8.24.17

Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

THURSDAY • 08.24.2017 • $1.50

Wow Air will add service to St. Louis

HIS FATHER IS A JANITOR AT WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Now this Bosnian refugee will study there

Iceland’s budget airline offers $99 international flights BY LISA BROWN AND MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Iceland’s budget airline, Wow Air, said Wednesday it will begin serving St. Louis next spring, offering a lowcost way to get to its island home country and from there to Europe. Area leaders hailed the announcement as a key step forward for the region and St. Louis Lambert International Airport, which lost regular direct transatlantic service in 2003 when American Airlines ended flights to London. “St. Louis and the entire region benefit for leisure and business connections and St. Louis becomes a bigger destination for international tourists,” Mayor Lyda Krewson said. St. Louis is among four Midwest cities getting the new service, an expansion giving the budget carrier 12 U.S. destinations. The other cities with new service are Cleveland, Cincinnati and Detroit. Wow’s new routes will begin on See WOW • Page A6 PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

“I still cannot believe I’m going to Washington University. I’ve come a long way from Bosnia. This will change the trajectory of my life and the future for my family,” said Meris Saric, 18, who brought Bosnian and American flags Friday for his room.

Creve Coeur Lake ice rink project awaits federal OK

‘YOU SEE THESE BIG HALLWAYS AND YOU FEEL LIKE YOU’RE LIVING IN ONE OF THOSE MOVIE SCENES WHERE A KID IS TRYING TO BECOME A SUCCESS STORY — I’M TRYING TO WRITE THAT FOR MYSELF.’ Meris Saric

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY ASHLEY JOST • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T

A new multimillion-dollar ice rink complex that will serve as a new practice facility for the St. Louis Blues advanced Wednesday, though the project in Creve Coeur Lake Park still needs approval from a federal agency. The project has recently become controversial after advancing quietly for months, pitting the region’s hockey organizations against some environmental groups and park enthusiasts. The St. Louis Legacy Ice Foundation, which would operate the facility, argues the four-rink facility would provide much-needed practice and tournament space for youth and amateur hockey organizations.

ST. LOUIS

here’s still a picture that floats around the house of Meris Saric as a toddler wearing an adult-size Washington University sweatshirt that he got from his dad. But the photo and the sweatshirt have a new meaning to Saric, 18, now that he is all moved in for his freshman year on the campus he grew up admiring. His acceptance at the prestigious, private school means a little extra as a first-generation college student whose family’s time in St. Louis has been rooted deeply in the university. Saric’s dad has been a member of the campus housekeeping crew since 2001. A few other relatives work there, too. “You see these big hallways and you feel like you’re living in one of those movie scenes where a kid is trying to become a success story — I’m trying to write that for myself,” Saric said. Saric doesn’t take for granted getting into Washington U. As an infant, he and his family relocated to St. Louis from a Bosnian refugee camp where they lived a few years after the genocide in their home nation.

See REFUGEE • Page A7

“My son,” said Zuhdija Saric, who proudly puts his arm around his son, Meris Saric, while he was moving into his freshman dorm room on Friday.

See RINK • Page A8

A TALE OF TWO TRUMPS Within 24 hours, a pair of wildly different speeches BY JULIE BYKOWICZ AND JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

RENO, NEV. • It was a tale of two Trumps in AP

PHOENIX Tuesday rally in Arizona

TODAY

81°/61°

Ice breaker

MOSTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

81°/62° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER A19

the desert southwest. A day after a searing speech tearing into the media and members of his own political party, President Donald Trump returned to calls for unity and love as he spoke to veterans Wednesday at an American Legion conference.

Rosenthal injury leaves closer role vacant

“We are here to hold you up as an example of strength, courage and resolve that our country will need to overcome the many challenges that we face,” Trump told the veterans, speaking in measured tones and adhering to his prepared remarks. He said all Americans must learn the same work ethic, patriotism and devotion as veterans.

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

296

$

WeST CouNTY VolVo 636-200-2822 • www.wcvolvo.com

14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

per mo*

Wednesday speech in Nevada

• A5

State’s REAL ID compliance clarified

• A6

Sinclair defends proposed media deal

• A10

2017 VolVo S90 MoMeNTuM Lease for 36 months,

$

stk#18558

• A4

Probe into Hawley vote to be limited

2017 S60 DYNAMIC AWD Lease for 36 months,

RENO

See TRUMP • Page A8

Vigil honors transgender woman

SPORTS

AP

439

per mo*

1 M Vol. 139, No. 236 ©2017

2017 VolVo XC60 T5 AWD Lease for 36 months,

$

stk#18698

376

per mo*

stk#18994

*$1,998 Cash or trade due at signing due at signing plus, tax, title, license and dealer administrative fee. Total due includes $1650 cap cost reduction. Lease at 7,500 miles per year (additional miles are available). No security deposit with approved credit. Financing through VCFS. Expires 8/31/17. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


der

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

THURSDAY • 08.24.2017 • $1.50

Wow Air will add service to St. Louis

HIS FATHER IS A JANITOR AT WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Now this Bosnian refugee will study there

Iceland’s budget airline offers $99 international flights BY LISA BROWN AND MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Iceland’s budget airline, Wow Air, said Wednesday it will begin serving St. Louis next spring, offering a lowcost way to get to its island home country and from there to Europe. Area leaders hailed the announcement as a key step forward for the region and St. Louis Lambert International Airport, which lost regular direct transatlantic service in 2003 when American Airlines ended flights to London. “St. Louis and the entire region benefit for leisure and business connections and St. Louis becomes a bigger destination for international tourists,” Mayor Lyda Krewson said. St. Louis is among four Midwest cities getting the new service, an expansion giving the budget carrier 12 U.S. destinations. The other cities with new service are Cleveland, Cincinnati and Detroit. Wow’s new routes will begin on See WOW • Page A6 PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

“I still cannot believe I’m going to Washington University. I’ve come a long way from Bosnia. This will change the trajectory of my life and the future for my family,” said Meris Saric, 18, who brought Bosnian and American flags Friday for his room.

Creve Coeur Lake ice rink project awaits federal OK

‘YOU SEE THESE BIG HALLWAYS AND YOU FEEL LIKE YOU’RE LIVING IN ONE OF THOSE MOVIE SCENES WHERE A KID IS TRYING TO BECOME A SUCCESS STORY — I’M TRYING TO WRITE THAT FOR MYSELF.’ Meris Saric

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY ASHLEY JOST • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T

A new multimillion-dollar ice rink complex that will serve as a new practice facility for the St. Louis Blues advanced Wednesday, though the project in Creve Coeur Lake Park still needs approval from a federal agency. The project has recently become controversial after advancing quietly for months, pitting the region’s hockey organizations against some environmental groups and park enthusiasts. The St. Louis Legacy Ice Foundation, which would operate the facility, argues the four-rink facility would provide much-needed practice and tournament space for youth and amateur hockey organizations.

ST. LOUIS

here’s still a picture that floats around the house of Meris Saric as a toddler wearing an adult-size Washington University sweatshirt that he got from his dad. But the photo and the sweatshirt have a new meaning to Saric, 18, now that he is all moved in for his freshman year on the campus he grew up admiring. His acceptance at the prestigious, private school means a little extra as a first-generation college student whose family’s time in St. Louis has been rooted deeply in the university. Saric’s dad has been a member of the campus housekeeping crew since 2001. A few other relatives work there, too. “You see these big hallways and you feel like you’re living in one of those movie scenes where a kid is trying to become a success story — I’m trying to write that for myself,” Saric said. Saric doesn’t take for granted getting into Washington U. As an infant, he and his family relocated to St. Louis from a Bosnian refugee camp where they lived a few years after the genocide in their home nation.

See REFUGEE • Page A7

“My son,” said Zuhdija Saric, who proudly puts his arm around his son, Meris Saric, while he was moving into his freshman dorm room on Friday.

See RINK • Page A8

A TALE OF TWO TRUMPS Within 24 hours, a pair of wildly different speeches BY JULIE BYKOWICZ AND JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

RENO, NEV. • It was a tale of two Trumps in AP

PHOENIX Tuesday rally in Arizona

TODAY

81°/61°

the desert southwest. A day after a searing speech tearing into the media and members of his own political party, President Donald Trump returned to calls for unity and love as he spoke to veterans Wednesday at an American Legion conference.

Violence at vigil for transgender woman

Ice breaker

MOSTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

81°/62° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER A19

PAGE A4 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

“We are here to hold you up as an example of strength, courage and resolve that our country will need to overcome the many challenges that we face,” Trump told the veterans, speaking in measured tones and adhering to his prepared remarks. He said all Americans must learn the same work ethic, patriotism and devotion as veterans.

296

$

WeST CouNTY VolVo 636-200-2822 • www.wcvolvo.com

14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

per mo*

Wednesday speech in Nevada

Probe into Hawley vote to be limited

• A5

State’s REAL ID compliance clarified

• A6

Sinclair defends proposed media deal

• A10

Weaver strong in 6-2 win over Padres

2017 VolVo S90 MoMeNTuM Lease for 36 months,

$

stk#18558

RENO

See TRUMP • Page A8

2017 S60 DYNAMIC AWD Lease for 36 months,

AP

439

per mo*

• B1

2 M Vol. 139, No. 236 ©2017

2017 VolVo XC60 T5 AWD Lease for 36 months,

$

stk#18698

376

per mo*

stk#18994

*$1,998 Cash or trade due at signing due at signing plus, tax, title, license and dealer administrative fee. Total due includes $1650 cap cost reduction. Lease at 7,500 miles per year (additional miles are available). No security deposit with approved credit. Financing through VCFS. Expires 8/31/17. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


M 1 THURSDAY • 08.24.2017 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

THE BEST WAY TO GO IN TOWN

WHAT NETFLIX HIT AND MISSED ON ‘OZARK’

TIM MCCARVER’S CAREER, IN PHOTOS

From mock phone booths to homages to old-school video games and classic vintage lounges, here are the best public loos in the Lou.

Party cove? Summer flannel? Some natives weigh in on what did and didn’t ring true.

The former catcher enters the Cardinals Hall of Fame this Saturday.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

KTVI anchor Weigel heading home to Windy City for a job JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ANCHOR STEAM • After roughly three years in STL, Chicagoan-to-the-core Rafer “Rafe” Weigel has ankled KTVI (Channel 2) and is heading back to the Windy City. Weigel, who had been anchoring the 6 and 10 p.m. newscasts with Sandy Miller, has accepted an offer to move up to another Fox station, WFLD (Channel 32) in Chicago. Starting Sept. 1, Weigel will anchor the station’s 9 p.m. newscasts on Saturdays and Sundays, and work as a reporter on some weekday casts. “I would’ve loved to Weigel have stayed in St. Louis; it had become my home,” Weigel said in a telephone interview. “But the chance to go back to my hometown and report is a dream come true.” Before coming to St. Louis in 2014, Weigel had worked at WLS in Chicago as a weekend sports anchor. On a related note, Chicago television watchdog Robert Feder reported that WFLD’s main co-anchor Jeff Herndon is leaving the station at the end of this month. He said Weigel is a candidate to take Herndon’s seat. Weigel’s roots in Chicago run deep. His father, the late Tim Weigel, was a legendary WLS sportscaster in Chicago; and his mother, Kathy Worthington, is a former WGN-Radio news anchor. In a statement issued after several phone calls to KTVI, general manager

Campus entrance of Maryville University

Spencer Koch said of Weigel: “We were happy to give Rafer his first main news anchor opportunity. We thank him for his contributions to the station, and we wish him all the best,” the statement said. While KTVI honchos seemed reluctant to talk about the move, one sports website reporting Monday on University of Illinois football said that “Fox 32’s Weigel is ‘optimistic’” about the 2017 squad. FIELD CONDITIONS • Women in Missouri have a few things going in their favor when it comes to equality, except for education and health. In a list from personal finance website WalletHub, Missouri is No. 36 in the “Best and Worst States For Women’s Equality.” The rankings took into account three main categories: workplace environment, mainly checking the disparities in income and unemployment rates; education and health, focusing on collegeeducation attainment rates, math scores and affordability of doctor’s visits; and political empowerment, the disparity in the share of legislators at the national and state level. Missouri showed strong in two categories, No. 14 in workplace environment

and No. 15 in political empowerment. But the state was ranked next to last, No. 49, when it came to education and health. Illinois finished in third place overall, behind Hawaii and Nevada. The bottom five, from 46 to 50, were: Georgia, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Utah. Sally Barr Ebest of the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Danielle MacCartney of Webster University, Shannon R. Wooden of Missouri State University and Courtney Kisat of Southeast Missouri State University were part of the 14-member panel that compiled the list. GROWTH CHART • A national publication has listed Maryville University as an increasingly popular college choice. The school in Town and Country is ranked No. 3 when it comes to the fastest-growing private universities in the U.S., according to the Chronicle of Higher Education. School marketers note that Maryville’s enrollment almost doubled between 2005 and 2015, the time frame for the study. This fall, the projected student population is 7,800, 15 percent higher than last year. Also, the freshman enrollment is expected to be 12 percent higher. (The Post-Dispatch chronicled the ways Maryville is trying to attract and better serve students in a front-page story last month.) Finishing ahead of Maryville were Liberty University in Virginia and the University of the Cumberlands in Kentucky. Maryville was founded in 1872 and became a four-year university in 1923. Founded by the Religious of the Sacred Heart, the college’s ownership was transferred in 1972 to a lay board of trustees. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

BY ASHLEY LISENBY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A Hollywood film yet again finds itself responding to a social-media outcry over the casting of a Caucasian actor in a role that was originally Asian-American. British actor Ed Skrein this week joined the cast of the “Hellboy” reboot “Rise of the Blood Queen.” His character Ben Daimio is Japanese-American in Mike Mignola’s “Hellboy” comics, and many are objecting to the role not going to an Asian-American actor. The backlash follows previous “whitewashing” controversies including the castings of Emma Stone in “Aloha” and Scarlett Johansson in “Ghost in the Shell.” The film’s distributor, Lionsgate, declined to comment. Simon Cowell all wet for real this time • Simon Cowell has been left all wet by a joke he made at the expense of fellow “America’s Got Talent” judge Mel B. Cowell was giving his appraisal of an act that had a technical mishap during Tuesday’s live shows when he said it reminded him of Mel B’s wedding night, because it had a lot of anticipation but “not much promise or delivery.” The former Spice Girl flashed a shocked smile before dumping a cup of water on Cowell midway through the joke and storming off stage. The singer filed for divorce from Stephen Belafonte in March and won a restraining order against him in April after accusing him of emotional and physical abuse.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Singer Marshall Thompson is 75. Actress Ann Archer is 70. Actor Joe Regalbuto is 68. Actor Kevin Dunn is 62. Actor Steve Guttenberg is 59. Talk-show host Craig Kilborn is 55. Actress Marlee Matlin is 52. Actor Chad Michael Murray is 36. From news services

LOTTERY POWERBALL Wednesday: 06-07-16-23-26 Powerball: 4 Power play: 4 Estimated jackpot: $700 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 24-35-46-50-51 Mega ball: 7 Megaplier:4 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $37 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

CASEYVILLE • Caseyville police said

LOTTO Wednesday: 03-04-05-18-24-28 Estimated jackpot: $3.4 million SHOW ME CASH Wednesday: 16-29-33-34-39 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $50,000 PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 424 Evening: 901 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 2381 Evening: 5601

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

PHOTO COURTESY KTVI

Vandals have stolen headstones from the Caseyville Cemetery, police said Wednesday.

want to do something like that,” he questioned of the thieves. Five generations of his family are buried in the Caseyville Cemetery, Stephens said. He called the act of vandalism a “slap in the face” to anyone whose relatives are buried there. The cemetery doesn’t have a gate around it or a security system to monitor activity, only a driveway and signs advising people not to trespass, Stephens said. “It’s just a country cemetery,” he said.

“We never dreamed anything like this would happen.” But now that it has, Stephens said association members may meet to discuss potential security tactics. Anyone with information about the vandalism is asked to call Caseyville police at 618-344-2151. Ashley Lisenby • 314-340-8344 @aadlisenby on Twitter alisenby@post-dispatch.com

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Wednesday Midday: 01-18-25-38-41 Evening: 02-06-26-37-40 LOTTO Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $4.25 million PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 365 FB: 2 Evening: 174 FB: 7 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 1307 FB: 5 Evening: 4227 FB: 3

CORRECTIONS The ingredients list for the Corn Pudding Soufflé recipe in Wednesday’s Let’s Eat section should have included three tablespoons of butter.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business ...............A10 Editorial................ A14 Horoscopes...........EV2 Joe Holleman..........A2 Letters to editor ... A14 Obituaries............. A16

‘Hellboy’ casting prompts backlash over ‘whitewashing’

MULTISTATE GAMES

Thieves swipe headstones from Caseyville cemetery Wednesday that nine headstones are missing from a cemetery there. Police said in a Facebook post that they were notified of the theft in the last two weeks. The headstones are reportedly more than 100 years old. Robert Stephens, the cemetery association treasurer, said he learned of the vandalism Wednesday morning. He said cemetery groundskeepers were the first to notice the missing headstones and contacted police. Stephens said repeatedly he couldn’t understand why someone would want to take them. “There’s just no (monetary) value to those tombstones,” he said. “What would you do with it? It’s not like you could reuse it.” He said with tombstones as old as the ones missing much of the original inscriptions would be faded. In his 40 years serving on the volunteer cemetery board, Stephens said there have been instances of “light vandalism,” such as knocked over headstones that could easily be righted. But he said headstones have never been stolen from the cemetery before. “I’m totally puzzled. Why would they

PEOPLE

Pat Gauen ...............A3 Puzzles .................EV2 Sports calendar ......B2 Stocks ....................A11 TV listings .............EV3 Weather................ A19

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $8.92, Sunday-Friday $9.10, Monday-Friday $6.88, Thursday-Sunday $7.09, Sat-Mon $6.16, Fri-Sun $6.16, Sun-Mon $5.62, Sat-Sun Only $5.62, Sunday Only $4.09. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 03/26/17, 04/16/17, 05/21/17, 06/18/17, 07/16/17, 08/27/17, 09/17/17, 10/15/17, 11/23/17 12/24/17, 01/14/18, 02/18/18, 03/18/18, 04/15/18, 05/20/18, 06/24/18 and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888 homedelivery@post-dispatch.com To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222 Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

314-340-8664 STLtoday.mycapture.com

Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284 Local news, Business: Adam Goodman...........314-340-8258 Online: Bob Rose............................................... 314-340-8333 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

08.24.2017 • THURSDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A3

Hatred waxes, wanes but never seems to go away PAT GAUEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

My mother told me that as a child, in the 1920s, she could see from her house into a wooded hollow along LaSalle Street in Collinsville where Ku Klux Klan members on horseback sometimes burned torches in the night. That proximity left me with a lifelong presumption that the organized hate once literally in her backyard was probably always present, at least figuratively, in mine. But I was an experienced reporter, in 1982, before I got a firsthand look at the magnitude. It was a visit to the “Freedom Festival” about 100 miles east, at Louisville, Ill. A somber guard at the gate, wearing camouflage and toting an AR-15 rifle, listened through my open car window as I explained in gentler words that I was an invited guest of the racist nut who lived up the lane. In silent horror, I recognized that the song playing softly on my radio was “Ebony and Ivory,” a duet by Paul McCartney and

Stevie Wonder urging racial harmony. I tried to act casual as I hastily spun the volume down. My mission was to see if the semi-annual event really drew several thousand radicals for paramilitary maneuvers and a fresh infusion of hate. The unequivocal answer was yes. The organizer, Johnny Bob Harrell, accepted my visit because I worked for the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, a beacon of conservatism. “The best newspaper in America,” he declared to his minions as we sat for an interview. I wanted to retch. Globe editorials were right-wing but hardly to his extreme. I wondered if he realized how many of its news reporters held more enlightened views. Harrell was unashamed of vendors selling Ku Klux Klan robes and Nazi uniforms on the 55acre tract used by his self-styled Christian church. Communism was overtaking America, he warned, and promoting the heresy of mixing races. His followers appeared to be training to do something about it. I saw the kind of anti-government fervor that had flared in the same spot in 1961. He and followers had refused to hand over a Marine Corps deserter who took

refuge there to escape what Harrell described as rampant sin in the military. It ended when 24 FBI agents and 84 state troopers, using an armored truck, broke down the gate. Had the dozen or so defenders resorted to using the 100 rifles and 10,000 rounds of ammunition at their disposal, it would have been a Waco-liked massacre, even Harrell later acknowledged. He served four years in federal prison and then emerged as a mildly prominent white supremacist who appeared to be flying high when I showed up almost two decades later. It was a lot different when we met there one more time, in 1995. The last of the onetime millionaire’s money had been spent on his cause and on the consequences of unpaid taxes. His army of intolerance had moved on. The land was overgrown and its buildings dilapidated. The man who scorned big government told me with no recognition of irony that he subsisted on Social Security checks. He had finally repudiated the militancy of the KKK and Nazis, and cooled his fiery oratory if not its root feelings. Where once he might have raged against betrayal by an estranged daughter whose

husband was black, he quietly told me, “I hear he’s a nice man. But I still think it’s a mistake.” Harrell faded away and would be about 95 now if he’s still alive. His brand of politics, like his life, seems to follow a cycle of aggressive and passive periods that may be dictated by how much open hatred the public will tolerate at a particular moment. I watched from the periphery about 20 years ago when neoNazis rallied, with a permit, outside the Madison County Courthouse in Edwardsville. A modest crowd that seemed more curious than faithful listened as an array of angry speakers droned on, using a scratchy PA system even more defective than themselves. Then everybody peacefully went home. It was not Charlottesville, Va., although with the right spark at the right time it could have been. In these days of supercharged nationalism and buzzing bigots emerging like cicadas, there is plenty of kindling in my backyard of Southern Illinois, as most everywhere. The Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit national legal activist organization, currently tracks 917 U.S. hate groups. Those include the Loyal White

Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, in Clay County, Ill., which — I doubt coincidentally — had been Harrell’s base. The list includes two black separatist organizations: the New Black Panther Party, in Springfield, Ill., and the Nation of Islam, in East St. Louis. Also cited are the Aryan Nations Sadistic Souls, which are neo-Nazi motorcycle clubs in Taylorville, Ill., and Wood River. It is, of course, constitutional to espouse your own superiority, unless you also break the law. Metro East harbored a dandy example in the 1990s, when the feds infiltrated and prosecuted an antigovernment conspiracy. The nascent plot was to rob armored cars to finance terror, including bombings and poisoning water supplies. There also was a plan to shoot down Morris Dees, the Southern Poverty Law Center’s cofounder, at a speech at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Officials determined that the would-be killer took a gun there but turned back upon seeing metal detectors at the entrance. I heard no public support for those conspirators when they went to prison. I’m not so sure of what I’d hear if it happened again today.

Rock Hill pulls out of plan to consolidate fire command BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROCK HILL • The city of Rock

Hill has opted out of a group of St. Louis suburbs working to consolidate oversight of their fire protection services. For more than a year, city leaders have been in talks about a proposal to establish a unified command to oversee fire responses and prevention in Clayton, Maplewood, Richmond Heights, Rock Hill and Brentwood. The plan emerged from a report by an Oregon-based consultant, Emergency Services Consulting International, which calls for one chief to direct fire operations in the participating cities. Three deputy chiefs, three battalion commanders and two in-

spectors would fill the remaining leadership roles. But for the Rock Hill Board of Aldermen, the cost of implementing the plan was too high, according to City Administrator Jennifer Yackley. The board agreed unanimously in a work session last week to drop out of the plan for now, Yackley said. It became clear, according to Yackley, that the city could not carry out a long-standing promise to raise salaries for city staff as well as implement the plan. “We all still think a joint fire command is a good idea,” Yackley said. “But we just couldn’t do both and we had other priorities.” Approving the plan would have cost the city $175,000, or about $100,000 more than what Rock Hill currently pays for fire com-

mand staff, Yackley said. “For that money we would have gotten much more specialized leadership in different skill areas,” Yackley said. “And the departments respond to incidents together all the time anyway.” Asked if the plan was dead, Maplewood City Manager Marty Corcoran said, “No, it will come back.” He said he is confident that joint command will work for the remaining municipalities. “You had five cities in this, OK? One city dropped out, that changes the flavor,” Corcoran said. “We have to take a look at everything, and we don’t have those figures now.” Although the consolidation would save money in the long run, it is costly in the short term, he said.

“It wouldn’t save money to start with because nobody’s leaving. Everybody’s staying,” Corcoran said. Still, Corcoran said he believes the plan can work with just the remaining four cities. Clayton City Manager Craig Owens agreed. “While this is disappointing, the viability of this concept is potentially just as strong or stronger,” Owens said in a statement Wednesday. “These are the four largest departments and have the most compact geography. Rock Hill was the smallest city and the smallest fire department in our group.” The consultants, ESCI, put the annual cost of a combined management structure at $1.625 million. The cost would be subsidized by participating cities

through a formula that takes into account the size of coverage areas, average number of annual responses and other criteria. City managers and fire chiefs have not yet gathered to re-evaluate and adjust the plan based on Rock Hill’s decision, Owens said. City managers in Brentwood and Richmond Heights could not be reached for comment on the plan Tuesday. For Rock Hill’s part, city administrator Yackley said city leadership plans to reconsider joining a joint fire command in the future. “We are not saying no,” Yackley said. “We are saying not yet.” Post-Dispatch correspondent Kathie Sutin contributed to this report. Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

DIGEST JEFFERSON CITY > Greitens announces appointments • Gov. Eric Greitens announced three nominees for posts on the St. Louis and St. Louis County election boards. The governor appointed Gerre Kraemer, a Democrat, to the bipartisan St. Louis City Board of Election Commissioners. Kraemer, former deputy assistant Democratic director at the office, will replace Benjamin Phillips, also a Democrat. Greitens also named Sharon Buchanan-McClure, a Kirkwood Republican, to the bipartisan St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners, replacing Republican John Maupin. He also named Matt Potter, a University City Democrat, who will replace Democrat Richard Kellett. (Kurt Erickson) CRESTWOOD > City updates requirements for parking • Crestwood has adopted maximum allowed parking spaces for all future land uses. City planner Adam Jones said the approach is aggressive on the city’s part but the newly adopted comprehensive plan says there is an abundance of underused parking in Crestwood. “Too many of the parking spaces are empty 80 percent of the time,” Jones said at the Board of Aldermen meeting Tuesday night. This is particularly true along Watson Road. Parking for existing sites will not be affected. But future developers will be required to use some of what has become excessive space to add additional businesses or for green space, pedestrian use or other desirable uses, as determined by city staff and, ultimately, aldermen. The update of city parking requirements is the first since the 1980s. The parking ordinance was adopted after a public hearing that drew no speakers. Aldermen delayed action on a pending bill that prohibits trampolines, swing sets and similar items in residential front and side

yards. All members were for the law in general, saying it helps keeps unsightly land uses away. But they agreed that a provision should be added that addresses lots that have “two front yards,’ but little or no rear yard space. (Special to the PostDispatch) URBANA, Ill. > Power company puts drones to work • Ameren Illinois is using drones to detect power outages, inspect power lines and poles, and plan for construction projects. Ameren officials demonstrated the drones Tuesday in Urbana, The News-Gazette reported. The company has 36 drones and 18 trained pilots. Kyle Maxwell, the company’s superintendent of electrical operations and one of the licensed drone pilots, said a fully supplied drone and kit costs about $3,000. (AP) JEFFERSON CITY > Website set up to empower interns • There’s a new website aimed at providing sexual harassment resources to interns following past allegations of misconduct at Missouri’s Capitol. Advocacy groups on Wednesday announced the website, mointernnetwork. org. It has information on students’ rights, preparing for internships and how to identify harassment. The Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence and Partners In Prevention created the site following allegations that former Democratic state Sen. Paul LeVota sexually harassed interns, which he repeatedly denied. He resigned in 2015. Former Republican House Speaker John Diehl also stepped down in 2015 after admitting to sending sexually suggestive texts to an intern. House members and staff now must attend annual sexual-harassment training. Current Republican House Speaker Todd Richardson says the website will help ensure there’s a safe environment at the Capitol and other workplaces. (AP)

N O W

I N

P R O G R E S S !

30

TAKE AN EXTRA

%

off

ENTIRE STOCK

...of all permanently reduced merchandise in these areas: Ladies’ Swimwear • Ladies’ Sportswear • Ladies’ Dresses & Suits Juniors’ Apparel • Children’s Apparel & Shoes • Ladies’ & Men’s Shoes

40

TAKE AN EXTRA

%

off

ENTIRE STOCK

...of all permanently reduced merchandise in these areas: Ladies’ Accessories • Jewelry • Watches • Handbags Intimate Apparel • Men’s Apparel • Home

REWARDS

Earn points toward your choice of rewards when you use your Dillard’s Card. Visit dillards.com/payonline for more details. *Subject to credit approval. See store associate for details.


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Vigil honors woman killed after stabbing of officer BY ERIN HEFFERNAN AND NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LO U I S • LGBT groups held a communal grief session Wednesday night for a transgender woman authorities say was shot and killed by police after stabbing an officer. The police department has identified the person killed as a man, Kenny Herring, but family and friends have said Kenneth “Kiwi” Herring was born a man but identified as a woman. Morgan Hunlen, 23, was among several speakers at the gathering at the Transgender Memorial Garden at Vandeventer and Hunt avenues Herring in the Grove area. Hunlen said she didn’t know Herring but as a black transgender woman herself she felt certain that Herring, like her, had battled racism and “transmisogyny.” “It may have been the police that put the bullet in her but let me tell you right now it was a combination of all those things that broke her down,” Hunlen said. LadyAshley Gregory, who is a board member of Metro Trans Umbrella Group, organized the vigil. “Any time something like this happens we come together as a family,” Gregory said. About 100 people attended the candlelight event and several staged a protest march down Vandeventer afterward. At one point, a car drove through the march, causing minor injuries. A poster in memory of Herring and a “Stop Police Brutality” sign were taped Wednesday morning to the front of the two-family flat where Herring lived and was raising three boys, ages 2 to 8. The encounter between police and Herring began when officers responded to reports of a stabbing about 8 a.m. Tuesday at the flat in the 5200 block of Ridge Avenue, east of Union Boulevard, police said. Officers arrived to find a man, 30, suffering from serious stab wounds to his face, arms and torso, according to the department. The victim identified his attacker as Herring, police said. Officers tried to arrest Herring, who then stabbed an officer in the arm with a large kitchen knife, according to police.

LAW & ORDER KIRKWOOD > Suspect charged in double shooting • A 27-year-old Kirkwood man has been charged in a double-shooting early Wednesday in Kirkwood. A man and a woman were injured when someone opened fire as they sat in a car about Watkins 1:30 a.m. Wednesday. Police heard the shots at Gordon and Ohlman avenues, which is near Big Bend and Kirkwood roads, and found the victims. The victims told police who attacked them, and police then saw the suspect walking away from the scene, arrested him and found him with a gun believed to have been used in the shooting, according to a police press release. Later Wednesday, Joshua Watkins of the 300 block of Chicago Street was charged with two counts of

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

A car drives through a protest march on Wednesdayin the Grove neighborhood. The march followed a vigil staged in memory of Kenny “Kiwi” Herring, a transgender woman killed by police a day earlier.

The injured officer and his partner both fired their guns at Herring, who died at the scene. The injured officer was taken to a hospital, police said. He was treated and released, police said Wednesday. The man police say was stabbed in that initial attack was in serious but stable condition, police said. A motive in that attack hasn’t been released. Police said they arrested a 28-year-old woman named Kristy Thompson, who was charged with armed criminal action and assault. Police said she had “some involvement” in the initial knife attack on the first victim, but her role wasn’t immediately clear. A relative of Thompson, Crevonda Nance, said Thompson is a transgender man who was married to Herring. Nance said Thompson is the biological mother of the boys the pair were raising.

‘THAT CAN’T BE TRUE’

Herring’s family members say they are looking for answers. “That can’t be true what they’re saying,” said Herring’s nephew Nicholas Herring, who said he had close to a fatherson relationship with Herring. “Kenny was just kind, caring and hilarious.” Some family and friends said the couple had been harassed and felt threatened since they moved to the neighborhood from Mississippi several years ago. “Some people hated them because of their lifestyle,” said Krystle Purnell, Herring’s close friend and classmate. “But

first-degree assault, three counts of armed criminal action and one count of unlawful use of a weapon. His bail has been set at $250,000. Medical conditions of the victims were not available, but authorities said they were stable. Police have not released a possible motive in the shooting, but did say the suspect and victims knew each other and all lived in Kirkwood. ST. LOUIS > Knife, gun, hammer used in melee • A hammer-wielding attacker who hit a man in a threeway melee in a St. Louis home early Wednesday was himself injured when he fell on a glass table and cut his arm. The battle, which ended outside the home in the 3000 block of Ohio Avenue, also involved a gun and a knife, authorities say. Police give this account: Two men — one, 20, with a gun, and another, 23, with a hammer — attacked a third

Kenny was always Kenny, no matter what anyone thought.” Herring’s neighbor and friend Brooke Jones, however, said that she wasn’t aware of any neighbors harassing Herring. “They’ll talk their little talk but, at the end of the day, she’s heard it so many times she didn’t let it faze her,” Jones said. Jones said Herring was excited Monday night about a barbecue she was planning for her friends. Law enforcement now say the event may be connected to the dispute that resulted in the stabbing and the call for police. A small fire that caused minor damage to both the second- and first-floor porches at the twofamily flat started after charcoal from a barbecue pit on a secondfloor balcony fell out of the pit. Firefighters responded to the address shortly after 2 a.m. Tuesday. The small blaze was extinguished and firefighters didn’t notice anything unusual that would have made them alert police, according to the fire department. It wasn’t clear why police thought there could be a connection to the later stabbing. Interim Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole said that was part of the investigation. Jones said the description of the stabbing by police seemed out of character for Herring. “If you needed anything from Kiwi, she would give it to you,” Jones said. “She’d see my kids outside playing and she’d hand out popsicles, have barbecues, all that.” Kim Bell of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

man inside the home just after midnight. The man with the hammer hit the victim, 38. The victim tried to defend himself with a knife, and in the struggle, the man with the hammer fell on a glass table, “severely cutting

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

THEATER REVIEW

‘In the Heights’ shows us Miranda before ‘Hamilton’ ‘IN THE HEIGHTS’

BY JUDITH NEWMARK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When • Through Sept. 3 Where • .ZACK Performing Arts Incubator, 3224 Locust Street How much • $20-$25 More info • 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

R-S Theatrics is enjoying its biggest success ever with “In the Heights,” which has sold so well that artistic director Christina Rios added an extra performance. But that may not be enough to satisfy all the St. Louis theatergoers who want to see Lin-Manuel Miranda’s first Tony Award-winning musical. His second one, “Hamilton,” plays the Fox Theatre in April. No doubt excitement about “Hamilton” has spilled onto “In the Heights,” which played the Fox on tour in 2009. The show first gained attention for the way it incorporated rap into a musical-theater score and for its charismatic composer, lyricist and star (all Miranda). Now, with the massive success of “Hamilton,” “In the Heights” seems to burst with clues. Here we see Manuel’s raps and clever lyrics for the first time, his first orphaned hero, his fascination with multicultural America. Rios, who directs the R-S production of “In the Heights,” of course presents the show on its own terms. It’s a lively account of a few days around the Fourth of July in a tightly knit Dominican and Puerto Rican neighborhood at the tip of Manhattan. We focus on three small businesses — a bodega, a beauty salon and a car service, all with uncertain futures — and four young adults. Their futures are uncertain, too. In a cast almost too big for the .ZACK stage, three women stand out. Anna Skidis Vargas, as the canny salon owner, leads the ensemble in “Carnaval del Barrio,” a song-and-dance number packed with life. Cassandra Lopez, delicate and charming, shines as Nina, a brilliant young woman who’s back home with bad news: Overwhelmed by the demands of schoolwork plus two jobs, she’s lost her scholarship to Stanford. She hates to disappoint her parents (though she’ll upset them more when she falls in love with the “wrong” guy). And Carmen García comes close to stealing the show as Abuela Claudia, the heart of the neighborhood and also its memory. In a song in which Claudia recalls her life, “Paciencia y Fe,” García offers a thrilling performance. Claudia has mothered the whole neighborhood, but especially the orphaned young man

his arm,” according to police. The gunman fired shots, hitting the victim in the foot. The melee eventually spilled outside, and one of the gunshots hit a nearby home. No one there was injured. The victim and the man

who owns the bodega, Usnavi (Jesse Muñoz). His rapping, a high point of the show, is a bit hard to catch. So, for that matter, are many song lyrics and even the dialogue. Enunciation is not this cast’s forte. But it’s not a big problem; you can follow the relationships. Muñoz is especially effective when he shows Usnavi’s awkward side, trying to woo Vanessa (Natasha Toro), a beautiful hairdresser. Vanessa dreams of moving downtown to an apartment where the walls are brick “on purpose,” not because they’re dilapidated. Nina’s parents (Jaime Zayas and Maritza Motta-Gonzalez), who own the car service, are very supportive of her academic efforts, though it never occurs to them to look into Columbia University, Barnard College or any of the other places where she could get a top-notch education at home. They are much less understanding when she and Benny (Marshall Jennings) fall in love. Benny works for Nina’s father, who has always respected him. But Benny, who’s AfricanAmerican, doesn’t belong to their Latino world. Lopez and Jennings, two fine voices, share a romantic duet, “When the Sun Goes Down,” with more precision than feeling; they just don’t have much chemistry. Muños and Toro make a more persuasive couple, whether they’re flirting on the dance floor (“The Club”) or revealing feelings that they don’t know what to do with (“Champagne”). Under conductor Leah Luciano, the orchestra steams. But it also tends to sound too loud (a problem other musicals have encountered at the .ZACK). Rios’ affection for the material imbues every character onstage — and perhaps inspired choreographer Cecily A. King. The company includes performers with a range of dance experience (maybe none). But King makes them all come together, especially in the cellphone choreography for “Blackout.” It turns out those useful little things can even dance.

with the hammer were both taken to hospitals. Their conditions were not available, but police said they were stable. The gunman was found in the area by police, who arrested him.

Authorities did not say what triggered the attack, but said the men were known to each other. The investigation is ongoing.

77% OFF LABOR!

Receive a $200 Visa Gift Card with purchase! Plus, receive a $25 Gas Card with FREE in-home estimate!*

AVAILABLE WINDOWS AND MORE!

Easy to open, easy to clean!

Stay cool inside with Beldon Windows!

DOUBLE HUNG

CASEMENT

AWNING

SLIDING

BAY

BOW

PICTURE

SPECIALTY

CALL BEFORE AUGUST 31st!

(314) 754-8441 (314) (618)254-6003 744-1755

Gas card ($25.00) with in-home estimate to home owner(s). Limit one per household. Gas card with estimate is valued at $25.00. Visa gift card ($200.00) with purchase will be mailed after installation and payment in full. Minimum purchase required for $200 Visa gift card. New orders only. Payment options available with minimum purchase and approved credit. Other restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer or previous job. Exp 8/31/17.

T he Perfect Solution to the Outdated Kitchen Don’t Replace Reface Solid Wood W Refacing

20% OFF! on your full kitchen refacing

Custom countertops Limited time offer CaLL today

314-236-2841 618-207-2135


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

Vigil honors woman killed after stabbing of officer BY ERIN HEFFERNAN AND NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • LGBT groups held a communal grief ses-

sion Wednesday night for a transgender woman authorities say was shot and killed by police after stabbing an officer. The police department has identified the person killed as a man, Kenny Herring, but family and friends have said Kenneth “Kiwi” Herring was born a man but identified as a woman. Morgan Hunlen, 23, was among several speakers at the gathering at the Transgender Memorial Garden at Vandeventer and Hunt avenues in the Grove area. Herring Hunlen said she didn’t know Herring but as a black transgender woman herself she felt certain that Herring, like her, had battled racism and “transmisogyny.” “It may have been the police that put the bullet in her but let me tell you right now it was a combination of all those things that broke her down,” Hunlen said. LadyAshley Gregory, who is a board member of Metro Trans Umbrella Group, organized the vigil. “Any time something like this happens we come together as a family,” Gregory said. About 100 people attended the candlelight event and several staged a protest march down Vandeventer afterward. At one point, a car drove through the march, causing minor injuries. A poster in memory of Herring and a “Stop Police Brutality” sign were taped Wednesday morning to the front of the two-family flat where Herring lived and was raising three boys, ages 2 to 8. The encounter between police and Herring began when officers responded to reports of a stabbing about 8 a.m. Tuesday at the flat in the 5200 block of Ridge Avenue, east of Union Boulevard, police said. Officers arrived to find a man, 30, suffering from serious stab wounds to his face, arms and torso, according to the department. The victim identified his attacker as Herring, police said. Officers tried to arrest Herring, who then stabbed an officer in the arm with a large kitchen knife, according to police. The injured officer and his partner both fired their guns at Herring, who died at the scene. The injured officer was taken to a hospital, police said. He was treated and released, police said Wednesday. The man police say was stabbed in that initial attack was in serious but stable condition, police said. A motive in that attack hasn’t been released. Police said they arrested a 28-year-old woman named Kristy Thompson, who was charged with armed criminal action and assault. Police said she had “some involvement” in the initial knife attack on the first victim, but her role wasn’t immediately clear. A relative of Thompson, Crevonda Nance, said Thompson is a transgender man who was married to Herring. Nance said Thompson is the biological mother of the boys the pair were raising.

‘THAT CAN’T BE TRUE’

Herring’s family members say they are looking for answers. “That can’t be true what they’re saying,” said Herring’s nephew Nicholas Herring, who said he had close to a father-son relationship with Herring. “Kenny was just kind, caring and hilarious.” Some family and friends said the couple had been harassed and felt threatened since they moved to the neighborhood from Mississippi several years ago. “Some people hated them because of their lifestyle,” said Krystle Purnell, Herring’s close friend and classmate. “But Kenny was always Kenny, no matter what anyone thought.” Herring’s neighbor and friend Brooke Jones, however, said that she wasn’t aware of any neighbors harassing Herring. “They’ll talk their little talk but, at the end of the day, she’s heard it so many times she didn’t let it faze her,” Jones said. Jones said Herring was excited Monday night about a barbecue she was planning for her friends. Law enforcement now say the event may be connected to the dispute that resulted in the stabbing and the call for police. A small fire that caused minor damage to both the second- and first-floor porches at the two-family flat started after charcoal from a barbecue pit on a secondfloor balcony fell out of the pit. Firefighters responded to the address shortly after 2 a.m. Tuesday. The small blaze was extinguished and firefighters didn’t notice anything unusual that would have made them alert police, according to the fire department. It wasn’t clear why police thought there could be a connection to the later stabbing. Interim Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole said that was part of the investigation. Jones said the description of the stabbing by police seemed out of character for Herring. “If you needed anything from Kiwi, she would give it to you,” Jones said. “She’d see my kids outside playing and she’d hand out popsicles, have barbecues, all that.”

LAW & ORDER KIRKWOOD > Suspect charged in double shooting • A 27-yearold Kirkwood man has been charged in a double-shooting early Wednesday in Kirkwood. A man and a woman were injured when someone opened fire as they sat in a car about 1:30 a.m. Wednesday. Police heard the shots at Gordon Watkins and Ohlman avenues, which is near Big Bend and Kirkwood roads, and found the victims. The victims told police who attacked them, and police then saw the suspect walking away from the scene, arrested him and found him with a gun believed to have been used in the shooting, according to a police press release. Later Wednesday, Joshua Watkins of the 300 block of Chicago Street was charged with two counts of first-degree assault, three counts of armed criminal action and one count of unlawful use of a weapon. His bail has been set at $250,000. Medical conditions of the victims were not available, but authorities said they were stable. Police have not released a possible motive in the shooting, but did say the suspect and victims knew each other and all lived in Kirkwood.

Driver pushes car into protesters during march

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS > Knife, gun, hammer used in melee • A hammer-wielding attacker who hit a man in a three-way melee in a St. Louis home early Wednesday was himself injured when he fell on a glass table and cut his arm. The battle, which ended outside the home in the 3000 block of Ohio Avenue, also involved a gun and a knife, authorities say. Police give this account: Two men — one, 20, with a gun, and another, 23, with a hammer — attacked a third man inside the home just after midnight. The man with the hammer hit the victim, 38. The victim tried to defend himself with a knife, and in the struggle, the man with the hammer fell on a glass table, “severely cutting his arm,” according to police. The gunman fired shots, hitting the victim in the foot. The melee eventually spilled outside, and one of the gunshots hit a nearby home. No one there was injured. The victim and the man with the hammer were both taken to hospitals. Their conditions were not available, but police said they were stable. The gunman was found in the area by police, who arrested him. Authorities did not say what triggered the attack, but said the men were known to each other. The investigation is ongoing.

A car drives through a protest march on Wednesday in the Grove neighborhood. The march followed a vigil staged in memory of Kenny “Kiwi” Herring, a transgender woman killed by police a day earlier.

Several people suffer minor injuries in altercation on Manchester Avenue BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Police and a witness gave

differing versions of how protesters were injured when a driver pulled into a group that had blocked an intersection on Wednesday night. The witness, Keith Rose, said the driver had his middle fingers raised before he accelerated through the group of people who were blocking Manchester Avenue and Sarah Street in the Grove neighborhood. But St. Louis police said the driver stopped, honked and attempted to drive around the protesters before some of them surrounded his car and began hitting it with their hands and a flag pole. The police statement, from spokeswoman Schron Jackson, said that three protesters were injured after they jumped onto the car and fell off when the driver pulled away. Jackson said the driver was taken into custody about a block from the intersection after initially refusing to stop for officers. She said the incident was captured on video. Both police and Rose characterized the injuries as minor. Rose, who was among the protesters, said he could see the driver of the car as it made its way down Manchester

Avenue. He said the driver at one point stopped the car for a few seconds before accelerating gradually and driving into the group. Rose said that a protester was thrown over the hood of the car by the impact and others were hit by the car. The people in the street had begun a march after a vigil that had been held nearby. They were holding candles in the intersection when the car approached. Rose said other drivers had turned off onto side streets rather than driving through the group. Police later closed off the intersection. The march ended shortly after the incident. The vigil that preceded the march was set up to honor Kenny “Kiwi” Herring, who was fatally shot by St. Louis police officers a day earlier. Police said Herring had used a knife to attack officers who had responded to a report of a stabbing. One officer was wounded. Friends and family say Herring was a transgender woman who, along with her partner, felt threatened by neighbors. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

77% OFF LABOR!

Receive a $200 Visa Gift Card with purchase! Plus, receive a $25 Gas Card with FREE in-home estimate!*

AVAILABLE WINDOWS AND MORE!

Easy to open, easy to clean!

Stay cool inside with Beldon Windows!

DOUBLE HUNG

CASEMENT

AWNING

SLIDING

BAY

BOW

PICTURE

SPECIALTY

CALL BEFORE AUGUST 31st!

(314) 754-8441 (314) (618)254-6003 744-1755

Gas card ($25.00) with in-home estimate to home owner(s). Limit one per household. Gas card with estimate is valued at $25.00. Visa gift card ($200.00) with purchase will be mailed after installation and payment in full. Minimum purchase required for $200 Visa gift card. New orders only. Payment options available with minimum purchase and approved credit. Other restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer or previous job. Exp 8/31/17.

Kim Bell of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

T he Perfect Solution to the Outdated Kitchen Don’t Replace Reface Solid Wood W Refacing

20% OFF! on your full kitchen refacing

Custom countertops Limited time offer CaLL today

314-236-2841 618-207-2135


LOCAL

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A5

Probe into Hawley vote will be limited Inquiry will not include whether he is complying with the state law on residency BY KURT ERICKSON st. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • An investigation into whether it was legal for Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley to cast a vote in Boone County in the Aug. 8 election will not include an inquiry into whether he is complying with a state law requiring him to reside in Jefferson City. Boone County Clerk Taylor Burks said his probe will focus only on whether the first-term Republican is qualified to vote in Boone County, based on property ownership and other documents that would prove his residency. Burks launched an investigation into Hawley’s vote after receiving a complaint from a Columbia, Mo., woman raising concerns about the attorney general’s residence. Questions about Hawley’s residence were first raised in a Post-Dispatch article in January after Hawley said he would be living in his home south of Columbia, rather than in Jefferson City. State law, however,

gibility of voting in Boone County, where he voted in a special election to replace a local state lawmaker. He said he cannot make a determination on the residency requirement, which is contained in Section 27 of Missouri statutes. “My office has no authority to investigate Section 27 of the statutes,” Burks said Wednesday. The investigation comes as Hawley is considering a bid for U.S. Senate against incumbent Democrat

says the attorney general “shall” reside at the seat of government, which is in the capitol city. Hawley later relented and announced he was renting an apartment in Jefferson City. In her complaint, Margaret Booker said she hoped the investigation would settle the attorney general’s residency requirement. But Burks said by law, his investigation can only determine Hawley’s eli-

Claire McCaskill. McCaskill weighed in on the residency issue last week during a visit to Warrensburg, Mo., according to the Kansas City Star. “The law’s pretty clear. There’s never been an attorney general in the history of our state that hasn’t lived in Jefferson City because the law says ‘shall.’ Listen, I’m a Mizzou-educated lawyer, but I can keep up and I know what the word ‘shall’ means in the law,” McCaskill said.

“And I know he went to Yale, I think, or Harvard — one of those, one of those fancy ones — I think they taught him the same thing that shall means shall,” McCaskill said of Hawley, who obtained his law degree from Yale University. “So if it’s shall then you must live in Jefferson City … so there’s a problem here,” McCaskill said. “Either he’s violating the law by not living in Jefferson City or he’s violating the law by voting in some place

he doesn’t live. One of the two.” Hawley has until Sept. 20 to respond to Burks’ letter. If he does not provide the requested material, Burks said he would use information and records obtained by his office to make a determination in the case. A Hawley spokesman could not immediately be reached for comment. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

now through labor Day!

R O D B A A Y L e r P FLOORING

Greitens fills rest of Board of Education openings

SALE

BY KRISTEN TAKETA st. Louis Post-dispatch

Gov. Eric Greitens has added two members to the Missouri Board of Education, half of which is now composed of appointments he made. Greitens announced Wednesday that he has appointed Claudia Oñate Greim of Kansas City, a self-identified Democrat, and Doug Russell of Lebanon, a Republican, to the State Board. Greim works as compliance counsel for an insurance brokerage firm, Lockton Cos. Russell is president of Durham Co., which designs and sells electrical utility products. The State Board accredits public school districts, sets state academic performance standards, approves new charter schools, hires the state education commissioner and more. State law forbids members of any one political party from comprising more than half of the eight spots on the State Board. With Greitens’ new appointments, the State Board contains four Republicans, while he says Greim is one of three Democrats. But Federal Election Commission records show that Greim donated $250 to Republican Mike Sullivan of Massachusetts as he was running for the U.S. Senate in 2013. At the time, Greim was working at the Ashcroft Law Firm, which was founded by John Ashcroft, a Republican and former U.S. Attorney General under George W. Bush. Parker Briden, a spokesman for Greitens, said in an email that Greim was appointed as a Democrat in 2006 to the Missouri Housing Development Commission. “Ms. Greim applied to our office as a Democrat. She is a Democrat,” Briden said. Earlier this month, Greitens was criticized by some in the political realm on similar grounds for his appointment to the state school board of Melissa Gelner, who says she is an independent. Her husband, Brian Gelner, had contributed $500 to Greitens’ gubernatorial campaign last year. Greitens also appointed Republican Eddy Justice to the board this month. The new board appointments are awaiting Senate confirmation.

Pay No Tax!

**

15 Months Free Financing!*

Top of the Line Textured Solid or ANSO Carpet Tonal Plush Nylon 99 99 Reg. Reg. 499 Reg. 7 6 sq. ft. sq. ft. sq. ft.

2 3 5 Now

Now

Now

$ 89 $ 99 $ 99 sq. ft.

sq. ft.

sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad AND Installation

Includes 8 lb Pad AND Installation

Includes 8 lb Pad AND Installation

Removal of regular carpet and furniture moving FREE!

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

ELLISVILLE

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

SOUTH COUNTY

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

CREVE COEUR

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

Regency Plaza (Bogey Rd., West of 94)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

STORE HOURS FRI 9-9 • SAT 9-6 SUN 12-5 • MON 9-9

Sales Ends

6pm Labor Day! www.EdwardsCarpet.com

*Previous sales excluded. On Approved Credit,1/3 deposit required, minimum payment. See Store for full details. ** Sales tax will be added to sale and then a discount equal to the sales tax will be deducted. Free pull up applies only to carpet purchase.


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

Greitens clarifies state REAL ID compliance Missouri will likely need a waiver for 2018 deadline BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Gov. Eric Greitens said Wednesday that Missourians will be able to board airplanes using their current state-issued driver’s licenses in January. But the Republican chief executive’s own administration says it hasn’t yet launched the process to actually make that happen. In a potentially confusing moment for travelers, Greitens’ remarks came during a Facebook Live video streaming event Wednesday morning. Among a handful of questions taken over the course of the 20-minute exchange was one from a viewer named

Sandy, who asked whether the state has resolved a long-running dispute with the federal Department of Homeland Security over compliance with the federal REAL ID law, which requires enhanced security features in state driver’s licenses. Missouri lawmakers have balked at complying with the 2005 law over privacy concerns, but in May approved legislation designed to put the state on track toward compliance under the threat of residents not being able to fly using their state-issued IDs after Jan. 22, 2018. Greitens signed the law in June. “The short answer, Sandy, is, ‘Yes, you can fly in 2018 with a Missouri driver’s license,’” Greitens said during his Facebook appearance. “I signed the Real ID bill so now you can use your Missouri driver’s license. You’re going to be able use it to fly. “That problem has been solved,” he said.

But Michele Gleba, a spokeswoman for the Department of Revenue, told the PostDispatch that the issue over air travel has not been resolved. The new state law doesn’t go into effect until Aug. 28. “The department will begin working with the DHS on Aug. 28 to determine any further action required for additional extensions and the certification requirements for full compliance of REAL ID,” Gleba said. In an earlier email, Gleba said, “The January 2018 deadline for air travel still exists, but the Department of Revenue will apply for another extension prior to that date.” Passage of House Bill 151 may be considered enough progress by the federal government to warrant a waiver allowing people to fly while the state begins the process of offering enhanced driver’s li-

censes that are compliant. That, said Gleba, could take until 2019. “Several internal and external processes will need to be changed or upgraded to obtain certification, and that process is expected to take at least 18 months,” she noted. Greitens’ spokesman later issued a clarification of his statement. “The Department of Revenue will be able to apply for a waiver on Aug. 28, and we are confident that with the steps we are taking to bring Missouri into compliance, Missourians will be able to travel with a Missouri ID in 2018,” Parker Briden said in an email. For now, travelers could avoid any potential hang-ups in airports in January by obtaining a U.S. passport. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

How does your garden grow? Jim Ortmann rakes a garden bed on Quincy Street at South Broadway under a mural by Matthew Skinner on Wednesday. Ortmann and neighborhood resident Dennis Potter tend the garden where they grow flowers in addition to tomatoes, peppers and cantaloupe. “We’re just sitting around watching the vegetables grow,” said Ortmann, long after spring planting. Most of their harvest is donated to area churches and food banks. Skinner’s mural is the fifth of the “Murals on Broadway” public art program.

ROBERT COHEN rcohen@post-dispatch.com

$800,000 in incentives credited with landing Wow flights in, out of St. Louis WOW • FROM A1

May 17. Tickets went on sale Wednesday. From St. Louis, Wow is offering a $99 flight to Keflavik International Airport outside the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik and $149 connecting flights to Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Dublin, Frankfurt and Paris. To help sign up Wow, St. Louis area governmental agencies offered $800,000 in incentives to help market the new route plus a waiver of landing fees for 18 months that could amount to $392,000. Sheila Sweeney, who heads the citycounty St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, said at an airport news conference Wednesday that $600,000 in incentives will come from the St. Louis County Port Authority and $200,000 from Lambert. Wow made a two-year commitment and will fly out of Lambert’s Terminal 2, which hosts the airport’s dominant carrier, Southwest Airlines. Sweeney and Airport Director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge said they hope the Wow flights will spur other airlines to begin international service here. Hamm-Niebruegge said surveys indicate that about 300 travelers to Europe already use Lambert each day and “we believe that this will drive additional traffic.” Wow Air’s announcement came just a few weeks after Lambert lost out to Nashville, Tenn., on landing a new British Airways connection to London.

However, Sweeney said, local officials are still talking with that airline about future expansion. As for the Wow connection to Europe through Iceland, Sweeney said affordability of flights is a key attraction. “For businesses, that’s a huge reason,” she said. As an ultra-discount airline, Wow manages to keep ticket costs low by charging for all sorts of extras. Expect to pay more for large carry-on luggage, for extra leg room and food. Prices vary depending on the date of the flight, destination and whether it includes a return trip. A round-trip ticket from St. Louis to Paris next May, for example, cost $499.98 for “basic” service that includes the ticket and one personal item. For $690.50, the same flight would also include a carry-on bag and a checked bag. A business ticket, for $891.84, would offer cancellation protection, an in-flight meal, extra legroom and priority boarding, in addition to a carry-on bag and a checked bag. The flight would include a layover in Iceland for a little over an hour. “We only charge what you use,” Wow founder and CEO Skúli Mogensen told the Post-Dispatch in a telephone interview. Mogensen started the airline in 2011 after working in technology and the telecom industry. In addition to lower prices, his airline’s philosophy is to offer better communication with travelers in a fun environment. The company’s name and signature color

SAVE 1,500 $

on its fleet, bright purple, are intended to make the airline stand out. “We wanted to make flying fun again,” Mogensen said. “I do believe the airline industry can be improved significantly.” The airline has had three consecutive years of profitability and is growing destinations faster than the company originally anticipated, he said. Wow’s fleet of 17 aircraft includes Airbus A320, Airbus A321 and Airbus A330 models, and the company began service in North America in 2015. Wow will begin here with four flights a week each way, on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. That could increase based on demand, Mogensen said. “St. Louis, we think it’s underserved,” Mogensen said. Some Wow passengers opt to spend a day or more in Iceland before traveling elsewhere in Europe, he added. A majority of Wow passengers are lei-

sure travelers but the airline has grown a following among business people. “As we establish ourselves, we’re seeing more and more small and midsize businesses” fly on Wow, Mogensen said. Kitty Ratcliffe, president of the regional Convention and Visitors Commission, called the Wow announcement “incredible news for our tourism industry” because it will be easier for travelers from Europe to get here. She added that it shows that “great things happen when people work together.” Hamm-Niebruegge said the $600,000 in incentives from the county port authority was a key. Lambert is owned and operated by the city. Referring to the port authority contribution, County Executive Steve Stenger called it “a smart investment.” Lisa Brown • 314-340-8127 @lisabrownstl on Twitter lbrown@post-dispatch.com

SAVE YOUR HAIR It’s Never Too Late!

Laser Hair Therapy is the Latest Technology to Help Slow the Process of Further Hair Loss and Restore Your Hair to a Healthier, Fuller Condition. Find out WHY you are losing your hair and what options WILL WORK for YOU! Call and Schedule Your FREE MICROSCOPIC HAIR AND SCALP EVALUATION TODAY

ON THE “NEW STYLE” METAL ROOF

• PRP – Platelet Rich Plasma • Laser Hair Therapy • Hair Restoration • ARTAS® Robotic FUE Hair Transplants

NEVER REPLACE YOUR ROOF AGAIN!

