Page 1

STORM STOPS SECOND ROUND SPORTS • D1

ROBERT COHEN • P-D

SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • $4.00 • EARLY EDITION

DISREPAIR AND DESPAIR Creeping mold, broken AC among unresolved issues at Bel-Ridge complex Problem properties T.E.H. Realty was warned about citations, building official says Trapped by poverty Many residents lack money to move despite health, safety concerns BY JESSE BOGAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BEL-RIDGE • Of all the growth

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Bel-Ridge Building Commissioner Raymond Winston looks up building code ordinances Thursday on his iPad at the Springwood Apartments in Bel-Ridge. He told the resident that he was revoking the occupancy permit because of the code violations he witnessed. He found black mold and a leaking water heater with exposed wires in the apartment.

The Bel-Ridge building commissioner puts a nooccupancy sticker on an Springwood apartment Thursday and tells the residents that they have one day to get out.

Black mold grows inside a Springwood apartment Wednesday in Bel-Ridge. When the building commissioner saw it, he immediately revoked the occupancy permit.

at Springwood Apartments, a 271-unit spread nestled in the woods here near Natural Bridge Avenue and Interstate 170, none of it appears to be economic. Trees sprout from gutters. Mold creeps in walls. And after a good rain, in at least one of the 17 two-story buildings that make up the complex, a large basement floods. The water lingers so long sometimes that an ecosystem flourishes. “It becomes like a swamp,” said Clarence Crumer, 32, who lives above it. “I guess, when it gets hot, the insects need to find their way up, into the apartments.” There are so many things to fix at Springwood, which was recently cited for at least 167 building code violations, he nearly forgot to mention temperature control. His air conditioner clanked like an old engine that wouldn’t start. He said it’s been broken all summer. But Crumer, who has lived at the complex four years and helped raise his daughter there in a one-bedroom apartment for $460 a month, was light-spirited about fighting mold and ignoring the eyesore across the courtyard: See APARTMENTS • Page A4

E L E C T I O N 2 0 1 8 • U . S . S E N ATO R

Democrat McCaskill typifies ‘raging centrist’

Republican Hawley fights for religious freedom

MUTING R. KELLY Our music critic is finished with the Pied Piper of R&B SPORTS • B1

Incumbent embraces label, place in middle: ‘I am not reliable for the party structure.’

BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • Claire Mc-

JEFFERSON CITY • One week

Caskill has been called many things, but she likes one label best: raging centrist. Emphasis on both words. “I think I can rage sometimes,” McCaskill said. “I know it makes me unlikable. I am intense, I am passionate, I feel strongly about stuff. It is one of the reasons I have been able to get things done, because I don’t give up.” The two-term Democratic senator added: “The people that are making all the noise right now are on the far left and on the far right. What I see clearly is that where we get things done is in the middle, when we work together, when people compromise. And we don’t have, frankly, leadership right now that wants

before Missouri voters chose nominees who will compete for the U.S. Senate seat held by Democrat Claire McCaskill, state Attorney General Josh Hawley announced he had joined 28 other states fighting to protect a historic cross honoring World War I veterans. His decision to add Missouri to an effort to preserve a memorial more than 800 miles away in Maryland was not a surprise. From his early days as a law clerk to his life in private practice, the Republican has focused on legal cases where religion and the law intersect, most often in an effort to defend religious liberty. Now, Hawley, 38, is in a race

See MCCASKILL • Page A8

See HAWLEY • Page A9

Tight market stalls aspiring craft brewers

• C1

Rick Hummel picks St. Louis’ all-star team

• D2

Stenger has fewer allies, but still a path forward •

A2

Watch the birdies

TODAY

90°/71°

Attorney general focuses on cases where religion and law cross, often to defend religious liberty.

SUNNY

TOMORROW

91°/72° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER D10 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

1 M Vol. 140, No. 224 ©2018


WOODS AMONG PACK OF STARS WITHIN FOUR STROKES OF KOEPKA PGA CHAMPIONSHIP • SPORTS, D1 LAURIE SKRIVAN • P-D

SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • $4.00 • FINAL EDITION

DISREPAIR AND DESPAIR Creeping mold, broken AC among unresolved issues at Bel-Ridge complex Problem properties T.E.H. Realty was warned about citations, building official says Trapped by poverty Many residents lack money to move despite health, safety concerns BY JESSE BOGAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BEL-RIDGE • Of all the growth

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Bel-Ridge Building Commissioner Raymond Winston looks up building code ordinances Thursday on his iPad at the Springwood Apartments in Bel-Ridge. He told the resident that he was revoking the occupancy permit because of the code violations he witnessed. He found black mold and a leaking water heater with exposed wires in the apartment.

The Bel-Ridge building commissioner puts a nooccupancy sticker on an Springwood apartment Thursday and tells the residents that they have one day to get out.

Black mold grows inside a Springwood apartment Wednesday in Bel-Ridge. When the building commissioner saw it, he immediately revoked the occupancy permit.

at Springwood Apartments, a 271-unit spread nestled in the woods here near Natural Bridge Avenue and Interstate 170, none of it appears to be economic. Trees sprout from gutters. Mold creeps in walls. And after a good rain, in at least one of the 17 two-story buildings that make up the complex, a large basement floods. The water lingers so long sometimes that an ecosystem flourishes. “It becomes like a swamp,” said Clarence Crumer, 32, who lives above it. “I guess, when it gets hot, the insects need to find their way up, into the apartments.” There are so many things to fix at Springwood, which was recently cited for at least 167 building code violations, he nearly forgot to mention temperature control. His air conditioner clanked like an old engine that wouldn’t start. He said it’s been broken all summer. But Crumer, who has lived at the complex four years and helped raise his daughter there in a one-bedroom apartment for $460 a month, was light-spirited about fighting mold and ignoring the eyesore across the courtyard: See APARTMENTS • Page A4

E L E C T I O N 2 0 1 8 • U . S . S E N ATO R

Democrat McCaskill typifies ‘raging centrist’

Republican Hawley fights for religious freedom

MUTING R. KELLY Our music critic is finished with the Pied Piper of R&B STL LIFE • B1

Incumbent embraces label, place in middle: ‘I am not reliable for the party structure.’

BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • Claire Mc-

JEFFERSON CITY • One week

Caskill has been called many things, but there’s a label she likes: raging centrist. Emphasis on both words. “I think I can rage sometimes,” McCaskill said. “I know it makes me unlikable. I am intense, I am passionate, I feel strongly about stuff. It is one of the reasons I have been able to get things done, because I don’t give up.” The two-term Democratic senator added: “The people that are making all the noise right now are on the far left and on the far right. What I see clearly is that where we get things done is in the middle, when we work together, when people compromise. And we don’t have, frankly, leadership right now that wants

before Missouri voters chose nominees who will compete for the U.S. Senate seat held by Democrat Claire McCaskill, state Attorney General Josh Hawley announced he had joined 28 other states fighting to protect a historic cross honoring World War I veterans. His decision to add Missouri to an effort to preserve a memorial more than 800 miles away in Maryland was not a surprise. From his early days as a law clerk to his life in private practice, the Republican has focused on legal cases where religion and the law intersect, most often in an effort to defend religious liberty. Now, Hawley, 38, is in a race

See MCCASKILL • Page A8

See HAWLEY • Page A9

Tight market stalls aspiring craft brewers

• C1

Cards secure another series win, beating Royals 8-3 • D1 Stenger has fewer allies, but still a path forward •

A2

Watch the birdies

TODAY

90°/71°

Attorney general focuses on cases where religion and law cross, often to defend religious liberty.

SUNNY

TOMORROW

91°/72° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER D10 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2 M Vol. 140, No. 224 ©2018


M 1 SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM PAGE-BY-PAGE

SALARIES

GOLF ACTION

Use our digital archives to flip page-by-page through history. Search for names to see what comes up. See what the front page looked like on your birthday. stltoday.com/archives

See what your town is spending on salaries, or research how much your district’s teachers and administrators are paid, by using our database. stltoday.com/pay

Can’t make it to Bellerive? Catch scenes from the greens — and the crowd — with our photo galleries and a live feed of tweets. stltoday.com/golf

Fewer allies for Stenger, but he still has a path forward TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Two years ago, Sam Page asked me for a favor. We had been talking for a couple of weeks about his work behind the scenes to help St. Louis County create a prescription drug monitoring program to fight the opioid epidemic. As a physician and state lawmaker, Page had worked extensively on the issue, but he was stymied by another physician-lawmaker, Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, who consistently protected Missouri’s status as the only state in the nation without such a program. So Page, the chairman of the St. Louis County Council, with the help of the medical community and full support of his then-ally, St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, helped set St. Louis County up to operate its own program, which has turned into a de facto state monitoring program, with more than half of the state’s population now covered by it. I planned to break the news ahead of Stenger’s planned announcement, and Page asked me not to. The county executive wanted the headline, Page said, and he wanted him to have it. So I waited. Stenger got his headline. And it probably contributed to his win Tuesday, narrowly holding on to his seat by defeating challenger Mark Mantovani by around 1,000 votes. The election hasn’t been certified yet as there are still ballots being tallied. Stenger will face Republican Paul Berry, III, and Libertarian Nick Kasoff in November, but neither are expected to be well-funded candidates. So unless Mantovani or the election board find any voting oddities, Stenger wins. By winning, though, the county executive may have actually lost. And the opioid issue is a perfect example of why. A politician who doesn’t care about credit builds coalitions. Stenger picks fights. He and Page would soon be at odds

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • P-D

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, shown last month, won re-election Tuesday, but two of his most ardent supporters did not.

over everything, mostly because the County Council chairman started to discover that Stenger was deceiving the council — on a plan to bump up Prosecutor Robert McCulloch’s pension, on a proposal to sell part of Creve Coeur Lake Memorial Park, on a bridge to nowhere, and on a scheme to move millions of dollars in county office leases to property owned by the county executive’s top donor. Page asked questions and got shut out. The pattern played out in county offices, too, as department head after department head quit or was forced out after they asked questions or stood up for good public policy. In winning, Stenger said voters sent a message: “Today’s victory shows that voters believe we are moving St. Louis County in the right direction,” he said Tuesday night. Seen another way, voters left Stenger all alone on an island. Challenger Lisa Clancy defeated Councilman Pat Dolan, Stenger’s last reliable ally on a council that now questions his every move. Voters approved at least one proposition meant to shift some balance of power away from Stenger and to the council, as a check to his power. And voters overwhelmingly defeated McCulloch, perhaps Stenger’s most important supporter, who had used his office to go after Councilman Ernie Trakas when he questioned the county executive, and had refused to investi-

gate Stenger when council investigations raised serious questions about the improper influence of donors or Sunshine Law violations. Wesley Bell, who will become the new prosecuting attorney, might be more receptive to investigating the office of the county executive. So Stenger’s next four years, if he lasts that long, might be more uncomfortable than the first. It didn’t have to be this way. And it still doesn’t. If Stenger wants to leverage his narrow victory into a real opportunity for success, a path forward exists. He could call Attorney General Josh Hawley tomorrow and commit to no more Sunshine Law violations and find a way to make that lawsuit go away. He could accept the council’s decision to force new appointments to the Port Authority and stop trying to use that body as his personal piggy bank to help select donors. He could commit to working on consensus with the council when it comes to developing policy priorities and awarding contracts and making appointments to boards. He could follow Mantovani’s lead and commit to not accepting donations from companies seeking contracts with the county. And he could actually start showing up at council meetings and rebuilding relationships with the body that voters expect him to work with to manage taxpayer dollars wisely. This path forward is not unknown to Stenger. It’s the same one he suggested for the nephew of a major donor in the fall of 2015 when he wrote a letter to a federal judge and asked for leniency in sentencing for a convicted drug dealer: “(He) understands and accepts full responsibility for his actions,” Stenger wrote at the time, “but also is aware that he must disassociate himself from those who would participate in illegal activity. He has made every effort to move forward in a positive way.” Strong words. Stenger could take them to heart. Or not. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE Kanye stays mum on Trump Kanye West made his first television appearance in more than three months on Thursday night’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” speaking about love and fear and the future, his new album, the importance of de-stigmatizing mental illness, even his porn preferences. But the polarizing rapper and mogul was curiously quiet where it mattered most: His thoughts on President Donald Trump. “You’ve so famously and so powerfully said, ‘George Bush doesn’t care about black people,’ it makes me wonder what makes you think that Donald Trump does, or any people at all?” Kimmel said. A stony West pondered Kimmel’s question, staring into the middle distance for an excruciating — and silent — three seconds. Kimmel quickly jumped in, sending the show to commercial break. Rapper trying to get plea deal in gun case • Rapper Juelz Santana’s scheduled trial on charges he tried to get a gun onto a plane at an airport has been pushed back so he can continue negotiations for a plea deal. A trial had been scheduled for early September. But an order filed this month extended the trial date at least until Sept. 30. Santana was arrested in March. Authorities said Newark Liberty International Airport security found a loaded .38-caliber handgun and unprescribed oxycodone pills in a carry-on bag containing his identification.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actor George Hamilton is 79. Rapper Sir Mix-A-Lot is 55. Actress Imani Hakim is 25. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Omarosa Manigault Newman, former assistant to Trump and White House communications director; Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Rudy Giuliani, President Donald Trump’s lawyer; former Gov. Terry McAuliffe, D-Va.. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Jack Reed, D-R.I. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Charlottesville, Va., Mayor Nikuyah Walker; Sens. Tim Kaine, D-Va., and Tim Scott, R-S.C. THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Giuliani; Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president; Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md.; Michael Avenatti, attorney for Stormy Daniels. Associated Press

LAW & ORDER CLAYTON > Driver gets 6-year sentence in fatal crash • A Chesterfield man who admitted driving drunk in a deadly crash in February has been sentenced to six years in prison. Adrian Rico-Esquivel, 22, of Chesterfield pleaded guilty to the DWI-death of another and was sentenced to prison for six years in the crash, which fatally injured Brian Smith, 44, of Chesterfield. Rico-Esquivel was driving 77 mph in a 40-mph zone with his headlights off when he struck an SUV at Chesterfield Parkway and Burkhardt Place about 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 12, authorities said. Smith suffered a severe head injury and died on Feb. 27. Authorities said blood tests revealed Rico-Esquivel had a blood-alcohol content of 0.163 percent, more than twice the legal limit to drive in Missouri. He pleaded guilty July 26 and was sentenced to prison by St. Louis County Circuit Judge John D. Warner Jr. He lived in the 600 block of Bigelow Drive in Chesterfield. JEFFERSON COUNTY > Driver admits being on heroin at time of crash that killed 2 • A Lemay-area man admitted in court this week that he was high on heroin when he was involved in January 2016 in a crash that killed two men. He faces up to 20 years in prison. Sokol N. Zuko, 30, of the 1900 block of Basil Drive, pleaded guilty Monday in

Jefferson County Circuit Court to involuntary manslaughter and two counts of drug possession. Authorities said Zuko was driving a 2001 Honda Accord east on Missouri Highway 30 about 3:35 p.m. on Jan. 15, 2016, when he ran a red light at High Ridge Boulevard and turned left into the path of a 2009 Chevrolet Colorado driven by Daniel A. Smentkowski, 84, of House Springs. Zuko’s passenger, Frederick C. Kelly, 37, of St. Louis, was pronounced dead at a hospital about an hour later. Smentkowski died the next day. Zuko was driving on a suspended license at the time and admitted he had used heroin and Xanax a few hours before the crash, authorities said. State troopers found several pills in Zuko’s pocket that tests revealed were heroin and Xanax. Zuko’s criminal history includes at least four convictions in St. Louis for heroin possession dating to 2010, court records say. Assistant prosecutor Thomas Hollingsworth plans to recommend that Zuko be sentenced to 20 years in prison and that one count of manslaughter be dropped, court records say. Zuko will be sentenced Oct. 12 by Jefferson County Circuit Judge Mark Stoll. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Woman accused of allowing others to use, sell drugs at her home • A woman faces charges after a

SWAT raid on her home Tuesday resulted in the seizure of illegal drugs and the arrest of seven people, according to St. Charles County police. Jessica Lynn Burge, 41, of the 1700 block of Wakefield Drive in an unincorporated area of St. Charles County admitted to allowing her daughter and several guests to use and distribute illegal drugs at her home, according to court documents. A SWAT raid allegedly found drug paraphernalia, marijuana, methamphetamine, and capsules containing white residue consistent with heroin and or fentanyl. The search took place after an informer told detectives earlier that day that about $1,100 had been distributed inside the home, Detective Brianna Selsvold wrote in the court records. Selsvold saw a woman leave the home and had police pull her over in her car. That woman was allegedly found to have about $1,443 in cash in her possession as well as a glass pipe with white residue. One of the adults arrested Tuesday was taken to a hospital because she swallowed a large quantity of methamphetamine to hide it from officers, Selsvold wrote. Burge faces a felony nuisance charge and misdemeanor charge of possession of paraphernalia in connection with the raid, according to the St. Charles County prosecuting attorney’s office. She was being held Friday at the St. Charles County jail.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 01-03-12-22-42 Mega ball: 06 Megaplier: 5 Estimated jackpot: $63 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $247 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.5 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 01-03-04-14-17 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $86,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 068 Evening: 331 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 4371 Evening: 6224

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 04-06-15-27-28 Evening: 11-12-17-22-25 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $10.5 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 101 FB: 2 Evening: 912 FB: 0 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 1712 FB: 2 Evening: 3810 FB: 4

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous >>> stltoday.com/newstips

CONTACT US

INSIDE Arts ...................... B6 Bill McClellan ........ B1 Books .................... B9 Business ................. C1 Editorial .............. A20 Horoscopes ......... EV4

Obituaries ........... A26 Puzzles ............. EV3-4 Sports calendar .... D2 Stocks ................... C5 Travel .................. B10 Weather .............. D10

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $10.25, Sunday-Friday $9.75, Monday-Friday $7.75, Thursday-Sunday $8.50, Sat-Mon $7.50, Fri-Sun $7.50, Sun-Mon $7.00, Sat-Sun Only $7.00, Sunday Only $4.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 01/14/18, 02/18/18, 03/18/18, 3/25/18, 04/15/18, 04/22/18, 05/20/18, 05/27/18, 06/17/18, 06/24/18, 07/15/18, 07/22/18, 08/19/18, 08/26/18, 09/09/18, 09/23/18, 10/14/18, 11/22/18, 12/09/18, 12/23/18 and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201

314-340-8664

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284

STLtoday.mycapture.com

Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


M 2 SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM PAGE-BY-PAGE

SALARIES

GOLF ACTION

Use our digital archives to flip page-by-page through history. Search for names to see what comes up. See what the front page looked like on your birthday. stltoday.com/archives

See what your town is spending on salaries, or research how much your district’s teachers and administrators are paid, by using our database. stltoday.com/pay

Can’t make it to Bellerive? Catch scenes from the greens — and the crowd — with our photo galleries and a live feed of tweets. stltoday.com/golf

Fewer allies for Stenger, but he still has a path forward TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Two years ago, Sam Page asked me for a favor. We had been talking for a couple of weeks about his work behind the scenes to help St. Louis County create a prescription drug monitoring program to fight the opioid epidemic. As a physician and state lawmaker, Page had worked extensively on the issue, but he was stymied by another physician-lawmaker, Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, who consistently protected Missouri’s status as the only state in the nation without such a program. So Page, the chairman of the St. Louis County Council, with the help of the medical community and full support of his then-ally, St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, helped set St. Louis County up to operate its own program, which has turned into a de facto state monitoring program, with more than half of the state’s population now covered by it. I planned to break the news ahead of Stenger’s planned announcement, and Page asked me not to. The county executive wanted the headline, Page said, and he wanted him to have it. So I waited. Stenger got his headline. And it probably contributed to his win Tuesday, narrowly holding on to his seat by defeating challenger Mark Mantovani by around 1,000 votes. The election hasn’t been certified yet as there are still ballots being tallied. Stenger will face Republican Paul Berry, III, and Libertarian Nick Kasoff in November, but neither are expected to be well-funded candidates. So unless Mantovani or the election board find any voting oddities, Stenger wins. By winning, though, the county executive may have actually lost. And the opioid issue is a perfect example of why. A politician who doesn’t care about credit builds coalitions. Stenger picks fights. He and Page would soon be at odds

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • P-D

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, shown last month, won re-election Tuesday, but two of his most ardent supporters did not.

over everything, mostly because the County Council chairman started to discover that Stenger was deceiving the council — on a plan to bump up Prosecutor Robert McCulloch’s pension, on a proposal to sell part of Creve Coeur Lake Memorial Park, on a bridge to nowhere, and on a scheme to move millions of dollars in county office leases to property owned by the county executive’s top donor. Page asked questions and got shut out. The pattern played out in county offices, too, as department head after department head quit or was forced out after they asked questions or stood up for good public policy. In winning, Stenger said voters sent a message: “Today’s victory shows that voters believe we are moving St. Louis County in the right direction,” he said Tuesday night. Seen another way, voters left Stenger all alone on an island. Challenger Lisa Clancy defeated Councilman Pat Dolan, Stenger’s last reliable ally on a council that now questions his every move. Voters approved at least one proposition meant to shift some balance of power away from Stenger and to the council, as a check to his power. And voters overwhelmingly defeated McCulloch, perhaps Stenger’s most important supporter, who had used his office to go after Councilman Ernie Trakas when he questioned the county executive, and had refused to investi-

gate Stenger when council investigations raised serious questions about the improper influence of donors or Sunshine Law violations. Wesley Bell, who will become the new prosecuting attorney, might be more receptive to investigating the office of the county executive. So Stenger’s next four years, if he lasts that long, might be more uncomfortable than the first. It didn’t have to be this way. And it still doesn’t. If Stenger wants to leverage his narrow victory into a real opportunity for success, a path forward exists. He could call Attorney General Josh Hawley tomorrow and commit to no more Sunshine Law violations and find a way to make that lawsuit go away. He could accept the council’s decision to force new appointments to the Port Authority and stop trying to use that body as his personal piggy bank to help select donors. He could commit to working on consensus with the council when it comes to developing policy priorities and awarding contracts and making appointments to boards. He could follow Mantovani’s lead and commit to not accepting donations from companies seeking contracts with the county. And he could actually start showing up at council meetings and rebuilding relationships with the body that voters expect him to work with to manage taxpayer dollars wisely. This path forward is not unknown to Stenger. It’s the same one he suggested for the nephew of a major donor in the fall of 2015 when he wrote a letter to a federal judge and asked for leniency in sentencing for a convicted drug dealer: “(He) understands and accepts full responsibility for his actions,” Stenger wrote at the time, “but also is aware that he must disassociate himself from those who would participate in illegal activity. He has made every effort to move forward in a positive way.” Strong words. Stenger could take them to heart. Or not. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE Kanye stays mum on Trump Kanye West made his first television appearance in more than three months on Thursday night’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” speaking about love and fear and the future, his new album, the importance of de-stigmatizing mental illness, even his porn preferences. But the polarizing rapper and mogul was curiously quiet where it mattered most: His thoughts on President Donald Trump. “You’ve so famously and so powerfully said, ‘George Bush doesn’t care about black people,’ it makes me wonder what makes you think that Donald Trump does, or any people at all?” Kimmel said. A stony West pondered Kimmel’s question, staring into the middle distance for an excruciating — and silent — three seconds. Kimmel quickly jumped in, sending the show to commercial break. Rapper trying to get plea deal in gun case • Rapper Juelz Santana’s scheduled trial on charges he tried to get a gun onto a plane at an airport has been pushed back so he can continue negotiations for a plea deal. A trial had been scheduled for early September. But an order filed this month extended the trial date at least until Sept. 30. Santana was arrested in March. Authorities said Newark Liberty International Airport security found a loaded .38-caliber handgun and unprescribed oxycodone pills in a carry-on bag containing his identification.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actor George Hamilton is 79. Rapper Sir Mix-A-Lot is 55. Actress Imani Hakim is 25. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Omarosa Manigault Newman, former assistant to Trump and White House communications director; Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Rudy Giuliani, President Donald Trump’s lawyer; former Gov. Terry McAuliffe, D-Va.. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Jack Reed, D-R.I. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Charlottesville, Va., Mayor Nikuyah Walker; Sens. Tim Kaine, D-Va., and Tim Scott, R-S.C. THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Giuliani; Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president; Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md.; Michael Avenatti, attorney for Stormy Daniels. Associated Press

Council to take up smoking ban with bar, casino exemptions BY MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES COUNTY • A late-break-

ing effort is underway on the St. Charles County Council to put on the Nov. 6 election ballot an indoor smoking ban with exemptions for many bars and Ameristar Casino. The measure, which could be voted on by the council Monday night, would be an alternative to a strict smoking ban with no exemptions that also may be on the ballot. An initiative petition drive by health groups last month turned in signatures aimed at putting a no-exemption plan before voters. Election authorities have until Aug. 28 to verify the names. The council bill’s sponsor — Councilman Mike Klinghammer, R-St. Charles — says putting two rival measures on the ballot would give voters a choice of banning smoking in indoor public places altogether or allowing exceptions for “businesses considered for adult enjoyment.” The council proposition would exempt bars and other businesses whose customers must be at least 21 years old. Bars and restaurants also could allow smoking in over-21 areas separately ventilated and physically separated from nonsmoking sections.

Karen Englert, an official with the American Heart Association, complained that the new proposal would “override the will of the people” as expressed through the 34,000 or so county residents who signed the health coalition’s petitions. “They do not want a measure that picks winners and losers when it comes to public health,” she said. She and Councilman Joe Cronin, R-St. Paul, also complained that the council proposal has a provision aimed at allowing it to be introduced and passed at the same meeting. Normally a bill must be aired at more than one session. “He kept it quiet intentionally to try to ram it through in one meeting,” Cronin said of Klinghammer. The council proposal cites a 1966 Missouri Supreme Court ruling that allowed the St. Louis County Council at a single meeting to put a charter amendment on the ballot. The ruling also said charter propositions don’t require a county executive’s signature. Klinghammer said taking up the bill at one meeting is an available option but that the council could decide to hold off voting until its next meeting Aug. 27. “It’s completely up to the council whether they feel they’ve gotten enough information” on the issue to act Monday,

Klinghammer said. Cronin also accused Klinghammer of pushing the measure to increase his chances of getting donations from Ameristar for a campaign for mayor of St. Charles next April. Cronin said the ploy amounted to “dirty politics.” Klinghammer said he may run for mayor but denied the accusation. He ran unsuccessfully for that office in 2015. Both proposals would cover unincorporated areas and cities. The council version also would allow municipalities to enact stricter laws, as O’Fallon and Lake Saint Louis already have done. If both county propositions make it to the ballot and each passes, the courts likely would decide which takes effect, said Assistant County Counselor Robert Hoeynck. Hoeynck said past court rulings generally have held that the proposition with the most specificity would prevail but that supporters of either smoking ban could argue that theirs fits that definition. The St. Louis County ballot also may include two competing smoking bans — one with no exceptions and another exempting casinos. But St. Louis County has an ordinance that says if two measures with conflicting provisions both pass, the one getting the most votes wins.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Saturday: 05-43-56-62-68 Powerball: 24 Power play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $247 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 01-03-12-22-42 Mega ball: 06 Megaplier: 5 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $75 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday: 12-14-15-16-18-35 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.6 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 16-17-27-30-34 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $105,000 PICK-3 Midday: 124 Evening: 750 PICK-4 Midday: 7561 Evening: 8488

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 02-12-19-30-43 Evening: 07-19-28-31-45 LOTTO Saturday: 06-11-22-36-48-51 Extra shot: 02 Estimated jackpot: $10.5 million PICK-3 Midday: 478 FB: 9 Evening: 339 FB: 6 PICK-4 Midday: 3125 FB: 9 Evening: 1539 FB: 4

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous >>> stltoday.com/newstips

CONTACT US

INSIDE Arts ...................... B6 Bill McClellan ........ B1 Books .................... B9 Business ................. C1 Editorial .............. A20 Horoscopes ......... EV4

Obituaries ........... A26 Puzzles ............. EV3-4 Sports calendar .... D2 Stocks ................... C5 Travel .................. B10 Weather .............. D10

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $10.25, Sunday-Friday $9.75, Monday-Friday $7.75, Thursday-Sunday $8.50, Sat-Mon $7.50, Fri-Sun $7.50, Sun-Mon $7.00, Sat-Sun Only $7.00, Sunday Only $4.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 01/14/18, 02/18/18, 03/18/18, 3/25/18, 04/15/18, 04/22/18, 05/20/18, 05/27/18, 06/17/18, 06/24/18, 07/15/18, 07/22/18, 08/19/18, 08/26/18, 09/09/18, 09/23/18, 10/14/18, 11/22/18, 12/09/18, 12/23/18 and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201

314-340-8664

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284

STLtoday.mycapture.com

Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


SATURDAY’S BEST

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

Saettele Jewelers Earning Your Trust For Over 66 Years!!!

IMMEDIATE PAYMENT FOR

DIAMONDS l WATCHES l GOLD

STARTING TOMORROW SPECIAL 3 DAY BUYING EVENT BUYING MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY ONLY

AUGUST 13th, 14th & 15th 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. MEET OUR EXPERTS Mr. William, GIA Graduate Gemologist, graduate of Christie’s Fine Arts in London, Senior Charter Member of the National Association of Jewelry Appraisers, Member of the British Society of Jewelry Historians & Doctorate of Geological Sciences with a Gemological Studies. He has over 35 years experience in the jewelry industry. Mr. Tilly, is Graduate Gemologist (GIA), dealer and expert in Vintage Estate and Antique jewelry from New York City. He is a member of American Society of Jewelry Historians and the International Watch and Jewelry Guild. He has over 25 years experience in the jewelry industry.

OUR KNOWLEDGEABLE BUYERS WILL MEAN MORE MONEY FOR YOU. You may rest assured that your property will be accurately and professionally appraised for its MAXIMUM CASH MARKET VALUE by our qualified expert appraisers. APPRAISALS ARE FOR PURCHASE ONLY NO CURIOSITY SEEKERS, PLEASE. WE OFFER TOP DOLLAR

strongly connected with the St. Louis community during his tenure at the Science Center was GROW, an indoor-outdoor exhibit about the science of food production. He also oversaw the opening of Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission, which hosted artifacts from the Smithsonian. “To be able to land that work in partnership with what arguably is the best sets of museums in the world … and find a way to find a St. Louis story around an already spectacular set of artifacts and national treasures,” said Vescolani, “that is how we can connect science to people and how we can make it really relevant and exciting.” The St. Louis Science Center named chief operating officer and chief financial officer Barbara Boyle as interim president and CEO while a national search for a new president and CEO is conducted. “We have an amazing leader who’s stepped up in the interim,” Vescolani said of Boyle. “She’s a native St. Louisan, so she has a great understanding of the St. Louis community.”

Bert Vescolani, CEO and president of the St. Louis Science Center, is leaving the St. Louis institution after seven years to become president and CEO of the Denver Zoo. Vescolani’s appointment at the Denver Zoo is effective mid-September, and he will remain at the St. Louis Science Center through the end of this month. He previously worked at the John Ball Zoological Gardens in Grand Rapids, Mich., and the John G. Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. In his new position, Vescolani will oversee 400 employees and 600 volunteers. “Bert was chosen to lead Denver Zoo because of his depth and breadth of experience in both animal care and executive leadership, and for his tremendous energy and enthusiasm,” Sherri Koelbel, chair of the Denver Zoological Foundation, who led the search effort, said in a statement. “We have full confidence that he will uphold our position as a worldclass cultural and conservation organization.” Vescolani said that one exhibit that

Christie L.C. Ellis • 314-340-8130 @femmechemistry on Twitter cellis@post-dispatch.com

Homeless man gets 120 years in attack on four with hammer and handrail

Our Expert Appraisers know the International Markets and are prepared to offer you top New York Prices. Don’t sell for less.

IMMEDIATE PAYMENT You are paid right away for the items we purchase.

PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL All transactions conducted in a safe, secure, discreet and confidential manner.

long section of a wooden handrail that had two wall brackets still attached. According to police and testimony, Moore claimed he thought the victims had ransacked his belongings of snacks and water in a room at the abandoned school where homeless people regularly slept. The victims ranged in age from 29 to 39. The two men and one of the women testified during the trial; the other could not be found because she has moved from the St. Louis area. They testified that they awoke to screams and a sharp object striking them in the head. One of the men testified that Moore thought one of the women had taken some of his food. The woman who testified lives in a nursing home in Ste. Genevieve, Mo., and has a large depression in her skull from the attack. She has another surgery scheduled to install a metal plate in her skull. Assistant Circuit Attorney Peter Bruntrager told jurors at trial that Moore had put a price on the victims’ lives worth “mere dollars.”

BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-dispatch

BRING EVERYTHING If you are not certain what you have, bring it in. Something you regard as insignificant may, in fact, be worth a great deal.

If you haven’t worn or used it in 3 years, chancesareyouwon’twearoruseitagain.

SELL US YOUR UNWANTED JEWELRY TODAY WANTED – Diamonds & Diamond Jewelry

WANTED – Antique & Vintage Jewelry

Loose or mounted diamonds, all shapes and sizes, old cuts (mine cut, European cut) diamonds, all diamond rings, bracelets, earrings, pins, necklaces, and pendants. All platinum and diamond jewelry. All Jewelry With Diamonds and/or Colored Gemstones. Premiums Paid for 2 Carat and Larger Diamonds. We specialize in individual diamonds UP TO 15 CARATS EACH.

Georgian, Victorian, Art Nouveau and Art Deco jewelry. Retro jewelry from 1950 to 1970s. All enameled jewelry, platinum jewelry, micro-mosaic jewelry, fine cameo jewelry, old lockets and necklaces. All diamond, ruby, emerald & sapphire jewelry. All jewelry by Tiffany, Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Bulgari, David Webb, C.D. Peacock, Bailey Banks & Biddle, Jeorge Jensen. NO COSTUME JEWELRY PLEASE! WANTED – Fine Sterling Silver

All sterling silver flatware and hollowware by any maker, foreign or domestic. Sterling silver tea sets. Full or partial flatware sets. Sterling pitchers, bowls, and trays. Not sure what you have? Bring it in. Premiums Paid For All Sterling Silver Flatware, Hollowware, & Tea Sets. We Pay Top Dollar For Tiffany, Jensen, Wallace, Gorham & All Brand Named Names.

ST. LOUIS • He refused to raise his right hand to be sworn in Friday or answer a St. Louis judge’s questions. So she skipped the formalities and sentenced him to prison for 120 years. Then Edward A. Moore smirked as sheriff’s deputies led him in handcuffs to a seat in the jury box. Moore, 62, represented himself at trial in June when a jury found him guilty of four counts each of first-degree assault and armed criminal action. He did so again Friday when St. Louis Circuit Judge Elizabeth Hogan gave Moore four consecutive life terms of 30 years for his crimes. Those sentences add to a 30-year term he finished about six weeks before attacking two homeless men and two homeless women in July 2017 inside the vacant Carr School building north of downtown. He was charged with beating them with a ball-peen hammer and a roughly 4-foot-

MEETOTHERSWITH RHEUMATOIDARTHRITIS(RA) Join our live EMERGE FROM RA event to • Learn more about your condition • Ask questions about life with RA • Become part of the RA community in your area

Tuesday, August 21, 2018 6:00 PM Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse, St Louis, MO Presented by Lori Siegel, MD Illinois Bone & Joint Institute

and an

EMERGE FROM RA Ambassador

Visit EmergeFromRA.com for more information and to register for this free event. Seats are limited, so reserve your spot now! This program is sponsored by

Speaker(s) are paid representatives of Sanofi Genzyme and Regeneron.

WANTED – Gold / Silver Coins & Currency

All U.S. silver dimes, quarters, half dollars dated 1964 and before. All Silver Dollars dated 1935 and before. WANTED – All paper money and large Gold Jewelry notes before 1928. All U.S. Solid gold chains, bracelets, rings, earrings, charms, gold, platinum, silver coins & pendants, pins, broaches, bullion in any denomination. clips. Gold nuggets, dental gold (white and yellow), broken bits and pieces of gold.

BUYING MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY ONLY AUGUST 13th, 14th & 15th 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Bring In This Coupon

15%

ADDITIONAL

279 Lamp & Lantern Village, Town & Country Mo. 63017 314-725-8182

FOR SENIOR CITIZENS GOLD & SILVER

www.mwrbank.com

Now Offering a NEW RATE on our Short-Term CD Special:

2.00% 13 Months APY*

Arnold • (636) 232-0070

Festus • (636) 937-5351

Chesterfield • (636) 534-8433

Kirkwood • (314) 394-6060

Clayton • (314) 338-7912

Sunset Hills • (314) 394-4900

* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of July 23, 2018 and is subject to change. Interest compounded quarterly. $1,000 min to $99,000 max to open account and obtain yield, penalties may apply for early withdrawals. Fees, such as penalties, may reduce earnings.

OF TRADITION AND PROGRESS.

© 2018 Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 04/2018 SAUS.SARI.18.03.1873

TH E B A N K

travel clocks. All solid gold pocket watches. All lady’s diamond watches. All gold, silver & platinum men’s wrist watches including Patek Phillippe, Rolex, Audemars, Cartier, Tiffany,Vacheron, Omega, Longines, and many others. Need Not Be In Working Condition. Premiums Paid For Fine Men’s Wristwatches.

Science Center CEO to step down to lead Denver Zoo BY CHRISTIE L.C. ELLIS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Fine Estate Jewelr y l Coins & Silver

WANTED – Fine Timepieces Fine carriage and

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3


NATION

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 2

Saettele Jewelers Earning Your Trust For Over 66 Years!!!

IMMEDIATE

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A3

Returned Korean War dog tag belonged to medic from Indiana A dog tag from Master Sgt. Charles Hobert McDaniel, who died in the Korean War in 1950 and was among recently repatriated remains from North Korea, is displayed with his service medals Wednesday in Arlington, Va.

PAYMENT FOR

DIAMONDS l WATCHES l GOLD

Fine Estate Jewelr y l Coins & Silver

STARTING TOMORROW SPECIAL 3 DAY BUYING EVENT BUYING MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY ONLY

AUGUST 13th, 14th & 15th 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

AP

MEET OUR EXPERTS Mr. William, GIA Graduate Gemologist, graduate of Christie’s Fine Arts in London, Senior Charter Member of the National Association of Jewelry Appraisers, Member of the British Society of Jewelry Historians & Doctorate of Geological Sciences with a Gemological Studies. He has over 35 years experience in the jewelry industry.

WASHINGTON • The lone military iden-

Mr. Tilly, is Graduate Gemologist (GIA), dealer and expert in Vintage Estate and Antique jewelry from New York City. He is a member of American Society of Jewelry Historians and the International Watch and Jewelry Guild. He has over 25 years experience in the jewelry industry.

OUR KNOWLEDGEABLE BUYERS WILL MEAN MORE MONEY FOR YOU. You may rest assured that your property will be accurately and professionally appraised for its MAXIMUM CASH MARKET VALUE by our qualified expert appraisers. APPRAISALS ARE FOR PURCHASE ONLY NO CURIOSITY SEEKERS, PLEASE. WE OFFER TOP DOLLAR Our Expert Appraisers know the International Markets and are prepared to offer you top New York Prices. Don’t sell for less.

IMMEDIATE PAYMENT You are paid right away for the items we purchase.

PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL All transactions conducted in a safe, secure, discreet and confidential manner.

BRING EVERYTHING If you are not certain what you have, bring it in. Something you regard as insignificant may, in fact, be worth a great deal.

If you haven’t worn or used it in 3 years, chancesareyouwon’twearoruseitagain.

SELL US YOUR UNWANTED JEWELRY TODAY WANTED – Diamonds & Diamond Jewelry

WANTED – Antique & Vintage Jewelry

Loose or mounted diamonds, all shapes and sizes, old cuts (mine cut, European cut) diamonds, all diamond rings, bracelets, earrings, pins, necklaces, and pendants. All platinum and diamond jewelry. All Jewelry With Diamonds and/or Colored Gemstones. Premiums Paid for 2 Carat and Larger Diamonds. We specialize in individual diamonds UP TO 15 CARATS EACH.

Georgian, Victorian, Art Nouveau and Art Deco jewelry. Retro jewelry from 1950 to 1970s. All enameled jewelry, platinum jewelry, micro-mosaic jewelry, fine cameo jewelry, old lockets and necklaces. All diamond, ruby, emerald & sapphire jewelry. All jewelry by Tiffany, Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Bulgari, David Webb, C.D. Peacock, Bailey Banks & Biddle, Jeorge Jensen. NO COSTUME JEWELRY PLEASE! WANTED – Fine Sterling Silver

MEETOTHERSWITH RHEUMATOIDARTHRITIS(RA) Join our live EMERGE FROM RA event to • Learn more about your condition • Ask questions about life with RA • Become part of the RA community in your area

Tuesday, August 21, 2018 6:00 PM Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse, St Louis, MO Presented by Lori Siegel, MD Illinois Bone & Joint Institute

and an

EMERGE FROM RA Ambassador

Visit EmergeFromRA.com for more information and to register for this free event. Seats are limited, so reserve your spot now! This program is sponsored by

Speaker(s) are paid representatives of Sanofi Genzyme and Regeneron. ™

© 2018 Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 04/2018 SAUS.SARI.18.03.1873

WANTED – Gold / Silver Coins & Currency

All U.S. silver dimes, quarters, half dollars dated 1964 and before. All Silver Dollars dated 1935 and before. WANTED – All paper money and large Gold Jewelry notes before 1928. All U.S. Solid gold chains, bracelets, rings, earrings, charms, gold, platinum, silver coins & pendants, pins, broaches, bullion in any denomination. clips. Gold nuggets, dental gold (white and yellow), broken bits and pieces of gold.

BUYING MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY ONLY AUGUST 13th, 14th & 15th 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Bring In This Coupon

15%

ADDITIONAL

279 Lamp & Lantern Village, Town & Country Mo. 63017 314-725-8182

FOR SENIOR CITIZENS GOLD & SILVER

www.mwrbank.com

Now Offering a NEW RATE on our Short-Term CD Special:

2.00% 13 Months APY*

Arnold • (636) 232-0070

Festus • (636) 937-5351

Chesterfield • (636) 534-8433

Kirkwood • (314) 394-6060

Clayton • (314) 338-7912

Sunset Hills • (314) 394-4900

* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of July 23, 2018 and is subject to change. Interest compounded quarterly. $1,000 min to $99,000 max to open account and obtain yield, penalties may apply for early withdrawals. Fees, such as penalties, may reduce earnings.

OF TRADITION AND PROGRESS.

travel clocks. All solid gold pocket watches. All lady’s diamond watches. All gold, silver & platinum men’s wrist watches including Patek Phillippe, Rolex, Audemars, Cartier, Tiffany,Vacheron, Omega, Longines, and many others. Need Not Be In Working Condition. Premiums Paid For Fine Men’s Wristwatches.

All sterling silver flatware and hollowware by any maker, foreign or domestic. Sterling silver tea sets. Full or partial flatware sets. Sterling pitchers, bowls, and trays. Not sure what you have? Bring it in. Premiums Paid For All Sterling Silver Flatware, Hollowware, & Tea Sets. We Pay Top Dollar For Tiffany, Jensen, Wallace, Gorham & All Brand Named Names.

tification tag that North Korea provided with 55 boxes of human remains last month belonged to Master Sgt. Charles H. McDaniel, an Army medic from Indiana who was killed in the opening months of the Korean War. The Army on Wednesday handed McDaniel’s slightly corroded dog tag to his sons, Charles Jr. and Larry, who were so young when their father perished that they have little memory of him. Charles, 71, told reporters he was moved to tears when he got the phone call at home in Indianapolis last week informing him that his father’s dog tag had been returned. “It’s a very mixed, jumbled moment for us,” he said, referring to the emotions he and his brother feel so many years after having grown up without their biological father, never knowing for sure what happened to him in a war many Americans have forgotten. “At least we have this,” he said, pointing to the dog tag, imprinted with the name, Charles Hobert McDaniel, and a service number. Charles Jr., of Indianapolis, told reporters he has no recollection of what his family was told when his father was reported missing in action. Larry, 70, of Jacksonville, Fla., said he has no memory at all of his father, but “I’m proud of what he did and what he accomplished.” The dog tag is no assurance that McDaniel’s remains are among those contained in the 55 boxes that the North Korean army turned over to U.S. officials at Wonsan, North Korea, on July 27. John Byrd, director of the Defense Department laboratory in Hawaii that is beginning the process of attempting to identify the remains, said the condition of the bones is

TH E B A N K

WANTED – Fine Timepieces Fine carriage and

judged to be “moderate to poor preservation,” meaning few are whole bones and all are quite old. No personal effects were handed over by the North Koreans aside from the McDaniel dog tag. The boxes contained a number of U.S.-issued military items such as helmets, gloves and canteens, but none are associated with any specific individual. North Korea returned the remains as part of an agreement reached by its leader, Kim Jong Un, at his Singapore summit with President Donald Trump in June. Kim also agreed to cooperate with the U.S. in searching for and excavating additional remains in North Korea, where an estimated 5,300 U.S. servicemen are believed to have fallen and not been recovered. Negotiations on the terms of such future operations have not yet begun, American officials said. A key tool in identifying war remains is matching DNA extracted from the bones with DNA samples provided by family members of the missing. As part of that process, the director of a DNA laboratory in Dover, Del., that will be attempting to make such matches, Dr. Timothy P. McMahon, took swabs of saliva from Larry’s mouth as news cameras snapped pictures. Charles McDaniel Jr. was three years old and Larry was two when their father was sent to South Korea in August 1950 from Japan, where he was a member of the U.S. occupation forces that had been stationed there since the end of World War II. At the time, North Korean forces had driven U.S. troops almost off the Korean peninsula at Pusan before Gen. Douglas MacArthur engineered the first big U.S. victory with an amphibious landing at Inchon in September. Byrd, the lab director, said it was too early to estimate how many individuals may be represented by the bones returned in the boxes.

BY ROBERT BURNS associated Press


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FROM A1

M 1 • SUNDAY • 08.12.2018

Apartment complex was nearly condemned in 2011 APARTMENTS • FROM A1

PROPERTY ‘MANAGEMENT’ T.E.H. Realty wouldn’t comment for this story. Springwood Apartments manager Twaniece Johnson referred all questions to Michael Fein, who didn’t respond to an email. Approached by the Post-Dispatch at the property Thursday, Fein said he didn’t have time to comment. He was busy showing the complex to somebody taking a lot of pictures of the buildings and said he had an airplane to catch afterward. T.E.H. Realty started in Israel

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Payton Jones (left) and Brooklyn Hines, both 2, sit on steps outside a Springwood building Thursday in Bel-Ridge. Building Commissioner Raymond Winston said the condition of the apartment steps was unsafe because of rusted supports.

“I am not saying the previous management company threw their hands in the air,” Kinder said. “They did the bare minimum. Now we have a great company that is going to, No. 1, hold residents responsible for the civic duty of paying rent, and in return provide them with great, decent, affordable housing and make Ferguson and Northwinds a great place to call home. That’s our goal.” Outside his office, the lawn looked like it was being cut for the first time in weeks. “By Christmas, you are going to see this place shining like the top of the Chrysler building,” he said.

Larry Smith (left), 25, and Will Russell, 38, start to tear down a wall Wednesday inside the Springwood Apartments in Bel-Ridge. The men, who work for Contractors Plus, were hired to find out where water was leaking. Mold was found in several apartments.

70

Sp

gdale rin

170

Ramona Lake

1 / 4 MILE

Michael Fein (right), a manager for T.E.H. Realty, shows a man the Springwood Apartments in Bel-Ridge on Thursday. The man took a lot of photographs of the buildings.

T.E.H. REALTY IN ST. LOUIS Springwood Apartments is one of at least 10 large apartment complexes in the St. Louis area owned and managed by affiliates of T.E.H. Realty. Together, the company has about 2,400 rental units locally: • Blue Fountain Apartments (52 units), 819 Gustav Avenue, Baden • Bridgeport Crossing Apartments (300 units), 4015 Brittany Circle, Bridgeton • Brighton Apartments (200 units), 2745 Rottingdean Drive, north St. Louis County • Crown Manor Apartments (173 units), 2041 Baroque Court, north St. Louis County • Northwinds Apartments (438 units), 9556 Glen Owen Drive, Ferguson • Park Ridge Apartments (336 units), 1379 Sharondale Circle, Ferguson • Pinnacle Ridge Apartments (168 units), 10613 Lookaway Drive, Glasgow Village • River Trail Apartments (129 units), 849 River Trail Court, near Bellefontaine Neighbors • Southwest Crossing Apartments (328 units), 7851 Bandero Drive, Carondelet • Springwood Apartments (271 units), 9123 Torchlite Lane, Bel-Ridge SOURCE: St. Louis and St. Louis county property records, company website

in 2006, according to its website. The firm and its affiliates started buying residential properties in the United States a few years later, initially in Reading, Pa., then the Midwest. Springwood, purchased in December 2014, was the first of at least 10 apartment complexes that T.E.H. Realty acquired in the St. Louis area, amounting to about 2,400 units. Last spring, the firm took over Park Ridge and Northwinds apartments, near three other large complexes near West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson. The area has one of the highest concentrations of subsidized housing in Missouri. Park Ridge and Northwinds, which have a combined 774 units, were refurbished about

a decade ago with the lure of at least $42 million in low-income housing tax credits, yet have since struggled with crime and occupancy. After T.E.H. Realty purchased the properties, representatives wouldn’t sit for an interview to explain its approach and goals. Questions were submitted by email to Fein, which went unanswered other than to say: “You asked a couple of questions that you have to have an understanding in property management to get the correct answer.” If one randomly picked apartment building at Northwinds last week is any indication, delayed work orders and lack of response are part of reality. The building, in the 9500 block of Glen Owen Drive, had four apartment units in it — out of

a nl

To rc hla Na To m tu rc p hli ra lB te rid ge

ey

Springwood Apartments

N. H

an entire building that has been condemned since a fire broke out several years ago and draws squatters. He has options. He has the resources to move out, which he plans to do soon. Less fortunate residents struggled to control their emotions when they talked about being trapped by poverty in Springwood, which illustrates challenges of highdensity affordable housing that were brought to light four years ago in the scrappy southeast corner of Ferguson where Michael Brown was shot. While multiple complexes near Canfield Green Apartments were a tinderbox of crime, Springwood is off on its own, but appears to be neglected by its owners, affiliates of T.E.H. Realty, which has been expanding in the St. Louis region. After the hotel she was living in caught fire in 2012, Margo Dannenberger, 63, said the Red Cross moved her to Springwood. Last week, she notified Bel-Ridge officials because she feared mold was in her walls. On one side of her building, a demolition crew was ripping through multiple units with hammers looking for a water leak. The neighboring unit has been shut tight since a man in his 70s was found dead in his apartment, lying in standing water. “I have no way of moving from here,” Dannenberger, who drives a taxi for a living, said, crying. “I don’t have the money or anything else.” Bonnie Keeling, 28, also lost her composure. Recovering from a destructive marriage, she said, she and her son have been evicted from two previous places. She said she tries to work as many hours as she can at a gas station to stay ahead of rent. But she’s behind again. “I haven’t had a day off work in more than a week,” she said. She was grateful for shelter. “It’s got a lot of problems, but it’s a haven for a lot of people,” she said. “At the end of the day, we are all broke. We are all struggling, and we need a place to go.” Springwood, which has changed hands multiple times, was nearly condemned in 2011 for dozens of health and safety violations. Concrete catwalks were falling apart. Gutters dangled. There were broken windows, and other issues. Once again, the village recently wrote dozens more citations for all sorts of property violations, ranging from tall grass, to stagnant water to refusing to repair defective handrails and guardrails. “This is external that we have them on right now,” Building Commissioner Raymond Winston said of the citations. “When we go inside, it will probably get bigger than that.” Winston, 67, who’s been doing code enforcement for decades, said he recognizes the need for housing. “That’s one of the reasons I don’t close it because it would displace a lot of people, but it seems like they are forcing my hand,” he said. He said affiliates of T.E.H. Realty were given warnings late last year to make numerous repairs that weren’t made. Now he’s getting a lot of complaints from residents and isn’t seeing enough improvement. “I call the manager, and she’s like, ‘Oh, well, I’ll get to it when I can,’” he said. The maintenance supervisor was fired this month. “I was recently terminated from that position because I was honest with residents and refused to enter unsafe working conditions without proper safety equipment, i.e. respirator mask for black mold and proper abatement equipment,” Dave Rathmann wrote in an email to the Post-Dispatch. “Yet these units are occupied by residents.” Rathmann said T.E.H. Realty is “charging rent for housing that if prisoners were exposed to in our state institutions, there would be rioting and the person in charge of that prison would undoubtedly be replaced.”

Post-Dispatch

438 total for the complex. In one, a three-bedroom with basement that rents for $720 a month, Angela Portis, 35, said she wants out of the lease and is trying to get a legal aid attorney’s attention for help. Portis pointed to an electrical outlet that appeared to have mold growing behind the cover. She believes it’s extensive. She has four children who are staying with their grandmother until they can be moved into a different apartment, a move that Portis said has been taking too long. She said the neighboring unit in the building was condemned after a fire. Next to that, Jittaun McConnell, 35, said she likes her apartment, but she’d been bitten in bed by a poisonous spider that sent her to the hospital. She was concerned about her 4-year-old son being bitten. In the fourth unit in the building, Marc Brothers, 32, and Stephanie Taylor, 32, usually have their children with them, too, including two with asthma. They’ve been staying at their grandmother’s house since the central air broke a few weeks ago. In the meantime, the complex gave them a small window unit, which isn’t enough to cool the place down. “We’ve been calling every day,” said Brothers, 32, a cook at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. They said they were recently told by the front office that there wasn’t a manager at Northwinds anymore. But Mike Kinder started Wednesday. In an interview, he said, he’d like to embrace the broader community and put in a food pantry. He vowed to get a better grip on maintenance, as well as on a lot of delinquent rental payments.

TENANTS AT RISK The next day, on the other side of north St. Louis County, Winston, the building commissioner in Bel-Ridge, was at Springwood Apartments, to meet a resident who had complained about mold. Waiting for her, he chatted up somebody else who said there was mold in her apartment. She invited Winston in to see it. “Oh, my God,” Winston said, asking if anybody, including children, had gotten sick. There were several square feet of what appeared to be mold growing in the corner and more along the kitchen wall. In a kitchen closet, wires were exposed on the water heater, which didn’t have a basin at the bottom and seemed to be leaking steamy water under the raised floor. A bedroom wall that bordered the shower was rotten and the main air conditioner was broken. Winston put a green sticker on the window and told the family that they had to move out in 24 hours. “I can’t just up and move in one day,” said Damont Allen, 28, whose name is on the lease. Winston told him the apartment complex was required to either find a suitable apartment or put them up in a hotel. “I just want you to understand that this is for your safety,” said Winston, mentioning exposed 220 volt wires and possible mold spores. Allen told him that Bel-Ridge should have known there was mold in the apartment. To gain occupancy, Allen acquired a permit in February. There was supposed to be an inspection done. Winston confirmed the permit but the inspection couldn’t be found. The apartment he had come to see on Thursday belonged to Dannenberger, the taxi driver, who was moved in six years ago by the Red Cross. Winston said the walls were wet and in enough disrepair to condemn the apartment. “I smell it, but I don’t see it,” Winston told her about mold. “I would advise you to keep your windows open.” She told him that she had screwed the windows shut to keep people from breaking in. Winston said he would give her five days to gather her things before he condemns the apartment. She felt the squeeze to pack her belongings when she also needed to be out driving while so many tourists were in town for the PGA championship. Instead of crying this time, she seemed to smile from the reality of possibly moving soon. Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FROM A1

M 2 • SUNDAY • 08.12.2018

Apartment complex was nearly condemned in 2011 APARTMENTS • FROM A1

PROPERTY ‘MANAGEMENT’ T.E.H. Realty wouldn’t comment for this story. Springwood Apartments manager Twaniece Johnson referred all questions to Michael Fein, who didn’t respond to an email. Approached by the Post-Dispatch at the property Thursday, Fein said he didn’t have time to comment. He was busy showing the complex to somebody taking a lot of pictures of the buildings and said he had an airplane to catch afterward.

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Payton Jones (left) and Brooklyn Hines, both 2, sit on steps outside a Springwood building Thursday in Bel-Ridge. Building Commissioner Raymond Winston said the condition of the apartment steps was unsafe because of rusted supports.

rental payments. “I am not saying the previous management company threw their hands in the air,” Kinder said. “They did the bare minimum. Now we have a great company that is going to, No. 1, hold residents responsible for the civic duty of paying rent, and in return provide them with great, decent, affordable housing and make Ferguson and Northwinds a great place to call home. That’s our goal.” Not far from his office, the lawn looked like it was being cut for the first time in weeks. “By Christmas, you are going to see this place shining like the top of the Chrysler building,” he said.

Larry Smith (left), 25, and Will Russell, 38, start to tear down a wall Wednesday inside the Springwood Apartments in Bel-Ridge. The men, who work for Contractors Plus, were hired to find out where water was leaking. Mold was found in several apartments.

70

Sp

gdale rin

170

Ramona Lake

1 / 4 MILE

Michael Fein (right), a manager for T.E.H. Realty, shows a man the Springwood Apartments in Bel-Ridge on Thursday. The man took a lot of photographs of the buildings.

T.E.H. REALTY IN ST. LOUIS Springwood Apartments is one of at least 10 large apartment complexes in the St. Louis area owned and managed by affiliates of T.E.H. Realty. Together, the company has about 2,400 rental units locally: • Blue Fountain Apartments (52 units), 819 Gustav Avenue, Baden • Bridgeport Crossing Apartments (300 units), 4015 Brittany Circle, Bridgeton • Brighton Apartments (200 units), 2745 Rottingdean Drive, north St. Louis County • Crown Manor Apartments (173 units), 2041 Baroque Court, north St. Louis County • Northwinds Apartments (438 units), 9556 Glen Owen Drive, Ferguson • Park Ridge Apartments (336 units), 1379 Sharondale Circle, Ferguson • Pinnacle Ridge Apartments (168 units), 10613 Lookaway Drive, Glasgow Village • River Trail Apartments (129 units), 849 River Trail Court, near Bellefontaine Neighbors • Southwest Crossing Apartments (328 units), 7851 Bandero Drive, Carondelet • Springwood Apartments (271 units), 9123 Torchlite Lane, Bel-Ridge SOURCE: St. Louis and St. Louis county property records, company website

T.E.H. Realty started in Israel in 2006, according to its website. The firm and its affiliates started buying residential properties in the United States a few years later, initially in Reading, Pa., then the Midwest. Springwood, purchased in December 2014, was the first of at least 10 apartment complexes that T.E.H. Realty acquired in the St. Louis area, amounting to about 2,400 units. Last spring, the firm took over Park Ridge and Northwinds apartments, near three other large complexes near West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson. The area has one of the highest concentrations of subsidized housing in Missouri. Park Ridge and Northwinds, which have a combined 774

units, were refurbished about a decade ago with the lure of at least $42 million in low-income housing tax credits, yet have since struggled with crime and occupancy. After T.E.H. Realty purchased the properties, representatives wouldn’t sit for an interview to explain its approach and goals. Questions were submitted by email to Fein, which went unanswered other than to say: “You asked a couple of questions that you have to have an understanding in property management to get the correct answer.” If one randomly picked apartment building at Northwinds last week is any indication, delayed work orders and lack of response are part of reality. The building, in the 9500 block of Glen Owen Drive, had four

a nl

To rc hla Na To m tu rc p hli ra lB te rid ge

ey

Springwood Apartments

N. H

an entire building that has been condemned since a fire broke out several years ago and draws squatters. He has options. He has the resources to move out, which he plans to do soon. Less fortunate residents struggled to control their emotions when they talked about being trapped by poverty in Springwood, which illustrates challenges of highdensity affordable housing that were brought to light four years ago in the scrappy southeast corner of Ferguson where Michael Brown was shot. While multiple complexes near Canfield Green Apartments were a tinderbox of crime, Springwood is off on its own, but appears to be neglected by its owners, affiliates of T.E.H. Realty, which has been expanding in the St. Louis region. After the hotel room she was living in caught fire in 2012, Margo Dannenberger, 63, said the Red Cross moved her to Springwood. Last week, she notified Bel-Ridge officials because she feared mold was in her walls. On one side of her building, a demolition crew was ripping through multiple units with hammers looking for a water leak. The neighboring unit has been shut tight since a man in his 70s was found dead in his apartment, lying in standing water. “I have no way of moving from here,” Dannenberger, who drives a taxi for a living, said, crying. “I don’t have the money or anything else.” Bonnie Keeling, 28, also lost her composure. Recovering from a destructive marriage, she said, she and her son have been evicted from two previous places. She said she tries to work as many hours as she can at a gas station to stay ahead of rent. But she’s behind again. “I haven’t had a day off work in more than a week,” she said. She was grateful for shelter. “It’s got a lot of problems, but it’s a haven for a lot of people,” she said. “At the end of the day, we are all broke. We are all struggling, and we need a place to go.” Springwood, which has changed hands multiple times, was nearly condemned in 2011 for dozens of health and safety violations. Concrete catwalks were falling apart. Gutters dangled. There were broken windows, and other issues. Once again, the village recently wrote dozens more citations for all sorts of property violations, ranging from tall grass, to stagnant water to refusing to repair defective handrails and guardrails. “This is external that we have them on right now,” Building Commissioner Raymond Winston said of the citations. “When we go inside, it will probably get bigger than that.” Winston, 67, who’s been doing code enforcement for decades, said he recognizes the need for housing. “That’s one of the reasons I don’t close it because it would displace a lot of people, but it seems like they are forcing my hand,” he said. He said affiliates of T.E.H. Realty were given warnings late last year to make numerous repairs that weren’t made. Now he’s getting a lot of complaints from residents and isn’t seeing enough improvement. “I call the manager, and she’s like, ‘Oh, well, I’ll get to it when I can,’” he said. The maintenance supervisor was fired this month. “I was recently terminated from that position because I was honest with residents and refused to enter unsafe working conditions without proper safety equipment, i.e. respirator mask for black mold and proper abatement equipment,” Dave Rathmann wrote in an email to the Post-Dispatch. “Yet these units are occupied by residents.” Rathmann said T.E.H. Realty is “charging rent for housing that if prisoners were exposed to in our state institutions, there would be rioting and the person in charge of that prison would undoubtedly be replaced.”

Post-Dispatch

apartment units in it — out of 438 total for the complex. In one, a three-bedroom with basement that rents for $720 a month, Angela Portis, 35, said she wants out of the lease and is trying to get a legal aid attorney’s attention for help. Portis pointed to an electrical outlet that appeared to have mold growing behind the cover. She believes it’s extensive. She has four children who are staying with their grandmother until they can be moved into a different apartment, a move that Portis said has been taking too long. She said the neighboring unit in the building was condemned after a fire. Next to that, Jittaun McConnell, 35, said she likes her apartment, but she’d been bitten in bed by a poisonous spider that sent her to the hospital. She was concerned about her 4-year-old son being bitten. In the fourth unit in the building, Marc Brothers, 32, and Stephanie Taylor, 32, usually have their children with them, too, including two with asthma. They’ve been staying at their grandmother’s house since the central air broke a few weeks ago. In the meantime, the complex gave them a small window unit, which isn’t enough to cool the place down. “We’ve been calling every day,” said Brothers, 32, a cook at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. They said they were recently told by the front office that there wasn’t a manager at Northwinds anymore. But Mike Kinder started Wednesday. In an interview, he said, he’d like to embrace the broader community and put in a food pantry. He vowed to get a better grip on maintenance, as well as on a lot of delinquent

TENANTS AT RISK The next day, on the other side of north St. Louis County, Winston, the building commissioner in Bel-Ridge, was at Springwood Apartments, to meet a resident who had complained about mold. Waiting for her, he chatted up somebody else who said there was mold in her apartment. She invited Winston in to see it. “Oh, my God,” Winston said, asking if anybody, including children, had gotten sick. There were several square feet of what appeared to be mold growing in the corner and more along the kitchen wall. In a kitchen closet, wires were exposed on the water heater, which didn’t have a basin at the bottom and seemed to be leaking steamy water under the raised floor. A bedroom wall that bordered the shower was rotten and the main air conditioner was broken. Winston put a green sticker on the window and told the family that they had to move out in 24 hours. “I can’t just up and move in one day,” said Damont Allen, 28, whose name is on the lease. Winston told him the apartment complex was required to either find a suitable apartment or put them up in a hotel. “I just want you to understand that this is for your safety,” said Winston, mentioning exposed 220 volt wires and possible mold spores. Allen told him that Bel-Ridge should have known there was mold in the apartment. To gain occupancy, Allen acquired a permit in February. There was supposed to be an inspection done. Winston confirmed the permit but the inspection couldn’t be found. The apartment he had come to see on Thursday belonged to Dannenberger, the taxi driver, who was moved in six years ago by the Red Cross. Winston said the walls were wet and in enough disrepair to condemn the apartment. “I smell it, but I don’t see it,” Winston told her about mold. “I would advise you to keep your windows open.” She told him that she had screwed the windows shut to keep people from breaking in. Winston said he would give her five days to gather her things before he condemns the apartment. She felt the squeeze to pack her belongings when she also needed to be out driving while so many tourists were in town for the PGA championship. Instead of crying this time, she seemed to smile from the reality of possibly moving soon. Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255


SATURDAY’S BEST

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Prop A rejection shines a light on pro-union, pro-Trump voter

Democratic votes spike in county; GOP downplays data

President has been hostile to labor, but many embrace his other policies

J E F F E R S O N C I T Y • Sev-

BY JEFF STEIN Washington Post

FRANKLIN COUNTY • Scott

Long, a refrigeration mechanic, is a supporter of President Donald Trump. But he joined with a large majority of voters in this red state Tuesday to reject “right to work” legislation that would have sharply constrained union organizing. Long, 43, a union member, said unions had played an indispensable role in his life. “Our benefits are just awesome. Our health care is top of the line. I have a pension, so I’m going to be set when I retire, we get a 401(k), my medical and dental and vision plans are awesome,” he said. “If I get laid off, they look for another job for me, and you can’t really ask for better, in my eyes.” The landslide vote in Missouri to defeat the right-to-work legislation, a state Republican push that became law last year, was celebrated this week by liberals and union leaders as a high point for organized labor. But it also shined a light on a group that gained significant attention in the 2016 presidential campaign: pro-union, pro-Trump voters. The ratio defeating the legislation — 67 percent to 33 percent — came in a state where Trump commanded nearly a 20-point victory in 2016, and Republicans control the governor’s office, the state Legislature, one U.S. Senate seat and six U.S. House seats. Even some of the most conservative counties rejected the measure. As president, Trump has shown hostility toward organized labor, and his Republican allies in Missouri were behind the rightto-work legislation. But prounion, pro-Trump voters say that even if they consider unions crucial, they see many other reasons to back Trump.

“I like what Trump is doing for the country, though I don’t agree on all of his policies,” Long said. “If you want to be a citizen, you shouldn’t just walk across the Southern California border. ... I like how Trump wants to close the border down.” Dennis Brinkler, a union electrician who voted against the legislation, also cited immigration as a reason he’s supporting Trump and state Attorney General Josh Hawley, an anti-union Republican who is challenging Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat, in November. “I vote my faith and morals, No. 1; my country and the Constitution second; and then for my union third,” said Brinkler, 65. “Without the Constitution, there are no labor unions. Without my country, the union means nothing, because we’d have no work.” Democrats said the vote was an example of the tide finally turning in their favor. “Trump and his Republican friends do not represent what working people want or need,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, N.Y., said on Twitter. But some labor leaders say support for the measure was less about politics and more about a sense that corporate leaders shouldn’t be reaping all the benefits of a prosperous economy. “This was not about Democrat vs. Republicans,” said Pat White, president of the St. Louis Labor Council, which organized to defeat the measure. “This is about workers vs. CEOs.” White and other union officials pointed to a range of reasons their members, even as they embraced organized labor, may reject Democrats at the polls — including the party’s support of free trade policies, gun policy, position on immigration, and protests of police shootings of unarmed black men. “Some of the guys I represent in their 50s, it’s hard for them to grasp shutting down a highway because of an incident that may have happened with the police, and often that’s people on our side of the party,” White said, referring to protests in Ferguson

BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-dispatch

after Michael Brown was killed by a police officer four years ago. “That’s hard for a lot of the old white guys to grasp.” In the 2016 presidential election, with his appeals to the nation’s “forgotten men and women,” Trump made a surprising impact on union voters. He won 42 percent of union households compared with Democratic rival Hillary Clinton’s 51 percent, the best showing for a Republican since Ronald Reagan. In February 2017, state Republicans had approved the right-to-work legislation, which would have allowed employees represented by unions not to pay union fees. But under Missouri law, unions and their allies successfully petitioned to halt its enforcement pending the results of a referendum. Labor officials said they had seen attitudes toward unions improve as the economy has grown stronger. After the Great Recession, labor unions’ public popularity hit their lowest point in several decades, with Gallup polling showing about as many people approving as disapproving of them. But with an extremely strong job market, voters appear less fearful about standing up to corporate owners. Unions’ favorability ratings rose to 61 percent approving with 31 percent disapproving in 2017, according to Gallup, their highest marks since before the recession. “People are seeing that their wages are not increasing even though the companies are making more money, so they’re turning to the union for answers,” said John Smreker, a union worker with Ironworkers 396 near St. Louis. “Anti-union sentiment is way down.” Some union leaders view their landslide victory as a signal that voters are waking up to the ways conservative policy favors businesses owners and investors over workers. “Absolutely, we’ve seen a shift,” Mike Louis, president of Missouri’s AFL-CIO, said in an interview in his office as staff members packed up signs from the monthslong campaign.

enty percent of primary voters in St. Louis County took a Democratic ballot on Tuesday, far more than the 49 percent of county voters who opted to weigh in in the Democratic primary two years ago. Voter turnout also skyrocketed, with 42 percent of all registered county voters casting ballots on Tuesday. County voter turnout in August primaries dating to 2006 had never cracked 30 percent. Observers partially attribute the spike in Democratic participation to the Proposition A vote, the referendum on the state’s “right to work” law. Heated Democratic primaries — including for a St. Louis County Council seat, the county executive race, and the contest for county prosecutor — also probably gave independents and Republicans a reason to pull Democratic ballots. Another potential factor: Suburban voters are gravitating toward Democrats, particularly voters in older, inner-ring suburbs such as Webster Groves and Kirkwood, said Dave Robertson, political science professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. “A lot of people are upset with the direction of the country and are expressing it at all levels of government,” he said. Those factors, along with apparently high engagement from reform-minded voters, all worked to drive turnout on Tuesday, Robertson added. Not only did Ladue businessman Mark Mantovani give embattled County Executive Steve Stenger a run for his money, but voters in mid-St. Louis County ditched Councilman Pat Dolan, a Stenger ally. And in a striking upset, Ferguson Councilman Wesley Bell toppled longtime prosecutor Robert McCulloch. The results “suggest a real movement for both reform and for the rejection of Prop A,” Robertson said. “Those kind of meld together and help explain some of the truly surprising results, most notably Wesley Bell’s election as prosecutor.”

St. Louis County Republicans played down the turnout numbers, saying that many Republicans crossed over to weigh in on the red-hot county executive race and other Democratic contests. The GOP primary for U.S. Senate was low-profile, with Attorney General Josh Hawley widely expected to win. “I think you can chalk it up to the Democrats having a much more exciting primary,” state Rep. Shamed Dogan, R-Ballwin, said. He added that in 2014, when Stenger ousted then-incumbent County Executive Charlie Dooley, a similarly high percentage of voters — 67 percent — pulled Democratic ballots. Even so, in a signal that there is the potential for turbulence for some Missouri House Republicans this fall, a handful of Republican-held House districts in St. Louis County saw more Democratic voters than Republican voters. For example, in Dogan’s 98th House District, there were 3,686 ballots cast in his uncontested GOP primary versus 4,009 votes that were cast for Charles Triplett, Dogan’s Democratic challenger who also faced no primary competition. Similar voting patterns played out in seven other St. Louis County GOP districts, including Rep. David Gregory’s Fenton-based district, Rep. Dean Plocher’s Des Peresbased district, Rep. Jean Evans’ Manchester-based district and Rep. Mark Matthiesen’s Maryland Heights-based district. In a nod to Proposition A opponents, Evans said she would not back any GOP attempts to push right to work in the Legislature next year. “They won overwhelmingly, and to try to overturn the will of the voters is a slap in the face” to them, she said. Sen. Jill Schupp, a Creve Coeur Democrat running against Republican Gregory B. Powers this year, said voters should recognize which party has opposed the policy for years. Two-thirds of Missouri voters, including as many as half of all Republican voters, opposed right to work on Tuesday.

NEW RATES

GREAT RATES CD/IRA SPECIALS BONUS RATE WITH 49ER CHECKING

3.20 % 3.05 % 2.85 % 2.75 % 2.60 % 2.40 %

APY * APY * APY * APY * APY * APY *

75 55 46 35 28 16

Months Months Months Months Months Months

GREAT RATE WITHOUT 49ER CHECKING 3.15 % APY * 75 Months 3.00 % APY * 55 Months 2.80 % APY * 46 Months 2.70 % APY * 35 Months 2.55 % APY * 28 Months 2.35 % APY * 16 Months ASK US ABOUT OUR GREAT SAVINGS & MONEY MARKET RATES

August 1415, 2018

St. Louis, MO

Held at

* Annual Percentage Yields (APY) are based on quarterly compounding of interest and reinvestment of principal for one year. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Available to any qualified individuals and guarantor trusts. Businesses and organizations with an FCB Checking Account may also qualify for the specials. Limited Time Offer. 49er Bonus available to customers with a 49er checking account with FCB. Rates effective as of date of publication and subject to change without notice. $1,000 minimum deposit required to earn APY.

MISSOURI LOCATIONS South County • 12000 Tesson Ferry Rd. • 314-842-9091 FCB Banks Coming Soon to Florissant at 14040 New Halls Ferry Rd.

ILLINOIS LOCATIONS Collinsville 618-346-9000 Collinsville Hwy 157 618-343-9096 Caseyville 618-345-9096 Maryville 618-346-9090 Troy 618-667-9090 MEMBER FDIC

Highland 618-651-9090 Edwardsville 618-656-9090 Swansea 618-239-9000 O’Fallon 618-622-9090

fcbbanks.com

Belleville 618-235-9090 New Baden 618-588-3511 Albers 618-248-5176 Trenton 618-224-9090


LOCAL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

LAW & ORDER WEST ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Bodies of 2 drowning victims pulled from Meramec at Castlewood • Divers recovered the bodies of two drowning victims Saturday night from the Meramec River at Castlewood State Park. A woman, 35, and a girl, 12, were in the river about 2:30 p.m. Saturday, swimming where there is a drop-off, Metro West Fire Protection District Chief Michael D. Thiemann said. Law enforcement officials will release the names of the victims on Sunday, he said. A third person was in the river swimming but was rescued by a man who was on the shore, Thiemann said. Thiemann said divers used sonar underwater to help in their search efforts, along with a canine on a boat. Thiemann advised swimmers to use flotation devices when swimming. Thiemann said the woman and girl are from the St. Louis area. CAHOKIA > Couple found dead • Police were investigating the deaths of a couple whose bodies were discovered about 11:30 a.m. Friday in their home in the 200 block of West Sixth Street. Authorities said the deaths of William R. Mansfield, 56, and his wife, Pamela Mansfield, 54, do not appear to be suspicious. The bodies were discovered by the woman’s sister, said St. Clair County Coroner Calvin Dye Sr. Dye said it appeared that the couple had been dead for a while. Dye said Saturday the cause of death had not been determined yet and that authorities were waiting for results of a toxicology tests. ST. LOUIS > Three wounded in shooting • Three people were wounded in a shooting about 10:25 p.m. Friday near the intersection of 14th Street and Cass Avenue, officials said. Police initially reported a man in his 50s was shot in the face and shoulder and a woman, 30, was shot twice in the buttocks. Police later reported a third victim, a woman shot in the leg, had arrived at a hospital. Police on Saturday did not release their conditions.

PHOTO BY TIM VIZER

St. Louis County police Lt. James Morgan (left) answers a question for Justin Bristol, of Edwardsville, prior to an assessment at a recruitment fair Saturday at Hazelwood Central High School sponsored by the St. Louis County branch of the Ethical Society of Police.

Police agencies push to recruit a more diverse force BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-dispatch

NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Police de-

partments across the country are having trouble filling open positions. So the Ethical Society of Police sponsored its first diversity recruitment fair Saturday to get their message out to people interested in police work. “We’re trying to get people interested in law enforcement. We think it is a noble and honorable profession,” said one of the recruiters, Capt. Kirk Brueggeman of the O’Fallon, Ill., police department. About 40 people attended the event at Hazelwood Central High School. They talked to representatives from 10 area police departments, from St. Louis and St. Louis County to Clayton and St. Louis Lambert International Airport. Alpha Spagner, of St. Louis, is in the Army National Guard and hopes to follow in the footsteps of a cousin who was a police officer. “I want to not only serve my country, but I also want to give back and serve my community while I have the chance,” Spagner said.

The focus of the event was diversity. “Our goal is to change the face or improve the face of the police in the area,” said Shanette Hall, recruiting officer for the St. Louis County Police Department. It’s not just race. Hall said the departments are looking for diversity in terms of gender, culture, religion and even age. Attendees ranged from as young as 20 to 39 or older. Lt. James Morgan of the St. Louis County Police Department, who is president of the Ethical Society of Police, said he pitches police work as a way for a community to improve itself. Rather than complaining about problems with the police, people should join the force and work to change it from the inside, he said. Stephanie Dickson, of Florissant, is a school bus driver for St. Louis Public Schools. She has been thinking about law enforcement for a long time — even as a girl she remembers admiring the authority and the uniforms — and she has recently started studying criminal justice at Columbia College. For her, law enforcement would be a way to help people.

“I don’t like to see people down and out. I like to help them up. To support their dreams of pursuing anything they want to do,” she said. Lamyra Wynn, of Florissant, has a similar reason for her interest in law enforcement: “Working with people and being able to help people. It’s something I like to do,” she said. Wynn, who serves in the Army National Guard, spoke with recruiters from several departments. She said she is thinking about starting with the airport police because she would enjoy the relatively laid-back atmosphere. According to Lt. Ray Rice of the St. Louis County Police Department, the attendees were given a presentation on how to navigate the lengthy application process and tips on making it through. For instance, he said, it was better to admit to previous drug use, which is not necessarily disqualifying, than to be caught lying about it, which is. The event ended with a reading-comprehension test, the first step in making an application. And yes, there were doughnuts.

NEW RATES

GREAT RATES CD/IRA SPECIALS BONUS RATE WITH 49ER CHECKING

3.20 % 3.05 % 2.85 % 2.75 % 2.60 % 2.40 %

APY * APY * APY * APY * APY * APY *

75 55 46 35 28 16

Months Months Months Months Months Months

GREAT RATE WITHOUT 49ER CHECKING 3.15 % APY * 75 Months 3.00 % APY * 55 Months 2.80 % APY * 46 Months 2.70 % APY * 35 Months 2.55 % APY * 28 Months 2.35 % APY * 16 Months ASK US ABOUT OUR GREAT SAVINGS & MONEY MARKET RATES

August 1415, 2018

St. Louis, MO

Held at

* Annual Percentage Yields (APY) are based on quarterly compounding of interest and reinvestment of principal for one year. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Available to any qualified individuals and guarantor trusts. Businesses and organizations with an FCB Checking Account may also qualify for the specials. Limited Time Offer. 49er Bonus available to customers with a 49er checking account with FCB. Rates effective as of date of publication and subject to change without notice. $1,000 minimum deposit required to earn APY.

MISSOURI LOCATIONS South County • 12000 Tesson Ferry Rd. • 314-842-9091 FCB Banks Coming Soon to Florissant at 14040 New Halls Ferry Rd.

ILLINOIS LOCATIONS Collinsville 618-346-9000 Collinsville Hwy 157 618-343-9096 Caseyville 618-345-9096 Maryville 618-346-9090 Troy 618-667-9090 MEMBER FDIC

Highland 618-651-9090 Edwardsville 618-656-9090 Swansea 618-239-9000 O’Fallon 618-622-9090

fcbbanks.com

Belleville 618-235-9090 New Baden 618-588-3511 Albers 618-248-5176 Trenton 618-224-9090


LOCAL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 3

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

LAW & ORDER WEST ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Bodies of two drowning victims pulled from Meramec at Castlewood • Divers recovered the bodies of two drowning victims in the Meramec River at Castlewood State Park where a woman and child went swimming Saturday and did not resurface, said Metro West Fire Protection District Chief Michael D. Thiemann. The woman, 34, and girl, 12, were swimming with a group of five at about 2:30 p.m. in a part of the river where there is a drop off, Thiemann said. The victims’ identities have not been released. A man and two other girls who also went underwater were rescued by people in the area, according to St. Louis County Police. Thiemann said the woman and girl are from the St. Louis area. CAHOKIA > Couple found dead • Police were investigating the deaths of a couple whose bodies were discovered about 11:30 a.m. Friday in their home in the 200 block of West Sixth Street. Authorities said the deaths of William R. Mansfield, 56, and his wife, Pamela Mansfield, 54, do not appear to be suspicious. The bodies were discovered by the woman’s sister, said St. Clair County Coroner Calvin Dye Sr. Dye said it appeared that the couple had been dead for a while. Dye said Saturday the cause of death had not been determined yet and that authorities were waiting for results of a toxicology tests. ST. LOUIS > Three wounded in Friday night shooting • Three people were wounded in a shooting about 10:25 p.m. Friday near the intersection of 14th Street and Cass Avenue, officials said. Police initially reported a man in his 50s was shot in the face and shoulder and a woman, 30, was shot twice in the buttocks. Police later reported a third victim, a woman shot in the leg, had arrived at a hospital. Police on Saturday did not release their conditions. ST. LOUIS > Three more hit by gunfire Saturday night • Three people were hit by gunfire Saturday night in two shootings in St. Louis, police said. A man was hit in the ankle and taken to a hospital just after 9 p.m. in a shooting at north Kingshighway Boulevard and Harney Avenue. Ten minutes later, a man and woman were shot in their legs in the 3600 block of north Taylor Avenue. No other details were available.

PHOTO BY TIM VIZER

St. Louis County police Lt. James Morgan (left) answers a question for Justin Bristol, of Edwardsville, prior to an assessment at a recruitment fair Saturday at Hazelwood Central High School sponsored by the St. Louis County branch of the Ethical Society of Police.

Police agencies push to recruit a more diverse force BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-dispatch

NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Police de-

partments across the country are having trouble filling open positions. So the Ethical Society of Police sponsored its first diversity recruitment fair Saturday to get their message out to people interested in police work. “We’re trying to get people interested in law enforcement. We think it is a noble and honorable profession,” said one of the recruiters, Capt. Kirk Brueggeman of the O’Fallon, Ill., police department. About 40 people attended the event at Hazelwood Central High School. They talked to representatives from 10 area police departments, from St. Louis and St. Louis County to Clayton and St. Louis Lambert International Airport. Alpha Spagner, of St. Louis, is in the Army National Guard and hopes to follow in the footsteps of a cousin who was a police officer. “I want to not only serve my country, but I also want to give back and serve my community while I have the chance,” Spagner said.

The focus of the event was diversity. “Our goal is to change the face or improve the face of the police in the area,” said Shanette Hall, recruiting officer for the St. Louis County Police Department. It’s not just race. Hall said the departments are looking for diversity in terms of gender, culture, religion and even age. Attendees ranged from as young as 20 to 39 or older. Lt. James Morgan of the St. Louis County Police Department, who is president of the Ethical Society of Police, said he pitches police work as a way for a community to improve itself. Rather than complaining about problems with the police, people should join the force and work to change it from the inside, he said. Stephanie Dickson, of Florissant, is a school bus driver for St. Louis Public Schools. She has been thinking about law enforcement for a long time — even as a girl she remembers admiring the authority and the uniforms — and she has recently started studying criminal justice at Columbia College. For her, law enforcement would be a way to help people.

“I don’t like to see people down and out. I like to help them up. To support their dreams of pursuing anything they want to do,” she said. Lamyra Wynn, of Florissant, has a similar reason for her interest in law enforcement: “Working with people and being able to help people. It’s something I like to do,” she said. Wynn, who serves in the Army National Guard, spoke with recruiters from several departments. She said she is thinking about starting with the airport police because she would enjoy the relatively laid-back atmosphere. According to Lt. Ray Rice of the St. Louis County Police Department, the attendees were given a presentation on how to navigate the lengthy application process and tips on making it through. For instance, he said, it was better to admit to previous drug use, which is not necessarily disqualifying, than to be caught lying about it, which is. The event ended with a reading-comprehension test, the first step in making an application. And yes, there were doughnuts.

NEW RATES

GREAT RATES CD/IRA SPECIALS BONUS RATE WITH 49ER CHECKING

3.20 % 3.05 % 2.85 % 2.75 % 2.60 % 2.40 %

APY * APY * APY * APY * APY * APY *

75 55 46 35 28 16

Months Months Months Months Months Months

GREAT RATE WITHOUT 49ER CHECKING 3.15 % APY * 75 Months 3.00 % APY * 55 Months 2.80 % APY * 46 Months 2.70 % APY * 35 Months 2.55 % APY * 28 Months 2.35 % APY * 16 Months ASK US ABOUT OUR GREAT SAVINGS & MONEY MARKET RATES

August 1415, 2018

St. Louis, MO

Held at

* Annual Percentage Yields (APY) are based on quarterly compounding of interest and reinvestment of principal for one year. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Available to any qualified individuals and guarantor trusts. Businesses and organizations with an FCB Checking Account may also qualify for the specials. Limited Time Offer. 49er Bonus available to customers with a 49er checking account with FCB. Rates effective as of date of publication and subject to change without notice. $1,000 minimum deposit required to earn APY.

MISSOURI LOCATIONS South County • 12000 Tesson Ferry Rd. • 314-842-9091 FCB Banks Coming Soon to Florissant at 14040 New Halls Ferry Rd.

ILLINOIS LOCATIONS Collinsville 618-346-9000 Collinsville Hwy 157 618-343-9096 Caseyville 618-345-9096 Maryville 618-346-9090 Troy 618-667-9090 MEMBER FDIC

Highland 618-651-9090 Edwardsville 618-656-9090 Swansea 618-239-9000 O’Fallon 618-622-9090

fcbbanks.com

Belleville 618-235-9090 New Baden 618-588-3511 Albers 618-248-5176 Trenton 618-224-9090


SATURDAY’S BEST

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Wesley Bell says he will address calls for reinvestigation of Brown’s death BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The victory of Ferguson City

Councilman Wesley Bell in the Democratic primary for St. Louis County prosecutor this week is leading to calls for Bell to reopen the investigation into the shooting death of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer in 2014. Those calls have come on social media and elsewhere, including the executive director of the Thurgood Marshall Civil Rights Center in a Washington Post op-ed Friday. Bell spokeswoman Josi Nielsen said that Bell was aware of the requests for a reinvestigation and would address them soon. “It would be irresponsible for Wesley to comment or take a position on any case prior to seeing all the evidence,” Nielson said in a statement. “Wesley’s platform is focused on transparency, expanding diversionary programs, reforming the cash bail system for nonviolent offenders and ensuring that victims are treated with the respect and dignity they deserve.”

Trinetta (center left) and Triniya Brown become emotional during a memorial service Thursday for their brother, Michael Brown, in the apartment complex in Ferguson where Brown was killed by a police officer four years ago.

Brown’s mother called on Missouri Gov. Mike Parson to reopen the investigation in an online petition last month. In a letter accompanying the petition, Lezley McSpadden-Head said St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch’s office presented a case to the grand jury before the police investigation was over and allowed witnesses to lie to grand jurors. She also faulted the quality of the investigation by police and prosecutors and mentioned a grand juror’s lawsuit seeking to speak about the case. After growing slowly at first, there were nearly 16,000 signatures Friday. Justin Hansford, who is also an associate professor of law at Howard University, says in the op-ed that McCulloch has historically been reluctant to charge police in shootings. He also faulted the investigation. “Brown’s killing remains a gaping wound in the nation’s psyche,” he said. Also Friday, McSpadden-Head said she planned to run for a seat on the Ferguson City Council.

CRISTINA M. FLETES • P-D

Joel Currier of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

07/01/2018

Is it ever okay to encourage kids to “tough it out”?

Our MomDocs know. For more information, visit ChildrensMD.org/Sports for trusted health advice from pediatricians who are also moms.


NATION

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Design chosen for memorial honoring 26 victims of Sandy Hook shooting ASSOCIATED PRESS

HARTFORD, CONN. • A committee in

Newtown, Conn., has chosen a design for a permanent memorial to honor the pupils and educators killed in the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The special town commission chose a design by San Francisco-based architecture and design firm SWA. It features a coiling wooded walkway leading past two natural ponds to a sycamore tree planted in the middle of a small man-made reflecting pool, which will be inscribed with the victims’ names. The tree will be planted using what town officials call “sacred soil,” the incinerated remains of tens of thousands of teddy bears, flowers, candles, letters and cards that were brought to the town in the days after the shooting on Dec. 14, 2012. The plan calls for plants that will provide year-round color, such as flowers that attract butterflies in the summer, maple and birch trees that change color in the fall, evergreens and arctic sun dogwoods that will provide color in the winter and

white flowering dogwoods and geraniums in the spring. Alan Martin, the vice chairman of the Sandy Hook Permanent Memorial Commission, said the design was picked from 189 that were submitted and received overwhelming approval from the families of the 20 children and six educators killed at the school. “Three of the members of commission are parents who lost their children in the massacre, and one serves as a liaison to the rest of the families,” Martin said. “We’ve always deferred to the opinion of the families. We decided on this with a consensus that frankly I was not expecting.” The board of selectmen is expected to give final approval to the design in September. The project is expected to cost about $250,000 and will be paid for using money donated to the town after the massacre. Martin said plans were for the memorial, which will be situated on a donated 5-acre site near the elementary school, to be dedicated on Dec. 14, 2019, the seventh anniversary of the shooting.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A lone sycamore will be planted using what Newtown, Conn., officials call “sacred soil,” the incinerated remains of toys, flowers, candles and cards left in memory of the victims.

07/01/2018

Is it ever okay to encourage kids to “tough it out”?

Our MomDocs know. For more information, visit ChildrensMD.org/Sports for trusted health advice from pediatricians who are also moms.


SATURDAY’S BEST

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Farm group backs Hawley in Senate race Save Money, Time & No Mess! FREE Estimates!

Trusted Since 1987

BY KURT ERICKSON • St. Louis Post-dispatch

Before

After

Why Replace? SIMPLY RESURFACE! Our Pebblestone/Epoxy is a permanent and durable resurfacing product (available in many colors) that can be applied directly over existing concrete- NO NEED TO REPLACE!

636-946-6464 Military & Senior Citizen Discounts!

New Installation Huge Fall $Any 250-$1500 OFF Savings! Limit 1 coupon per job. Not valid with jobs in progress. Min. apply. Not valid with other offers. Expires 10/15/18 POST.

See Our Customer Reviews At: www.archwaycoatings.com

What Makes Archway Industrial Different? Our Dream Team with

Over 170 Years Combined Experience! We Resurface... Driveways • Steps • Patios • Porches • Pool Decks • Garages & More!

Borders Also Available! ArchwayCoatings.com

JEFFERSON CITY • Against the backdrop of a trade war that has sent crop prices spiraling downward, Missouri’s largest farming organization put its weight behind Attorney General Josh Hawley in his bid for the U.S. Senate. After interviews of the Republican and his Democratic opponent, Sen. Claire McCaskill, the Missouri Farm Bureau announced its members had endorsed Hawley, 38, a lawyer, over the two-term incumbent in one of the most pivotal Senate races in the nation. Hawley, a first-time officeholder, also has been endorsed by President Donald Trump, whose trade war with China has put soybean prices under pressure. On Friday, after the U.S. Department of Agriculture boosted its outlook for harvests, prices fell 2.5 percent to $8.65 a bushel. Hawley said he supported the tariffs that had been imposed against China as a way to strike a new deal on trade. “We need to open up markets. We need to develop new markets,” he told delegates at the Farm Bureau meeting. In an earlier interview, Hawley told the Post-Dispatch he believed farmers understood the long-term goal of the president. “The folks I talk to, they say, ‘Look, we think the president is fighting for us. We’re willing to give him the benefit of the doubt and we think he’s going to get a better deal,’” Hawley said. Hawley also supports the $12 billion aid package Trump has announced as a way to soften the effects of the trade war on farmers. “I thought his package of aid to farmers was absolutely necessary. You know, farmers are going to get the brunt of the retaliation, and they need to be supported,” Hawley said. “We need to keep the pressure up.” The pick was not a surprise after the group passed over McCaskill in her two previous elections, but McCaskill had hoped the organization would take a different path. “I don’t expect your endorsement,” she told the attendees. “But if there was no endorsement that would be an improvement.”

How to go from “Laminate to Granite” in a weekend of fun Match Co unte with Gian rtop Cabinet Pi Nuvo aint!

Available in: • Chocolate Brown • Slate • Sicilian Sand • Bombay Black • White Diamond wned Family O

$

7799

per Kit

DES PERES

12017 Manchester Rd. 314-821-1616 A Family Tradition Since 1865 www.reinekedecorating.com

’S

E ! L A RS S CH T EA S BE 65 Y IN N PIO

AM

WINDOWS • SUNROOMS • SIDING • HOME EXTERIORS

50

% * OFF

WINDOWS (SELECT STYLES)

WITH PARTICIPATION IN THE YES! PROGRAM OFFERS EXPIRE 8-31-18

EVERY COMFORT 365 WINDOW® COMES WITH OUR EXCLUSIVE WARRANTY - YOU BREAK IT, WE FIX IT!†

*

35% OFF SUNROOMS & SIDING

WITH PARTICIPATION IN THE YES! PROGRAM OFFERS EXPIRE 8-31-18

EVERY CHAMPION SUNROOM IS BUILT RIGHT HERE IN THE USA

** PLUS! 60 MONTH LOW-INTEREST FINANCING

Visit SaleAtChampion.com to download a certificate for:

YOUR EXCLUSIVE SAVINGS

29 Cassens Ct • Fenton

FROM OUR FACTORY TO YOUR HOME - THAT’S FACTORY DIRECT!

636-764-3707 | SaleAtChampion.com DON’T MISS THIS OFFER! BOOK ONLINE OR CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE! *40% national windows discount applies to white double-hung and hopper windows with standard installation. Minimum purchase of 3 windows required. 25% national sunroom and siding discount requires purchase of 200 sq. ft. complete sunroom or 1,200 sq. ft. of siding. Earn up to an additional 10% off with participation in the Yes! Program, making your window discount a total of up to 50% off, and sunroom and siding discount up to 35% off. All discounts apply to the MSRP cost. No adjustments can be made on prior sales. Offer subject to change. See website or a Champion Representative for details.. ** Subject to qualifying credit approval. Fixed APR of 6.99% for 60 months. Based on each $1,000 financed, 5 monthly interest-only payments of $5.83 followed by 55 monthly principal and interest payments of $21.30. Financing for GreenSky consumer credit programs is provided by federally insured, federal and state chartered financial institutions without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, or familial status. †The Champion Limited Lifetime Warranty applies to Comfort 365 Windows® as long as the original purchaser owns the home. See website or a Champion Representative for details. Offer expires 8-31-18.©Champion Opco LLC, 2018.


NATION

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A7

‘Undetectable’ plastic 3D-printed guns have already been spotted

GOT A STORY TIP? Have the scoop on a local news story? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. Tips are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous. stltoday.com/newstips

Save Money, Time & No Mess! FREE Estimates!

Trusted Since 1987

BY HUGO MARTIN Los angeles Times

Before

After

Why Replace? SIMPLY RESURFACE! Our Pebblestone/Epoxy is a permanent and durable resurfacing product (available in many colors) that can be applied directly over existing concrete- NO NEED TO REPLACE!

636-946-6464 Military & Senior Citizen Discounts!

New Installation Huge Fall $Any 250-$1500 OFF Savings! Limit 1 coupon per job. Not valid with jobs in progress. Min. apply. Not valid with other offers. Expires 10/15/18 POST.

See Our Customer Reviews At: www.archwaycoatings.com

What Makes Archway Industrial Different? Our Dream Team with

Over 170 Years Combined Experience! We Resurface... Driveways • Steps • Patios • Porches • Pool Decks • Garages & More!

Borders Also Available! ArchwayCoatings.com

During the controversy surrounding the release of blueprints for 3D-printed plastic guns, the Transportation Security Administration said airport security screeners had been able to spot the so-called untraceable and undetectable weapons in carry-on bags. The 3D-printed gun controversy began in June when Defense Distributed of Austin, Texas, reached a settlement with the federal government to allow it to make the plans for the guns available for download. Then a federal judge in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order to stop the release of blueprints, and a coalition of 20 state attorneys general filed a motion Aug. 2 to continue to block the release of the plans. But TSA officials say 3D-printed guns and firearm components have been in circulation for years and have been found on passengers trying to board commercial flights. Since August 2016, the TSA has detected two 3Dprinted guns and two 3D-printed firearm components, all of which were voluntarily abandoned by the passengers who packed them in their carry-on bags, TSA spokesman Michael Bilello said. The most recent component was discovered in January at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas. “TSA officers are trained and on the lookout for 3D guns,” he said. “We have proven detection capabilities and screening protocols in place.” Like all firearms, explosives and replica weapons, 3D-printed guns are prohibited in the cabins of commercial planes. Passengers caught trying to bring any weapons into a flight are turned over to local law enforcement for prosecution and could face civil penalties of up to $9,800 imposed by the TSA. “It makes no sense to make downloadable guns available to any felon, domestic abuser or terrorist,” Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said. Ferguson is one of many who have sued to block the distribution of designs for 3D guns.

How to go from “Laminate to Granite” in a weekend of fun Match Co unte with Gian rtop Cabinet Pi Nuvo aint!

Available in: • Chocolate Brown • Slate • Sicilian Sand • Bombay Black • White Diamond wned Family O

$

7799

per Kit

DES PERES

12017 Manchester Rd. 314-821-1616 A Family Tradition Since 1865 www.reinekedecorating.com

’S

E ! L A RS S CH T EA S BE 65 Y IN N PIO

AM

WINDOWS • SUNROOMS • SIDING • HOME EXTERIORS

50

% * OFF

WINDOWS (SELECT STYLES)

WITH PARTICIPATION IN THE YES! PROGRAM OFFERS EXPIRE 8-31-18

EVERY COMFORT 365 WINDOW® COMES WITH OUR EXCLUSIVE WARRANTY - YOU BREAK IT, WE FIX IT!†

*

35% OFF SUNROOMS & SIDING

WITH PARTICIPATION IN THE YES! PROGRAM OFFERS EXPIRE 8-31-18

EVERY CHAMPION SUNROOM IS BUILT RIGHT HERE IN THE USA

** PLUS! 60 MONTH LOW-INTEREST FINANCING

Visit SaleAtChampion.com to download a certificate for:

YOUR EXCLUSIVE SAVINGS

29 Cassens Ct • Fenton

FROM OUR FACTORY TO YOUR HOME - THAT’S FACTORY DIRECT!

636-764-3707 | SaleAtChampion.com DON’T MISS THIS OFFER! BOOK ONLINE OR CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE! *40% national windows discount applies to white double-hung and hopper windows with standard installation. Minimum purchase of 3 windows required. 25% national sunroom and siding discount requires purchase of 200 sq. ft. complete sunroom or 1,200 sq. ft. of siding. Earn up to an additional 10% off with participation in the Yes! Program, making your window discount a total of up to 50% off, and sunroom and siding discount up to 35% off. All discounts apply to the MSRP cost. No adjustments can be made on prior sales. Offer subject to change. See website or a Champion Representative for details.. ** Subject to qualifying credit approval. Fixed APR of 6.99% for 60 months. Based on each $1,000 financed, 5 monthly interest-only payments of $5.83 followed by 55 monthly principal and interest payments of $21.30. Financing for GreenSky consumer credit programs is provided by federally insured, federal and state chartered financial institutions without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, or familial status. †The Champion Limited Lifetime Warranty applies to Comfort 365 Windows® as long as the original purchaser owns the home. See website or a Champion Representative for details. Offer expires 8-31-18.©Champion Opco LLC, 2018.


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FROM A1

M 1 • SUNDAY • 08.12.2018

“I am not reliable for the party structure. That causes problems, but it actually is who I am. I am very independent, and I think Missourians recognize that. At least I hope they do.” U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill

Senator has survived the rising red tide in Missouri MCCASKILL • FROM A1

to unite us.” Republicans call her a raging opportunist, a liberal in centrist clothing. “Whenever it is on the line, whenever it is a deciding vote, she is a consistent liberal,” former state Republican Party chairman John Hancock said, pointing to her votes for Obamacare and against Trump’s first Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch. “That is what (her Republican opponent, Josh Hawley) is going to be pushing. She is going to be pushing she is a true moderate, she is the centrist of the Senate,” Hancock said. “The public can’t believe both of those things at the same time, so somebody’s going to have to win that argument.”

A COUNTER HISTORY More than any Missouri Democrat, McCaskill, 65, has survived a rising red current in a state fertile for the populist, evangelical, rural coalition that elevated Donald Trump to the presidency in 2016. McCaskill is the only Democrat in the last 36 years to win a U.S. Senate seat in Missouri, the only to be re-elected since 1974. Now she faces in Hawley potentially her strongest Senate opponent, two years after Trump blitzed Hillary Clinton in Missouri by a wider margin than favorite son Harry S. Truman won it in 1948. With the voices of her late mother and grandmother in her ear, McCaskill — who once described herself as a “motor mouth” — hopes her passions are viewed as conciliation, not confrontation. “I hear my grandmother’s voice right now saying, ‘Work hard, always work hard, work harder than anyone else, and it will benefit you in life,’” McCaskill said. “I think that I am happiest while I am both independent and trying to get people to agree on stuff,” she continued. “I am not reliable for the party structure. That causes problems, but it actually is who I am. I am very independent, and I think Missourians recognize that. At least I hope they do.” A big moment will come in the middle of the fall campaign, when the Senate is expected to vote on Trump’s second Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh. Hawley, who was 2 when McCaskill was first elected to the Missouri Legislature, is framing it as a prime test of McCaskill’s willingness to step across the aisle. “Her views are tracking very predictably with the liberal elites,” Hawley said. “I think that’s a real shame because those people don’t represent or reflect the state of Missouri.” Independent ratings, however, consistently show McCaskill near the Senate’s ideological center. The nonpartisan website in 2017 ranked McCaskill less liberal than 41 of the other 47 senators in her Democratic caucus. Only Sens. Joe Donnelly, DInd., Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., are ranked as more conservative among the 49 Democrats or independents now in the Senate in the nonpartisan “VoteView”

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Sen. Claire McCaskill sings the national anthem on July 3 alongside Gateway Arch Superintendent Michael Ward (left) and Sen. Roy Blunt during the opening ceremony for the new Arch museum in St. Louis.

CLAIRE MCCASKILL Job • U.S. senator, elected 2007 Age • 65 Born • Rolla, Mo. Education • Undergraduate and law degree from the University of Missouri Previous elected offices • Missouri auditor, 1999-2007; Missouri House of Representatives, 1983-1988; Jackson County prosecutor and assistant prosecutor, 1978-1999 (with the exception of three years in which she was in private practice)

matrix. All three, like McCaskill, face tough elections in November. While battered for her vote against Gorsuch, McCaskill also voted for many in Trump’s Cabinet and roughly twothirds of his judicial nominees so far. She has supported him on issues like the need for the Keystone XL pipeline and Trump’s decision to roll back former President Barack Obama’s “Waters of the USA” environmental initiative. McCaskill has been a major player in getting bipartisan legislation passed on everything from internet sex trafficking (a coalition that included Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin) to making generic drugs and hearing aids more available and at lower cost (with Sen. Susan Collins, RMaine). When Collins was the leading Republican on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, the newly elected McCaskill suggested the committee sit alternately by party, rather than Republicans and Democrats on opposite sides of the dais as all other committees do. McCaskill credited that seating arrangement with her having “quiet conversations” with Republicans that led to political alliances exposing corruption in military spending. Collins, who always shows up near McCaskill in the middle of the Senate’s ideological ratings, said: “We’ve really worked to-

gether on a lot of issues over the years — homeland security issues, government shutdown issues where she shares the same view that I have that government shutdowns are never constructive. “Claire is very smart, she is tough, but she is also collaborative when you share a common cause,” Collins said. Norm Ornstein, a veteran political scientist at the rightleaning American Enterprise Institute, said that McCaskill is “very close to being the median senator,” ideologically. “Now that doesn’t make her a conservative of the Joe Manchin variety,” Ornstein said. “She is very strong on issues like women’s reproductive rights, and immigration, and protecting voting. But she is more fiscally conservative than I would say the average senator.” McCaskill voted for the Affordable Care Act, the controversial health care law that has split the political parties since its passage in her first term in the Senate. But McCaskill has acknowledged problems in the law, and she was among 24 senators — 12 Republicans and 12 Democrats, led by Collins — who late last year tried to come up with fixes after Republican attempts to repeal failed. But with lukewarm support from leadership, the effort faltered. McCaskill said she voted against former Sen. Harry Reid as her party’s Senate leader in 2014 because she had “had it up to my eyeballs” with partisanship. But Republicans say Reid’s successor, New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, who is so close to McCaskill that she paid to have Schumer and his wife join McCaskill’s family at a Cancun vacation, has been just as partisan. Hawley calls Schumer a “New York liberal” and McCaskill’s “vacation buddy.” “Well, certainly he has moments when he is not (bipartisan), and I tell him so,” Mc-

Caskill said of Schumer. “In fact I have told him to be quiet and quit getting his mug all over television, that he is not always helpful.”

GOP NARRATIVE McCaskill beat Republican incumbent Sen. Jim Talent in the Democratic wave year of 2006. In 2012, McCaskill trailed Republican Todd Akin until his mid-August statement about “legitimate rape” propelled McCaskill to re-election. “So she has won two statewide races in the last decadeplus where her favorable (poll) rating has been under 50 percent,” said Hancock, the former state Republican chair. “It does happen, but at some point you got to think that will catch up to her. Of the three Senate races she has had, I am certain this will be the roughest because of the opponent, because of the environment. Trump is still sitting in a pretty good place in Missouri.” That could explain why McCaskill has spent so much time campaigning in rural Missouri, holding town halls in counties where the president won 2-1, or more. McCaskill’s longtime advisers say she does that partly because she grew up in rural Missouri, partly because she learned in a 2004 loss for governor to Republican Matt Blunt that she needed to rewrite the old Democratic formula in Missouri. “There was a playbook once upon a time that all Democrats were supposed to do was turn out enough voters in Kansas City and St. Louis to win,” said Adrianne Marsh, McCaskill’s 2012 campaign manager. “She said there was nothing about that playbook that ever felt right to her. In 2004, she learned she was right, and that it wasn’t a winning strategy for a couple of reasons: You end up not listening to what’s important to the whole state and, from a practical standpoint, there aren’t enough votes.” Former Democratic Gov. Jay

Nixon says that “when it comes to policy, she is eminently reasonable,” which irks Republicans, especially when they expected to beat her in 2012. “They feel like Akin was the right one and they could have won that race,” Nixon said. McCaskill’s staffers refer to her free tweeting and occasional foot-in-mouth as a “hurricane” or “going rogue.” But they say her communication style can be traced to her mother, Betty Anne Ward McCaskill, who died days before the 2012 election. Betty Anne, her daughters said, could strike up a 15-minute conversation with a stranger on the other side of a gasoline station pump and, irrespective of background, find commonality in grandchildren or something else. McCaskill wrote in her book “Plenty Ladylike” that she got her “reputation for being direct and to the point” from her father, Bill, but that her mother — “the original multitasker” — preached commonality and common sense. “Claire was the one who was fun to play with, but at the same time there was just this sense of the kids and people around Claire — they wanted to know what she said, they wanted to know what she was doing,” McCaskill’s sister, Anne Morah, said. “People felt the same way about my mom. She was just a strong presence in so many people’s lives.” Claire McCaskill called her mother “just one of the most open and authentic people that I have known in my life, and I am so grateful. “I heard her voice” after the 2016 election, Sen. McCaskill said. “‘Yes, Donald Trump won the state by 19 points, but these are still the same people that you have known all these years. Get out there and listen to them.’” Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

Only ‘happy accidents’ in county library’s Bob Ross painting class BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • The full

Bob Ross experience began with soothing jazz. A group of adults holding paint brushes watched as the man they all came to see appeared on a projector screen: Unbuttoned shirt showing a bit of chest hair, oversized pallet in hand and that halo of perfectly rounded curls. Bob Ross greeted the painters in his soothing voice. Library assistant Lauren Rhodes paused the video. “Warning: Your painting might not be as glorious as what Bob Ross is about to create,” she said standing next to a lifesize Bob Ross cutout the library had ordered from Amazon. “But it’s OK. Just be like Bob and relax.” The students were the lucky few that got a spot in “Painting with Bob Ross,” the most popular new class at the St. Louis County Library. “We have a waiting list for the

PAINT WITH BOB ROSS CLASSES There are two upcoming sessions of Paint with Bob Ross at St. Louis County libraries. Daniel Boone Branch, 300 Clarkson Road in Ellisville Class is held the second Thursday of every month in the afternoon. Registration opens at the beginning of each month. The September class is booked, but there may still be spots on the wait list. It will be Sept. 13 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Florissant Valley Branch, 195 New Florissant Road The next class will be held Oct. 17 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. There were 25 open spots at press time.

waiting list for this one,” said Anne Bradley, assistant manager at the Daniel Boone Branch in Ellisville, where the class launched in May. The paint-along event provides participants the paint, canvas and, of course, episodes

of “The Joy of Painting,” which Ross hosted from 1983 to 1994 on PBS, to follow. A grant funds the project, making it free to participate. As the class painted on Thursday, the onscreen Ross colored a charming sunset scene and dropped gems of wisdom. “Each bush is an individual. They should be treated as such,” he said and later added: “Trees need friends, too.” At times, the novice painters struggled to match Ross’ laidback vibe. They stared at the screen with furrowed brows and shot looks at their neighbors’ canvases during their attempts to re-create fluffy clouds and bushes. “He said yellow makes the bush come alive,” said Maria Viehman of Wildwood, looking down at her art. “I think mine died.” Ross turned to the camera before starting to form a lake. “Now let’s go crazy,” he said. The students chuckled but got

right to work. Near the end of the class, Ross introduced an unexpected cabin over a portion of the riverbank. Some of the library painters were taken aback. “Well, I’m not doing a cabin,” said Beth Wakely, of Wildwood. “I just don’t have the real estate.” This sort of independence is very much encouraged, said Rhodes, who leads the class. “Bob Ross is all about: This is your world and you can make it what you want it to be,” she said. Rhodes, along with assistant branch manager Bradley, thought up the class last spring but soon realized that Bob Ross paint-alongs have been popping up at libraries across the country, including branches in Utah, New York, Michigan and Florida, among others. The trend taps into the painting instructor’s unlikely cult status years after his death in 1995 at the age of 52. The movement is fueled by internet odes to his inspirational sayings, calm de-

meanor and painting skills. A “The Joy of Painting” dance remix has more than 15 million views on YouTube. Ross is now a Chia Pet, a board game, a popular Halloween costume and a face on inspirational T-shirts. The website FiveThirtyEight even did a statistical analysis of all 403 episodes of “The Joy of Painting” revealing facts such as: There’s a 93 percent statistical probability that if Bob Ross paints a tree he will paint a friend for that tree. But most Bob Ross superfans have never actually painted with the public television icon. The library classes hope to give them that chance. After success at the Daniel Boone Branch, other county libraries, including the Grant’s View branch in South County and the Florissant Valley Branch, created their own versions of the class. Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com


POLITICS

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 08.12.2018

“I am not reliable for the party structure. That causes problems, but it actually is who I am. I am very independent, and I think Missourians recognize that. At least I hope they do.” U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill

Senator has survived the rising red tide in Missouri MCCASKILL • FROM A1

to unite us.” Republicans call her a raging opportunist, a liberal in centrist clothing. “Whenever it is on the line, whenever it is a deciding vote, she is a consistent liberal,” former state Republican Party chairman John Hancock said, pointing to her votes for Obamacare and against Trump’s first Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch. “That is what (her Republican opponent, Josh Hawley) is going to be pushing. She is going to be pushing she is a true moderate, she is the centrist of the Senate,” Hancock said. “The public can’t believe both of those things at the same time, so somebody’s going to have to win that argument.”

A COUNTER HISTORY More than any Missouri Democrat, McCaskill, 65, has survived a rising red current in a state fertile for the populist, evangelical, rural coalition that elevated Donald Trump to the presidency in 2016. McCaskill is the only Missouri Democrat to serve a full U.S. Senate term in the last 36 years, the only to be re-elected since 1974. Now she faces in Hawley potentially her strongest Senate opponent, two years after Trump blitzed Hillary Clinton in Missouri by a wider margin than favorite son Harry S. Truman won it in 1948. With the voices of her late mother and grandmother in her ear, McCaskill — who once described herself as a “motor mouth” — hopes her passions are viewed as conciliation, not confrontation. “I hear my grandmother’s voice right now saying, ‘Work hard, always work hard, work harder than anyone else, and it will benefit you in life,’” McCaskill said. “I think that I am happiest while I am both independent and trying to get people to agree on stuff,” she continued. “I am not reliable for the party structure. That causes problems, but it actually is who I am. I am very independent, and I think Missourians recognize that. At least I hope they do.” A big moment will come in the middle of the fall campaign, when the Senate is expected to vote on Trump’s second Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh. Hawley, who was 2 when McCaskill was first elected to the Missouri Legislature, is framing it as a prime test of McCaskill’s willingness to step across the aisle. “Her views are tracking very predictably with the liberal elites,” Hawley said. “I think that’s a real shame because those people don’t represent or reflect the state of Missouri.” Independent ratings, however, consistently show McCaskill near the Senate’s ideological center. The nonpartisan website in 2017 ranked McCaskill less liberal than 41 of the other 47 senators in her Democratic caucus. Only Sens. Joe Donnelly, DInd., Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., are ranked as more conservative among the 49 Democrats or independents now in the Senate

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Sen. Claire McCaskill sings the national anthem on July 3 alongside Gateway Arch Superintendent Michael Ward (left) and Sen. Roy Blunt during the opening ceremony for the new Arch museum in St. Louis.

