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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

TueSday • 08.13.2019 • $2.50

HUPP GETS LIFE No parole for ‘monster’ who killed disabled man

New rules to deny green cards to many legal immigrants BY COLLEEN LONG AND JILL COLVIN

Associated Press

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Louis Gumpenberger’s son, Trevelyan Gumpenberger, left, and mother, Margaret Burch, leave the St. Charles County Courthouse on Monday after the sentencing of Pamela Hupp to life in prison for the murder of Louis Gumpenberger. BY ROBERT PATRICK

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES COUNTY — Pamela Hupp was sentenced Monday to life in prison without parole for fatally shooting a mentally disabled man three years ago. Prosecutors say Hupp tricked 33-yearold Louis Gumpenberger into entering her car, drove him back to her O’Fallon, Missouri, house, planted a knife and a kidnapping note, and shot him while she was on the phone with a 911 dispatcher. “Hupp has done nothing but cause heartbreak and grief to so many families,” said Gumpenberger’s half-sister, Krystal Conn, calling Hupp a “monster,” “disgusting” and

8-year-old boy is 11th child shot and killed since June BY CHRISTINE BYERS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Xavier Usanga was about 15 hours away from a new school year as a second grader at Clay Elementary when he was fatally shot Monday while standing near an 18-year-old who was also shot but survived. The 8-year-old’s death makes him the 11th area child killed in a shooting since June. About half of them attended St. Louis Public Schools, said Kelvin Adams, superintendent of the St. Louis Public School District. Adams said he has already mobilized the district’s crisis team to report to the Hyde Park neighborhood school. The team provides counseling to students and staff at schools where students have been affected by violence. “This is not what you want to do on your first day of school,” he said. “Kids are supposed to look happy, but instead they’re going to be missing one of their friends, one of their classmates. Some don’t even know why yet. They’re going to be looking for this young man, but he won’t show up. “He’ll be in a body bag in a funeral parlor, and that’s not where a kid is supposed to be, and it’s happening much too often. We just can’t continue like this. It’s Please see CHILD, Page A3

a “serial killer.” Conn, wearing a pin with her brother’s picture on it, remembered him for his corny laugh, love for his mother and devotion to his two children. St. Charles County Circuit Court Judge Jon Cunningham noted that Hupp unsuccessfully tried to get two other people in her vehicle before finding Gumpenberger. “He was an innocent person whose life did not deserve to be extinguished by you,” Cunningham said. Krystal Conn hugs her husband on Monday The actual sentencing took about 15 minoutside the St. Charles County Courthouse after utes. Hupp said nothing. Her lawyers and the Pamela Hupp was sentenced for the murder of Louis Gumpenberger, Conn’s half-brother. Please see HUPP, Page A4

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration announced Monday it is moving forward with one of its most aggressive steps yet to restrict legal immigration: Denying green cards to many migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance. Federal law already requires those seeking to become permanent residents or gain legal status to prove they will not be a burden to the U.S. — a “public charge,” in government speak —but the new rules detail a broader range of programs that could disqualify them. It’s part of a dramatic overhaul of the nation’s immigration system that the administration has been working to put in place, despite legal pushback. While most attention has focused on President Donald Trump’s efforts to crack down on illegal immigration, including recent raids in Mississippi and the continued separation of migrant parents from their children, the new rules target people who entered the United States legally and are seeking permanent status. Trump is trying to move the U.S. toward a system that focuses on immigrants’ skills instead of emphasizing the reunification of families. Under the new rules, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will now weigh whether applicants have received public assistance along with other factors such as education, income and health to determine whether to grant legal status. The rules will take effect in mid-October. They don’t apply to U.S. citizens, though immigrants related to the citizens may be subject to them. Please see IMMIGRANTS, Page A5

New deli can’t use Amighetti’s ‘secret sauce,’ lawsuit says BY RACHEL RICE

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — First, Amighetti’s on the Hill wouldn’t toast its sandwiches. Then it refused to cut the stems off the pepperoncinis. Finally, it just closed and reopened, with new ownership and a new name. Now, the owner of the Amighetti’s brand is suing its one-time flagship deli, alleging the owner of the new sandwich shop has violated their licensing agreement. “It’s a complete scam,” said Anthony Favazza, who owns the brand, but not the store on the Hill. “It’s obvious it’s the same people in the same space doing the same thing.” Favazza last week sued Dominic Consolino, the owner of the now-closed Amighetti’s on the Hill, and Consolino’s wife, Cathy, who owns and operates the new deli, Colino’s, in the same location.

But the Consolinos’ attorney, David Weiss, said Favazza couldn’t demand that changes be made to Amighetti’s on the Hill just because he owns the brand. And Dominic Consolino isn’t involved in the operation of Colino’s, so the Amighetti licensing agreement doesn’t apply, Weiss argued. Cathy Consolino, he said, never signed that same agreement. “She’s not a shareholder to that agreement,” Weiss said. “She never was. She was an employee at Amighetti’s just like anybody else there. She happens to be married to Dominic.” Weiss said Colino’s is not using Amighetti’s bread or sauce recipes. Amighetti’s on the Hill had operated at the corner of Wilson and Marconi avenues since

FILE PHOTO

Amighetti’s had operated at the corner of Wilson and Marconi avenues since 1921, becoming an institution on the Hill — St. Louis’ famous Italian neighborhood. Dominic Consolino bought the deli in 2014. In 2016, Favazza purchased the rights to the Amighetti’s brand. Please see AMIGHETTI’S, Page A4

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION SIGNIFICANTLY WEAKENS PROTECTIONS FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES, PAGE A4 Food fight

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A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAY • 08.13.2019

1 1 TUESDAY • 08.13.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM CRIME TRACKER

FALL FASHION

UPCOMING CHATS

The Post-Dispatch crime tracker updates every month. View maps of each neighborhood in the city, as well as some areas in the county. stltoday.com/ crimetracker

When fall weather arrives, you can be prepared to look your best in metallics, sharpshouldered suits and other hip trends. stltoday.com/ lifestyles

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday: Friday

Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

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Labor issues: Missouri ranks low among best states to have baby sador for the Israel Association of Baseball, which works to promote baseball and softball in Israel. He was inducted in 1994 into the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.

JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ANCHOR STEAM: Parental leave may become a trending topic during the morning news on KMOV (Channel 4). Station honchos reported that on Thursday, their two “News 4 This Morning” anchors — Cory Stark and Marissa Hollowed — welcomed new babies into their families. And the tykes arrived on the scene just 91 minutes apart, a station release said. First to arrive was Caden Matthew Stark. The newest Stark (the couple’s second son) made his debut at 8:03 a.m. and weighed in at 8 pounds, 11 ounces. Hollowed Then at 9:34 a.m. , Liam Archer joined the party. Hollowed’s first child, young Liam tipped the scales at 5 pounds, 11 ounces. The station reported Stark that all parties are doing fine. Stark started at KMOV as a nightside reporter in November 2013. He was named co-anchor of the morning news show in February 2017. Hollowed left a station in Columbia, Missouri, in July 2017 to join Stark as the other anchor for the 4-7 a.m. newscast. DIAMOND CUT: If you’re tracking pitches, don’t forget to mark Aug. 21 on your calendar. University City native son Art Shamsky — a member of the “Amazing Mets” team that shocked baseball by winning the 1969 World Series — will be back in his hometown for a couple of talks and book signings. Shamsky recently wrote “After The Miracle” (Simon & Schuster; $28) about

LABOR MOVEMENT: Should any Missourians out there be in a pregnant state, consider the fact that you may not be in the best of states. Missouri could manage only a No. 34 ranking when it came to the “Best & Worst States to Have a Baby” list from personal-finance website WalletHub. The Show Me Sector ranked behind neighboring states Nebraska (15), Iowa (16), Illinois (23), Kentucky (31) and Kansas (32). Border states faring worse than Missouri were: Tennessee (37), Arkansas (44) and Oklahoma (46). Missouri had only one top-half finish in the four categories judged by Wal“After the Miracle,” by Art Shamsky letHub. Our worst performance, No. 43, was in the area of “baby-friendliness,” which his baseball career. On the afternoon of Aug. 21, Shamsky looked at parental-leave policies; number of mom groups and child care cenwill be a guest at the annual St. Louis ters; and Medicaid-covered parenting Browns Historical Society & Fan Club programs. luncheon at the Holiday Inn, 10709 We clocked in at No. 39 in “health Watson Road in Sunset Hills. (For more care,” which focused on infant and mainfo, call 314-608-9977.) ternal mortality rates; birth weights; Later on Aug. 21, at 7 p.m., Shamsky preterm births; food security for babies; will be at Main Street Books, 307 South and vaccinations. Main Street in St. Charles. When it comes to the “cost” of havShamsky, 77, is the son of William and ing a baby, Missouri was No. 30, based Sadie Yaffe Shamksy and played for U. on hospital delivery charges; cost of City High (several years before former babysitter/nanny and child care; healthMLB hurler Ken Holtzman). insurance premiums; and newborn He played college baseball at Mizzou screening prices. his freshman year, but then left when Our best placement, and the only one he was signed in 1960 by the Cincinnati in which we placed in the top half of all Reds. states, was when it comes to “family Primarily an outfielder, Shamsky friendliness.” We were No. 22 in the catmade it to the majors in 1965. He was egory that took into account the cost of traded to the Mets before the 1968 searaising children past infanthood. son. In the Mets’ 1969 championship The best state in the U.S was Vermont; season, Shamsky was the fourth outfielder and main left-handed pinch-hit- the worst, Mississippi. ter. He retired after playing for the Cubs Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter and Oakland in 1972. jholleman@post-dispatch.com In 2012, Shamsky became an ambas-

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CONCERT REVIEW

Carlile fills Fox with powerful voice, poignant lyrics BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ

Special to the Post-Dispatch

Sunday night at the Fox Theatre, Brandi Carlile recounted every concert she’s played in St. Louis, from opening shows at the Pageant 16 years ago to headlining there and drawing poorly to eventually selling it out. Last summer, she stepped up to Stifel, and now to the Fox. Carlile declared her Fox show “my favorite time ever playing St. Louis,” and, given the location — she marveled several times at the beauty of the venue — and the rapturous reception she received, it was easy to see why. The Seattle-based singer’s career is on a roll. Earlier this year, she won three Grammy Awards for her most recent album, “By the Way, I Forgive You.” And though she didn’t mention it, the Highwomen— her musical partnership with Maren Morris, Amanda Shires and Natalie Hemby — recently launched its first single, “Redesigning Women,” and delivered a triumphant, much retweeted duet with Dolly Parton at the Newport Folk Festival. The group’s self-titled debut album is due Sept. 6. Sunday’s concert was a testament to Carlile’s years of hard work and persistence. And of course, her pure talent, evinced most notably by her powerful, stratospheric vocals, which catch and crack at just the right moments so as to convey the warmth and emotion of her lyrics. A prime example of that power was offered at the Fox during “Cannonball.” Joined by her longtime musical partners, the Hanseroth twins — Phil on bass, Tim on guitar — Carlile stepped in front of the mics and monitors and tested her voice, as well at the Fox’s excellent acoustics, by singing without amplification. Pointing to the top of the theater, she said, “If (my voice doesn’t) get all the way back there, I’ll get back on the mic and continue to try to rock your face off.” Of course, she didn’t need to, and the moment was a special one, to be sure.

JON GITCHOFF

Brandi Carlile performs at the Fox Theatre in St. Louis on Sunday. There were others. Carlile talked about her fandom of and friendship with the legendary Joni Mitchell and sang a lovely version of Mitchell’s “A Case of You.” She also sang “The Mother,” a hearttugging song about the way children destroy your life as you know it only to replace it with something better. It was met with some knowing chuckles from the crowd and probably a few tears as well. Carlile talked about her kids and her wife, whom she joked is “my best friend and my arch-nemesis.” Noting it was important in the current political climate for her to talk about her family’s right to exist, she said, “We just want the right to screw up our kids like everybody else.” Another highlight — and an expected one — was “The Joke,” her soaring anthem of encouragement and self-belief that earned two of her Grammys. Elsewhere, she drew from each of her studio albums for songs including the show-opening “Follow,” “The Story,”

“Pride and Joy” and the anthemic “Hold Out Your Hand.” During the encore, Carlile and the Hanseroths played off harmonies supplied by the audience for “Party of One,” her latest single. The show closed with a cover of Led Zeppelin’s pastoral, proto-Americana “Going to California.” In her opening set, Valerie June cut a quirky, curious, yet endearing figure. Her look was glam, featuring a sequined outfit and dredlocks piled high and tied up. Her voice, meanwhile, sounded ghostly and distant, something drawn from a vintage Appalachian field recording. June’s songs and stories were folksy, funky and soulful, drawing deeply on what she called “dirty ol’, dirty ol’ blues.” Her set included “Astral Plane,” “Workin’ Woman Blues” and the blues standard “Rollin’ and Tumblin.’” As she closed with the traditional hymn “This World Is Not My Home Anymore,” June got up from her seat and sauntered offstage, singing all the while. Pretty cool.

Mazar is 55. Actress Quinn Cummings (“Family”) is 52. Country singer Andy Griggs is 46. Drummer Mike Melancon of Emerson Drive is 41. Actress Kathryn Fiore (“Reno

911!”) is 40. Actor Sebastian Stan (“Captain America”) is 37. Singer James Morrison is 35. Actress Lennon Stella (“Nashville”) is 20.

BIRTHDAYS Aug. 13 • Actor Kevin Tighe (“Emergency,” “Murder One”) is 75. Actor Danny Bonaduce (“The Partridge Family”) is 60. Actor John Slattery (“Mad Men”) is 57. Actress Debi

— Associated Press


LOCAL

08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Chief cites drugs as factor in homicides, seeks public’s help BY TAYLOR TIAMOYO HARRIS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After investigating some of the city’s most recent homicides, police in St. Louis believe they know the trending factor: drugs. “At the end of the day, with the right information, I could solve them all,” Chief John Hayden said Monday. “But the solvability factor is complicated when I don’t have the right information coming from the public.” Five of the past six homicides before Monday were drug-related, according to Hayden, and investigators presumed the sixth one to be as well.

Police reached that conclusion after examining evidence from crime scenes, such as money left behind, and witness accounts. Hayden said police are also hampered when the homicides take place inside buildings. “If you agree to take a drug deal, police are not going to be there to supervise it,” Hayden said. “What we’ve seen is folks getting involved with drug activity, and taking that risk is costing them their lives, and it’s a challenge to get ahead of that.” In response to the shootings, Hayden said, the police force is increasing the number of officers

in the northern area of what’s become known as Hayden’s rectangle. That’s an area Hayden has targeted for crime-reduction efforts. The rectangle’s northern and southern borders are West Florissant Avenue and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, and the western and eastern borders run along Goodfellow Boulevard and Vandeventer Avenue. St. Louis was at 121 homicides going into Monday, which the chief says is an increase of nine homicides over the same time last year, but two less than the time period in 2017. The other trend Hayden says

authorities have noted in the past week is the number of multipleshooting incidents. “We’re trying very hard to get in front of some of the gun violence associated with drug sales, but at the same time we need the public’s help to really make a difference,” Hayden said. Few witnesses come forward, and the chief says he understands those reservations and fear of retaliation. However, the chief pointed to resources such as CrimeStoppers, which lets people call in anonymously with information. If the information leads to an arrest,

callers can be rewarded. With the majority of crimes affecting those in the 18-24 age range, Hayden says police will continue to work with groups such as Better Family Life and the Urban League that aim to help youth. Just minutes after discussing drug-related homicides with reporters at police headquarters, Hayden responded to the scene of the fatal shooting of a child in the 3500 block of North 11th Street. Police did not release any information about how the child was shot or whether there were any suspects.

Child From A1

incredibly frustrating. Incredibly frustrating.” Police Chief John Hayden choked back tears as he announced that the child would not be starting school this week. He said the 18-year-old man was critically wounded in the double shooting but was stable. Hayden offered few other details about the shooting, which happened just after 5 p.m.in the 3500 block of North 11th Street, also in the Hyde Park neighborhood. Haydendidnothaveasuspectdescription.He did not know whether the shooter was on foot or in a car. And he did not know whether the victims knew each other, or their shooter. He said officers weren’t getting a lot of information from the community, and he pleaded for the public to come forward to help with the investigation. Police did find a pistol at the scene, Hayden said. “This case should be solvable,” he said. “This can’t be, ‘I’m afraid to talk to the police.’ I’m hoping people will listen to my plea.” Mary Norwood said Xavier Usanga was her grandson. “He didn’t make it,” she said before cutting an interview short, as she said she was on her way to a police station to pick up her other grandchildren. Neighbors said they saw officers rush the child to the hospital in their police SUV. One woman who did not want to be identified out of fear of retribution said she heard a series of six shots,followed by a pause,followed

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

A police officer handles a pistol found at the scene as he investigates a shooting in the 3500 block of North 11th Street in St. Louis where an 8-year-old was killed. An 18-year-old man was also shot but survived. by a series of about six more shots. She said it was uncommon to hear gunshots. Hayden said that the street “is

not known as a violent area.” The out of the past six were drug-re- an innocent victim.” chief spent part of his day Monday lated. Rachel Rice • 314-340-8344 He did not yet know a motive in @RachelDRice on Twitter meeting with reporters to discuss recent city homicides, saying five Xavier’s killing,but added:“He was rrice@post-dispatch.com

SOME THING BOTH SIDES

CAN AGREE ON:

ENDING ALZHEIMER’S.

alz.org/united


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 1 • TUESDAY • 08.13.2019

Protection weakened for Endangered Species Act BY ELLEN KNICKMEYER

Associated Press

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

YOUNGSTER AT THE WHEEL Romell Smith, 2, plays in the driver seat of his mother’s running car as firefighters from the Northeast Ambulance and Fire Protection District make quick work of unlocking her car on Monday in Bel-Ridge. Andrea Smith let her son out of his car seat to move around while she pumped gas at a Shell station in the 8800 block of Natural Bridge, but accidentally locked the car with the motor running when she got out. “It’s a blessing,” said Smith as she watched the firefighters open the door in moments.

Amighetti’s From A1

1921. It became an institution on the Hill — St. Louis’ famous Italian neighborhood — beloved for its Amighetti Special sandwich, among other items. Dominic Consolino bought the deli in 2014. In 2016, Favazza purchased the rights to the Amighetti’s brand. This meant that Favazza and Consolino were locked into a licensing agreement regarding the Amighetti name and signature recipes. Favazza also owns and operates Amighetti’s in Rock Hill. He said the trouble started in late 2016, a few months after he’d taken over the Amighetti brand. He wanted to revamp the menu, and told Consolino so, but the changes were never made at Amighetti’s on the Hill. He suggested a new music playlist for the restaurant, but it was never played. He wanted to switch over to toasting hot sandwiches rather than microwaving them, but that change didn’t happen either. The straw that broke the camel’s back was a pepperoncini stem: Favazza told Consolino

IAN FROEB, IFROEB@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The longtime site of Amighetti’s on the Hill in St. Louis showed the building Friday with a new name, Colino’s Cafe and Bakery. The historic restaurant and bakery had been at Wilson and Marconi Avenues since 1921. to start cutting the stems off before putting the peppers on the signature Amighetti Special sandwich. Consolino left the stems on. “I had tried everything possible to get them to make any progress whatsoever, and there was no progress at any time,” Favazza said. “I bought the brand to reinvigorate

it, to turn it around. We’d had declining sales for 25 years. The brand is in need of an overhaul, and Dominic denied me what I’d bought.” Now Colino’s is “telling the community that it’s the same family with the same Amighetti recipes,” the lawsuit states. But Colino’s shouldn’t even be

a deli, Favazza said: The licensing agreement’s noncompete clause forbids the shop from selling bread or sandwiches. Colino’s could rebrand as a different kind of restaurant, he said, selling burritos or sushi, for example. But they can’t compete with Amighetti’s within 10 miles of the Hill location, he said, and certainly not in the same building. “If you’re going to trust someone with what is literally your secret sauce and teach them how to run an Amighetti’s, it’s very common to say, ‘I don’t want you to take all this knowledge and turn around and stab me in the back,” Favazza said. Weiss said Cathy Consolino plans to “vigorously” defend her claim to operating the new restaurant at its current location. “They have roots that go back,” he said. “They’re well respected in that community. They both feel very strongly about the Hill. Cathy wanted to continue there and not be pushed out … Cathy is too strong-willed to let that happen.” Rachel Rice • 314-340-8344 @RachelDRice on Twitter rrice@post-dispatch.com

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Russell Faria, right, laughs outside the St. Charles County Courthouse after the sentencing of Pamela Hupp on Monday to life in prison for the murder of Louis Gumpenberger. At left is Alice Butler and Mary Anderson. Anderson is Faria’s cousin.

Hupp From A1

prosecutors dealt with the legal technicalities in a few sentences. “With her plea and today’s sentencing, Ms. Hupp will move forward with her life,” her attorney, Nick Williams, said after the hearing. “It is unlikely to be pleasant, but is as fair as we could make it.” Hupp had told police that Gumpenberger jumped in her SUV and tried to kidnap her at knifepoint, before chasing her into her house. She implied that behind his actions was Russell Faria, the husband of Elizabeth “Betsy” Faria, a friend of Hupp’s who was fatally stabbed in 2011. Prosecutors have said that was a lie; that Faria had no role in Gumpenberger’s death. Prosecuting Attorney Tim Lohmar said in June that Hupp’s scheme

was “sloppy” and sounded as if it had been planned by a middle-school student. Hupp reached a plea deal in June Hupp with prosecutors, who agreed to drop their bid for the death penalty. Gumpenberger was physically and mentally incapable of carrying out the crime, after suffering a traumatic brain injury in a 2005 vehicle crash, Lohmar said. Gumpenberger had trouble running, walking and talking. Investigators discovered that Hupp had bought the knife she claimed Gumpenberger used and wrote the kidnapping note on paper she bought, Lohmar said. Four $100 bills found in Gumpenberger’s pocket were sequential to a bill that investigators found in Hupp’s dresser, and could only come from a single ATM or bank transaction,

he said. Prosecutors believe Hupp told Gumpenberger that she was a producer for NBC’s Gumpenberger “Dateline” who wanted his help reenacting a 911 call, because she’d unsuccessfully tried to lure two others into her SUV with those claims. Prosecutors said Hupp’s plan was an attempt to divert suspicion from herself and onto Russell Faria in connection with Betsy Faria’s death. Russell Faria had been convicted of his wife’s murder before that conviction was overturned based on new evidence and a judge’s refusal to let his lawyers present Hupp as an alternate suspect. She has denied killing Betsy Faria. Russell Faria was acquitted of murder at a 2015 retrial, and has sued the prosecutor and investi-

gators. That suit is pending. In June, Hupp entered what is sometimes known as an Alford plea to charges of first-degree murder and armed criminal action, admitting that prosecutors had enough evidence to convict her of the crime, but not admitting that she did it. The new Lincoln County prosecuting attorney, Mike Wood, said after Hupp’s plea in June that he would reopen the Faria murder. Several people gathered outside the courtroom after Monday’s sentencing. Gumpenberger’s mother, Margaret Burch, said, “She’s finally going to get what she deserves.” And Lohmar addressed a throng of reporters: “It’s been a long time coming,” he said. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration moved on Monday to weaken how it applies the 45-year-old Endangered Species Act, ordering changes that critics said will speed the loss of animals and plants at a time of record global extinctions. The action, which expands the administration’s rewrite of U.S. environmental laws, is the latest that targets protections, including for water, air and public lands. Two states — California and Massachusetts— promised lawsuits to try to block the changes in the law. So did some conservation groups. Pushing back against the criticism, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt and other administration officials contend the changes improve efficiency of oversight while continuing to protect rare species. “The best way to uphold the Endangered Species Act is to do everything we can to ensure it remains effective in achieving its ultimate goal — recovery of our rarest species,” he said in a statement. “An effectively administered Act ensures more resources can go where they will do the most good: on-theground conservation.” Under the enforcement changes, officials for the first time will publicly attach a cost to saving an animal or plant. Blanket protections for creatures newly listed as threatened will be removed. Among other changes, the action could allow the government to disregard the possible impact of climate change, which conservation groups call a major threat to wildlife. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said the revisions “fit squarely within the president’s mandate of easing the regulatory burden on the American public, without sacrificing our species’ protection and recovery goals.” The Endangered Species Act is credited with helping save the bald eagle, California condor and scores of other animals and plants from extinction since President Richard Nixon signed it into law in 1973. The act currently protects more than 1,600 species in the United States and its territories. While the nearly half-century-old act has been overwhelmingly successful in saving animals and plants that are listed as endangered, battles over some of the listings have been yearslong and legendary. They have pitted northern spotted owls, snail darters and other creatures and their protectors against industries, local opponents and others in court and political fights. Republican lawmakers have pushed for years to change the law itself. Previous Trump administration actions have proposed changes to other bedrock environmental laws — the clean water and clean air acts. The efforts include repeal of an Obama-era act meant to fight climate change by getting dirtier-burning coal-fired power plants out of the country’s electrical grid, rolling back tough Obama administration mileage standards for cars and light trucks, and lifting federal protections for millions of miles of waterways and wetlands. Monday’s changes “take a wrecking ball to one of our oldest and most effective environmental laws, the Endangered Species Act,” Sen. Tom Udall, a New Mexico Democrat, said in a statement. “As we have seen time and time again, no environmental protection — no matter how effective or popular — is safe from this administration.” One of Monday’s changes includes allowing the federal government to raise in the decision-making process the possible economic cost of listing a species. That’s even though Congress has stipulated that economic costs not be a factor in deciding whether to protect an animal. The prohibition was meant to ensure that the logging industry, for example, would not be able to push to block protections for a forest-dwelling animal on economic grounds. A United Nations report warned in May that more than 1 million plants and animals globally face extinction, some within decades, owing to human influence, climate change and other threats. The report called the rate of species loss a record.


NEWS

08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

THEATER REVIEW

R-S Theatrics’ ‘Man of No Importance’ has lots of charm BY CALVIN WILSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Alfie (Mark Kelley), an aging bus conductor who appreciates the finer things, lives with his relatively unimaginative but supportive sister Lily (Stephanie Merritt). Their Dublin residence seems nice enough for a couple of unmarried siblings. But Alfie has found his true home in amateur theater. “A Man of No Importance,” the charming musical running through Aug. 25 in an R-S Theatrics production, is Alfie’s story. As he attempts to mount a production of Oscar Wilde’s “Salomé,” details of his life are gradually revealed — at least one of which he’d rather keep secret. Alfie is mostly successful at keeping a safe emotional distance from the townsfolk who take part in his theatrics. But his interest in a young woman named Adele (Lindy Elliott) doesn’t go unnoticed. Could she be the cure for Alfie’s celibacy? Or is he merely eyeing her for the sensual role of Salomé? Looking on is the ghost of Wilde (Michael B. Perkins), whom Alfie has taken into his confidence. Based on a 1994 film that starred Albert Finney, “A Man of No Importance” eloquently addresses the fragility of human connection. With a book by Terrence McNally (“Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune”), music by Stephen Flaherty and lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, the show demands close attention but rewards it with an experience that’s sentimental in the best sense. Director Christina Rios elicits strong performances — particularly from Kelley, whose Everyman appeal helps orient the audience to this Irish-tinged tale. And the songs are at once essential to the storytelling and beautiful in their own right. The show is a worthy successor to the company’s 2018 triumph,“The Light in the Piazza.” “A Man of No Importance” takes a few scenes to achieve momentum. But it proves to be the kind of ambitious and offbeat musical that’s only rarely presented on local stages. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

‘A MAN OF NO IMPORTANCE’ When: Through Aug. 25 Where: The Marcelle, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive How much: $20-$25 More info • 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

ROGELIO V. SOLIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Children of mainly Latino immigrant parents hold signs in August to support them and other individuals picked up during an immigration raid at a food processing plant in Canton, Miss. Trump administration rules that could deny green cards to immigrants if they use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance are going into effect.

Immigrants From A1

Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of Citizenship and Immigration Services, said the rule change will ensure those who come to the country don’t become a burden, though they pay taxes. “We want to see people coming to this country who are self-sufficient,” Cuccinelli said. “That’s a core principle of the American dream. It’s deeply embedded in our history, and particularly our history related to legal immigration.” Migrants make up a small percentage of those who get public benefits. In fact, many are ineligible for such benefits because of their immigration status. Immigrant rights groups strongly criticized the changes, warning the rules would scare immigrants away from asking for needed help. And they voiced concern the rules give officials too much authority to decide whether someone is likely to need public assistance in the future. The Los Angeles-based National Immigration Law Center said it would file a lawsuit, calling the new rules an attempt to redefine the legal immigration system “in order to disenfranchise communities of color and favor the wealthy.” And David Skorton, president and CEO of the Association of American Medical Colleges said,“The consequences of this action will be to potentially exacerbate illnesses and increase the costs of care when their condition becomes too severe to ignore.”

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Cuccinelli defended the move, insisting the administration was not rejecting longheld American values. Pressed on the Emma Lazarus poem emblazoned below the Statue of Liberty that reads: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,” he told reporters at the White House: “I’m certainly not prepared to take anything down off the Statue of Liberty.” A Pew Research Center survey released Monday found the American public is broadly critical of the administration’s handling of the wave of migrants at the southern border, with nearly two-thirds of Americans — 65% — saying the federal government is doing a very bad or somewhat bad job. The survey found broad support for developing a pathway to legal status for immigrants living in the country illegally. On average, 544,000 people apply for green cards every year, with about 382,000 falling into categories that would be subject to the new review, according to the government. Guidelines in use since 1999 refer to a “public charge” as someone primarily dependent on cash assistance, income maintenance or government support. Under the new rules, the Department of Homeland Security has redefined a public charge as someone who is “more likely than not” to receive public benefits for more than 12 months within a 36-month period. If someone uses two benefits, that is counted as two months. And the definition has been broadened to include Medicaid, housing assistance and food assistance un-

der the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP. Following publication of the proposed rules last fall, the Homeland Security Department received 266,000 public comments, more than triple the average number. It made a series of amendments to the final rules as a result. For example, women who are pregnant and on Medicaid or who need public assistance will not be subject to the new rules during pregnancy or for 60 days after giving birth. The Medicare Part D low-income subsidy also won’t be considered a public benefit. And benefits received by children until the age of 21 won’t be considered. Nor will emergency medical assistance, school lunch programs, foster care or adoption, student loans and mortgages, food pantries, homeless shelters or disaster relief. Active U.S. military members are also exempt, as are refugees and asylum seekers. And the rules will not be applied retroactively, officials said. Green card hopefuls will be required to submit three years of federal tax returns in addition to a history of employment. If immigrants have private health insurance, that will weigh heavily in their favor. According to an Associated Press analysis of census data, low-income immigrants who are not citizens use Medicaid, food aid, cash assistance and Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, at a lower rate than comparable low-income native-born adults. Noncitizen immigrants represent 6.5% of those participating in Medicaid and 8.8% of those receiving food assistance.

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NEWS

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

Dangerous heat grips wide stretch of the South and Midwest BY JAY REEVES AND JEFF MARTIN

Associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Forecasters are warning about days of scorching, dangerous heat across a wide stretch of the U.S. South and Midwest, where the heat index will feel as high as 117 degrees in some spots. With temperatures around 100 degrees at midday Monday and “feels like” temperatures soaring higher, parts of 13 states were under heat advisories, from Texas, Louisiana and Florida in the South to Missouri and Illinois in the Midwest, the National Weather Service reported. “It feels like hell is what it feels like,” said Junae Brooks, who runs Junae’s Grocery in Holly Bluff, Mississippi. Many of her customers were wearing straw hats or keeping cool with wet rags around their necks, she said. Some of the most oppressive conditions were being felt in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi and Oklahoma. Today will be about the same, forecasters said, and Wednesday will be only a little cooler. The temperature hit 100 degrees with a heat index of 106 degrees by mid-afternoon in Birmingham, where forecasters said they last issued an excessive heat warning seven years ago. It was expected to feel like 116 degrees in parts of eastern Oklahoma, near Tulsa, on Monday, forecasters said. And parts of

ANDREA SMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kai Frazier and Chance Seawright, brothers visiting from Aiken, S.C., cool off while playing Monday in the Fountain of Rings in Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park. Arkansas just west of Memphis, Tennessee, could see heat indexes Monday of around 117 degrees. Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are among the main threats in those areas. “You are more likely to develop a heat illness quicker in this type of weather, when it’s really humid and hot,” said Gary Chatelain, a National Weather Service meteorologist based in Shreveport,

Louisiana. Stifling humidity is hanging in the Louisiana air partly because the area has seen such a wet summer, Chatelain said. More of the same is in store for today, when heat and humidity will again make for dangerous heat indexes. However, an approaching cool front should help ease the intense heat by Wednesday, Chatelain said.

“If you’re going out in the summer, prepare for the worst,” he said. That means people spending time outdoors should take breaks in the shade, drink plenty of water, wear hats and light-colored clothing, among other precautions, he said. Anyone who stops sweating in the heat should be aware that it might be a sign of heat illness. But in the Mississippi Delta re-

gion, farmers did not have a choice but to work in the fields Monday since they’re scrambling to make repairs and get caught up after floodwaters inundated the region in recent months, Brooks said. The flooding — which involved an area larger than New York City and Los Angeles combined — has recently receded and the farmers are just now able to reach their land and begin cleaning up the mess left behind. “The mosquitoes the gnats, the spiders, the snakes — all of them — have been way worse this year,” Brooks said of the land known locally as the Yazoo backwater area. In Alabama and Tennessee, high school football coaches were adjusting practice schedules Monday and Tuesday, with some moving the workouts indoors and others conducting training in the early morning or evening, The Tennessean reported . Cooling stations were open in several cities, including Tulsa, Memphis and Little Rock, Arkansas, officials said. In northern Alabama, forecasters with the weather service’s Huntsville office said Monday they issued the first “excessive heat warning” for the area in more than seven years. Such a warning is more serious than a heat advisory. The region hardest-hit by this week’s heat wave could experience many more days each year when the heat index soars as the effects of climate change increase, scientists say.

LAW AND ORDER ST. LOUIS — Man shot at filling station: A man was shot Monday evening at a Shell gas station in downtown St. Louis by a shooter who had been pumping gas into a vehicle, police said. The man was shot in the leg shortly before 7 p.m. at the gas station at 721 North Tucker Boulevard, police said. He was taken to a hospital in stable condition. Witnesses told police the man was standing in between two parked vehicles when he was fired at once by a shooter who had been pumping gas into a gray vehicle, said Capt. Renee Kriesmann. The shooter, believed to be male, immediately drove away. Police did not know if the victim and shooter knew each other before the incident, Kriessman said. Investigators were reviewing footage Monday night from the surveillance cameras at the gas station to help identify the shooter and the shooter’s vehicle, she said. Detectives were not yet able to interview the shooting victim. ST. LOUIS — Two arrested after county-city chase: A St. Louis County police vehicle was struck during a pursuit in north St. Louis on Monday afternoon, and two people were taken into custody, police said. St. Louis County police officers began the chase about 12 p.m. Monday after spotting a Kia Optima that appeared to be involved in a shooting in St. Louis earlier that morning, police said. Officers tried to pull the car over, but the driver didn’t stop, so police began to chase the car near the intersection of Chambers and Halls Ferry roads on the edge of Castle Point, police said. The chase continued into north St. Louis, and St. Louis County police lost sight of the car around the Dome at America’s Center, according to the department. While police searched the area for the car, the suspects’ Kia struck one St. Louis County police car in the front passenger side at the intersection of 9th and Carr streets, near the Dome in the Columbus Square neighborhood. One officer was taken to a hospital with a minor injury and was released by Monday afternoon, police said. Two suspects, ages 16 and 18, were taken into custody at the scene of the crash. Both were treated at a hospital with minor injuries. Their identities have not yet been released by police. Police later found that the Kia Optima was stolen. Authorities ask anyone with information on the incident to contact the St. Louis County Police Department at 636-529-8210 to speak to investigators. To remain anonymous or potentially receive a reward, call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477.

10:40 p.m. in Lincoln County, the patrol said. The patrol said one of the boys died at the crash scene; the other died at St. Louis Children’s Hospital early Monday morning. Neither teen was wearing a seat belt, the patrol said. The car was driven by Cole L. Butler, 16, of Moscow Mills, according to the patrol. He suffered moderate injuries and was wearing a seat belt. Passenger Zachary W. Siebert, 17, of Troy was seriously hurt while another passenger, Robert J. Templeton, 17, of Foristell, suffered minor injuries, the patrol said. Siebert was not wearing a seat belt; Templeton was.

As of Monday morning, he was still listed on the organization’s website as its executive director, but Lineback’s name was removed after this story posted online.

FRANKLIN COUNTY — Motorcyclist killed: An O’Fallon, Missouri, man died Sunday morning in Franklin County when an SUV pulled into the path of the man’s motorcycle, the Missouri Highway Patrol reported. Kurt Alley, 33, was pronounced dead at the crash scene, the patrol said. The patrol said that at about 6 a.m., a Ford Explorer driven by Steven E. Brady, 54, of Plant City, Florida, pulled into the path of Alley’s Suzuki GSX-R750 motorcycle on ST. LOUIS — Shooting victim identified: Police on Monday Highway 100 at Highway V, near Villa Ridge, Missouri. identified a man fatally shot the day before as Darris D. Williams, 39, of the 1200 block of Melvin E. Collins Walkway. EAST ST. LOUIS — Woman’s body found in car: An East St. Williams was found dead shortly after 5 a.m. Sunday in Louis woman was found shot to death in a car Sunday the 3300 block of North Florissant Avenue. He had been morning, authorities say. shot in the head. Kisha E. Tolson, 29, was found fatally shot about The shooting was the city’s Hyde Park neighborhood. 10:30 a.m. at 15th Street and Ohio Avenue, police said. Police had no suspect information. Investigators believe she was shot within two hours of her being found. St. Clair County Coroner Calvin Dye Sr. said she was JEFFERSON CITY — Police chiefs’ lobbyist out: The longtime lobbyist for the Missouri Police Chiefs Association pronounced dead at 11:50 a.m. of a gunshot wound to her canceled his registration with Missouri ethics regulators neck. Friday, a week after a state audit blasted his role in a no-bid Illinois State Police are investigating the killing. Mascontract scheme that cost taxpayers $74,000. ter Sgt. Jerri Hochmuth said police don’t know if Tolson’s Sheldon Lineback, who registered to lobby for the Mis- death could be linked to other recent killings of women in souri Police Chiefs Association in March 2001, terminated the Metro East. Anyone with information about Tolson’s death is asked his lobbying relationship with the nonprofit group Friday, to call Hochmuth at 618-346-3780. according to Missouri Ethics Commission records.

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LINCOLN COUNTY — Two teens die in crash: Two teenagers have died after the car they were riding in Sunday night veered off a highway and struck a tree, the Missouri Highway Patrol reported. Brayden P. Hood and Mario Montalvo, both 16 and from Troy, Missouri, died after the Ford Fusion they were riding in veered off Highway 47 and struck a tree at about

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08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

M 1 TuesdAY • 08.13.2019 • A7

Dow slumps nearly 400 points

BUSINESS DIGEST USDA sees bigger corn crop: The U.S. corn harvest will be bigger than previously forecast, the U.S. Agriculture Department said on Monday, as the government issued a surprise boost to its outlook despite concerns about a wet spring and dry summer. For the 2019/20 crop year, the corn harvest will total 13.901 billion bushels, based on an average yield of 169.5 bushels per acre, the USDA predicted in its monthly supply and demand report. Farmers seeded 90 million acres with corn and were expected to harvest 82 million acres. “The yield going up in corn was shocking, because the crop condition ratings have been going down,” said Bob Utterback, of Utterback Marketing. He said the data suggested improving prospects in Missouri and Minnesota and parts of Iowa were offsetting the rest of the Midwest. USDA trimmed its outlook for soybean production, keeping its yield expectation unchanged but cutting its acreage estimates. It also lowered its export forecast for the 2019/20 marketing year by 100 million bushels to 1.775 billion as China cuts its purchases due to an escalating trade war with the United States. USDA has slashed 175 million bushels from its soy export forecast since issuing its initial outlook for the marketing year in May. Soybean production was pegged at 3.680 billion bushels, based on an average yield of 48.5 bushels per acre. The government’s U.S. wheat production forecast of 1.980 billion bushels topped market expectations for 1.925 billion bushels and was above the July outlook of 1.921 billion bushels. Morgan Stanley predicts Fed will cut rates: Morgan Stanley analysts said on Monday that they now expect the U.S. Federal Reserve to cut rates in September and then again in October. “Trade’s ‘simmer’ has begun to boil, business sentiment and capex (capital expenditures) have softened further, global growth remains weak and inflation ex-

pectations have fallen,” while the gap between 3-month and 10-year U.S. government bonds points to overly restrictive monetary policy, the investment bank’s analysts said in a note. The analysts previously predicted a cut in October alone, saying the central bank would “wait for further evidence that downside risks are weighing on the economy.” The bank joins a number of investors betting that the Fed’s first rate cut since 2008,late last month, will be the first of several moves to lower borrowing costs. Goldman Sachs said earlier this month it sees a strong chance of rate cuts in both September and October. Morgan Stanley is one of 24 socalled primary dealers that can trade directly with the Fed’s main market desk in New York.

Anxiety lingers over trade war with China BY ALEX VEIGA

Associated Press

Stocks fell sharply on Wall Street Monday, knocking nearly 400 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The benchmark S&P 500 had its worst day in a week as the sell-off put the market deeper into the red for August. The selling was widespread, with technology companies and banks accounting for a big share of the decline. Investors sought safety in U.S. government bonds, sending their yields tumbling. The price for gold, another traditional safe-haven asset, closed higher. The costly trade war between the U.S. and China has rattled markets this month. An escalation in tensions between the world’s largest economies has stoked worries that the longrunning trade conflict will undercut an already slowing global economy. “Trade and the concern that as this escalates it continues to wear on confidence to a point that this actually causes a recession, that’s what people are wrestling with,” said Ben Phillips, chief investment officer at

Nike adds kids sneaker subscriber service: Nike Inc. will launch a new subscription service for kids sneakers this week that seeks to woo parents with an offer of fewer nightmarish trips to the shoe store in exchange for a regular fee and consistent brand loyalty. Aimed at the U.S. kids shoe market, estimated at an annual $10 billion, “Adventure Club” builds on Nike’s SNKRS app, which notifies shoppers every time it launches a new shoe or has an exclusive sneaker at a nearby store. With three tiers of subscription — $20, $30 or $50 a month — Nike Adventure Club is aimed at 2- to 10-year-olds and effectively gives subscribers a new pair of Nike sneakers that cost about $50 or more once a month, once every two months or once every three. Depending on whether the kids pick, for example, Nike Air Max or Converse sneakers, members will save almost nothing or up to $50 on each pair. Nike’s subscription box will include a sizing chart in the form of a fridge magnet to help parents measure their children’s feet. The company said a pilot program with 10,000 members has shown that only a small proportion of parents get the size wrong.

already been hit with tariffs of 25%. The new tariff would go into effect Sept. 1 and more directly affect U.S. consumers. Last week, Trump said he’d be “fine” if the U.S. and China don’t go ahead with a meeting next month, dampening investors’ hopes for a path to resolving the economically damaging trade war. The longer the trade conflict drags on, the more it has the potential to threaten the weakening global economy by discouraging trade and causing businesses to pull capital spending plans on hold. The International Monetary Fund expects world trade to slow in 2019 for a second straight year. “We’re hearing from management teams that there’s just caution on investing, especially globally,” Phillips said. “Multinationals are being very cautious. ... Their view is if the rest of the world slows down, the U.S. won’t be insulated from that.” Traders continued to shift money into bonds Monday, sending bond prices sharply higher. That pulled down the yield on the 10-year Treasury to 1.64% from 1.73% late Friday, a big move. The yield is used as a benchmark for interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

EventShares. The latest wave of anxious selling left the S&P 500 index down 35.95 points, or 1.2%, at 2,882.70. The Dow fell 391 points, or 1.5%, to 25,896.44. The average was briefly down 462 points. The Nasdaq composite dropped 95.73, or 1.2%, to 7,863.41. The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks lost 18.58 points, or 1.2%, to 1,494.46. The major indexes are down more than 3% for August. Even after this month’s stumble, they are up solidly this year, led by the Nasdaq with a gain of 18.5%. The S&P 500 is up nearly 15%, though it’s down 4.7% from its all-time high set at the end of July. Anxiety and fear over the U.S.-China trade war continues to hover over the market and has taken stocks on a wild ride in August. The S&P 500 index zoomed up and down last week, ending with its second straight weekly loss. The wild swings follow President Donald Trump’s threat to impose more tariffs on Chinese goods, followed by China’s move to allow its currency to weaken. Trump has promised 10% tariffs on some $300 billion in Chinese imports that haven’t

Stifel to buy some assets of K.C. firm BY ANNIKA MERRILEES

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Brokerage and investment firm Stifel Financial Corp. is acquiring some assets from investment banking firm George K. Baum & Company. The transaction, which is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2019, will bring George K. Baum & Company’s municipal securities business to St. Louis-based Stifel. George K. Baum & Company

From staff and wire reports

is based in Kansas City. Since 2000, the company has provided financial advisory services or underwriting to municipal bond issues totaling more than $320 billion. “We are very excited about the opportunities for both GKB’s talents and clients by joining Stifel’s platform,” said Jonathan E. Baum, president & CEO of George K. Baum & Company, in a press release. The transaction does not af-

fect George K. Baum Capital Advisors or Baum Capital Partners. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. In June, Stifel agreed to buy GMP Capital Inc.’s advisory and trading business for about $52 million, and in March a Stifel subsidiary acquired the assets of Town and Country-based asset manager Piermont Capital Management.

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks fell sharply Monday, knocking nearly 400 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The selling was widespread, with technology companies and banks falling sharply. The costly U.S.-China trade war has continued to rattle markets this month.

Sysco

$32

75

30

70

28

65

26

M

J J 52-week range

10 DAYS

$75.98

3,040

Dow Jones industrials Close: 25,897.71 Change: -389.73 (-1.5%)

26,380

A

M

J J 52-week range

$34.44

18 M

J J 52-week range

$6.12

Corn Soybeans Wheat

CLOSE

CHG

Sep 19 Aug 19 Sep 19

385.25 861.50 471.75

-25 -12.25 -27.75

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

27,200

3,000

Feeder cattle

26,400

2,900

Hogs

2,800

134.40 105.05 79.17 17.61 258.00

-4.50 -3.00 +.15

25,600

Aug 19 Aug 19 Aug 19 Aug 19 Aug 19

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Sep 19 Sep 19 Nov 19

58.14 93.75 25.78

-.76 -3.55 -.10

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Sep 19 Sep 19 Sep 19 Sep 19

54.93 1.6652 180.58 2.105

+.43 -.0088 -.22 -.014

Milk

F

M

A

J

J

2,700

A

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

2,840 3,274 799 1934 134 196

1,970 2,140 931 1996 55 168

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

M

Copper

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 26178.95 10165.27 827.75 12688.78 7924.99 2907.58 1892.09 29945.65 1512.76

LOW 25824.94 9997.16 821.26 12556.97 7833.79 2873.14 1868.85 29466.55 1491.61

CLOSE 25897.71 10030.17 824.96 12586.24 7863.41 2883.09 1872.38 29561.10 1494.46

CHG. -389.73 -177.04 -1.34 -162.18 -95.73 -35.56 -28.95 -384.55 -18.58

%CHG. WK -1.48% s -1.73% t -0.16% s -1.27% s -1.20% s -1.22% s -1.52% s -1.28% s -1.23% s

MO QTR t s t t t s t s t s t s t t t s t t

YTD +11.02% +9.38% +15.71% +10.65% +18.51% +15.01% +12.59% +14.80% +10.82%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.64 34.42

-.12 -0.3 +20.6 +12.6

2.04 General Motors

GM

Aegion Corp

AEGN

14.12

25.83 19.05

-.39 -2.0 +16.7 -22.3 25

... Home Depot

HD

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.43

1.47

-.05 -3.4 -19.6 -36.9 dd

... Huttig Building Prod HBP

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

67.57 63.65

-.63 -1.0

77.77 76.64

-.05 -0.1 +17.5 +25.1 27

2.80

7

+8.7 +1.2 17

1.14 Lee Enterprises 1.90 Lowes

Ameren Corp

AEE

62.06

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

64.55 102.70 96.28 -1.94 -2.0 +46.3 +0.5 24 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 73.84 101.92 75.42 -.66 -0.9 -9.1 -13.1 5 1.80 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

Bank of America

BAC

22.66

31.49 27.62

37.79

75.25 44.10 -1.11 -2.5

+5.6 -36.9 11

0.20

292.47 446.01 332.88 -4.67 -1.4

+3.2 +0.5 31

8.22

Belden Inc

BDC

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

3.48

5.25

9.35

1.95

...

... -24.4 -61.8 dd

-.71 -2.5 +12.1

... McDonald’s

-8.5 10 0.72f

3.55 +.06 +1.7 -10.1 -58.0 dd

...

Caleres Inc.

CAL

14.54

41.09 14.52

-.30 -2.0 -47.8 -57.0

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.35

62.03 48.68

-.69 -1.4

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 47.97

-.73 -1.5

... -29.7 14

...

Charter

CHTR 272.91 417.13 376.28 -3.29 -0.9 +32.0 +24.4 75

...

Cigna

CI

Citigroup

C

141.95 226.61 165.63 -4.27 -2.5 48.42

7

-8.0 -14.2 14 1.04b

-7.9

75.24 64.25 -1.80 -2.7 +23.4

-8.4 16 -5.7

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

53.40

72.55 56.91 -1.11 -1.9

EPC

26.36

59.16 28.36 -1.24 -4.2 -24.1 -47.7 15

Emerson

EMR

55.39

79.70 58.21 -1.27 -2.1

Energizer Holdings

ENR

32.54

65.06 36.16

+1.0 -10.8 15 -2.6 -17.0 19

-.53 -1.4 -19.9 -39.7 24

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.09

58.00 38.83

ESE

59.00

85.86 75.07 -1.54 -2.0 +14.0 +16.4 21

Foresight Energy

FELP

0.40

FutureFuel

FF

10.22

.44

19.31 10.55

-.02 -5.2 -87.6 -83.8 dd

LOW MNK

-.75 -1.9 +16.2 +9.7 dd

1.52

158.09 219.30 206.97 -3.05 -1.5 +20.5 +8.4 21

5.44

30.56

41.90 38.86

1.57

5.75

2.40

-.07 -2.8 +33.3 -50.6 dd

1.84

3.69

2.17 +.08 +3.8

84.75 118.23 96.09 -2.46 -2.5 5.12

36.65

4.82

+2.8 -29.2

...

+4.0 +0.6 21 2.20f

-.49 -9.2 -69.5 -82.7

...

MA

171.89 283.33 269.99 -4.96 -1.8 +43.1 +35.7 63

MCD

156.56 221.93 217.09 -4.06 -1.8 +22.3 +41.6 33

OLN

17.58

32.00 16.88

...

-.79 -4.5 -16.1 -39.1

4

4.64 0.80

BTU

17.20 3.75

11.00 10.89

-.01 -0.1 +132.7+124.9 dd

0.28

Perficient

PRFT

20.92

38.80 34.91

-.52 -1.5 +56.8 +30.3 43

...

Post Holdings

POST

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

Reliv

RELV

Spire Inc

SR

70.53

Stifel Financial

SF

38.39

61.94 52.66 -1.25 -2.3 +27.1

TGT

60.15

90.39 82.06

UPS

89.89 125.09 114.88

USB

44.71 18.44 +.31 +1.7 -39.5 -53.2

1.32

SKIS

1.96 US Bancorp 1.20 US Steel

-.40

PREV

.0189 .6754 .2512 1.2079 .7556 .1417 1.1219 .0140 .2878 .009499 .051066 .0153 .0653 .000820 1.0321

.0221 .6792 .2537 1.2056 .7571 .1416 1.1207 .0141 .2875 .009472 .051496 .0153 .0656 .000823 1.0284

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

CHG

CLOSE

1505.30 17.04 863.70

Gold Silver

83.88 113.73 96.36 -1.36 -1.4

+8.1 +4.0 10

...

127.84 163.46 147.48

-.96 -0.6

+5.2 +6.7 13

2.40

4.46

-.16 -3.4

+5.3

-9.4 dd

...

87.13 80.60

-.70 -0.9

+8.8 +11.5 18

2.37

3.80

43.14

5.89

57.81 52.09

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note dropped to 1.64% on Monday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

+8.70 +.14 -.10

-0.2 16

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.25 5.50 5.00

-1.1 19

-.70 -1.3 +14.0 +1.5 12

1.48

X

11.67

31.59 11.67

-.38 -3.2 -36.0 -59.7

7

0.20

52.28

61.58 55.69

-.09 -0.2

7

2.41

0.32 WalMart

WMT

85.78 115.49 105.19 -2.09 -1.9 +12.9 +22.9 60 2.12f

WBA

49.31

86.31 52.00

-.79 -1.5 -23.9 -17.6

WFC

43.02

59.53 45.42

-.88 -1.9

9

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.99 1.92 1.76 1.56 1.48 1.55 1.64 2.13

... -0.03 -0.03 -0.07 -0.08 -0.09 -0.09 -0.12

2.04 2.22 2.39 2.61 2.73 2.80 2.88 3.03

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

2.38 2.38 1.88

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.31 2.30 6.07 3.09 2.99 .04

+0.01 +0.02 +0.02 ... +0.02 -0.04

2.05 3.34 6.23 3.92 3.98 .79

GlobalMarkets

3.84

VZ

-0.9 +9.8

LAST

0.60

-.35 -0.4 +24.2 +2.1 14 2.64f -.88 -0.8 +17.8

TREASURIES

BONDS

0.58f

0.13 Walgreen Boots

-.60 -5.4 -33.5 -15.0 13 0.24a Wells Fargo

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

Peabody Energy

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

A $24.45

Platinum

Peak Resorts

+3.2 -29.4 12 0.64f Verizon

Esco Technologies

4.05

0.04

9 2.04f

Edgewell

-.50 -1.3

0.28

Olin

LEE

$17.71

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

J J 52-week range

ExchangeRates

DATE

3,100

Live cattle

M

PE: 25.9 Vol.: 3.3m (1.4x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $39.5 b Yield: 3.5%

PE: ... Yield: ...

28,000

24,800

16

A $29.80

Vol.: 1.4m (0.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $377.7 m

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,883.09 Change: -35.56 (-1.2%)

2,800

25,440

20

Futures

S&P 500

2,920

$22

6

A

ABB

Close: $18.50 0.44 or 2.4% The robotics and engineering company hired Sandvik’s Bjorn Rosengren as its new CEO.

8

Vol.: 5.6m (1.5x avg.) PE: 7.0 Mkt. Cap: $10.1 b Yield: 2.8%

10 DAYS

ABB

RAD

Close: $7.02 -0.17 or -2.4% The struggling drugstore chain named former insurance executive Heyward Donigan as its new CEO. $10

$23.31

Vol.: 4.8m (1.9x avg.) PE: 23.9 Mkt. Cap: $37.2 b Yield: 2.2%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Rite Aid

VIAB

Close: $28.53 -1.48 or -4.9% The entertainment company and CBS are reportedly close to a merger deal.

$80

$59.44

27,320

Viacom

SYY

Close: $72.19 2.20 or 3.1% The food distributor reported higher profit in its fiscal fourth quarter and beat Wall Street forecasts.

1.76

-1.4 -17.6 10 2.04f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2883.09 11679.68 7226.72 25824.72 5310.31 39851.21 20684.82 101971.30 16237.77 9760.02

CHG

CHG

YTD

-35.56 -14.12 -27.13 -114.58 -17.61 -570.07 ... -2024.90 -103.57 +10.10

-1.22% -0.12% -0.37% -0.44% -0.33% -1.41% ...% -1.95% -0.63% +0.10%

+15.01% +10.61% +7.41% +0.02% +12.25% -4.30% +3.35% +16.03% +13.37% +15.79%


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2M , 118 7• 8TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019 A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TUESDAy • 08.13.2019 • A8 RAY FARRIS PReSIDeNT & PUBLISHeR

GILBERT BAILON eDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON eDITORIAL PAGe eDITOR

Reckless, endangering — and legal Missouri law allows mass-shooting scenarios, right up until the bullets fly.

T

he man who walked into a Springfield, Mo., Walmart last Thursday wielding a military-style semiautomatic rifle and wearing body armor, terrifying shoppers in the aftermath of the El Paso massacre, says he was just “testing” his Second Amendment rights. It sounds insane, but consider the true insanity: Since Missouri is an open-carry state, wielding that weapon in public probably wasn’t in itself illegal. He’s been charged with making a terrorist threat because he caused a storewide panic — by doing something that is explicitly permitted under Missouri law. What does that sick scenario say about Missouri law? Dmitriy Andreychenko, 20, entered the Walmart outfitted in camouflage and carrying, in addition to his visible AR-style rifle, a semiautomatic handgun and 100 rounds of ammunition. It was, in essence, exactly the scenario of the Aug. 3 massacre of 22 people in a Walmart in Texas — the cradle of the national open-carry movement. The only difference this time is that the Missouri gunman didn’t do any shooting. Nonetheless, fellow shoppers ran from the store and called police. Andreychenko was arrested without incident. The problem is that Missouri, like many other states, allows most people 19 years or older to carry firearms in public, open or concealed. It only becomes illegal if the weapon is “displayed in an angry or threatening manner.” It’s a standard so subjective as to be meaningless, but one the Springfield

gunman doesn’t seem to have violated by merely strolling the aisles watching his fellow shoppers scatter in fear. There’s been no reporting to suggest he pointed the guns at anyone. That has necessitated some logical contortions from Greene County Prosecuting Attorney Dan Patterson to explain how it is that Andreychenko faces criminal charges: “Missouri protects the right of people to open carry a firearm,” Patterson said in a statement, “but that does not allow an individual to act in a reckless and criminal manner endangering other citizens.” Again, Missouri law explicitly permits scenarios exactly like this one. If what Andreychenko did was “reckless” and “endangering” (and it was), then so is the law itself. The entire point of the “carry” movements, both open and concealed, was to create a society in which the people all around us are armed, as if to serve notice to all bad guys out there. Warnings that this was a careful-what-youwish-for proposition fell on deaf ears, as the gun lobby and its political lackeys apparently came to believe their own irrational rhetoric about gun violence having nothing to do with guns. Now, Walmart shoppers — and people in other public spaces wherever such laws are in effect — have to wonder which of those legally carrying gunmen will suddenly decide to illegally use what he’s carrying. This is the world our permissive gun culture built. We’re all prisoners in it, and will continue to be until sanity returns to the state legislatures where such laws exist. Springfield police respond to a Walmart in Springfield, Mo., Thursday after reports of a man with a weapon in the store. Dmitriy Andreychenko showed up at the Walmart store wearing body armor, sending panicked shoppers fleeing the store. HARRISON KEEGAN, THE SPRINGFIELD NEWS-LEADER

Black and blue St. Louisan’s hero worship of police is crushed by detective’s beat-down.

I

t’s entirely possible that a convenience store surveillance video doesn’t tell the complete story of Bryan Boyle’s encounter last week with an off-duty St. Louis police detective — an encounter that ended with the officer apparently attacking Boyle without provocation and Boyle winding up in handcuffs. Both Boyle and the officer are black. Boyle stated repeatedly in remarks to the Post-Dispatch’s Christine Byers that he was a big admirer of those who serve, especially when the officer is black. He himself aspired to that very calling. That is, until last week. Now Boyle, 31, isn’t so sure. Unless there’s something more to this story than what the store video revealed, Boyle deserves a personal visit from Police Chief John Hayden and words of encouragement not to let this violent incident destroy his advocacy of police service. Recruitment already was suffering, and the department is strained by staffing shortages. The trust of the community is, once again, at stake. The officer in question is under investigation for misconduct. If he has a conflicting account of what happened, it hasn’t been made public, nor has his name. Boyle’s version appears to have both video and witness corroboration. Boyle says he was standing behind the officer in the check-out line, having ordered food and a drink. The officer,

a detective dressed in a T-shirt, jeans and a duty belt that included his gun, was waiting to buy some cigarettes. Boyle says he tried to engage the officer in conversation while they waited. The store video has no audio to confirm his account. He says the officer responded tersely with an expletive. Boyle, undeterred, asked the man if he was a police officer and expressed interest in pursuing such a career. At that point, Boyle’s order was ready, so he reached toward the counter for his food. The video shows the officer shoving and hitting Boyle. “I’m like, ‘Dude, what is going on?’ I was really confused. I was trying to tell him you’re an inspiration to me. You are doing something I want to do. And he comes after me again. I look at him like he’s a king, and he’s still trying to put my hands behind my back for no reason,” Boyle said. “I wanted my sons to look up and see it’s OK to do (police work),” Boyle added. “But imagine if my son was with me? Would it change his mind about the police, too?” A store clerk who witnessed the attack told Byers he was appalled by the officer’s actions. Usually, people who experience encounters like this don’t speak of admiration for the police. Boyle seems more like a person who’s had his spirit crushed. That’s perhaps the saddest statement of all about what happened.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Our lawmakers do nothing to help Missourians We have had it with Rep. Jason Smith and Sens. Roy Blunt and Josh Hawley. They have sold Missourians down the pike. What have they done to protect our elections from Russian interference in 2020? Nothing. What have they done to create common-sense gun control laws and ban assault Smith weapons? Nothing. What have they done to address the climate change the world is experiencing? Nothing. What have they done to reunite the children with their parents Blunt at the southern border? Nothing. What have they done to make health care affordable for all American citizens? Nothing. What have they done to stop the racist hate mongering spewing from the White Hawley House? Nothing. They are not representing the hard-working, sensible and compassionate people of Missouri. If you feel the same way, now is the time to start working to make sure they do not get reelected. Maxine and Ken Horgan • Mountain View, Mo.

Stop turning a blind eye to each other’s misery Regarding “Nun’s sympathy for migrants too liberal and misinformed” (Aug. 3): Jane Petry denigrates Sister Agnes Brueggen for “relying on her title to make it seem she is overwhelmed with caring for the poor migrants.” Ms. Petry goes on to say that the people Sister Agnes is concerned about are not needy, that they have “iPhones, fancy clothes and marched in flip flops.” She thinks that Sister Agnes needs to get her information from somewhere other than CNN. My question is, where is Ms. Petry getting her information? Has she been to the border to see these people crossing in flip flops, carrying iPhones? Or perhaps she has been watching Fox News, that oh-so very unbiased news source. Everyone who speaks out about the injustice being done to the migrants is not in a position to pick up and move to Central America. Does this mean that we should never speak up? So often, we make assumptions about people without knowing the facts. Maybe “caring, good people” need to be open to the possibility that injustice is being done and stop turning a blind eye to the misery of others. Terri Schneider • St. Louis County

1791 muzzle-loaders not the same as assault rifles When the Second Amendment was ratified by Congress as part of the Bill of Rights in 1791, a modern firearm was a single-shot, muzzle-loaded musket. Today’s conventional weapons far exceed the destructive capability of those available when the Second Amendment was implemented. Well-regulated citizen militias have been replaced by the Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force. The number of weapons per capita in the United States far exceed those of any other nation in the world, and we surpass most other nations in the number of fatalities caused by weapons. Removing military-style assault weapons from the public domain would not infringe on the right of the people to

keep and bear less-lethal conventional arms. Roy Taylor • St. Louis

Some white communities are just as bad as Baltimore Regarding “Trump merely delivering the sad truth about Baltimore” (Aug. 3): Please consider the following: Kentucky’s 5th Congressional District has the nation’s second-highest rate for opioid use, the second-lowest median income, the highest poverty rate, the lowest life-expectancy rate and is 96% white. The 5th District is represented by an all-white Republican delegation, including Sens, Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul. Is it fair to say that this district is nothing but poor whites on drugs? The truth is, there are many low-income communities with drug addiction problems, high crime and poverty rates. These communities come in all colors, including white. But President Donald Trump never brings these facts to light. He focuses on minority communities exclusively for their poverty-, drug- and rodent-infested cities. The truth is sometimes very harsh, and racism is systemically induced by our leaders to benefit themselves or their objectives. In the case of Mr. Trump, he uses racism and ignorance to shore up his base and create division. Please keep in mind that Mr. Trump lost the general election by nearly 3 million votes. Malcolm J. Murphy, Jr. • St. Peters

Police are here to protect, and they deserve respect In light of recent events, I believe the present politically correct method of policing is not working. Police are not here to shoot baskets or play on waterslides with kids. They are here to enforce the laws and protect the community. They must have the respect of the community to do their jobs effectively, and that is not achieved by playing games with the kids. Today’s kids have a lack of discipline, brought on by running to mommy or someone else when they are required to do something they don’t like. Toughen up. Take responsibility for your actions. Don’t think you can assault a policeman and get away scot-free just because you’ve played games with an officer. Police are here to do a job, and that job is not to be your buddy, it’s to be your protector. If you expect them to respect you, then you must treat them with respect. John Ackerman • Town and Country

Mueller and Comey were inept, derelict in their duty Reflecting back on special counsel Robert Mueller’s stunningly inept testimony, I believe it finally revealed how shamefully biased the Trump/Russia collusion investigation was. I served under every Federal Bureau of Investigation director except the last three: Mueller, Comey and the current director, Christopher Wray. Mueller and Comey are worse than an embarrassment, as they both were responsible for investigations constructed to achieve a political result and turned a blind eye to consequences that turned justice on its head. Whatever reputation they had is now in shambles, as it should be, and soon we will learn the truth about the full extent of abuses committed by investigative teams and what I believe is Mueller and Comey’s dereliction of duty. Jim Nelson • Chesterfield Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON editorial Page editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


08.13.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

50 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

OTHER VIEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

WHEN GOVERNMENTS DISCRIMINATE • The United States Civil Rights Commission is challenging a broad spectrum of American government in its latest

report,a 277-page study of 600 state and local governments in seven scattered states.The commission accuses these governments of overt employment discrimination,having placed minority employees in low-paying,low-skilled jobs with few opportunities for advancement.Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Preaching morality while encouraging sin their cars, etc. To a devout Catholic teenager, this was gold. I felt special and grade, as soon as I became privileged, like I was being treated like a peer. Outside an altar boy at our parmy own home, I spent ish church. I went to the grade school connected to most of my time in that rectory. In our household our church, so the segue was a given. My path into no one was more revered than priests. Priests were the inner circle was all among the few friends but guaranteed since my that our family had and older brothers had taken socialized with. that route. It wasn’t long But that deference before a close friend and became a source of deep I were favorites of the priests — being pulled out confusion. By day, this of class to be altar boys for reverence was upheld in a nearly unnatural way. funerals, getting calls to serve weekend weddings, By night, I was receiving different messages from etc. the priests, and the gold A select crew of us became contaminated and became the focus of the tarnished. priests’ attention. We The priests didn’t hesiwere their companions. tate to take us to films my Joining in on visits to parents would never have the country house and allowed. The cursing and boat rides, helping with sexist comments flowed Christmas shopping, faster than in any locker running errands to buy room I ever experienced. A them cigarettes, washing

Clergy abuse of minors tells only part of the Catholic Church’s sordid story. BY TOM UNGER

On July 26, the Archdiocese of St. Louis published a list of 61 members of the clergy with verified allegations of sexual abuse of a minor against them, and an additional three with verified allegations of possession of child pornography. Two priests on the list had been stationed at the church I attended when I was growing up, and I knew two others through another parish. One was a close family friend for decades. The focus of clergy sexual abuse is usually, and rightly, placed on the offenders and direct victims of the abusive behavior. But the radius of the effects is much larger. For me, the grooming began around fourth

passive glance was all we received when sneaking alcohol from the rectory bar. Sexualized conversation became the norm, and our own sexual interests became a voyeuristic pleasure for one particular priest. My friend and I watched a porn film in this priest’s bedroom. How was I to reconcile this behavior as a teenager? I was being taught a strict moral code in school and at home, yet the primary examples of this lifestyle were teaching me that all that “sinful” and immoral behavior was okay and good fun. I recall going to confession and confessing to sins that the very priest I was confessing to had taught me. The hypocrisy led to self-doubt, questioning, and an invasive feeling of being deeply flawed. These priests caused untold collateral damage.

I was fortunate — I was never physically abused. But the psychological toll was immeasurable. It took many years of therapy, a 12-step program and examples of many healthy relationships to see how destructive this history was. It was a betrayal not only of me, but of my parents. And it was a betrayal of the community at large. For every sexually abused child, there have been countless children who have been groomed just to that point. Those who were considered morally superior, those who knew our personal and family secrets, violated the trust of all. Explicit and lewd conversation and showing a child pornography is not a model of healthy behavior. I have great empathy for those who were sexually abused in the church, but

like with all abuse, the victimization didn’t end there. The Archdiocese of St. Louis’ list presents a terrible but tidy and contained picture. Presenting this list as a group of anomalous perpetrators ignores the scope of the problem. It was a betrayal denied and protected by the church, enabled by other clergy, that poisoned families and communities. The reality is bigger and touches many, many lives and relationships. The radius is much wider. We are all hurt. We must all be heard. The entire Catholic Church needs to take responsibility and be held accountable — not just those who are deceased or defrocked. Tom Unger grew up in a suburb of St. Louis and now lives in New York City with his family.

Is the economy finally turning against Trump? Economists aren’t yet predicting a recession, but they’re drifting that way. BY ROBERT J. SAMUELSON

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president of the National Rifle Association, holds a custom 300 Remington ultra mag during a gun auction in 2013 in Salt Lake City.

The real tragedy: LaPierre fears for his own safety Longtime NRA head asking for gated, $6 million mansion. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

After two horrific mass shootings, we come together as a nation to confront an urgent question: How are we going to keep Wayne LaPierre safe? The longtime head of the National Rifle Association, it turns out, is worried sick about his personal safety in this gun culture. After the Sandy Hook massacre in 2012, he and his wife bravely waited out the uproar on the pink-sand beaches of the Bahamas, part of $542,000 in private jet trips and personal items the NRA bought for him. And now, thanks to some delightful reporting by my Washington Post colleagues Carol D. Leonnig and Beth Reinhard, we know that last year’s Parkland massacre left LaPierre so fearful for his personal safety that he tried to have the NRA buy him a $6 million French-chateaustyle mansion with nine bathrooms in a gated Dallas-area golf course community. He told associates that he was worried about his safety and thought his Virginia home was too easy for potential attackers to find. Ultimately, the financially stressed NRA didn’t buy LaPierre the mansion. That’s too bad, because, as the saying goes: “The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a French chateau.” LaPierre and his wife wanted the 10,000-square-foot estate, set on a lake and built with white oak floors, “French Beaumanier limestone” (whatever that is) and “exquisite custom handcrafted

wood trim” — rather than an upscale high-rise in Dallas. I am sympathetic to his thinking, because although guns don’t kill people, insufficiently fortified upscale high-rises most certainly do. Further, the LaPierres sought to acquire a social membership at the community’s exclusive golf club; they wanted the seller’s cars and golf cart to convey; and Susan LaPierre was concerned that there was not enough space in her husband’s would-be closet. This sounds a bit precious, but consider: The golf cart almost certainly would have been up-armored after closing. And though LaPierre typically wears Italian suits purchased for him by the NRA, he needs someplace to store all that bulky body armor. “They were just trying to find a safe house to put him in,” LeRoy Sisco, an NRA board member, told the Post. “They were just saying that they needed to get him to a safe place.” Some will see hypocrisy in LaPierre trying to get the NRA to buy him a mansion in a gated community when the NRA, at the time of the attempted acquisition, issued a statement decrying the anti-gun “elites” who “live in gated communities.” Many will see it as ironic that LaPierre feels unsafe because of the very gun culture his policies have created. But it’s good to know he apparently feels some of what most Americans feel: that gun violence is out of control. There have been 254 mass shootings in the United States this year, according to the Gun Violence Archive, but the backto-back mass killings in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, have people on edge. Active-shooter false alarms caused pandemonium

and injuries across the country last week. In New York’s Times Square, motorcycle backfire caused panic and a stampede, as people screamed, cried and climbed on each other and called 911. An altercation at a Louisiana Walmart, where one man brandished a gun but didn’t fire it, caused shoppers to flee. A sign falling at a mall in Utah where a performance was underway caused somebody to yell “shots!” and police evacuated the mall amid the mayhem. Unfounded reports of an armed man at USA Today offices in McLean, Va., resulted in a swarm of heavily armed police evacuating the building while a helicopter hovered. My 15-year-old daughter was caught up in one such panic in June. At the Capital Pride Parade in D.C., a man with a BB gun set off a stampede of hundreds of people, and falling metal barriers may have convinced others that shots had been fired. Several were injured. My daughter, separated from her group, sheltered in a hotel basement until police gave the all-clear. She has been skittish about being in crowds since then, and understandably so. Since El Paso and Dayton, and Gilroy, and Virginia Beach and Pittsburgh, millions don’t feel safe shopping, attending festivals, going to school or houses of worship, walking the streets or going out at night. This is directly because of the madness LaPierre’s NRA has inflicted on America. Now he knows what it feels like. Dana Milbank @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post

To have a recession or not — that is the question. It also encompassed last week’s most important political news, notwithstanding all the public attention understandably focused on the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton. There is growing evidence of a possible Samuelson recession. If one materializes, President Donald Trump could lose his most powerful argument for reelection: a strong economy. As is well-known, Trump’s approval ratings have stubbornly remained well below 50%. Typically, they’ve hovered in the high 30s and the low 40s. Even this weak support depends heavily on a buoyant economy. Consider a Washington Post-ABC News poll taken in late June and early July. Trump’s overall approval rate was 44%, with 53% disapproving. But this poor showing already included public support for his economic stewardship, with 51% approving and 42% disapproving. On every other issue, the public disapproved of his performance. On immigration, the public disapproved by a 40%-to-57% margin. (In all these comparisons, Trump’s approval number comes first.) On taxes, the margin was 42% to 49%. On health care, it was 38% to 54%. Here are the remaining results: On women’s issues, he trailed 32% to 56%; on abortion, 32% to 54%; on gun violence, 36% to 52%; on foreign policy, 40% to 55%; on climate change, 29% to 62%. For Trump to lose his edge on the economy would clearly make it harder for him to win the general election. One obvious possibility would be perverse: Democrats might become so overconfident that they’d nominate someone too far to the left for most Americans. For most of Trump’s presidency, the economic news has been favorable. At its current 3.7%, the unemployment rate hasn’t been lower since the 1960s. In July, the present economic expansion became the longest in U.S. history at slightly more than 10 years, as determined by the National Bureau of Economic Research. The bureau usually declares a recession if the economy contracts for two consecutive quarters — that is, unemployment rises and output falls. What threatens this rosy picture is growing economic strife over trade. Last week was chaotic. Trump threatened to slap a 10% tariff on roughly $300 billion of

Chinese exports to the United States. Rather than submit, China retaliated by letting its currency, the renminbi (RMB), depreciate below the symbolic rate of 7 to the dollar. A cheaper renminbi would make China’s exports more competitive, offsetting some of the effect of Trump’s tariffs. Trump responded by declaring China a “currency manipulator” — an ominoussounding label that merely requires the administration to open negotiations with China, something that it’s already doing and has led nowhere. Reflecting mounting uncertainty, the stock market fluctuated wildly during the week. All this is curbing alreadysluggish economic growth. Higher tariffs raise prices to consumers and businesses, reducing their purchasing power. In late July — before the most recent turmoil — the International Monetary Fund downgraded its economic outlook and warned that “risks to the forecast are mainly to the downside.” The main danger seems a loss of confidence that delays business investment and consumer spending. The plunge in interest rates is seen as evidence that investors are seeking safe havens for their money. Most economists aren’t yet predicting a recession, but they’re drifting in that direction. Lewis Alexander of Nomura Securities International expects the economy’s growth to slow to less than 2% but not to enter recessionary territory. Joel Prakken of IHS Markit says its models put the odds of recession within a year at 1-in-3. Mark Zandi of Moody’s Analytics seems more pessimistic. “The U.S. and global economies are headed for a downturn unless President Trump backs away from his latest tariff threat,” he writes in a commentary. The combination of higher tariffs, higher prices and other factors have already cost almost 300,000 U.S. jobs, he estimates. Trump seems acutely aware of the threats to his reelection. He’s repeatedly assailed the Federal Reserve for not lowering short-term interest rates sooner; he’s also accepted a federal budget with huge deficits. These constitute traditional “stimulus” designed to keep the economy advancing. If they don’t work, it’s a safe bet that Trump won’t blame himself. The Fed and China are being set up as the fall guys for the next recession. Robert J. Samuelson Copyright The Washington Post


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1 • TUESDAY • AUGUST.13.2019

RIDES

Audi

Buick

Ford

Jeep

Toyota

Sport Utility

'15 Audi Q7 3.0T Prem Plus, quattro, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 39k mi., #P9933 $27,555

'16 Buick Envision AWD, stk# P07322 $26,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Ford Taurus LTD FWD, stk# P07330 $20,078 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Jeep Wrangler Unlmtd Rubicon, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 50k, #97397M $29,888

'16 Toyota Highlander AWD, stk# P07255A $30,694 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'14 Chevy Equinox LT, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, black, 108k mi., stk# 44739A $10,656

'18 Buick Enclave Avenir, SUV, 6 cyl., awd, auto, metallic, 31k mi., #41230A $35,888

Honda

'16 Audi A6 3.0T Premium Plus, 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 30k mi., #P1185 $29,700

'16 Audi S6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 32k mi., #29179A $41,555

'16 Audi S7 4 dr., HB hatchback, 8 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 21k mi., #29100A $54,222

'16 Audi TT 2.0T, 2 dr., 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 54k mi., #P9998 $28,888

'07 Honda-CRV, Loaded, Fuel Power, Clean Carfax, #44813A $8,750 '18 Buick LaCrosse FWD, stk# P07300 $21,344 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Buick Lacrosse, #P07300 $21,344 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Cadillac '18 Cadillac XT5 Prem Luxury FWD, sport utility, 6 cyl., auto, silver, 23k mi., #P1152 $31,555

Chevrolet

'17 Audi A6 Premium Plus, 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 33k mi., #P1121 $32,888 '08 Chevy Impala SS, loaded, full power, very clean, stk# 44730A $8,754

'17 Audi Q5, Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 45k mi., #P9953 $28555

'17 Audi Q7 Prestige, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 108k mi., #29321A $32,700

'18 Audi A5 sport back premium plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 7k mi., #27849L $40,888

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6cyl., awd, auto, black, 8k mi., #80654A, $41,888

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6cyl., awd, auto, black, 8k mi., #80654A, $41,000

'18 Audi A6, Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, grey, #28600L $40,644

'18 Audi Q5 Prem>ech Prem, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 21k, #P9675 $29555

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27853L $40,555

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, #27848L $40555

'18 Audi Q5 Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 9k, #27847L $38,777

'18 Audi Q52.0T Premium Plus, quattro, clean carfax, 1 owner, awd, #28649L $40,555

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black 50k, #29142A $34,555

'19 Chevy Corvette Grand Sport, 2LT, 2 dr car, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, white, 4K mi., #P1237 $59222

Buick '16 Buick Enclave, #P07288 $22,450 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Infiniti QX80 4wd, 4 dr., sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 97k mi., #98388A $28,555

'16 Infiniti QX60, awd, 4 dr., sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 25k mi., #P1218 $30,700

'14 Volkswagen Passat SEL Premium, Sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, black, 81k mi., stk# P6845A $9,950

'18 Jeep Renegade, stk# P07266 $16,724 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Volkswagen Passat 4 dr sdn 2.0L, #P07258 $15,452 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Kia

'15 Volkswagen Passat, stk# P07259 $15,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'14 Kia Sorento, loaded, very clean, only 58xxx miles, stk# 44347B $13,569

'18 Kia Niro LX, FWD, white, 37k mi., #P07249 $16,811 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Kia Optima, stk# P07315 $14,963 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Lexus '18 Lexus LC 500h coupe, 6 cyl., RWD, silver, 10k mi., #P9941 $71,555

'15 Chevy Malibu LS Sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, silver, 49k mi., stk# 44144A $12,469

'16 Chevy Cruze Limited LT, sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, red, 31k mi., stk# P6804 $12,569

'16 Chevy Cruze LS, Sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, black, 28k mi., stk# P6932 $13,769

'18 Chevrolet Cruze, #P07306 $14,635 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Cruze LT, stk# P07310 $14,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Malibu 1LT, gray, 33k mi., #P07243 $16,728 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chevy Spark LS, hatchback, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, silver, 2k mi., stk# 44626A $12,990

'18 Infiniti Q70L 3.7 LUXE, 4dr. car, 6 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 4k mi., #97338L $39,700

'18 Infiniti Q70L 3.7 LUXE, 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, 6k mi., #97377L $39,200

'18 Infiniti Q70L 3.7 LUXE, 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 5k mi., #97342L $39,200

'18 Infiniti Q70L 3.7 Luxe, sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 3k mi, #97331L, $41,000

Mazda

'11 Chrysler 200 4 Door Sedan stk# P07241M $8,469 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chrysler 300, stk# P07210 $24,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'14 Mazda CX-5, grand touring, loaded, full power, #44725A $14,769

'15 Mazda CX-5 Touring, loaded, full power, stk# 37356A $13,990

'12 RAM 3500 Laramie, crew cab pickup, 6 cyl, 4wd, auto, blue, #98194B $31,400

'13 Dodge Challenger SRT8, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, black, 9k mi., #12808A $28,644

'18 XC90 MOMENTUM: Sport Utility, 4 Cyl, AWD, Auto, White, 40K Miles, #P9997 $37,888

Luxury Autos '19 Chevy Silverado 1500 H D #P07195 $28,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Chevy Tahoe LT, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 82k mi., #P9986A $29,888

'19 Chevy Colorado, 4wd, LT, white, 17k mi., #P07212 $26,850 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Dodge Plymouth Trucks

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 16k mi., #P9886 $33,555

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, platinum, 18k mi., #P1214 $55,339

'18 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT, 4x4 crew cab, #P07240 $26,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Ford Trucks '19 Mazda CX-9 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #13014L $33,888

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, 17k mi., #P1224 $55,700

'16 Chevy Suburban LT, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 67k mi., #80601B $41,700

'18 Mazda CX-5, Blue Reflex, CPO, 10w miles, Sport, #37263A $17,993

'18 Inifiniti Q70L 3.7 Luxe, sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 4k mi., #97344L, $38,555

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, sport utility, 6 cyl, awd, platinum, 19 k mi, #P1150 $33,555

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 High Country pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 22k mi., #80596A $36,888

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, double cab pu, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, blue, 2k mi., #44107A $37,990

'18 Mazda CX-9 Sport, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 2k mi., #12044L $26,555

'15 Mercedes-Benz CLS 400 4dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 25k mi., #13197A $32,888

'13 Ford F-150, 4WD, Super Crew Box XL, #P0794A $22,550 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Ford F150, stk# 181220A $29661 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

GMC Trucks

'18 Mercedes-Benz AMG C 63 S 2dr car, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, black, 4k mi., #29235A $69,222

'19 Mercedes - AMG GT 63 S hatchback, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 1k mi., #004596 $159,600

'15 Nissan Rogue SL, loaded, clean carfax, #35091B $12,973

'16 Nissan Altima 2.5, full power, clean carfax, dark gray, #P6904A $12,997

'18 Nissan Sentra #P07318 $13,146 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Jeep '13 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon, loaded, one owner, stk# 44967A $23,990

'18 Nissan Sentra SV CVT stk# P07318 $13,146 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Porsche '15 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 44k, #P1109 $27,888

'16 Chevy Suburban LTZ, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 60k mi., #98318A $39,700

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, luxury pkg., loaded, GM Certified, stk# 44968A $36,990

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 51k mi., #P6797 $38,990

'16 Chevy Tahoe LTZ, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 69k mi., #29272B $40,900

'16 Chevy Traverse AWD LS, stk# P07285A $21,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Traverse LS, loaded, very clean, clean carfax, stk# 44814A $19,997

'16 Dodge Durango Citadel, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 35k mi., #P1203 $32,600

'16 Honda Pilot Touring, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 51k mi., stk# P6867A $29,990

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax #79760A $34,555

'16 Nissan Rogue, FWD, 4dr, S, #190515B $18,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Equinox, one owner, clean carfax, stk# 44934A $13,994

'17 Chevy Suburban Premier, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 28k mi., #P1223 $48,700 '14 GMC Sierra 1500 Crew Cab short box, #190655A $26,950DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE pickup crew cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 39k mi., #44728A $29,990

Nissan, Datsun

Jaguar

'18 Jaguar XF 35t R-Sport, 9k mi., sedan, auto, awd, #P9821 $42,888

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $38,555 #P9665

'13 Chevy Equinox, very clean, loaded, stk# 40394B $9,869

'16 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT, pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 69k mi., #P1166 $32,222

'18 Jaguar F-Type R, 2 dr car, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 6k mi., #29499A $80,400

'15 Dodge Durango R>, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 35k mi., #P9927 $31,888

'13 Ram Sport Crew, 4x4, loaded, clean carfax, #44452B $24,500

'15 Mazda CX-5, awd, Grand Touring, one owner, stk# 44700A $16,990

Corvette '15 Chevy Corvette Z51 3LT, convertible, 8 cyl., RWD, 7spd manual, 51k, #44573A $41,990

'14 Mazda CX-5 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, white, 83k mi., stk# P6846A $13,569

Volvo

'14 Mazda CX-5 Touring, loaded, clean carfax, #44699A $11,990

Mercedes Benz '19 Chevy Traverse LT, leather, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 20k mi., #P6798 $37,550

'17 Chevy Trax FWD, LS, stk# P07323 $15,002 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Chevrolet Trucks

'15 Chevy Cruze LS, one owner, clean carfax, black, stk# 44621A $9,769

'15 BMW M3 4dr sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, manual, white, 29k mi., #P9684 $42,555

'16 BMW X5 eDrive xDrive 40e, sports activity vehicle, 4 cyl, awd, auto, grey, 49k mi., #29182A $32,700

'16 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 30k, #P9926 $25,555

Infiniti

'17 Infiniti QX80 AWD, 8 cyl., auto, blue, 8k mi., $60,555 #95548L

Dodge

'16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29KMi, AWD, Sedan, #12382A $27,555

'11 VW CC Sport, clean carfax, only 71xxx miles, stk# 44785A $9,989

'13 Chevy Spark LS, 4 dr hatch back, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, green, 40k mi., stk# 44753A $8,969

17 Q7 PRESTIGE: Sport Utility, 6 Cyl, AWD, Auto, Black, 63K Miles, #29031B $37,888

BMW

'17 Hyundai Sonata #P07314 $14,022 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Infiniti QX80 auto, awd, blue, #95533L $58,555

'17 Chevy Corvette Z06 1LZ coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, gray, 7k mi., #P1116 $65,500

2018 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9619 $42,555

'16 Jeep Cherokee Sport, loaded, full power, stk# 44738A $16,769

Hyundai

'13 Chevy Captiva LTZ, champagne mist, loaded, clean carfax, stk# 44844A $8,769

Chrysler '18 Audi Q5 Tech Prem Plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 12k mi., #28330L $40,555

'18 Honda Civic SI, stk# 181106B $22,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Hyundai Elantra SE, stk# P07325 $14,930 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'07 Chevy Tahoe LT, loaded, very clean, stk# 44588A, $9,969

'17 Audi A8 L Sport, quattro LWB Sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 50k mi., #P9999 $44,888

Volkswagen

'17 GMC Sierra 4x4, double cab, elevation pkg., loaded, black, #44678A $29,469

'17 GMC Yukon XL Denali, white, auto, 4wd, 19k mi., #79897A $53,555

'18 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT, pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, red, 14k mi., #41163A $38,888

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $59555

Crossovers '17 RX350: Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $36,555 #P9626

YOUR VIEWS. PUBLISHED.

'17 Ford Explorer XLT 4wd, stk# P07313 $25,102 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 GMC Terrain FWD SLE-1, #P07247 $17,660 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Porsche Macan S, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 60k mi., #P1158 $33,555

'19 Dodge Challenger SXT RWD stk# P07333 $23,550 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Dodge Journey GT AWD, #P07271 $20,750 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Sport Utility

'17 GMC Terrain, FWD, #P07281 $18,625 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Suburban LT #P07183 $45,919 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Hyundai Tucson SEL, awd, gray, 27k mi., #P07191 $17,850 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Jeep Renegade Latitude FWD, stk# P07266 $16,724 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Nissan Murano FWD, stk# P07328 $20,707 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chevy Tahoe 4wd Premier, stk# P07332 $61,550 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 25k mi., #P6867 $46,990

'19 MAZDA CX-9 TOURING: Sprt Utility, 4 Cyl, awd, Auto, Red, 1k Mi, #13084L $34,888

'12 Chevy Traverse LT, loaded, full power, stk# 44702A $11,990

Mini Vans

Become a contributor to an ongoing conversation about the best ways to address problems, right wrongs and make our society better. Your input can generate useful ideas that catalyze positive action. Let your view be known and voice be heard in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

'13 Chevy Traverse LT, sport utility, 6 cyl., FWD, gray, 140k mi., stk# 44684A $9,990

'11 Honda Odyssey EX-L: Loaded, Full Power, Clean Carfax, #42365A, $10,990

'13 Infiniti JX35 sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 123k mi., stk# 37292A $11,964

'17 Chrysler Pacifica Limited, mini van, 6 cyl., FWD, auto, white, 29k mi., #P1119A $30,555

'13 Nissan Pathfinder 4wd, 4 dr., SV, red, #P07150A $11,639 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'19 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, Wagon, #P07290 $21703 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Write a letter to the editor at

STLtoday.com/letters


08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

EPSTEIN CASE

Firefighter was dad to 3 killed in blaze

Authorities shift focus

ERIE, Pa. — Three of five kids killed in a fire at a home child care center in Pennsylvania were the children of a volunteer firefighter who was responding to another call, an official said Monday. Luther Jones’ two daughters and a son were trapped in a blaze in the lakeside city of Erie while he was responding to a call for what turned out to be a malfunctioning alarm, said Lawrence Park Township Volunteer Fire Chief Joe Crotty. The children haven’t been formally identified, but the Erie Fire Department says the dead range in age from 8 months to 7 years. The owner was hospitalized after the fire Sunday. Erie fire officials say the children were staying overnight at a house that had been turned into a day care center. The mother of Jones’ three children, Shevona Overton, who said she is also the mother of another child killed, told WICU that she had “lost a piece of me that can never be replaced.”

Barr warns there will still be a reckoning for any co-conspirators BY JIM MUSTIAN AND MICHAEL R. SISAK

Associated Press

NEW YORK — In the wake of Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide, federal prosecutors in New York shifted their focus to possible charges against anyone who assisted or enabled him in what authorities say was his rampant sexual abuse of underage girls. Two days after the wealthy financier’s death in the New York jail where he was awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges, Attorney General William Barr warned on Monday that “any co-conspirators should not rest easy.”

“Let me assure you that this case will continue on against anyone who was complicit,” Barr said at a law enforcement conference in New Orleans. “The victims deserve justice, and they will get it.” Authorities are most likely turning their attention to the team of recruiters and employees who, according to police reports, knew about Epstein’s penchant for underage girls and lined up victims for him. The Associated Press reviewed hundreds of pages of police reports, FBI records and court documents that show Epstein relied on an entire staff of associates to arrange massages that led to sex acts. If any Epstein assistants hoped to avoid charges by testifying against him, that expectation has been upended by his suicide.

“Those who had leverage as potential cooperators in the case now find themselves as the primary targets,” said Jacob S. Frenkel, a former federal prosecutor. “They no longer have anyone against whom to cooperate.” One possible roadblock to further charges is the controversial plea agreement Epstein struck more than a decade ago in Florida. The non-prosecution agreement not only allowed Epstein to plead guilty in 2008 to lesser state charges and serve just 13 months behind bars, it also shielded from prosecution several Epstein associates who allegedly were paid to recruit girls for him. Federal prosecutors in New York, in charging Epstein last month, argued that the nonprosecution agreement is bind-

ing only on their counterparts in Florida. Meanwhile, Barr said Monday that there were “serious irregularities” at the federal jail where Epstein took his own life as he awaited trial. He was found Saturday morning in his cell at the chronically short-staffed Metropolitan Correctional Center, in a unit known for holding notorious prisoners under extremely tight security. An anonymous source said Monday that one of Epstein’s two guards was not a corrections officer. “I was appalled, and indeed the whole department was, and frankly angry to learn of the MCC’s failure to adequately secure this prisoner,” Barr said at a police conference in New Orleans.

Judge in police shooting waits on venue request DALLAS — The judge in fired Dallas police Officer Amber Guyger’s murder case says she is delaying her decision on the defense’s request to move the trial out of Dallas. In a court order filed Monday, Texas District Judge Tammy Kemp said that the ruling should not come until after voir dire — the questioning of prospective jurors — is finished or it is apparent during the voir dire process “that a fair and impartial jury cannot be selected in Dallas County due the pervasive publicity in this case.” Guyger, 31, fatally shot 26-year-old Botham Jean in his apartment on Sept. 6 while she was off-duty but still in uniform. She told authorities that she mistook his apartment, which was above hers at the South Side Flats, for her own and thought he was a burglar. DAR YASIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRIEFLY

KASHMIRI MUSLIMS PROTEST LOCKDOWN AFTER PRAYERS NORTH KOREA: In a report seen this week by the Associated Press, U.N. experts said they are investigating at least 35 instances in 17 countries of North Koreans using cyberattacks to illegally raise money for its nuclear program — and called for sanctions against ships providing gasoline and diesel to the country. CHICAGO: No one was injured when a man fired a rifle outside a Veterans Affairs hospital on Chicago’s Near West Side Monday afternoon, then ran inside where he was arrested near a pharmacy as staff and patients yelled and scattered for cover, said Chicago police. An active shooter plan was called for the incident about 2:40 p.m. at the Brown VA Medical Center, but it was quickly canceled after the arrest was made, police said. WHITE HOUSE: Former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci said it’s time for Republicans to considering abandoning President Donald Trump. “You have to consider a change at the top of the ticket when someone is acting like this,” Scaramucci said during an appearance Monday on CNN’s “New Day.” BREXIT: The United States is ready to negotiate a post-Brexit trade deal with the U.K. “in pieces” to help speed the process as Britain prepares to leave the European Union on Oct. 31, National Security Adviser John Bolton said Monday after meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson in London. EBOLA: Two of four experimental Ebola drugs being tested in Congo seem to be saving lives, international health authorities announced Monday. The preliminary findings prompted an early halt to a major study on the drugs and a decision to prioritize their use in the African country, where a yearlong outbreak has killed more than 1,800 people. ETHICS REVIEW: U.S. Special Operations Command announced Monday that Army Gen. Richard Clarke has ordered an ethics review of his commando forces, in the wake of a number of recent incidents of bad behavior and criminal allegations against troops. — Wire reports

Kashmiri Muslims shout slogans Monday during a protest after Eid prayers in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir. Troops allowed some Muslims to walk to local mosques alone or in pairs to pray for the Eid al-Adha festival on Monday during an unprecedented security lockdown that forced most people in the disputed region to stay indoors on the Islamic holy day. Hundreds of worshippers gathered on a street after the prayers and chanted, “We want freedom” and “Go India, go back,” witnesses said. Officials said that protest ended peacefully, but two people were injured elsewhere in violent incidents.

Agents: Friend bought supplies Authorities have no indication he knew of Ohio shooter’s plans BY JOHN SEEWER AND MICHAEL BALSAMO

Associated Press

A longtime friend of the Dayton gunman bought the body armor, a 100-round magazine and a key part of the gun used in the attack, but there’s no indication the man knew his friend was planning a massacre, federal agents said Monday. Ethan Kollie told investigators that he also helped Connor Betts assemble the AR-15-style weapon about 10 weeks ago, according to a court document.

Kollie first spoke with investigators just hours after the assault and later said he bought the body armor, the magazine and the rifle’s upper receiver and kept the equipment at his apartment so Betts’ parents would not find it, the court filing said. Federal investigators emphasized that there was no evidence that Kollie knew how Betts would use the equipment or that Kollie intentionally took part in the planning. The accusations came as prosecutors unsealed charges against Kollie that were unrelated to the Aug. 4 shooting. Early that day, Betts opened fire in a popular entertainment district, killing his sister and eight others. Police killed Betts within 30 seconds

outside a crowded bar, and authorities have said hundreds more people may have died if Betts had gotten inside. Prosecutors accused Kollie of lying about not using marijuana on federal firearms forms in the purchase of a pistol that was not used in the shooting. Possessing a firearm as an unlawful user of a controlled substance is a federal crime punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Making a false statement regarding firearms carries a potential maximum sentence of up to five years’ imprisonment. Kollie fully cooperated with authorities before his arrest, his attorney said. “He was as shocked and surprised as everyone else that Mr.

Betts committed the massacre,” attorney Nick Gounaris said. Gounaris would not comment on what Kollie thought his friend would do with the equipment. Police said there was nothing in Betts’ background to prevent him from buying the gun. The weapon was purchased online from a dealer in Texas and shipped to another firearms dealer in the Dayton area, police said. Investigators have not released a motive for the shooting. Eight of the victims who died were shot multiple times, according to the Montgomery County coroner’s office. More than 30 others were hurt, including at least 14 with gunshot wounds, hospital officials and investigators said.

