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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 08.17.2018 • $2.00

ARETHA FRANKLIN • 1942 – 2018

‘QUEEN OF SOUL’ INSPIRED GENERATIONS

Blues’ new practice home is finally under construction BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

‘I don’t know anybody

There have been starts and stops, and controversy. Ground has been broken — and then “unbroken.” But the Blues finally are getting their new practice facility and the St. Louis area is getting much-needed rink space to grow amateur and college hockey in the region. The proof was in the tent, earth-movers, hard hats, and specially designed hockey sticks — with a blade on one end and a shovel on the other — on display Thursday morning in Maryland Heights. With several hundred spectators crammed

that can sing a song like Aretha Franklin. Nobody. Period.’ >>> RAY CHARLES

See BLUES • Page A4

Area dealerships offering monthly car subscriptions BY BRIAN FELDT ST. Louis Post-Dispatch

Multiple St. Louis auto dealers are introducing short-term rental service plans that could have customers in a high-end sedan to drive to work during the week, a sporty convertible for a Friday night out on the town and an SUV to lug around the kids over the weekend — all for a flat fee that includes insurance, maintenance and other car related costs. Lou Fusz Automotive Network and Jim Butler Auto Group are among those that will begin offering customers the subscription-based car rental service. See CARS • Page A4

Newspapers are ‘in collusion’ over free press, Trump says AP BY DAVID BAUDER Associated Press BY MESFIN FEKADU AND HILLEL ITALIE Associated Press

NEW YORK • Aretha Franklin, the undisputed “Queen of Soul” who sang with matchless style on such classics as “Think,” “I Say a Little Prayer” and her signature song, “Respect,” and stood as a cultural icon around the globe, has died from pancreatic cancer. She was 76. Publicist Gwendolyn Quinn told The Associated Press through a

family statement that Ms. Franklin died Thursday (August 16, 2018) at 9:50 a.m. at her home in Detroit. A professional singer and pianist by her late teens, a superstar by her mid20s, Ms. Franklin had long ago settled any arguments over who was the greatest popular vocalist of her time. Her gifts, natural and acquired, were a multi-octave mezzo-soprano, gospel passion and training worthy of a preacher’s daughter, taste sophisticated and eccentric, and the courage to chan-

nel private pain into liberating song. She recorded hundreds of tracks and had dozens of hits over the span of half a century, including 20 that reached No. 1 on the R&B charts. But her reputation was defined by an extraordinary run of top 10 smashes in the late 1960s, from the morning-after bliss of “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,” to the wised-up “Chain of Fools” to her unstoppable

NEW YORK • Newspapers from Maine to Ha-

See FRANKLIN • Page A7

See TRUMP • Page A10

Baby bobcat getting care after being found near YMCA in Potosi

A baby bobcat found near the YMCA in Potosi is being cared for by a rescue group in Black Jack until she can be released back into the wild. She’s 7 pounds of viciousness who devours mice, quail and rabbits.

BY LEAH THORSEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTO COURTESY OF BI-STATE WILDLIFE HOTLINE

TODAY

waii pushed back against President Donald Trump’s attacks on “fake news” with a coordinated series of editorials in defense of a free press on Thursday — and, not surprisingly, Trump didn’t take it silently. The campaign was set in motion by an editor at the Boston Globe, which argued in its own editorial that Trump’s label of the media as the enemy of the people “is as un-American as it is dangerous to the civic compact we have shared

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facility in Black Jack in north St. Louis County. It wouldn’t be hard to mistake the little bobcat, now around three months old, for an ornery feral cat. That’s until you hear her, said Angel Wintrode, president and founder of the group that rescues and rehabilitates wild animals ranging from squirrels and skunks to coyotes — and about once a year, a bobcat.

A baby bobcat emerged from the treeline outside the YMCA in Potosi a few weeks ago, her mother nowhere to be found. The scrawny cat weighed just a couple of pounds, and had parasites. The Missouri Department of Conservation trapped her, and she’s being cared for by the Bi-State Wildlife Hotline of Missouri and Illinois rescue group at its

See BOBCAT • Page A6

Messenger: Big costs for airport deal

• A2

Nats end Cards’ win streak at eight

Financial woes nag auditor candidate

• A3

SSM looks ready to reshape its future

• B1

SPORTS

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M 1 FRIDAY • 08.17.2018 • A2

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UPCOMING CHATS Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday

Big-dollar bill awaits city in Sinquefield’s airport deal TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

There’s a new payday loan outfit in town, and it’s taking up residence in St. Louis City Hall. It’s called the Bank of Rex. Borrowers beware: The costs of taking a loan from this bank are significant. They are outlined in a series of documents obtained by the Post-Dispatch in a Sunshine Law request that show how much consultants who are working under the control of a nonprofit called Grow Missouri will be paid as they advise the city on whether to privatize operations at St. Louis Lambert International Airport. The costs are steep, up to $800,000 per month or more for the one to two years it might take to make a recommendation on the airport’s future. If that happens, those monthly costs will be paid by city taxpayers out of the proceeds of what is effectively a risky auction of the city’s top asset. Grow Missouri is controlled by local billionaire and philanthropist Rex Sinquefield and run by lobbyist Travis Brown. It has agreed to front money to at least 14 separate consultants as the city prepares to issue requests for proposals to companies that want to bid on the airport operations. The monthly cost of those services, are at least $627,776 just in retainers. Expenses could be $270,250 or more. Three different law firms are also being paid between $425 and $575 an hour, with those costs rising as high as $800 an hour if the city closes a privatization deal. Mayor Lyda Krewson and Aldermanic President Lewis Reed approved the expenses when they voted to approve the contract with Grow Missouri and its consortium of consultants. Krewson stands by the deal and says no matter how much Grow Missouri pays it won’t cost taxpayers a penny. “We don’t pay anything,” Krewson says of the city and its taxpayers. She says it is still early in a process that might lead to “nothing,” but that she’s committed to finding out if privatization could improve

airport operations. “I think it is worth considering a different way of doing business at the airport,” she says. “I don’t think this should be alarming to people.” If the airport is privatized, Grow Missouri will be reimbursed its costs out of the fee paid by a private company for the right to profit off of the airport in coming decades. The city’s cost for, in effect, taking a loan from Sinquefield and allowing his operatives to run the process, is at least four times as high. When the city sought bids for consultants to advise them on the process, only one other consortium was deemed to be fully qualified, P3Point, based in California. Its proposed costs were about $200,000 per month, about one-fourth the amount the city agreed to pay the Grow Missouri group. P3Point specifically argued against an arrangement where the consultants were paid a percentage of profits of the deal. So while Krewson says taxpayers aren’t on the hook for any more no matter how much Grow Missouri spends, that’s only true in the context of that single bid. Other bidders who offered to advise the city, and agreed to be paid on the back end, offered smaller transaction fees than Grow Missouri. And several of them, like P3Point, argued against such commissionlike arrangements. Were P3Point to have been selected by the city, its total cost to taxpayers after 24 months would have been about $6.8 million. The Grow Missouri contract, if the airport is privatized, will cost between $21 million and $40 million. Who is making all of this money? There’s New York-based boutique investment banking firm Moelis & Co., the landing place of former U.S. House majority leader Eric Cantor, who became vice chairman of the firm after losing a Republican primary in 2014. Moelis doesn’t have significant airport privatization experience and doesn’t even mention the issue on its website as an area of expertise. Moelis will be paid $100,000 a month in a retainer and up to $150,000 a month in expenses. There’s McKenna & Associates, the Virginia-based consulting firm founded by Andrew J. McKenna, who is mostly

known as a Republican fundraiser who dabbles in dark money. He, too, lacks extensive airport privatization expertise. His firm will be paid a $125,000 monthly retainer and up to $20,000 in monthly expenses. Each of those companies will also share in a success fee — in effect a very expensive incentive, $5 million or more — to make sure the privatization deal gets done. There’s more. Attorney Marc Ellinger, who does much of Sinquefield’s legal work, will be paid $80,000 a month and up to $10,000 a month in expenses. Local political insider and consultant Mike Jones will be paid $12,500 a month. And the city’s contracted lobbyist, Jeff Aboussie, will also cash in as a consultant paid by Grow Missouri. The city didn’t yet provide his contract with Grow Missouri. This is no way to do business says Donald Cohen, executive director of In the Public Interest, a nonprofit that studies privatization efforts. “I’ve never seen a procurement process that was this loaded up with consultants especially since the process ignores some of the basic standards of good public procurement practice that protects taxpayers and the public,” Cohen says. None of this is news to city leaders. They knew when they approved Grow Missouri’s bid that several other bidders were critical of the inherent conflicts of interest and misplaced incentives in a socalled “success fee” arrangement. Krewson dismisses such talk. She says that despite the financial incentives tied to being paid by Grow Missouri: “They work for us. They are our contractors. They are on our team.” The only city official who voted against the contract with Grow Missouri, the one responsible for the city’s credit rating, disagrees. She says this is a bad deal for taxpayers. “Contract negotiators missed the mark when it came to fiscal responsibility and controlling costs on behalf of city taxpayers,” says Comptroller Darlene Green. “These numbers are irresponsible and extraordinarily high.” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

with bedrooms converted to offices. The original bathroom in powder blue tile still exists and is still functional,” he said. “The way this building is laid out is not very functional.” MAPLEWOOD > Redevelopment district gets initial OK • The City Council has given tentative approval for a special-tax district for the Sunnen Station redevelopment project. The ordinance on the district would levy a 1 percent sales tax on goods sold there. The council is expected to give final approval to the ordinance on Sept. 11. During a presentation Tuesday to the council, Angela Odlum, an attorney representing Sunco LLC and some property owners in the district, said the tax would not apply to cars sold at the auto dealerships in the redevelopment area but would apply to parts sales. Labor on auto repairs is not taxed. Sunnen Station, a 22-acre site on Hanley Road south of Manchester and north of Deer Creek Center, has three auto dealerships, a 174-unit apartment complex under construction and several vacant lots. The apartment complex is excluded from the district. The city declared the site blighted in 2006. Money generated by the tax would

PEOPLE Director testifies in filmmaker’s espionage trial in Cambodia One of Australia’s most famous movie directors testified Thursday in Cambodia at the trial of a filmmaking countryman facing a possible prison term of five to 10 years for flying a drone to capture images of an opposition political rally. Peter Weir, director of “The Year of Living Dangerously,” “Dead Poets Society” and “The Truman Show,” testified as a character witness at the trial of James Ricketson, who was arrested in June 2017 and has been kept in detention since then. Ricketson, 69, was taken in an orange jumpsuit to the Phnom Penh Municipal Court for the first official trial session on the charge of endangering national security, which in legal terms is tantamount to espionage. Ricketson was arrested after he used a drone to film the final rally of the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party before local elections. The party has since been dissolved as part of a sweeping crackdown on the opposition and media critical of Prime Minister Hun Sen’s government. Rapper sets up scholarship to help blacks attend Cambridge • London rapper Stormzy is setting up a scholarship to help black students attend Britain’s prestigious Cambridge University. The grime artist says the Stormzy Scholarship will pay the 9,250 pounds ($11,750) a year in tuition and fees, plus a maintenance grant, for two undergraduates at the 800-year-old university this year and in 2019.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actor Robert DeNiro is 75. “Downton Abbey” creator Julian Fellowes is 69. Actor Sean Penn is 58. Singer Maria McKee is 54. Actor David Conrad is 51. Actress Helen McCrory is 50. Singer-actor Donnie Wahlberg is 49. From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday: 12-15-28-47-48 Powerball: 16 Power play: 2 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $50 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday’s estimated jackpot: $88 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Thursday: 08-39-42-43-48 Lucky ball: 11

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

DIGEST ELLISVILLE > New City Hall considered • Officials are reviewing design concepts for a new municipal building. During a presentation featuring renderings at a City Council work session on Wednesday night, Travis Van Buren, with architectural contractor Archimages, said a new building of about 12,848 square feet with 41 parking spaces is being considered at the site of the current 6,935-square-foot building at 1 Weis Avenue. The estimated construction cost is about $4.9 million. City Manager Bill Schwer said the current City Hall was built in 1971. City Hall has been added on to over the years, including by connecting it to what had been a neighboring home, but “isn’t large enough for council meetings, court, and operations” in the growing city, Schwer said. He said the city hasn’t made a determination yet on how a new building would be funded. “But, if we do what we’ve done in the past, we would fund it through certificates of participation, though there is no timetable on the design or construction of the facility yet,” Schwer said. Mayor Mike Roemerman said a new City Hall is long overdue. “Half of City Hall, where a lot of offices are, was originally a single-family home,

Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m.

reimburse the developer for the cost of installing lighting and improving roads in the district, Odlum said. All of the property owners are on board with the idea of the taxing district, she said. The tax would expire on Dec. 31, 2043, or when the ceiling of $4.5 million is met, she added. SPRINGFIELD, ILL. > New law cracks down on texting and driving • People caught texting while driving will face stiffer penalties under a new Illinois law. Starting July 1, 2019, drivers caught texting will be issued a moving violation that will go on their driving record. Anyone convicted of three moving violations in a 12-month period may have their license suspended. Under the current law that took effect in 2014, a first offense for texting while driving is a nonmoving violation and doesn’t affect a person’s driving record. Secretary of State Jesse White says the law is needed because distracted driving has become a serious problem. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates at least 25 percent of crashes reported to police involve distracted driving. White says the new law Gov. Bruce Rauner signed this week “will make our roads safer.”

LOTTO Wednesday: 17-29-33-35-36-40 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.7 million SHOW ME CASH Thursday: 03-09-10-29-36 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $204,000 PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 484 Evening: 335 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 9524 Evening: 6912

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Thursday Midday: 14-24-28-39-43 Evening: 11-18-24-27-35 LOTTO Thursday: 03-05-21-39-43-48 Extra shot: 01 Estimated jackpot: $11 million PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 229 FB: 7 Evening: 485 FB: 7 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 7006 FB: 8 Evening: 8483 FB: 8

CORRECTIONS • Reports in the Law & Order on Wednesday and Thursday about charges against two people in the death of their infant daughter misstated who allegedly used drugs in the baby’s room the day before the child was found dead. Court documents say Robert Hasenfratz told police that his co-defendant, Samantha Poppleton, had used heroin in the child’s room.

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous >>> stltoday.com/newstips

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LOCAL

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Financial woes nag GOP candidate for auditor BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

SEDALIA, MO. • The Republican candidate for Missouri auditor says she’s staying in the race despite questions over her finances and whether she qualifies for the ballot. Saundra McDowell, an attorney from Jefferson City, told the Post-Dispatch on Thursday that she is in the midst of ramping up her general election campaign against current auditor Nicole Galloway, a Democrat from Columbia. “We’re ready to get going. I’m just trying to get the best people on my team right now and get that set up,” McDowell said. “You’re going to see a lot of me out there.” Her comments came

as politicians descended on the Missouri State Fair for the annual Governor’s Ham Breakfast event hosted by Gov. Mike Parson. Among the dozens of state, local and federal elected officials attending the morning gathering was Galloway, who has slammed McDowell’s credentials. “For me, I think that there is no question that she’s not qualified to be the state’s auditor. Given her poor track record of financial management, why would taxpayers turn over a billion-dollar checkbook to her?” said Galloway, a certified public accountant. McDowell’s candidacy has been under scrutiny since she joined the race late last year. Along

with being ordered to pay $32,658 to a Springfield landlord in 2015 after she and her husband, Jonathan, stopped paying rent on a home, McDowell may not have lived in Missouri long enough to qualify for the office. The state constitution requires the auditor to be a resident for 10 years. McDowell, who moved to Missouri in 2010, said she qualifies because she was in law school the previous two years and had intended to move to the state where her husband is from once she finished. Despite the questions, McDowell won last week’s four-way Republican Party primary race last week, amassing 32.5 percent of the vote. Missouri Republican

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Saundra McDowell, GOP candidate for Missouri auditor, at the Governor’s Ham Breakfast in Sedalia, Mo., on Thursday.

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Party Chairman Todd Graves, a Kansas City attorney, said the party is not attempting to get McDowell off the ballot. “Saundra McDowell was elected in the Republican primary, and the Republican Party supports its candidates,” Graves told the Post-Dispatch. McDowell also said she’s got solid support from the party. “The GOP is proudly supporting me. I’ve had a lot of communication with them,” McDowell said. Parson, meanwhile, was in his element. Hosting his first ham

breakfast after taking over for scandal-plagued former Gov. Eric Greitens on June 1, Parson, a cattle farmer, reveled in the crossroads of politics and rural Missouri. “I’m still living the dream,” Parson told the estimated 1,000 attendees. Parson focused his comments on his efforts to convince voters to support a phased-in, 10-cent increase in the state’s 17-cent per gallon gasoline tax. In one of their final acts of the spring legislative session, lawmakers placed the question on the November ballot.

If approved, the estimated $293 million generated by the higher taxes would go toward overhauling the state’s roads and bridges. Parson also expressed concern about the drought affecting much of the state. He said he has already fed his cattle hay because of a shortfall of forage. “I have never fed hay in August before in my farming career. Anytime you’re feeding hay in August for livestock producers is not a good sign,” Parson said. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

*Some Restrictions Apply

Senator Roy Blunt Receives the 2018 “Champion for Healthy Seniors Award” For more than 10 years, the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Benefit has successfully provided seniors with affordable access to prescription medicines. Many seniors have chronic conditions – like diabetes and arthritis – and depend on Part D coverage. Despite Part D’s success and popularity, proposals to cut its funding, limit access, and raise seniors’ share of the costs threaten to undermine the program. The Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease salutes Senator Blunt for his commitment to protecting and improving Part D coverage for America’s seniors.

Senator Roy Blunt is Working to Improve Medicare Part D for America’s Seniors Protecting Access to the Medicines Seniors Need

Eliminating Threats to Part D Funding

Fixing Changes in Part D’s Catastrophic Coverage

Senator Blunt is fighting to preserve patient protections under Part D that provide seniors with access to a wide variety of treatment options.

Thanks to the support of Senator Blunt, Congress passed legislation to end the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), which threatened seniors’ Part D coverage and access.

Recent changes to Part D catastrophic coverage would require seniors with very complex health needs to face significantly higher out-of-pocket costs once they reach a specific level of spending. Senator Blunt is fighting to reverse this change.

Call Senator Roy Blunt at 202-224-3121. Thank Him for Fighting for Seniors by Protecting the Medicare Part D Benefit. Urge Him to Keep Fighting to Make Part D Even Better for America’s Seniors. HealthySeniorsAward.org/Blunt

Paid for by Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease | fightchronicdisease.org


LOCAL

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Financial woes nag GOP candidate for auditor BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

SEDALIA, MO. • The Republican candidate for Missouri auditor says she’s staying in the race despite questions over her finances and whether she qualifies for the ballot. Sa u n d ra Mc Dowe l l , an attorney from Jefferson City, told the PostDispatch on Thursday that she is in the midst of ramping up her general election campaign against McDowell current auditor Nicole Galloway, a Democrat from Columbia. “We’re ready to get going. I’m just trying to get the best people on my team right now and get that set up,” McDowell said. “You’re going to see a lot of me out there.” Her comments came as politicians descended on the Missouri State Fair for the annual Governor’s Ham Breakfast event hosted by Gov. Mike Parson.

Among the dozens of state, local and federal elected officials attending the morning gathering was Galloway, who has slammed McDowell’s credentials. “For me, I think that there is no question that she’s not qualified to be the state’s auditor. Given her poor track record of financial management, why would taxpayers turn over a billion-dollar checkbook to her?” said Galloway, a certified public accountant. McDowell’s candidacy has been under scrutiny since she joined the race late last year. Along with being ordered to pay $32,658 to a Springfield landlord in 2015 after she and her husband, Jonathan, stopped paying rent on a home, McDowell may not have lived in Missouri long enough to qualify for the office. The state constitution requires the auditor to be a resident for 10 years. McDowell, who moved to Missouri in 2010, said she qualifies because she was in law school the previous two years and had intended to move to the state where her husband is from once she finished.

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Despite the questions, McDowell won last week’s four-way Republican Party primary race last week, amassing 32.5 percent of the vote. Missouri Republican Party Chairman Todd Graves, a Kansas City attorney, said the party is not attempting to get McDowell off the ballot. “Saundra McDowell was elected in the Republican primary, and the Republican Party supports its candidates,” Graves told the Post-Dispatch. McDowell also said she’s got solid support from the party. “The GOP is proudly supporting me. I’ve had a lot of communication with them,” McDowell said. Parson, meanwhile, was in his element. Hosting his first ham breakfast after taking over for scandal-plagued former Gov. Eric Greitens on June 1, Parson, a cattle farmer, reveled in the crossroads of politics and rural Missouri. “I’m still living the dream,” Parson told the estimated 1,000 attendees.

Parson focused his comments on his efforts to convince voters to support a phased-in, 10-cent increase in the state’s 17-cent per gallon gasoline tax. In one of their final acts of the spring legislative session, lawmakers placed the question on the November ballot. If approved, the estimated $293 million generated by the higher taxes would go toward overhauling the state’s roads and bridges. Parson also expressed concern about the drought affecting much of the state. He said he has already fed his cattle hay because of a shortfall of forage. “I have never fed hay in August before in my farming career. Anytime you’re feeding hay in August for livestock producers is not a good sign,” Parson said. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Shot fired at officers • Several police officers were searching late Thursday for a man who fired a shot at officers at a gas station at North Grand Boulevard and Natural Bridge Avenue. The officers were not hit and did not return fire. The gunfire happened just after 8:30 p.m. after an officer who was at the station went to check out a “suspicious” vehicle, a police official told KTVI (Channel 2). As the officer moved toward the car, someone inside jumped out, Lt. Anthony Aubuchon said. Officers chased the man, and as the officers were climbing over a fence, the man fired a gun toward them. “The officers are fine,” Aubuchon said. “They were not hit or anything.” Several more officers, detectives and a police helicopter quickly converged on the Mobil station and joined in the search for the gunman. The scene is just across Grand from Fairground Park. Company to pay $5.25 million over Medicare fraud • A medical equipment provider accused of giving illegal price

up to $1,000 Value *Some Restrictions Apply

reductions to Medicare beneficiaries has paid $5.25 million to resolve the allegations. The agreement was announced Thursday by U.S. Attorney Steven D. Weinhoeft of the Southern District of Illinois. Florida-based Lincare Inc. is one of the nation’s largest providers of oxygen and other respiratory therapy services at home, and has about 1,000 locations across the United States. The government claims that from 2011 to 2017, Lincare violated the federal False Claims Act and the Anti-Kickback Statute by unlawfully waiving or reducing co-payments, co-insurance and deductibles for beneficiaries who were a part of a Medicare Advantage Plan operated through a private insurer. The company’s goal was “to gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace,” the prosecutor said. The practices led to the submission of false claims for payments to Medicare, a press release from Weinhoeft said. The allegations were first brought to light by a whistleblower who formerly worked for the company as a billing supervisor. The whistleblower will receive $918,750 from the settlement proceeds.

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Senator Roy Blunt Receives the 2018 “Champion for Healthy Seniors Award” For more than 10 years, the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Benefit has successfully provided seniors with affordable access to prescription medicines. Many seniors have chronic conditions – like diabetes and arthritis – and depend on Part D coverage. Despite Part D’s success and popularity, proposals to cut its funding, limit access, and raise seniors’ share of the costs threaten to undermine the program. The Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease salutes Senator Blunt for his commitment to protecting and improving Part D coverage for America’s seniors.

Senator Roy Blunt is Working to Improve Medicare Part D for America’s Seniors Protecting Access to the Medicines Seniors Need

Eliminating Threats to Part D Funding

Fixing Changes in Part D’s Catastrophic Coverage

Senator Blunt is fighting to preserve patient protections under Part D that provide seniors with access to a wide variety of treatment options.

Thanks to the support of Senator Blunt, Congress passed legislation to end the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), which threatened seniors’ Part D coverage and access.

Recent changes to Part D catastrophic coverage would require seniors with very complex health needs to face significantly higher out-of-pocket costs once they reach a specific level of spending. Senator Blunt is fighting to reverse this change.

Call Senator Roy Blunt at 202-224-3121. Thank Him for Fighting for Seniors by Protecting the Medicare Part D Benefit. Urge Him to Keep Fighting to Make Part D Even Better for America’s Seniors. HealthySeniorsAward.org/Blunt

Paid for by Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease | fightchronicdisease.org


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

St. Louis auto dealers look to lure customers with monthly subscriptions

Developer to pay neighbors over neglected property FROM STAFF REPORTS

CARS • FROM A1

Car subscriptions have grown in popularity with independent auto dealers, but also with car manufacturers, including BMW and Volkswagen. “As car sharing and on-demand technology evolves and the business model of personal mobility changes, there will be less car sales because ownership of assets in this new order is not what it is cracked up to be,” said Neil Abrams, a former Hertz executive who now operates his own consulting firm that supports car rental and travel firms. “Why tie up the capital by owning if you can accomplish the same thing by not owning?” Lou Fusz’s Fusz Select plan, debuting in early September, is among the first of its kind in the region. Customers pay a one-time activation fee of $550 to start and then are charged a flat monthly fee of $950 that includes taxes, maintenance, insurance, concierge delivery and cleaning. Users of the plan could turn in their cars — or“flip”them,as the industry refers to it — and get a new one as many times as they’d like. Some of the vehicles in the fleet include the Alfa Romeo Giulia, Buick Enclave, Chevrolet Camaro, Ram 1500, Ford F-150, Ford Mustang GT, GMC Sierra 1500, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Kia Stinger, Mazda6, Subaru Ascent and the Toyota 4Runner. In all, said Lou Fusz New Car Director Pat Fusz, the dealership expects to invest at least $2 million to buy the 50 vehicles that will debut on the platform when first introduced. A more costly tier that would include higher-end vehicles could be introduced later this year. “We saw this was a growing trend,” he said. “The traditional way of owning a vehicle is going to change over the next few years and we see this as a way to stay ahead of that trend.” Pat Fusz said industry insights suggest consumers would flip a car on average 3.3 times per month. He expects about 30 customers to participate in the subscription service to start, “but that number will cater to demand and we hope that within a year’s time we’ll be seeing that figure at closer to 200.” Not all are as bullish on the trend. Steve Brown, a general manager for Frank Leta Acura in south St. Louis County, said he’s monitoring companies nationwide that are implementing such models to gauge the viability and consumer reception to it. “The entire model depends on high subscription rates so that the vehicles are in use as often as possible, thereby maximizing profitability and minimizing holding costs,” he said. “We have no plans in the near future to implement this model as we have seen no evidence that there is a substantial demand for it.”

PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Dennis Becker, director of security, wipes down fleet cars on display to promote the Fusz Select program on Thursday at Lou Fusz Athletic Training Center in Earth City.

Patrick Fusz displays the Fusz Select program app on his iPhone on Thursday at Lou Fusz Athletic Training Center in Earth City. Lou Fusz Select is a new monthly subscription service for automobiles. It is among the first vehicle subscription services in St. Louis. Members of the program will pay a monthly fee for access to a fleet of different vehicle makes and models. As subscribers they are able to change cars at will.

Michael Right, vice president of public affairs for AAA, said the high price of the service could scare off some consumers. The average true cost of vehicle ownership, according to AAA, is $8,469 per year, or $705.75 per month — more for a large truck and less for a small sedan. That total includes financing the vehicle, depreciation, maintenance, repair and fuel costs. “These subscriptions are looking to attract customers that aren’t particularly worried about the cost, but are more concerned about the convenience aspect of it,” he said. The Jim Butler subscription plan, called driveBlackTIE, will debut in early October and cost under $1,000 a month. Vehicles available in the plan would include brands across the Jim Butler portfolio, such as Alfa Romeo, Chevrolet, Kia, Maserati, Jeep, Dodge and others. Brad Sowers, co-owner of Jim Butler, said he’s banking on three types of customers to utilize the service: the lifestyle customer who just wants to drive without the hassle of maintenance or insurance, the mid-level luxury type that might want to drive a Mercedes from time to time and the high-end performance

‘A pinch-yourself moment’ for Blues — a new practice home BLUES • FROM A1

under the tent, official groundbreaking ceremonies took place for the $78 million St. Louis Community Ice Center. In the shadow of the Hollywood Casino, the complex will feature three indoor ice rinks, one covered outdoor rink, retail and restaurant space, plus space for Mercy health care sports medicine services. “It’s a little bit of a pinch-yourself moment,” Blues chairman Tom Stillman said. “There were a lot of obstacles. There were a lot of people trying to say ‘no,’ and these guys just kept at it and got it done.” By “these guys,” Stillman was referring to Patrick Quinn of the St. Louis Legacy Ice Foundation and Blues president and CEO of business operations Chris Zimmerman. The Legacy Foundation will manage the complex; the city of Maryland Heights will own it once the project is complete. Perhaps Quinn put it best in terms of the long road traveled before the complex became a reality. “David Perron was on the Blues when we started this project,” Quinn said. “But then he played for Edmonton, Pittsburgh and Anaheim before he was on the Blues again. So I figured that out, and I looked back and saw that Ellie’s had three baby elephants at St. Louis Zoo since then — at 22 months gestation. So it’s been a while.”

fans that want to get behind the wheel of a high-end BMW or Maserati. “We’re not saying it’s going to be huge, but it will be a limited offering for 15 or 25 users to start and we’ll work through that with them and launch it through the remainder of the year,” he said. “I’m not sure it will take off in St. Louis, but I do think there’s a niche in the marketplace for this type of thing. The cars are already here — we have $16 million in inventory so there are plenty of options to offer. Now the question is can we make money doing it?” The subscription model, which essentially is shortterm leases on vehicles, has the potential to upend the traditional car rental industry, including St. Louis’ largest private company, Enterprise Holdings, which operates Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Alamo Rent A Car and National Car Rental. “Any change to the competitive landscape is going to be of concern,” Abrams, the consultant, said. “But Enterprise is the largest car rental company on the planet and they have certainly smart leadership that has seen the writing on the wall, so I have no doubt they have a strategic plan to broaden their reach.” Indeed, Enterprise Hold-

The Blues and Legacy Foundation turned to the Hollywood Casino site after plans for the complex in Creve Coeur Lake Memorial Park fell through in controversy a year ago. There were charges that the bulldozing of land there took place without needed approval from the National Park Service, and ultimately the Park Service blocked construction on the site. Thursday’s groundbreaking at the new site was more ceremonial than usual for such events, because digging began in late June — even before all the financing was completed on the 25-acre, 277,000-square-foot project. As proof, there were acres of holes, hills and graded dirt behind Thursday’s ceremony. The goal, which seems ambitious, is to have the project completed by September 2019. Besides being the practice home of the Blues, the facility also will be used by Lindenwood University, the St. Louis AAA Blues and St. Louis Lady Cyclones hockey programs, as well as the St. Louis Blues Alumni Association According to a preliminary “official statement” on the project, dated July 13, 2018, the Blues will pay annual rent of $312,000 and also make a capital commitment of about $2.7 million. Lindenwood will pay $275,000 in annual rent and make a capital contribution of $1.5 million. The main rink will seat 2,500 spectators, with the other three rinks (two indoor, one outdoor) seating between 350 and 750 spectators. Other features in the official statement are a 1,500-squarefoot retail space to sell St. Louis Blues and other team merchandise, a 2,000-squarefoot restaurant plus outdoor patio dining, and a 12,700-square-foot St. Louis Ice

ings spokeswoman Laura Bryant said the Clayton-based company is in the final stages of development of its own subscription service model, though few details were disclosed. “Currently, we work with large dealerships and manufacturers to help them fulfill their programs, and we have offered our own similar product for years,” she said. “Our new model will have its own unique value proposition, with unmatched state-of-the art technology that will enable customers to have access to hundreds of different makes and models of vehicles.” Enterprise Holdings has a fleet of nearly 2 million vehicles spread across 6,400 cities in the United States alone (it operates in 90 countries overall), providing it a key advantage should it decide to implement it — geography and the ability to extend access to such a subscription as consumers travel across the country, as opposed to independent auto dealers that in most cases are bound to their own market. An opportunity, too, exists for Enterprise Holdings’ affiliate company Enterprise Fleet Management, which already manages a fleet of more than 520,000 vehicles in the U.S. and Canada for various companies, government agencies and other organizations with fleets as small as 20 vehicles. “As this situation evolves, rental companies are positioning themselves, and Enterprise owns one of the leading fleet management businesses in the world,” Abrams said. “Manufacturers build cars, they don’t manage cars or fleets. Technology companies build this connectivity for the cars, but they aren’t in the fleet management business. Enterprise (Holdings) is doing over $20 billion a year (in revenue) so they have a lot of money to transition themselves or develop their own plan.” Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

Sports Hall of Fame. The outdoor rink and adjacent plaza can be converted to a 4,000-4,500 capacity venue for concerts, festivals, markets and other events in the spring and summer. The project is being funded by $54 million in bonds by the Maryland Heights Industrial Development Authority, $6.5 million in cash contributions from the city of Maryland Heights, and $18 million more in contributions, grants and a community improvement sales tax. Mike Moeller, the mayor of Maryland Heights, said the complex will draw 1 million visitors, result in 16,000 hotel room stays and bring an annual economic impact of $20 million. “I think we will be able to attract tournaments, and tournaments of all sizes,” Zimmerman said. “National tournaments. All of these things play a big role in filling hotel rooms, in getting people into restaurants, and really just continuing to show people all of the opportunities in our region.” So the purpose of the complex is twofold: providing a showcase facility for youth and amateur hockey, and give the Blues a first-class practice facility. In the official project statement, it was pointed out that Pittsburgh, a similarsized market, has 44 ice rinks in its metropolitan area, to 20 for St. Louis. “Quite honestly, it’s ice time,” Zimmerman said. “By creating more sheets of ice, we’re gonna have better (practice) times. We won’t have as many kids playing in those horrible 6 a.m. practices that have become so legendary. People won’t be driving as far. And part of it really is an opportunity for us to quite honestly improve the lives of hockey families.”

ST. LOUIS • A developer who owns dozens of vacant and condemned properties in St. Louis has been ordered to pay $135,000 to four neighbors who sued claiming his neglect of a Tower Grove East apartment building devalued their land. St. Louis Circuit Judge Michael Stelzer issued an order Aug. 10 requiring the St. Louis Redevelopment Co., owned by Giro Katsimbrakis, to pay $135,000 to four neighbors who claimed the value of their homes suffered as a result of the developer’s failure to maintain a four-family apartment building in the 2900 block of Sidney Street. Stelzer’s order also requires Katsimbrakis’ company to bring the property up to code. The judge’s ruling follows a bench trial last month. Property owners Erik Lintvedt, Stefannie Marcus, Heim@ LLC and APS Real Estate Services LLC filed suit last year for damages, claiming Katsimbrakis neglected the property he bought in 2013 and allowed it to deteriorate. The suit claimed he allowed the building, which has been vacant since 2011, to fall apart over the years, with missing windows, a caved-in roof, crumbling masonry and debris scattered throughout the front and back yards. Katsimbrakis, a felon who spent 15 months in prison for bank fraud, was the subject of a 2015 Post-Dispatch investigation describing the California real estate investor’s practice of scooping up hundreds of foreclosed and bank-owned city properties following the nation’s housing crisis. Eventually, numerous complaints were filed about his vacant and condemned properties.

‘Rough ride’ given by officer, police group alleges BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A police membership asso-

ciation has alleged on social media that an officer intentionally tried to injure prisoners by driving erratically while she was taking them to the station to be booked. The Ethical Society of Police, which represents primarily black officers, tweeted on Tuesday that the officer, “Intentionality (sic) drove her police cruiser at a high rate of speed, stopping, and driving forward to hurt prisoners she was conveying. It’s on video, and at least one person was injured. She needs to be charged with a crime and placed on forced leave now.” The membership organization’s president, Sgt. Heather Taylor, has not returned requests for further comment. The police department did not comment on the matter. And the officer’s attorney said he could not comment because it is a pending investigation. The officer in question has not been charged with a crime, and “Nothing has been brought to our office regarding (the officer),” according to Susan Ryan, spokeswoman for the circuit attorney’s office. The officer is a 16-year veteran known for her community outreach efforts. The Post-Dispatch is not naming her because she has not been charged. Sources say the incident happened on Aug. 2 following the arrests of two young men in south St. Louis. The officer was transferred to administrative duty on Aug. 3 in the Communications Division, and an Internal Affairs investigation is underway, sources say. She is not allowed to work secondary duty or overtime.

Current Blue and former Oakville High player Patrick Maroon spoke firsthand Thursday about how the dearth of ice rinks affected young players and their families. He joined Moeller, Quinn, Stillman and Zimmerman on a makeshift stage, along with Blues Hall of Famers Brett Hull and Bernie Federko. Maroon said some of his earliest hockey practice memories included: “Waking up at 5 in the morning fully dressed. I’m still sleeping on the bench, I’m so cold, and my dad’s tying my skates.” Later, when he was playing AAA hockey, he made the nearly hourlong trek — oneway — from Oakville to Wentzville for practices that began at 9:30 p.m. at night. “We were 14 years old, 15 years old,” Maroon said. “Our parents were driving us, all the South County boys. One parent would carpool every day. They were fighting — they didn’t want to drive that far.” Underscoring the Blues’ commitment to youth hockey, the team announced a contribution of $100,000 in new rink development funds for a Chesterfield rink project as well as a donation of $10,000 annually to youth hockey organizations throughout the area. For the Blues themselves, the complex gives the team a state-of-the-art facility which is a far cry from their current practice setup at the nearly deserted Mills in Hazelwood. “Our guys are at the rink a lot,” Zimmerman said. “This is their job. This is their office. ... We want to be top-tier in how we support our players, and this is another piece of that.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 1

Trouble deepens for owner of apartment complex facing dozens of citations

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Hawley sues over conditions at Clinton-Peabody BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri AtBY JESSE BOGAN St. Louis Post-dispatch

BEL-RIDGE • One week after a two-bedroom apartment was condemned here for exposed wires on a water heater and apparent mold, the village inspector said he planned to cite T.E.H. Realty for not helping occupants move out of their infested home at Springwood Apartments. “I want them to make contact with other agencies to get help since the management won’t follow the ordinance that BelRidge has in place,” said Building Commissioner Raymond Winston. He told the occupants Aug. 9 that they had 24 hours to move out and that management was responsible for finding them a suitable apartment or put them up in a hotel. Damont Allen, 28, whose name is on the lease, said a T.E.H. Realty manager contacted him Tuesday about moving his family to one of the nine other apartment complexes that the firm has acquired in the St. Louis region since late 2014. “I haven’t heard from them since,” Allen said Thursday. “I tried to call her yesterday. She didn’t call me back and didn’t call me back today.” His apartment is one of 271 at Springwood. Located near Interstate 170 and Natural Bridge Avenue, officials threatened to condemn the complex in 2011 for dozens of safety and health violations. Affiliates of T.E.H. Realty bought the property in December 2014. Officials said the firm was given warnings late last year to make numerous repairs that weren’t made. This month, a village clerk started entering a stack of about 170 alleged

violations against T.E.H. Realty, ranging from stagnant water to refusing to repair defective handrails and guardrails. Michael Fein, a representative for T.E.H. Realty, didn’t respond to a request to visit this week. The pressure continues to mount. On Wednesday, Winston informed more residents at Springwood Apartments that they had 24 hours to vacate. He condemned the entire building at 9003 Torchlite Lane that includes about three occupied apartment units, as well as laundry and maintenance rooms. According to the notices, the building was ordered closed “until such time as collapsed and rotted stair supports, supports, railings, and the concrete deck to the second floor have been replaced,” as per code. Springwood Apartments was given 10 days to fix the problems and provide a structural engineer report, or face a summons to municipal court. On Thursday afternoon, the condemned building was still being used. Nae Jordan, 24, holding a 6-month-old girl, walked under a chunk of broken concrete hanging above the door to the laundry room without noticing. “Usually, when I am walking up here, I am looking at my phone,” she said, adding about the concrete: “Of course it needs to be fixed.” Dominick Moore, 24, said he hadn’t heard from management for relocation help and continued to stay in his apartment, which he rents for $496 a month. “I’ve called them, and they haven’t gotten back,” he said.

torney General Josh Hawley sued the St. Louis Housing Authority and the company that manages the Clinton-Peabody Housing Complex on Wednesday, accusing the two entities of failing to fix mold, infestations and structural issues at the complex. The lawsuit, filed in St. Louis Circuit Court, accuses the housing authority and the property manager, McCormack Baron Management Inc., of maintaining a public nuisance, engaging in a civil conspiracy and violating the Missouri Merchandising Practices Act by fraudulently marketing the units as habitable. Hawley’s office asked a circuit judge to issue an injunction requiring unit repairs and restitution of rent payments to residents living in uninhabitable units. The lawsuit also asks the judge to order punitive damages, civil penalties and reimbursement of money paid to McCormack Baron, and asks that the defendants cover the cost of the attorney general’s involvement, which started in April. At the time, Cheryl Lovell, the director of the housing authority, said housing managers had made progress in fixing conditions at the complex, where about 1,000 low-income residents live across 31 buildings. The complex, south of downtown St. Louis, was built in 1942.

She said in April that city health department officials had found evidence of mice in 42 units, down from 165 units in December. Lovell said the health department completed another inspection last week, but that she did not have the results. “We have spent a lot of time and energy trying to resolve these issues at Clinton-Peabody, and we have worked tirelessly to do it,” Lovell said, acknowledging the pests and rodents were not totally eradicated. Lovell said she had not read Hawley’s lawsuit, but thought it was “not particularly productive” to sue the housing authority seeing as the vast majority of its resources are derived from federal taxpayer funds. “It seems it might have been more in everybody’s best interests to try to understand what we are doing and how we are trying to resolve the problems before filing a lawsuit,” she said. “But then again, I can’t tell you what’s in the attorney general’s mind.” Hawley, a Republican, said in a statement that the conditions at Clinton-Peabody were “intolerable.” “Missouri law gives tenants the right to live in a safe and properly maintained home, and I am committed to ensuring that this vital right is vindicated,” said Hawley, who is running for the U.S. Senate. In response to Lovell’s concerns, Mary Compton, spokeswoman for the attorney general’s office, said in a statement that the office is aware of the authority’s efforts to correct

the problems, and the state’s top law enforcement office isn’t satisfied. “This is another example of the Housing Authority making excuses instead of offering solutions,” Compton said. “The residents of Clinton-Peabody deserve action, not talk.” She added: “The office is concerned that thus far the Housing Authority has not been responsive to the demands it has faced. We also sued McCormack Baron which has ample resources to pay a monetary award.” The lawsuit says “systematic” problems plague the complex. In April, representatives with McCormack Baron said they had shaken up management at the complex and were working to address the mice infestation. Officials in recent months have scrutinized conditions at the complex after a spat between city health officials and the housing authority and protests drew attention to the problems. In addition to Hawley’s investigation, U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., visited the complex in April. In a March 19 letter to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, she said the department should “act swiftly” to develop a long-term solution for the mice infestation. Last month, federal authorities said they broke up an alleged drugtrafficking ring at the complex, indicting 15 people.

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

Man charged in officer’s shooting fights unfit finding BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • A St. Louis man charged with

shooting and paralyzing a Ballwin police officer in 2016 has been found mentally unfit to face trial, according to recent court filings in the case. Antonio R. Taylor, 33, is objecting to an Aug. 8 finding by the Department of Mental Health that he is mentally incompetent to stand trial. Taylor filed a motion Tuesday via his Taylor public defender seeking a hearing. That hearing is set for Friday in St. Louis County Circuit Court.

Taylor underwent a mental examination earlier this year to determine if he suffers from mental illness and whether he understands court proceedings. His trial had been set for April but that was delayed when Circuit Judge Nellie Ribaudo ordered a mental evaluation for Taylor. Taylor, of the 1200 block of Tower Grove Avenue, is accused of using a .22-caliber pistol to shoot Officer Michael Flamion in the neck July 8, 2016, during a traffic stop on New Ballwin Road. Since Taylor’s arrest, he has been held at the St. Louis County Jail on charges of assaulting a law enforcement officer, unlawful gun possession, resisting arrest and armed criminal action.

fender and represent himself in court. In several of his filings, Taylor denies shooting Flamion and calls Flamion “the suspect” who “interfered with my life July 8, 2016.” Taylor’s criminal history in Missouri includes 2011 convictions of unlawful possession of a firearm and resisting arrest. He served 30 months in federal prison for a conviction of being a felon in possession of a gun. Court records also list convictions in California and Oklahoma. Flamion has undergone extensive rehabilitation since the shooting.

Flamion, 34, was paralyzed from the neck down when a man he stopped for speeding shot him from behind in July 2016, police have said. Taylor’s public defender, Beverly Hauber, this week sought to have all court filings related to Taylor’s mental exam or notice of Friday’s hearing sealed from the public. Assistant Prosecutor Jason Denney filed a motion Wednesday seeking a second mental health exam for Taylor within 60 days. Last month, Taylor wrote several letters to the judge seeking the dismissal of his charges and the return of his belongings, including clothing and personal hygiene items. He also sought to fire his public de-

Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Rescue center cares for baby bobcat after it was found in Potosi

considered dangerously low in the recent past. The animals were placed on the state’s list of threatened species in 1977 after dropping in numbers due to habitat changes and unregulated harvest, according to the state’s department of natural resources. A study by the Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory at Southern Illinois University Carbondale found reports of bobcats in all but three of Illinois’ counties by the 1990s, and they were removed from the threatened-species list in 1999. Other St. Louis-area rescue groups take in bobcats, including the TreeHouse Wildlife Center in Dow, between Alton and Godfrey. One such rescue was in March 2012, when the group took in a female bobcat after she was hit by a car near Belleville West High School. Staff named her Belle, and she gave birth to a baby bobcat, which they dubbed Bobbie, at the rehab center. They uploaded footage of the cats to YouTube, including a video showing them being released back into the wild. Baby bobcats usually are born in the spring, and typically stay with their mother until at least the fall. The bobcat found near Potosi is expected be ready to be released back into the wild by mid-September, likely near where she was found, although that decision will be made by the state conservation department, Wintrode said. Until then, her caretakers will keep making sure to keep the bobcat as afraid of people as she’ll need to be to survive. “They don’t have to do anything wrong to get shot at,” Wintrode said. “People shoot at bobcats just because they exist.”

BOBCAT • FROM A1

“If you close your eyes, you’d think there was a full-grown lion in there,” Wintrode said of the sounds coming from the bobcat’s enclosure. “She’s making noises you wouldn’t think would be possible from such a tiny, adorable thing.” She’s up to 7 pounds now after being at the shelter since July 27. She has been vaccinated and de-wormed, and is mean as can be, Wintrode said. She growls, hisses, bares her teeth and arches her back. Caretakers keep a hands-off approach so she stays that way and doesn’t get comfortable around people. “She knows she’s not supposed to be around us, and that’s exactly how it should be,” she said. She’s in a 6-foot-by-6-foot enclosure with a floor coated by pine shavings full of foliage with plenty of places for her to hide. Frequently, her caretakers can’t see her among the tree branches and limbs, which is the idea — bobcats are elusive by nature. There’s a plastic crate there too, but she hates it. She never required bottle-feeding, which is good — the less contact with people, the better, Wintrode said. She’s never fed by hand; heavy-duty grippers deliver her food. And she loves to eat. Her diet is all raw meat — mice, quail, rabbits, turkey necks and baby chicks, as well as chicken hearts and livers. She needs the organ meat, the fur, the bones. She’ll probably move onto live prey for

PHOTO COURTESY OF BI-STATE WILDLIFE HOTLINE

A bobcat found in Potosi is being cared for by a rescue group in Black Jack until she can be released back into the wild. She is soon expected to start eating live animals.

her meals in the next week or two. Much of her diet has to be shipped in, and must be sent overnight — which gets costly quickly, Wintrode said. The rescue group is spending about $500 a month on her food. She already has the hunting instinct and throws dead mice around before pouncing to eat. “That natural instinct to catch something is the only play they know. And that play that teaches them something,” Wintrode said. Attacks by bobcats on humans are extremely rare. Missouri’s bobcats once lived mostly in the Ozarks and the Bootheel area, but the cats have moved in recent decades west and north, according to the state’s

department of conservation. Habitat for bobcats has been greatly reduced by hardwood forest clearing and the draining of lowlands, but the agency says the bobcat population seems stable. Missouri bobcats like to live in heavy forests with thick underbrush broken by rock outcroppings, bluffs, glades, clearings and timbered swamps. They hunt mostly at dawn or dusk, and prey mainly on rabbits — they also eat small rodents, squirrels, turkey, quail and deer, especially fawns. It’s legal to hunt and trap the cats — this year’s season begins Nov. 15 and runs through Jan. 31, according to the conservation department. Bobcat pelts must be registered or tagged. Illinois also allows the animals to be hunted. The number of bobcats there was

Go to wildlifehotline.com/donate if you want to make a contribution toward the bobcat’s care. Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com

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LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Driver is killed in crash • A St. Louis man was killed Wednesday night when he lost control of the vehicle he was driving on an interstate south of downtown and crashed, police said. Police identified the man Thursday as Hani Atef Nonawer Al-Shoubaki, 30, of the 6600 block of Michigan Avenue. Al-Shoubaki was entering southbound Interstate 55 from eastbound I-44 shortly after 8 p.m. when he lost control of his vehicle and struck a guardrail, according to a police report. The vehicle rolled over after hitting the guardrail, ejecting Al-Shoubaki, police said. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The police department’s Accident Reconstruction Unit is investigating the crash. ST. LOUIS > Man is found fatally shot • A man was found shot to death Thursday morning in the 5100 block of Ridge Avenue in the Academy neighborhood. A resident found the man lying on the sidewalk about 6:15 a.m. He had a gunshot

wound to the upper part of his body. The man, 42, was pronounced dead at the scene. Police said he had not been identified. FESTUS > Suspect being chased by police calls in phony threat to hospital • Mercy Hospital in Festus was forced to go on lockdown Wednesday night, after a suspect being chased by police called in a false report about an active shooter, hoping to divert officers from the pursuit. The Crystal City and Festus police departments, Jefferson County sheriff’s office and the Missouri Highway Patrol all responded to the incident. The hospital was on lockdown for roughly an hour before law enforcement officials gave the “all clear” around 10:15 p.m., according to a spokesman for the hospital. “There never was an incident on the hospital property, and according to police reports, the suspect who placed the diversionary call to our switchboard has been apprehended,” reads a statement on the hospital’s Facebook page. The suspect was taken into custody Wednesday night.

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08.17.2018 • Friday • M 1

ARETHA FRANKLIN • 1942 – 2018

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A7

Franklin leaves powerful civil rights legacy BY ERRIN HAINES WHACK associated Press

Aretha Franklin, who was born and rose to fame during the segregation era and went on to sing at the inauguration of the first black president, often used her talent, fortune and platform to inspire millions of black Americans and support the fight for racial equality. “She not only provided the soundtrack for the civil rights movement, Aretha’s music transcended race, nationality and religion and helped people from all backgrounds to recognize what they had in common,” said longtime civil rights leader the Rev. Joseph E. Lowery. Franklin, who died Thursday at 76, was a close confidante of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and a financial lifeline to the civil rights organization he cofounded, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The Queen of Soul’s commitment to civil rights was instilled by her father, the Rev. C.L. Franklin, who also knew King and preached social justice from his pulpit at New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit. The church, in fact, was the first place King gave his “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963. Among those in the congregation were Aretha Franklin and Mahalia Jackson. It was Jackson who later urged the civil rights leader to “tell them about the dream, Martin” at the March on Washington, where he delivered the oration for which he is most famous.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Aretha Franklin performs at the inauguration for President Barack Obama at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 20, 2009. Franklin died Thursday at her home in Detroit. She was 76.

Franklin recorded “Respect” on Valentine’s Day 1967. Black Americans had already won federal legislation outlawing segregation and protecting their voting rights, particularly in the Deep South. But blacks were still a year away from the Fair Housing Act. And just months after the song was recorded, urban centers, including Franklin’s hometown of Detroit, would burn, exposing police brutality and unequal living conditions and job opportunities.

“Her songs were songs of the movement,” Andrew Young, the former King lieutenant and U.N. ambassador, said Thursday. “R-E-S-P-E-C-T. ... That’s basically what we wanted. The movement was about respect.” The SCLC often struggled financially, but Franklin played a vital role in keeping the movement afloat. “Almost every time we needed money, there were two people we could always count on: Aretha Franklin and Harry Belafonte,” Young said. “They would get to-

gether and have a concert, and that would put us back on our feet.” King and Franklin were like spiritual siblings, sharing a bond rooted in their Christian faith, Young said. King would often ask Franklin to sing his favorite songs, “Amazing Grace” or “Precious Lord, Take My Hand.” When King was assassinated in 1968, Franklin sang “Precious Lord” at his funeral in Atlanta. Franklin’s “Amazing Grace” was also a comfort to the Rev. Al Sharpton when he was a boy. He

recalled that his mother would play the song nonstop in their Brooklyn home after his father left. As an adult and an activist, Sharpton became friends with the soul singer. He noted her unwavering faith, which she brought with her on stage to every performance. “Whether it was the White House, Radio City Music Hall or the Apollo Theater, she always did gospel numbers,” Sharpton said. “She was unapologetically a hardcore, faith-believing Baptist. At the height of her career, she cut a gospel album. Who does that? Her faith is what motivated her.” Long after the civil rights movement ended, Franklin remained committed to social justice, helping Sharpton as he began his organization, the National Action Network, in New York. She would call Sharpton for updates on the emerging Black Lives Matter movement, asking about such cases as those of Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner. “She gave so much to so many people, from Dr. King, to Mandela, to Barack Obama,” said the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a longtime friend who visited her the day before her death. Her presence and influence were as valuable to the movement as her financial contributions, Sharpton said. “To have someone like that that involved and interested ... was a statement,” he said. “It gave all the credibility in the world. Others had celebrity, but she had gravity and respect.”

‘Queen of Soul’ Aretha Franklin dies in Detroit at 76 FRANKLIN • FROM A1

call for “Respect.” The music industry couldn’t honor her enough. Ms. Franklin won 18 Grammy awards. In 1987, she became the first woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Fellow singers bowed to her eminence and political and civic leaders treated her as a peer. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a longtime friend, and she sang at the dedication of King’s memorial in 2011. She performed at the inaugurations of Presidents Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter and Barack Obama, and at the funeral for civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks. Clinton gave Ms. Franklin the National Medal of Arts. President George W. Bush awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, in 2005. Ms. Franklin’s best-known appearance with a president was in January 2009, when she sang “My Country ’tis of Thee” at Obama’s inauguration. She wore a gray felt hat with a huge, Swarovski rhinestone-bordered bow that became an Internet sensation and even had its own website. Ms. Franklin endured the exhausting grind of celebrity and personal troubles dating to childhood. She was married from 1961 to 1969 to her manager, Ted White, and their battles are widely believed to have inspired her performances on several songs, including “(Sweet Sweet Baby) Since You’ve Been Gone,” “Think” and her heartbreaking ballad of despair, “Ain’t No Way.” The mother of two sons by age 16 (she later had two more), she was often in turmoil as she struggled with her weight, family problems and financial predicaments. Her best known producer, Jerry Wexler, nicknamed her “Our Lady of Mysterious Sorrows.” Despite growing up in Detroit, and having Smokey Robinson as a childhood friend, Ms. Franklin never recorded for Motown Records; stints with Columbia and Arista were sandwiched around her prime years with Atlantic Records. But it was at Detroit’s New Bethel Baptist Church, where her father was pastor, that Ms. Franklin learned the gospel fundamentals that would make her a soul institution.

FAMILY BUSINESS Aretha Louise Franklin was born March 25, 1942, in Memphis, Tenn. The Rev. C.L. Franklin soon moved his family to Buffalo, N.Y., then to Detroit. C.L. Franklin was among the most prominent Baptist ministers of his time. Music was the family business and performers from Sam Cooke to Lou Rawls were guests at the Franklin house. In the living room, young Aretha awed Robinson and other friends with her playing on the grand piano. Ms. Franklin was in her early teens when she began touring with her father, and she released a gospel album in 1956 through J-V-B Records. Four years later,

AP PHOTOS

ABOVE • Flowers and pictures are placed on aretha Franklin’s star at the Hollywood Walk of Fame Thursday in Los angeles. Franklin, the glorious “Queen of Soul” and genius of american song, died Thursday morning at her home in detroit of pancreatic cancer. She was 76. LEFT • Soul singers James Brown and aretha Franklin sing during a Home Box Office taping at the Taboo night club in detroit in 1987. BELOW • aretha Franklin performs at the inaugural gala for President Bill Clinton in Washington on Jan. 18, 1993.

she signed with Columbia Records producer John Hammond, who called Ms. Franklin the most exciting singer he had heard since a vocalist he promoted decades earlier, Billie Holiday. Ms. Franklin knew Motown founder Berry Gordy Jr. and considered joining his label, but decided it was just a local company at the time. Ms. Franklin recorded several albums for Columbia Records over the next six years. She had a handful of minor hits, including “Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With a Dixie Melody” and “Runnin’ Out of Fools,” but never quite caught on as the label tried to fit into her a variety of styles, from jazz and show songs to such pop numbers as “Mockingbird.” Ms. Franklin jumped to Atlantic Records when her contract ran out, in 1966. “But the years at Columbia also taught her several important things,” critic Russell Gersten later wrote. “She worked hard at controlling and modulating her phrasing, giving her a discipline that most other soul singers lacked. She also developed a versatility with mainstream music that gave her later albums a breadth that was lacking on Motown LPs from the same period. “Most important, she learned what she didn’t like: to do what she was told to do.” At Atlantic, Wexler teamed her with veteran R&B musicians from FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, and the result was a tougher, soulful sound, with calland-response vocals and Ms. Franklin’s gospel-style piano, which anchored “I Say a Little Prayer,” “Natural Woman” and others. Of Ms. Franklin’s dozens of hits, none was linked more firmly to her than the funky, horn-led march “Respect” and its spelled out demand for “R-E-S-P-E-CT.” Writing in Rolling Stone magazine in 2004, Wexler said: “It was an appeal for dignity combined with a blatant lubricity. There are songs that are a call to action. There are love songs. There are sex songs. But it’s hard to think of another song where all those elements are combined.” Ms. Franklin had decided she wanted to “embellish” the R&B song written by Otis Redding, whose version had been a modest hit in 1965. “When she walked into the studio, it was already worked out in her head,” the producer wrote. “Otis came up to my office right before ‘Respect’ was released, and I played him the tape. He said, ‘She done took my song.’ He said it benignly and ruefully. He knew the identity of the song was slipping away from him to her.” In a 2004 interview with the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times, Ms. Franklin was asked whether she sensed in the ’60s that she was helping change popular music. “Somewhat, certainly with ‘Respect,’ that was a battle cry for freedom and many people of many ethnicities took pride in that word,” she answered. “It was meaningful to all of us.”


LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 08.17.2018

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

What makes America great eludes politicians Their rank partisanship shouts down our history of freedom, aspiration, betterment packed in it. It’s a fig-leaf argument. Since when is it anti-American to strive for betterment, in education or wealth? Truth is, as opposed to the citizen legislators of the early republic, we have built up automatic barriers between the governed and those who serve in office. They have huge taxpayer-paid staffs and (relatively) large salaries. Their constant need to raise money for their campaigns thrusts them constantly into the orbits of the rich and famous. Some politicians get rich by trading in their expertise gained on the taxpayer dime for post-political careers providing seven-figure advice for the best way to gain access to the federal treasury. Most Missourians shrug off this elitist argument in the first place, says Jeremy Walling, a political scientist at Southeast Missouri State University. “We accept that most politicians come from elite backgrounds and live elite lifestyles,” Walling said, further describing it as “the cost of doing business” for politicians. “Hawley went to the best schools he could and has an education that makes him an elite,” Walling said. “McCaskill’s wealth makes her a financial elite. They’re both elites that make them out of step with the median Missourian. I just think most people don’t care.” That’s one more freedom — the freedom to ignore the unimportant.

CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If some politicians understood this nation’s history a little better, they’d not walk into that same America the Great trap over and over and over again. But they don’t understand, and then they fall, and they get called on it. And that helps make America great. If some politicians didn’t mistake “knowing what the average person goes through” with “I’m one of you,” they wouldn’t fall into the perpetual trap of who’s the least elitist. But that happens, election after election, and they get called on it. And that, too, helps make America great. This conversation comes to you in the smoldering aftermath of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s riff on President Donald Trump’s “Make America Great Again” slogan. “It was never that great,” said Cuomo, a Democrat, speaking to a re-election campaign audience in Manhattan. “We have not reached greatness. We will reach greatness when every American is fully engaged.” The remark set off the predictable social media firestorm and pious pronouncements on cable TV. It’s likely to be a line uttered in infamy in perpetuity against the New York politician for every right-wing commentator’s mantra that liberals hate America as much as conservatives love it. Cuomo clearly was not hearing the voice of his late father, Mario, whose speech at the 1984 Democratic National Convention in San Francisco is still held up as one of the shining rhetorical tributes to the aspirations — and the freedom to work toward them — that ultimately make this country great. In that speech, the elder Cuomo spoke of his father, an Italian immigrant, a “small man with thick calluses” who came to this country “alone, unable to speak the language,” a man who worked his way toward the American Dream and begat not one, but now two, New York governors. The fact that Andrew Cuomo, even in an instant, could not summon that greatness in his speech this week is testament not to the failure of aspirations, but to the politicians who are helping poison the political atmosphere with divisiveness and rank partisanship and blatant disregard for their nation’s history. The truth is, there was greatness embedded in Washington’s ragtag soldiers who survived Valley Forge, and in the people who more than a century later marched for women’s suffrage. There was greatness in millions of young Americans who answered the call after their politicians decided to go all in on the Great War — World War I — to save Europe from itself. There was greatness in the Greatest Generation’s young men who stormed the beaches of fascist Europe and ended Japanese imperialism in Asia. There was greatness in Martin Luther King Jr. writing from the Birmingham Jail, and for the civil rights marchers of the stormy years that followed. Flawed actors all, in a nation that will never perfect perfection. But still holding to aspirations. Last week, the two prime Senate candidates in Missouri engaged in a tweet skirmish on the following question:

ASSOCIATED PRESS

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has drawn fire for saying America “was never that great.”

Which is the least elitist? Democrat Claire McCaskill mocked Republican Josh Hawley for not knowing the difference between a truck and trailer, then stuck in a dig at his Ivy League education. Hawley responded with barbs aimed at McCaskll’s family airplane, and the “she’s too rich for us” baggage

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A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

Trump worked with Russians and now he’s desperate, Brennan says

U.S. officials say ex-ISIS fighter entered U.S. as refugee He is accused of killing Iraqi officer after being granted resettlement ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. • An Iraqi man

President Donald Trump listens during a Cabinet meeting Thursday in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. AP

BY JILL COLVIN AND ANNE FLAHERTY Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Former CIA Director

John Brennan said Thursday that President Donald Trump yanked his security clearance because his campaign colluded with the Russians to sway the 2016 election and is now desperate to end the special counsel’s investigation. In an opinion piece in The New York Times, Brennan cites press reports and Trump’s own goading of Russia during the campaign to find Democrat Hillary Clinton’s missing emails. Trump himself drew a direct connection between the revocation of Brennan’s clearance and the Russia probe, telling The Wall Street Journal the investigation is a “sham,” and “these people led it!” “So I think it’s something that had to be done,” Trump said regarding the revocation. It was a swift departure from the official explanation given by the White House on Wednesday, which cited “the risks” posed by what Trump labeled Brennan’s “erratic conduct and behavior.” The president said he was fulfilling his “constitutional responsibility to protect the nation’s classified information.” Brennan wrote that Trump’s claims of no collusion with Russia are “hogwash” and that the only question remaining is whether the collusion amounts to a “constituted criminally liable conspiracy.” “Trump clearly has become more desperate to protect himself and those close to him, which is why he made the politically motivated decision to revoke my security clearance in an attempt to scare into silence others who might dare to challenge him,” he wrote. Brennan’s loss of a security clearance was an unprecedented act of retribution against a vocal critic and politicizes the federal government’s security clearance process. Former CIA directors and other top national security officials are typically allowed to keep their clearances, at least for some period, so they can be in a posi-

tion to advise their successors and to hold certain jobs. Trump said Wednesday he is reviewing the security clearances of several other former top intelligence and law enforcement officials, including former FBI Director James Comey and current senior Justice Department official Bruce Ohr. All are critics of the president or are people whom Trump appears to believe are against him. Democrats called it an “enemies list,” a reference to the Nixon White House, which kept a list of President Richard Nixon’s political opponents to be targeted with punitive measures. There was no reference to the Russia probe in a White House statement Wednesday that was read at a press briefing and then sent out to reporters. In the statement, Trump denounced Brennan’s criticism and accused Brennan of having “leveraged his status as a former highranking official with access to highly sensitive information to make a series of unfounded and outrageous allegations, wild outbursts on the internet and television about this administration.” “Mr. Brennan’s lying and recent conduct characterized by increasingly frenzied commentary is wholly inconsistent with access to the nation’s most closely held secrets,” Trump said. In the Journal interview, Trump said he was prepared to yank Brennan’s clearance last week but that it was too “hectic.” The president, who was on an extended working vacation at his New Jersey golf club last week, has been under fire over accusations of racism by former adviser Omarosa Manigault Newman and his bitter reaction to them. Trump’s statement, distributed to reporters, was dated July 26, 2018, suggesting it could have been held and then released when needed to change a damaging subject. Besides Comey and Ohr, officials on the list include: James Clapper, the former director of national intelligence; former CIA Director Michael Hayden; former national security adviser Susan Rice; and Andrew

McCabe, who served as Trump’s deputy FBI director until he was fired in March. Also on the list: fired FBI agent Peter Strzok, who was removed from the Russia investigation over anti-Trump text messages; and former FBI lawyer Lisa Page, with whom Strzok exchanged messages. Trump recently accused Ohr on Twitter of “helping disgraced Christopher Steele ‘find dirt on Trump.’” Ohr was friends with Steele, the former British intelligence officer commissioned by an American political research firm to explore Trump’s alleged ties with the Russian government. Ohr is the only current government employee on the list. At least two of the former officials, Comey and McCabe, do not currently have security clearances, and none of the eight receive intelligence briefings. Trump’s concern apparently is that their former status gives special weight to their statements, both to Americans and foreign foes.

RECORDING RELEASED Meanwhile, Manigault Newman released a secret recording Thursday in a bid to bolster her contention that she was offered a $15,000-a-month contract from Trump’s campaign to stay silent after being fired from her job. On the recording, campaign aide Lara Trump, the president’s daughter-in-law, can be heard discussing salary considerations and other aspects of a campaign job with Manigault Newman and makes clear that she expects her to be positive about the president. The release of the recording, during an interview with MSNBC, was the latest escalation of Manigault Newman’s feud with Trump in the wake of the release of her tell-all book, “Unhinged,” which depicts him as racist and in mental decline. The president has disparaged Manigault Newman in recent tweets, calling her a “dog” and “lowlife,” among other things, and his campaign has filed an arbitration action in an attempt to silence her. The Washington Post contributed to this report.

arrested in California is accused of being a former Islamic State fighter and killing a police officer in Iraq after he qualified to be resettled in the U.S. as part of a refugee program. The case has drawn attention amid criticism by the administration of President Donald Trump to the vetting process involved in the nation’s refugee resettlement program. U.S. officials plan to extradite Omar Abdulsattar Ameen, 45, to Iraq under a treaty with that nation. He made his first appearance in federal court in Sacramento on Wednesday after his arrest at an apartment building in the California capital. Ameen left Iraq and fled in 2012 to Turkey, where he applied to be accepted as a refugee to the U.S., according to court documents. After he was granted that status in June 2014, prosecutors say he returned to Iraq and killed a police officer. The town of Rawah fell to Islamic State that same month. Five months later, Ameen traveled to the United States to be resettled as a refugee. He was arrested by the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force based on a warrant issued in May by an Iraqi federal court in Baghdad. Ameen could face execution for the “organized killing by an armed group,” according to Iraqi documents filed in U.S. federal court. Ameen did not disclose his membership in two terrorist groups when he later applied for a green card in the United States, officials said. The Trump administration has sharply criticized the Obama-era resettlement program, questioning whether enough was done to weed out those with terrorist ties. State Department and Department of Homeland Security officials did not immediately respond to questions about Ameen. Benjamin Galloway, one of Ameen’s public defenders, said he had just 10 minutes to meet with his client prior to his initial federal court appearance Wednesday, and attorneys hadn’t decided whether to contest that Ameen is the man wanted by Iraqi authorities. Ameen was identified by a witness to the slaying who viewed a series of photographs of Islamic State members, according to the Iraqi documents. The FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force has been investigating Ameen over the filing of fraudulent travel or immigration documents since 2016, according to a court filing. It says the FBI independently corroborated Ameen’s involvement with the terrorist organizations and participation in the slaying.

U.S. newspapers to Trump: We’re not enemies of the people TRUMP • FROM A1

for more than two centuries.” Trump denounced the effort on Twitter, saying the Globe was in collusion with other newspapers. “There is nothing that I would want more for our country than true FREEDOM OF THE PRESS,” the president typed. “The fact is that the press is FREE to write and say anything it wants, but much of what it says is FAKE NEWS, pushing a political agenda or just plain trying to hurt people.” Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate on Thursday passed a resolution with no objections stating that “the press is not the enemy of the people.” Cognizant of heated feelings on the issue, the Globe hired extra security on Thursday, said Jane Bowman, newspaper spokeswoman. “Journalistic outlets have had threats throughout time, but it’s the president’s rhetoric that gives us the most concern,” Bowman said. It was not clear how many newspapers participated. Marjorie Pritchard, the editor who launched the campaign, said earlier in the week that some 350 news organizations indicated they would, but she did not immediately return messages on Thursday. The Post-Dispatch participated in the effort with an editorial headlined, “Truth under attack,” calling journalists “the truest of patriots.” Even with the coordinated effort, there was some significant blowback from newspapers that wrote to say they would not participate.

‘DEMONIZING THE MESSENGER’ The Radio Television Digital News Association called on broadcasters and websites to express support. Since Monday, there have been 2,240 mentions of either “First Amendment” or “free press” by broadcasters across the country, said Dan Shelley, the group’s executive director. One TV station, WPSD in Paducah, Ky., showed a copy of the First Amendment guarantee-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

An editorial titled “A Free Press Needs You” is published Thursday in The New York Times. Newspapers from Maine to Hawaii pushed back against President Donald Trump’s attacks on “fake news” with a coordinated series of editorials speaking up for a free and vigorous press. The Boston Globe had estimated that 350 newspapers would participate.

ing freedom of the press on its screen before every commercial during newscasts, he said. “It has been a big source of conversation all across the country,” Shelley said. “Just because people are talking about it, it’s a victory in my book.” Editorial boards at the Portland (Maine) Press-Herald and the Honolulu StarAdvertiser and many places in between weighed in to support the effort. “The true enemies of the people — and democracy — are those who try to suffocate truth by vilifying and demonizing the messenger,” wrote the Des Moines Register in Iowa. The Chicago Sun-Times said it believed most Americans know that Trump is talking nonsense. The Fayetteville (North Carolina) Observer said it hoped Trump would stop, “but we’re not holding our breath.”

The Morning News of Savannah, Ga., said it was a confidant of the people. “Like any true friend, we don’t always tell you what you want to hear,” the Morning News said. “Our news team presents the happenings and issues in this community through the lens of objectivity. And like any true friend, we refuse to mislead you. Our reporters and editors strive for fairness.” The New York Times encouraged readers to subscribe to a local newspaper. “We’re all in this together,” the Times said. That last sentiment made some journalists skittish. Some newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Times-Picayune in New Orleans, the Rome (N.Y.) Daily Sentinel and the Richmond (Virginia) TimesDispatch, contained editorials or columns explaining why they weren’t joining the Globe’s effort. Some worried that it played

into the hands of Trump and his supporters who think the media is out to get him. The idea of a coordinated campaign simply left others cold, with one newspaper referencing a longtime rivalry. “We prize our independence, both from government and from other media outlets,” the New York Daily News wrote. “Coordination, especially with Boston, isn’t in our nature.” There was also some scolding of the press — from the press — for letting distaste for Trump show up where it shouldn’t in news stories. “Just as his lack of restraint has often been the president’s self-inflicted wound, the bias of some of the press has hurt journalism, at the very moment when it is most needed to save itself,” said the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “It is time for a truce.” It remains unclear how much sway the effort will have. Newspaper editorial boards overwhelmingly opposed Trump’s election in 2016. Polls show Republicans have grown more negative toward the news media in recent years: Pew Research Center said 85 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents said in June 2017 that the news media has a negative effect on the country, up from 68 percent in 2010. At the Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Md., where five staff members were killed by a gunman in June, editors said Thursday they were not participating in the effort because they care more about what the community thinks than the president. But Trump can do some good by giving a Presidential Medal of Freedom to one of the slain employees, Wendi Winters, who had tried to stop the gunman by charging at him before being killed, they said. “The president could use the occasion of presenting the medal to Wendi’s family as a moment of change in his approach toward those whose job it is to question his presidency,” the newspaper’s editorial board wrote. “He could honor her work by expressing his belief in the importance of journalism to our country — even when he feels unfairly treated.”


WORLD

08.17.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A11

Mexico City bans use of models at city events BY AMY GUTHRIE associated Press

MEXICO CITY • They’ve long been an un-

missable part of public events in Mexico, from soccer matches to trade fairs: attractive women hired to be greeters or simply as eye candy, sometimes scantily clad in short skirts and high heels or crop-tops and hot pants emblazoned with corporate logos. Now Mexico City has prohibited the use of models known in local parlance as “edecanes” at events sponsored by the local government, breaking new ground for a country where deeply entrenched gender stereotypes often continue to relegate women to supporting roles in the workforce. “This job should not exist,” the capital’s mayor, Jose Ramon Amieva, said in announcing the ban last week. “It goes against policies of gender equality.” In 2014, a group of female politicians organized a forum on the topic that concluded the edecan industry sometimes is a cover for prostitution and that the models face precarious employment conditions. It estimated more than 1 million Mexicans work as hostesses or hosts, most of them in the informal sector. Online job postings for hostesses offer salaries ranging anywhere from 5,000 pesos ($260) to 30,000 pesos ($1,560) per month, well above the current minimum wage of about $4.60 per day. While edecanes’ presence at corporate and government events tends to be more demure than elsewhere — think blazers, high heels and slacks or knee-length skirts rather than skin-tight bodysuits — there have been some instances that attracted criticism. In perhaps the most notorious one, the electoral institute hired a Playboy model to hand out envelopes at the first presidential debate ahead of the 2012 election. Julia Orayen emerged onstage in a tight white dress with a plunging neckline that revealed lots of cleavage, in sharp contrast

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A model strikes a pose for a photographer Tuesday as part of her registration to be represented by a model and “edecan” agency in Mexico City.

to the button-up dress shirt and black suit donned by the lone female contender for the presidency, Josefina Vazquez. And in 2016, the New Alliance party held a campaign event featuring several women in tight white stretch pants and topless save for body paint in the party’s signature turquoise and white. At Mexico City government events, models have generally been hired to greet guests, pass microphones around for questions or simply smile onstage alongside mostly male speakers. Indra Rubio, who coordinates the gender justice program for Oxfam in Mexico, called the capital’s model ban a “small but very important step” for a country that’s “still macho.” “We need to question as a society: Why is a woman’s body seen as an object?” Rubio said. “This places the woman always at a disadvantage, if her participation in the workforce is subject to her physical appearance.” Hector Garcia, a booker at the Agencia de Modelos y Edecanes in Mexico City, called it “dignified work” and said the in-

dustry’s reputation has been damaged by others who work as escorts but call themselves edecanes or models. He said the mayor’s characterization of the profession “is morally harmful and mainly stigmatizes edecanes all across Mexico.” The measure is part of a broader city initiative to give women greater responsibility in government. Amieva has committed to having women make up at least half

the participants on expert panels at events and ensuring they get equal speaking time. Citywide, he said, public officials will be told to encourage professional growth for female employees based on their abilities and experience, not their appearance. Public servants who fail to comply may be fined. Mexican institutions have made notable strides this year to incorporate more women in leadership positions. Nearly half the representatives in the incoming Congress will be female. Mexico City is about to get its first elected woman mayor in Claudia Sheinbaum, who won office in July. President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who takes office in December, has chosen women to fill half his Cabinet positions. Olga Sanchez, who is slated to run the Interior Ministry under Lopez Obrador, vowed on Saturday to change the “patriarchal system” so that men take on more domestic chores and children have more rights. But as recently as last week, the Mexican Health Ministry organized a discussion on breastfeeding that was widely mocked for its all-male panel. And an initiative called “Not Without Women Mx” that urges men to boycott forums that omit female experts from panels was launched without a single woman sitting at the lead table.

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A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

DIGEST Trump military parade postponed The Defense Department says the Veterans Day military parade ordered up by President Donald Trump won’t happen in 2018. Col. Rob Manning, a Pentagon spokesman, said Thursday that the military and the White House “have now agreed to explore opportunities in 2019.” Manning says the Pentagon had “originally targeted November 10, 2018,” for the Washington event, intended “to honor America’s military veterans and commemorate the centennial of World War I.” U.S. officials had told The Associated Press earlier Thursday that the parade would cost about $92 million, citing preliminary estimates more than three times the price first suggested by the White House. U.S. wants to open Arctic land for drilling • The administration of President Donald Trump is aiming to open for drilling millions of acres of Alaska Arctic land that was protected under the Barack Obama administration. The U.S. Department of the Interior began talks with state officials and the North Slope Borough, looking to update the 2013 management plan that kept drilling off about half of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, the Anchorage Daily News reported this week. The vast reserve spans about 35,937 square miles and is almost as large as the state of Maine. The potential area includes part of the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area. The area and nearby wetlands are considered vital for several animal species, including caribou, polar bears and migrating birds. Number of overdose victims rises • The number of overdose victims linked to a suspected bad batch of synthetic marijuana has risen to 76 in New Haven, Conn., as officials try to determine exactly what sickened people. People on and around the historic New Haven Green near Yale University began falling ill shortly after 8 a.m. Wednesday, and the overdoses continued into Thursday morning. No deaths were reported, and most people brought to hospitals have been discharged, officials said. Toxicology testing remained incomplete Thursday. Some victims tested positive for the powerful opioid fentanyl, but it appeared most if not all the overdoses were caused only by a potent batch of “K2” synthetic marijuana, according to physicians. Remains found at compound identified • Forensic investigators said Thursday they identified the remains of a Georgia boy whose father is accused of abducting him and performing purification rituals on the child as he died at a remote New Mexico desert compound. The cause of the child’s death remained unknown. The body of Abdul-ghani Wahhaj was found Aug. 6 in an underground tunnel. The boy’s father, Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, was among five people arrested on suspicion of child abuse at the compound. Court orders review of pipeline’s new route • A federal judge has ordered the U.S. State Department to conduct a more thorough review of the Keystone XL pipeline’s proposed pathway after Nebraska state regulators changed the route, raising the possibility of further delays to a project first proposed in 2008. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris of Montana said in a ruling Wednesday that the State Department must supplement its 2014 environmental impact study of the project to consider the new route. Morris declined to strike down the federal permit for the project, approved by President Donald Trump in March 2017. Nebraska officials rejected pipeline developer TransCanada’s preferred route in November 2017 but approved another pathway to the east. From news services

NATION

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

Despite buzz, female candidates lag behind men in fundraising BY MICHELLE YE HEE LEE AND ANU NARAYANSWAMY Washington Post

Lauren Baer, a former Barack Obama administration foreign policy adviser, has been buoyed by a string of endorsements from Democratic Party officials and national House leaders in her first-time bid for Congress. But for all the attention on her race in South Florida — one of the most competitive in the country — Baer has one significant disadvantage in her campaign to unseat Republican Brian Mast: money. “I know that we have a message that resonates in our community,” said Baer, who had raised less than half as much as Mast by the end of June. “But I also know that my viability, at the end of the day, depends on the amount of money that exists in my campaign coffers.” Even as a record number of women run for office this year, female congressional candidates overall are lagging behind their male counterparts when it comes to pulling in campaign cash, according to a Washington Post analysis of federal campaign finance reports. Men running for the House had collected almost 17 percent more on average than their female counterparts by the end of June, The Post found in its examination of candidates who showed viability by raising at least $50,000. One driving factor: Many of the women lack relationships with longtime political donors who work in traditionally male-dominated industries such as finance. That is a particular challenge for women this cycle, because the majority are newcomers to politics and, like any nonincumbent, must build donor networks from scratch. But their task is often more difficult, some female candidates said, because of skepticism about their potential, based on their gender. “The assumptions that are built into our political system is that the candidate is male,” said Baer, who said she has frequently been asked by donors and supporters about who is caring for her young child.

DANIA MAXWELL • Washington Post

Democratic congressional candidate Katie Hill at a canvassing event in Santa Clarita, Calif., on Aug. 4.

One group of female candidates who outraised their male counterparts: Democratic women seeking office in districts that lean left — a sign of the enthusiasm in the base to support women this year. In those districts, women collected an average of $97,000 more than men, The Post found. In Minnesota, for example, state legislator Ilhan Omar, a Somali refugee who would be one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress, handily outraised two of her three Democratic challengers — including a male opponent — before winning her primary Tuesday. Women in some marquee toss-up races are also seeing a flood of cash. That has been the case for Katie Hill, 30, a nonprofit-group executive from Santa Clarita, Calif., who is seeking to dislodge Rep. Steve Knight, the last Republican who still holds a congressional seat in Los Angeles County. Hill had raised $2.5 million to Knight’s $1.7 million by the end of June — a remarkable feat in a district that has been held by a Republican for 25 years. In a sign of grass-roots enthusiasm for her bid, one-quarter of her campaign cash came from donations of $200 or less. Such donations made up just 1.4 percent of

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NEWS

08.17.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A13

Vatican in ‘shame and sorrow’ over report BY FRANCES D’EMILIO associated Press

VATICAN CITY • The Vatican

expressed “shame and sorrow” Thursday over a scathing Pennsylvania grand jury report about clergy who raped and molested children in six dioceses in that state, calling the abuse “criminally and morally reprehensible” and says Pope Francis wants to eradicate “this tragic horror.” In a written statement using uncharacteristically strong language for the Holy See even in matters such as the long-running abuse scandals staining the U.S. church, Vatican spokesman Greg Burke sought to assure victims that “the pope is on their side.” Pope Francis himself wasn’t quoted in the statement, and there was no mention of demands in the United States among some Roman Catholics for the resignation of Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the archbishop of Washington. The grand jury report made public this week accused the cardinal of helping to protect some molester priests while he was bishop of Pittsburgh. Wuerl has defended his actions in Pittsburgh while apolo-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pope Francis (left) talks with Cardinal Donald Wuerl in 2010 at the Vatican. Wuerl has been accused of helping protect abusive priests when he was Pittsburgh’s bishop.

gizing for the damage inflicted on victims. Burke said the incidents of abuse graphically documented in the report were “betrayals of trust that robbed survivors of their dignity and their faith.” “The church must learn hard lessons from its past, and there should be accountability for both abusers and those who permitted abuse to occur,” he said. Victims and their advocates for decades have lamented that

top Catholic churchmen repeatedly put the reputation of the church ahead of obligations to protect children from harm from pedophile priests. In a sign that Pope Francis wants to end that pervasive mindset among church hierarchy, including bishops and cardinals, he recently accepted the resignation from cardinal’s rank of former Washington archbishop Theodore McCarrick amid allegations that the American prelate had engaged

in sexual misconduct. Resignations by cardinals are extremely rare, and McCarrick’s was the first time a prelate lost his cardinal’s rank in a sexual abuse scandal. Burke said Francis “understands well how much these crimes can shake the faith and the spirit of believers and reiterates the call to make every effort to create a safe environment for minors and vulnerable adults in the church and in all of society.” The grand jury report documented how pedophile priests were often protected by church hierarchy or moved to other postings without the faithful being told of the priests’ sexual predatory history. The long-awaited grand jury report was full of vivid examples of horrendous abuse. In one such example, a young girl was raped by a priest visiting her while she was in a hospital following surgery to remove her tonsils. In another, a priest tied up a victim with a rope in a confessional booth, and when the victim refused to perform sex, the priest assaulted him with a crucifix. Speaking about Francis, Burke said: “Those who have suffered are his priority, and the church wants to listen to them to root

out this tragic horror that destroys the lives of the innocent.” Even before the report was released, a series of scandals over the last few decades involving pedophile priests and systematic attempts by pastors and bishops to cover up the abuse by shuttling offenders to new parishes had rocked the faith of many Catholics in the United States. Similar abuse and determination by pastors and bishops to protect abusers had also stained the reputation of the Catholic Church in many other countries. Francis recently did a turnaround on how accusations by victims in Chile were viewed by the Vatican. After casting doubt on the victims’ accounts during his visit to Chile this year, Francis apologized to them, hosted the victims at the Vatican and later accepted the resignations of some of the country’s bishops, who offered en masse to step down. On Thursday, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops invited the Vatican to play a key role in investigating the scandal involving McCarrick, who allegedly engaged in sexual misconduct with minors and adult seminarians.

California is ripe for more wildfires, NOAA says BY STUART LEAVENWORTH Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON • Bad news for

the West: Even after firefighters have already battled 101 large blazes this year, the remainder of wildfire season is expected to be hotter and drier than normal, virtually assuring there will be more destruction ahead, scientists for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday. NOAA’s forecast comes as monitoring stations in Northern California show that grasses, brush and other fire “fuels” are reaching record-dry levels, following a July that was the state’s hottest month on record. There’s also a chance that strong “Diablo winds” — like those that fanned the deadly fires last fall in Sonoma and other counties — could return in coming months. “During August we typically don’t see those events, but they can return in the September and October time frame,” said Tim Brown, director of NOAA’s

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kim Burns sifts through the charred rubble of her home, which burned Sunday in the Carr Fire in Redding, Calif.

Western Region Climate Center in Reno, Nev. Diablo winds refer to a wind from the northeast that compresses and warms as it blows over ridge tops and down slopes. Suburban homeowners can partially protect themselves in advance by clearing brush and dead limbs from around houses. Au-

thorities say they should also pay attention to wind forecasts, avoiding yard work — which can ignite sparks — during strong winds. As of Thursday, there were eight major fires burning in California, including the 364,000acre Mendocino Complex blaze, the largest wildfire in California

history, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. More than 80 others were burning nationwide, including 17 in Alaska, 15 in Montana, 13 in Arizona, 11 in Idaho and 9 in Washington state. The multitude of blazes has renewed debate on the degree that global climate change is intensifying the West’s natural patterns of drought and fire. In a recent commentary, three leading climate and fire scientists — Daniel Swain, Crystal Kolden and John Abatzoglou — called climate change a “threat multiplier” that has lengthened the fire season and contributed to more-explosive blazes. The interior secretary, however, rejected the climate change link. “This has nothing to do with climate change,” Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke told KQED on Sunday, referring to California’s recent wildfires. “This has to do with active forest management.” Yet several of the West’s most destructive recent blazes have occurred in places where forAN AUTHORIZED AUTHORI DEALER OF

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 08.17.2018 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

See you in court St. Louis residents have a better tool to fight back against blight profiteers.

T

said, citing the potential exposure to he era of carefree, wanton expensive countersuits and other vindicneglect of derelict buildings by tive actions. Members of his neighborlarge-scale St. Louis property hood association recoiled at the thought. owners is about to end. For too The court-ordered monetary damages long, lax city code enforcement and were based on what Lintvedt called “real tepid fines for violating nuisance laws metrics” comparing his neighborhood’s have served as an invitation for so-called property values to broader real estate developers to game the system, scooping trends and up cheap similar St. properties only Louis neighto let them borhoods that decay while don’t contain neighboring crumbling, residents abandoned looked on in houses. horror. After A judge last Katsimbrakis week ordered bought the the St. Louis vacant Sidney RedevelopStreet house ment Co., in 2013, the owned by ex-felon busiPOST-DISPATCH entire back wall collapsed. nessman Giro This property at 2927 Sidney Street, owned by An embarKatsimbrakis, St. Louis Redevelopment Co., spurred a lawsuit rassed Lintvedt to reimburse accusing the owner of neglect. A judge has said he had to $135,000 to ordered that repairs be made. explain to visifour neighbors tors and potential homebuyers why the whose property values suffered from his eyesore was going unaddressed. neglect. The judgment affects only one A 2016 change in Missouri law makes Katsimbrakis property, at 2927 Sidney it possible for residents to seek injunctive Street in Tower Grove East, but it should help motivate residents around his many relief and damages — a game-changer. other derelict properties to start fighting The law now “empowers city neighborhood organizations and property owners back. Blight profiteers like Paul McKee to take direct action against noncompliand Nathan Cooper could be the next ant properties” and do the work that lucky defendants. overwhelmed city enforcement agencies Katsimbrakis’ various businesses own don’t have the resources to do, said Paul or hold liens on 110 St. Louis properties. Dozens are listed in city property records Brown, an activist on vacancy issues and partner in the Thompson Coburn law as vacant. The Sidney Street house has firm. at least 24 outstanding code violations “This is a pivotal win, not only for the and is tax-delinquent. Judge Michael Stelzer of the 22nd Circuit Court ordered plaintiffs in this case, but for communities across our city, as neighbors ... stand St. Louis Redevelopment to become up to absentee landlords,” said Alderman code-compliant and reimburse the Cara Spencer, whose 20th Ward contains plaintiffs. Whether he actually pays the the bulk of derelict properties owned by damages waits to be seen. Katsimbrakis and Cooper. It took a lot of courage for plaintiffs More residents should summon this Erik M. Lintvedt and Stefannie Marcus kind of courage and fight to take back to step forward and present this chaltheir neighborhoods. Peter Hoffman at lenge along with two businesses with Legal Services of Eastern Missouri says property interests in the neighborhood. he’s standing by to lend a hand. “I was definitely reluctant,” Lintvedt

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS ‘Right to work’ salvaged wages for jobs that may never exist As I was watching coverage of the PGA Championship and the regionwide effort needed to host the tournament, I was struck by the confluence of that with the primary election results. Thank God the people of Missouri saw through the “right to work” issue and voted against it. This struck me when I saw news reports regarding parking for the event at the old Chrysler plant. If Missouri actually had a vibrant and growing economy instead of one that is repelling manufacturing, just where would all of those people have parked? Boy, if we had retained all of those union jobs at Chrysler, not to mention the Ford plant, or attracted the new Boeing plant or other auto manufacturers, just how would the PGA have been able to bring the tournament to St. Louis? But, we dodged that bullet and saw through all of that nonsense. We made sure to keep all of those high union wages (and union dues) for jobs that don’t exist. We certainly have no intention of attracting new jobs or new industries. We would rather have an empty site just waiting for Stan Kroenke to build his NFL stadium. Oh wait, never mind. Jay Kirschbaum • Chesterfield

PGA event, other sports leave global imprint on the Earth

March of the Trumpers GOP candidates who embrace Trump’s populist brand enjoy primary victories.

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It’s little wonder that when Trump onald Trump’s hostile takeover wanted someone to help lead his nowof the Republican Party defunct voter-fraud commission — concontinued unabated in recent jured entirely from Trump’s refusal to GOP gubernatorial primaries believe he lost the popular vote by almost for Kansas,Wisconsin and Minnesota. 3 million ballots — Kobach was his choice. Trump-affiliated candidates won in all The probe failed miserably. three — a generally predictable outcome, In Minnesota on given polls Tuesday, Republishowing sky-high can primary voters approval ratings unceremoniously among Republican rejected former voters for the Gov. Tim Pawlenty, president despite who in 2016 rightly his controversial described Trump policies and as “unhinged and threats to curtail unfit.” It was likely constitutional that Pawlenty’s freedoms. There might be ASSOCIATED PRESS critical remarks helped nix his a silver lining for Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, Trump opponents, shown Aug. 8, was backed by the president comeback bid in a loss to Jeff Johnson, as the same pollin the GOP primary for governor. a little-known ing shows Trump county commissioner who took pains to remains historically unpopular among the identify himself with Trump and to remind wider public. In fact, the nominations of voters of Pawlenty’s earlier position. these three pro-Trump candidates could “It is the era of Trump, and I’m just not wind up sealing the GOP’s fate in the a Trump-like politician,” Pawlenty said November general election, setting back afterward. He should be proud of it. the march of Trumpism. In Wisconsin, Gov. Scott Walker easily The razor-thin margin in Kansas’ GOP won, as expected, over primary challenger gubernatorial primary suggests a close Robert Meyer, after an 11th-hour tweeted attachment to Trump might not be the endorsement from Trump — who had selling point it once was. Secretary of previously called Walker “a mess” and State Kris Kobach on Tuesday night was “not smart.” If history is a guide, Walker declared the winner over incumbent will have more abuse to endure from his Republican Gov. Jeff Colyer in a delayed benefactor in the future. result from last week’s primary. Some serious Republicans today believe Kobach has provided plenty of cause the only way their party will survive beyond his Trump affiliation for reaTrump is if it collapses entirely, discreditsonable people to view his victory with ing his backers once and for all and letting trepidation. He built his Kansas political the grown-ups retake charge. Democrats career and his rising national star on the and Republicans of conscience in these false premise that illegal immigrants are three states should view it as their patriotic overrunning America and despoiling our duty to help that process along by rejecting election system. He has helped craft laws any candidates in November who blindly in other states based on nothing but barely support Trump’s dangerously destructive veiled bigotry, including Arizona’s infaform of governance. mous “Show Me Your Papers” law.

The PGA Championship is over (“A grand 100th,” Aug. 12) but its carbon footprint will be with us until the Earth dies. No one talks about the huge amount of carbon connected with sports. However, when you consider the negative impact of all the travel by professional, college, high school and other teams, plus all of their fans, the carbon footprint is enormous and unnecessary. Local and intramural sports could be just as enjoyable to a true fan. If we could also put a moratorium on travel, quit idling our cars, and get the military to drastically cut its carbon footprint, we might have a chance to save life on this planet. But these changes would be inconvenient so we will, instead, exterminate all life on this planet. Sorry, Earth, but being at the big game matters more than you do. Kent Johnson • St. Louis

No confusion on collusion: Trump stands with Russians Regarding Bill Norman’s Aug. 12 letter, “‘Collusion is a far stretch when you weigh Democrats’ tactics”: I have noticed a large amount of confusion among some letters to the editor submissions regarding collusion. The Democrats hired Christopher Steele to find out about how Donald Trump had colluded with Russia. Trump, on the other hand, worked with Russia. So one was about Russia and the other was with Russia. One is about our enemy, the other is with our enemy. Get it now? Ric Haberstroh • Ferguson

St. Charles County Council aids special interests on smoking Regarding “Smoking ban exempting casino, bars to be considered by St. Charles County Council” (Aug. 12): I am so very shocked and disappointed to learn the St. Charles County Council is writing a bill to support smoking at the casino in St. Charles. The bill is in reaction to the 34,000 signatures

gathered to put a real smoke-free bill on the ballot in November. My husband, Don, and I have been working for 22 years in St. Charles County to pass legislation that protects all workers from the hazards of secondhand smoke. Just think how many lives would have been saved if St. Charles County had passed protective measures from secondhand smoke decades ago. This latest ploy by the St. Charles County Council once again demonstrates the level to which they will sink to do the bidding of special interests. Is the council more loyal to the casino than they are to their constituents? It is my hope the council will put the health of workers first and work with the casino to provide a healthy workplace for all employees. Kay Young • St. Charles

Sexual revolution snarkiness out of line in article on Hawley The Aug. 12 articles on Missouri’s U.S. Senate candidates Josh Hawley and Claire McCaskill were notable for omitting the most fundamental issue on which there is a yawning gap between the two. Sen. McCaskill has made a practice of trying to fly under the radar on her unmitigated support for abortion on all fronts. She doggedly supports tax funding for Planned Parenthood, the behemoth that does over one-third of all abortions in the U.S. Not surprisingly, Planned Parenthood supports her campaigns. In contrast, Hawley’s positions and efforts on religious liberty was well-covered in the article. But the reporter could not avoid snarky commentary about Hawley’s comment that human trafficking is related to the 1960s sexual revolution. So is abortion, adultery, all kinds of sexual license and degradation of the family. This is all well-documented and entirely predictable. Just because someone may not like to have this discussed is not a good basis for editorializing in a front-page news article. A.F. Kertz • Oakland

Hawley’s career path defies claim to be ‘rural’ Missourian Josh Hawley is quoted in an Aug. 12 Post-Dispatch article saying, “I’m proud to be from rural Missouri.” Really? He graduated from a private Jesuit prep school in Kansas City. He then attended Stanford. He taught for a private school in London. He than attended Yale, followed by a stint in Washington, D.C., and returning to Missouri in 2011 as a professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, before being elected to his current position as the state’s attorney general. He is not rural; he is a member of the urban and educated elite. Kay Blalock • St. Louis

Political ads would be so much better with focus on positive I thought that when the primary election was over we would not have to be subjected to all the negative political advertising, both in print and on television. Wouldn’t it be nice if the candidates could come to some sort of an agreement where they would only showcase who they are, why they should be elected, and by electing that candidate what they can do to improve your life and that of others. Think of all the positivity that would be generated and there would be no accusations of fake news. Shelley Edwards • Chesterfield Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

08.17.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1 25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

THE FEW, THE PROUD, THE SINGLE? • The Marine commandant issued a directive to phase out enlistment of married recruits by the end of 1995. Presi-

dent Bill Clinton quickly squashed the directive. Rather than ban married individuals from enlisting, the Marines need to ensure enlistees and spouses are carefully counseled about the difficulties service life can place on families. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Student loans: until death do you part This ticking financial bomb could be defused with simple solutions BY NORMAN W. PRESSMAN AND T.J. MULLIN

The media have recently focused on a ticking time bomb for both students and parents: student loans. As bankruptcy lawyers who have represented debtors from the lowest to the highest court in the land for more than 40 years each, we’ve seen this unfair situation become an epidemic, especially in light of many working adults who have sought

education or training to meet the demands of today’s global economy or have guaranteed their children’s debts. Most people have heard the saying “nothing is certain in life except death and taxes.” However, if income taxes are more than three years old, in general, they can be eliminated in a bankruptcy, yet student loans survive bankruptcy and are not subject to any statute of limitations. Student loan providers have

an iron grip on the labor of countless thousands, making them like Dark Age serfs, so perhaps the saying needs to be changed to “... death and student loans.” The problem is twofold: First, borrowers and their parent guarantors are liable for these loans until death. Second, schools and banks dole them out liberally because Uncle Sam is guaranteeing many of them and the lenders have no skin in the game or can hound their borrowers forever. We suggest a comprehensive and simple solution: First, debtors previously

could discharge student loans if they filed for relief under a Chapter 13 Wage Earner’s Plan. Chapter 13 is a mini-reorganization for individuals wherein over a three-to-five-year period, the debtor must pay the greater of his disposable income or the amount creditors would get in a Chapter 7 liquidation, or so-called “straight” bankruptcy. This provision in Chapter 13 should be reinstated. Allowing debtors to discharge student loans in bankruptcy would provide relief to student loan debt serfs, while wealthy or high-earning student loan

debtors (or their wealthy guaranteeing parents) would still repay their loans because their income and assets would be available to all creditors in a bankruptcy filing under any chapter. Second, in the future, government-backed student loans should have recourse to the school so that if, for instance, a school makes a $50,000 loan to a student seeking a degree and later files for bankruptcy, the school has to pay the lender back. The student loan ticking time bomb can be defused by these simple solutions.

We encourage elected leaders of both parties, sympathetic to the plight of hard-working people who are trying to better themselves, to enact these changes and challenge all candidates in the bistate area to state their positions on this crisis. Norman W. Pressman has been in private practice since 1974, concentrating in bankruptcy since 1978. He has argued cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court. T.J. Mullin has been in private practice since 1976, concentrating in bankruptcy since 1989. He was the first debtor’s attorney to receive the Missouri Bar’s Michael B. Roser Award for Excellence in Bankruptcy.

Trump must muzzle his cruel tendencies The steady stream of slurs proves it’s a dog-eat-dog White House. KATHLEEN PARKER Washington Post

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of Former CIA Director John Brennan, shown in 2017 testifying on Capitol Hill. Brennan is a frequent critic of the president.

Trump can’t fire everybody In revoking Brennan’s security clearance, Trump takes another step toward the abyss. president-elect in January, detailing the salacious sexual allegations conDAVID IGNATIUS tained in a now-famous (but unconWashington Post firmed) dossier compiled by former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele and funded partly by lawyers representing the Hillary Clinton campaign. Trump brought What Donald Trump did Wednesup this sleazy evidence repeatedly day isn’t supposed to happen in a afterward and pressed Comey for democracy. A president who swore a pledge of personal loyalty. When an oath to uphold the Constitution Trump didn’t get it, he fired his FBI just carried out a personal political director and, in a television intervendetta against a career intelligence view, blamed it on Comey’s pursuit officer. of the Russia investigation. In revoking the security clearBrennan poses a similar challenge ance of former CIA Director John for Trump. It’s not that Brennan Brennan, Trump took another step embodies the “deep state.” In truth, toward the abyss. He cited the “risk he disliked a CIA operations culture posed by (Brennan’s) erratic conthat he felt had rejected duct and behavior,” a him as a young officer; ludicrous charge coming while his modernization from our unguided misefforts at the CIA had sile of a chief executive. supporters, I’d bet that Brennan’s real crime many at the agency were is that he has been in relieved to see him go. Trump’s face nearly What was so threatevery day, trading ening about the former insults on Twitter and CIA chief? Beyond cable television. BrenBrennan’s sheer cussnan has taken to using edness, I’d guess that words like “high crimes Trump was frightened and misdemeanors” — and remains so to this and “nothing short of day — about just how treasonous” to describe much Brennan knows Trump’s behavior and about his secrets. And by likened him to convicted that, I don’t just mean fraudster Bernie Madoff. his dealings with RusStripping Brennan’s clearances was presiASSOCIATED PRESS sian oligarchs and presidents, but the way he dential payback, dressed President Donald Trump revoked the security clearance of moved through a world up in national-security former CIA Director John Brennan on Wednesday. He has also of fixers, flatterers and language. threatened the security clearance of others, including (top money launderers. I wrote back in Janurow, from left) former CIA Director Michael Hayden, former Brennan, like Comey, ary that I wished BrenFBI Director James Comey, former acting FBI director Andrew was there at the beginnan and other former McCabe, former national security adviser Susan Rice and ning of this investigaintelligence chiefs (bottom row, from left) former FBI Deputy Assistant Director tion. Trump must have would resist slugging it Peter Strzok, former FBI lawyer Lisa Page, former Deputy asked himself: What out with Trump — not Attorney General Sally Yates and former National Intelligence does Brennan know? because their criticisms Director James Clapper. What did he learn from are wrong, but because the CIA’s deep assets in Moscow, and they risked tarnishing the credibility investigation led by special counsel from liaison partners such as Britain, Robert Mueller. “I call it the rigged and professionalism of their agenIsrael, Germany and the Netherwitch hunt, (it) is a sham. And these cies. As I argued, Trump supporters lands? Does Trump think Brennan people led it! So I think it’s somewould “fume that the spy chiefs are will be a less credible witness withthing that had to be done.” ganging up on the populist presiout a security clearance? With Trump, you always have to dent. Conspiracy theories about an The Brennan episode is just one imaginary ‘deep state’ will gain more question what’s rubbing him so raw, more warning of what may be ahead. and driving him toward possibly traction, and the cycle of national Trump appears ready to take our illegal and unconstitutional actions. mistrust will get worse.” country over the waterfall to save As prosecutors like to say: “We may But let’s be honest: Brennan isn’t himself. Before it’s too late, Trump not know what he’s done wrong, a guy who was going to back down should realize: Even in his rage, he but he does.” Does a warped protecin a bar fight, any more than Trump. can’t fire everybody. He’s a tough, stubborn Irish-Ameri- tive impulse drive Trump into these furies of defensive action? can with a chip on his shoulder. He’s David Ignatius With James Comey, ground zero a guy who, if you write five positive davidignatius@washpost.com may have been the briefing given things about him and one negative, Copyright The Washington Post by the then-FBI director to the only remembers the negative. Once Trump insulted Brennan’s integrity, as he did after he won the presidency, these two were going to end up in a cockfight. The prevailing media explanation of the Brennan move was that Trump was trying to distract public attention from Omarosa Manigault Newman, a disaffected former staffer who just published a tell-all book about the president called “Unhinged.” But I wonder if that was the real Brennan trigger. Trump himself offered a clearer (and more damning) explanation in an interview Wednesday with The Wall Street Journal, suggesting that he punished Brennan because he was one of the original instigators of the

No sooner had I ordered the 2011 book “Less Than Human” for a late-summer read than President Donald Trump called Omarosa Manigault Newman a “dog” and a “lowlife.” Those two slurs fit nicely into author David Livingstone Smith’s philosophical study of man’s capacity to inflict cruelty by first dehumanizing the “other.” Trump’s personal template is familiar. He likes someone, then doesn’t, then reduces the object of his scorn to something less than human. The mononymously known Omarosa, whose friendship with Trump began when she appeared on “The Apprentice,” was fired last year from her job as a White House aide. During the past few days, she has released secretly taped recordings of her firing as well as a later conversation with Trump, just published a tell-all account of her time in the White House, and told MSNBC’s Chris Matthews that she’s willing to cooperate with the Robert Mueller investigation. (Whether Mueller is interested in her input isn’t clear.) All things considered, it sounds as if Trump and Omarosa may deserve each other. Recording people without their knowledge, especially in the White House, is certainly un-kosher if not illegal. On Tuesday, the Trump campaign filed for arbitration against Omarosa for breach of a 2016 nondisclosure agreement. More important, however, is the risk of having exposed top officials to hackers if Omarosa used her cellphone to record these and other conversations. Whatever her motivations, Omarosa seems set on exposing Trump as a racist. (Congratulations, Omarosa, you’re the last to know. He’s also a misogynist.) Trump may not be an N-word-hurling racist, though Omarosa claims to know of a tape from his reality-show days when he used the term. (Trump denies having used the epithet. But his pattern of speaking about AfricanAmericans, among others not of his race or ethnicity, suggests that racism taints his mental processes.) It’s fair to say that most whites who are racist usually don’t think they are. This is because they don’t use the N-word or actively seek to bring harm to non-whites. But racism is a pernicious, passive plague. You don’t have to burn crosses in people’s yards. All you have to do is see African-Americans (or Asians or Latinos) in stereotypically demeaning ways. Thus, when Trump became angry with Omarosa, he didn’t say she

was a disgruntled former employee — or make some other dismissively neutral comment. Instead, he tweeted: “When you give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn’t work out. Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog!” Directing such vitriol toward any woman is repellent. But what makes the president’s remarks especially repugnant is that they were aimed at a minority woman and followed a spate of similar insults targeting AfricanAmericans: He recently said that Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., has a low IQ, “somewhere in the mid-60s.” In a twofer on Aug. 3, he attacked both CNN anchor Don Lemon and Los Angeles Lakers superstar LeBron James, tweeting: “Lebron James was just interviewed by the dumbest man on television, Don Lemon. He made Lebron look smart, which isn’t easy to do.” Granted, all of the above have been critical of Trump, but so what? Presidents are frequently under fire. Yet, through some strange reasoning, Americans are supposed to accept that, you know, Trump’s a fighter. He always fires back, as though this were justification for the bile he releases into the atmosphere. In the process, he has offered aid to his enemies by displaying a pattern of racially charged commentary. It’s a simple matter of fact that certain insults have greater or lesser impact when applied to particular individuals or groups of people. Comparing Mitt Romney or Steve Bannon to a dog, as Trump previously did, obviously isn’t the same as calling a black woman a dog. Questioning the intelligence of AfricanAmericans is especially blistering. Did Trump mean for us to treat his comments so literally? Who cares? He’s the president of the United States and should be able to muzzle his schoolyard impulses. He should also know that dehumanization — or “othering,” to use current vernacular — leads to marginalization, which can lead to cruelty (say, separating young migrant children from their parents), which can lead to far worse. As Smith explains in his book, it’s much easier to hurt, maim or kill another when you no longer see them as quite human. World history’s catalog of atrocity confirms this. Which is why no one living today should be comfortable with the language of dehumanization, no matter how relatively minor the degree. Least of all, the president. Kathleen Parker kathleenparker@washpostcom Copyright The Washington Post


NATION

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

Manafort jury ends first day of deliberations with questions ASSOCIATED PRESS

• The jury in the fraud trial of former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort ended its first day of deliberations with a series of questions to the judge, including a request to “redefine” reasonable doubt. The questions came after roughly seven hours of deliberation, delivered in a handwritten note to U.S. District Judge T.S.

ALEXANDRIA, VA.

Ellis III. Ellis read the questions aloud to lawyers for both sides as well as Manafort before he called the jury in to give his answers. Along with the question on reasonable doubt, the jury asked about the list of exhibits, rules for reporting foreign bank accounts and the definition of “shelf companies,” a term used during the trial to describe some of the foreign companies used by Manafort.

Ellis told the jurors they need to rely on their collective memory of the evidence to answer most questions. As for reasonable doubt, he described it as “a doubt based on reason” and told jurors it does not require proof “beyond all doubt.” The jury concluded deliberations around 5:30 p.m. after receiving Ellis’ answers. Deliberations will resume Friday at 9:30 a.m.

OBITUARIES Arns, Gloria A. "Glo" - Kirkwood Coyle, Peter Marius - St. Louis English - see Gallen Gallen, Catherine Ellen - St. Louis Garcia, Michael J. "Mikee" - St. Louis Gogel - see Pautler Heggemann, Sr. Gregory, C.PP.S. - O'Fallon, MO

Jurors began their deliberations Thursday morning in the case against Manafort, who prosecutors say earned $60 million advising Russia-backed politicians in Ukraine, hid much of it from the IRS and then lied to banks to get loans when the money dried up. Manafort’s defense countered that he wasn’t culpable because he left the particulars of his finances to others. The trial is the first court-

Celebrations of Life

Higgins, Gail - St. Louis Kelble - see Pautler Obermoeller - see Pautler Pautler, Russell A. - St. Louis Perkinson, Jane B. - St. Louis Rupp, June Evelyn - St. Louis Skaggs, Richard Heskel - St. Charles

Pautler, Russell A.

Arns, Gloria A. "Glo" (nee Hagan), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Monday, August 13, 2018. Beloved wife of Thomas G. Arns; dear step-sister, sister-in-law and aunt. Services: Memorial visitation Mon., Aug. 20, 4-8 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Stray Rescue of St. Louis. www.boppchapel.com

Coyle, Peter Marius

Baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Wed., Aug. 15, 2018, at age 80. Beloved son of the l a t e Clement a n d Gera l d in e Pautler; dear husband of Barbara Pautler (Obermoeller); father of Mary (Christopher) Kelble; dear grandpa of Abigail, Kaitlyn and Zachary Kelble; dear brother of the late Michael Pautler; dear brother-in-law, uncle, nephew, cousin and friend. Russell and Barbara were married for 51 years. Russell was born in Centralia, IL. He attended St. Louis University and obtained a Master's Degree in Electronic Engineering. Russell worked for McDonnell Douglas and Boeing for 39 years. He has a special devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Services: Funeral from ORTMANN STIPANOVICH Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Mon., Aug. 20, 10:30 a.m. to St. John Bosco Catholic Church, 12934 Marine Ave., St. Louis, with the celebration of Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Masses preferred. Visitation 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Perkinson, Jane B.

Mon. 8/13/18. Visitation Immacolata Catholic Church, 8900 (nee Schneeberger), Monday, August 13, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Robert E. Perkinson; loving mother of Gary Austin and Clayton Rd., Sat., 8/18, 8:30 am followed by 10:00 am Mass. stepmother of Mary (Judge Henry) Autrey; cherished grandInterment Calvary Cemetery. Full obit www.boppchapel.com mother of Emily, Frederich Autrey and Christina Austin; dear sister of Don (JoAnn) Schneeberger; dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Gallen, Catherine Ellen (nee English), fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Services: Visitation at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Road, Church on August 13, 2018, originally of East St. Louis. Beloved Kirkwood, Monday, August 20th, 12:00-1:45 p.m., followed by a wife of the late James V. Gallen; dear mother of James M. committal service at Sunset Memorial Park. In lieu of (JoAnn) and Kevin P. (Ann); affectionate MaMaw of James W., flowers, memorials preferred to the American Brain Katie, Carol and Sarah Gallen. Dear aunt, cousin and friend to Foundation. www.boppchapel.com many. Services: Funeral from Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, 6464 Rupp, June Evelyn Chippewa and Watson, on Saturday, August 18, 2018 at 9:30 (nee Dennis) fortified with the a.m. to Our Lady of Providence Church, 8866 Pardee Rd. for a s a cra men t s of H ol y M ot h er Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. Burial at Resurrection Church on Saturday, August 11, Cemetery. Visitation: Friday, August 17 from 4:00 p.m. until 2018. Loving wife for 71 years of 9:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Masses preferred or donations the late William S. "Bill" Rupp; to Kenrick-Glennon Seminary or the Department of Special dear mother and mother-in-law Education of the Archdiocese of St. Louis are of Joe (Sally) Rupp, Tom (Sue) appreciated. Please share memories at Rupp, Mary Jane (Greg) Baker, www.hoffmeistercolonial.com. Carrie (Gary) Hantack and the late Matthew W. Rupp; dear Garcia, Michael J. "Mikee" grandmother of 16 and greatgrandmother of 23. Our dear 59, suddenly July 28, 2018. Loving son of the late Fred and aunt, great-aunt, cousin and Beatrice; loving brother of Karen E. Taken away too soon. friend. Services: Memorial Mass Saturday, August 18, at Immaculate June was a 1943 graduate of Visitation Academy and attended Heart of Mary Church, 4092 Blow St., 63116 at 11:30 a.m. St. Mary's College, Notre Dame, Indiana. She was a much Visitation before Mass at 10 a.m. Donations to Disabled beloved 4th grade teacher at the former Our Lady of Good American Veterans. KUTIS AFFTON service. Counsel Catholic School in Bellefontaine Neighbors, MO. Later in her career, she became the Business Manager for Northwest Heggemann, Sr. Gregory, C.PP.S. Radiation Oncology. T u e s d a y , A u g u s t 1 4 , 2 0 1 8 , Services: Funeral Monday, August 20, 9:45 a.m. from baptized into the hope of Christ's BUCHHOLZ Mortuary West, 2211 Clarkson Road (at Wilson), to St. Resurrection. Beloved daughter Clement of Rome Catholic Church, 1510 Bopp Road, Des Peres of the late Edward and Minnie for a 10:30 a.m. Mass. Interment National Cemetery at Jefferson ( S i c k m a n n ) H e g g e m a n n . Barracks, MO. In lieu of flowers, memorials made to the Society Survived by her brother Jerome of St. Vincent De Paul, 1310 Papin St., St. Louis, MO 63103 are Heggemann, sister-in-law Mary appreciated. Online guestbook at Ann (Bader) Heggemann, nieces buchholzmortuary.com. and nephews, dear friends and VISITATION SUNDAY, 4-8 p.m. Sisters in Christ. Services: Funeral Mass, August Skaggs, Richard Heskel 18, 2018 at 11:00 a.m., St. Joseph C h a p e l , 2 0 4 N o r t h M a i n , August 14, 2018. Service: Vis. Sat., Aug. 18, 4-8 p.m., Serv. O'Fallon, MO. Interment convent Sun., Aug. 19, 10 a.m. at Baue Cave Springs. Contact (636) cemetery. Wake Friday, August 17, from 3:30-8:00 p.m. and a 946-7811 or visit baue.com Prayer Service of Thanksgiving at 7:00 p.m. Wake continues on Saturday, August 17, from 9:00-10:45 a.m. in St. Joseph Chapel, Soutiea Jr., Wilfred G. "Bill" 204 North Main, O'Fallon, MO. Contributions to the 78, passed Wednesday, August 15, 2018. Services: At Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, 204 North Main, Hoffmeister South County Funeral Home, St. Louis, MO. VisitaO'Fallon, MO 63366-2299. tion August 19th, from 4-8 p.m., funeral August 20th at 10 a.m.

Higgins, Gail 79, Went home peacefully on 8-16-18. Visitation Sunday, 8/19/18, 4 pm-8 pm, Jay B. Smith Maplewood. Service Monday 8/20, 10am Jay B. Smith Maplewood. Tributes to jaybsmith.com.

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

Tracy Sr., Deacon Daniel J. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Monday, August 13, 2018. Beloved husband of Casimera Tracy (nee Malon); loving father of Daniel J. (the late Kathy) Tracy, Jr., Deborah (Robin) Sisco and Edward Michael (Shelle) Tracy; cherished grandfather of Daniel Joseph, III, Woody Thomas and William Henry. Our dearest g r e a t - g r a n d f a t h e r , b rot h er, brother-in-law, son-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Dan was ordained a permanent deacon on June 5, 1999 at St. Ambrose Catholic Church. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, on Monday, August 20 at 9:45 a.m. to St. Ambrose Catholic Church for 10:30 a.m. Mass. Interment at J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 1-8 p.m.

room test of the ongoing Russia probe led by special counsel Robert Mueller. While allegations of collusion are still being investigated, evidence of bank fraud and tax evasion unearthed during the probe has cast doubt on the integrity of Trump’s closest advisers during the campaign. T h e gove r n m e n t says Manafort hid at least $16 million in income from the IRS between 2010 and 2014.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Soutiea Jr., Wilfred G. "Bill" - St. Louis Tracy Sr., Deacon Daniel J. - St. Louis Triska, Shirley A. - St. Louis Williams, Margie - St. Louis Witte, Martha L. - St. Charles

Triska, Shirley A. Visitation Sunday, 3-8 p.m., Service 12 p.m. Monday. JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, 7027 Gravois (314) 352-2600 or ZiegenheinFuneralHome.com

Williams, Margie Beloved wife of the late Kevin Williams, dear daughter of the late Yola Mae and Arthur Tyler, Jr. Devoted mother of Tynisha, Tyanna and Joshua. Dear sister of 6, grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of 1. Margie was a 33 year employee of US Bank and had recently been recognized as Employee of the Year. Services: Visitation at New paradise MBC, 7348 W. Florissant on Saturday, August 18, at 9 a.m. until memorial service at 10 a.m.

Witte, Martha L. 77, of St. Charles, MO. August 15, 2018. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services, 636-498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

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LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Michael W. Walther Commercial Maintenance - Retired Member 49 Years August 5, 2018 Memorial Service Sun., Aug. 19, 2018 12-4 p.m., Knights of Columbus 9330 Old Missouri 21 Hillsboro, Mo. 63050 Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Kenneth E. Landwehr Sr. Journeyman Wireman - Retired Member 56 Years - August 13, 2018 Private service has been held. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be made to the IBEW Local One Relief Fund or Siteman Cancer Center Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S. Please be advised of the death of Vernon Brooks, 54 years old Passed away 8/9/18. Appointed 2/1/1988-Retired 2/27/1996 Service & Viewing at Metro Christian Worship Center on 8/17/18 at 10 a.m. Rest In Peace.

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08.17.2018 • FriDay • M 1

WORLD

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A17

Italy made cut in infrastructure spending Bridge collapse called a ‘metaphor’ for country BY COLLEEN BARRY associated Press

MILAN • Collapsed concrete, twisted metal, crushed cars. While the disaster in Genoa was the deadliest in recent years, Italy has seen other bridge and highway collapses that have raised alarm about the state of its aging transportation infrastructure. The 51-year-old Morandi Bridge was a key artery that linked highways to Milan and France, a vital lifeline for both commercial traffic as well as vacationers bound for the mountains and famous Mediterranean beaches. “When it was inaugurated, it was vaunted as an engineering achievement, representing the most advanced technology and a model that Italy spread throughout the world,” said Antonio Occhiuzzi, president of Italy’s CNR society of civil engineers. “It was a project that was constantly under surveillance,” he said. “Notwithstanding all these efforts, it came down. It is a little metaphor for the country.” Designed by Italian engineer Riccardo Morandi, its unusual features included concrete-encased stay cables, which he used in several of his bridge designs instead of the more common steel cables. Experts say the concrete can deteriorate relatively quickly. Many technicians had advised replacing the Genoa bridge. In the wake of Tuesday’s collapse, prosecutors are investigating both its possible design flaws as well as maintenance, although they have not identified any targets. Some in the government blame Italy’s partially privatized highway system, alleging that too much emphasis is put on profits. The disaster, in which dozens of vehicles plunged 150 feet when part of the bridge collapsed, is spurring calls to retrofit or replace others in Italy that are operating well beyond their expected lifespan and despite technological advances. A survey published this week by the CNR engineering group cited four other major highway overpass collapses in the last two years alone — all related to struc-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Firefighters remove debris Thursday of the collapsed Morandi highway bridge in Genoa, Italy. Italian authorities have lowered the death to 38 from 39 in the collapse the bridge. The death toll, however, is expected to rise as operations continue.

tural weakness. They caused three deaths and four injuries. The survey excluded smaller incidents that did not cause injury, but Italian media counted three more highway collapses going back to 2004 that caused four deaths and four injuries. “What are worrisome are the ones built in the 1950s and 1960s, most of which are at the end of their lifespans,” Occhiuzzi said, adding that they often are difficult to retrofit efficiently and probably cheaper to replace. He also noted that the recent collapses occurred in northern, central and southern Italy, defying stereotypes of a wellmaintained, wealthy north versus a neglected south. The government is focusing blame for the Morandi Bridge collapse on the Autostrade per l’Italia company operating the A10 highway that includes the bridge, citing a lack of maintenance, and

Challenged by U.S. and market crisis, Turkey turns to Europe

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tourists walk by the Golden Horn in Istanbul on Thursday. Many commentators believe the path to Turkey’s long-term recovery lies in bold economic steps, such as an interest rate increase to curb inflation after years of debt-fueled growth.

BY CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA associated Press

ISTANBUL • Beset by a shaky currency and tension with the United States, Turkey is reaching out to Europe to shore up relations with major trading partners despite years of testy rhetoric and a stalled bid for EU membership. The engagement by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has harshly criticized Germany and other European nations in the past, is part of a diplomatic campaign to capitalize on international unease over U.S. President Donald Trump and American tariff disputes around the world. Also this week, Qatar pledged $15 billion in investments in Turkey and Russia’s foreign minister talked about using national currencies instead of the dollar in trade with Turkey. Even so, many commentators believe the path to Turkey’s long-term recovery lies in bold economic steps, such as an interest rate increase to curb inflation after years of debt-fueled growth, as well as a resolution to a bitter rift with the United States over an American pastor on trial in a Turkish court. They wonder to what extent Erdogan, who has intensified his control over Turkey as leader for nearly 16 years, can modify his positions after saying the currency crisis and standoff with Washington is an “economic war.” The dialogue with NATO allies in Europe as well as Russia, seen by many in Washington as a threat to U.S. interests, reflect Turkey’s unusual status as a strategic country in a volatile region where world powers have long been deeply involved. Turkey, which has secular traditions and a mostly Muslim population, has generally taken a pragmatic course since the Cold War, staying anchored in Western institutions but also engaging Iran and other regional heavyweights. In a fresh emphasis on Europe, Erdo-

gan spoke by phone about stability and cooperation with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Wednesday, and with French President Emmanuel Macron on Thursday. In addition, Turkey freed two Greek soldiers who had been held in a Turkish prison for months. And a Turkish court freed Taner Kilic, an Amnesty International representative who was jailed for 14 months, though the terrorrelated charges against him were not dropped. “There is a growing reaction in Europe against the Trump administration’s restrictive and punitive economic policies,” Ibrahim Kalin, a spokesman for the Turkish president, said. He said Turkey, France and Germany “are on the same page” in opposing the U.S. move to impose tariffs. Just last year, during a low point, Erdogan referred to what he called the “Nazi practices” of contemporary Germany. Washington imposed sanctions on two Turkish government ministers and doubled tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum imports over the detention of American pastor Andrew Brunson on espionage and terrorism-related charges. Turkey retaliated with tariffs on some U.S. imports and said it would boycott U.S. electronic goods. The EU has likewise been subjected to new tariffs on steel and aluminum by the Trump administration, with the bloc responding in kind, though the sides agree last month to try to roll back the punitive duties. The EU, Turkey’s biggest trading partner, provides billions of euros to the Turkish government to help several million Syrian refugees on its soil and prevent them from reaching Europe. But the relationship is also fraught. Turkey has accused European countries of harboring suspected terrorists, while Europe has long-standing concerns about democracy and the rule of law in Turkey.

is pledging to revoke Autostrade’s highway concession. Cabinet ministers have said there was a cozy relationship between the knitwear making Benetton family that controls Autostrade and previous governments that prevented proper oversight. In a statement Thursday, Autostrade said it was prepared to take “rigorous action,” beyond any criminal charges, if it emerges that any of its managers or workers were in any way responsible for the disaster. It said it was conducting its own internal inquiry and cooperating with authorities. Figures from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development show that Italian investments in roads sank most dramatically among the top five European economies after the 2008 economic crisis, never fully recovering. From a level of just under 13.6 billion euros a year in 2007, second only to France, Italy dropped to 3.8 billion euros in 2014.

In that period, Occhiuzzi said, Italy pulled back dramatically on both infrastructure and research investment. But he said retrofitting old projects hasn’t been prioritized because it is not glamorous and requires studies of old technology that no longer exists. He also said assigning blame for collapses always involves more than one factor. Building roads, bridges and viaducts on the 745-mile Italian peninsula and two major islands are part of the complexity of resolving the infrastructure issue. The Morandi Bridge embodied this geographical challenge. Genoa is tucked picturesquely between the mountains and the Mediterranean, and motorists exiting a tunnel near the city make a gentle descent toward the Ligurian coastline. “Everyone loves the Italian panorama characterized by a rugged landscape and green vistas near the sea. But that beauty is also its weakness,” Occhiuzzi said.

DIGEST Uganda charges singer in attack A pop singer and prominent critic of Uganda’s government was charged with unlawful possession of firearms in a military court on Thursday for his alleged role in clashes in which the longtime president’s motorcade was attacked by people throwing stones. The arrest of lawmaker Kyagulanyi Ssentamu, whose stage name is Bobi Wine, has set off an outcry in the East African nation, with rights groups demanding his release. He has not been seen in public since he was detained after Monday’s clashes. A lawyer for Ssentamu, Medard Sseggona, told reporters after Thursday’s closed-door hearing that his client had been so “brutalized he cannot walk, he cannot stand, he can only sit with difficulty ... It is hard to say whether he understands this and that.” Palestinians to get mail years late • Palestinian postal workers have begun the daunting task of sorting through more than 10 tons of mail delivered by Israel nearly a decade late. Allam Moussa, the Palestinian Authority’s minister of communications, said the backlog of mail, which dates to 2010, was allowed in from Jordan after long negotiations with Israeli authorities. He accused Israel of delaying the delivery. The mail will take at least four weeks to deliver, a process that would begin after the Eid al-Adha holiday later this month, Sawaftah said. Amnesty International leader criticizes Trump • The new leader of Amnesty International says many world leaders, especially President Donald Trump, are rolling back gains made in respecting human rights, with the Trump administration’s separation of families at U.S. borders “one of the worst atrocities” seen in a long time. “The presidency of Donald Trump is a major challenge for the people of the U.S. and the people of the world,” Kumi Naidoo told The Associated Press on Thursday. With a background of activism against apartheid in his native South Africa and for environmental issues as a director of Greenpeace, Naidoo said he intends to make Amnesty “bigger, bolder and more inclusive.” He began a four-year term at the helm of the London-based rights group this week. Myanmar’s rights investigators pledge impartiality • Members of a commission established by Myanmar’s government to investigate human rights violations in western Rakhine state, where 700,000 members of the Muslim Rohingya minority fled brutal army operations, addressed critics Thursday with a pledge to be impartial. The Independent Commission of Enquiry held its first formal meeting Thursday in the capital, Naypyitaw. It was established after rights groups called for the International Criminal Court to investigate alleged abuses by the army against the

Rohingya, including murder, mass rape and the destruction of villages. Doctors, nurses protest Venezuelan leader • Riot police blocked hundreds of doctors and nurses from marching to Venezuela’s presidential palace to protest low pay and shortages of medical supplies amid the nation’s deepening crisis. Thursday’s demonstration in Caracas was the first attempt by protesters to reach the presidential palace since massive antigovernment protests last year. The medical professionals demanded action by President Nicolas Maduro, who’s overseeing a crisis marked by widespread shortages and mass migration from the country. U.S., Chile reach deal on cybersecurity • U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and his Chilean counterpart have signed an agreement pledging closer cooperation in combating cyberthreats. Mattis and Defense Minister Alberto Espina held a signing ceremony Thursday after meeting to discuss a range of security issues, including military exercises and cooperation in science and technology. Santiago was the fourth stop for Mattis on a tour of South America that began in Brasilia on Sunday. He also visited Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires and is scheduled to hold talks in Bogota, Colombia, on Friday. Russia warns sanctions could hurt North Korea talks • Russia has warned that the latest U.S. sanctions against a Russian company accused by Washington of breaching international restrictions on North Korea could undermine denuclearization talks with Pyongyang. The U.S. Treasury Department on Wednesday imposed sanctions on three companies from China, Russia and Singapore accused of helping North Korea dodge international sanctions. The Russian Foreign Ministry said Thursday that the U.S. move could “undermine recent progress toward the settlement” of the standoff over North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs. Dogs attend Mass honoring their patron saint • Many Bolivians brought their dogs, often freshly groomed and dressed in costumes, to the parish of Villa Adela near the capital Thursday for a Mass honoring the patron saint of dogs. Every Aug. 16, the church holds the feast of San Roque, or Saint Roch, who legend has it was a 14th-century French noble who traveled to Italy to care for plague victims and became the patron of dogs. He appears in images accompanied by a dog. While owners brought their groomed pooches for the Mass, nearby street dogs fought over scraps in garbage dumps. There is no census of dogs in Bolivia, but the Ministry of Health estimates there is an overpopulation of 3 million dogs, with about a half million living on the streets. From news services


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FRIDAY • 08.17.2018 • B

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Dignitaries and invited guests applaud from the deck of the Edward A. Doisy Research Center on Thursday during the topping-out ceremony for the new SSM Health St. Louis University Hospital project that is taking shape on South Grand Boulevard next to the old St. Louis University Hospital.

SSM SET TO RESHAPE ITS FUTURE Cementing its link with SLU • Final beam placed atop $550 million hospital, on track to open in 2020 BY SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The final steel beam was placed atop the new $550 million SSM Health St. Louis University Hospital on Thursday morning. The milestone represents the next stage in construction for the hospital that will replace the current one along Grand Boulevard.

Express Scripts staking out million-dollar gene therapies

Thursday’s topping out ceremony was celebrated by both SSM Health and St. Louis University leaders and physicians, and represents SSM and St. Louis University’s long-term commitment to one another. “The impact of this investment and our partnership cannot be overstated,” See HOSPITAL • Page B4

Consolidation • Health care provider in talks to sell facilities in Jefferson City, Audrain County, Maryville BY SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

SSM Health is in discussions to sell several Missouri health facilities in Jefferson City, Mexico and Maryville. Creve Coeur-based SSM said Thursday it has signed letters of intent to “explore transferring ownership” of its operations in those cities to two Missouri health sys-

Jefferson Connector project advances, wins tax credits

Giant pharmacy benefit manager negotiating to distribute costly drugs

tems for an undisclosed price. SSM Health is in talks with University of Missouri Health Care to sell its SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital-Jefferson City and SSM Health St. Mary’s HospitalAudrain, in addition to outpatient, home care, hospice and medical group locations throughout the region. See SSM • Page B4

Venture capital flowing freely to St. Louis area businesses One problem: More money is being spent, but for fewer investments

BY CAROLINE HUMER AND DEENA BEASLEY Reuters

Express Scripts Holding Co. built a multibillion-dollar enterprise pressuring drug companies to lower their prices for U.S. patients. Now it is quietly building a side business: getting paid to help drug companies dispense a new generation of high-priced drugs. St. Louis County-based Express Scripts is in talks with biotechnology companies Biomarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Spark Therapeutics Inc. and Bluebird Bio Inc. to have its specialty pharmaceutical business exclusively distribute their new gene therapies when they are expected to become available in 2019 See EXPRESS • Page B5

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Midtown Alley, its developer told economic development officials Thursday. Developer Jassen Johnson of Renaissance Development Associates is one of the people behind the rehab of

Any discussion of venture capital in St. Louis must start with the fact that the region has come a long way. Even after a couple of down years, the region attracts more funding for its early-stage companies than most Midwestern cities. Two recent rankings, by the website Crunchbase and by Chicago investment firm M25, both labeled St. Louis the fourth-best spot in the Midwest for startups to raise capital. The numbers aren’t all rosy, though.

See CONNECTOR • Page B4

See NICKLAUS • Page B5

TRIVERS ASSOCIATES

A 125-room hotel is planned at the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Locust Street by Midtown Alley developer Jassen Johnson and Oklahoma developer Ross Group.

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A $5.5 million project to rehab a vacant building at 2200 Washington Avenue into new offices for Twain Financial Partners is part of a larger effort to better tie Downtown West to

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B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Berendzen picked to be Fox Architects president, COO Fox Architects Managing Partner John Berendzen was named president and chief operating officer. Berendzen joined Fox Architects in 1988. He made principal in 1998 and managing partner in 2017. Berendzen earned his bachelor’s and maste r ’s d e g re e s from Washington University. He is a past president Berendzen of the St. Louis chapter of the American Institute of Architects and serves as a trustee of the AIA St. Louis Scholarship Foundation.

M 1 • FRIDAY • 08.17.2018

Ces & Judy’s Catering opens contemporary new venue

The Venue at Maison du Lac sits on a 25-acre estate and features a modern architectural design with high ceilings and an outdoor deck overlooking a lake.

Ces & Judy’s Catering has opened a 7,000-square-foot contemporary event space called the Venue at Maison du Lac in Catawissa in Franklin County. The Venue at Maison du Lac sits on a 25-acre estate and features a modern architectural design with high ceilings and an outdoor deck overlooking a lake. The property is available for weddings, corporate events and other gatherings and can accommodate up to 300 guests. Additionally, the property’s Catawissa Stone House, built in 1843, has a newly updated luxury bridal suite and features a groom’s lounge, full kitchen and separate driveway with access to a renovated barn and the Venue. The Venue at Maison du Lac was designed by Tao + Lee Associates and built by Spiegelglass Construction Co. Ces & Judy’s Catering is the exclusive caterer of the Venue at Maison du Lac and continues to cater off-premises events as well.

BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD AWARDS Mosby Building Arts received a regional Contractor of the Year Award from the National Association of the Remodeling Industry for a lower level remodeling project.

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ALL WHEEL DRIVE, BACK-UP CAMERA, 2.0T LEASE FOR

Doerr

Grothaus

399

$

Mattie

*

A MONTH

0 DOWN

$

2 or More Available VIN 3PCAJ5M31KF101684

NEW 2018

Kremer

McGraw

Fox

INFINITI

QX60

ALL WHEEL DRIVE, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION LEASE FOR

429

$

*

MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS Gabriel Group and Membership Consultants joined forces through a mutual acquisition agreement.

A MONTH

Bay

Mendez

$

0 DOWN

MORE BUSINESS

2 or More Available VIN 5N1DL0MMXJC517212

NEW 2018

Michael J. Werdes was promoted to vice president, engineering at Murphy Co.

INFINITI

LEASE FOR

Dr. Patrick Nakashima-Moran joined Esse Health Belleville Internal Medicine.

449

$

SSM Health Medical group added cardiologist Dr. Aaron L. Tang and general surgeon Dr. Jennifer LaPlante.

Jesse Schilligo joined Knoebel Construction as project manager. Schowalter & Jabouri PC promoted Deidra A. Doerr to senior manager. Bell Insurance Solutions hired Tricia Grothaus as client support representative.

0 DOWN

$

2 or More Available VIN JN1BY1PR7JM370662

Haberberger Inc. added Jim McGraw as project manager.

Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2017.

* 39 mo. lease, $0 down, $0 Security Deposit, 10,000 miles per year, 12,000 and 15,000 mile available. Plus tax, license and Acquisition fees. See dealer for details. Offer expires 8/31/18.

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. (636) 391-9400

BommaritoINFINITI.com

LISA BROWN

Business editor

314-340-8127

Jack Fox joined Larson Financial Group as chief financial officer.

JACOB BARKER

Economic development

314-340-8291

BRIAN FELDT

Retail and financial institutions

314-340-8528

Thompson Coburn partner Bill Bay was elected chair of the American Bar Association House of Delegates.

BRYCE GRAY

Energy and environment

314-340-8307

SAMANTHA LISS

Business of health

314-340-8017

DAVID NICKLAUS

Business columnist

314-340-8213

Tucker Ellis LLP added Jessica Mendez to its intellectual property and brand protection group.

MARK SCHLINKMANN Transportation and real estate

314-340-8265

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

Peel Wood Fired Pizza opened a new location: •208 South Meramec Avenue, Clayton

PROJECTS

Bommarito INFINITI WEST COUNTY

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF

SSM Health Physical Therapy opened a new outpatient physical therapy center: •5210 North Service Road, St. Peters

Medical Cannabis Outreach Wellness Clinics opened a new location: •203 East Ferguson Avenue, Wood River

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

Luby Equipment Services promoted Jeff Mattie to service manager at the Fenton headquarters. Dr. Theodore Kremer joined Esse Health Florissant Pediatrics.

OPENINGS

*

A MONTH

Fox Architects promoted Adnan Omeragic to partner. The St. Louis Sports Commission hired Tom Dolan as director of sales and development.

Millstadt Milling & Feed Co. at 419 South Jefferson Street in Millstadt is now offering U-Haul products and services.

Q70L

ALL WHEEL DRIVE, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF, LEATHER

Abeles and Hoffman PC promoted Brad Indelicato to tax manager, and Keith Rauch and Kelley Wingbermuehle to principal.

The Doe Run Co. donated the fire station building and its 2.88 acres of land to the Herculaneum Fire Department. The company originally donated the $750,000 needed to construct the fire station on Doe Run property in 2007. The building and land have an appraised value of $1.3 million. The company also donated three parcels of land adjacent to the Herculaneum American Veterans Post MO-0042 to the organization. The total value of the land is $40,000.

Impact Strategies completed the Washington University Pediatric Facility on Memorial Hospital East Campus in Shiloh. IWR North America is completing work on Jones Lang Lasalle’s Microsoft Technology Center. As part of a complete interior fit-out, IWR’s scope included fabricating and installing interior glass and glazing, including glass doors, storefront, partitions, and glazed openings. In addition, IWR was selected as a design-assist partner working on design and budget development for portions of Washington University’s campus enhancements.

SUBMIT AN ITEM Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

Interactive kiosks, with free Wi-Fi, on the way here BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Within a year, 6-foot-tall smartphonelooking kiosks could start popping up around St. Louis. They’d offer free Wi-Fi, directions to local businesses and attractions, public transit maps and emergency alert functions to pedestrians who pass by on the sidewalk. The kiosks, which are being adopted by other cities, could even measure air pollution and traffic. St. Louis’s new — and first — chief technology officer, Robert Gaskill-Clemons, who was hired by Mayor Lyda Krewson’s administration in March from the state of Washington, is spearheading the project. He described the devices as similar to smartphones, with touchscreen apps that

let pedestrians quickly find the information they want. The St. Louis Development Corp., the city’s economic development arm, will issue the request for proposals to select a smart kiosk and appoint a selection committee to evaluate the proposals. Gaskill-Clemons told their board Thursday that the initiative should not cost the city anything. The companies that provide the kiosks make their money selling advertising, but they do ask for long-term contracts, he said. “It’s one heck of an opportunity to start putting smart-city technology in front of the citizens of St. Louis,” Gaskill-Clemons said. The kiosks have been adopted in big cities including New York and smaller ones, including Newport, Ky., a Cincinnati sub-

urb. Gaskill-Clemons said he hopes to begin piloting the devices in some neighborhoods within the next four to six months and expand them after that. A contract with a provider will ensure they remove the devices should they not work, Gaskill-Clemons said, so the city doesn’t get stuck with them if they don’t perform as anticipated. Neighborhood organizations such as Downtown STL Inc. and those near Tower Grove Park have expressed “huge desire” for the smart kiosks, Gaskill-Clemons said. His project is an effort to get in front of the move to the technology and provide a “city solution” instead of individualized smart kiosks from different groups. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

An example of a smart kiosk from Chicago-area company Peerless-AV.


MARKET WATCH

08.17.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed broadly higher Thursday as investors cheered strong results from Walmart and signs that the U.S.-China trade dispute is easing. Banks, health care stocks and industrial companies accounted for some of the biggest gains.

Walmart

M

J J 52-week range

$77.50

Close: 25,558.73 Change: 396.32 (1.6%)

24,960

44

20

42

1

18

J J 52-week range

A $4.75

Close: 2,840.69 Change: 22.32 (0.8%)

2,800

25,500

10 DAYS

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Sep 18 Sep 18 Sep 18

365.25 885.50 542.25

+3.75 +28 +10

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle Hogs

150.27 108.32 55.47 14.99 261.35

+1.22

2,720

Aug 18 Aug 18 Oct 18 Aug 18 Aug 18

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Sep 18 Sep 18 Nov 18

81.80 101.70 25.60

+1.06 -.70 -.10

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Sep 18 Sep 18 Sep 18 Sep 18

65.46 1.9874 209.64 2.908

+.45 -.0100 +.60 -.032

Copper

2,640

A

M

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

NASD 1,919 2,175 2030 828 87 68

3,183 3,586 2105 702 87 45

J

2,560

A

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

J

HIGH 25607.34 11253.19 741.38 12875.41 7849.67 2850.49 2009.88 29713.62 1690.40

LOW 25294.97 11142.05 729.12 12784.75 7795.74 2831.44 1991.16 29540.47 1670.67

CLOSE 25558.73 11190.43 741.02 12841.28 7806.52 2840.69 2000.34 29610.05 1685.75

CHG. +396.32 +75.41 +8.70 +118.19 +32.41 +22.32 +15.98 +240.54 +15.08

%CHG. WK +1.58% s +0.68% s +1.19% s +0.93% t +0.42% t +0.79% t +0.81% t +0.82% t +0.90% t

MO QTR s s s s s s s s t s s s t s s s t s

YTD +3.40% +5.45% +2.44% +0.25% +13.08% +6.25% +5.25% +6.53% +9.78%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

30.13

39.80 33.09 +.62 +1.9 -14.9

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.81

28.19 24.63 +.17 +0.7

-3.1 +18.6 21

Amdocs

DOX

61.00

71.72 64.60 +.15 +0.2

-1.3 +4.0 18

1.00 Home Depot

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

64.89 64.45 +.84 +1.3

+9.3 +11.2 23

1.83 Huttig Building Prod HBP

47.34 47.01 +.48 +1.0 +12.9 +32.0

-9.7

6

2.00 FutureFuel

TKR

... General Motors

16.22 14.14 +.62 +4.6

46.76 36.29 +.35 +1.0 -11.5 +5.4 dd

ARII

34.30

BUD

91.70 126.50 98.47 +.09 +0.1 -11.7 -12.2 24 3.19e Lowes

LOW

Arch Coal

ARCH

68.95 102.61 89.15 +1.82 +2.1

MNK

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

4.66

11.93

4.77

-4.3 +19.1

8

-.12 -2.5 -41.8 -44.2

7

Bank of America

BAC

22.75

33.05 30.72 +.36 +1.2

Belden Inc

BDC

53.65

87.15 69.43

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

1.60 Lee Enterprises

11.32 34.50

American Railcar

1.60 Mallinckrodt plc ... MasterCard

+4.1 +26.0 16 0.60f McDonald’s

-.18 -0.3 -10.0

-3.4 13

0.20 Olin

146.89 207.61 195.39 +1.40 +0.7

LEE

5.09 +.12 +2.4 -23.5

1.90

3.30

2.90 +.05 +1.8 +23.4 +46.2

70.76 108.98 97.68 +.85 +0.9 11.65

22.39

37.10 35.73

53.23

74.49 71.20 +2.04 +2.9 +22.3 +27.3 35

-.24 -0.7

82.20 144.23 143.92 +.22 +0.2 +42.7 +73.5 22

+6.7 +46.3 17

Centene Corp.

CNC

Charter

CHTR 250.10 405.33 302.00 +6.25 +2.1 -10.1 -25.6 98

38.84 29.59 +.75 +2.6 -16.8 47.84 41.34 +.64 +1.6

Cigna

CI

163.02 227.13 188.19 +2.71 +1.5

-7.3 +3.6 18

5.78

5.00

-.05 -1.0

... ...

-2.8

1.00 4.04

9

0.80

+5.0 +45.5

0.60

-7.4 +7.7 dd

0.28

0.28 Perficient

PRFT

17.17

27.90 27.02 +.20 +0.7 +41.7 +53.4 44

...

1.04 Post Holdings

POST

70.66

96.96 97.81 +3.03 +3.2 +23.5 +10.2 25

...

... Reinsurance Gp

RGA

... Reliv

RELV

0.04 Spire Inc

-6.5 +3.1 12 1.80f Stifel Financial

126.62 165.12 143.29 +1.79 +1.3 3.72

8.44

-8.1 +1.9 13 2.00f

5.16 +.19 +3.8

+8.2 -30.6 dd

... 2.25

SR

60.09

82.85 76.90 +1.15 +1.5

+2.3 +3.0 21

-8.7 +7.7 17 0.48f

Citigroup

C

64.38

80.70 69.56 +.91 +1.3

SF

44.44

68.76 54.39 +.60 +1.1

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

70.85 70.59 +1.05 +1.5 +26.4 +31.3 20 0.94f Target Corp.

TGT

53.90

83.19 82.07 +1.38 +1.7 +25.8 +53.1 15 2.56f

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

76.76 57.25 +1.33 +2.4

-3.6 -25.2 14

UPS

Emerson

EMR

57.47

75.25 73.96 +.40 +0.5

+6.1 +26.3 28

Energizer Holdings

... UPS B 1.94 US Bancorp

ENR

40.64

65.57 63.98 +1.49 +2.4 +33.3 +54.1 22

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.65

58.15 56.85 +.65 +1.2 +25.9 +48.1 18 0.48f Verizon

Esco Technologies

ESE

51.45

67.40 66.80 +.40 +0.6 +10.9 +23.8 22

Express Scripts

ESRX

55.80

86.86 87.34 +.69 +0.8 +17.0 +40.4 11

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.28

4.73

3.90

...

... -10.8

-7.6 dd

1.16 US Steel 0.32 WalMart ... Walgreen Boots 0.13 Wells Fargo

USB

101.45 135.53 121.11 +1.06 +0.9

+1.6 +7.5 20

3.64

58.50 53.16 +.57 +1.1

-0.8 +1.5 14

1.20

48.49

X

23.16

47.64 29.51 +.48 +1.7 -16.1 +23.3 17

0.20

VZ

43.97

54.77 54.27 +1.03 +1.9

2.36

+2.5 +14.7

7

WMT

77.50 109.98 98.64 +8.42 +9.3

-0.1 +14.3 23 2.08f

WBA

59.07

83.89 69.62 +.89 +1.3

-4.1 -13.3 15 1.76f

WFC

49.27

66.31 58.66 +.67 +1.2

-3.3 +12.8 14 1.72f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Bayer to start integrating Monsanto • German pharmaceutical company Bayer AG said Thursday it can start integrating Creve Coeur-based Monsanto Co. after completing the required sale of some of its crop science business. Bayer became Monsanto’s sole owner in June but had to hold off on integrating Monsanto while it completed divestments demanded by regulators. Its acquisition of Monsanto cost some $63 billion including debt. Monsanto’s signage and other branding changes to Bayer will occur over time, according to the company. Bayer said in a statement that now that it is no longer required to keep the businesses separate, it has gained the ability to “become actively involved in defense efforts” in legal disputes including those involving Monsanto’s popular Roundup weedkiller. Last week, a jury in San Francisco awarded $289 million in damages to a dying man who claims Roundup gave him cancer.

Senniger Powers, Stinson Leonard Street merging • Intellectual property law firm Senniger Powers is merging with a Kansas City firm, Stinson Leonard Street, that has an existing presence in the St. Louis area. When the merger finalizes Oct. 1, the combined firm will operate as Stinson Leonard Street. Senniger Powers will relocate from its office at 100 North Broadway, according to a news release, to Stinson’s Clayton office. “This expansion will augment our already strong market presence, bringing us to 75 attorneys in Clayton, and will add breadth and depth to our ability to provide market-leading IP services to our clients,” said Mark Hinderks, Stinson’s managing partner. Stinson’s nearly 500 attorneys operate in 15 U.S. locations. In June, Stinson added offices in Dallas in Denver. Senniger Powers traces its history to 1919 when Delos Haynes established an office in St. Louis specializing in patent, trademark and copyright law.

Missouri unemployment drops to lowest rate since 2000 • Missouri’s unemployment has dropped slightly to hit its lowest rate since June 2000. Department of Economic Development data released this week show the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped to 3.4 percent in July. That’s down from 3.5 percent in June. Missouri unemployment was at 3.6 percent in July 2017 and hovered between 3.6 percent and 3.7 percent for most of the past year. It started edging down in June. According to department data, seasonally adjusted employment went up by about 9,800 jobs in July compared to June. The change in nonfarm employment came as the seasonally adjusted civilian labor force went up by about 7,700 people in the same time period. The labor force counts people with jobs and those who are on unemployment but looking for work.

Walmart posts best sales gains in a decade • Walmart bounced back from a lackluster start to the year with the strongest sales gain in more than a decade fueled by its grocery business, brightening the outlook for the overall retail sector. Comparable sales at U.S. Walmart stores rose 4.5 percent in the three months that ended in July, the company said Thursday, more than double analysts’ estimates. Grocery sales rose the most in nine years thanks to improved fresh-food offerings, and web revenue growth accelerated from the previous period. The world’s biggest retailer also boosted its full-year forecasts for comparable sales and adjusted profit. For the full fiscal year, Walmart expects comparable sales, excluding fuel, of about 3 percent at both its name-brand stores and at Sam’s Club. It had earlier been expecting growth off at least 2 percent at Walmart stores and slightly negative to flat performance at the bulk chain. From staff and wire reports

.0335 .7237 .2565 1.2694 .7611 .1442 1.1346 .0142 .2711 .009044 .052120 .0149 .0687 .000881 1.0070

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

CHG

CLOSE

1176.20 14.70 784.50

Gold Silver

1.52 4.12

...

-6.0 +4.0 24

27.68 4.10

CASS

-9.0

146.84 178.70 161.73 +1.85 +1.2 26.73

CAL

6

MCD BTU

Cass Info. Systems

41.70 34.14 +1.71 +5.3 +51.3

OLN SKIS

Caleres Inc.

+3.00 -.01 +5.65

PREV

.0337 .7260 .2559 1.2709 .7599 .1453 1.1365 .0143 .2723 .009019 .052433 .0149 .0677 .000887 1.0035

Platinum

+5.1 +32.6 22 1.92f

129.00 214.28 203.60 +3.36 +1.7 +34.5 +52.9 47

... Peak Resorts

-7.7 29

-9.6 dd

MA

6.84 Peabody Energy

-7.1

+3.1 +31.7 25

7.75

8.55 +.20 +2.4

10.45

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

+0.4 +2.0 17 0.24a

3.50

234.29 374.48 345.98+14.22 +4.3 +17.3 +41.5 32 7.25

$46.35

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

FF

ABInBev

6

52-WK LO HI

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.87 percent Thursday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

-1.30 +.28 +12.60

1.88 1.38 1.13

5.00 4.50 4.25

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.06 2.22 2.44 2.60 2.74 2.81 2.87 3.03

... ... ... +0.01 +0.02 +0.02 +0.02 +0.01

1.00 1.12 1.24 1.33 1.78 2.04 2.23 2.81

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

A

$30.36

Interestrates Interestrates

GM HD

J J 52-week range

Vol.: 48.4m (2.3x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $212.4 b Yield: 2.9%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

M

ExchangeRates

DATE

Milk

M

$34.20

CHICAGO BOT

Live cattle

F

40

A

2,800

24,500

23,500

$17.81

Wheat

25,000

24,000

J J 52-week range

Vol.: 32.4m (3.8x avg.) PE: 10.9 Mkt. Cap: $12.1 b Yield: 1.5%

Soybeans

2,880

26,000

M

Futures

S&P 500

2,840

10 DAYS

22

2 M

CSCO

Close: $45.16 1.30 or 3.0% The technology company topped Wall Street’s estimates in its fourth quarter and gave strong forecasts for the current period. $46

$24

Vol.: 83.6m (5.5x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $553.2 m Yield: 45.5%

2,880

Cisco Systems

SYMC

Close: $19.41 0.86 or 4.6% Activist investment firm Starboard Value disclosed a stake in the software company.

3

$1.75

$109.98

Dow Jones industrials

25,340

A

Vol.: 42.6m (5.9x avg.) PE: 33.0 Mkt. Cap: $291.1 b Yield: 2.1%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Symantec

JCP

Close: $1.76 -0.65 or -27.0% The department store cut its forecasts after it took a bigger loss and reported weaker sales than analysts expected. $4

90 80

25,720

J.C. Penney

WMT

Close: $98.64 8.42 or 9.3% The retailer raised its annual forecasts after a strong second quarter and said its online sales accelerated. $100

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.03 3.29 6.34 3.88 3.94 .78

-0.01 -0.03 +0.05 -0.04 -0.03 ...

1.56 2.51 5.73 3.68 3.17 .52

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2840.69 12237.17 7556.38 27100.06 5349.02 48059.06 22192.04 76818.72 16225.65 8997.72

CHG

CHG

YTD

+22.32 +74.16 +58.51 -223.53 +43.81 -497.63 -12.18 -259.28 +77.15 +71.49

+0.79% +0.61% +0.78% -0.82% +0.83% -1.02% -0.05% -0.34% +0.48% +0.80%

+6.25% -5.27% -1.71% -9.42% +0.69% -2.62% -2.52% +0.55% +0.10% -4.09%

J.C. Penney plummets on news of drastic forecast loss REUTERS

J.C. Penney Co Inc. shares sank below $2 for the first time on Thursday after it said it had alienated core middle-aged customers while chasing millennial buyers, and the venerable brand forecast an unexpectedly large loss. The company’s shares fell nearly 27 percent, closing at $1.76 Thursday, the lowest since it listed on the New York Stock Exchange a week before the launch of the Great Depression in 1929. One of the big names in U.S.

retailing, Penney has gone through three chief executives in five years as it struggles to figure out what shoppers want in an industry buffeted by fastfashion chains and Amazon. com Inc. Chief Financial Officer Jeffrey Davis said the chain might have undermined its traditional customer base of women over age 45 by revamping fashion lines to chase younger, trendier shoppers. “We were no longer necessarily having the broad array of merchandise silhouettes that is most important for her (our core

customer),” Davis said. To clear excess inventory, the company had to heavily discount not only seasonal merchandise but also its newer, trendier fashions, it said. The company’s problems have been exacerbated by a lack of clarity on its leadership after CEO Marvin Ellison left abruptly in May to join home improvement chain Lowe’s Cos. It now expected its losses per share for the year to be between 80 cents and $1, much worse than a previous forecast which ran from a loss of 7 cents to a profit of 13 cents.

Stocks rise on hopes for China trade talks BY MARLEY JAY associated Press

U.S. stocks jumped Thursday as China and the U.S. said they will hold their first trade discussions in months, a potential sign of progress toward ending their trade war. China will send a trade envoy to Washington this month in a new attempt to end the trade dispute before it causes major damage to the global economy. The two sides haven’t talked since early June. Energy and metals prices and shares of industrial companies turned higher. Walmart soared after reporting its strongest growth in sales in more than a decade. Other companies that make and sell basic necessities also rose. Jason Draho, the head of asset allocation for UBS, said investors are eager for the two countries to start making progress and resolve their differences. He added that China may be changing course because its economy has slowed. “The data we’ve seen from China recently has showed

slowing growth,” he said. “It’s possible they decided ‘OK, we need to take a different approach’ and come to the table offering a little more.” The S&P 500 index climbed 22.32 points, or 0.8 percent, to 2,840.69. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 396.32 points, or 1.6 percent, to 25,558.73 as Walmart and Boeing made big gains. The Nasdaq composite rose 32.41 points, or 0.4 percent, to 7,806.52. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks added 15.09 points, or 0.9 percent to 1,685.75. China and the U.S. have been in conflict for months over issues including Beijing’s technology policy and its trade surplus with the U.S. After the latest round of talks failed to produce much progress, both countries put taxes on $34 billion in each other’s imports. Those tariffs are set to rise next week, and both countries have threatened even larger increases as early as September. Walmart posted its biggest gain in more than a decade in sales at stores open at

least a year, and its online revenue grew 40 percent, a faster pace than it reported in the first quarter. The stock jumped 9.3 percent to $98.64, which wiped out its losses from earlier this year. Other retailers and consumer goods companies also edged higher. Target added 1.7 percent to $82.07 and Procter & Gamble rose 1.7 percent to $83.69 while McDonald’s climbed 1.2 percent to $161.73. Banks rallied as interest rates increased. Bond prices turned lower again. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.87 percent from 2.85 percent. Metals prices also turned higher. Gold dipped 0.1 percent to $1,184 an ounce. Silver rose 1.8 percent to $14.71 an ounce. Copper added 2.2 percent to $2.62 a pound. That made up for much of Wednesday’s loss, but copper prices are still down 20 percent since early June. Stocks have swung wildly over the last week. Thursday marked the Dow’s largest gain since April. The day before that, stocks took their biggest loss in six weeks.


BUSINESS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

BEST OF BUILDING BLOCKS

Collaboration blooms between SLU, plant science center

Highlights from our real estate and development blog. stltoday.com/buildingblocks

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Wellbridge moving to new space • Wellbridge Athletic Club & Spa will move into its new location in the under-construction Centene campus in downtown Clayton on Aug. 27. The move will clear the way for Centene and its developer partner Clayco to demolish Wellbridge’s existing building at 7620 Forsyth Boulevard, which is part of Centene’s expansion footprint and next to the now under-construction tower. The 40,000-square-foot, $10 million Wellbridge space will take up two stories of one of the Centene campus buildings at 7676 Forsyth Boulevard, Wellbridge said. Wellbridge owns and operates premier athletic and tennis clubs in several U.S. markets, including Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston and Denver. (08.16) Green Street sells Hazelwood warehouse occupied by GL Group • Clayton-based developer Green Street St. Louis sold a nearly 250,000-square-foot Hazelwood warehouse to a New York real estate firm for $11.2 million. Broadstone Net Lease Inc., based in Rochester, N.Y., acquired the property at 8950 Pershall Road last month. The building is under a longterm net lease and fully occupied by St. Louis-based GL Group Inc., which moved in last year. GL Group runs K-12 book distributor Booksource and popular literature library binding company Turtleback Books. Zach Harris and Brad Pepin of Tulsa-based commercial broker Stan Johnson Company represented Green Street. (08.15) Commercial Development Co. moves into new HQ • Brownfield redeveloper Commercial Development Co. has moved its headquarters across Des Peres Road to a recently completed office building on the site of a former quarry it spent 20 years filling and preparing for new development. CDC, led by principals Mike and Tom Roberts, and its four wholly owned affiliates will occupy the third floor of the new, 50,000-square-foot office building at 1515 Des Peres Road and is reserving some space for expansion. The company says 25,000 square feet is still available for lease and being marketed by Kevin McLaughlin at Newmark Grubb Zimmer. CDC acquires brownfields around the country and redevelops or sells them. It purchased the old Des Peres Quarry in 1994 and began slowly filling it to make it available for new development. Some 5.25 million cubic feet of fill dirt and other material was used on the site, according to the company. About $100 million of new development is expected on the site at Manchester Road and Interstate 270, with several projects already complete or nearly finished. A 60-bed assisted living facility, Provision Living at West County, opened in 2016. A 254-unit apartment complex, Alinea at Town & Country, opened last year. A 211-room Marriott Residence Inn & Courtyard hotel should be complete this fall. CDC, which has about 37 people employed at its headquarters, had occupied office space just across from the former Des Peres Quarry at 1650 Des Peres Road. The company said no public incentives subsidized development. “This is a privately financed reclamation of local industrial blight,” Steve Collins, CDC executive vice president, said in a statement. (08.13)

St. Louis University biology professor Allison Miller is being appointed to a joint faculty position by the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and SLU, expanding the collaboration between the university and the region’s premier plant science research institution. “I am delighted for the opportunity to bridge SLU and the Danforth Center through a

joint appointment,” Miller said in a statement. “This position will allow me to strengthen and diversify our research program o n p e re n n i a l plants, and to develop expanded re s e a rc h a n d training opportunities for SLU Miller students.” Miller’s lab, which houses four SLU graduate students, will be based at the Danforth cam-

pus in Creve Coeur and the 39 North plant science district. SLU has been on a push to expand its research capabilities and attract tens of millions in new research grants. “Our students and faculty will directly benefit from new research opportunities and access to some of the most innovative plant scientists in the world,” SLU’s vice president for research, Ken Olliff, said in a statement. Miller has actually been work-

Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Industry shifts have led to move

Final beam rivets union between SSM, college

SSM • FROM B1

HOSPITAL • FROM B1

SLU President Fred Pestello said from a ninth-story balcony overlooking the construction project. When SSM Health acquired the 365-bed hospital in 2015, the Creve Coeur-based Catholic health system promised to spend $500 million on building a new hospital and outpatient center. For staff and physicians, it was a welcome change. Over the years, tension grew between then-owner Dallas-based Tenet Healthcare Corp. and the university, mainly over Tenet’s failure to establish a broader hospital network in the region to feed into the academic medical center. SSM Health operates comm u n i ty- ba se d h os p i ta l s throughout the region. The current hospital last saw a major update nearly 30 years ago. Some parts of the original hospital still stand and date to 1933. “Ultimately this new hospital and faculty represent an opportunity for SSM health and St. Louis University to better fulfill our mission,” the president of the SLUCare physician group, Dr. Robert Heaney, said Thursday morning. “Collaboration between

ing out of the Danforth Center for over a year following a May 2017 fire at Macelwane Hall, the building on SLU’s midtown campus that housed her lab. Because she had collaborated with Danforth Center scientists on her research over the years, the plant science center agreed to house her lab while the damaged SLU building underwent renovations.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Ironworkers direct a ceremonial steel beam into place Thursday on the top floor of the new SSM Health St. Louis University Hospital project. The new hospital will span 10 floors and encompass 600,000 square feet.

St. Louis University and SSM Health means a unified objective where our missions and value inform our approach to patient-centered care,” he continued. The new hospital will span 10 floors and encompass 600,000 square feet. There will be fewer rooms: 316 inpatient beds, all in private rooms.

The 15-acre campus that sits along Grand Boulevard between Lasalle and Rutger streets also will be home to a new 200,000-square-foot outpatient center. The facility is on schedule to open Sept. 1, 2020. Samantha Liss • 314-340-8017 @samanthann on Twitter sliss@post-dispatch.com

Separately, SSM Health said it’s in talks with St. Josephbased Mosaic Life Care to sell its SSM Health St. Francis Hospital-Maryville and affiliated outpatient, home care, hospice and medical group locations in the area. “The health care industry has shifted dramatically over the past several years,” Laura Kaiser, president and CEO of SSM Health said in a statement. “In order to provide safe, highquality health care services that are convenient and affordable, health systems must integrate all points of service across the entire continuum of care. Given the close proximity of MU Health Care and Mosaic Life Care’s existing services, we feel this transition of ownership will best serve the people of Jefferson City, Mexico, Maryville and surrounding communities.” As insurers consolidate and increase their scale, they will have the upper hand in negotiations over pricing contracts with hospitals, Moody’s reported in February. “Insurers flexing their negotiating power by offering lower rate increases will likely result in more standoffs and terminations of contracts between insurers and hospitals,” Diana Lee, a Moody’s vice president, said. “To regain leverage, we expect hospitals to continue (mergers and acquisitions) and consolidation.”

Development helps connect Arch to Clayton CONNECTOR • FROM B1

the Washington Avenue building near Jefferson Avenue, along with members of Twain Financial Partners. Twain, which specializes in tax credit and complex financial transactions, will move its offices from downtown a few blocks west to the new building. Johnson said the rehab ties in with his Jefferson Connector project, which envisions a new hotel and a Boxyard development — a complex of bars and restaurants made out of shipping containers — near Jefferson Avenue and Locust Street. “It’s really just expanding the Jefferson Connector a little further east,” he told the board of St. Louis’ economic development arm on Thursday. The St. Louis Development Corp. board agreed to help, approving an allocation of $4 mil-

DEVELOPER JASSEN JOHNSON HOPES THE JEFFErSON CONNECTOr PrOJECT CrEATES A HUB OF OFFICES AND PEOPLE IN WHAT HE CALLS A “VOID” ALONG THE CENTrAL COrrIDOr BETWEEN MIDTOWN AND DOWNTOWN WEST. lion in federal New Markets Tax Credits for use in the Washington Avenue project. A city board in June recommended five years’ tax abatement worth 90 percent of the property’s value. Johnson, who has spent years working to rehab historic buildings along Locust Street for lofts and offices for creative firms, last year described plans for the Jefferson Connector project. He hopes it creates a hub of offices and people in what he

calls a “void” along the central corridor between midtown and Downtown West. Plans call for rehabbing the former Beaumont telephone building and AT&T building in the 2600 block of Locust Street into 60 apartments, 16 livework office suites and about 3,500 square feet of co-working space. It would be renamed the Malone. A hotel is planned just to the east of that, with the Boxyard planned across Locust Street from those projects. Already, work is underway to renovate the building at 2315 Locust Street, a project dubbed the Martin. It will add some 52,000 square feet of office space, subdivided for smaller users, and a rooftop restaurant. Johnson has partnered with ND Consulting and Twain Financial on the project as well as

two Tulsa, Okla., companies, Ross Group and Nelson + Stowe Development, for the hotel and Boxyard development, respectively. He’s finalizing his loans for the project, which he said was “well on its way.” Renaissance Development has closed on purchases of several buildings as part of the project and has six more under contract, according to a city report. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring on the hotel and Boxyard, with openings on developments slated through 2021. The $60 million plan for the area will fill in an area and help connect the Gateway Arch “all the way to Clayton” with contiguous development, Johnson said. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


BUSINESS

08.17.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B5

Seed sellers push for seasonal limits on dicamba nia jury ruled Monsanto must pay $289 million in damages in the first U.S. lawsuit over alleged links between glyphosate and cancer. Monsanto denies glyphosate causes cancer. Earlier this month, a Brazilian judge suspended the use of products containing glyphosate.

BY TOM POLANSEK reuters

America’s two biggest independent seed sellers, Beck’s Hybrids and Stine Seed, told Reuters they are pushing U.S. environmental regulators to bar farmers from spraying dicamba weedkiller during upcoming summers — a potential blow to Bayer AG’s Monsanto Co. Limiting spraying of the chemical to the spring season, before crops are planted, would prevent farmers from using the herbicide on dicambaresistant soybeans that Monsanto engineered. The seeds are sold by companies including Beck’s and Stine. Last summer, after farmers planted Monsanto’s dicamba-resistant soy seeds en masse, the herbicide drifted onto nearby farms and damaged an estimated 3.6 million acres of nonresistant soybeans, or 4 percent of all U.S. plantings. Problems have not gone away. As of July 15, the University of Missouri estimated that more than a million acres of nonresistant soybeans were hurt by dicamba. Homeowners who live near farms have also complained of damage to their trees and flowers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is weighing such complaints as part of a high-stakes decision on the herbicide’s

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

A farmer harvests soybeans near Malden, Mo., in the Bootheel.

future. Bayer bought Creve Coeur-based Monsanto and its portfolio of dicamba-resistant Xtend brand soy seeds for $63 billion in a deal that created the world’s largest seed and pesticides maker. Monsanto sells dicamba herbicide, along with rivals BASF SE and DowDuPont Inc. Monsanto and BASF said farmers need dicamba to kill tough weeds and that the chemical can be used safely. DowDuPont declined to comment. Monsanto is banking on Xtend soybean seeds to dominate soy production in the United States, the world’s biggest producer. They are seen as a replacement for the company’s

Roundup Ready line of seeds, engineered to tolerate the weed killer glyphosate, which has lost effectiveness as weeds develop their own tolerance to it. EPA approval for dicamba to be sprayed on resistant crops expires this autumn. The agency could extend its approval, with or without new restrictions on use, or take dicamba off the market. Seed companies expect a decision in the coming weeks. Most complaints about dicamba drifting would stop if the EPA restricted its use to killing weeds in fields before crops are planted, Beck’s Hybrids told the agency in a July 27 letter seen by Reuters. “Anybody that sprays it,

More cash goes to established startups NICKLAUS • FROM B1

As the St. Louis Regional Chamber points out in a new report on venture capital in the region, the number of local companies raising money has fallen by almost two-thirds since 2015. The amount of money raised peaked in the same year. The average deal size has more than tripled, from less than $2 million in 2012 to $7 million last year. Investors are backing fewer seed-stage startups and concentrating their capital on companies that already have a product and customers. An example of the latter is Claytonbased Varsity Tutors, which raised $50 million this year to expand its online tutoring business. Andrew Smith, the chamber’s vice president for entrepreneurship, said the region’s challenge is to keep filling the top of the funnel with very early-stage startups while continuing to attract money to later-stage firms. He’s optimistic that St. Louis will someday compare itself to Austin and Denver, not just Indianapolis and Kansas City. “We are at a point where we can set our ambitions higher and compete against other well-known hubs across the country,” Smith says. “That’s a stretch goal for us.” For now, the important thing is to maintain the momentum St. Louis has built up. As the report points out, the region attracted just $96 million a year in venture capital between 2005 and 2012, and boosted that average to $342 million since 2013. If national-level investors are focusing on later-stage companies — and they are — local leaders may need to get creative to keep money flowing to fragile top-of-the-funnel firms. The Regional Chamber teamed with Cultivation Capi-

tal and Twain Financial Partners last year to launch the $5 million Spirit of St. Louis Fund, and Smith says a second, larger seed fund is being discussed. It’s also possible that any funding shortfall in St. Louis will resolve itself with a little patience. Medical-device maker Veniti and medical-records startup BlueStrata have both been acquired this month, rewarding their early backers. New Jersey company DealCloud, backed by St. Louis investors, also was sold. If such exits start to happen often, investors will have profits to reinvest in new companies. High-profile success stories also may entice more wealthy St. Louisans to invest in startups. “The more successful cities have had exits that are more substantial,” says Brian Hopcraft, managing director of Lewis & Clark Ventures. “Certainly a couple of big exits in the next couple of years will help St. Louis.” Cliff Holekamp, a principal at Cultivation Capital, says St. Louisans need to remember that much of the region’s support structure for entrepreneurs is young. Arch Grants, Cultivation and accelerator fund Capital Innovators all started in 2012. “Entrepreneurial, early-stage investing is a long-term strategy,” Holekamp said. “It takes seven to 10 years to get a return on capital. … We are just at the earliest edge of when you would start to expect returns.” Entrepreneurs, of course, will never say there’s too much money in their sector. If Holekamp is right, however, their complaints about a capital shortage may sound less urgent a couple of years from now. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

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you have issues with the volatilization,” CEO Sonny Beck said in an interview on Wednesday, referring to the chemical vaporizing and drifting. Though his company profited from selling more than a million bags of Xtend soybean seeds this year, Beck said he worried that continued problems with the chemical could give the agriculture sector a bad reputation among consumers. Restricting use would also help prevent weeds from developing resistance to dicamba, he said. New limits would be another headache for Bayer, following its acquisition of Monsanto. Last week a Califor-

MONSANTO EXPECTS EPA NOD Monsanto has blamed U.S. field damage from dicamba largely on improper applications by farmers and says mandatory training helped this year. Inquiries to the company about dicamba problems dropped to about nine per million acres of dicamba-resistant crops planted, down from about 40 inquiries per million acres last year, said Ryan Rubischko, who heads the company’s dicamba portfolio. He said Monsanto expects the EPA to extend its approval for dicamba. In a sign the company is concerned, however, Monsanto has asked seed sellers to contact the agency to express support for the product, according to an email the company sent this week that was seen by Reuters. The email noted others had encouraged the EPA to add restrictions on dicamba or prevent sales. Monsanto likened those efforts to an “uninformed vocal minority” in the email. Rubischko confirmed the company had

asked dicamba users to give positive feedback to regulators. The EPA did not respond to requests for comment. The agency has held weekly phone calls with agriculture officials in farm states this summer to assess dicamba damage. Agency officials also visited farms in Tennessee, Missouri and Arkansas to see damaged crops firsthand, according to tour participants. Farther north, Monsanto funded a study by University of Wisconsin researchers that showed dicamba hurt nonresistant soybeans that were covered with plastic when the chemical was sprayed on nearby Xtend soybeans after planting. Stine Seed has told the EPA in writing and conversations that dicamba should not be sprayed on top of growing soybeans to control weeds, CEO Harry Stine said in an interview on Tuesday. The herbicide has damaged fields of Stine soy seeds by drifting, he said. Stine Seed is preparing to launch products that will compete with Xtend soy and also works with Monsanto on seed technology. “I’ve been doing this for 50 years and we’ve never had anything be as damaging as this dicamba situation,” Harry Stine said. “In this case, Monsanto made an error.”

Therapies may be cheaper in long run EXPRESS • FROM B1

and 2020, Chief Medical Officer Steve Miller said. Biomarin, Spark and Bluebird confirmed to Reuters that they were speaking to “A” payers — a group generally defined as pharmacy benefit managers, health plans and government agencies — about pricing models for future therapies. Analysts project those drugs could top $1 million to $1.5 million in price. Rather than rail against the drugs’ expected high prices, Miller echoes the familiar drug company argument that the potentially curative therapies will likely be worth the high cost if they supplant the hundreds of thousands of dollars in annual medical costs to treat ailments such as hemophilia, which affects about 20,000 people in the United States alone. “Even if they charge $1 million, that’s a great deal,” Miller said. “So there are going to be some gene therapies where it is very clear that everyone who has that disease should get it.” By working closely with biotech companies, Miller says it can help their expensive therapies succeed commercially. To manage any potential conflicts of interest, he said Express Scripts separates its benefits management and specialty pharmacy businesses. The move into hemophilia builds on exclusive rights Express Scripts already has to distribute Spark’s Luxturna — an $850,000 treatment for a rare genetic disorder that, left untreated, causes children to go blind. It has a similar deal with Biogen Inc. on Spinraza, he told Reuters. The drug costs $750,000 the first year and treats the rare condition spinal muscular atrophy that often kills babies within months of their birth. Spark and Biogen confirmed the agreements. Those deals put Express Scripts in a vastly different role from its traditional business of managing prescription drug claims for the employees of its corporate and government clients, a business Cigna Corp. found so valuable that it agreed in March to acquire Express Scripts for $52 billion. Patients usually know Express Scripts and other pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) as the name on the insurance card they present at the pharmacy counter when picking up a prescription. That card activates discounts the

benefits managers have negotiated with drug companies to lower prices, usually through rebates. PBMs make money by taking a cut of the rebates, and the rest goes to their clients.

GROWTH VS. CONFLICTS Express Scripts has been expanding its low-profile specialty pharmacy business that dispenses drugs that usually aren’t sold through drugstores because they require special handling. By using its own pharmacy instead of outsiders, Express Scripts is able to hold on to more of the profits along the drug distribution chain. Specialty pharmacy is one of Express Scripts’ fastest growing businesses and accounts for about a third of its sales and profits, ISI Evercore analyst Ross Muken said. The company earned $4.1 billion last year on total revenue of more than $100 billion — it does not break out financial information for specialty pharmacy. By working as both the manufacturer’s partner who gets paid for each sale, and the pharmacy benefit manager responsible for negotiating the best price for its traditional corporate and government clients, Express Scripts is open to questions about being conflicted, industry sources and experts say. “One could view this role as being a wonderfully catalytic: that they can help balance the views and interests of all the parties by being in this middle facilitating role. Or one could view that they have created a situation where internally they have multiple conflicts of interest, and can they manage them properly?” said Mark Trusheim, strategic director of a group of international payers and providers formed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to study gene therapy pricing models. Express Scripts says it saves money for payers on Luxturna by cutting out the hospital pharmacy mark up, which is 6 percent for the government Medicare program and more for commercial business — or $60,000 on a $1 million drug. “Our PBM treats our specialty pharmacy as they treat any other pharmacy in our pharmacy network,” Miller said. “So they are not privy to their acquisition prices or anything else, and the specialty pharmacy is not privy to the contracts that the PBM has with their payer clients or anything else.”

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 08.17.2018 • C

STREAK ENDS IN ERRORS Winning run is over after three miscues BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Cardinal pitcher Tyson Ross bobbles a shallow-hit ball that allowed Daniel Murphy of the Nationals to score in the fifth inning Thursday night.

Cardinals manager Shildt has full support of Oquendo BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Perhaps the greatest endorsement Cardinals interim manager Mike Shildt has received during what his bosses have called “an extended interview” came beneath Busch Stadium during a break in the action of Thursday’s Little League World Series. Jose Oquendo broke away

See CARDINALS • Page C5

from checking in on the score of Puerto Rico’s game and exited the team’s film room to listen to a summary of the praise Shildt had just heaped upon the third-base coach. At his desk beneath a wall of photos of Cardinals legends — Ozzie, Red, Stan, Gibson, Sutter — Shildt tried to put into words what Oquendo has meant to him since Shildt was promoted from bench coach one month ago. “When the transition took See FREDERICKSON • Page C6

BIG SERIES ON TAP The Cardinals trail the Brewers (and Phillies) by 1.5 games for a wild-card spot. 7:15 Friday, FSM Flaherty (6-6, 3.22 ERA) vs. Peralta (5-3, 4.47) 6:15 Saturday, Fox Sports 1 Mikolas (12-3, 2.85) vs. Miley (2-1, 2.23) 1:15 Sunday, FSM Gant (5-4, 3.74) vs. Chacin (12-4, 3.71)

Cardinal third-base coach Jose Oquendo congratulates Harrison Bader after the center fielder’s third-inning homer on Thursday.

Benes resumes baseball journey 3 ACL tears waylaid prep star BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Before his knee gave out, before baseball stopped being fun and before he loved it again, Shane Benes played little league games at the Bridgeton Athletic Complex. He wasn’t trying to live up to a famous last name — He was just a talented kid playing the sport he loved. A decade later, Benes sits under a pavilion at the same complex. The 22-year-old has tanned, muscular arms and a beard. His father, Andy, was the No. 1 pick in the 1988 MLB Draft, and his uncle played eight years in

> Series preview. C5

Mizzou has two starters at tailback Crockett, Rountree will share duties

the big leagues. Shane was supposed to continue the tradition — get drafted in an early round and find himself on the fast track to the majors. He laughs, as if in disbelief, when reflecting on his baseball journey. How could he have hurt his knee so many times? How could a game be so cruel? “Honestly, deep down, I’m kind of happy it happened,” he says. “I needed it.” In the past five years, Benes has played for two college teams, torn his right ACL three times and quit baseball twice. He’ll play as a graduate transfer at St. See BENES • Page C6

The routine groundball Luke Weaver needed, off the bat and on the ground and straight into central casting as a groundout, he got to free himself from a problematic inning. It was the out that didn’t happen. The Cardinals’ eight-game winning streak screeched to an ending Thursday night with a 5-4 loss to Washington. The game, which inched the Cardinals back once more in NATIONALS 5 the wild-card race, was one CARDINALS 4 the team and new man> Practice makes perfect for Bader. C5 ager agreed was “not our cleanest.” The Cardinals committed three errors, and the one at first base on that pivotal groundball led directly to Weaver’s departure from the game and two runs for the Nationals. Three of the five runs Washington scored, including the game-turning tworun single by Bryce Harper, were unearned as the Nats ended their own sour run. “Completely uncharacteristic,” manager Mike Shildt said. “Proves that there is a human element.”

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The compe-

PHOTO BY RIC HENRY • Metro Collegiate League

Former Westminster standout Shane Benes runs the bases for the St. Louis Kats in the Metro Collegiate League.

ON A1:

BLUES’ NEW PRACTICE HOME FINALLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

tition for Missouri’s starting job at running back between Damarea Crockett and Larry Rountree III isn’t a dogfight. Crockett has seen a dogfight. Been right in the middle of one. This isn’t that. “The only thing that makes it feel weird is that everyone is trying to make it weird, you know?” Crockett, a former 1,000-yard rusher, said after a recent practice. “Everybody’s asking, ‘What are you and Larry going do to?’ But two running backs is how I’ve always played. When you think about it, even when I was the starting running back last year, there really isn’t a starting running back because you’re going to split carries anyway. Two See MU • Page C3 > Opener • 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1 vs. Tenn.-Martin, SEC Network alternate

SPORTS

1 M

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Layne, Age 16 Cape Girardeau, MO


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 08.17.2018 • C

STREAK ENDS IN ERRORS Winning run is over after three miscues BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Cardinal pitcher Tyson Ross bobbles a shallow-hit ball that allowed Daniel Murphy of the Nationals to score in the fifth inning Thursday night.

Cardinals manager Shildt has full support of Oquendo BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Perhaps the greatest endorsement Cardinals interim manager Mike Shildt has received during what his bosses have called “an extended interview” came beneath Busch Stadium during a break in the action of Thursday’s Little League World Series. Jose Oquendo broke away

See CARDINALS • Page C5

from checking in on the score of Puerto Rico’s game and exited the team’s film room to listen to a summary of the praise Shildt had just heaped upon the third-base coach. At his desk beneath a wall of photos of Cardinals legends — Ozzie, Red, Stan, Gibson, Sutter — Shildt tried to put into words what Oquendo has meant to him since Shildt was promoted from bench coach one month ago. “When the transition took See FREDERICKSON • Page C6

BIG SERIES ON TAP The Cardinals trail the Brewers (and Phillies) by 1.5 games for a wild-card spot. 7:15 Friday, FSM Flaherty (6-6, 3.22 ERA) vs. Peralta (5-3, 4.47) 6:15 Saturday, Fox Sports 1 Mikolas (12-3, 2.85) vs. Miley (2-1, 2.23) 1:15 Sunday, FSM Gant (5-4, 3.74) vs. Chacin (12-4, 3.71)

Cardinal third-base coach Jose Oquendo congratulates Harrison Bader after the center fielder’s third-inning homer on Thursday.

Benes resumes baseball journey 3 ACL tears waylaid prep star BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Before his knee gave out, before baseball stopped being fun and before he loved it again, Shane Benes played little league games at the Bridgeton Athletic Complex. He wasn’t trying to live up to a famous last name — He was just a talented kid playing the sport he loved. A decade later, Benes sits under a pavilion at the same complex. The 22-year-old has tanned, muscular arms and a beard. His father, Andy, was the No. 1 pick in the 1988 MLB Draft, and his uncle played eight years in

> Series preview. C5

Mizzou has two starters at tailback Crockett, Rountree will share duties

the big leagues. Shane was supposed to continue the tradition — get drafted in an early round and find himself on the fast track to the majors. He laughs, as if in disbelief, when reflecting on his baseball journey. How could he have hurt his knee so many times? How could a game be so cruel? “Honestly, deep down, I’m kind of happy it happened,” he says. “I needed it.” In the past five years, Benes has played for two college teams, torn his right ACL three times and quit baseball twice. He’ll play as a graduate transfer at St. See BENES • Page C6

Hallmarks of the Cardinals’ winning streak and return from the wilderness of .500 have been a steady-handed defense and a scene-stealing offense, one helping to set the stage for the other. When opportunity arrived at the plate late Thursday against Washington and its ad hoc bullpen, flubs in the field proved too costly to overcome. The Cardinals’ eight-game winning jag NATIONALS 5 s c r e e c h e d to an end in CARDINALS 4 a 5-4 loss at Busch Sta> Practice makes perfect for Bader. C5 dium. True to the hardernine style they’ve had in a rapid climb back into the wild-card race, the Cardinals got the tying run into scoring position and the winning run on base in the ninth inning. But three errors earlier and the three runs scored as a result of them gave the souring Nationals their lone win in a four-game visit. All three errors came in the infield, and the deciding run scored on an errant flip for an out at second base. The team and its new manager referred to the game as

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The compe-

PHOTO BY RIC HENRY • Metro Collegiate League

Former Westminster standout Shane Benes runs the bases for the St. Louis Kats in the Metro Collegiate League.

ON A1:

BLUES’ NEW PRACTICE HOME FINALLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

tition for Missouri’s starting job at running back between Damarea Crockett and Larry Rountree III isn’t a dogfight. Crockett has seen a dogfight. Been right in the middle of one. This isn’t that. “The only thing that makes it feel weird is that everyone is trying to make it weird, you know?” Crockett, a former 1,000-yard rusher, said after a recent practice. “Everybody’s asking, ‘What are you and Larry going do to?’ But two running backs is how I’ve always played. When you think about it, even when I was the starting running back last year, there really isn’t a starting running back because you’re going to split carries anyway. Two See MU • Page C3 > Opener • 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1 vs. Tenn.-Martin, SEC Network alternate

SPORTS

2 M

INJURY SHOULD NEVER INTERRUPT THE PROMISE OF GREATNESS That’s why we have a team of medical all-stars on our side. At the Washington University and St. Louis Children’s Young Athlete Center, we are dedicated to ensuring young athletes like Layne, who lost three fingers in an ATV accident, can return to the Varsity baseball team with as little interruption as possible. Because we’re not just experts in our field, we’re Guardians of Childhood. Meet Layne at StLouisChildrens.org/Layne

Layne, Age 16 Cape Girardeau, MO


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 8/17 vs. Brewers 7:15 p.m. FSM

Saturday 8/18 vs. Brewers 6:15 p.m. Fox Sports 1

Sunday 8/19 vs. Brewers 1:15 p.m. FSM

Monday 8/20 at Dodgers 9:10 p.m. FSM

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/1 vs. Tenn.-Martin 3 p.m. SEC Net. alt.

Saturday 9/8 vs. Wyoming 6 p.m. ESPN2 or ESPNU

Saturday 9/15 at Purdue 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/22 vs. Georgia Time TBA TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 9/1 vs. Kent State 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/8 vs. Western Ill. 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/15 vs. South Florida (in Chicago) 2:30 p.m., BTN

Friday 9/21 vs. Penn State 8 p.m. Fox Sports 1

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 8/18 at Fresno 9 p.m.

Saturday 8/25 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 8/29 Saturday 9/1 at Portland at Seattle 9 p.m. 9 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Tue. 8/28: vs. Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 8/29: vs. Evansville, 6:35 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Fri. 8/17: vs. Normal, 6:35 p.m. Sat. 8/18: vs. Normal, 6:35 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 9:30 a.m. NASCAR: NRA Night Race, practice, NBCSN 11:30 a.m. NASCAR: NRA Night Race, final practice, NBCSN 2:30 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Food City 300, qualifying, NBCSN 4:30 p.m. NASCAR: NRA Night Race, qualifying, NBCSN 5 p.m. NHRA: Lucas Oil NHRA Nationals, Friday Nitro, FS1 6:30 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Food City 300, NBCSN BASEBALL 1 p.m. Little League WS: Spain vs. Japan, ESPN 3 p.m. Little League WS: Gr. Pt. Woods (Mich.) vs. Coeur d’Alene (Idaho), ESPN 5 p.m. Little League WS: Panama vs. Canada, ESPN 5 p.m. Mets at Phillies, MLB 7 p.m. Little League WS: Peachtree City (Ga.) vs. Honolulu, ESPN 7:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Brewers, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 9 p.m. Astros at Athletics, MLB BASKETBALL 6 p.m. WNBA: Los Angeles at Washington, NBA 7 p.m. BIG3 playoffs, KTVI (2) 9 p.m. WNBA: New York at Seattle, NBA BOXING 10 p.m. Junior lightweights: Andrew Cancio vs. Dardan Zenunaj, ESPN2 FOOTBALL 6 p.m. NFL exhibition: Chiefs at Falcons, KMOV (4) 6:30 p.m. NFL exhibition: Bills at Browns, NFL Network GOLF 8 a.m. European PGA: Nordea Masters, second round, GOLF 11 a.m. LPGA: Indy Women in Tech Championship, second round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Wyndham Championship, second round, GOLF 6 p.m. U.S. Amateur, quarterfinal matches, FS1 7 p.m. Web.com: Portland Open, second round, GOLF HORSE RACING 3 p.m. Thoroughbreds, races from Saratoga, FS2 RODEO 8 p.m. PBR: Music City Knockout, CBSSN SOCCER 8:50 a.m. U-20 Women’s World Cup: England vs. Netherlands, FS2 12:20 p.m. U-20 Women’s World Cup: Germany vs. Japan, FS2 TENNIS 10 a.m. ATP: Western & Southern Open, quarterfinals, Tennis Channel Noon ATP: Western & Southern Open, quarterfinals, ESPN2 6 p.m. ATP: Western & Southern Open, quarterfinals, ESPN2 6 p.m. ATP: Western & Southern Open, quarterfinals, Tennis Channel

M 1 • FRIDAY • 08.17.2018

MEDIA VIEWS

Buck balances work, family life Leaves ‘Undeniable,’ has new deal with Fox Sports DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It’s transition time for Joe Buck, who along with wife Michelle Beisner-Buck are heavily involved with their twin boys who were born in April. And that responsibility has created some significant changes in the professional life of St. Louisan Buck, who is Fox Sports’ longtime lead play-by-play voice for its coverage of Major League Baseball, the NFL and more recently its United States Golf Association events. Fox has given him quite a bit of time off since his football scheduled ended in January, as he has done only six regular-season baseball contests plus the All-Star Game, though he has called several golf tournaments. But he’s not scheduled to do any more baseball until the National League Championship Series. “I feel retired,” he quipped. Not exactly. “They’ve been great in not bombarding my schedule, especially this year with the twins,” Buck, 49, said this week. “Being an older dad is one thing, being an older dad of twins is another. It’s a lot of work. Thank God I have a great wife who is so good at this. It’s another job, another full-time endeavor.” But he is about to step back into a meaty schedule, beginning when he anchors the network’s coverage Saturday and Sunday of the U.S. Amateur Championship golf event from Pebble Beach, Calif. Then it’s on to the NFL followed by postseason baseball, with his football duties expanding because Fox now has the full 11-game Thursday night schedule that had been split by CBS and NBC in recent seasons. Buck will call most, if not all, of those matchups alongside analyst Troy Aikman and also do Sunday games on most weekends Fox has doubleheaders. That pending heavy workload in part has led him to give up his role as host of “Undeniable with Joe Buck,” the lively and insightful interview show on Audience Network he did for the last five seasons. He’ll be replaced by Dan Patrick, with production of new episodes set to start soon. “With my additional football schedule, with the addition of our boys, spending a couple weeks (in Los Angeles) shooting a full

season once or twice a year just seemed like it was going to be too much,” he said. “We’ve done 50 of them, that’s a great number, we’ve accomplished what I think we set out to do. Anything that runs for five years is great. “They’re moving on to Dan, which is awesome. I’m excited to see the show continue. I just can’t do it all. I have to be smart about this.” He knows firsthand how taxing it can be on a family when the father often is gone, as was the case with his dad. Jack Buck not only was the legendary longtime voice of the Cardinals, but also was the radio play-by-play announcer on “Monday Night Football” for 16 seasons, the lead TV voice of Major League Baseball for two years as well as having other local and network responsibilities. “I’m proud of the line I came up with to say in the mirror years ago — ‘I’m deathly afraid of overexposure on TV and underexposure at home,’” he said. “Having grown up as the kind of somebody who seemingly had 10 jobs, I know what that’s like. I just have to be smart, and Fox is thankfully on board and all behind me being smart about it.” To that end, he has a new deal that adds three years to his ties with Fox, running through 2022. That keeps him as the voice of the World Series through at least 2021 — after which Fox’s contract with MLB expires. He had talked last year about maybe dropping baseball after the 2019 season, when his contract ended, but is re-energized. And he’ll need a lot of energy in October, when he does the National League Championship Series, the World Series and NFL games. He could be working almost every day, in three or four cities and multiple time zones, for several weeks. “October is going to be crazy, a good crazy,” Buck said.

TIMING ISSUE Fox Sports Midwest’s annual telecast of a Cardinals game in which it dedicates much of the airtime to saluting members of the military is a fine gesture. And this year’s version, on Wednesday night, drew the highest rating for a Cards game so far this season, part of a recent viewership surge corresponding to the team’s rise. But with so much of the attention centered away from the field, and some of the military personnel who are interviewed being drowned out by crowd noise,

there would seem to be a better time for this production than a mid-August contest against a team the Redbirds are contending with for a playoff spot. That was the case Wednesday night, when FSM and the Cards teamed for the “This One’s For You” telecast of the game against Washington. Again, it is a noble move. But how about scheduling it next year for an early-season game?

CHIEF DISAPPOINTMENTS Two St. Louis stations are affiliates on an NFL team’s television network for exhibition telecasts this summer, and the ratings for the openers last week were poor. KMOV (Channel 4) is showing the Kansas City Chiefs’ practice games, and its telecast of the contest on Aug. 9, against Houston was seen in just 2.3 percent of homes in the market with a TV. That’s according to Nielsen, which tracks viewership. A week earlier, in that same 7-10:30 p.m. block, Channel 4 drew 6.7 ratings for episodes of “Young Sheldon” and “Big Brother,” a 4.8 figure for “Swat” and a 9.0 for its 10 o’clock newscast. KTVI (Channel 2) is showing Green Bay games this month and did even worse than KMOV, pulling a 2.2 rating for a matchup with Tennessee on Aug. 9. In the corresponding block the previous week (7:30-10:30 p.m.), it had a 3.4 figure for “The Four,” a 5.7 number for its 9 o’clock newscast and a 5.2 figure for its news at 10 p.m. SPECTRUM NO-SHOW Spectrum (formerly Charter) cable blacked out some recent NFL exhibition-game telecasts that should have been shown in St. Louis. Instead of carrying several contests NFL Network aired, including Dallas-San Francisco, it had taped programming — shows that were supposed to air only in markets of the teams that were playing because local productions had exclusive rights there. “We inadvertently carried the wrong NFL Network feed,” a Spectrum spokesman said. “We worked quickly to resolve the issue and apologize for the inconvenience.” NFL Network is scheduled to show the Buffalo-Cleveland game at 6:30 p.m. Friday. UP NEXT “Media Views” returns. Sept. 7.

DIGEST Kahne to retire from full-time NASCAR schedule Kasey Kahne announced Thursday that he will retire from full-time racing in NASCAR and plans to focus on the sprint car team he owns. Kahne said in a Twitter post that he is at ease with the decision after 15 years racing in NASCAR. Kahne, from Enumclaw, Wash., made it to NASCAR via sprint car racing and his Kasey Kahne Racing team competes in the World of Outlaws series. “I’m not sure what the future holds for me,” Kahne said. “The highs don’t outweigh the lows and the grueling schedule takes a toll on your quality of life. I need to spend more time doing the things I enjoy and love and that’s spending time with (son) Tanner and my sprint car teams.” The former Hendrick Motorsports driver has 18 victories. Kahne raced with Leavine Family Racing this year. He has one top-five finish in 23 starts for Leavine, and said the team had offered him a ride for next year. Kahne’s announcement came one day after 43-year-old Elliott Sadler said he will walk away from NASCAR after 21 seasons.

Bellerive: One of ‘greatest memories’ for CBS

Sauter wins Truck Series race • Johnny Sauter took the lead when John Hunter Nemechek slowed because of late fuel pump issues, then held off Stewart Friesen on Thursday night at Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway for his fifth NASCAR Camping World Truck Series victory of the season. The 40-year-old Sauter wrapped up the series regular-season title by starting the race on the 0.533 oval, and went on to break a tie with Brett Moffitt for the series victory lead heading into the playoffs. Friesen finished 0.236 seconds back. Nemechek ended up third, with Parker Kligerman fourth and Todd Gilliland fifth.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Tiger Woods greets the crowd as he leaves the course after finishing his final round of the 100th PGA Championship.

Grizzlies sign Crawford • The Memphis Grizzlies signed guard Markel Crawford and added him to their training-camp roster. Crawford, a 23-year-old Memphis native, played seven games for the Grizzlies’ NBA Summer League 2018 team in Las Vegas. Keys advances in Cincinnati • No. 13 seed Madison Keys beat No. 4 Angelique Kerber 2-6, 7-6 (3), 6-4 to reach the quarterfinals of the Western & Southern Open as play continued to be delayed by rain. No. 3 seeded Sloan Stephens was upset by No. 15 Elise Mertens 7-6 (8), 6-2. In men’s play, Novak Djokovic and defending champion Grigor Dimitrov were tied at a set apiece when more storms suspended play late Thursday night. Associated Press

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BY DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The 100th PGA Championship, which wrapped up Sunday at Bellerive, has become only a memory for those who attended, worked the event and watched from afar. And what a memory it is for many — especially CBS Sports’ Lance Barrow. It has emerged as of one of the top events in the storied history of Barrow at CBS. And that covers a lot. He has been in charge of the network’s golf telecasts for 21 years, ran its NFL coverage for 13 and has had a hand at some point in just about every major sports undertaking CBS has had in his 42 years of employment there. “It will always be one of the greatest memories of my career doing that tournament in St. Louis,” Barrow said this week after having a few days to reflect. The turnout was huge, the fans were enthusiastic but respectful and Tiger Woods nearly prevailed. Woods, who has won 14 major tourneys but none in a decade, made a huge charge in the final

round and had a solid shot to break the drought until faltering late and finishing second to Brooks Koepka. Woods was the crowd favorite all week, drawing overflowing galleries to the holes he was playing. “The fans were so positive all week,” he said on CBS after finishing.“I can’t thank them enough.” The network can’t thank Woods enough for huge ratings. And CBS delivered in the clutch. After Woods finished his final round he climbed steps and walked across a bridge above thousands of adoring fans and waved to the masses, a poignant moment that CBS showed to the nation. A camera that followed him not only showed Woods’ salute but also captured the sea of fans below. “I’d be hard-pressed to think of a (better) scene we’ve had,” Barrow said. “... It’s one of those moments that 10, 15, 20 years from now you’ll look back and always say, ‘One of those great moments was Tiger walking across the bridge going to the scorer’s tent at Bellerive at the PGA Championship with the thousands of people down below yelling for him.’”

Barrow said it was a fitting culmination to a standout week for CBS, which also produced the coverage shown on TNT. “I can’t think of anything from our standpoint that we needed to change or could change,” he said. “Start with how everyone came out, the galleries, the fans, everybody. That was tremendous. You always start with that. Then the support of the club. And the community is just top-notch. It was great to see tons of people surrounding the golf course.” The only thing that could have been better from a TV storytelling standpoint would have been if Woods would have won. “It would have gone down as maybe my greatest moment at CBS Sports,” Barrow said, adding that the leader is Jack Nicklaus winning the Masters for the sixth time, in 1986. He shot a 30 on the back nine for a round of 65 to win by a shot over Greg Norman and Tom Kite. “That would have been something,” Barrow said of what the aura would have been had Woods been victorious.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

NATIONAL NOTEBOOK

MU searching for punt returner

Florida St. yet to name QB starter

Wideout Richaud Floyd out four to six weeks with a broken leg BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Missouri has two weeks to identify a punt returner for the start of the season. On Wednesday wide receiver Richaud Floyd was named a preseason, second-team All-American as a punt returner by CBS Sports. Also on Wednesday Floyd broke his right leg, an injury that will sideline him for four to six weeks, the team announced. It’s a not a weight-bearing bone, MU coach Barry Odom said, and is similar to the injury linebacker Aubrey Miller suffered last season when he missed three games. “We expect him to be back fairly quickly,” Odom said. “Richaud told me this morning he’s going to drink lots of milk. I don’t know if that’ll help, but we’ll try it and get him back ready to go.” Floyd, a backup receiver who can play either the inside or outside positions, returned two punts for touchdowns last season and averaged 19.8 yards on his 11 returns. That return average would have led the SEC had Floyd returned more punts and qualified for the league leaders. He was in position to reprise that role this year and contribute as part of the receiver rotation. He also caught 14 passes for 170 yards and two touchdowns last season. Through the first two weeks of camp Mizzou has auditioned multiple candidates to handle the return duties and could turn back to slot receiver Johnathon Johnson, who was the team’s primary punt returner in 2016. After Thursday’s

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Richaud Floyd returns a punt for a touchdown against Vanderbilt last season.

practice, Odom mentioned freshman receivers Dominic Gicinto and Jalen Knox as other candidates. “Jalen Knox has really impressed us at that spot. Gicinto is in there, too,” he said. “Johnathon Johnson has been getting reps every day that he’s practiced. We’re going to be all right back there. I want a guy to catch the ball, secure it and let’s get a first down. We don’t need the home run every time. We’ve also got to do a great job on the line of scrimmage to give those guys a chance to have some time to make the catch. That’ll go to the top of the priority list over the next two days.”

INJURY UPDATE Also on the injury front, safety Khalil Oliver was limited Thursday with a bruised leg. The Oregon graduate transfer had been working with the first-team defense the last few days. Starting weakside linebacker Terez Hall is still sitting out most drills while recovering from a hamstring injury. Odom was unsure if Hall would play in Saturday’s scrimmage. Tight end Logan Christopherson is out with a concussion. Cornerback Jarvis Ware has missed the last two days with an illness. With Hall out, there’s concern about the depth at inside linebacker, but freshman Nick Bolton continues to impress the staff. “You look at the things Terez does to help those young guys bring them along, I am worried about the depth at that spot,” Odom said. “But Bolton has really come on and made so many strides in the last four to five days. He’s 245 pounds, so physically he’s already in position to help us. I don’t know that he’s an every-down guy yet. That’s the balance we’ve got to have. “I expect Terez to get back but we’re also a play away at any position on having the next guy ready to play. Aubrey’s had a pretty good camp. (Cam) Wilkins continues to come on. Jamal (Brooks) continues to do good things. We’ve got some guys there. It’s also how many game snaps have they played? It’s not many at that spot yet.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Damarea Crockett (right) is knocked out of bounds by defensive back and roommate DeMarkus Acy during Missouri’s spring game.

Crockett, Rountree will push one another MU • FROM C1

running backs are going to play all the time. It’ll be like any year.” That’s probably true, but as the clock counts down to Missouri’s Sept. 1 opener against Tennessee-Martin, and Crockett and Rountree continue to slam and slither through the defense on the practice field, it’s fair to wonder how this tandem will work, especially under new coordinator Derek Dooley, who’s installed more of a pro-style offense with an emphasis on running the ball downhill. Two weeks into preseason camp and the Tigers don’t have a starting tailback. They have two. “We consider them both 1s,” running backs coach Cornell Ford said. “They interchange. That’s not a problem.” The backs agree. As a freshman in 2016, Crockett was part of a timeshare with Ish Witter and made the most of his 153 carries as the second back to see the field each week. Despite barely playing the first game and serving a suspension for the finale, he set Mizzou records for freshman running backs with 1,062 yards and 10 touchdowns. He was among the Southeastern Conference’s most efficient runners, aver-

aging 6.9 yards per carry. He took over the starting role last season, though Witter still earned his share of touches. The 1-2 punch didn’t last seven games as Crockett suffered a season-ending shoulder injury at Georgia on Oct. 14. Then it was Rountree’s turn. The freshman from Raleigh, N.C., broke 80 yards in three of MU’s final seven games, including a 155-yard outburst against Tennessee. As Witter’s understudy, the rookie averaged 5.6 yards per carry and led all SEC freshman with 703 rushing yards. Again, it’s a two-man race to earn the season’s first touches, but neither back is consumed with being the starter. Both will play. It’s up to them to determine who plays more. “It don’t matter (who starts),” Rountree said. “Everybody’s going to eat regardless.” “I’ve always known there’s going to be two backs,” Crockett said. “Would you want to take the full load of carries in the SEC for 14 games? I don’t think so.” Midway through camp, Ford isn’t sure how he’ll divide the carries between his top two backs. Some plays, he said, will be designed for Crockett, some for Rountree. “Once we get to that second half whoever’s playing the best that’s who we finish

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with,” Ford said. “Hopefully they’re both playing well so it’s not a big deal. But if one’s playing a little better than the other one, I’m going to go with the hot hand.” At 5-11 and 225 pounds, Crockett is the bigger of the two — the 5-10 Rountree weighs 210 — though Rountree is widely considered the more physical runner. Crockett insists he offers everything the coaches want in an every-down back. “All the guys try to mark me down as a power back because I’m bigger, but I don’t think that’s the case at all,” Crockett said. “I’m just as fast or faster than any guy in the (running back) room. I’m bigger than any guy in the room. I’m just as quick or quicker than any guy in the room. I say that in the most humble way. I feel like I’m more of a balanced back.” But back to the dogfight. Crockett came to camp with several bite marks along his right forearm, including a deep gash nearly an inch long, none of which came from the football field. Crockett and his roommate, cornerback DeMarkus Acy, each have Cane Corso mastiffs, brothers from the same litter named Chance (Crockett’s dog) and Ghost (Acy’s). “They’re extremely big dogs but big goofballs,” Crockett said. “They love other dogs and love humans.” But, one day ... “We didn’t know this when we bought them but dogs from the same litter are the dogs that don’t like each other when they get older,” Crockett said. “Once they started going through that stage of growing up and sniffing ... and stuff like that, one day they just went at it. Me and Acy were looking at each other like, what the heck is that? Then they were fine. But the next week they went at it again. I broke them up and put my hand in front of my dog. (Ghost) was trying to get to my dog and ended up biting me.” Crockett’s arm bled … and bled and bled. The pain was worse than the shoulder injury he suffered last season. But, Ghost learned his lesson. “When he bit me he took off running,” Crockett said, laughing. “He knew he messed up.” He hopes defenses feel the same this fall, no matter who starts. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seminoles coach Willie Taggart has three players battling for the QB job. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Florida State wrapped up four days of training camp at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., with coach Willie Taggart saying the Seminoles accomplished several things as they prepare for their season opener against Virginia Tech. “I thought we got a lot done,” Taggart said Thursday. “I’m really impressed with the way the guys competed in practice. Plays that they’re not familiar with, we got better. It was just as if we were practicing at Florida State.” What Taggart wasn’t ready to announce, though, is his starting quarterback. Redshirt junior Deondre Francois, sophomore James Blackman and redshirt freshman Bailey Hockman are competing for the job. All three have been taking snaps with the first team during camp. Taggart said he’s looking for playmaking and leadership from whoever wins the job. “Part of it is getting the ball to the right guys, some of it is just building them up and encouraging them to do the things they are supposed to and being that leader of the entire football team,” Taggart said. Taggart said the trip also helped build chemistry within the team. The Seminoles, who signed a multi-year agreement to host a portion of preseason camp at IMG, headed back to Tallahassee after Thursday’s practice. “I thought we got a lot closer as a football team,” Taggart said. “In a lot of different ways, not just out on the football field, but in the meeting rooms and dinner. You see 30 guys on their down time just hanging and being around each other having fun.” Meanwhile, Taggart announced defensive end Tre Lawson is no longer with the team. Lawson, a redshirt freshman, did not make the trip to IMG. Offensive lineman Cole Minshew did not practice, however Taggart expects him to be ready for the opener. Alabama to renovate stadium • Alabama is planning extensive renovations to Bryant-Denny Stadium and Coleman Coliseum, reducing capacity at both venues but adding premium seating. Athletic director Greg Byrne said Thursday that the stadium will “most likely” go from 101,821 seats to sub100,000, with a massive video board going up in the south end zone that will eliminate some seating and two new video boards opposite. Renovations at Bryant-Denny Stadium are targeted to begin after the 2019 season with a total estimated cost of $288 million, Byrne said. The changes would be implemented in phases and include adding 3,826 premium seats and a tunnel into the stadium for players making their pregame entrance through the Walk of Champions. Alabama also plans to renovate the locker rooms and recruiting lounge and concourses, enlarging the entrance areas and putting in new restrooms and concession stands. “I think people try to emulate what we do on the field, off the field, so I think to continue to be proactive and progressive in the future is only going to help us keep the kind of standard relative to everybody else that we need to have continued success,” football coach Nick Saban said. They’re also adding 10 Founders Suites. Byrne says Alabama already has commitments for eight of them at $5 million apiece. Alabama has already received commitments for $143 million toward a 10year, $600 million fundraising campaign, including a $1 million gift from Nick and Terry Saban. The Tide have won five of the last nine football national championships and remains a huge draw. But attendance at the FBS level was down overall last season by 1,409 fans per game, according to the NCAA. CBS Sports reported it was the largest year-to-year decrease since 1983. Byrne said Coleman Coliseum renovations are projected at $115 million and could begin after the 2021-22 season. He said that figure was some $70 million less than the cost of building a new arena to replace the 50-year-old building.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Chicago

70 50 .583

Milwaukee

68 55 .553

Cardinals

66 56 .541

5

Pittsburgh

61 61 .500

10

Cincinnati

52 69 .430 18½

EAST

W

Atlanta

68 52 .567

Philadelphia 67 54 .554

Washington

L

Pct

— 6-4 W-2

38-23

32-27

— 4-6

L-1

36-24

32-31

L-1

32-27 34-29

8-2

6½ 4-6 L-4 15

3-7 L-4

33-30

28-31

28-35 24-34

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

34-25

34-27

— 4-6 W-1 40-20

27-34

L-1

W

L

Pct

51

.575

8-2 W-5

37-23

57 63 .475

12

14½

5-5 W-3

36-24

21-39

Detroit

50 72 .410

20

22½

3-7

32-30

18-42

Chicago

44 76 .367

25

27½ 4-6 W-2

22-38

22-38

Kansas City

36 84 .300

33

35½

17-44 19-40

EAST

W

GB WCGB L10

Boston

86 36 .705

New York

75 46 .620 10½

Tampa Bay

62 59

52 68 .433

16

WEST

W

Arizona

66 55 .545

5-5 W-1

32-29 34-26

Colorado

65 56

1

2 6-4 W-1

31-27 34-29

Los Angeles

65 57 .533

2½ 4-6 W-1

32-30

33-27

San Francisco 61 61 .500

5-5

L-1 34-26

27-35

19

20

5-5

L-3 22-40

26-35

Texas

San Diego

.537

48 75 .390

L-1

24-37

L-5

28-35 20-40

28-31

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

L

Pct

.512 23½

Toronto

55 65 .458

Baltimore

36 85 .298 49½

30

WEST

W

L

Pct

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rangers second baseman Rougned Odor tags out the Angels’ David Fletcher for the third out of a triple play during a game Thursday in Texas. It was the first triple play turned without the batter being retired since 1912.

NOTEBOOK Marlins’ Urena gets suspended for six games Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Urena has been suspended six games and fined an undisclosed amount for intentionally hitting Ronald Acuna Jr. of the Atlanta Braves with a pitch. Major League Baseball announced the penalties Thursday, a day after Urena hit Acuna on the left arm with his first pitch in the Marlins’ 5-2 loss in Atlanta. The 20-year-old Acuna went into the game having homered in five straight games, including four homers in the three games against Miami — three of them leading off. The 25-year-old Urena, from the Dominican Republic, is 3-12 with a 4.74 ERA in 24 starts. Unless appealed, the suspension is scheduled to begin Friday at Washington. Puig suspended two games • Los Angeles outfielder Yasiel Puig has been suspended for two games and fined an undisclosed fine for fighting and inciting a bench-clearing incident against San Francisco. Major League Baseball announced the sanctions Thursday, two days after the Cuban player took a swing at Giants catcher Nick Hundley in the seventh inning of the Dodgers’ 2-1 home loss. Hundley also was fined. Barring an appeal, Puig is scheduled to begin the suspension Friday at Seattle. Acuna back for Yankees • Rookie star Ronald Acuna Jr. is back in the lineup for the Atlanta Braves, hitting leadoff one day after being plunked on the left arm by Miami’s Jose Urena. The training staff signed off on Acuna returning to lineup after a CT scan on his elbow was normal. X-rays also were negative. Other news • New York Mets outfielder Brandon Nimmo left Game 1 of Thursday’s doubleheader against the Phillies after he injured his left index finger hitting a grounder to third base. ... Texas Rangers third baseman Adrian Beltre was still out of the lineup because of his troublesome left hamstring. Beltre said before the Rangers’ game Thursday against the Los Angeles Angels that he is feeling better than he did when he strained the hamstring earlier this season. The 39-yearold third baseman was on the DL twice earlier this season, and aggravated the injury Monday night. Associated Press

Rangers 8, Angels 6 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 2 3 1 0 0 .227 Fletcher 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .260 Upton lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .264 Ohtani dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .269 Pujols 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .251 Simmons ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .301 Arcia c 4 0 1 2 0 0 .316 Ward 3b 2 0 0 1 1 1 .333 Cowart 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .152 Young Jr. cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Totals 35 6 11 6 1 8 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 4 0 1 1 1 1 .279 Odor 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .270 Andrus ss 4 1 0 0 1 1 .281 Mazara rf 3 2 1 2 1 0 .272 Profar 3b 3 2 2 1 0 1 .253 Gallo lf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .203 Chirinos c 2 1 0 0 2 0 .219 Guzman 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .241 DeShields cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .204 a-Kiner-Falefa ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Tocci cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Totals 30 8 7 7 6 7 Los Angeles 510 000 000 — 6 11 1 Texas 210 001 04x — 8 7 0 a-struck out for DeShields in the 8th. E: Upton (3). LOB: Los Angeles 3, Texas 7. 2B: Simmons (23), Arcia (3), Choo (26), Gallo (17). HR: Calhoun (17), off Jurado; Mazara (16), off Cole; Gallo (32), off Cole; Profar (14), off Johnson. RBIs: Calhoun (50), Upton (74), Ohtani (35), Arcia 2 (15), Ward (2), Choo (57), Odor (46), Mazara 2 (60), Profar (65), Gallo 2 (73). CS: Andrus (2). S: DeShields. RLISP: Los Angeles 2 (Young Jr. 2); Texas 5 (Odor 2, Andrus 3). GIDP: Calhoun. DP: Texas 1 (Guzman, Andrus). TP: Texas 1 (Profar, Odor). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole 1 2 3 3 3 1 34 4.19 Alvarez 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.63 Jerez 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 Ramirez 2 0 0 0 0 2 23 4.39 Johnson, 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 3.91 Buttrey, 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 2/ Anderson, L, 3-3, 3 1 4 4 3 2 29 3.55 1/ Morales 3 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jurado 6 9 6 6 1 3 84 6.41 Moore, W, 2-6 2 1 0 0 0 3 16 7.07 Leclerc, S, 3-7 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 2.01 Cole pitched to 3 batters in the 2nd. Inherited runners-scored: Alvarez 2-0, Morales 3-2. HBP: Ramirez (Guzman), Anderson (Profar). WP: Morales. Umpires: Home, Vic Carapazza; First, CB Bucknor; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Chris Conroy. T: 2:53. A: 18,398.

33-26

10 6-4 W-2 34-24

28-35

16½ 4-6 W-2 36

3-7

L-1

29-32

26-33

21-40

15-45

Str Home

Away

— 4-6 W-1

33-29

41-18

2

35-24

37-25

Seattle

70 52 .574

Los Angeles 62 61 .504

13

11

7-3

L-1

33-30

29-31

21

19

5-5 W-1

27-37

27-32

54 69 .439

Rhys Hoskins hit a three-run homer, Scott Kingery had a solo shot and the Philadelphia Phillies beat the New York Mets 9-6 on Thursday night to split their doubleheader. In the first game, Jose Bautista hit a grand slam and had a career-high seven RBIs as the Mets set a franchise record for runs, prompting the Phillies to use two position players to pitch the final three innings of a 24-4 rout. The Mets kept on hitting in the nightcap with three straight doubles on Zach Eflin’s first four pitches. Michael Conforto’s two-run double made it 2-0. But then Hoskins crushed one high off the foul pole to give the Phillies a 3-2 lead in the bottom half against Steven Matz (5-10), just activated from the disabled list. Hoskins, who went deep in both ends of the twinbill, has 11 of his 25 homers since the All-Star break — and three in the last four games. In the opener, Corey Oswalt (2-2) allowed four solo homers in six innings, Amed Rosario hit a leadoff homer and had three RBIs and the Mets took advantage of four errors to score 11 unearned runs. Even reliever Jerry Blevins got his first career hit, a line-drive RBI single off Kingery. The Mets scored more than 15 runs in consecutive games for the first time in franchise history. They beat Baltimore 16-5 Wednesday night.

Associated Press

44-21

L-2 42-20

— 6-4

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .299 Wendle 3b-2b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .293 Bauers 1b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .221 Pham lf 3 0 2 1 1 0 .248 Choi dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Kiermaier cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .177 Adames ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .252 Lowe 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .111 Duffy 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .297 Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .302 Totals 33 3 10 3 2 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hicks cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .254 Stanton dh 4 0 2 1 0 1 .281 Andujar 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .294 Gregorius ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268 Torres 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .258 Walker rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .218 Bird 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Higashioka c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .170 a-Gardner ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Robinson lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .129 b-Romine ph-c 2 0 1 0 0 1 .266 Totals 34 1 7 1 2 11 Tampa Bay 200 000 010 — 3 10 1 New York 000 000 010 — 1 7 1 a-flied out for Higashioka in the 8th. b-singled for Robinson in the 8th. E: Adames (11), Andujar (13). LOB: Tampa Bay 7, New York 8. 2B: Wendle (16), Pham (12), Choi (7), Adames (5), Lowe (1), Stanton 2 (26). RBIs: Wendle (39), Bauers (34), Pham (42), Stanton (77). SB: Smith (26), Hicks (9). S: Wendle, Bauers. RLISP: Tampa Bay 5 (Smith, Kiermaier 3, Perez); New York 6 (Andujar 2, Gregorius 2, Romine 2). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell, W, 14-5 5 2 0 0 1 6 76 2.10 2/ Roe, 0 0 2 9 3.47 3 1 0 Alvarado, 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.49 2/ 0 0 0 18 2.42 Stanek, 3 2 1 1/ Romo, 0 1 0 19 3.54 3 2 0 Kolarek, S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 5.62 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tanaka, L, 9-4 6 9 2 2 0 6 92 4.03 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.50 Robertson 1 1 1 0 1 1 22 3.17 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 5.73 Romo pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Alvarado 1-0, Romo 1-0, Kolarek 3-0. Umpires: Home, Jerry Layne; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Nic Lentz; Third, Jordan Baker. T: 3:22. A: 41,033.

Rangers 8, Angels 6 • Jurickson Profar started a triple play and homered to help Texas rally from an early five-run deficit to beat visiting Los Angeles.

42-15

.612

Rays 3, Yankees 1

Rockies 5, Braves 3

Away

L-1

8-2

72 49 .595

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Baez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .293 Heyward rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .283 Bote 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .321 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .264 Happ lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .243 Almora cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .297 Contreras c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .272 Lester p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .102 a-Schwarber ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Edwards Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Zobrist ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Russell ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Totals 34 1 7 1 1 7 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .303 Marte cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Polanco rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .239 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Diaz c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Bell 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .266 Harrison 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Hechavarria ss 2 0 2 0 0 0 .264 b-Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Newman ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Nova p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .022 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Moran ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 31 0 6 0 0 10 Chicago 000 100 000 — 1 7 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 a-out on fielder’s choice for Lester in the 7th. b-grounded out for Hechavarria in the 8th. c-grounded out for Rodriguez in the 8th. d-flied out for Edwards Jr. in the 9th. LOB: Chicago 8, Pittsburgh 5. HR: Happ (13), off Nova. RBIs: Happ (34). CS: Marte (9). RLISP: Chicago 3 (Baez, Bote, Lester); Pittsburgh 1 (Nova). GIDP: Marte. DP: Chicago 1 (Bote, Baez, Rizzo). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester, W, 13-5 6 5 0 0 0 8 92 3.72 Cishek, 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 1.79 Edwards Jr., 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.50 Strop, S, 10-13 1 0 0 0 0 2 22 2.57 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova, L, 7-7 62/3 7 1 1 0 3 97 4.26 Rodriguez 11/3 0 0 0 0 4 24 3.18 Vazquez 1 0 0 0 1 0 17 2.88 Inherited runners-scored: Rodriguez 1-0. HBP: Rodriguez (Bote), Strop (Freese). Umpires: Home, Scott Barry; First, Carlos Torres; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Chad Fairchild. T: 2:48. A: 21,783.

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dahl cf 5 1 2 3 0 1 .270 LeMahieu 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .272 Gonzalez rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .287 Arenado 3b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .310 Story ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .289 Parra lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .284 Desmond 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .230 Wolters c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .154 c-McMahon ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .235 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gray p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .073 a-Blackmon ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Iannetta ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Totals 32 5 6 5 4 10 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .287 Albies 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Freeman 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .323 Markakis rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .319 Camargo 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Inciarte cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Suzuki c 3 2 2 1 0 1 .256 Swanson ss 3 1 1 1 0 2 .239 Teheran p 2 0 1 1 0 0 .226 Jackson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sobotka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 31 3 6 3 1 11 Colorado 011 000 003 — 5 6 0 Atlanta 010 020 000 — 3 6 1 a-grounded out for Gray in the 8th. b-grounded out for Jackson in the 8th. c-singled for Wolters in the 9th. d-struck out for Oh in the 9th. E: Swanson (9). LOB: Colorado 6, Atlanta 3. 2B: Suzuki (18), Swanson (21). HR: Dahl (6), off Teheran; Suzuki (9), off Gray. RBIs: Dahl 3 (19), Desmond (60), McMahon (17), Suzuki (38), Swanson (47), Teheran (4). SB: Dahl (4), McMahon (1), Acuna (9), Freeman (8). SF: Desmond. S: Gray. RLISP: Colorado 4 (Dahl, LeMahieu, Arenado 2); Atlanta 1 (Inciarte). GIDP: Markakis, Camargo. DP: Colorado 2 (Story, LeMahieu, Desmond), (Story, LeMahieu, Desmond). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray 7 5 3 3 1 9 94 4.76 Oh, W, 5-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 2.54 Davis, S, 33-39 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 5.19 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran 7 3 2 2 2 7 90 4.24 Jackson, 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 3.95 Brach, L, 1-3, 2/3 2 3 0 1 2 26 4.05 1/ 0 0 0 4 0.00 Sobotka 3 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Sobotka 1-0. HBP: Gray (Freeman). WP: Jackson. Umpires: Home, Pat Hoberg; First, Brian Knight; Second, Joe West; Third, Doug Eddings. T: 2:53. A: 23,428.

Str Home

74 47

Cubs 1, Pirates 0

Rays 3, Yankees 1 • Rookie lefthander Adam Kolarek pitched out of a bases-loaded, no-out jam in the ninth inning to lift the Rays to win in New York. Former Cardinal Tommy Pham returned from the DL for the Rays and had an RBI double during a two-run first inning.

L-2

Houston

Mets set record, then split with Phillies

AMERICAN LEAGUE

L-3

32-28

Oakland

BOX SCORES

Rockies 5, Braves 3 • Colorado snapped Ronald Acuna Jr.’s home run streak and host Atlanta’s five-game winning streak, rallying for three unearned runs in the ninth for the win.

2-8

GB WCGB L10

ROUNDUP

Cubs 1, Pirates 0 • Jon Lester pitched six innings to win for the first time in just over a month and Ian Happ homered as Chicago beat Pittsburgh.

Away

69

48 75 .390 21½

2-8

Str Home

Cleveland

Miami

20

GB WCGB L10

Minnesota

New York

14½ 6-4

31-33

CENTRAL

8

Pct

3-7 W-1 30-28

AMERICAN LEAGUE

61 61 .500

L

7-3

Thursday Washington 5, Cardinals 4 Philadelphia 9, NY Mets 6 NY Mets 24, Philadelphia 4 Cubs 1, Pittsburgh 0 Colorado 5, Atlanta 3 Arizona at San Diego, late Wednesday Minnesota 6, Pittsburgh 4 Cubs 8, Milwaukee 4 Philadelphia 7, Boston 4 NY Mets 16, Baltimore 5 Cleveland 4, Cincinnati 3 Atlanta 5, Miami 2 Houston 12, Colorado 1 Cardinals 4, Washington 2 LA Angels 3, San Diego 2 LA Dodgers 4, San Francisco 3, 12 inn.

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

7-3

L-1

2½ 6-4 W-1

Thursday Tampa Bay 3, NY Yankees 1 Texas 8, LA Angels 6 Minnesota 15, Detroit 8 Toronto at Kansas City, late Wednesday Minnesota 6, Pittsburgh 4 White Sox 6, Detroit 5 Seattle 2, Oakland 0, 12 inn. Tampa Bay 6, NY Yankees 1 Philadelphia 7, Boston 4 NY Mets 16, Baltimore 5 Cleveland 4, Cincinnati 3 Houston 12, Colorado 1 Toronto 6, Kansas City 5 LA Angels 3, San Diego 2

36-24 34-28

Friday’s pitching matchups

GAME ONE

Mets 24, Phillies 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 7 4 4 3 0 1 .242 Jackson cf 7 3 3 0 0 1 .286 Flores 1b 7 2 3 2 0 1 .275 Conforto lf 7 3 3 1 0 1 .238 Frazier 3b 4 3 1 1 2 0 .231 Nimmo rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Bautista rf 4 3 3 7 1 0 .204 Reyes 2b 5 3 2 1 2 0 .204 Plawecki c 4 3 4 3 2 0 .238 Oswalt p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-McNeil ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Blevins p 1 0 1 1 0 0 .500 Totals 52 24 25 19 7 5 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .256 Bour 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Cabrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Kingery ss-p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Hoskins lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .253 Williams rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .263 Franco 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .280 Herrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269 Alfaro c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Suarez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Quinn ph-p-ss 2 0 2 0 0 0 .290 Totals 37 4 10 4 1 4 New York 102 2100 252 — 24 25 0 Philadelphia 021 100 000 — 4 10 4 a-singled for Neris in the 6th. b-grounded out for Oswalt in the 7th. E: Hoskins (6), Franco 2 (13), Alfaro (9). LOB: New York 10, Philadelphia 7. 2B: Jackson 2 (13), Conforto (16), Frazier (11), Reyes (9), Plawecki (10), Bautista (14), Cabrera (27). 3B: Plawecki (2). HR: Rosario (6), off Suarez; Bautista (10), off Leiter Jr.; Conforto (17), off Quinn; Hoskins (24), off Oswalt; Franco (20), off Oswalt; Williams (17), off Oswalt; Alfaro (8), off Oswalt. RBIs: Rosario 3 (36), Flores 2 (44), Conforto (43), Frazier (42), Reyes (13), Plawecki 3 (23), Bautista 7 (40), Blevins (1), Hoskins (74), Williams (47), Franco (60), Alfaro (28). SB: Rosario (14). S: Oswalt. RLISP: New York 7 (Rosario, Flores, Conforto, Nimmo 2, Reyes, Oswalt); Philadelphia 4 (Hernandez, Bour 2, Williams). GIDP: Flores, Reyes. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Hernandez, Cabrera, Bour), (Cabrera, Hernandez, Bour). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA New York Oswalt, W, 2-2 6 9 4 4 1 2 96 5.16 McNeil 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.66 Rhame 2 1 0 0 0 1 36 7.25 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Suarez, L, 1-1 4 11 8 4 2 2 69 8.00 Leiter Jr. 1 4 7 0 3 0 37 5.40 Neris 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 6.54 2/ Quinn 1 3 6 7 7 2 0 42 37.80 Kingery 11/3 4 2 2 0 0 16 13.50 Suarez pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Leiter Jr. 1-2. HBP: Quinn (Frazier). WP: Quinn. Umpires: Home, Marty Foster; First, Chris Guccione; Second, Jeremie Rehak; Third, Gerry Davis. T: 3:01. GAME TWO

Phillies 9, Mets 6 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 4 3 2 1 1 1 .245 McNeil 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .254 Conforto lf 5 0 3 4 0 0 .243 Flores 1b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .274 Jackson cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .284 Bautista rf 3 0 0 0 2 2 .202 Mesoraco c 2 0 0 0 2 0 .218 Reinheimer 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Matz p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .086 a-Reyes ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 b-Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 d-Plawecki ph 1 1 0 0 0 0 .237 Totals 37 6 9 6 5 8 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 3 2 1 1 0 .258 Ramos c 5 0 3 1 0 2 .308 Williams rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .265 Hoskins lf 3 1 2 3 0 0 .256 Santana 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .216 Franco 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .279 Kingery ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .226 Eflin p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .121 c-Bour ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Quinn cf 4 2 1 0 0 0 .286 Totals 37 9 14 8 1 6 New York 200 000 202 — 6 9 1 Philadelphia 330 002 10x — 9 14 1 a-lined out for Sewald in the 4th. b-struck out for Wahl in the 7th. c-grounded out for Garcia in the 7th. d-reached on error, advanced to 2nd for Bashlor in the 9th. E: Matz (3), Rios (1). LOB: New York 9, Philadelphia 6. 2B: Rosario 2 (20), McNeil (3), Conforto (17), Jackson (14), Hernandez (15), Ramos (17), Santana (20), Franco (15). HR: Hoskins (25), off Matz; Kingery (6), off Matz. RBIs: Rosario (37), Conforto 4 (47), Flores (45), Hernandez (39), Ramos (57), Williams (48), Hoskins 3 (77), Franco (61), Kingery (32). SB: Hernandez (15), Williams (3), Quinn 2 (4). RLISP: New York 3 (Bautista, Mesoraco, Reyes); Philadelphia 3 (Williams, Santana, Quinn). LIDP: Williams. DP: New York 1 (McNeil, Flores). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz, L, 5-10 2 5 6 4 1 2 58 4.60 Sewald 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 4.81 Smith 2 3 0 0 0 1 26 1.64 Wahl 1 3 2 2 0 1 23 10.13 Bashlor 2 3 1 1 0 0 34 4.26 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eflin, W, 9-4 62/3 7 4 4 3 5 96 3.70 1/ Garcia 1 3.55 3 00 0 0 0 Arano 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 1.93 1/ 1 1 0 16 5.00 Rios 3 1 2 Domingz, S, 14-17 2/3 1 0 0 0 2 13 2.28 Inherited runners-scored: Garcia 1-0, Dominguez 2-1. HBP: Matz (Hoskins). PB: Mesoraco 2 (7). Umpires: Home, Mark Ripperger; First, Jeremie Rehak; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Chris Guccione. T: 3:03. A: 33,049.

LATE WEDNESDAY

Dodgers 4, Giants 3 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen rf 4 1 1 3 1 1 .253 Belt 1b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Longoria 3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Posey c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .290 G.Hernandez cf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .253 Crawford ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .274 Pence lf 5 1 3 0 0 1 .226 Hanson 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .281 d-d’Arnaud ph-2b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .254 Holland p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .071 e-Hundley ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .254 g-Slater ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Duggar cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Totals 41 3 6 3 2 11 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 0 1 1 2 0 .230 Turner 3b 5 1 1 0 1 3 .290 Machado ss 5 1 3 1 1 1 .306 Kemp lf-rf 4 0 2 1 2 1 .282 Taylor cf-lf 5 0 1 0 1 2 .248 K.Hernandez 1b 2 0 2 0 0 0 .220 a-Bellinger ph-1b-cf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .255 Puig rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .268 f-Maeda ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .094 Baez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Barnes c 1 0 0 0 1 1 .199 b-Grandal ph-c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .247 Ryu p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .154 c-Pederson ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .251 Muncy 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .255 Totals 43 414 4 10 13 San Francisco 000 000 030 000 — 3 6 0 Los Angeles 000 001 200 001 — 4 14 0 One out when winning run scored. a-popped out for K.Hernandez in the 5th. b-flied out for Barnes in the 6th. c-out on sacrifice fly for Ryu in the 6th. d-walked for Hanson in the 8th. e-struck out for Black in the 8th. f-struck out for Goeddel in the 9th. g-grounded out for Blach in the 10th. LOB: San Francisco 5, Los Angeles 17. 2B: Belt (17), Dozier (25), Machado (27), K.Hernandez (11), Puig (19), Grandal (17). HR: McCutchen (14), off Ferguson. RBIs: McCutchen 3 (52), Dozier (64), Machado (72), Kemp (67), Pederson (46). SB: Taylor (7). CS: Taylor (6). SF: Dozier, Pederson. S: d’Arnaud. RLISP: San Francisco 3 (Belt, Posey, Holland); Los Angeles 8 (Turner, Machado, Taylor, Ryu 2, Bellinger 2, Maeda). GIDP: Taylor. DP: San Francisco 1 (Longoria, d’Arnaud, Belt). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland 42/3 6 0 0 4 7 93 3.83 Moronta 11/3 1 1 1 0 0 17 2.17 Black 1 3 2 2 1 0 18 4.61 Blach 2 1 0 0 2 4 35 4.38 Melancon 1 1 0 0 1 2 19 3.09 Kelly, L, 0-1 11/3 2 1 1 2 0 20 1.42 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ryu 6 3 0 0 0 6 89 1.77 Chargois, 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.45 2/ Ferguson, 3 1 1 23 3.79 3 2 3 1/ Goeddel 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.95 Alexander 1 1 0 0 1 0 5 3.81 Baez, W, 4-3 2 0 0 0 0 2 22 3.89 Inherited runners-scored: Moronta 3-0. WP: Holland, Blach. Umpires: Home, Stu Scheurwater; First, Ryan Additon; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Eric Cooper. T: 4:05. A: 44,987.

This Date In Baseball Compiled by PAUL MONTELLA Aug. 17 1904: Jesse Tannehill of the Boston Red Sox pitched a no-hitter, beating the Chicago White Sox 6-0. 1920: Cleveland shortstop Ray Chapman died from a beaning by Carl Mays of the New York Yankees on Aug. 16. This was the only on-field fatality in major league history. 1933: Earl Averill of the Cleveland Indians hit for the cycle in a 15-4 rout of the Philadelphia Athletics. 1933: New York’s Lou Gehrig played in his 1,308th straight game to break Everett Scott’s record of 1,307. Gehrig’s single and triple didn’t prevent the last-place St. Louis Browns from beating the Yankees 7-6 in 10 innings at Sportsman’s Park. 1944: Johnny Lindell of the New York Yankees hit four consecutive doubles in a 10-3 victory over the Cleveland Indians. Lindell drove in two runs and scored twice. 1963: Jim Hickman became the first New York Met to hit for cycle in a 7-3 win over the St. Louis Cardinals. Hickman got the cycle in his first four times up: in single, double, triple, homer order. 1972: Steve Carlton of the Philadelphia Phillies became the first 20-game winner this season by winning his 15th consecutive game, a 9-4 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. 1980: George Brett went 4-for-4, raising his batting average to .401, in an 8-3 win over the Tornto Blue Jays. Brett drove in five runs and extended his hitting streak to 29 consecutive games. 1980: Al Oliver of Texas hit four home runs: one in the opener and three in the nightcap: as the Rangers swept a doubleheader from the Detroit Tigers, 9-3 and 12-6. 1989: Baltimore shortstop Cal Ripken played in his 1,208th consecutive game to pass Steve Garvey into third place on the all-time list. Ripken went 3 for 5 with a home run to help the Orioles to an 11-6 win over Toronto. 1990: Carlton Fisk broke Johnny Bench’s major league record for catchers with his 328th homer as the Chicago White Sox beat the Texas Rangers 4-2 for a split of a doubleheader. 1992: Kevin Gross pitched a no-hitter as Los Angeles beat San Francisco 2-0 at Dodgers Stadium. 1999: Jesse Orosco set a major league record by pitching in his 1,072nd game, breaking a tie with Dennis Eckersley atop the career list. The 42-year-old Orosco took the mound with two outs in the seventh inning of Baltimore’s victory over Minnesota. 2001: Jeff Frye became the second Toronto player to hit for the cycle as the Blue Jays beat Texas 11-3. 2002: Alex Rodriguez became the sixth player in major league history to have five straight 40-homer seasons. 2008: Melvin Mora had two homers and two doubles among his five hits and drove in a career-high six runs to pace Baltimore’s 22-hit attack in a 16-8 win over Detroit. 2008: Alex Rios went 5-for-6 and matched a club record with four doubles and Toronto knocked Boston ace Josh Beckett out after 2 1-3 innings in a 15-4 victory over the Red Sox. 2014: Michael Cuddyer hit for the cycle, including a two-run double in Colorado’s five-run eighth inning, and the Rockies beat the Cincinnati Reds 10-5 to complete a doubleheader sweep. Today’s birthdays: Victor Caratini, 25; Jesse Winker, 25; Dustin Pedroia, 35; Tuffy Gosewisch, 35.

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Freeman, Atlanta, .323; Markakis, Atlanta, .319; Arenado, Colorado, .310; Yelich, Milwaukee, .309; Martinez, Cardinals, .306; Gennett, Cincinnati, .305; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .303; Cain, Milwaukee, .301; Peralta, Arizona, .299; Almora, Chicago, .297. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 86; Albies, Atlanta, 84; Carpenter, Cardinals, 82; Yelich, Milwaukee, 82; Arenado, Colorado, 79; Harper, Washington, 76; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 76; Freeman, Atlanta, 75; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 75; 2 tied at 74. RBI: Baez, Chicago, 89; Suarez, Cincinnati, 88; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 87; Arenado, Colorado, 84; Story, Colorado, 83; Rizzo, Chicago, 78; Harper, Washington, 77; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 77; Markakis, Atlanta, 76; Freeman, Atlanta, 75. HITS: Freeman, Atlanta, 150; Markakis, Atlanta, 150; Albies, Atlanta, 135; Gennett, Cincinnati, 135; Peraza, Cincinnati, 135; Arenado, Colorado, 133; Turner, Washington, 133; Castro, Miami, 132; Story, Colorado, 132; 2 tied at 131.

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Mil StL

Peralta (R) Flaherty (R)

7:15

5-3 6-6

4.47 3.22

NY Phi

Syndergaard (R) 8-2 Nola (R) 5:05 13-3

3.22 2.28

Mia Straily (R) Was Scherzer (R)

4-5 6:05 15-5

4.42 2.19

Chi Pit

Hamels (L) Williams (R)

7-9 6:05 10-8

4.22 3.66

SF Cin

Kelly (R) DeSclafani (R) 6:10

0-1 6-3

1.42 4.46

Col Atl

Freeland (L) 10-7 Newcomb (L) 6:35 10-5

3.02 3.40

Ari SD

Ray (L) Lucchesi (L)

9:10

3-2 6-6

4.83 3.45

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tor NY

Stroman (R) Lynn (R)

6:05

4-8 8-8

5.03 4.46

Bal Cle

Hess (R) Carrasco (R)

2-6 6:10 14-6

6.25 3.50

6:10

1-3 3-3

2.42 3.95

LA Despaigne (R) Tex Minor (L) 7:05

2-0 9-6

5.31 4.61

6-11 7:10 4-14

4.82 4.41

TB Stanek (R) Bos Johnson (L)

KC Chi

Junis (R) Shields (R)

Det Boyd (L) Min Gibson (R)

7:10

7-10 6-9

4.20 3.49

Hou Morton (R) Oak Jackson (R)

9:05

12-3 4-2

2.88 2.48

IL

Time W-L

ERA

5-4 7-2

3.32 3.80

Pitcher

LAD Buehler (R) Sea LeBlanc (L)

9:10

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates. DOUBLES: Markakis, Atlanta, 37; Albies, Atlanta, 33; Carpenter, Cardinals, 33; Freeman, Atlanta, 33; Story, Colorado, 33; Baez, Chicago, 32; Rendon, Washington, 29; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 28; 3 tied at 27. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 10; Baez, Chicago, 8; Nimmo, New York, 8; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Desmond, Colorado, 6; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 6; Difo, Washington, 6; Rosario, New York, 6; 8 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Carpenter, Cardinals, 33; Arenado, Colorado, 30; Harper, Washington, 30; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 29; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Muncy, Los Angeles, 26; Suarez, Cincinnati, 26; Baez, Chicago, 25; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 25; Story, Colorado, 25. STOLEN BASES: Turner, Washington, 32; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 29; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28; Inciarte, Atlanta, 24; MTaylor, Washington, 24; Cain, Milwaukee, 21; Jankowski, San Diego, 20; Baez, Chicago, 19; Peraza, Cincinnati, 18; 2 tied at 16. PITCHING: Scherzer, Washington, 15-5; Godley, Arizona, 13-6; Lester, Chicago, 13-5; Nola, Philadelphia, 13-3; Chacin, Milwaukee, 12-4; Greinke, Arizona, 12-8; Mikolas, Cardinals, 12-3; 7 tied at 10. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.81; Scherzer, Washington, 2.19; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.28; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.86; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.86; Greinke, Arizona, 3.00; Freeland, Colorado, 3.02; Corbin, Arizona, 3.18; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 3.33; Newcomb, Atlanta, 3.40. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 227; deGrom, New York, 195; Corbin, Arizona, 190; Greinke, Arizona, 158; Gray, Colorado, 157; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 153; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 152; Nola, Philadelphia, 149; Marquez, Colorado, 146; Godley, Arizona, 143.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Betts, Boston, .352; Martinez, Boston, .333; Altuve, Houston, .329; Machado, Los Angeles, .315; Segura, Seattle, .314; Trout, Los Angeles, .309; Ramirez, Cleveland, .302; Simmons, Los Angeles, .301; Brantley, Cleveland, .300; 2 tied at .299. RUNS: Lindor, Cleveland, 102; Betts, Boston, 99; Martinez, Boston, 88; Benintendi, Boston, 85; Ramirez, Cleveland, 84; Trout, Los Angeles, 82; Segura, Seattle, 78; Stanton, New York, 78; Bregman, Houston, 77; Rosario, Minnesota, 76. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 104; Davis, Oakland, 93; Ramirez, Cleveland, 89; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 81; Haniger, Seattle, 78; Cruz, Seattle, 77; Stanton, New York, 77; Lowrie, Oakland, 76; Lindor, Cleveland, 75; 2 tied at 74. HITS: Segura, Seattle, 148; Martinez, Boston, 147; Lindor, Cleveland, 142; Betts, Boston, 140; Rosario, Minnesota, 140; Merrifield, Kansas City, 136; Castellanos, Detroit, 135; Altuve, Houston, 134; Ramirez, Cleveland, 132; Stanton, New York, 132. DOUBLES: Lindor, Cleveland, 39; Bregman, Houston, 38; Escobar, Arizona, 37; Betts, Boston, 35; Abreu, Chicago, 34; Andujar, New York, 34; Bogaerts, Boston, 33; Castellanos, Detroit, 33; Martinez, Boston, 33; 2 tied at 32. TRIPLES: Smith, Tampa Bay, 9; Sanchez, Chicago, 9; Hernandez, Toronto, 7; Benintendi, Boston, 6; Chapman, Oakland, 6; Profar, Texas, 6; Span, Seattle, 6; 4 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 37; Ramirez, Cleveland, 36; Davis, Oakland, 34; Gallo, Texas, 32; Cruz, Seattle, 30; Stanton, New York, 30; Trout, Los Angeles, 30; Lindor, Cleveland, 29; Betts, Boston, 27; 2 tied at 26. STOLEN BASES: Gordon, Seattle, 27; Ramirez, Cleveland, 27; Merrifield, Kansas City, 26; Smith, Tampa Bay, 26; Betts, Boston, 24; Anderson, Chicago, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 21; Benintendi, Boston, 20; Lindor, Cleveland, 19; DeShields, Texas, 18. PITCHING: Kluber, Cleveland, 15-6; Porcello, Boston, 15-5; Severino, New York, 15-6; Carrasco, Cleveland, 14-6; Snell, Tampa Bay, 14-5; Happ, New York, 13-6; 5 tied at 12. ERA: Sale, Boston, 1.97; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.10; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.22; Verlander, Houston, 2.52; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.68; Cole, Houston, 2.71; Morton, Houston, 2.88; Severino, New York, 3.27; Clevinger, Cleveland, 3.38; Fiers, Oakland, 3.38. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 219; Sale, Boston, 219; Verlander, Houston, 217; Bauer, Cleveland, 214; Paxton, Seattle, 176; Severino, New York, 173; Morton, Houston, 171; Kluber, Cleveland, 160; Berrios, Minnesota, 157; Carrasco, Cleveland, 155.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Chicago

70 50 .583

Milwaukee

68 55 .553

Cardinals

66 56 .541

5

Pittsburgh

61 61 .500

10

Cincinnati

52 69 .430 18½

EAST

W

Atlanta

68 52 .567

Philadelphia 67 54 .554

Washington

L

Pct

8

New York

52 68 .433

16

Miami

48 75 .390 21½

WEST

W

Pct

38-23

32-27

— 4-6

L-1

36-24

32-31

L-1

32-27 34-29

8-2

6½ 4-6 L-4 15

3-7 L-4

34-27

— 4-6 W-1 40-20

27-34

3-7 W-1 30-28

14½ 6-4 20

L-1

2-8

L-1

24-37

28-35 20-40

28-31

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

67 55 .549 65 56

Los Angeles

65 57 .533

2

2½ 4-6 W-1

San Francisco 61 61 .500

6

48 76 .387

31-33

L-5

Colorado

San Diego

28-31

28-35 24-34 34-25

7-3

Arizona

.537

33-30

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

61 61 .500

L

— 6-4 W-2

— 1½

20

5-5 W-2

2 6-4 W-1 5-5

32-29

35-26

31-27 34-29

Thursday Washington 5, Cardinals 4 Philadelphia 9, NY Mets 6 NY Mets 24, Philadelphia 4 Cubs 1, Pittsburgh 0 Colorado 5, Atlanta 3 Arizona 5, San Diego 1 Wednesday Minnesota 6, Pittsburgh 4 Cubs 8, Milwaukee 4 Philadelphia 7, Boston 4 NY Mets 16, Baltimore 5 Cleveland 4, Cincinnati 3 Atlanta 5, Miami 2 Houston 12, Colorado 1 Cardinals 4, Washington 2 LA Angels 3, San Diego 2 Dodgers 4, San Francisco 3, 12 inn.

M 2 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

51

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

Away

Cleveland

69

.575

8-2 W-5

37-23

Minnesota

57 63 .475

12

14½

5-5 W-3

36-24

21-39

Detroit

50 72 .410

20

22½

3-7

L-3

32-30

18-42

Chicago

44 76 .367

25

27½ 4-6 W-2

22-38

22-38

Kansas City

37 84 .306 32½

EAST

W

Boston

86 36 .705

L

Pct

New York

75 46 .620 10½

Tampa Bay

62 59

35

3-7 W-1 18-44 19-40

GB WCGB L10 —

.512 23½

32-28

Str Home

Away

L-1

42-15

44-21

L-2 42-20

33-26

10 6-4 W-2 34-24

28-35

8-2

— 6-4

Toronto

55 66 .455 30½

17 4-6

L-1

29-32 26-34

Baltimore

36 85 .298 49½

36

L-1

21-40

15-45

WEST

W

L

Pct

Str Home

Away

Houston

74 47

.612

— 4-6 W-1

33-29

41-18

Oakland

72 49 .595

2

35-24

37-25

3-7

GB WCGB L10 7-3

L-1

32-30

33-27

Seattle

70 52 .574

L-1 34-26

27-35

Los Angeles 62 61 .504

13

11

7-3

L-1

33-30

29-31

26-35

Texas

21

19

5-5 W-1

27-37

27-32

20½ 4-6 L-4

22-41

54 69 .439

2½ 6-4 W-1

36-24 34-28

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Mets set record, then split with Phillies

Cubs 1, Pirates 0

Rays 3, Yankees 1

Twins 15, Tigers 8

Rhys Hoskins hit a three-run homer, Scott Kingery had a solo shot and the Philadelphia Phillies beat the New York Mets 9-6 on Thursday night to split their doubleheader. In the first game, Jose Bautista hit a grand slam and had a career-high seven RBIs as the Mets set a franchise record for runs, prompting the Phillies to use two position players to pitch the final three innings of a 24-4 rout. The Mets kept on hitting in the nightcap with three straight doubles on Zach Eflin’s first four pitches. Hoskins, who went deep in both ends of the twinbill, has 11 of his 25 homers since the All-Star break — and three in the last four games. In the opener, Corey Oswalt (2-2) allowed four solo homers in six innings, Amed Rosario hit a leadoff homer and had three RBIs and the Mets scored 11 unearned runs.

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Baez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .293 Heyward rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .283 Bote 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .321 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .264 Happ lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .243 Almora cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .297 Contreras c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .272 Lester p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .102 a-Schwarber ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Edwards Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Zobrist ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Russell ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Totals 34 1 7 1 1 7 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .303 Marte cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Polanco rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .239 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Diaz c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Bell 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .266 Harrison 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Hechavarria ss 2 0 2 0 0 0 .264 b-Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Newman ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Nova p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .022 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Moran ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 31 0 6 0 0 10 Chicago 000 100 000 — 1 7 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 a-out on fielder’s choice for Lester in the 7th. b-grounded out for Hechavarria in the 8th. c-grounded out for Rodriguez in the 8th. d-flied out for Edwards Jr. in the 9th. LOB: Chicago 8, Pittsburgh 5. HR: Happ (13), off Nova. RBIs: Happ (34). CS: Marte (9). RLISP: Chicago 3 (Baez, Bote, Lester); Pittsburgh 1 (Nova). GIDP: Marte. DP: Chicago 1 (Bote, Baez, Rizzo). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester, W, 13-5 6 5 0 0 0 8 92 3.72 Cishek, 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 1.79 Edwards Jr., 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.50 Strop, S, 10-13 1 0 0 0 0 2 22 2.57 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova, L, 7-7 62/3 7 1 1 0 3 97 4.26 Rodriguez 11/3 0 0 0 0 4 24 3.18 Vazquez 1 0 0 0 1 0 17 2.88 Inherited runners-scored: Rodriguez 1-0. HBP: Rodriguez (Bote), Strop (Freese). Umpires: Home, Scott Barry; First, Carlos Torres; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Chad Fairchild. T: 2:48. A: 21,783.

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .299 Wendle 3b-2b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .293 Bauers 1b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .221 Pham lf 3 0 2 1 1 0 .248 Choi dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Kiermaier cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .177 Adames ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .252 Lowe 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .111 Duffy 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .297 Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .302 Totals 33 3 10 3 2 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hicks cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .254 Stanton dh 4 0 2 1 0 1 .281 Andujar 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .294 Gregorius ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268 Torres 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .258 Walker rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .218 Bird 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Higashioka c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .170 a-Gardner ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Robinson lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .129 b-Romine ph-c 2 0 1 0 0 1 .266 Totals 34 1 7 1 2 11 Tampa Bay 200 000 010 — 3 10 1 New York 000 000 010 — 1 7 1 a-flied out for Higashioka in the 8th. b-singled for Robinson in the 8th. E: Adames (11), Andujar (13). LOB: Tampa Bay 7, New York 8. 2B: Wendle (16), Pham (12), Choi (7), Adames (5), Lowe (1), Stanton 2 (26). RBIs: Wendle (39), Bauers (34), Pham (42), Stanton (77). SB: Smith (26), Hicks (9). S: Wendle, Bauers. RLISP: Tampa Bay 5 (Smith, Kiermaier 3, Perez); New York 6 (Andujar 2, Gregorius 2, Romine 2). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell, W, 14-5 5 2 0 0 1 6 76 2.10 2/ Roe, 0 0 2 9 3.47 3 1 0 Alvarado, 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.49 2/ 0 0 0 18 2.42 Stanek, 3 2 1 1/ Romo, 0 1 0 19 3.54 3 2 0 Kolarek, S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 5.62 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tanaka, L, 9-4 6 9 2 2 0 6 92 4.03 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.50 Robertson 1 1 1 0 1 1 22 3.17 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 5.73 Romo pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Alvarado 1-0, Romo 1-0, Kolarek 3-0. Umpires: Home, Jerry Layne; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Nic Lentz; Third, Jordan Baker. T: 3:22. A: 41,033.

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .226 Adduci 1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .257 Castellanos rf 4 2 2 2 1 0 .292 Goodrum 2b 4 1 2 1 1 0 .234 Martinez dh 2 1 1 1 1 0 .245 b-Gerber ph-dh 2 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Mahtook lf 4 1 1 2 1 1 .190 McCann c 4 1 1 2 1 1 .223 Rodriguez ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .194 Reyes cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .221 Totals 37 8 10 8 6 6 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 4 3 2 0 1 1 .272 Forsythe 2b 5 3 5 2 0 0 .256 1-Cave pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Polanco ss 4 2 2 4 0 0 .291 Sano 3b 4 2 2 3 1 1 .226 Austin dh 3 0 0 1 1 3 .216 Garver c 5 1 1 2 0 1 .256 Kepler cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .235 Field rf 2 1 0 0 0 1 .204 a-Rosario ph-rf-lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .295 Adrianza lf-2b 4 2 1 2 1 1 .244 Totals 38 15 15 15 4 10 Detroit 200 320 100 — 8 10 3 Minnesota 350 007 00x — 15 15 0 a-flied out for Field in the 6th. b-flied out for Martinez in the 7th. 1-ran for Forsythe in the 7th. E: Candelario (9), Mahtook (1), Rodriguez (5). LOB: Detroit 8, Minnesota 6. 2B: Castellanos (34), Goodrum (25), Martinez (15), Mauer (18), Forsythe 2 (14). HR: Castellanos (18), off Santana; Mahtook (1), off Santana; McCann (7), off Santana; Goodrum (13), off Reed; Polanco (2), off Liriano; Sano (10), off Liriano; Adrianza (5), off McAllister. RBIs: Castellanos 2 (68), Goodrum (40), Martinez (40), Mahtook 2 (8), McCann 2 (33), Forsythe 2 (21), Polanco 4 (20), Sano 3 (36), Austin (26), Garver 2 (28), Adrianza 2 (23), Rosario (68). CS: Austin (2). SF: Polanco, Austin. RLISP: Detroit 5 (Castellanos, Mahtook, McCann, Reyes 2); Minnesota 3 (Polanco, Austin, Adrianza). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano, L, 3-8 12/3 5 8 4 3 1 56 4.72 Reininger 11/3 0 0 0 0 4 20 7.71 Alcantara 2 1 0 0 0 3 26 0.54 1/ 5 0 0 21 6.20 McAllister 3 5 5 2/ Wilson 1 1 0 32 3.97 3 2 2 Jimenez 1 2 0 0 0 1 18 3.33 Greene 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.96 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santana 4 7 7 7 3 2 72 8.03 May, W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 2 2 42 1.35 Reed 2 3 1 1 0 0 32 4.73 Drake 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 6.34 Santana pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Wilson 3-3, May 3-2. HBP: Greene (Kepler). Umpires: Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, John Libka. T: 3:35. A: 25,108.

Cubs 1, Pirates 0 • Jon Lester pitched six innings to win for the first time in just over a month as Chicago beat Pittsburgh. Rockies 5, Braves 3 • Colorado snapped Ronald Acuna Jr.’s home run streak and host Atlanta’s five-game winning streak, rallying for three unearned runs in the ninth for the win. D’backs 5, Padres 1 • Clay Buchholz pitched a four-hitter, David Peralta hit a three-run homer and Arizona won in San Diego.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Rays 3, Yankees 1 • Rookie lefthander Adam Kolarek pitched out of a bases-loaded, no-out jam in the ninth inning to lift the Rays to win in New York. Former Cardinal Tommy Pham returned from the DL for the Rays and had an RBI double during a two-run first inning. Rangers 8, Angels 6 • Jurickson Profar started a triple play and homered to help Texas rally from an early five-run deficit to beat visiting Los Angeles. Twins 15, Tigers 8 • Logan Forsythe had a career-high five hits and Jorge Polanco drove in four runs as Minnesota outslugged visiting Detroit. Royals 6, Blue Jays 2 • Glenn Sparkman gave up four hits and two runs in his debut as Kansas City beat visiting Toronto. Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rangers second baseman Rougned Odor tags out the Angels’ David Fletcher for the third out of a triple play during a game Thursday in Texas. It was the first triple play turned without the batter being retired since 1912.

NOTEBOOK Marlins’ Urena gets suspended for six games Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Urena has been suspended six games and fined an undisclosed amount for intentionally hitting Ronald Acuna Jr. of the Atlanta Braves with a pitch. Major League Baseball announced the penalties Thursday, a day after Urena hit Acuna on the left arm with his first pitch in the Marlins’ 5-2 loss in Atlanta. The 20-year-old Acuna went into the game having homered in five straight games, including four homers in the three games against Miami — three of them leading off. The 25-year-old Urena, from the Dominican Republic, is 3-12 with a 4.74 ERA in 24 starts. Unless appealed, the suspension is scheduled to begin Friday at Washington. Puig suspended two games • Los Angeles outfielder Yasiel Puig has been suspended for two games and fined an undisclosed fine for fighting and inciting a bench-clearing incident against San Francisco. Major League Baseball announced the sanctions Thursday, two days after the Cuban player took a swing at Giants catcher Nick Hundley in the seventh inning of the Dodgers’ 2-1 home loss. Hundley also was fined. Barring an appeal, Puig is scheduled to begin the suspension Friday at Seattle. Acuna back for Yankees • Rookie star Ronald Acuna Jr. is back in the lineup for the Atlanta Braves, hitting leadoff one day after being plunked on the left arm by Miami’s Jose Urena. The training staff signed off on Acuna returning to lineup after a CT scan on his elbow was normal. X-rays also were negative. Other news • New York Mets outfielder Brandon Nimmo left Game 1 of Thursday’s doubleheader against the Phillies after he injured his left index finger hitting a grounder to third base. ... Texas Rangers third baseman Adrian Beltre was still out of the lineup because of his troublesome left hamstring. Beltre said before the Rangers’ game Thursday against the Los Angeles Angels that he is feeling better than he did when he strained the hamstring earlier this season. The 39-yearold third baseman was on the DL twice earlier this season, and aggravated the injury Monday night. Associated Press

Rockies 5, Braves 3 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dahl cf 5 1 2 3 0 1 .270 LeMahieu 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .272 Gonzalez rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .287 Arenado 3b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .310 Story ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .289 Parra lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .284 Desmond 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .230 Wolters c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .154 c-McMahon ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .235 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gray p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .073 a-Blackmon ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Iannetta ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Totals 32 5 6 5 4 10 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .287 Albies 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Freeman 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .323 Markakis rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .319 Camargo 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Inciarte cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Suzuki c 3 2 2 1 0 1 .256 Swanson ss 3 1 1 1 0 2 .239 Teheran p 2 0 1 1 0 0 .226 Jackson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sobotka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 31 3 6 3 1 11 Colorado 011 000 003 — 5 6 0 Atlanta 010 020 000 — 3 6 1 a-grounded out for Gray in the 8th. b-grounded out for Jackson in the 8th. c-singled for Wolters in the 9th. d-struck out for Oh in the 9th. E: Swanson (9). LOB: Colorado 6, Atlanta 3. 2B: Suzuki (18), Swanson (21). HR: Dahl (6), off Teheran; Suzuki (9), off Gray. RBIs: Dahl 3 (19), Desmond (60), McMahon (17), Suzuki (38), Swanson (47), Teheran (4). SB: Dahl (4), McMahon (1), Acuna (9), Freeman (8). SF: Desmond. S: Gray. RLISP: Colorado 4 (Dahl, LeMahieu, Arenado 2); Atlanta 1 (Inciarte). GIDP: Markakis, Camargo. DP: Colorado 2 (Story, LeMahieu, Desmond), (Story, LeMahieu, Desmond). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray 7 5 3 3 1 9 94 4.76 Oh, W, 5-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 2.54 Davis, S, 33-39 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 5.19 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran 7 3 2 2 2 7 90 4.24 Jackson, 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 3.95 Brach, L, 1-3, 2/3 2 3 0 1 2 26 4.05 1/ 0 0 0 4 0.00 Sobotka 3 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Sobotka 1-0. HBP: Gray (Freeman). WP: Jackson. Umpires: Home, Pat Hoberg; First, Brian Knight; Second, Joe West; Third, Doug Eddings. T: 2:53. A: 23,428.

Rangers 8, Angels 6 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 2 3 1 0 0 .227 Fletcher 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .260 Upton lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .264 Ohtani dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .269 Pujols 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .251 Simmons ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .301 Arcia c 4 0 1 2 0 0 .316 Ward 3b 2 0 0 1 1 1 .333 Cowart 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .152 Young Jr. cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Totals 35 6 11 6 1 8 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 4 0 1 1 1 1 .279 Odor 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .270 Andrus ss 4 1 0 0 1 1 .281 Mazara rf 3 2 1 2 1 0 .272 Profar 3b 3 2 2 1 0 1 .253 Gallo lf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .203 Chirinos c 2 1 0 0 2 0 .219 Guzman 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .241 DeShields cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .204 a-Kiner-Falefa ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Tocci cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Totals 30 8 7 7 6 7 Los Angeles 510 000 000 — 6 11 1 Texas 210 001 04x — 8 7 0 a-struck out for DeShields in the 8th. E: Upton (3). LOB: Los Angeles 3, Texas 7. 2B: Simmons (23), Arcia (3), Choo (26), Gallo (17). HR: Calhoun (17), off Jurado; Mazara (16), off Cole; Gallo (32), off Cole; Profar (14), off Johnson. RBIs: Calhoun (50), Upton (74), Ohtani (35), Arcia 2 (15), Ward (2), Choo (57), Odor (46), Mazara 2 (60), Profar (65), Gallo 2 (73). CS: Andrus (2). S: DeShields. RLISP: Los Angeles 2 (Young Jr. 2); Texas 5 (Odor 2, Andrus 3). GIDP: Calhoun. DP: Texas 1 (Guzman, Andrus). TP: Texas 1 (Profar, Odor). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole 1 2 3 3 3 1 34 4.19 Alvarez 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.63 Jerez 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 Ramirez 2 0 0 0 0 2 23 4.39 Johnson, 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 3.91 Buttrey, 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 2/ Anderson, L, 3-3, 3 1 4 4 3 2 29 3.55 1/ Morales 3 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jurado 6 9 6 6 1 3 84 6.41 Moore, W, 2-6 2 1 0 0 0 3 16 7.07 Leclerc, S, 3-7 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 2.01 Cole pitched to 3 batters in the 2nd. Inherited runners-scored: Alvarez 2-0, Morales 3-2. HBP: Ramirez (Guzman), Anderson (Profar). WP: Morales. Umpires: Home, Vic Carapazza; First, CB Bucknor; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Chris Conroy. T: 2:53. A: 18,398.

Thursday Tampa Bay 3, NY Yankees 1 Texas 8, LA Angels 6 Minnesota 15, Detroit 8 Kansas City 6, Toronto 2 Wednesday Minnesota 6, Pittsburgh 4 White Sox 6, Detroit 5 Seattle 2, Oakland 0, 12 inn. Tampa Bay 6, NY Yankees 1 Philadelphia 7, Boston 4 NY Mets 16, Baltimore 5 Cleveland 4, Cincinnati 3 Houston 12, Colorado 1 Toronto 6, Kansas City 5 LA Angels 3, San Diego 2

Friday’s pitching matchups

GAME ONE

Mets 24, Phillies 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 7 4 4 3 0 1 .242 Jackson cf 7 3 3 0 0 1 .286 Flores 1b 7 2 3 2 0 1 .275 Conforto lf 7 3 3 1 0 1 .238 Frazier 3b 4 3 1 1 2 0 .231 Nimmo rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Bautista rf 4 3 3 7 1 0 .204 Reyes 2b 5 3 2 1 2 0 .204 Plawecki c 4 3 4 3 2 0 .238 Oswalt p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-McNeil ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Blevins p 1 0 1 1 0 0 .500 Totals 52 24 25 19 7 5 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .256 Bour 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Cabrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Kingery ss-p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Hoskins lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .253 Williams rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .263 Franco 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .280 Herrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269 Alfaro c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Suarez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Quinn ph-p-ss 2 0 2 0 0 0 .290 Totals 37 4 10 4 1 4 New York 102 2100 252 — 24 25 0 Philadelphia 021 100 000 — 4 10 4 a-singled for Neris in the 6th. b-grounded out for Oswalt in the 7th. E: Hoskins (6), Franco 2 (13), Alfaro (9). LOB: New York 10, Philadelphia 7. 2B: Jackson 2 (13), Conforto (16), Frazier (11), Reyes (9), Plawecki (10), Bautista (14), Cabrera (27). 3B: Plawecki (2). HR: Rosario (6), off Suarez; Bautista (10), off Leiter Jr.; Conforto (17), off Quinn; Hoskins (24), off Oswalt; Franco (20), off Oswalt; Williams (17), off Oswalt; Alfaro (8), off Oswalt. RBIs: Rosario 3 (36), Flores 2 (44), Conforto (43), Frazier (42), Reyes (13), Plawecki 3 (23), Bautista 7 (40), Blevins (1), Hoskins (74), Williams (47), Franco (60), Alfaro (28). SB: Rosario (14). S: Oswalt. RLISP: New York 7 (Rosario, Flores, Conforto, Nimmo 2, Reyes, Oswalt); Philadelphia 4 (Hernandez, Bour 2, Williams). GIDP: Flores, Reyes. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Hernandez, Cabrera, Bour), (Cabrera, Hernandez, Bour). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA New York Oswalt, W, 2-2 6 9 4 4 1 2 96 5.16 McNeil 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.66 Rhame 2 1 0 0 0 1 36 7.25 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Suarez, L, 1-1 4 11 8 4 2 2 69 8.00 Leiter Jr. 1 4 7 0 3 0 37 5.40 Neris 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 6.54 2/ Quinn 1 3 6 7 7 2 0 42 37.80 Kingery 11/3 4 2 2 0 0 16 13.50 Suarez pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Leiter Jr. 1-2. HBP: Quinn (Frazier). WP: Quinn. Umpires: Home, Marty Foster; First, Chris Guccione; Second, Jeremie Rehak; Third, Gerry Davis. T: 3:01. GAME TWO

Phillies 9, Mets 6 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 4 3 2 1 1 1 .245 McNeil 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .254 Conforto lf 5 0 3 4 0 0 .243 Flores 1b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .274 Jackson cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .284 Bautista rf 3 0 0 0 2 2 .202 Mesoraco c 2 0 0 0 2 0 .218 Reinheimer 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Matz p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .086 a-Reyes ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 b-Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 d-Plawecki ph 1 1 0 0 0 0 .237 Totals 37 6 9 6 5 8 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 3 2 1 1 0 .258 Ramos c 5 0 3 1 0 2 .308 Williams rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .265 Hoskins lf 3 1 2 3 0 0 .256 Santana 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .216 Franco 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .279 Kingery ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .226 Eflin p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .121 c-Bour ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Quinn cf 4 2 1 0 0 0 .286 Totals 37 9 14 8 1 6 New York 200 000 202 — 6 9 1 Philadelphia 330 002 10x — 9 14 1 a-lined out for Sewald in the 4th. b-struck out for Wahl in the 7th. c-grounded out for Garcia in the 7th. d-reached on error, advanced to 2nd for Bashlor in the 9th. E: Matz (3), Rios (1). LOB: New York 9, Philadelphia 6. 2B: Rosario 2 (20), McNeil (3), Conforto (17), Jackson (14), Hernandez (15), Ramos (17), Santana (20), Franco (15). HR: Hoskins (25), off Matz; Kingery (6), off Matz. RBIs: Rosario (37), Conforto 4 (47), Flores (45), Hernandez (39), Ramos (57), Williams (48), Hoskins 3 (77), Franco (61), Kingery (32). SB: Hernandez (15), Williams (3), Quinn 2 (4). RLISP: New York 3 (Bautista, Mesoraco, Reyes); Philadelphia 3 (Williams, Santana, Quinn). LIDP: Williams. DP: New York 1 (McNeil, Flores). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz, L, 5-10 2 5 6 4 1 2 58 4.60 Sewald 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 4.81 Smith 2 3 0 0 0 1 26 1.64 Wahl 1 3 2 2 0 1 23 10.13 Bashlor 2 3 1 1 0 0 34 4.26 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eflin, W, 9-4 62/3 7 4 4 3 5 96 3.70 1/ Garcia 1 3.55 3 00 0 0 0 Arano 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 1.93 1/ 1 1 0 16 5.00 Rios 3 1 2 Domingz, S, 14-17 2/3 1 0 0 0 2 13 2.28 Inherited runners-scored: Garcia 1-0, Dominguez 2-1. HBP: Matz (Hoskins). PB: Mesoraco 2 (7). Umpires: Home, Mark Ripperger; First, Jeremie Rehak; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Chris Guccione. T: 3:03. A: 33,049.

LATE WEDNESDAY

Dodgers 4, Giants 3 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen rf 4 1 1 3 1 1 .253 Belt 1b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Longoria 3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Posey c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .290 G.Hernandez cf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .253 Crawford ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .274 Pence lf 5 1 3 0 0 1 .226 Hanson 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .281 d-d’Arnaud ph-2b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .254 Holland p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .071 e-Hundley ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .254 g-Slater ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Duggar cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Totals 41 3 6 3 2 11 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 0 1 1 2 0 .230 Turner 3b 5 1 1 0 1 3 .290 Machado ss 5 1 3 1 1 1 .306 Kemp lf-rf 4 0 2 1 2 1 .282 Taylor cf-lf 5 0 1 0 1 2 .248 K.Hernandez 1b 2 0 2 0 0 0 .220 a-Bellinger ph-1b-cf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .255 Puig rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .268 f-Maeda ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .094 Baez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Barnes c 1 0 0 0 1 1 .199 b-Grandal ph-c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .247 Ryu p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .154 c-Pederson ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .251 Muncy 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .255 Totals 43 414 4 10 13 San Francisco 000 000 030 000 — 3 6 0 Los Angeles 000 001 200 001 — 4 14 0 One out when winning run scored. a-popped out for K.Hernandez in the 5th. b-flied out for Barnes in the 6th. c-out on sacrifice fly for Ryu in the 6th. d-walked for Hanson in the 8th. e-struck out for Black in the 8th. f-struck out for Goeddel in the 9th. g-grounded out for Blach in the 10th. LOB: San Francisco 5, Los Angeles 17. 2B: Belt (17), Dozier (25), Machado (27), K.Hernandez (11), Puig (19), Grandal (17). HR: McCutchen (14), off Ferguson. RBIs: McCutchen 3 (52), Dozier (64), Machado (72), Kemp (67), Pederson (46). SB: Taylor (7). CS: Taylor (6). SF: Dozier, Pederson. S: d’Arnaud. RLISP: San Francisco 3 (Belt, Posey, Holland); Los Angeles 8 (Turner, Machado, Taylor, Ryu 2, Bellinger 2, Maeda). GIDP: Taylor. DP: San Francisco 1 (Longoria, d’Arnaud, Belt). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland 42/3 6 0 0 4 7 93 3.83 Moronta 11/3 1 1 1 0 0 17 2.17 Black 1 3 2 2 1 0 18 4.61 Blach 2 1 0 0 2 4 35 4.38 Melancon 1 1 0 0 1 2 19 3.09 Kelly, L, 0-1 11/3 2 1 1 2 0 20 1.42 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ryu 6 3 0 0 0 6 89 1.77 Chargois, 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.45 2/ Ferguson, 3 1 1 23 3.79 3 2 3 Goeddel 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.95 Alexander 1 1 0 0 1 0 5 3.81 Baez, W, 4-3 2 0 0 0 0 2 22 3.89 Inherited runners-scored: Moronta 3-0. WP: Holland, Blach. Umpires: Home, Stu Scheurwater; First, Ryan Additon; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Eric Cooper. T: 4:05. A: 44,987.

This Date In Baseball Compiled by PAUL MONTELLA Aug. 17 1904: Jesse Tannehill of the Boston Red Sox pitched a no-hitter, beating the Chicago White Sox 6-0. 1920: Cleveland shortstop Ray Chapman died from a beaning by Carl Mays of the New York Yankees on Aug. 16. This was the only on-field fatality in major league history. 1933: Earl Averill of the Cleveland Indians hit for the cycle in a 15-4 rout of the Philadelphia Athletics. 1933: New York’s Lou Gehrig played in his 1,308th straight game to break Everett Scott’s record of 1,307. Gehrig’s single and triple didn’t prevent the last-place St. Louis Browns from beating the Yankees 7-6 in 10 innings at Sportsman’s Park. 1944: Johnny Lindell of the New York Yankees hit four consecutive doubles in a 10-3 victory over the Cleveland Indians. Lindell drove in two runs and scored twice. 1963: Jim Hickman became the first New York Met to hit for cycle in a 7-3 win over the St. Louis Cardinals. Hickman got the cycle in his first four times up: in single, double, triple, homer order. 1972: Steve Carlton of the Philadelphia Phillies became the first 20-game winner this season by winning his 15th consecutive game, a 9-4 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. 1980: George Brett went 4-for-4, raising his batting average to .401, in an 8-3 win over the Tornto Blue Jays. Brett drove in five runs and extended his hitting streak to 29 consecutive games. 1989: Baltimore shortstop Cal Ripken played in his 1,208th consecutive game to pass Steve Garvey into third place on the all-time list. Ripken went 3 for 5 with a home run to help the Orioles to an 11-6 win over Toronto. 1990: Carlton Fisk broke Johnny Bench’s major league record for catchers with his 328th homer as the Chicago White Sox beat the Texas Rangers 4-2 for a split of a doubleheader. Today’s birthdays: Victor Caratini, 25; Jesse Winker, 25; Dustin Pedroia, 35; Tuffy Gosewisch, 35.

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Mil StL

Peralta (R) Flaherty (R)

7:15

5-3 6-6

4.47 3.22

NY Phi

Syndergaard (R) 8-2 Nola (R) 5:05 13-3

3.22 2.28

Mia Straily (R) Was Scherzer (R)

4-5 6:05 15-5

4.42 2.19

Chi Pit

Hamels (L) Williams (R)

7-9 6:05 10-8

4.22 3.66

SF Cin

Kelly (R) DeSclafani (R) 6:10

0-1 6-3

1.42 4.46

Col Atl

Freeland (L) 10-7 Newcomb (L) 6:35 10-5

3.02 3.40

Ari SD

Ray (L) Lucchesi (L)

9:10

3-2 6-6

4.83 3.45

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tor NY

Stroman (R) Lynn (R)

6:05

4-8 8-8

5.03 4.46

Bal Cle

Hess (R) Carrasco (R)

2-6 6:10 14-6

6.25 3.50

6:10

1-3 3-3

2.42 3.95

LA Despaigne (R) Tex Minor (L) 7:05

2-0 9-6

5.31 4.61

6-11 7:10 4-14

4.82 4.41

TB Stanek (R) Bos Johnson (L)

KC Chi

Junis (R) Shields (R)

Det Boyd (L) Min Gibson (R)

7:10

7-10 6-9

4.20 3.49

Hou Morton (R) Oak Jackson (R)

9:05

12-3 4-2

2.88 2.48

IL

Time W-L

ERA

5-4 7-2

3.32 3.80

Pitcher

LAD Buehler (R) Sea LeBlanc (L)

9:10

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NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Freeman, Atlanta, .323; Markakis, Atlanta, .319; Arenado, Colorado, .310; Yelich, Milwaukee, .309; Martinez, Cardinals, .306; Gennett, Cincinnati, .305; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .303; Cain, Milwaukee, .301; Peralta, Arizona, .299; Almora, Chicago, .297. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 86; Albies, Atlanta, 84; Carpenter, Cardinals, 82; Yelich, Milwaukee, 82; Arenado, Colorado, 79; Harper, Washington, 76; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 76; Freeman, Atlanta, 75; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 75; 2 tied at 74. RBI: Baez, Chicago, 89; Suarez, Cincinnati, 88; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 87; Arenado, Colorado, 84; Story, Colorado, 83; Rizzo, Chicago, 78; Harper, Washington, 77; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 77; Markakis, Atlanta, 76; Freeman, Atlanta, 75. HITS: Freeman, Atlanta, 150; Markakis, Atlanta, 150; Albies, Atlanta, 135; Gennett, Cincinnati, 135; Peraza, Cincinnati, 135; Arenado, Colorado, 133; Turner, Washington, 133; Castro, Miami, 132; Story, Colorado, 132; 2 tied at 131. DOUBLES: Markakis, Atlanta, 37; Albies, Atlanta, 33; Carpenter, Cardinals, 33; Freeman, Atlanta, 33; Story, Colorado, 33; Baez, Chicago, 32; Rendon, Washington, 29; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 28; 3 tied at 27. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 10; Baez, Chicago, 8; Nimmo, New York, 8; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Desmond, Colorado, 6; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 6; Difo, Washington, 6; Rosario, New York, 6; 8 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Carpenter, Cardinals, 33; Arenado, Colorado, 30; Harper, Washington, 30; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 29; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Muncy, Los Angeles, 26; Suarez, Cincinnati, 26; Baez, Chicago, 25; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 25; Story, Colorado, 25. STOLEN BASES: Turner, Washington, 32; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 29; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28; Inciarte, Atlanta, 24; MTaylor, Washington, 24; Cain, Milwaukee, 21; Jankowski, San Diego, 20; Baez, Chicago, 19; Peraza, Cincinnati, 18; 2 tied at 16. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.81; Scherzer, Washington, 2.19; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.28; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.86; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.86; Greinke, Arizona, 3.00; Freeland, Colorado, 3.02; Corbin, Arizona, 3.18; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 3.33; Newcomb, Atlanta, 3.40. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 227; deGrom, New York, 195; Corbin, Arizona, 190; Greinke, Arizona, 158; Gray, Colorado, 157; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 153; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 152; Nola, Philadelphia, 149; Marquez, Colorado, 146; Godley, Arizona, 143.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Betts, Boston, .352; Martinez, Boston, .333; Altuve, Houston, .329; Machado, Los Angeles, .315; Segura, Seattle, .314; Trout, Los Angeles, .309; Ramirez, Cleveland, .302; Simmons, Los Angeles, .301; Brantley, Cleveland, .300; 2 tied at .299. RUNS: Lindor, Cleveland, 102; Betts, Boston, 99; Martinez, Boston, 88; Benintendi, Boston, 85; Ramirez, Cleveland, 84; Trout, Los Angeles, 82; Segura, Seattle, 78; Stanton, New York, 78; Bregman, Houston, 77; Rosario, Minnesota, 76. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 104; Davis, Oakland, 93; Ramirez, Cleveland, 89; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 81; Haniger, Seattle, 78; Cruz, Seattle, 77; Stanton, New York, 77; Lowrie, Oakland, 76; Lindor, Cleveland, 75; 2 tied at 74. HITS: Segura, Seattle, 148; Martinez, Boston, 147; Lindor, Cleveland, 142; Rosario, Minnesota, 141; Betts, Boston, 140; Castellanos, Detroit, 137; Merrifield, Kansas City, 136; Altuve, Houston, 134; Ramirez, Cleveland, 132; Stanton, New York, 132. DOUBLES: Lindor, Cleveland, 39; Bregman, Houston, 38; Escobar, Arizona, 37; Betts, Boston, 35; Abreu, Chicago, 34; Andujar, New York, 34; Castellanos, Detroit, 34; Bogaerts, Boston, 33; Martinez, Boston, 33; 2 tied at 32. TRIPLES: Smith, Tampa Bay, 9; Sanchez, Chicago, 9; Hernandez, Toronto, 7; Benintendi, Boston, 6; Chapman, Oakland, 6; Profar, Texas, 6; Span, Seattle, 6; 4 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 37; Ramirez, Cleveland, 36; Davis, Oakland, 34; Gallo, Texas, 32; Cruz, Seattle, 30; Stanton, New York, 30; Trout, Los Angeles, 30; Lindor, Cleveland, 29; Betts, Boston, 27; 2 tied at 26. STOLEN BASES: Gordon, Seattle, 27; Ramirez, Cleveland, 27; Merrifield, Kansas City, 26; Smith, Tampa Bay, 26; Betts, Boston, 24; Anderson, Chicago, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 21; Benintendi, Boston, 20; Lindor, Cleveland, 19; DeShields, Texas, 18. ERA: Sale, Boston, 1.97; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.10; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.22; Verlander, Houston, 2.52; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.68; Cole, Houston, 2.71; Morton, Houston, 2.88; Severino, New York, 3.27; Clevinger, Cleveland, 3.38; Fiers, Oakland, 3.38. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 219; Sale, Boston, 219; Verlander, Houston, 217; Bauer, Cleveland, 214; Paxton, Seattle, 176; Severino, New York, 173; Morton, Houston, 171; Kluber, Cleveland, 160; Berrios, Minnesota, 157; Carrasco, Cleveland, 155.


CARDINALS

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 1 SERIES PREVIEW: CARDINALS VS. BREWERS Scouting report • The Cardinals have inched closer to the Brewers in the standings and could hop them this weekend in St. Louis. The Brewers (6855) sit in second place in the National League Central and currently have one of the NL wild card slots. Outfield tandem Lorenzo Cain and Christian Yelich have led the Brewers. Yelich is hitting .309, and Cain has a .391 on base percentage. Outfielder Ryan Braun, who has 14 homers on the season, left Wednesday’s game with a rib injury and is listed as day-to-day. Jesus Aguilar has been the Brewers’ strongest power hitter. He’s crushed 29 home runs and owns a .280 batting average. Jhoulys Chacin leads the Brewers’ pitching staff, and the Cardinals will face him Sunday. Chacin leads the team in wins (12), ERA (3.72) and strikeouts (119). Joakim Soria, one of the team’s top relievers, went on the disabled list Aug. 10, so the Cardinals will not face him. PROBABLE PITCHERS Friday, 7:15 RH Jack Flaherty (6-6, 3.22 ERA) vs. RH Freddy Peralta (5-3, 4.47) Saturday, 6:15 p.m. RH Miles Mikolas (12-3, 2.85) vs. LH Wade Miley (2-1, 2.23) Sunday, 1:15 p.m. RH John Gant (5-4, 3.74) vs. RH Jhoulys Chacin (12-4, 3.71) Peter Baugh

NATIONALS 5, CARDINALS 4 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .282 Taylor cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Turner ss 5 1 2 0 0 0 .269 Harper cf-rf 5 0 3 3 0 1 .243 Rendon 3b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .294 Soto lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .293 Zimmerman 1b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .257 Murphy 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .307 Glover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wieters c 4 0 0 0 1 0 .219 Roark p 3 2 2 0 0 0 .204 a-Reynolds ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Difo 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Totals 40 5 10 4 4 5 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .274 Molina c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .284 O’Neill rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .310 Ozuna lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .270 DeJong ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .241 Wong 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .237 Bader cf 3 1 2 1 1 1 .285 Garcia 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Weaver p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Ross p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .154 b-Wisdom ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .500 Cecil p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mayers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Martinez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .306 1-Gant pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .045 Totals 33 4 6 3 5 4 Washington 101 210 000 — 5 10 1 Cardinals 001 003 000 — 4 6 3 a-grounded out for Roark in the 7th. b-pinch hit for Ross in the 7th. c-singled for Mayers in the 9th. 1-ran for Martinez in the 9th. E: Rendon (4), Carpenter (10), Wong (5), Ross (2). LOB: Washington 12, Cardinals 7. 2B: Harper (22), O’Neill (2), Wong (14). HR: Bader (9), off Roark. RBIs: Harper 3 (77), Rendon (59), DeJong (37), Wong (29), Bader (23). RLISP: Washington 10 (Eaton, Turner 3, Rendon, Soto, Zimmerman 2, Wieters, Roark); Cardinals 2 (Molina, Garcia). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark 6 5 4 3 3 1 97 4.13 Miller 2 0 0 0 1 2 30 3.76 Glover 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 3.38 Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver 3 2/3 7 4 2 1 1 71 4.67 Ross 3 1/3 2 1 0 2 1 63 4.27 Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.47 Mayers 1 1 0 0 1 2 29 3.92 W: Roark 8-12. L: Weaver 6-11. S: Glover 1-1. H: Miller 7. Inherited runners-scored: Ross 3-2. Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Tripp Gibson; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T: 3:28. A: 38,074 (45,538).

HOW THEY SCORED Nationals first • Turner singles. Harper doubles, Turner scores. One run. Nationals 1, Cardinals 0. Nationals third • Roark singles. Turner singles, Roark to second. Harper singles, Roark to third, Turner to second. Rendon singles, Roark scores, Turner to third, Harper to second. One run. Nationals 2, Cardinals 0. Cardinals third • Bader homers. One run. Nationals 2, Cardinals 1. Nationals fourth • Roark singles. Eaton walks, Roark to second. Turner reaches on an error, Roark to third, Eaton to second. Harper singles, Roark and Eaton score, Turner to second. Two runs. Nationals 4, Cardinals 1. Nationals fourth • Murphy singles. Wieters walks, Murphy to second. Roark reaches on an error, Murphy to third, Wieters to second. Eaton reaches on an error, Murphy scores, Wieters to third, Roark to second. One run. Nationals 5, Cardinals 1. Cardinals sixth O’Neill doubles. Ozuna flies out, O’Neill to third. DeJong singles, O’Neill scores. Wong doubles, DeJong scores. Bader singles, Wong scores on an error. Three runs. Nationals 5, Cardinals 4.

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

NOTEBOOK

Practice makes perfect for Bader Coach McGee says player is always working on defense BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

When Willie McGee arrived with the Cardinals, some of the first coaching he received was a simple, short instruction from manager Whitey Herzog: Take fly balls off the bat. During batting practice, McGee would start in shallow center to practice balls hit over his head one day, and then he’d get liners struck his way the next — all because of an instructor’s suggestion. He hasn’t said the same thing to the Cardinals current outfielders. But he sees it. “This guy,” McGee said of center fielder Harrison Bader. “He works in BP. He’s out there working on balls off the bat. There isn’t a play that I don’t think he can’t make out there. If it’s a ball hit in the air, he’s worked on it.” A root cause of the Cardinals’ recent winning streak has been a substantially more stable defense. Since the All-Star break, the Cardinals have improved from plus-20 Defensive Runs Saved to plus-42, according to Bill James Online. That ranks fifth in the NL, and in August alone they’ve had plus-19 DRS. Bader is in the center of it. The Cardinals’ outfielder has seized an everyday job since Tommy Pham was traded to Tampa Bay in large part because of the ground he covers. In addition to three hits Wednesday night, Bader had a diving catch in center field that kept Washington from scoring two runs. He tracked a fly ball Thursday to make a leaping catch at the center-field wall. By any advanced defensive metric, Bader has been one of the most reliable center fielders in the game, despite playing fewer than 275 innings there. According to Baseball Info Solutions, Bader ranks second in center with plus13 DRS and third in right field at plus-8 DRS. “I’ve always told Willie he’s another set of eyes from the dugout (who) provides a dif-

AVERAGES Batting Wisdom O’Neill J. Martinez Molina Bader Carpenter Ozuna Gyorko DeJong Wong G. Garcia Pena Team

AVG .500 .309 .305 .288 .280 .276 .273 .254 .241 .237 .236 .206 .252

AB 6 55 394 340 246 421 462 276 282 279 140 107 4125

R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 3 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 10 17 1 0 3 9 2 24 1 1 41 120 21 0 14 69 39 69 0 7 42 98 17 0 15 54 20 50 4 3 46 69 11 1 8 22 21 76 12 1 82 116 33 0 33 68 77 114 1 9 49 126 13 2 14 64 28 85 2 3 34 70 13 1 9 39 32 60 1 12 46 68 16 1 13 36 27 76 0 9 34 66 13 2 8 28 23 49 4 4 14 33 6 0 3 12 16 30 1 4 8 22 2 0 2 7 4 32 1 1 552 1041 182 7 154 530 398 1000 47 92

Pitching W L ERA Hudson 3 0 0.87 Shreve 1 0 1.69 Poncedeleon 0 0 2.16 Mikolas 12 3 2.85 Gomber 3 0 2.89 Hicks 3 3 2.93 Ross 1 0 3.00 Norris 3 3 3.14 Flaherty 6 6 3.22 Gant 5 4 3.74 Mayers 2 1 4.01 Weaver 6 10 4.66 Cecil 0 1 5.70 Team 66 55 3.77 Prior to Thursday’s game

G 9 6 5 24 21 56 1 51 19 18 38 23 27 121

GS SV IP 0 0 10.1 0 0 5.1 1 1 16.2 24 0 151.1 4 0 37.1 0 4 61.1 1 0 6.0 0 23 48.2 19 0 103.1 11 0 74.2 0 1 42.2 23 0 121.2 0 0 23.2 121 31 1089.0

H 4 4 8 133 29 42 4 42 76 58 42 127 29 989

R 1 1 4 52 14 22 2 19 40 38 20 65 17 502

ER 1 1 4 48 12 20 2 17 37 31 19 63 15 456

HR 0 1 2 11 3 1 0 5 15 6 5 16 2 107

BB 4 1 9 26 19 28 2 10 36 31 11 43 18 416

SO 6 7 9 102 32 49 4 59 127 65 36 111 14 983

ferent perspective for me,” Bader told KMOX late Wednesday in a “Star of the Game” interview. “When you have four eyes on the ball, it’s a lot easier than just two.” At least once a series, Bader takes the field early to work on his throws to bases from center. At new ballparks, he’ll go out on the field and scout the caroms off the wall and the look from the gaps, as he did in Kansas City before reading and reacting to a ricochet that kept the Royals from advancing in last weekend’s sweep. McGee said Bader and Pham made such BP and early work part of their routine, and in the past month Marcell Ozuna has also been working through similar drills. Ozuna and Bader are directing traffic in the outfield during games. Each outfielder has a sheet of paper with spray probabilities available to him, and with more playing time Bader has become better

at reading bat angles, Yadier Molina’s pitchcalling, and tendencies so that McGee said he’s shifting and shading before the dugout tells him. Several times during an interview Thursday, McGee described how he was growing as a rookie coach right along with the rookie center fielder, learning new things to cover, new advice to give. He was asked what Bader could grow into. “The guy is good, Gold Glove-caliber now,” McGee said. “We’ve had a lot of them here. The Van Slykes. Vince Coleman — people don’t give him credit, but he was an excellent outfielder. Ray (Lankford). All these guys. Jim (Edmonds). He’s got a chance man, and he works. I have no doubt he’s got a chance. I like to say that. But I don’t like to crown (him), not yet.”

WAINO THROWS TWO Adam Wainwright’s two scoreless innings Thursday and his next outing for a minorleague affiliate will shape how the team intends to use him when he returns to the majors, possibly with the arrival of September. Wainwright made his second start this week for High-A Palm Beach in Jupiter, Fla., and for the PB-Cards struck out three in two innings. Wainwright threw 31 pitches, 19 of which were strikes. The team’s affiliate said his fastball reached 92 mph. The Cardinals’ veteran starter has spent most of the season recovering from elbow soreness and inflammation that sapped him of his velocity and placed him on the disabled list. He has pitched three innings on his rehab assignment, and his first was so abbreviated (nine pitches) that he had to reach his pitch count (20 pitches) with 11 throws after his outing. “We’ll evaluate how he feels, see how he recovers, and then look to push it forward,” Cardinals manager Mike Shildt said. “Could he start? We’ll see how he gets built up. We’ll have a better understanding after this one and the next one where he’s headed and what makes sense for him and for us.”

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

The Cardinals’ Harrison Bader is greeted by Greg Garcia after hitting a third-inning solo home run on Thursday night at Busch Stadium.

Cardinals’ late rally falls short in loss to Nationals CARDINALS • FROM C1

The Cardinals had won nine of their previous 10, 12 of their previous 14, and a season-best eight consecutive in large part because of two recurring themes — crisp defense, particularly in center field, and late rallies, in innings or in games. The Cardinals got some of the latter, but not nearly enough to overcome the former. The Cardinals scored three twoouts runs to cut into Washington’s lead, and in the ninth inning they got the game where they wanted it, right into the A-OK hands of leadoff hitter Matt Carpenter. Pinch-hitter Jose Martinez looped a single to right field to put the tying run on base. Carpenter, who was in the lineup a day after taking a pitch to the backside of his right hand, worked a walk to represent the winning run and a possible 11th walk-off win for the Cardinals this season. Yadier Molina had the tying run in scoring position. Washington had an ad hoc answer. The Nationals finished the four-game series having already lost two walk-offs this week and groping for any consistency in the bullpen. Despite having former All-Star closer and the Cardinals’ $14-million man Greg Holland in their bullpen, the Nationals did not have a reliever on the active roster with a save. They do now. Koda Glover got Molina to fly out to center field to end the game and get the Nats their only win of the series.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Yadier Molina throws the bat in frustration after hitting a fly ball in the seventh inning Thursday.

The Nationals led 5-1 when a three-run sixth inning attempted to salve the harm from three errors and Weaver’s abbreviated start. It took an error to help make it happen. A hallmark of the team’s recent success and hard-nine style has been two-out rallies, and with two outs the Cardinals struck together three hits against Roark to lunge back into the game. Paul DeJong singled to score Tyler O’Neill and then scored from first base on Kolten Wong’s double. Harrison Bader chopped a grounder to third base, and Anthony Rendon’s throw to first was short. Seeing the ball bound past the first baseman, Wong strolled home to cut the Nationals’ lead down to the final deficit. The Cardinals shuffled the rotation to get rookie Jack Flaherty against division rival and wildcard leader Milwaukee on Friday night and get Weaver back in

the mix earlier. The righthander had previously been scheduled to pitch Sunday in Kansas City, but he sliced the index finger on his pitching hand while trying to open up an aluminum foil lid on some food. That gave nine days between starts. It was not enough to outlast a trend. Since returning to the rotation in July, Weaver has had oscillating results, allowing seven runs in four innings one start and providing a quality start the next. The Rockies blistered him for seven baserunners in 2 2/3 innings on Aug. 1, and with newly acquired Tyson Ross in the mix Weaver responded with a quality start in Miami five days later. Ross started warming up in the third inning Thursday as Weaver tiptoed through the Nats’ lineup for a second time. Four singles from the first five batters upped Washington’s lead

to 2-0, and the Nationals had rookie Juan Soto and reigning NL player of the week Ryan Zimmerman looming. Weaver got to face both. He retired both, on flyouts. As Ross stopped warming in the bullpen, Weaver appeared to steady his outing with two quick outs to the start the forth inning. A single and walk put him back in trouble, and then an error happened. Weaver got the ground ball that would have ended the inning and held the Nationals’ lead to two runs. Wong threw low to Carpenter at first base, and Carpenter didn’t come up with the throw. Instead of in his glove, it spun at its tip — but in the dirt. Trea Turner was safe as a result and instead of the inning being over the bases were loaded. Weaver’s start was over. Shildt referred to how Weaver (6-11) was “getting through traffic.” He pitched with two runners on base in the first inning, and he had to sneak through the basesloaded issue in the third inning. Shildt said that the righthander has “the stuff” to get through a lineup for the third time, but he has seen his pitch count climb and his at-bats lengthen as hitters see him deeper in the game. Ross pitched 3 1/3 innings of relief and bought time for the Cardinals to rally. The one run he allowed was unearned. That run, which scored on an errant flip by Wong at second base, proved to be the difference in the game. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 2 SERIES PREVIEW: CARDINALS VS. BREWERS Scouting report • The Cardinals have inched closer to the Brewers in the standings and could hop them this weekend in St. Louis. The Brewers (6855) sit in second place in the National League Central and currently have one of the NL wild card slots. Outfield tandem Lorenzo Cain and Christian Yelich have led the Brewers. Yelich is hitting .309, and Cain has a .391 on base percentage. Outfielder Ryan Braun, who has 14 homers on the season, left Wednesday’s game with a rib injury and is listed as day-to-day. Jesus Aguilar has been the Brewers’ strongest power hitter. He’s crushed 29 home runs and owns a .280 batting average. Jhoulys Chacin leads the Brewers’ pitching staff, and the Cardinals will face him Sunday. Chacin leads the team in wins (12), ERA (3.72) and strikeouts (119). Joakim Soria, one of the team’s top relievers, went on the disabled list Aug. 10, so the Cardinals will not face him. PROBABLE PITCHERS Friday, 7:15 RH Jack Flaherty (6-6, 3.22 ERA) vs. RH Freddy Peralta (5-3, 4.47) Saturday, 6:15 p.m. RH Miles Mikolas (12-3, 2.85) vs. LH Wade Miley (2-1, 2.23) Sunday, 1:15 p.m. RH John Gant (5-4, 3.74) vs. RH Jhoulys Chacin (12-4, 3.71) Peter Baugh

NATIONALS 5, CARDINALS 4 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .282 Taylor cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Turner ss 5 1 2 0 0 0 .269 Harper cf-rf 5 0 3 3 0 1 .243 Rendon 3b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .294 Soto lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .293 Zimmerman 1b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .257 Murphy 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .307 Glover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wieters c 4 0 0 0 1 0 .219 Roark p 3 2 2 0 0 0 .204 a-Reynolds ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Difo 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Totals 40 5 10 4 4 5 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .274 Molina c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .284 O’Neill rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .310 Ozuna lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .270 DeJong ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .241 Wong 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .237 Bader cf 3 1 2 1 1 1 .285 Garcia 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Weaver p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Ross p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .154 b-Wisdom ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .500 Cecil p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mayers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Martinez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .306 1-Gant pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .045 Totals 33 4 6 3 5 4 Washington 101 210 000 — 5 10 1 Cardinals 001 003 000 — 4 6 3 a-grounded out for Roark in the 7th. b-pinch hit for Ross in the 7th. c-singled for Mayers in the 9th. 1-ran for Martinez in the 9th. E: Rendon (4), Carpenter (10), Wong (5), Ross (2). LOB: Washington 12, Cardinals 7. 2B: Harper (22), O’Neill (2), Wong (14). HR: Bader (9), off Roark. RBIs: Harper 3 (77), Rendon (59), DeJong (37), Wong (29), Bader (23). RLISP: Washington 10 (Eaton, Turner 3, Rendon, Soto, Zimmerman 2, Wieters, Roark); Cardinals 2 (Molina, Garcia). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark 6 5 4 3 3 1 97 4.13 Miller 2 0 0 0 1 2 30 3.76 Glover 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 3.38 Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver 3 2/3 7 4 2 1 1 71 4.67 Ross 3 1/3 2 1 0 2 1 63 4.27 Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.47 Mayers 1 1 0 0 1 2 29 3.92 W: Roark 8-12. L: Weaver 6-11. S: Glover 1-1. H: Miller 7. Inherited runners-scored: Ross 3-2. Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Tripp Gibson; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T: 3:28. A: 38,074 (45,538).

HOW THEY SCORED Nationals first • Turner singles. Harper doubles, Turner scores. One run. Nationals 1, Cardinals 0. Nationals third • Roark singles. Turner singles, Roark to second. Harper singles, Roark to third, Turner to second. Rendon singles, Roark scores, Turner to third, Harper to second. One run. Nationals 2, Cardinals 0. Cardinals third • Bader homers. One run. Nationals 2, Cardinals 1. Nationals fourth • Roark singles. Eaton walks, Roark to second. Turner reaches on an error, Roark to third, Eaton to second. Harper singles, Roark and Eaton score, Turner to second. Two runs. Nationals 4, Cardinals 1. Nationals fourth • Murphy singles. Wieters walks, Murphy to second. Roark reaches on an error, Murphy to third, Wieters to second. Eaton reaches on an error, Murphy scores, Wieters to third, Roark to second. One run. Nationals 5, Cardinals 1. Cardinals sixth O’Neill doubles. Ozuna flies out, O’Neill to third. DeJong singles, O’Neill scores. Wong doubles, DeJong scores. Bader singles, Wong scores on an error. Three runs. Nationals 5, Cardinals 4.

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

NOTEBOOK

Practice makes perfect for Bader Coach McGee says player is always working on defense BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

When Willie McGee arrived with the Cardinals, some of the first coaching he received was a simple, short instruction from manager Whitey Herzog: Take fly balls off the bat. During batting practice, McGee would start in shallow center to practice balls hit over his head one day, and then he’d get liners struck his way the next — all because of an instructor’s suggestion. He hasn’t said the same thing to the Cardinals current outfielders. But he sees it. “This guy,” McGee said of center fielder Harrison Bader. “He works in BP. He’s out there working on balls off the bat. There isn’t a play that I don’t think he can’t make out there. If it’s a ball hit in the air, he’s worked on it.” A root cause of the Cardinals’ recent winning streak has been a substantially more stable defense. Since the All-Star break, the Cardinals have improved from plus-20 Defensive Runs Saved to plus-42, according to Bill James Online. That ranks fifth in the NL, and in August alone they’ve had plus-19 DRS. Bader is in the center of it. The Cardinals’ outfielder has seized an everyday job since Tommy Pham was traded to Tampa Bay in large part because of the ground he covers. In addition to three hits Wednesday night, Bader had a diving catch in center field that kept Washington from scoring two runs. He tracked a fly ball Thursday to make a leaping catch at the center-field wall. By any advanced defensive metric, Bader has been one of the most reliable center fielders in the game, despite playing fewer than 275 innings there. According to Baseball Info Solutions, Bader ranks second in center with plus13 DRS and third in right field at plus-8 DRS. “I’ve always told Willie he’s another set of eyes from the dugout (who) provides a dif-

AVERAGES Batting Wisdom O’Neill J. Martinez Bader Molina Carpenter Ozuna Gyorko DeJong Wong G. Garcia Pena Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .500 6 3 3 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 .310 58 11 18 2 0 3 9 3 25 1 1 .306 395 41 121 21 0 14 69 39 69 0 7 .285 249 47 71 11 1 9 23 22 77 12 1 .284 345 42 98 17 0 15 54 20 50 4 3 .274 424 82 116 33 0 33 68 79 114 1 10 .270 466 49 126 13 2 14 64 28 85 2 3 .254 276 34 70 13 1 9 39 32 60 1 12 .241 286 47 69 16 1 13 37 27 77 0 9 .237 283 35 67 14 2 8 29 23 49 4 5 .229 144 14 33 6 0 3 12 16 31 1 4 .206 107 8 22 2 0 2 7 4 32 1 1 .252 4158 556 1047 184 7 155 533 403 1004 47 95

Pitching Hudson Shreve Ross Poncedeleon Mikolas Gomber Hicks Norris Flaherty Gant Mayers Weaver Cecil Team

W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 3 0 0.87 9 0 0 10.1 4 1 1 0 4 6 1 0 1.69 6 0 0 5.1 4 1 1 1 1 7 1 0 1.93 2 1 0 9.1 6 3 2 0 4 5 0 0 2.16 5 1 1 16.2 8 4 4 2 9 9 12 3 2.85 24 24 0 151.1 133 52 48 11 26 102 3 0 2.89 21 4 0 37.1 29 14 12 3 19 32 3 3 2.93 56 0 4 61.1 42 22 20 1 28 49 3 3 3.14 51 0 23 48.2 42 19 17 5 10 59 6 6 3.22 19 19 0 103.1 76 40 37 15 36 127 5 4 3.74 18 11 0 74.2 58 38 31 6 31 65 2 1 3.92 39 0 1 43.2 43 20 19 5 12 38 6 11 4.67 24 24 0 125.1 134 69 65 16 44 112 0 1 5.47 28 0 0 24.2 29 17 15 2 18 15 66 56 3.75 122 122 31 1098.0 999 507 458 107 420 988

ferent perspective for me,” Bader told KMOX late Wednesday in a “Star of the Game” interview. “When you have four eyes on the ball, it’s a lot easier than just two.” At least once a series, Bader takes the field early to work on his throws to bases from center. At new ballparks, he’ll go out on the field and scout the caroms off the wall and the look from the gaps, as he did in Kansas City before reading and reacting to a ricochet that kept the Royals from advancing in last weekend’s sweep. McGee said Bader and Pham made such BP and early work part of their routine, and in the past month Marcell Ozuna has also been working through similar drills. Ozuna and Bader are directing traffic in the outfield during games. Each outfielder has a sheet of paper with spray probabilities available to him, and with more playing time Bader has become better

at reading bat angles, Yadier Molina’s pitchcalling, and tendencies so that McGee said he’s shifting and shading before the dugout tells him. Several times during an interview Thursday, McGee described how he was growing as a rookie coach right along with the rookie center fielder, learning new things to cover, new advice to give. He was asked what Bader could grow into. “The guy is good, Gold Glove-caliber now,” McGee said. “We’ve had a lot of them here. The Van Slykes. Vince Coleman — people don’t give him credit, but he was an excellent outfielder. Ray (Lankford). All these guys. Jim (Edmonds). He’s got a chance man, and he works. I have no doubt he’s got a chance. I like to say that. But I don’t like to crown (him), not yet.”

WAINO THROWS TWO Adam Wainwright’s two scoreless innings Thursday and his next outing for a minorleague affiliate will shape how the team intends to use him when he returns to the majors, possibly with the arrival of September. Wainwright made his second start this week for High-A Palm Beach in Jupiter, Fla., and for the PB-Cards struck out three in two innings. Wainwright threw 31 pitches, 19 of which were strikes. The team’s affiliate said his fastball reached 92 mph. The Cardinals’ veteran starter has spent most of the season recovering from elbow soreness and inflammation that sapped him of his velocity and placed him on the disabled list. He has pitched three innings on his rehab assignment, and his first was so abbreviated (nine pitches) that he had to reach his pitch count (20 pitches) with 11 throws after his outing. “We’ll evaluate how he feels, see how he recovers, and then look to push it forward,” Cardinals manager Mike Shildt said. “Could he start? We’ll see how he gets built up. We’ll have a better understanding after this one and the next one where he’s headed and what makes sense for him and for us.”

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

The Cardinals’ Harrison Bader is greeted by Greg Garcia after hitting a third-inning solo home run on Thursday night at Busch Stadium.

Cardinals’ late rally falls short in loss to Nationals CARDINALS • FROM C1

“not our cleanest.” “Completely uncharacteristic,” manager Mike Shildt said. “Proved that there is a human element to this game. A couple of plays that we expect to make and will make and didn’t go our way for a little bit there. We regrouped, started playing back to the baseball we know they can.” The Cardinals took one step back in the wild-card race just as the team they’re chasing arrives for a vital three-game series. The Cardinals (66-56) entered Thursday tied in losses with Milwaukee (68-55), but after the loss start the Brewers visit trailing them by 1 ½ games in the wildcard stand. A series win would move the Cardinals a half game back. A series sweep and the Cardinals would leave the weekend with a hold on one of the wildcard berths less than three weeks after slipping nine games back in the National League Central race. How they broke free from the gravitational pull of .500 was equal parts pesky offense — 21 of 30 runs during one stretch were scored with two outs — and run prevention. The defense and bullpen have been two of the best in baseball since the start of August, and those are the cornerstones of the Cardinals’ NL-best 12-3 record in August. During the Cardinals’ eight-game winning streak, the starter got the win in seven of the games, and the lone starter not to be a part of the streak at all was Thursday’s, Luke Weaver. Weaver missed his scheduled start Sunday because of a cut on

his finger, but his readiness before his turn came up again allowed the Cardinals to massage the schedule for a matchup. Jack Flaherty moved back to Friday to start against the Brewers. At the same time, Carlos Martinez (shoulder) will begin a rehab assignment at Class AA Springfield, John Brebbia (forearm) is starting one at Class AAA Memphis, and Michael Wacha (oblique) is set to follow with his rehab assignment this weekend. More movement on the pitching staff is ahead, and both Weaver and long reliever Tyson Ross had three-inning auditions Thursday for that fifth spot in the rotation. “I felt strong. I felt ready to go. I felt fresh,” Weaver said. “I felt all of those things.” What he didn’t feel was his rhythm. Weaver described a hitch in his delivery that had the pitch leaving his fingertips too early or too late. The result was falling behind in counts or falling into lengthy innings. Since returning to the rotation in late July, Weaver has had oscillating results — abbreviated outings followed by a quality start. With Ross new to the team, Weaver had a quality start in Miami. This start was the truncated one. Weaver (6-11) limited the trouble after a one-out double in the first inning. He sped through the second, and then four singles plunged him back into jeopardy in the third. Ross started to warm up for his bid, but Weaver got two flyouts to end the inning and press on. In the fourth inning, Weaver retired the first two batters he faced. A single and a walk invited trouble and Weaver re-

sponded by getting the groundball he needed, off the bat and out of central casting. Kolten Wong fielded what could be the final out. Wong threw to first for what should be the final out. The throw was low, and it stayed in the dirt, not Matt Carpenter’s glove, for what wasn’t the final out. Instead of being out of the inning, Weaver was out of the game, and Bryce Harper stung a two-run single to put the Nats ahead 4-1. “He’s getting through traffic,” Shildt said. “You think gosh there’s something to work on there. You always want to give the guy credit because this guy makes pitches. He was able to escape some stressful innings without a lot of damage. … Higher pitch count. His third stress inning, third time through the order, in the fourth inning.” Ross allowed the single to Harper and then went on for 3 1/3 innings. The lone run he allowed proved to be the difference, and it scored as a result of an error at second base. Throughout the game, circumstance as much as execution greased Washington’s offense. Harper’s RBI double in the first hugged the line and was touched by a fan as Trea Turner headed home. The Cardinals opted not to challenge because Shildt felt the judgment call of umpires would have put Turner at home anyway. Shildt did challenge in the fourth inning that the second run on Harper’s single got to the plate before Yadier Molina’s glove got to Adam Eaton’s cleat. Replay affirmed the call; the 4-1

lead stood. It did not endure, however. Harrison Bader’s solo homer in the third cut into Tanner Roark’s start, and the Cardinals, with the aid of an error, bit deeper in the sixth. Paul DeJong hit an RBI single and then scored from first on Kolten Wong’s RBI double. Wong scooted home on a throwing error Bader’s speed helped coax. All of the runs came with two outs. Which is where the Cardinals found themselves in the ninth inning. Despite having a former All-Star closer the Cardinals are paying $14 million for this season and four other players on their team this season with 29-save seasons, the Nationals did not have an active reliever Thursday with a single save. Koda Glover got the ninth (and his first save) only after a two-out rally started. Pinch-hitter Jose Martinez looped a single to right field to get the game to Matt Carpenter, whose bruised hand from the previous night had faded. Carpenter worked a walk to reach base as the winning run and bring Molina to the plate. Glover got a fly out to keep the Cardinals from overcoming themselves. “The offense is going to show up at some point, whether it’s in the first, or the fifth, or the ninth, or even past the ninth,” Bader said. “We were just a little short. I think you’re only as good as your next game, and your next approach and your next at-bat. We’re definitely headed in the right direction.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Oquendo has no desire to manage FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

place, he almost was like a protector of me,” Shildt said. “He was very close to me. He was there for me. He was present for me. He was available for me. We have great conversation. I trust him a ton. Why wouldn’t you?” Oquendo had come up in a roundabout way. Shildt had referenced him as an example while answering a question about the youth movement that has helped carry the Cardinals back toward contention. The up-and-comers have demanded our attention. That the veterans have embraced their ascension should not go overlooked. Shildt, 50, recalled a conversation he shared with Yadier Molina more than five years ago. Shildt had often wondered how Molina started to emerge as a leader so early in his career. How did a 21-year-old win over his teammates? Molina cited his family legacy and his minor-league mentors. But, Shildt recalled, Molina said the biggest help came from within the Cardinals clubhouse. Larry Walker, Scott Rolen, Albert Pujols and Jim Edmonds had been willing to help. “Whether it’s scouting or player development, people appreciate and want to share their information,” Shildt said of the Cardinals. “It’s a special thing for veteran players who want to do that. Yadi continues to pay it forward. (Matt) Carpenter pays it forward.” Shildt then told another story, the one about finding low-A first baseman Matt Adams taking groundballs alongside Albert Pujols for an hour every day before spring training games. Adams wanted Pujols’ job. Pujols wanted to help, and compete. One coach, Oquendo, observed those drills. Oquendo has made a career of paying it forward. Here he goes once again. “He’s doing great,” Oquendo said of Shildt. “He’s doing everything he’s supposed to be doing, everything a good manager would do.” Oquendo knows some fans were fuming when he was not promoted to interim manager. Those backing him should hear this loud and clear: Oquendo is throwing his support behind Shildt. “I think the Cardinals have the right guy in Mike,” Oquendo said. “I think, to me, in my opinion, they should decide now and make him the manager. He’s a real good one. I don’t think they should miss him.” Oquendo, 55, said he is not interested in becoming a manager. President of baseball operations John Mozeliak had this information when he fired former manager Mike Matheny and promoted Shildt. Oquendo’s stance isn’t going to change. “I already told Mo, even before spring training, when we met about me coming back, that I wasn’t going to think about managing,” Oquendo said. “I told Mike Matheny that. Don’t worry about me trying to get a job. I’m not looking for that.” He doesn’t have a hint of interest? “No,” Oquendo said. The Secret Weapon shot a look that declared the topic dead. What he was happy to discuss, however, was his favorite candidate for the job. “He’s legit,” Oquendo said. “The staff and everybody are pulling together, on the same page. We are giving our opinions. He’s listening.” Oquendo said he first noticed Shildt’s attention to detail years ago, and compared him, with a laugh, to an observant school teacher. Shildt described his relationship with the third-base coach as an “accountable” one. Shildt said Oquendo has “earned autonomy” when it comes to pulling levers, and described a sense that the two “share the same brain.” That doesn’t mean they always agree. In fact, it’s the disagreements that often lead to the most meaningful conversations. “It improved a lot. Tremendously,” Oquendo said of communication among Cardinals players and coaches since Shildt’s promotion. “The preparation before and during the game is unbelievable. ” “He will have his own opinion, and share it with me,” Shildt explained. “And I will embrace that. I appreciate that. He does it, obviously, respectfully. And it goes both ways. That’s a healthy workplace, when people can do that. As he says, if we always know what the mission is — and the mission is to win championships here — and everybody works off that mission, then you can’t help but be in a good spot. It’s all healthy. I can’t say enough about the guy. He has been a true supporter. I can’t thank him enough.” Shildt can now thank Oquendo for a ringing endorsement. He might also want to start leaning on Oquendo to stick around. Oquendo has another knee that needs surgery. His home in Florida, where minor leaguers always need his help, beckons. “I really don’t know how long,” Oquendo said when asked how many more seasons he will spend in St. Louis. “But it’s not going to be long. I don’t know. I’ve got to go home (this offseason), sit down with my wife, and make a decision.” One more question: Would he be more likely to return if Shildt is the manager? “Yeah,” Oquendo said. “Probably.” Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

NFL NOTEBOOK

Dez Bryant visits Cleveland All-Pro WR was cut by Dallas in April

ready on Denver’s roster. “We offered him a contract. He didn’t take it,” Elway said. “And as I said at my deposition (in Kaepernick’s collusion lawsuit against the NFL) — and I don’t know if I’m legally able to say this — but he’s had his chance to be here. He passed.” Kaepernick declined to take a pay cut from his $11.9 million salary to facilitate a trade to the Broncos in 2016 following Peyton Manning’s retirement.

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Dez Bryant is getting to know the Cleveland Browns better and vice versa. The three-time Pro Bowl wide receiver visited the team’s headquarters in Berea, Ohio, on Thursday, and there’s a chance the meeting could lead to Bryant signing with Cleveland. Before sitting down with team officials, Bryant posted a photo on Twitter signing autographs at Cleveland’s airport. Later, he stopped in the studio of the team’s inhouse radio show and gave an on-air update of his stopover. “I’m happy to be here, you know excited, you know just trying to work out some things,” Bryant said. “It’s a lovely place.” The 29-year-old was released by the Dallas Cowboys after eight seasons in April and has been waiting to latch on with another team. He turned down a threeyear contract offer from the Baltimore Ravens, who may still have interest. The Browns have plenty of room under the salary cap to offer Bryant a multi-year deal. However, they may opt to sign him to a short-term contract. The Browns also must decide if they’re ready to take on a player who clashed with Cowboys coaches. Last week, general manager John Dorsey, who has been looking for more receiving help because of the uncertainty surrounding troubled star Josh Gordon, said he had been trying to contact Bryant with no success. Gordon is away from the team to work on his health. After Dorsey reached out to Bryant through the media, Bryant posted on Twitter that he intended to visit the Browns. Several Cleveland players, including starting quarterback Tyrod Taylor and standout receiver Jarvis Landry, have said

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jets rookie QB Sam Darnold completed 8 of 11 passes for 62 yards in his first start.

they’d like to see Bryant in a Browns uniform. “That would be awesome,” Taylor said following Cleveland’s exhibition opener. “We know what type of talent Dez brings to the football field. He’s been a very, very good player in his time throughout this league, and he adds talent to the wide receiver room. I hope it can get done, but that’s up to management. I definitely think he could help this team.” Landry, who is close to Bryant, added: “He’d be a great addition to our team and our offense for sure.” Bryant, who caught 69 passes for 838 yards and six touchdowns last year, has been one of the NFL’s top deep threats for years, amassing 531 catches for 7,459 yards and 73 TDs. No Kaepernick for Elway’s Broncos • John Elway might find himself in the market for a veteran backup quarterback soon, yet there’s one man who won’t be getting a call: Colin Kaepernick . “Colin had his chance to be here,” GM Elway said Thursday when asked if the former 49ers QB would be an option if he decides Case Keenum’s backup isn’t al-

Eagles’ Foles exits with shoulder injury • Philadelphia quarterback Nick Foles left Thursday’s exhibition game against the New England Patriots with a shoulder strain. The Super Bowl MVP, who played for the St. Louis Rams in 2015, appeared to be in pain when he was hit by Patriots defensive lineman and Webster Groves High product Adrian Clayborn in the right arm as he reared back to throw in the first half. The ball popped loose, and linebacker Ja’Whaun Bentley scooped it up and ran it back for a 54-yard touchdown. Foles took over for starter Carson Wentz last season and took Philadelphia to the Super Bowl, beating the Patriots 41-33. Wentz is expected to return to 11-on-11 drills next week, but it’s not certain he will be ready for the regular-season opener. Prior to the game, Eagles defensive backs Malcolm Jenkins and De’Vante Bausby remained in the tunnel and defensive lineman Micahel Bennett stayed in the locker room during the national anthem. There were no player protests before Thursday’s Jets-Redskins and SteelersPackers games. Jets’ Darnold makes first start • Rookie QB Sam Darnold, the third overall pick in May’s draft, started for the New York Jets in their preseason game at Washington Thursday. Darnold, the third QB in the team’s opener last week, completed 8 of 11 passes for 62 yards and had an interception as the Redskins rallied for a 15-13 win on Dustin Hopkins’ field goal as time expired.

After 3 torn ACLs, Benes maintains passion BENES • FROM C1

Louis University in the spring, and he’ll carry with him perspective he lacked as a 17-year-old phenom. §§§ The St. Louis Prospects high school summer team featured two future first-round picks and eight players who went on to Division I schools. Even amid the abundance of talent, Benes was the star. In the summer of 2013, the Prospects played a game at Pittsburg State in Kansas, and Nolan Gromacki — a pitcher from Kansas City who later signed with Mizzou — fired Benes a first-pitch fastball. The ball darted off Benes’ bat and soared over the left field fence. “You can only imagine where a healthy Shane Benes would have gone in the draft,” Gromacki said. As a junior at Westminster, Benes hit .417 with 11 home runs. Prospect lists suggested he’d be a top-three round pick, and representatives from pro teams visited his house. But half a year after taking Gromacki deep, Benes lay on the hardwood court at Lutheran North, writhing in pain. He had torn his right ACL, dashing his draft hopes. He would have to attend Mizzou, the school he committed to but never expected to play for. Before leaving St. Louis to join the Tigers’ baseball team, Benes started taking medication to treat depression and anxiety. He was cleared to play in the fall, but he tore his ACL again warming up for a fall scrimmage. “He only knew baseball, and he didn’t have a backup plan,” said Bailey Benes, Shane’s older sister. “Having that possibility taken away from him, potentially, was just devastating.” The injuries sent Benes on a four-year journey of catch-up. He chased shadows of the player he was supposed to be, and the burden tortured him. The summer after his freshman year, Benes played in the Cape Cod League, a summer hotspot for the nation’s best college players. He was still adjusting after his surgery and struggled against top-notch talent. He returned to Missouri with sinking confidence and a sub-.200 summer batting average. “I had missed so much time that year and a half,” Benes said. “I couldn’t adjust as quickly as I wanted to, just because of the lack of repetitions I had.” The pressure weighed on Benes. His self worth became tied to how well he played, and he struggled. When Mizzou’s season ended, Benes walked into coach Tim Jamieson’s office and quit the team while speaking through tears. He faced his Missouri teammates, including Gromacki, a few days later. “When I talk about Shane to people,” Gromacki said, “it’s like, ‘He was pretty much the best Missouri Tiger that never was.” §§§ Shane Benes did not expect to play baseball again, but a pitch from Nic Perkins changed his mind. Perkins, a Francis Howell product who played with Benes on the Prospects, was transferring from Ole Miss to Drury, a Division II school in Springfield. He convinced Benes to look into joining the team,

PHOTO COURTESY OF DRURY ATHLETICS

Shane Benes stands in the batter’s box for Drury, a Division II school in Springfield, Mo.

too. “We’re going to get these guys for one year, and they’re going to get a chance to play professionally,” Drury coach Scott Nasby remembers thinking. Perkins got his shot at pro ball — the Nationals drafted him last year — but Benes still hasn’t. He set a Drury singleseason record with 12 home runs, but his anxiety grew unbearable. He rarely felt excited trotting around the bases. Benes smacked three home runs in an April doubleheader against William Jewell, but he couldn’t shake what had become a sense of dread. The next day, he returned to St. Louis. He didn’t know when — or if — he’d come back to Drury, and draft implications didn’t stop him from going home. He had to take care of himself. Within a few weeks of his return to St. Louis, Benes tore his ACL for the third time during a workout. He vowed he was done with baseball. This time, he didn’t foresee a change in heart. §§§ Even while working as a personal trainer at the Balls and Strikes facility in Chesterfield, Benes hated the sound of bat hitting ball. He spent most of his time leading workouts for clients in the weight room, but the cacophony of pings never died, a constant reminder of the game he lost. Benes didn’t touch a baseball for half a year after his third ACL tear. The injury left him immobile and depressed. Bailey Benes described her brother as numb. For the first time in since high school, Benes was in St. Louis for an extended period of time, which helped him grow closer with family. He moved into an apartment with Bailey and enrolled in classes at Fontbonne. “I still felt like something was missing,” Benes said. “I had loved something and put so much work into something my whole life, and then it just stopped one day.” He rehabbed his knee as high school friends heard their names called in the MLB Draft. He had weekly appointments with two pastors to talk over his emotional struggles. Benes’ turning point came this past winter. Jimmy Obertop, a Westmin-

ster player, approached him at Balls and Strikes. He wanted to hit and was wondering if Benes could throw batting practice. “To be honest, I didn’t really want to do it,” Benes said. But he did, and as he tossed balls into Obertop’s wooden bat, a sense of peace washed over him. The desire to play hadn’t returned, but he felt like he could spend time around the game again. A few weeks later, Obertop challenged Benes to a home run derby in the batting cage. Benes hadn’t swung in months, but he obliged. Balls zoomed off his bat, and he won the derby. Benes still had it. §§§ As weeks passed after the contest with Obertop, Benes started to swing more and more. He signed up to play summer ball in the Metro Collegiate League in St. Louis, which primarily consists of local college players. A year removed from his last game at Drury, Benes led the league with five home runs and a .419 batting average. He looked rusty at points, but fans saw flashes of the old Shane. “He’s absolutely the type of caliber athlete that has what it takes and has always had what it takes,” Gromacki said. “Fate needs to let him be for long enough to get there.” The SLU coach watched a few of Benes’ summer games, and he offered him a spot on the team. The Billikens have a competitive Division I program — they played in an NCAA regional in 2017 — and Benes will remain near his family in St. Louis. Negative emotions still bother Benes every once in awhile, but he is in a good spot overall. He’s found an off-field passion in personal training, and he’s confident he can live successfully beyond baseball. Benes’ goal is the same as it was four years ago — the big leagues — but pressure has lifted. The passion is back. “I think the only reason I love it is because I actually know now that it is a game,” Benes says. “Not my life.” Peter Baugh @Peter_Baugh on Twitter pbaugh@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 1

Snedeker shoots 59 at Wyndham ‘It was really special’ to become 10th in tour history to break 60

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

FOOTBALL • PRESEASON TOP 10 RANKINGS COUNTDOWN NO. 8 LARGE SCHOOL • HAZELWOOD CENTRAL

Hawks maintain lofty expectations with new coach and rebuilt roster LARGE SCHOOLS TOP 10 10. Ladue 9. Pattonville 8. Hazelwood Central Note: Previous stories are on STLhighschoolsports. com; the No. 1 team will be published Aug. 24

BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

FLORISSANT • The Ha-

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Brandt Snedeker reacts after making a birdie putt on the ninth to secure his 59 in the first round.

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GREENSBORO, N.C. • Brandt Snedeker predicted

low scores at the Wyndham Championship — but not this low. Snedeker shot an 11-under 59 on Thursday, falling one shot shy of matching the PGA Tour record. He made a 20-foot putt on his final hole to become the 10th player in tour history to break 60. Jim Furyk set the record with a 58 in the final round of the Travelers Championship in 2016. “I better be smiling,” Snedeker said. “I don’t do this every day.” This is the third consecutive year the PGA Tour has had a sub-60 round. Snedeker is the first to shoot 59 since Adam Hadwin in the third round of the 2017 Careerbuilder Challenge. It gave him a four-stroke lead after one round. Ryan Moore and John Oda shot 63s, and Martin Flores, D.A. Points, Brett Stegmaier, David Hearn, Abraham Ancer, Ollie Schniederjans and Jonathan Byrd had 64s. Snedeker — who said a day earlier that the tournament would turn into a “birdie-fest” — began the round at par-70 Sedgefield Country Club with a bogey at No. 10, and took off from there. He played the front nine in 27, including an eagle 2 on the par-4 sixth hole when he holed out from 176 yards. After that shot, Snedeker said a 59 felt like a real possibility. He remembered a non-tour event he played in China in which he was one putt from that score, but those thoughts “got in the way.” “To know what you’re trying to do and step up and have a 20-footer (on the final hole) and know what it means, I was very aware of what was going on, and to knock that putt in was really special,” Snedeker said. Snedeker, the 2012 FedEx Cup champ, won the Wyndham in 2007. He broke Si Woo Kim’s 2-yearold Wyndham record of 60 and had the best opening round in this event’s history. Arjun Atwal had a 61 in 2010. “The trick for him is, he’s playing great. Now he’s just got to rest, relax and start over tomorrow from scratch and go play three more good rounds,” said Furyk, who also shot a 59 at the BMW Championship in 2013. “It’s awesome to see.” It’s been a somewhat frustrating, turbulent year for Snedeker. He has three top-10 finishes and two missed cuts in his last seven events and has not won on tour since 2016. During his first 16 tournaments of the season, he finished in the top 10 just once. “Nobody could see this coming — trust me,” Snedeker said. At No. 80 on the points list entering the final event of the tour’s regular season, he’s nowhere near the playoff bubble and his spot at The Northern Trust next week in New Jersey seems safe. But that ranking is his lowest since the tour’s postseason format debuted in 2007. During his tie for 42nd at the PGA Championship last week in St. Louis, Snedeker says he “kind of found something” when he simplified some swing fundamentals and began to feel better about that part of his game. Then, he spent the first round showing it off. Snedeker, who began his round on the back nine, reeled off four consecutive birdies on Nos. 13-16. He then got even hotter on his final nine holes, with six birdies in addition to the shot of the day on No. 6. But he missed a 3-foot birdie putt on No. 8 that would have made a 58 possible. “Could have been even more special,” he said, “but happy with the way everything turned out.”

GOLF ROUNDUP World’s top three lose at U.S. Amateur Jesus Montenegro of Argentina, the 998th-ranked amateur in the world, toppled top-ranked Braden Thornberry of Olive Branch, Mississippi, 2 and 1 in the U.S. Amateur on Wednesday at Pebble Beach as the world’s top three amateurs lost in the round of 64. The 21-year-old Montenegro is coming off his freshman season at Jacksonville State, and has college coach James Hobbs with him at Pebble Beach as his caddie. Jason Suh of San Jose, the No. 2-ranked amateur and an All-American this year as a junior at USC, fell 1 up to Harrison Ott of Brookfield, Wisconsin, a sophomore at Vanderbilt. John Augenstein of Owensboro, Kentucky, a sophomore at Vanderbilt, beat No. 3-ranked Collin Morikawa of La Canada-Flintridge, a senior at Cal, in 19 holes. Salas ties course record, takes lead at Indy LPGA • Lizette Salas matched the Brickyard Crossing record with a 10-under 62 in the Indy Women in Tech Championship, birdieing the final three holes for a two-stroke lead over fast-starting Angel Yin and Japan’s Nasa Hataoka. Yin birdied eight of the first nine holes in her morning round for a front-nine 8-under 28 — one short of the LPGA Tour’s nine-hole record. It matched the third-lowest ninehole score in relation to par in tour history. Sordet leads Nordea Masters • Clement Sordet opened with four straight birdies to shoot 8-under 62 and take the first-round lead of the Nordea Masters. The Frenchman, who shot his lowest European Tour round, has a two-stroke lead over Scott Jamieson of Scotland and Lee Slattery of England. Hunter Stewart is the highest-placed American after a 5-under 65 left him in a four-way tie for fourth with Christofer Blomstrand, Tapio Pulkkanen and Richard Green. Associated Press

zelwood Central football players were on their own. When Brent Chojnacki resigned as Central’s coach to take over the same job at Francis Howell in April, the returning Hawks knew it would take some time for a new coach to be hired. Time they didn’t have to sit around and wait. “It was mainly us seniors trying to get together and get these guys in the weight room,” Central senior Keon Cross said. “We knew we were going to get a new coach. We just wanted to make sure we were right and ready for the season.” The seniors quickly found herding the rest of their team to voluntary offseason workouts was tough. They decided to divide and conquer. “We had to rely on juniors and sophomores. We told them, ‘Make sure you get all your guys to come,’ ” Cross said. “We wanted everybody to be here. We knew it was going to take a family type thing. (The seniors) couldn’t just do it ourselves.” When Carey Davis was named Central’s new coach May 16, he inherited a senior class that is desperate to win and willing to work to make it happen. He also inherited a roster that graduated 36 seniors and returns only a few starters on either side of the ball. Central is the No. 8 large school in the STLhigh-

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Keon Cross (35) is a returning defensive standout but is one of the only players back for Hazelwood Central under first-year coach Carey Davis.

schoolsports.com preseason rankings. “As soon as Coach Davis got here we were trying to buy in to what he was selling and the system he was trying to incorporate,” senior receiver and linebacker Darius Watson said. “We bought in really well. Since this is our last year we want to go out with a bang.” A perennial championship contender, Central has had its last three seasons end at the hands of CBC in the district championship game. The Hawks are a combined 30-6 in the three previous seasons and three of those defeats came when they were freshmen. Knowing their regularseason success has not satisfied them, they are finding their limits and surpassing them at every opportunity in the offseason and at preseason practice. “What we’re trying to push is when we get to that point (in districts) we can’t

let up,” Watson said. “We can’t let up at practice, no off days, no nothing. We have to keep going every single snap, every single practice. We have to keep grinding. We know what our expectations are.” The expectations are always high at Central. That is nothing new for Davis, who graduated from Central in 1999. What is new at Central? Everything else. Davis has completely revamped the offensive and defensive schemes. He brought in a different coaching staff. The roster has turned over significantly. This transition differs from last season when Chojnacki was promoted from within the coaching staff to replace Van Vannatta, who was hired at Rock Bridge in Columbia after the 2016 season. “The first coaching change wasn’t really that different. We ran the same

offense, the same defense,” Cross said. “With Davis it’s different. It’s turned up.” The relationship between the players and Davis is unique for Central. Davis is the first AfricanAmerican head coach in the program’s illustrious history. The players are predominantly AfricanAmerican. Davis’ life experience mirrors many of the players and that resonates with them. “It’s a different connection,” senior wide receiver Jordan Tate said. The Hawks will have to be disciplined and on point if they hope to accomplish their goal of winning a district championship and chasing a state title. They brought back Cross, who had a team-high 108 tackles at linebacker last season. This year he’s moved to safety. Just about everyone else is getting their first extended look at varsity time. Only time will tell if these Hawks have what it takes to get over the hump. “We’ve been putting in a lot of work. The guys have been getting after it,” Davis said. “Our expectations are to work hard and the fun will come when you’re winning games.”

NO. 8 SMALL SCHOOL • LUTHERAN SOUTH

Lancers hope to continue momentum that paved way to Class 3 semifinals SMALL SCHOOLS TOP 10 10. McCluer South-Berkeley 9. Columbia 8. Lutheran South Note: Previous stories are on STLhighschoolsports. com; the No. 1 team will be published Aug. 24

BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

For the first time in 33 years, the Lutheran South football team is a defending district champion. Take a moment and let that marinate. During those three-plus decades, there were many valleys and few peaks for the Lancers. They were the perennial doormat in the ABC League and its current reincarnation as the Metro League. There were winless seasons. There were seasons so painful it was a fight just to get to the end. T h o s e t i m e s h ave passed. Behind a strong senior class that reset the mindset of the program, Lutheran South finished 9-4, won a district title and advanced to the Class 3 state semifinals to equal the highwater mark the program reached twice before. With a strong core of players returning and the experience of a lengthy playoff run in its pocket, Lutheran South is the No. 8 small school in the STLhighschoolsports.com preseason rankings. For the second time in three years, the Lancers have a new head coach. Derrick Colquitt was promoted to the top job after serving as the offensive coordinator last season. Colquitt replaces Jameson Allen, who spent two sea-

MICHAEL GULLEDGE • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Vito Orlando (2) returns at quarterback after helping Lutheran South reach the Class 3 semifinals last season.

Scott (6-3, 160) caught 24 passes for 375 yards and five scores. A four-year starter, he also will play in the defensive backfield where he had three interceptions last season. Junior cornerback Jabari Harris (5-10, 150) had 45 tackles last season. Washington had 85 tackles and 10 sacks last season at linebacker. He’ll be joined by junior David Howard (5-10, 175) and sophomore Cam Offerman (5-9, 160). Sophomore defensive end Cam Weiler (6-3, 200) had eight tackles for loss and four sacks while starting as a freshman. Senior Joseph Schmid (5-10, 165) and Orlando will see time at safety. Since Lutheran South committed resources to bettering its program in 2011, expectations have been raised. Now the Lancers have players who achieved those goals and want to sustain success. “A lot of these guys were involved in the run last year. They saw the work,” Colquitt said. “They’re ready.”

sons as South’s head coach. Colquitt is well traveled in the area. He graduated University City in 2000 and played football at Lindenwood. He then coached in various roles at U. City, Normandy, Chaminade and McCluer North before making the leap to Washington University, where he coached running backs. Last season was his first with Lutheran South. This also be his second season with senior quarterback Vito Orlando (6-foot-2, 185 pounds). A three-year starter who saw spot time as a freshman, Orlando threw for 2,393 yards, 30 touchdowns and was intercepted 12 times last season. He rushed for 358 yards and five touchdowns, too. Colquitt said he and Orlando clicked early last

season and that bond has only grown stronger. Orlando’s ability to read a defense and make adjustments have improved. “He’s so comfortable at the line,” Colquitt said. “He knows how to lead and we’re looking for big things from him this year.” The offensive line returns five guys who saw significant time either last season or the season before. Junior left tackle Jacob Taylor (6-1, 275) was a first-team all-conference selection. “He’s definitely one of the anchors,” Colquitt said. Senior left guard Jake Sherrill (6-3, 330), senior center Seth Day, senior right guard A’ron Washington (6-1, 215) and senior right tackle Caden Ritter fill out the offensive line. Senior receiver Derrick

SCOREBOARD

nelly, 76; 34. Riley Sieron, 80; 35. Andersyn Foster, 82

THURSDAY’S RESULTS

— BOYS GOLF MADISON COUNTY TOURNAMENT At Belk Park (par 72) Team totals: 1. Edwardsville 311, 2. Alton Marquette 321, 3. Granite City 338, 4. Highland 339, 5. Triad 341, 6. Alton 348, 6. Collinsville 348, 8. Roxana 396, 9. Wood River 413, 10. Metro-East Lutheran 423, 11. Civic Memorial 464 Leading individuals: 1. Kolten Bauer, Alton Marquette, 68; 2. (tie) Blake Burris, Edwardsville; and Nate Frey, Edwardsville, 77; 4. (tie) Trevor Laub, Edwardsville; and Clayton Mallard, Highland, 78. Team scores Edwardsville (311): 2. Blake Burris, 77; 2. Nate Frey, 77; 4. Trevor Laub, 78; 6. Ben Patterson, 79; 8. Zach Trimpe, 82; 26. Hayden Moore, 89 Alton Marquette (321): 1. Kolten Bauer, 68; 7. Sam Cogan, 81; 15. William Roderfeld, 85; 21. Jack Warren, 87; 47. Grant Heinz, 102; 50. Nick Wooden, 105 Granite City (338): 13. Brady Charbonier, 84; 13. Sam Wielgus, 84; 15. Cameron Rubenacker, 85; 15. Bennett Smallie, 85; 26. Nathan Merz, 89; 35. Simon Maxfield, 91 Highland (339): 4. Clayton Mallard, 78; 11. Evan Sutton, 83; 26. Connor Reinarman, 89; 26. Ethan Fenton, 89; 38. Jake Brauns, 94; 41. Jaxton Black, 98 Triad (341): 8. Tyler Flesher, 82; 11. Ryan Larson, 83; 20. Garrett Wood, 86; 30. Destin Patek, 90; 35. Matt Weiss, 91; 40.

Trey Moss, 96 Alton (348): 15. Austin Olson, 85; 15. Dylan Lahue, 85; 22. Tyler Hazelwood, 88; 30. Aiden Keshner, 90; 30. Clayton Pilger, 90; 43. Chase Alford, 99 Collinsville (348): 8. Nate Lee, 82; 22. Nick Garofalo, 88; 22. Greg Witte, 88; 30. Noah Scrum, 90; 37. Noah Carroll, 92; 45. Mason Wasser, 101 Roxana (396): 30. Matt Marcuzzo, 90; 41. Brandon Kelly, 98; 45. Christian Bertoletti, 101; 51. Zack Stanger, 107 Wood River (413): 22. Keegan Rigdon, 88; 47. CJ Mullnally, 102; 53. Austin Compton, 110; 54. Alex Dilks, 113; 55. Carson Reef, 114 Metro-East Lutheran (423): 38. Antonio Ybarra, 94; 49. Adam Sahuri, 104; 52. Ben Ide, 108; 56. Josh Faulders, 117; 60. Cameron Gusewelle, 126; 61. Jack Behrhorst, 133 Civic Memorial (464): 43. Nick Williams, 99; 57. Jake Cheatham, 119; 58. Cade Foster, 123; 58. Ethan Allison, 123; 61. Blake Hilliard, 133; 63. Clayton Law, 199

Caden Cannon, 40; 6. Ethan Ourada, 41; 6. Josh Krneta, 41; 25. Blake Holliday, 48; 30. Kyle Dismukes, 49 Althoff (166): 3. Jack Bruening, 39; 6. Avery Irwin, 41; 10. George Orlet, 42; 15. Connor Wilson, 44; 15. Kaleb Laramore, 44; 25. Carlo Amorado, 48 Columbia (167): 1. Jeremy Obregon, 38; 3. Nathan Bostick, 39; 17. Justin Budde, 45; 17. Jesse Griffin, 45; 22. Cam Noawk, 47; 33. Bryce Vogt, 52 Belleville East (176): 6. Dillon Donjon, 41; 10. Zach Gebhardt, 42; 17. Hogan Messinger, 45; 25. Richard Boyer , 48; 32. Alex Agne, 51 Belleville West (177): 12. Alex Woods, 43; 12. Max Hutchinson, 43; 17. Colin Shea, 45; 21. Dylan Fox, 46; 25. Tommy Dibadj, 48; 31. Jacob Cooper, 50 Freeburg (185): 12. Drew McKillip, 43; 22. Owen Smith, 47; 22. Ethan Smith, 47; 25. Andy Sebol, 48; 34. Hayden Ott, 54; 35. Henry Carpenter, 61

GOALBY/HAAS CLASSIC At St. Clair Country Club (9 holes, par 36) Team totals: 1. O’Fallon 160, 2. Althoff 166, 3. Columbia 167, 4. Belleville East 176, 5. Belleville West 177, 6. Freeburg 185 Leading individuals: 1. (tie) Logan Lowery, O’Fallon; and Jeremy Obregon, Columbia, 38; 3. (tie) Jack Bruening, Althoff; and Nathan Bostick, Columbia, 39 Team scores O’Fallon (160): 1. Logan Lowery, 38; 5.

BOYS GOLF Wood River Quad at Belk Park, 4 p.m. Teams: Carrollton, Illinois, Piasa Southwestern, Roxana, Wood River Litchfield, Auburn at Staunton at Timber Lakes, 4 p.m. GIRLS GOLF Belleville West, Okawville vs. Mascoutah at The Orchards GC, 3 p.m. Marissa vs. Sparta at Sparta CC, 4 p.m. Litchfield vs. Staunton at Timber Lakes, 4 p.m.

— GIRLS GOLF GOALBY/HAAS CLASSIC At St. Clair Country Club (9 holes, par 36) Team totals: 1. O’Fallon 175, 2. Belleville East 194, 3. Columbia 196, 4. Belleville West 213, 4. Freeburg 213, 6. Althoff 255 Leading individuals: 1. Brianna McMinn, O’Fallon, 37; 2. (tie) Christina Favela, O’Fallon; and Casey Wagner, Columbia, 44 Team scores O’Fallon (175): 1. Brianna McMinn, 37; 2. Christina Favela, 44; 6. Chloe Davidson, 47; 6. Kelly Short, 47; 8. Elizabeth Henken, 48; 16. Sophie Koesterer, 53 Belleville East (194): 4. Hannah Davis, 45; 9. Amber Carroll, 49; 9. Grace Basson, 49; 13. Sydney Nelson, 51; 16. McKenzy Gleadle, 53; 29. Brooke Haas, 60 Columbia (196): 2. Casey Wagner, 44; 4. Mikaela Kossing, 45; 16. Malia Kossina, 53; 20. Emeline Brockland, 54; 25. Natalie Frentzel, 58; 27. Brenna McDermott, 59 Belleville West (213): 11. Charli Thurlow, 50; 13. Grace Baedke, 51; 22. Nina Goodrich, 55; 24. Sydnie Smith, 57; 30. Gretchen Rudolf, 67; 31. Maddt Weinland, 68 Freeburg (213): 13. Chloe Janssen, 51; 16. Gabby Wuller, 53; 20. Chloe Hamilton, 54; 22. Olivia Lester, 55; 27. Paige Schaltenbrand, 59 Althoff (255): 11. Annie Pusa, 50; 25. Jil Pye, 58; 32. Julia Barker, 71; 33. Katie Con-

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CITY OF SAINT CHARLES, MISSOURI

Merchandise Wanted

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER PROPOSED PHASE FIVE IMPROVEMENTS AND PROPOSED ASSESSMENTS IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE NEW TOWN AT ST. CHARLES NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the City Council of the City of Saint Charles, Missouri, pursuant to sections 67.453 through 67.475 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri, as amended (the “NID Act”) will on Tuesday, September 4, 2018, at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers, Saint Charles City Hall, 200 North Second Street, St. Charles, Missouri 63301, hold a hearing to consider proposed “improvements” (as that term is used and defined in the NID Act) and proposed assessments to be made against benefited platted real property situated within those areas designated as Phase Five (the “Phase Five Area”) within the New Town at St. Charles Neighborhood Improvement District of the City of Saint Charles, Missouri (the “New Town NID”) “Private Lots” ” (as that term is used and defined in that certain Petition for the Creation of a Neighborhood Improvement District submitted to the City in connection with the establishment of the New Town NID) located within the Phase Five Area shall be subject to equal annual assessments for a duration of not more than twenty (20) years beginning on or about the date of issuance by the City of Saint Charles of limited general obligation neighborhood improvement district bonds (“NID Obligations”) to pay the costs of the “improvements” as described below (the “Phase Five Improvements”). Assessments shall be levied equally per square foot against each platted Private Lot located within the Phase Five Area and deemed benefited by the Phase Five Improvements. The project name for the Phase Five Improvements shall be the “New Town at St. Charles Neighborhood Improvement District Infrastructure Project – Phase Five Improvements”. The general nature of the Phase Five Improvements includes: : (a) site grading including baseline clearing and grubbing and final grading and compaction; (b) flood control works including silt and debris removal; (c) installation within street rights of way of decorative street lights, street trees, street furnishings and landscaping and plantings; (d) installation of storm sewerage and drainage works; (e) installation of main and lateral sanitary sewers and appurtenant sanitary sewerage systems including lift or pump stations; (f) construction of sidewalks and pavement; and (g) installation of potable water lines and such other public improvement(s) as may be appurtenant to any of the foregoing or as may be designated or illustrated in “New Town St. Charles” prepared by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company,Architects and Town Planners dated 12-29-03 including amendments thereto each dated 12-23-04 and which satisfies the definition of the term “improvement” as set forth in section 67.453(5) of the NID Act; together with the costs of design of any of the foregoing and the costs associated with the levy and collection of special assessments and with costs of issuance, debt service reserves, and accrued interest on associated temporary notes or neighborhood improvement district bonds issued with respect to the Phase Five Improvements. The revised estimated costs of the New Town at St. Charles Neighborhood Improvement District Infrastructure Project – Phase Five Improvements to be funded pursuant to the NID Act is $4,500,000, which amount is exclusive of costs associated with the levy and collection of special assessments and costs of issuance of NID obligations, debt service reserves and accrued interest and associated legal and administrative costs. The boundaries of that portion of the New Town NID to be assessed for the costs of the Phase Five Improvements are described as designated as “Phase 5” on that certain “Phasing Diagram” set forth at page 8, Section “C-Plan” of “New Town St. Charles” prepared by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company, Architects and Town Planners dated 12-29-03 on file in the Office of the City Clerk but specifically excluding: (1) rights-of-way; and (2) all areas which are: (a) identified as “Civic Spaces & Buildings” on the Civic Spaces Diagram and/ or “CP-Civic Parking” or “CS-Civic Space” on “Regulating Plan-Transect Zones” set forth at pages 3 and 3A, Section “E-Code” of the Amended Code Book, and (b) owned or designated for ownership: (i) by the City of Saint Charles, Missouri or any related entity, or (ii) by The New Town at St. Charles General Assembly or similar neighborhood association(s) organized for the collective benefit of the residents of the New Town at St. Charles, or (iii) by The New Town at St. Charles Trust or similar third party non-profit entity(ies) principally organized for the betterment of The New Town at St. Charles community. This Notice is given pursuant to Section 67.461 of the NID Act. Plans and Specifications for the Phase Five Improvements, together with the proposed Phase Five Assessment Roll have been placed on file with the City Clerk and are available for inspection at City Hall during normal business hours. Written or oral objections will be considered at the Public Hearing. Persons desiring to be heard are advised to attend the hearing and to express their views orally or in writing. Written comments may be submitted and will be considered if received on or before the date and time of the Public Hearing as specified above. Assistance will be provided to any handicapped individual upon receipt of notice, two days prior to the hearing. Persons needing additional assistance or information may call the City Clerk at (636) 949-3282. CITY OF SAINT CHARLES Laura L. Whitehead City Clerk

Bids/Proposals

Sourcewell (Formerly NJPA) Invitations for Bid Greater St. Louis and Springfield Areas Indefinite Quantity Construction Contract

T O A LL S EP A R A T ED EMPLOYEES OF: Sigma-Aldrich Co . LLC, USA A Subsidiary of Merck KGAA

INVITATION TO BID #18-081 PIPELINE TELEVISION INSPECTION SYSTEM CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

Sourcewell (Formerly NJPA) issues these Invitations for Bid (IFB) on behalf of, and to provide Indefinite Quantity Construction Contracting (IQCC) services to, all current and potential Sourcewell Members including all government agencies, education agencies to include colleges and universities, and nonprofit agencies in the State of Missouri. Each contract has an initial term of one (1 ) year and bilateral option provision for three (3) additional terms. The Estimated Annua l V a l u e p e r c o n t ra c t i s $2,000,000.00. IQCC is a contracting procurement system that provides facility owner's access to "on-call" contractors to provide immediate construction, repair and renovation services over an extended period of time. Intending bidders are required to attend a pre-bid seminar which shall be conducted for the purpos e of dis cus s ing the IQCC procurement system, the contract documents, and bid forms. Attendance at one of the below seminars is a mandatory condition of bidding.

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All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

Machinists' Hall, Bridgeton, MO. Aug 25th, Saturday only. Doors open 10 am. Birds, reptiles, cages, toys, food, & more. Raffle , Silent Auction & speakers. Adults-$5, Under 13 -Free. Vendor space available. For more info: www.gatewayparrotclub.org or call 314-756-2074

All announcements day of sale takes precedence over written material. Seller has the right to reject all offers. 10% down day of sale. Closing within 45 days.

Public Notices

08/29/2018 9:00 AM

Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments 15281 State Hwy 109, Dow, IL Tina McEvers 618-535-1059 Century 21 House Center Plus Jerseyville, IL Mike Prough Auctioneer

Public Notices

156 WHITETAIL CROSSING DR., TROY, MO

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets

Intending bidders can pre- register for the pre-bid seminar by visiting our website at w w w.sourcewellmn.gov/ solicitations. An electronic copy of the IFB Documents which include the instructions for submitting a bid and the bid documents may be obtained by letter of request to Corey Jensen, Sourcewell, 202 12th Street NE, Staples, MN 56479, or by visiting our website at www .sourcewell-mn.gov/solicitations selecting the desired solicitation from the open solicitations list and completing the bid document request form at the bottom of the page. All requests must include; mailing address, email address, contact name, phone number. Following your submitted request an email will b e s e n t d ire c tly to th e re g is t ra n t w it h c o mp le t e instructions on how to obtain the bid docume nts e le ctronically. Bids are due by 4 :3 0 pm CT on S eptember 1 1 , 2 0 1 8 and will be opened at 9:00 am CT on September 12, 2018. IFB Documents will be available until September 12, 2018. Direct questions regarding this IFB t o : C o re y J e n s e n eziqc@sourcewell-mn.gov

The Granite City Housing Authority has developed its 2019 Agency Plan in compliance with the Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act of 1998. It is available for review at the Authority's office located at 2517 Nameoki Road, Granite City, IL 62040. The hours of operation are 8:30AM to 4:30PM. In addition, a public hearing will be held on October 4, 2018 at 9:30 AM in the Recreation Hall at 2517 Nameoki Road, Granite City, Illinois. DATED: August 6, 2018

Belleville Flea Market August 18 - 19, 2018

Sharon J. Mathes Executive Director

ONLY at the BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS Belleville, IL 618-233-0052 www.bcfairgrounds.net

Bargain Box Kenmore washer, Series 600 HE, 600TAT. $125. 314-724-5318.

LO C A T ED A T : S t . Lo u i s , Missouri ENGAGED IN ACTIVITIES RELATED TO THE S UPPLY OF: Accounting Services Notice is hereby given that SigmaAldrich Co. LLC, USA had petition TAW ñ 93,968 approved under the Trade Act of 1 9 7 4 , as amended. If you were an affected worker laid off from Sigma-Aldrich Co. LLC, USA on or after July 10, 2017 (Impact Date) and before August 9 , 2 0 2 0 (Expiration Date), you may be entitled to weekly Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA), Reemployment Trade Adjustment Assistance (RTAA), Health Coverage Tax Credit (HCTC), or Trade Adjustment Assistance in the form of training, job search allowances, and/or relocation allowances. To be eligible for TRA weekly benefits, an eligible worker must be enrolled in training by the end of the 26th week after the petition is certified (August 9, 2018 Certification Date) or by the end of the 26th week following the most recent qualifying separation (lay-off) from Sigma-Aldrich Co. LLC, USA, whiche ve r is late r. For T R A , R T A A , H C T C , and/or T A A , a Trade Act claim must be filed with a Missouri Division of Employment S ecurity (DES ) Regional Claims Center or through the DES UInteract system (https://uinteract.labor.mo.gov). For information about training and other T A A benefits, contact or visit the nearest Missouri Division of Workforce Development (DWD) Missouri Job Center (www.jobs.mo.gov). Regional Claims Centers Jefferson City 573-751-9040 Kansas City 816-889-3101 Springfield 417-895-6851 St Louis 3 1 4 -3 4 0 4950 Outside Local Calling Area 800-3202519 Relay Missouri 800-735-2966 (TDD) 888-861-8349 (Voice)

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID Sealed bids for the Ranacker Conservation Area Bridge Improvements, Project No. 67-1010, Pike County, Missouri, will be received at MO Dept. of Conservation, PO Box 180, 2901 W. Truman Blvd., Jefferson City, MO 65102, UNTIL 2:00 PM, September 12, 2018 then publicly opened. A Non Mandatory Pre-Bid meeting will be held for this project on August 29, 2018 at 11:00 AM at the Ranacker Conservation Area in Pike County, MO. Bidders must obtain a full set of printed construction documents from American Document Solutions, 1400 Forum Blvd., Suite 7A, Columbia, M O 65203, P H No. 573-446-7768, for a non-refundable fee of $40.00. Electronic sets are available for viewing only at h t t p s : / / m d c .a d s m o . n e t CONTACTS: Project questions Xinguo Cai, P.E., (573) 522-4115 ext. 3765, Bidding questions Sandy Payne, (573) 522-0136.

Ahrens Contracting Inc. is interested in building working relationships with DBE /MBE/WBE vendors & subcontractors. If interested fax company resume to: 314-621-0977.

The City of Eureka is seeking statements of qualifications for police station architectural services. A detailed scope is available at www.eureka.mo.us under "Re que s ts for Proposals and Qualifications" and at Eureka City Hall, 100 City Hall Drive, Eureka, MO 63025. Responses are due by Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00 P.M.

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The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids for a pipeline te le vis ion ins pe ction syste m. S pecifications are available at www.ofallon.mo.us under Bid Opportunities. Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ìPipeline Television Inspection System“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 1 0 0 North Main S treet, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 by 2 : 0 0 P. M. C DT, S e pte mbe r 4 , 2018. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

REQUEST FOR BID(S) /PROPOSAL(S) BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE CITY OF ST LOUIS MUNICIPAL LIBRARY DISTRICT DBA ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY RFB 18-08318 FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT RFP 18-08018 COLLECTION, RESALE, AND DISPOSAL OF LIBRARY MATERIAL SERVICES The St Louis Public Library is requesting Bid and Proposal submissions from qualified contractors for the procurement of 1)Furniture and Equipment and 2) Collection, Resale, and Disposal of Library Material Services. Sealed Bid and Proposal packets will be received by the Purchasing Manager, St. Louis Public Library, 1415 Olive St, St. Louis, Missouri, 63103, until 4:00 p.m. CDT, Friday, August 31, 2018. In order to obtain a copy of the Request for Bid and/or Proposal, please contact Don Gillum during regular business hours by phone, 314.539.0312, email, dgillum@slpl.org , or at the above address.

Bids/Proposals

City of Eureka, Missouri Request for Qualifications Police Station Architectural Services

Saturday 9am-4pm Sunday 9am-3pm

Sealed bids for Controls Upgrades to Generator & Medium-Voltage Switchgear, Bellefontaine Habilitation Center, St. Louis, Missouri, Pr o je c t N o . M 1401-02 w ill b e received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 9/13/2018. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://o a.mo.gov/ facilities

Sealed bids for Structural Repairs to Tunnel Way, Guhleman Forensic Buildings - East and West, Fulton, Missouri , Project No. M180401 w ill be received by F M D C , State of MO, U N TIL 1 : 3 0 PM , 9/13/2018. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

The City of Webster Groves recreation department is accepting sealed bids for fitne s s circuit equipment. A pre-bid meeting will be at 9am on August 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 . Final bids are due to 4 E Lockwood Ave by 3pm S eptember 4 , 2018. For more information go to w w w .w e b s t e r g r o v e s.org/bids. Questions can be directed to Miki McKee (3 1 4 )9 6 3 -5 6 56 mckeem@webstergroves.org. All rights reserved.

Announcements If you worked with or know someone who worked with Harry Lohse , or have knowledge of his work at the St. Louis City Water Division (Water treatment plant) in the 1960's or 1970's please call Investigator Dave Ruebhausen of The Simmons Hanly Conroy Law Firm at 618910-8218.

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Public Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City of O'Fallon will conduct a Public Hearing before the Planning and Zoning Commission on September 6 , 2 0 1 8 at 7 : 0 0 p. m. in the Council Chambers of the O'Fallon Municipal Centre located at 100 North Main Street, O'Fallon, Missouri and before the City Council on S eptember 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 at 7 :3 0 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the O'Fallon Municipal Centre located at 1 0 0 North Main S treet, O'Fallon, Missouri, concerning an Ordinance amending provisions of Chapter 405 related to providing an option for City Council review o f d e c i s i o n s re g a rd i n g Pre liminary Plats and Display Home Plats made by the Planning and Zoning Commission. (Seal) óóóóóóóóóóóó Pamela L. Clement, City Clerk City of O'Fallon, Missouri

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All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 5, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive. The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the rezoning described below. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244. Petition 18-11 Payne Family Homes LLC requests a rezoning from C-3 General Commercial District and Planned Urban Development (PUD) to Amended Planned Urban Development (PUD) for a 13.9 acre +/- tract of ground. The subject site is located on the west side of Mid Rivers Mall Drive, south of Mexico Road. Proposed Use: Single-family residences. LOCATION MAP

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on file at the City of St. Peters Planning Department.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 5, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive (1020 Grand Teton Drive).

The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 5, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive.

All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244. Petition 18-09 LaRose Fields, LLC. requests a special use permit in the SD-RC Special District Retail/ Commercial to permit a car wash on a 3.36 +/- acre parcel. The property is located on the north side of Mexico Road, east of Spencer Road. LOCATION MAP

All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244. Petition 18-12 Off the Leash Dog Grooming, LLC requests a special use permit for a kennel on a 0.67 +/acre tract in the C-3 General Commercial District. The subject site is located on the south side of South St. Peters Parkway, east of Heritage Crossing, as recorded in Book 24 Page 51 at the St. Charles County Recorder’s Office, more commonly known as 2720 South St. Peters Parkway. LOCATION MAP

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on file at the City of St. Peters Planning Department.

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A detailed legal description of this property is available at St. Peters City Hall, One St. Peters Centre Boulevard.


FOR THE RECORD

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 1 AMERICA’S LINE

BASKETBALL | WNBA

Frontier League

BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League YANKEES .................-$175 .................Blue Jays INDIANS ................. -$360.....................Orioles RED SOX..................-$175 ........................ Rays RANGERS ................-$115...................... Angels TWINS......................-$170 ...................... Tigers WHITE SOX..............-$120 ..................... Royals Astros..................... -$140........................... A’S National League PHILLIES .................-$155 ........................ Mets NATIONALS ............ -$380....................Marlins Cubs ........................-$135 .................. PIRATES Giants......................-$110 ....................... REDS BRAVES ...................-$130 ....................Rockies CARDS .....................-$130 ...................Brewers D’backs....................-$125 ...................PADRES Interleague Dodgers...................-$130 .............. MARINERS

EASTERN W L Pct x-Atlanta 22 10 .688 x-Washington 21 11 .656 x-Connecticut 19 13 .594 Chicago 12 20 .375 New York 7 25 .219 Indiana 5 27 .156 WESTERN W L Pct x-Seattle 24 8 .750 x-Los Angeles 19 13 .594 x-Phoenix 18 14 .563 x-Minnesota 17 15 .531 Dallas 14 18 .438 Las Vegas 14 18 .438 Wednesday Washington 76, Indiana 62 Las Vegas 85, New York 72 Thursday • No games Friday Los Angeles at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Connecticut, 6 p.m. Las Vegas at Dallas, 7 p.m. New York at Seattle, 9 p.m. Atlanta at Phoenix, 9 p.m.

East W L Pct. GB Joliet 47 34 .580 — Washington 46 35 .568 1 Lake Erie 42 39 .519 5 Schaumburg 40 41 .494 7 Traverse City 35 45 .438 11½ Windy City 34 48 .415 13½ West W L Pct. GB Normal 43 35 .551 — Southern Illinois 41 37 .526 2 Rascals 41 41 .500 4 Florence 40 40 .500 4 Evansville 40 41 .494 4½ Grizzlies 34 47 .420 10½ Thursday Schaumburg 3, Windy City 2 Windy City 2, Schaumburg 1 Normal 7, Evansville 4 Washington 7, Traverse City 6 Joliet 5, Lake Erie 1 Southern Illinois 1, Rascals 0 Evansville 3, Normal 2 Florence at Grizzlies, late Friday Evansville at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Normal at Rascals, 6:35 p.m. Traverse City at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Grizzlies at Southern Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

NFL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog LIONS .....................3..... 3......................Giants FALCONS ...............2.5... PK .................... Chiefs PANTHERS ............3.5...3.5 ................Dolphins BROWNS................3.5.... 3......................... Bills SAINTS ..................3.5...3.5 .....................Cards Saturday VIKINGS................ 4.5 ..4.5................. Jaguars RAMS......................3.... 1.5 ..................Raiders COWBOYS...............3..... 3................... Bengals TEXANS .................2.5...2.5 .....................49ers TITANS....................3..... 3........................ Bucs BRONCOS ...............3....3.5 .....................Bears CHARGERS .............3..... 3................Seahawks Monday COLTS ....................1.5.....1.................... Ravens

GB — 1 3 10 15 17 GB — 5 6 7 10 10

SOCCER Major League Soccer Wednesday D.C. United 4, Portland 1 Los Angeles FC 2, Real Salt Lake 0 Saturday LA Galaxy at Seattle, 3 p.m. New York at Vancouver, 6 p.m. New York City FC at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Chicago at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota United at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Portland at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Houston, 8 p.m. Toronto FC at San Jose, 9 p.m. Sunday Columbus at Atlanta United FC, 3 p.m. New England at D.C. United, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles FC, 9 p.m.

SOCCER • English Premier League Saturday Newcastle United ................................... +$150 CARDIFF CITY.......................................... +$210 Draw: +$200 | Over/under: 2.0 goals WEST HAM UNITED................................. +$120 Bournemouth .........................................+$230 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals EVERTON.................................................. -$110 Southampton..........................................+$320 Draw: +$230 | Over/under: 2.5 goals TOTTENHAM ...........................................-$400 Fulham....................................................+$980 Draw: +$480 | Over/under: 3.0 goals LEICESTER CITY ...................................... +$105 Wolverhampton......................................+$265 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals CHELSEA ..................................................-$130 Arsenal....................................................+$320 Draw: +$280 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Sunday BURNLEY................................................. +$130 Watford ...................................................+$240 Draw: +$205 | Over/under: 2.0 goals MANCHESTER CITY............................... -$1400 Huddersfield Town ...............................+$3100 Draw: +$980 | Over/under: 3.5 goals Manchester United.................................. -$135 BRIGHTON & HOVE.................................+$420 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Monday Liverpool..................................................-$230 CRYSTAL PALACE....................................+$550 Draw: +$360 | Over/under: 3.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

FOOTBALL NFL preseason

United Soccer League Thursday Bethlehem 2, Toronto 0 Saturday Indy at Ottawa, 1 p.m. Charlotte at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Penn at Richmond, 6 p.m. Charleston at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Nashville at Louisville, 6:30 p.m. Okla. City at Rio Grande Valley, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Fresno, 9 p.m. Tulsa at Salt Lake City, 9 p.m. Phoenix at Las Vegas, 10 p.m. Los Angeles at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Sunday Reno at Kansas City, 4 p.m. Seattle at Portland, 9 p.m.

English Premier League Saturday Cardiff vs. Newcastle, 6:30 a.m. Tottenham vs. Fulham, 9 a.m. West Ham vs. Bournemouth, 9 a.m. Everton vs. Southampton, 9 a.m. Leicester vs. Wolverhampton, 9 a.m. Chelsea vs. Arsenal, 11:30 a.m. Sunday Man City vs. Huddersfield, 7:30 a.m. Burnley vs. Watford, 7:30 a.m. Brighton vs. Man United, 10 a.m. Monday Crystal Palace vs. Liverpool, 2 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | Major League Baseball MLB — Suspended Los Angeles Dodgers OF Yasiel Puig two games and fined an undisclosed amount for fighting and inciting a bench-clearing incident in a Aug. 14 against San Francisco Giants. Fined San Francisco C Nick Hundley an undisclosed amount for his role in the incident. Suspended Miami Marlins RHP José Ureña six-games and an undisclosed fine for intentionally hitting Ronald Acuña Jr. of the Atlanta Braves and Braves first base coach Eric Young one-game and an undisclosed fine for his actions during the incident. American League LOS ANGELES — Placed RHP Hansel Robles on the 10-day DL, retoactive to August 15. Recalled RHP Ty Buttrey from Salt Lake (PCL). TEXAS — Activated OF Nomar Mazara from the 10-day DL. Optioned OF Willie Calhoun to Round Rock (PCL). Acquired RHP Kelvin Gonzalez from Kansas City for international slot money and assigned him to the Arizona League.

BASEBALL Little League World Series At South Williamsport, Pa. Double Elimination Thursday G1: Seoul (South Korea) 4, Guayama (Puerto Rico) 2, 9 innings G2: Staten Island (N.Y.) 5, Des Moines (Iowa) 2 G3: Matamoros (Mexico) 3, Gold Coast (Australia) 2 G4: Houston 3, Coventry (R.I.) 1 Friday G5: Barcelona (Spain) vs. Kawaguchi (Japan), 1 p.m. G6: Grosse Pointe Woods (Mich.) vs. Coeur d’Alene (Idaho), 3 p.m. G7: Arraijan (Panama) vs. Surrey (British Columbia), 5 p.m. G8: Peachtree City (Ga.) vs. Honolulu, 7 p.m. Saturday G9: Guayama (Puerto Rico) vs. Gold Coast (Australia), Noon G10: Des Moines (Iowa) vs. Coventry (R.I.), 2 p.m. G11: G5 loser vs. G7 loser, 5 p.m. G12: G6 loser vs. G8 loser, 7 p.m. Sunday G13: Seoul (South Korea) vs. Matamoros (Mexico), 8 a.m. G14: Staten Island (N.Y.) vs. Houston, 10 a.m. G15: G5 winner vs. G7 winner, Noon G16: G6 winner vs. G8 winner, 1 p.m.

FOOTBALL | National Football League CHICAGO — Signed LS Tanner Carew. Waived-injured LB Andrew Trumbetti. COLLEGE CAMPBELL — Promoted Tyler Robinson to assistant baseball coach. NORTH CAROLINA — Named Tyler Thompson associate tennis head coach.

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England 2 0 0 1.000 NY Jets 1 1 0 .500 Miami 0 1 0 .000 Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston 1 0 0 1.000 Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 0 0 1.000 Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1.000 West W L T Pct Oakland 1 0 0 1.000 Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 LA Chargers 0 1 0 .000 Denver 0 1 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Washington 1 1 0 .500 NY Giants 0 1 0 .000 Philadelphia 0 2 0 .000 Dallas 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Carolina 1 0 0 1.000 New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 Detroit 0 1 0 .000 Chicago 0 2 0 .000 West W L T Pct San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 Seattle 0 1 0 .000 LA Rams 0 1 0 .000 Thursday New England 37, Philadelphia 20 Washington 15, NY Jets 13 Green Bay 51, Pittsburgh 34 Friday NY Giants at Detroit, 6 p.m. Kansas City at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Miami at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Arizona at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Saturday Jacksonville at Minnesota, Noon Oakland at LA Rams, 3 p.m. Cincinnati at Dallas, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Tennessee, 7 p.m. San Francisco at Houston, 7 p.m. Chicago at Denver, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at LA Chargers, 9 p.m. Monday Baltimore at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.

PF 63 30 24 23 PF 17 19 20 17 PF 50 20 30 65 PF 16 10 17 28

PA 37 15 26 28 PA 10 17 24 31 PA 23 10 27 65 PA 10 17 24 42

PF 32 10 34 21 PF 28 24 26 0 PF 82 42 10 43 PF 24 24 17 7

PA 39 20 68 24 PA 23 20 24 17 PA 51 28 16 47 PA 21 17 19 33

GOLF PGA | Wyndham Thursday | Greensboro, N.C. Purse: $6M | Yards: 7,127 | Par 70 (35-35) First Round Brandt Snedeker 27-32 — 59 Ryan Moore 30-33 — 63 John Oda 32-31 — 63 Martin Flores 32-32 — 64 D.A. Points 32-32 — 64 Brett Stegmaier 31-33 — 64 David Hearn 32-32 — 64 Abraham Ancer 30-34 — 64 Ollie Schniederjans 30-34 — 64 Jonathan Byrd 32-32 — 64 Corey Conners 31-34 — 65

-11 -7 -7 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5

WEATHER • Low 73, High 87 • Winds W/NW 3-8 mph

Nick Taylor Aaron Baddeley Ryan Armour Sung Kang Jim Furyk Brice Garnett Keith Mitchell C.T. Pan Sam Saunders Billy Horschel Webb Simpson Sergio Garcia Harris English Denny McCarthy Ricky Barnes Harold Varner III Michael Thompson Jason Dufner Peter Malnati Jamie Lovemark Alex Cejka Tommy Gainey Cameron Percy Ryan Blaum Zac Blair Hudson Swafford Sangmoon Bae Trey Mullinax Kevin Tway Brian Davis Scott Stallings Dylan Meyer Stephan Jaeger Tyrone Van Aswegen Russell Henley Billy Hurley III Ernie Els Dominic Bozzelli Joaquin Niemann Chesson Hadley Rafa Cabrera Bello Shawn Stefani Doug Ghim Xinjun Zhang Andrew Yun Norman Xiong Ken Duke Blayne Barber Chad Campbell Patrick Rodgers Richy Werenski Wesley Bryan Mackenzie Hughes Scott Brown Henrik Stenson Vaughn Taylor Fabian Gomez Matt Every Danny Lee Roberto Diaz Doc Redman Tom Hoge Shane Lowry Hideki Matsuyama William McGirt Chris Kirk James Driscoll Martin Laird Jason Kokrak Stuart Appleby Mickey DeMorat Lanto Griffin Conrad Shindler Rory Sabbatini David Lingmerth Bill Haas Padraig Harrington Jonas Blixt J.J. Henry Carl Pettersson Shane Bertsch Adam Schenk Nicholas Lindheim T.J. Vogel Matt Jones Johnson Wagner Tyler Duncan Graeme McDowell Brendan Steele Scott Piercy Whee Kim John Huh Matthew Fitzpatrick Martin Piller Hunter Mahan Grayson Murray Brian Gay Daniel Berger Jhonattan Vegas Nick Watney Steve Stricker Ben Crane Rob Oppenheim Stewart Jolly Andres Romero J.T. Poston Cameron Tringale John Merrick Satoshi Kodaira Davis Love III Jason Bohn Parker McLachlin Retief Goosen Ben Silverman Julian Suri Chris Stroud Robert Garrigus Peter Uihlein

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9 31-34 32-33 32-33 32-33 32-33 31-34 33-32 31-34 33-33 33-33 33-33 31-35 32-34 32-34 29-37 34-32 33-33 33-33 31-35 32-34 32-35 32-35 31-36 30-37 33-34 33-34 32-35 33-34 31-36 34-33 34-33 34-33 33-34 33-35 34-34 34-34 35-33 33-35 32-36 34-34 34-34 33-35 32-36 33-35 33-35 34-34 33-35 32-36 35-33 34-34 32-36 33-35 37-31 36-32 36-32 34-34 34-34 33-35 33-35 33-35 33-35 32-37 34-35 35-34 33-36 34-35 33-36 35-34 33-36 32-37 33-36 34-35 34-35 34-35 32-37 35-34 35-34 35-34 34-35 35-34 32-37 36-33 33-36 36-33 35-35 33-37 34-36 35-35 34-36 36-34 36-34 33-37 35-35 35-35 33-37 33-37 33-37 33-37 36-34 34-36 33-37 33-37 35-35 35-35 34-37 34-37 33-38 33-38 35-36 34-37 36-35 35-36 34-37 34-37 34-37 36-35 34-37 34-37

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65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71

-5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1

Derek Fathauer Brendon de Jonge Bronson Burgoon Steve Wheatcroft Will Zalatoris Jonathan Randolph Zecheng Dou Dicky Pride George McNeill Brandon Harkins Sam Ryder Sean O’Hair Kyle Thompson Kris Blanks Brian Stuard Arjun Atwal Matt Atkins Talor Gooch Rod Pampling Si Woo Kim Robert Streb Cody Gribble Seamus Power Daniel Summerhays Ethan Tracy Tom Lovelady Charles Frost

36-35 35-36 34-37 36-35 33-38 32-39 36-35 36-36 33-39 35-37 35-37 37-35 35-37 34-38 35-37 34-38 36-36 32-40 36-37 38-35 36-37 36-38 38-36 38-36 40-34 36-38 38-37

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71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 75

+1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5

Thursday | Indianapolis Purse: $2M | Yards: 6,456 | Par 72 (36-36) First Round | a-denotes amateur Lizette Salas 31-31 — 62 Nasa Hataoka 32-32 — 64 Angel Yin 28-36 — 64 Danielle Kang 33-32 — 65 Caroline Hedwall 32-33 — 65 Jin Young Ko 31-34 — 65 Jane Park 32-33 — 65 Brianna Do 34-32 — 66 Xiyu Lin 32-34 — 66 Lydia Ko 33-33 — 66 Carlota Ciganda 32-34 — 66 Mi Hyang Lee 33-33 — 66 Ashleigh Buhai 32-34 — 66 Mariah Stackhouse 33-33 — 66 Pernilla Lindberg 33-34 — 67 Wei-Ling Hsu 34-33 — 67 Thidapa Suwannapura 34-33 — 67 34-33 — 67 Nicole Broch Larsen Alena Sharp 34-33 — 67 Madeleine Sheils 33-34 — 67 Mariajo Uribe 33-34 — 67

-10 -8 -8 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5

Ryan Smith, Carlsbad, Calif. (143), 6 and 4 William Gordon, Davidson, N.C. (139) def. Hide Yoshihara, Japan (146), 4 and 3 Zheng Kai Bai, China (144) def. Travis Vick, Houston, (145), 4 and 3 William Mouw, Chino, Calif. (146) def. Alex Scott, Traverse City, Mich. (142), 1 up Trent Phillips, Inman, S.C. (143) def. Riley Elmes, Lake Oswego, Ore. (145), 3 and 2 Lower Bracket Cole Hammer, Houston (137) def. Alvaro Ortiz, Mexico (146), 2 up Joshua McCarthy, Danville, Calif. (144) def. Dan Erickson, Pace, Fla. (144), 3 and 2 Zach Murray, Australia (146) def. Jack Rhea, Jonesborough, Tenn. (142), 1 up Clay Feagler, Laguna Niguel, Calif. (146) def. Logan Lowe, Grass Valley, Calif. (142), 1 up Alex Fitzpatrick, England (146) def. Ian Siebers, Bellevue, Wash. (141), 2 and 1 Jesus Montenegro, Argentina (144) def. Braden Thornberry, Olive Branch, Miss. (145), 2 and 1 John Augenstein, Owensboro, Ky. (142) def. Collin Morikawa, La Canada Flintridge, Calif. (146), 19 holes McClure Meissner, San Antonio (145) def. Brad Dalke, Norman, Okla. (143), 1 up Andrew Alligood, St. Johns, Fla. (138) def. Ryan Stachler, Milton, Ga. (146), 19 holes Chun An Yu, Taiwan (144) def. Blake Windred, Australia (144), 6 and 5 Austin Squires, Union, Ky. (142) def. Max Theodorakis, Danbury, Conn. (146), 5 and 4 Luis Gagne, Costa Rica (146) def. Tyler Strafaci, Davie, Fla. (143), 4 and 3 Harrison Ott, Brookfield, Wis. (146) def. Justin Suh, San Jose, Calif. (140), 1 up Viktor Hovland, Norway (144) def. Hayden Wood, Edmond, Okla. (145), 3 and 2 Bradford Tilley, Easton, Conn. (146) def. Akshay Bhatia, Wake Forest, N.C. (142), 19 holes Kristoffer Reitan, Norway (143) def. Eoin Leonard, Ireland (145), 6 and 4

LPGA | Women in Tech

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Trucks | UNOH 200 Results

Euro | Nordea Masters Thursday | Gothenburg, Sweden Purse: $1.7 million | Yards: 7,169 | Par: 71 First Round Clement Sordet, France Scott Jamison, Scotland Lee Slattery, England Christofer Blomstrand, Sweden Tapio Pulkkanan, Finland Richard Green, Australia Hunter Stewart, United States Thomas Aiken, South Africa Matthieu Pavon, France Paul Waring, England Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark Daniel Brooks, England Lucas Herbert, Australia Thomas Detry, Belgium Sebastien Heisele, Germany Also Martin Kaymer, Germany Chase Koepka, United States Paul Peterson, United States Dru Love, United States Daniel Im, United States Anthony Paolucci, United States Jordan Gumberg, United States Wes McClain, United States

Thursday | Bristol, Tenn. Lap: 0.533 miles (Start pos. in parentheses) Driver Car Laps Pts 1. (4) Johnny Sauter Chevy 200 58 2. (13) Stewart Friesen Chevy 200 46 3. (3) John H. Nemechek Chevy 200 0 4. (6) Parker Kligerman Toyota 200 43 5. (8) Todd Gilliland Toyota 200 32 6. (11) Justin Haley Chevy 200 35 7. (2) Ben Rhodes Ford 200 40 8. (18) Matt Crafton Ford 200 29 9. (7) Noah Gragson Toyota 200 30 10. (5) Grant Enfinger Ford 200 37 11. (16) Dalton Sargeant Chevy 200 27 12. (10) Ross Chastain Chevy 199 0 13. (24) Austin Wayne Self Chevy 199 24 14. (19) Tanner Thorson Chevy 198 23 15. (20) Riley Herbst Toyota 198 22 16. (25) Codie Rohrbaugh Chevy 198 21 17. (30) Stefan Parsons Chevy 198 20 18. (14) Brett Moffitt Toyota 198 27 19. (15) Cody Coughlin Chevy 198 18 20. (21) Clay Greenfield Chevy 197 17 21. (23) Austin Hill Chevy 197 16 22. (29) Jordan Anderson Chevy 197 15 23. (32) Wendell Chavous Chevy 196 14 24. (31) Justin Fontaine Chevy 196 13 25. (26) Cory Roper Ford 195 12 26. (9) Jesse Little Toyota 194 11 27. (27) Korbin Forrister Toyota 188 10 28. (1) Christopher Bell Toyota 184 0 29. (17) Myatt Snider Ford (g)161 8 30. (12) Chad Finley Chevy (e)61 7 31. (22) Scott Lagasse Jr Toyota (a)24 0 32. (28) Bayley Currey Chevy (a)13 5. g=garage. e=engine. a=accident RACE STATISTICS Average Speed of Winner: 83.124 mph. Time: 1 hour, 16 minutes, 57 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.236 seconds. Caution Flags: 5 for 38 laps. Lead Changes: 6 among 4 drivers. Lap Leaders: C.Bell 1-31; J.Nemechek 32-116; J.Sauter 117-123; N.Gragson 124-130; J.Sauter 131-176; J.Nemechek 177-195; J.Sauter 196-200 Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Nemechek, 2 times for 102 laps; J.Sauter, 3 times for 55 laps; C.Bell, 1 time for 30 laps; N.Gragson, 1 time for 6 laps. Wins: J.Sauter, 5; B.Moffitt, 4; N.Gragson, 1; J.Haley, 1; J.Nemechek, 1; B.Rhodes, 1. Top 10 in Points: 1. J.Sauter, 683; 2. N.Gragson, 599; 3. G.Enfinger, 587; 4. S.Friesen, 582; 5. B.Moffitt, 560; 6. B.Rhodes, 532; 7. J.Haley, 529; 8. M.Crafton, 526; 9. M.Snider, 411; 10. D.Sargeant, 404.

62 64 64 65 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 69 69 71 72 74 76 83

U.S. Amateur Wednesday | Pebble Beach, Calif. Yards: 7,075 | Par: 71 Round of 64 | Upper Bracket Daniel Hillier, New Zealand (137) def. Jacob Bergeron, Slidell, La. (147), 3 and 2 Davis Riley, Hattiesburg, Miss. (144) def. Ryan Burnett, Lafayette, Calif. (144), 2 and 1 Mason Overstreet, Kingfisher, Okla. (146) def. Cameron Sisk, El Cajon, Calif. (142), 1 up Jackson Van Paris, Pinehurst, N.C. (146) def. Dylan Perry, Australia (142), 1 up Noah Goodwin, Corinth, Texas (141) def. Garrett Rank, Canada (146), 5 and 4 Raul Pereda, Mexico (144) def. Trey Winstead, Baton Rouge, La. (145), 23 holes Shintaro Ban, San Jose, Calif. (141) def. Skip Berkmeyer, St. Louis, Mo. (146), 1 up Devon Bling, Ridgecrest, Calif. (145) def. Caleb Ramirez, Blythe, Calif. (144), 5 and 4 Trevor Phillips, Inman, S.C. (146) def. Michael Thorbjornsen, Wellesley, Mass. (139), 4 and 3 Isaiah Salinda, South San Francisco, Calif. (144) def. Will Grimmer, Cincinnati, (145), 6 and 5 Stewart Hagestad, Newport Beach, Calif. (142) def. Harry Hall, England (146), 1 up Davis Chatfield, Attleboro, Mass. (145) def.

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 117° Death Valley, California

Low: 28° West Yellowstone, Montana

Warm with a few more storms 70s

A few more scattered showers and storms are possible, especially to the east and south of St. Louis. It will continue to be warm with highs in the upper 80s. Drier conditions are forecast for this weekend. Another storm system will bring more storms to the area on Monday.

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

76°

84°

86°

77°

Partly sunny, Slight chance Slight chance isolated storms of storms of storms

Partly cloudy

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

Rain

90s 80s

70s

4-DAY FORECAST

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

71°/89°

71°/83°

68°/81°

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy

Showers/ storms likely

Partly sunny

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

87 87 86 85 87 87 87 86 85 86 86 86 85

thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

H

W

69 73 71 69 70 67 71 69 69 68 70 69

83 86 82 82 81 82 85 82 85 82 84 83

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms

Kirksville 66 / 86

Springfield 70 / 8 4

Kansas City 70 / 8 7 St. Louis 73 / 87 Joplin 71 / 87

Carbondale 73 / 8 6 Poplar Bluff 72 / 87

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

0.20” 2.13” 1.61” 28.15” 26.37” Current Level

- 0.75 - 0.13 - 0.99 - 0.99 - 0.17 - 0.10 - 0.22 - 0.19 + 0.53 - 0.01

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, Aug 16th Weed - 2 (low), Mold - 56,730 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS 18 Yesterday 259 Month (Total) 1553 Season 1438 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 11.30 Peoria 18 12.07 Beardstown 14 9.59 MERAMEC RIVER Sullivan 15 2.35 Valley Park 16 - 2.67 Arnold 24 6.95 BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.48 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 18.67 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

+ 0.16 + 0.08 - 0.03 + 0.22 - 0.07 - 0.21 - 0.01

SUN & MOON

First Aug 18 Sunrise

Full Aug 26

Last Sep 2

6:17 AM Sunset

New Sep 9 7:53 PM

Moonrise 1:06 PM Moonset ————-

Venus will reach maximum eastern elongation tonight. This means Venus will be at its highest in the sky after sunset. After today, Venus will begin to head back to the sun’s glare reaching inferior conjunction on October 26th. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

357.02 360.08 497.84 658.90 704.96 657.47 913.57 838.84 599.88 405.95 601.20 445.28

- 0.05 + 0.04 + 0.23 - 0.03 0.00 - 0.06 - 0.04 + 0.05 0.00 + 0.07 - 0.06 + 0.07

- 1.52 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 92°

Jet Stream

Scattered showers and thunderstorms are expected throughout portions of the Northeast, southern Great Lakes, Ohio Valley, Midwest, and Tennessee Valley in association with a frontal boundary. Parts of the Deep South, central Gulf Coast, and southern Rockies will also see a few storms develop. Dry conditions will be in place across the upper Midwest and north-central Plains with high pressure in control. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 69 Albuquerque 67 Anchorage 53 Atlanta 73 Atlantic City 73 Baltimore 74 Billings 63 Biloxi, Ms. 78 Birmingham 73 Bismarck 59 Boise 71 Boston 70 Buffalo 72 Burlington, Vt. 63 Charleston, S.C. 75 Charleston, W.V. 70 Charlotte 73 Cheyenne 55 Chicago 71 Cincinnati 70 Cleveland 70 Colorado Spgs. 58 Concord, N.H. 59 Dallas 80 Daytona Beach 76 Denver 60 Des Moines 66 77 Destin, Fl. 70 Detroit 73 El Paso 73 Evansville 49 Fairbanks 55 Fargo 55 Flagstaff 76 Fort Myers 61 Great Falls 66 Green Bay 71 Hartford 77 Honolulu 77 Houston 71 Indianapolis 74 Jackson, Ms. 50 Juneau 83 Key West 83 Las Vegas 77 Little Rock 72 Los Angeles 74 Louisville

84 87 62 87 91 92 95 88 89 92 91 81 81 77 90 85 91 82 82 81 81 79 80 97 90 89 86 87 83 94 85 63 89 78 93 93 85 87 90 95 82 90 60 91 102 90 88 82

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy showers cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers

70 66 53 72 75 74 64 77 73 61 65 73 66 64 76 70 73 55 68 68 68 56 67 78 74 61 64 79 67 73 70 49 60 54 76 62 61 72 77 77 68 73 47 83 85 73 70 71

79 90 62 84 89 87 80 89 86 94 90 82 80 76 90 81 88 79 83 82 80 79 79 97 91 85 87 88 83 94 85 67 89 81 92 81 82 84 90 94 83 89 64 91 106 90 87 86

showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny smoke showers mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms showers thunderstorms showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms showers sunny showers showers partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms

City

Today L H

72 Macon 80 McAllen, Tx. 76 Memphis 79 Miami 68 Milwaukee Minneapolis 66 Missoula, Mt. 55 74 Mobile Montgomery 72 75 Nashville New Orleans 77 New York City 76 Norfolk, Va. 75 Oklahoma City 73 Omaha 66 Orlando 76 Palm Springs 83 Philadelphia 76 Phoenix 82 Pittsburgh 69 Portland, Me. 60 Portland, Or. 57 Providence 72 Raleigh 73 Rapid City 59 Reno 63 Richmond, Va. 74 Sacramento 58 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 68 San Antonio 76 San Diego 73 San Francisco 54 Santa Fe 58 Savannah 74 Seattle 57 78 Shreveport 62 Sioux Falls 70 Syracuse 73 Tallahassee 77 Tampa 72 Tucson 74 Tulsa 74 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 78 72 Wichita Wilmington, De. 74 83 Yuma

90 102 90 91 79 89 89 90 90 89 90 88 93 93 85 93 104 91 104 80 73 78 87 92 86 95 94 97 91 94 98 82 70 84 91 74 97 83 82 89 92 97 92 92 90 90 91 105

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny showers thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy

72 79 73 78 66 65 56 75 73 73 77 75 76 73 64 75 85 74 85 68 67 57 74 74 62 58 76 60 79 68 76 73 54 58 75 58 76 60 65 74 77 74 71 74 78 68 73 84

88 100 89 90 80 88 86 88 89 87 90 86 90 89 87 94 107 88 107 79 76 83 85 89 84 97 91 100 91 87 99 82 73 87 91 79 96 83 79 90 91 98 91 87 89 90 86 109

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers showers sunny showers thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

74 59 72 80 79 79 75 64 63 53 77 57 78 47 53 61

87 71 90 112 91 86 86 90 86 65 95 86 87 58 65 84

partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly sunny

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

61 77 72 77 68 52 65 52 72 81 55 62 54 79 51 82

77 83 87 90 86 81 93 72 91 106 75 69 76 87 73 94

W

thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny sunny cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms rain sunny thunderstorms partly sunny thunderstorms

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.30 + 0.16 0.00 + 0.01 - 0.03

Very unhealthy

Good

80s

90s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER 32 16.30 Kansas City Jefferson City 23 11.46 Hermann 21 10.06 Washington 20 7.42 St. Charles 25 14.14 MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 10.95 Hannibal 15 11.65 Louisiana 25 17.53 Dam 24 26 17.39 Dam 25 18 15.49 Grafton 419 418.50 M.Price, Pool 21 7.66 M.Price, Tail. 30 9.77 St Louis 27 13.46 Chester Cape Girardeau 32 18.78

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

92° 73° 88° 70° 103° 56° 91° 71°

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (3:59 p.m.) Low (5:38 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1936) Record Low (1992) High Last Year Low Last Year

90s

Wintry Mix

City

L

90s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

69 73 69 70 70 71 70 66 69 69 66 70 68

W

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

Chicago 71 / 8 2

Snow

80s

100s

71°/88°

80s

70s

80s

SATURDAY

80s

80s 110s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

T-storms

80s 90s

Alaska Low: 31°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

80s

90s

70s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

56 59 58 68 69 78 43 75 62 45 79 81 73 59 60 57

68 76 87 75 86 87 77 93 78 68 86 85 78 73 88 83

showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy


FOR THE RECORD

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 2 AMERICA’S LINE

BASKETBALL | WNBA

Frontier League

BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League YANKEES .................-$175 .................Blue Jays INDIANS ................. -$360.....................Orioles RED SOX..................-$175 ........................ Rays RANGERS ................-$115...................... Angels TWINS......................-$170 ...................... Tigers WHITE SOX..............-$120 ..................... Royals Astros..................... -$140........................... A’S National League PHILLIES .................-$155 ........................ Mets NATIONALS ............ -$380....................Marlins Cubs ........................-$135 .................. PIRATES Giants......................-$110 ....................... REDS BRAVES ...................-$130 ....................Rockies CARDS .....................-$130 ...................Brewers D’backs....................-$125 ...................PADRES Interleague Dodgers...................-$130 .............. MARINERS

EASTERN W L Pct x-Atlanta 22 10 .688 x-Washington 21 11 .656 x-Connecticut 19 13 .594 Chicago 12 20 .375 New York 7 25 .219 Indiana 5 27 .156 WESTERN W L Pct x-Seattle 24 8 .750 x-Los Angeles 19 13 .594 x-Phoenix 18 14 .563 x-Minnesota 17 15 .531 Dallas 14 18 .438 Las Vegas 14 18 .438 Wednesday Washington 76, Indiana 62 Las Vegas 85, New York 72 Thursday • No games Friday Los Angeles at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Connecticut, 6 p.m. Las Vegas at Dallas, 7 p.m. New York at Seattle, 9 p.m. Atlanta at Phoenix, 9 p.m.

East W L Pct. Joliet 47 34 .580 Washington 46 35 .568 Lake Erie 42 39 .519 Schaumburg 40 41 .494 Traverse City 35 45 .438 Windy City 34 48 .415 West W L Pct. Normal 43 35 .551 Southern Illinois 41 37 .526 Florence 41 40 .506 Rascals 41 41 .500 Evansville 40 41 .494 Grizzlies 34 48 .415 Thursday Schaumburg 3, Windy City 2 Windy City 2, Schaumburg 1 Normal 7, Evansville 4 Washington 7, Traverse City 6 Joliet 5, Lake Erie 1 Southern Illinois 1, Rascals 0 Evansville 3, Normal 2 Florence 5, Grizzlies 3 Friday Evansville at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Normal at Rascals, 6:35 p.m. Traverse City at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Grizzlies at Southern Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

NFL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog LIONS .....................3..... 3......................Giants FALCONS ...............2.5... PK .................... Chiefs PANTHERS ............3.5...3.5 ................Dolphins BROWNS................3.5.... 3......................... Bills SAINTS ..................3.5...3.5 .....................Cards Saturday VIKINGS................ 4.5 ..4.5................. Jaguars RAMS......................3.... 1.5 ..................Raiders COWBOYS...............3..... 3................... Bengals TEXANS .................2.5...2.5 .....................49ers TITANS....................3..... 3........................ Bucs BRONCOS ...............3....3.5 .....................Bears CHARGERS .............3..... 3................Seahawks Monday COLTS ....................1.5.....1.................... Ravens

GB — 1 3 10 15 17 GB — 5 6 7 10 10

SOCCER Major League Soccer Wednesday D.C. United 4, Portland 1 Los Angeles FC 2, Real Salt Lake 0 Saturday LA Galaxy at Seattle, 3 p.m. New York at Vancouver, 6 p.m. New York City FC at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Chicago at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota United at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Portland at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Houston, 8 p.m. Toronto FC at San Jose, 9 p.m. Sunday Columbus at Atlanta United FC, 3 p.m. New England at D.C. United, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles FC, 9 p.m.

SOCCER • English Premier League Saturday Newcastle United ................................... +$150 CARDIFF CITY.......................................... +$210 Draw: +$200 | Over/under: 2.0 goals WEST HAM UNITED................................. +$120 Bournemouth .........................................+$230 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals EVERTON.................................................. -$110 Southampton..........................................+$320 Draw: +$230 | Over/under: 2.5 goals TOTTENHAM ...........................................-$400 Fulham....................................................+$980 Draw: +$480 | Over/under: 3.0 goals LEICESTER CITY ...................................... +$105 Wolverhampton......................................+$265 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals CHELSEA ..................................................-$130 Arsenal....................................................+$320 Draw: +$280 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Sunday BURNLEY................................................. +$130 Watford ...................................................+$240 Draw: +$205 | Over/under: 2.0 goals MANCHESTER CITY............................... -$1400 Huddersfield Town ...............................+$3100 Draw: +$980 | Over/under: 3.5 goals Manchester United.................................. -$135 BRIGHTON & HOVE.................................+$420 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Monday Liverpool..................................................-$230 CRYSTAL PALACE....................................+$550 Draw: +$360 | Over/under: 3.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

FOOTBALL NFL preseason

United Soccer League Thursday Bethlehem 2, Toronto 0 Saturday Indy at Ottawa, 1 p.m. Charlotte at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Penn at Richmond, 6 p.m. Charleston at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Nashville at Louisville, 6:30 p.m. Okla. City at Rio Grande Valley, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Fresno, 9 p.m. Tulsa at Salt Lake City, 9 p.m. Phoenix at Las Vegas, 10 p.m. Los Angeles at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Sunday Reno at Kansas City, 4 p.m. Seattle at Portland, 9 p.m.

English Premier League Saturday Cardiff vs. Newcastle, 6:30 a.m. Tottenham vs. Fulham, 9 a.m. West Ham vs. Bournemouth, 9 a.m. Everton vs. Southampton, 9 a.m. Leicester vs. Wolverhampton, 9 a.m. Chelsea vs. Arsenal, 11:30 a.m. Sunday Man City vs. Huddersfield, 7:30 a.m. Burnley vs. Watford, 7:30 a.m. Brighton vs. Man United, 10 a.m. Monday Crystal Palace vs. Liverpool, 2 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | Major League Baseball MLB — Suspended Los Angeles Dodgers OF Yasiel Puig two games and fined an undisclosed amount for fighting and inciting a bench-clearing incident in a Aug. 14 against San Francisco Giants. Fined San Francisco C Nick Hundley an undisclosed amount for his role in the incident. Suspended Miami Marlins RHP José Ureña six-games and an undisclosed fine for intentionally hitting Ronald Acuña Jr. of the Atlanta Braves and Braves first base coach Eric Young one-game and an undisclosed fine for his actions during the incident. American League LOS ANGELES — Placed RHP Hansel Robles on the 10-day DL, retoactive to August 15. Recalled RHP Ty Buttrey from Salt Lake (PCL). TEXAS — Activated OF Nomar Mazara from the 10-day DL. Optioned OF Willie Calhoun to Round Rock (PCL). Acquired RHP Kelvin Gonzalez from Kansas City for international slot money and assigned him to the Arizona League.

BASEBALL Little League World Series At South Williamsport, Pa. Double Elimination Thursday G1: Seoul (South Korea) 4, Guayama (Puerto Rico) 2, 9 innings G2: Staten Island (N.Y.) 5, Des Moines (Iowa) 2 G3: Matamoros (Mexico) 3, Gold Coast (Australia) 2 G4: Houston 3, Coventry (R.I.) 1 Friday G5: Barcelona (Spain) vs. Kawaguchi (Japan), 1 p.m. G6: Grosse Pointe Woods (Mich.) vs. Coeur d’Alene (Idaho), 3 p.m. G7: Arraijan (Panama) vs. Surrey (British Columbia), 5 p.m. G8: Peachtree City (Ga.) vs. Honolulu, 7 p.m. Saturday G9: Guayama (Puerto Rico) vs. Gold Coast (Australia), Noon G10: Des Moines (Iowa) vs. Coventry (R.I.), 2 p.m. G11: G5 loser vs. G7 loser, 5 p.m. G12: G6 loser vs. G8 loser, 7 p.m. Sunday G13: Seoul (South Korea) vs. Matamoros (Mexico), 8 a.m. G14: Staten Island (N.Y.) vs. Houston, 10 a.m. G15: G5 winner vs. G7 winner, Noon G16: G6 winner vs. G8 winner, 1 p.m.

FOOTBALL | National Football League CHICAGO — Signed LS Tanner Carew. Waived-injured LB Andrew Trumbetti. COLLEGE CAMPBELL — Promoted Tyler Robinson to assistant baseball coach. NORTH CAROLINA — Named Tyler Thompson associate tennis head coach.

GB — 1 5 7 11½ 13½ GB — 2 3½ 4 4½ 11

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England 2 0 0 1.000 NY Jets 1 1 0 .500 Miami 0 1 0 .000 Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston 1 0 0 1.000 Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 0 0 1.000 Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1.000 West W L T Pct Oakland 1 0 0 1.000 Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 LA Chargers 0 1 0 .000 Denver 0 1 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Washington 1 1 0 .500 NY Giants 0 1 0 .000 Philadelphia 0 2 0 .000 Dallas 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Carolina 1 0 0 1.000 New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 Detroit 0 1 0 .000 Chicago 0 2 0 .000 West W L T Pct San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 Seattle 0 1 0 .000 LA Rams 0 1 0 .000 Thursday New England 37, Philadelphia 20 Washington 15, NY Jets 13 Green Bay 51, Pittsburgh 34 Friday NY Giants at Detroit, 6 p.m. Kansas City at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Miami at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Arizona at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Saturday Jacksonville at Minnesota, Noon Oakland at LA Rams, 3 p.m. Cincinnati at Dallas, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Tennessee, 7 p.m. San Francisco at Houston, 7 p.m. Chicago at Denver, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at LA Chargers, 9 p.m. Monday Baltimore at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.

PF 63 30 24 23 PF 17 19 20 17 PF 50 20 30 65 PF 16 10 17 28

PA 37 15 26 28 PA 10 17 24 31 PA 23 10 27 65 PA 10 17 24 42

PF 32 10 34 21 PF 28 24 26 0 PF 82 42 10 43 PF 24 24 17 7

PA 39 20 68 24 PA 23 20 24 17 PA 51 28 16 47 PA 21 17 19 33

GOLF PGA | Wyndham Thursday | Greensboro, N.C. Purse: $6M | Yards: 7,127 | Par 70 (35-35) First Round Brandt Snedeker 27-32 — 59 Ryan Moore 30-33 — 63 John Oda 32-31 — 63 Martin Flores 32-32 — 64 D.A. Points 32-32 — 64 Brett Stegmaier 31-33 — 64 David Hearn 32-32 — 64 Abraham Ancer 30-34 — 64 Ollie Schniederjans 30-34 — 64 Jonathan Byrd 32-32 — 64 Corey Conners 31-34 — 65

-11 -7 -7 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5

WEATHER • Low 73, High 87 • Winds W/NW 3-8 mph

Nick Taylor Aaron Baddeley Ryan Armour Sung Kang Jim Furyk Brice Garnett Keith Mitchell C.T. Pan Sam Saunders Billy Horschel Webb Simpson Sergio Garcia Harris English Denny McCarthy Ricky Barnes Harold Varner III Michael Thompson Jason Dufner Peter Malnati Jamie Lovemark Alex Cejka Tommy Gainey Cameron Percy Ryan Blaum Zac Blair Hudson Swafford Sangmoon Bae Trey Mullinax Kevin Tway Brian Davis Scott Stallings Dylan Meyer Stephan Jaeger Tyrone Van Aswegen Russell Henley Billy Hurley III Ernie Els Dominic Bozzelli Joaquin Niemann Chesson Hadley Rafa Cabrera Bello Shawn Stefani Doug Ghim Xinjun Zhang Andrew Yun Norman Xiong Ken Duke Blayne Barber Chad Campbell Patrick Rodgers Richy Werenski Wesley Bryan Mackenzie Hughes Scott Brown Henrik Stenson Vaughn Taylor Fabian Gomez Matt Every Danny Lee Roberto Diaz Doc Redman Tom Hoge Shane Lowry Hideki Matsuyama William McGirt Chris Kirk James Driscoll Martin Laird Jason Kokrak Stuart Appleby Mickey DeMorat Lanto Griffin Conrad Shindler Rory Sabbatini David Lingmerth Bill Haas Padraig Harrington Jonas Blixt J.J. Henry Carl Pettersson Shane Bertsch Adam Schenk Nicholas Lindheim T.J. Vogel Matt Jones Johnson Wagner Tyler Duncan Graeme McDowell Brendan Steele Scott Piercy Whee Kim John Huh Matthew Fitzpatrick Martin Piller Hunter Mahan Grayson Murray Brian Gay Daniel Berger Jhonattan Vegas Nick Watney Steve Stricker Ben Crane Rob Oppenheim Stewart Jolly Andres Romero J.T. Poston Cameron Tringale John Merrick Satoshi Kodaira Davis Love III Jason Bohn Parker McLachlin Retief Goosen Ben Silverman Julian Suri Chris Stroud Robert Garrigus Peter Uihlein

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9 31-34 32-33 32-33 32-33 32-33 31-34 33-32 31-34 33-33 33-33 33-33 31-35 32-34 32-34 29-37 34-32 33-33 33-33 31-35 32-34 32-35 32-35 31-36 30-37 33-34 33-34 32-35 33-34 31-36 34-33 34-33 34-33 33-34 33-35 34-34 34-34 35-33 33-35 32-36 34-34 34-34 33-35 32-36 33-35 33-35 34-34 33-35 32-36 35-33 34-34 32-36 33-35 37-31 36-32 36-32 34-34 34-34 33-35 33-35 33-35 33-35 32-37 34-35 35-34 33-36 34-35 33-36 35-34 33-36 32-37 33-36 34-35 34-35 34-35 32-37 35-34 35-34 35-34 34-35 35-34 32-37 36-33 33-36 36-33 35-35 33-37 34-36 35-35 34-36 36-34 36-34 33-37 35-35 35-35 33-37 33-37 33-37 33-37 36-34 34-36 33-37 33-37 35-35 35-35 34-37 34-37 33-38 33-38 35-36 34-37 36-35 35-36 34-37 34-37 34-37 36-35 34-37 34-37

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71

-5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1

Derek Fathauer Brendon de Jonge Bronson Burgoon Steve Wheatcroft Will Zalatoris Jonathan Randolph Zecheng Dou Dicky Pride George McNeill Brandon Harkins Sam Ryder Sean O’Hair Kyle Thompson Kris Blanks Brian Stuard Arjun Atwal Matt Atkins Talor Gooch Rod Pampling Si Woo Kim Robert Streb Cody Gribble Seamus Power Daniel Summerhays Ethan Tracy Tom Lovelady Charles Frost

36-35 35-36 34-37 36-35 33-38 32-39 36-35 36-36 33-39 35-37 35-37 37-35 35-37 34-38 35-37 34-38 36-36 32-40 36-37 38-35 36-37 36-38 38-36 38-36 40-34 36-38 38-37

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 75

+1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5

Thursday | Indianapolis Purse: $2M | Yards: 6,456 | Par 72 (36-36) First Round | a-denotes amateur Lizette Salas 31-31 — 62 Nasa Hataoka 32-32 — 64 Angel Yin 28-36 — 64 Danielle Kang 33-32 — 65 Caroline Hedwall 32-33 — 65 Jin Young Ko 31-34 — 65 Jane Park 32-33 — 65 Brianna Do 34-32 — 66 Xiyu Lin 32-34 — 66 Lydia Ko 33-33 — 66 Carlota Ciganda 32-34 — 66 Mi Hyang Lee 33-33 — 66 Ashleigh Buhai 32-34 — 66 Mariah Stackhouse 33-33 — 66 Pernilla Lindberg 33-34 — 67 Wei-Ling Hsu 34-33 — 67 Thidapa Suwannapura 34-33 — 67 34-33 — 67 Nicole Broch Larsen Alena Sharp 34-33 — 67 Madeleine Sheils 33-34 — 67 Mariajo Uribe 33-34 — 67

-10 -8 -8 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5

Ryan Smith, Carlsbad, Calif. (143), 6 and 4 William Gordon, Davidson, N.C. (139) def. Hide Yoshihara, Japan (146), 4 and 3 Zheng Kai Bai, China (144) def. Travis Vick, Houston, (145), 4 and 3 William Mouw, Chino, Calif. (146) def. Alex Scott, Traverse City, Mich. (142), 1 up Trent Phillips, Inman, S.C. (143) def. Riley Elmes, Lake Oswego, Ore. (145), 3 and 2 Lower Bracket Cole Hammer, Houston (137) def. Alvaro Ortiz, Mexico (146), 2 up Joshua McCarthy, Danville, Calif. (144) def. Dan Erickson, Pace, Fla. (144), 3 and 2 Zach Murray, Australia (146) def. Jack Rhea, Jonesborough, Tenn. (142), 1 up Clay Feagler, Laguna Niguel, Calif. (146) def. Logan Lowe, Grass Valley, Calif. (142), 1 up Alex Fitzpatrick, England (146) def. Ian Siebers, Bellevue, Wash. (141), 2 and 1 Jesus Montenegro, Argentina (144) def. Braden Thornberry, Olive Branch, Miss. (145), 2 and 1 John Augenstein, Owensboro, Ky. (142) def. Collin Morikawa, La Canada Flintridge, Calif. (146), 19 holes McClure Meissner, San Antonio (145) def. Brad Dalke, Norman, Okla. (143), 1 up Andrew Alligood, St. Johns, Fla. (138) def. Ryan Stachler, Milton, Ga. (146), 19 holes Chun An Yu, Taiwan (144) def. Blake Windred, Australia (144), 6 and 5 Austin Squires, Union, Ky. (142) def. Max Theodorakis, Danbury, Conn. (146), 5 and 4 Luis Gagne, Costa Rica (146) def. Tyler Strafaci, Davie, Fla. (143), 4 and 3 Harrison Ott, Brookfield, Wis. (146) def. Justin Suh, San Jose, Calif. (140), 1 up Viktor Hovland, Norway (144) def. Hayden Wood, Edmond, Okla. (145), 3 and 2 Bradford Tilley, Easton, Conn. (146) def. Akshay Bhatia, Wake Forest, N.C. (142), 19 holes Kristoffer Reitan, Norway (143) def. Eoin Leonard, Ireland (145), 6 and 4

LPGA | Women in Tech

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Trucks | UNOH 200 Results

Euro | Nordea Masters Thursday | Gothenburg, Sweden Purse: $1.7 million | Yards: 7,169 | Par: 71 First Round Clement Sordet, France Scott Jamison, Scotland Lee Slattery, England Christofer Blomstrand, Sweden Tapio Pulkkanan, Finland Richard Green, Australia Hunter Stewart, United States Thomas Aiken, South Africa Matthieu Pavon, France Paul Waring, England Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark Daniel Brooks, England Lucas Herbert, Australia Thomas Detry, Belgium Sebastien Heisele, Germany Also Martin Kaymer, Germany Chase Koepka, United States Paul Peterson, United States Dru Love, United States Daniel Im, United States Anthony Paolucci, United States Jordan Gumberg, United States Wes McClain, United States

Thursday | Bristol, Tenn. Lap: 0.533 miles (Start pos. in parentheses) Driver Car Laps Pts 1. (4) Johnny Sauter Chevy 200 58 2. (13) Stewart Friesen Chevy 200 46 3. (3) John H. Nemechek Chevy 200 0 4. (6) Parker Kligerman Toyota 200 43 5. (8) Todd Gilliland Toyota 200 32 6. (11) Justin Haley Chevy 200 35 7. (2) Ben Rhodes Ford 200 40 8. (18) Matt Crafton Ford 200 29 9. (7) Noah Gragson Toyota 200 30 10. (5) Grant Enfinger Ford 200 37 11. (16) Dalton Sargeant Chevy 200 27 12. (10) Ross Chastain Chevy 199 0 13. (24) Austin Wayne Self Chevy 199 24 14. (19) Tanner Thorson Chevy 198 23 15. (20) Riley Herbst Toyota 198 22 16. (25) Codie Rohrbaugh Chevy 198 21 17. (30) Stefan Parsons Chevy 198 20 18. (14) Brett Moffitt Toyota 198 27 19. (15) Cody Coughlin Chevy 198 18 20. (21) Clay Greenfield Chevy 197 17 21. (23) Austin Hill Chevy 197 16 22. (29) Jordan Anderson Chevy 197 15 23. (32) Wendell Chavous Chevy 196 14 24. (31) Justin Fontaine Chevy 196 13 25. (26) Cory Roper Ford 195 12 26. (9) Jesse Little Toyota 194 11 27. (27) Korbin Forrister Toyota 188 10 28. (1) Christopher Bell Toyota 184 0 29. (17) Myatt Snider Ford (g)161 8 30. (12) Chad Finley Chevy (e)61 7 31. (22) Scott Lagasse Jr Toyota (a)24 0 32. (28) Bayley Currey Chevy (a)13 5. g=garage. e=engine. a=accident RACE STATISTICS Average Speed of Winner: 83.124 mph. Time: 1 hour, 16 minutes, 57 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.236 seconds. Caution Flags: 5 for 38 laps. Lead Changes: 6 among 4 drivers. Lap Leaders: C.Bell 1-31; J.Nemechek 32-116; J.Sauter 117-123; N.Gragson 124-130; J.Sauter 131-176; J.Nemechek 177-195; J.Sauter 196-200 Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Nemechek, 2 times for 102 laps; J.Sauter, 3 times for 55 laps; C.Bell, 1 time for 30 laps; N.Gragson, 1 time for 6 laps. Wins: J.Sauter, 5; B.Moffitt, 4; N.Gragson, 1; J.Haley, 1; J.Nemechek, 1; B.Rhodes, 1. Top 10 in Points: 1. J.Sauter, 683; 2. N.Gragson, 599; 3. G.Enfinger, 587; 4. S.Friesen, 582; 5. B.Moffitt, 560; 6. B.Rhodes, 532; 7. J.Haley, 529; 8. M.Crafton, 526; 9. M.Snider, 411; 10. D.Sargeant, 404.

62 64 64 65 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 69 69 71 72 74 76 83

U.S. Amateur Wednesday | Pebble Beach, Calif. Yards: 7,075 | Par: 71 Round of 64 | Upper Bracket Daniel Hillier, New Zealand (137) def. Jacob Bergeron, Slidell, La. (147), 3 and 2 Davis Riley, Hattiesburg, Miss. (144) def. Ryan Burnett, Lafayette, Calif. (144), 2 and 1 Mason Overstreet, Kingfisher, Okla. (146) def. Cameron Sisk, El Cajon, Calif. (142), 1 up Jackson Van Paris, Pinehurst, N.C. (146) def. Dylan Perry, Australia (142), 1 up Noah Goodwin, Corinth, Texas (141) def. Garrett Rank, Canada (146), 5 and 4 Raul Pereda, Mexico (144) def. Trey Winstead, Baton Rouge, La. (145), 23 holes Shintaro Ban, San Jose, Calif. (141) def. Skip Berkmeyer, St. Louis, Mo. (146), 1 up Devon Bling, Ridgecrest, Calif. (145) def. Caleb Ramirez, Blythe, Calif. (144), 5 and 4 Trevor Phillips, Inman, S.C. (146) def. Michael Thorbjornsen, Wellesley, Mass. (139), 4 and 3 Isaiah Salinda, South San Francisco, Calif. (144) def. Will Grimmer, Cincinnati, (145), 6 and 5 Stewart Hagestad, Newport Beach, Calif. (142) def. Harry Hall, England (146), 1 up Davis Chatfield, Attleboro, Mass. (145) def.

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 117° Death Valley, California

Low: 28° West Yellowstone, Montana

Warm with a few more storms 70s

A few more scattered showers and storms are possible, especially to the east and south of St. Louis. It will continue to be warm with highs in the upper 80s. Drier conditions are forecast for this weekend. Another storm system will bring more storms to the area on Monday.

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

76°

84°

86°

77°

Partly sunny, Slight chance Slight chance isolated storms of storms of storms

Partly cloudy

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

Rain

90s 80s

70s

4-DAY FORECAST

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

71°/89°

71°/83°

68°/81°

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy

Showers/ storms likely

Partly sunny

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

87 87 86 85 87 87 87 86 85 86 86 86 85

thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

H

W

69 73 71 69 70 67 71 69 69 68 70 69

83 86 82 82 81 82 85 82 85 82 84 83

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms

Kirksville 66 / 86

Springfield 70 / 8 4

Kansas City 70 / 8 7 St. Louis 73 / 87 Joplin 71 / 87

Carbondale 73 / 8 6 Poplar Bluff 72 / 87

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

0.20” 2.13” 1.61” 28.15” 26.37” Current Level

- 0.75 - 0.13 - 0.99 - 0.99 - 0.17 - 0.10 - 0.22 - 0.19 + 0.53 - 0.01

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, Aug 16th Weed - 2 (low), Mold - 56,730 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS 18 Yesterday 259 Month (Total) 1553 Season 1438 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 11.30 Peoria 18 12.07 Beardstown 14 9.59 MERAMEC RIVER Sullivan 15 2.35 Valley Park 16 - 2.67 Arnold 24 6.95 BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.48 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 18.67 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

+ 0.16 + 0.08 - 0.03 + 0.22 - 0.07 - 0.21 - 0.01

SUN & MOON

First Aug 18 Sunrise

Full Aug 26

Last Sep 2

6:17 AM Sunset

New Sep 9 7:53 PM

Moonrise 1:06 PM Moonset ————-

Venus will reach maximum eastern elongation tonight. This means Venus will be at its highest in the sky after sunset. After today, Venus will begin to head back to the sun’s glare reaching inferior conjunction on October 26th. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

357.02 360.08 497.84 658.90 704.96 657.47 913.57 838.84 599.88 405.95 601.20 445.28

- 0.05 + 0.04 + 0.23 - 0.03 0.00 - 0.06 - 0.04 + 0.05 0.00 + 0.07 - 0.06 + 0.07

- 1.52 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 92°

Jet Stream

Scattered showers and thunderstorms are expected throughout portions of the Northeast, southern Great Lakes, Ohio Valley, Midwest, and Tennessee Valley in association with a frontal boundary. Parts of the Deep South, central Gulf Coast, and southern Rockies will also see a few storms develop. Dry conditions will be in place across the upper Midwest and north-central Plains with high pressure in control. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 69 Albuquerque 67 Anchorage 53 Atlanta 73 Atlantic City 73 Baltimore 74 Billings 63 Biloxi, Ms. 78 Birmingham 73 Bismarck 59 Boise 71 Boston 70 Buffalo 72 Burlington, Vt. 63 Charleston, S.C. 75 Charleston, W.V. 70 Charlotte 73 Cheyenne 55 Chicago 71 Cincinnati 70 Cleveland 70 Colorado Spgs. 58 Concord, N.H. 59 Dallas 80 Daytona Beach 76 Denver 60 Des Moines 66 77 Destin, Fl. 70 Detroit 73 El Paso 73 Evansville 49 Fairbanks 55 Fargo 55 Flagstaff 76 Fort Myers 61 Great Falls 66 Green Bay 71 Hartford 77 Honolulu 77 Houston 71 Indianapolis 74 Jackson, Ms. 50 Juneau 83 Key West 83 Las Vegas 77 Little Rock 72 Los Angeles 74 Louisville

84 87 62 87 91 92 95 88 89 92 91 81 81 77 90 85 91 82 82 81 81 79 80 97 90 89 86 87 83 94 85 63 89 78 93 93 85 87 90 95 82 90 60 91 102 90 88 82

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy showers cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers

70 66 53 72 75 74 64 77 73 61 65 73 66 64 76 70 73 55 68 68 68 56 67 78 74 61 64 79 67 73 70 49 60 54 76 62 61 72 77 77 68 73 47 83 85 73 70 71

79 90 62 84 89 87 80 89 86 94 90 82 80 76 90 81 88 79 83 82 80 79 79 97 91 85 87 88 83 94 85 67 89 81 92 81 82 84 90 94 83 89 64 91 106 90 87 86

showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny smoke showers mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms showers thunderstorms showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms showers sunny showers showers partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms

City

Today L H

72 Macon 80 McAllen, Tx. 76 Memphis 79 Miami 68 Milwaukee Minneapolis 66 Missoula, Mt. 55 74 Mobile Montgomery 72 75 Nashville New Orleans 77 New York City 76 Norfolk, Va. 75 Oklahoma City 73 Omaha 66 Orlando 76 Palm Springs 83 Philadelphia 76 Phoenix 82 Pittsburgh 69 Portland, Me. 60 Portland, Or. 57 Providence 72 Raleigh 73 Rapid City 59 Reno 63 Richmond, Va. 74 Sacramento 58 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 68 San Antonio 76 San Diego 73 San Francisco 54 Santa Fe 58 Savannah 74 Seattle 57 78 Shreveport 62 Sioux Falls 70 Syracuse 73 Tallahassee 77 Tampa 72 Tucson 74 Tulsa 74 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 78 72 Wichita Wilmington, De. 74 83 Yuma

90 102 90 91 79 89 89 90 90 89 90 88 93 93 85 93 104 91 104 80 73 78 87 92 86 95 94 97 91 94 98 82 70 84 91 74 97 83 82 89 92 97 92 92 90 90 91 105

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny showers thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy

72 79 73 78 66 65 56 75 73 73 77 75 76 73 64 75 85 74 85 68 67 57 74 74 62 58 76 60 79 68 76 73 54 58 75 58 76 60 65 74 77 74 71 74 78 68 73 84

88 100 89 90 80 88 86 88 89 87 90 86 90 89 87 94 107 88 107 79 76 83 85 89 84 97 91 100 91 87 99 82 73 87 91 79 96 83 79 90 91 98 91 87 89 90 86 109

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers showers sunny showers thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

74 59 72 80 79 79 75 64 63 53 77 57 78 47 53 61

87 71 90 112 91 86 86 90 86 65 95 86 87 58 65 84

partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly sunny

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

61 77 72 77 68 52 65 52 72 81 55 62 54 79 51 82

77 83 87 90 86 81 93 72 91 106 75 69 76 87 73 94

W

thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny sunny cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms rain sunny thunderstorms partly sunny thunderstorms

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.30 + 0.16 0.00 + 0.01 - 0.03

Very unhealthy

Good

80s

90s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER 32 16.30 Kansas City Jefferson City 23 11.46 Hermann 21 10.06 Washington 20 7.42 St. Charles 25 14.14 MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 10.95 Hannibal 15 11.65 Louisiana 25 17.53 Dam 24 26 17.39 Dam 25 18 15.49 Grafton 419 418.50 M.Price, Pool 21 7.66 M.Price, Tail. 30 9.77 St Louis 27 13.46 Chester Cape Girardeau 32 18.78

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

92° 73° 88° 70° 103° 56° 91° 71°

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (3:59 p.m.) Low (5:38 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1936) Record Low (1992) High Last Year Low Last Year

90s

Wintry Mix

City

L

90s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

69 73 69 70 70 71 70 66 69 69 66 70 68

W

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

Chicago 71 / 8 2

Snow

80s

100s

71°/88°

80s

70s

80s

SATURDAY

80s

80s 110s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

T-storms

80s 90s

Alaska Low: 31°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

80s

90s

70s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

56 59 58 68 69 78 43 75 62 45 79 81 73 59 60 57

68 76 87 75 86 87 77 93 78 68 86 85 78 73 88 83

showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy


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Friday, August 17, 2018

ECO-FRIENDLY HOME TECHNOLOGY

BACK

PLANTATION SHUTTERS

Windo Van Go, Your Local Expert Sponsored Content by Windo Van Go

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lantation shutters have always been one of the most stylish and upgraded looks a home owner can give their windows. The introduction of composite and vinyl shutters has made them more affordable. “Shutters are a treatment you buy once and love forever” says Julie Tolmais, owner of Windo Van Go. “While they are more expensive than custom blinds, shutters add so much warmth and style to your home and are quickly becoming our top-selling window treatment.” Windo Van Go sells vinyl and composite shutters, as well as wood shutters. Vinyl and composite shutters are practically maintenance free and indistinguishable from wood. Plantation shutters offer lexibility with privacy at the bottom while allowing light in at the top and provide excellent insulation. Shutters come in 2-1/2”, 3-1/2” and 4-1/2” louver sizes and are available in a variety of paint and stain colors. (Plantation Shutters Continued on Page 2)

DECORATE YOUR HOME WITH NEW WINDOW TREATMENTS

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636-265-2646 www.KempHomes.com


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WEATHER THE HOT SUMMER

BLINDS

Continued from Page 1

Like shutters, blinds give you the flexibility to control your light with just the tilt of the louvers. Still popular and maintenance free, they come standard with a decorative valance to finish off your window and are cost friendly.

PLANTATION SHUTTERS Shutters are one of Windo Van Go’s most popular products. They provide so many aspects to your window--great decor, superb insulation, flexibility of light control from room darkening to light and open. Composite/vinyl shutters come in white and off-white and are easy to clean and care for, and are more cost efficient. Wood shutters come in a variety of paints and warm stains. All of their shutters come with a variety of frame styles that work with your window.

HONEYCOMB SHADES Honeycomb shades offer a soft, light look to your window and give you excellent insulation and privacy at the same time. There are many configurations to honeycomb shades: standard raised from the bottom or a top down/bottom up gives the choice of stacking the shade at the bottom or the top or anywhere in between. These are great

for bathrooms and bedrooms where many would like privacy at the bottom and openness at the top. Cordless shades are a great option to keep the cords away from the children, and motorized are great for the hard to reach windows. Windo Van Go makes choosing window coverings easy and efficient. Their experts will visit your home to discuss your choices, take measurements, show samples, and give you a quote. Call (636) 394-3411 to schedule an in-home consultation. www.windovangostl.com. Windo Van Go Current Promotions: Free sales tax on all plantation shutters. Free cordless option on all honeycomb shades. Promotion ends September 15, 2018

10 Tricks for Hosting an Open House Sponsored Content By National Association of REALTORS® HouseLogic

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ew words get homebuyers more excited than ‘open house.’ For sellers, an open house is a chance to throw open the doors, dazzle buyers with the big reveal and make someone fall head over heels for that special, charming abode. The following tricks will help make any open house a massive hit. 1.Time It Right: An agent will typically hold an open house for two to three hours between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, when buyers have time and flexibility away from their jobs. To maximize foot traffic, avoid having an open house during holidays, big community events or unofficial “holidays” like Super Bowl Sunday. 2. LetYour Agent Take the Lead: For the seller, the real estate agent is the director; they give instructions on how to prepare for the open house and what to do during the event. To buyers, the agent is the host; they welcome viewers, introduce the home’s impressive features and respond to questions. The seller’s job is to make the home look like a million bucks — or more like $300,000, depending on the price range. 3.Try Simple Staging: A home should look its best while it’s on the market, especially during the open house. Many agents say the best way to primp a home for its big day is to stage it. Depending on what the agent recommends, staging may involve renting new furniture or decorating certain rooms in the home. There are also some easy staging tricks to try on the day of the open house. Consider displaying a bouquet of fresh flowers in the entryway, setting the dining room table to make it look inviting, or turning on the

outdoor sprinklers shortly before visitors arrive to make the lawn sparkle. 4. Clean Like Crazy: When a home is on the market, sellers will need to keep it in showing shape — not only for the open house, but also for any scheduled showings with buyers. Even though it’s already been cleaned and organized for its listing photos, there’s a good chance the clutter or dust has piled up again. Make sure appliances, windows and mirrors are fingerprint-free. Clean and organize closets, cabinets, and under the sinks. Clear every bit of clutter or put it in storage. 5. Do a Smell Check: If buyers get a whiff of something funky, they’re going to run — not walk — out of the open house. A week prior to the open house, ask the agent or a neighbor to do an honest, no-holds-barred smell check. 6. Put Pictures andValuables Away: A home should feel cozy and inviting, but not like someone specific is living there. Personal belongings such as family photos, awards and religious art can distract homebuyers and make it harder for them to imagine themselves living in the home. Don’t go overboard — the idea isn’t to eliminate every trace of the family, but consider temporarily hiding some pictures and personal effects out of sight during the open house. 7. Let the Light In: Light not only brightens up the space, it also makes a room look and feel larger. On open-house day, open all curtains and blinds to let the natural light in. Replace every single burnt-out light bulb in and outside the home — buyers should see a working light every time

they flip a switch. 8. Give the House Extra Curb Appeal: Buyers will judge the house on the outside, too. So, make last-minute improvements to turn up the curb appeal. Cut the grass, prune the trees, trim the shrubs and set out potted flowers. Touch up porch fixtures and furniture with a little paint. Small, relatively low-budget outdoor enhancements will make a home look all the more enticing to buyers — and may add last-minute value to the listing price. 9. Draw Attention to the Best Features: After the agent signs in and welcomes buyers to the home, they typically will have time to wander around on their own. Even though the seller won’t be there, the agent will have a last-minute opportunity to highlight special features. Post friendly and aesthetically pleasing signs around the house with calls to action such as, “look down, new hardwood floors,” or “gas fireplace, push this button.” Buyers will likely appreciate the help, and that they’re working with a conscientious seller. 10. Serve Refreshments: Serving warm cookies or freshly baked brownies at an open house is one of the oldest tricks in the book — that’s because it works: Buyers love being greeted with a sweet treat and a cold or warm beverage depending on the time of year. Refreshments also give people a reason to stay longer: No one will rush off because they’re hungry or thirsty. An agent may have a relationship with a local cafe or bakery, which might offer snacks for free advertising at the open house. This article provided through a partnership between The St. Louis Post-Dispatch and St. Louis REALTORS®.

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Southern Plantation Style Estate for Sale! 3161 Plattin Rd, Festus 63028 • $599,900

Southern Living’s plan of the year! 10.46 acre estate with 5 year new custom built 3,313 total sq. ft. home. Spectacular private surrounding with the mini farm you’ve dreamed of, if desired. 48x18 great hall that comprises living room, dining, foyer and oak staircase. Two gas fireplaces keep the large gathering area cozy while the light palette and many oversize windows keep it fresh and bright. Custom built to be energy efficient with 6” walls, premium insulation pkg and Andersen wood windows, rustic elegant design with 10’ ceilings, 9” crown moulding and hand scraped oak floors, Spacious open kitchen with Cambria counter tops, Bosch appliances, 8’ island and custom dish hutches. 20x30 Barn with horse stall, fenced pasture, raised garden beds, 4 level tree house, walking trail and herb garden. You must experience relaxing on the covered front porch! Location, location! 5 min from Interstate, hospitals & Schools. 2017 Roof, All this and Much More! Call Cindy today 314-578-5612 cindycallahan.com Realty Executives Five Star Homes 636-931-9800

3 ways to make your home more eco-friendly with smart home technology Sponsored content and photo by Brandpoint®

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ore and more Americans are shifting to a greener lifestyle, and if you’re one of them, you’re always looking for ways to reduce your impact on the environment. Cutting your energy usage is a big part of that, and the benefits of doing so are twofold: First, of course, is being more environmentally friendly, and second, is the added bonus of lower monthly energy bills. Consider this: The average American household spends $1,300 on energy expenses each year. Installing a smart home system like Iris or Google Home Mini can help you reduce those costs by putting you in total control of the connected devices in your home and making your home more energy efficient. Decide which smart home system is right for you and consider the tips below for using smart home technology to make your home more eco-friendly: * Control your home’s temperature from anywhere. Installing a smart thermostat connected to your home

automation system can help reduce your energy costs by 15-30 percent each year. Smart thermostats allow you to program your thermostat based on your daily routine so you can conserve more energy when you aren’t at home. This way you’re not wasting additional energy heating or cooling an empty space. * Water effectively. Unnecessary watering can waste more than 6,000 gallons of water per month. Installing a smart irrigation system can help you avoid unnecessary watering by automating the watering of your lawn based on weather conditions. You can make final adjustments as the season goes on to ensure your lawn stays fresh and your water usage is manageable. * Dim your lights. Accidentally leaving the lights on in a room you’re not using is obviously a waste of energy. At the same time, you may also be wasting energy simply by using more brightness than you need. Most people don’t need their lights to be on at 100 percent. Installing a smart

dimmer is easy and allows you to adjust your lights based on your needs and preferences. Once it’s installed, try setting your lights to 80 percent of their previous usage. You probably won’t notice the difference in the room, but you’ll certainly see it on your energy bill. From your appliances and your laptop to your smartphone, you use technology every single day to make your life easier. So why not utilize it to live a more ecofriendly lifestyle? To learn more about adding any of these solutions to your home, visit your local Lowe’s store today or head to www.lowes.com/smarthome.


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

Presto! WILLMAN APPEARS ON NETFLIX Page 26

08.17.18–08.23.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

Brick River pairs excellent ciders with conventional pub fare Page 28 Lynyrd Skynyrd says farewell to the road Page 6

T O U R O U R T OWN WALK THIS WAY Guided outings can teach you about food, ghosts, architecture, history, art and more

Page 14


08.17.18–08.23.18 ▼

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

A selection of dishes cover a table at Mango for a Sweet St. Louis Food Tour.

Visit EnterpriseCenter.com for the complete upcoming events schedule.

Cover story You needn’t be an outof-towner to enjoy — and learn from — a walking tour of St. Louis. Page 14

Datebook

FORMERLY PEABODY OPERA HOUSE

Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Cole Swindell at the Ready Room, “Lost in the Stars” at Union Avenue Opera and Festival of the Little Hills in St. Charles. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks. Page 4

Music & Clubs ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

Lynyrd Skynyrd is ready to say goodbye to the road. Page 6 Real life fuels debut solo album by Beth Ditto. Page 7

Organizer of An Under Cover Weekend picks nine must-see acts. Page 11

Kelly Macdonald provides the missing pieces in “Puzzle.” Page 22

See & Do

“Alpha” is simple but will melt any dog lover’s heart. Page 22

St. Louis World’s Fare combines education and celebration in fifth annual festival. Page 12 Recently reviewed theater. Page 13

Screens “Crazy Rich Asians” sends an empowering message. Page 19 Lead actors are the high point in stoner comedy “Never Goin’ Back.” Page 20

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6

ON SALE TODAY AT NOON

Recently reviewed movies. Page 24 St. Louis native Justin Willman appears on Netflix with “Magic for Humans.” Page 26 TV Q&A. Page 27

“Dark Money” tracks the harm from secretive campaign contributions. Page 21

Herb Alpert promises a show that’s “transparent, of the moment and honest.” Page 8

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29

“The Cakemaker” is a low-key but fascinating love story. Page 23

Blackberry Smoke moves past its frustration on new projects. Page 8 Ticket Tracker. Page 10

Fuel Brick River Cider Co. pairs excellent cider with conventional pub fare. Page 28 Recently reviewed restaurants. Page 30

ON THE COVER • Post-Dispatch photos

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

Visit StifelTheatre.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. EnterpriseCenter.com

StLouisBlues.com

StifelTheatre.com

Enterprise Center Group Sales: 314-622-5454 | Stifel Theatre Group Sales: 314-499-7676 Ticketmaster: 800-745-3000

2

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 08.17.18-08.23.18

WHAT’S HOT AT STLTODAY.COM ➨ We designed six routes to help you discover the St. Louis craft-brew scene. stltoday.com/hiphops ➨ Caleb Johnson who? Our critic ranks “Idol” winners from worst to best. stltoday.com/blender ➨ Less salmon and other highlights from Downtown Restaurant Week. stltoday.com/offthemenu ➨ No mistakes, only “happy accidents,” in libraries’ Bob Ross painting class. stltoday.com/arts

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : G A B E H A R T W I G / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ; WA R N E R B R O S . E N T E R TA I N M E N T ( “ C R A Z Y R I C H A S I A N S ” ) ; H I L L A R Y L E V I N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( B R I C K R I V E R C I D E R C O . )

TUESDAY, JUNE 18


HERE’S WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS WEEK ▼

“Immediately bingeing Justin Willman’s new Netflix series, ‘Magic for Humans.’ I was hooked at the first trailer.” •

“Attempting to help my husband brew his own beer!” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com Jon Naso • photo editor, 314-340-8775, jnaso@post-dispatch.com Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com

“This is an easy one: Sam Smith on Friday at Chaifetz Arena.” •

Emily Tintera • event and sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischoff • Post-Dispatch vice president of sales and marketing, 314-340-8529, dbischoff@post-dispatch.com

“A slow re-entry into work after a whirlwind vacation across Michigan. We loved the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn and the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids. Worth another visit someday!” •

CONTRIBUTORS

“The annual Edwardsville Rotary Criterium Festival.” •

Emma Baker • features intern Cara DeMichele • designer Brian Feldt • beer writer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Dylan Kiefer • features intern Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • theater critic

“Catching the nuances of ‘Nuages’ at the Django Reinhardt tribute at the Focal Point.” •

CONTACT US “Union Avenue Opera’s production of ‘Lost in the Stars’ sounds like a worthy close to their season.” •

Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • stltoday.com/events Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us ae@post-dispatch.com Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

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COPYRIGHT 2018 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

stltoday.com/go

08.17.18-08.23.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


STLTODAY.COM/EVENTS ▼

Hermann Wine & Jazz Festival

Cole Swindell performs at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre in 2017.

WHEN Noon-9:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Clara Eitmann Messmer Amphitheater, Fourth and Gutenberg streets, Hermann, Mo. • HOW MUCH Free admission • MORE INFO hermannjazz.com

BEST BETS

The Charles Glenn Group, the Montez Coleman Quartet and Bach to the Future are among the acts scheduled to perform at this annual Hermann event. Bring along blankets and lawn chairs, and check out live jazz under the sky. BY CALVIN WILSON

FRIDAY Cole Swindell WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Avenue • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO ticketfly.com

New country music star Cole Swindell plays St. Louis just as his new album, “All of It,” is being released. The new album follows “You Should Be Here” (2016). Swindell’s show at the Ready Room is sold out. Expect bigger things from him in the future.

Rise Up Festival WHEN 5-11 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Washington Avenue, between 16th and 17th streets • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO riseupfestival.org

R. Kelly WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $48-$98 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

R. Kelly still has concerts in 2018? That’s amazing, not because of the numerous allegations of sexual misconduct that have surrounded him since the ’90s but because the new flurry of accusations this year didn’t prevent him from getting booked at the Family Arena. But apparently Kelly still has fans who support him. (Kelly, for the record, has not been convicted of a crime). BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Union Avenue Opera: ‘Lost in the Stars’ WHEN 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Aug. 24 and 25; preview lectures at 7 p.m. Fridays • WHERE Union Avenue Christian Church, 733 North Union Boulevard • HOW MUCH $32-$55 • MORE INFO 314-361-2881; unionavenueopera.org

Union Avenue Opera closes its 2018 season with Kurt Weill’s powerful “Lost in the Stars.” Based on Alan Paton’s 1948 novel “Cry, the Beloved Country,” it’s a story of fathers and sons, loss and reconciliation, in apartheid-era South Africa. The production, which has received support from the Kurt Weill Foundation for

Music, is directed by Shaun Patrick Tubbs; UAO artistic director Scott Schoonover conducts. The cast includes Kenneth Overton as Stephen Kumalo, Tim Schall as James Jarvis, Melody Wilson as Linda and Myke Andrews as Absalom. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Festival of the Little Hills WHEN 4-10 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Main Street and Frontier Park, St. Charles • HOW MUCH Free; shuttles from parking at several locations • MORE INFO 636-940-0095; festivalofthelittlehills.com

This popular festival, now in its 47th year, is

at the base of the “little hills” that gave the city of St. Charles its original name, Les Petites Côtes. Main Street and Frontier Park on the Missouri Riverfront come alive with more than 300 vendors, craft demonstrators and antique dealers. More than 50 nonprofit groups sell food and drinks, making this event a major fundraiser for their individual goals. Trixie Delight headlines Friday, and Dr. Zhivegas headlines Saturday evening. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

YMCA 40th Annual Book Fair WHEN 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Tuesday • WHERE Greensfelder Recreation Complex, 550 Weidman Road, Queeny Park • HOW MUCH $10 Friday, free Saturday-Tuesday • MORE INFO ymcabookfair.org

This year, the YMCA’s annual book fair will feature more than half a million books, CDs, magazines and records with prices starting at just 50 cents. On Saturday, Family Day, attendees can meet local authors and enjoy food trucks, arts and crafts, and other activities. Collectors can stop by the rare books collection for a chance to swipe a first-

edition Stephen King novel or a signed copy of an Aretha Franklin book. All proceeds from the fair benefit the YMCA’s youth and literacy programs. BY DYLAN KIEFER

‘King Charles III’ WHEN 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, through Aug. 26; additional show at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 23 • WHERE Ivory Theater, 7620 Michigan Avenue • HOW MUCH $15-$20 • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

St. Louis Shakespeare presents Mike Bartlett’s drama that speculates about Prince Charles’ ascension to, and reign as, leader of the United Kingdom. Directed by Donna Northcott.

SATURDAY Rock the Hops WHEN 2-8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Check-in at Alton Visitors Center, 200 Piasa Street, Alton • HOW MUCH $30 • MORE INFO rockthehops2018. brownpapertickets.com

The cute name implies dancing, and yes, beer. There will be a lot of both at this celebration of music, art and craft beer: more than 25 musical performances, more than 30 artists, vendors and makers, and more than 25 styles of craft beer for sampling. BY

VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Traditional Music Day WHEN 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday • WHERE The Historic Daniel Boone Home, 1868 Highway F, Defiance • HOW MUCH $5-$8, free for active/ retired military and children

VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

BY CALVIN WILSON

FAST FORWARD The Art Fair at Queeny Park, Aug. 31-Sept. 2 at Queeny Park: More than 120 artists will sell their works at this annual Labor Day event inside the Greensfelder Recreation Complex • ’90s House Party, Sept. 8 at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre: Break out the boombox and parachute pants for an old-school show featuring Vanilla Ice, Coolio, Montell Jordan, All-4-One and more • Taste of St. Louis, Sept. 14-16 at Chesterfield Amphitheatre: Sample food from 30 area restaurants while enjoying free music, art, culinary challenges and family events • “Love Never Dies,” Sept. 18-30 at the Fox Theatre: The 2018-19 Broadway Series kicks off with Andrew Lloyd Webber’s sequel to “The Phantom of the Opera” Vanilla Ice

4

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 08.17.18-08.23.18

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ stltoday.com/events stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( S W I N D E L L ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( VA N I L L A I C E )

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Check out art and dance to tunes at this festival, organized by the nonprofit housing developer Rise. Music groups Dirty Muggs, Fat Pocket, Afriky Lolo and Top of the World will perform, and vendors will sell food and other items. Rising artists will also showcase their work, and Civil Life will sell its beer. BY


Colorful signs are for sale at a booth at the Festival of the Little Hills.

4 and under • MORE INFO 636-949-7535; sccmo.org

$20 • MORE INFO 314-4423283; geshermusicfestival.org

Explore the historic buildings in the village at the Daniel Boone home while enjoying musicians from Driftwood Music, KDHX Folk School and throughout the area. Each building in the village — including a grist mill, general store and schoolhouse — came from within 50 miles of the Boone property. BY VALERIE

The Gesher Music Festival is back for its eighth season of chamber music, this year with a theme of “Voices Rising.” Two concerts remain. On Saturday evening at the 560 Music Center, “Rise Up: Sounds of Protest” includes works like Ilse Weber’s “Lullaby,” composed in a concentration camp, Frederic Rzewski’s “Mayn Yingele” and the 1960 String Quartet No. 8 by Dmitri Shostakovich. On Sunday afternoon at the JCC Wool Studio Theater, the season closes with “Giving Voice,” by composers who include women, African-Americans, members of the LGBT community, and others.

SCHREMP HAHN

Edwardsville Rotary Criterium Festival

P H O T O : C H R I S T I A N G O O D E N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

WHEN 3-11 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Downtown Edwardsville • HOW MUCH $25-$35 for adult bike and running races, free for kids races or to watch • MORE INFO criteriumedwardsville.com

Bring your bike or cowbell to cheer on cyclists racing through downtown Edwardsville in this ninth annual event. Kids can be fitted for a free bicycle helmet, create a free work of art in the Pedal and Paint Art Tent, and enjoy activities from We Rock the Spectrum kids gym and the Watershed Nature Center. Local restaurants and Global Brew will sell food and drinks. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Gesher Music Festival WHEN AND WHERE 7:30 p.m. Saturday at 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue, University City; 3 p.m. Sunday at JCC Wool Studio Theater, 2 Millstone Campus Drive • HOW MUCH

stltoday.com/go

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Martin Luther Mathews Awards & Benefit Concert WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$100 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Funk/R&B veteran band Cameo (“Word Up,” “Candy,” “She’s Strange”) highlights the Soul Funk Fest, part of the Martin Luther Mathews Awards & Benefit Concert. Also performing are Doug E. Fresh and the Love Jones Band. Before the concert is a one-hour awards show, hosted by Darius Bradford. The awards honor the achievements of high-

performing youths, volunteers and others. The event benefits the Mathews-Dickey Boys’ & Girls’ Club. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

‘Happy Together Tour 2018’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $43-$78 • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

The “Happy Together Tour 2018,” now in its ninth year, returns to resurrect some of the hits of the 1960s and ’70s. Performing are the Turtles, Chuck Negron (formerly of Three Dog Night), Gary Puckett & the Union Gap, the Association, Mark Lindsay (formerly of Paul Revere & the Raiders), and the Cowsills. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SUNDAY Rod Stewart, Cyndi Lauper WHEN 7:30 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $30-$500 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; livenation.com

Rock ’n’ roll great Rod Stewart and veteran performer Cyndi Lauper, who teamed up for a tour last year, are together for another round that includes a stop Sunday at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre. Stewart will release his 30th studio album, “Blood Red Roses,” on Sept.

28. The album is a collection of original tunes with a trio of covers sprinkled in. “I always think I make albums for a few friends, and this record has that intimacy,” he said in a statement. “Sincerity and honesty go a long way in life, and the same is true in songwriting.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

WEDNESDAY Lil Baby, YK Osiris, City Girls, Kollision, B LA B, 24 Heavy WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $27.50-$30 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

Lil Baby has only been rapping for a year now, and the rising Atlanta star already is on a nationwide tour. His song “Yes Indeed,” which he recorded with Drake, was a Top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 and has reached more than 1.6 billion streams. His debut album, “Harder Than Ever,” features Quavo, Offset, Lil Yachty, Lil Uzi Vert, Young Thug, Moneybagg Yo and more. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Downtown Restaurant Week WHEN Monday through Aug. 26 • WHERE Various downtown restaurants • HOW MUCH $25-$35 per person • MORE INFO downtownrestaurantweek.net

Fifteen participating Downtown Restaurant Week establishments are serving threecourse dinners for $25 or $35 per person (drinks, tax and tip not included) next week. To help Operation Food Search, which provides meals to the hungry in our community, add a $5 “extra helping” to your check. Organizers say some 8,000 diners took part in last year’s event. Reservations are strongly recommended. BY IAN FROEB

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STLTODAY.COM/MUSIC

Johnny Van Zant of Lynyrd Skynyrd

Lynyrd Skynyrd ready to ‘stop and smell the roses’ After three decades on the road, the Southern rockers are finally on their farewell tour BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

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ynyrd Skynyrd is one of many bands to announce a farewell tour this year, and for the classic Southern rock act, St. Louis is clearly a must among the tour stops. The “Last of the Street Survivors Farewell Tour” comes to Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre on Saturday night with special guests. Lead singer Johnny Van Zant says St. Louis has always been good to the “Free kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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Bird” and “Sweet Home Alabama” band. “In 1987 when the band got back together, we went through there,” he says. “We always had a good time there, and the fans have always come out for us over the years.” A plane crash 10 years earlier killed some Lynyrd Skynyrd band members including Johnny Van Zant’s older brother, Ronnie Van Zant. “It’s been 31 years out there, pounding the pavement every year,” Van Zant says.

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“We’re all getting a little older, and Gary (Rossington, lead guitarist and sole founding member still in the group) has been having some heart trouble. We all just need to stop and smell the roses. Playing is great, but traveling is hard. Traveling just gets to you. We want to spend more time with family. We love our fans, don’t get me wrong. “If we could do a residency in St. Louis, we would.” Lynyrd Skynyrd’s farewell isn’t a complete vanishing act. The farewell refers to touring only. Despite the band’s love of being in front of its fans, it has created a strange feeling for Van Zant. “Being onstage is a great thing — what a great high,” he BYE, BYE, says. “Bob Seger said it BYE? best when he said it’s ▼ hard to come down after Farewell tours don’t always a show. You’re up there mean goodbye for 90 minutes having a forever. stltoday.com/ great time entertaining blender people. But then you go back to a hotel room by yourself. That’s a strange thing to do.” He says the farewell shows have been fantastic so far. The band made it a point to choose some songs that fans haven’t heard in years. “It’s a really cool event. I tell people we’re there to make memories,” he

says. “The crowds have been massive, and people are loving it.” Lynyrd Skynyrd is going out with a bang, having lined up Kid Rock, Bad Company, Marshall Tucker Band, .38 Special, Hank Williams Jr., Charlie Daniels Band, Blackfoot and Blackberry Smoke as support, with different acts playing in different cities. Saturday’s show features Hank Williams Jr., .38 Special and the Steel Woods. “We’re saying goodbye with our friends and trying to make it a good show, Van Zant says. “Tickets aren’t cheap, so we’re just trying to give people more bang for their buck.” He says not to expect Lynyrd Skynyrd to return to the road after this farewell tour. “We’ll probably be too old,” he says. “Five years from now we’ll have a lot of miles on us. But if something comes along, we can always go out and do it. We’ve always been blessed, been very successful. But now I can go fishing.” Without the rigors of touring to worry about, the band will have time to focus on a new album, the follow-up to “Last of a Dyin’ Breed” (2012). “We’ve got a bunch of songs we’ve already written,” Van Zant says. “It’s a matter of having the time, putting the effort of going into the studio and cutting in them. We might do a song or two and put them out, and at the end of that put all the songs together and see what that leads to.” One of them is “Last of the Street Survivors,” a song that, like the others the band is working on, is rootsy and earthy. “I never tried to go outside the boundaries too much. The previous CDs had been heavier than where we started. We stayed true to lyrics of common people,” he says. “Maybe we’ll spend the rest of the time making music instead of playing out.” WHAT Lynyrd Skynyrd with Hank Williams Jr., .38 Special, the Steel Woods • WHEN 6 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $71-$219 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; livenation.com

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P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S


Ditto that: On breakups, St. Louis ties and her debut solo album BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

hen Beth Ditto opens Sam Smith’s concert Friday night at Chaifetz Arena, the former Gossip frontwoman, now a solo artist, won’t be happy only for the high-profile gig. She’ll be happy that her family will finally get to see her play a major venue. Ditto hails from Arkansas and has lived in Portland, Ore., for years, but she feels some connection to St. Louis — her mother and aunt were born here — and she hopes to get as many family members as possible to the show. “With Gossip, everything that we ever did that was super fancy was in Europe,” Ditto says by phone from a tour stop in Cannes, France. “So my family never really got to see any of that. It’s like they thought I was making all of this up. So it’ll be nice to have them come to a big show in America for once.” Of course, another place they can see her right now is on the silver screen. Ditto makes her film debut in Gus Van Sant’s latest, “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot,” a biopic of Portland cartoonist John Callahan starring Joaquin Phoenix, Jonah Hill and Rooney Mara. Ditto plays Reba, a member of Callahan’s Alcoholics Anonymous group.

Beth Ditto

PHOTO: CHUFF MEDIA

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Ditto had nearly appeared in Tom Ford’s 2016 film “Nocturnal Animals,” but her part got cut. She’s not sure how she got on the casting director’s radar for “Don’t Worry” and hadn’t even read the script when she was called in to audition. “Their whole thing was that the character was this fat, redneck woman,” she says. And, being a big, loud, Southern person …” Ditto is nothing but matter-of-fact when discussing her weight, her upbringing, or pretty much anything, really. “It’s funny,” she continues. “I guess fat people are kind of rare in the film industry. In the rest of the world, we’re the majority, but in that scene, there’s not that many of us.”

Of course, the film isn’t the reason she’s opening for Sam Smith. That would be her debut solo album, “Fake Sugar,” which came out last year. Having fronted Gossip from 1999 to 2016, Ditto likens moving on to a solo career much like the need to move on from the dissolution of any long-term relationship. “It was like a marriage,” she says. “And when that broke up, I feel like doing a record with other people is like starting over — like learning to date again. It’s so strange when you kiss somebody new for the first time after you’ve been kissing the same person for 16 years. You’re like, ‘Oh, this is unfamiliar.’ But then you realize that it still feels really good. You just gotta figure out that things are not the same as they used to be. So it’s like that.” It’s interesting that Ditto puts the band breakup in those terms, because it’s another breakup — her separation from wife Kristin Ogata, whom Ditto married in 2013 — that fuels many of the pop/rock/dance numbers on “Fake Sugar.” “It’s true that I did put some of my romantic relationship with my wife into that record,” she says, but she also insists that “a lot of it was that I was also mourning the relationship with my bandmates. It was both.” WHAT Sam Smith, Beth Ditto • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Chaifetz Arena, 1 South Compton Avenue • HOW MUCH $48-$125 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

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Herb Alpert is still the top brass, and he’s keeping it fun BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

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azz great Herb Alpert is putting a new spin on his classic act, Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. The Grammy-winning trumpeter is working on “Herb Alpert Reimagines Tijuana Brass,” an album that updates the music of Tijuana Brass. The 1960s-era band released albums such as “Whipped Cream and Other Delights” (1965), “Going Places” (1965) and “The Lonely Bull” (1962) and songs including “Whipped Cream,” “Spanish Flea,” “Tijuana Taxi” and “Lollipops and Roses.” Remaking evergreens in a contemporary way was a challenge, 83-yearold Alpert says of the new album, coming in the fall. “I didn’t want to step on the toes of these records that we did. We had a lot of success with that project. I can’t necessarily make it better, but I can make it equally fun to listen to.” kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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In the last two years, he released “Human Nature” (2016), “Music Volume 1” (2017) and “The Christmas Wish” (2017). “Music Volume 1” includes his twists on timeless tunes such as “Imagine,” “Unforgettable” and “Cheek to Cheek,” along with “Flamingo,” a new song. “When I hear a song I like, a melody I like, I try to do it in a way that hasn’t been done before so you hear a fresh version of a familiar song,” Alpert says. “That’s one of the things I always think about. This might sound corny, but I don’t make music for other people. I make music for myself.” In deciding what songs to include on the new album, he first looks for strong melodies. “That’s why a lot of artists look for melodies written in the ’30s and ’40s,” he says. “For me as an instrumental artist, melody is what attracts me.” Not on the album is @kevincjohnson

Alpert’s new version of “What a Wonderful World.” Proceeds from downloads of the song will go to the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation. Armstrong originally recorded the song in 1967. Alpert says he did the song because he loved Armstrong. “I played with him, and he was a magnificent human and wonderful musician,” he says. “His personality and essence came right through on the horn. What you heard was pure. “I did this because of something that happened with Louis when he made the song. He was asked, ‘What do you mean it’s a wonderful world? What about war? Pollution?’ Louis answered the question, and I incorporated that right in the front of the song. I did that in tribute to him.” Alpert will give his fans some of this and more Sunday at the Grandel. He’ll perform with vocalist Lani Hall, his wife of 44 years, and his band that has been with him for 12 years. The set will include standards, Beatles songs, Tijuana Brass, Brazil ’66 (Hall was a member) and more. “It’s very transparent, of the moment and honest,” Alpert says of the show. “I play the songs we like to play. A lot of it is spontaneous. When you’re a jazz musician, everything you do is a surprise. It’s different every night.” There will also be a Q&A segment; he says fans most frequently ask questions about the

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Tijuana Brass, who his favorite trumpet player is and what advice he has for children who want to pursue music. MORE THAN MUSIC In addition to the music, paintings and sculptures by Alpert will be on display at the Grandel on Saturday. The exhibition, free and open to the public, is curated by Chip Tom of the Heather James Gallery. Alpert has been painting for 48 years and sculpting for 35 years. Though most people know Albert as a musician, his visual art means as much to him. “I’m hooked on playing the horn,” he says. “It’s been so good to me for so many years. As a musician, you never get to where you wanna go on your instrument. Dizzy Gillespie was a friend. He would say the closer you get, the further it looks. You never get there. The pursuit is the fun part. “When I’m playing the horn, that’s all that’s happening. It’s just about blowing the horn. When I’m painting, it’s just about painting.” He’s dedicating a bronze statue of a trumpet player (“not necessarily me,” he says) to the venue. “When I try to sculpt, especially something realistic like a trumpet player, I like to give people the feeling of what it’s like to play. It’s not anybody. It’s just the feeling of playing jazz.” WHAT Herb Alpert and Lani Hall • WHEN 7 p.m. Sunday (art on view 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday; free) • WHERE The Grandel, 3610 Grandel Square • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Q • How would you sum up the album from a musical standpoint?

Charlie Starr of Blackberry Smoke

A • It’s one of our best. When we were making it, we knew we were hitting on something really good. Everybody was playing their best. We worked with a good team with good friends like Amanda Shires, Robert Randolph and the Wood Brothers performing on some cuts.

Q&A ▼

Blackberry Smoke finds a light in the dark BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

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outhern rock band Blackberry Smoke didn’t let much grass grow under its feet after releasing “Find A Light” in April. A follow-up EP, “The Southern Ground Sessions,” is out Oct. 26. Lead singer and guitarist Charlie Starr chatted before the band’s concert Saturday at Chesterfield Amphitheater.

Q • What’s “Find a Light” all about? A • We convened to make a new album the way we always do, when it’s time. I had written this batch of songs, some of them with some good friends of mine, some songwriting partners. When I started looking at the batch of songs, I said a lot of them are a little more positive lyrically than the last couple of albums. Q • How so? A • On the last couple of albums, I’d been frustrated lyrically with the state of the world. It’s a scary time we live in. You look at people and it’s, “Geez, can

we get it together? What’s going on?” We called it “Find a Light” because as bad as it seems, the only thing we can do as a culture is find the light, look for the positivity where you can find it. It doesn’t have to be anything specific. It can be an openended kind of thing. In my 44 years, I don’t remember seeing it this hopeless in society. Q • What song best embodies the album’s theme? A • The song that finishes the album, “Mother Mountain.” It encapsulates the whole idea of “let’s head for the hills, let’s look for higher ground.”

Q • Why release an EP so soon after the album? A • It was a happy accident. We went into Southern Ground Studio (in Nashville, Tenn.) to record video of us sitting and playing acoustic versions of these songs. It turned out, not only did it look great but it sounded great. I don’t think anyone involved thought it would be an EP project. We were just going to film and record a song and wound up getting six. Q • How did covering Tom Petty’s “You Got Lucky” for the EP come about? A • We obviously grew up in the Tom Petty generation. We don’t know anyone who left a bigger imprint in rock ’n’ roll music. We’ve done tons of Tom Petty covers over the years, and we were fiddling with that one that night. Amanda was there and played fiddle on it. WHAT Blackberry Smoke, JJ Grey and Mofro, Greyhounds • WHERE Chesterfield Amphitheatre, 631 Veterans Place Drive, Chesterfield • WHEN 5 p.m. Saturday • HOW MUCH $35-$69 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

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P H O T O S : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

Herb Alpert


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TICKET TRACKER ▼

Chaifetz Arena ticketmaster.com • Jake Owen’s “Whatcha Make It Tour” with David Lee Murphy and more, 7 p.m. Oct. 19, $25.50-$60.25.

Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com • Billy the Kid: The Definitive Billy Joel Tribute, 8 p.m. Sept. 14, $12.50-$15. • The Marcus King Band, Bishop Gunn, 8 p.m. Sept. 19, $15-$18, • Guster, 8 p.m. Nov. 11, $30-$35.

Duck Room at Blueberry Hill ticketmaster.com • Astronoid, 8 p.m. Oct. 17, $12-$15. • Hoodie Allen, Gianni & Kyle, 8 p.m. Oct. 20, sold out.

Enterprise Center ticketmaster.com • Carrie Underwood’s “Cry Pretty Tour 360” with Maddie & Tae and Runaway June, 7 p.m. June 18, $43-$93, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Family Arena

Fox Theatre metrotix.com • Gladys Knight and Peabo Bryson, 8 p.m. Oct. 19, $47.50-$152.50.

The Pageant ticketmaster.com • Moneybagg Yo, 9 p.m. Sept. 15, $45-$55.

SEEN ON THE SCENE ▼

SLAYER • AUG. 9 • HOLLYWOOD CASINO AMPHITHEATRE 1 Theo Schauwecker (left) of St. Louis and Zach Tunison of Troy, Mo. 2 Heather (left) and Hannah Hogshead of Highland 3 Daniel Pierce and Jasmine Letscher, both of Warrenton 4 Tucker Murray and Josh Sides, both of Lake Saint Louis 5 Laura Hicks of Springfield, Mo., and Brandon Keairns of Cincinnati 6 Emily and Alan Phelan of St. Peters G-EAZY • AUG. 12 • HOLLYWOOD CASINO AMPHITHEATRE 7 Dominique Nicole (left) and Rahjanae McDonald, both of St. Louis 8 From left: Anna Curtin of Wildwood, Katie Brison of Florissant and Kennedi Ginger of Florissant 9 Dominic and Crystal Ruggeri of St. Louis 10 Akyrah Paulette (left) and Rumona Ray, both of St. Louis 11 Gaby Amezcua (left) and Jessica Barreras, both of St. Louis 12 Ericka Daniels (left) and Jemika West, both of St. Louis

• Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top, Matt Sorum, Austin Hanks, 8 p.m. Oct. 18, $30-$42.50. • Mayday Parade, This Wild Life, William Ryan Key, Oh, Weatherly, 7 p.m. Oct. 28, $27-$30.

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The Ready Room ticketfly.com • Jonathan Davis of Korn’s “Black Labyrinth Tour 2018” with the Birthday Massacre, Julien-K, 8 p.m. Oct. 23, $23-$30. • Circa Survive, La Dispute, Queen of Jeans, 8 p.m. Nov. 4, $29.99-$35.

Stifel Theatre ticketmaster.com • Thom Yorke of Radiohead, Nigel Godrich, Tarik Barri, Oliver Coates, 8 p.m. Dec. 8, $52, on sale at noon Friday.

• New Country 92.3 Jinglefest with Kane Brown, Luke Combs, Lanco, Jordan Davis, 7 p.m. Dec. 8, $48-$78, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Thom Yorke of Radiohead

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P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( S E E N ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( R A D I O H E A D )

metrotix.com

Find more photos from these events and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/photos

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TOMKO HIGHLIGHTS MUST-SEE ACTS Katarra

Thursday: the ’80s THE LINEUP Theresa Payne as Whitney Houston • Lyrique as Bobby Brown • Sister Wizzard, Pono AM, Poly Shades and Mother Stutter as the B-52s • School of Rock as Blondie • Jalisa Renay as Sade

THE BLENDER ▼

Go ‘Under Cover’ with some local bands Must-see acts put their spin on top stars of past decades

P H O T O S : H A N D O U T ( K ATA R R A ) ; B O N N E R W I L L I A M S ( PAY N E ) ; J O S H U A G O L D S T E I N ( T R E - G )

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

The 12th installment of An Under Cover Weekend unfolds next weekend at Delmar Hall, again allowing some of St. Louis’ original music acts to perform tribute sets to their favorite artists. Some of the acts participating include Middle Class Fashion, Mathias & the Pirates, School of Rock, Thames, Tre-G, Theresa Payne and Tiffany Elle. For the second year, the event focuses on a different decade each night: the ’80s, ’90s and ’00s. Organizer Michael Tomko says that approach works on a few levels: It lets people get a handle on what to expect, and it’s a good marketing device. “As I talk with random people, I can tell them, ‘I know you’ll like this night,’” he says. “It also helps the bands focus a lot more. When you’re given a box to put yourself in, you have to make the most of that. I really see people rising to the occasion.”

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year as Amy Winehouse, I brought them back for a second time. They’re middle and high school kids, and they may be some of the best musicians we have. They’re super professional. They can walk into any stage, plug up to an amp and be ready to play. This is an all-star crew from the two different schools.”

Aug. 24: the ’90s Theresa Payne Theresa Payne as Whitney Houston • “That one has gotten the biggest response of the weekend so far, primarily because Whitney Houston was such an untouchable performance. There’s very few people who could tackle that.” Sister Wizzard, Pono AM, Poly Shades and Mother Stutter as the B-52s • “They’re probably going as far into the costumes and physical personas as we’ve had people go. The B-52s are often thought of for that one single, but their catalog is actually pretty exciting. They’ll remind people the B-52s had a lot of other hits. We’ll see a faithful, exciting set.” School of Rock as Blondie • “They did such a good job last

THE LINEUP Mathias & the Pirates as De La Soul • Aida Ade as Tracy Chapman • Lana-J and S.O.N.S. as Missy Elliott • Tiffany Elle as Brandy • Middle Class Fashion and Vigilettes as the Cranberries

Mathis & the Pirates as De La Soul • “We haven’t done a lot of rap and hip-hop at these shows. But we had a huge response when we did the Outkast set. It’s definitely an area where you can have a full band hip-hop experience. We’re excited to find someone who’s so passionate about such a super-cool artist. It’ll be a lot of fun, and they’ll really do it justice.” Aida Ade as Tracy Chapman • “She did Erykah Badu last year and was one of the standouts of the whole weekend. She plays guitar as well. She’ll totally embody the Tracy Chapman vibe. She has a bona fide big, soulful voice, and you’ll

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see something special there. The set may not be as dancey as some of the others, but she’ll be hitting songs you know and putting them in an amazing light.” Lana-J as Missy Elliott • “She performed as a side player for the Lauryn Hill set last year. She can really rap. There was one moment I remember from last year when it was her turn, and everybody standing around me was like, ‘Oh, (crap), what was that?’”

Aug. 25: the ’00s

Thames as Arctic Monkeys • “These guys are blowing up around town, and I’m excited they’re channeling their energy for our show. The rock genre is always a little harder to do, especially on the alternative rock side. You want a band who’ll do it justice, not just play loud, not just play fast. They are nerds for the music. You need somebody to understand what makes the music tick in order to pay tribute to it.” Katarra as Maroon 5 • “She did Lauryn Hill last year, but I was actually a bit surprised at the Maroon 5 submission.

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We don’t get a ton of gender swaps, so it’s cool when we can do that. I’ve been talking to her about it, and it’s cool to hear how she was influenced by Maroon 5’s music behind the scenes. Her music doesn’t sound like Maroon 5 on the surface, but there’s things she plays off of. You’re not gonna hear Maroon 5 as they sound. You’re gonna hear her take on it. She was easily one of the biggest sets last year with Lauryn, and if it’s anything close to it, this year it’s gonna be big.” Tre-G as Usher • “A little birdie told me he’s got a whole dance troupe. They’re really going all out in the production. He’s really gonna bring it with the stage show.”

31 ST. LOUIS & METROEAST LOCATIONS

FREE INJURY SCREENS!

WHAT An Under Cover Weekend • WHEN 7:45 p.m. Thursday through Aug. 25 • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $15 nightly • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

@kevincjohnson

Winedown on Wydown!

MONDAY-FRIDAY 11am to 3pm

Half Sandwich and a Side House Salad or Caprese Sub and a Side Excludes Muffuletta Round. Only $7.69

Tre-G

THE LINEUP Katarra as Maroon 5 • Tre-G as Usher • Josh Stanton as John Legend • Thames as Arctic Monkeys • Backwash as the Strokes

LUNCH SPECIALS Small One-Topping Prosciutto di Parma Pizza Excludes and fresh mozzarella Only $10.99

WWW.APEXNE TWORKP T.COM

314-721-3233 7641 Wydown Blvd, Clayton MO Dine in, carry out , on-line ordering and full menu delivery!

anthonysitalianeats.com

Wine Special Purchase one bottle of wine, receive 2nd bottle half off! Monday thru Friday, 3p to 6p

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STLTODAY.COM/ARTS ▼

Festival celebrates history, food and fun Fifth annual St. Louis World’s Fare takes its cues from its 1904 predecessor in Forest Park BY DYLAN KIEFER | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

orest Park is home to the fifth annual St. Louis World’s Fare Heritage Festival this weekend, a catch-all celebration offering everything from food trucks and beer to electric bikes and ax throwing. Taking inspiration from the 1904 World’s Fair — which also took place

F

dkiefer@post-dispatch.com

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in Forest Park — this young festival on Government Hill celebrates St. Louis culture and art while aiming to educate visitors about the city’s rich and turbulent past. Some of the festival’s events take place at World’s Fair Pavilion. The venue atop Government Hill stands on the site of the 1904 fair’s Missouri state pavilion, which burned before the fair ended. Festival co-founders Davide Weaver and Mike Landau began to conceptualize the St. Louis World’s

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Fare seven years ago. “I’ve got crazy love for my city,” Weaver says. “I have deep appreciation for our culture, architecture, parks and people. I’ve always wanted to help it get better in my own little way.” The festival has significantly expanded since its 2014 debut. This year’s fest features several new additions including a new crafter section and two performing arts stages. “This year we really want to shine a light on performing artists,” Weaver says. Festival staples, such as the Artists’ Village and a giant Ferris wheel, providing a view of the city, will return. Fun and games aside, the St. Louis World’s Fare plans to emphasize local history. Weaver believes learning about St. Louis heritage is important — espe-

cially right now. “Our city is at a crossroads,” he says. “It wants to move forward but has a lot of old chains holding it back. These chains can be broken, but they need to be discussed in a positive format in order to break them.” He hopes the festival can provide an environment that fosters positive dialogue through merging education with celebration and connecting citizens to local artistry. To emphasize this connection, dance groups will perform on one of the two performing arts stages then dance through the crowd on their way to the second stage — an idea pioneered by Weaver. “I hope this experience fills our people with love and pride for their city.” WHAT St. Louis World’s Fare • WHEN 5-10 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday • WHERE Government Hill and World’s Fair Pavilion, Forest Park • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO stlworldsfare.com

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P H O T O : L A U R I E S K R I VA N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Tiffany Pool dances with Spirit of Angela dancers at the St. Louis World’s Fare in 2016.


$ 1 OY S T E R HAPPY HOU R

T H U R S D AY S & F R I D AY S 5P – 7P W H I LE S U P P L I E S L A S T.

Tiélere Cheatem and Macia Noorman in R-S Theatrics’ production of “The Light in the Piazza”

RECENTLY REVIEWED THEATER ▼

‘The Light in the Piazza’ WHEN Through Aug. 26 • WHERE The Marcelle, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive • HOW MUCH $20-$25 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

R-S Theatrics presents this magical musical set in Italy in the 1950s. It’s about a wealthy woman, her sheltered daughter and the determined young man who’s out to win her heart. Imaginatively directed by Christina Rios, with terrific performances by Kay Love, Macia Noorman and Tiélere Cheatem. P H O T O : R - S T H E AT R I C S ( “ T H E L I G H T ” ) ; P E T E R W O C H N I A K ( “ M A M M A M I A” ) ;

BY CALVIN WILSON

‘Mamma Mia!’ WHEN Through Sunday • WHERE Robert G. Reim Theatre, Kirkwood Civic Center, 111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood • HOW MUCH $50-$66 • MORE INFO stagesstlouis.org

A young woman invites three of her mom’s old boyfriends to her wedding in this musical featuring ABBA songs. But which one of them is her dad? This Stages St. Louis production is silly but fun, with strong performances and direction. BY

Summerisa Bell Stevens in Stages St. Louis’ production of “Mamma Mia!”

‘The Robber Bridegroom’ WHEN Through Saturday • WHERE Tower Grove Abbey, 2336 Tennessee Avenue • HOW MUCH $10-$30 • MORE INFO straydogtheatre.org

CALVIN WILSON

Stray Dog Theatre

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presents a strange but delightful musical based on a novella by Southern writer Eudora Welty, about a roguish robber and his courtship of a rich man’s daughter.

Find more events and performances in our calendar. stltoday. com/events ONE AMERISTAR BOULEVARD ST. CHARLES, MISSOURI 63301 636.949.7777 | AMERISTAR.COM Exclusions may apply. Cash, credit and mycash ® only. Cannot be combined with any other offers or discounts. ©2018 Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. All rights reserved.

BY CALVIN WILSON

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WHERE TO STROLL, RIDE OR RUN TO LEARN LIKE A LOCAL It could be a walk in the park. Sometimes, it’s a walk down memory lane. And if you’re lucky, in the case of a food tour, it could be a cakewalk. ❡ There’s no lack of guided walks (and bike tours — and even a trolley tour) available for the taking in the St. Louis area. And they’re not just for out-of-towners — there’s a lot for locals to learn and enjoy. We found and participated in several tours that took us past a tuberculosis hospital and a giant deer and through an old graveyard where spirits may have joined our group. ❡ Talk the talk. Go on a walk. BY GO! MAGAZINE STAFF

TOP, FROM LEFT: Chicken satay and spring rolls at Hiro Asian Kitchen on the Sweet St. Louis food tour • The Old Courthouse rotunda, seen on the St. Louis Running Tour • The Old Post Office, seen on the Landmarks Association of St. Louis’ Architectural Walking Tour • BOTTOM: Alton Hauntings Tour guide Luke Naliborski (in plaid) tells visitors about the ghost of August Mayford, an officer who was shot and killed after being abducted in 1937.

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P H O T O S : G A B E H A R T W I G / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( S W E E T S T. L O U I S ) ; C A I T L I N P L E I N ( O L D C O U R T H O U S E ) ; C H R I S T I A N G O O D E N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( O L D P O S T O F F I C E ) ; N O R M A K L I N G S I C K / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( A LT O N )

WALK LIKE A TOURIST


ALTON HAUNTINGS WALKING TOUR

P H O T O S : S C O T T K L I N G S I C K ( T U N N E L ) ; D AV I D C A R S O N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( O L D C AT H E D R A L )

WHEN Various dates, usually Fridays and Saturdays • WHERE Alton • HOW MUCH $25 • MORE INFO 217-7917859; altonhauntings.com

“You can’t have ghost tours if you don’t have history,” our guide said before we headed out on a three-hour walking tour around Alton — a town that bills itself as “one of the most haunted small towns in America.” Our guide was a great storyteller doing a nice job of weaving history with paranormal experiences. He also told a few jokes along the way. The first stop on the tour was an apartment building at 325 Third Street that was once a station on the Underground Railroad. It later became a hospital for tuberculosis patients; thousands died there during that time. Some of those patients “never left,” causing some apartment tenants to break their lease. A trip down to the underground tunnel of the building was a hot but creepy experience. Our guide turned out all the lights, and we were left in total darkness as he shared chilling stories. Did you know Alton was home to the first state penitentiary in Illinois? It opened in 1833 and closed in 1857. It reopened during the Civil War to house Confederate prisoners of war. As you may expect, bad

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The Alton Hauntings Walking Tour visits the underground tunnel at 325 Third Street in Alton. The house was once a stop on the Underground Railroad and now is an apartment building.

things happened there. The tour ended back on Third Street at the First Unitarian Church. Did my group see the ghost of the suicidal minister Phillip Mercer dressed in his gray suit sitting quietly in a pew near the back of church? I’m not telling. “We never promise anything is going to happen, but sometimes it does,” our guide said. Be sure to wear comfortable shoes. The tour goes at a leisurely pace and makes frequent stops, but there are steep hills and uneven sidewalks. BY NORMA KLINGSICK

LANDMARKS ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS’ ARCHITECTURAL WALKING TOURS WHEN 10 a.m.-noon Saturdays, April through October • WHERE Downtown St. Louis • HOW MUCH $10 • MORE INFO landmarks-stl.org

It’s not the big-picture information that sticks with you most on the Landmarks Association of St. Louis’ architecture tours. It’s the fascinating small details. Like the subtle way the possibly unpaid terra-cotta artisans working on the Merchant Laclede National Bank let their bosses — and the entire city — know

The Old Cathedral downtown

what they thought. Like the way a million pieces of mail a day were brought to the Old Post Office on a railroad under the ground. Like the clever way renowned architect Philip Johnson designed the General American building to work around the owners’ stipulation that it be no taller than three stories. The association’s tour of the downtown area (it also offers tours of significant buildings west of Tucker Boulevard and of Washington Avenue) makes perhaps a dozen stops in front

of — and sometimes inside — buildings that have helped make St. Louis what it is today. The tour kicks off on the steps of the Old Courthouse, where guide Paco Garriga gives a history not only of the building but also of the early days of the city. From there it wends its way to the Old Cathedral (where the history lesson includes the founding of St. Louis University High School), past one of the world’s first skyscrapers and through the old financial district on Fourth Street. BY DANIEL NEMAN

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“Earthmover,” by Marie Watt, at Laumeier Sculpture Park

LAUMEIER SCULPTURE PARK TOURS P H O T O S : C H R I S T I A N G O O D E N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( T I R E ) ; A M Y B E R T R A N D / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( S T. C H A R L E S ) ; S T. L O U I S F U N T O U R ( T R O L L E Y ) ; C A R A D E M I C H E L E / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( C A M P B E L L H O U S E )

WHEN 2 p.m. first Sunday of month • WHERE Laumeier Sculpture Park, 12580 Rott Road • HOW MUCH $5 • MORE INFO 314-615-5278; laumeiersculpturepark.org

You can walk around Laumeier Sculpture Park for free any day of the week. So is it worth paying $5 for a one-hour tour? A friend and I went to find out. A regular outdoor tour is scheduled at 2 p.m. the first Sunday of every month (see the park’s website for group and other tours). Only five tour-takers braved the muggy summer day to walk around the 105-acre park and view many of its 60

pieces of artwork. Docent Wes Morgan, wearing a Cardinals jersey, says he’s been giving tours for years, but he clearly still loves doing it, happily recalling things like who pursued the purchase of many sculptures and how long the pieces had been at the park. We started at the Aronson Fine Arts Center and soon rambled south, stopping at sculptures to learn more about their history, maker and material. Sculpture parks’ allure comes not just from how the art is placed in nature, but the sheer size of many

sculptures. Against a woody backdrop, a giant deer looks lifelike (if in a science fiction movie). A halfburied tire seems like something one might find on a vacant lot. But when Morgan explains how the artist alludes to both Cahokia Mounds and modern technology, the lowly tire acquires gravitas, and its placement seems perfect. A clockwise walk around the park allowed us to take in a great many of the artworks, and Morgan was still headed toward more after the hour was long spent.

Note that much of the walking was over uneven, slightly hilly ground; people in wheelchairs might need to ask if the tour could be modified. Laumeier has excellent signage for its collection, so some of what the tour offered could be read on one’s own. What was extremely helpful, though, were answers to questions about previous sculptures (some had been on loan and were gone) and tales about how a few had been damaged by weather or vandalism. The tour not only offered more information and background on the artwork, but it also propelled us out of the air-conditioned indoors and to a captivating destination that caters to art lovers, families, tourists and even dog walkers. BY JANE HENDERSON

Michael Henry leads a tour on Main Street in St. Charles.

ST. CHARLES GHOST TOURS WHEN 7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; reservations required • WHERE Corner of Jefferson and South Main streets • HOW MUCH $20 • MORE INFO 314-374-6102; stcharlesghosts.com

It’s hard to tell a ghost story with muscle cars revving and partiers shouting, but Michael Henry manages to weave tales of history mixed with the right amount of spookiness while

Saturday night goes on around him and the 20 or so people on his tour. Henry, who founded St. Charles Ghost Tours in 2003 and is the only person in St. Charles with permission from St. Charles city and St. Charles Historical Society to give the tours, considers himself both a historian and a scientist. He approaches

the tales of apparitions with a curiosity from both disciplines. For our tour, which took about two hours and traveled several blocks down the uneven sidewalks of Main Street, he talked about the particular ghosts that reappear through history: the Lady in White, the man with the handlebar

mustache usually seen on the landing at a restaurant, the father running down Main Street. He used a blacklight to show us what he said was blood encased on a brick wall in an alley, reportedly from a sheriff who killed himself there about a century ago. The highlight was the rebuilt Borromeo Church, near grounds that used to be a graveyard. Henry went into detail about the history of the church, the architecture of the one-room, vertical log building — and the ghosts said to haunt land around it. In fact, he said, several people on the 7 p.m. tour (we were on the 9:30) reported seeing the spirit of a young boy. Henry let us walk around the structure and look in its open windows. Without a doubt, I felt my skin crawl, but alas, I did not see any ghosts. BY AMY BERTRAND

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ST. LOUIS RUNNING TOUR WHEN Various times; private and group tours available • WHERE Downtown and Forest Park • HOW MUCH $25-$35 • MORE INFO stlrunningtour.com

A view of the St. Louis Art Museum from a trolley from St. Louis Fun Tours

ST. LOUIS FUN TOURS WHEN 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. March 1-Nov. 1, weekends only in offseason • WHERE Starts at Lumière Place Casino, 999 North Second Street • HOW MUCH $22, $10 for ages 2-12, $20 for ages 60 and up • MORE INFO stlouisfuntours.com

Even if you think you know St. Louis, you’re bound to learn something new aboard a “trolley” on a St. Louis Fun Tour. There’s no walking on this 75-minute journey, but it does cover 23 miles, giving tourists and locals alike glimpses of the best and most interesting parts of the city: the Gateway Arch, Citygarden, City

Hall, Forest Park, the Delmar Loop, the Central West End and Midtown. This is the tour to take if you’re entertaining outof-town guests, if you’re not superfamiliar with the city, if you’re looking to do something different or you want to entertain a kid. The trolleys are charming, trimmed inside with wood, arched windows and cushioned, metaland-wood benches. It’s a little difficult to get a good photo of the sights from inside, though our guide pulled over

at the top of Art Hill to allow guests to hop off to snap one. Our group was pretty quiet, and our guide was dry but informative, dishing out interesting and fun morsels along the way. Masters and Johnson did their sex research at what’s now the Barnes-Jewish Hospital complex. Ronnoco Coffee was founded by two O’Connor brothers, who came up with the company name by spelling their own name backward. A couple got married

inside one of the cars of the Ferris wheel at the 1904 World’s Fair — on horseback. One strength of the tour is it can provide guests with ideas for things to do later: the free AnheuserBusch tour with free samples at the end, a splash and stroll through Citygarden, the free attractions in Forest Park, root beer at Fitz’s, and barbecue at Sugarfire and Pappy’s. Tourist or resident, you’ll hop off the trolley ready to explore more. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

After pitching the idea of doing this tour, I had second thoughts. I had exactly 4.5 miles’ worth of second thoughts. I am a runner, but that’s with a lowercase “r.” Would I be able to keep pace? What if I couldn’t finish? What if it is extra muggy that morning? The information on St. Louis Running Tour’s website helped ease my concerns, but I was still unsure. So I did what any other runner would do: I asked another runner to take the plunge with me. St. Louis Running Tour is owned and operated by Joe Michaelree, who offers tours of downtown and Forest Park, as well as customizable routes. We opted for the tour of

Joe Michaelree of St. Louis Running Tour talks about the history of the Campbell House.

downtown, which begins and ends at the runner statue in Kiener Plaza. The 4.5-mile route meanders through the streets of downtown and the riverfront, with stops that highlight the breadth of St. Louis history. The tour includes photos taken along the way, and water and a T-shirt at the end, if you so choose. The tour takes about 2½ hours, though it may go longer if you enjoy talking with Michaelree as we did.

As a native St. Louisan, I have a basic knowledge of the city’s history, largely gleaned from history classes and long-forgotten school field trips to the Arch and the Old Courthouse. Michaelree covers these basics and then some, with a wealth of hardto-forget details and big-picture perspectives on how the events not only shaped the city, but often U.S. history at large. Michaelree’s knowledge of the city is thorough, and it is his clear

affection for St. Louis, both past and present, that made the tour so much fun. Most of the information was new to me, and there’s certainly something to be said for physically standing on the spot. While learning about the deadliest fire in St. Louis history — in which 30 people died after becoming trapped on the top floors of the original Missouri Athletic Club building — an aptly timed MetroLink train eerily rumbled beneath our feet. If you are a runner, get a group of friends together and sign up for a tour. And if you’re not a runner, St. Louis Running Tour is a great suggestion for your visiting runner friends. St. Louis Running Tour has weekly tours through the end of August and will resume private and group tours in October. BY CARA DEMICHELE

F A B U L O U S F O X T H E A T R E • 3 1 4 -5 3 4 - 1 1 1 1 • M E T R O T I X . C O M stltoday.com/go

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Dennis Shultz, front-of-house manager at Mango Peruvian Cuisine, describes dishes for Yvena Lesperance (left) and Meagan Cleary of Sweet St. Louis Food Tours.

MORE TOURS TO CHECK OUT ▼

City Cycling Tours WHEN Flexible starting times daily, with a set tour daily at 10 a.m. • WHERE Tours start at the visitors center in Forest Park • HOW MUCH $45-$65 per person, depending on group size; reservations required • MORE INFO citycyclingtours.com

These tours cover 10 miles of mostly flat ground and travel at a leisurely pace. The tours stop at 18 locations throughout Forest Park, and you’ll learn about the park’s history as well as its flora and fauna.

Eat St. Louis tour WHEN 11 a.m. most Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays • WHERE Soulard and the Hill • HOW MUCH $54, $40 for ages 12 and under • MORE INFO saintlouisfoodtours.com

Eat your way through the Hill or Soulard on these walking tours, which take about three hours and provide enough food to count for lunch. Guides will dish out architectural and historical morsels along the way.

Forest Park walking tours WHEN Various times and dates • WHERE Various meeting places in Forest Park • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO forestparkforever.org/walking-tours

Go on a wildflower walk, take a history tour, or check out a themed tour that focuses on fall colors or insects courtesy of Forest Park Forever. Guided walking tours for your group and bus tours are also available.

Renegade STL WHEN Times vary; book a private tour, or sign up for the newsletter to hop on a scheduled tour • WHERE Various locations • HOW MUCH $20-$35 • MORE INFO renegadestl.com

WHEN 11 a.m. Saturdays; reservations required • WHERE Downtown • HOW MUCH $56.99 per person • MORE INFO sweetstlouisfoodtours.com

You can learn a lot about a city — and even a neighborhood — through food. Yvena Lesperance knows that’s true. It’s why she and her husband, Jordan Atkins, launched Sweet St. Louis Food Tours downtown, where they live, a year ago. “It’s definitely a city of

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neighborhoods,” she says of St. Louis. “But this neighborhood in particular is revitalizing. Things are changing, and we’re excited about that and excited to show people.” You needn’t be an out-of-towner to appreciate a food tour. This one even managed to teach me a few things about my own neighborhood. The Sweet St. Louis experience begins with

a bit about downtown’s past and architecture. A typical excursion covers about 2 miles and between four and six different spots. Lesperance and “foodie ambassador” Meagan Cleary passed around bottles of water for the hot walk. For the more introverted, the idea of dining with strangers for three hours may not sound like a picnic. But at our first “meal” — at

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Hiro Asian Kitchen — Lesperance broke the ice by asking each of us what career we dreamed about as a kid. When spring rolls and chicken satay arrived at the table, there was plenty more to discuss. At each restaurant, you’ll get a snack-size serving, and it all adds up to a good-size meal. After the fourth stop, Sauce on the Side, many in my group agreed that we were stuffed and

could eat no more. But on the walk to the fifth and final location on our tour, we worked up an appetite. It didn’t hurt that we could smell what was cooking from around the corner. At Pharaoh’s Donuts, we stepped behind the scenes to see how doughnuts — about 500 dozen daily, a longtime employee told us, which also are sold at World’s Fair Donuts — were cut, fried, glazed

and decorated. Of course, we each chose a doughnut for the road. (Apple fritter for me.) That final sweet bite — and a group Instagram photo with some new pals — made for a memorable downtown dining experience. In addition to its Food and Cultural Tour every Saturday, Sweet St. Louis offers a Booze & Bites Tour on Friday evenings.

According to the company’s website, all you need to bring on a Renegade STL Tour is a water bottle, a sense of humor and questions to stump the tour guide. Themes and tours vary: Ye Olde North St. Louis, Central West End for Nerds, Disasters and Catastrophes, and Queer St. Louis. Prepare to see the sights and hear stories you’ve never heard before. Bus, walking and private tours are available.

Savor St. Louis food tour WHEN 11 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays or by appointment • WHERE Downtown, Central West End, Delmar Loop • HOW MUCH $54-$64, $40 for ages 12 and under • MORE INFO savorsaintlouis.com

These three-hour tours take you on a tasting journey through downtown, the Central West End or the Delmar Loop. Learn fun facts about each neighborhood while sampling from selected restaurants, and enjoy food unique to St. Louis.

BY GABE HARTWIG

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P H O T O : G A B E H A R T W I G / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

SWEET ST. LOUIS FOOD TOURS


STLTODAY.COM/MOVIES ▼

Awkwafina (left) with Constance Wu in “Crazy Rich Asians”

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ sends an empowering message Rom-com with an all-Asian cast is a success in terms of representation and entertainment ★★★½

P H O T O : WA R N E R B R O S . P I C T U R E S

BY KATIE WALSH | TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘C

razy Rich Asians” is a crazy big deal. It’s the first big Hollywood studio movie set in the present day featuring an all-Asian cast in 25 years, so there’s a lot riding on Jon M. Chu’s romantic comedy, an adaptation of Kevin Kwan’s novel. The movie is already a success in terms of Asian representation in Holly-

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent stltoday.com/go

wood, which is sorely lacking (in 2017, only 4.8 percent of top grossing movies featured an Asian character in a speaking role). Thankfully, it more than delivers on the entertainment front, too. With a screenplay by Adele Lim and Peter Chiarelli that makes personal empowerment as important as romantic love, and a talented, charismatic cast from around the globe, “Crazy Rich Asians” is a swoon-worthy romance, as well as funny and poignant — a feast for the eyes and emotions.

“Fresh Off the Boat” star Constance Wu stars as Rachel Chu, a ChineseAmerican economics professor from Queens, the daughter of a single mom who strove for her slice of the American dream. She’s dating the charming Nick Young (Henry Golding, in his first major acting role), who wants to bring her home to Singapore for a friend’s wedding and to meet his family. When the couple arrives at their swanky firstclass airline seats, it’s Rachel’s first indication Nick might come from money. Nick’s the ultimate self-effacing scion of an über-wealthy dynasty. He avoids the family business, living in New York, borrowing his girlfriend’s Netflix password and playing basketball at the Y. Rachel strives for her own success while Nick shuns the success that’s been thrust upon him. The film whisks us through the different types

of wealth and the differences between them: There’s old money (Nick’s family, the Youngs), new money, embodied by the delightfully tacky family of Rachel’s college friend Peik Lin (Awkwafina) and her hilariously outré dad (Ken Jeong), who also live in Singapore, and the American dreamers (Rachel and her mother). Part of the charm of “Crazy Rich Asians” is diving into the culture of the rich and famous on the small island, the gossip and rumor and friendships, and the outlandish displays of wealth. But it’s the emotional game-playing that goes on in Rachel’s and Nick’s circle, including his jealous ex-girlfriend and, most importantly, his staunch mother, Eleanor (Michelle Yeoh), that drives the conflict. Eleanor doesn’t believe Rachel’s casual, fun-loving American demeanor is up to snuff when it comes to the cutthroat (and racist) world in which she and her family had to establish themselves. None of this would work without the love story at the center, and Wu and Golding share a killer chemistry that jumps off the screen. Whether they’re on a double date at one of Singapore’s night markets or making eyes at a wedding, the on-screen energy between them is palpable. You root for them to make it despite the cultural obstacles between them. And yet, “Crazy Rich Asians” is about so much more than just Rachel’s and Nick’s love story. It’s about Rachel fully inhabiting her power, which means embracing her life story: her parentage, where she comes from, her values and the forces that shaped them. It’s when she embraces her truth that she is able to connect with Eleanor and is ultimately ready to accept Nick’s love. Universally empowering messages like that don’t always come in such pretty packages, so you’re bound to laugh, cry and simply love “Crazy Rich Asians.” WHAT “Crazy Rich Asians” • RUN TIME 2:00 • RATING PG13 • CONTENT Some suggestive content and language

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Lead actors are the high point in ‘Never Goin’ Back’ ★★½ BY SONIA RAO | WASHINGTON POST

t one point in “Never Goin’ Back,” a pair of 16-year-old waitresses sit in the dimly lit back office of a small-town Texas diner, high out of their minds on edibles. After staring at a picture of a tropical paradise on their boss’ computer screen, one of them turns to the other and says, slurring her words, “What’s the deal with screen savers like that in depressing places like this?” A similar question could be asked of the movie’s stars, Maia Mitchell and Camila Morrone, who play high school dropouts Angela and Jessie, who long to escape their humid, desolate hometown. Although these friends do their best to scrape together enough money to pay for rent and a beach vacation, a string of drug-fueled detours — some of their own

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making, others the fault of Jessie’s dealer brother, Dustin (Joel Allen) — land them at a wild party, in a burger joint’s supply closet and even behind bars. Everywhere but the beach. Director Augustine Frizzell has drawn from her own wayward youth to write “Never Goin’ Back,” which puts a fresh spin on stoner-comedy tropes. These teenage girls can be just as crass as their counterparts, Harold and Kumar. They spew dirty jokes, most of which — for once! — occur at the expense of male characters, such as their pervy roommate (Kyle Mooney). And although financial struggles don’t bog down the lighthearted tone, they remind viewers that welloff teenagers aren’t the only ones who deserve to let loose on screen. Because of its girlsgone-bad premise, which Frizzell clings to for dear life, “Never Goin’ Back”

has been compared to “Spring Breakers” (also from indie studio A24). There are few notable plot points here: A good portion of the meandering movie, which relies heavily on bodily-fluid-centric humor, follows Angela and Jessie on a quest to launder their work uniforms. At times, it seems as though there is no point to the lowbrow movie at all. The supporting characters’ shenanigans eventually wear thin, save for a hilarious attempted robbery in which Dustin believes that wearing sheer pantyhose as a mask will conceal his identity. But Angela and Jessie’s antics never get old. “Never Goin’ Back” owes much of its watchability to the actresses’ natural chemistry. Together, they paint a portrait of adolescent friendship so vibrant that it makes up for much of the movie’s structural flaws. Each time Angela tries to rope Jessie into another one of her harebrained schemes, you root for Jessie to go along with it, even though it will inevitably fail. (Past attempts to get out of work include hitting each other with bricks to fake a car accident and deliberately getting bitten by bugs to fake chickenpox.) To viewers, it won’t matter where the girls are trying to end up. You’re just happy to witness their unwavering determination to getting there. WHAT “Never Goin’ Back” • RUN TIME 1:26 • RATING R • CONTENT Crude sexual material and coarse language throughout, drug use and brief nudity, all involving teens

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Investigative journalist John S. Adams, seen in the Montana Capitol building, in “Dark Money”

‘Dark Money’ follows the campaign cash Political detective story tracks the harm from secretive political contributions

PHOTO: PBS DISTRIBUTION

BY KENNETH TURAN | LOS ANGELES TIMES

o one has to see a documentary to understand that large sums of untraceable political campaign contributions are a bad thing. But “Dark Money” does need to be seen because it reveals with fascinating specificity how that

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★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent stltoday.com/go

crooked system works and details how one state decided to take it on. That state would be Montana, a key target of dark money forces because it is sparsely populated and resourcerich. As directed and co-written by Kimberly Reed (with Jay Arthur Sterrenberg), “Dark Money” takes a detailed look at an unexpectedly complex situation that is at the heart of political action today. As Ann Ravel, former chairman of the Federal Election Commission, explains, “campaign financing is the gateway issue of every other issue you might care about.” Although the film does go off on brief side trips to the precarious status of that commission as well as to a similar situation in Wisconsin, it mostly stays put in Montana, where Reed, a native of the state, followed a range of crises and developments over three election cycles to get the story right. Montanans care about the role of dark money perhaps more than the residents of other states because of their own fraught history with corpo-

rate interests. Companies like Anaconda at one time played an outsize role in the state’s politics, with results like a flooded open pit copper mine in Butte that’s still so toxic decades later that geese who land on it die off in droves. Things got so bad that in 1912 the state passed the Corrupt Practices Act, one of the first in the nation to ban corporate contributions to politics. But the U.S. Supreme Court’s controversial 2010 Citizens United decision killed that and took things back to square one. Montana is also unusual among states in that it does not have a political class. It has what is referred to as “citizen legislators,” regular people with regular jobs who meet for 90 days every other year. U.S. Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., a working farmer, is very much in that tradition. His appearance at the start of the film dealing with a recalcitrant piece of equipment got delighted applause when “Dark Money” premiered at Sundance (where it won a producing award). “Dark Money”begins by demonstrat-

ing the kind of havoc dark money wreaks on a campaign by funding savage,fictitious attacks so close to election day that no response is logistically possible. Typical was the attack on Montana state Rep. John Ward, who was accused, in a mailer supposedly sent out by Mothers Against Child Predators, of being a supporter of murderer John Wayne Gacy, a man he had never met and who had never set foot in the state. What made this attack so inexplicable is that, like many targeted Montana legislators, Ward was no liberal firebrand but a Republican with a reliably conservative record. Who would go after people like this, and why? “Dark Money” follows the struggle to figure this out on several fronts, most noticeably the tireless investigative journalism of John S. Adams, who changes hairstyles several times in the course of filming but never wavers in his pursuit of the answers. Also key players were Jonathan Motl, the state’s commissioner of political practices, determined to investigate apparent violations, and Gene Jarussi, a lawyer who came out of retirement to spearhead a case against a powerful politician for campaign finance violations. As if all this wasn’t complicated enough, “Dark Money” takes further detours like showcasing the battle to get the state Legislature to pass the Montana Disclose Act and the energized campaign that Democratic then-Attorney General Steve Bullock ran on this issue to become the state’s governor. “Dark Money” is overflowing with examples because the filmmakers couldn’t bear to leave out fascinating stories. Best of all is the reveal, featuring twists and turns worthy of Ellery Queen, of how the people behind the crash-and-burn attack ads were exposed, the way they do their dirty work and what their ultimate goal is. The result is a genuine political detective story, as involving as it is significant, offering specifics from people who have been there about a modern affliction we ignore at our peril. WHAT “Dark Money” • No star rating provided • RUN TIME 1:39 • RATING Not rated

08.17.18-08.23.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

21


Kelly Macdonald provides the missing pieces in ‘Puzzle’ ★★½ BY MICHAEL PHILLIPS CHICAGO TRIBUNE

wo times out of three, this is what performers do for a living: Come up with something juicy and alive, working with material composited from cardboard and good intentions. Often there are pieces missing from the roles they play — and not in a tantalizing way. The resourceful actor finds them, often between the lines. Take Kelly Macdonald in “Puzzle,” the Englishlanguage remake of a 2009 Argentinian film. The terrific Scottish actress, who made her screen debut in “Trainspotting”

T

22

(1996), plays Agnes, a first-generation Hungarian-American homemaker devoted to her Bridgeport, Conn., parish but an isolated soul. She’s bound by tradition and habit to making meals, and life in general, comfortable for her auto mechanic husband (David Denman) and her sons (Austin Abrams and Bubba Weiler). In the opening scene, the darkly lighted interiors suggests a story taking place in 1947 or thereabouts, as Agnes goes about setting the table and decorating the dining room for a birthday party. It’s her own, it turns out. Clearly this servile character has been living for others for too long. Agnes is a whiz at jigsaw puzzles, and “Puzzle” gives its central motif a symbolic workout. In Manhattan one day, she visits a puzzle shop and answers someone’s ad for a puzzle partner. Irrfan Khan (“Life of Pi”) plays Robert, recently

divorced, fabulously wealthy, spending his days watching cable television and footage of natural disasters. With so much destructive chaos in the world, he says, puzzles offer the assurance that some things can be put together correctly. Robert and Agnes become jigsaw partners, prepping for the championship. Each scene in “Puzzle,” written by Oren Moverman and Polly Mann, nudges the protagonist toward action. As Agnes and Robert grow closer, Agnes’ deceptions get more difficult to manage (she tells her family she’s tending to a sick aunt). Mann is a first-time screenwriter; Moverman has done some wonderful, flavorful work in the past, with “The Messenger” and “Love & Mercy.” Here all is neat and tidy. Much of “Puzzle” feels schematic and, in the convenient solution to the family’s financial problems, a bit lazy. Yet Macdonald is so good, on her own or with a scene partner, director Marc Turtletaub’s movie refuses to fall apart. Macdonald and Khan do their best work in the early scenes, when these opposites have only begun to attract. The imperious Khan complements the piercingly true Macdonald. Does she outclass her own film? I prefer to look at it as a statistical matter. “Puzzle” is one of those two-out-of-three situations. For many, the acting will be enough. WHAT “Puzzle” • RUN TIME 1:42 • RATING R • CONTENT Language

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 08.17.18-08.23.18

Kodi Smit-McPhee in “Alpha”

‘Alpha’ is simple but will melt any dog lover’s heart ★★ BY KATIE WALSH TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

ou know Sheila the She-Wolf from “Glow” on Netflix? “Alpha” would be her favorite movie. She’d watch it every day on VHS, memorizing each line of Cro-Magnon dialogue, fashioning costumes in tribute to the fur-trimmed Hot Topic looks worn by the characters, adopting a Czech wolf dog like the one in the movie. It’s sweet, really, to imagine the kind of devotion “Alpha” might inspire, a film that’s simple and strange but will melt any dog lover’s heart. It’s the story of a young boy living in Europe’s last Ice Age, his fight for survival and the special relationship with a wolf that keeps him alive. It’s something Sheila the She-Wolf would really dig,

Y

and maybe you will too. When it comes to sheer spectacle, “Alpha” is a stunning production, especially in 3-D Imax. Director Albert Hughes and cinematographer Martin Gschlacht re-create the untouched vistas of pre-civilization Europe shooting on location in Canada, while enhancing with visual effects. Kodi Smit-McPhee stars as Keda, the son of a tribal chief Tau (Jóhannes Haukur Jóhannesson), embarking on his first big hunt. Tau is filled with pride to have his son learning how they provide for their tribe, teaching him lessons along the way. The dialogue, what little of it there is, is a bunch of baloney — the kind of vague aphorisms about killing things as a sign of strength and worthiness that’s essentially toxic

masculinity and bootstrap individualism dressed up as naturalistic wisdom. Fortunately, the sensitive and shy Keda is cut from a different hide, and he’s the film’s true hero. During the hunt, everything goes haywire, and Keda is thrown off a cliff by an angry bison. The tribe must leave him behind, unable to lose their chief Tau to a risky rescue mission. He’s racked with grief, but he must do what’s best and leaves his presumeddead son behind. Here sets off Keda’s remarkable survival mission, which he does his own way. All he takes from his father is his map home, a tattoo on his hand of the Big Dipper constellation. He’s no great hunter, but he’s a sweet and gentle soul: a healer, not a killer. When a pack of wolves goes after him, he injures the alpha wolf, then nurses it back to health. Soon Alpha is by his side, through blizzards and predator attacks, as Keda makes the arduous journey home. “Alpha” is an epic adventure tale that tells the story of how humans and dogs came to have the relationship they do, one of devoted companionship and mutual support. It’s hard to survive out there without a loving, warmblooded creature by your side, whether it’s the Ice Age or the 21st century. Thematically, “Alpha” nails the idea that our survival is dependent on the love and support of others. WHAT “Alpha” • RUN TIME 1:36 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Some intense peril

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

P H O T O S : S O N Y P I C T U R E S C L A S S I C S ( “ P U Z Z L E ” ) ; C O L U M B I A P I C T U R E S ( “A L P H A” )

Kelly Macdonald and Irrfan Khan in “Puzzle”


Tim Kalkhof in “The Cakemaker”

‘The Cakemaker’ whets your appetite with low-key love story BY KENNETH TURAN LOS ANGELES TIMES

espite, or perhaps because of, its position as one of the most polarizing of nations, Israel continues to produce exceptional films, including ones that have nothing to do with the current political situation. “The Cakemaker” is just such a film. The debut feature of 37-year-old writer-director Ofir Raul Graizer, this provocative work is as unusual a love story as you are likely to find. Culturally specific to its joint Berlin/Jerusalem setting but with themes that are universal, it joins an exploration of sexual fluidity and the nature of love and relationships with a strong plot that keeps you guessing until the end. Though its story is unapologetically melodramatic, it’s told with such low-key, unforced delicacy and

PHOTO: STRAND RELEASING

D

tact that it becomes plausible and convincing right in front of our eyes. The cakemaker of the title is Thomas (Tim Kalkhof), who runs a little bakery in Berlin, a place that Jerusalembased city planner Oren (Roy Miller) never fails to visit on his monthly work trips to Germany. Though Oren is married with a 6-year-old son, he is also having an affair with Thomas. Then, suddenly, Thomas does not hear from Oren. What has happened is worse than he imagines: Oren has died in an accident in Israel. “Cakemaker” now switches settings to Jerusalem, where Oren’s widow, Anat (Sarah Adler, last seen in the splendid “Foxtrot”), is getting ready to reopen the cafe she owns. A conversation about kosher certification makes it clear that Anat, though no longer observant

herself, is a member of an Orthodox clan. Personified by her brother-in-law, Motti (Zohar Strauss), it is a family that still cares strongly about religious rules and regulations. One day, as Anat shops in the Mahane Yehuda market, we spy someone we recognize: Yes, it’s Thomas, newly arrived from Germany, and intensely curious about his dead lover’s wife. Thomas shows up at Anat’s cafe and strikes up a conversation with her — English is the only language they have in common — but does not let on the connection he had with her late husband. Instead, Thomas asks for work, and one of the film’s numerous contrivances gets him employed to do errands, wash dishes and clean up despite Motti’s resistance to having a non-Jew, and a German no less, around the premises. Naturally Thomas eventually reveals his gifts as a baker, but even that gets complicated as detailed Orthodox rules about what a nonJew can and cannot do in a kosher kitchen add unexpected drama. Like a patient baker, filmmaker Grazier sees no reason to rush what happens between Thomas and Anat. Once the plot kicks in, it’s inevitable that we wonder how long Thomas can keep the past a secret. The most fascinating kind of tension results. WHAT “The Cakemaker” • No star rating provided • RUN TIME 1:45 • RATING Not rated • LANGUAGE In English, Hebrew and German with English subtitles

Looking for a specific cuisine, price range or location? Check Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s guide to essential St. Louis restaurants.

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08.17.18-08.23.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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ALSO IN THEATERS ▼

‘Adrift’ PG-13 • 2:00 • Shailene

of stories that wouldn’t sustain a film on their own, the pooches steal the show. TRIBUNE

ANGELES TIMES

NEWS SERVICE

‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ ★★★★

★★★½

improvement on “Ant-Man” (2015), this entertaining release starting Paul Rudd shows director Peyton Reed deftly balancing action and comedy. CALVIN WILSON

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:29 • The

superheroes must cope with a global existential threat in what’s said to be the penultimate film in the franchise. CW

‘BlacKkKlansman’ ★★★½

PRESENTS

R • 2:15 • Spike Lee’s

PG • 1:44 • Now all grown

up and frustrated by life, Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor) is reunited with his stuffed childhood pal Winnie the Pooh (voiced by Jim Cummings).

SEPTEMBER 30 at 2:00 PM 618.462.3205

24

www.altonlittletheater.org

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 08.17.18-08.23.18

ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The Equalizer 2’ ★★★ R • 2:01 • An intense

Denzel Washington saves this sequel from its painful writing ills.

WASHINGTON POST

‘The Darkest Minds’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:45 • Amandla

Stenberg (“The Hunger Games”) plays a young girl ripped away from her family as the country is gripped in a crisis. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

sequel to the 2004 film about a superpowered family. CW

‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:08 • Chris

Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard star in the latest installment of the long-running dinosaur franchise. CW

‘Leave No Trace’ ★★★ PG • 1:49 • Tom (Thoma-

sin Harcourt McKenzie) and her dad, Will (Ben Foster), are experts at living off the grid. CW

‘Mama Mia! Here We Go Again’ ★★★ movie that feels and sounds like a summer vacation should. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘McQueen’ ★★★½

‘Far From the Tree’ ★★★

R • 1:51 • Documentary

NR • 1:33 • Moving docu-

mentary offers glimpses of breakthroughs that can happen when people hang in long enough to come to terms with sobering realities. WASHINGTON POST

“Purge” is an erratic, angry prequel to the politically pointed series. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Generation Wealth’ ★★★ NR • 1:46 • Director Lauren Greenfield turns her camera on an America obsessed with the superficial. WASHINGTON POST

‘Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation’ ★★★ PG • 1:37 • Dracula returns in this second sequel to the 2012 animated hit. TRIBUNE

about fashion designer Alexander McQueen is the best of this year’s many fashion movies. WASHINGTON POST

‘The Meg’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:53 • Jason

Statham takes on a shark bigger than a bus. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Mission: Impossible — Fallout’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:27 • Christopher McQuarrie’s second “M:I” assignment comes with just enough twists in the narrative to justify 147 minutes. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Ocean’s 8’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:50 • Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett and Anne Hathaway star in this intermittently engaging but curiously joyless spinoff of the “Ocean’s” crime comedy franchise. CW

‘Sherlock Gnomes’

NEWS SERVICE

PG • 1:26 • Garden

‘Incredibles 2’ ★★★½

gnomes return, aided by the famous detective in this animated sequel. Not reviewed.

PG • 1:58 • Holly Hunter

and Catherine Keener are among the voice talent in this fine

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ ★★½ R • 2:02 • Josh Brolin and

Benicio Del Toro star in this inferior sequel about government operatives bending the law at the border. CW

‘Skyscraper’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:42 • Dwayne

Johnson brings charisma to this ridiculous film about a security consultant’s struggle to rescue his family from a blazing skyscraper. CW

‘Slender Man’ ★½ PG-13 • 1:33 • In this not-

scary horror film, a group of teenage girls discover Slender Man. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

PG-13 • 1:54 • A silly

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

R • 1:37 • The latest

‘Christopher Robin’ ★★½

SEPTEMBER 27, 28, 29 at 7:30 PM

R • 1:34 • Bo Burnham’s clever movie plunges us into the day-today experience of a 13-year-old girl.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

and Diane Keaton deserve better than this anemic featurelength sitcom. CW

Staged by Diana Enloe as an Alton Little Theater fundraising event.

‘Eighth Grade’

‘The First Purge’ ★★½

PG-13 • 1:44 • Jane Fonda

Licensed by the family and estate of Patsy Cline.

‘Dog Days’ ★★ PG • 1:52 • In a mashup

blistering new film is based on the true story of an AfricanAmerican police officer who became a leader in the Ku Klux Klan.

‘Book Club’ ★½

Created by Ted Swindley Based on a True Story

is back as the superantihero. Not as good as the original. CW

Woodley and Sam Claflin star as a pair of bohemian lovers whose sailing adventure leads into a catastrophic hurricane. Not reviewed. LOS

PG-13 • 1:58 • A vast

ALTON LITTLE THEATER

‘Deadpool 2’ ★★★ R • 1:59 • Ryan Reynolds

LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘The Spy Who Dumped Me’ ★★½ R • 1:56 • Kate McKinnon

launches middling material to greater heights. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Tag’ ★★½ R • 1:40 • Jon Hamm and

Jeremy Renner star in this comedy about men who are still obsessed with the children’s game. STAR TRIBUNE

‘Teen Titans Go! to the Movies’ ★★★ PG • 1:28 • Animated, escapist fun with voices including Shia LaBoeuf, Will Arnett and Jimmy Kimmel. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Uncle Drew’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:43 • Charles

Stone III directed this comedy about oldschool streetball stars. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Unfriended: Dark Web’ ★★½ R • 1:28 • The smartly

constructed sequel is a horror story that takes place entirely on a computer screen. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 1:34 • Morgan

Neville directed this documentary about Fred Rogers and his children’s program. CW

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent


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JUSTIN WILLMAN ON “MAGIC FOR HUMANS”

Justin Willman takes his magic act to Netflix St. Louis native produces and stars in six-part ‘Magic for Humans,’ streaming Friday BY DANIEL NEMAN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

A

through magic.

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couple of years ago, Justin Willman thought he would be able to solve the world’s problems

It’s not that he thought he could wave a magic wand and the world’s problems would disappear. Willman is a professional magician, and he thought perhaps he could get people to understand our problems one card trick, metamorphosis or levitation act at a time.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 08.17.18-08.23.18

The show’s writers were divided between comedians who knew nothing about magic and magicians who knew nothing about comedy. The groups learned from each other and pushed each other into trying new ideas, he said. Willman is both comedian and magician. He has shown his comedy chops on numerous television appearances, including a seven-year stint as host of Food Network’s “Cupcake Wars.” He uses magic in the service of his comedy and comedy in the service of his magic. “A joke is a great misdirection, which I use in the show. When you make people laugh, they don’t look where you don’t want them to look. It’s a great secret that I exploit,” he said. The Ladue Horton Watkins High School grad (class of ’98) was last in the area only two weeks ago, when he performed at the Chautauqua Summer Fest — for the 25th year in a row. He started when he was 13, “so they’ve hopefully seen me get better over the years,” he said. That was shortly after he first began doing magic. “I was riding my bike while wearing roller blades, because I was 13 and would do anything to impress girls,” he said. Inevitably, he fell, breaking both arms. “I had to have pins in my left arm and I had to have my arms rebroken. I stayed in the hospital several times.” You could call it a lucky break. Or a happy accident. Because at the time, St. Louis Children’s Hospital was visited almost every week by the late Jerry Hughes, a beloved local magician who was known as Dr. Magic. Willman was fascinated by his card tricks, and his orthopedic surgeon reasoned that practicing magic tricks might be a good way for him to regain his dexterity. “My parents would do anything to make me a normal kid again,” he said. “Little did my parents know when they bought me that magic book that it would start me on a career that would make me completely abnormal.” WHAT “Magic for Humans” • WHEN Available for streaming Friday • WHERE Netflix • MORE INFO netflix.com/magicforhumans

stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: JILLIAN SIPKINS

“A JOKE IS A GREAT MISDIRECTION, WHICH I USE IN THE SHOW. WHEN YOU MAKE PEOPLE LAUGH, THEY DON’T LOOK WHERE YOU DON’T WANT THEM TO LOOK.”

That idea proved to be too divisive, especially in these divisive times. So his current idea is to use magic to bring us together and show us our similarities. And now he has a television show to do it. St. Louis native Willman, 38, produces and stars in a new, six-part series for Netflix called “Magic for Humans.” The episodes are available beginning Friday. “It’s a literal title in one sense, in that I’m doing magic for humans instead of dogs. But it is also me using magic to learn what is common among humans, about what unites us,” he said on the phone from Indianapolis, where he was performing a corporate show. “It’s context-driven magic,” he said, adding that each episode is about a different topic of universal experience, such as self-control, fear, guilt and love. In the first episode, which tackles self-control, he re-creates the Stanford marshmallow experiment, which tested the ability children have to delay gratification. The children in the original test were offered one marshmallow, but if they could wait awhile before eating it they would get another. On the show, Willman does the same thing, but with magic. To avoid temptation, the children have the opportunity to cover the marshmallow with a red plastic cup. When they do, the marshmallow disappears. On paper, the trick sounds kind of cruel, and one of the kids does cry (“I swoop in and try to clean it all up and make amends,” Willman said about that incident). But it is all done with gentle good humor. A Facebook video promoting this episode has been viewed more than 3 million times. “It’s definitely not like ‘Punk’d’ or any kind of show where we try to exploit, or ‘Candid Camera’ where we laugh at someone’s expense,” he said. There is one other part of the show’s formula that is just as vital as the magic: the comedy. “It’s very tonguein-cheek. Lots of jokes — not scripted jokes, but situational jokes. I’m one who cannot resist throwing in a joke when there is one to be had,” he said.


blakemciverofficial. com, and he is on Twitter as @ BlakeMcIver.

TV Q&A ▼

Q • When will Season 1 of the new “Star Trek” series be available on DVD? A • I was beginning to wonder when CBS might release a set of “Star Trek: Discovery,” which has been used to draw customers to its All Access subscriptionstreaming service. But the company has announced Season 1 will arrive on DVD and Blu-ray on Nov. 13, with many promised extras including deleted and extended scenes, looks at the props, costumes and production design — and subtitles in Klingon. The second season of “Discovery” is due early in 2019. And, in case you missed it, there is another “Star Trek” series in the works, with Patrick Stewart returning as Jean-Luc Picard, of “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” for a show about the next chapter in Picard’s life. Q • Will there be more of “Call the Midwife”? A • Yes. U.S. viewers have seen seven seasons of the series so far, and two more seasons are planned. Look for a Christmas special and then the eighth season around spring 2019 on PBS; the ninth season will arrive in 2020. According to Good Housekeeping’s UK website: “At the

Q • I absolutely love Turner Classic Movies. How is it possible that its movies can be shown without commercial interruption? James Frain in “Star Trek: Discovery”

start of series eight, it’s spring time in 1964 and everyone is excited for the Queen’s Royal birth (of Prince Edward). Violet is holding a Teddy Bears’ Picnic and raising funds through a competition on whether the Queen will have a boy or a girl. With the additions of the two new Sisters, who have been sent to live and work with the team in Poplar, Nonnatus House feels full once more.” Q • Did they cancel “Bull”? I see advertisements for “FBI” on Tuesdays on CBS. A • The legal drama starring Michael Weatherly will be back for a third season Sept. 24. But after two cozy seasons following “NCIS” (where Weatherly used to co-star), “Bull” is moving to Monday nights, taking over the slot vacated by the canceled “Scorpion.” That lets “FBI” — the new series from pro-

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ducer Dick Wolf — move into the old “Bull” Tuesday time, hammocked between the returning “NCIS” and “NCIS: New Orleans.” Q • My kids watch reruns of “Full House.” Would you happen to know the name of a boy around 10 or 12 years old who performed in school plays with one “Full House” girl and sang on the show? A • That was Blake McIver, at times billed as Blake McIver Ewing or Blake Ewing, who played Derek. In addition to onscreen acting and animatedvoice work, he has been a model and a musician. He has a stage show, “Blake Sings Barbra,” that is part tribute to Barbra Streisand, part autobiography, and in July appeared in “Priscilla, Queen of the Desert: The Musical” with the Uptown Players in Dallas. His website is

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STLTODAY.COM/DINING ▼

Excellent cider pairs with conventional pub fare The food at Brick River, the St. Louis area’s only dedicated cidery, falls back on brewpub tropes ★★ BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

ard cider is not beer. The process of making cider is more like making wine than brewing beer. This simple fact needs stating

H

ifroeb@post-dispatch.com

28

because as cider has surged in popularity in the past few years, its marketing, packaging and placement in supermarket refrigerators might lead you to believe it is merely an adjunct to craft beer. Brick River Cider Co., which opened in February in Downtown West, is a

stltoday.com/offthemenu

@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 08.17.18-08.23.18

case in point. Glanced in a display case, the design of its cans — the Americanflag-inspired logo in blues and red against metallic white, “Brick River” in much larger, bolder type than “Cider Co.” — is sleek but anonymous, the beverage as likely to be one more hazy IPA as cider. The cidery itself, a converted firehouse at the corner of Washington Avenue and North 20th Street, evokes the classic brewpub with its fermentation tanks visible through glass behind the bar. But once you look past these superficial similarities to the craft-beer boom, you find a 150-year history of apple orchards and cider. After enlisting at Jefferson Barracks and serving in the Union Army, the great-grandfather

of Brick River owner Russ John established a farm and apple orchard near Elmwood, Neb. John himself grew up on this farm and owns it today. (The regular ciders at Brick River use apples from within a 400-mile radius of St. Louis rather than from John’s farm. Those apples will likely feature in a future “reserve” cider.) John’s professional background is in business and finance. Brick River is the third company he has founded, after a toy manufacturer and a toy retailer. He moved to St. Louis a few years ago when his wife, Sharon Price John, was appointed CEO of Build-a-Bear. At Brick River, he oversees the formulation and production of the ciders, with Tom Johnson, formerly of Schlafly

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ stltoday.com/go Extraordinary

P H O T O S : H I L L A R Y L E V I N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Hand-battered Alaskan cod at Brick River Cider Co.


French onion chicken on a toasted brioche bun at Brick River Cider Co.

Beer, as the head cidermaker. (Johnson recently succeeded the inaugural cidermaker Evan Hiatt.) The lineup features two flagship and two limited-edition ciders. The flagships are the aptly named Cornerstone — crisp and just dry enough to temper apple’s sweetness — and the sweeter, unfiltered Homestead. If the flagships make for a fine introduction to cider, the two specialeditions showcase its potential for as wide a variety of flavors as beer or wine. The Firehouse Rosé, made with

sour cherries and hibiscus tea, delivers the complex fruity tartness of a dry rosé wine (the inspiration) but also the refreshing quaffability of a sour beer. Dry-hopping lends the Brewer’s Choice cider the grassy, citrusy brightness of an American pale ale, but with a much lighter body and more fleeting hoppiness. Brick River leaves no doubt cider is not beer. The menu, however, developed with consulting chef Chris Lee, falls back on brewpub tropes. Not that there is anything wrong with

solid brewpub fare, especially fish and chips ($15), flaky Alaskan cod inside its gnarled jacket of fried batter. The fries could use a shake or two of salt, but garlic and Parmesan nudge them from crisp but bland to crisp and interesting. The kitchen brines chicken wings ($10) in cider, which doesn’t affect the flavor but does leave the meat juicy even after deep-frying. The wings are coated in Red Hot Riplets seasoning, which imparts its signature sweet-hot accent. A trend seemingly impervious to

cliché is the smashed burger. Brick River serves two patties ($11) with cheese and the standard garnishes, but the kitchen needs to smash the patties more vigorously. My burger showed little of the lacy char that gives skinny patties their appeal, and they retained enough heft that I was more aware of the meat’s well-doneness than I wanted to be. A better option from the sandwich menu is pulled pork ($11), which delivers a good balance between luscious meat and crisp edges, with a tangy barbecue sauce to add to taste. You can also order the pork atop macaroni and cheese ($11, $9 without pulled pork). A couple of the standout dishes here were refreshingly light relative to conventional pub fare: baked chicken breast in a zippy citrus marinade ($16) with baby red potatoes and asparagus and the Summer Veggie Flatbread ($9), a bed of cauliflower-herb puree topped with squash, zucchini, tomato, mushroom and basil. Brick River has already tweaked its menu once, John told me in a phone interview. The fish and chips, for example, replaced a more ambitious (and more expensive) trout dish. The former is selling better than the latter did. The craft-beer and pub-fare conventions cast a long shadow. Let Brick River’s cider show you a different way forward. WHERE Brick River Cider Co., 2000 Washington Avenue • MORE INFO 314-224-5046; brickrivercider.com • MENU Brewpub fare and cider made on site • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

From left: Brewer’s Choice, Firehouse Rose, Homestead and Cornerstone ciders at Brick River Cider Co.

Head cidermaker Tom Johnson checks the carbonation levels on the tanks at Brick River Cider Co.

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary stltoday.com/go

08.17.18-08.23.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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RECENTLY REVIEWED RESTAURANTS ▼

The Benevolent King ★★★ WHERE 7268 Manchester Road, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-899-0440; thebenevolentking.com • MENU Moroccan-inspired cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

Billie-Jean ★★★½ WHERE 7610 Wydown Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7978484; billiejeanstl.com • MENU Contemporary American and Southeast Asian cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

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The Blue Duck ★ WHERE 2661 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-769-9940; blueduckstl.com • MENU Contemporary American food • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Cafe Piazza ★★ WHERE 1900 Arsenal Street • MORE INFO 314-343-0294; cafepiazza.com • MENU Pizza as well as panini and breakfast fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Club Taco ★½ WHERE 200 North Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • MORE INFO 314-858-1488; clubtacostl. com • MENU Tacos with a variety of fillings drawn from various cuisines • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Cork & Barrel Chophouse ★½ WHERE 7337 Mexico Road, St. Peters • MORE INFO 636-387-7030; corkandbarrel. com • MENU Steaks, chops and pizza • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sunday

Himalayan Yeti ★★ WHERE 3515 South Kingshighway • MORE INFO 314-354-8338; himalayanyetistlouis.com • MENU Indian and Nepalese cuisine • HOURS Lunch buffet and dinner daily rd

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Hofbräuhaus ONE-HALF STAR WHERE 123 St. Eugene Drive, Belleville • MORE INFO 618-800-2337; haufbrauhausstlouis. com • MENU Traditional Bavarian fare, with an emphasis on pork • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Hugo’s Pizzeria ★★½ WHERE 3135 Olive Street • MORE INFO 314-896-4846; hugospizzeria.com • MENU Pizzas both conventional and creative • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Iron Barley High Hog Ridge ★★½ WHERE 3367 High Ridge Boulevard, High Ridge • MORE INFO 636-671-9911; ironbarleyshighhogridge. com • MENU Hearty comfort fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

J. Devoti Trattoria ★★★ WHERE 5100 Daggett Avenue • MORE INFO 314-773-5553; jdevoti.com • MENU Contemporary American fare, with Italian influences • HOURS Dinner Wednesday-Saturday (closed Sunday-Tuesday)

Kalbi Taco Shack ★★ WHERE 2301 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314240-5544; kalbitacoshack. com • MENU Korean-Mexican fusion • HOURS 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

Knead Bakehouse + Provisions ★★½ WHERE 3467 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314376-4361; kneadbakehouse.

com • MENU Breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. SaturdaySunday (closed Monday)

L’Acadiane ★½ WHERE 1915 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-8750108; lacadiane.com • MENU Creole- and Cajuninspired fare • HOURS Lunch Wednesday-Friday, dinner Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

The Mad Crab ★★ WHERE 8080 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-801-8698; facebook.com/madcrabstl • MENU Seafood boils featuring shrimp, crab and crawfish • HOURS 3-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Majeed Mediterranean Restaurant ★★ WHERE 4658 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-282-0981; facebook.com/majeed mediterraneanrestaurant • MENU Syrian cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Nippon Tei ★★★ WHERE 14025 Manchester Road • MORE INFO 636386-8999; nippon.teistl. com • MENU Sushi and other traditional Japanese fare • HOURS Lunch TuesdayFriday, dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Nudo House ★★★ WHERE 11423 Olive Boulevard, Creve Coeur • MORE INFO 314-2748046; facebook.com/ nudohousestl • MENU Ramen and pho • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

Pangea ★★½ WHERE 3245 Rue Royale, St. Charles • MORE INFO 636757-3579; pangeaworldfusion. com • MENU Contemporary bistro fare with global accents • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Parigi ★★★ WHERE 8025 Bonhomme Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-899-9767; parigistl. com • MENU Elegant versions of classic Italian dishes • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner MondaySaturday, brunch Sunday

Privado ★★★★ WHERE 6665 Delmar Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-899-9221; privadostl.com • MENU A ticketed tasting menu of progressive American cuisine • HOURS Dinner Friday and Saturday

Sardella ★★★½ WHERE 7734 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-773-7755; sardellastl.com • MENU Contemporary fare with Italian and Californian influences • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday

Simba Uganda Restaurant ★★ WHERE 8531 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-475-5630; facebook.com/ simbaugandanrestaurant • MENU Traditional Ugandan fare • HOURS Lunch buffet and dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

com • MENU Creative modern breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

The Taco & Ice Cream Joint ★★½ WHERE 2738 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314224-5799; facebook.com/ tacoandicecreamjoint • MENU Tacos and other taqueria fare, ice cream and popsicles • HOURS 11 a.m.10 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday

Vicia ★★★★ WHERE 4260 Forest Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314553-9239; viciarestaurant. com • MENU Modern, progressive cuisine with an emphasis on vegetables • HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Saturday

VP Square ★★½ WHERE 3611 Juniata Street • MORE INFO 314-833-4838; facebook.com/vpsquarestl • MENU Pan-Asian cuisine, including Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese dishes • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

The Wood Shack ★★½ WHERE 1862 South 10th Street • MORE INFO 314-8334770; thewoodshacksoulard. com • MENU Sandwiches featuring smoked meats • HOURS 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday) BY IAN FROEB

Squatter’s Cafe ★★½ WHERE 3524 Washington Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-925-7556; squatterscafe.

Search Ian Froeb’s STL 100 to find the best restaurants in St. Louis. stltoday.com/stl100

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YOUR EXCLUSIVE GUIDE to a better ride

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FEATURES

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The 2018.5 Nissan Rogue Sport Meet the street savvy, road-trip ready crossover that helps you navigate life’s daily adventures, or break routine at a moment’s notice. The 2018.5 Nissan Rogue Sport.

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DYNAMIC DRIVING TECHNOLOGIES Weave through traffic with the power to merge and the range to keep going. Nimble handling and responsive steering make driving downtown fun.

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BOOST YOUR STREET CRED For that scary moment when you’re stopped at the very top, hill start assist helps hold your vehicle in place while you’re moving your foot from the brake to the gas so you don’t roll back down. In addition to hill start assist, Nissan also believes your coffee belongs in its cup. Active Ride Control can automatically apply brakes and adjust engine torque when you hit a bump, helping give a smoother ride.

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START AND BRAKE ASSIST Get confident cornering, even on the most challenging on-ramps. Intelligent Trace Control adjusts the braking to each wheel to help you steer through the turn with confidence. For the stop-and-go of city driving, this system also applies engine braking, helping give smoother deceleration. EXCEPTIONALLY EFFICIENT The 2018.5 Nissan Rogue Sport is the smarter way to get ahead with up to 32 MPG highway. Rogue Sport’s 2.0-L 4-cylinder engine features an advanced valve timing system that can adjust to your driving style.

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2018.5 Nissan Rogue Sport

By DAN WIESE Contributing Automotive Writer

It can't wait to brag about its new stuff The youngster of the Nissan Rogue brood, it's unsurprising Rogue Sport is exhibiting youthful exuberance. Like kids everywhere, Sport just couldn't wait to brag about its newfound goodies. So, instead of debuting its just-acquired features for the 2019 model year, Rogue Sport simply decided 2018.5 is new enough. You can almost hear it shouting, "Hey, look at me!" as it brags of just-added: • Standard Automatic Emergency Braking, Blind Spot Warning and Rear Cross Traffic Alert for all trims • Intelligent Cruise Control that's now standard on SL and newly optional on SV • And a redrawn front grille, which has been slightly restyled to accommodate the radar and front camera used by Sport's Around View Monitor, Auto Emergency Braking and Intelligent Cruise. Alas, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto capability still elude this guy, but let's not spoil his party. Having arrived stateside as a 2017 model, Rogue Sport is a small crossover that - beyond the name and basic platform - bears little relationship to the regular Rogue. Born in 2006 as the tiny Nissan Dualis for the Japanese and Australian markets, it became known globally as the Nissan Qashqai in 2014 with its second generation. But, since we Americans can't pronounce Qashqai (at least, this American can't), it's rechristened "Rogue Sport" for the U.S. Comparatively speaking, Sport is a foot shorter than Rogue while riding a wheelbase that covers 2.3 inches less real estate. Offered with front- or all-wheel drive in S, SV and SL trims, it earns the "Sport" moniker thanks to easy maneuverability in urban confines, not from its driving dynamics. In the

DRIVING WITH DAN

drivingwithdan@gmail.com

2018.5 Nissan Rogue Sport

Handsomely styled, the 2018.5 Nissan Rogue Sport adds active safety features throughout its S, SV and SL trim lines

SL AWD we sampled, the suspension happily transferred road imperfections to the cabin, the steering was feather light and acceleration was glacial. That's because forward motion in every Rogue Sport is provided by a 2.0-liter I-4 that generates 141 hp. And, since that engine is naturally aspirated, its peak grunt of 147 lb.-ft. of torque doesn't arrive until way up at 4,400 rpm in the rev band. To add accelerative insult to injury, the only transmission is a CVT automatic. That said, nobody does CVTs better than Nissan, and 04

RIDES MAGAZINE

this little guy's faux "shifts," which can be exploited further via a manual mode, somewhat ameliorate the rubbery sensation so common to CVTs. Nonetheless, when planning a trip from zero to 60, bring lunch. In 200 miles around town, we realized 25 mpg in our all-wheel drive model. Inside, our top-trim SL AWD displayed a handsome cabin and well-bolstered leather buckets. In back, head room is fine, but leg room is dependent on the kindness of front passengers. The 7.0-inch infotainment touch screen proved easy to use, including in our SL a navigation function that was effortless and flawless in getting us to a heretofore unknown Eureka, Mo., diamond for a granddaughter's softball game.

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DRIVE FORMAT: Front- or four-wheel drive BASE PRICE: S: $23,085; SV: $24,715; SL: $28,165 (add $1,350 to each for AWD) PRICE AS DRIVEN: $31,780; SL AWD, $1,990 Premium Pkg. (moon roof, LED headlights, lane departure warning, auto emergency braking with pedestrian detection, more); $275 floor mats ENGINE: 2.0-liter I-4 HORSEPOWER: 141 at 6000 rpm TORQUE: 147 lb.-ft. at 4400 rpm RECOMMENDED FUEL: Regular TRANSMISSION: "Xtronic" CVT automatic EPA MPG: FWD: 25 city/32 hwy/28 combined; AWD: 24/30/27 WHEELBASE: 104.2 inches LENGTH: 172.4 inches CARGO (seat up/down): 19.9 cu. ft./53.3 cu. ft. (S trim: 22.9/61.1) WHERE BUILT: Kyushu, Japan

The clever cargo bay, expandable to as much as 61 cubic feet, boasts a 50/50-split floor whose half-panel can be raised into a partition position if desired. Cool. Finally, Rogue Sport is attainable, starting about 23 grand. The compact crossover category's petite sub-segment, highlighted by the likes of the Honda HR-V, Toyota C-HR, Mazda CX-3 and Jeep Renegade, is gaining traction. From an appearance and functionality standpoint, Rogue Sport is a real standout.


Technology voids need for convertible rain-detection system DEAR CAR TALK: When I owned a 1964 Chevrolet Impala convertible, I designed and installed a rain-detection system so the convertible top would close automatically when it started to rain. This system never failed me in the six years I owned the car, and I would purposely leave the top down even if it was expected to rain -- just so I and others could see it go up. With much better technology now, why is this feature not available on convertibles today? - George

from closing? But maybe some of our readers in the automotive business have a more conclusive answer for George. If you know why this feature hasn’t been offered yet, write to us via cartalk.com. What’s the best way to warm up your

engine in the morning? Find out by ordering Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Ten Ways You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It!” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Car Talk/Ruin, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803. Got a question about cars? Write to

DEAR GEORGE: Good question, George. It’s certainly technically feasible. The skylights in my house do that, so why not a convertible? I can think of a couple of reasons why manufacturers might not want to add a feature like that. One is that today’s convertible tops are so easy and quick to put up and down, there’s very little incentive to leave the top down when you park the car. It literally takes 10-15 seconds, and no effort other than pressing a button to close up the car completely -- including securing the top and closing all the windows. So why would you leave your car exposed to the sun, debris, bums who want to take a nap, and the guy who doesn’t know where else to throw the wrapper from his lamb gyro? It’s so easy now, you can put the top down for a three-minute drive to the convenience store on a nice day and put it back up again, and not feel burdened. The other reason I can think of is that the manufacturers might not want the liability. Even though the technology is good, what if it fails? Do you think Jaguar wants to pony up for an entirely new Freedonian leather interior because a five-dollar moisture sensor failed? Or because you parked under a low tree limb that blocked the top 05

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CAR TALK By RAY MAGLIOZZI Contributing Automotive Writer cartalk@gmail.com

Ray in care of King Features, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, or by visiting www.cartalk.com. (c) 2018 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


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stltoday.com/RIDES


BEST OF ST. CHARLES 3 YEARS IN A ROW BOMMARITO ST. PETERS Winner St. Charles County Reader's Choice Poll

N I B N I A G R A B All State Inspected.

Over 80 Vehicles. 1 Lot. Nothing Over

$12,000

6 ACRES = 400 PRE-OWNED VEHICLES = $AVINGS 2008 Nissan Sentra

2005 Ford Focus

#M9044A

2005 Kia Sorento

#B9263B

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

2006 Chrysler Sebring Touring

#B9223

#C9101B

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$3,990

$4,990

$4,990

$6,490

2010 Hyundai Accent GLS

2006 Nissan Pathfinder

2008 Honda Civic LX

2006 Chrysler Sebring Touring

#M18267A SALE PRICE

#V18115B

#V18332A

#C9101B

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$6,490

$6,490

$6,490

$6,490

2007 Cadillac CTS

2012 Kia Rio5

2011 Ford Escape LTD

2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

#C18135RA

#B9248

SALE PRICE

#M18078A1

SALE PRICE

#V18315B

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$6,990

$6,990

$6,990

$6,990

2005 Mercedes Benz C-Class

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage ES

2015 Chevy Spark LS

2006 GMC Envoy

#C17318B

#V17786A

#V18453A

#V18150A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$6,990

$7,490

$7,490

$7,490

2009 Suzuki Grand Vitara X

2009 Mazda 6 i Touring

2010 Chevy Equinox LT

2004 Jaguar XJ VDP

#V18410A

#M18396A

#M8790A

#C8785A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$7,990

$7,990

$7,990

$7,990

2011 Kia Soul +

2012 Buick Regal Premium

2013 Chrysler 200 Limited

2014 VW Passat SE

#B9251

#B9322

#V18324A

#V18317A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$8,490

$8,990

$8,990

$9,490

2011 Chevy Cruze LT

2013 Ford Fusion SE

2013 Hyundai Veloster

2013 Ford Escape SE

#V9240A

#M18264A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$9,990

#M18259A

$9,990

Bommaritostpeters.com 08

RIDES MAGAZINE

SALE PRICE

$10,490

St. Peters Pre-Owned Super Center

Bommarito "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

#M17469A

SALE PRICE

4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs

(636) 928-2300 Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers. ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$10,990 IT’S BACK!

RECEIVE 2 TICKETS TO THE BOMMARITO AUTOMOTIVE GROUP 500 INDYCAR RACE WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE


6 Years / 100,000 Miles 12 Months / 12,000 Miles 24 Months / 24,000 Miles

BEST OF ST. CHARLES 3 YEARS IN A ROW BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

6 Months / 7,500 Miles

Winner St. Charles County Reader's Choice Poll

COME SEE "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS" EVERYDAY

6 ACRES = 400 PRE-OWNED VEHICLES = $AVINGS 2009 Hyundai Genesis

2009 Cadillac CTS

2009 Mazda Tribute Sport

2011 Kia Optima SX

#B9132B

#C9285A

#M17489A

#M9232A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$7,490

$8,990

$9,490

$10,490

2010 Nissan Frontier SE

2013 Nissan Altima SL

2013 Ford Escape SE

2011 Mazda 6 i Touring

#B9247

#B9261

#M17469A

#M18282B

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$10,990

$10,990

$10,990

$11,490

2011 Jeep Compass Limited

2011 Chevy Impala LT

2012 GMC Terrain SLE-1

2007 Cadillac CTS 3.6L

#M17306A

#C9113A

#B9250

#C9284A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$11,490

$11,990

$11,990

$11,990

2011 Honda Accord EX-L

2014 Honda Civic LX

2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport

2010 Cadillac SRX

#B9262

#B9260

#V19017A

#C18023RB

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$11,990

$11,990

$11,990

$11,990

2012 Volvo S60 T6

2013 Ford Fusion SE

2010 Lincoln MKX

2011 Chrysler Town & Country

#M18332A

#V19012A

#M18175B

#C18127RA

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$12,490

$12,990

$12,990

$12,990

2014 Hyundai Tucson Limited

2014 VW Passat S

2013 Ford Explorer

2016 Chevy Cruze LT

#M18144A

#V9147

#B9196A

#B9219

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$12,990

$13,490

$13,490

$13,490

2011 Lincoln MKS

2016 Jeep Patriot Sport SE

2010 GMC Yukon Denali

2015 Jeep Cherokee Latitude

#C17217RA

#V17797A

#C17447C

#V18494A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$14,490

$15,490

St. Peters Pre-Owned Super Center

Bommarito "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

Bommaritostpeters.com 09

$15,990

RIDES MAGAZINE

4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs

(636) 928-2300 Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers. ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$16,990 IT’S BACK!

RECEIVE 2 TICKETS TO THE BOMMARITO AUTOMOTIVE GROUP 500 INDYCAR RACE WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE


Find your next certified pre-owned vehicle at

Lou Fusz Chevrolet PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER Over 900 Pre-owned to choose from at Fusz.com $

$

13,247

2016 CHEVROLET CRUZE LS 35K Miles, Stk# C11757P

14,499

$

13,998

$

13,995

13,999

$

2017 CHEVROLET SONIC LT

2016 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS

2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU

29K Miles, Clean Carfax, Stk# C11778DTP

Clean Carfax Stk# C11754DTP

29K Miles, One Owner, Stk# C11682P

$

$

14,555

14,999

15,255

$

2016 CHEVROLET CRUIZE LIMITED LT

2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU

2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT

13K Miles, Clean Carfax, Stk# C11714P

40K Miles, Clean Carfax, Stk# C11686P

36K Miles, Clean Carfax,Stk# C11719P

Clean Carfax, Stk# C181680A

15,988

$

$

16,275

2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS

2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT

33K Miles, Stk# C181528B

43K Miles, Stk# C11709P

$

$

17,561

$

2016 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT

2015 GMC TERRAIN SLE

25K Miles, Clean Carfax Stk# C11668P

33K Miles, Stk# C11728P

18,140

$

17,991

$

17,445

17,552

$

23,399

2017 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

2014 BUICK LACROSSE

2015 GMC TERRAIN SLE

2015 CHEVROLET COLORADO LT

39K Miles, Clean Carfax Stk# C11777DTP

46K Miles, Leather, Clean Carfax, Stk# C11752P

32K Miles, Stk# C11729DTP

27K Miles, Stk# C181691A

5120 N Service Rd. St. Peters, MO

CALL (636) 875-5374

www.LouFuszChevrolet.com 10

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


2002 Chrysler PT Cruiser Limited

2008 Ford Taurus SEL

2006 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SL

2009 Dodge Caliber SXT

Stk# 79710A

Stk# 12434A

Stk# 12375B

Stk# P9399

Stk# 12438B

Stk# 12035A

SALE PRICE

$

SALE PRICE

4,333

SALE PRICE

$

4,500

SALE PRICE

$

4,800

SALE PRICE

$

5,435

SALE PRICE

$

6,000

2006 Mazda Miata Grand Touring

2005 Toyota Sienna XLE

2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2007 Honda Accord EX-L

2011 Kia Sorento LX

Stk# 12316A

Stk# P9445

Stk# 28693B

Stk# 28892B

Stk# 11214M

Stk# 12241B

SALE PRICE

CERTIFIED VEHICLES AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

3,232

$

$

6,999

SALE PRICE

$

7,000

SALE PRICE

$

7,000

$

7,500

SALE PRICE

$

7,500

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

7,500

2007 Honda Accord EX-L

2006 Dodge Dakota SLT

2006 Honda Accord EX-L

2013 Jeep Patriot Latitude

2008 Infiniti G35 x

2011 Hyundai Elantra GLS

Stk# 11214M

Stk# P9213A

Stk# 97404C

Stk# 79412C

Stk# 79412C

Stk# P9405A

SALE PRICE

$

7,500

$

SALE PRICE

7,800

$

SALE PRICE

7,899

SALE PRICE

$

8,000

SALE PRICE

$

8,000

SALE PRICE

$

8,500

2010 Mazda 3 s Sport

2012 Chevrolet Cruze LT w/2LT

2012 Chevy Cruze LT w/2LT

2012 Mazda 3 i Touring

2006 Mercedes Benz SLK 3.5L

2012 GMC Terrain SLE-2

Stk# P9458

Stk# 12230A

Stk# 12230A

Stk# 12477A

Stk# 28755B

Stk# 79767A

SALE PRICE

$

8,500

$

8,800

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

8,800

$

9,500

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

9,800

SALE PRICE

$

10,000

2012 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited

2012 Ford Fusion SEL

2011 Ford Escape Limited

2011 Cadillac SRX Luxury

2007 Mercedes Benz E-Class 3.5L

2012 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV

Stk# 28845B

Stk# P9417B

Stk# 12404A

Stk# P9383A

Stk# P9439

Stk# 79800A

SALE PRICE

$

10,500

SALE PRICE

$

10,749

SALE PRICE

$

10,800

$

10,800

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

11,000

SALE PRICE

$

11,000

2011 Buick Regal CXL Turbo

2009 Buick Enclave CXL

2010 Mercedes Benz GLK 350

2015 Kia Sorento LX

2012 Chevrolet Equinox

2014 Jeep Cherokee Latitude

Stk# P9475

Stk# 12480A

Stk# P9231B

Stk# 79387B

Stk# P9310

Stk# P9181A

SALE PRICE

$

11,215

SALE PRICE

$

11,500

SALE PRICE

$

11,783

SALE PRICE

$

11,800

SALE PRICE

$

12,053

• We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition.

SALE PRICE

$

13,881

*Excludes model year 2008 and older and any vehicle with 80,000 or more miles.

Bommarito

2007 Chevy Cobalt LS

West County Pre-Owned Center

WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE

TO THE BOMMARITO AUTOMOTIVE GROUP 500 INDYCAR RACE

RECEIVE 2 TICKETS IT’S BACK!

2004 Dodge Caravan SXT

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 636-391-7200 11

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


$

17,995

2017 NISSAN ALTIMA Stk. #95336SL, 2.5 SV

$

2017 NISSAN ROGUE

Stk. #95351SL, Sport SV

20,995

$

24,697

2017 NISSAN TITAN Stk. #95061SL, SV

2017 NISSAN ALTIMA Stk. #95332SL, 2.5 SV

2018 NISSAN ROGUE Stk. #95375SL S

$

17,997

$

21,597

2017 NISSAN ALTIMA Stk. #95333SL, 2.5 SV

2018 NISSAN ROGUE Stk. #95373SL, S

2018 NISSAN PATHFINDER $

2017 NISSAN ARMADA

Stk. #95358SL, S

Stk. #95379SL, SL

26,397

$

17,997

$

21,597

$

43,995

Family Owned and Operated Since 1979!

370 ST. CHARLES NISSAN

70 270

844-339-6739 www.StCharlesNissan.com

40/64

12

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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StCharlesNissan.com 844-339-6739 Family Owned and Operated Since 1979!

2008 DODGE NITRO SXT Stk. #69780-1

$5,995

Stk. #69311-1

$7,995

2008 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR

2013 CHRYSLER 300C

2009 LINCOLN MKX

$9,397

Stk. #649614-1

Stk. #95595-1

2010 NISSAN CUBE 1.8 KROM

2009 TOYOTA CAMRY SE Stk. #69534-1

$6,995

Stk. #69771-2

$11,995

Stk. #68742-1

$6,997

Stk. #50667-1

$9,995

2004 GMC YUKON XL 1500

2014 CHEVROLET CRUZE 2LT Stk. #68631-1

$11,997

2016 NISSAN VERSA 1.6 S

2002 BMW Z3 2.5I CONVERTIBLE Stk. #69566-1

$7,297

2013 HYUNDAI TUCSON LIMITED

2014 NISSAN SENTRA SR Stk. #69619-1

$10,995

$9,995

Stk. #69562-1

844-339-6739

$5,995

StCharlesNissan.com 2013 BUICK VERANO Stk. #50984-1

$10,397

2007 NISSAN ARMADA SE Stk. #50319-1

5625 Veterans Memorial Pkwy Saint Peters, MO 63376

2014 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT 1.8T S

$7,597 13

Stk. #68890-1

RIDES MAGAZINE

$10,297

2011 HYUNDAI SONATA LIMITED Stk. #69900-1

2012 FORD TAURUS LIMITED Stk. #51169-1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

$11,297

08-17-18

$10,995

2015 HYUNDAI SONATA SE Stk. #68498-1

stltoday.com/RIDES

$9,995


14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011 SALES (636) 200-2822 SERVICE (877) 589-2738 • PARTS (877) 606-3265 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE

Suntrup 100k Warranty 2.9% apr Financing on all 2015 & 2016 Certified Volvos

$6,800

$7,850

$8,800

$9,780

2006 MerCedeS-Benz

2007 VoLVo XC90 3.2 SUV

2011 CheVroLeT eQUInoX 1LT SUV

2012 nISSan JUke SL (CVT) SUV

Stk # L14771

Stk # L14411

Stk # P42451

Stk # 194311

$10,000

$11,500

$12,855

$15,000

2015 nISSan SenTra SV Sedan

2011 BMW 528I Sedan

2014 Ford eSCape S SUV

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Stk # 193421

Stk # 195031

Stk # 194782

Stk # P43151

$15,500

$15,880

$17,650

$17,850

2015 nISSan roGUe SeLeCT S SUV

2013 USed VoLVo C30 T5

2013 VoLVo XC60 3.2

2014 Ford eSCape TITanIUM SUV

Stk # P4301

Stk# 194711

Stk # P4307

Stk # 192372

$22,977

$28,780

$30,000

$30,000

2016 VoLVo S60 T5 drIVe e preMIer

2016 VoLVo XC60 T6 SUV

2015 VoLVo XC60 T6 (2015.5) SUV

2017 VoLVo XC60 T5 FWd

Stk # 192501

Stk # L1436

Stk # P4317

Stk # L1449

www.wcvolvo.com 14

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

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Bommarito GM D! IFIE R CE T

2015 Chevy Traverse LT

South County 2017 Chevy Tahoe LT

GM D! IFIE R CE T

IT’S BACK!

TO THE BOMMARITO AUTOMOTIVE GROUP 500 INDYCAR RACE

Pre-Owned Center

WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE

GM D! IFIE CERT

2017 Chevy Impala

Stk. #P6427A, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified

Stk. #P6519, Leather, One Owner, GM Certified

Stk. #P6520, V6, Loaded, GM Certified

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$40,990

$18,950 GM D! IFIE R CE T

RECEIVE 2 TICKETS

2016 Chevy Cruze 1LT

GM D! IFIE R CE T

2016 Chevrolet Equinox LT

$17,650 A MAZDIFIED! T R E C

2015 Mazda 6 i Sport

Stk. #P6547, 21K Miles, GM Certified

Stk. #P6508, Clean Carfax, GM Certified

Stk. #P6538, Full Power, Mazda Certified

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$17,950

$13,773

2014 Ford Escape SE Stk. #35112A.. SALE PRICE $13,570 2016 Chevy Cruze LT Stk. #P6551 .... SALE PRICE $13,750 2015 Mazda 6 Stk. #P6538..................... SALE PRICE $13,773 2017 Jeep Patiot Sport Stk. #P6527 SALE PRICE $13,950 2016 Toyota Corolla LE Stk. #33720A SALE PRICE $13,976 2014 Ford Fusion Titanium Stk. #35401A SALE PRICE $14,550 2015 Chevy Trax LS Stk. #P6540 ....... SALE PRICE $14,950 2015 Mazda 6 i Touring Stk. #40090A SALE PRICE $14,990 2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #42448A.. SALE PRICE $14,990

2016 GMC Terrain SLE Stk. #P6548. SALE PRICE $18,950 2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #42373A ... SALE PRICE $18,950 2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #42587A ....... SALE PRICE $18,969 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35381A SALE PRICE $18,973 2017 Chevy Equinox LS Stk. #P6565 SALE PRICE $19,750 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35332A SALE PRICE $19,769 2013 GMC Yukon XL Stk. #P6199A ..... SALE PRICE $19,776 2016 GMC Terrain SLE Stk. #P6546. SALE PRICE $19,950 2017 Chevy Equinox LS Stk. #P6568 SALE PRICE $19,950 2018 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #P6524 .... SALE PRICE $19,950

$15,550 UNDER $10,000 2007 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #P6558...... SALE PRICE $4,950 2008 Chevy Cobalt LS Stk. #420084A .. SALE PRICE $4,950 2007 Pontiac Vibe Stk. #42495A ............. SALE PRICE $4,950 2010 Mazda 3 i Sport Stk. #35074B ...... SALE PRICE $4,990 2006 Mazda 6 Stk. #35152A....................... SALE PRICE $5,850 2012 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #42841A..... SALE PRICE $5,990 2008 Chevy Trailblazer Stk. #42107A ... SALE PRICE $6,450 2005 Buick LaCrosse CXL Stk. #42760A SALE PRICE $6,550 2008 Chevy Impala LS Stk. #42755A.... SALE PRICE $6,990 2007 Cadillac CTS Stk. #P6512A ............ SALE PRICE $7,250 2008 Honda Pilot Stk. #42634B ................. SALE PRICE $7,750 2010 Ford Escape Limited Stk. #42744A SALE PRICE $7,950 2005 Ford Mustand GT Stk. #P6458A .. SALE PRICE $8,950 2007 Chevy Silverado Stk. #P6501B..... SALE PRICE $9,750 2010 Mazda 3 S H/B Stk. #35373A ........ SALE PRICE $9,750 2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk. #42669A...... SALE PRICE $9,950 2013 Jeep Patiot Sport Stk. #42914B.... SALE PRICE $9,950

UNDER $15,000

2010 Saab 9-3 3 Aero Conv. Stk. #35513A SALE PRICE $10,950 2014 Ford Fusion SE Stk. #42830A ... SALE PRICE $10,950 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid Stk. #42345A SALE PRICE $11,250 2013 Mazda CX-9 Touring Stk. #35254A SALE PRICE $11,750 2014 VW Passat Stk. #42917B.............. SALE PRICE $11,750 2007 Chevy Tahoe LT Stk. #420023A. SALE PRICE $11,950 2014 Chevy Cruze 1LT Stk. #P6556.... SALE PRICE $12,250 2013 Chevy Equinox LS Stk. #42967A SALE PRICE $12,750 2013 Nissan Rogue Stk. #35388A ...... SALE PRICE $12,950 2016 Jeep Compass Stk. #P6447...... SALE PRICE $13,250

UNDER $20,000 2013 Mini Cooper S Stk. #35020A...... SALE PRICE $15,573 2015 Mazda 3 i SV Stk. #P6561........... SALE PRICE $15,793 2017 Dodge Journey SXT Stk. #P6497 SALE PRICE $15,850 2012 Honda CR-V EX-L Stk. #35221A SALE PRICE $15,850 2014 Mazda 3 Stk. #P6537..................... SALE PRICE $15,963 2016 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #42404A. SALE PRICE $15,990 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6518 SALE PRICE $16,750 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6510 SALE PRICE $16,950 2015 Mazda 3 i Touring Stk. #35082A SALE PRICE $16,993 2017 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6520 .. SALE PRICE $17,650 2016 Mazda 6 i Sport Stk. #P6560 .... SALE PRICE $17,663 2015 Buick Regal Stk. #P6550 ............ SALE PRICE $17,750 2014 Mazda CX-5 Gr. Touring Stk. #33602A SALE PRICE $17,973 2016 Mazda 6 i Touring Stk. #35100A SALE PRICE $17,973 2016 Mazda 6 i Touring Stk. #P6529 SALE PRICE $18,379 2015 Mazda CX-5 Touring Stk. #35138A SALE PRICE $18,693 2017 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #P6564 SALE PRICE $18,775 2015 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #P6427A SALE PRICE $18,950 2014 Dodge Challenger SXT Stk. #P6496A SALE PRICE $18,950

UNDER $25,000

2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35264A SALE PRICE $20,463 2015 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #P6509 SALE PRICE $20,750 2017 Mazda CX-5 Gr. Touring Stk. #35486A SALE PRICE $20,773 2016 Ford Edge SEL Stk. #35180A .... SALE PRICE $20,950 2017 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6570 SALE PRICE $21,250 2007 Chrysler Pacifica Stk. #P6522. SALE PRICE $21,950 2017 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6567 SALE PRICE $22,750 2018 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6598 .. SALE PRICE $22,850 2016 Ford Transit XLT Stk. #42823A . SALE PRICE $24,250 2017 Mazda 6 Gr. Touring Stk. #33618A SALE PRICE $24,993

OVER $25,000

2015 Jeep Gr. Cherokee Stk. #P6536A SALE PRICE $27,469 2013 Lexus GS 350 Stk. #35171A ....... SALE PRICE $27,550 2017 Chevy Camaro SS Conv. Stk. #420109A SALE PRICE $28,750 2014 Chevy Suburban LTZ Stk. #P6555 SALE PRICE $28,750 2016 Mazda CX-9 Stk. #310178A........... SALE PRICE $34,773 2017 Mazda CX-9 Gr. Touring Stk. #33176A SALE PRICE $36,669 2017 Chevy Tahoe LT Stk. #P6521 .... SALE PRICE $40,850

6127 S. Lindbergh Blvd. • BommaritoChevy.com • 314-487-9800 15

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2008 Kawasaki Versys 650

2016 Audi A5 Premium Plus

2018 Audi Q5

2017 Audi Q7

2015 Audi S7

2018 BMW 4 Series 430i

Runs great, good condition

17K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner #28761A

Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD #28197L

Premium Plus, AWD, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 owner #28833A

Sportback, Quattro, AWD #P9378

RWD, Carfax 1 owner, 36K Miles #P9462

$2900

$31,000

$49,300

$49,300

$35,000

618-593-8804

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2015 Acura ILX

2015 Audi A8

2018 Audi Q5

2017 Audi Q7

2015 Audi SQ5

2015 BMW 6 Series

28K Miles, Automatic, Navigation, Sunroof, #B9178

Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats #27112A

2.0T Quattro, Ibis White, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28326L

Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD, Graphite Gray #P9385

Premium Plus, Florett Silver Metallic, 28K Miles #P9345

Alpina B6, Power Moonroof, V8 #986038

$43,300

$53,800

$38,364

$52,743

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2018 Audi A3

2018 Audi Q3 Quattro

2018 Audi Q5 Premium Plus

2016 Audi S3

2018 BMW 430i

2010 BMW X3

Premium Plus, 9K Miles, Cosmos Blue, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #28276L

7K Miles, Utopia Blue Metallic, AWD, #28209L

2.0 Turbo, Prestige, Quattro, 28K #M17475B

Convertible, 2.0L I-4 Cyl, RWD, #P9269

AWD, #195001

$32,500

$36,300

Quattro, 11K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 owner #28197L

$33,990

$31,500

$22,490

$35,368

$43,500

$43,300

$15,000

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2017 Audi A4

2018 Audi Q3 Quattro

2018 Audi Q5

2018 Audi S5 Cabriolet

2011 BMW 528i

2017 BMW X5 xDrive 35i

2.0Turbo Premium Plus, S-Line, Quattro #V18351A

8K Miles, AWD, Utopia Blue, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28219L

Premium Plus, Quattro, 10K Miles, AWD #28330L

Prestige, 4K Miles, Tango Red Metallic #P9434

#195031

$10,900

Alpine White, 25K Miles, AWD #97307A

$32,490

$33,500

$43,300

$65,000

$43,800

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2018 Audi A4

2018 Audi Q5

2016 Audi Q5

2016 Audi S5

2017 BMW M4 Coupe

2015 BMW x5 xDrive35i

Premium Plus, Quattro, 7K Miles, AWD, Monlight Black #28277L

2.0 Turbo Premium, Quattro, Black #B9265

Premium, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 24K Miles #P9344

Prestige, Daytona Gray Pearl, 6K Miles, #P9341

17K Miles, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28748B

AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, 32K Miles #P9452

$37,300 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$40,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

16

$33,082 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

RIDES MAGAZINE

$47,339

$62,000

$39,800

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Buick Cascada

2012 Buick Regal

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2017 Chevy Camaro SS

2014 Chevy Camaro

2015 Chevy Cruze

Convertible, Stock #P06758

Leather, Auto, Just Arrived #B9322

ESU, Platinum Edition #C8832A

Manual, RWD, 29K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #P9436

LT, #180903M

1LT, #P06882 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$26,700

$19,999

$12,251

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$8,990

$24,490

$35,500

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2011 Buick Enclave

2007 Cadillac CTS

2018 Cadillac Escalade

2015 Chevy Camaro

1995 Chevy C/K 1500

2015 Chevy Cruze

49K Miles, 1 Owner, Leather, DVD, Pano Roof #C18261A

Black, Loaded, Very Clean #P6512A

Luxury Package, 4WD, 20K Miles #P9311

LT, Stk #180817A

Stock #P06908

1LT, Stk #P06918

$66,237

$17,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$7,250

$21,055

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2014 Buick Encore

2007 Cadillac CTS

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2010 Chevy Camaro

2015 Chevy Colorado

2017 Chevy Cruze

Premium, FWD, Priced to sell Fast! #C9081C

49K Miles, Auto, Local Trade #C9284A

Platinum Edition, AWD, Clean Carfax #P9477

1LT Stk #P06852

Z71, Crew Cab Long Box, #P06854

$26,899

Premier, Red Hot, 8K Miles, Certified , Clean Carfax 1 Owner #C11726P

$33,971

$13,600

$17,990

$16,990

$11,990

$11,272

$18,417

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2018 Buick Envision

2016 Cadillac CTS

2018 Cadillac XTS

2016 Chevy Camaro

2012 Chevy Colorado

2013 Chevy Equinox

Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, #P9356

3K Miles, Savings #C16150R

Luxury, Radiant Silver Metallic, 15K Miles #P9287

1LT Stock #181025A

Stock #181053A

$11,133

Loaded, Full Power #42967A

$30,255

$22,400

$43,649

$32,990

$12,750

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2005 Buick LaCrosse

2011 Cadillac CTS

2017 Chevy Camaro SS

2010 Chevy Camaro

2007 Chevy Corvette

2016 Chevy Equinox

CXL, One Owner, FWD #42760A

Coupe, Stock #P06905

1LT, Stock #195752

LT, #P06841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$28,750

$13,600

Low Miles, Targa Roof, 8 Cyl #C180583B

$6,550

Convertible, Black, Auto, Clean Carfax, GM Certified #420109A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$22,555 Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$16,326

17

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$18,500


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Express 3500

2011 Chevy Impala

2015 Chevy Malibu

GET CONNECTED 1LT, Stock #P06914

LT, 15 Passenger Van, GM Certified! #P6535

LT, Stock #181001A

$17,910

LT, Low Miles, Certified, One Owner #C11687P

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$26,750

$15,995

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2016 Chevy Equinox

2012 Chevy Impala

2007 Chevy Malibu

2007 Chevy Silverado

$14,154

@STLPD

LT Stock # P06725

LSl, Very Clean, #P6558

LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax #42841A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2015 Chevy Equinox

2008 Chevy Impala

2018 Chevy Malibu

2017 Chevy Silverado 1500

LS, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 33K Miles, #C181528B

$4,950

LS, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 99K Miles #42755A

1LT, #P06861

$19,365

@stltoday

@stltoday

@stltoday

Reg Cab, Work Truck, White, One Owner #P6501B

$15,280

$5,990

@stltoday

$9,750

LT, Stock #180856A

@STLPostDispatch

$32,500

$15,991

$6,990

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2011 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Impala

2017 Chevy Malibu

2009 Chevy Silverado 1500 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

STAY IN TOUCH Low Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, Backup Camera #C181692A

1LT Stk #P06875

1LT, Stock #180851A

$18,400

Extended Cab, Long Box Stock #P06868

$10,767

$18,805

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2012 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Impala

2016 Chevy Malibu

2018 Chevy Silverado

$13,600

FIND ANSWERS LTZ, Carfax, 1 Owner, Heated Front Seats #C181282A

2LTZ, Stock #P06871

$19,930

LT, Carfax 1 Owner, Backup Camera, Remote Start #C11776JEP

$13,614

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

18

$15,796

RIDES MAGAZINE

1500, LT Stock #P06798

$33,000 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2018 Chevy Silverado

2013 Chevy Spark

2017 Chevy Tahoe

2014 Chevy Tahoe

2017 Chrysler Pacifica

2017 Dodge Grand Caravan

1500, LT, Stock #181014A

LS, Stock #180946A

$7,965

LT, Loaded, GM Certified, One Owner, Black #P6521

LT, Stock #P06879

$37,557

Touring, Black, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax #P6522

SXT, FWD, Carfax 1,50K Miles, #P6564

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$40,850

$48,400 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$21,950

$18,775

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2018 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Suburban

2018 Chevy Tahoe

2008 Chevy Trailblazer

2014 Dodge Challenger

2011 Dodge Grand Caravan

1500, LT, Stock #P06798

$33,000

Summit White, 8 Cyl 5.3L, 4WD, 44K Miles, #P9026

LT, 4WD, 8 Cyl-5.3L, Black #P9316

SXT, Auto, Loaded, Clean Carfax #P6496A

$46,300

DVD, Orange!! Orange!! #B9356

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$45,770

Full Power, Clean Carfax, #42107A

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2016 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Suburban

2014 Chevy Tahoe

2013 Chevy Traverse

2017 Dodge Charger

2017 Dodge Grand Caravan

1500, LT, STock #181079A

LT, Stock #P06912

LT, 4WD, Carfax 1 Owner, 55K Miles #79174A

LTZ, One Owner, Crystal Red, FWD #C180712A

R/T 392, 16K Miles, Just Arrived #B9157

GT, Stk #P06837

$34,990

$27,995

$35,567

$33,341

$18,950

$6,450

$10,990

$17,999

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2015 Chevy Spark

2011 Chevy Suburban

2015 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Trax

2016 Dodge Charger

2009 Dodger Charger

Great MPG, Auto, Black #V18453A

1500, LTZ, Stock #P06729A

LT, 4WD, Sable Metallic #97244A

LS, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, FWD, 11K Miles #P6540

SXT, Stock #P06851

$21,100

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$14,950 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

One Owner, White, 120k miles, brand new tires Call for Price By Owner 314-479-1710

2015 Chevy Spark

2007 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Tahoe

2014 Chrysler 300C

2016 Dodge Dart

2013 Ford C-Max

LS, 75K Miles, Auto, Certified #V18453A

LT, Gray, Loaded, Very Clean #420023A

LTZ, Stock #P06790

Stock #180928B

Stock #P06922

$19,537

$11,190

Hybrid, SEL, Hatchback, Ruby Red, 64K Miles, Clean Carfax #42345A

$11,950

$42,010 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$7,490

$7,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$31,800

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

19

RIDES MAGAZINE

$13,999

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

$17,400

stltoday.com/RIDES

$11,250


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Ford Edge

2013 Ford Explorer

2016 Ford Fiesta

2005 Ford Mustang

2017 Genesis G80

2006 GMC Envoy SLE

SEL, AWD, Auto, 1 Owner #B9332

AWD, V6, Tow Package, Local Trade #B9196A

SE, Stock #P06889

$11,416

GT, Black, Loaded, Very Clean, #P6458A

3.8 Sedan, Casablanca White, 3.8L V-6, AWD, 4K Miles #40165A

4WD, Automatic, #V18150A

$23,990

$13,490

$35,500

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$8,950

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2010 Ford Escape

2017 Ford Explorer

2005 Ford Focus

2015 Ford Mustang

2016 GMC Acadia Denali

2015 GMC Sierra

Limited, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD #42744A

XLT, FWD, 9K, Local Trade #B8963A

ZX4, Manual, Great MPG #B9263B

Fastback Ecoboost, #180732A

$17,938

Ebony Twilight,AWD, 24K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9478

Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax One Owner, #79019C

$7,950

$29,490

$4,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2013 Ford Escape

2015 Ford Explorer

2014 Ford Fusion

2010 Ford Mustang

2015 GMC Acadia

2016 GMC Terrain

Titanium, Heated Front Seats, 64K Miles, #C180776A

Lmtd, Stock #180965A

SE, FWD, 95K Miles, Clean Carfax #42830A

GT #P06592A

SLE-2, Stock #P06885

$15,301

$22,100

$17,501

SLE, 18K Miles, FWD, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #P6546

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$10,950

$17,756

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2015 Ford Escape

2012 Ford Explorer

2014 Ford Fusion Titanium

2017 Ford Taurus

2015 GMC Acadia

2018 GMC Terrain

Titanium #194821

XL #19558-1

SLT-1, Stock #P06886

$15,000

Loaded, Leather, Full Power #35401A

#P06744

$19,700

$19,000

$25,574

1K Miles, FWD, White #B9076B

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Ford Expedition

2015 Ford F-150 Lariat

2013 Ford Fusion

2016 Ford Transit 350

Limited, 3.5L V-6, 4x4 #P9243

Super Crew Cab Styleside, 67K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9460

S, Stock #P06910

XLT, Pass Van, Very Clean, #42823A

$32,500

$36,000

$9,759 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$14,550

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

20

RIDES MAGAZINE

$37,917

$7,490

$24,250

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$32,300

$19,950

$26,490

YOUR 24/7 NEWS SOURCE (INSTANT ACCESS TO STORIES YOU NEED TO KNOW)


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2013 GMC Terrain

2010 GMC Yukon Denali

2015 GMC Yukon Denali

2009 Honda Civic

2017 Honda CR-V

2013 Hyundai Santa Fe

SLE, FWD, Black, 35K Miles #C18063C

AWD, Quad Seats, DVD, Sunroof, #C17447C

59K Miles, 4WD, 8 Cyl 6.2L, Carfax 1 Owner, #79759A

LX #195491

$6,800

Touring, 11K Miles, Variable Trans, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner #P9443

Sport, AWD, 57K Miles, Roof, Auto #V19042A

$16,990

$46,000

$17,490

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$32,000

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 GMC Terrain

2017 GMC Yukon

2015 GMC Yukon

2012 Honda CR-V

2008 Honda Pilot

2015 Hyundai Sonata

SLE-2, Stock #P06880

$19,318

SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4, #P9277

XL, SLE, Stock #P06727

SE, Silver, Loaded #42634B

Automatic, Alloys, Local Trade #V19017A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$46,500

$35,500

EX-L, One Owner, Clean Carfax, #35221A

$7,750

$11,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon Denali

2011 Honda Accord

2005 Honda CR-V

2018 Honda Pilot

2015 Hyundai Sonata

SLE-1, Stock #P06887

29K Miles, White Diamond, 4WD, #79415A

EX-L, V6, Navigation #B9262

EX, AWD, Local Trade, New Arrival #B9263A

Touring, 6K Miles, Automatic, Clean Carfax AWD, #97054A

Limited, 31K, Red, Local Trade #V17800A

$16,490

$17,886

$15,850

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$53,000

$11,990

$45,019

$19,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon Denali

2014 Honda Civic LX

2015 Honda CR-V

2017 Hyundai Accent

2013 Hyundai Sonata

SLE, 33K Miles, Certified, FWD #C11728P

Summit White, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 72K Miles #P9464

Coupe, Automatic, Back Up Camera, #B9260

SE, Stock #P06901

Hybrid, Stock #190037A

$45,282

$11,990

LX, AWD, 48K Miles #M18343A

$11,650

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$18,490

$12,200

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2013 GMC Yukon

2015 GMC Yukon

2009 Honda Civic

2014 Honda CR-V

2013 Hyundai Elantra

2013 Hyundai Sonata

XL, SLT, Black, Loaded #P6199A

XL, SLT, 4WD, 44K Miles, Onyx Black #P9406

LX, Manual #185491

Loaded, Very Clean, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, #42669A

$43,600

EX, AWD, 17K Miles #C18230A2

Stock #P06906

$6,800 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$9,950

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$17,680

$19,776 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

21

RIDES MAGAZINE

$6,490

$19,990

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

stltoday.com/RIDES

$12,003


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Hyundai Sonata

2016 Infiniti Q70

2017 Infiniti QX60

2017 Infiniti QX80

2016 Jeep Compass Latitude

2013 Jeep Patriot

Stock #P06804

$13,984

AWD, 10K Miles, Certified, Clean Carfax #40242A

Certified, Clean Carfax One Owner, AWD, 11K Miles #514622

Graphite Shadow, 5.6L V-8, AWD, #P9279

Sport, 84K Miles, 4WD, Mineral Gray Metallic #42914B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$37,800

$38,000

$44,500

FWD, Remote Start, Heated Front Seats #P6447

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2013 Hyundai Veloster

2017 Infiniti QX60

2015 Infiniti QX60

2014 Infiniti QX80

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Jeep Patriot

Sunroof, Manual, Premium Sound, 64K Miles #M18259A

Clean Carfax One Owner, Certified, AWD, #522804

4WD, 27K Miles, Graphite Shadow, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #P9373

4WD, 43K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, #P9472

Stock #P06715

Sport, Stock #P06893

$19,900

$15,352

$10,490

$38,000

$13,250

$9,950

$30,800

$41,798 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2013 Infiniti G37

2015 Infiniti QX60

2017 Infiniti QX60

2014 Infiniti QX80

2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2016 Jeep Patriot

Auto, Navigation, Black, 38K Miles #B9339

AWD, 16K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #P9474

One Owner, 10K Miles, AWD, Graphite Shadow #P9369

AWD, Black Obsidian, 71K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #P9432

LTD #L14431

SE, Stock #P06919

$33,427

$37,605

$36,500

$15,000

$14,519

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2018 Infiniti Q50

2017 Infiniti QX60

2017 Infiniti QX60

2004 Jaguar Vanden

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2010 Jeep Wrangler

3.0t LUXE, 22K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 owner, AWD #P9463

Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 11K Miles #96531L

12K Miles, Clean Carfax One Owner, AWD, #526829

White, Loaded, Well Serviced #C8785A

LTD, #P4254

$30,000

Sahara, Auto, Soft Top, 4WD #C9282A

$22,990

$19,990

$36,851

$39,054

$8,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Infiniti Q50

2017 Infiniti QX60

2015 Infiniti QX70

2014 Jeep Cherokee

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2015 Jeep Wrangler

3.0T Premium, Black Obsidian, Carfax 1 Owner, AWD #P9431

Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 11K Miles, Hermosa Blue #96351L

AWD, Moonlight White, 12K Miles #P9329

Trailhawk, Low Miles, Backup Camera, Roof Rack #C11716P

#P43151

$15,000

Unlimited, Sahara, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #79449A

$33,000

$30,000 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$36,851

$32,164

$21,310

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

22

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

stltoday.com/RIDES

$32,500 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Jeep Wrangler

2011 Kia Sorento

2017 Lexus RX 350

2013 Mazda CX-9

2014 Mazda 3

2017 Mazda 6 Touring

Unlimited, Sahara, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #C181757A

67K Miles, Certified, 1 Owner #C18232B

F-Sport, AWD, 15K Miles, Local Trade #M18226A

Touring, Loaded, 3rd Row, Very Clean #35254A

iSport, 42K Miles, Automatic, Certified #V17159B

3K Miles, Automatic, Great Sale Price, #M17209R

$30,479

$14,990

$48,490

$12,990

$20,990

Lou Fusz Chewy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2018 Kia Rio

2012 Kia Sorento

2010 Lincoln MKX

2018 Mazda CX-9

2013 Mazda Mazda3

2011 Mazda 6

2xxx Miles, 4 Door, Hatchback, Auto, #V18419A

EX, One Owner, Backup Camera, Heated Front Seats #C180188A

AWD, Navigation, Pano Roof #M18175B

Grand Touring, Navigation, 1K Miles, Snowflake White, #12065L

Sky Active, Manual, 1 Owner #V18381B

i Touring Plus, 72K Miles, Certified #M18282B

$11,750

$16,990

$11,586

$12,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2016 Kia Rio

2011 Kia Sportage

2010 Mazda 3

2016 Mazda CX-9

2013 Mazda Miata

2015 Mercedes-Benz

LX, Stk #553497

$10,200

EX, Red, Backup Camera, Bluetooth #V18516A

Black, Auto, Very Clean, #35074B

Hard Top, Grand Touring, 11K Miles #M9297

24K Miles, AWD, 4 matic, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, #40091A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

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$4,990

Grand Touring, 13K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, FWD #40233B

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2016 Kia Rio

2013 Lexus GS 350

2016 Mazda CX-3

2010 Mazda 3 S

2004 Mazda Miata

2017 Mercedes-Benz AMG

LX, Stock #P06903

$10,200

AWD, Super Clean, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Only 12K Miles #35171A

Grand Touring, AWD, NAV, Auto, #M18107A

Hatchback, 5 Speed, Loaded, Very Clean! #35373A

Speed Edition, 51K Miles, SHARP!! #M9286

C 43 4MATIC, One Owner, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, #P9060

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$21,490

$9,750

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2011 Kia Sorento

2016 Lexus NX 200t

2017 Mazda CX-5

2014 Mazda 3

2015 Mazda 6 Touring

2006 Mercedes-Benz E350

FWD, Red, 67K Miles, Certified #V18516A

4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 32K Miles #P9488

#L1477-1

$36,000

iSport, Auto, Certified, 33xxx Miles, #M9289

Auto, Loaded, Black #40090A

$14,990

Grand Touring, Clean Carfax, 2K Miles, AWD, Certified, #11391L

$14,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$27,550

23

$28,386 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

RIDES MAGAZINE

$39,915

$34,877

$13,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

$11,990

$21,490

$10,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

stltoday.com/RIDES

$11,490

$34,500

$52,999

$6,800


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2013 Mercedes-Benz G63

2015 Mini Cooper

2018 Nissan 370Z

2015 Nissan Juke

2008 Nissan Sentra

2009 Pontiac G8

AMG, Automatic, Black, 25K Miles #P9126

Countryman, Auto, "S" Pkg, Leather #B9243

Sport, Manual Transmission, Just Arrived #B9346

Auto, FWD, Backup Camera #V9316A

Automatic, Power Options, Just Arrived, #M9044A

GT, Red and Ready, Local Trade #V18160B

$85,500

$20,990

$27,990

$13,990

$3,990

$16,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

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Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2016 Mercedes-Benz GLE

2015 Mini Cooper S

2017 Nissan Altima

2012 Nissan Juke

2015 Nissan Sentra

2007 Pontiac Vibe

350, 4Matic, 3.5L V-6, AWD, #28548A

Paceman, AWD, 35xxx Miles, Automatic, Pano Room, #B9291

Stk #P06926

SL #194311

SV, 16K Miles #P4322

$9,780

$14,880

One Owner, Clean Carfax, M/R #42495A

$20,990

$16,060

$35,500

$4,950

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2013 Mini Cooper S

2015 Mini Cooper

2013 Nissan Altima

2006 Nissan Pathfinder

2015 Nissan Titan

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera

Countryman, Black, M/R, Auto #35020A

S, Auto, John Cooper Extra's #B9203

Backup Camera, Remote Start, Fuel Efficient #C180191B

LE, 4WD, 3rd Row #V18115B

4 Door, Crew Cab, 4WD, 52K Miles, #B9063

4S Cabriolet, White, 23K Miles #79457A

$22,490

$10,302

$27,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

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Bommarito South 866-721-7269

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Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2015 Mini Cooper

2017 Mitsubishi Mirage

2015 Nissan Armada

2015 Nissan Pathfinder

2016 Nissan Versa

2015 Ram 1500

Manual, Pano Sunroof, 31K Miles #B9204

G4, Stock #P06902

SL, Stk #P06829

Stock #P06899

Stock #P06927

$23,579

$10,578

Laramie Longhorn Edition, 36K Miles, 4WD, #C18245A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$15,575

$28,466

$10,878

$64,500

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Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2015 Mini Cooper S

2015 Mitsubishi Outlander

2010 Nissan Frontier

2013 Nissan Rogue

2009 Pontiac G6

2014 Ram 2500

Auto, Sunroof, Leather, 37xxx Miles, #B9290

Sport, Stock #P06923

$13,969

Extended Cab, 4WD, 1 Owner #B9247

White, Loaded, Only 29K Miles #35388A

New Rear Brakes, Remove Start #C181656A

6.7 Diesel, Crew Cab Laramie, 4 New Tires, #B9170

$19,990

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$16,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

24

$10,990

RIDES MAGAZINE

$12,950

$5,391

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$38,990

$47,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Ram ProMaster

2003 Santa Fe, 4x4

2012 Toyota Corolla

2015 Toyota Prius

2014 Volkswagen Beetle

2018 Volkswagen Tiguan

Cargo Van, Local Trade #M18052A

V6, red, extras, 160K mi., Nice SUV,

LE, 42K Miles, 1 Owner, Automatic #M18252A

Stock #P06894

TDI, 10K Miles, Fender Radio, Auto #V9315

S, 7K Miles, Time to Save! #V8873

$11,990

$16,755

$21,490

Call (314)479-1821

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$23,490

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Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2018 Ram Promaster

2017 Subaru Impreza

2015 Toyota Corolla

2015 Toyota Prius

2015 Volkswagen Beetle

2012 Volvo S60

Cargo Van, Stock #P06838

Limited Stock #P06746A

CVT, R-Line, #19523-1

$21,780

L, 1 Owner, Low Miles, Fuel Efficient, #C181640A

Stock #P06895

$22,300

$21,975

T6, AWD, Leather, Sunroof, Auto #M18332A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,542

$16,100

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2010 Saab 9-3 Aero

2015 Toyota Avalon

2016 Toyota Highlander

2015 Toyota Rav4

2012 Volkswagen EOS

2012 Volvo S60

Convertible, Auto, Loaded, Clean Carfax #35513A

XLE, #P06855

Limited, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, #P9440

Limited, AWD, Local Trade #V18348A

Convertible, Stock #180544A

$10,950

$17,835 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$23,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2015 Toyota Camry

2015 Toyota Prius

2015 Volkswagen Beetle

2014 Volkswagen Passat

2007 Volvo XC90

LE, #P06876

HB Four, Stk #P06895

$17,236

$16,100

R-Line, Auto, Roof, VW Certified #V19025A

Wolfsburg, One Owner, Clean Carfax #42917B

#L14411

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$11,750 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2016 Toyota Corolla

2015 Toyota Prius

2014 Volkswagen Beetle

2017 Volkswagen Passat

2005 C-Class Toy-Hauler

Black Sand Pearl, Aux Audio Input, Cruise Control #33720A

Stock #P06896

TDI, Auto, Certified, Like New! #V9313

SE #L1460-1

$13,976

$16,427

29ft – Chassis: Ford E450 Super Duty (Automatic/gas) - 65K

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$17,880

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Mike (314)775-5626

$21,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$3500 obo

$34,500

$12,800

$12,990

#192061

$15,000

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25

RIDES MAGAZINE

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08-17-18

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$7,850

$15,900 OBO.


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RIDES MAGAZINE

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08-17-18

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2016 KIA RIO LX

2012 VW EOS

FWD, Recent Arrival, 6 Speed Automatic

Convertible, Executive, Leather, Clean Carfax, 81K Miles

*

$10,200

STK #P06903

STK #180544A

2017 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT

2015 FORD MUSTANG

4x4, One Owner, Clean Carfax, 44K Miles

Fastback Ecoboost, 45K Miles

$15,352*

STK #P06893

STK #180732A

Heated & Cooled Seats, Bluetooth, Nav, 53K Mi,

*

$19,000

STK #P06592A

*

STK #180928B

2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

3.6L V6, Clean Carfax, 28K Miles

Limited, 4WD, 70K Miles

$20,489

STK #P06715

$20,700* 2016 CHEVY CAMARO 1LT Bluetooth, Clean Carfax,

2015 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED One Owner, Clean Carfax, 77K Miles

12K Miles

$22,100*

STK #180965A

$19,537

2014 CHEVY CAMARO LT

*

STK #180903M

$18,100* 2014 CHRYSLER 300C

2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 5 Speed Manual 4.6L V8, 32K Miles

$12,900*

STK#181025A

$22,400*

*Tax, Title,, License Fees Extra. Photos may not be actual representation.

27

DON BROWN CHEVROLET

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ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

08-17-18

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THEY JUST MAKE CENTS Whether you use a couple or couple dozen every week, you end up with more groceries in your cart and change in your pocket. And that Sunday newspaper you just bought? It has paid for itself.

SUNDAYCOUPONS

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Friday • 08.17.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES North-South vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠J 5 4 ♥9 ♦K Q J 7 3 2 ♣K Q 2 WEST EAST ♠10 7 ♠K 9 8 3 ♥K Q 10 7 6 4 ♥A J 8 2 ♦A 8 5 ♦10 6 4 ♣J 4 ♣8 3 SOUTH ♠A Q 6 2 ♥5 3 ♦9 ♣A 10 9 7 6 5 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♣ 1♥ 2♦ 3♥* Pass 4♥ 5♣ All pass *Pre-emptive Opening lead: King of ♥ Today’s deal features one of the world’s best pairs. East and West, respectively, were Chip Martel and Lew Stansby, from the San Francisco area. They are former World Open Pairs champions. Martel’s pre-emptive bid was about a king heavier than normal. With an opening bid on his left and a two-level response on his right, he knew that his partner had limited high-card points. Martel’s bid had ramifications in the play. Stansby continued with a second heart at trick two, ruffed in dummy. Declarer led

dummy’s king of diamonds to Stansby’s ace and Stansby continued with another diamond. South shed a spade as dummy won the queen. Declarer now cashed dummy’s jack of diamonds and discarded another spade. The king of clubs came next, as Stansby smoothly followed with the jack! Declarer was at the crossroads. Should the trumps split 2-2, he could just draw the outstanding trumps with dummy’s queen and discard his queen of spades on a diamond. He could also take the spade finesse, but West rated to have the king after East’s pre-emptive bid. Should the jack of clubs be an honest card, he could simply continue with a good diamond. He could overruff East and return to dummy with the queen of clubs, drawing the last trump, and discard his spade on a diamond. He chose to lead another diamond. Martel was careful not to ruff the diamond or it would have exposed the position. South confidently discarded his queen of spades and was pained when Stansby ruffed this for the setting trick. Nice defense!

CRYPTOQUIP

Across

32 Cross to bear 34 Somewhat icy 35 What old records and happy-go-lucky people may do 36 Fore-and-aftrigged vessel 38 Stoppage 39 Geoffrey of fashion 40 “Sup?” 43 Meritorious 45 Picked up on 48 Subject of the 2008 biography “Woman of the House” 49 Annual event that includes snocross and ski superpipe 51 Number two 52 Rock band whose name is suggested by the first row of this puzzle

1 Ride 5 Trattoria offering 10 Effervescence 14 Natural pain reliever 15 West Indian sorcery 16 Dirt pie ingredient 17 Amorphous mass 18 5-Across unit 19 Days long gone 20 Inept sorts 22 One low on dough 24 Aziz of Netflix’s “Master of None” 25 Loft addition 26 Bush animal, for short 27 “Still, after all this time …” 31 Film speed letters

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE D E F S A L O H S C R U H E L T E N H A S A E P I C R O C K E S S H A I K E T R E A L A Y R A Q I W I N

T S A K B I L A E N O S I P S E E N C E L E D Y N S M A U B B R A I E S T

P A G E

A V E

P E S O

WORD GAME August 17 WORD — ARTIFICE (ARTIFICE: ART-ih-fis: An artful or crafty skill; stratagem.) Average mark 31 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 43 or more words in ARTIFICE? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — CALYPSO slay cosy capo slop also clap soap lacy clasp soapy palsy clay soya play clop spacy ploy cloy spay posy coal splay scalp cola opal scaly copay slap copy RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

A Z O V

N O T A

G O A L O C E N H A G I S R Y O N A N O T W O R D E D P S

A W N A O R V E A H S A I N N D S O D R O E W O N

H E M I N

I D E A S

A F R O A S I A N

T E E N Y D R Y

56 “The Burning Giraffe” artist 57 ___ school 58 Martial art whose name means, literally, “sword way” 59 Sophocles tragedy 60 Best, but barely 61 Language from which “kayak” comes 62 Paint swatch selection 63 Go-getter 64 Pours on the love 65 “The Garden of ___” (Oscar Wilde poem)

Down 1 Apocalyptic event predicted in Norse mythology 2 Like a shampoo/ conditioner 3 Expands one’s view, in a way 4 Referee, in slang 5 Pink, for one 6 Sacred symbol of ancient Egypt 7 The Hudson’s Tappan ___ Bridge 8 Galifianakis of “The Hangover” 9 Leading 10 Place for an umbrella stand 11 Heavyweight champion who defeated “Bonecrusher” Smith

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

If Aug. 17 is your birthday • This year you tend to use tension as a motivator. However, you can get locked into a point of view and have difficulty gaining perspective. Let others know about dreams that you would like to bring to fruition. Scorpio sees you as transparent. ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★ You might believe that someone is speaking gibberish. Although this isn’t true, this person doesn’t seem to connect the dots as you would. Keep smiling, and your interactions with this person will work out. Financial gain is possible here. Tonight: Happiest as a duo. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ Defer to others, and be optimistic about an offer. Others will seek you out, as they enjoy your company. If you are in a committed relationship, make sure to dote on your significant other. You don’t want to upset this person. Tonight: Out and about, strutting your stuff. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★ When the cat’s away, the mouse will play. You have acted like a mouse with an absent cat nearly all week. Now you are faced with an enormous amount to catch up on. Dive right in rather than quarrel. You might be surprised by how much you accomplish. Tonight: Out late. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Use today to finish a project. You could be surprised by a loved one; the caring and attention he or she gives you mean a lot. You begin to see the makings of caring days. Go along with a demand from a loved one. Tonight: Christen the weekend. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★ Your instinct might be to stay home. If so, you are right to listen to your intuition. Others will find you if they need you. On the other hand, you might squeeze in some R and R. As a result, you are likely to feel vibrant. Tonight: At a favorite restaurant. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★★ You might not communicate as well as you’d like to. You feel as if you are speaking a foreign language and

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

that people don’t seem to “get it.” Take charge of a set of plans. Listen to what others want. Somehow you will make it all work. Tonight: Speak your mind. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★ Before you say “yes” to someone, make sure you really want to. Honor a change of heart. Remain secure in what you need to do. Be clear about your desires. Remain open in conversations. Make sure your budget is as tight as you’d like. Tonight: Treat a friend to TGIF. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ Beam in more of what you want. You have the charisma and energy to hit a home run. Do not allow someone to change plans or cause a problem. Think positively and you will see better results. Someone might change his or her mind at the last minute. Tonight: Keep smiling. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★ Listen to the drumbeats. Someone is trying to tell you something, whether you want to hear it or not. Slow down and follow your intuition. You might be hoping for a certain resolution, which could color your perspective. Ask for feedback. Tonight: Play it low-key. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ You know what you want, but at times you do not use the correct words. Refuse to allow a misunderstanding to begin. Verify that you are on the same page as someone else, or that he or she understands what you’re saying. Tonight: Get together with the gang. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★ Take a stand, if you feel it’s necessary. You cannot minimize what is happening around you. Know that more responsibility will be dropped on you. Consider that you might not want to play a significant role. Be honest with what is going on within you. Tonight: Be willing to say “no.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★★ Put yourself in someone else’s shoes. You might not have the control you desire in a tense situation. By identifying with others involved, you can find the right. Others appreciate your sensitivity and support. Tonight: Be adventuresome and spontaneous.

Puzzle by Trenton Charlson

12 Gets closer and closer 13 Old-fashioned image projector 21 Fractions of a krona 23 Word 28 “Beowulf,” essentially 29 Eating with one’s elbows on the table, e.g. 30 Meeting places 33 “Peanuts” boy 35 Makes plans to tie the knot

37 Intense attraction, with “the” 39 Google alternative 41 Tiny brain? 42 Vamps 43 Odd duck 44 What “education is the best provision for,” per Aristotle 46 Key for “Spring” in Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons” 47 Roosevelt predecessor?

48 Summoned 50 Yahtzee scoresheet row 53 Founder of Stoicism 54 Hardware bit 55 Comics character who once, surprisingly, solved a sudoku puzzle

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0713

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

WORDY GURDY

STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

08.17.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Daughter’s old flame has dad steaming Dear Torn • I think the chances of your father “getting used” to his daughter being married to a convicted felon and drug user who can’t quite kick the habit are somewhere between a snowflake and hell. Gary may have been the love of your life since childhood, but if you plan to marry him, it’s important you get a glimpse of what you may be in for. There are self-help groups for the friends and family of addicts. Join one of them. (Visit Nar-Anon.org to find the nearest meeting.) If you do, you will meet other individuals who are involved with people who have a drug addiction and learn about challenges you both will face. Dear Abby • A longtime friend of mine, “Jenny,” and I reunited after years of not speaking. Our pregnancies brought us back together, and since the births of our children we have had playdates, shared baby stories, advice, etc. My problem is, Jenny tries to pass down stained, out-ofseason clothes from her child to

mine. (She gets free handouts from organizations that help moms who aren’t financially well off.) She and her child’s father drive brand-new cars with hefty car payments, and they are paying a big mortgage — all the while collecting assistance. It bothers me because, while we struggle, my family doesn’t use assistance. We feel it should be used only for those who really need it. Am I silly for letting something like this get to me? — Making My Own Way in Virginia Dear Making • Your problem isn’t the baby clothes. It’s that you disapprove of Jenny’s values. While you have some things in common, you also have major differences. Among them, your choice to work for what you get and her willingness to game the system. That’s a big difference, and you’re not being silly. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Side mirror is different. 2. Suitcase handle is missing. 3. Window is missing. 4. Collar is different. 5. Hair is different. 6. Fence is shorter.

Dear Abby • I’m dating my grammar school and high school sweetheart, “Gary.” We’ve known each other since I was 6. (I’m 33.) In high school we dated for nine months and were in love, but he told lies to my dad, so Dad ordered him to stay away. Now, 16 years later, after being friends all this time, we both became single and got back together. Gary is and always has been the love of my life, as I am his. He would do anything for me. He says he wants to marry me and have kids, and he’s never said that to any other woman. Since we broke up at 16, Gary has done some bad things (drugs, prison). Because of it, my dad hates him. Dad was finally getting used to Gary being back in my life until a few months ago, when Gary crashed my car after relapsing. Gary is getting me a new car and trying to get my dad to like him, but Dad is stubborn. I want to bring Gary to my parents’ to visit. Is there any way to get my dad used to him? — Torn in New Jersey

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

‘Let me know’ deserves some response

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Dear Miss Manners • I am single. Very often, when I ask married friends or potential friends to meet me for a meal or another event — either with the spouse or without — I get an enthusiastic response, followed by, “Let me check with (spouse) to see if we have anything else planned.” And then I never hear a response back. This happens even when I throw several dates out. My instinct is to think they really were not interested. I do not follow up, because I do not want to make them uncomfortable. Is there a polite way to address this? Gentle Reader • More likely, their spouses gave them a similarly vague response and they got tired of asking. While this practice of nonresponse is clearly rude, Miss Manners recommends that you attempt at least one follow-

up before you start eliminating friends. Dear Miss Manners • Since my 48th birthday last year, I have had at least three restaurant clerks put a “senior discount” on my bill without asking. The standard minimum age for senior discounts is 55; however, I am less bothered by the “you look old” assessment than by the guilt over accepting something I don’t merit. I try to correct people when it happens, but they just shrug it off. Wouldn’t the polite approach be to wait for the customer to request the discount herself? Gentle Reader • At least the restaurant did not issue the discount while saying, “Here you go, young lady!” Since you are not currently one, you may politely correct these helpful clerks.

Dear Miss Manners • We will soon be hosting our daughter’s fifth birthday party. We always include food for all attending. Most parents do not eat at children’s parties, but we have always gotten them to join us for pizza and cake and love it! How do I tell my guests that they can help themselves to coffee/tea/lemonade? The drinks are free and included in the cost, and we do not have to pay extra.

8/17/18

7:00

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CBS ÎNFL Preseason Football: Kansas City Chiefs at Whistleblower: The 4 Atlanta Falcons. From Mercedes-Benz Stadium Case Against Los Alamos. (N) (cc) in Atlanta. (N) NBC American Ninja Warrior: Philadelphia City Fi5 nals. The top 30 compete. (cc) PBS Washing9 ton Week (N) (cc)

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

CW 11

Please send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, www.missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.

ABC WE Day Young people 30 committed to change. (N)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

Dateline NBC (N) (cc)

The Great British BakBreaking Father Brown Lady Big: Eddie Felicia lands in the hos- ing Show: The Final. Huang. pital. (cc) (N) (cc)

Gentle Reader • “Please help yourself to drinks at the counter. Tell them you are here for Eliana’s party.” The clerks at the counter, if not the guests, will know exactly what that means.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 08.17.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Surrogacy at an older age comes with some high risk FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk Dear Dr. Roach • Would you please comment on common or uncommon issues that might be expected in a pregnancy at age 57? I am healthy, with no issues other than slightly elevated LDL. I have not gone through menopause. I had four full-term pregnancies, the last at age 35 (after which I had my tubes tied), and no miscarriages. I asked my doctor two years ago if I would have an issue being a surrogate and was told there was no reason I couldn’t be, but my physician told me it can be dangerous at my age. I appreciate your thoughts. — M.V.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

Answer • I admire your willingness to consider being a surrogate. However, the risks of pregnancy in a 57-year-old woman are significant. A study from the U.K. from 2016 quantified the risks pretty thoroughly; however, of the 233 women studied, only two of them were older than 57, so your risks are probably higher than the average risk for an older mother in the study (which was defined here as 48 years or older at the date of delivery). Before I go over the risks, let me point out that one major risk for older mothers, Down syndrome, may not apply, since the ovum (egg) you would be carrying would come from another woman and it is her age that determines the risk for the fetus. Compared with younger mothers, older mothers have a higher risk for: high blood pressure during pregnancy; pre-eclampsia, also called toxemia; diabetes during pregnancy; hemorrhage after delivery; Caesarean section; preterm delivery; and admission of the baby to the intensive care unit. Miscarriage rate (after 11 weeks) in women over 55 is estimated to be about 10 percent, compared with 1 percent in younger women. Maternal death is much more likely for older women than younger; however, that risk is small. Yo u s h o u l d t h i n k through your risks before making a decision.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Dear Dr. Roach • Are net carbs really a thing? I understand low impact on blood sugar, but not measuring net carbs. — H.C. Answer • The “net carbs” number is normally calculated by taking the grams of total carbohydrates and subtracting the grams of fiber and sugar alcohols. It’s an attempt to look at the effect on blood sugar, and it has modest informational benefit. I don’t recommend using the term “net carbs.” I think it’s more important to look at ingredients.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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