CLAIRE MCCASKILL Job • U.S. senator, elected 2006 Age • 65 Born • Rolla, Mo. Previous elected offices • Missouri auditor, 1999-2007; Jackson County prosecutor, 19931998; Jackson County Legislature, 1991-1992; Missouri House, 19831988 Other jobs • Assistant prosecutor, lawyer in private practice

in the nonpartisan “VoteView” matrix. All three, like McCaskill, face tough elections in November. While battered for her vote against Gorsuch, McCaskill also voted for many in Trump’s Cabinet and roughly twothirds of his judicial nominees so far. She has supported him on issues like the need for the Keystone XL pipeline and Trump’s decision to roll back former President Barack Obama’s “Waters of the USA” environmental initiative. McCaskill has been a major player in getting bipartisan legislation passed on everything from internet sex trafficking (a coalition that included Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin) to making generic drugs and hearing aids more available and at lower cost (with Sen. Susan Collins, RMaine). When Collins was the leading Republican on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, the newly elected McCaskill suggested the committee sit alternately by party, rather than Republicans and Democrats on opposite sides of the dais as all other committees do. McCaskill credited that seating arrangement with her having “quiet conversations” with Republicans that led to political alliances exposing corruption in military spending. Collins, who always shows up near McCaskill in the middle of the Senate’s ideological ratings, said: “We’ve really worked together on a lot of issues over the years — homeland security is-

sues, government shutdown issues where she shares the same view that I have that government shutdowns are never constructive. “Claire is very smart, she is tough, but she is also collaborative when you share a common cause,” Collins said. Norm Ornstein, a veteran political scientist at the rightleaning American Enterprise Institute, said that McCaskill is “very close to being the median senator,” ideologically. “Now that doesn’t make her a conservative of the Joe Manchin variety,” Ornstein said. “She is very strong on issues like women’s reproductive rights, and immigration, and protecting voting. But she is more fiscally conservative than I would say the average senator.” McCaskill voted for the Affordable Care Act, the controversial health care law that has split the political parties since its passage in her first term in the Senate. But McCaskill has acknowledged problems in the law, and she was among 24 senators — 12 Republicans and 12 Democrats, led by Collins — who late last year tried to come up with fixes after Republican attempts to repeal failed. But with lukewarm support from leadership, the effort faltered. McCaskill said she voted against former Sen. Harry Reid as her party’s Senate leader in 2014 because she had “had it up to my eyeballs” with partisanship. But Republicans say Reid’s successor, New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, who is so close to McCaskill that she paid to have Schumer and his wife join McCaskill’s family at a Cancun vacation, has been just as partisan. Hawley calls Schumer a “New York liberal” and McCaskill’s “vacation buddy.” “Well, certainly he has moments when he is not (bipartisan), and I tell him so,” McCaskill said of Schumer. “In fact I have told him to be quiet

and quit getting his mug all over television, that he is not always helpful.”

GOP NARRATIVE McCaskill beat Republican incumbent Sen. Jim Talent in the Democratic wave year of 2006. In 2012, McCaskill trailed Republican Todd Akin until his mid-August statement about “legitimate rape” propelled McCaskill to re-election. “So she has won two statewide races in the last decadeplus where her favorable (poll) rating has been under 50 percent,” said Hancock, the former state Republican chair. “It does happen, but at some point you got to think that will catch up to her. Of the three Senate races she has had, I am certain this will be the roughest because of the opponent, because of the environment. Trump is still sitting in a pretty good place in Missouri.” That could explain why McCaskill has spent so much time campaigning in rural Missouri, holding town halls in counties where the president won 2-1, or more. McCaskill’s longtime advisers say she does that partly because she grew up in rural Missouri, partly because she learned in a 2004 loss for governor to Republican Matt Blunt that she needed to rewrite the old Democratic formula in Missouri. “There was a playbook once upon a time that all Democrats were supposed to do was turn out enough voters in Kansas City and St. Louis to win,” said Adrianne Marsh, McCaskill’s 2012 campaign manager. “She said there was nothing about that playbook that ever felt right to her. In 2004, she learned she was right, and that it wasn’t a winning strategy for a couple of reasons: You end up not listening to what’s important to the whole state and, from a practical standpoint, there aren’t enough votes.” Former Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon says that “when it comes to policy, she is eminently rea-

sonable,” which irks Republicans, especially when they expected to beat her in 2012. “They feel like Akin was the right one and they could have won that race,” Nixon said. McCaskill’s staffers refer to her free tweeting and occasional foot-in-mouth as a “hurricane” or “going rogue.” But they say her communication style can be traced to her mother, Betty Anne Ward McCaskill, who died days before the 2012 election. Betty Anne, her daughters said, could strike up a 15-minute conversation with a stranger on the other side of a gasoline station pump and, irrespective of background, find commonality in grandchildren or something else. McCaskill wrote in her book “Plenty Ladylike” that she got her “reputation for being direct and to the point” from her father, Bill, but that her mother — “the original multitasker” — preached commonality and common sense. “Claire was the one who was fun to play with, but at the same time there was just this sense of the kids and people around Claire — they wanted to know what she said, they wanted to know what she was doing,” McCaskill’s sister, Anne Morah, said. “People felt the same way about my mom. She was just a strong presence in so many people’s lives.” Claire McCaskill called her mother “just one of the most open and authentic people that I have known in my life, and I am so grateful. “I heard her voice” after the 2016 election, Sen. McCaskill said. “‘Yes, Donald Trump won the state by 19 points, but these are still the same people that you have known all these years. Get out there and listen to them.’” Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

Wisconsin Democrats crowd in for chance to challenge Walker BY SCOTT BAUER Associated Press

MADISON, WIS. • Wisconsin

Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican, has been warning for months about a “blue wave” coming this fall, but so many Democrats are eager to ride it that it is a struggle for any dominant challenger to emerge. Eight Democrats are taking on Walker as he seeks a third term, a sign of just how badly the party wants to dethrone one of the GOP’s most recognizable governors. Walker’s strong antiunion moves made him a demon to the left and catapulted him to the national stage for a brief 2016 presidential run. State schools chief Tony Evers, who has skirmished with Walker on a number of issues over the years, enters Tuesday’s primary as the best-known Democrat. Though he leads in polls, many voters are undecided, and some challengers

Walker

Evers

are counting on a surge from younger voters to help them topple Evers, 66. “We’ve been ignored by outof-touch politicians,” said Kelda Roys, 39, a former state lawmaker who got noticed early in the campaign with a video that showed her breastfeeding her daughter. Roys argues she is the one to appeal to millennials, Gen Xers and suburban married women. The primary will serve as a test of Democratic enthusiasm in a state that has long been associated with liberal politics but has been trending red and narrowly voted for President Donald Trump in 2016. The large

field of Democratic challengers to Walker is the latest example of the energy in the party as it tries to regain ground, especially in the Upper Midwest. Even though Wisconsin has trended red in recent years, Democrats are optimistic they will re-elect Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and defeat Walker. And they’re counting on more than the usual bump the party out of power gets in a midterm election. Their blue wave talk began in January when they won a special legislative race in a conservative district, continued with a liberal candidate’s victory in a statewide Supreme Court race in April and soared again with another special election victory in conservative territory in June. “For the first time since the dawn of the Scott Walker era, Democrats have reason for optimism that the political environment will favor our nomi-

nee,” Democratic strategist Joe Zepecki said. “The political environment nationally is making it very difficult to run as a Republican right now.” Walker has a great story to tell — Wisconsin’s unemployment is at record lows — but he must battle against the national tide that favors Democrats, Republican strategist Mark Graul said. Also Tuesday, Republican voters will pick between two fervent Trump supporters to take on Baldwin. Former Marine Kevin Nicholson, running as an outsider, is running against state Sen. Leah Vukmir, a 15year veteran of the Legislature who has the state GOP endorsement. Trump has not endorsed in the Senate primary, but the candidates’ fealty to him has been a major point of contention in the race’s waning days. Footage from 2016 showing Vukmir saying Trump was “offensive to everyone” got recy-

cled two weeks before the election, with Nicholson saying it showed she wouldn’t stand with him. Though both Vukmir and Nicholson initially supported other GOP candidates in 2016, they eventually backed Trump in the general election. Polls showed the GOP primary race to be a dead heat. In the governor’s race, Evers tried to hold off a push from younger candidates Roys and state firefighters union leader Mahlon Mitchell, 41, who argue that they are a better matchup against Walker. Both Roys and M itchell snagged a big-name endorsement from potential 2020 Democratic presidential candidates — California Sen. Kamala Harris for Mitchell and New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand for Roys. If elected, Mitchell would be Wisconsin’s first black governor, and Roys would be the first woman to hold the office.


FROM A1

08.12.2018 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

“I think it’s about being where the people are and holding the values that they hold, embracing the way of life that we live here. I’m proud of our way of life. I’m proud to be from rural Missouri.” Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley

Republican candidate wants return to small-town values HAWLEY • FROM A1

to take that mindset to the U.S. Senate, after he easily beat a crowded field of contenders vying to run against McCaskill in November in one of the most watched races in the nation. His message during the primary campaign mirrored many of the legal battles he has fought: America needs to return to the same small-town values he saw growing up in Lexington, Mo. “The heartland way of life is really at stake,” Hawley told the Post-Dispatch. “I think it’s the great crisis of our day. I think there’s a real sense out there that access to the middle class, the ability to stay in the middle class, to live that kind of life, is in serious jeopardy. “I think protecting that and defending that is extremely important,” he said. The message of rural and often religious values at a time when Missouri’s Democratic vote comes largely out of its two largest cities is a switch from his first successful campaign for office, when Hawley called himself a “conservative outsider” in taking down two more experienced officeholders in 2016. Hawley cruised to victory in that maiden run for office, knocking off fellow Columbia Republican Kurt Schaefer, a former state senator, and then beating Democrat Teresa Hensley, a former Cass County prosecutor. In winning, Hawley became the first Republican to hold the seat in 20 years. Hawley, a constitutional law professor at the University of Missouri before his leap into politics, clerked for Chief Justice John Roberts at the U.S. Supreme Court and has served as an attorney in cases before the high court. He graduated from Rockhurst High School in Kansas City, graduated from Stanford University and received his law degree at Yale. McCaskill scoffs at Hawley’s attempt to connect with rural Missouri and said his Ivy League résumé means he is “obviously a very intelligent man.” But, she said, “I am pretty certain he has never looked Missouri in the eye. I am pretty sure he has not ferreted out waste and abuse over years of experience. I am pretty sure he is not as knowledgeable as I am about a lot of the public policy issues.” Similarly, Hawley is trying to cast McCaskill as an elite, while he is a defender of small-town values and religious freedom. “I think it’s about being where the people are and holding the values that they hold, embracing the way of life that we live here. I’m proud of our way of life. I’m proud to be from rural Missouri,” Hawley said.

ALL-IN WITH TRUMP An outline of the coming campaign emerged quickly after Tuesday’s primary vote when Hawley issued a demand that McCaskill debate him on a “flatbed truck.” McCaskill responded on Twitter that Hawley was standing on a utility trailer, not a flatbed truck, hinting that her Republican opponent was out of touch with basic transportation terminology. Hawley responded to that with his own zinger by tweeting a picture of a recreational vehicle and an airplane, referencing a June

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Josh Hawley (left) greets David Hoffman, of St. Peters, as Hawley starts his campaign for U.S. Senate with a “Let’s Debate” event with supporters Wednesday at the Republican National Committee field office in St. Charles.

JOSH HAWLEY Job • Missouri attorney general, elected 2016 Age • 38 Born • Springdale, Ark. Previous elected office • None Previous jobs • University of Missouri law professor, Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, Hogan Lovells law firm

dust-up when McCaskill was touring the state in an RV, but flew in her husband’s plane after events ended for the day to either St. Louis or Kansas City. Hawley has gone all-in with President Donald Trump, who, after winning Missouri by 19 points in 2016, has endorsed Hawley and held two rallies and fundraisers on his behalf. “I think he’s going a great job. His record has been a tremendous success,” Hawley said of the president. David Zucker, of Dardenne Prairie, who is chairman of the St. Charles Republican Central Committee, thinks Hawley is making the right call by linking arms with the president. “He’s joined at the hip with Trump,” Zucker said. “Trump may be more popular here now than he was two years ago.” Rep. Glen Kolkmeyer, ROdessa, who grew up minutes from Hawley’s hometown, said Hawley’s message is resonating in his district. “I think it’s something that’s been lacking for quite some time,” Kolkmeyer said. “We need to take more rural values to D.C.” In addition to clerking for Roberts, Hawley served under Judge Michael W. McConnell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit. McConnell, now retired from the bench, directs the Constitutional Law Center at Stanford. He has published widely in the fields of constitutional law and theory, especially church and state issues.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if he chose a clerkship with me because of my academic writing on this,” McConnell told the PostDispatch. McConnell also isn’t surprised that Hawley has continued to pursue similar cases as attorney general. “His interest in this goes way back to law school if not before,” he said. “That shows a considerable dedication to that issue.” Prior to joining the University of Missouri faculty, Hawley worked as an appellate litigator at the Hogan Lovells law firm in Washington. He also served as senior counsel for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty. It was at the Becket Fund where he took on high-profile religious freedom cases. The most well-known among them was a case in which the Hobby Lobby craft store was fighting the U.S. government over a requirement in the Affordable Care Act that companies provide insurance to employees that covers contraceptives. Hobby Lobby’s CEO David Green, an evangelical Christian, said the mandate violated the religious beliefs on which the company was founded. The Supreme Court ruled that business could be protected from government mandates that violate their owners’ religious beliefs. “With his background, Josh could have done anything,” Kristina Arriaga, former executive director of the Becket Fund, told the National Review in April. “He decided not to devote himself to personal enrichment. Instead, he decided to work for religious freedom.”

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM, STATES’ RIGHTS The origin of Hawley’s interest in the crossroads of law and religion germinated when he clerked for McConnell, who retired and founded a religious liberty law

clinic at Stanford University and has argued religious liberty cases at the Supreme Court. “I think protecting that and defending that is extremely important,” said Hawley, who attends the Crossing, a Columbia church associated with the Evangelical Presbyterian Church. He said he wants to strengthen the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which was the law used to litigate the Hobby Lobby case. “I think it needs to be defended and protected,” Hawley said, adding that the Constitution will dictate how far Congress can go in when it comes to adding new religious freedom laws. Hawley also has taken on the Affordable Care Act in other venues. In February, he joined a coalition of GOP attorneys general to try to bring the ACA to an end — a move that has already drawn scrutiny from McCaskill. In July, McCaskill co-sponsored a resolution that would direct Senate lawyers to defend against the lawsuit because it could threaten ACA protections for people with pre-existing conditions. Hawley also took aim at Obamacare in 2014, when he and his wife, attorney Erin Hawley, filed a petition in support of a lawsuit that sought to dump the ACA over the tax credit people would receive to reduce the cost of health insurance. The brief, filed under the name of two of Hawley’s nonprofits — Missouri Liberty Project and Missouri Forward Foundation — focused largely on the rights of states. Of the tax credit, Hawley wrote that, “The effect is to diminish the political authority of state voters and short-circuit the democratic process in the states.” In his first year in office, Hawley sued Google and Facebook over data protection policies and promoted efforts to fight sex trafficking. In 2017, Hawley announced

raids of more than a dozen Springfield, Mo., businesses advertising as massage parlors as part of a multi-state investigation into human trafficking. The result of the raid was a court injunction prohibiting 15 businesses and individuals from engaging in trafficking or prostitution. “Ten of the raided businesses have shut down permanently. Additionally, nine individuals were charged with criminal conduct. Six have pled guilty,” said Mary Compton, spokeswoman for the attorney general’s office. Last December, however, Hawley raised eyebrows when he linked the problem of human trafficking to the sexual revolution of the 1960s and 1970s during a speech in Kansas City. “We have a human trafficking crisis in our state and in this city and in our country because people are willing to purchase women, young women, and treat them like commodities. There is a market for it. Why is there? Because our culture has completely lost its way,” he says in a recording made of the speech. “The sexual revolution has led to exploitation of women on a scale that we would never have imagined, never have imagined.” In an interview, Hawley said he wants a return to the days of quieter small towns where the middle class is prosperous. “I think there is a real sense that, when you talk to folks all around Missouri, they feel like there’s not much that holds us together anymore as Americans,” he said. “They feel besieged by media, looked down on by Hollywood and sort of the elite media, that of course is not based here in Missouri. They feel like their values of family and work and faith are taken for granted.” Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Kansas City area winner of state House primary leaves trail of bigotry BY EDWARD MCKINLEY Kansas City Star

KANSAS CITY• On his Monday morning radio show, Steve West promotes fanatical conspiracies about “Jewish cabals” that are “harvesting baby parts” through Planned Parenthood, that torture and molest children and that run the Republican Party. On Tuesday he won the Republican primary for a Clay County seat in the Missouri House. “Looking back in history, unfortunately, Hitler was right about what was taking place in Germany. And who was behind it,” West said on a show on KCXL radio on Jan. 23, 2017. West won the 15th District nomination in a four-candidate race by nearly 25 points. Besides his radio show, he has a YouTube channel and a website. Donning a wig and beard and calling himself Jack Justice, he has unleashed an array of bigotry including homophobia, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and outright racism.

“I’m trying to get sense of why he flew under the radar, and I’m not sure I have a great answer,” said Karen Aroesty, regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. The Missouri Republican Party issued late Thursday afternoon a statement about West’s “disgusting comments”: “Steve West’s shocking and vile comments do not reflect the position of the Missouri Republican Party or indeed of any decent individual. West’s abhorrent rhetoric has absolutely no place in the Missouri Republican Party or anywhere. We wholeheartedly condemn his comments.” KCXL did not reply to a request for comment. West, reached by phone Thursday afternoon, said he wanted to talk about “the issues” and his platform. He declined to speak about statements he has made that he said had been taken out of context. “You guys want to make it an issue, you can go there, but I’m

not going to comment on that,” he said. He then asked if he could call back in a few minutes, and hung up. When he called back, he said: “I’m not running as a radio show host, I’m running for state representative. I’m sorry. I’m not going to have this discussion.” Pressed to clarify his Hitler comment, he questioned its validity until a reporter cited the date and time of the recording. West then said that he’d been taken out of context. He said that he believes all men are created equal, but not all ideologies are equal. Specifically, he said, he finds fault with Islam and Judaism. “Jewish people can be beautiful people, but there’s ideologies associated with that that I don’t agree with,” he went on. “Jews today are a remnant of the tribe of Judah that rejected Christ.” He again asked to speak about issues related to the job of a state representative. When asked about Jewish people in Missouri, he

said, “Well, maybe they shouldn’t vote for me.” At no point did West apologize for or retract his comments. He asked that the Kansas City Star link to his website within the story and expressed hope that readers would listen to his remarks in full to make up their own minds. Although West’s most overtly bigoted and offensive statements were sent anonymously to a reporter on Thursday, he had enough “dog whistles” before the election that voters should have known better than to support him, Aroesty said. She said her opinion is coming from a place of principal over politics because the Anti-Defamation League is an apolitical organization. A dog whistle, she said, is when someone hints at extremist beliefs in such a way that others who hold those beliefs will know, but they retain plausible deniability. “It’s a subtle form of hatred,” Aroesty said. “Not open, but it should be watched, in some ways, more carefully than if someone

was openly extreme.” The Anti-Defamation League has been seeing extremist candidates pop up all around the country, Aroesty said. “There is a level of political rhetoric and anger out in the world today that is providing people with more extremist views a comfort to come forward and share those extremist views,” she said. “I’d like to say he is unusual this year … but there are a whole variety of folks.” The internet gives so many people a voice, she said, that it’s easy to think that people with extreme, hateful beliefs are everywhere. They’re not, she said — the ones who are out there are just making a lot of noise. State Rep. Jon Carpenter, the Democratic incumbent for the district, responded to the news of West’s statements in an email. “It is my hope that folks who voted for Steve West in the Republican primary weren’t aware of any of this stuff. I sincerely hope that’s true,” he wrote.


POLITICS

08.12.2018 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

“I think it’s about being where the people are and holding the values that they hold, embracing the way of life that we live here. I’m proud of our way of life. I’m proud to be from rural Missouri.” Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley

Republican candidate wants return to small-town values HAWLEY • FROM A1

to take that mindset to the U.S. Senate, after he easily beat a crowded field of contenders vying to run against McCaskill in November in one of the most watched races in the nation. His message during the primary campaign mirrored many of the legal battles he has fought: America needs to return to the same small-town values he saw growing up in Lexington, Mo. “The heartland way of life is really at stake,” Hawley told the Post-Dispatch. “I think it’s the great crisis of our day. I think there’s a real sense out there that access to the middle class, the ability to stay in the middle class, to live that kind of life, is in serious jeopardy. “I think protecting that and defending that is extremely important,” he said. The message of rural and often religious values at a time when Missouri’s Democratic vote comes largely out of its two largest cities is a switch from his first successful campaign for office, when Hawley called himself a “conservative outsider” in taking down two more experienced officeholders in 2016. Hawley cruised to victory in that maiden run for office, knocking off fellow Columbia Republican Kurt Schaefer, a former state senator, and then beating Democrat Teresa Hensley, a former Cass County prosecutor. In winning, Hawley became the first Republican to hold the seat in 20 years. Hawley, a constitutional law professor at the University of Missouri before his leap into politics, clerked for Chief Justice John Roberts at the U.S. Supreme Court and has served as an attorney in cases before the high court. He graduated from Rockhurst High School in Kansas City, graduated from Stanford University and received his law degree at Yale. McCaskill scoffs at Hawley’s attempt to connect with rural Missouri and said his Ivy League résumé means he is “obviously a very intelligent man.” But, she said, “I am pretty certain he has never looked Missouri in the eye. I am pretty sure he has not ferreted out waste and abuse over years of experience. I am pretty sure he is not as knowledgeable as I am about a lot of the public policy issues.” Similarly, Hawley is trying to cast McCaskill as an elite, while he is a defender of small-town values and religious freedom. “I think it’s about being where the people are and holding the values that they hold, embracing the way of life that we live here. I’m proud of our way of life. I’m proud to be from rural Missouri,” Hawley said.

ALL-IN WITH TRUMP An outline of the coming campaign emerged quickly after Tuesday’s primary vote when Hawley issued a demand that McCaskill debate him on a “flatbed truck.” McCaskill responded on Twitter that Hawley was standing on a utility trailer, not a flatbed truck, hinting that her Republican opponent was out of touch with basic transportation terminology. Hawley responded to that with his own zinger by tweeting a picture of a recreational vehicle and an airplane, referencing a June

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Josh Hawley (left) greets David Hoffman, of St. Peters, as Hawley starts his campaign for U.S. Senate with a “Let’s Debate” event with supporters Wednesday at the Republican National Committee field office in St. Charles.

JOSH HAWLEY Job • Missouri attorney general, elected 2016 Age • 38 Born • Springdale, Ark. Previous elected office • None Other jobs • University of Missouri law professor, Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, Hogan Lovells law firm

dust-up when McCaskill was touring the state in an RV, but flew in her husband’s plane after events ended for the day to either St. Louis or Kansas City. Hawley has gone all-in with President Donald Trump, who, after winning Missouri by 19 points in 2016, has endorsed Hawley and held two rallies and fundraisers on his behalf. “I think he’s going a great job. His record has been a tremendous success,” Hawley said of the president. David Zucker, of Dardenne Prairie, who is chairman of the St. Charles Republican Central Committee, thinks Hawley is making the right call by linking arms with the president. “He’s joined at the hip with Trump,” Zucker said. “Trump may be more popular here now than he was two years ago.” Rep. Glen Kolkmeyer, ROdessa, who grew up minutes from Hawley’s hometown, said Hawley’s message is resonating in his district. “I think it’s something that’s been lacking for quite some time,” Kolkmeyer said. “We need to take more rural values to D.C.” In addition to clerking for Roberts, Hawley served under Judge Michael W. McConnell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit. McConnell, now retired from the bench, directs the Constitutional Law Center at Stanford. He has published widely in the fields of constitutional law and theory, especially church and state issues.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if he chose a clerkship with me because of my academic writing on this,” McConnell told the PostDispatch. McConnell also isn’t surprised that Hawley has continued to pursue similar cases as attorney general. “His interest in this goes way back to law school if not before,” he said. “That shows a considerable dedication to that issue.” Prior to joining the University of Missouri faculty, Hawley worked as an appellate litigator at the Hogan Lovells law firm in Washington. He also served as senior counsel for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty. It was at the Becket Fund where he took on high-profile religious freedom cases. The most well-known among them was a case in which the Hobby Lobby craft store was fighting the U.S. government over a requirement in the Affordable Care Act that companies provide insurance to employees that covers contraceptives. Hobby Lobby’s CEO David Green, an evangelical Christian, said the mandate violated the religious beliefs on which the company was founded. The Supreme Court ruled that business could be protected from government mandates that violate their owners’ religious beliefs. “With his background, Josh could have done anything,” Kristina Arriaga, former executive director of the Becket Fund, told the National Review in April. “He decided not to devote himself to personal enrichment. Instead, he decided to work for religious freedom.”

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM, STATES’ RIGHTS The origin of Hawley’s interest in the crossroads of law and religion germinated when he clerked for McConnell, who retired and founded a religious liberty law

clinic at Stanford University and has argued religious liberty cases at the Supreme Court. “I think protecting that and defending that is extremely important,” said Hawley, who attends the Crossing, a Columbia church associated with the Evangelical Presbyterian Church. He said he wants to strengthen the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which was the law used to litigate the Hobby Lobby case. “I think it needs to be defended and protected,” Hawley said, adding that the Constitution will dictate how far Congress can go in when it comes to adding new religious freedom laws. Hawley also has taken on the Affordable Care Act in other venues. In February, he joined a coalition of GOP attorneys general to try to bring the ACA to an end — a move that has already drawn scrutiny from McCaskill. In July, McCaskill co-sponsored a resolution that would direct Senate lawyers to defend against the lawsuit because it could threaten ACA protections for people with pre-existing conditions. Hawley also took aim at Obamacare in 2014, when he and his wife, attorney Erin Hawley, filed a petition in support of a lawsuit that sought to dump the ACA over the tax credit people would receive to reduce the cost of health insurance. The brief, filed under the name of two of Hawley’s nonprofits — Missouri Liberty Project and Missouri Forward Foundation — focused largely on the rights of states. Of the tax credit, Hawley wrote that, “The effect is to diminish the political authority of state voters and short-circuit the democratic process in the states.” In his first year in office, Hawley sued Google and Facebook over data protection policies and promoted efforts to fight sex trafficking. In 2017, Hawley announced

raids of more than a dozen Springfield, Mo., businesses advertising as massage parlors as part of a multi-state investigation into human trafficking. The result of the raid was a court injunction prohibiting 15 businesses and individuals from engaging in trafficking or prostitution. “Ten of the raided businesses have shut down permanently. Additionally, nine individuals were charged with criminal conduct. Six have pled guilty,” said Mary Compton, spokeswoman for the attorney general’s office. Last December, however, Hawley raised eyebrows when he linked the problem of human trafficking to the sexual revolution of the 1960s and 1970s during a speech in Kansas City. “We have a human trafficking crisis in our state and in this city and in our country because people are willing to purchase women, young women, and treat them like commodities. There is a market for it. Why is there? Because our culture has completely lost its way,” he says in a recording made of the speech. “The sexual revolution has led to exploitation of women on a scale that we would never have imagined, never have imagined.” In an interview, Hawley said he wants a return to the days of quieter small towns where the middle class is prosperous. “I think there is a real sense that, when you talk to folks all around Missouri, they feel like there’s not much that holds us together anymore as Americans,” he said. “They feel besieged by media, looked down on by Hollywood and sort of the elite media, that of course is not based here in Missouri. They feel like their values of family and work and faith are taken for granted.” Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Count of final Kansas governor primary ballots will continue BY JOHN HANNA Associated Press

TOPEKA, KAN. • The count-

ing of the last ballots in the tight and contentious Republican primary for Kansas governor will stretch out over the next week and still might not settle the race. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach leads Gov. Jeff Colyer by 110 votes out of 313,000plus cast after late mail-in ballots from all 105 counties were added Friday to totals from advance voting and ballots cast at the polls Tuesday. The state’s 105 counties still must review nearly 9,000 provisional ballots and determine how many of them were cast in the Republican primary — and how many will be counted. They have until Aug. 20 to finish that process and certify their local results. A look at the process for counting the remaining votes and a potential recount:

Colyer

Kobach

MAIL-IN BALLOTS The Legislature changed the state’s law on mail-in ballots last year so that they were to be counted if they were postmarked Tuesday, the day of the primary, and arrived by Friday. Previously, they had to arrive by Election Day, and in the 2016 general election, more than 500 arrived afterward, said Bryan Caskey, the state elections director in the secretary of state’s office.

WHO COUNTS? While Kobach’s office provides guidance on the handling of ballots and supervises the counting, the work is done by the counties.

The chief elections officer in each county appoints a bipartisan board of election workers to handle the individual ballots. The secretary of state appoints an election commissioner in the state’s four most populous counties, Johnson, Sedgwick, Shawnee and Wyandotte, and the chief elections officers in the other 101 are elected clerks. The elections chiefs present their workers’ recommendations on whether provisional ballots should be counted to the county commission, which then decides and certifies the final results.

PROVISIONAL BALLOTS Voters receive provisional ballots at the polls when election workers are not sure they are eligible to vote at that location, or at all. Those ballots are sealed in envelopes and set aside to be reviewed later, with notes about the issues involved. The eligibility of the voters is determined before workers un-

seal the ballots. Once a ballot is unsealed, workers can see whether it was cast in the Republican or Democratic primary before counting any relevant votes. Kobach said based on past elections, it’s likely that about two-thirds of 9,000 provisional ballots that were filled out Tuesday were cast in the Republican primary and that a majority of them will be counted.

REQUESTING A RECOUNT Under a Kansas law specific to statewide races, a candidate must ask for a recount by 5 p.m. Friday. State law has no provision for an automatic recount, no matter how close the race. A candidate can ask for a recount no matter how large the margin, but he or she must put up funds to cover the full cost of the recount. If the recount changes the result, the candidate seeking it gets his or her money back, and the counties and state cover their costs.

The candidate can seek a recount in only one or a handful of counties, dozens of counties, or statewide. Also, the candidate chooses whether the recount will be machine re-scanning of paper ballots or a hand count of those ballots. The cost of the recount is determined by the secretary of state’s office. Caskey said the office would survey the counties involved in a recount for their estimated costs, then add “a small amount” to cover the state’s administrative expenses. There’s no frame of reference for what a recount would cost because there hasn’t been one in a statewide race in at least several decades. A recount must start the day after the candidate requests one, even if the work would start on a Saturday. Counties involved have five days to finish, meaning all of it would be done by Aug. 22 at the latest.


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

If you are in possession of jewelry that really isn’t your style, give us a call. We are buying estate jewelry, fine watches, diamonds, gold, silver, coins, paintings and more. Our experienced experts will evaluate your item and make you an offer. If you choose to sell, we’ll pay you on the spot. Simplifying your life is as simple as that. For more information, call 314-485-8223 or visit us at estatejules.com. 13990 Olive Blvd., Suite 103, Chesterfield, MO 63017 • Monday–Friday, 9am–5pm. No appointment necessary.

WE BUY: GOLD • DIAMONDS • FINE JEWELRY • FINE WATCHES • STERLING SILVER • OLD CURRENCY • AUTOGRAPHS AND PHOTOS • PAINTINGS

at

y s

i

e

v

.


NATION

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A11

CHARLOTTESVILLE • ONE YEAR LATER

WOUNDS ARE STILL RAW

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

The statue of Thomas Jefferson is surrounded by fencing and a no-trespassing sign Monday in front of the rotunda on the campus of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. The statue was the focal point of a clash between torch-carrying white nationalists and students the night before a violent white nationalist rally in downtown Charlottesville.

BY SARAH RANKIN associated Press

Sometimes Alfred Wilson still has to take a moment to collect himself after he pulls open files at the law firm where he works and sees Heather Heyer’s handwriting. “I get choked up and have to gather myself before I talk to the client,” said Wilson, who hired Heyer, 32, the paralegal killed a year ago in a car attack during a violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. The rally that left Heyer dead and dozens more injured proved to be a watershed moment, both for the racist, fringe “altright” movement and for the city itself. In the year since, many residents such as Wilson say the wounds haven’t healed. Others say the violence has laid bare divisions over deeper issues of race and economic inequality and what should be done to move forward. “One of my hugest gripes with last year with

Susan Bro, mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed during the Unite the Right rally last year, looks over photos and memorabilia Monday in her office in Charlottesville, Va.

the people of this town was that people, mostly white folks, kept saying, ‘This isn’t Charlottesville,’” said Brenda Brown-Grooms, an area pastor and activist. “I wonder what planet they live on. This is exactly who we are.”

Brown-Grooms is a Charlottesville native, born in the segregated basement of the University of Virginia hospital. She said white supremacy was present in Charlottesville long before the rally and was the “elephant in the

room” the city now must deal with. Activists have pushed leaders to address the city’s legacies of racism and slavery, its dearth of affordable housing and the police department’s poor relationship with black residents,

Ugly Concrete? Don’t tear it out!

Let us cover your front porch, walkway, patio, pool deck and more with the beautiful

Pebblestone/Epoxy System Available in 15 Beautiful Colors!

FREE ESTIMATES!

OVER

28 YEARS

Senior & Military Discounts

EXPERIENCE!

END OF SEASON SPECIAL!

SAVE $600 - $1,800 SAVINGS BASED ON JOB SIZE

St. Louis Resurfacing, Inc. 90 ©19

St Lo

uis R

esurf

acing

314-576-9220 1-800-283-6234

www.stlresurfacing.com

CHECK OUT OUR EXCELLENT A+ RATING WITH THE BBB!

Hemorrhoids can be a sensitive topic which sometimes makes it difficult to take the necessary steps toward relief. Betsy Clemens, MD and her staff understand this and strive to make you feel at ease every step of the way. Dr. Clemens has been with the MWHTC for 10 years. She has evaluated thousands of patients and has performed over 28,000 infrared coagulation procedures.

Don’t Suffer in Silence

Schedule a consultation with Dr. Clemens today by calling (314) 991-9888

450 N New Ballas Rd • #266N, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 www.mwhtc-stl.com

• IRC is a minimally invasive non-surgical hemorrhoid treatment option • Each procedure only requires a few minutes • No downtime or missed work/activity • Covered under most insurances

among other issues, since the rally on Aug. 12, 2017. The event was one of the largest gatherings of white nationalists and far-right extremists in a decade. Many participants dressed as if they were headed to battle, shouted racist slurs and clashed violently with counterprotesters. Meanwhile, authorities largely stood by on the fringes of the action near a downtown park with a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that the city wanted to remove. The crowd was eventually forced to disperse, but a car that authorities say was driven by a man fascinated with Adolf Hitler later plowed into a crowd of peaceful counterprotesters. The day’s death toll rose to three when a state police helicopter that had been monitoring the event and assisting with the governor’s motorcade crashed, killing two troopers. In the year since, the city has taken steps toward meeting some of the activists’ demands, despite resistance on some issues from the Republican-controlled state Legislature. Lawmakers defeated every bill Charlottesville supported in the rally’s aftermath, including measures dealing with cities’ abilities to remove Confederate monuments. Responding in part to calls for a closer look at stop-and-frisk policies that disproportionately affect black residents, the city established a new Police Civilian Review Board. The city approved funds for affordable housing and workforce development. Meanwhile, there’s been a churn in leadership. The city attorney took a new job, the city manager’s contract was not renewed, a spokeswoman quit and the police chief, 50 at the time, retired after less than two years on the job. The five-person city council has two new faces, and the group picked a different mayor, Nikuyah Walker, a black woman who ran as an independent in the staunchly Democratic town and was previously one of the council’s strongest critics. Walker has clashed publicly with other council members on issues such as hiring an interim city manager. She recently took to social media to criticize the candidate, the way he was selected and her fellow councilors’ behavior. The council’s drama doesn’t seem to affect most residents, who “just go on with our lives and watch with quiet amusement,” said Charles “Buddy” Weber, a lawyer and longtime resident involved in a law-

suit seeking to stop the city from removing the Lee monument. As the city has been struggling to find its footing, some alt-right leaders are faltering. The rally violence proved a costly debacle for leading figures such as white nationalist Richard Spencer and others who are fighting lawsuits. Many in the movement have been booted from mainstream internet platforms. Only one organizer of last summer’s rally seems intent on publicly marking the anniversary. Jason Kessler, a Charlottesville resident and UVA graduate, sued the city after it denied him a permit for an anniversary event. Kessler recently abandoned his lawsuit, but he vowed to press ahead with plans for a rally Sunday in Washington. In an interview this summer, Kessler said he was still “coming to terms” with what happened last year and said he apologized to Heyer’s family. But he struck a defiant tone when a city attorney questioned him last month. Kessler said that he had no regrets or remorse about his role and took no responsibility for the violence. An investigation by a former U.S. attorney found that a lack of planning, poor communication and a passive response by law enforcement added to last year’s chaos. Though Kessler’s plans for the anniversary weekend shifted, many residents were bracing for some sort of white nationalist presence. Officials and law enforcement authorities insisted that whatever happened, they would be better prepared. Michael Rodi, owner of a downtown nightclub, told city and law enforcement officials at a forum for business people that “if we can make this thing fizzle, the rest of the world looks at us and goes, ‘Oh, you’re not Nazi Central.’” Heyer’s mother, Susan Bro, who has been working with Wilson on a foundation named for her daughter, said she planned to place flowers Sunday at the site of the attack that claimed Heyer’s life. But the day should be about more than just Heyer, Bro said. “I just would like people to focus on the anniversary, not on Heather, but on the issues that she died for — Black Lives Matter, overpolicing, affordable housing, for more truth and the telling of the history of Charlottesville — and to focus on where they need to go as a community,” Bro said.


NATION

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A11

CHARLOTTESVILLE • ONE YEAR LATER

REFLECTION, RENEWAL Police presence reassures some, irritates others as residents recall violence, its aftermath BY MICHAEL KUNZELMAN associated Press

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. • The city of Charlottes-

ville marked the anniversary of last summer’s white supremacist violence that sent ripples through the country with largely peaceful vigils and other events, but police had a brief, tense confrontation with students angry over the heavy security presence there this weekend. “Why are you in riot gear? We don’t see no riot here,” activists chanted Saturday evening. Shortly before a preplanned evening rally to mark the anniversary of a campus confrontation between torch-carrying white nationalists and counterprotesters, activists unfurled a banner that said, “Last year they came w/ torches. This year they come w/ badges.” A group of more than 2 0 0 p ro te s te rs t h e n marched to another part of the University of Virginia’s campus, where m a ny i n t h e c rowd shouted at officers in riot gear who had formed a line. Kibiriti Majuto, a coordinator for UVA Students United, said the students moved to another part of campus because they didn’t want to be “caged” in the area where the rally had been planned. “How does that create a sense of community? How are we going to be safe in that situation?” he asked. Majuto said police “were not on our side” last year when white supremacists surrounded counterprotesters on the rotunda. “Cops and Klan go hand in hand,” he said. Charlottesville City Councilman Wes Bellamy said he tried to defuse the situation and told the police commander that the students were upset by the officers’ tactics, calling the officers’ riot gear “over the top.” After a few minutes, most of the demonstra-

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Anti-fascism demonstrators march Saturday in downtown Charlottesville, Va., in anticipation of the anniversary of last year’s Unite the Right rally.

Virginia state police patrol near a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Va., as they lock down the downtown area on Saturday. Gov. Ralph Northam and the city both declared states of emergency.

tors began to walk away. There were no immediate reports of arrests on campus. The rest of the day had been much quieter. In the popular downtown shopping district

Saturday morning, law enforcement officers outnumbered visitors. Concrete barriers and metal fences had been erected, and police were searching bags at two checkpoints where people could enter

or leave. “It’s nice that they’re here to protect us,” said Lara Mitchell, 66, a sales associate at a shop that sells artwork, jewelry, and other items. “It feels good that they’re here in front

Ugly Concrete? Don’t tear it out!

Let us cover your front porch, walkway, patio, pool deck and more with the beautiful

Pebblestone/Epoxy System Available in 15 Beautiful Colors!

FREE ESTIMATES!

OVER

28 YEARS

Senior & Military Discounts

EXPERIENCE!

END OF SEASON SPECIAL!

SAVE $600 - $1,800 SAVINGS BASED ON JOB SIZE

St. Louis Resurfacing, Inc. 90 ©19

St Lo

uis R

esurf

acing

314-576-9220 1-800-283-6234

www.stlresurfacing.com

CHECK OUT OUR EXCELLENT A+ RATING WITH THE BBB!

Hemorrhoids can be a sensitive topic which sometimes makes it difficult to take the necessary steps toward relief. Betsy Clemens, MD and her staff understand this and strive to make you feel at ease every step of the way. Dr. Clemens has been with the MWHTC for 10 years. She has evaluated thousands of patients and has performed over 28,000 infrared coagulation procedures.

Don’t Suffer in Silence

Schedule a consultation with Dr. Clemens today by calling (314) 991-9888

450 N New Ballas Rd • #266N, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 www.mwhtc-stl.com

• IRC is a minimally invasive non-surgical hemorrhoid treatment option • Each procedure only requires a few minutes • No downtime or missed work/activity • Covered under most insurances

of our store. Last year was a whole different story. It looked like a war zone last year compared to what it is today.” On Aug. 12, 2017, hundreds of white nationalists — including neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members — descended on Charlottesville in part to protest the city’s decision to remove a monument to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a park. Violent fighting broke out between attendees and counterprotesters that day. Authorities eventually forced the crowd to disperse, but a car later barreled into a crowd of peaceful counter p ro te s te rs, k i l l i n g Heather Heyer, 32. The day’s death toll rose to three when a state police helicopter that had been monitoring the event and assisting with the governor’s motorcade crashed, killing two troopers.

POETRY, ACTIVISM Among the remembrance events that took place Saturday was a “morning of reflection and renewal” at UVA that featured musical performances, a poetry reading and an address from University President James Ryan. Ryan recalled how a group of students and area residents had faced off against the white supremacist marchers near a statue of Thomas Jefferson on campus, calling it a “remarkable moment of courage and bravery.” Clara Carlson was one of those counterprotesters. Carlson, 22, said she feared for her life when she and a group of her friends were surrounded by the phalanx of young white men at the statue. Carlson’s group locked arms and chanted slogans

of their own, including “Black Lives Matter!” and “No Nazis, No KKK, No Fascist USA!” Carlson said police didn’t intervene to help her or her friends that night last year. “I remember the police just standing around. They weren’t there to protect us,” she recalled. “I was grateful that I was able to come out of that alive.” A group of anti-fascist activists rallied peacefully in the afternoon. The few dozen black-clad demonstrators marched through downtown, stopping to pause for a moment of silence at the site where Heyer was killed. Some in the group scrawled messages in chalk at the site that hosts a makeshift memorial to her, as police officers watched from a distance. The group then continued marching, with some members carrying a sign that said, “Good night white pride.” As the activists made their way wordlessly through a downtown pedestrian mall, people sitting outdoors at cafes began singing “This Little Light of Mine.” Some community activists were concerned that this year’s heavy police presence could be a counterproductive overreaction. An independent investigation of the rally violence, led by a former federal prosecutor, found that the chaos last year stemmed from a passive response by law enforcement and poor preparation and coordination between state and city police. Lisa Woolfork, a University of Virginia professor and Black Lives Matter Charlottesville organizer, said police were mounting a “huge, overwhelming show of force to compensate for last year’s inaction.” “Last year, I was afraid of the Nazis. This year, I’m afraid of the police,” Woolfork said. “This is not making anyone that I know feel safe.” But others said Saturday they were comforted by the security measures. Kyle Rodland, who took his young sons to get ice cream downtown, said he felt much safer than last year, when he left town with his family and stayed with his parents after seeing people armed with long rifles walking around outside his home. Events marking the anniversary are planned Sunday in both Charlottesville and Washington, where Jason Kessler, the primary organizer of last summer’s rally, has obtained a permit for a “white civil rights” rally.


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Inducing labor helps some moms avoid cesareans, study finds BY MARILYNN MARCHIONE Associated Press

First-time mothers at low risk of complications were less likely to need a cesarean delivery if labor was induced at 39 weeks instead of waiting for it to start on its own, a big study found. Their babies fared better, too. The results overturn the longtime view that inducing labor raises the risk for a C-section, and prompted two leading OB-GYN doctor groups to say it’s now reasonable to offer women like those in the study that option. But only certain pregnant women qualify, and the study did not track how inducing labor affected breastfeeding or other mom-baby issues later. Some groups such as Lamaze International still advocate letting nature take its course rather than giving medicines to make the womb start contracting. “Many women don’t want all of the medical care that goes with induction” such as an IV and fetal monitoring, said Lisa Kane Low, past president of the American College of Nurse-Midwives and associate dean of the University of Michigan School of Nursing. “It can result in a very different type of experience.” Being induced doesn’t mean mothers can’t have “natural childbirth” — they can forgo pain medicine or use a hospital’s homelike birthing center rather than delivering in “an operating room in a sterile suite with a big light over your head,” said the study leader, Dr. William Grobman, an OBGYN specialist at Northwestern University in Chicago. “Everyone has a different definition of what a natural birth is,” said Dr. Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman of New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, which participated in the study. “Some women feel that natural just means delivering vaginally” and more were able to do that when labor was induced, she said. Results of the federally funded study were published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine.

Nine percent of induced women developed dangerous high blood pressure at the end of pregnancy versus 14 percent of the others. Study participants who were induced, such as Aleksa Owen, said they had less pain and felt more in control. “I was pretty open to any kind of birth, whatever works to keep the baby safe and myself safe as well,” said Owen, 34, a graduate student from the Chicago suburb of Woodridge. Her son was born in October 2016 and “I felt like I had a sense of control

throughout the process.”

THE COST It’s not clear which option costs more; researchers plan to study that. Induced women spent more time in the labor and delivery unit but went home sooner after birth. Insurers often pay a fixed rate for births, complicating cost comparisons. The labor and delivery suite is one of the most expensive places in a hospital, said Dr. Nanette Santoro, OB-GYN chief at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. If all

eligible mothers decided to be induced, “I do not believe we would have the resources to accommodate them,” but may have to adapt based on this study, she said.

WHAT OTHERS THINK Christen Sadler, a certified nurse-midwife and president-elect of Lamaze International, said other research suggests that “letting labor start on its own is almost always best for mothers and babies” unless there’s a problem that requires intervening. Nan Strauss, policy

chief for the advocacy g ro u p Eve ry Mo t h e r Counts, agreed: “Inducing labor disrupts the complex hormonal processes that help labor progress, prepare the baby for birth, and promote successful breastfeeding and bonding.” The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine says it’s reasonable for doctors to offer labor induction “after discussing the options thoroughly” with first-time mothers at low risk who had an ultra-

sound early in pregnancy to verify when they will reach 39 weeks. Dr. Michael Greene of Massachusetts General Hospital noted that women in the study were younger than U.S. mothers on average and fewer were over 35, calling into question how generalizable the results are. Still, the study “should reassure women that elective induction of labor at 39 weeks is a reasonable choice” that’s unlikely to harm mothers or babies, he wrote in a commentary in the journal.

Save up to $50/mo when you switch to Verizon. When you’re living your best life, you need the best unlimited. Limited-time offer available for ages 55 and older.

ABOUT THE STUDY About 40 percent of U.S. women giving birth are first-time mothers, and at least half are low risk — no problems requiring early delivery or a cesarean. Many women ask to be induced now, to let them plan delivery and ensure their doctor is available, but the risks and benefits are unclear. Previous studies suggesting that inducing labor raises the risk for a C-section were observational and compared different types of women giving birth under different types of circumstances. This was the first big experiment to time labor induction for 39 weeks — when a pregnancy is considered full term and complication rates are lowest. More than 6,100 women at 41 hospitals were randomly placed in two groups: one had labor induced at 39 weeks; the other waited for labor to start on its own and were induced only if a problem developed or they hadn’t delivered by 42 weeks. HOW MOMS, BABIES FARED Deaths and severe complications were fewer among babies of women who were induced — about 4 percent versus 5 percent in the other group — but the difference was so small it could have occurred by chance alone. Significantly fewer babies in the induced group needed breathing tubes or extra oxygen after birth, and they spent less time in the hospital. Nineteen percent of induced mothers had a cesarean versus 22 percent of the others. Doctors estimate that one C-section would be avoided for every 28 women induced.

Paper-free billing and Auto Pay req’d for this rate. Rate applies only to phone lines for account holder aged 55 years of age or older on the Go Unlimited plan and with a Florida, Illinois or Missouri billing address. Cannot be combined with Military or Fios discounts. In times of congestion your data may be temporarily prioritized behind other traffic. Mobile Hotspot/tethering reduced to speeds up to 600kbps. Domestic data roaming at 2G speeds. Our Surcharges (incl. Fed. Univ. Svc. of 17.9% of interstate & int’l telecom charges [varies quarterly] $0.21 Regulatory & $1.23 Administrative/line/mo., & others by area) are not taxes (details: 1.888.684.1888); gov’t taxes & our surcharges could add 7%-46% to your bill. Activation fee/line: $30. IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Subject to VZW Agmts., Calling Plan & credit approval. Coverage, varying by svc. not available everywhere. Max. 2 lines. © 2018 Verizon Wireless.


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

Trump condemns racism after week of tinged remarks BY ANNE GEARAN, SEUNG MIN KIM AND JOSH DAWSEY Washington Post

B E D M I N ST E R , N . J. •

President Donald Trump condemned on Saturday “all types of racism and acts of violence” on the first anniversary of the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., calling for the nation to “come together” after a week in which he stoked racial divisions with attacks on black athletes and other minorities. Taking to Twitter ahead of a controversial “Unite the Right 2” white supremacist rally Sunday in Washington, Trump decried the “senseless death and division” spawned by what he called the “riots in Charlottesville.” A counterprotester was killed when a man who police say identified himself as a Nazi drove a car into a crowd. “I condemn all types of racism and acts of violence,” Trump wrote. “Peace to ALL Americans!” The remarks stood in stark contrast to Trump’s reaction a year ago — when he declared that “both sides” were to blame for the violence in Charlottesville — and followed a week of racially incendiary statements by the president and allies. Trump insulted the intelligence of NBA star LeBron James and CNN anchor Don Lemon, both of whom are black; reignited his crusade against black football players protesting police brutality; and told a group of business leaders that Chinese students studying in the United States were spies. One of the few AfricanAmericans to have worked in the White House, former special assistant Omarosa Manigault Newman, also accuses Trump of being a racist in a book to be released Tuesday. At a “Bikers for Trump” event here in Bedminster on Saturday, the president told reporters that Manigault Newman was a “lowlife.” Trump — who kicked off his presidential campaign in 2015 by labeling Mexicans illegally present in the United States as criminals and “rapists” — has repeatedly used racial and ethnic differences as political wedges, rarely attempting to bridge cultural differences as Barack Obama and other predecessors did. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., said in a statement Saturday that Trump shared responsibility for the violence in Charlottesville. “These purveyors of hate and bigotry were emboldened to take their message public by a President who has refused to categorically and unequivocally condemn their message and actions in clear terms,” Warner wrote. Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential nominee in 2012, now running for the U.S. Senate from Utah, said in an essay published Friday that he disagreed with Trump’s declaration that many “good people” had taken part on the white nationalist side of the Charlottesville event. “People who knowingly march under the Nazi banner have disqualified themselves as ‘good people,’” Romney wrote. On his attacks on black athletes, cable news personalities or members of Congress, Trump allies argue that he is merely swinging back at opponents when provoked. White House aides also say Trump loves the attack on NFL players kneeling for the national anthem and seeks out reasons and stories to tweet about it. “He’s not, in my view, a racist by any stretch of the imagination,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., who was critical of Trump during the 2016 campaign but has become a staunch ally. “I have never heard him make a single racist

statement. Not even close.” Graham, who spent considerable time at Bedminster over the past week, added: “It is how you react to him. It is not the color of your skin, it is not the content of your character. It is what you say about him.” Trump’s political base is overwhelmingly white and older, and he won the 2016 presidential election in part by rallying

white voters who do not have college degrees. The perceived erosion of former cultural and economic touchstones — the American flag, the steel and mining industries — were mainstays of his campaign. Immigration, which Trump has called a “disaster,” and the wall he wants to build on the Mexican border are among his most consistent themes. He counts few minorities

among his top advisers or friends. Christopher Malone, a political science professor and dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Molloy College, said Trump’s racially charged outbursts were part of a calculated effort to appeal to whites, especially those with a sense of cultural grievance. “These are intentional acts, even though people may not see the rhyme or reason to it,” Malone said. Race is a frequent subtext of Trump’s most prominent crusades, including his long-running feud with black NFL players and his anger at James, who told Lemon in a recent interview that Trump

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018 used sports “to divide us.” “Lebron James was just interviewed by the dumbest man on television, Don Lemon. He made Lebron look smart, which isn’t easy to do,” Trump wrote on Twitter at 11:37 p.m. on Aug. 3, his first full day here at his New Jersey golf resort. In a private dinner at his Bedminster club with business executives a few days later, Trump asserted that “almost every student” from China studying in the United States was a spy. And in a pair of tweets on Friday, Trump revived his periodic criticism of NFL players who kneel during the national anthem to protest racial profiling and police brutality.

“Stand proudly for your National Anthem or be Suspended Without Pay!” he tweeted. Fox News host Laura Ingraham, a reliable Trump defender whose hard-line views on immigration mirror Trump’s, declared last week that “the America we know and love doesn’t exist anymore,” citing legal and illegal immigration. She later said the comments “had nothing to do with race or ethnicity.” Trump has stayed quiet about this weekend’s planned demonstration by potentially hundreds of white nationalists at Lafayette Square, across the street from the White House. He will remain in New Jersey on Sunday.

Save up to $50/mo when you switch to Verizon. When you’re living your best life, you need the best unlimited. Limited-time offer available for ages 55 and older.

Paper-free billing and Auto Pay req’d for this rate. Rate applies only to phone lines for account holder aged 55 years of age or older on the Go Unlimited plan and with a Florida, Illinois or Missouri billing address. Cannot be combined with Military or Fios discounts. In times of congestion your data may be temporarily prioritized behind other traffic. Mobile Hotspot/tethering reduced to speeds up to 600kbps. Domestic data roaming at 2G speeds. Our Surcharges (incl. Fed. Univ. Svc. of 17.9% of interstate & int’l telecom charges [varies quarterly] $0.21 Regulatory & $1.23 Administrative/line/mo., & others by area) are not taxes (details: 1.888.684.1888); gov’t taxes & our surcharges could add 7%-46% to your bill. Activation fee/line: $30. IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Subject to VZW Agmts., Calling Plan & credit approval. Coverage, varying by svc. not available everywhere. Max. 2 lines. © 2018 Verizon Wireless.


NATION

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A13

Returned Korean War dog tag belonged to medic The lone military ID tag that North Korea provided with human remains last month belonged to Indiana man

Charles McDaniel Jr. was three years old and Larry was two when their father was sent to South Korea in August 1950 from Japan, where he was a member of the U.S. occupation forces that had been stationed there since the end of World War II. At the time, North Korean forces had driven U.S. troops almost off the Korean peninsula at Pusan before Gen. Douglas MacArthur engineered the first big U.S. victory with an amphibious landing at Inchon in September.

BY ROBERT BURNS associated Press

WASHINGTON • The lone military identification tag that North Korea provided with 55 boxes of human remains last month belonged to Master Sgt. Charles H. McDaniel, an Army medic from Indiana who was killed in the opening months of the Korean War. The Army on Wednesday handed McDaniel’s slightly corroded dog tag to his sons, Charles Jr. and Larry, who were so young when their father perished that they have little memory of him. Charles, 71, told reporters he was moved to tears when he got the phone call at home in Indianapolis last week informing him that his father’s dog tag had been returned. “It’s a very mixed, jumbled moment for us,” he said, referring to the emotions he and his brother feel so many years after having grown up without their biological father, never knowing for sure what happened to him in a war many Americans have forgotten. “At least we have this,” he said, pointing to the dog tag, imprinted with the name, Charles Hobert McDaniel, and a service number. Charles Jr., of Indianapolis, told reporters he has no recollection of what his family was told when his father was reported missing in action.

NO MEMORY OF FATHER Larry, 70, of Jacksonville, Fla., said he has no memory at all of his father, but “I’m proud of what he did and what he accomplished.” The dog tag is no assurance that McDaniel’s remains are among those contained in the 55 boxes that the North Korean army turned over to U.S. officials at Wonsan, North Korea,

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Larry McDaniel (left), of Jacksonville, Fla., and his brother, Charles McDaniel, of Indianapolis, sons of Master Sgt. Charles Hobert McDaniel, who died in the Korean War in 1950, are presented their father’s dog tag by Greg Gardner, chief of Past Conflicts for the Army Casualty Office, during a news conference Wednesday in Arlington, Va. The dog tag was among remains recently repatriated from North Korea.

sociated with any specific individual.

A dog tag from Master Sgt. Charles Hobert McDaniel, who died in the Korean War in 1950 and was among recently repatriated remains from North Korea, is displayed with his service medals during a ceremony Wednesday by military officials in Arlington, Va.

on July 27. John Byrd, director of the Defense Department laboratory in Hawaii that is beginning the process of attempting to identify the remains, said the condition of the bones is judged to be “moderate to poor preservation,” meaning few are whole

bones and all are quite old. No personal effects were handed over by the North Koreans aside from the McDaniel dog tag. The boxes contained a number of U.S.-issued military items such as helmets, gloves and canteens, but none are as-

5,300 MISSING North Korea returned the remains as part of an agreement reached by its leader, Kim Jong Un, at his Singapore summit with President Donald Trump in June. Kim also agreed to cooperate with the U.S. in searching for and excavating additional remains in North Korea, where an estimated 5,300 U.S. servicemen are believed to have fallen and not been recovered. Negotiations on the terms of such future operations have not yet begun, American officials said. A key tool in identifying war remains is matching DNA extracted from the bones with DNA samples provided by family members of the missing. As part of that process, the director of a DNA laboratory in Dover, Del., that will be attempting to make such matches, Dr. Timothy P. McMahon, took swabs of saliva from Larry’s mouth as news cameras snapped pictures.

FIGHTING IN UNSAN McDaniel was a medic with 3rd Battalion, 8th Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, which was called on to reinforce South Korean army units overrun by Chinese forces in late October 1950 at Unsan, about 60 miles north of Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. In “This Savage War: MacArthur’s Korea,” author Arthur F. Dorie wrote that the only escape route from Unsan after the Chinese fought their way into the town was closed before the 3rd Battalion, known as “Scrappy Blue,” could withdraw. “Living up to the standard of their regimental motto, ‘Honor and Courage,’ the men of the 3rd Battalion organized a perimeter defense, and for four days and nights they turned back wave upon wave of Chinese commandos, infantrymen and cavalrymen,” he wrote. Ultimately, hundreds of U.S. troops were killed or captured. A Pentagon profile of McDaniel says there is no evidence that he was captured by the Chinese and held as a prisoner of war. An eyewitness interviewed after the battles at Unsan — another medic assigned to McDaniel’s battalion — said he believed McDaniel was killed in action. Byrd, the lab director, said it was too early to estimate how many individuals may be represented by the bones returned in the boxes. Suggesting that it might be more than 55, Byrd said that 208 boxes returned by North Korea between 1990 and 1994 turned out to contain remains from about 400 individuals, not all of whom have yet been identified.

LIFE IS ABOUT

Celebrating At The Sheridan we believe in celebrations, smiles and happiness. And we love grandchildren too! From family nights and birthday dinners to monthly theme parties and Brain Health University, our award-winning programs are focused on happiness and well-being. Get a taste of what life at The Sheridan is all about.

Tasty Tuesdays LUNCH OR DINNER TUESDAYS IN AUGUST CALL TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT AT THE TABLE AND BE READY TO SMILE! Best-In-Class Assisted Living & Memory Care Communities

THE SHERIDAN ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE 16300 JUSTUS POST ROAD CHESTERFIELD, MO 63017

ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE 450 N. LINDBERGH BLVD. CREVE COEUR, MO 63141

ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE 12470 ROTT ROAD SUNSET HILLS, MO 63127

RSVP AT 636-896-5113 TODAY

RSVP AT 314-312-0012 TODAY

RSVP AT 314-925-0491 TODAY

WWW.SENIORLIFESTYLE.COM


NATION

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A13

Wildfire victims among those stung by trade war Cost of building a home is rising, in part because of tariffs Trump has imposed BY GEOFF MULVIHILL AND JONATHAN J. COOPER associated Press

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. • Add

this to the challenges facing California wildfire victims: Tariffs. The import tariffs imposed by President Donald Trump are adding thousands of dollars to the cost of building homes. That especially squeezes homeowners who seek to rebuild quickly after losing their houses to natural disasters, such as the wildfires scorching parts of California. The Trump administration’s tariffs have raised the cost of imported lumber, drywall, nails and other key construction materials. One building association official said the tariffs could raise the price of a typical new home in California by as much as $20,000, and it could be more for individual homes being custombuilt on short order. That could be enough to keep some people with inadequate homeowners insurance from rebuilding or force them to consider a smaller house. Other factors making home construction more expensive include a shortage of workers and increased demand that has pushed up the price of materials produced in the U.S. The difference with the tariff-related cost increase: It’s a direct result of a governmental policy change. “This comes at a bad time if you’ve just had your neighborhood swept up in a firestorm,” said Jock O’Connell, an international trade adviser at Beacon Economics in California. Wildfires have destroyed thousands of homes in California over the past two years, including 1,200 so far this year. It’s not just wildfire victims in the West who have to deal with higher construction costs. Last year, Hurricane Harvey flooded 300,000 structures in Texas. Trump has imposed the import tariffs on a range of goods as a way to strike back at trading partners he says have not treated the U.S. fairly. His move has set off a trade war, with other nations raising tariffs on U.S. goods in retaliation. Tariffs now are just over 20 percent on imported Canadian

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A house in Santa Rosa, Calif., destroyed by a wildfire stands only partially rebuilt this month. Tariffs imposed by President Donald Trump’s administration have raised the cost of imported lumber, drywall, nails and other key construction materials, squeezing homeowners who seek to rebuild quickly after losing their houses to natural disasters such as the wildfires that ravaged parts of Santa Rosa.

lumber and 25 percent on steel imported from certain nations as well as on a long list of goods from China. Rob Dietz, chief economist for the National Association of Home Builders, said that typically the price of labor, interest rates and the availability of land are the main variables determining the cost of new home construction, with the price of materials and local fees also having an effect. “Now, lumber and labor are the top two,” he said. The U.S. imports about onethird of its softwood lumber, mostly from Canada. Among other things, it’s used to build the wood framing for new houses. California Building Industry Association President Dan Dunmoyer said contractors tell him that the tariffs alone could add $8,000 to $10,000 to the lumber costs for a typical singlefamily home and about the same amount for steel products such as nails, other fasteners and wire

mesh. Tariffs also are boosting the cost of appliances, drywall and solar panels, which will be required on all new homes in California starting in two years. Asked for comment about the impacts of the tariffs on building materials, White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters did not respond directly. In an email, she said, “Instead of retaliating, China should address the longstanding concerns about its unfair trading practices.” APM Homes is rebuilding 50 houses destroyed by fire last October in the Coffey Park neighborhood of Santa Rosa, north of San Francisco. Project manager John Allen said rebuilding costs had not risen as much as the building association predicts, but said they could in time. Even relatively small price increases can hit homeowners hard. “They’re already maxing out their insurance,” Allen said. Insurance policies are another potential obstacle for homeown-

ers wanting to rebuild and faced with rising construction costs. Many homeowners have policies that do not guarantee rebuilding a home at today’s replacement cost but rather an amount tied to an outdated estimate or the value of the mortgage. In a survey of a group of Californians who lost homes in fires last year, Roadmap to Recovery, a project of insurance customer advocacy group United Policyholders, found that two-thirds of the respondents did not have enough insurance to cover the full cost of rebuilding. The majority of that group was short by at least $100,000. Those are the homeowners most affected by the tariffs on construction material and the other factors boosting the cost of rebuilding. California lawmakers, reacting to reports of wildfire victims with insurance coverage inadequate to rebuild, gave final approval this week to a consumer

protection bill. It would require insurers to tell homeowners every two years how much it will cost to replace their home at current prices, giving homeowners a chance to boost their coverage. Rising construction costs already are affecting some of Debbie and Rick Serdin’s neighbors in Santa Rosa’s Coffey Park neighborhood. They said one neighbor was replacing a two-story house with a single-story model because their insurance coverage wasn’t enough to rebuild the home they had. Others are selling their lots, taking their insurance checks and looking to start over somewhere else. Debbie Serdin, a veterinary technician whose husband works at The Home Depot, said she had been watching construction prices rise for neighbors who had waited to start the rebuilding process. “Don’t put it off,” she said. “The longer you wait, the more it’s going to cost.”

LIFE IS ABOUT

Celebrating At The Sheridan we believe in celebrations, smiles and happiness. And we love grandchildren too! From family nights and birthday dinners to monthly theme parties and Brain Health University, our award-winning programs are focused on happiness and well-being. Get a taste of what life at The Sheridan is all about.

Tasty Tuesdays LUNCH OR DINNER TUESDAYS IN AUGUST CALL TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT AT THE TABLE AND BE READY TO SMILE! Best-In-Class Assisted Living & Memory Care Communities

THE SHERIDAN ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE 16300 JUSTUS POST ROAD CHESTERFIELD, MO 63017

ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE 450 N. LINDBERGH BLVD. CREVE COEUR, MO 63141

ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE 12470 ROTT ROAD SUNSET HILLS, MO 63127

RSVP AT 636-896-5113 TODAY

RSVP AT 314-312-0012 TODAY

RSVP AT 314-925-0491 TODAY

WWW.SENIORLIFESTYLE.COM


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Company accused of mixing Chesapeake blue crab with imports Massive fraud worth millions of dollars has shaken the seafood industry BY JUSTIN JOUVENAL Washington Post

Few things say “local” like the Chesapeake blue crab. It has scuttled its way into Maryland’s tourism slogan and is part of the region’s signature dish, proudly touted on menus and in markets as a taste of the Bay in an era when “eat local” has become the mantra of foodies. But a few years ago, a tipster made an unsavory allegation: A major Virginia seafood supplier was selling packages of premium Chesapeake blue crab meat cut with cheaper foreign crab. It wasn’t even the same species. In an unusual probe, federal agents fanned out across Virginia, Delaware and North Carolina, scooping up crab from Casey’s Seafood and sending it out for the type of DNA analysis more common in rape and murder cases. The results would reveal the tip of what authorities say is a massive fraud worth millions of dollars, one so large it has shaken the food industry and raised questions about just how much of the iconic food labeled as local comes from the Chesapeake Bay. Federal prosecutors allege that the Newport News, Va., company sold a whopping 398,000 pounds of Chesapeake blue crab mixed with cut-rate crab from as far away as Indonesia and Brazil, and labeled it as a U.S. product. The retail value of the crab is roughly $14 million at current prices. It is difficult to ascertain how widespread such problems are, but watermen, seafood suppliers, lawmakers and environmental groups have all expressed concerns about crab fraud in recent years and whether enough is being done to stop it. A 2015 report by Oceana, an international nonprofit group focused on ocean

AN AUTHORIzED AUTHORI DEALER OF

ALYSSA A. BOTELHO • Washington Post

Some chefs and crab aficionados say Chesapeake blue crabs are a cut above blue crabs found in warmer waters, as well as other similar species, because they put on fat for hibernation.

conservation and advocacy, found that nearly 40 percent of crab cakes it tested that were labeled as local in area restaurants contained imported meat. “It’s a species that’s well loved around the area,” said Kimberly Warner, the senior scientist at Oceana who authored the report. “The thought that we’ve all been subject to this fraud when we are enjoying what we think is a local product really hits home with diners in this region and undercuts the watermen.” But it’s not just consumers and industry insiders who suffer. Oceana says the foreign crab that ends up in local products is sometimes illegally fished in an unsustainable fashion, such as via bottom trawling, that can kill fish and other species and deplete crab stocks. Then, there’s the taste. Some chefs and crab aficionados say

Chesapeake blue crabs are a cut above blue crabs found in warmer waters such as those in the Carolinas and Louisiana, as well as other similar species. Crab cakes made with other meats — or crab fakes as some have derisively taken to calling them — just don’t hold up. “We are one of the farthest northern points they harvest the blue crab from,” said Steve Vilnit, vice president of marketing for Capital Seaboard, based in Jessup, Md. “Our crabs have to hibernate in the winter and to do that they have to put on fat. Just like with a piece of beef, fat gives it flavor.” The cache of Chesapeake blues and the limited supply allows stores and restaurants to charge a premium. Investigators said that higher price point may have provided incentive for Casey’s to cheat in the current case. It may motivate others, too.

NEW INTERIOR DOORS MAKE A

BIG DIFFERENCE Over 500 Doors Installed in 2017!

SHAKER COLLECTION

In-Stock CABINETS up to

ONLY

25%OFF

$

159

Granite

starting at

$28.95/sq ft

PER INSTALLED DOOR 1O DOOR MIN.*

4 hours later with no messy construction CLASSIC COLLECTION

A federal agent from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration wrote in a search warrant that an informant told him Casey’s Seafood was trying to undercut the market, because prices for Chesapeake blue crabs had climbed with their scarcity. The fraud allegedly occurred between 2012 and 2015. James R. Casey, the company’s president, directed employees to remove foreign crab meat from packing containers and blend it with meat from another processor before placing the meat in containers containing the label “Product of the USA,” according to court documents. The employees also brazenly slapped “Product of the USA” stickers over the labels of the discarded cans that read “Product of Brazil” or “Product of China,” presumably to cover their tracks, according to court documents.

In 2015, federal agents scoured the Casey’s Seafood processing plant in Newport News, removing 17 bags and cans of crab meat labeled “Product of Vietnam,” invoices, computers and dozens of other items, according to court documents. After the action, Harris Teeter and Farm Fresh supermarkets announced that they were dropping Casey’s Seafood products. Casey, 74, has been charged with violating the Lacey Act, a federal law on the labeling of fish and wildlife. He faces up to five years in prison if convicted. Casey’s attorney did not return requests for comment and Casey’s listed phone number has been disconnected. The way federal prosecutors filed the charge — as a “criminal information,” or a written accusation — indicates that they may be moving toward a plea deal with Casey. The U.S. attorney’s office for the Eastern District of Virginia declined to comment on the case. No hearing dates have been set. In 2015, Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., Tim Kaine, D-Va., and Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., before her retirement, wrote to President Barack Obama urging greater regulation of crab processing to stamp out fraud. “The fraudulent labeling of Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean blue crab meat has a detrimental impact on an industry that plays an important role in the Virginia and Maryland economies,” they wrote. At the time, the Obama administration was studying ways to monitor seafood imports and cut down on fraud — which, in addition to crabs, affects other sectors of the seafood industry. New rules went into effect at the start of 2018, requiring importers to document that the catch is legally and sustainably caught. The rules apply to blue crab, but not other species commonly mixed with it. And the regulations do not do much to combat fraud that occurs within the United States.

Paint & Hardware Sold Separately MODERN COLLECTION

MANY STYLES TO CHOOSE FROM

IN-STOCK CABINETS READY FOR PICKUP IN 5-7 DAYS!

St. Louis Doors and Closets 180 CHESTERFIELD INDUSTRIAL BLVD, CHESTERFIELD MO 63005

FREE ESTIMATES BY APPT.

636-442-0159

6 locations for your convenience

StLouisDoorsandClosets.com

*Whole Home Sale $159 promotional price is good for 10 or more standard weight raised panel doors our two most popular styles Shaker and Modern styles available for additional fee. Doors sold separately for orders less than 10 doors. Paint and hardware sold separately. New orders only. Must present ad at time of estimate. May not be combined with other offers or discounts.This is an independently owned and operated retailer of One Day Doors & Closets. Offer expires XX/XX/2018.

CLOSET ORGANIZERS

fREE

walk-in closets • bedroom closets INSTALLATION laundry rooms • pantries home offices • garages CLOSET SALE*

Call 636-200-3760 Special Contractor Pricing Available

WHOLESALE PRICING AVAILABLE

Come in and find out why our clients say,

“I’m so glad I found you!” (With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included)

The timeless appeal and beauty of quality hardwood floors enhances your furnishings and allows you to create the ambiance you desire whether you’re going for a warm comfortable atmosphere or a smooth contemporary feeling. STOP BY TODAY TO VIEW OUR WIDE SELECTION OF HARDWOOD FLOORING, CARPET, AND VINYL. 6215 Ronald Reagan Dr, Lake St Louis, MO 63367

(636) 561-5441

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 9/10/18

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 9/10/18

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS • BEST WINDOW • FACTORY DIRECT • FREE, NO PRESSURE ESTIMATES • FREE FINANCING

40% OFF SIDING Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 8/31/18

$200 314-429-7000 25+

millswindow.com

yEA RS

OFF

WINDOWS Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 8/31/18


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Facing indictment, Collins ends re-election bid for U.S. Congress

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Winners of Hawaii’s Democratic primaries favored in November

BY KAREN MATTHEWS Associated Press

NEW YORK • In an about-face, Rep.

Chris Collins, R-N.Y., is ending his reelection bid days after he was charged with insider trading. Collins released a statement Saturday morning saying he would suspend his campaign and finish the rest of his term. Collins was indicted Wednesday on charges he passed inside information about a biotechnology company to family members so they could profit from illicit trades. He had said later that day that he would remain on the ballot despite the indictment and fight the charges. But Collins reversed himself Saturday. “I have decided that it is in the best interests of the constituents of NY-27, the Republican Party and President Donald Trump’s agenda for me to suspend my campaign for re-election to Congress,” his statement said. He went on to say he would fill out his term and “continue to fight the meritless charges brought against me.” He has denied any wrongdoing. Collins’ decision to end his re-election bid appeared to boost Democrats’ chances of taking in a solidly Republican district, but the announcement left unanswered questions including how Collins’ name could be removed from the ballot. Wednesday’s indictment charges Collins and two others, including his son, with conspiracy, wire fraud and other counts. Prosecutors say the charges relate to a scheme to gain insider information about a biotechnology company headquartered in Sydney, Australia, with offices in Auckland, New Zealand. It is unclear whether Collins’ name can be removed from the November ballot at this point and whether Republican Party officials will be able to nominate another candidate for the seat. Under New York state election law, Collins’ name could be taken off the ballot under certain narrowly defined circumstances that include death, disqualification or being nominated for a different office such as a county clerkship. Jessica Proud, a spokeswoman for the New York state Republican Party, said party officials were weighing their options. She said no decision had been made about a potential replacement for Collins on the ballot — if they are able to AN AUTHORIzED AUTHORI DEALER OF

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., leaves federal court in New York on Wednesday after being indicted for insider trading. Collins is suspending his re-election campaign. ASSOCIATED PRESS

replace him. Stefan Mychajliw, the Erie County comptroller, released a statement putting his name forward for the ballot spot and said he hoped to earn the support of county Republican officials in the district. The Democratic candidate in the November election, Nate McMurray, said in a statement on Saturday that Collins had no choice but to quit Congress, given the seriousness of the allegations against him. It is “a continuing disgrace that both parties have not said, with one clear voice, ‘Resign, Mr. Collins, and do it today,’” said McMurray, a supervisor for the town of Grand Island in western New York. McMurray had said after Collins’ indictment that he took “no joy in the terrible news” of his rival’s arrest. He said tens of thousands of dollars were donated to his campaign in the 24 hours after Collins’ arrest and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee reached out to partner with McMurray’s team. The district spans an area between the Rochester and Buffalo suburbs and is considering the most Republican-leaning district in New York. The race had not been considered competitive by many observers, including those predicting a “blue wave” that gives Democrats control of the House. The area backed Trump over Hillary Clinton by nearly 25 percentage points in 2016, when Collins beat his Democratic challenger by more than 2 to 1.

BY AUDREY MCAVOY Associated Press

HONOLULU • The winners of most of the

Democratic Party’s primary races in Hawaii this weekend will be the favorites to win the general election in November. The most hotly contested matches in this deep blue state on Saturday were for governor and the state’s 1st Congressional District. U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa was challenging one-term incumbent Gov. David Ige in the gubernatorial primary. Both Hanabusa and Ige are experienced, longtime politicians in Hawaii, leading to a close race. Three Republicans, including House Minority Leader state Rep. Andria Tupola, were vying for the Republican nomination. Former Pearl Harbor nonprofit CEO Ray L’Heureux and former state senator John Carroll were the two others. Six major figures from the Democratic Party were competing to succeed Hanabusa in Washington. The diverse list includes a 65-yearold fiscally conservative Democrat and a 29-year-old democratic socialist who advocates giving all Americans Medicare and making college tuition free. Two of the others gained notoriety by opposing President Donald Trump. Former U.S. Rep. Ed Case, the con-

servative Democrat, leads the field in name recognition and experience, having served in Congress before. Another contender, Lt. Gov. Doug Chin, gained popularity when he was state attorney general by leading Hawaii’s lawsuit challenging the Trump administration’s ban on travelers from several mostly Muslim-majority countries. That, along with his support for boosting spending on public education and boosting teacher salaries, earned Chin earned the endorsement of the Hawaii State Teachers Association, one of the state’s most powerful unions. Also running were veteran lawmaker Donna Mercado Kim, a former state Senate president, and Ernie Martin, the current chairman of the Honolulu City Council. Kaniela Ing, a state representative, was hoping his calls for free college, canceling student debt and Medicare-for-all would help him. Beth Fukumoto is another candidate who made her name opposing Trump. In her case, she was a member of the Republican Party, serving as the House Minority Leader in the state House of Representatives, when she criticized Trump during the Women’s March in Honolulu. Members of her party asked her to resign her leadership post. In response, she quit the party and joined the Democrats.

NEW INTERIOR DOORS MAKE A

BIG DIFFERENCE Over 500 Doors Installed in 2017!

SHAKER COLLECTION

In-Stock CABINETS up to

ONLY

25%OFF

$

159

Granite

starting at

$28.95/sq ft

PER INSTALLED DOOR 1O DOOR MIN.*

4 hours later with no messy construction CLASSIC COLLECTION

Hawaiians sign in on Thursday to vote at an early-polling location in Honolulu. Hawaii’s primary election will most probably settle the outcome of this year’s major races there.

Paint & Hardware Sold Separately MODERN COLLECTION

MANY STYLES TO CHOOSE FROM

IN-STOCK CABINETS READY FOR PICKUP IN 5-7 DAYS!

St. Louis Doors and Closets 180 CHESTERFIELD INDUSTRIAL BLVD, CHESTERFIELD MO 63005

FREE ESTIMATES BY APPT.

636-442-0159

6 locations for your convenience

StLouisDoorsandClosets.com

*Whole Home Sale $159 promotional price is good for 10 or more standard weight raised panel doors our two most popular styles Shaker and Modern styles available for additional fee. Doors sold separately for orders less than 10 doors. Paint and hardware sold separately. New orders only. Must present ad at time of estimate. May not be combined with other offers or discounts.This is an independently owned and operated retailer of One Day Doors & Closets. Offer expires XX/XX/2018.

CLOSET ORGANIZERS

fREE

walk-in closets • bedroom closets INSTALLATION laundry rooms • pantries home offices • garages CLOSET SALE*

Call 636-200-3760 Special Contractor Pricing Available

WHOLESALE PRICING AVAILABLE

Come in and find out why our clients say,

“I’m so glad I found you!” (With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included)

The timeless appeal and beauty of quality hardwood floors enhances your furnishings and allows you to create the ambiance you desire whether you’re going for a warm comfortable atmosphere or a smooth contemporary feeling. STOP BY TODAY TO VIEW OUR WIDE SELECTION OF HARDWOOD FLOORING, CARPET, AND VINYL. 6215 Ronald Reagan Dr, Lake St Louis, MO 63367

(636) 561-5441

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 9/10/18

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 9/10/18

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS • BEST WINDOW • FACTORY DIRECT • FREE, NO PRESSURE ESTIMATES • FREE FINANCING

40% OFF SIDING Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 8/31/18

$200 314-429-7000 25+

millswindow.com

yEA RS

OFF

WINDOWS Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 8/31/18


NATION

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A15

Case of civil rights worker slain in 1940 to be reopened BY ADRIAN SAINZ associated Press

MEMPHIS, TENN. • More than 78 years after civil rights worker Elbert Williams’ body was found in a Tennessee river, a district attorney announced last week that he is reopening the investigation into the slaying. Haywood County District Attorney Garry Brown said his office is launching an investigation into the death of the 32-yearold black man, whose body was found in a Brownsville river in June 1940, three days after being taken from his home by a group of men led by a police officer. “We cannot do all in 2018 that should have been done in 1940, but justice and historic truth demand that questions about the cause of Elbert Williams’ death, and the identity of his killer(s), that should have been answered long ago, be answered now if possible,” Brown said in a statement. “We will do what we can.” The Department of Justice initially ordered the case be presented to a federal grand jury, then mysteriously reversed itself and closed the case in early 1942. A U.S. attorney in Memphis declined to reopen the investigation in 2017, after a request from Williams’ relatives and Jim Emison, a lawyer who became intrigued by the case. An NAACP official has called Williams “the first martyr of the NAACP.” No one was ever charged in the case, and Williams’ grave has not been found, though it is believed to be in a cemetery near Brownsville. It was not immediately clear if Brown has new leads or if new evidence has been discovered. The move comes about three weeks after the U.S. government renewed its investigation into the 1955 slaying of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy from Chicago who was visiting relatives in Mississippi when he was brutally killed. Former U.S. Attorney Edward Stanton III said in a February 2017 letter to Williams’ family that his office could not reopen the investigation because more than 75 years had passed since the crimes and many if not all of the potential witnesses have died. He also wrote that the statute of limitations for any federal crime had long expired. However, there is no time limit on firstdegree murder charges in Tennessee. Brown said the case falls under Tennessee’s new Civil Rights Crimes Cold Case Law, which mandates a statewide survey of cold civil rights crimes and directs referral of viable cases for prosecution.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

In this photo from 2015, visitors inspect a historical marker honoring Elbert Williams after it was unveiled near the town square in Brownsville, Tenn. Williams’ body was found in a river in Brownsville in June 1940.

Noah Bond, of Memphis, Tenn., reads the program during a service to honor Elbert Williams in 2015. Williams was killed by unknown assailants in June 1940, amid a drive to register black voters. Williams was taken from his home by a group of men led by a police officer, and his body was found later in the Hatchie River. His slaying was never solved. Haywood County District Attorney Garry Brown said: “We cannot do all in 2018 that should have been done in 1940, but justice and historic truth demand that questions about the cause of Elbert Williams’ death ... be answered now if possible.”

Brown’s investigators plan to team up with a University of Tennessee forensic scientist to look for Williams’ grave. Emison and others believe exhuming the body could lead to a murder weapon. Williams’ wife said she saw what looked like bullet holes in his chest. A relative is providing a DNA sample to help identify the body, Emison said. Williams was killed more than two decades before NAACP leader Medgar Evers was gunned down by a Klansman outside his Jackson, Miss., home in 1963 but has received far less attention than the slayings of Evers and Till. Williams was part of a group of people who registered black voters in western Tennessee in the early days of the civil rights movement. They toiled in rural areas where lynchings had taken place and civil rights workers were threatened with violence. FBI and Justice Department documents Emison obtained from the National Archives showed that Brownsville police, upset because the local NAACP branch was registering blacks to vote, had led an effort to force its members out of town. Then-U.S. Assistant Attorney General Wendell Berge said in a letter to U.S. District Attorney William Clanahan that the “obvious purpose” of the police and others had been to frighten the town’s black population and prevent them from voting. When police got a tip that he was planning an NAACP meeting at his home, a group of men led by police Officer Tip Hunter went to his residence, said they needed to question him outside and then took him away on June 20, 1940. Williams’ body was found three days later in the nearby Hatchie River. No autopsy was performed. A coroner’s jury ruled the body was badly decomposed and that the cause of death was believed to be by “foul means by persons unknown.” The Justice Department closed its investigation in spite of evidence gathered by Thurgood Marshall, then special counsel to the NAACP who later became the U.S. Supreme Court’s first African-American justice. Emison, who has done exhaustive research, believes there may be witnesses — or perpetrators — still alive. He said a new investigation into Williams’ death is “a dream come true.” “I hope this has a cascade effect,” he said. “It’s a matter of the pursuit of justice, no matter how long it takes.”

Prouhet Farms 314-739-4978

13117 Prouhet Farm Road Bridgeton, MO 63044

HOME GROWN Watermelon, Cantaloupe & Many More Vegetables 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Fremont DIY Fireplace Kit Woodboxes optional

7 days/week

Now Open

Pick your own

Crowder Peas & Tomatoes

Serving St. Louis For Over 25 Years ! Fast Reliable Service! comfortsolutionsstl.com

314-968-9900 636-227-9100

0% FINANCING

Servicing All Makes and Models

For qualifying credit.

• • • • •

Residential Specialist 10 year Labor Warranty 10 year Parts Warranty Licensed & Bonded Flexible Financing with No Money Down

Local Utility Rebate $300.00 to $950.00

Spire $25.00 to $325.00

Other financing available Expires 8/31/18. PD

$

75

00

Regularly $80

Air Conditioning or Furnace Tune-Up Valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Expires 8/31/18. PD

May not offer services in all areas. Rebate may vary on areas and utility service provider. Other limitation and restriction may apply.

FREE INJURY

15584 Veterans Memorial Parkway • Wentzville, MO (636) 332-9784 • midwestblock.com

Building your community one block at a time!

Renew Your Bath Tub & Tile

Reglaze! Make Your Bathroom

Look Like New Again!

295

NOW TUB ONLY 00 Save ONLY $ $100 with Coupon! Angies List Super Service Award Winner 6 Years in a Row Make Your Tile, Countertops And Floors Look Like Granite For A Fraction Of The Cost.

CONTEMPORARY REFINISHING Call Now (314) 520-0857 www.contemporaryrefinishing.com

Member Better Business Bureau

Physical Therapy · Sports Rehab · Hand Therapy Vestibular Therapy · Industrial Rehab

SCREENS

Bring this coupon in for

5 OFF

$

WWW.APEXNE TWORKP T.COM

of a $20 purchase Expiration 8/26. Not valid with other offers.

31 CONVENIENT STL & ME TROEAST LOCATIONS

Sign up for our Reward Program for more coupons and discounts!

2500 Lemay Ferry Rd - 314-416-4611


NATION

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Design is chosen for memorial for Sandy Hook victims ASSOCIATED PRESS

HARTFORD, CONN. • A committee in

Newtown, Conn., has chosen a design for a permanent memorial to honor the pupils and educators killed in the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The special town commission chose a design by San Francisco-based architecture and design firm SWA. It features a coiling wooded walkway leading past two natural ponds to a sycamore tree planted in the middle of a small man-made reflecting pool, which will be inscribed with the victims’ names. The tree will be planted using what town officials call “sacred soil,” the incinerated remains of tens of thousands of teddy bears, flowers, candles, letters and cards that were brought to the town in the days after the shooting on Dec. 14, 2012. The plan calls for plants that will provide year-round color, such as flowers that attract butterflies in the summer, maple and birch trees that change color in the fall, evergreens and arctic sun dogwoods that will provide color in the winter and

white flowering dogwoods and geraniums in the spring. Alan Martin, the vice chairman of the Sandy Hook Permanent Memorial Commission, said the design was picked from 189 that were submitted and received overwhelming approval from the families of the 20 children and six educators killed at the school. “Three of the members of commission are parents who lost their children in the massacre, and one serves as a liaison to the rest of the families,” Martin said. “We’ve always deferred to the opinion of the families. We decided on this with a consensus that frankly I was not expecting.” The board of selectmen is expected to give final approval to the design in September. The project is expected to cost about $250,000 and will be paid for using money donated to the town after the massacre. Martin said plans were for the memorial, which will be situated on a donated 5-acre site near the elementary school, to be dedicated on Dec. 14, 2019, the seventh anniversary of the shooting.

’RE CELEBRATING

IONAL IFT SHOP DAY IDE

17 ASSOCIATED PRESS

This image provided by the Sandy Hook Permanent Memorial Commission on Wednesday shows the design for a memorial to honor the 26 people killed in the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. The memorial would be located on a donated 5-acre site near the school and is projected to be dedicated on Dec. 14, 2019, the seventh anniversary of the shooting.

Ph o

t

e

Chick C

rea Vigilet

arlitos D e th C lP wi u

, courtesy Chick Co rea Abate Pro ndo d. rma it: A ed Cr to

to er

e or

for the whole family! Clothing Shoes Jewelry Accessories cor

In our community. For our community. indbergh Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63141 314.692.8141

theresaleshop.org

All proceeds from The Resale Shop help support the programs of NCJW STL to improve the lives of women, children and families in our community

Marcu s G and ilm

Exclusively Sponsored By

The

30th

Midwest’s Premier GOT DRAFTYWINDOWS? ENERGY BILLS RISING? WE HAVE THE CURE! Art Festival

TH TH TH & August 25th AUGUST 24 , 2524th, & 26 100 JURIED ARTISTS ON DISPLAY

Moody Park on Longacre Drive In the HEART of Fairview Heights, Illinois

INSTANT $500 OFF ANY WINDOW OR PATIO DOOR PURCHASE when you mention this ad.

Just 12 miles east of the St. Louis Arch

FREE ADMISSION

First 25 Callers Get a FREE UPGRADE from Dual Pane to Triple Pane

Friday 6-10 • Saturday 10-8 • Sunday 11-5 ART AND FINE CRAFT DEMONSTRATIONS • CHILDREN’S GALLERY INTERACTIVE CHILDREN’S CREATION STATION SAT & SUN REFRESHMENTS & LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ALL WEEKEND

www.MidwestSalute.com

ARMSTRONG Heating and Air Conditioning System!

Installation starting at

$3,98000

SUMMER

(Based on a 2 ton system) 4SCU13LB124P PROMO PD 4 A80UH1E070B12

Installation includes new flue pipe for furnace only and flushed line set. Any upgrades will be an additional charge. Existing electrical, gas line shutoff and union will be reused. Offer Expires on 8-31-18

CALL NOW FOR A FREE ESTIMATE Get Ready for the Rainy season and end the damp basement musty smell! Get an APRILAIRE Whole House DEHUMIDIFIER Installed

$150 Off The Regular Price

Installed without ductwork using existing electric. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 8-31-18

Save Big on a Complete Furnace or Air Conditioner Maintenance Inspection

$42.00 Off The regular price of a complete system. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 8-31-18

! T A E H E H T T A B E KICK OFF SAL E!

314-236-3352 Air Purification with “Reme Halo”

0% Financing for up to 18 months

SAvE $100

Attacks viruses, mold spores, bacteria, VOC’s and Dust particles in your home. Ionization Process discovered by Albert Einstein to virtually duplicate Swiss Mountain Air. Expires on 8-31-18

Call NOW! 314-230-8111 • 618-206-5933 • 636-203-9289


NATION

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

DIGEST ‘Suicidal’ airline worker steals, crashes empty turboprop plane

resolved quickly. The $1.5 billion mission is already a week late because of rocket issues.

An airline worker stole an empty Alaska Airlines plane from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington on Friday night, and the National Guard scrambled two fighter jets to chase the aircraft, which crashed on an island in Puget Sound, officials said. No passengers were aboard the 76-seat Horizon Air Q400 turboprop plane, which was stolen by Richard Russell, 29, a Horizon Air ground service agent from Pierce County, according to airline and law enforcement officials. Horizon Air is a subsidiary company that operates Alaska Airlines aircraft. The renegade pilot bantered erratically with air-traffic controllers who pleaded with him to land the plane, according to officials and dispatch audio. Russell had been described as “suicidal,” and it appeared impossible that he could have survived the crash.

Boat crew suspended for political flag on state vessel • Officials with North Carolina’s ferry system have suspended a boat captain and crew member for a week after they hoisted a flag supporting President Donald Trump’s re-election on a state-owned ship. A passenger on the MV Frisco ferry took a picture of the “Trump 2020” flag flying below the U.S. flag and even with the North Carolina flag last month and posted it to social media. Ferry Division spokesman Tim Hass told media outlets that putting campaign material on a state-owned vessel is not appropriate. He did not release the names of the employees suspended for a week.

Sinkhole swallows vehicles in Pennsylvania • Vehicles stranded in a large sinkhole that opened up in the parking lot of a Pennsylvania outlet mall have been removed with the help of a crane. At least six vehicles were engulfed by the sinkhole that opened at Tanger Outlets just east of the city of Lancaster, about 70 miles west of Philadelphia, about 4:45 p.m. Friday. LNP newspaper reports that a worker tethered to a tower ladder from Lafayette Fire Company climbed into the sinkhole and connected the cars to the crane. A woman was reportedly in one of the vehicles when the sinkhole opened, but no injuries were reported. Chicago tallies 20 shootings, 1 fatal, early in weekend • Twenty people were shot, one fatally, in Chicago on Friday and early Saturday. Five juveniles including a 12-yearold girl were wounded. Police had added 600 officers to patrol the streets over the weekend in districts most affected by gun violence after the last weekend, the city’s most weekend in more than two years. At least 74 people were shot, 12 of them fatally,

LANCASTERONLINE VIA AP

Vehicles sit at the bottom of a sinkhole that opened Friday in a parking lot at the Tanger Outlets shopping center in Lancaster, Pa. Six cars were stuck in the sinkhole that opened up in the parking lot of the Pennsylvania outlet mall, but no one was hurt.

last weekend between 3 p.m. Friday and 6 a.m. Monday. First lady’s attorney blasts president over ‘chain migration’ • First lady Melania Trump’s immigration attorney is criticizing the president’s hostility toward “chain migration” — a process by which U.S. citizens or permanent residents can sponsor family members to come to the country — and called the attacks “unconscionable.” Michael Wildes, a high-profile attorney who has worked for numerous celebrities on immigration cases, represented the first lady’s parents, who became naturalized citizens Thursday. Viktor and Amalija Knavs left their native Slovenia and had been living in the United States as permanent residents. NASA delays launching of sun probe • A last-minute technical problem Saturday delayed NASA’s flight to the sun. The earlymorning countdown was halted with just one minute, 55 seconds remaining, keeping the

Ph o

t

e

Chick C

rea Vigilet

arlitos D e th C lP wi u

, courtesy Chick Co rea Abate Pro ndo d. rma it: A ed Cr to

to er

e or

Delta IV rocket on its pad with the Parker Solar Probe. Rocket maker United Launch Alliance said it would try again early Sunday, provided the helium-pressure issue can be

Snake cozying up to car gets cool reception • A resident of Stoughton, Mass., popped a car hood to check fluids and found a boa constrictor. The animal was safely captured by animal control officers, and no one was injured. Boas, which are not venomous, can grow to between 3 and 13 feet long. Animal control said it would keep custody of the snake for the time being. From news services

’RE CELEBRATING

IONAL IFT SHOP DAY IDE

17

for the whole family! Clothing Shoes Jewelry Accessories cor

In our community. For our community. indbergh Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63141 314.692.8141

theresaleshop.org

All proceeds from The Resale Shop help support the programs of NCJW STL to improve the lives of women, children and families in our community

Marcu s G and ilm

Exclusively Sponsored By

The

30th

Midwest’s Premier GOT DRAFTYWINDOWS? ENERGY BILLS RISING? WE HAVE THE CURE! Art Festival

TH TH TH & August 25th AUGUST 24 , 2524th, & 26 100 JURIED ARTISTS ON DISPLAY

Moody Park on Longacre Drive In the HEART of Fairview Heights, Illinois

INSTANT $500 OFF ANY WINDOW OR PATIO DOOR PURCHASE when you mention this ad.

Just 12 miles east of the St. Louis Arch

FREE ADMISSION

First 25 Callers Get a FREE UPGRADE from Dual Pane to Triple Pane

Friday 6-10 • Saturday 10-8 • Sunday 11-5 ART AND FINE CRAFT DEMONSTRATIONS • CHILDREN’S GALLERY INTERACTIVE CHILDREN’S CREATION STATION SAT & SUN REFRESHMENTS & LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ALL WEEKEND

www.MidwestSalute.com

ARMSTRONG Heating and Air Conditioning System!

Installation starting at

$3,98000

SUMMER

(Based on a 2 ton system) 4SCU13LB124P PROMO PD 4 A80UH1E070B12

Installation includes new flue pipe for furnace only and flushed line set. Any upgrades will be an additional charge. Existing electrical, gas line shutoff and union will be reused. Offer Expires on 8-31-18

CALL NOW FOR A FREE ESTIMATE Get Ready for the Rainy season and end the damp basement musty smell! Get an APRILAIRE Whole House DEHUMIDIFIER Installed

$150 Off The Regular Price

Installed without ductwork using existing electric. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 8-31-18

Save Big on a Complete Furnace or Air Conditioner Maintenance Inspection

$42.00 Off The regular price of a complete system. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 8-31-18

! T A E H E H T T A B E KICK OFF SAL E!

314-236-3352 Air Purification with “Reme Halo”

0% Financing for up to 18 months

SAvE $100

Attacks viruses, mold spores, bacteria, VOC’s and Dust particles in your home. Ionization Process discovered by Albert Einstein to virtually duplicate Swiss Mountain Air. Expires on 8-31-18

Call NOW! 314-230-8111 • 618-206-5933 • 636-203-9289


NEWS

08.12.2018 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Produced by the Niche Department of the Suburban Journals of Greater St. Louis, LLC

ST. LOUIS’ BEST BRIDAL

Engagements &Weddings stlouisbestbridal.com Spread the exciting word! Fill out the engagement form online, attach a photo and we do the rest! It’s easy and free. You also receive a package with a special T-shirt to help plan the special occasion.

Recently married? Just tell us about it within a year of your wedding and attach your photo. Announcing that big occasion is free, too!

( WEDDINGS )

Lovett

& Coffey

Grasse

Sam Coffey and Pamela Lovett were married the evening of June 22, 2018, at Sandy Creek Covered Bridge, Jefferson County, by the Rev. William Christman. A reception was held in the Fortune Teller Bar in St. Louis. The couple lives in Cedar Hill. !

& Springer

Jamie Jean Grasse and Malte Springer were married in an afternoon ceremony on June 15, 2018, by a justice of the peace in Copenhagen, Denmark. The bride’s parents are Louis and Mary Grasse of Des Peres and Pamela J. Schindeler of Sarasota, Fla. The groom is the son of Henry and Lisa Springer of Braunschweig, Germany. The newlyweds earned degrees from AlbertLudwig-Universität in Freiburg, Germany, the bride a master’s degree in philosophy and the groom a bachelor of arts in English. The couple lives and works in Leipzig, Germany. They plan to celebrate with a reception for friends and relatives when they visit the St. Louis area. !

( ENGAGEMENTS )

Belton

& Quarterman

Dr. Keith and Mrs. Denise Belton announce the engagement of their daughter, Kirsten Victoria Belton, to Brandon Aaron Quarterman, son of Carlos and Rena Collins and Aderia Quarterman. The wedding is planned for Sept. 10, 2018, at The Louisiana Castle in Franklinton, La., with the bride’s parents and godparents, Bishop W. L. Bradley and Gwendolyn Bradley, senior international prophetess, officiating. The bride-to-be is a patient care technician at Mercy Hospital and her fiance is HVAC technician in the Brentwood School District. !

Klaus

& Tevlin

Toni Klaus and Christopher Tevlin announce their engagement. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Fern Price of O’Fallon, Mo., and her fiance’s parents are Robert and Geraldine Tevlin, House Springs. The future bride, who has a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, is office manager for a chiropractor in Creve Coeur. Mr. Tevlin works in apartment management. They plan a wedding on March 16, 2019, the ceremony at Lutheran Church of the Resurrection and reception at Andre’s South, both in south St. Louis County. The future newlyweds also live in O’Fallon. !

Burger

& Beecher

Francis Beecher and Janelle Burger announce their engagement. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Joe Burger and Joy Lindley, each of Iowa, while her fiance’s parents are Louise Beecher of Connecticut and Chris Beecher of North Carolina. The couple plans a May 2019 wedding in Chesterfield, the same town where they live. !

Harris

& Dell

Lindsey Harris and Nathan Dell announce their engagement and date of their 2019 wedding. Ms. Harris works for Centene and her fiance is a lineman at Ameren. The newlyweds-to-be live in Creve Coeur and plan a wedding on March 9, 2019. !

Kilker

& Spakowski

Phil Spakowski and Meghan Kilker met through mutual friends in November of 2013 at Peppers Bar and Grill in south St. Louis. They have been laughing together ever since their first date at the Funny Bone comedy club. On Aug. 10, 2017, overlooking Lily Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park, Mr. Spakowski asked Ms. Kilker to marry him. She agreed, so the south St. Louis County couple plans to be married on Sept. 22, 2018. The future bride is a graduate of Central Methodist University, Fayette, and works for Unigroup in Fenton. Her fiance, a graduate of the University of Dayton in Ohio, is employed by Ansira, St. Louis. !

Linn

& Nicewaner

Mary and Randy Munson of Stampleton, Neb., and Sandra and David Lee announce the engagement of their children, Mikaila Linn and Jason Nicewaner. The bride’s father is the late Michael Linn and the groom is also the son of the late Robert Nicewaner. The couple lives in south St. Louis County and plans to be married Aug. 18, 2018. !

Smith

& Altman

Tim and Cindy Smith of Ballwin and Jeff and Kim Altman of Anaheim Hills, Calif., announce the engagement of their children, Kathryn Smith and CodyAltman. The bride-to-be earned a bachelor of science degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia. Her fiance is pursuing a degree in criminal justice at Maryville University, Town and Country. The couple met while working at the Penguin House of the Saint Louis Zoo, where Mr. Altman also later proposed. Ms. Smith is a zookeeper and Mr. Altman works in security. They plan to be married May 11, 2019. !

Winker

& Junge

Michael Junge and Anastazia Winker announce their engagement. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Ronald and Daria Winker. The couple lives in Florissant and plans to be married Feb. 22, 2019. !

ST Z E S ! ALIEAT PRI N I 2 F GR

1 FO R E

DIV

Groom’s Cake Dive @ Busch Stadium

Register for a chance to dive into a groom’s wedding cake! Twelve soon-to-be grooms will battle for valuable prizes by diving face-first into a multi-tiered Russo’s groom’s wedding cake. Prizes include packages for a vacation for 2, photography, videography, gown preservation, tuxedos, rehearsal dinner, flowers and more. Plus, each winner receives four tickets to the game in a party room!

 ENTER! | AUGUST 12 - 26 www.stltoday.com/contests

VOTE! | AUG. 27 - SEPT. 9 www.stltoday.com/contests

DIVE! | SEPTEMBER 24 just prior to the baseball game!

Est. 1961

C

A

T

E

R

I

N

G


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Sponsored in part by

THE TEMPTATIONS & THE FOUR TOPS

THE FAB FOUR

SEPTEMBER 8 | 8:00 PM

SEPTEMBER 22 | 8:00 PM

LUBOXOFFICE.COM

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

(636) 949-4433

POSTMODERN JUKEBOX

BILL ENGVALL

BACK IN BLACK AND WHITE TOUR

OCTOBER 5 | 8:00 PM

OCTOBER 13 | 8:00 PM

THE CARPENTERS TRIBUTE A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS

CELTIC WOMAN

FEATURING MICHELLE WHITED

THE BEST OF CHRISTMAS TOUR

DECEMBER 15 | 7:30 PM

DECEMBER 21 | 8:00 PM

RICK SPRINGFIELD

PATTI LABELLE

JANUARY 26 | 8:00 PM

MARCH 22 | 8:00 PM

PATTI LUPONE

TRACE ADKINS

MAY 11 | 8:00 PM

MAY 18 | 8:00 PM


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A19

176 AUTO COURT, O’FALLON, IL 62269 SALES: (618) 589-8744 SERVICE: (618) 641-0005 #89350

NEW CHRYSLER

LEASE PAYMENT

PACIFICA TOURING L MSRP $38,480 DEALER DISCOUNT $2,831 REBATE $3,250

EVERYONE QUALIFIES PRICE

$

279 *

$32,399

TOTAL SAVINGS $6,081 #89783

NEW JEEP

LEASE PAYMENT

WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT $

99 ^

MSRP $34,940

#89111

NEW JEEP

COMPASS MSRP $26,285 DEALER DISCOUNT $2,897 REBATE $4,000

EVERYONE QUALIFIES PRICE

$19,388

TOTAL SAVINGS $6,897 #89769

NEW JEEP

LEASE PAYMENT

GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED MSRP $43,135 DEALER DISCOUNT $4,340 REBATE $4,000

EVERYONE QUALIFIES PRICE

$

$34,795

229

TOTAL SAVINGS $8,340 #89691

NEW JEEP

GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO MSRP $34,640 DEALER DISCOUNT $2,796 REBATE $3,000

EVERYONE QUALIFIES PRICE

$28,844

TOTAL SAVINGS $5,796 #89591

NEW RAM

1500 ST QUAD CAB MSRP $32,540 DEALER DISCOUNT $5,833 REBATE $6,000

TOTAL SAVINGS $11,833 #89604

EVERYONE QUALIFIES PRICE

$20,707

OR 0% FOR 72 MO AVAILABLE

NEW RAM

1500 EXPRESS CREW CAB MSRP $42,365 DEALER DISCOUNT $6,893 REBATE $6,500

EVERYONE QUALIFIES PRICE

LEASE PAYMENT

$

$28,972

239

TOTAL SAVINGS $13,393 #89107

NEW RAM

1500 BIG HORN CREW CAB 4X4 MSRP $48,095 DEALER DISCOUNT $7,967 REBATE $6,500

EVERYONE QUALIFIES PRICE

$33,628

TOTAL SAVINGS $14,467 PLUS TAX, TITLE & LICENCE. PLUS DOC FEE. $3000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 36 mo, with approved credit ^ $3000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 24 mo, with approved credit † $3000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 36 mo, with approved credit ‡ $3000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 39 mo, with approved credit

*

Everyone Qualifies! Additional Discounts for Active/Retired Military.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUNDAy • 08.12.2018 • A20 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Tax-credit shell game Shady deals landed millions for McKee. For north St. Louis, nothing.

T

he more we know about the busi- advantage to work with the seller to inflate the stated purchase price. ness practices of developer Paul One purchase of a long-vacant, 17-acre McKee, the less there is to like. He started off as the would-be savior tract in the Bottle District north of downtown involved McKee providing a $16.4 of north St. Louis, a guy whose massive million promissory note to the sellers property purchases — often carried out using front companies — would enable big without putting any cash down. The state, under the DALA program, reimbursed things to happen in some long-neglected NorthSide for half the value of the purneighborhoods: expansive new office chase. Six years later, the land sits virtually space, jobs galore, 10,000 new homes, parks, trolleys. Roughly 15 years since his controversial purchasing spree began, a lot of nothing has actually happened. Nothing, that is, except for some suspicious land deals that enabled McKee to reap big tax-credit payoffs. As the Post-Dispatch’s Jacob Barker reported last Sunday, radically inflated purchase prices for some McKee properties apparently yielded millions of dollars in development incentives that yielded no actual development. McKee was willing to CHRISTIAN GOODEN • Post-Dispatch invest heavily in areas that The iconic Vess soda bottle replica stands amid vacant other developers avoided lots on Aug. 1, in the area known as the Bottle District in like the plague. He bet his downtown St. Louis. financial farm on the risky untouched. promise that the blighted north side could Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley be transformed. Without McKee’s help, has filed suit to recover tax credits from the deal might not have happened that deals involving two other north St. Louis secured north St. Louis as the site for the properties where stated purchase prices new National Geospatial-Intelligence radically exceeded the actual property Agency western headquarters. values. Still another questionable deal But the ongoing neglect of his massive involves a 2012 transaction between property acquisitions — totaling 1,500 McKee and a company partially owned by acres — has only deepened the decay his longtime attorney, Steve Stone. The and helped drag down property values of sale price was listed as $463,000, yielding neighboring residents. a tax credit of $230,000. The actual value For a long time, it looked as if McKee in city property records was listed at only had simply run out of money. But Barker’s $48,100. report indicates McKee was able to tap Had McKee worked the wonders he $43 million from the Distressed Area originally promised, chances are his finanLand Assemblage tax-credit program cial finagling might have passed unnobefore it ended in 2013. The way DALA credits work, the higher the purchase price ticed. But colossal failure, at significant taxpayer expense, has a way of inviting McKee reported on land purchases, the greater the tax credit NorthSide Regenera- uncomfortable scrutiny. McKee should prepare for a lot more poking and probing. tion received. So it was every bit to his

Rewriting the rulebook Now the Trump administration wants to target legal immigrants?

O

Melania Trump and her parents can attest. ne of the most popular refrains The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has of President Donald Trump’s shown that immigrants pay more into candidacy and subsequent ralSocial Security and Medicare than they lies has been to “build the wall.” Coupled with his frequent warnings about take from it. A 2013 CATO study reveals that native-born citizens living at or near MS-13 gangs, he claimed his administrathe poverty line use public benefits, such tion’s focus was on the “drug dealers, as welfare and food stamps, at a higher rate criminals and rapists” who were illegally than immigrants in similar economic cirentering the country. cumstances. Current policies are already His supporters took great umbrage at restrictive about legal immigrants’ use of the suggestion that Trump and the GOP public benefits, barring most for five years hated immigrants. They claim to support after entry. law-abiding immigrants who waited in But this isn’t even the real issue, which line and did things the right way. Those is about throwing red meat to those enerdefenders were strangely silent last week gized by Trump’s harsh anti-immigrant after NBC News reported on an adminrhetoric. It’s about making sure certain istration draft proposal targeting legal communities are too afraid to use benefits residents or even naturalized American like the Earned Income Credit or the citizens who have used public benefits Children’s Health Insurance such as purchasing subsiProgram, even if they’re dized insurance through the entitled as taxpayers. It’s Affordable Care Act. about stopping legal residents Lawmakers, especially and citizens from sponsoring pro-growth Republicans, immigrant children, spouses should call out this idea for or parents from joining them what it is — a craven attempt in this country. to energize a xenophobic How far is this administrabase, bypass Congress and tion willing to go in its efforts overturn the system for legal to purge the country of immiimmigrants who have played grants they deem undesirable? by the rules. Will the next target include The reported architect of legal immigrants who send their the proposal is Trump adviser Stephen Miller children to taxpayer-funded Stephen Miller, who is pushing public schools? to radically redefine what it means to be A goal that politicians from both para “public charge” — someone primarily ties can agree on is that America should dependent on the government. Those encourage and even reward legal immigradeemed likely to become a public charge tion. The administration now seeks to are already denied entry or lawful permapunish those who migrate the right way nent residence. and dare to access services their taxes pay The proposal is designed to feed into for. Like so many ideas Miller offers up, bigoted and false tropes about immigrants as burdens on the country. Significant evi- this one belongs in the shredder. dence abounds to the contrary, as first lady

See editoral cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Ample opportunities for voters to have their say in any election

Theater groups in St. Louis are a ‘treasure’ to be supported

I have been a poll manager for St. Louis election commissioners for many years. I also have worked St. Louis County elections. I am upset by inaccuracies in Randy Eschbach’s letter, “First-time voter encounters difficulties navigating primary” (Aug. 9). Every poll worker attends mandatory training sessions prior to each election. All registered voters in the city and county received a voter notification card advising of their poll locations, times that polls are open and a note that voters “must select a party ballot (Republican, Democratic, Libertarian, Constitution or Green Party). Voters who only want to vote on the propositions can by selecting a Non-Partisan ballot.” At each polling location there are posters with sample ballots and information on the three options for voter identification. The Post Dispatch printed a comprehensive Voters Guide on July 27 stating the Missouri law that a governmentissued photo identification (Missouriissued driver’s license, non-driver’s license, U.S. passport or military ID) is needed. Without a photo ID, you can show another form of identification, such as paycheck or bank statement and then sign a statement confirming your identity. This information is also printed on the voter notification card sent to all registered voters. There is also an option for voters without identification to get a provisional ballot. The signature on the provisional ballot is matched at election headquarters with the signature on file. Michael Weidhaas • St. Louis

Regarding Philip Boehm’s column “A Great Moment to Champion the Local Theatrical Scene” (Aug. 8): We are blessed with local theater companies. Support for these — from individuals, corporations, foundations and government — help make St. Louis an appealing place to live. Directors design their seasons with care. They offer well-known and popular plays, but they also want to stretch our minds and hearts with edgier and challenging plays. Critics at The New York Times recently developed a list of the 25 best plays since “Angels in America.” My husband and I have seen 13 of those, 12 in St. Louis. We plans to see another, “The Realistic Joneses,” produced by Rebels and Misfits, and in January will see “The Wolves” at the Rep Studio. People who buy tickets only for traveling productions at the Fox should sample what local companies offer. Tickets can be unbelievably affordable. Venues are intimate, and you are close to the actors so are drawn into the play. If you enjoy it, next year buy a season subscription. And make a donation to the company since revenue from tickets generally covers less than half of production expenses. For those of you employed by major corporations, if your company supports our smaller theaters, applaud that decision to company leadership. If it doesn’t, encourage them to do that. And share with your lawmaker how important governmental support of the arts is. St. Louis’ theater scene is truly a treasure. Barbara Bennett • St. Louis

‘Collusion’ is a far stretch when you weigh Democrats’ tactics

Vaccinations for senior citizens key to maintaining good health

Regarding the Post-Dispatch editorial “Trump admits collusion” (Aug. 8): I can’t believe you are urging me to not vote for Republican Josh Hawley because Donald Trump Jr. went to a meeting hoping to get dirt on Democrat Hillary Clinton. Rather, you want me to vote for the Democrats who hired Christopher Steele to go to Russia to get dirt on Donald Trump. They paid Steele big bucks for a phony Russian dossier that was then used to help justify a special prosecutor, who then hired 16 Democrat lawyers to waste millions on a witchhunt to get rid of Trump. You must think I’m an idiot. Bill Norman • Lake Saint Louis

It may be cliché to talk about aches and pains in seniors, but it’s a simple fact that as we age, our bodies are more vulnerable to injury and illness. What starts off as a cough and a runny nose can take a life when it turns into pneumonia. Frighteningly, 18,000 adults ages 65 and older die each year as a result of pneumococcal disease. At the age of 58, I was diagnosed with pneumonia three times in the same year – each time suffering from a high fever, cold, heavy chest and extreme fatigue. Now four years later, I have not had any symptoms of pneumonia, and for that, I am thankful. A simple shot was all it took to get my active life back. Oddly, even though history, studies, science and stories like mine show that vaccinations work and are essential for the health of our community, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is considering a dangerous decision to repeal the recommendation of the pneumococcal vaccinations for adults 65 years or older in 2019. I would hate to see this happen and hope doctors in our state continue to encourage seniors to get this important protection. Senior citizens are a vital component of the St. Louis community — through volunteer efforts, financial contributions, political activism and more. Of course, this can only be the case when they are healthy. I will be an advocate for prevention when it comes to good health. St. Louis’ seniors deserve the best shot at active, fulfilling and healthy lives. Michael Howard • St. Louis Executive director, Five Star Senior Center

Dirty dealings plentiful by both of the presidential candidates Both candidates in the 2016 presidential election sought dirt on their opponent from Russia. Why is it only a crime when Donald Trump did it? You need to stop demonizing Russia. We’ve had enough war. Mark Clarke • St. Louis

Political ads ahead of next election already too much Are voters going to be subjected to the intensity of political ads for the next 13 weeks that we have already endured? How about a moratorium on TV ads for a month? I may not vote for either Republican Josh Hawley or Democrat Claire McCaskill if this propaganda assault continues. I am saturated in Florissant. Doyle Perry • Florissant

Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

08.12.2018 • SUNDAY • M 1 75 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A21

A SUPERFICIAL REPORT • We believe nothing is gained by the failure of an official committee, charged with investigating the race war in Detroit, to deal honestly with its fundamental causes. It would have been far more wholesome if the committee had addressed the need for better housing, examined Klan activities and studied the methods and purposes of agitators. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

The climate change writing is on the seawall Recent case dismissals prove the point: Global warming must be addressed by legislators, not the courts. BY ERIN HAWLEY

In a big blow to green activists and cash-strapped cities looking for new revenue sources, a federal district judge recently dismissed a climate change lawsuit filed by New York City. This decision is a win for the rule of law as the recent spate of climate change lawsuits violate separation of powers principles. Unable to obtain the regulatory regime they want through the legislative process, cities and states across the country have filed suit alleging that five of the largest energy companies should be held liable for the international phenomenon of global warming. These tort lawsuits are wrong-headed for all sorts of legal reasons, but primarily because the democratic branches are in a much better position to balance regulation against the need for economic development. Two federal judges agree.

Most recently, Judge John F. Keenan of the Southern District of New York dismissed New York City’s climate change case, finding that its lawsuit was not suitable to judicial resolution. Keenan held that neither state tort nor federal common law provided a cause of action for greenhouse gas injuries. The international nature of the controversy made it wholly “inappropriate” for the interference of state tort law. Keenan also declined the city’s invitation to create a federal common law cause of action for greenhouse gas injuries (federal common law, after all, is limited precisely because it is judge-made law), writing “It is primarily the office of Congress, not the federal courts, to prescribe national policy in areas of special federal interest.” The ruling was a decisive victory for energy companies particularly because of the stage of litigation: Keenan got rid of the lawsuit at the motion-to-dismiss stage,

meaning the court was required to accept each and every one of the city’s allegations as true and also to draw every inference in favor of the city. Keenan found that, even accepting every one of New York City’s allegations as true and even drawing every inference in its favor, the city had failed to state even a plausible claim for relief. Keenan’s opinion is on firm ground: Indeed, a unanimous Supreme Court has already held that “the Clean Air Act and the EPA actions it authorizes displace any federal common law right to seek abatement of carbon-dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel fired power plants.” As Keenan pointed out, neither the city’s clever pleading about an alleged conspiracy nor its focus on production does anything to change the fact that the alleged harm — increased temperatures — is a result of emissions, not the production or sale of fossil fuels. And the Supreme Court has already held that the

Wanted:

Blight fighters Don’t just complain about derelict houses. Get angry and take action. TOD ROBBERSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The low-80s afternoon weather was so spectacular earlier this month, Janese and Mark decided one day to sit out on their front porch along with their three daughters. Their porch was immaculate. Their fenced yard was nicely mowed and weed-free. By all appearances, these homeowners have spent a lot of effort over the years to keep their property looking good. But the view looking outward from the porch spoiled everything, as it has pretty much every day for as long as the couple can remember. Right across the street in the 2400 block of Coleman Street stand no fewer than three crumbling, vacant houses with heavily overgrown lots. The houses, Mark said, are full of “squirrels and crackheads.” Though they are mostly boarded up on the front,“the whole back is off,” meaning trespassers can easily enter for whatever nefarious purpose they have in mind. Janese says she wouldn’t dare let her kids play outside unsupervised because POST-DISPATCH of the dangers — this despite what This derelict house at 2430 Coleman Street is one of three that mar the she says is a heavy police presence view from the front porch of Janese and Mark. The abandoned houses in the neighborhood. are owned by NorthSide Regeneration LLC. The danger doesn’t come from any of the six or seven neighbors complaining and shaming will have rights, too. in either direction, all of whom are cause McKee to bulldoze those A few blocks away, at 1531 Bacon taking pains to keep their propereyesores and give St. Louisans a Street, Ethel Sayles had pretty ties in order. The problems emareason to believe in his project. But much the same assessment. Her nate specifically from unsightly these taxpaying residents deserve front-porch view consists of a and dangerous vacant properties a chance to fight back and force crumbling house right next door, registered to NorthSide Regeneraaction. at 1529 Bacon Street, along with tion LLC, the largest private propSo do people like Dana Malkus three other eyesore houses where erty owner in north St. Louis. and Peter Hoffman. They are Bacon intersects with Magazine “It makes the whole neighborspearheading a legal-aid project hood look bad,” Janese complained. Street. Just beyond that is Vashon to organize homeowners and give “You think somebody wants to buy High School, presumably a place them the tools to fight back. when they come by and see all this? where teachers spend part of their “There’s a misconception that time convincing students that their Hell no!” dealing with vacancy is only a city futures don’t have to be defined by And that’s the whole point. problem. It’s not true. There are their neighborhood Responsible property actually tools that neighborhoods environment. Northowners don’t just take Side Regeneration does themselves can use,” Malkus, an care of their yards associate law school professor its best to convince and keep their houses at St. Louis University, told our those students otherpainted. They work editorial board in April. They are wise. hard and pay taxes. drawing on legal-aid models that On my very first Mark works as a meat Hoffman had already put to the test road trip through cutter; Janese works successfully in Kansas City before St. Louis three years for a company that moving to St. Louis as a staff attorago, I had reason to manufactures parts for ney for Legal Services of Eastern go exploring around airplanes and railroad Missouri. Vashon and happened cars. They declined to I asked Sayles, Janese and Mark to park my car at Bacon give their last names. if they would be willing to rally and Magazine streets. Neither had heard the their neighbors to take on McKee, I watched Sayles name of NorthSide Paul McKee provided people like Hoffman and climb the steps to her Regeneration’s owner, Malkus gave them a hefty assist. porch, imagining how Paul McKee, nor Their answer, without hesitation, frustrated and angry she must did they know of the sweetheart was a resounding,“Yes!” feel every day as she watched the deal that McKee cooked up years The massive blight problem houses around her deteriorate from ago to evade responsibility for — Hoffman prefers to call it an neglect while she worked hard to maintenance of scores of derelict “opportunity” — cannot be fixed keep her own house looking clean buildings among his nearly 1,700 by government alone. At some and presentable. properties. point, residents will have to get I vowed on that very day to tell The effect is that the property angry enough to take back their tax dollars paid by people like Mark her story and to hold the owners of neighborhoods. I found three volthose derelict houses accountable and Janese have allowed McKee to evade his responsibilities as a prop- for the psychological and economic unteers in no time. I suspect there are thousands more just like them. damage they were causing — long erty owner. They get the privilege before I knew that only one person of paying so McKee can drag down trobberson@post-dispatch.com their property values. It doesn’t get was responsible. Twitter: @trobberson It seems that no amount of any more unfair than that. They 314-340-8382

EPA is the entity tasked with weighing competing concerns and setting reasonable emissions standards. The judge also questioned the merits of the city’s case, writing that “it is not clear that Defendants’ fossil fuel production and the emissions created therefrom have been (a nuisance) in New York City,as the City benefits from and participates in the use of fossil fuels as a source of power, and has done so for many decades.” Finally, Keenan held that the city’s lawsuit was incapable of judicial resolution for one additional reason: its enormous foreign policy implications. As the Supreme Court held just this term, “The political branches, not the Judiciary, have the responsibility and institutional capacity to weigh foreign policy concerns.” This is not the first time that climate change plaintiffs have been shown the courthouse door. On June 25, Judge William Alsup

of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California dismissed climate change lawsuits by the cities of San Francisco and Oakland on exactly the same grounds, in exactly the same procedural posture. In that case, Alsup found that the cities’ lawsuits failed to state even a plausible claim to relief, because global warming “requires a comprehensive solution that weighs the global benefits of fossil fuel use with the gravity of the impending harms.” This is the second time in a few months that the federal courts have told plaintiff-cities (and their contingent-fee-seeking attorneys), that global warming is an issue for the political branches not the courts. It’s time for them to start listening. Erin Hawley is a legal fellow at the Independent Women’s Forum, an associate professor of law at the University of Missouri, and a former clerk to Chief Justice John Roberts.

Trump meets his match in the media: CNN’s Jim Acosta Cable channel’s chief White House correspondent, like the president, is a showman who must be star of the show. immigrants — that didn’t bother him so much when the Obama administration committed similar offenses. Before Trump came up with “bad hombres,” Obama repeatedly assured us that he was only Let me tell you something you deporting “gangbangers.” already know: At the moment, Well, if that was true, then the media are a mess. Obama managed to find and It’s time to send out a search remove about 3 million gangparty, because we’ve completely bangers. Apparently, America lost our way. We went from suffered a nationwide crime covering the world to thinking wave. the world revolves around us. We The problem is not what used to hunt for the story; today, Acosta said during an appearance we make ourselves the story. this week on CBS’s “The Late Our primary job is to hold the Show with Stephen Colbert.” powerful accountable when they His best line went like this: do wrong, but never before has “If you think ... you can take there been such a need to hold children away from their parents us accountable for what we get on the border and put them wrong. in cages, if you think you can Nowadays, even reporters — demonize immigrants and call who are supposed to be trained to them rapists and criminals, if keep their opinions to themselves you think that you can distort the — can’t wait to share their opinsense of reality that we all have ions with the masses through on a daily basis by telling lie after an interview, a sound bite or a lie and falsehood after falsehood, tweet. Then, like Superman slip- and not face any hard questions, ping back into Clark Kent, they then you’re just not living in the remake themselves as reporters same United States of America pretending to be objective. that I live in.” You’ve heard of the #MeToo Nothing wrong with that, movement. Well, we’re suffering folks. through the #LookAtMe media. The problem is that Acosta I’m old enough to remember was a guest on “The Late Show when the media was a referee with Stephen Colbert” in the and not a combatant in the arena. first place. It’s been clear for a And, although there are mornwhile that Trump is — perhaps ings when my creaky unintentionally — body would disagree, helping Acosta’s I’m not that old. career by elevating The point is, his profile and we’re talking about a making him a hero relatively new phewith the antinomenon. It began Trump crowd. It’s when Donald Trump also clear that the started attacking and CNN reporter is insulting the media, gamely playing and the media took along for his own the bait by taking it benefit. These two all too personally. guys need each After nearly two other. Jim Acosta years of brazenly tryTrump gets a ing to topple Trump’s foil, and a Latino presidency — and several months one at that, which will really before that during the campaign inflame the Trump supporters. of trying to make sure he was Can’t you just hear them? never elected in the first place by “See, you let these people publicizing a dubious dossier and sneak up here from Mexico and having private dinners with top the next thing you know they’ve officials in the Hillary Clinton edged out some more-deserving campaign — the media has crewhite American to be a White ated its own version of Trump: House reporter and attack our Jim Acosta. president.” It’s not easy to find someone I know that sounds ignorant, who loves himself as much as but I was in character. Acosta is Trump loves himself, but I think Cuban-American. we may have a winner. Meanwhile,Acosta gets invited CNN’s chief White House onto talk shows, nails down a correspondent clearly has a thin book deal and snags some paid skin, and he dishes it out betspeeches. He becomes a celebrity ter than he takes it. He doesn’t by transcending the news junkies adhere to the rules of his profesand crossing over to the mainsion and makes himself the censtream. terpiece of every conversation. Everyone wins — except, that He’s a master showman who is, the country. Also on the losing feels most comfortable when he’s end are the consumers of what the star of the show. we used to call “news,” but which Stop me if any of this sounds now, more and more, resembles a familiar. traveling circus. Sadly, this show What’s more, Acosta seems doesn’t leave you entertained as to have a short memory, and a much as it does depressed and bad case of selective outrage. frustrated. He’s like a cartoon figure when Ruben Navarrette he gets worked up over things ruben@rubennavarrette.com that the Trump administration Copyright The Washington Post does — i.e., attacking illegal RUBEN NAVARRETTE Washington Post


NEWS

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

® ® ® ®

®

GIVE IT A

®

whirl

Whirligigs turn a passing breeze into performance art. The folk art collectibles, put together from spare parts and found materials, are full of character and life. written and produced by MARTY ROSS • photography by BRIE WILLIAMS

says. There’s creative genius f you’re scouting around for at work in a garden gizmo a whirligig, it’s important to designed to take advantage hit the brakes. When you of a bit of breeze to make a see a little antiques shop cunningly designed figure crank on a winding country road a car, churn butter, chop wood, or spot a bustling weekend flea row a boat, or ride a bicycle. market, don’t just slow down. The history of whirligigs is Stop the car. This is exactly obscure, but they have been where you’re most likely to around for a long time. “I reckon find whirligigs—idiosyncratic, there are as many stories of the ingenious inventions made of history of whirligigs as there are wood, metal, leftover materials, whirligigs,” L. A. says. They’re and a sense of humor. A modern whirligig artist inspired by the famous the cousins of weather vanes “Folk art is a grassroots thing, story of a great white shark created a little garden and may have been invented by and it happens in unexpected drama with this fresh design. farmers or sailors, some experts places,” says Barry Huffman, suggest. The basic idea has been a folk art collector in Hickory, interpreted endlessly around the world. North Carolina. Barry and her husband, Allen, and their “Whirligigs are an artistic expression, a construction friends L. A. and Suzan Rhyne share an enthusiasm for with color and texture, in the finest tradition of folk art,” whirligigs, and they know every roadside crafts market Barry says. She and Allen bought their first whirligig in the Carolinas. 40 years ago or more, and they’re still adding to their Whirligigs are the handiwork of tinkerers, collection. “They are great pleasures,” Barry says. made just for the fun of it, Allen

I

These meticulously painted farmhands with their 10-gallon hats bend to their endless task. Carved figures such as these are rarer than silhouettes, which can be cut out with a coping saw or jigsaw.

A GIG OF YOUR OWN Whirligigs are colorful, creative interpretations of domestic life, adventure, customs, and traditions. They can be made of any material, on almost any scale. Keep in mind that works of art designed to be displayed in the great outdoors need to be durable. A few dents and dings add character, but you may need to touch up the paint or make small repairs from time to time. Even if a propeller is broken, you’ll probably be able to fix it yourself—and have fun doing so. Very old and unique whirligigs may cost thousands of dollars, but if you keep your eyes open you can find vintage folk art whirligigs for $50 or less. New whirligigs cost about $30 and up. Or make your own: Patterns are available in books and online, and you probably already have enough scrap lumber and useful bits of hardware to get started. The mechanics are simple. Once you figure them out, you can make up your own design. In the garden, set whirligigs on sturdy poles where they can catch a breeze. If you have a precious old whirligig, treat it with care and display it indoors. Barry and Allen Huffman keep most of their collection inside, but when they have friends over and the weather is nice, the whirligigs go out into the garden, and they get the party cranking.

BEAUTIFUL GARDENS Folk art collectors (from left) Barry Huffman, L. A. Rhyne, Allen Huffman, and Suzan Rhyne show off some of their treasured whirligigs in the Huffman garden in Hickory, North Carolina. Both couples have been collecting whirligigs for decades.

Subscribe to Country Gardens® magazine at magazine.store and get 1 year for $9.99, or pick up a copy wherever magazines are sold.

1/! %"))*&$ 0*" ,!!# $* +,# ("'-.$0

SENIOR LIVING SOLUTIONS INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE A Place for Mom has helped over a million families find senior living solutions that meet their unique needs. Our Advisors are trusted, local experts who can help you understand your options. Here’s what’s included with our free service:

There’s no cost to you!

(618) 206-5954 Southern Ilinois

(636) 203-7047 A dedicated local Advisor

Hand-picked list of communities

Full details and pricing

St. Louis

(314) 230-8132 Missouri

Help scheduling tours

Move in support

! We’re paid by our partner communities

Joan Lunden, journalist, best-selling author, former host of Good Morning America and senior living advocate.


NATION

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A23

Twitter CEO defends his decision not to ban Alex Jones BY KELVIN CHAN associated Press

LONDON • Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey defended his com-

pany’s decision not to ban right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his “Infowars” show, as many other social media platforms have done, saying he did not break any rules. Apple, Facebook, YouTube and Spotify took down over the past week material published by Jones, reflecting more aggressive enforcement of their hate speech policies after rising online backlash and raising pressure on Twitter to do the same. Jones’ Facebook account has also been suspended for 30 days but he still has a “verified” Twitter account. A separate Twitter account for “Infowars” is also still running. “We didn’t suspend Alex Jones or Infowars yesterday,” Dorsey said in a series of tweets late Tuesday. “We know that’s hard for many but the reason is simple: He hasn’t

violated our rules. We’ll enforce if he does.” Dorsey said Twitter did not want to take “one-off actions to make us feel good in the short term, and adding fuel to new conspiracy theories.” He said he wanted the company to avoid succumbing to outside pressure but instead impartially enforce straightforward principles “regardless of political viewpoints.” He also linked to a blog post Tuesday by the company’s vice president for trust and safety, Del Harvey, outlining the company’s policies. “Twitter is reflective of real conversations happening in the world and that sometimes includes perspectives that may be offensive, controversial, and/or bigoted,” she said. “While we welcome everyone to express themselves on our service, we prohibit targeted behavior that harasses, threatens, or uses fear to silence the voices of others.” Jones, who has 858,000 followers on Twitter, has built up his profile while promulgating conspiracy theories, including the claim that the 9/11 terrorist attacks were

carried out by the government. He is perhaps most notorious for claiming that the 2012 Sandy Hook mass school shooting, which left 26 children and adults dead, was a hoax and that the surviving relatives are paid actors. Family members of some of the victims are suing Jones for defamation. Dorsey said that it’s up to journalists to “document, validate, and refute” rumors and sensationalized issues spread by accounts like Jones’ so “people can form their own opinions.” Twitter is taking other steps besides account deletions to combat misuse in its battle to rein in hate and abuse even as it tries to stay true to its roots as a bastion of free expression. Dorsey acknowledged last year that the company hasn’t done enough to curb such abuse and protect users. Jones says his shows, which are broadcast on radio and online platforms and had been available on YouTube, reached at least 70 million people a week. It’s unclear how big his audience is now after the latest bans.

Fine Jewelry, Platinum, Gold, Silver & Diamonds

Sell Your Jewelry Highest Prices Paid for High End Jewelry • • • • •

For a FREE ESTIMATE

Antique & Estate Jewelry Modern Fine Jewelry Sterling Silver Jewelry Native American Jewelry Certified Diamonds

Text a Photo 314-974-6699

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPONSORED BY:

Used Jewelry Buyer 122 North Main Street • St. Charles, MO 63301 usedjewelrybuyer.com • (636) 896-4117

In this photo from 2016, Alex Jones (center right) is escorted by police out of a crowd of protesters outside the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Facebook took down four pages belonging to the conspiracy theorist for violating its hate speech and bullying policies. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey didn’t follow suit, saying Jones hasn’t violated the social network’s rules.

636-328-0888 Baue.com

14th Annual

HEALTHY LIVING SENIOR FAIR Tuesday, August 14, 2018 10:00 am - 2:00 pm St. Charles Convention Center 1 Convention Center Plaza St. Charles, MO 63303 Free admission! Free parking! Free health screenings! Bingo!

Live Entertainment! Featuring the St. Louis Metro Area Square Dancers, St. Louis Strutters, and the talented ladies from the Ms. Senior Missouri Pageant!

Have questions about cremation? What services are right for you? This educational program will allow you to have all your questions answered. We invite you to learn about the many benefits of funeral and cremation PrePlanning while enjoying a complimentary lunch.

Baue Funeral & Memorial Center 3950 West Clay Street St. Charles, MO 63301

Advance Planning Seminar

Tuesday, August 21 12:00pm

For more information or to register, visit Baue.com/events or call (636) 200-2707. Helping you honor life.

Helping you honor life.

$1000 OFF INSTALLATION NEVER REPLACE YOUR ROOF AGAIN! Chesterfield • 636-387-4058 Chesterfield | Clayton

(XXX) XXX-XXXX

Clayton • 314-269-0075

A select number of homeowners in the area will be given the opportunity to have a lifetime ProCraft Exteriors metal roof installed on their home at a reasonable cost. Call today to see if you qualify for these great savings. IL roofing license number: #104.015632

• Do you want invisible hearing aids? • Do you want to stream your mobile phone calls and music to your hearing aids? • Do you want rechargeable hearing aids? • Do you want audiologists you can trust? Call us today! Free TV streamer with purchase of new hearing aids!!!

Don’t miss this opportunity to save! Call Now! Financing Available 314-230-8141 for ALL of Your 636-203-9901 Home Projects 618-690-4003 New orders only. Minimum purchase required. Other restrictions may apply. Offer expires 08/31/2018.

Tina Daher McWhorter, M.A. Margaret Fritsch Juelich, Au.D. Audiologists www.hearstl.com MS056099


WORLD

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

DIGEST Canada charges suspect in fatal shootings Canadian police charged a man Saturday in the deaths of two police officers and two civilians in a shooting that struck a nerve in a country that has been roiled in recent months by several instances of mass violence. Police in the eastern city of Fredericton, New Brunswick, said that Matthew Vincent Raymond, 48, had been arrested and charged with four counts of first-degree murder. Horizon Health, which delivers care for New Brunswick’s Department of Health, said that Raymond was the only person being treated for injuries related to the shooting. He is due to appear in court Aug. 27.

Erdogan blames Turkey’s woes on U.S. • Turkey’s president blamed the country’s economic downturn on the United States and other nations that he claims are waging “war” against his country. Speaking in the northeastern province of Rize, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan promised supporters that Turkey was taking the necessary precautions to protect its economy but added “the most important thing is breaking the hands firing these weapons.” Muslim fundamentalists protest equal gender rights • Thousands of Muslim fundamentalists protested Saturday in front of the nation’s parliament to decry proposals in a government report

on gender equality that they claim are contrary to Islam. Men and veiled women marched under a blazing sun from Tunis to Bardo, outside the capital where the parliament is situated, to protest the report by the Commission of Individual Liberties and Equality. The report, among other things, calls for legalizing homosexuality and giving the sexes equal inheritance rights. Iran’s ruler OKs special courts to try officials • Iran’s Supreme Leader has approved a request by the judiciary to set up special courts to punish corrupt officials. The state-run IRNA news agency reported Ayatollah Ali Khamenei as saying punishments should be “carried out quick and fair.”

The request by the judiciary said the courts should be eligible to try all suspects, including “official and military” people. Sentencing can include the death penalty. The decision comes after outcries over alleged corruption of some officials. Last week, the judiciary detained the former deputy governor of Iran’s Central Bank on corruption charges. U.S. seeks trade deal with Japan • In the latest round of Japan-U.S. trade talks on Thursday and Friday in Washington, the United States called for launching negotiations on a bilateral trade deal, illustrating its position to rush concrete outcomes in preparation for the U.S. midterm elections in November.

Washington apparently aims to demand that Tokyo considerably open its market for beef and other agricultural products, probably provoking a series of battles between the two governments. Minority Arabs in Israel protest new law • Members of Israel’s Arab minority led a mass protest in central Tel Aviv on Saturday night against a contentious new law that critics say marginalizes the state’s non-Jewish citizens. The rally marked further fallout from the explosive Nation-State law and came a week after thousands of Druze, also members of the Arab minority, packed the same city square last week. From news services

Fine Jewelry, Platinum, Gold, Silver & Diamonds

Sell Your Jewelry Highest Prices Paid for High End Jewelry • • • • •

For a FREE ESTIMATE

Antique & Estate Jewelry Modern Fine Jewelry Sterling Silver Jewelry Native American Jewelry Certified Diamonds

Text a Photo 314-974-6699

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPONSORED BY:

Used Jewelry Buyer 122 North Main Street • St. Charles, MO 63301 usedjewelrybuyer.com • (636) 896-4117

A Muslim woman walks Saturday past a mosque collapsed by an earthquake in Gangga, Lombok Island, Indonesia, on Aug. 5. The powerful quake killed hundreds of people, and scientists say it pushed the island’s surface up by as much as 10 inches in places.

636-328-0888 Baue.com

14th Annual

HEALTHY LIVING SENIOR FAIR Tuesday, August 14, 2018 10:00 am - 2:00 pm St. Charles Convention Center 1 Convention Center Plaza St. Charles, MO 63303 Free admission! Free parking! Free health screenings! Bingo!

Live Entertainment! Featuring the St. Louis Metro Area Square Dancers, St. Louis Strutters, and the talented ladies from the Ms. Senior Missouri Pageant!

Have questions about cremation? What services are right for you? This educational program will allow you to have all your questions answered. We invite you to learn about the many benefits of funeral and cremation PrePlanning while enjoying a complimentary lunch.

Baue Funeral & Memorial Center 3950 West Clay Street St. Charles, MO 63301

Advance Planning Seminar

Tuesday, August 21 12:00pm

For more information or to register, visit Baue.com/events or call (636) 200-2707. Helping you honor life.

Helping you honor life.

$1000 OFF INSTALLATION NEVER REPLACE YOUR ROOF AGAIN! Chesterfield • 636-387-4058 Chesterfield | Clayton

(XXX) XXX-XXXX

Clayton • 314-269-0075

A select number of homeowners in the area will be given the opportunity to have a lifetime ProCraft Exteriors metal roof installed on their home at a reasonable cost. Call today to see if you qualify for these great savings. IL roofing license number: #104.015632

• Do you want invisible hearing aids? • Do you want to stream your mobile phone calls and music to your hearing aids? • Do you want rechargeable hearing aids? • Do you want audiologists you can trust? Call us today! Free TV streamer with purchase of new hearing aids!!!

Don’t miss this opportunity to save! Call Now! Financing Available 314-230-8141 for ALL of Your 636-203-9901 Home Projects 618-690-4003 New orders only. Minimum purchase required. Other restrictions may apply. Offer expires 08/31/2018.

Tina Daher McWhorter, M.A. Margaret Fritsch Juelich, Au.D. Audiologists www.hearstl.com MS056099


A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Take a hike today

… play some golf

... or go out to eat

From scenic paths at Ste. Genevieve to urban paths in Forest Park, here are 100+ top trails in the area.

Find details on the public courses around the St. Louis area and book a tee time.

Find a new favorite place from Ian Froeb’s list of the top 100 restaurants in town.

stltoday.com/hike

stltoday.com/golfguide

stltoday.com/stl100

Where Quality Counts... Since 1977

nean Restau MediterSra isestaurarnant Best Meditin erratn. eLaonuR t est

B

Come visit our restaurant today, and let our family make you a meal to remember!

BUY 3 GET ONE

Serving Mediterranean for over 20 years to the Manchester community!

FREE

$5.00 OFF

*Standard Install, White Only. Savings off retail pricing. Minimums apply, Not valid on previous sales. Cannot be combined with other offers. Financing offer for those who qualify. Call for details. Expires August 30, 2018

PURCHASE OF $30 OR MORE OFFER EXPIRES 8/26/18

Ask about Senior and Military Discounts

Call Us Today! 636-527-4000 403, Lafayette Center, Manchester, MO 63011

Ask About Our Catering Options!

Call Now For Your Free Estimate

314-898-0126 • 618-215-7387

FINANCING AVAILABLE

20 YEAR FINANCING AVAILABLE! Best Place to Shop for all your Small RV needs!

LOVE THIS CITY...

St. Louis, MO | Las Vegas, NV | Kalispell, MT | Colorado Springs, CO 2018 coacHmen gaLLeria

2018 roadTrek simPLiciTy

2018 dynamax isaTa

2018 roadTrek advenTurous cs

2016 cHinook counTryside

$5,000 rebaTe unTiL 8/31/18

$118,140 2017 Leisure TraveL Wonder

$81,329 2018 PLeasure-Way PLaTeau FL

$104,882 2018 dynamax isaTa

starting at

2017 Hymer axion

$135,105 2018 coacHmen Prism

$105,825

We service and repair all rv’s!

$104,906

2013 PLeasure-Way exceL Ts

$134,262 2018 renegade verona Le

$69,900

00

$263,501

199 SUMMER TUNE UP 3100 Telegraph Rd. St. Louis, MO 63125

Monday - Friday • 8:30 am - 5 pm Saturday • 10 am - 4 pm Service Dept. Monday - Friday 8 am - 4:30 on the Service Dept hours Authorized Dealer of:

2017 renegade vienna

$73,692

$86,785

$

$152,640

• Water system Flush • appliance service • 25 Point inspection

$139,981 2017 renegade viLLagio

$113,753 2018 renegade vaLencia

$192,702

special reduced Pricing available!

caLL Today 314-894-3905 Full inventory at www.vancityrv.com


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

August

WRITTEN BY

JORDAN BARANOWSKI

T PGA Championship is in The St. Louis this week, so grab one S of o o our August specials before you hit the links. y

SPECIALS TULI PINOT NOIR SONOMA

TRUTH & VALOR ZINFANDEL PASO ROBLES

This nuanced Pinot Noir offers an amazing value. The winemaker is Joseph Wagner, and the price can’t be beat for his award-winning skill.

Plum and dark-cherry flavors are rounded out with oak and given a complex, spicy finish – excellent with smoky meats.

California, 750 mL, 21.99

California, 750 mL, $15.99

GOVERNORS BAY MARLBOROUGH SAUVIGNON BLANC

ARMANI PINOT GRIGIO VALDADIGE

Designed exclusively for Total Wine, this uniquely flavored Sauvignon Blanc was created by Brent and Shirley Wastron. Try it with chicken or pasta.

This delicate wine boasts floral aromas and a flavor profile of apple, mineral and spice.

Italy, 750 mL, $11.99

MELT CHARDONNAY Look for notes of pear and golden apple in this Chardonnay, which features a buttery, melt-in-your-mouth finish.

California, 750 mL, $10.99

CALIFORNIA SQUARE CABERNET Rich, round and approachable, expect a unique style and flavor with Square.

California, 750 mL, $14.99

New Zealand, 750 mL, $10.99

BEYER RANCH CHARDONNAY CA

NO CURFEW RED WINE

Look for flavors of cherry, currant and raspberry in this medium-bodied, structured Pinot Noir.

An inviting Chardonnay, Beyer Ranch has a flavors of spicy green apple and oak, A perfect pairing with roast chicken or creamy cheese.

A full-bodied blend of Syrah, Zinfandel and Petite Sirah, No Curfew has a beautiful dark color to match its bold fruit flavors.

France, 750 mL, $11.99

California, 750 mL, $8.99

California, 750 mL, $13.99

D’AUTREFOIS PINOT NOIR

RADIUS MERLOT Rich fruit flavors are softened by a vanilla finish; Radius is an excellent example of Washington winemaking.

RIVATA PROSECCO A delicate, elegant Prosecco, Rivata is a wonderful base for a brunch Mimosa.

URO TORO FINCA LA RANA An earthy aroma enhances the fruit and herb flavors of this perfect pairing for red meat.

Spain, 750 mL, $16.99

Washington, 750 mL, $10.99

Italy, 750 mL, $11.99

OAK RIDGE CABERNET LODI

RIVER ROAD CHARDONNAY SONOMA

ITER CABERNET SAUVIGNON NAPA RESERVE

Made with grapes sourced from the prestigious Russian River Valley, this Chardonnay is excellent on its own or paired with a light meal.

This elegant, layered wine pairs complex fruit flavors with intense oak undertones.

This Cab is a perfect example of the flavorful wines expected from Lodi. Vanilla and tannins balance out the rich, black fruit.

California, 750 mL, $12.99

California, 750 mL, $26.99

California, 750 mL, $13.99

Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

Manchester Meadows 13887 Manchester Road Ballwin, MO 63011 636.527.0482

Clarkson Square 1781 Clarkson Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 636.536.9869

Prices valid from 8/8/2018 through 8/15/2018 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2018 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

OBITUARIES Alexander, Virginia A. - St. Louis Billadello, Joseph M.D. - Clayton Blake, S.S.N.D. , Sister Jean Marie - St. Louis Bodecker, Timothy - Troy, MO Cramer, John Edward III - St. Louis Dignam, Rosemary Christ - Maryland Heights Early - see Oglesby Eberle, George F. - University City Eichenlaub, Lawrence "Larry" John - St. Louis Etling, Thomas - Chesterfield Hauser, Dale E. - Dardenne Prairie Hobin, Nicole LeeAnn - St. Ann Hutson, Julie Hogan - Kirkwood Janis, Larry W. - St. Louis Johnson, Fred - Villa Ridge/Manchester, MO

Celebrations of Life

Judd, Rose Mary - St. Louis Kabuss, Rosemarie Johanna - St. Louis Kahl, F.S.M., Sr. Mary Jo - St. Louis Kaufman, Margaret J. - St. Louis Klein, Eugenia Ann - St. Louis Kreutz, Ethel M. - St. Louis Laffey, Lois Jane Carrel - St. Louis Liebman, Clarence J. "Larry" - St. Louis Little, Robert Carter "Bob" - St. Louis Manning, Vernell A. - St. Louis Mathews, Thomas G. - Ballwin Mayer, Patsy A. - St. Louis McKenna, Charles J. - St. Louis McKinney, Patricia M. - St. Louis Michniok, Catherine Jeanette - St. Louis

Eichenlaub, Lawrence "Larry" John It is with great sadness that the family of Lawrence "Larry" John Eichenlaub announces his passing after his brave battle with Pancreatic Cancer, on August 8, 2018 at the age of 63. Larry will be lovingly remembered by his parents Charlotte (late Thomas), siblings Thomas (Delcie), Ann ( Steve) Borgschulte, Linda Alley, Mary (Jim) Adams, Patty (late Ted) Ahrens, Robert "Ike" (Shelley). Larry was loved tremendously by his 19 nieces and nephews and will be remembered fondly by his friends and co-workers. Services: Memorial Mass will be held Monday, August 13 at St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church, Crestwood, MO at 10 a.m. preceded by visitation at 9 a.m. We will continue to celebrate LarAlexander, Virginia A. ry's life at Helen Fitzgerald's, Sunset Hills, 4-6 pm. In lieu of (nee Atchison) entered into rest on Monday, August 6, 2018. Be- flowers donations may be made online at Pancan.org or Pancreloved wife of the late Duwarde L. Alexander; loving mother of atic Cancer Action Network, 1500 Rosecrans Ave., Manhattan David (Wendy) Pike of Oconomowoc, WI; cherished grandmother Beach, CA 90266. of Melinda (Paul) Grittner of Oconomowoc, WI, and will be missed by many of her south St. Louis friends. Etling, Thomas Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 56, August 8, 2018. Funeral Mass at St. Anselm Parish, Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, August 17 from 9 a.m. until Creve Coeur, Tues. (8/14) 10 am. Visit. Schrader Funeral time of service 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Home, Ballwin, Mon. (8/13) 4-8 pm. For info Schrader.com

Billadello, Joseph M.D.

Hauser, Dale E. Dr. Billadello died Wednesday, August 8, 2018. He was a Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Adults 82, of Dardenne Prairie, MO. August 10, 2018. with Congenital Heart Disease in the Cardiovascular Division at Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services 636-498-5300 Alternativefuneralcremation.com Washington University. His career encompassed basic science investigation, interventional cardiology, and treating adults with congenital Hobin, Nicole LeeAnn heart disease. His leadership of the Adult Congenital Heart Saturday, August 4, 2018. Disease Center culminated in accreditation as a comprehensive Beloved daughter of Babette care center by the Adult Congenital Heart Association, one of Stubits (nee Hackworth) and the few in the nation. Patrick Hobin; partner of Craig Services: Private services will be held. Colton; sister of Tony, Devin and Memorials may be made at wustl.edu. Click GIVE. At "I prefer Cody; bff of Tara Bishop; our to enter my own designation," enter Adult Congenital Heart Disdear niece, cousin, bunco girl, ease #34779 and complete form. Memorials may be sent to: teacher of many and friend of Washington University, Fund for Adults with Congenital Heart many. Disease #34779, Attn: Rachel Hartmann, Campus Box 1247, Nicol e w a s a gra d u a t e of 7425 Forsyth Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63105. Pattonville High School. She A SERVICE OF taught High School English at THE LUPTON CHAPEL McCluer North and in Cooper City, Florida. Blake, S.S.N.D., Sister Jean Marie Services: Service Mon., Aug. 13, 11:00 a.m. at COLLIER'S Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. (St. Ann). In lieu of aka Sister M. Agnes Joseph flowers, memorial contributions may be given to Bring Me Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on Mon., Aug. 6, a Book - St. Louis. Visitation Sunday 2:00 - 8:00 p.m. 2018. Beloved sister of William Blake of Punta Gorda, FL. Our www.colliersfuneralhome.com dear relative, friend and Sister in Religious Life. Services: Visitation at the Sarah Community, 12284 DePaul Dr., Hutson, Julie Hogan Bridgeton, Mon., Aug. 13, from 2:30 (Prayers) to 3:30 p.m. Then taken to the Theresa Center (Motherhouse), 320 E. Ripa 63125 August, 9, 2018. for visitation from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Prayer service at 7 p.m. Dear wife of Jeffrey; loving Mass of Christian burial on Tuesday at 11:15 a.m. with intermother of Kyle; daughter of ment in the Motherhouse Cemetery. Contributions to the Mary Ellen and Carl Hogan (dSchool Sisters of Notre Dame appreciated. KUTIS CITY Service. eceased); sister of Carl Hogan, Jr. (Tara), David (Cathy) and Brian (Kris), and many other loving Bodecker, Timothy relatives and friends. 70 of Troy, MO. August 05, 2018. A memorial service is pending. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. For updates and to share 636 498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com condolences online, visit www.stlouiscremation.com In lieu of flowers, family Cramer, John Edward III requests donations to the July 27, 2018. Services: Visitation 9:15 a.m. and Mass 10:00 a.m. on Thurs., Aug. 16 at St. Louis Abbey. Kriegshauser Brothers. American Heart Association, Komen Race for the Cure, or the Epilepsy Foundation. For more information, visit www.k-brothers.com

Dignam, Rosemary Christ 76, of Maryland Heights, MO, died Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Loving wife of the late John A. Dignam; father of Maria (Pete) Shuleski, John (Tracy) Dignam, Patrick (Trish) Dignam, Christopher (Leah) Dignam, and cherished grandmother to seven. Service details at https://www.boppchapel.com/

Janis, Larry W. Aug. 9, 2018. Services: Visitation Tues. Aug. 14, 9:30 am to time of service 12:30 pm at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr. (at 141). Tributes at www.jaybsmith.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Montigne George J., Jr. - St. Louis Nitka Jr., Joseph J. - St. Louis Oglesby, Florence Early - St. Louis Palazzola, Joseph F. - St. Louis Reyland, Lynn A. - St. Louis Schubert, Jr., Leonard F. - St. Charles Sheppard, Allan - St. Louis Silver, Edward S. - Wildwood Steele, Ruth P. - St. Louis Thacker, Betty Ruth - St. Louis Walter, Thomas Paul - St. Louis Weaver, Leslie Ann - Maryland Heights Wilmering, Joy D. - St. Louis Witte, Victoria Bradford - St. Louis Zaiger, Henry R. - St. Louis

Klein, Eugenia Ann Eugenia Ann Klein, age 90, died 7/31/18, at Dolan Memory Care, Conway House, in Creve Coeur, MO, after a brief illness. Eugenia was born in New York City in 1928 into a publishing and literary family. Her mother, Beulah Hagen, was the assistant to Cass Canfield, president and acquiring editor of Harper & Brothers, and she worked with iconic writers such as E.B. White, James Thurber, and Thornton Wilder. Eugenia's uncle was Glenway Wescott, the author of The Grandmothers, Apartment in Athens, and The Pilgrim Hawk. In 1966, Eugenia went to work for the C.V. Mosby Company, a health sciences publisher in St. Louis, Missouri. Eugenia rose to become Mosby's first female medical acquisitions editor and was responsible for the publication of classic medical references such as Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, Jaffe: Cataract Surgery, Ryan: Retina, Hunter: Rehabilitation of the Hand, and Johnson: Arthroscopic Surgery. Eugenia retired from Mosby as executive editor in 1994 after 28 years at the firm. In 2003, her significant contributions to medical publishing were recognized when she won the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Medical Publishers Assoc iation. Eugenia was a role model and mentor to many women during her successful publishing career. Eugenia enjoyed singing and was an accomplished soprano. For many years Eugenia was a member of the Cosmopolitan Singers and the Washington University Civic Chorus. In her retirement years, Eugenia contributed her editing skills volunteering with St. Louis Oasis in the production of their activity catalog. Eugenia loved traveling the U.S., particularly to her favorite states of Minnesota, Wisconsin and California, but she also enjoyed and supported the many cultural gifts of St. Louis, including the St. Louis Symphony, the Repertory Theatre, Stages St. Louis, the Missouri History Museum, the Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Missouri Botanical Garden. Eugenia was also a die-hard fan of the St. Louis Cardinals. Eugenia was a loving mother, a loyal friend, and a dedicated, professional colleague who will be missed by all. Eugenia is survived by her children, Cord Klein, of Milwaukee, WI, Keith Klein (Regina), Eileen Pacino, Nancy O'Brien (Marty), of St. Louis, MO, and Elizabeth Clark (H. Brent) of St. Paul, MN, her grandchildren, Kate Francis Cunningham, Matthew Klein (Shannon), David Klein, James O'Brien, Jessica O'Brien, and Martha Clark, and great-grandchildren Emelia Cunningham and Nathan Higley-Klein. Eugenia also leaves behind her beloved cousins Bruce "Duke" Hotchkiss (Phyllis), Sybil Albrecht Lewis (Arthur), Susan Lockhart (Kenneth), Elizabeth Aitken, and William Jacobs (Natasha). Eugenia is also survived by her dearest and oldest friend, Janet Krupnik. Eugenia's family would like to thank the wonderful caregivers from Dolan Memory Care, Conway House, Hope Hospice, and AW Health Care who cared for Eugenia in the last weeks of her life. A memorial service for Eugenia is planned for November 17, 2018, at 3:00 pm at the Ethical Society of St. Louis, 9001 Clayton Road. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to a charity of one's choice. Services: November 17, 2018, at 3:00 pm at the Ethical Society of St. Louis, 9001 Clayton Road.

Kreutz, Ethel M. (nee Berberich), Passed away peacefully with her family at her side on July 25, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Norbert Kreutz; dear mother of Eileen (Cathy Wimett) Kreutz, Robert (Deanna) Kreutz, Janet (Chuck) Hanneke, David (Julia) Kreutz, Linda Rola, Karen (Craig) Hooper, Michelle (Steve) Cheli, and Jackie (Kevin) Eveker; dear grandmother, great grandmother, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Saturday, August 25 at Assumption Church Mattese. 9:00 a.m. Family greeting, 10:00 a.m. Memorial Mass. Donations in her honor to Assumption School or Missouri School for the Blind.

Johnson, Fred 88, August 8, 2018. Services: Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Sat. 8/25, 10 am., visit. prior to service starting at 9 am. For more info see Schrader.com.

Judd, Rose Mary Eberle, George F. George F. Eberle, 1926 - 2018 Passed away peacefully on Saturday, August 4, 2018 at the age of 91. He was the son of George and Helen Eberle and beloved husband for 61 years of the late Susan Hill Eberle; father of Leigh Corrigan (Tom), Ann Ludeke and the late Jane Newbold (survived by her husband Bill); grandfather of Elizabeth Kelley (Zeb), Caroline Eskow (Adam), Margaret Corrigan, George Weston Ludeke (Gabriela), Charles Ludeke, Andrew Newbold, and special family Sharon and Molly Newbold; great-grand- father of Jack and Charlie Eskow, brother-in-law of Donald Hill (Betty) and brother of the late Robert Eberle (survived by his wife Anne). He is also survived by nieces and nephews. Mr . Eberle grew up in St. Louis, he was a graduate of Washington University School of Engineering and a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps. Mr. Eberle co-founded Efco Corporation which was later sold to Pella Window and then founded Lumbermate Company which is now part of Illinois Tool Works. The family wishes to thank his caregivers at the Gatesworth for their compassionate and attentive service. Services: A Memorial Service will be held at St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 110 N. Warson Road, Ladue, Missouri on Saturday, August 25 at 10:00 a.m. Inurnment in the Church Columbarium. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Eberle Family Fund for Cancer Research at Washington University, Campus Box 1060, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130. Online condolences at luptonchapel.com. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

(nee Cullen), fortified with Sacraments of the Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, August 7, 2018. Beloved wife of Leroy "Lee" Judd for over 62 years; loving mother of Judy (Jim) Budde, John (Earlene) Judd, Tom (Chris) Judd, Jan (Don) Monroe, Tim Judd, Teresa (Ron) Hess and Tricia (Mark) Mosbacher; cherished grandmother of 11; loving great-grandmother of 4; beloved sister of John Terry Cullen, Della Sprehe and the late Mary Ann "Mac" Sciaroni; our beloved aunt, sister-in-law and friend to many. Rose was always gracious, uplifting, optimistic and spoke kindly of others. Services: Visitation at St. Martin of Tours Catholic Church, 610 W. Ripa, St. Louis, MO 63125 from 9:30 a.m. until the start of Funeral Mass at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, August 13, 2018. Burial will follow at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Catholic Charities of St. Louis. A Kutis City Service.

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

Kabuss, Rosemarie Johanna (nee Kindler), age 91, passed away on Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Elmer J. Kabuss; dear mother of Pamela, Peggy (Joseph) O'Leary, Anita (John) Soteres and Mark Kabuss; loving grandmother of 7 and great-grandmother of 7; dear sister, aunt and friend. Services: Funeral procession to leave KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., on Wednesday, August 15, 10:30 a.m. for a 10:45 graveside service at J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to The Alzheimer's Association.

Kahl, F.S.M., Sr. Mary Jo Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection on Sunday, August 5, 2018. Beloved sister of Ben Kahl of Redditt, Ontario, Canada and Mrs. Margaret Skolaski of Madison, WI; our dear friend and sister in religious life. Services: A memorial Mass will be celebrated at the Sarah Community/Marian Chapel, 12284 De Paul Drive, Bridgeton, MO 63044, on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Contributions to the Franciscan Sisters of Mary, 3221 McKelvey Rd., Ste. 107, Bridgeton, MO 63044 appreciated. A KUTIS CITY SERVICE.

Kaufman, Margaret J. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, August 9, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Ollie; amazing mom of Bob (Janie), Janet (Dan) Hughes, and Carole (Dan) Johnston; fun loving granny of 6 and loving GG of 10; dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, and friend to many. Services: Visitation on Monday, August 13, 11 a.m. with Funeral Service to follow at noon, at Kriegshauser West Mortuary, 9450 Olive Blvd., 63132. Interment Jefferson Barracks. For more information visit www.kriegshausermortuary.com

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

OBITUARIES Alexander, Virginia A. - St. Louis Billadello, Joseph M.D. - Clayton Black, Jr., Holston Eugene "Gene" - Snellville, GA, formerly of St. Louis Blake, S.S.N.D. , Sister Jean Marie - St. Louis Bodecker, Timothy - Troy, MO Brigham, Anna Maria - St. Louis Campbell, Glenn A. - St. Louis Cramer, John Edward III - St. Louis Daues, Margaret M. - St. Louis Dignam, Rosemary Christ - Maryland Heights Early - see Oglesby Eberle, George F. - University City Eichenlaub, Lawrence "Larry" John - St. Louis Etling, Thomas - Chesterfield Fulford, Janet - Ballwin Gettemeier, Marian J. - Springfield, MO Hauser, Dale E. - Dardenne Prairie Hobin, Nicole LeeAnn - St. Ann Hutson, Julie Hogan - Kirkwood

Celebrations of Life

Janis, Larry W. - St. Louis Johnson, Frank Edward Jr., M.D. - St. Louis Johnson, Fred - Villa Ridge/Manchester, MO Judd, Rose Mary - St. Louis Kabuss, Rosemarie Johanna - St. Louis Kahl, F.S.M., Sr. Mary Jo - St. Louis Kaufman, Margaret J. - St. Louis Klein, Eugenia Ann - St. Louis Kreutz, Ethel M. - St. Louis Laffey, Lois Jane Carrel - St. Louis Langwell, Shirley June - Eureka, MO Liebman, Clarence J. "Larry" - St. Louis Little, Robert Carter "Bob" - St. Louis Manning, Vernell A. - St. Louis Mathews, Thomas G. - Ballwin Mayer, Patsy A. - St. Louis McGrath, Sr. M. Ellen "Mary Ellen" RGS - St. Louis McKenna, Charles J. - St. Louis McKinney, Patricia M. - St. Louis McLaughlin, William H. - Chesterfield

Dignam, Rosemary Christ 76, of Maryland Heights, MO, died Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Loving wife of the late John A. Dignam; father of Maria (Pete) Shuleski, John (Tracy) Dignam, Patrick (Trish) Dignam, Christopher (Leah) Dignam, and cherished grandmother to seven. Service details at https://www.boppchapel.com/

Eberle, George F. Alexander, Virginia A. (nee Atchison) entered into rest on Monday, August 6, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Duwarde L. Alexander; loving mother of David (Wendy) Pike of Oconomowoc, WI; cherished grandmother of Melinda (Paul) Grittner of Oconomowoc, WI, and will be missed by many of her south St. Louis friends. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, August 17 from 9 a.m. until time of service 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery.

Billadello, Joseph M.D. Dr. Billadello died Wednesday, August 8, 2018. He was a Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Adults with Congenital Heart Disease in the Cardiovascular Division at Washington University. His career encompassed basic science investigation, interventional cardiology, and treating adults with congenital heart disease. His leadership of the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center culminated in accreditation as a comprehensive care center by the Adult Congenital Heart Association, one of the few in the nation. Services: Private services will be held. Memorials may be made at wustl.edu. Click GIVE. At "I prefer to enter my own designation," enter Adult Congenital Heart Disease #34779 and complete form. Memorials may be sent to: Washington University, Fund for Adults with Congenital Heart Disease #34779, Attn: Rachel Hartmann, Campus Box 1247, 7425 Forsyth Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63105. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Black, Jr., Holston Eugene "Gene" age 77 of Snellville, GA, passed away on Sat., Aug. 4, 2018. Gene lived in East St. Louis, IL until he was 10. The family moved to a small black community in St. Louis County where he graduated from Rittnour H.S. He attended Lincoln U. in MO and Central State U. in OH as a political science major and member of Alpha Phi Alpha. Gene was career sales professional. Also an inventor and entrepreneur in projection televisions, advertising displays, and LED lighting replacement. He had a passion for UCity public schools and founded the high school's Academic U Letter program. Throughout his life, he was a lover of Jazz and engaging with people, through facebook, board games and card playing. Beloved husband of the late Sylvia C. Black (nee Fields). He is survived by children, Holston III and Fields (Sylvia); grandson, Mercury; step grandchildren Tashan, Zoe and Jayani; sister, Valerie (Ronald) Pressley; uncle Donnel Black. Our dear uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Services: A remembrance will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sat., Aug. 18, at the Moonrise Hotel in St. Louis. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the ACLU of Missouri.

Blake, S.S.N.D., Sister Jean Marie aka Sister M. Agnes Joseph Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on Mon., Aug. 6, 2018. Beloved sister of William Blake of Punta Gorda, FL. Our dear relative, friend and Sister in Religious Life. Services: Visitation at the Sarah Community, 12284 DePaul Dr., Bridgeton, Mon., Aug. 13, from 2:30 (Prayers) to 3:30 p.m. Then taken to the Theresa Center (Motherhouse), 320 E. Ripa 63125 for visitation from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Prayer service at 7 p.m. Mass of Christian burial on Tuesday at 11:15 a.m. with interment in the Motherhouse Cemetery. Contributions to the School Sisters of Notre Dame appreciated. KUTIS CITY Service.

Bodecker, Timothy 70 of Troy, MO. August 05, 2018. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. 636 498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Brigham, Anna Maria (nee Bennetsen) Age 93 of St. Louis, MO. went home to heaven on August 10, 2018 from Alzheimer's disease. Anna is survived by her husband, Reginald; children Alice (Fred) Seagren, Douglas (Donna) Brigham; 4 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. Anna was an AVON district manager for 29 years. The anchor of her life was her faith in Jesus Christ. Anna and Reg were devoted to each other, sharing their Christian faith, enjoyed travel, family and friends for 71 years of marriage. Services: A celebration of life will be held August 17th at South County Baptist Church, 12995 Tesson Ferry Road St. Louis, MO. 63128. Visitation at 10 AM, service at 11 AM, lunch to follow. In lieu of flowers memorials preferred to South County Baptist Church.

Campbell, Glenn A. On Fri., Aug. 10, 2018. Services: Visitation Mon., Aug. 13, 4-8 p.m. and Service Tues. 12:30 p.m. at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd. Interment J.B. National Cemetery.

Cramer, John Edward III July 27, 2018. Services: Visitation 9:15 a.m. and Mass 10:00 a.m. on Thurs., Aug. 16 at St. Louis Abbey. Kriegshauser Brothers. For more information, visit www.k-brothers.com

Daues, Margaret M. Friday, August 10, 2018. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel Tuesday, August 14, 11 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., with funeral Mass 1 p.m. at St. John Paul II Church

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

George F. Eberle, 1926 - 2018 Passed away peacefully on Saturday, August 4, 2018 at the age of 91. He was the son of George and Helen Eberle and beloved husband for 61 years of the late Susan Hill Eberle; father of Leigh Corrigan (Tom), Ann Ludeke and the late Jane Newbold (survived by her husband Bill); grandfather of Elizabeth Kelley (Zeb), Caroline Eskow (Adam), Margaret Corrigan, George Weston Ludeke (Gabriela), Charles Ludeke, Andrew Newbold, and special family Sharon and Molly Newbold; great-grand- father of Jack and Charlie Eskow, brother-in-law of Donald Hill (Betty) and brother of the late Robert Eberle (survived by his wife Anne). He is also survived by nieces and nephews. Mr . Eberle grew up in St. Louis, he was a graduate of Washington University School of Engineering and a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps. Mr. Eberle co-founded Efco Corporation which was later sold to Pella Window and then founded Lumbermate Company which is now part of Illinois Tool Works. The family wishes to thank his caregivers at the Gatesworth for their compassionate and attentive service. Services: A Memorial Service will be held at St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 110 N. Warson Road, Ladue, Missouri on Saturday, August 25 at 10:00 a.m. Inurnment in the Church Columbarium. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Eberle Family Fund for Cancer Research at Washington University, Campus Box 1060, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130. Online condolences at luptonchapel.com. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Mersmann, Joel Christopher - Denver, CO Michniok, Catherine Jeanette - St. Louis Montigne George J., Jr. - St. Louis Nitka Jr., Joseph J. - St. Louis Oglesby, Florence Early - St. Louis Palazzola, Joseph F. - St. Louis Reyland, Lynn A. - St. Louis Richardson, George F. - O'Fallon, MO Saunders-Prante, Audrey E. - Shrewsbury Schubert, Jr., Leonard F. - St. Charles Sheppard, Allan - St. Louis Silver, Edward S. - Wildwood Steele, Ruth P. - St. Louis Stutz, Patricia M. - St. Louis Thacker, Betty Ruth - St. Louis Walter, Thomas Paul - St. Louis Weaver, Lesli Ann - Maryland Heights Wilmering, Joy D. - St. Louis Witte, Victoria Bradford - St. Louis Zaiger, Henry R. - St. Louis

Hutson, Julie Hogan August, 9, 2018. Dear wife of Jeffrey; loving mother of Kyle; daughter of M a ry E l l en a n d Ca rl H o g a n (deceased); sister of Carl Hogan, Jr. (Tara), David (Cathy) and Brian (Kris), and many other loving relatives and friends. A memorial service is pending. For updates and to share condolences online, visit www.stlouiscremation.com In l ieu of fl ow ers , fa mil y requests donations to the American Heart Association, Komen Race for the Cure, or the Epilepsy Foundation.

Janis, Larry W. Aug. 9, 2018. Services: Visitation Tues. Aug. 14, 9:30 am to time of service 12:30 pm at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr. (at 141). Tributes at www.jaybsmith.com

Johnson, Frank Edward Jr., M.D. age 74, Aug. 8, 2018. Services: Memorial service at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood, Sat., Aug. 18, 4 p.m., with visitation at 3 p.m. Seeboppchapel.com

Johnson, Fred 88, August 8, 2018. Services: Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Sat. 8/25, 10 am., visit. prior to service starting at 9 am. For more info see Schrader.com.

Judd, Rose Mary (nee Cullen), fortified with Sacraments of the Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, August 7, 2018. Beloved wife of Leroy "Lee" Judd for over 62 years; loving mother of Judy (Jim) Budde, John (Earlene) Judd, Tom (Chris) Judd, Jan (Don) Monroe, Tim Judd, Teresa (Ron) Hess and Tricia (Mark) Mosbacher; cherished grandmother of 11; loving great-grandmother of 4; beloved sister of John Terry Cullen, Della Sprehe and the late Mary Ann "Mac" Sciaroni; our beloved aunt, sister-in-law and friend to many. Rose was always gracious, uplifting, optimistic and spoke kindly of others. Services: Visitation at St. Martin of Tours Catholic Church, 610 W. Ripa, St. Louis, MO 63125 from 9:30 a.m. until the start of Funeral Mass at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, August 13, 2018. Burial will follow at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Catholic Charities of St. Louis. A Kutis City Service.

Kabuss, Rosemarie Johanna

(nee Kindler), age 91, passed away on Wednesday, August 8, Eichenlaub, Lawrence "Larry" John 2018. Beloved wife of the late Elmer J. Kabuss; dear mother of It is with great sadness that the Pamela, Peggy (Joseph) O'Leary, Anita (John) Soteres and Mark family of Lawrence "Larry" John Kabuss; loving grandmother of 7 and great-grandmother of 7; Eichenlaub announces his pass- dear sister, aunt and friend. ing after his brave battle with Services: Funeral procession to leave KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, Pancreatic Cancer, on August 8, 10151 Gravois Rd., on Wednesday, August 15, 10:30 a.m. for 2018 at the age of 63. Larry will a 10:45 graveside service at J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu be lovingly remembered by his of flowers, contributions to The Alzheimer's Association. parents Charlotte (late Thomas), siblings Thomas (Delcie), Ann ( Kahl, F.S.M., Sr. Mary Jo Steve) Borgschulte, Linda Alley, Mary (Jim) Adams, Patty (late Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection on Sunday, Ted) Ahrens, Robert "Ike" (Shel- August 5, 2018. Beloved sister of Ben Kahl of Redditt, Ontario, ley). Larry was loved tremen- Canada and Mrs. Margaret Skolaski of Madison, WI; our dear dously by his 19 nieces and neph- friend and sister in religious life. ews and will be remembered fondly by his friends and co-work- Services: A memorial Mass will be celebrated at the Sarah ers. Services: Memorial Mass will be held Monday, August 13 at Community/Marian Chapel, 12284 De Paul Drive, Bridgeton, MO St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church, Crestwood, MO at 10 a.m. pre- 63044, on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Contributions ceded by visitation at 9 a.m. We will continue to celebrate Lar- to the Franciscan Sisters of Mary, 3221 McKelvey Rd., Ste. ry's life at Helen Fitzgerald's, Sunset Hills, 4-6 pm. In lieu of 107, Bridgeton, MO 63044 appreciated. A KUTIS CITY flowers donations may be made online at Pancan.org or Pancre- SERVICE. atic Cancer Action Network, 1500 Rosecrans Ave., Manhattan Beach, CA 90266.

Kaufman, Margaret J.

Etling, Thomas 56, August 8, 2018. Funeral Mass at St. Anselm Parish, Creve Coeur, Tues. (8/14) 10 am. Visit. Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Mon. (8/13) 4-8 pm. For info Schrader.com

Fulford, Janet 78, August 10, 2018. Services: Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Wed., 2:30 p.m. For more info see Schrader.com

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, August 9, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Ollie; amazing mom of Bob (Janie), Janet (Dan) Hughes, and Carole (Dan) Johnston; fun loving granny of 6 and loving GG of 10; dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, and friend to many. Services: Visitation on Monday, August 13, 11 a.m. with Funeral Service to follow at noon, at Kriegshauser West Mortuary, 9450 Olive Blvd., 63132. Interment Jefferson Barracks. For more information visit www.kriegshausermortuary.com

Gettemeier, Marian J. 84 years, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Friday, August 10, 2018. Beloved mother of Diane Meinhardt, Robert Gettemeier, Jr., Donna Besaw, Becky Gettemeier, Kathy Gettemeier; loving grandmother of Zachary (Michele) Meinhardt, Nicholas (Kelcey) Meinhardt, Amanda (Dave) Hale, Michelle (Gary) Besaw and great-grandmother of Noah, Annabel, Malachi and Emerie; dear sister of the late Mildred Jens and Donald McFarland; dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Prayer service 10 a.m. Saturday, August 18 at Hutchens Mortuary & Cremation Center, Florissant. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Friday, August 17. In lieu of flowers, donations to Freedom Hooves Therapeutic Riding Center, P.O. Box 782622, Wichita, KS 67278 or online at www.fhtrc.org.

Hauser, Dale E. 82, of Dardenne Prairie, MO. August 10, 2018. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services 636-498-5300 Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Hobin, Nicole LeeAnn Saturday, August 4, 2018. Beloved daughter of Babette Stubits (nee Hackworth) and Patrick Hobin; partner of Craig Colton; sister of Tony, Devin and Cody; bff of Tara Bishop; our dear niece, cousin, bunco girl, teacher of many and friend of many. Nicol e w a s a gra d u a t e of Pattonville High School. She taught High School English at McCluer North and in Cooper City, Florida. Services: Service Mon., Aug. 13, 11:00 a.m. at COLLIER'S Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. (St. Ann). In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be given to Bring Me a Book - St. Louis. Visitation Sunday 2:00 - 8:00 p.m. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

SEND FLOWERS AND GIFTS, OR CREATE A MEMORIAL WEBSITE

STLtoday.com/obits


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

OBITUARIES

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Laffey, Lois Jane Carrel

Michniok, Catherine Jeanette

Steele, Ruth P.

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Saturday, July 28, 2018 at the age of 86. Beloved wife of the late Lawrence R. Laffey; loving mother of Mary Laffey Adams, Michael Laffey (Argentina), Jane Laffey Beckman (John), Susan Laffey Roehlke (Kent), Stephen Laffey (Mary) and the late James Laffey (survived by Debbie); dear grandmother of Brian, Dan, Kelly, Tim, Steffanie, Jimmy, Emily, Russell, Jake, Lauren, Brennen, Jack, Kate, Patrick, Grace and Brett; loving great-grandmother of Jackson, Jacob and Ryan, Corban and Ezra; dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Lois will be remembered as a giving, caring woman who always acted out of love for her family and friends and her belief in social action. Services: A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 106 North Meramec at Maryland, Clayton on Saturday, August 18 at 10:30 am. Visitation at the Church beginning at 9:00 a.m. Saturday morning. Private interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials appreciated to Saint Louis Crisis Nursery, 11710 Administration Dr., Suite 18, St. Louis, MO 63146. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

1923 - 2018. Catherine J. Michniok (nee Coffman) passed peacefully on August 2, 2018 at age 94. Beloved wife of the late Richard B. Michniok. Loving mother of Rick (Terese) Michniok and Jan (Duke) Gowen. Adoring grandmother of Lauren, Kevin and Erin Michniok, Allie (Tony) Bindbeutel, and Tori Gowen. Our dear aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend. 50+ year member of the Beta Sigma Phi sorority. Services: Visitation at Kutis Funeral Home, Affton Chapel, 9:00 AM Saturday, August 18, 2018 until time of service at 10:00 AM. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Contributions to animal rescue group of your choice appreciated.

August 8, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Fred Steele; former wife of the late Marvin Rosecan, MD; mother of the late Jeffrey Rosecan, MD (Barbara Gross Rosecan), Lauren R. Rosecan, MDPhD, Deborah L. Rosecan, and Arthur S. Rosecan, MD (Janet Voorhees Rosecan); dear grandmother of Sam and Andy Rosecan, Allie, Brett, Shaun Rosecan and Devon Rudolph, Jerry Linder, Emma Rosecan (fiancé Jacob Ehlenberger), and Michael Lugo; dear sister of the late Geraldine Portman, Eugene Portman (Ellen), and the late Darwin Portman (Carol); dear aunt, cousin, and friend to many. Services: Graveside service Sunday, August 12, 10:30 a.m. at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery, 9125 Ladue Road. Memorial contributions preferred to the charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Liebman, Clarence J. "Larry" Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Beloved husband of Ailene Liebman (nee Miller) and the late Avril Liebman (nee Dillree); loving father of Mary Ann (James) Sloand, Laura (Dan) Max, Janine (Steve) Edler, Joseph (Kathy) Liebman and the late Dan Liebman; dear grandfather of ten and great-grandfather of 1; dear brother of the late Rosemary (surviving Karl) Kittrell; our dear uncle, great-uncle, and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., Tuesday, August 14th, 9:45 a.m. to Seven Holy Founders Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Cardinal Glennon or St. Louis Children's Hospital. Visitation Monday, 5-8 p.m.

Little, Robert Carter "Bob" passed away peacefully on August 3, 2018 at the age of 93. Born March 12, 1925 to the late Henry Francis and Nelle Elvage Little of Kansas City, MO. Beloved husband to Betty Kreder Little for 67 years; father to Susan Burr (Buddy) of Carbondale, CO, Martha McCoy (Mike) of Augusta, MO, James "Jim" Little (Kathy) of Costa Mesa, CA, and Elizabeth "Liz" Little of St. Louis; grand-father of Lauren McCoy (Mike O'Bryan) of St. Louis, Emily Hoyt (Ben) of Eldorado Springs, CO, and Colton Nappier of St. Louis. Bob graduated from Southwest High School in Kansas City, MO. During his youth he played baseball, participated in ROTC and Boy Scouts, achieving Eagle Scout. He attended Texas A & M, where he received a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. His college years were interrupted by World War II and his enrollment in the Army Air Corp. He did extensive reconnaissance work and flew 68 combat missions over Europe flying P-51 Mustangs. He was awarded the DFC and the Air Medal with 13 Oak Clusters. After completing college in 1948, he began his career at McDonnell Aircraft as a flight test engineer and test pilot. He has the distinction of being the first man to pilot four McDonnell Douglas jet fighters that went into successful production: the F3H-1 Demon (1953), the F-101A Voodoo (1954), the F-101B (1957), and the F4H-1 Phantom (1958). Little was also the first person to take a maiden flight supersonic. Little is a Fellow in the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. He was awarded the prestigious James Doolittle Award for outstanding professional accomplishment in aerospace in 1977 and The Spirit of St. Louis Award in 1989. He was inducted into The Aerospace Hall of Fame/Walk of Honor, Lancaster, CA in 2003. He retired from McDonnell Douglas in 1989 as Vice Chairman-Government Business. Bob was an avid outdoorsman, who enjoyed fishing, hunting, and working with his bird dogs Mike and Jake. He had a spirit of adventure and a love of the west. He especially enjoyed exploring the diverse landscape of Arizona, where he and Betty spent many winters. Bob also had a great passion for playing golf with family and friends near and far. When at home Bob liked to putter around in the yard, take a plunge in the pool and cook out, ideally with some great jazz playing in the background. Services: Visitation 4 - 7:00 p.m. on Fri., Aug. 17 at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., in Kirkwood, MO. Funeral Service 11 a.m. Sat., Aug. 18 at Bopp Chapel. Interment Bellerive Gardens Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Greater St. Louis Boy Scouts of America, the Evans Scholarship or the American Cancer Society. The family would like to thank the staff at Two McKnight Skilled Nursing, especially Quana Jones and Lakisha Elkins, Gatesworth Personal Care and BJC Hospice with very special thanks to Dana Jones. www.boppchapel.com

Montigne George J., Jr. passed away on August 9, 2018 at the age of 91. He is survived by his beloved wife Beverly Eyer Montigne (nee Shirk) of Lake St. Louis, Missouri; two sons Richard M. (Lenore) Montigne, Steven R. (Mary) Montigne; two grandsons Justin Montigne, Christopher Montigne. He is preceded in death by his father George J. Montigne, Sr., mother Theresa Montigne (n ee H il l ) , s is t er L o r e t t a G. Gunderson, sister Dorothy M. Parmalee. George was united in marriage to Beverly on April 1, 1947 in Jonesboro, AR. They shared 71 wonderful years together. He was a member of Dardenne Presbyterian Church in Dardenne Prairie, Missouri. He was an avid golfer. He will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved him. Services: A Memorial Service will be held at a later date. Memories and condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com.

Nitka Jr., Joseph J.

Mathews, Thomas G.

Mayer, Patsy A. (nee Messmer) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, August 5, 2018. Beloved wife of Robert P. Mayer; loving mother of Steven (Rosario) Mayer, David Mayer, Linda Cardenas and Lisa (Patrick) Thompson; cherished grandmother of Sarah and Samuel Cardenas; our dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: A Memorial Mass will be held Tuesday, August 14, 9:30 a.m. at St. Mark Catholic Church. Interment J.B. National Cemetery to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to The American Parkinson Disease Association, 1415 Elbridge Payne Rd., Suite 150, Chesterfield, MO 63017 appreciated. A KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY SERVICE.

McKenna, Charles J. Thurs., Aug. 9, 2018. Beloved husband of Alice McKenna. Visitation at Kutis So. Co., 5255 Lemay Ferry, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 10 a.m. until service 12 noon. Interment National Cemetery.

McKinney, Patricia M. (nee Kollefrath), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Loving aunt of George Kollefrath and Mary Yousef; dear great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Dominic Savio, 7748 MacKenzie Rd., Tuesday, August 14, at 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to The Humane Society or Catholic Charities. A KUTIS AFFTON Service.

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

Walter, Thomas Paul Financial Advisor who served in US Marine Corps. Husband of Linda; father of Lindsay (Erik) Meyer and Mary Clare (Adam) Taylor; brother of Elizabeth (Terry) Diehl; grandfather of Kevin Walter Meyer and Zikyra Walter Meyer. Services: Visitation Sat., 8/18 from 10:30 a.m. until 12 noon Mass at St. Gerard Majella, 1969 Dougherty Ferry Rd., Kirkwood, MO 63122. www.archwaychapel.com

Weaver, Lesli Ann Thurs., Aug. 9, 2018. Service Tues., Aug. 14, 10 am at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. (St. Ann). Visitation Mon., 4-8 pm. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Wilmering, Joy D.

Age 89, died on July 12, 2018 in St. Paul, MN. Graduate of St Louis University and St Louis University Law School. Preceded in death by parents Joseph and Mary Nitka; beloved wife Grace Wade Nitka; and sister Jeanne Krupp. Survived by daughter Beth Brombach, and Bill; son William Nitka, and Susan; grandchildren Michael, Dan and Grace; sister-in-law Alice Provaznik; nieces, nephews and friends. Joe was a highly respected labor arbitrator for over 40 years (finally retiring at age 82), whose decisions were published numerous times. All are welcome to join us for a luncheon at 12:00 p.m. on October 20th at Russell's on Macklind. Memorials to The Nature Conservancy and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Entered peacefully into eternal life August 6, 2018. Services: Memorial Services September 15, Mass at 10:00 a.m., Annunziata Catholic Church 9305 Clayton Rd., 63124. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Birthright STL, 2525 S. Brentwood Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63144.

Schubert, Jr., Leonard F.

Florists

Witte, Victoria Bradford

passed away peacefully at home Wednesday, August 8, 2018, with her husband of 56 years Dr. Patrick H. Witte ever at her side. She was born in Cambridge, MA to Mark W. and Matilda Frantz Bradford. Vicky earned degrees from Wellesley College, The University of Michigan, and Washington University. She became Associate Dean of the Libraries at Washington University, Oglesby, Florence Early where she was integral in the redevelopment of the Olin Lipassed away on Saturday, August 4, 2018. Wife of the late Coy brary. She was active in the Webster-Rockhill Ministries and the C. Oglesby and the late Henry Early, Jr.; mother of Dr. Gerald League of Women Voters, after retiring from Washington UniEarly (Ida), Rosalind Early and the late Lenora Early; sister, versity she tutored students in reading and was a popular grandmother and great-grandmother. course facilitator at the Lifelong Learning Institute. A love for Services: Services will be held in Philadelphia, PA. Private travel since college, she enjoyed many trips with family and interment. friends to Alaska, across Canada, Central America, Scotland, A SERVICE OF Denmark, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Japan, China, Australia, THE LUPTON CHAPEL New Zealand. A long-standing member of St. Louis Public Radio and KETC, the St. Louis Symphony and the Opera Theater of St. Louis, she was an avid supporter of the many St. Louis musePalazzola, Joseph F. ums, she had a special love for the Missouri Botanical Garden 85, of St. Louis, MO, entered into rest Thurs., August 9, 2018. where she was fond of the Japanese Garden. She is survived by Vis. Tues., 4-8 p.m., Chapel Hill Mortuary Kirkwood. her husband, Patrick, and children Mark P. Witte, PhD (Megan Serv. Wed., 10 a.m. at Chapel Hill Mortuary Kirkwood. McCarville, MD) of Evanston, IL, Eric B. Witte, JD (Michelle) of Woodbury, MN, Bruce H. Witte, MD of Clayton, MO, and MargaReyland, Lynn A. ret (Gretchen) Anderson (Greg) of Lawrence, KS. Loving grandAnnointed in Christ, Aug. 7, 2018, beloved daughter of Walter mother of Hannah, Elizabeth, Katherine, Eleanor, Vivian, (Barb) Reyland and the late Joyce Reyland; dear sister of Pam Josephine, and Louisa. Dear friend to many, she will be greatly (George) Meier, Keith (Donna) Reyland, and Cathy (Ray) missed. She has bequeathed her body to the Washington University Gardiner; dear aunt of Timothy, Michael, Christopher, Keith, School of Medicine to further research into Parkinson's Disease. Haley, Claire and Amelia. Special thanks to Creative Concepts for Living staff and Medi There will be a private service at a later date. In lieu of flowers, a donation may be made to the League of Women Voters or the Plex Hospice. Services: Mass of the Resurrection, Mon., Aug. 13, 11 a.m. at Missouri Botanical Garden. St. Monica Church, 12140 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Visitation from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Monday at Zaiger, Henry R. church. In lieu of flowers, donations to ccliving.org or 94, July 22, 2018. spensa.org. Services: Memorial Mass on Monday August 13, 10 a.m. at St. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com Margaret Mary Alacoque, 63129.

August 7, 2018. Services: Vis. Mon., Aug. 13th from 4-8 pm, Service Tues., Aug. 14th at 10 am at Baue Funeral Home, 620 Jefferson St., St. Charles, MO. Visit baue.com

Sheppard, Allan

77, on Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Beloved husband of Esther Elfriede (nee Heilmann) Sheppard and loving father of Noah Luke Sheppard. He also leaves a daughter-in-law, Kristen Joy (nee Scro) Sheppard. A native St. Louisan, growing up in Jennings, he earned his B.S. in Applied Mathematics at University of Missouri - Rolla, Teacher Certification from University of Missouri - Columbia, M.S. in Applied Mathematics at SUNY - Albany, and Ed.D. in Instructional Systems Technology at Indiana University. Prior to teaching, he was a 1st Lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers. He taught in junior and senior high schools, community colleges, and universities. He was also a programmer analyst and co-owner of a company that wrote software for DEC minicomputers. He served as a trustee for Judson Manor Subdivision in Chesterfield for many years and in the late 90s represented Ward I on the Chesterfield City Council. He rounded out his work experiences as a TSA screener. Among other interests, he was an avid gardener. He was a resident at the Missouri Veterans' Home - St. Louis when he passed into his Manning, Vernell A. (nee Sweeney), on Thursday, August 9, 2018. Wife of the late eternal home with Our Lord and Savior. Services: Visitation will be held at 3:00 p.m., and a memorial William J. Manning Jr.; mother of Stephen, Paul (Barbara), William (Laurie) and Mark Manning; grandmother, great-grand- service will follow at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, August 14, at Arlington United Methodist Church, 3770 McKelvey Rd., Bridgeton, mother, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. MO 63044. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Arlington UMC or the St. Louis Veterans' Home CommitLemay Ferry Rd., Thurs., Aug. 16, 9 a.m. for 9:30 Mass at tee, 3905 Germania St., St. Louis, MO 63116. Assumption. Interment Mt. Olive. Visitation Wed., 5-9 p.m. Family served by Kriegshauser West Mortuary.

age 64, of Ballwin, MO, died on August 6, 2018. Contact Cremation Society of Missouri or visit missouricremate.com

Thacker, Betty Ruth 89, of St. Louis, MO passed away August 7, 2018. Funeral services and interment on Thursday, August 16 in Kingsport, TN. www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND

SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

Silver, Edward S. July 31, 2018, 84, is survived by his loving wife June, his son Edward, his daughter Patricia. He worked at AT&T as an Engineer for 36 years. Private graveside service. stlouiscremation.com

STLtoday.com/obits


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

OBITUARIES Klein, Eugenia Ann Eugenia Ann Klein, age 90, died 7/31/18, at Dolan Memory Care, Conway House, in Creve Coeur, MO, after a brief illness. Eugenia was born in New York City in 1928 into a publishing and literary family. Her mother, Beulah Hagen, was the assistant to Cass Canfield, president and acquiring editor of Harper & Brothers, and she worked with iconic writers such as E.B. White, James Thurber, and Thornton Wilder. Eugenia's uncle was Glenway Wescott, the author of The Grandmothers, Apartment in Athens, and The Pilgrim Hawk. In 1966, Eugenia went to work for the C.V. Mosby Company, a health sciences publisher in St. Louis, Missouri. Eugenia rose to become Mosby's first female medical acquisitions editor and was responsible for the publication of classic medical references such as Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, Jaffe: Cataract Surgery, Ryan: Retina, Hunter: Rehabilitation of the Hand, and Johnson: Arthroscopic Surgery. Eugenia retired from Mosby as executive editor in 1994 after 28 years at the firm. In 2003, her significant contributions to medical publishing were recognized when she won the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Medical Publishers Assoc iation. Eugenia was a role model and mentor to many women during her successful publishing career.

Celebrations of Life

Liebman, Clarence J. "Larry"

Little, Robert Carter "Bob"

Langwell, Shirley June

McKenna, Charles J. (nee Kleist), age 84, of Eureka, passed away Tuesday, August 7, Thurs., Aug. 9, 2018. Beloved husband of Alice 2018. She was the beloved wife of the late James Langwell; dear McKenna. Visitation at Kutis So. Co., 5255 Lemay Ferry, mother of Susan Langwell, Ronald James (Ruby) Langwell and Tuesday, Aug. 14, 10 a.m. until service 12 noon. InterLorraine Langwell (Achim) Fisher; loving grandmother of five ment National Cemetery. and great-grandmother of six. Servi c es : All services are private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Alzheimer's Assn. A service McKinney, Patricia M. of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends (nee Kollefrath), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother may sign the family's online guestbook at Schrader.com. Church, Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Loving aunt of George Kollefrath and Mary Yousef; dear great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Dominic Savio, 7748 MacKenzie Rd., Tuesday, August 14, at 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to The Humane Society or Catholic Charities. A KUTIS AFFTON SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND Service. SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

McLaughlin, William H.

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

THEM GREAT

Mersmann, Joel Christopher

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Beloved husband of Ailene Liebman (nee Miller) and the late Avril Liebman (nee Dillree); loving father of Mary Ann (James) Sloand, Laura (Dan) Max, Janine (Steve) Edler, Joseph (Kathy) Liebman and the late Dan Liebman; dear grandfather of ten and great-grandfather of 1; dear brother of the late Rosemary (surviving Karl) Kittrell; our dear uncle, great-uncle, and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., Tuesday, August 14th, 9:45 a.m. to Seven Holy Founders Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Cardinal Glennon or St. Louis Children's Hospital. Visitation Monday, 5-8 p.m.

passed away peacefully on August 3, 2018 at the age of 93. Born March 12, 1925 to the late Henry Francis and Nelle Elvage Little of Kansas City, MO. Beloved husband to Betty Kreder Little for 67 years; father to Susan Burr (Buddy) of Carbondale, CO, Martha McCoy (Mike) of Augusta, MO, James "Jim" Little (Kathy) of Costa Mesa, CA, and Elizabeth "Liz" Little of St. Louis; grand-father of Lauren McCoy (Mike O'Bryan) of St. Louis, Eugenia enjoyed singing and was an accomplished soprano. Emily Hoyt (Ben) of Eldorado For many years Eugenia was a member of the Cosmopolitan Springs, CO, and Colton Nappier of St. Louis. Singers and the Washington University Civic Chorus. In her Bob graduated from Southwest High School in Kansas City, retirement years, Eugenia contributed her editing skills volunMO. During his youth he played baseball, participated in ROTC teering with St. Louis Oasis in the production of their activity and Boy Scouts, achieving Eagle Scout. He attended Texas A & catalog. Eugenia loved traveling the U.S., particularly to her M, where he received a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical favorite states of Minnesota, Wisconsin and California, but she also enjoyed and supported the many cultural gifts of St. Louis, Engineering. His college years were interrupted by World War II and his enrollment in the Army Air Corp. He did extensive including the St. Louis Symphony, the Repertory Theatre, reconnaissance work and flew 68 combat missions over Europe Stages St. Louis, the Missouri History Museum, the Saint Louis flying P-51 Mustangs. He was awarded the DFC and the Air Art Museum, and the Missouri Botanical Garden. Eugenia was Medal with 13 Oak Clusters. also a die-hard fan of the St. Louis Cardinals. After completing college in 1948, he began his career at McDonnell Aircraft as a flight test engineer and test pilot. He Eugenia was a loving mother, a loyal friend, and a dedicated, has the distinction of being the first man to pilot four McDonnell professional colleague who will be missed by all. Eugenia is Douglas jet fighters that went into successful production: the survived by her children, Cord Klein, of Milwaukee, WI, Keith F3H-1 Demon (1953), the F-101A Voodoo (1954), the F-101B Klein (Regina), Eileen Pacino, Nancy O'Brien (Marty), of St. (1957), and the F4H-1 Phantom (1958). Little was also the first Louis, MO, and Elizabeth Clark (H. Brent) of St. Paul, MN, her grandchildren, Kate Francis Cunningham, Matthew Klein (Shan- person to take a maiden flight supersonic. Little is a Fellow in the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. He was awarded the non), David Klein, James O'Brien, Jessica O'Brien, and Martha Clark, and great-grandchildren Emelia Cunningham and Nathan prestigious James Doolittle Award for outstanding professional accomplishment in aerospace in 1977 and The Spirit of St. Louis Higley-Klein. Eugenia also leaves behind her beloved cousins Award in 1989. He was inducted into The Aerospace Hall of Bruce "Duke" Hotchkiss (Phyllis), Sybil Albrecht Lewis (Arthur), Susan Lockhart (Kenneth), Elizabeth Aitken, and William Jacobs Fame/Walk of Honor, Lancaster, CA in 2003. He retired from McDonnell Douglas in 1989 as Vice Chairman-Government (Natasha). Eugenia is also survived by her dearest and oldest Business. friend, Janet Krupnik. Bob was an avid outdoorsman, who enjoyed fishing, hunting, and working with his bird dogs Mike and Jake. He had a spirit of Eugenia's family would like to thank the wonderful caregivers adventure and a love of the west. He especially enjoyed from Dolan Memory Care, Conway House, Hope Hospice, and exploring the diverse landscape of Arizona, where he and Betty AW Health Care who cared for Eugenia in the last weeks of her spent many winters. Bob also had a great passion for playing life. A memorial service for Eugenia is planned for November golf with family and friends near and far. When at home Bob 17, 2018, at 3:00 pm at the Ethical Society of St. Louis, 9001 liked to putter around in the yard, take a plunge in the pool and Clayton Road. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to cook out, ideally with some great jazz playing in the a charity of one's choice. background. Services: Visitation 4 - 7:00 p.m. on Fri., Aug. 17 at Bopp Services: November 17, 2018, at 3:00 pm at the Ethical Society Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., in Kirkwood, MO. Funeral of St. Louis, 9001 Clayton Road. Service 11 a.m. Sat., Aug. 18 at Bopp Chapel. Interment Bellerive Gardens Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Greater St. Louis Kreutz, Ethel M. Boy Scouts of America, the Evans Scholarship or the American (nee Berberich), Passed away peacefully with her family at her Cancer Society. The family would like to thank the staff at Two side on July 25, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Norbert Kreutz; McKnight Skilled Nursing, especially Quana Jones and Lakisha dear mother of Eileen (Cathy Wimett) Kreutz, Robert (Deanna) Elkins, Gatesworth Personal Care and BJC Hospice Kreutz, Janet (Chuck) Hanneke, David (Julia) Kreutz, Linda Rola, with very special thanks to Dana Jones. Karen (Craig) Hooper, Michelle (Steve) Cheli, and Jackie (Kevin) www.boppchapel.com Eveker; dear grandmother, great grandmother, aunt, cousin and friend. Manning, Vernell A. Services: Saturday, August 25 at Assumption Church Mattese. (nee Sweeney), on Thursday, August 9, 2018. Wife of the late 9:00 a.m. Family greeting, 10:00 a.m. Memorial Mass. Donations in her honor to Assumption School or Missouri School for William J. Manning Jr.; mother of Stephen, Paul (Barbara), William (Laurie) and Mark Manning; grandmother, great-grandthe Blind. mother, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Laffey, Lois Jane Carrel Lemay Ferry Rd., Thurs., Aug. 16, 9 a.m. for 9:30 Mass at fortified with the Sacraments of Assumption. Interment Mt. Olive. Visitation Wed., 5-9 p.m. Holy Mother Church, on Saturday, July 28, 2018 at the Mathews, Thomas G. age of 86. Beloved wife of the age 64, of Ballwin, MO, died on August 6, 2018. Contact late Lawrence R. Laffey; loving mother of Mary Laffey Adams, Cremation Society of Missouri or visit Michael Laffey (Argentina), Jane missouricremate.com Laffey Beckman (John), Susan Laffey Roehlke (Kent), Stephen Mayer, Patsy A. Laffey (Mary) and the late James (nee Messmer) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Laffey (survived by Debbie); dear Church on Sunday, August 5, 2018. Beloved wife of Robert P. grandmother of Brian, Dan, Kelly, Mayer; loving mother of Steven (Rosario) Mayer, David Mayer, Tim, Steffanie, Jimmy, Emily, Linda Cardenas and Lisa (Patrick) Thompson; cherished grandRussell, Jake, Lauren, Brennen, mother of Sarah and Samuel Cardenas; our dear sister, sisterJack, Kate, Patrick, Grace and Brett; loving great-grandmother in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. of Jackson, Jacob and Ryan, Corban and Ezra; dear sister, sister- Services: A Memorial Mass will be held Tuesday, August 14, in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. 9:30 a.m. at St. Mark Catholic Church. Interment J.B. National Lois will be remembered as a giving, caring woman who Cemetery to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Amerialways acted out of love for her family and friends and her can Parkinson Disease Association, 1415 Elbridge Payne Rd., belief in social action. Suite 150, Chesterfield, MO 63017 appreciated. Services: A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Joseph A KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY SERVICE. Catholic Church, 106 North Meramec at Maryland, Clayton on Saturday, August 18 at 10:30 am. Visitation at the Church McGrath, Sr. M. Ellen "Mary Ellen" RGS beginning at 9:00 a.m. Saturday morning. Private interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials 8/10/18. Born March 18, 1927 in St. Louis, MO. She is survived appreciated to Saint Louis Crisis Nursery, 11710 Administration by her sister Shirley Shore of Wharton, NJ and many nieces and nephews. Dr., Suite 18, St. Louis, MO 63146. Services: The viewing will be 4:00 p.m. on Monday, August 13th A SERVICE OF in the Immaculate Heart Convent Chapel, 7626 Natural Bridge THE LUPTON CHAPEL Rd. Mass of Resurrection on Tuesday at 10:00 a.m.

STLtoday.com/obits

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Fri., Aug. 10, 2018. Beloved husband of Jean McLaughlin (nee Trangmar); dear fa t h er of Thomas (Nancy) McLaughlin and Karen (James) Bruns; dear father-in-law of the late Catherine McLaughlin; loving grandfather of Timothy (Lindsay) a n d L a u ren M c L a u g h l i n a n d Kristin and Melissa Bruns; dear brother of the late Hugh McLaughlin; our dear brother-inlaw, uncle and friend. Mr. McLaughlin retired from Monsanto in 1986 and then enjoyed cruising around the world with his loving wife, Jean. Services: Funeral Mass at Incarnate Word Church, 13416 Olive Blvd., Chesterfield, Tues., Aug. 14 at 10:30 a.m. with visitation at church from 9:30 a.m. until time of service. Interment Bellerive Gardens Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society or Alzheimer's Association appreciated. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

8/9/18, age 52. He died peacefully in his sleep at his home in Denver, CO. Joel was loved and will be missed terribly by his family and hundreds of friends from St. Louis to Denver. Beloved son of Mark Mersmann and Ann (Pickert) Mersmann; brother of Ken M e r s ma n n (Tomea); Amy Grzesiowski (Michael); Eric Mersmann; Paul Mersmann (Alison); uncle to Joy, Grace, and Mark M ers ma n n ; Ryan and Will Grzesiowski; Ray Mersmann. Services: Visitation Friday, Aug. 17, 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., Schrader Funeral Home, 14960 Manchester Rd., Ballwin, MO 63011. Funeral Mass Sat., Aug. 18, 10:00 a.m., Most Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 350 E 4th St., Eureka, MO 63025. Burial Mon., Aug. 20, 1:00 p.m., St. Boniface Cemetery, 32292 NE Norton Rd., Garnett, KS 66032. For more info, see Schrader.com

Michniok, Catherine Jeanette 1923 - 2018. Catherine J. Michniok (nee Coffman) passed peacefully on August 2, 2018 at age 94. Beloved wife of the late Richard B. Michniok. Loving mother of Rick (Terese) Michniok and Jan (Duke) Gowen. Adoring grandmother of Lauren, Kevin and Erin Michniok, Allie (Tony) Bindbeutel, and Tori Gowen. Our dear aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend. 50+ year member of the Beta Sigma Phi sorority. Services: Visitation at Kutis Funeral Home, Affton Chapel, 9:00 AM Saturday, August 18, 2018 until time of service at 10:00 AM. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Contributions to animal rescue group of your choice appreciated.

Montigne George J., Jr. passed away on August 9, 2018 at the age of 91. He is survived by his beloved wife Beverly Eyer Montigne (nee Shirk) of Lake St. Louis, Missouri; two sons Richard M. (Lenore) Montigne, Steven R. (Mary) Montigne; two grandsons Justin Montigne, Christopher Montigne. He is preceded in death by his father George J. Montigne, Sr., mother Theresa Montigne (n ee H il l ) , s is t er L o r e t t a G. Gunderson, sister Dorothy M. Parmalee. George was united in marriage to Beverly on April 1, 1947 in Jonesboro, AR. They shared 71 wonderful years together. He was a member of Dardenne Presbyterian Church in Dardenne Prairie, Missouri. He was an avid golfer. He will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved him. Services: A Memorial Service will be held at a later date. Memories and condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com.

Nitka Jr., Joseph J. Age 89, died on July 12, 2018 in St. Paul, MN. Graduate of St Louis University and St Louis University Law School. Preceded in death by parents Joseph and Mary Nitka; beloved wife Grace Wade Nitka; and sister Jeanne Krupp. Survived by daughter Beth Brombach, and Bill; son William Nitka, and Susan; grandchildren Michael, Dan and Grace; sister-in-law Alice Provaznik; nieces, nephews and friends. Joe was a highly respected labor arbitrator for over 40 years (finally retiring at age 82), whose decisions were published numerous times. All are welcome to join us for a luncheon at 12:00 p.m. on October 20th at Russell's on Macklind. Memorials to The Nature Conservancy and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Oglesby, Florence Early passed away on Saturday, August 4, 2018. Wife of the late Coy C. Oglesby and the late Henry Early, Jr.; mother of Dr. Gerald Early (Ida), Rosalind Early and the late Lenora Early; sister, grandmother and great-grandmother. Services: Services will be held in Philadelphia, PA. Private interment. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Palazzola, Joseph F. 85, of St. Louis, MO, entered into rest Thurs., August 9, 2018. Vis. Tues., 4-8 p.m., Chapel Hill Mortuary Kirkwood. Serv. Wed., 10 a.m. at Chapel Hill Mortuary Kirkwood.

Reyland, Lynn A. Annointed in Christ, Aug. 7, 2018, beloved daughter of Walter (Barb) Reyland and the late Joyce Reyland; dear sister of Pam (George) Meier, Keith (Donna) Reyland, and Cathy (Ray) Gardiner; dear aunt of Timothy, Michael, Christopher, Keith, Haley, Claire and Amelia. Special thanks to Creative Concepts for Living staff and Medi Plex Hospice. Services: Mass of the Resurrection, Mon., Aug. 13, 11 a.m. at St. Monica Church, 12140 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Visitation from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Monday at church. In lieu of flowers, donations to ccliving.org or spensa.org. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Richardson, George F. born September 9, 1931, died August 10. 2018. Beloved husband of Amelia "Moe" Richardson (Nee Ventimiglia); dear father of Mike (Karen) Richardson, Ken (Ruth) Richardson, and Chris (Christopher) Borrello; brother of Robert (Anna) Richardson; grandfather of five, great-grandfather of five; brother-in-law, uncle, cousin, and friend. Retired Laclede Gas 41+ years, Stygar Soccer Club coach, Life Member VFW 5077. Donations to SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital. SERVICES: A memorial visitation will be held from 10am - 11am on Thursday, August 16, 2018 at Immaculate Conception Church, 7701 Hwy N, (Dardenne Prairie) with a memorial Mass immediately following at 11am.

Saunders-Prante, Audrey E. (nee Lang), Friday, August 10, 2018. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Loving wife of the late Joseph M. Saunders and Gerald Prante; loving mother of Martin (Loretta) Saunders, Audrey Jane (John) Brauer, Teresa (Mark) James and the late Mary Saunders; loving grandmother of 9; great-grandmother of 3. Audrey was an avid gardener, quilter and volunteer for Multiple Sclerosis Society. Services: Visitation 10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. Tuesday, August 14, 2018 at Cure of Ars Church, 670 L a cl ed e Station Rd., Shrewsbury, followed with an 11:00 a.m. Funeral Mass. In t ermen t Calvary Cemetery. O n l in e guest book www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Schubert, Jr., Leonard F. August 7, 2018. Services: Vis. Mon., Aug. 13th from 4-8 pm, Service Tues., Aug. 14th at 10 am at Baue Funeral Home, 620 Jefferson St., St. Charles, MO. Visit baue.com

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND

SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits STLtoday.com/obits


A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WORLD

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Syrians find bargains at markets for looted goods Stolen hauls have become routine after government victories in seven-year civil war BY NABIH BULOS Los Angeles Times

BEIRUT • The street market

in Jaramana, Syria, is a bargain hunter’s paradise. Shoppers might find an ornate, 43-square-foot wool rug made by hand in Aleppo and pay less than $5 for it, rather than $100 or more. A refrigerator, normally $400, could be bought for half that much. The items are a steal because they were, in fact, stolen. They’re part of the haul from the looting that has become routine after government victories in Syria’s seven-year civil war. Government-friendly militiamen, in many cases, strip vanquished rebel bastions of anything not destroyed by airstrikes, artillery and close-quarters urban fighting. So prevalent is the looting that the word tafeesh, which means “furniturization,” has gained a new definition: to steal furniture. Markets such as the one in Jaramana, a suburb of the Syrian capital, Damascus, have sprung up over the years near war-torn areas such as Aleppo, Ghouta and Dara. Many residents and observers say that government loyalists have long treated the looting as their right as they defeat rebel forces, and that Syrian President Bashar Assad and his allies allow it to continue virtually unchecked. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a pro-opposition group based in Britain, said recently that its monitoring of the situation in some communities indicated “the looting culture is worsening.” The group said local sources reported that forces loyal to the government in recent weeks “looted most of the homes of the eastern, southeastern and western countryside of Dara, where they steal household appliances, furniture, blankets, cars and cattle.” The rebels too have taken advantage of opportunities to claim goods during the war. Aleppo, once Syria’s economic engine, was eviscerated when rebel factions blitzed through the industrial zones ringing the city in 2012. They ransacked warehouses and transported entire factories across the border to Turkey, where rebel groups had set up rear-guard bases. Occasionally, they would sell the equipment back to the original owners. Industrial machines worth tens of thousands of dollars were melted down to be sold as scrap metal. “They even ripped out the wiring from the walls for the copper,” said Moustafa Kawaie, an Aleppo business owner, as he walked through his factory during a government-organized trip to the city late last year. Fighters with the militant group Islamic State took a more bureaucratic approach, grounded in an extreme interpretation of Islamic jurisprudence. After taking over a city, the militants would scour neighborhoods for homes and businesses owned by Christians or Shiite Muslims — the jihadis consider

LOS ANGELES TIMES

The market in Jaramana, where items from battles in Dara have begun to trickle in.

the latter apostates who are to be killed. They would stencil on the building “Property of Islamic State,” then sell or rent the businesses to the Sunni Muslim populations under their grip. But it was the paramilitary factions bolstering Assad’s troops that turned looting into a highstakes business, the total value of which remains unknown. Once they seized rebel-held areas, the militiamen would engage in an orgy of tafeesh: washing machines, refrigerators, satellite dishes, the furnishings of entire living rooms, even mismatched sets of cutlery would appear in markets such as the one near Jaramana. As the government has picked off the opposition’s bastions over the last two years, fresh offen-

sives have brought new supplies of goods to be sold. The fridge in the Jaramana market had come from the government’s April campaign against the former rebel holdout of Ghouta, the rug from the last offensive on Dara. Government-controlled areas haven’t been immune. In Ramouseh, a loyalist neighborhood outside Aleppo, fighters with the Tiger Forces, a unit of the state’s air force intelligence directorate, tied up guards and emptied their factories, local media reported. As the vanguard of most government offensives, the Tiger Forces are the first to get to the spoils. “They assign the duties to different groups,” said one activist who, like many of those interviewed for this story, declined to

be named because of safety concerns. “One group gets fridges, another takes (air conditioners), another one deals with furniture. No one encroaches on the goods of the other.” Local media outlets, both proopposition and pro-government, have reported on dozens of workers strong-armed by paramilitary groups into stripping wires and electric cables from devastated neighborhoods. When they’re done, lower-level paramilitaries go in and snatch up the crumbs. There are several options for vendors hoping to cash in on the trade, one merchant explained in a July interview. Some pay a fixed sum for an entire truckload, sight unseen, and sell whatever they get. Others contract with a dozen or so

militiamen working under a commander to get their spoils or ransack a certain area. Those whose homes were emptied trudge through the markets to try to buy back what they lost. Abu Ahmad, a villager from the southern town of Saida, said he left home in July to escape the government’s latest offensive on Dara. A week later, he came back to a house pillaged to its foundation. “The fighters took the doors, fridge, freezer, ovens, generators, even the wiring. … Nothing was left, and the army was watching them do it,” he said in a recent Facebook chat. He headed to the nearby city of Sweida to recover what he could, but all he found from his home was a single rug. “The merchant told me that was all that was left from the truck. … Everything had been sold within two days,” said Abu Ahmad. The markets are an open secret, said an activist who runs a Sweida-based Facebook group that exposes tafeesh vendors and tries to get authorities to stop them. “No one needs to show you where they are. They’re on the edges of the street, selling goods without any bill of sale or documentation,” said the activist in a Facebook chat. Although looting has been reported in pro-government media outlets, authorities were “in paralysis,” the activist said, and haven’t gone beyond issuing poorly enforced injunctions against militiamen or market vendors. There’s also concern that anyone protesting too loudly may face retaliation. Rida Basha, a reporter with the pro-government Lebanese news broadcaster Al Mayadeen, was barred from working as a journalist in Syria after covering tafeesh in a widely shared article in early 2017. Tafeesh has also sparked tension with Russia, Bashar Assad’s top ally, which has deployed its military police as guarantors of surrender deals between the government and the rebels. In May, a video emerged of three Russian military officers arresting three government fighters when they tried to leave Babbila, a suburb near Damascus, with two truckloads of furniture. A crowd gathering around them breaks into applause when the Russians force the looters to lie on the ground. But it’s little more than a continuation of the prewar trend of corruption, said Aymenn Tamimi, an expert on Syrian factions, in a recent Facebook chat. “There are chances for new guys to become middlemen but they’re still part of the same system. It’s part of the way Assad’s Syria works: Concessions are made at the lower levels but the top of the system essentially remains as it is,” he said. Although many Syrians have protested against tafeesh, many others it see as the just reward for soldiers whose pay, already a pittance, had been further whittled down by a weaker Syrian pound and higher prices.

One man’s idea could defuse ‘fecal time bomb’ that is Everest BY CLEVE R. WOOTSON JR. Washington Post

Every year, some 1,200 people make a mad dash for the summit of Mount Everest during the climbing season that begins in May — taking on the arduous, often congested route to the world’s highest peak that most will not complete and some will not survive. Working against them: temperatures far below zero, altitude sickness with effects that range from disorientation to death, and the ever-present threat of frostbite. More than 200 corpses of ill-fated climbers line the mountain’s slopes, a constant reminder of those climbers’ fatal missteps. So it should probably come as no surprise if people traipsing up a mountain with its own death zone don’t give too much thought to one particular question: What should we do with all this poop? In the roughly two months that it takes to climb Mount Everest, the average alpinist will have produced nearly 60 pounds of excrement. This season, porters who work on Mount Everest carried down 14 tons of human waste from base camp and other locations. It’s dropped into earthen pits on Gorak Shep, a frozen lake bed near a village

ADEEL HALIM • Bloomberg

This season, porters who work on Mount Everest carried down 14 tons of human waste from base camp and other locations.

17,000 feet above sea level. If not handled properly, the frozen fecal matter will spend years littering one of the Seven Wonders of the World. As Grayson Schaff, an editor for Outside magazine wrote in a 2012 Washington Post opinion piece: “The peak has become a fecal time bomb, and the mess is gradually sliding back toward base camp.” It is a problem Garry Porter, of Washington state, is well aware of. He’s a retired engineer who got more than 20,000 feet up the mountain in 2003 before strong wind forced his climbing party to turn back. He’s spent a good

chunk of his retirement thinking about Everest — and about how to clean it up. “Everest is a lifetime dream for most climbers. You come off of that and you’re still wrapped up in the scenery and the nature, and … tempering that excitement is the thought that we really made a mess,” Porter said. “It really was a feeling that Everest deserves better than that — and it’s my responsibility because I’m a climber and I can’t walk away saying my crap doesn’t smell.” His solution for what he calls a potential environmental nightmare is simple: Use a biogas di-

gester to turn mountaineer excrement into something more useful. The digester would produce fertilizer and methane, a renewable biogas that can be used to cook food and light homes. Whole Foods uses a similar system to reduce food waste. In fact, the digester Porter wants to build won’t be much different from devices sold on the internet: A large tank that can hold water, human waste and anaerobic bacteria will produce fertilizer and methane gas to power cooking stoves and fires. There is, however, a mountainsized hurdle. The bacteria can’t do its work if the temperature is too low. And in many parts of Mount Everest, the thermometer doesn’t go north of freezing all year long. So Porter, a man who spent a career as an engineer but wanted a sizable challenge to occupy his mind in retirement, had found a problem to solve: How to keep the digester at optimal temperature using only simple materials that can be obtained locally? The device he’s come up with is a cross between a sewage treatment facility and a gigantic thermos — a digester, buried in the ground and surrounded by insulation. On top of that, subcontractors will construct a basic hut that will keep the elements out

and keep the temperature above a relatively toasty 68 degrees. Solar panels will be used to transmit heat into the digester, and power batteries that will be used for nighttime heating. If it sounds simple, that’s by design. If the digester is too difficult to operate — or replacement parts have to be shipped across the world — it won’t last. And the goal is to ultimately turn over the device to authorities in Nepal, who will operate it. Porter said his group, the Mount Everest Biogas Project, had already gotten approval to build the digester from the Nepalese government and the blessing of dozens of climbers who sought to conquer Everest, not sully it. One of his favorite moments of the project was watching a researcher at Kathmandu University turn a knob and spark a blue flame with methane from a prototype digester, all produced by excrement removed from the mountain. Porter hopes that that design serves as a proof of concept for other mountains. His group is taking donations and estimates it will cost half a million dollars to install a working digester on Everest. They could break ground as soon as they raise enough funds.


OBITUARIES

A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Amber Leigh Tatro • The woman whose 1984 victory over the Irving, Texas, Independent School District in the U.S. Supreme Court ensured disabled students the right to public education has died. She was 42. Tatro Ms. Tatro died Wednesday (Aug. 8, 2018) at a hospital in Dallas, according to a notice her family placed in the Dallas Morning News. She had spina bifida, a congenital physical defect causing partial paralysis. As a grade-school student, Ms. Tatro would require help with catheterization several times daily to remove urine. But school officials refused, saying that having to do so would open a “Pandora’s box” and require the district to provide extensive medical procedures. The district’s battle with Ms. Tatro and her family advanced all the way to the nation’s highest court, which ultimately ordered the district to perform the procedure. The decision for the first time made a legal distinction between a related health service and a medical service requiring a doctor. The decision “set the standard for getting ‘related services’ from a school district,” attorney Mark Partin said at the time. “And that allowed kids to stay in school who perhaps were being sent home.” Robert J. Danzig • The man who overcame difficult beginnings as a foster child during the Great Depression to become the head of Hearst Newspapers has died, the company said. He was 85. He died Wednesday Danzig (Aug. 8, 2018) in Cape Cod, Mass., after a long illness. Mr. Danzig led the newspaper

division at Hearst from 1977 to 1997, overseeing its growth to become the seventh-largest newspaper company in the United States, the company said. Robert L. Martin • A combat pilot, who said he flew “63 and a half” missions during World War II as part of the barrier-breaking Tuskegee Airmen, died July 26 (2018) at a senior living center in Olympia Fields, Ill. He was 99. The cause was pneumonia, said his daughter, Gabrielle Martin. Mr. Martin was attached to the 100th Fighter Squadron, which helped provide cover for Allied bombers on missions over targets in Europe. On March 3, 1945, he was shot down over German-occupied territory and spent five weeks trying to return to Allied lines with the help of Yugoslav partisans. H.F. ‘Gerry’ Lenfest • The philanthropist who made a $1 billion fortune in the cable industry and gave almost all of it away, supporting schools, museums, journalism and the arts in Philadelphia and beyond, died Aug. 5 (2018), a family spokesman said. Mr. Lenfest was 88. He was taken from his home in Philadelphia to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead of complications from chronic illness. “There is likely not an organization or charity in Philadelphia that didn’t benefit from the Lenfest family’s generosity in some way,” Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf said. “Gerry was a great human being and an even better citizen.” Mr. Lenfest and his wife, Marguerite, made about $1.2 billion when they sold Suburban Cable to Comcast Corp. in 2000. The Lenfests immediately set out to give away the fortune. By 2014, Gerry Lenfest estimated he had given away $1.1 billion. Charlotte Rae • The actress who played a wise and patient housemother to teenage girls on the long-running sitcom “The Facts of Life” has died. She was 92.

Ms. Rae died at her Los Angeles home on Aug. 5 (2018), said her publicist, Harlan Boll. A cause of Rae death was not immediately available, but Ms. Rae reportedly was diagnosed last year with bone cancer after beating pancreatic cancer. She originated the character of Mrs. Garrett in 1978 during the first season of NBC’s comedy “Diff’rent Strokes,” then took the character with her for the spinoff “Facts,” which premiered the following season. Initially set at a girls boarding school, that NBC series ran for nine seasons. Ms. Rae left after its seventh year, however, explaining later, “I needed some time for the rest of my life.” She earned an Emmy nomination for the part and was a two-time Tony nominee for her work on Broadway. Paul Laxalt • The son of Basque immigrants, who rose to political power as a Nevada governor, U.S. senator and close ally to Ronald Reagan, has died. He was 96. Gov. Laxalt, a conservative Republican, died Monday Laxalt (Aug. 6, 2018) at a health care facility in Virginia, according to the public relations firm the Ferraro Group. Gov. Laxalt had a storied political career, including a brief run for president in 1987. Alan Rabinowitz • The zoologist who overcame a debilitating stutter to become a powerful voice for leopards, jaguars and other wild cats threatened by humans died Aug. 5 (2018) at a hospital in Manhattan. He was 64. The cause was cancer, according to a statement from Panthera, a wild-cat conservation organization

OBITUARIES Sheppard, Allan

that he co-founded in 2006 and, until recently, led as chief executive. Mr. Rabinowitz had been diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2001. Mr. Rabinowitz became “the Indiana Jones of wildlife protection,” as Time magazine once called him, braving 500-mile hikes through the wilderness, vampire bats, attacks of leeches and malaria, and a plane crash in the jungle, to preserve wild cats from Latin America to Southeast Asia. Takeshi Onaga • The governor of Okinawa, Japan, who led a movement against a U.S. military base on the southern Japanese island, has died at age 67, Japanese media said. The newspaper Onaga Ryukyu Shimpo said Gov. Onaga died of pancreatic cancer Wednesday (Aug. 8, 2018) night at a hospital where he had been treated. Robert Ellis Smith • A journalist who published and edited a newspaper covering the civil rights movement in the South in the 1960s, and who later became a lawyer and publisher specializing in issues of personal privacy and security, died July 25 (2018) at his home in Providence, R.I. He was 77. The cause was a heart attack, said a son, Marc Smith. In 1965, Mr. Smith was a founder of the Southern Courier, a weekly newspaper based in Montgomery, Ala. The aim of the Courier, which ceased publication in 1968, was to cover events of the civil rights movement that were ignored by mainstream media outlets. Mr. Smith later worked as a reporter and editor at the Detroit Free Press, Trenton Times and Newsday and as a civil rights official at the old U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. He also wrote at least a dozen books.

Celebrations of Life

Witte, Victoria Bradford

passed away peacefully at home Wednesday, August 8, 2018, with her husband of 56 years Dr. Patrick H. Witte ever at her side. She was born in Cambridge, MA to Mark W. and Matilda Frantz Bradford. Vicky earned degrees from Wellesley College, The University of Michigan, and Washington University. She became Associate Dean of the Libraries at Washington University, where she was integral in the redevelopment of the Olin Library. She was active in the Webster-Rockhill Ministries and the League of Women Voters, after retiring from Washington University she tutored students in reading and was a popular course facilitator at the Lifelong Learning Institute. A love for travel since college, she enjoyed many trips with family and friends to Alaska, across Canada, Central America, Scotland, Denmark, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Japan, China, Australia, New Zealand. A long-standing member of St. Louis Public Radio and KETC, the St. Louis Symphony and the Opera Theater of St. Louis, she was an avid supporter of the many St. Louis museums, she had a special love for the Missouri Botanical Garden where she was fond of the Japanese Garden. She is survived by her husband, Patrick, and children Mark P. Witte, PhD (Megan McCarville, MD) of Evanston, IL, Eric B. Witte, JD (Michelle) of Woodbury, MN, Bruce H. Witte, MD of Clayton, MO, and Margaret (Gretchen) Anderson (Greg) of Lawrence, KS. Loving grandmother of Hannah, Elizabeth, Katherine, Eleanor, Vivian, Josephine, and Louisa. Dear friend to many, she will be greatly missed. She has bequeathed her body to the Washington University School of Medicine to further research into Parkinson's Disease. Silver, Edward S. There will be a private service at a later date. In lieu of flowers, July 31, 2018, 84, is survived by his loving wife June, his son Ed- a donation may be made to the League of Women Voters or the ward, his daughter Patricia. He worked at AT&T as an Engineer Missouri Botanical Garden. for 36 years. Private graveside service. stlouiscremation.com

77, on Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Beloved husband of Esther Elfriede (nee Heilmann) Sheppard and loving father of Noah Luke Sheppard. He also leaves a daughter-in-law, Kristen Joy (nee Scro) Sheppard. A native St. Louisan, growing up in Jennings, he earned his B.S. in Applied Mathematics at University of Missouri - Rolla, Teacher Certification from University of Missouri - Columbia, M.S. in Applied Mathematics at SUNY - Albany, and Ed.D. in Instructional Systems Technology at Indiana University. Prior to teaching, he was a 1st Lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers. He taught in junior and senior high schools, community colleges, and universities. He was also a programmer analyst and co-owner of a company that wrote software for DEC minicomputers. He served as a trustee for Judson Manor Subdivision in Chesterfield for many years and in the late 90s represented Ward I on the Chesterfield City Council. He rounded out his work experiences as a TSA screener. Among other interests, he was an avid gardener. He was a resident at the Missouri Veterans' Home - St. Louis when he passed into his eternal home with Our Lord and Savior. Services: Visitation will be held at 3:00 p.m., and a memorial service will follow at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, August 14, at Arlington United Methodist Church, 3770 McKelvey Rd., Bridgeton, MO 63044. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Arlington UMC or the St. Louis Veterans' Home Committee, 3905 Germania St., St. Louis, MO 63116. Family served by Kriegshauser West Mortuary.

Steele, Ruth P. August 8, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Fred Steele; former wife of the late Marvin Rosecan, MD; mother of the late Jeffrey Rosecan, MD (Barbara Gross Rosecan), Lauren R. Rosecan, MDPhD, Deborah L. Rosecan, and Arthur S. Rosecan, MD (Janet Voorhees Rosecan); dear grandmother of Sam and Andy Rosecan, Allie, Brett, Shaun Rosecan and Devon Rudolph, Jerry Linder, Emma Rosecan (fiancé Jacob Ehlenberger), and Michael Lugo; dear sister of the late Geraldine Portman, Eugene Portman (Ellen), and the late Darwin Portman (Carol); dear aunt, cousin, and friend to many. Services: Graveside service Sunday, August 12, 10:30 a.m. at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery, 9125 Ladue Road. Memorial contributions preferred to the charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Stutz, Patricia M. (nee Daniels), Fri., 8/10/18. Vis. Mon., 8/13, 4-8 pm, Kutis Affton Chapel, funeral Mass Tu es., A u g . 14, 10 am Annunciation Ch. Interment Resurrection Cemetery.

Thacker, Betty Ruth 89, of St. Louis, MO passed away August 7, 2018. Funeral services and interment on Thursday, August 16 in Kingsport, TN. www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Walter, Thomas Paul Financial Advisor who served in US Marine Corps. Husband of Linda; father of Lindsay (Erik) Meyer and Mary Clare (Adam) Taylor; brother of Elizabeth (Terry) Diehl; grandfather of Kevin Walter Meyer and Zikyra Walter Meyer. Services: Visitation Sat., 8/18 from 10:30 a.m. until 12 noon Mass at St. Gerard Majella, 1969 Dougherty Ferry Rd., Kirkwood, MO 63122. www.archwaychapel.com

Weaver, Lesli Ann (nee Sparacio) Thurs., Aug. 9, 2018. Services: Funeral Tues. Aug. 14, 10 a.m. at COLLIER'S F.H., 3400 N. Lindbergh (St. Ann), Vis. Mon. 4-8 p.m. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Wilmering, Joy D. Entered peacefully into eternal life August 6, 2018. Services: Memorial Services September 15, Mass at 10:00 a.m., Annunziata Catholic Church 9305 Clayton Rd., 63124. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Birthright STL, 2525 S. Brentwood Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63144.

Zaiger, Henry R. 94, July 22, 2018. Services: Memorial Mass on Monday August 13, 10 a.m. at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, 63129.

Florists Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

“It is not length of life, but depth of life.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON

Barry Chuckle • The British children’s entertainer, half of sibling duo the Chuckle Brothers, has died at age 73. Manager Phil Dale said Sunday that Mr. Chuckle, whose real name was Barry Elliott, died Aug. 5 (2018) at home after an illness. No other details were disclosed. Barry and his younger brother Paul became icons to British children with their TV show “ChuckleVision,” which ran on the BBC between 1987 and 2009. The duo were awarded a special British Academy award in 2008 for their contribution to children’s television. Arsène Tchakarian • The last surviving member of the Armenianled Manouchian network, which fought alongside the French resistance against the Nazi occupiers during World War II, died Aug. 4 (2018) Tchakarian at a hospital in Villejuif, south of Paris. He was 101. His family announced the death but did not specify the cause. Mr. Tchakarian, an ethnic Armenian born in Turkey during the Ottoman Empire, later received France’s highest award, as a commander of the Legion of Honor. V.S. Naipaul • The Nobel Literature laureate has died at the age of 85. His family said the novelist died Saturday (Aug. 11, 2018) at his home in London. Mr. Naipaul published his first novel, “The Mystic Masseur,” in 1957. He went on to write dozens of books, many dealing with colonialism and its legacy. Mr. Naipaul was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2001 “for having united perceptive narrative and incorruptible scrutiny in works that compel us to see the presence of suppressed histories.” From news services

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Florists Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

“To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


WORLD

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A29

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

People take pictures at the Valley of the Fallen monument near El Escorial, outside Madrid, last month. Spain’s new government says that removing late dictator Gen. Francisco Franco from a glorifying mausoleum will be the first among many symbolic moves to come to terms with the country’s troubled 20th-century history.

DIGGING UP FRANCO SPAIN DIVIDED OVER DICTATOR’S LEGACY BY ARITZ PARRA associated Press

MADRID • Even in his grave, the 20th-century dictator who ruled Spain with an iron fist keeps dividing the country. Spain’s new center-left government says removing the embalmed body of Gen. Francisco Franco from a glorifying mausoleum will be the first among many symbolic moves aimed at coming to terms with the country’s troubled history. Critics of the government and Franco’s descendants are pushing back, vowing to preserve the memory of a regime they claim should be credited for “modernizing Spain.” Banning the foundation that preserves the legacy of Franco is precisely what should be done instead, says Fernando Martinez, the official appointed to oversee the government’s efforts to unearth and identify the 114,000 or so victims of the 1936-39 Spanish Civil War and the four decades of dictatorship that followed under Franco, who died in 1975. “Exhuming the body of the dictator will begin healing the wounds of this country. But that task will only be completed when the last ditch with a mass grave in this country has been opened,” Martinez told The Associated Press, speaking at the Ministry of Justice in Madrid, where his new Directorate General for Historic Memory is being formed. Martinez says creating an upto-date census of anonymous burials in ditches across the country will be among the most pressing tasks for Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez’s new government. Other moves include re-opening an office to help victims’ relatives — an office closed under Spain’s previous conservative government — setting up a new system for reparation payments and turning Franco’s current burial place into a museum against fascism. “We are going to accelerate and make up for lost time, it’s a question of democratic dignity,” says Martinez, who was appointed in July after Sanchez ousted conservative Mariano Rajoy with a no-confidence vote in June. Three U.N.-sponsored missions to Spain since 2013 had criticized authorities for lacking a national plan to search for missing people, for poor coordination on exhumations and for outdated maps of graves. They also raised concerns about the inaction of Spanish courts in prosecuting some of the period’s darkest crimes. But a panel of U.N. rights experts just recently praised the authorities’ move for “placing the right to truth at the top of the political agenda” by leading the efforts to search for those disappeared as well as for vowing to create a Truth Commission to investigate crimes that

Visitors stand around the tomb of former Spanish dictator Francisco Franco last month, inside the basilica at the Valley of the Fallen monument near El Escorial, outside Madrid. Franco’s tomb, a simple granite slate with only his name engraved, presides over the altar of the basilica. Fresh flowers are always on display.

People visit one of the chapels at the Valley of the Fallen monument last month. The somber mausoleum was built by Franco as a tribute to the dead during his so-called “glorious crusade” against Spain’s government.

occurred under Franco up until his death. “This decision represents a fundamental step toward the realization of the right to truth for all victims of serious human rights violations,” the rapporteurs wrote. The government wants to adopt the changes by amending the 2007 Historic Memory Law, which fell short of addressing the demands of survivors and victims’ relatives when Rajoy’s conservative government eliminated its budgets for exhumations and reparations. Emilio Silva, president of the Association for the Recovery of Historic Memory, or ARMH, says the new government should use its executive powers to remove Franco from the Valley of the Fallen — a maca-

bre mausoleum 31 miles northwest of Madrid. He also wants the government to dig up all the graves of Franco’s victims, rather than kicking off a grand political showdown between conservative and progressive voices in parliament. “They fear a legal backlash,” Silva said of the government. But he called digging up unmarked graves and compensating the relatives of identified victims “very basic, human things. There shouldn’t be any need to discuss them.” With a towering 500-foottall cross that can be seen from miles away, the somber neoclassic-style mausoleum and basilica of the Valley of the Fallen were built by Franco as a tribute to the dead during his so-called “glorious crusade”

in overthrowing Spain’s democratic government. Some 34,000 people from both sides of the fratricidal war are buried at the site, most of them never identified, along with the remains of Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, the founder of the fascist Spanish Falange party. Franco’s tomb, a simple granite slate with only his name engraved, presides over the altar of the basilica. Fresh flowers are always on display. Public events supporting the Franco regime were outlawed in 2007, but the grandiose site remains a popular pilgrimage destination for those nostalgic for the dictatorship. Activists say the whole place exudes a totalitarian air and is an insult to the memory of the victims. They are also an-

gry at the decrepit state of the remains, with water leaks that have turned the crypts into “piles of bones,” according to an expert’s assessment in 2011. Martinez says the projected revision of the law will include a proposal to remove symbols celebrating the dictatorship and will rebrand the Valley into a monument for reconciliation and a museum that tells about the abuses during its construction, including the use of political prisoners as forced laborers. But the government, which failed to exhume Franco by July as promised, is facing a myriad of obstacles, including its weak position in parliament. Hundreds of people nostalgic for Francoism have staged protests at the Valley, and conservative parties are accusing Sanchez’s administration of reopening a chapter they consider closed instead of focusing on 21st-century problems. Meanwhile, descendants of Franco’s family are refusing to cooperate with authorities, mounting a legal case against plans to exhume the dictator and refusing to take his remains to the family sepulchral vault in Galicia. With their refusal, authorities are faced with the dilemma of what to do with Franco’s remains. Digging Franco up, Martinez said, aims to “consolidate our democracy,” which was peacefully instituted in the late 70s upon the death of the dictator. Martinez refused to venture a date for the Franco exhumation. But even if it succeeds, Sanchez’s government will face the politically sensitive task of outlawing the National Francisco Franco Foundation, which up to 2003 was receiving public funding for safeguarding documents from the 1939-1975 regime. The Franco Foundation did not respond to AP’s requests for comment, but in recent statements online, officials said any attempt to ban them would be against Spain’s Constitution, which protects freedom of speech. Its president, retired Gen. Juan Chicharro, wrote that the foundation must defend itself from “the staggered outlawing of everyone who doesn’t bend to the totalitarian demands” of the Spanish left. ARMH’s Silva said “banning the foundation does not limit their freedom to express their ideas,” it just restricts their access to public funding. Martinez believes the issue is not about free speech but about protecting Spain’s democracy. “Every foundation justifying Francoism has no space in democracy, the same way it wouldn’t by supporting fascism or a Nazi ideology, because these are ideologies that go against democratic values and liberties,” he said. “Those of us in favor of democracy have a mandate to defend democracy.”


WORLD

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A29

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

People take pictures at the Valley of the Fallen monument near El Escorial, outside Madrid, last month. Spain’s new government says that removing late dictator Gen. Francisco Franco from a glorifying mausoleum will be the first among many symbolic moves to come to terms with the country’s troubled 20th-century history.

DIGGING UP FRANCO SPAIN DIVIDED OVER DICTATOR’S LEGACY BY ARITZ PARRA associated Press

MADRID • Even in his grave, the 20th-century dictator who ruled Spain with an iron fist keeps dividing the country. Spain’s new center-left government says removing the embalmed body of Gen. Francisco Franco from a glorifying mausoleum will be the first among many symbolic moves aimed at coming to terms with the country’s troubled history. Critics of the government and Franco’s descendants are pushing back, vowing to preserve the memory of a regime they claim should be credited for “modernizing Spain.” Banning the foundation that preserves the legacy of Franco is precisely what should be done instead, says Fernando Martinez, the official appointed to oversee the government’s efforts to unearth and identify the 114,000 or so victims of the 1936-39 Spanish Civil War and the four decades of dictatorship that followed under Franco, who died in 1975. “Exhuming the body of the dictator will begin healing the wounds of this country. But that task will only be completed when the last ditch with a mass grave in this country has been opened,” Martinez told The Associated Press, speaking at the Ministry of Justice in Madrid, where his new Directorate General for Historic Memory is being formed. Martinez says creating an upto-date census of anonymous burials in ditches across the country will be among the most pressing tasks for Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez’s new government. Other moves include re-opening an office to help victims’ relatives — an office closed under Spain’s previous conservative government — setting up a new system for reparation payments and turning Franco’s current burial place into a museum against fascism. “We are going to accelerate and make up for lost time, it’s a question of democratic dignity,” says Martinez, who was appointed in July after Sanchez ousted conservative Mariano Rajoy with a no-confidence vote in June. Three U.N.-sponsored missions to Spain since 2013 had criticized authorities for lacking a national plan to search for missing people, for poor coordination on exhumations and for outdated maps of graves. They also raised concerns about the inaction of Spanish courts in prosecuting some of the period’s darkest crimes. But a panel of U.N. rights experts just recently praised the authorities’ move for “placing the right to truth at the top of the political agenda” by leading the efforts to search for those disappeared as well as for vowing to create a Truth Commission to investigate crimes that

Visitors stand around the tomb of former Spanish dictator Francisco Franco last month, inside the basilica at the Valley of the Fallen monument near El Escorial, outside Madrid. Franco’s tomb, a simple granite slate with only his name engraved, presides over the altar of the basilica. Fresh flowers are always on display.

People visit one of the chapels at the Valley of the Fallen monument last month. The somber mausoleum was built by Franco as a tribute to the dead during his so-called “glorious crusade” against Spain’s government.

occurred under Franco up until his death. “This decision represents a fundamental step toward the realization of the right to truth for all victims of serious human rights violations,” the rapporteurs wrote. The government wants to adopt the changes by amending the 2007 Historic Memory Law, which fell short of addressing the demands of survivors and victims’ relatives when Rajoy’s conservative government eliminated its budgets for exhumations and reparations. Emilio Silva, president of the Association for the Recovery of Historic Memory, or ARMH, says the new government should use its executive powers to remove Franco from the Valley of the Fallen — a maca-

bre mausoleum 31 miles northwest of Madrid. He also wants the government to dig up all the graves of Franco’s victims, rather than kicking off a grand political showdown between conservative and progressive voices in parliament. “They fear a legal backlash,” Silva said of the government. But he called digging up unmarked graves and compensating the relatives of identified victims “very basic, human things. There shouldn’t be any need to discuss them.” With a towering 500-foottall cross that can be seen from miles away, the somber neoclassic-style mausoleum and basilica of the Valley of the Fallen were built by Franco as a tribute to the dead during his so-called “glorious crusade”

in overthrowing Spain’s democratic government. Some 34,000 people from both sides of the fratricidal war are buried at the site, most of them never identified, along with the remains of Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, the founder of the fascist Spanish Falange party. Franco’s tomb, a simple granite slate with only his name engraved, presides over the altar of the basilica. Fresh flowers are always on display. Public events supporting the Franco regime were outlawed in 2007, but the grandiose site remains a popular pilgrimage destination for those nostalgic for the dictatorship. Activists say the whole place exudes a totalitarian air and is an insult to the memory of the victims. They are also an-

gry at the decrepit state of the remains, with water leaks that have turned the crypts into “piles of bones,” according to an expert’s assessment in 2011. Martinez says the projected revision of the law will include a proposal to remove symbols celebrating the dictatorship and will rebrand the Valley into a monument for reconciliation and a museum that tells about the abuses during its construction, including the use of political prisoners as forced laborers. But the government, which failed to exhume Franco by July as promised, is facing a myriad of obstacles, including its weak position in parliament. Hundreds of people nostalgic for Francoism have staged protests at the Valley, and conservative parties are accusing Sanchez’s administration of reopening a chapter they consider closed instead of focusing on 21st-century problems. Meanwhile, descendants of Franco’s family are refusing to cooperate with authorities, mounting a legal case against plans to exhume the dictator and refusing to take his remains to the family sepulchral vault in Galicia. With their refusal, authorities are faced with the dilemma of what to do with Franco’s remains. Digging Franco up, Martinez said, aims to “consolidate our democracy,” which was peacefully instituted in the late 70s upon the death of the dictator. Martinez refused to venture a date for the Franco exhumation. But even if it succeeds, Sanchez’s government will face the politically sensitive task of outlawing the National Francisco Franco Foundation, which up to 2003 was receiving public funding for safeguarding documents from the 1939-1975 regime. The Franco Foundation did not respond to AP’s requests for comment, but in recent statements online, officials said any attempt to ban them would be against Spain’s Constitution, which protects freedom of speech. Its president, retired Gen. Juan Chicharro, wrote that the foundation must defend itself from “the staggered outlawing of everyone who doesn’t bend to the totalitarian demands” of the Spanish left. ARMH’s Silva said “banning the foundation does not limit their freedom to express their ideas,” it just restricts their access to public funding. Martinez believes the issue is not about free speech but about protecting Spain’s democracy. “Every foundation justifying Francoism has no space in democracy, the same way it wouldn’t by supporting fascism or a Nazi ideology, because these are ideologies that go against democratic values and liberties,” he said. “Those of us in favor of democracy have a mandate to defend democracy.”


A30 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BREATHTAKING PICS See the latest work from our award-winning photographers. STLTODAY.COM/PHOTOS

M 1 • SUNDAY • 08.12.2018

GOT A STORY TIP? Have the scoop on a local news story? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. Tips are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous. stltoday.com/newstips

Ramps for safety & comfort. Specializing in Creating Safe, Accessible Homes

Veteran-Owned and VA Certified

6 months samE as cash aUGUst onLY CALL TODAY AND RECEIVE A FREE IN HOME QUOTE

314-325-3199 • 618-206-5963

PROUD MEDIA SPONSOR


NATION

A30 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Ohio zoo marks Elephant Day with pregnancy notice

ASSOCIATED PRESS

POWELL, OHIO • The Columbus Zoo

and Aquarium is celebrating World Elephant Day by announcing that one of its Asian elephant moms is expecting. Zoo officials said Saturday that Phoebe, 31, is expecting her fourth calf

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

— her third in Columbus, where she came to live in 2002. Officials say she’s in her third trimester and is expected to give birth in December. Elephant pregnancies last about 22 months. The identity of the baby’s father is a mystery that will be solved with DNA after Phoebe’s calf is born. Phoebe was

inseminated with sperm from Columbus Zoo partner Hank and an elephant from another zoo. She also was bred by Hank. Phoebe’s previous two deliveries in 2004 and 2009 are the only two Asian elephants to be born at the Columbus Zoo.

Ramps for safety & comfort. Specializing in Creating Safe, Accessible Homes

Veteran-Owned and VA Certified

COLUMBUS ZOO AND AQUARIUM VIA AP

Phoebe, an Asian elephant, is expecting her fourth calf — her third in Columbus, where she came to live in 2002. She’s expected to give birth in December.

6 months samE as cash aUGUst onLY CALL TODAY AND RECEIVE A FREE IN HOME QUOTE

314-325-3199 • 618-206-5963

PROUD MEDIA SPONSOR


STLTODAY.COM/LIFE STLTODAY.COM/GO SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • B

STLLIFE ARTS + HOME + TRAVEL

MUTING R. KELLY Our music critic is finished with the Pied Piper of R&B BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Time’s up for R. Kelly. The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter has been saddled with allegations of sexual misconduct for decades, and many fans have already tossed him to the garbage heap. That it’s taken this long for me to part with Kelly and his music is something I’m embarrassed to admit. But I’m done with the self-proclaimed Pied Piper of R&B. I’m all about #MuteRKelly, a nationwide movement that started last year to end Kelly’s career. Spotify may have reversed its decision to remove his music from its playlists, but I’m removing him from everything. R. Kelly at the Family Arena in 2016, where he returns Friday.

See KELLY • Page B7

Photo by Jon Gitchoff

Bad case of COD? Voter, heal thyself

A fight over a lost shirt sparks discussion

BILL McCLELLAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AISHA SULTAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The proof is in the poutine

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

“I just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in.” — song lyrics by Mickey Newbury The primaries are over, and the general election season is upon us. This is not good news for our collective mental health. Even during normal times, a large swath of the population is afflicted with COD — compulsive outrage disorder. COD sufferers like to be angry. They need to be angry. They listen to talk radio. They watch cable news shows. As the disease progresses, they get active on social media. They write angry, hateful notes on message boards. They find joy in See MCCLELLAN • Page B2

public high schools have raised tens of thousands of dollars to travel to Costa Rica. Each year, they kayak and hike, study the wildlife and meet the people. The annual effort is called the Show Me Costa Rica Project. Vashon High School Dean of Students Samantha Lurie

A war broke out over a lost T-shirt on our summer vacation. I had spotted a vintage-looking tee at a hipster shop in the historic Distillery District during a recent visit to Toronto. It featured a graphic design of a bucket of poutine. For the unfamiliar, which we were until this trip, poutine is Canada’s heavenly version of hangover food — fries drenched in gravy and loaded with cheese curds. My teenage daughter had already ordered the dish twice in the past two days. I suggested it would be a good souvenir that she ought to buy for herself. The girl balked at the price — $30 CAD — about $23 in our currency. That seems pricey for a T-shirt, she

See COSTA RICA • Page B4

See SULTAN • Page B2

Ron Fraction (center) of Gateway STEM High School joins classmates in April at the Missouri Botanical Garden as they learn about plant life in preparation for a trip to Costa Rica. The student trip was part of the Show Me Costa Rica Project.

Area students go way beyond the ‘basic’ with Costa Rica trip BY KRISTEN TAKETA Special to the Post-Dispatch

Ron Fraction, a 17-year-old student at Gateway STEM High School, went to Costa Rica because he never wants to be “basic.” For six years, groups of students from some of St. Louis’ most disadvantaged

BOOKS LAURELL K. HAMILTON IS IN TOP FORM WITH PARANORMAL NOVEL ‘SERPENTINE.’ PAGE B9 TRAVEL A PERFECT FLORIDA DESTINATION FOR A GIRLS GETAWAY. PAGES B10-B11 STLLIFE

1 M

T h e s p e l l b i n di ng s e q u e l to t h e p h a n tom of t h e op e r a

the Fabulous Fox September 18-30 314-534-1111 metrotix.com


ON OUR RADAR

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

MORE AT STLTODAY.COM

GABE HARTWIG deputy features editor ghartwig@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8353

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • B2

JANE HENDERSON books editor jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

Big Boy Baby is an affectionate 4-year-old domestic shorthair looking for a forever family to call his own. This handsome red tabby cat is a big guy who thrives on snuggling and chin scratches and would love to share a home with you if there’s enough room in your lap to curl up and nap in. He needs a family that will not only pet him from head to tail but will also help keep him on a diet so that he’s healthy. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Chesterfield Valley Center.

Think of the sweetest thing you’ve ever known, and Sweetie is still sweeter than that. Seems impossible, we know — we thought so, too, until she showed up. Sweetie just can’t help but want to be loved on and will push her face into your hands until you have to pet her. She’s an adorable 6-year-old with a gorgeous, lynx point coat, a loud purr and a tiny meow that couldn’t fit her any better. All she’s looking for is a home with a warm spot for sleeping and a family with plenty of time to pet her from head to tail. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Macklind Avenue Headquarters in St. Louis.

PETS OF THE WEEK

FRESH PRODUCE Use our interactive guide to find a farmers market near you. stltoday.com/farmersmarket

DANIEL NEMAN’S PREP SCHOOL Our food writer shows you how to make your own croutons. stltoday.com/food

TELEVISION

If you have a thing for tiny eyebrows, come check out Bam. Bam is a beautiful 2-yearold Jack Russell terrier mix with a smooth, white coat and the smallest eyebrows that give her the best expressions. She weighs in at about 36 pounds, so she’s the perfect size for snuggling up on the couch after a walk around the neighborhood. Bam can be a little shy with new people, but if you’re willing to take things slow you’ll be rewarded with a bottomless supply of tail wags and puppy kisses. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Best Buddy Pet Center in Maryland Heights.

Coming Tuesday • “A.P. Bio,” Season 1; “Arrow,” Season 6; “Here and Now,” Season 1; “Mr. Mercedes,” Season 1; “SEAL Team,” Season 1; “The Blacklist,” Season 5

Last week’s featured pets • Dogs named Blush and Poppy and a rabbit named Willow are still available for adoption. Hours and directions • hsmo.org

NEW ON DVD MOVIES Coming Tuesday • “Avengers: Infinity War”; “Bad Samaritan”; “How to Talk to Girls at Parties”; “Higher Power”; “Shock and Awe”; “The Yellow Birds” Coming Aug. 21 • “Deadpool 2”; “Show Dogs”; “God’s Not Dead: A Light in Darkness”

GARDENING Q&A

Witch hazel likely should have leafed out by now BY CHIP TYNAN Missouri Botanical Garden

Q • I have a witch hazel planted by a nursery earlier this spring. So far it has not demonstrated any interest in leafing out although the stems have little buds and the wood is green. Have you ever heard of this? I have other witch hazels that all have leaves now.

A • Was it a bare root shrub, container-grown or balled in burlap? Bare root specimens often take longer to produce new growth than container or balled-andburlap specimens, but as we have been so unseasonably warm for so long now, it’s way overdue, and if growth isn’t forthcoming in the weeks ahead, I’d say it’s time you check your warranty and give your nursery a call. Write to Chip Tynan of the Missouri Botanical Garden at chip.tynan@ mobot.org or Horticultural Answer Service, Department PD, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, Mo. 63166. Check his blog at: mobot.org/gardeninghelp/ hilight.asp

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS WEEK • Harvest vegetables promptly to keep plants productive. Production declines if fruit is allowed to become overripe before picking. • Continue sowing seeds of turnips, beets, leaf lettuce and other greens for the fall vegetable garden. • Spray tulip poplars and susceptible magnolias for scale crawlers now through September. Insecticidal soaps and superior oils are the least toxic spray choices. Repeat sprays following label interval instructions. • Make only spot treatments of lawn weeds now if fall seeding is planned. Wholesale applications of weed killers to the entire lawn will interfere with turf seed sprouting and growth for many weeks. • Water your garden this week if dry conditions continue. New plantings are especially vulnerable to moisture stress.

Self-inflicted disease has cure: Chill out MCCLELLAN • FROM B1

name-calling. Eventually, they start arguing with friends at parties. Make that, ex-friends. COD peaks during election seasons. So do yourself a favor. Disengage from political discourse for the next three months. If you are at all cynical about politics — and you should be — you are already resigned to voting for the lesser evil. For me, the last presidential election was a perfect example of that. I thought Hillary Clinton was corrupt. I thought Donald Trump was a demagogue. I opted for corruption over demagoguery. I have friends who went the other way. Maybe they thought the demagoguery was an act, and that Trump would change if he were elected. Maybe they think he did. I don’t know. I generally avoid political discussions. The point is, an engaged citizen — and you’re reading a newspaper so you qualify — has things figured out already. Donald Trump has been president for almost two years, and he dominated the news

the year before he was elected. He is not a mysterious figure. He is well-defined. You’re either for him and you want to keep Congress on his side, or you’re against him and you want a Congress that will oppose him. Or maybe you’re a single-issue voter. Again, you know how you’re going to vote. If your issue is climate change — that is, you think we can do something to stop it — you’re going to vote for the Democrats. If your issue is abortion — that is, you want to criminalize it — you’re going to vote for the Republicans. Why allow yourself to get all worked up over an election when you already know how you’re going to vote? To be clear about this, I am not suggesting you disengage from politics. If you want to give money to a candidate, do so. Knock on doors if you want. Just don’t listen to Rush or Rachel or their ilk. Their job is to raise your blood pressure. For your own sake, stay calm. And, of course, continue to read the newspaper. Local papers are a treasure. They can give you an

insight into your community. For instance, the Post-Dispatch’s Robert Patrick reported last month about St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden visiting the Clinton-Peabody public housing complex. The chief and some of his officers were trying to connect with the residents, the idea being, of course, that if people trust the police, the police can better serve them. “But the reception was mixed,” Patrick wrote. “Several men walked by singing an anti-police song. Three children rode around on Lime rental bikes that were playing a recording: ‘Please unlock me to ride me. Or I’ll call the police.’” What an eloquent way to describe the difficulties facing the police chief. Was he supposed to take the bikes away from the kids when he was there to make a connection with the residents? But what message does it send when he ignores the recording? And how sad is it that some kids don’t have bikes? These are things worth thinking about. As opposed to Stormy Daniels.

Not that she is not worth thinking about. It’s the nondisclosure agreement that is not worth thinking about. Why should we care if Trump had an affair with her and somebody paid her not to talk about it? I mean, really. To his credit, Trump has never pretended to be monogamous. His feelings toward women are well-documented. In fact, he doesn’t hide his feelings at all. Two years into his presidency, we know how he feels about almost everybody — journalists, Mexicans, Russians, white supremacists, Canadians, his own attorney general. He is nothing if not forthright. By now, you should have your mind made up about him. So chill out. For the next three months, stay away from cable news shows. Listen to golden oldies on the radio. Steer clear of social media. Continue to read the newspaper, but try to focus on local stories. Remember, COD is a selfinflicted disease. Bill McClellan • 314-340-8143 @Bill_McClellan on Twitter bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com

TO BE CLEAR ABOUT THIS, I AM NOT SUGGESTING YOU DISENGAGE FROM POLITICS. IF YOU WANT TO GIVE MONEY TO A CANDIDATE, DO SO. KNOCK ON DOORS IF YOU WANT. JUST DON’T LISTEN TO RUSH OR RACHEL OR THEIR ILK. THEIR JOB IS TO RAISE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE. FOR YOUR OWN SAKE, STAY CALM.

Was T-shirt a sign of parental enabling? SULTAN • FROM B1

said. I pointed out that she had money saved from baby-sitting jobs, and it was worth it to splurge on a memento that would remind her of a delicious highlight of the trip. I mean, I wasn’t going to pay for it, but she should. She did really like the shirt, so she shelled out the money. An undercurrent of tension had been building on the trip over maternal expectations and the inevitable teenage daughter resistance to them. Typical things like her looking at the phone when I felt she should have been more engaged with us. When it was time to pack up our stuff and move on to the next leg of our trip, I told both kids to make sure they had all of their things. So, of course, at our next stop the girl said she couldn’t find her new shirt. I advised her to look through the dirty laundry bag, which I saw her rummage through. I felt like I was being blamed for the misplaced item, and she snapped at me when I asked a question about the upcoming school year. It escalated from there. I yelled; she cried. We eventually talked it out, but it kind of ruined the morning. Before we headed out for the day’s activities, I went online and found a similar shirt and decided to order it and surprise her at home. Our family met up with friends we were traveling with and on the bus ride to one of the Niagara Falls attractions, I confided in my friend about the scene that morning. As a good friend ought to do,

Two shirts: One was bought on a trip to Canada, and the other inspired by it.

she called out the exact doubt that had been niggling at me. Was it wise to replace an item lost to a child’s carelessness? “Would your parents have replaced the shirt for you?” she asked. “No way,” I said. In fact, my own mother would have considered a $25 T-shirt a big waste of money. Are we enabling our children when we bail them out like this? Shouldn’t they suffer the consequences of their mistakes so they are more careful next time? She wasn’t judging me and confessed that she had done similar things for her own children, but it was worth thinking about what is driving us to diverge from our own upbringing in this way. I had rationalized the purchase by reminding myself that I had pushed her to buy it. Her antimaterialistic, anti-consumption nature can seem a bit alien to me

considering I have to actively fight the urge to buy things that are clearly not necessities. The fight about the shirt had escalated as these trivial things often do when they become an indictment against which one must defend oneself. Parenting is actually a series of these little moments. A harsh exchange that is really about a million other things than the argument at hand. Making things personal that aren’t. And then trying to make up for falling short of our best selves. Replacing the lost shirt was a peace offering. It was also a way of granting her forgiveness that I can’t give myself. I relate too closely to misplacing things. In the space of a week, I had left my FitBit in the gym shower (it was never returned), a favorite pair of wedges in a hotel room (lost

forever) and a new book I was reading somewhere in transit. This sort of absent-mindedness has haunted me since I was a child. It makes me feel guilty and mad at myself. So much so that I often refuse to replace the lost items as a self-inflicted form of punishment. It feels so wasteful, which growing up was one of the worst possible sins in our home. When I see my daughter lose track of her things, I worry that I’ve passed on this defective gene. I asked my husband later if he would have bought another shirt for her. (His parents would have reacted the same as mine.) “Yes, probably,” he said. “But you would have gotten mad at me for doing it, so I would have done it secretly.” That sounded uncomfortably true. My daughter overheard me talking to my friend. “Wait. What did you do?” she asked. “I found the shirt online, and I ordered a new one for you,” I said, expecting a warm hug. “Why did you do that?!” she said. “I found the shirt in the dirty laundry bag this morning!” “Oh my God, why didn’t you tell me?” I asked. “I thought you were already so mad at me.” I had told her several times to check the dirty laundry bag. Then, she did hug me. I guess we’ll have matching poutine shirts, I said. Aisha Sultan • 314-340-8300 Home and family editor @aishas on Twitter asultan@post-dispatch.com


HOME

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • B3

PHOTOS BY TIM VIZER

The open-concept design takes its cues from a Missouri dairy barn in the home of Steve and Jennifer Schatz of rural Pacific. After cutting down the trees on the lot, Steve repurposed the lumber to make storage and a custom gallery-style dining room table that runs parallel to the back of the couch.

AT HOME WITH STEVE AND JENNIFER SCHATZ

BARN IT, IT’S THE TIMBER THAT SETS HOME APART

Concrete steps lead to the entrance of the home of Steve and Jennifer Schatz of rural Pacific.

BY EMMA BAKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Tucked away down a winding road at the unincorporated crossroads of Eureka and Pacific, there is a blue barn-style home dwarfed by towering oaks. Its distinctive façade invites passers-by to stop and ask, “Who built a timber frame in Missouri?” “You would not believe the amount of people that go by here and stop and talk to us,” owner and builder Steve Schatz says. “My last house was a pretty nice house, but this simple little house gets more people coming by and saying, ‘Can we come take a look inside?’” This is the second home the Schatz family built, but it is the first project where Steve, who owns an industrial inspection company, served as the general contractor on the four-acre lot. “We said that if we were ever going to build again we wanted an open-concept living,” Steve says. “We wanted something different.” Timber-frame homes are unique in their integrity because the entire frame is supported by wooden pegs and chisels. “We modeled this house after a Missouri dairy barn,” Steve says. “We spent a lot of time searching the internet and looking at different things, and it (had) a really simple shape.” Upon entering, the lofty

STEVE AND JENNIFER SCHATZ

A pool table is featured in the loft area of the Schatz home. The space also included a video game machine and chairs for an entertainment area. Two bedrooms and a bathroom sit opposite the space.

Home • Pacific Ages • Steve is 48; Jennifer is 45. Family • Children Maddy, 20, Charlie, 17, and Ethan, 15 Occupations • Steve owns CIS, an industrial inspection company, and Jennifer owns Vision Title, a land titling company.

ceilings create a sense of airiness that is complemented by the bright timber tones. Above the front door frame, a carved “2018” christens the home’s construction year. They just moved in in June. “I feel pretty accomplished after four and a half months,” Steve says. “But, tired.”

St.Louis Antique Festival 80 Quality Dealers from 32 States St. Louis Area’s Largest Indoor 30,000sf Antique Show/Event! BELLE CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS 200 SOUTH BELT EAST, BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS CLIMATE CONTROLLED BUILDING , FREE AND CLOSE PARKING

$1 OFF $6 ADMISSION FOR EACH PERSON IN YOUR GROUP WITH THIS COUPON. GOOD FOR 2018 SPRING & FALL FESTIVALS

The kitchen adjoins the open living area on the main floor of the Schatz home. The huge island has a microwave and conventional ovens built in. Instead of using traditional countertop materials, the Schatzes continued the bronze hues from the copper kitchen sink and backsplash with a shiny sheet of copper.

PRESENTING OUTSTANDING DEALERS SELLING DRESDEN, MEISSEN, SEVRES, PORCELAIN, JEWELRY, NIPPON, ORIENTALIA, ART GLASS, POTTERY, BRONZES, ART DECO & NOUVEAU, PAINTINGS, FURNITURE, SILVER, CHINA, COUNTRY, QUILTS, LIGHTING, GLASS, CLOCKS, PHOTOGRAPHS, CIVIL WAR AND OTHER MILITARY, COINS, DOLLS, TOYS, SPORTS, ADVERTISING, COIN OP, PAPER, PRIMATIVES, STATUARY, PRINTS, COLLECTIBLES, ART POTTERY, MAJOLICA, and MUCH MORE!

5 Year Workmanship Guarantee Quality Craftsmanship • Refinishing • Reupholstery Antique Restoration • Repair • Custom Made Draperies Custom Made Furniture

314-832-1555 Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm Appointments & Service Available • 24 Hrs. A Day, 7 Days A Week

SATURDAY, SEPT 1, 10 AM – 5 PM SUNDAY, SEPT 2, 10 AM – 4 PM

50th SHOW SPRING 2019 SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 10 AM – 5 PM SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 10 AM – 4 PM 608-346-3797 / HIPPIWIGAL@YAHOO.COM

603 TIGGER CT. MILTON, WI 53563

Emma Baker • 314-340-8101 @ems_lorraine on Twitter ebaker@post-dispatch.com

FURNITURE REPAIRED FURNITURE REFINISHED

49th SHOW FALL 2018

INFORMATION: DORRIE MAWHINNEY

The dominating feature separating the living spaces from the kitchen is an island, measuring at 6 feet by 10 feet, that the Schatzes affectionately refer to as their “continent” because of its immense size. “We built this (island) because we have such an open floor plan,” Steve says. “It’s kind of a separation between the two (spaces) and works as a great storage.” The natural light, which saturates the entire open space, continues into the back of the house to the master bedroom. “We’ve lived in a lot of different styles of homes over the years, but we’ve never had a real open concept,” Steve says. “I just like the openness and brightness of all the windows and being able to see outside.” Above, a lofted space looks onto the main level. There, the Schatzes’ two teenage sons have separate bedrooms and share a cabin-inspired bathroom complete with a crescent moon burned on the door. “We took scale drawings of the furniture we had, made sure it fit in the room, and that’s how we designed the house,” Steve says. “This is plenty big for us.” On the lower level is the threecar garage where Steve’s collection of license plates are on display. Adjacent to the garage is the fourth bedroom, for their older daughter. To make an accent wall for the space, they used the shou sugi ban technique — an old Japanese practice of charring wood until it’s a burnt black color. “When we were building a barn-looking home, we started editing ourselves pretty aggressively,” Steve says. “I think by adding too much of a barn theme when you’re already living in a barn would be a bit much.” Steve thinks that while timber frames might be more common in states like Colorado, there is a growing movement across the United States to living smaller. “Most of our neighbors drive by and say, ‘You’ve got the little barn,’” Steve says. “And I’m like, ‘Yeah,’ but they’ve never seen the inside.”

Since 1893

www.zollingerfurniture.com

4821 Fairview Ave., St. Louis, MO 63116


STL LIFE

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Costa Rica trip offers many firsts for area students COSTA RICA • FROM B1

started the project with 10 students. Now, it claims more than 80 alumni. This spring, about 30 students from Vashon, Gateway STEM, Carnahan and Central Visual and Performing Arts high schools completed a nine-day trip after raising $50,000. Lurie, who began teaching at Vashon in 2008 with Teach for America, organized the Costa Rica trips after some of her students visited Clayton High School as part of a school swap. One of her students saw a flyer advertising an international trip. The student asked Lurie: Why didn’t their school offer a trip like that? Many of the families whose children attend schools taking part in the Costa Rica project can’t afford trips for their children, said Ana Barrios, a math teacher at Gateway STEM who went on this year’s trip. Accomplishing something as big as a nine-day trip to Costa Rica, without endorsement or funding from their schools, proves that students from schools like Vashon can accomplish big things, students say. “For my kids, it’s more about proving to themselves — and I think to other people who have let them down — that they can do this,” Barrios said. The Costa Rica project represents a lot of firsts for students. For many, the trip is their first flight.

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Area students preparing for a Costa Rica trip practice kicks during a swimming lesson at Vashon High School on March 6. Each year, participating students raise tens of thousands of dollars to fund the culture and biology trip.

For some, it’s the first time learning to swim or the first time applying for a passport. For some, it’s the first time seeing nature outside of St. Louis. But much of the growing happens before they board the plane to Costa Rica. Over the course of the school year, students sold coffee at farmers markets

“STATISTICS SAY THAT I AM FIVE TIMES MORE LIKELY TO BE INCARCERATED, LIKE MY FATHER, BUT THIS IS WHY I WANT TO GO ON THE COSTA RICA TRIP. I BELIEVE THAT IT WILL BROADEN MY HORIZONS AND MAKE ME WANT TO BUILD A BETTER LIFE.” RON FRACTION

on weekend mornings — a daunting task to learn how to approach and do

business with strangers. They also had to muster courage to give speeches

to crowds at donor events, asking them to help fund the Costa Rica project. The speeches often detailed tribulations the students have endured. “Statistics say that I am five times more likely to be incarcerated, like my father, but this is why I want to go on the Costa Rica trip,” Ron said in his

speech. “I believe that it will broaden my horizons and make me want to build a better life.” Now that he is back, Ron said the project has helped him to “break out of his shell.” “Because of this opportunity, I know that I will not be a statistic,” he said. “I will not be basic.”

PHOTO BY SAMANTHA LURIE

Janya Harris, a student at Central Visual and Performing Arts, holds a chicken during an ecological-farm tour at Equus Farm in Monteverde, Costa Rica, where students learned about sustainable ways to produce food.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Rachel Becknell (third from right), a doctoral student studying ecology at Washington University and a member of the Young Scientists Program, works with St. Louis high school students inside the Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden on April 21.

Chippendale Wing Leather Recliner starting at $1498

Buying American Never Felt So Good. PHOTO BY AUSTIN STEELE

Teachers and students from Central and Visual Performing Arts High School sell coffee and other goods at the Tower Grove Farmers Market in St. Louis in March as part of a fundraiser for their Costa Rica trip.

Mon-Th: 10am-6:30pm Fri,Sat: 10am-5:30pm

call 636 394 3005

15424 MANCHESTER RD, ELLISVILLE 63011

daufurniture.com

Had it with dentures? Dental implants are more affordable than ever. Left: upper denture Right: upper implant

Starting at $17,500 Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BAKER JR.

Na’Theori Coleman from Gateway STEM High, Antonette Sutton from Vashon High, and Raikelle Smith from Central Visual and Performing Arts engage in a game of futbol (soccer) with Costa Rican students after spending time learning about their school and the education system in Costa Rica.

$

1

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service.

Call Now Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office (314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office (636) 200-2664


STL LIFE

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

MAGINATING: A MAKE BELIEVE COMPANY Artist • Brad Woods Home • Kirkwood Family • Married What he makes • Greeting cards and art prints suitable for framing Where to buy • Woods sells his greeting cards at City Sprouts, Left Bank Books and Urban Matter. His work may be purchased at local craft shows and online at his website, maginating.com. How much • Greeting cards, $4 each; 8-inch-by-10-inch art prints, $15; 11-inch-by-14-inch art prints, $20.

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

MADE IN ST. LOUIS

ARTIST NOT AFRAID TO ‘MAGINATE’ A FUTURE BY PAT EBY Special to the Post-dispatch

A

rtist, animator and greeting card designer Brad Woods has spent a lifetime “maginating,” sketching the world with pencil in hand from his earliest years when he first coined the word. Today, he markets his greeting cards and art under the name Maginating: A Make Believe Company. It’s a real company celebrating all that is wonderful about make-believe. His whimsical cards illustrate the worlds of urbane, witty animals, of orbiting stars and moons, of robust robots and bitty birds. A world where vegetables speak and fruits whoop it up with friends on special occasions in designs simple, clear and compelling. He’s an accomplished illustrator, a master punster and a clever wordsmith. His early work in computer animation at George Lucas’ Industrial Light and Magic — layered, complex and technically challenging — contrasts markedly with the spare designs he creates today.

Letter perfect • Woods discovered the world of highend wedding and baby announcements when he accompanied his sister to a letterpress company after a casual lunch. “I didn’t know about letterpress at the time,” Woods says. “I bought my first press from Bob Paduano, who was known in Los Angeles as Mr. Letterpress. I moved it into the garage, and Bob’s your uncle — that’s how Maginating started. I taught myself to use it,” he says.

Greeting happiness • He used the press to explore an old hobby. “I’ve been making my own cards forever. I’d always loved them. I found a box of them that I’d made growing up at my parents’ house. They kept them all those years,” he says. “With the letterpress, I got into greeting cards.” His designs garnered praise and awards from the beginning. Woods is the recipient of seven LOUIE awards from the American Greeting Card Association, a high honor. Today, some of Woods’ cards are printed using a letterpress; others are done in indigo printing, a high-end method he

favors. He sells his cards through a team of sales reps who have placed them in high-end paper and card shops all across the country. On the move • Woods moved from Los Angeles to St. Louis when his wife accepted a job here. They settled in Kirkwood. “When you make the right move you know it’s right when it blesses everybody,” he says. “The move here blessed me and my business.” The old house Woods and his wife purchased allowed him to explore more of his talents, renovating and transforming a long-term rental

property into a comfortable home. More cute than cool • “I’m more on the cute side than the cool side. At art shows, people comment on the cleanness of the designs and wittiness of the sentiments,” he says. “That’s new for me. I’ve gotten to interact with customers here and to be part of my community at the Kirkwood Greentree Festival,” he says. “I think people respond well to greeting cards. I remember when my friends and I would go to the Hallmark store to shop for cards. It was an outing in itself. We’d end up laughing out loud, showing cards to each other. That’s what I like about shows.” A wink and a nod to midcentury masters • Woods’ simple designs, his informed use of color and the kinetic energy in his illustrations reflect designers he admires in midcentury American Modernist movement — in the shape and form of George Nelson’s furniture for Herman Miller, in the movement and materials Charles and Ray Eames created, and in the color playfulness of Alexander Girard exhibits. At the heart of things • “A greeting card is significantly more meaningful than a text or an email. A special envelope shows up in the mailbox, and it’s got heft. Maybe it’s a color, like blue. It’s hand-addressed. You know it isn’t a bill,” he says. “Greeting cards are a medium where people can say ‘I love you’ or ‘great job.’ Someone picked out that card for you. You can hold it in your hand. That’s powerful.” Up close and personal • Woods is showing at three art fairs in the St. Louis area in August and September. Visit his Maginating booth at the Festival of the Little Hills in St. Charles Aug. 17-19. He will be at the Greentree Festival in Kirkwood Sept. 15-16. Look for his booth at Strange Folk, the Wonderlove Festival, in Carondelet Park Sept. 28-30.


ARTS

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B6

Gesher Music Festival offers music of Tin Pan Alley, lost voices GESHER MUSIC FESTIVAL

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER St. Louis Post-dispatch

The Gesher Music Festival returns this week for its eighth annual season with a theme of “Voices Rising.” Gesher means “bridge” in Hebrew; the chamber music festival’s programs explore themes related to, or influenced by, the Jewish experience. This year, artistic director Sara Sitzer and her colleagues look at music of Tin Pan Alley, protest and underrepresented composers. On Thursday evening, the Gesher will again partner with the Missouri History Museum for a free program, this time dedicated to the music and influences of Tin Pan Alley and

When and where • 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Boulevard; 7:30 p.m. Saturday at 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue, University City; 3 p.m. Sunday at JCC Wool Studio Theater, 2 Millstone Campus Drive How much • Free-$20 More info • 314-442-3283; geshermusicfestival.org

Sara Sitzer

its mostly Jewish composers. Harold Arlen and Irving Berlin influenced the music of Gershwin and classical composers like Debussy and Ravel, making American jazz a part of the world’s musical vocabulary. The program includes music by Gershwin, Scott Joplin, Frank Loesser, Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein and others. On Saturday evening at the 560 Music Center, “Rise Up:

Sounds of Protest” will feature works including Ilse Weber’s “Lullaby,” composed in a concentration camp; Frederic Rzewski’s “Mayn Yingele,” and the 1960 String Quartet No. 8 by Dmitri Shostakovich. Finally, on Sunday afternoon at the JCC Wool Studio Theater, the musicians will explore music by what Sitzer calls “underrepresented composers,” including women, African-Americans

and members of the LGBT community, and “those whose voices have been lost,” such as Holocaust victims. There’s a local premiere by St. Louis-based composer L.J. White, “Negro Folksongs in Counterpoint” by African-American composer Florence Price (1887-1953) and a suite from the film “The Golem,” by Betty Olivero. Along with Sitzer, a cellist, the musicians taking part in the Gesher are soprano Lucy Dhegrae, violinists J Freivogel and Cristina Buciu, violist Dominic Johnson, clarinetist Dana Hotle and pianist Daniel Pesca. Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 Classical music critic @sbmillermusic on Twitter sbmiller@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS CONNECTIONS AT SANTA FE OPERA Ryan McKinney and Julia Bullock, a St. Louis native, in Santa Fe Opera’s production of “doctor atomic,” one of five operas in the company’s 2018 season. Read classical music critic Sarah Bryan Miller’s complete look at the season, which runs through aug. 25, at stltoday.com/cultureclub.

KEN HOWARD

Union Avenue Opera looks at fathers, sons in ‘Lost in the Stars’ BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER St. Louis Post-dispatch

Union Avenue Opera has become more adventurous in its programming in recent years. To conclude the 2018 season, the company will present Kurt Weill’s rarely produced “Lost in the Stars.” Based on Alan Paton’s 1948 novel “Cry, the Beloved Country,” “Lost” was Weill’s final stage composition before his death in 1950. With a book by Maxwell Anderson, it tells the story of the Rev. Stephen Kumalo, a black Anglican priest, and his son, Absalom, in the South Africa of the apartheid era. Absalom takes part in a robbery with two friends that results in the death of a white man, Arthur Jarvis, a friend of Stephen’s. Absalom confesses and is sentenced to hang, while his friends lie about their involvement and get off. At the end, Stephen is reconciled with Arthur’s father, who realizes that they have both lost sons. The music reflects everything from African melodies to Anglican church music; there are also aspects of jazz and the blues. As a whole, “Lost” lands somewhere between opera and Broadway. UAO received the support, both financial and artistic, of the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, which gave $25,000 toward the production and sent trustee Tazewell Thompson to serve as a mentor and guide to director Shaun Patrick Tubbs. Thompson has directed three different productions of “Lost,”

in Capetown, at Glimmerglass and at Washington National Opera. “It’s a show that’s not always performed,” he says. He’s become an expert on “Lost,” having studied the extensive archives at the Weill Foundation, including the original script, “the notes, the cuts, the reasons for cutting. It was quite an awakening. I’m vastly interested in helping to lend my support and my knowledge of this great opera.” He’s impressed by what Tubbs, conductor Scott Schoonover and the large cast have achieved in a short time. “There’s very good talent involved,” he says. The cast includes Kenneth Overton as Stephen Kumalo, Tim Schall as James Jarvis, Melody Wilson as Linda and Myke Andrews as Absalom. “The crux of the show is a story of fathers and sons,” Tubbs says. “It’s about the lessons we give and the lessons we don’t give and where the responsibility lies. You have two fathers who both experience loss, who both find themselves lost in a world of racism, in a world that separates them. One, literally, lives at the top of a hill, while the other lives at the bottom. There’s this chasm between them, and it takes the loss of their sons to bring them together.” Tubbs, an actor as well as director who’s worked at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, describes “Lost” as “literally and figuratively black and white. But where the story exists is really in the gray area in

JOHN LAMB

Kenneth Overton as the Rev. Stephen Kumalo in “Lost in the Stars.”

UNION AVENUE OPERA: ‘LOST IN THE STARS’ When • 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Aug. 24 and 25; preview lectures at 7 p.m. Fridays Where • Union Avenue Christian Church, 733 North Union Boulevard How much • $32-$55 More info • 314-361-2881; unionavenueopera.org

between, where they try to find each other, where they have to see beyond their own situation, and they have to see over to the other side.” It is, he observes, “an unusual piece. It is for all intents and purposes an opera. We often think of an opera as sung from beginning to end; there’s so much dialogue in (‘Lost’) that it feels more like a musical. Kurt Weill was known for that, as, really, the father of American musicals. He uses the music to enhance the words and the dialogue in a way that traditional musicals don’t do.” In Weill’s works, he says, “it

feels like it’s growing out of the need to find a better way to express themselves that the words can’t do in those moments. I wish more musicals interwove the music so cleanly as this one does.” But he’s not worried about categories. “My hope is that we don’t separate art forms,” he says. “As a young black man in Cleveland, Ohio, opera wasn’t supposed to be part of my world. But it’s for everyone. I hope people get the story.” Tubbs is using an almost bare stage, focusing on the people involved. “I don’t just want bodies onstage; I want experiences

onstage,” he says. “Throughout this entire piece, each person will be sharing their experience of this journey, of this time period of apartheid, with the audience. “Too often, we’re afraid of presenting these themes, these harsh realities of race and social class structure that are consistent in all of our history. I want to make sure that that’s the only thing that we can look at on the stage, the only thing that we can focus on the stage. We create everything around us, every circumstance.” That’s true for the two fathers in “Lost.” “They’re really good fathers, they both have taught all of these lessons to their children and they’ve taught them the best way they know how but given them no application of how to use those lessons,” Tubbs says. “It’s like I explain to you how to garden, but I’ve never taken you out and taught you how to make a meal from it. They have to realize where their responsibility lies.” The story remains relevant today, in the United States. “What I try to convey in this piece is that it’s a constant cycle, learning and teaching lessons. It’s always relevant because it’s always important. I hope people leave with the idea that this isn’t just something that happened in the past; this is something that we continually deal with every day. “The show ends not where everything is resolved, or fixed, because it’s like life: It’s what you do with it now. There’s a hope that there’s another possibility, that there’s another chance for both of them. Now what do they do with what they learned? Are they able to teach the lessons better? Are they able to protect the next generation with this new message?” Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 Classical music critic @sbmillermusic on Twitter sbmiller@post-dispatch.com


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

In #MeToo era, support for R. Kelly is eroding KELLY • FROM B1

As a fan, I discovered Kelly when the Chicago native fronted the group Public Announcement in the early 1990s. I practically wore out my copies of his solo albums including “12 Play” (1993), “R. Kelly” (1995) and “TP-2.com” (2000). As a critic, I’ve reviewed Kelly’s concerts for the past 20-plus years, including the 2004 “Best of Both Worlds” show with Jay-Z at Savvis Center (now Enterprise Center) where Kelly stormed off the stage. Most recently, I reviewed his 2016 show at the Family Arena in St. Charles. At the time, evidenced by a column I wrote before the show, I wasn’t ready to dismiss him. But now I see no reason to attend or review again; this could be

R. KELLY When • 8 p.m. Friday Where • Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles How much • $48-$98 More info • 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

the last time I write about Kelly, barring special circumstances. Supporting the 51-yearold performer at this point, particularly in the #MeToo age of heightened awareness of sexual misconduct, feels gross. My respect and admiration for black women and black girls is a bigger priority for me than hearing “Happy People,” “Fiesta” and “I Believe I Can Fly” again. Malcolm X once famously said the most disrespected, neglected and unprotected person in America is the black

ARTS woman. Beyoncé reiterated that in April at Coachella. Of course, choosing black women over Kelly is a given, right? Maybe it’s not for everyone. For me, the choice is easy.

PLENTY OF ALLEGATIONS Let’s be clear: Kelly has not been convicted of a crime. But sexual allegations against him are as old as “Bump n Grind,” starting with his 1994 marriage to a 15-year-old Aaliyah and continuing today. We’ve seen the sex tape involving a teenage girl and what unmistakably looks like Kelly. In 2008, he was acquitted of child pornography charges stemming from that tape; he’s coasted on that victory for a while. And there are plenty of new allegations, including the claim that he’s running an abusive sex cult, holding women against their will. A new BBC documentary, “R. Kelly: Sex, Girls &

Videotapes,” alleges Kelly groomed a 14-year-old girl to be his sex pet. Police in Dallas are investigating a woman’s allegations that Kelly “knowingly and intentionally” gave her a sexually transmitted disease. His ex-wife Andrea Kelly has stepped forward alleging years of abuse. And his assistant, publicist and attorney all have run for the hills. A statement issued by Kelly’s camp denies the various claims: “Mr. Robert Kelly is both alarmed and disturbed at the recent revelations attributed to him. Mr. Kelly unequivocally denies such allegations and will work diligently and forcibly to pursue his accusers and clear his name.” Kelly’s first step in that direction was a mess: “I Admit,” a new song that’s a 19-minute, stream-ofconsciousness exercise in teasing and trolling. In it, he responds to the things people have said about him and asks “how they gon’ say I don’t respect these women when all I’ve done is represent?” Some of the lyrics: I admit I (had sex with) all the ladies (ladies). That’s both older and young ladies (yeah). But tell me how they call it pedophile because of that. (Expletive), that’s crazy (crazy). You may have your opinions (opinions) Entitled to your opinions (opinions). But really, am I supposed to go to jail or lose my career because of your opinion? Then there’s the chorus: I admit it, admit it (I admit it) I admit it, I did it (I did it, yeah) I admit it, I did (I) I admit it, I did, did it To that I say: I’m tired of it, tired of it, tired of it (tired). Did I just write a song? Here’s what exhausts

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

me, and it once was my position: the argument that his personal life has nothing to do with his art. But it’s tough to apply that reasoning to Kelly’s situation. There’s no separating the man from the music. The man is the music. They were one and the same as far back as when Kelly wrote and produced a song called “Age Ain’t Nothing But a Number” while married to an underage girl, and they’re the same now with “I Admit.” I’m tired of hearing that attempts to take down Kelly are part of a larger strategy to bring down black men in America, as some have said about Bill Cosby. We know what’s happening to black men in America, and this ain’t that. I’m tired of hearing about what a genius Kelly is, or how entertaining he is in concert. Yes, his list of hits is long, and he has one of the most extensive libraries in modern R&B. He’s talented, for sure. He has produced for Michael Jackson, Janet Jackson, Celine Dion, Toni Braxton, Whitney Houston, the Isley Brothers and Britney Spears. But what does any of that have to do with this? And I’m most tired of folks placing the blame on the women. Some say those in the alleged cult are of age, that they want to be there and they are free to leave when they want. Others say the underage girls, such as the girl in the explicit video, were promiscuous. That’s an ugly thing to suggest. Shame on Chante Moore and Syleena Johnson, who both had hits with Kelly, for furthering some of that.

BACK TO FAMILY ARENA Regardless of your opinions about Kelly, he returns to the Family Arena on Friday with his “The Memory

Lane” tour. (The line forms here for jokes about Kelly performing at a venue named the Family Arena.) It’s likely the arena was the only size-appropriate venue that would have Kelly. Two years ago, he had been booked at Chaifetz Arena, but venue officials aborted, and the show moved to Family Arena. Several months ago, a promoter not affiliated with the Family Arena asked if I thought Kelly would make for a good booking in St. Louis. I told him he didn’t want those problems; the show wasn’t booked. Months later, when the Family Arena announced Friday’s show amid a flurry of bad Kelly publicity, it felt like a shock. The show is presented by Ideal Barbershop & Five Star Empire, which didn’t respond to my request for a comment. Reaction to the booking was swift, and complaints have been made to the venue. A growing social media movement aimed to cancel the show, and an unspecified action in opposition to the concert is planned. The Family Arena, for its part, issued this statement: “The Family Arena is being leased to a thirdparty promoter for this concert, meaning the promoter pays all expenses for rental, set up and staffing. Before we agree to a contract, in accordance with our policy, we evaluate each act based on the appropriateness of lyrics and stage performance. We understand concerns arise about certain performers, but our policy does not including evaluating acts on allegations related to their personal lives.” Duly noted; I’m good. Y’all can go “Step in the Name of Love” if you want, but I’m shutting off the “Ignition.” Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

(618) 206-5697 | (314) 236-3348


ARTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FAUSTival set to explore culturally timely themes

THEATER REVIEW

‘THE LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA’

‘Light in the Piazza’ is engaging fairy tale fit for grown-ups

When • 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 7 p.m. Sunday, through Aug. 26 Where • The Marcelle, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive How much • $20-$25 More info • 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTO BY JASON HACKETT

From left: Miranda Jagels Félix, Dustin Sholtes, Joe Taylor, Jacob Stern, Alicen Moser, Gabe Taylor, Grace Langford, Will Bonfiglio and Erica Withrow in ERA’s “Faust (go down with all the re$t).”

BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The myth of Faust, who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge, power and success, has inspired numerous artistic works. And now it’s the theme of a St. Louis theater festival. FAUSTival is a collaboration of five theater companies: Equally Represented Arts (ERA), the Midnight Company, Theatre Nuevo, SATE (Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble) and the Post Romantics. Each of them is taking on the Faust story. The first offering, ERA’s “Faust (go down with all the re$t),” runs through Aug. 18, to be followed by an adaptation by a different company each month through December. The Faust myth has inspired writers — and playwrights in particular — since the 15th century, says Lucy Cashion, artistic director of ERA. “Christopher Marlowe’s version is pretty well-known, and Goethe’s version is also very wellknown,” she says. “And Gertrude Stein has a version. It’s a story about people dealing with unchecked power, and making bargains, and about moral corruption. It seems pretty timely.” Accordingly, the ERA take on Faust — which features the band Kid Scientist — is described as “a capitalist tragedy with music.” “To me, the world’s problems right now — at least, America’s problems — come from capitalism and our obsession with money,” Cashion says. “So in our version, heaven is the bank, and God is the CEO of the bank. And Earth is plagued by game shows, winning prizes for money and timeshare salesmen. It’s very farcical — a satire, really.”

In that regard, the Post Romantics’ “Doomsday Faust” directly addresses the current occupant of the Oval Office. “Basically, our idea is that Donald Trump is Faust,” says producer Jimmy Bernatowicz. Faust’s antagonist, the devilish Mephisto, takes the form of Russian president Vladimir Putin. The play chronicles “the journey of Faust being corrupted and being dragged off to hell. But I guess in this case, it would be jail, maybe.” Although the FAUSTival offerings are thematically similar, each stands on its own, says Ellen Schwetye, managing director of SATE. “There’s no collective story that ties all five together, other than this character of Faust,” she says. “But obviously, we encourage everybody to try and catch all five shows because of the different perspectives that are brought to the story.” Often, all of the plays in a festival are presented during the same week, or even on the same day. But that wasn’t a viable option for FAUSTival, Schwetye says. “Different companies were ready to produce at different times,” she says. “And we didn’t want to have too much competition among each other. And outside of the FAUSTival, there’s lots happening all the time. We didn’t want to have these five shows competing with other companies. So we decided to stretch it out.” Although FAUSTival aims to entertain, it also reflects the present American moment. “It’s very difficult right now to produce work that isn’t political,” Cashion says. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

FAUSTIVAL Equally Represented Arts “Faust (go down with all the re$t)” featuring Kid Scientist • When 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Aug. 18 • Where Foam, 3359 South Jefferson Avenue • How much $10 • More info eratheatre.org The Midnight Company “An Apology for the Course and Outcome of Certain Events Delivered by Doctor John Faustus on This His Final Evening” and “The Hunchback Variations,” both by Mickle Maher • When Sept. 20-29 • Where The Monocle, 4510 Manchester Avenue • How much $15 • More info brownpapertickets.com

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Girl meets boy, and they fall in love, but their future is in doubt. That’s because of a secret that the girl’s mother fiercely protects. And it all plays out during a sun-burnished Italian summer in the 1950s. The very simplicity of “The Light in the Piazza” is among its strengths. Directed by Christina Rios and presented by R-S Theatrics, it’s a dream of a musical and something of a fairy tale for grown-ups — engagingly romantic and vividly realized. With a book by Craig Lucas (“Prelude to a Kiss”) and music and lyrics by Adam Guettel (“Floyd Collins”), based on a novella by Elizabeth Spencer, it’s a musical that takes its inspiration not from pop tunes but from classical musical and

opera, conjuring an emotional magic that’s nothing short of exhilarating. Margaret Johnson (Kay Love) and her daughter, Clara (Macia Noorman), are on holiday in Florence, where they encounter an effusively friendly young man named Fabrizio Naccarelli (Tiélere Cheatem). The spark between Clara and Fabrizio could start a fire, but Margaret discourages their romance. What she doesn’t count on is Fabrizio’s persistence. It’s not long before the conversation turns to marriage. But Margaret can’t accept the possibility. The Broadway production of “The Light in the Piazza” opened at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theater in 2005 and ran for more than 500 performances. That stage was significantly larger than the Marcelle’s, but Rios makes imaginative use

SATE “Doctor Faustus, or the Modern Prometheus” by John Wolbers and Kit Marlowe • When Oct. 31-Nov. 17 • Where The Chapel, 6238 Alexander Drive • How much $15-$20 • More info brownpapertickets.com Post-Romantics “Doomsday Faust” by Jimmy Bernatowicz • When Dec. 5-8 • Where Centene Center for the Arts, 3547 Olive Street • How much Price to be announced • Five-play passes are $50 and may be purchased at brownpapertickets.com. Find more information at faustival.org.

Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

Elvis Week celebration will feature appearance by Lisa Marie Presley ASSOCIATED PRESS

Theatre Nuevo “whither should I fly” co-devised by Gabe Taylor • When Oct. 25-Nov. 10 • Where William A. Kerr Foundation, 21 O’Fallon Street • How much Price to be announced

of the space — such as a sequence in which Clara’s windblown hat is handed off from actor to actor, only to make its way to Fabrizio. Love turns in a nuanced performance as a woman struggling to do the right thing. Noorman brings to Clara a poignant vulnerability. And Cheatem is perfect as the moonstruck Fabrizio. Highlights of the rapturous score include the title tune, which serves as Clara’s musical declaration of independence, “Dividing Day,” in which Margaret laments that the fire has gone out of her marriage, and “Say It Somehow,” a lovely duet between Clara and Fabrizio. This show will leave you breathless.

MEMPHIS, TENN. • An

exhibit centered on the career of Lisa Marie Presley, and a launch party marking the release of an album of gospel songs by her late father, Elvis Presley, are among the highlights of this year’s Elvis Week in Memphis, Tenn. Elvis Presley died on Aug. 16, 1977, in Memphis — 41 years ago. Since then, fans have been making a pilgrimage to Graceland to celebrate the King of Rock ’n’ Roll’s life, movies and music. Elvis Week, which began Thursday, will feature the usual mainstays, including performances by tribute artists, a memorabilia auction and the candlelight vigil that begins the night before his death anniversary and continues until the next day. Elvis Week will also include the “Lisa Marie: Growing Up Presley” exhibit, which explores

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This 1972 file photo shows Elvis Presley, the King of Rock ’n’ Roll, during a performance.

her childhood and career. She also is scheduled to appear at Saturday’s launch event for the release of “Elvis Presley — Where No One Stands Alone.” The album from RCA/ Legacy Recordings

features 14 performances of gospel songs, including a duet with Lisa Marie singing along with her father on the title track. Other songs on the album feature prominent vocalists who backed Elvis, including Darlene Love, Cissy Houston, and members of The Imperials and The Stamps Quartet. Love will perform a concert Monday on the Graceland Soundstage, in her first-ever appearance at Elvis Week. Love was lead singer for The Blossoms, who sang with Elvis Presley in the televised 1968 “Comeback Special.” Love is expected to perform hits such as “He’s a Rebel,” “The Boy I’m Going to Marry” and “Da Doo Ron Ron,” in addition to a special tribute to Elvis. Elvis Week ends with a concert at the Graceland Soundstage on Aug. 18. A Graceland official says 25,000 to 40,000 people are expected to attend Elvis Week events.

Lost in the Stars

2018/2019 SEASON

ON SALE NOW

Tickets on sale NOW!

Choose 3 or more and SAVE up to 20%*

314-361-2881 or www.unionavenueopera.org

GEMMA NEW CONDUCTS

ENIGMA VARIATIONS

A CELEBRATION OF

SEP 22-23

NOV 2-4

Its Opening Act in Song and Symphony OCT 7

BELL

PERFORMS BRUCH

DEC 7-9

NOV 23-25

*Excludes Boxes, Orchestra Right Front and prior sales

314-534-1700 slso.org


ARTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FAUSTival set to explore culturally timely themes

THEATER REVIEW

‘THE LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA’

‘Light in the Piazza’ is engaging fairy tale fit for grown-ups

When • 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 7 p.m. Sunday, through Aug. 26 Where • The Marcelle, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive How much • $20-$25 More info • 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTO BY JASON HACKETT

From left: Miranda Jagels Félix, Dustin Sholtes, Joe Taylor, Jacob Stern, Alicen Moser, Gabe Taylor, Grace Langford, Will Bonfiglio and Erica Withrow in ERA’s “Faust (go down with all the re$t).”

BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The myth of Faust, who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge, power and success, has inspired numerous artistic works. And now it’s the theme of a St. Louis theater festival. FAUSTival is a collaboration of five theater companies: Equally Represented Arts (ERA), the Midnight Company, Theatre Nuevo, SATE (Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble) and the Post Romantics. Each of them is taking on the Faust story. The first offering, ERA’s “Faust (go down with all the re$t),” runs through Aug. 18, to be followed by an adaptation by a different company each month through December. The Faust myth has inspired writers — and playwrights in particular — since the 15th century, says Lucy Cashion, artistic director of ERA. “Christopher Marlowe’s version is pretty well-known, and Goethe’s version is also very wellknown,” she says. “And Gertrude Stein has a version. It’s a story about people dealing with unchecked power, and making bargains, and about moral corruption. It seems pretty timely.” Accordingly, the ERA take on Faust — which features the band Kid Scientist — is described as “a capitalist tragedy with music.” “To me, the world’s problems right now — at least, America’s problems — come from capitalism and our obsession with money,” Cashion says. “So in our version, heaven is the bank, and God is the CEO of the bank. And Earth is plagued by game shows, winning prizes for money and timeshare salesmen. It’s very farcical — a satire, really.”

In that regard, the Post Romantics’ “Doomsday Faust” directly addresses the current occupant of the Oval Office. “Basically, our idea is that Donald Trump is Faust,” says producer Jimmy Bernatowicz. Faust’s antagonist, the devilish Mephisto, takes the form of Russian president Vladimir Putin. The play chronicles “the journey of Faust being corrupted and being dragged off to hell. But I guess in this case, it would be jail, maybe.” Although the FAUSTival offerings are thematically similar, each stands on its own, says Ellen Schwetye, managing director of SATE. “There’s no collective story that ties all five together, other than this character of Faust,” she says. “But obviously, we encourage everybody to try and catch all five shows because of the different perspectives that are brought to the story.” Often, all of the plays in a festival are presented during the same week, or even on the same day. But that wasn’t a viable option for FAUSTival, Schwetye says. “Different companies were ready to produce at different times,” she says. “And we didn’t want to have too much competition among each other. And outside of the FAUSTival, there’s lots happening all the time. We didn’t want to have these five shows competing with other companies. So we decided to stretch it out.” Although FAUSTival aims to entertain, it also reflects the present American moment. “It’s very difficult right now to produce work that isn’t political,” Cashion says. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

FAUSTIVAL Equally Represented Arts “Faust (go down with all the re$t)” featuring Kid Scientist • When 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Aug. 18 • Where Foam, 3359 South Jefferson Avenue • How much $10 • More info eratheatre.org The Midnight Company “An Apology for the Course and Outcome of Certain Events Delivered by Doctor John Faustus on This His Final Evening” and “The Hunchback Variations,” both by Mickle Maher • When Sept. 20-29 • Where The Monocle, 4510 Manchester Avenue • How much $15 • More info brownpapertickets.com Theatre Nuevo “whither should I fly” co-devised by Gabe Taylor • When Oct. 25-Nov. 10 • Where William A. Kerr Foundation, 21 O’Fallon Street • How much Price to be announced SATE “Doctor Faustus, or the Modern Prometheus” by John Wolbers and Kit Marlowe • When Oct. 31-Nov. 17 • Where The Chapel, 6238 Alexander Drive • How much $15-$20 • More info brownpapertickets.com Post-Romantics “Doomsday Faust” by Jimmy Bernatowicz • When Dec. 5-8 • Where Centene Center for the Arts, 3547 Olive Street • How much Price to be announced • Five-play passes are $50 and may be purchased at brownpapertickets.com. Find more information at faustival.org.

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Girl meets boy, and they fall in love, but their future is in doubt. That’s because of a secret that the girl’s mother fiercely protects. And it all plays out during a sun-burnished Italian summer in the 1950s. The very simplicity of “The Light in the Piazza” is among its strengths. Directed by Christina Rios and presented by R-S Theatrics, it’s a dream of a musical and something of a fairy tale for grown-ups — engagingly romantic and vividly realized. With a book by Craig Lucas (“Prelude to a Kiss”) and music and lyrics by Adam Guettel (“Floyd Collins”), based on a novella by Elizabeth Spencer, it’s a musical that takes its inspiration not from pop tunes but from classical musical and

opera, conjuring an emotional magic that’s nothing short of exhilarating. Margaret Johnson (Kay Love) and her daughter, Clara (Macia Noorman), are on holiday in Florence, where they encounter an effusively friendly young man named Fabrizio Naccarelli (Tiélere Cheatem). The spark between Clara and Fabrizio could start a fire, but Margaret discourages their romance. What she doesn’t count on is Fabrizio’s persistence. It’s not long before the conversation turns to marriage. But Margaret can’t accept the possibility. The Broadway production of “The Light in the Piazza” opened at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theater in 2005 and ran for more than 500 performances. That stage was significantly larger than the Marcelle’s, but Rios makes imaginative use

CONCERT REVIEW

‘American Idol Live!’ brings bright covers, fun BY EMMA BAKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Finalists from Season 16 of “American Idol” delivered an evening of strong covers and all-around lively performances Friday at the Fox Theatre. Gabby Barrett, Cade Foehner, Caleb Lee Hutchinson, Catie Turner, Michael Woodard and season winner Maddie Poppe, along with veteran “Idol” singer Kris Allen, came armed with fan favorites for “American Idol Live!” The competition series recently ended its first season on ABC after airing for 15 seasons on Fox. The dozens of songs performed, in a setlist that felt spontaneous, spanned all genres. The singers cycled through as backup vocalists, musicians and duet partners for one another, a formula that consistently

produced crowd-pleasing performances. The group began with a solid cover of Bebe Rexha’s “Meant to Be” and “Titanium” by Sia, keeping pace with an energetic cover of “Walk Like an Egyptian” by the Bangles before transitioning to songs that highlighted the vocal capabilities and talents of each artist. Hutchinson sang soulful country tracks such as Chris Stapleton’s “Midnight Train to Memphis” and “Don’t Close Your Eyes” by Keith Whitley, while Turner gave powerful pop performances of songs such as “Havana” by Camila Cabello and “Part of Me” by Katy Perry. Similarly, Barrett executed passionate renditions of pop and country tunes including Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” and “Church Bells” by Carrie Underwood. Woodward charmed

of the space — such as a sequence in which Clara’s windblown hat is handed off from actor to actor, only to make its way to Fabrizio. Love turns in a nuanced performance as a woman struggling to do the right thing. Noorman brings to Clara a poignant vulnerability. And Cheatem is perfect as the moonstruck Fabrizio. Highlights of the rapturous score include the title tune, which serves as Clara’s musical declaration of independence, “Dividing Day,” in which Margaret laments that the fire has gone out of her marriage, and “Say It Somehow,” a lovely duet between Clara and Fabrizio. This show will leave you breathless. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

the audience with his charismatic versions of “Maybe this Time” from “Cabaret” and “My Heart Will Go On” by Celine Dion. Foehner paired rich, growling vocals with his distinctive electric guitar to cover rock songs including “No Good” by Kaleo. Allen provided a brief interlude with covers such as “Falling Slowly” by Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová before playing his most recent single, “When All the Stars Have Died.” He finished with his bestknown song, “Live Like We’re Dying,” before the “Idol” finalists came back out for another round of captivating covers. Poppe performed youthful covers of “Brand New Key” by Melanie, “God Only Knows” by the Beach Boys and her own single, “Going Going Gone.” She ended her set with her audition song, “Rainbow Connection” from “The Muppet Movie,” earning her a well-deserved standing ovation. Emma Baker • 314-340-8101 @ems_lorraine on Twitter ebaker@post-dispatch.com

Lost in the Stars

2018/2019 SEASON

ON SALE NOW Choose 3 or more and SAVE up to 20%* GEMMA NEW CONDUCTS

ENIGMA VARIATIONS

A CELEBRATION OF

SEP 22-23

NOV 2-4

Its Opening Act in Song and Symphony OCT 7

BELL

PERFORMS BRUCH

DEC 7-9

NOV 23-25

*Excludes Boxes, Orchestra Right Front and prior sales

314-534-1700 slso.org

Tickets on sale NOW! 314-361-2881 or www.unionavenueopera.org


08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

BOOKS

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • B9

BEST-SELLERS

FICTION

Here are the best-selling books from Publishers Weekly for the week that ended Aug. 5.

Hamilton is in top form with paranormal novel ‘Serpentine’

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “The President Is Missing” • Clinton/ Patterson 2. “Paradox” • Catherine Coulter 3. “The Outsider” • Stephen King 4. “Cottage by the Sea” • Debbie Macomber 5. “The Other Woman” • Daniel Silva 6. “Spymaster” • Brad Thor 7. “The Good Fight” • Danielle Steel 8. “The Perfect Couple” • Elin Hilderbrand 9. “All We Ever Wanted” • Emily Giffin 10. “When Life Gives You Lululemons” • Lauren Weisberger

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “The Russia Hoax” • Gregg Jarrett 2. “Girl, Wash Your Face” • Rachel Hollis 3. “Liars, Leakers, and Liberals” • Jeanine Pirro 4. “Magnolia Table” • Joanna Gaines 5. “The Gutfeld Monologues” • Greg Gutfeld 6. “The Donald J. Trump Presidential Twitter Library” • The Daily Show With Trevor Noah 7. “Death of a Nation” • Dinesh D’Souza 8. “12 Rules for Life” • Jordan B Peterson 9. “Educated” • Tara Westover 10. “Indianapolis” • Vincent/Vladic

MASS MARKET 1. “Origin” • Dan Brown 2. “Dark in Death” • J.D. Robb 3. “You Will Pay” • Lisa Jackson 4. “The Rooster Bar” • John Grisham 5. “Wanted: Perfect Partner” • Debbie Macomber 6. “End Game” • David Baldacci 7. “Legion of Fire” • William W Johnstone 8. “Enigma” • Catherine Coulter 9. “Pale as Death” • Heather Graham 10. “Murder in Paradise” • James Patterson

TRADE PAPERBACK 1. “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine” • Gail Honeyman 2. “Less” • Andrew Sean Greer 3. “Origin” • Dan Brown 4. “Y Is for Yesterday” • Sue Grafton 5. “A Column of Fire” • Ken Follett 6. “Instant Pot Miracle” • HMH 7. “Triple Homicide” • James Patterson 8. “Crazy Rich Asians” (movie tie-in) • Kevin Kwan 9. “Pachinko” • Min Jin Lee 10. “The Sun and Her Flowers” • Rupi Kaur Here are the best-sellers at area independent stores for the week that ended Aug. 5. Stores reporting: The Book House, Left Bank Books, Main Street Books, the Novel Neighbor, Subterranean Books. ADULTS 1. “Enemies in Love: A German POW, a Black Nurse, and an Unlikely Romance” • Alexis Clark 2. “Hope Never Dies” • Andrew Shaffer 3. “Strange Stars: David Bowie, Pop Music, and the Decade Sci-Fi Exploded” • Jason Heller 4. “The View From Flyover Country” • Sarah Kendzior 5. “There There” • Tommy Orange 6. “Freshwater” • Akwaeke Emezi 7. “Calypso” • David Sedaris 8. “Sharp Objects” • Gillian Flynn 9. “The Perfect Stranger” • Megan Miranda 10. “Less” • Andrew Sean Greer

CHILDREN/ YOUNG ADULTS 1. “Children of Blood and Bone” • Tomi Adeyemi 2. “Be Kind” • Pat Zietlow Miller 3. “Incredible Cardinals” • Ed Wheatley 4. “Are You Scared Darth Vader” • Adam Rex 5. “The Witch Boy” • Molly Knox Ostertag 6. “91 Story Treehouse” • Andy Griffiths 7. “Goodnight St. Louis” • June Herman and Julie Dubray 8. “Grace and Fury” • Tracy Banghart 9. “Calling All Minds” • Temple Grandin 10. “Dog Man and Cat Kid” • Dav Pilkey

BY STEPHEN BOLHAFNER Special to the Post-Dispatch

I was so disappointed with the last Anita Blake novel (“Crimson Death”) that it was with a certain trepidation that I opened this one. Had Hamilton lost her touch? Would this be another rambling tour through Anita’s many relationships, punctuated by a big fight at the end? Well, there is a big fight at the end of “Serpentine.” And there is a lot of attention paid to relationships, fitting the setting, which is mostly at the site of an upcoming wedding. But it feels very different, and author Laurell K. Hamilton has never been more in control of her paranormal urban fantasy series. Edward, the deadliest monster hunter around, is marrying Donna, the widowed mother of two that he’s lived with for several

LAURELL K. HAMILTON When • 7 p.m. Tuesday Where • Ethical Society of St. Louis, 9001 Clayton Road How much • $31-$36, includes one or two tickets and a presigned book More info • brownpapertickets.com, left-bank.com

years. Donna knows him as “Ted Forrester” (his legal identity and the name on his U.S. marshal’s badge). But there’s a lot she really doesn’t know about the man she’s marrying and what he does. Anita has never particularly liked her, but she knows Edward loves Donna, and she is willing to stand beside him as his best man. Woman. Whatever. As the book opens in New Mexico, Anita’s biggest problem is Donna’s oldest friend, Dixie, one of the bridesmaids. Dixie is positive that “Ted” and Anita had an affair and is determined to derail the

wedding. Once a cheater, always a cheater. After a quick interlude in St. Louis, Anita and Micah and Nathaniel, both wereleopards, travel early on to the Florida Keys, where the beach wedding is to take place. Micah, meanwhile, has a problem in his role as liaison between humans and lycanthropes and between various lycanthrope communities. He’s been asked to help a local family with a problem. Instead of a person turning into a wolf or a wolf-man, or a leopard, or a rat, the human’s arm, for instance, becomes a writhing mass of snakes.

The family believes they were cursed by a god back in ancient Greece. Micah is distraught because he can’t think of any way to help these people. Then a woman disappears from the wedding hotel. Then another. The police decide the men in Anita’s life are their chief suspects. As if that’s not enough, an old “friend” shows up — one of the few people who actually scares Anita. If she is going to get out of this mess, though, she’s probably going to need his help. This is not one of those hit-the-ground-runningand-never-let-up pulsepounding adventures Hamilton is best known for, and while there are some sex scenes, it’s not one of those over-the-top pieces of erotica with a thin layer of plot. I think this one is what she was intending with “Crimson Death” but

NONFICTION

‘Fly Girls’ gives a hand, not a swat, to historic aviators BY TIM FOX Special to the Post-Dispatch

Most people know about Charles Lindbergh’s 1927 solo flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St. Louis. But few know that even before Lindbergh’s historic journey, women across the country were learning to fly as well — and preparing to achieve amazing airborne feats of their own. Journalist Keith O’Brien tells the dramatic story of five of these women in his new book, “Fly Girls,” named for one of the more generous terms applied to female pilots at the time. These brave women “refused to live by the old rules, appearing bold and almost dangerous as a result,” O’Brien writes before quoting a contemporary newspaper: “The people are exhorted to swat the fly, but it is safer to keep your hands off the fly girl.” Ruth Elder, Florence Klingensmith, Ruth

Nichols, Louise Thaden and Amelia Earhart: While only one of these names is familiar to most today, each of these women risked their lives to make individual contributions to the history of aviation. They helped create a club for female flyers, which they called the Ninety-Nines, recognizing the number of inaugural members. And at the climax of O’Brien’s book, one of the five even beats a male pilot to win the coveted Bendix Trophy — the top prize in a grueling air race across the United States. And no, it wasn’t Earhart. O’Brien quickly places the women and their achievements in historical context. Women had only gotten the vote in 1919, and many avenues of employment, citizenship and social mobility were still closed to them. Meanwhile, the aircraft industry was just getting off the ground, 20 years after the Wright brothers’

famous first flight at Kitty Hawk, N.C. World War I had been a boost to the young industry, but flying was still incredibly dangerous. Planes were made of wood, covered with linen — metal airplanes seemed an impossibility. To prove planes were safe and reliable, manufacturers like Travel Air in Wichita, Kan., started sponsoring and participating in air races that drew hundreds of thousands of spectators, making them among the most popular sporting events of the day. Still, flying was exciting to men and women. With a keen eye to detail, careful research, and empathy for the exhilaration and gutwrenching fear early pilots must have felt, O’Brien takes readers inside a fascinating moment in the history of flight and the struggle for equal rights. O’Brien’s book deserves favorable comparison to Tom Wolfe’s 1979 book

“Fly Girls: How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds and Made Aviation History” By Keith O’Brien Published by Eamon Dolan Books/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 327 pages, $28

“The Right Stuff.” Like Wolfe, who told the story of the Mercury Seven astronauts, O’Brien focuses on the few to tell the story of the many. Also like Wolfe, he pulls his narrative threads from their disparate beginnings — the dusty plains of Wichita, the wealthy enclave of Rye, N.Y., the streets of Boston — and draws them together to lend his story a sense of inevitability if not destiny. And his breathless account of the Bendix race is as dramatic as Wolfe’s description of John Glenn orbiting the Earth three

ROUNDUP

Four summer books you might have missed “Ultimately, she is writing about something bigger and more universal, which is that, here on Earth, in these human bodies, it is hard to be happy. … These stories are full of sorrow and loneliness and the human heart pushing back.”

BY LAURIE HERTZEL Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Summer whizzes by, books get buzzed about, noted on “best of” and “to be read” lists, and then — blammo! — the talk turns to fall books. Wait, what about those summer titles? We haven’t read them all yet! So before we get engulfed in the buzz of autumn reading, here are four books from the first half of the year that you might not — but should — know about.

‘PATCHWORK: A BOBBIE ANN MASON READER’ In the 1980s, Bobbie Ann Mason, Raymond Carver and Ann Beattie grew famous for their “K Mart Realism” — gritty stories of working-class Americans, punctuated with references to popular culture and day-to-day life. “Patchwork” pulls together a sampling of Mason’s stories, novel excerpts and nonfiction. (Her stories ran mainly in the New Yorker; her memoir, “Clear Springs” was a Pulitzer finalist.) Her writing holds up brilliantly over time — clear, precise and emotionally true. Despite the pop culture references, none of it feels dated. As George Saunders notes in the introduction,

“Patchwork: A Bobbie Ann Mason Reader” Published by University Press of Kentucky, 487 pages, $35

“The Desert and the Sea” By Michael Scott Moore Published by Harper Wave, 451 pages, $27.99

“Conversations on Writing” By Ursula K. LeGuin Published by Tin House, 138 pages $14.95

“The Lost for Words Bookshop” By Stephanie Butland Published by Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, 352 pages, $26.99

‘THE DESERT AND THE SEA’ In 2012, journalist Michael Scott Moore headed to the Horn of Africa to write about Somali pirates who had been raiding boats and kidnapping sailors, and he ended up getting kidnapped himself. His memoir is an excruciating, nearly day-by-day account of being a captive for almost three years — surviving months of inertia, sometimes in chains, punctuated by occasional terror and beatings. Moore struggled to avoid Stockholm syndrome, to keep fit and to not give in to despair. His memoir is a close look at the misconceptions of his captors, the tedium of both his and their existence, and the stupid, underlying violence that can erupt at any moment. ‘CONVERSATIONS ON WRITING’ A good interview, Ursula K. LeGuin notes in the introduction to this lovely

“Serpentine” A novel by Laurell K. Hamilton Published by Berkeley, 486 pages, $28

didn’t quite pull off: a serious exploration of Anita’s now very complicated life, with enough tension built up throughout and a big monster-hunting climax to make everything fit into the “Vampire Hunter” canon. Here, Hamilton pulls it off. “Serpentine” is not just better than the last one, but the best book she has written in a long time — maybe since “Obsidian Butterfly,” which has always been my favorite. Stephen Bolhafner is a freelance writer living in the St. Louis area.

times in 1962. But most importantly, he brings his characters to life. He describes young Louise McPhetridge, later Louise Thaden, hanging by her knees from the back of a moving funeral cart to impress her friends. He reproduces the letter Earhart wrote to her new husband and publicist, G.P. Putnam, stating, “I shall not hold you to any medieval code of faithfulness to me, nor shall I consider myself bound to you similarly.” When Nichols’ plan to become the first woman to cross the Atlantic falters, O’Brien writes, “Like the animals mounted on the walls of her parents’ mansion in Rye, Nichols’ flight plan was dead and gathering dust by the spring of 1930.” These are, O’Brien shows, not dusty heroes for history books, but living people whose spirit of competition and friendship broke barriers and helped build an industry. But while the women in Wolfe’s book wait anxiously on Earth, in O’Brien’s they take to the sky. Their story deserves to be told, and O’Brien does it exceptionally well. Tim Fox is a freelance writer/editor and principal of the Write Fox LLC.

little book, “is like a badminton rally: you know right away that the two of you can keep that birdie in the air and all you have to do is watch it fly.” And this series of interviews with David Naimon, host of the podcast “Between the Covers,” is nothing but flying birdies. You can see the pair warm to each other as the book progresses, with LeGuin’s answers growing longer and more passionate as she talks about the craft of writing, language and syntax, poetry, books in translation, and the way female authors such as Grace Paley just “slide out of sight” after death. This is a bracing book of ideas.

‘THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP’ I am a sucker for books set in libraries and bookstores, and even more of a sucker if the bookstore is in England. So I had to pick up Stephanie Butland’s novel, which takes place in a used bookstore in York. Her charming novel follows the life of Loveday Cardew, a young woman with several tattoos, a sharp tongue, a quick mind and a deeply troubled, mysterious past. Working in the bookstore has been a lifesaver, but as the story descends into darkness, it is unclear if the books, her poetry and her friends will be enough to keep her going. This book is pure escapism, though wellwritten and well-plotted escapism.


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

TRAVEL

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B10

AMY BERTRAND • abertrand@post-dispatch.com

One of the more permanent establishments on Crab Island, Waterworld serves seafood and Mexican food with floating “tables” and a dance floor.

DESTIN PERFECT FOR A GIRLS GETAWAY BY AMY BERTRAND • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH DESTIN, FLA.

F

amily trips help you bond as a group. Solo vacations can soothe the soul. Couples trips can rekindle a romance. But a friends trip, a girlfriend getaway, can recharge you with laughter, adventures and relaxation.

I traveled with five friends in May to Destin. We are all busy, working moms of tween boys, some have older or younger kids also. Destin sits on the Gulf of Mexico, in Florida’s panhandle, in an area known for its white sand

beaches and emerald green waters. Parts of it, including the Crystal Beach area where we stayed, have sort of a small beach town vibe. Other parts have a touristy feel as visitors have discovered Destin and descend on it all times of the year but

especially in the summer. “St. Louis is one of the top 10 cities where our guests live, and we’re finding that more and more St. Louis residents are discovering the beaches of Destin and South Walton,” says CONTINUED ON B11

Michael’s Baths Family own & Operated

314-230-8150 636-203-9907 618-206-5965

INSTALL A NEW TUB OR CONVERT YOUR EXISTING TUB INTO AN EASY WALK-IN SHOWER.

oWnER on SITE! FREE

ESTIMATES

YOU COULD HAVE A BEAUTIFUL NEW BATH OR SHOWER IN AS LITTLE AS ONE DAY! Wide Color & Pattern Selection Professionally Installed • Easy to Clean • Cutting Edge Technology • Life Time Warranty

CALL US TODAY!

Free Shower/ Tub Door up to $1,000 Value *Some Restrictions Apply


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

TRAVEL

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B11

PHOTOS BY AMY BERTRAND • abertrand@post-dispatch.com

The beach, in the morning, at Crystal Beach in Destin.

CONTINUED FROM B10

Tracy Louthain, director of marketing and communications at Newman-Dailey resort properties. We started planning our trip by finding a place to stay. We wanted a house with its own pool (some of my friends are not big fans of sand). I’ve had great success on other trips booking a house or condo with a real-estate company that specializes in vacation rentals. Newman-Dailey is one of the biggest in the Destin area, so I started there, searching its website, destinvacation.com. That’s when we came across a house called Blue Starfish. It was perfect. A private pool with a hot tub; an outside seating area with a TV, mini kitchen and outdoor bathroom; a block or two from the beach; four bedrooms; a huge kitchen and even a small putting green in the back. After booking it and talking to the folks at Newman-Dailey, we learned the house was owned by people from St. Louis. And when I got there, I think I would have figured it out anyway. Budweiser and Dilly Dilly signs in the liquor cabinet, wine glasses from Mount Pleasant and a fabulous coffee table made of railroad ties with the Cotton Belt (officially known as the St. Louis Southwestern Railway) name on them. Marcy and Seth Anderson of Clayton built the home in 2014. “It’s part of Seth’s future retirement plan,” Marcy says, “to own four rental properties that we can rent out.” The Andersons have three children, 11-year-old twin girls and a 12-yearold son, and when I talked to Marcy, she had just gotten back from a girls trip at Blue Starfish. “It’s a great place for a girls trip,” she says. “It’s just really chill.” She says her house is most often used for multi-generational families. She knows that because a guest book she keeps in the house tells stories of guests using the board games, cooking together and swimming in the pool. When we arrived, the house was as promised. Maybe even better than promised. It was pristine, with towels, dishes, board games, sheets and comfy beds. The only thing we needed was food — and alcohol.

HOW WE GOT THERE Two years ago Allegiant Airlines started offering flights from Belleville’s MidAmerica Airport to the Destin-Fort Walton Beach airport. It’s a budget airline, which means no snacks or free beverages. You have to pay for your seat, your checked bag and your carry-on. So the cheap price you see at first does add up a bit. But the bonus is you don’t have to pay exorbitant parking fees (it’s $5 a day) and you pretty much walk right

Beach yoga classes are offered through Henderson Beach Resort in Destin.

The Blue Starfish property, owned by St. Louisans Seth and Marcy Anderson, is available for rent through Newman-Dailey. Prices vary by season, from $269 to $763 per night for the whole house.

A platter of fresh seafood includes mussels and oysters from Brotula’s in Destin.

A food boat on Crab Island in Destin serves margaritas and barbecue sandwiches.

from the parking lot to check-in. I had heard from many people how easy and quick it is. But we must have gotten there on a bad day. We waited in line nearly an hour to check in, then an additional 20 minutes for security, but it was

a direct flight that took less than two hours.

THINGS TO DO IN DESTIN You go to Destin for the beach, right? So plan to spend at least one day lounging around in the

sand, wading in the water, possibly even catching a few waves on a boogie board or stand-up paddleboard. But it’s even more fun to get on the water. We did it in two ways. With a rental from Newman-Dailey, you get one pass to a variety of attractions (minigolf, snorkeling, water park and more). They call it the Be Free Bundle. One of the attractions is the Sea Blaster dolphin cruise, a 73-foot, 119-passenger speed boat that takes you on a tour through the harbor before you speed into open waters. It also offers beer and wine and a party atmosphere. Oh and dolphins. We saw plenty of dolphins. As beautiful as they were on that sunset cruise (which runs $28; destinseablaster.com), the mammals were even more magnificent to behold a few days later when we rented a pontoon boat from Destin Boat Rentals ($275 for half a day in the offseason at destinvacationboatrentals.com). My friend Andrea piloted us out into quiet waters, and we watched as the dolphins crested and dived back down right in front of us. We could hear the water blow like a swimmer coming up for air before we saw them. We probably could have stayed there all day, but we had a goal: Crab Island. Sitting just off Destin Harbor at the entrance to Choctowatchee Bay, Crab Island isn’t really an island at all (though it used to be) but an underwater sandbar where the water is about waist deep and crystal clear. There are about a half-dozen semipermanent structures: restaurants and shops and an inflatable obstacle course known as Crab Island Waterpark. In addition, several food boats (like a food truck) come by to serve margaritas, burgers and more. In the busy times, bands play on a floating stage. We anchored right in the middle of it. It was a Monday in early May, but there were still a good handful of boats with partying people around us. But there’s plenty of room to spread out if you

want. We cranked up the music on our pontoon, anchored and I jumped in the water. It was chilly, but gorgeous. Until a jellyfish swam by me. I scrambled up the back steps like I was being chased by sharks, not a gorgeous, translucent floating creature. Yes, jellyfish can sting, but this was a lone moon jelly, a less potent kind. I saw it again a few times, once I eventually got back in the water. But it stayed clear of us. A girls trip wouldn’t be complete without a spa day. The Henderson Beach Resort, a relatively new and needed addition to the area, is a luxury resort next to the beach and Henderson State Park. Salamander Spa is everything you’d expect from a luxury spa: cucumber water (actually they even offer a complimentary Prosecco), lush robes, a gorgeous lounge, a steam room with an infusion of lavender, private whirlpools and more. Services range from the balancing facial I had to a Neroli Blossom Sensory Experience with meditative massage and essential oils. Each treatment room I saw had windows overlooking the park. Henderson Beach Resort also offers fitness classes (and not just for guests). We took a beach yoga class. For $15, you take a short walk to the beach, actually a patch of grass that sits just back from the beach, which is perfect (no sand!), and work through a series of floor and standing postures great for beginners or more advanced students, all while staring at the waves coming into those white sand beaches. Reservations recommended.

PLACES TO EAT You can’t go wrong heading to the HarborWalk Village for some food. Even those who would scoff at a chain such as Margaritaville shouldn’t. The food selection is great, the portions are huge and the view (and the breeze at the top) is fantastic. But head to a locally owned place for a more authentic Destin experience. We stopped in at Brotula’s Seafood House and Steamer, just down the boardwalk from Margaritaville on our first night. My friends and I loved it so much we wanted to go back every night. Chef Tommy LeMaster, a young, affable guy whose bubbly sister was our server, focuses on local seafood and produce to create platters and traditional boils with a new Southern twist. The fish is so fresh it often comes with a QR code, which you can scan to see when and where it was caught. Maybe it’s because we were sitting by the water, but the snapper and the grouper really did taste like some of the freshest fish I’ve ever had. Yet there’s another reason to come back again and again: the sauteed mussels ($15.95), a bowl of them in creamy white wine sauce

perfect for sopping up the crusty bread that comes with it (brotulas.com). Just down the boardwalk is Brotula’s sister restaurant, Jackacuda’s Seafood + Sushi. It has a little bit more of a party atmosphere, with a bar out front along the boardwalk. I especially liked the Thai Fighter sushi roll (spicy tuna, cucumber, avocado, crunchies, yellowtail, jalapeño, green onion and ponzu), again offering that fresh fish taste we don’t often get in sushi at home (jackacudas.com). For brunch, we headed just down the street from our house to 790 Gulf Place, located in the Inn at Crystal Beach. The menu has a Louisiana feel with omelets, beignets and an amazing crab cakes eggs Benedict. Sit outside right next to the sand dunes and order the bottomless mimosas, but beware the winds, which knocked an umbrella into diners on our visit (eatmoregumbo.com). Also just down the road (and perfect if you are staying in the Crystal Beach neighborhood) is a corner shop named Camille’s. It sits across the beach, so beachgoers can grab a sandwich for lunch or a daiquiri in a to-go cup for chilling in the sand. You’ll find live music there at times, too. We especially loved the avocado toast and bloody Marys for breakfast (camillesatcrystalbeach.com). For a fancy night out, we headed to Cuvee Kitchen + Wine Bar, a recently renovated space along the Emerald Coast Highway. It also happens to be run by Tyler Jarvis, whose Savory restaurant group runs Brotula’s and Jackacudas. I was sensing a trend here for us, and Cuvee did not disappoint, with its extensive wine list and genius sommelier, craft cocktails and inventive food. But for all the fresh seafood and duck fat fries, I fell in love with the organic fried chicken ($19) served with the best macaroni and cheese I’ve had in my entire life (cuveekitchen. com). When drinking, not eating, is on your mind, three bars shouldn’t be missed. The touristy AJ’s on the HarborWalk may be full of partygoing tourists, but the giant, elevated screen showing sports, and the live band that plays in front of it are pretty cool. The Whale’s Tale Beach Bar & Grill, a few miles down Scenic Gulf Drive, sits on the beach and has the feel (and the bathrooms) of a chill neighborhood bar. In the middle, Pompano Joe’s is more of a restaurant on the beach, but it has a large bar and a family party feel. With its balance of fresh seafood, waterside relaxation and fun outings, Destin offers a perfect excuse to grab some friends and head for the beach. Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 @abertrand on Twitter abertrand@post-dispatch.com


TRAVEL

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

BRING IT ON HOME: ITALY

Some flights have extra restrictions; here’s what to do if you’re on one

Who and where • Barb and Mark Kroenig of Oakville at Lake Como, Bellagio, Italy The trip • They went with their son’s family to Italy where he teaches a course for Georgetown University. They stayed in Bologna, Lake Como and Florence, and also visited Milan, Parma and Modena. Travel tip • If you have a car, plan to park it when you are in Lake Como. The streets are narrow with no sidewalks so everyone walks in the street plus parking is very limited.

BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT Special To The Washington Post

Before Debbie Winsett boarded a recent Delta Air Lines flight from Minneapolis to Washington, a flight attendant added a surprise restriction to her ticket. “While waiting to board, an agent announced that a passenger had a nut allergy and we should refrain from using or eating any nut products on the flight,” says Winsett, a real estate manager from Visalia, Calif. “Though I empathize with the allergic traveler, there were several comments from passengers who had bought or brought food containing nuts, and many wondered if they had to comply.” As if tickets aren’t already limited enough — with restrictions on changes, luggage and refunds — now airlines are adding several new terms. While some of them are reasonable, such as accommodating a fellow traveler with a disability, others are puzzling to airline passengers. With the busy summer travel season in full swing, I have some strategies for coping with these surprise limits. Delta’s peanut allergy policy, posted on a private site for travel agents, answers some of Winsett’s questions. If you tell the airline you have a peanut allergy, the carrier will refrain from serving peanuts and peanut products on the flight. It will stock the plane with additional nonpeanut snacks, which allow flight attendants to serve these snack items to everyone. “We’ll make an announcement asking that customers refrain from opening any peanut products they might have brought on board,” says Delta spokesperson Savannah Huddleston. “But we can’t guarantee that the flight will be completely peanut-free.” In other words, Winsett could have sipped the almond milk she carried on board if she wanted. But peanuts were a no-no. Some of the restrictions limit your movement. That’s what happened to Marjorie Yasueda, a retired San Francisco travel agent, when she flew from San Francisco to Seattle on Alaska Airlines. “Just before we landed in Seattle, the passengers were asked to remain seated while those making a very close connection disembarked,” she says. The passengers without connections were understanding: “I did not hear a grumble,” she recalls. “In fact, some of the seated passengers started chanting, “Go! Go! Go!” while those people with a tight connection were disembarking. The whole thing made me feel good about my fellow human beings.” That’s a best-case scenario. I’ve heard from many passengers who complain that the opposite happens: Flight attendants ask passengers to stay put as a courtesy to fellow travelers with connecting flights — but they don’t comply. Still other restrictions deal with protocol. On Amy Bishop’s recent flight from Dallas to Louisville, Ky., a flight attendant made a somber announcement: Passengers should remain seated while the airline removed the casket of a fallen soldier. “They removed the casket, performed a small ceremony and then loaded the casket into a hearse,” remembers Bishop, who owns a digital marketing agency in Salem, Ind. “It was a short but moving procession.” Her fellow passengers observed the moment of silence and remained in their seats, for the most part. “Most of the plane sat patiently, but a handful of people stood up to gather their things, and a few others chatted amongst themselves,” she recalls. Other flight restrictions are more difficult to anticipate. The most common are weight limits on smaller aircraft, which must be correctly weighted for safety. That’s what happened to Scott Bawek on a flight from Rapid City, S.D., to Minneapolis. The Bombardier Regional Jet 200 was overweight, and the airline unloaded five bags from the plane, two of which were his. One contained a necessary medical device, which made the next flight to Minneapolis. “They were delivered to my house at 9:45 p.m.,” recalls Bawek, who works for the federal government in Minneapolis. How do you prepare for a surprise flight restriction? There’s no strategy beyond expecting the unexpected when you fly — which is always sound advice. Allergy restrictions are the most contentious. Behind the scenes, a conflict is unfolding between passengers who carry allergy-inducing animals on board and those who suffer from allergies. In May, the Transportation Department solicited public comments on amending its Air Carrier Access Act regulation on transportation of service animals. The government wanted to know how it should distinguish between emotional support animals and other service animals and whether it should require emotional support animals to travel in pet carriers for the duration of the flight. All told, the Transportation Department received more than 4,000 comments. “As a traveler with allergies the increasing numbers of pets taken in the aircraft cabin is a threat to my health,” wrote one commenter, Carol Meerschaert. “Why should I have to drug myself just to visit my family?” Stephen Speakes, another commenter, wrote that he “absolutely” endorsed the practice of emotional support animals traveling with the person they support. “This needs to continue unchanged!” he added. Stay tuned for the government’s decision. Most surprise restrictions have a clear resolution. For example, asking passengers to stay in their seats is a question of common decency. You can wait the five minutes it takes for a few passengers to disembark so that they can make their connecting flights. The cabin crew shouldn’t have to ask twice. Same thing for paying final respects to a fallen soldier — it’s a no-brainer. And the overweight luggage situation? That’s a much-needed reminder to travel light. Check your flight itinerary. If you see the words “regional jet” or “RJ” on your ticket, you’re flying on a smaller aircraft, which may have extra weight restrictions. Leave the heavy luggage at home. The nut problem is a little harder to crack. Southwest Airlines announced in July it was going to stop serving its trademark peanuts Aug. 1 to protect passengers with nut allergies. Even consumer advocate Ralph Nader has weighed in with a campaign to save the airline’s trademark snack. So far, Southwest says it has no plans to reverse course. Christopher Elliott is a consumer advocate, journalist and co-founder of the advocacy group Travelers United.

Contribute • Email your photo to stlpost@gmail.com. Include the full names of everyone in the photo, including where they are from and where you are standing in the photo. Also include your address and phone number. Please also tell us a little about the trip and a travel tip. We’re looking for interesting, well-composed, well-lighted photos.

% IOR N

E /S NT 0 N U RA O

1ETE V

DI

SC

Barrier Free Showers Specializing in Creating Safe, Accessible Homes

Veteran Owned and VA Certified

6 months same as cash august onLY CAll tOdAy And ReCeiVe A fRee in hOme quOte

314-758-0594•618-857-3458

FEDERAL & STATE WORKERS: NO COST HEARING AIDS!

CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE HEARING TEST*

THAT’S RIGHT... NO CO-PAY, NO EXAM FEE, NO ADJUSTMENT FEE! Plus special factory pricing available for non-qualifiers. Federal and state workers and retirees may qualify for no cost hearing aids. Insurance pays total cost of two Miracle-Ear™ Audiotone Pro series aids. **Most Federal Government employees and retirees are eligible. You may even be covered if you have other non-federal insurance coverage. All candidates must go through a free evaluation and bring insurance information to verify eligibility.

All Health Insurances Accepted.

Call Now!

636-321-3282 • 618-433-3620 • 314-325-3174 Swansea IL ● Waterloo IL ● Crystal City Arnold ● South County ● Union ● Ballwin Town&Country ● Chesterfield ● Glendale Arsenal ● Florissant ● St. Charles St. Peters ● O’Fallon, MO *Hearing tests are always free. Not a medical exam. Audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. **BlueCross BlueShield Insurance pays total cost of two Miracle Ear Audiotone Pro series aids. Health insurance plans may vary by insurer, see store for details. 1 year warranty. If you have a basic plan, we have factory pricing for non-qualifiers

FED0803


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • C

Monsanto lawsuits mount as takeover by Bayer looms BY BRYCE GRAY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Michael Crowell, 31, cleans brewing tanks last month at St. Louis Wine & Beermaking. He dreams of someday owning his own brewery. In the meantime, he is learning the business. Crowell said that the brewing business is 10 percent brewing and 90 percent cleaning.

TIGHT MARKET STALLS ASPIRING BREWERS Good beer is just ‘table stakes’ to opening a craft brewery BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

With the companies nearing completion of their marathon merger process, significant developments are unfolding in lawsuits facing two of Monsanto’s top weedkilling products — and soon to be inherited by Bayer. In San Francisco on Friday, jurors found Monsanto liable in a class action suit alleging that glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, is a carcinogen. And in Cape Girardeau the week prior, two master complaints were filed grouping cropdamage and anti-trust cases lobbied against dicamba — a hotselling but controversial weed control technology being turned to as a successor to Roundup in the fight against “superweeds.” The legal developments combine for an eventful backdrop as Monsanto, the Creve Coeurbased agribusiness titan, and Bayer, the German life sciences company, pull to within weeks, or even days, of realizing their $63 billion merger first announced almost two full years ago. Bayer officials said on June 7 that the company was “approximately two months” away from the point at which integration with Monsanto could officially begin, with the companies held separate until that time. In the interim, Bayer needs to sell off certain parts of its business to See MONSANTO • Page C4

Michael Crowell began homebrewing six years ago, found modest success with his first batch and soon built up a portfolio of beers that were regularly sought out by friends and family. He upgraded his system a few years later and garnered local homebrew awards. When his brother Jonathan moved back to the area from Rolla, the two decided to go into business to open a craft brewery in O’Fallon, Mo. They hatched a business plan, met with civic leaders and even picked the brains of other brewers in the region to find best practices. Their Small Business Administration loan application was well-received, but at the seemingly last minute the bank they were working with said it could no longer fund their venture because it didn’t like the location — in a strip mall on Highway K near the Highway 364 intersection. The Crowells, who had named their brewery See BREWERY • Page C4

Tax abatement guidelines are under scrutiny by city officials Alderman touts map for use of incentives Craft beer makers as a whole are pouring more beer than ever. These are the offerings last month at St. Louis Wine & Beermaking in Chesterfield.

The runaround of tariff exemptions Two area manufacturers file dozens of requests, have waited months for response DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

RotoMetrics, a cutting-die manufacturer in Eureka, thought it had a strong case for being exempted from President Donald Trump’s steel tariffs. Nearly three months after it started asking for an exclusion, the company is still waiting. So is Deutsche Precision, a transmission parts manufacturer in Maryland Heights. The Commerce Department took weeks to even post its exemption requests. Both companies import thousands of tons of steel a year, and they continue to price and sell their products despite not knowing how much that steel will cost — the price suppliers were charging before Trump announced his trade action in March, or 25 See NICKLAUS • Page C3

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROTOMETRICS

A RotoMetrics tooling machine cuts steel to create perforation blades on a solid rotary tool at the company’s plant in Eureka. RotoMetrics imports thousands of tons of steel a year.

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis economic development officials are finalizing a map to guide where property tax abatement will be offered in the city as part of a months-long effort to establish more parameters for the commonly used incentive. St. Louis Development Corp. officials are seeking feedback from members of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen, city legislators say, in an effort to get a document ready in time for the board’s return to session in September. “In terms of giving people more confidence that we’re using tax abatement appropriately, the map would go a long way,” said Alderman Scott Ogilvie, a member of board’s Housing, Urban Development and Zoning committee, which sometimes considers larger abatement projects. “So I hope we adopt it soon.” The effort is part of a yearslong debate over the city’s prolific use of tax abatement and other incentives, which freeze property assessments when investors plan to put money into new development. Some have questioned their necessity in strong neighborhoods, but others point out they often help developers and rehabbers finance projects and that it encourages new investment in a city that needs it. See ABATEMENT • Page C4

BUSINESS

1 M

8,488 SF Office / Flex / Warehouse Building Available for Lease in Hanley Industrial Park 1400 Strassner Dr, Brentwood MO 63144 For More Information: John Sheahan | 314-994-4176 jsheahan@naidesco.com Where Can We Help You?

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE SERVICES, WORLDWIDE

www.naidesco.com


BUSINESS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

How to unload your timeshare

Rebuild after a divorce has derailed your retirement Max out contributions to tax-free accounts BY BETH PINSKER Reuters

BY LIZ WESTON nerdWallet

Some timeshare buyers know almost instantly that they’ve made a mistake. Other owners struggle for years with loan payments and ever-escalating annual fees before they’re ready to throw in the towel. Even the happiest timeshare owners may decide they want out of their contracts, perhaps when they are no longer able to travel. Buyers can cancel a timeshare purchase if they do so within the “recission period,” which varies by state and ranges from three to 15 days. After that, for most owners there’s no easy way to get rid of a timeshare. That angers Jeff Weir, chief correspondent for RedWeek, a timeshare rental and resale site. “The industry has failed to provide a dignified exit for owners,” Weir says. “That leaves an opening for crooks and shysters to take advantage.” A common scam is to promise to sell an owner’s timeshare, often for an unrealistically high price, in exchange for an upfront fee, says Brian Rogers, owner of Timeshare Users Group, another forum for timeshare users. Or the fraudsters may promise to find a charity that will accept the timeshare. In reality, few charities are willing to take timeshares.

GIVE UP ON GETTING YOUR MONEY BACK Timeshare owners need to be wary — and realistic. Far more people want to sell timeshares than want to buy them. Timeshares at higher-end properties — those owned by Disney, Marriott, Wyndham or Hilton, for example — sell for at most 15 percent of their original price, Weir says. Timeshares at older and less swanky resorts may find no buyers, or sellers might have to pay annual fees for a year or two to induce someone to take their shares. Maintenance fees average about $900 per year, but can exceed $3,000 for better resorts. A caveat: If you borrowed money from the timeshare developer, that loan has to be paid off before you can sell or give away your timeshare. Many novice buyers get talked into 10-year loans with interest rates of 15 percent or more, Weir says. Interest costs can easily inflate a $20,000 purchase into a $40,000 debt, he says.

A bankruptcy filing can suspend collection activity and ultimately erase timeshare debt, but that obviously isn’t a good solution for everyone. Anyone considering walking away from a timeshare

should discuss their situation with an experienced bankruptcy attorney who can assess the situation and discuss options. The National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys offers referrals.

BEST OF ST. CHARLES 3 YEARS IN A ROW. BOmmARITO ST. PETERS Winner of 2015, 2016 & 2017 St. Charles County reader’s choice poll

2018 CTS

2018 ATS

0%

apr up to

60

*

months

60

*

months

TIME ON YOUR SIDE

2018 CT6

2018 xTS apr up to

apr up to

Plus $2,000 down payment assistance On All 2018 models

Plus $2,000 down payment assistance On All 2018 models

0%

0%

60

*

months

Plus $2,000 down payment assistance On All 2018 models

0%

apr up to

60

*

months

Plus $2,000 down payment assistance On All 2018 models

ASK THE RESORT TO TAKE IT BACK Wyndham and Diamond Resorts are among the few developers with formal programs for owners who want to relinquish their shares, Weir says. The programs are discretionary, meaning the chains decide which timeshares they’re willing to take back, he says. Most other developers won’t take back timeshares at all, but it doesn’t hurt to ask. Developers that accept returns may require owners to pay annual fees for a year or two while the resort finds another buyer, he says.

SELL IT Beware of people who contact you offering to sell your timeshare, since those are typically scams. If you need help and you own a timeshare at one of the high-end resorts, you can look for a broker through the Licensed Timeshare Resale Brokers Association site. These brokers don’t charge upfront fees but instead take a commission from any sale. The Timeshare Users Group and RedWeek both have active marketplaces to facilitate sales. RedWeek also has a “What’s My Timeshare Worth?” tool to help people research values based on previous sales through the site, while the Timeshare Users Group has a “bargain bin” section for owners willing to give away their shares. Owners also list their timeshares on Craigslist and eBay.

2018 ESCALAdE

2018 xT5

0%

apr up to

60

*

months

Plus $2,000 down payment assistance On All 2018 models

0%

apr up to

WALK AWAY (OR FILE BANKRUPTCY) People who stop paying their loans or annual fees can be subject to foreclosure. At a minimum, they should expect their credit scores to plunge if the developers turn their accounts over to collection agencies. They also could face lawsuits and wage garnishment, depending on the collector, although Rogers says that’s unlikely to happen to older people who can no longer use the timeshare. “No resort is going to actually sue an elderly retired person,” he says. The owners “will likely take a credit hit, but most folks don’t care at that age.”

*

months

Plus $2,000 down payment assistance On All 2018 models

CADILLAC BommaritoCadillac.com

LOCATION 4190 I-70 North Outer Road St. Peters, mO 63376

SALES 314-266-7072 Saturday full service available 7am-3pm by appointment only.

©2016 General motors. All Rights Reserved. Cadillac®

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF LISA BROWN JACOB BARKER BRIAN FELDT BRYCE GRAY SAMANTHA LISS MARK SCHLINKMANN DAVID NICKLAUS

Business editor Economic development Retail and financial institutions Energy and environment Business of health Transportation and real estate Business columnist

314-340-8127 314-340-8291 314-340-8528 314-340-8307 314-340-8017 314-340-8265 314-340-8213

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

RENT IT OUT Many owners discover they can rent their timeshares for enough to pay or at least significantly offset annual fees, Rogers says. The same sites that list timeshares for sale also list options to rent.

60

* 0% apr for 60 months = $16.67 per $1,000 financed

Bommarito

SUBMIT AN ITEM Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@postdispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 North Tucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

THE BOTTOM LINE Ten years after the merger that formed Anheuser-Busch InBev, business reporter Brian Feldt talks with David Nicklaus about the ways the deal changed St. Louis. stltoday.com/watch

MARKETS • WEEK IN REVIEW Dow Jones

Nasdaq

S&P 500

-149.44

+27.1

-7.07

25,313.14

7,839.11

2,833.28

SOURCE: Reuters

Divorce crushed Dennis Nolte’s retirement plans not once but twice. The first time, which was more than 20 years ago, “everything burned to the ground,” Nolte said. He had to start over financially from scratch. The second divorce was rough, too, but he was better prepared. What happened in between is that Nolte rebuilt, little by little, using what he knows as a certified financial planner and former therapist. Giving up retirement assets can be one of the biggest psychological blows in a divorce. The other assets that couples typically divvy up, like a house and cash, are usually in joint accounts. When splitting pensions, IRAs and 401(k)s, which all require legal documents, couples can choose a straight 50-50 split or a more creative swap. When incomes and savings are equal, sometimes both parties just walk away with their own pots. No matter what, each spouse ends up with less money than they had been expecting to carry them through the rest of their lives together. Overall in the United States, divorced households have about 30 percent less net worth than nondivorced households, and have a 7 percentage point higher risk of not having enough money to last through retirement, according to a new study from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. At first, “there’s a lot of crying,” says Michelle Buonincontri, a certified financial planner and certified divorce financial analyst based in Scottsdale, Ariz. Rebuilding your retirement nest egg after a divorce is complicated because qualified retirement plans have contribution restrictions. You might lose $250,000 from your 401(k) in a divorce agreement, but you can only invest $18,500 per year, or $24,500 if you are over 50. And IRAs and Roths are limited to contributions of $5,500 per year, with restrictions related to age and income. Pensions are walled off completely.

MARKET WATCH: Page C5

A financial strategy as well as a bit of saving psychology will help you get back on your feet. What kept Nolte going is that he knew time was on his side after his first divorce, even though he had to cash in his whole retirement IRA for small business owners to maintain two households, pay lawyers and fund the divorce settlement. “At 40, you still have the benefit of compounding,” said Nolte, who is now 61 and based near Orlando, Fla. Financial planner Rose Sanger had a high-income client who found himself in a similar situation — he had to give up half of a seven-figure 401(k) balance in a divorce and was very down about it. Sanger suggested he continue to max out his current contributions in his retirement plan but also auto-deduct another couple of thousand of dollars and stash that money in a taxable investment account. “That helps build up an emergency fund and set aside money for savings,” Sanger said. More than five years later, her client now has more than $250,000 in his 401(k), and more than $100,000 in his taxable account. The situation for the spouse on the receiving end of the retirement accounts, who might have been a stayat-home parent during the marriage or just earned less, also has challenges. Things get even more complicated when the receiving spouse is past retirement age because you cannot contribute to accounts like 401(k) s and IRAs unless you have earned income, and Social Security does not count. One of Deirdre Prescott’s clients got a $500,000 chunk of her ex-husband’s IRA but she is now 62 and no longer working as a teacher. Prescott is working with her to bridge the gap between when her client’s alimony runs out in two years and when she taps Social Security. (Delaying retirement benefits until age 70 greatly increases the amount you get each month.) Prescott’s client plans to live off other assets and some modest freelance income. The key part of the strategy is to take advantage of her low tax bracket. She will convert as much of that traditional pre-tax IRA into a Roth IRA, which allows contributions to grow tax-free. She will have to pay income taxes on the amount she transfers, but the account will then grow tax free, and she will not be subject to required minimum distributions at 70½ like she would be with an IRA. “She came in completely panicked, but if she continues to live modestly and puts off taking Social Security, she should be OK,” Prescott said.


BUSINESS

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

Process does not allow for answers

for relief from steel and aluminum tariffs and granted 1,418. Daniel Ikenson, a trade policy expert at the Cato Institute, says business’ frustration stems from the way the exemption process was designed. Unlike with past tariffs, he said, the Commerce Department won’t let one company’s successful request be a precedent for other importers of the same product. Ikenson says that Ross, the commerce secretary, “has carved out a hands-on role for himself and his office. Usually, requests for an exemption are straightforward, but this process is really backward and capricious.” Deutsche Precision’s Maryland Heights plant, which employs 150 people, was built in 2012 by a German supplier that wanted to be closer to its North American customers. If the tariffs persist, Ilardi acknowledged, the parent company might have to rethink that strategy. RotoMetrics employs 450 people in Eureka, the largest of its three U.S. factories. McInnis says that he’s “hoping the tariffs are a short-term situation” but that they’re definitely bad for business. “Our overseas competitors can undercut us on price and there’s nothing we can do about it,” he explained. If it wanted, the Commerce Department could quickly end the uncertainty the tariffs are causing for RotoMetrics, Deutsche Precision and thousands of other firms. Instead, it seems to be trying to drown them in red tape.

NICKLAUS • FROM C1

percent more to cover the tariffs. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said up front that companies could apply for exemptions “through a fair and transparent process” with decisions based on “whether a product is produced in the United States of a satisfactory quality or in a sufficient and reasonably available amount.” RotoMetrics buys 71 percent of its steel domestically. It asked for tariff exclusions on types of tool steel that aren’t available in the U.S. Deutsche Precision imports all of its steel from Italy and Japan. Carlo Ilardi, the company’s general manager, said domestic mills can’t meet its customers’ specifications for hardness and purity. Each firm must file a separate request for each size, grade or chemical composition of a steel product it imports. So far, that adds up to 72 requests by RotoMetrics and 14 by Deutsche Precision. Ken McInnis, RotoMetrics’ director of supply chain-Americas and global purchasing, says dozens of his requests were kicked back for being incomplete. Of the requests that went through the required 30-day comment period, several drew objections from steel suppliers in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas that say they can meet RotoMetrics’ needs.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROTOMETRICS

RotoMetrics employee Chad Jung cuts steel to begin the process of making a solid rotary die at RotoMetrics’ plant in Eureka. RotoMetrics buys 71 percent of its steel domestically.

McInnis has checked; they can’t. “They had huge lead times and were charging three times the price,” he said. “Financially, we can’t pay that and be viable.” The process, though, provides no way for him to answer the steel companies’ claims. An objection seems to stop the request in its tracks. “The process has just been a fiasco,” McInnis said. “They kill it even though it (an objection) is not legitimate.” Ilardi, too, is frustrated by the exemp-

tion process. “There’s nobody to call. You just email an address and hope they will respond,” he said. The requests are critical to Deutsche Precision. “We don’t have a profit margin on material, and we’re a very low-margin business,” Ilardi said. “It’s difficult to push the price on to our customers, because their customers aren’t accepting price changes either.” As of Aug. 6, the Commerce Department said it had received 33,099 requests

will likely saddle them with the most debt.” Other schools’ per-borrower debts include: • Truman State University, $24,938. • Missouri State University, $25,714. • University of Missouri-St. Louis, $25,873. • University of Missouri, $27,364. • Missouri University of Science and Technology, $27,500. • Washington University, $22,592. • Maryville University, $29,849. • Webster University, $29,867. • Lindenwood University, $32,774. • University of Illinois, $25,550. • Southern Illinois University Carbondale, $29,637.

such as liquidity, declining leverage and enplanement growth” — meaning it noticed that St. Louis Lambert International Airport has plenty of cash, less debt and more flights. Moody’s said it expects passenger growth this year of between 2 percent and 3 percent. Lambert served 15.1 million passengers in the fiscal year that ended June 30, an increase of 5 percent from the previous year. Comptroller Darlene Green said in a statement that the upgrade “shows the continuing confidence that Moody’s has in our management team” at the airport. Moody’s now rates the airport bonds two notches above the city’s general credit rating, which is Baa1.

David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

MOUND CITY MONEY From David Nicklaus’ blog about St. Louis business. STLtoday.com/moundcitymoney Three-fifths of Missouri and Illinois college students graduate with debt • Roughly three-fifths of college graduates in Missouri and Illinois carry some student debt, according to a report by website LendEDU. The 59 percent of Missouri students with loans owe an average of $26,834. Sixty-one percent of Illinois students are borrowers and they owe an average of $28,424. Those figures are for the class of 2017. The average debt amount rose slightly in Missouri compared with 2016, but fell slightly in Illinois. Nationally, the average debt rose 1 percent to $28,288. In Missouri, average debt amounts ranged from $21,292 per borrower at St. Louis University to $33,326 at William Jewell College in Liberty. LendEDU relied on a survey of 1,080 college financial-aid offices. It says the data can “inform both future and current college students about which four-year institutions

Moody’s upgrades St. Louis airport bonds • Moody’s, which has steadily downgraded St. Louis’ credit rating in recent years, has nicer things to say about the city’s airport revenue bonds. The rating agency upgraded the airport bonds by a notch, from A2 to A3. The move affects $657 million of the city’s debt. Moody’s said the upgrade was driven by “the positive trajectory of credit metrics

St. Louis’s Most Affordable Office Space

started, get incorporated and begin creating something,” he said. “Sometimes the hardest milestone is the first — going from nothing to something.” The grants come with no strings attached, although Holekamp says he hopes grateful students will pledge to pay the money back in $200-a-year increments after they graduate. Farm income and land prices are both falling • Prices of crop land are beginning to fall as a long slump in farm income continues, the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank reports. The Fed’s quarterly survey of agricultural bankers, conducted in June, found that prices for quality farmland were down 3.5 percent in the past year. Ranch or pasture land, however, got 1.6 percent more expensive, even though rents on such land fell by 9 percent. One banker said prices within a short drive of St. Louis are holding up especially well. “Demand for recreational/low-incomeproducing properties is increasing, as St. Louis MSA residents become more confident about their economy,” the anonymous banker told Fed pollsters. The bankers have reported declining farm income in every quarter since late 2013. They also report that farmers are spending less on both household expenses and capital items. The bankers reported that demand for farm loans grew during the second quarter, but that loan repayment rates slowed. The survey covers the St. Louis Fed’s region, which covers all of Arkansas and parts of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee.

Seed fund will back Washington University students’ ventures • Thanks to a $500,000 gift from the Holekamp family, Washington University will be handing out $1,000 grants to promising student entrepreneurs. The new Holekamp Seed Fund will offer as many as 20 grants a year to students. Cliff Holekamp, professor of entrepreneurship at the university’s Olin Business School and a partner in venture capital firm Cultivation Capital, will screen the applications along with his father, William Holekamp, and Elise Miller Hoffman, a principal at Cultivation. Washington University student entrepreneurs have founded several companies, including Varsity Tutors, which has raised more than $107 million in capital. In a statement, Holekamp says he hopes the seed fund will jump-start more success stories. “It’s enough to get them motivated, get

2 PRIME LOCATIONS 3 SUITES LEFT!

skobusch@bommarito.net

From 500 to 1,100 sq. ft.

314-731-7025

Ask For Stacie Kobusch Today!

• Flexible Lease Terms Move In Ready • Primary Access to Hwy. 270, Hwy. 70, Hwy. 170 & Hwy. 40 • St. Louis' Best - Prices From $10.75 sq. ft. and $447.00 Per Month • Full Service Includes All Utilities • Minutes From St. Louis International Airport • Conveniently Located Near Post Offices • Carpeted Offices Wall To Wall • Door to Door Mail Service • Includes Janitorial Services • 24/7 Digital Video Surveillance • Great Hwy. and Major Artery Visibility • Call Today for Details And Appointment • 24/7 - On Call Management Team $ave Money On Your Next Office Space *See Bommarito Leasing Representative For Full Details.

BUSINESS CENTERS - 2 LOCATIONS -

HAZELWOOD - 320 Brookes Dr. WEST COUNTY - 13610 Barrett Office Dr. Bommarito.com “Bommarito - We Make Office Space Affordable!”

Deposit & Loan Guide

Institution

Int Chking Money Acct Mkt Acct Min Min

3 mo CD Min

6 mo CD Min

0.71

10,000 1,000

3.01 1.10 Alliance Credit Union

5

Synchrony Bank

12 mo CD Min

18 mo CD Min

1.16

1.51

1.81

2.06

2.26

2.81

1,000

1,000

1,000 1,000

1,000

1,000

24 mo CD Min

36 mo CD Min

60 mo CD Min

1.66

NA 10,000

Phone / Website

636-343-7005 www.alliancecu.com

60-month is for new money only.

NA Simmons Bank

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NA

NA

2.45

2.60

2.70

NA

NA

NA

NA

2,000 2,000

2,000

NA

NA

866-246-2400 www.simmonsbank.com

NA

1.15

NA

NA

2.45

2.40

NA

0

NA

NA

2,000 2,000

2.50

2.55

2.85

2,000 2,000 2,000

Great Rates + Safety = Peace of Mind. Member FDIC.

800-869-3813 www.synchronybank.com

Savings Update

Are there fees to open or maintain a CD? By Sabrina Karl

If you’ve noticed the news stories over the last several years about the rising frequency of bank fees, and are considering stashing some of your savings in a certificate of deposit, you might wonder what fees you could encounter with a CD.

withdrawal penalty, which is triggered if you withdraw any of the CD’s balance before maturity.

Each bank’s early withdrawal penalty is self-determined, and is typically calculated as a number of months’ interest deducted The good news is that it’s a rare CD that from the CD’s balance before the bank will hit you with any fees. returns your funds. But the penalties vary widely, so it’s important to check a bank’s With the basic model of a certificate of policy before opening a certificate with deposit being that you agree both to invest them. a certain dollar amount with the bank or credit union for a predetermined number of Another fee that a small number of years and not withdraw the funds until the CDs charge is for paper statements. term expires, there are almost no transac- Occasionally, a CD will carry a condition tions involved with a CD, other than its that only electronic statements are allowed inception and maturity. — it might even be called an eCD. So requesting paper statements could land As a result, banks generally don’t charge you in monthly fee territory. any fees for opening a CD, nor for maintaining it through its term. For the vast majority of CD savers, though, the experience will be fee-free: you’ll That said, a couple specific instances deposit your funds, let them sit and earn could incur a fee or penalty in your CD interest for the term, and withdraw the account. The most common is the early principal and earnings in full at the end.

Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 8/7/18 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.


BUSINESS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

Retailers court internet-savvy youngsters Apps, targeted messages replace TV ads WASHINGTON POST

Nine-year-old Isabella Colello shops for just about everything online. She scrolls through the Amazon app on her phone at least once a day. She gets ideas from YouTube, searches on Google for things she wants and sends the links to her dad: Pink swimsuits, earrings, Adidas sneakers. “It’s like, I’ll put 18 items in my cart, and we’ll end up getting like one or two,” said Isabella, who lives in Sharpsville, Pa., and spends about $100 a month online. “It’s so much better than going to the mall because there aren’t that many places to shop anymore.” Children and preteens are more connected to the internet than ever before, which means retailers are looking for new ways to market — and sell — directly to young shoppers on their phones, tablets and laptops. Gone are the days of blanket television ads, marketing experts say. Instead, companies are flocking to Snapchat, YouTube Kids and other mobile apps to reach children with personalized messages. Nearly half of 10- to 12-yearolds have their own smartphones, according to Nielsen. By the time they’re teenagers, 95 percent of Americans have access to a smartphone. “Kids are shopping on their phones and influencing much more of their families’ spending,”

said Katherine Cullen, director of retail and consumer insights for the National Retail Federation. “As a result, retailers are paying a lot more attention to pint-sized customers.” Back-to-school season is peak time for direct-to-kids marketing. Brands such as Five Star, which makes binders and folders, and Red Bull, the energy drink maker, have released new backto-school “filters” on Snapchat, while clothing chain Justice is advertising in-store fashion shows on its app. Families are expected to spend an average of $685 per household on clothing, shoes and other items for school-age children in the coming weeks, according to the National Retail Federation. But advocacy groups say marketing to children directly on their smartphones — where companies can collect data on users and tailor ads to specific consumers — also raises concerns, not just about privacy but also about the kind of influence those ads may have on children. “As adults, we might think it’s a little weird or creepy if we’re getting targeted ads that follow us from site to site,” said Josh Golin, executive director of the Campaign for a CommercialFree Childhood. “Kids, though, are especially vulnerable because they have no understanding of what those ads are or why they’re seeing them.” Nearly 1.5 million children age

BESS ADLER • Bloomberg

An employee pulls a pallet jack carrying online orders at the Amazon fulfillment center in Robbinsville, N.J., in June.

11 and under have active Snapchat accounts, according to data from eMarketer, which expects continued double-digit growth in coming years. (Snapchat requires that users be at least 13.) The social media platform — which is particularly popular among teenagers and 20-somethings — has emerged as a holy grail for retailers in search of young consumers. That is especially true, the company says, during back-to-school seasons, where last year users spent an extra 130 million hours using the platform to chat with friends and connect with popular brands like Vans, Hollister and Michael Kors. “Kids have their own screens and are choosing exactly what they want to watch at younger ages,” said Nick Cicero, chief executive of Delmondo, a New York

firm that helps brands such as Red Bull and MTV market themselves on Snapchat and other social media platforms.” Justice, the clothing brand, is popular among the under-13 crowd and pitches its mobile app to parents as “a safe place where your girl can create, engage and have fun with awesome girls just like herself.” Once in the app, shoppers can save items to a wish list that they’re encouraged to email to their parents. Amazon, meanwhile, allows children as young as 13 to create their own logins for online purchases. (Parents can either set spending limits or ask to approve all purchases.) The company declined to say how many teenagers had signed up for teen accounts since they were introduced late last year but said “customer re-

Map would be guideline ABATEMENT • FROM C1

Tax abatement typically lasts up to a decade. The St. Louis comptroller’s office found that the city did not collect nearly $30 million in revenue last year due to property tax abatement. About 60 percent of property tax revenue goes to St. Louis Public Schools, which has no say in whether the incentives are granted. In May, Alderman Shane Cohn, the chair of the Neighborhood Development Committee that sees the bulk of tax abatement requests, said on Twitter that he would hold up abatement bills in his committee. “That’s it, folks!” he wrote, linking to an article about a downgrade to the city’s credit. “No more tax abatement in the central corridor. Period. Not in my committee.” Cohn Cohn told the Post-Dispatch this week the ultimatum was intended to put pressure on officials to develop “a consistent policy” on incentive use. He also wants a new plan to better direct incentives in areas truly struggling with disinvestment, particularly north St. Louis and the southeast swath of the city. “We needed more consistent guidelines and we needed to put more emphasis on investing in areas that are being disinvested,” Cohn said. Cohn said the abatement map has been shown to about 10 aldermen, most of whom are supportive. He’s “guardedly optimistic” with the progress that’s been made in recent months and hopes he won’t have to continue holding up tax abatement bills in his committee when the Board of Aldermen is back in session starting next month. St. Louis Development Corp. Director Otis Williams said each request for tax abatement will still be made on a case-by-case basis and that there can still be “special cases” that don’t fit into the recommendations outlined in the map. “The map will continue to evolve based on actual data, and it’s only a guide,” Williams said. But, he added, “it is a way for us to have a baseline going forward.” Meanwhile, the city economic development board that vets requests for tax abatement made a slight change to its procedures that could make it more difficult for property owners to win tax breaks from aldermen when staff says the incentive isn’t necessary. LCRA will no longer blight properties and submit redevelopment plans to aldermen when it recommends no tax abatement, required steps in the process before real estate tax breaks are awarded. The city’s Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority had continued to approve the procedural steps for property owners to obtain tax abatement even when its staff said projects didn’t require the incentive to move forward. “One of the things that’s come up, we’ve all scratched our head, is why are we blighting areas in a redevelopment area if we’re not going to grant a tax incentive or tax abatement for that,” LCRA board chair Chris Goodson said at a meeting last month. “It’s been a healthy discussion here. I know the staff and the mayor’s office have had a healthy discussion.” When the LCRA board was still passing blighting and redevelopment plans on to aldermen despite negative recommendations for tax abatement, some aldermen were then amending the plans submitted to the board and adding tax abatement into the board bills required for final tax abatement approval. Ultimate authority to pass tax abatement still rests with aldermen, and the state law would allow them to institute their own blighting and tax abatement process as opposed to the LCRA beginning the process. But LCRA’s decision to no longer pass requests with negative recommendations on to aldermen won’t make the process any easier. The move is the latest policy change at LCRA. In the last couple of years, the board has stopped recommending full tax abatement except for properties in the weakest neighborhoods. In an effort to generate some new revenue immediately, it has opted to abate only a portion of property taxes. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Michael Crowell, 31, cleans brewing tanks last month after making a batch of beer at St. Louis Wine & Beermaking in Chesterfield.

Loans fall through BREWERY • FROM C1

Petrichor Brewing, were baffled. “It’s an area of prime development with a lot of housing sites approved,” Jonathan Crowell said. “But there was someone there that thought it’s not a good spot for our business. And now we’re working with new banks to try and make this location work.” Craft beer makers as a whole are pouring more beer than ever, with total craft volume nearly doubling over the last five years, according to the Brewers Association. But many aspiring brewers struggle to even get to that point of sale as bankers more closely scrutinize business plans and hundreds of new breweries flood the market each quarter. “When I think about the brewery environment now and how much more of a crowded category it is versus 10 years ago, it really makes it even more important to have a good business strategy and an approach to the market,” said Doug Best, vice president and director of Fifth Third Bank’s restaurant and beverage finance division. “It all boils down to how are

Trial decided Friday MONSANTO • FROM C1

competitor, BASF, in order to satisfy conditions of the merger outlined by the U.S. Department of Justice. That process is ongoing. Bayer and Monsanto officials said that a key round of required divestitures was completed Aug. 1. That day, BASF signaled that the remaining divestment — involving Bayer’s vegetable seeds — could be completed by mid-August. “These transactions are now completed, except for the vegetable seeds business for which closing is expected in mid-August 2018,” BASF said in a statement. The glyphosate trial decided Friday in San Francisco’s Superior Court of California pitted Monsanto against more than 5,000 plaintiffs who claimed weedkillers using the chemical caused cancer. The case was spearheaded by Dewayne Johnson, a former pest control manager for a California county school system who has terminal cancer, and who used to apply Monsanto’s glyphosate-based herbicides about 30 times per year. Monsanto said it would appeal the

you going to capitalize the business? It takes a lot more than just making good beer, although a good, consistent, quality beer is table stakes at this stage in the game.” Andy Hille, a former brewer for Perennial Artisan Ales who is opening Rockwell Beer Co., said he had two loans for his business fall through before he was able to move forward. His brewery, at 1320 South Vandeventer Avenue in the Botanical Heights neighborhood, will open in September, but there were months when Hille didn’t know if the venture would progress or stall like hundreds of others across the country. “There seems to be a disconnect between the financial side of things and the reality of the situation, because you’re buying a ton of stainless steel equipment and process piping,” Hille said. “So is it a factory? Is it a bar? Is it a restaurant? There’s an opportunity for us to do all of that, but from a banking standpoint, sometimes people don’t want to take the risk on all three.” Brewery upstart costs can range from high six-figures to several million dollars. Larger production facilities or historic rehabs can often force costs to skyrocket into the tens of mil-

jurors’ decision to have the company pay $289 million in damages. “We are sympathetic to Mr. Johnson and his family,” said Scott Partridge, Monsanto’s vice president of global strategy, in a statement released after the verdict was announced. “Today’s decision does not change the fact that more than 800 scientific studies and reviews – and conclusions by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. National Institutes of Health and regulatory authorities around the world – support the fact that glyphosate does not cause cancer, and did not cause Mr. Johnson’s cancer. We will appeal this decision and continue to vigorously defend this product, which has a 40-year history of safe use and continues to be a vital, effective, and safe tool for farmers and others.” But other legal challenges loom for Monsanto — and, soon, Bayer — thanks to class suits surrounding dicamba. Off-target movement of the hard-to-control chemical is blamed for damaging millions of acres of crops and other plants over the last few growing seasons, and some farmers say they have felt pressured to adopt Monsanto seeds engineered to tolerate dicamba solely to protect themselves. That trait is now found in

sponse has been strong.” It’s been over a year, Kristin Harris says, since her kids watched TV. Instead, her 6- and 10-yearold daughters spend hours a week watching videos on YouTube, where companies such as Nike and Nintendo routinely partner with “influencers” to get their toys, clothing and accessories featured in videos. “The videos that really get their attention are the ones where kids are playing with toys like Breyer Horses or Hatchimals — those really get them interested,” said Harris. “As an adult, you’re like, ‘Why are you watching this?’ But the next thing you know, they’re asking for Hatchimals because they saw them in a video.” It’s become increasingly challenging, marketing experts said, to keep a child’s interest — there is no expectation that they’ll have to sit through commercials; they can skip through ads and easily close out of videos they’re not interested in. As a result, brands such as Build-A-Bear, American Girl and Victoria’s Secret’s Pink now offer games and photo filters on their apps. “Snapchat and YouTube have become a way for brands to market right to tweens — in fact, it’s one of the only ways to get to them directly,” said Gregg L. Witt, executive vice president of youth marketing for advertising firm Motivate. “If you’re trying to target a specific demographic, TV no longer works. You’re going to mobile, digital, social media.”

lions of dollars. Without strong relationships or deep pockets, starting a brewery can be nearly impossible. Hille said he had been working on his plan for three years to varying degrees of success when he partnered with Green Street, the St. Louis development firm that built the Urban Chestnut Brewing Co.’s Grove beer hall, a $10 million renovation of the former Renard Paper facility at 4465 Manchester Avenue. “That put us over the edge because no one wanted to take the risk with us when we were first-time entrepreneurs,” Hille said. “We had plenty of brewing experience, but it really didn’t resonate as well with bankers who were more concerned about overall measurable risk.” Other young breweries, such as Narrow Gauge Brewing Company in Florissant, are operating in small spaces to begin. Narrow Gauge cofounder Jeff Hardesty brews out of the basement of Cugino’s Italian Restaurant, which is owned by his friend. Hardesty has found success in making New England IPAs, a hazy and more smooth variety of an India Pale Ale that aren’t readily available elsewhere in the St. Louis market. Having that distinction has helped the brewery grow — Narrow Gauge brewed 738 barrels in 2017, a massive increase over the 200 barrels he produced in the first year. This year, he’s on pace to brew well over 1,300 barrels thanks to a recent expansion of his brewhouse. But for other brewers, it can be hard to stand out. Brewers must continually roll out new beers in order to capture or retain consumers’ attention — or create a culture that keeps people coming back. Green Street has implemented a design concept for Rockwell that incorporates shipping containers to help the facility stand out, another key component to staying in business when craft breweries around the country are closing at a faster rate. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

about half of the country’s soybeans — the top crop planted in the U.S. this year — doubling its acreage from 2017. Those issues and allegations have fueled legal complaints from multiple angles. “Last week we filed two master complaints — one for all the crop damage cases and one for the anti-trust cases,” said Don Downing, a leading lawyer behind the lawsuits from the St. Louis law office, Gray, Ritter and Graham. “It sort of frames the issues that are going to be teed up first in the case,” Downing said, adding that the first trial for the complaints is scheduled to begin in May 2020. Monsanto has steadfastly denied that there are defects associated with its dicamba weed control system, or that it is liable for damage associated with the herbicide. Under its ongoing mandate from the Department of Justice to function as a technical competitor to Monsanto, Bayer said it was unable to comment on the legal battles facing both glyphosate and dicamba. Reuters contributed to this report. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com


MARKET WATCH

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

15 BEST LARGE-CAP STOCKS COMPANY

TICKER

IAC InterActive CenturyLink Inc Zebra Tech Michael Kors Hldgs Broadridge Fincl Nektar Therapeutics Worldpay Inc ZTO Express Cayman MercadoLibre Inc Express Scripts Andeavor Logistics Sprint Corp Sarepta Thera Jacobs Eng Plains All Am Pipe

DIV

YLD

IAC 1.36 .7 CTL 2.16 10.1 ZBRA ... ... KORS ... ... BR 1.94f 1.5 NKTR ... ... WP ... ... ZTO ... ... MELI .60 .2 ESRX ... ... ANDX 4.12 8.3 S ... ... SRPT ... ... JEC .60 .8 PAA 1.95 7.2

15 BEST MID-CAP STOCKS

52-WEEK P/E HIGH LOW

FRIDAY CLOSE

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

73 10 cc 22 39 dd cc ... cc 11 25 3 dd 28 35

193.00 21.38 161.26 72.67 129.37 59.75 92.14 21.13 372.35 83.64 49.54 6.03 129.53 71.88 27.27

40.29 2.55 19.02 8.43 14.38 5.81 8.32 1.74 28.47 6.12 3.50 0.41 8.66 4.79 1.75

183.77 100.57 22.64 13.16 167.61 94.78 73.18 36.76 131.21 71.58 111.36 17.51 90.80 63.56 22.67 12.84 417.91 217.06 85.07 55.80 55.21 40.66 8.87 4.81 176.50 35.26 73.90 49.31 26.99 18.38

26.4 13.5 13.4 13.1 12.5 10.8 9.9 9.0 8.3 7.9 7.6 7.3 7.2 7.1 6.9

24.9 7.5 7.9 9.2 9.7 25.0 6.5 2.5 13.6 2.7 15.7 6.5 -7.1 8.4 15.9

COMPANY

|9764321 73.4 |5432 6.0 |954 56.0 |962 58.0 |976542 75.7 |999971 217.8 |864321 35.0 |876431 47.5 |941 53.0 |864 33.7 |61 6.6 |82 -26.0 |999987621 250.2 |86432 34.9 |86321 33.5

TICKER

Wins Finance Hldgs 3D Systems Trede Desk Inc Cl A Belmond Ltd Match Group Inc Yelp Inc Mallinckrodt plc Core-Mark Holding Co Alteryx Inc Endo Intl plc Hortonworks Inc Five9 Inc Windstream Hldgs Twilio Inc Hertz Corp

DIV

WINS ... DDD ... TTD ... BEL ... MTCH ... YELP ... MNK ... CORE .40 AYX ... ENDP ... HDP ... FIVN ... WIN ... TWLO ... HTZ ...

10 WORST LARGE-CAP STOCKS COMPANY

TICKER

Newell Rubbermaid Dentsply Sirona Inc Coty Inc Perrigo Co plc Yandex NV Magna Intl Microchip Tech Kraft Heinz Co Teleflex Inc Noble Energy Inc

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK 20.82 -5.75 39.02 -8.71 12.05 -1.89 69.90 -8.81 31.89 -3.70 53.05 -6.12 87.41 -7.68 59.65 -4.83 228.13 -17.73 30.58 -2.31

DIV

YLD

P/E

NWL .92f XRAY .35 COTY .50 PRGO .76 YNDX ... MGA 1.32f MCHP 1.46f KHC 2.50 TFX 1.36 NBL .44

4.4 .9 4.1 1.1 ... 2.5 1.7 4.2 .6 1.4

4 51.57 20.21 dd 68.98 38.83 ... 21.68 12.02 dd 95.93 63.68 80 44.49 28.87 9 67.47 45.37 89 104.20 78.33 17 87.29 54.11 28 288.78 203.13 31 37.76 22.99

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

YLD P/E ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.3 ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

... 390.88 80 18.70 ... 97.87 cc 16.20 52 49.98 28 49.77 ... 41.70 38 36.29 ... 57.43 dd 17.34 dd 22.00 dd 44.45 ... 13.65 ... 79.20 ... 27.27

33.38 7.92 40.70 10.30 18.06 36.42 11.65 17.10 18.64 5.27 14.15 19.53 3.03 23.25 13.40

15 BEST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR 77.00 19.88 127.93 15.55 50.82 49.35 31.10 31.54 55.03 15.65 21.73 42.52 4.92 77.49 19.50

43.62 130.7 28.3 |9876521 -62.4 7.03 54.7 29.5 9 | 743 41.5 41.06 47.3 35.9 9 | 9732 72.8 4.35 38.8 35.2 8| 43 17.5 12.94 34.2 30.7 9 | 9999531 162.7 11.43 30.1 24.0 |82 16.3 6.93 28.7 43.6 |853 -18.6 7.03 28.7 34.3 |742 9.3 12.16 28.4 30.7 |999986432 149.8 3.45 28.3 40.7 |9995421 99.4 4.74 27.9 12.9 |9654 39.0 8.90 26.5 21.2 |99931 96.7 1.02 26.2 8.8 |9861 -52.2 15.49 25.0 26.7 |99997 136.1 3.59 22.6 38.3 |754 11.0

COMPANY

TICKER

Protagonist Thera Ekso Bionics Hldgs Inseego Corp Vitamin Shoppe Inc Armstrong Flooring Acer Therapeutics CohBar Inc Strongbridge Biophm NeoPhotonics Corp On Deck Capital Newater Technology Ceco Env HTG Molecular Diag Vericel Corp Cmcl Vehicle Grp

PTGX ... EKSO ... INSG ... VSI ... AFI ... ACER ... CWBR ... SBBP ... NPTN ... ONDK ... NEWA ... CECE .30 HTGM ... VCEL ... CVGI ...

-21.6 -18.2 -13.6 -11.2 -10.4 -10.3 -8.1 -7.5 -7.2 -7.0

-25.1 -14.0 -15.4 -7.9 -15.9 -11.4 -7.0 -6.6 -17.2 -15.1

COMPANY

|9999954321 -57.0 |9983 -28.0 |999631 -35.0 |85321 6.6 |7531 3.7 |973 14.1 |9865321 19.1 |99765431 -27.7 |87654 10.8 |9943 22.8

TICKER

Redfin Corp Portola Pharm High Point Resources Luminex Corp Spark Therapeutics Rite Aid Corp Extracion Oil & Gas TTEC Holdings Inc Fossil Group GTT Communications

DIV

RDFN ... PTLA ... HPR ... LMNX .24 ONCE ... RAD ... XOG ... TTEC .54f FOSL ... GTT ...

YLD P/E

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

... ... ... .9 ... ... ... 2.1 ... ...

31.50 64.56 7.60 35.37 96.59 2.80 17.42 43.75 32.17 62.32

17.96 -5.58 -23.7 -23.6 |753 -12.1 29.15 -8.61 -22.8 -27.6 |975321 -49.0 5.07 -1.40 -21.6 -22.1 |97643 52.0 27.20 -7.40 -21.4 -14.4 |8765431 36.2 58.42 -15.35 -20.8 -31.2 |86421 -24.5 1.48 -0.36 -19.6 -10.3 |87651 -34.5 12.27 -2.91 -19.2 -15.7 |64321 6.8 25.85 -6.10 -19.1 -26.8 |8754 -30.9 23.31 -5.47 -19.0 -8.6 9 | 999876421 179.9 32.80 -7.60 -18.8 -29.3 |762 14.1

... dd dd 36 dd 2 ... 25 dd dd

19.18 30.10 2.66 18.62 41.06 1.38 10.28 26.15 5.50 28.30

YLD P/E

52-WEEK FRIDAY HIGH LOW CLOSE

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3.5 ... ... ...

23.97 4.77 2.58 11.15 17.91 30.00 10.79 9.25 8.97 9.41 28.20 9.75 5.83 14.75 13.90

3.40 0.84 0.82 3.20 4.11 6.79 1.64 1.45 1.99 1.91 4.87 1.88 0.78 2.75 1.91

dd dd dd 13 80 ... ... ... dd dd ... ... dd dd 38

5.50 1.02 1.01 2.95 12.03 7.36 4.44 4.30 4.56 4.11 7.60 4.00 1.59 3.00 5.55

10.41 2.63 2.76 11.85 16.85 27.89 6.84 6.10 8.62 8.62 22.04 8.62 3.58 12.90 9.04

48.5 46.9 42.3 37.0 32.3 32.2 31.5 31.2 30.0 28.5 28.4 27.9 27.9 27.1 26.8

39.7 49.5 41.5 71.7 20.1 25.1 12.9 10.9 29.8 19.1 -1.5 29.5 12.6 41.8 25.9

|53 5.0 |976532 93.7 |98764 122.0 |965432 79.5 |653 13.2 |99986541 238.4 |9998763 249.0 |651 -12.4 |86 40.1 |965 76.1 |987631 121.3 |521 -4.8 |87651 60.4 |99997 272.1 |852 36.5

10 WORST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

10 WORST MID-CAP STOCKS

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

DIV

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

COMPANY

TICKER

Maiden Holdings Diebold Inc Endologix Inc Ovid Therapeutics Sanchez Energy Corp La Jolla Pharm Ultra Petroleum Corp ELF Inc Babcock&Wilcox Ent Flotek Industries

DIV

YLD P/E

MHLD .20m 4.3 DBD .40 10.1 ELGX ... ... OVID ... ... SN ... ... LJPC ... ... UPL ... ... ELF ... ... BW ... ... FTK ... ...

dd 4 dd dd dd dd ... ... dd dd

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 11.10 23.50 6.72 12.44 6.19 41.36 10.18 26.00 10.16 6.77

4.15 4.70 3.75 5.28 2.78 22.68 1.08 9.30 1.61 2.08

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

4.60 -3.75 -44.9 -39.9 |9951 -35.3 3.95 -3.05 -43.6 -68.3 |99997652 -75.9 2.99 -1.99 -40.0 -45.6 |85431 10.5 6.16 -3.36 -35.3 -44.0 |751 -5.4 2.90 -1.50 -34.1 -42.5 |99761 -40.6 23.20 -10.82 -31.8 -23.9 |97542 -23.1 1.17 -0.53 -31.2 -33.9 |999987641 -83.8 10.18 -4.21 -29.3 -35.3 |999851 -60.9 1.41 -0.51 -26.6 -39.7 9 | 998542 -61.5 2.26 -0.82 -26.6 -24.9 |9998654 -63.5

Note: Stocks classified by market capitalization, the product of the current stock price and total shares outstanding. Ranges are $100 million to $1 billion (small); $1 billion to $8 billion (mid); greater than $8 billion (large).

S&P 500 HOW TO READ THE TABLES Dividend: Expected cash payment to shareholders. PE ratio: Multiple of stock price to company earnings. 52-week high/low: Trading range over the past year. Last: Selling price at end of week. Net change: Dollar change in price of stock from previous week. Percent change: From the previous week.

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

NAME

DIV

PE

AES Corp AFLAC s AT&T Inc AbbottLab AbbVie Abiomed Accenture ActivsBliz AdobeSy AdvAuto AMD Aetna AffilMgrs Agilent AirProd AkamaiT AlaskaAir Albemarle AlexREE Alexion lf AlignTech Allegion Allergan AlliData AlliantEg s Allstate Alphabet C Alphabet A Altria Amazon Ameren AmAirlines AEP AmExp AmIntlGrp AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen Amphenol Anadarko AnalogDev Andeavor Ansys Anthem Aon plc Apache AptInv Apple Inc ApldMatl Aptiv ArchDan Arconic Assurant Autodesk AutoData AutoZone AvalonBay AveryD

.52 1.04 2.00 1.12 3.84

12 13.99 14 47.08 6 39.80 27 65.90 17 125.86 cc 450.93 26 168.95 40 81.64 58 263.83 26 148.70 cc 20.18 19 194.88 12 216.99 78 75.00 24 175.17 68 83.08 8 86.92 21 144.99 31 134.37 45 149.34 cc 385.00 ... 89.81 11 245.50 13 278.33 21 45.52 14 105.36 34 1273.89 38 1291.44 19 74.38 cc 1914.57 22 64.89 6 59.08 17 78.07 15 104.24 dd 65.55 43 155.28 38 92.37 11 183.90 10 106.27 32 79.32 17 201.23 36 95.90 78 76.70 34 103.59 43 152.97 53 184.95 16 267.95 28 152.78 28 49.59 25 46.72 24 209.78 14 62.40 18 103.23 21 50.60 dd 31.17 42 111.43 dd 142.94 37 141.52 16 797.89 24 193.41 37 123.67

2.66 .34f .24 2.00 1.20 .60 4.40 1.28 1.34f 3.72f .84 2.88 2.28 1.34 1.84 2.80f 1.83 .40 2.48 1.40 1.28 3.08f 1.82 3.60 1.52 .56f 5.28 .92 1.00 1.92 2.36 3.00 1.60 1.00 1.52 2.92 .80 .22 1.34 .24 2.24 2.76f 5.88 2.26

rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s Split increased shares by at least 20% in last year. t Paid in stock. Approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of stock. un Unit, including more than one security. v Trading halted on primary market. vj In bankruptcy or receivership. x Ex-dividend.

j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year. Cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. lf Late filing with SEC. m Current annual rate, decreased by most recent dividend announcement. n New issue in the last year. p Initial dividend. Annual rate not known. Yield not shown. pf Preferred-stock issue. pr Preferences. r Declared or paid in last 12 months plus stock dividend. rs Reverse split decreased outstanding shares by at least 50% in last year.

FOOTNOTES a Extra dividends paid but not included. b Annual rate plus stock dividend. c Liquidating dividend. cc P/E greater than 99 cld Issue recalled for redemption by company. dd loss in last 12 months e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Annual rate, increased on most recent dividend announcement. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Doesn’t meet continued-listing standards. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split.

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

9.86 13.56 -.13 39.58 46.48 -.11 30.13 32.26 -.01 48.05 64.03 -1.20 69.47 95.80 -.73 144.01 377.83 +.72 127.26 160.68 +.31 57.29 70.61 -.71 143.95 253.70 +.42 78.81 146.35 +1.67 9.04 19.06 +.57 149.69 194.52 +5.79 145.00 148.16 -3.60 58.22 66.26 +.53 143.79 157.87 -2.09 44.65 74.66 +.05 57.53 63.23 +.43 86.75 98.50 +5.89 114.00 125.21 -2.25 102.10 118.88 -4.79 165.18 364.53 +1.02 73.85 81.80 +.08 142.81 184.00 -1.93 192.02 228.16 +.57 36.84 42.72 -.04 85.59 98.63 +.58 903.40 1237.61+13.90 918.60 1252.51+14.35 53.91 59.05 -.68 931.75 1886.30+63.01 51.89 62.78 +.33 35.64 37.26 -1.06 62.71 70.85 +.29 83.97 101.58 +.79 49.57 52.22 -1.43 130.37 149.18 -1.81 76.04 87.64 -.41 129.87 137.12 -3.74 71.90 81.98 +1.01 61.77 75.88 -.69 163.31 194.42 -3.57 77.52 93.75 -.11 39.96 66.82 -1.44 76.41 94.94 -1.62 89.58 150.23 +3.05 119.20 171.53 -1.74 179.40 260.04 +2.09 130.87 141.76 -1.36 33.60 44.17 -.98 37.97 42.89 -.92 149.16 207.53 +.27 41.94 48.13 -.71 75.99 94.53 -3.92 38.59 49.87 -.08 16.47 20.81 -.42 84.34 106.28 -1.86 101.55 134.85 +2.80 102.81 139.29 +5.04 497.29 738.96+17.58 152.65 177.20 -2.88 91.75 110.16 -2.99

-.9 -.2 -1.8 -.8 +.2 +.2 -1.0 +.2 +1.2 +3.1 +3.1 -2.4 +.8 -1.3 +.1 +.7 +6.4 -1.8 -3.9 +.3 +.1 -1.0 +.3 -.1 +.6 +1.1 +1.2 -1.1 +3.5 +.5 -2.8 +.4 +.8 -2.7 -1.2 -.5 -2.7 +1.2 -.9 -1.8 -.1 -2.1 -1.7 +2.1 -1.0 +.8 -1.0 -2.2 -2.1 +.1 -1.5 -4.0 -.2 -2.0 -1.7 +2.1 +3.8 +2.4 -1.6 -2.6

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

BB&T Cp BakHuGE n BallCorp s BkofAm BkNYMel Baxter s BectDck BerkH B BestBuy Biogen BlackRock BlockHR Boeing BookingHl BorgWarn BostProp BostonSci BrghtFn n BrMySq BroadcInc BroadrdgF BrownFB s CA Inc CBOE Glb CBRE Grp CBS B CF Inds s CH Robins CME Grp CMS Eng CSX CVS Health CabotO&G Cadence CampSp CapOne CardnlHlth CarMax Carnival Caterpillar Celgene Centene s CenterPnt CntryLink Cerner ChartCm n Chevron Chipotle ChubbLtd ChurchDwt s Cigna Cimarex CinnFin Cintas Cisco Citigroup CitizFincl CitrixSy s Clorox CocaCola CognizTch

1.62f .72f .40 .60f 1.12f .76 3.00

15 56.31 43.03 50.75 -.44 -.9 cc 38.10 25.53 34.75 +.87 +2.6 21 43.24 34.71 40.32 -1.10 -2.7 16 33.05 22.75 31.19 -.32 -1.0 12 58.99 49.39 51.02 -1.75 -3.3 34 76.51 59.36 71.50 -.85 -1.2 cc 253.77 191.53 249.33 +2.21 +.9 28 217.62 172.61 206.63 +6.39 +3.2 28 79.90 51.61 78.71 +2.63 +3.5 21 388.67 249.17 343.00 -1.21 -.4 19 594.52 408.62 478.95 -3.45 -.7 9 31.80 22.45 25.86 +.51 +2.0 32 374.48 230.94 339.41 -7.32 -2.1 26 2228.991630.56 1897.66-132.05 -6.5 12 58.22 42.06 43.94 -1.37 -3.0 31 131.84 111.57 128.94 -.16 -.1 26 37.30 24.54 33.55 +.02 +.1 ... 67.55 39.24 39.96 -3.83 -8.7 59 70.05 49.96 59.31 +.15 +.3 8 285.68 197.46 212.23 -5.58 -2.6 39 131.21 71.58 129.37+14.38 +12.5 30 59.58 38.05 53.25 -.74 -1.4 20 44.25 31.45 43.38 -.70 -1.6 37 138.54 92.09 92.49 -2.14 -2.3 18 50.43 34.38 46.99 -2.51 -5.1 12 67.57 47.54 52.52 -.64 -1.2 dd 49.95 28.47 49.27 +.20 +.4 28 100.18 65.55 94.90 -.89 -.9 36 174.36 123.05 163.92 +2.29 +1.4 29 50.83 40.48 48.37 +.01 10 72.91 48.11 72.39 +1.13 +1.6 12 84.00 60.14 69.05 +4.16 +6.4 45 29.57 21.71 23.64 +.25 +1.1 45 46.99 35.49 45.20 +.43 +1.0 13 54.37 32.63 41.35 -1.41 -3.3 15 106.50 76.98 96.10 -.58 -.6 12 75.75 48.14 48.40 -1.90 -3.8 19 81.67 57.05 73.08 -1.61 -2.2 14 72.70 56.45 59.60 +.55 +.9 16 173.19 112.69 135.92 -2.59 -1.9 27 147.17 74.13 91.21 +.77 +.9 21 139.77 81.00 138.49 +3.66 +2.7 20 30.45 24.81 28.13 +.16 +.6 10 22.64 13.16 21.38 +2.55 +13.5 33 73.86 52.05 65.18 -1.67 -2.5 98 408.83 250.10 302.45 -1.21 -.4 55 133.88 105.30 123.34 -.71 -.6 cc 493.00 247.52 485.47+22.20 +4.8 17 157.50 123.96 135.89 -2.92 -2.1 ... 58.03 43.21 55.74 -1.43 -2.5 18 227.13 163.02 183.28 -5.97 -3.2 19 130.16 82.45 89.99 -4.04 -4.3 21 80.67 66.33 74.39 -1.15 -1.5 36 212.59 130.09 210.99 +4.07 +2.0 22 46.37 30.36 43.78 +.95 +2.2 12 80.70 64.38 70.26 -2.13 -2.9 11 48.23 31.51 40.27 -.15 -.4 31 116.82 73.34 111.44 +1.50 +1.4 23 150.40 113.57 140.21 -2.87 -2.0 87 48.62 41.45 46.08 -.54 -1.2 24 85.10 69.24 75.56 -2.26 -2.9

1.80f 12.52f 1.00f 6.84 .68 3.20 1.60 7.00 1.94f 1.02 1.24f .05p .72 1.20 1.84 2.80a 1.43 .88 2.00 .24 1.40 1.60 1.90 2.00 3.44f 1.11 2.16 4.48 2.92e .87f .04 .64 2.12 1.62f 1.32f 1.80f .52 3.84 1.56 .80

Mutual funds GL: Long Government GR: Global Real Estate GS: Short Government HM: High-Yield Muni HY: High-Yield Bond IB: World Bond IC: Trading-Inverse Commodities ID: Industrials IE: Trading-Inverse Equity IH: World Allocation IP: Inflation-Protected Bond IS: Trading-Miscellaneous JS: Japan Stock LB: Large Blend LC: Trading-Leveraged Commodities LE: Trading-Leveraged Equity LG: Large Growth LO: Long-Short Equity LP: Energy Limited Partnership LS: Latin America Stock LV: Large Value MA: Allocation - 50-70% Equity MB: Mid-Cap Blend MG: Mid-Cap Growth MI: Muni National Intermediate ML: Muni National Long MQ: Miscellaneous Region MR: Miscellaneous Sector MS: Muni National Short MU: Multisector Bond MV: Mid-Cap Value ND: Trading-Inverse Debt NE: Market Neutral NT: Nontraditional Bond PJ: Pacific/Asia ex-Japan Stock RI: Target-Date Retirement RR: Preferred Stock SB: Small Blend SC: Communications SF: Financial SG: Small Growth SH: Health SI: Muni Single State Intermediate SL: Muni Single State Long SN: Natural Resources SP: Equity Precious Metals

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Friday value: Price at which shares can be sold. Year-to-date return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Three-year and five-year annualized return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Objective: Fund’s investment category. 1-yr Rank: On a 1-to-5 scale, with 1 meaning the fund ranks in the top 20% of its category. FUND OBJECTIVES: AL: Allocation - 70-85% Equity AM: Multialternative BB: Commodities Broad Basket BL: Bank Loan BM: Bear Market CA: Allocation - 30-50% Equity CC: Consumer Defense CD: Consumer Cyclical CH: China Region CI: Intermediate-Term Bond CL: Long-Term Bond CR: Multicurrency CS: Short-Term Bond CV: Convertibles DP: Diversified Pacific/Asia EB: Emerging-Markets Bond EE: Equity Energy EI: India Equity EM: Diversified Emerging Markets ES: Europe Stock FA: Foreign Small/Mid-Value FB: Foreign Large-Blend FF: Managed Futures FG: Foreign Large-Growth FQ: Foreign Small/Mid-Blend FR: Foreign Small/Mid-Growth FV: Foreign Large-Value FX: Single Currency GI: Intermediate Government NAME

FRI NAV

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

AB DiversMunicipal 14.15 ReltvValA m 6.12 -.02 AMG YacktmanI d 23.86 -.12 AllianzGI NFJDivValA m 15.32 -.11 American Beacon SmCpValInstl 29.21 +.12 American Century EqIncInv 9.03 -.04 GrInv 37.02 +.16 HeritageA m 22.54 +.12 IntlGrA m 13.37 -.22 SelA m 76.97 +.20 UltraInv 50.62 +.26 American Funds AMCpA m 34.01 AmrcnBalA m 27.71 -.02 AmrcnHiIncA m 10.23 -.01 AmrcnMutA m 41.91 -.29 BdfAmrcA m 12.58 +.03 CptWldGrIncA m 50.98 -.50 CptlIncBldrA m 60.44 -.53 CptlWldBdA m 19.35 -.08 EuroPacGrA m 53.40 -.57 FdmtlInvsA m 64.04 -.38 GlbBalA m 31.99 -.30 GrfAmrcA m 55.30 +.06 IncAmrcA m 23.13 -.10 IntlGrIncA m 33.26 -.39 IntrmBdfAmrA m13.15 +.03 InvCAmrcA m 41.29 -.26 NewWldA m 64.92 -.76 NwPrspctvA m 46.06 -.27 SmCpWldA m 59.30 +.26 TheNewEcoA m 48.76 +.06 TxExBdA m 12.80 +.01 WAMtInvsA m 45.76 -.19 Angel Oak MltStratIncIns 11.16 Artisan IntlInstl 32.80 -.79 IntlSmCpInv 23.06 -.42 IntlValueInstl 36.83 -.51 SmCpInvs 37.24 +.51 Baird AggrgateBdInstl 10.58 +.05 CorPlusBdInstl 10.92 +.04 ShrtTrmBdInstl 9.57 +.01 BlackRock AlCpEngyRsInvA m11.84 -.06 EqDivInstl 23.43 -.14 EqDivInvA m 23.36 -.14 GlbAllcIncInstl 19.69 -.09 GlbAllcIncInvA m19.57 -.09 GlbAllcIncInvC m17.65 -.09 HYBdInstl 7.67 StrIncOpIns 9.75 -.01 StratMuOpIns 11.71 -.02 TtlRetInstl 11.33 +.03 CGM Rlty 28.27 -.89 Calamos MktNetrlIncIns 13.40 -.01

+5.0 +4.4 +2.2

+1.4 +1.9 MS 5 +10.7 +10.8 LV 1 +10.7

+8.5 LV

2

+7.7

+8.1 LV

3

+11.4 +10.3 SV

2

+2.3 +12.8 +8.3 +.3 +12.0 +16.6

+11.6 +14.6 +8.0 +4.4 +14.4 +15.9

+10.4 +14.7 +10.0 +5.1 +15.4 +16.5

LV LG MG FG LG LG

5 2 4 2 3 1

+10.7 +3.0 +2.2 +3.7 -1.1 +.8 -2.2 -2.2 -2.2 +4.3 -.4 +11.6 +.4 -3.4 -.3 +4.4 -3.0 +6.7 +6.3 +9.3 -.1 +4.4

+12.0 +8.8 +5.5 +10.4 +1.6 +7.6 +4.5 +2.0 +5.8 +12.7 +4.6 +14.5 +7.3 +3.5 +.6 +11.0 +7.5 +10.9 +9.9 +12.4 +2.7 +12.1

+13.4 +9.0 +4.0 +10.5 +2.1 +8.4 +5.5 +1.0 +6.7 +12.8 +5.3 +14.6 +7.4 +3.8 +0.9 +11.9 +5.3 +11.1 +10.3 +13.7 +3.9 +11.6

LG MA HY LV CI WS IH IB FG LB IH LG AL FB CS LB EM WS SW LG MI LV

3 2 1 2 4 3 5 4 4 4 3 3 5 2 5 4 1 1 1 3 1 1

+6.6

+2.1 -2.1 -.1 -4.9 +21.9 -1.1 -1.0 +.4 +5.0 +4.6 +4.4 +.5 +.4 -.1 +1.7 -.1 +1.5 -1.5

+3.6

+4.7 MU

+2.7 +4.2 +5.3 +4.8 +5.6 +6.1 +15.0 +13.1

FG FR FB SG

4 2 4 2

+2.9 CI +3.2 CI +1.5 CS

2 2 3

+4.5 -1.8 EE +12.4 +11.0 LV +12.1 +10.7 LV +4.8 +5.0 IH +4.5 +4.7 IH +3.7 +3.9 IH +5.8 +5.5 HY +2.4 +2.9 NT +4.7 +4.9 MI +1.9 +3.1 CI

2

+2.2 +2.6 +1.4

1 1 4

-11.9

+4.3

+8.9 MB 5

+3.0

+4.0

+3.8 NE

1

NAME

FRI NAV

Causeway IntlValInstl d 16.25 ClearBridge AggresivGrA m 219.30 LgCpGrI 50.68 Columbia ContrCoreIns 26.89 DivIncIns 22.51 GlbDivOppA m 18.69 SelM/CValA m 13.04 DFA EMktCorEqI 21.29 EMktSCInstl 21.72 EmMktsInstl 28.34 EmMktsValInstl 29.57 FvYrGlbFIIns 10.94 GlbEqInstl 23.71 GlbRlEsttSec 11.03 IntlCorEqIns 13.81 IntlRlEsttScIns 5.11 IntlSmCoInstl 20.37 IntlSmCpValIns 21.32 IntlValInstl 19.12 ItmGovtFIIns 12.06 LgCpIntlInstl 22.95 OneYearFIInstl 10.26 RlEsttSecInstl 35.34 ShTrmExQtyI 10.72 TAUSCorEq2Instl 19.15 TMdUSMktwdVl 31.59 TMdUSTrgtedVal 39.45 TwYrGlbFIIns 9.94 USCorEq1Instl 24.27 USCorEqIIInstl 22.75 USLgCo 22.03 USLgCpValInstl 39.51 USMicroCpInstl 24.37 USSmCpInstl 38.84 USSmCpValInstl 40.79 USTrgtedValIns 26.35 USVectorEqInstl 20.17 Davis NYVentureA m 32.66 Delaware Inv ValInstl 22.40 Dodge & Cox Bal 107.99 GlbStk 13.80 Inc 13.47 IntlStk 43.58 Stk 211.14 DoubleLine CorFII 10.71 TtlRetBdI 10.42 TtlRetBdN b 10.42 Eaton Vance AtlntCptSMIDCI 36.52 FltngRtInstl 9.07 Edgewood GrInstl 34.92 FPA Crescent d 35.27 NewInc 9.92 USVal 10.33 Federated InsHYBdIns d 9.75 StratValDivIns 5.84

SR: Real Estate SS: Muni Single State Short ST: Technology SU: Utilities SV: Small Value TA: Target-Date 2000-2010 TD: Target-Date 2015 TE: Target-Date 2020 TG: Target-Date 2025 TH: Target-Date 2030 TI: Target-Date 2035 TJ: Target-Date 2040 TK: Target-Date 2045 TL: Target-Date 2055 TN: Target-Date 2050 TW: Corporate Bond TV: Tactical Allocation UB: Ultrashort Bond VD: Trading-Leveraged Debt VL: Stable Value VO: Volatility WS: World Stock XM: Allocation - 85+% Equity XO: Infrastructure XQ: Target-Date 2060+ XR: Option Writing XS: Long-Short Credit XP: Emerging-Markets LocalCurrency Bond XY: Allocation - 15-30% Equity. FOOTNOTES b -Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d -Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f -front load (sales charges). m -Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA-not available. p -previous day´s net asset value. s -fund split shares during the week. x - fund paid a distribution during the week. WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR -.30 -6.2 -1.01 +7.8 +.01 +12.6 -.04 -.13 -.22 -.05

+4.0 +3.0 -2.6 +1.3

-.41 -.41 -.53 -.49 +.03 -.13 -.18 -.26 -.09 -.35 -.42 -.42 +.06 -.43 +.01 -.57 +.02 +.02 -.06 +.17 +.01 +.02 +.01 -.04 -.10 +.18 +.20 +.24 +.12 +.03

-7.8 -9.0 -6.6 -5.3 +.6 +2.6 +.7 -3.8 -1.7 -4.0 -7.2 -5.0 -1.3 -2.6 +.9 +1.7 +.4 +6.2 +3.1 +5.5 +.8 +7.2 +6.1 +7.2 +2.0 +10.9 +8.5 +7.8 +6.3 +5.7

+2.5

+3.7 FV

1

+7.0 +9.8 LG +15.1 +16.3 LG

5 2

+10.5 +12.0 LB +11.8 +11.6 LV +4.8 +4.1 WS +7.1 +9.1 MV

5 2 5 3

+8.1 +7.8 +8.5 +9.7 +1.6 +10.0 +5.7 +6.2 +3.5 +8.5 +6.6 +4.4 +.8 +4.4 +.9 +6.7 +1.6 +11.7 +10.3 +10.6 +.9 +12.4 +11.7 +12.7 +11.2 +13.7 +12.1 +11.4 +10.9 +11.0

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 4 2 4 1 5 1 5 1 3 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 1

+4.7 +5.7 +4.6 +4.4 +1.8 +9.7 +7.3 +6.0 +5.1 +8.0 +7.5 +4.5 +1.7 +4.8 +0.7 +8.6 +1.5 +11.8 +11.1 +10.8 +0.7 +12.5 +11.6 +13.1 +11.3 +12.1 +11.2 +9.8 +10.3 +10.7

EM EM EM EM IB WS GR FB GR FQ FA FV GI FB UB SR CS MB LV SV IB LB MB LB LV SB SB SV SV MV

-.11 +5.9

+11.6 +11.9 LB

1

-.04 +5.2

+10.4 +11.1 LV

1

+8.8 +9.2 +8.7 +9.1 +2.9 +3.1 +3.0 +4.4 +12.1 +12.4

2 4 1 5 1

-.10 +3.1 -.18 -.4 +.02 -.5 -1.15 -5.9 -.40 +5.6 +.02 +.04 +.04

-.6 +.1 +.1

+.06 +8.7 +.01 +3.4 +.05 +18.1

+2.3 +2.2 +2.0

MA WS CI FB LV

+3.2 CI +3.1 CI +2.8 CI

1 1

+13.6 +13.9 MG 3 +4.9 +3.8 BL 1 +18.1 +19.5 LG

2

-.30 +2.3 +1.3 +.01 +5.4

+6.6 +1.9 +3.3

+6.7 MA 3 +1.7 CS 1 +6.3 LB 5

+1.0 -.09 -3.0

+5.9 +7.0

+5.4 HY +8.7 LV

3 5

NAME

DIV

PE

ColgPalm Comcast s Comerica ConAgra ConchoRes ConocoPhil ConEd ConstellA CooperCo Copart s Corning Costco Coty CrwnCstle Cummins DR Horton DTE DXC Tch n Danaher Darden DaVita Inc Deere DeltaAir Dentsply DevonE DigitalRlt Discover DiscIncA DiscIncC DishNetw h Disney DollarGen DollarTree DomEngy Dover DowDuPnt DukeEngy DukeRlty E-Trade eBay s EOG Rescs EQT Corp EastChem Eaton Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci s ElectArts EliLilly EmersonEl Entergy EnvisnHl n Equifax Equinix EqtyRsd EssexPT EsteeLdr EverestRe Evergy EversrceE Exelon Expedia h ExpdIntl ExpScripts ExtraSpce ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp Facebook Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FidNatInfo FifthThird FirstEngy Fiserv s Fleetcor Flowserve Fluor FootLockr FordM Fortive n FBHmSec FrankRes FrptMcM GGP Inc Gallaghr Gap Garmin Gartner GenDynam GenElec GenMills GenMotors GenuPrt

1.68 .76 2.40f .85

23 17 16 18 21 58 16 17 96 38 dd 32 ... cc 39 17 20 ... 25 23 18 27 12 dd 27 58 14 13 12 17 16 17 13 14 16 22 18 23 22 16 dd dd 14 18 31 15 46 29 dd 28 37 dd 22 cc 41 28 45 23 25 20 12 60 25 11 22 17 24 36 17 34 25 11 22 20 8 8 38 27 cc 41 19 5 ... 18 11 10 32 27 15 21 43 20 dd 10 dd 21

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

22 1.46f 89 5 1.68 52 3.48 18 14 1.64 10 1.04f 22 42 1.76 37 1.20f 11 .10 43 2.08 22 8 .12 55 1.76 24 .20 dd dd 1.60f 31 cc .92f 4 14 .56 27 .20 dd .20 ... 4.44 13 .78 33 1.40f 13 .80 70 .44 31 1.48a 20 3.20f 26 2.20f 19 4.80f 31 16 1.52 12 .60 48 21 3.12f cc 2.40 14 3.30f 50 .76 55 2.12f 7 3.80f 12 1.92f 19 1.64 13 .15 18 1.12 11 3.16f 18 3.04f 21 2.24 28 55 .70 13 .70 16 3.71 35 .28 33 .76 dd 1.36 16 4.56f 20 3.20f 28 2.78 19 .32f cc 3.30 35 2.80 21 2.12f 11 1.92 27 2.87 21 .69e 25 3.60 10 1.80 18 6.80 23 .36 16 99 2.48 dd 23 2.00f 20 2.50f 20 .88f 19 3.47 28 2.53 32 79 2.22 23 25 .56f 16 1.50f 33 1.48f 52 1.12 29 3.68 26 1.32 21 1.65 31 .90 24 2.40 15 2.00 29 cc .49m 9 3.25 37

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

73.18 104.20 64.66 111.15 110.24 286.85 91.74 46.54 70.21 187.98 59.38 32.32 125.31 47.82 35.17 96.19 49.08 111.36 83.60 423.21 51.57 35.20 42.04 17.29 17.70 172.07 27.76 43.15 81.88 37.76 54.61 174.43 115.61 360.88 61.18 70.48 269.20 321.01 87.67 83.34 71.99 53.48 71.57 163.59 122.07 39.90 169.22 79.69 131.13 212.80 73.10 92.35 74.84 20.26 122.51 87.72 95.93 41.64 119.43 123.97 92.42 213.40 168.54 127.43 75.59 67.53 94.67 64.77 127.14 54.50 234.90 35.21 86.84 69.28 40.11 116.49 147.79 102.17 229.75 60.05 177.70 70.64 505.49 20.21 73.31 109.97 79.91 210.72 139.63 312.38 92.72 135.65 217.31 177.67 63.93 106.35

72.67 +8.43 +13.1 87.41 -7.68 -8.1 51.37 -1.44 -2.7 109.00 +.96 +.9 99.85 -2.00 -2.0 182.32 -4.29 -2.3 65.46 -3.74 -5.4 41.94 -1.82 -4.2 60.70 +1.44 +2.4 170.99 -1.69 -1.0 48.39 -1.52 -3.0 31.49 +1.04 +3.4 121.01 +3.34 +2.8 37.21 -1.24 -3.2 33.79 +1.18 +3.6 92.12 +.63 +.7 45.84 -1.19 -2.5 59.75 +5.81 +10.8 81.95 +.27 +.3 345.87 +2.78 +.8 20.82 -5.75 -21.6 27.88 +.38 +1.4 35.60 -.86 -2.4 13.20 -1.88 -12.5 13.45 -1.85 -12.1 170.93 -.22 -.1 26.61 +.02 +.1 21.97 -.02 -.1 80.73 +1.99 +2.5 30.58 -2.31 -7.0 52.58 +2.00 +4.0 171.94 +.32 +.2 108.40 -1.41 -1.3 291.32 -5.93 -2.0 50.61 +.80 +1.6 63.45 -1.02 -1.6 254.79 +2.69 +1.1 318.94 +7.06 +2.3 78.78 -3.51 -4.3 67.85 +.40 +.6 68.90 +1.39 +2.1 48.32 -.15 -.3 42.67 -.29 -.7 143.55 -1.48 -1.0 107.46 -3.01 -2.7 28.84 -.13 -.4 153.74 +2.89 +1.9 63.56 -.87 -1.4 110.56 -.83 -.7 168.00 -4.51 -2.6 71.02 +1.28 +1.8 87.01 +1.82 +2.1 43.28 -.68 -1.5 18.40 -.14 -.8 112.87 -3.43 -2.9 84.92 -1.40 -1.6 69.90 -8.81 -11.2 40.93 +.39 +1.0 82.56 -4.28 -4.9 122.59 +.93 +.8 81.30 +.98 +1.2 186.14 +2.03 +1.1 154.79 -9.42 -5.7 117.14 -.26 -.2 53.98 -1.84 -3.3 64.57 -2.24 -3.4 81.43 -.90 -1.1 62.44 +.89 +1.4 96.97 -2.45 -2.5 51.32 -.11 -.2 214.73 +.75 +.4 28.74 +.10 +.3 83.19 -.99 -1.2 64.82 -.58 -.9 34.45 -.47 -1.3 108.53 -.31 -.3 136.38 +6.02 +4.6 89.97 -1.37 -1.5 196.35 +.55 +.3 56.51 -1.16 -2.0 144.78 +3.78 +2.7 63.25 -1.59 -2.5 368.78 -26.10 -6.6 19.13 -.01 -.1 72.86 +.21 +.3 107.78 +3.04 +2.9 79.32 +2.09 +2.7 173.26 -5.30 -3.0 136.09 -.85 -.6 293.25 -1.79 -.6 91.60 +2.55 +2.9 113.64 +1.22 +1.1 201.32 +3.24 +1.6 156.10 -2.39 -1.5 38.02 -4.10 -9.7 103.81 -.58 -.6

SVB FnGp 27 333.74 159.44 316.75 -4.91 -1.5 Salesforce cc 149.35 87.26 145.51 +4.47 +3.2 Schlmbrg 2.00 40 80.35 61.02 66.04 +.15 +.2 Schwab .52f 26 60.22 38.06 50.61 +.32 +.6 SeagateT 2.52 13 62.70 30.60 50.88 -3.00 -5.6 SealAir .64 20 49.94 40.76 39.76 -3.63 -8.4 SempraEn 3.58 21 122.98 100.49 114.44 -2.35 -2.0 Sherwin 3.44 34 450.83 326.68 442.99 +.11 SimonProp 8.00f 23 179.45 145.78 174.38 -3.89 -2.2 SkywksSol 1.52f 19 117.65 86.13 93.09 -2.14 -2.2 SmithAO s .72 30 68.39 53.42 57.46 -1.29 -2.2 Smucker 3.40f 15 133.38 96.13 110.83 -5.41 -4.7 SnapOn 3.28 16 185.47 140.83 170.18 +1.75 +1.0 SouthnCo 2.40 51 53.51 42.38 46.13 -2.80 -5.7 SwstAirl .64 10 66.99 49.76 58.99 +1.58 +2.8 StanBlkDk 2.64f 19 176.62 130.56 139.24 -5.27 -3.6 Starbucks s 1.44f 24 61.94 47.37 51.51 -.36 -.7 StateStr 1.68 14 114.27 84.56 83.99 -2.89 -3.3 Stericycle dd 79.18 56.64 61.47 -.19 -.3 Stryker 1.88 28 179.84 137.70 165.88 +.58 +.4 SunTrst 1.60 14 73.44 51.96 71.95 -.19 -.3 Symantec lf .30 9 34.20 17.81 19.18 -.07 -.4 Synchrony .84f 11 40.59 28.33 29.41 -.44 -1.5 Synopsys 47 94.80 75.59 93.53 +2.39 +2.6 Sysco 1.44 27 71.97 50.05 68.48 -.09 -.1 TE Connect 1.76 26 108.23 77.15 92.15 -.94 -1.0 TJX 1.56 23 100.45 66.44 100.70 +3.11 +3.2 TakeTwo dd 130.43 87.66 128.80 +5.39 +4.4 Tapestry 1.35 30 55.50 38.70 47.93 +1.40 +3.0 Target 2.56f 15 83.06 53.90 82.71 +1.26 +1.5 Technip .13 17 35.00 24.53 30.00 -1.21 -3.9 TexInst 2.48 28 120.75 79.60 110.09 -2.75 -2.4 Textron .08 36 69.36 47.24 65.75 -1.25 -1.9 ThermoFis .68 29 236.29 170.07 231.42 -1.90 -.8 3M Co 5.44f 28 259.77 190.57 201.96 -5.33 -2.6 Tiffany 2.20f 40 141.64 86.15 134.34 -1.46 -1.1 Torchmark .64 7 93.60 74.48 86.61 -.26 -.3 TotalSys .52 24 97.82 62.81 93.87 +.74 +.8 TractSupp 1.24 24 82.68 51.85 80.41 +1.79 +2.3 TransDigm 24.00 25 377.67 249.57 357.02 -12.80 -3.5 Travelers 3.08f 17 150.55 113.76 128.87 -.83 -.6 TripAdvis cc 62.36 29.50 54.35 +1.08 +2.0 21stCFoxA .36 21 50.15 24.81 45.48 +.06 +.1 21stCFoxB .36 19 49.65 24.30 44.92 Twitter dd 47.79 15.67 32.01 +.05 +.2 Tyson 1.20 11 84.65 56.79 60.18 +2.43 +4.2 UDR 1.29 24 40.33 32.88 38.59 -.54 -1.4 UltaBeauty 25 261.40 187.96 236.52 +1.50 +.6 UndrArm s 36 24.70 11.40 20.63 +.95 +4.8 UnAr C wi ... 22.68 10.36 19.14 +.76 +4.1 UnionPac 3.20f 10 151.50 101.90 148.84 -.94 -.6 UtdContl 12 83.66 56.51 81.72 +.38 +.5 UPS B 3.64 20 135.53 101.45 119.27 +.12 +.1 UtdRentals 8 190.74 106.52 148.59 +.18 +.1 US Bancrp 1.20 14 58.50 48.49 53.10 +.19 +.4 UtdTech 2.80 23 139.24 109.10 133.10 -.79 -.6 UtdhlthGp 3.60 23 263.02 186.00 260.36 +3.14 +1.2 UnivHlthS .40 16 128.15 95.26 124.41 +.22 +.2 UnumGrp 1.04f 1 58.73 35.33 35.18 -1.26 -3.5 VF Corp 1.84 51 95.96 60.01 96.29 +3.85 +4.2 ValeroE 3.20 31 126.98 64.22 115.37 +.79 +.7 VarianMed 85 130.29 95.23 111.18 -3.59 -3.1 Ventas 3.16 16 69.92 46.55 56.96 -1.04 -1.8 Verisign 40 159.11 97.15 152.92 +1.92 +1.3 Verisk 40 118.13 78.97 116.95 +2.56 +2.2 VerizonCm 2.36 7 54.77 43.97 52.47 +.20 +.4 VertxPh cc 183.39 136.50 174.82 +.28 +.2 ViacomB .80 6 35.55 22.13 30.34 +1.25 +4.3 Visa s .84 46 143.14 99.43 139.73 -.09 -.1 Vornado 2.52 26 80.30 64.14 72.75 +.74 +1.0 VulcanM 1.12 24 141.20 108.17 110.51 -3.99 -3.5 WEC Engy 2.21 21 70.09 58.48 67.15 +.82 +1.2 WalMart 2.08f 21 109.98 77.50 90.18 +1.10 +1.2 WalgBoots 1.76f 14 83.89 59.07 66.49 -.73 -1.1 WsteMInc 1.85 19 90.71 74.61 89.94 +.38 +.4 Waters 29 220.20 175.07 189.99 -3.99 -2.1 WellsFargo 1.72f 14 66.31 49.27 58.05 -.35 -.6 Welltower 1.68e 14 75.58 49.58 63.14 -1.18 -1.8 WDigital 2.00 7 106.96 65.30 64.79 -3.17 -4.7 WstnUnion .76 10 22.21 18.38 18.84 -.56 -2.9 WestRck 1.72 16 71.55 52.78 55.00 -.39 -.7 Weyerhsr 1.28 30 38.39 30.95 34.05 +.08 +.2 Whrlpl 4.60f dd 190.73 122.81 127.32 -7.46 -5.5 WmsCos 1.36 12 33.67 24.00 31.79 +.65 +2.1 WillisTwW 2.40 42 165.00 142.67 149.73 +.91 +.6 Wynn 3.00 41 203.63 124.11 148.52 -.67 -.4 XL Grp .88 dd 56.51 33.77 56.38 +.11 +.2 XcelEngy 1.52 21 52.22 41.51 47.53 +.35 +.7 Xerox rs 1.00 33 37.42 23.52 26.23 +.09 +.3 Xilinx 1.44 36 78.02 60.12 71.16 -.35 -.5 Xylem .84f 32 79.83 58.58 75.80 -.20 -.3 YumBrnds 1.44 30 88.07 72.61 82.94 +1.08 +1.3 ZimmerBio .96 17 129.34 104.28 122.57 -3.34 -2.7 ZionsBcp 1.20e 16 59.19 41.23 53.06 -.28 -.5 Zoetis .50 42 93.67 59.50 91.70 +.07 +.1

65.43 -2.07 -3.1 35.08 -.33 -.9 97.14 -.88 -.9 36.65 -.95 -2.5 137.73 +4.23 +3.2 71.94 +.65 +.9 78.67 -.44 -.6 213.30 +.03 253.26 -7.05 -2.7 60.23 +2.80 +4.9 32.74 -.10 -.3 220.31 -1.72 -.8 12.05 -1.89 -13.6 110.34 -2.15 -1.9 140.29 -1.32 -.9 44.92 +1.27 +2.9 110.34 +.24 +.2 86.10 -.30 -.3 100.33 -1.04 -1.0 109.47 +.59 +.5 71.79 -2.76 -3.7 137.05 -6.31 -4.4 54.71 +.45 +.8 39.02 -8.71 -18.2 42.84 -.21 -.5 120.96 -1.62 -1.3 74.52 +1.18 +1.6 25.99 -1.07 -4.0 24.17 -.77 -3.1 35.17 +.97 +2.8 112.68 -1.41 -1.2 102.33 +4.10 +4.2 92.43 +2.15 +2.4 70.69 -1.43 -2.0 81.55 -.69 -.8 67.74 +.92 +1.4 80.89 -.66 -.8 28.83 -.56 -1.9 60.57 +.46 +.8 34.09 +.43 +1.3 122.77 +.36 +.3 49.81 -.52 -1.0 99.87 -2.12 -2.1 80.55 -1.02 -1.3 146.86 -.26 -.2 66.63 -.39 -.6 138.06 -7.15 -4.9 131.32 +.45 +.3 102.25 +1.67 +1.7 73.86 +2.38 +3.3 83.39 -.38 -.5 44.67 +.28 +.6 128.36 +.60 +.5 437.24 -18.19 -4.0 65.96 -.95 -1.4 236.62 -5.79 -2.4 132.73 -2.26 -1.7 215.17 -5.52 -2.5 57.68 +1.50 +2.7 61.35 +.42 +.7 43.13 +.64 +1.5 131.89 -.21 -.2 73.08 -3.49 -4.6 83.64 +6.12 +7.9 92.90 +.70 +.8 79.42 -.78 -1.0 179.98 +7.75 +4.5 59.37 +1.25 +2.2 87.76 -.03 180.26 +2.48 +1.4 57.71 +1.45 +2.6 241.76 -1.56 -.6 125.04 -3.18 -2.5 106.88 +2.66 +2.6 29.34 -.37 -1.2 36.24 +.05 +.1 79.24 +2.99 +3.9 217.53 +1.47 +.7 50.10 +5.20 +11.6 55.66 +.01 47.97 +.81 +1.7 9.74 -.30 -3.0 79.70 -1.51 -1.9 54.63 -2.89 -5.0 32.09 -.21 -.7 15.11 -.60 -3.8 21.42 -.10 -.5 70.87 -.59 -.8 31.33 +.98 +3.2 63.83 -1.08 -1.7 140.32 +2.12 +1.5 191.81 -2.28 -1.2 12.77 -.37 -2.8 45.18 -2.06 -4.4 36.59 -1.14 -3.0 98.03 -.01

GileadSci 2.28 9 89.54 64.27 76.73 -1.20 -1.5 GlobPay s .04 39 121.00 92.90 116.14 -2.63 -2.2 GoldmanS 3.20f 18 275.31 214.64 229.61 -4.48 -1.9 Goodyear .56 8 36.07 20.75 24.28 -.35 -1.4 Graingr 5.44 25 358.63 155.00 351.30+13.66 +4.0 HCA Hldg .35p 19 131.10 71.18 128.17 -1.99 -1.5 HCP Inc 1.48 14 30.59 21.48 25.98 -.48 -1.8 HP Inc .56f 9 24.75 18.36 23.99 +.65 +2.8 Hallibrtn .72 cc 57.86 38.18 41.94 -.11 -.3 Hanesbds s .60 10 25.73 16.38 18.62 +.65 +3.6 HarleyD 1.48 15 56.50 39.34 43.25 -.81 -1.8 HarrisCorp 2.28 29 170.54 116.62 163.26 +.88 +.5 HartfdFn 1.20f 18 59.20 49.67 51.68 -1.08 -2.0 Hasbro 2.52 60 107.58 79.00 97.82 -1.71 -1.7 HelmPayne 2.80f dd 75.02 42.16 62.62 +1.32 +2.2 HSchein s 30 92.64 62.56 77.37 -2.86 -3.6 Hershey 2.89f 21 115.82 89.10 97.70 -1.46 -1.5 Hess 1.00 dd 71.14 37.25 64.27 -2.03 -3.1 HP Ent n .45e 13 19.48 12.82 15.85 -.13 -.8 Hilton .60 38 88.11 60.54 75.65 -2.38 -3.1 HollyFront 1.32 17 83.28 27.04 69.02 +1.37 +2.0 Hologic dd 45.09 35.10 40.66 -1.45 -3.4 HomeDp 4.12 26 207.61 146.89 196.30 +.66 +.3 HonwllIntl 2.98 72 165.13 134.50 153.09 -1.95 -1.3 Hormel s .75 23 38.00 29.75 37.09 +.07 +.2 HostHotls 1.00a 17 22.47 17.26 20.27 -1.36 -6.3 Humana 2.00f 27 327.50 231.90 325.04 +.93 +.3 HuntJB .96 18 131.74 89.81 121.11 +.30 +.2 HuntBncsh .56f 17 16.60 12.14 15.84 +.11 +.7 HuntgtnIng 2.88 22 276.69 201.91 237.85 +1.89 +.8 IdexxLab s 73 252.49 146.09 243.52 +.88 +.4 IHS Mark 31 54.41 42.40 53.79 +.84 +1.6 IPG Photon 26 264.11 161.05 162.47 -7.99 -4.7 IQVIA Hldg 15 125.35 87.45 121.15 -1.99 -1.6 ITW 4.00f 25 179.07 134.66 136.47 -3.08 -2.2 Illumina 86 341.08 189.15 330.25 -2.24 -.7 Incyte dd 140.11 60.23 64.44 +1.40 +2.2 IngerRd 2.12f 22 99.00 79.63 96.25 -.70 -.7 Intel 1.20 18 57.60 34.38 48.85 -.48 -1.0 IntcntlExc s .88e 17 77.22 63.93 73.27 +.46 +.6 IBM 6.28f 11 171.13 137.45 144.48 -3.22 -2.2 IntFlav 2.92f 34 157.40 122.11 132.41 -1.79 -1.3 IntPap 1.90 17 66.94 50.00 52.12 -.43 -.8 Interpublic .84 15 26.01 18.30 22.09 +.07 +.3 Intuit 1.56 47 219.46 133.60 211.01 +5.86 +2.9 IntSurg s 76 539.30 309.21 521.02 -1.58 -.3 Invesco 1.16 10 38.43 24.76 24.70 -.45 -1.8 IronMtn 2.20 30 41.52 30.78 34.60 -1.16 -3.2 JPMorgCh 2.24f 15 119.33 88.08 115.73 -1.36 -1.2 JacobsEng .60 28 73.90 49.31 71.88 +4.79 +7.1 JeffrFn .40 41 28.30 21.61 23.67 -.84 -3.4 JohnJn 3.60f 18 148.32 118.62 130.75 -1.20 -.9 JohnContl n 1.04e 25 42.60 32.89 36.90 -1.04 -2.7 JnprNtwk .72 15 29.95 23.61 26.89 +.55 +2.1 KLA Tnc 3.00f 16 123.96 87.93 114.23 -5.36 -4.5 KC Southn 1.44f 21 117.79 99.47 115.02 -.75 -.6 Kellogg 2.24f 17 73.24 56.40 71.38 -.77 -1.1 Keycorp .48f 14 22.40 16.28 21.38 +.02 +.1 KimbClk 4.00 22 124.15 97.10 110.09 -6.61 -5.7 Kimco 1.12 17 20.78 13.16 16.27 -.82 -4.8 KindMorg .80 23 20.20 14.69 18.17 +.55 +3.1 Kohls 2.44 15 79.92 36.50 75.66 +3.35 +4.6 KraftHnz n 2.50 17 87.29 54.11 59.65 -4.83 -7.5 Kroger s .56f 12 31.45 19.69 30.14 +.21 +.7 L Brands 2.40 10 63.10 30.42 31.24 -1.27 -3.9 L-3 Tch 3.20 21 218.71 175.87 210.06 -1.35 -.6 LKQ Corp 19 43.86 29.60 33.75 +.31 +.9 LabCp 21 190.36 146.68 179.59 +.68 +.4 LamResrch 4.40f 17 234.88 149.04 178.10 -9.19 -4.9 LeggPlat 1.52f 20 51.99 39.57 43.33 -.29 -.7 LennarA .16 14 72.17 48.71 53.38 +1.90 +3.7 LincNat 1.32 9 86.68 61.18 64.66 -1.97 -3.0 LockhdM 8.00 38 363.00 291.52 313.12 -7.43 -2.3 Loews .25 14 53.59 45.01 50.11 -1.03 -2.0 Lowes 1.92f 22 108.98 70.76 98.31 +.68 +.7 LyonBas A 4.00f 9 121.95 85.35 112.57 +.42 +.4 M&T Bk 3.20f 18 197.37 141.12 173.96 -.47 -.3 MGM Rsts .48 8 38.41 26.85 28.86 +.33 +1.2 MSCI Inc 1.52 42 176.88 106.13 173.13 +6.31 +3.8 Macerich 2.96 32 69.73 52.12 58.72 -1.80 -3.0 Macys 1.51 12 41.33 17.41 39.97 +1.02 +2.6 MarathnO .20 dd 22.74 10.55 20.38 -.16 -.8 MarathPt s 1.84 12 83.33 49.30 80.93 +1.84 +2.3 MarIntA 1.64f 31 149.21 96.90 120.16 -8.03 -6.3 MarshM 1.66f 23 87.89 76.68 83.01 -.14 -.2 MartMM 1.76 29 241.33 189.27 200.13 -6.83 -3.3 Masco .42 20 46.45 35.79 38.60 -.90 -2.3 MasterCrd 1.00 47 214.28 127.59 202.65 +1.45 +.7 Mattel .60 cc 19.21 12.21 15.72 -.22 -1.4 McCorm 2.08 18 122.58 92.93 121.00 -.52 -.4 McDnlds 4.04 24 178.70 146.84 158.68 +2.47 +1.6 McKesson 1.56f 10 178.86 122.92 123.14 -3.07 -2.4 Medtrnic 2.00f 36 91.47 76.41 90.60 +.12 +.1 Merck 1.92 25 66.99 52.83 66.07 +.14 +.2 MetLife 1.68 10 55.91 43.09 44.65 -.68 -1.5 MettlerT 39 697.26 540.24 572.20 -14.47 -2.5

MKors Microchp MicronT Microsoft MidAApt Mohawk MolsCoorB Mondelez MonstrBv s Moodys MorgStan Mosaic MotrlaSolu Mylan NV NRG Egy Nasdaq NOilVarco NektarTh NetApp Netflix s NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewsCpA NewsCpB NextEraEn NiSource s Nielsen plc NikeB s NobleEngy Nordstrm NorflkSo NorTrst NorthropG NorwCruis Nucor Nvidia OReillyAu OcciPet Omnicom ONEOK Oracle PG&E Cp PNC PPG s PPL Corp PVH Corp Paccar PackAmer ParkerHan Paychex PayPal n Pentair PeopUtdF PepsiCo PerkElm Perrigo Pfizer PhilipMor Phillips66 PinWst PioNtrl Praxair PriceTR PrinFncl ProLogis ProctGam ProgsvCp Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp Qorvo Qualcom QuantaSvc QstDiag RLauren RJamesFn Raytheon RltyInco RedHat RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegionsFn RepubSvc ResMed RobtHalf RockwlAut RockColl Roper RossStrs s RylCarb S&P Glbl SBA Com SCANA SLGreen

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR TtlRetBdInstl 10.57 +.01 -1.0 +2.5 +2.9 CI 2 Fidelity 500IdxIns 99.18 -.18 +7.2 +12.7 +13.2 LB 2 500IdxInsPrm 99.18 -.18 +7.2 +12.7 +13.2 LB 2 500IndexPrm 99.18 -.18 +7.2 +12.7 +13.1 LB 2 AllSectorEq 13.24 +8.7 +12.2 +12.9 LG 5 AsstMgr50% 18.52 -.02 +2.0 +6.3 +6.5 CA 1 AsstMgr70% 23.06 -.07 +2.9 +7.9 +8.1 MA 1 BCGrowth 16.34 +.15 +18.1 +16.7 NA LG 1 BCGrowth 102.45 +.86 +16.7 +16.2 +17.5 LG 1 BCGrowthK 102.62 +.86 +16.8 +16.4 +17.6 LG 1 Balanced 24.97 +.02 +6.0 +8.7 +9.6 MA 1 BalancedK 24.97 +.02 +6.0 +8.8 +9.7 MA 1 Cap&Inc 10.07 -.02 +1.6 +6.3 +6.9 HY 1 ChinaRegion 34.45 +.37 -4.3 +7.5 +9.8 CH 3 Contrafund 13.73-122.64 NA NA NA LG 5 ContrafundK 13.73-122.63 NA NA NA LG 5 ConvertibleSecs 28.94 +.07 +5.0 +4.4 +5.6 CV 4 CptlApprec 38.66 +.12 +9.8 +10.2 +12.2 LG 4 DivGro 33.76 -.18 +2.8 +8.7 +10.4 LB 4 DiversIntl 38.97 -.51 -2.6 +3.1 +5.7 FG 5 DiversIntlK 38.91 -.52 -2.6 +3.2 +5.8 FG 5 EmergMketsOpps19.63 -.39 -8.3 +9.0 +5.6 EM 3 EmergingAsia 42.66 +.11 -5.3 +10.4 +9.6 PJ 2 EqDividendInc 28.03 -.18 +2.1 +9.1 +9.6 LV 4 EqIncome 59.72 -.28 +1.8 +8.6 +8.6 LV 4 ExMktIdxPr 67.83 +.46 +9.4 +11.7 +11.7 MB 1 FltngRtHiInc 9.63 +2.7 +4.4 +3.4 BL 3 FourinOneIdx 45.84 -.19 +3.6 +8.7 +9.2 AL 2 Frdm 2015 13.19 -.01 +1.2 +6.2 +6.4 TD 1 Frdm 2020 16.39 -.03 +1.4 +6.7 +6.9 TE 1 Frdm 2025 14.30 -.03 +1.6 +7.0 +7.5 TG 1 Frdm 2030 17.95 -.05 +2.0 +8.1 +8.5 TH 1 Frdm 2035 15.22 -.05 +2.5 +8.9 +9.2 TI 1 Frdm 2040 10.68 -.05 +2.6 +9.0 +9.3 TJ 1 GlobalexUSIdx 12.72 -.22 -3.9 +4.9 +4.6 FB 2 GrDiscv x 36.23 -.98 +14.6 +15.4 +16.0 LG 3 GroCo 20.75-184.14 NA NA NA LG 5 GroCo 19.43 +.25 +16.8 +19.0 NA LG 1 GroCoK 20.76-184.20 NA NA NA LG 5 Growth&Inc 39.35 -.19 +4.7 +10.4 +10.8 LB 3 IntlDiscv 43.80 -.76 -4.1 +3.8 +5.5 FG 5 IntlGr 16.13 -.17 -.1 +5.8 +6.9 FG 2 IntlIdxInstlPrm 41.84 -.76 -3.0 +3.9 +4.8 FB 2 IntlIdxPremium 41.84 -.76 -3.0 +3.8 +4.8 FB 2 IntlVal 10.22 -.20 -4.4 +1.4 +3.1 FV 3 IntrmMuniInc 10.23 +.1 +2.2 +2.9 MI 2 InvmGradeBd 10.97 +.03 -.8 +2.5 +2.7 CI 1 InvmGradeBd 7.72 +.02 -1.2 +2.2 +2.5 CI 2 LowPrStk 55.18 -.30 +1.2 +9.7 +10.5 MV 1 LowPrStkK 55.15 -.31 +1.2 +8.0 +9.5 MV 2 Magellan 11.00 -98.57 NA NA NA LG 5 MidCapStock 39.12 +.11 +6.7 +10.4 +10.8 MG 5 MuniInc 12.76 -.4 +3.0 +4.3 ML 3 NasdCmpIdx 103.36 +.43 +14.0 +16.5 +17.6 LG 2 NewMktsInc 14.82 -.30 -6.1 +5.5 +4.5 EB 4 OTCPortfolio 12.91 +.12 +17.5 +20.1 +19.3 LG 1 OTCPortfolioK 13.09 +.13 +17.6 +20.3 +19.4 LG 1 Overseas 49.75 -.68 -1.9 +6.0 +7.8 FG 4 Puritan 24.70 +.04 +6.2 +9.2 +10.1 MA 1 PuritanK 24.69 +.04 +6.3 +9.3 +10.2 MA 1 SCValue 20.82 +.11 +2.5 +9.9 +9.8 SV 4 SmCpOpps 15.73 +.11 +12.1 +11.0 +10.1 SB 1 StkSelorAllCp 47.54 -.07 +8.2 +12.6 +12.9 LG 5 TotalBond 10.38 +.02 -.9 +2.6 +3.0 CI 2 TtlMktIdxF 81.87 -.03 +7.6 +12.5 +12.9 LB 1 TtlMktIdxInsPrm 81.85 -.02 +7.6 +12.5 +12.9 LB 1 TtlMktIdxPrm 81.86 -.03 +7.6 +12.5 +12.8 LB 1 USBdIdxF 11.26 +.03 -1.3 +1.6 +2.2 CI 4 USBdIdxInsPrm 11.26 +.03 -1.3 +1.6 +2.2 CI 4 USBdIdxPrm 11.26 +.03 -1.3 +1.6 +2.2 CI 4 Value 12.24 -.04 +1.0 +7.3 +9.4 MV 4 Worldwide 28.56 -.01 +8.1 +9.6 +10.1 WS 1 Fidelity Advisor NewInsA m 34.11 +.11 +11.1 +13.4 +13.5 LG 3 NewInsC m 29.81 +.09 +10.6 +12.6 +12.7 LG 4 NewInsI 34.90 +.12 +11.3 +13.7 +13.8 LG 3 StgInc 12.17 -.04 NA NA NA MU StgIncC m 11.98 -.03 -1.1 +3.4 +2.9 MU 4 StgIncI 12.17 -.04 -.6 +4.4 +3.9 MU 3 TotalBondI 10.37 +.02 -.9 +2.6 +2.9 CI 2 Fidelity Select Biotechnology 23.29-208.50 NA NA NA SH 5 ConsumerStaples80.96 -2.14 -6.7 +2.8 +5.6 CC 4 Energy 47.77 -.02 +6.9 +6.8 +0.6 EE 1 HealthCare 25.81-231.47 NA NA NA SH 5 MedTech&Devcs 52.10 +.12 +23.9 +18.4 +20.8 SH 1 NaturalRes 31.15 -.17 +3.5 +4.8 -0.6 EE 2 Swre&ITSvcs 19.49 +.18 +19.9 +24.0 +21.3 ST 1 Technology 18.52-166.34 NA NA NA ST 5 First Eagle GlbA m 58.56 -.41 -.8 +6.6 +6.1 IH 3 Franklin Templeton CATxFrIncA m 7.30 +.02 -.2 +3.2 +4.9 MC 4 FdrTFIncA m 11.67 +.01 -.1 +2.1 +3.7 ML 4 GlbBdA m 11.76 -.14 +1.2 +2.4 +2.0 IB 1 GlbBdAdv 11.71 -.15 +1.3 +2.6 +2.2 IB 1 Gr,IncA m 26.86 -.37 -1.5 +5.1 +5.0 WS 5 GrA m 103.08 -.20 +9.1 +13.1 +14.4 LG 4 IncA m 2.32 -.02 +.9 +6.2 +5.1 CA 4 IncAdv 2.30 -.02 +1.0 +6.4 +5.3 CA 3 IncC m 2.36 -.01 +1.0 +5.8 +4.7 CA 4 MsrTxFrIncA m 11.46 +.02 +.8 +2.1 +3.0 SL 2 MutBeaconA m 16.73 -.10 +1.6 +7.3 +8.2 XM 5 MutBeaconC m 16.53 -.09 +1.2 +6.5 +7.4 XM 5 MutBeaconZ 16.90 -.10 +1.7 +7.6 +8.5 XM 5 MutEuropeanC m20.46 -.11 +.4 +.4 +2.9 ES 3 MutGlbDiscvA m32.12 -.17 +1.0 +4.8 +6.3 WS 5 MutGlbDiscvZ 32.79 -.18 +1.1 +5.0 +6.6 WS 5 MutZ 29.46 -.11 +2.9 +6.4 +7.6 XM 5 RisingDivsA m 63.52 -.28 +4.4 +11.4 +10.3 LB 3 UtlsA m 18.88 -.02 +2.4 +9.3 +9.0 SU 5 GE RSPUSEq 56.94 -.10 +8.6 +10.8 +11.9 LB 3 Gabelli SmCpGrAAA m 58.83 +.04 +1.4 +10.1 +9.5 SB 5 Goldman Sachs SmCpValA m 58.70 +.04 +4.3 +10.8 +10.3 SB 4 Guggenheim MgdFutsStratP b18.96 +.16 -1.5 -5.0 +0.5 1 Harbor CptlApprecInstl 79.36 +.48 +14.3 +15.1 +17.0 LG 2 IntlInstl 65.15 -1.80 -3.5 +1.7 +2.7 FB 4

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR Harding Loevner IntlEqInstl d 23.20 +.03 +1.8 +9.5 +8.0 FG Heartland SelValInv m 29.78 +.18 +6.0 +10.9 +9.4 MV 1 Hodges Retail m 49.45 +.57 -.2 +12.5 +11.3 MG 5 INVESCO ComStkA m 27.53 -.30 +3.1 +10.0 +9.9 LV 1 DiversDivA m 20.30 -.14 +.7 +6.1 +8.6 LV 5 EqandIncA m 11.00 -.06 +1.1 +7.0 +7.8 MA 4 HYMuniA m 10.01 +.01 +1.6 +5.4 +6.9 HM 2 IntlGrA m 34.00 -.80 -6.3 +2.5 +4.1 FG 5 IVA WldwideI d 18.93 +.02 +.1 +5.4 +5.4 IH 3 Ivy GlbGrA m 49.01 -.31 +7.7 +7.7 +8.2 WS 1 JPMorgan CPBondR6 8.07 +.03 -.8 +2.3 +3.1 CI 1 CoreBondI 11.28 +.04 -1.0 +1.7 +2.2 CI 3 CoreBondR6 11.30 +.05 -.8 +1.9 +2.4 CI 2 EqIncI 17.82 -.11 +3.3 +10.7 +10.9 LV 2 HighYieldR6 7.26 +1.3 +5.2 +4.6 HY 2 MCapValA m 40.31 -.24 +2.3 +7.6 +9.7 MB 5 MCapValL 41.32 -.25 +2.6 +8.1 +10.2 MB 5 USLCpCrPlsI 32.03 -.01 +6.9 +11.1 +12.8 LB 2 USRsrchEnhEqR6 29.91 -.04 +6.5 +10.6 +12.2 LB 3 Janus Henderson BalancedT 34.63 -.02 +6.0 +9.0 +8.9 MA 1 EnterpriseT 130.62 -.27 +11.7 +15.0 +15.0 MG 3 FlexibleBondT 10.05 +.03 -1.2 +1.4 +2.1 CI 3 GlobalLifeSciT 62.86 +.04 +15.1 +3.1 +15.6 SH 2 John Hancock BdR6 15.44 +.03 -.9 +2.8 +3.6 CI 1 DiscpValI 22.38 -.06 +2.5 +9.4 +9.9 LV 2 DiscpValMCI 23.74 -.09 +1.8 +9.4 +11.9 MB 4 FdmtlLgCpCorA m51.38 +.20 +5.2 +10.9 +12.1 LB 4 IntlGrI 28.40 -.13 +2.6 +8.6 +9.4 FG 1 MltMgLsBlA b 15.31 -.07 +1.4 +6.3 +6.5 MA 4 MltmgrLsGr1 b 16.41 -.09 +2.1 +7.4 +7.9 AL 4 Lazard EMEqInstl 17.19 -.77 -14.1 +4.3 +1.4 EM 5 GlbLtdInfrsIns 16.43 +.01 +3.2 +11.2 +13.4 XO 1 IntlStratEqIns 15.58 -.25 -.8 +3.4 +4.7 FG 3 Leuthold CorInvmRetail d 20.64 +.04 +.7 +5.7 +7.2 TV 3 Loomis Sayles BdInstl 13.53 -.03 +.2 +4.1 +3.3 MU 3 GrY 16.65 -.06 +7.2 +15.0 +15.9 LG 5 Lord Abbett AffiliatedA m 16.00 -.08 +2.3 +10.0 +10.1 LV 3 FltngRtF b 9.14 +2.8 +4.8 +4.0 BL 1 ShrtDurIncA m 4.18 +.7 +2.1 +2.0 CS 1 ShrtDurIncC m 4.21 +.01 +.3 +1.5 +1.4 CS 2 ShrtDurIncF b 4.18 +.01 +.7 +2.2 +2.2 CS 1 ShrtDurIncI 4.18 +.01 +.8 +2.3 +2.3 CS 1 MFS GrA m 104.00 +.51 +16.0 +15.2 +15.5 LG 2 InstlIntlEq 25.23 -.55 -.9 +5.0 +5.7 FG 3 ValA m 40.12 -.50 -.3 +8.6 +9.9 LV 5 ValI 40.35 -.50 -.2 +8.8 +10.1 LV 5 Mairs & Power BalInv 94.61 -.20 +1.7 +7.3 +7.1 MA 3 GrInv 125.52 -.34 +4.2 +10.5 +10.2 LB 4 MassMutual SelectMdCpGrI 23.30 +.03 +8.5 +11.4 +13.7 MG 4 Matthews AsianGrIncInv 16.17 +.04 -6.1 +2.8 +2.2 PJ 5 ChinaInv 20.96 +.19 -5.6 +10.2 +9.1 CH 3 Meridian ContrarianLgcy d 46.64 +.44 +11.2 +15.2 +12.7 MG 1 GrLegacy d 46.31 +.58 +11.2 +14.9 +13.0 SG 4 Metropolitan West TtlRetBdI 10.41 +.04 -.8 +1.7 +2.5 CI 2 TtlRetBdM b 10.41 +.04 -.9 +1.4 +2.2 CI 2 TtlRetBdPlan 9.80 +.04 -.7 +1.7 +2.5 CI 2 Northeast Investors NorthstInvTrust 4.62 -.01 +.2 +2.1 -0.1 HY 5 Northern IntlEqIdx d 12.51 -.25 -3.1 +3.6 +4.6 FB 2 StkIdx 33.70 -.06 +7.1 +12.6 +13.1 LB 2 Nuveen HYMuniBdA m 17.25 +1.9 +6.1 +8.0 HM 1 HYMuniBdI 17.25 +2.1 +6.3 +8.2 HM 1 IntermDrMnBdI 9.16 +.01 +.8 +3.0 +3.6 MI 1 Oakmark EqAndIncInv 32.43 -.22 +.7 +6.7 +7.2 MA 3 IntlInv 26.09 -.57 -8.7 +4.5 +4.5 FB 5 Inv 87.10 -.95 +3.3 +11.7 +12.2 LB 4 SelInv 45.95 -.76 -3.8 +7.0 +9.9 LB 5 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCpStrat17.26 -.08 +3.0 +8.5 +8.3 SW 4 LgCpStrats 14.92 -.14 +3.2 +7.1 +8.7 WS 3 StratOpps 7.89 -.04 +.9 +4.5 +5.2 IH 2 Oppenheimer CptlIncA m 10.19 -.03 +.8 +4.2 +4.6 CA DevMktsA m 42.13 -.59 -3.3 +8.2 +4.2 EM 1 DevMktsY 41.59 -.58 -3.1 +8.5 +4.5 EM 1 GlbA m 98.93 -1.10 +3.1 +9.1 +10.4 WS 1 GlbAllcA m 19.62 -.10 +4.9 +5.2 IH GoldSpecMnralA m14.43 -.43 -11.7 +16.7 -2.3 SP IntlGrY 41.89 -.89 -4.0 +4.1 +4.6 FG 5 IntlSmMidCoY 52.80 -.74 +7.5 +13.6 +14.8 FR 1 LtdTrmGvtA m 4.32 +.4 +0.6 GS 3 MnStrA m 52.82 -.13 +3.5 +9.6 +11.4 LB 5 Osterweis StrInc 11.28 +.03 +1.5 +4.8 +4.1 HY 2 PGIM Investments TtlRetBdZ 14.11 +.04 -1.7 +2.8 +3.5 CI PIMCO AlAstAllAthIns 8.43 -.13 -3.6 +4.0 +1.1 TV AlAstInstl 11.71 -.13 -1.6 +6.0 +3.6 TV CmdtyRlRtStrIns 6.42 -.04 -2.7 -.7 -7.2 BB HYInstl 8.73 +.6 +5.3 +4.9 HY 4 IBdUSDHI 10.79 +2.0 +4.3 +5.0 IB IncA m 11.97 -.04 -.4 +5.2 +5.4 MU IncC m 11.97 -.04 -.8 +4.4 +4.7 MU IncI2 11.97 -.04 -.2 +5.5 +5.7 MU IncInstl 11.97 -.04 -.1 +5.6 +5.8 MU InvtGrdCdtBdI 10.13 +.01 -1.7 +3.7 +4.5 TW LowDrInstl 9.74 -.02 +1.2 +1.2 CS

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR RlRetInstl 10.80 +.02 -.5 +1.8 +1.2 IP ShrtTrmIns 9.87 -.01 +1.4 +2.2 +1.9 UB TtlRetA m 10.00 +.01 -1.3 +1.6 +2.1 CI 4 TtlRetIns 10.00 +.01 -1.1 +2.0 +2.4 CI 3 PRIMECAP Odyssey AgrsGr 50.54 +.75 +14.0 +18.6 +18.4 MG 1 Gr 42.12 +.28 +13.1 +17.3 +16.2 LG 1 Stk 33.55 -.10 +5.1 +13.5 +13.8 LB 1 Parnassus CorEqInv 45.72 -.17 +7.8 +10.7 +11.8 LB 2 Pioneer CorEqA m 21.85 -.10 +6.2 +11.2 +11.6 LB 2 Principal DiversIntlIns 13.40 -.21 -1.9 +6.3 +6.0 FB Putnam DiversIncA m 7.01 -.02 +2.5 +3.8 +3.1 NT 1 EqIncA m 25.47 -.14 +4.5 +10.0 +10.7 LV 1 GlbUtlsA m 13.47 -.17 +.2 +5.5 +5.1 SU 4 IncA m 6.88 +.03 +1.2 +2.1 +2.9 CI 1 SustLeadersA m 99.70 -.16 +11.5 +13.8 +14.9 LG 3 Royce LowPricedStkSvc m9.47 +.11 +11.9 +10.0 +5.6 SB 1 SmlrCoGrSvc m 12.13 +.17 +13.5 +9.5 +10.8 SG 4 SpecEqInvm d 22.23 -.22 +2.0 +9.9 +7.3 SV 5 Schwab FdmtlUSLgCIdx 18.07 -.04 +4.7 +11.4 +11.2 LV 1 HC 26.49 -.23 +9.4 +5.5 +12.7 SH 3 SP500Idx 44.15 -.08 +7.2 +12.7 +13.1 LB 2 Schwab1000Idx 67.16 -.07 +7.3 +12.3 +12.8 LB 2 TtlStkMktIdx 50.84 -.01 +8.3 +13.2 +12.9 LB State Farm Gr 80.57 -.67 +1.8 +9.6 +9.8 LB 5 T. Rowe Price BCGr 111.30 +.50 +15.6 +16.6 +17.8 LG 1 Comm&TeInv 107.19 +.63 +11.1 +16.7 +16.4 SC 1 CptlAprc 29.87 +.03 +5.6 +9.2 +10.6 MA 1 DivGr 45.46 -.27 +5.5 +11.4 +12.1 LB 4 EMBd d 11.34 -.23 -6.4 +5.2 +3.9 EB 5 EMStk d 41.72 -.98 -7.3 +10.5 +7.0 EM 1 EmergEurope d 13.55 -.92 -13.4 +5.1 -5.1 MQ 5 EqIdx500 d 76.15 +.19 +7.1 +12.5 +12.9 LB 2 EqInc 33.71 -.34 +2.1 +10.3 +8.9 LV 3 FinclSvcs 29.30 -.12 +4.6 +10.0 +11.9 SF 2 GlbTech 18.21 -.07 +8.2 +22.3 +24.8 ST 5 GrStk 71.00 +.37 +13.3 +14.8 +16.7 LG 3 HY d 6.53 -.01 +5.2 +4.8 HY 4 HlthSci 79.53 +.11 +13.0 +6.3 +16.9 SH 2 InsLgCpGr 42.98 +.17 +16.4 +17.5 +18.3 LG 1 InsMdCpEqGr 59.63 +.07 +9.5 +12.7 +14.7 MG 4 IntlDiscv d 71.42 -.95 +11.4 +11.1 FR 2 IntlStk d 18.33 -.29 -1.8 +5.5 +6.5 FG 4 IntlValEq d 14.32 -.30 -5.3 +.9 +2.9 FV 5 LatinAmerica d 21.60 -1.63 -12.1 +8.0 -1.3 LS 4 MdCpGr 94.93 +.11 +9.1 +12.0 +14.1 MG 4 MdCpVal 31.48 -.61 +3.6 +10.8 +11.0 MV 2 NewHorizons 63.01 +.93 +19.9 +17.6 +16.4 SG 2 NewInc 9.21 +.03 -1.2 +1.7 +2.3 CI 2 OverseasStk d 11.05 -.21 -2.3 +4.8 +5.5 FB 2 RlEstt d 28.10 -.55 -.9 +4.6 +7.8 SR 4 Rtr2015 15.19 -.03 +1.4 +6.1 +6.5 TD 1 Rtr2020 22.95 -.05 +1.8 +6.9 +7.4 TE 1 Rtr2025 17.96 -.06 +2.1 +7.5 +8.1 TG 1 Rtr2030 26.56 -.10 +2.5 +8.0 +8.8 TH 2 Rtr2035 19.48 -.09 +2.7 +8.4 +9.3 TI 2 Rtr2040 28.03 -.14 +2.9 +8.7 +9.6 TJ 3 Rtr2045 19.04 -.09 +3.1 +8.9 +9.7 TK 3 Rtr2050 15.99 -.08 +3.0 +8.9 +9.7 TN 3 SciandTech 51.06 -.19 +12.3 +21.3 +20.0 ST 4 SmCpStk 53.98 +.51 +13.2 +13.7 +12.2 SG 4 SmCpVal d 52.95 +.37 +7.9 +14.9 +11.1 SB 3 SpectrumInc 12.33 -.04 -1.3 +3.9 +3.4 MU 4 SummitMnIntrInv11.68 +.01 -.2 +2.0 +3.0 MI 4 TFInc 9.95 +2.5 +4.1 ML 3 Val 37.28 -.23 -.1 +8.2 +10.1 LV 5 TCW TtlRetBdI 9.69 +.06 -.6 +1.5 +2.7 CI 2 TIAA-CREF BdIdxIns 10.52 +.03 -1.5 +1.3 +2.1 CI EqIdxIns 21.13 +7.5 +12.5 +12.9 LB 1 GrIncIns 15.43 +.02 +8.6 +12.2 +13.4 LG 4 IntlEqIdxIns 19.61 -.37 -2.8 +3.9 +4.9 FB 2 LgCpGrIdxIns 32.44 +.10 +12.5 +15.6 +16.0 LG 2 LgCpValIdxIns 19.97 -.09 +1.9 +9.2 +9.9 LV 4 LgCpValIns 19.35 -.12 +1.6 +8.5 +9.0 LV 4 Thornburg LtdTrmMnI 14.19 +.4 +1.3 +1.7 MS 5 Thrivent LgCpStkA m 28.36 -.21 +4.6 +8.1 +9.3 WS 2 MidCpStkA m 26.39 -.03 +4.3 +15.7 +14.8 MB 1 MnBdA m 11.10 -.4 +2.0 +3.5 ML 5 Torray Torray 48.66 -.21 -1.3 +7.8 +8.3 LV 5 Tweedy, Browne GlbVal d 28.95 -.12 +1.6 +5.6 +5.5 FV 1 USAA Gr 32.37 -.08 +6.0 +12.8 +14.7 LG 5 Inc 12.75 +.05 -1.2 +3.0 +3.1 CI 2 PrcMtlsMnral 11.96 -.30 -10.0 +11.0 -3.7 SP 1 VALIC Co I StkIdx 41.44 -.08 +7.0 +12.4 +12.8 LB 2 Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl 262.12 -.48 +7.2 +12.7 +13.1 LB 2 500IdxInv 262.10 -.48 +7.1 +12.6 +13.0 LB 2 BalIdxAdmrl 35.78 +.05 +4.1 +8.2 +8.6 MA 1 BalIdxIns 35.79 +.05 +4.1 +8.2 +8.6 MA 1 CAITTxExAdm 11.62 +.01 +.3 +2.5 +3.6 MF 2 CptlOppAdmrl 171.45 +.17 +11.6 +16.2 +16.5 LG 2 DevMIdxAdmrl 13.72 -.25 -3.2 +4.7 +5.3 FB 1 DevMIdxIns 13.73 -.26 -3.3 +4.7 +5.3 FB 1 DivGrInv 27.55 -.11 +5.7 +10.6 +11.2 LB 4 EMStkIdxInAdm 35.35 -.49 -6.6 +6.3 +4.1 EM 3 EMStkIdxIns 26.88 -.37 -6.6 +6.4 +4.1 EM 3 EngyAdmrl 106.61 -.50 +5.9 +8.4 +1.2 EE 3 EqIncAdmrl 78.91 -.65 +2.5 +11.5 +11.1 LV 2 EqIncInv 37.65 -.31 +2.4 +11.4 +11.0 LV 2 ExplorerAdmrl 103.78 +1.58 +17.4 +14.0 +12.8 SG 2 ExtMktIdxAdmrl 92.19 +.63 +9.4 +11.7 +11.7 MB 1 ExtMktIdxIns 92.18 +.62 +9.4 +11.7 +11.7 MB 1 ExtMktIdxInsPls227.49 +1.53 +9.4 +11.7 +11.7 MB 1 FAWexUSIAdmr 32.18 -.58 -3.8 +5.1 +4.9 FB 2 FAWexUSIIns 102.03 -1.83 -3.8 +5.1 +5.0 FB 2 GNMAAdmrl 10.23 +.03 -.4 +1.4 +2.4 GI 1

1.14f 2.86 2.96f .06 .72 2.28f .50 4.20 4.56f .50 3.53 .76f .64 3.00f 2.76f 1.40f .35 .32f 4.04 1.60f

1.68 1.16f 3.34 1.88 1.52 3.71f .80 .88f .12 2.24 2.64 1.64 2.42 2.25 1.94 3.56 1.56 9.12 2.16 7.44f 1.52 5.20f 1.60 2.02 1.38f 1.28f .90f 3.44f 3.28 .64 .66 1.60f 2.60f 4.08f 1.28 .72f 1.44 .76 .84 1.38 .60a .28 .80 .92 .20 .88 1.64 .97 2.12f 3.72 .48 1.96 1.52 2.88f

77.91 44.00 102.66 39.43 163.11 73.76 89.70 236.62 261.71 60.43 35.10 225.48 21.68 114.97 194.18 53.32 116.74 93.28 106.08 112.81 80.71 175.26 60.50 68.98 46.54 127.23 81.93 28.78 26.64 60.59 117.90 105.82 116.65 85.30 109.06 77.08 91.78 30.14 66.46 46.99 131.60 66.03 112.45 89.85 150.46 83.38 156.87 151.26 103.81 75.25 87.85 58.05 145.63 495.35 70.46 270.04 158.80 270.94 57.44 66.15 43.43 154.24 78.16 85.07 101.96 89.30 183.27 60.71 98.70 218.62 58.74 274.66 134.52 109.95 34.67 37.00 78.93 225.92 51.55 62.09 59.40 13.48 82.63 73.62 45.96 20.25 24.23 73.11 35.68 65.96 142.16 230.00 25.89 60.69 46.76 107.75

61.28 30.43 64.04 32.16 106.73 42.27 71.12 193.01 216.47 30.46 26.11 150.06 12.02 98.85 129.90 34.95 94.25 66.83 78.97 76.27 52.51 112.87 44.59 38.83 29.79 96.56 57.50 15.99 14.99 28.80 96.20 70.30 72.78 61.53 71.71 61.27 71.96 24.30 39.12 32.86 81.99 43.70 82.33 69.82 125.74 57.63 100.20 99.63 73.69 57.47 71.95 23.79 89.59 370.79 54.97 214.03 98.16 208.81 47.06 52.76 35.57 98.52 54.32 55.80 74.44 72.16 114.63 37.18 72.73 149.02 39.79 203.13 106.41 88.97 24.66 29.34 59.85 138.43 37.51 37.04 28.42 9.82 63.97 52.63 31.28 13.22 18.83 57.19 21.84 50.86 111.57 184.21 12.61 41.01 34.50 79.86

36.76 78.33 26.85 71.28 85.16 177.00 58.75 37.42 47.61 126.28 43.84 19.23 82.86 29.39 22.90 71.65 29.90 17.51 37.55 164.23 20.21 22.72 34.20 12.84 13.10 144.70 22.44 20.53 50.35 22.99 37.79 114.89 85.69 264.35 46.16 51.67 152.91 186.82 58.44 65.32 49.65 42.57 37.30 119.77 100.36 25.30 118.66 59.82 106.49 152.47 54.20 57.58 41.28 15.97 95.94 62.43 63.68 32.32 76.21 80.73 73.41 125.46 127.36 81.61 52.31 58.28 70.73 43.59 92.05 45.05 180.48 24.66 64.53 48.56 32.19 90.10 76.86 74.14 173.35 47.25 95.88 54.87 281.89 13.03 60.26 72.44 42.92 155.81 121.46 227.31 52.85 101.20 147.07 137.17 33.61 89.46

DIV

PE

FRI NAME NAV GNMAInv 10.23 GlbEqInv 32.10 GrIdxAdmrl 80.20 GrIdxIns 80.21 GrandIncAdmrl 82.50 HCAdmrl 91.31 HCInv 216.49 HYCorpAdmrl 5.76 HYTEAdmrl 11.22 HiDivYldIdxInv 34.10 InTrBdIdxAdmrl 10.98 InTrInGdAdm 9.43 InTrTEAdmrl 13.89 InTrTrsAdmrl 10.79 InflPrtScAdmrl 25.32 InflPrtScIns 10.31 InsIdxIns 258.76 InsIdxInsPlus 258.78 InsTrgRt2020Ins 22.87 InsTtlSMIInPls 63.30 IntlGrAdmrl 99.14 IntlGrInv 31.14 IntlValInv 38.34 LTInGrdAdm 9.83 LTTEAdmrl 11.39 LfStrCnsrGrInv 19.97 LfStrGrInv 34.11 LfStrModGrInv 27.32 LgCpIdxAdmrl 65.78 LtdTrmTEAdmrl 10.86 MCpGrIdxAdm 59.64 MCpVlIdxAdm 58.53 MdCpIdxAdmrl 200.49 MdCpIdxIns 44.29 MdCpIdxInsPlus 218.44 MorganGrAdmrl102.53 PrmCpAdmrl 148.30 PrmCpCorInv 28.95 PrmCpInv 143.00 RlEstIdxAdmrl 115.69 RlEstIdxInstl 17.91 SCpGrIdxAdm 63.85 SCpValIdxAdm 59.98 STBdIdxAdmrl 10.26 STBdIdxIns 10.26 STBdIdxInsPlus 10.26 STInfPrScIdAdmr24.51 STInfPrScIdIns 24.53 STInfPrScIdxInv 24.49 STInvmGrdAdmrl 10.48 STInvmGrdIns 10.48 STInvmGrdInv 10.48 STTEAdmrl 15.74 STTrsAdmrl 10.43 SeledValInv 29.78 SmCpIdxAdmrl 76.89 SmCpIdxIns 76.89 SmCpIdxInsPlus 221.95 StarInv 27.39 StrEqInv 36.56 TMCapApAdm 145.96 TMSmCpAdm 70.00 TrgtRtr2015Inv 15.51 TrgtRtr2020Inv 31.85 TrgtRtr2025Inv 18.82 TrgtRtr2030Inv 34.30 TrgtRtr2035Inv 21.15 TrgtRtr2040Inv 36.65 TrgtRtr2045Inv 23.07 TrgtRtr2050Inv 37.13 TrgtRtr2055Inv 40.23 TrgtRtrIncInv 13.54 TtBMIdxAdmrl 10.45 TtBMIdxIns 10.45 TtBMIdxInsPlus 10.45 TtInBIdxAdmrl 21.88 TtInBIdxIns 32.83 TtInBIdxInv 10.94 TtInSIdxAdmrl 28.93 TtInSIdxIns 115.69 TtInSIdxInsPlus 115.71 TtInSIdxInv 17.29 TtlSMIdxAdmrl 71.20 TtlSMIdxIns 71.21 TtlSMIdxInv 71.17 USGrAdmrl 108.97 ValIdxAdmrl 42.43 ValIdxIns 42.42 WlngtnAdmrl 73.08 WlngtnInv 42.31 WlslyIncAdmrl 64.27 WlslyIncInv 26.53 WndsrAdmrl 79.78 WndsrIIAdmrl 68.77 WndsrIIInv 38.76 Victory RSPtnrsA m 30.12 SycEsVlI 42.21 Virtus VontobelEMOppI 11.15 WCM FocIntGrIns d 16.26 Weitz ValInv 43.62 sHickory 50.55 Wells Fargo CommonStkA f 24.30 Westcore PlusBdRtl 10.43 Western Asset CorBdI 12.32 CorPlusBdI 11.34 CorPlusBdIS 11.34 Mgd Mns A m 15.99 iShares S&P500IdxK 337.90

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.03 -.5 +1.3 +2.3 GI 1 -.38 +2.5 +10.1 +9.9 WS 2 +.09 +11.4 +13.7 +14.9 LG 3 +.10 +11.4 +13.7 +14.9 LG 3 -.02 +7.7 +12.7 +13.3 LB 1 -.25 +8.0 +4.6 +13.8 SH 4 -.58 +8.0 +4.5 +13.7 SH 4 +.01 +.6 +5.2 +5.1 HY 4 +.4 +4.1 +5.2 ML 1 -.22 +2.1 +11.3 +11.1 LV 3 +.04 -1.7 +1.7 +2.5 CI 5 +.02 -1.4 +2.5 +3.0 TW 4 +.01 +2.4 +3.3 MI 3 +.04 -1.1 +.7 +1.4 GI 5 +.11 -.1 +1.9 +1.3 IP 3 +.04 -.2 +1.9 +1.4 IP 3 -.46 +7.2 +12.7 +13.2 LB 2 -.46 +7.2 +12.7 +13.2 LB 2 -.05 +1.5 +6.3 NA TE 1 -.02 +7.6 +12.6 +12.9 LB 1 -1.02 +3.7 +12.3 +9.6 FG 1 -.32 +3.7 +12.2 +9.5 FG 1 -.57 -3.9 +4.4 +4.5 FV 1 +.03 -5.0 +4.8 +6.0 TW 4 -.3 +3.3 +4.7 ML 3 +1.0 +5.2 +5.7 CA 2 -.16 +2.3 +8.1 +8.6 AL 3 -.08 +1.6 +6.7 +7.1 MA 3 -.08 +7.3 +12.6 +13.0 LB 2 +.8 +1.3 +1.4 MS 3 +.29 +8.9 +9.7 +11.5 MG 4 -.40 +2.3 +9.5 +11.3 MV 2 -.21 +5.4 +9.6 +11.4 MB 2 -.05 +5.4 +9.6 +11.4 MB 2 -.22 +5.4 +9.7 +11.5 MB 2 +.57 +13.0 +14.1 +15.2 LG 3 -.43 +11.0 +16.8 +17.1 LG 2 -.08 +7.6 +14.8 +15.2 LG 4 -.42 +10.9 +16.7 +17.0 LG 2 -1.96 +.3 +5.9 +7.9 SR 4 -.30 +.4 +5.9 +7.9 SR 4 +.73 +13.2 +12.1 +11.4 SG 3 -.02 +6.0 +11.7 +11.5 SV 2 +.02 +.9 +1.0 CS 4 +.02 +.9 +1.0 CS 4 +.02 +.9 +1.1 CS 4 +.04 +.8 +1.3 +0.5 IP 2 +.04 +.8 +1.3 +0.5 IP 2 +.05 +.8 +1.2 +0.4 IP 2 +.02 +.2 +1.7 +1.8 CS 3 +.02 +.2 +1.8 +1.8 CS 3 +.02 +.1 +1.6 +1.7 CS 3 +.01 +1.1 +1.0 +0.9 MS 2 +.01 +.1 +.5 +0.6 GS 3 -.41 -4.8 +7.7 +8.7 MV 5 +.38 +9.2 +11.9 +11.5 SB 2 +.38 +9.2 +11.9 +11.5 SB 2 +1.12 +9.2 +11.9 +11.5 SB 2 -.05 +2.9 +7.9 +8.3 MA 2 +.24 +7.6 +10.9 +12.7 MB 1 -.02 +7.1 +12.7 +13.2 LB 2 +.51 +14.0 +15.5 +13.8 SB 1 -.01 +1.2 +5.3 +6.0 TD 2 -.06 +1.5 +6.3 +6.9 TE 1 -.05 +1.7 +6.9 +7.5 TG 1 -.12 +2.0 +7.5 +8.1 TH 2 -.09 +2.2 +8.0 +8.6 TI 2 -.20 +2.5 +8.5 +9.1 TJ 2 -.14 +2.5 +8.8 +9.2 TK 2 -.23 +2.6 +8.8 +9.2 TN 2 -.25 +2.5 +8.8 +9.2 TL 3 +.8 +4.2 +4.5 RI 2 +.03 -1.1 +1.7 +2.2 CI 3 +.03 -1.1 +1.7 +2.3 CI 3 +.03 -1.1 +1.7 +2.3 CI 3 +.08 +1.4 +3.1 +3.8 IB 1 +.12 +1.4 +3.1 +3.8 IB 1 +.04 +1.3 +3.0 +3.7 IB 1 -.52 -3.9 +5.2 +5.0 FB 2 -2.06 -3.9 +5.3 +5.0 FB 2 -2.06 -3.9 +5.3 +5.1 FB 2 -.31 -4.0 +5.2 +5.0 FB 2 -.02 +7.6 +12.5 +12.9 LB 1 -.02 +7.6 +12.5 +12.9 LB 1 -.02 +7.5 +12.4 +12.8 LB 1 +.40 +15.2 +14.2 +16.2 LG 2 -.14 +3.7 +11.6 +11.5 LV 2 -.15 +3.6 +11.6 +11.5 LV 2 -.26 +2.0 +8.5 +8.7 MA 2 -.15 +2.0 +8.4 +8.6 MA 2 -.10 -.1 +6.1 +6.2 CA 3 -.04 -.2 +6.1 +6.1 CA 3 -.98 +1.9 +8.5 +10.1 LV 3 -.38 +3.4 +9.1 +9.9 LV 2 -.21 +3.4 +9.0 +9.8 LV 2 -.13 +3.1 -.30 +4.5

+10.5 +7.4 SB 5 +11.5 +13.1 MV 1

-.23 -7.7

+5.1

+3.7 EM

4

-.08 +3.3

+9.8

+9.7 FG

1

-.05 +7.1 -.07 +1.6

+5.3 +4.0

+7.5 LG 5 +4.1 MB 5

+.06 +5.7

+9.7 +10.2 MB 1

+.04

-.7

+2.4

+2.8 CI

1

+.02 -1.0 -.02 -1.8 -.01 -1.7 -.1

+2.8 +3.3 +3.3 +2.5

+3.5 +3.9 +3.9 +4.0

1 3 3 3

-.61 +7.9

CI CI CI ML

+13.4 +13.3 LB


C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

IRS targets loopholes for tax break Proposed rules make clear that ‘crack and pack’ by business owners is seen as abusive BY LYNNLEY BROWNING Bloomberg

The Internal Revenue Service provided some longawaited answers for business owners hoping to dodge the limits on a juicy new tax break. The IRS’s proposed regulations make it clear that the agency considers a technique known as “crack and pack” to be abusive. The move had been eyed by professional service providers, such as law and accounting firms, to get around income limits set for pass-through businesses, whose income is reported on their owners’ personal returns. Under that strategy, business owners split their businesses into different entities or combine multiple businesses into one to take full advantage of the new 20 percent deduction. The pass-through break under President Donald Trump’s tax law spurred tax professionals to circulate proposals and riff on each other’s ideas, as the industry looked to coalesce around strategies that would save their clients money. Trump and Republican leaders have said middleclass Americans and small businesses would be the biggest beneficiaries under the $1.5 trillion tax cut. But the strategies under consideration to take advantage of the 20 percent pass-through deduction showed how top earners could ultimately reap the biggest gains. All taxpayers who earn less than $157,500, or $315,000 for a married couple, can now deduct 20 percent of the income they receive via pass-through businesses from their overall taxable income. If taxpayers earn above those amounts and aren’t ser-

vice professionals, they must meet tests to take the full deduction. The size of their deduction depends on how much they pay in employee wages or how much they’ve invested in capital such as real estate. For “service professionals,” the break fully phases out if they earn more than $207,500 if they’re single, or $415,000 if they’re married. Treasury officials said during a call with reporters on Wednesday that a law firm consisting of multiple, commonly controlled entities, in which one entity provides its specified services back to the law firm, would be subject to the income limits on the services. The officials added that the proposed regulations also target relabeling employees as independent contractors. The proposed regulations provide some answers about what’s a service business, but questions still remain because the law is vague and has left hundreds of thousands of businesses wondering if they qualify. But, the IRS said businesses with a relatively small amount of “specified” service income won’t be hit by the limits. Business owners, including service providers, whose annual gross receipts are less than $25 million a year — with less than 10 percent of their income coming from the service part of their business — won’t be subject to the income caps. That could provide relief for contractors, headhunters and hairdressers. The proposed regulations also specify that pass-through owners with income from multiple legal entities won’t have to restructure to take advantage of the deduction. Many pass-throughs are com-

prised of a series of related entities. A common structure is a unit that holds the operating business with another that conducts payroll activities. It had been unclear whether those businesses would

have to aggregate to maximize the break. Treasury plans to come out with additional rules, including some to address a loophole in the tax law under which highly paid professionals, such as in-

Compare Our CD Rates Bank-issued, FDIC-insured

6-month

1-year

2-year

vestment managers, doctors and lawyers, could form cooperatives to take advantage of the deduction, according to the officials. The estimated cost of the pass-through deduc-

2.00 2.35 2.80

tion is $415 billion over the coming decade, according to the nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation. The tax break could be even more expensive if IRS regulations can’t keep gamesmanship in check.

% APY*

Minimum deposit $1000.00

% APY*

Minimum deposit $1000.00

% APY*

Minimum deposit $1000.00

* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 03/21/2018. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC).

Heather Aehle Financial Advisor

Thomas J O‘Donnell Financial Advisor

701 Emerson Road Ste 244 Creve Coeur, MO 63141 314-809-1944

567 Howdershell Florissant, MO 63031 314-830-0331

A PLACE FOR CONFIDENCE

With two children dying from drowning every day, teaching kids how to be safe around water is not a luxury; it is a necessity. That is why last year the Y provided $6.2 million in financial assistance to those in need of its programs and services, including for swim lessons. Because every child deserves to learn, build confidence and explore the world safely.

618-364-4186 • 314-802-4130 Expires 08/18/2018

gwrymca.org/opportunities


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • D

ON HIGH GROUND

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Gary Woodland tees off on the 12th hole Friday during the second round of the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. Woodland leads the tournament at 10 under par.

Woodland and Kisner are 1-2 as rain halts second round THE 100TH PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

Bellerive Country Club Rain impact • Friday’s second round was suspended. Players will complete the round Saturday morning and then play the third round. Saturday’s TV coverage begins at 7 a.m. on TNT and continues at 1 p.m. on KMOV-4 News from throughout the tournament, photo galleries, videos and more: stltoday.com INSIDE Jordan Spieth praises fans at Bellerive but says greens are making low scores too easy. D6 Brooks Koepka, Charl Schwartzel both shoot record-tying 63. D7 Leaderboard. D11

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

They’re both ranked among the world’s top 50 players, but neither Gary Woodland nor Kevin Kisner came to St. Louis among the favorites to capture the 100th PGA Championship or attract the biggest galleries at Bellerive Country Club. But halfway home (almost) to Sunday’s presentation of the Wanamaker Trophy, the two 34-year-old buddies with vastly different games find their names on top of the leaderboard — a familiar place for one, not the other. After Woodland shot a sixunder-par 64 on Thursday, his 66 on Friday gave him the lowest score through 36 holes in the history of the PGA Championship. At 9 under through two rounds, Kisner is one stroke off the lead, followed by Brooks Koepka at 8 under and four others at 7 under. For all the low scores posted through two days, the weather has remained the protagonist of this tournament. Late Friday, midway through the afternoon rounds, the skies opened and dumped more rain on the course, sending golfers to the clubhouse for cover as thousands of fans

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Frank Ochoa (left) of Herculaneum and Richard Cook of Oakville find shelter with some plastic bags they “acquired” on the ninth hole as rain hit the golf course. LEADERS G. Woodland 64-66 -10 F K. Kisner

67-64 -9 F

B. Koepka

69-63 -8 F

NOTABLES D. Johnson J. Spieth

COLUMBIA, MO. • Greedy are the hands that claim this crown. Before a Tiger can take his temporary throne, he must prove he is willing to scrap, to claw, to flat-out steal. All of this for a kingdom that lasts just one day. When it comes to the com-

71-66 -3 F

J. Day*

67-(-1) -4 8

T. Woods*

70-(-3) -3 7

J. Thomas* 69-(-1) -2 7 J. Daly

73-70 +3 F

P. Mickelson* 73-(E) +3 8

Tigers want defense to have claws out for more turnovers BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

67-66 -7 F

* Players will complete the second round on Saturday.

See PGA • Page D6

PGA leader has a cause that’s major

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Kevin Kisner walks to the 17th tee box after getting a par on No. 16.

This is the story of Major Dan and Gary’s major. On Thursday at Bellerive, Gary Woodland was at even par when he spotted Major Dan Rooney on the ninth hole. “And I gave the salute,” Major Dan said. “And he goes birdie, par, birdie, birdie and then finished six under. … That’s a moment of synchronicity.” Major Dan talks a lot about synchronicity. He’s an Air Force fighter pilot with three tours in Iraq … and a PGA golf pro … and a founder of a revered charity, so I figured I’d hear him out. (He also does weddings!) He is here at Bellerive to encourage his dear friend Woodland, who is leading the 100th PGA Championship at 10 under with two rounds penciled on his scorecard. Major Dan says his first meeting with Woodland was See HOCHMAN • Page D7

Cards stick to what’s working

> Mizzou tight end Swinson tears ACL. D8

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

petition for the title of Missouri football’s turnover king, overthrows are encouraged. But victory, even though brief, is spectacularly sweet. “You get your play shown in front of the team meeting,” starting linebacker Cale Garrett said with a grin after Friday’s practice. There is no jeweled headgear to be had, at least not yet, though Garrett is open to the idea of

KANSAS CITY • Before taking any questions late Friday night, Jose Martinez had to finish a forkful of birthday cake. And then another. And then he just apologized because he was going to answer while he chewed. “It’s some chocolate,” he said, combing the frosting with his fork. “After a great game, this is more delicious, too.” Immediately after romping against Kansas City in a 7-0 victory at Kauffman Stadium, the Cardinals gathered

See FREDERICKSON • D8

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Harrison Bader enjoys the dugout after hitting a solo home run in the sixth inning Friday night.

CARDS 7 ROYALS 0 > 6:15 p.m. Saturday at Royals, FSM > Flaherty (5-6, 3.27) vs. Duffy (7-10, 4.70) > Visit to AL park gives Shildt a chance to change lineup. D4

See CARDINALS • Page D4

SPORTS

Don’t Suffer in Silence

Schedule a consultation with Dr. Clemens today by calling 450 N New Ballas Rd • #266N, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 www.mwhtc-stl.com

(314) 991-9888

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • D

KOEPKA TAKES CHARGE

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Brooks Koepka hits from the rough after taking a penalty stroke when his ball landed behind a tree off the 15th fairway, leading to a bogey Saturday at Bellerive Country Club.

Two-time U.S. Open champ powers his way to the top THE 100TH PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

Bellerive Country Club Sunday’s TV: 10 a.m. on TNT, 1 p.m. on KMOV-4 News from the tournament, photo galleries, videos and more: stltoday.com INSIDE Finau’s 10-birdie round: ‘It was nuts’. D6 Fowler enjoying friend Wisdom’s MLB call-up. D7 Leaderboard and stats. D8 > Koepka looks to become the fifth player to win the U.S. Open and PGA Championship in the same season. The others: Tiger Woods

2000

Jack Nicklaus

1980

Ben Hogan

1948

Gene Sarazen

1922

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Through buckets of rain and blistering sunshine, fans flocked to Bellerive Country Club by the thousands for six straight days to catch glimpses of the world’s best golfers in the year’s final major tournament. On Sunday, they’ll be rewarded with a starfilled leaderboard in the 100th PGA Championship, stocked with some of the game’s greats, including the latest chapter in sport’s most dramatic comeback story. Tiger Woods, chasing his first major in a decade and his 15th overall, played 29 holes at 5 under par to claw his way back into contention Saturday. With the course’s largest galleries lining the ropes to watch his every move, Woods opened the third round with a birdie putt and broke out his signature fist pump, signaling to the rest of the field he was in the hunt. Woods left Bellerive tied for sixth at 8 under for the tournament. But he’s got some work ahead of him to chase down Brooks Koepka. The winner of the last two U.S. Opens with the biceps of a Marvel character tamed See PGA • Page D6

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Tiger Woods watches hopefully as his par putt misses on the fifth hole.

LEADERS B. Koepka -12 A. Scott -10 J. Rahm -9 R. Fowler -9 G. Woodland -9 NOTABLES T. Woods -8 J. Day -8 J. Thomas -8 D. Johnson -5 J. Spieth -4 R. McIlroy -2

> 1:15 p.m. Sunday at Royals, FSM > Weaver (6-10, 4.66) vs. Junis (6-11, 4.98) > MLB Insider: Hummel looks at the All St. Louis MLB team. D2 > Minors: Adolis Garcia gets his big chance. D3 > Called up: Wisdom brought up as Munoz is injured. D4

Cards clinch another series

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY, MO. • Although the Cardinals have had three injuries put starting right fielders on the disabled list during this road trip, they had already whacked away at their roster to create playing time for Harrison Bader and see how far the speedy center fielder could run with it. Bader homered for the second time in as many games and reached base three times as the Cardinals positioned themselves for a sweep in Kansas City with an 8-3 victory Saturday night See CARDINALS • Page D4

At first, they cheer just to cheer. But the cheers that matter — the ones with substance, with value, with an actual view of the hole – are delayed. Such was the case on the second hole Saturday at Bellerive, on a microwaved day, when Tiger Woods arched a 145-yard approach shot. From Woods’ vantage point, you couldn’t see the hole well. The ball and frivolous cheers pierced the air … but as the ball pinned down near the pin, the telling cheers roared — and behind the green, dozens of arms shot up, just like the hair on them. Tiger is in this thing. Five birdies on the first eight holes! His third round in The 100th PGA Championship stirred up the past – and imaginations.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Charl Schwartzel tees off on the 13th hole.

Bader homers again in blowout win CARDINALS 8 ROYALS 3

Tiger Woods is in it, and so is St. Louis

See HOCHMAN • Page D7

Mizzou’s O-line aims to earn SEC respect

KANSAS CITY STAR

C O LU M B I A , M O. • Derek Dooley has a question. How many of Missouri’s offensive linemen were named to the Southeastern Conference’s all-league team last season? Go ahead, he will wait. “That’s what I thought,” Dooley snapped this week when a reporter confirmed what the Tigers’ first-year offensive coordinator already knew. The answer is zero. That same number — zilch, nada, zip — made the cut for second-team all-conference. And when the 2018 preseason all-conference

Harrison Bader connects on a two-run home run in the sixth inning to give the Cardinals a 6-2 lead Saturday night.

See FREDERICKSON • Page D9

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

> MU opener • 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1 vs. Tenn.Martin, SECN alt.

SPORTS

Don’t Suffer in Silence

Schedule a consultation with Dr. Clemens today by calling 450 N New Ballas Rd • #266N, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 www.mwhtc-stl.com

(314) 991-9888

2 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 08.12.2018 • D

KOEPKA CAPS A CROWD

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Brooks Koepka hits from the rough after taking a penalty stroke when his ball landed behind a tree off the 15th fairway, leading to a bogey Saturday at Bellerive Country Club.

Two-time U.S. Open champ tops star-packed PGA field THE 100TH PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

Bellerive Country Club Sunday’s TV: 10 a.m. on TNT, 1 p.m. on KMOV-4 News from the tournament, photo galleries, videos and more: stltoday.com INSIDE Finau’s 10-birdie round: ‘It was nuts’. D6 Fowler enjoying friend Wisdom’s MLB call-up. D7 Leaderboard and stats. D8 > Koepka looks to become the fifth player to win the U.S. Open and PGA Championship in the same season. The others: Tiger Woods

2000

Jack Nicklaus

1980

Ben Hogan

1948

Gene Sarazen

1922

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Through buckets of rain and blistering sunshine, fans flocked to Bellerive Country Club by the thousands for six straight days to catch glimpses of the world’s best golfers in the year’s final major tournament. On Sunday, they’ll be rewarded with a starfilled leaderboard in the 100th PGA Championship, stocked with some of the game’s greats, including the latest chapter in sport’s most dramatic comeback story. Tiger Woods, chasing his first major in a decade and his 15th overall, played 29 holes at 5 under par to claw his way back into contention Saturday. With the course’s largest galleries lining the ropes to watch his every move, Woods opened the third round with a birdie putt and broke out his signature fist pump, signaling to the rest of the field he was in the hunt. Woods left Bellerive tied for sixth at 8 under for the tournament. But he’s got some work ahead of him to chase down Brooks Koepka. The winner of the last two U.S. Opens with the biceps of a Marvel character tamed See PGA • Page D6

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Tiger Woods watches hopefully as his par putt misses on the fifth hole.

LEADERS B. Koepka -12 A. Scott -10 J. Rahm -9 R. Fowler -9 G. Woodland -9 NOTABLES T. Woods -8 J. Day -8 J. Thomas -8 D. Johnson -5 J. Spieth -4 R. McIlroy -2

> 1:15 p.m. Sunday at Royals, FSM > Weaver (6-10, 4.66) vs. Junis (6-11, 4.98) > MLB Insider: Hummel looks at the All St. Louis MLB team. D2 > Minors: Adolis Garcia gets his big chance. D3 > Called up: Wisdom brought up as Munoz is injured. D4

Cards clinch another series

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY, MO. • At the bang-bang end to another twoout jamboree that tilted the game Saturday, Cardinals center fielder Harrison Bader yanked the batting helmet from his head and spiked it several strides past first base. The frustration unleashed had been building from the moment he broke from the batter’s box and tried outrun a grounder — not because he was the third out of the inning or even an out of the inning. He reached out for a pitch, and See CARDINALS • Page D4

At first, they cheer just to cheer. But the cheers that matter — the ones with substance, with value, with an actual view of the hole – are delayed. Such was the case on the second hole Saturday at Bellerive, on a microwaved day, when Tiger Woods arched a 145-yard approach shot. From Woods’ vantage point, you couldn’t see the hole well. The ball and frivolous cheers pierced the air … but as the ball pinned down near the pin, the telling cheers roared — and behind the green, dozens of arms shot up, just like the hair on them. Tiger is in this thing. Five birdies on the first eight holes! His third round in The 100th PGA Championship stirred up the past – and imaginations.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Charl Schwartzel tees off on the 13th hole.

Bader homers again in blowout win CARDINALS 8 ROYALS 3

Tiger Woods is in it, and so is St. Louis

See HOCHMAN • Page D7

Mizzou’s O-line aims to earn SEC respect

KANSAS CITY STAR

C O LU M B I A , M O. • Derek Dooley has a question. How many of Missouri’s offensive linemen were named to the Southeastern Conference’s all-league team last season? Go ahead, he will wait. “That’s what I thought,” Dooley snapped this week when a reporter confirmed what the Tigers’ first-year offensive coordinator already knew. The answer is zero. That same number — zilch, nada, zip — made the cut for second-team all-conference. And when the 2018 preseason all-conference

Harrison Bader connects on a two-run home run in the sixth inning to give the Cardinals a 6-2 lead Saturday night.

See FREDERICKSON • Page D9

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

> MU opener • 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1 vs. Tenn.Martin, SECN alt.

SPORTS

Don’t Suffer in Silence

Schedule a consultation with Dr. Clemens today by calling 450 N New Ballas Rd • #266N, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 www.mwhtc-stl.com

(314) 991-9888

3 M


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 8/11 at Royals 6:15 p.m. FSM

Sunday 8/12 at Royals 1:15 p.m. FSM

Monday 8/13 vs. Nationals 7:10 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 8/14 vs. Nationals 7:15 p.m. FSM

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

MLB INSIDER

St. Louis’ all-star team

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/1 vs. Tenn.-Martin 3 p.m. SEC Net. alt.

Saturday 9/8 vs. Wyoming 6 p.m. ESPN2 or ESPNU

Saturday 9/15 at Purdue 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/22 vs. Georgia Time TBA TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 9/1 vs. Kent State 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/8 vs. Western Ill. 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/15 vs. South Florida (in Chicago) 2:30 p.m., BTN

Friday 9/21 vs. Penn State 8 p.m. Fox Sports 1

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 8/11 vs. Las Vegas 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 8/15 Saturday 8/18 at Fresno vs. Sacramento 9 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 8/25 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Sat. 8/11: vs. So. Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Sun. 8/12: vs. So. Illinois, 6:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Tue. 8/14: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 8/15: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR SATURDAY AUTO RACING 8:30 a.m. NASCAR trucks: Corrigan Oil 200, qualifying, FS1 12 p.m. NASCAR trucks: Corrigan Oil 200, FS1 2 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Mid-Ohio Challenge, NBCSN BASEBALL 10 a.m. Little League: Midwest Regional, ESPN 12 p.m. Little League: New England Regional, ESPN 12 p.m. Rangers at Yankees, MLB 2 p.m. Little League: Northwest Regional, final, teams TBA, ESPN 3 p.m. Nationals at Cubs, FS1 Little League: Great Lakes Regional, ESPN 4 p.m. 6 p.m. Little League: Mid-Atlantic Regional, ESPN 6 p.m. Brewers at Braves, FS1 6:15 p.m. Cardinals at Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 8 p.m. Little League: West Regional, ESPN 9 p.m. Athletics at Angels (joined in progress), MLB Network BASKETBALL 12 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 1 p.m. WNBA: Dallas at Atlanta, NBA 1:15 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 2:30 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 3:45 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 6 p.m. College exhibition: Kentucky vs. Mega Bemax, SEC Network 6:30 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 7:45 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) BOWLING 4 p.m. PWBA: Twin Cities Open, CBSSN CYCLING 3 p.m. Tour of Utah: Stage 5, FS2 FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL exhibition: Vikings at Broncos, NFL Network GOLF 7 a.m. PGA Championship: Conclusion of second round followed by start of third round, TNT 9 a.m. Women’s U.S. Amateur: Semifinals, FS2 1 p.m. PGA Championship: Third round, KMOV (4) HOCKEY 4 p.m. Hlinka Gretzky Cup bronze medal game:, NHL Network 8 p.m. Hlinka Gretzky Cup gold medal game, NHL Network MOTORCYCLE RACING 2 p.m. Lucas Oil Motocross: Unadilla National, 450 Moto 2, KSDK (5) HORSE RACING 5 p.m. Breeders’ Cup Challenge Series: Arlington Million, NBCSN SOCCER 6:25 a.m. English Premier League: Newcastle United vs. Tottenham Hotspur, NBCSN 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Huddersfield Town FC vs. Chelsea, NBCSN 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Wolverhampton Wanderers FC vs. Everton, KSDK (5) 2 p.m. International Champions Cup: Atletico Madrid vs. FC Internazionale Milano, ESPNews 2:30 p.m. NWSL: Seattle at Utah, Lifetime 7:30 p.m. USL: St. Louis FC vs. Las Vegas, KTRS (550 AM) 9:30 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC at Los Angeles FC, FSM Plus TENNIS 11:30 a.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, doubles semifinal, Tennis Channel 12 p.m. WTA: Rogers Cup, first semifinal, ESPN2 1 p.m. USTA: National Championships, girls’ 18s semifinals, Tennis Channel 2 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, first semifinal, ESPN2 5 p.m. WTA: Rogers Cup, second semifinal, ESPN2 5 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, doubles semifinal, Tennis Channel 6:30 p.m. USTA: National Championships, girls’ 16s championship, Tennis Channel 7 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, second semifinal, ESPN2

SUNDAY’S HIGHLIGHTS AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Consumers Energy 400, NBCSN BASEBALL 1:10 p.m. Mariners at Astros, TBS 1:15 p.m. Cardinals at Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7:10 p.m. Nationals at Cubs, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) GOLF 10 a.m. PGA Championship: Final round, TNT 1 p.m. PGA Championship: Final round, KMOV (4) 1 p.m. Women’s U.S. Amateur: Championship match, FS1 SOCCER 6:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: England vs. Mexico, FS1 6:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: Brazil vs. North Korea, FS2 7:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. West Ham United, NBCSN 9:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: Netherlands vs. France, FS2 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 1:30 p.m. DFL-Supercup: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Bayern Munich, FS2 3 p.m. MLS: New York City FC at Toronto FC, ESPN 7 p.m. MLS: Orlando at D.C. United, FS1 9 p.m. MLS: Dallas at Seattle, FS1 TENNIS 12:30 p.m. WTA: Rogers Cup: Final, ESPN2 3 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup: Final, ESPN2

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

WASHINGTON POST

Parkway Central and Mizzou product Max Scherzer, with four Cy Youngs, easily makes the All St. Louis team.

There are lots of options when compiling the roster BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Because Washington righthander Max Scherzer is slated to face the Cubs in Chicago Sunday, the St. Louis fans will not get a chance this week to see perhaps the best baseball player ever to come out of St. Louis. What’s that? There is some bleating from the Hill about some guy named Larry. Lawrence Peter Berra, the great New York Yankees catcher, generally is considered the best player to come out of St. Louis. And for at least four good reasons. Yogi won three Most Valuable Player awards (1951, 54-55) and he’s in the Baseball Hall of Fame. But Parkway Central and Mizzou product Scherzer already has won three Cy Young Awards, one with Detroit and two with Washington. And he’s destined for a third in a row with Washington and fourth overall unless Jacob deGrom of the New York Mets continues to keep his ERA in Bob Gibson country despite a losing record. Four Cy Youngs would put Scherzer in some elite company with Roger Clemens (seven), Randy Johnson (five) and Steve Carlton and Greg Maddux, both with four. The final three are in the Hall of Fame. Clemens someday may be, if enough voters forego his suspected dalliance with performance enhancements. Scherzer’s lifetime record is 156-80 and his .661 winning percentage ranks in the top 20 alltime. If he wins 20 games again this season, it will be the fourth time he has achieved that. Since 2013, nine pitchers have won 20 or more games in the majors. Three of them are named Scherzer, who has two no-hitters and is headed for his fourth consecutive NL strikeout title. Berra has some estimable statistics. He had 356 homers and 1,430 RBIs. He played in 18 AllStar Games. And he has one record that won’t be broken in our lifetimes: He played on 10 World Series champions with the Yankees. Scherzer, on the other hand, has been in one World Series game with Detroit in 2012. Because of the Nationals’ horrid postseason history, he hasn’t even appeared in a National League championship game, let alone a World Series with the Nats. But ... if he wins another Cy Young, do four Cy Youngs trump three MVPs? And Scherzer may not be done yet. Food for thought. Wherever you come down on this, there is no question that the Scherzer-Berra combo is the alltime St. Louis battery. For a city which rich baseball history, there have been surprisingly few position players who have really excelled. But lefthanded starting pitching has been particularly strong. How would you choose, for instance, among Ken Holtzman, Jerry Reuss and Mark Buehrle? University City product Holtzman, who won 174 games, had the best ERA at 3.49. Ritenour star Reuss had the most wins of the three at 220. Buehrle had the best winning percentage with 214-160, had two no-hitters and for the final 15 years of his career, won at least 10 games every season. Advantage: Buehrle. There is little question at first base. Lafayette High’s Ryan Howard, playing mostly with Philadelphia, clouted 382 home runs and

ALL ST. LOUIS TEAM 1B: RYAN HOWARD Former Phillie had four seasons of more than 45 homers from 200609. 2B: RED SCHOENDIENST Had 190 or more hits three times. Homered in 14th inning to win 1950 All-Star Game. SS: DAL MAXVILL Hit slam off former teammate Larry Jaster in first game played in Canada. 3B: BILL MUELLER Played on first Boston World Series champion in 86 years in 2004. LF: ROY SIEVERS Led AL with 42 homers, 114 RBIs in 1957. CF: PETE REISER Batting champion in 1941, was carried off field 11 times in his career after being hurt. RF: HANK BAUER Played on nine pennant winners with Yankees; managed Orioles to 1966 Series title. C: YOGI BERRA Besides his hitting exploits, caught ex-Brownie Don Larsen’s perfect game in 1956 World Series. UTIL ELSTON HOWARD When Yogi wasn’t catching, Howard was and became Gold Glover. Otherwise, he was in left. RHP: MAX SCHERZER He’s 44 wins shy of 200. He may get there before he has 100 losses. LHP: MARK BUEHRLE Was cut from Francis Howell North team as sophomore. Had perfect game as one of two no-hitters. CLOSER: MIKE HENNEMAN Had seven seasons of more than 20 saves. MANAGER: EARL WEAVER Had .582 winning percentage for Orioles. Hoped to be Cards second baseman. They had Red. Rick Hummel

drove in 1,194 runs while winning the National League Most Valuable Player award in 2006. He smashed 58 homers that year. Middle infielders weren’t plentiful but Ron Hunt, another Ritenour product, was a good hitter as a second baseman, hitting .273, and was good at being hit. He was plunked 243 times, including a modern-day record 50 in one year. In this instance, though, we’re going to play the 40-milesaway-or-less card and go with late Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst, a Germantown, Ill, native and Cardinals legend.

With no real strong offensive personages at shortstop, we’re looking for defense and who better than Dal Maxvill, the slick fielder who played for three World Series teams in the 1960s? The Granite City High grad hit only .217 but one of his six homers was the first Cardinals’ homer hit outside the U.S. He hit a grand slam at Montreal in the Expos’ first game in 1969. Third base had a strong crew, if you include Mike Shannon. Scott Cooper was a two-time All-Star, but the nod goes to DeSmet’s Bill Mueller, the recently deposed Cardinals assistant coach who hit .291 for his career and won a batting title in 2003 for Boston. This outfield requires a left fielder, center fielder and right fielder. In left will be Beaumont High’s Roy Sievers, a former Rookie of the Year for the St. Louis Browns and who hit 318 home runs. Center fielder Pete Reiser, who played mostly for Brooklyn, hit .295 in 10 years. But another Beaumont product had trouble with the walls. They didn’t move when he ran into them and he often was hurt. In right field will be East St. Louis native Hank Bauer, who played in nine World Series alongside Berra with the Yankees and batted .277 with 164 home runs. This grouping excludes Bernard Gilkey, a U. City star who played on some good Cardinals teams and had a huge year for the New York Mets in 1996, the year after he was traded by the Cardinals, when he hit .317 with 30 homers and 117 RBIs. The club will need a closer and former Detroit Tiger Mike Henneman, who was born in St. Charles and who played high school ball at St. Pius in Festus, had 193 saves. Since the team was picked by position, Vashon’s Elston Howard, who played both left field and backed up Berra behind the plate for awhile, doesn’t have a starting spot. But he would be the top utility player, having been a ninetime All-Star with 167 home runs and a .274 batting average besides appearing in 10 World Series including one with Boston. He also won two Gold Gloves. Catcher Joe Garagiola, Berra’s childhood friend, became a Hall of Famer in the broadcast booth but he did star as a 20-year-old in the 1946 Series for the Cardinals. Be s i d e s ca tc h e rs a n d lefthanded starting pitchers, the St. Louis area is best known for its managers. Dick Williams, Earl Weaver and Whitey Herzog won a collective 4,332 games before they all went to the Hall of Fame. Since Beaumont’s Weaver had the best winning percentage and got to the Hall of Fame first, he will be the manager on this team. But he’s got some dandy coaches in Herzog, the pride of New Athens, Ill., and St. Louis-born Williams. The record books will show that James “Pud” Galvin was born in St. Louis and grew up in the Irish “Kerry Patch” neighborhood. The books show that he was 37-27 as a rookie for the St. Louis team in the American Association and that he won 345 games (while losing 310) for his career. The 5-foot8, 190-pounder is in the Baseball Hall of Fame. But his career ended in 1892 and, contrary to some popular opinion, I did not see him play. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 8/12 at Royals 1:15 p.m. FSM

Monday 8/13 vs. Nationals 7:10 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 8/14 vs. Nationals 7:15 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 8/15 vs. Nationals 7:15 p.m. FSM

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

MLB INSIDER

St. Louis’ all-star team

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/1 vs. Tenn.-Martin 3 p.m. SEC Net. alt.

Saturday 9/8 vs. Wyoming 6 p.m. ESPN2 or ESPNU

Saturday 9/15 at Purdue 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/22 vs. Georgia Time TBA TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 9/1 vs. Kent State 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/8 vs. Western Ill. 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/15 vs. South Florida (in Chicago) 2:30 p.m., BTN

Friday 9/21 vs. Penn State 8 p.m. Fox Sports 1

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Wednesday 8/15 Saturday 8/18 at Fresno vs. Sacramento 9 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 8/25 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 8/29 at Seattle 9 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Sun. 8/12: vs. So. Illinois, 6:05 p.m. Wed. 8/15: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Tue. 8/14: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 8/15: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Consumers Energy 400, NBCSN BASEBALL 9 a.m. Little League New England Regional final, ESPN 1:10 p.m. Mariners at Astros, TBS 1:15 p.m. Cardinals at Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. High School: Perfect Game All-American Classic, MLB 7:10 p.m. Nationals at Cubs, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 2 p.m. WNBA: Dallas at Washington, NBA 2:30 p.m. Junior NBA World championship, KTVI (2) 3 p.m. College exhibition: Team Toronto vs. Kentucky, SEC Network 3:45 p.m. Junior NBA World championship, KTVI (2) 6 p.m. WNBA: Los Angeles at Phoenix, ESPN2 GOLF 10 a.m. PGA Championship: final round, TNT 1 p.m. PGA Championship: final round, KMOV (4) 1 p.m. Women’s U.S. Amateur: Championship Match, FS1 SOCCER 6:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: England vs. Mexico, FS1 6:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: Brazil vs. North Korea, FS2 7:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. West Ham United, NBCSN 9:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: Netherlands vs. France, FS2 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 1:30 p.m. DFL-Supercup: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Bayern Munich, FS2 2:30 p.m. Spanish Super Cup: Sevilla vs. Barcelona, ESPNews 3 p.m. MLS: New York City at Toronto, ESPN 7 p.m. MLS: Orlando at D.C. United, FS1 9 p.m. MLS: Dallas at Seattle, FS1 TENNIS 12:30 p.m. WTA: Rogers Cup, final, ESPN2 3 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, final, ESPN2 3:30 p.m. USTA Nationals: Girls’ 18s Championship, Tennis Channel 6 p.m. ATP: Western & Southern Open, ATP Early round, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Greek teen advances to Rogers Cup tennis final Greek teen Stefanos Tsitsipas became the youngest player to beat four straight top-10 players in an event since the ATP World Tour was established in 1990, outlasting Kevin Anderson 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (7) on Saturday to reach the Rogers Cup final in Toronto. The 19-year-old Tsitsipas, ranked a career-high 27th and guaranteed to break into the top 20 on Monday, will face the winner of Saturday’s late and rain-delayed match between top-ranked Rafael Nadal and Karen Khachanov for the title on Sunday. Tsitsipas beat the fourth-seeded Anderson after topping seventhseeded Dominic Thiem, ninth-seeded Novak Djokovic and secondseeded defending champion Alexander Zverev to reach his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 semifinal. On the women’s side, in Montreal, a weary Simona Halep, upset over how her matches are scheduled, defeated Ashleigh Barty 6-4, 6-1 Saturday to reach the final. The top-ranked Romanian will meet third-ranked Sloane Stephens Sunday in a rematch of Halep’s victory in the French Open final. Stephens beat fifth-seeded Elina Svitolina 6-3, 6-3 to advance Saturday. Halep has reached the Rogers Cup final in three of the last four years. She won the last time it was in Montreal in 2016. Halep complained Friday about playing the first semifinal after two straight night matches. She contended she has the worst schedule in the 56-player event and “this happens almost every tournament.” Despite playing on only 15 hours rest, Halep needed just 71 minutes to dispatch the 15th-seeded Barty on Saturday. “I just tried to focus on what I have to play and, to make it a little bit easier, which I did in the end, was to finish it early,” Halep said. (AP) SLU’s Klug on MAC Hermann Trophy watch list • Alli Klug, a junior defender at St. Louis University, is one of 45 NCAA Division I women’s soccer players named to the Missouri Athletic Club Hermann Trophy watch list. On the men’s side, the list includes 32 players. The MAC Hermann Trophy is the most prestigious individual award in college soccer and is presented annually to the most outstanding male and female players of the year. This year’s winners will be announced and honored Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 at the Missouri Athletic Club in downtown St. Louis. Klug, who starred at Nerinx Hall High in Webster Groves, earned third-team All-America honors last fall as a sophomore after helping a 15-3-2 Billiken squad to a school record-tying 13 shutouts. She also contributed five goals to the SLU attack. (News services) U.S. advances to softball title game • Pitcher Rachel Garcia drove in the winning run in the eighth inning Saturday to lift the United States to a 4-3 win over Japan and into the final of the women’s world softball championship in Makuhari, Japan. It also gives the Americans a chance to qualify for the Olympics. The defending champions will face either Japan or Canada in Sunday’s final of a tournament that doubles as a qualifier for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. If Japan wins, the second-place finisher will get the Olympic spot because Japan has an automatic berth as host. Softball and baseball were dropped from the Olympic program after the 2008 Beijing Games but have been restored for 2020. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

WASHINGTON POST

Parkway Central and MU product Max Scherzer, close to his fourth Cy Young, easily makes All St. Louis team.

There are lots of options when compiling the roster BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Because Washington righthander Max Scherzer is slated to face the Cubs in Chicago Sunday, the St. Louis fans will not get a chance this week to see perhaps the best baseball player ever to come out of St. Louis. What’s that? There is some bleating from the Hill about some guy named Larry. Lawrence Peter Berra, the great New York Yankees catcher, generally is considered the best player to come out of St. Louis. And for at least four good reasons. Yogi won three Most Valuable Player awards (1951, 54-55) and he’s in the Baseball Hall of Fame. But Parkway Central and Mizzou product Scherzer already has won three Cy Young Awards, one with Detroit and two with Washington. And he’s destined for a third in a row with Washington and fourth overall unless Jacob deGrom of the New York Mets continues to keep his ERA in Bob Gibson country despite a losing record. Four Cy Youngs would put Scherzer in some elite company with Roger Clemens (seven), Randy Johnson (five) and Steve Carlton and Greg Maddux, both with four. The final three are in the Hall of Fame. Clemens someday may be, if enough voters forego his suspected dalliance with performance enhancements. Scherzer (15-5, 2.28 ERA) has a lifetime record of 156-80 and his .661 winning percentage ranks in the top 20 all-time. If he wins 20 games again this season, it will be the fourth time he has achieved that. Since 2013, nine pitchers have won 20 or more games in the majors. Three of them are named Scherzer, who has two no-hitters and is headed for his fourth consecutive NL strikeout title. Berra has some estimable statistics. He had 356 homers and 1,430 RBIs. He played in 18 AllStar Games. And he has one record that won’t be broken in our lifetimes: He played on 10 World Series champions with the Yankees. Scherzer, on the other hand, has been in one World Series game with Detroit in 2012. Because of the Nationals’ horrid postseason history, he hasn’t even appeared in a National League championship game, let alone a World Series with the Nats. But ... if he wins another Cy Young, do four Cy Youngs trump three MVPs? And Scherzer may not be done yet. Food for thought. Wherever you come down on this, there is no question that the Scherzer-Berra combo is the alltime St. Louis battery. For a city which rich baseball history, there have been surprisingly few position players who have really excelled. But lefthanded starting pitching has been particularly strong. How would you choose, for instance, among Ken Holtzman, Jerry Reuss and Mark Buehrle? University City product Holtzman, who won 174 games, had the best ERA at 3.49. Ritenour star Reuss had the most wins of the three at 220. Buehrle had the best winning percentage with 214-160, had two no-hitters and for the final 15 years of his career, won at least 10 games every season. Advantage: Buehrle. There is little question at first base. Lafayette High’s Ryan Howard, playing mostly with Philadelphia, clouted 382 home runs and

ALL ST. LOUIS TEAM 1B: RYAN HOWARD Former Phillie had four seasons of more than 45 homers from 200609. 2B: RED SCHOENDIENST Had 190 or more hits three times. Homered in 14th inning to win 1950 All-Star Game. SS: DAL MAXVILL Hit slam off former teammate Larry Jaster in first game played in Canada. 3B: BILL MUELLER Played on first Boston World Series champion in 86 years in 2004. LF: ROY SIEVERS Led AL with 42 homers, 114 RBIs in 1957. CF: PETE REISER Batting champion in 1941, was carried off field 11 times in his career after being hurt. RF: HANK BAUER Played on nine pennant winners with Yankees; managed Orioles to 1966 Series title. C: YOGI BERRA Besides his hitting exploits, caught ex-Brownie Don Larsen’s perfect game in 1956 World Series. UTIL: ELSTON HOWARD When Yogi wasn’t catching, Howard was and became Gold Glover. Otherwise, he was in left. RHP: MAX SCHERZER He’s 44 wins shy of 200. He may get there before he has 100 losses. LHP: MARK BUEHRLE Was cut from Francis Howell North team as sophomore. Had perfect game as one of two no-hitters. CLOSER: MIKE HENNEMAN Had seven seasons of more than 20 saves. MANAGER: EARL WEAVER Had .582 winning percentage for Orioles. Hoped to be Cards second baseman. They had Red. Rick Hummel

drove in 1,194 runs while winning the National League Most Valuable Player award in 2006. He smashed 58 homers that year. Middle infielders weren’t plentiful but Ron Hunt, another Ritenour product, was a good hitter as a second baseman, hitting .273, and was good at being hit. He was plunked 243 times, including a modern-day record 50 in one year. In this instance, though, we’re going to play the 40-milesaway-or-less card and go with late Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst, a Germantown, Ill, native and Cardinals legend.

With no real strong offensive personages at shortstop, we’re looking for defense and who better than Dal Maxvill, the slick fielder who played for three World Series teams in the 1960s? The Granite City High grad hit only .217 but one of his six homers was the first Cardinals’ homer hit outside the U.S. He hit a grand slam at Montreal in the Expos’ first game in 1969. Third base had a strong crew, if you include Mike Shannon. Scott Cooper was a two-time All-Star, but the nod goes to DeSmet’s Bill Mueller, the recently deposed Cardinals assistant coach who hit .291 for his career and won a batting title in 2003 for Boston. This outfield requires a left fielder, center fielder and right fielder. In left will be Beaumont High’s Roy Sievers, a former Rookie of the Year for the St. Louis Browns and who hit 318 home runs. Center fielder Pete Reiser, who played mostly for Brooklyn, hit .295 in 10 years. But another Beaumont product had trouble with the walls. They didn’t move when he ran into them and he often was hurt. In right field will be East St. Louis native Hank Bauer, who played in nine World Series alongside Berra with the Yankees and batted .277 with 164 home runs. This grouping excludes Bernard Gilkey, a U. City star who played on some good Cardinals teams and had a huge year for the New York Mets in 1996, the year after he was traded by the Cardinals, when he hit .317 with 30 homers and 117 RBIs. The club will need a closer and former Detroit Tiger Mike Henneman, who was born in St. Charles and who played high school ball at St. Pius in Festus, had 193 saves. Since the team was picked by position, Vashon’s Elston Howard, who played both left field and backed up Berra behind the plate for awhile, doesn’t have a starting spot. But he would be the top utility player, having been a ninetime All-Star with 167 home runs and a .274 batting average besides appearing in 10 World Series including one with Boston. He also won two Gold Gloves. Catcher Joe Garagiola, Berra’s childhood friend, became a Hall of Famer in the broadcast booth but he did star as a 20-year-old in the 1946 Series for the Cardinals. Be s i d e s ca tc h e rs a n d lefthanded starting pitchers, the St. Louis area is best known for its managers. Dick Williams, Earl Weaver and Whitey Herzog won a collective 4,332 games before they all went to the Hall of Fame. Since Beaumont’s Weaver had the best winning percentage and got to the Hall of Fame first, he will be the manager on this team. But he’s got some dandy coaches in Herzog, the pride of New Athens, Ill., and St. Louis-born Williams. The record books will show that James “Pud” Galvin was born in St. Louis and grew up in the Irish “Kerry Patch” neighborhood. The books show that he was 37-27 as a rookie for the St. Louis team in the American Association and that he won 345 games (while losing 310) for his career. The 5-foot8, 190-pounder is in the Baseball Hall of Fame. But his career ended in 1892 and, contrary to some popular opinion, I did not see him play. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 8/12 at Royals 1:15 p.m. FSM

Monday 8/13 vs. Nationals 7:10 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 8/14 vs. Nationals 7:15 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 8/15 vs. Nationals 7:15 p.m. FSM

M 4 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

MLB INSIDER

St. Louis’ all-star team

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/1 vs. Tenn.-Martin 3 p.m. SEC Net. alt.

Saturday 9/8 vs. Wyoming 6 p.m. ESPN2 or ESPNU

Saturday 9/15 at Purdue 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/22 vs. Georgia Time TBA TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 9/1 vs. Kent State 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/8 vs. Western Ill. 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/15 vs. South Florida (in Chicago) 2:30 p.m., BTN

Friday 9/21 vs. Penn State 8 p.m. Fox Sports 1

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Wednesday 8/15 Saturday 8/18 at Fresno vs. Sacramento 9 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 8/25 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 8/29 at Seattle 9 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Sun. 8/12: vs. So. Illinois, 6:05 p.m. Wed. 8/15: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Tue. 8/14: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 8/15: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Consumers Energy 400, NBCSN BASEBALL 9 a.m. Little League New England Regional final, ESPN 1:10 p.m. Mariners at Astros, TBS 1:15 p.m. Cardinals at Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. High School: Perfect Game All-American Classic, MLB 7:10 p.m. Nationals at Cubs, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 2 p.m. WNBA: Dallas at Washington, NBA 2:30 p.m. Junior NBA World championship, KTVI (2) 3 p.m. College exhibition: Team Toronto vs. Kentucky, SEC Network 3:45 p.m. Junior NBA World championship, KTVI (2) 6 p.m. WNBA: Los Angeles at Phoenix, ESPN2 GOLF 10 a.m. PGA Championship: final round, TNT 1 p.m. PGA Championship: final round, KMOV (4) 1 p.m. Women’s U.S. Amateur: Championship Match, FS1 SOCCER 6:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: England vs. Mexico, FS1 6:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: Brazil vs. North Korea, FS2 7:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. West Ham United, NBCSN 9:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: Netherlands vs. France, FS2 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 1:30 p.m. DFL-Supercup: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Bayern Munich, FS2 2:30 p.m. Spanish Super Cup: Sevilla vs. Barcelona, ESPNews 3 p.m. MLS: New York City at Toronto, ESPN 7 p.m. MLS: Orlando at D.C. United, FS1 9 p.m. MLS: Dallas at Seattle, FS1 TENNIS 12:30 p.m. WTA: Rogers Cup, final, ESPN2 3 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, final, ESPN2 3:30 p.m. USTA Nationals: Girls’ 18s Championship, Tennis Channel 6 p.m. ATP: Western & Southern Open, ATP Early round, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Greek teen advances to Rogers Cup tennis final Greek teen Stefanos Tsitsipas became the youngest player to beat four straight top-10 players in an event since the ATP World Tour was established in 1990, outlasting Kevin Anderson 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (7) on Saturday to reach the Rogers Cup final in Toronto. The 19-year-old Tsitsipas, ranked a career-high 27th and guaranteed to break into the top 20 on Monday, will face top-ranked Rafael Nadal for the title on Sunday. Nadal beat Karen Khachanov 7-6 (3), 6-4. Tsitsipas beat the fourth-seeded Anderson after topping seventhseeded Dominic Thiem, ninth-seeded Novak Djokovic and secondseeded defending champion Alexander Zverev to reach his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 semifinal. On the women’s side, in Montreal, a weary Simona Halep, upset over how her matches are scheduled, defeated Ashleigh Barty 6-4, 6-1 Saturday to reach the final. The top-ranked Romanian will meet third-ranked Sloane Stephens Sunday in a rematch of Halep’s victory in the French Open final. Stephens beat fifth-seeded Elina Svitolina 6-3, 6-3 to advance Saturday. Halep has reached the Rogers Cup final in three of the last four years. She won the last time it was in Montreal in 2016. Halep complained Friday about playing the first semifinal after two straight night matches. She contended she has the worst schedule in the 56-player event and “this happens almost every tournament.” Despite playing on only 15 hours rest, Halep needed just 71 minutes to dispatch the 15th-seeded Barty on Saturday. “I just tried to focus on what I have to play and, to make it a little bit easier, which I did in the end, was to finish it early,” Halep said. (AP) SLU’s Klug on MAC Hermann Trophy watch list • Alli Klug, a junior defender at St. Louis University, is one of 45 NCAA Division I women’s soccer players named to the Missouri Athletic Club Hermann Trophy watch list. On the men’s side, the list includes 32 players. The MAC Hermann Trophy is the most prestigious individual award in college soccer and is presented annually to the most outstanding male and female players of the year. This year’s winners will be announced and honored Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 at the Missouri Athletic Club in downtown St. Louis. Klug, who starred at Nerinx Hall High in Webster Groves, earned third-team All-America honors last fall as a sophomore after helping a 15-3-2 Billiken squad to a school record-tying 13 shutouts. She also contributed five goals to the SLU attack. (News services) U.S. advances to softball title game • Pitcher Rachel Garcia drove in the winning run in the eighth inning Saturday to lift the United States to a 4-3 win over Japan and into the final of the women’s world softball championship in Makuhari, Japan. It also gives the Americans a chance to qualify for the Olympics. The defending champions will face either Japan or Canada in Sunday’s final of a tournament that doubles as a qualifier for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. If Japan wins, the second-place finisher will get the Olympic spot because Japan has an automatic berth as host. Softball and baseball were dropped from the Olympic program after the 2008 Beijing Games but have been restored for 2020. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

WASHINGTON POST

Parkway Central and MU product Max Scherzer, close to his fourth Cy Young, easily makes All St. Louis team.

There are lots of options when compiling the roster BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Because Washington righthander Max Scherzer is slated to face the Cubs in Chicago Sunday, the St. Louis fans will not get a chance this week to see perhaps the best baseball player ever to come out of St. Louis. What’s that? There is some bleating from the Hill about some guy named Larry. Lawrence Peter Berra, the great New York Yankees catcher, generally is considered the best player to come out of St. Louis. And for at least four good reasons. Yogi won three Most Valuable Player awards (1951, 54-55) and he’s in the Baseball Hall of Fame. But Parkway Central and Mizzou product Scherzer already has won three Cy Young Awards, one with Detroit and two with Washington. And he’s destined for a third in a row with Washington and fourth overall unless Jacob deGrom of the New York Mets continues to keep his ERA in Bob Gibson country despite a losing record. Four Cy Youngs would put Scherzer in some elite company with Roger Clemens (seven), Randy Johnson (five) and Steve Carlton and Greg Maddux, both with four. The final three are in the Hall of Fame. Clemens someday may be, if enough voters forego his suspected dalliance with performance enhancements. Scherzer (15-5, 2.28 ERA) has a lifetime record of 156-80 and his .661 winning percentage ranks in the top 20 all-time. If he wins 20 games again this season, it will be the fourth time he has achieved that. Since 2013, nine pitchers have won 20 or more games in the majors. Three of them are named Scherzer, who has two no-hitters and is headed for his fourth consecutive NL strikeout title. Berra has some estimable statistics. He had 356 homers and 1,430 RBIs. He played in 18 AllStar Games. And he has one record that won’t be broken in our lifetimes: He played on 10 World Series champions with the Yankees. Scherzer, on the other hand, has been in one World Series game with Detroit in 2012. Because of the Nationals’ horrid postseason history, he hasn’t even appeared in a National League championship game, let alone a World Series with the Nats. But ... if he wins another Cy Young, do four Cy Youngs trump three MVPs? And Scherzer may not be done yet. Food for thought. Wherever you come down on this, there is no question that the Scherzer-Berra combo is the alltime St. Louis battery. For a city which rich baseball history, there have been surprisingly few position players who have really excelled. But lefthanded starting pitching has been particularly strong. How would you choose, for instance, among Ken Holtzman, Jerry Reuss and Mark Buehrle? University City product Holtzman, who won 174 games, had the best ERA at 3.49. Ritenour star Reuss had the most wins of the three at 220. Buehrle had the best winning percentage with 214-160, had two no-hitters and for the final 15 years of his career, won at least 10 games every season. Advantage: Buehrle. There is little question at first base. Lafayette High’s Ryan Howard, playing mostly with Philadelphia, clouted 382 home runs and

ALL ST. LOUIS TEAM 1B: RYAN HOWARD Former Phillie had four seasons of more than 45 homers from 200609. 2B: RED SCHOENDIENST Had 190 or more hits three times. Homered in 14th inning to win 1950 All-Star Game. SS: DAL MAXVILL Hit slam off former teammate Larry Jaster in first game played in Canada. 3B: BILL MUELLER Played on first Boston World Series champion in 86 years in 2004. LF: ROY SIEVERS Led AL with 42 homers, 114 RBIs in 1957. CF: PETE REISER Batting champion in 1941, was carried off field 11 times in his career after being hurt. RF: HANK BAUER Played on nine pennant winners with Yankees; managed Orioles to 1966 Series title. C: YOGI BERRA Besides his hitting exploits, caught ex-Brownie Don Larsen’s perfect game in 1956 World Series. UTIL: ELSTON HOWARD When Yogi wasn’t catching, Howard was and became Gold Glover. Otherwise, he was in left. RHP: MAX SCHERZER He’s 44 wins shy of 200. He may get there before he has 100 losses. LHP: MARK BUEHRLE Was cut from Francis Howell North team as sophomore. Had perfect game as one of two no-hitters. CLOSER: MIKE HENNEMAN Had seven seasons of more than 20 saves. MANAGER: EARL WEAVER Had .582 winning percentage for Orioles. Hoped to be Cards second baseman. They had Red. Rick Hummel

drove in 1,194 runs while winning the National League Most Valuable Player award in 2006. He smashed 58 homers that year. Middle infielders weren’t plentiful but Ron Hunt, another Ritenour product, was a good hitter as a second baseman, hitting .273, and was good at being hit. He was plunked 243 times, including a modern-day record 50 in one year. In this instance, though, we’re going to play the 40-milesaway-or-less card and go with late Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst, a Germantown, Ill, native and Cardinals legend.

With no real strong offensive personages at shortstop, we’re looking for defense and who better than Dal Maxvill, the slick fielder who played for three World Series teams in the 1960s? The Granite City High grad hit only .217 but one of his six homers was the first Cardinals’ homer hit outside the U.S. He hit a grand slam at Montreal in the Expos’ first game in 1969. Third base had a strong crew, if you include Mike Shannon. Scott Cooper was a two-time All-Star, but the nod goes to DeSmet’s Bill Mueller, the recently deposed Cardinals assistant coach who hit .291 for his career and won a batting title in 2003 for Boston. This outfield requires a left fielder, center fielder and right fielder. In left will be Beaumont High’s Roy Sievers, a former Rookie of the Year for the St. Louis Browns and who hit 318 home runs. Center fielder Pete Reiser, who played mostly for Brooklyn, hit .295 in 10 years. But another Beaumont product had trouble with the walls. They didn’t move when he ran into them and he often was hurt. In right field will be East St. Louis native Hank Bauer, who played in nine World Series alongside Berra with the Yankees and batted .277 with 164 home runs. This grouping excludes Bernard Gilkey, a U. City star who played on some good Cardinals teams and had a huge year for the New York Mets in 1996, the year after he was traded by the Cardinals, when he hit .317 with 30 homers and 117 RBIs. The club will need a closer and former Detroit Tiger Mike Henneman, who was born in St. Charles and who played high school ball at St. Pius in Festus, had 193 saves. Since the team was picked by position, Vashon’s Elston Howard, who played both left field and backed up Berra behind the plate for awhile, doesn’t have a starting spot. But he would be the top utility player, having been a ninetime All-Star with 167 home runs and a .274 batting average besides appearing in 10 World Series including one with Boston. He also won two Gold Gloves. Catcher Joe Garagiola, Berra’s childhood friend, became a Hall of Famer in the broadcast booth but he did star as a 20-year-old in the 1946 Series for the Cardinals. Be s i d e s ca tc h e rs a n d lefthanded starting pitchers, the St. Louis area is best known for its managers. Dick Williams, Earl Weaver and Whitey Herzog won a collective 4,332 games before they all went to the Hall of Fame. Since Beaumont’s Weaver had the best winning percentage and got to the Hall of Fame first, he will be the manager on this team. But he’s got some dandy coaches in Herzog, the pride of New Athens, Ill., and St. Louis-born Williams. The record books will show that James “Pud” Galvin was born in St. Louis and grew up in the Irish “Kerry Patch” neighborhood. The books show that he was 37-27 as a rookie for the St. Louis team in the American Association and that he won 345 games (while losing 310) for his career. The 5-foot8, 190-pounder is in the Baseball Hall of Fame. But his career ended in 1892 and, contrary to some popular opinion, I did not see him play. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

MINOR LEAGUE REPORT

Garcia gets his big chance After making adjustments, outfielder moves up from Memphis

MIAMI HERALD

Cardinals outfielder Adolis Garcia (left) smiles during the eighth inning against the Marlins in Miami on Tuesday. The Cards won, 3-2.

BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-dispatch

At this point, new faces must feel like a familiar sight around the Cardinals’ clubhouse. Of the team’s 25-man roster, 10 players have been on AAA Memphis’ roster on non-rehab assignments this season. The Triple-A prospects have proven potent. Spurred by their young core, the Cardinals have won each of their past four series. And, on Monday, the Memphis mafia gained a new member when the Cardinals called up Adolis Garcia. The Cuban outfielder comes from a baseball family. Adonis Garcia, Adolis’

Breakthrough Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Now Available in St. Louis! The St. Louis Men’s Clinic is proud to introduce the newest and most effective technologies available to treat Erectile Dysfunction. ED WAVE THERAPY Revolutionary Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Treatment Without Medication St. Louis Men’s Clinic is now offering a cutting edge new treatment procedure known as WAVE Therapy. Wave Therapy is the most advanced and highly effective non-invasive treatment for ED. Call us today at 314-282-8080 to see if you are a candidate for this in office procedure that can significantly improve the quality of your life. Our ED patients now have a revolutionary treatment option available to them that provides long-term results and spontaneity without the use of drugs, surgery, injections or apparatus. 88% of our patients who have tried WAVE Therapy would recommend it to others. This proprietary technology treats the cause and not the symptoms of ED by breaking up plaque and blockages, and increasing blood flow by creating new blood vessels, utilizing the body’s natural healing agents. The beneficial effects of WAVE Therapy are often experienced after only a few treatments at The St. Louis Men’s Clinic.

older brother, played three major league seasons with the Braves, and he is currently on a team in Korea. “He’s been the biggest influence in my career,” Adolis Garcia said through a translator before his call-up. “I just want to someday try to be like him, try to accomplish what he did: Play in the big leagues.” Garcia achieved his goal when the Cardinals called him up after Tyler O’Neill — another player who has been with Memphis this season — went to the disabled list with a groin injury. Now both Garcia brothers have major league experience. (Adolis went zero-for-four in his debut Wednesday.) The Cardinals inked Garcia, a 25-yearold, to a minor league contract in 2017 and gave him a $2.5 million signing bonus. The outfielder caught eyes immediately. He batted .290 between AA Springfield and Triple-A Memphis last season and slugged 15 home runs. High expectations surrounded Garcia heading into the 2018 campaign, but the prospect faltered initially. His average dipped to .202 on June 8, and he only had four home runs through the first two months of the season. “I had the confidence that I could turn it around,” he said. “I believe in hard work, that everybody has a bad month or bad stretch in baseball.” Before the All-Star break, Garcia made a mechanical change in his swing. He lowered his hands, and the adjustment allowed him to bring his bat into the strike zone quicker, helping him make contact more frequently. It also led to more power. The outfielder said he also worked on his mental approach. He made a point to swing at pitches that he wanted to swing at, not ones pitchers hoped he would chase. The Cardinals hope he can further develop discipline at the plate and learn to draw more walks. Director of player development Gary Larocque said part of Garcia’s early struggles had to do with getting used to Triple-

A talent. He just needed experience. “It’s the adjustment to that level of pitching,” Larocque said in July after Garcia started to play better. “With his athleticism and his focus, he’ll continue to improve at it.” He has. In his 23 Triple-A games after the All-Star break, Garcia hit .372 with 11 home runs. He averaged less than one strikeout a game and earned Pacific Coast League Player of the Month honors for July. “He’s done a little of Matt Carpenter the last two months at Memphis,” general manager Michael Girsch told reporters this week. The Cardinals called up Garcia in the midst of his midseason surge, making him one of five players in Memphis’ opening day lineup to reach the majors this season. Garcia spent time with the big-league Cardinals in spring training, and he hit .291 with a homer. He said catcher Yadier Molina repeated a piece of advice that stuck with him. “Yadi always told me that you’ve got to be aware of the game,” Garcia said. “You’ve got to have good discipline on and off the field.” Garcia first realized the big leagues were possible when he hit .315 in the Cuban national baseball league in 2016. His performance was enough to win MVP honors. The 25-year-old also watched his brother make it to the big leagues and thought he’d have a chance, too. Still, he’s surprised by his accelerated ascent. “If you asked me a couple years back where I would be, I never thought I would be so close to the big leagues so fast,” he said pre-promotion. “I’m just happy to be here, and I’m just waiting for the opportunity to come.” By allowing an influx of youth, the Cardinals have opened the door for players like Garcia. The team has given the outfielder his chance. He just wants to take advantage of it. Peter Baugh @Peter_Baugh on Twitter pbaugh@post-dispatch.com

Many patients report a noticeable improvement of their ability to achieve an erection within a few weeks.

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Without Medication During treatment, high frequency acoustical waves are applied to different areas of the penis. This stimulates the creation of new blood vessels in the cavernous bodies and improves blood flow in the penis (and the ability to achieve an erection).

$ Unlike conventional ED treatment, such as PDE5 inhibitors, EDWT does not involve the use of any pharmaceuticals. Morover, the Wave Treatment causes no side-effects or systemic load on other organs and healthy tissues.

This breakthrough, therapeutic treatment brings long lasting improvement for erectile function and sexual health to millions of men –without pain or medication.

Benefits of Non-Invasive WAVE Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction • Long Term Results and Spontaneity • No Drugs • Non-Surgical • No Side Effects • Treats root cause of problem • Fast, Safe, & Effective

10 Year Parts Warranty!

$99 OFFICE VISIT Limited Time Offer

Please call The St. Louis Men’s Clinic today at 314-282-8080 to see if you are a candidate for this in office procedure that can significantly improve the quality of your life. To learn more about WAVE Therapy, visit our website: www.stlmensclinic.com

777 S. New Ballas Road, Suite 119W, St. Louis, MO 63141

www.stlmensclinic.com 314-282-8080

R-410A

2,895 Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of $1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

Expires Expires5/15/15 8/31/18

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM 314-993-1110

SINCE 1950


BASEBALL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

MLB NOTEBOOK

MINOR LEAGUE REPORT

Arenado out of Rockies lineup

Garcia gets his big chance

Colorado’s Nolan Arenado was held out of Saturday night’s starting lineup against the Los Angeles Dodgers because of a right shoulder strain, though the Rockies remain hopeful the injury won’t result in a trip to the disabled list for their powerhitting third baseman. “He got looked at by our medical staff. They all seem to think that this is something minor,” manager Bud Black said. Arenado was lifted from Friday night’s game in the fifth inning after it became too painful to use his right arm to throw the ball. Black said the All-Star could pinch hit if needed. (AP)

After making adjustments, outfielder moves up from Memphis

Bryant confident he’ll return • Cubs third baseman Kris Bryant said there’s no timetable for his return but said he is “totally confident” he will play again this season. He is taking ground balls and “stages of” dry swings without a baseball. “It’s going slow, but that seems to be the smart thing to do,” he said. Bryant, out since July 24, believes his shoulder has been adversely affected by taking too many “violent” swings in pregame work. “Practice a little slower in the cage,” he said of his new plan, “and then have more for the game.” (Chicago Tribune) Indians’ Encarnacion has MRI • Cleveland Indians slugger Edwin Encarnacion had an MRI exam Saturday because of discomfort in his left biceps and there wasn’t a decision yet on whether to put him on the disabled list. Third on the team with 25 homers and second with 81 RBIs, he has struggled since being hit on the right hand by Yankees reliever Chad Green before the All-Star break. (AP) Wright to play in minors • The Mets announced that third baseman David Wright will play five innings at third base Sunday for Single-A St. Lucie at Clearwater. Wright, 35, hasn’t played in a majorleague game since late May of the 2016 season and the last time he appeared in a minor-league game was on Aug. 26, 2017. The Mets’ captain has been slowly rehabbing from multiple surgeries to repair injuries to his shoulder, back and neck. (New York Daily News)

MIAMI HERALD

Cardinals outfielder Adolis Garcia (left) smiles during the eighth inning against the Marlins in Miami on Tuesday. The Cards won, 3-2.

BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-dispatch

At this point, new faces must feel like a familiar sight around the Cardinals’ clubhouse. Of the team’s 25-man roster, 10 players have been on AAA Memphis’ roster on non-rehab assignments this season. The Triple-A prospects have proven potent. Spurred by their young core, the Cardinals have won each of their past four series. And, on Monday, the Memphis mafia gained a new member when the Cardinals called up Adolis Garcia. The Cuban outfielder comes from a baseball family. Adonis Garcia, Adolis’

Ohtani has bullpen session • Los Angeles Angels rookie Shohei Ohtani took his next step in a possible return to pitching by throwing a light bullpen session on Saturday. The 24-year-old Japanese star threw 23 pitches, mixing in fastballs, sliders and curveballs. It was the first time he had thrown off a mound since he last pitched in a game, on June 6. (AP)

Breakthrough Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Now Available in St. Louis! The St. Louis Men’s Clinic is proud to introduce the newest and most effective technologies available to treat Erectile Dysfunction. ED WAVE THERAPY Revolutionary Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Treatment Without Medication St. Louis Men’s Clinic is now offering a cutting edge new treatment procedure known as WAVE Therapy. Wave Therapy is the most advanced and highly effective non-invasive treatment for ED. Call us today at 314-282-8080 to see if you are a candidate for this in office procedure that can significantly improve the quality of your life. Our ED patients now have a revolutionary treatment option available to them that provides long-term results and spontaneity without the use of drugs, surgery, injections or apparatus. 88% of our patients who have tried WAVE Therapy would recommend it to others. This proprietary technology treats the cause and not the symptoms of ED by breaking up plaque and blockages, and increasing blood flow by creating new blood vessels, utilizing the body’s natural healing agents. The beneficial effects of WAVE Therapy are often experienced after only a few treatments at The St. Louis Men’s Clinic.

older brother, played three major league seasons with the Braves, and he is currently on a team in Korea. “He’s been the biggest influence in my career,” Adolis Garcia said through a translator before his call-up. “I just want to someday try to be like him, try to accomplish what he did: Play in the big leagues.” Garcia achieved his goal when the Cardinals called him up after Tyler O’Neill — another player who has been with Memphis this season — went to the disabled list with a groin injury. Now both Garcia brothers have major league experience. (Adolis went zero-for-four in his debut Wednesday, and got his first big-league hit on Friday.) The Cardinals inked Garcia, a 25-yearold, to a minor league contract in 2017 and gave him a $2.5 million signing bonus. The outfielder caught eyes immediately. He batted .290 between AA Springfield and Triple-A Memphis last season and slugged 15 home runs. High expectations surrounded Garcia heading into the 2018 campaign, but the prospect faltered initially. His average dipped to .202 on June 8, and he only had four home runs through the first two months of the season. “I had the confidence that I could turn it around,” he said. “I believe in hard work, that everybody has a bad month or bad stretch in baseball.” Before the All-Star break, Garcia made a mechanical change in his swing. He lowered his hands, and the adjustment allowed him to bring his bat into the strike zone quicker, helping him make contact more frequently. It also led to more power. The outfielder said he also worked on his mental approach. He made a point to swing at pitches that he wanted to swing at, not ones pitchers hoped he would chase. The Cardinals hope he can further develop discipline at the plate and learn to draw more walks. Director of player development Gary Larocque said part of Garcia’s early strug-

gles had to do with getting used to TripleA talent. He just needed experience. “It’s the adjustment to that level of pitching,” Larocque said in July after Garcia started to play better. “With his athleticism and his focus, he’ll continue to improve at it.” He has. In his 23 Triple-A games after the All-Star break, Garcia hit .372 with 11 home runs. He averaged less than one strikeout a game and earned Pacific Coast League Player of the Month honors for July. “He’s done a little of Matt Carpenter the last two months at Memphis,” general manager Michael Girsch told reporters this week. The Cardinals called up Garcia in the midst of his midseason surge, making him one of five players in Memphis’ opening day lineup to reach the majors this season. Garcia spent time with the big-league Cardinals in spring training, and he hit .291 with a homer. He said catcher Yadier Molina repeated a piece of advice that stuck with him. “Yadi always told me that you’ve got to be aware of the game,” Garcia said. “You’ve got to have good discipline on and off the field.” Garcia first realized the big leagues were possible when he hit .315 in the Cuban national baseball league in 2016. His performance was enough to win MVP honors. The 25-year-old also watched his brother make it to the big leagues and thought he’d have a chance, too. Still, he’s surprised by his accelerated ascent. “If you asked me a couple years back where I would be, I never thought I would be so close to the big leagues so fast,” he said pre-promotion. “I’m just happy to be here, and I’m just waiting for the opportunity to come.” By allowing an influx of youth, the Cardinals have opened the door for players like Garcia. The team has given the outfielder his chance. He just wants to take advantage of it. Peter Baugh @Peter_Baugh on Twitter pbaugh@post-dispatch.com

Many patients report a noticeable improvement of their ability to achieve an erection within a few weeks.

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Without Medication During treatment, high frequency acoustical waves are applied to different areas of the penis. This stimulates the creation of new blood vessels in the cavernous bodies and improves blood flow in the penis (and the ability to achieve an erection).

$ Unlike conventional ED treatment, such as PDE5 inhibitors, EDWT does not involve the use of any pharmaceuticals. Morover, the Wave Treatment causes no side-effects or systemic load on other organs and healthy tissues.

This breakthrough, therapeutic treatment brings long lasting improvement for erectile function and sexual health to millions of men –without pain or medication.

Benefits of Non-Invasive WAVE Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction • Long Term Results and Spontaneity • No Drugs • Non-Surgical • No Side Effects • Treats root cause of problem • Fast, Safe, & Effective

10 Year Parts Warranty!

$99 OFFICE VISIT Limited Time Offer

Please call The St. Louis Men’s Clinic today at 314-282-8080 to see if you are a candidate for this in office procedure that can significantly improve the quality of your life. To learn more about WAVE Therapy, visit our website: www.stlmensclinic.com

777 S. New Ballas Road, Suite 119W, St. Louis, MO 63141

www.stlmensclinic.com 314-282-8080

R-410A

2,895 Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of $1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

Expires Expires5/15/15 8/31/18

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM 314-993-1110

SINCE 1950


BASEBALL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 4

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

MLB NOTEBOOK

MINOR LEAGUE REPORT

Arenado out of Rockies lineup

Garcia gets his big chance

Colorado’s Nolan Arenado was held out of Saturday night’s starting lineup against the Los Angeles Dodgers because of a right shoulder strain, though the Rockies remain hopeful the injury won’t result in a trip to the disabled list for their powerhitting third baseman. “He got looked at by our medical staff. They all seem to think that this is something minor,” manager Bud Black said. Arenado was lifted from Friday night’s game in the fifth inning after it became too painful to use his right arm to throw the ball. Black said the All-Star could pinch hit if needed. (AP)

After making adjustments, outfielder moves up from Memphis

Bryant confident he’ll return • Cubs third baseman Kris Bryant said there’s no timetable for his return but said he is “totally confident” he will play again this season. He is taking ground balls and “stages of” dry swings without a baseball. “It’s going slow, but that seems to be the smart thing to do,” he said. Bryant, out since July 24, believes his shoulder has been adversely affected by taking too many “violent” swings in pregame work. “Practice a little slower in the cage,” he said of his new plan, “and then have more for the game.” (Chicago Tribune) Indians’ Encarnacion to DL • Cleveland is putting slugger Edwin Encarnacion on the disabled list because of swelling in his left biceps. Manager Terry Francona made the announcement after the AL Central leaders beat the Chicago White Sox 3-1 on Saturday night. Encarnacion left Friday night’s game and had an MRI in Cleveland on Saturday.(AP) Wright to play in minors • The Mets announced that third baseman David Wright will play five innings at third base Sunday for Single-A St. Lucie at Clearwater. Wright, 35, hasn’t played in a majorleague game since late May of the 2016 season and the last time he appeared in a minor-league game was on Aug. 26, 2017. The Mets’ captain has been slowly rehabbing from multiple surgeries to repair injuries to his shoulder, back and neck. (New York Daily News)

MIAMI HERALD

Cardinals outfielder Adolis Garcia (left) smiles during the eighth inning against the Marlins in Miami on Tuesday. The Cards won, 3-2.

BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-dispatch

At this point, new faces must feel like a familiar sight around the Cardinals’ clubhouse. Of the team’s 25-man roster, 10 players have been on AAA Memphis’ roster on non-rehab assignments this season. The Triple-A prospects have proven potent. Spurred by their young core, the Cardinals have won each of their past four series. And, on Monday, the Memphis mafia gained a new member when the Cardinals called up Adolis Garcia. The Cuban outfielder comes from a baseball family. Adonis Garcia, Adolis’

Ohtani has bullpen session • Los Angeles Angels rookie Shohei Ohtani took his next step in a possible return to pitching by throwing a light bullpen session on Saturday. The 24-year-old Japanese star threw 23 pitches, mixing in fastballs, sliders and curveballs. It was the first time he had thrown off a mound since he last pitched in a game, on June 6. (AP)

Breakthrough Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Now Available in St. Louis! The St. Louis Men’s Clinic is proud to introduce the newest and most effective technologies available to treat Erectile Dysfunction. ED WAVE THERAPY Revolutionary Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Treatment Without Medication St. Louis Men’s Clinic is now offering a cutting edge new treatment procedure known as WAVE Therapy. Wave Therapy is the most advanced and highly effective non-invasive treatment for ED. Call us today at 314-282-8080 to see if you are a candidate for this in office procedure that can significantly improve the quality of your life. Our ED patients now have a revolutionary treatment option available to them that provides long-term results and spontaneity without the use of drugs, surgery, injections or apparatus. 88% of our patients who have tried WAVE Therapy would recommend it to others. This proprietary technology treats the cause and not the symptoms of ED by breaking up plaque and blockages, and increasing blood flow by creating new blood vessels, utilizing the body’s natural healing agents. The beneficial effects of WAVE Therapy are often experienced after only a few treatments at The St. Louis Men’s Clinic.

older brother, played three major league seasons with the Braves, and he is currently on a team in Korea. “He’s been the biggest influence in my career,” Adolis Garcia said through a translator before his call-up. “I just want to someday try to be like him, try to accomplish what he did: Play in the big leagues.” Garcia achieved his goal when the Cardinals called him up after Tyler O’Neill — another player who has been with Memphis this season — went to the disabled list with a groin injury. Now both Garcia brothers have major league experience. (Adolis went zero-for-four in his debut Wednesday, and got his first big-league hit on Friday.) The Cardinals inked Garcia, a 25-yearold, to a minor league contract in 2017 and gave him a $2.5 million signing bonus. The outfielder caught eyes immediately. He batted .290 between AA Springfield and Triple-A Memphis last season and slugged 15 home runs. High expectations surrounded Garcia heading into the 2018 campaign, but the prospect faltered initially. His average dipped to .202 on June 8, and he only had four home runs through the first two months of the season. “I had the confidence that I could turn it around,” he said. “I believe in hard work, that everybody has a bad month or bad stretch in baseball.” Before the All-Star break, Garcia made a mechanical change in his swing. He lowered his hands, and the adjustment allowed him to bring his bat into the strike zone quicker, helping him make contact more frequently. It also led to more power. The outfielder said he also worked on his mental approach. He made a point to swing at pitches that he wanted to swing at, not ones pitchers hoped he would chase. The Cardinals hope he can further develop discipline at the plate and learn to draw more walks. Director of player development Gary Larocque said part of Garcia’s early strug-

gles had to do with getting used to TripleA talent. He just needed experience. “It’s the adjustment to that level of pitching,” Larocque said in July after Garcia started to play better. “With his athleticism and his focus, he’ll continue to improve at it.” He has. In his 23 Triple-A games after the All-Star break, Garcia hit .372 with 11 home runs. He averaged less than one strikeout a game and earned Pacific Coast League Player of the Month honors for July. “He’s done a little of Matt Carpenter the last two months at Memphis,” general manager Michael Girsch told reporters this week. The Cardinals called up Garcia in the midst of his midseason surge, making him one of five players in Memphis’ opening day lineup to reach the majors this season. Garcia spent time with the big-league Cardinals in spring training, and he hit .291 with a homer. He said catcher Yadier Molina repeated a piece of advice that stuck with him. “Yadi always told me that you’ve got to be aware of the game,” Garcia said. “You’ve got to have good discipline on and off the field.” Garcia first realized the big leagues were possible when he hit .315 in the Cuban national baseball league in 2016. His performance was enough to win MVP honors. The 25-year-old also watched his brother make it to the big leagues and thought he’d have a chance, too. Still, he’s surprised by his accelerated ascent. “If you asked me a couple years back where I would be, I never thought I would be so close to the big leagues so fast,” he said pre-promotion. “I’m just happy to be here, and I’m just waiting for the opportunity to come.” By allowing an influx of youth, the Cardinals have opened the door for players like Garcia. The team has given the outfielder his chance. He just wants to take advantage of it. Peter Baugh @Peter_Baugh on Twitter pbaugh@post-dispatch.com

Many patients report a noticeable improvement of their ability to achieve an erection within a few weeks.

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Without Medication During treatment, high frequency acoustical waves are applied to different areas of the penis. This stimulates the creation of new blood vessels in the cavernous bodies and improves blood flow in the penis (and the ability to achieve an erection).

$ Unlike conventional ED treatment, such as PDE5 inhibitors, EDWT does not involve the use of any pharmaceuticals. Morover, the Wave Treatment causes no side-effects or systemic load on other organs and healthy tissues.

This breakthrough, therapeutic treatment brings long lasting improvement for erectile function and sexual health to millions of men –without pain or medication.

Benefits of Non-Invasive WAVE Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction • Long Term Results and Spontaneity • No Drugs • Non-Surgical • No Side Effects • Treats root cause of problem • Fast, Safe, & Effective

10 Year Parts Warranty!

$99 OFFICE VISIT Limited Time Offer

Please call The St. Louis Men’s Clinic today at 314-282-8080 to see if you are a candidate for this in office procedure that can significantly improve the quality of your life. To learn more about WAVE Therapy, visit our website: www.stlmensclinic.com

777 S. New Ballas Road, Suite 119W, St. Louis, MO 63141

www.stlmensclinic.com 314-282-8080

R-410A

2,895 Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of $1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

Expires Expires5/15/15 8/31/18

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM 314-993-1110

SINCE 1950


D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH CARDINALS 7, ROYALS 0 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 5 1 1 2 0 2 .280 Molina c 3 2 2 0 0 0 .288 Pena c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .206 Martinez dh 4 0 3 2 1 0 .298 Ozuna lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .269 DeJong ss 5 1 1 1 0 2 .243 Gyorko 3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .248 Wong 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .226 Munoz rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .284 a-Garcia ph-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .167 Bader cf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .273 Totals 38 7 12 7 3 9 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .297 Herrera rf 3 0 0 0 2 2 .252 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Butera c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Dozier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Duda 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .239 Bonifacio lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .211 Phillips cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .232 Mondesi ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 O’Hearn dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .105 Totals 33 0 7 0 4 5 Cardinals 050 001 100 — 7 12 1 Kansas City 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 a-singled for Munoz in the 6th. E: Wong (4). LOB: Cardinals 8, Kansas City 11. 2B: Molina 2 (16), Martinez (21), Bonifacio (10). 3B: Mondesi (1). HR: DeJong (11), off Smith; Carpenter (32), off Smith; Bader (7), off Sparkman. RBIs: Carpenter 2 (65), Martinez 2 (65), DeJong (32), Bader 2 (18). RLISP: Cardinals 4 (Ozuna, Gyorko 2, Bader); Kansas City 5 (Dozier 2, Mondesi 2, O’Hearn). GIDP: Merrifield, Perez. DP: Cardinals 2; Kansas City 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gomber 5 4 0 0 1 3 89 3.45 Shreve 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 4.10 Poncedeleon 3 2 0 0 3 1 44 1.23 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smith 1 2/3 6 5 5 1 0 46 6.97 Sparkman 4 1/3 4 2 2 1 2 68 5.06 Adam 2 1 0 0 0 4 25 5.10 Maurer 1 1 0 0 1 3 19 10.00 Sparkman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. W: Gomber 2-0. L: Smith 1-4. S: Poncedeleon 1-1. Inherited runners-scored: Sparkman 1-0, Adam 1-0. HBP: Smith (Molina), Gomber (Perez). WP: Sparkman 2. Umpires: Home, Tom Hallion; First, Ryan Blakney; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T: 3:04. A: 29,414 (37,903).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second • Paul DeJong homers to center field. Jedd Gyorko walks. Kolten Wong grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. Jedd Gyorko to second. Yairo Munoz grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. Jedd Gyorko to third. Harrison Bader singles to center field. Jedd Gyorko scores. Matt Carpenter homers to center field. Harrison Bader scores. Yadier Molina doubles to deep left center field. Jose Martinez singles to center field. Yadier Molina scores. On Glenn Sparkman’s wild pitch, Jose Martinez to second. Marcell Ozuna grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. 5 runs, 5 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Cardinals 5, Royals 0.

CARDINALS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

NOTEBOOK

Visit to AL park changes lineup BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AVERAGES

KANSAS CITY • After weeks of different combinations and alterations to the lineup, a visit to an American League ballpark this weekend gives Cardinals manager Mike Shildt a chance, for the first time, to write a lineup that satisfies both offense and defense — and, just maybe, a peek at what a twist to the usual lineup might look like. Access to a designated hitter gave Shildt the ideal spot to start Jose Martinez and see what the Cardinals’ resurgent offense looks like at its current deepest. “It’s fun,” he said. “Regardless of who is in there right now, I like our lineup.” It has, after all, been the change agent as the Cardinals won four series in a row, including the first two on this three-city road trip. Since the All-Star break, the Cardinals have scored the seventh-most runs in the majors (99), hit .268 (eighth), and slugged .425 (14th). They have seen a spike in their OPS from .714 in the first half to .770 in the first 21 games of the second half. The greatest change has been in the on-base percentage, which has hopped from .315 (21st) to .345 (fifth). Shildt credited the clubhouse and how “players have really taken heed to quality atbats.” Each day, the coaches do a post-op on the previous game with acknowledgement of two-strike hits, opposite-field hits and other hits that were either timely or ideal for the situation. Whatever the cause, the result has been an offense less reliant on home runs and more relentless when it comes to generating baserunners. “We had 19 straight innings where we had somebody on base; (that’s) every inning over two games,” Shildt said before listing recent games when the Cardinals forced opponents to throw far more pitches than the league average. “I’d like to think that we have more of the ability to create runs or score runs regardless of circumstance. Clearly, we hit the ballpark and we feel pretty good about that. It’s a quick and immediate return on investment.” The second inning Friday captured the reward and riddle of revival. The Cardinals sent nine batters to the plate, scored five runs, got two homers, and also knocked Kansas City’s starter from the game with the help of a walk and two other base hits. Matt Carpenter played his usual part in the jubilee with the 32nd home run of his

Batting O’Neill J. Martinez Molina Munoz Carpenter Bader Ozuna Gyorko DeJong G. Garcia Wong Pena A. Garcia Team

AVG AB .309 55 .298 373 .288 319 .284 208 .280 403 .273 231 .269 439 .248 258 .243 263 .231 134 .226 265 .206 107 .167 6 .249 3952

Pitching Hudson Webb Poncedeleon Shreve Mikolas Norris Hicks Flaherty Gomber Mayers Brebbia Gant Weaver Team

W 2 0 0 1 12 3 3 5 2 2 1 4 6 61

R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 10 17 1 0 3 9 2 24 1 1 39 111 21 0 13 65 38 66 0 7 40 92 16 0 15 51 19 47 4 3 21 59 12 0 6 31 20 54 5 10 78 113 33 0 32 65 73 110 1 8 41 63 9 1 7 18 18 71 12 1 45 118 12 1 13 60 28 83 2 3 30 64 13 1 8 37 31 59 1 12 42 64 14 1 11 32 25 75 0 9 14 31 5 0 3 11 16 28 1 4 30 60 12 2 7 25 21 48 3 4 8 22 2 0 2 7 4 32 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 519 986 173 6 145 498 384 973 46 89

L ERA 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 1.23 0 2.45 3 2.74 3 2.87 3 3.10 6 3.27 0 3.45 1 3.51 3 3.83 4 3.89 10 4.66 55 3.78

G 6 4 4 5 23 48 53 18 20 36 33 17 23 116

GS SV IP 0 0 8.2 0 0 6.0 1 1 14.2 0 0 3.2 23 0 144.1 0 22 47.0 0 2 58.0 18 0 96.1 3 0 31.1 0 1 41.0 0 2 40.0 10 0 69.1 23 0 121.2 116 28 1044.0

H 2 5 4 3 129 39 40 73 26 39 37 54 127 955

R 0 0 2 1 48 17 22 38 14 17 17 37 65 485

ER 0 0 2 1 44 15 20 35 12 16 17 30 63 439

HR BB SO 0 1 4 0 0 3 1 9 8 1 1 5 9 25 98 5 9 58 1 28 47 14 33 118 3 15 26 4 11 35 4 13 45 6 31 59 16 43 111 102 401 943

season, but only the fifth with a runner on base. As the team’s entrenched leadoff hitter, Carpenter has eight leadoff homers and 19 other solo home runs. Shildt has toyed with the idea of batting the pitcher eighth for this reason – to get a position player immediately ahead of Carpenter – but recently played down his likelihood of doing it. He agreed the AL rules offer a hint of what that would look like. In the second inning, No. 9 hitter Harrison Bader extended the scoring with a two-out, RBI single, and he was on base for Carpenter’s homer. A two-run inning mushroomed into a four-run jag just like that. Shildt has canvassed his coaches for their opinion on batting the pitcher eighth, and in the coming week or so intends to talk to former manager Tony La Russa about why he did it. Until Monday, the DH is the answer. It’s a new look at a question Carpenter’s production invites. “We just keep looking at it and I can’t get my head around the overall benefit of why we would do it,” Shildt said. “When you look at what it looks like it turns out to be a relative wash. … I enjoyed the process of looking at it. Nothing has swayed me to pull the trigger.”

WAINWRIGHT HAS BRIEF STINT Adam Wainwright (elbow) faced hitters during a 20-pitch game simulation at Jupiter, Fla., on Friday and responded well to the spring training-like workout. He will increase his pitch count in a similar session before advancing toward a game appearance, possibly on the back fields at the team’s spring training complex. … Carlos Martinez (shoulder strain) has intensified his throwing program in recent days and after returning to St. Louis on Thursday will continue his strides toward throwing off the mound – possibly as early as this coming homestand. … Outfielder Tyler O’Neill (groin) officially began his rehab assignment Friday with Class AAA Memphis. BREBBIA TO DL Instead of joining Class AAA Memphis’ bullpen and attempting to pitch through soreness in his right forearm, John Brebbia has been placed on the 10-day disabled and his option from his past week was voided. That does keep Brebbia, officially, in the major leagues. The reliever has been experiencing discomfort near his wrist that has affected his grip and the feel he can get with his fingers. The team, according to an official, does not believe the soreness emanates from his right elbow, which would be more alarming. No significant structural damage was found, and he has been prescribed rest before he’ll resume throwing and reappear again later this season. VISITING NEGRO LEAGUE MUSEUM On their off day Thursday, Cardinals coach Willie McGee, three players and broadcaster Mike Claiborne took a guided tour of the Negro League Baseball Museum in Kansas City. Paul DeJong, Bader and pitcher Jack Flaherty joined McGee. The museum features artifacts stretching back to the late 1800s, and it was in those early days of the Negro Leagues that something happened that caught Bader’s ear. “You get a clear feel for how intertwined the Negro Leagues are with the importance of baseball, and it was the Negro Leagues that went to Japan — before Babe Ruth,” Bader said, referencing tours that took place in the 1920s and 1930s before Ruth’s 1934 jaunt. “Think about that and you have a sense of the reach the Negro Leagues had.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals sixth • Kolten Wong flies out to deep right center field to Brett Phillips. Adolis Garcia pinch-hitting for Yairo Munoz. Adolis Garcia strikes out swinging. Harrison Bader homers to left field. Matt Carpenter grounds out to first base to Lucas Duda. 1 run, 1 hit, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 6, Royals 0. Cardinals seventh • Yadier Molina doubles to deep left field. On Glenn Sparkman’s wild pitch, Yadier Molina to third. Jose Martinez doubles to deep right center field. Yadier Molina scores. Marcell Ozuna strikes out swinging. Paul DeJong called out on strikes. Jedd Gyorko flies out to deep right field to Rosell Herrera. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Cardinals win 7-0.

QUALITY STARTS M. Mikolas .............................16 C. Martinez ............................. 9 L. Weaver................................ 8 M. Wacha ................................ 7 J. Flaherty............................... 5 J. Gant..................................... 3 A. Gomber................................1 A. Wainwright ..........................1 D. Poncedeleon........................1 ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Austin Gomber throws to a batter in the first inning Friday night. Gomber earned his first victory as a starting pitcher.

Offense hums along as Cardinals beat Kansas City CARDINALS • FROM D1

in the clubhouse to sing. A cake, with “Happy Birthday, Skipper” scrawled on top, had been procured for the 50th birthday of the 50th manager in Cardinals history, and though the cake and the traditional song were a day late for Mike Shildt’s actual birthday, they still came at a time when the Cardinals have suddenly found their tune. With a fifth win in six games and another bite taken off their deficit in the wild-card race, the Cardinals have an opportunity this weekend to turn a reassuring road trip into an assertive one. Matt Carpenter added to his league lead with his 32nd home run, his sixth homer in the past seven games. The first baseman’s two-run shot was part of a fiverun second inning that pushed the Cardinals ahead for good. Austin Gomber pitched five scoreless innings for his first major-league win as a starter. Daniel Poncedeleon threw three scoreless innings to close the game for his first major-league save. Bookended by those feats, Yairo Munoz left the game with soreness in his right wrist, and his replacement, rookie Adolis Garcia, looped his first big-league hit. That was just the icing on a

rising Cardinals offense. “I use the word relentless,” Shildt said. “It just came to mind probably toward the Pittsburgh series. Look at the at-bats. Just boom, boom, wearing guys out, not giving a quarter. Wearing guys down, taking tough at-bats. Fun to watch. Now it’s just part of the habit how we’re taking atbats, one through nine.” This weekend intrastate, interleague series positions the Cardinals for their best chance yet to become relevant in the wild-card race. While they visit Kansas City and the moribund Royals, who are more than 30 games out in the American League playoff race at the same time school supplies are full price, the two wild-card leaders in the National League play each other. Atlanta downed Milwaukee on Friday night to move into a virtual tie and leave them both 3½ games ahead of the Cardinals. With a vulnerable opponent in KC and the guarantee that every win will gain ground on some team they’re chasing, the Cardinals have a gift. What they have already given is a reimagined offense that is starting to reflect the “relentlessness” described. The Cardinals averaged 4.26 runs a game

before the All-Star break and have upped that to 4.82 in the 22 games since. The fuel behind the increase has been a jolt of on-base percentage, rising from .315, the 10th lowest in baseball, to .345 since the break and the fifth-best in baseball. The Cardinals have cut their strikeouts down from 8.4 a game to 7.2 a game, and internally there has been a greater stress on devouring pitchers, forcing high pitch counts, and making contact. The Cardinals didn’t strike out Friday until the 19th batter came to the plate and by then they already had a 5-0 lead and the starter from the game. Kansas City righthander Burch Smith didn’t survive the second inning as Paul DeJong opened it with a home run, his 11th, and eight more Cardinals came to the plate. With two outs, Harrison Bader took two fastballs to gain favor in the count and then laced a curveball for a two-out, RBI single that broke the inning open. Carpenter followed with his 32nd home run of the season and only his fifth with a runner on base. “You know, just having him on base in front of me — his speed alone you’ve got to figure bought me an extra fastball or so,” Carpenter said. “The lineup is con-

structed well. You’ve got guys in the right positions. It’s got good flow to it.” In the middle, gobbling RBIs, stands Martinez. Carpenter called Martinez the team’s “first-half MVP offensively,” and still his 65 RBIs are tied for the team lead with Carpenter despite a reduced role in the second half. Access to the designated hitter gives Martinez certainty this season, and he had three hits and reached base four times Friday night. By Monday, he could be back on the bench. It’s a role that could be tough to swallow. He calls it sweet. Before joining the Cardinals, Martinez was a Class AAA batting champ for the Royals, and he’d be playing every day for a team that had its DH bat ninth Friday. In eight games against KC, Martinez has hit .333 (11 for 33) with a .455 slugging percentage. “I’ve got to respect whatever it is — a bench role, DH, right field, or whatever,” Martinez said. “I’m happy here when the team wins.” He put his plate down. “Piece of cake,” he said. The Cardinals added to their lead with a solo home run from Bader and Martinez’s RBI double. Gomber remained aggressive after one detour into trouble during the third inning. Adal-

berto Mondesi tripled to lead off the third inning. He picnicked at third while Gomber retired the next two batters and then hit one and walked another to load the bases. A fly ball ended the threat, and Gomber continued to show a variety of ways for him to thrive. He struck out a batter swinging on an 80 mph curveball and he caught another whiffing on an elevated, 88 mph fastball. That kept him out of trouble in the fourth inning and ushered the shutout to the bullpen. “He’s doing a nice job of evolving,” Shildt said. On his actual birthday, Thursday, an off day, Shildt saw a movie, “Mission Impossible: Fallout.” He noted that evidently the mission wasn’t impossible. It’s just how it got done. Kind of like the standings. After the win and after the song, Shildt took a plate of dinner back to his office. It was his late father’s birthday Friday, so the postgame celebration echoed. But he didn’t take any of what Martinez was having. Shildt cannot eat bread. He can have his cake. In this case, he just can’t eat it, too. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH CARDINALS 8, ROYALS 3 Cardinals

4 0 0 0

1

1 .278

Molina c

5 2 2 0

0

0 .290

Martinez dh

4 2 2

3

1

1 .300

Ozuna lf

5 1 2

1

0

0 .270

DeJong ss

4 1 1

1

0

1 .243

Gyorko 3b

4 1 2

1

0

0 .252

Bader cf

3 1 2

2

1

0 .278

Wong 2b

4 0 0 0

0

0 .223

Garcia rf

4 0 0 0

0

1 .100

3

4

37 8 11

8

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b

3 0 0 0

1

1 .295

Gordon lf

2 0 0 0

2

0 .247

Perez c

3 0 0

1

2 .229 2 .239

0

Duda dh

4 0 1 0

0

Herrera rf

4 0 0 0

0

1 .245

Phillips cf

4 0 0

0

0

2 .217

O’Hearn 1b

4 1 1 0

0

1 .130

Escobar 3b

2 2 2

2

1

0 .206

Mondesi ss

3 0 1 0

0

1 .260

Totals Cardinals

29 3 5

2

5 10

004 002 002 — 8 11 1

Kansas City 000 020 010 — 3 5 0 E: Carpenter (9). LOB: Cardinals 5, Kansas City 4. 2B: Molina (17), DeJong (15). 3B: Ozuna (2). HR: Bader (8), off Duffy; Martinez (14), off Flynn; Escobar (4), off Flaherty. RBIs: Martinez 3 (68), Ozuna (61), DeJong (33), Gyorko (38), Bader 2 (20), Escobar 2 (24). RLISP: Cardinals 1 (Wong); Kansas City 2 (Herrera, O’Hearn). GIDP: Ozuna, Merrifield 2. DP: Cardinals 3; Kansas City 1. Cardinals Flaherty Hudson Hicks

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 7 3 2 2/ 3

1 1

2

3 9 106 3.22

1

2 0

1 1/3 1 0 0 0

1

17 0.96 17 3.03

Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy McCarthy Flynn

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

NOTEBOOK

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Carpenter 1b

Totals

CARDINALS

5 1/3 8 6 6 2/ 3

1

2 100 4.90

0 0 0 0

1 10 3.67

3 3 2

2

2

1 48 4.22

W: Flaherty 6-6. L: Duffy 7-11. S: Hicks 3-7. Inherited runners-scored: Hicks 1-0. WP: Duffy, Hudson. Umpires: Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Tom Hallion. T: 2:56. A: 38,427 (37,903).

HOW THEY SCORED

Wisdom finally gets the call-up Slugger added to roster after 747 games in the minors BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KANSAS CITY • When Class AAA Memphis

manager Stubby Clapp invited Patrick Wisdom into his office late Friday night and asked the infielder if he needed a day off, he didn’t, in hindsight, make clear where exactly Wisdom would be if he declined the break. Wisdom said he was good, ready, available. Clapp told him he could be all those things then for the Cardinals, on Saturday. “To hear him say those words I was at a loss for words,” said Wisdom, who received his first call to the majors after 747 games in the minors. “I didn’t know what to say or how to act. … Happy. Sad. Nervous. Anxious. You name it, I felt it.” The Cardinals placed utility fielder Yairo Munoz on the 10-day disabled list with a sprain in his right wrist, and to take Munoz’s spot on the active roster the Cardinals purchased Wisdom’s contract from their TripleA affiliate and put him on the roster he had so often been left off, the 40-man. The Cardinals made room on their expanded roster for the 26-year-old slugger by adding veteran reliever Luke Gregerson to the 60-day disabled list. That move reduces the likelihood that Gregerson, sidelined by a shoulder impingement, will throw again this season because of the limited window of eligibility he’ll have after a mandatory 60 days. Munoz jammed his wrist at the start of this road trip in Pittsburgh, felt it sting with pain on a swing in Miami, and had it lock-up on him Friday night in Kansas City. The rookie will see a hand specialist in St. Louis on Monday — at which time he could receive a cortisone injection or some other treatment. He was placed in a brace Friday night. “I couldn’t move the wrist,” Munoz said of his swing. A lack of movement came to define Wisdom’s place in the organization. He didn’t move up because he wasn’t on the 40-man, and even though he was available to other teams he didn’t move out either. The unofficial MVP of Memphis’ Pacific Coast League title run a year ago, Wisdom had 31 home runs, a .817 OPS, and 89 RBIs in 2017. Yet, when the Cardinals didn’t protect him in the Rule 5 draft, no team took a swing for him. He was available via trade this spring, and the

Cardinals didn’t find an adequate deal. Wisdom has described the Rule 5 experience as “frustrating,” but not hindering. “Obviously there was some sense of doubt that crept in,” Wisdom said. “You’ve got to shut that down, immediately. Once you start doubting yourself it will start happening on the field. Next thing you know, you’re just going down a spiral you don’t want to go down.” Twice passed over after a career season, Wisdom went back to Class AAA for a third season — and improved. He upped his onbase percentage from .310 a year ago to .363 this season. He hunted walks, and he said a “maturation” took hold at the plate as he was more aware of the game, the situation, and all the dynamics, including a lineup, that could influence his at-bats. His 41 walks this season and 14 home runs offset 110 strikeouts in 357 at-bats. A superb fielder at third and first, Wisdom’s strikeout rate has been the one drag on his rise — and a reason given for teams passing on him when available. He’s worked to change that perception. “Being selectively aggressive,” he said. “Understanding the game better, taking my walks when they come. I kind of made a personal game with myself seeing how many walks I could get. I’d realize I haven’t had a walk in a little bit, I’m going to go out there and try to get a walk. It’s the game plan you have.”

EXTRA BASES Michael Wacha (oblique strain) continues to inch back toward the mound with no real timetable for his return because, as manager Mike Shildt explained Saturday, the team wants to avoid a setback that would end his season. The runway is getting shorter for the righthander as the minor-league season concludes toward the end of this month as Wacha would be seeking rehab appearances. Shildt suggested minorleague affiliates in their postseason will offer some innings and the team still feels a return is possible. … Tyler O’Neill (groin) went onefor-four with two RBIs in his first rehab game at Class AAA Memphis. Dominic Leone (nerve) has allowed two runs on four hits and two walks in four innings for the Triple-A Redbirds as he nears a return from a rehab assignment. And, Brett Cecil (foot) has pitched four scoreless innings for Memphis on his rehab assignment. … With a double in the third inning Saturday, Yadier Molina tied Red Schoendienst for seventh on the team’s career leaderboard with 352 doubles.

KANSAS CITY STAR

The Cardinals’ Paul DeJong hits an RBI double in the third inning Saturday night.

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Molina Bader Carpenter Ozuna Gyorko DeJong G. Garcia Wong Pena A. Garcia Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .300 377 41 113 21 0 14 68 39 67 0 7 .290 324 42 94 17 0 15 51 19 47 4 3 .278 234 42 65 9 1 8 20 19 71 12 1 .278 407 78 113 33 0 32 65 74 111 1 8 .270 444 46 120 12 2 13 61 28 83 2 3 .252 262 31 66 13 1 8 38 31 59 1 12 .243 267 43 65 15 1 11 33 25 76 0 9 .231 134 14 31 5 0 3 11 16 28 1 4 .223 269 30 60 12 2 7 25 21 48 3 4 .206 107 8 22 2 0 2 7 4 32 1 1 .100 10 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 .250 3989 527 997 175 7 147 506 387 977 46 89

Pitching W L Webb 0 0 Hudson 2 0 Poncedeleon 0 0 Shreve 1 0 Mikolas 12 3 Norris 3 3 Hicks 3 3 Flaherty 6 6 Gomber 2 0 Mayers 2 1 Brebbia 1 3 Gant 4 4 Weaver 6 10 Team 62 55

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 0.00 4 0 0 6.0 5 0 0 0 0 3 0.96 7 0 0 9.1 3 1 1 0 3 4 1.23 4 1 1 14.2 4 2 2 1 9 8 2.45 5 0 0 3.2 3 1 1 1 1 5 2.74 23 23 0 144.1 129 48 44 9 25 98 2.87 48 0 22 47.0 39 17 15 5 9 58 3.03 54 0 3 59.1 41 22 20 1 28 48 3.22 19 19 0 103.1 76 40 37 15 36 127 3.45 20 3 0 31.1 26 14 12 3 15 26 3.51 36 0 1 41.0 39 17 16 4 11 35 3.83 33 0 2 40.0 37 17 17 4 13 45 3.89 17 10 0 69.1 54 37 30 6 31 59 4.66 23 23 0 121.2 127 65 63 16 43 111 3.78 117 117 29 1053.0 960 488 442 103 406953

Cardinals third Molina doubles, advances to third on a wild pitch. J.Martinez singles, Molina scores. Ozuna triples, J.Martinez scores. DeJong doubles, Ozuna scores. Gyorko singles, DeJong scores. Four runs. Cardinals 4, Royals 0. Royals fifth O’Hearn singles. Escobar homers, O’Hearn scores. Two runs. Cardinals 4, Royals 2. Cardinals sixth Gyorko singles. Bader homers, Gyorko scores. Two runs. Cardinals 6, Royals 2. Royals eighth Escobar walks. Mondesi singles, Escobar to second. Merrifield grounds into a double play, Escobar to third. Escobar scores on a wild pitch. One run. Cardinals 6, Royals 3. Cardinals ninth Molina singles. J.Martinez homers, Molina scores. Two runs. Cardinals 8, Royals 3. GETTING STARTED Cardinals starters by starts, quality starts, team record, and runs scored in their starts: GS QS Tm. W-L Runs Flaherty 19 6 8-11 4.6 Gant 10 3 3-7 3.6 Gomber 3 1 3-0 6.3 Mikolas 23 15 16-7 5.0 Weaver 23 8 11-12 4.5 KANSAS CITY STAR

The Cardinals’ Yadier Molina scores past Royals catcher Salvador Perez on a single by Jose Martinez in the third inning Saturday.

Flaherty goes seven innings as Cardinals beat Royals again CARDINALS • FROM D1

against the Royals at Kauffman Stadium. Bader’s two-run homer in the sixth inning helped widen the score early before the Cardinals pulled away late. That home run came a day after his two-out single unlocked a breakout inning in Friday night’s rout, and it came three runs before Jose Martinez turned Saturday’s game into a walk. Martinez’s two-run shot in the ninth punctuated the win. An early gust of runs and Bader’s homer backed starter Jack Flaherty during his seven strong innings. The only two runs the Royals scored on Flaherty came on a homer, and papered over that with nine strikeouts. The win was the Cardinals’ sixth in seven games. It assured the Cardinals a fifth consecutive series victory, meant that they would win all three series on this dog-day, three-city trip, and again gained ground on teams ahead of them in the playoff race. The Cubs’ loss to Washington bumped the Cardinals a game closer in the National League Central and, with Milwaukee’s win against Atlanta, moved the Cardinals up for a

second consecutive day in the wild-card race. The Cardinals are within three games of the second wild-card. This rush back into the race coincides with a tender spot in the Cardinals’ schedule – which includes six games against the Marlins and Royals, who are a combined 69 games worse than .500 – and turning prominent spots in the lineup over to younger players. The Cardinals dealt center fielder Tommy Pham to Tampa Bay at the trade deadline with the idea that Bader and Tyler O’Neill would see the largest share of playing time in Pham’s position. O’Neill, one of those right fielders now on the DL, had the bat, and Bader had the superior glove. After his win Friday night, lefty Austin Gomber remarked how aggressive he could be with strikes because he had “an elite center fielder out there” in Bader to run liners down. Bader has done that as well as any outfielder in the game, and that success defensively gives his offense time to reveal itself. With center fielder basically deeded to him now, Bader made his sixth start of the road trip Saturday and left with a homer, a

walk, two hits, and two RBIs. On the three-city swing, Bader has gone eight-for-25 (.320) with three extra-base hits. He nearly outran a throw at the end of the Cardinals’ fourrun third inning to keep that inning alive and net a third hit in the game. It took Alcides Escobar’s barehanded nab from third to beat Bader to first. In the bottom of the same inning, Escobar got the Royals’ first hit against Flaherty (6-6) and then walked off the field when the inning ended on a double play. Flaherty walked a couple in the first inning, walked another in the fourth inning, and allowed a homer in the fifth inning, and yet never seemed to lose a grip on the game. He finished by retiring all eight batters he faced after the home run. Four of those eight struck out – all in their third time seeing the rookie righthander. The home run by Bader enraged Royals starter Danny Duffy – not because of the height of a chest-high breaking ball, or the distance Bader gave it but because he, arguably, shouldn’t have had to make that pitch at all. Bader had already fouled off consecutive pitches and faced a 1-2 count when Duffy teased

the outfielder with a changeup. Bader checked his swing, or so first-base umpire Adam Hamari confirmed on appeal. That gave Bader continued life and the at-bat would go on for another three pitches. On the ninth pitch, a 3-2 marshmallow slider, Bader drilled his second home run in as many games at Kauffman Stadium. Almost as fast as Bader rounded the bases, Duffy started in on Hamari. Former Cardinals reliever and special assistant Cal Eldred, now the Royals’ pitching coach, had to come on the field to restrain Duffy. Hamari ejected the lefty quickly. That brought further anger from Duffy, who at one point slipped free from Eldred and tried to charge again at an umpire. He was calmed, collected, and removed from the field. Bader’s home run had salted the game. Instead of holding onto a two-run deficit and buying time for the Royals’ offense to rattle late, Duffy had fallen into a fourrun hole, again, and was leaving the final 4 2/3 innings to the bullpen. The Cardinals crafted their initial 4-0 lead on Duffy a lot

like they built their lead the night before – on a binge. And all of it came with two outs. Eight Cardinals went to the plate against Duffy in the third inning, and three of them got two-out extra-base hits that flipped the game early on the lefty. After two infield outs, Yadier Molina doubled to ignite the rally. Martinez singled for the Cardinals’ first run, and Marcell Ozuna broke the inning open with an RBI triple. The Cardinals’ cleanup hitter landed a ball deep in center, and he arrived at third base after the throw did but a sneaky slide kept him safe when he pulled an arm back and reached with his left hand to the bag. Ozuna scored on Paul DeJong’s double, and DeJong scored when Jedd Gyorko skipped a single. Duffy went from one pitch away from finishing the third inning to needing 37 pitches to survive the inning and leave with only a 4-0 deficit. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH CARDINALS 8, ROYALS 3 Cardinals

4 0 0 0

1

1 .278

Molina c

5 2 2 0

0

0 .290

Martinez dh

4 2 2

3

1

1 .300

Ozuna lf

5 1 2

1

0

0 .270

DeJong ss

4 1 1

1

0

1 .243

Gyorko 3b

4 1 2

1

0

0 .252

Bader cf

3 1 2

2

1

0 .278

Wong 2b

4 0 0 0

0

0 .223

Garcia rf

4 0 0 0

0

1 .100

3

4

NOTEBOOK

37 8 11

8

Wisdom finally gets the call-up Slugger added to roster after 747 games in the minors BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b

3 0 0 0

1

1 .295

Gordon lf

2 0 0 0

2

0 .247

Perez c

3 0 0

0

1

2 .229

Duda dh

4 0 1 0

0

2 .239

Herrera rf

4 0 0 0

0

1 .245

Phillips cf

4 0 0

0

0

2 .217

O’Hearn 1b

4 1 1 0

0

1 .130

Escobar 3b

2 2 2

2

1

0 .206

3 0 1 0

0

1 .260

Mondesi ss Totals Cardinals

29 3 5

2

5 10

004 002 002 — 8 11 1

Kansas City 000 020 010 — 3 5 0 E: Carpenter (9). LOB: Cardinals 5, Kansas City 4. 2B: Molina (17), DeJong (15). 3B: Ozuna (2). HR: Bader (8), off Duffy; Martinez (14), off Flynn; Escobar (4), off Flaherty. RBIs: Martinez 3 (68), Ozuna (61), DeJong (33), Gyorko (38), Bader 2 (20), Escobar 2 (24). RLISP: Cardinals 1 (Wong); Kansas City 2 (Herrera, O’Hearn). GIDP: Ozuna, Merrifield 2. DP: Cardinals 3; Kansas City 1. Cardinals Flaherty Hudson Hicks

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 7 3 2 2/ 3

1 1

2

3 9 106 3.22

1

2 0

1 1/3 1 0 0 0

1

17 0.96 17 3.03

Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy McCarthy Flynn

M 3 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Carpenter 1b

Totals

CARDINALS

5 1/3 8 6 6 2/ 3

1

2 100 4.90

0 0 0 0

3 3 2

2

2

1 10 3.67 1 48 4.22

W: Flaherty 6-6. L: Duffy 7-11. S: Hicks 3-7. Inherited runners-scored: Hicks 1-0. WP: Duffy, Hudson. Umpires: Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Tom Hallion. T: 2:56. A: 38,427 (37,903).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals third Molina doubles, advances to third on a wild pitch. J.Martinez singles, Molina scores. Ozuna triples, J.Martinez scores. DeJong doubles, Ozuna scores. Gyorko singles, DeJong scores. Four runs. Cardinals 4, Royals 0. Royals fifth O’Hearn singles. Escobar homers, O’Hearn scores. Two runs. Cardinals 4, Royals 2. Cardinals sixth Gyorko singles. Bader homers, Gyorko scores. Two runs. Cardinals 6, Royals 2. Royals eighth Escobar walks. Mondesi singles, Escobar to second. Merrifield grounds into a double play, Escobar to third. Escobar scores on a wild pitch. One run. Cardinals 6, Royals 3. Cardinals ninth Molina singles. J.Martinez homers, Molina scores. Two runs. Cardinals 8, Royals 3.

KANSAS CITY • When Class AAA Memphis

manager Stubby Clapp invited Patrick Wisdom into his office late Friday night and asked the infielder if he needed a day off, he didn’t, in hindsight, make clear where exactly Wisdom would be if he declined the break. Wisdom said he was good, ready, available. Clapp told him he could be all those things then for the Cardinals, on Saturday. “To hear him say those words I was at a loss for words,” said Wisdom, who received his first call to the majors after 747 games in the minors. “I didn’t know what to say or how to act. … Happy. Sad. Nervous. Anxious. You name it, I felt it.” The Cardinals placed utility fielder Yairo Munoz on the 10-day disabled list with a sprain in his right wrist, and to take Munoz’s spot on the active roster the Cardinals purchased Wisdom’s contract from their TripleA affiliate and put him on the roster he had so often been left off, the 40-man. The Cardinals made room on their expanded roster for the 26-year-old slugger by adding veteran reliever Luke Gregerson to the 60-day disabled list. That move reduces the likelihood that Gregerson, sidelined by a shoulder impingement, will throw again this season because of the limited window of eligibility he’ll have after a mandatory 60 days. Munoz jammed his wrist at the start of this road trip in Pittsburgh, felt it sting with pain on a swing in Miami, and had it lock-up on him Friday night in Kansas City. The rookie will see a hand specialist in St. Louis on Monday — at which time he could receive a cortisone injection or some other treatment. He was placed in a brace Friday night. “I couldn’t move the wrist,” Munoz said of his swing. A lack of movement came to define Wisdom’s place in the organization. He didn’t move up because he wasn’t on the 40-man, and even though he was available to other teams he didn’t move out either. The unofficial MVP of Memphis’ Pacific Coast League title run a year ago, Wisdom had 31 home runs, a .817 OPS, and 89 RBIs in 2017. Yet, when the Cardinals didn’t protect him in the Rule 5 draft, no team took a swing for him. He was available via trade this spring, and the

Cardinals didn’t find an adequate deal. Wisdom has described the Rule 5 experience as “frustrating,” but not hindering. “Obviously there was some sense of doubt that crept in,” Wisdom said. “You’ve got to shut that down, immediately. Once you start doubting yourself it will start happening on the field. Next thing you know, you’re just going down a spiral you don’t want to go down.” Twice passed over after a career season, Wisdom went back to Class AAA for a third season — and improved. He upped his onbase percentage from .310 a year ago to .363 this season. He hunted walks, and he said a “maturation” took hold at the plate as he was more aware of the game, the situation, and all the dynamics, including a lineup, that could influence his at-bats. His 41 walks this season and 14 home runs offset 110 strikeouts in 357 at-bats. A superb fielder at third and first, Wisdom’s strikeout rate has been the one drag on his rise — and a reason given for teams passing on him when available. He’s worked to change that perception. “Being selectively aggressive,” he said. “Understanding the game better, taking my walks when they come. I kind of made a personal game with myself seeing how many walks I could get. I’d realize I haven’t had a walk in a little bit, I’m going to go out there and try to get a walk. It’s the game plan you have.”

EXTRA BASES Michael Wacha (oblique strain) continues to inch back toward the mound with no real timetable for his return because, as manager Mike Shildt explained Saturday, the team wants to avoid a setback that would end his season. The runway is getting shorter for the righthander as the minor-league season concludes toward the end of this month as Wacha would be seeking rehab appearances. Shildt suggested minorleague affiliates in their postseason will offer some innings and the team still feels a return is possible. … Tyler O’Neill (groin) went onefor-four with two RBIs in his first rehab game at Class AAA Memphis. Dominic Leone (nerve) has allowed two runs on four hits and two walks in four innings for the Triple-A Redbirds as he nears a return from a rehab assignment. And, Brett Cecil (foot) has pitched four scoreless innings for Memphis on his rehab assignment. … With a double in the third inning Saturday, Yadier Molina tied Red Schoendienst for seventh on the team’s career leaderboard with 352 doubles.

KANSAS CITY STAR

The Cardinals’ Paul DeJong hits an RBI double in the third inning Saturday night.

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Molina Bader Carpenter Ozuna Gyorko DeJong G. Garcia Wong Pena A. Garcia Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .300 377 41 113 21 0 14 68 39 67 0 7 .290 324 42 94 17 0 15 51 19 47 4 3 .278 234 42 65 9 1 8 20 19 71 12 1 .278 407 78 113 33 0 32 65 74 111 1 8 .270 444 46 120 12 2 13 61 28 83 2 3 .252 262 31 66 13 1 8 38 31 59 1 12 .243 267 43 65 15 1 11 33 25 76 0 9 .231 134 14 31 5 0 3 11 16 28 1 4 .223 269 30 60 12 2 7 25 21 48 3 4 .206 107 8 22 2 0 2 7 4 32 1 1 .100 10 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 .250 3989 527 997 175 7 147 506 387 977 46 89

Pitching W L Webb 0 0 Hudson 2 0 Poncedeleon 0 0 Shreve 1 0 Mikolas 12 3 Norris 3 3 Hicks 3 3 Flaherty 6 6 Gomber 2 0 Mayers 2 1 Brebbia 1 3 Gant 4 4 Weaver 6 10 Team 62 55

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 0.00 4 0 0 6.0 5 0 0 0 0 3 0.96 7 0 0 9.1 3 1 1 0 3 4 1.23 4 1 1 14.2 4 2 2 1 9 8 2.45 5 0 0 3.2 3 1 1 1 1 5 2.74 23 23 0 144.1 129 48 44 9 25 98 2.87 48 0 22 47.0 39 17 15 5 9 58 3.03 54 0 3 59.1 41 22 20 1 28 48 3.22 19 19 0 103.1 76 40 37 15 36 127 3.45 20 3 0 31.1 26 14 12 3 15 26 3.51 36 0 1 41.0 39 17 16 4 11 35 3.83 33 0 2 40.0 37 17 17 4 13 45 3.89 17 10 0 69.1 54 37 30 6 31 59 4.66 23 23 0 121.2 127 65 63 16 43 111 3.78 117 117 29 1053.0 960 488 442 103 406953

GETTING STARTED Cardinals starters by starts, quality starts, team record, and runs scored in their starts: GS QS Tm. W-L Runs Flaherty 19 6 8-11 4.6 Gant 10 3 3-7 3.6 Gomber 3 1 3-0 6.3 Mikolas 23 15 16-7 5.0 Weaver 23 8 11-12 4.5 KANSAS CITY STAR

The Cardinals’ Yadier Molina scores past Royals catcher Salvador Perez on a single by Jose Martinez in the third inning Saturday.

Flaherty goes seven innings as Cardinals beat Royals again CARDINALS • FROM D1

that is now out of character. “I expanded my zone on a changeup that I shouldn’t have swung at,” Bader said. “The frustration as I was running down to first came not from just getting out. Outs are going to happen. How those outs happen is what is separating our team now from earlier this year.” So, too, are the wins. That four-run second inning built from a series of two-out, two-strike hits offered kindling for the Cardinals’ 8-3 victory against Kansas City at Kauffman Stadium. Not a part of that rally but definitely a party to the Cardinals’ reanimating road trip, Bader kept his helmet on all the way around the bases in his next at-bat when he hit a tworun homer to widen the Cardinals’ lead before Jose Martinez’s ninth-inning homer punctuated the win. The Cardinals’ sixth win in their past seven games assured them a third series win on this road trip. The Cardinals have won five consecutive series for the first time since 2015, and in the process started elbowing their way into the wild-card race. The win Saturday even cut the Cubs’ division lead down to 5 ½ games. “The biggest difference,” Marcell Ozuna said, “we play for winning.”

Manager Mike Shildt, who pushes the team to take the season in bite-sized series victories, elaborated: “We talk about consistency and consistency looks like winning a series. If you’re playing good baseball, you’re going to have games every now and then, but you play the game the right away over the course of that day and over the course of that series and you’re going to be in pretty good shape. You’re body of work, you’ll feel pretty good about then over the course of a season.” This rush back into the race has coincided with a tender spot in the Cardinals’ schedule — six consecutive games against the Marlins and Royals, who are a combined 69 games worse than .500 — and the commitment of prominent spots on the team to younger players. Jack Flaherty has emerged as a match for AllStar Miles Mikolas. The righthander pitched around two walks in the first inning and two-run homer in the fifth inning to complete seven innings and level his record this season at 6-6. Alcides Escobar cut the Cardinals’ lead in half with a two-run homer off Flaherty in the fifth inning. The righthander retired the next eight batters he faced. He struck out four of that eight, all of them seeing him for the third time. Flaherty has had months on

the job to hasten such in-game adjustments and fine-tune or flaunt new ways to get outs. Bader is getting that time now, figuring out the many ways he can avoid outs. The Cardinals dealt center fielder Tommy Pham to Tampa Bay at the trade deadline with the idea that Bader and Tyler O’Neill would see the largest share of increased playing time. On this road trip the Cardinals have placed three starting right fielders on the disabled list — O’Neill (groin), Dexter Fowler (foot), and, on Saturday, Yairo Munoz (wrist) — which effectively deeds center field to Bader. His play has been the down payment, and it’s come to personify many of the changes within the team’s offense. “Right now, it’s everything keeping him in the lineup,” Shildt said. “He’s doing a lot of things effectively. … In Bader’s case he can beat you a lot of different ways. Speed. Defense. Arm. Bat. I think this guy has turned into a nice offensive player, if you look at his body of work.” Bader has started six games on the nine-game road trip and hit eight-for-25 (.320) with three extra-base hits. Since the Pham trade, Bader has hit 12-for-34 (.353), and Saturday’s homer was his second in as many days at Kauffman. Considered an elite field, the glove is getting him time the bat

is exploiting. “You have more feel for the game, in the flow of the game,” Bader said. “Ideally as a hitter, you’re supposed to get better from the first at-bat to your fourth at-bat, and when you have the opportunity as a body of work in nine innings as opposed to an at-bat here or an atbat there you just feel a lot more of a comfortable level, a lot more confident.” All around him the Cardinals have a developed a game that fits his profile, too — extending at-bats, putting the ball in play, generating action and sometimes chaos. Bader’s two-out RBI single in the second inning Friday night ignited a five-run rally that cinched that win against KC early. On Saturday, lefty Danny Duffy retired the first two batters he faced in the third inning before Yadier Molina worked him for a 10-pitch at-bat. Molina ended it with a two-strike double. Ozuna followed with a twostrike triple. Away they went. Four consecutive two-strike hits led to a four-run inning that also included an RBI double from Paul DeJong and an RBI single from Jedd Gyorko. Duffy (7-11) got two outs on his first seven pitches of the inning and would throw 30 more in the inning, a third of those to Molina. He was tenderized. The Cardinals capi-

talized. All four runs came with two outs, and over the previous three wins, the Cardinals have scored 16 runs with two outs. Bader joined the production with his two-run homer in the sixth on a nine-pitch at-bat against Duffy. The lefty was so furious after the homer about a checkswing call he didn’t get that he fumed to first-base umpire Adam Hamari and had to be restrained before being ejected. Bader took his lap, and two innings later reached base for a third time with a single in the eighth. “There is,” he said, “never a free out.” Which is why Bader was so bothered by his at-bat at the end of the rally that gave Flaherty a lead to carry and the Royals a hill they couldn’t surmount. He chased a pitch he should have taken. And still it took a barehand play on a grounder to get Bader out. His speed almost stole a base hit. “Yeah,” Bader said. “That’s ultimately what’s going to allow you to hit over .300 in 600 atbats — those plays right there. You beat it out by half a step. And, if he moves in, I’ll bang one down the line for a double. That’s why I’m always applying pressure.” Now so are the Cardinals. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1 NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Chicago

67 48 .583

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

— 6-4 W-1

31-27

Milwaukee

66 53

.555

3

61 55 .526

7-3 W-3 29-26

32-29

Pittsburgh

60 56

5-5 W-3

33-29

27-27

Cincinnati

51 65 .440 16½

13½

3-7 W-1

27-31 24-34

L

.517

W

Atlanta

63 50 .558

Pct

— 4-6

36-21

Cardinals

EAST

.557

— 6-4

Washington

59 57 .509

5½ 6-4

51

L-2 36-24 30-29

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

Philadelphia 64

7-3 W-1 L-2

29-23

34-27

38-18

26-33

L-1 30-28 29-29

New York

48 65 .425

15

15 4-6 W-2

24-37 24-28

Miami

47 70 .402

18

18

27-34 20-36

WEST

W

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

L

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Pct

1-9

L-3

Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Cubs 3, Washington 2 Cincinnati 3, Arizona 0 NY Mets 6, Miami 2 Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 5, LA Dodgers 4 San Diego 2, Philadelphia 0 Pittsburgh at San Francisco, late Thursday Washington 6, Atlanta 3 San Diego 8, Milwaukee 4 LA Dodgers 8, Colorado 5 Pittsburgh 10, San Francisco 5

CENTRAL

W

Cleveland

64

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

51 .557

Minnesota

53 62 .461

11

Detroit

48 68 .414 16½

Chicago

42 73 .365

Kansas City

33-24 20-38

25½

5-5 W-1

22-36 20-37

35 80 .304

29

32½

3-7

L-1 16-40 19-40

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home Away

Boston

82 35

.701

New York

72 43 .626

9

— 4-6

Tampa Bay

59 57 .509 22½

Toronto

52 63 .452

Baltimore

35 81 .302 46½

WEST

W

L

Pct

29

8-2 W-1

1

5-5

L-1

32-29

32-24

Houston

73 44 .624

5-5

L-1

31-28

33-25

Oakland

68 48 .586

Colorado

61 55 .526

3-7 W-1

29-27

32-28

Seattle

67 50 .573

6

San Francisco 57 59 .491

5-5

32-25 25-34

Los Angeles

59 58 .504

14

71 .398 17½

18½

21-36

Texas

52 66 .441

21½

42-15 40-20 33-26

9 6-4 W-2 34-24

25-33

15½ 4-6 33

3-7

L-1

18-41

39-17

GB WCGB L10

26-35

L-3

27-28

22

64 53 .547

5-5 W-2

14½ 4-6

37-23 30-27

64 53 .547

47

L-1

3-7 W-1

Arizona

San Diego

7-3

20

Los Angeles

L-3

Str Home Away

28-31

24-32

L-2 20-36

L-1

15-45

Str Home Away

— 6-4

L-2

32-26

41-18

L-1

33-23

35-25

1½ 4-6 W-2 36-24

31-26

7-3

5-5 W-4

17 6-4 W-1

33-28 26-30 25-36

27-30

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Cubs win as Holland ASSOCIATED PRESS walks in decisive run

Cubs 3, Nationals 2 merged

Mets 6, Marlins 2

White Sox 1, Indians 0

Mariners 5, Astros 2

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .302 Turner ss 5 1 1 0 0 3 .270 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Harper cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .235 Soto lf 3 0 2 1 1 1 .309 Zimmerman 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Solis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Glover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Reynolds ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Murphy 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .297 Kieboom c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .197 d-Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Hellickson p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Adams 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rizzo 1b 1 1 0 1 3 0 .264 Baez 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .296 Zobrist rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .310 Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Edwards Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Heyward cf-rf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .281 Bote 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .324 Schwarber lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .244 Almora cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .298 Contreras c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Hendricks p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .065 a-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 b-Happ ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Russell ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .263 Totals 27 3 4 3 6 5 Washington 110 000 000 — 2 9 0 Chicago 000 002 10x — 3 4 1 a-lined out for Hendricks in the 6th. b-singled for Cishek in the 7th. c-flied out for Glover in the 8th. d-flied out for Kieboom in the 9th. E: Strop (2). LOB: Washington 9, Chicago 6. 2B: Murphy (9). RBIs: Eaton (20), Soto (41), Rizzo (75), Heyward 2 (48). SB: Eaton (4). CS: Bote (4). S: Hellickson. RLISP: Washington 5 (Eaton, Turner, Rendon, Zimmerman, Murphy); Chicago 4 (Zobrist 2, Heyward, Bote). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hellickson 52/3 0 2 2 4 3 89 3.54 1/ 1 0 1 12 4.72 Solis, L, 1-2, 3 2 1 1/ 0 1 0 11 7.24 Holland 3 2 0 2/ 0 0 0 4 0.00 Glover 3 0 0 Suero 1 0 0 0 1 1 11 3.08 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks 6 8 2 2 0 5 85 4.02 1/ 0 0 0 8 3.27 Wilson 3 1 0 Cishek, W, 3-1 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.87 Kintzler 0 0 0 0 2 0 15 3.30 Edwards Jr., 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.65 Strop, S, 9-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.68 Solis pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Kintzler pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Solis 3-2, Holland 1-1, Glover 3-0, Cishek 1-0, Edwards Jr. 2-0. HBP: Hendricks (Rendon). WP: Cishek. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, Nick Mahrley; Second, Alan Porter; Third,

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 5 0 3 2 0 1 .235 McNeil 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .289 Flores 1b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .273 Conforto lf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .233 Nimmo rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Frazier 3b 4 2 2 0 0 1 .216 Jackson cf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .286 Plawecki c 3 0 1 2 0 0 .222 Wheeler p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .195 b-Reyes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .185 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 6 13 6 1 9 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sierra cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Anderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .283 Realmuto c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .290 Dietrich 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .279 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Prado 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .232 Ortega lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Rojas ss 3 1 1 2 0 0 .257 Urena p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .059 Rucinski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Riddle ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .221 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 4 2 2 8 New York 001 003 020 — 6 13 1 Miami 000 000 200 — 2 4 0 a-struck out for Garcia in the 7th. b-struck out for Wheeler in the 8th. E: Rosario (10). LOB: New York 8, Miami 5. 2B: Flores (20), Jackson (11), Realmuto (25). HR: Rojas (9), off Wheeler. RBIs: Rosario 2 (31), Conforto (40), Jackson (22), Plawecki 2 (15), Rojas 2 (44). S: Urena. RLISP: New York 2 (Nimmo 2); Miami 5 (Sierra, Dietrich, Castro, Ortega, Urena). GIDP: Castro. DP: New York 1 (Smith, McNeil, Flores). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wheeler, W, 7-6 7 4 2 2 1 8 108 3.82 Lugo 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.80 Blevins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.94 Smith 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 2.25 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Urena, L, 3-12 51/3 8 4 4 1 3 90 4.74 2/ Rucinski 0 1 9 3.00 3 1 0 0 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.39 Guerra 1 3 2 2 0 3 21 6.32 Conley 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 3.34 Blevins pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Smith 1-0, Rucinski 2-2. HBP: Rucinski (Plawecki), Blevins (Dietrich). WP: Wheeler. Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Ramon De Jesus; Third, Gabe Morales. T: 2:43. A: 6,993.

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .298 Brantley lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .296 Encarnacion dh 0 0 0 0 1 0 .229 a-Cabrera ph-dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .239 1-Allen pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Guyer rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .206 Alonso 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Davis cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Totals 31 0 5 0 3 6 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Delmonico lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .227 b-Engel ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Sanchez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Palka dh 4 1 1 1 0 3 .238 Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Narvaez c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .285 Anderson ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .241 Moncada 2b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .219 LaMarre cf-lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .272 Totals 29 1 5 1 2 11 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Chicago 000 000 001 — 1 5 1 No outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Encarnacion in the 4th. b-struck out for Delmonico in the 8th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 9th. E: Narvaez (5). LOB: Cleveland 8, Chicago 6. 2B: Lindor (39), Ramirez (30), Anderson (18), Moncada (21). HR: Palka (18), off Ramirez. RBIs: Palka (46). SB: Lindor 2 (19), Encarnacion (2). RLISP: Cleveland 5 (Ramirez, Guyer 3, Kipnis); Chicago 2 (Sanchez, LaMarre). GIDP: Gomes. DP: Chicago 1 (Anderson, Moncada, Abreu). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bieber 62/3 3 0 0 2 8 106 4.10 Perez 1 1 0 0 0 3 19 1.45 Ramirez, L, 0-2 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 6 4.40 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodon 8 4 0 0 2 5 106 2.61 Cedeno 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 3.38 1/ 4 3.55 Minaya 3 0 0 0 0 0 2/ 1 16 4.58 Fry, W, 1-2 3 1 0 0 0 Cedeno pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Ramirez 1-0, Minaya 1-0, Fry 1-0. Umpires: Home, Carlos Torres; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Tom Woodring; Third, Scott Barry. T: 2:46. A: 18,772.

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .273 Span lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .277 Heredia lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Segura ss 3 1 0 0 0 0 .306 Cruz dh 4 0 2 2 0 1 .268 Seager 3b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .228 Zunino c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .202 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Maybin cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .254 Gordon 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .276 Totals 34 5 7 5 1 6 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kemp lf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .301 Bregman 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .278 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .265 Reddick rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 Gurriel 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Gonzalez 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .242 White dh 4 1 1 0 0 2 .279 Maldonado c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .217 a-Gattis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Marisnick cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .217 1-Fisher pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .169 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 7 Seattle 000 002 030 — 5 7 0 Houston 000 020 000 — 2 9 0 a-flied out for Maldonado in the 9th. 1-ran for Marisnick in the 7th. LOB: Seattle 4, Houston 7. 2B: Haniger 2 (23), Cruz 2 (13), Bregman (37), Marisnick (7). RBIs: Haniger (75), Span (51), Cruz 2 (75), Seager (62), Kemp (24), Bregman (72). CS: Gonzalez (3). RLISP: Seattle 3 (Seager, Zunino, Healy); Houston 3 (Correa 3). GIDP: Gurriel. DP: Seattle 1 (Segura, Gordon, Healy). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 6 8 2 2 1 4 97 4.11 Warren, W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 3.00 Colome, 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.18 Diaz, S, 44-47 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.05 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole, L, 10-5 71/3 6 4 4 1 5 93 2.75 2/ 1 0 1 15 3.40 Pressly 3 1 1 McHugh 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.98 Inherited runners-scored: Pressly 2-2. HBP: Pressly (Segura). Umpires: Home, Doug Eddings; First, Joe West; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Nic Lentz. T: 2:48. A: 41,236.

Rangers 12, Yankees 7

Braves 10, Brewers 1

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith lf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .300 Wendle 3b 3 0 1 3 0 0 .292 Bauers 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .233 Choi dh 4 1 1 1 0 3 .226 Gomez rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .180 Lowe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Adames ss 3 3 3 0 1 0 .236 Perez c 4 2 2 2 0 0 .323 Totals 34 7 9 7 2 10 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Grichuk rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .234 Travis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Hernandez lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .244 Morales dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .244 Diaz ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Maile c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Urena 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .286 Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Totals 29 0 3 0 1 9 Tampa Bay 002 021 200 — 7 9 0 Toronto 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 LOB: Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 3. 2B: Wendle (14), Adames 2 (4). 3B: Smith (9). HR: Perez (1), off Estrada; Choi (5), off Estrada. RBIs: Smith (27), Wendle 3 (37), Choi (14), Perez 2 (4). SB: Adames (3). SF: Wendle. S: Smith. RLISP: Tampa Bay 2 (Bauers, Choi); Toronto 1 (Pillar). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell, W, 13-5 5 0 0 0 0 6 47 2.18 Faria 3 3 0 0 1 3 43 4.97 Schultz 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 4.58 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Estrada, L, 5-9 5 3 5 5 5 2 6 91 4.84 Pannone 12/3 3 2 2 0 3 30 10.80 Biagini 2 1 0 0 0 1 21 6.62 HBP: Biagini (Wendle). Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Tony Randazzo; Second, Ryan Additon; Third, Bill Welke. T: 2:27. A: 23,082.

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .262 Hoskins lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Williams rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .260 Santana 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .217 Cabrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Herrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Franco 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .277 1-Kingery pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Alfaro c 3 0 1 0 1 2 .254 Eflin p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .133 a-Quinn ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Totals 34 0 8 0 3 8 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Hosmer 1b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .254 Renfroe lf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Reyes rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .262 Strahm p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hedges c 3 2 2 1 0 1 .256 Spangenberg 3b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .235 Galvis ss 3 0 2 1 0 0 .237 Asuaje 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .199 Nix p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Jankowski lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Totals 29 2 7 2 1 11 Philadelphia 000 000 000 — 0 8 0 San Diego 010 100 00x — 2 7 0 a-struck out for Eflin in the 7th. b-struck out for Garcia in the 9th. 1-ran for Franco in the 9th. LOB: Philadelphia 10, San Diego 4. HR: Hedges (9), off Eflin. RBIs: Hedges (25), Galvis (44). SB: Hedges (2), Galvis (5). RLISP: Philadelphia 5 (Hernandez, Hoskins 2, Herrera 2); San Diego 3 (Renfroe, Asuaje, Nix). GIDP: Cabrera, Renfroe 2. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Cabrera, Santana), (Hernandez, Santana); San Diego 1 (Asuaje, Galvis, Hosmer). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eflin, L, 8-4 6 5 2 2 1 8 90 3.57 Morgan 11/3 1 0 0 0 3 17 4.68 2/ 0 0 0 7 3.69 Garcia 3 1 0 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nix, W, 1-0 6 4 0 0 2 4 88 0.00 Strahm, 1 1 0 0 1 2 24 2.30 Stammen, 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 2.33 Yates, S, 4-4 1 2 0 0 0 2 20 1.59 WP: Garcia. Umpires: Home, Mike Winters; First, Jansen Visconti; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T: 2:34. A: 26,306.

Anthony Rizzo drew a basesloaded walk off Greg Holland in the seventh inning to break a 2-2 tie and lead the Chicago Cubs to 3-2 victory at home over Washington on Friday. Holland, who recently was dropped by the Cardinals before signing with the Nationals, came in with no outs and a man on first. He retired Willson Contreras before giving up singles to Ian Happ and Addison Russell to load the bases before walking Rizzo. Holland then was removed from the game. The Cubs didn’t get a hit against Nationals starter Jeremy Hellickson in his 52/3 innings of work, but he walked four and allowed two earned runs. Braves 10, Brewers 1 • Kevin Gausman pitched eight strong innings and Ender Inciarte drove in four runs in host Atlanta’s rout. Milwaukee has lost four of five to fall three games back of the first-place Cubs in the NL Central. Rockies 5, Dodgers 4 • Ryan McMahon hit a two-run homer in the seventh to give Colorado the lead for good as it won at home. He entered the game in the fifth after Arenado departed because of a sore shoulder. Reds 3, Diamondbacks 0 • Anthony DeSclafani struck out nine over seven innings and scored to help host Cincinnati win. Padres 2, Phillies 0 • Austin Hedges had two hits, including a homer, and scored twice to lift host San Diego. Mets 6, Marlins 2 • Amed Rosario had three hits and drove in two runs to boost visiting New York.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Red Sox 19, Orioles 12 • Xander Bogaerts and Andrew Benintendi each hit three-run homers as visiting Boston won a slugfest. After hitting for the cycle a night earlier, Red Sox outfielder Mookie Betts had three hits and three RBIs. Rangers 12, Yankees 7 • Ronald Guzman became the first rookie to hit three homer in a game against the Yankees, powering visiting Texas to victory. The first baseman batted in the eighth with a chance to tie the bigleague record for homers in a game — no rookie has ever hit four — but fanned. Mariners 5, Astros 2 • Nelson Cruz hit a tiebreaking two-run double in a threerun eighth inning to key Seattle’s victory on the road. Houston’s Gerrit Cole yielded six hits and four runs in 7 1/3 innings for his season-high third straight loss. Rays 7, Blue Jays 0 • Blake Snell pitched five perfect innings then was pulled, and Michael Perez hit his first career homer as visiting Tampa Bay rolled. White Sox 1, Indians 0 • Daniel Palka hit a homer in the bottom of the ninth to win the game for Chicago. Tigers 5, Twins 3 • Niko Goodrum and Jose Iglesias homered as host Detroit broke a losing streak at six. Angels 4, Athletics 3 • Kole Calhoun and Justin Upton hit two-run homers, Albert Pujols recorded his 1,000th career hit with the Angels, and Los Angeles beat visiting Oakland. Associated Press

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Yelich lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .316 Cain cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Perez cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .253 Aguilar 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .272 Shaw 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Houser p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Kratz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Schoop ss-2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Thames rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Pina c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .239 Peralta p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lyles p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Arcia ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .213 Totals 33 1 6 1 0 9 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna lf 5 2 3 0 0 1 .270 Albies 2b 2 2 0 0 3 2 .275 Freeman 1b 3 1 1 1 2 0 .318 Markakis rf 3 3 2 3 1 0 .326 Duvall rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Camargo 3b 5 2 4 2 0 0 .262 Inciarte cf 5 0 2 4 0 1 .252 Flowers c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Swanson ss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .237 Gausman p 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000 a-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Sobotka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 10 13 10 8 7 Milwaukee 000 001 000 — 1 6 0 Atlanta 302 203 00x — 10 13 0 a-struck out for Gausman in the 8th. b-grounded out for Houser in the 9th. LOB: Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 11. 2B: Moustakas 2 (24), Acuna (16), Markakis 2 (35), Camargo 2 (17), Inciarte (18). RBIs: Aguilar (83), Freeman (71), Markakis 3 (73), Camargo 2 (52), Inciarte 4 (46). SB: Albies (12). SF: Markakis. RLISP: Milwaukee 2 (Aguilar, Peralta); Atlanta 4 (Markakis 2, Gausman, Flaherty). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peralta, L, 5-3 3 7 7 7 5 3 81 4.47 Lyles 21/3 3 3 3 1 3 43 4.52 Houser 22/3 3 0 0 2 1 60 3.29 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman, W, 6-9 8 6 1 1 0 8 94 4.27 Sobotka 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Peralta pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Lyles 2-1, Houser 2-1. Umpires: Home, John Tumpane; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Chad Whitson; Third, Mark Wegner. T: 2:59. A: 36,519.

Tigers 5, Twins 3 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Polanco ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .287 Forsythe 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .234 Kepler rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Garver c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .261 Morrison dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .186 Cave cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .282 Adrianza 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .249 Totals 36 3 10 2 0 1 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gerber lf 2 1 0 1 1 1 .174 Iglesias ss 4 1 1 2 0 0 .266 Castellanos rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Candelario 3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .226 Martinez dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Goodrum 2b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .231 Adduci 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 McCann c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .218 Jones cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .205 Totals 27 5 3 5 3 6 Minnesota 001 001 001 — 3 10 1 Detroit 001 220 00x — 5 3 2 E: Rosario (8), Candelario (8), Goodrum (9). LOB: Minnesota 7, Detroit 2. 2B: Polanco (8), Cave (9), Adrianza (15). 3B: Jones (5). HR: Goodrum (11), off Santana; Iglesias (5), off Santana. RBIs: Garver (26), Adrianza (21), Gerber (2), Iglesias 2 (47), Goodrum 2 (36). SF: Garver, Gerber. RLISP: Minnesota 3 (Mauer, Kepler, Adrianza). GIDP: Morrison. DP: Detroit 1 (Goodrum, Iglesias, Adduci). Minnesota IPHRERBBSONPERA Santana, L, 0-1 6 3 5 5 2 5 94 6.53 Drake 2 00 0 1 1 30 6.82 Detroit IPHRERBBSONPERA Zimmermann, W, 5-461/3 8 2 0 0 1 96 3.98 2/ Wilson, 3 00 0 0 0 43.80 Jimenez, 1 00 0 0 0 13 3.28 Greene, S, 24-27 1 2 1 1 0 0 24 4.12 Inherited runners-scored: Wilson 1-0. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Bruce Dreckman; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Mike Estabrook. T: 2:37. A: 24,849.

Friday Boston 19, Baltimore 12 Texas 12, NY Yankees 7 Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 0 Detroit 5, Minnesota 3 White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Seattle 5, Houston 2 Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 LA Angels 4, Oakland 3 Thursday Cleveland 5, Minnesota 4 NY Yankees 7, Texas 3 Toronto 8, Boston 5 Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4 Seattle 8, Houston 6

Saturday’s Sunday’s pitching matchups

Rays 7, Blue Jays 0

Reds 3, Diamondbacks 0 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .278 Pollock cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .278 Souza Jr. rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .254 Marte 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Ahmed ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Avila c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .175 Buchholz p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .050 Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 30 0 5 0 0 10 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .283 Votto 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .289 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Suarez 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .303 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .313 Ervin lf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .295 Williams rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .295 Barnhart c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .243 DeSclafani p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .214 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dixon 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Hamilton cf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .228 Totals 31 3 9 2 2 7 Arizona 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Cincinnati 000 001 20x — 3 9 0 a-flied out for Diekman in the 9th. E: Buchholz (1). LOB: Arizona 3, Cincinnati 7. 2B: Goldschmidt (23), Barnhart (15). RBIs: Suarez (88), Hamilton (23). SF: Suarez. RLISP: Arizona 1 (Pollock); Cincinnati 3 (Suarez, Williams 2). GIDP: Pollock, Avila, Williams. DP: Arizona 1 (Marte, Ahmed, Goldschmidt); Cincinnati 2 (Suarez, Gennett, Votto), (Gennett, Peraza, Votto). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz, L, 5-2 7 8 3 2 2 4 93 2.67 Diekman 1 1 0 0 0 3 16 3.86 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA DeSclafani, W, 6-3 7 3 0 0 0 9 94 4.46 Hughes, 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 1.37 Iglesias, S, 22-25 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.52 DeSclafani pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Hughes 1-0. Umpires: Home, Jordan Baker; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 2:30. A: 19,089. Todd Tichenor. T: 3:10. A: 41,531.

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 5 1 2 0 1 1 .273 Odor 2b 4 3 2 1 1 0 .275 Andrus ss 5 2 4 3 0 0 .289 Beltre 3b 5 1 2 4 0 0 .278 Profar dh 5 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Guzman 1b 5 3 3 3 0 1 .245 Calhoun lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 1-Tocci pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .183 Kiner-Falefa c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .272 D.Robinson cf-lf 2 2 0 0 3 2 .186 Totals 41 12 14 11 5 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hicks cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .246 Stanton dh 3 1 0 0 2 2 .277 Torres 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Gregorius ss 5 2 3 0 0 0 .270 Andujar 3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .294 Voit 1b-rf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .174 Gardner lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .248 Romine c 4 1 3 3 0 0 .263 S.Robinson rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .148 a-Bird ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 37 7 10 7 3 5 Texas 000 324 120 — 12 14 0 New York 000 013 120 — 7 10 1 a-grounded out for S.Robinson in the 8th. 1-ran for Calhoun in the 7th. E: Gregorius (5). LOB: Texas 7, New York 6. 2B: Choo (24), Andrus (15), Beltre (14), Andujar (31). HR: Beltre (7), off Tanaka; Guzman (10), off Tanaka; Guzman (11), off Tanaka; Guzman (12), off Cole; Gardner (10), off Minor; Romine (7), off Butler. RBIs: Odor (45), Andrus 3 (24), Beltre 4 (40), Guzman 3 (46), Andujar (53), Voit 2 (5), Gardner (34), Romine 3 (33). SB: D.Robinson (2), Romine (1). RLISP: Texas 1 (Guzman); New York 2 (Hicks, Gregorius). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor, W, 9-6 52/3 6 4 4 1 2 84 4.61 Butler 11/3 1 1 1 1 0 24 4.67 2/ 2 0 1 27 4.55 Martin 3 3 2 1/ 0 0 0 6 3.86 Gearrin 3 0 0 Leclerc 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 2.11 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tanaka, L, 9-3 5 6 6 6 3 2 96 4.08 Cole 2 5 4 2 1 2 56 5.08 Green 1 3 2 2 0 1 21 2.98 Britton 1 0 0 0 1 3 17 3.80 Tanaka pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Butler 1-0, Gearrin 1-0. WP: Martin. Umpires: Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Ben May; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Will Little. T: 3:34. A: 45,198.

Red Sox 19, Orioles 12 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 3 3 3 2 0 .352 Benintendi lf 5 3 1 3 1 0 .303 Leon c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Moreland 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .265 Martinez dh 5 2 2 2 1 1 .332 Bogaerts ss 4 2 1 4 2 1 .272 Devers 3b 5 0 0 1 1 1 .245 Holt 2b 4 3 3 3 2 1 .262 Butler c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 a-Pearce ph-lf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .301 Bradley Jr. cf 4 4 3 1 1 0 .213 Totals 41 19 16 18 10 6 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 4 0 1 2 1 1 .266 Beckham ss 6 1 2 2 0 1 .237 Jones rf 5 0 3 2 0 0 .285 Rickard rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Trumbo dh 5 2 3 1 0 1 .270 Mancini lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .230 Davis 1b 4 2 2 2 0 2 .162 Nunez 3b 3 2 1 0 2 1 .247 Joseph c 5 2 1 0 0 2 .219 Mullins cf 4 3 3 2 1 0 .750 Totals 41 12 17 11 4 10 Boston 300 206 350 — 19 16 1 Baltimore 044 002 011 — 12 17 0 a-hit by pitch for Butler in the 8th. E: Bradley Jr. (4). LOB: Boston 7, Baltimore 8. 2B: Betts 2 (32), Moreland (17), Martinez (31), Bradley Jr. (21), Mancini (16), Mullins 2 (2). 3B: Bradley Jr. (3). HR: Bogaerts (17), off Bundy; Holt (2), off Bundy; Benintendi (15), off Hart; Davis (14), off Eovaldi; Beckham (7), off Hembree; Trumbo (17), off Barnes. RBIs: Betts 3 (62), Benintendi 3 (70), Moreland (58), Martinez 2 (101), Bogaerts 4 (72), Devers (55), Holt 3 (29), Bradley Jr. (44), Villar 2 (26), Beckham 2 (21), Jones 2 (47), Trumbo (42), Davis 2 (39), Mullins 2 (2). SB: Bogaerts (4), Jones (3). CS: Beckham (2). SF: Moreland, Davis. S: Villar. RLISP: Boston 5 (Benintendi 2, Devers 2, Butler); Baltimore 3 (Mancini, Davis, Joseph). GIDP: Martinez, Beckham. DP: Boston 1 (Holt, Bogaerts, Moreland); Baltimore 1 (Beckham, Villar, Davis). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi 22/3 10 8 4 2 0 71 3.74 Workman 11/3 1 0 0 0 3 24 2.62 Pomeranz, W, 2-5 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 6.19 Hembree, 1 3 2 2 1 0 27 3.83 Brasier 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 1.23 Barnes 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 2.52 Kelly 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 4.28 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy 5 8 8 7 4 3 93 4.70 2/ Castro, L, 2-7, 3 0 3 3 3 0 19 3.84 1/ 1 0 23 5.79 Hart 3 5 3 3 Phillips 11/3 2 4 4 1 0 22 9.31 2/ Scott 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 28 5.94 Bundy pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Hart pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Workman 1-0, Castro 2-1, Hart 3-3, Phillips 1-0, Scott 1-1. HBP: Phillips (Pearce). WP: Scott 2. PB: Butler (1), Joseph (4). Umpires: Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Adrian Johnson. T: 4:01. A: 23,649.

Padres 2, Phillies 0

Rockies 5, Dodgers 4 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson lf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Turner 3b 3 2 2 0 0 0 .272 Grandal c 5 0 1 1 0 1 .252 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .228 Bellinger cf-rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .251 Taylor ss-cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .251 Muncy 1b 4 1 3 2 0 1 .262 Puig rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maeda p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .097 Rosscup p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Floro p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Machado ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .308 Totals 36 4 10 4 1 5 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .278 LeMahieu 2b 4 2 2 2 1 2 .271 Gonzalez rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .287 Arenado 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .307 McMahon 3b 2 1 1 2 0 0 .244 Story ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .289 Dahl lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Desmond 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .236 Iannetta c 4 0 2 0 0 2 .228 Gray p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .075 Musgrave p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Parra ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .281 McGee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Valaika ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 5 9 5 3 13 Los Angeles 100 210 000 — 4 10 2 Colorado 201 000 20x — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Musgrave in the 6th. b-struck out for Oberg in the 8th. E: Pederson (1), Muncy (11). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Colorado 9. 2B: Turner (10), Muncy 2 (15), Story (32). 3B: Gonzalez (3), Iannetta (1). HR: Muncy (26), off Gray; LeMahieu (9), off Maeda; McMahon (3), off Rosscup. RBIs: Grandal (58), Bellinger (54), Muncy 2 (52), LeMahieu 2 (36), Story (80), McMahon 2 (13). SB: Blackmon (6), Story (15), Desmond (13). S: Gray. RLISP: Los Angeles 4 (Pederson, Taylor 2, Puig); Colorado 6 (Blackmon, LeMahieu 2, Gonzalez, Dahl, Desmond). GIDP: Grandal. DP: Colorado 1 (Desmond, Arenado). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maeda 51/3 6 3 3 3 7 100 3.80 Rosscup, L, 0-1, 1 2 2 2 0 3 24 12.27 2/ Floro 1 16 2.50 3 0 0 0 0 Axford 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 5.33 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray 52/3 8 4 4 1 4 109 4.81 1/ Musgrave 4 4.55 3 0 0 0 0 0 McGee, W, 2-4 12/3 1 0 0 0 0 23 6.35 1/ Oberg, 5 3.15 3 0 0 0 0 0 Ottavino, S, 5-8 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 1.60 Inherited runners-scored: Rosscup 1-0, Musgrave 1-0, Oberg 1-0. HBP: Gray 2 (Turner,Turner). WP: Oberg. Umpires: Home, James Hoye; First, Quinn Wolcott; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T: 3:31. A: 42,184.

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

StL KC

Flaherty (R) Duffy (L)

5-6 6:15 7-10

3.27 4.70

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Was Roark (R) Chi Lester (L)

6-12 3:05 12-4

4.21 3.44

Ari Cin

Ray (L) Harvey (R)

5:40

3-2 5-7

4.92 5.37

Mil Atl

Miley (L) Teheran (R)

6:10

2-1 8-7

2.10 4.48

NY Oswalt (R) Mia Straily (R)

6:10

1-2 4-5

5.13 4.35

LA Col

Buehler (R) Freeland (L)

5-4 7:10 10-7

3.63 3.04

Phi SD

Nola (R) Lockett (R)

7:40

12-3 0-2

2.37 9.28

Pit SF

Williams (R) TBA

8:05

9-8 —

3.88 —

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tex Hutchison (R) 1-2 NY Lynn (R) 12:05 8-8

6.29 4.58

Bos Price (L) 11-6 Bal Yacabonis (R) 12:05 0-0

3.93 7.15

TB Tor

Stanek (R) Gaviglio (R)

3:07

1-3 2-4

2.56 5.08

Min Gibson (R) Det Liriano (L)

5:10

5-9 3-6

3.60 4.37

Bos TBA Bal Ramirez (R)

6:05

— 1-4

— 5.66

Cle Chi

Bauer (R) Shields (R)

11-6 6:10 4-13

2.25 4.50

Sea LeBlanc (L) Hou Morton (R)

6-2 6:10 12-2

3.81 2.81

Oak Jackson (R) LA Skaggs (L)

8:07

3-2 8-7

2.87 3.34

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

Angels 4, Athletics 3 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Martini lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Chapman 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .273 Lowrie 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .265 Davis dh 3 1 1 2 0 1 .256 Olson 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .235 Piscotty rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Canha cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Semien ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Totals 32 3 6 3 0 8 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .215 Fletcher 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .263 Upton lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .258 Pujols dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .254 Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .308 Marte 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Briceno c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .296 Cowart 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Young Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .214 Totals 30 4 7 4 0 5 Oakland 300 000 000 — 3 6 1 Los Angeles 002 002 00x — 4 7 0 E: Chapman (13). LOB: Oakland 3, Los Angeles 2. 2B: Chapman (23). HR: Chapman (16), off Pena; Davis (33), off Pena; Calhoun (16), off B.Anderson; Upton (24), off Trivino. RBIs: Chapman (39), Davis 2 (90), Calhoun 2 (46), Upton 2 (67). RLISP: Oakland 1 (Olson); Los Angeles 1 (Pujols). GIDP: Lucroy, Simmons, Marte. DP: Oakland 2 (Chapman, Lowrie, Olson), (Semien, Lowrie, Olson); Los Angeles 1 (Fletcher, Simmons, Marte). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Anderson 5 4 2 2 0 4 63 4.53 Trivino, L, 8-2, 1 3 2 2 0 0 16 1.58 Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 3.02 Kelley 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.18 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pena 52/3 5 3 3 0 4 86 4.95 Johnson, W, 4-2 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.18 Bedrosian, 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.33 J.Anderson, 11/3 0 0 0 0 4 21 2.91 1/ 0 0 3 2.81 Alvarez, 3 0 0 0 Parker, S, 11-14 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.29 Inherited runners-scored: Johnson 1-0. HBP: Pena (Davis). WP: Pena. Umpires: Home, Chris Segal; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Stu Scheurwater; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 2:22. A: 42,722.

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Markakis, Atlanta, .326; Freeman, Atlanta, .318; Yelich, Milwaukee, .316; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .313; Gennett, Cincinnati, .313; Zobrist, Chicago, .310; Arenado, Colorado, .307; Peralta, Arizona, .303; Suarez, Cincinnati, .303; Almora, Chicago, .298. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 84; Albies, Atlanta, 81; Yelich, Milwaukee, 79; Carpenter, Cardinals, 78; Arenado, Colorado, 77; Baez, Chicago, 73; Harper, Washington, 72; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 71; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 71; Turner, Washington, 70. RBI: Baez, Chicago, 88; Suarez, Cincinnati, 88; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 83; Arenado, Colorado, 82; Story, Colorado, 80; Rizzo, Chicago, 75; Markakis, Atlanta, 73; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 72; Freeman, Atlanta, 71; Harper, Washington, 71. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 144; Freeman, Atlanta, 140; Gennett, Cincinnati, 132; Arenado, Colorado, 128; Peraza, Cincinnati, 128; Yelich, Milwaukee, 128; Albies, Atlanta, 127; Anderson, Miami, 127; Castro, Miami, 127; Story, Colorado, 127. DOUBLES: Markakis, Atlanta, 35; Albies, Atlanta, 33; Carpenter, Cardinals, 33; Story, Colorado, 32; Baez, Chicago, 31; Freeman, Atlanta, 30; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 28; Rendon, Washington, 28; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 27; 2 tied at 26. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 10; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Baez, Chicago, 7; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 6; Difo, Washington, 6; Nimmo, New York, 6; Rosario, New York, 6; 8 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Carpenter, Cardinals, 32; Arenado, Colorado, 29; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 28; Harper, Washington, 28; Muncy, Los Angeles, 26; Suarez, Cincinnati, 26; Baez, Chicago, 25; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 24; Story, Colorado, 24; Shaw, Milwaukee, 23. STOLEN BASES: Turner, Washington, 31; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 27; MTaylor, Washington, 24; Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; Cain, Milwaukee, 20; Baez, Chicago, 19; Peraza, Cincinnati, 18; Dyson, Arizona, 16; 2 tied at 15. PITCHING: Scherzer, Washington, 15-5; Godley, Arizona, 12-6; Greinke, Arizona, 12-7; Lester, Chicago, 12-4; Mikolas, Cardinals, 12-3; Nola, Philadelphia, 12-3; Chacin, Milwaukee, 11-4; Freeland, Colorado, 10-7; Newcomb, Atlanta, 10-5; Quintana, Chicago, 10-8. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.77; Scherzer, Washington, 2.28; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.37; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.74; Greinke, Arizona, 2.89; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.98; Freeland, Colorado, 3.04; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 3.11; Corbin, Arizona, 3.15; Newcomb, Atlanta, 3.15. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 216; Corbin, Arizona, 183; deGrom, New York, 183; Greinke, Arizona, 152; Gray, Colorado, 148; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 147; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 145; Nola, Philadelphia, 144; Marquez, Colorado, 139; Godley, Arizona, 137.


BASEBALL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 2 NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Chicago

67 49 .578

— 6-4

36-22

31-27

Milwaukee

67 53 .558

2

— 4-6 W-1 36-24

31-29

Cardinals

62 55 .530

5½ 7½

.513

GB WCGB L10

Pittsburgh

60 57

Cincinnati

52 65 .444 15½

EAST

Str Home Away L-1

8-2 W-4 29-26

33-29

5-5

27-28

L-1

12½ 4-6 W-2

28-31 24-34

CENTRAL

7-3

W-1

37-23

11

14

5-5

W-1

33-24

21-38

Detroit

48 69 .410 17½

20½

3-7

L-1 30-28

18-41

Chicago

42 74 .362

23

26

5-5

L-1

22-37

20-37

Kansas City

35 81 .302

30

33

2-8

L-2

16-41 19-40

EAST

W

GB WCGB L10

Boston

83 35 .703

8-2 W-2

42-15

41-20

New York

73 43 .629

9

5-5

40-17

33-26

Tampa Bay

60 57

8½ 6-4 W-3 34-24

26-33

— 6-4

L-2

38-18

26-33

Atlanta

63

51

.553

½

— 6-4

L-1 29-24

34-27

Washington

60 57

.513

5

New York

48 66

.421 15½

Miami

48 70 .407 17½

WEST

W

Los Angeles

64 53 .547

5-5

L-1

31-28

33-25

Arizona

64 54 .542

½

1

5-5

L-2

32-29

32-25

Colorado

61 55 .526

3

3-7 W-1

29-27

San Francisco 58 59 .496

6

5-5 W-1

33-25

71 .398 17½

18

5-5 W-2

21-36

26-35

Texas

San Diego

47

L-1

24-37 24-29

GB WCGB L10

Str Home Away

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Zimmerman powers Nationals past Cubs

NATIONAL LEAGUE Nationals 9, Cubs 4

Ryan Zimmerman hit two home runs off a shaky Jon Lester and tied a career high with six RBIs, sending the Washington Nationals over the host Chicago Cubs 9-4 on Saturday. Zimmerman hit a two-run homer in the first inning, had a sacrifice fly to the warning track in the third and chased Lester with a three-run drive in the fourth that made it 9-1. He is batting .355 (16 for 45) with four homers and 16 RBIs in 14 games since returning from the disabled list last month. Brewers 4, Braves 2 • Mike Moustakas hit a two-run double in the eighth, Josh Hader recorded a two-inning save and Milwaukee won in Atlanta. Atlanta began the game leading the NL East by one percentage point and had won nine of 12. Milwaukee snapped a two-game skid and pulled within two games of the NL Central lead. Reds 6, D’backs 3 • Pinchhitter Tucker Barnhart’s two-run double highlighted a four-run rally in the eighth inning and Cincinnati beat visiting Arizona.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Yankees 5, Rangers 3 • Rain pouring off his hat, Aroldis Chapman struck out Jurickson Profar with the bases loaded in a steady storm to end the game, preserving New York’s win over visiting Texas. Rookie Miguel Andujar hit a tiebreaking, two-run homer in the seventh inning and Yankees newcomer Lance Lynn turned in another strong start. New York has won five of six. Red Sox 5, Orioles 0 • David Price struck out 10 over six sparkling innings, Jackie Bradley Jr. hit two solo homers and Boston won the first game of a doubleheader in Baltimore. The second game was still in progress at press time. Eduardo Nunez also went deep for Boston and Xander Bogaerts had three hits and scored twice in the first game. Rays 3, Blue Jays 1 • Willy Adames had two hits and drove in the decisive run, and Tampa Bay won in Toronto. Aledmys Diaz homered for the Blue Jays, who have lost five of six. Twins 4, Tigers 3 • Tyler Austin hit a two-run homer in his Minnesota debut, helping the Twins win in Detroit. Austin was acquired in the July 30 trade that sent Lance Lynn to the Yankees. He was recalled from Triple-A Rochester on Friday. Kyle Gibson pitched seven effective innings as Minnesota improved to 2-4 on its seven-game trip. Gibson (6-9) allowed one run and seven hits. Indians 3, White Sox 1 • Trevor Bauer allowed two hits into the seventh inning before getting struck in the right leg by a line drive, and Michael Brantley and Jose Ramirez hit back-to-back home runs to lift Cleveland in Chicago. Mariners 3, Astros 2 • Ryon Healy had three hits and drove in the go-ahead run, Guillermo Heredia made a spectacular catch to preserve the lead in the eighth inning, and Seattle won in Houston. Associated Press

Str Home Away

51 .560

Pct

2-8 W-1 28-34 20-36

GB WCGB L10

65

.557

17

Pct

54 62 .466

L

15 4-6

L

Minnesota

51

4½ 6-4 W-1 30-28 30-29

W

Cleveland

W

Pct

Str Home Away

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Philadelphia 64

L

GB WCGB L10

33-29

Saturday Cardinals 8, Kansas City 3 Washington 9, Cubs 4 Cincinnati 6, Arizona 3 Miami 4, NY Mets 3, 11 inn. Milwaukee 4, Atlanta 2 LA Dodgers at Colorado, late Philadelphia at San Diego, late Pittsburgh at San Francisco, late Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Cubs 3, Washington 2 Cincinnati 3, Arizona 0 NY Mets 6, Miami 2 Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 5, LA Dodgers 4 San Diego 2, Philadelphia 0 San Francisco 13, Pittsburgh 10

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

L

Pct

.513 22½

Toronto

52 64 .448

Baltimore

35 82 .299 47½

30

WEST

W

16 4-6 33½

3-7

Str Home Away W-1 L-2

28-32

24-32

L-3

20-37

15-45

L

Pct

Houston

73 45

.619

— 6-4

L-3

32-27

41-18

Oakland

68 48 .586

4

7-3

L-1

33-23

35-25

32-28

Seattle

68 50 .576

5

1

5-5 W-3

36-24

32-26

25-34

Los Angeles 59 58 .504 13½

5-5 W-4

33-28 26-30

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Turner ss 4 2 2 1 1 1 .272 Harper cf 3 2 2 0 1 1 .238 Difo 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Zimmerman 1b 3 2 2 6 1 0 .256 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 5 0 0 0 0 2 .303 Soto lf Reynolds 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .270 Murphy 2b 4 1 3 2 0 1 .308 Taylor cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Wieters c 3 1 3 0 2 0 .221 Roark p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .174 Adams 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Totals 37 9 13 9 5 12 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rizzo 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Montgomery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Caratini c 1 1 0 0 1 0 .254 Baez 2b 2 0 0 1 0 0 .295 Chatwood p 1 1 1 0 0 0 .167 c-Zobrist ph 1 0 1 2 0 0 .313 Heyward rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .279 b-Happ ph-rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .241 Bote 3b-1b-2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .320 Contreras c-1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .275 Schwarber lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Russell ss 4 1 3 0 0 1 .268 Lester p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .106 De La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-La Stella ph-3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .278 Almora cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .298 Totals 35 4 11 4 2 8 Washington 201 600 000 — 9 13 0 Chicago 001 000 012 — 4 11 1 a-walked for De La Rosa in the 5th. b-struck out for Heyward in the 6th. c-doubled for Chatwood in the 9th. E: Contreras (11). LOB: Washington 9, Chicago 8. 2B: Zobrist (19). HR: Zimmerman (8), off Lester; Murphy (5), off Lester; Zimmerman (9), off Lester. RBIs: Turner (49), Zimmerman 6 (32), Murphy 2 (26), Baez (89), Contreras (41), Zobrist 2 (46). SB: Turner (32). CS: Rizzo (4). SF: Zimmerman, Baez. S: Eaton, Roark. RLISP: Washington 4 (Eaton 2, Soto, Roark); Chicago 4 (Schwarber, Lester, Almora, Happ). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark, W, 7-12 72/3 9 2 2 1 7 117 4.12 Suero 11/3 2 2 2 1 1 23 3.58 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester, L, 12-5 32/3 10 9 8 1 5 88 3.89 De La Rosa 11/3 0 0 0 1 4 26 4.46 Montgomery 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 3.62 Chatwood 3 3 0 0 2 2 57 5.06 Inherited runners-scored: Suero 2-0. HBP: Roark (Rizzo). WP: Suero. T: 3:11. A: 41,320.

Brewers 4, Braves 2 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Yelich rf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .313 Cain cf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .297 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 2 1 1 .253 Braun lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .249 Shaw 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Thames 1b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .229 c-Aguilar ph-1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Kratz c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .229 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Miley p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .231 a-Schoop ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Burnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Perez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Totals 34 4 7 4 3 10 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna cf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Albies 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .277 Freeman 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .318 Markakis rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .325 Camargo 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Duvall lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Biddle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Jackson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Suzuki c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .251 Swanson ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Teheran p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .207 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Inciarte ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Totals 31 2 7 2 1 3 Milwaukee 100 000 030 — 4 7 1 Atlanta 100 100 000 — 2 7 1 a-grounded out for Miley in the 7th. b-lined out for Brach in the 7th. c-walked for Thames in the 8th. d-struck out for Burnes in the 8th. e-grounded out for Jackson in the 9th. E: Burnes (1), Biddle (1). LOB: Milwaukee 8, Atlanta 4. 2B: Moustakas (25), Freeman (31). HR: Acuna (14), off Miley. RBIs: Moustakas 2 (70), Braun (43), Kratz (11), Acuna (32), Markakis (74). SB: Cain (21). CS: Cain (6). S: Teheran. RLISP: Milwaukee 4 (Shaw 2, Perez 2); Atlanta 2 (Acuna, Inciarte). GIDP: Camargo, Duvall. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Moustakas, Thames), (Arcia, Shaw, Thames). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley 6 6 2 2 1 0 77 2.23 Burnes, W, 3-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.77 Hader, S, 9-12 2 0 0 0 0 3 29 1.54 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran 6 2 1 1 2 6 90 4.33 Brach, 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.30 Biddle, L, 3-1, 1/3 3 3 2 0 0 9 2.60 2/ Winkler 0 1 2 15 2.79 3 1 0 Jackson 1 1 0 0 0 2 10 3.70 IRS: Winkler 2-1. HBP: Teheran 2 (Braun,Kratz). WP: Miley. T: 2:42. A: 40,297.

Reds 6, D’backs 3, 11 inn. Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .302 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Pollock cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .286 Escobar 3b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .278 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Marte 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Ahmed ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .244 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .206 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McFarland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ray p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .037 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chafin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Murphy c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Totals 33 3 7 3 1 8 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 0 1 0 1 1 .283 Herrera lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .154 b-Votto ph-1b 1 0 1 1 1 0 .291 Gennett 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .310 Suarez 3b 2 2 0 0 0 1 .301 Ervin rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .293 Dixon 1b-lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .175 Casali c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .294 Harvey p 2 0 1 1 0 1 .079 a-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Barnhart ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .246 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hamilton cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .231 Totals 32 6 9 6 5 8 Arizona 000 200 010 — 3 7 0 Cincinnati 000 200 04x — 6 9 0 a-struck out for Harvey in the 7th. b-pinch hit for Herrera in the 7th. c-doubled for Garrett in the 8th. LOB: Arizona 4, Cincinnati 9. 2B: Goldschmidt (24), Ray (1), Ervin (6), Barnhart (16). HR: Escobar (16), off Harvey; Peralta (20), off Hernandez. RBIs: Peralta (59), Escobar 2 (72), Ervin (16), Harvey (1), Hamilton (24), Votto (54), Barnhart 2 (37). SB: Hamilton 2 (29). CS: Peraza (5). RLISP: Arizona 3 (Goldschmidt, Escobar, Souza Jr.); Cincinnati 4 (Gennett 2, Ervin 2). RISP: Arizona 0 for 5; Cincinnati 4 for 11. DP: Cincinnati 1 (Suarez, Gennett, Dixon). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray 5 4 2 2 2 6 106 4.83 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.34 1/ Chafin 1 9 1.77 3 1 0 0 0 1/ Bradley, L, 3-4 1 3 1 3 3 2 1 33 3.42 McFarland 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 8 1.93 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey 7 5 2 2 1 7 99 5.19 2/ Hernandez 1 0 0 14 2.01 3 2 1 1/ 7 3.52 Garrett, W, 1-2 3 0 0 0 0 0 Iglesias, S, 23-26 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.47 Inherited runners-scored: Bradley 1-0, McFarland 1-1, Garrett 1-0. HBP: Ray (Suarez), Bradley (Suarez). WP: Ray. T: 3:04. A: 29,348

GB WCGB L10

28-28

52 67 .437 21½

17½ 6-4

Str Home Away

L-1

25-36

Saturday Cardinals 8, Kansas City 3 NY Yankees 5, Texas 3 Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 1 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3 Cleveland 3, White Sox 1 Seattle 3, Houston 2 Game 1: Boston 5, Baltimore 0 Game 2: Boston at Baltimore, late Oakland at LA Angels, late Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Boston 19, Baltimore 12 Texas 12, NY Yankees 7 Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 0 Detroit 5, Minnesota 3 White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Seattle 5, Houston 2 LA Angels 4, Oakland 3

27-31

Sunday’s pitching matchups

ASSOCIATED PRESS

New York Yankees pitcher Aroldis Chapman and catcher Kyle Higashioka celebrate after the Yankees defeated the Texas Rangers 5-3 on Saturday. AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 5, Rangers 3

Rays 3, Blue Jays 1

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 5 2 3 0 0 1 .277 Odor 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .278 Andrus ss 4 0 1 1 1 2 .288 Beltre dh 3 0 1 1 1 2 .279 Profar 3b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .248 Gallo lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Chirinos c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .219 Guzman 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .243 Tocci cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .176 a-Kiner-Falefa ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Totals 34 3 8 2 6 13 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Stanton dh 3 2 2 1 1 0 .279 Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .268 Andujar 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .296 Bird 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .216 Torres 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269 Walker rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .227 Higashioka c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .157 Robinson cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .138 Totals 31 5 8 5 4 3 Texas 001 000 200 — 3 8 0 New York 200 001 20x — 5 8 0 a-walked for Tocci in the 9th. LOB: Texas 11, New York 6. 2B: Choo (25), Gallo (15), Bird 2 (12). HR: Stanton (29), off Hutchison; Andujar (17), off Martin. RBIs: Andrus (25), Beltre (41), Stanton (75), Andujar 2 (55), Bird (28), Walker (30). SB: Choo (4), Odor (10). RLISP: Texas 7 (Beltre 2, Profar 4, Tocci); New York 3 (Gardner, Torres, Robinson). GIDP: Gregorius. DP: Texas 1 (Hutchison, Andrus, Guzman). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hutchison 51/3 5 3 3 4 2 85 6.07 Springs 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 1.29 2/ Martin, L, 1-3 3 2 2 2 0 0 12 5.08 Claudio 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.99 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn 5 5 1 1 3 8 99 4.46 Robertson, 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.23 2/ Britton, 3 2 2 2 2 0 25 4.50 1/ Betances, W, 3-3, 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.19 Chapman, S, 30-32 1 1 0 0 1 2 29 2.15 IRS: Springs 1-1, Betances 3-1. HBP: Chapman (Beltre). T: 3:16. A: 45,933.

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith rf-lf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .299 Duffy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .301 Wendle 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .295 Cron 1b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .247 Gomez rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .218 Choi dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .227 Kiermaier cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .181 Adames ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .243 Lowe lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bauers 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Sucre c 4 0 1 1 0 2 .215 Totals 36 3 10 3 1 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Grichuk rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .231 Travis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .260 Hernandez lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .245 Morales dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .245 Solarte 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .233 a-Urena ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .261 b-Granderson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Martin c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .199 Diaz ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .262 Pillar cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Totals 28 1 5 1 4 8 Tampa Bay 110 000 001 — 3 10 0 Toronto 000 010 000 — 1 5 1 a-grounded out for Solarte in the 2nd. b-flied out for Urena in the 9th. E: Pillar (6). LOB: Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 5. 2B: Smith (19), Wendle (15), Cron (21), Choi (5), Hernandez (25). HR: Diaz (15), off Schultz. RBIs: Wendle (38), Adames (15), Sucre (15), Diaz (35). SB: Kiermaier (8), Adames (4). CS: Martin (3). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Duffy, Choi, Kiermaier, Lowe); Toronto 2 (Pillar 2). GIDP: Morales, Urena. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Adames, Wendle, Cron), (Adames, Wendle, Cron). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 2 25 2.49 Castillo, W, 3-2 22/3 1 0 0 1 2 34 3.86 Schultz 2 2 1 1 1 1 35 4.58 Wood, 1 1 0 0 1 0 16 3.91 Alvarado, 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.39 Romo, S, 15-22 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.57 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gaviglio, L, 2-5 51/3 6 2 1 0 7 99 4.86 2/ Garcia 0 0 1 7 6.18 3 0 0 Petricka 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 4.71 Clippard 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.79 Tepera 1 2 1 1 0 1 14 4.17 IRS: Castillo 2-0, Garcia 1-0. HBP: Castillo (Martin). T: 2:56. A: 38,797.

Twins 4, Tigers 3 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .270 Rosario rf-lf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .296 Forsythe 2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Sano 3b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .224 Austin dh 4 1 1 2 1 2 .224 Polanco ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Field cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .209 a-Cave ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Adrianza lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Kepler rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Wilson c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .165 Totals 35 4 9 3 6 7 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .202 Iglesias ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .264 Castellanos rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Candelario 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Martinez dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .238 1-Gerber pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .174 Goodrum 2b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .232 Adduci 1b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .276 McCann c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .222 Reyes lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .220 Totals 34 3 9 3 3 6 Minnesota 001 021 000 — 4 9 0 Detroit 010 000 002 — 3 9 0 a-flied out for Field in the 7th. 1-ran for Martinez in the 9th. LOB: Minnesota 10, Detroit 7. 2B: Rosario (29). 3B: Adduci (1). HR: Austin (9), off Liriano; Goodrum (12), off Hildenberger. RBIs: Rosario (67), Austin 2 (25), Goodrum 2 (38), McCann (31). CS: Goodrum (3). RLISP: Minnesota 6 (Rosario, Polanco 3, Cave 2); Detroit 2 (Jones, McCann). GIDP: Iglesias. DP: Minnesota 1 (Polanco, Forsythe, Mauer). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 6-9 7 7 1 1 2 4 111 3.49 May, 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.93 Hildenberger, S, 1-3 1 2 2 2 1 2 25 4.74 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano, L, 3-7 5 6 3 3 4 3 86 4.42 McAllister 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 5.06 Alcantara 1 1 0 0 1 0 24 0.66 Coleman 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.71 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 4.59 WP: Liriano, Alcantara, Gibson. T: 3:09. A: 26,991.

FIRST GAME

Red Sox 5, Orioles 0 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .351 Benintendi lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .302 Moreland 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .329 Bogaerts ss 4 2 3 0 0 1 .278 Holt 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .263 E.Nunez 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .264 Leon c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .212 Bradley Jr. cf 4 2 2 2 0 0 .216 Totals 35 5 9 4 3 5 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .263 1 .233 Beckham ss 4 0 0 0 0 Jones rf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .287 Trumbo dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .267 Mancini lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .230 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .161 R.Nunez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Mullins cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .571 Wynns c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Totals 32 0 5 0 0 14 Boston 000 031 001 — 5 9 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 E: Wynns (1). LOB: Boston 6, Baltimore 5. 2B: Bogaerts (33), Jones (30). HR: E.Nunez (7), off Yacabonis; Bradley Jr. (10), off Yacabonis; Bradley Jr. (11), off Castro. RBIs: E.Nunez 2 (35), Bradley Jr. 2 (46). SB: Bogaerts (5). RLISP: Boston 2 (Moreland 2); Baltimore 2 (Beckham, Mancini). GIDP: E.Nunez. DP: Baltimore 1 (Beckham, Villar, Davis). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price, W, 12-6 6 5 0 0 0 10 94 3.75 Thornburg 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.97 Brasier 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.15 Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.47 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 2/ Yacabonis, L, 0-1 4 3 5 3 3 0 2 60 6.75 Gilmartin 21/3 3 1 1 2 0 40 3.86 Castro 2 1 1 1 1 3 35 3.86 Inherited runners-scored: Gilmartin 1-0. T: 2:48. A: 18,003.

MLB CALENDAR Aug. 31: Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster. Oct. 2-3: Wild-card games. Oct. 4: Division Series start. Oct. 12: League Championship Series start. Oct. 23: World Series starts. November TBA: Deadline for teams to make qualifying offers to their eligible former players who became free agents, fifth day after World Series. November TBA: Deadline for free agents to accept qualifying offers, 15th day after World Series. Nov. 6-8: General managers’ meetings, Carlsbad, Calif.

Mariners 3, Astros 2 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .271 Span lf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .278 Segura ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .305 Cruz dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .271 Seager 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .229 Herrmann c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .236 Zunino c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Healy 1b 4 0 3 1 0 1 .236 Gordon 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Heredia cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Totals 33 3 10 3 1 6 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Bregman 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .278 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .262 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Gonzalez lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .240 Gurriel 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .279 Reddick rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .248 White 1b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .286 Stassi c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .246 1-Fisher pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Maldonado c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Totals 31 2 5 2 3 8 Seattle 000 300 000 — 3 10 0 Houston 020 000 000 — 2 5 1 1-ran for Stassi in the 8th. E: Stassi (1). LOB: Seattle 5, Houston 5. 2B: Seager (27), Healy 2 (13), Reddick (12). 3B: Herrmann (2). RBIs: Seager (63), Herrmann (4), Healy (57), White 2 (11). SB: Gordon (27). RLISP: Seattle 3 (Haniger, Gordon, Heredia); Houston 1 (Gattis). LIDP: Kemp. GIDP: Segura 2, Seager. DP: Seattle 1 (Heredia, Healy); Houston 3 (Bregman, Gurriel, White), (Morton, Correa, White), (Gurriel, Correa, White). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc, W, 7-2 5 3 2 2 2 5 90 3.80 Vincent, 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.38 1/ Duke, 0 0 0 3 4.81 3 0 0 1/ 0 0 0 9 2.97 Warren, 3 0 0 Colome, 1 2 0 0 1 0 16 3.12 Diaz, S, 45-48 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.02 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton, L, 12/3 6 7 3 3 1 4 87 2.88 2/ Sipp 0 0 1 12 1.52 3 1 0 1/ 0 0 0 4 3.69 Smith 3 0 0 Osuna 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.45 Rondon 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 2.11 Inherited runners-scored: Smith 1-0. HBP: Morton (Span). Umpires: Home, Joe West; First, Mark Ripperger; Second, Nic Lentz; Third, Doug Eddings. T: 2:56. A: 38,888.

Indians 3, White Sox 1 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Brantley lf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .297 Ramirez 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .298 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .247 Cabrera dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Kipnis 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .220 Guyer rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Perez c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .161 G.Allen cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .232 Totals 36 3 9 3 0 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Delmonico lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Sanchez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Palka dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .235 Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .250 Narvaez c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .280 Anderson ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Moncada 2b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .220 LaMarre cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Totals 30 1 3 1 2 12 Cleveland 000 012 000 — 3 9 0 Chicago 001 000 000 — 1 3 3 E: Garcia (2), Narvaez (6), LaMarre (1). LOB: Cleveland 7, Chicago 4. 2B: Brantley (28), Kipnis (20). HR: Brantley (13), off Shields; Ramirez (34), off Shields; Moncada (15), off Bauer. RBIs: Brantley (62), Ramirez (84), G.Allen (6), Moncada (46). SB: Perez (1). RLISP: Cleveland 4 (Cabrera, Guyer 3); Chicago 1 (Anderson). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bauer, W, 12-6 61/3 2 1 1 0 8 102 2.22 Hand, 12/3 0 0 0 2 3 29 2.73 C.Allen, S, 22-25 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 4.28 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields, L, 4-14 7 7 3 2 0 4 94 4.41 2/ 1 29 3.63 Avilan 3 2 0 0 0 Gomez 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.52 Inherited runners-scored: Gomez 3-0. HBP: Avilan (Cabrera). Umpires: Home, Paul Nauert; First, Tom Woodring; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Carlos Torres. T: 2:53. A: 28,061.

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

StL KC

Weaver (R) Junis (R)

1:15

6-10 6-11

4.66 4.98

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Ari Cin

Godley (R) Castillo (R)

12-6 12:10 6-9

4.35 4.91

NY Syndergaard (R) 7-2 Mia Chen (L) 12:10 4-8

3.17 5.48

Mil Atl

Anderson (R) 7-7 Newcomb (L) 12:35 10-5

3.81 3.15

LA Col

Hill (L) Bettis (R)

2:10

5-4 5-2

3.62 5.67

Phi SD

Arrieta (R) Lucchesi (L)

2:40

9-6 5-6

3.11 3.70

Pit SF

Musgrove (R) Rodriguez (R) 3:05

4-6 5-1

3.41 2.34

Was Scherzer (R) Chi Hamels (L)

7:05

15-5 7-9

2.28 4.38

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bos Sale (L) Bal Cobb (R)

11-4 12:05 3-14

2.04 5.55

Tex Perez (L) NY Sabathia (L)

2-4 12:05 6-4

6.15 3.49

TB Tor

Glasnow (R) Stroman (R)

1-2 12:07 4-8

4.14 5.20

Min Stewart (R) Det Boyd (L)

— 12:10 6-10

— 4.33

Sea Ramirez (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

1:10

Cle Chi

1:10

13-6 4-8

3.69 5.58

3:07

4-2 7-7

3.12 3.96

Carrasco (R) Covey (R)

Oak Cahill (R) LA Heaney (L)

0-2 10.24 9-9 3.53

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

MLB LEADERS NATIONAL LEAGUE G AB R H Pct. Markakis Atl 113 442 67 144 .326 FFreeman Atl 113 440 69 140 .318 Yelich Mil 103 405 79 128 .316 Gennett Cin 112 422 67 132 .313 Dickerson Pit 98 370 52 115 .311 Arenado Col 110 417 77 128 .307 Suarez Cin 99 373 60 113 .303 DPeralta Ari 105 416 56 126 .303 Almora ChC 108 332 51 99 .298 Martinez StL 109 373 39 111 .298 Home Runs Carpenter, Cardinals, 32; Arenado, Colorado, 29; Harper, Washington, 28; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 28; Muncy, Los Angeles, 26; Suarez, Cincinnati, 26; JBaez, Chicago, 25; Story, Colorado, 24; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 24; TShaw, Milwaukee, 23. Runs Batted In JBaez, Chicago, 88; Suarez, Cincinnati, 88; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 83; Arenado, Colorado, 82; Story, Colorado, 80; Rizzo, Chicago, 75; Markakis, Atlanta, 73; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 72; Harper, Washington, 71; FFreeman, Atlanta, 71. Pitching Scherzer, Washington, 15-5; Mikolas, Cardinals, 12-3; Nola, Philadelphia, 12-3; Lester, Chicago, 12-4; Godley, Arizona, 12-6; Greinke, Arizona, 12-7; Chacin, Milwaukee, 11-4; Newcomb, Atlanta, 10-5; Freeland, Colorado, 10-7; Quintana, Chicago, 10-8. AMERICAN LEAGUE G AB R H Pct. Betts Bos 97 381 98 134 .352 JMartinez Bos 110 425 85 141 .332 Altuve Hou 104 407 64 134 .329 MMachado Bal 96 365 48 115 .315 Trout LAA 109 372 82 115 .309 Simmons LAA 105 396 56 122 .308 109 448 78 137 .306 Segura Sea MDuffy TB 96 378 41 115 .304 Benintendi Bos 110 426 84 129 .303 MSmith TB 105 327 43 98 .300 Home Runs JMartinez, Boston, 35; KDavis, Oakland, 33; JoRamirez, Cleveland, 33; Gallo, Texas, 31; Trout, Los Angeles, 30; NCruz, Seattle, 30; Lindor, Cleveland, 29; Stanton, New York, 28; Betts, Boston, 27; Judge, New York, 26. Runs Batted In JMartinez, Boston, 101; KDavis, Oakland, 90; JoRamirez, Cleveland, 83; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 81; NCruz, Seattle, 75; Haniger, Seattle, 75; Lindor, Cleveland, 74; Stanton, New York, 74; Bregman, Houston, 72; Bogaerts, Boston, 72. Pitching Severino, New York, 15-5; Porcello, Boston, 14-5; Kluber, Cleveland, 14-6; Snell, Tampa Bay, 13-5; Carrasco, Cleveland, 13-6; Morton, Houston, 12-2; Gonzales, Seattle, 12-7; Rodriguez, Boston, 11-3; Sale, Boston, 11-4; 2 tied at 11-6.

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL Aug. 12 1921: Philadelphia’s George Smith gave up 12 hits but pitched a shutout for the Phillies, who beat the Boston Braves 4-0. 1948: In the second game of a doubleheader, the Cleveland Indians routed the St. Louis Browns 26-3 with a 29-hit barrage. The Indians set a major league record, with 14 players hitting safely. 1964: Mickey Mantle hit a home run both left- and right-handed in a 7-3 win over the Chicago White Sox. It was the 10th time in his career and a major league record for switch-hit homers in a game. 1966: Art Shamsky of the Cincinnati Reds connected for three home runs in a 14-11, 13-inning loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates at Crosley Field. Two of the homers came in the 10th and 11th innings. The game featured 11 homers by both clubs. 1970: Curt Flood lost his $41 million antitrust suit against baseball. 1974: Nolan Ryan of the California Angels set an American League record by striking out 19 in a 4-2 win over the Boston Red Sox. Ryan bettered the 18 strikeouts set by Bob Feller in 1938 and tied the major league record set by Steve Carlton in 1969 and Tom Seaver in 1970. 1984: A brawl-filled game in Atlanta began when Pascual Perez hit San Diego’s Alan Wiggins in the back with the first pitch. Padres pitchers retaliated by throwing at Perez all four times he came to the plate. The game had two bench-clearing brawls, the second of which included several fans and 19 ejections, including both managers and both replacement managers. The Braves won 5-3. 1988: The Boston Red Sox set an AL record with their 23rd straight victory at home, beating the Detroit Tigers 9-4. Boston surpassed the league mark of 22 set by the 1931 Philadelphia Athletics. 1994: Major league baseball players went on strike for the sport’s eighth work stoppage since 1972. 2007: Bobby Jenks pitched a perfect ninth inning in the Chicago White Sox’s 6-0 loss to Seattle, breaking David Wells’ American League record and tying the major league record of 41 straight batters retired. Jim Barr also set down 41 straight for San Francisco in 1972.


BASEBALL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 3 NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Chicago

67 49 .578

— 6-4

36-22

31-27

Milwaukee

67 53 .558

2

— 4-6 W-1 36-24

31-29

Cardinals

62 55 .530

5½ 7½

.513

GB WCGB L10

Pittsburgh

60 57

Cincinnati

52 65 .444 15½

EAST

Str Home Away L-1

8-2 W-4 29-26

33-29

5-5

27-28

L-1

12½ 4-6 W-2

28-31 24-34

W

L

Pct

Philadelphia 64

51

.557

— 6-4

L-2

38-18

26-33

Atlanta

63

51

.553

½

— 6-4

L-1 29-24

34-27

Washington

60 57

.513

5

New York

48 66

.421 15½

Miami

48 70 .407 17½

WEST

W

Arizona

64 54 .542

1

5-5

L-2

32-29

32-25

Los Angeles

64 54 .542

1

5-5

L-2

31-28

33-26

Colorado

62 55 .530

2½ 4-6 W-2

30-27

San Francisco 58 59 .496

5-5 W-1

33-25

17

18

5-5 W-2

21-36

26-35

San Diego

47

L

GB WCGB L10

33-29

Pct

4½ 6-4 W-1 30-28 30-29 15 4-6 17

L-1

24-37 24-29

2-8 W-1 28-34 20-36

GB WCGB L10

71 .398

Str Home Away

Str Home Away

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Martinez, Red Sox sweep Orioles

NATIONAL LEAGUE Nationals 9, Cubs 4

J.D. Martinez hit two home runs, including a tiebreaking, two-run drive in the eighth inning, and the Boston Red Sox beat the Baltimore Orioles 6-4 Saturday night for a doubleheader sweep. In the opener, David Price struck out 10 over six sparkling innings, Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a pair of solo homers and the Red Sox cruised to a 5-0 victory. The Red Sox have won nine of 10 to improve their big league-best record to 84-35. The split doubleheader was caused by a rainout on July 25; before the bad weather came that night, Boston led 5-0 in the second inning. Yankees 5, Rangers 3 • Rain pouring off his hat, Aroldis Chapman struck out Jurickson Profar with the bases loaded in a steady storm to end the game, preserving New York’s win over visiting Texas. Rookie Miguel Andujar hit a tiebreaking, two-run homer in the seventh inning and Yankees newcomer Lance Lynn turned in another strong start. New York has won five of six. Rays 3, Blue Jays 1 • Willy Adames had two hits and drove in the decisive run, and Tampa Bay won in Toronto. Aledmys Diaz homered for the Blue Jays, who have lost five of six. Twins 4, Tigers 3 • Tyler Austin hit a two-run homer in his Minnesota debut, helping the Twins win in Detroit. Austin was acquired in the July 30 trade that sent Lance Lynn to the Yankees. He was recalled from Triple-A Rochester on Friday. Indians 3, White Sox 1 • Trevor Bauer allowed two hits into the seventh inning before getting struck on the right leg by a line drive, and Michael Brantley and Jose Ramirez hit back-to-back home runs to lift Cleveland in Chicago. Mariners 3, Astros 2 • Ryon Healy had three hits and drove in the go-ahead run, Guillermo Heredia made a spectacular catch to preserve the lead in the eighth inning, and Seattle won in Houston.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Nationals 9, Cubs 4 • Ryan Zimmerman hit two home runs off a shaky Jon Lester and tied a career high with six RBIs as Washington won in Chicago. Brewers 4, Braves 2 • Mike Moustakas hit a two-run double in the eighth, Josh Hader recorded a two-inning save and Milwaukee won in Atlanta. Reds 6, D’backs 3 • Pinchhitter Tucker Barnhart’s two-run double highlighted a four-run rally in the eighth inning and Cincinnati beat visiting Arizona. Marlins 4, Mets 3 • Bryan Holaday delivered a pinchhit single with one out in the 11th inning, giving Miami a win over visiting New York. Rockies 3, Dodgers 2 • Ryan McMahon hit a three-run home run with two outs in the ninth inning — his second go-ahead homer in as many nights — and Colorado beat visiting Los Angeles. Associated Press

Saturday Cardinals 8, Kansas City 3 Washington 9, Cubs 4 Cincinnati 6, Arizona 3 Miami 4, NY Mets 3, 11 inn. Milwaukee 4, Atlanta 2 Colorado 3, LA Dodgers 2 Philadelphia at San Diego, late Pittsburgh at San Francisco, late Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Cubs 3, Washington 2 Cincinnati 3, Arizona 0 NY Mets 6, Miami 2 Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 5, LA Dodgers 4 San Diego 2, Philadelphia 0 San Francisco 13, Pittsburgh 10

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home Away

Cleveland

65

51 .560

7-3

W-1

37-23

Minnesota

54 62 .466

11

14

5-5

W-1

33-24

21-38

Detroit

48 69 .410

17½

20½

3-7

L-1 30-28

18-41

Chicago

42 74 .362

23

26

5-5

L-1

22-37

20-37

Kansas City

35 81 .302

30

33

2-8

L-2

16-41 19-40

GB WCGB L10

L

Pct

28-28

EAST

W

Boston

84 35 .706

9-1 W-3

42-15 42-20

New York

73 43 .629

5-5

40-17

33-26

Tampa Bay

60 57

8½ 6-4 W-3 34-24

26-33

.513

23

Str Home Away W-1

Toronto

52 64 .448 30½

16 4-6

L-2

28-32

24-32

Baltimore

35 83 .297 48½

34

L-4 20-38

15-45

WEST

W

L

Pct

2-8

GB WCGB L10

Str Home Away

Houston

73 45

.619

— 6-4

L-3

32-27

41-18

Oakland

68 48 .586

4

L-1

33-23

35-25

32-28

Seattle

68 50 .576

5

1

5-5 W-3

36-24

32-26

25-34

Los Angeles 59 58 .504

13½

5-5 W-4

33-28 26-30

Texas

21½

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Turner ss 4 2 2 1 1 1 .272 Harper cf 3 2 2 0 1 1 .238 Difo 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Zimmerman 1b 3 2 2 6 1 0 .256 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 5 0 0 0 0 2 .303 Soto lf Reynolds 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .270 Murphy 2b 4 1 3 2 0 1 .308 Taylor cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Wieters c 3 1 3 0 2 0 .221 Roark p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .174 Adams 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Totals 37 9 13 9 5 12 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rizzo 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Montgomery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Caratini c 1 1 0 0 1 0 .254 Baez 2b 2 0 0 1 0 0 .295 Chatwood p 1 1 1 0 0 0 .167 c-Zobrist ph 1 0 1 2 0 0 .313 Heyward rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .279 b-Happ ph-rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .241 Bote 3b-1b-2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .320 Contreras c-1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .275 Schwarber lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Russell ss 4 1 3 0 0 1 .268 Lester p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .106 De La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-La Stella ph-3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .278 Almora cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .298 Totals 35 4 11 4 2 8 Washington 201 600 000 — 9 13 0 Chicago 001 000 012 — 4 11 1 a-walked for De La Rosa in the 5th. b-struck out for Heyward in the 6th. c-doubled for Chatwood in the 9th. E: Contreras (11). LOB: Washington 9, Chicago 8. 2B: Zobrist (19). HR: Zimmerman (8), off Lester; Murphy (5), off Lester; Zimmerman (9), off Lester. RBIs: Turner (49), Zimmerman 6 (32), Murphy 2 (26), Baez (89), Contreras (41), Zobrist 2 (46). SB: Turner (32). CS: Rizzo (4). SF: Zimmerman, Baez. S: Eaton, Roark. RLISP: Washington 4 (Eaton 2, Soto, Roark); Chicago 4 (Schwarber, Lester, Almora, Happ). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark, W, 7-12 72/3 9 2 2 1 7 117 4.12 Suero 11/3 2 2 2 1 1 23 3.58 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester, L, 12-5 32/3 10 9 8 1 5 88 3.89 De La Rosa 11/3 0 0 0 1 4 26 4.46 Montgomery 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 3.62 Chatwood 3 3 0 0 2 2 57 5.06 Inherited runners-scored: Suero 2-0. HBP: Roark (Rizzo). WP: Suero. T: 3:11. A: 41,320.

Brewers 4, Braves 2 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Yelich rf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .313 Cain cf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .297 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 2 1 1 .253 Braun lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .249 Shaw 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Thames 1b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .229 c-Aguilar ph-1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Kratz c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .229 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Miley p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .231 a-Schoop ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Burnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Perez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Totals 34 4 7 4 3 10 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna cf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Albies 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .277 Freeman 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .318 Markakis rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .325 Camargo 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Duvall lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Biddle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Jackson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Suzuki c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .251 Swanson ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Teheran p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .207 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Inciarte ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Totals 31 2 7 2 1 3 Milwaukee 100 000 030 — 4 7 1 Atlanta 100 100 000 — 2 7 1 a-grounded out for Miley in the 7th. b-lined out for Brach in the 7th. c-walked for Thames in the 8th. d-struck out for Burnes in the 8th. e-grounded out for Jackson in the 9th. E: Burnes (1), Biddle (1). LOB: Milwaukee 8, Atlanta 4. 2B: Moustakas (25), Freeman (31). HR: Acuna (14), off Miley. RBIs: Moustakas 2 (70), Braun (43), Kratz (11), Acuna (32), Markakis (74). SB: Cain (21). CS: Cain (6). S: Teheran. RLISP: Milwaukee 4 (Shaw 2, Perez 2); Atlanta 2 (Acuna, Inciarte). GIDP: Camargo, Duvall. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Moustakas, Thames), (Arcia, Shaw, Thames). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley 6 6 2 2 1 0 77 2.23 Burnes, W, 3-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.77 Hader, S, 9-12 2 0 0 0 0 3 29 1.54 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran 6 2 1 1 2 6 90 4.33 Brach, 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.30 Biddle, L, 3-1, 1/3 3 3 2 0 0 9 2.60 2/ Winkler 0 1 2 15 2.79 3 1 0 Jackson 1 1 0 0 0 2 10 3.70 IRS: Winkler 2-1. HBP: Teheran 2 (Braun,Kratz). WP: Miley. T: 2:42. A: 40,297.

Reds 6, D’backs 3 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .302 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Pollock cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .286 Escobar 3b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .278 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Marte 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Ahmed ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .244 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .206 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McFarland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ray p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .037 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chafin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Murphy c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Totals 33 3 7 3 1 8 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 0 1 0 1 1 .283 Herrera lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .154 b-Votto ph-1b 1 0 1 1 1 0 .291 Gennett 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .310 Suarez 3b 2 2 0 0 0 1 .301 Ervin rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .293 Dixon 1b-lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .175 Casali c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .294 Harvey p 2 0 1 1 0 1 .079 a-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Barnhart ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .246 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hamilton cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .231 Totals 32 6 9 6 5 8 Arizona 000 200 010 — 3 7 0 Cincinnati 000 200 04x — 6 9 0 a-struck out for Harvey in the 7th. b-pinch hit for Herrera in the 7th. c-doubled for Garrett in the 8th. LOB: Arizona 4, Cincinnati 9. 2B: Goldschmidt (24), Ray (1), Ervin (6), Barnhart (16). HR: Escobar (16), off Harvey; Peralta (20), off Hernandez. RBIs: Peralta (59), Escobar 2 (72), Ervin (16), Harvey (1), Hamilton (24), Votto (54), Barnhart 2 (37). SB: Hamilton 2 (29). CS: Peraza (5). RLISP: Arizona 3 (Goldschmidt, Escobar, Souza Jr.); Cincinnati 4 (Gennett 2, Ervin 2). RISP: Arizona 0 for 5; Cincinnati 4 for 11. DP: Cincinnati 1 (Suarez, Gennett, Dixon). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray 5 4 2 2 2 6 106 4.83 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.34 1/ Chafin 1 9 1.77 3 1 0 0 0 1/ Bradley, L, 3-4 1 3 1 3 3 2 1 33 3.42 McFarland 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 8 1.93 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey 7 5 2 2 1 7 99 5.19 2/ Hernandez 1 0 0 14 2.01 3 2 1 1/ 7 3.52 Garrett, W, 1-2 3 0 0 0 0 0 Iglesias, S, 23-26 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.47 Inherited runners-scored: Bradley 1-0, McFarland 1-1, Garrett 1-0. HBP: Ray (Suarez), Bradley (Suarez). WP: Ray. T: 3:04. A: 29,348

52 67 .437

7-3

17½ 6-4

L-1

25-36

Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Boston 19, Baltimore 12 Texas 12, NY Yankees 7 Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 0 Detroit 5, Minnesota 3 White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Seattle 5, Houston 2 LA Angels 4, Oakland 3 Saturday Cardinals 8, Kansas City 3 NY Yankees 5, Texas 3 Game 1: Boston 5, Baltimore 0 Game 2: Boston 6, Baltimore 4 Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 1 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3 Cleveland 3, White Sox 1 Seattle 3, Houston 2 Oakland at LA Angels, late

27-31

Sunday’s pitching matchups Marlins 4, Mets 3, 11 inn. New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .235 McNeil 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Flores 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .276 Conforto lf 2 1 1 0 3 1 .235 Nimmo cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .245 Frazier 3b 4 0 1 3 1 1 .217 Bautista rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .197 Mesoraco c 4 0 0 0 1 1 .220 Oswalt p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Wahl p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Jackson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .285 Bashlor p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rhame p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 37 3 6 3 6 9 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ortega lf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .250 Realmuto c 4 0 1 1 1 1 .289 Castro 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .281 Anderson rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .282 Dietrich 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .278 Prado 3b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .238 Rojas ss 4 1 1 0 1 0 .257 Sierra cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .189 Straily p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Rivera ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .195 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Riddle ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Galloway ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Steckenrider p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rucinski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Holaday ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .183 Totals 40 4 11 4 3 7 New York 000 300 000 00 — 3 6 0 Miami 000 210 000 01 — 4 11 0 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for Garcia in the 5th. b-flied out for Guerrero in the 7th. c-lined out for Conley in the 8th. d-struck out for Sewald in the 9th. e-doubled for Guerra in the 11th. LOB: NYM 8, Miami 10. 2B: Rosario (18), Flores 2 (22), Frazier (9), Dietrich (22), Holaday (2). RBIs: Frazier 3 (36), Realmuto (54), Prado 2 (15), Holaday (13). SB: Frazier (6). S: Sierra. RLISP: NYM 4 (Nimmo 2, Bautista, Oswalt); MIA 4 (Castro 2, Galloway 2). GIDP: Nimmo. DP: MIA 1 (Castro, Rojas, Dietrich). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oswalt 6 6 3 3 1 3 84 5.03 Wahl 1 1 0 0 1 2 17 4.91 Sewald 1 2 0 0 1 1 27 4.63 Bashlor 2 0 0 0 0 1 24 4.32 1/ Rhame, L, 0-2 3 2 1 1 0 0 7 7.97 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily 42/3 4 3 3 4 5 95 4.42 1/ Garcia 0 0 0 2 4.37 3 0 0 Hernandez 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 5.68 Guerrero 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.00 Conley 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 3.24 Steckenrider 1 0 0 0 0 3 17 3.35 Rucinski 1 1 0 0 1 0 24 2.84 Guerra, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 5.94 IRS: Garcia 2-0. HBP: Straily (Flores), Oswalt (Prado). WP: Sewald. T: 3:26. A: 11,478.

Rockies 3, Dodgers 2 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .229 Machado ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .308 Turner 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .277 Hernandez cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .216 Kemp lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .285 Taylor lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .251 Muncy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .259 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Chargois p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Puig rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .271 Barnes c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .196 Buehler p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .138 Ferguson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Bellinger 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Totals 31 2 6 2 3 11 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .276 LeMahieu 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .269 Gonzalez rf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .290 Story ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .289 Parra lf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .285 b-Arenado ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .307 Desmond 1b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .234 McMahon 3b 4 1 1 3 0 1 .244 Iannetta c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Freeland p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .064 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Dahl ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 3 6 3 3 8 Los Angeles 110 000 000 — 2 6 1 Colorado 000 000 003 — 3 6 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Oh in the 8th. b-hit by pitch for Parra in the 9th. E: Muncy (12). LOB: Los Angeles 6, Colorado 5. 2B: Machado (26), Story (33). 3B: Turner (1). HR: Puig (15), off Freeland; McMahon (4), off Chargois. RBIs: Turner (23), Puig (44), McMahon 3 (16). SB: Puig (9). S: Buehler. RLISP: Los Angeles 3 (Dozier, Kemp, Barnes); Colorado 1 (Parra). LIDP: Desmond. GIDP: Hernandez, LeMahieu, Story. DP: Los Angeles 3 (Dozier, Machado, Muncy), (Puig, Muncy), (Turner, Dozier, Muncy); Colorado 1 (McMahon, LeMahieu, Desmond). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehler 7 4 0 0 3 6 103 3.32 Ferguson, 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.15 1/ 1 0 1 10 3.42 Alexander, 3 1 1 Chargois, L, 2-4, 1/3 1 2 2 0 0 13 3.72 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland 7 6 2 2 2 10 111 3.02 Oh 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.59 Shaw, W, 4-5 1 0 0 0 1 0 20 6.31 Inherited runners-scored: Chargois 1-1. HBP: Chargois (Arenado). Umpires: Home, Quinn Wolcott; First, Sean Barber; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, James Hoye. T: 2:54. A: 47,633.

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

StL KC

Weaver (R) Junis (R)

1:15

6-10 6-11

4.66 4.98

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Ari Cin

Godley (R) Castillo (R)

12-6 12:10 6-9

4.35 4.91

NY Syndergaard (R) 7-2 Mia Chen (L) 12:10 4-8

3.17 5.48

Mil Atl

Anderson (R) 7-7 Newcomb (L) 12:35 10-5

3.81 3.15

LA Col

Hill (L) Bettis (R)

2:10

5-4 5-2

3.62 5.67

Phi SD

Arrieta (R) Lucchesi (L)

2:40

9-6 5-6

3.11 3.70

Pit SF

Musgrove (R) Rodriguez (R) 3:05

4-6 5-1

3.41 2.34

ASSOCIATED PRESS

New York Yankees pitcher Aroldis Chapman and catcher Kyle Higashioka celebrate after the Yankees defeated the Texas Rangers 5-3 on Saturday. AMERICAN LEAGUE Mariners 3, Astros 2

Rays 3, Blue Jays 1

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .271 Span lf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .278 Segura ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .305 Cruz dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .271 Seager 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .229 Herrmann c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .236 Zunino c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Healy 1b 4 0 3 1 0 1 .236 Gordon 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Heredia cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Totals 33 3 10 3 1 6 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Bregman 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .278 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .262 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Gonzalez lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .240 Gurriel 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .279 Reddick rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .248 White 1b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .286 Stassi c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .246 1-Fisher pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Maldonado c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Totals 31 2 5 2 3 8 Seattle 000 300 000 — 3 10 0 Houston 020 000 000 — 2 5 1 1-ran for Stassi in the 8th. E: Stassi (1). LOB: Seattle 5, Houston 5. 2B: Seager (27), Healy 2 (13), Reddick (12). 3B: Herrmann (2). RBIs: Seager (63), Herrmann (4), Healy (57), White 2 (11). SB: Gordon (27). RLISP: Seattle 3 (Haniger, Gordon, Heredia); Houston 1 (Gattis). LIDP: Kemp. GIDP: Segura 2, Seager. DP: Seattle 1 (Heredia, Healy); Houston 3 (Bregman, Gurriel, White), (Morton, Correa, White), (Gurriel, Correa, White). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc, W, 7-2 5 3 2 2 2 5 90 3.80 Vincent, 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.38 1/ Duke, 0 0 0 3 4.81 3 0 0 1/ 0 0 0 9 2.97 Warren, 3 0 0 Colome, 1 2 0 0 1 0 16 3.12 Diaz, S, 45-48 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.02 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton, L, 12/3 6 7 3 3 1 4 87 2.88 2/ Sipp 0 0 1 12 1.52 3 1 0 1/ Smith 0 0 0 4 3.69 3 0 0 Osuna 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.45 Rondon 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 2.11 Inherited runners-scored: Smith 1-0. HBP: Morton (Span). T: 2:56. A: 38,888.

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith rf-lf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .299 Duffy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .301 Wendle 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .295 Cron 1b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .247 Gomez rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .218 Choi dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .227 Kiermaier cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .181 Adames ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .243 Lowe lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bauers 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Sucre c 4 0 1 1 0 2 .215 Totals 36 3 10 3 1 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Grichuk rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .231 Travis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .260 Hernandez lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .245 Morales dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .245 Solarte 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .233 a-Urena ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .261 b-Granderson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Martin c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .199 Diaz ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .262 Pillar cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Totals 28 1 5 1 4 8 Tampa Bay 110 000 001 — 3 10 0 Toronto 000 010 000 — 1 5 1 a-grounded out for Solarte in the 2nd. b-flied out for Urena in the 9th. E: Pillar (6). LOB: Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 5. 2B: Smith (19), Wendle (15), Cron (21), Choi (5), Hernandez (25). HR: Diaz (15), off Schultz. RBIs: Wendle (38), Adames (15), Sucre (15), Diaz (35). SB: Kiermaier (8), Adames (4). CS: Martin (3). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Duffy, Choi, Kiermaier, Lowe); Toronto 2 (Pillar 2). GIDP: Morales, Urena. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Adames, Wendle, Cron), (Adames, Wendle, Cron). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 2 25 2.49 Castillo, W, 3-2 22/3 1 0 0 1 2 34 3.86 Schultz 2 2 1 1 1 1 35 4.58 Wood, 1 1 0 0 1 0 16 3.91 Alvarado, 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.39 Romo, S, 15-22 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.57 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gaviglio, L, 2-5 51/3 6 2 1 0 7 99 4.86 2/ Garcia 0 0 1 7 6.18 3 0 0 Petricka 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 4.71 Clippard 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.79 Tepera 1 2 1 1 0 1 14 4.17 IRS: Castillo 2-0, Garcia 1-0. HBP: Castillo (Martin). T: 2:56. A: 38,797.

Twins 4, Tigers 3

Yankees 5, Rangers 3

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .270 Rosario rf-lf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .296 Forsythe 2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Sano 3b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .224 Austin dh 4 1 1 2 1 2 .224 Polanco ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Field cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .209 a-Cave ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Adrianza lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Kepler rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Wilson c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .165 Totals 35 4 9 3 6 7 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .202 Iglesias ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .264 Castellanos rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Candelario 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Martinez dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .238 1-Gerber pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .174 Goodrum 2b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .232 Adduci 1b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .276 McCann c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .222 Reyes lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .220 Totals 34 3 9 3 3 6 Minnesota 001 021 000 — 4 9 0 Detroit 010 000 002 — 3 9 0 a-flied out for Field in the 7th. 1-ran for Martinez in the 9th. LOB: Minnesota 10, Detroit 7. 2B: Rosario (29). 3B: Adduci (1). HR: Austin (9), off Liriano; Goodrum (12), off Hildenberger. RBIs: Rosario (67), Austin 2 (25), Goodrum 2 (38), McCann (31). CS: Goodrum (3). RLISP: Minnesota 6 (Rosario, Polanco 3, Cave 2); Detroit 2 (Jones, McCann). GIDP: Iglesias. DP: Minnesota 1 (Polanco, Forsythe, Mauer). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 6-9 7 7 1 1 2 4 111 3.49 May, 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.93 Hildenberger, S, 1-3 1 2 2 2 1 2 25 4.74 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano, L, 3-7 5 6 3 3 4 3 86 4.42 McAllister 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 5.06 Alcantara 1 1 0 0 1 0 24 0.66 Coleman 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.71 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 4.59 WP: Liriano, Alcantara, Gibson. T: 3:09. A: 26,991.

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 5 2 3 0 0 1 .277 Odor 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .278 Andrus ss 4 0 1 1 1 2 .288 Beltre dh 3 0 1 1 1 2 .279 Profar 3b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .248 Gallo lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Chirinos c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .219 Guzman 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .243 Tocci cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .176 a-Kiner-Falefa ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Totals 34 3 8 2 6 13 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Stanton dh 3 2 2 1 1 0 .279 Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .268 Andujar 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .296 Bird 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .216 Torres 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269 Walker rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .227 Higashioka c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .157 Robinson cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .138 Totals 31 5 8 5 4 3 Texas 001 000 200 — 3 8 0 New York 200 001 20x — 5 8 0 a-walked for Tocci in the 9th. LOB: Texas 11, New York 6. 2B: Choo (25), Gallo (15), Bird 2 (12). HR: Stanton (29), off Hutchison; Andujar (17), off Martin. RBIs: Andrus (25), Beltre (41), Stanton (75), Andujar 2 (55), Bird (28), Walker (30). SB: Choo (4), Odor (10). RLISP: Texas 7 (Beltre 2, Profar 4, Tocci); New York 3 (Gardner, Torres, Robinson). GIDP: Gregorius. DP: Texas 1 (Hutchison, Andrus, Guzman). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hutchison 51/3 5 3 3 4 2 85 6.07 Springs 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 1.29 2/ Martin, L, 1-3 3 2 2 2 0 0 12 5.08 Claudio 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.99 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn 5 5 1 1 3 8 99 4.46 Robertson, 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.23 2/ Britton, 3 2 2 2 2 0 25 4.50 Betances, W, 3-3, 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.19 Chapman, S, 30-32 1 1 0 0 1 2 29 2.15 IRS: Springs 1-1, Betances 3-1. HBP: Chapman (Beltre). T: 3:16. A: 45,933.

MLB LEADERS *Prior to Saturday’s games NATIONAL LEAGUE G AB R H Pct. Markakis Atl 113 442 67 144 .326 FFreeman Atl 113 440 69 140 .318 Yelich Mil 103 405 79 128 .316 Gennett Cin 112 422 67 132 .313 Dickerson Pit 98 370 52 115 .311 Arenado Col 110 417 77 128 .307 Suarez Cin 99 373 60 113 .303 DPeralta Ari 105 416 56 126 .303 Almora ChC 108 332 51 99 .298 Martinez StL 109 373 39 111 .298 Home Runs Carpenter, Cardinals, 32; Arenado, Colorado, 29; Harper, Washington, 28; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 28; Muncy, Los Angeles, 26; Suarez, Cincinnati, 26; JBaez, Chicago, 25; Story, Colorado, 24; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 24; TShaw, Milwaukee, 23. Runs Batted In JBaez, Chicago, 88; Suarez, Cincinnati, 88; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 83; Arenado, Colorado, 82; Story, Colorado, 80; Rizzo, Chicago, 75; Markakis, Atlanta, 73; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 72; Harper, Washington, 71; FFreeman, Atlanta, 71. Pitching Scherzer, Washington, 15-5; Mikolas, Cardinals, 12-3; Nola, Philadelphia, 12-3; Lester, Chicago, 12-4; Godley, Arizona, 12-6; Greinke, Arizona, 12-7; Chacin, Milwaukee, 11-4; Newcomb, Atlanta, 10-5; Freeland, Colorado, 10-7; Quintana, Chicago, 10-8.

IL

AMERICAN LEAGUE G AB R H Pct. Betts Bos 97 381 98 134 .352 JMartinez Bos 110 425 85 141 .332 Altuve Hou 104 407 64 134 .329 MMachado Bal 96 365 48 115 .315 Trout LAA 109 372 82 115 .309 Simmons LAA 105 396 56 122 .308 Segura Sea 109 448 78 137 .306 MDuffy TB 96 378 41 115 .304 Benintendi Bos 110 426 84 129 .303 MSmith TB 105 327 43 98 .300 Home Runs JMartinez, Boston, 35; KDavis, Oakland, 33; JoRamirez, Cleveland, 33; Gallo, Texas, 31; Trout, Los Angeles, 30; NCruz, Seattle, 30; Lindor, Cleveland, 29; Stanton, New York, 28; Betts, Boston, 27; Judge, New York, 26. Runs Batted In JMartinez, Boston, 101; KDavis, Oakland, 90; JoRamirez, Cleveland, 83; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 81; NCruz, Seattle, 75; Haniger, Seattle, 75; Lindor, Cleveland, 74; Stanton, New York, 74; Bregman, Houston, 72; Bogaerts, Boston, 72. Pitching Severino, New York, 15-5; Porcello, Boston, 14-5; Kluber, Cleveland, 14-6; Snell, Tampa Bay, 13-5; Carrasco, Cleveland, 13-6; Morton, Houston, 12-2; Gonzales, Seattle, 12-7; Rodriguez, Boston, 11-3; Sale, Boston, 11-4; 2 tied at 11-6.

Indians 3, White Sox 1 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Brantley lf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .297 Ramirez 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .298 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .247 Cabrera dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Kipnis 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .220 Guyer rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Perez c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .161 G.Allen cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .232 Totals 36 3 9 3 0 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Delmonico lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Sanchez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Palka dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .235 Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .250 Narvaez c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .280 Anderson ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Moncada 2b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .220 LaMarre cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Totals 30 1 3 1 2 12 Cleveland 000 012 000 — 3 9 0 Chicago 001 000 000 — 1 3 3 E: Garcia (2), Narvaez (6), LaMarre (1). LOB: Cleveland 7, Chicago 4. 2B: Brantley (28), Kipnis (20). HR: Brantley (13), off Shields; Ramirez (34), off Shields; Moncada (15), off Bauer. RBIs: Brantley (62), Ramirez (84), G.Allen (6), Moncada (46). SB: Perez (1). RLISP: Cleveland 4 (Cabrera, Guyer 3); Chicago 1 (Anderson). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bauer, W, 12-6 61/3 2 1 1 0 8 102 2.22 Hand, 12/3 0 0 0 2 3 29 2.73 C.Allen, S, 22-25 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 4.28 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields, L, 4-14 7 7 3 2 0 4 94 4.41 2/ 1 29 3.63 Avilan 3 2 0 0 0 Gomez 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.52 Inherited runners-scored: Gomez 3-0. HBP: Avilan (Cabrera).. T: 2:53. A: 28,061.

Was Scherzer (R) Chi Hamels (L)

7:05

15-5 7-9

2.28 4.38

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bos Sale (L) Bal Cobb (R)

11-4 12:05 3-14

2.04 5.55

Tex Perez (L) NY Sabathia (L)

2-4 12:05 6-4

6.15 3.49

TB Tor

Glasnow (R) Stroman (R)

1-2 12:07 4-8

4.14 5.20

Min Stewart (R) Det Boyd (L)

— 12:10 6-10

— 4.33

Sea Ramirez (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

1:10

Cle Chi

1:10

13-6 4-8

3.69 5.58

3:07

4-2 7-7

3.12 3.96

Carrasco (R) Covey (R)

Oak Cahill (R) LA Heaney (L)

0-2 10.24 9-9 3.53

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates. FIRST GAME

Red Sox 5, Orioles 0 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .351 Benintendi lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .302 Moreland 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .329 Bogaerts ss 4 2 3 0 0 1 .278 Holt 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .263 E.Nunez 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .264 Leon c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .212 Bradley Jr. cf 4 2 2 2 0 0 .216 Totals 35 5 9 4 3 5 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .263 Beckham ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Jones rf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .287 Trumbo dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .267 Mancini lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .230 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .161 R.Nunez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Mullins cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .571 Wynns c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Totals 32 0 5 0 0 14 Boston 000 031 001 — 5 9 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 E: Wynns (1). LOB: Boston 6, Baltimore 5. 2B: Bogaerts (33), Jones (30). HR: E.Nunez (7), off Yacabonis; Bradley Jr. (10), off Yacabonis; Bradley Jr. (11), off Castro. RBIs: E.Nunez 2 (35), Bradley Jr. 2 (46). SB: Bogaerts (5). RLISP: Boston 2 (Moreland 2); Baltimore 2 (Beckham, Mancini). GIDP: E.Nunez. DP: Baltimore 1 (Beckham, Villar, Davis). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price, W, 12-6 6 5 0 0 0 10 94 3.75 Thornburg 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.97 Brasier 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.15 Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.47 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Yacabonis, L, 0-1 42/3 5 3 3 0 2 60 6.75 Gilmartin 21/3 3 1 1 2 0 40 3.86 Castro 2 1 1 1 1 3 35 3.86 IRS: Gilmartin 1-0. T: 2:48. A: 18,003. SECOND GAME

Red Sox 6, Orioles 4 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .351 Holt 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .261 Pearce 1b 3 2 1 0 1 2 .301 Martinez lf 2 2 2 3 2 0 .332 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Devers 3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .243 E.Nunez dh 4 1 1 0 0 0 .264 Butler c 2 0 0 1 0 1 .167 b-Benintendi ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .301 Leon c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Bradley Jr. cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .215 Totals 30 6 7 5 6 7 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peterson 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .196 Villar ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .262 Jones rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Mancini 1b 3 2 3 2 2 0 .236 Davis dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .160 R.Nunez 3b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .242 Mullins cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .444 Rickard lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .230 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .216 a-Trumbo ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .267 1-Wynns pr-c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Totals 32 4 7 4 8 4 Boston 000 111 021 — 6 7 0 Baltimore 011 001 001 — 4 7 0 a-walked for Joseph in the 8th. b-struck out for Butler in the 9th. 1-ran for Trumbo in the 8th. LOB: Boston 5, Baltimore 10. 2B: Betts (33), R.Nunez (9). 3B: E.Nunez (3). HR: Martinez (36), off Ramirez; Martinez (37), off Wright Jr.; Rickard (7), off Hembree; Mancini (17), off Kimbrel. RBIs: Holt (30), Martinez 3 (104), Butler (1), Mancini 2 (38), R.Nunez (7), Rickard (21). SB: Betts (23), Bradley Jr. (12), Jones (4). CS: Bradley Jr. (1), Mullins (1), Rickard (1). SF: Butler. RLISP: Boston 2 (Holt 2); Baltimore 7 (Peterson 2, Davis, Mullins 2, Joseph 2). GIDP: Bogaerts. DP: Baltimore 1 (Villar, Peterson, Mancini). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Velazquez 22/3 2 2 2 1 0 41 2.82 1/ 2 0 21 2.59 Workman 3 1 0 0 Pomeranz 2 1 0 0 1 0 30 5.96 Hembree, 1 1 1 1 1 0 20 3.94 Kelly, W, 4-0 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 4.20 Cuevas, 1 0 0 0 2 1 19 3.00 Kimbrel, S, 34-38 1 1 1 1 0 3 21 2.62 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ramirez 5 3 2 2 2 5 88 5.40 Carroll 1 0 1 1 3 0 27 7.36 2/ Wright Jr., L, 3-1 1 3 2 2 2 0 1 26 4.96 1/ Fry 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 26 3.32 Inherited runners-scored: Workman 1-1. HBP: Velazquez (Davis), Fry (Bradley Jr.). WP: Carroll, Cuevas. Umpires: Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 3:39. A: 24,051.


BASEBALL

08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 4 NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Chicago

67 49 .578

— 6-4

36-22

31-27

Milwaukee

67 53 .558

2

— 4-6 W-1 36-24

31-29

Cardinals

62 55 .530

Pittsburgh

61 57

Cincinnati

52 65 .444 15½

EAST

W

L

.517

7

Pct

2½ 4

L-1

8-2 W-4 29-26

33-29

5-5 W-1

28-28

12½ 4-6 W-2

GB WCGB L10

28-31 24-34

Str Home Away

51 .560

Atlanta

63

51

.553

1

Washington

60 57

.513

New York

48 66

.421

16

15 4-6

Miami

48 70 .407

18

17

WEST

W

GB WCGB L10

Arizona

64 54 .542

1

5-5

L-2

32-29

32-25

Los Angeles

64 54 .542

1

5-5

L-2

31-28

33-26

Colorado

62 55 .530

2½ 4-6 W-2

San Francisco 58 60 .492

6

San Diego

Pct

47 72 .395 17½

33-29

Philadelphia 65

L

Str Home Away

7-3 W-1

— 6-4

38-18

27-33

L-1 29-24

34-27

4½ 6-4 W-1 30-28 30-29

7 4-6 18½

L-1

24-37 24-29

2-8 W-1 28-34 20-36

5-5

Str Home Away

Indians 3, White Sox 1 • Trevor Bauer allowed two hits into the seventh inning before getting struck by a line drive, and Michael Brantley and Jose Ramirez hit back-to-back home runs to lift Cleveland in Chicago. Mariners 3, Astros 2 • Ryon Healy had three hits and drove in the go-ahead run, Guillermo Heredia made a spectacular catch to preserve the lead in the eighth inning, and Seattle won in Houston. Athletics 7, Angels 0 • Edwin Jackson allowed no runs and three hits in 7 1/3 innings, Marcus Semien homered twice and Oakland won in Los Angeles.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Nationals 9, Cubs 4 • Ryan Zimmerman hit two home runs off a shaky Jon Lester and tied a career high with six RBIs as Washington won in Chicago. Brewers 4, Braves 2 • Mike Moustakas hit a two-run double in the eighth, Josh Hader recorded a two-inning save and Milwaukee won in Atlanta. Reds 6, D’backs 3 • Pinchhitter Tucker Barnhart’s two-run double highlighted a four-run rally in the eighth inning and Cincinnati beat visiting Arizona. Marlins 4, Mets 3 • Bryan Holaday delivered a pinchhit single with one out in the 11th inning, giving Miami a win over visiting New York. Rockies 3, Dodgers 2 • Ryan McMahon hit a three-run home run with two outs in the ninth inning — his second go-ahead homer in as many nights — and Colorado beat visiting Los Angeles. Phillies 5, Padres 1 • Aaron Nola pitched six scoreless innings, Maikel Franco and Cesar Hernandez homered, and Philadelphia won in San Diego. Pirates 4, Giants 0 • Trevor Williams and two relievers combined on a six-hitter, and Pittsburgh won in San Francisco. Associated Press

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

65

51 .560

7-3 W-1

37-23

Minnesota

54 62 .466

11

14½

5-5 W-1

33-24

21-38

Detroit

48 69 .410

17½

21

L-1 30-28

18-41

Chicago

42 74 .362

23

26½

5-5

L-1

22-37

20-37

Kansas City

35 81 .302

30

33½

2-8

L-2

16-41 19-40

EAST

W

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Boston

84 35 .706

9-1 W-3

42-15 42-20

New York

73 43 .629

5-5 W-1

40-17

33-26

Tampa Bay

60 57

9 6-4 W-3 34-24

26-33

L

Pct

.513

23

52 64 .448 30½

16½ 4-6

L-2

35 83 .297 48½

34½

L-4 20-38

15-45

WEST

W

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

L

Pct

Houston

73 45

.619

Oakland

69 48 .590

— 6-4

L-3

32-27

41-18

8-2 W-1

33-23

36-25

5-5 W-3

36-24

32-26

5-5

L-1

33-29 26-30

18 6-4

L-1

25-36

68 50 .576

5

14

10½

L-1

21-37

26-35

Texas

Brewers 4, Braves 2

Reds 6, D’backs 3 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .302 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Pollock cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .286 Escobar 3b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .278 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Marte 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Ahmed ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .244 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .206 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McFarland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ray p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .037 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chafin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Murphy c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Totals 33 3 7 3 1 8 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 0 1 0 1 1 .283 Herrera lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .154 b-Votto ph-1b 1 0 1 1 1 0 .291 Gennett 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .310 Suarez 3b 2 2 0 0 0 1 .301 Ervin rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .293 Dixon 1b-lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .175 Casali c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .294 Harvey p 2 0 1 1 0 1 .079 a-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Barnhart ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .246 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hamilton cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .231 Totals 32 6 9 6 5 8 Arizona 000 200 010 — 3 7 0 Cincinnati 000 200 04x — 6 9 0 a-struck out for Harvey in the 7th. b-pinch hit for Herrera in the 7th. c-doubled for Garrett in the 8th. LOB: Arizona 4, Cincinnati 9. 2B: Goldschmidt (24), Ray (1), Ervin (6), Barnhart (16). HR: Escobar (16), off Harvey; Peralta (20), off Hernandez. RBIs: Peralta (59), Escobar 2 (72), Ervin (16), Harvey (1), Hamilton (24), Votto (54), Barnhart 2 (37). SB: Hamilton 2 (29). CS: Peraza (5). RLISP: Arizona 3 (Goldschmidt, Escobar, Souza Jr.); Cincinnati 4 (Gennett 2, Ervin 2). RISP: Arizona 0 for 5; Cincinnati 4 for 11. DP: Cincinnati 1 (Suarez, Gennett, Dixon). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray 5 4 2 2 2 6 106 4.83 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.34 1/ Chafin 1 9 1.77 3 1 0 0 0 1/ Bradley, L, 3-4 1 3 1 3 3 2 1 33 3.42 McFarland 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 8 1.93 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey 7 5 2 2 1 7 99 5.19 2/ Hernandez 1 0 0 14 2.01 3 2 1 1/ 7 3.52 Garrett, W, 1-2 3 0 0 0 0 0 Iglesias, S, 23-26 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.47 Inherited runners-scored: Bradley 1-0, McFarland 1-1, Garrett 1-0. HBP: Ray (Suarez), Bradley (Suarez). WP: Ray. T: 3:04. A: 29,348

21½

24-32

Los Angeles 59 59 .500 52 67 .437

2-8

28-32

Away

Baltimore

Seattle

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Yelich rf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .313 Cain cf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .297 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 2 1 1 .253 Braun lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .249 Shaw 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Thames 1b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .229 c-Aguilar ph-1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Kratz c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .229 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Miley p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .231 a-Schoop ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Burnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Perez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Totals 34 4 7 4 3 10 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna cf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Albies 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .277 Freeman 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .318 Markakis rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .325 Camargo 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Duvall lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Biddle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Jackson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Suzuki c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .251 Swanson ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Teheran p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .207 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Inciarte ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Totals 31 2 7 2 1 3 Milwaukee 100 000 030 — 4 7 1 Atlanta 100 100 000 — 2 7 1 a-grounded out for Miley in the 7th. b-lined out for Brach in the 7th. c-walked for Thames in the 8th. d-struck out for Burnes in the 8th. e-grounded out for Jackson in the 9th. E: Burnes (1), Biddle (1). LOB: Milwaukee 8, Atlanta 4. 2B: Moustakas (25), Freeman (31). HR: Acuna (14), off Miley. RBIs: Moustakas 2 (70), Braun (43), Kratz (11), Acuna (32), Markakis (74). SB: Cain (21). CS: Cain (6). S: Teheran. RLISP: Milwaukee 4 (Shaw 2, Perez 2); Atlanta 2 (Acuna, Inciarte). GIDP: Camargo, Duvall. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Moustakas, Thames), (Arcia, Shaw, Thames). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley 6 6 2 2 1 0 77 2.23 Burnes, W, 3-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.77 Hader, S, 9-12 2 0 0 0 0 3 29 1.54 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran 6 2 1 1 2 6 90 4.33 Brach, 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.30 Biddle, L, 3-1, 1/3 3 3 2 0 0 9 2.60 2/ Winkler 0 1 2 15 2.79 3 1 0 Jackson 1 1 0 0 0 2 10 3.70 IRS: Winkler 2-1. HBP: Teheran 2 (Braun,Kratz). WP: Miley. T: 2:42. A: 40,297.

3-7

28-28

Toronto

32-28

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Turner ss 4 2 2 1 1 1 .272 Harper cf 3 2 2 0 1 1 .238 Difo 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Zimmerman 1b 3 2 2 6 1 0 .256 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 5 0 0 0 0 2 .303 Soto lf Reynolds 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .270 Murphy 2b 4 1 3 2 0 1 .308 Taylor cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Wieters c 3 1 3 0 2 0 .221 Roark p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .174 Adams 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Totals 37 9 13 9 5 12 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rizzo 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Montgomery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Caratini c 1 1 0 0 1 0 .254 Baez 2b 2 0 0 1 0 0 .295 Chatwood p 1 1 1 0 0 0 .167 c-Zobrist ph 1 0 1 2 0 0 .313 Heyward rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .279 b-Happ ph-rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .241 Bote 3b-1b-2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .320 Contreras c-1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .275 Schwarber lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Russell ss 4 1 3 0 0 1 .268 Lester p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .106 De La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-La Stella ph-3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .278 Almora cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .298 Totals 35 4 11 4 2 8 Washington 201 600 000 — 9 13 0 Chicago 001 000 012 — 4 11 1 a-walked for De La Rosa in the 5th. b-struck out for Heyward in the 6th. c-doubled for Chatwood in the 9th. E: Contreras (11). LOB: Washington 9, Chicago 8. 2B: Zobrist (19). HR: Zimmerman (8), off Lester; Murphy (5), off Lester; Zimmerman (9), off Lester. RBIs: Turner (49), Zimmerman 6 (32), Murphy 2 (26), Baez (89), Contreras (41), Zobrist 2 (46). SB: Turner (32). CS: Rizzo (4). SF: Zimmerman, Baez. S: Eaton, Roark. RLISP: Washington 4 (Eaton 2, Soto, Roark); Chicago 4 (Schwarber, Lester, Almora, Happ). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark, W, 7-12 72/3 9 2 2 1 7 117 4.12 Suero 11/3 2 2 2 1 1 23 3.58 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester, L, 12-5 32/3 10 9 8 1 5 88 3.89 De La Rosa 11/3 0 0 0 1 4 26 4.46 Montgomery 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 3.62 Chatwood 3 3 0 0 2 2 57 5.06 Inherited runners-scored: Suero 2-0. HBP: Roark (Rizzo). WP: Suero. T: 3:11. A: 41,320.

Away

Cleveland

25-34

NATIONAL LEAGUE Nationals 9, Cubs 4

Twins 4, Tigers 3 • Tyler Austin hit a two-run homer in his Minnesota debut, helping the Twins win in Detroit. Austin was acquired in the July 30 trade that sent Lance Lynn to the Yankees.

W

33-26

Martinez, Red Sox sweep Orioles

Rays 3, Blue Jays 1 • Willy Adames had two hits and drove in the decisive run, and Tampa Bay won in Toronto.

CENTRAL

30-27

BOX SCORES

Yankees 5, Rangers 3 • Rain pouring off his hat, Aroldis Chapman struck out Jurickson Profar with the bases loaded in a steady storm to end the game, preserving New York’s win over visiting Texas.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

L-1

ROUNDUP

J.D. Martinez hit two home runs, including a tiebreaking, two-run drive in the eighth inning, and the Boston Red Sox beat the Baltimore Orioles 6-4 Saturday night for a doubleheader sweep. In the opener, David Price struck out 10 over six sparkling innings, Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a pair of solo homers and the Red Sox cruised to a 5-0 victory. The split doubleheader was caused by a rainout on July 25; before the bad weather Boston led 5-0 in the second inning.

Saturday Cardinals 8, Kansas City 3 Washington 9, Cubs 4 Cincinnati 6, Arizona 3 Miami 4, NY Mets 3, 11 inn. Milwaukee 4, Atlanta 2 Colorado 3, LA Dodgers 2 Philadelphia 5, San Diego 1 Pittsburgh 4, San Francisco 0 Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Cubs 3, Washington 2 Cincinnati 3, Arizona 0 NY Mets 6, Miami 2 Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 5, LA Dodgers 4 San Diego 2, Philadelphia 0 San Francisco 13, Pittsburgh 10

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5 Saturday Cardinals 8, Kansas City 3 NY Yankees 5, Texas 3 Boston 5, Baltimore 0 Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 1 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3 Boston 6, Baltimore 4 Cleveland 3, White Sox 1 Seattle 3, Houston 2 Oakland 7, LA Angels 0 Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Boston 19, Baltimore 12 Texas 12, NY Yankees 7 Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 0 Detroit 5, Minnesota 3 White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Seattle 5, Houston 2 LA Angels 4, Oakland 3

27-31

Sunday’s pitching matchups Marlins 4, Mets 3, 11 inn.

Pirates 4, Giants 0

Mariners 3, Astros 2

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .235 McNeil 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Flores 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .276 Conforto lf 2 1 1 0 3 1 .235 Nimmo cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .245 Frazier 3b 4 0 1 3 1 1 .217 Bautista rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .197 Mesoraco c 4 0 0 0 1 1 .220 Oswalt p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Wahl p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Jackson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .285 Bashlor p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rhame p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 37 3 6 3 6 9 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ortega lf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .250 Realmuto c 4 0 1 1 1 1 .289 Castro 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .281 Anderson rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .282 Dietrich 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .278 Prado 3b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .238 Rojas ss 4 1 1 0 1 0 .257 Sierra cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .189 Straily p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Rivera ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .195 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Riddle ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Galloway ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Steckenrider p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rucinski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Holaday ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .183 Totals 40 4 11 4 3 7 New York 000 300 000 00 — 3 6 0 Miami 000 210 000 01 — 4 11 0 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for Garcia in the 5th. b-flied out for Guerrero in the 7th. c-lined out for Conley in the 8th. d-struck out for Sewald in the 9th. e-doubled for Guerra in the 11th. LOB: NYM 8, Miami 10. 2B: Rosario (18), Flores 2 (22), Frazier (9), Dietrich (22), Holaday (2). RBIs: Frazier 3 (36), Realmuto (54), Prado 2 (15), Holaday (13). SB: Frazier (6). S: Sierra. RLISP: NYM 4 (Nimmo 2, Bautista, Oswalt); MIA 4 (Castro 2, Galloway 2). GIDP: Nimmo. DP: MIA 1 (Castro, Rojas, Dietrich). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oswalt 6 6 3 3 1 3 84 5.03 Wahl 1 1 0 0 1 2 17 4.91 Sewald 1 2 0 0 1 1 27 4.63 Bashlor 2 0 0 0 0 1 24 4.32 1/ Rhame, L, 0-2 3 2 1 1 0 0 7 7.97 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily 42/3 4 3 3 4 5 95 4.42 1/ Garcia 0 0 0 2 4.37 3 0 0 Hernandez 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 5.68 Guerrero 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.00 Conley 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 3.24 Steckenrider 1 0 0 0 0 3 17 3.35 Rucinski 1 1 0 0 1 0 24 2.84 Guerra, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 5.94 IRS: Garcia 2-0. HBP: Straily (Flores), Oswalt (Prado). WP: Sewald. T: 3:26. A: 11,478.

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson lf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .308 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Polanco rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .245 Freese 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .292 Cervelli c 1 0 0 0 1 1 .257 Diaz c 2 0 2 0 0 0 .293 Bell 1b 4 1 1 3 0 1 .268 Harrison 2b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .254 Mercer ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Williams p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .065 Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 30 4 6 4 2 8 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .258 Posey c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .298 Longoria 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .259 Crawford ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Slater 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .308 Hanson lf-2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Panik 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Kelly p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Duggar cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Blach p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .036 Hernandez lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Totals 30 0 6 0 1 2 Pittsburgh 001 300 000 — 4 6 0 San Francisco 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 LOB: Pittsburgh 3, San Francisco 4. HR: Bell (8), off Blach. RBIs: Dickerson (46), Bell 3 (54). CS: Hanson (2). SF: Dickerson. S: Williams. RLISP: Pittsburgh 2 (Marte, Harrison); San Francisco 1 (Longoria). GIDP: Bell, Crawford 2. DP: Pittsburgh 2 (Harrison, Mercer, Bell), (Harrison, Mercer, Bell); San Francisco 1 (Crawford, Panik, Slater). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, W, 10-8 7 5 0 0 1 2 104 3.66 Kela 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.10 Vazquez 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.94 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blach, L, 6-7 4 4 4 4 2 5 67 4.47 Kelly 5 2 0 0 0 3 58 0.00 T: 2:18. A: 41,209.

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .271 Span lf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .278 Segura ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .305 Cruz dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .271 Seager 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .229 Herrmann c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .236 Zunino c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Healy 1b 4 0 3 1 0 1 .236 Gordon 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Heredia cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Totals 33 3 10 3 1 6 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Bregman 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .278 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .262 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Gonzalez lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .240 Gurriel 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .279 Reddick rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .248 White 1b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .286 Stassi c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .246 1-Fisher pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Maldonado c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Totals 31 2 5 2 3 8 Seattle 000 300 000 — 3 10 0 Houston 020 000 000 — 2 5 1 1-ran for Stassi in the 8th. E: Stassi (1). LOB: Seattle 5, Houston 5. 2B: Seager (27), Healy 2 (13), Reddick (12). 3B: Herrmann (2). RBIs: Seager (63), Herrmann (4), Healy (57), White 2 (11). SB: Gordon (27). RLISP: Seattle 3 (Haniger, Gordon, Heredia); Houston 1 (Gattis). LIDP: Kemp. GIDP: Segura 2, Seager. DP: Seattle 1 (Heredia, Healy); Houston 3 (Bregman, Gurriel, White), (Morton, Correa, White), (Gurriel, Correa, White). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc, W, 7-2 5 3 2 2 2 5 90 3.80 Vincent, 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.38 1/ 0 0 0 3 4.81 Duke, 3 0 0 1/ Warren, 0 0 0 9 2.97 3 0 0 Colome, 1 2 0 0 1 0 16 3.12 Diaz, S, 45-48 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.02 IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Houston Morton, L, 12/3 6 7 3 3 1 4 87 2.88 2/ Sipp 0 0 1 12 1.52 3 1 0 1/ 0 0 0 4 3.69 Smith 3 0 0 Osuna 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.45 Rondon 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 2.11 Inherited runners-scored: Smith 1-0. HBP: Morton (Span). T: 2:56. A: 38,888.

Rockies 3, Dodgers 2 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .229 Machado ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .308 Turner 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .277 Hernandez cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .216 Kemp lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .285 Taylor lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .251 Muncy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .259 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Chargois p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Puig rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .271 Barnes c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .196 Buehler p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .138 Ferguson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Bellinger 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Totals 31 2 6 2 3 11 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .276 LeMahieu 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .269 Gonzalez rf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .290 Story ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .289 Parra lf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .285 b-Arenado ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .307 Desmond 1b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .234 McMahon 3b 4 1 1 3 0 1 .244 Iannetta c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Freeland p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .064 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Dahl ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 3 6 3 3 8 Los Angeles 110 000 000 — 2 6 1 Colorado 000 000 003 — 3 6 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Oh in the 8th. b-hit by pitch for Parra in the 9th. E: Muncy (12). LOB: LAD 6, COL 5. 2B: Machado (26), Story (33). 3B: Turner (1). HR: Puig (15), off Freeland; McMahon (4), off Chargois. RBIs: Turner (23), Puig (44), McMahon 3 (16). SB: Puig (9). S: Buehler. RLISP: LAD 3 (Dozier, Kemp, Barnes); COL 1 (Parra). LIDP: Desmond. GIDP: Hernandez, LeMahieu, Story. DP: LAD 3 (Dozier, Machado, Muncy), (Puig, Muncy), (Turner, Dozier, Muncy); COL 1 (McMahon, LeMahieu, Desmond). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Los Angeles Buehler 7 4 0 0 3 6 103 3.32 Ferguson, 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.15 1/ Alexander, 1 0 1 10 3.42 3 1 1 1/ Chargois, L, 2-4, 3 1 2 2 0 0 13 3.72 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland 7 6 2 2 2 10 111 3.02 Oh 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.59 Shaw, W, 4-5 1 0 0 0 1 0 20 6.31 Inherited runners-scored: Chargois 1-1. HBP: Chargois (Arenado). T: 2:54. A: 47,633.

Phillies 5, Padres 1 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 2 1 1 1 1 .262 Hoskins lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .254 Williams rf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .263 Santana 1b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .215 Cabrera ss 4 0 2 1 0 2 .274 Herrera cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Hunter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Franco 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .277 Alfaro c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .252 Nola p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .070 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Quinn cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Totals 34 5 7 5 3 10 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 0 0 1 0 1 .251 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .252 Renfroe lf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .251 Reyes rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Hedges c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .261 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .235 Villanueva 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .230 Spangenberg 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .244 Lockett p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Stock p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Pirela ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .254 Maton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wingenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Jankowski ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 32 1 7 1 4 9 Philadelphia 200 120 000 — 5 7 0 San Diego 000 000 100 — 1 7 1 a-walked for Stock in the 7th. b-grounded out for Wingenter in the 9th. E: Wingenter (1). LOB: PHI 5, SD 10. 2B: Cabrera (26), Renfroe (18), Hedges (9). 3B: Williams (3), Spangenberg (3). HR: Franco (19), off Lockett; Hernandez (10), off Lockett. RBIs: Hernandez (38), Williams (45), Santana (65), Cabrera (65), Franco (58), Margot (38). SB: Hedges (3). SF: Margot. RLISP: PHI 3 (Hernandez, Herrera 2); SD 5 (Margot 2, Hosmer, Hedges, Villanueva). GIDP: Reyes. DP: PHI 1 (Cabrera, Hernandez, Santana). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nola, W, 13-3 6 4 0 0 3 5 95 2.28 Davis 0 1 1 1 1 0 10 3.97 Arano 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.01 Hunter 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.89 Dominguez 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 2.40 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lockett, L, 0-3 41/3 5 5 5 2 2 88 9.60 Stock 22/3 2 0 0 0 4 42 3.12 Maton 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.00 Wingenter 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 0.00 Davis pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. IRS: Arano 2-1, Stock 1-1. HBP: Nola (Villanueva). T: 3:12. A: 35,098.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Yankees 5, Rangers 3 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 5 2 3 0 0 1 .277 Odor 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .278 Andrus ss 4 0 1 1 1 2 .288 Beltre dh 3 0 1 1 1 2 .279 Profar 3b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .248 Gallo lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Chirinos c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .219 Guzman 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .243 Tocci cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .176 a-Kiner-Falefa ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Totals 34 3 8 2 6 13 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Stanton dh 3 2 2 1 1 0 .279 Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .268 Andujar 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .296 Bird 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .216 Torres 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269 Walker rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .227 Higashioka c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .157 Robinson cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .138 Totals 31 5 8 5 4 3 Texas 001 000 200 — 3 8 0 New York 200 001 20x — 5 8 0 a-walked for Tocci in the 9th. LOB: TEX 11, NYY 6. 2B: Choo (25), Gallo (15), Bird 2 (12). HR: Stanton (29), off Hutchison; Andujar (17), off Martin. RBIs: Andrus (25), Beltre (41), Stanton (75), Andujar 2 (55), Bird (28), Walker (30). SB: Choo (4), Odor (10). RLISP: TEX 7 (Beltre 2, Profar 4, Tocci); NYY 3 (Gardner, Torres, Robinson). GIDP: Gregorius. DP: TEX 1 (Hutchison, Andrus, Guzman). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hutchison 51/3 5 3 3 4 2 85 6.07 Springs 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 1.29 2/ Martin, L, 1-3 3 2 2 2 0 0 12 5.08 Claudio 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.99 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn 5 5 1 1 3 8 99 4.46 Robertson, 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.23 2/ Britton, 3 2 2 2 2 0 25 4.50 Betances, W, 3-3, 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.19 Chapman, S, 30-32 1 1 0 0 1 2 29 2.15 IRS: Springs 1-1, Betances 3-1. HBP: Chapman (Beltre). T: 3:16. A: 45,933.

Indians 3, White Sox 1 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Brantley lf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .297 Ramirez 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .298 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .247 Cabrera dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Kipnis 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .220 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Guyer rf Perez c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .161 G.Allen cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .232 Totals 36 3 9 3 0 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Delmonico lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Sanchez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Palka dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .235 Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .250 Narvaez c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .280 Anderson ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Moncada 2b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .220 LaMarre cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Totals 30 1 3 1 2 12 Cleveland 000 012 000 — 3 9 0 Chicago 001 000 000 — 1 3 3 E: Garcia (2), Narvaez (6), LaMarre (1). LOB: CLE 7, CWS 4. 2B: Brantley (28), Kipnis (20). HR: Brantley (13), off Shields; Ramirez (34), off Shields; Moncada (15), off Bauer. RBIs: Brantley (62), Ramirez (84), G.Allen (6), Moncada (46). SB: Perez (1). RLISP: CLE 4 (Cabrera, Guyer 3); CWS 1 (Anderson). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bauer, W, 12-6 61/3 2 1 1 0 8 102 2.22 Hand, 12/3 0 0 0 2 3 29 2.73 C.Allen, S, 22-25 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 4.28 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields, L, 4-14 7 7 3 2 0 4 94 4.41 2/ Avilan 1 29 3.63 3 2 0 0 0 Gomez 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.52 Inherited runners-scored: Gomez 3-0. HBP: Avilan (Cabrera). T: 2:53. A: 28,061.

Twins 4, Tigers 3 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .270 Rosario rf-lf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .296 Forsythe 2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Sano 3b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .224 Austin dh 4 1 1 2 1 2 .224 Polanco ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Field cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .209 a-Cave ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Adrianza lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Kepler rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Wilson c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .165 Totals 35 4 9 3 6 7 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .202 Iglesias ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .264 Castellanos rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Candelario 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Martinez dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .238 1-Gerber pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .174 Goodrum 2b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .232 Adduci 1b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .276 McCann c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .222 Reyes lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .220 Totals 34 3 9 3 3 6 Minnesota 001 021 000 — 4 9 0 Detroit 010 000 002 — 3 9 0 a-flied out for Field in the 7th. 1-ran for Martinez in the 9th. LOB: MIN 10, DET 7. 2B: Rosario (29). 3B: Adduci (1). HR: Austin (9), off Liriano; Goodrum (12), off Hildenberger. RBIs: Rosario (67), Austin 2 (25), Goodrum 2 (38), McCann (31). CS: Goodrum (3). RLISP: MIN 6 (Rosario, Polanco 3, Cave 2); DET 2 (Jones, McCann). GIDP: Iglesias. DP: Minnesota 1 (Polanco, Forsythe, Mauer). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 6-9 7 7 1 1 2 4 111 3.49 May, 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.93 Hildenberger, S, 1-3 1 2 2 2 1 2 25 4.74 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano, L, 3-7 5 6 3 3 4 3 86 4.42 McAllister 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 5.06 Alcantara 1 1 0 0 1 0 24 0.66 Coleman 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.71 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 4.59 WP: Liriano, Alcantara, Gibson. T: 3:09. A: 26,991.

Rays 3, Blue Jays 1 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith rf-lf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .299 Duffy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .301 Wendle 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .295 Cron 1b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .247 Gomez rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .218 Choi dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .227 Kiermaier cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .181 Adames ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .243 Lowe lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bauers 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Sucre c 4 0 1 1 0 2 .215 Totals 36 3 10 3 1 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Grichuk rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .231 Travis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .260 Hernandez lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .245 Morales dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .245 Solarte 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .233 a-Urena ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .261 b-Granderson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Martin c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .199 Diaz ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .262 Pillar cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Totals 28 1 5 1 4 8 Tampa Bay 110 000 001 — 3 10 0 Toronto 000 010 000 — 1 5 1 a-grounded out for Solarte in the 2nd. b-flied out for Urena in the 9th. E: Pillar (6). LOB: Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 5. 2B: Smith (19), Wendle (15), Cron (21), Choi (5), Hernandez (25). HR: Diaz (15), off Schultz. RBIs: Wendle (38), Adames (15), Sucre (15), Diaz (35). SB: Kiermaier (8), Adames (4). CS: Martin (3). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Duffy, Choi, Kiermaier, Lowe); Toronto 2 (Pillar 2). GIDP: Morales, Urena. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Adames, Wendle, Cron), (Adames, Wendle, Cron). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 2 25 2.49 Castillo, W, 3-2 22/3 1 0 0 1 2 34 3.86 Schultz 2 2 1 1 1 1 35 4.58 Wood, 1 1 0 0 1 0 16 3.91 Alvarado, 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.39 Romo, S, 15-22 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.57 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gaviglio, L, 2-5 51/3 6 2 1 0 7 99 4.86 2/ Garcia 0 0 1 7 6.18 3 0 0 Petricka 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 4.71 Clippard 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.79 Tepera 1 2 1 1 0 1 14 4.17 IRS: Castillo 2-0, Garcia 1-0. HBP: Castillo (Martin). T: 2:56. A: 38,797.

Athletics 7, Angels 0 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 5 3 3 4 0 0 .259 Chapman 3b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .274 Lowrie 2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .265 Davis dh 5 1 2 2 0 1 .258 Canha 1b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .258 a-Olson ph-1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Piscotty rf 5 1 3 0 0 0 .255 Pinder lf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .253 Laureano cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .263 Lucroy c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .244 Totals 40 7 14 7 3 7 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .212 Upton lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Marte lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Ohtani dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .272 Pujols 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .254 Fernandez 1b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .270 Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .306 Fletcher 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Cowart 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .167 Briceno c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .280 Young Jr. cf 1 0 0 0 2 0 .207 Totals 31 0 5 0 3 8 Oakland 131 200 000 — 7 14 1 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 a-grounded out for Canha in the 4th. E: Semien (19). LOB: Oakland 9, Los Angeles 8. 2B: Semien (26), Upton (14), Cowart (4). HR: Semien (8), off Skaggs; Davis (34), off Skaggs; Semien (9), off Skaggs. RBIs: Semien 4 (43), Chapman (40), Davis 2 (92). RLISP: Oakland 3 (Semien, Laureano, Olson); Los Angeles 4 (Pujols, Briceno 2, Marte). LIDP: Upton. GIDP: Olson, Simmons. DP: Oakland 2 (Laureano, Canha), (Olson, Semien); Los Angeles 1 (Fletcher, Simmons, Pujols). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson, W, 4-2 71/3 3 0 0 3 6 110 2.48 2/ 2 9 3.51 Buchter 3 0 0 0 0 Pagan 1 2 0 0 0 0 18 3.28 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Skaggs, L, 8-8 31/3 10 7 7 1 5 64 3.78 Robles 12/3 3 0 0 0 0 22 3.89 Jerez 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 0.00 Ramirez 2 0 0 0 1 1 21 4.55 Arcia 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 IRS: Buchter 2-0, Robles 2-1. HBP: Pagan (Simmons). WP: Jackson, Jerez. T: 3:08. A: 39,425.

MLB CALENDAR Aug. 31: Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster. Oct. 2-3: Wild-card games. Oct. 4: Division Series start. Oct. 12: League Championship Series start. Oct. 23: World Series starts. November TBA: Deadline for teams to make qualifying offers to their eligible former players who became free agents, fifth day after World Series. November TBA: Deadline for free agents to accept qualifying offers, 15th day after World Series. Nov. 6-8: General managers’ meetings, Carlsbad, Calif. Nov. 8-15: All-Star tour of Japan. Nov. 14-15: Owners’ meetings, Atlanta.

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

StL KC

Weaver (R) Junis (R)

1:15

6-10 6-11

4.66 4.98

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Ari Cin

Godley (R) Castillo (R)

12-6 12:10 6-9

4.35 4.91

NY Syndergaard (R) 7-2 Mia Chen (L) 12:10 4-8

3.17 5.48

Mil Atl

Anderson (R) 7-7 Newcomb (L) 12:35 10-5

3.81 3.15

LA Col

Hill (L) Bettis (R)

2:10

5-4 5-2

3.62 5.67

Phi SD

Arrieta (R) Lucchesi (L)

2:40

9-6 5-6

3.11 3.70

Pit SF

Musgrove (R) Rodriguez (R) 3:05

4-6 5-1

3.41 2.34

Was Scherzer (R) Chi Hamels (L)

7:05

15-5 7-9

2.28 4.38

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bos Sale (L) Bal Cobb (R)

11-4 12:05 3-14

2.04 5.55

Tex Perez (L) NY Sabathia (L)

2-4 12:05 6-4

6.15 3.49

TB Tor

Glasnow (R) Stroman (R)

1-2 12:07 4-8

4.14 5.20

Min Stewart (R) Det Boyd (L)

— 12:10 6-10

— 4.33

Sea Ramirez (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

1:10

Cle Chi

1:10

13-6 4-8

3.69 5.58

3:07

4-2 7-7

3.12 3.96

Carrasco (R) Covey (R)

Oak Cahill (R) LA Heaney (L)

0-2 10.24 9-9 3.53

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates. FIRST GAME

Red Sox 5, Orioles 0 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .351 Benintendi lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .302 Moreland 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .329 Bogaerts ss 4 2 3 0 0 1 .278 Holt 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .263 E.Nunez 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .264 Leon c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .212 Bradley Jr. cf 4 2 2 2 0 0 .216 Totals 35 5 9 4 3 5 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .263 Beckham ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Jones rf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .287 Trumbo dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .267 Mancini lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .230 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .161 R.Nunez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Mullins cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .571 Wynns c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Totals 32 0 5 0 0 14 Boston 000 031 001 — 5 9 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 E: Wynns (1). LOB: Boston 6, Baltimore 5. 2B: Bogaerts (33), Jones (30). HR: E.Nunez (7), off Yacabonis; Bradley Jr. (10), off Yacabonis; Bradley Jr. (11), off Castro. RBIs: E.Nunez 2 (35), Bradley Jr. 2 (46). SB: Bogaerts (5). RLISP: Boston 2 (Moreland 2); Baltimore 2 (Beckham, Mancini). GIDP: E.Nunez. DP: Baltimore 1 (Beckham, Villar, Davis). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price, W, 12-6 6 5 0 0 0 10 94 3.75 Thornburg 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.97 Brasier 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.15 Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.47 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Yacabonis, L, 0-1 42/3 5 3 3 0 2 60 6.75 Gilmartin 21/3 3 1 1 2 0 40 3.86 Castro 2 1 1 1 1 3 35 3.86 IRS: Gilmartin 1-0. T: 2:48. A: 18,003. SECOND GAME

Red Sox 6, Orioles 4 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .351 Holt 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .261 Pearce 1b 3 2 1 0 1 2 .301 Martinez lf 2 2 2 3 2 0 .332 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Devers 3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .243 E.Nunez dh 4 1 1 0 0 0 .264 Butler c 2 0 0 1 0 1 .167 b-Benintendi ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .301 Leon c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Bradley Jr. cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .215 Totals 30 6 7 5 6 7 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peterson 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .196 Villar ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .262 Jones rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Mancini 1b 3 2 3 2 2 0 .236 Davis dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .160 R.Nunez 3b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .242 Mullins cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .444 Rickard lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .230 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .216 a-Trumbo ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .267 1-Wynns pr-c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Totals 32 4 7 4 8 4 Boston 000 111 021 — 6 7 0 Baltimore 011 001 001 — 4 7 0 a-walked for Joseph in the 8th. b-struck out for Butler in the 9th. 1-ran for Trumbo in the 8th. LOB: Boston 5, Baltimore 10. 2B: Betts (33), R.Nunez (9). 3B: E.Nunez (3). HR: Martinez (36), off Ramirez; Martinez (37), off Wright Jr.; Rickard (7), off Hembree; Mancini (17), off Kimbrel. RBIs: Holt (30), Martinez 3 (104), Butler (1), Mancini 2 (38), R.Nunez (7), Rickard (21). SB: Betts (23), Bradley Jr. (12), Jones (4). CS: Bradley Jr. (1), Mullins (1), Rickard (1). SF: Butler. RLISP: Boston 2 (Holt 2); Baltimore 7 (Peterson 2, Davis, Mullins 2, Joseph 2). GIDP: Bogaerts. DP: Baltimore 1 (Villar, Peterson, Mancini). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Velazquez 22/3 2 2 2 1 0 41 2.82 1/ 2 0 21 2.59 Workman 3 1 0 0 Pomeranz 2 1 0 0 1 0 30 5.96 Hembree, 1 1 1 1 1 0 20 3.94 Kelly, W, 4-0 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 4.20 Cuevas, 1 0 0 0 2 1 19 3.00 Kimbrel, S, 34-38 1 1 1 1 0 3 21 2.62 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ramirez 5 3 2 2 2 5 88 5.40 Carroll 1 0 1 1 3 0 27 7.36 2/ Wright Jr., L, 3-1 1 3 2 2 2 0 1 26 4.96 1/ Fry 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 26 3.32 Inherited runners-scored: Workman 1-1. HBP: Velazquez (Davis), Fry (Bradley Jr.). WP: Carroll, Cuevas. Umpires: Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 3:39. A: 24,051.


D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 08.12.2018

FINAU’S WILD RIDE

COME ON, ANTARCTICA!

CASEY HEADING HOME

Tony Finau played 11 holes Friday and had yet to par one. He had eight birdies, a bogey and a triple bogey. He is tied with Dustin Johnson and Charl Scwartzel for the tournament lead with 12 birdies, one ahead of leader Gary Woodland, yet Finau sits 10 shots back at even par.

Six of the seven continents are represented in the top 16 spots on the leaderboard. North America, Europe and Australia aren’t surprises, but Africa (Charl Schwartzel, Brandon Stone), Asia (Yuta Ikeda) and South America (Emiliano Grillo) presences are reminders the game truly is global.

With the cut expected to land around even par, England’s Paul Casey will see his string of eight consecutive cuts made in major championships come to an end. Casey, No. 15 in the world rankings, shot 75-73 to finish at 8 over. In those eight majors, Casey finished in the top 16 six times.

Brandon Stone

Spieth loves crowds, not the greens BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jordan Spieth’s abilities stand out most at challenging golf courses. It’s why he’s done well at the Masters — balls move fast across the greens at Augusta, and golfers have to place their shots well to hold the greens. With the receptive putting surfaces at Bellerive, Spieth is frustrated that his opponents have an easier time posting low scores. Golfers can hit onto the green and trust their shots will stick. “You just fire in, and you get away with more,” Spieth said after his round Friday. “You don’t have to be as precise. That’s frustrating in a major championship.” The 25-year-old sits at eighth in the world rankings, and the PGA Championship is the only major he hasn’t won. With a 4-under 66 Friday, Spieth put his overall score at 3 under. He will need a phenomenal final two rounds to catch the leaders. He’s currently seven strokes off Gary Woodland’s mark of 10 under. Spieth said his score wouldn’t have been lower with faster greens. The condition just isn’t what he wanted to see at a major. Though Spieth expressed frustration with the course, he

praised the fan turnout. He even gave one youngster a high-five on his first hole of the day. “Everyone’s been very respectful, fantastic sports and golf fans,” he said. “This is a great market to come to in St. Louis. … I think this has been some of the most fun golf as far as playing in front of fans that I can remember experiencing.”

CROWDS FLOCKING TO PREMIER GROUPS Fans stood multiple rows deep whenever Tiger Woods approached a shot, and most deserted holes as soon as he left. Woods was playing with defending champion Justin Thomas and four-time major winner Rory McIlroy, and cheers echoed around the Bellerive grandstands whenever they stepped onto a green. Though not to the same extreme, spectators flocked to other groups of highly-ranked players throughout the day. The trio of Brooks Koepka, Patrick Reed and Francesco Molinari — the three major winners in 2018 — highlighted the morning groupings. “It’s nice having all these fans out following that group,” Koepka said. “You’re trying to impress them a little bit.” Fans wanting a better view

PGA NOTEBOOK

PETER BAUGH • Post-Dispatch

Jackson Baker, 9, poses for a picture with his father after receiving a high-five from Jordan Spieth at No. 10 on Friday.

could track lesser-known players. As soon as the big names were away from a hole, spectators could find seats in the grandstands or stand right next to the ropes.

SCOTT MOVES INTO CONTENTION Adam Scott might have a future in fortune telling. Following his even-par 70 Thursday, he said he had a 5-under 65 in him. Less than 24 hours later, Scott shot a 65. After his round, a reporter joked that he should have predicted a 63.

“I feel like I’ve got a 63 in me tomorrow,” Scott deadpanned. Scott sits in a tie for ninth and is five strokes behind Woodland, the leader. “Everything’s kind of felt good here for the last two days,” Scott said. “I’m trying to not think about it too much and keep the good vibes going.”

D. JOHNSON NEARLY HIT BY ERRANT BALL Dustin Johnson almost hit two balls on the third tee. As he brought back his club, a wild shot from the 11th hole flew across the tee box. The world’s No. 1 golfer didn’t flinch. He drove the ball 132 yards to the green on the par-3 hole and made the putt. “I made birdie, so it’s all right,” he said. The misplaced drive came from Jorge Campillo, whose shot on the 11th tee went right and into the woods. Oddly enough, the golfer from Spain still parred the hole. Johnson shot 4 under on the day. He sits at 7 under and is in a tie for fourth place. His only major win was at the 2016 U.S. Open. “I’m definitely wanting to get that second major,” he said. “I’m in a good position going into the weekend. I’m going to have to

play a good 36 holes, though, if I want to have a chance to win.”

NOTABLE GOLFERS LIKELY TO MISS CUT John Daly’s Cardinals dress pants may have made St. Louis fans happy, but they did not make Bellerive any kinder. Daly, a twotime major winner, shot a 70 Friday to sit 3 over and will not make the cut. Since Daly is 52 years old and hasn’t won a major in more than 20 years, it’s not shocking that he fell over the projected cut line of even. Other misses were a little more surprising. Masters champion Patrick Reed shot 71 and was 3 over. Two-time Masters winner Bubba Watson shot 78 and was 8 over and also out of contention. Some other notable golfers in the group include Paul Casey, Y.E. Yang, Henrik Stenson and Martin Kaymer. EARLY TV COVERAGE SET Because of the suspension of play Friday, TNT will begin its Saturday television coverage of the tournament at 7 a.m., three hours earlier than planned. It begins with the conclusion of the second round, followed by the third round. Then at 1 o’clock, CBS (KMOV, Ch. 4) picks up the remainder of the day’s TV coverage.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Justin Rose shows his disappointment after missing a putt for an eagle on the 10th hole Friday during the second round of the PGA Championship.

Woodland and Kisner are on top of leaderboard PGA • FROM B1 D1

headed for the exits. Play was suspended for the rest of the day and will resume at 7 a.m. Saturday. Approximately 30 minutes after the conclusion of the second round, groups of three will begin play in the third round on holes 1 and 10. Golfers with the top 70 scores, plus ties, will advance to the third round. The cut line figures to be around even par. The weather interrupted what was building into a breakout round by the week’s biggest attraction. After shooting par Thursday, Tiger Woods birdied three of his first five holes Friday in front of monstrous galleries that erupted at all three of his birdie putts. Play was stopped when his group — defending PGA champion Justin Thomas (2 over) and two-time PGA champion Rory McIlroy (even) — were sizing up their second shots on No. 8. “The good thing is we’re going to have the greens prepared before we go back out there to finish up our second round,” Woods said. “It would have been quite a bit different if we had to go back out this afternoon and finish it up. But the greens will be freshly cut, so it will be just like it was when we played on Thursday.”

Before the storm rolled in, Koepka and South Africa’s Charl Schwartzel tied the PGA 18-hole record, both finishing Friday’s round at 63. They’re both part of the pack chasing Woodland and Kisner, who played together the last two days, each taking turns mastering the course. Woodland’s highlight Friday came on the par-5 17, where he blasted his second shot 265 yards to the green, then sank the 5-foot putt for eagle. “For me, I’m very happy with where I’m at,” Woodland said. “I’m very comfortable with how I’m driving the golf ball. The iron game, the distance control this week has been phenomenal. And when I stand over a golf ball putting as comfortable as I am right now, I’m pretty excited.” Woodland’s career hasn’t come as easy as he made his first two rounds look. Once a college basketball player at Washburn University in his hometown of Topeka, Kan., Woodland left the hardwood for the links and enrolled at Kansas to play golf. After college he had to grind through the Hooters Tour, made it through PGA Q-School in 2008, underwent shoulder surgery and had to regain his tour card all over again in 2010. Woodland won his first

PGA event in 2011, but just two wins have followed, including the Phoenix Open in February. But none of that would compare to his first major, especially given the difficult 2017 Woodland and his wife Gabby endured. Gabby was pregnant with boy and girl twins but lost the girl to a miscarriage in March. Three months later, Jaxson Lynn Woodland was born June 24, 10 weeks early but healthy. Throughout the year, Woodland’s game never got going. He had just one top-10 finish the rest of the season and missed the cut three times. But in February of this year, Woodland snapped a five-year winless streak with a playoff victory in Phoenix. When he rolled in the winning putt, he tapped his chest, kissed his fist and pointed to the skies in honor of the daughter he never met, then embraced Gabby and Jaxson on the green. Again Friday the former Jayhawk heard his share of Mizzou chants from fans on the course but didn’t let it spoil another memorable experience in a major. “The crowds are awesome,” he said. “There’s a lot of energy out there, and it’s positive energy. It’s fun to come here. I think this area is striving for an event like this,

and it’s pretty special to get one here.” He’ll have to hold off good pal Kisner to have another heartwarming moment Sunday. Like Woodland, success didn’t come immediately for Kisner in pro golf. After an All-American career at Georgia, Kisner had to scuffle on the Hooters Tour and Web.com Tour in his 20s, then missed the PGA Tour by one stroke at qualifying school in 2009 and nearly gave up the game to join his father’s construction business. Instead, he kept grinding. Kisner lost his tour card in 2011, failed to retain it in 2012 but gradually gained traction, first with a win at the RSM Classic in 2016, then the Dean & DeLuca Invitational in 2017. At last month’s British Open, Kisner held the lead through the first round and shared the lead after Friday and Saturday before slipping into a tie for second, his best finish in a major. He held at least a share of the lead through each of the first three rounds at last year’s PGA and finished tied for seventh. Kisner credited his playing partner for raising the level of play in their morning group, which included Sergio Garcia, who shot 71 and sits 1-over through two days.

“I think every time that you see guys playing well it kind of drags other guys in the group along,” Kisner said. “And Sergio wasn’t having the best day, but I bet we made him hang in there just because of how well we were going. Gary and I are good buddies, had a great time out there playing, and if I could only hit it as far as he could it would be a different game.” On the course, Woodland and Kisner are nothing alike. The brawny 6-1, 195-pound Woodland is one of the game’s longest drivers off the tee, punishing his drives 313 yards on average this season. He’s been working to reinvent his putting grip but still came into the week ranked among the Tour’s worst putters in several categories. Kisner, meanwhile — hardly an imposing figure on the course at 5-10 and 165 and less so at the tee box — specializes in the short game. Through two days he’s ranked 124th in the field in driving distance but third in driving accuracy. “Kis played beautifully today,” Woodland said. “He drove the ball unbelievable, and he gets that putter rolling quite often. It was nice to feed off that energy.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

WHERE’S THE BEEF?

CUT DRAMA: GOOD

CUT DRAMA: BAD

Throughout his round, Shane Lowry was spurred on by the crowd with cries of “Let’s go, Beef” and “Get ’em, Beef.” Problem is, the Irish Lowry isn’t the English Andrew Johnston, affectionately known as “Beef,” and who didn’t qualify for the PGA Championship. We can see the resemblance.

Eighteen players finished Round 2 on the cut line at even par Saturday. Among those in the final groups knowing that even par would be the line was Scott Brown. Finishing on the front nine, he missed a 7-foot putt on No. 8 that left him at 1 over, but he chipped in from 29 feet on the ninth to get in.

Twelve players missed the cut by one stroke, none more dramatic than Bryson DeChambeau, who at ninth in the Ryder Cup standings will need a captain’s pick to be on the team. He was 2 under with six holes to go, then made three bogeys down the stretch, including a three-putt on his final hole.

Lowry

Johnston

NOTEBOOK

Finau’s 10-birdie round was ‘nuts’ BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Ten birdies in one round at the PGA Championship would normally be enough to put someone near the top of the leaderboard. For Tony Finau, those birdies were barely enough to get him past the second round. Finau tied Gary Player’s tournament record for birdies in one round but barely made the cut at even par. That was because his second round also included a triple bogey and three bogeys with only four par holes. The round was split between Friday and Saturday because of Friday’s rain. His round of 66 followed Thursday’s 74, which included four birdies, four bogeys and two double bogeys. “It was nuts,” he said. “As far as putting went, when you see the first few go in the beginning of your round, the hole seems to look a little bigger. It frees you up and you’re not thinking as much. ... I haven’t hit it great, up to my standards, these first couple of days. So I’ll be looking to clean

that up.” Finau finished in the top 10 of the year’s first three majors. That helped place him 13th in the U.S. Ryder Cup standings before arriving in St. Louis. Coincidentally, he ended up playing with Ryder Cup captain Jim Furyk in the first two rounds, giving Furyk a chance to see him up close. Finau is considered a contender for one of Furyk’s captain’s picks if he doesn’t reach the top eight. “He didn’t say anything, but he was just shaking his head,” Finau said. “I made a lot of putts on the front nine, and at the end of the round for sure it was the craziest round I think he’s ever seen. So the good news is 10 birdies in a major is pretty good.” In the third round, Finau was a bit more consistent. He finished at 69, recording four birdies and three bogeys and was tied for 57th at 1 under overall.

struck on the 12th hole and his hopes of completing the career Grand Slam at Bellerive quickly and painfully disappeared. Spieth sprayed his tee shot into the crowd near a batch of trees. He then tried to hit through a slight opening in the mass of branches, only to see his ball strike two trees and go out of bounds. By the time he was done, he had a triple bogey. He finished with a 69 for the day, leaving him at 4 under and tied for 28th. “It’s a bummer because my putter is as hot as it’s been in two years,” he said. “Just extremely disappointed that I worked my way into a chance to win the tournament, only to throw it away on a bad decision. I thought a 5-iron was the club to get back to the hole. It hits two trees after hitting the cart path to get over there. It was just the perfect storm.”

TROUBLE IN THE TREES Jordan Spieth was making up ground on the leaders, having climbed within four shots of Brooks Koepka. Then disaster

JUST LIKE HOME Stewart Cink has a shot at his first top-10 finish in a major tournament since 2009, the year he defeated Tom Watson

in a playoff at the British Open, thanks to a layout that feels like his home course in Atlanta. He is accustomed to zoysia grass, and many other aspects were comfortable. “In the old days this was like East Lake with big greens and soft in the summer,” he said. “So I’m comfortable with this type of grass and it feels like home. I’m familiar with the way it’s going to react.” Cink has rounds of 67, 69 and 66 to put him at 8 under along with Tiger Woods and four others. He played with Woods on Saturday and said it felt like a throwback to his more successful days on the tour when the two played a lot together. “Playing with Tiger is always exciting,” he said. “Players downplay it and I’ve downplayed it. But it’s pretty intense. You have to decide what you’re going to do with it before you get out there. It was like turning back the hands of the clock.”

golf star enjoying a good weekend at the PGA Championship? For Brandon Stone, there were many messages from the sports world, including some of his country’s top cricket and rugby players. Among them was AB de Villiers, a well-known cricket player, when Stone finished the first two days with scores of 66 and 68. He remained in the hunt Saturday with a 70 and was at 6 under. The message from de Villiers came in Afrikaans, a language spoken in South Africa, and took some time for Stone to translate. “The South African golfers and cricketers tend to get along really well,” Stone said. “Seems like they become more golf fans than cricket fans the moment they hang up their boots. So basically the entire South African cricket team has been sending me good messages. And a few rugby guys that I don’t think many guys will know.”

SUPPORTIVE CRICKETERS Whom do you hear from back home if you’re a South African

Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Star-studded pack chasing Koepka in PGA Championship PGA • FROM D1

Bellerive’s smushy greens, firing a 4-under 66 to put him at 12 under for the tournament. If he lifts the Wanamaker Trophy on Sunday — and lifting is no problem for the 28-year-old — he’ll have won three of the last seven major championships. He’ll be paired with Adam Scott (10 under) with a 1:55 p.m. tee time. There’s a loaded crowd on their heels. Jon Rahm, Rickie Fowler and Gary Woodland are three back at 9 under. Five more are tied with Woods at 8 under: Stewart Cink, Jason Day, Justin Thomas, Shane Lowry and Charl Schwartzel. Of the 11 golfers within four strokes of the lead, seven have won at least one major. Rahm, Fowler, Woodland and Lowry are looking for their first. “There’s a lot of star power, and it should be,” Koepka said. “It’s a major championship. You should see the best players in the world come to the top. And that’s what you have.” Three of the game’s biggest stars struggled to gain ground on the leaders in the afternoon. Dustin Johnson, the world No. 1, went 4 over for the day to all but fall out of contention and sits at 5 under, one better than Jordan Spieth and three ahead of Rory McIroy. But that didn’t diminish the star power at the top. Eight of the world’s top 20 ranked players are within six shots of the lead. “With so many big names,” Koepka said, “you would expect two or three of them to really make a run, make a push to get off to a good start and challenge me. Everybody out here is so good, and you look at this leaderboard and … they’re names that I’ve grown up watching that everybody else loves to watch play. It should be an exciting day tomorrow.” Scott, down to No. 76 in the world rankings, needed an exemption to make the field this year and savors his chance to win his first major since the 2013 Masters. “It’s been quite awhile since I was really in contention, which has been quite frustrating,” said Scott, who has just one top-10 finish this year. “But I’m glad I got a dose of it today because I want a whole lot tomorrow.” The field’s biggest star had to get through a grueling day to stay alive for the Wanamaker. Rain suspended play midway through the afternoon round Friday, putting half the field back on the course early Saturday morning, including Woods, who with 11 holes to finish stayed at 4 under coming out of the second round. After a short break before the third round, Woods mixed five birdies with one bogey through the first eight holes but couldn’t make anything happen on the back nine. On the par-five 17th, a hole that yielded 42 birdies and three eagles Saturday, Woods blew a chance to cut into the lead when he knocked an eagle putt 4 feet long, then missed the birdie try by inches. “I left pretty much every single putt short on the back nine,” Woods said. “The greens were getting fuzzy. They’re getting slow, and I didn’t hit the putts quite hard enough. And I made sure on 17 I did. And I blew it by about four feet and then pulled the next one.” Playing 29 holes at 42 years old with a

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Gary Woodland hits from a sand trap on No. 18. The Kansas native made par and is tied for third place at 9 under par.

surgically fused back — with the sun baking the course most of the day — became more of a mental grind than physical challenge, Woods said. Drenched in sweat, Woods changed his shirt three times. “Yeah, I’m a little bit tired,” he said. Koepka had the fortune of finishing his Friday round before the rain came, leaving him just 18 holes Saturday. Before heading to the course for his afternoon round, he visited Life Time Fitness in Ellisville for a back and triceps workout that included an encounter that defines his curious anonymity among the world’s best golfers. “Today I was in there with Dustin, and everybody wanted a picture with Dustin,” Koepka said. “They were talking about him as we left and I was just standing there laughing. They were like, ‘Did you see that No. 1 player in the world was here?’” Never mind the world’s No. 4 player with twice as many majors. “I don’t know what to say to that,” he said, laughing. Other than his two U.S. Open titles, Koepka is mostly known for his chiseled frame and biceps that bust out of his Nike sleeves, which led to an unusual question during his post-round interview Saturday: How much you bench? “It’s not that impressive,” he said. Au contraire. Koepka can bench press 315 pounds, he said. At the U.S. Open in June, he put up 14 reps of 225 pounds. And to no one’s surprise, he’s winning with power this week, averaging 326 yards per drive, second-best in the field. To start Saturday’s round he pulled out his driver for the 425-yard par 4 and crushed his tee shot 327 yards. He placed his iron shot within two feet of the hole and tapped in the birdie.

Dustin Johnson retrieves his ball after making par on the second hole. The top-ranked Johnson shot 74 and is seven shots behind leader Brooks Koepka.

On a course that continues to play soft on the greens but offers safe passageways of zoysia grass on the fairways, Koepka doesn’t understand why so many of his peers continue to lay up with their irons instead of busting out the bigger club. “I just don’t see anything but driver,” he said. “This golf course, I like the way it

sets up.” Possibly, by Sunday evening, enough to set up Koepka’s third major in 14 months. Then maybe he’ll get recognized at the gym. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

FRIDAY TICKETS NO LONGER GOOD Patrons who carried Friday tickets to the tournament but saw their experience shortened by the weather suspension will not be able to use them Saturday for the rest of the second round. The grounds cannot accommodate numbers that Friday and Saturday tickets could draw.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • Post-dispatch

Fans climb a tree to get a better view.

EAGLES LAND FRIDAY

WILL A CLUB PRO GET IN?

There were no eagles in the opening round, but Bellerive yielded four Friday. Leader Gary Woodland made the convential 3 on a par 5, but the other three were on par-4 holes. Satoshi Kodaira and Brendan Steele drove the 298-yard 11th hole, and Ted Potter Jr. holed a 137-yard shot on 14.

At even par through two rounds, Ben Kern of Abilene, Texas, will have to wait until about 10 a.m. Saturday to learn whether he’ll make the cut. Overnight, 63 players were minus-1 or better, so even might not get in. A few other club pros have a shot but would have to make big charges.

Koepka ties a tournament record U.S. Open champion races into third place; Schwartzel also fires 63 BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-dispatch

All that stood between Brooks Koepka and a bit of PGA Championship history were 17 feet on the ninth hole Friday, but despite a nearly flawless round he had no idea what awaited if he made the birdie. The putt didn’t fall, so Koepka settled for a round of 7-under 63, one stroke short of setting a tournament record. His bogey-free day allowed him to charge up the leaderboard into third place at 8 under and two strokes behind leader Gary Woodland. On a morning of low scores, Charl Schwartzel matched Koepka’s recordtying round as he jumped into a tie for fourth. “I didn’t know. I just was trying to make the (final putt) and I really thought I made it,” Koepka said. “My caddie said something. Ricky (Elliott) said something walking off on 18. I didn’t even think of it. I’ve been so in the zone you don’t know where you are or where you’re at.” Leaving the course, Koepka had placed himself in position to make a run at his third major championship after winning the U.S. Open in 2017 and ’18. One would never know that Koepka was sidelined for four months at the start of the year while rehabilitating a torn tendon in his left wrist. He has rebounded to reach No. 4 in the world rankings and No. 2 in the U.S. Ryder Cup standings. Family genes seemed to dictate that Koepka would play baseball. His great uncle is Dick Groat, who was the National League MVP in 1960 and played for the Cardinals three seasons. But he’s doing OK with the golf thing. He might be at the top of the leaderboard if the wind hadn’t caught one of his drives in the first round and left him with a double bogey. “I played really well. I feel like (Thursday) I played well, too, and sometimes you just don’t really score very well,” he said. “On the double we had, the wind just kind of switched on us and that happens. But today I drove it beautifully, my wedges distance control is very spot on, and making the putts, making those 5-, 6-footers that you need to make.” Schwartzel had eight birdies and one bogey for his 63, matching his career low

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Charl Schwartzel tees off on the 16th hole at Bellerive Country Club on Friday. Schwartzel is in a tie for fourth place at the PGA Championshkip.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Brooks Koepka lines up a putt on the 18th hole, where he had a par Friday during the second round of the PGA Championship.

round. He nearly made a 94-foot putt on No. 4 for another birdie, but he wasn’t complaining after failing to make the cut in the year’s previous three majors. “It’s a good position to be in, and there’s a lot of holes to be played,” Schwartzel said. “I think this golf course, you’re going to have to keep firing. I don’t think you can — most majors, the weekends get difficult,

but I think this course you’re going to have to keep shooting birdies.” For Koepka, it’s the continuation of a good season that just got started a little late. He announced in January that he would have to take time off for his ailing wrist to heal. Not only could he not play golf, but he wasn’t able to hit the weights as he usu-

ally does with gusto, being relegated to leg work. He targeted a return for The Masters but didn’t reach that goal. “It was disappointing not being able to play at Augusta,” he said. “But when you take four months off, you really appreciate it, and you’re eager to get back out here. Any time you can tee it up, especially only doing three majors, it makes every one a little bit more important. I kind of fell back in love with the game a little bit.” When Koepka finally returned to action, it was a gradual progression. He didn’t make the cut in New Orleans. Then he tied for 42nd and then tied for 11th at The Players Championship. Two rounds of 63 put him in second in Fort Worth. A few weeks later he repeated at the U.S. Open. Schwartzel’s fortunes in the majors have not been so good since he won The Masters in 2011. In six previous rounds this year, he failed to break 70. In 35 career appearances in the majors, he has five top-10 finishes. “It’s great. I’m looking forward to playing on the weekend and competing in a major,” he said. “It doesn’t get better than that.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Woodland wears Folds of Honor logo in support HOCHMAN • FROM B1 D1

synchronicity. As was the time Major Dan saw the casket of Corporal Brock Bucklin. “Synchronicity is all around us — signs on the highway of life,” said Major Dan, 45 years old. “It’s the divine current of life leading us to our essence. It’s the courage to take action when that inspiration comes into your path.” When Woodland met Major Dan, they had an immediate connection — both had golfed for the University of Kansas. Woodland was infused with inspiration — he promptly promoted Major’s Dan’s foundation on his golf bag. Perhaps you’ve heard of Folds of Honor? Since 2007, Folds of Honor has donated $115 million in scholarships to the children or spouses of veterans killed or disabled in action. This year, Woodland began wearing a hat on the PGA Tour with the foundation’s logo — a folded triangle-shaped American flag, featuring the canton of blue and stars. And at 34, Woodland is having a breakout year. “It means a lot — Major Dan has been a close friend,” Woodland said after his Friday round of 66. “It’s pretty special to give back. Those men and women sacrifice so much for us so we can come out here and play golf and enjoy our dreams. They hold a special spot in my heart.” During Woodland’s two rounds in St. Louis, spectators have occasionally screamed out “Folds of Honor!” (Others, in jest, have screamed out “M-IZ!”) Woodland’s performance here has been resplendent, even transcendent, considering the history he’s made — the lowest first two-round score in PGA Championship history.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Gary Woodland hits a shot from the fairway on the 10th hole during his second-round 66 on Friday at Bellerive Country Club.

There’s been 100 of these things. Woodland set the record here in St. Louis with a searing 64 and 66, which showcased the driving style that makes him great — obliterate-but-straight. Woodland took advantage of the rain-softened zoysia grass, which set him up for short irons. With a blue flag on his head, he had the yellow flags on his mind. He confidently and consistently placed approach shots near the sticks with the yellow flags. Woodland is someone to root for, even for those who might never spend a dime in the state of Kansas. He gets it. And he gets a lot of it from Major Dan. “I think there’s a big differ-

ence between success and significance,” Major Dan explained while walking Bellerive on Friday, before the heavy stuff came down. “You come out here and you win a golf tournament for yourself, but Gary understands that life is way bigger than that. “For him to support us and ‘fly the flag on his hat,’ as I say, for what he stands for? People love it. They embrace him. … Just this Monday, Folds of Honor gave 4,176 scholarships. In the past seven years, Anheuser-Busch has donated about $14 million. And now our logo is on the product (this year), donating a dollar for every case. And Schnucks just gave us $1.1 million — so St.

Louis is one of the greatest towns in America and one of the hugest supporters of Folds of Honor. And now to have the leader in the clubhouse flying the flag? A lot of synchronicity. I say synchronicity is chance with purpose.” Folds of Honor came to be in 2007, when Major Dan was a passenger on a flight. When it landed, the captain announced passengers would wait on the plane until they removed the flag-cloaked casket of Corporal Brock Bucklin. As Major Dan watched out the window, spotting Corporal Bucklin’s twin brother, other passengers disregarded the request and scurried off the plane. Major Dan’s life

changed that moment — he decided to find a way to honor the families of those killed in action … and a way to motivate others to honor them, too. Now he has the hottest golfer on the planet spreading the word. How close are these two? Major Dan even ministered the island wedding of Gabby and Gary Woodland in 2016. The day before, Major Dan’s flight from the West Coast to Turks and Caicos was canceled, as were many other commercial flights. So Woodland had Major Dan fly to Atlanta and board the private jet of golfer Matt Kuchar. Major Dan got there safe and got a pair of “I dos.” It was a memorable night. Kuchar even did a cannonball in the pool. Now Major Dan is at Gary’s major. Like the thousands of St. Louisans stuffing the galleries at Bellerive, he witnessed some of the best golf ever played in the first 36 holes of a major. Perhaps it’s fitting — or, dare I, synchronicity? — that Woodland’s total score is 130. It takes 13 folds to bring the American flag to its triangle shape. And at Major Dan’s golf club in Oklahoma, a bell tolls 13 times daily at 1300 hours. And who knows — if the tournament is delayed more this weekend, it could be finished on Monday the 13th. “Gary may not win it,” Major Dan said. “I hope he does. But there’s a much bigger tournament called life that we’re all trying to win — and he will win that one, I promise you that.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

A ONE FOR WALLACE

BELLERIVE THEN, NOW

BLACKJACK ON NO. 15

Matt Wallace, 28, of England made a hole-in-one at the par-3 16th, using 5-iron on the 232-yard shot. It was his first professional ace and the third in the PGA Championship since 2010. Wallace kissed the ball, threw it into the stands, then found the fan who caught the ball and signed it.

When Bellerive hosted the 1992 PGA, at 7,148 yards it was a longer course than 27 of the 34 PGA venues that preceded it. Now at 7,316 yards, it’s shorter than nine of the last 10 sites. In 1992, Gene Sauers led after 54 holes with a 206 score, a number that would be T-28 this year.

Of the 80 third-round scores on No. 15, a par 4 of 493 yards, there were only five birdies. Three of those came from the group of Jimmy Walker, Ryan Moore and Kevin Chappell. Chappell made a 3-foot putt, Moore a 6-footer, and Walker a 10-foot putt.

Fowler’s friend gets Cards’ call-up Wisdom sends news in a text BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

Rickie Fowler has known Cardinals farmhand Patrick Wisdom since they were in high school in Murrieta, Calif., and Wisdom, two years younger than Fowler, was friends with Fowler’s sister. When Wisdom has been in Florida for spring training, he’s stayed at Fowler’s house. On Saturday, Wisdom finally made the jump, getting called up to the majors with the Cardinals after seven seasons in the minors. “It’s pretty cool,” Fowler said Saturday. “It’s been a long time coming. He’s put a lot of work in, going through each stage of what you would call professional baseball. … It’s been fun to be as close as I am with our families and everything. Definitely happy for him.” Wisdom finally made his breakthrough. Could it also be

time for Fowler’s? Fowler goes into the final round of the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club three shots off the lead as he searches for his first win at a major. He’s come close before, with eight top-five finishes in majors and second-place finishes in the Masters, the U.S. Open and the British Open. So when he takes to the course at 1:45 p.m. Sunday in the next-to-last pairing, alongside Jon Rahm, who’s also at 9 under, it will be a case of been there, still haven’t done that. “It’s just how comfortable and how confident I’ll feel tomorrow vs. maybe when you look at three, four, five years ago,” Fowler said after shooting a 1-under 69 in the third round. “It will be fun. I’m looking forward to it. It’s going to take a solid round of golf from whoever’s going to win tomorrow because there’s a lot of guys ... obviously Brooks (Koepka) is out front, but a lot of guys are from 10 to seven under. It’s not going to be given to anyone.” Each of those times Fowler came in second, that’s where he

started the final round, and most of the time he’s played well but usually had too many strokes to make up. In this year’s Masters, he was five shots back of Patrick Reed and closed with a 67 and lost by a stroke. In the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst, he was five back after three rounds, closed with a 72 and lost by eight to Martin Kaymer. In the 2014 British Open at Royal Liverpool, he was six shots back of Rory McIlroy, shot a 67 and lost by two. This time, he’s not in second, but in a three-way tie for third with Rahm and Gary Woodland, with Adam Scott between them and leader Koepka. If there’s a good sign for Fowler going into the final round, it’s that his third round was not a good one. While many of the golfers high on the leaderboard were three to five shots under par Saturday, Fowler was only one under. He birdied only one hole on the back nine, that coming on the 17th hole, one that just about all the main contenders in the tournament birdied. He also birdied the sixth and eight holes,

but canceled those out with bogeys on 10 and 13. (Fowler didn’t learn about Wisdom till after the round, but his bogey on 10 came right around the time Wisdom was texting him with the news.) He basically stayed in contention with a lackluster round after shooting 65 and 67 in the first two rounds. “Play better than I did today, that’s for sure,” he said of what he needs to do Sunday. “Fairways and greens, and I’ll make some putts — that will happen — but I definitely need to drive the ball a little better than what I’ve been doing. “Tighten up the irons. I think playing similar to what we did the first day, which was very stress-free golf. (He had six birdies and one bogey that day.) It sounds easy, but hitting the ball in play, getting the ball in the fairway, get it on the green, just kind of keep plodding around and moving forward. “I had to grind it out and fight through things, but overall we’re in a good spot and have a chance to win tomorrow, so I’m looking

forward to that opportunity.” There were certainly some shots he could have saved along the way. He missed birdie putts on 14, 15 and 16. “It’s a fine line,” he said. “There were some tight pins. It is what it is. I was a little off. Didn’t get the ball close enough on a few holes, but I’m happy with where we’re at, not having played our best golf in a 26-hole stretch today.” It was a long day for Fowler, who was one of the golfers on the course when the rain hit Friday. He was up at 4:45 a.m. Saturday to be back on the course for the resumption of play at 7 a.m. He played eight holes, had a quick break, and was back on the course at 1:16 p.m. and finished after 6 p.m. “It’s definitely a long day,” he said. “Long hours and being out here in the heat, in contention, going through the grind. You need a rest mentally and physically.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Tiger Woods bends down to pick up his ball after his putt for par on the 18th green during the rain-delayed finish of the second round of the PGA Championship at Bellerive.

Woods is on the prowl, and the crowds can’t get enough HOCHMAN • FROM D1

It was no longer, “can Tiger Woods win another major?” It was, “can Tiger Woods win this major?” And, sure, yeah, maybe he can. It would be the biggest sports story of the year. He’s eight-under and four off the lead. But we might’ve learned more Saturday about Tiger in the back nine than the front. Those final holes exposed holes. On 11 … and 14 … and 17, he missed a make-able birdie putt. And after three goarounds here at Bellerive, there’s a pattern: Woods has shot 10-under on the front nine, while two-over on the back. If fact, check out the symmetry of the scores: 33-37, 31-35, -31-35. Oh, and Tiger has won a major while trailing after three rounds. Oh, and this year, his final round average score is 73rdbest on the tour. So, in other words … it’ll all make Sunday’s win even more incredible! We’ll see. It would be so much fun if it happened. But brawny Brooks Koepka is built and built for this course. He leads by four strokes. He already won a major this year. And last year. As for Tiger, he was tired. Because of Friday’s rain, he had to play 29 holes on Saturday. And as for the soft greens, “Well, it takes the creativity of the greens away, for sure,” Woods shared. “The putts are very straightforward, they don’t break very much, and just go ahead and take a rap at them.” With each shot, a marshal’s hands rose, cell phones rose, hope rose. St. Louis squeezed behind the ropes and seized the day. “They have been unbelievable,” Woods said of the fans. “Not only supportive, but just so positive. They have been on … and it’s been a pleasure to play in front of them, it really has. Hopefully, we can come back soon.” As for the crowds, which so many golfers have complimented, it’s just feels nice

Tiger Woods tees off on the 17th hole during the finish of the second round.

to get a win. It’s been a good week for St. Louis. There’s been such a positive embracing of this tournament. The city has

had some frustrations baked by a national spotlight — Ferguson, the Rams leaving, the Stockley protests — so here was

a chance to be a part of something awesome. And the crowds truly were the definition of that word. And of course, plenty of people would’ve showed up even if Tiger Woods didn’t (literally or figuratively). But he’s coming off a top-10 finish in the British Open. Tiger is hunting. Many folks here probably wondered: Could you imagine if he won and I didn’t see him in St. Louis? And on Saturday, Tiger played all the hits. Following a birdie, there was a fist pump on the first hole. There were barked curse words after an errant drive. There was his unbreakable stare as he walked from hole to hole, as fans peppered him with his own name. There was another squeezed fist on 17. And more cursing after 17. And, finally, from the post-round podium, there was that famous smile. “I just feel like it’s been really good to have Tiger back,” said golfer Stewart Cink of the man with 14 majors. “I got to see it firsthand today. … Kind of reminded me of being in the vortex a lot of years ago. It was awesome. Being in Tiger’s group is always exciting.” Everyone just seemed so unwaveringly encouraging. It is interesting that so many fans have pushed his rampant infidelities aside like with a rake in a sand trap. There was a time when many were disgusted with Woods — and some surely can’t see the famous smile without thinking about his infamous car crash. But the passage of time and the narrative of comebacks make for a delicious cocktail of redemption, and so many of us sure drink it up. Or perhaps it’s just sort of “understood” that Tiger Woods, in full, is forever a flawed hero — but in sports, the word hero is always stronger than any adjective wedged beside it. So here we go. On Sunday, August 12, 2018, Tiger Woods could win a major in St. Louis. Our town will be palpitating. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


08.12.2018 • Sunday • M 3

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

A ONE FOR WALLACE

BELLERIVE THEN, NOW

BLACKJACK ON NO. 15

Matt Wallace, 28, of England made a hole-in-one at the par-3 16th, using 5-iron on the 232-yard shot. It was his first professional ace and the third in the PGA Championship since 2010. Wallace kissed the ball, threw it into the stands, then found the fan who caught the ball and signed it.

When Bellerive hosted the 1992 PGA, at 7,148 yards it was a longer course than 27 of the 34 PGA venues that preceded it. Now at 7,316 yards, it’s shorter than nine of the last 10 sites. In 1992, Gene Sauers led after 54 holes with a 206 score, a number that would be T-28 this year.

Of the 80 third-round scores on No. 15, a par 4 of 493 yards, there were only five birdies. Three of those came from the group of Jimmy Walker, Ryan Moore and Kevin Chappell. Chappell made a 3-foot putt, Moore a 6-footer, and Walker a 10-foot putt.

Fowler’s friend gets Cards’ call-up Wisdom sends news in a text BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

Rickie Fowler has known Cardinals farmhand Patrick Wisdom since they were in high school in Murrieta, Calif., and Wisdom, two years younger than Fowler, was friends with Fowler’s sister. When Wisdom has been in Florida for spring training, he’s stayed at Fowler’s house. On Saturday, Wisdom finally made the jump, getting called up to the majors with the Cardinals after seven seasons in the minors. “It’s pretty cool,” Fowler said Saturday. “It’s been a long time coming. He’s put a lot of work in, going through each stage of what you would call professional baseball. … It’s been fun to be as close as I am with our families and everything. Definitely happy for him.” Wisdom finally made his breakthrough. Could it also be

time for Fowler’s? Fowler goes into the final round of the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club three shots off the lead as he searches for his first win at a major. He’s come close before, with eight top-five finishes in majors and second-place finishes in the Masters, the U.S. Open and the British Open. So when he takes to the course at 1:45 p.m. Sunday in the next-to-last pairing, alongside Jon Rahm, who’s also at 9 under, it will be a case of been there, still haven’t done that. “It’s just how comfortable and how confident I’ll feel tomorrow vs. maybe when you look at three, four, five years ago,” Fowler said after shooting a 1-under 69 in the third round. “It will be fun. I’m looking forward to it. It’s going to take a solid round of golf from whoever’s going to win tomorrow because there’s a lot of guys ... obviously Brooks (Koepka) is out front, but a lot of guys are from 10 to seven under. It’s not going to be given to anyone.” Each of those times Fowler came in second, that’s where he

started the final round, and most of the time he’s played well but usually had too many strokes to make up. In this year’s Masters, he was five shots back of Patrick Reed and closed with a 67 and lost by a stroke. In the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst, he was five back after three rounds, closed with a 72 and lost by eight to Martin Kaymer. In the 2014 British Open at Royal Liverpool, he was six shots back of Rory McIlroy, shot a 67 and lost by two. This time, he’s not in second, but in a three-way tie for third with Rahm and Gary Woodland, with Adam Scott between them and leader Koepka. If there’s a good sign for Fowler going into the final round, it’s that his third round was not a good one. While many of the golfers high on the leaderboard were three to five shots under par Saturday, Fowler was only one under. He birdied only one hole on the back nine, that coming on the 17th hole, one that just about all the main contenders in the tournament birdied. He also birdied the sixth and eight holes,

but canceled those out with bogeys on 10 and 13. (Fowler didn’t learn about Wisdom till after the round, but his bogey on 10 came right around the time Wisdom was texting him with the news.) He basically stayed in contention with a lackluster round after shooting 65 and 67 in the first two rounds. “Play better than I did today, that’s for sure,” he said of what he needs to do Sunday. “Fairways and greens, and I’ll make some putts — that will happen — but I definitely need to drive the ball a little better than what I’ve been doing. “Tighten up the irons. I think playing similar to what we did the first day, which was very stress-free golf. (He had six birdies and one bogey that day.) It sounds easy, but hitting the ball in play, getting the ball in the fairway, get it on the green, just kind of keep plodding around and moving forward. “I had to grind it out and fight through things, but overall we’re in a good spot and have a chance to win tomorrow, so I’m looking

forward to that opportunity.” There were certainly some shots he could have saved along the way. He missed birdie putts on 14, 15 and 16. “It’s a fine line,” he said. “There were some tight pins. It is what it is. I was a little off. Didn’t get the ball close enough on a few holes, but I’m happy with where we’re at, not having played our best golf in a 26-hole stretch today.” It was a long day for Fowler, who was one of the golfers on the course when the rain hit Friday. He was up at 4:45 a.m. Saturday to be back on the course for the resumption of play at 7 a.m. He played eight holes, had a quick break, and was back on the course at 1:16 p.m. and finished after 6 p.m. “It’s definitely a long day,” he said. “Long hours and being out here in the heat, in contention, going through the grind. You need a rest mentally and physically.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Tiger Woods bends down to pick up his ball after his putt for par on the 18th green during the rain-delayed finish of the second round of the PGA Championship at Bellerive.

Woods is on the prowl, and the fans here can’t get enough HOCHMAN • FROM D1

It was no longer, “can Tiger Woods win another major?” It was, “can Tiger Woods win this major?” And, sure, yeah, maybe he can. It would be the biggest sports story of the year. He’s 8 under and four off the lead. But we might’ve learned more Saturday about Tiger on the back nine than the front. Those final holes exposed holes. On 11 … and 14 … and 17, he missed a make-able birdie putt. And after three go-arounds here at Bellerive, there’s a pattern: Woods has shot 10 under on the front nine, while 2 over on the back. If fact, check out the symmetry of the scores: 3337, 31-35, 31-35. Oh, and Tiger has won a major while trailing after three rounds. Oh, and this year, his final-round average score is 73rdbest on the tour. So, in other words … it’ll all make Sunday’s win even more incredible! We’ll see. It would be so much fun if it happened. But brawny Brooks Koepka is built, and built for this course. He leads by four strokes. He already won a major this year. And last year. As for Tiger, he was tired. Because of Friday’s rain, he had to play 29 holes Saturday. And as for the soft greens, “Well, it takes the creativity of the greens away, for sure,” Woods shared. “The putts are very straightforward, they don’t break very much, and just go ahead and take a rap at them.” With each shot, a marshal’s hands rose, cell phones rose, hope rose. St. Louis squeezed behind the ropes and seized the day. “They have been unbelievable,” Woods said of the fans. “Not only supportive, but just so positive. They have been on … and it’s been a pleasure to play in front of them, it really has. Hopefully, we can come back soon.” As for the crowds, which so many golfers have complimented, it just feels nice

Tiger Woods tees off on the 17th hole during the finish of the second round.

to get a win. It’s been a good week for St. Louis. There’s been such a positive embracing of this tournament. The city has

had some frustrations baked by a national spotlight — Ferguson, the Rams leaving, the Stockley protests — so here was

a chance to be a part of something awesome. And the crowds truly were the definition of that word. And of course, plenty of people would’ve showed up even if Tiger Woods didn’t (literally or figuratively). But he’s coming off a top-10 finish in the British Open. Tiger is hunting. Many folks here probably wondered: Could you imagine if he won and I didn’t see him in St. Louis? And on Saturday, Tiger played all the hits. Following a birdie, there was a fist pump on the first hole. There were barked curse words after an errant drive. There was his unbreakable stare as he walked from hole to hole, as fans peppered him with his own name. There was another squeezed fist on 17. And more cursing after 17. And, finally, from the post-round podium, there was that famous smile. “I just feel like it’s been really good to have Tiger back,” said golfer Stewart Cink of the man with 14 majors. “I got to see it firsthand today. … Kind of reminded me of being in the vortex a lot of years ago. It was awesome. Being in Tiger’s group is always exciting.” Everyone just seemed so unwaveringly encouraging. It is interesting that so many fans have pushed his rampant infidelities aside like with a rake in a sand trap. There was a time when many were disgusted with Woods — and some surely can’t see the famous smile without thinking about his infamous car crash. But the passage of time and the narrative of comebacks make for a delicious cocktail of redemption, and so many of us sure drink it up. Or perhaps it’s just sort of “understood” that Tiger Woods, in full, is forever a flawed hero — but in sports, the word hero is always stronger than any adjective wedged beside it. So here we go. On Sunday, August 12, 2018, Tiger Woods could win a major in St. Louis. Our town will be palpitating. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 08.12.2018

MIZZOU FOOTBALL

Swinson expected to miss season BY BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Tight end Messiah Swinson, a true freshman, was expected to play for Mizzou this fall. Considering his position group includes starters Albert Okwuegbunam and Kendall Blanton, along with reserves Logan Christopherson and Brendan Scales, that’s saying something. But that now doesn’t seem likely.

Swinson, who is 6 feet 7 and 260 pounds, is expected to miss the season because of a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee, the team confirmed Friday. He was injured during a drill this week. Swinson’s setback is the first significant blow to the Tigers during their first week of fall camp. The pass-catcher from Glen Head, N.Y., had made multiple impressive catches during portions of practices open to the media.

FREDERICKSON • FROM D1

repurposing one of Burger King’s paper crowns. For now, though, the turnover king who emerges from each session of fall camp is simply toasted with a round of applause from his teammates and honored with a highlight-reel recap. He gets bragging rights — until a teammate snatches what he himself stole. A daily defensive challenge that has given this camp a Game of Thrones vibe started as a suggestion from Ryan Walters toward the end of last season. As the defensive coordinator’s role has expanded, so has the internal race to sharpen a dulled edge. “If you ask our guys, they will tell you the key to what we need to have in our favor is the turnover margin,” thirdyear Tigers coach Barry Odom said Friday. “That’s taking care of the ball offensively, being smart with it. But defensively, it’s finding ways to get it back for our offense. It goes together. If you end the game, and you are a plus in the turnover margin, you have a chance to win.” Sounds simple, right? Easier said than done. And perhaps too easily forgotten. Last season, Mizzou’s turnover margin of minus-eight ranked 111th in the nation. The Tigers turned the ball over 25 times while creating only 17 fumble recoveries and interceptions. These numbers did not sit well with a head coach who has defense in his DNA. Some of it can be blamed on bad luck. No one knows how an oblong football is going to bounce. But the more potential turnovers a team forces, the higher the number of bounces that might go your way. “Tip the ball,” Odom said. “Go intercept it. If it’s on the ground, scoop it up. Really, it’s just emphasizing it. In meetings, making it a mind-set. Somehow, some way, get the ball back. Get it back. Take it back. Get it back to our offense.” Sometimes, gimmicks work. Think naming a turnover king is tacky? Miami would like a word. The Hurricanes handed out a gaudy turnover chain on the sideline last season. Their 31 takeaways ranked third in the country. Every defensive player knows turnovers are good. Not every player looks to force them in the heat of the moment. That’s the instinct Walters and Odom have been working to instill. “Any time we get a tackle, try to strip the ball out,” starting defensive tackle Terry Beckner Jr. explained. “Force fumbles. Go get it.” “It’s something I need to get better at,” echoed Garrett. “Second guy in, go after the ball. If we get it back, we get to put it back in the hands of (quarterback) Drew (Lock) and our offense. That’s a big deal.” “Being more aggressive,” summarized starting cornerback Adam Sparks. “Running to the ball. If it’s all the way to the sideline, it doesn’t matter. We are all sprinting to it. That’s the only way to get a takeaway. Run to the ball.” Freshman defensive back Chris Mills forgot this last key during a portion of Friday’s practice that was open to the media. Odom had asked him to give chase to a receiver who was not within reach, because what if that ball popped out? When Mills didn’t show enough burst toward the ball, Walters dispatched the freshman on a lap around the field. Apparently not every point of emphasis is as fun as being named turnover king. The result, though, could pay dividends for a defense that returns seven starters and some key contributors who were thrust into SEC action earlier than expected last season. “You can’t teach experience,” said Garrett, a junior. “You can’t buy it. It comes with reps, and time. The more you have, the more comfortable you are going to be. Sometimes, you have to go through it a little bit to get to where you are now.” Perhaps the best player to ask about a sharper, more aggressive defense is the quarterback who faces it daily. Lock said he has noticed an uptick in batted balls this ilable

ava Gift ates olidays! cCertificates H ertifiAvailable e C h t t f i r G ct fo

FREE

Perfe

Fly Tying & Casting Lessons Our FFF Certified instructors have been teaching fly casting and fly tying in the St. Louis area for over 35 year...FREE!

Call to sign up. It’s just too much fun to miss out on!

8307 Manchester Rd.

314-963-7884 • www.feather-craft.com Compare Our CD Rates Bank-issued, FDIC-insured

1-year

2-year

3-year

2.35 % 2.80 % 3.00%

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000

Here are the other injury updates the team provided Friday: • Starting linebacker Ronnell Perkins and starting defensive tackle Jordan Elliott are sitting out because of knee strains. • Starting linebacker Terez Hall has missed at least two practices because of a hamstring injury. • Starting receiver Johnathon Johnson is battling a bug of some kind, perhaps the one that bounced among players during

camp. • Freshman linebacker Chad Bailey had surgery to repair a torn thumb ligament. He’s expected to be sidelined at least two weeks. “At this point in the camp, injuries are the name of the game,” Tigers coach Barry Odom said after practice. “Other than Messiah (and Bailey), we feel like we are going to get everybody back here the next time we are out on the field.”

Tigers crown turnover kings in camp

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Defensive lineman Terry Beckner Jr. (right) tries to get past teammate Markell Utsey during Missouri’s football practice session Friday.

camp. The windows an inexperienced secondary left open last season are not there as often, and they sure seem to slam shut sooner these days. “Tipped balls, they end in the defense’s favor,” Odom said. “We have the opportunity to play a little more zone coverage at times (this season). That has helped us out some. Also, the speed and understanding of what we are doing (has improved).” Twice during live portions of camp, according to observers who are not ushered out minutes in, a defensive

back has intercepted one of Lock’s passes and returned it for a touchdown. “If we can stop him,” Sparks said, “we can stop anybody in the SEC.” Stop, then strip. A kingdom is up for grabs. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

The Missouri Athletic Club – A Tradition of Impactful Community Support The Missouri Athletic Club, which opened its doors on Sept. 13, 1903, was born into a city bustling with preparations for the 1904 Olympics and World’s Fair. The spectacular new Club played a pivotal role hosting dignitaries from around the world who were visiting St. Louis for the Olympics and World’s Fair. Athletes from the MAC competed in boxing, wrestling, water polo, swimming and track at the Olympic Games. In that first year, the foundation for a St. Louis institution was established. Community outreach through athletics has remained at the forefront of the MAC’s mission for more than a century. Today, members of the Missouri Athletic Club give back to the St. Louis community through its Sports Foundation. Over the past decade, the Foundation has donated more than $300,000 to local children’s charities. Last year, the MAC’s Charitable Society for Children donated approximately $30,000 to local children’s charities. Each year, the MAC selects three local children’s charities to support. In 2017, the MAC supported Home Works!, It’s Your Birthday, Inc., and Friends of Kathy J. Weinman Shelter. This year, the MAC is supporting Books for Newborns, Join Hands ESL, and KEEN (Kids Enjoy Exercise Now) not only financially, but also through volunteer opportunities. In recent years, the MAC has also supported athleticfocused organizations such as Mathews-Dickey Boys & Girls Club and the Special Olympics. Missouri Athletic Club member Nat Walsh is actively involved in this community outreach effort. He is a member of the MAC’s Board of Governors, co-chair of the Charitable Society for Children, and avid basketball player at the Club. Nat is also on the Board of Directors at Habitat for Humanity in St. Louis. His connections to these organizations and his heart for giving spurred a partnership between the Missouri Athletic Club and Habitat for Humanity. “Habitat for Humanity – St. Louis is a remarkable organization that assists local families with the purchase of new or rehabbed homes through an affordable mortgage and their contribution of sweat equity during the construction process,” said Walsh. “While these energy efficient homes provide the vital underpinning of stable housing, they do not come with the “extras” like a basketball hoop.” Nat and Avis McHugh, Director of Family Services at Habitat for Humanity were exploring creative ways to allow the families to have affordable, safe and heart-healthy fun at their disposal. They came up with the idea of installing basketball hoops that would allow kids to play in the comfort and safety of their own yards, while enhancing the family’s pride of homeownership. Nat shared this idea with the MAC basketball league members, and they approached the Sports Foundation about allocating funds to install hoops at Habitat homes. To date, the MAC has sponsored and installed two hoops at Habitat homes and has plans to install seven more. “The dedications have been great!” said Avis. “The partner families really look forward to the opportunity to personally thank the group, and getting a bit of play time with the members is a major bonus.”

* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 08/08/18. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDICinsured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC).

FDI-1867H-A

Kelly D Clark Financial Advisor 13088 Tesson Ferry Road St Louis, MO 63128 314-849-6790

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

To learn more about the MAC’s Foundations, contact Cynthia Goudy, Director of Foundations at cgoudy@mac-stl.org.


GOLF

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 08.12.2018

100TH PGA STATISTICS THE COURSE

SCOREBOARD

Bellerive Country Club played to a 69.50 scoring average in Saturday’s third round, measured at 7,224 yards for the par-70 layout. The course yielded 53 rounds of par or better from the 80 players who made the cut.

Saturday | Bellerive CC | Purse: $11 million | Yards: 7,316 | Par: 70 THIRD ROUND

HOLE RANKINGS (hardest to easiest)

Rickie Fowler hits a tee shot during Saturday’s long day at the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. ROBERT COHEN rcohen@postdispatch.com

Rk. Hole Par Yds.

Avg.

Rk. Hole Par Yds.

1

4.30

10

18

4 440 3.975

10

4 502

Avg.

T-2

4

4

516 4.175

11

11

4 373 3.925

T-2

6

3 198 3.175

12

7

4 400 3.913

4

15

4 493 4.150

13

1

4 427

5

13

3

T-14

9

4 432 3.875

T-14

14

4 402 3.875

6

5

7

16

8

12

9

2

192 3.138

4 463

4.10

3 232 3.075

16

4 462 4.038 4 418

4.00

3.90

3

3

142 2.775

17

8

5 602 4.663

18

17

5 550

HARDEST HOLE

EASIEST HOLE

NO. 10, PAR 4, 502 YARDS Scoring average • 4.30 Eagles • 0 Birdies • 11 Pars • 39 Bogeys • 26 Others • 4

NO. 17, PAR 5, 550 YARDS Scoring average • 4.45 Eagles • 3 Birdies • 42 Pars • 31 Bogeys • 4 Others • 0

4.45

THE PLAYERS • Through three rounds DRIVING DISTANCE Rk. Player 1 Rory McIlroy T2 Jason Day T2 Brooks Koepka 4 Ollie Schniederjans 5 Byeong Hun An 6 Gary Woodland 7 Jason Kokrak 8 Jhonattan Vegas 9 Dustin Johnson 10 Justin Thomas

Avg. 330.3 325.8 325.8 323.0 318.5 317.5 317.3 316.8 315.7 314.5

GREENS IN REGULATION Rk. Player Pct. T1 Rickie Fowler 81.48 T1 Julian Suri 81.48 T3 Ross Fisher 79.63 T3 Jon Rahm 79.63 T5 Jason Day 77.78 T5 Andrew Landry 77.78 T5 Thomas Pieters 77.78 T5 Justin Thomas 77.78 T9 Daniel Berger 75.93 T9 Patrick Cantlay 75.93

STROKES: APPROACH GREEN Rk. Player Gain 1 Julian Suri 2.557 1 Daniel Berger 2.310 3 Eddie Pepperell 2.257 4 Justin Thomas 2.127 5 Rickie Fowler 1.774 6 Jon Rahm 1.646 7 Adam Scott 1.590 8 Tiger Woods 1.502 9 Billy Horschel 1.481 10 Chez Reavie 1.409

STROKES GAINED: PUTTING Rk. Player Gain 1 Matt Wallace 2.596 2 Shane Lowry 2.050 3 Jordan Spieth 1.667 4 Pat Perez 1.621 5 Jimmy Walker 1.554 6 Chris Kirk 1.509 7 Emiliano Grillo 1.502 8 Brooks Koepka 1.301 9 Joaquin Niemann 1.300 10 Mike Lorenzo-Vera 1.287

DRIVING ACCURACY Rk. Player Pct. 1 Kevin Kisner 88.10 2 Ben Kern 83.33 T3 Keegan Bradley 80.95 T3 Austin Cook 80.95 T5 Martin Kaymer 78.57 T5 Shane Lowry 78.57 T5 Francesco Molinari 78.57 T5 Adrian Otaegui 78.57 T9 Chris Kirk 76.19 T9 Brooks Koepka 76.19

STROKES GAINED: OFF TEE Rk. Player Gain 1 Brooks Koepka 1.590 2 Gary Woodland 1.255 3 Brandon Stone 1.248 4 Tony Finau 1.222 5 Thomas Pieters 1.050 6 Jon Rahm 0.973 7 Tommy Fleetwood 0.924 8 Francesco Molinari 0.835 9 Jhonattan Vegas 0.829 10 Austin Cook 0.815

STROKES: AROUND GREEN Rk. Player Gain 1 Ted Potter 1.802 2 Stewart Cink 1.659 3 Webb Simpson 1.453 4 Jason Day 1.075 5 Thorbjorn Olesen 1.022 6 Rory McIlroy 0.998 7 Ollie Schniederjans 0.941 8 Charl Schwartzel 0.827 9 Tyrrell Hatton 0.766 10 Sungjae Im 0.755

STROKES GAINED: TOTAL Rk. Player Gain 1 Brooks Koepka 4.157 2 Adam Scott 3.491 T3 Rickie Fowler 3.157 T3 Jon Rahm 3.157 T3 Gary Woodland 3.157 T6 Stewart Cink 2.824 T6 Jason Day 2.824 T6 Shane Lowry 2.824 T6 Charl Schwartzel 2.824 T6 Justin Thomas 2.824

Brooks Koepka Adam Scott Jon Rahm Rickie Fowler Gary Woodland Tiger Woods Stewart Cink Jason Day Justin Thomas Shane Lowry Charl Schwartzel Julian Suri Francesco Molinari Kevin Kisner Daniel Berger Xander Schauffele Webb Simpson Pat Perez Thomas Pieters Brandon Stone Eddie Pepperell Ian Poulter Matt Wallace Emiliano Grillo Justin Rose Patrick Cantlay Dustin Johnson Chris Kirk Ryan Fox Branden Grace Billy Horschel Chez Reavie Jordan Spieth Jason Kokrak Seungsu Han Andrew Landry Rafa Cabrera Bello Tyrrell Hatton Kevin Na Ryan Moore Zach Johnson Ben Kern Martin Kaymer Dylan Frittelli Mike Lorenzo-Vera Rory McIlroy Tommy Fleetwood Satoshi Kodaira Yuta Ikeda Keegan Bradley Brice Garnett Russell Knox Austin Cook Brandt Snedeker Jimmy Walker Ted Potter Jr. Sungjae Im J.J. Spaun Andrew Putnam Adrian Otaegui Tony Finau Byeong Hun An Ollie Schniederjans Ross Fisher Russell Henley Hideki Matsuyama Joaquin Niemann Kevin Chappell Nick Watney Jhonattan Vegas Thorbjorn Olesen Marc Leishman Jim Furyk Brian Harman Vijay Singh Charles Howell III Cameron Smith Scott Brown Chris Stroud Brian Gay

69-63-66— 198 70-65-65—200 68-67-66— 201 65-67-69— 201 64-66-71— 201 70-66-66—202 67-69-66—202 67-68-67—202 69-65-68—202 69-64-69—202 70-63-69—202 69-66-68—203 68-67-68—203 67-64-72—203 73-65-66—204 70-67-67—204 68-68-68—204 67-67-70—204 67-66-71—204 66-68-70—204 72-66-67—205 67-70-68—205 71-66-68—205 69-67-69—205 67-69-69—205 68-67-70—205 67-66-72—205 68-70-68—206 68-70-68—206 68-70-68—206 68-69-69—206 71-68-67—206 71-66-69—206 68-67-71—206 74-66-66—206 73-65-69— 207 70-68-69— 207 71-67-69— 207 70-69-68— 207 69-70-68— 207 66-70-71— 207 71-69-67— 207 71-69-67— 207 73-67-67— 207 73-65-70—208 70-67-71—208 69-70-69—208 71-68-69—208 68-69-71—208 69-68-71—208 71-68-69—208 71-68-69—208 67-72-69—208 72-67-69—208 69-70-69—208 74-66-68—208 71-67-71—209 69-68-72—209 68-69-72—209 73-67-69—209 74-66-69—209 70-70-69—209 67-71-72— 210 68-69-73— 210 74-65-71— 210 68-69-73— 210 68-71-71— 210 69-71-70— 210 75-65-70— 210 70-70-70— 210 70-68-73— 211 68-71-72— 211 69-71-71— 211 72-68-71— 211 71-69-71— 211 74-66-72— 212 74-66-73— 213 72-68-74— 214 69-70-76— 215 67-73-75— 215

-12 -10 -9 -9 -9 -8 -8 -8 -8 -8 -8 -7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +5

MISSED CUT Luke List Kyle Stanley Matt Kuchar Sergio Garcia Brendan Steele Shugo Imahira Davis Love III Padraig Harrington Bryson DeChambeau J.B. Holmes Troy Merritt Patton Kizzire Whee Kim Alex Noren Shaun Micheel Bill Haas Justin Harding Kevin Streelman Henrik Stenson Jordan Smith Ryan Armour Peter Uihlein Matthew Fitzpatrick John Daly Patrick Reed Charley Hoffman Anirban Lahiri Sean McCarty James Hahn Rich Beem Adam Hadwin Shubhankar Sharma Alexander Levy Mikko Korhonen Beau Hossler Chris Wood Paul Broadhurst Jason Dufner Aaron Wise Ryuko Tokimatsu Danny Willett Phil Mickelson Andy Sullivan K. Aphibarnrat Kelly Kraft Zach J. Johnson Craig Hocknull Alexander Bjork Ryan Vermeer Jamie Lovemark Scott Piercy Paul Dunne Danny Balin Matt Dobyns Y.E. Yang Jason Schmuhl Chesson Hadley Bubba Watson Paul Casey Omar Uresti Matthew Borchert Rich Berberian, Jr. Shawn Warren Si Woo Kim Craig Bowden Marty Jertson Michael Kim Brian Smock Michael Block David Muttitt Johan Kok Jaysen Hansen Jorge Campillo Yusaku Miyazato Bob Sowards

71-70 68-73 71-70 70-71 73-68 72-69 75-66 71-70 71-70 73-68 71-70 72-69 75-67 71-71 73-69 72-70 72-70 72-70 73-69 74-68 69-73 73-69 72-70 73-70 72-71 72-71 70-73 74-69 73-70 74-69 71-72 69-74 76-67 68-75 73-71 70-74 74-70 72-72 76-68 73-71 73-71 73-71 75-69 75-69 71-74 76-69 72-73 72-73 73-73 71-75 74-72 73-73 72-75 76-71 73-74 74-73 75-73 70-78 75-73 75-73 74-74 74-74 77-71 72-77 75-74 76-74 73-77 79-71 75-75 81-69 78-73 76-75 78-74 76-77 80-75

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 150 150 150 150 150 151 151 152 153 155

TEE TIMES 7:29 a.m.: Chris Stroud, Brian Gay 7:38 a.m.: Cameron Smith, Scott Brown 7:47 a.m.: Vijay Singh, Charles Howell III 7:56 a.m.: Jim Furyk, Brian Harman 8:05 a.m.: Thorbjorn Olesen, Marc Leishman 8:14 a.m.: Nick Watney, Jhonattan Vegas 8:23 a.m.: Joaquin Niemann, Kevin Chappell 8:32 a.m.: Russell Henley, Hideki Matsuyama 8:41 a.m.: Ollie Schniederjans, Ross Fisher 8:50 a.m.: Tony Finau, Byeong Hun An 8:59 a.m.: Andrew Putnam, Adrian Otaegui 9:08 a.m.: Sungjae Im, J.J. Spaun 9:17 a.m.: Jimmy Walker, Ted Potter 9:26 a.m.: Austin Cook, Brandt Snedeker 9:35 a.m.: Brice Garnett, Russell Knox 9:53 a.m.: Yuta Ikeda, Keegan Bradley 10:02 a.m.: Tommy Fleetwood, Satoshi Kodaira 10:11 a.m.: Mike Lorenzo-Vera, Rory McIlroy

ilable

ava Gift ates olidays! cCertificates H ertifiAvailable e C h t t f i r G ct fo

10:20 a.m.: Martin Kaymer, Dylan Frittelli 10:29 a.m.: Zach Johnson, Ben Kern 10:38 a.m.: Kevin Na, Ryan Moore 10:47 a.m.: Rafa Cabrera Bello, Tyrrell Hatton 10:56 a.m.: Seungsu Han, Andrew Landry 11:05 a.m.: Jordan Spieth, Jason Kokrak 11:15 a.m.: Billy Horschel, Chez Reavie 11:25 a.m.: Ryan Fox, Branden Grace 11:35 a.m.: Dustin Johnson, Chris Kirk 11:45 a.m.: Justin Rose, Patrick Cantlay 11:55 a.m.: Matt Wallace, Emiliano Grillo 12:05 p.m.: Eddie Pepperell, Ian Poulter 12:15 p.m.: Thomas Pieters, Brandon Stone 12:25 p.m.: Webb Simpson, Pat Perez 12:45 p.m.: Daniel Berger, Xander Schauffele 12:55 p.m.: Francesco Molinari, Kevin Kisner 1:05 p.m.: Charl Schwartzel, Julian Suri 1:15 p.m.: Justin Thomas, Shane Lowry 1:25 p.m.: Stewart Cink, Jason Day 1:35 p.m.: Gary Woodland, Tiger Woods 1:45 p.m.: Jon Rahm, Rickie Fowler 1:55 p.m.: Brooks Koepka, Adam Scott

FREE

Perfe

Fly Tying & Casting Lessons Our FFF Certified instructors have been teaching fly casting and fly tying in the St. Louis area for over 35 year...FREE!

Call to sign up. It’s just too much fun to miss out on!

8307 Manchester Rd.

314-963-7884 • www.feather-craft.com Compare Our CD Rates Bank-issued, FDIC-insured

1-year

2-year

3-year

2.35 % 2.80 % 3.00%

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000

The Missouri Athletic Club – A Tradition of Impactful Community Support The Missouri Athletic Club, which opened its doors on Sept. 13, 1903, was born into a city bustling with preparations for the 1904 Olympics and World’s Fair. The spectacular new Club played a pivotal role hosting dignitaries from around the world who were visiting St. Louis for the Olympics and World’s Fair. Athletes from the MAC competed in boxing, wrestling, water polo, swimming and track at the Olympic Games. In that first year, the foundation for a St. Louis institution was established. Community outreach through athletics has remained at the forefront of the MAC’s mission for more than a century. Today, members of the Missouri Athletic Club give back to the St. Louis community through its Sports Foundation. Over the past decade, the Foundation has donated more than $300,000 to local children’s charities. Last year, the MAC’s Charitable Society for Children donated approximately $30,000 to local children’s charities. Each year, the MAC selects three local children’s charities to support. In 2017, the MAC supported Home Works!, It’s Your Birthday, Inc., and Friends of Kathy J. Weinman Shelter. This year, the MAC is supporting Books for Newborns, Join Hands ESL, and KEEN (Kids Enjoy Exercise Now) not only financially, but also through volunteer opportunities. In recent years, the MAC has also supported athleticfocused organizations such as Mathews-Dickey Boys & Girls Club and the Special Olympics. Missouri Athletic Club member Nat Walsh is actively involved in this community outreach effort. He is a member of the MAC’s Board of Governors, co-chair of the Charitable Society for Children, and avid basketball player at the Club. Nat is also on the Board of Directors at Habitat for Humanity in St. Louis. His connections to these organizations and his heart for giving spurred a partnership between the Missouri Athletic Club and Habitat for Humanity. “Habitat for Humanity – St. Louis is a remarkable organization that assists local families with the purchase of new or rehabbed homes through an affordable mortgage and their contribution of sweat equity during the construction process,” said Walsh. “While these energy efficient homes provide the vital underpinning of stable housing, they do not come with the “extras” like a basketball hoop.” Nat and Avis McHugh, Director of Family Services at Habitat for Humanity were exploring creative ways to allow the families to have affordable, safe and heart-healthy fun at their disposal. They came up with the idea of installing basketball hoops that would allow kids to play in the comfort and safety of their own yards, while enhancing the family’s pride of homeownership. Nat shared this idea with the MAC basketball league members, and they approached the Sports Foundation about allocating funds to install hoops at Habitat homes. To date, the MAC has sponsored and installed two hoops at Habitat homes and has plans to install seven more. “The dedications have been great!” said Avis. “The partner families really look forward to the opportunity to personally thank the group, and getting a bit of play time with the members is a major bonus.”

* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 08/08/18. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDICinsured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC).

FDI-1867H-A

Kelly D Clark Financial Advisor 13088 Tesson Ferry Road St Louis, MO 63128 314-849-6790

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

To learn more about the MAC’s Foundations, contact Cynthia Goudy, Director of Foundations at cgoudy@mac-stl.org.

+1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +6 +7 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12 +13 +15


SPORTS

08.12.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • D9

MOTOR SPORTS COLLEGE NOTEBOOK

MLB NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trout, Jansen go on DL

headline Hamlin takes pole in Michigan

subhed Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle Busch will start in second spot

Mike Trout has landed on the disabled list, somethin