US budget deficit Demonstrators close balloons to $866B Hong Kong’s airport Income lags behind spending due to tax cuts, aging population BY SARAH MCGREGOR

Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — The U.S. fiscal deficit already exceeded the full-year figure for last year, as spending growth outpaces revenue. The gap grew to $866.8 billion in the first 10 months of the fiscal year, up 27% from the same period a year earlier, the Treasury Department said in an emailed statement on Monday. That’s wider than last fiscal year’s shortfall of $779 billion — which was the largest federal deficit since 2012. So far in the fiscal year that began Oct. 1, a revenue increase of 3% hasn’t kept pace with an

8% rise in spending. While still a modest source of income, tariffs imposed by the Trump administration helped almost double customs duties to $57 billion in the period. Republican tax cuts, increased federal spending and an aging population contributed to the fiscal strains, though the GOP says tax reform enacted last year will spur economic growth and lift government revenue. Corporate income-tax receipts rose 3% between October and July, while individual income taxes gained 1%, according to Treasury data. The annual budget deficit is expected to exceed $1 trillion starting in 2022, the Congressional Budget Office has said. The nonpartisan agency is scheduled to update its latest 10-year budget and economic forecasts on Aug. 21.

Chinese government calls pro-democratic protests ‘terrorism’ BY YANAN WANG AND CHRISTOPHER BODEEN

Associated Press

HONG KONG — One of the world’s busiest airports canceled all flights after thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators crowded into Hong Kong’s main terminal Monday, while the central government in Beijing issued an ominous characterization of the protest movement as something approaching “terrorism.” The extreme action by the largely leaderless movement seemed calculated to prompt a stern response from Beijing, and Communist Party leader Xi Jinping’s administration responded within hours.

No new violence was reported by Monday evening, though the city remained on edge after more than two months of near-daily and increasingly bloody confrontations between protesters and police. Beijing tends toward a broad definition of terrorism, including in it nonviolent protests of government policies on the environment or in minority regions such as Xinjiang and Tibet. Such a designation adds to the regime’s descriptions of protesters as clowns, criminals and traitors intent on overthrowing Chinese rule in Hong Kong. Hong Kong International Airport said in a statement the demonstration “seriously disrupted” airport operations. Only flights that already started boarding or those cleared for landing were allowed to use runways at the airport.


WORLD

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Canada police say teen fugitives took own lives BY ROB GILLIES

Associated Press

TORONTO — Canadian police said Monday they believe two teenage fugitives suspected of killing a North Carolina woman and her Australian boyfriend as well as another man took their own lives amid a nationwide manhunt. The Manitoba Medical Examiner completed the autopsies and confirmed that two bodies found last week in dense bush in northern Manitoba were indeed 19-year-old Kam McLeod and 18-year-old Bryer Schmegelsky. A police statement said their deaths appeared to be suicide. A manhunt for the pair had spread across three provinces and included the Canadian military. The suspects had not been seen since July 22. McLeod and Schmegelsky were charged with second-degree murder in the death of Leonard Dyck, a University of British Columbia lecturer whose body was found July 19 along a highway in British Columbia. They were also suspects in the fatal shootings of Australian Lucas Fowler and Chynna Deese of Charlotte, North Carolina, whose bodies were found July 15 along the Alaska Highway about 300 miles from where Dyck was killed. The bodies of the suspects were found near Gillam, Manitoba — more than 2,000 miles from northern British Columbia. Police said in a statement McLeod and Schmegelsky were dead for a number of days before they were found, but said they were

strong indications that they had been alive for a few days since last seen. Police also confirmed two guns were located and authorities are working to definitively confirm that the firearms are connected to the murders in British Columbia The separate discoveries of three bodies and burning cars shook rural northern British Columbia and Manitoba. Schmegelsky’s father, Alan Schmegelsky, said last month that he expected the nationwide manhunt to end in the death of his son, who he said was on “a suicide mission.” McLeod and Schmegelsky grew up together on Vancouver Island and worked together at a local Walmart before they set off together on what their parents thought was a trip to Yukon for work. McLeod and Schmegelsky themselves were originally considered missing persons and only became suspects later. Police were investigating a photograph of Nazi paraphernalia allegedly sent online by one of the suspects. Schmegelsky allegedly sent photographs of a swastika armband and a Hitler Youth knife to an online friend on the videogame network Steam. Alan Schmegelsky had said his son took him to an army surplus store about eight months ago in his small Vancouver Island hometown of Port Alberni, where his son was excited about the Nazi artifacts. Alan Schmegelsky said he didn’t believe that his son identified as a neoNazi, but that he did think the memorabilia was “cool.”

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

Nuclear engineers buried after explosion Rocket tragedy raises fears in Russia BY VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV

Associated Press

MOSCOW — Thousands of Russians attended the funerals Monday of five Russian nuclear engineers killed by an explosion as they tested a new rocket engine, a tragedy that fueled radiation fears and raised new questions about a secretive weapons program. The engineers, who died Thursday, were laid to rest Monday in Sarov, which hosts Russia’s main nuclear weapons research center, where they worked. Flags flew at half-staff in the city, located 230 miles east of Moscow, which has served as a base for Russia’s nuclear weapons program since the late 1940s. The coffins were displayed at Sarov’s main square before being driven to a cemetery. The Defense Ministry initially reported that the explosion at the navy’s testing range near the village of Nyonoksa in the northwestern Arkhangelsk region killed two people and injured six others. The statecontrolled Rosatom nuclear corporation then said over the weekend that the blast also killed five of its workers and injured three others. It’s not clear what the final toll is. The company said the victims were on a sea platform testing a rocket engine and were thrown into the sea by explosion. Rosatom director Alexei Likhachev praised the victims as “true heroes” and “pride of our country.” “Our further work on new weapons that we will certainly complete will be the best tribute to them,” Likhachev said during the funeral, according to Ro-

OBITUARIES

RUSSIAN STATE ATOMIC ENERGY CORPORATION VIA AP

In this grab taken from a footage provided by the Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation Rosatom press service, people gather Monday for the funerals of five Russian nuclear engineers killed by a rocket explosion in Sarov. satom. “We will fulfill the Motherland’s orders and fully protect its security.” Rosatom said the explosion occurred while the engineers were testing a “nuclear isotope power source” for a rocket engine. Local authorities in nearby Severodvinsk, a city of 183,000, reported a brief spike in radiation levels after the explosion, but said it didn’t pose any health hazards. Still, the statement from Severodvinsk’s administration came just as the Defense Ministry insisted that no radiation had been released, a claim that drew comparisons to Soviet-era attempts to cover up catastrophes. Spooked residents rushed to buy iodide, which can help limit the damage from exposure to radiation. Following the explosion, Russian authorities also closed part of Dvina Bay on the White Sea to shipping for a month, in what could be an attempt to prevent outsiders from seeing an operation to recover the missile debris. The Severodvinsk city administration said the radiation level rose to 2 microsieverts per hour

for about 30 minutes on Thursday before returning to the area’s natural level of 0.1 microsieverts per hour. Emergency officials issued a warning to all workers to stay indoors and close the windows. The radiation level of 2 microsieverts per hour is only slightly higher than the natural background radiation, which could vary between 0.1 and 0.4 microsieverts per hour. It’s lower than the cosmic radiation that plane passengers are exposed to on longer haul flights. Regional authorities haven’t reported any radiation increases after Thursday’s spike. Russian environmental groups have urged the government to release details of the radioactive leak, but officials offered no further details. Neither the Defense Ministry nor Rosatom mentioned the type of rocket that exploded during the test, saying only that it had liquid propellant. But Rosatom’s mention of a “nuclear isotope power source” led some Russian media to conclude it was the Burevestnik (Petrel), a nu-

clear-powered cruise missile first revealed by Russian President Vladimir Putin in March 2018 during his state of the nation address along with other doomsday weapons. U.S. President Donald Trump weighed in Monday on the blast, tweeting, “The United States is learning much from the failed missile explosion in Russia. We have similar, though more advanced, technology. The Russian ‘Skyfall’ explosion has people worried about the air around the facility, and far beyond. Not good!” The U.S. and the Soviet Union pondered nuclearpowered missiles in the 1960s, but they abandoned those projects as too unstable and dangerous. While presenting the new missile, Putin claimed it will have an unlimited range, allowing it to circle the globe unnoticed, bypassing the enemy’s missile defense assets to strike undetected. The president claimed the missile had successfully undergone the first tests, but observers were skeptical, arguing that such a weapon could be very difficult to handle and harmful to the environment.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Cerame, Lyda Ann - St. Louis

Koehler, Grace P. - St. Louis

Pieper, Joan M. - O'Fallon, MO

Conner, Dr. Robert, D.D.S. - St. Louis

Licari, Justine C. "Mickey" - St. Louis

Rea, Charles W. - St. Louis, MO

Cutler, Sylvia Mae - St. Louis

Ludwig, Michael L. - St. Louis

Schweitzer, Joseph P. - Pasadena Hills, MO.

Harris, Gary R. - St. Louis

Mazurkiewicz, Helen M. - St. Louis

Tribout, Anna Mae - St. Louis

Fraternal

Licari, Justine C. "Mickey"

(nee Carey) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Sunday, August 11, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Gus Licari; loving mother of Tony (Nora) Licari, Jeanne Licari, Beth (Tim) Sommer, Tim (Kathy) Licari, Marty (Barb) Licari and the late Dan (surviving Pat) Licari; adoring grandmother and great-grandmother; our dearest sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Thursday, August 15, 8:45 a.m. to St. John the Baptist Catholic Church for 9:30 a.m. Mass. Interment at J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions to Backstoppers appreciated. Visitation Wednesday, 3-8 p.m.

Ludwig, Michael L.

72, passed August 6, 2019. Born August 29, 1946 to Nicholas M. and Virginia C. (Goddard) Ludwig, who preceded him in death as did his brother, Nicholas J. Ludwig. Loving brother-in-law of Diane B. Ludwig Cerame, Lyda Ann and a host of treasured friends and (nee Geno), Sunday, August 11, 2019. See www.hutchensfuneralho family. Military veteran, Bronze mes.com for service details. Star recipient for Viet Nam service, avid motorcycle enthusiast, and Conner, Dr. Robert, D.D.S. lover of life who knew no strangers Aug. 8, 2019. Funeral Mass Fri., Aug. 16, 11 a.m. at and who brightened the days of Incarnate Word Church, Chesterfield w vis. 10-11 a.m. Fri. many. osfuneralhomes.com Services: Celebration of Life service Saturday, August 24, 2019. Visitation 2-4:00 p.m., Celebration Service at 2:45 p.m. KUTIS Cutler, Sylvia Mae AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois. Donations to August 10, 2019. Visitation will be held from 10-11 on charity of donor's choice. Thursday Aug 15, Funeral at 11, Interment ValhallaCemetery. www.valhallafunerals.net

Harris, Gary R.

Sat., Aug. 10, 2019. Beloved husband, stepfather, grandfather and teacher. Vis. Wed., Aug. 14, 4-8 p.m. and service Thurs., 1 p.m. at Kutis South County. Interment J. B. National Cemetery.

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Kenneth J. Sorden Production - Retired Member 59 Years - July 10, 2019 Services were held. Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. David A. Roth, F.S.

Florist Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

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Mazurkiewicz, Helen M.

(nee Libla) Sun., Aug 11, 2019. Vis. at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Thurs. Aug. 15, 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass Fri., 9:30 a.m. at Seven Holy Founders. Int. J.B. National Cem.

Pieper, Joan M.

August 9, 2019 age 90. Services: Visitation Thurs., Aug. 15, 2-3pm, Service to follow at Assumption Church Cemetery O’Fallon, MO. Koehler, Grace P. Age 88, Monday, August 12, 2019. Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH Contact (636) 240-2242 or visit baue.com COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, August 16, 11 a.m. until service 1 p.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. Rea, Charles W. Rea, Charles W. "Charlie" passed away, Friday, August 9, 2019.Father of Richard (Janice), William, Mary (Rob) Thompkins. Grandfather of Jennifer Rea, Stephanie (Ryan) Melson, Rick Thompkins and Katie Thompkins. Great Grandfather of Noah Melson and Sylas Melson. Former spouse of Jean Kersting. Uncle, great uncle, cousin and good friend to many. Charlie was the founder and former owner of Charles W. Rea Insurance Agency in Kirkwood, Mo.

STLtoday.com/obits

Schweitzer, Joseph P.

Sept. 9, 1955 - Aug. 9, 2019 of Pasadena Hills, MO. Services: Celebration of Life visitation at SHEPARD FUNERAL CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170 (314-426-6000), Fri., Aug. 16, 4-8pm and at St. Ann Church, 7530 Natural Bridge Rd., Normandy, Sat., 10am until Memorial Mass, 11am. More info at www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Tribout, Anna Mae

(nee Miano), passed away on Sunday, August 4, 2019. Beloved wife and best friend to the late David L. Tribout for 62 years. Devoted mother of Sherry (Alan) Kingsbury and the late AIC Daniel D. Tribout; loving grandmother of Thomas, Krystal (Michael), Kacie (Sean), Treston (Tia), and Melanie; dear great-grandmother of Thomas, Danielle, Ava, Anna, Madelyn, Nora, Lily, Michael, Chase, and the late James D. Lawrence; dear sister of Joseph (Patricia) Miano andCarol (Floyd) Metcalf and dear sister-in-law of the late Melvin (LaRaine) Tribout. Ann was also a loving aunt, great-aunt, great-great aunt, and cousin. She was a cherished girlfriend to Mary, Arlene, Carol, and the late Marilyn, but she was always a friend tomany. Ann was an avid outdoors woman, who was also known as "Deer Ann". She was preceded in death by her parents, Salvatore and Esther Miano. Services: A visitation will be 10:00-11:00 AM, on Wednesday, August 14, 2019, at Our Holy Redeemer, 341 E. Lockwood Ave., Webster Groves, MO 63119, with memorial Mass to follow at 11:00 AM, and reception to follow. Interment will be private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Missouri Department of Conservation, and masses appreciated.

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08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

NATION

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

Cosby lawyers ask court to toss conviction BY MARYCLAIRE DALE

Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A Pennsylvania appeals court on Monday questioned why actor Bill Cosby never got a supposed non-prosecution agreement in writing as his lawyers asked the panel to overturn his sexual assault conviction. Cosby, 82, is serving a threeto 10-year prison term for drugging and molesting a woman at his home in what became the first celebrity trial of the #MeToo era. The three-judge panel asked why Cosby’s top-shelf lawyers didn’t follow the norm and get an immunity agreement in writing, and approved by a judge, when accuser Andrea Constand first came forward in 2005. “This is not a low-budget op-

eration. … They had an unlimited budget,” said Superior Court Judge John T. Bender. “Could it be they knew this was Cosby something the trial court would never have allowed?” Cosby’s lawyers have long argued that he relied on the promise before giving testimony in Constand’s 2005 lawsuit that proved incriminating when it was unsealed a decade later. Judge Carolyn Nichols echoed Bender’s point, asking, “how can the elected district attorney bind that office in perpetuity?” Cosby’s lawyers also attacked Montgomery County Judge Steven O’Neill’s decision to let five other accusers testify when

Cosby went on trial last year, after more than 60 accusers came forward and his deposition was unsealed. Prosecutors said they chose women whose accounts showed that Cosby had a “signature” crime pattern. Bender seemed to agree, interrupting defense arguments that their stories had significant differences. “The reality of it is, he gives them drugs and then he sexually assaults them,” he said. “That’s the pattern, is it not?” Kristen L. Weisenberger, representing Cosby, said one of the women wasn’t even sure she’d been violated. But prosecutors said that’s how Cosby planned it. “The defendant should not be rewarded because she has no recollection because of the

drugs he gave her,” Assistant District Attorney Adrienne Jappe argued. The court’s decision on how many other accusers should be allowed to testify will be closely watched by sexual assault survivors and defense lawyers as men like movie mogul Harvey Weinstein await trial in #MeToo-type cases. O’Neill allowed just one other accuser at Cosby’s first trial in 2017, when the jury failed to reach a verdict. Cosby’s lawyers called the decision to let five testify at the retrial arbitrary and prejudicial. However, the panel said judges are not bound by their earlier trial rulings. Cosby, who is serving time at a state prison near Philadelphia, was not in court for the

arguments at the Pennsylvania Capitol in Harrisburg. The court typically takes several months to issue decisions. Long beloved as “America’s Dad” for his TV role as Dr. Cliff Huxtable, Cosby has called his encounters with Constand and other accusers consensual. In his deposition, Cosby acknowledged getting quaaludes in the 1970s to give to women before sex, including 19-yearold Therese Serignese, whom he had met at a Las Vegas hotel. Serignese traveled from Florida to attend Monday’s hearing. “Remember, there are 60 accusers,” she said. “Out of 19 prior bad act witnesses requested by the prosecutors, the judge only allowed five. I say Bill Cosby got a good deal there.”

Utah man closer to death by firing squad Ron Lafferty killed sister-in-law, child over polygamy belief BY BRADY MCCOMBS

Associated Press

KANSAS CITY STAR, VIA AP

NEBRASKA BIDDER WINS WRIGHT-BUILT HOUSE IN KANSAS CITY This undated photo shows the Sondern-Adler house, designed and built in Kansas City by iconic architect Frank Lloyd Wright. A bidder from Nebraska paid $920,000 for the house at auction Monday. So far, the buyer wants to remain anonymous.

Fighting fire with fire underused in West BY BRIAN MELLEY

Associated Press

KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Calif. — The thick scent of smoke hung in the midday air when a trail along the Kings River opened up to an ominous scene: flames in the trees and thick gray smoke shrouding canyon walls. Firefighters were on the job. In fact, they had started the blaze that chewed through thick ferns, blackened downed trees and charred the forest floor. The prescribed burn — a low-intensity, closely managed fire — was intended to clear out undergrowth and protect the heart of Kings Canyon National Park from future wildfires that are growing larger and more frequent amid climate change. The tactic is considered one of the best ways to prevent the kind of catastrophic destruction that has become common from wildfires, but its use falls woefully short of goals in the U.S. West. A study published in the journal Fire in April found prescribed burns on federal land in the last 20 years across the West has stayed level or fallen despite calls for more. Prescribed fires are credited with making forests healthier and stopping or slowing the advance of some blazes. Despite those successes, there are plenty of reasons they are not set as often as officials would like, ranging from poor conditions to safely burn to bureaucratic snags and public opposition. After a wildfire last year largely leveled the city of Paradise and killed 86 people, the state prioritized 35 brush and other vegetation-reduction projects that could all involve some use of intentional fire, said Mike Mohler, deputy director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Despite the push for more burns, there are disastrous reminders of prescribed fires blowing out of control — such as a 2012 Colorado burn that killed three people and damaged or destroyed more than two dozen homes. Overcoming public fears by teaching about “good smoke, bad smoke, out-of-control fire and

BRIAN MELLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Firefighters keep an eye on a prescribed burn June 11 in Kings Canyon National Park, Calif. The prescribed burn, a low-intensity, closely managed fire, was intended to clear out undergrowth and protect the heart of Kings Canyon National Park from a future threatening wildfire. prescribed fire” is just one hurdle before firefighters can put match to kindling, Mohler said. “It’s the difference between fire under our terms and fighting fire on Mother Nature’s terms,” he said. It can take years to plan and clear federal, state and local environmental and air pollution regulations. A burn among giant sequoias once took 13 years to accomplish, said Michael Theune, a spokesman for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. In the American West, where the landscape is steep and downed trees, brush and other fuels have built up over decades of fire suppression, the so-called burn window can be short because of hot, dry conditions. Relaxing environmental restrictions has cleared the way for more prescribed fires in some cases. Oregon recently changed air quality rules for planned fires to

strike a balance between smoky winter skies and bad summer blazes. California proclaimed a state of emergency to allow it to fast-track brush clearing. Most states and federal agencies in the U.S. West have ambitious goals they don’t achieve, said Crystal Kolden, a University of Idaho forest and fire science professor whose study concluded that not enough prescribed fires are being done in the region. “They know they need to be doing more prescribed fire, they want to be doing more prescribed fire,” she said. “They are simply unable to accomplish that.” Opponents cite the threat to wildlife and release of greenhouse gases. In California, some environmentalists opposed intentional burns because they can destroy natural drought-tolerant shrubs and replace them with flammable invasive weeds and grasses. Rick Halsey of the California

Chaparral Institute said reintroducing fire through prescribed burns is appropriate in the Sierra Nevada, where more frequent lightning-sparked fires and blazes historically set by Native Americans are believed to improve forests by clearing brush to allow taller trees to thrive and opening sequoia seed pods so they can reproduce. But Halsey said prescribed fires don’t help much of the rest of the state. The fire that tore through Paradise showed how ineffective clearing underbrush can be — it roared across 7 miles that had burned just 10 years earlier. “It was still grasses and weeds and shrubs, and that’s the model these prescribed burning advocates have used,” Halsey said. “They say if we have younger fuels on the landscape, we’ll have less fires or lower intensity fires, and we can use those areas to protect communities. And that has never happened in wind-driven fires.”

SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah death row inmate featured in the popular book “Under the Banner of Heaven” after killing his sister-in-law and her child for resisting his polygamist beliefs inched closer to becoming the first American to be executed by firing squad in nearly a decade after losing his latest appeal Monday. Ron Lafferty could be executed as soon as next year after his latest legal setback, said Andrew Peterson, assistant solicitor general at the Utah attorney general’s office. Lafferty’s lawyer, Dale Baich, said in an email that he will use all options to challenge the ruling and will likely ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the case. Lafferty chose the firing squad Lafferty decades ago when he was sentenced to die — before Utah changed its law to use it only as a backup method if lethal injection drugs aren’t available. The last time a firing squad was used in the U.S. was in 2010, when Ronnie Lee Gardner was executed in Utah for the 1984 murder of an attorney during a failed courthouse escape. Lafferty was convicted in the 1984 slayings of his sisterin-law and her baby daughter, which he carried out with his brother. He claimed to get a revelation from God to kill the two because of her resistance to his fundamentalist beliefs in polygamy. His case became well known nationwide when it was included in Jon Krakauer’s 2003 book about radical offshoots of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Krakauer also wrote the popular books “Into Thin Air” and “Into the Wild.” Lafferty’s lawyers have argued that he suffered from mental illness, and his punishment was out of line with the life sentence given to his brother Dan Lafferty, among other objections. The ruling Monday by the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver backed lowercourt judges in their previous rejections of the arguments. His lawyer, Baich, expressed disappointment that the court relied on what he described as “procedural technicalities” to deny Lafferty a complete review of his case. “When the most severe penalty a state can impose is at stake, we look to the courts to be the safety net to ensure that the full protections allowed by the constitution have been met,” Baich said in a statement. Peterson, the prosecutor, said he’s pleased Lafferty’s countless appeals have nearly run their course. He said he considers it a long shot that the U.S. Supreme Court would take the case. “Five judges have said there’s nothing in this case worth spending any more time on,” Peterson said.


WORLD

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

Suspect in Norway mosque attack linked to white supremacy BY JAN M. OLSEN AND VANESSA GERA

Associated Press

A Norwegian man suspected of killing his stepsister and then storming an Oslo mosque with guns appeared in court Monday with a smirk on his bruised face as evidence grew that he sought to emulate attacks by white supremacists in the U.S. and New Zealand. Security experts believe Philip Manshaus is the latest example of an extremist who was radicalized by farright conspiracy theories spread online, particularly the “great replacement” theory, which falsely warns of a “genocide” in which white people are being replaced by immigrants and Muslims. Manshaus, 21, was arrested Saturday after entering a mosque in the Oslo suburb of Baerum, where three men were preparing for Sunday’s Eid al-Adha celebrations. Police said he waved weapons and fired several shots. They did not specify what type of weapon was used. One person was slightly wounded before people inside the Al-Noor Islamic Center held the suspect down until police arrived. Police then raided Manshaus’ nearby house and found the body of his 17-year-old stepsister, identified Monday as Johanne Zhangjia Ihle-Hansen, who was reportedly adopted from China as a 2-year old. Manshaus is suspected in her killing, police said, but they did not provide details. With signs of his struggle still visible in the dark bruises under both eyes and scratches on his face and neck, Manshaus en-

tered a court in Oslo. In a closed-door hearing, he did not admit guilt and asked to be Manshaus set free, his lawyer, Unni Fries, told The Associated Press. The court ordered him held in pre-trial detention for four weeks, two of which will be in solitary confinement. The head of Norway’s domestic security agency PST, Hans Sverre Sjoevold, said authorities received a “vague” tip a year ago about the suspect, but it was not enough to act because they had no information about any “concrete plans” of attack. Sjoevold told a news conference that the agency and the police receive many tips from worried people every day and the information “didn’t go in the direction of an imminent terror planning.” “Many of the people who have right-wing attitudes share a violent mindset, but experience shows that very few go from word to action. Therefore, it is a demanding mission to capture and prevent those who have the ability and will to carry out attacks,” Stoevold said. Norwegian media reported that Manshaus was inspired by shootings in March in New Zealand, where a gunman targeted two mosques, killing 51 people, and on Aug. 3 in El Paso, Texas, where an assailant targeted Hispanics and left at least 22 dead. Dagbladet, one of Norway largest newspapers, reported that on the day of the attack, Manshaus wrote online that he had been

“chosen” by “Saint (Brenton) Tarrant,” the Christchurch gunman. Saturday’s attack came amid the rising popularity of far-right parties across the Nordics, fueled in part by a surge of migration into Europe in 2015. Groups that were once taboo have gained some social acceptance and influence. Extremists groups increasingly manifest their beliefs openly in ways that were once unheard of. Magnus Ranstorp, the lead terrorism researcher at the Swedish Defense University, said the rise of violent far-right extremism is being driven by a complex overlapping of elements, including hateful rhetoric and conspiracies on social media and “old Nazis combining with the alt-right, combining a race war with a cultural war.” Adding to that are state actors, like Russia with its propaganda outlets, and President Donald Trump seeking to sow tensions and break down trust in established elites and the media. “The leader of free world is part of the problem,” Randstorp said. “We are in a hybrid threat environment — we are not in peacetime,” Randstorp added. “Liberal democracy is under threat.” Prime Minister Erna Solberg called the attempted assault a “direct attack on Norwegian Muslims.” She suggested that political parties unite to tackle racism and discrimination, including possible legislation designed to thwart hatred against Muslims. Across the country, police have reinforced security measures in connection with Eid, which runs through Thursday.

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TUESDAY • 08.13.2019 • B

CARPENTER’S ROYAL ELIXIR

JEFF ROBERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter is congratulated in the dugout after hitting a home run against the Kansas City Royals last season at Busch Stadium

Cardinals must take advantage of their schedule

Struggling Cardinal loves to feast on KC, other opponents in AL BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY — The Cardinals apparently couldn’t wait to get to town, with many of them leaving their clubhouse in Busch Stadium after Sunday afternoon’s game to make the short trip west even though they don’t play the Royals until Tuesday night at Kauffman Stadium. And perhaps no Cardinal will be as happy to arrive here as third baseman Matt Carpenter, who is royalty in Kansas City — and in interleague play, in general. In 17 games at Kauffman, Carpenter has hit .403 (27 for 67) with eight doubles, five homers, 17 runs batted in, an-base percentage of .488, a slugging percentage of .776 and a whopping OPS of 1.264. He had five hits in a game on June 4, 2014, on a night it was said he had been trying to dissect his swing using utensils while eating spaghetti in the lunch room. “That sounds familiar,” Carpenter said, smiling. “I’ve always liked hitting (in Kansas City),” Please see CARDINALS, Page B5

River City baseball to shut down after season

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MORRY GASH, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Slowed this season by a sore back, the Brewers’ Christian Yelich, the reigning NL MVP, is hitting .335 with a league-leading 39 home runs. The Cardinals face Milwaukee nine more times this season.

Cardinals at Royals Up next: 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, FSM Flaherty (5-6) vs. Sparkman (3-7) Inside: Cards promote Arozarena, put J. Martinez on IL. B5

Young wide receivers ready to step up Knox, Gicinto, Scott all scored touchdowns as first-year Tigers BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Please see RASCALS, Page B7

Please see BENFRED, Page B3

MIZZOU FOOTBALL

BY STU DURANDO

The River City Rascals will cease operations at the end of the season, and the city of O’Fallon, Mo., has started looking for another baseball team to play at CarShield Field in 2020. Negotiations on a new lease between PS&J Baseball, which owns the Rascals, and the city broke down last week, and employees and players were informed of the news Sunday, general manager David Schmoll said. The Rascals have played in O’Fallon for 21 years and are operating on a one-year lease for 2019. They play in the Frontier League, which is an independent minor league. “Any time in minor-league sports that you’re on a one-year lease, you’re always aware of the reality,” Schmoll said. “It’s just one of those things where we were unable to get a deal done, so that’s where it leaves us.” A news release said that “the team and the city will begin discussions on transitioning operations of the stadium back to

Pirates, Royals and Reds. Oh, sigh. If a three-game home sweep of Pittsburgh to start a tissue-paper soft swath of the schedule failed to convince you all is well with the Cardinals, you were not the only one. Ask assistant hitting coach Mark Budaska, who lost his job Monday. The respected bat whisperer, credited by many players on this roster for saving their swings at different points in their careers, humbly served the organization for more than a decade, mostly in the minor leagues. His ejection was announced with a two-sentence news release. Some sendoff. It’s easy (and right) to read Budaska’s

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Missouri receiver Jalen Knox caught 27 passes for 419 yards and three touchdowns last season as a freshman and expects even better production this fall.

COLUMBIA, Mo. — As much as coach Barry Odom’s staff targeted wide receivers in the first couple recruiting classes, the Tigers either struck out or struggled to reel in any keepers. Players such as Dimetrios Mason, Harry Ballard, O’Shae Clark and DaRon Davis inspired hope when they chose Mizzou but each one either washed out of the program or never arrived. Last year the Tigers missed on the state’s best receiver prospect when CBC’s Kamryn Babb picked Ohio State. But, as the season unfolded, MU found strength in numbers. The Tigers’ 2018 receiver class hardly was the nation’s most celebrated — Clemson, Florida, Louisiana State, Southern California and Texas all signed multiple top-20 ranked wideouts — but the trio of Jalen Knox, Kam Scott and Dominic Gicinto stood out in its own ways. Pressed into expanded roles because of depth issues at some point or another, the rookies combined to catch 50 passes for 804 yards and seven touchdowns. Missouri was the only Power 5 team with three true freshman wide receivers who caught touchdown passes. Florida State had two freshmen wideouts and one redshirt freshman catch a TD. After Monday’s preseason practice, Knox said he expects much more to come. “Last year was like a building block, just setting the foundation,” he said. “This year is when we Please see MIZZOU, Page B2

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Tuesday 8/13 at Royals 7:15 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 8/14 at Royals 7:15 p.m. FSM

Thursday 8/15 at Reds 6:10 p.m. FSM

Friday 8/16 at Reds 6:10 p.m. FSM

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 8/31 at Wyoming 6:30 p.m. CBSSN

Saturday 9/7 vs. West Virginia 11 a.m. ESPN

Saturday 9/14 vs. SEMO 6:30 p.m. SEC Net. alt.

Saturday 9/21 vs. So. Carolina Time, TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 8/31 vs. Akron 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/7 at UConn 2:30 p.m. CBSSN

Saturday 9/14 vs. Eastern Mich. 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/21 vs. Nebraska Time, TV TBA

Sunday 9/1 vs. Hartford 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 9/4 vs. Ottawa 7 p.m.

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

Injuries test Tigers’ TE depth short-yardage package. “It’s like anything else, whether they’re hurt or not I try to go as hard as I can,” Scales said. “But, yeah, it’s an opportunity. Daniel and Albert can do both blocking and catching. . . . Daniel is more of a blocker. Albert’s more of a catcher. I’m right in the middle.”

Okwuegbunam, Parker miss practice, putting Scales in position to earn more snaps BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 8/24 at Ottawa 1 p.m.

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

Saturday 9/7 vs. Nashville 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Wed. 8/21: vs. Joliet, 5:05/8:05 p.m. Tue. 8/20: vs. Schaumburg, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 8/21: vs. Schaumburg, 6:35 p.m. Thu. 8/22: vs. Joliet, 6:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL 6:05 p.m. Cubs at Phillies, MLB Network 7:15 p.m. Cardinals at Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) SOFTBALL 6 p.m. Little League: World Series, semifinal game, ESPN2 8:30 p.m. Little League: World Series, semifinal game, ESPN2 TENNIS 10 a.m. ATP, WTA: Western & Southern Open, early rounds, Tennis Channel

DIGEST No racing Tuesday at Fairmount Park Heavy rain Monday that led to flooding at Fairmount Park has led officials at the thoroughbred race track in Collinsville to cancel its Tuesday afternoon program. “The track surface was not in proper condition for thoroughbred competition,” Fairmount spokesman Jon Slonae said. “So in the best interest of the horses and jockeys we decided to cancel the card. J.B. FORBES, POST-DISPATCH We are looking into making up the date before the Rider Elizabeth Thurman is led to the track by her brother, Austin current season ends.” He said the track is av- Thurman, before the first race of the eraging crowds of about day on July 30 at Fairmount Park. 5,000 for its Tuesday afternoon “horse hooky” sessions. In addition, Fairmount will be closed Tuesday for intertrack wagering — betting on horse races at other tracks — but its auxiliary facilities in Sauget and Alton are to be open for that. Fairmount is scheduled to return to its intertrack business Wednesday. “We . . . absolutely plan on resuming our regularly scheduled racing on Saturday night at 7:30,” Sloane said. That’s the next live card on the schedule. (Staff report) Fewer late NBA games set for TV: The NBA released its 2019-20 schedule, and the big winners are East Coast fans who have been forced to burn the candle at both ends. For the upcoming season, which begins Oct. 22, the league made a concerted effort to reduce the number of nationally televised games that tip off at 10:30 p.m. in the east (9:30 in St. Louis). Those late starts were no trifling matter; last season,they often featured LeBron James’s Los Angeles Lakers and Stephen Curry’s Golden State Warriors. Overall, the NBA’s national television partners will air just 33 games with 9:30 p.m. (St. Louis time) tip times, down from 57 last year. ESPN, which airs games Wednesdays and Fridays, will eliminate 9:30 p.m. tips from its Wednesday doubleheaders, replacing them with 8:30 or 9 p.m. starts. TNT, which airs games Tuesdays and Thursdays, will do mostly the same, airing two 9:30 p.m. games on Tuesdays, down from nine last year. The Tuesday nightcaps largely shift to 9 p.m. TNT’s popular “Inside the NBA” programming lineup on Thursdays, however, will continue to air most of its doubleheaders at 7 and 9:30 p.m. (Washington Post) Murray falls in tennis tourney: Andy Murray moved well in his first singles match since January, but not well enough to move on. Richard Gasquet beat him 6-4, 6-4 win in the first round of the Western & Southern Open, in suburban Cincinnati. Gasquet will play fourth-seeded Dominic Thiem in the second round. The singles match was Murray’s first since the three-time Grand Slam champion underwent a second hip surgery on Jan. 28. He has decide against playing in the U.S. open, for which qualifying begins next week. Sam Querrey earned a second-round berth opposite top seed Novak Djokovic with a 7-6 (2), 7-6 (1) win over PierreHugues Herbert. Rafael Nadal, withdrew from the tourney, citing fatigue after he won the Rogers Cup on Sunday in Montreal. In the women’s draw, Rogers Cup champion Canadian Bianca Andreescu, also withdrew. Then 14th-seeded Johanna Konta was upset by qualifier Rebecca Peterson 6-3, 3-6, 7-5. Among big-name unseeded players, Venus Williams and Maria Sharapova won in straight sets. Hurricanes tab Williams as starting QB: Jarren Williams beat out incumbent starter N’Kosi Perry and highly touted Ohio State transfer Tate Martell in the battle to be the Miami Hurricanes’ No. 1 quarterback, coach Manny Diaz said. Williams appeared in just one game for Miami last season, completing one of three passes and rushing for a short touchdown. The team opens its season on Aug. 24, against Florida. (AP) Carolina’s GM gets new deal: The NHL’s Carolina Hurricanes signed team president and general manager Don Waddell to a three-year contract extension. Financial terms were not disclosed. Waddell, 60, had been mentioned as a candidate for the Minnesota Wild’s GM vacancy. He has been with Carolina since 2014. (AP).

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COLUMBIA, Mo. — There’s no cause for alarm — yet — but Missouri sure is testing its depth at tight end, a position of strength when preseason camp began two weeks ago. Albert Okwuegbunam, a preseason All-Southeastern Conference choice and All-American candidate, sat out all of Monday’s practice, the Tigers’ first on-field drills since Saturday’s scrimmage. He didn’t scrimmage Saturday and hasn’t been on the field for many 11-on-11 drills since he left last Monday’s practice because of a sprained right knee. After Monday’s practice, Missouri coach Barry Odom declined to say what specific injury Okwuegbunam was nursing, though his left hamstring was wrapped Monday. “He’s got a number of things but not anything real serious. So maybe (we’ll) get him back out here a little bit (Tuesday), I hope,” Odom said. The Tigers are blessed with an experienced and talented backup, but he, too, sat out Monday’s practice. Daniel Parker Jr. rode the exercise bike and did other conditioning drills alongside Okwuegbunam throughout Monday’s two-hour practice. Odom did not disclose Parker’s injury. If this was a game week, Odom said, and the Tigers played Saturday he’s optimistic both would be available. “So I think we’ll be OK,” he said.

INJURY UPDATE

PHELAN M. EBENHACK, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri tight end Albert Okwuegbunam, getting ready for a game last season, is out of preseason camp indefinitely because of an undisclosed injury.

chance to work with the starting unit. Once near the bottom of the depth chart, Scales is putting himself in position for his first taste of significant game action. The last few years haven’t been easy for Scales, who initially committed to Alabama out of Lafayette High then picked Missouri shortly before signing day in 2016. “It’s patience, frustration, all of that,” he said. “Because, you know, most freshmen come in thinking they’re going to play right away. So did I. But it’s just patience. I wanted to be here and I love the school. There’s nowhere else I want to be.” If the team’s top two tight ends miss any more time this week, Scales could use the opportunity to carve out a role with the offense as a blocker and receiver. Freshman Niko Hea (CBC) also SCALES IN THE MIX The injuries gave fourth-year figures to earn more looks and on junior Brendan Scales a rare Saturday played on the first-team

After missing Saturday’s scrimmage because of a sore foot, starting slot receiver Johnathon Johnson was back in action Monday with the first unit. Starting safety Tyree Gillespie (hip) took part in some periods but sat out live team drills. Safety Jalani Williams (dental work) was back in the mix. Defensive end Trajan Jeffcoat (sprained elbow) remains sidelined, along with safety Aidan Harrison (leg) and linebacker Jamie Pettway (knee). With Gillespie limited, junior safety Jordan Ulmer is starting to capitalize with more work on the first unit. Ulmer started the 2017 opener as a freshman but was benched after a rough debut and has since played almost exclusively on special teams. “He’s grown up,” Odom said. “He’s matured and credit to him on the approach that he’s taken. Because there were times that I didn’t know if he was going to be part of the program. And that’s just being real honest. And he knows it. That was some of the things he was not taking care of academically. He’s got all this ability. He had to look in the mirror a little bit. I’m proud of him, because he has grown up and he has had as good of camp as anybody up to this point. He’s going to help us.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

WADE PAYNE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mizzou’s Dominic Gicinto, left, had 15 catches for 171 yards and two TDs as a freshman last year.

Mizzou From B1

really start building the house and getting everything put into place.” Of the three wideouts, Knox played the least as a receiver in high school but quickly earned the biggest role in a rotation that featured senior Emanuel Hall on the outside. Knox, from Mansfield, Texas, dabbled at multiple positions in high school, from quarterback to running back to slot receiver. Mizzou shifted him to outside receiver, behind Hall. But injuries sidelined Hall for long stretches, vaulting Knox into a leading role sooner than most expected, starting at Purdue in the season’s third week, when the freshman caught five passes for 110 yards and his first of three touchdowns. After another 100-yard game against Memphis, Knox’s production slipped. He missed the Tennessee game because of a head injury and caught only four passes over the final five games. By November, he wasn’t the same player that dazzled the coaches in August. “I hit that wall where my body gave out,” Knox said, “because I really wasn’t taking care of it.” The deeper the Tigers got into Southeastern Conference play, Knox struggled to fight off press coverage on the outside, something he never experienced at the high-school level. He quickly learned that a receiver who can’t get open can’t catch the ball. “That was a skill set I didn’t even have yet,” he said. After half an offseason in the weight room, Knox practiced better than anyone on the team during spring drills, Odom said. He reported to camp chiseled at 6 feet and 195 pounds. “First of all, he’s extremely

PHELAN M. EBENHACK, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Kam Scott, 13, averaged 26.75 yards a catch and scored twice last season as a freshman. fast,” said cornerback Richaud Floyd, who moved from receiver to defense in the spring. “He’s picked up more muscle from last year. He’s taking care of his body better so that his body doesn’t break down at the end of the season. He’s just getting more mature and learning the offense at a much higher clip.” “He’s a confident guy now,” quarterback Kelly Bryant said. Scott, a deep threat reserve last year, could earn a bigger role with the kind of catches he made through the first two weeks of camp. He hauled in the only touchdown in Saturday’s scrimmage, turning a slant into a 34yard score. “He’s getting the offense down quicker, more than he did last year,” Floyd said. “And he is just a natural playmaker.” Gicinto, the least heralded recruit of the three, was a quick study last year in the slot and should push senior starter Johnathon Johnson for snaps this fall. Gicinto was on the receiving end of the longest play Saturday, a

46-yard catch on a pass from Bryant. Odom noted Gicinto is playing with more “savviness” this year. “He’s a quiet guy, but also has some leadership capabilities about himself,” Odom said. “He is a playmaker. And the thing we’ve talked over and over and you guys will be tired of me saying it, but it’s about the consistency of doing it with these guys. He’s got to show up every day and do it.” With graduate transfer Jonathan Nance in place to start on the outside and Johnson back in the slot — the fifth-year senior is 882 yards away from Danario Alexander’s team record for career receiving yardage — the Tigers are stocked with experienced pass-catchers. The difference between a functional passing game and one of the SEC’s best could hinge on the three sophomores. With the foundation set, it’s time to see how high they can build the house. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

Illini’s Green excels on O-line BY JOEY WAGNER

Decatur (Ill.) Herald & Review

URBANA — Illinois coach Lovie Smith hasn’t been shy about praising redshirt sophomore offensive lineman Kendrick Green this offseason. At Big Ten Media Days last month, Smith gave ringing endorsements about Green’s progression in just a year playing on the offensive line in college. Through the first week of training camp, Smith has not changed his tune. “It’s been exactly what I thought it would be,” Smith said. “He took to the offensive line. He jumped up on the radar after he got over there. It’s not like he went through a long transition period. He was one who right away you saw the potential to be an outstanding

player. Nothing has said otherwise.” The nature of the compliments weren’t striking for Green’s dad, La Mont Carroll. He raised Green to have a strong work ethic, but that’s still not how Carroll sees Green. He doesn’t see his son as the 6-foot-4, 310-pound behemoth who started all 12 games at left guard last season and is among the strongest players on the team. He sees the kid who ran around by his side at the grocery store growing up. “It’s not shocking, but they look at him as a big strong mammoth of a dude and I look at him as a little kid,” Carroll said Monday. That isn’t at all who Green is now, though. He moved from

the defensive line to the offensive line during training camp last season as a redshirt freshman and immediately took off. He carved out a starting role and was in the lineup for Week 1 against Kent State, overcoming some butterflies before taking his first offensive snap. Green has gotten stronger and more confident since then while playing in a position that seems like a natural fit. He played both sides of the line at Peoria High, but had an inkling that the defensive line wasn’t his forever home when he got to Champaign. He didn’t really tell many people, but he thought he would end up as a better fit on the offensive line. As it turns out, he was right. “Destiny works itself out,” Green said.

Richie Petitbon III, who joined the Illini before spring practices as a graduate transfer from the University of Alabama, can’t even tell that Green is a relative newcomer to the position. This kind of move isn’t as seamless as some might think. “Obviously Kendrick is a guy who was up to that challenge and he was able to pick it up with flying colors and he’s doing a great job,” Petitbon said. “I don’t know if I could switch to D-Line at this point in my career. Props to him.” Entering his second year as the Illini’s starting left guard — he can also play center if needed — Green knows the system and is experienced playing in it. He’s improving his pass blocking technique, and

the rest of the tools are there. Smith said Green checks off all the boxes he looks for in an offensive lineman. Green is studious. When he’s not in the weight room, being recorded by new strength and conditioning coach Lou Hernandez for his feats of strength, he’s studying tape of other offensive lineman. He wants to pick up the skills necessary to continue on his trajectory and live up to the praise Smith gives him. “He always tells me, ‘Hey, you could be good. One day, you could be really good, you could play this game for a long time.’ I try to sit on that and think about that when I’m working out and working hard,” Green said. “If I’m going to make it, it’s up to me.”

Brown loses grievance over helmet dispute ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALAMEDA, Calif. — Oakland Raiders receiver Antonio Brown lost his grievance with the NFL on Monday over his use of an old helmet that is no longer certified as safe to use for practice or play. The arbitrator issued the ruling after holding a hearing last Friday with Brown, representatives from the league and the players’ union. “While I disagree with the arbitrator’s decision, I’m working on getting back to full health and looking forward to rejoining my teammates on the field,” Brown said in a statement on social media. “I’m excited about this season appreciate all the concerns about my feet.” Brown has not participated in a full practice for the Raiders after starting training camp on the non-football injury list with injuries to his feet that reportedly came from frostbite suffered while getting cryotherapy treatment in France. Brown was cleared to practice on July 28 and participated in part of two sessions but wasn’t around the team last week when he had the grievance hearing with the NFL over his helmet.

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

Raiders receiver Antonio Brown lost his grievance with the NFL Monday over the use of an old helmet that is no longer certified as safe to use for practice or play.

Raiders CB Lawson suspended 4 games

Oakland Raiders cornerback Nevin Lawson was suspended four games for violating the NFL’s policy on performanceenhancing substances. The league announced the decision Monday, one week after Lawson revealed he had tested positive for Ostarine despite Petition seeks union for “never knowingly” taking the substance. running backs Lawson signed a one-year deal with the A petition reportedly has been filed Raiders in March after spending the past with the National Labor Relations Board five seasons with the Detroit Lions. He seeking to create a separate union for run- was in the mix for one of the backup spots at cornerback for Oakland this season. ning backs. According to the website Law360, the petition was filed Thursday by the In- Browns DE sprains neck ternational Brotherhood of Professional at practice Running Backs and focuses on the shorter careers for players at the position. Browns defensive end Chad Thomas “These employees have unique career sustained a sprained neck but avoided a structures; and the current one-size- more serious injury at training camp. fits-all unit is inappropriate,” the petition Thomas was immobilized on the field says of players’ representation by the NFL and taken by ambulance to University Players Association. “Excluded: All other Hospitals in Cleveland. player groups,” it said. A team spokesman said Thomas, a Running backs often draw attention for third-round pick in 2018, was back at the their holdouts, with Dallas star Ezekiel Browns’ facility Monday evening. His Elliott and Chargers running back Melvin return to practice will be evaluated on a Gordon currently missing training camp. day-to-day basis. Last year, Le’Veon Bell sat out the entire Thomas appeared to absorb a blow to season rather than sign his franchise tag his right shoulder and head area during a tender with Pittsburgh. He subsequently play. The 6-foot-5, 280-pounder stood became a free agent and signed with the up but then went to the ground, where he New York Jets for $52.5 million over four was treated by Browns medical personnel. years. As his teammates and fans at camp watched, Thomas was put on a backboard and carted away. Prescott rejects latest

Cowboys’ offer The Dallas Cowboys continue to talk about new deals with their stars, and the quarterback wants more than Ezekiel Elliott and Amari Cooper. And every other quarterback, too. Sources confirmed that quarterback Dak Prescott rejected a contract offer that would pay him $30 million per season. Jane Slater of the NFL Network is reporting that Dak wants $40 million per season, which would make him the highest paid quarterback in the league. A source did not confirm that $40 million figure, but did say “he wants more” than $30 million per year.

Patriots acquire Saubert from Falcons The New England Patriots have acquired tight end Eric Saubert from the Atlanta Falcons for a conditional draft pick. Saubert, entering his third season, had five catches for 48 yards for the Falcons in 2018. He played in 16 games with one start. Saubert was a fifth-round draft pick from Drake in 2017. The Patriots have questions at tight end following Rob Gronkowski’s retirement. Veteran Ben Watson will be suspended for the first four games following a positive test for a banned substance.

MATT YORK, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Milwaukee’s Ryan Braun, center, celebrates with Christian Yelich, left, as teammate Mike Moustakas follows them after hitting a three-run homer last month.

Benfred From B1

dismissal as the Cardinals deciding to double down on the direction established by first-year hitting coach Jeff Albert. Time will tell if that’s the right move or if Albert winds up going the way of Budaska, who wound up going the way of John Mabry. Results under Albert have been underwhelming so far. The Cardinals rank 13th in the National League in runs per game (4.47), 12th in home runs per contest (1.25), 13th in batting average (.244), 12th in onbase percentage (.316) and 13th in slugging percentage (.407). You don’t have to be an analytics ace to read these numbers. They’re bad. If the coach nicknamed “Buddha” was clashing with Albert and leading hitters down a different path, then results should improve now, right? Especially during this stretch of games. The schedule gods have given a gift to the Cardinals. Albert, unchallenged, could appear to be enlightened. It would be easy (and wrong) to misread the Cardinals as surging contenders if they churn through this nine-game stretch against Pittsburgh, Kansas City and Cincinnati. These three losing opponents woke up Monday morning with a combined record of 147-205. And this stretch is just an appetizer. Only 19 of the Cardinals’ remaining 46 regular-season games come against teams that entered Monday with more wins than losses. Dessert is served first, with 24 games against non-winning teams in the Cardinals’ next 33. Sprinkled throughout what has the makings of one very upbeat month of Cardinals baseball is a reality check, dressed in navy blue. The Cardinals’ nine games against contending teams during the stretch happen to be against the same team, your defending National League Central champion Brewers. The rival is a half-game behind the second-place Cardinals in the Central standings, and the closest competitor to freeing the Cardinals’ hold (for now) on the National League’s second wild-card spot.

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We know the Cardinals can beat bad teams. They are 31-20 against teams that are below .500. We know they can’t consistently beat good teams. They’re 30-35 against teams that are above. 500. We know they can’t consistently beat the Brewers. They’re .500 against Milwaukee. The Brewers, like the division-leading Cubs, are a good team. But like every National League Central hopeful, they are vulnerable. Their pitching always is a question-mark. Lorenzo Cain is having a lost season. They have made up for their weaknesses with a division-leading 188 home runs and the performance of reigning National League MVP Christian Yelich, who reportedly will return to the lineup Tuesday after a back issue. His team is going to need him. The Brewers, unlike the Cardinals, are cursing this current section of their schedule. Their two-game date with the Twins starting Tuesday night kicks off a stretch of 23 consecutive games against nonlosing teams. Milwaukee receives just a four-game reprieve against the lowly Marlins before its final regular-season series against the Cardinals, which will be played at Busch Stadium. Surrounding the regular-season’s three remaining series between the Cardinals and Brewers, Milwaukee plays six of its seven other series against teams that on Monday sat in first or second place in their respective divisions. The Cardinals’ seven non-Brewers series during that span come against six teams that as of Monday sat in fourth or fifth. Runs and wins should come easier for the Cardinals during this sunny stretch. The schedule is begging them to surge until September’s uphill finish, one that is littered with games against the Cubs. The Brewers loom as speed bumps. Another season finished behind them in the standings, and the Cardinals will need to consider refreshing more than a longtime and loyal hitting instructor. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

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BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MONDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Atlanta Washington New York Philadelphia Miami Central Chicago St. Louis Milwaukee Cincinnati Pittsburgh West Los Angeles Arizona San Francisco San Diego Colorado

W 70 63 61 60 44 W 64 61 62 56 48 W 79 59 59 55 53

L 50 55 57 58 73 L 54 55 57 61 69 L 41 59 60 62 65

Pct .583 .534 .517 .508 .376 Pct .542 .526 .521 .479 .410 Pct .658 .500 .496 .470 .449

GB — 6 8 9 24½ GB — 2 2½ 7½ 15½ GB — 19 19½ 22½ 25

WC — — 1 2 17½ WC — — ½ 5½ 13½ WC — 3 3½ 6½ 9

L10 5-5 6-4 8-2 3-7 2-8 L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 6-4 1-9 L10 8-2 5-5 4-6 5-5 3-7

Str W-1 W-2 L-1 L-2 L-1 Str W-1 W-3 L-1 L-2 L-8 Str W-2 L-2 W-2 L-1 W-1

Home 32-25 32-25 34-21 34-26 24-37 Home 41-19 34-23 35-25 33-28 24-32 Home 48-16 27-28 28-32 28-31 29-27

Away 38-25 31-30 27-36 26-32 20-36 Away 23-35 27-32 27-32 23-33 24-37 Away 31-25 32-31 31-28 27-31 24-38

Sunday’s results Atlanta 5, Miami 4 St. Louis 11, Pittsburgh 9 Chicago Cubs 6, Cincinnati 3 Colorado 8, San Diego 3 Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 4 L.A. Dodgers 9, Arizona 3 Texas 1, Milwaukee 0 San Francisco 9, Philadelphia 6 Monday’s results Washington 7, Cincinnati 6 Pittsburgh at L.A. Angels, (n) Arizona at Colorado, (n) Tampa Bay at San Diego, (n) Today’s games Chicago Cubs (Quintana 10-7) at Philadelphia (Vargas 6-6), 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Wood 1-0) at Washington (Ross 2-3), 6:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 11-2) at Miami (Yamamoto 4-3), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 9-6) at Atlanta (Fried 13-4), 6:20 p.m. Minnesota (Perez 8-5) at Milwaukee (Anderson 5-2), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Flaherty 5-6) at Kansas City (Sparkman 3-7), 7:15 p.m. Arizona (Gallen 2-3) at Colorado (Gray 10-8), 7:40 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 10-7) at San Francisco (Anderson 3-4), 8:45 p.m. Pittsburgh (Williams 4-5) at L.A. Angels (Peters 2-1), 9:07 p.m. Tampa Bay (McKay 2-2) at San Diego (Lauer 6-8), 9:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Cleveland Minnesota Chicago Kansas City Detroit West Houston Oakland Texas Los Angeles Seattle

W 79 69 62 50 39 W 72 71 52 43 35 W 77 67 59 58 48

L 41 50 59 72 80 L 47 47 64 76 80 L 41 51 59 61 71

Pct .658 .580 .512 .410 .328 Pct .605 .602 .448 .361 .304 Pct .653 .568 .500 .487 .403

GB — 9½ 17½ 30 39½ GB — ½ 18½ 29 35 GB — 10 18 19½ 29½

WC — — 8 20½ 30 WC — — 15½ 26 32 WC — 1½ 9½ 11 21

L10 8-2 8-2 3-6 5-5 3-7 L10 8-2 5-5 6-4 3-6 3-7 L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 2-8 2-8

Str W-3 W-3 L-3 W-1 L-2 Str W-2 L-1 L-1 W-2 L-2 Str L-1 W-1 L-1 W-2 L-3

Home 45-18 31-28 30-32 23-36 18-43 Home 39-24 36-26 28-30 23-35 16-41 Home 43-15 37-23 35-22 29-28 27-36

Away 34-23 38-22 32-27 27-36 21-37 Away 33-23 35-21 24-34 20-41 19-39 Away 34-26 30-28 24-37 29-33 21-35

Sunday’s results Baltimore 8, Houston 7 Cleveland 7, Minnesota 3 (10) L.A. Angels 5, Boston 4 (10) Oakland 2, Chicago White Sox 0 N.Y. Yankees 1, Toronto 0 Texas 1, Milwaukee 0 Kansas City 10, Detroit 2 Tampa Bay 1, Seattle 0 Monday’s results N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 5, 1st Pittsburgh at L.A. Angels, (n) N.Y. Yankees 11, Baltimore 8, 2nd Tampa Bay at San Diego, (n) Toronto 19, Texas 4 Houston at Chicago White Sox, ppd. Cleveland 6, Boston 5 Today’s games Houston (Greinke 11-4) at Chicago White Sox (Cease 2-4), 3:40 p.m., 1st Baltimore (Means 8-7) at N.Y. Yankees (German 15-2), 6:05 p.m. Texas (Lynn 14-7) at Toronto (Pannone 2-5), 6:07 p.m. Boston (Sale 6-11) at Cleveland (Clevinger 7-2), 6:10 p.m. Seattle (Kikuchi 4-8) at Detroit (Boyd 6-8), 6:10 p.m. Houston (Cole 14-5) at Chicago White Sox (Nova 7-9), 7:10 p.m., 2nd Minnesota (Perez 8-5) at Milwaukee (Anderson 5-2), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Flaherty 5-6) at Kansas City (Sparkman 3-7), 7:15 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 10-7) at San Francisco (Anderson 3-4), 8:45 p.m. Pittsburgh (Williams 4-5) at L.A. Angels (Canning 4-6), 9:07 p.m. Tampa Bay (McKay 2-2) at San Diego (Lauer 6-8), 9:10 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

2020 season to start March 26 NEW YORK — Major League Baseball will open its 2020 season March 26, its earliest start other than international games. The schedule also features a late April series in Puerto Rico between the New York Mets and Miami Marlins. Globe Life Field, the new home of the Texas Rangers, opens March 31. This is the first new ballpark since the Atlanta Braves’ SunTrust Park opened in 2017. Globe Life will be the seventh big league stadium with a retractable roof after those in Toronto, Phoenix, Seattle, Houston, Milwaukee and Miami. Tampa Bay has a fixed roof. The commissioner’s office also said Monday all 30 teams could play on opening day for the first time since 1968. A full slate was scheduled in 2018 but two games were postponed. The 2020 regular season is to end Sept. 27, putting the World Series on track for Oct. 20-28.

Puig drops appeal for brawl CLEVELAND — Indians outfielder Yasiel Puig dropped the appeal of his three-game suspension for his involvement in a brawl when he was with Cincinnati. Puig began serving his ban Monday when the Indians, who have climbed back into a tie for first in the AL Central, opened a three-game series against Boston. Puig was disciplined for his involvement in the latest benches-clearing incident between the Reds and Pittsburgh Pirates on July 30. The fracas began shortly after Puig was dealt to the Indians as part of a three-team trade that sent righthander Trevor Bauer from Cleveland to Cincinnati. BRIEFLY RED SOX: Michael Chavis played through the pain for as long as he could. Boston placed the versatile Chavis on the 10-day injured list Monday with a sprained left shoulder he sustained recently while trying to make a diving catch. Chavis has 18 homers and 58 RBIs this season. But he’s been in a slump, batting .156 in his last 11 games. —Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

14

Padres rookie Fernando Tatis Jr. had his 14-game hit streak come to an end Sunday in an 8-3 loss to Colorado but became eligible for the batting title with four plate appearances. His .320 average sat .017 points behind leader Jeff McNeil entering Monday. — MLB.com

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

Torres lifts Yankees to DH sweep ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Gleyber Torres hit three more home runs, including a pair of three-run drives in the night game that gave him 13 of New York’s record 59 long balls against Baltimore this season, and the Yankees completed a doubleheader sweep with an 11-8 win on Monday night that stretched their winning streak versus the Orioles to 14 games. Gio Urshela had six hits in the twinbill, including a 461-foot homer as the Yankees won the opener 8-5, and raised his average to .332 with 18 homers and 63 RBIs. AL East-leading New York hit seven homers and has five doubleheader sweeps to go along with one split. The Yankees improved to 15-2 against Baltimore with two games left and have won 12 of their past 14 overall. Torres set a big league record with his fifth multihomer game against a team in a season, breaking a tie with Ralph Kiner (1947), Gus Zernial (1951) and Roy Sievers (1955). His 26 homers are two more than his total as a rookie last year, and the 13 against Baltimore matched Roger Maris in 1961 against Cleveland for the second-most against one team in a season by a

The Blue Jays recorded season-highs in runs and hits (21) against six Rangers pitchers, including catcher Jeff Mathis. NATIONALS 7, REDS 6: Trea Turner and Matt Adams homered, Erick Fedde pitched well after allowing a solo shot on the game’s first pitch and host Washington held on to edge Cincinnati. Washington led 7-2 but blew most of that advantage before Sean Doolittle got his 27th save in 32 chances. He entered in the ninth with a 7-4 lead, but the struggling lefty closer’s first pitch of the evening became Phillip Ervin’s pinch-hit homer.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor looks to first base after getting Red Sox left fielder Andrew Benintendi out at second base Monday in Cleveland. Yankees player, one behind Lou Gehrig’s total in 1936 versus Cleveland. When Torres came to the plate with runners on first and second in the eighth, Baltimore intentionally walked him. Didi Gregorius hit a three-run homer in the first inning of the day game and had four RBIs. Urshela, Torres and Cameron Maybin added solo shots, all off Gabriel Ynoa.

BLUE JAYS 19, RANGERS 4: Brandon Drury hit his first career grand slam, Justin Smoak had a two-run homer among his three extra-base hits, and host Toronto routed Texas. Bo Bichette had the first fourhit game of his career, and Randal Grichuk had three hits, including a solo homer as the Blue Jays won for the 10th time in 15 games. Drury had five RBIs, while Smoak and Grichuk each had four.

INDIANS 6, RED SOX 5: Carlos Santana homered leading off the ninth inning to send host Cleveland to a win over fast-fading Boston and back into first-place in the AL Central. After the Red Sox tied it in the top of the inning, Santana connected on a 2-2 pitch from Marcus Walden, driving it barely over the wall in left. Santana was mobbed at home by his overjoyed teammates. José Ramírez hit a three-run homer and Franmil Reyes had a two-run shot as the Indians improved to an MLB-best 43-17 since June 4, when they trailed the Twins by 101/2 games.

BOX SCORES Yankees 8, Orioles 5 First Game Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Alberto 3b 5 2 2 0 0 2 .316 Mancini 1b 4 2 1 1 1 1 .280 Santander rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .310 Nunez dh 3 0 0 2 0 0 .240 Villar 2b 1 0 0 0 3 1 .270 Severino c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .261 Peterson lf 3 0 0 1 1 0 .242 Wilkerson cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Martin ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .192 Totals 32 5 7 5 5 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 2 3 1 0 2 0 .258 Urshela 3b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .328 Gregorius ss 3 1 1 4 0 1 .263 Sanchez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .224 Torres dh 4 1 1 1 0 0 .278 Tauchman lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Maybin rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .319 Ford 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .159 Valera 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .207 Totals 31 8 8 8 3 5 Baltimore 101 001 020 — 5 7 0 New York 410 011 10x — 8 8 0 LOB — Baltimore 6, New York 3. 2B — Gardner (19), Urshela (28). HR — Mancini (28), off Paxton; Santander (10), off Paxton; Gregorius (9), off Ynoa; Torres (24), off Ynoa; Urshela (18), off Ynoa; Maybin (8), off Ynoa. RBIs — Mancini (68), Santander (34), Nunez 2 (65), Peterson (11), Urshela 2 (63), Gregorius 4 (35), Torres (63), Maybin (24). SF — Nunez, Gregorius. DP — New York 1. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ynoa, L, 1-7 6 7 7 7 1 3 5.93 Kline 1 1 1 1 1 2 7.44 Yacabonis 1 0 0 0 1 0 6.80 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Paxton, W, 8-6 6 5 3 3 2 7 4.40 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.92 1 /3 2 2 2 2 0 3.99 Cessa 2 /3 0 0 0 1 1 2.22 Britton, H, 24 Chapman, S, 32-37 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.51 Inherited runners-scored — Britton 3-1. WP — Paxton. T — 2:50. Att. — 42,843

Yankees 11, Orioles 8 Second Game Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .269 Mancini rf 5 1 1 2 0 0 .279 Santander cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Nunez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .237 Peterson lf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .246 Sisco c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .222 Alberto 2b 4 3 3 3 0 0 .321 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .178 Wilkerson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .225 Ruiz 3b 3 0 1 3 1 0 .245 Totals 35 8 9 8 3 7 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 3b 4 2 3 0 1 0 .338 Judge rf 3 2 0 0 2 0 .268 Urshela dh 5 2 3 0 0 0 .332 Torres ss 4 3 3 6 1 1 .283 Gardner cf 4 0 1 3 1 1 .258 Maybin lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .312 Romine c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .259 Ford 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .164 Valera 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .219 Totals 35 11 12 10 6 7 Baltimore 003 000 302 — 8 9 1 New York 310 133 00x — 11 12 0 E — Sisco (5). LOB — Baltimore 3, New York 6. 3B — Alberto (2), Gardner (6). HR — Mancini (29), off Mantiply; Alberto (7), off Lail; Ford (4), off Blach; Torres (25), off Phillips; Torres (26), off Eshelman. RBIs — Mancini 2 (70), Alberto 3 (36), Ruiz 3 (33), Torres 6 (69), Gardner 3 (50), Ford (6). DP — Baltimore 1; New York 1. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Blach, L, 0-1 4 7 7 6 3 4 13.94 Phillips 1 2 3 3 2 2 8.84 Eshelman 3 3 1 1 1 1 6.09 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Green 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 4.69 Mantiply, W, 1-0 3 3 3 3 2 2 9.00 Lail, H, 1 22/3 2 3 3 1 2 10.12 Cortes Jr. 11/3 3 2 2 0 1 4.44 Ottavino, S, 2-7 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 1.71 Inherited runners-scored — Phillips 2-2, Eshelman 2-1, Lail 1-0, Ottavino 3-2. WP — Blach. T — 2:51. Att. — 40,354

Orioles second baseman Hanser Alberto turns a double play after forcing out Aaron Judge in the second game of a doubleheader Monday in New York. Blue Jays 19, Rangers 4 Texas Choo dh Santana cf-ss Andrus ss DeShields cf Calhoun lf Mazara rf Odor 2b Forsythe 1b Kiner-Falefa 3b Trevino c Totals Toronto Bichette ss Biggio 2b Guerrero Jr. 3b Smoak dh Grichuk rf Hernandez cf Fisher lf Drury 1b Jansen c Totals

AB R H 4 0 0 4 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 1 4 2 2 4 1 2 4 0 0 4 0 1 4 0 1 35 4 8 AB R H 6 3 4 6 0 2 4 3 2 5 2 3 5 3 3 4 1 1 3 3 1 5 1 2 5 3 3 43 19 21

Texas 010 000 201 Toronto 023 822 02x

BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 .272 0 0 0 .307 0 0 0 .282 0 0 0 .258 1 0 0 .274 1 0 0 .264 1 0 1 .208 0 0 2 .248 0 0 1 .229 1 0 2 .200 4 1 6 BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 0 .394 2 0 0 .208 1 1 0 .276 4 0 2 .211 4 0 1 .238 0 1 2 .224 0 2 1 .213 5 0 0 .232 2 0 1 .212 19 4 7 — —

4 8 0 19 21 0

LOB — Texas 6, Toronto 4. 2B — Mazara (23), Bichette 2 (11), Biggio 2 (9), Guerrero Jr. (21), Smoak 2 (10), Grichuk (20), Hernandez (12). HR — Mazara (16), off Stewart; Calhoun (10), off Stewart; Odor (21), off Stewart; Smoak (19), off Jurado; Grichuk (21), off Jurado; Drury (14), off Sampson; Jansen (11), off Mathis. RBIs — Calhoun (26), Mazara (59), Odor (65), Trevino (2), Bichette (8), Biggio 2 (31), Guerrero Jr. (52), Smoak 4 (52), Grichuk 4 (56), Drury 5 (37), Jansen 2 (40). SB — Bichette (2). Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Jurado, L, 6-8 32/3 11 8 8 1 3 5.31 1 /3 3 5 5 2 1 5.71 Sampson Martin 1 2 2 2 1 0 5.00 Chavez 1 3 2 2 0 0 4.85 Montero 1 0 0 0 0 3 1.80 Mathis 1 2 2 2 0 0 9.00 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.09 Stewart, W, 2-0 51/3 5 3 3 0 3 7.42 Boshers 11/3 0 0 0 1 2 7.50 Shafer 11/3 3 1 1 0 1 2.16 Inherited runners-scored — Sampson 2-2, Shafer 2-0. HBP — Boshers (DeShields). T — 3:02. Att. — 16,492

Nationals 7, Reds 6 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .266 Farmer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Votto 1b 3 0 2 1 2 0 .259 Gray pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Suarez 3b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .258 VanMeter 2b-lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .283 Aquino rf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .429 Senzel cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Barnhart c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .220 Ervin ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .355 J.Iglesias ss 4 1 3 1 0 0 .292 DeSclafani p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .162 O’Grady ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Peraza ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Totals 36 6 11 6 4 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 5 1 2 4 0 1 .290 Eaton rf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .283 Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .317 Adams 1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .244 Cabrera 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .239 Parra lf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .249 Suzuki c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Robles cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .240 Fedde p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .143 Kendrick ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .319 Dozier ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .232 Totals 33 7 11 7 4 5

Indians 6, Red Sox 5 Boston AB Betts rf 4 Devers 3b 4 Bogaerts ss 5 Martinez dh 4 Benintendi lf 4 Vazquez c 4 Moreland 1b 3 Travis ph-1b 1 Holt 2b 4 Bradley Jr. cf 4 Totals 37 Cleveland AB Lindor ss 4 Mercado cf 5 Santana 1b 4 Reyes dh 4 Ramirez 3b 4 R.Perez c 3 Kipnis 2b 3 Allen lf 4 Naquin rf 3 Totals 34

R H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 0 1 1 .280 0 1 0 1 1 .317 0 2 1 0 2 .304 2 2 1 1 0 .310 0 2 1 1 0 .287 0 0 0 0 1 .278 1 2 0 0 0 .234 0 1 0 0 0 .270 0 1 1 0 1 .314 1 1 1 0 0 .218 5 12 5 4 6 R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 1 0 .300 0 0 0 0 1 .272 3 3 1 1 0 .286 2 2 2 0 2 .244 1 2 3 0 1 .250 0 1 0 0 1 .226 0 1 0 1 1 .259 0 0 0 0 0 .244 0 2 0 1 1 .284 6 12 6 4 7

Boston 010 200 101 Cleveland 203 000 001

— —

5 12 0 6 12 0

LOB — Cincinnati 7, Washington 6. 2B — Votto (25), J.Iglesias (16), Cabrera (17), Robles (19), Kendrick (17). 3B — J.Iglesias (3). HR — Winker (16), off Fedde; Aquino (8), off Rainey; Ervin (3), off Doolittle; Adams (18), off DeSclafani; Turner (11), off DeSclafani. RBIs — Winker (38), Votto (39), Aquino 2 (16), J.Iglesias (44), Ervin (14), Turner 4 (33), Adams 2 (49), Parra (37). CS — Parra (3). DP — Cincinnati 1; Washington 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA DeSclafani, L, 7-7 4 6 6 6 2 3 4.51 Gausman 2 1 0 0 0 2 6.11 Hughes 2 4 1 1 2 0 4.37 Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fedde, W, 3-2 6 6 2 2 2 4 4.09 Guerra 1 1 0 0 0 1 4.60 Rainey 1 1 2 2 1 2 4.40 Doolittle, S, 27-32 1 3 2 2 1 0 3.73 T — 3:11. Att. — 22,394

LOB — Boston 9, Cleveland 9. 2B — Bogaerts (40), Benintendi (35), Holt (10), Travis (4), Ramirez (31). HR — Martinez (28), off Plesac; Bradley Jr. (13), off Clippard; Reyes (28), off Rodriguez; Ramirez (17), off Rodriguez; Santana (26), off Walden. RBIs — Bogaerts (88), Martinez (72), Benintendi (61), Holt (21), Bradley Jr. (45), Santana (71), Reyes 2 (51), Ramirez 3 (67). SB — Bogaerts (4). S — R.Perez. DP — Boston 1; Cleveland 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Rodriguez 6 10 5 5 3 5 4.31 Hernandez 11/3 1 0 0 1 2 4.08 2 /3 1 1 1 0 0 3.41 Walden, L, 7-2 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Plesac 5 7 3 3 2 2 3.27 2 Wood, H, 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.14 Clippard, H, 4 11/3 1 1 1 0 2 2.80 2 Wittgren, H, 10 /3 1 0 0 0 1 2.58 1 /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.81 O.Perez, H, 17 Hand, W, 6-3, BS 1 1 1 1 2 1 2.74 Inherited runners-scored — Walden 1-0, Clippard 1-0, O.Perez 1-0. WP — Plesac. T — 3:34. Att. — 24,770

nati Reds. 1969 — Jim Palmer of the Orioles, plagued by arm trouble the year before, threw an 8-0 no-hitter against the Oakland A’s in Baltimore. 1979 — St. Louis’ Lou Brock reached 3,000 hits with an infield hit off Chicago Cubs pitcher Dennis Lamp. St. Louis won 3-2. 2004 — Kansas City rookies Abraham Nunez and John Buck hit grand slams to lead the Royals past the Oakland Athletics 10-3. 2005 — New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera blew his first save since April 6 in a 7-5 win over Texas. Rivera had converted a career-best 31 consecutive saves before allowing Kevin Mench’s two-run, game-tying single in the ninth. 2013 — Paul Goldschmidt hit the first pitch of the 11th in-

ning for a game-ending home run after leading off the ninth with a tying homer, to help Arizona beat Baltimore 4-3 with a winning blast for the second straight night. 2015 — The Toronto Blue Jays won their 11th straight game, beating the Oakland Athletics 4-2. The AL East leaders also won 11 in a row in June, becoming the first team with winning streaks of at least 11 since Cleveland in 1954. 2016 — Tyler Austin and Aaron Judge became the first teammates to hit home runs in the first at-bats of their major league debuts in the same game, sparking the New York Yankees to an 8-4 win over Tampa Bay. 2018 — Ronald Acuna Jr. hit leadoff homers in both games of a doubleheader for the Atlanta Braves.

Cincinnati 110 000 022 Washington 300 300 10x

— —

6 11 0 7 11 0

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1910 — The Brooklyn Dodgers and the Pittsburgh Pirates played to an 8-8 tie. Each team had 38 at-bats, 13 hits, 12 assists, two errors, five strikeouts, three walks, one hit batsman and one passed ball. 1921 — George Sisler of the St. Louis Browns became the first batter in American League history to hit for the cycle twice. Sisler went 5-for-5 and drove in three runs in a 7-5, 10-inning win over the Detroit Tigers. 1921 — John “Mule” Watson of the Boston Braves pitched two complete-game victories over the Philadelphia Phillies. 1931 — Tony Cuccinello of the Cincinnati Reds had six hits in six at-bats in the first game of a doubleheader at Boston. Cuccinello had a triple, two doubles and three singles to knock in five runs as

the Reds won 17-3. Cuccinello hit a three-run homer in the eighth of the nightcap to give the Reds a 4-2 win. 1939 — The New York Yankees beat the Philadelphia Athletics 21-0 to equal the major-league record for lopsided shutouts. Every batter in the Yankees lineup hit safely. Joe DiMaggio and Babe Dahlgren had two home runs apiece, each hitting an inside-theparker. Pitcher Red Ruffing had four hits and drove in three runs. 1948 — Satchel Paige, 42, pitched his first major league complete game against the Chicago White Sox. Paige gave up five hits en route to 5-0 Cleveland victory. 1957 — Milwaukee pitcher Lew Burdette hit his first two home runs to lead the Braves to a 12-4 win over the Cincin-


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MONDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Atlanta Washington New York Philadelphia Miami Central Chicago St. Louis Milwaukee Cincinnati Pittsburgh West Los Angeles Arizona San Francisco San Diego Colorado

W 70 63 61 60 44 W 64 61 62 56 49 W 79 60 59 55 53

L 50 55 57 58 73 L 54 55 57 61 69 L 41 59 60 62 66

Pct .583 .534 .517 .508 .376 Pct .542 .526 .521 .479 .415 Pct .658 .504 .496 .470 .445

GB — 6 8 9 24½ GB — 2 2½ 7½ 15 GB — 18½ 19½ 22½ 25½

WC — — 1 2 17½ WC — — ½ 5½ 13 WC — 2½ 3½ 6½ 9½

L10 5-5 6-4 8-2 3-7 2-8 L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 6-4 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 5-5 3-7

Str W-1 W-2 L-1 L-2 L-1 Str W-1 W-3 L-1 L-2 W-1 Str W-2 W-1 W-2 L-1 L-1

Home 32-25 32-25 34-21 34-26 24-37 Home 41-19 34-23 35-25 33-28 24-32 Home 48-16 27-28 28-32 28-31 29-28

Away 38-25 31-30 27-36 26-32 20-36 Away 23-35 27-32 27-32 23-33 25-37 Away 31-25 33-31 31-28 27-31 24-38

Sunday’s results Atlanta 5, Miami 4 St. Louis 11, Pittsburgh 9 Chicago Cubs 6, Cincinnati 3 Colorado 8, San Diego 3 Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 4 L.A. Dodgers 9, Arizona 3 Texas 1, Milwaukee 0 San Francisco 9, Philadelphia 6 Monday’s results Washington 7, Cincinnati 6 Pittsburgh 10, L.A. Angels, 2 Arizona 8, Colorado 6 Tampa Bay at San Diego, (n) Today’s games Chicago Cubs (Quintana 10-7) at Philadelphia (Vargas 6-6), 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Wood 1-0) at Washington (Ross 2-3), 6:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 11-2) at Miami (Yamamoto 4-3), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 9-6) at Atlanta (Fried 13-4), 6:20 p.m. Minnesota (Perez 8-5) at Milwaukee (Anderson 5-2), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Flaherty 5-6) at Kansas City (Sparkman 3-7), 7:15 p.m. Arizona (Gallen 2-3) at Colorado (Gray 10-8), 7:40 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 10-7) at San Francisco (Anderson 3-4), 8:45 p.m. Pittsburgh (Williams 4-5) at L.A. Angels (Peters 2-1), 9:07 p.m. Tampa Bay (McKay 2-2) at San Diego (Lauer 6-8), 9:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Cleveland Minnesota Chicago Kansas City Detroit West Houston Oakland Texas Los Angeles Seattle

W 79 69 62 50 39 W 72 71 52 43 35 W 77 67 59 58 48

L 41 50 59 72 80 L 47 47 64 76 80 L 41 51 59 62 71

Pct .658 .580 .512 .410 .328 Pct .605 .602 .448 .361 .304 Pct .653 .568 .500 .483 .403

GB — 9½ 17½ 30 39½ GB — ½ 18½ 29 35 GB — 10 18 20 29½

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

WC — — 8 20½ 30 WC — — 15½ 26 32 WC — 1½ 9½ 11½ 21

L10 8-2 8-2 3-6 5-5 3-7 L10 8-2 5-5 6-4 3-6 3-7 L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 2-8 2-8

Str W-3 W-3 L-3 W-1 L-2 Str W-2 L-1 L-1 W-2 L-2 Str L-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-3

Home 45-18 31-28 30-32 23-36 18-43 Home 39-24 36-26 28-30 23-35 16-41 Home 43-15 37-23 35-22 29-29 27-36

Away 34-23 38-22 32-27 27-36 21-37 Away 33-23 35-21 24-34 20-41 19-39 Away 34-26 30-28 24-37 29-33 21-35

Sunday’s results Baltimore 8, Houston 7 Cleveland 7, Minnesota 3 (10) L.A. Angels 5, Boston 4 (10) Oakland 2, Chicago White Sox 0 N.Y. Yankees 1, Toronto 0 Texas 1, Milwaukee 0 Kansas City 10, Detroit 2 Tampa Bay 1, Seattle 0 Monday’s results N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 5, 1st Pittsburgh 10, L.A. Angels, 2 N.Y. Yankees 11, Baltimore 8, 2nd Tampa Bay at San Diego, (n) Toronto 19, Texas 4 Houston at Chicago White Sox, ppd. Cleveland 6, Boston 5 Today’s games Houston (Greinke 11-4) at Chicago White Sox (Cease 2-4), 3:40 p.m., 1st Baltimore (Means 8-7) at N.Y. Yankees (German 15-2), 6:05 p.m. Texas (Lynn 14-7) at Toronto (Pannone 2-5), 6:07 p.m. Boston (Sale 6-11) at Cleveland (Clevinger 7-2), 6:10 p.m. Seattle (Kikuchi 4-8) at Detroit (Boyd 6-8), 6:10 p.m. Houston (Cole 14-5) at Chicago White Sox (Nova 7-9), 7:10 p.m., 2nd Minnesota (Perez 8-5) at Milwaukee (Anderson 5-2), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Flaherty 5-6) at Kansas City (Sparkman 3-7), 7:15 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 10-7) at San Francisco (Anderson 3-4), 8:45 p.m. Pittsburgh (Williams 4-5) at L.A. Angels (Canning 4-6), 9:07 p.m. Tampa Bay (McKay 2-2) at San Diego (Lauer 6-8), 9:10 p.m.

Torres lifts Yankees to DH sweep ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Gleyber Torres hit three more home runs, including a pair of three-run drives in the night game that gave him 13 of New York’s record 59 long balls against Baltimore this season, and the Yankees completed a doubleheader sweep with an 11-8 win on Monday night that stretched their winning streak versus the Orioles to 14 games. Gio Urshela had six hits in the twinbill, including a 461-foot homer as the Yankees won the opener 8-5, and raised his average to .332 with 18 homers and 63 RBIs. AL East-leading New York hit seven homers and has five doubleheader sweeps to go along with one split. The Yankees improved to 15-2 against Baltimore with two games left and have won 12 of their past 14 overall. Torres set a big league record with his fifth multihomer game against a team in a season, breaking a tie with Ralph Kiner (1947), Gus Zernial (1951) and Roy Sievers (1955). His 26 homers are two more than his total as a rookie last year, and the 13 against Baltimore matched Roger Maris in 1961 against Cleveland for the second-most against one team in a season by a Yankees player, one behind Lou Gehrig’s total in 1936

2020 season to start March 26 NEW YORK — Major League Baseball will open its 2020 season March 26, its earliest start other than international games. The schedule also features a late April series in Puerto Rico between the New York Mets and Miami Marlins. Globe Life Field, the new home of the Texas Rangers, opens March 31. This is the first new ballpark since the Atlanta Braves’ SunTrust Park opened in 2017. Globe Life will be the seventh big league stadium with a retractable roof after those in Toronto, Phoenix, Seattle, Houston, Milwaukee and Miami. Tampa Bay has a fixed roof. The commissioner’s office also said Monday all 30 teams could play on opening day for the first time since 1968. A full slate was scheduled in 2018 but two games were postponed. The 2020 regular season is to end Sept. 27, putting the World Series on track for Oct. 20-28.

Puig drops appeal for brawl CLEVELAND — Indians outfielder Yasiel Puig dropped the appeal of his three-game suspension for his involvement in a brawl when he was with Cincinnati. Puig began serving his ban Monday when the Indians, who have climbed back into a tie for first in the AL Central, opened a three-game series against Boston. Puig was disciplined for his involvement in the latest benches-clearing incident between the Reds and Pittsburgh Pirates on July 30. The fracas began shortly after Puig was dealt to the Indians as part of a three-team trade that sent righthander Trevor Bauer from Cleveland to Cincinnati. BRIEFLY RED SOX: Michael Chavis played through the pain for as long as he could. Boston placed the versatile Chavis on the 10-day injured list Monday with a sprained left shoulder he sustained recently while trying to make a diving catch. Chavis has 18 homers and 58 RBIs this season. But he’s been in a slump, batting .156 in his last 11 games. —Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

14

Padres rookie Fernando Tatis Jr. had his 14-game hit streak come to an end Sunday in an 8-3 loss to Colorado but became eligible for the batting title with four plate appearances. His .320 average sat .017 points behind leader Jeff McNeil entering Monday. — MLB.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Orioles second baseman Hanser Alberto turns a double play after forcing out Aaron Judge in the second game of a doubleheader Monday in New York. versus Cleveland. When Torres came to the plate with runners on first and second in the eighth, Baltimore intentionally walked him. Didi Gregorius hit a threerun homer in the first inning of the day game and had four RBIs. Urshela, Torres and Cameron Maybin added solo shots, all off Gabriel Ynoa.

tin Smoak had a two-run homer among his three extra-base hits, and host Toronto routed Texas. Bo Bichette had the first fourhit game of his career, and Randal Grichuk had three hits, including a solo homer as the Blue Jays won for the 10th time in 15 games. Drury had five RBIs, while Smoak and Grichuk each had four.

INDIANS 6, RED SOX 5: Carlos Santana homered leading off the ninth inning to send host Cleveland to a win over fast-fading Boston and back into first-place in the AL Central. After the Red Sox tied it in the top of the inning, Santana connected on a 2-2 pitch from Marcus Walden, driving it barely over the wall in left. José Ramírez hit a three-run homer and Franmil Reyes had a two-run shot as the Indians improved to a MLBbest 43-17 since June 4.

DIAMONDBACKS 8, ROCKIES 6: Jake Lamb, Nick Ahmed and Carson Kelly homered during a four-run sixth inning as Arizona rallied for a victory over host Colorado. Over the course of 13 pitches, Arizona went from trailing 6-3 to leading 7-6. BLUE JAYS 19, RANGERS 4: NATIONALS 7, REDS 6: It was the Diamondbacks’ Brandon Drury hit his first Trea Turner and Matt Ad- 27th comeback win of the career grand slam, Jus- ams homered, Erick Fedde season.

BOX SCORES Yankees 8, Orioles 5

First Game Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Alberto 3b 5 2 2 0 0 2 .316 Mancini 1b 4 2 1 1 1 1 .280 Santander rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .310 Nunez dh 3 0 0 2 0 0 .240 Villar 2b 1 0 0 0 3 1 .270 Severino c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .261 Peterson lf 3 0 0 1 1 0 .242 Wilkerson cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Martin ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .192 Totals 32 5 7 5 5 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 2 3 1 0 2 0 .258 Urshela 3b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .328 Gregorius ss 3 1 1 4 0 1 .263 Sanchez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .224 Torres dh 4 1 1 1 0 0 .278 Tauchman lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Maybin rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .319 Ford 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .159 Valera 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .207 Totals 31 8 8 8 3 5 Baltimore 101 001 020 — 5 7 0 New York 410 011 10x — 8 8 0 LOB — Baltimore 6, New York 3. 2B — Gardner (19), Urshela (28). HR — Mancini (28), off Paxton; Santander (10), off Paxton; Gregorius (9), off Ynoa; Torres (24), off Ynoa; Urshela (18), off Ynoa; Maybin (8), off Ynoa. RBIs — Mancini (68), Santander (34), Nunez 2 (65), Peterson (11), Urshela 2 (63), Gregorius 4 (35), Torres (63), Maybin (24). SF — Nunez, Gregorius. DP — New York 1. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ynoa, L, 1-7 6 7 7 7 1 3 5.93 Kline 1 1 1 1 1 2 7.44 Yacabonis 1 0 0 0 1 0 6.80 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Paxton, W, 8-6 6 5 3 3 2 7 4.40 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.92 1 /3 2 2 2 2 0 3.99 Cessa 2 Britton, H, 24 /3 0 0 0 1 1 2.22 Chapman, S, 32-37 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.51 Inherited runners-scored — Britton 3-1. WP — Paxton. T — 2:50. Att. — 42,843

Yankees 11, Orioles 8

AROUND THE MAJORS

pitched well after allowing a solo shot on the game’s first pitch and host Washington held on to edge Cincinnati. Washington led 7-2 but blew most of that advantage before Sean Doolittle got his 27th save in 32 chances. He entered in the ninth with a 7-4 lead, but the struggling lefty closer’s first pitch of the evening became Phillip Ervin’s pinch-hit homer.

Second Game Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .269 Mancini rf 5 1 1 2 0 0 .279 Santander cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Nunez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .237 Peterson lf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .246 Sisco c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .222 Alberto 2b 4 3 3 3 0 0 .321 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .178 Wilkerson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .225 Ruiz 3b 3 0 1 3 1 0 .245 Totals 35 8 9 8 3 7 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 3b 4 2 3 0 1 0 .338 Judge rf 3 2 0 0 2 0 .268 Urshela dh 5 2 3 0 0 0 .332 Torres ss 4 3 3 6 1 1 .283 Gardner cf 4 0 1 3 1 1 .258 Maybin lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .312 Romine c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .259 Ford 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .164 Valera 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .219 Totals 35 11 12 10 6 7 Baltimore 003 000 302 — 8 9 1 New York 310 133 00x — 11 12 0 E — Sisco (5). LOB — Baltimore 3, New York 6. 3B — Alberto (2), Gardner (6). HR — Mancini (29), off Mantiply; Alberto (7), off Lail; Ford (4), off Blach; Torres (25), off Phillips; Torres (26), off Eshelman. RBIs — Mancini 2 (70), Alberto 3 (36), Ruiz 3 (33), Torres 6 (69), Gardner 3 (50), Ford (6). DP — Baltimore 1; New York 1. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Blach, L, 0-1 4 7 7 6 3 4 13.94 Phillips 1 2 3 3 2 2 8.84 Eshelman 3 3 1 1 1 1 6.09 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Green 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 4.69 Mantiply, W, 1-0 3 3 3 3 2 2 9.00 Lail, H, 1 22/3 2 3 3 1 2 10.12 Cortes Jr. 11/3 3 2 2 0 1 4.44 Ottavino, S, 2-7 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 1.71 Inherited runners-scored — Phillips 2-2, Eshelman 2-1, Lail 1-0, Ottavino 3-2. WP — Blach. T — 2:51. Att. — 40,354

Diamondbacks 8, Rockies 6

Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor looks to first base after getting Red Sox left fielder Andrew Benintendi out at second base Monday in Cleveland.

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dyson rf-cf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .260 Marte cf-2b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .317 Escobar 2b-3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .274 Walker 1b 4 2 1 0 1 1 .263 Lamb 3b 3 2 1 1 1 0 .224 Flores ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rojas lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .500 Ahmed ss 4 1 2 4 0 0 .267 C.Kelly c 2 1 1 1 2 1 .270 M.Kelly p 2 1 0 0 0 1 .026 Peralta ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Totals 36 8 11 8 5 3 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon rf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .322 Story ss 4 2 3 1 1 0 .286 Murphy 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .285 Arenado 3b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .305 McMahon 2b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .264 Tapia cf 5 1 3 2 0 0 .283 Desmond lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .261 Wolters c 4 0 2 2 0 1 .286 Lambert p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .389 Daza ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Alonso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .197 Totals 38 6 11 6 4 9 Arizona 001 204 100 — 8 11 0 Colorado 400 110 000 — 6 11 0 LOB — Arizona 6, Colorado 9. 2B — Dyson (9), Ahmed (25), Story 2 (32). HR — Lamb (5), off McGee; Ahmed (13), off McGee; C.Kelly (17), off Bettis; Story (27), off M.Kelly; McMahon (13), off M.Kelly. RBIs — Marte (68), Lamb (16), Rojas (1), Ahmed 4 (61), C.Kelly (42), Story (67), McMahon (56), Tapia 2 (37), Wolters 2 (30). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO ERA M.Kelly, W, 8-12 5 9 6 6 2 5 4.75 2 /3 1 0 0 1 0 4.20 Chafin, H, 16 Hirano, H, 13 1 1 0 0 1 2 4.09 McFarland, H, 4 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 4.63 Bradley, S, 4-6 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.78 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lambert 5 4 3 3 5 1 6.75 McGee, BS, 2-2 0 3 3 3 0 0 3.98 Bettis, L, 1-6 1 1 1 1 0 0 5.89 Diaz 1 2 1 0 0 0 5.02 Davis 1 1 0 0 0 1 6.23 Shaw 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.34 T — 3:30. Att. — 32,160

Blue Jays 19, Rangers 4

Indians 6, Red Sox 5

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 4 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Santana cf-ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .307 Andrus ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .282 DeShields cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Calhoun lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .274 Mazara rf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .264 Odor 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .208 Forsythe 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Kiner-Falefa 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .229 Trevino c 4 0 1 1 0 2 .200 Totals 35 4 8 4 1 6 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bichette ss 6 3 4 1 0 0 .394 Biggio 2b 6 0 2 2 0 0 .208 Guerrero Jr. 3b 4 3 2 1 1 0 .276 Smoak dh 5 2 3 4 0 2 .211 Grichuk rf 5 3 3 4 0 1 .238 Hernandez cf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .224 Fisher lf 3 3 1 0 2 1 .213 Drury 1b 5 1 2 5 0 0 .232 Jansen c 5 3 3 2 0 1 .212 Totals 43 19 21 19 4 7 Texas 010 000 201 — 4 8 0 Toronto 023 822 02x — 19 21 0 LOB — Texas 6, Toronto 4. 2B — Mazara (23), Bichette 2 (11), Biggio 2 (9), Guerrero Jr. (21), Smoak 2 (10), Grichuk (20), Hernandez (12). HR — Mazara (16), off Stewart; Calhoun (10), off Stewart; Odor (21), off Stewart; Smoak (19), off Jurado; Grichuk (21), off Jurado; Drury (14), off Sampson; Jansen (11), off Mathis. RBIs — Calhoun (26), Mazara (59), Odor (65), Trevino (2), Bichette (8), Biggio 2 (31), Guerrero Jr. (52), Smoak 4 (52), Grichuk 4 (56), Drury 5 (37), Jansen 2 (40). SB — Bichette (2). Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Jurado, L, 6-8 32/3 11 8 8 1 3 5.31 1 Sampson /3 3 5 5 2 1 5.71 Martin 1 2 2 2 1 0 5.00 Chavez 1 3 2 2 0 0 4.85 Montero 1 0 0 0 0 3 1.80 Mathis 1 2 2 2 0 0 9.00 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.09 Stewart, W, 2-0 51/3 5 3 3 0 3 7.42 Boshers 11/3 0 0 0 1 2 7.50 Shafer 11/3 3 1 1 0 1 2.16 Inherited runners-scored — Sampson 2-2, Shafer 2-0. HBP — Boshers (DeShields). T — 3:02. Att. — 16,492

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .280 Devers 3b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .317 Bogaerts ss 5 0 2 1 0 2 .304 Martinez dh 4 2 2 1 1 0 .310 Benintendi lf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .287 Vazquez c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Moreland 1b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .234 Travis ph-1b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .270 Holt 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .314 Bradley Jr. cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .218 Totals 37 5 12 5 4 6 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 0 1 0 1 0 .300 Mercado cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Santana 1b 4 3 3 1 1 0 .286 Reyes dh 4 2 2 2 0 2 .244 Ramirez 3b 4 1 2 3 0 1 .250 R.Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .226 Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .259 Allen lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Naquin rf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .284 Totals 34 6 12 6 4 7 Boston 010 200 101 — 5 12 0 Cleveland 203 000 001 — 6 12 0 LOB — Boston 9, Cleveland 9. 2B — Bogaerts (40), Benintendi (35), Holt (10), Travis (4), Ramirez (31). HR — Martinez (28), off Plesac; Bradley Jr. (13), off Clippard; Reyes (28), off Rodriguez; Ramirez (17), off Rodriguez; Santana (26), off Walden. RBIs — Bogaerts (88), Martinez (72), Benintendi (61), Holt (21), Bradley Jr. (45), Santana (71), Reyes 2 (51), Ramirez 3 (67). SB — Bogaerts (4). S — R.Perez. DP — Boston 1; Cleveland 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Rodriguez 6 10 5 5 3 5 4.31 Hernandez 11/3 1 0 0 1 2 4.08 2 /3 1 1 1 0 0 3.41 Walden, L, 7-2 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Plesac 5 7 3 3 2 2 3.27 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.14 Wood, H, 2 Clippard, H, 4 11/3 1 1 1 0 2 2.80 2 /3 1 0 0 0 1 2.58 Wittgren, H, 10 1 /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.81 O.Perez, H, 17 Hand, W, 6-3, BS 1 1 1 1 2 1 2.74 Inherited runners-scored — Walden 1-0, Clippard 1-0, O.Perez 1-0. WP — Plesac. T — 3:34. Att. — 24,770

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .266 Farmer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Votto 1b 3 0 2 1 2 0 .259 Suarez 3b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .258 VanMeter 2b-lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .283 Aquino rf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .429 Senzel cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Barnhart c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .220 Ervin ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .355 J.Iglesias ss 4 1 3 1 0 0 .292 DeSclafani p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .162 O’Grady ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Peraza ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Totals 36 6 11 6 4 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 5 1 2 4 0 1 .290 Eaton rf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .283 Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .317 Adams 1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .244 Cabrera 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .239 Parra lf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .249 Suzuki c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Robles cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .240 Fedde p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .143 Kendrick ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .319 Dozier ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .232 Totals 33 7 11 7 4 5 Cincinnati 110 000 022 — 6 11 0 Washington 300 300 10x — 7 11 0 LOB — Cincinnati 7, Washington 6. 2B — Votto (25), J.Iglesias (16), Cabrera (17), Robles (19), Kendrick (17). 3B — J.Iglesias (3). HR — Winker (16), off Fedde; Aquino (8), off Rainey; Ervin (3), off Doolittle; Adams (18), off DeSclafani; Turner (11), off DeSclafani. RBIs — Winker (38), Votto (39), Aquino 2 (16), J.Iglesias (44), Ervin (14), Turner 4 (33), Adams 2 (49), Parra (37). CS — Parra (3). DP — Cincinnati 1; Washington 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA DeSclafani, L, 7-7 4 6 6 6 2 3 4.51 Gausman 2 1 0 0 0 2 6.11 Hughes 2 4 1 1 2 0 4.37 Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fedde, W, 3-2 6 6 2 2 2 4 4.09 Guerra 1 1 0 0 0 1 4.60 Rainey 1 1 2 2 1 2 4.40 Doolittle, S, 27-32 1 3 2 2 1 0 3.73 T — 3:11. Att. — 22,394

nati Reds. 1969 — Jim Palmer of the Orioles, plagued by arm trouble the year before, threw an 8-0 no-hitter against the Oakland A’s in Baltimore. 1979 — St. Louis’ Lou Brock reached 3,000 hits with an infield hit off Chicago Cubs pitcher Dennis Lamp. St. Louis won 3-2. 2004 — Kansas City rookies Abraham Nunez and John Buck hit grand slams to lead the Royals past the Oakland Athletics 10-3. 2005 — New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera blew his first save since April 6 in a 7-5 win over Texas. Rivera had converted a career-best 31 consecutive saves before allowing Kevin Mench’s two-run, game-tying single in the ninth. 2013 — Paul Goldschmidt hit the first pitch of the 11th in-

ning for a game-ending home run after leading off the ninth with a tying homer, to help Arizona beat Baltimore 4-3 with a winning blast for the second straight night. 2015 — The Toronto Blue Jays won their 11th straight game, beating the Oakland Athletics 4-2. The AL East leaders also won 11 in a row in June, becoming the first team with winning streaks of at least 11 since Cleveland in 1954. 2016 — Tyler Austin and Aaron Judge became the first teammates to hit home runs in the first at-bats of their major league debuts in the same game, sparking the New York Yankees to an 8-4 win over Tampa Bay. 2018 — Ronald Acuna Jr. hit leadoff homers in both games of a doubleheader for the Atlanta Braves.

Nationals 7, Reds 6

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1910 — The Brooklyn Dodgers and the Pittsburgh Pirates played to an 8-8 tie. Each team had 38 at-bats, 13 hits, 12 assists, two errors, five strikeouts, three walks, one hit batsman and one passed ball. 1921 — George Sisler of the St. Louis Browns became the first batter in American League history to hit for the cycle twice. Sisler went 5-for-5 and drove in three runs in a 7-5, 10-inning win over the Detroit Tigers. 1921 — John “Mule” Watson of the Boston Braves pitched two complete-game victories over the Philadelphia Phillies. 1931 — Tony Cuccinello of the Cincinnati Reds had six hits in six at-bats in the first game of a doubleheader at Boston. Cuccinello had a triple, two doubles and three singles to knock in five runs as

the Reds won 17-3. Cuccinello hit a three-run homer in the eighth of the nightcap to give the Reds a 4-2 win. 1939 — The New York Yankees beat the Philadelphia Athletics 21-0 to equal the major-league record for lopsided shutouts. Every batter in the Yankees lineup hit safely. Joe DiMaggio and Babe Dahlgren had two home runs apiece, each hitting an inside-theparker. Pitcher Red Ruffing had four hits and drove in three runs. 1948 — Satchel Paige, 42, pitched his first major league complete game against the Chicago White Sox. Paige gave up five hits en route to 5-0 Cleveland victory. 1957 — Milwaukee pitcher Lew Burdette hit his first two home runs to lead the Braves to a 12-4 win over the Cincin-


CARDINALS

08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

NOTEBOOK

2020 CARDINALS SCHEDULE March 26-29

at Cincinnati

March 30-April 1

at Milwaukee

April 2, 4-5

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Arozarena replaces ailing J. Martinez

Baltimore

April 6-9

L.A. Dodgers

April 10-12

at Chicago Cubs

April 14-16

at L.A. Dodgers

April 17-19

at Colorado

April 20-22

Cincinnati

April 24-26

Miami

April 27-30

at San Diego

May 1-3

at Milwaukee

May 4-6

San Diego

May 8-10

N.Y. Mets

May 11-13

at Pittsburgh

May 15-17

at Philadelphia

May 18-21

Atlanta

May 22-24

Arizona

May 25-27

at Atlanta

May 29-31

Pittsburgh

June 1, 2

Toronto

June 4-7

at Pittsburgh

June 8-10

at N.Y. Mets

June 13, 14

Chicago Cubs, in London

June 16-18

Colorado

June 19-21

Cincinnati

June 22-25

at Miami

June 26-28

at Boston

June 29-July 2

Washington

July 3-5

Milwaukee

July 7, 9

at Washington

July 10-12

at Tampa Bay

July 17-19

N.Y. Yankees

July 20-22

San Francisco

July 23-26

Chicago Cubs

July 27-30

at Milwaukee

July 31-Aug. 2

at Pittsburgh

Aug. 4, 5

at Kansas City

Aug. 7-9

Cincinnati

Aug. 10-12

Pittsburgh

Aug. 14-16

Milwaukee

Aug. 18, 19

at Toronto

Aug. 21-23

at Chicago Cubs

Aug. 24-26

at Cincinnati

Aug. 28-30

Pittsburgh

Aug. 31-Sept. 3

Philadelphia

Sept. 4-6

at Arizona

Sept. 7-9

at San Francisco

Sept. 10-13

Chicago Cubs

Sept. 15, 16

Kansas City

Sept. 17-20

at Cincinnati

Sept. 21-23

Milwaukee

Sept. 25-27

at Chicago Cubs

BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY — Much-discussed outfielder Randy Arozarena has been brought up by the Cardinals to join them Tuesday night, but it comes at the expense of losing veteran outfielder Jose Martinez to the injured. He has a sprained right shoulder. At the same time Monday, the Cardinals also announced they were activating catcher Yadier Molina (right thumb tendon strain) from the injured list and optioning catcher Andrew Knizner to Class AAA Memphis. Arozarena, a 24-year Cuban native, has batted .349 with 10 home runs and 16 stolen bases while playing both at Class AA Springfield and Class AAA Memphis this year. At Memphis, Arozarena had reached base safely in 37 consecutive games, including hitting for the cycle. He has hit .368 with a .442 on-base percentage and .568 slugging percentage for the Redbirds. Cardinals general manager Michael Girsch said Harrison Bader, who had been optioned to Memphis two weeks ago, and Arozarena were considered for the promotion. Bader, who was hitting .195 for the Cardinals, hit two home runs in a game over the weekend and Girsch said, “Harrison’s had a good couple of games. But the whole thing was . . . to get him right and we didn’t want to interrupt the process. “Randy has played so well, he deserves the opportunity. Both deserve to be up but right now we’ll go with Randy. I think he’ll get opportunities.” Cardinals President of baseball operations John Mozeliak spoke to Bader on Monday and reviewed the situation with him. Arozarena will wear uniform No. 66. He joins the club’s 40-man roster with his purchase from Memphis. That roster had been at 39. Martinez was injured when he banged into the wall chasing a fly ball on Sunday. He is hitting .266 with 10 homers and 40 runs batted in. Girsch said it would be a few days before Martinez could swing a bat and “it didn’t make sense for (manager) Mike Shildt to play short for three or four days.” Girsch said Martinez shouldn’t be out long. “At, or shortly beyond 10 days would be our expectation,” he said. Molina, 37, was placed on the IL on July 8 for the second time because of the thumb injury he first incurred in May. The ninetime All-Star and Gold Glove winner was three for 20 with a home run in eight games during a rehabilitation stint at Memphis and Springfield. With the Cardinals, he is batting .261 with four homers and 36 runs batted in. The Cardinals were 17-11 in his absence.

BUDASKA DISMISSED

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Randy Arozarena, shown in spring training, has batted .349 with 10 homers and 16 steals in the minors this year.

AVERAGES Batting Thomas Wong Edman Munoz Goldschmidt Molina Ozuna DeJong Fowler Wieters Carpenter Team Pitching Gallegos Helsley Gant Brebbia C.Martinez Webb Flaherty Miller Hudson Mikolas Wainwright Wacha Fernandez Team

AVG .364 .267 .266 .265 .262 .261 .257 .249 .248 .231 .217 .244

AB 22 359 154 147 435 261 319 429 330 147 313 3893

R 4 40 22 19 71 24 56 74 43 14 44 518

H 8 96 41 39 114 68 82 107 82 34 68 950

2B 0 18 7 7 13 16 16 27 17 4 13 175

3B 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 12

HR RBI BB SO 3 10 2 5 8 42 37 59 4 15 5 34 2 13 5 28 26 62 50 122 4 36 9 34 22 65 37 73 19 53 42 100 13 39 40 94 10 23 10 44 10 31 46 94 145 486 368 1000

SB 1 15 7 7 1 4 10 6 6 1 6 78

E 0 7 2 1 5 1 2 5 4 1 6 48

W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 3 1 1.96 46 0 0 55.0 29 12 12 5 11 76 0 0 2.35 9 0 0 15.1 7 4 4 2 10 15 8 0 2.80 49 0 3 54.2 39 18 17 4 21 45 3 3 2.95 50 0 0 58.0 43 21 19 5 19 71 3 2 3.48 29 0 12 31.0 27 13 12 2 12 31 0 1 3.63 45 0 1 39.2 26 16 16 5 17 37 5 6 3.72 23 23 0 128.1 104 54 53 21 41 150 4 4 3.92 53 0 4 39.0 31 21 17 9 19 54 10 6 4.00 24 23 1 121.1 134 69 54 19 57 93 7 12 4.13 24 24 0 137.1 146 67 63 19 23 101 8 8 4.35 22 22 0 120.0 120 59 58 15 49 118 6 5 5.54 20 15 0 89.1 105 59 55 21 42 72 0 0 27.00 1 0 0 0.2 2 2 2 0 0 2 61 55 4.08 116 116 36 1027.1 942 502 466 146 393 1003

ka’s philosophies didn’t really mesh with those of hitting coach Jeff Albert. The Cardinals rank near the bottom of the National League in multiple offensive categories. “It’s really a matter of we wanted a consistent voice for our hitters from the coaching staff and not having mixed messages,” Girsch. “We felt we were better positioned to have a more uniformed voice for the players. There’s no blame.” Jobel Jimenez, the hitting coach at Memphis, was promoted — just as Budaska had been last year after hitting coach John Mabry was fired. “Jobel and Jeff will be a good mix together,” Girsch said and added, “The whole organization is accountable for how we’ve done offensively.”

When the Cardinals get to the park on Tuesday, they won’t find Mark Budaska, ORIOLES HERE FOR OPENER the popular assistant hitting coach who Next season the Cardinals will open their had worked with many of the Cardinals’ home schedule with an interleague series young hitters in the minors. Budaska, 66, for the first time, as the transplanted St. was dismissed Monday. Girsch said Budas- Louis Browns return for the first time in

17 years. The Baltimore Orioles, whose only interleague visit here was in June 2003, before the construction of Busch Stadium III and who last toiled here as the Browns 50 years before that, will play in the Cardinals’ 2020 home opener. It is set for April 2, a Thursday afternoon. According to the to the Major League Baseball schedule released Monday, that series will continue with Saturday and Sunday games. And then the Los Angeles Dodgers, who visited on the Cardinals’ first home stand this year, will make their only appearance here in 2020 from April 6-9. As they did this year, the Cardinals will open their season on the road with two National League Central Division series. They will start on March 26, a Thursday, in Cincinnati. After playing two more games against the Reds, the Cardinals will go to Milwaukee for three. The highlight of the home schedule is a post-All-Star break appearance by the New York Yankees, who last played here in 2014. The Yankees will be in town for a three-game weekend set from July 17-19, followed by three games with San Francisco and a four-game set with the Chicago Cubs from July 23-26, comprising the Cardinals’ longest home stand of the season. The Cubs also will be here for a fourgame weekend set from Sept. 10-13. The two other “home” games the Cardinals have with Chicago will be played in London, on June 13-14. The Cardinals will play only 79 games at Busch in 2020. Trips to Boston, Tampa Bay, Toronto and Kansas City — with each of the latter two being two-game series — will comprise the Cardinals’ road interleague games. Toronto and Kansas City also will play two games each here. The Cardinals will wrap up the regular season with a weekend series against the Cubs at Wrigley Field on Sept. 25-27. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals From B1

he said. “I can see the ball well. That’s a big part of it. Also a big part of it was that early on in my career, especially my first year when we played those American League teams, it was an opportunity for me to get to play because we had an extra bat in the lineup (because of the designated hitter rule). I took advantage of it. “Any time you’ve hit well in a ballpark, when you go back, those good feelings come back. Pretty much every year in my career, when I’m playing there, I’m feeling good. So hopefully, we’ll have a repeat of that.” For all interleague games, Carpenter ranks second to the Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout among active players in on-base percentage (.399) and OPS (.987) and is third in slugging (.588) behind Trout and Washington’s Anthony Rendon. Why this has happened is unclear to Carpenter. “You could probably say that playing against teams that don’t know you helps,” said Carpenter, who is batting only .176 in interleague play this season. “They don’t have a game plan as good as the teams which have faced you all the time. But, on the flip side of that, it could be the same thing for the hitter. If you don’t face a guy a bunch, you don’t necessarily know what he has. “I really don’t have an answer. For some reason when we’ve matched up against the AL, I’ve played well.” Carpenter’s poor interleague average this season is reflective of his mark against all teams, which is .217. “But my at-bats have been way better since coming back from the rehab stint,” said Carpenter, who took a minor-league tour, at his request, to Class AA Springfield and Class AAA Memphis as he recovered from a right foot contusion and sought to recover his lost swing.

COLIN E. BRALEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter is greeted by teammates after hitting a two-run home run on Aug. 10, 2018, in Kansas City.

MAKING PROGRESS Carpenter was two for 26 during that exercise but since returning to the Cardinals, he has gone five for 20 (.250) but he has hit a number of balls harder than he had been hitting them. “My swing is getting closer to what I think is capable. But I’ve got a long way to go,” he said. “Candidly I’m really not worried about myself at all. It’s about this team right now. If I was getting six hits a game and we were losing, it doesn’t matter. But . . . winning games and contributing . . . that’s all I care about. “Obviously I’m not happy with my production. It’s just a shell of what I’m capable of being. But there’s no sense in sitting around and pouting about it. My sole focus is to do my part to help us get into the postseason. If that means I finish the year hitting .220 but I can get some big hits to help us get there, then that will satisfy my need for the season. But I’m doing everything I can to get myself back to respectable

numbers that are in line with what I’m capable of doing. “If I can get to .250 and above an .800 OPS, that would be pretty much a miraculous turnaround. I would be OK with that. Mentally, I’m just trying to roll with it. Nobody wants to be around a sourpuss anyway so . ..” Carpenter is hitting sixth rather than first. He has had only 13 starts in that batting-order spot in his career, but is 20 for 48 (.417) while hitting sixth and is for four for 11 there this season. “I’ve had very few at-bats anywhere, besides leadoff,” he said. “But I like it. I like to be able to watch what a guy’s got that day, what kind of stuff he has. Hitting leadoff, there’s a challenge to that. If a guy’s got great stuff, you’re the first one to find out. If he’s struggling, then, you’re the first guy to find out but it can be tough.” The Cardinals’ interleague record, with the two games in Kansas City the final two for the

season, is just 7-11. In 2016 and 2017, when the Cardinals missed the playoffs, they were 8-12 in interleague play each year. So their interleague record has — and could hurt them. For instance, Chicago is 10-8 in interleague play this year, the New York Mets are 10-4, Washington 8-4 and Philadelphia 8-5. Of the teams jousting with the Cardinals for three playoff berths, only Milwaukee (6-10), is worse in interleague than the Cardinals. “I don’t think there’s anything to it other than we haven’t been good enough the last couple of years,” Carpenter said. “If you look at the years we were in the postseason, we dominated in interleague play but we were just a better team. The last couple of years, we haven’t been as good. This year we’re better.”

LOOKING AHEAD The Cardinals will start Tuesday’s play two games behind the division-leading Cubs and one-

half game ahead of third-place Milwaukee. “Our focus this whole year has been the division,” Carpenter said. “We’re two games out. We get to play the team we’re chasing a bunch. We play Milwaukee (nine games). “If you look at our schedule, outside of Washington, every team that we’re playing that’s not in our division (Colorado seven games, San Francisco four, Arizona three) are sub .500. If we play well against our division teams and take care of business versus the teams that aren’t winning, we’ve got a real good shot. Winning the division is going to be a huge luxury — not having to face the Dodgers in the first round. “Now I know that you can’t keep talking about it. You’ve got to do it. But you would think that as good of an offense we have, at some point, you’re going to see it.” As on Sunday when the Cardinals erased a four-run lead in the seventh inning en route to an 11-9 win over Pittsburgh to facilitate a three-game series sweep. “If that happens, I think we win the division,” Carpenter said. “I honestly believe (the offense) is going to be the deciding factor.” Carpenter agreed that only second baseman Kolten Wong had matched or exceeded expectations, offensively. “That’s it,” Carpenter said. “Wong’s right at the .270 mark, seemingly having a career year. The rest of us are underachieving to what we’re used to. If all those guys can bring it back up, I think we can win this division. We don’t even need all of them. Just a few of them. Everything else has been good enough. “I keep telling myself, I don’t have to be other worldly for these next 46 games. I just have to better than I’ve been. And everybody else can do that same thing.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

BOYS SOCCER

Success a double-edged sword for Gibault Hawks bumped into largest class despite their small enrollment BY JIM FAASEN

STLhighschoolsports.com

WATERLOO — The Gibault boys soccer team took the first steps during its opening practice Monday morning toward a daunting challenge it faces this season. Despite its enrollment of 221 students, Gibault has been placed by the Illinois High School Association in Class 3A for boys soccer — the largest of three IHSA boys soccer classifications. The Hawks were classified in 3A for the next two seasons because of the IHSA success factor, which is applied to “non-boundaried” schools based on a program’s recent postseason history. Gibault no doubt has had plenty of success in boys soccer and is seeking a state tournament appearance for the fourth consecutive season. But this season it will be facing opponents in the playoffs with enrollments at minimum of greater than 1,635.

PAUL KOPSKY, STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Connor Olson (left) and Kyle Barbour battle for the ball during Gibault’s boys soccer practice on Monday, August 12, 2019 at Gibault High School in Waterloo, Ill. “The move to 3A is going to be indeed a big challenge for our team and we have to make changes to adapt to the skill level,” Hawks senior defender Alex Bira said. “It is a huge accomplishment for our school to compete at a 3A level in soccer and the competition will keep getting harder with many new players filling in the gaps, but I believe my team is ready. Competing (in Class 3A) will be no easy task, but we are definitely determined and ready for

this new season.” Gibault was bumped up to Class 2A the last two seasons by the success factor, finishing fourth last season and as the state runner-up in 2017. The Hawks won the Class 1A state title in 2013 and were fourth in 1A in 2016. Senior goalkeeper Connor Olson said the move up is something of a doubleedged sword. Sure, winning has put the Hawks in position to take on the big boys of the state, some with

enrollments more than 10 times larger than Gibault’s. It has happened, though, thanks to plenty of the players who no longer are with the program. “For me, it really isn’t fair,” Olson said. “We’re a school of 230 kids, or so, and not just boys. From that aspect, it is a very big compliment and I can speak for the rest of the team that it is a very proud moment. However, I think something else needs to be taken into consideration because most of our success, the past three state runs, came from the older groups, mostly seniors, on those teams. Also graduating seven starters, with three going to play college soccer, and not having a bunch of depth hurts. It hurts a lot.” Gibault coach Darryn Haudrich said he feels the Hawks will be prepared for the challenge, which isn’t unusual. The Hawks posted a 124-5 record in the regular season one year ago, playing each of the area’s 3A schools. They finished 176-5, falling in penalty kicks in both the Class 2A semifinals and third-place game. Haudrich said tough scheduling has been a fixture for Gibault since the

FOOTBALL

days of former coach Jim Corsi, who led the program to Class 1A state titles from 2005-07, and continued with Matt Reeb, who guided the program to the 2013 Class 1A title. “It is still our focus to go out and play every day, no matter who we play,” Haudrich said. “As we go from regular season to postseason, there is a pretty even transition.” IHSA assistant executive director Matt Troha said the situation faced by Gibault is one that has few parallels, and none in boys soccer. Troha said the Rockford Lutheran boys basketball team (2015-16 and 2016-17) and the Quincy Notre Dame girls basketball team (201516) are the only other programs with the lowest enrollment numbers for their sport to have to play in the highest classification due to the success factor, which was enacted in 2015. “The classification of non-boundaried high schools within the IHSA has been and remains a topic of thoughtful conversation and deliberation,” Troha said. “The IHSA rules as they relate to the nonboundaried school multiplier and non-boundaried success adjustment formula

have both been developed, studied, and tweaked since their inception. “Because it is an important topic to our membership, we will continue to be receptive to ideas on how to best classify our schools from a competitive aspect.” Gibault is one of only two boys soccer programs affected by the success factor for the next two seasons, along with Elgin St. Edward in Class 2A. In eight fall sports offered by the IHSA, nine programs were bumped up to a higher classification. For boundaried public schools, Class 1A soccer is for schools up to an enrollment of 697, while the 2A ranks consist of schools greater than 697 to 1,635. The schools in last year’s Class 3A state tournament — including third-place finisher Collinsville — had an average enrollment of 2,270. It’s a challenge the Hawks seem ready to accept. “It’s a huge motivator and is something that should push the team,” Olson said. “(That’s) because even winning one regional game is something that (might not) happen again in school history at the 3A level.”

VOLLEYBALL

GORDON RADFORD, SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

New Borgia volleyball coach CJ Steiger talks to players during a tryout Monday at Borgia High School in Washington, Mo.

New coach, same goals for Borgia BY STEVE OVERBEY

STLhighschoolsports.com PAUL HALFACRE, STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

First-year Seckman football coach Nick Baer talks to his team during practice at Seckman High School on Monday, August 12, 2019 in Imperial, Mo.

ON THE RIGHT TRACK

Baer hopes to continue Seckman’s upward trajectory BY DAVID KVIDAHL

STLhighschoolsports.com

IMPERIAL — Nick Baer landed the only job he ever wanted. A job that has not been kind to those who previously held it. On Monday afternoon,the 30-year-old Baer ran his first official practice as the Seckman football coach. Monday was the first day fall sports teams in Missouri and Illinois were allowed to have official preseason practices. Baer was one of many new football skippers across the area. Among the programs under new leadership are Affton (Tony Muyco), Belleville East (Mike Harrison), Belleville West (Bryan Edgar),Fort Zumwalt West (Ben Pike), Granite City (Orlando Gooden), Hazelwood West (Rory Seals), Lift For Life (Charles Bass), Marquette (Michael Stewart), McCluer (Howard Brown), O’Fallon (Byron Gettis), O’Fallon Christian (Dakota Conway), Orchard Farm (Blake Arnette), Parkway North (Karl Odenwald), Riverview Gardens (Lee Brown), Soldan (Sorrell Harvey), St. Pius X (Dan Oliver), Vashon (Will Franklin) and Vianney (Chad Masters).

Baer, who was tabbed Seckman’s new coach in late April,greeted his first official practice with open arms and is ready to build on what he said was a productive summer.Baer spent the last eight years on Seckman’s coaching staff, the last two as the offensive coordinator. The transition from former coach Doug Baker to Baer was easy. “It was pretty seamless,” Baer said. “They know my style.” It’s a style everyone involved hopes can help Seckman take the next step.Baker resigned to take an administrative position in Excelsior Springs, but his three seasons at the helm helped reshape the football culture at Seckman. In his final season, Baker guided the Jaguars to a 6-4 record and set the highwater mark for most wins in program history.The Jaguars were beaten in the first round of district play by rival Fox. Prior to last season, Seckman last won at least five games in the 2006 season, Baer’s senior year. A Jaguar through and through, Baer has craved the challenge of helping his alma mater reach new plateaus. Now he’s got his chance — as long as everyone brings the required paperwork. “For me, I’m just kind of rolling right into it. I know all these guys out here already,” Baer said. “Today’s more making sure everyone

gets here, has their physicals and is ready to go.” Baer’s familiarity with the program and its players was big in the Seckman locker room. His biography resonates in a way that some might not. “I love Coach Baer. He’s exciting, he’s passionate,” senior running back Anthony Chellew said. “It’s a great change to see someone who’s come from the environment. He’s been here his entire life and he’s truly passionate about what he does.It makes me more excited about this season.” Expectations are high aroundSeckman.Thathasn’t always been the case for a program that has suffered through its share of winless or single-victory campaigns. There is an energy,an excitement around the team. And, for the first time, a blueprint of what’s possible. “The thing is playing behind these guys last year you learn a lot,” senior quarterback Joe Stuckmeyer said. “They were great leaders and I know our group we have now, we can be just as good as them.” Last year didn’t produce just the best season in school history, it also saw two-way standout Dylan Hawk and quarterback Seth Lounsbury become the first two Division I football recruits for the Jaguars. Hawk landed at Southeast Missouri State

and Lounsbury is at Missouri State. This year senior offensive lineman Jake Seidel has verbally committed to Missouri State after receiving several Division I offers. He leads an offensive line that returns talent and experience and will be counted on after the Jaguars lost all but two offensive touchdowns to graduation. “We have some humongous shoes to fill,” Chellew said. “It’s lit a fire under me, it’s pushed me to get better in the weight room, get better with my agility and my speed.” The good part of building on the best season in school history is there’s a lot of positive energy, high expectations and a genuine belief that victories will come. The downside? Everyone the Jaguars beat had to hear about it for the better part of a year. There’s no more flying under the radar. Seckman has their opponent’s full attention. That by itself is a statement about where Seckman’s program stands. “I have no idea what’s going to happen this season but I’m expecting very,very great things.This is the most exciting season I’ve ever played football,” Chellew said. “When we go to other events we’re proud to say we’re from Seckman. It’s definitely a good thing.”

WASHINGTON, MO. — Abby Lynn called it “disappointing.” Anna Eckelkamp, her teammate on the Borgia girls volleyball team, referred to it as “sort of a letdown.” Yes, the Knights’ thirdplace finish at the Class 3 state tournament last season did not sit well in this volleyball-crazy town. Borgia has reached the state final four tournament 19 times in its storied history and took first place 10 times, the last title in 2013. So, the third-place effort was rather ho-hum. “You don’t get a (banner) with your name on it in the gym for finishing third,” Eckelkamp said. “The worst part was, we really thought we could win it.” The Knights get a shot at redemption this time around. And this group is determined not to come up short. Borgia carries high hopes, as usual, into the upcoming campaign. With Lynn and Eckelkamp, the only returning senior starters, leading the way, the Knights assembled for their first practice late Monday afternoon under the direction of new coach CJ Steiger. Steiger has coached the boys volleyball team at Borgia the last six seasons and brings plenty of experience to the table. A 1995 graduate of nearby New Haven High, Steiger has been a club coach and an NCAA volleyball referee. Plus, he is well aware of the school’s rich tradition. “The bar is set pretty high here,” he said. Steiger is replacing Andrea Beaty, who left to take a job as an assistant coach at the University of TexasEl Paso. Borgia lost plenty of talent from last year’s 28-9-2 squad, which beat Pleasant Hill 25-18, 25-18 in the third-place match at the state tournament in Cape Girardeau.

Sluggers Sophie Straatmann (190 kills) and Diana Pfiefer (160 kills) have graduated along with allaround standout Paige Lynn, Abby’s sister. But the cupboard is far from bare. Abby Lynn, who is headed to the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, returns to run the offense. She finished with a teamhigh 794 assists last season. Eckelkamp, a three-year starter, will anchor the defense. Abby Lynn and Eckelkamp have known each other since they were toddlers and they want to make their senior season something special. “We’re both ready for this,” Eckelkamp said. “She was the leader on her club team and I was the leader on my club team. We both know how to lead.” Sophomore Ella Brinkmann is back to trigger the attack. She finished with a team-best 346 kills last season and really played well during the postseason run. Brinkmann had 20 kills and 11 service points in a 25-13, 27-29, 25-18 win over Incarnate Word in the quarterfinal round. Both Lynn and Eckelkamp are ready for the challenge. They are also excited about their new coach. “At open gym, we got used to each other and learned how to communicate.” Lynn said. “We have a lot of work to do because there are a lot of newcomers on the team. But it shouldn’t take us too long to get into rhythm.” Borgia opens the season Sept. 3 at home against Helias. Steiger began his first practice by moving the girls outside for a one-mile run in the 95-degree heat. He wanted to see who kept in shape during the summer. “Most of us know what we have to do to be successful,” Eckelkamp said. “And that starts today.”


SPORTS

08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

Rascals From B1

the city or a future tenant.” Including players, the team has about 80 employees, Schmoll said. O’Fallon mayor Bill Hennessy said the city already has been in touch with prospective tenants

without indicating what type of entity that might be. “Although we are disappointed to hear the Rascals are ceasing operations at the end of the year, we are grateful for 21 years of Rascals baseball,” Hennessy said in a statement. “The team has entertained thousands of O’Fallon residents over the years.”

AMERICA’S LINE AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Astros .................. -$260..............WHITE SOX Astros .................. -$300..............WHITE SOX YANKEES.............. -$300.................... Orioles Rangers ............... -$132...............BLUE JAYS INDIANS............... -$107...................Red Sox TIGERS ................. -$155................. Mariners National League NATIONALS .......... -$110........................Reds Cubs..................... -$122................. PHILLIES Dodgers ............... -$260.................MARLINS BRAVES................ -$120........................Mets ROCKIES............... -$125....................Dbacks Interleague BREWERS............. -$145...................... Twins Cards ................... -$185................... ROYALS GIANTS................. -$125................. Athletics ANGELS................ -$158.................... Pirates PADRES................ -$105........................Rays NFL Preseason Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Thursday JAGUARS.................. 3..........3 ........... Eagles FALCONS.................1.5.... 1.5 ................Jets REDSKINS ...............3.5.... 3.5 ......... Bengals RAVENS...................4.5.... 4.5 ......... Packers CARDS...................... 4..........4 ..........Raiders Friday PANTHERS ............... 3..........3 ............... Bills GIANTS..................... 2..........2 .............Bears BUCS .......................3.5.... 3.5 ........Dolphins Saturday COLTS....................... 3..........3 ..........Browns Patriots.................... 3..........3 .......... TITANS Cowboys .................2.5.... 2.5 ............ RAMS STEELERS................ PK ..... PK ............ Chiefs TEXANS...................4.5.... 4.5 ............. Lions Sunday CHARGERS ............... 3..........3 ............ Saints VIKINGS ................... 4..........4 ......Seahawks Monday BRONCOS................. 2..........2 ............ 49ers COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current August 24 o-Florida.................7.5.... 7.5 ......Miami-Fla Arizona ..................11.5. 11.5 .......... HAWAII August 29 CINCINNATI .............3.5.... 3.5 ...............Ucla CLEMSON................ 34 ..... 34 . Georgia Tech TULANE.................... 3..........3 ... Florida Int’l TEXAS A&M............34.5. 34.5 .........Texas St ARIZONA ST ............ 26 ..... 26 .......... Kent St Utah......................... 6..........6 ............... BYU August 30 ARMY .....................23.5. 23.5 ............... Rice WAKE FOREST.........3.5.... 3.5 .......... Utah St Wisconsin................ 11 ..... 11 ................USF MICHIGAN ST .........21.5. 21.5 ............. Tulsa RUTGERS................. 14 ..... 14Massachusetts d-Colorado.............10.5. 10.5 ... Colorado St Purdue..................... 9..........9 .........NEVADA Oklahoma St ..........16.5. 16.5 ... OREGON ST August 31 OHIO ST .................. 27 ..... 27 ....Fla Atlantic NEBRASKA.............. 34 ..... 34 .....S Alabama NC STATE................. 20 ..... 20 ......E Carolina ILLINOIS.................16.5. 16.5 ............ Akron i-Indiana ................. 17 ..... 17 ............Ball St KENTUCKY .............12.5. 12.5 ........... Toledo Miss St .................... 23 ..... 23UL-LAFAYETTE MEMPHIS ................. 6..........6 .... Mississippi TENNESSEE............25.5. 25.5 ..... Georgia St E Michigan ..............5.5.... 5.5COASTAL CARO c-S Carolina ............7.5.... 7.5 ..... N Carolina a-Alabama .............. 33 ..... 33 ..............Duke STANFORD ..............6.5.... 6.5 Northwestern Va Tech ...................2.5.... 2.5 BOSTON COLL Syracuse ................17.5. 17.5 ........ LIBERTY j-Florida St............... 4..........4 .........Boise St ARKANSAS ST .......... 3..........3 ...............Smu MICHIGAN ..............31.5. 31.5 ... Mid Tenn St IOWA ......................21.5. 21.5 ... Miami-Ohio LSU ......................... 26 ..... 26 ..Ga Southern Georgia ..................20.5. 20.5 ..VANDERBILT Virginia...................2.5.... 2.5 . PITTSBURGH Missouri.................14.5. 14.5 ......WYOMING ar-Auburn ...............2.5.... 2.5 .......... Oregon TEXAS ....................20.5. 20.5 ..........La Tech WASH ST ................. 34 ..... 34New Mexico St USC ........................13.5. 13.5 .......Fresno St

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

The Rascals are to play their final regular-season home game on Aug. 29. Their final game of the season is Sept. 1, in Schaumburg, Ill. However, they are in position to possibly earn a playoff berth again this summer. Among the employees whose future is in limbo is Steve Brook, who is in his 10th season as man-

ager and his 16th with the organization, where he started as a pitcher. The team won its only Frontier League championship in 2010, Brook’s first as manager. The Rascals have made five other league championship series appearances. “It’s obviously a scary situa-

TRANSACTIONS TRANSACTIONS

September 1 OKLAHOMA............. 26 ..... 26 ........ Houston September 2 Notre Dame ............ 20 ..... 20 ... LOUISVILLE o- Orlando, FL. c- Charlotte, NC. d- Denver, CO. a- Atlanta, GA. i- Indianapolis, IN. j- Jacksonville, FL. n- New Orleans, LA. ar- Arlington, TX. Odds to win the Heisman Trophy Tua Tagovailoa....5/2 Sam Ehlinger ... 15/1 Trevor Lawrence.5/2 Jonathan Taylor20/1 Justin Fields........8/1 Shea Patterson 25/1 Jalen Hurts ...... 10/1 Najee Harris..... 30/1 Jake Fromm..... 12/1 Travis Etienne.. 30/1 Adrian Martinez12/1 Ian Book .......... 40/1 Justin Hebert... 15/1 AJ Dillon .......... 40/1 CFL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Thursday WINNIPEG ............... 12 ..... 12 .. Br Columbia Friday Edmonton............... 10 ..... 10 ...... TORONTO Saturday Hamilton.................. 4..........4 .........OTTAWA CALGARY.................. 6..........6 ....... Montreal BOXING August 24 Chelyabinsk, Russia S. Kovalev .. -$220 vs. A. Yarde ..........+$180 August 31 London, England V. Lomachenko-$1800 vs. L. Campbell +$900 September 28 Los Angeles, CA E. Spence Jr. ......-$600 vs.. S. Porter +$400 UFC Saturday UFC 241 Anaheim, CA D. Cormier . -$145 vs. S. Miocic ..........+$125 A. Pettis .......-$120 vs. N. Diaz...............even September 7 UFC 242 Abu Dhabi Khabib .......-$360 vs. D. Poirier..........+$300 W- women SOCCER Wednesday UEFA Champions League Super Cup Istanbul, Turkey Liverpool .............................................-$135 Chelsea ............................................... +$360 Draw: +$290 Over/under: 2.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL Frontier League East Lake Erie Schaumburg Joliet Washington Windy City West Florence Rascals Evansville Southern Illinois Grizzlies

W L Pct. GB 40 36 .526 — 39 39 .500 2 33 45 .423 8 33 47 .413 9 32 46 .410 9 W L Pct. GB 48 32 .600 — 46 33 .582 1½ 45 33 .577 2 44 34 .564 3 31 46 .403 15½ Tuesday Grizzlies at Lake Erie, Game 1, 4:05 p.m. Grizzlies at Lake Erie, Game 2, TBD River City at Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Florence at Southern Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Wednesday Grizzlies at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Rascals at Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Florence at Southern Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Joliet, 7:05 p.m.

MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 13 7 6 45 48 38 Atlanta 13 9 3 42 43 30 D.C. United 10 7 9 39 34 32 New York City FC 10 5 8 38 41 31 New York 11 10 4 37 43 38 New England 9 9 7 34 37 44 Montreal 10 13 3 33 36 47 Toronto FC 9 10 6 33 39 41 Orlando City 8 11 6 30 33 34 Chicago 7 10 9 30 38 37 Columbus 7 14 5 26 27 39 Cincinnati 5 17 3 18 25 57 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 17 3 4 55 65 25 Seattle 11 7 6 39 38 34 Minnesota United 11 8 5 38 42 35 San Jose 11 8 5 38 41 36 LA Galaxy 12 11 1 37 31 36 Real Salt Lake 11 9 4 37 35 32 FC Dallas 10 9 6 36 36 31 Portland 10 9 4 34 38 34 Houston 9 13 3 30 35 41 Sporting K.C. 7 10 7 28 37 43 Colorado 7 12 5 26 41 49 Vancouver 5 12 9 24 26 45 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday Sporting K.C. at Orlando City, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. FC Dallas at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. Chicago at Portland, 10 p.m.

TODAY

TONIGHT

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

Humid with clouds and sun WIND NW 7-14 mph

A moonlit sky; humid WIND NNW 4-8 mph

Mostly sunny and pleasant WIND WNW 7-14 mph

Pleasant with some sun WIND NNW 6-12 mph

87°

72°

PGA Tour

LPGA MONEY LEADERS Through Aug. 11 Trn 1.Jin Young Ko 16 2.Jeongeun Lee6 17 3.Sung Hyun Park 14 4.Lexi Thompson 16 5.Minjee Lee 20 6.Brooke M. Henderson 19 7.Sei Young Kim 17 8.Ariya Jutanugarn 20 9.Nelly Korda 15 10.Hyo Joo Kim 14 11.Shanshan Feng 17 12.Carlota Ciganda 18 13.Lizette Salas 18 14.Hannah Green 15 15.Moriya Jutanugarn 20 16.Eun-Hee Ji 17 17.Danielle Kang 16 18.So Yeon Ryu 14 19.Amy Yang 16 20.Celine Boutier 20 21.Inbee Park 13 22.Nasa Hataoka 15 23.Yu Liu 21 24.Angel Yin 16 25.Mi Hyang Lee 20 26.Azahara Munoz 18 27.Bronte Law 18 28.Ally McDonald 18 29.Morgan Pressel 18 30.Mi Jung Hur 14 31.Brittany Altomare 18 32.Jessica Korda 12 33.Mirim Lee 16 34.Megan Khang 17 35.Jasmine Suwannapura 23 36.Jenny Shin 18 37.Jennifer Kupcho 10 38.Gaby Lopez 19 39.Jing Yan 17 40.Su Oh 19 41.Annie Park 19 42.Marina Alex 17 43.Charley Hull 16 44.Caroline Masson 19 45.Ashleigh Buhai 19 46.Anna Nordqvist 18 47.Lydia Ko 16 48.Chella Choi 18 49.In-Kyung Kim 9 50.Stacy Lewis 16

Money $9,605,150 $7,673,176 $6,273,119 $5,497,346 $5,637,315 $5,122,488 $5,513,991 $4,178,184 $4,611,716 $4,638,610 $4,337,278 $3,774,467 $3,749,710 $3,640,282 $2,998,349 $3,900,380 $3,348,084 $3,162,367 $3,657,551 $3,466,233 $3,825,541 $3,230,144 $2,655,034 $2,842,791 $3,447,070 $2,639,215 $2,313,215 $3,158,915 $2,781,948 $2,706,137 $2,621,552 $2,315,652 $2,398,411 $2,771,436 $2,308,749 $2,234,298 $2,383,789 $2,408,612 $2,649,311 $2,615,909 $2,103,950 $2,011,602 $2,146,549 $2,126,133 $1,861,224 $2,008,487 $2,127,825 $2,257,309 $1,731,025 $3,481,734 $2,343,083 $2,043,534 $1,555,403 $1,650,896 $1,628,767 $1,871,102 $1,924,358 $1,872,272 $1,907,233 $2,108,656 $1,698,464 $1,798,088 $1,575,910 $1,676,508 $1,793,027 $1,524,126 $2,622,950 $1,588,881 $2,083,492 $1,390,433 $1,558,014 $1,500,618 $1,468,855 $1,380,869 $1,413,149

Money $2,281,131 $1,844,938 $1,447,823 $1,380,170 $1,183,318 $1,140,197 $997,786 $987,642 $983,017 $950,029 $874,716 $839,895 $835,070 $784,519 $727,915 $716,048 $714,549 $690,266 $686,114 $669,399 $659,342 $620,377 $618,047 $610,957 $572,696 $523,907 $519,735 $511,120 $500,238 $496,487 $481,269 $478,471 $418,235 $411,817 $400,302 $396,375 $380,237 $379,875 $363,914 $356,948 $355,198 $340,591 $338,955 $338,242 $336,453 $333,503 $326,691 $324,781 $320,864 $314,163

BASKETBALL WNBA EASTERN Washington Connecticut Chicago Indiana New York Atlanta WESTERN Las Vegas Los Angeles Seattle Minnesota Phoenix Dallas

W L 17 7 16 8 14 10 9 16 8 15 5 19 W L 16 9 15 8 14 11 12 12 11 12 7 17 Tuesday Minnesota at New York, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Las Vegas, 9 p.m. Wednesday Seattle at Washington, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 7 p.m. Connecticut at Phoenix, 9 p.m.

Pct .708 .667 .583 .360 .348 .208 Pct .640 .652 .560 .500 .478 .292

GB — 1 3 8½ 8½ 12 GB — — 2 3½ 4 8½

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com FRIDAY

GOLF

FEDEX CUP LEADERS Through Aug. 11 Points 1.Brooks Koepka 2,887 2.Rory McIlroy 2,315 3.Matt Kuchar 2,313 4.Xander Schauffele 1,858 5.Gary Woodland 1,795 6.Patrick Cantlay 1,730 7.Dustin Johnson 1,686 8.Paul Casey 1,629 9.Webb Simpson 1,619 10.Jon Rahm 1,447 11.Justin Rose 1,423 12.Marc Leishman 1,415 13.Rickie Fowler 1,391 14.Chez Reavie 1,309 15.Charles Howell III 1,279 16.Tony Finau 1,279 17.Justin Thomas 1,247 18.Bryson DeChambeau1,203 19.Tommy Fleetwood 1,193 20.Shane Lowry 1,137 21.Adam Scott 1,124 22.Kevin Kisner 1,098 23.Sungjae Im 1,097 24.Ryan Palmer 1,088 25.Francesco Molinari 1,054 26.Scott Piercy 1,025 27.J.T. Poston 1,015 28.Tiger Woods 1,003 29.Sung Kang 986 30.Hideki Matsuyama 969 31.Corey Conners 962 32.Lucas Glover 947 33.Phil Mickelson 903 34.Brandt Snedeker 934 35.C.T. Pan 900 36.Rory Sabbatini 895 37.Keith Mitchell 884 38.Andrew Putnam 873 39.Jim Furyk 865 40.Jason Day 865 41.Kevin Tway 863 42.Nate Lashley 836 43.Billy Horschel 835 44.Si Woo Kim 832 45.Jason Kokrak 774 46.Adam Hadwin 818 47.J.B. Holmes 815 48.Kevin Na 815 49.Collin Morikawa 780 50.Patrick Reed 774 51.Louis Oosthuizen 754 52.Max Homa 742 53.Dylan Frittelli 735 54.Graeme McDowell 729 55.Adam Long 719 56.Joel Dahmen 716 57.Byeong Hun An 710 58.Keegan Bradley 700 59.Rafa Cabrera Bello 696 60.Ian Poulter 690 61.Emiliano Grillo 673 62.Ryan Moore 690 63.Vaughn Taylor 641 64.Cameron Champ 639 65.Sergio Garcia 637 66.Danny Lee 625 67.Abraham Ancer 622 68.Kevin Streelman 609 69.Jordan Spieth 605 70.Matthew Wolff 602 71.Bubba Watson 572 72.Troy Merritt 569 73.Charley Hoffman 567 74.Joaquin Niemann 566 75.Matt Every 561

SOCCER

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

GOLF

Canadian Football League TORONTO ARGONAUTS: Traded DE Shawn Lemon to British Columbia for DT Davon Coleman and a conditional 2020 eighth-round draft pick. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES: Signed president and general manager Don Waddell to a contract extension. American Hockey League SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE: Agreed to terms with G Adam Wilcox on a one-year contract. OLYMPIC SPORTS USADA: Announced American karate athlete Joane Orbon accepted a nine-month sanction after testing positive for a prohibited substance from a contaminated supplement. SOCCER U.S. SOCCER: Named Earnie Stewart sporting director and Kate Markgraf general manager of the women’s national team. Major League Soccer LOS ANGELES FC: Acquired D Diego Palacios from Aucas (Primera Categoría Serie A-Ecuador) with targeted allocation money NEW YORK RED BULLS: Named Ryan Brooks senior manager/academy business operations and Sam Gough welfare officer for Red Bulls Academy. REAL SALT LAKE: Terminated the contract of coach Mike Petke. Promoted assistant coach Freddy Juarez to interim head coach for the remainder of the season. SEATTLE SOUNDERS: Transferred M Henry Wingo to Molde (Eliteserien-Norway). USL Championship ORANGE COUNTY: Signed M Francis Jacobs. COLLEGE CONFERENCE CAROLINAS: Officially added Chowan as a full member. BUCKNELL: Named Tammy Cecchini women’s tennis coach. EAST CAROLINA: Named Robbie Fields assistant women’s golf coach. HAMLINE: Named Spencer Jones men’s and women’s tennis coach. SHENANDOAH: Named Jason Cole men’s and women’s tennis coach. WILLIAM PENN: Announced the addition of men’s and women’s shotgun sports, to begin in the 2020-21 academic year. YALE: Named Kiley Anderson volunteer assistant women’s lacrosse coach.

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Optioned RHP Branden Kliine to Norfolk (IL). Recalled RHPs Jimmy Yacabonis and Evan Phillips and LHP Ty Blach from Norfolk. BOSTON RED SOX: Placed INF Michael Chavis on the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Ryan Weber to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled RHP Travis Lakins and INF Marco Hernández from Pawtucket. CHICAGO WHITE SOX: Optioned RHP Jose Ruiz to Charlotte (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS: Sent OF Bradley Zimmer to the AZL Indians Blue for a rehab assignment. DETROIT TIGERS: Placed OF JaCoby Jones on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Friday. Recalled SS Ronny Rodriguez from Toledo (IL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS: Placed RHP Justin Anderson on 10 Day IL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Jose Rodriguez from Salt Lake. NEW YORK YANKEES: Recalled 2B Breyvic Valera from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL) as 26th man. OAKLAND ATHLETICS: Sent C Josh Phegley to Las Vegas (PCL) for a rehab assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS: Sent RHP Dan Altavilla to Everett (NWL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS: RHP David Paulino cleared release waivers. Recalled OF Billy McKinney from Buffalo (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS: Optioned LHP Robby Scott to Reno (PCL). Reinstated RHP Matt Andriese from the 10-day IL. Purchased the contract of outfielder Josh Rojas from Triple-A Reno. CINCINNATI REDS: Released RHP David Hernandez. Signed 1B Samir Duenez and RHP Junichi Tazawa to minor league contracts. Claimed INF Freddy Galvis off waivers from Toronto. MILWAUKEE BREWERS: Sent LHP Brent Suter to San Antonio (PCL) for a rehab assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES: Sent C Francisco Cervelli to Altoona (EL) and RHP Rookie Davis to Indianapolis (IL) for rehab assignments. Recalled RHP Mitch Keller from Indianapolis. Placed RHP Richard Rodriguez on 10-day IL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS: Designated RHP Ryan Dull for assignment. Claimed RHP Burch Smith off waivers from Milwaukee and assigned him to Sacramento (PCL). Signed RHP Carlos Torres to a minor league contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS: Optioned OF Andrew Stevenson to Harrisburg (EL). Reinsted INF Howie Kendrick from the 10-day IL. American Association ST. PAUL SAINTS: Released LHP John Kilichowski. Signed OF Jabari Henry. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS: Signed LHP Matt Burleton and traded him to Joliet for RHP Matt Quintana. GATEWAY GRIZZLIES: Traded INF Luis Roman and RHP Thomas Nicoll to Schaumburg. Signed RHP Nick Stroud and OF Greg White. JOLIET SLAMMERS: Signed OF Jacob Crum, RHP Kit Fowler and SS Milton Ramos. LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS: Released OF Kody Ruedisili. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS: Released RHP Cody Thompson. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS: Claimed LB Jeff Holland off waivers from Denver. ATLANTA FALCONS: Traded TE Eric Saubert to New England for a conditional draft pick. DETROIT LIONS: Released CB Marcus Cooper Sr. Signed CB Jamar Summers. GREEN BAY PACKERS: Signed FB Tommy Bohanon. MIAMI DOLPHINS: Waived/injured DE Jonathan Woodard. Signed LB Terrance Smith. MINNESOTA VIKINGS: Named Andrew Miller chief operating officer, effective Sept. 1. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS: Released DB D’Angelo Ross. Re-signed OL Cole Croston. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS: Signed T Sam Young. Placed T Shon Coleman on IR. TENNESSEE TITANS: Waived/injured LB Jordan Williams. Agreed to terms with LB James Folston.

tion for all of us, trying to figure out the next step,” Schmoll said. “A decent chunk of (the employees) are local. We’re all kind of in limbo waiting to see what happens.”

A swath of heavy rain, with severe thunderstorms to the south, will extend from the lower Ohio and Tennessee valleys to New England today. A few storms will erupt in the steamy air in the Southeast. Another pocket of storms is forecast for the Upper Midwest and central High Plains. Much of the West can expect sunshine and dry conditions.

SATURDAY

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Some sun, a stray Times of sun and clouds t-storm WIND WIND SSW 7-14 mph S 6-12 mph

80

Peoria 84/66

74

55

Macomb 82/62 Bloomington 82/65

Kirksville 87/62

Urbana 84/63

Quincy 84/65

Decatur 85/65

Springfield 57 85/66 Effingham 70 55 85/66

35

Columbia 70 88/66 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 87/72 City 87/63 89/66 Union 55 87/67 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 87/67 89/67 Farmington 87/66 Cape Girardeau 91/69 Springfield 88/68 Poplar Bluff West Plains 93/71 55 89/68

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

20.62 17.94 20.19 16.49 23.29

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

-0.29 -0.17 -0.13 -0.13 -0.15

16 11.38 -0.22 15 11.97 none 25 18.68 -0.46 26 19.14 +0.10 18 16.08 +0.19 419 418.69 +0.20 21 13.10 +0.20 30 18.61 -0.45 27 22.16 -0.81 32 27.15 -0.64 20 18 14

11.90 +0.26 12.20 +0.12 9.80 -0.11

15 16 24 15 40

2.42 none -1.43 -0.30 15.79 -0.75 1.77

26.10 -0.08 357.84 359.97 497.44 659.62 717.28 681.41 917.12 844.81 602.58 407.12 605.20 446.38

Forecast Temperature

100

90

87

87

89

91

Average High

+0.04 -0.11 -0.24 +0.55 +0.08 -0.33 +0.08 -0.33 -0.23 -0.03 -0.12 -0.24

Average Low

95 87

87

92

88 83

87

86

88

80

71

70

71

72

T

W

T

F

75

76

75

72

67

67

69

W

T

72

71

71

S

S

M

60

S

S

M

T

F

Statistics through 5 p.m. Monday Temperature High/low 95°/76° Normal high/low 89°/70° Last year high/low 90°/70° Record high 106° (1881) Record low 51° (1967) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Mon. 2.68” Month to date (normal) 2.98” (1.24”) Year to date (normal) 39.71” (26.00”) Record for this date 2.10” (1916)

Toronto 80/60

Detroit 83/63

New York 78/69

Chicago 81/65

Denver 88/59

San Francisco 79/59

Washington 89/75

Kansas City 89/66

Los Angeles 87/64

Atlanta 96/78 El Paso 101/77 Chihuahua 97/69

Cold front

Warm front

Houston 101/80

Miami 90/78

Monterrey 103/73

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Absent Low - 7 Absent High - 13562 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Monday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

21 176 176 1216 1145

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

83° 8 a.m.

88° noon

92° 4 p.m.

83° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

-0.02

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Montreal 79/56 Minneapolis 78/62

Billings 81/57

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Though a weak front is off to the south today, some humid conditions will remain with a mixture of clouds and sunshine. It will become less humid for tomorrow.

Joplin 87/67

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

88° 67° 83° 69° 86° 75° 92° 72°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 89/66

Winnipeg 74/51

Seattle 82/61

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

City

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

76/60/sh 92/67/s 71/61/c 96/78/pc 103/75/s 85/71/t 98/76/pc 91/62/s 81/66/r 96/77/pc 90/70/t 95/76/pc 81/65/c 88/70/t 80/65/r 101/76/s 90/76/t 88/59/s 85/63/pc 91/80/pc 83/63/c 80/63/r 90/75/pc 101/80/s 84/67/t 89/66/pc 106/83/s 97/75/pc

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

87/64/pc 94/73/t 96/75/pc 90/78/t 77/66/c 78/62/c 99/79/pc 97/74/t 94/81/pc 78/69/r 87/68/t 86/64/pc 90/76/t 83/71/r 109/86/s 78/64/r 76/59/sh 87/61/s 98/62/s 90/68/s 103/78/s 78/66/pc 79/59/pc 82/61/s 89/79/t 103/76/s 89/75/t 90/69/pc

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

6:13 a.m. 7:12 p.m.

7:59 p.m. 4:16 a.m.

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Aug 15

Aug 23

Aug 30

Sep 5

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

90/64/s 90/70/pc 91/73/pc 91/77/t 73/63/c 72/59/c 95/74/t 91/69/pc 90/80/t 80/68/pc 90/69/s 80/61/pc 90/75/t 84/69/pc 112/87/s 82/63/pc 77/56/pc 84/60/pc 103/64/s 94/70/s 101/78/pc 82/66/pc 84/59/pc 81/60/pc 89/80/pc 104/77/s 86/73/pc 89/68/s

National Extremes Monday in the 48 contiguous states High: 113 Death Valley, Calif. Low: 29 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

80/56/pc 91/64/pc 71/61/sh 93/74/t 100/74/t 85/69/pc 92/71/t 94/62/s 76/63/pc 93/75/t 85/65/pc 94/72/t 79/63/c 85/66/pc 82/63/pc 94/76/t 90/76/t 88/61/s 78/59/pc 89/77/t 80/64/c 84/59/pc 89/78/pc 98/80/t 84/64/pc 85/64/s 108/84/s 92/72/s

City

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

64/53/t 92/75/s 119/87/s 90/79/t 89/70/c 72/53/t 50/33/c 98/76/s 90/78/pc 64/55/pc 91/84/t 89/68/s 75/47/s 70/55/pc 87/61/pc 103/82/pc

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

74/57/t 79/56/pc 74/61/r 90/80/pc 77/51/pc 93/80/t 70/54/pc 86/67/pc 90/68/pc 89/79/pc 80/46/c 94/77/pc 65/43/s 90/81/sh 80/60/pc 73/59/pc

67/59/r 94/73/s 119/88/s 89/79/t 89/69/pc 70/54/pc 53/41/s 100/82/s 89/79/s 66/54/c 91/82/t 88/67/s 75/47/s 66/57/r 92/65/s 106/81/pc

75/56/t 73/57/pc 74/62/pc 90/80/pc 75/51/c 90/80/pc 72/60/c 70/63/r 87/65/s 90/80/s 78/41/pc 95/77/pc 66/43/s 90/81/sh 75/59/pc 72/59/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

TuesdaY • 08.13.2019 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

SUDOKU


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAMES

CROSSWORD

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR TUESDAY, AUG. 13, 2019: This year, you often swing from overly serious and efficient to far-reaching attitudes and a dynamic perspective. You might drive yourself a little crazy, but it will be worse for your immediate circle, as they never know who they are going to run into. If single, you might emphasize friendship more than romance when you start dating someone. You do not need to be defensive. You will have many different people to choose from. If attached, you often become exhausted from juggling different -- if not opposing -- interests. Listen to your sweetie and what he or she wants. Mix in his or her needs more often. AQUARIUS likes you a lot. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) HHHH The you of this morning might barely recognize the you of the afternoon. You might have been dragging and feeling weighed down. Success greets you through friends and a potential meeting. Tonight: Where the action is. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) HHHH You have manifested good sense and wisdom this past week, especially around work. Others look at you as a potential leader or organizer at work, as you have been revealing more of your talents. Tonight: Working till the wee hours. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) HHHHH Reach out for a partner in the morning. You will not necessarily agree with everything you hear, but you do know how to work this person. By afternoon, you might be eyeing an adventure or an investment in a new field. Tonight: Opt for the unusual. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) HHHH You could be extremely emotional and determined to have your way. You can be stubborn, but generally you flow. Ask yourself why you are so tenacious at the present moment. Your behavior might be significant. Tonight: Say yes to someone’s request. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) HHH You might be ready to tackle your work or a project head-on. Somehow, distraction hits in the afternoon. You might be moving from hard work to “networking.” No sign

socializes as well as yours. Go for it! Tonight: Having fun. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) HHHH Allow your creativity to flourish and handle a problem head on. You enjoy the unexpected quality of the day, as long as you are not invested in the outcome. News might need some checking before you embrace it as true. Tonight: Off to the gym. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) HHHH You might be focused on a domestic matter in the morning, but a child, loved one or wildly creative associate absorbs your time in the afternoon. You feel indulged and far more giving as a result. Tonight: Continue being playful. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) HHHH You are heading in the right direction for you in the morning. Others seem highly responsive to your inquiries, questions and even a visit. Do not give a misunderstanding any energy. Tonight: Head home early. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) HHHH You could be driven by a financial concern, which you will handle. You end up calling several different friends for feedback and opinions. An associate acts in a most unexpected manner. Tonight: Hang with friends. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) HHHHH You feel in sync with your world in the a.m., but easily could be distracted by a financial offer later. You note an underlying confusion around this matter. Doublecheck all figures. Someone could have made a mistake. Tonight: Do some shopping on the way home. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) HHHH Be aware of what is happening behind the scenes. You might need to make a decision that could involve your understanding of underground currents. Verify information. Tonight: Just be you. Note all the energy around you. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) HHHH Focus on what needs to happen as opposed to accepting the status quo. Important information comes out in the morning. You need to think through some of what you are hearing. You might not be getting the whole story. Tonight: Get a good night’s sleep. BORN TODAY Director Alfred Hitchcock (1899), Cuban political leader Fidel Castro (1926), sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860)

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

.com „ Find more free

games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday. com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

ORHAD RNOST TINKET QEULSE ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) Yesterday’s

Jumbles: WOULD BLUNT APIECE MOTIVE Answer: The squirrel was stressed because he spent so much time — OUT ON A LIMB


08.13.2019 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

DEAR ABBY

Man is inappropriate when drinking Dear Abby • Sometimes when my husband has been drinking, he does things I consider inappropriate with his cousin and childhood friend “Jasper.” The most recent incident involved my husband pulling down his pants and showing Jasper his private parts. Later that night he tried to grab Jasper’s crotch. To me, Jasper seems slightly uncomfortable, but he just laughs it off. When I confronted my husband about it, he said I was overreacting and he was “just messing around.” I don’t think he’s gay. Am I overreacting, and what should I do? — Confounded in the Midwest Dear Confounded • Your husband’s immature behavior “sometimes when he has been drinking” is EXTREMELY inappropriate. How many times has this occurred? Listen to your gut and get to the bottom of this because it appears you are married to a problem drinker who may need help. Dear Abby • A few years ago, my mom and I started a book club. For the most part, it’s been a lot of fun. But one member,

“Maeve,” has to be the smartest person in the room no matter the topic. She often belittles other members she considers less educated than she is. She also frequently doesn’t read or finish the book. She uses the excuse of, “Oh, I read that years ago, and I didn’t have time to review it again.” Maeve is retired, and I don’t mean to judge what she does with her time but, if all of us who are working can find time, surely she can too. Abby, would it be terrible to ask her to leave the book club? — Book Addict in the South Dear Book Addict • Talk privately with Maeve. Tell her how her actions have made the rest of the members uncomfortable and give her some examples. Then tell her that if she can’t keep up with the reading and contribute in a positive manner, she should withdraw. Dear Abby • I am a happily married woman. After 45 years of working full time and raising three great children, I decided to retire. I loved working and raising my children, and I am now thor-

oughly enjoying my retirement. I do not yet have grandchildren, and my days are quiet and simple, which is fine with me. My husband and I enjoy little things — the crossword puzzle, discussing the news, going to a play or concert and enjoying the company of our children and extended family when we get together. The problem? My working siblings and their spouses constantly ask, “So, what are you doing with your time?” If I say, “Enjoying each day as it comes,” they scoff and say, “So, you’re just doing NOTHING?! What can I say to these folks who think I’m “doing nothing”? — Lost for Words in New Jersey Dear Lost for Words • You can feel sad and judged only if you allow it. All you have to say to these people is, “I’m finding plenty of things to devote time to and I’m wallowing in it!” Then smile. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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Nosy questions just keep on coming Dear Miss Manners • My husband is a paraplegic and uses a wheelchair. When we became engaged, friends, family, colleagues and even acquaintances thought absolutely nothing of asking me whether he was sexually capable and able to father children. Not wanting any bit of that conversation, I would normally reply with “How would I possibly know?” and then change the subject immediately. I thought that these sort of inquiries would end when we were married and I became pregnant, but now the same people are asking me how my child was conceived. My husband is good mannered and laughs off these sort of offensive questions, but I’m afraid that I’m much more irritated. I need a proper line of

defense from Miss Manners before I really blow my top. Gentle Reader • No, no, Miss Manners would have you take an opposite tone — that of a patient parent having a difficult conversation with a curious young child: “Well, it’s like this: When two people love each other and want to be close ...” Then you can trail off with, “Wait — I don’t know you well enough to be having this conversation. Surely there must be someone in your family who will explain to you how babies are made.” Dear Miss Manners • I work in a physician’s office. The physician was ill several years ago and the patients could not help but notice. The physician does not discuss this illness with people. When patients ask me di-

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rectly, “How is Dr. So-and-So? Did he have illness XYZ?” I am at a loss as how to respond. I usually say, “Oh, he’s fine,” or “I’m not sure about XYZ,” and try to divert the conversation. I feel uncomfortable lying, as I do know the answers to these questions. If I say something like, “You will have to ask Dr. So-and-So,” or “I’m not at liberty to discuss this with you,” it may come across as rude . Do you have any suggestions? Gentle Reader • “You’ll be happy to hear that all medical information in this office is kept confidential. I’ll tell him you were kind enough to be concerned, but you needn’t worry.” Send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 08.13.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

DR. KEITH ROACH

CPAP can help with sleep apnea

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach •

How are sleep apnea, sighing and heart failure related? Recently, I was told that I have severe sleep apnea and that I must use a CPAP machine. I have noticed that during the day I frequently take a spontaneous deep breath. Is that sleep apnea while awake? I have coronary heart disease and have three stents. Will the CPAP machine help me in any way? — A.P. Answer • It’s complicated. By far, the most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. This happens in people who are overweight, or in people whose neck anatomy predisposes them to the condition. During sleep, the upper airway collapses, preventing proper inspiration. This can be noticed by a sleep partner as choking, gasping or just not breathing for a prolonged time. The person eventually will wake up enough, due to lack of oxygen, to be able to take in a good breath, but will then fall back asleep. The process may happen hundreds of times a night, with the person often unaware. Sleepiness during the day (from never sleeping properly at night) and snoring are the most common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea. CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure), which uses high pressure to keep the airway open, is the most common initial treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. In severe sleep apnea, the oxygen level in the blood can be so low for so long that the heart and lungs can be damaged, eventually leading to a type of heart failure of the right side of the heart. However, the situation is even more complex. People who have other kinds of heart failure, such as from repeated heart attacks, can develop the less common form of sleep apnea, central sleep apnea. Although this also may be treated by CPAP, it is critical to treat the underlying heart failure as well. Your doctor can tell you whether you have central or obstructive sleep apnea. Spontaneous deep breaths, sighs, are a part of normal human physiology. Sighs have several purposes, but the most important is to help keep the lungs properly expanded. Sighs might be more common in people with heart failure, but I do not know of any correlation with sleep apnea.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

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