A select number of homeowners in the area will be given the opportunity to have a lifetime Erie Metal Roofing System installed on their home at a reasonable cost. Call today to see if you qualify for these great savings.

Don’t miss this opportunity to save! Call Now!

314-802-4135 618-215-7382

Ne New orders ders only. Minimum purchase required. Other restric restrictions may apply. Offer expires 8/31/17.

SAVE YOUR HAIR AND YOUR MONEY! FREE HAIR AND SCALP EVALUATION

40% OFF SALE

GOING ON NOW!

Restrictions Apply. Offer Good for Non-Medical Solutions Only Expires 8/31/17 PLEASE MENTION COUPON WHEN SCHEDULING APPOINTMENT

618-215-7398 314-236-9884

Technology Meets the Art of Hair Restoration!


LOCAL

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

Deputy sues, says he wasn’t promoted because he’s white BY CHRISTINE BYERS st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A white St. Louis sheriff’s deputy has sued the department and the sheriff alleging that he was passed over for a promotion to sergeant twice for lessqualified black candidates. John Castellano III, who is white, alleges in the lawsuit filed this week that Sheriff Vernon Betts, who is black, deviated from his own promotional policy to promote two black deputies to the rank of sergeant over Castellano. Betts, a Democrat, took office in January for a four-year term after winning election in November. His Republican opponent in that election: Castellano. In a statement released Wednesday, Betts spokesman Gregg Christian said the department doesn’t comment on pending legal actions, but implied Castellano’s suit is fueled by resistance to reform of the department. “Broadly speaking, the sheriff campaigned, and was elected, on a platform of reforming a deeply dysfunctional department,” the statement said. “Sheriff Vernon Betts is committed to progressive reform and expects this type resistance to the status quo in city government.” Castellano has been with the department since 1998, and applied for a promotion in September or October 2016, according to the lawsuit. “At the first roll call after his election, Betts announced that all racists that are still here need to leave and don’t (expletive) with” Betts, the lawsuit says. Promotions to the rank of sergeant and above are filled from eligibility lists based on written or oral tests, performance evaluations and the evaluation of training and experience of the candidates or any combination thereof. Those lists then stay in effect for two years, according to the lawsuit. To become a sergeant, a deputy must have five years of experience. In April, Betts promoted a black deputy to the rank of sergeant, though the deputy did not have five years of experience, according to the lawsuit. In July, Betts promoted another deputy to sergeant without using the competitive testing process, the lawsuit alleges. Betts also made his brother a supervisor, the suit says. Castellano’s attorney, Lynette Petruska, has made headlines recently for two settlements she has reached on behalf of white St. Louis police officers who have alleged they, too, were passed over for promotions because of their race. The same firm represents a black officer who said she was denied a promotion because of her gender. That case is pending.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A7

Bosnian refugee will be first member of his family to attend college

PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

“This part of campus reminds me of Bosnia,” said Meris Saric, as he walks back through an area known as “The Spine” on the south forty campus back to his dormitory on Friday.

“We have it all planned out. He’s running for president and I am running for vice president,” said Meris Saric (right), who talks with his roommate Tyrin Truong, as they move into their dorm room on Friday at Washington University.

REFUGEE • FROM A1

“I’m going to be the first kid in my family to go to college, and not just any college — WashU,” Saric said. He moved into his dormitory, Park House, last week. A graduate of Bayless High School, he is one of six freshmen at Washington U. this fall who came through the first group of College Prep Scholars. The three-year-long scholars program was created at Washington U. with private donations to give mostly first-generation, low-income students and their families a better understanding of all things college. High schoolers and their parents learn about everything from how to fill out financial aid documents to time management. The other incoming Washington U. students from the prep program graduated from St. Louis Public Schools, the Hazelwood School District and the Ladue School District, according to Leah Merrifield, director of the College Prep program. Other students from this first group

n o d e v o l a r o u Have yo

e

?

H T I W D E S O N G A I D N E BE IA

N E R H P O Z I H C S

GN EEN DIA HAVE B EN T. T A H T E T R E AT M R T H OS UDY FO EEK IN G N E W T S H C AR ES A RESE AND AR THERE ISHIZO PH R ENIA C WIT H S

MUST: E N O , Y F I TO QUAL Ages 18-55 we e n - B e B et w it h gnosed ia D e B r e n ia S c h iz o p h B ip o la r ly. - N ot b e m ay a p p ia r e it r c - O the r

UNTEERS L O V D E I QUALIF EIVE: Travel MAY REC for Time &

OSED

of college freshmen are headed off to schools like Duke University, Morehouse College, Truman State University, the University of Missouri-Columbia and Missouri State University, among others. Merrifield said 98 percent of students are the first in their family to go to college, and the average family income of participants is $30,000 a year. There were 25 students in Saric’s college prep group, but interest — and competition — for the program has started to boom four years later. For Saric, it all started when someone at Gateway STEM High School suggested he check out the program. He spent his freshman year at Gateway STEM before moving to the Bayless School District. When it came time to apply, after he was formally nominated, Saric wrote his essay about how being a first-generation college student would affect his family. Students start the program the summer between their freshman and sophomore years of high school. They live on campus two to three weeks, working on their writing skills and taking a STEMfocused class, as well as a seminar worth college credit. “I thought at first it would be boring summer school,” Saric joked. “It caught me by surprise.” One of his seminars was taught by Washington U.’s provost, Holden Thorp. That made an impression on Saric. “For me, personally, sitting in front of him I was like, ‘How in the world did I get to be taught by someone like this?’” he said. Saric speaks about overcoming self-

st nsation at No Co - C omp e e r a C d R e la te - Stud y

doubt. He contemplates what others might think of him as he walks on his new campus. People might assume he comes from an affluent background, able to pay the almost $70,000 in tuition, room and board. “If they ask, I’d tell them if (my parents) saved every single penny they couldn’t afford one semester at WashU. One year would have been — there’s no way,” he said. Between scholarships from the College Prep program and being a child of an employee, Washington U. was actually Saric’s least expensive option. And his family couldn’t be more proud. Saric’s father took a break from work to help move his son into his dorm last week. “There are professors’ kids going here … They’re going to know what to expect, they know what it takes to get into college,” Saric said. “My dad made a joke that, ‘I work here, too, and I have affiliations,’ but he was joking. He realized he couldn’t help me like some of the other kids here with connections. That set a fire in me.” Saric is excited to build a legacy for his family, pursuing a political science degree and possibly, later, a law degree. “Meris is a great example, a representative sample, of a St. Louis kid in the College Prep program,” Merrifield said. “He’s gained so much confidence and knows that he is supposed to be here.” Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

Where Qualit uality Counts... Since 1977

ONE IS D E V O L R YOUR ONTACT IF YOU OTED, PLE ASE CTANTS INTERES ARE CONSUL 3-7388 0 PSYCHC T 314-6 N. A H C R RESE A RE INFORMATIO FOR MO

50% OFF

INSTALLATION on SUNROOMS

* Savings off retail pricing. Minimums apply, Not valid on previous sales. Cannot be combined with other offers. Financing offer for those who qualify. Call for details. Expires 9/30/17.

Call Now For Your Free Estimate

314-236-9883

618-215-7381


NEWS

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THURSDAY • 08.24.2017

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

Voids in nation’s moral leadership We could use some historical context, conciliation and efforts to dress open wounds CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • After ESPN announced it had pulled Asian-American football broadcaster Robert Lee from a University of Virginia football game in the aftermath of violence in Charlottesville over a statue of Robert E. Lee, this thought arose: What would the Entertainment and Sports Programming Network have done had there been a similar state of hyperhistorical sensitivity when Coach (Mike) Sherman of the Green Bay Packers prepared his team to try to defeat Atlanta in the 2002 NFL playoffs? If you know your history, you know that first Sherman-Atlanta matchup ended in a city ablaze. Had ESPN been around, how might it have handled Coach (Bud) Grant of the Minnesota Vikings drafting a quarterback named Bob Lee in that racially charged, anti-war year of 1968? (That Bobby Lee — an Ohioan by birth and nicknamed “The General” — later played for Atlanta, which sportswriters and broadcasters at the time had field days with). The point is not to belittle controversies over statues and the national anthem involving race, history and heritage that have erupted around the country this summer. Marches over statues honoring Confederate generals and NFL players kneeling or sitting during the national anthem are what happens in a self-governing republic with First Amendment speech protections and a long history interwoven with greatness and courage, as well as the scourges of slavery and race-based violence. What does such a country put on a pedestal? No one — not political leaders, and not a cable media that financially and rhetorically lives off conflict — seems to be investing in a sober assessment of that question.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Residents and visitors look over the covered statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday. The move to cover the statues is intended to symbolize the city’s mourning for Heather Heyer, killed while protesting a white nationalist rally this month.

At a time when the nation could use context, conciliation and concerted efforts to dress reopened wounds, the opposite is happening. President Donald Trump — to the delight of his supporters, and to the anger of his detractors — jumped into the burning landscape by asking if George Washington statues are safe in America. In Trump’s defense, that has become more than a rhetorical question. But it is not the essential one. Instead of cooling this hot summer, Trump’s reaction to the violence and death earlier this month in Charlottesville, Va., home of the University of Virginia, has inflamed a national war of words on race, leadership, and — in soapboxes like Don Lemon’s on CNN — Trump’s mental

Within 24 hours, Trump delivers a pair of wildly different speeches TRUMP • FROM A1

The messaging zigzag appears to reflect the president’s real-time internal debate between calls for moderation and his inclination to let loose. Trump had opened his Tuesday rally in Phoenix much the same way — but quickly erupted in anger, blaming the media for the widespread condemnation of his response to violence at a Charlottesville, Va., protest organized by white supremacists. At the Phoenix rally, he read from his three responses to the racially charged violence, becoming more animated with each one. He withdrew from his suit pocket the written statement he’d read the day a woman was killed by a man who’d plowed a car through counterprotesters, but he skipped over the troublecausing part that he’d freelanced at the time: his observation that “many sides” were to blame. That, as well as his reiteration days later that “both sides” were to blame for the violence that led to the death of Heather Heyer and two state troopers, prompted Democrats and many Republicans to denounce Trump for not unmistakably calling out white supremacists and other hate groups. The president awoke Wednesday still thinking about the rally, as evidenced by his Twitter account. “Last night in Phoenix I read the things from my statements on Charlottesville that the Fake News Media didn’t cover fairly,” he wrote. “People got it!” By the time he arrived at the American Legion conference, Trump seemed more congenial. He even thanked Sen. Dean Heller, a Nevada Republican with whom he has openly and repeatedly feuded. He discussed his early efforts to restructure and improve the Veterans Administration. Later in the speech, Trump said Americans aren’t defined by the color of their skin, the size of their paycheck or their political party. “Our hearts beat for America. Our souls fill with pride every time we hear the national anthem,” Trump said. “This is the spirit we need to overcome our challenges.” When Medal of Honor recipient Donald Ballard joined the president on stage and offered praise for Trump, saying the president would “drain the swamp” of Washington, Trump smiled and tipped his hand that he was indeed being restrained. “That was very risky,” Trump told the veteran. “I didn’t know what was going to happen.” But Trump wasn’t able to stick to his unity theme Tuesday night. His broadside against the media, and the “fake news” that he says is out to get him, was one of several detours he took from remarks prepared for the Phoenix rally. Trump unabashedly acknowledged that his own advisers had urged him to stay on message, and that he simply could not. Trump’s diatribe against the press wasn’t in his prepared remarks, according to two people familiar with the plan but

not authorized to speak publicly about the president’s decision. The president had told aides that he planned to speak on “unity,” but launched into a lengthy, meandering and angry denunciation of the press, complete with a furious relitigation of his remarks about Charlottesville once he reached the podium. He also suggested he intends to pardon former Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who is awaiting sentencing in Arizona after his conviction in federal court for disobeying court orders to stop his immigration patrols. After whipping up the crowd about Arpaio, he said he wanted to avoid “controversy” by not speaking about the pardon, but added: “I’ll make a prediction: I think he’s going to be just fine.” Trump skewered both of Arizona’s Republican senators, insisting that his coy refusal to mention their names showed a “very presidential” restraint. He said his aides had begged him, “Please, please Mr. President, don’t mention any names. So I won’t.” Yet he’d clearly described Sen. John McCain as the reason Congress didn’t repeal and replace the much-maligned Affordable Care Act, and he labeled Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake as “weak” on law enforcement and immigration. He followed up Wednesday morning on Twitter, writing “Phoenix crowd last night was amazing — a packed house. I love the Great State of Arizona. Not a fan of Jeff Flake, weak on crime & border!” As for how he would assist with the upcoming Herculean tasks facing Congress — passing tax reform, raising the debt ceiling, and agreeing on a budget — Trump offered little detail. He did threaten that if legislators force a government shutdown “we’re building that wall,” a reference to his campaign promise to close off the border with Mexico. He also said he thinks the U.S. will “end up probably terminating” the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico “at some point,” though he said he hasn’t made up his mind. In the comfort of his most fervent fans, Trump often resurrects his free-wheeling 2016 campaign style, pinging insults at perceived enemies such as the media and meandering from topic to topic without a singular theme. This was Trump’s eighth rally since taking office in January, and each event is attended by supporters screened by his campaign. His comfort level was apparent: As he discussed his responses to Charlottesville, he interrupted himself. “I didn’t want to bore you. You understand where I’m coming from. You people understand.” Outside the rally, the divisiveness seen across the country was on display. One man on a loudspeaker said the largely Latino protesters belong in the kitchen. A Trump opponent hoisted a sign depicting the president with horns. A day of noisy but largely peaceful protests turned unruly after his speech, as police fired pepper spray at crowds after someone apparently lobbed rocks and bottles at officers.

state and fitness for the job. No more was this evident than after a Trump speech in Phoenix Tuesday night. In a raucous rally reminiscent of many in his successful 2016 campaign, Trump escalated attacks on the news media for misrepresenting his words and actions after Charlottesville. The problem: Trump misquoted himself. He did not mention the “many sides” ad lib in his first response to Charlottesville that even some of his defenders agreed appeared to be an attempt to draw a false moral equivalency between Ku Klux Klan marchers in favor of keeping a statue of Robert E. Lee and those who marched in counterprotest.

Missouri reporters recently asked Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., if he agreed with fellow Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham’s assessment that Trump was dividing the country. Blunt is a consummate inside player whose reaction to Trump in coming months will be a key barometer on how the Republican-led Senate and Trump are getting along and whether anything can get done. Blunt denounced neo-Nazis and white supremacists in an uncharacteristically sharp retort to his fellow senator from South Carolina. “Sen. Graham gives a lot more advice to the president than I do,” Blunt said. “I am focused on what I believe is the right thing for the country, which is … there is no moral equivalency between these groups and other groups. Everybody in our country has a right to say whatever they want to say. But the country doesn’t have any responsibly to embrace that flawed ideology that we should be rejecting, and I think the country is rejecting.” Blunt said this at an event intended to highlight efforts to expand broadband coverage, a big issue in rural Missouri. But the escalated culture war — exacerbated by Trump’s ever-changing political responses to the moral questions of the time — is taking up a lot of bandwidth. The effect will really be tested in September, when Blunt and the rest of Congress return from an August recess to confront issues that stretch far beyond a statue in Charlottesville: The tenuous condition of Obamacare and Republican failures to follow through on repealand-replace promises; unmet vows to make trillions in national infrastructure improvements; and yet-to-be-broached promises to reform the tax code and lower rates in an attempt to stimulate the economy. They are the nuts-and-bolts promises of this new president. But they have been set aside in the acrimony of a long, hot summer. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

Creve Coeur Lake Park project would include practice space for the Blues RINK • FROM A1

But some residents and park advocates argue that the large recreation facility — which calls for 900 parking spaces and room for 500 more — isn’t appropriate for Creve Coeur Lake Park. At a late afternoon board meeting, the St. Louis County Industrial Development Authority (IDA) approved an agreement outlining terms that must be met before issuing an estimated $39.8 million in bonds to finance much of the project. St. Louis County approved a resolution authorizing its involvement Dec. 20, and the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership has taken the lead advancing the project since then. The agreement approved Wednesday is between the IDA, St. Louis County and the St. Louis Legacy Ice Foundation, which would lease the land and building. The project’s success appears to depend on a key approval from the National Park Service because portions of the park were established using money from the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund. Rules attached to that money require that land acquired or developed with it must remain as an outdoor recreation area unless the National Park Service grants a waiver. Katy Jamboretz, a spokeswoman for the Economic Partnership, said she believed the application to build the ice rink was still with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, which reviews it before sending it off to the National Park Service. Patrick Quinn, chairman of the Legacy Ice Foundation, said the project’s environmental impact is “extremely limited,” pointing to a recently completed environmental impact study paid for by the county. “It’s a net positive to the area, the environment and the park,” he said. Grading on the site of the proposed ice complex has already begun, but Economic Partnership Director Sheila Sweeney has said the grading is only for stormwater management because the site doesn’t drain well. Charles Bell, a resident who opposes the project, doesn’t buy that. “The elephant is that this all still has to be approved by the federal government,” he said. “If the project doesn’t go through, they just leveled 40 acres of parkland.”

COUNTY BACKING

Meanwhile, the agreement approved Wednesday offered more details on the facility’s amenities and the county’s support. And the price tag appears to be getting larger. Total project costs, including interest and bond reserves, are estimated at $66 million, up from about $59.3 million estimated in documents submitted to the IDA in June. Rent and fees paid to the St. Louis Legacy Ice Foundation from rink users would pay down the bonds, but St. Louis County is offering a partial guarantee. Proposed terms of the financing agreement would

A rendering of the proposed four-rink ice complex in Creve Coeur Lake Memorial Park that would be developed by St. Louis County and the St. Louis Legacy Ice Foundation.

commit St. Louis County to make up to $450,000 annually in backstop payments on the bonds if the Legacy Ice Foundation dips into a debt reserve fund. However, the Legacy Ice Foundation would be obligated to try and reimburse the county for any public money that goes toward bond repayment. And a public payment would trigger a default under the lease agreement, giving the IDA the right to take possession of the facility. The agreement also stipulates which contractors will build the facility: ARCO Construction Company Inc. will serve as the contractor team and Summit Development Group as independent construction manager. The agreement sets a goal of Sept. 30, 2018, as the project completion date. The 254,000-square-foot facility calls for three indoor ice rinks and one covered outdoor rink, all National Hockey League size. A 20,000-square-foot outdoor workout and field area as well as a walking and bike trail surrounding the complex are included. Plans also call for a 13,000-square-foot “hall of honor commemorating the history of ice sports in the region.” The Legacy Ice Foundation says the rinks will be open for public use and also for youth and amateur hockey. But the Blues hockey team, which plans to contribute $7 million toward the facility’s construction and would move from its existing practice facility in Hazelwood’s St. Louis Outlet Mall, will play a critical role in the project. The building would include 15,000 square feet dedicated to Blues offices and locker rooms. And one of the provisions of the agreement with the IDA and county requires a lease between the St. Louis Legacy Ice Foundation and the Blues, with the county as a beneficiary. Protections for the county include a $1.5 million payment from the Blues to help cover debt service should the team ever express any intent to relocate to another city. Quinn said his group is on track to meet their obligations under the agreement approved Wednesday. Now, it’s a matter of waiting for federal approval. “It’s not in our hands anymore,” he said. “We worked our tails off to get everything completed.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

Navy replaces 7th Fleet commander after rash of warship accidents

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A9

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

PAIDADVERTISEMENT

BREAKING NEWS...

CoQ10’s Failure Leaves Millions Wanting

Use this pill to supercharge your brain and think better than ever. BREAKING NEWS: Millions of Americans take the supplement CoQ10. It’s the “jet fuel” that supercharges your cells’ power generators, known as mitochondria.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this photo released by the Royal Malaysian Navy, a U.S. Navy helicopter lands to receive an unidentified body recovered by the Royal Malaysian Navy off the Johor coast of Malaysia on Wednesday. BY KEN MORITSUGU associated Press

TOKYO • The U.S. Navy dismissed the commander of the Asia-based 7th Fleet on Wednesday after a series of warship accidents raised questions about its operations in the Pacific. A two-sentence statement said Adm. Scott Swift, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, had relieved Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin “due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command.” The move follows four Navy accidents in the Pacific since late January, including two collisions that left sailors dead and missing. Aucoin’s successor, Rear Adm. Phillip Sawyer, has already been named. The move follows four Navy accidents in the Pacific since late January, including two collisions that left sailors dead and missing. “While each of these four incidents is unique, they cannot be viewed in isolation,” Swift said late Tuesday. The Navy would carry out a “deliberate reset” of all its ships in the Pacific, focused on navigation, mechanical systems and bridge resource management. It would include training and an expert assessment of each ship. The 7th Fleet, based in Yokosuka, Japan, has 50 to 70 ships and submarines, 140 aircraft and about 20,000 sailors. Seven sailors died in June after the Fitzgerald collided with a container ship off Japan. On Monday, the John S. McCain and an oil tanker collided off Singapore, injuring five sailors and leaving 10 others missing. Swift, speaking at a news conference in Singapore where the McCain is now docked, said Navy divers had found remains of some of the missing in a flooded compartment in the ship. He also said Malaysians assisting in the search had found a body, but it had not been determined if it was a McCain crew member. At least three of the 10 missing sailors have been identified by family. Crew member Logan Palmer is from the Decatur, Ill., area and his mother identified him as missing, U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis said. April Brandon in Michigan said the military informed her that her son, Ken

Smith, is missing. She said Smith’s father, stepmother and grandfather served in the Navy. Brandon said, “His father and I couldn’t be prouder of our son.” The family of Jacob Drake of Ohio was told he was among the missing, the Columbus Dispatched reported. Megan Partlow told The Associated Press that Drake was her fiancé and she’d last had contact with him Sunday in a text message. The collision at daybreak in a busy shipping area tore a gaping hole in the McCain’s left rear hull and flooded adjacent compartments including crew berths and machinery and communication rooms. The cause of the collision has not been determined. The Navy previously said there was no evidence it was intentional, or that it was a result of sabotage or cyberintrusion. The Navy last week said the Fitzgerald’s captain was being relieved of his command and other sailors were being punished after poor seamanship and flaws in keeping watch were found to have contributed to its collision. An investigation into how and why the Fitzgerald collided with the other ship was not finished, but enough details were known to take those actions, the Navy said. There were two lesser-known incidents in the first half of the year. In January, the Antietam guided missile cruiser ran aground near Yokosuka base, the home port of the 7th Fleet, and in May another cruiser, the Lake Champlain from the Navy’s 3rd Fleet, had a minor collision with a South Korean fishing boat. The decision to remove Aucoin was first reported by The Wall Street Journal. He assumed command of the 7th Fleet in September 2015 and was due to retire in a few weeks, one of the U.S. officials said. Aucoin, a career flight officer, served in five fighter squadrons and flew in more than 150 combat missions, according to Navy biographies. He commanded a carrier air wing aboard the Kitty Hawk and a carrier strike group based in Bremerton, Wash. Prior to heading the 7th Fleet, he was deputy chief of naval operations for warfare systems.

Saudi-led coalition airstrike kills dozens in Yemen ahead of rally BY ALI AL-MUJAHED AND SUDARSAN RAGHAVAN Washington Post

SANAA, YEMEN • An airstrike by a

Saudi-led coalition on Wednesday hit a two-story motel north of the capital, killing at least 46 people, the latest in an escalating barrage of air assaults in wartorn Yemen this year, witnesses and officials said. “I saw a few bodies hanging out from the windows,” said Mohammed Aluraiji, 34, a seller of khat, the narcotic leaf chewed by many Yemenis. “Bodies were completely burned. ... I was completely shocked.” The assault comes as the alliance between the rebel Houthi movement and loyalists of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who together control the capital and much of northern Yemen, shows signs of splintering. In recent months, sharp differences have emerged over U.N. initiatives, the control of ministries, and military and political decisions. Saleh’s supporters are planning a major rally in the capital on Thursday to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the founding of the General People’s Congress, Saleh’s political party that controlled the Middle East nation for more than three decades. Residents fear possible violence as armed factions from both sides are positioned in the capital. Wednesday’s airstrikes may have been intended to exploit the divisions. There were other airstrikes targeting areas around the capital, Yemeni officials said. Some local media reports suggested that Houthi rebels were killed in the attack on the motel, which was near a Houthi checkpoint on the main road

about 19 miles north of the capital. Health ministry officials and witnesses said most of the victims were khat farmers who were staying at the motel. “We are still extracting bodies from under the rubble,” said Zaid Alshami, a senior health ministry official. “The numbers of dead could go up.” A Saudi-led coalition spokesman told Reuters that information about the attack was being collected, but did not elaborate further. Yemen’s conflict pits the HouthiSaleh alliance against the recognized government of Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, who was ousted from power two and half years ago. Saudi Arabia and its neighbors are seeing to restore Hadi to power, not least because they are wary of the Shiite Houthis and their suspected backing by Iran. More than 10,000 Yemeni civilians have been killed, mostly by airstrikes conducted by the Saudi-led coalition that have targeted hospitals, schools and other civilian targets. More than 3 million people have fled their homes, and the country is grappling with a hunger crisis and an outbreak of cholera. Human rights activists have called on the United States and Britain to stop selling weapons to the Saudi-led coalition. A report last week by a group of international aid agencies led by the U.N. High Commission for Refugees found that more airstrikes have struck Yemen this year than in all of 2016. There have been 5,676 airstrikes this year compared to 3,936 in all of last year, according to the Protection Cluster in Yemen. The number of clashes on the ground has also intensified, increasing by 56 percent from last year, the report said.

As you age, your mitochondria begin to die. In fact, by age 67, you lose 80% of the mitochondria you had at age 25.1 But if you’re taking CoQ10, there’s something important you should know. As powerful as CoQ10 is, there is a critical thing it fails to do. It can’t create new mitochondria in your cells.

Taking CoQ10 is not enough “There’s a little-known NASA nutrient that multiplies the number of new power generators in your cells by up to 55%,” says Dr. Al Sears, owner of the Sears Institute for Anti-Aging Medicine in Royal Palm Beach, Florida. “Science once thought this was impossible. But now you can make your heart, brain and body young again.” “I tell my patients the most important thing I can do is increase their ‘health span.’ This is the length of time you can live free of disease and with all your youthful abilities and faculties intact.” Medical first: Multiply the “power generators” in your cells Al Sears, M.D., recently released an energy-boosting supplement based on this NASA nutrient that has become so popular, he’s having trouble keeping it in stock. Dr. Sears is the author of over 500 scientific papers on anti-aging and recently spoke at the WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival featuring Dr. Oz and special guest Suzanne Somers. Thousands of people listened to Dr. Sears speak on his anti-aging breakthroughs and attended his book signing at the event. Now, Dr. Sears has come up with what his peers consider his greatest contribution to anti-aging medicine yet — a newly discovered nutrient that multiplies the number of tiny, energy-producing “engines” located inside the body’s cells, shattering the limitations of traditional CoQ10 supplements.

Why mitochondria matter A single cell in your body can contain between 200 to 2,000 mitochondria, with the largest number found in the most metabolically active cells, like those in your brain, heart and skeletal muscles. But because of changes in cells, stress and poor diet, most people’s power generators begin to malfunction and die off as they age. In fact, the Mitochondria Research Society reports 50 million U.S. adults are suffering from health problems because of mitochondrial dysfunction. Common ailments often associated with aging — such as memory problems, heart issues, blood sugar concerns and vision and hearing difficulties — can all be connected to a decrease in mitochondria.

Birth of new mitochondria Dr. Sears and his researchers combined the most powerful form of CoQ10 available — called ubiquinol — with a unique, newly discovered natural compound called PQQ that has the remarkable ability to grow new mitochondria. Together, the two powerhouses are now available in a supplement called Ultra Accel II. Discovered by a NASA probe in space dust, PQQ (Pyrroloquinoline quinone) stimulates something called “mitochondrial biogenesis” — a unique process that actually boosts the number of healthy mitochondria in your cells. In a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, mice fed PQQ grew a staggering number of new mitochondria, showing an increase of more than 55% in just eight weeks.

Dr. Al Sears with fellow physician Dr. Oz at the WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival held in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.

The mice with the strongest mitochondria showed no signs of aging — even when they were the equivalent of 80 years old.

Science stands behind the power of PQQ Biochemical Pharmacology reports that PQQ is up to 5,000 times more efficient in sustaining energy production than common antioxidants. “Imagine 5,000 times more efficient energy,” says Dr. Sears. “PQQ has been a game changer for my patients.” “With the PQQ in Ultra Accel, I have energy I never thought possible,” says Colleen R., one of Dr. Sears’ patients. “I am in my 70s but feel 40 again. I think clearer, move with real energy and sleep like a baby.”

It works right away Along with an abundance of newfound energy, users also report a sharper, more focused mind and memory, and even youngerlooking skin and hair. Jerry M. from Wellington, Florida, used Ultra Accel and was amazed at the effect. “I noticed a difference within a few days,” says Jerry. “My endurance almost doubled. But it’s not just in your body. You can feel it mentally, too,” says Jerry. “Not only do I feel a difference, but the way it protects my cells is great insurance against a health disaster as I get older.”

Increase your health span today The demand for this supplement is so high, Dr. Sears is having trouble keeping it in stock. “My patients tell me they feel better than they have in years. This is ideal for people who are feeling or looking older than their age… or for those who are tired or growing more forgetful.” “My favorite part of practicing anti-aging medicine is watching my patients get the joy back in their lives. Ultra Accel sends a wake-up call to every cell in their bodies… and they actually feel young again.”

Where to find Ultra Accel II Right now, the only way to get this potent combination of PQQ and super-powered CoQ10 is with Dr. Sears’ breakthrough Ultra Accel II formula. To secure bottles of this hot, new supplement, buyers should contact the Sears Health Hotline at 1-877-353-0593 within the next 48 hours. “It takes time to get bottles shipped out to drug stores,” said Dr. Sears. “The Hotline allows us to ship the product directly to the customer.” Dr. Sears feels so strongly about this product, he offers a 100%, money-back guarantee on every order. “Just send me back the bottle and any unused product within 90 days, and I’ll send you your money back,” said Dr. Sears. The Hotline will be taking orders for the next 48 hours. After that, the phone number will be shut down to allow them to restock. Call 1-877-353-0593 to secure your limited supply of Ultra Accel II. You don’t need a prescription, and those who call in the first 24 hours qualify for a significant discount. To take advantage of this great offer use Promo Code NPUAAUG174 when you call in.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY.


NEWS

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 2

Navy replaces 7th Fleet commander after rash of warship accidents BY KEN MORITSUGU associated Press

TOKYO • The U.S. Navy dismissed the commander of the Asia-based 7th Fleet on Wednesday after a series of warship accidents raised questions about its operations in the Pacific. A two-sentence statement said Adm. Scott Swift, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, had relieved Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin “due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command.” The move follows four Navy accidents in the Pacific since late January, including two collisions that left sailors dead and missing. Aucoin’s successor, Rear Adm. Phillip Sawyer, has already been named. The move follows four Navy accidents in the Pacific since late January, including two collisions that left sailors dead and missing. “While each of these four incidents is unique, they cannot be viewed in isolation,” Swift said late Tuesday. The Navy would carry out a “deliberate reset” of all its ships in the Pacific, focused on navigation, mechanical systems and bridge resource management. It would include training and an expert assessment of each ship. The 7th Fleet, based in Yokosuka, Japan, has 50 to 70 ships and submarines, 140 aircraft and about 20,000 sailors. Seven sailors died in June after the Fitzgerald collided with a container ship off Japan. On Monday, the John S. McCain and an oil tanker collided off Singapore, injuring five sailors and leaving 10 others missing. Swift, speaking at a news conference in Singapore where the McCain is now docked, said Navy divers had found remains of some of the missing in a flooded compartment in the ship. He also said Malaysians assisting in the search had found a body, but it had not been determined if it was a McCain crew member. At least three of the 10 missing sailors have been identified by family. Crew member Logan Palmer is from the Decatur, Ill., area and his mother identified him as missing, U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis said. April Brandon in Michigan said the military informed her that her son, Ken

Smith, is missing. She said Smith’s father, stepmother and grandfather served in the Navy. Brandon said, “His father and I couldn’t be prouder of our son.” The family of Jacob Drake of Ohio was told he was among the missing, the Columbus Dispatched reported. Megan Partlow told The Associated Press that Drake was her fiancé and she’d last had contact with him Sunday in a text message. The collision at daybreak in a busy shipping area tore a gaping hole in the McCain’s left rear hull and flooded adjacent compartments including crew berths and machinery and communication rooms. The cause of the collision has not been determined. The Navy previously said there was no evidence it was intentional, or that it was a result of sabotage or cyberintrusion. The Navy last week said the Fitzgerald’s captain was being relieved of his command and other sailors were being punished after poor seamanship and flaws in keeping watch were found to have contributed to its collision. An investigation into how and why the Fitzgerald collided with the other ship was not finished, but enough details were known to take those actions, the Navy said. There were two lesser-known incidents in the first half of the year. In January, the Antietam guided missile cruiser ran aground near Yokosuka base, the home port of the 7th Fleet, and in May another cruiser, the Lake Champlain from the Navy’s 3rd Fleet, had a minor collision with a South Korean fishing boat. The decision to remove Aucoin was first reported by The Wall Street Journal. He assumed command of the 7th Fleet in September 2015 and was due to retire in a few weeks, one of the U.S. officials said. Aucoin, a career flight officer, served in five fighter squadrons and flew in more than 150 combat missions, according to Navy biographies. He commanded a carrier air wing aboard the Kitty Hawk and a carrier strike group based in Bremerton, Wash. Prior to heading the 7th Fleet, he was deputy chief of naval operations for warfare systems.

THEATER REVIEW

‘In the Heights’ shows us Miranda before ‘Hamilton’ ‘IN THE HEIGHTS’

BY JUDITH NEWMARK st. Louis Post-dispatch

R-S Theatrics is enjoying its biggest success ever with “In the Heights,” which has sold so well that artistic director Christina Rios added an extra performance. But that may not be enough to satisfy all the St. Louis theatergoers who want to see Lin-Manuel Miranda’s first Tony Award-winning musical. His second one, “Hamilton,” plays the Fox Theatre in April. No doubt excitement about “Hamilton” has spilled onto “In the Heights,” which played the Fox on tour in 2009. The show first gained attention for the way it incorporated rap into a musicaltheater score and for its charismatic composer, lyricist and star (all Miranda). Now, with the massive success of “Hamilton,” “In the Heights” seems to burst with clues. Here we see Manuel’s raps and clever lyrics for the first time, his first orphaned hero, his fascination with multicultural America. Rios, who directs the R-S production of “In the Heights,” of course presents the show on its own terms. It’s a lively account of a few days around the Fourth of July in a tightly knit Dominican and Puerto Rican neighborhood at the tip of Manhattan. We focus on three small businesses — a bodega, a beauty salon and a car service, all with uncertain futures — and four young adults. Their futures are uncertain, too. In a cast almost too big for the .ZACK stage, three women stand out. Anna Skidis Vargas, as the canny salon owner, leads the ensemble in “Carnaval del Barrio,” a song-and-dance number packed with life. Cassandra Lopez, delicate and charming, shines as Nina, a brilliant young woman who’s back home with bad news: Overwhelmed by the demands of schoolwork plus two jobs, she’s lost her scholarship to Stanford. She hates to disappoint her parents (though she’ll upset them more when she falls in love with the “wrong” guy). And Carmen García comes close to stealing the show as Abuela Claudia, the heart of the neighborhood and also its memory. In a song in which Claudia recalls her life, “Paciencia y Fe,” García offers a thrilling performance. Claudia has mothered the whole neighborhood, but especially the or-

When • Through Sept. 3 Where • .ZACK Performing Arts Incubator, 3224 Locust Street How much • $20-$25 More info • 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

phaned young man who owns the bodega, Usnavi (Jesse Muñoz). His rapping, a high point of the show, is a bit hard to catch. So, for that matter, are many song lyrics and even the dialogue. Enunciation is not this cast’s forte. But it’s not a big problem; you can follow the relationships. Muñoz is especially effective when he shows Usnavi’s awkward side, trying to woo Vanessa (Natasha Toro), a beautiful hairdresser. Vanessa dreams of moving downtown to an apartment where the walls are brick “on purpose,” not because they’re dilapidated. Nina’s parents (Jaime Zayas and Maritza Motta-Gonzalez), who own the car service, are very supportive of her academic efforts, though it never occurs to them to look into Columbia University, Barnard College or any of the other places where she could get a top-notch education at home. They are much less understanding when she and Benny (Marshall Jennings) fall in love. Benny works for Nina’s father, who has always respected him. But Benny, who’s African-American, doesn’t belong to their Latino world. Lopez and Jennings, two fine voices, share a romantic duet, “When the Sun Goes Down,” with more precision than feeling; they just don’t have much chemistry. Muños and Toro make a more persuasive couple, whether they’re flirting on the dance floor (“The Club”) or revealing feelings that they don’t know what to do with (“Champagne”). Under conductor Leah Luciano, the orchestra steams. But it also tends to sound too loud (a problem other musicals have encountered at the .ZACK). Rios’ affection for the material imbues every character onstage — and perhaps inspired choreographer Cecily A. King. The company includes performers with a range of dance experience (maybe none). But King makes them all come together, especially in the cellphone choreography for “Blackout.” It turns out those useful little things can even dance.

JOIN STLTODAY ON FACEBOOK Become a fan of STLtoday on Facebook and get the early word on news scoops. facebook.com/STLPD

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A9

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

PAIDADVERTISEMENT

BREAKING NEWS...

CoQ10’s Failure Leaves Millions Wanting

Use this pill to supercharge your brain and think better than ever. BREAKING NEWS: Millions of Americans take the supplement CoQ10. It’s the “jet fuel” that supercharges your cells’ power generators, known as mitochondria. As you age, your mitochondria begin to die. In fact, by age 67, you lose 80% of the mitochondria you had at age 25.1 But if you’re taking CoQ10, there’s something important you should know. As powerful as CoQ10 is, there is a critical thing it fails to do. It can’t create new mitochondria in your cells.

Taking CoQ10 is not enough “There’s a little-known NASA nutrient that multiplies the number of new power generators in your cells by up to 55%,” says Dr. Al Sears, owner of the Sears Institute for Anti-Aging Medicine in Royal Palm Beach, Florida. “Science once thought this was impossible. But now you can make your heart, brain and body young again.” “I tell my patients the most important thing I can do is increase their ‘health span.’ This is the length of time you can live free of disease and with all your youthful abilities and faculties intact.” Medical first: Multiply the “power generators” in your cells Al Sears, M.D., recently released an energy-boosting supplement based on this NASA nutrient that has become so popular, he’s having trouble keeping it in stock. Dr. Sears is the author of over 500 scientific papers on anti-aging and recently spoke at the WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival featuring Dr. Oz and special guest Suzanne Somers. Thousands of people listened to Dr. Sears speak on his anti-aging breakthroughs and attended his book signing at the event. Now, Dr. Sears has come up with what his peers consider his greatest contribution to anti-aging medicine yet — a newly discovered nutrient that multiplies the number of tiny, energy-producing “engines” located inside the body’s cells, shattering the limitations of traditional CoQ10 supplements.

Why mitochondria matter A single cell in your body can contain between 200 to 2,000 mitochondria, with the largest number found in the most metabolically active cells, like those in your brain, heart and skeletal muscles. But because of changes in cells, stress and poor diet, most people’s power generators begin to malfunction and die off as they age. In fact, the Mitochondria Research Society reports 50 million U.S. adults are suffering from health problems because of mitochondrial dysfunction. Common ailments often associated with aging — such as memory problems, heart issues, blood sugar concerns and vision and hearing difficulties — can all be connected to a decrease in mitochondria.

Birth of new mitochondria Dr. Sears and his researchers combined the most powerful form of CoQ10 available — called ubiquinol — with a unique, newly discovered natural compound called PQQ that has the remarkable ability to grow new mitochondria. Together, the two powerhouses are now available in a supplement called Ultra Accel II. Discovered by a NASA probe in space dust, PQQ (Pyrroloquinoline quinone) stimulates something called “mitochondrial biogenesis” — a unique process that actually boosts the number of healthy mitochondria in your cells. In a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, mice fed PQQ grew a staggering number of new mitochondria, showing an increase of more than 55% in just eight weeks.

Dr. Al Sears with fellow physician Dr. Oz at the WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival held in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.

The mice with the strongest mitochondria showed no signs of aging — even when they were the equivalent of 80 years old.

Science stands behind the power of PQQ Biochemical Pharmacology reports that PQQ is up to 5,000 times more efficient in sustaining energy production than common antioxidants. “Imagine 5,000 times more efficient energy,” says Dr. Sears. “PQQ has been a game changer for my patients.” “With the PQQ in Ultra Accel, I have energy I never thought possible,” says Colleen R., one of Dr. Sears’ patients. “I am in my 70s but feel 40 again. I think clearer, move with real energy and sleep like a baby.”

It works right away Along with an abundance of newfound energy, users also report a sharper, more focused mind and memory, and even youngerlooking skin and hair. Jerry M. from Wellington, Florida, used Ultra Accel and was amazed at the effect. “I noticed a difference within a few days,” says Jerry. “My endurance almost doubled. But it’s not just in your body. You can feel it mentally, too,” says Jerry. “Not only do I feel a difference, but the way it protects my cells is great insurance against a health disaster as I get older.”

Increase your health span today The demand for this supplement is so high, Dr. Sears is having trouble keeping it in stock. “My patients tell me they feel better than they have in years. This is ideal for people who are feeling or looking older than their age… or for those who are tired or growing more forgetful.” “My favorite part of practicing anti-aging medicine is watching my patients get the joy back in their lives. Ultra Accel sends a wake-up call to every cell in their bodies… and they actually feel young again.”

Where to find Ultra Accel II Right now, the only way to get this potent combination of PQQ and super-powered CoQ10 is with Dr. Sears’ breakthrough Ultra Accel II formula. To secure bottles of this hot, new supplement, buyers should contact the Sears Health Hotline at 1-877-353-0593 within the next 48 hours. “It takes time to get bottles shipped out to drug stores,” said Dr. Sears. “The Hotline allows us to ship the product directly to the customer.” Dr. Sears feels so strongly about this product, he offers a 100%, money-back guarantee on every order. “Just send me back the bottle and any unused product within 90 days, and I’ll send you your money back,” said Dr. Sears. The Hotline will be taking orders for the next 48 hours. After that, the phone number will be shut down to allow them to restock. Call 1-877-353-0593 to secure your limited supply of Ultra Accel II. You don’t need a prescription, and those who call in the first 24 hours qualify for a significant discount. To take advantage of this great offer use Promo Code NPUAAUG174 when you call in.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY.


M 1 Thursday • 08.24.2017 • a10

Sinclair defends proposed purchase of Tribune Media Tribune Tower in downtown Chicago features the WGN Radio sign. Tribune Media Co. is a target of acquisition by Sinclair Broadcast Group. That bid has been opposed by numerous organizations.

By LOrraINE MIraBELLa Baltimore Sun

Sinclair Broadcast Group is firing back at critics of its plan to acquire Chicago-based Tribune Media Co. for $3.9 billion and become the nation’s largest broadcaster, saying the deal will create scale and efficiencies that will ensure the future of free, over-the-air television. Sinclair filed a petition late Tuesday with the Federal Communications Commission opposing numerous requests for the government to deny the acquisition. Groups such as Dish Network LLC, the American Cable Association, Free Press, Public Knowledge and Common Cause have filed such requests with the FCC. Chris Ripley, Sinclair’s president and CEO, said in a statement Wednesday that the company “firmly believes in the mission of local broadcasting … This acquisition will help to ensure the future of the free and local television model for both Tribune and Sinclair’s local communities.” Sinclair announced its plan in May to buy Tribune, which would give it 233 television stations that reach 72 percent of U.S. households. The deal is made possible by a recent FCC decision to relax station ownership rules. In St. Louis, Sinclair owns KDNL (Channel 30) while Tribune Media owns KTVI (Channel 2) and KPLR (Channel 11). The FCC in April reinstated the “UHF discount.” It allows stations broadcasting on those higher frequency airwaves to count only half their audience against a cap allowing a single company to own stations reaching no more than 39 percent of the nation’s television households. The FCC’s rule change — which could allow Sinclair to potentially retain all three St. Louis stations — has been criticized by media watchdogs and others who say they are worried about the concentration of ownership. Analysts have said they expect the deal to trig-

Exxon misled public on its climate views, researchers contend By EMILy FLITTEr Reuters

NEW yOrK • Two Har-

FILE PHOTO

ger a wave of media consolidation as traditional broadcasters vie for viewers and advertisers in a digital age. Most opponents have complained that the deal would not serve the public interest and violate the broadcast ownership cap, even with the UHF discount in place. Critics also echoed long-running criticism that Sinclair uses its news broadcasts to advocate conservative views. “The combination of the two companies would create a broadcasting behemoth with unprecedented control over both the national and local television markets — inflicting tremendous harm to competition and consumers,” the American Cable Association said in its petition to deny the deal. The cable group represents about 750 small and medium-size cable operators, telephone companies, municipal utilities and other local providers of multichannel video programming services. Craig Aaron, president and CEO of Free Press, said the group that promotes diverse and independent media ownership is most concerned about the size and reach of the merged company. “That any one company would control 230 stations reaching almost three quarters (of the U.S.) is too much media power in too few hands,” Aaron said. He added that

“we’re particularly concerned the Trump (administration) FCC has gamed the rules to benefit Sinclair.” Opponents also said the proposed deal will stifle competition beyond the broadcast industry. It would hurt wireless providers by giving Sinclair power to block the transition of broadband spectrum from broadcasters to mobile broadband operators, making it difficult for smaller wireless companies to compete with dominant wireless carriers, the Competitive Carriers Association, which represents wireless providers, says in its petition. Newsmax Media accused the FCC of using regulatory “sleight of hand,” “an approach that will end decades of bipartisan consensus on the importance of limiting television broadcast networks’ market reach and consequently, their influence and power.” In its petition, Sinclair counters that it has a strong record of broadcasting in the public interest, running local stations that have racked up strong ratings and numerous awards and that it would be able to direct more resources toward covering local news in Tribune markets. Opponents’ allegations, the company said, are based on hearsay and raise issues of First Amendment viewpoint discrimination. The Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

Neuropathy aNd ChroNiC paiN?

Cutting Edge Treatment System Showing Excellent Relief! Only Neuro-Laserplex Healing System In St. Louis

Dr. Jeffery D. Birkenmeier, D.C. “Now In South County” First visit: • Gentle, Safe 1. Personalized Treatment Program Consultation with • No medications, Dr. Birkenmeier no shots, no surgery 2. Detailed Examination • Insurance Accepted 3. Laser Treatment to Benefits Verified start the Relief Process • Personalized Consultation and ALL FOR ONLY $37.00 Treatment

Call Today

(314) 485-2790 Limited appointment times available

“I had problems with my knees and lower back. I was walking with a distinct limp, almost like I had a wooden leg. I can walk without a limp and am no longer considering knee replacement.” - Delores M. of St. Louis

“Frequent severe pain, numbness and tingling in legs, feet and arms and lower back pain. I’m sleeping much better as the result of treatments received and the pain described is

“I was having heaviness in my legs and low back pain. I can go upstairs. I can walk without having discomfort in my legs and back. I am so happy I decided to come to the office of Dr. Birkenmeier. I always looked forward to the treatments. Everyone was so nice to me.” - Jo B. of St. Louis

seldom experienced.” - Doug C. of St. Louis

“I have no more back pain and no more pain and tingling in my feet…. honest answer and explanation for what they could do for me.” - Ray T.

and staff are well organized and it’s a pleasant

“Jabbing pain in my legs. Pain in my neck and back. At times crawling or tingling feelings up my legs…and burning feet. I can sit and not have restless legs and feet.Dr. Birkenmeier experience. I cannot believe I am better.” - Rita S. of St. Louis

Neuropathy and Pain Relief Institute Dr.Jeffery D.Birkenmeier DC “We’ve Moved!” 12152 Tesson Ferry Road St. Louis, Missouri 63128

vard University researchers said in a study published on Wednesday they had collected data proving that Exxon Mobil Corp. made “explicit factual misrepresentations” in newspaper ads it bought to convey its views on the oil industry and climate science. In an article in the journal Environmental Research Letters, researchers Geoffrey Supran and Naomi Oreskes said they examined 187 documents, including internal memos, peer-reviewed papers by Exxon scientists and “advertorials” that ran in The New York Times — paid advertisements in the style of opinion pieces. The researchers said they used a social science analysis method to turn statements in the documents into data points that could be counted and compared to each other. Supran and Oreskes said that as early as 1979, Exxon scientists acknowledged burning fossil fuels was adding more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and causing global temperatures to rise, but they said the company’s position in newspaper ads remained significantly different by consistently asserting doubt about climate science. The study was funded by the Rockefeller family philanthropies, which previously supported a campaign to prove Exxon knew more than it publicly admitted about climate change. That campaign used the slogan #ExxonKnew. Exxon spokesman Scott Silvestri called the study “inaccurate and preposter-

ous” and said the researchers’ goal was to attack the company’s reputation at the expense of its shareholders. “Our statements have been consistent with our understanding of climate science,” he said. He also noted that Oreskes spearheaded the #ExxonKnew campaign. Oreskes said the Rockefeller family funding did not affect the study’s outcome. She said the impetus for the study came from Exxon’s responses to reports in InsideClimate News and the Los Angeles Times in September 2015 and October 2015, respectively, that Exxon’s scientists had long known of the dangers fossil fuels posed to the earth’s climate. “They accused the journalists of cherry-picking,” Oreskes said of Exxon’s responses. “They also posted a collection of documents on their website. They said, ‘Read the documents and make up your own mind.’ We thought that was an excellent opportunity.” Oreskes and Supran pointed to a 2000 Exxon advertorial that said a U.S. government report on climate change put the “political cart before the horse” and was “based on unreliable models.” In his statement on Wednesday, Silvestri offered two examples from advertorials that Exxon had placed in The New York Times, both published in 2000, that he said showed the company did not try to cast doubt on climate change. One statement read: “Enough is known about climate change to recognize it may pose a legitimate longterm risk and that more needs to be learned about it.”

Escape? Whether your considering a staycation or visiting a new destination, don’t miss our upcoming premium edition!

Escape with:

THE ULTIMATE PUZZLE BOOK Crossword Puzzles • Sudoku • And Much More!

DESTINATIONS

OFF THE BEATEN PATH

The

MATE ULTIle bo ok Puzz

ZZLES SWORD PU ® • CROS LSA • JUMBLE • WORD SA • SUDOKU I OR HIT • LEGRAMS • SCRABB ACKER • CODE-CR ES PAG ING • COLOR

COMING AUGUST 27 & MORE!


MARKET WATCH

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed lower Wednesday, giving back some of their gains from a day earlier. Losses among health care companies led the decline. Retailers and other consumer-focused companies also weighed on the market. Real estate stocks led the gainers.

Lowe’s

$10

30

8

75

24

25

6

70

22

20

21,600

J J 52-week range

2,400

22,500

2,520

22,000

2,480

21,500

2,440

21,000

2,400

20,500

2,360 M

A

M

StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 1,457 1,530 1266 1536 58 73

2,690 2,698 1530 1364 90 56

J

J

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

2,320

A HIGH 21866.66 9177.45 744.51 11805.49 6291.30 2448.91 1707.73 25369.21 1373.27

LOW 21808.39 9058.97 739.96 11758.99 6263.29 2441.42 1697.81 25270.94 1363.17

A $31.64

Vol.: 11.3m (9.4x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $2.16 b

Close: 2,444.04 Change: -8.47 (-0.3%)

Futures

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Sep 17 Sep 17 Sep 17

342 935 403.25

-4 +1.25 +1

Wheat CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

Aug 17 Aug 17 Oct 17 Aug 17 Aug 17

141.62 105.65 63.55 16.53 298.05

-.45 -1.07 -.32 +.01 -.60

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Oct 17 Sep 17 Nov 17

69.60 126.25 25.20

+.72 +.40 +.10

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Oct 17 Sep 17 Sep 17 Sep 17

48.41 1.6189 162.44 2.928

Hogs Milk Copper

CLOSE 21812.09 9086.30 744.00 11785.92 6278.41 2444.04 1703.08 25319.63 1369.74

A

M

CHG. -87.80 -114.64 +0.82 -19.37 -19.07 -8.47 -3.96 -66.81 -1.80

J

%CHG. WK -0.40% t -1.25% t +0.11% s -0.16% t -0.30% t -0.35% t -0.23% t -0.26% t -0.13% t

J

A

MO QTR s s t s s s t s t s t s t t t s t t

Coffee

YTD +10.37% +0.47% +12.79% +6.59% +16.63% +9.17% +2.56% +8.08% +0.93%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

35.81

43.03 37.92

-.06 -0.2 -10.8

Aegion Corp

AEGN

17.18

26.68 20.55

-.06 -0.3 -13.3 +8.1 16

Amdocs

DOX

54.91

67.98 63.12

-.19 -0.3

Ameren Corp

AEE

46.84

59.99 60.25 +.34 +0.6 +14.8 +21.7 21 51.10 35.51 +.04 +0.1 -21.6 -12.0 13

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

ABInBev

BUD

98.28 136.08 116.09

Arch Coal

ARCH

59.05

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

8.14

15.45

-0.5

-3.7

Bank of America

BAC

14.81

25.80 23.76

BDC

60.06

81.33 73.25 +.08 +0.1

-.07 -0.3

Boeing

BA

15.85

GM

... Home Depot

HD

-2.0 +0.4 14

8.50 +.35 +4.3 -38.2 -31.0 19

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.39

36.61 24.50 +.25 +1.0 -25.4

-5.4 12

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

52.69

74.83 61.29 -1.99 -3.1 -16.7 +17.1 28

Centene Corp.

CNC

50.00

87.94 85.70

Charter

CHTR 241.50 408.83 390.33 -6.72 -1.7 +35.6 +57.2 22

-.55 -0.6 +51.7 +22.1 19

52-WK LO HI 30.13

38.55 35.49 +.19 +0.5

119.20 160.86 149.10 9.24

5.12

1.76 Lee Ent

1.75

3.92

2.25

1.60 Lowes 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc ... McDonald’s

+1.9 +15.5

5

1.52 3.56

-.03 -0.6 -22.5 -16.4 ...

... -22.4 -17.9 +2.7

5

...

5

...

LOW

64.87

86.25 73.01 -2.81 -3.7

MNK

35.04

77.42 37.21 +.09 +0.2 -25.3 -54.4

... 18 1.64f

MA

96.13 134.24 133.07

-.73 -0.5 +28.9 +40.6 34

0.88

MCD

110.33 159.98 158.81

-.83 -0.5 +30.5 +41.5 27

3.76

...

MON

97.35 118.97 116.77

-.38 -0.3 +11.0 +14.2 22

2.16

0.20 Olin

OLN

18.24

33.88 30.09

-.51 -1.7 +17.5 +46.8 44

0.80

5.68 Peabody Energy

BTU

22.58

30.95 27.99 +.51 +1.9

... Peak Resorts

3.90

PRFT

14.15

20.79 17.65

-.10 -0.6

+0.9 -11.7 34

...

0.92 Post Holdings

POST

68.76

89.04 85.01

-.23 -0.3

+5.7

...

-.48 -0.4

+8.0 +35.0 15 2.00f

RGA RELV

104.61 141.89 135.87 3.84

51.45

...

... -14.4 +4.2 dd -0.2 49

7.59

-.19 -2.4 +63.6 +59.8 35

... 2.10

Citigroup

C

45.16

69.86 67.23 +.38 +0.6 +13.1 +45.0 13

SR

59.54

77.05 76.45

-.35 -0.5 +18.4 +18.0 22

CBSH

45.37

60.61 54.58 +.21 +0.4

-5.6 +18.1 20 0.90b Stifel Financial

SF

36.71

56.62 48.58

-.14 -0.3

Edgewell

EPC

69.63

84.45 74.90

-.32 -0.4

+2.6

TGT

48.56

79.33 56.46

-.08 -0.1 -21.8 -16.2 11 2.48f

Emerson

EMR

49.22

64.36 58.43

-.39 -0.7

+4.8 +14.8 25

1.92 UPS B

UPS

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.98

60.07 42.80 +.23 +0.5

-4.1 -11.8 15

1.10 US Bancorp

USB

42.17

56.61 51.81

Enterprise Financial EFSC

29.65

46.25 38.35

-.05 -0.1 -10.8 +29.8 17

0.44 US Steel

X

0.32 Verizon

102.12 120.44 113.55 -1.05 -0.9

-2.7 +30.4 16 -1.0 +7.3 19

3.32

+0.9 +22.3 16

1.12

15.72

41.83 24.89 +.64 +2.6 -24.6 +16.7 dd

0.20

-.13 -0.3

Esco Technologies

ESE

42.95

63.80 53.50

-.45 -0.8

VZ

42.80

54.83 48.28

-.07 -0.1

-3.6 10

2.31

ESRX

57.80

77.61 60.93

-.69 -1.1 -11.4 -19.5 10

... WalMart

WMT

65.28

81.99 79.96

-.06 -0.1 +15.7 +12.9 18

2.04

-.12 -2.8 -36.6 +29.8 dd

... Walgreen Boots

WBA

75.18

88.00 81.36 +.08 +0.1

-1.7 +0.1 17 1.60f

WFC

43.55

59.99 52.03

-5.6 +10.5 13

Foresight Energy

FELP FF

3.45 10.24

8.33

4.10

16.58 13.18

-.17 -1.3

-5.2 +32.9 16 0.24a Wells Fargo

-.19 -0.4

-9.6

1.52

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Sales of new homes cool • New U.S. single-family home sales unexpectedly fell in July, dropping to their lowest level in seven months. The Commerce Department said on Wednesday new home sales tumbled 9.4 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 571,000 units last month, the lowest level since December 2016. The percentage drop was the largest since August 2016 and confounded economists’ expectations for a 0.3 percent gain. June’s sales pace was revised up to 630,000 units from the previously reported 610,000 units. Home sales in May also were not as weak as previously reported, taking some of the sting from July’s report. In addition to recent data showing a plunge in both housing starts and permits in July, the unexpected decline in new home sales suggests the housing market could be cooling. A separate report from the Mortgage Bankers Association on Wednesday showed applications for loans to buy a house decreased last week. Wal-Mart launches voiceactivated shopping • The world’s largest retailer is diving into voice-activated shopping. But unlike online leader Amazon, WalMart is not doing it alone. The Bentonville, Ark.-based company said Wednesday it is working with Google to offer hundreds of thousands of items from laundry detergent to Legos for voice shopping through Google Assistant. The capability will be available in late September. It’s Google’s biggest retail partnership — and the most personalized shopping experience it offers — as it tries to broaden the reach of its voicepowered assistant Home speaker. The move underscores Wal-Mart’s drive to compete in an area dominated by Amazon’s Alexapowered Echo device. Lowe’s misses earnings estimates • Lowe’s Cos. Inc., the No. 2 home improvement retailer in the United States, on

Wednesday reported lower-thanexpected quarterly earnings and warned of slower growth in profit margins, as it spends more on marketing to boost sales in a robust home improvement market. Mooresville, N.C.-based Lowe’s net income rose 21.4 percent to $1.42 billion or $1.68 per share in the second quarter ended Aug. 4. Excluding one-time items, the company earned $1.57 per share, missing analysts’ average estimate of $1.61, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S. Net sales climbed 6.8 percent to $19.50 billion. Analysts had expected $19.53 billion. Sales at Lowe’s stores open for more than a year rose 4.5 percent, edging past the 4.3 percent expected by analysts on average, according to research firm Consensus Metrix. Lowe’s shares fell 3.7 percent to close Wednesday at $73.01. Uber losses narrow as bookings climb • Uber Technologies Inc. reported on Wednesday that its losses narrowed in the second quarter by 9 percent and ride bookings rose, but the company is still a long way from being profitable. Uber said its net loss was $645 million, down from $708 million in the first quarter and $991 million in the fourth quarter of last year. Last year, San Francisco-based Uber lost about $3 billion. As a private company, Uber is not required to publicly disclose its finances, but it started the practice earlier this year as it eyes an initial public offering in the near future. The company said its gross ride bookings for the second quarter reached $8.7 billion, up from $7.5 billion in the first quarter. The number of global trips on the app increased 150 percent over the previous year, with growth strongest in developing markets. Since 2010, Uber has raised more than $15 billion from investors, which has allowed it to continue to operate at a loss. From staff and wire reports

4.25 3.75 3.50

.0581 .7909 .3163 1.2828 .7959 .1502 1.1752 .0156 .2763 .009131 .056598 .0169 .0756 .000883 1.0326

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

Silver

+3.80 +.07 -.40

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.00 1.11 1.22 1.31 1.75 2.17 2.75

... -0.02 -0.01 -0.02 -0.03 -0.04 -0.04

.29 .44 .58 .76 1.14 1.55 2.23

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

1.13 .63 .38

CHG

CLOSE

1288.90 17.03 980.90

Gold

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

.0580 .7909 .3174 1.2804 .7972 .1501 1.1821 .0156 .2771 .009173 .056527 .0169 .0760 .000887 1.0359

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.24 -0.01 1.72

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.54 +0.02

Barclays USAggregate

2.48 +0.02 1.93

...

Barclays US High Yield 5.77 -0.03 6.34 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.66 +0.04 3.25

Barclays US Corp

3.13 +0.02 2.77

10-Yr. TIPS

.38 -0.06

.06

...

Express Scripts FutureFuel

-5.6 +20.9 31

... Target Corp.

+.58 +.0281 +3.32 -.011

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.17 percent Wednesday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

0.28

Commerce Banc.

-3.6 19

1.28 Spire Inc

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

...

SKIS

... ReinsGrp

4.75

...

0.28 Perficient

... Reliv

6.20

+1.6

$14.39 PE: 12.9 Yield: ...

ExchangeRates

Platinum

-.81 -0.5 +11.2 +13.1 21

A

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

4.65

LEE

$5.28

Interestrates Interestrates

0.88 Huttig Building Prod HBP

+7.5 +59.0 14 0.48f Monsanto Co

126.31 246.49 238.09 -1.66 -0.7 +52.9 +81.6 25 8.05

1.96 General Motors

... dd 0.35p MasterCard

9.04 +.08 +0.9 -13.0 -38.1 14

Belden Inc

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

+8.4 +8.9 17

-.80 -0.7 +10.1

86.47 77.66 +1.02 +1.3

-2.4 14

TKR

J J 52-week range

Vol.: 18.4m (6.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $516.9 m

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$34.10

CHICAGO BOT

Live cattle

M

4

A

Vol.: 4.3m (7.2x avg.) PE: 14.4 Mkt. Cap: $1.21 b Yield: 1.8%

Soybeans

10 DAYS

J J 52-week range

$22.09

PE: ... Yield: ...

S&P 500

2,440

10 DAYS

J J 52-week range

$20.50

$86.25

2,480

Close: 21,812.09 Change: -87.80 (-0.4%)

20,000

A

EXPR

Close: $6.56 1.07 or 19.5% The retailer reported better second-quarter results than analysts expected.

$35

Dow Jones industrials

21,860

Express

LZB

Close: $24.95 -6.30 or -20.2% The furniture company had a weak fiscal first quarter as its upholstery manufacturing business struggled.

26

Vol.: 26.3m (4.3x avg.) PE: 22.9 Mkt. Cap: $61.64 b Yield: 2.2%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

La-Z-Boy

CREE

Close: $22.21 -0.82 or -3.6% The energy efficient lighting maker reported disappointing profit and made a weak forecast for the current quarter. $28

80

$64.87

22,120

Cree

LOW

Close: $73.01 -2.81 or -3.7% The home improvement retailer fell short of expectations in the second quarter and gave a weak profit forecast. $85

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2444.04 12174.30 7382.65 27401.67 5115.39 51280.17 19434.64 70477.63 15063.16 8955.94

CHG

CHG

YTD

-8.47 -55.04 +0.91 +246.99 -16.47 -52.81 +50.80 +466.38 +78.20 -7.89

-0.35% -0.45% +0.01% +0.91% -0.32% -0.10% +0.26% +0.67% +0.52% -0.09%

+9.17% +6.04% +3.36% +24.55% +5.20% +12.35% +1.68% +17.02% -1.47% +8.95%

Whole Foods shareholders agree to Amazon takeover FTC declines to block acquisition of the organic grocer ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Whole Foods shareholders and federal regulators approved Amazon’s $13.7 billion acquisition of the organic grocer, a deal that could bring big changes to the supermarket industry and how people order groceries online. By buying Whole Foods, Amazon is taking a bold step into brick-and-mortar, with more than 460 stores, including three in the St. Louis area, and potentially very lucrative data about how shoppers behave offline. Two moves forward came Wednesday. Whole Foods shareholders gave their blessing to a marriage that CEO John Mackey had called “love at first sight.” And the Federal Trade Commission said in a brief statement that

it had looked into competition concerns and would not block the deal. The FTC investigated whether the takeover “substantially lessened competition” or “constituted an unfair method of competition,” said Bruce Hoffman, the acting director of the agency’s Bureau of Competition. “Based on our investigation we have decided not to pursue this matter further.” A union that represents foodindustry workers had asked the FTC to scrutinize the deal closely, saying it could hurt competition and lead to job cuts. Regulators tend to block deals when two direct competitors are combining, and Amazon — despite its dominance in the online marketplace — doesn’t currently have a big groceries business.

Before the deal was announced in June, Whole Foods had been under intense shareholder pressure to improve results and retain customers who have more choices about where to get natural foods. As Whole Foods grew, more supermarkets offered similar organic and natural foods, but at cheaper prices. Amazon and Whole Foods have not given many details about what might change for customers, though Mackey told Whole Foods employees at a meeting that he thought Amazon would help with efforts on costcutting and a loyalty program. Mackey had said the deal came about after a “whirlwind courtship” and that “it was truly love at first sight.”

Stocks fall as Trump threatens shutdown REUTERS

NEW YORK • U.S. stocks closed lower on Wednesday as investors grappled with a threat from President Donald Trump to shut down the government if Congress fails to fund a Mexico border wall. Stocks managed to briefly pare losses after comments from U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan calling a government shutdown unnecessary. Yet that was not enough to calm nerves as the deadline to approve spending measures draws near and a fight looms over raising the cap on government borrowing. Congress will have about 12 working days when it returns from its summer recess on Sept. 5 to raise the debt ceiling before the U.S. Treasury exhausts the last of its options to remain cur-

rent on all of the federal government’s obligations. Credit ratings agency Fitch Ratings said a failure to raise the ceiling in a timely manner would prompt it to review its rating on U.S. sovereign debt, “with potentially negative implications.” “What we’ve seen over this last week or so in financial markets has been a bit of wiggling around regarding the U.S. political situation,” said Paul Eitelman, multiasset investment strategist at Russell Investments in Seattle. “Ultimately, I don’t think markets care that much about the noise coming out of Washington, D.C., but they’re trying to translate what that noise means for the potential for tax reform.” Trump’s comments also affected the bond and currency markets, with the dollar index slipping 0.4 to 93.14 and 10-

Year U.S. Treasury yields falling a touch below 2.17 percent on safety buying. Investors have grown increasingly concerned about Trump’s ability to legislate his pro-growth agenda given the near-constant political turbulence in the White House. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 87.8 points, or 0.4 percent, to 21,812.09, the S&P 500 lost 8.44 points, or 0.34 percent, to 2,444.07 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 19.07 points, or 0.3 percent, to 6,278.41. Investors looked toward a speech by Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen at a meeting of central bankers in Jackson, Wyo., on Friday, which will be scrutinized for clues on the U.S. central bank’s monetary policy.


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

1

¢

EACH

with $5 minimum purchase before taxes

1

¢

Limit 3 per household/business.

Office Depot® Brand Composition Books 122-8582, 139-4515, 139-4524, 139-4533

EACH

with $5 minimum purchase before taxes

Reg. 75¢ SAVE 74¢

Limit 3 per household/business.

Office Depot® Brand Ballpoint Pens, 10‑PK Black, Blue, Red

1

Reg. $1.59 SAVE $1.58

¢ EACH

Offers not valid in Hawa ii,

1

¢

Alaska, Puerto Rico and

with $5 minimum pur purchase befor before taxes

Virgin Islands.

Limit 3 per household/business.

EACH

with $5 minimum purchase before taxes

Limit 10 per household/business.

Office Depot® Brand Scissors

Office Depot Brand 2‑Pocket Poly Plastic Folders ®

Blunt-Tip nt Tip 972-029 Pointed-Tip 971-939

Reg. 99¢ SAVE 98¢

Without Prongs 480-387, With Prongs 699-753

Reg. 50¢ SAVE 49¢

Valid 8/21/17 ‑ 8/26/17

Plus, SAVE up to $100

on these Realspace® Magellan Performance Height‑Adjustable Desks Exclusively for Office Depot OfficeMax ®

®

Sit or stand while you work Help improve your health at the push of a button

Shown with Realspace® Winsley Chair

Realspace® Magellan Height‑Adjustable Desk

Realspace® Magellan Performance Electric Height‑Adjustable Desk

Espresso 787-781 Cherry 102-866 Gray 119-694

Espresso 358-370 Cherry 216-230

• Pneumatic lift-assist controls make it easy to adjust

• 4 power outlets and 2 USB outlets

• Cable management cord holder

• Electric push button controls make it easy to adjust the desk height from 30"- 47"

Learn more at officedepot.com or visit a store near you! Assembly required for all furniture. Available by delivery only in select locations. Delivery fee may apply. Selection varies by location. Accessories not included. Prices and offers offers available in store only 8/21/17 – 8/26/17 (unless otherwise noted) or while supplies last, whichever occurs first, and are not available in Office Office Depot or OfficeMax convenience/clearance/closing stores, Offers not valid in Hawaii, Alaska, Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands. No rain checks or substitutions online or by phone, including orders for in-store pick up. Cannot be combined with Rewards Member or Business Select pricing. Offers except where required by law. We reserve the right to limit quantities sold to each customer. We are not responsible for errors. Intermediate markdowns may have been taken. Furniture selection varies by location. Of fice Depot is a trademark of The Office Club, Inc. OfficeMax is a trademark of OMX, Inc. ©2017 Office Depot, Inc. All rights reserved. Office

Click & chat 24/7 officedepot.com

Call or text 24/7 800.GO.DEPOT (800.463.3768)

Visit us in store RU082117


NATION

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A13

Trump’s shutdown threat draws heat Democrats object to border wall as president pushes to fulfill campaign promise BY MIKE DEBONIS AND ELISE VIEBECK The Washington Post

WASHINGTON • Congressio-

nal Democrats are holding their ground in opposition to President Donald Trump’s proposed border wall after Trump threatened to “close down the government” if lawmakers do not provide money for the project when they return from August recess. On Wednesday, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, DN.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., repeated their objections to funding a wall and argued Trump would be responsible if the government shuts down over the impasse. “If the President pursues this path, against the wishes of both Republicans and Democrats, as well as the majority of the American people, he will be heading towards a government shutdown which nobody will like and which won’t accomplish anything,” Schumer said in a statement. Trump’s threat Tuesday night during a campaign-style rally in Phoenix raised the stakes for the showdown over government spending that awaits lawmakers. Federal spending authority expires in a little more than a month, requiring Congress to act to keep the government fully operating past Sept. 30. Many Republicans are hoping to include border wall funding in any deal to keep the government open, and key conservative lawmakers have rallied to Trump’s side. But Democrats on Wednesday showed no sign of backing down. “Last night, President Trump yet again threatened to cause chaos in the lives of millions of Americans if he doesn’t get his way,” Pelosi said in a statement. “Make no mistake: The President said he will purposefully hurt American communities to force American taxpayers to fund an immoral, ineffective and expensive border wall.” Trump, escalating a conflict that has been brewing for months, told supporters Tues-

DIGEST Federal judge tosses Texas voter ID law A federal judge Wednesday again threw out Texas’ voter ID requirements that she previously compared to a “poll tax” on minorities, dealing another court setback to state Republican leaders over voting rights. U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos rejected a weakened version of the law signed by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott earlier this year. The new version didn’t

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump salutes as he steps from Marine One to walk to the White House in Washington on Wednesday on his return from Nevada.

day night: “Believe me, if we have to close down our government, we’re building that wall. Let me be very clear to Democrats in Congress who oppose a border wall and stand in the way of border security: You are putting all of America’s safety at risk.” Neither Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., nor House Speaker Paul Ryan, RWis., has weighed in on Trump’s remarks, but some conservative lawmakers are urging Republicans to support the president. “Congress would do well to join the President by keeping our own commitments and including border wall funding in upcoming spending measures,” Freedom Caucus Chairman Rep.

expand the list of acceptable photo identifications — meaning gun licenses remained sufficient proof to vote, but not college student IDs. But the changes would allow people who lack a required ID to cast a ballot if they signed an affidavit and brought paperwork that showed their name and address, such as a bank statement or utility bill. The new version was supported by the U.S. Justice Department, which under President Barack Obama had joined Democrats and

STAY SAFE, and don’t let your gutters stop the game!

Mark Meadows, R-N.C., wrote on Twitter before Tuesday’s rally. Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, another voice within the group, repeated the same message. “Secure borders are vital to natl security — Congress shld fund border wall in govt funding legislation this fall — time to keep our promise,” he tweeted Tuesday. Rasmussen Reports, a Republican firm, conducted a poll of likely U.S. voters late last month and found that a solid majority of Americans oppose building a border wall, with 37 percent supporting Trump’s proposal versus 56 percent against. That is largely unchanged from a poll conducted in February by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center that found

minority rights groups in suing over the law that was first passed in 2011. But that position has changed with President Donald Trump in charge. He has established a commission to investigate allegations of voter fraud in the 2016 elections. Harvey strengthens as it nears Texas; could become hurricane • Former Tropical Storm Harvey regained strength Wednesday as it approached the Texas Gulf Coast and could become a hurricane by the time it makes landfall later this

77% OFF LABOR!

Receive a $200 Visa Gift Card with purchase! Plus, receive a $25 Gas Card FREE with in-home estimate!*

Americans opposed the wall 62 percent to 35 percent. House Republicans voted last month to provide $1.6 billion in seed funding for the border wall as part of a larger spending package. That bill is expected to be taken up in the Senate, where Democrats can filibuster any measure that funds the wall or includes other GOP provisions that they have termed “poison pills.” A 2017 spending bill passed into law earlier this year did not include border wall funding after Democrats refused to accept it. That impasse increased pressure on Republicans to deliver wall funding in a future spending battle.

Democrats uniformly slammed Trump’s remarks, with several calling the president’s speech “unhinged” on Twitter. Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., the top Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee, called Trump’s threat the “polar opposite of leadership” and said he should be held accountable if the government shuts down. “Wasting tens of billions on a useless and immoral border wall is a nonstarter for Democrats, particularly at a time of such real need in our communities. Congress should use this funding to help American families — not fulfill campaign applause lines,” Lowey said Wednesday in a statement.

week. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Harvey, currently a tropical depression, was likely to intensify as it moves over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico and arrive in Texas on Friday. It was expected to bring heavy rainfall to parts of eastern Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi. At 4 p.m. CST Wednesday, Harvey was located 460 miles southeast of Port Mansfield, Texas. It was moving northwest at about 2 mph and had maximum sustained winds of 35 mph.

Clinton: My ‘skin crawled’ as Trump hovered on debate stage • Hillary Clinton says Donald Trump’s pacing, hovering demeanor onstage during an October 2016 presidential debate made her so uncomfortable “my skin crawled.” She says in her upcoming book that Trump shadowed her so closely she had to resist shouting out, “Back up you creep, get away from me.” The Democratic presidential nominee recounts her struggle to keep composed during that pivotal Oct. 9 faceoff in St.

CALL

COPD?

BEFORE

Shortness of Breath?

AUG. 31st!

Ladders are dangerous! is the permanent, clog-free gutter solution!

(314) 227-9022

(314) (618)222-7160 744-1725

Gas card ($25.00) with in-home estimate to home owner(s). Limit one per household. Gas card with estimate is valued at $25.00. Visa gift card ($200.00) with purchase will be mailed after installation and payment in full. Minimum purchase required for $200 Visa gift card. New orders only. Payment options available with minimum purchase and approved credit. Other restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer or previous job. Exp 8/31/17.

Where Quality Counts... Since 1977

bUY 2 gEt 1

FrEE FiNaNCiNg availablE

Ask about Senior and Military Discounts

*Standard Install, White Only. Savings off retail pricing. Minimums apply, Not valid on previous sales. Cannot be combined with other offers. Financing offer for those who qualify. Call for details. Exp 9/30/17

Call Now For Your Free Estimate

314-764-3500

618-215-7383

Take Part in a Research Study Please call

314-514-8509

www.clinicalresearchcenter.com

Louis less than a month before the election. Two days earlier, their bitter campaign was rocked by the release of footage in which Trump bragged aggressively about groping women. During the town-hall style debate, the 6-foot-3 Trump repeatedly hovered over Clinton, who’s closer to 5-foot-5, as she responded to questions. Teen back with family after 11 days missing in Smokies • A teenager who went missing for 11 days without food in Tennessee’s Great Smoky Mountains National Park is back with his family after he emerged from the woods this week and flagged a passing boat for help, the National Park Service said Wednesday. Park officials said 18-yearold Austin Bohanan was found uninjured Tuesday. Park Chief Ranger Steve Kloster said he remained confident throughout the search that Bohanan was alive, even though a rescue team of more than 100 people found no clues he had survived across a rugged 6,700-acre search area. Officials believe Bohanan was within those search parameters the whole time. Officials said Bohanan had become separated from his stepfather while hiking. From news services


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

THURSDAy • 08.24.2017 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

The treasurer’s trove Secretive office controls too much money with too little transparency and oversight.

A

lawsuit challenging the dark domain of the St. Louis treasurer’s office merits a sympathetic look by taxpayers. The office operates independently, with minimal accountability, and hoards a majority of revenue from the city’s parking operations while the city struggles to balance its budget. The lawsuit, by attorney Elkin Kistner, should shine some much-needed sunlight into an office little understood by the St. Louisans who help fill its coffers. Treasurer Tishaura Jones has positioned herself to come to the rescue of the cityowned Scottrade Center, whose current renovation is the subject of a funding dispute. Comptroller Darlene Green seeks to block St. Louis from incurring more than $105 million in debt and interest to pay for the renovation, which would benefit the center’s sole tenant, the St. Louis Blues. Money flowing into the treasurer’s office shouldn’t be for Jones to dole out as she sees fit. It belongs in the city’s general fund. Green and plaintiffs in a separate lawsuit want to block the city from paying for the renovation. Green refused to sign a finance agreement to issue investment bonds, saying the city’s credit rating would suffer because of the added debt. The treasurer’s reserve fund is the subject of so much controversy that the Board of Aldermen passed a bill, which Mayor Lyda Krewson signed, seeking to transfer some revenue Jones’ controls into the general fund. The comptroller’s office says Jones has $32 million in the Parking

Commission fund, of which she is allowed to keep at least 60 percent after her office pays its bills. The remaining 40 percent is supposed to go into general revenue. Former Treasurer Larry C. Williams operated the fund similarly. The reserve fund provides financial backing for the treasurer’s bonding authority. But critics say there is little oversight and question why the treasurer needs bonding authority anyway. Kistner’s lawsuit challenges the basis for the treasurer’s authority. He argues that “nothing in the city charter gives the treasurer any authority over parking matters.” Debbie Johnson, a spokeswoman for Jones, said the office could not comment on the lawsuit but noted that Kistner has unsuccessfully sued the treasurer’s office before. Williams’ tenure as treasurer from 1981 through 2012 was marked by a federal investigation and scandals. He convinced the Legislature in 1989 to grant him bonding authority. Over time, he developed a financial fiefdom, building parking garages and making development deals. Jones has pledged to change the treasurer’s office structure, but her office still operates beyond local oversight. During her mayoral campaign this year, Jones declined to answer questions from this editorial board. Jones might hope to boost future political prospects by asserting herself as the hero who saved the Scottrade Center renovation. That’s not her office’s role, and taxpayers shouldn’t tolerate it when so many other city needs are going unmet.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Students want an education, not social engineering If Missouri State University President Clif Smart really wants to take on Mizzou (“Missouri State U. takes on Mizzou,” Aug. 20), he won’t follow that failing university’s path of self-imposed destruction-by-diversity. Mizzou tried that approach, and its policies attracted more liberal professors, more left-wing extremist students and suppression of free speech. What followed was predictable: a huge drop in enrollment and fundraising. Missouri State’s corresponding increase in enrollment from St. Charles County and other areas came about for specific reasons. Students — and their parents who pay the bills — want an education, not social engineering and political correctness. And parents want safety for their children as they pursue their education. If Missouri State follows the same path as Mizzou, it will get the same result. William Sparacino • Dardenne Prairie

Editorial on protecting First Amendment gets it right

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

The ice rink floor is removed as part of renovations at Scottrade Center.

Undermining markets

T

Threat to the Affordable Care Act remains alive and expensive.

he Congressional Budget Office, whose estimates of the disastrous impact of various Republican health care bills did so much to sink them, reported this month on the potential impact of President Donald Trump’s Plan B for getting rid of the Affordable Care Act. The prognosis isn’t good, mainly because the goal has become simply to sabotage Obamacare without coming up with something better to replace it. Several crises ago, Trump threatened to eliminate $8 billion in cost-sharing reduction payments made to insurance companies. The so-called CSR payments reimburse companies for reducing out-of-pocket costs for about 6 million low-income Americans who’ve bought midlevel plans on the state and federal insurance exchanges. Trump has called the CSR payments a “bailout” of insurance companies. In fact, the money pays for low-income enrollees’ co-payments and deductibles. The mere threat that they might go away has made insurers wary of selling Obamacare policies next year without steep price increases. Democrats asked the Congressional Budget Office to quantify how much premiums might go up. The answer: 20 percent more. This on top of other anticipated increases because of uncertainty surrounding the Affordable Care Act. Eliminating the CSR payments would actually cost the government $194 billion more over 10 years, the budget office said. That’s because people who had been getting help with their deductibles and co-pays would then become eligible for

additional tax credits to help pay insurance costs. In the short run, killing the subsidies would further destabilize an already-shaky insurance market, the budget office said. The Trump administration has continued to pay the CSR subsidies on a month-to-month basis even though a federal court last year sided with House Republicans who claimed the subsidies are illegal because Congress never appropriated money for them. That decision is on appeal. If either Trump or the appeals court decides to stop the payments, the insurance market will get shakier, but government tax credits will make up the difference for consumers. A far better solution would be to stabilize the insurance markets. Better still would be to fix Obamacare rather than replace it. Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., plan committee hearings in early September on a bipartisan bill on market stabilization. Alexander has asked Trump to continue the CSR payments until Congress can provide insurers with the predictability they need. Before North Korea and Charlottesville, Trump demanded that Congress take another crack at replacing the Affordable Care Act. That’s unlikely to happen. In September, Congress will have only 12 working days to pass a budget and raise the debt ceiling. It’ll be hard to squeeze a health care fix into that schedule, but America needs rational, bipartisan cooperation on fixing what’s wrong with the ACA, not more “kill Obamacare” proposals that would hurt millions of Americans and cost billions of dollars.

Bravo to the Post-Dispatch for its editorial “First Amendment under attack” (Aug. 18). I found its publication to be resoundingly, and unexpectedly, invigorating. There is hope yet when the normally left-wing espousing Post-Dispatch actually prints something they believe in, perhaps to the extent of momentarily jeopardizing their standing with the leftists. To think that protecting the First Amendment is vital, and to actually printing it is another matter. Kudos. Bob Bainter • St. Louis County

Catholic Church has spoken out against racism, hatred Tom O’Connor’s letter (“Catholic Church is inexplicably silent in face of hate rhetoric,” Aug. 22) castigating the Catholic Church for not speaking out on the president’s response to events in Charlottesville demands a response. The church has been anything but “inexplicably silent” on racism and hatred. Locally and nationally, Catholic officials did speak out in mass media. And it’s not just a matter of Charlottesville; if O’Connor followed the church on social media or got the local Catholic paper, he would see the long history of Catholic statements and, far more important, active efforts to unite our region and our country. It was one of St. Louis’ archbishops who integrated Catholic schools, in 1947, long before it became common elsewhere. History also teaches that white supremacists are no friends of Catholics. One example: When the Ku Klux Klan was reconstituted in the early 20th century, it had a virulently anti-Catholic stance, and that is when it grew to its largest size, numbering upward of 6 million by 1924. Locally, the archdiocese has two special events planned in September, including a social justice conference Sept. 30. To call Catholics silent on this issue is preposterous. Ken Colombini • Manchester

Democratic Party should expel Sen. Chappelle-Nadal Voting out state Sen. Maria ChappelleNadal from the Legislature might be a hard thing to do. Other members could be wary of it happening to them.

I don’t know what procedure they would use, but it would be a good move by the Missouri Democratic Party to expel her. At least the rest of the party won’t be smeared by her indiscretion. Dan Kilper • Crestwood

Confederate statues are grotesque, must be removed Confederate statues are nothing more than glorified participation awards for the team that came in second place when the good old United States of America defeated them in the Civil War. They represent the sale of human beings into slavery. They are grotesque, and should be taken down nationwide. Also, if you’re waving a Confederate flag to honor those soldiers, then you should fly the only flag that ended up helping them out. That is the white flag they were forced to wave when they were cornered by Union soldiers. Both the statues and the Confederate flag have nothing to do with real patriotism. In fact, they represent treason. Deb Vermaas • Salem, Ill.

Republicans should get Trump to resign Regarding the editorial “The stability question” (Aug. 20): The leading Republican members in Congress must join together now to meet with President Donald Trump and explain to him why it is in his best interests to resign the office. If he refuses, which he likely would, as he doesn’t like anybody telling him what to do, then they must publicly demand he resign. They can clarify that on the basis that his legislative agenda has a better chance of passage if he is no longer the lighting rod against it. If they use a tactic for him to save face, it might just work. Trump’s instability as president is the clear and present danger to our democracy and the safety and security of the nation. It goes beyond domestic tranquility, reaching to the extreme uncertainty in foreign affairs in East Asia. We are past the threshold of Republicans having a serious consideration of Trump’s fitness for office. That says it all. Laurence C. Day • Ladue

President is turning the country around The editorial “The stability question” (Aug. 20) was preposterous. It has been a long time since the country has been in this good of shape. The economy is growing. Unemployment is way down. Jobs are being created. Illegal immigration has practically dried up. The NATO countries have responded to the challenge to pick up the slack on their defense spending. The United Nations has unanimously voted to sanction North Korea. We have an education secretary who is taking on the teachers union. We have an Environmental Protection Agency secretary who is bringing sanity back to that agency. The importance of a strong defense has been reestablished. I could go on, but all of this has been done while President Donald Trump has had to fight the Democrats and the media tooth and nail, with the Post-Dispatch’s editorial being a good example of this. Ben Janson • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

08.24.2017 • THURSDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

IS THE HELICOPTER HERE? • The news that an airplane has been perfected that can hover over one spot, if true, is the most interesting in the field of aviation since the Wrights first demonstrated human flight at Kittyhawk. Whether this dream of the inventors or any other method of actual hovering has been realized, the hovering airplane would revolutionize present war methods. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Can Trump control the wave of racism he has released?

With Bannon now outside the White House, president could start by preaching tolerance. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

Lyndon Johnson, deciding whether to fire FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, famously reasoned that “it’s probably better to have him inside the tent pissing out, than outside the tent pissing in.” President Donald Trump has made a different choice, opting to fire Stephen Bannon, the nationalist envoy of the “alt-right” in the White House. And now Bannon, who only last week was boasting that his rivals within the administration were “wetting themselves,” is on the outside, fly unzipped. Bannon has returned to Breitbart News, his former haunt and the voice of the white right, and on Tuesday night, when Trump addressed the nation about Afghanistan, Bannon’s Breitbart hit Trump with three unfriendly headlines: Trump “defends flip-flop in somber speech” “His McMaster’s voice: Is Trump Afghanistan policy that different from Obama’s?” “Donald Trump echoes Obama’s ‘Blank Check’ rhetoric in

Afghanistan speech” Which way the flow goes now in these early days of the postBannon White House could well be determinative — not just for the Trump presidency but for the country as it grapples with a reemergence of white supremacists. Can Trump control the wave of racism he has released? Monday night brought an encouraging sign. Trump announced a responsible Afghanistan policy that was essentially a continuation of existing strategy — that is, not the pullout Trump had wanted nor Bannon’s cockamamie idea of turning the war over to the scandal-prone company formerly known as Blackwater. Just as important was the way he announced it, with an appeal to unity that had none of Bannon’s “American carnage” influence. “We cannot remain a force for peace in the world if we are not at peace with each other,” he said.“As we send our bravest to defeat our enemies overseas — and we will always win — let us find the courage to heal our divisions within.” But is that what Trump really wants? Or was Bannon right when he told The Weekly Standard after his dismissal that Trump’s “natural tendency — and I think you saw it this week on Charlottesville

Steve Bannon

ASSOCIATED PRESS

— his default position is the position of his base, the position that got him elected.” But Bannon’s cause for despair — “I think they’re going to try to moderate him ... I think it’ll be much more conventional” — is my cause for hope. The consequences could hardly be greater, because there are signs the country is on the cusp of a new wave of racial violence. Arie Perliger, who wrote an authoritative report on rising violence

by right-wing extremists while teaching at West Point and who now is director of security studies at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, says the recent violence in Charlottesville and elsewhere “is just the tip of the iceberg.” There have been a few hundred such incidents of domestic terrorism annually in recent years by far-right-affiliated perpetrators, but the previously gradual increase in violence is accelerating under Trump, for three reasons. They feel the election validated their worldview and indicated popular support for their views; they believe the Trump administration will be more tolerant of their actions; they are frustrated that, so far, Trump’s agenda has been largely thwarted. And now, Charlottesville. “Here, for the first time ever, they were able really to penetrate the American political system. Suddenly their views are less marginalized, and the president himself says there are fine people there,” Perliger tells me.“For 100 years, nobody could imagine an American president saying that. That he’s willing to endorse the leaders of the Confederate side of the Civil War, for them that’s an indication that their agenda has some seeds of support.”

Trump has much say over whether these seeds take root. The new Washington Post/ABC News poll finds that 9 percent of Americans believe it’s acceptable to hold Nazi or white-supremacist views. But because Americans make so many judgments through a partisan lens, any position Trump takes drives most Republicans to embrace the same position. In a SurveyMonkey poll, when respondents were told that Trump had said people on both sides in Charlottesville were responsible for the violence, Republicans reflexively agreed, 87 percent to 11 percent. Bannon was all about exploiting this, using the campaign and presidency to stoke racial grievances, to convince people that immigrants and “globalists” were to blame for their troubles. But now Bannon is outside the tent, doing what LBJ talked about. Trump is the one who matters. He can do what George W. Bush did, honorably, after 9/11, preaching tolerance. Or he can prove beyond any doubt that his “natural tendency” is as base as Bannon believes it to be. Dana Milbank dana.milbank@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

FREE SPEECH

Offensive statues should be protected under First Amendment Court decisions suggest that Confederate statuary constitutes protected symbolic speech. BY KENNETH F. WARREN

ASSOCIATED PRESS

White nationalist groups march with torches through the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 11.

There is truly no alternative to free speech When we are done talking, violence is the only thing we have left to resolve our disputes. BY ALEX NEZAM

Who is more moral? Person 1: Speaks out in order to further an immoral cause. Person 2: Uses violence in order to further a moral cause. There are too many people who think that the answer to this question is a matter of debate. But it seems to me that the difference between speech and violence is about as clear a moral distinction as one can make. “Punch a Nazi”? That sounds like a great way to get out that suppressed aggression, come off like a bad-ass, and feel morally justified all in one fell swoop. Someone should make shirts. What transpired in Charlottesville, Va., wasn’t a public lynching, nor was it an armed rebellion, nor was it the sudden resurgence of the Third Reich. It was a march. It is imperative to note that white supremacist marchers had the tool of real violence available to them, and they didn’t use it. Nevertheless, this exchange culminated with one white supremacist driving a car into a crowd of counterprotesters. What is one to make of this? Right-wing pundits were eager to define Black Lives Matter by the few who were burning down buildings after the death of Michael Brown. By this reasoning, the police would have been justified in treating all of those protesters like violent criminals. Should a few jihadists render all American Muslims violent by the same belief in the Quran? Obviously not. The Sean Hannitys of the world will be quick to exploit such hypocrisy on the left. Unless we remain logically consistent on this point, we grant white supremacists credence and triumphantly reinforce the narrative that Fox News has been spoon-feeding their millions of viewers each day.

If we grant that the murderous driver doesn’t throw a blanket of violence over the entire white supremacist group, then the perceived moral justification for “punching Nazis” must come from the notion that the act of carrying a flag with a swastika itself is the same as committing an act of violence. This would validate Nazi-punching as an act of defense. The Supreme Court already deliberated the legality of Nazis marching publicly in National Socialist Party of America v. Village of Skokie 40 years ago, ruling that carrying the swastika does not constitute “fighting words,” and is not considered violence. Which means punching them is an act of aggression, not defense. Perhaps some of us are beginning to feel that the First Amendment is not all it’s cracked up to be. At this point, the belabored defense of freedom of speech as an essential pillar of democracy is starting to sound like a right-wing trope that takes on the same droning character as the voice of your high school civics teacher. After all, in this situation, it seems to be doing more harm than good. Right? But what is the alternative to speech? There is truly no alternative. When we are done talking, violence is the only thing we have left to resolve our disputes. The First Amendment is not about giving a platform to deplorable ideas; it’s about coming to an agreement as a society that we’re not going to hurt each other when we inevitably disagree. It would be enormously helpful if we saw fewer people asserting “Punch a Nazi” into the ether on Facebook as though this were the moral insight of the century, and more people defending our most fundamental and most flouted value, even when it’s not fashionable. Alex Nezam is an Indian-American writer who lives in St. Louis.

Are statues that are offensive, reminding us of our racist history, protected under the First Amendment? As repugnant and politically incorrect as these statues may be, any attempt to force their removal would seem to constitute a violation of their First Amendment protections. Why, because these statues seem to be protected under what the courts have ruled to be protected “symbolic speech.” Most forms of spoken or written speech are protected by the Constitution’s First Amendment, particularly political expression. However, certain speech is not protected. For example, fighting words or speech aimed clearly at inciting violence; libel; obscenity; threats; false advertising in business (but allowed in political campaigns) are not protected speech. Although the constitutional framers were silent on protecting symbolic speech, the U.S. Supreme Court first ruled to protect symbolic speech in Stromberg v. California in 1931 when the court ruled against a California law that forbade protesters from displaying a red flag as a symbol of opposition to organized government. Since 1931, the concept of symbolic speech has been expanded by federal court rulings to cover a broader array of messaging considered a form of speech or expression. Protected symbolic speech may convey messages through sit-ins, protest signs, armbands, badges, flag burning, and all sorts of artistic expression such as dance, theater, paintings, photographs and statuary. Today, our society is clashing over the removal of certain statuary that proponents of removal argue remind us of our racist past, even celebrating it. It is completely understandable why certain groups, especially African-Americans, would deem such statuary offensive and push for its removal. The problem is that the statue of, say, Robert E. Lee might be offensive, but being offensive, according to federal court decisions, is not reason enough to allow for the removal of such statues under the First Amendment. The display of a Robert E. Lee statue by itself is unlikely to cause a riot any more than a gun by itself is likely to kill someone. Consequently, it seems that federal court decisions for the past 86 years would suggest that controversial Confederate statuary constitutes protected symbolic speech, regardless of the offensive messaging. As a liberal, I am frustrated by my liberal friends who want it both ways. They want to use the First Amendment to protect their speech, writings and artistic expressions, but they oppose allowing the other side their right of freedom of expression. For instance, last January, U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay defended a painting on a Capitol wall as constitutionally protected artistic expression. The artist was a local high school student who created

rather negative, piglike images of police as they confronted Ferguson protesters. Some felt the painting was offensive because it denigrated police, including Republican U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter, who decided to remove it from the wall. There was outrage over its removal with Clay and mostly other liberals, including myself, arguing that this young artist had a right to express his feelings through his painting under the First Amendment. But where are these defenders of this artwork now? Let’s face it, we are a bunch of hypocrites arguing that speech should be protected when we want our messages advanced, but quick to condemn freedom of expression when we do not like the message. This is a natural human inclination, but it does not pass the legal scrutiny of our federal courts. In Texas v. Johnson (1989), the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is removed from the University of Texas campus on Aug. 21.

Supreme Court’s Justice William Brennan ruled that flag burning, as offensive as it may be, constitutes symbolic speech that is constitutionally protected, reasoning “that the government may not prohibit expression simply because it disagrees with its message.” It should not be forgotten that the ACLU lost many of its members, especially Jewish members, after the ACLU successfully defended the right of a neoNazi group to march in Skokie, Ill., displaying very offensive Nazi images such as swastikas. However, the ACLU placed constitutional principle before their membership interests, and did the right thing. The ACLU acknowledged how repugnant to its organization this neoNazi march would be, but they argued that they had no choice, as advocates of civil liberties, but to support the constitutional right of these neo-Nazis to march. President Jimmy Carter also said at the time: “I must respect the decision of the Supreme Court allowing this group to express their views, even when those views are despicable and ugly.” Kenneth F. Warren is a professor of political science at St. Louis University.


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

OBITUARIES

Bartch, Harold S. - St. Charles Behm, R. James "Jim" - St. Louis Brannan, Jack "Steve" - St. Louis Bruns-Cook, Deborah Sue - Kansas City, MO, formerly St. Louis Drakesmith, Angeline Cantrell - Farmington, formerly of St. Louis Durant, Joseph Allen - St. Louis Gibson, James Dee, Sr. - St. Louis Hagemann, Lorin M. - St. Louis

Celebrations of Life

Hannon - see VanHoogstraat Jones, Frank Mack - St. Louis Kleinlein, Harold R. - O'Fallon, MO McCutcheon, Mary J. "Joey" - St. Louis McKay, George R. - St. Louis Mirras, James P. - St. Louis Poelker, Eugene B. - St. Louis Pusey, Robert "Bob" Charles - St. Louis Riechman, James M. - St. Louis

McKay, George R.

Monday, August 21, 2017. Survived by his love, Dorothy (McKay) Tippett; father of Dawn (James) Osborn, Bridget McKay and the late Georgie M cKa y; grandfather of Matthew and Ashley Osborn, Andrew and Colin McKay; Brother of Laverne Thul, Joan (the late Richard) Svejkosky, Terry "Bob" (the late Addie) M cKa y, Kathleen (Mike) Tustanowsky, Lorraine (Cliff) Politte, Gloria (Tom) Higgins, Rich a rd M c K a y and the late Charlie (Barb) McKay; all of Dorothy's family; loved uncle, cousin, friend and neighbor. Thank you to the special care workers at Delmar Garden's North. Services: Funeral 11:00 a.m., Monday, August 28, from Bartch, Harold S. HUTCHENS Mortuary 675 Graham Rd, Florissant. Interment 95, of Saint Charles, Missouri, Wednesday, August 16, 2017. He Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers was born in Piedmont, Missouri on July 8, 1922 to the late Sher- memorials to Stray Rescue of St. Louis. Visitation 4-8 Sunday, man and Ethel Bartch (nee Henson). August 27. Harold was a Factory Supervisor at Lever Brothers Factory for many years. He was married to the late Stella Mary Bartch (nee Mirras, James P. Golec). Harold is survived by his daughter, Carol (Steven) Passed away on Monday, August 21, 2017 at the age of Handley of Saint Peters, MO, grandsons, Michael (Laura Wright) 88 years. Beloved husband for 44 years of Joyce Bartch, Matthew P. (Paige Iaffaldano) Bartch and Jonathan E. Arbeiter Mirras. Son of the late Peter and Hressi Handley and daughter-in-law, Julie A. (late Harold) Bartch. Services: A service will be held in Harold's honor at St. Peter's Mirras. Dear Brother of the late Ida Vias (George), Cynthia Reid and Helen Papahronis (survived by Chris) and Brother-In-Law of Parish in St. Charles, MO at 9:30 a.m. on Friday, August 25th. the late Dianne Arbeiter Roach (Richard). Loving Nouno of Philip Vias, Dean Millonas and Lyle F. Gulley III. Dear Uncle, Cousin Behm, R. James "Jim" and Friend. Died at home on Wednesday, Services: The Funeral Service will be conducted at St. Nicholas August 16, 2017. Family Life Center, 12550 South Forty Drive, Town and Country, Please see https://www.stlouisc- MO 63141 on Friday, August 25 at 10AM. Visitation at the Family remation.com/obituary for full Life Center beginning at 9AM Friday until the start of the obituary service. Interment to follow at St. Matthew's Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to St. Nicholas Family Life Center Capital Campaign, 12550 South Forty Drive, Town and Country, MO 63141. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Brannan, Jack "Steve"

52, July 17, 2017. Beloved son of the late Jack and Sandy Brannan (nee Larkin), dear brother of the late Jason Brannan, uncle of Christabel Angeletti, loving friend of Julie Davis, dear nephew, cousin and friend. Services: Graveside services will be held Monday August 28,2017 at noon at Oak Grove Cemetery, St Charles Rock Road, St Louis, Mo. 63114

Bruns-Cook, Deborah Sue

Deborah Bruns-Cook, originally from St. Louis, passed away on Saturday, August 19, 2017 at her home in Kansas City, MO. She is survived by her devoted and loving husband, Gary; parents, Carl and Shirley Bruns; sister Janice Mantovani (John); nephew Ray Figueroa; great-niece and nephew, Ava and Noel Figueroa; step-children Chris Cook, Annelise Mendoza (Ivan), Jason Cook, and Justin Cook (Megan). Debbie was preceded in death by her brother, Carl Jr. Services: A celebration of Debbie's life will take place on Saturday, August 26th at 11:00 a.m. at Parkway United Church of Christ, 2841 N. Ballas Road, St.Louis, MO 63131. Visitation with family and friends will follow at the church. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Nature Conservancy, www.nature.org. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

Drakesmith, Angeline Cantrell

85, August 20, 2017. Visitation at Cozean Memorial Chapel in Farmington August 24, 12 - 8 p.m. Holy Rosary service 7 p.m. Share condolences at cozeanfuneralhome.com.

Durant, Joseph Allen

Joe Durant passed away after a brief illness on Sunday, August 20. He is lovingly remembered by his wife Nancy, daughters M e l i s s a (Scot t ) a n d Kris s y, step-daughters Beth and Patricia, and 2 granddaughters and 3 step-granddaughters. Services: A memorial service will be held Friday, August 25 at 4:00pm at Manchester Untied Methodist Church.

Gibson, James Dee, Sr.

88, passed away on Aug., 20, 2017. Dear husband of the late Marcella Gibson (nee Haines); Loving father of James D. Gibson Jr and Thomas Gibson; James was a member of Berlin Airlift Veterans Association. Services: Vis. Sun. Aug. 27, 2017 from 2 pm to 6 pm at Jay B Smith Funeral Home Maplewood Chapel; Funeral Mon. Aug. 28, 2017 at 12 pm Interment to follow at J.B. National Cemetery

Kleinlein, Harold R.

McCutcheon, Mary J. "Joey"

Aug 23. 2017. Vis. Hutchens Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd., Florissant Fri., Aug 25 4-8 pm. Visitation at Liley Funeral Home, Hwy 51 & 72, Patton, MO, 10 until service at 12 pm, Sat., 8/26. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Ritzer, Dorothy L. - Richmond Heights Ruzycki, Elizabeth S. - St. Louis Schlueter, Frank J., Sr. - St. Louis Sinovich, Ann Marie - Bridgeton Smith, George E. " Pop Pop" - St. Louis Toler, John M. - Foristell VanHoogstraat, George - St. Louis Vogler, Agnes "Jean" - St. Louis White, Richard F. "Dick" - Affton

Smith, George E. "Pop Pop"

on Wednesday, August 23, 2017. Loving husband of the late Rosemarie Smith (nee Hoffmann); loving father of Janice (Daryl) Boulware and the late Paul G. Smith; dear grandfather of Brian, Michelle, Crystal and Andrew; our dear great-grandfather, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. on Saturday, August 26, 10 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to HospiceCompassus.com appreciated. Visitation Friday, 4-8 p.m.

Toler, John M.

age 77, of Foristell, MO, August 21, 2017. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

VanHoogstraat, George

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Saturday, August 19, 2017 Beloved husband of Barbara VanHoogstraat (nee Gillihan); dear father of Lisa (Jim) H a n n on , Amy (Jack Lamb) VanHoogstraat and Adam (Tiffany) VanHoogstraat; dear gra n d fa t h er of B ret t (L exie Steindl) Jackson, Nicole Jackson, Chloe Hannon, Riley Hannon, Jade VanHoogstraat and Roslyn VanHoogstraat; dear brother of Sr. Mary Clare, Charles (Fran) VanHoogstraat, Teresa (Joe) DeMoor, Charlotte (Ray) Breakfield and Mary (Bob) Whitehouse; dear friend of Msgr. Jerome Billing; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial visitation will be celebrated at the Old Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis Saturday, August 26, 9:00 a.m. until Memorial Mass at 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers contributions to the American Red Cross or the Missouri Department of Conservation appreciated. A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE.

Vogler, Agnes "Jean"

(nee Barnard) Went to heaven on Monday, August 21, 2017. Beloved wife of the late LawPoelker, Eugene B. rence F. Vogler for over 50 Baptized into the hope years, and sister of Grace of Christ's resurrection Dodd and the late Betty Yoder. on Tuesday, August 22, She is survived by her seven 2017. children, Julie (Mike) Connors, Beloved husband of Elizabeth P J ( J a me s ) O e l l i e n , D a n (Grote) and the late Dolores Jean; (Shelly), Kevin (Patrice), Vicki dear father of Steve (Laura), Ann (Bruce) Troop, Tim (Jodi) and Marie (Thomas) Towey, Mary Lisa Chrissy (Jay) Lewis, and grand(Scott) Antrobus, Joan (Joseph) children Kelly (Dan) Eldridge, Hussey; step-father of Gary (Jan) Kevin, Kyle (Kelly Howe) Colleen, Dan, Trevor (Shannon) Giles, Grote, Tom Grote, Dan (Beth) Lauren (Ptah) Walls, Leah (Ryan) Boulay, AJ , Lindsay (Dylan) Grote, Madelyn (Jim) Curry; dear Cunningham, Ally (Andrew) Thorpe, Matt (Angie) Rost, Melissa, grandfather of Thomas, Kelsey, Gwen, Val (Scott) Hancock, Matt, Tara, Molly, Blake, Drew, Jake, Samantha, Abbey, Eric, Amanda, Caleb, Autumn, Maggie, Lucy, and Torie and great grandchildren Joseph, Claire, Nathan, Claire, Zach, Kellyn, (late) Adam, Jeff, Nicole, Ellie, Emily, Forest, Ocean, Gracie, Donovan, Tessa, Kate Bridget, Jim and Ted; beloved brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and and Charlie, as well as many many more "adopted" grandchilfriend. Eugene was a 40 year member of Norwood Hills Country dren! Jean (aka Gram) was devoted to her family and her faith, Club. and was a stellar example of how life should be lived. Her Services: Funeral from Hutchens Mortuary & Cremation Center, devotion included daily prayer, with at least 3 rosaries per day. Florissant 9:30 a.m. Sat., Aug. 26 to St. Angela Merici for 10 She enjoyed being a parishioner at Assumption Parish in St. a.m. Mass. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Louis as well as St. Joseph's of Neier, and she also enjoyed Friday, Aug. 25. Memorials to St Louis Chapter of APDA. her last several months at the Nazareth Living Center in Oakville. She will be missed by the many people she met throughout her life. Pusey, Robert "Bob" Charles 92, of St. Peters, MO, passed away August 19, 2017 at Evelyn's Services: Visitation 9:00-11:00 a.m. Saturday, August 26, at House in Creve Coeur, MO. Born in East St. Louis, IL to the late Assumption Parish Church, 4725 Mattis Road, with a Memorial Mass immediately following. In lieu of flowers, donations can be Frank and Virginia Pusey. He was preceded in death by his wife of 56 years Mattie made to Assumption Parish School, Operation Food Search or Pusey, brother William Pusey and two sisters Doris Huber and Food For The Poor. A Kutis South County Service. Virginia Martiszus. Bob was extremely proud of his family and is survived by one White, Richard F. "Dick" daughter Doris Altmansberger two grandchildren Kimberly of Affton passed away on August (Jeremy) Al t ma n s b erger-P u gh and Robert (Karen) 22, 2017 at age 87. Beloved A l t ma n s b e r g e r , t h ree grea t gra n d ch il d ren , Madison husband of Dolores "Dolly" White Altmansberger, Johnathan Altmansberger, and Amie Pleasant (nee Andre) for 58 years. Loving and a host of other family and friends. father of Joan and Rick White Services: Memorial Service will be 7:00 PM, with Visitation a n d K a r e n ( S c o t t ) D i s t l e r. 4:00 PM -7:00 PM on August 24, 2017 at Newcomer Funeral Grandfather of Mason White and Home, St. Peters, MO. Interment will be August 25, 2017, 11:00 Bryan and Jacob Distler. Brother AM at Valhalla Cemetery in Belleville, IL. of Robert (Jean) White. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Dick was known fondly as "The honor of Bob to the Evelyn's House on the campus of Barnes L a wn Chair Man" and for Jewish West County Hospital, 1000 N. Mason Road, St. Louis, attending estate sales. He retired MO 63141 or online at www.bjchospice.org. Share condolences from the City of St. Louis. at www.NewcomerStLouis.com. Services: Visitation on Friday (8/25) from 4 to 8 pm at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL Riechman, James M. HOMES (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129). Visitation on Saturday (8/26) at Salem Lutheran Church, 8343 passed way on Friday, August 18, 2017. Beloved son of the late John and Purl Riechman; loving brother of Paul (Pat) Riechman Gravois Rd. (63123) from 12, noon to the time of funeral and Nancy Riechman; dearest uncle of Tanya Daugherty and service at 1:00 pm Saturday. Interment Mt. Hope Cemetery Brenda Riechman; dear great-uncle, nephew, cousin and friend. (Lemay). James worked at the St. Louis Science Center as a Maintenance Engineer. Florists Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, August 26, 11 a.m. until the funeral servDierbergs Florist ice at 12 p.m. Private interment. In lieu of flowers, contriOrder 24 Hours butions may be made to the American Diabetes Association 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 or The St. Louis Science Center. Dierbergs.com

Ritzer, Dorothy L.

73, of Richmond Heights, passed Hagemann, Lorin M. away on August 19, 2017. Thursday, August 17, 2017. Beloved wife of Robert Ritzer Beloved husband of Hester Hagemann (nee Kemp); and loving mother of Natalie dear son of Samuel and Atanza Hagemann (nee Heim); (Earl) Gardner, Brian Kidd and dear brother, father and grandfather. Gary Kidd; dear sister of Barbara Services will be held Saturday, August 26 at 11 a.m. at St. Johns (Al) Lee, David Jr. (Naomi) Lee, Ev. UCC Church, Mehlville, MO. Visitation 9 a.m. until time of M a r y C o n l e y a n d P a u l L ee; service. Interment Old St. John Cemetery. Memorials to adoring grandmother of Grayson St. John's Ev. UCC Church. For more information (Tia) Owens, Appollonia Kidd; feyfuneralhome.com great-grandmother of Irie, Izzy and Imirah; aunt, cousin and friend to many. Jones, Frank Mack She enjoyed cooking, Son of the late Lonnie and Marie Jones, was born July 11, 1928 in gardening, reading and traveling the world. St. Louis, MO. He died August 17, 2017, in Bolivar, Missouri. Services: Visitation, Friday August 25 12-1pm, with Funeral On February 15, 1950, Frank married Joan Belle Taylor. Their following at Granberry Mortuary, 8806 Jennings State Rd., 67-year marriage was blessed with five children. Frank was Jennings, MO, 63136. Interment St. Johns Cemetery. employed by Cummings, McGowan & West as a heavy-duty diesel mechanic for many years and was a member of the Ruzycki, Elizabeth S. Operating Engineers, Local 513. He retired in 1985. Frank is survived by his wife, Joan; his brothers, Jack and on Aug.22, 2017. Services: Funeral 7 pm, Thurs. Aug.24 Larry; sisters Susan McClenahan and Pat Smith; and all five of at Gethsemane Lutheran Church 765 Lemay Ferry. Vis. his children: Esther (Dan) Wiese of St. Louis, MO; Lonnie at church, 6-7 p.m. Hoffmeistersouthcounty.com (Candace) Jones of Springfield, MO; Frank M. Jones Jr. of Colorado Springs, CO; Eddie (Cindy) Jones of Steelville, MO; and Schlueter, Frank J. Sr. Jeff (Sandi) Jones of Theodosia, MO.; seven grandchildren and 96 years young. Memorial Mass Sat 10 a.m. at St. Clair 12 great-grandchildren. Catholic Church, 165 E. Springfield Rd., 63077. A private service was held at Butler Funeral Home in Bolivar. A service of Lord Funeral Home. A celebration of Frank's life will be held in the fall. 81, passed away August 22, 2017. Servi c es: Vis. Sat. Aug. 26, 10-11am, Wentzville United Methodist Church, Services to follow at 11am. pitmanfuneralhome.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Sinovich, Ann Marie

Memorial visitation Saturday, August 26, 10 a.m. until Mass time 11 a.m. at Holy Spirit Church, 3130 Parkwood Lane, Maryland Heights 63043. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

“A great soul serves everyone all the time. A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.” MAYA ANGELOU

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

NATION

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A17

ACLU faces Charlottesville backlash Critics say organization has blood on its hands for defending white supremacists BY TOM HAYS AND LARRY NEUMEISTER associated Press

NEW YORK • Faced with an angry backlash for defending white supremacists’ right to march in Charlottesville, Va., the American Civil Liberties Union is confronting a feeling among some of its members that was once considered heresy: Maybe some speech isn’t worth defending. Cracks in the ACLU’s strict defense of the First Amendment no matter how offensive the speech opened from the moment a counterprotester was killed during the rally in Virginia. Some critics said the ACLU has blood on its hands for persuading a judge to let the Aug. 12 march go forward. An ACLU leader in Virginia resigned, tweeting, “What’s legal and what’s right are sometimes different.” “This was a real tragedy and we’re all reeling,” said Lee Rowland, a senior staff attorney at the ACLU’s headquarters in New York City. “Charlottesville should be a wake-up call to all of us.” The backlash, reminiscent of one that followed the ACLU’s 1978 defense of a neo-Nazi group that wanted to march through Skokie, Ill., a Chicago suburb with a large number of Holocaust survivors, set off a tumultuous week of soul-searching and led to a three-hour national staff meeting in which the conflict within the group was aired. What resulted was an announcement that the ACLU will no longer stand with hate groups seeking to march with weapons,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

White nationalist demonstrators use shields as they guard the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12. The ACLU says it will no longer back groups seeking to march with weapons.

as some of those in Charlottesville did. The newfound limit on how far the nearly century-old ACLU is willing to go to defend free speech sets up intriguing choices in the months ahead. Will it intervene, for example, in the case of a white nationalist rally at Texas A&M that the university canceled after Charlottesville? The ACLU said it won’t discuss when and where it might take a stand. The seeds of upheaval in Charlottesville were planted when a

judge agreed with the ACLU that white nationalists should be able to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee where the monument stands, instead of at a neutral site sought by city officials. It was a position consistent with the ACLU’s history of defending free-speech rights for protesters on all parts of the spectrum. But then James Alex Fields Jr. was accused of using his car to kill Heather Heyer, 32, and injure several others who were staging a counterdemonstration.

Within hours, a board member of the ACLU’s Virginia branch, Waldo Jaquith, resigned and fired off a stinging tweet that ended with, “I won’t be a fig leaf for the Nazis.” In an opinion piece in The New York Times, K-Sue Park, a race studies fellow at the UCLA School of Law, argued that the ACLU’s defend-in-all-cases approach to the First Amendment “perpetuates a misguided theory that all radical views are equal,” adding that the group is “standing on the wrong side of history.”

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe went further, accusing the ACLU of creating a “powder keg” in Charlottesville. The ACLU of Virginia responded by saying it was “horrified” by the violence but didn’t cause it. “We do not support Nazis,” it said. “We support the Constitution and the laws of the United States.” The latest criticism of the ACLU has come from some of the same people who had heaped praise and donations on the organization for its resistance to President Donald Trump’s travel ban. Membership surged from 25,000 to 1.6 million, with $90 million in online contributions, in the months since Trump’s election. “The ACLU has faced much worse before and emerged stronger and more dynamic,” said Ron Kuby, a New York civil rights attorney. “Refusing to represent people who intend to march while visibly armed is a reasonable line to draw given what we’ve seen from the white supremacists.” ACLU member and Charlottesville resident Ira Bashkow said he never considered quitting the group but feels the disturbing episode in his city showed it has to rethink its “old-line” approach to the First Amendment. “I believe in the right to free speech, but it doesn’t mean (demonstrators) can say whatever they want and hold a weapon at the same time,” he said.

Park Service battling NRA, Trump Girl Scouts oppose effort over bill on hunting, fishing rules by Boy Scouts to add girls Service could not regulate hunting in Alaska’s preserves BY STUART LEAVENWORTH McClatchy Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON • The National Park Service has several big problems with NRA-backed legislation that would restrict the agency from regulating hunting and fishing within park boundaries. But according to a leaked memo obtained by McClatchy, the administration of President Donald Trump has so far prevented the parks from voicing such concerns. National Park Service Acting Director Michael Reynolds prepared a June 30 memo detailing his agency’s objections to the draft legislation, the “Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act.” Under the bill, the National Park Service would be prevented from regulating the hunting of bears and wolves in Alaska wildlife preserves, including the practice of killing bear cubs in their dens. It also would be prevented from regulating commercial and recreational fishing within park boundaries and from commenting on development projects outside park boundaries that could affect the parks. Reynolds objected to these and other parts of the bill in a memo sent to the U.S. Department of Interior’s Legislative Counsel. The park service later received a response from Interior, with sections of Reynolds’ concerns crossed out, next to the initials “C.H.” Agency officials were told they could not repeat their concerns to Congress, according to Jeff Ruch, executive director of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, who obtained the memo and provided a copy to McClatchy. “It appears the national parks are no longer allowed to give Congress their honest views about the impacts of pending legislation,” said Ruch, whose organization serves as a support network for environmental agency employees. Heather Swift, an Interior Department spokeswoman, re-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A female polar bear and her cubs are shown in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in this undated file photo.

jected that claim. In an email, she said: “At no point did the Department tell the NPS not to communicate with Congress. In fact, the document in question is not even addressed to Congress. The document was an early internal draft meant to express the Department’s position on a legislative proposal.” Ruch said it was his understanding that the “C.H.” stands for Casey Hammond — an Interior political appointee and former House Natural Resources Committee staffer — but that could not be verified. The memo is hardly the first instance where the Trump administration has sought to overrule or pressure the national parks. The day after he was sworn in, Trump reportedly called Reynolds, the acting NPS director, and urged him to release additional aerial photographs of the inauguration, to counter imagery suggesting that crowds were sparse. More recently, the Trump administration overturned a National Park Service policy that allowed 20 parks to ban sales of plastic water bottles, to reduce litter. It is not unusual for an administration to muzzle the NPS when it is concerned about certain legislation, said Kristen Brengel, vice president for government affairs at the National

Parks Conservation Association. “This is an issue with every administration, including the Obama administration,” she said, noting that both Interior and the Office of Management and Budget often reject proposed agency comments. In this case, the Trump administration is going to bat for the National Rifle Association and sporting groups that have close ties to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, Donald Trump Jr. and Trump himself. “Expanding access to national parks and public lands for hunting, fishing and recreation is and remains a top priority of this administration,” said Swift. The NRA and hunting and fishing organizations have lobbied Congress for years to pass versions of the “Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act,” also known as the SHARE Act. According to the NRA, the legislation is aimed at improving hunting access on public lands while removing regulations promoted by “animal rights extremists.” Among its provisions, the SHARE act would prevent the National Park Service from regulating hunting in Alaska’s national preserves, including the practice of trapping and shooting bears and wolves in their dens.

BY RACHEL CHASON Washington Post

Long plagued by declining membership, the Boy Scouts are considering a campaign to recruit in a previously untapped market: girls. The Girl Scouts aren’t having it. A feud between the two largest scouting organizations broke into the open Tuesday when the president of Girl Scouts of the USA called the Boy Scouts’ “covert campaign” to recruit girls “reckless” and “unsettling” in a letter obtained by BuzzFeed News. A Girl Scouts spokesman confirmed the letter in an email to The Washington Post. “We were disappointed in the lack of transparency as we learned that you are surreptitiously testing the appeal of a girls’ offering to millennial parents,” Girl Scouts President Kathy Hopinkah Hannan wrote in her letter to Boy Scouts President Randall Stephenson. “Furthermore, it is inherently dishonest to claim to be a single gender organization while simultaneously endeavoring upon a co-ed model.” She said the Boy Scouts’ “well documented” declining membership — its numbers have dwindled by a third since 2000, to just more than 2 million as of 2016 — is behind its push to include girls. The Boy Scouts said in a statement to The Washington Post that they are considering including girls in their ranks not to boost their numbers but in response to requests from families who want their daughters to be a part of the same organization as their sons. “The Boy Scouts of America believes in the benefit of single-gender programs,” said the statement from the Boy Scouts’ director of national communications, Effie Delimarkos. “But in evaluating the possibility of serving the whole family, we’ve been having conversations with our members and volunteers to see how to make Scouting accessible for families.” No final decision on whether to include girls has been made, she said.

WORKNG OUT ISSUES

The Girl Scouts spokesman, explaining the letter, said the organization “believes in maintaining an open and honest dialogue with other organizations in the youth serving space. ... To that end we sent a professional letter” to the Boy Scouts, and look forward to “working out those issues with them in a mutually satisfactory manner.” Girl Scouts’ membership has also taken a hit in recent years, falling from its peak of more than 3.8 million in 2003 to 2.8 million in 2014. Some women outside the Girl Scouts have actively lobbied the Boy Scouts to include girls in its ranks. In February, after the 107-year-old Boy Scouts announced it would admit transgender children in its scouting programs, the National Organization for Women called on the group to “honor its decree to help all children by permitting girls to gain full membership.” “Women can now hold all combat roles in the military, and women have broken many glass ceilings at the top levels of government, business, academia and entertainment,” said NOW President Terry O’Neill. “It’s long past due that girls have equal opportunities in Scouting.” One New York teen leading the push for the Boy Scouts to include girls as official members is Sydney Ireland, who has been an unofficial member of her brother’s troop in Manhattan for several years but is unable to earn a merit badge to begin the process of becoming an Eagle Scout because she is a girl. With her father, Ireland has become a leader in the national push to allow girls to join the Boy Scout ranks, appearing in a video with more than 3 million views and launching a Change.org petition with more than 8,400 supporters. “I know I could rise through the ranks and become an Eagle Scout alongside the best of the boys — all I need is the opportunity,” Ireland wrote on Change. org.


WORLD

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

Arsenic taints Pakistan’s groundwater 50 million people could be at risk of poisoning, study says; there is no cure to malady BY KATHY GANNON AND KATY DAIGLE Associated Press

ISLAMABAD • Some 50 million people are at risk of arsenic poisoning from contaminated groundwater in Pakistan’s Indus Valley — far more than previously thought, according to a new study. Pakistan is aware of the growing problem, with arsenic levels rising in some areas as people increasingly and indiscriminately draw from the country’s underground aquifers, said Lubna Bukhari, who heads the government’s Council for Research in Water Resources. “It’s a real concern,” she said. “Because of lack of rules and regulations, people have exploited the groundwater brutally, and it is driving up arsenic levels.” The authors of the study developed a map highlighting areas of likely contamination based on water quality data from nearly 1,200 groundwater pumps tested from 2013 to 2015, and accounting for geological factors including surface slope and soil contents. They determined some 88 million people

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman carries water for her family Tuesday at a well in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. A study suggests some 50 million Pakistanis could be at risk from arsenic-tainted groundwater.

were living in high-risk areas. Given that about 60-70 percent of the population relies on groundwater, they calculated that roughly 50 million — maybe even 60 million — were potentially affected. That’s equal to at least a third of the 150 million already estimated by the World Health Organization to be drinking, cooking and farming with arsenic-laced water worldwide.

“This is an alarmingly high number, which demonstrates the urgent need to test all drinking water wells in the Indus Plain,” with hot spots around the densely populated cities of Lahore and Hyderabad, said the study’s lead author, Joel Podgorski, of the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, known as Eawag. The findings were published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances.

The high-risk area mapped out in the study broadly covers the middle and lower reaches of the Indus River and its tributaries, before they empty into the Arabian Sea. Scientists had expected this area might be affected. Similar geographical areas along the Ganges River in neighboring India and Brahmaputra in Bangladesh also contain pockets of arsenic contamination. Normally, that arsenic

would stay in the ground. But in the last few decades, South Asian countries concerned with pathogeninfused surface water have been pumping enormous volumes of groundwater, causing the water tables to drop drastically and tapping into new water pockets tainted by the colorless, odorless toxin. The WHO considers arsenic concentrations above 10 micrograms per liter to be dangerous. Pakistan’s guideline is five times that, and many of its wells test much higher. Arsenic is naturally occurring and kills human cells — causing skin lesions, organ damage, heart disease and cancer. There is no cure for arsenic poisoning. “This study is important because it draws attention to an overlooked — yet solvable — problem of vast magnitude affecting the health of millions of villagers,” said geochemist Alexander van Geen of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who was not involved in the study. He said the patterns it identifies are broadly consistent with data he and other researchers have collected

Egypt’s leader, U.S. envoy meet after cut in aid CAIRO • Egypt’s presi-

dent and foreign minister met with White House adviser Jared Kushner on Wednesday, just hours after the administration of President Donald Trump cut or delayed hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Cairo over human rights concerns. Kushner, who is also

Trump’s son-in-law, was in Cairo as part of a Middle East tour aimed at exploring ways to revive IsraeliPalestinian peace talks, which last collapsed in 2014. Kushner’s delegation includes Jason Greenblatt, the U.S. envoy for international negotiations, and Dina Powell, the deputy national security adviser. The Trump administration on Tuesday cut nearly

$100 million in military and economic aid to Egypt and delayed almost $200 million more in military financing, citing Egypt’s poor human rights record and its crackdown on civic and other nongovernmental groups. The move came as a surprise to many, given the close ties forged since Trump took office. The U.S. president has repeatedly hailed President Abdel Fat-

Oh my gah, like,

TOTALITY St. Louis Post-Dispatch Eclipse Photo and Video Contest presented by Kenrick's Meats and Catering

Oh my gah, like, TOTALITY upload your eclipse related photos and videos at STLtoday.com/contests for a chance to win semi-fame and stellar prizes like a $265 ‘Have a Totality Cow’ meat package from Kenrick’s (including sirloin, bacon, pork steak and more), a $50 Macy’s gift card and a glow-inthe-dark eclipse t-shirt! We’re looking for groups shots of goofy glasses, pets in protective eyewear, scenes from eclipse parties and events…and of course the eclipse itself.

REMEMBER: You should NEVER look directly at the sun during an eclipse. The only way to safely observe a partially eclipsed sun is through special solar filtered glasses. There are several manufactures of eclipse glasses that meet international standards. For more information on eclipse viewing safety, visit STLtoday.com/eclipse.

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS THROUGH SUNDAY, AUG. 27 A AT:

STLtoday.com/contests

How to sell your valuable jewelry with confidence:

Choose a buyer like T. Brian Hill who has over 30 years experience buying and selling. Then call for a free verbal estimate.

tah el-Sissi as a key ally in the fight against terrorism. In a statement, the Egyptian Foreign Ministry said Cairo regretted the U.S. decision, calling it a “misjudgment of the nature of the strategic relations that have bound the two countries for decades.” It said the move “reflects the lack of careful understanding of the importance of supporting the stability and success of Egypt.

Family y Reunion eunion W Weekend 2017 Week

BY MENNA ZAKI Associated Press

from some 10,000 well tests in the region. One of those researchers, Abida Farooqui, assistant professor of environmental sciences at Islamabad’s Qaid-e-Azam University, said the new study’s sample size may be too small to draw clear conclusions. “The study revealed very important and an emerging problem of arsenic in the country,” Farooqui said. But “only 1,193 samples have been used to predict the situation in the whole Indus Valley, which is unrealistic.” In any case, no map can tell villagers whether a specific well is contaminated. Arsenic concentration varies widely from pump to pump, and the only way to know for certain is to test each one. Shallow wells are less likely to be tainted. Deeper ones, such as those run by the government’s Drinking Water Filtration sites, may be more at risk. This makes the problem especially acute for thousands of city-dwellers who have no access to clean water and rely on what the government supplies.

(314) 313-5804

USED JEWELRY BUYER T. Brian Hill

Sell these valuables today —

WWW.USEDJEWELRYBUYER.COM

122 N. Main in Historic Saint Charles

• Certified diamonds & fine jewelry • Antique & estate jewelry • High grade wrist and pocket watches • Old gold & sterling silver • U.S. gold & silver coins • Private jewelry & coin collections

Soul Train Music AAward

16-time GRAMMY Nominee

at The Fabulous Fox Theatre

Winner

Presented by

www.fabulousfox.com | 314.534.1111 Discount Code: STLTODAYBMK

VIP Dinner and Corporate Sponsorship Tables ONLY AVAILABLE at www.mathews-dickey.com and 314.679.5228.

y D.C. Young Fl

Rip Mic haels

Hitman

Holla

Basketball, Hip-Hop & Comedy Live at Center Court Friday, August 25 | 5 p.m.

Mathews-Dickey Boys’ & Girls’ Club High School All-Star games, Nappy DJ Needles and comedy sets by

MTV Wild n Out’s D.C. Young Fly Rip Michaels & Hitman Holla

Presented by

BUY TICKETS NOW!

www.mathews-dickey.com www | 314.679.5228 Funds support the Mathews-Dickey Boys’ & Girls’ Club’s strategic efforts to Build Together, Win Together by creating community alliances to close the achievement gap among young people through scholar-athletics. Proud Media Sponsor


NEWS

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

WEATHER • Low 59, High 81 • Winds NE 3-8 mph

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A19

Pleasant weather persisting

60s 70s

A stretch of pleasant weather will continue across the St. Louis area today and is forecast to persist through this weekend. Highs today will top out in the upper 70s to low 80s under mostly sunny skies. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

62°

DRIVE

77°

Sunny

BEDTIME

80°

69°

Mostly sunny Mostly sunny

Partly cloudy

81 81 81 80 81 81 81 80 80 80 82 80 80

W

sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

H

55 57 58 54 54 54 55 55 56 53 55 54

77 81 72 77 77 77 80 77 80 72 79 76

4-DAY FORECAST

0.00” 2.43” 2.26” 29.43” 27.02”

Flood Stage

Current Level

FRIDAY

61°/81°

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

62°/82°

Kansas City 61 / 81

Kirksville 55 / 80

Joplin 58 / 81

Springfield 55 / 79

St. Louis 59 / 81 Poplar Bluff 58 / 81

Carbondale 57 / 81

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Wednesday, Aug 23rd Weed - 66 (high), Mold - 36,925 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS 2 Yesterday 272 Month (Total) 1536 Season 1557 Year Ago

- 0.11 - 0.14 + 0.58 + 0.34 0.00 0.00 + 0.55 + 0.24 - 0.10 + 0.25

Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 11.59 18 12.39 Peoria 14 10.00 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.69 Sullivan 16 - 2.16 Valley Park 24 6.18 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.25 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 16.60

24-Hr Change

0.00 + 0.15 + 0.10 - 0.01 - 0.04 + 0.03 - 0.19 - 0.45

Maps and weather data provided by:

SUN & MOON

First Aug 29 Sunrise

Full Sep 6

Last Sep 13

New Sep 20

6:23 AM Sunset

7:42 PM

Moonrise 9:21 AM Moonset 9:38 PM

Looking south at 9 p.m. you will find the planet Saturn. It is currently found in the 13th zodiac constellation called Ophiuchus, the Serpent Bearer.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

357.39 - 0.29 360.07 - 0.01 497.53 - 0.19 659.94 + 0.51 709.92 + 0.84 677.64 0.00 916.99 - 0.12 840.83 - 0.01 599.63 + 0.04 405.94 - 0.02 603.26 + 0.17 445.17 + 0.07

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Jet Stream

Harvey

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 55 Albuquerque 64 Anchorage 52 Atlanta 69 Atlantic City 62 Baltimore 63 Billings 62 Biloxi, Ms. 76 Birmingham 68 Bismarck 55 Boise 68 Boston 61 Buffalo 54 Burlington, Vt. 56 Charleston, S.C. 77 Charleston, W.V. 58 Charlotte 69 Cheyenne 54 Chicago 58 Cincinnati 57 Cleveland 57 Colorado Spgs. 57 Concord, N.H. 50 Dallas 74 Daytona Beach 75 Denver 61 Des Moines 59 79 Destin, Fl. 54 Detroit 68 El Paso 57 Evansville 47 Fairbanks 54 Fargo 49 Flagstaff 76 Fort Myers 59 Great Falls 49 Green Bay 56 Hartford 76 Honolulu 77 Houston 57 Indianapolis 72 Jackson, Ms. 49 Juneau 80 Key West 79 Las Vegas 64 Little Rock 67 Los Angeles 60 Louisville

74 83 56 88 82 80 87 88 87 81 88 80 68 71 90 78 84 82 72 75 69 81 78 86 90 85 79 90 71 87 80 66 74 76 89 84 68 80 89 93 75 88 58 90 99 84 84 80

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy showers thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny

55 62 51 69 59 62 60 76 66 58 63 61 54 55 74 55 66 53 55 54 54 56 53 72 76 57 62 78 51 69 57 48 56 49 77 51 45 56 76 77 56 68 51 81 80 64 68 57

74 87 60 87 80 78 85 88 87 78 88 75 71 70 88 76 86 84 74 75 70 83 73 90 90 88 80 91 75 90 80 67 74 78 88 81 71 79 89 85 76 87 56 90 104 84 86 79

partly cloudy thunderstorms showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy showers thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy rain thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

Today L H

City

72 Macon 78 McAllen, Tx. 64 Memphis 77 Miami 56 Milwaukee Minneapolis 56 Missoula, Mt. 54 74 Mobile Montgomery 73 62 Nashville New Orleans 78 New York City 64 Norfolk, Va. 74 Oklahoma City 65 Omaha 60 Orlando 75 Palm Springs 79 Philadelphia 66 Phoenix 84 Pittsburgh 56 Portland, Me. 56 Portland, Or. 60 Providence 60 Raleigh 69 Rapid City 59 Reno 60 Richmond, Va. 67 Sacramento 60 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 68 San Antonio 76 San Diego 68 San Francisco 60 Santa Fe 57 Savannah 76 Seattle 58 74 Shreveport 60 Sioux Falls 56 Syracuse 75 Tallahassee 78 Tampa 73 Tucson 63 Tulsa 67 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 78 60 Wichita Wilmington, De. 61 81 Yuma

91 99 84 87 68 71 83 90 92 83 90 80 81 84 83 92 104 83 104 72 77 75 81 83 86 92 83 92 90 92 94 75 72 78 92 71 89 78 68 93 91 99 86 81 87 85 82 106

W

thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy showers thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

Tomorrow L H W

71 77 65 78 56 57 50 73 69 61 78 64 70 66 64 76 80 65 85 52 55 54 59 64 60 60 64 58 79 69 76 69 58 55 75 54 70 61 54 75 78 73 64 64 77 65 61 80

90 91 86 87 69 67 84 89 91 83 89 78 81 82 82 94 106 80 107 72 73 81 77 84 84 93 82 91 89 94 93 76 72 83 88 76 89 74 70 93 89 101 86 79 88 84 80 108

partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

74 62 68 80 81 80 70 52 53 60 75 57 77 55 54 60

83 70 90 110 93 88 91 76 82 71 93 81 88 61 68 80

W

thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

57 83 66 77 68 39 66 55 68 88 59 55 56 80 56 79

84 89 81 90 85 68 88 70 97 105 79 68 68 88 77 91

W

mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny sunny mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 2.16 + 4.02 + 2.81 + 2.01 + 0.92

Very unhealthy

Good

Hawaii High: 91°

Wintry Mix

Harvey is forecast to strengthen to a tropical storm as it continues to move northwestward in the Gulf of Mexico. A frontal boundary will trigger a few showers and thunderstorms across parts of the Gulf Coast and coastal sections of the Southeast. Portions of the south-central and northern Rockies may also see a few storms develop. Cooler and dry conditions will be in place throughout the Great Lakes and Midwest with high pressure in control. City

W

90s

90s

Partly sunny Partly sunny, isolated storm

Chicago 58 / 72

Snow

80s

Alaska Low: 36°

partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

80s

MONDAY

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 21.02 23 13.78 Jefferson City 21 11.47 Hermann 20 7.50 Washington 25 13.44 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 11.02 Louisiana 15 11.78 Dam 24 25 16.55 Dam 25 26 16.49 Grafton 18 15.11 M.Price, Pool 419 418.30 M.Price, Tail. 21 6.68 St Louis 30 7.09 Chester 27 9.58 Cape Girardeau 32 15.23

80s

63°/83° 65°/83°

Partly cloudy Partly cloudy

T-storms

80s 70s

100s

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

24-Hr Change

60s

70s

80s

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

RIVER STAGES

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

79° 59° 87° 69° 102° 54° 78° 66°

90s

70s

70s

90s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (2:50 p.m.) Low (5:11 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1947) Record Low (1966) High Last Year Low Last Year

80s

80s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

70s

Low: 29° Bodie, California

Rain

80s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

58 57 56 56 56 58 61 55 55 57 58 56 57

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

70s

80s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

National Extremes High: 115° Death Valley, California

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

48 63 50 65 66 78 40 79 45 48 81 77 55 57 53 49

67 82 83 77 88 90 60 81 70 60 95 90 67 69 84 71

showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

WORLD DIGEST Family ‘dismayed’ after journalist’s body identified FIND THE CHEAPEST GAS IN TOWN Check gas prices and see real-time traffic conditions. STLTODAY.COM/TRAFFIC

DONATE YOUR CAR x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri *Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (314) 499-1300

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

End of The Summer Sale! • Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $700*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $350*)

Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16 Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace

10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTY*

0% Financing for 21 Months** Rebate Stimulus Package $2,225.00 Rebates For You!

*On Select Models Only Call for Details **With approved credit use either financing or rebate. Expires 8/31/17.

$150 - $700

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $325

Laclede Gas Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

Totaling $2,225

Potential Savings

We are a locally owned & operated company with 36 years of experience behind us! Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

Fall Special!

$ 314-991-COOL (2665) 636-923-COOL (2665) 618-248-6400

www.totalcomfort-hvac.com

30Off

Service Repair

Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 618-248-6400 For residential customers only. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Expires 8/31/17.

Family members of Swedish journalist Kim Wall, whose headless body was found on a beach off Copenhagen, says they received the confirmation of her death “with boundless sadness and dismay.” In an email to The Associated Press on Wednesday, the family said “the tragedy has hit not only us and other families, but friends and colleagues all over the world.” Police confirmed Wednesday that DNA from a headless torso found Monday in the Black Sea matched that of Wall, who was believed to have died on a private submarine that sank. Wall, 30, was last seen alive on inventor Peter Madsen’s submarine on Aug. 10. Danish police say the torso was attached to a piece of metal, “likely with the purpose to make it sink.” The homemade submarine was reported to have gone down Aug. 11. Her blood was found inside the submarine. Chad closing Qatar’s embassy there, kicking out diplomats • Chad’s government says it is closing Qatar’s embassy there and accuses the Gulf nation of trying to destabilize the Central African country via neighboring Libya. The foreign ministry said in a statement Wednesday that Qatar’s diplomats have 10 days to leave Chad. The statement also said Chad’s embassy in Qatar is closing and its diplomats are leaving. Chad is calling on Qatar to “cease all actions that could undermine its security as well as those of the countries of the Lake Chad basin and Sahel.” The statement gives no further details. Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt months ago cut diplomatic and transport links with Qatar, accusing it of supporting terrorist groups and fomenting unrest in the region. Qatar has rejected the allegation that it backs extremist groups. 10 dead, dozens missing after boat sinks on Brazilian river • A boat carrying 70 people sank on a major river in northern Brazil leaving at least 10 dead and dozens missing, authorities said Wednesday. The public security office of the state of Para said 15 people made it to the shore and 10 bodies were recovered, while the rest were unaccounted for. Earlier the office had reported that 25 reached the shore. Authorities said the boat was traveling on the Xingu River when it sank late Tuesday. The cause was not immediately clear.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Police search a waterway Wednesday for remains in the Kim Wall murder investigation at the west coast of Amager close to Copenhagen, Denmark.

Dutch police detain driver of Spanish van near canceled gig • Police in the Dutch port city of Rotterdam detained the driver of a van with Spanish license plates and a number of gas tanks inside after a concert by an American rock band was canceled Wednesday night following a threat, the city’s mayor said. A Spanish counterterrorism official said the van is not connected to the attacks that killed 15 people in Spain last week. Police detained the driver for questioning about two hours after a concert by Los Angeles band AllahLas was called off after Dutch police received a terror warning. Rotterdam Mayor Ahmed Aboutaleb said the warning came from Spanish police. U.S. chastises Cambodia for curtailing press freedom • The United States strongly criticized Cambodia on Wednesday for ordering an American democracy group to leave the country and pressuring dissenting news media — chastising a government whose leader says he shares President Donald Trump’s disdain for the press. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the U.S. is deeply concerned by “the deterioration in Cambodia’s democratic climate” in the past two weeks, as the government of longtime Prime Minister Hun Sen has moved to curtail press freedom and civil society groups. Hun Sen has an uneasy relationship with the U.S., claiming it supports his political opponents. He has held power for three decades, employing authoritarian methods in a nominally democratic framework. His efforts to rein in media and other public watchdogs comes ahead of a 2018 national election, in which his ruling party is expected to face a strong opposition challenge.

Pence, delegation meet with Venezuelan exiles • Vice President Mike Pence has met with 15 Venezuelan exiles in South Florida who told him more help is needed to restore democracy in the socialist regime. Sen. Marco Rubio, Florida Gov. Rick Scott and U.S. Rep. Mario DiazBalart joined Pence in listening to testimonies of established leaders of the Venezuelan diaspora and recently exiled politicians and judges. Ramon Muchacho had been the mayor of the municipality of Chacao since 2013 but fled in July saying he was being persecuted by the government. He told Pence that Venezuela is a dictatorship. Two other mayors asked for the U.S. government to impose more sanctions. Pence is visiting the Venezuelan diaspora in South Florida after traveling to Latin America to win over allies unnerved by a possible U.S. military intervention in the socialist nation. Zuma tightens grip as South Africa ruling party censures rebels • It’s payback time for South African President Jacob Zuma as his ruling African National Congress censures its lawmakers who openly backed a move to oust him, increasing his sway over who’ll succeed him. The ANC fired Makhosi Khoza as chairwoman of parliament’s public service committee last week after saying it would punish three legislators who announced they’d back an opposition motion of no confidence in Zuma. It then wrote to Derek Hanekom, the head of its disciplinary committee, rebuking him for his Twitter postings calling for the president’s removal. The ANC’s response shows the balance of power within the party is still tilted in favor of Zuma. From news services


A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

RIDES NEWS

Antique/Classic Special Interest

Chevrolet

Honda

Jeep

NISSAN Z CHARITY CAR SHOW

'15 Chevy Impala LS: Clean Carfax, Bluetooth $15,490 #P8945

'12 Honda Crosstour EXL: 4 Cyl, Navigation, Modern Steel Metallic, $14,500 #H171209A

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited: Navigation, Pano Roof, 22K Miles, $29,490 #B8647

'11 Chevy Cruze: ECO, Hard To Find 6 Speed Manual Transmission, Bluetooth, FWD, $8,990 #27408B

Rain Date: Sunday, September 10 Held at and sponsored by:

BOMMARITO NISSAN 661 Dunn Road

'13 Chevy Sonic LTZ: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, Remote Start, $10,990 #11002A

off I-270 between N. Lindbergh and McDonnell Blvd. FREE show open to the public RAFFLES

Registration 10:00 am - Noon Voting 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm Trophy Awards 2:30 pm

'13 Chevy Cruze 2LT: 53K Miles, Leather, Auto, $11,990

1st place, 2nd place and 3rd place trophies in most classes. Food & Drink Available Proceeds to benefit families of Spinal Muscular Atrophy More information: Contact jillcummins1@yahoo.com or Steve Scott 618-558-8105 stevescottZ82@hotmail.com www.gatewayZclub.com

'16 Chevy Corvette Z51: 3LT, Only 900 Miles, $59,990 #B8569

'15 Chevy Camaro LT: Local Trade, 34K Miles, Black, Auto, $21,490 #M17411A

'07 Chevy Cobalt LS: 4 Door, Red, 131K Miles, Call Now, $4,500 #X3316A

'11 Chevy Cruze: ECO, 1.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Black Granite, One Owner Clean Carfax, $8,490 #27511C

'16 Chevy Cruze LTZ: Limited, Loaded, Gray, 30K Miles, $14,700 #X3370

'10 Acura TL 3.7: Sedan, SH-AWD, Clean Car, AWD, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $12,990 #11138A

'13 Chevy Impala LTZ: Heated Leather Front Seats, Bluetooth, Remote Start, Flex Fuel, $10,490 #78105A

'08 Acura MDX: Tech Pkg, Black, 117K Miles, Call Now, $12,000 #H170956A

'13 Chevy Impala LT: Black, 95K Miles, Hurry In, $9,500 #H162268A

Audi

Chrysler

'09 Audi A4 2.0T Avant: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated Leather Front Seats, Bluetooth, $9,990 #96715A

'15 Chrysler 200: 4 Door Sedan, Limited, FWD, 15K Miles Stk# 170456A Call Today! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chrysler 200: Touring, Auto, Metallic Gray, Just Arrived $7,990 #M17156A

'10 Audi A5 2.0T: Premium Coupe, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles $15,490 #P8878A

Dodge '13 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated Lthr Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $13,990 #27607A

'10 Audi TTS: 2.0 Turbo, Premium Quattro, 66K Miles, $25,990 #C17188R1

'07 Audi A4: Cabriolet, Just Arrived, In time for Fall $9,990 #M17245A

BMW '06 BMW 324i: 85K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $9,990

Buick '12 Buick Enclave: Leather Group, Clean Carfax, 3rd Row Seating, BU Camera $15,990 #39103A

'11 Buick Lucerne CX: 3.9L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Flex Fuel, $8,990 #39233A

Cadillac '16 Cadillac ATS: Coupe, Performance Collection $38,990 #C8689

'14 Honda Accord EXL: 4 Cyl, 3 To Choose, Silver, 39k Miles, Htd Lthr, Moonroof, Loaded, Starting At $18,500 #X3449

'17 Honda Accord Sport: 5,500 Mi, 18" Alloys, Foglights, Dual Exhaust, Honda Certified, $23,500 #H171262A

'14 Honda Civic LX: Honda Certified, 4 to Choose From, Gray, 30K Miles, $14,000 #X3457

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

BACK TO SCHOOL SALE LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN THE MIDWEST 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty

Acura '10 Acura MDX 3.7L: One Owner Clean Carfx, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, 3rd Row, $11,990 #27774A

'14 Honda Accord LX: 4 To Choose, White, 44K Miles, All Honda Certified, Starting At $14,800 #X3408

'15 Chevy Malibu: LT, Silver, 34K, Sunroof $16,990 #V17709A

RAFFLE PRIZES throughout the day TROPHY CLASSES: 1) 240Z, 260Z & 280Z 2) 280ZX 3) 300ZX (Z-31) 4) 300ZX (Z-32) 5) 350Z 6) 370Z 7) Datsun/Nissan/Infinity nonZ 8) Infiniti G-Class 9) Overall Best In Show

'13 Dodge Charger SE: 3.6L V6, RWD, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $14,490 #96646D

'13 Dodge Charger: 52K Miles, Black, 20" Wheels, Auto, $16,990 #B8639

'17 Dodge Challenger SXT: Black, Only 11K Miles, Must See, $22,995 #H170943A

'16 Civic EX: Alloys, Moonroof, Smartkey, ect. 27K Miles, Gray Metallic $18,500 #X3451 '14 Accord V6 EXL: Black, 57K Miles, Dual Power, Heated Leather, Moonroof, Loaded! $18,200 #X3454 '14 Civic LX: 4 To Choose, 34K Miles, Gray, $14,000 #X3457 '14 Odyssey EXL: Blue, Only 19K Miles, Heated Leather, Power Doors, Power Rear Liftgate etc, $27,500 #X3453

'14 Civic EX: 3 To Choose, 4 Door, 34K Miles, Crimson Metallic, Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Starting at $14,995 #X3425 '14 Honda Accord LX: 6 Remain, White, 28K Mi, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, Starting At $15,495 #X3441 '14 CRV EXL: AWD, Titanium Metallic, 28K Mi, Heated Leather, Moonroof, Power Seat, $21,000 #X3405 Only 5,490 Miles, Spoiler, 18" Alloys, Foglights, Like New, Now $23,500 #H171262A

'16 Hyundai Sonata: 4 Door Sedan, 2.4L PZEV, 45K Miles, Shale Gray Metallic $13,446 Stk# P06310 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Hyundai Sonata: 4 Door Sedan, 2.4L, 41K Miles, $13,819 Stk# P06312 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Hyundai Sonata: 4 Door Sedan, 2.4L SE, 41K Miles, Venetian Red, $14,476 Stk# P06311 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Hyundai Genesis: Coupe 2.0T, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $17,990 #P8943A

'12 Hyundai Sonata GLS: 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, $9,990 #11164B

'17 Ford Fusion SE: One Owner Clean Carfax, $15,490 #P8946

'12 Hyundai Sonata: Hybrid, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, $10,990 #39223A

'13 Hyundai Elantra GLS: Manual Transmission, 61K Miles, Red, 4 Door, Call Today, $10,695 #H170200A

'12 Hyundai Elantra GLS: Blue, 107K Miles, $9,000 #H171446A

'15 Ford Fusion S: 46K Miles, Green $12,500 #X3242A

'14 Cadillac ATS: Premium, Red, Only 30K Miles, Call Now, $23,495 #X3383A

'17 Cadillac ATS: 4 Door, 2.0 Luxury, 22K Miles, Black, Call Now!$26,300 #X3372

'13 Cadillac CTS: 2 Dr Coupe, Black, Only 52K Miles, Sharp, $21,000 #H171445A

Chevrolet '16 Chevy Malibu: LS, 25K Miles, $17,039 Stk# P06320 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Impala: LS, 29K Miles, $16,680 Stk# P06316 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Trax: AWD, 4 Door, LTZ, Black, 69K Miles, $17,500 Stk# P06303 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Volt: 5 Door Hatchback, Automatic, 31 K Miles, $18,237 Stk# P06319 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

STLtoday.com/jobs

'14 Ford Mustang GT: 5.0L 8 Cyl, Manual, 34K Miles, A Must See, $26,490 #B8630

'13 Ford Taurus SEL: Silver, 100K Miles, Loaded, Large, $10,000 #X3314

Honda '14 Honda Civic EXL: Heated Leather, Moonroof, Silver, 35K Mi, Honda Certified, $16,200 #X3391

'13 Honda Fit: Sport, 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $11,990 #78268A

'14 Jeep Cherokee: 4WD Latitude, White, 90K Miles, Hurry In, $15,000 #X3233A

Volkswagen

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'14 VW Beetle: R-Line, 55K Miles, One Owner Deep Black, $14,990 #V17298A

Infiniti '08 Infiniti G37: Journey Sport, One Owner Clean Carfax, Nav, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof, $13,990 #96021A

'08 Infiniti EX35: One Ownr Clean Carfax, AWD, Heatd Front Seats, Surnoof, $12,990#78002B

'13 Passat: Automatic, Gray, 43K Miles, $11,990 13 Passat SE: Automatic, Sunroof, Black, $13,490 '14 Beetle: R-Line, Sunroof, Auto, $14,490 '13 VW Passat TDI: 52K Miles, Auto, Black

'14 CC: R-Line, 30K Miles, Auto, Silver, $16,990

'16 Kia Optima: 4 Door Sedan, LX, 9K Miles, $16,993 Stk #P06315 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Kia Forte: 4 Door, Auto, LX, 26K Miles, $12,680 Stk# P06314 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Kia Optima SX: Clean Carfax, Nav, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof, $12,990 #11127A

'17 Tiguan S: Pure White, 14K, Auto, $18,990

'12 Kia Forte EX: Hatchback, Auto, 62K Miles, $11,490

'17 CTS: Luxury, Panoramic Roof, Navigation, AWD, White, Certified, $39,990

'12 Kia Rio5 LX: Hatchback, Clean Carfax, 4 Cyl, 69K Miles, Motor Trend Certified, $8,490 #11387A

'09 Kia Borrego LX: V6 4WD, Blue, Only 92K Miles, $9,000 #H170942B

'13 Kia Optima LX: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, FWD, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,490 #P8930A

'15 Golf: Wagon, TDI, Red, Auto, $22,990

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC SUPERSTORE 1-866-244-9085

'12 SRX Premium: AWD, Black, $20,990 '11 CTS: 50K Miles, AWD, Black, Auto, Sunroof, Call

Lexus '08 Lexus IS 250: Clean Carfax, Nav, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $10,990 #94971M

'08 Lexus ES 350: 3.5L V6, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $10,490 #27270B

'07 Lexus IS 250: AWD, Nav, Heated & Cooled Seats $11,990 #B8686

Mazda '17 Mazda Mazda3; 4 Door, Touring, 18K Miles, Blue $17,449 Stk# P06313 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Mazda Mazda3 i: Hatchback, 4 Cyl, FWD, Low Miles, 67K Miles, $11,490 #11450A

'14 CTS: Luxury, AWD, Certified $28,990 '12 CTS: 38K Miles, AWD, Panoramic Sunroof, Call '17 XTS: Luxury, Navigation, Radiant Silver $34,990 '13 XTS: Premium, Certified, Black/Black, Call

'15 SRX Luxury: AWD, White Roof, Certified $32,990

Mitsubishi '15 Mitsubishi Lancer: Evolution, Local Trade, $29,490 #M16456A

Nissan/Datsun '14 Nissan Altima 2.5 SL: One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Bluetooth $14,990 #P8888

'10 Nissan Altima 2.5S: 4 Door, Black, 112K Miles, Hurry In! $7,800 #H170069A

'09 Nissan Altima 2.5: Only 90K Miles, Call Today, $8,000 #H170664A

Pontiac '16 Mazda Mazda6 i: Sport, 2.5L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified, $15,990 #9071A

'06 Mazda MX-5: 2.0L 4 Cyl, RWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, $7,990 #8876A

'16 Mazda CX-3: Touring, AWD, Certified, $18,990 #M16424A

'12 Mazda Miata: 21K, Manual, Black, $16,990 #M17181A

'10 Mazda3 i Sport: 2.0L 4 Cyl, FWD, Gunmetal Blue Mica, 94K Miles, Call Today, $6,990 #11110A

'10 Mazda Mazda6 i: 2.5L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, 6 Speed, Stick Shift, Call Today, $7,990 #11446A

'10 Mazda Mazda3: Grand Touring, Blue, 113K Miles, $9,000 #H171192A

'17 VW Jetta GLI: 7K Miles, Just Arrived, Save, $24,990 #V8550A

'09 VW GTI: 2 Door Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Nice! $8,990 #27542A

Chevrolet Trucks '16 Chevy Silverado 1500: Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, LT, 11K Miles, $35,000 Stk# 171142A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Silverado 1500: Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, LT, Silver, 86K Miles, $23,900 Stk# P06308 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Silverado 1500: Crew Cab, Standard Box, 4WD, LTZ Z71, $52,955 Stk# 171156A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Silverado 1500: Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, LT, 35K Miles, $35,000 Stk# 171143A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Silverado: Crew Cab, 4x4, Z-71, Leather $26,490 #B8728

'09 Pontiac G8: 4 Door Sedan, Automatic, Red, 74K Miles, $12,895 Stk# P06304 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Pontiac G6: 4 Door Sedan, Automatic, 1SF 134K Miles, Stk# 170437A Call Today! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Range Rover/Land Rover '17 Land Rover Range Rover: Evoque, CONVERTIBLE!! Only 3,120 Miles, White, $59,490 #B8649

Subaru

'12 Chevy Silverado: 34K Miles, 4WD, White, 5.3L V8, $27,490 #B8631

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '12 Ram 1500 SLT: Red, 4WD, Well Equipped, $22,990 #B8579

Ford Trucks '15 Ford F150: Lariat, 5.0L, Panoramic Roof, Navigation, 27K Miles, $39,990 #B8537

GMC Trucks '15 GMC Sierra SLT: Crew Cab, 6.2L 4WD, $42,990 #B8565

'14 GMC Sierra Denali: White, AWD, Loaded, $38,990 #M16722A

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '04 Nissan Titan: Crew Cab, Local Trade, Well Serviced, $8,990 #M17158B

Sport Utility '16 Chevy Equinox: Gray, FWD, LT, 17K Miles $20,600 Stk #P06309 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '08 Chevy Equinox: FWD, Sport, 47K Miles $11,246 Stk #180041A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox: FWD, LTZ, 29K Miles $22,438 Stk #180004A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox: AWD, 1LT, 46K Miles $18,500 Stk #P06305 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '05 Cadillac Escalade: Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Rear DVD, 3rd Row, $9,990 #39131A

'17 Subaru Impreza: Sport, 2K Miles, Local Trade, $24,490 #C8445C

'08 Chevy Equinox LT: 54K Miles, Certified, V6, Well Maintained, $11,490 #B8687

Toyota '06 Toyota Avalon Lmtd: Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Front Seats, Sunroof, $7,490 #P8886A

'13 Toyota Corolla S: Auto, Power Sunroof, $10,990 #V17375A

'12 Toyota Prius Four: One Owner Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $7,990 #96569A

'13 Ford Escape: FWD, 4 Door, SE, 59K Miles, $13,650 Stk #171145A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Ford Escape XLT: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth, 68K Miles, $12,490 #28044C

'13 Ford Escape SE: Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Call Today, $12,990 #38225A

Mercedes Benz '12 Mercedes Benz E350: 4Matic, 48K Mi, Black, Sunroof, Navigation, $22,990 #C17186A

Mini Cooper

'14 Toyota Camry SE: One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Bal of Fact Wrnty, $15,990 #P8906

'12 Toyota Corolla LE: 18K Miles, White, Clean Car, Hurry In, $12,500 #H170006A

'07 Toyota Sequoia: Limited, One Owner Clean Carfax, 4WD, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seats, $10,490 #78427A

'14 Mini Cooper: Convertible, Auto, 46K, Red $18,990 #B8727

'05 Honda Accord EX-L: 3.0L V6, Clean Carfax, Heated Lthr Front Seats, Sunroof, $6,990 #27777A

'15 Ford Edge: Titanium, 30K Miles, AWD, $27,490 #B8420A

'14 GMC Terrain: FWD, SLE-1, 43K Miles $17,098 Stk# P06318 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 GMC Terrain SLE-1: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, $12,990 #P8885A

'11 GMC Terrain SLE-2: Heated Fron tSeats, Bluetooth, Remote Start, BU Camera, $12,990 #78036A

Volkswagen '12 Infiniti M37x: 3.7 Sedan, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $18,990 #11267A

'15 VW Jetta 1.8T SE: 1.8L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Turbo, $12,990 #P8949

Jaguar

'15 VW Jetta 1.8T SE: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $13,490 #P8971

'09 Honda Civic: Automatic, 73K Miles, $11,490

'13 Honda Civic: Auto, 32K Miles, Sedan Certified, $13,990 #B8599

'14 VW CC: R-Line, 30K Miles, Auto, Certified, $19,990 #V17451A

'16 CT6: Premium, Certified AWD, Loaded $56,490

'17 XT5: Platinum, 3K Miles, AWD, Certified, White, $55,990

'10 Mini Cooper S: Auto, Roof, Red #B8731 Call Today! '08 Infiniti M35x: Tech Package, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, $11,490 #96567A

'13 Jetta SE: Automotive, Black, 55K Miles, $11,490

Kia

STLtoday.com/readerrewards '08 Infiniti G35x: 3.5L V6, Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $11,490 #96728A

VOLKSWAGEN'S

'12 Jetta: Black, Automatic, 28K Miles, Certified, $12,990

Hyundai

Ford

'15 Ford Focus: Hatchback, Titanium, Beige, Only 12K Miles, $15,000 #H171370A

'13 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Lifted, 5 New Tires, $27,990 #V17530A

'17 Honda Accord: Sport, Red,

'14 Ford Focus SE: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Low Mi, $11,490 #10961A

'13 Ford Taurus SEL: 3.5L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, AWD, Bluetooth, Remote Start, $11,990 #78213B

'14 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Hart Top, Auto, A Must See, $35,990 #B8588

'14 CRV LX: AWD, 8 To Choose, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Black, Starting At $16,995 #X3442

'14 Hyundai Sonata: Gray, 22K Miles, $12,800 #X3323 '99 Cadillac Deville: White Diamond 50Km Anniversary Edition $4,490 #C8707

Misc. Autos

1-866-244-9085

GATEWAY Z CLUB Labor Day Sunday Sunday, September 3 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

'12 Jaguar XF: Porfolio, 34K, Pure Luxury, $27,990 #C16212D

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

See More Rides Ads On Page B8


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

THURSDAY • 08.24.2017 • B

STAKING A CLAIM

Steckel believes Bears are on the rise Missouri State plays Mizzou in opener

MISSOURI STATE PHOTO

Dave Steckel has gone 1-10 and 4-7 as Missouri State coach. BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

S P R I N G F I E L D, M O. • The PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals starter Luke Weaver steps on first base ahead of San Diego’s Jabari Blash after receiving the toss from first baseman Jedd Gyorko.

Weaver sharp in his bid to be part of rotation

Lyons should get a chance at closer’s role

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

While most of Wednesday’s talk centered on the Cardinals’ pressing need to find a pitcher to finish games, there has been a more paramount one creeping into the box score. They need better starts to games. A rotation that has begun to bend and splinter in recent weeks may have found an arm to give it some support. In a resounding bid to be a part of the rotation for good, rookie Luke Weaver pitched seven scoreless innings and tied a career best with 10 strikeouts for the Cardinals in a 6-2 victory Wednesday at Busch Stadium. The Cardinals were hit by five pitches and capitalized with nine hits, including three from Kolten Wong to go with his two stolen bases. Weaver became the Cardinals’ first starter in a month to throw seven scoreless innings, and the first Cardinals rookie since See CARDINALS • Page B5

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Seung Hwan Oh hands the ball to manager Mike Matheny after failing to get any outs in the eighth inning.

CARDINALS

6 PADRES

> 6:15 p.m. Thursday vs. Padres, FSM > Martinez (10-9, 3.57) vs. Perdomo (6-8, 4.93)

2

> Rosenthal is set for elbow surgery. B5

QUALITY ASSURANCE Luke Weaver’s outing Wednesday comes as Cardinals starters had failed to record quality starts in seven of their previous 10 games. A look at the Cards’ starting pitchers since July 27:

Carpe closer. “I have no particular pecking order — I want to see someone seize the job,” Cardinals general manager Michael Girsch said. “And I really don’t care who it is.” Here the Cardinals are — late August and still in the playoff mix — and the manager sometimes scorned for bullpen management must save the season … by managing his bullpen. Mike Matheny has pressed some of the right buttons this season, and this team, with all of its roster redundancies and offensive underachievement, is still hanging around. But the Trevor Rosenthal news — Tommy John, out for year — puts increasing pressure on Matheny. who not only must find a closer but then also figure out who will See HOCHMAN • Page B3

Quality start (6IP or more, 3 ER or fewer) QS of seven or more innings

Martinez recorded both starts of 7 or more IP

golden nugget sits on the corner of Dave Steckel’s desk inside the Missouri State football facility. It was a souvenir from his trip this summer to Ellensburg, Wash., where Steckel panned for gold while in town for a friend’s daughter’s wedding. The nugget sits there as a reminder, a metaphor, a symbol for his program’s potential. “I keep telling everyone we’re sitting on a gold mine here,” Steckel said Wednesday, 10 days before the start of his third season as the Bears’ head coach. “We still have some facility work to do. We have a lot of recruiting work to do. We have a lot of coaching work to do. But I think when we win, this place is just going to take off.” It’s been 27 years since Missouri State last made the Football Championship Subdivision playoffs, which Steckel brought up multiple times during a 30-minute interview Wednesday. When he left his post as Missouri’s defensive coordinator after the 2014 season, Steckel understood he faced a long-term rebuilding project in Springfield. The Bears play in the competitive Missouri Valley Conference, and while other programs on campus have thrived behind strong institutional support — notably baseball, men’s and women’s basketball and women’s volleyball — the football program had started to decay in the 2000s and needed more than a new coat of maroon paint when Steckel arrived. MSU finished just 1-10 his first season in 2015, which puts into context the strides the program made during last year’s 4-7 season.

See MSU • Page B2 > MU opener • 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 2 vs. Missouri State, SEC Network

IndyCar’s return good news for Carpenter BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

But oval racing expert doesn’t rule out road courses in future

As he drove from Gateway Motorsports Park to his home in Indianapolis in the fall of 2015, Ed Carpenter didn’t hesitate to call IndyCar president Mark Miles to offer his endorsement. He had spent time that day testing the track and meeting Gateway officials in one of the initial steps to determine whether the venue was up to the task of hosting a series race. “I told him these guys Carpenter were serious and we needed to make it happen,” Carpenter said. The veteran driver has been beating a path to the area since that test. When IndyCar added Gateway as the site of Saturday’s Bommarito Automotive Group 500, it meant that Carpenter had one more race to drive in his abbreviated season.

Ed Carpenter checks out the repaved surface at Gateway Motorsports Park during an IndyCar test session earlier this month.

See INDY • Page B7

> Bommarito Auto Group 500 • 8:30 p.m. Saturday at Gateway Motorsports Park, NBCSN

PHOTO BY TOM TUSSEY

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

THURSDAY • 08.24.2017 • B

STAKING A CLAIM

Steckel believes Bears are on the rise Missouri State plays Mizzou in opener

MISSOURI STATE PHOTO

Dave Steckel has gone 1-10 and 4-7 as Missouri State coach. BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

S P R I N G F I E L D, M O. • The PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals starter Luke Weaver steps on first base ahead of San Diego’s Jabari Blash after receiving the toss from first baseman Jedd Gyorko.

Weaver sharp in his bid to be part of rotation

Lyons should get a chance at closer’s role

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

About the only thing that didn’t go as planned for Luke Weaver on Wednesday night was when he grabbed his batting helmet for his first at-bat. The batting gloves that should have been cradled inside weren’t. On deck, the rookie was set to take his cuts, sans gloves, until his manager advised against it. A dash for gloves ensued. Paul DeJong produced a pair of his own batting gloves and handed them to Weaver — all so that the pitcher didn’t take the chance of one swing causing the pine tar to tear away his skin. That’s how precious his hands have become. In a resounding bid to be part of the rotation from here on, Weaver pitched seven scoreless innings and tied a career high with 10 strikeouts in a 6-2 victory against San Diego at Busch Stadium. He became the first Cardinals starter in a month to throw seven scoreless innings See CARDINALS • Page B5

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Seung Hwan Oh hands the ball to manager Mike Matheny after failing to get any outs in the eighth inning.

CARDINALS

6 PADRES

> 6:15 p.m. Thursday vs. Padres, FSM > Martinez (10-9, 3.57) vs. Perdomo (6-8, 4.93)

2

> Rosenthal is set for elbow surgery. B5

QUALITY ASSURANCE Luke Weaver’s outing Wednesday comes as Cardinals starters had failed to record quality starts in seven of their previous 10 games. A look at the Cards’ starting pitchers since July 27:

Carpe closer. “I have no particular pecking order — I want to see someone seize the job,” Cardinals general manager Michael Girsch said. “And I really don’t care who it is.” Here the Cardinals are — late August and still in the playoff mix — and the manager sometimes scorned for bullpen management must save the season … by managing his bullpen. Mike Matheny has pressed some of the right buttons this season, and this team, with all of its roster redundancies and offensive underachievement, is still hanging around. But the Trevor Rosenthal news — Tommy John, out for year — puts increasing pressure on Matheny. who not only must find a closer but then also figure out who will See HOCHMAN • Page B3

Quality start (6IP or more, 3 ER or fewer) QS of seven or more innings

Martinez recorded both starts of 7 or more IP

golden nugget sits on the corner of Dave Steckel’s desk inside the Missouri State football facility. It was a souvenir from his trip this summer to Ellensburg, Wash., where Steckel panned for gold while in town for a friend’s daughter’s wedding. The nugget sits there as a reminder, a metaphor, a symbol for his program’s potential. “I keep telling everyone we’re sitting on a gold mine here,” Steckel said Wednesday, 10 days before the start of his third season as the Bears’ head coach. “We still have some facility work to do. We have a lot of recruiting work to do. We have a lot of coaching work to do. But I think when we win, this place is just going to take off.” It’s been 27 years since Missouri State last made the Football Championship Subdivision playoffs, which Steckel brought up multiple times during a 30-minute interview Wednesday. When he left his post as Missouri’s defensive coordinator after the 2014 season, Steckel understood he faced a long-term rebuilding project in Springfield. The Bears play in the competitive Missouri Valley Conference, and while other programs on campus have thrived behind strong institutional support — notably baseball, men’s and women’s basketball and women’s volleyball — the football program had started to decay in the 2000s and needed more than a new coat of maroon paint when Steckel arrived. MSU finished just 1-10 his first season in 2015, which puts into context the strides the program made during last year’s 4-7 season.

See MSU • Page B2 > MU opener • 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 2 vs. Missouri State, SEC Network

IndyCar’s return good news for Carpenter BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

But oval racing expert doesn’t rule out road courses in future

As he drove from Gateway Motorsports Park to his home in Indianapolis in the fall of 2015, Ed Carpenter didn’t hesitate to call IndyCar president Mark Miles to offer his endorsement. He had spent time that day testing the track and meeting Gateway officials in one of the initial steps to determine whether the venue was up to the task of hosting a series race. “I told him these guys Carpenter were serious and we needed to make it happen,” Carpenter said. The veteran driver has been beating a path to the area since that test. When IndyCar added Gateway as the site of Saturday’s Bommarito Automotive Group 500, it meant that Carpenter had one more race to drive in his abbreviated season.

Ed Carpenter checks out the repaved surface at Gateway Motorsports Park during an IndyCar test session earlier this month.

See INDY • Page B7

> Bommarito Auto Group 500 • 8:30 p.m. Saturday at Gateway Motorsports Park, NBCSN

PHOTO BY TOM TUSSEY

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Thursday 8/24 vs. Padres 6:15 p.m. FSM

Friday 8/25 vs. Rays 7:15 p.m. FSM

Saturday 8/26 vs. Rays 6:15 p.m. FSM

Sunday 8/27 vs. Rays 1:15 p.m. FSM

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

The final round of hype

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 8/26 at Rochester 5:05 p.m.

Wednesday 8/30 Sunday 9/3 at Ottawa at Toronto 1 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Saturday 9/9 vs. Harrisburg 7:30 p.m.

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/2 vs. Missouri State 11 a.m. SEC Network

Saturday 9/9 vs. South Carolina 6 p.m., ESPN2

Saturday 9/16 vs. Purdue 3 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 9/23 vs. Auburn Time/TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 9/9 vs. Western Kentucky 7 p.m., BTN

Saturday 9/2 vs. Ball State 11 a.m. BTN

Friday 9/15 at South Florida 6 p.m. ESPN

Friday 9/29 vs. Nebraska 7 p.m. FS1

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily. FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Thurs. 8/24: vs. So. Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Fri. 9/1: vs. Evansville, 7:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Wed. 8/30: vs. Florence, 6:35 p.m. Thurs. 8/31: vs. Florence, 6:35 p.m.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Noon Yankees at Tigers, MLB 2 p.m. Little League WS: Reynosa (Mexico) vs. White Rock (B.C), ESPN Rockies at Royals (joined in progress), MLB 3 p.m. 6 p.m. Red Sox at Indians, MLB 6:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Padres, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 6:30 p.m. Little League WS: Fairfield (Conn.) vs. Lufkin (Texas), ESPN BASKETBALL WNBA: Los Angeles at Phoenix, ESPN2 8 p.m. HORSE RACING 3 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Riskaverse Stakes, FS2 FOOTBALL NFL exhibition: Dolphins at Eagles, NFL Network 6 p.m. GOLF 9:30 a.m. LPGA: Canadian Pacific Open, first round, GOLF 1 p.m. PGA: The Northern Trust, first round, GOLF Web.com: Portland Open, first round, GOLF 5 p.m. 4:30 a.m. (Fri.) European PGA: Made in Denmark, second round, GOLF TRACK AND FIELD 1 p.m. IAAF Diamond League at Zurich, NBCSN

DIGEST MU board to vote on south end zone complex

The University of Missouri System Board of Curators will vote on approval for the $98 million south end zone complex at Memorial Stadium during its meeting Friday, the board announced Wednesday. The meeting will take place over teleconference, starting at 10:30 a.m. In February, the board voted to approve the design costs of the three-story facility project. The athletics department was expected to present the board its funding plan by late summer. According to MU’s proposal, long-term debt financing will not exceed $57.2 million. MU has raised $48 million in private pledges for the project. From that total, MU has allowed for $5 million in uncollectible pledges and another $3 million in interest for the longterm financing. The facility is expected to be finished by the start of the 2019 season. (Dave Matter) McIlroy ready for playoff opener • Ten days ago, Rory McIlroy wasn’t sure if he was going to play the rest of the year. A week off made him feel positive enough that a nagging rib injury can be managed well enough for him to compete in the FedEx Cup playoffs. And with just over a month before he shuts it down for the year, McIlroy wants to do more than just play. “I think the real thing for me was I want to win,” McIlroy said Wednesday. “I want to win at least once before the end of the year. I haven’t not won a tournament since the 2008 season, which was my real rookie season on the European Tour.” The Northern Trust, which starts Thursday at Glen Oaks on Long Island, features the top 120 players available based on their performance this season on the toughest circuit in golf. There are no aging champions, amateur qualifiers or club professionals. There is no Masters champion, either, as Sergio Garcia again is taking off the first playoff event. Hideki Matsuyama enters the FedEx Cup playoffs as the fifth player in the last five years to be the No. 1 seed. The points count four times as much for the next three playoff events until the reset for the Tour Championship at East Lake. The objective is to be among the top five seeds going into the finale, where those players only have to win the Tour Championship to capture the $10 million bonus. (AP) Payne retiring at Augusta • Billy Payne is retiring as chairman of Augusta National Golf Club and the Masters after 11 years of substantial change that included the club inviting female members and supporting the game’s growth with two international amateur tournaments. Payne officially retires Oct. 16 when the club opens for a new season. He will be succeeded by Fred Ridley, a former USGA president and U.S. Amateur champion who heads the Masters competition committee. (AP) ESPN’s Russillo arrested • ESPN Radio host Ryen Russillo has been arrested on criminal trespass charges after entering a condo in Jackson, Wyo. The 42-year-old host of “The Ryen Russillo Show” was booked into the Teton County Jail on Wednesday on a misdemeanor criminal trespassing charge. The Jackson Hole News & Guide reports that officers were called around 3:30 a.m. Wednesday to a condo for a report of a “highly intoxicated male” who was refusing to leave. Russillo, of West Hartford, Conn., remained in jail on Wednesday afternoon. His case will be handled by the Jackson Municipal Court. ESPN spokeswoman Diane Lamb says the company is looking into the matter. (AP) Spurs sign guard Perrantes • The San Antonio Spurs have signed guard London Perrantes. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed Wednesday. The 22-year-old Perrantes wasn’t drafted out of Virginia this year but made summer league appearances for the Miami Heat in Las Vegas and Orlando. The 6-foot-2 guard averaged 10 points in the MGM Resorts Summer League, and 11.3 points in Orlando summer league action. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Conor McGregor (right) and Floyd Mayweather Jr. pose for photos Wednesday. Their fight is Saturday in Las Vegas.

Fighters boast of power prowess ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS • Floyd Mayweather Jr. says it was the first punch of the fight. His promoter thinks it came during the second round. One shot to the head, and suddenly Manny Pacquiao decided his night might better be spent fighting on the outside. “I let him know it’s not what you think it is,” Mayweather said. “You’re not just going to run in there. He felt a strength he didn’t expect.” The knock on Mayweather — and the reason some people give Conor McGregor a chance Saturday night — is that he doesn’t knock out people. Pacquiao never went down either, but Mayweather showed there are other ways to change a fight than putting a fighter on the canvas. McGregor may find that out early if he goes after Mayweather at the opening bell as expected. The prevailing theory is that McGregor wins the power battle, but there’s more than one fighter with power in this, the most unusual of fights. “When he gets hit he’s going to find out it’s totally different,” Mayweather said. “The brittle hands, they keep saying that, but when I come across his head he’ll find out that it’s totally different.” McGregor doesn’t believe that, of course, and predicted again Wednesday that the fight would end early with Mayweather on his back. “I believe one or two rounds, with 8-ounce gloves I don’t see him surviving,” McGregor said. “I’m starting to think I’ll toy with

him once he goes down.” The two fighters got together for the final pre-fight press conference to further hype a fight built on hype. In contrast to the bombastic tone of earlier appearances it was a relatively subdued affair at the MGM Grand. They posed together and didn’t come close to exchanging blows. They did both manage to get in a few final words, though. “It’s not going to be easy Conor,” Mayweather told his opponent. “I’ve got a great chin but remember this: The same way you give it you gotta be able to take it.” Though ticket sales have been tepid — largely because of astronomical prices — the pay-perview is expected to be watched by some 50 million people in the United States alone and millions more worldwide. It’s half-fight, half-spectacle, a bout that matches a UFC star who has never boxed against a masterful ring technician with a record of 49-0. Born of internet hype, it has captured the curiosity of even those outside both sports and could end up being the richest fight ever. And it’s a bout Mayweather says he is taking very seriously, despite training at odd hours and holding meet-and-greets every night before the fight with fans who come to his strip club. “I’m taking a gamble,” said Mayweather, who is coming off a two-year layoff. “But it’s worth it.” Mayweather’s fight with Pacquiao ended up going 12 long rounds, and turning a lot of people off from boxing. But while Mayweather hasn’t really knocked out anyone in a decade, he says the streak will come to an end in what he insists is his final

fight. Oddsmakers in this gambling town hope it’s not McGregor stopping Mayweather early as he claims. McGregor fans have placed thousands of small bets at long-shot odds of their man knocking Mayweather out in the early rounds, and sports books could suffer their worst loss ever in what is expected to be the most heavily bet fight ever. McGregor also believes that’s exactly what is going to happen. He said his years in the octagon and his varied skillset will translate well into the boxing ring, especially after a three-month camp where he used a former referee to help him adjust to boxing rules. What he didn’t bring in was any boxing trainer to teach him more about the sport, insisting that the team he has always been with knows him so well that it wouldn’t have made a difference. “We added what is useful and discarded what is not,” he said. “As the final sparring session approached all the unnecessary was gone. It was a cleaner product, just the perfect product.” He was dismissive of Mayweather to the end, telling those attending the final press conference that Mayweather is not only a one dimensional fighter but more than likely not the sports bettor he claims to be when posting his winning tickets online. Perhaps, he said, that’s the reason Mayweather still owes the IRS $22.2 million in back taxes. “I think he has a big-time gambling problem,” McGregor said. “He always shows his winning bets but never his losers. Maybe that’s why he’s in the position he is and had to take this fight.”

Steckel is trying to lift Missouri State MSU • FROM B1

Now, the Bears expect more, from the man in charge to his Mizzou-bred staff and the veteran players populating their roster. When Steckel returns to Columbia, Mo., Sept. 2 for the first Mizzou-Missouri State meeting in nearly a century, he’ll bring a Bears team that returns seven starters on offense and nine on defense and expects a breakthrough this fall, no matter what happens on Faurot Field against the state’s only Football Bowl Subdivision team. “I really think this year is going to be telltale and next year we have to produce,” said Steckel, a Mizzou defensive assistant under Gary Pinkel from 2001-14, including the last six years as coordinator. “With all this said, I understand 100 percent it’s on me. We can have the nice facilities. We can do this and talk about that, but we have to win. And right now, 5-17 sucks.” The Missouri State administration hasn’t lost faith. Earlier this summer, Steckel received a twoyear contract extension through the 2021 season. The school has made a stronger commitment to facilities since Steckel arrived, including renovations to the 7,200-square-foot weight room. The team works under its third strength coach in three years, but the 2017 Bears are far bigger and stronger than the team he inherited three years ago, Steckel said. “This league is an offensive and defensive line-driven league, and when I bench press more than half the guys, that’s scary,” he said. “But now they all bench more than me, so that’s good. We’re go-

ing in the right direction.” Steckel, whose office pays homage to one of his former teams, the U.S. Marine Corps, has always been a stickler for discipline, but for Missouri State to reach the potential he believes is possible, he’s worked to balance the tough love with positive energy within and around the program. Behind his desk hangs the classic Marines recruitment poster featuring a bug-eyed drill instructor and the words, “We don’t promise you a rose garden.” But he doesn’t coach on scare tactics alone, not when he’s trying to sell a brand and a culture to his locker room and beyond. Steckel teaches his players lessons from John Gordon’s book, “The Energy Bus: 10 Rules to Fuel Your Life, Work and Team With Positive Energy.” In the community, he’s pushed the same message to MSU fans, symbolized by his ubiquitous “Bear Up” rallying cry, a riff on Kramer’s “Giddy Up” from his beloved “Seinfeld.” (Steckel and MSU trademarked the slogan with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.) Between media interviews and studying 2016 clips of Mizzou’s offense, Steckel found time to visit with the local Rotary Club on Wednesday morning, all to grow the program’s following. “I think the culture of the program is changing,” said running backs coach Munir Prince, a former Mizzou and De Smet High defensive back. “We’re going from wanting to be an average team to a great team. The guys are starting to understand the time commitment and sacrifice it takes to build a culture of winning.” Those changes didn’t happen

immediately. Offensive tackle Cole Christensen, a junior from Eureka High, called Steckel’s hands-on approach with players “a night and day difference” from the previous regime under former coach Terry Allen. With a core of younger assistants, most of whom played or coached at Mizzou during Steckel’s time there, the staff worked to build trust with the nucleus of players on the roster. “Our discipline has changed a lot,” said offensive lineman Marquis Prophete, a junior from McCluer North High. “Our attitude and just our will to compete has changed a lot since my freshman year. It’s 100 percent Coach Stec.” Just ask his staff. Kenji Jackson, a former Mizzou safety who coaches the same position group for the Bears, first met Steckel a decade ago when he came to Texas to recruit him. Not much has changed except the coach’s ZIP code and team colors. “He looks the same to me as he did when I was 18 and he came into Mansfield High School with that silver hair, clean shaven look,” Jackson said. “He’s still Stec. He’s had to change roles, but he’s still high energy and all about discipline and still a fun guy.” There are 17 reasons Steckel’s 5-17 start hasn’t been fun, but the program’s prospects haven’t wavered. There’s football gold in this southwest corner of the state, the head coach is convinced. “I think the town and the school and the administration, everybody is bought in now,” Steckel said. “Now it’s down to us.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

Big win for STLFC over Tulsa Rudolph’s late goal is the game-winner BY JOE LYONS st. Louis Post-dispatch

In a must-win game, St. Louis FC delivered. Seth Rudolph’s goal in the 90th minute capped one of the team’s best second-half showings of the season as STLFC came from behind to beat the Tulsa Roughnecks 2-1 before a crowd of 4,152 at Soccer Park in Fenton. “Second half, I felt like we were men on the field,” STLFC coach Preki Radosavljevic said. “We dictated tempo — I thought in the 60th minute, we should’ve been up 3-1 — but in that second half, it was an outstanding performance for all our guys.” Rudolph added: “We knew we had to win, get three points. Tonight was huge for us, coming back the way we did.” STLFC improved to 8-10-5 and is now just three points back in the battle for the eighth and final playoff spot in United Soccer League’s Eastern Conference. Tulsa, the sixth-place team in the Western Conference, is 10-10-3. Rudolph’s game-winning goal capped a spirited second-half effort from STLFC, which trailed 1-0 at halftime. The deciding play started with a chip into the box from Ivan Mirkovic. The ball was cleared to Austin Ledbetter, whose low shot was deflected to Konrad Plewa, who touched the ball wide to Sebastian Dalgaard. Dalgaard’s low pass back into the box was redirected into the goal by Rudolph, who netted his team-leading fifth goal of the season and his fourth in the team’s last three games. “Right now, they’re falling for me,’’ the Belleville West High product said. “To be honest, my teammates are doing most of the work; I’m just passing the ball into the goal. We’re more worried about getting three points, so I don’t think it matters who scores.” Rudolph’s winner came about 12 minutes after Tulsa defender Modou Jadama was sent off after picking up a second yellow card. The Roughnecks finished with just 10 men. STLFC tied it about 10 minutes into the second half. A free kick by Ryan Howe to the near post was headed to the far post by Christian Volesky. Mats Bjurman’s first shot was blocked but his followup found the net. “It wasn’t pretty, but we stuck with it and made it happen,’’ Bjurman said. “The ball was just bouncing around. ... After I scored, I really didn’t know what to do because I was so relieved.” Tulsa, which defeated visiting STLFC 2-1 on Aug. 10, came on strong to take a 1-0 lead to the halftime break. About 10 minutes after STLFC goalkeeper Devala Gorrick managed to tip a shot from Joey Calistri off the goal post, the Roughnecks went up with a goal off a corner-kick scramble. After STLFC blocked a pair of shots, the loose ball fell to Calistri, whose spinning side-volley deflected off a defender and into the net. In added time at the end of the opening half, STLFC created a quality chance as Bjurman played a ball to space in the box for Volesky, but Tulsa keeper Bryan Byars came strong off his line to make a sliding save. Preki was asked what was said to inspire his team’s inspired second half. “We were pretty calm,’’ the coach said. “I told them that I thought they played the first half very nervous. I felt like we were playing under pressure, under stress. ... We were working hard, but a pass, a touch, a decision wasn’t there for us. “Just told them to relax and keep working. Make sure that we put them under pressure, that we press them as hard as we can. And finally, the ball started to bounce our way.” STLFC had a pair of high-level chances midway through the second half. Byars got a hand on a Bjurman cross, deflecting it just out of the reach of Volesky at the back post. Less than a minute later, Volesky headed a Dalgaard chip off the goal post and Rudolph’s off-balance rebound try was cleared by a Tulsa defender.

UP NEXT

Following a 2-1 homestand, STLFC will kick off a threegame road trip with a 5:05 p.m. game Saturday in Rochester, N.Y. against the Rhinos (9-5-8). Rochester is in fifth place in the Eastern Division and features goalkeeper Tomas Gomez (Webster Groves). Joe Lyons @joelyonspd on twitter jlyons@post-dispatch.com

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B3

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Bradley on DL as Red Sox get Davis ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston Red Sox outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. will have his sprained left thumb in a splint for five to seven days after being injured Tuesday night. Bradley was placed on the 10day disabled list Wednesday. He was injured while reaching for home plate during a slide in Tuesday night’s game against the Cleveland Indians. The Red Sox then boosted their outfield depth by acquiring speedy Rajai Davis from the Oakland Athletics for a minor league outfielder. The Red Sox sent 18-yearold Rafael Rincones to the lastplace A’s. Davis is expected to join the Red Sox in Cleveland on Thursday for a game between division leaders. He hit .233 with 26 stolen bases, five home runs and 18 RBIs in 100 games with Oakland this season. Bradley was sent back to Boston for an MRI on Wednesday. Manager John Farrell said the tests showed no tears or fractures, but he doesn’t know how long the center fielder will be sidelined. “Any time you’re dealing with a hitter and his hands, there is always concern,” Farrell said. Bradley slid around catcher Yan Gomes’ tag to score on Eduardo Nunez’s seventh-inning double. Indians manager Terry Francona challenged the call, which was upheld after a review. Farrell said had the call been overturned he would have challenged that Gomes blocked the plate and didn’t give Bradley a clear lane to slide. “It’s unfortunate that he wound up in an unfortunate position on the slide,” Farrell said. Andrew Benintendi started in center field with Brock Holt in left Wednesday. Farrell said Nunez might get time in left when second baseman Dustin Pedroia (left knee inflammation) returns from the DL. To take Bradley’s spot on the roster, the Red Sox called up infielder Deven Marrero from Triple-A Pawtucket. Bradley was batting .262 with 14 homers and 54 RBIs this season, hitting .400 in his last

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston’s Jackie Bradley Jr. is injured as he slides safely into home plate Tuesday night in Cleveland.

seven games. Marrero has played 58 games in three stints in the majors this season. He has batted .212 with three homers and 23 RBIs with the Red Sox. Kipnis is back on DL • Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis is on the disabled list again with a strained right hamstring. Kipnis returned recently after missing a month but was removed from Tuesday night’s game against Boston. He grounded out in the first inning and was replaced by a pinch hitter in the third. Kipnis joins a list of injured Indians players that seems to grow by the day. Pitchers Andrew Miller (right knee tendinitis) and Danny Salazar (sore right elbow) were placed on the 10-day DL on Tuesday. Outfielders Michael Brantley (sprained right ankle) and Lonnie Chisenhall (strained right calf) and pitcher Josh Tomlin (strained left hamstring) have been sidelined for several weeks. Kipnis is batting .228 with 11 homers and 30 RBIs. He was on the DL from July 9-Aug. 6 when he first injured the hamstring. Infielder Erik Gonzalez was recalled from Triple-A Columbus.

Twins bring up relief pitcher • The Minnesota Twins have promoted righthanded reliever John Curtiss from Triple-A Rochester. The move was made before their game Wednesday at Chicago. Curtiss would be the 50th player used by the Twins this season and the 12th to make his major league debut. Drafted in the sixth round out of Texas in 2014, Curtiss has a 1.28 ERA, 19 saves and 68 strikeouts over 49 1/3 innings between Double-A and Triple-A this year. To make room on both the 40-man and 25-man rosters, the Twins designated righthander Tim Melville for release or assignment. Melville became the 16th starting pitcher used by the Twins this season in the doubleheader Monday against the White Sox, but righthander Dillon Gee was chosen for the next open spot in the rotation Saturday. Longtime executive dies • Joe Klein, who was a general manager for three major league teams before spending the last two decades as executive director of the independent Atlantic League, has died. He was 75. The Atlantic League said Klein

died Wednesday at Temple University Hospital after complications from heart surgery. He was the Texas Rangers’ general manager from October 1982 until November 1984. He later served as GM for the Cleveland Indians (1986-87) and Detroit Tigers (1994-95). Fan behavior policy in works • Commissioner Rob Manfred says Major League Baseball plans to issue a policy on fan behavior for all ballparks next season. Manfred spoke Tuesday while visiting Comerica Park before Detroit hosted the Yankees. Manfred said he didn’t want to talk about the details of what will be in the code of conduct for spectators. Individual teams have their own policies governing fan behavior, and those rules often are posted on the scoreboard or announced over the public-address system. Earlier this season, Baltimore center fielder Adam Jones was targeted by racial taunts during a game at Fenway Park in Boston. The Red Sox later banned a fan for life after he used a racial slur while talking to another man.

Cards will shuffle bullpen roles as needed now HOCHMAN • FROM B1

fill that guy’s role, and so on. To me, it makes the most sense to go with Tyler Lyons at closer. This isn’t some crazy prediction or proclamation — the lefty Lyons really is good, guys — and gals. Did you see his stuff Wednesday? Lyons’ slider slid like Glenn Brummer across home plate. “Tyler has been borderline dominant for the last few weeks, and that’s exciting,” Girsch said Wednesday. “We lost a guy who has been dominant for years (in Rosenthal), but we’ve got a guy who’s been dominant for weeks. At least we have that going for us. We’ve seen Tyler’s role expand, and I think it will continue to expand.” Lyons last allowed a run on July 6. Since then, in 14 2/3 innings, he’s allowed three hits. Four walks. Nineteen strikeouts. And he saved Wednesday’s game, even without getting a save. He saved Seung Hwan Oh’s behind, is what he did. Sure, it was 5-0 in the eighth. But with two on and no outs, Lyons relieved the reliever and got three nasty, necessary outs. Before the game, Rosenthal suggested that Oh is “going to fill in nicely for the time being.” But I think (think?) most of us are all on the same page about the guy who started the season at closer. You can’t trust Oh for a full inning, assuming one of the fellows in that inning bats lefthanded. Entering Wednesday, lefties have a .638 slugging percentage against Oh. For perspective, Giancarlo Stanton entered the day with a .640 slugging percentage this year to lead the whole league. “It’s been something we’ve had to keep our eye on,” Matheny said. “I’d love for his change, split and slider to sharpen up to the point where it’s not part of the conversation. Last year we had no doubt. It didn’t matter, lefty, righty. We had a lot of faith that he was going to get the job done at the end of the game. Certainly he is in that conversation as a guy who has been there, done that and done it very well. There are just still some adjustments that have to be made with his offspeed, and the location on his fastball, that will let him be the

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals reliever Seung Hwan Oh pitches in the eighth inning Wednesday night against the Padres.

guy who can do that role.” Of course, on Wednesday you couldn’t trust Oh against righties, either. Up 5-0 in the eighth, Oh promptly allowed two hits and a run. Both were righthanded hitters. On Wednesday at Busch, Matheny didn’t proclaim a successor to the save savior that was Closenthal. Nor did we get to find out his answer on the field, since the game wasn’t a save situation. “I’d love to have so many guys down there that we can’t decide which one is the one who is getting everybody out so consistently, that they all look like they can finish up a game. But it’s a tough spot.” Matheny said before the game. “It’s a situation where you can’t take out the psychology of being in a close game. And some of these

players, we are talking about a few guys who haven’t been here in the big leagues that long, let alone in a situation to save a game. Some guys are made for that situation. You only find out by throwing them in high leverage situations and seeing how they respond.” Well, Tyler sure looked pretty good in the highest-leverage situation for a reliever Wednesday. The Cards desperately needed that one. The Cubs have an easy week too, facing Cincinnati and Philadelphia, and Chicago slapped around Cincy on Wednesday, 9-3. The Brewers lost but the Pirates, you might have heard, won the zaniest game of the season — 1-0, on a homer that both ended the game and broke up a no-hitter. As we look forward to the final 5½ weeks, the Cards have their big-money leadoff hitter

in cleanup and a rookie call-up batting in the coveted third spot, and these are the positive turn of events. They have one starting pitcher on the DL, another one pitching like he should be on it, too. And they have a bullpen that’s had stretches of instability — and that’s before they lost their stable closer. Matheny should push the right button with Lyons as his closer — but that leaves other unanswered late-inning questions for the skipper. And it won’t be easy. I don’t know if Ryan Sherriff and John Brebbia are the 2017 version of 2013’s Carlos Martinez and Rosenthal. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 2

Big win for STLFC over Tulsa Rudolph’s late goal is the game-winner BY JOE LYONS st. Louis Post-dispatch

In a must-win game, St. Louis FC delivered. Seth Rudolph’s goal in the 90th minute capped one of the team’s best second-half showings of the season as STLFC came from behind to beat the Tulsa Roughnecks 2-1 before a crowd of 4,152 at Soccer Park in Fenton. “Second half, I felt like we were men on the field,” STLFC coach Preki Radosavljevic said. “We dictated tempo — I thought in the 60th minute, we should’ve been up 3-1 — but in that second half, it was an outstanding performance for all our guys.” Rudolph added: “We knew we had to win, get three points. Tonight was huge for us, coming back the way we did.” STLFC improved to 8-10-5 and is now just three points back in the battle for the eighth and final playoff spot in United Soccer League’s Eastern Conference. Tulsa, the sixth-place team in the Western Conference, is 10-10-3. Rudolph’s game-winning goal capped a spirited second-half effort from STLFC, which trailed 1-0 at halftime. The deciding play started with a chip into the box from Ivan Mirkovic. The ball was cleared to Austin Ledbetter, whose low shot was deflected to Konrad Plewa, who touched the ball wide to Sebastian Dalgaard. Dalgaard’s low pass back into the box was redirected into the goal by Rudolph, who netted his team-leading fifth goal of the season and his fourth in the team’s last three games. “Right now, they’re falling for me,’’ the Belleville West High product said. “To be honest, my teammates are doing most of the work; I’m just passing the ball into the goal. We’re more worried about getting three points, so I don’t think it matters who scores.” Rudolph’s winner came about 12 minutes after Tulsa defender Modou Jadama was sent off after picking up a second yellow card. The Roughnecks finished with just 10 men. STLFC tied it about 10 minutes into the second half. A free kick by Ryan Howe to the near post was headed to the far post by Christian Volesky. Mats Bjurman’s first shot was blocked but his followup found the net. “It wasn’t pretty, but we stuck with it and made it happen,’’ Bjurman said. “The ball was just bouncing around. ... After I scored, I really didn’t know what to do because I was so relieved.” Tulsa, which defeated visiting STLFC 2-1 on Aug. 10, came on strong to take a 1-0 lead to the halftime break. About 10 minutes after STLFC goalkeeper Devala Gorrick managed to tip a shot from Joey Calistri off the goal post, the Roughnecks went up with a goal off a corner-kick scramble. After STLFC blocked a pair of shots, the loose ball fell to Calistri, whose spinning side-volley deflected off a defender and into the net. In added time at the end of the opening half, STLFC created a quality chance as Bjurman played a ball to space in the box for Volesky, but Tulsa keeper Bryan Byars came strong off his line to make a sliding save. Preki was asked what was said to inspire his team’s inspired second half. “We were pretty calm,’’ the coach said. “I told them that I thought they played the first half very nervous. I felt like we were playing under pressure, under stress. ... We were working hard, but a pass, a touch, a decision wasn’t there for us. “Just told them to relax and keep working. Make sure that we put them under pressure, that we press them as hard as we can. And finally, the ball started to bounce our way.” STLFC had a pair of high-level chances midway through the second half. Byars got a hand on a Bjurman cross, deflecting it just out of the reach of Volesky at the back post. Less than a minute later, Volesky headed a Dalgaard chip off the goal post and Rudolph’s off-balance rebound try was cleared by a Tulsa defender.

UP NEXT

Following a 2-1 homestand, STLFC will kick off a threegame road trip with a 5:05 p.m. game Saturday in Rochester, N.Y. against the Rhinos (9-5-8). Rochester is in fifth place in the Eastern Division and features goalkeeper Tomas Gomez (Webster Groves). Joe Lyons @joelyonspd on twitter jlyons@post-dispatch.com

SPORTS

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B3

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Bradley on DL as Red Sox get Davis ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston Red Sox outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. will have his sprained left thumb in a splint for five to seven days after being injured Tuesday night. Bradley was placed on the 10day disabled list Wednesday. He was injured while reaching for home plate during a slide in Tuesday night’s game against the Cleveland Indians. The Red Sox then boosted their outfield depth by acquiring speedy Rajai Davis from the Oakland Athletics for a minor league outfielder. The Red Sox sent 18-yearold Rafael Rincones to the lastplace A’s. Davis is expected to join the Red Sox in Cleveland on Thursday for a game between division leaders. He hit .233 with 26 stolen bases, five home runs and 18 RBIs in 100 games with Oakland this season. Bradley was sent back to Boston for an MRI on Wednesday. Manager John Farrell said the tests showed no tears or fractures, but he doesn’t know how long the center fielder will be sidelined. “Any time you’re dealing with a hitter and his hands, there is always concern,” Farrell said. Bradley slid around catcher Yan Gomes’ tag to score on Eduardo Nunez’s seventh-inning double. Indians manager Terry Francona challenged the call, which was upheld after a review. Farrell said had the call been overturned he would have challenged that Gomes blocked the plate and didn’t give Bradley a clear lane to slide. “It’s unfortunate that he wound up in an unfortunate position on the slide,” Farrell said. Andrew Benintendi started in center field with Brock Holt in left Wednesday. Farrell said Nunez might get time in left when second baseman Dustin Pedroia (left knee inflammation) returns from the DL. To take Bradley’s spot on the roster, the Red Sox called up infielder Deven Marrero from Triple-A Pawtucket. Bradley was batting .262 with 14 homers and 54 RBIs this season, hitting .400 in his last

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston’s Jackie Bradley Jr. is injured as he slides safely into home plate Tuesday night in Cleveland.

seven games. Marrero has played 58 games in three stints in the majors this season. He has batted .212 with three homers and 23 RBIs with the Red Sox. Kipnis is back on DL • Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis is on the disabled list again with a strained right hamstring. Kipnis returned recently after missing a month but was removed from Tuesday night’s game against Boston. He grounded out in the first inning and was replaced by a pinch hitter in the third. Kipnis joins a list of injured Indians players that seems to grow by the day. Pitchers Andrew Miller (right knee tendinitis) and Danny Salazar (sore right elbow) were placed on the 10-day DL on Tuesday. Outfielders Michael Brantley (sprained right ankle) and Lonnie Chisenhall (strained right calf) and pitcher Josh Tomlin (strained left hamstring) have been sidelined for several weeks. Kipnis is batting .228 with 11 homers and 30 RBIs. He was on the DL from July 9-Aug. 6 when he first injured the hamstring. Infielder Erik Gonzalez was recalled from Triple-A Columbus.

Twins bring up relief pitcher • The Minnesota Twins have promoted righthanded reliever John Curtiss from Triple-A Rochester. The move was made before their game Wednesday at Chicago. Curtiss would be the 50th player used by the Twins this season and the 12th to make his major league debut. Drafted in the sixth round out of Texas in 2014, Curtiss has a 1.28 ERA, 19 saves and 68 strikeouts over 49 1/3 innings between Double-A and Triple-A this year. To make room on both the 40-man and 25-man rosters, the Twins designated righthander Tim Melville for release or assignment. Melville became the 16th starting pitcher used by the Twins this season in the doubleheader Monday against the White Sox, but righthander Dillon Gee was chosen for the next open spot in the rotation Saturday. Longtime executive dies • Joe Klein, who was a general manager for three major league teams before spending the last two decades as executive director of the independent Atlantic League, has died. He was 75. The Atlantic League said Klein

died Wednesday at Temple University Hospital after complications from heart surgery. He was the Texas Rangers’ general manager from October 1982 until November 1984. He later served as GM for the Cleveland Indians (1986-87) and Detroit Tigers (1994-95). Fan behavior policy in works • Commissioner Rob Manfred says Major League Baseball plans to issue a policy on fan behavior for all ballparks next season. Manfred spoke Tuesday while visiting Comerica Park before Detroit hosted the Yankees. Manfred said he didn’t want to talk about the details of what will be in the code of conduct for spectators. Individual teams have their own policies governing fan behavior, and those rules often are posted on the scoreboard or announced over the public-address system. Earlier this season, Baltimore center fielder Adam Jones was targeted by racial taunts during a game at Fenway Park in Boston. The Red Sox later banned a fan for life after he used a racial slur while talking to another man.

Cards will shuffle bullpen roles as needed now HOCHMAN • FROM B1

fill that guy’s role, and so on. To me, it makes the most sense to go with Tyler Lyons at closer. This isn’t some crazy prediction or proclamation; the lefty Lyons really is good, guys — and gals. Did you see his stuff Wednesday? Lyons’ slider slid like Glenn Brummer across home plate. “Tyler has been borderline dominant for the last few weeks, and that’s exciting,” Girsch said Wednesday. “We lost a guy who has been dominant for years (in Rosenthal), but we’ve got a guy who’s been dominant for weeks. At least we have that going for us. We’ve seen Tyler’s role expand, and I think it will continue to expand.” Lyons last allowed a run on July 6. Since then, in 14 2/3 innings, he’s allowed three hits. Four walks. Nineteen strikeouts. And he saved Wednesday’s game, even without getting a save. He saved Seung Hwan Oh’s behind, is what he did. Sure, it was 5-0 in the eighth. But with two on and no outs, Lyons relieved the reliever and got three nasty, necessary outs. Before the game, Rosenthal suggested that Oh is “going to fill in nicely for the time being.” But I think (think?) most of us are all on the same page about the guy who started the season at closer. You can’t trust Oh for a full inning, assuming one of the fellows in that inning bats lefthanded. Entering Wednesday, lefties have a .638 slugging percentage against Oh. For perspective, Giancarlo Stanton entered the day with a .640 slugging percentage this year to lead the whole league. “It’s been something we’ve had to keep our eye on,” Matheny said. “I’d love for his change, split and slider to sharpen up to the point where it’s not part of the conversation. Last year we had no doubt. It didn’t matter, lefty, righty. We had a lot of faith that he was going to get the job done at the end of the game. Certainly he is in that conversation as a guy who has been there, done that and done it very well. There are just still some adjustments that have to be made with his offspeed, and the location on his fastball, that will let him be the

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals reliever Seung Hwan Oh pitches in the eighth inning Wednesday night against the Padres.

guy who can do that role.” Of course, on Wednesday you couldn’t trust Oh against righties, either. Up 5-0 in the eighth, Oh promptly allowed two hits and a run. Both were righthanded hitters. On Wednesday at Busch, Matheny didn’t proclaim a successor to the save savior that was Closenthal. Nor did we get to find out his answer on the field, since the game wasn’t a save situation. “I’d love to have so many guys down there that we can’t decide which one is the one who is getting everybody out so consistently, that they all look like they can finish up a game. But it’s a tough spot.” Matheny said before the game. “It’s a situation where you can’t take out the psychology of being in a close game. And some of these

players, we are talking about a few guys who haven’t been here in the big leagues that long, let alone in a situation to save a game. Some guys are made for that situation. You only find out by throwing them in high leverage situations and seeing how they respond.” Well, Tyler sure looked pretty good in the highest-leverage situation for a reliever Wednesday. The Cards desperately needed that one. The Cubs have an easy week too, facing Cincinnati and Philadelphia, and Chicago slapped around Cincy on Wednesday, 9-3. The Brewers lost but the Pirates, you might have heard, won the zaniest game of the season — 1-0, on a homer that both ended the game and broke up a no-hitter. As we look forward to the final 5½ weeks, the Cards have their big-money leadoff hitter

in cleanup and a rookie call-up batting in the coveted third spot, and these are the positive turn of events. They have one starting pitcher on the DL, another one pitching like he should be on it, too. And they have a bullpen that’s had stretches of instability — and that’s before they lost their stable closer. Matheny should push the right button with Lyons as his closer — but that leaves other unanswered late-inning questions for the skipper. And it won’t be easy. I don’t know if Ryan Sherriff and John Brebbia are the 2017 version of 2013’s Carlos Martinez and Rosenthal. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Chicago

68 57 .544

8-2 W-5 34-28 34-29

Milwaukee

66 62

.516

3

7-3

L-1

35-30

31-32

Cardinals

64 62 .508

Pittsburgh

61 66 .480

8

Cincinnati

53 74

.417

16

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

3-7 W-1

15½ 4-6

L-3

35-30 26-36 29-33

24-41

EAST

W

Washington

75 49 .605

Miami

62 63 .496 13½

Atlanta

56 69 .448 19½

New York

55 70 .440 20½

12½

2-8 W-1

28-38

27-32

Philadelphia 46 79 .368 29½

21½

3-7 W-1

25-33

21-46

W

WEST

L

4 4-6 W-1 36-28 28-34 7½

L

Pct

— 6-4 5½

7-3

11½ 4-6

L-1

35-25 40-24

L-1

32-29 30-34

L-1 28-34

28-35

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Los Angeles

89 36

.712

8-2

L-1

51-14

Arizona

69 58 .543

21

— 4-6

L-1

39-23 30-35

Colorado

68 58 .540 21½

3-7

L-4

38-25 30-33

San Diego

56 70 .444 33½

12

5-5

L-1

33-30 23-40

San Francisco 52 77 .403

39

17½

5-5 W-1

31-35

38-22

21-42

Wednesday Cardinals 6, San Diego 2 San Francisco 4, Milwaukee 2 Pittsburgh 1, Dodgers 0, 10 inn. Philadelphia 8, Miami 0 NY Mets 4, Arizona 2 Cubs 9, Cincinnati 3 Seattle 9, Atlanta 6 Houston 6, Washington 1 Kansas City 6, Colorado 4 Tuesday Miami 7, Philadelphia 4 Miami 12, Philadelphia 8 LA Dodgers 8, Pittsburgh 5 Cubs 13, Cincinnati 9 Arizona 7, NY Mets 4 Atlanta 4, Seattle 0 Washington 4, Houston 3 Kansas City 3, Colorado 2 San Diego 12, Cardinals 4 Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 3

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

Away

Cleveland

69 56

.552

— 6-4

L-2

32-29

37-27

Minnesota

65 61

.516

— 6-4

L-1

31-35

34-26

Kansas City 64 61

.512

5

½

Detroit

54

71 .432

15

10½

Chicago

49 76 .392

20

EAST

W

GB WCGB L10

Boston

73 53 .579

7-3 W-2 40-22

33-31

New York

68 57 .544

7-3 W-2

35-22

33-35

Baltimore

62 65 .488 11½

3½ 4-6 W-1

38-26

24-39 29-33

L

Pct

7-3 W-3

35-29

29-32

2-8

L-2

30-32

24-39

15½ 4-6 W-1

27-33

22-43

Str Home

Away

Tampa Bay

62 66 .484

12

4

3-7

L-1

33-33

Toronto

60 66 .476

13

5

5-5 W-1

34-29

26-37

WEST

W

Str Home

Away

Houston

77 49

.611

— 6-4 W-1

37-28

40-21

Los Angeles 65 61

.516

12

7-3 W-1

34-27

31-34

Seattle

65 63 .508

13

1 6-4 W-1

34-32

31-31

Texas

62 63 .496 14½

2½ 6-4

L-1

35-29

27-34

Oakland

55 72 .433 22½

10½ 4-6

L-1

34-31

21-41

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Dodgers’ Hill allows no hits in 9 innings, loses game in 10th

Cubs 9, Reds 3

Mariners 9, Braves 6

Mets 4, Diamondbacks 2

Pirates 1, Dodgers 0

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .284 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Uehara p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Schwarber lf 5 1 1 3 0 1 .202 Zobrist 2b 3 1 0 0 2 0 .225 Rizzo 1b 4 2 1 0 1 2 .271 Avila c 4 1 1 0 1 3 .273 La Stella 3b 3 1 1 3 1 0 .295 Heyward rf 4 0 2 2 1 1 .260 Baez ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .270 Montgomery p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .143 b-Almora ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Totals 36 9 10 8 6 11 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hamilton cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Cozart ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .312 Votto 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .314 Duvall lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Suarez 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Schebler rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .231 Peraza 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Turner c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .164 Wojciechowski p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Chacin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Winker ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .306 Farrell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Kivlehan ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 33 3 7 3 1 8 Chicago 301 500 000 — 9 10 0 Cincinnati 000 000 003 — 3 7 2 a-singled for Chacin in the 5th. b-struck out for Montgomery in the 7th. c-struck out for Farrell in the 8th. E: Duvall (5), Turner (2). LOB: Chicago 7, Cincinnati 4. 2B: Rizzo (25). HR: Schwarber (21), off Wojciechowski; La Stella (3), off Chacin; Votto (33), off Rondon; Suarez (24), off Rondon; Schebler (24), off Rondon. RBIs: Schwarber 3 (43), La Stella 3 (11), Heyward 2 (44), Votto (88), Suarez (70), Schebler (47). SB: Hamilton (53). RLISP: Chicago 3 (Jay, Baez 2); Cincinnati 1 (Suarez). GIDP: Heyward, Votto. DP: Chicago 1 (Baez, Zobrist, Rizzo); Cincinnati 1 (Iglesias, Cozart, Votto). Chicago IPHRERBBSONPERA Montgomery, W, 4-6 6 40 0 1 4 89 3.43 Wilson 1 00 0 0 1 163.06 Uehara 1 00 0 0 2 143.86 Rondon 1 3 3 3 0 1 16 5.03 Cincinnati IPHRERBBSONPERA Wojciechowski, L, 3-332/3 8 8 7 3 6 85 6.17 Chacin 11/3 1 1 1 0 2 19 6.75 Farrell 3 10 0 2 3 52 7.94 Iglesias 1 00 0 1 0 9 1.88 Inherited runners-scored: Chacin 1-1. Umpires: Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Chris Segal; Third, Bill Miller. T: 2:55. A: 15,355.

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 6 1 1 0 0 3 .306 5 2 1 0 1 1 .270 Alonso 1b Cano 2b 2 0 2 0 0 0 .277 1-Motter pr-2b 3 2 2 2 0 0 .206 5 1 1 0 0 1 .266 Valencia rf Seager 3b 5 2 3 4 0 0 .259 5 1 2 1 0 1 .255 Haniger lf-cf Zunino c 4 0 1 0 1 2 .225 Heredia cf 0 0 0 1 2 0 .279 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Gamel lf Ramirez p 3 0 2 1 0 1 .667 b-Cruz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .291 --Rzepczynski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 Phelps p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vincent p Diaz p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 41 9 15 9 4 10 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Atlanta Inciarte cf 5 2 4 0 0 0 .303 4 2 1 1 1 0 .289 Phillips 3b Freeman 1b 4 0 2 2 1 1 .329 Kemp lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .289 Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-M.Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Minter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Markakis rf 4 0 0 2 0 2 .281 3 0 0 0 1 2 .286 Flowers c Albies 2b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .227 Swanson ss 3 2 2 0 1 1 .224 Dickey p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .122 a-L.Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Motte p Peterson lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Totals 36 6 11 6 4 10 Seattle 022 000 050 — 9 15 1 Atlanta 210 000 210 — 6 11 0 a-struck out for Dickey in the 6th. b-grounded out for Ramirez in the 7th. c-lined out for Winkler in the 8th. 1-ran for Cano in the 3rd. E: Rzepczynski (1). LOB: Seattle 11, Atlanta 10. 2B: Segura (24), Cano 2 (28), Haniger (15), Zunino (18), Motter (12), Freeman (24). HR: Seager (19), off Winkler. RBIs: Seager 4 (67), Haniger (30), Heredia (23), Ramirez (1), Motter 2 (25), Phillips (48), Freeman 2 (53), Kemp (49), Markakis 2 (65). SB: Motter (10). SF: Heredia, Markakis. S: Dickey. RLISP: Seattle 7 (Segura 2, Valencia 2, Ramirez 2, Cruz); Atlanta 4 (Kemp, Albies 2, M.Adams). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Seattle Ramirez 6 6 3 3 3 6 90 4.52 Rzepczynski, 1/3 1 2 2 1 1 12 3.25 Phelps, W, 4-5 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 12 3.29 2/ Vincent 1 0 0 18 2.02 3 3 1 Diaz, S, 29-33 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 12 3.58 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dickey 6 11 4 4 2 6 88 4.06 Motte 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 3.78 Johnson, L, 6-3 0 3 4 4 1 0 14 5.69 Winkler 1 1 1 1 0 2 15 6.75 Minter 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Johnson pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Phelps 2-2, Diaz 2-0, Winkler 2-2. HBP: Motte (Heredia), Phelps (Flowers). WP: Dickey, Johnson. Umpires: Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 3:07. A: 23,890.

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 4 1 3 0 1 1 .303 Pollock cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .264 Lamb 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .263 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .314 Martinez rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .280 Descalso 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Iannetta c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .230 Marte ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .260 Godley p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .059 a-Drury ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --De La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Fuentes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Totals 33 2 7 2 5 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nimmo lf 1 2 1 0 3 0 .280 Cabrera 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .253 Conforto rf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .280 Flores 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Smith 1b 3 2 1 1 1 2 .190 d’Arnaud c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Rosario ss 4 0 2 1 0 2 .269 Lagares cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Flexen p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .100 b-Cespedes ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .288 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Reynolds ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Totals 30 4 8 4 6 9 Arizona 100 001 000 — 2 7 1 New York 100 111 00x — 4 8 0 a-struck out for Godley in the 6th. b-pinch hit for Flexen in the 6th. c-struck out for Sewald in the 8th. d-struck out for Hernandez in the 9th. E: Lamb (13). LOB: Arizona 10, New York 8. 2B: Lamb (27), Nimmo (4). HR: Iannetta (12), off Flexen; Smith (3), off Barrett. RBIs: Martinez (65), Iannetta (30), Conforto 2 (68), Smith (5), Rosario (7). SB: Peralta (8). RLISP: Arizona 3 (Martinez 2, Descalso); New York 3 (Cabrera 2, Smith). nd> GIDP: Cabrera, Lagares 2. DP: Arizona 3 (Descalso, Goldschmidt), (Lamb, Descalso, Goldschmidt), (Lamb, Descalso, Goldschmidt); New York 1 (Lagares, d’Arnaud). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arizona 5 4 3 2 4 5 100 3.15 Godley, L, 5-7 2/ Barrett 1 1 0 10 4.41 3 3 1 11/3 0 0 0 1 2 21 4.53 De La Rosa Hernandez 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 2.72 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Flexen, W, 3-2 6 6 2 2 4 5 104 5.79 1/ Blevins, 3 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.72 Sewald, 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 18 3.86 Ramos, S, 23-25 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 3.70 Inherited runners-scored: De La Rosa 2-0, Sewald 2-0. HBP: Blevins (Pollock). PB: Iannetta (5). Umpires: Home, Ryan Additon; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jerry Layne. T: 3:15. A: 31,277.

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .309 5 0 3 0 0 0 .311 Seager ss Granderson lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .224 5 0 1 0 0 1 .246 Gonzalez 1b Puig rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .254 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .225 4 0 1 0 0 1 .240 Forsythe 3b Barnes c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .295 4 0 0 0 0 2 .061 Hill p Totals 36 0 8 0 4 7 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Harrison 2b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .281 McCutchen cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .285 Bell 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 3 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Freese 3b Rodriguez rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .206 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .248 2 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Stewart c Williams p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .059 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rivero p a-Osuna ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --28 1 1 1 0 10 Totals Los Angeles 000 000 000 0 — 0 8 1 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 1 — 1 1 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Rivero in the 9th. E: Forsythe (5). LOB: Los Angeles 11, Pittsburgh 1. 2B: Forsythe (14). HR: Harrison (16), off Hill. RBIs: Harrison (47). S: Stewart. RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Seager, Granderson, Forsythe, Hill 2); Pittsburgh 1 (Marte). GIDP: Granderson, Utley. DP: Pittsburgh 2 (Harrison, Mercer, Bell), (Harrison, Mercer, Bell). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 9 1 1 1 0 10 99 3.32 Hill, L, 9-5 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams 8 7 0 0 4 5 114 4.40 Rivero 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 1.29 Nicasio, W, 2-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.95 HBP: Williams (Puig). Umpires: Home, Brian O’Nora; First, Paul Emmel; Second, Nick Mahrley; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 2:34. A: 19,859.

Dodgers lefty Rich Hill lost his perfect game on an error in the ninth inning, then lost his no-hitter on a leadoff home run in the bottom of the 10th by Josh Harrison that sent the Pittsburgh Pirates over Los Angeles 1-0 Wednesday night. The Pirates didn’t have a runner until Jordy Mercer led off the ninth with a sharp grounder that smacked off third baseman Logan Forsythe’s glove for an error. Hill retired the next three. Hill (9-5) came back out for the 10th and Harrison sent his 99th pitch of the night into the first row of seats in left field, just out of the reach of Curtis Granderson. Hill struck out 10 without a walk. Hill became the first pitcher since Pedro Martinez in 1995 to take a no-hit try into extra innings. Martinez, then with Montreal, lost his perfect game in the 10th at San Diego. Cubs 9, Reds 3 • Kyle Schwarber hit a three-run homer and Tommy La Stella added a two-run shot while subbing for Kris Bryant as Chicago kept its second-half surge going with a win at Cincinnati. Phillies 8, Marlins 0 • Mark Leiter Jr. allowed one hit over seven innings, Rhys Hoskins homered and drove in five runs, and Philadelphia rode that rookie tandem to a victory at home. Mets 4, D’backs 2 • Chris Flexen pitched six effective innings, rookie Dominic Smith homered and host New York ended a threegame skid. Giants 4, Brewers 2 • Jarrett Parker hit a go-ahead two-run double in the seventh as the Giants won at home.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Orioles 8, Athletics 7 • Zach Britton’s AL-record run of converting 60 straight save attempts ended, but the Orioles ultimately won in the bottom of the 12th. Red Sox 6, Indians 1 • Mitch Moreland hit a fifth-inning home run, Drew Pomeranz and three relievers bested Corey Kluber, and Boston won at Cleveland. Yankees 10, Detroit 2 • Gary Sanchez homered and drove in three runs to lead New York to another lopsided win at Detroit. Blue Jays 7, Rays 6 • Kevin Pillar hit Toronto’s sixth home run of the game in the eighth inning, lifting the visiting Blue Jays over Tampa Bay. White Sox 4, Twins 3 • Tim Anderson singled with one out in the bottom of the ninth to score Avisail Garcia as host Chicago came back to win.

INTERLEAGUE

Mariners 9, Braves 6 • In Atlanta, Taylor Motter replaced an injured Robinson Cano and gave Seattle the lead with a two-run single in the eighth inning. Cano had two doubles before leaving with tightness in his left hamstring in the third. Astros 6, Nationals 1 • Alex Bregman hit a three-run homer and Jake Marisnick and Max Stassi added solo shots to help Houston win at home. Associated Press

Giants 4, Brewers 2 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .227 Santana rf 3 1 2 0 1 1 .270 Braun lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Shaw 3b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .285 Aguilar 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Pina c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .283 d-Vogt ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .232 Broxton cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .230 e-Thames ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Arcia ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Garza p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 6 2 3 8 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez cf 3 2 2 0 0 1 .272 Tomlinson 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .259 Parker lf 3 0 1 2 1 0 .263 Posey c 3 0 0 1 0 1 .317 Crawford ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .236 Sandoval 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .236 Moncrief rf 3 0 0 1 0 2 .250 Jones 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .190 Moore p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .116 Strickland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Span ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Calixte ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .176 Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 4 9 4 2 10 Milwaukee 100 000 001 — 2 6 0 San Francisco 100 000 21x — 4 9 1 a-lined out for Hader in the 7th. b-doubled for Strickland in the 7th. c-struck out for Melancon in the 8th. d-homered for Pina in the 9th. e-flied out for Broxton in the 9th. E: Jones (3). LOB: Milwaukee 5, San Francisco 8. 2B: Santana (23), Shaw (28), Hernandez 2 (17), Parker (9), Crawford (24), Span (26). HR: Vogt (9), off Dyson. RBIs: Shaw (82), Vogt (30), Parker 2 (16), Posey (54), Moncrief (4). SF: Posey, Moncrief. RLISP: Milwaukee 4 (Aguilar 3, Walker); San Francisco 5 (Posey 2, Sandoval, Moore, Calixte). GIDP: Aguilar, Arcia. DP: San Francisco 2 (Crawford, Tomlinson, Jones), (Crawford, Tomlinson, Jones). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza 5 5 1 1 2 6 83 4.67 Hader 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.23 Barnes, L, 3-4 1 2 2 2 0 2 20 4.11 Torres 1 2 1 1 0 1 22 3.94 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Moore 6 5 1 1 2 6 97 5.38 Strickland, W, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.74 Melancon, 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.38 Dyson, S, 12-17 1 1 1 1 1 0 17 5.40 Moore pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Strickland 1-0. HBP: Barnes (Hernandez). WP: Torres. Umpires: Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 3:08. A: 40,015.

Red Sox 6, Indians 1 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nunez 2b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .315 Betts rf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .263 Benintendi cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .279 H.Ramirez dh 4 0 0 0 0 4 .248 Devers 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .312 Bogaerts ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .278 Moreland 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .247 Vazquez c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .285 Holt lf 3 2 1 1 1 1 .200 Totals 35 6 8 5 2 14 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .262 Jackson cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .322 J.Ramirez 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .298 Encarnacion 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .250 Bruce rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .265 Guyer lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .223 Diaz dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .186 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .216 Urshela 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .193 a-Zimmer ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 30 1 3 1 5 13 Totals Boston 000 010 014 — 6 8 0 Cleveland 000 000 010 — 1 3 0 a-struck out for Urshela in the 9th. LOB: Boston 5, Cleveland 8. 2B: Holt (3). HR: Moreland (15), off Kluber; Nunez (10), off Shaw; Encarnacion (29), off Reed. RBIs: Nunez 2 (51), Betts (77), Moreland (54), Holt (4), Encarnacion (74). RLISP: Boston 3 (H.Ramirez 2, Bogaerts); Cleveland 1 (Gomes). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz, W, 13-4 51/3 2 0 0 4 9 103 3.18 Kelly, 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.34 Reed, 11/3 1 1 1 0 1 24 3.09 Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 1 3 21 1.33 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber, L, 12-4 72/3 4 2 2 1 12 114 2.65 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0.00 Olson 1 3 3 3 0 2 22 3.32 Smith 1/ Shaw 6 3.36 3 1 1 1 0 0 Olson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Kelly 1-0, Olson 2-0, Smith 3-0, Shaw 1-1. HBP: Pomeranz (Bruce), Kluber (Nunez). WP: Shaw. PB: Gomes (3). Umpires: Home, Alan Porter; First, Andy Fletcher; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Bill Welke. T: 3:11. A: 25,346.

Blue Jays 7, Rays 6 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pearce lf 5 2 2 1 0 1 .273 Carrera lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Donaldson 3b 5 1 1 2 0 3 .264 Smoak 1b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .290 Bautista rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .211 Morales dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .245 Pillar cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .253 Goins ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .216 Barney 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .223 Lopez c 3 1 1 1 1 0 .130 Totals 38 7 12 7 1 9 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 4 3 3 3 1 0 .276 Duda dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .238 a-Puello ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Longoria 3b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .264 Morrison 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Souza Jr. rf 5 2 2 1 0 0 .256 Dickerson lf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .286 Ramos c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .258 Miller 2b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .187 Hechavarria ss 4 1 0 0 0 1 .242 Totals 37 6 11 6 4 7 Toronto 230 010 010 — 7 12 1 Tampa Bay 002 111 100 — 6 11 0 a-grounded out for Duda in the 8th. E: Lopez (1). LOB: Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 8. 2B: Pearce (14). HR: Donaldson (22), off Pruitt; Goins (6), off Pruitt; Lopez (1), off Pruitt; Pearce (13), off Pruitt; Smoak (34), off Whitley; Pillar (13), off Hunter; Kiermaier (9), off Stroman; Souza Jr. (27), off Stroman; Kiermaier (10), off Stroman. RBIs: Pearce (37), Donaldson 2 (55), Smoak (81), Pillar (33), Goins (49), Lopez (3), Kiermaier 3 (26), Longoria (70), Souza Jr. (74), Miller (29). SB: Barney (6), Kiermaier (11), Longoria (4). RLISP: Toronto 2 (Pearce, Donaldson); Tampa Bay 4 (Ramos 2, Miller, Hechavarria). GIDP: Morales, Souza Jr.. DP: Toronto 1 (Goins, Barney, Smoak); Tampa Bay 1 (Miller, Longoria, Morrison). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman 51/3 8 5 5 1 4 87 3.17 2/ Barnes, 1 2 0 16 3.02 3 1 1 Tepera, W, 7-1, 1 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.08 2/ Loup, 0 1 13 4.24 3 1 0 0 Osuna, S, 33-41 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.52 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pruitt 32/3 7 5 5 0 2 69 5.76 Whitley 12/3 3 1 1 1 2 36 3.35 Kittredge 12/3 1 0 0 0 1 19 3.60 Hunter, L, 2-5 1 1 1 1 0 2 17 2.35 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 2.03 Barnes pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Barnes 2-1, Tepera 2-1, Osuna 1-0, Whitley 1-0, Kittredge 2-0. WP: Whitley. Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Chad Fairchild. T: 3:13. A: 8,264.

Astros 6, Nationals 1 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kendrick lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .343 Difo ss 3 0 0 1 0 2 .276 Murphy 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .324 Zimmerman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .303 Lind dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .298 Wieters c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .230 Taylor cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Stevenson rf 2 1 1 0 1 1 .179 Totals 30 1 6 1 1 8 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 4 1 0 0 1 0 .300 Bregman 3b 5 1 2 3 0 1 .278 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .358 Reddick lf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .301 Gurriel 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Gonzalez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .307 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .242 Stassi c 2 1 1 1 2 1 .214 4 2 2 1 0 0 .254 Marisnick cf Totals 33 6 10 6 5 2 Washington 001 000 000 — 1 6 1 Houston 000 110 04x — 6 10 0 E: Taylor (2). LOB: Washington 4, Houston 9. 2B: Kendrick (13), Stevenson (1), Reddick (26), Gonzalez (23). 3B: Altuve (4). HR: Marisnick (15), off Jackson; Stassi (2), off Grace; Bregman (16), off Kelley. RBIs: Difo (17), Bregman 3 (51), Reddick (62), Stassi (3), Marisnick (34). SB: Marisnick (7). SF: Difo, Reddick. RLISP: Washington 2 (Difo, Wieters); Houston 4 (Gurriel, Beltran, Marisnick 2). GIDP: Kendrick, Zimmerman. DP: Houston 2 (Bregman, Altuve, Gurriel), (Gonzalez, Altuve, Gurriel). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson, L, 4-3 6 6 2 2 3 1 95 3.38 2/ Albers 0 1 1 17 1.86 3 0 0 Grace 1 2 1 1 0 0 10 4.08 1/ Kelley 3 1 0 17 8.10 3 2 3 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 7 4 1 1 1 6 90 4.17 Fiers, W, 8-8 1 1 0 0 0 2 11 5.15 Musgrove, Liriano 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 5.60 Inherited runners-scored: Grace 1-0. Umpires: Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Chad Whitson; Second, James Hoye; Third, Tim Timmons. T: 2:48. A: 23,434.

Yankees 10, Tigers 2 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 1 0 0 0 0 .252 A.Hicks rf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .267 Sanchez c 5 2 2 3 0 0 .276 Judge dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .286 c-Au.Romine ph-dh 1 0 1 0 0 0 .224 Gregorius ss 4 1 2 2 0 0 .312 Wade 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .135 Headley 1b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .274 Austin 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Frazier 3b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .214 Ellsbury cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .239 Torreyes 2b-ss 4 1 4 1 0 0 .299 Totals 391014 10 3 6 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .248 Machado 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .298 Presley rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .293 Upton lf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .283 Mahtook lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .288 Cabrera 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 a-Jones ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Castellanos 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Martinez dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .253 b-McCann ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .258 3 0 0 0 0 2 .302 J.Hicks c An.Romine cf-1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .236 Iglesias ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .251 Totals 36 2 9 2 1 13 New York 105 011 110 — 10 14 0 Detroit 000 001 001 — 2 9 1 a-struck out for Cabrera in the 8th. b-struck out for Martinez in the 8th. c-singled for Judge in the 9th. E: Kinsler (8). LOB: New York 6, Detroit 9. 2B: Judge (16), Torreyes (12), Upton (35), Machado (3). HR: Sanchez (26), off Zimmermann; Gregorius (19), off Zimmermann; Headley (8), off Bell; Kinsler (13), off Severino; Iglesias (5), off Kahnle. RBIs: A.Hicks (46), Sanchez 3 (72), Judge (82), Gregorius 2 (60), Headley 2 (48), Torreyes (35), Kinsler (37), Iglesias (42). CS: Judge (4). SF: Headley. RLISP: New York 2 (A.Hicks, Sanchez); Detroit 5 (Presley 2, Martinez, Iglesias, McCann). IPHRERBBSO NPERA New York Severino, W, 11-5 62/3 6 1 1 1 8100 3.10 Green 11/3 10 0 0 4 25 2.19 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 3.10 Kahnle IPHRERBBSO NPERA Detroit Zimmermann, L, 7-11 5 9 7 7 1 0 85 6.11 4 5 3 2 2 6 675.48 Bell Inherited runners-scored: Green 2-0. HBP: Severino (J.Hicks). WP: Green. Umpires: Home, Ben May; First, Carlos Torres; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Paul Nauert. T: 2:55. A: 29,695.

Phillies 8, Marlins 0 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0 0 1 .290 Gordon 2b Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Yelich cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .282 2 0 0 0 1 0 .306 Ozuna lf Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .287 J.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --3 0 0 0 0 2 .245 Dietrich 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .233 Telis 1b-c Rojas ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .287 Nicolino p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Despaigne p a-Ellis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Ellington p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Tazawa p b-Moore ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Totals 28 0 2 0 2 6 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .284 Galvis ss 4 2 1 1 1 1 .255 4 3 2 0 1 2 .288 Williams cf 3 1 2 5 1 0 .271 Hoskins lf Joseph 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .239 Franco 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .222 Florimon rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .400 Alfaro c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .324 Leiter Jr. p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .067 L.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 c-Kelly ph Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 8 11 8 5 8 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Philadelphia 105 002 00x — 8 11 0 a-flied out for Despaigne in the 6th. b-out on fielder’s choice for Tazawa in the 8th. c-grounded out for L.Garcia in the 8th. LOB: Miami 3, Philadelphia 7. 2B: Rojas (6), Hernandez (18), Hoskins (1), Joseph (25), Alfaro (1). 3B: Hernandez (5). HR: Hoskins (7), off Nicolino. RBIs: Galvis (53), Hoskins 5 (16), Joseph (60), Alfaro (4). SB: Ozuna (1). RLISP: Miami 2 (Stanton, Telis); Philadelphia 4 (Hoskins, Joseph, Franco 2). d> GIDP: Realmuto. DP: Miami 1 (Telis, Dietrich); Philadelphia 1 (Galvis, Hernandez, Joseph). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nicolino, L, 2-2 21/3 8 6 6 2 2 74 5.45 Despaigne 22/3 2 0 0 0 2 30 4.42 Ellington 1 1 2 2 2 0 28 7.27 Tazawa 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 5.31 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 3.35 J.Garcia Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leiter Jr., W, 2-3 7 1 0 0 2 5 96 3.86 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.82 L.Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.28 Neris Inherited runners-scored: Despaigne 2-0. WP: Ellington. Umpires: Home, Tom Woodring; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Bruce Dreckman. T: 2:50. A: 19,161.

Orioles 8, Athletics 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Powell cf 6 2 3 0 0 1 .303 Semien ss 5 1 3 2 1 1 .257 Joyce rf 5 1 1 3 0 2 .232 K.Davis lf 5 1 1 0 1 2 .233 Healy dh 5 1 1 0 1 1 .266 Olson 1b 5 0 2 1 1 0 .242 Chapman 3b 5 0 0 0 1 3 .225 Maxwell c 5 0 2 1 0 2 .228 2-Garneau pr-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .191 Pinder 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .244 a-Lowrie ph-2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .270 Totals 48 7 14 7 5 15 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham ss 6 0 3 0 0 1 .296 Machado 3b 6 1 2 1 0 1 .264 Schoop 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .301 Jones cf 5 1 1 0 0 4 .278 Mancini lf 4 2 1 3 1 1 .285 C.Davis 1b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .224 Trumbo dh 4 1 0 0 1 2 .235 Castillo c 3 1 2 2 1 1 .285 1-Joseph pr-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Flaherty rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .242 Gentry rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 b-Smith ph-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .269 Totals 43 8 13 8 4 15 Oakland 000 001 222 000 — 7 14 0 Baltimore 000 402 010 001 — 8 13 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Pinder in the 7th. b-singled for Gentry in the 9th. 1-ran for Castillo in the 9th. 2-ran for Maxwell in the 10th. LOB: Oakland 11, Baltimore 6. 2B: Powell (2), Semien (10), K.Davis (23), Maxwell (7), Beckham (14). HR: Joyce (19), off Givens; Mancini (22), off Gossett; Castillo (14), off Coulombe; C.Davis (20), off Dull; Machado (28), off S.Castro. RBIs: Semien 2 (22), Joyce 3 (54), Olson (17), Maxwell (15), Machado (84), Mancini 3 (65), C.Davis (48), Castillo 2 (40), Flaherty (4). SB: Beckham (6). CS: Powell (1), Machado (3). SF: Joyce. RLISP: Oakland 6 (Powell, Semien, Joyce, Chapman 2, Maxwell); Baltimore 2 (Schoop, Jones). DP: Oakland 1 (Olson, Maxwell); Baltimore 1 (Castillo, Machado). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gossett 5 8 5 5 2 6 91 5.49 Coulombe 1 1 1 1 0 1 14 3.74 Casilla 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 4.27 Dull 1 1 1 1 0 2 20 5.40 Hatcher 1 1 0 0 1 3 25 4.32 S.Castro, L, 1-2 2 1 1 1 1 3 33 3.43 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy 6 7 3 3 0 8 91 4.18 Givens, 12/3 2 2 2 1 3 32 2.42 Bleier 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 1.82 1/ 1 1 9 2.91 Brach, 3 0 0 0 1/ 2 1 0 20 3.55 Britton, 3 3 2 2/ M.Castro, W, 3-1 3 3 2 0 0 1 3 50 2.74 Gossett pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Bundy pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Bleier pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Coulombe 1-1, Givens 2-1, Brach 1-0, M.Castro 2-0. WP: Gossett, Coulombe, Britton. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, John Tumpane; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Ted Barrett. T: 4:20. A: 20,072.

White Sox 4, Twins 3 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .260 Mauer 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .285 Polanco ss 4 1 2 2 0 1 .249 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .297 Buxton cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .237 Kepler rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Vargas dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .242 Castro c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .229 Gimenez c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 30 3 3 2 3 9 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. L.Garcia cf 4 2 2 1 0 1 .286 Moncada 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .192 Abreu 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .297 Delmonico dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .315 A.Garcia rf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .318 Smith c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .280 Sanchez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Anderson ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .239 Hanson lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .215 Totals 30 4 7 3 3 9 Minnesota 000 102 000 — 3 3 1 Chicago 001 001 011 — 4 7 1 One out when winning run scored. E: Polanco (16), Moncada (4). LOB: Minnesota 3, Chicago 6. 2B: L.Garcia (15), Moncada (6). 3B: Hanson (3). HR: Polanco (7), off Shields; L.Garcia (9), off Santana. RBIs: Polanco 2 (50), L.Garcia (33), Moncada (11), Anderson (42). SB: Kepler (4). S: Smith. RLISP: Minnesota 2 (Buxton, Escobar); Chicago 1 (Anderson). GIDP: Mauer, Delmonico. DP: Minnesota 1 (Dozier, Polanco, Mauer); Chicago 1 (Anderson, Abreu). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minnesota Santana 7 3 2 1 1 8 91 3.24 Rogers, 1 2 1 1 1 1 20 3.64 Hildenberger, L, 2-2 1/3 2 1 1 1 0 9 3.08 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields 6 3 3 3 2 6 92 5.62 1/ 1 1 11 7.15 Bummer 3 00 0 Infante 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 23 3.99 Farquhar, W, 3-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.03 Inherited runners-scored: Infante 1-0. HBP: Santana (A.Garcia). WP: Shields. Umpires: Home, Chris Guccione; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Nic Lentz; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T: 2:43. A: 15,605.

Wednesday Baltimore 8, Oakland 7, 12 innings Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 6 NY Yankees 10, Detroit 2 Boston 6, Cleveland 1 Seattle 9, Atlanta 6 Houston 6, Washington 1 White Sox 4, Minnesota 3 Kansas City 6, Colorado 4 Texas at LA Angels, late Tuesday Oakland 6, Baltimore 4 NY Yankees 13, Detroit 4 Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 5 Boston 9, Cleveland 1 Atlanta 4, Seattle 0 Minnesota 4, White Sox 1 Washington 4, Houston 3 Kansas City 3, Colorado 2 LA Angels 10, Texas 1

Thursday’s pitching matchups NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

SD

Perdomo (R)

6-8

4.93

StL

Martinez (R)

6:15 10-9

3.57

Ari

Ray (L)

NY

Montero (R)

9-5

3.11

11:10a 2-8

5.47

Mia Worley (R)

2-3

4.82

Phi

1-1

4.20

Thompson (R) 12:05

LA

Ryu (L)

Pit

Kuhl (R)

4-6

3.45

6-8

4.52

13-8

3.63

3:05

Chi

Arrieta (R)

Cin

Romano (R)

6:10

3-5

5.32

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tor

Koehler (R)

TB

Cobb (R)

NY

Garcia (L)

Det Fulmer (R)

1-5

7.92

12:10 9-8

3.80

5-8

4.52

12:10 10-11

3.60

Bos Sale (L) Cle

Bauer (R)

14-5

2.62

6:10 12-8

4.50

Min Berrios (R) Chi

Holland (L)

11-5

3.99

7:10 6-13

6.28

Tex Perez (L)

8-10

5.26

2-0

3.46

Time W-L

ERA

LA

Scribner (R)

9:07

IL

Pitcher

Col

Marquez (R)

KC

Junis (R)

Was Strasburg (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

10-5

4.24

5-2

4.99

10-4

3.24

11-2

2.58

1:15

7:10

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

LATE TUESDAY

Brewers 4, Giants 3 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .243 Walker 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .281 Braun lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .286 Shaw 3b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .285 Santana rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .267 Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Swarzak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pina c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .285 Sogard ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .289 Arcia ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Broxton cf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .229 Nelson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .080 Jeffress p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Perez rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Totals 36 4 10 3 3 8 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .271 Tomlinson 2b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .252 5 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Parker lf Posey c-1b 4 2 1 0 1 1 .320 Crawford ss 3 1 1 2 1 2 .234 Sandoval 3b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .236 Jones 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .198 c-Hundley ph-c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Hernandez rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .268 Samardzija p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .096 a-Moncrief ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Suarez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Crick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Pence ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .259 1-Blach pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Gearrin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 34 3 10 3 5 11 Milwaukee 010 100 200 — 4 10 0 San Francisco 010 020 000 — 3 10 1 a-walked for Samardzija in the 6th. b-lined out for Jeffress in the 7th. c-singled for Jones in the 8th. d-walked for Crick in the 8th. 1-ran for Pence in the 8th. E: Hernandez (2). LOB: Milwaukee 9, San Francisco 10. 2B: Walker (14), Shaw (27). 3B: Thames (4). HR: Crawford (11), off Nelson. RBIs: Braun (40), Shaw (81), Broxton (48), Crawford 2 (63), Hernandez (19). CS: Span (6), Tomlinson (1). SF: Braun. RLISP: Milwaukee 6 (Shaw 2, Santana, Broxton, Nelson 2); San Francisco 4 (Span 4). GIDP: Braun. DP: Milwaukee 1 (Pina, Walker); San Francisco 1 (Tomlinson, Crawford, Jones). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milwaukee Nelson 5 7 3 3 3 6 99 3.79 Jeffress, W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 5.18 Hader, 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 21 1.27 2/ 1 1 21 2.31 Swarzak, 3 2 0 0 Knebel, S, 27-32 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 1.36 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Samardzija 6 6 2 1 2 4 89 4.67 Suarez, L, 0-3, 2/3 2 2 2 1 0 15 7.27 Crick 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 19 2.78 Gearrin 1 2 0 0 0 1 18 2.15 Inherited runners-scored: Crick 1-0. HBP: Nelson (Jones). Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Mark Carlson. T: 3:15. A: 39,523.

NL LEADERS BATTING: JTurner, Los Angeles, .336; Blackmon, Colorado, .333; Harper, Washington, .325; Murphy, Washington, .324; Posey, San Francisco, .317; Votto, Cincinnati, .314; Goldschmidt, Arizona, .314; Arenado, Colorado, .311; Seager, Los Angeles, .310; LeMahieu, Colorado, .310. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 115; Stanton, Miami, 95; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 93; Harper, Washington, 92; Votto, Cincinnati, 88; Gordon, Miami, 86; Bryant, Chicago, 82; Arenado, Colorado, 80; Inciarte, Atlanta, 80; 2 tied at 78. RBI: Arenado, Colorado, 107; Stanton, Miami, 99; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 98; Ozuna, Miami, 97; Lamb, Arizona, 95; Votto, Cincinnati, 88; Harper, Washington, 87; Zimmerman, Washington, 86; Duvall, Cincinnati, 85; Rizzo, Chicago, 85. HITS: Blackmon, Colorado, 168; Inciarte, Atlanta, 160; Arenado, Colorado, 149; Gordon, Miami, 145; Ozuna, Miami, 145; LeMahieu, Colorado, 144; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 142; Murphy, Washington, 140; Votto, Cincinnati, 139; Seager, Los Angeles, 138. DOUBLES: Arenado, Colorado, 38; Herrera, Philadelphia, 36; Murphy, Washington, 36; Duvall, Cincinnati, 32; Drury, Arizona, 30; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 30; Markakis, Atlanta, 30; Seager, Los Angeles, 30; Taylor, Los Angeles, 30; 2 tied at 29. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 14; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 9; Arenado, Colorado, 7; Cozart, Cincinnati, 7; Bell, Pittsburgh, 6; Fowler, Cardinals, 6; Galvis, Philadelphia, 6; Reyes, New York, 6; 5 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 46; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 34; Votto, Cincinnati, 33; Blackmon, Colorado, 29; Bruce, Cleveland, 29; Duvall, Cincinnati, 29; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 29; Harper, Washington, 29; Ozuna, Miami, 29; Zimmerman, Washington, 29. ERA: Kershaw, Los Angeles, 2.04; Scherzer, Washington, 2.25; Gonzalez, Washington, 2.39; Greinke, Arizona, 3.16; Lynn, Cardinals, 3.17; Strasburg, Washington, 3.24; deGrom, New York, 3.49; Martinez, Cardinals, 3.57; Nola, Philadelphia, 3.58; Arrieta, Chicago, 3.63.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Chicago

68 57 .544

8-2 W-5 34-28 34-29

Milwaukee

66 62

.516

3

7-3

L-1

35-30

31-32

Cardinals

64 62 .508

Pittsburgh

61 66 .480

8

Cincinnati

53 74

.417

16

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

3-7 W-1

15½ 4-6

L-3

35-30 26-36 29-33

24-41

EAST

W

Washington

75 49 .605

Miami

62 63 .496 13½

Atlanta

56 69 .448 19½

New York

55 70 .440 20½

12½

2-8 W-1

28-38

27-32

Philadelphia 46 79 .368 29½

21½

3-7 W-1

25-33

21-46

W

WEST

L

4 4-6 W-1 36-28 28-34 7½

L

Pct

— 6-4 5½

7-3

11½ 4-6

L-1

35-25 40-24

L-1

32-29 30-34

L-1 28-34

28-35

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Los Angeles

89 36

.712

8-2

L-1

51-14

Arizona

69 58 .543

21

— 4-6

L-1

39-23 30-35

Colorado

68 58 .540 21½

3-7

L-4

38-25 30-33

San Diego

56 70 .444 33½

12

5-5

L-1

33-30 23-40

San Francisco 52 77 .403

39

17½

5-5 W-1

31-35

38-22

21-42

Wednesday Cardinals 6, San Diego 2 San Francisco 4, Milwaukee 2 Pittsburgh 1, Dodgers 0, 10 inn. Philadelphia 8, Miami 0 NY Mets 4, Arizona 2 Cubs 9, Cincinnati 3 Seattle 9, Atlanta 6 Houston 6, Washington 1 Kansas City 6, Colorado 4 Tuesday Miami 7, Philadelphia 4 Miami 12, Philadelphia 8 LA Dodgers 8, Pittsburgh 5 Cubs 13, Cincinnati 9 Arizona 7, NY Mets 4 Atlanta 4, Seattle 0 Washington 4, Houston 3 Kansas City 3, Colorado 2 San Diego 12, Cardinals 4 Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 3

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

Away

Cleveland

69 56

.552

— 6-4

L-2

32-29

37-27

Minnesota

65 61

.516

— 6-4

L-1

31-35

34-26

Kansas City 64 61

.512

5

½

Detroit

54

71 .432

15

10½

Chicago

49 76 .392

20

EAST

W

GB WCGB L10

Boston

73 53 .579

7-3 W-2 40-22

33-31

New York

68 57 .544

7-3 W-2

35-22

33-35

Baltimore

62 65 .488 11½

3½ 4-6 W-1

38-26

24-39 29-33

L

Pct

7-3 W-3

35-29

29-32

2-8

L-2

30-32

24-39

15½ 4-6 W-1

27-33

22-43

Str Home

Away

Tampa Bay

62 66 .484

12

4

3-7

L-1

33-33

Toronto

60 66 .476

13

5

5-5 W-1

34-29

26-37

WEST

W

Str Home

Away

Houston

77 49

.611

— 6-4 W-1

37-28

40-21

Los Angeles 65 61

.516

12

7-3 W-1

34-27

31-34

Seattle

65 63 .508

13

1 6-4 W-1

34-32

31-31

Texas

62 63 .496 14½

2½ 6-4

L-1

35-29

27-34

Oakland

55 72 .433 22½

10½ 4-6

L-1

34-31

21-41

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Dodgers’ Hill allows no hits in 9 innings, loses game in 10th

Cubs 9, Reds 3

Mariners 9, Braves 6

Mets 4, Diamondbacks 2

Pirates 1, Dodgers 0

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .284 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Uehara p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Schwarber lf 5 1 1 3 0 1 .202 Zobrist 2b 3 1 0 0 2 0 .225 Rizzo 1b 4 2 1 0 1 2 .271 Avila c 4 1 1 0 1 3 .273 La Stella 3b 3 1 1 3 1 0 .295 Heyward rf 4 0 2 2 1 1 .260 Baez ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .270 Montgomery p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .143 b-Almora ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Totals 36 9 10 8 6 11 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hamilton cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Cozart ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .312 Votto 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .314 Duvall lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Suarez 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Schebler rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .231 Peraza 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Turner c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .164 Wojciechowski p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Chacin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Winker ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .306 Farrell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Kivlehan ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 33 3 7 3 1 8 Chicago 301 500 000 — 9 10 0 Cincinnati 000 000 003 — 3 7 2 a-singled for Chacin in the 5th. b-struck out for Montgomery in the 7th. c-struck out for Farrell in the 8th. E: Duvall (5), Turner (2). LOB: Chicago 7, Cincinnati 4. 2B: Rizzo (25). HR: Schwarber (21), off Wojciechowski; La Stella (3), off Chacin; Votto (33), off Rondon; Suarez (24), off Rondon; Schebler (24), off Rondon. RBIs: Schwarber 3 (43), La Stella 3 (11), Heyward 2 (44), Votto (88), Suarez (70), Schebler (47). SB: Hamilton (53). RLISP: Chicago 3 (Jay, Baez 2); Cincinnati 1 (Suarez). GIDP: Heyward, Votto. DP: Chicago 1 (Baez, Zobrist, Rizzo); Cincinnati 1 (Iglesias, Cozart, Votto). Chicago IPHRERBBSONPERA Montgomery, W, 4-6 6 40 0 1 4 89 3.43 Wilson 1 00 0 0 1 163.06 Uehara 1 00 0 0 2 143.86 Rondon 1 3 3 3 0 1 16 5.03 Cincinnati IPHRERBBSONPERA Wojciechowski, L, 3-332/3 8 8 7 3 6 85 6.17 Chacin 11/3 1 1 1 0 2 19 6.75 Farrell 3 10 0 2 3 52 7.94 Iglesias 1 00 0 1 0 9 1.88 Inherited runners-scored: Chacin 1-1. Umpires: Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Chris Segal; Third, Bill Miller. T: 2:55. A: 15,355.

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 6 1 1 0 0 3 .306 5 2 1 0 1 1 .270 Alonso 1b Cano 2b 2 0 2 0 0 0 .277 1-Motter pr-2b 3 2 2 2 0 0 .206 5 1 1 0 0 1 .266 Valencia rf Seager 3b 5 2 3 4 0 0 .259 5 1 2 1 0 1 .255 Haniger lf-cf Zunino c 4 0 1 0 1 2 .225 Heredia cf 0 0 0 1 2 0 .279 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Gamel lf Ramirez p 3 0 2 1 0 1 .667 b-Cruz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .291 --Rzepczynski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 Phelps p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vincent p Diaz p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 41 9 15 9 4 10 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Atlanta Inciarte cf 5 2 4 0 0 0 .303 4 2 1 1 1 0 .289 Phillips 3b Freeman 1b 4 0 2 2 1 1 .329 Kemp lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .289 Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-M.Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Minter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Markakis rf 4 0 0 2 0 2 .281 3 0 0 0 1 2 .286 Flowers c Albies 2b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .227 Swanson ss 3 2 2 0 1 1 .224 Dickey p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .122 a-L.Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Motte p Peterson lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Totals 36 6 11 6 4 10 Seattle 022 000 050 — 9 15 1 Atlanta 210 000 210 — 6 11 0 a-struck out for Dickey in the 6th. b-grounded out for Ramirez in the 7th. c-lined out for Winkler in the 8th. 1-ran for Cano in the 3rd. E: Rzepczynski (1). LOB: Seattle 11, Atlanta 10. 2B: Segura (24), Cano 2 (28), Haniger (15), Zunino (18), Motter (12), Freeman (24). HR: Seager (19), off Winkler. RBIs: Seager 4 (67), Haniger (30), Heredia (23), Ramirez (1), Motter 2 (25), Phillips (48), Freeman 2 (53), Kemp (49), Markakis 2 (65). SB: Motter (10). SF: Heredia, Markakis. S: Dickey. RLISP: Seattle 7 (Segura 2, Valencia 2, Ramirez 2, Cruz); Atlanta 4 (Kemp, Albies 2, M.Adams). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Seattle Ramirez 6 6 3 3 3 6 90 4.52 Rzepczynski, 1/3 1 2 2 1 1 12 3.25 Phelps, W, 4-5 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 12 3.29 2/ Vincent 1 0 0 18 2.02 3 3 1 Diaz, S, 29-33 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 12 3.58 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dickey 6 11 4 4 2 6 88 4.06 Motte 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 3.78 Johnson, L, 6-3 0 3 4 4 1 0 14 5.69 Winkler 1 1 1 1 0 2 15 6.75 Minter 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Johnson pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Phelps 2-2, Diaz 2-0, Winkler 2-2. HBP: Motte (Heredia), Phelps (Flowers). WP: Dickey, Johnson. Umpires: Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 3:07. A: 23,890.

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 4 1 3 0 1 1 .303 Pollock cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .264 Lamb 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .263 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .314 Martinez rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .280 Descalso 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Iannetta c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .230 Marte ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .260 Godley p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .059 a-Drury ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --De La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Fuentes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Totals 33 2 7 2 5 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nimmo lf 1 2 1 0 3 0 .280 Cabrera 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .253 Conforto rf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .280 Flores 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Smith 1b 3 2 1 1 1 2 .190 d’Arnaud c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Rosario ss 4 0 2 1 0 2 .269 Lagares cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Flexen p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .100 b-Cespedes ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .288 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Reynolds ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Totals 30 4 8 4 6 9 Arizona 100 001 000 — 2 7 1 New York 100 111 00x — 4 8 0 a-struck out for Godley in the 6th. b-pinch hit for Flexen in the 6th. c-struck out for Sewald in the 8th. d-struck out for Hernandez in the 9th. E: Lamb (13). LOB: Arizona 10, New York 8. 2B: Lamb (27), Nimmo (4). HR: Iannetta (12), off Flexen; Smith (3), off Barrett. RBIs: Martinez (65), Iannetta (30), Conforto 2 (68), Smith (5), Rosario (7). SB: Peralta (8). RLISP: Arizona 3 (Martinez 2, Descalso); New York 3 (Cabrera 2, Smith). nd> GIDP: Cabrera, Lagares 2. DP: Arizona 3 (Descalso, Goldschmidt), (Lamb, Descalso, Goldschmidt), (Lamb, Descalso, Goldschmidt); New York 1 (Lagares, d’Arnaud). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arizona 5 4 3 2 4 5 100 3.15 Godley, L, 5-7 2/ Barrett 1 1 0 10 4.41 3 3 1 11/3 0 0 0 1 2 21 4.53 De La Rosa Hernandez 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 2.72 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Flexen, W, 3-2 6 6 2 2 4 5 104 5.79 1/ Blevins, 3 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.72 Sewald, 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 18 3.86 Ramos, S, 23-25 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 3.70 Inherited runners-scored: De La Rosa 2-0, Sewald 2-0. HBP: Blevins (Pollock). PB: Iannetta (5). Umpires: Home, Ryan Additon; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jerry Layne. T: 3:15. A: 31,277.

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .309 5 0 3 0 0 0 .311 Seager ss Granderson lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .224 5 0 1 0 0 1 .246 Gonzalez 1b Puig rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .254 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .225 4 0 1 0 0 1 .240 Forsythe 3b Barnes c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .295 4 0 0 0 0 2 .061 Hill p Totals 36 0 8 0 4 7 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Harrison 2b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .281 McCutchen cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .285 Bell 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 3 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Freese 3b Rodriguez rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .206 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .248 2 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Stewart c Williams p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .059 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rivero p a-Osuna ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --28 1 1 1 0 10 Totals Los Angeles 000 000 000 0 — 0 8 1 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 1 — 1 1 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Rivero in the 9th. E: Forsythe (5). LOB: Los Angeles 11, Pittsburgh 1. 2B: Forsythe (14). HR: Harrison (16), off Hill. RBIs: Harrison (47). S: Stewart. RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Seager, Granderson, Forsythe, Hill 2); Pittsburgh 1 (Marte). GIDP: Granderson, Utley. DP: Pittsburgh 2 (Harrison, Mercer, Bell), (Harrison, Mercer, Bell). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 9 1 1 1 0 10 99 3.32 Hill, L, 9-5 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams 8 7 0 0 4 5 114 4.40 Rivero 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 1.29 Nicasio, W, 2-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.95 HBP: Williams (Puig). Umpires: Home, Brian O’Nora; First, Paul Emmel; Second, Nick Mahrley; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 2:34. A: 19,859.

Dodgers lefty Rich Hill lost his perfect game on an error in the ninth inning, then lost his no-hitter on a leadoff home run in the bottom of the 10th by Josh Harrison that sent the Pittsburgh Pirates over Los Angeles 1-0 Wednesday night. The Pirates didn’t have a runner until Jordy Mercer led off the ninth with a sharp grounder that smacked off third baseman Logan Forsythe’s glove for an error. Hill retired the next three. Hill (9-5) came back out for the 10th and Harrison sent his 99th pitch of the night into the first row of seats in left field. Hill became the first pitcher since Pedro Martinez in 1995 to take a no-hit try into extra innings. Martinez, then with Montreal, lost his perfect game in the 10th at San Diego. Cubs 9, Reds 3 • Kyle Schwarber hit a three-run homer and Tommy La Stella added a two-run shot while subbing for Kris Bryant as Chicago kept its second-half surge going with a win at Cincinnati. Phillies 8, Marlins 0 • Mark Leiter Jr. allowed one hit over seven innings, Rhys Hoskins homered and drove in five runs, and Philadelphia rode that rookie tandem to a victory at home. Mets 4, D’backs 2 • Chris Flexen pitched six effective innings and host New York ended a three-game skid. Giants 4, Brewers 2 • Jarrett Parker hit a go-ahead two-run double in the seventh as the Giants won at home.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Orioles 8, Athletics 7 • Zach Britton’s AL-record run of converting 60 straight save attempts ended, but the Orioles ultimately won in the bottom of the 12th. Red Sox 6, Indians 1 • Mitch Moreland hit a fifth-inning home run, Drew Pomeranz and three relievers bested Corey Kluber, and Boston won at Cleveland. Yankees 10, Detroit 2 • Gary Sanchez homered and drove in three runs to lead New York to another lopsided win at Detroit. Blue Jays 7, Rays 6 • Kevin Pillar hit Toronto’s sixth home run of the game in the eighth inning, lifting the visiting Blue Jays over Tampa Bay. White Sox 4, Twins 3 • Tim Anderson singled with one out in the bottom of the ninth to score Avisail Garcia as host Chicago came back to win.

INTERLEAGUE

Mariners 9, Braves 6 • In Atlanta, Taylor Motter replaced Robinson Cano and gave Seattle the lead in the eighth inning. Cano had two doubles before leaving with tightness in his left hamstring in the third. Astros 6, Nationals 1 • Alex Bregman hit a three-run homer and Jake Marisnick and Max Stassi added solo shots to help Houston win at home. Royals 6, Rockies 4 • Eric Hosmer hit a three-run homer with two outs in the bottom of the ninth for Kansas City. Associated Press

Giants 4, Brewers 2 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .227 Santana rf 3 1 2 0 1 1 .270 Braun lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Shaw 3b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .285 Aguilar 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Pina c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .283 d-Vogt ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .232 Broxton cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .230 e-Thames ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Arcia ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Garza p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 6 2 3 8 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez cf 3 2 2 0 0 1 .272 Tomlinson 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .259 Parker lf 3 0 1 2 1 0 .263 Posey c 3 0 0 1 0 1 .317 Crawford ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .236 Sandoval 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .236 Moncrief rf 3 0 0 1 0 2 .250 Jones 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .190 Moore p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .116 Strickland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Span ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Calixte ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .176 Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 4 9 4 2 10 Milwaukee 100 000 001 — 2 6 0 San Francisco 100 000 21x — 4 9 1 a-lined out for Hader in the 7th. b-doubled for Strickland in the 7th. c-struck out for Melancon in the 8th. d-homered for Pina in the 9th. e-flied out for Broxton in the 9th. E: Jones (3). LOB: Milwaukee 5, San Francisco 8. 2B: Santana (23), Shaw (28), Hernandez 2 (17), Parker (9), Crawford (24), Span (26). HR: Vogt (9), off Dyson. RBIs: Shaw (82), Vogt (30), Parker 2 (16), Posey (54), Moncrief (4). SF: Posey, Moncrief. RLISP: Milwaukee 4 (Aguilar 3, Walker); San Francisco 5 (Posey 2, Sandoval, Moore, Calixte). GIDP: Aguilar, Arcia. DP: San Francisco 2 (Crawford, Tomlinson, Jones), (Crawford, Tomlinson, Jones). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza 5 5 1 1 2 6 83 4.67 Hader 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.23 Barnes, L, 3-4 1 2 2 2 0 2 20 4.11 Torres 1 2 1 1 0 1 22 3.94 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Moore 6 5 1 1 2 6 97 5.38 Strickland, W, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.74 Melancon, 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.38 Dyson, S, 12-17 1 1 1 1 1 0 17 5.40 Moore pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Strickland 1-0. HBP: Barnes (Hernandez). WP: Torres. Umpires: Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 3:08. A: 40,015.

Red Sox 6, Indians 1 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nunez 2b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .315 Betts rf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .263 Benintendi cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .279 H.Ramirez dh 4 0 0 0 0 4 .248 Devers 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .312 Bogaerts ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .278 Moreland 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .247 Vazquez c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .285 Holt lf 3 2 1 1 1 1 .200 Totals 35 6 8 5 2 14 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .262 Jackson cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .322 J.Ramirez 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .298 Encarnacion 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .250 Bruce rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .265 Guyer lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .223 Diaz dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .186 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .216 Urshela 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .193 a-Zimmer ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 30 1 3 1 5 13 Totals Boston 000 010 014 — 6 8 0 Cleveland 000 000 010 — 1 3 0 a-struck out for Urshela in the 9th. LOB: Boston 5, Cleveland 8. 2B: Holt (3). HR: Moreland (15), off Kluber; Nunez (10), off Shaw; Encarnacion (29), off Reed. RBIs: Nunez 2 (51), Betts (77), Moreland (54), Holt (4), Encarnacion (74). RLISP: Boston 3 (H.Ramirez 2, Bogaerts); Cleveland 1 (Gomes). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz, W, 13-4 51/3 2 0 0 4 9 103 3.18 Kelly, 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.34 Reed, 11/3 1 1 1 0 1 24 3.09 Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 1 3 21 1.33 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber, L, 12-4 72/3 4 2 2 1 12 114 2.65 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0.00 Olson 1 3 3 3 0 2 22 3.32 Smith 1/ Shaw 6 3.36 3 1 1 1 0 0 Olson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Kelly 1-0, Olson 2-0, Smith 3-0, Shaw 1-1. HBP: Pomeranz (Bruce), Kluber (Nunez). WP: Shaw. PB: Gomes (3). Umpires: Home, Alan Porter; First, Andy Fletcher; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Bill Welke. T: 3:11. A: 25,346.

Blue Jays 7, Rays 6 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pearce lf 5 2 2 1 0 1 .273 Carrera lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Donaldson 3b 5 1 1 2 0 3 .264 Smoak 1b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .290 Bautista rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .211 Morales dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .245 Pillar cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .253 Goins ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .216 Barney 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .223 Lopez c 3 1 1 1 1 0 .130 Totals 38 7 12 7 1 9 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 4 3 3 3 1 0 .276 Duda dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .238 a-Puello ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Longoria 3b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .264 Morrison 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Souza Jr. rf 5 2 2 1 0 0 .256 Dickerson lf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .286 Ramos c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .258 Miller 2b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .187 Hechavarria ss 4 1 0 0 0 1 .242 Totals 37 6 11 6 4 7 Toronto 230 010 010 — 7 12 1 Tampa Bay 002 111 100 — 6 11 0 a-grounded out for Duda in the 8th. E: Lopez (1). LOB: Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 8. 2B: Pearce (14). HR: Donaldson (22), off Pruitt; Goins (6), off Pruitt; Lopez (1), off Pruitt; Pearce (13), off Pruitt; Smoak (34), off Whitley; Pillar (13), off Hunter; Kiermaier (9), off Stroman; Souza Jr. (27), off Stroman; Kiermaier (10), off Stroman. RBIs: Pearce (37), Donaldson 2 (55), Smoak (81), Pillar (33), Goins (49), Lopez (3), Kiermaier 3 (26), Longoria (70), Souza Jr. (74), Miller (29). SB: Barney (6), Kiermaier (11), Longoria (4). RLISP: Toronto 2 (Pearce, Donaldson); Tampa Bay 4 (Ramos 2, Miller, Hechavarria). GIDP: Morales, Souza Jr.. DP: Toronto 1 (Goins, Barney, Smoak); Tampa Bay 1 (Miller, Longoria, Morrison). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman 51/3 8 5 5 1 4 87 3.17 2/ Barnes, 1 2 0 16 3.02 3 1 1 Tepera, W, 7-1, 1 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.08 2/ Loup, 0 1 13 4.24 3 1 0 0 Osuna, S, 33-41 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.52 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pruitt 32/3 7 5 5 0 2 69 5.76 Whitley 12/3 3 1 1 1 2 36 3.35 Kittredge 12/3 1 0 0 0 1 19 3.60 Hunter, L, 2-5 1 1 1 1 0 2 17 2.35 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 2.03 Barnes pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Barnes 2-1, Tepera 2-1, Osuna 1-0, Whitley 1-0, Kittredge 2-0. WP: Whitley. Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Chad Fairchild. T: 3:13. A: 8,264.

Astros 6, Nationals 1 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kendrick lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .343 Difo ss 3 0 0 1 0 2 .276 Murphy 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .324 Zimmerman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .303 Lind dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .298 Wieters c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .230 Taylor cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Stevenson rf 2 1 1 0 1 1 .179 Totals 30 1 6 1 1 8 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 4 1 0 0 1 0 .300 Bregman 3b 5 1 2 3 0 1 .278 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .358 Reddick lf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .301 Gurriel 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Gonzalez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .307 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .242 Stassi c 2 1 1 1 2 1 .214 4 2 2 1 0 0 .254 Marisnick cf Totals 33 6 10 6 5 2 Washington 001 000 000 — 1 6 1 Houston 000 110 04x — 6 10 0 E: Taylor (2). LOB: Washington 4, Houston 9. 2B: Kendrick (13), Stevenson (1), Reddick (26), Gonzalez (23). 3B: Altuve (4). HR: Marisnick (15), off Jackson; Stassi (2), off Grace; Bregman (16), off Kelley. RBIs: Difo (17), Bregman 3 (51), Reddick (62), Stassi (3), Marisnick (34). SB: Marisnick (7). SF: Difo, Reddick. RLISP: Washington 2 (Difo, Wieters); Houston 4 (Gurriel, Beltran, Marisnick 2). GIDP: Kendrick, Zimmerman. DP: Houston 2 (Bregman, Altuve, Gurriel), (Gonzalez, Altuve, Gurriel). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson, L, 4-3 6 6 2 2 3 1 95 3.38 2/ Albers 0 1 1 17 1.86 3 0 0 Grace 1 2 1 1 0 0 10 4.08 1/ Kelley 3 1 0 17 8.10 3 2 3 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 7 4 1 1 1 6 90 4.17 Fiers, W, 8-8 1 1 0 0 0 2 11 5.15 Musgrove, Liriano 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 5.60 Inherited runners-scored: Grace 1-0. Umpires: Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Chad Whitson; Second, James Hoye; Third, Tim Timmons. T: 2:48. A: 23,434.

Yankees 10, Tigers 2 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 1 0 0 0 0 .252 A.Hicks rf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .267 Sanchez c 5 2 2 3 0 0 .276 Judge dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .286 c-Au.Romine ph-dh 1 0 1 0 0 0 .224 Gregorius ss 4 1 2 2 0 0 .312 Wade 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .135 Headley 1b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .274 Austin 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Frazier 3b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .214 Ellsbury cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .239 Torreyes 2b-ss 4 1 4 1 0 0 .299 Totals 391014 10 3 6 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .248 Machado 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .298 Presley rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .293 Upton lf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .283 Mahtook lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .288 Cabrera 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 a-Jones ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Castellanos 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Martinez dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .253 b-McCann ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .258 3 0 0 0 0 2 .302 J.Hicks c An.Romine cf-1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .236 Iglesias ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .251 Totals 36 2 9 2 1 13 New York 105 011 110 — 10 14 0 Detroit 000 001 001 — 2 9 1 a-struck out for Cabrera in the 8th. b-struck out for Martinez in the 8th. c-singled for Judge in the 9th. E: Kinsler (8). LOB: New York 6, Detroit 9. 2B: Judge (16), Torreyes (12), Upton (35), Machado (3). HR: Sanchez (26), off Zimmermann; Gregorius (19), off Zimmermann; Headley (8), off Bell; Kinsler (13), off Severino; Iglesias (5), off Kahnle. RBIs: A.Hicks (46), Sanchez 3 (72), Judge (82), Gregorius 2 (60), Headley 2 (48), Torreyes (35), Kinsler (37), Iglesias (42). CS: Judge (4). SF: Headley. RLISP: New York 2 (A.Hicks, Sanchez); Detroit 5 (Presley 2, Martinez, Iglesias, McCann). IPHRERBBSO NPERA New York Severino, W, 11-5 62/3 6 1 1 1 8100 3.10 Green 11/3 10 0 0 4 25 2.19 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 3.10 Kahnle IPHRERBBSO NPERA Detroit Zimmermann, L, 7-11 5 9 7 7 1 0 85 6.11 4 5 3 2 2 6 675.48 Bell Inherited runners-scored: Green 2-0. HBP: Severino (J.Hicks). WP: Green. Umpires: Home, Ben May; First, Carlos Torres; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Paul Nauert. T: 2:55. A: 29,695.

Phillies 8, Marlins 0 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0 0 1 .290 Gordon 2b Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Yelich cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .282 2 0 0 0 1 0 .306 Ozuna lf Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .287 J.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --3 0 0 0 0 2 .245 Dietrich 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .233 Telis 1b-c Rojas ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .287 Nicolino p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Despaigne p a-Ellis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Ellington p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Tazawa p b-Moore ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Totals 28 0 2 0 2 6 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .284 Galvis ss 4 2 1 1 1 1 .255 4 3 2 0 1 2 .288 Williams cf 3 1 2 5 1 0 .271 Hoskins lf Joseph 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .239 Franco 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .222 Florimon rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .400 Alfaro c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .324 Leiter Jr. p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .067 L.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 c-Kelly ph Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 8 11 8 5 8 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Philadelphia 105 002 00x — 8 11 0 a-flied out for Despaigne in the 6th. b-out on fielder’s choice for Tazawa in the 8th. c-grounded out for L.Garcia in the 8th. LOB: Miami 3, Philadelphia 7. 2B: Rojas (6), Hernandez (18), Hoskins (1), Joseph (25), Alfaro (1). 3B: Hernandez (5). HR: Hoskins (7), off Nicolino. RBIs: Galvis (53), Hoskins 5 (16), Joseph (60), Alfaro (4). SB: Ozuna (1). RLISP: Miami 2 (Stanton, Telis); Philadelphia 4 (Hoskins, Joseph, Franco 2). d> GIDP: Realmuto. DP: Miami 1 (Telis, Dietrich); Philadelphia 1 (Galvis, Hernandez, Joseph). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nicolino, L, 2-2 21/3 8 6 6 2 2 74 5.45 Despaigne 22/3 2 0 0 0 2 30 4.42 Ellington 1 1 2 2 2 0 28 7.27 Tazawa 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 5.31 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 3.35 J.Garcia Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leiter Jr., W, 2-3 7 1 0 0 2 5 96 3.86 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.82 L.Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.28 Neris Inherited runners-scored: Despaigne 2-0. WP: Ellington. Umpires: Home, Tom Woodring; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Bruce Dreckman. T: 2:50. A: 19,161.

Orioles 8, Athletics 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Powell cf 6 2 3 0 0 1 .303 Semien ss 5 1 3 2 1 1 .257 Joyce rf 5 1 1 3 0 2 .232 K.Davis lf 5 1 1 0 1 2 .233 Healy dh 5 1 1 0 1 1 .266 Olson 1b 5 0 2 1 1 0 .242 Chapman 3b 5 0 0 0 1 3 .225 Maxwell c 5 0 2 1 0 2 .228 2-Garneau pr-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .191 Pinder 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .244 a-Lowrie ph-2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .270 Totals 48 7 14 7 5 15 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham ss 6 0 3 0 0 1 .296 Machado 3b 6 1 2 1 0 1 .264 Schoop 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .301 Jones cf 5 1 1 0 0 4 .278 Mancini lf 4 2 1 3 1 1 .285 C.Davis 1b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .224 Trumbo dh 4 1 0 0 1 2 .235 Castillo c 3 1 2 2 1 1 .285 1-Joseph pr-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Flaherty rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .242 Gentry rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 b-Smith ph-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .269 Totals 43 8 13 8 4 15 Oakland 000 001 222 000 — 7 14 0 Baltimore 000 402 010 001 — 8 13 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Pinder in the 7th. b-singled for Gentry in the 9th. 1-ran for Castillo in the 9th. 2-ran for Maxwell in the 10th. LOB: Oakland 11, Baltimore 6. 2B: Powell (2), Semien (10), K.Davis (23), Maxwell (7), Beckham (14). HR: Joyce (19), off Givens; Mancini (22), off Gossett; Castillo (14), off Coulombe; C.Davis (20), off Dull; Machado (28), off S.Castro. RBIs: Semien 2 (22), Joyce 3 (54), Olson (17), Maxwell (15), Machado (84), Mancini 3 (65), C.Davis (48), Castillo 2 (40), Flaherty (4). SB: Beckham (6). CS: Powell (1), Machado (3). SF: Joyce. RLISP: Oakland 6 (Powell, Semien, Joyce, Chapman 2, Maxwell); Baltimore 2 (Schoop, Jones). DP: Oakland 1 (Olson, Maxwell); Baltimore 1 (Castillo, Machado). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gossett 5 8 5 5 2 6 91 5.49 Coulombe 1 1 1 1 0 1 14 3.74 Casilla 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 4.27 Dull 1 1 1 1 0 2 20 5.40 Hatcher 1 1 0 0 1 3 25 4.32 S.Castro, L, 1-2 2 1 1 1 1 3 33 3.43 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy 6 7 3 3 0 8 91 4.18 Givens, 12/3 2 2 2 1 3 32 2.42 Bleier 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 1.82 1/ 1 1 9 2.91 Brach, 3 0 0 0 1/ 2 1 0 20 3.55 Britton, 3 3 2 2/ M.Castro, W, 3-1 3 3 2 0 0 1 3 50 2.74 Gossett pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Bundy pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Bleier pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Coulombe 1-1, Givens 2-1, Brach 1-0, M.Castro 2-0. WP: Gossett, Coulombe, Britton. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, John Tumpane; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Ted Barrett. T: 4:20. A: 20,072.

White Sox 4, Twins 3 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .260 Mauer 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .285 Polanco ss 4 1 2 2 0 1 .249 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .297 Buxton cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .237 Kepler rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Vargas dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .242 Castro c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .229 Gimenez c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 30 3 3 2 3 9 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. L.Garcia cf 4 2 2 1 0 1 .286 Moncada 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .192 Abreu 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .297 Delmonico dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .315 A.Garcia rf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .318 Smith c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .280 Sanchez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Anderson ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .239 Hanson lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .215 Totals 30 4 7 3 3 9 Minnesota 000 102 000 — 3 3 1 Chicago 001 001 011 — 4 7 1 One out when winning run scored. E: Polanco (16), Moncada (4). LOB: Minnesota 3, Chicago 6. 2B: L.Garcia (15), Moncada (6). 3B: Hanson (3). HR: Polanco (7), off Shields; L.Garcia (9), off Santana. RBIs: Polanco 2 (50), L.Garcia (33), Moncada (11), Anderson (42). SB: Kepler (4). S: Smith. RLISP: Minnesota 2 (Buxton, Escobar); Chicago 1 (Anderson). GIDP: Mauer, Delmonico. DP: Minnesota 1 (Dozier, Polanco, Mauer); Chicago 1 (Anderson, Abreu). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minnesota Santana 7 3 2 1 1 8 91 3.24 Rogers, 1 2 1 1 1 1 20 3.64 Hildenberger, L, 2-2 1/3 2 1 1 1 0 9 3.08 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields 6 3 3 3 2 6 92 5.62 1/ 1 1 11 7.15 Bummer 3 00 0 Infante 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 23 3.99 Farquhar, W, 3-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.03 Inherited runners-scored: Infante 1-0. HBP: Santana (A.Garcia). WP: Shields. Umpires: Home, Chris Guccione; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Nic Lentz; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T: 2:43. A: 15,605.

Wednesday Baltimore 8, Oakland 7, 12 innings Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 6 NY Yankees 10, Detroit 2 Boston 6, Cleveland 1 Seattle 9, Atlanta 6 Houston 6, Washington 1 White Sox 4, Minnesota 3 Kansas City 6, Colorado 4 Texas at LA Angels, late Tuesday Oakland 6, Baltimore 4 NY Yankees 13, Detroit 4 Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 5 Boston 9, Cleveland 1 Atlanta 4, Seattle 0 Minnesota 4, White Sox 1 Washington 4, Houston 3 Kansas City 3, Colorado 2 LA Angels 10, Texas 1

Thursday’s pitching matchups NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

SD

Perdomo (R)

6-8

4.93

StL

Martinez (R)

6:15 10-9

3.57

Ari

Ray (L)

NY

Montero (R)

9-5

3.11

11:10a 2-8

5.47

Mia Worley (R)

2-3

4.82

Phi

1-1

4.20

Thompson (R) 12:05

LA

Ryu (L)

Pit

Kuhl (R)

4-6

3.45

6-8

4.52

13-8

3.63

3:05

Chi

Arrieta (R)

Cin

Romano (R)

6:10

3-5

5.32

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tor

Koehler (R)

TB

Cobb (R)

NY

Garcia (L)

Det Fulmer (R)

1-5

7.92

12:10 9-8

3.80

5-8

4.52

12:10 10-11

3.60

Bos Sale (L) Cle

Bauer (R)

14-5

2.62

6:10 12-8

4.50

Min Berrios (R) Chi

Holland (L)

11-5

3.99

7:10 6-13

6.28

Tex Perez (L)

8-10

5.26

2-0

3.46

Time W-L

ERA

LA

Scribner (R)

9:07

IL

Pitcher

Col

Marquez (R)

KC

Junis (R)

Was Strasburg (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

10-5

4.24

5-2

4.99

10-4

3.24

11-2

2.58

1:15

7:10

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

Royals 6, Rockies 4 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 5 1 3 1 0 1 .336 5 0 3 1 0 0 .313 LeMahieu 2b Arenado 3b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .311 Parra dh 3 0 1 1 0 0 .343 3 0 0 0 1 3 .275 Reynolds 1b Gonzalez rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Tapia lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Story ss 2 2 1 0 2 0 .225 Totals 33 4 9 4 5 10 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 5 2 4 1 0 0 .288 Cain cf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .291 5 1 2 0 0 1 .295 Cabrera rf Hosmer 1b 4 1 3 4 1 0 .319 4 0 0 0 0 2 .278 Perez c Moustakas 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .282 Bonifacio dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Escobar ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .240 Gordon lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .198 Totals 38 6 14 6 2 4 Colorado 101 011 000 — 4 9 1 Kansas City 010 010 103 — 6 14 0 Two outs when winning run scored. E: Story (9). LOB: Colorado 8, Kansas City 8. 2B: Parra (20), Cain (23). HR: Arenado (29), off Kennedy; Blackmon (30), off Kennedy; Hosmer (21), off Holland. RBIs: Blackmon (79), LeMahieu (53), Arenado (108), Parra (60), Merrifield (57), Cain (41), Hosmer 4 (73). SB: Merrifield (24). SF: Parra. RLISP: Colorado 5 (Arenado, Reynolds 2, Gonzalez 2); Kansas City 3 (Cain, Perez 2). GIDP: Parra, Cain, Gordon. DP: Colorado 2 (Arenado, LeMahieu, Reynolds), (Reynolds, Story); Kansas City 1 (Escobar, Merrifield, Hosmer). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colorado Senzatela 5 9 2 2 1 2 81 4.52 Rusin, 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 2.50 2/ Neshek, 1 0 2 13 1.63 3 1 1 McGee, 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 24 3.45 Holland, L, 2-5, 2/3 2 3 3 1 0 23 3.77 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy 42/3 7 3 3 3 6 95 5.09 Buchter 1 1 1 1 1 0 29 3.44 Moylan 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 20 4.37 Alexander 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 2.38 Maurer, W, 3-5 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 6.00 Inherited runners-scored: McGee 1-1, Buchter 3-0, Moylan 2-1. Umpires: Home, Eric Cooper; First, Roberto Ortiz; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Dan Iassogna. T: 3:36. A: 25,752 . LATE TUESDAY

Brewers 4, Giants 3

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .243 Walker 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .281 Braun lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .286 Shaw 3b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .285 Santana rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .267 Pina c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .285 Sogard ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .289 Arcia ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Broxton cf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .229 Nelson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .080 b-Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Perez rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Totals 36 4 10 3 3 8 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .271 Tomlinson 2b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .252 5 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Parker lf Posey c-1b 4 2 1 0 1 1 .320 Crawford ss 3 1 1 2 1 2 .234 Sandoval 3b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .236 Jones 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .198 c-Hundley ph-c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Hernandez rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .268 Samardzija p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .096 a-Moncrief ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .280 d-Pence ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .259 1-Blach pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 34 3 10 3 5 11 Totals Milwaukee 010 100 200 — 4 10 0 San Francisco 010 020 000 — 3 10 1 a-walked for Samardzija in the 6th. b-lined out for Jeffress in the 7th. c-singled for Jones in the 8th. d-walked for Crick in the 8th. 1-ran for Pence in the 8th. E: Hernandez (2). LOB: Milwaukee 9, San Francisco 10. 2B: Walker (14), Shaw (27). 3B: Thames (4). HR: Crawford (11), off Nelson. RBIs: Braun (40), Shaw (81), Broxton (48), Crawford 2 (63), Hernandez (19). CS: Span (6), Tomlinson (1). SF: Braun. RLISP: Milwaukee 6 (Shaw 2, Santana, Broxton, Nelson 2); San Francisco 4 (Span 4). GIDP: Braun. DP: Milwaukee 1 (Pina, Walker); San Francisco 1 (Tomlinson, Crawford, Jones). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milwaukee Nelson 5 7 3 3 3 6 99 3.79 Jeffress, W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 5.18 1/ Hader, 1 3 0 0 0 0 3 21 1.27 2/ Swarzak, 1 1 21 2.31 3 2 0 0 Knebel, S, 27-32 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 1.36 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Samardzija 6 6 2 1 2 4 89 4.67 Suarez, L, 0-3, 2/3 2 2 2 1 0 15 7.27 1/ Crick 1 3 0 0 0 0 3 19 2.78 Gearrin 1 2 0 0 0 1 18 2.15 Inherited runners-scored: Crick 1-0. HBP: Nelson (Jones). Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Mark Carlson. T: 3:15. A: 39,523.


CARDINALS

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1 CARDINALS 6, PADRES 2 San Diego AB Margot cf 4 Asuaje 2b 4 Pirela lf 4 Yates p 0 Solarte ss 4 Myers 1b 3 Spangenberg 3b 3 Blash rf 4 Hedges c 4 Chacin p 2 Baumann p 0 b-Szczur ph-lf 1 Totals 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2

H 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 6

BI BB SO 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 12

Avg. .268 .285 .294 --.266 .234 .273 .207 .216 .261 --.218

Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wong 2b 5 3 3 0 0 0 .314 Pham lf 3 1 1 1 2 1 .305 DeJong ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .294 Fowler cf 2 1 0 1 1 0 .260 Molina c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .281 Gyorko 1b 4 0 2 2 1 1 .271 Piscotty rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .238 Garcia 3b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .249 Weaver p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .167 a-Grichuk ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lyons p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 6 9 4 6 7 San Diego 000 000 011 — 2 6 1 Cardinals 201 110 01x — 6 9 0 a-flied out for Weaver in the 7th. b-singled for Baumann in the 8th. E: Chacin (1). LOB: San Diego 6, Cardinals 12. 2B: Chacin (2), Wong (24), Pham (16). 3B: Margot (5). HR: Spangenberg (13), off Brebbia. RBIs: Margot (31), Spangenberg (44), Pham (53), Fowler (50), Gyorko 2 (63). SB: Wong 2 (6), Pham (17). SF: Fowler. S: Weaver. RLISP: San Diego 4 (Asuaje, Solarte, Blash 2); Cardinals 6 (Wong 2, DeJong, Piscotty 2, Grichuk). GIDP: Fowler. DP: San Diego 1. San Diego IP H Chacin 4 2/3 6 Baumann 2 1/3 1 Yates 1 2

R ER BB SO NP ERA 5 4 3 3 92 4.10 0 0 1 2 35 1.29 1 1 2 2 22 3.98

Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO Weaver 7 3 0 0 1 10 Oh 0 2 1 1 0 0 Lyons 1 0 0 0 0 2 Brebbia 1 1 1 1 0 0 Oh pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.

NP 99 11 20 17

ERA 2.31 3.86 2.70 2.23

W: Weaver 2-1. L: Chacin 11-9. Inherited runners-scored: Baumann 3-0, Lyons 1-0. HBP: Chacin 4 (DeJong,Molina,Fowler,Garcia), Weaver (Spangenberg), Baumann (Garcia). WP: Chacin. Umpires: Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Will Little; Second, Ryan Blakney; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 2:53. A: 38,762 (43,975).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals first • Wong doubles. Pham doubles, Wong scores. DeJong flies out, Pham to third. Fowler hits a sacrifice fly, Pham scores. Two runs. Cardinals 2, Padres 0. Cardinals third • Wong singles. DeJong hit by a pitch, Wong to second. Molina hit by a pitch, Wong to third, DeJong to second. Gyorko singles, Wong scores. One run. Cardinals 3, Padres 0. Cardinals fourth • Garcia singles. Weaver sacrifice bunts Garcia to second. Wong flies out, Garcia to third. Pham walks. Garcia scores on an error on a pickoff attempt. One run. Cardinals 4, Padres 0. Cardinals fifth • Fowler hit by a pitch. Gyorko walks, Fowler to second. Piscotty grounds into a force out, Fowler to third, Gyorko out at second. Garcia hit by a pitch, Piscotty to second. Fowler scores on a wild pitch. One run. Cardinals 5, Padres 0. Padres eighth • Szczur singles. Margot triples, Szczur scores. One run. Cardinals 5, Padres 1. Cardinals eighth • Wong singles, steals second and third. Pham walks, steals second. Fowler intentionally walked. Gyorko singles, Wong scores. One run. Cardinals 6, Padres 1. Padres ninth • Spangenberg homers. One run. Cardinals 6, Padres 2.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B5

NOTEBOOK

Rosenthal is set for elbow surgery Cards don’t have a closer, will ‘figure it out as we go’ BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

Already scrambling for an answer in the ninth inning, the Cardinals learned Wednesday that Trevor Rosenthal’s elbow surgery and prolonged absence will also leave them searching, even shopping, for a closer to open next season. Rosenthal will have Tommy John surgery next week to repair a partially torn ligament in his right elbow. The standard recovery time for the procedure is between eight and 12 months, and that puts both the Cardinals and Rosenthal in an unusual, but shared, bind this winter. A team that has studiously avoided chasing closers on the open market may have to even as they consider what to do with Rosenthal’s contract, which they could walk away from at season’s end. “It certainly creates a need where we previously had a pretty set answer,” general manager Michael Girsch said. “In the short term, there’s not a ton we can do about it, unfortunately, because of the time of the year. We’re doing our best. In the longer term, it is something we’ll have to add to the things we’re trying to address this offseason.” The Cardinals immediately moved Rosenthal to the 60-day disabled list and used the roster spot to add lefty Ryan Sherriff. One of Class AAA Memphis’ most reliable late-inning relievers, Sherriff was promoted to take Josh Lucas’ spot in the major-league bullpen. Lucas had been optioned out late Tuesday night. The closer role is up for grabs. “Figure it out as we go,” manager Mike Matheny said. Rosenthal, an All-Star and twice a 40-save reliever for the Cardinals, had returned to the closer role this season and had a dominant stretch that coincided with the team’s charge back into the division race. During a recent game, he felt his elbow go slack, and this past week in Boston he had difficulty sparking his arm to life. Rosenthal explained that he’s “not a human radar gun,” but when he saw 91 mph and 92 mph on the stadium board he could sense something deeper was wrong, something sinister. An exam in St. Louis by team physician Dr. George Paletta revealed a tear in the ulnar collateral ligament, and a review of Rosenthal’s

MRI by Dr. Neal ElAttrache confirmed the diagnosis. Both surgeons suggested elbow reconstruction, or Tommy John, as Rosenthal’s best option. The alternative was a platelet injection, eight to 12 weeks of rest, and the medical equivalent of a Powerball ticket. “That wasn’t something that they thought would be a guarantee to prevent something from happening in the future,” said Rosenthal, who had 11 saves and a 2.15 ERA with 76 strikeouts in 47 2/3 innings this season. “So take all the time off and come back out and then end up injuring it again or injuring it more — having surgery at that point, I’d end up missing two seasons instead of just looking at parts of one.” The injury and its lengthy rehab come at a tricky time for Rosenthal and his contract. The Cardinals hold one more year of control on the righthander before he can become a free agent after the 2018 season. He is eligible for arbitration this winter, though using arbitration to set his salary will pay him on past performance and market value, not the fact that he’ll miss months of next season. The Cardinals could approach Rosenthal about an extension that covers his rehab year, assures he’ll pitch for them next season, and gets at least 2019 in exchange for that security. Or, the Cardinals could choose not to tender Rosenthal a contract and allow him to become a free agent, where any team could sign him to a minor-league deal. Either approach has its risks — for both sides. Girsch said there hasn’t been a lot of thought put into the contract, yet. There will be. The Cardinals’ other reliever with closing experience, Seung Hwan Oh, will be a free agent at the end of this season. Oh or lefty Tyler Lyons could see save opportunities in the coming weeks, though the Cardinals are also open to alternatives and could cycle up some of the younger, hotshot relievers from Class AAA.

EXTRA BASES

Matt Carpenter was sent home after arriving at the ballpark ill with what his manager called a virus. The team did not want him to spread whatever he had and shifted to Jedd Gyorko at first base and Kolten Wong at leadoff. … With two hits Tuesday night, his 1,705th and 1,706th, Yadier Molina moved ahead of Ted Simmons for 11th place on the Cardinals’ career list. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Trevor Rosenthal had been pitching well before an elbow injury hampered him.

AVERAGES Batting Wong Pham DeJong J. Martinez Molina Gyorko Fowler Garcia Carpenter Grichuk Piscotty Kelly Team

AVG AB .309 269 .305 338 .295 278 .285 179 .282 401 .269 383 .262 332 .246 179 .245 413 .244 328 .241 253 .143 28 .261 4237

R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 43 83 23 3 2 36 29 47 4 9 68 103 15 1 16 52 48 94 16 1 35 82 17 0 20 48 11 89 0 6 33 51 8 1 10 28 20 42 2 2 53 113 21 0 15 56 20 62 8 7 48 103 19 2 18 61 41 95 6 9 54 87 18 6 15 49 52 76 5 1 19 44 6 1 2 14 30 46 2 5 69 101 28 2 16 60 84 98 2 11 44 80 23 2 15 46 21 106 5 3 30 61 14 0 7 32 39 61 3 2 1 4 1 0 0 5 1 5 0 0 591 1107 233 19 150 564 446 1040 59 73

Pitching W L ERA G Brebbia 0 0 2.04 32 Tuivailala 3 1 2.15 24 Lyons 1 0 2.77 34 Lynn 10 6 3.17 26 Weaver 1 1 3.31 5 Martinez 10 9 3.57 25 Oh 1 5 3.69 53 Wacha 9 6 4.08 23 Leake 7 12 4.16 25 2 4 4.18 60 Cecil Bowman 3 5 4.38 62 Duke 0 1 6.75 11 63 62 4.04 125 Team Prior to Wednesday’s game

GS 0 0 0 26 2 25 0 23 25 0 0 0 125

SV 0 0 1 0 0 0 19 0 0 1 2 0 36

IP H 35.1 22 29.1 24 39.0 29 150.2 118 16.1 14 161.1 136 53.2 60 125.2 129 147.0 163 51.2 58 49.1 45 8.0 5 1120.1 1084

R 9 7 12 61 6 69 26 62 79 26 27 6 551

ER 8 7 12 53 6 64 22 57 68 24 24 6 503

HR BB SO 4 5 29 3 11 23 2 14 46 22 58 124 2 7 16 22 56 169 8 13 52 14 41 119 16 35 100 6 15 48 4 15 38 2 5 4 141 381 1019

PAINFUL GAMES Since 1913, only one team has had batters hit by a pitch more than five times in a game. A look: Year Team Opp. Result HBP 1913 NYY WSH W, 9-3 6 STL SD W, 6-2 5 2017 2017 ATL TOR W, 10-6 5 OAK ANA L, 4-6 5 2001 2000 HOU LAD W, 10-3 5 KCR TEX W, 13-2 5 1989 1969 ATL CIN W, 9-4 5 DET KCA W, 5-4 5 1965 1956 CHW CLE W, 6-3 5 Source: baseball-reference.com

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Dexter Fowler scores on a fifth-inning wild pitch as Padres catcher Austin Hedges and pitcher Jhoulys Chacin were both unable to retrieve the ball.

Weaver pitches seven strong innings in win over the Padres CARDINALS • FROM B1

Shelby Miller in 2013 to have a start with at least seven scoreless and 10 strikeouts in his first 15 major-league games. In the majors, only six rookies had 10-strikeout games this season. Weaver (2-1) is the seventh. The righthander started Wednesday in place of veteran Adam Wainwright, who is recovering from an impingement in his right elbow. The Cardinals are optimistic that Wainwright will contribute again this season, though his role will be determined by his stamina and time left on the schedule, and at the same time the Cardinals have grown increasingly alarmed by Mike Leake’s sag in consistency. As manager Mike Matheny said about the closing role, vacated by Trevor Rosenthal now that he requires elbow surgery, the Cardinals are open for any pitcher to take the mound and capture a role. “We’ve got a lot of opportunity for somebody to step in and take over the spot,” Matheny said, and then pivoted. “A few spots. Pretty great opportunity for a lot of these young kids, too. We are

going to let everybody see what they can do and see who looks the best to fill that spot.” The Cardinals have eyed Weaver for prominence all month. John Mozeliak, the club’s president of baseball operations, suggested that Weaver does not need a return to Class AAA Memphis to prove his ability. On the day he learned he would be going to the disabled list, Wainwright said he was sure his spot was in good hands with Weaver there to “carry the torch.” The Cardinals promoted Weaver earlier this month to serve a spot in the bullpen, and within two days he was back in the rotation. Matheny said the slight righthander had finally learned “not to give hitters at this level too much credit.” Two days after his 24th birthday, Weaver buzzed through them. Weaver got the first of his strikeouts in the first inning, and he held the first eight batters of the Padres’ lineup without a hit. Of the three hits Weaver allowed, the opposing pitcher got two of them. Only two other Padres got into scoring position, and the Padres needed Weaver’s help to make that happen. In the fourth inning, Jose Pirela’s infield single

with one out nudged the Padres into their best chance against Weaver. The righthander then walked Wil Myers and plunked Cory Spangenberg to load the bases. The Cardinals had a tworun lead at the time and Weaver held it by getting Jabari Blash to nick a 96 mph fastball for a strikeout. Many of his teammates just took the pitch for the same result. Weaver found the lower reach of the strike zone, got the call for a strike, and then just lived there with his fastball most of the game. Of his 89 pitches, more than half were fastballs that ranged from 93.5 mph to 96.7 mph. He got 14 called strikes on that pitch, and he also was able to get efficient innings as a result. It took Weaver 10 pitches to get through the second inning, and he was in the eighties when he finished the sixth inning with a 94.5 mph fastball that Myers just observed for a called strike 3. Given the seventh inning as a result of his effectiveness, Weaver struck out the final two batters he faced. Blash took the fastball that he nicked in the previous at-bat, and Austin Hedges flailed at a breaking ball. The

finishing pitches had a gap of 10 mph, as Weaver downshifted from 95 mph to 85 mph. The 10th strikeout came on his 99th pitch. To give him license to be aggressive with the fastball in ways he was dominant at Class AAA, the Cardinals staked Weaver to the ideal lead – an early one. Wong, cast at leadoff after Matt Carpenter was sent home with a virus, doubled to open the game and scored two pitches later when Tommy Pham doubled. Pham took third on a fly ball and then scored on Dexter Fowler’s sacrifice fly. That set the pace for the evening and for Pham’s approach on the bases. Later in the game he drew a pickoff at first that turned into an error and he turned that into a spot at third base with two outs. The Cardinals added steadily to their lead by taking advantage of what Padres starter Jhoulys Chacin gave them, even if sometimes it hurt. Chacin (11-9) hit four batters in his 4 2/3 innings, and two of them led to runs. In the third inning, Wong’s leadoff single put him at third base after two hit batters. He then scored easily on Jedd Gyorko’s infield hit, which clanked off the third baseman. In the fourth, Greg Garcia

scored from third on the pickoff Pham coaxed. In the fifth, Chacin plunked Fowler to lead off the inning, and they would meet again, with Fowler apparently stepping on Chacin to get to home plate. The Cardinals did not get a hit in the fifth inning and yet beefed their lead to 5-0 thanks to Chacin’s generosity. He hit Fowler, walked Gyorko, hit Garcia, and then walked Weaver. Fowler scored on a wild pitch that caromed from the brick backstop to the plate, where Chacin tried to control it as he slid to home plate. Fowler never left his feet and just tromped over the pitcher for the run. Chacin remained in the game after flexing and testing his ankle, though he only faced one more batter, Weaver, and then left with that walk. Wong’s two steals and Pham’s one helped the Cardinals load the bases in the eighth inning with one out. They got one run from the potential bonanza. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 2 CARDINALS 6, PADRES 2 San Diego AB Margot cf 4 Asuaje 2b 4 Pirela lf 4 Yates p 0 Solarte ss 4 Myers 1b 3 Spangenberg 3b 3 Blash rf 4 Hedges c 4 Chacin p 2 Baumann p 0 b-Szczur ph-lf 1 Totals 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2

H 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 6

BI BB SO 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 12

Avg. .268 .285 .294 --.266 .234 .273 .207 .216 .261 --.218

Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wong 2b 5 3 3 0 0 0 .314 Pham lf 3 1 1 1 2 1 .305 DeJong ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .294 Fowler cf 2 1 0 1 1 0 .260 Molina c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .281 Gyorko 1b 4 0 2 2 1 1 .271 Piscotty rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .238 Garcia 3b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .249 Weaver p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .167 a-Grichuk ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lyons p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 6 9 4 6 7 San Diego 000 000 011 — 2 6 1 Cardinals 201 110 01x — 6 9 0 a-flied out for Weaver in the 7th. b-singled for Baumann in the 8th. E: Chacin (1). LOB: San Diego 6, Cardinals 12. 2B: Chacin (2), Wong (24), Pham (16). 3B: Margot (5). HR: Spangenberg (13), off Brebbia. RBIs: Margot (31), Spangenberg (44), Pham (53), Fowler (50), Gyorko 2 (63). SB: Wong 2 (6), Pham (17). SF: Fowler. S: Weaver. RLISP: San Diego 4 (Asuaje, Solarte, Blash 2); Cardinals 6 (Wong 2, DeJong, Piscotty 2, Grichuk). GIDP: Fowler. DP: San Diego 1. San Diego IP H Chacin 4 2/3 6 Baumann 2 1/3 1 Yates 1 2

R ER BB SO NP ERA 5 4 3 3 92 4.10 0 0 1 2 35 1.29 1 1 2 2 22 3.98

Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO Weaver 7 3 0 0 1 10 Oh 0 2 1 1 0 0 Lyons 1 0 0 0 0 2 Brebbia 1 1 1 1 0 0 Oh pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.

NP 99 11 20 17

ERA 2.31 3.86 2.70 2.23

W: Weaver 2-1. L: Chacin 11-9. Inherited runners-scored: Baumann 3-0, Lyons 1-0. HBP: Chacin 4 (DeJong,Molina,Fowler,Garcia), Weaver (Spangenberg), Baumann (Garcia). WP: Chacin. Umpires: Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Will Little; Second, Ryan Blakney; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 2:53. A: 38,762 (43,975).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals first • Wong doubles. Pham doubles, Wong scores. DeJong flies out, Pham to third. Fowler hits a sacrifice fly, Pham scores. Two runs. Cardinals 2, Padres 0. Cardinals third • Wong singles. DeJong hit by a pitch, Wong to second. Molina hit by a pitch, Wong to third, DeJong to second. Gyorko singles, Wong scores. One run. Cardinals 3, Padres 0. Cardinals fourth • Garcia singles. Weaver sacrifice bunts Garcia to second. Wong flies out, Garcia to third. Pham walks. Garcia scores on an error on a pickoff attempt. One run. Cardinals 4, Padres 0. Cardinals fifth • Fowler hit by a pitch. Gyorko walks, Fowler to second. Piscotty grounds into a force out, Fowler to third, Gyorko out at second. Garcia hit by a pitch, Piscotty to second. Fowler scores on a wild pitch. One run. Cardinals 5, Padres 0. Padres eighth • Szczur singles. Margot triples, Szczur scores. One run. Cardinals 5, Padres 1. Cardinals eighth • Wong singles, steals second and third. Pham walks, steals second. Fowler intentionally walked. Gyorko singles, Wong scores. One run. Cardinals 6, Padres 1. Padres ninth • Spangenberg homers. One run. Cardinals 6, Padres 2.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B5

NOTEBOOK

Rosenthal is set for elbow surgery Cards don’t have a closer, will ‘figure it out as we go’ BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

Already scrambling for an answer in the ninth inning, the Cardinals learned Wednesday that Trevor Rosenthal’s elbow surgery and prolonged absence will also leave them searching, even shopping, for a closer to open next season. Rosenthal will have Tommy John surgery next week to repair a partially torn ligament in his right elbow. The standard recovery time for the procedure is between eight and 12 months, and that puts both the Cardinals and Rosenthal in an unusual, but shared, bind this winter. A team that has studiously avoided chasing closers on the open market may have to even as they consider what to do with Rosenthal’s contract, which they could walk away from at season’s end. “It certainly creates a need where we previously had a pretty set answer,” general manager Michael Girsch said. “In the short term, there’s not a ton we can do about it, unfortunately, because of the time of the year. We’re doing our best. In the longer term, it is something we’ll have to add to the things we’re trying to address this offseason.” The Cardinals immediately moved Rosenthal to the 60-day disabled list and used the roster spot to add lefty Ryan Sherriff. One of Class AAA Memphis’ most reliable late-inning relievers, Sherriff was promoted to take Josh Lucas’ spot in the major-league bullpen. Lucas had been optioned out late Tuesday night. The closer role is up for grabs. “Figure it out as we go,” manager Mike Matheny said. Rosenthal, an All-Star and twice a 40-save reliever for the Cardinals, had returned to the closer role this season and had a dominant stretch that coincided with the team’s charge back into the division race. During a recent game, he felt his elbow go slack, and this past week in Boston he had difficulty sparking his arm to life. Rosenthal explained that he’s “not a human radar gun,” but when he saw 91 mph and 92 mph on the stadium board he could sense something deeper was wrong, something sinister. An exam in St. Louis by team physician Dr. George Paletta revealed a tear in the ulnar collateral ligament, and a review of Rosenthal’s

MRI by Dr. Neal ElAttrache confirmed the diagnosis. Both surgeons suggested elbow reconstruction, or Tommy John, as Rosenthal’s best option. The alternative was a platelet injection, eight to 12 weeks of rest, and the medical equivalent of a Powerball ticket. “That wasn’t something that they thought would be a guarantee to prevent something from happening in the future,” said Rosenthal, who had 11 saves and a 2.15 ERA with 76 strikeouts in 47 2/3 innings this season. “So take all the time off and come back out and then end up injuring it again or injuring it more — having surgery at that point, I’d end up missing two seasons instead of just looking at parts of one.” The injury and its lengthy rehab come at a tricky time for Rosenthal and his contract. The Cardinals hold one more year of control on the righthander before he can become a free agent after the 2018 season. He is eligible for arbitration this winter, though using arbitration to set his salary will pay him on past performance and market value, not the fact that he’ll miss months of next season. The Cardinals could approach Rosenthal about an extension that covers his rehab year, assures he’ll pitch for them next season, and gets at least 2019 in exchange for that security. Or, the Cardinals could choose not to tender Rosenthal a contract and allow him to become a free agent, where any team could sign him to a minor-league deal. Either approach has its risks — for both sides. Girsch said there hasn’t been a lot of thought put into the contract, yet. There will be. The Cardinals’ other reliever with closing experience, Seung Hwan Oh, will be a free agent at the end of this season. Oh or lefty Tyler Lyons could see save opportunities in the coming weeks, though the Cardinals are also open to alternatives and could cycle up some of the younger, hotshot relievers from Class AAA.

EXTRA BASES

Matt Carpenter was sent home after arriving at the ballpark ill with what his manager called a virus. The team did not want him to spread whatever he had and shifted to Jedd Gyorko at first base and Kolten Wong at leadoff. … With two hits Tuesday night, his 1,705th and 1,706th, Yadier Molina moved ahead of Ted Simmons for 11th place on the Cardinals’ career list. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Trevor Rosenthal had been pitching well before an elbow injury hampered him.

AVERAGES Batting Wong Pham DeJong J. Martinez Molina Gyorko Fowler Garcia Carpenter Grichuk Piscotty Kelly Team

AVG AB .314 274 .305 341 .294 282 .285 179 .281 405 .271 387 .260 334 .249 181 .245 413 .243 329 .238 256 .143 28 .262 4266

Pitching Tuivailala Brebbia Weaver Lyons Lynn C. Martinez Oh Wacha Leake Cecil Bowman Duke Team

W L 3 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 10 6 10 9 1 5 9 6 7 12 2 4 3 5 0 1 64 62

R H 2B 46 86 24 69 104 16 35 83 17 33 51 8 53 114 21 48 105 19 55 87 18 20 45 6 69 101 28 44 80 23 30 61 14 1 4 1 597 1116 235

3B HR RBI 3 2 36 1 16 53 0 20 48 1 10 28 0 15 56 2 18 63 6 15 50 1 2 14 2 16 60 2 15 46 0 7 32 0 0 5 19 150 568

BB SO SB E 29 47 6 9 50 95 17 1 11 90 0 6 20 42 2 2 20 64 8 7 42 96 6 9 53 76 5 1 30 47 2 5 84 98 2 11 21 106 5 3 40 62 3 2 1 5 0 0 452 1047 62 73

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 2.15 24 0 0 29.1 24 7 7 3 11 23 2.23 33 0 0 36.1 23 10 9 5 5 29 2.31 6 3 0 23.1 17 6 6 2 8 26 2.70 35 0 1 40.0 29 12 12 2 14 48 3.17 26 26 0 150.2 118 61 53 22 58 124 3.57 25 25 0 161.1 136 69 64 22 56 169 3.86 54 0 19 53.2 62 27 23 8 13 52 4.08 23 23 0 125.2 129 62 57 14 41 119 4.16 25 25 0 147.0 163 79 68 16 35 100 4.18 60 0 1 51.2 58 26 24 6 15 48 4.38 62 0 2 49.1 45 27 24 4 15 38 6.75 11 0 0 8.0 5 6 6 2 5 4 4.02 126 126 36 1129.1 1090 553 505 142 382 1031

PAINFUL GAMES Since 1913, only one team has had batters hit by a pitch more than five times in a game. A look: Year Team Opp. Result HBP 1913 NYY WSH W, 9-3 6 STL SD W, 6-2 5 2017 2017 ATL TOR W, 10-6 5 OAK ANA L, 4-6 5 2001 2000 HOU LAD W, 10-3 5 KCR TEX W, 13-2 5 1989 1969 ATL CIN W, 9-4 5 DET KCA W, 5-4 5 1965 1956 CHW CLE W, 6-3 5 Source: baseball-reference.com

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Dexter Fowler scores on a fifth-inning wild pitch as Padres catcher Austin Hedges and pitcher Jhoulys Chacin were both unable to retrieve the ball.

Weaver pitches seven strong innings in win over the Padres CARDINALS • FROM B1

and only the second Cardinals rookie in the past 65 years to have a start with that many scoreless innings and at least 10 strikeouts. Weaver halted the Cardinals’ losing streak at three and gave the bullpen an essential breather. “We needed that,” manager Mike Matheny said. “Just an impressive start.” While most of Wednesday centered on the Cardinals’ pressing need to find a pitcher to finish games, more paramount is a need creeping into the box score. They must get better starts to games. Four of the Cardinals’ past 12 starts had been quality starts, and only once this month have they had back-to-back quality starts. The bullpen learned Wednesday that closer Trevor Rosenthal’s season had ended with Tommy John surgery — a casting call has begun for the ninth inning — but the rotation has been splintering for a week. Weaver (2-1) took Adam Wainwright’s spot in the rotation as the veteran recovers from elbow soreness, and the team is increasingly concerned about Mike Leake’s declining performance.

The Cardinals are open for any pitcher to take the mound and capture a role. “We’ve got a lot of opportunity for somebody to step in and take over the spot,” Matheny said, referring to the ninth, and then broadened his point. “A few spots. Pretty great opportunity for a lot of these young kids, too. We are going to let everybody see what they can do and see who looks the best to fill that spot.” Possible answers for both short- and long-term openings were on display Wednesday. Thrust into the leadoff spot when Matt Carpenter was sent home with a virus, Kolten Wong had three of the Cardinals’ nine hits and stole two bases. He keyed the first inning with a double, and then scored two pitches later on Tommy Pham’s double. Jhoulys Chacin hadn’t thrown his sixth pitch of the game and the Cardinals had a 1-0 lead. That would swell to 2-0 after some heady baserunning from Pham, and by the end of the fifth the Cardinals led 5-0. Chacin (11-9) aided the Cardinals with bruises. He became the first Padres starter to hit four batters, and the Cardinals were hit five times total in the game.

Three of those hit batsmen led to runs. Dexter Fowler was hit by Chacin in the fifth inning, and then ran into the pitcher again at home plate when Chacin had to field his own wild pitch and was stepped on as Fowler touched home. The Cardinals didn’t have a hit in the inning but scored that run. The gift of an early lead fed Weaver’s aggressiveness. The Cardinals have eyed Weaver for a prominent role in this flickering playoff push for several weeks. He was promoted to take a late-inning spot in the bullpen, but Wainwright’s injury necessitated a move back to the rotation. John Mozeliak, the club’s president of baseball operations, said there’s nothing left for Weaver to show at Class AAA. Wainwright lauded the rookie and said he was ready to “carry the torch.” Matheny saw a righthander who had stopped “giving the hitters so much credit” and “trusted his stuff.” That was clear Wednesday. Weaver retired the first eight batters he faced. Of the three hits he allowed, Chacin had two. Weaver dotted the lower part of the strike zone, established his changeup, and then went explor-

ing for the levels and corners he could extend. “I thought he used every area of the strike zone effectively,” Matheny said. “Did a nice job of being able to throw his secondary pitches at any count. That’s what separates any of these young guys who come up here. You can’t guess with them because you never know what they’re going to throw.” Weaver’s comfort with his delivery was apparent, as a few times he paused before going into his windup — a little deke to throw off the hitter’s time without costing him his. The righthander leaned heavily on his fastball and spotted it between 91.5 mph and 96.7 mph. The awareness of his offspeed pitches made the fastball more effective. He had 17 called strikes on the fastball. The sixth inning ended with Wil Myers observing a 94.5mph strike streaking by. In the fourth inning, with the bases loaded, Weaver got Jabari Blash out when he nicked a 96 mph fastball for a foul-tip strikeout. In the seventh, Blash took a called strike fastball at 95 mph, and before he could sit in the dugout his teammate, Austin Hedges, had tried to avoid the

same ending and flailed at an 85 mph changeup. Weaver’s 10th strikeout came on his 99th and final pitch. “I think you could go all day trying to figure (called strike three) out,” said Weaver, the seventh rookie this season with a 10-strikeout game. “One thing that sticks out is how you manage your pitches and what you’re throwing them. Usually when you get a strikeout they’re thinking something else.” Weaver got DeJong’s gloves on in time to ground out in the second inning. He dropped a successful sacrifice bunt in the fourth and took his walk in the fifth. Myers and Carpenter both hit without gloves, but Matheny knows the risks well. He tried hitting without gloves and the pine tar would cause tiny gashes in his hands he closed with Superglue. That’s a bit more problematic for a pitcher when the feel for pitches is essential. Weaver never lacked that. Gloves or not, he had Wednesday what the Cardinals needed for their rotation. A grip. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

BOYS CROSS COUNTRY • SEASON PREVIEW FEATURE

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

Kolten Bauer Alton Marquette golf A junior, Bauer won two tournaments and finished second in another in the first week of the season. In the East Alton-Wood River Invitational at Belk Park, he recorded a birdie on the second hole of overtime to defeat Hillsboro sophomore Alex Eickhoff and grab medalist honors. Eickhoff and Bauer each shot 3-over-par 75s through regulation. Bauer then won the Alton Tee-Off Classic at Spencer T. Olin with an even par-72, finishing one stroke ahead of the runner-up. He capped off his big week by firing a 1-over 73 to tie for second place at the Madison County Tournament at Belk Park. Last season, Bauer tied for 32nd in the Class 2A state tournament. Caleb Camacho Northwest Cedar Hill football A 5-foot-5 senior running back/ inside linebacker, Camacho helped the Lions come back from a 32-14 halftime deficit to beat Francis Howell North 43-38. Camacho carried the ball 38 times for 346 yards and four second-half touchdowns on runs of 25, 1, 2 and 19 yards. His 19-yard TD run came with just 50 seconds to play in the fourth quarter and proved to be the game-winner. A third-year starter, Camacho has been an all-Suburban West Conference selection the past two seasons. Last season, he rushed for a team-high 1,274 yards and 14 TDs. He also wrestles and plays baseball. Tionne Harris Vianney football A 5-foot-9, 190-pound senior quarterback, Harris piled up 369 total yards of offense to rally the Griffins from a 14-0 first-quarter deficit to a 42-28 seasonopening victory over visiting Pattonville. Harris completed 15 of 28 passes for 248 yards with touchdown strikes of 50, 15, 33 and 52 yards and carried the ball 18 times for 121 yards. He snapped a 28-28 tie with a pair of fourth-quarter TD passes. A four-year starter and three-time all-Metro Catholic Conference selection, Harris passed for 2,549 yards and 19 TDs and ran for 1,502 and 13 TDs last season. He also plays basketball and has committed to West Point for football. Allison Kaiser Notre Dame softball A freshman shortstop, Kaiser was a big hit in her high school debut, helping the Rebels win all three of their games in the Notre Dame Preseason Tournament to capture the championship. In the first at-bat of her high school career, Kaiser hit a two-run home run against DuBourg. In the same game, she had two more hits, including a two-run double, to lift the Rebels to an 11-1 win. Kaiser followed by hitting a three-run home run in a 13-8 victory over St. Pius X and contributed an RBI single to an 11-6 win over Westminster. A versatile performer who can play any position on the field, Kaiser plays summer ball for the St. Louis Chaos. Andrew Klump Summit football In his first varsity game, Klump, a 6-foot-1, 180-pound sophomore quarterback, completed 9 of 17 passes for 316 yards and three touchdowns to lift the Falcons to a 25-21 win over Marquette. After splitting playing time in the first half, Klump got hot in the second half, passing for 260 yards and all three of his TDs on big plays (36, 93 and 55 yards) in the final two quarters as the Falcons erased a 21-6 halftime deficit. Klump played primarily on the freshman team last season before moving up to start for the junior varsity late in the campaign. He was the starting shortstop on Summit’s junior varsity baseball team last spring. Justin Pawlowski Francis Howell Central football In his first varsity start, Pawlowski, a 6-foot, 170-pound senior quarterback, used his arm and his legs to help the Spartans to 70-52 win over Fort Zumwalt East for their first season-opening win since 2011. He completed 8 of 15 passes for 184 yards with two second-quarter touchdown tosses of 8 and 59 yards to Jacob Schroeder and rushed 10 times for 156 yards. Pawlowski also caught a pass for a 2-point conversion from Dylan Thaxton in the third quarter. Pawlowski, who threw just one pass during his junior season, also plays tennis. Kamryn Sloan Seckman softball A senior catcher, Sloan led the Jaguars to the championship of the Union Tournament. In a 16-1 victory over Affton, Sloan was 2-for-3 with two home runs and four RBI. She was 2-for-3 with two more home runs and three RBI in a 7-1 win over Farmington and capped off the tournament by drawing three walks in a 14-1 championship-game victory over Pacific. Sloan caught every inning of the Jaguars’ games in the tournament and threw out a runner trying to steal second base. A returning all-Suburban West Conference and all-district honoree, Sloan batted .356 with 29 RBI last season and has committed to Missouri S&T. Compiled by Paul Kopsky. Please Send nominations to pkopsky@stltoday.com

BOYS RUNNERS TO WATCH Max McDaniel, junior, Festus Lone returning runner from last season’s Tigers lineup that won the program’s third consecutive Class 3 state team championship.

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

Charlie Parrish finished 13th individually last season in the Illinois 1A boys cross country state meet and helped Freeburg to a second-place team finish.

BIG GOAL

Parrish strives to lead Freeburg to state team championship BY PAUL HALFACRE STLhighschoolsports.com

FREEBURG • Freeburg High senior cross country runner Charlie Parrish didn’t hesitate. He hardly ever does. For a sport that prides itself on sustained, long-distance speed, Parrish used a sprinter’s touch when he responded to the question. “I fully plan on breaking 15 minutes in my first meet of the year at Granite City,” Parrish said. Just like that, Parrish is ready to tear down a barrier. He just missed breaking down that wall last season when he turned in his personal best time of 15 minutes, 3 seconds. After Parrish’s offseason of intense training, Freeburg coach Carl Florczyk is all but certain his lead runner will break the 15-minute barrier on the 3-mile courses in Illinois cross country. “He’s in great shape,” Florczyk said. “I’ve seen his training very closely last fall and this summer and I feel he’s in better shape than he was last year. He’s hungry, motivated and I think it’ll be a special season for him.” The 15-minute mark was broken by 65 of the 629 runners in all three classes at the Illinois cross country state championships last season. The fastest time came from Minooka

High’s Soren Knudsen, who turned in a blistering 14:02 in winning Class 3A race. Last season, Parrish finished 13th overall in Class 1A with a time of 15:24 and helped lead his team to a second-place finish. Freeburg returns four of last year’s top seven runners, including Parrish; Corbin Schwable, who finished 63rd at state; Blake Hatter (94th); and Carson Smith (123th). Even though the Midgets grabbed the first boys cross country state team trophy in school history, Parrish says the runner-up performance still stings a little. “That was the worst memory of last year,” Parrish said. “In all honesty, I know my coach will tell you differently, but to me and a few of my teammates, that was an extreme disappointment. We were nine points away, and a few of us didn’t have our best race.” Florczyk tried to put a positive spin on the second-place effort. “Just to get a state trophy on that stage, I’m so proud of the boys who made such a great accomplishment,” Florczyk said. “At first there was that initial disappointment because we were so close, but I think over time, they’ve come to realize that it was such a great accomplishment.”

GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY • SEASON PREVIEW FEATURE

Holt’s Griesenauer begins quest to earn her fourth state medal BY CHRIS GOVE STLhighschoolsports.com

WENTZVILLE • Emily Griesenauer might help save the world. But she wouldn’t necessarily tell you about it. “She’s probably the most humble person you’re ever going to meet,” said Craig Kinnary, who coaches Griesenauer with both the Holt High School girls cross country and track and field programs. Griesenauer said she is leaning toward pursuing a degree in environmental engineering. Her interest in the field was sparked last year by an Advanced Placement environmental science class, which according to the Holt course planning guide helps “to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made … and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.” Over the summer, Griesenauer delved further into environmental engineering by

attending a camp at Missouri S&T in Rolla. There was one catch. “I kind of asked would I have an opportunity to have time to run,” Griesenauer said. “They said they could do that. It was nice of them.” Her senior cross country season was fast approaching, after all. Griesenauer has earned individual state medals all three seasons of her career. Last season, she crossed the Oak Hills Golf Center course finish line in a time of 19 minutes and 9.5 seconds that was her best in a 5-kilometer race. It was good for a personal-best showing of 14th place out of 170 competitors in the Class 4 state meet. That followed a 24th-place state finish as a freshman in 2014 and an 18th-place showing as a sophomore. The top 25 finishers at the state cross country meet in Missouri earn medals. “It would be wonderful to get medals all four years of her career,” Kinnary said. “That’s a

short list of people.” The best part of the accomplishments for Griesenauer is that she hasn’t done them as a solo act. Each of her three seasons, Holt also has qualified for the Class 4 state meet as a team. One of her teammates each season has been twin sister Nicole Griesenauer. “I’m proud my team has been to state all three years I’ve been here with my sister,” Emily Griesenauer said. “It’s good to have a good team coming back every year. Even when, like the older kids leave, you still have the new kids coming in. It’s fun to be on a team like that.” Griesenauer’s 19:09.50 from last season’s state meet is the school’s second-fastest 5-kilometer time ever, only behind a 18:33 by Chandler Carreon in 2013. It also is the 10th-fastest returning time from last season’s Class 4 state meet, putting Griesenauer right among the elite as her final high school season dawns.

GIRLS RUNNERS TO WATCH Mikayla Reed, senior, Washington Last season’s Class 4 individual cross country state champion by a whopping 25 seconds with a time of 18:02.26 that was 12th-fastest ever in state meet history.

Jenna Schwartz, junior, Waterloo Sixth in the Illinois Class 2A state meet, which was the highest area finish in either the girls or boys meets. Also was a conference, regional and sectional champion.

Abigail Juedemann, junior, Lindbergh Finished 19th in Class 4 state meet with time of 19:15.07 that was eighthbest among area runners in any classification on the state course.

Brooke Witzel, senior, O’Fallon Posted personal-best time of 17:28 on the 3-mile course to finish 33rd last season in the Illinois Class 3A meet, which was by far the area’s best showing at state.

Gabi Kohring, senior, Webster Groves Won district and sectional titles before slipping to 28th at state meet. Also was runner-up in top division of Forest Park Invitational.

MORE COVERAGE ONLINE Please visit STLhighschoolsports.com for results from Wednesday’s area events.

ssmhealth.com/urgent ©2017 SSM Health. All rights reserved. CC-STL-17-320648 8/17

Andrew O’Keefe, junior, Granite City 69th in the Illinois 3A state meet last season, which was second-best finish of an area runner in that division, with a personal-best time of 15:12 on the 3-mile course. Nassim Oufattole, senior, Lafayette His best time of the season was 15:50.30 at the Chile Pepper in Fayetteville, Ark., helping Lancers to the team championship in the prestigious event. Blake Selm, senior, Parkway West Helped Longhorns to fifth-place team finish in Class 4 state meet last season by finishing 26th individually with a time of 16:15.28. Nick Warmann, senior, Marquette Area’s top returning finisher from last season’s Class 4 state meet. Warmann was 19th in Jefferson City with a personal-best time of 16:07.18.

THURSDAY’S SCHEDULE FIELD HOCKEY Parkway South at MICDS, 4 p.m. University City at Lindbergh, 4:15 p.m. Villa Duchesne at Ladue, 4:15 p.m. Oakville vs. Clayton, at Gay Field, 4:15 p.m. Alton Marquette at Parkway West, 4:15 p.m. Pattonville at Eureka, 5:30 p.m. BOYS SOCCER St. Pius X vs. Crossroads, at DuBourg, 4 p.m. Wood River at Breese Central, 4:15 p.m. Brentwood at O’Fallon Christian, 4:30 p.m. Lebanon at Father McGivney, 4:30 p.m. Staunton vs. Roxana at Wood River, 4:30 p.m. St. Clair at Sullivan, 5 p.m. North Mac at Piasa Southwestern, 5 p.m. Poplar Bluff at Union, 5 p.m. Mo. Military vs. Park. North at FZ South, 5 p.m. ME Luth. vs. Mt Vernon, at Belle-Clair, 5:30 p.m. Valmeyer vs. Wesclin at Belle-Clair, 5:30 p.m. Soldan vs. Metro, at Sumner, 5:30 p.m. FH Central at Timberland, 6 p.m. Springfield, IL at Columbia, 6 p.m. St. Charles West at Liberty, 6 p.m. Maplewood-RH at DuBourg, 6 p.m. Granite City at Edwardsville, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Borgia, 6:45 p.m. Webster Groves at Mehlville, 7 p.m. Vianney at Collinsville, 7 p.m. CBC at Lindbergh, 7 p.m. Haz. West at Fort Zumwalt South, 7 p.m. Freeburg vs. Mater Dei at Belle-Clair, 7:30 p.m. Civic Mem vs. Mascoutah at Belle-Clair, 7:30 p.m. Althoff vs. Gibault, at Columbia, 8 p.m. SOFTBALL Affton at Notre Dame, 4 p.m. Incarnate Word at St. Dominic, 4 p.m. Riverview Gardens at Jennings, 4 p.m. Lutheran North vs. Metro at JECCF, 4 p.m. Kirkwood vs. De Soto at Kirkwood AA, 4 p.m. Parkway Central vs. Parkway South, at Kirkwood AA, 4 p.m. Kirkwood vs. De Soto at Kirkwood AA, 4 p.m. Lutheran South at St. Joseph’s, 4:15 p.m. Orchard Farm at O’Fallon Christian, 4:15 p.m. Duchesne at St. Charles West, 4:15 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North at Liberty, 4:15 p.m. FH Central at Francis Howell, 4:15 p.m. Clayton at McCluer S-Berkeley, 4:15 p.m. Union at Warrenton, 4:30 p.m. Potosi at Farmington, 4:30 p.m. Borgia at St. Clair, 4:30 p.m. Chaffee at Jefferson, 4:30 p.m. Hillsboro at Troy, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Fort Zumwalt East, 4:30 p.m. Helias at Rolla, 4:30 p.m. Herculaneum at Windsor, 4:30 p.m. Van-Far at North Callaway, 5 p.m. Nerinx Hall vs. Webster Groves, Park. West vs. FZ West at Kirkwood AA, 6 p.m. FH North vs. Marquette at Kirkwood AA, 8 p.m. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Ste. Genevieve at Fox, 5:30 a.m. Fort Zumwalt South at Liberty, 4 p.m. Nerinx Hall at Villa Duchesne, 4:15 p.m. Vashon at Miller Career, 4:15 p.m. McKinley at Carnahan, 4:15 p.m. Bayless vs. Maplewood at Hancock, 4:30 p.m. FH Central at Timberland, 5 p.m. Civic Memorial at Wood River, 5 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West at FH North, 5 p.m. St. Charles West at Winfield, 5 p.m. Brentwood at Whitfield, 5 p.m. Father McGivney at McCluer North, 5:15 p.m. MS-Berkeley at Cardinal Ritter, 5:15 p.m. Ritenour at Clayton, 5:30 p.m. Althoff at Columbia, 5:30 p.m. O’Fallon at Waterloo, 5:30 p.m. Lindbergh at Cor Jesu, 5:30 p.m. Seckman at Pacific, 5:30 p.m. Troy at Francis Howell, 6 p.m. Borgia at Duchesne, 6 p.m. DuBourg at Trinity, 6 p.m. Washington at Fort Zumwalt East, 6 p.m. Mater Dei at Mascoutah, 6 p.m. Wright City at Bowling Green, 6 p.m. Crystal City at Bismarck High, 6 p.m. Marissa at Red Bud, 6:15 p.m. Greenville at Lebanon, 6:15 p.m. Mount Olive at Spr. Lutheran, 6:15 p.m. Dupo at Christ Our Savior, 6:15 p.m. Lutheran North at Notre Dame, 6:30 p.m. Windsor at St. Vincent, 6:30 p.m. Jefferson City at Hermann, 7 p.m. Okawville at Nashville, 7 p.m. Northwest-CH at Hillsboro, 7 p.m. Collinsville at Centralia (Ill.), 7:15 p.m. Belleville East at Freeburg, 7:30 p.m. De Soto at North County, 7:30 p.m. Carlyle at Altamont, 7:30 p.m. Gibault at Wesclin, 7:30 p.m.


SPORTS

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

As if Thomas needed it, trade will be motivator ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON • Isaiah Thomas’ basketball journey is littered with decision-makers who have underestimated the diminutive guard. He was selected last in the 2011 NBA draft coming out of Washington, and when he arrived in Boston he looked only to be a role player for the storied franchise. Thomas has had to prove his worth with every stop. Now, following the biggest slight of his NBA career, he’ll have to do it again. All eyes will be watching how he rebounds after Tuesday’s blockbuster trade. The Celtics sent the two-time AllStar packing from a franchise and city that he’d embraced with every ounce of his 5-foot-9 frame. He’s now bound for Cleveland in exchange for a bigger star — and what the Celtics believe is a better point guard for them — in Kyrie Irving. For all the praise Boston president of basketball operations Danny Ainge showered on Thomas in explaining what he’s meant to the Celtics, the organization took Irving — a four-time All-Star — over the scrappy underdog who’s just beginning to build his résumé. It’s the ultimate reminder of how fickle the business of the NBA can be. “I’ll leave it to your own imaginations to realize how difficult that conversation might have been for me and Isaiah,” Ainge said of informing Thomas of the trade. “You do pay a heavy price for a player of that age and that caliber,” Ainge said of acquiring Irving. Many have paid a hefty price for undervaluing Thomas, and Ainge may not be done paying yet. Thomas always plays with a chip on his shoulder and he was not only traded for a player who plays the same position, in the same conference, but he was dealt to the team Ainge and the Celtics are trying to beat. Now he will be playing alongside arguably the best player in the world in LeBron James, and both will be motivated to deny Boston a shot at the title — once again. It was just three months ago that Thomas was trudging into the most melancholy offseason of his six-year career. The 28-year-old was battered after leading Boston to the top seed in the Eastern Conference, only to have a hip injury leave him sidelined for the majority of the conference finals in an unsuccessful bid to unseat James and the Cavaliers. But that journey also was overshadowed by the sudden death of his younger sister on the eve of the playoffs and losing a tooth during Boston’s secondround series with Washington. It was the Celtics and Ainge that stood behind their star at every turn. Ainge twice arranged private flights for Thomas to mourn with his family, and even accompanied him to Chyna Thomas’ funeral. Boston’s fans were equally supportive, wrapping support around a player that

The native of Paris, Ill., is the only driver in the series who also owns a team. In recent years he has reduced his racing activity to ovals, and Gateway became the sixth oval in IndyCar and the last one on the schedule for 2017. Carpenter has tested there three times in the past year and this week made the trek to Busch Stadium to throw out the first pitch Tuesday night. On Saturday he will complete his fourth season racing on only ovals while JR Hildebrand will drive the other car for Ed Carpenter Racing. The decision has helped Carpenter balance the duties of being an owner and driver, but it doesn’t mean he never thinks about returning to the road and street courses that dominate the series. “It was something that was situational,” he said. “The team is a business that I’m trying to build and grow. At the time I made the decision we were running one car. Some guys are still disappointed I made that decision, but I want to see the team be successful.” Carpenter has been driving in the series since 2003 and was with five teams in his first nine years. Generally speaking, his best performances always have come on ovals. Until this year, all that remained were Iowa, Phoenix, Texas, Pocono and Indianapolis. His last win was at Texas in 2014 and his previous career wins came on ovals at Fontana and Kentucky. So, Gateway was a blessing, although he has never raced on the track in the IndyCar series. Hildebrand is now the team’s No. 1 driver, and Spencer Pigot competes on the road and street courses. Hildebrand replaced Josef Newgarden, who was fourth in the standings in 2016 before leaving to join Team Penske. The potential for losing talented young drivers is one of the frustrations of building the team. “We’re still maturing and growing,” Carpenter said. “I’m proud of how far we’ve come. I don’t have as big a platform as Penske, Ganassi or Andretti. Sometimes they can offer things I can’t compete with. We did work hard to make Josef an offer he couldn’t refuse. I under-

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Yankees...................-$118 .................... TIGERS RAYS........................-$120 .................Blue Jays Red Sox ...................-$168 .................. INDIANS Twins.......................-$170 ..............WHITE SOX ANGELS ...................-$127 ...................Rangers National League D’backs....................-$145 ....................... METS Marlins....................-$128 ................. PHILLIES Dodgers...................-$165 .................. PIRATES Cubs ........................-$170 ....................... REDS CARDS .................... -$220.....................Padres Interleague ROYALS ...................-$120 ....................Rockies ASTROS .................. -$140................ Nationals NFL Preseason Favorite Open/current Underdog EAGLES..................3.5...3.5 ................Dolphins Panthers ...............PK... 1.5 ...............JAGUARS Friday Patriots .................PK...2.5 .................... LIONS SEAHAWKS............3.5...3.5 .................... Chiefs Saturday GIANTS ................... 5..... 5..........................Jets RAVENS.................3.5...3.5 ....................... Bills FALCONS ...............3.5...3.5 .....................Cards BUCS.......................3..... 3....................Browns STEELERS............... 5..... 6........................ Colts SAINTS ..................1.5.... 3.....................Texans COWBOYS...............3..... 3....................Raiders RAMS.....................2.5...2.5 ............... Chargers BRONCOS ...............3..... 3................... Packers Sunday TITANS....................3..... 3.......................Bears WASHINGTON.........3..... 3................... Bengals VIKINGS................ 4.5 ..4.5.....................49ers

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston Celtics guard Isaiah Thomas drives to the basket during the playoffs.

had not only performed on the court, but was an active presence in the community. It was those types of overtures and expressions that made Thomas optimistic about a future with a storied franchise and in a city that has always rallied behind its stars. Yes, Thomas knew it was possible he might not stay in Boston, but he expected to be here. “Boston has changed my career and changed my life,” Thomas said in May. “I would love to be here long-term and win championships here. But as you guys know, it’s a business and anything can happen. I know that. So I understand, but I would love to be here. This has been everything to me. This city, this organization ... it’s been good.” And just like that, everything has changed. In today’s NBA, stars of Thomas’ caliber usually switch teams in the prime of their careers on their own volition. But he found himself at the center of a deal involving a bigger, more valued star. It reminds longtime NBA executive Pat Williams of when as general manager of the Atlanta Hawks he dealt All-Star “Pistol” Pete Maravich to the New Orleans Jazz. “Pete was shocked but, it turned out to be a good deal for him,” Williams said. “He had his best years in New Orleans.” Maravich continued to be a fan-favorite in Atlanta, and Thomas will never be a villain in Boston. But the Celtics may not be happy when Thomas comes back to town. Thomas is heading to a team that has recently broken the hearts of Celtics fans and will be favored to do it again . Add to the mix that in Thomas, James gets probably the only player on the planet that will be as motivated as him to stave off a rebuilt Celtics roster led by his former sidekick.

Carpenter is happy IndyCar has come back to Gateway INDY • FROM B1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B7

stood him moving on. Now we have two young Americans in JR and Spencer who are both talented and can have a future with us.” Hildebrand is 15th in the standings as he drives full time for the first time since 2012, when he had his best overall finish of 11th with Panther Racing. Asked recently about next year — his contract expires after 2017 — he told the Indianapolis Star, “I’m not concerned with what’s going on next year at all. Once the checkered flag drops at (the season finale in) Sonoma, then we’ll slowly migrate into thinking about next year.” Carpenter’s team has done especially well on shorter ovals this season. The team owner was seventh at Phoenix and Hildebrand was third and followed with a second place at Iowa. Carpenter’s only competitive experience at Gateway came when he finished in the top five of Indy Lights races at the track in 2002 and ’03. He also ran on the track in USAC Silver Crown events. Having lived in Indianapolis since he was 8, Carpenter’s highlight every year is the Indy 500. He won the pole for the race in 2013 and ’14. However, his best finishes at the Brickyard were a fifth in 2008 and eighth in 2009 when he was driving for Vision Racing. Those were also among his best years in the final standings. He wonders about how he might fare these days if he were driving road courses and not having such long gaps out of the car. One benefit of his schedule this week is that the series if coming off a race at Pocono last weekend, where Carpenter finished 12th. “There are times I think I’d benefit from being in the car more,” he said. “Coming off Pocono, I’m coming in fresh. There have been times I would go a couple of months without being in the car. I would never say never (to returning to road races). I wasn’t always the fastest but felt I was able to do a fairly good job. I wouldn’t be opposed if the right situation was there.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Open/current Underdog Saturday COLORADO ST.......3.5.... 4................Oregon St UMASS ................... 1 .... 1.5 ...................Hawaii S Florida................20....22.......... SAN JOSE ST s-Stanford ........... 30.5 30.5...................... Rice August 31 Ohio St ................ 20.5 20.5...............INDIANA MINNESOTA..........26.5 26.5 ................. Buffalo MEMPHIS .............. 27....27.............UL-Monroe ARIZONA ST ..........24... 24.......New Mexico St C FLORIDA............17.5. 17.5...........Florida Int’l OKLAHOMA ST...... 17 ....17.......................Tulsa September 1 E MICHIGAN .........13.5. 13.5 ..............Charlotte Washington......... 30.5 30.5..............RUTGERS Navy .....................12.5. 12.5 ......FLA ATLANTIC WISCONSIN ..........28.5 28.5 .................Utah St Boston Coll.............3..... 3............NO ILLINOIS d-Colorado ............NL... NL ...........Colorado St September 2 MICHIGAN ST .......18.5. 18.5 .....Bowling Green IOWA.....................12.5. 12.5 ..............Wyoming MARSHALL............PK... PK ...........Miami-Ohio CLEMSON .............38.5 38.5 ................. Kent St COASTAL CARO .....NL... NL ................... UMass PENN ST ................33... 33..................... Akron i-Louisville............25.5.25.5 ................. Purdue NEBRASKA...........16.5.16.5 ..........Arkansas St NORTHWESTERN .24.5 24.5 .................Nevada ILLINOIS .................8..... 8......................Ball St OKLAHOMA......... 44.5 44.5..................... Utep N CAROLINA.......... 12 ....12............... California MISSISSIPPI .........24.5 24.5 ........... S Alabama USC.......................27.5. 27.5 ..........W Michigan h-Lsu ..................... 13 ....13.........................Byu TEXAS.................... 17 ....17............... Maryland NOTRE DAME .......15.5. 15.5 ................. Temple AUBURN................ 35... 35...........Ga Southern GEORGIA ............... 14 ....14...........App’chian St Kentucky ..............10.5.10.5 ................SO MISS Houston ...............13.5. 13.5 .................... UTSA c-NC State .............5.5...5.5 ............. S Carolina a-Michigan .............3..... 3.....................Florida Vanderbilt.............5.5...5.5 .........MID TENN ST at-Alabama ............ 7..... 7................ Florida St BOISE ST...............12.5. 12.5 ......................Troy September 3 l-Va Tech............... 4.5 ..4.5............. W Virginia UCLA......................3.5...3.5 ............ Texas A&M September 4 at-Tennessee.........3.5...3.5 ................. Ga Tech Note: Hawaii opened as a favorite. s- Sydney, Australia. d- Denver, CO. i- Indianapolis, IN. h- Houston, TX. c- Charlotte, NC. a- Arlington, TX. l- Landover, MD. at- Atlanta, GA. CFL Favorite Open/current Underdog Winnipeg...............1.5.....1............. MONTREAL Friday EDMONTON.......... 6.5 ... 6........ Saskatchewan Saturday OTTAWA.................. 2......1............Br Columbia CALGARY............... 10... 10.................. Toronto BOXING Floyd Mayweather Jr.............................. -$500 vs. Conor McGregor............................... +$400 Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 Miami 1 1 0 New England 0 2 0 Buffalo 0 2 0 South W L T Jacksonville 1 1 0 Houston 1 1 0 Tennessee 1 1 0 Indianapolis 0 2 0 North W L T Baltimore 2 0 0 Pittsburgh 2 0 0 Cleveland 2 0 0 Cincinnati 1 1 0 West W L T Denver 2 0 0 Kansas City 1 1 0 Oakland 0 2 0 L.A. Chargers 0 2 0

Pct .500 .500 .000 .000 Pct .500 .500 .500 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .500 Pct 1.000 .500 .000 .000

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Dallas 2 1 0 .667 Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 N.Y. Giants 0 2 0 .000 Washington 0 2 0 .000 South W L T Pct Carolina 1 1 0 .500 New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 North W L T Pct Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 Detroit 2 0 0 1.000 Chicago 1 1 0 .500 Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 West W L T Pct Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 L.A. Rams 2 0 0 1.000 San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 Arizona 1 2 0 .333 Thursday Miami at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Carolina at Jacksonville, 6:30 p.m. Friday New England at Detroit, 6 p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 7 p.m. Saturday Buffalo at Baltimore, 6 p.m. Arizona at Atlanta, 6 p.m. N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m. L.A. Chargers at L.A. Rams, 7 p.m. Oakland at Dallas, 7 p.m. Green Bay at Denver, 8 p.m. Sunday Chicago at Tennessee, Noon Cincinnati at Washington, 3:30 p.m. San Francisco at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS

PF 13 30 47 26 PF 39 44 37 29 PF 54 37 30 35 PF 57 47 31 24

PA 19 51 58 37 PA 36 50 34 48 PA 10 25 20 42 PA 31 39 44 61

PF 54 29 18 20 PF 54 27 24 33 PF 45 40 41 30 PF 68 37 41 61

PA 50 40 30 44 PA 51 27 31 40 PA 26 16 47 30 PA 30 31 50 54

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE — Optioned RHP Alec Asher to Norfolk (IL). Assigned LHP Vidal Nuno outright to Norfolk. Reinstated RHP Miguel Castro from the bereavement list. BOSTON — Placed OF Jackie Bradley Jr. on the 10-day DL. Recalled INF Deven Marrero from Pawtucket (IL). Acquired OF Rajai Davis from Oakland for OF Rafael Rincones. CLEVELAND — Placed 2B Jason Kipnis, RHP Danny Salazar and LHP Andrew Miller on the 10-day DL, Salazar retroactive to Monday. Recalled INF Erik Gonzalez, 3B Yandy Diaz and RHP Shawn Armstrong from Columbus (IL). CHICAGO — Sent 3B Matt Davidson to Charlotte (IL) for a rehab assignment. KANSAS CITY — Optioned OF Paulo Orlando to Omaha (PCL). Recalled RHP Miguel Almonte from Omaha. MINNESOTA — Designated RHP Tim Melville for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP John Curtiss from Rochester (IL). OAKLAND — Optioned RHP Michael Brady to Nashville (PCL). Recalled RHP Daniel Gossett from Nashville. Sent OF Jake Smolinski to Nashville for a rehab assignment. SEATTLE — Designated OF Leonys Martin for assignment. Reinstated RHP David Phelps from the 10-day DL. TEXAS — Acquired OF Pedro Gonzalez from Colorado to complete the Jonathan Lucroy trade on July 30 and assigned Gonzalez to Grand Junction (Pioneer). TORONTO — Placed RHP Nick Tepesch on paternity leave. Recalled LHP Tim Mayza from Buffalo (IL). National League CINCINNATI — Designated RHP Blake Wood for assignment. Optioned OF Phillip Ervin to Louisville (IL). Recalled RHP Luke Farrell from Louisville. Selected the contract of RHP Alejandro Chacin from Louisville. Sent RHP Nefi Ogando to Pensacola (SL) for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES — Assigned RHP Dylan Floro outright to Oklahoma City (PCL). MIAMI — Optioned RHP Severino Gonzalez to New Orleans (PCL). Assigned RHP Javy Guerra outright to New Orleans.

NEW YORK — Placed LHP Steven Matz on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Kevin McGowan from Las Vegas (PCL). PHILADELPHIA — Optioned OF Cameron Perkins to Lehigh Valley (IL). Recalled RHP Drew Anderson from Lehigh Valley. PITTSBURGH — Optioned RHP Edgar Santana to Indianapolis (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Angel Sanchez from Indianapolis. CARDINALS — Optioned RHP Josh Lucas to Memphis (PCL). Selected the contract of LHP Ryan Sherriff from Memphis. Transferred RHP Trevor Rosenthal to the 60-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO — Sent RHP Johnny Cueto and 2B Joe Panik to Sacramento (PCL) for rehab assignments. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association SAN ANTONIO — Signed G London Perrantes. NBA G League SALT LAKE CITY — Named Martin Schiller coach. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO — Re-signed OL Charles Leno Jr. to a four-year contract extension. CLEVELAND — Placed LB Tank Carder and OL Matt McCants on injured reserve. Waived/injured DB Justin Currie. Signed DB Christian Bryant. DETROIT — Waived TE Andrew Price. Claimed DT Caushaud Lons off waivers from the L.A. Rams. HOUSTON — Waived/injured WR Devin Street. Removed DE Joel Heath from the nonfootball injury list. Signed LB Mike Catapano. INDIANAPOLIS — Waived/injured CB Tevin Mitchel. Signed LB Darnell Sankey. Removed OL Brian Schwenke from the PUP list. NY GIANTS — Waived OL Michael Bowie and Corin Brooks. Waived/ injured WRs Darius Powe and Andrew Turzilli. Placed CB Valentino Blake on the exempt/left squad list. NY JETS — Released WR Marquess Wilson. Signed TE Brandon Barnes and RB Jahad Thomas. OAKLAND — Reinstated T Donald Penn to the active roster. Waived DE Jimmy Bean. SAN FRANCISCO — Signed DL Sen’Derrick Marks to a one-year contract. Removed DB Jimmie Ward from the PUP list. WASHINGTON — Traded CB Dashaun Phillips to Pittsburgh for C Lucas Crowley. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW JERSEY — Signed RW Jimmy Hayes to a professional tryout agreement. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Fined Portland M Sebastian Blanco an undisclosed amount for hands to the face, head or neck of an opponent and N.Y. Red Bulls M Felipe an undisclosed amount for simulation/embellishment. National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON — Claimed M Morgan Proffitt off waivers from Chicago. COLLEGE AUBURN — Announced the retirement of Clint Myers, softball coach. DELAWARE — Named Heather Wiley volunteer assistant field hockey coach. DETROIT — Named Madison Ristovski assistant women’s basketball coach. LEES-MCRAE — Named Dustin Barrow assistant men’s lacrosse coach. OKLAHOMA — Suspended sophomore F Kristian Doolittle from the university for the fall semester for failing to meet academic standards. STANFORD — Named Tabitha Yim women’s gymnastics coach.

SOCCER

Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA 15 3 8 53 52 25 Toronto FC New York City FC 14 7 4 46 47 34 Chicago 12 8 5 41 46 34 12 12 3 39 40 41 Columbus New York 12 10 2 38 37 32 10 8 6 36 41 38 Montreal Atlanta United FC 10 8 5 35 42 30 Orlando City 8 10 7 31 26 37 8 12 6 30 34 36 Philadelphia New England 8 11 5 29 39 40 D.C. United 7 15 4 25 21 44 W L T Pts GF GA WESTERN Sporting K.C. 10 5 10 40 31 19 11 7 7 40 39 32 Seattle Houston 10 8 8 38 46 37 Portland 10 9 7 37 45 43 9 6 9 36 36 31 FC Dallas Vancouver 10 9 4 34 34 33 9 10 6 33 28 40 San Jose Real Salt Lake 8 13 5 29 32 47 Los Angeles 6 13 5 23 32 44 Minnesota United 6 14 4 22 30 51 Colorado 6 13 4 22 22 32 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday Columbus 2, Los Angeles 0 D.C. United 1, Atlanta United FC 0 Houston 3, FC Dallas 3, tie Toronto FC 3, Philadelphia 0 San Jose at Real Salt Lake, late Seattle at Vancouver, late Colorado at Portland, late Friday New York City FC at New York, 6 p.m. Saturday Atlanta United FC at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. New England at D.C. United, 6 p.m. FC Dallas at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Vancouver at Orlando City, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Houston, 8 p.m. Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Sunday Toronto FC at Montreal, 3:30 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Portland at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Pts 2 2 0 0 8 0 6 Man. United Huddersfield 2 2 0 0 4 0 6 2 2 0 0 2 0 6 West Brom. Watford 2 1 1 0 5 3 4 Man. City 2 1 1 0 3 1 4 2 1 1 0 4 3 4 Liverpool Southampton 2 1 1 0 3 2 4 2 1 1 0 2 1 4 Everton Leicester 2 1 0 1 5 4 3 Tottenham 2 1 0 1 3 2 3 2 1 0 1 4 4 3 Arsenal Chelsea 2 1 0 1 4 4 3 Burnley 2 1 0 1 3 3 3 2 1 0 1 1 1 3 Stoke Swansea 2 0 1 1 0 4 1 Bournemouth 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 Newcastle 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 Brighton 2 0 0 2 0 4 0 Crystal Palace 2 0 0 2 0 4 0 West Ham 2 0 0 2 2 7 0 Saturday Bournemouth vs. Manchester City, 6:30 a.m. Watford vs. Brighton, 9 a.m. Newcastle vs. West Ham, 9 a.m. Huddersfield vs. Southampton, 9 a.m. Crystal Palace vs. Swansea, 9 a.m. Manchester United vs. Leicester, 11:30 a.m. Sunday West Bromwich Albion vs. Stoke, 7:30 a.m. Chelsea vs. Everton, 7:30 a.m. Tottenham vs. Burnley, 10 a.m. Liverpool vs. Arsenal, 10 a.m.

World Cup Qualifying NORTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN FINAL ROUND Top three teams qualify Fourth-place team advances to playoff against Asia fifth-place team GP W D L GF GA Pts Mexico 6 4 2 0 9 2 14 6 3 2 1 9 4 11 Costa Rica United States 6 2 2 2 11 8 8 Panama 6 1 4 1 4 4 7 Honduras 6 1 2 3 6 14 5 Trinidad 6 1 0 5 3 10 3 Friday, Sept. 1 At Harrison, N.J. United States vs. Costa Rica, 5:55 p.m. At Couva, Trinidad Trinidad and Tobago vs. Honduras, 7 p.m. At Mexico City Mexico vs. Panama, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 5 At San Pedro Sula, Honduras Honduras vs. United States, 4:36 p.m. At Panama City Panama vs. Trinidad and Tobago, 8:30 p.m. At San Jose, Costa Rica Costa Rica vs. Mexico, 9:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL • WNBA EASTERN W L Pct x-Connecticut 20 10 .667 x-New York 18 12 .600 x-Washington .586 17 12 Chicago 11 18 .379 Atlanta 20 11 .355 Indiana 9 22 .290 WESTERN W L Pct x-Minnesota 23 6 .793 x-Los Angeles 22 8 .733 Phoenix 15 15 .500 Dallas .452 14 17 Seattle 14 17 .452 San Antonio 7 24 .226 Tuesday Minnesota 105, Phoenix 69 Los Angeles 75, San Antonio 55 Wednesday New York 71, Indiana 50 Connecticut 93, Dallas 87 Atlanta 89, Seattle 83 Thursday Los Angeles at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Friday Chicago at Connecticut, 6 p.m. Washington at New York, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m.

GB — 2 2½ 8½ 9½ 11½ GB — 1½ 8½ 10 10 17

BASEBALL

Frontier League East W L Pct. Schaumburg 58 28 .674 Windy City 46 40 .535 Washington 45 40 .529 Lake Erie 41 45 .477 Joliet 39 46 .459 Traverse City 33 51 .393 West W L Pct. Florence 55 32 .632 Evansville 48 38 .558 Rascals 46 41 .529 Normal 42 44 .488 Southern Illinois 35 51 .407 Grizzlies 27 59 .314 Wednesday Traverse City 3, Lake Erie 0 Rascals 10, Florence 5 Traverse City 3, Lake Erie 0 Washington 6, Schaumburg 5 Evansville 7, Normal 0 Joliet 7, Windy City 1 Grizzlies 8, Southern Illinois 7 Florence 8, Rascals 4 Thursday Traverse City at Lake Erie, 5:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Rascals at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Normal at Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Joliet at Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m. Friday Joliet at Traverse City, 4:30 p.m. Grizzlies at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Rascals at Normal, 6:35 p.m. Traverse City at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Evansville at Southern Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

GB 12 12½ 17 18½ 24 GB 6½ 9 12½ 19½ 27½

Little League World Series At South Williamsport, Pa. Wednesday Fairfield (Conn.) 12, Jackson (N.J.) 2, 5 innings, Jackson eliminated Tokyo 10, White Rock (British Columbia) 0, 5 innings Greenville (N.C.) 2, Lufkin (Texas) 1, 7 innings Thursday Game 25: Tamaulipas (Mexico) vs. White Rock (British Columbia), 2 p.m. Game 26: Fairfield (Conn.) vs. Lufkin (Texas), 6:30 p.m. Saturday International Championship Game 27: Tokyo vs. Game 25 winner, 11:30 a.m. United States Championship Game 28: Greenville (N.C.) vs. Game 26 winner, 2:30 p.m. Sunday Third Place Game 29: Loser Game 27 vs. Loser Game 28, 9 a.m. Championship Game 30: Winner Game 27 vs. Winner Game 28: 2 p.m.

BOXING SCHEDULE Friday At Buffalo Run Casino, Miami, Okla. (FS1), Sergiy Derevyanchenko vs. Tureano Johnson, 12, middleweights; Immanuwel Aleem vs. Hugo Centeno Jr., 10, middleweights. Saturday At StubHub Center, Carson, Calif. (HBO), Miguel Cotto vs. Yoshihiro Kamegai, 12, for the vacant WBO World junior middleweight title; Rey Vargas vs. Ronny Rios, 12, for Vargas’ WBC World super bantamweight title; Joet Gonzalez vs. Deivis Bassa, 10, featherweights. At T-Mobile Arena, Las Vegas (PPV), Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor, 12, junior middleweights; Gervonta Davis vs. Roman Martinez, 12, for Davis’ IBF junior lightweight title; Shawn Porter vs. Thomas Dulorme, 12, welterweights. Sunday At Kumamoto, Japan, Tatsuya Fukuhara vs. Ryuya Yamanaka, 12, for Fukuhara’s WBO World strawweight title. Sept. 3 At Kyoto, Japan, Shun Kubo vs. Daniel Roman, 12, for Kubo’s WBA World junior featherweight title. Sept. 8 At The Joint at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas (SHO), David Benavidez vs. Ronald Gavril, 12, for the vacant WBC super middleweight title; J’Leon Love vs. Abraham Han, 10, super middleweights; Caleb Plant vs. Alan Campa, 10, super middleweights. Sept. 9 At Berlin, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Marco Huck, 12, for Usyk’s WBO World cruiserweight title. At Los Angeles, David Benavidez vs. Ronald Gavril, 12, for the vacant WBC World super middleweight title. At StubHub Center, Carson City, Calif., Wisaksil Wangek vs. Roman Gonzalez, 12, for Gonzalez’s WBC World super flyweight title; Naoya Inoue vs. Antonio Nieves, 12, for Inoue’s WBO World super flyweight title; Carlos Cuadras vs. Juan Francisco Estrada, 12, super flyweights. Sept. 13 At Osaka, Japan, Yukinori Oguni vs. Ryosuke Iwasa, 12, for Oguni’s IBF junior featherweight title; Kosei Tanaka vs. Rangsan Chayanram, 12, for Tanaka’s WBO World junior flyweight title. Sept. 16 At Cebu City, Philippines, Milan Melindo vs. Hekkie Budler, 12, for Melindo’s IBF junior flyweight title. At London, Billy Joe Saunders vs. Willie Monroe Jr., 12, for Saunders WBO World middleweight title. At T-Mobile Arena, Las Vegas (PPV), Gennady Golovkin vs. Canelo Alvarez, 12, for Golovkin’s WBC World/WBA Super World/IBF/IBO middleweight titles; Diego De La Hoya vs. Randy Caballero, 12, junior featherweights; Antonio Orozco vs Roberto Oritz, 10, junior welterweights. Sept. 22 At Convention Center, Tucson, Ariz., Oscar Valdez vs. Genesis Servania, 12, for Valdez’s WBO World featherweight title; Gilberto Ramirez vs. Jessie Hart, 12, for Ramirez’s WBO World super middleweight title. Sept. 23 At Machester, England, Joseph Parker vs. Hughie Fury, 12, for Parker’s WBO World heavyweight title. At the Forum, Inglewood, Calif. (HBO), Jorge Linares vs. Luke Campbell, 12, for Linares’ WBA World lightweight title. Sept. 26 At Cannery Casino & Hotel, Las Vegas (FS1), Eduard Ramirez vs. Leduan Barthelemy, 10, featherweights. Sept. 30 At Riga, Latvia, Mairis Briedis vs. Mike Perez, 12 for Briedis’ WBC World cruiserweight title. Oct. 5 Mohegan Sun, Uncasville, Conn., Vaughn Alexander vs. Elvin Ayala, 10, middleweights. Oct. 7 At Staples Center, Los Angeles (SHO), Leo Santa Cruz, vs. Abner Mares, 12, for Santa Cruz’s WBA Super World featherweight title. Oct. 14 At London, George Groves vs. Jamie Cox, 12, for Groves’ WBA Super World super middleweight title. Oct. 21 At Belfast, Northern Ireland, Ryan Burnett vs. Zhanat Zhakiyanov, 12, for Burnett’s IBF and Zhakiyanov’s WBA Super World bantamweight titles. Oct. 22 At Tokyo, Hassan N’Dam vs. Ryota Murata, 12, for N’dam’s WBA World middleweight title. Oct. 31 At TBA, United States, Jessie Magdaleno vs. Cesar Juarez, 12, for Magdaleno’s WBO World junior featherweight title; Artur Beterbiev vs. Enrico Koelling, 12, light heavyweights.

GOLF

Area holes in one Warrenton • Joe Survant, hole No. 17, 142 yards, 9-iron, Aug. 23. Bogey Hills • Ed Fricke, hole No. 16, 175 yards, 5-wood, Aug. 22. Wolf Hollow • Mark Sieli, hole No. 14, 136 yards, 7-iron, Aug. 19. Oak Brook • Jim “Shoes” Wilson, hole No. 22, 145 yards, 8-iron, Aug. 22.

COLLEGES Area results

Men’s soccer Evangel 1, Missouri Baptist 0 Women’s volleyball Missouri Baptist def. Florida National 17-25, 25-18, 25-23, 25-21.


SPORTS

08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 2

As if Thomas needed it, trade will be motivator ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON • Isaiah Thomas’ basketball journey is littered with decision-makers who have underestimated the diminutive guard. He was selected last in the 2011 NBA draft coming out of Washington, and when he arrived in Boston he looked only to be a role player for the storied franchise. Thomas has had to prove his worth with every stop. Now, following the biggest slight of his NBA career, he’ll have to do it again. All eyes will be watching how he rebounds after Tuesday’s blockbuster trade. The Celtics sent the two-time AllStar packing from a franchise and city that he’d embraced with every ounce of his 5-foot-9 frame. He’s now bound for Cleveland in exchange for a bigger star — and what the Celtics believe is a better point guard for them — in Kyrie Irving. For all the praise Boston president of basketball operations Danny Ainge showered on Thomas in explaining what he’s meant to the Celtics, the organization took Irving — a four-time All-Star — over the scrappy underdog who’s just beginning to build his résumé. It’s the ultimate reminder of how fickle the business of the NBA can be. “I’ll leave it to your own imaginations to realize how difficult that conversation might have been for me and Isaiah,” Ainge said of informing Thomas of the trade. “You do pay a heavy price for a player of that age and that caliber,” Ainge said of acquiring Irving. Many have paid a hefty price for undervaluing Thomas, and Ainge may not be done paying yet. Thomas always plays with a chip on his shoulder and he was not only traded for a player who plays the same position, in the same conference, but he was dealt to the team Ainge and the Celtics are trying to beat. Now he will be playing alongside arguably the best player in the world in LeBron James, and both will be motivated to deny Boston a shot at the title — once again. It was just three months ago that Thomas was trudging into the most melancholy offseason of his six-year career. The 28-year-old was battered after leading Boston to the top seed in the Eastern Conference, only to have a hip injury leave him sidelined for the majority of the conference finals in an unsuccessful bid to unseat James and the Cavaliers. But that journey also was overshadowed by the sudden death of his younger sister on the eve of the playoffs and losing a tooth during Boston’s secondround series with Washington. It was the Celtics and Ainge that stood behind their star at every turn. Ainge twice arranged private flights for Thomas to mourn with his family, and even accompanied him to Chyna Thomas’ funeral. Boston’s fans were equally supportive, wrapping support around a player that

The native of Paris, Ill., is the only driver in the series who also owns a team. In recent years he has reduced his racing activity to ovals, and Gateway became the sixth oval in IndyCar and the last one on the schedule for 2017. Carpenter has tested there three times in the past year and this week made the trek to Busch Stadium to throw out the first pitch Tuesday night. On Saturday he will complete his fourth season racing on only ovals while JR Hildebrand will drive the other car for Ed Carpenter Racing. The decision has helped Carpenter balance the duties of being an owner and driver, but it doesn’t mean he never thinks about returning to the road and street courses that dominate the series. “It was something that was situational,” he said. “The team is a business that I’m trying to build and grow. At the time I made the decision we were running one car. Some guys are still disappointed I made that decision, but I want to see the team be successful.” Carpenter has been driving in the series since 2003 and was with five teams in his first nine years. Generally speaking, his best performances always have come on ovals. Until this year, all that remained were Iowa, Phoenix, Texas, Pocono and Indianapolis. His last win was at Texas in 2014 and his previous career wins came on ovals at Fontana and Kentucky. So, Gateway was a blessing, although he has never raced on the track in the IndyCar series. Hildebrand is now the team’s No. 1 driver, and Spencer Pigot competes on the road and street courses. Hildebrand replaced Josef Newgarden, who was fourth in the standings in 2016 before leaving to join Team Penske. The potential for losing talented young drivers is one of the frustrations of building the team. “We’re still maturing and growing,” Carpenter said. “I’m proud of how far we’ve come. I don’t have as big a platform as Penske, Ganassi or Andretti. Sometimes they can offer things I can’t compete with. We did work hard to make Josef an offer he couldn’t refuse. I under-

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Yankees...................-$118 .................... TIGERS RAYS........................-$120 .................Blue Jays Red Sox ...................-$168 .................. INDIANS Twins.......................-$170 ..............WHITE SOX ANGELS ...................-$127 ...................Rangers National League D’backs....................-$145 ....................... METS Marlins....................-$128 ................. PHILLIES Dodgers...................-$165 .................. PIRATES Cubs ........................-$170 ....................... REDS CARDS .................... -$220.....................Padres Interleague ROYALS ...................-$120 ....................Rockies ASTROS .................. -$140................ Nationals NFL Preseason Favorite Open/current Underdog EAGLES..................3.5...3.5 ................Dolphins Panthers ...............PK... 1.5 ...............JAGUARS Friday Patriots .................PK...2.5 .................... LIONS SEAHAWKS............3.5...3.5 .................... Chiefs Saturday GIANTS ................... 5..... 5..........................Jets RAVENS.................3.5...3.5 ....................... Bills FALCONS ...............3.5...3.5 .....................Cards BUCS.......................3..... 3....................Browns STEELERS............... 5..... 6........................ Colts SAINTS ..................1.5.... 3.....................Texans COWBOYS...............3..... 3....................Raiders RAMS.....................2.5...2.5 ............... Chargers BRONCOS ...............3..... 3................... Packers Sunday TITANS....................3..... 3.......................Bears WASHINGTON.........3..... 3................... Bengals VIKINGS................ 4.5 ..4.5.....................49ers

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston Celtics guard Isaiah Thomas drives to the basket during the playoffs.

had not only performed on the court, but was an active presence in the community. It was those types of overtures and expressions that made Thomas optimistic about a future with a storied franchise and in a city that has always rallied behind its stars. Yes, Thomas knew it was possible he might not stay in Boston, but he expected to be here. “Boston has changed my career and changed my life,” Thomas said in May. “I would love to be here long-term and win championships here. But as you guys know, it’s a business and anything can happen. I know that. So I understand, but I would love to be here. This has been everything to me. This city, this organization ... it’s been good.” And just like that, everything has changed. In today’s NBA, stars of Thomas’ caliber usually switch teams in the prime of their careers on their own volition. But he found himself at the center of a deal involving a bigger, more valued star. It reminds longtime NBA executive Pat Williams of when as general manager of the Atlanta Hawks he dealt All-Star “Pistol” Pete Maravich to the New Orleans Jazz. “Pete was shocked but, it turned out to be a good deal for him,” Williams said. “He had his best years in New Orleans.” Maravich continued to be a fan-favorite in Atlanta, and Thomas will never be a villain in Boston. But the Celtics may not be happy when Thomas comes back to town. Thomas is heading to a team that has recently broken the hearts of Celtics fans and will be favored to do it again . Add to the mix that in Thomas, James gets probably the only player on the planet that will be as motivated as him to stave off a rebuilt Celtics roster led by his former sidekick.

Carpenter is happy IndyCar has come back to Gateway INDY • FROM B1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B7

stood him moving on. Now we have two young Americans in JR and Spencer who are both talented and can have a future with us.” Hildebrand is 15th in the standings as he drives full time for the first time since 2012, when he had his best overall finish of 11th with Panther Racing. Asked recently about next year — his contract expires after 2017 — he told the Indianapolis Star, “I’m not concerned with what’s going on next year at all. Once the checkered flag drops at (the season finale in) Sonoma, then we’ll slowly migrate into thinking about next year.” Carpenter’s team has done especially well on shorter ovals this season. The team owner was seventh at Phoenix and Hildebrand was third and followed with a second place at Iowa. Carpenter’s only competitive experience at Gateway came when he finished in the top five of Indy Lights races at the track in 2002 and ’03. He also ran on the track in USAC Silver Crown events. Having lived in Indianapolis since he was 8, Carpenter’s highlight every year is the Indy 500. He won the pole for the race in 2013 and ’14. However, his best finishes at the Brickyard were a fifth in 2008 and eighth in 2009 when he was driving for Vision Racing. Those were also among his best years in the final standings. He wonders about how he might fare these days if he were driving road courses and not having such long gaps out of the car. One benefit of his schedule this week is that the series if coming off a race at Pocono last weekend, where Carpenter finished 12th. “There are times I think I’d benefit from being in the car more,” he said. “Coming off Pocono, I’m coming in fresh. There have been times I would go a couple of months without being in the car. I would never say never (to returning to road races). I wasn’t always the fastest but felt I was able to do a fairly good job. I wouldn’t be opposed if the right situation was there.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Open/current Underdog Saturday COLORADO ST.......3.5.... 4................Oregon St UMASS ................... 1 .... 1.5 ...................Hawaii S Florida................20....22.......... SAN JOSE ST s-Stanford ........... 30.5 30.5...................... Rice August 31 Ohio St ................ 20.5 20.5...............INDIANA MINNESOTA..........26.5 26.5 ................. Buffalo MEMPHIS .............. 27....27.............UL-Monroe ARIZONA ST ..........24... 24.......New Mexico St C FLORIDA............17.5. 17.5...........Florida Int’l OKLAHOMA ST...... 17 ....17.......................Tulsa September 1 E MICHIGAN .........13.5. 13.5 ..............Charlotte Washington......... 30.5 30.5..............RUTGERS Navy .....................12.5. 12.5 ......FLA ATLANTIC WISCONSIN ..........28.5 28.5 .................Utah St Boston Coll.............3..... 3............NO ILLINOIS d-Colorado ............NL... NL ...........Colorado St September 2 MICHIGAN ST .......18.5. 18.5 .....Bowling Green IOWA.....................12.5. 12.5 ..............Wyoming MARSHALL............PK... PK ...........Miami-Ohio CLEMSON .............38.5 38.5 ................. Kent St COASTAL CARO .....NL... NL ................... UMass PENN ST ................33... 33..................... Akron i-Louisville............25.5.25.5 ................. Purdue NEBRASKA...........16.5.16.5 ..........Arkansas St NORTHWESTERN .24.5 24.5 .................Nevada ILLINOIS .................8..... 8......................Ball St OKLAHOMA......... 44.5 44.5..................... Utep N CAROLINA.......... 12 ....12............... California MISSISSIPPI .........24.5 24.5 ........... S Alabama USC.......................27.5. 27.5 ..........W Michigan h-Lsu ..................... 13 ....13.........................Byu TEXAS.................... 17 ....17............... Maryland NOTRE DAME .......15.5. 15.5 ................. Temple AUBURN................ 35... 35...........Ga Southern GEORGIA ............... 14 ....14...........App’chian St Kentucky ..............10.5.10.5 ................SO MISS Houston ...............13.5. 13.5 .................... UTSA c-NC State .............5.5...5.5 ............. S Carolina a-Michigan .............3..... 3.....................Florida Vanderbilt.............5.5...5.5 .........MID TENN ST at-Alabama ............ 7..... 7................ Florida St BOISE ST...............12.5. 12.5 ......................Troy September 3 l-Va Tech............... 4.5 ..4.5............. W Virginia UCLA......................3.5...3.5 ............ Texas A&M September 4 at-Tennessee.........3.5...3.5 ................. Ga Tech Note: Hawaii opened as a favorite. s- Sydney, Australia. d- Denver, CO. i- Indianapolis, IN. h- Houston, TX. c- Charlotte, NC. a- Arlington, TX. l- Landover, MD. at- Atlanta, GA. CFL Favorite Open/current Underdog Winnipeg...............1.5.....1............. MONTREAL Friday EDMONTON.......... 6.5 ... 6........ Saskatchewan Saturday OTTAWA.................. 2......1............Br Columbia CALGARY............... 10... 10.................. Toronto BOXING Floyd Mayweather Jr.............................. -$500 vs. Conor McGregor............................... +$400 Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 Miami 1 1 0 New England 0 2 0 Buffalo 0 2 0 South W L T Jacksonville 1 1 0 Houston 1 1 0 Tennessee 1 1 0 Indianapolis 0 2 0 North W L T Baltimore 2 0 0 Pittsburgh 2 0 0 Cleveland 2 0 0 Cincinnati 1 1 0 West W L T Denver 2 0 0 Kansas City 1 1 0 Oakland 0 2 0 L.A. Chargers 0 2 0

Pct .500 .500 .000 .000 Pct .500 .500 .500 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .500 Pct 1.000 .500 .000 .000

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Dallas 2 1 0 .667 Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 N.Y. Giants 0 2 0 .000 Washington 0 2 0 .000 South W L T Pct Carolina 1 1 0 .500 New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 North W L T Pct Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 Detroit 2 0 0 1.000 Chicago 1 1 0 .500 Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 West W L T Pct Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 L.A. Rams 2 0 0 1.000 San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 Arizona 1 2 0 .333 Thursday Miami at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Carolina at Jacksonville, 6:30 p.m. Friday New England at Detroit, 6 p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 7 p.m. Saturday Buffalo at Baltimore, 6 p.m. Arizona at Atlanta, 6 p.m. N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m. L.A. Chargers at L.A. Rams, 7 p.m. Oakland at Dallas, 7 p.m. Green Bay at Denver, 8 p.m. Sunday Chicago at Tennessee, Noon Cincinnati at Washington, 3:30 p.m. San Francisco at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS

PF 13 30 47 26 PF 39 44 37 29 PF 54 37 30 35 PF 57 47 31 24

PA 19 51 58 37 PA 36 50 34 48 PA 10 25 20 42 PA 31 39 44 61

PF 54 29 18 20 PF 54 27 24 33 PF 45 40 41 30 PF 68 37 41 61

PA 50 40 30 44 PA 51 27 31 40 PA 26 16 47 30 PA 30 31 50 54

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE — Optioned RHP Alec Asher to Norfolk (IL). Assigned LHP Vidal Nuno outright to Norfolk. Reinstated RHP Miguel Castro from the bereavement list. BOSTON — Placed OF Jackie Bradley Jr. on the 10-day DL. Recalled INF Deven Marrero from Pawtucket (IL). Acquired OF Rajai Davis from Oakland for OF Rafael Rincones. CLEVELAND — Placed 2B Jason Kipnis, RHP Danny Salazar and LHP Andrew Miller on the 10-day DL, Salazar retroactive to Monday. Recalled INF Erik Gonzalez, 3B Yandy Diaz and RHP Shawn Armstrong from Columbus (IL). CHICAGO — Sent 3B Matt Davidson to Charlotte (IL) for a rehab assignment. KANSAS CITY — Optioned OF Paulo Orlando to Omaha (PCL). Recalled RHP Miguel Almonte from Omaha. MINNESOTA — Designated RHP Tim Melville for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP John Curtiss from Rochester (IL). OAKLAND — Optioned RHP Michael Brady to Nashville (PCL). Recalled RHP Daniel Gossett from Nashville. Sent OF Jake Smolinski to Nashville for a rehab assignment. SEATTLE — Designated OF Leonys Martin for assignment. Reinstated RHP David Phelps from the 10-day DL. TEXAS — Acquired OF Pedro Gonzalez from Colorado to complete the Jonathan Lucroy trade on July 30 and assigned Gonzalez to Grand Junction (Pioneer). TORONTO — Placed RHP Nick Tepesch on paternity leave. Recalled LHP Tim Mayza from Buffalo (IL). National League CINCINNATI — Designated RHP Blake Wood for assignment. Optioned OF Phillip Ervin to Louisville (IL). Recalled RHP Luke Farrell from Louisville. Selected the contract of RHP Alejandro Chacin from Louisville. Sent RHP Nefi Ogando to Pensacola (SL) for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES — Assigned RHP Dylan Floro outright to Oklahoma City (PCL). MIAMI — Optioned RHP Severino Gonzalez to New Orleans (PCL). Assigned RHP Javy Guerra outright to New Orleans.

NEW YORK — Placed LHP Steven Matz on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Kevin McGowan from Las Vegas (PCL). PHILADELPHIA — Optioned OF Cameron Perkins to Lehigh Valley (IL). Recalled RHP Drew Anderson from Lehigh Valley. PITTSBURGH — Optioned RHP Edgar Santana to Indianapolis (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Angel Sanchez from Indianapolis. CARDINALS — Optioned RHP Josh Lucas to Memphis (PCL). Selected the contract of LHP Ryan Sherriff from Memphis. Transferred RHP Trevor Rosenthal to the 60-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO — Sent RHP Johnny Cueto and 2B Joe Panik to Sacramento (PCL) for rehab assignments. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association SAN ANTONIO — Signed G London Perrantes. NBA G League SALT LAKE CITY — Named Martin Schiller coach. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO — Re-signed OL Charles Leno Jr. to a four-year contract extension. CLEVELAND — Placed LB Tank Carder and OL Matt McCants on injured reserve. Waived/injured DB Justin Currie. Signed DB Christian Bryant. DETROIT — Waived TE Andrew Price. Claimed DT Caushaud Lons off waivers from the L.A. Rams. HOUSTON — Waived/injured WR Devin Street. Removed DE Joel Heath from the nonfootball injury list. Signed LB Mike Catapano. INDIANAPOLIS — Waived/injured CB Tevin Mitchel. Signed LB Darnell Sankey. Removed OL Brian Schwenke from the PUP list. NY GIANTS — Waived OL Michael Bowie and Corin Brooks. Waived/ injured WRs Darius Powe and Andrew Turzilli. Placed CB Valentino Blake on the exempt/left squad list. NY JETS — Released WR Marquess Wilson. Signed TE Brandon Barnes and RB Jahad Thomas. OAKLAND — Reinstated T Donald Penn to the active roster. Waived DE Jimmy Bean. SAN FRANCISCO — Signed DL Sen’Derrick Marks to a one-year contract. Removed DB Jimmie Ward from the PUP list. WASHINGTON — Traded CB Dashaun Phillips to Pittsburgh for C Lucas Crowley. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW JERSEY — Signed RW Jimmy Hayes to a professional tryout agreement. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Fined Portland M Sebastian Blanco an undisclosed amount for hands to the face, head or neck of an opponent and N.Y. Red Bulls M Felipe an undisclosed amount for simulation/embellishment. National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON — Claimed M Morgan Proffitt off waivers from Chicago. COLLEGE AUBURN — Announced the retirement of Clint Myers, softball coach. DELAWARE — Named Heather Wiley volunteer assistant field hockey coach. DETROIT — Named Madison Ristovski assistant women’s basketball coach. LEES-MCRAE — Named Dustin Barrow assistant men’s lacrosse coach. OKLAHOMA — Suspended sophomore F Kristian Doolittle from the university for the fall semester for failing to meet academic standards. STANFORD — Named Tabitha Yim women’s gymnastics coach.

SOCCER

Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA 15 3 8 53 52 25 Toronto FC New York City FC 14 7 4 46 47 34 Chicago 12 8 5 41 46 34 12 12 3 39 40 41 Columbus New York 12 10 2 38 37 32 10 8 6 36 41 38 Montreal Atlanta United FC 10 8 5 35 42 30 Orlando City 8 10 7 31 26 37 8 12 6 30 34 36 Philadelphia New England 8 11 5 29 39 40 D.C. United 7 15 4 25 21 44 W L T Pts GF GA WESTERN Seattle 11 7 8 41 40 33 10 5 10 40 31 19 Sporting K.C. 11 9 7 40 47 44 Portland Houston 10 8 8 38 46 37 9 6 9 36 36 31 FC Dallas Vancouver 10 9 5 35 35 34 9 11 6 33 28 44 San Jose Real Salt Lake 9 13 5 32 36 47 Los Angeles 6 13 5 23 32 44 Minnesota United 6 14 4 22 30 51 Colorado 6 14 4 22 23 34 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday Columbus 2, Los Angeles 0 D.C. United 1, Atlanta United FC 0 Houston 3, FC Dallas 3, tie Toronto FC 3, Philadelphia 0 Real Salt Lake 4, San Jose 0 Seattle 1, Vancouver 1, tie Portland 2, Colorado 1 Friday New York City FC at New York, 6 p.m. Saturday Atlanta United FC at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. New England at D.C. United, 6 p.m. FC Dallas at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Vancouver at Orlando City, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Houston, 8 p.m. Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Sunday Toronto FC at Montreal, 3:30 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Portland at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Pts 2 2 0 0 8 0 6 Man. United Huddersfield 2 2 0 0 4 0 6 2 2 0 0 2 0 6 West Brom. Watford 2 1 1 0 5 3 4 Man. City 2 1 1 0 3 1 4 2 1 1 0 4 3 4 Liverpool Southampton 2 1 1 0 3 2 4 2 1 1 0 2 1 4 Everton Leicester 2 1 0 1 5 4 3 Tottenham 2 1 0 1 3 2 3 2 1 0 1 4 4 3 Arsenal Chelsea 2 1 0 1 4 4 3 Burnley 2 1 0 1 3 3 3 2 1 0 1 1 1 3 Stoke Swansea 2 0 1 1 0 4 1 Bournemouth 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 Newcastle 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 Brighton 2 0 0 2 0 4 0 Crystal Palace 2 0 0 2 0 4 0 West Ham 2 0 0 2 2 7 0 Saturday Bournemouth vs. Manchester City, 6:30 a.m. Watford vs. Brighton, 9 a.m. Newcastle vs. West Ham, 9 a.m. Huddersfield vs. Southampton, 9 a.m. Crystal Palace vs. Swansea, 9 a.m. Manchester United vs. Leicester, 11:30 a.m. Sunday West Bromwich Albion vs. Stoke, 7:30 a.m. Chelsea vs. Everton, 7:30 a.m. Tottenham vs. Burnley, 10 a.m. Liverpool vs. Arsenal, 10 a.m.

World Cup Qualifying NORTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN FINAL ROUND Top three teams qualify Fourth-place team advances to playoff against Asia fifth-place team GP W D L GF GA Pts Mexico 6 4 2 0 9 2 14 6 3 2 1 9 4 11 Costa Rica United States 6 2 2 2 11 8 8 Panama 6 1 4 1 4 4 7 Honduras 6 1 2 3 6 14 5 Trinidad 6 1 0 5 3 10 3 Friday, Sept. 1 At Harrison, N.J. United States vs. Costa Rica, 5:55 p.m. At Couva, Trinidad Trinidad and Tobago vs. Honduras, 7 p.m. At Mexico City Mexico vs. Panama, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 5 At San Pedro Sula, Honduras Honduras vs. United States, 4:36 p.m. At Panama City Panama vs. Trinidad and Tobago, 8:30 p.m. At San Jose, Costa Rica Costa Rica vs. Mexico, 9:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL • WNBA EASTERN W L Pct x-Connecticut 20 10 .667 x-New York 18 12 .600 x-Washington .586 17 12 Chicago 11 18 .379 Atlanta 20 11 .355 Indiana 9 22 .290 WESTERN W L Pct x-Minnesota 23 6 .793 x-Los Angeles 22 8 .733 Phoenix 15 15 .500 Dallas .452 14 17 Seattle 14 17 .452 San Antonio 7 24 .226 Tuesday Minnesota 105, Phoenix 69 Los Angeles 75, San Antonio 55 Wednesday New York 71, Indiana 50 Connecticut 93, Dallas 87 Atlanta 89, Seattle 83 Thursday Los Angeles at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Friday Chicago at Connecticut, 6 p.m. Washington at New York, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m.

GB — 2 2½ 8½ 9½ 11½ GB — 1½ 8½ 10 10 17

BASEBALL

Frontier League East W L Pct. Schaumburg 58 28 .674 Windy City 46 40 .535 Washington 45 40 .529 Lake Erie 41 45 .477 Joliet 39 46 .459 Traverse City 33 51 .393 West W L Pct. Florence 55 32 .632 Evansville 48 38 .558 Rascals 46 41 .529 Normal 42 44 .488 Southern Illinois 35 51 .407 Grizzlies 27 59 .314 Wednesday Traverse City 3, Lake Erie 0 Rascals 10, Florence 5 Traverse City 3, Lake Erie 0 Washington 6, Schaumburg 5 Evansville 7, Normal 0 Joliet 7, Windy City 1 Grizzlies 8, Southern Illinois 7 Florence 8, Rascals 4 Thursday Traverse City at Lake Erie, 5:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Rascals at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Normal at Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Joliet at Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m. Friday Joliet at Traverse City, 4:30 p.m. Grizzlies at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Rascals at Normal, 6:35 p.m. Traverse City at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Evansville at Southern Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

GB 12 12½ 17 18½ 24 GB 6½ 9 12½ 19½ 27½

Little League World Series At South Williamsport, Pa. Wednesday Fairfield (Conn.) 12, Jackson (N.J.) 2, 5 innings, Jackson eliminated Tokyo 10, White Rock (British Columbia) 0, 5 innings Greenville (N.C.) 2, Lufkin (Texas) 1, 7 innings Thursday Game 25: Tamaulipas (Mexico) vs. White Rock (British Columbia), 2 p.m. Game 26: Fairfield (Conn.) vs. Lufkin (Texas), 6:30 p.m. Saturday International Championship Game 27: Tokyo vs. Game 25 winner, 11:30 a.m. United States Championship Game 28: Greenville (N.C.) vs. Game 26 winner, 2:30 p.m. Sunday Third Place Game 29: Loser Game 27 vs. Loser Game 28, 9 a.m. Championship Game 30: Winner Game 27 vs. Winner Game 28: 2 p.m.

BOXING SCHEDULE Friday At Buffalo Run Casino, Miami, Okla. (FS1), Sergiy Derevyanchenko vs. Tureano Johnson, 12, middleweights; Immanuwel Aleem vs. Hugo Centeno Jr., 10, middleweights. Saturday At StubHub Center, Carson, Calif. (HBO), Miguel Cotto vs. Yoshihiro Kamegai, 12, for the vacant WBO World junior middleweight title; Rey Vargas vs. Ronny Rios, 12, for Vargas’ WBC World super bantamweight title; Joet Gonzalez vs. Deivis Bassa, 10, featherweights. At T-Mobile Arena, Las Vegas (PPV), Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor, 12, junior middleweights; Gervonta Davis vs. Roman Martinez, 12, for Davis’ IBF junior lightweight title; Shawn Porter vs. Thomas Dulorme, 12, welterweights. Sunday At Kumamoto, Japan, Tatsuya Fukuhara vs. Ryuya Yamanaka, 12, for Fukuhara’s WBO World strawweight title. Sept. 3 At Kyoto, Japan, Shun Kubo vs. Daniel Roman, 12, for Kubo’s WBA World junior featherweight title. Sept. 8 At The Joint at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas (SHO), David Benavidez vs. Ronald Gavril, 12, for the vacant WBC super middleweight title; J’Leon Love vs. Abraham Han, 10, super middleweights; Caleb Plant vs. Alan Campa, 10, super middleweights. Sept. 9 At Berlin, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Marco Huck, 12, for Usyk’s WBO World cruiserweight title. At Los Angeles, David Benavidez vs. Ronald Gavril, 12, for the vacant WBC World super middleweight title. At StubHub Center, Carson City, Calif., Wisaksil Wangek vs. Roman Gonzalez, 12, for Gonzalez’s WBC World super flyweight title; Naoya Inoue vs. Antonio Nieves, 12, for Inoue’s WBO World super flyweight title; Carlos Cuadras vs. Juan Francisco Estrada, 12, super flyweights. Sept. 13 At Osaka, Japan, Yukinori Oguni vs. Ryosuke Iwasa, 12, for Oguni’s IBF junior featherweight title; Kosei Tanaka vs. Rangsan Chayanram, 12, for Tanaka’s WBO World junior flyweight title. Sept. 16 At Cebu City, Philippines, Milan Melindo vs. Hekkie Budler, 12, for Melindo’s IBF junior flyweight title. At London, Billy Joe Saunders vs. Willie Monroe Jr., 12, for Saunders WBO World middleweight title. At T-Mobile Arena, Las Vegas (PPV), Gennady Golovkin vs. Canelo Alvarez, 12, for Golovkin’s WBC World/WBA Super World/IBF/IBO middleweight titles; Diego De La Hoya vs. Randy Caballero, 12, junior featherweights; Antonio Orozco vs Roberto Oritz, 10, junior welterweights. Sept. 22 At Convention Center, Tucson, Ariz., Oscar Valdez vs. Genesis Servania, 12, for Valdez’s WBO World featherweight title; Gilberto Ramirez vs. Jessie Hart, 12, for Ramirez’s WBO World super middleweight title. Sept. 23 At Machester, England, Joseph Parker vs. Hughie Fury, 12, for Parker’s WBO World heavyweight title. At the Forum, Inglewood, Calif. (HBO), Jorge Linares vs. Luke Campbell, 12, for Linares’ WBA World lightweight title. Sept. 26 At Cannery Casino & Hotel, Las Vegas (FS1), Eduard Ramirez vs. Leduan Barthelemy, 10, featherweights. Sept. 30 At Riga, Latvia, Mairis Briedis vs. Mike Perez, 12 for Briedis’ WBC World cruiserweight title. Oct. 5 Mohegan Sun, Uncasville, Conn., Vaughn Alexander vs. Elvin Ayala, 10, middleweights. Oct. 7 At Staples Center, Los Angeles (SHO), Leo Santa Cruz, vs. Abner Mares, 12, for Santa Cruz’s WBA Super World featherweight title. Oct. 14 At London, George Groves vs. Jamie Cox, 12, for Groves’ WBA Super World super middleweight title. Oct. 21 At Belfast, Northern Ireland, Ryan Burnett vs. Zhanat Zhakiyanov, 12, for Burnett’s IBF and Zhakiyanov’s WBA Super World bantamweight titles. Oct. 22 At Tokyo, Hassan N’Dam vs. Ryota Murata, 12, for N’dam’s WBA World middleweight title. Oct. 31 At TBA, United States, Jessie Magdaleno vs. Cesar Juarez, 12, for Magdaleno’s WBO World junior featherweight title; Artur Beterbiev vs. Enrico Koelling, 12, light heavyweights.

GOLF

Area holes in one Warrenton • Joe Survant, hole No. 17, 142 yards, 9-iron, Aug. 23. Bogey Hills • Ed Fricke, hole No. 16, 175 yards, 5-wood, Aug. 22. Wolf Hollow • Mark Sieli, hole No. 14, 136 yards, 7-iron, Aug. 19. Oak Brook • Jim “Shoes” Wilson, hole No. 22, 145 yards, 8-iron, Aug. 22.

COLLEGES Area results

Men’s soccer Evangel 1, Missouri Baptist 0 Women’s volleyball Missouri Baptist def. Florida National 17-25, 25-18, 25-23, 25-21.


FOOTBALL

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

NFL NOTEBOOK

Browns pick Kizer to be starting QB ASSOCIATED PRESS

DeShone Kizer will be next through the Browns’ quarterback turnstile. He doesn’t want it to spin again anytime soon. The rocket-armed rookie QB from Notre Dame was named Cleveland’s starter for Saturday night’s third exhibition game in Tampa Bay, and barring an unforeseen flop or injury — remember, these are the Browns — Kizer will start the season opener Sept. 10 against Pittsburgh. After watching Kizer develop over the past month and show poise while delivering some long completions in two preseason appearances, coach Hue Jackson picked him over veterans Brock Osweiler and Cody Kessler. “I don’t ever want to put something on someone too soon if they’re not ready,” Jackson said Wednesday. “But he’s demonstrated that he’s ready, so let’s give him a chance to see if he can do it.” The confident 21-year-old is excited about the opportunity and intends to make the most of it. Just a week ago, he seemed to be destined for a backup role when 10-time Pro Bowl tackle Joe Thomas said he expected Osweiler to win the job and take the field in Week 1. Thomas has seen rookies thrown into the mix too early, and said he hoped the Browns would be patient with Kizer. Oh, well. Now, it appears he’ll be protecting Kizer in the opener — the 19th quarterback Thomas has played with since 2007. Kizer feels an obligation not to let his celebrated teammate down. “There’s a lot to show Joe Thomas,” said Kizer, in position to be Cleveland’s 27th starting QB since 1999. “That guy’s seen quite a few quarterbacks, obviously, and my ultimate goal is for him to not see another one. And in order to do that, I’ve got to continue to show him the type of worker that I am and how much time I’m putting in off the field in my preparation and making sure he can go out and get the wins that he absolutely deserves.” Jackson, who went 1-15 in his first season with Cleveland, could have taken the safer route and chosen Osweiler, who made 14 starts last season for Houston. But Jackson believes Kizer makes Cleveland’s offense more dynamic and gives his team the best chance to win — now. “In my mind, this young man is going to go play extremely well,” Jackson said. “My job is to help him do that and create the right environment for him to go and do that with the rest of the offensive football team. There is nothing in my mind that says he is not going to do well. I expect him to do well, our organization expects him to do well and his teammates expect him to do well.” Jackson said Osweiler will not play against the Buccaneers, raising suspicions the Browns may be trying to trade the 26-year-old, who has a $16 million guaranteed deal this season and was considered a trade throw-in when he was acquired in March from Houston. Jackson said he had a good conversation with Osweiler. Reed returns for Redskins • Jordan Reed is back at practice with the Washington Redskins. The 27-year-old tight end made his onfield debut Wednesday after missing almost the first month of practices with a toe injury. Reed missed the team’s first two preseason games and was activated off the physically unable to perform list Sunday. Reed was examined by a foot specialist Aug. 1 and recently started using wider shoes and orthotics to help alleviate the soreness in the big toe on his left foot. Last week he said it felt better when running routes and walking around, and he doesn’t expect the injury to affect him during the season.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

One of quarterback Kirk Cousins’ most consistent and effective targets, Reed had 66 catches for 686 yards and six touchdowns last season despite missing four games with injury. Henne moves ahead of Bortles • Chad Henne will start Jacksonville’s preseason game against Carolina, a change that could signal the end of Blake Bortles’ career with the Jaguars. Coach Doug Marrone made the announcement Wednesday, a day before the exhibition and nearly a week after he created a quarterback competition in Jacksonville for the first time since 2013. He said both quarterbacks will get time with the first-team offense. Henne, a 10-year veteran whose last start came in 2014, outperformed Bortles during training camp and through two preseason games. If Henne plays well against the Panthers, he probably will start the season opener at Houston. Jets sign Barnes, Thomas • The New York Jets signed tight end Brandon Barnes and running back Jahad Thomas, and released wide receiver Marquess Wilson and running back Jordan Todman. Barnes was waived by Detroit on Aug. 9 after being signed as an undrafted free agent out of Alabama State in April. He had 29 catches for 436 yards and six touchdowns in his college career. Thomas was signed by Dallas as an undrafted free agent out of Temple. He had a hamstring injury during training camp and was waived by the Cowboys on Tuesday. Bears give Leno extension • The Chicago Bears have signed offensive lineman Charles Leno Jr. to a contract extension. Leno started all 16 games at left tackle last year and is entering his fourth season with the Bears. Last year marked the second straight season in which Leno made 16 starts. He was one of two Bears offensive players to start every game in 2016. Giants waive Bowie • The New York Giants waived Michael Bowie days after finding out that the offensive lineman had been charged with assault and battery in Oklahoma. The team learned of the charges Saturday and did not allow the 25-year-old to make the trip to Cleveland for a preseason game against the Browns on Monday night. Bowie is accused of grabbing his girlfriend by the neck during a fight at her home in Bixby, Okla., then breaking two televisions and punching a hole in the wall. Court records don’t list an attorney for Bowie, a Tulsa resident. His agent says Bowie is working to prove his innocence, saying there was no physical contact with the girlfriend. Penn ends holdout with Raiders • Pro Bowl left tackle Donald Penn has ended his holdout with the Oakland Raiders. Penn reported for practice Wednesday, ending his 26-day holdout. Penn was looking for an improved contract but general manager Reggie McKenzie said earlier in training camp that he would not negotiate a new deal with Penn until he arrived at camp. Penn is entering the final year of an $11.9 million, two-year contract. Ward back with 49ers • San Francisco safety Jimmie Ward has been taken off the physically unable to perform list after missing nearly four weeks of practice with a hamstring injury. Ward was cleared to return Wednesday and took part in practice on a limited basis. Ward hurt his hamstring doing the conditioning test July 27 and has been sidelined ever since.

'14 Honda Pilot: EX-L, 33K 4WD $28,990 #M16532RA

A20

Sport Utility '14 GMC Terrain: Denali, 45K Miles, FWD, Loaded, $21,490 #C17297A

'15 GMC Yukon SLT: White Diamond, Quad Seats, AWD, $46,990 #B8549

OUR NEW WEST COUNTY LOCATION IS OPEN New Look. New Brands. Same Great Service!

CELEBRATE OUR GRAND OPENING SALE AT ALL 3 LOCATIONS!

15% OFF

$10 OFF

Any Pair of Shoes *Offer valid in store only, cannot be combined with other offers, not valid on Garmin or nutritional products. Expires 9/10/17

Apparel, Inserts & Accessories

*Offer valid in store only, cannot be combined with other offers, not valid on Garmin or nutritional products. Expires 9/10/17

Big River West County is more than a running store. With a new look and many new brands including KEEN, prAna, Patagonia, OluKai, Sperry, UGG, and Merrell you can now find shoes & apparel for any activity all in one stop. Our expert staff is dedicated to helping you find the perfect fit, providing the care and attention you and your feet deserve for over 11 years!

www.bigriverrunning.com STORE LOCATIONS

West County

South City

University City

13969 Manchester Rd. Town & Country, MO 63011 636.394.5500

5352 Devonshire Ave. St. Louis, MO 63109 314.832.2400

606 North & South Rd. University City, MO 63130 314.727.4786

RIDES

Sport Utility

Rides Ads Continued from Page

CLEVELAND.COM

Cleveland Browns rookie quarterback DeShone Kizer signs autographs following a team scrimmage Aug. 4 in Cleveland.

'15 Honda CR-V: EX-L, AWD, 15K, White $26,990 #C17358A

'15 Honda CR-V: EX-L, AWD, Black, 19K, Local Trade, $25,490 #C17376A

'12 Honda Crosstour EXL: Local One Owner Trade, Black, $13,490 #C17400A

'08 GMC Acadia: Red, 121K Miles, Hurry In, $12,500 #H171310A

'08 Hyundai Veracruz SEL: Limited, AWD, Heated Leather Front Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #78583A

'15 GMC Terrain SEL-1: 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, $15,990 #78376A

'14 Honda CRV LX: 11 To Choose, 38K Mi, Black, Honda Certified Used, Starting at $16,995 #X3442

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'16 Lexus NX 200t: 7K Miles, AWD, Local Trade, $37,490 #C17318A

'07 Mazda CX-9 Sport: 3.5L V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $8,990 #96726A

'12 VW Tiguan LE: 2.0L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $12,990 #P8856

'11 Honda Pilot EXL: Navigation, Black, 117K Miles, Heated Leather, Moonroof, $15,000 #H171475A

'13 Land Rover Range Rover Sport: 55K Miles, 4WD, Well Maintained $35,490 #B8688

'17 Nissan Murano: AWD, SV, Blue, 21K Miles, Just Arrived, $25,000 #X3474

Mini vans

'16 Jeep Compass Latitude: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax $14,990 #P8947

'11 Mazda CX-7 i Sport: 2.5L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Sunroof, $9,490 #96595A

'07 Honda Pilot EX-L: V6 FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Rear DVD, 3rd Row Seats, $10,990 #8808M

'16 Jeep Patriot: Sport, One Owner Clean Carfax, $13,990 #P8954

'12 Kia Sorento EX: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, $12,990 #11456A

'12 Kia Sorento LX: 4 Cyl, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, 75K Miles, $12,990 #11385A

'14 Mazda CX-5: Touring, One Owner Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $13,990 #11327A

'14 Mazda CX-5: Touring, Roof & Navigation, Certified #M8729 $17,990

'14 Subaru Forester: AWD, Premier, Beige, Only $15,000 #H162111A

'05 Toyota RAV4: Sport, 4 Cyl, Sunroof, AWD, Clean Carfax, Call Today, $7,490 #11262A

'15 Toyota Highlander: Platinum Edition, 25K Miles, AWD, $36,490 #M16655A

'14 Chrysler T&C: 4 Door, Touring, 65K Miles, $16,500 Stk# P06317 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Dodge Grand Caravan: Blue, 36K Miles, $19,995 #X3411

'13 Toyota Sienna: Limited, AWD, $23,490 #B8586

'16 Toyota Sienna XLE: 8 Passenger, Salsa Red, Only 8K Miles, Hurry In, $30,500

Vans '13 Mazda CX-5: Sport, FWD, A Bargain, $7,490 #M17134A

'16 Toyota RAV4 XLE: Gray, 36K Miles, $19,995 #X3412

'16 Nissan NV1500: Ladder Lock, Shelves, 12K Miles, $22,990 #B8381A


RECOVER THE PAST

EXPLORE OUR ARCHIVES AT STLtoday.com/archives

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Thursday • 08.24.2017 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, East deals NORTH ♠K 10 9 ♥A 9 6 4 ♦A K 7 5 ♣5 4 WEST EAST ♠8 6 2 ♠4 ♥2 ♥K Q J 10 8 ♦J 9 4 ♦Q 10 8 6 3 ♣K J 10 9 8 2 ♣A Q SOUTH ♠A Q J 7 5 3 ♥7 5 3 ♦2 ♣7 6 3 The bidding: EAST SOUTH WEST NORTH 1♥ 2♠* Pass 4♠ All pass *Pre-emptive Opening lead: Two of ♥ North’s jump to game was a reasonable shot. A tenth trick might well come from a club ruff in his hand. South won the opening heart lead with dummy’s ace, cashed the ace and king of diamonds to discard a heart, and then led a club from dummy. East rose with his ace of clubs and cashed the king of hearts as West discarded the jack of diamonds. East continued with the queen of hearts, which was ruffed by South with the jack of spades. Another club from South went

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD to East’s queen, and East continued with the jack of hearts. South ruffed this with the queen of spades, ruffed his last club in dummy, and then cashed dummy’s king and 10 of spades. In this two-card ending, with South holding the ace-seven of trumps, he tried to ruff a diamond with the seven to get back to his hand but was over-ruffed by West with the eight for the setting trick. Declarer was certainly unlucky, finding West with three trumps to the eight and only three diamonds. Still, he could have done better. Can you spot how? Instead of leading a club from dummy at trick four, South should have ruffed a diamond with a low trump. That would have put South one trick ahead. The ending would have left South with just the ace of trumps. Even a fine player like West wouldn’t have been able to over-ruff that. (08/24/17)

Across

1 Hitchcock film with Laurence Olivier 8 Exaggerate 15 Edited, in a way 16 Wound up 17 James is keeping me from getting a steam engine patent 19 Make a scene 20 Itsy-bitsy bits 21 Discrimination 22 Some delivery drivers’ plans: abbr. 24 Big Ten powerhouse, for short 25 Edward VII, familiarly 26 Presidential ex 28 Out of one’s head

29 Half-days, for short 30 Real downers 34 Genealogist’s work 35 Hockey, to Gordie 38 Princes, e.g. 39 Nation whose flag has a black eagle on a solid red background 40 Middle name of Sean Lennon 41 Low island 42 Cheating meeting? 46 Over-thecounter cold remedy 48 Brest friend 51 Drains 52 Calvin who may have designs on you

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

WORD GAME August 24 WORD — DEODORIZE (DEODORIZE: dee-O-dor-ize: To mask or neutralize the smell of.) Average mark 20 words. Time limit 35 minutes. Can you find 29 or more words in DEODORIZE? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — MACKINAWS macaw nick skim main wain skin mania wick smack maniac wink snack manic sack snick mask saki swain mica sank swam mink sawn swami akin scam swan anima scan swank caiman sick swim cask sink RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

53 Place for French lessons 55 One making a row? 56 A former leader of China gave his Shar-Peis some exercise 59 Extract of beef fat 60 Fascinate 61 What’s turned up on someone’s face? 62 Request from the curious 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

CROSSWORD

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

14

18

Down

Nuke, maybe Challenging bet Outdo Setting for an O’s game Mexican thing Screenplay directive Fictional swordsman AOL and MSN “Car Talk” carrier Paid, as a bill Lung-related Top pros Driving schedule? Member of Ronald Reagan’s cabinet It’ll never get off the ground

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might want to take a risk, but you will want to weigh the pros and cons first. Be sure you can accept a loss, and don’t allow yourself to get too upset if the result is negative. Tonight: Make it your treat.

If Aug. 24 is your birthday • This year confusion seems to surround your relationships; what you think is happening could be quite wrong. If you are single, be aware of a tendency to put a potential sweetie on a pedestal. If you are attached, the two of you might spend more time indulging in an entertaining pastime. Libra knows how to soften you up.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You could be exhausted by all the attention you are getting. On the other hand, you have learned to adjust and enjoy the excitement. A loved one might be unpredictable, and you’ll want to distance yourself. Tonight: Others rally around you.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You might test others’ patience today. Your anger is likely to surface when dealing with what you consider “annoying” people. The unexpected throws off your day and affects your routine in various ways. Tonight: Lie low for a little while. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Focus on what you need to do and on what is happening around you. If you don’t stop and take a deep breath, you could find your stress levels mounting. Tonight: Soak away any stress in a hot tub. GEMINI (May 201-June 20) HHHH You could be exhausted by everything that is going on around you. Find out why a close associate seems to be in the midst of adding some tension to your life. Detach, and know that the issue has little to do with you. Tonight: Allow yourself to cut loose. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You could be under a lot of pressure, even more than you realize. An authority figure will be very unpredictable, which will encourage you to race to a favorite spot for some solace and centering. Tonight: Screen your calls and lock your doors. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You could be in the line of fire and wondering what to do with some odd news you hear. If you relax, you will see that the situation is taking you to a new level of understanding. Tonight: Hang out at a preferred spot.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You might be on the last leg of a low-energy cycle. Make it OK to drag a little if you’re not feeling up to snuff. Take a nap, or head home early. Tonight: Get as much R and R as possible.

Puzzle by Randolph Ross

23 25 27 28 31

32 33 34 35

Impedes It holds water Copier Big butte Shorthand system inventor Pitman Well It may have a ring to it Reaction to sad news Southernmost major U.S. city

36 How a flamingo may stand 37 Coll. hoops competition 38 Old school dance 41 Response to a discouraging comment 43 Louts 44 Frequent co-signatory 45 Fly over the equator

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0720

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH A child or new friend seems to have some quirks that make you smile. Understand that some of this person’s spontaneity could be a liability. Tonight: Reach out to a loved one. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You are more in touch with your responsibilities than many others seem to be. You will work late to accomplish an unexpected task, if necessary. Tonight: Be resourceful. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You might want to consider taking off this weekend. You will enjoy the change of pace, and your perspective could change as a result. It will surprise you how a situation can look so different just because you go away for a few days. Tonight: Make the most of the moment.

47 Attach, in a way 48 Big heart? 49 Cable ___ 50 Massey of old movies 53 Jennifer of “Pride and Prejudice,” 1995 54 Like custard 57 Sequel to “Angela’s Ashes” 58 Mr., abroad

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Touch base with a loved one you really care about. This person might be more open than in the recent past. As a result, what he or she reveals could have unusual significance. Tonight: Be more caring, if possible. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


08.24.2017 • Thursday • M 1

EVERYDAY

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Evenings at home fall silent with wife

Dear Mattering • Facebook and gaming can be so absorbing that when members sign on for “just a minute,” the next thing they know, two hours have flown by. I say this because it has happened

to me. Discuss this again with your wife, and this time tell her you miss the closeness you had when the two of you could share activities and that you are lonely. If she doesn’t realize that it is a red flag, the two of you may need professional mediation to reach a compromise, such as a scheduled date night. If that doesn’t satisfy you, look for projects or hobbies you can share with other people with similar interests. You are not alone in having this problem. Dear Abby • I am a gay man. My boyfriend, “James,” and I have been together for nine years with a few time-outs. I’m 59; he’s 57. In many ways we have a great relationship and care deeply for each other. Our problem? We are in the same field of employment but work for different companies. He works full-time in a highly stressful position, while I work 20 hours a week and have a great time doing it. James earns twice what I do. I

have no money put away for retirement because I don’t earn enough to save. James doesn’t like it. He wants someone who is his equal in saving money. Obviously, our story isn’t as simple as it sounds. His therapist supports his feelings. Mine says: “In 2008, when everyone lost their pensions, you didn’t see a bunch of people filing for divorce, did you? There are more important things than money.” I don’t know what to do. I want to grow old with James. — MONEY WOES IN SAN FRANCISCO Dear Money • You two need a different kind of mediation than two shrinks and an advice columnist. From where I sit, you would benefit from consulting a financial planner who can help you figure out if there’s a way to put away some money for a rainy day. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

DR. FOX

A warning about cat scratch fever Dear Dr. Fox • Two years ago, I started having short episodes of double vision, numbness on the right side of my face, diminished taste sensation and gait abnormality. For about a week, I had to walk with assistance and could not drive. My primary care doctor diagnosed me with central origin vertigo and ordered an MRA (to check blood flow to the brain) and an MRI of the brain. The brain showed some spots. I was then referred to a neurologist, who did a lumbar puncture. This confirmed a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. The diagnosis was devastating, even though I had no outward signs of the disease. As time passed, I developed a severe anxiety disorder, and I had obsessivecompulsive tendencies. I had a lot of other psych symptoms that I somehow managed to keep under control. More symptoms started snowballing as time went on, and I be-

gan to think something else was going on, so I started taking my temperature daily. I always ran a low-grade fever. Having overcome Lyme disease about 10 years prior, I do have some knowledge of vector-borne diseases. I researched and started reading about the various diseases and considered the fact that I was infected with Bartonella, also known as cat-scratch fever. I made an appointment with my previous vector-borne disease specialist and was tested for Bartonella. My titer was 1:256, which is very high! The abnormalities in my spinal fluid, brain spots and constant inflammation are most likely caused by the infection. My doctor and I discussed how I got infected. I do own a cat, and he has bitten and scratched me innocently during play. I recall one occasion when I got a deep bite on the thin skin on the back of my hand, so I figure that these

bacteria had almost three years to multiply in my central nervous system! I will be on three different antibiotics daily for several months. Some of the psych and neuro symptoms have resolved, but I still have a way to go. My case may be atypical, but all possibilities have to be considered when it comes to these vector-borne diseases. — C.C., Cumberland, Md. Dear C.C. • I am sure that readers will sympathize with you and appreciate your call for vigilance concerning this bacterial disease transmissible from cats and other animals to humans. Your experience is a warning to all cat owners to not let their cats roam free because they may pick up fleas that have fed on infected cats. Visit Dr. Fox’s website at DrFoxVet.net. Send mail to animaldocfox@gmail.com or to Dr. Michael Fox in care of Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

Differences: 1. Mouth is different. 2. Fingers are not showing. 3. Button is added. 4. Hand is moved. 5. Woman’s arm is not showing. 6. Headrest is added.

Dear Abby • A large portion of conversation in our home has been replaced with the time my wife spends on her cellphone. Not that she is talking on it. It’s games and Facebook that absorb hours of her time. We used to spend evenings working on special projects together, but that is the exception now and no longer the rule. If I ask a question or make a comment, she answers, but we sit mostly in silence. Must I accept this as the new norm that seems to have swept up everyone and wait for her to tire of this activity? I have gently mentioned my dismay, but when I did she became defensive and said it is HER time. Do you have any advice on how to cope with this? — MATTERING LESS IN MISSOURI

TV THURSDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 8/24/17

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX Beat Shazam: Episode Love Connection: Epi- Fox 2 News at 9:00pm 2 Twelve. (N) (cc) sode Twelve. (N) (cc) (N) (cc) CBS The Big 4 Bang Theory

Kevin Can Big Brother (N) (cc) Wait (7:31)

Zoo: The Black Forest. (N) (cc)

NBC The Wall: Sheriese and Saturday Great News The Night Shift More 5 Kieara. (N) (cc) Night Live (cc) is learned about Cain’s (cc) past. (N) (cc) PBS Donny9 brook CW 11

Doc Martin The wed- ÍVera: Dark Road. Donnybrook: Your ding of Doc and Louisa. Vera investigates a Turn (cc) mysterious death.

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Penn & Teller: Fool Us Whose Line Whose Line Riccardo Berdini; Yan Is It Any- Is It Anyway? way? Markson. (N)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

Here’s Help The Beverly Hillbillies

ABC Boy Band The winners Battle of the Network The Gong Show Will Ar30 are announced. (N) (cc) Stars: ABC Stars vs. nett; Ken Jeong. (cc) Variety. (N) Blue Bloods A cartel MYTV Blue Bloods An under- Blue Bloods: Exiles. 46 cover detective is killed. Danny makes a shock- attack leaves Baez (cc) ing discovery. wounded. (cc)

You trust your friends. Do you trust their source?

NEWS FOR HUMANITY


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 08.24.2017

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Kyphoplasty props up vertebra after fracture Dear Dr. Roach • An almost 90-year-old friend has osteoporosis. In January, she collapsed while walking home. Now, five months after having a compression fracture of her vertebra, she says she is most comfortable while lying in bed. She has been taking OxyContin and oxycodone. She is afraid of becoming addicted. She has been advised that kyphoplasty is the recommended surgery. She is scared and wants more opinions. She saw an advertisement on TV about minimally invasive back surgery, so I called about it for her, but it was symptom-relief surgery and they do not provide kyphoplasty, which when successful relieves the pressure (almost immediately) that causes the pain without cutting the nerves. Re-establishing the original height and shape of her bone with balloon kyphoplasty seems like an amazing surgical approach and has been available for about 25 years. My friend believes in offering up her pains (she is deeply spiritual), and I am doing my best to help her make her decision. The neurosurgeon advised her that all surgery has risks, that he has performed the surgery many times, that the vertebra will heal to this new shape and that her pain threshold should be a significant part of her decision. — B.C.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

Answer • A compression fracture happens when a vertebral bone, usually weakened through osteoporosis, is crushed. This often causes the nerve roots, which exit between the vertebrae, to be compressed by the bone, causing pain and sometimes weakness. For a compression fracture that continues to be so painful that it requires opiates, surgical intervention is clearly worth considering. Both balloon kyphoplasty (where the compressed vertebra is returned to nearly its original height with a balloon and filled with cement to keep it from crushing again) and minimally invasive lumbar fusion (where metal rods keep the nerve from being compressed) are reasonable surgical options. I can’t give an opinion on which of those two would be better, but it sounds like her surgeon has recommended the balloon kyphoplasty, which sounds entirely reasonable to me. Long-term opiate use is safe and effective for some people, but there are many risks, including dependence on the medication. It is clear that lying in bed is a bad long-term solution. I also can’t comment on the religious nature of her pain. However, I asked a friend of mine, Clare Rothschild, a professor of Scripture Studies at Lewis University, and she recommended that your friend consult with a trusted leader in the community before making her decision.

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics