State High School Associations rule 3-1-4, the game becomes official once the opening kick is put in play. The score stands no matter how much or how little of the game has been played. Both schools can agree to resume the game at a later time and finish it or it becomes a final score. Those are the only two options. “There is no third option currently,” MSHSAA spokespersonJasonWestsaid. The No. 6 large school, Kirkwood (4-1) has a bye this week to accommodate the Turkey Day Game with Webster Groves on Thanksgiving. Parkway North (3-2, No. 7 LS) will play at Ritenour (5-0) at 7 p.m. Friday. Parkway School District athletics director Mike Roth declined comment. The decision to count the game as complete caught Parkway North by surprise. When discussing his team’s upcoming games with Ritenour and Oakville, Parkway North coach Bob Bunton believed Monday night’s game wouldn’t count. The game was rescheduled from Friday after Kirkwood postponed citing safety concerns surrounding the verdict in Jason Stockley’s murder trial. Bunton and his staff hadn’t dried out Monday night when they began preparing for Ritenour. It’s not the ideal situation but one Bunton and his Vikings had to live with. “Whether the game went four quarters, overtime or double overtime we still have Ritenour on Friday,” Bunton said. “We still had to prepare.”

WAIVERS REQUIRED At sundown on Sept. 29, Yom Kippur begins. To allow players, students, faculty, staff and community members to observe the religious holiday there are five area games scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 28. John Burroughs plays at Lutheran South, Ladue is at Clayton, Jennings plays at Parkway Central, Parkway North plays at Oakville and Westminster tussles with MICDS at Kirkwood High. All 10 of these teams play either the previous Friday or Saturday which, under state rules, could complicate Thursday’s games. The members of the Missouri State High School Activities Association passed an amendment last school year that went into effect July 1 that stated football players were prohibited from playing more than six quarters in a week. It says “Amends By-Law 3.23.1 by restricting football players to six quarters per week, and defines a football week for the tracking purposes as beginning Friday and ending the following Thursday.” GRID BITS • Wesclin broke Columbia’s 31-game Cahokia Conference winning streak Friday night with its comefrom-behind 21-16 victory. It’s the first league loss for Columbia (2-2) since Red Bud beat it 34-20 on Oct. 14, 2011. Wesclin is 4-0 for the first time since 2006 when it won its first six games. • Mater Dei (1-3) is off to its slowest start since at least 1999. The Knights are in jeopardy of not qualifying for the playofs for the first time since 2003. The top 32 teams qualify for the playofs and the Knights are currently listed at 41 in the Illinois High School Association’s Class 4A playoff outlook projector. Mater Dei’s opponents have racked up 26 wins, the most thus far in its class, which is used to break ties for playof qualification. • Vianney is 5-0 for the first time since 2005. That season the Golden Griins won the Metro Catholic Conference and finished 9-1. They lost 47-12 to Kirkwood in Week 8 in the first of three round-robin district games. Kirkwood won all three of its district games that season to claim the district title.

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS GOLF

GIRLS TENNIS

Alton vs. Belleville West at Spencer T. Olin GC, 3:30 p.m. Roxana vs. Mascoutah at The Orchards GC, 3:30 p.m. New Athens, Sparta at Marissa, 4 p.m. Freeburg at Red Bud, 4 p.m. Breese Central vs. Wesclin at Governors Run, 4 p.m. Valmeyer vs. ME Lutheran at Oak Brook Golf Club, 4 p.m.

Belleville East at Belleville West, 3:30 p.m. Timberland at St. Dominic, 3:30 p.m. Hazelwood Central at Ritenour, 3:30 p.m. Collinsville at Roxana, 3:30 p.m. East St. Louis at Granite City, 3:45 p.m. Webster Groves vs. Kirkwood, at Kirkwood Park, 4 p.m. Duchesne at Alton, 4 p.m. Civic Memorial at Alton Marquette, 4 p.m. Ursuline vs. Nerinx Hall, at Webster Grove, 4 p.m. Parkway South at Parkway West, 4 p.m. Lutheran South at St. Pius X, 4 p.m. Villa Duchesne at Westminster, 4 p.m. Waterloo at Mascoutah, 4 p.m. Crossroads at Barat, 4 p.m. Cor Jesu at Marquette, 4:15 p.m. Jackson at Mehlville, 4:30 p.m. Lutheran North at Notre Dame, 4:30 p.m.

GIRLS GOLF Suburban XII Tournament at Emerald Greens, 8 a.m. Teams: Kirkwood Suburban West Conference Championships at Links At Dardenne, 8 a.m. Teams: Eureka, Fox, Lafayette, Lindbergh, Marquette, Mehlville, Parkway South Capital City Invitational at Meadow Lake Acres, 9 a.m. Teams: Jeferson City, St. Joseph’s Francis Howell at Fort Zumwalt North, 3:30 p.m. Staunton, Triad at Civic Mem. at Cloverleaf CC, 3:30 p.m. Alton vs. Granite City at Legacy GC, 3:30 p.m. O’Fallon vs. Collinsville at Arlington Greens, 3:30 p.m. Edwardsville vs. Belleville West at The Orchards GC, 3:30 p.m. Westminster vs. Borgia at Franklin County CC, 3:30 p.m. Mascoutah at Okawville, 4 p.m. Ursuline, Notre Dame, St. Dominic at Sunset Country Club, 4 p.m. Visitation vs. MICDS at Whitmoor, 4 p.m.

FIELD HOCKEY Kirkwood at Nerinx Hall, 4 p.m. St. Joseph’s at Lafayette, 4:15 p.m. Edwardsville at Marquette, 5:30 p.m.

BOYS SOCCER Mater Dei at Freeburg, 4 p.m. Hazelwood Central at Maplewood-RH, 4 p.m. De Smet at Priory, 4:15 p.m. Gtwy Science Ac. vs. McKinley, at De Soto Park, 4:15 p.m. Alton at Bayless, 4:15 p.m.

Washington vs. Fox, at Luth. South, 4:15 p.m. Brentwood at Orchard Farm, 4:15 p.m. O’Fallon Christian at Elsberry, 4:30 p.m. Breese Central at Lebanon, 4:30 p.m. Father McGivney at Wood River, 4:30 p.m. Hancock at North Tech, 4:30 p.m. Soldan at Holt, 4:30 p.m. St. Clair at Valley Park, 5 p.m. Althof at Granite City, 5 p.m. Sullivan at Warrenton, 5 p.m. St. Pius X at Seckman, 5 p.m. Gateway STEM at Hazelwood East, 5:30 p.m. Farmington vs. Belleville West, at Columbia, 5:30 p.m. Lift For Life at Cleveland, 5:30 p.m. Windsor at Cape Central, 6 p.m. CBC vs. Ladue, at Soccer Park, 6 p.m. Kirkwood vs. O’Fallon, at Soccer Park, 6 p.m. Waterloo at Mehlville, 6 p.m. Troy at Lutheran South, 6 p.m. Mascoutah at Northwest-CH, 6 p.m. Alton Marquette at Liberty, 6:30 p.m. Trinity at Fort Zumwalt North, 7:30 p.m. Triad at Columbia, 7:30 p.m. Vianney vs. FH Central, at Soccer Park, 7:45 p.m. Chaminade vs. Webster Groves, at Soccer Park, 7:45 p.m. Washington vs. Afton, at Luth. South, 7:45 p.m.

Miller Career vs. Soldan, at Forest Park C, 4 p.m. Pattonville at Hazelwood Central, 4 p.m. Kirkwood at Riverview Gardens, 4 p.m. St. Pius X at Fredericktown, 4 p.m. Gateway STEM vs. Cleveland, at La Russa Fiel, 4 p.m. Nerinx Hall vs. Afton, at Afton AA, 4:15 p.m. Parkway South TBD, 4:15 p.m. Hancock at Brentwood, 4:15 p.m. Duchesne at St. Dominic, 4:15 p.m. Trinity at McCluer North, 4:15 p.m. St. Charles at Westminster, 4:15 p.m. Webster Groves at Hazelwood East, 4:15 p.m. Liberty at Ladue, 4:15 p.m. Holt at Fort Zumwalt East, 4:15 p.m. Francis Howell at Marquette, 4:15 p.m. Lafayette at FH Central, 4:15 p.m. Cor Jesu at Incarnate Word, 4:15 p.m. Northwest-CH at Hancock, 4:15 p.m. Lutheran North at Principia, 4:15 p.m. Valley Park at New Haven, 4:30 p.m. St. James at Waynesville, 4:30 p.m. Seckman at Hillsboro, 4:30 p.m. Festus at Potosi, 4:30 p.m. Windsor at Chafee, 4:30 p.m. Jennings at Bayless, 4:30 p.m. Winield at Clopton, 5 p.m.

SOFTBALL

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Notre Dame at Rosati-Kain, 3:45 p.m. Metro vs. Carnahan, at JECCF, 4 p.m. Ritenour at McCluer, 4 p.m.

Miller Career at Roosevelt, 4:15 p.m. Granite City at O’Fallon, 4:30 p.m. Marquette at Parkway West, 4:30 p.m.

Metro at Carnahan, 5:15 p.m. Jennings at McCluer S-Berkeley, 5:15 p.m. North Tech at Bayless, 5:15 p.m. Kirkwood at Hazelwood Central, 5:30 p.m. Lindbergh at Nerinx Hall, 5:30 p.m. Potosi at Jeferson, 5:30 p.m. Ritenour at McCluer, 5:30 p.m. Northwest-CH at Sullivan, 5:30 p.m. Cardinal Ritter at Rosati-Kain, 5:30 p.m. Medicine and Biosc at Gateway STEM, 5:30 p.m. O’Fallon Christian at Duchesne, 6 p.m. FH Central at Francis Howell, 6 p.m. Gibault at Lebanon, 6:15 p.m. St. Pius X at St. Vincent, 6:30 p.m. Herculaneum at De Soto, 7:30 p.m.

BOYS SWIMMING Francis Howell North, Washington at Fort Zumwalt North at Rec-Plex, 3:30 p.m. Teams: Fort Zumwalt North, Francis Howell North, Washington Francis Howell Central at Chaminade, 4 p.m. Vianney at Afton, 4 p.m. Lindbergh at Lafayette, 4:30 p.m. Mehlville at Marquette, 4:30 p.m. Parkway South at Oakville, 4:30 p.m. Francis Howell, Liberty, Lutheran St. Charles, 8:30 p.m. Teams: Francis Howell, Liberty (Wentzville), Lutheran St. Charles


11655 NEW HALLS FERRY RD. JUST 1 MINUTE NORTH OF I-270

YOUR EXCLUSIVE GUIDE to a better ride

www.ceramekia.com

CALL 314-838-2400

RIDES

EXCLUSIVE HOME OF

LIFETIME

MAINTENANCE

CUSTOMER USA’s #1 KIA DEALER FOR SALES SATISFACTION Out of 770 Kia dealers, no one treats you better!

2018 BMW M5

MUSCLE BORN FROM TECHNOLOGY

DRIVING WITH DAN By Dan Wiese - Automotive Writer

These days, automotive muscle is techy and global. The classic age of American muscle came just after the midpoint of the last century — late 1960s to early-’70s. Then the 1973 Arab oil embargo, among other factors, led to the downsizing and emasculation of heretofore firebreathing brutes. But, thanks to technology, a 21st-century renaissance of muscle is upon us, enabled by variable valve timing, artificial aspiration from turbos and superchargers, multi-gear transmissions, lightweight components, cylinder deactivation for socially acceptable consumption with retained fastand-furious capability and much more. Power isn’t dependent anymore The sixth-generation, 2018 BMW M5 uses proprietary technology to provide the driver with control over everything from the intrusiveness of active safety nets to whether the car functions with all- or rear-wheel on cubic inches and fuel consumption and awesome sedan muscle drive. isn’t the sole purview of we Yanks. Today, the streets are crowded 2018 BMW M5 with such luminaries as the 550-hp TRANSMISSIONS: Eight-speed DRIVE FORMAT: All-wheel drive HORSEPOWER: 600 at 5700 rpm; Porsche Panamera Turbo, the 603automatic hp Mercedes E63, the 605-hp Audi BASE PRICE: N/A; TORQUE: 553 lb.-ft.; at 1800 RPM RS7, the 640-hp Cadillac CTS-V EPA MPG: Not yet certified. (Guesstimate: near $100,000) and the 707-hp Dodge Charger ENGINE: 4.4-liter L twin-turbo V-8

REQUIRED FUEL: Premium

SRT Hellcat. Among the early adopters of techno-muscle, of course, was the BMW M5, a high-performance iteration of the Bimmer 5-series that bowed in 1984 in its native Germany and arrived stateside three years later. Arriving here early next year will be M5’s sixth generation, bringing with it something of a revolution. The 2018 edition, for example, is the first M5 with all-wheel drive, the first with no manual transmission option and the first to shed curb weight with a carbon-fiberreinforced plastic roof to complement its, otherwise, aluminumintensive construction. Power is courtesy of the familiar 4.4-liter, twin-turbo V-8 that makes 600 hp and 553 lb.-ft. of torque, twist available at a low 1,800 rpm. All that power is sent to all four wheels — unless the driver has other ideas — via an eightspeed automatic transmission. With all performance parameters dialed in, this car will greet 60 mph in 3.2 seconds, BMW says. Intriguingly, M5’s xDrive continued inside

TRUNK: 18.7 cu. ft.

2017 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT

ROOMY, MID-SIZE CAR COMES WITH BIG-CAR APPEAL

Cargazing by Derek Price

When people want a roomy, comfy, American-style sedan, it’s ironic the American brands have all but eliminated that type of car. It’s not uncommon for me to hear someone say they want to replace their big ol’ Buick LeSabre, for example, but can’t find anything comparable at the dealerships today. Nobody makes that style of sedan anymore, with a syrupy suspension and front seats like media-room recliners. The closest thing you can get to that old-style Buick these days is the Toyota Avalon. continued inside

CALL 314-838-2400

11655 NEW HALLS FERRY RD JUST 1 MINUTE NORTH OF I-270

USED CAR-BUYING GUIDE:

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS Sponsored content and photo provided by Green Shot Media

CUSTOMER USA’s #1 KIA DEALER FOR SALES SATISFACTION Out of 770 Kia dealers, no one treats you better!

HAD 10 -JUST 6 LEFT!

23,500

$

2016 KIA SEDONAS AS LOW AS

K66447 MSRP $31,635 Includes all incentives

1 WWW.CERAMEKIA.COM

WE WERE ALSO # JUST NAMED THE

DEALER IN THE WHOLE MIDWEST!

When purchasing a used vehicle, you might not know how the vehicle was treated by its previous owner, any accidents it may have been involved in or if it might begin experiencing issues as soon as you drive off the lot. Buying from a dealership can alleviate issues that could arise, especially if the vehicle has been inspected and repaired. However, it is still important to know your vehicle’s history. Your salesperson will have a thorough report of all history and service records of your vehicle. Learn how to ask the important questions before making a deal. Ask to See the Service Records This is a telling way to discover any abuse the vehicle might have experienced from a previous owner. This record will show you the history of basic maintenance, such as oil changes, tire rotations or other repairs such as engine rebuilds. A vehicle that hasn’t been properly maintained will likely cause you expensive issues down the road. When you are researching a model, be sure to look into any manufacturer recalls. If the repair is not listed on the service record, ask if the issue is still covered by the manufacturer. If not, it may be best to look at different options. Ask About the Features Before you drive home a used vehicle, make sure it works for you and your family. A manual transmission is a tough adjustment for someone used to using an automatic. Some used vehicles won’t have the convenient extras such as power locks and windows, a sunroof or powered mirrors. Be sure to make sure the models you’re interested in have exactly what you’re looking for. Ask About Condition Dealerships and value appraisers use a system of poor, fair, good and excellent when determining the value of a vehicle. Some factors that can lower the category your vehicle falls into are a damaged interior, rust on the exterior, soiled carpets or performance issues. Ask your salesperson which condition a particular used vehicle falls into, and be sure to look it over thoroughly to ensure you agree with the dealer’s assessment.


Classified

C2

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

RIDES 11655 NEW HALLS FERRY RD JUST 1 MINUTE NORTH OF I-270

G N I C I R P E L P REAL-PEO ! S E I F I L A U Q E N EVERYO

Prices include all Kia incentives. Ends 9-30-17

2016 SEDONAS

8,040

$ UP TO

OFF MSRP

EXAMPLE #K69175

$

23,500

EXAMPLE #KD5938

$

19,988

EXAMPLE #K549109

$

18 ,623

MSRP $31,540

2017 FORTES

6,097

$ UP TO

OFF MSRP

MSRP $25,485

2017 OPTIMAS

4,917

$ UP TO

OFF MSRP

MSRP $23,540

PAUL CERAME KIA SERVICE COUPON

PAUL CERAME KIA SERVICE COUPON

PAUL CERAME KIA SERVICE COUPON

Air Conditioning Service

Oil Change Just

Front Wheel Alignment

15%

OFF

Valid for Kia vehicles only. An environmental disposal fee may apply. Taxes excluded. Not to be combined with any other offers. Must present Coupon in person at dealership at the time of arrival. Limit one coupon per customer, per service item. Offer ends 9/30/17.

24.95

$

$

Diesel not included. An environmental disposal fee may apply. Up to 5 quarts, full synthetic not included, Taxes excluded. Not to be combined with any other offers. Must present coupon in person at the time of arrival. Limit one coupon per customer per service item. Offer expires 9/30/17

59.95 .955

Plus tax. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Must present coupon prior to write-up. Good only at Paul Cerame Kia. See service advisor for details. Expires 9/30/17.

WORRIED ABOUT CREDIT PROBLLEMS? Whatever your credit situation, our experts will work hard on your behalf lf to get you approved for a vehicle you can afford and on the road to better credit!

THE CERAME CREDIT CREW CAN HELP YOU RIGHT NOW!

Lamont Goss Jordan Farmer

CALL NOW 314-838-2400

ceramekia.com

Antique/Classic Special Interest

BMW

Cadillac

Chevrolet

Chevrolet

Dodge

WE BUY CARS Cash Paid Today 636-940-9969 fastlanecars.com

'01 BMW 330 Ci: $5,697 #68146-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'08 Chevy Malibu: Heated Front Seats, Leather Trimmed Seats $7,990 #39190C

'15 Chevy Malibu LTZ: 38K Miles, Black, Sunroof, Navigation, $17,990 #V17695A

'12 Dodge Charger: Internet Price

'84 Mazda RX-7; 75,786mi.Looks great.Runs fine.Clean interior. $12,000 O.B.O. Call 314-498-0940

'13 BMW 328I : $14,997 #67848-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'12 Cadillac CTS: Navigation, Sunroof, 50K Miles, White Diamond, $20,900 #48933-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '13 Cadillac CTS: 2 Dr Coupe, Black, Only 52K Miles, Sharp, $20,000 #H171445A

'11 Chevy Cruze: ECO, 1.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Black Granite, One Owner Clean Carfax, $7,490 #27511C

Acura '08 Acura MDX: $10,995 #49063-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'10 Acura TL 3.7: Sedan, SH-AWD, Clean Car, AWD, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $12,990 #11138A

'08 BMW 550i: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $12,490 #11056A

'14 Cadillac ATS: Premium, Red, Only 30K Miles, Call Now, $22,200 #X3383A '06 BMW 324i: 85K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $9,990

Chevrolet '10 Acura MDX 3.7L: One Owner Clean Carfx, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, 3rd Row, $11,990 #27774A

'12 BMW 528i: Internet Price

$212/Mo $13,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '09 BMW 750i:

$249/Mo $16,988 '10 Acura MDX 3.7L: AWD, GPS, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating, Bluetooth $14,490 #96706A

Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '16 BMW 328i: 4 Door, white, 118K Miles, $7,500 X3382A

Audi '14 Audi A4 2.0T: $24,388 #P05072 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'10 BMW 528i: 74K Miles, $12,825 #P41761 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'13 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated Lthr Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $13,990 #27607A

Buick

'09 Audi A4 2.0T Avant: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated Leather Front Seats, Bluetooth, $9,990 #96715A

'08 Audi A4 2.0T Special Edition $8,490 #78734B

'07 Audi A4: Cabriolet, Just Arrived, In time for Fall $9,990 #M17245A

'14 Buick Verano: $12,490 #HD93368A 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Buick LaCrosse: $13,997 #47002-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '07 Buick Lucerne CXL: 4.6L V8, Leather $8,942 #C171477A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'11 Buick Lucerne CX: 3.9L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Flex Fuel, $8,990 #39233A

'11 Buick Regal CXL: Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Bluetooth $11,990 #39069A

'10 Audi TTS: 2.0 Turbo, Premium Quattro, 66K Miles, $25,990 #C17188R1 '13 Buick LaCrosse: 4 Cyl, 11K Mi, $16,477 #24208-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'08 Audi A4: Low Miles,

$199/Mo $9,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '12 Audi A7: Navigation, Sunroof, 41K Miles, $29,900 #49013-8 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

Cadillac '17 Cadillac XTS: FWD, Certified, Navigation, Silver, $34,990 #C8665

'16 Chevy Malibu Limited: $14,698 #TGC42364A 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Chevy Camaro 1LT: $17,890 #KP21322 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Chevy Malibu LT: $14,890 #KE47274 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Chevy Camaro 1LT: Cpe, V6, $22,445 #E55092 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Chevy Sonic $12,191 Stk# 171032A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Chevy Volt: 5 Door Hatchback, Automatic, 31 K Miles, $18,000 Stk# P06319 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Spark $8,500 Stk# P06329 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 16 Chevy Trax $19,786 Stk# P06346 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'13 Chevy Spark: $7,397 #68067-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'13 Chevy Impala LTZ: Heated Leather Front Seats, Bluetooth, Remote Start, Flex Fuel, $10,490 #78105A

'15 Chevy Impala LS: Clean Carfax, Bluetooth $15,490 #P8945

'15 Chevy Malibu: LT, Silver, 34K, Sunroof $16,990 #V17709A

'16 Chevy Camaro: SS Convertible, 3K Miles, Just Arrived #C17287B Call Today!

'13 Chevy Cruze 2LT: 53K Miles, Leather, Auto, $11,990

'15 Chevy Camaro LT: Local Trade, 34K Miles, Black, Auto, $21,490 #M17411A

'12 Chevy Cruze LT: Blue, 48K Miles, Just Traded In, $10,500 #X3242B

'15 Chevy Camaro 2LT: Convertible, $24,888 #P3659-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'12 Chevy Cruze LT: Automatic Transmission $8,782 #C171198M LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '11 Chevy Cruze ECO: 6 Speed Manual, Bluetooth, Motor Trend Certified $8,990 #27408B

'02 Chevy Tahoe LS 4WD 1 Owner, $2.100. Call: 816-388 -0750

Ford

'17 Jeep Compass Sport $15,994 #E06747 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'13 Ford Taurus SEL: Silver, 100K Miles, Loaded, Large, $9,200 #X3314

Chrysler '16 Chrysler 300 S $21,182 Stk# P06252 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chrysler 200 $11,900 Stk #P06309A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'13 Chrysler 200: Touring, Auto, Metallic Gray, Just Arrived $7,990 #M17156A

Dodge '14 Dodge Charger R/T $21,494 #KP12686 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Dodge Charger R/T $25,000 #KP14529 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Dodge Dart: 4 Door, SXT, $12,249 StK# P06235 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Dodge Dart Limited: $12,397 #48347-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'13 Dodge Charger SE: 3.6L V6, RWD, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $14,490 #96646D

'08 Ford Crown Victoria $6,990 Stk# 170095A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Ford Escape $18,490 #TP95117 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Ford Fiesta SES: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $9,990 #39068A

'05 Ford Five Hundred: $3,995 #49106-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'09 Ford Flex: $10,990 #TE02254A 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Ford Focus SE: $12,325 #P82336 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Focus: $10,995 #47434-3 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '16 Ford Focus ST: Hatchback $20,997 #68412-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '12 Ford Focus SEL: $6,995 #68422-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'12 Dodge Charger SE: Flex Fuel $11,990 #78008A

'07 Chevy Cobalt LS: 4 Door, Red, 131K Miles, Call Now, $4,200 #X3316A

'12 Chevy Captiva: Sport, $8,397 #67664-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Chevy Cruze LS: 1.8L, Automatic Transmission, $9,898 #C172023A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

$199/Mo $9,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com

'13 Dodge Dart: SE/AERO, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $9,490 #27396B

'14 Ford Focus SE: 2.0L, Automatic Transmission $9,799 #C171862A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '12 Ford Focus SEL: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles $9,990 #P8779B

'01 Chevy Corvette: Coupe, Auto, Black, 18K Miles, $21,990 #B8569A '13 Dodge Charger: 52K Miles, Black, 20" Wheels, Auto, $16,990 #B8639

'14 Chevy Cruze: Factory Warranty, $149/Mo $7,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '14 Chevy Impala: Factory Warranty $188/Mo $9,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com

'14 Ford Fusion: $14,499 #P12000 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'16 Dodge Challenger R/T, Wht w/ 20x9 blk wheels, 6 spd man, 9800 mi, 100% stk. immaculate, $28,800. call 618-314-2608

'12 Ford Fusion: $8,397 #47593-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'16 Dodge Charger SXT: $19,477 #P3691 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'12 Ford Fusion SE: $8,397 #47593-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020


Classified CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

C3

RIDES

2018 BMW M5

DRIVING WITH DAN

MUSCLE BORN FROM TECHNOLOGY

By Dan Wiese - Automotive Writer

continued from the front

all-wheel-drive hardware, which is unsurprisingly rear-biased, is — surprisingly — convertible to exclusively rear-drive motivation at the driver’s discretion. When the engine is started, the car defaults to all-wheel drive with all safety nets, like Dynamic Stability Control, engaged. However, the driver can vary the handling characteristics of the M5 by enabling various driving-dynamics modes, including a rear-drive mode sans DSC. At that point, this techy ride is, for the moment, a traditional rear-drive Bimmer. In fact, with the combination of reconfigurable AWD, the Active M Differential, M Dynamic mode, the Sport mode, Drivelogic transmission settings (with three modes) and other wizardry, and all- or rear-wheel motivation. this M5 is said to offer — wait for it It’s a brave new world. — more than 2,000 different ways to Look for this technological revoluconfigure to personal taste steering, suspension, active safety nets, transmission tion — and, since styling is only subtly altered, look closely — next spring. No shift characteristics, throttle response

GREAT BRAND NEW BACK TO SCHOOL CAR

NEW W DART GT MSRP $24,390

pricing yet, but we’d be unsurprised by a writer. He is a regular contributor to window sticker within shouting distance the Post-Dispatch and to AAA Midwest of six figures. Traveler magazine’s online Web Bonus. You can e-mail him at drivingwithdan@ gmail.com. Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive

JEEP CHEROKEE AMERICA’S FAVORITE MID-SIZE SUV ADDITIONAL SAVINGS DURING “ONE WEEK TO JEEP”

$7,039 OFF

STK #D397

SALE PRICE $17,351 NEW PACIFICA

$5,000 to $8,208 off

$6,000 to $9,155 off Great Values On Late Model Company Owned Vehicles --like NEW 2014 Chrysler 200 #50806................................................ $14,188 2014 Dodge Journey AWD #A21313 .................................... $16,488 2016 Chrysler 200 #AA425 ............................................... $22,888 2016 Jeep Cherokee FWD #EE859 ...................................... $20,888 2016 Jeep Patriot FWD #PP401 ......................................... $16,988 2016 Jeep Renegade FWD #FF87 ....................................... $20,488 2017 Chrysler Paciica Touring-L FWD #II58 .......................... $30,988 2017 Jeep Cherokee Altitude FWD #EE1013........................... $22,888 2017 Chrysler 300S #II6 .................................................. $30,988 2017 Jeep Cherokee 75th Anniversary Edition FWD #EE958........ $22,888 2017 Jeep Cherokee Latitude FWD Sport Utility #EE1000........... $22,888 2017 Chrysler 200 Touring FWD Car #AA514 .......................... $18,888 2017 Chrysler 200 Touring FWD Car #AA536 .......................... $18,888

If you currently own a FCAV additional loyalty rebates may apply.

2017 Dodge Ram 1500

2017 Chrysler 200 Limited Platinum FWD Car #AA534 .............. $19,888

100+ DODG ODGE RAMS IN-STOCK SOLD MORE RAM TRUCKS IN AUGUST THAN ANY OTHER MONTH IN OVER 104 YEARS.

$12,000 to

$

15,000 OFF

0% for 75 months available on select modelsin lieu of some rebates

Tax title, license, doc extra, some vehicles may have aftermarket options at extra cost.

My first ride Whether it was righteous or rusty, fuel-injected or pedal-powered, share your story and a photo of your irst ride with St. Louis.

You could be featured in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and online at STLtoday.com

SUBMIT YOUR STORY AT:

STLtoday.com/contests


Classified

C4

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

Bommarito WEST COUNTY LARGE SELECTION OF BUICK/GMC VEHICLES TO CHOOSE FROM APR % 0 FOR72 BUICK

MONTHS See dealer for details.

BUICK

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

2017 BUICK

$99

ENCORE IN STOCK

A BOMMARITO EXCLUSIVE

2017 BUICK

WHILE LEASE FOR 24 SUPPLIES MONTHS LAST!

*

Stk. #052681

ENCORES

UP TO

IN STOCK

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE

$8,000

OFF MSRP

NATIONWIDE WARRANTY WITH EVERY NEW BUICK/GMC PURCHASE!

LEASE FOR

2017 GMC

349

$

ACADIA LEASE DENALI FOR Stk. #052681

249

$

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

PER MONTH IN STOCK

PER MONTH

2018 GMC TERRAIN 2

Bommarito 636-391-7200 "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

15736 Manchester Rd.

Toll Free

at Clarkson Rd. (just east of Clarkson)

1-888-387-5234

bommaritobuickgmc.com

*Offer limited to dealer selected vehicles in stock while they last. Not compatible with some other offers. *2017 Buick Encore, 24 month lease, up to 10k miles per year, more miles available. $1,100 down cash or trade, $0 security deposit. Tax, title, license and acq. fee extra. 2014 non GM lease in the household. **2017 GMC Acadia Denali, 36 month lease, up to 10K miles per year, more miles available. $2,500 down cash or trade, $0 security deposit. Tax, title, license and acq. fee extra. Includes conquest. 2014 non GM lease in the household. ***2018 GMC Terrain, 39 month lease, up to 10K miles per year, more miles available. $2,500 down cash or trade, $0 security deposit. Tax, title, license and acq. fee extra, 0% apr for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 inanced. †Bommarito advantage offer with every new Buick or GMC purchase. See dealer for details. Offers expire 9/30/17.

Bommarito SUPERSTORE

Convenient Saturday Service

BEST BACKED CARS IN AMERICA 10YEAR / 200,000MILE NATIONWIDE WARRANTY ++ PLUS 2 YEARS FREE MAINTENANCE 2017 FUSION S

2017 FORD FOCUS SE

0%

2016 FORD TAURUS SEL

0%

0%

APR

APR

APR

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

BUY FOR

$

149

*** PER MO

11,977

$ BUY Y FOR R

16,977 20,977

$

*

BUY UY FOR OR

*

*Sale Price Includes $5,500 Ford Coutesy Transportation Out of Service Dealer Cash Cer., $4,000 Retail Customer Cash, $1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,000 Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2017 FORD TRANSIT CONNECT 2017 FORD F-150 REG. CAB XL

0%

BUY Y FOR R

AVAILABLE

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

$

*

BUY Y FOR R

0

19,977

% APR

30

MPG**

BUY UY FOR OR

22,477

*

*Sale Price Includes $2,500 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2017 FORD EXPLORER

2017 FORD EDGE SE

0%

0%

APR

APR

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

18,477

$

*

*Sale Price Includes $2,500 Retail Customer Cash, $1,000 Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Retail Owner Loyalty, $500 Owner Loyalty, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

BommaritoADVANTAGE

$ BUY Y FOR R

23,977

*

*Sale Price Includes $1,850 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,000 Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2Year Maintenance,Oil Changes, Tire Rotations (NO EXTRA CHARGE) ComplimentaryTank of Gas (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

Hablamos Español llama - Ivette Kincade 314-642-5895 SALES - SERVICE - PARTS - COLLISION REPAIR Police And Fire Department Discounts - Union Labor Discounts We Are A Union Shop

$

*

*Sale Price Includes $1,750 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $250 Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,500 Bonus Customer Cash, $1,000 Special Owner Loyalty, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2017 FORD ESCAPE S

BUY Y FOR R

APR

AVAILABLE

*Sale Price Includes $3,000 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

30

0%

APR

AVAILABLE

16,977 MPG**

2017 FORD MUSTANG

0%

APR

$

*

BUY UY FOR OR

*Sale Price Includes $3,500 “EcoBoost” Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

*Sale Price Includes $4,000 Retail Customer Cash, $500 “EcoBoost” Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

$

$ BUY FOR

26,777

*

*Sale Price Includes $1,250 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,000 Retail Bonus Cutomer Cash, $500 Retail Owner Loyalty, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

$500 More ForYourTrade If GivenThe Opportunity Nitro InTheTires For LongerTire Life (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

636-346-9640

Saturday Service ASK YOUR SALESPERSON FOR MORE DETAILS.

Bommarito N

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

1-888-696-4066 • 314-731-1222

E

W

S

675 Dunn Rd. - AT THE BIG CORNER I-270 & N. LINDBERGH *Available with approved credit. All units subject to availability. Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit Financing. 0% APR Financing available in lieu of any other offers or discounts. See dealer for qualifications and complete details.†See dealer for details. **Highway miles. =See dealer for details, new cars only, standard rates apply, cannot be combined with other offers, restriction may apply. ***84 Months. 4.29% APR financing($13.84 per $1,000 financed) with $2,200 down cash or trade. With approved credit. ++Bommarito advantage offer with every new Ford purchase. Special financing in lieu of any other offers or discounts. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 9/30/17. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 9/30/17.

• ILLINOIS BUYERS WE WILL PROCESS SALES TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE PLATES

www.bommaritoford.com


Classified CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

C5

RIDES

2017 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT

ROOMY, MID-SIZE CAR COMES WITH BIG-CAR APPEAL

Cargazing by Derek Price

continued from the front

But now, I’ve got another surprising place to send those comfort-seeking buyers: their local Volkswagen dealer. The VW Passat checks a lot of the same boxes as a classic American sedan. It’s got a spacious back seat, cavernous trunk and wide but supportive seats that don’t pinch your sides in place like so many sporty cars do these days. While the Passat is technically considered a midsize car, it doesn’t feel that way in person. It looks and drives more like a full-size sedan, with an impressive amount of knee room for back-seat passengers and good isolation from road and wind noise. Even more importantly, it’s not priced for the luxury market. While grandpa’s favorite car, the Avalon, starts over $33,000 and seems to be aimed at a higher-end market now, the Passat starts in the more budget-friendly $22,000 range. That’s also considerably less than the roughly $27,000 starting point of the Ford Taurus and Chevrolet Impala. My Passat tester seemed like a good value, ringing up under $25-grand with dual-zone climate control, heated seats, blind-spot monitors, a 6.3-inch touchscreen display, automatic headlights and 19-inch wheels. The R-Line trim gave it a sportier look with a chrome exhaust tip, special bumpers and grille and unique interior trim. I also was glad to see it came with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, something I appreciate as a smartphone junkie.

RATINGS Style: 6

Ride: 7

Performance: 7

Comfort: 8

Price: 9

Quality: 6

Handling: 6

Overall: 7

The 2017 Volkswagen Passat offers a lot of space and comfort for the money, starting around $22,000. The one thing I wish the Passat could change is a difficult thing to quantify: its personality. It feels bland in some ways — straight lines and smooth panels on the body, a driving feel that’s oh-so-ordinary — and doesn’t quite fit in with Volkswagen’s otherwise spunky, youthful lineup. Power comes from your choice of a 1.8-liter, 170-horsepower four-cylinder engine or a 280-horsepower V6. After a major refresh in 2016, the changes this year are relatively minor. The biggest news is the addition of forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking as standard features on all Passat trim levels. The system uses radar sensors to detect a possible collision. It warns the driver if it senses a wreck is imminent and automatically applies the brakes if the driver doesn’t react.

The 2017 Volkswagen Passat offers a lot of space and comfort for the money, starting around $22,000. Volkswagen is also taking some connectivity and convenience features and pushing them down to lower trim levels this year, letting buyers get a bit more content for the money. The SE trim, for example, adds keyless access with pushbutton start and a blind spot monitor with rear cross traffic alert. Another addition is the new V6-powered “SE with Technology” model. Pricing for the Passat starts at $22,440, including an automatic transmission on the 1.8T S model. The range tops out at $33,995 for the luxury-oriented V6 SEL Premium trim.

250 NEW INFINITIS IN STOCK NEW 2017 INFINITI Q60 NEW 2017 INFINITI Q50 NEW 2017 INFINITI QX60 ALL WHEEL DRIVE

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

$

0 DOWN

$

0 DOWN

299

$

Premium Plus with Navigation *

329

$

*

A MONTH

QX50

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

CURRENT OWNERS OF Honda, Toyota, Acura, Lexus, Chevrolet, Buick, GMC and Cadillac are eligible for up to an additional

$ Premium Plus with 19" Wheels

309

$

**

$

0 DOWN

397

$

A MONTH 2 or More At This Price

OVER 60 IN STOCK

*

A MONTH

2 or More At This Price

2 or More At This Price

2 or More At This Price

NEW 2017 INFINITI

A MONTH

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

NEW 2017 INFINITI

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

Q70

4,000 ON SELECT

2017 & 2018 INFINITI MODELS. PURCHASE OR LEASE! Current INFINITI Owners are eligible for up to an additional $3,000

ON SELECT

2017 INFINITI MODELS.

Premium Select Pkg. 20" Wheels

498

$

**

A MONTH 2 or More At This Price

*39 mo. lease -10,000 miles per year, 12,000 and 15,000 miles available. $0 cash down. Tax, title, license, Acquisition fee and dealer fee not included. $0 security deposit. See dealer for details. **39 mo. lease -10,000 miles per year, 12,000 and 15,000 miles available. $995 cash down. Tax, title, license, Acquisition fee and dealer fee not included. $0 security deposit. See dealer for details. )Offers expire 9/30/17.

MISSOURI'S #1 INFINITI RETAILER Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

B ommarito INFINITI WEST COUNTY

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • (636) 391-9400

BommaritoINFINITI.com STLtoday.com/contests

C | ENTER TODAY | YOU COULD BE THE ONE


C6

Classified

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

RIDES

Ford

Hyundai

Kia

Misc. Autos

Nissan/Datsun

Volvo

'12 Ford Fusion SE: $8,995 #49002-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Hyundai Sonata GLS: $14,990 #KP36343 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'12 Kia Rio5 LX: Hatchback, Clean Carfax, 4 Cyl, 69K Miles, Motor Trend Certified, $8,490 #11387A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'17 Nissan Versa: 7K Miles,

'09 Volvo S40: $6,995 #189172 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'17 Ford Fusion SE: One Owner Clean Carfax, $15,490 #P8946

'12 Ford Fusion SEL: Red, 58K Miles, Nice Car for only $12,500 #X3484

'11 Ford Mustang Coupe: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $14,490 #11441A

'14 Ford Mustang GT: 5.0L 8 Cyl, Manual, 34K Miles, A Must See, $26,490 #B8630

'14 Hyundai Sonata GLS: $16,088 #KTP30779 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Hyundai Elantra SE: $14,488 #KP38600 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Hyundai Genesis: $29,990 #KP19129 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Hyundai Accent: 4 Door Hatchback, 1.6L, 16V, Auto, $10,000 StK# P06347 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Hyundai Elantra $12,721 Stk# P06340 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'11 Ford Taurus SEL: $10,397 #48162-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'10 Hyundai Tuscon: $10,397 #67144-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'13 Ford Taurus SEL: 3.5L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, AWD, Bluetooth, Remote Start, $11,990 #78213B

'14 Hyundai Elantra SE: $10,397 #68347-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'12 Ford Fusion SEL: 46K Miles, Leather & Sunroof, $12,990 #B8734

'16 Ford Mustang: V6, Black $18,477 #P3696 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

Honda BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

BACK TO SCHOOL SALE LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN THE MIDWEST 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '15 Civic EX: Moonroof, Alloys, White, 31K Miles, $16,300 #X3532

'13 Hyundai Elantra: $10,397 #68470-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Hyundai Sonata: Sport, $14,997 #67675-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '17 Hyundai Elantra SE: $12,777 #P3714 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Hyundai Elantra GLS: Blue, 107K Miles, $7,500 #H171446A

'09 Kia Borrego LX: V6 4WD, Blue, Only 92K Miles, $8,000 #H170942B

'06 Infiniti QX56: Clean Carfax, 4WD, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $10,990 #96734B

'13 Kia Optima SXL:

$199/Mo $14,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com

Lexus '07 Lexus ES 350: Navigation, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, Bluetooth $10,490 #96168A

'08 Infiniti M35x: Tech Package, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, $11,490 #96567A

'15 Accord EXL: V6, Black, 46K Miles, Moonroof, Heated Leather, Loaded, Call Today, $19,800 #H171332A '14 CRV LX: AWD, 6 To Choose, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Red, 43K Miles, Starting At $17,000 #X3520

'07 Lexus IS 250: AWD, Nav, Heated & Cooled Seats $11,990 #B8686

'05 Lexus SC90: Stunning!

$249/Mo $19,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com

Lincoln '98 Lincoln Town Car: Executive, 4.6L V8, Well Serviced, Looks New, $6,490 #C8703A

'14 Accord LX: 7 To Choose, Silver, 25K Miles, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, Starting At $15,800 #X3463 '14 CRV EXL: AWD, Pearl White, 43K Miles, Heated Leather, Moonroof, Power Seat, $22,500 #X3539

Mazda

'16 Accord: Sport, Black, 34K Miles, Spoiler, 18" Alloys, Foglights, $20,000 #H171356A

'12 Honda Civic: $12,490 #H265874A 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'12 Mazda 3 i Grand Touring: Mazda Certified Pre-Owned $13,490 #11036A

'10 Mazda 6 i: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified Low Miles $10,490 #96721C

'10 Honda Fit $8,604 Stk# 171006A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Honda Civic EX: Only 22K Miles, $15,9 00 #48899-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '07 Honda Fit Sport: Hatchback $4,990 #39238B

'08 Honda Civic EX: Coupe, Carfax One Owner, Sunroof $6,990 #11309A

'14 Mazda 3 Skyactive: 12K Miles, $14,800 #186721 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'10 Mazda Mazda6 i: 2.5L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, 6 Speed, Stick Shift, Call Today, $7,990 #11446A '08 Infiniti EX35: One Ownr Clean Carfax, AWD, Heatd Front Seats, Surnoof, $12,990 #78002B

'12 Mazda Mazda3 i: Hatchback, 4 Cyl, FWD, Low Miles, 67K Miles, $11,490 #11450A

'12 Mazda Miata: 21K, Manual, Black, $16,990 #M17181A

Jaguar '12 Jaguar XF: Porfolio, 34K, Pure Luxury, $27,990 #C16212D

'15 Jetta SE: 37K Miles, Blue, Automatic, Certified $13,990 '14 Beetle Turbo R-Line: 55K Miles, Black, Automatic $14,490

'12 Routan Premium: White 46K Miles, $17,990

'15 Mazda Mazda6 i: Touring, 28K Miles, Auto, Certified, $18,990 #M8673

'17 CTS: Luxury, Panoramic Roof, Navigation, AWD, White, Certified, $39,990 '12 SRX Premium: AWD, Black, $20,990 '11 CTS: 50K Miles, AWD, Black, Auto, Sunroof, Call

'12 CTS: 38K Miles, AWD, Panoramic Sunroof, Call

'13 XTS: Premium, Certified, Black/Black, Call '17 XT5: Platinum, 3K Miles, AWD, Certified, White, $55,990 '15 SRX Luxury: AWD, White Roof, Certified $32,990

Mitsubishi '15 Mitsubishi Lancer: Evolution, Local Trade, $29,490 #M16456A

Nissan/Datsun '16 NISSAN ALTIMA: $14,990 #P29312 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '17 Nissan Maxima $24,141 Stk# P06349 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'14 Nissan Sentra: $12,397 #94930 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '14 Nissan Sentra: $10,995 #68716-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '16 Nissan Maxima 3.5S: $23,997 Stk #94468SL St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'15 Nissan Leaf: $9,995 #48979-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee: $25,479 #KTP78491 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'12 Mercedes Benz E350: 4Matic, 48K Mi, Black, Sunroof, Navigation, $22,990 #C17186A

'11 Nissan Versa: Manual Transmission, 1.6L, 74K Miles, $6,000 #C172128A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Nissan Altima 2.5 SL: One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Bluetooth $14,990 #P8888

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited: Navigation, Pano Roof, 22K Miles, $29,490 #B8647

'13 Honda Civic: Auto, 32K Miles, Sedan Certified, $13,990 #B8599

'16 Honda Civic EX: With Sensing, Black, 8K Miles, Honda Certified $20,500 #X3561

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Limited, Panoramic Roof, White, 35K Mi, $32,990 #B8712

'08 Mercedes-Benz S550: 82K Miles,

$229/Mo $18,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com

'14 Honda Accord EXL: 4 Cyl, 3 To Choose, Gray, 48K Miles, Htd Lthr, Moonroof, Loaded, Starting At $18,200 #X3505

'11 Jeep Grand Cherokee: $229/Mo $14,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '14 Jeep Wrangler Sahara: Unlimited, Hart Top, Auto, A Must See, $35,490 #B8588

'14 Honda Civic LX: Honda Certified, 9 to Choose From, Brown, 35K Miles, $13,700 #X3495

'85 Pontiac Fiero GT: Red, Manual, One For The Ages, $8,490 #M17439A

'08 Range Rover: Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '08 Range Rover: Low Miles,

$229/Mo $17,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com

Subaru '17 Subaru Impreza: Sport, 2K Miles, Local Trade, $24,490 #C8445C

Toyota '15 Toyota Corrolla S: $14,850 #P4209 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Toyota Corolla $13,800 Stk# P06331 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Toyota Corolla: $10,995 #68288-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'10 Toyota Prius: Automatic Transmission, 1.8L 4 Cyl, $9,500 #C170122A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'06 Toyota Avalon Lmtd: Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Front Seats, Sunroof, $7,490 #P8886A

'12 Toyota Prius Four: One Owner Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $7,990 #96569A

'13 Toyota Corolla S: Auto, Power Sunroof, $10,990 #V17375A

'05 Volvo S60R: AWD, 75K Miles $10,800 #189741 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo S80 T5: 9K Miles $29,980 #L1349 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Chevrolet Trucks '13 Chevy Silverado 1500: $32,990 #KTP52406 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '04 Chevy Silverado 3500 Stk# 170870A Call Today! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Silverado 1500 $28,000 Stk #170671A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '07 Chevy Colorado: Extended Cab $8,995 #67494-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT: Crew Cab, 4WD, 5.3L V8, 31K Miles, $29,000 #C11243FIT LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '12 Chevy Silverado: 34K Miles, 4WD, White, 5.3L V8, $27,490 #B8631

'05 Nissan Sentra: Clean Carfax $3,990 #96713B

'07 Nissan Altima SE: $6,725 #190261 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'08 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Silver, 141K Miles, Call Now! $7,000 #H162037A

'11 Chevy Avalanche LT: $212/Mo $13,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '06 Dodge Ram 1500: Quad Cab $9,397 #68320-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'16 Dodge Ram 1500: 4WD, Crew Cab, Blue, Only 11K Miles, Call today!$30,000 #X3371A

'05 Dodge Ram 2500:

$225/Mo $12,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '12 Ram 3500: Laramie Longhorn, 56K Miles, 4WD, White $47,990 #C17291A

Ford Trucks '07 FORD F-250 SUPER DUTY LARIAT KING, 125,000 miles| $4,200 | (636) 238-6214 '16 Ford F-150 Lariat: $39,376 #T54980 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Ford F-150 XLT: Super Crew, 4WD, Lifted, Auto, $17,990 #C17375C

'07 Toyota Camry LE: Black, 87K Miles, Hurry In!$8,700 #X3360A

'05 Ford F-150: Lariat

$199/Mo $8,988 '14 Toyota Avalon: Hybrid, $23,900 #189581 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Toyota Camry SE: Leather, $17,900 #P3719 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '15 Ford F350 Lariot: Diesel, 4x4, Crew, Loaded $50,900 #P3757 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

GMC Trucks

'14 Toyota Corolla LE: White, 60K Miles, Call Today, $12,000 #X3425A

'14 GMC Sierra Denali: White, AWD, Loaded, $38,990 #M16722A

Volkswagen

'06 GMC 2500: Low Miles,

'15 Volkswagen Golf: 4 Door, Hatchback, 1.8L, 16V, Auto, $14,856 StK# 170185A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

$199/Mo $14,988 Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com '13 GMC Sierra 1500: Crew Cab, 4WD, Gray, 45K Miles, $26,500 #H170719N

'13 Volkswagen Passat $8,492 Stk# P06316A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '08 Volkswagen EOS: Convertible $7,397 #68309-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Volkswagen Jetta: $10,995 #67492-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Volkswagen Jetta 2.0L: One Owner Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $10,490 #11468A

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '14 Nissan Frontier: Crew Cab, 4WD, 36K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, Auto, $26,990 #V17599A

Sport Utility '10 Acura MDX: AWD, Advance Pkg, Black, 130K Miles, $15,000 #H180058A

'09 VW GTI: 2 Door Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Nice! $8,490 #27542A

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5S: White, 118K Miles, #9,000 #H171250A

'06 Nissan 350Z: 2 Door, GT Coupe, Silver, Only 27K Miles! Extremely Rare Find, Call Now!$15,000 #H170758A

STLtoday.com/jobs

'15 Civic EX: 3 Remain, Alloys, Pwr Moonroof, White, 31K Mi, Bluetooth, Push-Button Start, Camera, Starting $16,300 #X3532

'09 Pontiac G6 GXP: 3.6L V6, 6 Speed Automatic $7,213 #C171957B LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'15 VW Jetta 1.8T SE: 1.8L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Turbo, $12,990 #P8949

'16 Honda Accord EXL: With Navigation, Gray, Only 9K Miles, Honda Certified $25,000 #H171588A

'14 Honda Accord LX: 7 Remain, silver, 25K Miles, All Honda Certified, Starting At $15,800 #X3463

'14 Nissan Maxima: 10K Miles $17,800 #P4220 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Mini Cooper '14 Mini Cooper: Convertible, Auto, 46K, Red $18,990 #B8727

'09 Pontiac Vibe: Hatchback, 1.8L, Automatic Transmission, $7,500 #C172024A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'14 Nissan Sentra SR: $13,997 #95065 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Nissan Versa Note: $10,995 #49064-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Mercedes-Benz C250: 4 Door, 25K Miles, Hurry In, $22,000 #X3452

'11 Volvo S60 T6: Black/Brown, $12,775 #190431 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'94 Toyota Corolla DX: Gas Saver, 1.6L, $2,900 #C171933A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'13 Mercedes GLK 350: Navigation, Leather, $24,888 #48111-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'16 Jeep Cherokee Sport: 6K Miles, White, Auto, 4WD, $21,990 #C8689A

'06 Pontiac Grand Prix: 4 Door, 3.8L V6, 52K mi, $5,800 Stk# 171041A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'14 CTS: Luxury, AWD, Certified $28,990

'15 Jeep Renegade $17,999 #TE69999 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'08 Mercedes-Benz C Class Sport: $10,995 #48038-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'11 Volvo C70: CVT $16,850 #187912 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

$249/Mo $18,988

Mercedes Benz

'09 Honda Civic: Automatic, 73K Miles, $11,490

'06 GT O. 400 HP, 6 speed, 8K miles. Silver. $28,950. Call Tom a 314-706-0231.

CADILLAC SUPERSTORE 1-866-244-9085

Jeep

'07 Mercedes Benz S550: 48K Miles! WOW $24,990 #B8753

'11 Volvo XC60 R: $13,750 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Range Rover/Land Rover

'14 Nissan Pathfinder: $20,397 #48553-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'07 Jeep Patriot Limited: $8,995 #68317-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

Pontiac

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'17 XTS: Luxury, Navigation, Radiant Silver $34,990

'08 Infiniti G35x: 3.5L V6, Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $11,490 #96728A

'08 Infiniti M45x: Clean Carfax, AWD, GPS, Bluetooth, Backup Camera $9,990 #96443A

'14 Passat S: Navigation, Automatic, 38K Miles $12,990

'16 CT6: Premium, Certified AWD, Loaded $56,490

'09 Mazda 6i: Grand Touring, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $9,990 #96564B

'14 Civic EX: Black, 31K Miles, Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Starting at $15,500 #X3552

'14 Jetta SE: Automatic, Silver, 43K Miles, Certified $12,990

'17 Jetta S: Automatic, Red, 7K Miles, $15,490

'14 Accord EXL: 4 Cyl, Champagne Frost, 34K Miles, $18,900 #X3487 '14 Civic LX: 6 Remain, 34K Miles, Gray, Now $13,500 #X3458

VOLKSWAGEN'S '13 Passat S: Automotive, 35K Miles, Certified, $11,990 '13 Passat SE: Automatic, 53K Miles, Silver, $12,490

'14 Hyundai Sonata GLS: 35K Miles $12,497#24305-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'07 Infiniti G35X: Gray, $9,650 #185561 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Call or Text 314-571-8400 ConcoursAutomotive.com

1-866-244-9085

'15 Mazda 3 i Touring: Motor Trend Certified, Bluetooth, Backup Camera $14,490 #11270A

Infiniti

$119/Mo $10,988

'15 VW Jetta 1.8T SE: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $13,490 #P8971

'16 Buick Encore: 4 Door, 1.4L, Auto, $18,366 StK# P06285 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Buick Encore: $17,397 #67242-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'15 Buick Enclave: Premium, Sunroof, Leather, $25,900 ##24180-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

Kia '10 Nissan Maxima: 3.5 SV Sedan, Leather Trimmed Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #39128B

'14 KIA OPTIMA: $16,488 #KP37990 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '08 KIA SORENTO LX: $9,990 #K732124A 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '12 Kia Sorento: $10,995 #48959-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '13 Kia Soul: Hatchback, 1.6L $9,247 #C172139A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'17 VW Jetta GLI: 7K Miles, Just Arrived, Save, $24,990 #V8550A

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP

Search “stltoday” in your App Store

'09 Nissan Altima 2.5: Only 90K Miles, Call Today, $7,500 #H170664A

'14 VW Beetle: R-Line, 55K Miles, One Owner Deep Black, $14,990 #V17298A

'16 Nissan Altima 2.5S: White, Only 6,119 Miles, $22,000 #H171099A

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

'03 Buick Rendezvous: FWD, 3.4L, V6 $4,200 #C180019A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'10 Cadillac Escalade: White Diamond, 4WD, Loaded $21,990 #C17298A

'15 Chevy Trax LTZ $18,490 #TL67799 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Chevy Tahoe $27,900 Stk# 170844A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841


Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

C7

SEPTEMBER SALES EVENT!

MISSOURI'S LARGEST SELECTION †† A

Bommarito Exclusive

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE

NATIONWIDE WARRANTY WITH EVERY NEW MAZDA PURCHASE! 2017 Mazda CX-5 2017 Mazda3

% 0 60

SPORT, FWD, AUTOMATIC

0

%

APR FOR

PLUS

SPORT, Manual

169

$

LEASE FOR

MONTHS

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

$1,000 APR CASH

13,995

**36

$

*

OR MOS. BUY FOR

$ LEA EA FOR OR

219

PLUS

SPORT, Manual

175

$

LEASE FOR

0 60

OR MOS. BUY FOR

SPORT, FWD

APR FOR

MONTHS

0

% APR

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

16,995

$

*

OR MO BUY FOR MOS.

*

2017 Mazda CX-9

$1,000 APR CASH

**36

23,735

$

**36

2017 Mazda6

%

APR

$ LEA EA FOR OR

359

**36

26,758

$

OR MOS. BUY FOR

*

*Sale prices and discounts include all publicly available customer cash incentives. Restrictions apply, see dealer for details. *Mazda3 buy price includes $2000 customer cash. **Lease Sport Automatic for 36 months at $169 per month w/ $1999 cash down = $8083, excludes taxes, title, and license fee. *Mazda6 buy price includes $3,000 customer cash. **Lease for 36 months at $175 per month w/ $1999 cash down = $8299, excludes taxes, title, and license fee. *Mazda CX-5 buy price includes $750 Customer Cash. **Lease for 36 months at $219 per month w/ $1999 cash down = $9,883, excludes taxes, title, and license fee. *Mazda CX-9 buy price includes $2500 Customer Cash and dealer discounts. **Lease for 36 months at $359 per month w/ $1999 cash down = $14923.00, excludes taxes, title, and license fee. **0% for 60 months per $1000 financed = $16.67 per month. Must take retail delivery from dealer stock by 9/30/2017. APR offers may be in lieu of other advertised offers. All lease offers advertised with 10k miles per year, per term. All offers with approved credit. Restrictions apply. See dealer for complete details. +90 Days No Payments With Approved Credit. All lease offers advertised with 10k miles per year, per term. All offers with approved credit. See dealer for complete details. All offers with approved credit. See dealer for complete details. ††Based on 2016 sales summary Mazda Motor Division of North America. Photos for illustration purposes only. See dealer for complete details.

3 LOCATIONS We’re In Your Neighborhood

Bommarito MAZDA

TEST DRIVE YOUR NEW MAZDA TODAY!

ST. PETERS

WEST COUNTY

SOUTH COUNTY

15736 Manchester Rd., at Clarkson Rd.

6127 South Lindbergh

4190 N. Service Rd., I-70 Cave Springs

636-391-0073

314-487-9800

636-928-2300

BommaritoMazdaSouth.com

BommaritoMazdaStPeters.com

BommaritoMazdaWest.com +Bommarito

advantage offer with every new Mazda purchase. See dealer for warranty details.

New 2017 Audi A6 $0 DOWN

$492

per month* Stk. #27472

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

Complimentary Service Pickup And Delivery

$0 DOWN

New 2017 Audi A3

$285

per month*

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

$0 DOWN

New 2017 Audi A4 quattro

$384

per month*

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

New 2017 Audi S3

$457

per month*

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

*36 month closed end lease, 10,000 miles per year, more miles available. Audi A6, A3, A4 and S3 include loyalty or acquisition program incentives. $0 cash down on Audi A3, A4 and A6. Taxes, title, license and fees not included. **1st payment paid by Audi Financial Services. Offers expire 9/30/17.

MISSOURI'S #1 AUDI RETAILER Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

Bommarito Audi West County 15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 1-877-756-8753 • audiwestcounty.com


C8

Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

SUNDAY COUPONS

THEY JUST MAKE CENTS Whether you use a couple or couple dozen every week, you end up with more groceries in your cart and change in your pocket. And that Sunday newspaper you just bought? It has paid for itself. Now that is what we call savvy shopping. SUBSCRIBE TODAY at STLtoday.com/subscribe


Classified Sport Utility '12 Chevy Traverse: $9,997 #67060-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Chevy Equinox: $17,397 #66907-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

M 1

Sport Utility '16 Jeep Compass Latitude: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax $14,990 #P8947

'16 Jeep Patriot: Sport, One Owner Clean Carfax, $13,990 #P8954

'06 Chevy HHR LT: 2.4L, Automatic, Leather, $4,741 #C172018A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '07 Chevy Trailblazer: LS package, RWD, 4.2L, $6,224 #C11346P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '15 Chevy Equinox LT: 8K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $20,490 #C17287A

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Mini vans

Garage Sales

'08 Chrysler Town & Country: $6,995 #67785-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

63109: 5466 Itaska, Wed. 6/20 & Sat. 6/22. 8am -1pm

'08 Dodge Grand Caravan: SXT, 3.8L V6, AWD, $7,117 #C172270A LOU FUSZ CHEVY

63304: Woodstone Estates Subdivision Sale, Sat. 9/23 7:00 am-1:00pm. From 70, take Hwy 94 South, Left on Woodstone Dr., follow to Subd. Furniture, Xmas, Clothing, Books, Household Items & Much More! Rain Date: Sat. 9/30

Huge Garage Sale. Everything from toys to tools. Friday and Saturday. 3741 Hwy 79, 63366

'14 Honda Odyssey: EX-L, Just Arrived, 40K Miles, Well Cared For $25,990 #B8762

Firewood/Fuel

'14 Kia Forte EX: $12,088 #KP79443 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Seasoned Oak & Hickory Cherry for smoking Delivered & Stacked. Over 25 yrs of service 573-513-6510

'13 Toyota Sienna: Limited, AWD, $23,490 #B8586

'11 Kia Sorento LX: V6, One Owner Clean Carfax, $6,990 #28093B

'14 Chevy Suburban LT: 4WD, Sunroof, DVD, Black, $39,490 #B8741

'13 Dodge Durango: AWD, Sunroof, $18,900 #48146-4 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '08 Ford Expedition Limited: 10,397 #68321-3 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

Merchandise Wanted Utility Trailers/Trucks 2017 Arising Utility Trailer 7x14. Slightly used, in excellent condition. $2350. Call 314-604-6642.

'12 Kia Sorento EX: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, $12,990 #11456A

Sporting Goods

RV Motor Homes

'12 Kia Sorento LX: 4 Cyl, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, 75K Miles, $12,990 #11385A

'13 Ford Escape SE: Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Call Today, $12,990 #38225A

'16 Lexus NX 200t: 7K Miles, AWD, Local Trade, $37,490 #C17318A

'06 Mazda Tribute S: One Owner Carfax, $5,990 #11170A

'07 Ford Edge SEL: Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats $9,490 #78351C

'05 Coachman C-Class Toy-Hauler - 29ft, auto/gas,65K, $17,900 OBO Michael 314-775-5626.

'14 GMC Terrain: 4 Door, 2.4L, Auto, $17,749 StK# P06336 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 GMC Terrain SLE-2: 4WD, 2.4L $8,999 #C171468M LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'12 GMC Acadia: $13,980 #187851 SUNTRUP W COUNTYVOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 GMC Terrain: Denali, 45K Miles, FWD, Loaded, $21,490 #C17297A

'17 GMC Acadia SLT-1: FWD, 3K Miles, Local Trade, $36,990 #C8502A

'08 GMC Acadia: Red, 121K Miles, Hurry In, $11,000 #H171310A

SEPT. 22, 23, 24, 2017 Big Sale 3 days only

Public Notices

• Motorhomes • 5th Wheels • Travel Trailers • Pop-Ups • Special Financing

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS '11 Mazda CX-7 i Sport: One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $10,990 #11333A

618-233-0052

'15 Mazda 3i SV: One Owner Carfax, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned, Low Miles $13,990 #11160A

'97 LEISURE TRAVEL FREEDOM WIDEBODY, Class B, $ 4.100 (331)214-9617

Belleville, IL www.bcfairgrounds.net

Dogs '05 Mercury Mountaineer: $5,995 #94954-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

AC A Bichon 13 w ks; AC A West Highland Terrier M/F 12 wks; 3/4 English 1/4 Amer Bull Dogs M/F 13wks $650-950 217-653-8866

'11 Mazda CX-7 S: AWD, Touring, Silver, 84K Mi, Only $11,000 #H171480A

AKC German Shepherd Puppies (European bloodlines) Males & females, dewormed & shots $750. Ready now. 618-426-9782 Dobermans, 9 wks, Shots, Wormed & Vet Checked, Farm Raised, Well Socializ ed, I mported St o c k, (314)560-0104

'16 Nissan Murano $22,500 Stk# P06350 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS:

'09 Nissan Murano: $7,995 #48936-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

Puppies Ready Now & Thru Christmas!

'04 Nissan Xterra: $3,995 #48470-3 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS

'06 Nissan Murano: $7,995 #49025-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '08 Nissan Pathfinder: $6,995 #68676-5 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'12 Honda Crosstour EXL: Local One Owner Trade, Black, $13,490 #C17400A

'06 Honda Element: EX-P, AWD, Silver, 76K Miles, $10,490 #M17477A

'14 Honda Pilot: EX-L, 33K 4WD $28,990 #M16532RA

'16 Honda CR-V Touring: AWD, Gray, 17K Miles, Fully Loaded!$28,500 #H180059A

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF CHESTERFIELD PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning and Public Works Committee of the City of Chesterfield w ill hold a Public Hearing on October 4, 2017 at 5 : 4 5 p . m. in t h e C it y C o u n c il Chambers at Chesterfield City Hall, 690 Chesterfield Parkway We s t , C h e s t e r f i e l d , M i s s o uri 63017. Said Hearing will be as follows: An appeal by Petitioner of the Planning Commission's decision of denial of the following request for a zoning map amendment: P.Z. 05-2016 Wildhorse Baxter Center, C148B (Shelbourne Senior Living): A request for a zoning map amendment from a "C-8" Planned Commercial District to a "UC" Urban Core District for 5.21 acres located south of Wild Horse Creek Road and east of its intersection w ith Bax ter Road (18T630283). Copies of the request are available for review in the Department of Public Services at Chesterfield City Hall, 690 Chesterfield Parkway West during weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. If you should need additional information about this project, please contact Ms. Jessica Henry , Senior Planner, by telephone at 636-537-4741 or by e m a i l at j h e n r y @ chesterfield.mo.us CITY OF CHESTERFIELD Guy Tilman, Chair Chesterfield Planning and Public Works Committee PROPERTY DESCRIPTION PARCEL C148B OF LOT SPLIT OF SECOND ADJUSTED PARCEL C148 OF C148 AND C254C BO U N D AR Y ADJUSTM ENT PL AT, ACCORDI NG TO THE PLAT THEROF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 360 PAGE 190 OF THE ST. LOUIS COUNTY RECORDS.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP

'14 Nissan Pathfinder S: Black, 31K Mi, $20,477 #P3204-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'11 Subaru Outback: Limited, Sunroof, Leather, DVD, $12,490 #B8736

Labradors, AKC, Vaccinations, Dew o r m e d , M icrochip, 3 6 - m o. hip guar.Not affected by: Dilute, DM, EIC. PRA, HPK & CNM 1200-1500 618-521-5719

'08 Toyota Highlander: $8,995 #48563-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

POODLES, Toy, 10 wks, AKC, females, Health Guarantee, Smart, Happy. $600 Call (636)537-3797

'15 Toyota Highlander: Platinum Edition, 25K Miles, AWD, $36,490 #M16655A

Two 8-week old female small Beagles; shots are up to date and puppies are dewormed. Call David at 314-620-0078

'07 Jeep Commander Sport: $8,397 #47835-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

Accepting Bids for: "BAND INSTRUMENTS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS" RFB Due & Public Opening on October 5, 2017 at 10:30 AM, CST 280 Interstate Drive Wentzville, 63385 To receive bid contact Carol Harvey carolharvey@wsdr4.org or Visit http:// wentzville.k12.mo.us Page Down to Open Bids

Housing Authority of St. Louis County 8865 Natural Bridge St. Louis, MO 63121 Tu e s d a y , September 2 6 , 2017 2:00 p.m.Lower Level

81%OFF

*off the cover price

The Ultimate Guide To What’s On TV Localized TV and cable listings for your area

13 issues for just

Daily best bets & sports section

$9.75

A-Z movie guide & network news

lovencarepets.org '12 VW Tiguan LE: 2.0L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $10,490 #P8856

*

FOR POST-DISPATCH SUBSCRIBERS ONLY

Write Your Own Best Seller

Woodles, Labradoodles, Pappytese, Std. Cockapoos, Cockalierpoo, Boxers, Shih Tzus, Doxipoos, Other Cute Poos! Specials!

'16 Toyota RAV4 XLE: Gray, 36K Miles, Call Today $18,800 #X3412

Q & A with your favorite celebrities es

Yorkie puppies! $650 for females, $600 for males. ACA registered. 5 7 3 7 6 0 2 3 8 6 . Wi l l b e s m a l l . $650.00 5737602386

Puzzles, games, trivia, soaps and horoscopes

ordering is easy!

Garage Sales

'15 Hyundai Tuscon: $17,995 #67279-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Jeep Cherokee Lmtd: $21,490 #TP15894 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

The State of Missouri, Office of Administration, Division of Facilities Management, Design and Construction is soliciting sealed bids to be received by 2:00 P.M. on October 17, 2017 for Food Services at the State of Missouri Capitol Building located at 201 East Capitol Ave., Jefferson City, Missouri on IFB number FMDC18-0005. The specifications may be obtained on the internet at https://oa.mo.gov/f a c i l i t i e s / b i d - o p p o r t u n i t i e s. Questions regarding obtaining specifications may be directed to (573) 526-4135.

America’s most complete TV listings magazine

The Housing Authority of St. Louis County , Housing Authority of Hillsdale, Housing Authority of Pagedale and Housing Authority of Olivette are conducting a hearing on audit reports for 2016 pursuant to Chapter 99, Revised Statutes of Missouri on the following date and location

LAB PUPS - AKC, OFA Yellow. See Parents, Calm. Shots, Wormed, Health Guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com

Old English Sheepdog Puppies. 8 w e e k s o ld Se p te m b e r 2 9 . $1,200. Call 660-359-1400 or visit us at Valley View Sheepdog Farm

'14 Chrysler T&C: 4 Door, Touring, 65K Miles, $16,500 Stk# P06317 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'11 Hyundai Tucson: $9,900 #48802-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

Sealed bids for Bridge Restoration, Union Covered Bridge, State Historic Site, Paris, MO, Project No. X 1 7 0 3 - 0 1 w ill b e received b y FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM , 10/12/2017. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Selectively Bred. Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com

'08 Toyota Highlander: $8,995 #68363-5 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'12 Hyundai Tuscon GLS: $9,997 #68198-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'06 Honda Element EX-P: AWD, Silver, 76K Miles. $10,490 #M17477A

Not less than the prevailing hourly wage rates, as determined by the State of Missouri, Division of Labor Standards, shall be paid all workers employed on this project. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive technicalities, to select any contractor filing a proposal, and to reject any or all bids. NO PRE-BID MEETING IS SCHEDULED.

GET A GREAT DEAL!

Maltese Puppies AKC $650. (417) 473-6416

Mini vans

'14 Honda CRV LX: 8 To Choose, 43K Mi, Red, Honda Certified Used, Starting at $17,000 #X3520

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Sealed bids will be received by Wentzville R-IV School District, at the Wentzville Administration Offices, 280 Interstate Drive, We n t z v ille , M O 6 3 3 8 5 , u n t il TH U R SD AY , O C TO BER 1 2 , 2017, at 2:00 P.M. CST, for the FACS (Family and Consumer Science) Renovations at Holt High School. Bids will be opened publicly at that time. Drawings and specifications for this project are on file at the office of the Architect, Hoener Associates, Inc., 6 7 0 7 Pla in v ie w Av e n u e , St . Louis, M O 63109, (314) 7819855, FAX (314) 781-0163. Information as to bidding instructions and requirements for procuring bidding documents may be obtained from the Architect.

sieversretrievers.com

'11 Nissan Murano SL: AWD, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth $11,990 #11469A

'15 Hyundai Elantra: $13,990 #KP12593 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'08 Hyundai Veracruz SEL: Limited, AWD, Heated Leather Front Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #78583A

Bids/Proposals

Search “stltoday” in your App Store

636-240-3647 '12 Honda CR-V EX: Silver, 129K Miles, Camera, Bluetooth, $10,000 #DL1651B

C9

WENTZVILLE RIV SCHOOL DISTRICT

618.396.2494

'17 Nissan Murano: AWD, SV, Blue, 21K Miles, Just Arrived, $24,800 #X3474

'12 Honda CR-V EXL: $18,450 #189821 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for the City of St. Peters, St. Charles County, Missouri, and Case No. 17-070905P.The Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) solicits technical information or comments on proposed flood hazard determinations for the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, the Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report for your community. These flood hazard determinations may include the addition or modification of Base F lo o d Ele v a t io n s , b a s e f lo o d depths, Special Flood Haz ard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway. The FIRM and, if applicable, the FIS report have been revised to reflect these flood hazard determinations through issuance o f a L e t t e r o f M a p Revision (LOMR), in accordance with Title 44, Part 65 of the Code of Federal Regulations. These determinations are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to adopt or show evidence of having in effect to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. For more information on the proposed flood hazard determinations and information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, please visit FEMA's website at www.fema.gov/plan/ prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the F E M A Map Information eX change (FMIX) toll free at 1877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627).

STLTODAY.COM

All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

'13 GMC Acadia: Gray, 61K Miles, Call Today, $18,500 #H170576A

'15 Honda Pilot: $24,397 #47880-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

Cape Girardeau, MO Antique & Modern OVER 450 TABLES Sept. 22, 23, & 24 Fri 4-8 Sat 8-5 Sun 8-4 SHOW ME CENTER For more info.: J.D. King 573-243-0499 Jody Geiser 573-204-8888

FALL RV & CAMPER SHOW

'09 Ford Escape XLT: 3.0L, Low Miles, $8,990 #96391C

'15 Ford Explorer Sport: Black/Black, $32,770 #P4199 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

MISSOURI GUN & KNIFE SHOW

Largest Selection

'12 Ford Escape XLT: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth, 68K Miles, $11,990 #28044C

'15 Ford Edge: Titanium, 30K Miles, AWD, $27,490 #B8420A

WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 Public Notices

63139 - SUPER GARAGE SALE Dogtown, 6163 Victoria back, this Fri-Sun 10-4.

'16 Honda Odyssey $33,115 Stk# 170185M DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Kia Forte LX: $12,486 #KP09351 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

WEDNESDAY

1-877-580-4159

63021 Treetop Condo's Semi-Annual Community-Wide Garage Sale Sat. Sept. 23, 8am-4pm 701 Sandy Summit Manchester, MO. 63021

iwantmytvmagazine.com

314-621-6666 STLtoday.com/classiieds

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING MEHLVILLE FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT The Mehlville Fire Protection District Board of Directors will hold a public hearing on proposed tax rates at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at the Mehlville Fire Protection District Headquarters, 11020 Mueller Road, St. Louis, Missouri, 63123, at which meeting, residents of the District may be heard concerning the 2017 property tax rates proposed to be set by the District. The tax rates shall be set to produce the revenue required for the budget for the iscal year beginning January 1, 2018. The tax rates outlined herein are proposed rates and are subject to change pending action of the Board and/or the tax rate certiication by the Missouri State Auditor. The inal tax rates set by the District shall be established in accordance with the provision of Section 137.073 RSMo, and Article X, Section 22 of the Missouri Constitution.

Assessed Valuation (by category)

Current Tax Year 2017 *

Real Estate – Residential Real Estate – Agricultural Real Estate – Commercial Personal Property Total

Prior Tax Year 2016 **

$1,654,409,750 $428,880 $500,366,804 $330,712,068 $2,485,917,502

$1,524,241,210 $ 492,710 $466,149,903 $328,619,587 $2,319,503,410

Proposed Tax Rates (Per $100 of Assessed Valuation) Fund

Blended Rate

General Rev Pension Total New revenue from new construction New revenue from reassessment Percent increase from reassessment

Residential .645 .036 .681

$ 95,435 $0 0.00%

Agricultural .593 .033 .626

Commercial .936 .060 .996

BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEHLVILLE FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT Aaron Hilmer, Chairman

Personal Property .704 .034 .738

.812 .056 .868

Tax Revenue $ 16,022,633 $ 901,536 $ 16,924,169

* Per the 2017 Post Board of Equalization Assessment Roll. ** Per the 2016 Post Board of Equalization Assessment Roll.


Classified

C10

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

Bommarito MISSOURI’S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP-THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE #1

BEST BACKED CARS IN AMERICA

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE NATIONWIDE WARRANTY

*

OVER 10,000 VEHICLES TO CHOOSE FROM Nissan $25,145 MSRP -6,269 OFF MSRP

$18,335 MSRP -4,540 OFF MSRP

2 Locations

BommaritoNissan 661 Dunn Rd.

2017 NISSAN ROGUE

314-731-2228 BommaritoNissan West

18,876 Bommarito

$

14747 Manchester Rd.

636-394-0330 Nissan.com

13,795

$

2017 NISSAN SENTRA

Rogue Model #22117, Vin. #5N1AT2MT3HC786572 Sentra Model #12067, Vin. #3N1AB7AP4HY368561. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. Sale on in stock units only. Prior sales excluded. Includes all rebates and incentives with approved credit. Dealer added options additional. No dealers while supplies last. Tax, title, destination & license not included in sale prices. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 9/30/17.

Bommarito Honda SUPERSTORE

330 Brookes Drive

314-731-9777

159

$

2017 Honda CIVIC LX Automatic

BommaritoHonda.com 2017 Honda

36 Month Lease

*

169

$

ACCORD LX Automatic

36 Month Lease

36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, 2017 Civic LX total cost of lease $7,224 with $1,500 down cash or trade. 2017 Accord LX total cost of lease $7,584 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra. Price includes all factory and dealer incentives with approved credit. Available w/approved credit excludes leases new Hondas only. On select models. Deferred payments on finance deals only. Excludes leases. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 9/30/17.

Volkswagen Bommarit o of Hazelwood 400 Brookes Drive

314-731-7777

Bommaritovwhazelwood.com 2017 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA S

6,000

$

2017 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT S

OFF MSRP

$

6,500

OFF MSRP

See dealer for details. Includes all factory and dealer incentives with approved credit. Available w/approved credit. On select models. Deferred payments on finance deals only. Excludes leases. Artwork for illustration only. Sale ends 9/30/17.

Ford 675 Dunn Road

314-731-1222

16,977

$

2017 FORD FUSION S

BommaritoFord.com

$

2017 FORD ESCAPE S

18,477

Available with approved credit. 2017 Fusion S price includes $3,500 “EcoBoost” Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. 2017 Escape S price includes $2,500 Retail Customer Cash, $1,000 Retail Owner Loyalty, $500 Owner Loyalty, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. Available with approved credit. All units subject to availability. Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit Financing. †The largest Ford dealership based on Fords 2016 new retail sales report. See Dealer For Details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 9/30/17.

Toyota 9095 Dunn Road

314-731-0911

BommaritoToyota.net

Stock # T171321

2017 TOYOTA RAV 4 LE STARTING AT

S

22,452

$

*

ALL NEW 2018 TOYOTA CAMRYS

NOW IN STOCK!

270

Nissan Ballwin

Sulphur Spring Rd.

Ellisville

I70 64

ster Rd. Manche 44 55

Nissan In Ballwin

Nissan, Honda, VW, Ford, Toyota In Hazelwood

*Bommarito advantage offer with every new vehicle purchase. Excludes Nissan Leaf & Nissan GT-R. See dealer for details. †Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

370

Toyota Nissan Ford

270

270

ber

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

N. L ind

40

N. Lindbergh

Clarkson

270

gh

*2017 RAV 4 prices include $2,000 customer cash, does not include administrative fee of $199. With approved credit. Expires 9-30-17.

Honda

255

VW

I70 40

64 44

55


STLTODAY.COM/FOOD • WEDNESDAY • 09.20.2017 • L

SIMPLE BUT ELEGANT PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Rustic Japanese food promises a humble, delicious meal BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I was 8 years old when I first had Japanese food. I still remember every detail. It was my first trip to San Francisco. The restaurant had a red lantern outside, and when we came in we were asked to remove our shoes. We walked shoeless on tatami mats to the tables,

which raised just slightly over the level of the floor with a hollowed space underneath for our feet. And I had what I thought then — and considered for many years after that — to be the finest meal of my life. The restaurant was called MingeiYa, and we dined on a dish they called o-mizu-taki. It was thin slices of beef and vegetables that we cooked ourselves

in a pot of simmering stock. And it was memorable enough to be recalled with great pleasure nearly 50 years later. Imagine my thrill, then, when I was skipping like a stone across the internet a few years ago and discovered that the restaurant, Mingei-Ya, had published a cookbook back in 1969. It was out of print, but used copies were available from various sources.

I happily snagged one and have been using it for inspiration ever since. Mingei-Ya specialized in rustic Japanese cooking, the humble but delicious meals you would find in the countryside. As with all Japanese cooking, simplicity is key, along with elegance and beauty. The flavors speak See JAPANESE • Page L4

Recipes • Donburi Soboro (above), Pickled Fresh Mushrooms, Chicken Sukiyaki (Niwa Tori Sukiyaki) and Shrimp Meatballs (Ebi Dango). PAGE L4

Mixing food, government and civilization DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As is often the case in stories out of Ancient China, there are more legends about Yi Yin than actual known fact. What is certain is this: He began his career as a cook (perhaps he was originally a slave) and became a high-ranking chancellor in the Shang Dynasty,

beginning in around 1600 B.C. He even ruled the kingdom as a regent when a boy was king. That’s not a bad leap for a guy who used to sling the Chinese equivalent of hash for a living. But he had a philosophy, as related in the book “The Quest for Perfect Balance: Taste and Gastronomy in Imperial China,” by Joanna WaleyCohen, and it helped him as a ruler. “He transformed the greatest philosophical issues of governance into a menu of foods to be coveted,” WaleyCohen wrote.

“Among other things, Yi Yin likened the whole world to a kitchen in which one prepares food, and proper government to good cooking. Just as in cooking it was necessary to understand flavours to blend them successfully, so in governing it was necessary to grasp people’s sufferings and aspirations in order to satisfy their needs.” We all bring our own field of expertise and past experiences to our understanding of the world around us. This See NEMAN • Page L4

TWO WINES FOR ROSH HASHANA. PAGE L2

SPARE NO RIB GIVES CAPRESE SALAD A FALL TWIST. PAGE L3

LET’S EAT

1 M

PICK MISSOURI GROWN Fresh, local and delicious — that’s Missouri Grown. Here in Missouri, we grow everything from corn and soybeans to cotton and rice. Our family farms raise some of the nation’s best beef and pork products. Missouri vineyards produce some of the most rich, lavorful wines that rival the best of California. And that’s just a sampling of what you’ll ind when you pick Missouri Grown!

DISCOVER THE BEST MISSOURI HAS TO OFFER.

www.MissouriGrownUSA.com


LET’S EAT

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR WINE FINDS

BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, starts at sundown on Sept. 20 and lasts through Sept. 22. One of the holiest of Jewish holidays, it’s a time for prayer and reflection with many Jews spending one to two days attending religious services. But in the evening, families and friends gather together to celebrate with a festive meal. While sweet concord grape wine remains a part of this tradition in many homes, dry wines are now often served as well. Below are two kosher options.

Bought • Wine and Cheese Place, 457 New Ballas Road, in August for $13.99. Description • Although this sparkling wine is labeled brut, it’s certainly not bone dry and instead has a touch of sweetness. It can be sipped as a festive aperitif or with traditional apples and honey. Made from glera grapes, it comes from the Prosecco denomination in Italy’s Veneto region. This is a slightly fizzy, light and fruity wine with a relatively low alcohol level of 11.5 percent. Prosecco should be served chilled and consumed young.

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat and features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

BEST BITES: CHOCEUR CARAMEL CHOCOLATE PIECES

Wines for Rosh Hashana

BARTENURA PROSECCO BRUT SPARKLING WINE, ITALY

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 09.20.2017

TABOR WINERY 2014 MOUNT TABOR CABERNET SAUVIGNON, GALILEE, ISRAEL Bought • Wine and Cheese Place, 457 New Ballas Road, in August for $13.99. Description • Since many Rosh Hashana festive meals feature brisket or other meats, it’s good to have a robust red wine on hand. Consider one from Israel, which is home to some delicious cabernet sauvignon, including those from Tabor Winery, located in the foothills of Mount Tabor. This is a fresh and fruity, medium-bodied red that has firm tannins. It tastes of blackberries and black currants with hints of green bell pepper, herbs and cedar.

Creamy milk chocolate filled with soft, smooth caramel. What’s not to love about Choceur’s decadently rich treats from Spain? They are even individually wrapped, keeping them nicely fresh in the bag. I had to have another, just to make sure they melt in your mouth. They do. Yum. Size • 7.94 ounces Price • $2.69 Available • Aldi — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Southside Strangler cocktail A little bit sour, a little bit sweet, Daniel Neman’s own cocktail concoction called a Southside Strangler (don’t ask) is a perfectly balanced drink for adults. In a new Prep School video, Neman shows the simple steps to make one.

stltoday.com/food

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

WHAT’S FRESH

Apples, pumpkins, squash and more This week at area farmers markets, look for apples, pumpkins, zucchini, acorn squash, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, fall radishes, greens and root crops like beets and turnips. The last tastes of summer are hanging on in the form of tomatoes, peaches, cucumbers and peppers. To help you use that butternut squash and peppers, here is a recipe from last year’s Let’s Eat for Roasted Fall Salad With Homemade Ranch Dressing. Information provided by the Lake Saint Louis Farmers and Artists Market

• Find our guide to area farmers markets at stltoday. com/farmersmarkets

ROASTED FALL SALAD WITH HOMEMADE RANCH DRESSING Yield: 4 servings of salad, 12 servings (3 batches) of ranch dressing ASSOCIATED PRESS

A tenderloin gets an assist from paprika, dark brown sugar BY ELIZABETH KARMEL Associated Press

As its name implies, the tenderloin is one of the most tender cuts of pork, and comes from the full loin. It’s mild in flavor and takes well to rubs, marinades and sauces. Tenderloins range in weight from 10 ounces to 1 ½ pounds. I prefer the smaller 10 to12 ounce tenderloins and look for those when I am shopping for meat. I love coating the tenderloin with my simple “crusty” barbecue rub of dark brown sugar, salt, pepper and paprika. The sugar in the rub helps to create a nice crust on the pork, and thus the name. After applying the rub, I sear the tenderloin over direct heat on both sides and then move it to indirect heat to finish cooking. Depending on the size of the tenderloin, the entire cooking time will be between 15 and 20 minutes, making it perfect for a quick weekday meal. If you are using a meat thermometer, cook the tenderloin to a medium end temperature of 145-150 F. Don’t be alarmed if the inside is still a bit pink. This is the way that pork today should be served. If you cook it until it is well done, it will be dry

and much less tasty. Once the meat rests for 3 to 5 minutes, slice it on the diagonal and serve with a generous slather of Jezebel Sauce. If you aren’t familiar with Jezebel Sauce, think of it as the less popular southern sister to Hot Pepper Jelly. Jezebel Sauce is thought to have its origins along the Gulf coast where it appears in community cookbooks as far back as the 1950s. Growing up in North Carolina, it was served as an appetizer, spooned over cream cheese, and accompanied by crackers. But I always thought that it was begging to be served with pork. Regardless of where it came from, it is very good with crackers and cream cheese, but it makes an amazing sauce for grilled pork and sausages. The unusual flavors of sweet pineapple, zippy horseradish and the heat of dry mustard complement the smoky grilled pork tenderloin. Traditionally, Jezebel Sauce is made with pineapple preserves and apple jelly, but lately, I have had a hard time finding pineapple preserves so I made it with pureed canned pineapple and apple jelly. The texture is a bit looser, but I like the tang of the uncooked pineapple.

CRUSTY PORK TENDERLOIN WITH JEZEBEL SAUCE Yield: 4 to 6 servings 2 pork tenderloins (10 to 12 ounces each) Olive oil Crusty Barbecue Rub: ½ cup dark brown sugar ½ tablespoon coarse ground pepper 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon granulated sugar ½ tablespoon smoked paprika or Hungarian paprika Crushed Pineapple Jezebel Sauce: ¼ cup pureed or crushed canned pineapple 1 jar (16 to 18 ounces) tart apple jelly ¼ cup white horseradish (not horseradish cream) 1 ½ tablespoons dry mustard 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 1. Make rub and sauce before grilling. 2. For Rub: Mix all rub ingredients together until well combined. Store in an airtight container until ready to use. 3. For Sauce: Combine all ingredients. Cover and chill. Store any extra in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 4. Coat tenderloins lightly with oil. Sprinkle each with 1 to 2 tablespoons of the Crusty Rub. Place directly on the cooking grates over direct heat to sear. Grill 2 to 3 minutes per side. 5. Once seared, move to the center of the cooking grate and cook for 12 to 15 minutes, turning once halfway through cooking time to ensure even cooking. 6. Remove the tenderloins from the grill, allow them to rest for 3 to 5 minutes, then slice on the diagonal into ½-inch slices and serve with Jezebel Sauce. Per serving (based on 6): 257 calories; 7g fat; 101mg cholesterol; 691mg sodium; 14g carbohydrate; no fiber; 13g sugar; 33g protein.

For the dressing 3 tablespoons dried buttermilk, see note 1 tablespoon dried parsley flakes ¾ teaspoon dried dill weed 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon dehydrated onion flakes ½ teaspoon dried chives ½ teaspoon white pepper ½ teaspoon salt 1/3 cup low-fat sour cream 1/3 cup low-fat plain Greek yogurt For the salad 1 to 1½ pounds fall squash such as butternut, acorn or pumpkin, cut in 1-inch cubes ½ yellow bell pepper, seeded and cut into ¼-inch strips ½ red bell pepper, seeded and cut into ¼-inch strips ½ medium red onion, peeled and sliced into ¼-inch rings 3 Roma tomatoes, sliced into 3/8 -inch rounds 6 ounces baby spinach, stemmed, washed and dried Salt and pepper Note: Dried buttermilk is available at most grocers with the powdered milk products or with baking ingredients. Once opened, it must be refrigerated. 1. Stir together dried buttermilk, parsley, dill, garlic powder, onion flakes, chives and pepper. Store in the refrigerator in a tightly covered container. 2. The night before you plan to serve the salad, make the dressing. Stir the herb mix to blend any settled herbs and spices. Put 1¾ tablespoons of the mix into a small bowl (refrigerate the rest for future use). Add the sour cream and yogurt, and whisk until thoroughly blended. Cover and refrigerate overnight. 3. Using your favorite method of roasting vegetables, roast the squash, peppers, onions and tomatoes, preferably separately (the red and yellow peppers may be roasted at the same time). Allow the squash to cool until warm. 4. Divide spinach among 4 salad plates. Arrange roasted peppers, tomatoes and onions in groups around the plate. Place roasted squash cubes in the center. 5. Stir dressing before using. If the dressing is too thick, thin with a little skim milk. Top salad with dressing, and serve. Per serving (based on 4): 91 calories; 1g fat; no saturated fat; 3mg cholesterol; 4g protein; 18g carbohydrate; 5g sugar; 5g fiber; 84mg sodium; 119mg calcium. Recipe by Randi Carter


LET’S EAT

09.20.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

SPARE NO RIB GRAPES & PEARLS SALAD Yield: 6 side salads

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L3

SPECIAL REQUEST

Caprese salad gets a fall twist

1 pound ingerling potatoes or red potatoes 6 to 8 ounces spring salad mix, fresh or prepackaged 1 pound grape tomatoes 8 ounces mozzarella pearls 1 avocado, seeded, peeled and diced 3 to 4 large basil leaves, torn in small pieces ¼ cup fresh lemon juice ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil ¼ teaspoon kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper to taste Notes: This salad is lightly dressed. If you like more dressing, simply double the recipe. Store any leftover in the refrigerator. Bring to room temperature to serve again. 1. Roast, grill or steam ingerling or red potatoes until tender. Set aside to cool. 2. If using fresh spring greens, wash, spin and pat leaves dry. Place the mix on 6 salad plates and set aside. 3. Wash tomatoes and divide among 6 plates. 4. Add ingerling potatoes to each plate. If using red potatoes, cut into pieces and add to plates. 5. Add diced avocado to plates. 6. Combine lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil in a small cup. Add kosher salt and whisk to blend. Drizzle 2 teaspoons of dressing over each salad, whisking in between each. 7. Grind fresh black pepper over the top of each. Per serving: 264 calories; 17g fat; 6g saturated fat; 30mg cholesterol; 11g protein; 19g carbohydrate; 3g sugar; 5g iber; 299mg sodium; 230mg calcium

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

BY PAT EBY special to the Post-dispatch

Q • I was wondering if I could request a recipe for the Grapes & Pearls salad at Spare No Rib. — Mary Claire Elbring, St. Louis

A • At Spare No Rib, the Grapes & Pearls salad captures the fresh flavors of the classic caprese salad year-round with its use of tasty grape tomatoes and little “pearls” of fresh mozzarella. Its wellthought out flavors don’t stop there, however. The salad starts with a bed of tender spring greens. Fingerling potatoes, roasted or steamed, and diced avocado join the tomatoes

SPARE NO RIB 3701 South Jeferson 314-354-8444; sparenorib.com

and mozzarella. The dressing, bright with fresh lemon juice, tops off this simple salad. “We find it to be the perfect salad to bridge between summer and fall,” owner Lassaad Jeliti says. “Tomato season is winding down, grape tomatoes are plentiful, and potatoes of all kinds are at their peak. Avocados provide a creaminess, basil adds kick and the simple lemon, basil and oil dressing, which is very popular in the Mediterranean, sets everything off.” Although Spare No Rib is a

barbecue place, the barbecue crosses international borders regularly, with style. “We’re riding two wild horses here — American street food and Mexican food,” Jeliti says. “We don’t do barbecue like a ‘cue joint. No turkey legs or chicken wings here. We do briskets, pork butts and baby back ribs, which we then use in our shared plates, tacos and sandwiches.” Mexican tacos include carne asada (steak and onion), cachete (braised beef cheek), carnitas (pork belly and shoulder) and chorizo (spicy Mexican sausage). American tacos include brisket, rib, lamb and fish offerings.

Customers can order a classic half or full slab of baby back ribs with baked beans, slaw and cornbread, but the SNR plate of two ribs, two tacos and one side provides a quick taste across the menu. The simple Grapes & Pearls Salad works to bridge flavors across the menu, too. “Some of our best ideas come when we are making favorite foods for ourselves, experimenting in the kitchen,” Jeliti says. “Like our chicken chorizo sandwich. We had a little chicken and a little chorizo left over, so we made a sandwich — just for us. The Grapes & Pearls Salad came about by experimentation also. It became a staple menu item.”

To request a recipe • Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name and the city you live in to reciperequest@post-dispatch.com.

Hibiscus margaritas blend two Mexican favorites BY THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA

If you’ve spent much time traveling in Mexico or the southwestern United States, you may have seen folks enjoying an agua fresca on a hot day. Agua frescas are simply water blended with sugar, fresh fruit, seeds (like chia) or dried flowers to make a refreshing, nonalcoholic drink. Fruits like lime, pineapple and watermelon are

HIBISCUS MARGARITA Yield: 1 serving 1 lime wedge, for preparing glasses (optional) Smoked vanilla salt, for garnish (optional) 2 ounces hibiscus water (see note) 1 ounce mescal 1 ounce honey liqueur ½ ounce orange liqueur 1 ounce agave syrup ½ ounce freshly squeezed lime juice Sliced limes, for garnish Vanilla beans, for garnish (optional)

all popular in agua frescas, but none is more recognizable than the jewel-toned water of the hibiscus flower. Known across the region as agua de Jamaica, hibiscus aqua frescas are sweet and floral. The hibiscus’ use in traditional Latin American cooking doesn’t stop there. In Mexico, the bright red flower can be found in everything from tacos to quesadillas, salsas, liquors and desserts. Martin Matysik, a chef

Note: Make hibiscus water by combining 2 cups of water with 2/3 cur of dried hibiscus lowers. Let soak 4 hours or up to overnight. Drain in a ine mesh sieve, using a wooden spoon to press out all of the liquid, and discard the lowers. 1. Prepare a tall glass by wiping the lime wedge around the top rim. Dip the rim of the glass in smoked salt, ill with ice, and set aside. 2. In a cocktail shaker illed with ice, combine the hibiscus water, mescal, honey liqueur, orange liqueur, agave syrup and lime juice. Shake vigorously, and then strain into the prepared glass. Garnish with lime and vanilla beans, if using, before serving. Per serving: 307 calories; no fat; no cholesterol; 2mg sodium; 38g carbohydrate; no iber; 34g sugar; no protein. ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOCK PROBLEMS? “Shop on Wheels” Service To Your Door

314-961-2444 • FixMyLock.com 8619 Manchester Rd. • Brentwood Store Hours M-F 9am-4pm • Service on Wheels M-F 8am-6pm

at the Culinary Institute of America, makes a hibiscus margarita, combining two of Mexico’s most beloved beverages for a hot-weather (or any-weather) cocktail. In this recipe, we’ve used mescal, the earthier cousin to tequila. It’s a distilled spirit derived from the agave plant and has many regional styles. You’ll also notice that the recipe includes honey liqueur, which should be available at most liquor stores. If you can’t find it, just omit it and add a

dash of honey, which will provide the light sweetness and rich flavor that helps round out the tartness in the cocktail. Experiment with fragrant and floral honeys, like orange blossom. Since this drink is otherwise sweetened, use unsweetened hibiscus water. If you’d like, you can make a big batch (use about 1 cup of dried flowers for every 3 cups of water), reserve some for the cocktail, and sweeten the rest to make a classic

Culinary Institute of America

agua de Jamaica. Sweeten it to taste with simple syrup or agave syrup. The mixture also makes the perfect popsicle. Dried hibiscus flowers can be purchased online, but you’re likely to pay a premium. If you have a local market that specializes in Mexican or Latin American products, you will almost certainly find hibiscus flowers and other regional delicacies. Because if you’re making margaritas, tacos can’t be far behind.


LET’S EAT

L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 09.20.2017

Pickled mushrooms are easy, fast to make JAPANESE • FROM L1

for themselves. It is with fond memories of that meal I had in San Francisco that I decided this week to dip my chopsticks into Japanese cuisine. I used the Mingei-Ya cookbook, “Japanese Country Cookbook,” as my guide for all four recipes. I chose not re-create the o-mizu-taki, however, because to do so properly requires a hot pot, which most Americans do not have. I have made it in an ordinary pot, and the result tastes great but you miss out on the convivial cooking-atthe-table aspect that is such an important part of the meal. Even without the o-mizutaki, I could not have been more pleased with the four dishes I made. I began with pickled fresh mushrooms. The Japanese are fond of pickling just about anything they can think of, and these mushrooms are a great example why. They are very fast to make — less than 20 minutes — and the speed helps to keep them mild in flavor and not too vinegary. Traditionally, they are made with shiitakes, and the unique earthiness of that variety takes particularly well to pickling. But in 1969, when the cookbook was written, shiitakes were largely unknown in the United States, so the book suggests using cremini – baby portobellos — instead. I tried both, and the cremini were nearly as good as the shiitakes, and much cheaper. But for the true Japanese experience, go with the shiitakes. Next, I made a simple egg meal in a bowl, Donburi Soboro. This is a prime example of Japanese cooking, in that it takes ingredients familiar to Americans (the cookbook is meant for American readers, so the ingredients it chooses are commonly available here) and uses them in ways that

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

PICKLED FRESH MUSHROOMS Yield: 4 servings 1 cup vinegar, preferably rice or sherry vinegar 1 cup soy sauce 1 cup granulated sugar

Salt, if desired 1 pound mushrooms, shiitake or cremini, halved or quartered if large

Boil vinegar, soy sauce sugar and salt, if using. Add mushrooms and boil for 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit 5 to 10 minutes. Remove mushrooms from liquid and serve hot or cold. Per serving: 265 calories; 1g fat; no saturated fat;no cholesterol; 8g protein; 56g carbohydrate; 52g sugar; 1g iber; 3,506mg sodium; 28mg calcium Adapted from “Japanese Country Cookbook,” by Russell Rudzinski

are, to us, wonderfully unexpected. It begins with ground beef, which is sauteed with minced carrots and scallions. To this is

added tofu, plus spinach, sugar and soy sauce. Beaten eggs are then mixed in, resulting in a semi-congealed, crumbly melange. It’s served on rice, of

course, to make a light and delicately flavored meal. I added hot sauce — the Japanese would use togarashi, which is a powdered spice blend — and that only made it even better. Naturally, I had to make sukiyaki. Beef sukiyaki is most common in Japan, or at least it was in 1969, but I decided to make chicken because I was not inclined to employ the skills and precision required by the beef version. Chicken sukiyaki is more of a casual affair. Sukiyaki is meat that is stewed in a broth with vegetables added later; the word means to grill on a hoe. This chicken version uses very little broth but a wealth of vegetables: onion, carrots, celery, spinach, mushrooms and bamboo shoots, plus soy sauce and sugar. It is a cross between a stew

and a stir-fry, and it is tremendously satisfying. Finally, I made my favorite dish in the entire cookbook, shrimp meatballs called Ebi Dango. In this dish, it is the broth used to simmer the meatballs that is seasoned with soy sauce and sugar. That adds flavor, but the real secret is the meatballs themselves. You mince the shrimp and then mix it with chopped scallions, cornstarch and a beaten egg. When you drop them in the boiling stock, they cook up effervescently light and flavorful. Add napa cabbage and sliced mushrooms to the broth and you have a meal worth remembering. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

DONBURI SOBORO Yield: 4 servings 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 carrots, minced 2 scallions, minced 4 to 6 ounces ground beef 8 ounces tofu, diced into ½-inch cubes ½ bunch spinach or ½ cup frozen, chopped 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 4 tablespoons soy sauce Salt 4 eggs Hot cooked rice 1. In a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat, heat oil and sauté carrots until tender. Add scallions and cook until limp. Add beef, breaking it up to prevent formation of chunks. Cook until brown. Add tofu, spinach, sugar, soy sauce and salt to taste. Cook on low until heated through, stirring carefully so tofu doesn’t crumble. 2. Beat eggs and add to the mixture, cook and stir carefully until done, about 4 to 5 minutes. Put hot rice in 4 bowls and top with the meat-egg mixture. Add hot sauce, if desired. Per serving: 392 calories; 18g fat; 4g saturated fat; 204mg cholesterol; 22g protein; 36g carbohydrate; 9g sugar; 3g iber; 1,067mg sodium; 202mg calcium Adapted from “Japanese Country Cookbook,” by Russ Rudzinski

CHICKEN SUKIYAKI (NIWA TORI SUKIYAKI)

SHRIMP MEATBALLS (EBI DANGO)

Yield: 4 servings

Yield: 4 servings

1½ pounds boneless chicken breasts 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ¼ cup chicken stock or water 1 onion, sliced thin 2 carrots, parboiled 1 minute and sliced thin on diagonal

8 ounces bamboo shoots (canned is ine) 2 ribs of celery, sliced thin on diagonal 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1½ teaspoons granulated sugar 1 bunch spinach 8 large mushrooms, sliced

Cut chicken breasts in crosswise slices. Heat oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat until very hot. Add the chicken and brown slightly, tossing often. Add stock carefully, to guard against splatter. Add onion, carrots, bamboo shoots, celery, soy sauce and sugar. Simmer and stir for 5 minutes. Add spinach and mushrooms and cook until spinach is wilted. Serve hot with rice. Per serving: 332 calories; 12g fat; 2g saturated fat; 105mg cholesterol; 45g protein; 12g carbohydrate; 5g sugar; 5g iber; 713mg sodium; 134mg calcium

1 pound shrimp, cleaned and ground or minced ine 2 scallions, chopped ine 2 tablespoons cornstarch 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon soy sauce, divided 1 beaten egg

4 cups chicken or ish stock 1 teaspoon granulated sugar 1 head Chinese (Napa) cabbage, about 1½ pounds, in 1-inch cubes 8 dry mushrooms, reconstituted

In a large bowl, blend together shrimp, scallions, cornstarch, 1 teaspoon of the soy sauce and egg. In a large pot, season the stock with the remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce and the sugar, and bring to a boil. Drop spoonfuls of the shrimp mixture into the stock and they will cook into dumplings. When they rise to the surface, they are done. Add cabbage and mushrooms. Cook 7 to 8 minutes, covered, and serve with hot rice. Per serving: 158 calories; 3g fat; 1g saturated fat; 188mg cholesterol; 21g protein; 12g carbohydrate; 3g sugar; 2g iber; 2,045mg sodium; 151mg calcium Recipe from “Japanese Country Cookbook,” by Russ Rudzinski.

Recipe from “Japanese Country Cooking,” by Russ Rudzinski

Does cooking deine civilization? NEMAN • FROM L1

is how a chef understood politics, and it apparently served him well. He is said to have helped restore stability to a region brought to turmoil by the replacement of one dynasty by another. There is a lesson to be learned here, but it is tempered by uncertainty about Yi’s fate. One version says he banished the young king to his grandfather’s tomb and assumed full power while the young ruler learned to be less cruel. According to this version, Yi became greatly honored throughout his full life and died at the age of 100. In another version, the young ruler escaped his banishment and had Yi assassinated. This bit of culinary wisdom comes to us from a (very) long article on Eater.com called “A Brief (and Biased) History of Flavor,” by Mandy Aftel and Daniel Patterson. It is an excerpt from their book “The Art of Flavor: Practices and Principles for Creating Delicious Food,” which is presumably even longer, though one wonders how that could be possible. Even though it is quite long (I’m not sure I mentioned that), it does have some interesting things to say about the relationship of cooking food to governance and even to civilization itself. Pearls of wisdom, if you will, taken presumably from fire-roasted oysters. For instance, it quotes the Tao Te Ching

as saying “governing a country is in principle like cooking a small fish.” The meaning is perhaps a bit obscure, but according to the authors, it means “great care and attention are in both cases essential.” I like that. And it also reminds me never to cook a small fish. A more recent citation in the article comes from Australian writer Michael A. Symons in his “A History of Cooks and Cooking.” Symons argues that we shouldn’t always think of chefs in terms of the food they cook, but rather as masters of rationing resources. “Think of them counting out one artichoke for each guest. Think of them balancing the sweet and sour. Think of them ensuring fat, but not too much, and fibre, but not too much … (T)he most balanced results become the most satisfying, those we agree are the most pleasing. We like fairness. Not just through the dishes, cooks conjure harmonious blends out of the social, cultural and physical worlds.” Inevitably, the authors also cite the eminently quotable Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, the famous 18th century gastronome. According to him, they say, cooking is a defining characteristic of civilization. “Animals feed themselves; men eat; but only wise men know the art of eating.” Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

Give your tabbouleh a lift by adding fava beans BY MELISSA D’ARABIAN Associated Press

Beans are an inexpensive and lean source of protein, fiber and micronutrients. But it’s easy to fall into a bean rut. White beans, black beans, garbanzo beans and fresh green beans easily make their way to the table relatively frequently. Consider widening your bean circle and including fava beans, also known as broad beans (perhaps more commonly so, thanks to a “Silence of the Lambs”induced PR problem). Fava beans are relatively large and flat irregularly-shaped beans that have a creamy, almost buttery taste. They are available in the grocery store frozen fresh, canned, dried, or (my favorite) cooked and vacuum-packed on the packaged vegetable shelf. A quarter cup of fava beans has about 125 calories and delivers about 10 grams each of protein and fiber, as well as vitamins and minerals, particularly magnesium and iron. The mild flavor and pleasant non-mealy texture mean the fava bean is perfect for swapping into almost any of your favorite bean recipes — salads, stews, and soups all get a nice face-lift from bringing in a new bean. This Fava Bean Tabbouleh recipe replaces classic bulgur wheat with fava beans, and the result is a fresh, herbaceous side dish that is hearty enough to work as a meat-free main dish. The salad is sturdy enough to survive brownbagging or picnicking, or simply an extra day in the fridge if you have leftovers. Grabbing a box of cooked fava beans at the market turns this dish into convenience food you can feel great about.

FAVA BEAN TABBOULEH Yield: 6 servings 2 cups cooked fava beans 1 ½ cups parsley leaves (and soft stems), chopped ½ cup cilantro leaves (and soft stems), chopped ¼ cup mint leaves, roughly chopped 1 large tomato, chopped 2 tablespoons minced shallot Dressing: ¼ cup lemon juice (approximately 2 medium lemons) 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced ½ teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon chili powder Salt and pepper 1. Place the beans, herbs, tomato and shallot in a large bowl. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together the dressing ingredients, and pour onto the salad and toss. Will keep for up to 24 hours in the refrigerator. Per serving: 123 calories; 5g fat; no cholesterol; 216mg sodium; 15g carbohydrate; 4g iber; 3g sugar; 5g protein.


LET’S EAT

09.20.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

HONEY-GLAZED CORNISH HENS Yield: 8 servings 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons rendered chicken fat (schmaltz) or extra-virgin olive oil, divided use ½ cup honey 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 2 medium yellow onions, thinly sliced 8 Cornish hens or 2 roasting chickens (about 4 pounds each) Kosher salt, to taste 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a small saucepan, melt 2 tablespoons of the chicken fat with the honey and pepper. Remove the glaze from the heat and set aside. 2. Divide the onions among the bottom of 2 large baking dishes or roasting pans. Rub the hens all over with the remaining chicken fat, then season all over with salt. Place the hens on top of the onions (4r in each pan; they should not be crowded), using roasting racks if desired. Roast the hens until they are golden brown and just about cooked through, about 25 minutes. 3. Remove from the oven and brush each hen with the reserved honey glaze. Increase the oven temperature to 425 degrees and bake the hens until the chickens are deeply browned and the juices from the hens run clear, an additional 5 minutes. 4. Set aside to rest for 10 minutes before serving. Per serving: 398 calories; 12g fat; 236mg cholesterol; 380mg sodium; 19g carbohydrate; no iber; 18g sugar; 52g protein.

Dig into honey-glazed Cornish hens BY THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA

Though the disco ball drops in January, the shofar blows in September, marking the beginning of the new year for Jewish communities across the globe. Observed as one of the holiest days of the year, Rosh Hashana is a special two-day celebration of what’s to come. Like the ceremonial blowing of the shofar (a ram’s horn), the holiday is marked by many traditions such as candle-lighting, special greetings and prayers, and foods and dishes that hold special meaning for the coming year. Here’s a new familyfavorite recipe to ring in the new year, with some special ingredients that help set the tone for happy and healthy months ahead. Honey-glazed Cornish hens with sauteed cabbage and baked apples is a fresh take on foods commonly found on your Rosh Hashana table. The honey infuses sweetness into the new year and, paired with savory schmaltz, adds a sticky glaze atop the crisp poultry skin. Served alongside sweet, baked apples — another holiday table tradition — and tender cabbage, this meal is sure to start your family’s year off with lots of luck and a full belly. Schmaltz, which is simply rendered chicken fat, is a common ingredient in traditional Jewish cooking as a substitute for

skin over low heat until it gives up its clear fat — the schmaltz. Another option is to skim the bright yellow fat from the top of

dairy-filled butter. Though it can be found in the kitchens of grandmothers the world over, schmaltz is gaining in popularity for its savory flavor among those who eschew dairy products. Schmaltz can be purchased in some specialty markets, but it’s a cinch to prepare with ingredients you may already have. In fact, you’ve likely made it before and just discarded it. (A tragedy.) One common way to “make” schmaltz is to slowly render chicken

We Specialize in Area Rugs! More Selection at Sale Prices!

Over 8,400 Rugs!

60-70% Off Suggested retail

Volume Rug Gallery St. Louis’ Best Kept Secret

8994 Manchester (2 blocks West of Brentwood) VolumeCarpet.com

Store Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9am-8pm Sun. 9am-5:30pm

Yield: 8 servings ½ cup coconut oil or dairy-free butter substitute, melted ¼ cup packed light brown sugar ½ cup raisins 4 baking apples 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a small bowl, combine coconut oil, sugar and raisins, and set aside. 2. Core the apples. Slice the top of each apple, approximately ¼-inch from the top, and, using an apple-corer, small knife or spoon, gently hollow the apples. Be sure to leave about a ½-inch-thick shell. 3. Fill the hollowed apples with the sugar mixture. Place stufed apples in a greased baking dish and bake until the apples are slightly browned, tender and cooked throughout, about 25 minutes. Spoon the liquid at the bottom of the pan over the apples before serving. Per serving: 234 calories; 14g fat; no cholesterol; 6mg sodium; 30g carbohydrate; 3g iber; 26g sugar; 1g protein.

Vincent’s 12TH Street Market

VINCENT’S MARKET VINCENT’S MARKET We Reserve the Right to Limit

• Full Line of Groceries • Chauvin Whole Bean Coffee • Butcher Shop • Fine Wine…200 + Varieties

.

PRICES GOOD SEPT. 24, 2017

• Fresh Baked Fazio's Breads • Produce & Health Food Sections • Meat Custom Cut to Your Order • Beer - Imports & MicroBrews

Fresh Pork

• Liquor • Draft Beer • Propane Refilled

2400 S. 12th Street • 314-772-4710 www.vincentsmarket.biz

USDA Choice

Spare Ribs

Chicken

Porterhouse Steak

2

6

$ 19

Leg Quarters

89

$ 99

lb.

6 $ 29 Ham Shanks .......................... 2 $ 89 Pork Sausage ........................ 1 USDA Choice

T-Bone Steak .........................

$

¢

lb.

Premium

Pork Tenderloin ....................

lb.

Oscar Mayer

lb.

16 oz. pkg.

GROCERIES/HEALTH FOOD

6 $ 29 Chopped Ham ................... 5 $ 29 Swiss ................................ 6 $ 99 Colby Longhorn................. 5 $ 99 ColeSlaw.......................... 3

9 $ 59 Sam Adams.................... 8 St. Louis $ 99 Kraftig.......................... 8 Missouri $ 99 Bur Oak ........................ 7 6 pak btl. Bells.............................

l b.

$ 99

Boston

l b.

6 pak btl.

l b.

Ragu

4 Betty Crocker 5/$ 00 Specialty Potatoes............... 5 PRODUCE ¢ Hunt’s 4/$ 00 Lettuce .......................... 99 Manwich .......................... 5 $ 29 Taco Bell Tomatoes ...................... 1 2/$ 00 ¢ Dinner Kits ..................... 5 Red Onions ..................... 69 Taco Bell 3/$ 00 $ 29 Refried Beans ................. 4 Cantaloupes .................. 1 Post 2/$ 00 FROZEN FOODS Fruity or Cocoa Pebbles.............. 5 Prairie Farms $ 99 Keebler 2/$ 00 Ice Cream ....................... 5 Zesta Saltines ............. 4 Ore-Ida $ 99 Wesson 2/$ 00 Potatoes ........................ 2 Oil................................. 6 DAIRY Sunshine Velveeta $ 99 Cheez-It ......................... $299 Slices .............................. 2 Alpo Daisy 2/$ 00 Prime CutsDog Food .............. $899 Sour Cream ................... 4 24 oz. jar Pasta Sauce ...................

2/$ 00

l b.

4-7 oz. box

hd.

15 oz. can

Vine Ripe

lb.

8-14 oz. var.

Jumbo

BEER Michigan

$ 19

l b.

lb.

lb.

Our Own

Turkey Breast...................

$

Sea Best

lb.

DELI DEPT.

lb.

399 $ 99 Tilapia Fillets ........................ 5 $ 29 Turkey Franks ........................ 2

59

Smoked

lb.

Southern

We Accept Food Stamps

A real neighborhood store In Historic Soulard... Since 1912

Iceberg

BAKED APPLES

homemade chicken stock —also schmaltz. When hot it is a liquid, but stored in the refrigerator, the fat will become solid and

100 Years In Business

Yield: 8 servings

1. Chop scallions, reserving white and dark green parts separately. 2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the scallion whites and garlic and cook until fragrant and lightly browned, about 3 minutes. Add the cabbage, salt and pepper and saute until the cabbage begins to release its juices, about 1 minute. Add water and cover, and cook until the cabbage is wilted, about 3 minutes. Add the remaining scallion and cook, uncovered, until the water has evaporated and the cabbage is tender, about 2 more minutes. Per serving: 72 calories; 5g fat; no cholesterol; 142mg sodium; 6g carbohydrate; 3g iber; 2g sugar; 2g protein.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

scoopable. Every time you use it in place of butter or oil, your house will smell like chicken soup. We’ve used Cornish game hens for this recipe, because they are perfect for individual servings at a holiday dinner. But this glaze will work perfectly with whatever poultry you prefer, like roasting chickens, turkey, or even duck. Of course, the cooking times will vary, so just roast the meat as you would normally, adding the glaze for the last 5 or 10 minutes. You can drizzle some of the leftover glaze over a platter of sliced meat, if you like. Roasted meats and baked apples make the perfect sweet and savory combination. You’ll want to choose apples that stand up well to baking, like Cortland, Golden Delicious, Jonagold and Granny Smith. Granny Smith is a great choice for this recipe, since it’s a little tart, which will help balance out the sweetness of the honeyglazed hens. Of course, you want your new year to be sweet, not sour, so choose wisely.

314-963-7847

SAUTEED CABBAGE 1 bunch scallions 3 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil 2 garlic cloves, chopped 1 pound Savoy cabbage, cored and thinly sliced (about 8 cups) ½ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper ¼ cup water

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • L5

11 oz. can

ea.

11 oz. box

gal. pail

12 pak cans

6 pak can.

FINE WINES The Path

8 $ 99 Dei Poggi ....................... 8 Villa San Maurice $ 99 Chardonnay.................... 8 Arona $ 99 Sauvignon Blanc.............. 9 750 ml. Cabernet Sauvignon............

Rosso

750 ml.

750 ml.

750 ml.

SODA

16 oz. box

16-32 oz. bag

48 oz. btl.

8-12 oz. var.

12 oz. pks.

16 oz. bag

14 oz. squeeze

$ 99

Dr. Pepper

99¢

2 ltr. btl. 7 Up .............................

Dr. Pepper 12 pak 12 oz. cans

7 Up ......................

1199

3/$

FRESH MEAT ORDERS STOCK-UP & SAVE!! Vincent’s Market Is Proud To Carry MEAT ORDER #6 2 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Pork Chops 3 lbs. Rib Tips 2 lbs. Ground Beef

2 lbs. Chicken Wings 3 lbs. Leg Quarters 2 lbs. Slab Bacon 1 lb. Cooked Salami

MEAT ORDER #9

MEAT ORDER #10

MEAT ORDER #11

3 lbs. Pork Chops 5 lbs. Ground Beef 3 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Slab Bacon 3 lbs. Chicken Wings 2 lbs. Hot Dogs 5 lbs. Leg Quarters

ALL BEEF!!!

3 lbs. Ground beef 5 lbs. Pork Sausage 3 lbs. Rib Tips 5 lbs. Pork Steaks 10 lbs. Chicken Wings 9 lbs. Chicken

49.99

64.99

$

MEAT ORDER #23 5 lbs. Ground Beef 2 lbs. Bologna 4 lbs. Pork Steaks 4 lbs. Pork Chops 2 lbs. American Cheese

3 lbs. Pork Sausage 3 lbs. Beef Roast 9 lbs. Leg Quarters 3 lbs. Pork Roast 4 lbs. Chicken Wings

112.99

$

MEAT ORDER #34 ALL PORK 3 lbs. Pork Roast 2 lbs. Bacon 6 lbs. Spare Ribs 3 lbs. Pork Steaks 3 lbs. Boneless Pork Chops 2 lbs. Pork Sausage

52.99

$

$

MEAT ORDER #24 5 lbs. Ground Beef 5 lbs. Slab Bacon 5 lbs. Pork Sausage 5 lbs. Beef Roast 4 lbs. Pork Roast

9 lbs. Leg Quarters 5 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Bologna 6 lbs. Chicken

128.99

$

2 lbs. Round Steak 2 lbs. Chuck Roast 3 lbs. Ground Beef

2 lbs. Sirloin Steak 2 lbs. Stew Meat

51.99

$

MEAT ORDER #25

62.99

$

MEAT ORDER #37

PICNIC SPECIAL

2 lbs. Hot Dogs 2 lbs. Bacon 2 lbs. Pork Chops 2 lbs. Ground Beef

1 lb. Swiss Cheese 2 lbs. Hot Dogs 2 lbs. Bratwurst 3 lbs. Ground Beef

61.99

$

MEAT ORDER #27

3 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Ground Beef 3 lbs. Cube Steak 3 lbs. Ground Chuck 4 lbs. Country Spareribs 2 lbs. Italian Sausage 3 lbs. Sirloin Steak 3 lbs. T-Bone 3 lbs. Pork Steaks 3 lbs. Center Cut 3 lbs. Cut-Up Chicken 2 lbs. Bratwurst 3 lbs. Porterhouse Steak Pork Chops

MEAT ORDER #35 2 lbs. Bologna 2 lbs. Cooked Salami 2 lbs. Turkey Breast 1 lbs. American

79.99

$

23.99

$

119.99

$

MEAT ORDER #36 ALL CHICKEN!!! 3 lbs. Cut Up 2 lbs. Wings 2 lbs. Drum Sticks

2 lbs. Thighs 3 lbs. Boneless Breast

25.99

$

Chauvin Coffee roasting coffee in St. Louis since 1930!


L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 09.20.2017

September

WINE SPECIALS

WRITTEN BY Jordan Baranowski

September is the perfect time of year to try a new wine. Total Wine & More has over 8,000 wines, from full-bodied Cabernets to tart Sauvignon Blancs. Stop by and take advantage of our September wine specials.

FERN RIDGE MARLBOROUGH SAUVIGNON BLANC

SOBON ZINFANDEL FIDDLETOWN This full-bodied Zinfandel contains bold fruit flavors and finishes with a great deal of complexity. Try it with barbecue or red meat at your next cookout.

This dry Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand is full of tart fruit flavors like passion fruit and grapefruit.

California, 750mL, $19.99

New Zealand, 750mL, $11.99

OAK RIDGE CABERNET LODI

KUPELWIESER PINOT GRIGIO ALTO ADIGE

This Cab begins with flavors of cedar and vanilla from its oak casks, with a finish of blackberry and green olive. This vintage received a 90 from Beverage Dynamics.

This refreshing Pinot Grigio has elements of both citrus and tree fruits, as well as a subtle mineral quality. It's a perfect pairing with fish.

California, 750mL, $11.99

Italy, 750mL, $12.99

SEVEN RINGS CHARDONNAY MONTEREY

ST REINE BLANC DE BLANCS BRUT

This crisp Chardonnay balances its traditional butter and oak flavors with hints of apple and pear. Medium-bodied, it also contains subtle hints of vanilla.

A sparkling French wine made in the method champenoise, this Blanc de Blancs Brut has a dry, fruity quality with hints of vanilla and spice.

California, 750mL, $13.99

France, 750mL, $10.49

D’AUTREFOIS PINOT NOIR

CHATEAU VIVONNE BANDOL ROSÉ

A complex Pinot Noir for a great value, the D’Autrefois features a bouquet of cherry and berry framed by vanilla and spice. Enjoy its crisp finish with roasted chicken.

With fruit flavors like apricot and peach developing into a slight almond finish, this rosé pairs well with spicy and starchy foods, such as Japanese cuisine.

France, 750mL, $9.99

France, 750mL, $14.99

ACCESSORIES AQUA DEL SOL STEMLESS GLASSES

VIVID DECANTER

These stemless glasses are a vibrant rainbow of color, perfect for toasting your favorite wine. The slight color variation between glasses adds to their unique charm.

Aerate your favorite wine to improve its flavor and bouquet. This crystal decanter has a sleek, striking design for an incredible value and would make a perfect gift for any wine lover.

$39.99

2-pack, $19.99

Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

Manchester Meadows 13887 Manchester Road Ballwin, MO 63011 636.527.0482

Clarkson Square 1781 Clarkson Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 636.536.9869

Prices valid from 9/20/2017 through 10/1/2017 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Same Price Cash or Credit. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2017 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


The Difference Is In The Detail! We Buy... Walter’s has an outstanding reputation gold, platinum, silver, diamonds estate jewelry, coins & watches.

for high quality jewelry and diamonds, with our knowledgeable staff and our excellent service. Walters Jewelry Inc. • Four Generations • Since 1925 230 North Main St. St. Charles 63301 636-724-0604 or 636-946-7352

Mon & Fri 9am-7pm • Tues-Thur 9am-5:30pm • Sat 9am-5pm

www.waltersjewelryinc.com

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Wednesday • 09.20.2017 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Neither vulnerable, West deals NORTH ♠K 9 5 3 ♥Void ♦K Q 4 2 ♣A K 10 8 3 WEST EAST ♠A Q 6 ♠10 4 ♥K Q ♥A J 10 9 7 6 4 ♦A 10 9 7 ♦J 5 3 ♣9 6 5 2 ♣J SOUTH ♠J 8 7 2 ♥8 5 3 2 ♦8 6 ♣Q 7 4 The bidding: WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH 1NT Pass 4♦* Pass 4♥ Dbl Pass 4♠ All pass *Transfer to hearts Opening lead: King of ♥ North did well to make a take-out double of four hearts. That contract will succeed unless North finds the unlikely lead of a low club to South’s queen for a spade shift. South ruffed the opening heart lead in dummy and led the king of diamonds. West won with his ace and continued with another diamond to the queen. Declarer ruffed a diamond in his hand and led a spade to the king as West ducked his ace. This was followed by another diamond ruff and a heart ruff, leaving

this position: NORTH ♠9 ♥Void ♦Void ♣A K 10 8 3 WEST EAST ♠A Q ♠10 ♥Void ♥A J 10 6 ♦Void ♦Void ♣9 6 5 2 ♣J SOUTH ♠J ♥83 ♦Void ♣Q 7 4 South exited dummy with the nine of spades and West couldn’t prevent declarer from taking four club tricks to make his contract. It was a lucky lie of the cards for South, but still, the defense could have done better. East’s play at trick one should have been treated as a suit preference signal. Had West shifted to a club after winning the ace of diamonds, he could have won the first round of trumps with the ace and given East a club ruff. A heart from East after that would have tapped dummy and assured West of the setting trick with the queen of trumps. (09/20/17)

Across 1 Early Peruvian 6 “Gone With the Wind” studio 9 Mooed 14 Festive 15 Folk singer DiFranco 16 Edward Snowden, e.g. 17 Peter Parker is his alter ego 19 Musical piece for nine 20 “That’s terrible!” 21 Wipes out on the half-pipe, say 23 Comedian Philips 24 Rue 26 Grammywinning electronic music producer and DJ 28 Ram’s mate 29 Red Cross response

31 J. Peterman employee on “Seinfeld” 32 Excited Spanish cry 35 D-Day carriers: abbr. 36 Name assumed by billiards great Rudolf Wanderone 40 Asset for a press secretary 41 Way to watch “Game of Thrones” on your phone 42 Tater Tots maker 45 Course standard 46 ___ Kat 49 Longtime co-worker of Vanna White 52 Chevy’s response to the Mustang

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If Sept. 20 is your birthday • This year you feel as if you have what it takes, and you really do. If you are single, you easily might ind yourself in a whirlwind romance. If you are attached, remember that a relationship is not a one-way street. You understand Libra a little too well at times.

WORD GAME September 20 WORD — SABOTAGE (SABOTAGE: SAB-uh-tajh: To deliberately destroy or destruct, esp. for political or military advantage.) Average mark 23 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 33 or more words in SABOTAGE? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — ADDICTED aced didact acid died acted diet added iced addict idea adit caddied aide cadet aided cite dace tide date tied dead edict dice edit RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

54 Vow before testifying 55 Sushi condiment 57 Words said before and after “what” 58 TBS late-night host 60 Modern exercise option … or what the answers to 17-, 26-, 36- or 49-Across could teach? 62 A straight one is 180° 63 Suitable 64 Fictional orphan protected by Punjab 65 Zapped, as unwanted hair 66 West who said Puzzle by Andrew Kingsley and John Lieb “Too much of a good thing can 9 Kind of soup 30 One running 43 Began be wonderful” mentioned in away in “Hey 44 1977 Steely 67 Wherewithal Genesis Diddle Diddle” Dan album 10 Losing 32 Opposing side 46 Samurai Down tic-tac-toe line 33 Short cut sword 1 Complaint after 11 Request at a 34 Above 47 Silent film overexercise fine restaurant opener 36 With Pelé, 12 Earth, wind and 48 Scraps co-winner of 2 Huey, Dewey fire FIFA’s Player 50 Kind of tea or Louie, to 13 Cleanses, in a of the Century from Asia Donald Duck way award 51 10th of 24 3 Reaction to 18 Finish the job? 37 Minibar 53 Pooh creator an awkward accessory 22 Boiling point? 56 Orthodontist’s moment 38 Advil alternative concern 25 Make 4 Passion 59 Pub pint 39 Fit ___ king 27 1980s-90s 5 Bill ___, the NBC drama 61 Kiss ___ 40 In the news Science Guy 6 One of the Three Bears Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 7 Cloud in the past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). summer Read about and comment on each puzzle: 8 Capital of nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0816 Belarus

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 09.20.2017

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Defer to others in the morning, as it might be easier at that time. You have strong opinions, but you recognize that others do not necessarily have to agree with you. Tonight: The call is yours to make. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★ You wake up with an unusual idea. You are able to make changes quickly and eiciently. Your instincts point you down the path to success. Tonight: Squeeze in some exercise. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ You move through the morning with ease, and are likely to ind yourself in a creative situation. Idea after idea emerges when you are engaged in a conversation with a respected associate. Tonight: Allow your imagination to roam. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★ A conversation starts of your day. You might opt to stay at home or place yourself in a cozy environment in order to work through a problem. Your versatility relects your moodiness, and easily could change your perspective. Tonight: All smiles. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★★ Reach out to someone who might have a better understanding of your inances. Your sense of well-being could be instrumental to what occurs. Tonight: Out and about. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★ Be aware of the costs of delegating a job and not inishing it as you would like. You also

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

WORD SCRIMMAGE

need to be more aware of what is going on around you. Your conidence soars, and you feel as if you are unstoppable. Tonight: Go along with the moment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★★ You achieve exactly what you want to. Your focus, planning and generous nature will take over and open up more opportunities. Tonight: In the limelight. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★ Use the morning hours to the max, when you can zero in on what you want. A friend might be involved in making your desire a reality. You have a lot to work through, so set aside time for relection. Tonight: Play it low-key.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You won’t hesitate to take the lead. You have a strong sense of self, which emerges when you’re dealing with others. What you make clear is that it is your way or the highway. Tonight: On a roll. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ You might wonder what would be the most efective way of taking charge of a diicult yet worthwhile project. Not everyone agrees with your choices and chosen direction. Tonight: Stay on top of your obligations. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★★ At irst your focus might be on a partner, but as the day goes on, you’ll concentrate on what’s best for the greater good. If you experience a change of heart, be sure to have a chat with those involved. Your openness is greatly appreciated. Tonight: You gain a deeper perspective.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ You have several people with whom you enjoy relating on a very intense level. Your perspective will change once you hear someone else’s viewpoint. Suddenly, you’ll gain an insight that will help remove any obstacle you might run into. Tonight: Express your versatility. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

09.20.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Husband won’t stop watching porn

Dear Feeling • Men watch porn because they are turned on by the visual. You have a right to a sex life, but meddling with your husband’s computer won’t fix your problem. Because your marital needs are not being met, frame your conversation with him that way. He may be addicted to online porn and unable to stop watching without a professional intervention. P.S. Please stop comparing yourself with what your husband

is viewing on screen, because what he is seeing isn’t real. It’s show business. Dear Abby • My wife and I have been married 13 years and have two young sons. She’s a free spirit. She likes to independently make a lot of decisions that affect us both. This has led to arguments about what should or should not be decided on together. We have had years of counseling with multiple professionals. Frankly, I feel she ignores my opinions and concerns if I don’t agree with her position on an issue. She will commit to a compromise, then turn around and do what she wants anyway. Recently, she brought up having permanent eyebrow makeup done on an international trip she was taking without me. I asked her to wait until she returned so we could discuss it further before she jumped into it. Despite promising not to, she did it anyway, and I think it looks awful. I’m left feeling my trust in her has been further damaged and I

have a reminder of it staring me in the face on a daily basis. How can I trust her in the future? — DISGUSTED IN ARIZONA Dear Disgusted • If “years of counseling” haven’t worked for the two of you, I think it’s fair to conclude that you and your wife have a troubled marriage. While some might say that it’s your wife’s face and what she puts on it is her business, if a daily reminder of her broken promise to you is a deal-breaker, it may be time to consider whether you can forgive her or if it would be in everyone’s best interests to go your separate ways. In marriage there is supposed to be compromise. If you are staying because of your sons, take into consideration that because your relationship with your wife is dysfunctional, the tension your boys are exposed to on a daily basis is not healthy. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Broom is diferent. 2. Apron is longer. 3. Awning is not as wide. 4. Apron bow is added. 5. Doormat is added. 6. Ear is larger.

Dear Abby • Can you tell me why men watch porn? My husband watches porn on the computer at all hours of the night. When I found out about it six months ago, he promised he would stop doing it, but I just realized that he still goes online and watches it when I’m asleep at night and early in the morning. Our sex life has diminished to almost nothing. I considered blocking the site on his computer, but is that a good idea? Please help me. How can I compete with this? — FEELING DISRESPECTED

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

Striking the right teasing tone

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Hi, Carolyn • I am writing about a behavior common to a close relative and a friend. They notice something about someone and then “give them the business” about this flaw. You probably know this type of jovial person who will write this of as a normal part of being a close friend. The ones I know seem to be able to pull it of without seeming unkind. But I feel that if I poked fun at their flaws, I would end up sounding or being mean. Am I being too sensitive? Or can we both be right? — Wondering Answer • To your general point, I’ll say yes, you both can be right. There are definitely people who know how to get the tone (and humility) right, to tweak someone in a way that is clearly afectionate. And there are definitely people

who can’t strike that tone and whose “giving the business” just sounds opportunistic or mean, whether they mean it to or not. Most people probably belong in this second group. Good for you for having the self-awareness to put yourself there. I’d add a third group accordingly — the people who think they’re socially skilled and selfeffacing enough to poke goodnatured fun at others, but aren’t. But I’m wondering where being “too sensitive” comes in. If you mean that you don’t like how it feels to be on the receiving end of “the business,” then that supersedes any discussion of whether your close relative or friend has the personality to “pull it off.” Someone’s company is only as good as you deem it to be. You’re entitled to decide for yourself whether you enjoy someone’s character, sense of humor or dexterity with your flaws.

Dear Carolyn • My wife and I were married a year ago. We were surprised at the number of guests who never sent a gift. We now have a conundrum, because one of the guests has gotten engaged. We are certain to be invited to that wedding. How should we handle the gift question? — C. Answer • By renouncing, now and forever, any and all forms of beancounting. Please. You got married, yay for you! You had a wedding, yay for you! People you care about showed up to your wedding to let you know they care about you, too! That attitude isn’t just good for your soul; it’s also more polite. So for the soon-to-be bride and groom, think soul, not quid pro quo. Buy a gift if you feel moved. Write a thoughtful card regardless. tellme@washpost.com

9/20/17

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

CBS 4

Big Brother (N) (cc)

Salvation Darius makes final plans for the ark. (N) (cc)

NBC America’s Got Talent: Live Results Finale. Tyra The Good Place: Every5 Banks reveals the winner. (N) (cc) thing Is Great! (9:01) (N) (cc) PBS The Vietnam War: Resolve. Defying American 9 air power. (N) (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Arrow: Missing. Black Siren returns to help Chase. (cc)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

ABC The Gold- Speechless: Modern 30 bergs C-A-- CAMP. Family

ÍThe Vietnam War: Resolve. Defying American air power.

Supernatural The American and British hunters fight. (cc) Here’s Help The Lucy Show

American Designated Survivor: Housewife Brace for Impact. (cc)

MYTV Law & Order: Doped. A Law & Order Witness in Law & Order: Shotgun. 46 suspicious nasal spray. a murder trial is found Violent armed robbery. (cc) dead. (cc) (cc)

The Difference Is In The Detail!

Walter’s has an outstanding reputation for high quality jewelry and diamonds, with our knowledgeable staff and our excellent service. Purchasing a diamond from Walters Jewelry has never been more clear! Enjoy Digital Diamond Imaging!

We Buy...

9:30

FOX MasterChef: The Finale, Pt. 1; The Finale, Pt. 2. Fox 2 News at 9:00pm 2 The remaining chefs vie for the prize. (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

gold, platinum, silver, diamonds estate jewelry, coins & watches.

ESPECIALLY DIAMONDS TWO CARATS AND LARGER! Walters Jewelry Inc. • Four Generations • Since 1925 230 North Main St. St. Charles 63301

636-724-0604 or 636-946-7352 Mon & Fri 9am-7pm • Tues-Thur 9am-5:30pm • Sat 9am-5pm

www.waltersjewelryinc.com


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 09.20.2017

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Medical conditions can lead to low body temp FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • I am an 85-year-old female with an often low body temperature. I feel very warm, like I have a fever, but when I take my temperature it can be as low as 95 or 96. This has happened several times. I’ve heard that a low temp is just the same as a high fever. I take numerous medications, including for my thyroid, which my doctor has had trouble regulating. What do you think? Could this be related? My normal body temp seems to run about 97. — D.C.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

Answer • Normal body temperature varies, both during the day (morning temperatures are lowest), among people (normal values in young adults range from 96 F (35.6 C) to 100.8 F (38.2 C), and across ages, with older people tending to have lower body temperatures by 0.4 F (0.2 C). So, 97 F is not necessarily unusual. However, certain medical conditions can cause the temperature to be abnormally low. Low thyroid blood levels certainly can make temperatures lower, as can other endocrine abnormalities (especially diabetes, pituitary gland problems and adrenal insufficiency). Some people with chronic kidney disease have low temperatures. Some medications can affect body temperature; the most common are anti-psychotic medicines, barbiturates (almost never used anymore) and alcohol. There are very worrisome causes of low body temperature. Sepsis, a state of abnormal body equilibrium related to serious infection, can present with either fever or low body temperature, which probably is where you got the idea that low temperature is as bad as a fever. Of course, exposure to cold can cause low temperature (hypothermia), but that’s not what we are concerned about here. Hopefully your doctor will get your thyroid regulated, but if your kidney function is OK, you’re not taking any of the medications listed and you are feeling fine, it’s much more likely that this body temperature is normal for you rather than being a sign of a serious condition.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Readers • The booklet on abnormal heart rhythms explains the more common heart rhythm disturbances in detail. Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Roach Book No. 107 628 Virginia Dr. Orlando, FL 32803 Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6. Can. with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics