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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 08.14.2019 • $2.50

‘WE’RE SCARED’

Law licenses of 2 former prosecutors suspended for cover-up

Killing of 7-year-old boy rattles Hyde Park neighborhood

Schuessler

Dierdorf

BY ROBERT PATRICK

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The Missouri Supreme Court on Tuesday suspended the law licenses of two former St. Louis prosecutors for covering up a police beating of a handcuffed suspect in 2014. In a unanimous opinion, the court suspended Katherine Anne “Katie” Dierdorf and Ambry Schuessler. Dierdorf cannot apply for reinstatement for three years. Schuessler will be suspended for at least two years. The court’s ruling cited “the severity of Ms. Dierdorf’s Please see SUSPEND, Page A4 ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Ifiok Usanga, the father of 7-year-old Xavier Usanga, is embraced outside his home in the 3500 block of North 14th Street on Tuesday, the day after his son was shot and killed in the Hyde Park neighborhood. “He was supposed to go to school today,” Usanga said.

‘There used to be a line: you don’t hurt a child. And when a child gets hurt, it’s time to call the police. But that’s not happening. Police Maj. Mary Warnecke BY CHRISTINE BYERS AND BLYTHE BERNHARD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

THE LINKS ST. LOUIS

Xavier Usanga participates in a community event in July.

Fee hike may not resurrect state’s shuttered license offices

ST. LOUIS — At Clay Elementary School on Tuesday, students were greeted on the first day by their new teachers, a new principal — and grief counselors. Xavier Usanga, 7, was fatally shot Monday outside his home nearby. He was to have started second grade Tuesday at Clay. Police officers in cars and on foot still circled the family’s Hyde Park house on Tuesday morning. Neighbors visited to console family members — and share their own fears. “We’re scared,” said Gracie

Koenig, 20, who lives across the street from the Usanga family. “It was just kids in the yard.” Xavier was shot just after 5 p.m. Monday. An 18-year-old standing nearby was injured. The two were in the backyard of the Usangas’ home, in the 3500 block of North 14th Street. Xavier’s death makes him the 10th child killed in a shooting in St. Louis this year, and at least the 17th in the metro area. City officials on Tuesday blasted the incident, demanded action and begged the public for help finding the shooters. “Another child has been killed,” Mayor Lyda Krewson wrote on Facebook. “Please say

US retreats on Chinese tariff threats

something.” Police Maj. Mary Warnecke, too, pleaded for witnesses to speak out: “There used to be a line: You don’t hurt a child,” she said. “And when a child gets hurt, it’s time to call the police. But that’s not happening.” Lewis Reed, president of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen, called on city, state and federal leaders to act — to move city money from surplus funds to violence prevention, to pass a federal bill allowing cities to control their own gun laws, and to work with anti-violence groups to draft a local ordinance relating to gun purchases in the city. “It is fully within the city’s power to change these circumstances immediately,” Reed said.“We have the tools to make effective changes — today. We

BY DAMIAN PALETTA AND HEATHER LONG

Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The White House on Tuesday said it would delay imposing tariffs on Chinese imports of cellphones, laptop computers, video game consoles and certain types of footwear and clothing until Dec. 15, significantly later than the Sept. 1 deadline President Donald Trump had repeatedly threatened. The announcement, which came from the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, ensures that Apple products and other major consumer goods would be

Please see XAVIER, Page A4

Please see CHINA, Page A5

PROTESTERS, POLICE FACE OFF IN HONG KONG BY YANAN WANG AND KATIE TAM

Associated Press

HONG KONG — Frenzied mob violence Tuesday against two men suspected by protesters of being spies from mainland China marked the second day of pro-democracy demonstrations that caused mass cancellations and disruptions in Hong Kong’s busy airport. Calm eventually returned, with most of the protesters leaving the airport hours after officers armed with pepper spray and swinging batons tried to enter the terminal, fighting with demonstrators who barricaded entrances with luggage carts. Riot police clashed briefly with the demonstrators, who said they planned to return to the airport early Wednesday. But by early Wednesday, check-in counters had reopened and only about three dozen protesters remained camped out in

BY KURT ERICKSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY — Contractors who run license offices in small towns across Missouri cheered when lawmakers and Gov. Mike Parson signed off on the first fee increase in two decades earlier this summer. The higher fees, they said, would help offset rising costs for materials and less support from the state Department of Revenue, allowing them to make ends meet as they distribute driver’s licenses and license plates. But, in communities where offices closed because contractors were losing money, there VINCENT YU, ASSOCIATED PRESS Please see PLATES, Page A4

TODAY

Down the road

86°/64° MOSTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

83°/71° PARTLY SUNNY

Policemen arrest a protester during a demonstration at the airport in Hong Kong on Tuesday.

Cards blank Royals SPORTS

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Please see HONG KONG, Page A5

Animal control workers fear for jobs •

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Opera star accused of harassment •

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Mizzou defense wants more speed •

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Japan’s delectable street food •

1 M LET’S EAT Vol. 141, No. 226 ©2019

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WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM BREAKFAST POTATOES There are fried potatoes, and then there are crispy breakfast potatoes made the Prep School way. stltoday.com/lifestyles

THROUGH THE YEARS

UPCOMING CHATS

The buses are rolling and the kids are heading back to school, so check out some back-to-theclassroom photos through the years. stltoday.com/education

Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday

Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m.

TONY’S TAKE

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Bell’s office drops old McCulloch case, calling it a waste of resources

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LOTTERY Multistate games MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 7-27-31-34-51 Mega ball: 5 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $65 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $138 million

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $4.1 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 5-8-9-24-39 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $92,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 116 Evening: 584 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 0961 Evening: 1345

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 6-9-16-35-36 Evening: 8-9-11-33-42 LOTTO Monday: 2-19-25-29-40-52 Extra shot: 9 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $4.5 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 788 FB: 4 Evening: 536 FB: 9 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 8347 FB: 9 Evening: 7564 FB: 5

CORRECTION • Xavier Usanga was 7 years old when he was fatally shot Monday in St.Louis.A story on Tuesday’s front page gave the wrong age.

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It started like a bad April Fool’s joke. It was April 1, 2014, and the Clayton Police Department arrested Town and Country attorney Scott Ehlermann and booked him on suspicion of felony stealing. The allegation was that Ehlermann had taken a document from a case file in St. Louis County Circuit Court. Ehlermann and Marie Lipowicz, who is also an attorney, were going through a difficult custody dispute. She had filed for an order of protection against him related to their son. There was a dispute about a requirement of a consent decree that allegedly contained two pages. Scott Ehlermann’s decree only had one page. When he went to the court, he found the consent decree in the file also only had one page. From the moment he was charged, Ehlermann denied taking anything. Here’s how his attorneys, Jeff Goldfarb and Will Goldstein, described what happened in a recent letter to St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell: As Ehlermann was looking at the court file, he took a folded copy of his consent decree from his pocket to compare to the one in the file. “He then folded up his copy and placed it back in his pocket, organized the court file, and returned it (to the clerk).” So why were Goldfarb and Goldstein writing Bell? Because five years, seven witnesses, six judges, 38 subpoenas, a grand jury and two canceled trials later, the case against Ehlermann was still hanging over his head. Until Monday. That’s when Bell’s office dropped the case, and suggested that the previous prosecutor, Robert McCulloch, had engaged a massive waste of resources on what might have been a “personal grudge,” says Sam Alton, Bell’s chief of staff. “This is exactly one of the reasons Wesley Bell ran for office,” Alton says. “The whole idea of this being a felony in the first place is unbelievable. He’s been

PHOTO BY SID HASTINGS

St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell run through the wringer since 2014, all without evidence that is sufficient to prosecute.” The last time the charges were dropped, McCulloch blamed a judge’s ruling, and then refiled them as a misdemeanor. At the time, Ehlermann said he thought McCulloch had it out for him. “I was an intern under (McCulloch) and I guess he’s got a vendetta. All they’re trying to do is smear my name,” he said. In their letter to Bell, asking his office to look at the case again, Goldfarb and Goldstein make a similar case. “It is important to note that Scott was not well liked by the previous administration,” the attorneys wrote. “Scott had worked as an intern in the office and had a falling out with Bob McCulloch. We do not mean to suggest that the prosecution against Scott was malicious, just that when the issue arose, logic and common sense were brushed aside. The disdain for Scott among many within that office resulted in an illogical prosecution.” McCulloch could not be reached for comment. The clerk who was present when Ehlermann looked at the court file that day said in a deposition that she didn’t see him take anything from the file. But until Bell’s office took over, the case persisted. The assistant prosecutor who handled the case the longest, Ed McSweeney, was among the first of the McCulloch

loyalists to be fired by Bell when he took office. McSweeney infamously turned to Facebook after Bell won and wrote that “County voters will soon regret what they did.” That’s definitely not the case for Ehlermann. “I appreciate the new regime at the prosecuting attorney’s office looking into my case and understanding what really went down,” he says. “I praise their effort to look at the truth. Wesley Bell and Sam Alton deserve praise to push this county in a new direction of seeking the truth for the public good. I truly believe the prosecutor’s office has not only a duty to prosecute cases but also not to prosecute cases when the truth is overwhelming against their own interest and not to rely on any political or other motives when taking action.” This is the new culture in progressive prosecutors’ offices all over the country. It is the spirit behind conviction integrity units, like the one operating in St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office and the one close to being up and running in Bell’s office. Justice in 2019 isn’t just about law and order. It’s about the truth. And that’s no joke. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

CONCERT REVIEW

Gary Clark Jr. shows why he’s a rising star BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Fox Theatre got a onetwo punch of rising music powerhouses this week. Recent Grammy winner Brandi Carlile played a great show Sunday, immediately followed by Gary Clark Jr. on Monday. The singer-guitarist drew an impressive crowd of more than 3,000, possibly fueled in part by the good favor he drew by performing here in June before Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Final. “I was here a little while ago, and you guys won something,” he recalled on Monday. “Oh yeah, and I met Nelly, and that was dope.” Clark didn’t say much, and when he did, he mostly mumbled. Playoffs or no playoffs, Clark is on his way up: appearances on “Saturday Night Live” and NPR’s “Tiny Desk” series; his best-ever sales for his new album, “This Land”; and his great track record of recent concerts. Clark took the stage as a Johnny “Guitar” Watson song

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Gary Clark Jr. performs Monday at the Fox Theatre. Clark jumped from blues to rock to reggae and more for a crowd of more than 3,000 people. played and artwork was lowered into place. Lit from behind, he cut a striking figure with his hat and guitar. Clark played a long guitar intro before opening with the bluesy “Bright Lights” from his 2012 album, “Blak and Blu.” For just over two hours,

going just past the scheduled time, Clark and his band proved highly combustible playing songs from “This Land,” “The Sonny of Sonny Boy Slim” (2015) and “Blak and Blu.” As is customary for Clark, he genre-hopped throughout the show, diving into blues, rock (“I Walk Alone”), Curtis

Mayfield and Prince-inspired R&B (“Feed the Babies” and “Pearl Cadillac,” respectively), reggae (“Feelin’ Like a Million”) and punk (“Gotta Get Into Something”). It all seemed natural — probably because it was. Clark’s constant guitar shredding along the way led to an abundance of stirring solos, such as during the balladry of “Our Love,” on which it wasn’t clear whether he was possessing his instrument or his instrument was possessing him. Support act Greyhounds played a memorable opening set, later joining Clark and his band for a jam session that ignited the encore. But the sparse “Things Are Changin,” also during the encore, was equally lit while occupying quieter spaces. A cover of the Beatles’ “Come Together” was a fitting way to end the show. Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

BIRTHDAYS Singer David Crosby is 78. Country singer Connie Smith is 78. Actor-musician Steve Martin is 74. Actor Antonio Fargas (“Starsky and Hutch”) is 73. Bassist Larry Graham of Sly and the Family Stone is 73. Actress Susan St. James is 73. Actor David Schramm (“Wings”) is 73. Romance novelist Danielle Steel is 72. Keyboardist Terry Adams of NRBQ is 71. Cartoonist Gary Larson (“The Far Side”) is 69. Actor Carl Lumbly (“Alias”) is 68. Actress Jackee

Cadogan (Third Eye Blind) is Harry (“Sister, Sister,” 49. Actress Lalanya Masters “227”) is 63. Actress Marcia (“Barbershop”) is 47. Actor Gay Harden is 60. Singer Christopher Gorham (“Ugly Sarah Brightman is 59. Betty”) is 45. Actress Mila Actress Susan Olsen (“The Kunis is 36. Actor Lamorne Brady Bunch”) is 58. Actress Morris (“New Girl”) is 36. TV Halle Berry is 53. Actor Martin Kunis personality Spencer Pratt is Ben Bass (“Rookie Blue”) is 36. Actress Marsai Martin 51. Actress Catherine Bell (“JAG”) is 51. Keyboardist Cody McCarver of (“black-ish”) is 15. Confederate Railroad is 51. Guitarist Kevin — Associated Press


08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

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University City High School senior Molly Lyons wears her 2020 crown as students are welcomed back to class Tuesday with a red-carpet treatment by teachers, alumni and staff on the first day of the 2019-2020 school year. WILDWOOD — City administrator hired: Samuel Anselm, former city manager of Joplin, Missouri, has been hired as the city administrator of Wildwood, effective Wednesday. On Monday, the City Council unanimously approved Anselm’s compensation at $155,000 in annual base salary plus benefits. Anselm,43,has been Joplin’s city manager for the past five years and was assistant city manager for three years before that. Wildwood’s city administrator, Ryan Thomas, resigned in December. Since January, Wildwood treasurer Stephen Cross and director of planning and parks Joe Vujnich have served as co-interim city administrators. Councilwoman Katie Dodwell, head of a search committee that sought applicants for the post,said Anselm was chosen from more than a dozen candidates. “He was very involved with the recovery of that community after the (2011) tornado,” she said. Anselm attended the meeting and said he was “excited to get going.” TOWN AND COUNTRY — Marijuana ordinance enacted: The City Council enacted an ordinance Monday night to regulate conditional use permits for medical marijuana businesses. The city has had one informal inquiry from a man who said he was interested in opening a dispensary.The ordinance forbids such uses within 1,000 feet of an existing school,

day care center or church. The ordinance addresses site requirements such as security cameras and waste disposal, hours of operation, definitions of qualifying patients,“marijuana-infused products”and other items. In recent weeks aldermen rewrote the bill to add more regulatory topics. Also Monday night, Mayor Jon Dalton noted that the long-awaited ribbon-cutting for the public portion of Town Square will begin at 7 p.m. Friday. The city bought the 8-acre property, southeast of Clayton and Mason roads, for $2.25 million in 2014. Food trucks, music and sponsor booths will be featured at Friday night’s events. JEFFERSON CITY — Hepatitis A vaccinations set: Franklin County health officials are planning mass hepatitis A vaccinations as the county grapples with a continuing outbreak of the highly contagious liver infection. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said Tuesday an employee at the Bob Evans restaurant in Washington,3151 Phoenix Center Drive, was infected while working shifts from Aug.3 through Saturday. The DHSS said it was “uncommon” for restaurant patrons to catch hepatitis A from a sick food handler but said anyone who dined at Bob Evans from Aug. 3 through Monday should get vaccinated as a precaution. The county health department is administering a mass vaccination from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.Friday at 414 East Main Street,Union; and from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday at the same location.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

John Paynes, right, and Kevin Finch, second from right, volunteers for Better Family Life’s Neighborhood Net, watch on Tuesday as St. Louis Public Schools students exit a bus at Mimika and Lucille avenues in St. Louis. Better Family Life’s new project aims to keep bus stops safe during the first school week in St. Louis city.

LAW AND ORDER ST. CHARLES COUNTY — Hupp goes to prison: Pamela Hupp was transferred from the St. Charles County jail to state prison Tuesday to begin serving her sentence of life without parole for the murder of a mentally disabled man in 2016. Hupp is now at the Women’s Eastern Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center in Vandalia, prison officials said. She could stay there or end up at the Chillicothe Correctional Center. In a brief hearing Monday in St. Charles County Circuit Court, Hupp was sentenced on first-degree murder and armed criminal action charges after entering an Alford plea to the charges in June. Prosecutors say Hupp tricked 33-yearold Louis Gumpenberger into entering her car, then drove him back to her O’Fallon, Missouri, house, where she called 911 and shot him. She told police that he’d tried to kidnap her, suggesting it was at the behest of Russell Faria, the husband of Elizabeth “Betsy” Faria, a friend of Hupp’s who was fatally stabbed in 2011. Prosecutors said that was a lie and that she’d planted a knife, money and a kidnapping note. They believe it was a “sloppy” scheme to smear Faria and say he had no role in Gumpenberger’s death. Faria was convicted of his wife’s murder, but that conviction was overturned based on new evidence and a Lincoln County judge’s failure to let Faria’s lawyers present Hupp as an alternate suspect. She has denied killing Betsy Faria. Prosecutors believe Hupp told Gumpenberger that she was a producer for NBC’s “Dateline” who wanted his help reenacting a 911 call, because she’d tried similar stories with two others. “Dateline” has repeatedly aired shows about the Faria case and is planning another. ST. LOUIS COUNTY — 18-year-old charged in robberies, burglaries: An 18-year-old man was charged Tuesday by the St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office in connection with several robberies and car dealership burglaries. The man and a 16-year-old boy were arrested Monday following a police chase during which the sus-

pect’s car slammed into a police patrol car. Jawan Henderson, of the 1300 block of Norchester Drive in north St. Louis County has been charged in connection with three armed robberies and two burglaries that occurred within the past month. On July 19, Henderson allegedly pointed a gun at a woman and demanded her car keys and cellphone and then drove off in her car. On Aug. 6, Henderson allegedly approached a woman in her car, pointed a gun at her and demanded her purse. He allegedly committed an almost identical crime the following day against a different woman. All three women identified Henderson in a lineup. Police did not provide locations or times for the armed robberies. Henderson and the 16-year-old suspect are accused of breaking into Westport Auto on Page Avenue on Sunday, stealing several car key fobs and leaving the scene in a BMW valued at about $39,000. The burglary was captured on video surveillance. Henderson and the 16-year-old suspect are also accused of breaking into the car showroom at Suntrup Automotive on Lindbergh Boulevard on Monday and taking several key fobs. The two allegedly drove off with three new Mustangs valued at about $31,000 each. Police say Henderson admitted that he’d stolen one of the Mustangs. Henderson faces five counts of first-degree robbery, five counts of armed criminal action, two counts of second-degree burglary and two counts of stealing $25,000 or more. He is being held without bond. The 16-year-old boy has been referred to St. Louis County Family Courts. ST. LOUIS — Car kills pedestrian: A man was killed when he was struck by a car Monday night in north St. Louis. Eric Eddings, 59, of the 1400 block of Pine Street was pronounced dead at the scene. Eddings was struck by a 2008 Pontiac Grand Prix at 9:19 p.m. as he tried to cross North Florissant Avenue near St.Louis Avenue.The intersection straddles the Old North St.Louis and St.Louis Place neighborhoods. Police said the driver, a 23-year-old woman, remained on the scene. The incident is under investigation.

By Michael Plane National Health Press Nancy Holm of Salt Lake City, Utah had tried 18 different diets and diet products without success. “I was so frustrated. I was about give up and not even try anymore. But I really wanted to feel better, look better, and have more energy for my 4 grandchildren who are the joy of my life” she said with a proud smile. Nancy’s lucky break came one afternoon while watching TV. A news special about weight loss was on, and the expert being interviewed on PBSTV was Dr. Eric Wood, who said: “98% of diets and diet products fail. The reason for this is because they do not address a vital underlying root cause of weight gain.” Dr. Wood continued, “If you read the latest medical studies, it becomes very clear most people will never lose weight and keep it off unless they cleanse their liver. The liver must be cleansed because it is the workhorse for weight loss in so many ways. It �ilters all the food and liquid that enters your body. It removes toxins which can keep anyone overweight. It regulates blood sugar levels, converts carbohydrates and much more.” Nancy’s weight loss results were incredible after she cleansed her liver. “I lost 34 pounds without a strict diet or exercise. This was faster and easier than I’d ever lost weight before, and I’ve kept the weight off for over a year now with no problem”, she beamed The pill that safely cleanses your liver in 30-days is now available in the United States without a prescription. It is sold under the brand name LIVAPROL. It contains an active ingredient that has been shown to help the liver eliminate the fat-causing toxins in the body. STUDY: 30% OF BODY WEIGHT LOST IN 31 DAYS Scientists in Japan have discovered a natural compound that has been shown in laboratory tests to restore the liver and trigger phenomenal weight loss. Dr. Decker Weiss, M.D. said, “Laboratory tests showed a loss of up to 30% of body weight in 31 days when this extract was mixed with food. My patients have had remarkable success with this. It is a new, different and exciting breakthrough for people who are overweight.” The results seem hard to believe, yet these �indings are supported by many

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everyday people like Winston Harrison of Randolph, Wisconsin: “I was very skeptical when I �irst read an article about LIVAPROL, but my doctor veri�ied it for me, so I gave it a try. I expected to be disappointed again because I am what they call a “hard loser”, meaning it is very hard for me to lose any weight. But this time it was different and so far I have lost 22 pounds and I feel like I am living in a dream come true.” HOW IT WORKS People have toxic and sluggish livers from all the toxins in our foods and the environment in today’s society. This means their bodies are not effective at digestion and fat breakdown, resulting in weight gain, feeling heavy, bloated and sluggish. The liver’s role is crucial for ef�icient fat breakdown and metabolism. The ingredients in LIVAPROL trigger weight loss. They slim you down by cleansing the liver of its toxins so your metabolism burns off more fat. This can be compared to an old junk car that has not had a tune-up in twenty years getting a fresh new overhaul so it runs like it used to. “Since I turned 50, I put on extra weight and it’s been impossible to lose it. Nothing has worked. When I was younger this was not a problem. When my doctor told me about this, I was skeptical, but I tried it and so far I have lost 42 pounds. I am very happy with all aspects of this supplement. Finally something that works for us 50 plusers”, said Ann LaSalle of Orlando. WHAT DOCTORS ARE SAYING “In all my years as a doctor, LIVAPROL is the most different and exciting breakthrough in weight loss that I have seen for people who want to lose weight and keep it off without a crazy diet or exercise routine”, said Dr. Eric Wood.

“All my patients who have used LIVAPROL have reported a signi�icant weight loss with no side effects, and all say it is much better than any other product they have ever tried”, reports Dr. Decker Weiss, M.D. “LIVAPROL is the right choice for individuals who are overweight. The test results show this supplement works, as do the results of my patients. And my own personal experience of losing weight by using it”, said Dr. Holly Marcelle, who has appeared on award winning TV shows like The Doctors, and PBS’ Healing Quest. With so many enthusiastic comments and actual user results, it was no surprise the �irst production run of LIVAPROL sold out in just days. “We are having a hard time keeping up with the demand”, noted company spokesman Vik Swanson. HOW TO GET LIVAPROL This is the of�icial nationwide release of LIVAPROL in the United States. And so, the company is offering a special discount supply to anyone who calls within the next 48 hours. A Regional Order Hotline has been set up for local readers to call. This gives everyone an equal chance to try LIVAPROL. Starting at 7:00 am today, the order hotline will be open for 48 hours. LIVAPROL is guaranteed to work for you – or you will get full refund with a 90-day unconditional money-back guarantee. It is not sold in stores or online. No prescription or doctor visit is required. All you have to do is call now TOLL-FFREE 1-888-986-8503 and provide the operator with the special discount approval code: LIV142. The company will do the rest. Important: Due to LIVAPROL’S recent media exposure on ABC, CBS, and FOX NEWS, phone lines are often busy. If you call, and do not immediately get through, please be patient and call back. Those who miss the 48-hour special discount offer must pay more for LIVAPROL.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Results based upon averages. Models are used in all photos to protect privacy


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Suspend From A1

misconduct as a result of her dishonesty and instruction of others to conceal information about the incident” and Schuessler’s “repeated dishonesty during and interference with the federal prosecution of the police detective” in their decision. In an emailed statement, Dierdorf lawyer Michael Downey called the suspension “inconsistent with the facts, its own precedent, and what is appropriate to protect the public and maintain the integrity of the judicial system in this case.” He said Dierdorf had “promptly and repeatedly attempted to remedy her earlier misstatements but was rebuffed by her supervisors” and that she voluntarily produced thousands of text messages to the FBI. The incident that started it all was the beating of a handcuffed suspect, Michael Waller, by thenSt. Louis police Officer Thomas A. Carroll on July 22, 2014. Carroll’s daughter’s car had been broken into, and Waller was found with her stolen credit card.

Waller said he had found the card. The next morning, another prosecutor and Carroll’s close friend, Bliss Barber Worrell, told Dierdorf and an intern that Carroll had beaten Waller, the opinion says. Dierdorf did not report the incident to supervisors. Carroll described the beating to Worrell and Schuessler by speakerphone later that morning, saying he punched and kicked Waller, hit him with a chair and stuck his gun in Waller’s mouth, the opinion says. Schuessler responded with what the court called a “racist and homophobic comment about the suspect’s assault,” bringing laughter from Carroll and Worrell. Schuessler and another prosecutor, Lauren Collins, learned Waller had been charged with a felony for fleeing custody, and became concerned that he could go to jail for a crime he did not commit, the opinion says. A reluctant Schuessler went with Collins to a supervisor, the opinion says, telling that supervisor that Worrell might have filed false charges. When called in front of supervisors, Dierdorf withheld some of what she knew about the incident, the opinion says, then told Schuessler, “I told them I don’t

LOCAL know anything. You don’t tell them you know anything either.” Schuessler failed to tell supervisors that she heard Carroll describe the assault, and failed to tell them that he said he used a gun. The next day, Schuessler told police internal affairs investigators that she’d only heard Worrell’s half of the July 23 call, failing to tell them that Carroll was on speakerphone. Dierdorf resigned July 28 rather than face termination. She was interviewed twice by the FBI and a federal prosecutor, Hal Goldsmith. It wasn’t until the second interview that she admitted knowing about the beating on the morning of July 23, describing the incident to others, overhearing a phone call between Worrell and Carroll about the investigation and lying to supervisors about when she learned about the assault. The court said that prosecutors “are held to a higher standard given the nature of their work to protect the public.” Dierdorf’s conduct undermined the public’s confidence in Missouri prosecutors, and her “repeated dishonesty … shows a pattern of protecting herself and her friends over the

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

duties she assumed when she became an assistant circuit attorney,” the opinion says. Schuessler initially blamed Carroll for the racist and homophobic joke and said she didn’t hear the speakerphone call, but admitted the truth in a second interview with federal investigators, the opinion says. That hampered the prosecution of Carroll, they said. Goldsmith believed the joke was relevant because it bolstered prosecutors’ claims that Carroll put his gun in Waller’s mouth during the attack, which carried an enhanced potential prison sentence. Carroll had denied the use of the gun during his criminal case. “The violation was particularly egregious given the circumstances in which the racist and homophobic comment was made,” they said. Schuessler violated the public trust by failing to report the assault and joking about it. But she did go with Collins to report the incident and sought counseling, the opinion says. As a result of the federal investigation, Carroll got 52 months in prison; Worrell was sentenced to 18 months of probation and 140 hours of community service.

The opinion rejects a disciplinary hearing board’s recommendation of a reprimand for each and supports the suspension requested by the Office of Chief Disciplinary Counsel, which investigates lawyer misconduct. The panel, formed to hold a hearing and issue recommendations, dismissed the case against Caroline Anne Rutledge, a former intern. Rutledge’s attorneys and attorneys for the disciplinary counsel agreed with that recommendation. Rutledge was not a lawyer at the time of the incident, and her filings say she did not lie but could have been “forthcoming.” Her lawyer, Maurice Graham, previously told the Post-Dispatch that there was an unprofessional culture in the office. Rutledge is now a lawyer in St. Louis County family court. Dierdorf is a public defender in Denver, Colorado. Schuessler had been working for a Clayton law firm, although her status was unclear Tuesday. Waller won a a $300,000 settlement over the incident, but recently died, his lawyer said. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

ROBERT COHEN PHOTOS, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Ifiok Usanga, the father of 7-year-old Xavier Usanga, sits in front of his home in the 3500 block of North 14th Street on Tuesday, the day after his son was shot and killed in the Hyde Park neighborhood. Candles and Xavier’s toy tricycle sit on a nearby wall.

Xavier From A1

do not have any more time to waste.” And Alderman Brandon Bosley renewed his call to bring in the National Guard. Xavier was the youngest of six children — and the only boy, said his 18-year-old sister, Precious Usanga. His oldest sister is 24. To his family, Xavier was “God’s child,” his sister said. He was the third son born to his mother, but the only one who survived. One born with Down syndrome died about 20 years ago from SIDS. Another boy was stillborn. Xavier was born prematurely and spent time in the neonatal intensive care unit before he came home to join his sisters, Precious said. During the past few Christmas church services, he has carried a replica of baby Jesus to the altar, his sister recalled. “He was so afraid he was going to drop it, and he was so happy when he didn’t,” she said as she started to weep. The family lost a previous home to a fire, but their church, the Most

Plates From A1

doesn’t appear to be any move by the state to restore services to residents. “We are not planning to open any license offices as a result of the fee increase itself,” Department of Revenue spokeswoman Anne Marie Moy told the Post-Dispatch on Monday. According to documents supplied by the governor’s office, 14 offices across the state have been shuttered since 2005. Although not all of the closures can be attributed to the stagnant rates,most occurred in small towns where higher costs and lower foot traffic left license office contractors scrambling to stay afloat. In 2018, for example, the license office in Willow Springs, a town of about 2,100 in Howell County, closed down. “It really has been a problem for

Precious said Xavier was in the family’s backyard Monday with his 11- and 12-year-old sisters, Trinity and Angel, when shots rang out. Their father was inside the house. “They got down on the ground, but when the shooting stopped, they were going to run toward the house,” she said. “Then they all got up to run to the house, and the shooting started again and that’s when Xavier got hit.” Xavier’s grandmother, Mary Norwood, said she felt bad that she didn’t teach her grandchildren what to do when they hear gunshots the way she used to teach her own children what to do if they were ever in a house fire. “I should have told them,‘When you hear gunshots, don’t run, just get down,’ and ‘If they’re shooting at you, run side to side,’” she said, standing near her grandson’s house Tuesday afternoon. Bosley, the alderman, said Xavier and his family were regulars at many community events. Xavier and his father recently attended a father-and-son camping Carmen Long, a longtime neighbor of the Usanga family, is comforted by event, Bosley said. Alderman Brandon Bosley after a news conference Tuesday about the “They were the neighborhood’s death of 7-year-old Xavier Usanga. children,” he said.“They were outside doing what kids do on a sumHoly Trinity Catholic Church, across the street from the parish mer day right before school starts, helped them relocate to a house along 14th Street, Precious said. enjoying the breeze and enjoying

us, especially for the elderly,” said City Administrator Beverly Hicks. Now, residents of the southern Missouri community must make a 40- to 50-mile round trip to Mountain View, West Plains or Mountain Grove to get their documents up to date. Hicks said it’s especially burdensome on owners of trucking companies in the area, who often must make monthly visits to license offices. Similarly, the license office in Vandalia, which straddles both Ralls and Audrain counties, closed in 2017 after the Vandalia Housing Authority told the state it was no longer profitable. Now,Vandalia City Clerk Brandie Gay says the closest offices are in New London,Bowling Green,Mexico or Montgomery City. The latest office to close was in Licking, which was shut down in January. Unlike other states where a government agency operates all license

offices,Missouri allows companies, individuals and not-for-profit organizations to bid for the right to operate the facilities in exchange for a portion of the fees they collect. There are 177 offices still operating. Although Moy said there are no plans to reopen the facilities for now, she didn’t rule out the possibility. “As we have in the past, we consider need to open additional license offices based upon, among other things, interest in a given area,hardware availability and geographic considerations,” Moy said. The fee hikes, which go into effect Aug. 28, include an increase in the annual license plate registration fee to $6 from $3.50. The fee for a biennial registration will go to $12 from $7. The processing fee for a threeyear driver’s license will rise to $6 from $2.50. For a driver’s license longer than three years, the fee

the weather.” Bosley said he is struggling, as well. “To be in the thick of it and personally know a child — who ain’t got nothing to do with this, a child you regularly buy water for, who you fist bump with — is dead,” Bosley said. “That’s so hard to swallow.” He said Xavier and his sisters were regulars at his office and The Links Inc., a nonprofit social service agency that serves as a community center. The agency’s director, Kimyatta Smith, said Tuesday that Xavier and his sisters spent every day through the summer at the center, using the computers, participating in the activities and listening to speakers. Xavier was the youngest to recently attend a presentation about climate change, she said. “He not only wanted to ask all the questions, but he knew all of the answers,” she recalled. “He knew about the ozone and how pollution is damaging it. He was just a very bright child for his age.” Janelle O’Dea of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

CRISTINA M. FLETES, CFLETES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Jeffrey Yin, of Maryland Heights, waits in line to renew his license plates at the Central West End Driver License and Vehicle Registration Office at 3917 Lindell Boulevard in St. Louis in March. climbs to $12 from $5. under the new law. The fees those offices may charge Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 for title transfers, instructional @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter permits and other specialty li- kerickson@post-dispatch.com censes will jump to $6 from $2.50


NEWS

08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

China From A1

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

ST. LOUIS MOURNS THE VICTIMS IN EL PASO From left, Iliana Perez, 11, Jazlyn Perez, 9, Ramon Perez Jr., 10, and their mother, Marlene Perez, take part in a vigil Tuesday at Tower Grove Park to remember the 22 people killed by a white supremacist on Aug. 3 at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas.

Hong Kong From A1

the arrivals area. Flights appeared to be operating normally. More than 100 flights were canceled on Tuesday, the fifth consecutive day that protesters occupied the airport. Airlines were still working through a backlog of more than 200 flights from Monday when the airport announced in the afternoon that check-in processes would once again be suspended. “Democracy is a good thing,” said signs that appeared to be aimed at mainland Chinese and foreign travelers. Many signs also contained apologies for the disruption to travelers: “We stand here to obstruct, only for one single reason. We love and care for Hong Kong. We hope you will understand. Sorry.” The burst of violence included protesters beating up at least two men they suspected of being undercover agents and came the same day Hong Kong’s proBeijing leader warned that the demonstrators had pushed events onto a “path of no return,” highlighting the hardening positions on both sides. Police have acknowledged using “decoy” officers, and the violence followed weekend sightings of men dressed like demonstrators — in black and wearing face masks — appearing to arrest protesters. In both instances, angry demonstrators pushed past people trying to hold them back and attacked the men, binding their wrists together and beating them to the ground. The two were eventually taken away by paramedics. In one case, protesters detained a man they claimed to be an undercover police officer from mainland China, pulled his identity documents from his wallet and encouraged journalists to photograph them. None of them showed that he was a police officer, though protesters claimed to have found his name on an online list of police officers in southern Guangdong province. The Associated Press could not independently verify the man’s identity. Sally Tong, an 18-year-old protester, said they needed to hold him as evidence that mainland Chinese authorities are in Hong Kong to monitor the demonstrations. Tong said the man was dressed in black and wore a mask to look like one of them. “We want to keep him here and

shielded from the import tax until at least December, potentially keeping costs on these products down during the holiday shopping season. It was the latest in a series of Trump’s unexpected announcements and reversals as the White House attempts to pressure China to change long-standing economic practices. The confusion and uncertainty has weighed on the economy, leading companies to tighten up investment as they wait for a resolution. White House officials have been split over how to proceed with China. Some, including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow,have expressed optimism that a deal could be reached. But Trump and senior trade adviser Peter Navarro have defended the tough tactics, saying they are necessary to change China’s behavior. Tuesday’s announcement reflected a more cautious approach, and it moved stocks sharply higher. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped after the news and finished the day 373 points, or more than 1.4%, higher. The stock prices of Apple,Best Buy,Mattel and Macy’s were among those that rallied on the announcement. The announcement effectively shields more than $100 billion in Chinese imports from tariffs until Dec. 15. Shortly after the announcement, Trump told reporters that he delayed the tariffs “just in case” they would have a negative impact on U.S. shoppers this holiday season. This marked the most explicit admission he has made so far that the tariffs could have raised costs for American consumers and businesses and had a negative impact on the economy. Trump has for weeks insisted that higher tariffs are somehow paid for by the Chinese government, even though tariffs are imposed as a form of customs duty that is paid for by U.S. importers. “What we’ve done is we’ve delayed it so they won’t be relevant in the Christmas shopping season,” Trump said before boarding a flight to western Pennsylvania. “Just in case they might have an impact on people.”

U.S. firms issue plea

KIN CHEUNG, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stranded travelers gather at the airport departure hall in Hong Kong on Tuesday. More than 100 flights had to be canceled on Tuesday as demonstrators took over the terminals as part of their push for democratic reforms. investigate,” Tong said. Hours later, the protesters apprehended another man from mainland China. But they could not agree on who they believed he was: Some said he was a gangster, others said he was a fake reporter, and still others said he was masquerading as a protester. As with the first man, some protesters tied his wrists together and poured water over his head, inciting laughter from some in the crowd. Airport security appeared unable to control the crowd. Hu Xijin, editor-in-chief of the Global Times, a nationalistic Chinese tabloid, said the man was one of his reporters. “Fu Guohao, reporter of GT website is being seized by demonstrators at HK airport,” Hu wrote on his widely followed Twitter account. “I affirm this man being tied in this video is the reporter himself. He has no other task except for reporting.” One protester used a U.S. flag to beat Fu as he lay on the floor in a fetal position. Other protesters and first aid workers attempted to stop some who tried to trample the man, while pro-democracy lawmaker Kwok Ka-ki crouched beside him and tried to calm the attackers. After a heated argument, protesters eventually allowed ambulance workers to take the man away on a stretcher. Hong Kong police said they arrested five people for unlawful assembly, assaulting police officers and possessing weapons.

Officials said in a statement that some protesters detained, harassed and assaulted a traveler and a journalist, and obstructed ambulance workers from taking the two men to the hospital. They said other protesters attacked a police officer and snatched a baton from him. The airport disruptions escalated a summer of demonstrations aimed at what many Hong Kong residents see as an increasing erosion of the freedoms they were promised in 1997 when Communist Party-ruled mainland China took over what had been a British colony. The early protests were in neighborhoods near government offices. However, the airport protest has had a direct impact on business travel and tourism. Analysts said it could make foreign investors think twice about Hong Kong, which has long prided itself as being Asia’s leading business city with convenient regional air links. The central government in Beijing has ominously characterized the current protest movement as something approaching “terrorism” that poses an “existential threat” to citizens. While Beijing tends to define terrorism broadly, extending it especially to movements opposing government policies in minority regions such as Tibet and Xinjiang, its use of the term in relation to Hong Kong raised the prospect of greater violence and

the possible suspension of legal rights for those detained. The black-clad demonstrators have shown no sign of letting up on their campaign to force Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam’s administration to respond to their demands, including that she step down and scrap proposed legislation under which some suspects could be sent to mainland China, where critics say they could face torture and unfair or politically charged trials. Lam has rejected calls for dialogue, saying Tuesday the protesters were threatening to push their home into an “abyss.” “After the violence has been stopped, and the chaotic situation that we are seeing could subside, I as the chief executive will be responsible to rebuild Hong Kong’s economy ... to help Hong Kong to move on,” Lam said, without elaborating on what conciliatory steps she will take. Meanwhile, paramilitary police were assembling across the border in the city of Shenzhen for exercises that some saw as a threat to increase force against the mostly young protesters who have turned out by the thousands in the past 10 weeks. President Donald Trump tweeted that U.S. intelligence believes that the Chinese government is moving troops to its border with Hong Kong. He also tweeted that “Everyone should be calm and safe!” He provided no additional details.

The economy has shown signs of slowing this year, and some business executives, lawmakers and White House officials had worried that the tariffs were damaging the economy further. A number of businesses had cut back on investing, in part because they were unsure how Trump planned to proceed with the trade war.Democrats had begun attacking Trump for lacking a coherent plan in his approach to dealing with the Chinese, and the rapid reversals had caused dramatic swings in the stock market. Sensing that Trump’s new defiance toward China could drive up costs,a number of companies petitioned the White House to exempt items they import from the new tariffs.They argued that these costs would be either passed along to the consumer or threaten the solvency of individual firms. U.S. trade officials said the 10% tariff would still go into effect in September on some items, including many food products, gloves, coats and suits. But it said tariffs on other items would be waived completely, “based on health, safety, national security and other factors.” In a nod to pressure from religious groups and publishers, the White House completely exempted Bibles and certain other books from new tariffs. Trump, in a Twitter post and comments to reporters, suggested that the announcement was meant as an overture to Chinese officials and an attempt to restart the stalled negotiations. “I’m not sure if it was the tariffs or the call, but the call was very productive,” Trump said, referring to a conversation this week between top Chinese and U.S. negotiators.

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

Animal control workers worry about losing jobs

LAW AND ORDER

BY JEREMY KOHLER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON — The St. Louis County Council heard from several animal control workers Tuesday expressing concern they could lose their jobs because of problems at the county’s pet adoption center. An audit released last month found myriad problems at the facility in Olivette, including a contention that the center hid its euthanasia rates from advisory board members through paperwork tricks and was spending little effort marketing pets for adoption. And the audit found the shelter was unable to control infectious disease because of overcapacity. Officials in County Executive Sam Page’s administration have said they are working on implementing a series of changes to improve conditions at the center. But employees said Tuesday they were in the dark about any reforms underway and said the problems were caused by mismanagement under the administration of former County Executive Steve Stenger. Some said they were concerned they could be fired if the county decides to hand the center to a private operator. Animal care and control officer Klye Frysztak said his colleagues had been trying for years to make officials in the county’s Department of Public Health aware of problems at the shelter. And animal caregiver Clinton Wall told the council, “Since 2015, the staff of Animal Care and Control have voiced concerns … over who is actually in charge, Is it the volunteers? Is it the advisory board? Is it the citizens of St. Louis County and the taxpayers who pay for these services?” Page said he would have a representative from the health department report next week on the progress of reforms taking place at the center. The council’s presiding officer, Ernie Trakas, told the employees: “Your voices were heard tonight. This is not the prior administration. We will not ignore your concerns.”

HILLARY LEVIN, HLEVIN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Kelli Dunaway, D-2nd District, is sworn in to the St. Louis County Council on Tuesday by Diann Valenti, left. The county does not require council members to be sworn in on a Bible, and Dunaway chose the Dr. Seuss book “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” Holding the popular children’s book are Dunaway’s children Liam, 5, and Bella, 7.

Bi-State refinance advances After two weeks of delays, the council advanced legislation that would allow the county to sign off on a major bond issue refinancing for Bi-State Development to provide some $20 million for new public safety measures on MetroLink. The council voted 4-1 to advance the measure to a final vote next week. Bi-State has said it would use that money to help pay for upgrades in security cameras, reconfiguration of MetroLink stations, fencing and other improvements to make the light-rail system more secure for passengers. Trakas had held up the refinancing but said Tuesday his questions had been answered. Trakas said the council would be doing a “deep dive” on Metro’s budget request from the county for its 2020 budget. The county contributes the largest share to Bi-State from any government, about $150 million. Last year, after concerns about safety on MetroLink, the council voted to withhold some of Bi-State’s funding to pressure the agency into providing regular updates.

crats won special elections Aug. 6 to fill vacancies on the council from the resignations of Page and vice chair Hazel Erby after Stenger’s resignation on April 29. Kelli Dunaway, D-2nd District, was sworn in Tuesday, and Democrat Rita Heard Days, D-1st District, is scheduled to be sworn in next week, giving the Democrats a 4-3 majority. The county does not require council members to be sworn in on a Bible, and Dunaway chose the Dr. Seuss book “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” “I’m proud and excited

Council turnover The council has a Democratic majority for the first time in more than three months, after two Demo-

to get to work for the 2nd District, and to help rebuild trust in our county government,” Dunaway told a reporter after her first meeting. The council has not yet broached the issue of whether the new majority would try to regain leadership of the council by electing a chairman and vice chair. Trakas, a Republican, has temporarily filled the chairman’s duties as presiding officer and has said he would like to continue in the position. Hillary Levin of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this story.

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other legal appointments where their absence might lead to a failure to appear charge and jail time. “Missouri jails are full, and the irony is that many of these defendants are not supposed to be in jail in the first place,” said Missouri Public Defender Director Michael Barrett. The program also could help reduce the amount of money the state spends on subsidizing local jails for holding Missourians who are serving pretrial detention sentences and who haven’t yet been convicted of a crime, Barrett said. The texting program is a joint venture by the Public Defender’s Office and Uptrust, a Massachusettsbased company that has done similar work in Florida, California and Oklahoma. The program is backed by the Missouri Coalition for the Right to Counsel and the Missouri Bar Foundation. Other jurisdictions involved in the pilot are Columbia, Jefferson City, Troy and Kennett. Supporters hope the technology will be eventually offered throughJEFFERSON CITY — Defen- out the state. dants to get reminders to show up: In a new bid to re- BELLEVILLE — Man found duce local jail populations, guilty in toddler’s death: A the Missouri Public De- judge has found a Southern fender’s Office will launch a Illinois man guilty of involpilot project that sends text untary manslaughter in the messages to defendants re- death a toddler. minding them of their court Judge Dennis Doyle dates. handed down the verThe $37,000 project, ini- dict Tuesday in the trial of tially focused on St. Louis Gyasi Campbell stemming and four other cities, is de- from the April 2017 death signed to ensure defendants of 2-year-old Kane Friessdon’t miss court dates and Wylie of Belleville.

CREVE COEUR — Item leads to scare at hospital waiting room: A Mercy Hospital waiting room was evacuated Monday night after hospital staff found a “suspicious item” within the belongings of a car crash patient, Creve Coeur police said. Hospital staff moved the item from the emergency room into an area adjacent to a waiting room. Police responded to the hospital on South New Ballas Road about 6:25 p.m. The waiting room was evacuated for about 30 minutes while the St. Louis County Bomb and Arson unit examined the item, police said. The item appeared to be homemade or commercial fireworks, police said. The patient was an adult male with a St.Louis County address, officials said, but investigators have not been able to interview him because he is still unconscious, Creve Coeur police Capt.Jon Romas said Tuesday afternoon. The car accident that injured the man was unrelated to the suspicious item the man carried, officials said.

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08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

22 states sue over new coal rules BY DON THOMPSON AND ADAM BEAM

Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A coalition of 22 Democratic-led states sued the Trump administration Tuesday over its decision to ease restrictions on coal-fired power plants, with California’s governor saying the president is trying to rescue an outdated industry. In June, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency eliminated the agency’s Clean Power Plan and replaced it with a new rule that gives states more leeway in deciding upgrades for coal-fired power plants. The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, says the new rule violates the federal Clean Air Act because it does not meaningfully replace power plants’ green-

house gas emissions. “They’re rolling things back to an age that no longer exists, trying to prop up the coal industry,” California Gov. Gavin Newsom said at a news conference. He said the lawsuit was not just about Trump but “our kids and grandkids” who would continue to be harmed by coal pollutants. West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, whose state produced the second most coal behind Wyoming in 2017, predicted the lawsuit will ultimately fail at the U.S. Supreme Court, which stayed an earlier Obama administration attempt in 2016 at the request of a competing 27-state coalition. He called the lawsuit a “big government ‘power grab’” and argued that the Democratic attorneys general “are dead wrong” in

their interpretation of the Clean Air Act. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The U.S. EPA said in a statement that it wouldn’t comment on pending litigation, but that it “worked diligently to ensure we produced a solid rule that we believe will be upheld in the courts, unlike the previous administration’s Clean Power Plan.” The lawsuit was filed by attorneys general in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and the District of Columbia. “The science is indisputable; our climate is changing. Ice caps

are melting. Sea levels are rising. Weather is becoming more and more extreme,” New York Attorney General Letitia James, who is leading the coalition, said in a statement. “Rather than staying the course with policies aimed at fixing the problem and protecting people’s health, safety, and the environment, the Trump Administration repealed the Clean Power Plan and replaced it with this ‘Dirty Power’ rule.” The states were joined by six local governments: Boulder, Colorado; Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, Philadelphia and South Miami, Florida. The EPA’s analysis of the new rules predicts an extra 300 to 1,500 people will die each year by 2030 because of additional air pollution from the power grid. But EPA Administrator Andrew

Wheeler in June said Americans want “reliable energy that they can afford,” adding he expected more coal plans to open as a result. “It’s more of a fossil fuel protection plan,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said. It would replace the Clean Power Plan, which would require cutting emissions fossil fuelburning power plants. Becerra said that was expected to eliminate as much climate change pollution as is emitted by more than 160 million cars a year, the equivalent of 70 percent of the nation’s passenger cars, and was projected to prevent up to 3,600 additional deaths annually. Newsom and James said states’ existing efforts to reduce greenhouse gases are beginning to work while creating green jobs and vibrant economies.

CBS, Viacom to reunite, bulk up for streaming BY MAE ANDERSON

Associated Press

CAROLYN KASTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A monarch butterfly perches on milkweed May 31 at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Md. Farming and other human developments have eradicated state-size swaths of its native milkweed habitat, cutting the butterfly’s numbers by 90% over the last two decades. It is now under considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act.

Monarchs caught up in rewrite of endangered species policy BY ELLEN KNICKMEYER

Associated Press

GREENBELT, Maryland — Hand-raising monarch butterflies in the midst of a global extinction crisis, Laura Moore and her neighbors gather round in her suburban Maryland yard to launch a butterfly newly emerged from its chrysalis. Eager to play his part, 3-year-old Thomas Powell flaps his arms and exclaims, “I’m flying! I’m flying!” Moore moves to release the hours-old monarch onto the boy’s outstretched finger, but the butterfly, its wings a vivid orange and black, has another idea. It banks away, beginning its new life up in the green shelter of a nearby tree. Monarchs are in trouble, despite efforts by Moore and countless other volunteers and organizations across the United States to nurture the beloved butterfly. The Trump administration’s new order weakening the Endangered Species Act could well make things worse for the monarch, one of more than 1 million species that are struggling around the globe. Rapid development and climate change are escalating the rates of species loss, according to a May United Nations report. For monarchs, farming and other human development have eradi-

cated state-size swaths of native milkweed habitat, cutting the butterfly’s numbers by 90% over the past two decades. With its count falling 99% to the low tens of thousands in the western United States last year, the monarch is now under government consideration for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. But if the Trump administration’s latest action survives threatened legal challenges, there will be sweeping changes to how the government provides protections, and which creatures receive them. Administration officials say the changes, expected to go into effect next month, will reduce regulation while still protecting animals and plants. But conservation advocates and Democratic lawmakers say the overhaul will force more to extinction, delaying and denying protections. The administration will for the first time reserve the option to estimate and publicize the financial cost of saving a species in advance of any decision on whether to do so. Monarchs compete for habitat with soybean and corn farmers, whose crops are valued in the low tens of billions of dollars annually. For mountain caribou, sage grouse, the Humboldt marten in California’s old-growth red-

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woods and other creatures, it’s logging, oil and gas development, ranching, and other industry driving struggling species out of their ranges. Another coming change will end across-the-board protections for creatures newly listed as threatened. Conservation groups say that will leave them unprotected for months or years, as officials, conservationists and industries and landowners hash out each species’ survival plan. The rule also will limit consideration of threats facing a species to the “foreseeable” future, which conservation groups say allows the administration to ignore the growing harm of global warming. Along with farming, climate change is one of the main drivers of the monarch’s threatened extinction, disrupting an annual 3,000-mile migration synched to springtime and the blossoming of wildflowers. In 2002, a single wet storm followed by a freeze killed an estimated 450 million monarchs in their winter home in Mexico, piling wings inches deep on a forest floor. A decision on whether the monarch will be listed as threatened is expected by December 2020. In the meantime, volunteers like Moore grow plants to feed

and host the monarchs, nurture caterpillars, and tag and count monarchs on the insects’ annual migrations up and down America. For Moore, a tutor who has turned her 20-by-20-foot yard over to milkweed, fleabane and other butterfly nectar and host plants, the hope is that grassroots efforts of thousands of volunteers loosely connected in wildlife organizations, schools, and Facebook groups will save the monarch, at least. “People having an interest in it might reverse it. It’s encouraging,” said Moore, who also raises extra milkweed to give away. If the monarch can’t be saved, she said, “it would be kind of sad. What it would say about what we’re able to do.” Some animals — like a shy mountain caribou species that went extinct from the wild in the lower 48 states last winter, despite protection under the Endangered Species Act — struggle and disappear out of sight. Monarchs can serve as reminders of the others, says Karen Oberhauser, director of the University of Wisconsin Arboretum, who has studied monarchs since 1984. That was before a boom in soybeans, corn and herbicide wiped out milkweed in pastures converted to row crops.

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NEW YORK — The newly combined ViacomCBS will invest in more movies and TV shows and try to sell more advertising as it seeks to become a bigger player in the growing business of streaming video. Yet the bigger company still might not be big enough to be competitive, as larger rival Disney launches its own service in November and streaming pioneer Netflix spends even more on original shows and movies. That isn’t stopping Viacom CEO Bob Bakish, who will lead the combined company, to declare that ViacomCBS will be “one of only a few companies with the breadth and depth of content and reach to shape the future of our industry.” CBS and Viacom, which separated in 2006, announced their long-anticipated reunion Tuesday. Viacom owns the Paramount Pictures movie studio and pay TV channels such as Comedy Central, MTV and BET, while CBS has a broadcast network, television stations, Showtime and a stake in The CW over-the-air network. CBS was one of the first media companies to launch its own streaming service, CBS All Access. The $6-a-month service now has a new “Star Trek” series, a revival of “The Twilight Zone” and archives of old and current broadcast shows. Now, Disney, Comcast’s NBCUniversal and AT&T’s WarnerMedia are jumping in with their own services as well to challenge Netflix, Amazon, Google and other tech companies encroaching into entertainment. To expand its library, Disney bought Fox’s entertainment businesses for $71 billion in March, while DirecTV owner AT&T bought Time Warner last year for $81 billion. To make ViacomCBS’ streaming services more attractive, Showtime could absorb Paramount’s movie library, for instance, while CBS All Access could get a boost from Viacom’s Nickelodeon video, MoffettNathanson analyst Michael Nathanson said. Once the deal is completed, expected by the end of the year, ViacomCBS will have a combined library with more than 140,000 TV episodes and 3,600 film titles, including franchises such as “Star Trek” and “Mission: Impossible.” The two companies have been major content spenders, having spent more than $13 billion combined in the past year, or close to the estimated $15 billion Netflix is expected to spend on content in 2019. The two companies have more than 750 series currently ordered or in production.

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NATION

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

A beautiful new bathtub right over your old one! bEFORE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Vincent Seeborn, 2, reaches out from a structure on the playground in 2018 at Wallingford Child Care Center in Seattle. Child care costs in most states exceed federal subsidy payments provided to low-income parents, according to a newly released report from the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, leaving working families with few affordable options.

Report: Costs in most states exceed subsidies for child care ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Child care costs in most states exceed federal subsidy payments provided to low-income parents, according to a newly released report from the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, leaving working families with few affordable options. The report, released Tuesday, focuses on the Child Care Development Fund, an $8.2 billion block grant that goes toward offsetting the cost of care for 1.4 million children nationwide. The fund is the primary federal funding source for child care assistance for eligible working parents. The federal recommendation is that states provide payment rates at the 75th percentile, which allows eligible families to access three out of four providers without paying more out of pocket. But the report shows most states set their rates much lower. States have discretion over the how to administer the program: They set their own income requirements and decide how much families are expected to contribute. The report cites several

reasons that states may keep their rates low, including stretching limited resources to serve more families and taking into consideration the cost of higher-quality care. Nineteen states reported paying enrollment and registration fees for lowincome families, and seven states said they pay for extra child care activities such as field trips. The Administration for Children and Families,which oversees the block grant, relies on states to self-certify that they are setting rates that ensure low-income families have equal access to care. But the inspector general report shows most states aren’t meeting the requirements. Last year, under a bipartisan agreement, Congress approved a $2.4 billion increase to the fund. But advocates say money continues to be a problem. “CCDF is severely underfunded, and as families across the country are struggling to afford care across all income levels, it’s dire for low-income families,” said Catherine White, director of child care and early learning at the National Women’s Law Center.

Meanwhile, the Trump administration has moved to tighten work requirements for low-income families that receive food stamps and housing assistance, creating concern for parents unable to find affordable child care. “This shows how the administration is talking out of both sides of their mouth,” White said. “They say they want to support children and families, but they’re stripping families of basic assistance they need. It’s another trend where they are both not following through on promises and needs of families, but working directly to undermine them.” The report recommends that the Administration for Children and Families should develop new methods for ensuring equal access for CCDF families, establish a forum for states to share strategies, and encourage states to minimize administrative burdens for families. In its response, the group said it has placed 33 states on a corrective action plan to ensure they’re complying with equal access requirements and accurately collecting data. ACF said it will provide states with training and guidance.

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08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

M 1 WednesdAy • 08.14.2019 • A9

Bunge to move headquarters to St. Louis

BUSINESS DIGEST when the downturn does come,” Suryadevara said, adding that company does not see an imminent downturn. Deferring nonessential capital expenditure and considering a shift to lower-priced vehicles are among the few things GM will look at as part of its “downturn planning” to save costs. Ford said it was “proactively” evaluating its future moves, as it works with economists to model the severity of a possible recession.

Allegiant Air adding nonstop flights from MidAmerica airport to Florida: Allegiant Air is adding nonstop flights from from MidAmerica St. Louis Airport in the Metro East to Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport in Florida beginning Nov. 15. This new seasonal route will operate twice weekly, Las Vegasbased Allegiant said Tuesday. With the new route, Allegiant will serve 10 cities from MidAmerica St. Louis Airport. “Our July record has been surpassed in August with over 45,000 passengers using the airport,” Tim Cantwell, director of MidAmerica Airport, said in a statement. “It’s clear that travelers from across the region have discovered the advantages of flying through MidAmerica, and the addition of this latest great destination will help to ensure the growth trend continues.”

BY BRYCE GRAY

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St.Louis’concentration of agriculture and plant science expertise has attracted a fresh influx of corporate growth. The food and agriculture giant Bunge announced Tuesday that within the next year it would move its global headquarters to the St. Louis area from White Plains,New York. The development beefs up the company’s regional presence by adding to its existing North American headquarters in Chesterfield. Bunge describes itself as “a world leader in sourcing, processing and supplying oilseed and grain products and ingredi-

Coke putting Dasani water in cans amid backlash against plastic: Coca-Cola is putting its Dasani water brand into aluminum cans as the beverage industry faces pressure to reduce its use of plastic. Coke will start selling canned Dasani in the U.S. Northeast next month, with plans to expand the product to other parts of the country in 2020. The announcement comes after PepsiCo Inc. said recently it would experiment with selling Aquafina, its mainstream water brand, in cans at restaurants and stadiums. Beverage giants are under pressure to boost recycling and cut down on plastic that’s filling the world’s oceans and waterways. Aluminum cans generally contain more recycled material than plastic bottles and are less likely to float away in the ocean. Dasani and Aquafina are the top two bottled brands in the U.S., with combined sales north of $2 billion. In addition to the can test, Coke is unveiling a new “hybrid” Dasani bottle, with half of the materials from a combination of plants and recycled plastic. The company also said it’s cutting down on the weight of its bottles in a bid to use less material. The initiatives are designed to appeal to customers and help Coke meet its pledge to boost the use of recycled material by 2030. Lauren King, Dasani’s brand director, said the efforts will also help boost profit at the parent company. “Overall this is good for our bottom line,” King said.

GM, Ford planning for possible economic downturn: The top two U.S. automakers are preparing for a possible economic downturn, the companies said on Tuesday, as an ongoing trade war between Washington and Beijing fuels fears of a global recession. Tit-for-tat tariffs have increased raw material costs for the global auto industry, which is already dealing with weak demand in both China and the United States. Ford Motor Co. has a cash buffer of $20 billion for a potential downturn event, Ford North American Chief Financial Officer Matt Fields said at a J.P. Morgan Conference in New York. General Motors has $18 billion in cash, with the potential to pay two years worth of dividends, the company’s finance head, Dhivya Suryadevara, said at the conference. GM has modeled both moderate and severe downturn scenarios similar to 2008-2009 to get a sense of how it might affect profitability and cash flow at the No.1 U.S. car manufacturer, Suryadevara said. “It’s something that we continually keep watching and updating to make sure that we’re all set for

ents,” according to a press release announcing the move. Based on its 2018 revenue of $45.7 billion, Bunge would become the secondbiggest public company based in the St. Louis area. Centene is the largest, at $60 billion. “While St. Louis is already an important hub for Bunge and our current North American operations, the city is also home to a number of food, agriculture, animal health, and plant science organizations and customers,” Bunge CEO Gregory Heckman said in the release. “We are grateful to have called White Plains home for many years, and now look forward to the new growth and development opportunities which our

expanded St. Louis presence will provide.” The company did not provide information about the number of jobs that may be added locally related to the move. The announcement said the transition is expected to be completed by the end of the second quarter next year. The region has attracted other recent job growth in the industry from Bayer. Since the German life sciences company completed its acquisition of Creve Coeurbased Monsanto last year, it has committed to adding 500 jobs to its regional presence. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

Boeing deliveries plunge on Max troubles REUTERS

Boeing Co. delivered 38% fewer planes in the first seven months of 2019 than the same period a year earlier, as the grounding of its best-selling 737 Max jets and doubts about the plane’s future hurt operations. Deliveries totaled 258 aircraft in the seven months through July, compared to 417 last year, and trailed far behind the 458 aircraft handed over in the same period by European rival Airbus SE. The numbers put Boeing on course to lose the crown of world’s biggest planemaker, which it has held uninterrupted for seven years. The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide following two fatal ac-

cidents that killed more than 300 people, and both Boeing and airlines continue to extend the timelines for when it will return to service. Lastmonth,thecompanyposted itslargest-everquarterlylossdueto thespiralingcostofresolvingissues with the Max, warning it may have to halt production of the grounded jet altogether if regulators around the world do not give clearance for it to fly again soon. A new problem identified with the Max in June has delayed the aircraft’s entry into service until at leasttheendofSeptember,disrupting schedules for airline operators, whohavedemandedcompensation from Boeing for their loss.

Onemajorclient,Southwest,has already removed the Max from its schedules until early January. The U.S. planemaker is still ahead of Airbus on combined deliveries of its widebody jets,the 777 and787Dreamliner,whichstoodat 24and90,respectively,throughthe first seven months of 2019, compared with 25 and 80,a year earlier. Airbus delivered 60 of its widebody A350 jets, up from 46 planes, a year earlier.Deliveries of Airbus’s widebody A330 aircraft were 24 planes through July this year. Both Boeing and Airbus have seen deliveries oftheir four-engine jumbo jets shrink in recent years as airlines prefer modern fuel-efficient twin-engine passenger jets.

Centene will expand marketplace health plans in 10 states FROM STAFF REPORTS

Clayton-based Centene Corp. plans to expand its offerings in the 2020 health insurance marketplace in 10 states. Centene said Tuesday it plans to expand in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Washington. The company said it has started

From staff and wire reports

the process for seeking all necessary regulatory approvals for the expansion. Centene served 1.9 million exchange members in 20 states as of June 30. Of those members, over 90% are eligible for subsidies, the company said. “Centene takes pride in being the country’s largest provider of health insurance market-

place plans,” chairman, CEO and president Michael Neidorff said in a statement. “The need for affordable, high-quality healthcare has never been more urgent, and we will continue to demonstrate disciplined execution, agility and capacity to successfully navigate industry changes to the benefit of our members, customers and shareholders.”

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks rose Tuesday after the U.S. said it would hold off on tariffs of Chinese imports of mobile phones, toys and other items typically on holiday shopping lists. China also said the two sides held discussions on trade overnight and would talk again in two weeks.

Apple

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StocksRecap NYSE

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DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 26426.97 10271.68 828.06 12789.08 8065.24 2943.31 1912.03 30158.40 1522.77

LOW 25833.25 9956.45 820.65 12552.31 7833.79 2877.05 1866.81 29497.13 1490.00

CLOSE 26279.91 10148.68 825.24 12724.37 8016.36 2926.32 1893.51 29979.52 1510.58

CHG. +372.54 +116.19 +0.45 +138.12 +152.95 +42.57 +20.71 +418.42 +16.12

%CHG. WK +1.44% s +1.16% t +0.05% s +1.10% s +1.95% s +1.48% s +1.11% s +1.42% s +1.08% s

MO QTR t s t t s s t s t s t s t t t s t t

YTD +12.66% +10.67% +15.75% +11.87% +20.81% +16.73% +13.86% +16.43% +12.01%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.64 34.86 +.38 +1.1 +22.1 +13.1

Aegion Corp

AEGN

14.12

25.83 19.37 +.32 +1.7 +18.7 -23.3 25

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.43

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

67.57 64.04 +.39 +0.6 77.77 76.51

2.80

1.45

Ameren Corp

AEE

62.06

ABInBev

BUD

64.55 102.70 95.67

Arch Coal

ARCH

-.02 -1.2 -20.6 -37.7 dd +9.3 +0.1 17

-.13 -0.2 +17.3 +25.1 27

2.04 General Motors

GM

... Home Depot

HD

... Huttig Building Prod HBP 1.14 Lee Enterprises 1.90 Lowes

-.60 -0.6 +45.4 +1.9 24 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 73.84 101.92 77.54 +2.02 +2.7 -6.6 -13.1 5 1.80 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

Bank of America

BAC

22.66

31.49 27.72 +.08 +0.3 +12.5

Belden Inc

BDC

37.79

75.25 44.86 +.75 +1.7

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

7

5.25

2.05 +.10 +5.1 -20.5 -60.5 dd

3.34

9.35

... McDonald’s

-9.5 10 0.72f

+7.4 -37.1 11

0.20

...

+3.2 +0.4 31

8.22

3.68 +.14 +4.0

-6.8 -57.2 dd

...

292.47 446.01 332.86

-.08

Caleres Inc.

CAL

14.30

41.09 15.38 +.85 +5.8 -44.7 -58.2

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.35

62.03 49.10 +.42 +0.9

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 49.73 +1.77 +3.7

... -30.7 14

...

Charter

CHTR 272.91 417.13 379.37 +3.09 +0.8 +33.1 +24.4 75

...

141.95 226.61 169.47 +3.86 +2.3

7

Cigna

CI C

48.42

75.24 64.83 +.59 +0.9 +24.5

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

53.40

72.55 57.37 +.46 +0.8

Edgewell

EPC

26.36

59.16 29.04 +.75 +2.7 -22.2 -50.0 15

Emerson

EMR

55.39

79.70 59.19 +.90 +1.5

Energizer Holdings

ENR

32.54

65.06 36.17 +.01

-5.7

-9.6 16 -5.9

+1.8 -12.5 15 -0.9 -18.4 19

... -19.9 -40.5 24

36.09

58.00 39.33 +.50 +1.3

59.00

85.86 76.31 +1.24 +1.7 +15.8 +15.0 21

Foresight Energy

FELP FF

0.40 10.22

4.05

Olin

.44 +.00 +0.5 -87.5 -84.4 dd

LEE LOW MNK

.0189 .6754 .2512 1.2079 .7556 .1417 1.1219 .0140 .2878 .009499 .051066 .0153 .0653 .000820 1.0321

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

CHG

CLOSE

1502.20 16.96 859.70

Gold Silver

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

41.90 39.01 +.15 +0.4 +16.6 +10.4 dd

1.52

158.09 219.30 208.33 +1.32 +0.6 +21.2 +7.9 21

5.44

30.56

1.57

5.75

2.40

1.84

3.69

2.26 +.09 +4.1

...

... +33.3 -52.4 dd

84.75 118.23 96.58 +.50 +0.5 4.81

36.65

+7.1 -25.2 +4.6

... ...

-0.2 21 2.20f

4.85 +.03 +0.6 -69.3 -84.5

...

MA

171.89 283.33 274.53 +4.53 +1.7 +45.5 +33.8 64

MCD

156.56 221.93 219.73 +2.57 +1.2 +23.7 +39.6 33 32.00 17.35 +.46 +2.7 -13.7 -40.1

4

1.32 4.64

16.83

Peabody Energy

BTU

17.20

Peak Resorts

SKIS

3.75

11.00 10.91 +.02 +0.2 +133.1+119.0 dd

0.28

38.80 35.97 +1.06 +3.0 +61.6 +28.6 44

...

44.71 18.79 +.35 +1.9 -38.4 -52.3

0.80

Perficient

PRFT

20.92

POST

83.88 113.73 97.19 +.83 +0.9

+9.0 +3.4 10

...

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

127.84 163.46 147.86 +.38 +0.3

+5.4 +6.3 13

2.40

Reliv

RELV

-.05 -1.1

+4.1 -12.4 dd

...

Spire Inc

SR

70.53

87.13 81.09 +.50 +0.6

+9.5 +11.0 18

2.37

Stifel Financial

3.80

5.89

4.41

SF

38.39

61.94 53.62 +.96 +1.8 +29.5

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

TGT

60.15

90.39 84.24 +2.21 +2.7 +27.5 +1.5 14 2.64f

UPS

89.89 125.09 115.83 +.94 +0.8 +18.8

1.96 US Bancorp 1.20 US Steel

USB

43.14

57.81 52.83 +.59 +1.1 +15.6 +1.2 12

1.48

X

11.52

31.59 x12.11 +.43 +3.7 -33.6 -60.6

7

0.20

61.58 56.37 +.68 +1.2

7

2.41

-0.8 17

-0.5 20

+0.3 +10.7

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.68% on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

-3.10 -.08 -4.00

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.25 5.50 5.00

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.00 1.95 1.84 1.65 1.56 1.61 1.68 2.13

+0.01 +0.03 +0.08 +0.09 +0.08 +0.06 +0.04 ...

2.06 2.23 2.40 2.62 2.75 2.82 2.88 3.04

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

0.58f

Post Holdings

2.38 2.38 1.88

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.27 2.23 6.09 3.01 2.92 .05

-0.04 -0.07 +0.02 -0.08 -0.07 +0.01

2.02 3.28 6.26 3.86 3.93 .78

0.60

GlobalMarkets

3.84

VZ

52.28

0.32 WalMart

WMT

85.78 115.49 107.41 +2.19 +2.1 +15.3 +19.0 62 2.12f

0.13 Walgreen Boots

WBA

49.31

86.31 53.07 +1.07 +2.1 -22.3 -19.2 10

WFC

43.02

59.53 45.96 +.53 +1.2

19.31 10.73 +.18 +1.7 -32.3 -19.5 13 0.24a Wells Fargo

CHG

+2.17 +.0712 +7.15 +.042

PREV

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

PE: ... Yield: ...

.0180 .6793 .2525 1.2055 .7564 .1420 1.1174 .0141 .2872 .009374 .051571 .0154 .0661 .000828 1.0245

Platinum

OLN

+4.5 -30.1 12 0.64f Verizon

Enterprise Financial EFSC

FutureFuel

0.04

9 2.04f

Esco Technologies

ESE

0.28

-7.2 -14.1 15 1.04b

Citigroup

TKR

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$42.99

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

-19.25 +10.50 +.25

2,960

Copper

A

ExchangeRates

DATE

27,200

Milk

J J 52-week range

Vol.: 11.0m (40.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.4 b

PE: 24.7 Yield: ...

3,040

Live cattle

M

$18.55

$50.00

Vol.: 17.6m (12.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.6 b

28,000

24,800

10

A

Futures

S&P 500

2,800

10 DAYS

M

DCPH

Close: $35.90 15.95 or 80.0% The biotech drug developer reported positive results from a study of a potential stomach cancer treatment.

$30

Vol.: 5.9m (5.0x avg.) PE: 24.3 Mkt. Cap: $10.2 b Yield: 0.2%

2,920

Deciphera Pharma.

CVET

Close: $13.89 -9.30 or -40.1% The veterinary science company reported weak second quarter financial results.

20

$130.09

3,040

Dow Jones industrials

26,380

A

Vol.: 47.4m (1.8x avg.) PE: 17.8 Mkt. Cap: $906.0 b Yield: 1.5%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Covetrus

AAP

Close: $142.23 -0.07 or -0.0% The auto parts retailer trimmed its revenue forecast for the year after reporting weak second quarter financial results. $170

200

$142.00

27,320

Advance Auto Parts

AAPL

Close: $208.97 8.49 or 4.2% The U.S. government postponed tariffs aimed at China that involve cellphones, laptop computers and other electronics. $220

1.76

-0.3 -18.6 10 2.04f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2926.32 11750.13 7250.90 25281.30 5363.07 39476.50 20455.44 103299.50 16350.84 9786.24

CHG

CHG

YTD

+42.57 +70.45 +24.18 -543.42 +52.77 -374.71 -229.38 +1384.30 +113.07 +26.22

+1.48% +0.60% +0.33% -2.10% +0.99% -0.94% -1.11% +1.36% +0.70% +0.27%

+16.73% +11.28% +7.77% -2.08% +13.37% -5.20% +2.20% +17.54% +14.16% +16.10%


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . M1 21, •1 8WeDneSDAy 78 A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 08.14.2019

WEDNESDAy • 08.14.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PReSIDenT & PUBLISHeR

GILBERT BAILON eDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON eDITORIAL PAGe eDITOR

Trump’s immigration hypocrisy Administration sweeps up undocumented workers while employers escape sanction.

I

n the largest single-day roundup of undocumented workers in U.S. history, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents raided six work sites in Mississippi last week, arresting 680 workers. Yet, so far, not a single employer has been arrested. Republican members of Congress should be as outraged as their Democratic counterparts, who are demanding to know why employers aren’t being held accountable. President Donald Trump’s strategy seems to focus on capturing and expelling as many undocumented workers as possible ahead of the 2020 election, as if get-tough images of workplace arrests and frightened families would win him the votes he needs. But his hands-off policy toward the employers who enable and encourage such migrants tells an entirely different story about Trump’s supposed immigration solutions. It is a story of unabashed hypocrisy. The driving force behind the immigration problem is jobs. Immigrants aren’t swarming across the border for the sunny beaches and beautiful mountain vistas. They’re coming for the combination of a safe haven for their children and work to put food in their bellies. In most cases, employers hire them to perform low-paying and odious tasks, like processing chickens, that Americans won’t do. It takes two people to violate the law under such circumstances: the migrant who knows he or she is not allowed to work in this country, and any employer who hires such people without verifying their legal status. The Trump administration is obsessed with the former but seems not terribly concerned about punishing the latter. Why is that? One possible explanation is that Trump’s own businesses have hired undocumented immigrants. One employee who went public in protest of Trump’s immigration policies was Victorina Morales, an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala who made

ROGELIO V. SOLIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Children of mainly Latino immigrant parents hold signs in August to support them and other individuals picked up during an immigration raid at a food processing plant in Canton, Miss. Trump’s bed at his golf resort in Bedminster, N.J. The White House was so satisfied with her work it issued her a certificate of appreciation last year. Employers in businesses such as hotel staffing, roofing, fruit-picking, landscaping and restaurant services are fully aware that they’d go out of business without having backdoor access to these workers. As long as they can credibly claim ignorance about the legal status of their workers, federal law gives them plenty of wiggle room to evade justice. The law imposes a high bar on prosecutors to prove that employers knew of workers’ illegal status but hired them anyway. Two of the Mississippi chicken-processing plants are owned by a Chinese man who federal authorities believe was fully aware of his worker’s status. Others, such as industry giant Koch Foods, say they use the federal e-Verify system to authenticate workers’ legal employment status, which is mandatory in Mississippi. Clearly, the system didn’t work — a symptom of an overall broken immigration system. Trump is under the illusion that the only fix is by wrecking workers’ lives and destroying their livelihoods, while leaving their employers free to hire the next migrant who comes along.

Encouraging endangerment Administration’s attack on threatened-species protections must be stopped.

T

here have been times, of course, when the federal government imposed mandates that turned out to be unnecessary or ineffective. Then there are laws like the Endangered Species Act, one of the most unequivocal success stories in the history of governmental regulation. The humpback whale, the grizzly bear, and America’s national emblem itself, the bald eagle, almost certainly wouldn’t be with us today if President Richard Nixon hadn’t signed this crucial set of wildlife protections into law 46 years ago. In the vast pantheon of short-sighted and irresponsible policy initiatives undertaken by the Trump administration, its move this week to largely dismantle this historic firewall against wildlife extinction is among the most potentially catastrophic. Environmental groups and some states say they will sue to prevent it, and some congressional Democrats are vowing to fight it. They must. The 1973 law — which scientists say has also saved the American alligator, the Florida manatee, the California condor and many others — works by protecting not just the endangered animals themselves from hunting, but protecting their habitats from destruction. In an era when the effects of climate change are more obvious by the month, that habitat protection includes looking decades down the road to determine where, for example, polar bears might live when melting sea ice has decimated their current habitats. The rule changes that were announced Monday by administration officials — including Interior Secretary and former oil lobbyist David Berhardt — will scale back the protections offered to species designated as threatened but not yet endangered. Common sense suggests that move will lead to more species ultimately ending up endangered, since the government will now be

J.B. FORBES, POST-DISPATCH

A bald eagle squawks at another eagle next to Simpson Lake in Valley Park. less apt to take preventive action before they reach that point. The changes will also allow the government to consider economic impact, instead of just the science, when studying whether and how to protect a given species. Perhaps most perniciously, the rules will diminish the consideration of long-term climate-change impact when determining how to preserve species and habitats. This from an administration that has already demonstrated a stubborn aversion to the globally accepted facts regarding climate change. It isn’t hard to see what’s going on here: The administration has already worked at every turn to expose protected lands to oil drilling and other development at the behest of industry. This accelerates that dark agenda. The Endangered Species Act was a major, thoroughly debated law that was put in place with national consensus and bipartisan backing decades ago. It’s now being unilaterally kneecapped with regulatory sabotage by an administration bent on allowing its industrial taskmasters to dig up, burn through or pave over any protected nature blocking their path. Environmental-minded plaintiffs and congressional Democrats must make this a fight for survival. For many species out there, it’s exactly that.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Don’t fault the media for reporting Trump’s bad deeds

Treat flag with respect; don’t abuse or misuse it

Regarding D.R. Phillips’ Aug. 5 letter, “Trump won, Post-Dispatch, time to get over it”: D.R. Phillips blames the media for our country’s massive division and says they are out to get President Donald Trump. Surprisingly, the writer doesn’t find Trump’s 10,000 lies to be a real issue. Rather, the writer accuses the PostDispatch of citing too many negatives about Trump while not reporting the good things — none of which are named. I applaud the Post-Dispatch for reporting the news. Readers need to know about Trump’s lies, obstruction of justice, racist diatribes, destruction of the environment, crooked cronies, dangerous tax cuts and tariffs, policies that put children in cages and efforts to enrich himself and his family. Should the Post-Dispatch not report all of this? It’s hard to see how anyone who believes in democracy, honesty and ethics could want Trump’s obvious violations swept under the rug. Tim Arnold • Kirkwood

When flag burning became a common way to protest, I thought it was a tribute to the idea of freedom in this country that you could do that. Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick used another meaningful acknowledgment of freedom in this country by kneeling during the national anthem. I was impressed that a veteran told him that kneeling would be preferable to sitting on the bench with his back to the flag. Is the way people use the flag today respectful? As a young girl I was taught to raise and lower the flag daily, protect it from weather, shine a light on it if it had to be out at night. A flag was an indication of a federal building, a post office, an American Embassy, a military base. You could wave a flag on holidays. Then there were flags on T-shirts and windshields, and others who flew 24 hours a day on porches, mailboxes and on and on. Why? They were never taken down, never protected and not even made in this country. What did they signify? How do those flags honor veterans? When decorated heroes retire from the military, they seem to be disrespected: John McCain or Robert Mueller, for example. The flag is a wonderful symbol of freedom and shouldn’t be used as a decoration or for what you think is a political statement. Francine Cohn • Ballwin

Putting dangerous weapons in teen’s hands is a crime Regarding recent news coverage of the July 28 shooting at a Gilroy, Calif., festival by a gunman, Santino William Legan: My jaw dropped when I read that the owner of Big Mikes Gun and Ammo shop in Nevada, the man who legally sold the 19-year-old gunman the semiautomatic assault rifle, claimed the boy “was acting happy and showed no reasons for concern” when they met. The owner posted he was “heartbroken this could ever happen.” What in the world did he think the young man was going to do with this military-style weapon? No good can come from owning such an item. It’s only greed and stupidity that would prompt someone to own a business that would put such weapons into the hands of a teenager. It may have been legal, but it is outrageous. Not only should the gun store owner be losing sleep and put out of business over his moral culpability in this tragedy, but he needs to be held criminally responsible for Legan’s actions. Oh, wait, such laws are the job of senators, such as Missouri’s Roy Blunt and Josh Hawley, and our esteemed president. Another fine mess you’ve gotten us into, gentlemen. I’m counting the days until Nov. 3, 2020. Sherilyn Krell • Olivette

‘Handmaid’ storylines feel ripped from the headlines Two very serious situations are occurring at this point in time that affect our collective humanity: Our neighbors south of the U.S. border are fleeing life-threatening circumstances, and women within our borders are being denied control over their bodies. Versions of both scenarios are played out in “The Handmaid’s Tale,” a television series based on a novel of the same name by Margaret Atwood. As my daughter and I watched an episode, I was overwhelmed by the parallels. Missourians, let us not deny women control over their reproductive rights. One website, nobanmo.com, allows visitors to post their names in support of reproductive rights. And speak loudly about the human rights of those trapped at our country’s borders. Sharon Elliott • University City

Consider supporting people in disadvantaged nations

Trump’s words have dangerous power to influence

Guatemala, Honduras and other countries in that part of the world have been in the news as sources of asylumseekers wanting the safe opportunities our country might provide. This has resulted in a controversial border situation for us. Is there anything we might do to alleviate what some consider a crisis? May I suggest participating in a child-sponsorship program by which we can help those in other countries who are economically disadvantaged. For as little as $35 per month you can send assistance to teach parenting skills, learn to read and write, conduct nutrition assessments or overcome drought-related problems. These are just some examples. For those of us who like to chant “USA! USA!” here is a chance to actually do something beyond being voyeurs of the gridlock in Washington. Over time you could reduce the number of asylumseekers coming to our border. Dan Flynn • Creve Coeur

Regarding the debate over whether our president’s words, either spoken at a microphone or written in a tweet, have any bearing on acts of violence, consider this: According to Mediapost.com, American companies paid the entertainment industry more than $10 billion in 2018 for product placement. Product placement refers to either a direct or an oblique reference to a product in a movie, such as Reese’s Pieces in the movie “E.T.,” or an easily overlooked can of Coke on a kitchen table in a film or TV show. If the captains of industry are forking out such huge sums of money, they understand how even a subtle prompt influences our actions. How can the specific, incendiary words of the president be presumed to do less? Leah Rubin • Wildwood Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON editorial Page editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 n. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


08.14.2019 • WEdnEsday • M 1

50 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

OTHER VIEWS

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

MOUNTING PRESSURE FOR IMPORT QUOTAS • The Nixon administration is under merciless pressure from quota-minded congressmen to impose controls on textile imports, which if successful could lead to quotas on other items such as steel, shoes, meat and glass, and a wave of protectionism. Innovative Americans ought to be able to find a way to protect domestic industries without hiding behind restrictive walls. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Five years after Ferguson, reforms are yielding results Laws have helped eliminate ‘taxation by citation’ and other onerous practices. BY ERIC SCHMITT

Five years ago last weekend, the events surrounding Ferguson burst onto our streets and into the public consciousness. Much has been said and written about it, but the actions taken in the aftermath have brought real, concrete reform to municipal governSchmitt ments and courts here in Missouri. As we continue to evolve as a community, and work to develop and improve positive relationships with law enforcement and all citizens of our state, no matter their race, creed or zip code, it is important to take time to reflect and continue to challenge ourselves to be better. The sweeping reforms enacted in 2015 and 2016 can and should stand as a national model to

reign in the practice of taxation by citation — a practice that weaponized municipal courts to fund bloated budgets by treating citizens as nothing more than ATMs. In the wake of Ferguson, a truth was exposed: there were simply too many municipalities relying on traffic tickets and other fines and fees to fund their budgets. In and around Ferguson, some cities were generating 30%, 40%, and even 50% of their revenue from traffic tickets and fines alone. Moreover, people were being thrown in jail for weeks at a time for municipal infractions. Although supposedly illegal in the United States, de-facto “debtors’ prisons” were alive and well. What is more, some cities were trying to drum up revenue by citing people for ridiculous things such as mismatched blinds and drapes. What became clear to me back

then, as a state senator from St. Louis County and someone who grew up near Ferguson, was that there had been a breakdown of trust between people and their government and courts. I decided that something needed to be done — our core notions of justice and important institutions of our republic were at stake. From that awareness came the most sweeping municipal reform in the history of Missouri: Senate Bill 5. An unusual coalition spanning the political spectrum came together, including law enforcers who said that they didn’t go to the police academy to write traffic tickets all day long but would rather spend time building relationships with the people in the communities they served. We enacted a series of reforms that included caps on how much a municipality could receive from traffic tickets and fines, limits on the amount that could be charged per ticket, and assurances that someone arrested could see a judge within

48 hours. Additionally, real consequences for violating the law were put in place, such as letting voters ultimately decide if a city in violation could continue to be a city at all. Five years later, the positive results are undeniable. Revenues extracted from the pockets of Missourians from traffic tickets, fines and fees are down nearly 64% in St. Louis County alone and nearly 45% statewide. We are making progress toward our citizens being treated with more respect in our courts. Citizens aren’t being thrown in jail for unpaid traffic tickets. Municipalities are more accountable to their citizens. And, some cities have merged or are now sharing services, saving taxpayer dollars. Today, I have a new role as Missouri’s attorney general. An important duty of my office is to enforce the laws of our state, including these important reforms. Recently a whistleblower came forward regarding a traffic ticket quota scheme in

a southwest Missouri town. We took action and we shut it down. We also recently launched an investigation into a major Missouri university that appeared to be directing campus officers to meet ticket quota guidelines in an effort to raise money for that department and the school. And, when we hear of additional cases, we will take action to protect Missourians from the overreach of government and institutions into the lives of our citizens. As the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. famously said, “The arc of the moral universe is long. But it bends toward justice.” Here in Missouri, we have taken those words to heart and are leading the way toward solutions by taking on the municipal profiteering that was taking place in many Missouri municipalities, providing a road map for reform and ending the practice of taxation by citation. Eric Schmitt, a Republican, is the Missouri attorney general.

Trump turns on Scaramucci — just like all the others In series of mean tweets, president attacks former communications director. BY CATHERINE RAMPELL

ROGELIO V. SOLIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A trailer loaded with chickens passes a federal agent outside a Koch Foods Inc. plant in Morton, Miss. U.S. immigration officials raided Mississippi food processing plants on Aug. 7 and hundreds of employees were swept up. Their employers have not yet been charged and are already looking for replacement workers.

Cruelty is Trump’s guiding principle with immigrants His message to the world: Keep your tired, your poor, your huddled masses. EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

The erratic Trump administration has had just one consistent policy principle, one guiding North Star: punitive and often sadistic treatment of nonwhite immigrants. President Donald Trump’s claim that he supports legal immigration, as opposed to the undocumented “invasion” he rails against, turns out to be — big surprise — a lie. On Monday, the administration proved its antagonism toward those who “stand in line” and “come in the right way” by issuing a new rule forcing many legal immigrants to make an impossible choice: accept needed government benefits to which they are fully entitled, or preserve their chances of obtaining permanent residence. Say you’re an immigrant from Mexico who came here legally to join family members who are already permanent residents or citizens. Say you’re working a full-time minimum wage job, plus odd jobs nights and weekends. You are a productive member of society. You are paying payroll taxes, sales taxes, vehicle registration fees and other government levies. Still, as hard as you work, you can’t make ends meet. You may be legally entitled to health care through Medicaid. You may be entitled to food assistance through the SNAP program, formerly known as food stamps. You may be entitled to housing assistance. But according to the new Trump administration rule — set to take effect in two months — if you use any of these programs, you might forfeit the opportunity to ever obtain a green card making you a permanent resident.

That means you also forfeit the chance of ever becoming a citizen. Long advocated by White House adviser Stephen Miller, the Torquemada of the immigration inquisition, the new policy is a major step in Trump’s crusade to Make America White Again. If it survives court challenges, the new rule could dramatically reduce legal — I repeat, legal — immigration from low-income countries. Not coincidentally, I am sure, this means fewer black and brown people would be granted resident status. Trump’s message to the world: Keep your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free. As he memorably and disgracefully put it: “Our Country is FULL!” This is part of a well-established pattern. Trump often uses immigrants as scapegoats, encouraging his supporters to blame them for any and all problems they face. But beneath the cynical posturing there appears to be genuine animus. Does the president hate all immigrants? He did once allegedly muse about wanting more newcomers from Norway. But those who are not white are treated, by this administration, as if they were not fully human. How else to characterize a policy of cruelly separating children from their asylumseeking parents at the border? Of keeping children in cages and denying them toothbrushes or soap? Of cramming adults into overcrowded lockups when their only crime was to lawfully seek refuge from violence and persecution? Last week, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement staged what was apparently the biggest one-day immigration raid in modern American history. Approximately 680 men and women classified as “removable aliens” were

arrested at seven work sites in Mississippi. Taken from their job sites, many left young children waiting in vain, and in anguish, for their parents to pick them up from school or daycare. ICE has limited resources — certainly nowhere near enough to go after all of the estimated 11 million unauthorized immigrants in the United States. The only policy that makes sense is to prioritize the capture and removal of those who pose a genuine danger, such as MS-13 gang members. But that’s not who you find punching a clock for minimum wage at a chicken plant in Mississippi. Instead, you find hard-working people trying to put food on the table for their families. The raid was a demonstration, a warning, a show of force. If the administration were serious it would have gone after the employers, who were not immediately hit with charges or sanctions — and are already looking for replacement workers. The message to undocumented migrants was: You are weak. We can hurt you whenever we want. Sensible immigration reform would provide the law-abiding undocumented with a pathway to legal status and citizenship. But the Republican Party blocks action because it is terrified that these immigrants would eventually become Democrats. I wonder why. I’m betting that not a single unemployed steel worker or laid-off coal miner moves to Mississippi to take those jobs plucking poultry. Trump’s immigration policy isn’t a matter of economics. Nor is it a matter of principle or fairness. Cruelty isn’t a sideshow in the way Trump deals with nonwhite immigrants. It’s the main event. Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

On Friday evening, during our joint appearance on HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher,” former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci said that he stood by President Rampell Donald Trump despite his flaws — because Scaramucci loves his country. He also warned Democrats that his bosom buddy could win reelection in a 40-state landslide. By Sunday afternoon, Scaramucci was calling for a new candidate to top the 2020 Republican ticket. “Bullying is very anti-American,” he told Bloomberg News. “People are embarrassed now.” So what happened in the intervening, oh, 36 hours? Presumably, Scaramucci still loves his country. There was also no detectable change in Trump’s “embarrassing” and “bullying” behavior. The racism, xenophobia, grifting, misogyny, narcissism, flattery of dictators, trade wars, or any of the other things endangering the lives and livelihoods of Americans: All that long predated Friday’s panel. Most of it by several decades, in fact. As I noted during our discussion with Maher, Trump’s documented bigotry goes back at least to the 1970s, when he got in trouble with the Nixon administration for refusing to rent to black tenants. Do you know how racist you need to be to be considered too racist by the Nixon administration? Here’s my theory of what broke the camel’s back: Trump watched the show. Trump tweeted that he tuned in “by accident.” He must have seen Scaramucci defending his former boss not by denying Trump’s racism but rather by deflecting the charge, pivoting to a talking point that Trump has “the toughest job in the world.” And then — as he does with everyone who exhibits even the gentlest, mildest dissent — Trump turned on Scaramucci in a series of mean tweets. As one op-ed columnist put it, completely unironically: “By trolling Anthony Scaramucci, Trump has crossed a line.” Finally, someone speaks for all those single-issue Scaramucci voters out there. It’s tempting to see Scaramucci as a sort of cautionary tale, one that should be heeded by all Republicans still willing to debase themselves for Trump — whether for “love of country” or plain old tax cuts. On the other hand, it’s frustrating that Scaramucci and other Trump surrogates haven’t yet learned this lesson from all the other cautionary prequels, including those

starring Michael Cohen, Sean Spicer, Reince Priebus, Rex Tillerson, Jeff Sessions, Paul Ryan and other allies, aides and surrogates similarly, summarily humiliated. For a guy who claims to care about infrastructure, Trump loves burning bridges. And on some level, Scaramucci must have known this. Following Trump’s Twitter attack, Scaramucci tweeted a cheeky cartoon titled “Five Stages of White House Employment,” which depicts a smiling staffer entering with a red hat and exiting with a knife in his back. This New Yorker cartoon was originally published more than two years ago — when other loyal White House aides were being ousted over their objections to Trump’s decision to hire ... Scaramucci. Trump himself has been unsubtle about what friends and supporters should expect from him, as illustrated by a story he sometimes reads at rallies to explain his worldview. This is a parable called “The Snake,” which he claims is about immigrants (an improbable interpretation, given its authorship by a black former communist). It features a gullible woman who gives shelter to a snake and then is shocked when the snake bites her. Its final line, which Trump recites with relish: “’Oh, shut up, silly woman!’ said the reptile with a grin. ‘You knew damn well I was a snake before you took me in.’” There’s one sense in which the story of Scaramucci and the Snake is a bit different from that of other viper victims, however. Unlike some of Trump’s disowned, fiercely loyal attack dogs — his former attorney Cohen, say, or former adviser Stephen K. Bannon — Scaramucci is charming, likable, a happy warrior. His shtick has been about making the optimistic case for Trump, urging the president to emphasize uplift of the Forgotten Man rather than fear and racism. Winning though Scaramucci may be, this was always a difficult sell. The Forgotten Man, after all, never got his promised infrastructure package, or his “terrific” new health coverage, or his big raise. Instead, he still faces an opioid crisis. He worries whether there’s a customer for his pork and soybeans. And he’s ducking bullets from maniacs shooting up restaurants, schools, Walmarts. In other words: Despite Scaramucci’s sunny spin, once you strip away the fear and the racism, there’s not much left to Trumpism. And so maybe this falling out — and the subsequent Scaramucci evolution — was inevitable. Welcome to the Resistance, Mooch. Better late than never. Catherine Rampell @crampell Copyright The Washington Post


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • AUGUST.14.2019

OBITUARIES

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Bangs - see Mellow

Jersa, Michael Joseph - St. Louis

Peterson, Ronald Walter ''Pete'' - Saint Charles

Brown Sr., Bob - St. Louis

Judge, S.S.N.D., Sister Margaret Mary - St. Louis

Rea, Charles W. - St. Louis, MO

Crespi, Rosemary R. - St. Louis

Kirchner, MaryAnn - St. Louis

Daniele, Mary - St. Louis

Kisling, William Michael "Mike" - Creve Coeur

Ells, William - St. Louis

Kocot, Ruth A. - St. Louis

Rott, Lilale - St. Louis

Eynon, Harold - Ellisville

Kuester, Ervin W. - Morrison, MO

Schoemehl, Jeanette C. - St. Louis

Fleckenstein - see Mellow

Loftus, E. Iona - St. Louis

Schroeder, Corliss "Corky" - St. Louis

Hagensieker, Wayne - St. Louis

Marini, David John - Sellersburg, IN

Haynie - see Stone

McGavock, Betty R. - St. Louis

Henner, Dolores Jeannine - St. Charles

Mellow, James Kuhn - Ladue

Stone, Linda M. - St. Louis

Holland, Joyce E. - St. Louis

Meyers - See Kocot

Waldman, Albert - St. Louis

Jersa, Michael Joseph

79, entered into eternal peace on Saturday, August 10, 2019 at Barnes Hospital in Saint Louis, Missouri. His final moments were spent surrounded by family. Michael was born in Iowa to the late Michael and Eleanor Jersa. He attended grade school at Notre Dame and Seven Holy Founders. He graduated from Christian Brothers College in 1957, then earned his Bachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering from the Missouri School of Mines at Rolla. He was a Street Engineer for the City of St. Louis, then the owner of National Sales Company, where he retired after 48 years as a successful, respected, beloved businessman. He enjoyed cars and discussing sports and the stock market. He was strong, athletic and exercised daily - doing his push-ups every night, sometimes with both sons on his back. He was a quiet, dependable and loving father and a supportive friend with a quick, (sometimes wicked) wit who was unbeatable on Trivia Night. He inspired many, made friends wherever he went, and knew no enemies. "Tiger" Mike and Nancy were married 49 years and loved to travel the world, especially Germany, sampling authentic cuisine, local beer, adventure, scenery and camaraderie. They spent weekends on their farmland, enjoying family, nature, hard work, open lands and Brown Sr., Bob L fresh air. Nancy wrote "I am most grateful to have a tremendous Bob Len Brown Sr., beloved husband, father, grandfather and partner for life with the power of our love and trust in God we brother, passed away on Aug 6, 2019 at the age of 68. have met the challenges that life presents. With the grace of God, Services: See https://stlouiscremation.combituaries we hope to enjoy all eternity together in the presence of God." All /bob-len-brown-sr/ for details who love Michael are grateful this beautiful couple are reunited for Eternity. He was a member of Legatus, St. Vincent de Paul, and the Queen of All Saints Variety Guild, and a boxer with Rock Steady Boxing. Michael Jersa is survived by 3 children and their Crespi, Rosemary R. spouses, Tammy and John Deardeuff, Michael and Andrea Jersa, Fortified with the Sacraments of Susanne and Leonard Knese, and John Bailey, 8 grand-children, Holy Mother Church Sunday, and 1 great-grandchild. He is preceded in death by his wife, Nancy August 11, 2019. Beloved wife of Jersa, his son, Daniel Jersa, and his brother, Thomas Richard Crespi; loving mother of Jersa.Services: A memorial visitation will be held on Saturday, Thomas (Susan), Susan Hoeksema, August 17 from 9 am - 10 am, followed with the funeral mass at 10 Jane Crespi and Julia Tietjens; am at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church, 6603 Christopher Drive, dearest grandmother of Kristine, St. Louis, MO, 63129. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions Michael, Jimmy, Annie and Alissa; may be made to the American Parkinson Disease Association - St. dear great-grandmother of Zander Louis. and Gia; dear sister of James (Donna) Apprill and Anita Ohlhausen; dear aunt, great-aunt, Judge, S.S.N.D., Sister Margaret Mary cousin and friend. Baptized into the Hope of Christ’s Resurrection on Saturday August Rosemary was a longtime parishioner of St. St. Gabriel Archangel 10, 2019. Beloved sister of Sr. Kathleen Judge SSND, Maryellen Catholic Church. Judge, Patricia Milstein, Fr. Tony Judge CSSR, Larry Judge and the Services: Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., late Joe Judge. Our dear relative, friend and Sister in Religious Friday, August 16, 11:30, to St. Gabriel Archangel Church for 12:00 Life. p.m. Mass. Private interment at a later date. In lieu of Services: Visitation at the Theresa Center (Motherhouse) 320 E. flowers, contributions may be made to ALS or Alzheimers Ripa 63125 3:00 to 8:00 PM Prayer service at 7:00 PM. Mass of Association. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m. Christian burial on Friday 11:15 AM with Interment in the Motherhouse Cemetery. Contributions to the School Sisters of Notre Dame appreciated. KUTIS CITY SERVICE. Daniele, Mary Monday, Aug. 12, 2019. Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, Friday, Kirchner, MaryAnn August 16, 9:15 a.m. to St. Ambrose Catholic Church for 10 a.m. (nee Sommers) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Mass. Interment Resurrection Cem. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m. Church on August 10, 2019 at the age of 77. Beloved wife of the late Stephan Kirchner; beloved mother of Kathy (Tony) Garcia, Kris Ells, William Kirchner, and Karen (Ron) Edgeston; beloved grandmother of 89, Asleep in Jesus Sun., Aug. 11, 2019. Hannah (Alex) Gallagher, and Chloe and Daniel Garcia, and soon to Beloved husband of Marilyn and the late Elizabeth; dear father of be great-grandmother of Addison Gallagher. Beloved daughter of Stephen (Laurie), Thomas Ells; step-father of Nancy Karandzieff, the late Henry and Hazel Sommers and daughter-in-law of the late and Roger, Dan, Jim (Lynn), and Ed Schultz; our dear grandfather, Stefan and Maria Kirchner. Beloved sister of the late Dorothy (Lou) great-grandfather, brother, uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Kaiser, the late Harry (survived by Jo) Sommers, and Pat (Joe) Services: Memorial Service will be held at Trinity Lutheran Darcy and sister-in-law of John, Frank, and Mary Kirchner and Church Thurs., Aug. 15, 1:00 p.m., at 1805 S. 8th St., St. Louis, Elizabeth (Mike) Whitmore. Our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin, and 63104. Interment later. Family Served by Buchholz Mortuary West, friend to many, especially her life-long friends in Girls Club. Chesterfield. In lieu of flowers memorial to be made to Trinity MaryAnn was a member of the St. Ann's Sodality. She donated her Lutheran Church. body to St. Louis University. Services: Memorial Mass at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4200 Delor Street at 12 noon on August 17, 2019. In lieu of flowers, Eynon, Harold memorials may be made to the St. John's St. Vincent de Paul 89, August 12, 2019. Society (4200 Delor Street, 63116) or the Humane Society of Funeral mass at St. Clare of Assisi, Ellisville, Saturday, Missouri. 11am. Visit Sat. 10-11am. For more info see Schrader.com

Hagensieker, Wayne

78 of St. Louis, MO., entered into rest On Monday August 12, 2019. Preceded in death by his former wife, Mary Patricia (nee Moran) Hagensieker and son Steven Hagensieker. Loving husband to Ann Hagensieker; Dearest father to Stacey (Jeff) Morris, Michelle (Tim) Brewster and David Young; Beloved Grandfather to Dan, Cameron, Cole, Britanna, Grace and Claire; Great-Grandfather to Kendall and Colby Services: Visitation Thursday, August 15th 4 – 8 p.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS HOMES, 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129). Services Friday, August 16th at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS HOMES, 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129) at 11:30 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Henner,

Kisling, William Michael "Mike”

Aug. 12, 2019. Beloved husband of Susan Jolley Kisling; loving father of Anne-Marie, Becky and Elizabeth. Visitation at Ortmann Stipanovich FH 4-8 pm on Aug. 16. Funeral at St. Monica Church at 10 a.m. on Aug. 17. See www.osfuneralhomes.com for full obituary.

Kocot, Ruth A.

(nee Mohlman) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Sun., Aug. 11, 2019. Beloved wife for 72 years of Andrew J. Kocot; dear mother of Alan (Mary) Kocot, Beverly Meyers, Celeste Kocot and the late Dennis Kocot; dear grandmother of Sarah, Heather, Andrew, Melissa, and Christine; dear great-grandmother of 13. She loved to cook, tell jokes and type, but hated housework. Services: Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Dolores Jeannine Saturday, August 17, 9:30 a.m. to St. Gabriel the Archangel Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment at J.B. National Cemetery, Monday, August 19, 9:15 a.m. In lieu of flowers, 89, of St. Charles, August 12, 2019. contributions to National MS Society appreciated. Visitation Vis. Thurs., Aug. 15, 10 am – 12 pm Friday, August 16, 4-8 p.m. with funeral to follow, Baue Cave Springs 3950 West Clay St. Contact Kuester, Ervin W. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com August 11, 2019. Beloved father of Ronald (Kathy) Kuester, Beverly (Dwayne) Trout, and Ardith Walters. Dear brother, grandfather, and great grandfather. Visitation Sat. 9:30-11:00 am at Assumption Church, Morrison, MO, where funeral mass will follow at 11:00 am. Burial at Assumption Cemetery. Arrangements under direction of Toedtmann & Grosse Funeral Home, Hermann, MO.

Holland, Joyce E.

Loftus, E. Iona

9/29/1922-8/10/2019 passed away peacefully, surroun- paulfuneral.com ded by her loved ones, at the age of 71. Daughter of the late Richard and Iris Goodloe, Joyce was born in Los Angles, California. She was the Marini, David John loving wife of late J. Paul Holland; David passed away at the age of 61, Monday, July 22, 2019 in the former spouse of Gary L. Sellersburg, IN. He is survived by his wife Robin, sons Chris Joachims; beloved mother of Brad (Paula) Joachims of Leavenworth, (Candise) and John, Joey (Megan) and stepchildren Jason, Rhonda, KS, Julie (Carlos) Trejo of Ferguson, Johnie and Colyn, along with grandchildren Presley, Kingston and MO and stepmother of Helen (Mike) Abel. In addition, he is survived by his parents John and Barbara, Launhardt of Rochester, NY, Denise and brothers Michael, Thomas (Gwyn); nephews Weston, Graham (Randy) Moore of Lake St. Louis, and niece Julietta. MO and honorary daughter Services: Funeral services were conducted on July 27 in New Stephanie Joachims of Ferguson, MO; dear grandmother of Tim Albany, IN. A memorial Mass will be celebrated 10 a.m. at Mother and Jennifer Joachims and Enrique Trejo of Ferguson, MO, and of Perpetual Help Catholic Church, 200 Lange Ave., in Maryville, IL step-grandmother of Leigh (Nathan) Herkamp of Rochester, NY, on Saturday, August 17, 2019. Ashley (Shannon) Stock of St. Louis, MO, Lindsey (Nick) Dorland of Holley, NY, Nathaniel (Tara) of Lawrence, KS, Cameron & McGavock, Betty R. Cassandra Moore of Lake St. Louis, MO; great-grand- mother of August 12, 2019. Survivors include her husband, Bert W.; three Evelyn, Nataleigh and Adelaide Herkamp, Donnie Stock, Alivia, children, Bert, II [Janie], Stephen [Trudie], Brian [Sheila]; and Jesse and Maggie Jo Dorland; sister of Janice (Larry) Allen of six grandchildren. Clinton, OK and Bill (MaryAnn) Goodloe of Guymon, OK; dear aunt Visitation: Thursday Aug. 15, 2019 from 11 -1 at New Life of a host of nieces and nephews. Church, Bridgeton, MO 63044, with Funeral at 1:00. Joyce retired after 25 years of service with Hunter Engineering. Memorials to Tupelo Children's Mansion. Joyce loved gardening until the sun went down and then reading www.valhallafunerals.net at any chance. Her life revolved around her family and her church. She was loved and respected by all who knew her. Services: Memorial visitation on Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 9 am and with formal service at 11:00 am. Lunch following and more visitation at Immanuel United Church of Christ, 221 Church St., Ferguson, MO 63135. In lieu of flowers, donations to Immanuel UCC Music Fund, American Cancer Society or the American Lung SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND Association.

SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

Spiegel, Terese - Dardenne Prairie

Mellow, James Kuhn

91 years old, of St. Louis, Missouri passed away on August 5, 2019. He was the beloved son of George Edward Mellow and Lucy Kuhn Mellow. He is preceded in death by his wife of 64 years, Mary Virginia Roberts Mellow and his son, James Kuhn Mellow, Jr. He is survived by his children, Ann Mellow Fleckenstein (Scot), Lucy Mellow Bangs (Leo Giebel), and Thomas Edward Mellow (Lauralyn); five grandchildren, Stephen Bangs, David Bangs, Sarah Fleckenstein, Emily Mellow, and Madalyn Mellow and his sister-in-law, Phyllis Kriegh Roberts. Jim was born on November 1, 1927 in St. Louis, Missouri. He attended St. Louis Country Day School, Princeton University, and graduated from Washington University in 1951 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. He was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity and Senior Men’s Honorary, O.D.K. He spent 1947 in Japan as part of the Occupation Forces of the 1st Cavalry Division. Jim was Executive Vice President of Liberty Foundry, the family business, where he worked for 41 years. Jim was a charter member, elder, trustee, and deacon at Ladue Chapel. He was active in volunteer work including Board Member of the Campbell House and the St. Louis Altenheim and Alumni Secretary of the St. Louis Country Day School Class of 1945. He was a member of Bellerive Country Club and the Missouri Athletic Club. He loved photography and had photos published in ten books, twenty magazines and multiple travel brochures. Jim was a lifelong adventurer including climbing the Matterhorn and traveling around the world with Mary Virginia. He was grateful for the many friends that he made during his travels. Jim and his family spent over 50 summers at Crystal Lake in Michigan. He was a wonderful son, husband, parent and a friend to many. Services: A memorial service will be held at Ladue Chapel Presbyterian Church, 9450 Clayton Road, St. Louis, MO on Friday, August 16th at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The Salvation Army, 1130 Hampton Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63139 (https:/centralusa.salvationarmy.org /midland/) or a charity of one’s choice. Friends may submit condolences online at www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL

Peterson, Ronald Walter "Pete"

August 10, 2019, 69. Services: Vis. Fri., Aug. 16, Baue Cave Springs, 4-8pm. Svc. Thu., August 22, Baue Cave Springs, 9:30 am. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Rea, Charles W.

Rea, Charles W. "Charlie" passed away, Friday, August 9, 2019.Father of Richard (Janice), William, Mary (Rob) Thompkins. Grandfather of Jennifer Rea, Stephanie (Ryan) Melson, Rick Thompkins and Katie Thompkins. Great Grandfather of Noah Melson and Sylas Melson. Former spouse of Jean Kersting. Uncle, great uncle, cousin and good friend to many. Charlie was the founder and former owner of Charles W. Rea Insurance Agency in Kirkwood, Mo.

Roe, Jean Hess

of Chesterfield, passed peacefully into the presence of God on Monday, August 12, 2019 at the age of 98. She was born in St. Louis, Missouri, to the late Ida Mae (nee Tuthill) and Alfred Foley Hess. Beloved wife of the late Charles A. Roe, Jr.; cherished mother of Patty and Steve (Jeanne) Roe; treasured grandmother of Rachel (Ryan) Bush, Ryan (Rachel) Roe, Rebekah (Isaac) Fraley, Tori and Steve Roe; great-grandmother of RJ, Noah, Jadon and baby boy Bush, and Beckett and Mason Roe. Dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. The family is deeply grateful to the entire staff at Friendship Village Chesterfield Care Center for the exceptional care and love our mother receive while residing there. Services: Visitation Wed., Aug. 14, 4-8 p.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Services private. In lieu of flowers, donation may be made to Promise Christian Academy, 13250 S. Outer 40, Town and Country, MO 63017. www.boppchapel.com

Rott, Lilale

(nee Parks) Friday, August 9, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Kenneth G. Rott; loving mother of Kenneth L. (Lisa), Robert (Mary) and the late Donald M. Rott; adoring grandmother of Mallory (Dana) Getman, Brian (Meghan Scydick) Rott , Matthew (Whitney Powell) Rott, Mary (Zachary) Fox, Theresa (Michael) Kennedy and Robert K. Rott; cherished great-grandmother of Sophia Fox, Samuel Getman and Adien Brooks; dear sister of Mary Lou Sonntag and the late Carvin Parks; our dearest sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Lilale was a longtime member of the Bell Telephone Pioneers of America. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, August 16, 5-9 p.m. Depart Kutis at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, August 17, to Lakewood Park Cemetery for 10:00 a.m. graveside service. Contributions to the American Heart Association or American Diabetes Association appreciated.

Schoemehl, Jeanette C. 86. Visit Sat. 8/17, 8:30am-10:15am, John L. Ziegenhein & Sons (7027 Gravois) to St. Stephen Protomartyr for 11am Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery.

Schroeder, Corliss ''Corky'' on Tues., Aug 13, 2019. Wife of Paul & mother of Paul III (Jessica) & Stephen. Family Memories Thurs., 8/15, 6pm, Bopp Chapel. Donations to Charity of your choice. www.boppchapel.com

Spiegel, Terese

Aug 12, 2019. Mass 8/16, 10:30 am, Immaculate Conception Dardenne. Visit 8/15, 4-8 pm Hutchens-Stygar (St. Charles) & 9:30 8/16, 9:30am until Mass. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Stone, Linda M.

67. Visit Thurs., 8/15, 5-8pm, Serv. Fri., 8/16 at 10am, both at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons Funeral Home (7027 Gravois) Interment Resurrection Cemetery.

Waldman, Albert

August 12, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Betty Lou Perry Waldman. Beloved partner of Ida Motchan. Al considered Ida’s children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren to be his own. He will be missed by children Donna Hanley, Sandy Cowhey (Peter) and Craig Schultz (Sandy); grandchildren Kayla and Connor Hanley, Matthew, Casey and Timothy Cowhey, Debbie Schultz and Jennifer Patchin (Doug); and great-grandchildren Drew and Tyler Patchin. Dear brother of the late Eileen Cohn. Our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Mr. Waldman was a veteran of the Korean War. Services: Graveside service Wednesday, August 14th, 2:00 p.m. at Bellerive Gardens Cemetery, 740 N Mason Road. Memorial contributions preferred to the charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE WRITE YOUR LOVED ONE’S LIFE STORY STLtoday.com/obit

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE THEM GREAT | STLtoday.com/obits

Roe, Jean Hess - Chesterfield

STLtoday.com/obits


NEWS

08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

War-torn Syrian city a symbol of Assad’s victories, defeats BY BASSEM MROUE

Associated Press

DAVE KILLEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

After a confrontation between authorities and protesters, police use pepper spray as multiple groups protest June 29 in downtown Portland, Ore.

Far-right rally, counterprotest have Oregon city on edge BY GILLIAN FLACCUS

Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. — Portland police are mobilizing to prevent clashes between out-of-state farright groups planning a rally here and the homegrown anti-fascists who oppose them as America’s culture wars seep into this progressive haven. Saturday’s rally and the violence it may bring are relatively new realities here, as an informal coalition of white nationalists, white supremacists and extreme-right militias hones its focus on Oregon’s largest city as a stand-in for everything it feels is wrong with the U.S. At the top of that list are the masked and black-clad antifascists who turn out to violently oppose right-wing demonstrators as soon as they set foot in town. “It’s Portlandia, and in the public mind it represents everything these (far-right) groups are against,” said Heidi Beirich, director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups. “It’s progressive, and even more offensive to them, it’s progressive white people who should be on these guys’ side.” The groups know they will get a headline-grabbing reaction from Portland’s so-called “antifa,” whose members have issued an online call to their followers to turn out to“defend Portland from a farRight attack.” Portland’s Rose City Antifa, the nation’s oldest active anti-fascist group, says violence against right-wing demonstrators is “exactly what should happen when the far-right attempts to invade our town.” Portland leaders are planning a major law enforcement presence on the heels of similar rallies in June and last summer that turned violent,and the recent hate-driven shooting in El Paso,Texas.None of the city’s nearly 1,000 police officers will have the day off,and Portland will get help from the Oregon State Police and the FBI. Mayor Ted Wheeler has said he may ask Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, to call up the Oregon National Guard.

“There’s no winning for the cops in a situation like this. There just isn’t,” Beirich said. “This is hardcore stuff, and I don’t think you can be too cautious.” Experts who track right-wing militias and hate groups warn that the mix of people heading to Portland also came together for a Unite the Right rally in 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia, which ended when a participant rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing one person and injuring 19. The rally is being organized by a member of the Proud Boys, who have been designated by the Southern Poverty Law Center as a hate group. Others expected include members of the American Guard, the Three Percenters, the Oathkeepers and the Daily Stormers. American Guard is a white nationalist group, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center,while the Three Percenters and the Oathkeepers are extremist anti-government militias. The Daily Stormers are neo-Nazis,according to the center. Portland’s fraught history with hate groups adds to the complex dynamic. Many of today’s anti-fascists trace their activist heritage to a group that battled with neo-Nazis in Portland’s streets decades ago, and they feel this is the same struggle in a new era, said Randy Blazak, the leading expert on the history of hate groups in Oregon. White supremacists murdered an Ethiopian man, Mulugeta Serawin, in Portland in 1988. And by the 1990s,Portland was known as Skinhead City because it was the home base of Volksfront, at the time one of the most active neoNazi groups in the U.S.As recently as 2007, neo-Nazis attempted to gather in Portland for a three-day skinhead festival. “When I’m looking at what’s happening right now, for me it’s a direct line back to the 1980s: the battles between the racist skinheads and the anti-racist skinheads,” Blazak said.“It’s the latest version of this thing that’s been going on for 30 years in this city.”

ALEPPO, Syria — Members of the al-Ali family were walking home from shopping when several shells slammed into the busy street on the western edges of the Syrian city of Aleppo. The blast tore through them, killing 2-year-old Salam and one of her cousins, and incinerated a car nearby with a woman and her infant daughter inside. It was one of multiple attacks by rebels firing from Aleppo’s outskirts that killed more than a dozen civilians last month. Nearly three years have passed since President Bashar Assad’s forces gained full control of Aleppo, sweeping out rebels who had held the eastern half of the city through years of fighting. That victory made Aleppo — Syria’s largest city — a symbol of how Assad succeeded with crucial assistance from Russia and Iran in turning the tide of the long civil war, clawing back most opposition-held territory in the country’s heartland and ensuring Assad’s survival. But Aleppo is equally a symbol of how Assad has been unable to secure full victory in the war or bring total security to Syria’s people — and appears unlikely to in the near future. Half of Aleppo remains destroyed, much of its population is scattered, and deadly attacks like the July 24 mortar fire that killed Salam — whose name means peace in Arabic — are still common. Aleppo still sits on the edge of the opposition’s last major stronghold, a territory stretching across the neighboring province of Idlib and parts of Hama province. From positions on Aleppo’s outskirts, rebels frequently fire mortars and rockets into the city’s western districts. Frustrated supporters of Assad call for the army to recapture Idlib or at least push the rebels further west. “Let it be war,” said Ahmad al-Ali, Salam’s uncle. The girl’s mother was wounded along with three of her cousins. Dry blood stains where the family was hit could still be seen on the pavement days later. Al-Ali said he wasn’t afraid of having a fullfledged battle on his neighborhood’s doorstep. “Either we all live in peace or — if we die — others will live in peace.” Government forces backed by Russian warplanes have been waging an intense air and ground campaign in Idlib since April 30 — resulting in the death

HASSAN AMMAR, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Syrians wait for public transportation July 26 in Aleppo, Syria. Rebels still frequently strike with shelling and mortars into Aleppo, killing civilians nearly three years after the government recaptured the city. Aleppo is a symbol of how President Bashar Assad succeeded in turning the tide in Syria’s long civil war with a series of wins, but it’s equally a symbol of how he’s been unable to secure a final victory. of at least 450 civilians and displacing hundreds of thousands within Idlib, according to the U.N.’s human rights office. So far, they have only managed to take a fringe of villages along the enclave’s southern edge, but the campaign picked up momentum last week, with troops drawing close to a major town. One objective is to recapture the highway linking Damascus with Aleppo, which runs through opposition-held territory. Doing so would push the rebels back from Aleppo and provide Aleppans with a further bit of normalcy — a better connection to the capital. Opening the highway would reduce travel time to Damascus by two hours, since drivers now must take a longer desert road. But that would mean retaking a large chunk of Idlib, including several major towns, a fight that could take months and exact a heavy toll. Idlib is dominated by Islamic militant opposition factions, and the rebel territory is crowded with hundreds of thousands of people, including many who fled from other opposition-held areas that fell to the government. Retaking territory further north is even more out of reach, since areas bordering Turkey are a patchwork of militias and foreign troops, with Americans and Europeans in the east and the Turkish military in the west. Syria’s southern province of

Daraa, recaptured by government troops in July last year, is becoming chaotic with assassinations and attacks against government forces inside what were once areas held by rebels. “It is doubtful if Damascus will ever be able to exert authority over the entire country,” said Fawaz Gerges, a professor of Middle Eastern politics at the London School of Economics. “Large swaths of Syria are under the control of rebels, militants, Kurds and foreign forces, including Turkey, Iran, Russia and the U.S. and Europeans.” “Equally important, social reconstruction is a distant dream. The international community will not invest precious resources in reconstruction as long as there is no reconciliation and political transition,” he said. “Western powers will do everything in their power to keep Assad from consolidating his central authority over the whole country.” In Aleppo, reconstruction has been limited. Most of the eastern neighborhoods that were taken from rebels remain empty and destroyed. “We cannot say that this city will easily return to its normal status,” said Muhannad Haj Ali, a lawmaker from Aleppo and a member of parliament’s national security committee. “It still needs a lot of effort and restoration of security and stability.”

Doctor says two Ebola patients in Congo ‘cured’ with new drugs BY SALEH MWANAMILONGO

Associated Press

KINSHASA, Congo — Two Ebola patients who were treated with new drugs in the city of Goma in eastern Congo have been declared “cured” and returned to their home. Top doctors fighting Ebola quickly used the case on Tuesday to press the message that people can recover from the potentially deadly disease if they seek proper care. Ebola is dangerous but it is also curable with correct treatment, said Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe, director of Congo’s National Institute for Biomedical Research. “Ebola kills quickly and Ebola heals quickly. That’s the message,” said Muyembe, at a press conference in Goma.

AUGUST.14.2019

“These cases were detected very quickly. The husband was infected, he was at home for 10 days and his wife and son were infected,” said Muyembe. “As soon as the response teams detected these cases, they brought them here to the treatment center. We gave them treatment that is effective and here in a short time both are cured.” Muyembe said two new drugs “are now be used to treat Ebola patients because, according to the studies and the results we obtained in the lab, these are the two drugs that are effective.” Muyembe and other scientists announced this week that preliminary results from two trials in Congo found two drugs — made by Regeneron and the U.S. National Institutes of Health — seem

WEDNESDAY • M 1

to be saving lives. Researchers said more study is needed to nail down how well those two compounds work. The drugs are antibodies that block Ebola. In the trial, significantly fewer people died among those given the Regeneron drug or the NIH’s, about 30%, compared to those who received another treatment. Esperance Nabintu rejoiced that she and her young son had survived Ebola. “May the Lord be praised, I thank the Lord very much. I and my child were sick with Ebola, but God has just healed us. “My brothers, we must not doubt. Ebola exists, “said Nabintu, whose husband was the second Ebola victim to die in Goma. No other Ebola death has been detected since then.

OBITUARIES

After a public announcement that Nabintu and her son, Ebenezer Fataki, 1, had recovered from Ebola, the response team accompanied the two former patients to their home in the Kiziba area, where the medical team educated the residents about proper Ebola treatment. There is less danger that Ebola will spread through Goma, the capital of North Kivu province with more than 2 million inhabitants, because about 200 contacts and suspected cases have been identified and have received proper medication, said Muyembe. He said people arriving in Goma are being monitored at the city’s entry points. “People who come from Beni and Butembo (nearby cities where there are many Ebola cases) must

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be carefully examined,“said Muyembe. “All of the 200 contacts we are following are doing well. We are waiting until the end of the 21day surveillance period. We are at day 13, so there are still 8 days to go before we can say that Goma has won against Ebola.” Health officials have also vaccinated tens of thousands of people in Congo and surrounding countries in an attempt to stop the outbreak, but the virus has now continued to spread for more than a year. Response efforts have been repeatedly hampered by attacks on health workers and continuing mistrust among the affected communities; many people in the region don’t believe the virus is real and choose to stay at home when they fall ill, infecting those who care for them.

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Women accuse opera’s Domingo of sexual harassment BY JOCELYN GECKER

Associated Press

For decades, Placido Domingo, one of the most celebrated and powerful men in opera, has tried to pressure women into sexual relationships by dangling jobs and then sometimes punishing the women professionally when they refused his advances, numerous accusers told The Associated Press. Regarded as one of the greatest opera singers of all time, Domingo also is a prolific conductor and the director of the Los Angeles Opera. The multiple Grammy winner is an immensely respected figure in his rarefied world, described by colleagues as a man of prodigious charm and energy who works tirelessly to promote his art form. But his accusers and others in the industry say there is a troubling side to the 78-year-old Domingo — one they say has long been an open secret in the opera world. Eight singers and a dancer have told the AP that they were sexually harassed by the long-married, Spanishborn superstar in encounters that took place over three decades beginning in the late 1980s, at venues that included opera companies where he held top managerial positions. One accuser said Domingo stuck his hand down her skirt and three others said he forced wet kisses on their lips — in a dressing room, a hotel room and at a lunch meeting. “A business lunch is not strange,” said one of the singers. “Somebody trying to hold your hand during a business lunch is strange — or putting their hand on your knee is a little strange. He was always touching you in some way, and always kissing you.” In addition to the nine accusers, a half-dozen other

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Placido Domingo directs the Washington Opera Orchestra and Chorus during a rehearsal of Verdi’s Requiem in 2001 at Washington’s Constitution Hall. Multiple women have accused Domingo of sexually harassing them. women told the AP that suggestive overtures by Domingo made them uncomfortable, including one singer who said he repeatedly asked her out on dates after hiring her to sing a series of concerts with him in the 1990s. The AP also spoke to almost three dozen other singers, dancers, orchestra musicians, backstage staff, voice teachers and administrators who said they witnessed inappropriate sexually tinged behavior by Domingo and that he pursued younger women with impunity. Domingo did not respond to detailed questions from the AP about specific incidents, but issued a statement saying: “The allegations from these unnamed individuals dating back as many as thirty years are deeply troubling, and as

Placido Domingo sings during his performance Jan. 22, 2004, at the National Theater in Santiago, Dominican Republic. presented, inaccurate. “Still, it is painful to hear that I may have upset anyone or made them feel uncomfortable — no matter how long ago and despite my best intentions. I believed that all of my interactions and relationships were always welcomed and consensual. People who know me or who have worked with me know that I am not someone who

would intentionally harm, offend, or embarrass anyone. “However, I recognize that the rules and standards by which we are — and should be — measured against today are very different than they were in the past. I am blessed and privileged to have had a more than 50-year career in opera and will hold myself to the

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highest standards.” Seven of the nine accusers told the AP they feel their careers were adversely impacted after they rejected Domingo’s advances, with some saying that roles he promised never materialized and several noting that while they went on to work with other companies, they were never hired to work with him again. Only one of the nine women would allow her name to be used — Patricia Wulf, a mezzo-soprano who sang with Domingo at the Washington Opera. The others requested anonymity, saying they either still work in the business and feared reprisals or worried they might be publicly humiliated and even harassed. The accusers’ stories lay out strikingly similar patterns of behavior that included Domingo persistently contacting them —

often calling them repeatedly at home late at night — expressing interest in their careers and urging them to meet him privately under the guise of offering professional advice. None of the women could offer documentation, such as phone messages, but the AP spoke to many colleagues and friends that they confided in. In addition, the AP independently verified that the women worked where they said they did and that Domingo overlapped with them at those locations. Two of the women said they briefly gave in to Domingo’s advances, feeling they couldn’t risk jeopardizing their careers by saying no to the most powerful man in their profession. One of them said she had sex with him twice, including at the Biltmore hotel in Los Angeles. When Domingo left for a performance, the woman said, he put $10 on the dresser, saying,“I don’t want you to feel like a prostitute, but I also don’t want you to have to pay to park.” The women making the accusations — who said they were emboldened to speak out by the #MeToo movement — were mostly young and starting their careers at the time. Several said they took extreme measures to avoid Domingo, including asking colleagues to stick with them while at work and not answering their home phones. The dancer called her avoidance technique “the bob and weave, the giggle and get out,” and one soprano labeled it “walking the tightrope.” On Tuesday, the Los Angeles Opera said Tuesday it would launch an investigation of Domingo, and the Philadelphia Orchestra and San Francisco Opera announced they would cancel upcoming performances featuring the star.

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NATION&WORLD DIGEST

MASS SHOOTINGS

Counties sue over immigration rule

Democrats urge gun limits

SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco and Santa Clara counties filed the first lawsuit challenging the Trump administration’s new rules to deny green cards to migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday, came after the Department of Homeland Security’s announcement Monday of its expanded “public charge” rules to restrict legal immigration. In a filing, the counties of Santa Clara and San Francisco argued that the rules will worsen the health and well-being of their residents, increase public health risks and financially harm the counties. The rules, the counties argued, would result in a “chilling effect” in which migrants forgo or disenroll from federal public assistance programs to reduce the risk of being denied a green card. This practice would mean that the cost of services would shift from federal to state governments, the counties argued.

Congressman says McConnell waiting for ‘outrage to die down’ BY ALAN FRAM

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Democrats pressed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday to approve House-passed legislation expanding background checks and to take other steps curbing guns, in an offensive fueled by public outrage over this month’s mass killings in Texas and Ohio. It seemed unlikely that Democrats’ moves would have much impact on top Republicans. While President Donald Trump and McConnell have expressed a

new openness to unspecified gun curbs following the back-to-back mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, their decisions will reflect the sentiment of fellow Republicans, not predictable pressure tactics by Democrats. Still, Democrats’ moves underscore their focus on an issue that largely unites them — responding to the massacres that killed 31 people — and away from the party’s hand-wringing over whether to impeach Trump, a question that deeply divides Democrats. McConnell, R-Ky., came under the sharpest attacks at a news conference held by No. 2 House Democratic leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., five other House Democrats and gun activists and survivors of shootings. Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., said

McConnell hadn’t moved gun curb legislation because “he’s waiting for the outrage to die down, the headlines to change, the people to turn the page and think about something else.” Congress is out of town on recess until a week after Labor Day. Democrats focused on McConnell’s failure to let the Senate consider a measure the House approved in February. It would require background checks for most private sales, including online and gun show purchases of firearms, not just for transactions involving registered gun dealers. Meanwhile, one of the first victims struck by the Dayton shooter during his 32-second rampage that left nine people dead was his younger sister, but whether he intentionally killed

her remains unknown more than a week later, the Ohio city’s police chief said Tuesday. Investigators have “radically different views” on whether Connor Betts targeted his 22-year-old sister, Megan, two hours after they arrived with a friend at a popular strip of nightclubs, Chief Richard Biehl said at a news conference. Text messages show the 24-year-old gunman knew his sister and their friend were going to a taco stand minutes before he came down an alley and started shooting, Beihl said. “There’s a real question whether he could see who was on the other side,” the police chief said, adding that its possible investigators may never come up with an answer.

Pakistan seeks urgent UN meeting UNITED NATIONS — Pakistan called Tuesday for an urgent meeting of the U.N. Security Council, saying India’s decision to strip its part of disputed Kashmir of autonomy poses “an imminent threat” to international peace and could lead to ethnic cleansing and genocide in the Muslim-majority region. Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi accused India in a letter to the council of implementing a “racist ideology” aimed at turning its part of Kashmir from a Muslim-majority into a Hindu-majority territory. “The Indian actions on Aug. 5, 2019 have opened the way for realization of this fascist policy objective,” he wrote. Qureshi warned that any such attempt “will evoke strong Kashmiri resistance” and “the anticipated massive repression by India’s occupation forces will lead to ethnic cleansing and genocide.” BRIEFLY OFFICER SHOOTING: A driver stopped by police pulled out a rifle and opened fire Monday, killing a California Highway Patrol officer and wounding two others on a freeway overpass. The gunman was also killed. One officer was in critical condition and the other was seriously injured, an official said Tuesday. DAY CARE FIRE: There weren’t enough working smoke detectors at a Pennsylvania home day care center where a fire killed five children, Fire Chief Guy Santone said Tuesday. TULSI GABBARD: Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii is taking two weeks off from her 2020 Democratic presidential campaign to participate in Army National Guard training, she announced this week. Gabbard is a major in the Army National Guard who has served in the military for more than 16 years and deployed to Iraq in 2004 and Kuwait in 2008. BREXIT: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Tuesday that getting a free trade deal with the United States would be “a tough old haggle,” after U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton promised the U.K. quick sector-by-sector trade deals once it leaves the European Union. Johnson vows Britain will leave the EU on Oct. 31, with or without a divorce deal. CATHEDRAL FIRE: Paris authorities shut down streets surrounding the Notre Dame Cathedral to decontaminate them Tuesday, after high levels of lead were registered in the area following the April blaze that damaged the landmark. ELECTION 2020: Mark Sanford, the former South Carolina governor and congressman, headed to another early voting state as he considers mounting an uphill challenge to President Donald Trump for the Republican presidential nomination. A spokeswoman confirmed that Sanford would travel Tuesday night to New Hampshire for meetings. — Associated Press

DIMITRIS KAPADAIS, INTIME NEWS VIA AP

WILDFIRES BURN OUT OF CONTROL IN PARTS OF GREECE More than 1,000 firefighters battled wildfires Tuesday in Greece, with the largest burning out of control through a nature reserve on the island of Evia north of Athens causing four villages and a monastery to be evacuated. The country’s civil protection authority declared a state of emergency in the area of Evia affected by the fire, where about 280 firefighters, volunteers, soldiers, six water-dropping planes and seven helicopters were deployed. Greece called on the European civil protection organization for assistance, and four firefighting planes were being sent from Croatia and Italy, Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said. Above, firefighters try to extinguish flames outside a house on Evia.

Warden out after Epstein’s death Punishment for guards, warden comes amid evidence of lapses BY JIM MUSTIAN, MICHAEL R. SISAK AND MICHAEL BALSAMO

Associated Press

NEW YORK — The warden at the federal jail where Jeffrey Epstein took his own life over the weekend was removed Tuesday and two guards who were supposed to be watching the financier were placed on leave while federal authorities investigate the death. The move by the Justice Department came amid mounting evidence that the chronically understaffed Metropolitan Correctional

Center may have bungled its responsibility to keep the 66-yearold Epstein from harming himself while he awaited trial on charges of sexually abusing teenage girls. Epstein was taken off a suicide watch last month for reasons that have not been explained, and was supposed to have been checked on by a guard every 30 minutes. But investigators learned those checks weren’t done for several hours before he was found Saturday morning, according to a person familiar with the case who was not authorized to discuss it and spoke on condition of anonymity. Attorney General William Barr ordered warden Lamine N’Diaye temporarily assigned to the Bureau of Prisons’ regional office

while the FBI and the Justice Department’s inspector general investigate. The two guards were not identified. While the exact Epstein manner of Epstein’s death has not been officially announced, a second person familiar with operations at the jail said the financier was discovered in his cell with a bedsheet around his neck. That person likewise spoke on condition of anonymity for the same reason. Under the jail’s protocol, Epstein would not have been given a bedsheet had he been on suicide

watch. He was placed on suicide watch last month after he was found on the floor of his cell with bruises on his neck, but he was later returned to the jail’s special housing unit for inmates needing close supervision. On Monday, Barr said that he was “frankly angry to learn of the MCC’s failure to adequately secure this prisoner.” The warden of an institution in upstate New York has been named the acting warden at the jail. Eric Young, president of the union council that represents prison guards, said that such reassignments are routinely done to “protect the integrity of investigations until any formal action, if any, is warranted.”

Trump takes credit Russia orders, then for Shell complex cancels evacuation Despite his claims, plant announced when Obama was in office BY JILL COLVIN AND JOSH BOAK

Associated Press

MONACA, Pa. — President Donald Trump sought to take credit Tuesday for a major manufacturing complex in western Pennsylvania in his latest effort to reinvigorate the Rust Belt support that sent him to the White House. He was cheered on by fluorescent-vest-clad workers who were paid to attend by Shell, their employer, which is building the facility. Despite Trump’s claims, Shell announced its plans to build the complex in 2012, midway through President Barack Obama’s term in the White House.

The event was billed as an official White House event, but Trump turned much of it into a campaign-style rally, boasting of achievements he claims as president and assailing his would-be Democratic rivals for the 2020 election. “I don’t think they give a damn about Western Pennsylvania, do you?” he prodded the crowd. Trump was visiting Shell’s soon-to-be completed Pennsylvania Petrochemicals Complex, which will turn the area’s vast natural gas deposits into plastics. The facility is being built in an area hungry for investment and employment, though critics claim it will become the largest air polluter in western Pennsylvania. “This would have never happened without me and us,” he said.

Residents initially told to clear out of village near testing range BY VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV

Associated Press

MOSCOW — The Russian military on Tuesday told residents of a village near a navy testing range to evacuate, but canceled the order hours later, adding to the uncertainty and confusion fueled by a missile explosion last week that led to a brief spike in radiation that frightened residents and raised new questions about the military’s weapons program. Initially the military told residents of Nyonoksa, a village of about 500, to move out temporarily, citing unspecified activities at the range. But a few hours later, it said the planned activi-

ties were canceled and rescinded the request to leave, said Ksenia Yudina, a spokeswoman for the Severodvinsk regional administration. Local media in Severodvinsk said Nyonoksa residents regularly receive similar temporary evacuation orders usually timed to tests at the range. The Defense Ministry initially said Thursday’s explosion of a rocket engine at the navy range killed two people and injured six others, but the state-controlled Rosatom nuclear corporation said two days later that the blast also killed five of its nuclear engineers and injured three others. It’s still not clear what the final toll is. And just as the Severodvinsk administration reported a brief spike in radiation levels, the Defense Ministry insisted that no radiation had been released.


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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 08.14.2019 • B

FLAHERTY MASTERFUL AGAIN

CHARLIE RIEDEL PHOTOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jack Flaherty allowed just three hits and a walk, with seven strikeouts, over seven innings in the Cardinals’ 2-0 victory Tuesday in Kansas City.

MLB’s playoff races are giving the sport a much-needed boost

Hurler mows down KC as Redbirds close in on lead in NL Central BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY — Cardinals righthander Jack Flaherty, reunited with catcher Yadier Molina for the first time in six weeks, knocked off his ninth game of at least six innings pitched while allowing three hits or fewer. Extended to 110 pitches Tuesday night, he held the Kansas City Royals to just three hits and an unintentional walk while fanning seven over seven innings in a 2-0 Cardinals victory that moved them one game behind first-place Chicago in the National League Central Division race. The outing marked the third time in succession Flaherty had pitched seven innings. It marked the third time in succession that he hadn’t allowed a run, extending his string of scoreless innings to 23. Flaherty retired 13 men in a row after he allowed a two-out double to Hunter Dozier and an The Cardinals’ Dexter Fowler celebrates in the dugout after scoring on a intentional walk to Jorge Soler in the first inning. sacrifice fly hit by Paul Goldschmidt in the first inning. That streak ended in the sixth, when Nicky Lopez and Whit Merrifield singled. But Flaherty took matters into his own hands by fielding Alex GorUp next: 7:15 p.m. Wednesday, in Kansas City, FSM don’s comebacker and starting a double play via Hudson (10-6) vs. Keller (7-12) Please see CARDINALS, Page B5 Inside: Shildt says he wanted assistant fired. B6.

Cardinals 2, Royals 0

JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Forgive fans if they didn’t feel the playoff race electricity Sunday afternoon at Busch Stadium. They mostly felt heat and humidity instead as the Cardinals outlasted the Pirates 11-9 during that 3-hour, 40-minute slog. Yet that stunning comeback did add more drama to an MLB season that got more interesting in recent weeks. The Cardinals are in a three-way race for the National League Central title and in the NL wild-card chase featuring at least seven teams. This late scramble can’t cure all that’s wrong with Our National Pastime, but it could give the industry a nice boost while it wrestles with big issues. The ponderous pace of play is a primary concern, as Cardinals fans experienced again Sunday. Style of play remains problematic, because of the Please see GORDON, Page B3

ILLINI FOOTBALL

MIZZOU FOOTBALL

Shedding weight the right way helps tight end round into form

Defense feels the need for speed Tigers are employing system that utilizes hybrid of safeties BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JOEY WAGNER

Decatur Herald & Review

URBANA, Ill. — At one point as a youth football player, Daniel Barker knew he needed to lose weight if he wanted to get on the field. He didn’t know about nutritionists and the healthy way to shed pounds until he joined the Illinois football team last year. Barker knew salads, but he had to cut quick — about 13 pounds in three weeks. In the mornings, he would throw on a sweatshirt and run at a local park in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., or even hop in a garbage bag, to burn fat via heavy sweating. It worked and Barker was able to play. When Barker came back from Christmas break as a freshman tight end last season, he was up to 265 Please see ILLINOIS, Page B7

MARK HUMPHREY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri safety Ronnell Perkins (above) and fellow senior Khalil Oliver are nearly interchangeable at the position.

COLUMBIA, Mo. — Each year that they’ve constructed Missouri’s defense to catch up with the game’s offensive evolution, coach Barry Odom and defensive coordinator Ryan Walters have looked for ways to put more speed on the field. This past offseason, Mizzou broke tradition and officially overhauled its base structure, shifting to a 4-2-5 system that uses a third safety instead of a third linebacker. Offensive spread formations have antiquated the traditional three-linebacker defense and forced teams to employ faster, more dynamic defenders, especially in the age of the RPO — the run-pass option plays. “Nowadays, you’re getting mostly 11 personnel (one running back, one tight end, three receivers), and even when it’s 12 (one back, two tight ends, two receivers) the tight end is standing up (in space),” Walters said after Tuesday’s preseason practice. “It’s just Please see MIZZOU, Page B7

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 08.14.2019 • B

FLAHERTY MASTERFUL AGAIN

CHARLIE RIEDEL PHOTOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jack Flaherty allowed just three hits and a walk, with seven strikeouts, over seven innings in the Cardinals’ 2-0 victory Tuesday in Kansas City.

MLB’s playoff races are giving the sport a much-needed boost

Hurler mows down KC as Redbirds close in on lead in NL Central BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY — Cardinals backup catcher Matt Wieters had had a front-row seat for most of Jack Flaherty’s recent estimable work. Flaherty had allowed just 19 hits in 38 1/3 innings, giving up just four runs in his previous six starts, with Wieters catching five of those. But Yadier Molina returned for the first six time in six weeks Tuesday night. The results were roughly the same. Flaherty knocked off his ninth game of at least six innings pitched while allowing three or fewer hits. Extended to 110 pitches, he held the Kansas City Royals to just three hits and an unintentional walk while fanning seven over seven innings in a 2-0 Cardinals victory that moved them one game behind first-place Chicago in the National League The Cardinals’ Dexter Fowler celebrates in the dugout after scoring on a Central Division race. The outing marked the third time in succession sacrifice fly hit by Paul Goldschmidt in the first inning. Flaherty had pitched seven innings. It marked the third time in succession that he hadn’t allowed a run, extending his string of scoreless innings to 23. Up next: 7:15 p.m. Wednesday, in Kansas City, FSM “I’ve got to get used to it again,” said Wieters, Hudson (10-6) vs. Keller (7-12) Please see CARDINALS, Page B5 Inside: Shildt says he wanted assistant fired. B6.

Cardinals 2, Royals 0

JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Forgive fans if they didn’t feel the playoff race electricity Sunday afternoon at Busch Stadium. They mostly felt heat and humidity instead as the Cardinals outlasted the Pirates 11-9 during that 3-hour, 40-minute slog. Yet that stunning comeback did add more drama to an MLB season that got more interesting in recent weeks. The Cardinals are in a three-way race for the National League Central title and in the NL wild-card chase featuring at least seven teams. This late scramble can’t cure all that’s wrong with Our National Pastime, but it could give the industry a nice boost while it wrestles with big issues. The ponderous pace of play is a primary concern, as Cardinals fans experienced again Sunday. Style of play remains problematic, because of the Please see GORDON, Page B3

ILLINI FOOTBALL

MIZZOU FOOTBALL

Shedding weight the right way helps tight end round into form

Defense feels the need for speed Tigers are employing system that utilizes hybrid of safeties BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JOEY WAGNER

Decatur Herald & Review

URBANA, Ill. — At one point as a youth football player, Daniel Barker knew he needed to lose weight if he wanted to get on the field. He didn’t know about nutritionists and the healthy way to shed pounds until he joined the Illinois football team last year. Barker knew salads, but he had to cut quick — about 13 pounds in three weeks. In the mornings, he would throw on a sweatshirt and run at a local park in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., or even hop in a garbage bag, to burn fat via heavy sweating. It worked and Barker was able to play. When Barker came back from Christmas break as a freshman tight end last season, he was up to 265 Please see ILLINOIS, Page B7

MARK HUMPHREY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri safety Ronnell Perkins (above) and fellow senior Khalil Oliver are nearly interchangeable at the position.

COLUMBIA, Mo. — Each year that they’ve constructed Missouri’s defense to catch up with the game’s offensive evolution, coach Barry Odom and defensive coordinator Ryan Walters have looked for ways to put more speed on the field. This past offseason, Mizzou broke tradition and officially overhauled its base structure, shifting to a 4-2-5 system that uses a third safety instead of a third linebacker. Offensive spread formations have antiquated the traditional three-linebacker defense and forced teams to employ faster, more dynamic defenders, especially in the age of the RPO — the run-pass option plays. “Nowadays, you’re getting mostly 11 personnel (one running back, one tight end, three receivers), and even when it’s 12 (one back, two tight ends, two receivers) the tight end is standing up (in space),” Walters said after Tuesday’s preseason practice. “It’s just Please see MIZZOU, Page B7

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Wednesday 8/14 at Royals 7:15 p.m. FSM

Thursday 8/15 at Reds 6:10 p.m. FSM

Friday 8/16 at Reds 6:10 p.m. FSM

Saturday 8/17 at Reds 5:40 p.m. FSM

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

NFL PRESEASON | PACKERS

Rodgers to play ‘a quarter or so’

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 8/31 at Wyoming 6:30 p.m. CBSSN

Saturday 9/7 vs. West Virginia 11 a.m. ESPN

Saturday 9/14 vs. SEMO 6:30 p.m. SEC Net. alt.

Saturday 9/21 vs. So. Carolina Time, TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 8/31 vs. Akron 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/7 at UConn 2:30 p.m. CBSSN

Saturday 9/14 vs. Eastern Mich. 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/21 vs. Nebraska Time, TV TBA

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 8/24 at Ottawa 1 p.m.

Sunday 9/1 vs. Hartford 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 9/4 vs. Ottawa 7 p.m.

Saturday 9/7 vs. Nashville 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Wed. 8/21: vs. Schaumburg, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 8/21: vs. Joliet, 5:05/8:05 p.m. Thu. 8/22: vs. Joliet, 6:35 p.m. Thu. 8/22: vs. Schaumburg, 6:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL 12:10 p.m. Red Sox at Indians, MLB Network 3:05 p.m. Reds at Nationals, MLB Network 6:10 p.m. Cubs at Phillies, ESPN 7:15 p.m. Cardinals at Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) BASKETBALL 7 p.m. WNBA: Seattle at Washington, CBSSN 9 p.m. WNBA: Connecticut at Phoenix, ESPN2 HORSE RACING 12 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Races from Saratoga, FS2 GOLF 3 p.m. U.S. Amateur Championship: round of 64 matches, FS1 4:30 a.m. (Thu.) European PGA Tour Czech Masters, first round, GOLF RODEO 6 p.m. College: National finals, ESPNU SOCCER 2 p.m. UEFA Super Cup: Liverpool vs. Chelsea, TNT 6:30 p.m. Campeones Cup: Atlanta United FC vs. Club America, ESPN2 6:30 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC at Orlando City, FSM Plus SOFTBALL 9 p.m. Little League: World Series, ESPN TENNIS 10 a.m. ATP, WTA: Western & Southern Open, early rounds, Tennis Channel

DIGEST

Venus wins, Serena withdraws On a day when back problems forced Serena Williams to withdraw before her second-round match, Venus Williams reached the third round of the Western & Southern Open tennis tournament with a 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (4) upset of defending champion Kiki Bertens on Tuesday in Mason, Ohio. Hours before her match was scheduled to begin,Serena Williams withdrew,citing the same back injury that forced her to retire from the Rogers Cup final Sunday in Toronto.The injury raises questions about her fitness ahead of the U.S. Open, which starts Aug. 26. In another match, sixth seed Petra Kvitova lost to Maria Sakkari 6-4, 2-6, 6-3. On the men’s side, top-seeded and defending champion Novak Djokovic defeated wild card Sam Querry 7-5, 6-1.Roger Federer, the third seed who was playing for the first time since Wimbledon, beat Juan Ignacio Londero 6-3, 6-4. Fourthseeded Dominic Thiem withdrew because of illness. (AP) Gauff gets U.S. Open wild card: Coco Gauff will get a chance to try for an encore. The 15-year-old from Florida received a wild-card entry for the U.S. Open’s main draw. It will be Gauff’s second Grand Slam tournament. She made a run to the fourth round at Wimbledon last month after getting a wild card into the qualifying rounds there. (AP) Woods will try to play: Tiger Woods said he’ll give it a go at the BMW Championship, the second of three FedEx Cup playoff events on the PGA Tour. Woods will be first off the first tee in Wednesday’s pro-am, at Medinah in suburban Chicago, starting at 6:50 a.m. He has said that winning the Masters in April took a toll on his body, and he wasn’t kidding. He has teed it up only five times since, making two cuts. He withdrew from the Northern Trust last weekend with what he called a mild oblique strain. (Chicago Tribune) Tennessee player sidelined with spinal condition: Tennessee defensive back Baylen Buchanan has a spinal condition that makes his status for this season uncertain. Buchanan started all 12 games for Tennessee last year but hasn’t been participating in preseason practice. He is the son of former All-Pro defensive back Ray Buchanan and made 49 tackles as a junior last season while playing cornerback, safety and nickel back. (AP) NFL, Jay-Z join forces: The NFL is forming a partnership with music mogul Jay-Z in a deal that allows him to help manage entertainment ventures tied to league events and is closely connected to the sport’s community activism efforts. The partnership will make Jay-Z and his Roc Nation agency a co-producer of the Super Bowl halftime show. It does not contain a provision for him to be the halftime performer, he and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said. (Washington Post) Schilling eyes run for Congress: Former major-league pitcher Curt Schilling says he’s thinking about running for Congress in Arizona. Schilling, 52, helped the Arizona Diamondbacks win their only World Series championship, in 2001. He won another World Series with the Boston Red Sox in 2004. He was later fired as an ESPN commentator for controversial online comments.He’s an outspoken supporter of President Donald Trump, who tweeted,“Curt Schilling, a great pitcher and patriot, is considering a run for Congress in Arizona. Terrific!” (AP) Doug DeCinces sentenced: Former Major League Baseball player Doug DeCinces was sentenced to eight months of home detention and ordered to pay a $10,000 fine for his role in an insidertrading scheme. DeCinces, who played third base for the California Angels and Baltimore Orioles, was convicted in 2017 of insider trading for a stock buy that earned him over $1 million. He finished his career by playing in four games for the Cardinals in 1987. (Orange County Register)

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MIKE ROEMER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Packers coach Matt LaFleur talks with quarterback Aaron Rodgers during a practice in Green Bay, Wis. BY KEITH JENKINS

Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. — For the first time this preseason, the world will have the opportunity to see what Aaron Rodgers looks like in Matt LaFleur’s offense. The Packers’ first-year coach said Tuesday that Rodgers and the rest of the first-team offense and first-team defense will play about “a quarter or so” Thursday when Green Bay faces Baltimore in its second preseason game. “We’re always fluid with that, dependent upon how the game goes and how much time they have,” LaFleur said. “But everybody should be prepared to play about a quarter or so.” Thursday will be Rodgers’ preseason debut after the 15th-year pro watched the entire preseason opener against the Texans last week from the sideline in warmups while listening to the offensive communications on his headset. Rodgers said he wants to make sure he stays healthy and plays ef-

ficient football Thursday night. “It will be a good test for our first time running this offense in another stadium, on the road, against a really good defense,” he said. For the umpteenth time, Rodgers was asked on Tuesday about his relationship with LaFleur. Specifically, Rodgers was asked what he wishes people knew about his relationship with his new coach who is just four years his senior. “We have a great line of communication,” he said. “But I’m not sitting up here wishing people — ‘I wish you just knew this’ — I don’t care. Look, I don’t need to go out and prove to anybody how great Matt and I are getting along, or him stand up there and say how great it’s been. Look, we’re having a great time communicating, and the conjecture is for clickbait news stories you guys can put on your websites.” Rodgers said the dialogue between him and LaFleur has been great because Rodgers knows who’s the boss — LaFleur.

LaFleur said running back Aaron Jones will not play. Jones, who led the team with 728 yards on the ground last season, participated in his first team (11-on-11) period on Tuesday after missing six practices and the preseason opener because of a hamstring issue. “I wouldn’t even call it an injury; it was just tight,” Jones said. The defense will be without outside linebacker Oren Burks indefinitely. Burks said he initially thought he would need to undergo season-ending surgery to repair a pectoral muscle he injured last week against the Texans. Burks said a specialist determined it would heal on its own. “I’m really hoping that Oren’s thing is going to be really short term and we’ll get him back here quicker,” Packers general manager Brian Gutekunst. “Right now, I’d just kind of like to get through this next game, kind of see where we’re at, see where Oren’s at.” Burks said he’s day to day and there is no timetable for his return.

NFL NOTEBOOK

Tate’s suspension appeal denied practice last December, and one to fix a severely sprained right ankle a month later. Sanders recounted fans approaching him at the mall last winter and asking, “How’s the Achilles doing?” while pointing at the boot on his right foot. “I’m like, ‘I’m good. But it’s not my Achilles. It’s actually my ankle,’” Sanders said Tuesday. “But I kind of kept that under wraps because I didn’t want you guys writing stories of, ‘Hey, there’s no way he can battle through two surgeries.’ So, I just said I’m going to keep it under wraps and let you guys know once I get myself back healthy and feeling good.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — New York Giants wide receiver Golden Tate has had the appeal of his four-game suspension for a violation of the NFL’s policy on performance enhancers turned down. The decision by an independent arbiter was announced Tuesday and means the 10-year-veteran will miss the first four games of the regular season, starting against Dallas on Sept. 8. Tate, who signed a $37.5 million contract as a free agent with the Giants in March, announced the suspension in a Twitter post on July 27. He said he intended to appeal it and felt his case had merit because he was using a fertility drug prescribed by a doctor. The appeal was heard by a member of an independent appeals panel in New York last week. Tate will be eligible to practice with the team until the start of the regular season.

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

Giants receiver Golden Tate has had the appeal of his four-game suspension for a violation of the NFL’s policy on performance enhancers turned down, meaning the 10-yearveteran will miss the first four games of the regular season.

Peterson declines to address finances

Brown returns to Raiders’ practice facility

Adrian Peterson said he won’t be discussing financial woes that came to light over the summer. The Washington Redskins running back conducted his first interview of training camp Tuesday and declined to answer a question about pending legal action against him. Peterson was sued last month over failure to fully repay a $5.2 million loan and was ordered to pay $2.45 million to another creditor. “I won’t be addressing none of that,” Peterson said. “I thought maybe you would figure that I wouldn’t. But I knew someone would probably ask, so I’m not going to be talking about none of that. You guys got questions pertaining to that, I won’t be answering it.” Lawyer Chase Carlson said in a statement last month that “the truth behind Adrian Peterson’s current financial situation is more than is being reported at this time.” “This is yet another situation of an athlete trusting the wrong people and being taken advantage of by those he trusted,” Carlson said. “Adrian and his family look forward to sharing further details when appropriate.”

Antonio Brown walked onto the Oakland Raiders practice field in his familiar No. 84 jersey surrounded by cameras and received warm greetings from teammates. His weeklong absence to deal with his frostbitten feet and a grievance with the NFL over the use of a helmet ended, and now he’s eager to get back on the field as soon as he can. “I’m extremely grateful to be here,” Brown said during a short news conference. “I’ve been dealing with a lot of adversity. I’m excited to be back and see my teammates and get in the groove of things.” Brown gave no timeline for when he would be healthy enough to practice, saying only to “stay tuned.”

Broncos’ Sanders has surgery on both ankles Emmanuel Sanders’ comeback was more complex than he led on. The Denver Broncos’ 32-yearold receiver revealed this week he had surgeries on both ankles in the offseason, one to repair his left Achilles tendon, which he tore in

Jets sign cornerback Cooper for depth The New York Jets have signed veteran cornerback Marcus Cooper for depth in their depleted secondary. The team also announced Tuesday it waived tight end Nick Truesdell to make room on the roster. Cooper has played in 74 games, including 28 starts, in stints with San Francisco, Kansas City, Arizona, Chicago and Detroit in six NFL seasons. He was released by the Lions on Monday. The 2013 seventh-round draft pick out of Rutgers has seven career interceptions with 36 passes defensed and 154 tackles.

Bears cut ex-Missouri receiver The Chicago Bears have waived undrafted rookie wide receiver Emanuel Hall. He didn’t play against the Panthers last week and had missed several practices. The Bears had given him a $12,000 bonus and $30,000 base guarantee. Hall had expected to be drafted as high as the second round in April, but teams were scared off by, among other things, his durability concerns. His final season at Missouri was limited by a groin injury. Hall, a deep threat during his career at Mizzou, was second-team All-SEC last year. His 2,016 career receiving yards rank 10th in school history, and his 16 career TDs rank as the seventh-most in MU history. (Chicago Tribune)


SPORTS

08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

GOLF | ON THE TEE

THIS WEEK

GETTING MOVING Video sheds new light on old problem of slow play BY DOUG FERGUSON

Associated Press

his could go down as one of the most memorable years in golf. Tiger Woods won the Masters following four surgeries on his back, and just two years after he feared he might never compete again. The British Open was not held in Britain for the first time in 68 years. Two players went from college to PGA Tour winners in a span of two months. And the PGA Tour finally might get around to doing something about pace of play. The Player Advisory Council is meeting this week during the BMW Championship, and slow play is on the agenda. The Tour all along had planned on the final PAC meeting of the year to be devoted entirely to solutions for a problem that apparently has no quick fix or it would have been fixed a long time ago. So this could take some time. One possibility the Tour raised was timing players even when they were not out of position on the golf course. The Tour is equipped with ShotLink laser technology that tracks every shot by every player on every hole in every round. Players for about the last 10 years have received individual reports on how long it takes them to play various shots. The time is not entirely accurate — it’s more guide than gospel — because it’s measured by when the scorer records each shot in the group, not when it’s the player’s turn to hit. But it at least gives a general idea, and there are not a lot of surprises. Rules officials now have a mobile app that gives the location of every group on the course and how much they are over or under the scheduled time it should take to play. When a group falls behind — even if it is not out of position — they can use ShotLink to see what or who is the problem. Oddly enough, it was an older form of technology that brought searing attention to a sore subject: a television camera. Fans get a Twitter vote on which of two groups they would rather see in streaming coverage, and the winner Friday at The Northern Trust was Bryson DeChambeau, Justin Thomas and Tommy Fleetwood. Without them being seen, there would be no video of DeChambeau taking 2 minutes, 6 sec-

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

PGA TOUR

BMW CHAMPIONSHIP Medinah CC in Medinah, Illinois Yardage: 7,613; Par: 72 Purse: $9.25 million; Winner’s share: $1,665,000 Television: Thursday-Friday, 2-6 p.m. (Golf Channel); Saturday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. (Golf Channel), 2-5 p.m. (NBC); Sunday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. (Golf Channel), 1-5 p.m. (NBC) Defending champion: Keegan Bradley

T

What to know: This is the final event to get into the top 30 and qualify for the Tour Championship at East Lake. Medinah has not held a big event since the 2012 Ryder Cup, where Europe rallied from a 10-6 deficit to win. Among the top 70 who advanced to the BMW Championship is Ian Poulter, who birdied the last five holes that turned the momentum to Europe. Four players moved into the top 70 after the opening FedEx Cup playoffs event — Harold Varner III, Wyndham Clark, Joaquin Niemann and Troy Merritt. Hideki Matsuyama goes into the week at No. 30. He has made the Tour Championship every year since his rookie season in 2014. Kevin Na, No. 55 in the FedEx Cup, has withdrawn from the BMW Championship. Fifteen players who won PGA Tour events that offer full FedEx Cup points are outside the top 30. That includes Collin Morikawa, who only turned pro two months ago. Tiger Woods, who withdrew last week and is No. 38 in the FedEx Cup, won the PGA Championship twice at Medinah. PETER MORRISON, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bryson DeChambeau has fought back about his pace of play after he was criticized for taking more than 2 minutes to hit a putt at a recent tournament.

PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS

DICK’S SPORTING GOODS OPEN onds on an 8-foot putt. Without that video, there would not have been near the social media storm it caused. That’s not to suggest it exposed a problem because the problem has been around forever. DeChambeau took more than 2 minutes to hit a putt, and the next day he said on two occasions — to Brooks Koepka’s caddie and the media after his final round — that he was not going to let that episode give him the reputation as a slow player. Words won’t change anything. DeChambeau had an explanation for what took him so long on that putt, but no good excuse. It’s less complicated to hear him talk about air density than his reasons why he shouldn’t be singled out. For starters, he believes the pace policy should include how long it takes to walk to the ball and hit the shot. He said if he gets there first and he’s the last to hit, he can’t stand in front of other players to get his yardage, so he has to wait. “That’s kind of not good etiquette,” he said. Neither is taking 2 minutes for an 8-foot putt. On a Friday. Fulton Allem was home last week in Florida and would have been shaking his head. He made better use of the word in 2000 at The Players Championship when he said, “Etiquette is not

some small city in France.” Slow play is bad etiquette. No one has explained the problem over the years better than Allem. It starts with the Tour policy. Players are not timed until they are out of position. Then they are told they are being timed. They are given a warning if they go over the limit. The second bad time is a penalty shot. “It would be like you going down the highway 100 mph,” Allem once said. “A cop says: ‘Listen bud, you are doing 100. I am going to follow you now. I am going to measure your speed.’ You’re not going to go over the speed limit. You’re going to drive perfectly.” So to say officials are not enforcing the rules is to ignore what little punch the policy has. Meanwhile, Allem’s tone hasn’t changed. “The problem is the players are slow,” he said from his Orlando home. “They know they’re slow, and they’re not prepared to do anything about it.” Players were asked two years ago in a confidential survey by Golf.com if slow play was a problem on the PGA Tour, and 84% said yes. The same website conducted a similar survey the following year, and one question was whether a player felt his own pace of play was acceptable. “Yes” received 100% of the vote.

$99 Office Visit

En Joie GC in Endicott, New York Yardage: 6,974; Par: 72 Purse: $2,050,000; Winner’s share: $307,500 Television: Friday, 6-8 p.m. (Golf Channel-Tape); Saturday, 4-6 p.m. (Golf Channel); Sunday, 3:30-6 p.m. (Golf Channel) Defending champion: Bart Bryant What to know: Fred Couples is in the field, returning to En Joie for the first time in 24 years. He won the B.C. Open in 1991 when it was a PGA Tour event. Bart Bryant is the only two-time winner of the Dick’s Sporting Goods Open. John Daly leads the PGA Tour Champions in driving distance at 295.8 yards. That would rank 83rd, tied with Roger Sloan, on the PGA Tour. Scott McCarron, who has a comfortable lead in the Schwab Cup, won at En Joie two years ago. Bernhard Langer moved up to No. 5 in the Schwab Cup standings with his victory in the Senior British Open. Langer has won $27.9 million on the PGA Tour Champions.

NUMBER OF THE WEEK

1

Phil Mickelson is the only player to reach the BMW Championship every year since the FedEx Cup began in 2007.

FINAL WORD “It means the world to me. I’m living the dream.” Abraham Ancer, the runner-up at The Northern Trust, who earned a spot in the Tour Championship and will be the first Mexican to play in the Presidents Cup.

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poisonous mix of max-effort pitching, extreme fielding shifts, launch angle obsession and juiced baseballs. We’re seeing lots of homers . . . but also many strikeouts and much standing around. Replay challenges have become weird, with obviously wrong calls being upheld upon review. Why stop games just to compound errors? That’s stupid. And don’t get us started on the potential work stoppage coming down the pike. On the field, though, the competition has become compelling. The Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and Milwaukee Brewers are having it out in the NL Central. Each team is just good enough to hang in the race, but too flawed to pull away. The Cardinals have 16 games remaining against the Cubs and Brewers, so they control their own situation in this race. They play the Cubs seven times in their final 10 games, which should be fun. The Brewers drew more than 121,000 fans to Miller Park for their weekend series with Texas while winning two of the three onerun games. They hope to reach postseason play in consecutive years for the first time since 1981-82. As for the Cubs, manager Joe Maddon is in the final year of his contract. His team has struggled on the road, and it closes the season with a six-game trip — with the final three games Busch Stadium. Over in the NL East, the streaking Washington Nationals and New York Mets could yet apply pressure on the first-place Atlanta Braves. The Nationals appeared dead after losing 31 of their first 50 games amid an injury epidemic, but improbably they have roared back to within six games of the Braves. The Mets appeared finished at the All-Star break. They were 40-51 on July 12 before miraculously springing to life.

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals center fielder Lane Thomas heads for home after hitting a grand slam against the Pirates in the seventh inning Sunday at Busch Stadium. Novice general manager Brodie Van Wagenen doubled down on his preseason boast and opted to go for it at the trade deadline. He held on to pitchers Noah Syndergaard and Zack Wheeler, added pitcher Marcus Stroman and got rewarded. Since the All-Star break the Mets have posted a 2.66 rotation ERA, making the rest of the league jealous. They won 13 of 14 games heading into last weekend’s series with Washington, then took two of three games from the Nationals while drawing more than 124,00 fans to Citi Field. “We have all the confidence in the world right now with us,” Mets utility man J.D. Davis told reporters. “But some things that we’re doing right now, we’re surprising ourselves.” The wild-card race is a free-for-all. Seldom will you see so many teams battling so hard just to reach the Bud Selig Play-In Game. Often GMs decide not to go “all in” to bid for potentially one postseason date. That’s not the case this year. The Nationals hold the top wild-card slot, one game up on the secondslot Cardinals, after both won Tuesday. If Our Town’s Max Scherzer is healthy and available for the single-elimination game, who wants to face Washington? Then there were five teams within 3½ games in the wild-card race on Monday morning: the Brewers, Mets, Philadelphia Phillies, Arizona Diamondbacks and San Francisco Giants. Even the Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres have kept contact with the pack.

The Giants should have bailed on the season to expedite their needed rebuilding. But in manager Bruce Bochy’s farewell season they played on. So did the Reds, who added high-end starting pitcher Trevor Bauer at the deadline. Over the American League, the surging Cleveland Indians erased Minnesota’s 11½-game Central Division lead. Those teams will meet six more times next month. “It says a lot about the guys we have in this clubhouse,” Indians reliever Brad Hand told reporters Monday night. “Nobody threw in the towel. Nobody gave up, and we all battled together. And to be where we’re at today — back in first place — is something we should all be proud of, but we got a lot of work left to do and we got a lot of season left.” In the AL wild-card chase, Tommy Pham’s Tampa Bay Rays and Stephen Piscotty’s Oakland A’s probably will battle the AL Central runner-up for the two slots. Through Monday’s games, only four games separated the Twins, Rays and A’s. Commissioner Rob Manfred would love to see the Boston Red Sox rally Metslike into the picture and drive up national TV ratings, but that seems unlikely. Even without higher stakes attached to the Red Sox-Yankees rivalry, we’ll see many teams playing meaningful games in September. That’s great news for a sport that needs it. Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TUESDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Atlanta Washington New York Philadelphia Miami Central Chicago St. Louis Milwaukee Cincinnati Pittsburgh West Los Angeles Arizona San Francisco San Diego Colorado

W 71 64 61 61 44 W 64 62 62 56 49 W 80 60 59 55 53

L 50 55 58 58 74 L 55 55 57 62 69 L 41 59 60 63 66

Pct .587 .538 .513 .513 .373 Pct .538 .530 .521 .475 .415 Pct .661 .504 .496 .466 .445

GB — 6 9 9 25½ GB — 1 2 7½ 14½ GB — 19 20 23½ 26

WC — — 2 2 18½ WC — — 1 6½ 13½ WC — 3 4 7½ 10

L10 6-4 6-4 8-2 4-6 2-8 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 5-5 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 5-5 3-7

Str W-2 W-3 L-2 W-1 L-2 Str L-1 W-4 L-1 L-3 W-1 Str W-3 W-1 W-2 L-2 L-1

Home 33-25 33-25 34-21 35-26 24-38 Home 41-19 34-23 35-25 33-28 24-32 Home 48-16 27-28 28-32 28-32 29-28

Away 38-25 31-30 27-37 26-32 20-36 Away 23-36 28-32 27-32 23-34 25-37 Away 32-25 33-31 31-28 27-31 24-38

Monday’s results Washington 7, Cincinnati 6 Pittsburgh 10, L.A. Angels 2 Arizona 8, Colorado 6 Tampa Bay 10, San Diego 4 Tuesday’s results Philadelphia 4, Chicago Cubs 2 Minnesota at Milwaukee, (n) Washington 3, Cincinnati 1 Arizona at Colorado, (n) L.A. Dodgers 15, Miami 1 Oakland at San Francisco, (n) Atlanta 5, N.Y. Mets 3 Pittsburgh at L.A. Angels, (n) St. Louis 2, Kansas City 0 Tampa Bay at San Diego, (n) Today’s games Minnesota (Gibson 11-5) at Milwaukee (Gonzalez 2-1), 1:10 p.m. Arizona (Ray 10-7) at Colorado (Freeland 3-10), 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Kittredge 1-0) at San Diego (Quantrill 5-3), 2:40 p.m. Oakland (Bailey 9-8) at San Francisco (Beede 3-6), 2:45 p.m. Cincinnati (Bauer 10-8) at Washington (Strasburg 14-5), 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Hamels 6-3) at Philadelphia (Nola 10-3), 6:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (May 0-1) at Miami (Hernandez 2-4), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Matz 7-7) at Atlanta (Keuchel 3-5), 6:20 p.m. Pittsburgh (Archer 3-8) at L.A. Angels (Peters 2-1), 7:07 p.m. St. Louis (Hudson 10-6) at Kansas City (Keller 7-12), 7:15 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Kansas City Detroit West Houston Oakland Texas Los Angeles Seattle

W 80 70 63 51 39 W 71 72 52 43 35 W 78 67 59 58 49

L 41 50 59 72 81 L 47 48 65 77 81 L 41 51 60 62 71

Pct .661 .583 .516 .415 .325 Pct .602 .600 .444 .358 .302 Pct .655 .568 .496 .483 .408

GB — 9½ 17½ 30 40½ GB — — 18½ 29 35 GB — 10½ 19 20½ 29½

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

WC — — 8 20½ 31 WC — — 16½ 27 33 WC — 2 10½ 12 21

L10 8-2 8-2 4-5 6-4 2-8 L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 3-6 3-7 L10 9-1 6-4 4-6 2-8 2-8

Str W-4 W-4 W-1 W-2 L-3 Str L-1 L-1 L-2 L-1 L-3 Str W-1 W-1 L-2 L-1 W-1

Home 46-18 31-28 30-32 24-36 18-43 Home 36-26 39-25 28-31 23-36 16-42 Home 43-15 37-23 35-22 29-29 27-36

Away 34-23 39-22 33-27 27-36 21-38 Away 35-21 33-23 24-34 20-41 19-39 Away 35-26 30-28 24-38 29-33 22-35

Ross, Washington stymie Cincinnati ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Brian Dozier hopped a dugout piggyback ride to celebrate his 17th home run and Juan Soto hit a second-deck shot for his 25th as both returned to the lineup, Joe Ross extended his scoreless streak to 171/3 innings and the Washington Nationals beat the Cincinnati Reds 3-1 Tuesday night. Ross allowed one run and five hits in his 62/3 innings; the run came when the final batter the righty faced, José Iglesias, delivered an RBI single. Still, Ross now is responsible for the most consecutive innings without a run by a Nationals pitcher ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS this season — and that’s on a staff that includes Max White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu is safe at home plate as Astros catcher Robinson Scherzer, Stephen Strasburg Chirinos corrals a late throw Tuesday in Chicago. and Patrick Corbin. PHILLIES 4, CUBS 2: J.T. innings, and host Atlanta George Springer and José BLUE JAYS 3, RANGERS 0: Realmuto homered and upended New York. Ron- Altuve hit solo home runs Five Toronto pitchers com- drove in the tiebreaking ald Acuña Jr. hit his 34th and Houston topped host bined on a five-hitter, Te- run with an RBI double in home run of the season in Chicago in the first game oscar Hernandez and Billy the seventh inning to lift the fourth inning off Zach of a doubleheader. HouMcKinney hit back-to- host Philadelphia to a vic- Wheeler, who allowed 12 ston right-hander Gerrit back home runs in a home tory over Chicago. Cubs hits and five earned runs Cole didn’t make a schedvictory over slumping starter Jose Quintana had a over five innings. uled start in the second game of the doubleheader Texas. Blue Jays outfielder career-best 14 strikeouts in Randal Grichuk celebrated six innings. MARINERS 11, TIGERS 6: Kyle because of right hamstring his 28th birthday with a Seager homered three times discomfort. solo home run as Toronto DODGERS 15, MARLINS 1: and Tom Murphy added two won for the fifth time in Rookie Will Smith achieved to help Seattle beat host De- RED SOX 7, INDIANS 6 (10): seven games. another milestone in the troit. Seager and Murphy Jackie Bradley Jr. homered storybook start to his big hit back-to-back homers in the top of the 10th inning YANKEES 8, ORIOLES 3: league career with his first in the fourth and sixth in- to give Boston a victory over Domingo Germán pitched two-homer game, and Los nings before Seager added host Cleveland. The Indiseven strong innings to be- Angeles twice hit back-to- his third in the ninth. It was ans had just tied the game come the first 16-game win- back homers to pound host the first three-homer game in the bottom of the ninth ner in the majors, and host Miami. Cody Bellinger tied of Seager’s career. on a Francisco Lindor douNew York beat Baltimore, a career high with his 39th ble. Chris Sale struck out 12 running its winning streak home run. ASTROS 6, WHITE SOX 2 batters and allowed five hits, over the Orioles to 15 games. (1ST): Zack Greinke tossed two walks and three earned Germán won his seventh BRAVES 5, METS 3: Max six solid innings in his sec- runs over 62/3 innings for the Fried pitched six effective ond start with the Astros, Red Sox. straight decision.

BOX SCORES

Monday’s results N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 5, 1st Pittsburgh 10, L.A. Angels 2 N.Y. Yankees 11, Baltimore 8, 2nd Tampa Bay 10, San Diego 4 Toronto 19, Texas 4 Houston at Chicago White Sox, Cleveland 6, Boston 5 ppd. Tuesday’s results Houston 6, Chi White Sox 2, 1st Houston at Chi White Sox, (n), 2nd N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 3 Minnesota at Milwaukee, (n) Toronto 3, Texas 0 Oakland at San Francisco, (n) Seattle 11, Detroit 6 Pittsburgh at L.A. Angels, (n) St. Louis 2, Kansas City 0 Tampa Bay at San Diego, (n) Boston 7, Cleveland 6 (10) Today’s games Texas (Allard 0-0) at Toronto (Reid-Foley 2-2), 11:37 a.m. Baltimore (Bundy 5-12) at N.Y. Yankees (Happ 9-7), 12:05 p.m. Boston (TBD) at Cleveland (Bieber 12-4), 12:10 p.m. Houston (Miley 11-4) at Chicago White Sox (Detwiler 1-3), 1:10 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 11-5) at Milwaukee (Gonzalez 2-1), 1:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Kittredge 1-0) at San Diego (Quantrill 5-3), 2:40 p.m. Oakland (Bailey 9-8) at San Francisco (Beede 3-6), 2:45 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 12-9) at Detroit (Jackson 2-5), 6:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Archer 3-8) at L.A. Angels (Peters 2-1), 7:07 p.m. St. Louis (Hudson 10-6) at Kansas City (Keller 7-12), 7:15 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Yelich back in Brewers’ lineup MILWAUKEE — Brewers star Christian Yelich returned to the lineup after missing five starts because of a back injury. The NL MVP played right field and batted third Tuesday when the Brewers hosted Minnesota. Yelich leads the NL with a .335 batting average and his 39 home runs are tied for the most in the majors with Mike Trout of the Angels.

Manuel hired as hitting coach PHILADELPHIA — The Phillies have hired former manager Charlie Manuel to replace John Mallee as hitting coach. Manuel was working as senior adviser to the general manager. The Phillies announced Tuesday that he would assume his new position for the remainder of the season. Manuel led the Phillies to five straight division titles, two NL pennants and the franchise’s second World Series championship in 2008. BRIEFLY NATIONALS: Greg Holland and Washington are giving it another go, the latest in a long series of moves aimed at helping the team’s struggling bullpen. The 33-year-old Holland, a former Cardinals pitcher, was designated for assignment by the Arizona Diamondbacks last week. He was 1-2 with a 4.54 ERA and 17 saves in 22 chances this season and lost the job as Arizona’s closer after a blown save in late July. BRAVES: Austin Riley, the slugging rookie for Atlanta, will not need surgery on his injured right knee and expects to return to the lineup in about two weeks. An MRI revealed a partial tear that will require him to wear a brace but nothing more. Surgery likely would have ended his season. —Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

14

Ronald Acuña Jr. entered Tuesday against the Mets with 33 home runs and 28 stolen bases. With 42 games to play, he could become the youngest member of the 40-40 club, beating out Alex Rodriguez, who accomplished the feat at age 22. — MLB.com

Braves catcher Brian McCann tags out Mets third baseman Todd Frazier Tuesday in Atlanta. Astros 6, White Sox 2

First Game Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .297 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 1 1 1 .306 Brantley lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .323 Correa ss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .292 Alvarez dh 3 1 0 0 2 1 .349 Gurriel 1b 4 2 2 0 1 0 .304 Diaz 3b 2 0 0 0 3 0 .271 Chirinos c 5 0 2 2 0 1 .231 Marisnick cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .250 Totals 34 6 9 4 10 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .288 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .320 Abreu 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .274 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .195 Jimenez lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .237 Goins 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .288 Sanchez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Skole dh 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Engel cf 2 1 0 0 0 2 .220 Totals 31 2 7 2 2 9 Houston 101 001 111 — 6 9 0 Chicago 000 110 000 — 2 7 0 LOB — Houston 11, Chicago 5. 2B — Brantley (33), Gurriel (32), Abreu (26), Jimenez (9). HR — Springer (26), off Cease; Altuve (21), off Cease. RBIs — Springer (66), Altuve (52), Chirinos 2 (43), Abreu (84), Jimenez (45). SB — Marisnick (10). DP — Houston 2; Chicago 1. Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Greinke, W, 12-4 6 7 2 2 2 6 3.08 Harris, H, 20 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.60 Pressly, H, 25 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.94 McHugh 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.18 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Cease, L, 2-5 6 5 4 2 5 2 5.54 2 Herrera /3 0 0 0 2 1 7.08 Fry 1 3 1 1 1 0 5.08 Osich 11/3 1 1 1 2 2 5.66 Cease pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Herrera 1-0, Fry 3-1, Osich 3-0. HBP — Greinke (Engel). WP — Osich. PB — Castillo 3 (7). T — 3:17.

Nationals 3, Reds 1

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .269 Votto 1b 3 0 2 0 1 1 .262 Suarez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Aquino rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .385 VanMeter 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Senzel cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .272 J.Iglesias ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .292 Farmer c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Stephenson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Galvis ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Wood p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Peraza ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .242 Barnhart ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Totals 34 1 9 1 2 5 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .293 Robles cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .240 Rendon 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Soto lf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .288 Kendrick 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .315 Dozier 2b 2 1 1 1 1 0 .234 Parra rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .247 Gomes c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .202 Ross p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Totals 28 3 6 2 2 8 Cincinnati 000 000 100 — 1 9 0 Washington 100 200 00x — 3 6 0 LOB — Cincinnati 8, Washington 3. 2B — Winker (17), VanMeter (9), Senzel (20), Turner (24), Robles (20). HR — Soto (25), off Wood; Dozier (17), off Wood. RBIs — J.Iglesias (45), Soto (78), Dozier (41). SB — J.Iglesias (5). CS — Dozier (3). DP — Cincinnati 1; Washington 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wood, L, 1-1 5 6 3 3 0 4 5.59 Sims 2 0 0 0 2 3 4.50 Stephenson 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.50 Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ross, W, 3-3 62/3 5 1 1 2 3 5.91 Strickland, H, 4 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 4.32 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.56 Suero, H, 15 Hudson, S, 3-5 11/3 3 0 0 0 2 2.80 Inherited runners-scored — Strickland 1-0, Hudson 1-0. T — 2:38. Att. — 30,130

Phillies 4, Cubs 2

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Heyward rf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .271 Castellanos lf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .285 Bryant 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .292 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .284 Baez ss 2 0 0 1 1 0 .288 Lucroy c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Almora Jr. cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Kemp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Happ 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Quintana p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .068 Schwarber ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Caratini ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .255 Bote pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 29 2 5 2 5 3 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harper rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Hoskins 1b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .242 Realmuto c 3 2 2 2 1 0 .275 Segura ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .284 Kingery 3b 3 0 1 1 0 2 .275 Dickerson lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .312 Rodriguez ph-lf 2 1 0 0 0 1 .224 Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Quinn cf 4 0 2 1 0 2 .192 Vargas p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .094 Knapp ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .200 Miller ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Totals 32 4 9 4 1 15 Chicago 000 101 000 — 2 5 1 Philadelphia 001 010 11x — 4 9 0 E — Happ (1). LOB — Chicago 8, Philadelphia 8. 2B — Bryant (31), Realmuto (26), Segura (25), Kingery (26). 3B — Quinn (1). HR — Castellanos (16), off Vargas; Realmuto (16), off Quintana. RBIs — Castellanos (44), Baez (81), Realmuto 2 (59), Kingery (35), Quinn (9). SB — Baez (10). DP — Philadelphia 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Quintana 6 5 2 1 1 14 4.11 1 /3 1 1 1 0 0 2.98 Ryan, L, 3-2 2 /3 1 0 0 0 1 3.38 Phelps Underwood Jr. 2/3 2 1 1 0 0 2.70 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.47 Holland Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Vargas 6 5 2 2 3 1 4.03 Parker, W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1 4.26 Morin, H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.44 Neris, S, 21-25 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.44 T — 3:16. Att. — 26,442

Blue Jays 3, Rangers 0

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .269 Santana 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .310 Andrus ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .279 Calhoun lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .275 Pence dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .287 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .206 Forsythe 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .244 DeShields cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .254 Mathis c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .165 Mazara ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Totals 32 0 5 0 5 10 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bichette ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .377 Biggio 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .205 Guerrero Jr. 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .212 Grichuk dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .240 Hernandez cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .225 McKinney rf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .218 Drury lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .230 Fisher lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 McGuire c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Totals 30 3 6 3 4 8 Texas 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Toronto 010 002 00x — 3 6 0 E — Odor (9). LOB — Texas 10, Toronto 7. 2B — Santana 2 (19), Pence (17), Guerrero Jr. (22). HR — Grichuk (22), off Lynn; Hernandez (19), off Kelley; McKinney (9), off Kelley. RBIs — Grichuk (57), Hernandez (47), McKinney (20). SB — Pence (5). Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lynn, L, 14-8 5 4 1 1 3 6 3.54 Kelley 1 2 2 2 0 0 4.11 Clase 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.69 Carpenter 1 0 0 0 1 1 10.80 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Font 2 1 0 0 2 2 4.40 Pannone, W, 3-5 4 2 0 0 2 3 6.39 Mayza, H, 16 1 1 0 0 0 2 4.20 Law, H, 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 4.84 Giles, S, 16-17 1 0 0 0 1 1 1.89 T — 2:48. Att. — 22,958

Yankees 8, Orioles 3

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .267 Mancini dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .276 Santander rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .303 Nunez 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .237 Peterson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .246 Alberto 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .320 Sisco c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Wilkerson cf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .227 Ruiz 3b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .247 Totals 32 3 6 3 1 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .337 Judge rf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .267 Urshela 3b 5 1 3 1 0 1 .336 Sanchez dh 4 0 2 1 1 0 .228 Torres 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .283 Gregorius ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .262 Maybin lf 3 1 1 2 1 0 .312 Romine c 4 1 3 0 0 0 .271 Tauchman cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .299 Totals 37 8 15 8 5 3 Baltimore 000 110 001 — 3 6 0 New York 120 410 00x — 8 15 0 LOB — Baltimore 3, New York 10. 2B — Peterson (3), Alberto (15), Ruiz (9), Judge (10), Urshela (29), Sanchez (10), Gregorius (8), Tauchman (16). HR — Santander (11), off German; Wilkerson (10), off German; Nunez (26), off Rosa; LeMahieu (19), off Means. RBIs — Santander (35), Nunez (66), Wilkerson (32), LeMahieu (81), Judge 2 (32), Urshela (64), Sanchez (60), Maybin 2 (26), Tauchman (42). DP — Baltimore 1; New York 1. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Means, L, 8-8 32/3 8 6 6 2 1 3.76 1 /3 2 1 1 0 0 4.89 Castro Shepherd 4 5 1 1 3 2 2.25 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA German, W, 16-2 7 5 2 2 1 7 3.96 Rosa 2 1 1 1 0 2 4.50 Inherited runners-scored — Castro 1-1. T — 2:38. Att. — 41,284

Braves 5, Mets 3

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 2b 5 0 1 1 0 3 .332 Rosario ss 5 0 0 0 0 3 .275 Alonso 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .258 Davis lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .307 Ramos c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .270 Conforto rf 4 1 0 1 0 0 .258 Frazier 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .239 Lagares cf 4 1 4 1 0 0 .199 Wheeler p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Guillorme ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .171 Panik ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Totals 35 3 10 3 3 8 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna Jr. lf-rf 5 2 2 1 0 0 .299 Albies 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .299 Freeman 1b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .311 Donaldson 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .261 McCann c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .268 Joyce rf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .255 Duvall ph-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Inciarte cf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .237 Culberson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .304 Fried p 3 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Ortega ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 35 5 13 5 2 4 New York 010 000 020 — 3 10 0 Atlanta 210 110 00x — 5 13 0 LOB — New York 9, Atlanta 9. 2B — Frazier (12), Lagares (8), Inciarte (9), Fried (3). HR — Acuna Jr. (34), off Wheeler. RBIs — McNeil (55), Conforto (67), Lagares (17), Acuna Jr. (81), Freeman (96), Donaldson (69), Joyce (11), Inciarte (22). DP — New York 2; Atlanta 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wheeler, L, 9-7 5 12 5 5 2 2 4.36 Brach 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.93 2 /3 1 0 0 0 1 4.79 Avilan 1 /3 0 0 0 0 1 6.46 Familia Gagnon 1 0 0 0 0 0 7.29 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fried, W, 14-4 6 6 1 1 3 4 3.99 Jackson 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.60 1 /3 2 2 2 0 0 2.55 Greene 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.38 Blevins, H, 8 Swarzak, H, 16 1/3 2 0 0 0 0 3.73 Melancon, S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.88 Inherited runners-scored — Familia 2-0, Blevins 2-1, Swarzak 1-1. HBP — Fried (Wheeler), Avilan (Duvall). WP — Wheeler. T — 3:18. Att. — 27,627

Dodgers 15, Marlins 1

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Garlick ph-rf 3 1 2 1 0 1 .250 Muncy 2b 5 1 1 1 1 0 .258 Turner 3b 2 1 1 2 2 0 .288 Martin 3b-p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Bellinger 1b-cf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .316 Pollock cf 3 2 3 0 0 0 .265 Negron pr-cf-ss 2 2 1 0 0 0 .276 Seager ss 4 1 1 2 0 0 .265 W.Smith c 4 3 2 3 1 1 .324 Beaty lf 5 2 2 4 0 0 .296 May p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Totals 43 15 15 14 5 7 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Berti ss-lf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .295 Diaz 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Anderson rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .253 Cooper 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .284 Castro 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Ramirez lf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Alfaro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Brinson cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .196 Totals 29 1 4 1 2 9 Los Angeles 010 302 414 — 15 15 0 Miami 000 100 000 — 1 4 1 2B — Muncy (17), Pollock 3 (9), Garlick (3), Ferguson (1), Anderson (29). 3B — Beaty (1). HR — Seager (10), off Yamamoto; W.Smith (8), off Yamamoto; W.Smith (9), off Chen; Turner (20), off Chen; Bellinger (39), off Chen; Beaty (6), off Brice. RBIs — Muncy (77), Turner 2 (55), Bellinger (90), Seager 2 (49), W.Smith 3 (26), Beaty 4 (35), Garlick (5), Anderson (61). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA May, W, 1-1 52/3 3 1 1 1 5 2.65 1 /3 0 0 0 1 1 4.69 Kelly Chargois 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.40 Ferguson 1 0 0 0 0 2 5.53 Martin 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Yamamoto, L, 4-4 5 4 4 4 2 2 4.42 Chen 2 6 6 6 0 2 7.06 Brice 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.45 2 /3 4 4 4 2 2 6.64 Brigham Garcia 0 0 0 0 1 0 2.83 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Holaday T — 3:22. Att. — 8,729

Mariners 11, Tigers 6

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith cf-rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .232 Crawford ss 5 0 1 1 0 1 .241 Santana dh 3 1 0 0 2 2 .260 Vogelbach 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .226 Nola rf-1b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .288 Seager 3b 4 3 3 6 1 0 .237 Murphy c 4 2 2 2 1 0 .273 Gordon 2b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .279 Lopes lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .222 Totals 38 11 11 11 6 10 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Goodrum cf 5 2 1 0 0 1 .249 Lugo 3b 4 0 2 0 1 0 .237 Cabrera dh 4 0 1 1 1 1 .285 Dixon lf 5 0 1 0 0 4 .258 Rodriguez 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .217 Hicks 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .206 Demeritte rf 5 2 2 0 0 2 .262 Rogers c 3 1 1 2 1 2 .194 Mercer ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .253 Totals 40 6 13 5 3 12 Seattle 001 206 002 — 11 11 0 Detroit 001 410 000 — 6 13 1 2B — Smith (18), Lopes (1), Goodrum (25), Lugo (1), Cabrera (17), Dixon (13), Mercer (9). HR — Seager (12); Murphy (11); Seager (13); Murphy (12); Seager (14); Hicks (8); Rogers (4). RBIs — Smith (29), Crawford (37), Seager 6 (34), Murphy 2 (27), Lopes (5), Cabrera (47), Hicks (20), Rogers 2 (7), Mercer (12). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kikuchi 31/3 9 5 5 1 3 5.56 Grotz, W, 1-0 12/3 2 1 1 1 3 5.40 Brennan 0 0 0 0 1 0 5.50 Tuivailala, H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.16 Wisler, H, 5 1 1 0 0 0 2 4.46 Magill, H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.42 Swanson 1 1 0 0 0 3 7.34 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Boyd, L, 6-9 51/3 7 7 6 2 4 4.38 Ramirez 0 3 2 2 0 0 5.15 Hall 12/3 0 0 0 2 3 3.38 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.70 Cisnero 1 1 2 2 2 2 4.71 T — 3:42. Att. — 16,195


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TUESDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Atlanta Washington New York Philadelphia Miami Central Chicago St. Louis Milwaukee Cincinnati Pittsburgh West Los Angeles Arizona San Francisco San Diego Colorado

W 71 64 61 61 44 W 64 62 62 56 49 W 80 61 60 55 53

L 50 55 58 58 74 L 55 55 58 62 69 L 41 59 60 63 67

Pct .587 .538 .513 .513 .373 Pct .538 .530 .517 .475 .415 Pct .661 .508 .500 .466 .442

GB — 6 9 9 25½ GB — 1 2½ 7½ 14½ GB — 18½ 19½ 23½ 26½

WC — — 2 2 18½ WC — — 1½ 6½ 13½ WC — 2½ 3½ 7½ 10½

L10 6-4 6-4 8-2 4-6 2-8 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 5-5 2-8 L10 8-2 7-3 5-5 5-5 2-8

Str W-2 W-3 L-2 W-1 L-2 Str L-1 W-4 L-2 L-3 W-1 Str W-3 W-2 W-3 L-2 L-2

Home 33-25 33-25 34-21 35-26 24-38 Home 41-19 34-23 35-26 33-28 24-32 Home 48-16 27-28 29-32 28-32 29-29

Away 38-25 31-30 27-37 26-32 20-36 Away 23-36 28-32 27-32 23-34 25-37 Away 32-25 34-31 31-28 27-31 24-38

Monday’s results Washington 7, Cincinnati 6 Pittsburgh 10, L.A. Angels 2 Arizona 8, Colorado 6 Tampa Bay 10, San Diego 4 Tuesday’s results St. Louis 2, Kansas City 0 Minnesota 7, Milwaukee 5 Philadelphia 4, Chicago Cubs 2 Arizona 9, Colorado 3 Washington 3, Cincinnati 1 San Francisco 3, Oakland 2 L.A. Dodgers 15, Miami 1 Pittsburgh at L.A. Angels, (n) Atlanta 5, N.Y. Mets 3 Tampa Bay at San Diego, (n) Today’s games Minnesota (Gibson 11-5) at Milwaukee (Gonzalez 2-1), 1:10 p.m. Arizona (Ray 10-7) at Colorado (Freeland 3-10), 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Kittredge 1-0) at San Diego (Quantrill 5-3), 2:40 p.m. Oakland (Bailey 9-8) at San Francisco (Beede 3-6), 2:45 p.m. Cincinnati (Bauer 10-8) at Washington (Strasburg 14-5), 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Hamels 6-3) at Philadelphia (Nola 10-3), 6:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (May 0-1) at Miami (Hernandez 2-4), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Matz 7-7) at Atlanta (Keuchel 3-5), 6:20 p.m. Pittsburgh (Archer 3-8) at L.A. Angels (Peters 2-1), 7:07 p.m. St. Louis (Hudson 10-6) at Kansas City (Keller 7-12), 7:15 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Kansas City Detroit West Houston Oakland Texas Los Angeles Seattle

W 80 70 63 51 39 W 72 72 53 43 35 W 78 67 59 58 49

L 41 50 59 72 81 L 47 48 65 77 81 L 42 52 60 62 71

Pct .661 .583 .516 .415 .325 Pct .605 .600 .449 .358 .302 Pct .650 .563 .496 .483 .408

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

GB WC L10 Str Home Away — — 8-2 W-4 46-18 34-23 9½ — 8-2 W-4 31-28 39-22 17½ 8 4-5 W-1 30-32 33-27 30 20½ 6-4 W-2 24-36 27-36 40½ 31 2-8 L-3 18-43 21-38 GB WC L10 Str Home Away — — 5-5 W-1 36-26 36-21 ½ — 7-3 L-1 39-25 33-23 18½ 16 6-4 W-1 29-31 24-34 29½ 27 3-6 L-1 23-36 20-41 35½ 33 3-7 L-3 16-42 19-39 GB WC L10 Str Home Away — — 8-2 L-1 43-15 35-27 10½ 2½ 6-4 L-1 37-23 30-29 18½ 10½ 4-6 L-2 35-22 24-38 20 12 2-8 L-1 29-29 29-33 29 21 2-8 W-1 27-36 22-35

Monday’s results N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 5, 1st Pittsburgh 10, L.A. Angels 2 N.Y. Yankees 11, Baltimore 8, 2nd Tampa Bay 10, San Diego 4 Toronto 19, Texas 4 Houston at Chicago White Sox, Cleveland 6, Boston 5 ppd. Tuesday’s results St. Louis 2, Kansas City 0 Houston 6, Chi White Sox 2, 1st N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 3 Chi. White Sox 4, Houston 1, 2nd Toronto 3, Texas 0 San Francisco 3, Oakland 2 Seattle 11, Detroit 6 Pittsburgh at L.A. Angels, (n) Boston 7, Cleveland 6 (10) Tampa Bay at San Diego, (n) Minnesota 7, Milwaukee 5 Today’s games Texas (Allard 0-0) at Toronto (Reid-Foley 2-2), 11:37 a.m. Baltimore (Bundy 5-12) at N.Y. Yankees (Happ 9-7), 12:05 p.m. Boston (TBD) at Cleveland (Bieber 12-4), 12:10 p.m. Houston (Miley 11-4) at Chicago White Sox (Detwiler 1-3), 1:10 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 11-5) at Milwaukee (Gonzalez 2-1), 1:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Kittredge 1-0) at San Diego (Quantrill 5-3), 2:40 p.m. Oakland (Bailey 9-8) at San Francisco (Beede 3-6), 2:45 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 12-9) at Detroit (Jackson 2-5), 6:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Archer 3-8) at L.A. Angels (Peters 2-1), 7:07 p.m. St. Louis (Hudson 10-6) at Kansas City (Keller 7-12), 7:15 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Yelich back in Brewers’ lineup MILWAUKEE — Brewers star Christian Yelich returned to the lineup after missing five starts because of a back injury. The NL MVP played right field and batted third Tuesday when the Brewers hosted Minnesota. Yelich leads the NL with a .335 batting average and his 39 home runs are tied for the most in the majors with Mike Trout of the Angels.

Manuel hired as hitting coach PHILADELPHIA — The Phillies have hired former manager Charlie Manuel to replace John Mallee as hitting coach. Manuel was working as senior adviser to the general manager. The Phillies announced Tuesday that he would assume his new position for the remainder of the season. Manuel led the Phillies to five straight division titles, two NL pennants and the franchise’s second World Series championship in 2008. BRIEFLY NATIONALS: Greg Holland and Washington are giving it another go, the latest in a long series of moves aimed at helping the team’s struggling bullpen. The 33-year-old Holland, a former Cardinals pitcher, was designated for assignment by the Arizona Diamondbacks last week. He was 1-2 with a 4.54 ERA and 17 saves in 22 chances this season and lost the job as Arizona’s closer after a blown save in late July. BRAVES: Austin Riley, the slugging rookie for Atlanta, will not need surgery on his injured right knee and expects to return to the lineup in about two weeks. An MRI revealed a partial tear that will require him to wear a brace but nothing more. Surgery likely would have ended his season. —Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

14

Ronald Acuña Jr. entered Tuesday against the Mets with 33 home runs and 28 stolen bases. With 42 games to play, he could become the youngest member of the 40-40 club, beating out Alex Rodriguez, who accomplished the feat at age 22. — MLB.com

Ross, Washington stymie Cincinnati ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Brian Dozier hopped a dugout piggyback ride to celebrate his 17th home run and Juan Soto hit a second-deck shot for his 25th as both returned to the lineup,Joe Ross extended his scoreless streak to 171/3 innings and the Washington Nationals beat the Cincinnati Reds 3-1 Tuesday night. Ross allowed one run and five hits in his 62/3 innings; the run came when the final batter the righty faced, José Iglesias, delivered an RBI single. Still, Ross now is responsible for the most consecutive innings without a run by a Nationals pitcher this season — and that’s on a staff that includes Max ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Scherzer, Stephen Strasburg White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu is safe at home plate as Astros catcher Robinson and Patrick Corbin. Chirinos corrals a late throw Tuesday in Chicago. PHILLIES 4, CUBS 2: J.T.Realmuto homered and drove in the tiebreaking run with an RBI double in the seventh inning to lift host Philadelphia to a victory over Chicago. Cubs starter Jose Quintana had a career-best 14 strikeouts in six innings. TWINS 7, BREWERS 5: Marwin Gonzalez hit a threerun homer in the eighth inning to lift Minnesota over Milwaukee. The Brewers had taken a lead in the seventh on a Yasmani Grandal three-run blast. YANKEES 8, ORIOLES 3: DomingoGermánpitchedseven strong innings to become the first 16-game winner in the majors, and host New York beat Baltimore, running its winning streak over the Oriolesto15games.Germánwon his seventh straight decision.

ASTROS 6, WHITE SOX 2 (1ST) WHITESOX4,ASTROS1(2ND): Ivan Nova tossed a four-hitter and host Chicago took advantage of an injury to Houston ace Gerrit Cole for a win and split of the doubleheader. The Astros won the first game behind six solid innings from Zack Greinke in his second start with Houston and solo home runs by George Springer and José Altuve.Cole,14-5 with a 2.87 ERA, didn’t start because of right hamstring discomfort.

RED SOX 7, INDIANS 6 (10): Jackie Bradley Jr. homered in the top of the 10th inning to give Boston a victory over host Cleveland. The Indians had just tied the game in the bottom of the ninth on a Francisco Lindor double. Chris Sale struck out 12 batters 62/3 innings for the Red Sox.

DIAMONDBACKS 9, ROCKIES 3: Arizona had three homers in the first inning and another in the second as it defeated host Colorado. Nick Ahmed finished with three RBIs. MARINERS 11, TIGERS 6: Kyle Seager homered three times and Tom Murphy added two to help Seattle beat host Detroit. Seager and Murphy hit back-to-back homers in the fourth and sixth innings before Seager added his third in the ninth.

GIANTS 3, ATHLETICS 2: Madison Bumgarner struck out nine over seven innings and outdueled fellow lefthander Brett Anderson in BLUE JAYS 3, RANGERS 0: San Francisco’s home vic- DODGERS 15, MARLINS 1: Five Toronto pitchers com- tory over Oakland. Rookie Will Smith achieved bined on a five-hitter, and BRAVES 5, METS 3: Max Fried another milestone in the stoTeoscar Hernandez and Billy pitched six effective innings, rybook start to his big league McKinney hit back-to-back and host Atlanta upended career with his first twohome runs in a home victory New York. Ronald Acuña Jr. homer game as Los Angeles over slumping Texas. Blue hit his 34th home run of the pounded host Miami. Cody Jays outfielder Randal Gri- season in the fourth inning Bellinger hit his 39th home chuk hit a solo home run. off Zach Wheeler. run.

BOX SCORES Astros 6, White Sox 2

Nationals 3, Reds 1

First Game Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .297 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 1 1 1 .306 Brantley lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .323 Correa ss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .292 Alvarez dh 3 1 0 0 2 1 .349 Gurriel 1b 4 2 2 0 1 0 .304 Diaz 3b 2 0 0 0 3 0 .271 Chirinos c 5 0 2 2 0 1 .231 Marisnick cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .250 Totals 34 6 9 4 10 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .288 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .320 Abreu 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .274 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .195 Jimenez lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .237 Goins 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .288 Sanchez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Skole dh 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Engel cf 2 1 0 0 0 2 .220 Totals 31 2 7 2 2 9 Houston 101 001 111 — 6 9 0 Chicago 000 110 000 — 2 7 0 LOB — Houston 11, Chicago 5. 2B — Brantley (33), Gurriel (32), Abreu (26), Jimenez (9). HR — Springer (26), off Cease; Altuve (21), off Cease. RBIs — Springer (66), Altuve (52), Chirinos 2 (43), Abreu (84), Jimenez (45). SB — Marisnick (10). DP — Houston 2; Chicago 1. Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Greinke, W, 12-4 6 7 2 2 2 6 3.08 Harris, H, 20 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.60 Pressly, H, 25 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.94 McHugh 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.18 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Cease, L, 2-5 6 5 4 2 5 2 5.54 2 Herrera /3 0 0 0 2 1 7.08 Fry 1 3 1 1 1 0 5.08 Osich 11/3 1 1 1 2 2 5.66 Cease pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Herrera 1-0, Fry 3-1, Osich 3-0. HBP — Greinke (Engel). WP — Osich. PB — Castillo 3 (7). T — 3:17.

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .269 Votto 1b 3 0 2 0 1 1 .262 Suarez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Aquino rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .385 VanMeter 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Senzel cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .272 J.Iglesias ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .292 Farmer c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Stephenson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Galvis ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Wood p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Peraza ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .242 Barnhart ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Totals 34 1 9 1 2 5 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .293 Robles cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .240 Rendon 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Soto lf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .288 Kendrick 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .315 Dozier 2b 2 1 1 1 1 0 .234 Parra rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .247 Gomes c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .202 Ross p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Totals 28 3 6 2 2 8 Cincinnati 000 000 100 — 1 9 0 Washington 100 200 00x — 3 6 0 LOB — Cincinnati 8, Washington 3. 2B — Winker (17), VanMeter (9), Senzel (20), Turner (24), Robles (20). HR — Soto (25), off Wood; Dozier (17), off Wood. RBIs — J.Iglesias (45), Soto (78), Dozier (41). SB — J.Iglesias (5). CS — Dozier (3). DP — Cincinnati 1; Washington 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wood, L, 1-1 5 6 3 3 0 4 5.59 Sims 2 0 0 0 2 3 4.50 Stephenson 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.50 Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ross, W, 3-3 62/3 5 1 1 2 3 5.91 Strickland, H, 4 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 4.32 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.56 Suero, H, 15 Hudson, S, 3-5 11/3 3 0 0 0 2 2.80 Inherited runners-scored — Strickland 1-0, Hudson 1-0. T — 2:38. Att. — 30,130

White Sox 4, Astros 1

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Heyward rf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .271 Castellanos lf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .285 Bryant 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .292 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .284 Baez ss 2 0 0 1 1 0 .288 Lucroy c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Almora Jr. cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Kemp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Happ 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Quintana p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .068 Schwarber ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Caratini ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .255 Bote pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 29 2 5 2 5 3 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harper rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Hoskins 1b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .242 Realmuto c 3 2 2 2 1 0 .275 Segura ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .284 Kingery 3b 3 0 1 1 0 2 .275 Dickerson lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .312 Rodriguez ph-lf 2 1 0 0 0 1 .224 Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Quinn cf 4 0 2 1 0 2 .192 Vargas p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .094 Knapp ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .200 Miller ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Totals 32 4 9 4 1 15 Chicago 000 101 000 — 2 5 1 Philadelphia 001 010 11x — 4 9 0 E — Happ (1). LOB — Chicago 8, Philadelphia 8. 2B — Bryant (31), Realmuto (26), Segura (25), Kingery (26). 3B — Quinn (1). HR — Castellanos (16), off Vargas; Realmuto (16), off Quintana. RBIs — Castellanos (44), Baez (81), Realmuto 2 (59), Kingery (35), Quinn (9). SB — Baez (10). DP — Philadelphia 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Quintana 6 5 2 1 1 14 4.11 1 /3 1 1 1 0 0 2.98 Ryan, L, 3-2 2 /3 1 0 0 0 1 3.38 Phelps Underwood Jr. 2/3 2 1 1 0 0 2.70 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.47 Holland Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Vargas 6 5 2 2 3 1 4.03 Parker, W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1 4.26 Morin, H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.44 Neris, S, 21-25 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.44 T — 3:16. Att. — 26,442

Second Game Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .299 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Alvarez dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .346 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Gurriel 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Reddick lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Diaz 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .210 Straw cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Totals 30 1 4 1 0 3 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Goins 3b 4 0 2 2 0 2 .298 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .316 Abreu dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273 McCann c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .286 Jimenez lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .237 Skole 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .259 Sanchez 2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .244 Engel cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .221 Cordell rf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .230 Totals 33 4 10 4 2 6 Houston 001 000 000 — 1 4 1 Chicago 030 100 00x — 4 10 1 E — Devenski (1), Anderson (20). LOB — Houston 3, Chicago 7. 2B — Cordell (7). RBIs — Springer (67), Goins 2 (9), Engel (14), Cordell (20). DP — Houston 1; Chicago 1. Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Devenski, L, 2-1 2 5 3 1 0 0 4.33 Biagini 3 2 1 1 1 2 3.63 Rondon 2 2 0 0 0 2 3.86 Smith 1 1 0 0 1 2 1.86 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Nova, W, 8-9 9 4 1 0 0 3 4.51 HBP — Nova (Correa). WP — Nova, Biagini. T — 2:21. Att. — 19,559

Dodgers 15, Marlins 1 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Garlick ph-rf 3 1 2 1 0 1 .250 Muncy 2b 5 1 1 1 1 0 .258 Turner 3b 2 1 1 2 2 0 .288 Martin 3b-p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Bellinger 1b-cf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .316 Pollock cf 3 2 3 0 0 0 .265 Negron pr-cf-ss 2 2 1 0 0 0 .276 Seager ss 4 1 1 2 0 0 .265 W.Smith c 4 3 2 3 1 1 .324 Beaty lf 5 2 2 4 0 0 .296 May p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Totals 43 15 15 14 5 7 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Berti ss-lf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .295 Diaz 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Anderson rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .253 Cooper 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .284 Castro 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Ramirez lf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Alfaro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Brinson cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .196 Totals 29 1 4 1 2 9 Los Angeles 010 302 414 — 15 15 0 Miami 000 100 000 — 1 4 1 2B — Muncy (17), Pollock 3 (9), Garlick (3), Ferguson (1), Anderson (29). 3B — Beaty (1). HR — Seager (10), off Yamamoto; W.Smith (8), off Yamamoto; W.Smith (9), off Chen; Turner (20), off Chen; Bellinger (39), off Chen; Beaty (6), off Brice. RBIs — Muncy (77), Turner 2 (55), Bellinger (90), Seager 2 (49), W.Smith 3 (26), Beaty 4 (35), Garlick (5), Anderson (61). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA May, W, 1-1 51/3 3 1 1 1 5 2.65 1 Kelly /3 0 0 0 1 1 4.69 Chargois 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.40 Ferguson 1 0 0 0 0 2 5.53 Martin 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Yamamoto, L, 4-4 5 4 4 4 2 2 4.42 Chen 2 6 6 6 0 2 7.06 Brice 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.45 2 Brigham /3 4 4 4 2 2 6.64 Garcia 0 0 0 0 1 0 2.83 1 Holaday /3 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 T — 3:22. Att. — 8,729

Phillies 4, Cubs 2

Blue Jays 3, Rangers 0

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .269 Santana 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .310 Andrus ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .279 Calhoun lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .275 Pence dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .287 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .206 Forsythe 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .244 DeShields cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .254 Mathis c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .165 Mazara ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Totals 32 0 5 0 5 10 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bichette ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .377 Biggio 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .205 Guerrero Jr. 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .212 Grichuk dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .240 Hernandez cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .225 McKinney rf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .218 Drury lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .230 Fisher lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 McGuire c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Totals 30 3 6 3 4 8 Texas 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Toronto 010 002 00x — 3 6 0 E — Odor (9). LOB — Texas 10, Toronto 7. 2B — Santana 2 (19), Pence (17), Guerrero Jr. (22). HR — Grichuk (22), off Lynn; Hernandez (19), off Kelley; McKinney (9), off Kelley. RBIs — Grichuk (57), Hernandez (47), McKinney (20). SB — Pence (5). Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lynn, L, 14-8 5 4 1 1 3 6 3.54 Kelley 1 2 2 2 0 0 4.11 Clase 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.69 Carpenter 1 0 0 0 1 1 10.80 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Font 2 1 0 0 2 2 4.40 Pannone, W, 3-5 4 2 0 0 2 3 6.39 Mayza, H, 16 1 1 0 0 0 2 4.20 Law, H, 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 4.84 Giles, S, 16-17 1 0 0 0 1 1 1.89 T — 2:48. Att. — 22,958

Yankees 8, Orioles 3

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .267 Mancini dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .276 Santander rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .303 Nunez 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .237 Peterson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .246 Alberto 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .320 Sisco c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Wilkerson cf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .227 Ruiz 3b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .247 Totals 32 3 6 3 1 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .337 Judge rf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .267 Urshela 3b 5 1 3 1 0 1 .336 Sanchez dh 4 0 2 1 1 0 .228 Torres 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .283 Gregorius ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .262 Maybin lf 3 1 1 2 1 0 .312 Romine c 4 1 3 0 0 0 .271 Tauchman cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .299 Totals 37 8 15 8 5 3 Baltimore 000 110 001 — 3 6 0 New York 120 410 00x — 8 15 0 LOB — Baltimore 3, New York 10. 2B — Peterson (3), Alberto (15), Ruiz (9), Judge (10), Urshela (29), Sanchez (10), Gregorius (8), Tauchman (16). HR — Santander (11), off German; Wilkerson (10), off German; Nunez (26), off Rosa; LeMahieu (19), off Means. RBIs — Santander (35), Nunez (66), Wilkerson (32), LeMahieu (81), Judge 2 (32), Urshela (64), Sanchez (60), Maybin 2 (26), Tauchman (42). DP — Baltimore 1; New York 1. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Means, L, 8-8 32/3 8 6 6 2 1 3.76 1 /3 2 1 1 0 0 4.89 Castro Shepherd 4 5 1 1 3 2 2.25 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA German, W, 16-2 7 5 2 2 1 7 3.96 Rosa 2 1 1 1 0 2 4.50 Inherited runners-scored — Castro 1-1. T — 2:38. Att. — 41,284

Braves 5, Mets 3

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 2b 5 0 1 1 0 3 .332 Rosario ss 5 0 0 0 0 3 .275 Alonso 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .258 Davis lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .307 Ramos c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .270 Conforto rf 4 1 0 1 0 0 .258 Frazier 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .239 Lagares cf 4 1 4 1 0 0 .199 Wheeler p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Guillorme ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .171 Panik ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Totals 35 3 10 3 3 8 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna Jr. lf-rf 5 2 2 1 0 0 .299 Albies 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .299 Freeman 1b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .311 Donaldson 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .261 McCann c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .268 Joyce rf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .255 Duvall ph-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Inciarte cf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .237 Culberson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .304 Fried p 3 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Ortega ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 35 5 13 5 2 4 New York 010 000 020 — 3 10 0 Atlanta 210 110 00x — 5 13 0 LOB — New York 9, Atlanta 9. 2B — Frazier (12), Lagares (8), Inciarte (9), Fried (3). HR — Acuna Jr. (34), off Wheeler. RBIs — McNeil (55), Conforto (67), Lagares (17), Acuna Jr. (81), Freeman (96), Donaldson (69), Joyce (11), Inciarte (22). DP — New York 2; Atlanta 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wheeler, L, 9-7 5 12 5 5 2 2 4.36 Brach 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.93 2 Avilan /3 1 0 0 0 1 4.79 1 /3 0 0 0 0 1 6.46 Familia Gagnon 1 0 0 0 0 0 7.29 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fried, W, 14-4 6 6 1 1 3 4 3.99 Jackson 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.60 1 Greene /3 2 2 2 0 0 2.55 1 Blevins, H, 8 /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.38 Swarzak, H, 16 1/3 2 0 0 0 0 3.73 Melancon, S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.88 Inherited runners-scored — Familia 2-0, Blevins 2-1, Swarzak 1-1. HBP — Fried (Wheeler), Avilan (Duvall). WP — Wheeler. T — 3:18. Att. — 27,627

Mariners 11, Tigers 6

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith cf-rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .232 Crawford ss 5 0 1 1 0 1 .241 Santana dh 3 1 0 0 2 2 .260 Vogelbach 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .226 Nola rf-1b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .288 Seager 3b 4 3 3 6 1 0 .237 Murphy c 4 2 2 2 1 0 .273 Gordon 2b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .279 Lopes lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .222 Totals 38 11 11 11 6 10 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Goodrum cf 5 2 1 0 0 1 .249 Lugo 3b 4 0 2 0 1 0 .237 Cabrera dh 4 0 1 1 1 1 .285 Dixon lf 5 0 1 0 0 4 .258 Rodriguez 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .217 Hicks 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .206 Demeritte rf 5 2 2 0 0 2 .262 Rogers c 3 1 1 2 1 2 .194 Mercer ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .253 Totals 40 6 13 5 3 12 Seattle 001 206 002 — 11 11 0 Detroit 001 410 000 — 6 13 1 2B — Smith (18), Lopes (1), Goodrum (25), Lugo (1), Cabrera (17), Dixon (13), Mercer (9). HR — Seager (12); Murphy (11); Seager (13); Murphy (12); Seager (14); Hicks (8); Rogers (4). RBIs — Smith (29), Crawford (37), Seager 6 (34), Murphy 2 (27), Lopes (5), Cabrera (47), Hicks (20), Rogers 2 (7), Mercer (12). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kikuchi 31/3 9 5 5 1 3 5.56 Grotz, W, 1-0 12/3 2 1 1 1 3 5.40 Brennan 0 0 0 0 1 0 5.50 Tuivailala, H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.16 Wisler, H, 5 1 1 0 0 0 2 4.46 Magill, H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.42 Swanson 1 1 0 0 0 3 7.34 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Boyd, L, 6-9 51/3 7 7 6 2 4 4.38 Ramirez 0 3 2 2 0 0 5.15 Hall 12/3 0 0 0 2 3 3.38 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.70 Cisnero 1 1 2 2 2 2 4.71 T — 3:42. Att. — 16,195

Red Sox 7, Indians 6 (10)

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 2 2 1 1 1 .282 Devers 3b 6 1 6 3 0 0 .325 Bogaerts ss 6 0 1 0 0 3 .302 Martinez dh 4 1 2 0 1 0 .312 Benintendi lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .285 Moreland 1b 5 0 1 1 0 2 .233 Hernandez 2b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .338 Leon c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .193 Vazquez ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Bradley Jr. cf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .221 Totals 43 7 16 7 4 10 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 0 3 3 0 1 .303 Mercado cf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .271 Santana 1b 4 2 2 1 1 2 .288 Reyes dh 3 1 1 2 1 1 .245 Freeman pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Ramirez 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .247 R.Perez c 4 1 0 0 1 4 .223 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Allen lf 4 2 1 0 0 0 .245 Naquin rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .283 Totals 39 6 9 6 3 17 Boston 110 022 000 1 — 7 16 1 Cleveland 000 102 201 0 — 6 9 0 LOB — Boston 11, Cleveland 6. 2B — Devers 4 (43), Lindor 2 (29). 3B — Betts (5). HR — Bradley Jr. (14), off Wittgren; Santana (27), off Sale; Reyes (29), off Sale. RBIs — Betts (63), Devers 3 (93), Moreland (42), Hernandez (8), Bradley Jr. (46), Lindor 3 (51), Santana (72), Reyes 2 (53). Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Sale 62/3 5 5 3 2 12 4.40 1 Barnes, H, 19 /3 1 0 0 1 1 4.66 1 Taylor, H, 3 /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.31 2 Eovaldi, H, 4 /3 0 0 0 0 1 6.12 Workmn, W, 9-1, BS 1 2 1 1 0 1 2.00 Cashner, S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 2 4.79 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Clevinger 41/311 4 4 2 6 3.34 Smith 21/3 1 2 2 2 2 5.40 Cimber 1 2 0 0 0 0 3.64 Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.74 Wittgren, L, 4-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 2.72 T — 4:07. Att. — 26,662

Twins 7, Brewers 5

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler cf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .259 Garver c 5 1 1 2 0 1 .268 Polanco ss 4 0 1 0 1 0 .294 Rosario lf 4 2 2 0 1 1 .286 Sano 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Arraez 2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .350 Cron 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .261 Gonzalez rf 4 2 2 3 0 0 .256 M.Perez p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Adrianza ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .285 Schoop ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Totals 34 7 9 7 6 8 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 5 0 0 1 0 1 .248 Hiura 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .303 Yelich rf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .333 Braun lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .279 Grandal 1b 4 1 2 3 1 0 .253 Moustakas 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Pina c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .223 H.Perez ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .238 Grisham ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .290 Anderson p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .033 Gamel ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Thames ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .249 Totals 37 5 10 5 5 5 Minnesota 003 000 130 — 7 9 2 Milwaukee 000 100 400 — 5 10 0 E — Garver (5), Polanco (12). LOB — Minnesota 7, Milwaukee 12. 2B — Rosario (19), Adrianza (5), Yelich (24), Moustakas (25), Pina (6). HR — Garver (22), off Anderson; Gonzalez (14), off Hader; Grandal (20), off Harper. RBIs — Garver 2 (49), Arraez (16), Gonzalez 3 (41), Adrianza (19), Cain (40), Yelich (85), Grandal 3 (61). CS — Arraez (2). DP — Minnesota 1; Milwaukee 2. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA M.Perez 6 6 1 0 4 3 4.57 Harper 0 3 4 3 0 0 3.55 Duffey, W, 2-1 1 1 0 0 1 1 3.15 Dyson, H, 18 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.42 Romo, S, 19-20 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.25 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Anderson 5 3 3 3 3 4 3.78 Peralta 1 0 0 0 1 1 5.26 Faria 1 2 1 1 0 1 4.05 Pomeranz, L, 2-10, H 1/3 1 2 2 1 0 5.70 1 Albers, H, 8 /3 0 0 0 0 1 3.91 1 Hader /3 1 1 1 0 1 2.91 Williams 1 2 0 0 1 0 0.00 T — 3:47. Att. — 44,331

Giants 3, Athletics 2 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Chapman 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Olson 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Canha cf 3 0 0 1 1 2 .252 Pinder 2b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .253 Piscotty rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .249 Grossman lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Garneau c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .247 Anderson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Davis ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .230 Totals 31 2 5 2 1 13 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Solano 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .331 Gennett ph-2b 0 0 0 1 0 0 .232 Rickard lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .213 Posey c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .255 Longoria 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .249 Pillar cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .253 Slater rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Garcia 1b 2 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Crawford ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .223 Bumgarner p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Totals 27 3 6 3 3 4 Oakland 000 010 001 — 2 5 1 San Francisco 000 002 10x — 3 6 0 LOB — Oakland 3, SF 5. 2B — Posey (23), Longoria (16), Pillar (30). HR — Piscotty (12), off Bumgarner. RBIs — Canha (35), Piscotty (40), Longoria (44), Pillar (63), Gennett (10). CS — Pillar (4). SF — Gennett. S — Bumgarner. Oakland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Anderson, L, 10-8 6 6 2 2 0 4 3.95 1 Diekman /3 0 1 1 2 0 4.89 2 Petit /3 0 0 0 0 0 2.51 Treinen 1 0 0 0 1 0 4.74 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bumgarner, W, 8-7 7 2 1 1 0 9 3.63 Moronta, H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.58 Smith, S, 29-32 1 3 1 1 1 3 2.55 Inherited runners-scored — Petit 2-1. WP — Anderson. T — 2:45. Att. — 36,663


CARDINALS

08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

Cardinals 2, Royals 0 Cardinals AB Fowler rf 3 Edman 3b 4 Goldschmidt 1b 3 Ozuna lf 3 DeJong ss 3 Carpenter dh 3 Molina c 4 Wong 2b 3 Thomas cf 3 Totals 29 Kansas City AB Merrifield cf 4 Gordon lf 4 Dozier rf 4 Soler dh 2 Cuthbert 3b 4 O’Hearn 1b 3 Arteaga ss 3 Viloria c 3 Lopez 2b 2 Totals 29 Cardinals 101 Kansas City 000

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 5

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 4

000 000

BB 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2

000 000

— —

NOTEBOOK

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 4

Avg. .246 .266 .260 .255 .248 .218 .257 .271 .360

SO 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 8

Avg. .306 .262 .284 .260 .274 .169 .191 .224 .223

2 0

Kansas City Sparkman, L, 3-8 Newberry Hill Barnes Barlow

H 3 0 1

R 0 0 0

Arozarena’s special wake-up call New Redbirds outfielder was asleep when promoted BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

5 4

0 1

E: Cuthbert (9). LOB: Cardinals 5, Kansas City 5. 2B: Carpenter (14), Wong (19), Dozier (21). RBIs: Edman (16), Goldschmidt (63). SB: Ozuna (11). CS: DeJong (5). SF: Goldschmidt. Runners left in scoring position: Cardinals 2 (Molina 2); Kansas City 3 (Dozier, Cuthbert 2). Runners moved up: Edman, Gordon. GIDP: Merrifield, Gordon. DP: Cardinals 2 ; Kansas City 1 . Cardinals IP Flaherty, W, 6-6 7 Miller, H, 19 11/3 Martinez, S, 13-16 2/3

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 1 7 110 3.52 0 1 1 25 3.79 0 0 0 12 3.41

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 6 4 2 1 1 2 97 5.45 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.04 1/ 0 0 0 5 3.60 3 0 0 2/ 0 1 1 13 6.64 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 21 5.14

HBP: Flaherty (Soler). Umpires: Home, Pat Hoberg; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Brian Knight. T: 2:54. A: 23,563 (37,903).

How they scored CARDINALS FIRST Dexter Fowler reaches on error. Fielding error by Cheslor Cuthbert. Tommy Edman grounds out to second base, Nicky Lopez to Ryan O’Hearn. Dexter Fowler to third. Paul Goldschmidt out on a sacrifice fly to deep right field to Hunter Dozier. Dexter Fowler scores. Marcell Ozuna grounds out to shortstop, Humberto Arteaga to Ryan O’Hearn. 1 run, 0 hits, 1 error, 0 left on. Cardinals 1, Royals 0. CARDINALS THIRD Kolten Wong doubles to deep right field. Lane Thomas singles to shortstop. Dexter Fowler flies out to center field to Whit Merrifield. Tommy Edman singles to right field, tagged out at second, Hunter Dozier to Ryan O’Hearn to Humberto Arteaga to Nicky Lopez. Lane Thomas scores. 1 run, 3 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 2, Royals 0.

KANSAS CITY — Randy Arozarena, the newest Cardinal, said he thought it was a “dream” when Memphis manager Ben Johnson, not really fluent in Spanish, called him Monday morning in his room while he was sleeping in Fresno, Calif., where the Redbirds were playing. As Cardinals translator Carlos Villoria related the story from the Cuban outfielder Tuesday, Johnson said, “Hey, Randy, you’re going to the bigs.’” Arozarena, 24, rubbed the sleep out of his eyes and put down the phone, only to pick it up again. “Was this a dream?” he said he asked himself. He called Johnson back and asked, “Did you call me saying that I’m going to the big leagues?” Johnson, according to Arozarena, said, “It’s not a dream. It’s reality. You’re going.” Arozarena admitted that on a scale of 1 to 10, Johnson’s ability to speak Spanish “was about a 2. But he can get a point across.” With the jersey No. 66 hanging in his locker, Arozarena, who was hitting .368 at Memphis when called up, was asked what he thought about Cleveland’s Yasiel Puig, who has made 66 rather famous. “Loco,” said a smiling Arozarena, a description needing no translation. But, through Villoria, Arozarena said, “He’s crazy. But he’s a good player.” Arozarena says he is that type of player. “I have similar characteristics,” he said. “Every time I play hard. I have the same arm. And yes, I love that number. I played with that number in Mexico, too.” Arozarena was hitting .346 in spring training with the Cardinals before being sent out on the day he suffered a broken right hand when he was hit by a pitch. His minor-league season, which actually started at Springfield, would begin late. But he said, “That injury helped me to prepare myself — to gain strength in other parts of the body. So I think that injury actually helped me to get here.” Arozarena hit only .232 at Memphis last year, although he had hit .396 in Class AA in 91 at-bats. “Last year was my first experience in Triple A,” he said. “I didn’t really know what to expect. The biggest difference from Double-A to Triple-A is that you’ve got veteran pitchers who know how to locate pitches. In Double A, you’ve got more talented players who just want to throw the ball hard. So I had to learn how to make the adjustments to hit those veteran players.” When he found out he was coming to the majors, he said he called his mother in Cuba and “she started crying.” His family was not able to attend Tuesday night, but Arozarena said a close friend of his did come. Cardinals fans had been waiting for this day, not quite as long as Arozarena, of course.

RYAN REMIORZ, THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

The Cardinals’ Randy Arozarena, left, stealing a base in an exhibition game against Toronto last year, now is in the big leagues and awaiting his first action.

AVERAGES Batting Thomas Wong Edman Munoz Goldschmidt Molina Ozuna DeJong Fowler Wieters Carpenter Team Pitching Gallegos Helsley Gant Brebbia C.Martinez Flaherty Webb Miller Hudson Mikolas Wainwright Wacha Fernandez Team

AVG .360 .271 .266 .265 .260 .257 .255 .248 .246 .231 .218 .243

AB 25 362 158 147 438 265 322 432 333 147 316 3922

R 5 40 22 19 71 24 56 74 44 14 44 520

H 9 98 42 39 114 68 82 107 82 34 69 955

2B 0 19 7 7 13 16 16 27 17 4 14 177

3B 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 12

HR RBI BB SO 3 10 2 6 8 42 37 59 4 16 5 34 2 13 5 28 26 63 50 122 4 36 9 35 22 65 38 74 19 53 43 100 13 39 41 94 10 23 10 44 10 31 47 95 145 488 372 1004

SB 1 15 7 7 1 4 11 6 6 1 6 79

E 0 7 2 1 5 1 2 5 4 1 6 48

W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 3 1 1.96 46 0 0 55.0 29 12 12 5 11 76 0 0 2.35 9 0 0 15.1 7 4 4 2 10 15 8 0 2.80 49 0 3 54.2 39 18 17 4 21 45 3 3 2.95 50 0 0 58.0 43 21 19 5 19 71 3 2 3.41 30 0 13 31.2 28 13 12 2 12 31 6 6 3.52 24 24 0 135.1 107 54 53 21 42 157 0 1 3.63 45 0 1 39.2 26 16 16 5 17 37 4 4 3.79 54 0 4 40.1 31 21 17 9 20 55 10 6 4.00 24 23 1 121.1 134 69 54 19 57 93 7 12 4.13 24 24 0 137.1 146 67 63 19 23 101 8 8 4.35 22 22 0 120.0 120 59 58 15 49 118 6 5 5.54 20 15 0 89.1 105 59 55 21 42 72 0 0 27.00 1 0 0 0.2 2 2 2 0 0 2 62 55 4.05 117 117 37 1036.1 946 502 466 146 395 1011

“I knew I was doing a good job, but I can’t control when they were calling me up,” he said. “I knew the day was coming, and luckily it’s here.” He said the best part of his game was “being aggressive on the base paths and my quick swing. Probably in a couple of weeks I’ll know where the challenges are. But Triple A is a really good league, so it’s not like it’s a lot of difference.” Manager Mike Shildt started Lane Thomas on Tuesday after Thomas had driven in five runs, including hitting a grand slam, on Sunday. Thomas had a hit and scored a run in the Cards’ 2-0 victory. Arozarena did not get into the game. “We’ll get Randy in there sooner than later,” Shildt said. “I’m looking forward to seeing Randy play, too. You have two guys who can do multiple things. Clearly, Lane has played well here. He has acclimated here, not to say that Randy won’t. “The opportunity will come for Randy to play. Both of them have multiple skill

sets that can help you beat the other team. They can do it with their legs. They can do it with their arm. They can do it with the bat, obviously.”

MOLINA FEELS ‘NO PAIN’ Catcher Yadier Molina, making his first start since before the All-Star break Tuesday night, said he didn’t have any issues with his right thumb, in which he had a torn tendon, on his 20 at-bat (three hits) rehabilitation stint at Springfield and Memphis. Before, when he came back after only 12 days following the initial injury in May, Molina had trouble with pain in his hand when he made contact with a pitch. “Not right now,” he said. “Everything went well. That was my only worry — when I (would) swing and want to make contact that it would start bothering me. But, right now, pain free.” Molina said he wasn’t sure about his timing until he got into a game here. “You work on that every day you play,” said Molina, now hitting hitting .257 after going 0 for four. He had only three runs batted in for the last three weeks he played in the first half. Did he come off the injured list too soon the first time? “Probably,” he said. “I guess so. That’s what history says. (But) I was trying to come back.”

WACHA TO START THURSDAY Michael Wacha will make his first start in more than two weeks Thursday in Cincinnati. Shildt said Wacha will be followed, in order, by Adam Wainwright, Miles Mikolas and Jack Flaherty, who shined Tuesday night. Wacha has had a win in each of his past seven appearances at Great American Ball Park. • When Paul Goldschmidt stole second on the front end of a double steal Sunday, he became the 17th Cardinal to steal a base this season. As recently as three years ago, he stole 32 bases for Arizona. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

CHARLIE RIEDEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Tommy Edman hits an RBI single in the third inning Tuesday night.

Cardinals From B1

shortstop Paul DeJong at second. Then, on the eighth pitch of a duel with Dozier, Flaherty struck him out on his 92nd pitch of the night. Flaherty nicked Soler with a pitch to open the seventh but notched two more strikeouts and an infield grounder to finish his night. Besides his nine games of three hits or under, Flaherty (6-6) has had four more in which he gave up only four hits while pitching at least six innings. He has allowed just 22 hits in his last 45 1/3 innings, a stunning statistic. Rookie Tommy Edman showed twice in the first three innings why he is valued by the Cardinals. He is a fundamentally strong player.

The Cards took a 1-0 lead in the first on an unearned run. Dexter Fowler was safe on an error by third baseman Cheslor Cuthbert, who was shifted to behind the second-base bag and bobbled Fowler’s grounder. Righthander Glenn Sparkman balked Fowler to second base and then Edman made George Kissell smile somewhere by hitting a right-side grounder to advance Fowler to third. On the 10th pitch of a lengthy at-bat, Fowler scored on Paul Goldschmidt’s sacrifice fly. In the third inning, Kolten Wong opened with a double to right. He stayed at second as Lane Thomas grounded into the shortstop hole, where Humberto Arteaga made a diving stop but had no play. Wong and Thomas took off on a Sparkman pitch in the dirt but catcher Meibrys Viloria threw out Wong at third as Thomas made second.

Fowler flied out but Edman singled with two out to right. As the throw from Dozier came toward the plate, Edman rounded first and headed to second, hoping first baseman Ryan O’Hearn would cut the ball off. O’Hearn did cut off the throw, which probably wasn’t going to get Thomas anyway but Edman caused the Royals to make the play. Edman was out but not until Thomas had scored. Flaherty, who had given up just four earned runs over his past six starts, allowed more hard contact than usual in the first five frames, including two deep flies to left in the third. But the Royals had just one hit, a two-out double by Dozier. After that hit, the Cardinals intentionally walked dangerous Soler (35 homers) to get to Cuthbert, who popped up. Flaherty, who had had three consecutive games of nine or more strikeouts, didn’t register his first Tuesday until the fourth

inning when he fanned Dozier and Soler in succession. Lefthander Andrew Miller relieved for the Cardinals in the eight. After striking out Viloria, he walked Lopez. Merrifield then hit a hard grounder at DeJong, who started a double play, pivoted neatly by second baseman Wong. Carlos Martinez finished the Cardinals’ sixth shutout of the season and first on the road. It was their fourth consecutive win. The Cardinals’ victory also was their 38th in 57 games at Kauffman Stadium, a .667 winning percentage, tying them for the best by a road team in major-league history with at least 50 games played. The Houston Astros are 44-22 in Seattle and the 1892-99 Boston Braves were 34-17 in Washington, against the Senators. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 2

Cardinals 2, Royals 0 Cardinals AB Fowler rf 3 Edman 3b 4 Goldschmidt 1b 3 Ozuna lf 3 DeJong ss 3 Carpenter dh 3 Molina c 4 Wong 2b 3 Thomas cf 3 Totals 29 Kansas City AB Merrifield cf 4 Gordon lf 4 Dozier rf 4 Soler dh 2 Cuthbert 3b 4 O’Hearn 1b 3 Arteaga ss 3 Viloria c 3 Lopez 2b 2 Totals 29 Cardinals 101 Kansas City 000

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 5

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 4

000 000

BB 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2

000 000

— —

NOTEBOOK

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 4

Avg. .246 .266 .260 .255 .248 .218 .257 .271 .360

SO 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 8

Avg. .306 .262 .284 .260 .274 .169 .191 .224 .223

2 0

Kansas City Sparkman, L, 3-8 Newberry Hill Barnes Barlow

H 3 0 1

R 0 0 0

Arozarena’s special wake-up call New Redbirds outfielder was asleep when promoted BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

5 4

0 1

E: Cuthbert (9). LOB: Cardinals 5, Kansas City 5. 2B: Carpenter (14), Wong (19), Dozier (21). RBIs: Edman (16), Goldschmidt (63). SB: Ozuna (11). CS: DeJong (5). SF: Goldschmidt. Runners left in scoring position: Cardinals 2 (Molina 2); Kansas City 3 (Dozier, Cuthbert 2). Runners moved up: Edman, Gordon. GIDP: Merrifield, Gordon. DP: Cardinals 2 ; Kansas City 1 . Cardinals IP Flaherty, W, 6-6 7 Miller, H, 19 11/3 Martinez, S, 13-16 2/3

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 1 7 110 3.52 0 1 1 25 3.79 0 0 0 12 3.41

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 6 4 2 1 1 2 97 5.45 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.04 1/ 0 0 0 5 3.60 3 0 0 2/ 0 1 1 13 6.64 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 21 5.14

HBP: Flaherty (Soler). Umpires: Home, Pat Hoberg; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Brian Knight. T: 2:54. A: 23,563 (37,903).

How they scored CARDINALS FIRST Dexter Fowler reaches on error. Fielding error by Cheslor Cuthbert. Tommy Edman grounds out to second base, Nicky Lopez to Ryan O’Hearn. Dexter Fowler to third. Paul Goldschmidt out on a sacrifice fly to deep right field to Hunter Dozier. Dexter Fowler scores. Marcell Ozuna grounds out to shortstop, Humberto Arteaga to Ryan O’Hearn. 1 run, 0 hits, 1 error, 0 left on. Cardinals 1, Royals 0. CARDINALS THIRD Kolten Wong doubles to deep right field. Lane Thomas singles to shortstop. Dexter Fowler flies out to center field to Whit Merrifield. Tommy Edman singles to right field, tagged out at second, Hunter Dozier to Ryan O’Hearn to Humberto Arteaga to Nicky Lopez. Lane Thomas scores. 1 run, 3 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 2, Royals 0.

KANSAS CITY — Randy Arozarena, the newest Cardinal, said he thought it was a “dream” when Memphis manager Ben Johnson, not really fluent in Spanish, called him Monday morning in his room while he was sleeping in Fresno, Calif., where the Redbirds were playing. As Cardinals translator Carlos Villoria related the story from the Cuban outfielder Tuesday, Johnson said, “Hey, Randy, you’re going to the bigs.’” Arozarena, 24, rubbed the sleep out of his eyes and put down the phone, only to pick it up again. “Was this a dream?” he said he asked himself. He called Johnson back and asked, “Did you call me saying that I’m going to the big leagues?” Johnson, according to Arozarena, said, “It’s not a dream. It’s reality. You’re going.” Arozarena admitted that on a scale of 1 to 10, Johnson’s ability to speak Spanish “was about a 2. But he can get a point across.” With the jersey No. 66 hanging in his locker, Arozarena, who was hitting .368 at Memphis when called up, was asked what he thought about Cleveland’s Yasiel Puig, who has made 66 rather famous. “Loco,” said a smiling Arozarena, a description needing no translation. But, through Villoria, Arozarena said, “He’s crazy. But he’s a good player.” Arozarena says he is that type of player. “I have similar characteristics,” he said. “Every time I play hard. I have the same arm. And yes, I love that number. I played with that number in Mexico, too.” Arozarena was hitting .346 in spring training with the Cardinals before being sent out on the day he suffered a broken right hand when he was hit by a pitch. His minor-league season, which actually started at Springfield, would begin late. But he said, “That injury helped me to prepare myself — to gain strength in other parts of the body. So I think that injury actually helped me to get here.” Arozarena hit only .232 at Memphis last year, although he had hit .396 in Class AA in 91 at-bats. “Last year was my first experience in Triple A,” he said. “I didn’t really know what to expect. The biggest difference from Double-A to Triple-A is that you’ve got veteran pitchers who know how to locate pitches. In Double A, you’ve got more talented players who just want to throw the ball hard. So I had to learn how to make the adjustments to hit those veteran players.” When he found out he was coming to the majors, he said he called his mother in Cuba and “she started crying.” His family was not able to attend Tuesday night, but Arozarena said a close friend of his did come. Cardinals fans had been waiting for this day, not quite as long as Arozarena, of course.

RYAN REMIORZ, THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

The Cardinals’ Randy Arozarena, left, stealing a base in an exhibition game against Toronto last year, now is in the big leagues and awaiting his first action.

AVERAGES Batting Thomas Wong Edman Munoz Goldschmidt Molina Ozuna DeJong Fowler Wieters Carpenter Team Pitching Gallegos Helsley Gant Brebbia C.Martinez Flaherty Webb Miller Hudson Mikolas Wainwright Wacha Fernandez Team

AVG .360 .271 .266 .265 .260 .257 .255 .248 .246 .231 .218 .243

AB 25 362 158 147 438 265 322 432 333 147 316 3922

R 5 40 22 19 71 24 56 74 44 14 44 520

H 9 98 42 39 114 68 82 107 82 34 69 955

2B 0 19 7 7 13 16 16 27 17 4 14 177

3B 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 12

HR RBI BB SO 3 10 2 6 8 42 37 59 4 16 5 34 2 13 5 28 26 63 50 122 4 36 9 35 22 65 38 74 19 53 43 100 13 39 41 94 10 23 10 44 10 31 47 95 145 488 372 1004

SB 1 15 7 7 1 4 11 6 6 1 6 79

E 0 7 2 1 5 1 2 5 4 1 6 48

W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 3 1 1.96 46 0 0 55.0 29 12 12 5 11 76 0 0 2.35 9 0 0 15.1 7 4 4 2 10 15 8 0 2.80 49 0 3 54.2 39 18 17 4 21 45 3 3 2.95 50 0 0 58.0 43 21 19 5 19 71 3 2 3.41 30 0 13 31.2 28 13 12 2 12 31 6 6 3.52 24 24 0 135.1 107 54 53 21 42 157 0 1 3.63 45 0 1 39.2 26 16 16 5 17 37 4 4 3.79 54 0 4 40.1 31 21 17 9 20 55 10 6 4.00 24 23 1 121.1 134 69 54 19 57 93 7 12 4.13 24 24 0 137.1 146 67 63 19 23 101 8 8 4.35 22 22 0 120.0 120 59 58 15 49 118 6 5 5.54 20 15 0 89.1 105 59 55 21 42 72 0 0 27.00 1 0 0 0.2 2 2 2 0 0 2 62 55 4.05 117 117 37 1036.1 946 502 466 146 395 1011

“I knew I was doing a good job, but I can’t control when they were calling me up,” he said. “I knew the day was coming, and luckily it’s here.” He said the best part of his game was “being aggressive on the base paths and my quick swing. Probably in a couple of weeks I’ll know where the challenges are. But Triple A is a really good league, so it’s not like it’s a lot of difference.” Manager Mike Shildt started Lane Thomas on Tuesday after Thomas had driven in five runs, including hitting a grand slam, on Sunday. Thomas had a hit and scored a run in the Cards’ 2-0 victory. Arozarena did not get into the game. “We’ll get Randy in there sooner than later,” Shildt said. “I’m looking forward to seeing Randy play, too. You have two guys who can do multiple things. Clearly, Lane has played well here. He has acclimated here, not to say that Randy won’t. “The opportunity will come for Randy to play. Both of them have multiple skill

sets that can help you beat the other team. They can do it with their legs. They can do it with their arm. They can do it with the bat, obviously.”

MOLINA FEELS ‘NO PAIN’ Catcher Yadier Molina, making his first start since before the All-Star break Tuesday night, said he didn’t have any issues with his right thumb, in which he had a torn tendon, on his 20 at-bat (three hits) rehabilitation stint at Springfield and Memphis. Before, when he came back after only 12 days following the initial injury in May, Molina had trouble with pain in his hand when he made contact with a pitch. “Not right now,” he said. “Everything went well. That was my only worry — when I (would) swing and want to make contact that it would start bothering me. But, right now, pain free.” Molina said he wasn’t sure about his timing until he got into a game here. “You work on that every day you play,” said Molina, now hitting hitting .257 after going 0 for four. He had only three runs batted in for the last three weeks he played in the first half. Did he come off the injured list too soon the first time? “Probably,” he said. “I guess so. That’s what history says. (But) I was trying to come back.”

WACHA TO START THURSDAY Michael Wacha will make his first start in more than two weeks Thursday in Cincinnati. Shildt said Wacha will be followed, in order, by Adam Wainwright, Miles Mikolas and Jack Flaherty, who shined Tuesday night. Wacha has had a win in each of his past seven appearances at Great American Ball Park. • When Paul Goldschmidt stole second on the front end of a double steal Sunday, he became the 17th Cardinal to steal a base this season. As recently as three years ago, he stole 32 bases for Arizona. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals From B1

who saw the performance from the bench. “But it’s still fun to watch.” Manager Mike Shildt said, “That was Jack. He’s been a front-line, elite guy. Conviction with his fastball. Location with his fastball. Nice, short slider. Sprinkled in a couple of really dirty changeups, and a curveball as well. “He was in control the whole way. He’s a tough look.” Flaherty retired 13 men consecutively after he allowed a two-out double to the Royals’ Hunter Dozier and an intentional walk to Jorge Soler in the first inning. That streak ended in the sixth, when Nicky Lopez and Whit Merrifield singled. But Flaherty took matters into his own hands by fielding Alex Gordon’s comebacker and starting a double play via shortstop Paul DeJong at second base. “Paulie did a really nice job of staying on the base,” Flaherty said. “I didn’t give him the best throw.” Then, on the eighth pitch of a duel with Dozier — all fastballs — Flaherty finally struck him out after Flaherty had taken an 0-2 lead in the count. Flaherty nicked Soler with a pitch to open the seventh but notched two more strikeouts and an infield grounder to finish his night. Besides his nine games of three hits or fewer, Flaherty has had four more in which he gave up only four hits while pitching at least six innings. He has allowed just 22 hits in his last 45 1/3 innings, a stunning statistic. Or, how about this one? Flaherty has an 0.79 earned-run average in his last seven starts, in which opponents are hitting .142. His scoreless streak is the longest active in the majors. “Hopefully, we can ride him all the way into October,” teammate Matt Carpenter said. Molina was happy to be back and Flaherty seconded that. “Wieters and ‘Kiz’ (Andrew Knizner) have done a really good job and it was fun to throw to both of them,” Flaherty said. “But it was nice to have (Molina) back. He just has a presence and energy about him.” Molina said, “Today, (Flaherty) was amazing. I was just happy to be there for him. He’s our ace so far. Hopefully, he continues doing that.” In his first game since early July, Molina was cheered loudly by a huge contingent of Cardinals fans in the paid house of 23,563. But he went nothing for four. “It would be better to be cheered going

CHARLIE RIEDEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Tommy Edman hits an RBI single in the third inning Tuesday night. four for four in a win than go ‘oh’ for four,” he said. “It’s coming.” But, as manager Mike Shildt pointed out, “He caught a shutout.” And Molina said, “I’ll take that any day.” In theory, Flaherty could conserve energy because he didn’t have to bat in an interleague game. Instead, he said, smiling, “It was boring, sitting there and not getting in the game.” Rookie Tommy Edman showed twice in the first three innings why he is valued by the Cardinals. He is a fundamentally strong player. The Cardinals took a 1-0 lead in the first on an unearned run. Dexter Fowler was safe on an error by third baseman Cheslor Cuthbert, who was shifted to behind the second-base bag but who bobbled Fowler’s grounder. Glenn Sparkman balked Fowler to second and then Edman made George Kissell smile somewhere by hitting a rightside grounder to advance Fowler to third. Fowler scored on Paul Goldschmidt’s sacrifice fly.

In the third, Kolten Wong opened with a double to right. He stayed at second as Lane Thomas grounded into the shortstop hole, where Humberto Arteaga made a diving stop but had no play. Wong and Thomas took off on a Sparkman pitch in the dirt but catcher Meibrys Viloria threw out Wong at third as Thomas made second. Fowler flied out but Edman singled to right with two out. As the throw from Dozier came toward the plate, Edman rounded first and headed to second, hoping first baseman Ryan O’Hearn would cut the ball off. O’Hearn did cut the throw, which probably wasn’t going to get Thomas anyway, but Edman caused the Royals to make the play. Edman was out but not until Thomas had scored. Shildt said that third-base coach Pop Warner had flashed a sign to first-base coach Stubby Clapp to send Edman toward second on a hard-hit ball and Edman had that in his mind anyway. “Just good baseball,” Shildt said. Lefthander Andrew Miller relieved for

the Cardinals in the eight. After striking out Viloria, he walked Lopez. Merrifield then hit a hard grounder at DeJong, who started a double play, pivoted neatly by Wong. Carlos Martinez, saving his 13th, finished the Cardinals’ sixth shutout of the season and first on the road. It was their fourth consecutive win overall. The Cardinals’ victory also was their 38th in 57 games in Kansas City, a .667 winning percentage, tying them for the best by a road team with at least 50 games played in major-league history, according to Elias Sports Bureau. The Houston Astros are 44-22 in Seattle and the 1892-99 Boston Braves were 34-17 in Washington against the Senators. On Wednesday night, a Cardinals win could forge the all-time lead. “Keep it rolling,” Shildt said. “Let’s do this. That’s an interesting tidbit. Let’s take care of business.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

Shildt says it was his call to fire Budaska BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY — The decision to replace Cardinals assistant hitting coach Mark Budaska with Memphis hitting coach Jobel Jimenez on Monday was thought to be a front-office move. Manager Mike Shildt said that president of baseball operations John Mozeliak certainly was a part of it, but Shildt made it clear Tuesday that the decision was made on Monday’s off day — by himself. “It’s really a decision that I didn’t want to make, but I’m comfortable and confident it was the right decision,” Shildt said. “Collectively, it was made, but I ultimately made the decision. That was a difficult decision and not one that was taken lightly by any stretch of the imagination. It was done after multiple internal conversations to try to find a solution. “After a while, it got to a point where I made the decision for the greater good and, moving forward, we’d make a transition.” Jeff Albert, more data driven, was hired as the head hitting coach before the season began, and Budaska, who finished last season as the interim hitting coach after John Mabry was fired, was made the assistant coach this year. “I know ‘Mo’ mentioned that there were some philosophical differences and that would be accurate,” Shildt said. “But, from my chair, I always encourage within our staff and within our clubhouse to have a very open, honest dialogue about what you think and feel. We welcome varying opinions. I think that’s how we grow. We also want it to come from a like-minded place when we do it. “It’s not that there was a difference of opinion. It was about how it was ultimately, consistently handled. “It’s more about creating some consistent clarity and messaging. It doesn’t have to be kumbaya and everybody is working off the same script all the time. But there does need to be clarity in what that looks like for the player and that communication being consistent

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals manager Mike Shildt says it was his decision for the team to replace assistant hitting coach Mark Budaska. and supportive. I didn’t (think) that was taking place on a consistent basis.” Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong said that from the beginning of the season “guys used both Jeff and (Budaska). Sometimes there’s different ways of looking at things, and when they don’t talk and exchange ideas, sometimes it’s hard to get some collaboration. “If either side is unwilling or unable to collaborate, that’s going to cause some tension and some problems, so, for us as a group we just need to get to understanding and listening to each other and trying to come up with solutions rather than try to bring our preconceptions in — not really solving the problem but perpetuating it.” Perhaps it wasn’t as clear as “old school vs. new school,” and Shildt said that conclusion would

AMERICA’S LINE

FOOTBALL

BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League BLUE JAYS............. -$118 ................ Rangers YANKEES............... -$250 .................. Orioles INDIANS................ -$110 .................Red Sox Astros ................... -$300 ............WHITE SOX Mariners ............... -$140 .................. TIGERS National League Dbacks .................. -$120 ................ROCKIES NATIONALS ........... -$148 ......................Reds PHILLIES ............... -$115 ......................Cubs Dodgers ................ -$280 ...............MARLINS BRAVES................. -$135 ......................Mets Interleague BREWERS.............. -$110 .................... Twins PADRES................. -$110 ......................Rays Athletics ............... -$115 ..................GIANTS ANGELS................. -$113 .................. Pirates Cards .................... -$125 ................. ROYALS FOOTBALL NFL Preseason Favorite Points Underdog Thursday JAGUARS................... 3 ....................... Eagles FALCONS..................1.5.......................... Jets REDSKINS ................. 3 .....................Bengals RAVENS....................4.5....................Packers CARDINALS ............... 3 ..................... Raiders Friday PANTHERS ................ 3 ...........................Bills GIANTS...................... 2 ........................ Bears BUCS ........................3.5.................. Dolphins Saturday COLTS........................ 3 ......................Browns Patriots....................1.5..................... TITANS Cowboys ..................2.5....................... RAMS STEELERS................. PK .......................Chiefs TEXANS....................4.5........................Lions Sunday CHARGERS ................ 3 ........................Saints VIKINGS ...................4.5.................Seahawks Monday BRONCOS.................2.5....................... 49ers CFL Favorite Points Underdog Thursday WINNIPEG ...............11.5............Br Columbia Friday Edmonton................8.5.................TORONTO UFC 241, Saturday, Anaheim, CA D. Cormier -$145 ................S. Miocic +$125 A. Pettis -$120...........................N. Diaz even Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

NFL preseason

BOXING Fight Schedule Saturday At Banc of California Stadium, Los Angeles (ESPN), Emanuel Navarrete vs. Francisco De Vaca, 12, for Navarrete’s WBO super banatmweight title; Chris van Heerden vs. Aslanbek Kozaev, 10, welterweights; Jessie Magdaleno vs. Rafael Rivera, 10, featherweights; Arnold Barboza Jr. vs. Jorge Luis Rodriguez, 10, super lightweights; Janibek Alimkhanuly vs. Stuart McLellan, 10, middleweights.

AFC East W L T Pct PF PA Buffalo 1 0 0 1.000 24 16 New England 1 0 0 1.000 31 3 Miami 1 0 0 1.000 34 27 NY Jets 0 1 0 .000 22 31 South W L T Pct PF PA Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 27 10 Indianapolis 0 1 0 .000 16 24 Houston 0 1 0 .000 26 28 Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 0 29 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 29 0 Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000 30 10 Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1.000 30 28 Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 17 38 West W L T Pct PF PA Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 38 17 Oakland 1 0 0 1.000 14 3 Denver 1 1 0 .500 28 32 L.A. Chargers 0 1 0 .000 13 17 NFC East W L T Pct PF PA NY Giants 1 0 0 1.000 31 22 Dallas 0 1 0 .000 9 17 Philadelphia 0 1 0 .000 10 27 Washington 0 1 0 .000 10 30 South W L T Pct PF PA Carolina 1 0 0 1.000 23 13 New Orleans 0 1 0 .000 25 34 Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 30 Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 37 48 North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 1 0 0 1.000 28 26 Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 34 25 Chicago 0 1 0 .000 13 23 Detroit 0 1 0 .000 3 31 West W L T Pct PF PA San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 17 9 Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 17 13 Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 22 14 LA Rams 0 1 0 .000 3 14 WEEK 2 Thursday Philadelphia at Jacksonville, 6 p.m. Green Bay at Baltimore, 6:30 p.m. NY Jets at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Cincinnati at Washington, 6:30 p.m. Oakland at Arizona, 7 p.m. Friday Buffalo at Carolina, 6 p.m. Chicago at NY Giants, 6:30 p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Saturday Cleveland at Indianapolis, 3 p.m. New England at Tennessee, 6 p.m. Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 7 p.m. Dallas vs LA Rams at Honolulu, Hawaii, 9 p.m. Sunday New Orleans at LA Chargers, 3 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Monday San Francisco at Denver, 7 p.m.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL LEADERS NATIONAL LEAGUE TOTAL BASES BATTING Yelich, MIL .335 Yelich, MIL 279 Reynolds, PIT .333 Bellinger, LAD 277 McNeil, NYM .332 Acuna Jr., ATL 267 Blackmon, COL .322 Freeman, ATL 263 Marte, ARI .317 EARNED RUN Rendon, WAS .316 AVERAGE HOME RUNS Ryu, LAD 1.45 Bellinger, LAD 39 Soroka, ATL 2.32 Yelich, MIL 39 Scherzer, WAS 2.41 Alonso, NYM 38 deGrom, NYM 2.68 Acuna Jr., ATL 34 Castillo, CIN 2.69 Suarez, CIN 33 Kershaw, LAD 2.77 RUNS BATTED IN Buehler, LAD 3.08 Freeman, ATL 96 WON-LOST Bell, PIT 95 Fried, ATL 14-4 Escobar, ARI 94 Strasburg, WAS 14-5 Bellinger, LAD 90 Ryu, LAD 12-2 Rendon, WAS 90 GAMES PITCHED Arenado, COL 87 Claudio, MIL 63 ON-BASE PCT Chafin, ARI 57 Yelich, MIL .427 Stammen, SD 57 Bellinger, LAD .414 SAVES Reynolds, PIT .405 Yates, SD 33 Freeman, ATL .404 Smith, SF 28 Soto, WAS .402 Doolittle, WAS 27 RUNS SCORED 26 Acuna Jr., ATL 101 Jansen, LAD 25 Freeman, ATL 94 Hader, MIL INNINGS PITCHED Bellinger, LAD 93 Blackmon, COL 87 Marquez, COL 163.0 Strasburg, WAS 152.1 HITS Acuna Jr., ATL 147 Bumgarner, SF151.2 Marte, ARI 146 Syndergard NY148.0 Albies, ATL 144 deGrom, NYM 148.0 Freeman, ATL 144 Corbin, WAS 147.2 Nola, PHI 147.1 DOUBLES STRIKEOUTS Bell, PIT 36 Baez, CHC 32 Scherzer, WAS 189 Story, COL 32 deGrom, NYM 189 185 Albies, ATL 31 Ray, ARI Bryant, CHC 31 Strasburg, WAS 181 172 McNeil, NYM 31 Castillo, CIN Corbin, WAS 172 TRIPLES 166 Escobar, ARI 9 Nola, PHI Marte, ARI 8 Marquez, COL 163 Albies, ATL 7 Buehler, LAD 160 Blackmon, COL 7 Darvish, CHC 158 Eaton, WAS 6 COMPLETE GAMES Rosario, NYM 6 Buehler, LAD 2 Tatis Jr., SD 6 Eflin, PHI 2

AMERICAN LEAGUE TOTAL BASES BATTING 269 LeMahieu, NYY .337 Devers, BOS 263 Brantley, HOU .323 Trout, LAA Alberto, BAL .320 Bogaerts, BOS 256 Devers, BOS .317 Martinez, BOS 251 Martinez, BOS .310 Merrifield, KC 247 242 Altuve, HOU .306 Soler, KC EARNED RUN Merrifield, KC .306 AVERAGE HOME RUNS Trout, LAA 39 Verlander, HOU 2.82 2.87 Soler, KC 35 Cole, HOU 2.90 Cruz, MIN 32 Morton, TB 2.90 Kepler, MIN 32 Minor, TEX 2.99 Encarnacion, NYY30 Miley, HOU 3.28 Mancini, BAL 29 Bieber, CLE Berrios, MIN 3.29 RUNS BATTED IN WON-LOST Trout, LAA 92 Devers, BOS 90 German, NYY 16-2 Verlander, HOU 15-4 Bogaerts, BOS 88 14-5 Soler, KC 87 Cole, HOU 14-8 Abreu, CHW 84 Lynn, TEX GAMES PITCHED Gurriel, HOU 81 Petit, OAK 58 LeMahieu, NYY 81 Kahnle, NYY 56 ON-BASE PCT Mayza, TOR 56 Trout, LAA .439 Ottavino, NYY 56 Santana, CLE .408 Soria, OAK 56 Bregman, HOU .406 SAVES Voit, NYY .392 Chapman, NYY 32 Betts, BOS .388 Hand, CLE 29 RUNS SCORED Osuna, HOU 26 Betts, BOS 107 Colome, CHW 23 Devers, BOS 96 Kennedy, KC 20 Bogaerts, BOS 91 INNINGS PITCHED Trout, LAA 91 Verlander, HOU 162.2 Bregman, HOU 90 Lynn, TEX 160.0 HITS Cole, HOU 156.2 Merrifield, KC 154 Bieber, CLE 156.1 Devers, BOS 152 Minor, TEX 155.0 LeMahieu, NYY 149 Berrios, MIN 153.1 Bogaerts, BOS 141 Keller, KC 152.0 Brantley, HOU 141 Morton, TB 149.0 DOUBLES Fiers, OAK 147.1 Bogaerts, BOS 40 Rodriguez, BOS 146.1 Devers, BOS 39 STRIKEOUTS Benintendi, BOS 35 Cole, HOU 226 Brantley, HOU 33 Verlander, HOU 217 Merrifield, KC 33 Sale, BOS 206 Bieber, CLE 193 TRIPLES 188 Merrifield, KC 9 Boyd, DET 184 Mondesi, KC 9 Lynn, TEX

be too “easy” to reach. “There’s just a lot of different ways for things to be done in today’s game,” Shildt said. “The open-mindedness to that and still look at what has worked for years . . . the blend of that is very important. We talked about that in the offseason to try to find what that sweet spot looks like. We’re just looking to continue to find what that sweet spot is. “It wasn’t maybe the opinion being different, it was how it was handled.” Shildt said that in the last day he had spoken to every position player, including Harrison Bader, who is at Class AAA Memphis. “Everybody was supportive,” the manager said. Second baseman Kolten Wong said, “(The change) was something that caught a lot of people off-guard.” Wong said he didn’t think Al-

WNBA W L Pct 17 7 .708 16 8 .667 14 10 .583 9 16 .360 8 16 .333 5 19 .208 W L Pct 16 9 .640 15 8 .652 14 11 .560 13 12 .520 11 12 .478 7 17 .292 Tuesday Minnesota 89, New York 73 Atlanta at Las Vegas, (n) Wednesday Seattle at Washington, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 7 p.m. Connecticut at Phoenix, 9 p.m. WNBA LEADERS Scoring G FG FT PTS Griner, PHO 23 187 71 446 Delle Donne, WAS 21 153 60 402 Howard, SEA 25 172 95 459 Bonner, PHO 23 135 105 414 Charles, NYL 23 156 80 400 Ogwumike, LAS 22 147 55 372 Cambage, LVA 23 140 79 361 Wilson, LVA 18 106 65 277 Ogunbowale, DAL 23 124 67 351 Jones, CON 24 129 74 363 DeShields, CHI 24 123 78 358 McBride, LVA 25 122 73 366 Sims, MIN 24 130 67 345 Nurse, NYL 23 98 87 326 Fowles, MIN 24 147 44 338 Hayes, ATL 22 111 58 309 Quigley, CHI 24 118 29 327 Gray, LAS 23 120 43 313 Mitchell, PHO 21 93 39 280 Toliver, WAS 23 116 30 298 3-point FG 3FG 3FGA Clark, SEA 40 78 Quigley, CHI 62 135 Mitchell, PHO 55 120 McBride, LVA 49 107 Allen, NYL 17 40 Delle Donne, WAS 36 85 Wheeler, IND 39 93 Dantas, MIN 26 63 Brown, MIN 37 91 Wiese, LAS 26 64 Free throw Pct FT FTA Loyd, SEA 52 54 Delle Donne, WAS 60 63 Bonner, PHO 105 113 Achonwa, IND 51 55 Walker-Kimbrough, WAS 37 40 Thornton, DAL 48 52 Gray, LAS 43 47 McBride, LVA 73 80 Rebounds G OFF DEF TOT Jones, CON 24 81 166 247 Ogwumike, LAS 22 52 158 210 Fowles, MIN 24 70 158 228 Delle Donne, WAS 21 28 146 174 Cambage, LVA 23 43 145 188 Howard, SEA 25 70 134 204 McCowan, IND 25 77 124 201 Charles, NYL 23 42 131 173 Thomas, CON 24 65 115 180 Bonner, PHO 23 25 146 171 Assists G AST Vandersloot, CHI 23 203 Toliver, WAS 23 137 Gray, LAS 23 134 Cloud, WAS 24 133 Sims, MIN 24 132 Wheeler, IND 25 137 Thomas, CON 24 125 Canada, SEA 22 111 Boyd, NYL 22 108 Mitchell, PHO 21 90

GB — 1 3 8½ 9 12 GB — — 2 3 4 8½

AVG 19.4 19.1 18.4 18.0 17.4 16.9 15.7 15.4 15.3 15.1 14.9 14.6 14.4 14.2 14.1 14.0 13.6 13.6 13.3 13.0 PCT .513 .459 .458 .458 .425 .424 .419 .413 .407 .406 PCT .963 .952 .929 .927 .925 .923 .915 .912 AVG 10.3 9.5 9.5 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.0 7.5 7.5 7.4 AVG 8.8 6.0 5.8 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.2 5.0 4.9 4.3

BASEBALL Frontier League East Lake Erie Schaumburg Joliet Windy City Washington West Florence Rascals Evansville Southern Illinois Grizzlies

Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

TRANSACTIONS

BASKETBALL EASTERN Washington Connecticut Chicago Indiana New York Atlanta WESTERN Las Vegas Los Angeles Seattle Minnesota Phoenix Dallas

bert and Budaska, 66, were a lot different in philosophies “but just a lot different in approaches. ‘Buddha’ was definitely a lot more laid back and tried not to make it . . . complex . . . that’s the word I’m looking for. “Jeff has his own approach and what he thinks his approach is doing to hitters. ‘Buddha’ was more about simplifying the game in ‘old school.’ It was one of those things where you had new school and old school kind of coming together. It can go one of two ways. “(The Cardinals) were going down a different route, I feel.” Wong, a Hawaiian like Budaska and who was instructed by Budaska at Memphis and with the Cardinals, said, “(Decisions) obviously have to be made. It’s a little above my pay grade as far as what’s going on right now. “You hope for nothing but the best for him. I’ll see him this off-

season. It was a decision the Cardinals made. And it is what it is. “‘Buddha’ was kind of one guy I was able to talk to and reminisce about being back home, and he would kind of calm me down when I was going through some tough times, so I’m going to miss ‘Buddha’ for that and all the things that he’s taught me.” Wong spoke of Budaska’s ability to “simplify things for me when other coaches weren’t able to get to that point. When you’re at the highest level, some coaches try to take it too far and make you think a little too much while you’re swinging. ‘Buddha’ was always there to simplify things and try to make it a little easier. “A decision had to be made and, unfortunately, it was him.” DeJong, who also had Budaska at Memphis and in the big leagues, agreed with Wong about the simplistic approach to hitting. “There were little weaknesses between him and Jeff based on working on weaknesses or working on strengths,” he said. “There was some difference of opinion but overall I felt got information from both of them. I had Jobel at Peoria in 2015. I’m comfortable with him. Jobel also simplifies things. He’ll also be able to speak Spanish to some of the Latin guys. Some new energy, some new direction, can be good for all of us. “I’m very thankful for (Budaska’s) service to us. It’s one of those things were there’s a difference of opinion and you’ve got to move on.” First baseman Paul Goldschmidt said he “didn’t have any problems with ‘Buddha’ or Jeff. The coaching staff and the front office made the decision. Everyone’s a little different. But I don’t know. . . . sorry.” Shildt said “I’ve got a ton of respect and have had for Mark Budaska for going on 12 years that I’ve known him in the organization. He’s done a tremendous job. He’s been a big contributor to what we’ve done here.”

W L Pct. GB 41 37 .526 — 39 39 .500 2 34 45 .430 7½ 32 46 .410 9 33 48 .407 9½ W L Pct. GB 48 33 .593 — 46 33 .582 1 45 33 .577 1½ 45 34 .570 2 32 47 .405 15 Tuesday Lake Erie 6, Grizzlies 0, 7 innings Grizzlies 2, Lake Erie 1, 7 innings Rascals at Evansville, ppd. Southern Illinois 6, Florence 3 Joliet 5, Washington 4 Schaumburg at Windy City, (n) Wednesday Rascals at Evansville, Game 1, 5:05 p.m. Rascals at Evansville, Game 2, TBD Grizzlies at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Florence at Southern Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Thursday Grizzlies at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Schaumburg at Windy City, 6:05 p.m. Rascals at Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Florence at Southern Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Washington at Joliet, 7:05 p.m.

BASEBALL USA BASEBALL: Named Scott Brosius bench coach, Roly de Armas bullpen coach, Phil Plantier hitting coach, Bryan Price pitching coach, Willie Randolph third base coach and Ernie Young first base coach of the Premier12 team. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Recalled RHP Chandler Shepherd from Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX: Added RHP Jose Ruiz to roster from Charlotte. COLORADO ROCKIES: Selected C Dom Nunez from Albuquerque. Recalled RHP Jeff Hoffman from Albuquerque. Optioned P Chi Chi Gonzales to Albuquerque. Designated Chris Ianetta for assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS: Recalled INF/OF Myles Straw from Round Rock. KANSAS CITY ROYALS: Optioned LHP Eric Skoglund to Omaha (PCL). Recalled RHP Jacob Barnes from Omaha. Signed RHP Nick Howard to a minor league contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS: Optioned RHP Jose Rodriguez to Salt Lake. Reinstated RHP Griffin Canning from IL. Placed LHP Adalberto Mejia on the Restricted List. Recalled RHP Jake Jewell from Salt Lake. MINNESOTA TWINS: Optioned RHP Cody Stashak to Rochester (IL). Reinstated RHP Sam Dyson from the 10-day IL. NEW YORK YANKEES: Designated LHP Joe Mantiply for assignment. Released LHP Daniel Camarena. Reinstated RHP Jonathan Loaisiga from the 60-day IL. Selected the contract of RHP Adonis Rosa from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Optioned RHP Adonis Rosa to Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre (IL). TEXAS RANGERS: Placed RHP Jesse Chavez on the 10-day IL. Selected the contract of RHP David Carpenter from Nashville (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS: Optioned RHP Brock Stewart to Buffalo (IL). Recalled 1B Rowdy Tellez from Buffalo. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS: Designated OF Blake Swihart for assignment. ATLANTA BRAVES: Optioned RHP Patrick Weigel to Gwinnett (IL). Selected the contract of OF Rafael Ortega from Gwinnett. CHICAGO CUBS: Optioned RHP Dillon Maples to Iowa (PCL). Reinstated LHP Kyle Ryan from the bereavement list. CINCINNATI REDS: Optioned OF Brian O’Gray to Louisville (IL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS: Placed INF Tyler White on the 10-day IL. Recalled OF Kyle Garlick from Oklahoma City (PCL). NEW YORK METS: Optioned RHP Chris Mazza to Syracuse (IL). Recalled RHP Drew Gagnon from Syracuse. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES: Fired hitting coach John Mallee. Named senior adviser to the general manager Charlie Manuel hitting coach for the remainder of the season. PITTSBURGH PIRATES: Sent C Francisco Cervelli to Indianapolis (IL) for a rehab assignment. Reinstated RHP Rookie Davis from the 60-Day IL and optioned him to Indianapolis. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS: Optioned C Andrew Knizner to Memphis (PCL). Placed OF Jose Martinez on the 10-day IL. Selected the contract of OF Randy Arozarena from Memphis. Reinstated C Yadier Molina from the 10-day IL. SAN DIEGO PADRES: Placed RHP Carl Edwards Jr. on the 10-day IL. Recalled LHP Robert Erlin from El Paso. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS: Optioned LHP Conner Menez to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled

C Aramis Garcia from Sacramento. WASHINGTON NATIONALS: Signed P Greg Holland to a minor league contract. American Association SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS: Signed INF Joel Davis. Atlantic League LANCASTER BARNSTORMERS: Released 2B Zach Shank. NEW BRITAIN BEES: Released C Tyler Clark. SOMERSET PATRIOTS: Signed RHP Chris Beck. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS: Released RHP Kevin Simmons. FLORENCE FREEDOM: Signed RHP Jamal Wilson. GATEWAY GRIZZLIES: Signed SS Wesley Jones. JOLIET SLAMMERS: Released OFs London Lindley and Jared Morello. LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS: Released RHP Evy Ruibal. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES LAKERS: Signed G Demetrius Jackson. OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER: Signed C Justin Patton. Women’s NBA WNBA: Suspended Phoenix C Brittney Griner three games, Dallas Fs Kristine Anigwe and Kayla Thornton two games and Phoenix G Diana Taurasi and Dallas F Kaela Davis one game for their actions during Saturday’s game. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS: Waived WR Emanuel Hall. CINCINNATI BENGALS: Waived OT Kent Perkins. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS: Released QB Danny Etling. NEW YORK GIANTS: Placed WR Amba Etta-Tawo on IR. Waived/injured TE Isaiah Searight. Waived DE Alex Jenkins. Signed TE Jake Powell. NEW YORK JETS: Waived TE Nick Truesdell. Signed CB Marcus Cooper. OAKLAND RAIDERS: Waived CB Hamp Cheevers and P Johnny Townsend. Signed DB Makinton Dorleant and CB Joshua Holsey. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS: Waived DL Dare Odeyingbo. Signed S Darian Stewart. HOCKEY ECHL IDAHO STEELHEADS: Agreed to terms with D Colton Saucerman on a one-year contract. COLLEGE CHARLESTON SOUTHERN: Promoted assistant baseball coach Thomas Butters to assistant head coach. CHATTANOOGA: Named Mike Hatcher head assistant wrestling coach. CHOWAN: Named Michael Branch assistant men’s and women’s swim coach. HOFSTRA: Named Stacie Nadel assistant men’s and women’s cross country and track coach. MANHATTANVILLE: Named Chris Abramo men’s and women’s golf coach and Paul Templeton men’s soccer coach. PENNSYLVANIA: Named Joy De Jesús senior associate athletic director/chief financial officer. RANDOLPH: Named Ryan Purrington cross country coach. YALE: Named Ellyse Hamlin assistant women’s tennis coach.

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Monster Energy Cup POINTS LEADERS 1. Kyle Busch .......................................... 892 2. Joey Logano........................................ 872 3. Kevin Harvick ..................................... 822 4. Denny Hamlin..................................... 815 5. Martin Truex Jr. .................................. 805 6. Brad Keselowski ................................. 754 7. Chase Elliott ....................................... 711 8. Kurt Busch.......................................... 701 9. Ryan Blaney ....................................... 654 10. Alex Bowman ................................... 653 11. Aric Almirola .................................... 645 12. William Byron................................... 642 13. Kyle Larson ...................................... 624 14. Erik Jones......................................... 623 15. Ryan Newman .................................. 569 16. Clint Bowyer..................................... 559 17. Daniel Suarez ................................... 553 18. Jimmie Johnson ............................... 547 19. Paul Menard..................................... 506 20. Chris Buescher ................................. 486 LAPS LED LEADERS 1. Ky. Busch 1134 11. Byron 196 2. Keselowski 860 12. Bowyer 128 3. Logano 673 13. Almirola 112 4. Harvick 653 14. Suarez 106 5. Truex Jr. 562 15. Ku. Busch 85 6. Elliott 491 15. Johnson 85 7. Blaney 365 17. Stenhouse Jr. 75 8. Hamlin 294 18. Dillon 72 9. Bowman 216 19. Jones 60 10. Larson 211 20. Menard 55

SCHEDULE (WINNERS) Feb. 17: Daytona 500 (Denny Hamlin) Feb. 24: Folds of Honor 500 (Brad Keselowski) March 3: Pennzoil 400 (Joey Logano) March 10: TicketGuardian 500 (Kyle Busch) March 17: Auto Club 400 (Kyle Busch) March 24: STP 500 (Brad Keselowski) March 31: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Hamlin) April 7: Food City 500 (Kyle Busch) April 13: Toyota Owners 400 (Truex Jr.) April 28: Geico 500 (Chase Elliott) May 6: Gander RV 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) May 11: Digital Ally 400 (Brad Keselowski) May 26: Coca-Cola 600 (Martin Truex Jr.) June 2: Pocono 400 (Kyle Busch) June 10: FireKeepers Casino 400 (Logano) June 23: Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Truex Jr.) June 30: Camping World 400 (Alex Bowman) July 7: Coke Zero Sugar 400 (Justin Haley) July 13: Quaker State 400 (Kurt Busch) July 21: Foxwoods Resort Casino 301 (Harvick) July 28: Gander RV 400 (Denny Hamlin) Aug. 4: Go Bowling at The Glen (Chase Elliott) Aug. 11: Consumers Energy 400 (Harvick) Saturday: Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. Sept. 1: Darlington, S.C. Sept. 8: Brickyard, Indianapolis Sept. 15: Las Vegas Sept. 21: Richmond, Va. Sept. 29: Concord, N.C. Oct. 6: Dover, Del. Oct. 13: Talladega, Ala. Oct. 20: Kansas City, Kan. Oct. 27: Martinsville, Va. Nov. 3: Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 10: Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 17: Homestead, Fla.

SOCCER MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 13 7 6 45 48 38 Atlanta 13 9 3 42 43 30 D.C. United 10 7 9 39 34 32 New York City FC 10 5 8 38 41 31 New York 11 10 4 37 43 38 New England 9 9 7 34 37 44 Montreal 10 13 3 33 36 47 Toronto FC 9 10 6 33 39 41 Orlando City 8 11 6 30 33 34 Chicago 7 10 9 30 38 37 Columbus 7 14 5 26 27 39 Cincinnati 5 17 3 18 25 57 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 17 3 4 55 65 25 Seattle 11 7 6 39 38 34 Minnesota United 11 8 5 38 42 35 San Jose 11 8 5 38 41 36 LA Galaxy 12 11 1 37 31 36 Real Salt Lake 11 9 4 37 35 32 FC Dallas 10 9 6 36 36 31 Portland 10 9 4 34 38 34 Houston 9 13 3 30 35 41 Sporting Kansas City7 10 7 28 37 43 Colorado 7 12 5 26 41 49 Vancouver 5 12 9 24 26 45 Wednesday Sporting K.C. at Orlando City, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. FC Dallas at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. Chicago at Portland, 10 p.m. Saturday New England at New York, 6 p.m. FC Dallas at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. New York City FC at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Orlando City at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m. San Jose at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Houston, 8 p.m. D.C. United at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Los Angeles FC at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Seattle at LA Galaxy, 9 p.m. MLS LEADERS Goals Goals-Allowed Avg. Vela, LFC 23 Clark, POR 0.77 Martinez, ATL 20 Miller, LFC 0.95 Ibrahimovic, LA 16 Gonzalez, DAL 1.17 Rossi, LFC 13 Guzan, ATL 1.20 Kamara, COL 11 Hamid, DC 1.24 Przybylko, PHI 11 Rimando, RSL 1.30 Rooney, DC 11 Saves Gutierrez, KC 10 103 Heber, NYC 10 Bingham, LA Hamid, DC 102 Assists 82 Vela, LFC 15 Mannone, MIN Crepeau, VAN 80 Moralez, NYC 14 Melia, KC 77 Valeri, POR 14 76 Barrios, DAL 11 Frei, SEA 73 Lodeiro, SEA 11 Rowe, ORL

USL Championship Eastern W L T Pts GF GA New York Red Bulls II 14 4 5 47 56 27 Tampa Bay 13 3 7 46 39 16 Nashville 12 5 6 42 41 19 North Carolina 11 5 7 40 38 21 Indy 12 4 4 40 30 15 Pittsburgh 10 3 8 38 41 22 Louisville 10 7 6 36 34 28 Ottawa 8 4 9 33 32 22 Charleston 6 5 9 27 27 30 STLFC 6 7 8 26 25 26 Birmingham 7 10 5 26 21 36 Charlotte 5 9 10 25 28 36 Bethlehem Steel 6 12 5 23 30 44 Loudoun 5 9 5 20 28 34 Memphis 4 11 7 19 21 32 Atlanta 2 4 13 5 17 24 54 Hartford 4 17 4 16 30 62 Swope Park Rangers 3 12 6 15 27 48 Western W L T Pts GF GA Phoenix 15 2 5 50 58 20 Reno 13 6 5 44 51 37 Fresno 12 3 7 43 38 22 Real Monarchs 10 7 4 34 43 33 New Mexico 8 6 9 33 43 37 Austin 9 8 6 33 30 34 Portland II 8 7 8 32 43 38 LA Galaxy II 8 8 8 32 40 47 Sacramento 9 9 4 31 30 26 San Antonio 8 9 6 30 37 33 OKC Energy 7 8 9 30 31 34 El Paso 7 7 8 29 24 25 Orange County 6 8 9 27 34 35 Las Vegas 7 9 6 27 31 34 Rio Grande Valley 6 11 6 24 36 42 Colorado Springs 6 14 4 22 23 43 Tulsa 4 12 7 19 29 48 Tacoma 4 13 5 17 20 53 Wednesday Pittsburgh at New York Red Bulls II, 6 p.m. Charleston at Loudoun, 6:30 p.m.

NWSL W L T Pts Portland 8 3 6 30 Chicago 9 5 2 29 North Carolina 8 4 4 28 Reign FC 7 4 5 26 Utah 7 6 3 24 Houston 6 7 4 22 Washington 6 6 3 21 Orlando 3 10 2 11 Sky Blue FC 2 11 3 9 Wednesday Sky Blue FC at Chicago, 6 p.m.

GF GA 33 21 27 19 31 17 15 18 17 15 11 26 19 15 16 32 10 22


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

Shildt says it was his call to fire Budaska BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY — The decision to replace Cardinals assistant hitting coach Mark Budaska with Memphis hitting coach Jobel Jimenez on Monday was thought to be a front-office move. Manager Mike Shildt said that president of baseball operations John Mozeliak certainly was a part of it, but Shildt made it clear Tuesday that the decision was made on Monday’s off day — by himself. “It’s really a decision that I didn’t want to make, but I’m comfortable and confident it was the right decision,” Shildt said. “Collectively, it was made, but I ultimately made the decision. That was a difficult decision and not one that was taken lightly by any stretch of the imagination. It was done after multiple internal conversations to try to find a solution. “After a while, it got to a point where I made the decision for the greater good and, moving forward, we’d make a transition.” Jeff Albert, more data driven, was hired as the head hitting coach before the season began, and Budaska, who finished last season as the interim hitting coach after John Mabry was fired, was made the assistant coach this year. “I know ‘Mo’ mentioned that there were some philosophical differences and that would be accurate,” Shildt said. “But, from my chair, I always encourage within our staff and within our clubhouse to have a very open, honest dialogue about what you think and feel. We welcome varying opinions. I think that’s how we grow. We also want it to come from a like-minded place when we do it. “It’s not that there was a difference of opinion. It was about how it was ultimately, consistently handled. “It’s more about creating some consistent clarity and messaging. It doesn’t have to be kumbaya and everybody is working off the same script all the time. But there does need to be clarity in what that looks like for the player and that communication being consistent

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals manager Mike Shildt waved goodbye to assistant hitting coach Mark Budaska by firing him Monday. and supportive. I didn’t (think) that was taking place on a consistent basis.” Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong said that from the beginning of the season “guys used both Jeff and (Budaska). Sometimes there’s different ways of looking at things, and when they don’t talk and exchange ideas, sometimes it’s hard to get some collaboration. “If either side is unwilling or unable to collaborate, that’s going to cause some tension and some problems, so, for us as a group we just need to get to understanding and listening to each other and trying to come up with solutions rather than try to bring our preconceptions in — not really solving the problem but perpetuating it.” Perhaps it wasn’t as clear as “old school vs. new school,” and

AMERICA’S LINE

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BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League BLUE JAYS............. -$118 ................ Rangers YANKEES............... -$250 .................. Orioles INDIANS................ -$110 .................Red Sox Astros ................... -$300 ............WHITE SOX Mariners ............... -$140 .................. TIGERS National League Dbacks .................. -$120 ................ROCKIES NATIONALS ........... -$148 ......................Reds PHILLIES ............... -$115 ......................Cubs Dodgers ................ -$280 ...............MARLINS BRAVES................. -$135 ......................Mets Interleague BREWERS.............. -$110 .................... Twins PADRES................. -$110 ......................Rays Athletics ............... -$115 ..................GIANTS ANGELS................. -$113 .................. Pirates Cards .................... -$125 ................. ROYALS FOOTBALL NFL Preseason Favorite Points Underdog Thursday JAGUARS................... 3 ....................... Eagles FALCONS..................1.5.......................... Jets REDSKINS ................. 3 .....................Bengals RAVENS....................4.5....................Packers CARDINALS ............... 3 ..................... Raiders Friday PANTHERS ................ 3 ...........................Bills GIANTS...................... 2 ........................ Bears BUCS ........................3.5.................. Dolphins Saturday COLTS........................ 3 ......................Browns Patriots....................1.5..................... TITANS Cowboys ..................2.5....................... RAMS STEELERS................. PK .......................Chiefs TEXANS....................4.5........................Lions Sunday CHARGERS ................ 3 ........................Saints VIKINGS ...................4.5.................Seahawks Monday BRONCOS.................2.5....................... 49ers CFL Favorite Points Underdog Thursday WINNIPEG ...............11.5............Br Columbia Friday Edmonton................8.5.................TORONTO UFC 241, Saturday, Anaheim, CA D. Cormier -$145 ................S. Miocic +$125 A. Pettis -$120...........................N. Diaz even Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

NFL preseason

BOXING Fight Schedule Saturday At Banc of California Stadium, Los Angeles (ESPN), Emanuel Navarrete vs. Francisco De Vaca, 12, for Navarrete’s WBO super banatmweight title; Chris van Heerden vs. Aslanbek Kozaev, 10, welterweights; Jessie Magdaleno vs. Rafael Rivera, 10, featherweights; Arnold Barboza Jr. vs. Jorge Luis Rodriguez, 10, super lightweights; Janibek Alimkhanuly vs. Stuart McLellan, 10, middleweights.

AFC East W L T Pct PF PA Buffalo 1 0 0 1.000 24 16 New England 1 0 0 1.000 31 3 Miami 1 0 0 1.000 34 27 NY Jets 0 1 0 .000 22 31 South W L T Pct PF PA Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 27 10 Indianapolis 0 1 0 .000 16 24 Houston 0 1 0 .000 26 28 Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 0 29 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 29 0 Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000 30 10 Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1.000 30 28 Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 17 38 West W L T Pct PF PA Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 38 17 Oakland 1 0 0 1.000 14 3 Denver 1 1 0 .500 28 32 L.A. Chargers 0 1 0 .000 13 17 NFC East W L T Pct PF PA NY Giants 1 0 0 1.000 31 22 Dallas 0 1 0 .000 9 17 Philadelphia 0 1 0 .000 10 27 Washington 0 1 0 .000 10 30 South W L T Pct PF PA Carolina 1 0 0 1.000 23 13 New Orleans 0 1 0 .000 25 34 Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 30 Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 37 48 North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 1 0 0 1.000 28 26 Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 34 25 Chicago 0 1 0 .000 13 23 Detroit 0 1 0 .000 3 31 West W L T Pct PF PA San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 17 9 Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 17 13 Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 22 14 LA Rams 0 1 0 .000 3 14 WEEK 2 Thursday Philadelphia at Jacksonville, 6 p.m. Green Bay at Baltimore, 6:30 p.m. NY Jets at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Cincinnati at Washington, 6:30 p.m. Oakland at Arizona, 7 p.m. Friday Buffalo at Carolina, 6 p.m. Chicago at NY Giants, 6:30 p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Saturday Cleveland at Indianapolis, 3 p.m. New England at Tennessee, 6 p.m. Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 7 p.m. Dallas vs LA Rams at Honolulu, Hawaii, 9 p.m. Sunday New Orleans at LA Chargers, 3 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Monday San Francisco at Denver, 7 p.m.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL LEADERS NATIONAL LEAGUE EARNED RUN AVG BATTING Reynolds, PIT .333 Ryu, LAD 1.45 Yelich, MIL .333 Soroka, ATL 2.32 McNeil, NYM .332 Scherzer, WAS 2.41 Blackmon, COL .325 deGrom, NYM 2.68 Rendon, WAS .316 Castillo, CIN 2.69 Bellinger, LAD .316 Kershaw, LAD 2.77 HOME RUNS Buehler, LAD 3.08 Bellinger, LAD 39 WON-LOST Yelich, MIL 39 Fried, ATL 14-4 Alonso, NYM 38 Strasburg, WAS 14-5 Acuna Jr., ATL 34 Ryu, LAD 12-2 Suarez, CIN 33 Kershaw, LAD 11-2 Renfroe, SD 31 Woodruff, MIL 11-3 RUNS BATTED IN Castillo, CIN 11-4 Freeman, ATL 96 Marquez, COL 11-5 Bell, PIT 95 GAMES PITCHED Escobar, ARI 94 Claudio, MIL 63 Bellinger, LAD 90 Chafin, ARI 57 Rendon, WAS 90 Stammen, SD 57 ON-BASE PCT Lorenzen, CIN 56 Yelich, MIL .425 Suero, WAS 56 Bellinger, LAD .414 SAVES Reynolds, PIT .405 Yates, SD 33 Freeman, ATL .404 28 Soto, WAS .402 Smith, SF 27 McNeil, NYM .400 Doolittle, WAS Jansen, LAD 26 RUNS SCORED 25 Acuna Jr., ATL 101 Hader, MIL INNINGS PITCHED Freeman, ATL 94 Bellinger, LAD 93 Marquez, COL 163.0 Blackmon, COL 88 Strasburg, WAS152.1 Bumgarner, SF151.2 HITS Acuna Jr., ATL 147 Syndergrd, NY148.0 Marte, ARI 146 deGrom, NYM 148.0 Albies, ATL 144 Corbin, WAS 147.2 147.1 Freeman, ATL 144 Nola, PHI Wheeler, NYM 144.1 DOUBLES STRIKEOUTS Bell, PIT 36 Blackmon, COL 32 Scherzer, WAS 189 Baez, CHC 32 deGrom, NYM 189 185 Story, COL 32 Ray, ARI Albies, ATL 31 Strasburg, WAS 181 172 Bryant, CHC 31 Castillo, CIN 172 McNeil, NYM 31 Corbin, WAS Nola, PHI 166 TRIPLES Escobar, ARI 9 Marquez, COL 163 Marte, ARI 8 COMPLETE GAMES Albies, ATL 7 Buehler, LAD 2 Blackmon, COL 7 Eflin, PHI 2

AMERICAN LEAGUE EARNED RUN AVG BATTING LeMahieu, NYY .337 Verlander, HOU 2.82 2.87 Devers, BOS .325 Cole, HOU 2.90 Brantley, HOU .323 Morton, TB Alberto, BAL .320 Minor, TEX 2.90 Martinez, BOS .312 Miley, HOU 2.99 Merrifield, KC .306 Bieber, CLE 3.28 Lindor, CLE .303 Berrios, MIN 3.29 Altuve, HOU .303 WON-LOST HOME RUNS German, NYY 16-2 Trout, LAA 39 Verlander, HOU 15-4 Soler, KC 35 Cole, HOU 14-5 Cruz, MIN 32 Lynn, TEX 14-8 Kepler, MIN 32 Morton, TB 13-4 Encarnacion, NYY30 Odorizzi, MIN 13-5 RUNS BATTED IN Rodriguez, BOS 13-5 GAMES PITCHED Devers, BOS 93 58 Trout, LAA 92 Petit, OAK Bogaerts, BOS 88 Kahnle, NYY 56 56 Soler, KC 87 Mayza, TOR Abreu, CHW 84 Ottavino, NYY 56 56 Gurriel, HOU 81 Soria, OAK SAVES LeMahieu, NYY 81 Chapman, NYY 32 ON-BASE PCT 29 Trout, LAA .439 Hand, CLE 26 Santana, CLE .409 Osuna, HOU 23 Bregman, HOU .406 Colome, CHW Voit, NYY .392 Kennedy, KC 20 18 Betts, BOS .389 Rogers, MIN INNINGS PITCHED LeMahieu, NYY .386 Verlander, HOU162.2 RUNS SCORED 160.0 Betts, BOS 109 Lynn, TEX 156.2 Devers, BOS 97 Cole, HOU Bogaerts, BOS 91 Bieber, CLE 156.1 155.0 Trout, LAA 91 Minor, TEX Bregman, HOU 90 Berrios, MIN 153.1 HITS Keller, KC 152.0 STRIKEOUTS Devers, BOS 158 226 Merrifield, KC 155 Cole, HOU 218 LeMahieu, NYY 149 Sale, BOS Bogaerts, BOS 142 Verlander, HOU 217 DOUBLES Bieber, CLE 193 192 Devers, BOS 43 Boyd, DET 184 Bogaerts, BOS 40 Lynn, TEX 184 Benintendi, BOS 35 Morton, TB COMPLETE GAMES Brantley, HOU 33 3 Merrifield, KC 33 Bieber, CLE Giolito, CHW 2 TRIPLES 2 Merrifield, KC 9 Minor, TEX 2 Mondesi, KC 9 Nova, CHW

Shildt said that conclusion would be too “easy” to reach. “There’s just a lot of different ways for things to be done in today’s game,” Shildt said. “The open-mindedness to that and still look at what has worked for years . . . the blend of that is very important. We talked about that in the offseason to try to find what that sweet spot looks like. We’re just looking to continue to find what that sweet spot is. “It wasn’t maybe the opinion being different, it was how it was handled.” Shildt said that in the last day he had spoken to every position player, including Harrison Bader, who is at Class AAA Memphis. “Everybody was supportive,” the manager said. Second baseman Kolten Wong said, “(The change) was something that caught a lot of people

TRANSACTIONS

BASKETBALL WNBA EASTERN Washington Connecticut Chicago Indiana New York Atlanta WESTERN Las Vegas Los Angeles Seattle Minnesota Phoenix Dallas

W L Pct 17 7 .708 16 8 .667 14 10 .583 9 16 .360 8 16 .333 5 20 .200 W L Pct 17 9 .654 15 8 .652 14 11 .560 13 12 .520 11 12 .478 7 17 .292 Tuesday Minnesota 89, New York 73 Las Vegas 94, Atlanta 90 Wednesday Seattle at Washington, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 7 p.m. Connecticut at Phoenix, 9 p.m. WNBA LEADERS Scoring G FG FT PTS Griner, PHO 23 187 71 446 Delle Donne, WAS 21 153 60 402 Howard, SEA 25 172 95 459 Bonner, PHO 23 135 105 414 Charles, NYL 23 156 80 400 Ogwumike, LAS 22 147 55 372 Cambage, LVA 23 140 79 361 Wilson, LVA 18 106 65 277 Ogunbowale, DAL 23 124 67 351 Jones, CON 24 129 74 363 DeShields, CHI 24 123 78 358 McBride, LVA 25 122 73 366 Sims, MIN 24 130 67 345 Nurse, NYL 23 98 87 326 Fowles, MIN 24 147 44 338 Hayes, ATL 22 111 58 309 Quigley, CHI 24 118 29 327 Gray, LAS 23 120 43 313 Mitchell, PHO 21 93 39 280 Toliver, WAS 23 116 30 298 3-point FG 3FG 3FGA Clark, SEA 40 78 Quigley, CHI 62 135 Mitchell, PHO 55 120 McBride, LVA 49 107 Allen, NYL 17 40 Delle Donne, WAS 36 85 Wheeler, IND 39 93 Dantas, MIN 26 63 Brown, MIN 37 91 Wiese, LAS 26 64 Free throw Pct FT FTA Loyd, SEA 52 54 Delle Donne, WAS 60 63 Bonner, PHO 105 113 Achonwa, IND 51 55 Walker-Kimbrough, WAS 37 40 Thornton, DAL 48 52 Gray, LAS 43 47 McBride, LVA 73 80 Rebounds G OFF DEF TOT Jones, CON 24 81 166 247 Ogwumike, LAS 22 52 158 210 Fowles, MIN 24 70 158 228 Delle Donne, WAS 21 28 146 174 Cambage, LVA 23 43 145 188 Howard, SEA 25 70 134 204 McCowan, IND 25 77 124 201 Charles, NYL 23 42 131 173 Thomas, CON 24 65 115 180 Bonner, PHO 23 25 146 171 Assists G AST Vandersloot, CHI 23 203 Toliver, WAS 23 137 Gray, LAS 23 134 Cloud, WAS 24 133 Sims, MIN 24 132 Wheeler, IND 25 137 Thomas, CON 24 125 Canada, SEA 22 111 Boyd, NYL 22 108 Mitchell, PHO 21 90

GB — 1 3 8½ 9 12½ GB — ½ 2½ 3½ 4½ 9

AVG 19.4 19.1 18.4 18.0 17.4 16.9 15.7 15.4 15.3 15.1 14.9 14.6 14.4 14.2 14.1 14.0 13.6 13.6 13.3 13.0 PCT .513 .459 .458 .458 .425 .424 .419 .413 .407 .406 PCT .963 .952 .929 .927 .925 .923 .915 .912 AVG 10.3 9.5 9.5 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.0 7.5 7.5 7.4 AVG 8.8 6.0 5.8 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.2 5.0 4.9 4.3

BASEBALL Frontier League East Lake Erie Schaumburg Joliet Washington Windy City West Florence Rascals Evansville Southern Illinois Grizzlies

off-guard.” Wong said he didn’t think Albert and Budaska, 66, were a lot different in philosophies “but just a lot different in approaches. ‘Buddha’ was definitely a lot more laid back and tried not to make it . . . complex . . . that’s the word I’m looking for. “Jeff has his own approach and what he thinks his approach is doing to hitters. ‘Buddha’ was more about simplifying the game in ‘old school.’ It was one of those things where you had new school and old school kind of coming together. It can go one of two ways. “(The Cardinals) were going down a different route, I feel.” Wong, a Hawaiian like Budaska and who was instructed by Budaska at Memphis and with the Cardinals, said, “(Decisions) obviously have to be made. It’s a little above my pay grade as far as

what’s going on right now. “You hope for nothing but the best for him. I’ll see him this offseason. It was a decision the Cardinals made. And it is what it is. “‘Buddha’ was kind of one guy I was able to talk to and reminisce about being back home, and he would kind of calm me down when I was going through some tough times, so I’m going to miss ‘Buddha’ for that and all the things that he’s taught me.” Wong spoke of Budaska’s ability to “simplify things for me when other coaches weren’t able to get to that point. When you’re at the highest level, some coaches try to take it too far and make you think a little too much while you’re swinging. ‘Buddha’ was always there to simplify things and try to make it a little easier. “A decision had to be made and, unfortunately, it was him.” DeJong, who also had Budaska at Memphis and in the big leagues, agreed with Wong about the simplistic approach to hitting. “There were little weaknesses between him and Jeff based on working on weaknesses or working on strengths,” he said. “There was some difference of opinion but overall I felt got information from both of them. I had Jobel at Peoria in 2015. I’m comfortable with him. Jobel also simplifies things. He’ll also be able to speak Spanish to some of the Latin guys. Some new energy, some new direction, can be good for all of us. “I’m very thankful for (Budaska’s) service to us. It’s one of those things were there’s a difference of opinion and you’ve got to move on.” First baseman Paul Goldschmidt said he “didn’t have any problems with ‘Buddha’ or Jeff. The coaching staff and the front office made the decision. Everyone’s a little different. But I don’t know. . . . sorry.” Shildt said “I’ve got a ton of respect and have had for Mark Budaska for going on 12 years that I’ve known him in the organization. He’s done a tremendous job. He’s been a big contributor to what we’ve done here.”

W L Pct. GB 41 37 .526 — 40 39 .506 1½ 34 45 .430 7½ 33 48 .407 9½ 32 47 .405 9½ W L Pct. GB 48 33 .593 — 46 33 .582 1 45 33 .577 1½ 45 34 .570 2 32 47 .405 15 Tuesday Lake Erie 6, Grizzlies 0, 7 innings Grizzlies 2, Lake Erie 1, 7 innings Rascals at Evansville, ppd. Southern Illinois 6, Florence 3 Joliet 5, Washington 4 Schaumburg 10, Windy City 4 Wednesday Rascals at Evansville, Game 1, 5:05 p.m. Rascals at Evansville, Game 2, TBD Grizzlies at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Florence at Southern Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Thursday Grizzlies at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Schaumburg at Windy City, 6:05 p.m. Rascals at Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Florence at Southern Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Washington at Joliet, 7:05 p.m.

BASEBALL USA BASEBALL: Named Scott Brosius bench coach, Roly de Armas bullpen coach, Phil Plantier hitting coach, Bryan Price pitching coach, Willie Randolph third base coach and Ernie Young first base coach of the Premier12 team. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Recalled RHP Chandler Shepherd from Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX: Added RHP Jose Ruiz to roster from Charlotte. COLORADO ROCKIES: Selected C Dom Nunez from Albuquerque. Recalled RHP Jeff Hoffman from Albuquerque. Optioned P Chi Chi Gonzales to Albuquerque. Designated Chris Ianetta for assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS: Recalled INF/OF Myles Straw from Round Rock. KANSAS CITY ROYALS: Optioned LHP Eric Skoglund to Omaha (PCL). Recalled RHP Jacob Barnes from Omaha. Signed RHP Nick Howard to a minor league contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS: Optioned RHP Jose Rodriguez to Salt Lake. Reinstated RHP Griffin Canning from IL. Placed LHP Adalberto Mejia on the Restricted List. Recalled RHP Jake Jewell from Salt Lake. MINNESOTA TWINS: Optioned RHP Cody Stashak to Rochester (IL). Reinstated RHP Sam Dyson from the 10-day IL. NEW YORK YANKEES: Designated LHP Joe Mantiply for assignment. Released LHP Daniel Camarena. Reinstated RHP Jonathan Loaisiga from the 60-day IL. Selected the contract of RHP Adonis Rosa from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Optioned RHP Adonis Rosa to Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre (IL). TEXAS RANGERS: Placed RHP Jesse Chavez on the 10-day IL. Selected the contract of RHP David Carpenter from Nashville (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS: Optioned RHP Brock Stewart to Buffalo (IL). Recalled 1B Rowdy Tellez from Buffalo. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS: Designated OF Blake Swihart for assignment. ATLANTA BRAVES: Optioned RHP Patrick Weigel to Gwinnett (IL). Selected the contract of OF Rafael Ortega from Gwinnett. CHICAGO CUBS: Optioned RHP Dillon Maples to Iowa (PCL). Reinstated LHP Kyle Ryan from the bereavement list. CINCINNATI REDS: Optioned OF Brian O’Gray to Louisville (IL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS: Placed INF Tyler White on the 10-day IL. Recalled OF Kyle Garlick from Oklahoma City (PCL). NEW YORK METS: Optioned RHP Chris Mazza to Syracuse (IL). Recalled RHP Drew Gagnon from Syracuse. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES: Fired hitting coach John Mallee. Named senior adviser to the general manager Charlie Manuel hitting coach for the remainder of the season. PITTSBURGH PIRATES: Sent C Francisco Cervelli to Indianapolis (IL) for a rehab assignment. Reinstated RHP Rookie Davis from the 60-Day IL and optioned him to Indianapolis. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS: Optioned C Andrew Knizner to Memphis (PCL). Placed OF Jose Martinez on the 10-day IL. Selected the contract of OF Randy Arozarena from Memphis. Reinstated C Yadier Molina from the 10-day IL. SAN DIEGO PADRES: Placed RHP Carl Edwards Jr. on the 10-day IL. Recalled LHP Robert Erlin from El Paso. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS: Optioned LHP Conner Menez to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled

C Aramis Garcia from Sacramento. WASHINGTON NATIONALS: Signed P Greg Holland to a minor league contract. American Association SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS: Signed INF Joel Davis. Atlantic League LANCASTER BARNSTORMERS: Released 2B Zach Shank. NEW BRITAIN BEES: Released C Tyler Clark. SOMERSET PATRIOTS: Signed RHP Chris Beck. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS: Released RHP Kevin Simmons. FLORENCE FREEDOM: Signed RHP Jamal Wilson. GATEWAY GRIZZLIES: Signed SS Wesley Jones. JOLIET SLAMMERS: Released OFs London Lindley and Jared Morello. LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS: Released RHP Evy Ruibal. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES LAKERS: Signed G Demetrius Jackson. OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER: Signed C Justin Patton. Women’s NBA WNBA: Suspended Phoenix C Brittney Griner three games, Dallas Fs Kristine Anigwe and Kayla Thornton two games and Phoenix G Diana Taurasi and Dallas F Kaela Davis one game for their actions during Saturday’s game. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS: Waived WR Emanuel Hall. CINCINNATI BENGALS: Waived OT Kent Perkins. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS: Released QB Danny Etling. NEW YORK GIANTS: Placed WR Amba Etta-Tawo on IR. Waived/injured TE Isaiah Searight. Waived DE Alex Jenkins. Signed TE Jake Powell. NEW YORK JETS: Waived TE Nick Truesdell. Signed CB Marcus Cooper. OAKLAND RAIDERS: Waived CB Hamp Cheevers and P Johnny Townsend. Signed DB Makinton Dorleant and CB Joshua Holsey. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS: Waived DL Dare Odeyingbo. Signed S Darian Stewart. HOCKEY ECHL IDAHO STEELHEADS: Agreed to terms with D Colton Saucerman on a one-year contract. COLLEGE CHARLESTON SOUTHERN: Promoted assistant baseball coach Thomas Butters to assistant head coach. CHATTANOOGA: Named Mike Hatcher head assistant wrestling coach. CHOWAN: Named Michael Branch assistant men’s and women’s swim coach. HOFSTRA: Named Stacie Nadel assistant men’s and women’s cross country and track coach. MANHATTANVILLE: Named Chris Abramo men’s and women’s golf coach and Paul Templeton men’s soccer coach. PENNSYLVANIA: Named Joy De Jesús senior associate athletic director/chief financial officer. RANDOLPH: Named Ryan Purrington cross country coach. YALE: Named Ellyse Hamlin assistant women’s tennis coach.

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Monster Energy Cup POINTS LEADERS 1. Kyle Busch .......................................... 892 2. Joey Logano........................................ 872 3. Kevin Harvick ..................................... 822 4. Denny Hamlin..................................... 815 5. Martin Truex Jr. .................................. 805 6. Brad Keselowski ................................. 754 7. Chase Elliott ....................................... 711 8. Kurt Busch.......................................... 701 9. Ryan Blaney ....................................... 654 10. Alex Bowman ................................... 653 11. Aric Almirola .................................... 645 12. William Byron................................... 642 13. Kyle Larson ...................................... 624 14. Erik Jones......................................... 623 15. Ryan Newman .................................. 569 16. Clint Bowyer..................................... 559 17. Daniel Suarez ................................... 553 18. Jimmie Johnson ............................... 547 19. Paul Menard..................................... 506 20. Chris Buescher ................................. 486 LAPS LED LEADERS 1. Ky. Busch 1134 11. Byron 196 2. Keselowski 860 12. Bowyer 128 3. Logano 673 13. Almirola 112 4. Harvick 653 14. Suarez 106 5. Truex Jr. 562 15. Ku. Busch 85 6. Elliott 491 15. Johnson 85 7. Blaney 365 17. Stenhouse Jr. 75 8. Hamlin 294 18. Dillon 72 9. Bowman 216 19. Jones 60 10. Larson 211 20. Menard 55

SCHEDULE (WINNERS) Feb. 17: Daytona 500 (Denny Hamlin) Feb. 24: Folds of Honor 500 (Brad Keselowski) March 3: Pennzoil 400 (Joey Logano) March 10: TicketGuardian 500 (Kyle Busch) March 17: Auto Club 400 (Kyle Busch) March 24: STP 500 (Brad Keselowski) March 31: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Hamlin) April 7: Food City 500 (Kyle Busch) April 13: Toyota Owners 400 (Truex Jr.) April 28: Geico 500 (Chase Elliott) May 6: Gander RV 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) May 11: Digital Ally 400 (Brad Keselowski) May 26: Coca-Cola 600 (Martin Truex Jr.) June 2: Pocono 400 (Kyle Busch) June 10: FireKeepers Casino 400 (Logano) June 23: Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Truex Jr.) June 30: Camping World 400 (Alex Bowman) July 7: Coke Zero Sugar 400 (Justin Haley) July 13: Quaker State 400 (Kurt Busch) July 21: Foxwoods Resort Casino 301 (Harvick) July 28: Gander RV 400 (Denny Hamlin) Aug. 4: Go Bowling at The Glen (Chase Elliott) Aug. 11: Consumers Energy 400 (Harvick) Saturday: Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. Sept. 1: Darlington, S.C. Sept. 8: Brickyard, Indianapolis Sept. 15: Las Vegas Sept. 21: Richmond, Va. Sept. 29: Concord, N.C. Oct. 6: Dover, Del. Oct. 13: Talladega, Ala. Oct. 20: Kansas City, Kan. Oct. 27: Martinsville, Va. Nov. 3: Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 10: Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 17: Homestead, Fla.

SOCCER MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 13 7 6 45 48 38 Atlanta 13 9 3 42 43 30 D.C. United 10 7 9 39 34 32 New York City FC 10 5 8 38 41 31 New York 11 10 4 37 43 38 New England 9 9 7 34 37 44 Montreal 10 13 3 33 36 47 Toronto FC 9 10 6 33 39 41 Orlando City 8 11 6 30 33 34 Chicago 7 10 9 30 38 37 Columbus 7 14 5 26 27 39 Cincinnati 5 17 3 18 25 57 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 17 3 4 55 65 25 Seattle 11 7 6 39 38 34 Minnesota United 11 8 5 38 42 35 San Jose 11 8 5 38 41 36 LA Galaxy 12 11 1 37 31 36 Real Salt Lake 11 9 4 37 35 32 FC Dallas 10 9 6 36 36 31 Portland 10 9 4 34 38 34 Houston 9 13 3 30 35 41 Sporting Kansas City7 10 7 28 37 43 Colorado 7 12 5 26 41 49 Vancouver 5 12 9 24 26 45 Wednesday Sporting K.C. at Orlando City, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. FC Dallas at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. Chicago at Portland, 10 p.m. Saturday New England at New York, 6 p.m. FC Dallas at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. New York City FC at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Orlando City at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m. San Jose at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Houston, 8 p.m. D.C. United at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Los Angeles FC at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Seattle at LA Galaxy, 9 p.m. MLS LEADERS Goals Goals-Allowed Avg. Vela, LFC 23 Clark, POR 0.77 Martinez, ATL 20 Miller, LFC 0.95 Ibrahimovic, LA 16 Gonzalez, DAL 1.17 Rossi, LFC 13 Guzan, ATL 1.20 Kamara, COL 11 Hamid, DC 1.24 Przybylko, PHI 11 Rimando, RSL 1.30 Rooney, DC 11 Saves Gutierrez, KC 10 103 Heber, NYC 10 Bingham, LA Hamid, DC 102 Assists 82 Vela, LFC 15 Mannone, MIN Crepeau, VAN 80 Moralez, NYC 14 Melia, KC 77 Valeri, POR 14 76 Barrios, DAL 11 Frei, SEA 73 Lodeiro, SEA 11 Rowe, ORL

USL Championship Eastern W L T Pts GF GA New York Red Bulls II 14 4 5 47 56 27 Tampa Bay 13 3 7 46 39 16 Nashville 12 5 6 42 41 19 North Carolina 11 5 7 40 38 21 Indy 12 4 4 40 30 15 Pittsburgh 10 3 8 38 41 22 Louisville 10 7 6 36 34 28 Ottawa 8 4 9 33 32 22 Charleston 6 5 9 27 27 30 STLFC 6 7 8 26 25 26 Birmingham 7 10 5 26 21 36 Charlotte 5 9 10 25 28 36 Bethlehem Steel 6 12 5 23 30 44 Loudoun 5 9 5 20 28 34 Memphis 4 11 7 19 21 32 Atlanta 2 4 13 5 17 24 54 Hartford 4 17 4 16 30 62 Swope Park Rangers 3 12 6 15 27 48 Western W L T Pts GF GA Phoenix 15 2 5 50 58 20 Reno 13 6 5 44 51 37 Fresno 12 3 7 43 38 22 Real Monarchs 10 7 4 34 43 33 New Mexico 8 6 9 33 43 37 Austin 9 8 6 33 30 34 Portland II 8 7 8 32 43 38 LA Galaxy II 8 8 8 32 40 47 Sacramento 9 9 4 31 30 26 San Antonio 8 9 6 30 37 33 OKC Energy 7 8 9 30 31 34 El Paso 7 7 8 29 24 25 Orange County 6 8 9 27 34 35 Las Vegas 7 9 6 27 31 34 Rio Grande Valley 6 11 6 24 36 42 Colorado Springs 6 14 4 22 23 43 Tulsa 4 12 7 19 29 48 Tacoma 4 13 5 17 20 53 Wednesday Pittsburgh at New York Red Bulls II, 6 p.m. Charleston at Loudoun, 6:30 p.m.

NWSL W L T Pts Portland 8 3 6 30 Chicago 9 5 2 29 North Carolina 8 4 4 28 Reign FC 7 4 5 26 Utah 7 6 3 24 Houston 6 7 4 22 Washington 6 6 3 21 Orlando 3 10 2 11 Sky Blue FC 2 11 3 9 Wednesday Sky Blue FC at Chicago, 6 p.m.

GF GA 33 21 27 19 31 17 15 18 17 15 11 26 19 15 16 32 10 22


FOOTBALL

08.14.2019 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE PREVIEW

THE CHASE IS ON JOHN ZENOR | Associated Press

labama still is king in the Southeastern Conference, if not nationally. Nothing that happened in the national championship game changed that, beyond serving as a heartening reminder that Nick Saban’s Crimson Tide aren’t in fact invulnerable. The pursuit continues in the SEC, with Georgia again leading the chase pack after coming ever so close the past two seasons — in league and national championship games.

A

Georgia leads the SEC pack in hot pursuit of Alabama So Tide players are motivated by the mantra “never be satisfied.” For Georgia, the catchphrase is “do more.” Meanwhile, both can eye each other throughout the regular season just in case they meet again in the SEC title game. An Alabama team that won every regular-season game by at least 22 points had to rally to beat the Bulldogs in Atlanta with the SEC title on the line before ultimately getting pummeled 44-16 by Clemson in the national cham-

pionship game. “Our mantra now for our guys that we have as a leadership group is to never be satisfied,” said Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa, last season’s runner up for the Heisman Trophy. “Early in the season, we’d been beating teams by a lot. Of course you’re going to get satisfied because you feel invincible as a team. But never being satisfied is the way to go for us. We’ve just got to keep going until we get what we want.”

East Division

SEC PRESEASON POLL

Georgia safety J.R. Reed said the Bulldogs can’t focus on a potential SEC title game rematch with the Tide. “We can’t look ahead way down the line because we might not make it there if we look way down there,” Reed said. “We can’t count our eggs before they hatch.” Teams like Florida, LSU and Texas A&M are ready to pounce if either favorite falters. All three, like Georgia and Alabama, have high hopes and veteran quarterbacks.

West Division

Top players

Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm sets to throw during a game last season in Atlanta.

The favorites East: If any team is threatening the SEC supremacy of Alabama’s program, it’s Georgia. The Bulldogs not only have challenged the Tide on the field but on the recruiting trail. Georgia, led by quarterback Jake Fromm, is the clear favorite to win a third consecutive division title. The Florida Gators are coming off Dan Mullen’s 10-win debut season and Missouri is boosted by the addition of quarterback Kelly Bryant, a former Clemson starter. West: Alabama remains the favorite, as usual. But LSU’s Ed Orgeron and Texas A&M’s Jimbo Fisher are trying to build on solid 2018 seasons when the Tigers won 10 games and the Aggies went 9-4. Auburn, Arkansas, Mississippi and Mississippi State are breaking in new quarterbacks. Tua Tagovailoa

In fact, eight SEC quarterback starters return and four other teams could start graduate transfers. While Alabama’s nonconference schedule is less formidable than usual, other potential SEC contenders have some big ones. Auburn opens with Oregon in Arlington, Texas. Then Texas A&M visits Clemson on Sept. 7 and LSU is at Texas before Georgia hosts Notre Dame on Sept. 21. So there should be plenty of drama on the road to Atlanta. Here are some things to know about the SEC this season:

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

LSU safety Grant Delpit celebrates his sack during a game last season in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

New faces Sure, every SEC coach returns for the first time since 2006, but there was plenty of change among coordinators. The league has 11 new offensive and defensive coordinators, with Alabama and Georgia both replacing the play callers on both sides of the ball.

On the hot seat It might be too much to ask for all 14 coaches to survive for a second consecutive season. The warmest seat going into the season undoubtedly belongs to Auburn’s Gus Malzahn, who’s set to start a freshman quarterback against a difficult schedule. Malzahn

Derrick Brown, DT, Auburn: Opted to return for his senior season though he’s a highly rated NFL prospect. He’s the centerpiece of what could be one of the nation’s top defensive lines. Grant Delpit, DB, LSU: The unanimous All-American and finalist for the Nagurski Award as the nation’s Auburn defensive lineman top defender led the Derrick Brown warms up league with five inter- after a lightning delay ceptions but also had 74 during a game last season tackles and five sacks. in Auburn, Alabama. Jake Fromm, QB, Georgia: One of the nation’s most efficient passers, ranking fifth last season, has 54 touchdown passes against just 13 interceptions in two seasons as starter. C.J. Henderson, CB, Florida: The latest standout defensive back for the Gators has six interceptions over the past two seasons and returned a pair of them for touchdowns in 2017. Jerry Jeudy, WR, Alabama: Tagovailoa’s favorite target won the Biletnikoff Award last season and is a big-time deep threat. He’s hard to double team because the Tide have so many weapons in the passing game. Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama: The SEC offensive player of the year lost out on the Heisman to Oklahoma’s Kyler Murray in his first season as the starter. He set Alabama single-season passing records with 43 touchdowns and 3,966 yards. Andrew Thomas, LT, Georgia: The second-team AP All-American last season is one of the nation’s better offensive linemen. He helps protect Fromm and pave the way for a running game led by D’Andre Swift.

Mizzou

Illinois

From B1

From B1

the nature of the game, the trickle-down effect from all areas of football right now. So you need those type athletes out there that allows us to be more diverse and get more favorable matchups, especially in RPO games.” Missouri’s answer is a three-safety base system, using two traditional deep safeties to cover the short side of the field (boundary safety) and the wide side (free safety). The third safety in the equation, the strong safety, is what separates the past and the future. In Walters’ defense, that player must hold his own against the running game at the point of attack. He has to be athletic enough to cover tight ends and slot receivers in the passing game. When his number’s called he gets to rush the passer, too. “We come up in the run, we cover one on one, we drop in zones,” senior Ronnell Perkins said. “It’s a hybrid of everything combined.” Here’s the good news for Mizzou’s newly structured base defense: The Tigers have faith in two potential starters at the position. Olihave traded shifts with the first- and second-team defense throughout camp.

pounds and unhappy with how he was moving. He wasn’t in a bad place mentally because of that experience in youth football and knowing how to lose weight, but he wasn’t happy with himself. “I was very shocked,” Barker said. “I was like, ‘Wow, I haven’t been this way.’ It will never happen again.” This time, he didn’t need a garbage bag to sweat out his weight. He made a commitment, worked with the team nutritionist, cut his meals down, ate better, focused on hydration and put in the workouts to get back to a more comfortable weight. As a 6-foot-4 sophomore now, he said he’s at 250 pounds and his ideal weight is 245 pounds. The change has worked. He’s shown the ability to make plays through the first week of training camp and is proving to be a valuable piece to the offensive puzzle without standout tight end Luke Ford, whose waiver to become immediately eligible after transferring from the University of Georgia was denied by the NCAA. “I just knew I had to work to get down to where I want to be, to be able to showcase the talent I’m capable of showing,” Barker said. At a more desirable weight, Barker has been able to show his full set of skills. “He needed to tighten his body up; he’s done that,” Illinois coach Lovie Smith said. “He’s a smart player. He’s a competitor. I love his energy that he brings to the team. He’s a good football player. “With Luke Ford not playing this year, we’re going to need him to even have a bigger role. He’s able to do that. Every day there’s something to see Daniel Barker do that you like.” Barker is more than a player who had to lose weight to get on the field. He has the talent to make an impact, coming to Champaign as a three-star recruit by all the major recruiting services after receiving offers from Kentucky, Pitts-

L.G. PATTERSON

Missouri safety Khalil Oliver, 20, is set to be more involved as a run-stopper this season. It might be the most-contested position battle on the team. One will start, but both will play. “They’re 1 and 1A,” Walters said. “They’re both good at different things, so it’s really hard to tell who’s playing better at times. I would definitely see both of them getting a lot of playing time. There’s not a starter and a backup. Obviously, when we go out there for the first snap somebody has to go out there, but throughout the course of the game I see both of them playing a lot. They’re both competing. They’re both encouraging of one another. They understand we’re going to need both of them.” “If we were playing tomorrow,” Odom said, “they’ll both play a lot.”

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Perkins, a fifth-year senior from University City High, has played multiple positions the last three seasons but mostly in a part-time role. He started three games last year when the Tigers opened with three safeties against Purdue, Tennessee and Oklahoma State. Time’s running out on his college career. He knows it. “There’s a lot of urgency. I want to end with a good year, let my name be known as a great Mizzou player that came from St. Louis,” said Perkins, who intercepted a Kelly Bryant pass late in Saturday’s scrimmage. “Every year I try to go out there and give my best, but it’s my last year. I have dreams of going to the NFL, and to do that you’ve got to dominate.” Perkins and fellow senior Khalil Oliver took a different path to this showdown for a starting job. The Idaho native spent three years at Oregon but suffered a season-ending ankle injury one game into the 2017 season. He came to Mizzou last year as a graduate transfer and instantly became a starter. He finished fifth on the team in tackles (40). That came as a safety, stationed deep in the secondary. Now Oliver plays closer to the line of scrimmage, where he’ll be more involved as a run-stopper alongside MU’s two inside linebackers. Perkins and Oliver “are both physical enough to get in the box and play in there and leverage the ball back to the (middle

linebacker),” Walters said. “Both of those guys are vital to what we’re doing on defense.” They’re also both seniors, which means Missouri better have someone in mind for the future at the position. For now, that appears to be Stacy Brown, a rangy 6-foot-2, 190-pound freshman from Duncanville, Texas, who’s gotten work with the second unit in practice. When he’s not making a case for playing time this year, he’s absorbing all he can from the two fifth-year veterans. “They’ve been (in college) since I was in eighth grade,” Brown said. “So I can really learn from them as I watch them compete and they pass their knowledge down to me.”

Tigers land pledge Missouri’s defensive line added a big piece to its future on Tuesday with a commitment from Montra Edwards Jr., a threestar defensive tackle from Lexington, Miss. Edwards, listed at 6-3, 290 pounds, is rated the nation’s No. 29 defensive tackle and No. 8 player in Mississippi by Rivals.com. As a junior last fall at Holmes County Central High School, Edwards put up monstrous numbers for an interior lineman: 107 tackles, 29 tackles for loss and 13 sacks. Edwards gives Mizzou 14 commitments for the 2020 class and four defensive linemen. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

burgh and others. He played in all 12 games, with three starts, last year and had nine receptions for 84 yards and a touchdown. Smith remembers Barker’s first day on campus and recalls that Barker never lacked confidence and never needed to be “pumped up.” That much about Barker hasn’t changed. He’s still a wildly entertaining watch on the field. After catching a touchdown pass in the corner of the end zone during a 7-on-7 portion of Tuesday’s practice, Barker stretched his arms and flew around the field like a jet ready to take off. “I just give it all I’ve got and have fun with what I want to do,” Barker said. On the next play, Barker caught a touchdown pass in the middle of the field, lay on his back and put his arms straight up in the air to celebrate. He knows how to have fun — it’s a trait no one wants to take from him. Smith said the enthusiasm is authentic and a perfect fit for the team. “Daniel has the ability. I liked his high school film, it was just a matter of him growing up and he’s starting to grow up,” offensive coordinator Rod Smith said. “His body is changing, he’s got strong hands, he’s got an athleticism to him. He gives us a vertical threat down the seam, a big target and a guy we can throw to and he’s also getting better in the run game.”

Beason is injured Freshman cornerback Marquez Beason was carted off the field after suffering a knee injury Tuesday, the extent of which is unclear. Beason, a prized fourstar recruit from Duncanville, Texas, returned to the sidelines with his right knee in a brace and was seen using crutches. “He went down with a knee injury and didn’t finish practice, so that’s concerning,” Smith said. “We’ll kind of see how it goes.” Beason was getting second-team reps behind starters Nate Hobbs and Quan Martin, but Beason was expected to make an early impact for the Illini at a position that lacked depth.


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • AUGUST.14.2019

CLASSIFIED Antique/Classic Sp. Interest Triumph TR6 '76, runs good, drives good, new tires. British racing green. $7500. 636-274-6100

BMW

Ford

Kia

Volvo

Sport Utility

'16 BMW X5 eDrive xDrive 40e, sports activity vehicle, 4 cyl, awd, auto, grey, 49k mi., #29182A $32,700

'18 Ford Taurus LTD FWD, stk# P07330 $19,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'14 Kia Sorento, loaded, very clean, only 58xxx miles, stk# 44347B $13,569

'16 XC 90 SUV: #197901, $33,822 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'15 Dodge Durango R>, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 35k mi., #P9927 $31,888

Honda

Acura '15 Acura TLX 3.5 awd, #L16261 $16,890 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black 50k, #29142A $34,555

Audi '15 Audi A6 3.0 TDI Sedan, black, #200591 $23,780 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Audi Q7 3.0T Prem Plus, quattro, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 39k mi., #P9933 $27,555

'16 Audi A6 3.0T Premium Plus, 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 30k mi., #P1185 $29,700

'16 Audi S6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 32k mi., #29179A $41,555

'19 Chevy Corvette Grand Sport, 2LT, 2 dr car, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, white, 4K mi., #P1237 $59222

'07 Honda-CRV, Loaded, Fuel Power, Clean Carfax, #44813A $8,750

'18 Honda Civic SI, stk# 181106B $22,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Hyundai Buick '16 Buick Enclave, #P07288 $22,450 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Hyundai Sonata #P07314 $14,022 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Buick Envision AWD, stk# P07322 $26,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Infiniti

'18 Buick Enclave Avenir, SUV, 6 cyl., awd, auto, metallic, 31k mi., #41230A $35,888

'15 Infiniti Q50 Sport Sedan, #201351 $22,825 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'18 Buick LaCrosse FWD, stk# P07300 $21,344 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Buick Lacrosse, #P07300 $21,344 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Audi TT 2.0T, 2 dr., 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 54k mi., #P9998 $28,888

'17 Audi A6 Premium Plus, 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 33k mi., #P1121 $32,888

Chevrolet '17 Audi A8 L Sport, quattro LWB Sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 50k mi., #P9999 $44,888

'17 Audi Q5, Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 45k mi., #P9953 $28555

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6cyl., awd, auto, black, 8k mi., #80654A, $38,888

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6cyl., awd, auto, black, 8k mi., #80654A, $41,000

'17 Infiniti QX80 auto, awd, blue, #95533L $58,555

'17 Infiniti QX80 AWD, 8 cyl., auto, blue, 8k mi., $60,555 #95548L

Lexus '07 Lexus IS 250 Base Sedan, stk# L16031 $7,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '18 Lexus LC 500h coupe, 6 cyl., RWD, silver, 10k mi., #P9941 $71,555

'14 Mazda CX-5 Touring, loaded, clean carfax, #44699A $11,990

'14 Mazda CX-5, grand touring, loaded, full power, #44725A $14,769

'15 Mazda CX-5 Touring, loaded, full power, stk# 37356A $13,990

'15 Mazda CX-5, awd, Grand Touring, one owner, stk# 44700A $16,990

'18 Mazda CX-5, Blue Reflex, CPO, 10w miles, Sport, #37263A $17,993

'13 Chevy Spark LS, 4 dr hatch back, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, green, 40k mi., stk# 44753A $8,969

'15 Chevy Cruze LS, one owner, clean carfax, black, stk# 44621A $9,769

'15 Chevy Malibu LS Sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, silver, 49k mi., stk# 44144A $12,469

'19 Mazda CX-9 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #13014L $33,888 '18 Infiniti Q70L 3.7 LUXE, 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, 6k mi., #97377L $39,200

Mercedes Benz '18 Infiniti Q70L 3.7 LUXE, 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 5k mi., #97342L $39,200

'10 Mercedes Benz GLK-Class 350 4Matic, #199371 $14,000 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Mercedes-Benz CLS 400 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 25k mi., #13197A $32,888

'18 Infiniti Q70L 3.7 Luxe, sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 3k mi, #97331L, $41,000

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 H D #P07195 $28,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Chevrolet Trucks

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 High Country pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 22k mi., #80596A $36,888

'16 Chevy Suburban LT, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 67k mi., #80601B $41,700

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, double cab pu, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, blue, 2k mi., #44107A $37,990

'19 Chevy Colorado, 4wd, LT, white, 17k mi., #P07212 $26,850 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '18 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT, 4x4 crew cab, #P07240 $26,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Ford Trucks '13 Ford F-150, 4WD, Super Crew Box XL, #P0794A $22,550 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Ford F150, stk# 181220A $29661 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'13 Chevy Equinox, very clean, loaded, stk# 40394B $9,869

'14 GMC Sierra 1500 Crew Cab short box, #190655A $26,950DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Mercedes-Benz AMG C 63 S 2dr car, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, black, 4k mi., #29235A $69,222 '16 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT, pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 69k mi., #P1166 $32,222 '19 Mercedes - AMG GT 63 S hatchback, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 1k mi., #004596 $159,600

'18 Audi A6, Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, grey, #28600L $40,644

'16 Chevy Cruze Limited LT, sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, red, 31k mi., stk# P6804 $12,569

'17 GMC Sierra 4x4, double cab, elevation pkg., loaded, black, #44678A $29,469

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 16k mi., #P9886 $33,555

Nissan, Datsun '18 Audi Q5 Prem>ech Prem, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 21k, #P9675 $29555

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27853L $40,555

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, #27848L $40555

'18 Audi Q5 Tech Prem Plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 12k mi., #28330L $40,555

'16 Chevy Cruze LS, Sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, black, 28k mi., stk# P6932 $13,769

'18 Chevrolet Cruze, #P07306 $14,635 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Cruze LT, stk# P07310 $14,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Malibu 1LT, gray, 33k mi., #P07243 $16,728 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chevy Spark LS, hatchback, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, silver, 2k mi., stk# 44626A $12,990

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, sport utility, 6 cyl, awd, platinum, 19 k mi, #P1150 $33,555

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, 17k mi., #P1224 $55,700

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, platinum, 18k mi., #P1214 $55,339

Jaguar '18 Jaguar F-Type R, 2 dr car, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 6k mi., #29499A $80,400

'18 Audi Q5 Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 9k, #27847L $38,777

17 Q7 PRESTIGE: Sport Utility, 6 Cyl, AWD, Auto, Black, 63K Miles, #29031B $38,888

'11 Chrysler 200 4 Door Sedan stk# P07241M $8,469 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chrysler 300, stk# P07210 $24,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Corvette 2018 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9619 $42,555

BMW

'15 Chevy Corvette Z51 3LT, convertible, 8 cyl., RWD, 7spd manual, 51k, #44573A $41,990

'18 Jaguar XF 35t R-Sport, 9k mi., sedan, auto, awd, #P9821 $42,888

Jeep '13 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon, loaded, one owner, stk# 44967A $23,990

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd, 4x4, #200691 $17,888 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 44k, #P1109 $27,888

'17 Chevy Corvette Z06 1LZ coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, gray, 7k mi., #P1116 $65,500 '15 Jeep Wrangler Unlmtd Rubicon, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 50k, #97397M $29,777

'15 BMW M3 4dr sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, manual, white, 29k mi., #P9684 $42,555

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

'18 Nissan Sentra #P07318 $13,146 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Nissan Sentra SV CVT stk# P07318 $13,146 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'12 RAM 3500 Laramie, crew cab pickup, 6 cyl, 4wd, auto, blue, #98194B $31,400

'13 Dodge Challenger SRT8, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, black, 9k mi., #12808A $28,644

'19 Dodge Challenger SXT RWD stk# P07333 $23,550 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Jeep Cherokee Sport, loaded, full power, stk# 44738A $16,769

'16 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 30k, #P9926 $25,555

'18 Jeep Renegade, stk# P07266 $16,724 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 GMC Yukon XL Denali, white, auto, 4wd, 19k mi., #79897A $53,555

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $59555

Crossovers '17 RX350: Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $36,555 #P9626

Porsche '15 Porsche Macan S, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 60k mi., #P1158 $33,555

Toyota '16 Toyota Highlander AWD, stk# P07255A $30,694 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Sport Utility '08 Ford Explorer XLT, V6, #200841 $7,975 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '09 Toyota Highlander Hybrid Limited SUV #L16411 $8,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 Chevy Traverse LT, loaded, full power, stk# 44702A $11,990

Volkswagen '11 VW CC Sport, clean carfax, only 71xxx miles, stk# 44785A $9,989

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, luxury pkg., loaded, GM Certified, stk# 44968A $36,990

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 51k mi., #P6797 $38,990

'16 Chevy Tahoe LTZ, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 69k mi., #29272B $40,900

'16 Chevy Traverse AWD LS, stk# P07285A $21,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Traverse LS, loaded, very clean, clean carfax, stk# 44814A $19,997

'16 Dodge Durango Citadel, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 35k mi., #P1203 $32,600

'16 Honda Pilot Touring, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 51k mi., stk# P6867A $29,990

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax #79760A $34,555

'16 Nissan Rogue, FWD, 4dr, S, #190515B $18,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Equinox, one owner, clean carfax, stk# 44934A $13,994

'13 Chevy Traverse LT, sport utility, 6 cyl., FWD, gray, 140k mi., stk# 44684A $9,990

'17 Chevy Suburban Premier, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 28k mi., #P1223 $48,700

'17 Dodge Journey GT AWD, #P07271 $20,750 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Ford Explorer XLT 4wd, stk# P07313 $25,102 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 GMC Terrain FWD SLE-1, #P07247 $17,660 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 GMC Terrain, FWD, #P07281 $18,625 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Suburban LT #P07183 $45,919 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Ford F150 Super Crew Cab, #P4372 $29500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '18 Hyundai Tucson SEL, awd, gray, 27k mi., #P07191 $17,850 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Jeep Renegade Latitude FWD, stk# P07266 $16,724 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Nissan Murano FWD, stk# P07328 $20,707 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chevy Tahoe 4wd Premier, stk# P07332 $61,550 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 25k mi., #P6867 $46,990

'19 MAZDA CX-9 TOURING: Sprt Utility, 4 Cyl, awd, Auto, Red, 1k Mi, #13084L $34,888

Mini Vans '11 Honda Odyssey EX-L: Loaded, Full Power, Clean Carfax, #42365A, $10,990

'17 Chrysler Pacifica Limited, mini van, 6 cyl., FWD, auto, white, 29k mi., #P1119A $30,555 '14 Volkswagen Passat SEL Premium, Sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, black, 81k mi., stk# P6845A $9,950

'15 Volkswagen Passat 4 dr sdn 2.0L, #P07258 $15,452 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Volkswagen Passat, stk# P07259 $15,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Trax FWD, LS, stk# P07323 $15,002 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Dodge '16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29KMi, AWD, Sedan, #12382A $27,555

'16 Nissan Altima 2.5, full power, clean carfax, dark gray, #P6904A $12,997

'19 Chevy Traverse LT, leather, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 20k mi., #P6798 $37,550

Chrysler '18 Audi Q52.0T Premium Plus, quattro, clean carfax, 1 owner, awd, #28649L $40,555

'15 Nissan Rogue SL, loaded, clean carfax, #35091B $12,973

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $38,555 #P9665

GMC Trucks

'15 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE pickup crew cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 39k mi., #44728A $29,990

'18 Inifiniti Q70L 3.7 Luxe, sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 4k mi., #97344L, $38,555

'15 Honda CR-V EX AWD 32,852 miles, automatic, urban titanium. $9,750 636-517-8871

Luxury Autos

Mazda

'18 Infiniti Q70L 3.7 LUXE, 4dr. car, 6 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 4k mi., #97338L $39,700 '08 Chevy Impala SS, loaded, full power, very clean, stk# 44730A $8,754

'18 XC90 MOMENTUM: Sport Utility, 4 Cyl, AWD, Auto, White, 40K Miles, #P9997 $37,888

'13 Ram Sport Crew, 4x4, loaded, clean carfax, #44452B $24,500

'18 Mazda CX-9 Sport, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 2k mi., #12044L $26,555

'07 Chevy Tahoe LT, loaded, very clean, stk# 44588A, $9,969

'13 Chevy Captiva LTZ, champagne mist, loaded, clean carfax, stk# 44844A $8,769 '17 Audi Q7 Prestige, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 108k mi., #29321A $32,700

'16 Infiniti QX60, awd, 4 dr., sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 25k mi., #P1218 $30,700

Cadillac '18 Cadillac XT5 Prem Luxury FWD, sport utility, 6 cyl., auto, silver, 23k mi., #P1152 $31,555

'18 Kia Optima, stk# P07315 $14,963 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Hyundai Elantra SE, stk# P07325 $14,930 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Infiniti QX80 4wd, 4 dr., sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 97k mi., #98388A $28,555 '16 Audi S7 4 dr., HB hatchback, 8 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 21k mi., #29100A $54,222

'18 Kia Niro LX, FWD, white, 37k mi., #P07249 $16,811 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 XC90 T5 Momentum: AWD, $31,822 #L1559 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Volvo '16 S60 T5: Drive-E Inscription Sedan, #L1603, $18,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo S60 Inscription T5 Platinum #L1704 $24,792 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo XC60 T5 Drive-E Premier, stk# L16521 $17795 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'13 Infiniti JX35 sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 123k mi., stk# 37292A $11,964 '19 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, Wagon, #P07290 $21703 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'13 Nissan Pathfinder 4wd, 4 dr., SV, red, #P07150A $11,639 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Sport Vans/Conversions

'14 Chevy Equinox LT, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, black, 108k mi., stk# 44739A $10,656

'16 Ford Transit Connect XLT w ear liftgate wagon, #L15915 $14,875 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Vans '14 Dodge Durango Ltd, #L16161 $16,880 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Mazda CX-5 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, white, 83k mi., stk# P6846A $13,569

'16 Sienna MobilityVan; 18Kmi, power fold side ramp for wheel chair, floor-loc; 636-441-7748;

RV Motor Homes 2016 32' Winnebago Class C Motor Home, 450 V10 Ford, 4K mi., $60,000. Call 618-963-2100

'15 Chevy Tahoe LT, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 82k mi., #P9986A $29,888

Dogs Australian Shepherd Puppies AKC reg., $500 & up. Blue or red merle, blk or red tri. Vet ckd shots. Cash only. 314-283-5406.


08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

Dogs

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

Public Notices

Boston Terrier Puppies Home Raised, black & white 5 weeks 618-967-2774

Bids and Proposals additional entry/exit from the building, and the construction of a Primate Care Center building, eight outdoor habitats, elevated boardwalks, and site paving and retaining walls. Site work also includes tree protection, minor grading and soil treatment, fences, irrigation, and utility connections. Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting & Site Inspection on 8/28/2019 at 1:00 pm. Meet in the Bayer Lecture Theatre, located on lower level of the Living World. Note for the walkthrough, individuals must wear a dust mask (provided by the Zoo) in the Primate House. Bids are due to the Distribution Center by 2:00pm on 9/17/2019. Bids will be walked over to the Bayer Lecture Theatre for opening at 2:00 pm on 9/17/2019. Documents can be found on 8/14/2019 at: https:/ /www.stlzoo.org/about/contact/vendor opportunities/

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

FRENCH BULLDOGS/BOSTON TERRIER Pups, Registered. All up to date on shots. Call (636)699-5911 FRENCH BULLDOGS/BOSTON TERRIER Pups. Registered. All up to date on shots. Call (636) 699-5911 GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES FOR SALE CALL FOR PRICE 618-610-3669 Golden Retrievers, AKC Reg. Ready end of August. Males & Females. Great with children. $400 each. 573-238-3920 Goldendoodle & & AKC Standard Poodle Pups. 8wks, Aug 15/22. goldendoodles/poodlegems.us will meet. For info/pics 660-541-0596 Great Pyrenees Puppies, Parents from Working Stock, Very Intelligent, Extremely Loyal, Excellent Family or Working Dogs. $300 to $500. (314)917-2718 Lab Pups - AKC, UKC, parents OFA, 6wks, choc., black & yellows avail. Father & grandfather hunter retriever champs. $850 314-324-7235 Mini Australian Shepherd Pups. Black Tri and Red Tri. $275. (217) 336-4060

Other Pets Pug puppies, reg., wormed & shots, 5 males, 1 female, 4 fawn, 3 black $500. 618-917-6286, leave msg.

Horses and Tack 2 gentle gaited horses for sale Fox Trotter & Walking Horses, show & trail broke. Extra gentle. 618-420-7966

ST. LOUIS COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT A public hearing will be held at 3:30 p.m., August 19, 2019, at the Headquarters Branch, 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd., at which time citizens may be heard on the property tax rates to be set by the St. Louis County Library District Board. The tax rates shall be set to produce revenues for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2020. The property tax revenues are the gross property taxes for the current year, minus the cost of collection, cost of reassessment, uncollectible taxes and tax increment financing deduction. Assessed Valuation: Real Estate: Residential 2018 – 12,452,166,800 2019 – 14,259,924,940

Sealed bids for Company Headquarters & Administration Building, Macon Training Site, Macon, Missouri, Project No. T1833-02 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 95/81/4019. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/facilities

Agricultural 2018 – 6,454,830 2019 – 7,047,210 Commercial 2018 – 5,754,972,273 2019 – 6,634,197,563 Personal Property 2018 – 3,223,105,991 2019 – 3,306,093,470

Sealed bids for Repair Storm Damage & Replace Roof, Jackson Readiness Center, Jackson, Mo, Project No. T1931-01 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 9/12/2019. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http:/ /oa.mo.gov/facilities

Total 2018 – 21,436,599,024 2019 – 24,207,263,183 Tax Rate: Real Estate: Residential 2018 Assessed Rate - .234 2019 Prelim Proposed Rate - .210

Sealed bids for Repairs to CCC Thunderbird Lodge, Washington State Park, DeSoto, Missouri, Project No. X1802-01 will be received ONLINE at https://missouribuys.mo.gov UNTIL 1:30 PM, 9/5/2019. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to:http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

Agricultural 2018 Assessed Rate - .215 2019 Prelim Proposed Rate - .200 Commercial 2018 Assessed Rate - .253 2019 Prelim Proposed Rate - .232 Personal Property 2018 Assessed Rate - .225 2019 Prelim Proposed Rate - .225

Merchandise Wanted WANTED - 2000 AMP or more Outside Diesel Motor Generator with switch gear. John J Steuby Co. 6002 N Lindbergh 314-895-1000

Belleville Flea Market August 17-18, 2019

Saint Louis Zoo Exploration Outpost Kitchen Renovation RFP The St Louis Zoo is seeking contractor bids for food service equipment replacement and associated construction renovation materials and labor as outlined in bid documents. Bid documents will be located on 08 1/84 1/89: https://www.stlzoo.org /about/contactendoropportunities

ONLY at the BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS Belleville, IL 618-233-0052 www.bcfairgrounds.net

Saint Louis Zoo Primate Canopy Trails RFP

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STLTODAY.COM/READERREWARDS The maximum amount of current year property tax revenue is estimated at $52,300,000. Final rates will be set by the Board at their September meeting.

WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

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ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

Mostly sunny and pleasant WIND NW 7-14 mph

Partly cloudy WIND NNW 6-12 mph

86°

64°

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

Drenching showers and thunderstorms will congregate in the Southeast states today, and isolated flash flooding can occur. Lesser showers and storms will push eastward across the Great Lakes. A few heavy storms will dot the High Plains and Rockies. New England, the rest of the Plains and the remainder of the West will be free of rain.

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

A thunderstorm in spots WIND SE 7-14 mph

Mostly cloudy and humid WIND S 7-14 mph

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Partly sunny and Some sun with a pleasant t-storm WIND WIND NNW 6-12 mph S 7-14 mph

80

Peoria 81/61

74

Macomb 78/58 Bloomington 80/58

Kirksville 82/59

Quincy 81/61

55

Urbana 83/61

Decatur 83/62 Springfield 57 83/61 Effingham 70 55 85/63

35

Columbia 70 85/62 St. Louis Mount Jefferson 86/64 Vernon City 87/62 86/62 Union 55 86/64 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 86/62 88/63 Farmington 88/64 Cape Girardeau 90/65 Springfield 88/64 Poplar Bluff West Plains 91/65 55 89/64

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Tue. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Tue. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

21.11 +0.49 17.79 -0.15 19.98 -0.21 16.39 -0.10 23.27 -0.02

16 11.66 +0.28 15 11.94 -0.03 25 18.67 -0.01 26 18.96 -0.18 18 16.12 +0.04 419 418.67 -0.02 21 13.40 +0.30 30 20.10 +1.49 27 22.39 +0.23 32 26.74 -0.41 20 18 14

12.14 +0.24 12.34 +0.14 9.84 +0.04

15 16 24

2.38 -0.04 -0.71 +0.72 17.04 +1.25

15

1.75

-0.02

40

24.48

-1.62

357.83 359.89 497.22 658.69 716.75 681.09 917.07 844.14 602.38 407.14 605.24 447.77

-0.01 -0.08 -0.22 -0.93 -0.05 -0.32 -0.05 -0.67 -0.20 +0.02 +0.04 +1.39

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature

100

87

87

89

71

72

91

Average High

Average Low

90

87

86

88

90

89

87

75

74

73

72

S

M

83

88

80

70

76

73

67

W

T

F

S

71

69

64

60

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

T

Toronto 76/60

Minneapolis 73/61

New York 80/68

San Francisco 85/61

Statistics through 5 p.m. Tuesday Temperature High/low 90°/73° Normal high/low 88°/70° Last year high/low 90°/70° Record high 103° (1936) Record low 50° (1964) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Tue. 0.35” Month to date (normal) 3.33” (1.34”) Year to date (normal) 40.06” (26.10”) Record for this date 1.18” (1973)

Chicago 79/64 Denver 88/61

Detroit 81/63 Washington 88/74

Kansas City 83/62

Los Angeles 90/63 Atlanta 93/74 El Paso 96/74 Chihuahua 95/69

Cold front

Warm front

Houston 99/79 Miami 92/78

Monterrey 102/74

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Low - 2 Moderate - 37 Absent High - 13357 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Tuesday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

17 193 190 1233 1159

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

77° 8 a.m.

88° noon

87° 4 p.m.

76° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

82/58/pc 93/67/pc 73/60/sh 93/74/t 101/76/t 86/69/t 92/70/t 94/61/s 75/62/pc 96/77/t 86/65/pc 94/72/t 79/64/c 86/65/pc 80/61/pc 93/76/t 92/75/t 88/61/s 77/60/pc 89/77/t 81/63/pc 83/60/pc 90/78/pc 99/79/t 84/65/pc 83/62/s 108/84/s 93/71/s

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

79/62/pc 91/67/pc 75/59/c 93/69/pc 97/74/t 84/68/t 93/67/s 90/58/s 75/64/pc 89/76/t 87/63/pc 91/71/pc 78/63/pc 82/62/pc 79/63/t 97/78/s 88/75/t 92/56/pc 78/65/pc 88/77/t 79/63/t 83/61/pc 91/79/pc 95/77/t 80/63/pc 79/66/pc 110/83/s 91/70/s

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

90/63/pc 90/68/pc 92/72/pc 92/78/t 73/62/c 73/61/c 95/74/t 92/67/pc 92/78/t 80/68/c 92/67/s 78/61/pc 90/75/t 84/70/t 113/87/s 83/61/pc 77/58/pc 85/61/pc 103/66/s 94/68/s 101/78/pc 80/66/pc 85/61/pc 82/60/pc 89/80/t 105/78/s 88/74/c 88/68/s

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

National Extremes Tuesday in the 48 contiguous states

Today’s Air Quality

High: 112 Needles, Calif.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

6:14 a.m. 7:50 p.m.

7:58 p.m. 5:12 a.m.

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Aug 15

Aug 23

Aug 30

Sep 5

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

88/63/pc 86/67/pc 90/71/s 91/78/t 74/64/c 77/63/pc 95/67/pc 89/66/s 90/77/t 79/69/pc 95/71/s 78/66/pc 87/75/t 83/70/t 112/85/s 81/62/t 76/60/s 79/59/pc 106/64/s 93/69/s 97/77/pc 79/64/pc 86/60/pc 78/60/pc 88/79/t 106/77/pc 85/73/t 90/70/pc

Low: 28 Daniel, Wyo.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

95

75

Montreal 75/56

Billings 88/60

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

We have a couple of nice days on the way. Today, there should be lots of sunshine and a noticeable drop in the humidity. Highs will be in the 80s. More nice weather tomorrow before some heat returns.

Joplin 87/66

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

83° 71° 88° 75° 90° 74° 89° 73°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 83/62

Winnipeg 76/55

Seattle 82/60

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

66/59/r 92/75/s 118/86/pc 92/80/t 89/67/pc 71/54/pc 52/42/s 100/82/s 90/79/pc 68/55/c 93/83/t 87/65/s 76/47/s 66/59/r 92/65/s 105/82/s

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

67/57/sh 92/77/s 115/86/s 93/79/t 91/68/s 70/57/c 60/45/pc 104/78/s 90/80/t 68/58/pc 90/82/t 89/69/s 73/49/s 73/57/sh 96/67/s 110/82/s

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

77/56/t 75/56/pc 73/62/c 90/80/pc 76/50/pc 91/81/t 72/59/c 71/64/r 85/63/s 90/79/pc 79/43/s 95/78/pc 66/43/s 88/81/t 76/60/s 73/58/s

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

76/56/t 75/58/s 74/57/pc 90/81/pc 75/52/pc 90/80/c 74/56/sh 72/59/pc 86/65/s 91/80/pc 72/40/s 84/75/t 70/46/s 89/82/sh 74/59/c 71/58/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

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STLTODAY.COM/FOOD • WEDNESDAY • 08.14.2019 • L

Yakitori JAPAN’S DELECTABLE STREET FOOD BY DANIEL NEMAN , St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Just west of Tokyo’s Shinjuku station, the busiest train station in the world, the air is said to be heavy with the irresistible aroma of chicken cooking on charcoal grills. • This is Yakitori Alley (though it also has a less appealing name), perhaps the greatest concentration of yakitori street food stalls in all of Japan. If you don’t happen to be there, don’t worry: Yakitori is popular throughout the country. • And if you aren’t in Japan, that’s also no problem. You can easily make it yourself at home. It only takes a few minutes to make one of Japan’s most addictive street treats. • In its most basic form, yakitori is small pieces of chicken that are skewered and cooked quickly over blazing hot charcoal. It is often eaten as a snack, particularly on the way home from work — which is why you can usually find it near a train station. Please see YAKITORI, Page L4

RECIPES Yakitori With Tare (right), Yakitori With Shio, Torikawa (Crispy Chicken Skin) and Reba (Chicken Livers) Page L4

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, POST-DISPATCH

Former St. Louisan turns ramen into comic-book art out of art. You should go into business or get an MBA,” she said DANIEL NEMAN from Chicago, where she now St. Louis Post-Dispatch lives. And then she had an epiphany. “You don’t have to be a rock star to make a career out of music, and you don’t have to be Sarah Becan — Cor Jesu a Picasso to make a career out Academy class of ’94 — was interested enough in art to make of art. There are lots of little niches.” it one of her two majors in colBecan is the illustrator of a lege. The other was modern comic-book cookbook, “Let’s languages. Make Ramen!” In the still-new But, “at the time, I thought it was not realistic to make a career world of printing cookbooks in

comic-book form, Becan is kind of a Picasso. She will be at the St. Louis Small Press Expo on Saturday with copies of the book, other comic books and art prints. “Let’s Make Ramen!” is an expansive look into all things ramen, including the history of the dish, the ingredients used in making it, the Please see NEMAN, Page L5

ARGENTINA MAKES MORE THAN MALBEC; TRY THESE WHITE WINES. PAGE L2

SPECIAL REQUEST: LEGRAND’S PASTA SALAD IS FULL OF ITALIAN FAVORITES. PAGE L5 LET’S EAT

1 1


ON OUR RADAR

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

DANIEL NEMAN food writer dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 08.14.2019

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

BEST BITES

Argentina’s signature white wine: torrontés

California Pizza Kitchen Take and Bake Pizza

BY GAIL APPLESON • SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

When it comes to wines from Argentina, reds made from malbec grapes are probably the first that come to mind. However, Argentina also has a signature white grape variety: torrontés. This grape produces aromatic, floral whites that usually have a moderate acidity, taste of stone fruits and have a distinctive spicy character. The following are examples of sparkling and still styles.

Tapiz NV Extra Brut Torrontés, Mendoza, Argentina

Alma Andina 2018 Torrontés, Salta, Argentina

Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard, in July for $15.99 Description • It’s very unusual to see a torrontés sparkling wine in our market, so coming across this one was a real find. Although it’s labeled “extra brut,” a term that indicates a sparkling wine is drier than a regular “brut,” the Tapiz was not too dry. Instead this nonvintage aromatic wine has fresh tropical fruit flavors along with zesty citrus notes. Made through the same process as real French Champagne, the Tapiz is crisp and delicate with pinpoint bubbles and good acidity. It would be great with seafood.

Bought • Wine Cellar Outlet, 11553 Gravois Road, in July for $10 Description • This fresh and fragrant torrontés is made from grapes grown in Salta, a region on the edge of the Andes with some of the highest vineyards in the world. This area is believed to produce some of the country’s best torrontés, and this wine is a good example. Created by highly regarded winemaker Steve McEwen, this lovely and elegant wine is soft and easy to drink. Tasting of honeyed stone fruits with hints of spice, it has a rich mouthfeel and long finish. A fine aperitif wine, it would also pair with seafood and spicy Asian cuisine.

If you like California Pizza Kitchen — and who doesn’t? — but you don’t want the bother of eating at a restaurant, you can now pick up a fresh (not frozen) pizza to bake at home. We tried our favorite, the Thai Chicken, and it tasted just like it does at the restaurant. It costs the same, too, which is a great deal for the restaurant, which takes in the same money without having to cover much of the overhead. Size • 1 regular pizza Price • $15.39 (Thai Chicken pizza) Available • California Pizza Kitchen locations in the St. Louis Galleria, West County Mall and 10590 Old Olive Street — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Crispy, addictive breakfast potatoes Are our Crispy Breakfast Potatoes the best potatoes you’ve ever had? Maybe, yeah. In a favorite Prep School video, Daniel Neman shows how to make them so addictively good. stltoday.com/food

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

CRISTINA M. FLETES, POST-DISPATCH

WHAT’S FRESH

Zucchini, potatoes, green beans and more This week at area farmers markets you will find watermelon, cantaloupe, sweet corn, peaches, cherries, blueberries, potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini, eggplant, onions, peppers, carrots, fresh herbs, Swiss chard, sweet potatoes, lettuce, kohlrabi, cabbage, green beans, cucumbers, fresh eggs and more. To help you use that zucchini, here’s a recipe for Sauteed Zucchini Ribbons from a previous Let’s Eat section. Information provided by the Lake Saint Louis Farmers and Artists Market. Find our guide to area farmers markets at stltoday.com/farmersmarkets

STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG, THE WASHINGTON POST

Fruit crumble is a crispy, buttery delight BY BECKY KRYSTAL

Blueberries are wonderful, of course, and you won’t go wrong if you only use them. My favorChocolate is my default dessert mode. I eat enough berries, ite rendition, however, was a peaches, apricots and plums out mixed berry number, with blueberries, blackberries, cherries of hand in the summer that I never feel a great urgency to use and raspberries. Peaches were them when I’m baking. But then quite nice, too, if a little soupier. The bottom line — use whatever something like this Summer Fruit Crumble comes along and you like or have in excess. Be sure your butter for the I’m reminded how delightful streusel-like topping is cold. it is to incorporate some of the season’s best fruit into a simple, Chilling the butter is extra insurance against it melting into comforting treat. the rest of the ingredients as you A blueberry crumble from the late, great cookbook author work it in with your hands. That way, you get enticing nuggets Maida Heatter caught my eye.

The Washington Post

of topping (large crumbs are not only good, but encouraged) rather than a cohesive sand. The end result is crunchy and a little rich and, true to Heatter’s promise, stays crisp well after the crumble comes out of the oven. Nuts (again, take your pick) add an extra layer of texture and flavor, but feel free to leave them out if you prefer, for allergy or any other reasons. Ideally, you’ll be making this in an 11-by-8-inch baking dish, with sides at least 2 inches tall. If that’s not in your cabinet, try for a similar dish whose volume

is at least 2 quarts. We also tested this in a 9-inch square dish, which may require a few more minutes of baking time. A ceramic or other nonglass dish is preferable, because they can tolerate being run under the broiler, which helps brown the topping. If glass is all you have, you can use it, but skip broiling. The crumble will still be attractive and delicious. A dessert like this naturally calls for being served with ice cream, heavy cream or whipped cream — and a healthy dose of summer sunshine.

Summer Fruit Crumble

JON GITCHOFF

Sauteed Zucchini Ribbons Yield: 4 to 6 servings 1 small garlic clove, minced 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest plus 1 tablespoon juice 4 (6- to 8-ounce) zucchini or yellow summer squash, trimmed 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil Salt and pepper 1½ tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Yield: 6 to 8 servings For the fruit Unsalted butter, for the baking dish 1/3 cup (77 grams) packed light or dark brown sugar 3 tablespoons (30 grams) all-purpose flour ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon 6 cups fresh fruit, such as blackberries, peaches, raspberries, blueberries, plums, cherries or apricots (pitted and coarsely chopped or sliced, as needed) 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice (from 1 lemon)

For the crumble ½ cup (70 grams) all-purpose flour ¼ teaspoon nutmeg, preferably freshly grated ¼ cup (49 grams) granulated sugar ½ cup (111 grams) packed light or dark brown sugar 8 tablespoons (4 ounces; 1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch pieces ½ cup old-fashioned rolled oats (56 grams; do not use quickcooking or instant) 1 cup toasted nuts (about 4 ounces) of your choice, such as pecans, almonds or hazelnuts, chopped (optional)

Note: Toast the nuts in a small, dry skillet over medium heat for 5 to 7 minutes, until lightly browned and fragrant, shaking the pan to avoid scorching. Cool completely before using. 1. For the fruit: Generously grease a baking dish with butter. 2. Combine the brown sugar, flour and cinnamon in a mixing bowl. Add the fruit; use a flexible spatula to gently toss together. Transfer the mixture to the baking dish, spreading it evenly. If there is any remaining sugar mixture at the bottom of the bowl, scatter it evenly over the fruit, then drizzle the lemon juice evenly over it. Wipe out the bowl, because you’ll use it for the next step. 3. For the crumble: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. 4. Whisk or sift together the flour, nutmeg and granulated sugar in the same mixing bowl. Add the brown sugar, stirring to incorporate. Add the butter; use your fingers, a pastry blender or 2 table knives to quickly work the butter into the dry ingredients until it resembles coarse crumbs (not too fine). Stir in the oats. 5. To assemble, scatter the nuts, if using, over the fruit. Then scatter the crumble topping evenly over the top. 6. Bake (middle rack) for 25 to 30 minutes, until the fruit is bubbling at the edges. Switch the oven to broil for a minute or so to further brown the crumble topping a bit — watch it carefully to avoid burning. 7. Serve warm, or at room temperature. Per serving (based on 8): 330 calories; 12g fat; 30mg cholesterol; no sodium; 56g carbohydrates; 5g fiber; 38g sugars; 3g protein Adapted from “Maida Heatter’s Book of Great American Desserts,” by Maida Heatter

1. Combine garlic and lemon juice in a large bowl and set aside for at least 10 minutes. Using a vegetable peeler, shave off 3 ribbons from 1 side of summer squash, then turn squash 90 degrees and shave off 3 more ribbons. Continue to turn and shave ribbons until you reach seeds; discard core. Repeat with remaining squash. 2. Whisk 2 tablespoons oil, ¼ teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper and lemon zest into garliclemon juice mixture. 3. Heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until just smoking. Add summer squash and cook, tossing occasionally with tongs, until squash has softened and is translucent, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer squash to bowl with dressing, add parsley, and gently toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve. Per serving (based on 6): 132 calories; 9g fat; no cholesterol; 318mg sodium; 11g carbohydrate; 3g fiber; 7g sugar; 4g protein.


08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • L3

Fall in Love W I TH T HESE AUTU MN C L A S SE S ! SEPTEMBER–OCTOBER CLASSES NOW AVAILABLE!

Pick up the NEW School of Cooking brochure in stores or register today at DIERBERGS.COM/SCHOOL

LEMP: THE HAUNTING HISTORY

PUMPKIN SPICE EVERYTHING

Beer barons, family drama, true and tragic stories – learn about St. Louis’ most celebrated “haunted house” – The Lemp Mansion. Sit down to a feast inspired by their famous Sunday fried chicken dinner while author Stephen P. Walker shares stories about this infamous local landmark. His book, Lemp: The Haunting History ($20) will be available for purchase at each class. (Cash or check only. No credit or debit cards.)

It’s that time again – pumpkin spice everything! Whether used in sweet or savory dishes, there’s nothing better than a whiff of pumpkin spice during the fall months. Each person will take home a jar of homemade pumpkin pie spice.

Classic Spinach Salad with Mayfair Dressing • Sunday Special Pan-Fried Chicken • Roasted Smashed Spuds • Homestyle Green Beans • Homemade Biscuits • $45 Cherries Jubilee

Bogey Hills Des Peres Edwardsville Southroads West Oak

Mon., Oct. 28 Mon., Oct. 21 Tues., Oct. 29 Thurs., Oct. 17 Wed., Oct. 30

6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30

PM PM PM PM PM

Maple Pumpkin Butter Oat Bars • Brown Butter Cinnamon Spiced Apples over Dutch Baby Pancake • Baked Pasta with Butternut & Bacon • Pumpkin Cinnamon Pull-Apart Bread with Brown Sugar Glaze • Salted Caramel Pumpkin Parfaits $42 with Spiced Candied Nuts & Ginger • Frozen Pumpkin Spice Lattes

Bogey Hills Des Peres West Oak

Mon., Oct. 14 Mon., Sept. 23 Wed., Sept. 11

6:30-8:30 PM 6:30-8:30 PM 11:00 AM-1:00 PM

Christie Maggi – Dierbergs Culinary Event Center Chef Culinary Event Center Manager since 2014

Dierbergs Culinary Professional

GLUTEN-FREE EVERYDAY

With Special Guest Instructor Stephen P. Walker, Author Lemp: The Haunting History & Ghosts Among Us: True Stories of the Paranormal

Need to put dinner on the table for someone who is following a gluten-free diet? This collection of gluten-free recipes will help you meet that challenge. A registered dietitian from Missouri Baptist Medical Center will be on hand to chat with you about the ins-and-outs of living gluten free. Better-Than-Canned Soup Base • Creamy Chicken Vegetable Soup • Cornbread Taco Pie • Rush Hour Swiss Steak • Warm Apple Crisp $38

Bogey Hills Des Peres Southroads West Oak

Wed., Oct. 16 Thurs., Oct. 10 Thurs., Sept. 26 Wed., Oct. 23

6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30

PM PM PM PM

Nancy Raben, DTR, Culinary Professional Instructor for Dierbergs since 2006

Edwardsville

Wed., Sept. 11

6:30-8:30 PM

Loretta Evans, Dierbergs Culinary Professional School of Cooking Manager since 1997 With Special Guest Instructor Dana Medaris, RD, Missouri Baptist Medical Center Instructor for Dierbergs since 2012

AIR FRYER MEETS STEAKHOUSE FAVORITES A steakhouse dinner in the air fryer is simple to prepare. And best of all, you’ll turn out evenly cooked steaks every time – brown crust on the outside and tender meat on the inside. Paired with loaded baked potato and flavorful green beans, the air fryer provides a healthier means of cooking a great-tasting meal. Bacon & Cream Cheese Stuffed Jalapeño Poppers • Garlic Butter Steak Bites & Mushrooms • Steakhouse Loaded Baked Potatoes • Air Fried Green Beans with $42 Balsamic Glaze • Apple Fritters with Cinnamon Glaze

Bogey Hills Des Peres Edwardsville Edwardsville West Oak

Thurs., Sept. 12 Fri., Sept. 27 Tues., Sept. 17 Tues., Oct. 1 Wed., Oct. 2

6:30-8:30 11:00 AM-1:00 6:30-8:30 11:00 AM-1:00 11:00 AM-1:00

PM PM PM PM PM

Loretta Evans, Dierbergs Culinary Professional School of Cooking Manager since 1997

A SEAFOOD CELEBRATION

PEARL’S OYSTER BAR

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Crab Cakes with Roasted Red Pepper Aïoli • New England Seafood Chowder • Classic Caesar Salad • Marinated-Grilled Salmon Fillet • Fresh Made Pasta with Lemon Shrimp Cream Sauce • Key Lime Pie with Fresh $45 Made Whipped Cream

Cajun Shrimp & Crab Dip (jumbo lump crab, Gulf shrimp, house-blend cheese, toasted crostini) • Oysters Rockefeller (bacon, spinach, gruyère cheese, bread crumbs) • Pearl’s Gumbo (Gulf shrimp, chicken, andouille, tasso ham, red brick roux, steamed jasmine rice) • Lobster Rolls (Maine style – cold) –– Beer will $50 be served with each course.

Des Peres

Tues., Oct. 8

6:30-8:30 PM

Chef John Conway – Pearl’s Oyster Bar Ameristar Casino Resort – St. Charles MO

Bogey Hills Bogey Hills Edwardsville Southroads West Oak

Fri., Sept. 20 Thurs., Oct. 24 Mon., Sept. 16 Thurs., Oct. 10 Thurs., Sept. 26

11:00 AM-1:00 6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30 6:30-8:30

PM PM PM PM PM

Sally Bruns, Dierbergs Culinary Professional School of Cooking Manager since 2007

BOGEY HILLS 636-669-0049

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EDWARDSVILLE 618-307-3818

SOUTHROADS 314-849-3698

WEST OAK 314-432-6505

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12420 Tesson Ferry Road Saint Louis , MO 63128

11481 Olive Boulevard Creve Coeur , MO 63141


LET’S EAT

L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN, POST-DISPATCH

Yakitori (from left): tare style, torikawa, with shio (or salt) and reba (or livers).

Yakitori With Shio

Yakitori With Tare

Yield: 10 servings

Yield: 10 servings

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts 2 teaspoons salt Oil (for cooking on stove only)

Lemon wedges, optional Togarashi (seveningredient chile pepper mix), optional, see note Yuzukosho (chili pepper paste), optional, see note

½ cup soy sauce ¼ cup granulated sugar ¼ cup sake ¼ cup mirin

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs 3 to 4 green onions Vegetable oil (if using stove)

Note: Togarashi and (sometimes) yuzukosho are available at international markets. 1. If grilling, soak bamboo skewers in water at least 30 minutes and set grill for direct heating. Lightly oil a large skillet if using the stove. 2. Dice chicken into bite-sized pieces of equal size. Thread 3 to 4 pieces on each skewer (or 2 skewers side by side, for easier turning). Sprinkle the chicken on each skewer with a good pinch or two of salt. 3. Place skewers on grill directly over heat and cook, turning once or more, until thoroughly cooked, or cook several skewers at once in a skillet over medium-high heat, turning once or more, until thoroughly done. Remove from heat and serve with slices of lemon, togarashi and yuzukosho if desired. Per serving: 66 calories; 3g fat; 1g saturated fat; 33mg cholesterol; 10g protein; no carbohydrate; no sugar; no fiber; 486mg sodium; 3mg calcium

1. If grilling, soak bamboo skewers in water at least 30 minutes and set grill for direct heating. Lightly oil a large skillet if using the stove. 2. Mix soy sauce, sugar, sake and mirin in a small pot and boil for 8 to 10 minutes until the sauce becomes slightly thickened. Set aside. Slice the thick part of the onions into 1-inch pieces and set aside 3. Dice chicken into bite-sized pieces of equal size. Thread 1 piece on a skewer (or 2 skewers side by side, for easier turning). Thread 1 piece of onion on the skewer or skewers and keep alternating until you have 2 pieces of onion and 3 pieces of chicken on each skewer. 3. Place skewers on grill directly over heat or in prepared skillet in batches over medium-high heat. Baste with the sauce a few times while you cook, turning at least once, until thoroughly done. Remove from heat and serve. Per serving: 121 calories; 5g fat; 3g saturated fat; 43mg cholesterol; 10g protein; 9g carbohydrate; 8g sugar; no fiber; 884mg sodium; 7mg calcium

Recipe by Ochikeron via YouTube

Recipe by Japanese Cooking 101

Yakitori

to both the chicken and the green onions. There should be no problems if you grill with it, but using it in a skillet results in a blackened mess that ferociously sticks to your pan. Still, it isn’t too hard to clean: Just soak the pan in soapy water for a few hours and the black mess will lift right up. Because I’m not squeamish, I also made torikawa and reba — that is, yakitori made with strips of chicken skin and chicken livers. Both are prepared shio style, with just salt. The torikawa, the chicken skin, was as good as I thought it would be. When chicken skin receives enough heat it becomes crispy, with a rich, irresistible flavor. All it needs to be the perfect

skewer: I actually used two skewers for every piece of yakitori. In Japan, they use From L1 special wide, flat skewers, It is also popular later in which make it east to turn the evening, to enjoy after the meat. But all I could (or during) a few drinks. It get here were thin, round skewers. Two of these goes especially well with skewers let you turn the beer. meat with ease. Not surprisingly, you As I said, the yakitori can get yakitori made with shio was wonderful. from virtually any part I used plenty of salt before of a chicken: skin, heart, cooking, bringing the meat liver, even the cockscomb and cartilage from the keel just to the point before it bone between the breasts. is too salty. After it was cooked, I spritzed it with But this is America, so I a spray of lemon juice and have decided to concentrate only on yakitori from topped it with togarashi, a spicy, seven-ingredient the thigh and the breast. Japanese spice blend. And maybe the skin. And Yakitori with tare is the liver. usually made with small No matter what part pieces of chicken thigh of the chicken it comes meat alternated with a from, yakitori typically form of onion. In Japan, is prepared in one of two they use long onion, which ways. Shio is just flavored is sort of a cross between with salt, though after it green onions and a leek. is cooked, you can add a But I couldn’t find long squeeze of lemon, a spice onion, so I just used pieces mix or a hot sauce. Tare is of green onion. basted with a thickened, The versatile tare — sweet soy, mirin and sake sauce — could not be simsauce. pler to make. It’s just two Shio is typically made with pieces of breast meat. parts soy sauce to one part each of granulated sugar, I stuck a few bite-size sake and mirin, boiled pieces on a skewer and together until it is lightly cooked them relatively quickly on a hot, oiled skil- thickened. I repeatedly basted some let. of the skewers of yakitori A word about the skillet: Yakitori is meant to be with the sauce while they were cooking, and marigrilled, but I don’t have a nated others in the sauce grill in the test kitchen in the office — because it is in for 30 minutes before putthe office, and lit charcoal ting them in the pan. There was very little difference would suffocate everyone in taste between them, so in the building. So I did the next best thing, which just do whichever you find easiest. is to cook it on a skillet. It And yes, I have a word didn’t have the charcoal flavor, but it was wonder- about the tare, too: It tastes amazing and is the ful nonetheless. perfect accompaniment Now, a word about the

Torikawa (Crispy Chicken Skin) Yield: 4 servings Vegetable oil (if using stove)

Skin from 4 chicken thighs or 2 chicken breasts Salt

1. If grilling, soak bamboo skewers in water at least 30 minutes and set grill for direct heating. Lightly oil a large skillet if using the stove. 2. Slice skin into thin strips. Thread strips of skin from 1 thigh or ½ breast onto 1 skewer (or 2 skewers side by side, for easier turning), and sprinkle generously with salt. Place skewers on grill directly over heat or on a large skillet over medium-high heat. Turn a few times until thoroughly cooked and mostly crispy. Remove from heat and serve. Per serving: 154 calories; 16g fat; 6g saturated fat; 30mg cholesterol; 3g protein; no carbohydrate; no sugar; no fiber; 596mg sodium; 2mg calcium Recipe by Daniel Neman

Reba (Chicken Livers) Yield: 8 servings

(though perhaps unhealthful) snack is plenty of salt, which you give it before cooking. The chicken livers were also as good as I’d hoped. Skewering them and cooking them on a skillet or over a fire does not significantly alter their flavor. They tasted exactly like chicken liver. I like chicken liver. I was happy.

1 pound chicken livers Salt

Vegetable oil (if using stove)

1. If grilling, soak bamboo skewers in water at least 30 minutes and set grill for direct heating. Lightly oil a large skillet if using the stove. 2. Thread 1 liver on a skewer (or 2 skewers side by side, for easier turning), and sprinkle generously with salt. Place skewers on grill directly over heat or on a large skillet in batches over medium-high heat. Turn a few times until thoroughly cooked. Remove from heat and serve. Per serving: 97 calories; 6g fat; 4g saturated fat; 196mg cholesterol; 10g protein; 1g carbohydrate; no sugar; no fiber; 331mg sodium; 5mg calcium Recipe by Daniel Neman

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LET’S EAT

08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

SPECIAL REQUEST

Neman

LeGrand’s pasta salad is full of Italian favorites BY PAT EBY

Special to the Post-Dispatch

Q • Would it be possible to get the recipe for pasta salad at LeGrand’s? It’s a tasty dish that would be great for an end-ofsummer barbecue. — David Loeb, Benton Park

A • Joyce LeGrand’s famous pasta salad has been a great seller since 2012, when she added it to the menu at this family-owned market, deli, butcher shop and catering company in south St. Louis. “That salad has everything in it that she loves,” James LeGrand II says. “She’s Italian. There’s black olives, Volpi salami, red onion, artichoke hearts, garbanzo beans, pimentos, spinach and rotini noodles, all tossed with a poppy seed dressing.” When the LeGrand family took over at the former Binder’s Tom Boy store on Donovan Avenue in 1987, they kept the store’s lighted Tom Boy sign, which dates from 1936, and incorporated the LeGrand name into its marquee. They also kept another tradition from Binder’s. “When kids come in with their parents, we offer them a lil’ smokie, if the parents approve,” LeGrand says. “We have kid-sized shopping carts, too. In the cafe, we’ve got an original vintage child’s table for four.” The deli-cafe offers more than three dozen hot and cold sandwiches, an array of side dishes all made in house, chips of all kinds and homemade desserts such as gooey butter cookies, brownie pops, salted chocolate chip cookies, cake pops and more. One standout on the sandwich menu, the Legend Club, includes

Joyce LeGrand’s Famous Pasta Salad

PAT EBY

LeGrand’s Market & Catering

specialties, Boar’s Head meats, USDA prime and choice meats, sausages and bratwursts. “We make 4414 Donovan Avenue 200 pounds of sausages each day,” he says. They legrandsmarket-catering. make classics like German com; 314-353-6128 brats and Italian salsicSausalito turkey, pastrami, cia as well as a range of specialty products. “Our pepperoni, bacon, hot chicken sausages have gotpepper cheese, Havarti, ten really popular. We offer garlic cream cheese the basic, as well as bacon and roasted red pepranch and tomato basil per sauce. “We make chicken sausages.” nearly 50 pounds of garlic LeGrand is well-versed cream cheese every week because of that sandwich,” in making sausages. “I LeGrand says. “People love started twisting brats in the store when I was about it — it’s our top-secret recipe. That one, we won’t 8 years old,” he says. “I had an apron, with my name share.” on it, and I stood on a milk The cafe is open, airy, crate, so I could talk to and often packed with people.” friends and families sitToday, in addition to ting at vintage chrome and the work he does with his Formica-topped kitchen father, also named James, tables enjoying a meal. in the store, the deli and “We get our tables and chairs from our neighbors the butcher shop, James II schedules their catering at the Future Antiques on jobs. “We can cater anyChippewa,” he says. The thing from a dinner for two meat and deli counter, to a spread for a thousand which runs nearly the people.” length of the south wall, displays house-made

Notes: This pasta salad is best when made a day ahead of time. • This recipe scales well and can easily be doubled or halved. • The Volpi salami was cut from the roll in a half-inch piece at the butcher counter for this test, which yielded a scant cup of cubed pieces. • For the test, we used Ken’s lower fat poppy seed dressing, which worked well. 1. Cook pasta al dente according to the package directions. Drain, rinse and set aside to cool. 2. When the pasta has cooled, place the pimentos, red onion, black olives, artichoke hearts, salami, spinach and garbanzo beans into a large mixing bowl. Stir together, lifting the spoon, to incorporate all ingredients equally. 3. Add the Parmesan cheese and, again, stir in carefully to distribute evenly. 4. Add the dressing and stir, making sure to coat all pieces. Cover, and refrigerate overnight. 5. Serve the following day. If the dressing absorbed too much the night before, add in more dressing. Per serving (based on 18): 153 calories; 6g fat; 1g saturated fat; 5mg cholesterol; 5g protein; 20g carbohydrate; 4g sugar; 2g fiber; 227mg sodium; 57mg calcium

— which is owned by a company that is owned by Penguin Random House From L1 — became interested in the idea of best methods for cookcookbooks ing and enjoying it, and written as plenty of recipes. And it’s comic books all in the style of a graphic (they are novel. becoming “I’m very biased, increasingly but I think comics are popular in the perfect format for Becan Asia but are instructions, because you little known here). They can pare away the ancillary information that you approached Becan and said they would be open to a don’t need and just show the sequential instruction proposal for a comic-book cookbook about ramen. very quickly,” she said. “I love ramen. I think “It’s like Ikea instrucit’s amazing,” she said. tions.” In fact, on a trip to Japan Becan was introduced she once visited the to comics by her grand“incredibly charming” father, who shared with her his collection of Pogo Shin-Yokohama Ramen cartoons by the legendary Museum. “The first floor had a Walt Kelly. And so, as she bunch of museumy exhibput it, her first jobs out its about ramen” includof college as a graphics designer “helped fund my ing tools used to cook hobby of making comics.” ramen in the 1940s and ‘50s, she said. For several years, she The most exciting part drew an autobiographical web comic called “I Think for her, though, was the basement, which she said You’re Saucesome.” The “is like the Colonial Wilstrips were often about food. So when a restaurant liamsburg of ramen. They have re-created old Japan, called Fat Rice opened with streets and shops and in her neighborhood and actors playing policemen.” she tried it with her boyNine different shops friend, it is not a surprise there sell ramen in the that she drew a little style of nine region of sketch of the food. Japan, and though “I was The next week, the determined to try all nine,” restaurant called her and she only made it through asked if she would make two. some art for them. Soon, Once she decided to she was designing their work on the cookbook, posters, hot sauce labels she had to find an author. and T-shirts. Amano had left Fat Rice by As it happens, one of that time and was working the sous chefs at the restaurant was Hugh Amano, as a corporate chef, so he had the advantage of not who co-wrote the cookbook “The Adventures of trying to hype his restaurant, as had been the case Fat Rice.” Amano is also the author of “Let’s Make of a couple of other chefs they had considered. Ramen!” but their colOn top of that, his laboration on that book father is Japanese, so did not begin at Fat Rice. he had grown up eating Ten Speed Press

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Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

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Sarah Becan will be at the Opening Night Kick-Off Party for the St. Louis Small Press Expo from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at the Contemporary Arts Center, 3750 Washington Boulevard, and will be at the expo from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at the St. Louis Public Library Central Library, 1301 Olive Street. Both events are free.

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ramen. “It was an extremely collaborative cookbook,” Becan said. She served not only as illustrator, but also as a sounding board, offering suggestions on which recipes to include and also, most important, giving feedback on whether the recipes were easily understood by an ordinary cook using an ordinary kitchen. That was the goal: to make the recipes approachable and accessible. Becan has been drawing food for years and finds it especially easy to depict a food she loves, such as ramen. But she had one notable problem with the book, depicting a type of broth called tonkotsu. “It is the most intense of the ramen broths that you are going to make. Some restaurants that make this will boil it for 48 hours. You put a lot of trotters and bones and collagen and random pig parts into a broth. After it’s boiled and boiled and boiled, it’s essentially liquefied pig.” Part of the difficulty was just in depicting the thick, gelatinous texture. But the color of the broth was a bigger, unforeseen problem: It turns out to be the same color as the watercolor paper she used.

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Serving St. Louis for over 100 years

Yield: 9 cups; 18 side servings 1 (12 ounce) box of tricolor rotini pasta ¼ cup diced pimentos, undrained ¼ cup chopped red onion ½ cup black olives, sliced ¾ cups quartered artichoke hearts, drained and chopped ¾ cups cubed hard salami (cut in ½-inch cubes) ¾ cup frozen spinach, thawed and drained 1 cup canned low-sodium garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese ¾ cup low-fat poppy seed dressing

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L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Wednesday • 08.14.2019 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

SUDOKU


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAMES

CROSSWORD

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR WEDNESDAY, AUG. 14, 2019: This year, you will grow to a new level of acceptance. You will notice at times that you understand an argument from both sides and that you agree with both sides if you follow their logic. If you’re single, a potential lover might find you extremely agreeable. Let this person meet your multifaceted personality. If you’re attached, you identify often with your sweetie. As a result, your arguments will become less significant. AQUARIUS helps you be a better friend. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) ★★★ You are eliminating some never-questioned concepts, and at the same time you are accepting more responsibility. Keep a firm hold on your finances. A child or loved one plays a significant role in your day. Tonight: Check in on an older relative. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) ★★★★ You might want to take off and go out of town for the day. Do not be surprised at how you feel when you wake up. A partner might change his or her tune about a money matter, or you might buy a lottery ticket that could bring in some change! Tonight: Do something new. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) ★★★ Willingly let go of your need for control and you could be delighted by what comes down the path. Associates, loved ones and friends might surprise you, but they are accommodating. Tonight: It appears as if someone has decided to indulge you. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) ★★★★ One-on-one relating could be more exciting than you might have thought. You find the process of getting to know someone better -- one person in particular -- rewarding and worthwhile. Later, you will decide what niche this bond belongs in. Tonight: Opt to be a team -- for now. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) ★★★ You might be pleased and surprised by a phone call or gesture from someone you care about. You might not be used to someone making the first move. Be flattered. A child or a dear friend adds to your mood. He or she wants to visit

with you. Tonight: Go for the moment. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) ★★★ Pace yourself, and if possible, get ahead of your work. You will want some extra time very soon. Some of you also will opt for more personal time. You are processing an issue. Your instincts are right on. Tonight: Relax. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) ★★★★ Your playfulness emerges out of the blue. You might need to add a little sobriety to your work situation, as others might not appreciate your lightness with the moment. Someone lets you know they have a case of the butterflies when they think of you. Tonight: Live as if there is no tomorrow. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) ★★★★ Listen to news that might cause you to adjust your plans. The information you receive will probably have an impact on your domestic or personal life. Stay centered and do not push too hard to have everything fall into place as you might like. Tonight: Order in. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) ★★★★★ Follow through on what is happening around you. Be aware of what is needed from you. Someone might ask for something in an indirect manner. This person is serious about what he or she wants but feels awkward asking. Tonight: Meet a friend at your favorite spot. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) ★★★ Be aware of what makes you tick, and be aware of an opportunity that could delight you to no end. An understanding of the dynamics of this situation could make a difference in the end results. Tonight: Make an effort to pick up the tab with a friend. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) ★★★★★ Use your charisma, as it seems to delight others. They respond to you. A matter involving property could surprise you. Get past your reaction. You will know what to do. Tonight: Spontaneously make merry. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) ★★ You might feel a little out of it. Get as much done as possible. The pace is about to pick up. Try to squeeze in a nap or two, as well as a trip to the pool or gym. You will want to be in great shape soon. Tonight: Not to be found. BORN TODAY Actress Halle Berry (1966), comedian Steve Martin (1945), author Danielle Steel (1947)

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

.com „ Find more free

games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday. com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

ASCEE TVEEN EPPPRE SLUEST ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: HOARD SNORT KITTEN SEQUEL Answer: After revolving doors were invented, people quickly learned — THE INS AND OUTS


08.14.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

DEAR ABBY

Addict betrays his girlfriend’s trust Dear Abby • I’ve been with my boyfriend, “Rocko,” for two years, but in the late months of last year, he became distant. He would disappear for days at a time, block my phone number and ignore me. I was sure he was seeing another woman or taking drugs because he is an ex-addict. Two months ago, he was arrested. I was right — Rocko was on drugs and had been hanging out with another woman. Like any man who’s caught, he swears she was “just someone to get high with” and nothing happened between them. It has destroyed my self-esteem. I hate myself, and I can’t stop wondering why I wasn’t enough. Rocko is currently in rehab and seems to be doing wonderfully. I have asked him a lot of questions and said I needed him to be truthful. So far he has been honest. However, he still denies anything happened between them. He says he wants to save our relationship and start a new life together now that he’s clean. How do I do this? How do I even

begin to forgive him for everything he has done to us? — Jumble of Emotions in Kentucky Dear Jumble • You wrote that the way Rocko treated you has destroyed your self-esteem. Work on rebuilding it, and once you have done that, ask yourself why you should continue to be involved with someone as unstable as this man. Disappearing for days at a time, blocking your number and ignoring you when you reach out is brutal. It is abusive. If you don’t have it in you to stay and see this through to a possibly positive conclusion, end the relationship. Dear Abby • My neighbor regularly goes around gardening in her yard wearing yoga pants with huge tears in the inner thighs and an even bigger hole in the crotch. You can’t miss it because she bends over, and stays bent over, for significant quantities of time while she is weeding. Her behind is frequently aimed in the direction of my house and yard. Abby, you could fit both hands in that hole, and it stretches

wide over her pear-shaped rear end. I have kids. The first time I saw her, I gave her the benefit of the doubt and assumed the tears were recent. But she wears this same pair of indecent pants every time she goes out to garden. She isn’t poor. This woman is in her 60s, semi-retired, and loves nothing more than to call the police and the city code enforcement people on any neighbor she dislikes, so I can’t talk to her about it because I’m afraid she’ll retaliate. Should I send her an anonymous letter asking her to buy new pants? — Exposed Out There Dear Exposed • No. Tell her calmly that you are concerned about your children and ask her to please wear something less “revealing.” However, if she refuses, install a hedge to shield you from the view. And practice your “look away” skills. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

She’s caught between husband, parents

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Adapted from a recent online discussion.

8/14/19

Dear Carolyn • I’m tired of feeling caught between my husband and my parents. They didn’t like him and outright told him they thought marrying him wasn’t the best path for me. Friction increased when I moved to his hometown. I am the first of my sisters to marry and leave the area. I recognize my family of origin is not the most functional. They are temperamental, judgmental, and resort to emotional manipulation. Growing up, I just went with it; I’m a pleaser. However, husband doesn’t like to see me get hurt so he tries to head off proposed visits by arguing what horrible things they might do/ say (plausibly, based on past behavior). But I think disappointing my parents is more painful than opening myself up to being burned by them.

On principle he opposes giving in to them, I think. And they are actively not nice to him, so I have to balance how much I’m torturing him by pushing for visits. The latest example: They were upset they aren’t invited to our house — it’s been too cluttered for hosting for most of a year — so I caved after they went on about how hurt they were. — Between a Rock and a Hard Place Answer • “[D]isappointing my parents is more painful”? Translation: You’re not choosing toward your desire, but away from pain. Husband opposes on principle? Translation: Your husband and parents have stubbornness in common. Pleasing is your emotional comfort zone, so that figures. Your husband does sound more focused on your interests than his own — but still, it’s pressure, which you react to

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by scrambling to please, so it’s essentially the same problem in a new form. Too much clutter to host? Translation: This is the microcosm of your world. Your “no” is about clutter or your husband, your “yes” is about your parents ... and there’s no you. No sign of what you actually want. Do you want your parents to visit? Yes/ No. That’s the foundation of any decision. The rest is pleaser-y stuff. Now, I could argue your husband deserves an in-law-free zone, because they’re nasty to him. And he does. But the main issue here is your inability to tune out what others want and just hear your own voice. Please make room to be you — a good therapist can show you how.

7:00

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8:00

8:30

FOX MasterChef The cooks BH90210: The Pitch. 2 FOX greenlights a refacing a plating chalboot. (N) (cc) lenge. (N)

9:00

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FOX 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

SEAL Team The team is SEAL Team A surprise CBS Big Brother Houseg4 uests vie for the power deployed to the Philip- bomb attack in Manila. (cc) pines. (cc) of veto. (N) NBC America’s Got Talent 5 Seven acts will move on. (N)

Songland Songwriters The InBetween Cassie pitch to Macklemore. must deal with Ed Roven. (N) (cc) (8:01) (N) (cc)

PBS NOVA: Pluto and Be9 yond. New Horizons prepares for a flyby.

NOVA Uranus and Nep- ÍADD and Loving It?! tune; Pluto; Kuiper belt. (cc) (N) (cc)

CW 11

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News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 08.14.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

DR. KEITH ROACH

Smoking is biggest factor in COPD progression Dear Dr. Roach • I was diagnosed with COPD a year and a half ago and have several questions. I seem to be unable to get answers from my pulmonary doctor. How fast does COPD progress? I’m 78 years old, in reasonably good health and exercise regularly. I have chronic bronchitis with a slight amount of emphysema. I had been coughing a little during the day, had mucus in the morning and coughed at night for two to three hours after bedtime — to the extent of having to use a rescue inhaler to settle down and get back to sleep. After he put me on Trelegy, all of those symptoms disappeared, and I feel perfectly normal except for shortness of breath. My other question is what is the life expectancy of a person diagnosed with COPD? I’ve read about answers to this all over the map, from two or three years after diagnosis to 15 or more years. I would like some kind of guideline for someone in my condition. — T.J. Answer • There are two major types of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: chronic bronchitis, where the primary problem is productive cough; and emphysema, which is destruction of the small airways. Shortness of breath is a common feature of all types of COPD. The most prevalent cause is smoking. I can’t answer your questions on rate of progression and overall prognosis without much more information, but it is certainly a good sign that many of your symptoms are well-controlled on treatment. The single biggest factor in rate of progression of COPD is whether you are a smoker, but not being able to exercise, being male and being very underweight are additional risk factors for faster progression. Lung function falls inexorably over time. In people who have no lung disease, the normal decline with aging is never enough to cause symptoms during normal activity. In someone with COPD, the decline over months to years can cause symptoms to occur first with exercise, and then when at rest. Once people have severe symptoms at rest, the prognosis becomes quite poor. No medication can reverse lung damage. Inhaled steroids reduce inflammation and can slow progression somewhat. Inhaled bronchodilators open airways and make breathing easier. Inhaled anticholinergics reduce secretions. Your medication, Trelegy, contains all of these medicines, and is appropriate for people with severe COPD or those who do not have good symptom control with a less intensive regimen. An online calculator for prognosis can be found at https://bit.ly/2N1UEoy. It can be used if you know how far you can walk in six minutes and the results of your breathing test.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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