Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SATURDAY • 08.11.2018 • $2.00

MISSOURI’S BLUE WAVE?

‘Right to work’ rejection shines light on pro-union, pro-Trump voters

TOTAL BALLOTS CAST

PERCENT AFFILIATION OF VOTERS

300,000

80

eration mechanic, is a supporter of President Donald Trump. But he joined with a large majority of voters in this red state Tuesday to reject “right to work” legislation that would have sharply constrained union organizing. Long, 43, a union member, said unions had played an indispensable role in his life. “Our benefits are just awesome. Our health

Republican

BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

60

200,000

FRANKLIN COUNTY • Scott Long, a refrig-

Democrat

70

250,000

BY JEFF STEIN Washington Post

50 150,000 40 100,000

30

50,000 0

20 0

’06 ’08 ’10 ’12 ’14 ’16 ’18

’06

’08

’10

’12

’14

’16

SOURCE: St. Louis County

See TRUMP • Page A5

Democratic votes skyrocket in county, but GOP plays down data

VOTER TURNOUT IN ST. LOUIS CO. AUGUST PRIMARIES

PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

’18

JEFFERSON CITY • Seventy percent of primary voters in St. Louis County took a Democratic ballot on Tuesday, far more than the 49 percent of county voters who opted to weigh in in the Democratic primary two years ago. Voter turnout also skyrocketed, with 42 percent of all registered county voters casting ballots on Tuesday. County voter turnout in August primaries dating to 2006 had never See COUNTY • Page A5

TV: 7 A.M. TNT, 1 P.M. CBS

DELAY OF GAME

Monsanto ordered to pay $289 million in California Roundup case FROM NEWS SERVICES

SAN FRANCISCO • A San Francisco jury ordered on Friday agribusiness giant Monsanto to pay $289 million to a former school groundskeeper dying of cancer, saying the company’s popular Roundup weedkiller had contributed to his disease. The lawsuit brought by Dewayne Johnson was the first to go to trial among hundreds filed in state and federal courts saying Roundup causes non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which Monsanto denies. Jurors in state Superior Court agreed that the product had contributed to Johnson’s cancer and that the company should have provided a label warning of the potential health hazard. Johnson’s attorneys sought and won $39 million in compensatory damages and $250 million of the $373 million they wanted in punitive damages. “This jury found Monsanto acted with malice and oppression because they knew what they were doing was wrong and doing it with reckless disregard for human life,” said See MONSANTO • Page A8 ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Patrick Reed hits into a pine tree but was able to save par on the 14th hole during the second round of the 100th PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club in Town and Country on Friday. Weather suspended play Friday, with the second round scheduled to resume at 7 a.m. Saturday. COMPLETE COVERAGE OF THE PGA CHAMPIONSHIP • SPORTS, STLTODAY.COM

Only ‘happy accidents’ in Bob Ross painting class

began with soothing jazz. A group of adults holding paint brushes watched as the man they all came to see appeared on a projector screen: Unbuttoned shirt showing a bit of chest hair, oversized pallet in hand and that halo of perfectly rounded curls. Bob Ross greeted the painters in his soothing voice. Library assistant Lauren Rhodes paused the video. “Warning: Your painting might not be as glorious as what Bob Ross is about to create,” she said standing next to a lifesize Bob Ross cutout the library had

See CLASS • Page A4

See ANTHEM • Page A8

BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • The full Bob Ross experience

PHOTO BY SID HASTINGS

TODAY

89°/69°

Picture perfect

MOSTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

90°/71° MOSTLY SUNNY

WEATHER B10

Carpenter homers in rout of Royals SPORTS

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump is once again lashing out at football players who refuse to stand for the national anthem. Numerous NFL players who demonstrated during the national anthem at several preseason games Thursday were rebuked by tweet Friday morning and then exhorted to “Be happy, be cool!” Players have been protesting police killings of black men, social injustice and racism. Writing on Twitter from his New Jersey golf resort, Trump said that players “make a fortune doing what they love” and that those who refused to stand “proudly” for the anthem should be suspended without pay. He also contended that “most of them are unable to define” what they’re demonstrating against. On Friday night, Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch sat during the national

County library class has a waiting list for the waiting list

Sherry Martin of the Oakville area works Thursday on her painting during the St. Louis County Library adult program “Paint with Bob Ross” at the Grant’s View Branch in the Concord Village area.

‘Be happy, be cool!’ Trump exhorts NFL players who protest

Science Center CEO to lead Denver Zoo

• A3

Bell may reopen Brown investigation

• A4

K.C.-area candidate spouts bigotry

• A4

Trump hits Turkey with metal tariffs

• A12

1 M Vol. 140, No. 223 ©2018

OP 24 E /7 N

BommaritoBuickGMC.com


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SATURDAY • 08.11.2018 • $2.00

MISSOURI’S BLUE WAVE?

‘Right to work’ rejection shines light on pro-union, pro-Trump voters

TOTAL BALLOTS CAST

PERCENT AFFILIATION OF VOTERS

300,000

80

eration mechanic, is a supporter of President Donald Trump. But he joined with a large majority of voters in this red state Tuesday to reject “right to work” legislation that would have sharply constrained union organizing. Long, 43, a union member, said unions had played an indispensable role in his life. “Our benefits are just awesome. Our health

Republican

BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

60

200,000

FRANKLIN COUNTY • Scott Long, a refrig-

Democrat

70

250,000

BY JEFF STEIN Washington Post

50 150,000 40 100,000

30

50,000 0

20 0

’06 ’08 ’10 ’12 ’14 ’16 ’18

’06

’08

’10

’12

’14

’16

SOURCE: St. Louis County

See TRUMP • Page A5

Democratic votes skyrocket in county, but GOP plays down data

VOTER TURNOUT IN ST. LOUIS CO. AUGUST PRIMARIES

PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

’18

JEFFERSON CITY • Seventy percent of primary voters in St. Louis County took a Democratic ballot on Tuesday, far more than the 49 percent of county voters who opted to weigh in in the Democratic primary two years ago. Voter turnout also skyrocketed, with 42 percent of all registered county voters casting ballots on Tuesday. County voter turnout in August primaries dating to 2006 had never See COUNTY • Page A5

TV: 7 A.M. TNT, 1 P.M. CBS

DELAY OF GAME

Monsanto ordered to pay $289 million in California Roundup case FROM NEWS SERVICES

SAN FRANCISCO • A San Francisco jury ordered on Friday agribusiness giant Monsanto to pay $289 million to a former school groundskeeper dying of cancer, saying the company’s popular Roundup weedkiller had contributed to his disease. The lawsuit brought by Dewayne Johnson was the first to go to trial among hundreds filed in state and federal courts saying Roundup causes non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which Monsanto denies. Jurors in state Superior Court agreed that the product had contributed to Johnson’s cancer and that the company should have provided a label warning of the potential health hazard. Johnson’s attorneys sought and won $39 million in compensatory damages and $250 million of the $373 million they wanted in punitive damages. “This jury found Monsanto acted with malice and oppression because they knew what they were doing was wrong and doing it with reckless disregard for human life,” said See MONSANTO • Page A8 ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Patrick Reed hits into a pine tree but was able to save par on the 14th hole during the second round of the 100th PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club in Town and Country on Friday. Weather suspended play Friday, with the second round scheduled to resume at 7 a.m. Saturday. COMPLETE COVERAGE OF THE PGA CHAMPIONSHIP • SPORTS, STLTODAY.COM

Only ‘happy accidents’ in Bob Ross painting class

began with soothing jazz. A group of adults holding paint brushes watched as the man they all came to see appeared on a projector screen: Unbuttoned shirt showing a bit of chest hair, oversized pallet in hand and that halo of perfectly rounded curls. Bob Ross greeted the painters in his soothing voice. Library assistant Lauren Rhodes paused the video. “Warning: Your painting might not be as glorious as what Bob Ross is about to create,” she said standing next to a lifesize Bob Ross cutout the library had

See CLASS • Page A4

See ANTHEM • Page A8

BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • The full Bob Ross experience

PHOTO BY SID HASTINGS

TODAY

89°/69°

Picture perfect

MOSTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

90°/71° MOSTLY SUNNY

WEATHER B10

Carpenter homers in rout of Royals SPORTS

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump is once again lashing out at football players who refuse to stand for the national anthem. Numerous NFL players who demonstrated during the national anthem at several preseason games Thursday were rebuked by tweet Friday morning and then exhorted to “Be happy, be cool!” Players have been protesting police killings of black men, social injustice and racism. Writing on Twitter from his New Jersey golf resort, Trump said that players “make a fortune doing what they love” and that those who refused to stand “proudly” for the anthem should be suspended without pay. He also contended that “most of them are unable to define” what they’re demonstrating against. On Friday night, Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch sat during the national

County library class has a waiting list for the waiting list

Sherry Martin of the Oakville area works Thursday on her painting during the St. Louis County Library adult program “Paint with Bob Ross” at the Grant’s View Branch in the Concord Village area.

‘Be happy, be cool!’ Trump exhorts NFL players who protest

Science Center CEO to lead Denver Zoo

• A3

Bell may reopen Brown investigation

• A4

K.C.-area candidate spouts bigotry

• A4

Trump hits Turkey with metal tariffs

• A12

2 M Vol. 140, No. 223 ©2018

OP 24 E /7 N

BommaritoBuickGMC.com


M 1 SATURDAY • 08.11.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM POUR AND PLAY

LAST CHANCE

PGA ACTION

St. Louisans flocked to The Magic House in Kirkwood to celebrate the region’s “Top Pours,” the best wines, brews and spirits. stltoday. com/pictures

Summer is, sad to say, winding down. Before school really gets started, and before Labor Day, check our list of pools to find a new one to visit. stltoday.com/pools

Can’t make it to Bellerive? Catch scenes from the greens — and the crowd — with our photo galleries and a live feed of tweets. stltoday.com/golf

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

If there’s golf to cover here, Jay Randolph is on the scene JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DRIVE • Let’s not think about having a PGA Championship in town without Jay Randolph — the longtime KSDK sports director and national play-by-play man who makes his home here. Randolph, 83, is entering his 57th year of covering golf. He and his son, Jay Randolph Jr., are hosting nightly reports on KTRS (550 AM) about the action at Bellerive Country Club. Randolph “My first golf coverage was in 1962,” the elder Randolph said Thursday from the tourney’s media center. “It was a Monday playoff for the U.S. Open, Oakmont, Pa., between Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus. I was working at a 250-watt radio station out of Clarksburg, W.Va.,” he said. Randolph came to St. Louis a few years later, getting hired in 1966 by KMOX (1120 AM). “I was there in ’67, for the Blues’ first season. I did TV and Jack Buck did the radio,” Randolph said. “And I can tell you for certain that neither of us knew what we were doing” covering hockey. In 1967, Randolph became the sports director for KSDK (Channel 5), and for years called Cardinals baseball while still doing national play-by-play for football and other sports. When asked for a tip on who to watch in this tournament, Randolph said he was rooting for several golfers, such as Tiger Woods and Justin Speith, to do well. “But I have to say, I really like (Francesco) Molinari,” he said. “He’s playing really good golf right now, and this course suits him.” CHIP • Sometimes you luck into someone else’s mistake, like Ladue News columnist and local radio host Paul Brown did Thursday at the PGA Championship. Brown said he parked near the 16th hole at Bellerive Country Club, which

JOE HOLLEMAN • jholleman@post-dispatch.com

John Sheehan (right) on Thursday at the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club with KMOX Blues play-by-play announcer Chris Kerber.

happened to be near where Tiger Woods coincidentally shot into the woods while playing the 15th hole. “I happened to be right there” when he arrived, Brown said, then alluded to the Woods aura. “People were just staring at his ball like it was some magical orb or something,” Brown said. PUTT • Speaking of birdies at the PGA Championship, STL’s former CBS Radio chief John Sheehan revealed at Bellerive Country Club that his nest will soon take on two more. Sheehan and his wife, former local TV reporter Rebecca Roberts Sheehan, are expecting twin boys in January. The couple has a 10-month old daughter, Juliet. “So there will be a lot of increased activity,” he said. “Lots of diapers.” The former radio manager recently took a job with CRBE commercial real estate company and was on the course Thursday with several of his higher-ups. HAMM (TIME) • Jon Hamm has added modesty, honesty and risk-taking to the list of reasons why he is STL’s No. 1 celeb. In a sitdown this week with news site “The Independent,” Hamm spoke frankly about his relatively late-coming fame, its benefits and drawbacks. Hamm said the first years in Holly-

wood were a struggle, working as a waiter and finding few acting gigs. “I would literally fill out my tax return and go, ‘Wow, that is not a lot of money I made this year – I made $2000! I wonder how I ate?’” Hamm said. He continued on to say that fame had its drawbacks. “I don’t love going out in public. Everybody is essentially carrying a video camera and a recorder around with them at all times and everyone is a paparazzi,” Hamm said. “You go out to dinner and people are surreptitiously taking your photo and it becomes a thing and it’s a drag.” Since “Mad Men” ended, Hamm also has established himself as an actor willing to try a variety of roles. Most recent, Hamm took a sharp satirical turn in a sketch, “White Thoughts,” that aired last week on Terence Nash’s new HBO series “Random Acts of Flyness.” But for all the changes, Hamm said his self-image hadn’t changed that much over the years. “In my mind, I’m literally the same person I was since I’ve been cognizant as a human being — which is a goofy little kid from St. Louis, Missouri.”

PEOPLE White House denounces Omarosa’s racism claim The White House is slamming a new book by ex-staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman, calling her “a disgruntled former White House employee.” The Guardian reported that in the memoir, Manigault Newman labels President Donald Trump a “racist” and claims she’s been told there are tapes of him using the N-word repeatedly while filming “The Apprentice” reality series on which she appeared. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement Friday:“Instead of telling the truth about all the good President Trump and his administration are doing to make America safe and prosperous,” Manigault-Newman’s book is “riddled with lies and false accusations.” Photographer accuses Bill Murray of attack • A photographer says actor Bill Murray slammed him against a door and poured a glass of water over him while he was taking photos of a band at a restaurant in Massachusetts. Peter Simon told The Boston Globe he was on an assignment for The Martha’s Vineyard Times at Lola’s in Oak Bluffs on Wednesday when Murray accosted and threatened him. Simon, who is singer Carly Simon‘s brother, said the band invited him and he was not there to take pictures of Murray. A police report says Murray told police Simon was taking pictures of him. No one was charged. Ex-cycling champion arrested in alleged assault • Former Tour de France champion Jan Ullrich was arrested early Friday and is being investigated for attempted manslaughter after allegedly attacking an escort at a hotel in Frankfurt, Germany. “It seems Mr. Ullrich and an escort woman had a dispute and that he attacked her,” police spokeswoman Carina Lerch said. “She alerted the hotel staff and they called police.” Lerch said the retired German cyclist was under the influence of drugs and alcohol. The woman, 31, needed medical treatment. . Later, a police statement said Ullrich had resisted arrest.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Country singer John Conlee is 72. Wrestleractor Hulk Hogan is 65. Singer Joe Jackson is 64. Actress Viola Davis is 53. Actress Anna Gunn is 50. Rapper Asher Roth is 33. From news services

Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES

DIGEST PERRYVILLE, MO. > Salmonella outbreak investigated • Nearly two dozen people were sickened by salmonella this week, local health officials said. At least 23 cases of salmonella infection were diagnosed between Monday and Thursday at Perry County Memorial Hospital. The patients ranged from 2 to 68 years old and three required hospitalization, according to the hospital about 80 miles south of St. Louis. State and local health departments are investigating the source of the outbreak, which is usually transmitted through contaminated food. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating two multistate salmonella outbreaks — one linked to raw turkey (no cases in Missouri) and the other linked to Hy-Vee pasta salad (three cases in Missouri). Perry County Memorial Hospital started rapid testing in July to detect 22 of the most common germs that cause diarrhea. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > School district boots plastic straws • A Buder Elementary School first-grade class inspired the Ritenour School Board to vote on Thursday night to stop the use of plastic straws in district buildings “as soon as possible.”

Six pupils in teacher Catherine Richard’s class attended the board meeting with parents and Principal Jennifer Singleton. That participation itself meant a lot to Richard, who said all 19 children from her 2017-18 class had been in touch, “and two of these kids here tonight have even moved from Ritenour.” A multimedia presentation prepared by the class showed that plastic straws cause problems “all around the world,” harming the oceans and sea creatures, and are wasteful. It noted that the class was “working to stop using straws” and noted that it was possible to drink milk and juice without them, as “we do it every day.” Plastic straws have been in the crosshairs of environmentalists this year and have become the focus of calls for their banishment nationwide. Seattle is believed to be the first major U.S. city to shun them. Its ban went into effect last month, and San Francisco took a similar step a few weeks ago. Starbucks and Marriott have announced that plastic straws and stirrers will be removed from those businesses. The Ritenour board vote said that straws, including small ones used to stir coffee, would no longer be used for beverages. But straws won’t completely disappear from district schools. The ones used in arts

classes and projects will not be affected by the ban. SPRINGFIELD, ILL. > Law requires state jobs to stay in capital • Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed a law requiring state jobs to be based in the capital city unless there’s good reason to put them elsewhere. The Republican’s action Thursday is designed to save state money — and Springfield’s pride. It makes Sangamon County what Rep. Sara Wojcicki Jimenez, R-Leland Grove, called the “default location” for government employees. Jimenez sponsored the measure. A study has identified 400 jobs that could potentially move to Springfield. A job won’t move until it becomes vacant. New jobs based outside of Sangamon County must be justified. Jimenez says it “promotes (Abraham) Lincoln’s hometown and his vision” for the capital. Lincoln was among lawmakers called the “Long Nine” who succeeded in moving the state capital to Springfield from Vandalia in 1837. From staff, correspondent and wire reports

MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 01-03-12-22-42 Mega ball: 06 Megaplier: 5 Estimated jackpot: $63 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $247 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.5 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 01-03-04-14-17 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $86,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 068 Evening: 331 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 4371 Evening: 6224

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 04-06-15-27-28 Evening: 11-12-17-22-25 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $10.5 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 101 FB: 2 Evening: 912 FB: 0 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 1712 FB: 2 Evening: 3810 FB: 4

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous >>> stltoday.com/newstips CONTACT US

INSIDE Business .................A6 Editorial................A10 Horoscopes...........EV2 Joe Holleman..........A2 Letters to editor ...A10 Obituaries..............A11

Puzzles .................EV2 Religion .................A11 Sports calendar ......B2 Stocks .....................A7 TV listings .............EV3 Weather................B10

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Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A3

Science Center CEO leaving to lead Denver Zoo BY CHRISTIE L.C. ELLIS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Bert Vescolani, CEO and president of the St. Louis Science Center, is leaving the St. Louis institution after seven years to become president and CEO of the Denver Zoo. Vescolani’s appointment at the Denver Zoo is effective mid-September and he’ll remain at the St. Louis Science Center through the end of August. He previously worked at the John Ball Zoological Gardens in Grand Rapids, Mich., and the John G. Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. In his new position, Vescolani will oversee 400 employees and 600 volunteers. “Bert was chosen to lead Denver Zoo because of his depth and breadth of expe-

rience in both animal care and executive leadership, and for his tremendous energy and enthusiasm,” Sherri Koelbel, chair of the Denver Zoological Foundation, who led the search Vescolani effort, said in a statement. “We have full confidence that he will uphold our position as a world-class cultural and conservation organization.” Vescolani said that one exhibit that strongly connected with the St. Louis community during his tenure at the science center was GROW, an indoor-outdoor exhibit about the science of food production. He also oversaw the opening of Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission, which hosted artifacts from the Smithsonian.

“To be able to land that work in partnership with what arguably is the best sets of museums in the world … and find a way to find a St. Louis story around an already spectacular set of artifacts and national treasures,” said Vescolani, “that is how we can connect science to people and how we can make it really relevant and exciting.” On the horizon for the science center is a new exhibit called GameXPloration that will open October 13. “It is a look into the world of gaming — old-school gaming, chess, new school (virtual reality), augmented reality, foosball,” said Vescolani, “all things game and how science and neuroscience connect people to games.” Vescolani also noted that the science center will undergo a rebranding effort just after Labor Day. The St. Louis Science Center named

CONCERT REVIEW

Slayer says farewell — loudly — with a fiery thrill ride of thrash metal BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ Special to the Post-dispatch

So who or what was responsible for the throng of about 8,000 mostly black-clad dudes — and they were decidedly, prohibitively dudes — banging their heads and thrusting their fists in the air to songs titled “Black Magic,” “Hell Awaits” and “Angel of Death” at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre on Thursday night? Cue the Church Lady: “I don’t know, could it be … SATAN?” Well, maybe, but probably not. It most definitely was Slayer, the controversycourting, thrash-metal-pioneering band that claims to be bringing nearly 40 years of musical mayhem to an end after its current world tour. If that is the case, Slayer seems determined to go out very near the top of its game. Its performance was a thrill ride of thrash, with a set list offering a suitable career retrospective and a stage show filled with enough flames to credibly re-create the home of the guy with the pitchfork and pointy tail. It was the finale of a long afternoon and evening of metal — five veteran bands in all — that demonstrated some of the ways the genre can be sliced, diced and subdivided. Napalm Death’s brief opening set was a bracing eyeopener that mixed metal with hardcore punk. Songs such as “Standardization,” “Scum” and a cover of the Dead Kennedys’“Nazi Punks (expletive) Off” presented a series of brief, chaotic sonic maelstroms, in between which vocalist Mark “Barney” Greenway railed against the homogenization of modern culture and advocated for simple human dignity. Testament threatened to break a land-speed record with its lightning-fast anthems “Rise Up” and “Over the Wall,” while singer Chuck Billy got some moshing going in front of the stage with the appropriately titled “Into the Pit.” Anthrax picked up on that theme, opening with “Caught in a Mosh,” then of-

chief operating officer and chief financial officer Barbara Boyle as interim president and CEO while a national search for a new president and CEO is conducted. “We have an amazing leader who’s stepped up in the interim,” Vescolani said of Boyle. “She’s a native St. Louisan, so she has a great understanding of the St. Louis community.” Vescolani said that he hoped his successor would recognize the importance of connecting with the St. Louis community. “It is their science center,” he said. “We help people … make sense of a world that’s so rapidly changing and allow them to connect in a new way.” Christie L.C. Ellis • 314-340-8130 @femmechemistry on Twitter cellis@post-dispatch.com

Homeless man gets 120 years in attack on four with hammer and handrail BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • He refused to raise his right

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Slayer performs at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre in Maryland Heights on Thursday.

fered a truly bonkers cover of Joe Jackson’s “Got the Time” and kept the energy level high with “Madhouse” and “Be All, End All.” Sole remaining original band member Scott Ian received an enthusiastically affirmative answer when he asked the crowd, “Do you love thrash metal?” The unenviable task of playing into the direct light of the setting sun went to Lamb of God, but that didn’t make the band’s 50-minute set any less heavy or keep singer Randy Blythe from furiously whipping his dreadlocks or barking out throat-ripping vocals on “Omerta,” “Redneck” and “512,” which he dedicated to the concert’s American Sign Language interpreter, who was making the most of a difficult gig. Blythe offered praise for the other bands on the bill, saying Slayer “helped create this brand of music that we play.” The crowd seemed a little bit pummeled into submission by the time Slayer hit the stage, but the band’s performance was brutal and relentless — well worth its fans’ expending whatever energy they had remaining in the tank. To be sure, this was also one of the loudest concerts of

the summer season. A decibel meter smartphone app — measuring from Row Q — regularly registered in the danger area of 110dB. But even those with suitable ear protection couldn’t escape the visceral, bone-rattling music or the eyebrow-singeing pyro that characterized Slayer’s 90-minute set. The band played a couple of songs from its most recent album, 2015’s “Repentless,” including the show-opening title track and “When the Stillness Comes.” But the lion’s share of material came from classic, genre-defining works such as “Reign in Blood” and “Seasons in the Abyss.” Guitarists Kerry King and Gary Holt traded razor-edged riffs and dazzling lead lines as drummer Paul Bostaph pounded out double-time rhythms. As ever, bassist/vocalist Tom Araya served as the primary focus, spitting out the songs’ darker-than-dark lyrics and shrieking as necessary. It’s true that some of the band’s songs are given over to topics that many regard as taboo. Not content to merely cross that line, Slayer happily obliterates it, leaving listeners to take or leave what they

offer. But the real story of seeing the group in concert is the sheer cathartic fury of the quartet’s ensemble playing. On that count, the show scored again and again on songs such as “Disciple,” “Mandatory Suicide” and “Jihad.” During “Hell Awaits,” the onstage pyro wasn’t just turned up to 11; it was set at “Book of Revelation.” The concert closed with the breathtaking triumvirate of “Raining Blood,” “Chemical Warfare” and “Angel of Death,” with the stage backdrop for the latter song paying tribute to founding guitarist Jeff Hanneman, who died in 2013. Araya spoke little between songs and didn’t say anything about calling it quits. At show’s end, he simply stood onstage and looked out at the crowd for a very long time, his stare suggesting that maybe the retirement is real. If this really is Slayer’s last hurrah, fans shouldn’t weep because it’s over; they should scream because it happened.

hand to be sworn in Friday or answer a St. Louis judge’s questions. So she skipped the formalities and sentenced him to prison for 120 years. Then Edward A. Moore smirked as sheriff’s deputies led him in handcuffs to a seat in the jury box. Moore, 62, represented himself at trial in June when a jury found him guilty of Moore four counts each of firstdegree assault and armed criminal action. He did so again Friday when St. Louis Circuit Judge Elizabeth Hogan gave Moore four consecutive life terms of 30 years for his crimes. Those sentences add to a 30-year term he finished about six weeks before attacking two homeless men and two homeless women in July 2017 inside the vacant Carr School building north of downtown. He was charged with beating them with a ball-peen hammer and a roughly 4-footlong section of a wooden handrail that had two wall brackets still attached. According to police and testimony, Moore claimed he thought the victims had ransacked his belongings of snacks and water in a room at the abandoned school where homeless people regularly slept. The victims ranged in age from 29 to 39. The two men and one of the women victims testified during the trial; the other could not be found because she has moved from the St. Louis area. They testified that they awoke to screams and a sharp object striking them in the head. One of the men testified that Moore thought one of the women had taken some of his food. The woman who testified is in her late 30s, lives in a nursing home in Ste. Genevieve, Mo., and has a large depression in her skull from the attack. She has another surgery scheduled to install a metal plate in her skull. Assistant Circuit Attorney Peter Bruntrager told jurors at trial that Moore had put a price on the victims’ lives worth “mere dollars.” Moore also was convicted by a St. Louis County jury in 1991 of first-degree assault and sentenced to 30 years in prison, court records say. He was found guilty of using “a blunt object” in that case, and represented himself at that trial as well. He was paroled from prison on June 5, 2017, a little more than six weeks before the attack at Carr School. The school, just north of downtown St. Louis, closed in 1978.

Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER CLAYTON > Driver gets 6-year sentence in fatal crash • A Chesterfield man who admitted driving drunk in a deadly crash in February has been sentenced to six years in prison. Adrian Rico-Esquivel, 22, of Chesterfield pleaded guilty to the DWI-death of another and was sentenced to prison for six years in the crash, which fatally injured Brian Smith, 44, of Chesterfield. Rico-Esquivel Rico-Esquivel was driving 77 mph in a 40-mph zone with his headlights off when he struck an SUV at Chesterfield Parkway and Burkhardt Place about 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 12, authorities said. Smith suffered a severe head injury and died on Feb. 27. Authorities said blood tests revealed Rico-Esquivel had a blood-alcohol content of 0.163 percent, more than twice the legal limit to drive in Missouri. He pleaded guilty July 26 and was sentenced to prison by St. Louis County Circuit Judge John D. Warner Jr. He lived in the 600 block of Bigelow Drive in Chesterfield. JEFFERSON COUNTY > Driver admits being on heroin at time of crash that killed 2 • A Lemay-area man admitted in court this week that he was high on heroin when he was involved in January 2016 in a crash that

killed two men. He faces up to 20 years in prison. Sokol N. Zuko, 30, of the 1900 block of Basil Drive, pleaded guilty Monday in Jefferson County Circuit Court to involuntary manslaughter and two counts of drug possession. Authorities said Zuko was driving a 2001 Honda Accord east on Missouri RouteHighway 30 about 3:35 Zuko p.m. on Jan. 15, 2016, when he ran a red light at High Ridge Boulevard and turned left into the path of a 2009 Chevrolet Colorado driven by Daniel A. Smentkowski, 84, of House Springs. Zuko’s passenger, Frederick C. Kelly, 37, of St. Louis, was pronounced dead at a hospital about an hour later. Smentkowski died the next day. Zuko was driving on a suspended license at the time and admitted he had used heroin and Xanax a few hours before the crash, authorities said. State troopers found several pills in Zuko’s pocket that tests revealed were heroin and Xanax. Zuko’s criminal history includes at least four convictions in St. Louis for heroin possession dating to 2010, court records say. Assistant prosecutor Thomas Hollingsworth plans to recommend that Zuko be sentenced to 20 years in prison and that

one count of manslaughter be dropped, court records say. Zuko will be sentenced Oct. 12 by Jefferson County Circuit Judge Mark Stoll. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Woman accused of allowing others to use, sell drugs at her home • A woman faces charges after a SWAT raid on her home Tuesday resulted in the seizure of illegal drugs and the arrest of seven Burge people, according to St. Charles County police. Jessica Lynn Burge, 41, of the 1700 block of Wakefield Drive in an unincorporated area of St. Charles County admitted to allowing her daughter and several guests to use and distribute illegal drugs at her home, according to court documents. A SWAT raid allegedly found drug paraphernalia, marijuana, methamphetamine, and capsules containing white residue consistent with heroin and or fentanyl. The search took place after an informer told detectives earlier that day that about $1,100 had been distributed inside the home, Detective Brianna Selsvold wrote in the court records. Selsvold saw a woman leave the home and had police pull her over in her car. That woman was allegedly found to have about $1,443 in cash in her possession as well as a glass pipe with white residue.

One of the adults arrested Tuesday was taken to a hospital because she swallowed a large quantity of methamphetamine to hide it from officers, Selsvold wrote. Burge faces a felony nuisance charge and misdemeanor charge of possession of paraphernalia in connection with the raid, according to the St. Charles County prosecuting attorney’s office. She was being held Friday at the St. Charles County jail. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Man accused of coercing girl into online sex acts • A man who lives near Jacksonville, Fla., coerced a 14-year-old St. Louis County girl into videotaping and sending him sexually explicit video clips of her, charges filed Friday say. Broderick Waller, 21, of Middleburg, Fla., was charged in St. Louis County Circuit Court with three felony counts of using a child in a sexual performance. Court documents say Waller met the girl online in January 2017 and began chatting with her through the KIK cellphone app, a mobile multimedia messaging platform. Waller asked the girl to get naked and “send the naughtiest thing she could think of,” St. Louis County police said in court documents. The girl complied, then sent Waller at least three videos based on his requests for specific sexual conduct at different camera angles. Waller was not in custody Friday.


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Bell will soon address calls for reinvestigation of Brown’s death Brown’s mother has started online petition drive to reopen case BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The victory of Ferguson city

Councilman Wesley Bell in the Democratic primary for St. Louis County prosecutor this week is leading to calls for Bell to reopen the investigation into the shooting death of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer in 2014. Those calls have come on social media and elsewhere, including the executive director of the Thurgood Marshall Civil Rights Center in a Washington Post oped Friday. Bell spokeswoman Josi Nielsen said that Bell was aware of the requests for a reinvestigation and would address them

soon. “It would be irresponsible for Wesley to comment or take a position on any case prior to seeing all the evidence,” Nielson said in a statement. “Wesley’s platform is focused on transparency, expanding diversionary programs, reforming the cash bail system for nonviolent offenders and ensuring that victims are treated with the respect and dignity they deserve.” Brown’s mother called on Missouri Gov. Mike Parson to reopen the investigation in an online petition last month. In a letter accompanying the petition, Lezley McSpadden-Head said St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch’s office presented a case to the grand jury before the police investigation was over and allowed witnesses to lie to grand jurors. She also faulted the quality of the investigation by police and prosecutors and mentioned a grand juror’s lawsuit seeking to speak about the case. After growing slowly at first, there

were nearly 16,000 signatures Friday afternoon. Justin Hansford, who is also an associate professor of law at Howard University, says in the op-ed that McCulloch has historically been reluctant to charge police in shootings. He also faulted the investigation. “Brown’s killing remains a gaping wound in the nation’s psyche,” he said. McCulloch and his defenders have long rejected the accusations against him, and pointed to a federal investigation that found that physical evidence and “credible” witnesses supported then-Officer Darren Wilson’s version of the events that led to his shooting of Brown. Also Friday, McSpadden-Head said she planned to run for a seat on the Ferguson City Council. Joel Currier contributed to this report. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

No mistakes, only ‘happy accidents’ in Bob Ross painting class at county libraries

PHOTOS BY SID HASTINGS

Carolyn Moore displays her finished painting after the St. Louis County Library adult program “Paint with Bob Ross” at the Grant’s View Branch in the Concord Village area of south St. Louis County on Thursday. CLASS • FROM A1

ordered from Amazon. “But it’s OK. Just be like Bob and relax.” The students were the lucky few that got a spot in “Painting with Bob Ross,” the most popular new class at the St. Louis County Library. “We have a waiting list for the waiting list for this one,” said Anne Bradley, assistant manager at the Daniel Boone Branch in Ellisville, where the class launched in May. The paint-along event provides participants the paint, canvas and, of course, episodes of “The Joy of Painting,” which Ross hosted from 1983 to 1994 on PBS, to follow. A grant funds the project, making it free to participate. As the class painted on Thursday, the onscreen Ross colored a charming sunset scene and dropped gems of wisdom. “Each bush is an individual. They should be treated as such,” he said and later added: “Trees need friends, too.” At times, the novice painters struggled to match Ross’ laid-back vibe. They stared at the screen with furrowed brows and shot looks at their neighbors’ canvases during their attempts to recreate fluffy clouds and bushes. “He said yellow makes the bush come alive,” said Maria Viehman of Wildwood, looking down at her art. “I think mine died.” Ross turned to the camera before starting to form a lake. “Now let’s go crazy,” he said. The students chuckled but got right to work. Near the end of the class, Ross introduced an unexpected cabin over a portion of the riverbank. Some of the library painters were taken aback. “Well, I’m not doing a cabin,” said Beth Wakely, of Wildwood. “I just don’t have the real estate.” This sort of independence is very much encouraged, said Rhodes, who leads the class. “Bob Ross is all about: This is your world and you can make it what you want it to be,” she said. Rhodes, along with assistant branch manager Bradley, thought up the class last spring but soon realized that Bob Ross paint-alongs have been popping up at libraries across the country, including branches in Utah, New York, Michigan and Florida, among others. The trend taps into the painting instructor’s unlikely cult status years af-

Wearing a Bob Ross T-shirt, Jonathan Koller of Crestwood works on his painting Thursday during the St. Louis County Library adult program “Paint with Bob Ross” at the Grant’s View Branch in the Concord Village area of south St. Louis County.

PAINT WITH BOB ROSS CLASSES There are two upcoming sessions of “Paint with Bob Ross” at St. Louis County libraries. Daniel Boone Branch, 300 Clarkson Road in Ellisville Class is held the second Thursday of every month in the afternoon. Registration opens at the beginning of each month. The September class is booked, but there may still be spots on the wait list. It will be Sept. 13 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Florissant Valley Branch, 195 New Florissant Road The next class will be held Oct. 17, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. There were 25 open spots at press time.

ter his death in 1995 at the age of 52. The movement is fueled by internet odes to his inspirational sayings, calm demeanor and painting skills. A “The Joy of Painting” dance remix has more than 15 million views on YouTube. Ross is now a Chia Pet, a board game, a popular Halloween costume and a face on inspirational T-shirts. The website FiveThirtyEight even did a statistical analysis of all 403 episodes of “The Joy of Painting” revealing facts such as: There’s a 93 percent statistical probability that if Bob Ross paints a tree he will paint a friend for that tree. But most Bob Ross superfans have

never actually painted with the public television icon. The library classes hope to give them that chance. After success at the Daniel Boone Branch, other county libraries, including the Grant’s View branch in South County and the Florissant Valley Branch, created their own versions of the class. “I had to buy every fan brush at two different craft stores to get enough,” said Grant’s View branch manager Anne Arthur. “They’re essential: That’s what makes the happy little trees.” Jonathan Koller, of Crestwood, wore a faded Bob Ross T-shirt to the first Grant View’s version of the class Thursday with his wife, Nicole. “I’ve been watching Bob Ross since I was a kid,”Jonathan Koller said. “But this is the first time I’ll actually get to paint with him.” “I’ve adopted his philosophy in a lot of ways. Sometimes there are those ‘happy little accidents’ when you are doing something creative,” said Nicole Koller, referencing a famous Ross quote. “Bob Ross says you don’t have to be perfect, and that’s OK.” Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

KC-area winner of state House primary leaves trail of bigotry

SELLINGTRUTH.COM

Steve West as “Jack Justice” on his website. BY EDWARD MCKINLEY Kansas City Star

KANSAS CITY• On his Monday morning radio show, Steve West promotes fanatical conspiracies about “Jewish cabals” that are “harvesting baby parts” through Planned Parenthood, that torture and molest children and that run the Republican Party. On Tuesday he won the Republican primary for a Clay County seat in the Missouri House. “Looking back in history, unfortunately, Hitler was right about what was taking place in Germany. And who was behind it,” West said on a show on KCXL radio on Jan. 23, 2017. West won the 15th District nomination in a four-candidate race by nearly 25 points. Besides his radio show, he also has a YouTube channel and a website. Donning a wig and fake beard and calling himself Jack Justice, he has unleashed an array of bigotry including homophobia, antiSemitism, Islamophobia and outright racism. “I’m trying to get sense of why he flew under the radar, and I’m not sure I have a great answer,” said Karen Aroesty, regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. The Missouri Republican Party issued late Thursday afternoon a statement about West’s “disgusting comments”: “Steve West’s shocking and vile comments do not reflect the position of the Missouri Republican Party or indeed of any decent individual. West’s abhorrent rhetoric has absolutely no place in the Missouri Republican Party or anywhere. We wholeheartedly condemn his comments.” KCXL did not reply to a request for comment. West, reached by phone Thursday afternoon, said he wanted to talk about “the issues” and his platform. He declined to speak about statements he has made that he said had been taken out of context. “You guys want to make it an issue, you can go there, but I’m not going to comment on that,” he said. He then asked if he could call back in a few minutes, and hung up. When he called back, he said: “I’m not running as a radio show host, I’m running for state representative. I’m sorry. I’m not going to have this discussion.” Pressed to clarify his Hitler comment, he questioned its validity until a reporter cited the date and time of the recording. West then said that he’d been taken out of context. He said that he believes all men are created equal, but not all ideologies are equal. Specifically, he said, he finds fault with Islam and Judaism. “Jewish people can be beautiful people, but there’s ideologies associated with that that I don’t agree with,” he went on. “Jews today are a remnant of the tribe of Judah that rejected Christ.” He again asked to speak about issues related to the job of a state representative. When asked about Jewish people in Missouri, he said, “Well, maybe they shouldn’t vote for me.” At no point did West apologize for or retract his comments. He asked that the Kansas City Star link to his website within the story and expressed hope that readers would listen to his remarks in full to make up their own minds. Although West’s most overtly bigoted and offensive statements were sent anonymously to a reporter on Thursday, he had enough “dog whistles” before the election that voters should have known better than to support him, Aroesty said. She said her opinion is coming from a place of principal over politics because the Anti-Defamation League is an apolitical organization. A dog whistle, she said, is when someone hints at extremist beliefs in such a way that others who hold those beliefs will know, but they retain plausible deniability. “It’s a subtle form of hatred,” Aroesty said. “Not open, but it should be watched, in some ways, more carefully than if someone was openly extreme.” The Anti-Defamation League has been seeing extremist candidates pop up all around the country, Aroesty said. “There is a level of political rhetoric and anger out in the world today that is providing people with more extremist views a comfort to come forward and share those extremist views,” she said. “I’d like to say he is unusual this year … but there are a whole variety of folks.” The internet gives so many people a voice, she said, that it’s easy to think that people with extreme, hateful beliefs are everywhere. They’re not, she said — the ones who are out there are just making a lot of noise. State Rep. Jon Carpenter, the Democratic incumbent for the district, responded to the news of West’s statements in an email. “It is my hope that folks who voted for Steve West in the Republican primary weren’t aware of any of this stuff. I sincerely hope that’s true,” he wrote.


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St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A5

Farm group backs Hawley in Senate race BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Against the backdrop

of a trade war that has sent crop prices spiraling downward, Missouri’s largest farming organization put its weight behind Attorney General Josh Hawley in his bid for the U.S. Senate. After interviews of the Republican and his Democratic opponent, Sen. Claire McCaskill, the Missouri Farm Bureau announced its members had endorsed Hawley, 38, a lawyer, over the two-term incumbent in one of the most pivotal Senate races in the nation. Hawley, a first-time officeholder, also has been endorsed by President Donald Trump, whose trade war with China has put soybean prices under pressure. On Friday, after the U.S. Department of Agriculture boosted its outlook for har-

vests, prices fell 2.5 percent to $8.65 a bushel. Hawley said he supported the tariffs that had been imposed against China as a way to strike a new deal on trade. “We need to open up markets. We need to develop new markets,” he told delegates at the Farm Bureau meeting. In an earlier interview, Hawley told the Post-Dispatch he believed farmers understood the long-term goal of the president. “The folks I talk to, they say, ‘Look, we think the president is fighting for us. We’re willing to give him the benefit of the doubt and we think he’s going to get a better deal,’” Hawley said. Hawley also supports the $12 billion aid package Trump has announced as a way to soften the effects of the trade war on farmers. “I thought his package of aid to farmers was absolutely necessary. You know,

farmers are going to get the brunt of the retaliation and they need to be supported,” Hawley said. “We need to keep the pressure up.” The pick was not a surprise after the group passed over McCaskill in her two previous elections, but McCaskill had hoped the organization would take a different path. “I don’t expect your endorsement,” she told the attendees. “But if there was no endorsement that would be an improvement.” Although the Farm Bureau isn’t backing her, the trade war could help McCaskill make inroads into the rural and increasingly red areas of the state, which helped push Trump to a 19-point win in the Show-Me state two years ago. She called the tariffs a “gut punch” to the state, which exported more than $920 million worth of goods to China last year.

“The damage that is being done to Missouri agriculture is inexcusable,” McCaskill said. Earlier in the day, McCaskill visited a 4,000-acre soybean farm in Tebbetts, situated along the Missouri River near Jefferson City. Peggy Smart, co-owner of Smart Bros. Farms, said she had presold this year’s bean crop at $10.36 per bushel and wouldn’t be immediately affected by the current price drop. But, she said, the uncertainty is already having negative effects and the bailout is not a long-term solution. “That’s a Band-Aid,” Smart said. “I think we’re going to see a faster downward trend. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

‘Right to work’ vote reflects economy, not politics TRUMP • FROM A1

care is top of the line. I have a pension, so I’m going to be set when I retire, we get a 401(k), my medical and dental and vision plans are awesome,” he said. “If I get laid off, they look for another job for me, and you can’t really ask for better, in my eyes.” The landslide vote in Missouri to defeat the right-to-work legislation, a state Republican push that became law last year, was celebrated this week by liberals and union leaders as a high point for organized labor. But it also shined a light on a group that gained significant attention in the 2016 presidential campaign: pro-union, pro-Trump voters. The ratio defeating the legislation — 67 percent to 33 percent — came in a state where Trump commanded nearly a 20-point victory in 2016, and Republicans control the governor’s office, the state Legislature, one U.S. Senate seat and six U.S. House seats. Even some of the most conservative counties rejected the measure. As president, Trump has shown hostility toward organized labor, and his Republican allies in Missouri were behind the rightto-work legislation. But prounion, pro-Trump voters say that even if they consider unions crucial, they see many other reasons to back Trump. “I like what Trump is doing for the country, though I don’t agree on all of his policies,” Long said. “If you want to be a citizen, you shouldn’t just walk across the Southern California border. ... I like how Trump wants to close the border down.” Dennis Brinkler, a union electrician who voted against the legislation, also cited immigration as a reason he’s supporting Trump and state Attorney General Josh Hawley, an anti-union Republican who is challenging Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat, in November. “I vote my faith and morals, No. 1; my country and the Constitution second; and then for my union third,” said Brinkler, 65. “Without the Constitution, there are no labor unions. Without my country, the union means nothing, because we’d have no work.” Democrats said the vote was an example of the tide finally turning in their favor. “Trump and his Republican friends do not represent what working people want or need,” Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, N.Y., said on Twit-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

People opposing a right-to-work law listen to a speaker during a rally in Kansas City on July 31. The issue spurred high voter turnout for a primary election and highlighted the existence of the pro-union, pro-Donald Trump voter.

ter. But some labor leaders say support for the measure was less about politics and more about a sense that corporate leaders shouldn’t be reaping all the benefits of a prosperous economy. “This was not about Democrat vs. Republicans,” said Pat White, president of the St. Louis Labor Council, which organized to defeat the measure. “This is about workers vs. CEOs.” White and other union officials pointed to a range of reasons their members, even as they embraced organized labor, may reject Democrats at the polls — including the party’s support of free trade policies, gun policy, position on immigration, and protests of police shootings of unarmed black men. “Some of the guys I represent in their 50s, it’s hard for them to grasp shutting down a highway because of an incident that may have happened with the police, and often that’s people on our side of the party,” White said, referring to protests in Ferguson

after Michael Brown was killed by a police officer four years ago. “That’s hard for a lot of the old white guys to grasp.” In the 2016 presidential election, with his appeals to the nation’s “forgotten men and women,” Trump made a surprising impact on union voters. He won 42 percent of union households compared with Democratic rival Hillary Clinton’s 51 percent, the best showing for a Republican since Ronald Reagan. In February 2017, state Republicans had approved the right-to-work legislation, which would have allowed employees represented by unions not to pay union fees. But under Missouri law, unions and their allies successfully petitioned to halt its enforcement pending the results of a referendum. Labor officials said they had seen attitudes toward unions improve as the economy has grown stronger. After the Great Recession, labor unions’ public popularity hit their lowest point in several decades, with Gallup

polling showing about as many people approving as disapproving of them. But with an extremely strong job market, voters appear less fearful about standing up to corporate owners. Unions’ favorability ratings rose to 61 percent approving with 31 percent disapproving in 2017, according to Gallup, their highest marks since before the recession. “People are seeing that their wages are not increasing even though the companies are making more money, so they’re turning to the union for answers,” said John Smreker, a union worker with Ironworkers 396 near St. Louis. “Anti-union sentiment is way down.” Some union leaders view their landslide victory as a signal that voters are waking up to the ways conservative policy favors businesses owners and investors over workers. “Absolutely, we’ve seen a shift,” Mike Louis, president of Missouri’s AFL-CIO, said in an interview in his office as staff

members packed up signs from the monthslong campaign. “We’re in a position to take back some seats, especially looking at districts where over 70 percent voted ‘no.’ “ The AFL-CIO knocked on more than 800,000 doors, made close to 1 million phone calls and recruited more than 1,000 volunteers — all of which surpassed their efforts during the 2016 presidential campaign, said a spokeswoman for the union. Union organizers said they received key help from church leaders, both black and white, in Missouri. But conservatives are skeptical, arguing that the best evidence for unions’ popularity comes in their ever-diminishing membership. Union membership nationwide has fallen markedly from the 1970s, with the percentage of American workers in a union falling from about onequarter in the 1970s to less than 11 percent in 2017, according to survey data.

Prop A vote, suburbs may have driven spike in Democratic participation COUNTY • FROM A1

cracked 30 percent. Observers partially attribute the spike in Democratic participation to the Proposition A vote, the referendum on the state’s “right to work” law. Heated Democratic primaries — including for a St. Louis County Council seat, the county executive race, and the contest for county prosecutor — also probably gave independents and Republicans a reason to pull Democratic ballots. Another potential factor: Suburban voters are gravitating toward Democrats, particularly voters in older, inner-ring suburbs such as Webster Groves and Kirkwood, said Dave Robertson, political science professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. “A lot of people are upset with the direction of the country and are expressing it at all levels of government,” he said. Those factors, along with apparently high engagement from reform-minded voters, all worked to drive turnout on Tuesday, Robertson added. Not only did Ladue businessman Mark Mantovani give embattled County Executive Steve Stenger a run for his money, but voters in mid-St. Louis County also

ditched Councilman Pat Dolan, a Stenger ally. And in a striking upset, Ferguson Councilman Wesley Bell toppled longtime prosecutor Robert McCulloch. The results “suggest a real movement for both reform and for the rejection of Prop A,” Robertson said. “Those kind of meld together and help explain some of the truly surprising results, most notably Wesley Bell’s election as prosecutor.” St. Louis County Republicans played down the turnout numbers, saying that many Republicans crossed over to weigh in on the red-hot county executive race and other Democratic contests. The GOP primary for U.S. Senate was low-profile, with Attorney General Josh Hawley widely expected to win. “I think you can chalk it up to the Democrats having a much more exciting primary,” state Rep. Shamed Dogan, R-Ballwin, said. He added that in 2014, when Stenger ousted then-incumbent County Executive Charlie Dooley, a similarly high percentage of voters — 67 percent — pulled Democratic ballots. Even so, in a signal that there is the potential for turbulence for some Missouri House Republicans this fall, a handful of Republican-held House districts in St.

Louis County saw more Democratic voters than Republican voters. For example, in Dogan’s 98th House District, there were 3,686 ballots cast in his uncontested GOP primary versus 4,009 votes that were cast for Charles Triplett, Dogan’s Democratic challenger who also faced no primary competition. Similar voting patterns played out in seven other St. Louis County GOP districts, including Rep. David Gregory’s Fenton-based district, Rep. Dean Plocher’s Des Peres-based district, Rep. Jean Evans’ Manchester-based district and Rep. Mark Matthiesen’s Maryland Heights-based district. In a nod to Proposition A opponents, Evans said she would not back any GOP attempts to push right to work in the Legislature next year. “They won overwhelmingly, and to try to overturn the will of the voters is a slap in the face” to them, she said. Sen. Jill Schupp, a Creve Coeur Democrat running against Republican Gregory B. Powers this year, said voters should recognize which party has opposed the policy for years. Two-thirds of Missouri voters, including as many as half of all Republican voters, opposed right to work on Tuesday. “It is the Republican legislators in Jef-

ferson City that are pushing for what I would consider anti-working people legislation like right to work,” she said. John Hancock, a Chesterfield resident and former chairman of the Missouri Republican Party, said he wasn’t sure Democratic engagement in August would translate into a wave this fall. He said two things needed to happen for a wave to take place: an energized Democratic Party and a deflated Republican Party. “I don’t see any evidence that Republicans are deflated,” he said. Statewide, unofficial vote tallies showed 663,553 Republicans casting ballots compared with 605,503 Democrats. Democrats cheered their higher-thanusual statewide primary turnout. On Friday, at a soybean farm in Tebbetts, Mo., Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., touted her opposition to right to work. “He favored Prop A,” McCaskill said of Hawley, her opponent. “Josh wants to talk about protecting the middle class, while he supports right to work.” Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com


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Mortgage rates dip slightly after a weak jobs report

Florida firm is cited for treatment of farmworkers in southern Missouri Labor Dept. calls conditions inhumane

Freddie Mac headquarters are seen in McLean, Va. By KatHy OrtON Washington Post

Mortgage rates retreated this week after weaker-than-expected employment data. According to the latest data released this week by Freddie Mac, the 30-year fixed-rate average slipped to 4.59 percent with an average 0.5 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1 percent of the loan amount.) It was 4.6 percent a week ago and 3.9 percent a year ago. The 15-year, fixed-rate average fell to 4.05 percent with an average 0.5 point. It was 4.08 percent a week ago and 3.90 percent a year ago. The five-year adjustable rate average dropped to 3.9 percent with an average 0.3 point. It was 3.93 percent a week ago and 3.14 percent a year ago. The U.S. economy added 157,000 jobs in July, which was slightly below the expectations of many economists. A slowing job rate can indicate the economy is ebbing. That concern was enough to push mortgage rates down a bit. “Mortgage rates fell slightly after an unexpectedly weak July jobs report, but are still above where they stood a month ago,” said Aaron Terrazas, senior economist at Zillow. “This week should be fairly quiet in bond

markets, except potentially for Friday’s release of inflation data. A strong inflation report could put upward pressure on rates.” Bankrate.com, which puts out a weekly mortgage rate trend index, found that more than half the experts it surveyed say rates will remain relatively stable in the coming week. Jim Sahnger, mortgage planner at C2 Financial, is one who predicts rates will hold steady. “Following weaker-thanexpected employment numbers and no movement from the Fed last week, we have been somewhat range-bound and look to continue until we have something to move us higher or lower,” Sahnger said. Meanwhile, mortgage applications were down, according to the latest data from the Mortgage Bankers Association. The market composite index — a measure of total loan application volume — decreased 3 percent from a week earlier. The refinance index fell 5 percent, while the purchase index dropped 2 percent. The refinance share of mortgage activity accounted for 36.6 percent of all applications. “Despite recent data indicating a strong U.S. economy and job market, including signs of wage growth, overall mort-

BLOOMBERG

aSSOCIatEd PrESS

KaNSaS CIty • A Florida com-

gage applications fell for the third straight week as housing continues to be hampered by the lack of homes for sale and crimped affordability,” said Joel Kan, an MBA economist. “The Market Index, which measures both purchase and refinance applications, was decreased to its lowest level since January 2016. Both purchase and refinance indexes decreased as well this week, with the refinance index staying close to its lowest level since December 2000.” The MBA also released its mortgage credit availability index (MCAI) this week that showed credit availability increased in July. The MCAI rose 1.7 percent to 184.1 last month. An increase in the MCAI indicates that lending standards are loosening, while a decline signals that they are tightening. “Credit availability continued to expand, driven by an increase in conventional credit supply,” Kan said. “More than half of the programs added were for jumbo loans, pushing the jumbo index to its fourth straight increase, and to its highest level since we started collecting these data. There was also continued growth in the conforming nonjumbo space, which reached its highest level since October 2013.”

pany kept more than 100 temporary farmworkers in “inhumane” and “unsanitary” working conditions while not paying them what they were due as they harvested watermelons in southeastern Missouri, according to federal labor officials. The U.S. Labor Department issued a preliminary injunction against Marin J Corp. of Avon Park, Fla., after witnessing conditions for 107 workers hired under the federal H-2A program, which allows foreign workers into the U.S. for temporary agriculture work, The Kansas City Star reported. The company, owned by Jorge Marin, was responsible for housing, feeding and caring for the workers in Kennett, Mo., about 75 miles north of Memphis, Tenn. The workers began in June and were to be paid $13.42 an hour, according to documents filed in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. The company said in a statement that the H-2A program has many complex requirements that are substantially different from the rules for other employers. It said Marin J was cooperating with the investigation and was working to comply with requirements. Labor department inspectors found 27 workers housed in a former jail with an unus-

able kitchen, limited windows, no drinking fountains or access to water beyond bathroom sinks, according to an affidavit. An additional 80 workers were living in two houses Marin owned and a hotel that had too few beds, leaking toilets, standing water in restrooms and a barely functioning refrigerator, an investigator wrote in the affidavit. While employees worked 12hour days harvesting watermelons, they generally shared a Gatorade bottle for water and several workers “passed out from the heat due to dehydration,” the inspector wrote. Washing and restroom facilities were “rarely provided” in the field and “workers frequently relieved themselves in the fields, without washing their hands,” according to the affidavit. Workers also “remain largely unpaid,” it said. One group of workers told investigators they had received only two checks, for $340 and $120, after working nearly 20 consecutive days. The affidavit said the workers were taken to a bank where company representatives made them cash the $120 checks and return the money. Marin J. Corp. has agreed to move the workers out of the former jail to a motel in Kennett, improve the two houses, and provide funding for food, adequate water and drinking cups, toilets and hand-washing facilities in the field. The company also was ordered to maintain accurate payroll records, not threaten workers into making payments or kickbacks, and to allow workers to communicate with the Labor Department without fear of retribution.

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MARKET WATCH

08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A7

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks skidded Friday as investors worried about Turkey’s financial stability and how it might affect the global financial system. Investors sold stocks and bought U.S. dollars and government bonds. That sent bond yields lower, which hurts banks.

Overstock.com

30 M

$18.35

J J 52-week range

Vol.: 9.8m (6.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.2 b

Close: 25,313.14 Change: -196.09 (-0.8%)

25,120

65

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J J 52-week range

A $80.70

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25,500

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2,800

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StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

3,218 3,011 917 1868 64 84

2,022 1,988 1110 1692 88 103

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

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DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

J

2,560

A

HIGH 25401.19 11121.60 733.00 12878.03 7866.19 2842.20 2006.38 29664.03 1695.79

LOW 25222.88 11008.03 723.28 12818.01 7818.37 2825.81 1992.55 29506.09 1680.77

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CLOSE 25313.14 11090.63 723.51 12843.49 7839.11 2833.28 1996.02 29566.85 1686.80

A CHG. -196.09 -50.48 -3.94 -113.17 -52.67 -20.30 -11.81 -180.62 -4.09

M

J

%CHG. WK -0.77% t -0.45% t -0.54% t -0.87% t -0.67% s -0.71% t -0.59% t -0.61% s -0.24% s

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MO QTR s s s s s s s s s s s s t s s s t s

A YTD +2.40% +4.51% +0.02% +0.27% +13.55% +5.97% +5.02% +6.38% +9.85%

DATE

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CHG

Sep 18 Aug 18 Sep 18

357.75 846 546.75

-11.50 -41.75 -17.75

CLOSE

CHG

149.90 108.25 54.80 15.04 273.25

+.55

ICE

DATE

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CHG

Cotton

Sep 18 Sep 18 Nov 18

85.23 107.00 25.72

-2.03 -.65 -.06

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Sep 18 Sep 18 Sep 18 Sep 18

67.63 2.0392 213.97 2.944

Coffee Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

30.13

39.80 32.26

-.23 -0.7 -17.0 -10.1

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.81

28.19 24.83

-.18 -0.7

-2.4 +23.2 22

6

Amdocs

DOX

61.00

71.72 64.63 +.05 +0.1

-1.3 +0.0 18

1.00 Home Depot

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

64.89 62.78

-.05 -0.1

+6.4 +11.3 22

1.83 Huttig Building Prod HBP

47.34 46.39

-.69 -1.5 +11.4 +31.3

... General Motors

American Railcar

ARII

34.30

ABInBev

BUD

91.70 126.50 96.43 -3.28 -3.3 -13.6 -11.6 24 3.19e Lowes 68.95 102.61 88.85

Arch Coal

ARCH

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

4.66

Bank of America

BAC

22.75

33.05 31.19

Belden Inc

BDC

53.65

87.15 70.49 -1.51 -2.1

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

11.93

4.94

-.66 -0.7

6

2.00 FutureFuel

-4.6 +18.9

8

-.16 -3.1 -39.8 -39.7

8

-.41 -1.3

10.45

8.25

1.60 Mallinckrodt plc ... MasterCard

+5.7 +29.7 16 0.60f McDonald’s -8.7 +0.1 13

230.94 374.48 339.41 -4.31 -1.3 +15.1 +49.5 32 7.25

1.60 Lee Enterprises

-.05 -0.6 -10.3

MCD

146.84 178.70 158.68

-.62 -0.4

4.04

-7.8 +5.4 24

96.96 93.22

-.77 -0.8 +17.7 +10.3 24

...

80.70 70.26 -1.72 -2.4

49.43

70.00 69.42 +.01

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

76.76 56.57

-.05 -0.1

-4.7 -23.2 14

Emerson

EMR

57.47

75.25 73.86

-.19 -0.3

+6.0 +25.8 28

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

65.57 62.71

-.09 -0.1 +30.7 +54.6 22

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.65

58.15 56.35

-.10 -0.2 +24.8 +45.5 18 0.48f Verizon -.55 -0.8

... Reinsurance Gp

RGA RELV

-5.6 +7.3 12 1.80f Stifel Financial

... +24.3 +29.6 20 0.94f Target Corp. ... UPS B 1.94 US Bancorp 1.16 US Steel 0.32 WalMart ... Walgreen Boots 0.13 Wells Fargo

5.10 +.13 +2.6

0.80

70.66

0.04 Spire Inc

126.62 165.12 141.10 3.72

9.45

-.39 -0.3

-9.5 +3.4 13 2.00f

5.09

-.01 -0.2

+6.7 -42.1 dd

...

-0.5 +2.5 21

2.25

SR

60.09

82.85 74.75

-.25 -0.3

SF

44.44

68.76 53.63

-.90 -1.7 -10.0 +8.8 17 0.48f

TGT

53.90

83.06 82.71 +.09 +0.1 +26.8 +47.1 15 2.56f

UPS USB

101.45 135.53 119.27 -1.60 -1.3 48.49

58.50 53.10

-.38 -0.7

+0.1 +10.6 20

3.64

-0.9 +2.7 14

1.20

X

22.94

47.64 29.97

-.29 -1.0 -14.8 +26.5 17

0.20

VZ

43.97

54.77 52.47

-.54 -1.0

2.36

-0.9 +14.8

7

WMT

77.50 109.98 90.18 +1.17 +1.3

-8.7 +11.6 21 2.08f

WBA

59.07

83.89 66.49 +.32 +0.5

-8.4 -16.6 14 1.76f

WFC

49.27

66.31 58.05

-4.3 +13.7 14 1.72f

-.39 -0.7

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Loop retailer Phoenix Rising to close • After more than two decades as the go-to spot for novelty gifts and unique apparel and jewelry, Delmar Loop retail fixture Phoenix Rising is closing. The store at 6331 Delmar Boulevard posted on its Facebook page this week that it would close at the end of the month. “Many thanks to all of you funny, smart, generous, and kind people who have made this such a wonderful experience — it has been my great pleasure to be a part of your lives for the last 24 years,” owner Carrie Drda wrote. Many retailers in the popular entertainment district that runs from the city limits into University City have complained that business has suffered due to the yearslong construction on the Loop Trolley. Phoenix Rising was among retailers that received a forgivable loan from University City in 2016 to offset losses it said was due to the construction. Record corn, soybean production forecast • The U.S. Agriculture Department raised on Friday its outlook for domestic corn and soybean harvests by more than expected due to good weather during key phases of development. The increased domestic projections will boost the U.S. soybean stockpile even as a trade war with China threatens to shut off the biggest market for the oilseed. Strong demand for corn will keep supplies of the yellow grain in check. The government’s closely watched supply and demand report pegged U.S. soybean production and corn yields at record levels. USDA also lowered its outlook for global wheat production and supplies as hot and dry conditions crippled harvest prospects in the European Union. USDA boosted its outlook for 201819 soybean exports to 2.06 billion bushels after sharply cutting them in July. But soybean exports were still expected to fall below the 2017-18 total. Corn harvest for the 2018-19 crop year was seen at 14.586 billion bushels, the third-biggest yet, and up from its July outlook of 14.23 billion bushels. Yields were raised 4.4 bushels per acre to 178.4 bushels per acre, which would top the previous record of 176.6 set a year ago.

Citigroup fined for faulty mortgage document practices • The Federal Reserve said Friday it had fined Citigroup $8.6 million over shoddy mortgage documentation practices at a subsidiary. The Fed said that in 2015, CitiFinancial, a bank subsidiary, mishandled customer files as it was preparing to wind down its mortgage servicing business. The regulator said the problem happened in 2015 and was corrected, and CitiFinancial left that line of business in 2017. The Fed also said it was terminating a separate 2011 enforcement action against Citigroup on a separate residential mortgage loan servicing matter, citing sustainable improvements by the bank. Citigroup’s mortgage unit, CitiMortgage, is based in O’Fallon, Mo. Advisory firm backs Cigna’s Express Scripts buy • Shareholder advisory firm Institutional Shareholder Services Inc. (ISS) recommended on Friday that Cigna Corp. investors vote for the health insurer’s $52 billion purchase of St. Louis County-based pharmacy benefits manager Express Scripts, a deal that has been opposed by activist investor Carl Icahn. ISS, whose recommendations are followed by major mutual funds, said that for investors with exposure to both companies the potential benefits outweighed the risks, “especially given that these risks are, to some degree, unavoidable.” However, the firm noted that the merger presented a more difficult decision for Cigna investors, highlighting the worsening environment for pharmacy benefits managers. In his latest attack on Thursday, Icahn said drug rebates that pharmacy benefit managers received from drugmakers would ultimately be eliminated. PBMs have come under increasing scrutiny in the drug pricing debate, with the administration of President Donald Trump proposing a rule that would scale back protections in place that allow rebates among drug manufacturers, insurers and PBMs. Hedge fund Glenview Capital Management backed the deal on Thursday, saying it would strengthen Cigna’s growth prospects. From staff and wire reports

+.82 +.0393 +2.78 -.011

Silver

-.80 -.15 -4.50

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.04 2.22 2.39 2.61 2.73 2.80 2.88 3.03

... ... -0.02 -0.04 -0.08 -0.08 -0.05 -0.04

1.04 1.14 1.20 1.32 1.77 2.02 2.20 2.78

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

1.88 1.38 1.13

CHG

CLOSE

1211.10 15.27 829.60

Gold

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS 5.00 4.50 4.25

.0356 .7385 .2631 1.2847 .7669 .1466 1.1542 .0145 .2712 .009006 .053655 .0150 .0731 .000891 1.0069

PreciousMetals

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.88 percent on Friday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

.0342 .7289 .2585 1.2760 .7611 .1460 1.1398 .0145 .2698 .009038 .052730 .0148 .0708 .000884 1.0051

NEW YORK

0.60

POST

... Reliv

5.78

9

1.04 Post Holdings

64.38

-1.7 dd

1.00

...

CBSH

... -10.8

-.95 -0.5 +33.9 +57.7 47

0.28

C

...

...

127.59 214.28 202.65

-5.6 +9.4 dd

Commerce Banc.

3.90

41.70 31.10 +.40 +1.3 +37.9 -18.6

MA

-.05 -0.2 +42.4 +54.4 44

Citigroup

4.88

11.65

6

+5.8 +29.8 22 1.92f

27.90 27.15

CI

3.28

...

-.05 -1.7 +23.4 +47.5

4.10

Cigna

FELP

2.90

16.99

... +37.3 +67.4 21

Foresight Energy

3.30

PRFT

81.00 139.77 138.49 +.02

+8.8 +24.3 22

1.90

70.76 108.98 98.31 -1.63 -1.6

SKIS

CNC

67.35 65.55

...

... Peak Resorts

CHTR 250.10 408.83 302.45 -2.72 -0.9 -10.0 -23.9 98

85.07 83.64 +1.82 +2.2 +12.1 +33.7 11

5.04 +.04 +0.8 -24.2 -10.7 dd

0.28 Perficient

Charter

50.30

MNK

7.75

-.82 -2.7 -17.1 +5.1

Centene Corp.

55.80

LOW

3.50

-.19 -0.4 +10.2 +54.5

74.49 69.31 -1.08 -1.5 +19.1 +25.6 34

-.17 +.05 -2.30

1.52 4.12

38.84 29.51

53.23

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Platinum

+3.6 +30.1 26

47.84 43.37

CASS

ESE

LEE

146.89 207.61 196.30 -1.78 -0.9

$173.24

ExchangeRates

-6.4 16 0.24a

27.68

Cass Info. Systems

ESRX

HD

-4.8

-.92 -2.5 -10.7 +10.6 dd

26.73

-8.8 28

Esco Technologies

46.76 36.59

OLN

37.06 35.40 +.31 +0.9

Express Scripts

16.22 13.41 +.01 +0.1

34.50

BTU

22.39

-9.8 +4.1 18

11.32

GM

0.20 Olin

CAL

163.02 227.13 183.28 -2.14 -1.2

FF

A

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

6.84 Peabody Energy

Caleres Inc.

+5.7 +34.5 16

52-WK LO HI

J J 52-week range

Vol.: 6.3m (1.5x avg.) PE: 26.4 Mkt. Cap: $80.8 b Yield: 2.5%

Interestrates Interestrates

TKR

M

$112.69

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$7.57

DATE

Copper

2,640

130

A

Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18

Milk

24,000

J J 52-week range

Feeder cattle Hogs

2,720

24,500

M

CHICAGO MERC

Live cattle

25,000

140

Futures

Soybeans

2,880

$160 150

$5.13

Corn

10 DAYS

CAT

Close: $135.92 -2.60 or -1.9% Industrial companies took sharp losses Friday as the U.S. dollar strengthened.

Vol.: 17.3m (2.0x avg.) PE: 11.2 Mkt. Cap: $16.9 b Yield: 5.8%

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,833.28 Change: -20.30 (-0.7%)

2,760

26,000

23,500

6

Vol.: 20.2m (1.2x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $176.8 b Yield: 2.6%

PE: ... Yield: ...

2,820

10 DAYS

70

$64.38

$89.80

2,880

Dow Jones industrials

25,420

A

Caterpillar

SAN

Close: $5.19 -0.18 or -3.4% European banks suffered steep losses as investors worried that financial turmoil in Turkey will spread to them. $7

$75

40

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Banco Santander

C

Close: $70.26 -1.72 or -2.4% Banks fell as interest rates turned lower.

$50

20

25,720

Citigroup

OSTK

Close: $41.65 3.05 or 7.9% The online discount retailer said a private equity firm is investing in its blockchain business.

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.05 3.34 6.23 3.92 3.98 .79

-0.01 -0.02 +0.02 -0.02 -0.01 -0.06

1.55 2.49 5.59 3.63 3.14 .38

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2833.28 12424.35 7667.01 28366.62 5414.68 48383.59 22298.08 76514.35 16326.51 9031.33

CHG

CHG

YTD

-20.30 -251.76 -74.76 -240.68 -87.56 -860.81 -300.31 -2253.65 -90.47 -114.35

-0.71% -1.99% -0.97% -0.84% -1.59% -1.75% -1.33% -2.86% -0.55% -1.25%

+5.97% -3.82% -0.27% -5.19% +1.92% -1.97% -2.05% +0.15% +0.72% -3.74%

Wage growth is getting wiped out by inflation BY HEATHER LONG Washington Post

WASHINGTON • U.S. work-

ers’ paychecks are worth less than they were a year ago, the Labor Department reported Friday, as modest wage gains have failed to keep pace with inflation. Inflation rose 2.9 percent from July 2017 to July 2018, the Labor Department said, while average hourly pay increased 2.7 percent over the same period. The lack of real wage gains comes despite a strong economy, with sustained growth and an unemployment rate of 3.9 percent — one of the lowest levels in decades. The Labor Department tracks average hourly pay adjusted for inflation, which is known as the “real wage.” According to the federal government, the real average hourly wage was $10.78 in July 2017 and $10.76 in July 2018. Real wages have been on a sharp decline since the start of the year. “Despite the strong labor market, wage growth has lagged economists’ expectations,” wrote Pew Research in a report this week. “In fact, despite some ups and downs over the past several decades, today’s real average wage has about the same purchasing power it did 40 years ago.” Since 2000, only the top quarter of wage earners have seen any true increase in their pay once you account for inflation, Pew reports. For the middle class, it’s been years of stagnation, and the latest trends aren’t encouraging. Gas prices, housing and transportation costs have all jumped in the past year, taking a bigger bite out of people’s paychecks. The price of gas has risen 50 cents per gallon in the past year, according to

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gasoline prices are displayed on a pump at Sheetz in June along the Interstate 85 and 40 corridor near Burlington, N.C. Gas prices, housing and transportation costs have all jumped in the past year, taking a bigger bite out of people’s paychecks. the AAA tracker of the average national price of gas. Used car prices and rent are also up substantially from a year ago, a potential hardship for working-class Americans in need of a new vehicle. When inflation rises more quickly than wages, workers fall behind. They have to cut costs from their budgets, use credit cards or put in more hours to try to live the same lifestyle they had enjoyed a year ago. The Labor Department reported that Americans are putting in more time on the job this summer versus last summer, which is helping to keep family earnings about the same for now. “We are nearly a decade into the recovery and we’re still arguing about whether or not we’re seeing meaningful gains in wages. That should be a given at this point in the cycle,” said Lindsey Piegza, chief economist at Stifel. President Donald Trump campaigned on getting Americans back to work and getting them a raise as he recognized the frustration of many working people, but it’s proving a

challenging task for Trump, much as it was for former presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush. Trump passed a large tax cut for businesses and consumers that is giving many families more money in their pockets this year and doesn’t show up in the wage data, but families are having to use a good chunk of the tax cut to cover rising energy and housing costs. The president has tweeted several times to try to get Saudi Arabia to produce more oil and lower gas prices. The last time wages were growing substantially above inflation was in 2016. Since then, inflation has picked up while wages have remained the same. Inflation hit a six-year high this summer, and most economists think it will stay about where it currently is or even grow a bit more quickly, especially if Trump’s tariffs on Chinese products and steel and aluminum drive up costs for consumers. Most economists have been predicting that pay will take off, but that has not happened.


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

Trump aide’s associate held in contempt in Russia probe

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Paul Kamenar (right), attorney for Andrew Miller, joined by Peter Flaherty (center), chairman of the National Legal and Policy Center, talks to reporters after a federal judge found Miller in contempt Friday. BY JEFF HORWITZ AND DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated Press

WASHINGTON • An associate of former Donald Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone was held in contempt of court Friday in a fresh attempt to challenge Robert Mueller’s appointment as the special counsel investigating Trump campaign contacts with Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign. The move also spotlighted a growing focus by Mueller on Stone. Another of Stone’s associates, a New Yorker known as the “Manhattan Madam” because she once operated an upscale escort service, was expected to make her first appearance before a grand jury in the case. Paul Kamenar, the attorney for Stone associate Andrew Miller, whose refusal to appear before the grand jury Friday prompted the contempt ruling, argued after the proceedings that Mueller’s appointment was unconstitutional. He asserted that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein did not have the authority to appoint Mueller to lead the investigation into Trump campaign contacts with

Russia. Kamenar said his client planned to appeal the contempt ruling in hope that the U.S. Supreme Court will eventually hear the case. Previous challenges to Mueller’s legitimacy have failed. Trump has sought to undermine the investigation by calling it a “witch hunt” and a “hoax.” He has repeatedly insisted, “there was no collusion.” Kamenar said a prosecutor with powers as broad as Mueller’s should be treated like a U.S. attorney and be subject to Senate confirmation. “There’s been no authority, we say, that gives the Justice Department the power to appoint Mr. Mueller,” Kamenar told reporters outside the courthouse in Washington after Miller was held in contempt for refusing to appear before the grand jury. Rosenstein appointed Mueller as special counsel last year after Attorney General Jeff Sessions stepped aside from the Russia investigation. Sessions, a former U.S. senator, was one of Trump’s earliest Senate backers and was involved in campaign operations. Sessions met several times with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S.

Monsanto denies Roundup causes cancer; glyphosphate safe if used correctly, EPA says MONSANTO • FROM A1

Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a member of Johnson’s legal team. “This should send a strong message to the boardroom of Monsanto.” Monsanto denies that glyphosate, the world’s most widely used herbicide, causes cancer and says decades of scientific studies have shown the chemical to be safe for human use. The company, a Creve Coeur-based unit of Bayer AG after a $62.5 billion acquisition by the German conglomerate, said it would appeal the verdict. “Today’s decision does not change the fact that more than 800 scientific studies and reviews ... support the fact that glyphosate does not cause cancer, and did not cause Mr. Johnson’s cancer,” Scott Partridge, a Monsanto vice president, said in a statement. Johnson’s case, filed in 2016, was fast-tracked for trial because of the severity of his nonHodgkin’s lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph system that he alleges was caused by Roundup and Ranger Pro, another Monsanto glyphosate herbicide. Johnson’s doctors said he was unlikely to live past 2020. Johnson, 46, a former pest control manager for a California school system, applied the weedkiller as many as 30 times per year. Johnson used Roundup Ranger Pro at a San Francisco Bay Area school district, his attorneys said. He sprayed large quantities from a 50-gallon tank attached to a truck, and in gusty wind, the product would cover his face, said Brent Wisner, one of his attorneys. Once, when a hose broke, the weedkiller soaked his entire body. Johnson read the label and even contacted the company after developing a rash but was never warned it could cause cancer, Wisner said. He was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2014 at age 42. “The simple fact is he is going to die. It’s just a matter of time,” Wisner told the jury in his opening statement last month.

But George Lombardi, an attorney for Monsanto, said non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma took years to develop, so Johnson’s cancer must have started well before he began working at the school district. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says Roundup’s active ingredient is safe for people when used in accordance with label directions. However, the France-based International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is part of the World Health Organization, classified it as a “probable human carcinogen” in 2015. And California added glyphosate to its list of chemicals known to cause cancer. Environmental groups were quick to applaud the verdict. Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group, said in a statement, “Monsanto made Roundup the oxycontin of pesticides, and now the addiction and damage they caused have come home to roost. This won’t cure DeWayne Lee Johnson’s cancer, but it will send a strong message to a renegade company.” Over the course of the fourweek trial, jurors heard testimony by statisticians, doctors, public health researchers and epidemiologists who disagreed on whether glyphosate can cause cancer. Johnson’s case is not part of proceedings consolidated in Missouri, Delaware or California state court, where most of the Monsanto cases are pending. It is also separate from consolidated federal multidistrict litigation pending before U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria in San Francisco. Chhabria decided in July to allow hundreds of Roundup lawsuits to proceed to trial, finding there was sufficient evidence for a jury to hear the cases despite calling plaintiff’s expert opinions “shaky.” The Associated Press, Reuters and the PostDispatch contributed to this report.

Mueller has spent months investigating Russian meddling in the election and whether any Trump campaign aides had a hand in the foreign interference plot. Mueller, a former FBI director, appears to be putting a focus on Stone, a political consultant and longtime informal adviser to Trump. Mueller’s team has spent months questioning witnesses, including Stone’s associates, about him. An indictment announced last month accused 12 Russian military intelligence officers of hacking into the presidential campaign of Hillary Clinton, Trump’s Democratic opponent, and the Democratic Party, and releasing tens of thousands of private communications in a sweeping Kremlin-orchestrated conspiracy to interfere in the 2016 U.S. election. According to the charges, the Russian defendants, using a persona known as Guccifer 2.0, in August 2016 contacted a person in touch with the Trump campaign to offer help. Stone, through his attorney, has acknowledged having a “24-word exchange with someone on Twitter claiming to be Guccifer 2.0.”

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 08.11.2018

Bank CEO wanted Manafort to secure him a Cabinet post WASHINGTON POST

A bank CEO who helped President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort obtain $16 million in loans hoped for a Cabinet-level position in the administration, a bank employee testified in federal court Friday. The witness, Dennis Raico, testified after a confusing morning at Manafort’s trial in Alexandria, Va., in which U.S. District Court Judge T.S. Ellis III huddled privately with prosecutors and defense attorneys, delaying the start of testimony until midafternoon. A transcript of those discussions was sealed. No reason was offered publicly for the delay. When Raico finally took the stand, he described how the CEO, Steve Calk, was willing to depart from bank policies to approve loans for a friendly and well-connected political operative. Raico, a former vice president at Federal Savings Bank, testified with immunity from prosecution for any statements he made as a witness. Prosecutors say Manafort lied to that bank and others to secure millions of dollars in loans in 2016 when his political consulting business had run out of clients willing to pay for his services. Manafort, 69, has been on trial for two weeks. He faces bank fraud and tax charges. His trial is the first to grow from special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether any of Trump’s associates conspired with Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election. Raico described how Manafort won approval for loans as part of a process that featured unusual involvement from Calk, the bank’s CEO and chairman. Calk was seeking a role in the Trump administration and sought to make that known to Manafort, Raico testified. Calk did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment. Manafort received two loans from Federal Savings Bank totaling $16 million. One of them, a $9.5 million cash out refinance on a property in Southamp-

ton, N.Y., closed Nov. 16, 2016, shortly after the presidential election. The other, a $6.5 million construction takeout loan, closed on Jan. 4, 2017, weeks before Trump’s inauguration, Raico testified. Raico testified that Manafort contacted the bank about April 2016, inquiring about a loan for a project he was working on with his son-in-law. Raico said he contacted Calk about Manafort’s interest after learning that he worked in politics. “I knew Steve was interested in politics,” he said. Calk, Raico said, wanted to meet the potential client in person. In July 2016, Raico said he had a video conference with Manafort and Manafort’s sonin-law to discuss properties they wanted to finance. The next day, high level bank officials approved a loan for the two men — a quicker turnaround than Raico had ever seen before, he told the court. Calk was directly involved in the negotiations, something Raico also had never seen before, he testified. Raico said he sometimes passed messages between Calk and Manafort, which made him uncomfortable. On Nov. 11, 2016, for example, Raico said Calk called him to say he would “possibly be up for some role in the Trump administration,” and asked Raico if he could inquire about that. The potential roles, Raico said, were Treasury secretary, or as the head of Housing and Urban Development. Both are Cabinetlevel posts. Emails show that a few months earlier, Manafort requested Calk’s résumé after Calk apparently asked if he could serve in the administration. Calk was named to a panel of Trump’s economic advisers during the campaign, and other evidence introduced in court shows Manafort sought to get Calk’s name on a list of candidates for Army secretary. Raico told the court he had not told Manafort about the positions Calk wanted. “It made me very uncomfortable,” he testified.

Player cites ‘need to fight for everyday Americans’ ANTHEM • FROM A1

anthem. Lynch declined to stand for the anthem before the exhibition opener against the Detroit Lions on Friday night. Lynch also sat for the anthem all of last season but never gave a reason for his decision. No other players on either team demonstrated during the anthem, with the Lions all standing together with locked arms. In Philadelphia Thursday, Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins and cornerback De’Vante Bausby raised their fists during the anthem, and defensive end Chris Long placed his arm around Jenkins’ shoulder. Defensive end Michael Bennett walked out of the tunnel during the anthem and walked toward the bench while it played. All the Pittsburgh Steelers appear to have stood. “Everybody is waiting for what the league is going to do,” Jenkins said. “We won’t let it stop what we stand for. I was very encouraged last year with the direction, and that obviously took a different turn. “I think it’s important to utilize the platform as we can because for whatever reason, we have framed this demonstration in a negative light, and often players have to defend why we feel the need to fight for everyday Americans, and in actuality we’re doing the right thing.” At Miami, Dolphins receivers Kenny Stills and Albert Wilson and defensive end Robert Quinn protested during the anthem. Stills and Wilson kneeled behind teammates lined up standing along the sideline. Quinn stood and raised his right fist. There were no apparent protests by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. “As a black man in this world, I’ve got an obligation to raise awareness,” Quinn said. “If no one wants to live in unity, that’s why we’re in the situation we’re in.” Stills kneeled during the anthem during the 2016-17 seasons and has been vocal discussing social injustice issues that inspired the protest movement by NFL players. Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, a leader of the movement, tweeted support for Stills and Wilson. “My brother @kstills continued his protest of systemic oppression tonight by taking a knee,” the tweet said. “Albert

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Miami Dolphins defensive end Robert Quinn raises his right fist during the performance of the national anthem, before the team’s NFL preseason football game Thursday in Miami Gardens, Fla.

Wilson joined him in protest. Stay strong brothers!”

‘DIFFERENT REALITIES’

And in Seattle, three Seahawks players ran into the team’s locker room prior to the playing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Defensive linemen Branden Jackson and Quinton Jefferson, and offensive lineman Duane Brown left the field after team introductions. They returned to the sideline immediately after the anthem concluded. All three were among a group of Seattle players that sat during the anthem last season. Brown and Jefferson said they intended to continue the action all season. Seattle coach Pete Carroll said the team had discussed the topic and decided to support individual decisions. Brown said he didn’t believe there had been much progress made from the demonstrations of last season. “Everyone was clear on my decision and understands and supports it,” Brown said. “We all have different realities in this country, and they understand my perspective. We’re all on good terms.” In Jacksonville, four Jaguars remained in the locker room during the national anthem, and team officials said it would be up to the players to explain why they weren’t on the field. Cornerback Jalen Ramsey, linebacker Telvin Smith and running backs Leonard Fournette and T.J. Yeldon joined teammates on the sideline after the anthem. “As a man, I got certain beliefs,” said Smith, who wore “Salute the Service” cleats. “You know what I mean? This is not

going to become a distraction, and Jacksonville’s not going to become a distraction for this team. I got beliefs. I did what I did. I don’t know if it’s going to be every week, can’t answer if it’s going to be every week. “But as a man I’ve got to stand for something. I love my team, I’m dedicated to my teammates, and that’s what we’re talking about. I did what I did. It was love. I hope people see it and respect it. I respect views.” At Baltimore, both teams stood, but while most of the Ravens lined up shoulder to shoulder on the sideline, second-year linebacker Tim Williams stood alone in front of the bench with his back toward the field. All players on each team at New England appeared to stand for the anthem, some bowing their heads and others placing their hands on their hearts. The Patriots observed a moment of silence beforehand for Weymouth, Mass., police officer Michael Chesna, who was killed last month in the line of duty. The league and the players union have yet to announce a policy for this season regarding demonstrations during the anthem after the league initially ordered everyone to stand on the sideline when the anthem is played or remain in the locker room. League spokesman Brian McCarthy said in an email that the NFL had agreed to delay the implementation of the order while discussions with the NFL Players Association continue. But McCarthy said the national anthem policy had not changed.


NATION

08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 1

Kobach steps away from duties in contested Kansas vote count ASSOCIATED PRESS

TOPEKA, KAN. • Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach stepped aside from his duties as the state’s top elections official Friday until his hotly contested primary race with Gov. Jeff Colyer is resolved. But Kobach rejected Colyer’s accusations that the advice he has been giving local election officials on handling ballots violates state law. Kobach said in a letter to Colyer that he was turning his election duties over to his top deputy. Colyer had demanded in his own letter Thursday to Kobach that the secretary of state stop providing guidance to county officials as they counted late mail-in ballots from Tuesday’s Republican primary and prepared to count other ballots next week. “Although I would discharge my duties ethically, impartially, and responsibly, I have carefully considered your request and have decided that it is in the best interest of the citizens of Kansas that I permit another to perform the duties of the secretary of state until the conclusion of the 2018 primary election process,” Kobach

wrote. Under state law, mail-in ballots are counted if they were postmarked Tuesday and arrive in county election offices by Friday. The secretary of state’s office was updating vote totals as it received new numbers from individual counties. With 25 of the state’s 105 counties reporting, Kobach’s lead almost doubled to a still-tiny 241 votes out of more than 311,000 cast. It had been 121 votes after discrepancies were found between results reported by two counties and what Kobach’s office posted on its website. Kobach is a conservative lightning rod who alienates even some fellow Republicans, but he is perhaps President Donald Trump’s closest political ally in Kansas and had Trump’s tweeted endorsement. Colyer, backed by the National Rifle Association and a strong abortion opponent, is trying to avoid becoming the first Kansas governor to lose a primary since 1956. Even with late mail-in ballots tallied, the counting is not complete because county officials also must review nearly 9,000 provisional ballots. They have until Aug. 20 to finish.

DIGEST Father, son charged in bear killings A man and his teenage son have been charged with illegal hunting after killing a female black bear in her den in southern Alaska and then shooting her two “shrieking” newborn cubs, state authorities said. Alaska Wildlife Troopers said Andrew Renner, 41, and his son, Owen, 18, from the town of Wasilla, skied in April to the remote den on Esther Island in Prince William Sound, where they fatally shot the three bears and then tampered with evidence. The hunters were apparently unaware that the bears were part of a study by the U.S. Forest Service and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game aimed at learning more about the species and individuals’ habitats. A camera monitoring the den captured the killings on video, the state troopers said. Firefighters battle to save homes • Firefighters fought to spare homes Friday from a growing Southern California forest fire, a day after flames came perilously close to neighborhoods and destroyed one house. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency for Orange and Riverside counties as the fire carved its way along ridges in Cleveland National Forest south of Los Angeles. Some hillsides were allowed to burn under the watchful eyes of firefighters as a way to reduce fuel and make it harder for flames to jump roadways into towns if the wind picks up again. Wildlife officials document seabird die-off • Federal wildlife officials are documenting a die-off of Alaska seabirds stretching from north of the Bering Strait to the Gulf of Alaska that may be connected to a trend of warming ocean water. Carcasses examined so far have shown no indication of disease, and tests are pending for harmful algal

toxins. Seabirds have been found emaciated and starved, and changed ocean conditions may have affected prey. Kavanaugh hearings set for September • Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings will be held the first week of September, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, announced Friday. The hearings for President Donald Trump’s pick to replace retired Justice Anthony Kennedy will be held Sept. 4-7, according to a notice sent to Senate Republican offices Friday and obtained by The Washington Post, although the committee noted that the hearing could be three or four days. Administration targets student debt regulation • The administration of President Donald Trump set in motion Friday the repeal of a rule set under thenPresident Barack Obama that sought to ensure that students attending career programs mainly at forprofit colleges don’t pile up debt they can’t repay. The 2014 “gainful employment” rule caps the debt former students amass in those programs in relation to their income after leaving school. The Education Department wants to scrap the rule and expand disclosure of data on student debt and earnings for programs at all types of colleges. Gun safety advocates meet to strategize • Gun safety advocates from around the country are gathering in Atlanta to discuss strategies to end gun violence. More than 1,000 volunteer leaders of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America have congregated at an Atlanta hotel for a two-day conference called Gun Sense University. A common refrain at the conference has been a push for group members to run for office. From news services

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CHARLOTTESVILLE ANNIVERSARY

Washington prepares for showdown with supremacists

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U.S. Park Police are seen working in riot gear in Washington in February. Officials in the nation’s capital say they are confident the city can manage to host this weekend’s white nationalist rally without violence. BY JOE HEIM AND TEO AMUS Washington Post

WASHINGTON • Thousands of

protesters are planning to descend on downtown Washington on Sunday to voice opposition to the white supremacist rally planned for late afternoon at Lafayette Square across from the White House. Protest organizers from a wide range of groups say they have been working for weeks to prepare for the event and have secured permits to gather at Lafayette Square as well as nearby locations, including Freedom Plaza, McPherson Square and Farragut Square. Others plan to meet at the Lincoln Memorial and march to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, where scheduled speakers include New York congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and actor Nick Cannon. The number of protesters across Washington will likely dwarf the number of participants in the white supremacist rally. Jason Kessler, the organizer for that event, stated in his permit application that he expected up to 400 people. But it is unclear if anywhere near that number will show up. For protesters, the emphasis will be on telling Kessler and his followers that their message is not welcome in Washington. Kessler is one of the lead organizers of the violent Unite the Right rally held in Charlottesville, Va., last August that led to the death of protester Heather Heyer. Heyer was killed when a man police say identified himself as a Nazi drove a car into a crowd. Two Virginia State troopers died when their helicopter crashed following a day of monitoring the civil disturbance. Kessler is holding his Washington event, which he is billing as a “white civil rights rally” on the anniversary of the Charlottesville rally. “We are united in supporting diverse communities and we vehemently oppose white supremacy and everything Unite the Right 2 stands for,” said Michelle Styczynski, a member of Democratic Socialists of America and an organizer of the D.C. United Against Hate rally that begins at noon at Freedom Plaza. That rally has a permit for 1,000 protesters and is expected to be the largest counterrally taking place. Styczynski said she expects participants with a range of political backgrounds from far-left to moderates to conservatives “who agree that

white supremacy is abhorrent.” The Freedom Plaza event will include speeches and music and will culminate in mid-afternoon with a march to Lafayette Square to confront rallygoers there. Maurice Cook, an organizer for March for Racial Justice, another group taking part in protests Sunday, said it was important for him as a black man to be present, in part to pay respect to the generations before him who endured persecution and fought for civil rights. “I’m standing on the shoulders of those who made sacrifices to ensure opportunities for me,” said Cook, a Washington resident who was in Charlottesville last year to protest Unite the Right rallygoers. “We need to build something to fight against this white supremacy in a sustained way. I don’t want children to experience this again.” Makia Green, of Black Lives Matter D.C., said she wanted white nationalists to know that the movement against them was only getting stronger. “Our resistance is ever-growing,” she said. “This progress that they are so afraid of — the rise of black leaders and Black Lives Matter getting bigger and people feeling safe to speak their mind — that is still happening.” Her group will meet a block from Lafayette Square to march without a permit on streets police have closed. Their act of civil disobedience will end by the White House, where protesters have permits to occupy half the plaza. “One of our tactics with Black Lives Matter is taking to the streets and letting people allow themselves to physically confront systems of oppression,” Green said. “If we want to abolish white supremacy, we also have to understand that there may be some civil disobedience necessary. ... Ignoring white supremacy doesn’t make it go away.” Green said the group did not expect to be protected by D.C. police officers, so their action will also include de-escalators, legal observers and marshals, “who can literally put their bodies in between folks if things are to escalate,” she said, in addition to looking out for any white nationalist infiltrators. Should any of the counterprotesters be arrested, Black Lives Matter also has raised money for a jail fund to bail people out. Ahead of the counterprotest, organizers will be distributing Know Your Rights pamphlets and inform-

ing attendees on how to keep themselves safe during the march. On Friday afternoon, they held workshops about legal rights and selfdefense, and on Saturday, they plan to disseminate similar information on walks east of the Anacostia River, where most residents are AfricanAmerican. Green said Black Lives Matter was part of the broader Shut It Down D.C. Coalition. She said she would be speaking at the Freedom Plaza rally to explain BLM’s philosophy behind counterprotests and civil disobedience. Antifascists, or antifa, are also expected to be present among the protesters, but it is not known what, if any, actions they have planned for Sunday. Law enforcement and National Park Service officials anticipate they will most likely be present at Lafayette Square. Antifa members fought with white supremacists in bloody street battles last year in Charlottesville. Political leaders across the region condemned white supremacists and their message and pledged support to law enforcement in its efforts to manage the situation. “We the people of Washington, D.C., say unequivocally that we denounce hate, we denounce antiSemitism and we denounce the rhetoric that we expect to hear this Sunday,” D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, a Democrat, said Thursday at a news conference. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, also a Democrat, said the torches “carried by white supremacists in Charlottesville a year ago shone a light on an ugly truth.” “But they also reawakened our commitment to fight back against that ugliness of racism and bigotry. Hatred has no home in this Commonwealth,” he said in a statement. Northam declared a state of emergency Wednesday to allow officials to marshal resources to prepare for the potential impact of events in and around Charlottesville and northern Virginia. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, a Republican, also issued a statement, saying, “As we face this invasion of vile and perverted ideology infesting our region, we stand united in our conviction that a diverse and inclusive Maryland is a stronger Maryland.” President Donald Trump, who is not scheduled to be at the White House on Sunday, has not yet remarked on the anniversary event.

Questions raised about timing of compound search BY STEPHEN R. GROVES AND MORGAN LEE associated Press

• A property owner questioned Friday why authorities did not search a squalid New Mexico compound sooner for a missing boy, saying he told them in late spring that he had met the child’s father at the site and that the man was wanted in Georgia for kidnapping his own son. While touring the ramshackle living quarters littered with ammunition, diesel cans, used diapers, household garbage and Qurans on his property, Jason Badger also said he believed he saw the searched-for boy by his father’s side in January, wearing a hooded jacket. Badger said in an interview that he learned through an online search this spring that the father, Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, was wanted in the disappearance of his son, Abdul-ghani Wahhaj, and reported his earlier encounter to law enforcement authorities in New Mexico and Georgia — and eventually to the FBI. Authorities did not search the

AMALIA, N.M.

compound for the severely disabled boy until last week in a raid that resulted in the arrest of Wahhaj and four other adults on child neglect charges after 11 other children were found at the compound. A second search on Monday uncovered a child’s body that hasn’t been positively identified by a state medical examiner, although Wahhaj’s father, also named Siraj Wahhaj, said this week that the body found was his grandson’s. “If they knew about it, and then that kid died in that time frame, when they knew, somebody has to be held accountable,” Badger said. Taos County Sheriff’s Department spokesman Steve Fullendorf played down Badger’s criticism of the investigation, saying Sheriff Jerry Hogrefe did everything he could possible under the law and had to follow certain restrictions. “Mr. Badger doesn’t have to adhere to those same restrictions,” Hogrefe said. “He wants to have his 15 minutes of fame, and that’s fine.” Hogrefe has said the FBI put the New Mexico compound under surveillance in recent months and took

photographs, but he could not initially get a warrant to enter because images collected did not show the boy or his father. That changed when a note was forwarded to Georgia authorities saying children inside the compound were starving, Hogrefe said. The missing boy’s grandfather, who leads a well-known mosque in New York, said his adult daughter, who was in the compound, had sent the note to a man in Georgia. That man then notified the grandfather, who said he contacted police. The five adults, including the imam’s son and daughter and a second adult daughter, have been charged with child abuse stemming from the alleged neglect of the 11 children found living in filth in the compound on the outskirts of tiny Amalia, N.M. Prosecutors also have accused them in court documents of training children to use firearms in preparation for future school shootings, although no charges have been filed based on those allegations.


NATION

08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 2

Kobach steps away from duties in contested Kansas vote count ASSOCIATED PRESS

TOPEKA, KAN. • Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach stepped aside from his duties as the state’s top elections official Friday until his hotly contested primary race with Gov. Jeff Colyer is resolved. But Kobach rejected Colyer’s accusations that the advice he has been giving local election officials on handling ballots violates state law. Kobach said in a letter to Colyer that he was turning his election duties over to his top deputy. Colyer had demanded in his own letter Thursday to Kobach that the secretary of state stop providing guidance to county officials as they counted late mail-in ballots from Tuesday’s Republican primary and prepared to count other ballots next week. “Although I would discharge my duties ethically, impartially, and responsibly, I have carefully considered your request and have decided that it is in the best interest of the citizens of Kansas that I permit another to perform the duties of the secretary of state until the conclusion of the 2018 primary election process,” Kobach

DIGEST Father, son charged in bear killings A man and his teenage son have been charged with illegal hunting after killing a female black bear in her den in southern Alaska and then shooting her two “shrieking” newborn cubs, state authorities said. Alaska Wildlife Troopers said Andrew Renner, 41, and his son, Owen, 18, from the town of Wasilla, skied in April to the remote den on Esther Island in Prince William Sound, where they fatally shot the three bears and tampered with evidence. The hunters were apparently unaware that the bears were part of a study by the U.S. Forest Service and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game aimed at learning more about the species and individuals’ habitats. A camera monitoring the den captured the killings on video, the state troopers said. Airline reports stolen aircraft, witnesses report chase • Alaska Airlines says there was an “unauthorized take-off” of an airplane and witnesses reported a jet being chased by military planes near Sea-Tac International Airport in Washington state. The airline reported that the plane was a Horizon Air Q400 and it believed no passengers were on board. A plume of smoke later was reported near Ketron Island, Wash., according to the U.S. Coast Guard. SeaTac Airport tweeted, “An airline employee conducted an unauthorized takeoff without passengers at Sea-Tac; aircraft has crashed in south Puget Sound. Normal operations at Sea-Tac Airport have resumed.” Wildlife officials document seabird die-off • Federal wildlife officials are documenting a die-off of Alaska seabirds stretching from north of the Bering Strait to the Gulf of Alaska that may be connected to a trend of warming ocean water. Carcasses examined so far have shown no indication of disease, and tests are pending for harmful algal toxins. Seabirds have been found

wrote. Under state law, mail-in ballots are counted if they were postmarked Tuesday and arrive in county election offices by Friday. The secretary of state’s office was updating vote totals as it received new numbers from individual counties. With 25 of the state’s 105 counties reporting, Kobach’s lead almost doubled to a still-tiny 241 votes out of more than 311,000 cast. It had been 121 votes after discrepancies were found between results reported by two counties and what Kobach’s office posted on its website. Kobach is a conservative lightning rod who alienates even some fellow Republicans, but he is perhaps President Donald Trump’s closest political ally in Kansas and had Trump’s tweeted endorsement. Colyer, backed by the National Rifle Association and a strong abortion opponent, is trying to avoid becoming the first Kansas governor to lose a primary since 1956. Even with late mail-in ballots tallied, the counting is not complete because county officials also must review nearly 9,000 provisional ballots. They have until Aug. 20 to finish.

emaciated and starved, and changed ocean conditions may have affected prey. Kavanaugh hearings set for September • Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings will be held the first week of September, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, announced Friday. The hearings for President Donald Trump’s pick to replace retired Justice Anthony Kennedy will be held Sept. 4-7, according to a notice sent to Senate Republican offices Friday and obtained by The Washington Post, although the committee noted that the hearing could be three or four days. Administration targets student debt regulation • The administration of President Donald Trump set in motion Friday the repeal of a rule set under thenPresident Barack Obama that sought to ensure that students attending career programs mainly at for-profit colleges don’t pile up debt they can’t repay. The 2014 “gainful employment” rule caps the debt former students amass in those programs in relation to their income after leaving school. The Education Department wants to scrap the rule and expand disclosure of data on student debt and earnings for programs at all types of colleges. FBI agent found not guilty of lying about gunshots • A jury found an FBI agent not guilty Friday of obstructing an investigation into who fired two errant shots at a key figure in a group that seized an Oregon wildlife refuge in 2016. W. Joseph Astarita, 41, was charged with making false statements and obstruction of justice after telling investigators he did not fire the shots that missed Robert “LaVoy” Finicum. His attorneys, Robert Cary and David Angeli, stressed to jurors that no eyewitnesses saw Astarita fire his weapon, and there was no ballistic evidence linking a bullet to his rifle. From news services

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St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A9

CHARLOTTESVILLE ANNIVERSARY

Washington prepares for showdown with supremacists

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Park Police are seen working in riot gear in Washington in February. Officials in the nation’s capital say they are confident the city can manage to host this weekend’s white nationalist rally without violence. BY JOE HEIM AND TEO AMUS Washington Post

WASHINGTON • Thousands of

protesters are planning to descend on downtown Washington on Sunday to voice opposition to the white supremacist rally planned for late afternoon at Lafayette Square across from the White House. Protest organizers from a wide range of groups say they have been working for weeks to prepare for the event and have secured permits to gather at Lafayette Square as well as nearby locations, including Freedom Plaza, McPherson Square and Farragut Square. Others plan to meet at the Lincoln Memorial and march to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, where scheduled speakers include New York congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and actor Nick Cannon. The number of protesters across Washington will likely dwarf the number of participants in the white supremacist rally. Jason Kessler, the organizer for that event, stated in his permit application that he expected up to 400 people. But it is unclear if anywhere near that number will show up. For protesters, the emphasis will be on telling Kessler and his followers that their message is not welcome in Washington. Kessler is one of the lead organizers of the violent Unite the Right rally held in Charlottesville, Va., last August that led to the death of protester Heather Heyer. Heyer was killed when a man police say identified himself as a Nazi drove a car into a crowd. Two Virginia State troopers died when their helicopter crashed following a day of monitoring the civil disturbance. Kessler is holding his Washington event, which he is billing as a “white civil rights rally” on the anniversary of the Charlottesville rally. “We are united in supporting diverse communities and we vehemently oppose white supremacy and everything Unite the Right 2 stands for,” said Michelle Styczynski, a member of Democratic Socialists of America and an organizer of the D.C. United Against Hate rally that begins at noon at Freedom Plaza. That rally has a permit for 1,000 protesters and is expected to be the largest counterrally taking place. Styczynski said she expects participants with a range of political backgrounds from far-left to moderates to conservatives “who agree that

white supremacy is abhorrent.” The Freedom Plaza event will include speeches and music and will culminate in mid-afternoon with a march to Lafayette Square to confront rallygoers there. Maurice Cook, an organizer for March for Racial Justice, another group taking part in protests Sunday, said it was important for him as a black man to be present, in part to pay respect to the generations before him who endured persecution and fought for civil rights. “I’m standing on the shoulders of those who made sacrifices to ensure opportunities for me,” said Cook, a Washington resident who was in Charlottesville last year to protest Unite the Right rallygoers. “We need to build something to fight against this white supremacy in a sustained way. I don’t want children to experience this again.” Makia Green, of Black Lives Matter D.C., said she wanted white nationalists to know that the movement against them was only getting stronger. “Our resistance is ever-growing,” she said. “This progress that they are so afraid of — the rise of black leaders and Black Lives Matter getting bigger and people feeling safe to speak their mind — that is still happening.” Her group will meet a block from Lafayette Square to march without a permit on streets police have closed. Their act of civil disobedience will end by the White House, where protesters have permits to occupy half the plaza. “One of our tactics with Black Lives Matter is taking to the streets and letting people allow themselves to physically confront systems of oppression,” Green said. “If we want to abolish white supremacy, we also have to understand that there may be some civil disobedience necessary. ... Ignoring white supremacy doesn’t make it go away.” Green said the group did not expect to be protected by D.C. police officers, so their action will also include de-escalators, legal observers and marshals, “who can literally put their bodies in between folks if things are to escalate,” she said, in addition to looking out for any white nationalist infiltrators. Should any of the counterprotesters be arrested, Black Lives Matter also has raised money for a jail fund to bail people out. Ahead of the counterprotest, organizers will be distributing Know Your Rights pamphlets and inform-

ing attendees on how to keep themselves safe during the march. On Friday afternoon, they held workshops about legal rights and selfdefense, and on Saturday, they plan to disseminate similar information on walks east of the Anacostia River, where most residents are AfricanAmerican. Green said Black Lives Matter was part of the broader Shut It Down D.C. Coalition. She said she would be speaking at the Freedom Plaza rally to explain BLM’s philosophy behind counterprotests and civil disobedience. Antifascists, or antifa, are also expected to be present among the protesters, but it is not known what, if any, actions they have planned for Sunday. Law enforcement and National Park Service officials anticipate they will most likely be present at Lafayette Square. Antifa members fought with white supremacists in bloody street battles last year in Charlottesville. Political leaders across the region condemned white supremacists and their message and pledged support to law enforcement in its efforts to manage the situation. “We the people of Washington, D.C., say unequivocally that we denounce hate, we denounce antiSemitism and we denounce the rhetoric that we expect to hear this Sunday,” D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, a Democrat, said Thursday at a news conference. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, also a Democrat, said the torches “carried by white supremacists in Charlottesville a year ago shone a light on an ugly truth.” “But they also reawakened our commitment to fight back against that ugliness of racism and bigotry. Hatred has no home in this Commonwealth,” he said in a statement. Northam declared a state of emergency Wednesday to allow officials to marshal resources to prepare for the potential impact of events in and around Charlottesville and northern Virginia. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, a Republican, also issued a statement, saying, “As we face this invasion of vile and perverted ideology infesting our region, we stand united in our conviction that a diverse and inclusive Maryland is a stronger Maryland.” President Donald Trump, who is not scheduled to be at the White House on Sunday, has not yet remarked on the anniversary event.

Questions raised about timing of compound search BY STEPHEN R. GROVES AND MORGAN LEE associated Press

• A property owner questioned Friday why authorities did not search a squalid New Mexico compound sooner for a missing boy, saying he told them in late spring that he had met the child’s father at the site and that the man was wanted in Georgia for kidnapping his own son. While touring the ramshackle living quarters littered with ammunition, diesel cans, used diapers, household garbage and Qurans on his property, Jason Badger also said he believed he saw the searched-for boy by his father’s side in January, wearing a hooded jacket. Badger said in an interview that he learned through an online search this spring that the father, Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, was wanted in the disappearance of his son, Abdul-ghani Wahhaj, and reported his earlier encounter to law enforcement authorities in New Mexico and Georgia — and eventually to the FBI. Authorities did not search the

AMALIA, N.M.

compound for the severely disabled boy until last week in a raid that resulted in the arrest of Wahhaj and four other adults on child neglect charges after 11 other children were found at the compound. A second search on Monday uncovered a child’s body that hasn’t been positively identified by a state medical examiner, although Wahhaj’s father, also named Siraj Wahhaj, said this week that the body found was his grandson’s. “If they knew about it, and then that kid died in that time frame, when they knew, somebody has to be held accountable,” Badger said. Taos County Sheriff’s Department spokesman Steve Fullendorf played down Badger’s criticism of the investigation, saying Sheriff Jerry Hogrefe did everything he could possible under the law and had to follow certain restrictions. “Mr. Badger doesn’t have to adhere to those same restrictions,” Hogrefe said. “He wants to have his 15 minutes of fame, and that’s fine.” Hogrefe has said the FBI put the New Mexico compound under surveillance in recent months and took

photographs, but he could not initially get a warrant to enter because images collected did not show the boy or his father. That changed when a note was forwarded to Georgia authorities saying children inside the compound were starving, Hogrefe said. The missing boy’s grandfather, who leads a well-known mosque in New York, said his adult daughter, who was in the compound, had sent the note to a man in Georgia. That man then notified the grandfather, who said he contacted police. The five adults, including the imam’s son and daughter and a second adult daughter, have been charged with child abuse stemming from the alleged neglect of the 11 children found living in filth in the compound on the outskirts of tiny Amalia, N.M. Prosecutors also have accused them in court documents of training children to use firearms in preparation for future school shootings, although no charges have been filed based on those allegations.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SATURDAy • 08.11.2018 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

Short takes

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

POSTCARD FROM MOUND CITy • By DAN MARTIN

To be (yawn) or not to be? The city of Hanley Hills (pop. 2,115) had a chance to dissolve itself in the name of efficiency and county consolidation — a goal this newspaper has supported as a way to secure our region’s economic health. Sadly, voters rejected the opportunity Tuesday in a referendum. A whopping 479 people mustered the energy to vote, with 60 percent rejecting dissolution. It would seem that on a decision as momentous as the town’s future existence, more than 23 percent of the people would have weighed in at the polls. The turnout alone was testament to the dissolution cause. If the vast majority of your residents can’t be inspired to vote on whether the municipality should even exist, that’s a strong sign that it’s time to join the others that have taken the dissolution plunge. Meanwhile, a whopping 29 people voted in Kinloch (pop. 297), regarding two fire district financing issues. Kinloch, which has been in a state of almost perpetual financial crisis, has yet to consider the dissolution option. As much as we respect the pride and perseverance of these tiny communities, there is minimal, if any, logic to taking the expensive option of independent governance when the far easier, cheaper and more efficient route would be to merge with St. Louis County.

Let the healing begin Two dozen states have found ways to legalize medical marijuana, but the Missouri Legislature can’t seem to do more than wring its hands over the issue. Missouri voters will have a chance to bypass those reluctant lawmakers and create a legal medical marijuana system in Missouri via a November ballot initiative. Three of them, actually. The Nov. 6 ballot will include three questions about allowing patients with cancer, HIV, epilepsy and other conditions access to medical marijuana. The differences between the proposals have to do with regulation and taxation. Estimates put Missouri’s potential medical marijuana market at more than $100 million annually. Two of the measures would amend the state constitution instead of just putting it into law. If more than one passes, the constitutional amendment proposal with the most votes would take effect. Pot’s medical benefits, especially for pain alleviation, are at this point beyond debate. Standing against these sensible proposals isn’t responsible or principled, it’s just cruel.

Let Trump have his stardom The president’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame can’t get any love in West Hollywood. Earlier this week, the City Council voted unanimously for a resolution calling for Donald Trump’s star to be removed because of the president’s “disturbing treatment of women and other actions that do not meet the shared values of the City of West Hollywood, the region, state, and country.” Trump’s star has been repeatedly vandalized and twice smashed to pieces. It was a symbolic Donald Trump’s vandalized vote since the Hollywood star on the Hollywood Walk Chamber of Commerce, not the council, of Fame. holds jurisdiction over the Walk of Fame. Chamber president Leron Gubler says there are no plans to remove any stars. If Bill Cosby still has a star, then surely Trump’s contributions — the Miss Universe pageants and “The Apprentice” — still deserve recognition. But, for its own protection, perhaps the star would be better off with a wall around it?

Et tu, Apprentice? President Donald Trump, who has asserted that former President Barack Obama tapped his phone at Trump Towers, learned yet again it’s his friends he should worry about. His hand-picked reality star and former administration official, Omarosa Manigault Newman, secretly recorded conversations with Trump in the West Wing, according to The Daily Beast. She used her smartphone to record some private conversations, described by one person who listened to the recordings as “anodyne, everyday chatter,” according to the report. The recordings reportedly were used to leverage her forthcoming tell-all book, “Unhinged.” This comes on the heels of the secret recordings by his former longtime lawyer Michael Cohen. Perhaps that soccer ball gifted to Trump by his good friend Vladimir Putin deserves a second look.

#OscarsSoLame The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Wednesday that it plans to tighten its marathon-length program for fear that it’s losing viewers. But it will add another category for “popular” films to the awards show, which simple math suggests would add to the show’s length. What constitutes a “popular” film isn’t clear, but it would presumably include less-than-artful blockbusters that typically get overlooked. Actor Rob Lowe tweeted an obituary: “The film business passed away today with the announcement of the ‘popular’ film Oscar. It had been in poor health for a number of years. It is survived by sequels, tent poles, and vertical integration.” We already have the People’s Choice awards. The Oscars should be reserved exclusively for films that meet artistic merits, not box-office cash quotas.

A watershed moment Rashida Tlaib is poised to become the first Muslim congresswoman in U.S. history after a narrow win in the primary for Michigan’s 13th District on Tuesday. She will run unopposed in November in the heavily Democratic district for the seat formerly held by Rep. John Conyers, who resigned amid allegations of sexual harassment. Tlaib, a Detroit native and daughter of Palestinian immigrants, was also the first Muslim woman ever to serve in Michigan’s Legislature in 2008. She told supporters early Wednesday morning, “I’m going to push back against everything that’s so un-American that’s coming out of this administration,” The New York Times reported. Tlaib’s victory means the electorate, at least in Michigan, isn’t buying the administration’s anti-Muslim rhetoric.

dmartin@post-dispatch.com

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltodayl.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Unconscious bias likely at play in regard to new prosecuting attorney

Missouri’s GOP lawmakers were out of touch with constituents on Prop A

Regarding “Stunning upset for Bell over McCulloch” (Aug. 8): The race for St. Louis County prosecuting attorney between Wesley Bell and Bob McCulloch is not unlike many political races that involve African-American candidates facing white incumbents. The argument is that because the black candidate does not have as much experience they are not competent. This standard seems to emerge in political campaigns as if politics and the collective conscience of the voters does not matter. In the case of Bell and McCulloch, the will of the people was clearly demonstrated by the results. Where was the competence standard with our president? Or with Eric Greitens? Once upon a time, a young Bob McCulloch SID HASTINGS was given Wesley Bell the chance to demonstrate what kind of prosecuting attorney he would become. That same chance should be given to Wesley Bell. There is much about the many years of McCulloch’s service that is commendable, but that was not enough capital to overcome dissatisfaction many felt about his handling of the Michael Brown case and less advertised decisions regarding minority communities. It’s a fair request for us to ask ourselves: Am I colorblind when I apply the competence test? Do I apply it with people of color and women more than I apply it to others? Let’s celebrate the significance of this and give Bell a chance. Let’s embrace the often untapped resource of diversity whether it is someone who is African-American, a woman or person with a disability. This is America, where opportunity is there for all who aspire to serve. Cecilia Nadal • St. Louis

Regarding “Right to work is out” (Aug. 8): I think that there is another conclusion from Proposition A’s defeat in 89 percent of Missouri counties. The message sent by Missouri voters is the Legislature’s Republican supermajority is clearly either out of touch with its constituents, or they simply did not care about their constituent’s opinion. I did not see or read about mass protests by workers demanding a right-to-work law. The law passed because of the culture in the Missouri House and Senate (gratuities, contributions and dark money). This culture will not change until we elect people who will represent us. In November, we again have a choice. I urge you to use it wisely. Dan Gould • Ballwin

Ginsburg editorial a vivid reminder of GOP theft of Supreme Court seat Forgiveness is good, but there are things I can never forgive. Reading the Aug. 4 Short Takes editorial “To your health, Justice Ginsburg” reminded me of two. One, as mentioned in the article, is the stealing of the Supreme Court vacancy by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and others, which by the Constitution, tradition and fair play, belonged to President Barack Obama. The other, not nearly as earth-shaking, is the Mizzou-Colorado football game where Colorado scored the winning touchdown as time ran out on the fifth down as fans tried to get referees’ attention. It ended Missouri’s chance at a national championship, and was called in Wikipedia “one of the top memorable moments and blunders in college football history.” I don’t believe the Colorado case was done out of malice, probably incompetence. But the Obama case was an unAmerican, unconstitutional and malicious act by a party that embraces cheating in many forms, not the least of which is gerrymandering. Robert Kloster • Vandalia, Ill.

Fake controversies of voter fraud distract from more vital concerns Regarding “Trump commission on voter fraud in ’16 found none, documents show” (Aug. 5): Yes, the Russians worry us, but homegrown dangers to voting and democracy foment under our noses. Maine Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap received documents from the commission empty of evidence of voter fraud: no instances of double voting, no 1,000 convictions for voter fraud as claimed, no evidence of between 3 million and 5 million illegally cast ballots in 2016 as claimed by President Donald Trump, and, thus, no need for restrictive voter ID rules. Then we have the gerrymandering of voting districts and the purging of voter rolls to skew the vote one way or another, and we have more undemocratic moves tampering with our vote. Voter fraud, like yelling “fire” in a crowded theater, is Republican fake news meant to scare, mislead and obfuscate likely what is really happening with the Russians. Good advice: Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain. William Kwapy • Pacific

On ‘right to work,’ legislators bow to someone other than the voters Regarding “Right to work: Off the table?” (Aug. 9): One would think the resounding defeat of Proposition A would cause the legislature to move on. They evidently passed the right-to-work law without consideration as to how voters think. Voters of both parties have stated in no uncertain way their opinion on the matter. Legislators should be asking themselves how tone-deaf they were. Instead, many in the legislature are saying they will try again, maybe within the next year. How can this be? The people have spoken via the ballot box. Perhaps a more important constituency matters to them. Clue: Who funded all their ads? After the way they diluted the “puppy mill” referendum I will not be surprised to see them try to nibble away at the unequivocal statement of the electors. The only way to oppose these attempts to overturn the will of the people is to vote them out, and ensure we have more representative elections. Remember the state motto: The welfare of the people shall be the supreme law. Malcolm D. Spence • Florissant

Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

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M 1 Saturday • 08.11.2018 • a11

Willow Creek elders quit, Instead of demons, cite need for ‘fresh start’ try seeing others as FAITH PERSPECTIVES

members of family

By MaNya BraCHEar PaSHMaN Chicago Tribune

CHICaGO • The pastor and

other leaders of a megachurch in suburban Chicago have resigned and apologized for mishandling allegations that the church’s founder engaged in improper behavior with women. Answering critics’ calls to let new leaders shepherd Willow Creek Community Church, lead pastor Heather Larson and other church elders announced their resignations Wednesday at the campus in South Barrington. “It has become clear to me that this church needs a fresh start,” Larson said. “Trust has been broken by leadership, and it doesn’t return quickly.” Founder bill Hybels stepped down from the helm of the megachurch in April after a Tribune investigation that revealed allegations of misconduct with women — including church employees — that spanned decades. Women have continued to come forward with allegations. Among them is Hybels’ former executive assistant, who told The New York Times that she was sexually harassed and fondled by the pastor for more than two years in the 1980s. Hybels denied those allegations. The alleged behavior detailed by the Tribune included suggestive comments, extended hugs, an unwanted kiss and invitations to hotel rooms. It also included an allegation of a prolonged consensual affair with a married woman who reversed herself and said her claim about the affair was not true when confronted by an elder in 2014. Hybels has denied the allegations against him but apologized to the congregation for taking a defensive stance “instead of one that invited conversation and learning.” On Wednesday, church elder Missy Rasmussen told the congregation that elders believed Hybels’ sins go “beyond what he previously admitted on stage.” “We were not aware of many of the choices he made in pri-

GrEG WEEKS Manchester United Methodist Church

DAILY HERALD VIA AP

Willow Creek Community Church lead pastor Heather Larson speaks at the church Wednesday in South Barrington, Ill. Larson and the entire board will step down by the end of the year.

vate and therefore did not hold him accountable in meaningful ways,” said Rasmussen, who has served on the elder board for seven years. Hybels was the subject of a series of inquiries overseen by Willow Creek’s elders, including one conducted by an outside law firm. He was cleared of any wrongdoing in those inquires. With the elders’ knowledge, he continued to counsel the woman who alleged, then retracted, her story of having a 14-year affair with Hybels. When members of the Willow Creek Association board questioned that conflict of interest, elders said he was fulfilling his pastoral duty because the woman was suicidal and had kept them informed every time the woman reached out to him. On Wednesday, elders conceded that letting Hybels counsel the woman was wrong. They expressed regret for conducting their inquiries with the goal of finding definitive evidence of an affair, not with a goal of ensuring the pastor’s behavior was “above reproach.” “We also weren’t as objective as we should have been,” Rasmussen said. “We viewed the allegations through a lens of trust we had in Bill that clouded our judgment and caused us to not act quickly enough.” Hybels had named Larson and teaching pastor Steve

Carter as his successors last October, before the allegations became public, but planned to stay another year to ready them for their roles. Since stepping down in April, he has had no role with the church that he founded in a rented movie theater nearly 43 years ago and built into one of the nation’s most iconic and influential megachurches. Larson had served as executive pastor of Willow Creek for five years, overseeing the church’s $77 million budget and 350 employees. Her role as lead pastor, or essentially CEO, included oversight of the church’s main campus in South Barrington and the seven satellite campuses in the city and suburbs. Carter stepped into the pulpit long dominated by Hybels but did not appear on stage Sunday. He announced his resignation later that day, citing “a fundamental difference in judgment between what I believe is necessary for Willow Creek to move in a positive direction, and what they think is best.” Steve Gillen, pastor of Willow Creek’s North Shore regional campus, will serve as Willow Creek’s interim leader. Rasmussen said all the elders would leave in waves, starting next Wednesday until the end of the year. She said there would be an external review of the church’s governance to help future leaders.

OBITUARIES

Linehan, Benjamin Joseph - St. Louis

One of the most intriguing stories about Jesus is when he healed a man possessed by multiple “demons” (Luke 8:26-39). After they are cast out, the change in the man is remarkable. The local villagers, who had known him to be loud, violent and uncontrollable, came and found him “sitting at Jesus’ feet, fully dressed and completely sane” (8:35, CEB). This is where the story has a surprise twist. The townspeople, instead of celebrating, become surprisingly defensive. “Then everyone gathered from the region … and asked Jesus to leave their area because they were overcome with fear” (8:37). There have been many explanations for their reaction. When I read the story against our modern backdrop, I believe one thing becomes clear. We’re more comfortable with demons than without them. Many, of course, may not believe anymore in literal spirits that possess people. There is no denying, though, that imagining “unclean spirits” in others is real. Not only that, but it energizes us. Modern culture thrives on demonizing those who are simply unlike us or with whom we disagree. You can find a legion of them in a quick read of the daily news. The media. Political parties and candidates. Labor unions. Big business. Immigrants. Social media is rabid with insults and stereotypes of “those people,” demonstrating their lack of moral decency. Academic psychologist Rob Brotherton, in his book “Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories,” suggests a reason for this. We each naturally assume that we have a cornerstone on virtue and those different from us don’t. If we happen to do bad things, it’s by accident or a momentary lapse. When others do bad things, though, they are “bad to the bone.” We project onto them values and intentions that may be based

Celebrations of Life

Mask, Catherine Beatrice - St. Louis

Linehan, Benjamin Joseph

“What we have once enjoyed, we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes part of us.” HELEN KELLER

SHARE A MEMORY

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The "Best Dad Ever" died August 06, 2018. May he spend eternity next to a beautiful blue lake in the Adirondack Mountains. Ben was born 85 years ago in Glens Falls, NY to the late Katherine Hoey and Daniel "Buster" Linehan. He was preceded in death by sons, Sean and Michael; grandson, Paul Mattie; brothers, Dan and Paul; and sister, Jane Broderick. He is survived by his "first wife" of 57 years, Patricia Egan Linehan; daughters, Sharon (Michael) Changar of Underwood, WA, Anne Linehan, and Mary (Scott) Stewart of St. Louis; sister, Mary Linehan of Syracuse, NY; his grandchildren, Layla and Ben Linehan; Daniel (Jenna), Joseph, Matthew and Patrick Changar; Thomas and Katherine Stewart; and great grandson, Egan Changar. Ben was a Navy veteran and served aboard the Block Island CVE 106. After graduating from the University of Dayton, he began a long career with IBM Corp. After retirement, he worked as a private consultant to the utility industry B en w a s vot ed "cl a s s wit" in high school and never relinquished the title. He would want you all to have a Manhattan, adopt a puppy and enjoy the butterflies in your garden. Peace. Services: Ben donated his body to the St. Louis University School of Medicine.

more on feelings than facts. Such simplistic thinking gives us safety and identity, two good things to have in chaotic times. No wonder the people asked Jesus to leave. It’s easier living with the security of imagined evil than with the insecurity that comes from admitting we’re each a combination of saint and sinner. The Gospel story portrays Jesus casting out the demons by verbal command. If he were to exorcise our demons today, what would he say? “Love your enemies and pray for those who harass you” (Matthew 5:44). “Don’t judge so you won’t be judged” (Matthew 7:1). “You must love your neighbor as you love yourself” (Matthew 22:39). “Whoever hasn’t sinned should throw the first stone” (John 8:7). Jesus confronts our unclean spirits by reminding us that we all are flawed, selfish, proud people. Each of us needs grace, forgiveness for ourselves and forgiveness of others. He challenges us to rise above our brokenness by claiming a larger view of humanity. We, many and different as we are, are one human family. Not only are we better together but we’re more beautiful when we are together. After the man was healed, he wanted to stay with Jesus rather than return to a village that had grown comfortable believing he was the evil one. Who can blame him? Instead of granting comfort, Jesus gave him a mission. “Return home and tell the story of what God has done for you” (8:39). Similarly, people of faith, in their posts, tweets and conversation, are called to proclaim what God has done for them. Like the cured demoniac, we have the opportunity to become “completely sane.” It takes a lot of energy demonizing the other side. We can put that energy to much better use today. Weeks is senior pastor of Manchester United Methodist Church. He is a regular Faith Perspectives contributor to STLtoday.com/ religion.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Swagman, Esther - O'Fallon, MO

Mask, Catherine Beatrice

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WORLD

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 08.11.2018

Trump takes aim at Turkey, says he will double metal tariffs

DIGEST Taliban forces storm key Afghan city

A brazen and bloody overnight assault Friday by the Taliban on a key provincial capital in central Afghanistan has increased pressure on U.S.-backed Afghan forces that are withering under relentless attacks, prompting President Ashraf Ghani to call an emergency meeting of his security officials. While government security forces in the city of Ghazni repulsed the multipronged attack with the help of U.S. air support, Taliban insurgents remained hunkered down on its outskirts, according to Interior Ministry deputy spokesman, Nasrat Rahimi. At least 39 insurgents were killed and 14 police died, officials said.

WASHINGTON POST

WASHINGTON • Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned Friday against those who try to “bully” his country, as an announcement by U.S. President Donald Trump imposing new tariffs on Turkey sent the Turkish currency into a free fall. “The language of threats and blackmail cannot be used against this nation,” Erdogan said in apparent response to Trump’s early-morning tweet saying he was doubling U.S. import levies on Turkish steel and aluminum. “Those who assume they can bring us to our knees through economic manipulations don’t know our nation at all,” he said, without directly mentioning Trump or the tariffs. But the U.S. announcement quickly sent the value of the Turkish lira, already under severe strain, to a record low against the U.S. dollar. The currency crisis has fueled growing concern among global financial professionals and investors about the health of the Turkish economy. Relations between the two NATO allies were already in a downward spiral over a host of issues, including Syria policy, weapons purchases and the fallout from a 2016 coup attempt against Erdogan. And there were immediate signs Friday that Russia could try to exploit the latest row between the United States and Turkey, a country where the U.S. military maintains a critical air base for operations in the Middle East. Trump’s willingness to ratchet up the financial pain on Turkey followed an unsuccessful effort this week to resolve the ongoing dispute between the two countries over Andrew Brunson,

Opposition launches challenge of vote in Zimbabwe vote • Zimbabwe’s main opposition party filed on Friday a legal challenge to the results of the country’s first election without Robert Mugabe on the ballot, alleging irregularities and calling for a fresh vote or for their candidate, Nelson Chamisa, to be declared the winner. The filing brings more uncertainty to a country that had hoped the peaceful vote would begin a new era. Justice Minister Ziyambi Ziyambi said the inauguration, once planned for Sunday, “is on hold” until the court rules.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

People in Turkey check foreign currency rates Friday in Ankara. Turkey’s currency nosedived on concerns about its economic policies and a dispute with the U.S.

an American pastor held on charges that include espionage and trying to overthrow the government. Trade Minister Ruhsar Pekcan said that Turkey was “deeply disappointed” by the tariff decision and that it would “not only impact Turkey, but ... American companies and workers as well.” Disputes between the two countries, she said in a statement, “can and should be resolved through dialogue and cooperation.” The Brunson case is far from the only issue between Washington and Ankara. Turkey has demanded the extradition of a Turkish cleric living in Pennsylvania who it charges was the mastermind of a 2016 coup attempt against Erdogan. It also wants the release of a Turkish banker convicted here this year as part of an ongoing U.S. federal investigation of alleged violations of oil sanctions against Iran by a Turkish state bank. As Turkey becomes increasingly es-

tranged from the United States, it has solidified relations with Russia. Erdogan spoke with Russian President Vladimir Putin on the telephone Friday morning soon after Trump’s tariff announcement. After the call, Erdogan hailed Turkey’s economic ties with Russia, saying that “these contacts make us stronger.” Experts on Turkish politics have long compared the styles of Trump and Erdogan as divisive leaders, and the two have previously declared their admiration for each other. But the same stubbornness that appears to drive Trump to take actions is likely to cause Erdogan to dig in his heels. Soner Cagaptay, director of the Turkish research program at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, predicted that Erdogan’s response to the new tariffs “will be perhaps completely opposite to what the United States wants to achieve.”

Campsite officials detained after flooding danger • French police detained two officials from a German association that operates a campsite in southern France where flooding danger prompted evacuations and a man was reported missing, a local prosecutor said Friday. The association, based in Leverkusen, Germany, owns the property in Saint-Julien-de-Peyrolas where the campsite was built without authorization, Nimes Prosecutor Eric Maurel told French broadcaster BFM TV. Yemen’s Houthis back investigation of airstrike • Yemen’s Shiite rebels on Friday backed a U.N. call for a probe into a Saudi-led coalition airstrike in the country’s north that killed dozens of people, including many children, the previous day in an attack that drew wide international criticism. Senior Yemeni rebel leader Mohammed Ali al-Houthi said on Twitter that the rebels — known as Houthis — welcomed the call and were willing to cooperate in an investigation of the strike in Saada province.

Shooting in Canadian city leaves 4 dead ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORONTO • A shooting in a small

Canadian city Friday that left four people dead, including two police officers who were responding to a call of shots fired, struck a nerve in a country that has been roiled in recent months by several instances of mass violence. People in Fredericton, the capital of New Brunswick in the eastern part of the country, said they heard as many as 20 gunshots after a confrontation that prompted police to initially cordon off a large section of the city with emergency vehicles and order residents to remain inside their homes and businesses. Finally, after a tense period of waiting, authorities disclosed the toll: Among the four killed were two officers, a rare case of police killed in the line of duty in Canada. Fredericton’s deputy police chief

Martin Gaudet said the two officers arrived at the apartment complex and saw two deceased civilians before being shot and killed themselves. Gaudet said a 48-year-old man with serious injuries was arrested. They didn’t identify him. No motive has been disclosed for the shooting. Fredericton Police Chief Leanne Fitch identified the officers killed as Sara Burns, 43, who was married with three children, and Robb Costello, 45, who had a common law partner and four children. The two civilians killed, a man and a woman, were not identified. Costello was a 20-year veteran of the force. Burns had been on the force for two years. Several other victims were being treated at a regional hospital, but there were no immediate details on the nature of their injuries or their condi-

tions. “Our hearts are broken by the murder of our two brave police officers,” Fredericton Mayor Mike O’Brien said in a tweet. The entire province of New Brunswick had 11 homicides in 2016. In Fredericton, a city of about 60,000 residents, people said they were stunned by the scene, which occurred as people were heading to work or dropping children at a day care center not far from the apartment complex where the shooting took place. “This is the first time I’ve even heard of any serious crime or violent crime in this city,” said Travis Hrubeniuk, whose fiancée had just left their home when the sirens began. In 2014, a shooting in Moncton, New Brunswick, left three Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers dead and two wounded.

Syrian assault could impact a million children, U.N. says • Government airstrikes on opposition-held territory in northwest Syria killed at least 22 people, a monitoring group said Friday, as the U.N.’s children’s agency warned a new battle in the war-torn country could affect the lives of 1 million children. Government forces unleashed a wave of airstrikes across Idlib, Aleppo and Hama provinces, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. Expatriate Romanians return to protest • Thousands of Romanians who live abroad flocked to an antigovernment protest in Bucharest on Friday, urging the left-wing government to resign and call an early election. The expatriates, some of whom drove across Europe to attend, are angry about how Social Democrats are governing Romania. The government has proposed new laws that critics say weaken the nation’s fight against corruption. Macron makes plea for Ukrainian • French President Emmanuel Macron spoke with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday about his concern for a Ukrainian moviemaker on a hunger strike in a Siberian prison. Macron urged Putin to find a humanitarian solution for Oleg Sentsov, according to a palace statement. The moviemaker, an opponent of Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea, is serving a 20-year prison sentence for conspiracy to commit terrorism, a crime he denies. From news services

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Continued on Page B9


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 08.11.2018 • B

ON HIGH GROUND

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Gary Woodland tees off on the 12th hole Friday during the second round of the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. Woodland leads the tournament at 10 under par.

Woodland and Kisner are 1-2 as rain halts second round THE 100TH PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Brooks Koepka, Charl Schwartzel both shoot record-tying 63. B7

They’re both ranked among the world’s top 50 players, but neither Gary Woodland nor Kevin Kisner came to St. Louis among the favorites to capture the 100th PGA Championship or attract the biggest galleries at Bellerive Country Club. But halfway home (almost) to Sunday’s presentation of the Wanamaker Trophy, the two 34-year-old buddies with vastly different games find their names on top of the leaderboard — a familiar place for one, not the other. After Woodland shot a sixunder 64 on Thursday, his 66 on Friday gave him the lowest score through 36 holes in the history of the PGA Championship. At 9 under through two rounds, Kisner is one stroke off the lead, followed by Brooks Koepka at 8 under and four others at 7 under. For all the low scores posted through two days, the weather has remained the protagonist of this tournament. Late Friday, midway through the afternoon rounds, the skies opened and dumped more rain on the course, sending golfers to the clubhouse for cover as thousands of fans

Leaderboard. B8

See PGA • Page B6

Bellerive Country Club Rain check • Friday’s second round was suspended. Players will complete the round Saturday morning and then play the third round. Saturday’s TV coverage begins at 7 a.m. on TNT and continues at 1 p.m. on KMOV-4 News from throughout the tournament, photo galleries, videos and more: stltoday.com INSIDE Jordan Spieth praises fans at Bellerive but says greens are making low scores too easy. B6

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Frank Ochoa (left) of Herculaneum and Richard Cook of Oakville find shelter with some plastic bags they “acquired” on the ninth hole as rain hit the golf course. LEADERS G. Woodland 64-66 -10 F K. Kisner

67-64 -9 F

B. Koepka

69-63 -8 F

NOTABLES D. Johnson J. Spieth

COLUMBIA, MO. • Greedy are the hands that claim this crown. Before a Tiger can take his temporary throne, he must prove he is willing to scrap, to claw, to flat-out steal. All of this for a kingdom that lasts just one day. When it comes to the com-

67-66 -7 F 71-66 -3 F

J. Day*

67-(-1) -4 8

T. Woods*

70-(-3) -3 7

J. Thomas* 69-(-1) -2 7 J. Daly

73-70 +3 F

P. Mickelson* 73-(E) +3 8 * Players will complete the second round on Saturday.

Tigers want defense to have claws out for more turnovers BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PGA leader has a cause that’s major

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Kevin Kisner walks to the 17th tee box after getting a par on No. 16.

This is the story of Major Dan and Gary’s major. On Thursday at Bellerive, Gary Woodland was at even par when he spotted Major Dan Rooney on the ninth hole. “And I gave the salute,” Major Dan said. “And he goes birdie, par, birdie, birdie and then finished six under. … That’s a moment of synchronicity.” Major Dan talks a lot about synchronicity. He’s an Air Force fighter pilot with three tours in Iraq … and a PGA golf pro … and a founder of a revered charity, so I figured I’d hear him out. (He also does weddings!) He is here at Bellerive to encourage his dear friend Woodland, who is leading the 100th PGA Championship at 10 under with two rounds penciled on his scorecard. Major Dan says his first meeting with Woodland was See HOCHMAN • Page B7

Cards stick to what’s working

> Mizzou tight end Swinson tears ACL. B2

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

petition for the title of Missouri football’s turnover king, overthrows are encouraged. But victory, even though brief, is spectacularly sweet. “You get your play shown in front of the team meeting,” starting linebacker Cale Garrett said with a grin after Friday’s practice. There is no jeweled headgear to be had, at least not yet, though Garrett is open to the idea of

KANSAS CITY • With a chance to turn a reassuring road trip into an assertive one, the Cardinals had a little of the pitching they expect, a lot of the offense they want, and a dash of the DL that always seems to be lurking around the corner. Matt Carpenter homered for the sixth time in seven games and launched the Cardinals toward a 7-0 romp against Kansas City on Friday at Kauffman Stadium. The intrastate, interleague series

See FREDERICKSON • B2

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Harrison Bader enjoys the dugout after hitting a solo home run in the sixth inning Friday night.

CARDS 7 ROYALS 0 > 6:15 p.m. Saturday at Royals, FSM > Flaherty (5-6, 3.27) vs. Duffy (7-10, 4.70) > Visit to AL park gives Shildt a chance to change lineup. B5

See CARDINALS • Page B5

SPORTS

Don’t Suffer in Silence

Schedule a consultation with Dr. Clemens today by calling 450 N New Ballas Rd • #266N, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 www.mwhtc-stl.com

(314) 991-9888

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 08.11.2018 • B

ON HIGH GROUND

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Gary Woodland tees off on the 12th hole Friday during the second round of the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. Woodland leads the tournament at 10 under par.

Woodland and Kisner are 1-2 as rain halts second round THE 100TH PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Brooks Koepka, Charl Schwartzel both shoot record-tying 63. B7

They’re both ranked among the world’s top 50 players, but neither Gary Woodland nor Kevin Kisner came to St. Louis among the favorites to capture the 100th PGA Championship or attract the biggest galleries at Bellerive Country Club. But halfway home (almost) to Sunday’s presentation of the Wanamaker Trophy, the two 34-year-old buddies with vastly different games find their names on top of the leaderboard — a familiar place for one, not the other. After Woodland shot a sixunder-par 64 on Thursday, his 66 on Friday gave him the lowest score through 36 holes in the history of the PGA Championship. At 9 under through two rounds, Kisner is one stroke off the lead, followed by Brooks Koepka at 8 under and four others at 7 under. For all the low scores posted through two days, the weather has remained the protagonist of this tournament. Late Friday, midway through the afternoon rounds, the skies opened and dumped more rain on the course, sending golfers to the clubhouse for cover as thousands of fans

Leaderboard. B8

See PGA • Page B6

Bellerive Country Club Rain impact • Friday’s second round was suspended. Players will complete the round Saturday morning and then play the third round. Saturday’s TV coverage begins at 7 a.m. on TNT and continues at 1 p.m. on KMOV-4 News from throughout the tournament, photo galleries, videos and more: stltoday.com INSIDE Jordan Spieth praises fans at Bellerive but says greens are making low scores too easy. B6

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Frank Ochoa (left) of Herculaneum and Richard Cook of Oakville find shelter with some plastic bags they “acquired” on the ninth hole as rain hit the golf course. LEADERS G. Woodland 64-66 -10 F K. Kisner

67-64 -9 F

B. Koepka

69-63 -8 F

NOTABLES D. Johnson J. Spieth

COLUMBIA, MO. • Greedy are the hands that claim this crown. Before a Tiger can take his temporary throne, he must prove he is willing to scrap, to claw, to flat-out steal. All of this for a kingdom that lasts just one day. When it comes to the com-

67-66 -7 F 71-66 -3 F

J. Day*

67-(-1) -4 8

T. Woods*

70-(-3) -3 7

J. Thomas* 69-(-1) -2 7 J. Daly

73-70 +3 F

P. Mickelson* 73-(E) +3 8 * Players will complete the second round on Saturday.

Tigers want defense to have claws out for more turnovers BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PGA leader has a cause that’s major

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Kevin Kisner walks to the 17th tee box after getting a par on No. 16.

This is the story of Major Dan and Gary’s major. On Thursday at Bellerive, Gary Woodland was at even par when he spotted Major Dan Rooney on the ninth hole. “And I gave the salute,” Major Dan said. “And he goes birdie, par, birdie, birdie and then finished six under. … That’s a moment of synchronicity.” Major Dan talks a lot about synchronicity. He’s an Air Force fighter pilot with three tours in Iraq … and a PGA golf pro … and a founder of a revered charity, so I figured I’d hear him out. (He also does weddings!) He is here at Bellerive to encourage his dear friend Woodland, who is leading the 100th PGA Championship at 10 under with two rounds penciled on his scorecard. Major Dan says his first meeting with Woodland was See HOCHMAN • Page B7

Cards stick to what’s working

> Mizzou tight end Swinson tears ACL. B2

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

petition for the title of Missouri football’s turnover king, overthrows are encouraged. But victory, even though brief, is spectacularly sweet. “You get your play shown in front of the team meeting,” starting linebacker Cale Garrett said with a grin after Friday’s practice. There is no jeweled headgear to be had, at least not yet, though Garrett is open to the idea of

KANSAS CITY • Before taking any questions late Friday night, Jose Martinez had to finish a forkful of birthday cake. And then another. And then he just apologized because he was going to answer while he chewed. “It’s some chocolate,” he said, combing the frosting with his fork. “After a great game, this is more delicious, too.” Immediately after romping against Kansas City in a 7-0 victory at Kauffman Stadium, the Cardinals gathered

See FREDERICKSON • B2

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Harrison Bader enjoys the dugout after hitting a solo home run in the sixth inning Friday night.

CARDS 7 ROYALS 0 > 6:15 p.m. Saturday at Royals, FSM > Flaherty (5-6, 3.27) vs. Duffy (7-10, 4.70) > Visit to AL park gives Shildt a chance to change lineup. B5

See CARDINALS • Page B5

SPORTS

Don’t Suffer in Silence

Schedule a consultation with Dr. Clemens today by calling 450 N New Ballas Rd • #266N, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 www.mwhtc-stl.com

(314) 991-9888

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 8/11 at Royals 6:15 p.m. FSM

Sunday 8/12 at Royals 1:15 p.m. FSM

Monday 8/13 vs. Nationals 7:10 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 8/14 vs. Nationals 7:15 p.m. FSM

Mizzou football • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/1 vs. Tenn.-Martin 3 p.m. SEC Net. alt.

Saturday 9/8 vs. Wyoming 6 p.m. ESPN2 or ESPNU

Saturday 9/15 at Purdue 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/22 vs. Georgia Time TBA TV TBA

Illinois football • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 9/1 vs. Kent State 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 9/8 vs. Western Ill. 6:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 9/15 vs. South Florida (in Chicago) 2:30 p.m., BTN

Friday 9/21 vs. Penn State 8 p.m. Fox Sports 1

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 8/11 vs. Las Vegas 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 8/15 Saturday 8/18 at Fresno vs. Sacramento 9 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 8/25 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Sat. 8/11: vs. So. Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Sun. 8/12: vs. So. Illinois, 6:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Tue. 8/14: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 8/15: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 08.11.2018

MIZZOU FOOTBALL

Swinson expected to miss season BY BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Tight end Messiah Swinson, a true freshman, was expected to play for Mizzou this fall. Considering his position group includes starters Albert Okwuegbunam and Kendall Blanton, along with reserves Logan Christopherson and Brendan Scales, that’s saying something. But that now doesn’t seem likely. Swinson, who is 6 feet 7 and 260 pounds, is expected to miss the season because of a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left

knee, the team confirmed Friday. He was injured during a drill this week. Swinson’s setback is the first significant blow to the Tigers during their first week of fall camp. The pass-catcher from Glen Head, N.Y., had made multiple impressive catches during portions of practices open to the media. Here are the other injury updates the team provided Friday: • Starting linebacker Ronnell Perkins and starting defensive tackle Jordan Elliott are sitting out because of knee strains. • Starting linebacker Terez Hall has missed at least two practices

because of a hamstring injury. • Starting receiver Johnathon Johnson is battling a bug of some kind, perhaps the one that bounced among players during camp. • Freshman linebacker Chad Bailey had surgery to repair a torn thumb ligament. He’s expected to be sidelined at least two weeks. “At this point in the camp, injuries are the name of the game,” Tigers coach Barry Odom said after practice. “Other than Messiah (and Bailey), we feel like we are going to get everybody back here the next time we are out on the field.”

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

Tigers crown turnover kings in camp

ON THE AIR

FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

SATURDAY

AUTO RACING 8:30 a.m. NASCAR trucks: Corrigan Oil 200, qualifying, FS1 NASCAR trucks: Corrigan Oil 200, FS1 12 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Mid-Ohio Challenge, NBCSN 2 p.m. BASEBALL 10 a.m. Little League: Midwest Regional, ESPN Little League: New England Regional, ESPN 12 p.m. Rangers at Yankees, MLB 12 p.m. 2 p.m. Little League: Northwest Regional, final, teams TBA, ESPN 3 p.m. Nationals at Cubs, FS1 Little League: Great Lakes Regional, ESPN 4 p.m. Little League: Mid-Atlantic Regional, ESPN 6 p.m. 6 p.m. Brewers at Braves, FS1 6:15 p.m. Cardinals at Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 8 p.m. Little League: West Regional, ESPN Athletics at Angels (joined in progress), MLB Network 9 p.m. BASKETBALL 12 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 1 p.m. WNBA: Dallas at Atlanta, NBA 1:15 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 2:30 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 3:45 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) College exhibition: Kentucky vs. Mega Bemax, SEC Network 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) 7:45 p.m. Junior NBA: World Championship, KTVI (2) BOWLING PWBA: Twin Cities Open, CBSSN 4 p.m. CYCLING Tour of Utah: Stage 5, FS2 3 p.m. FOOTBALL NFL exhibition: Vikings at Broncos, NFL Network 8 p.m. GOLF PGA Championship: Conclusion of second round 7 a.m. followed by start of third round, TNT Women’s U.S. Amateur: Semifinals, FS2 9 a.m. PGA Championship: Third round, KMOV (4) 1 p.m. HOCKEY Hlinka Gretzky Cup bronze medal game:, NHL Network 4 p.m. Hlinka Gretzky Cup gold medal game, NHL Network 8 p.m. MOTORCYCLE RACING Lucas Oil Motocross: Unadilla National, 450 Moto 2, KSDK (5) 2 p.m. HORSE RACING Breeders’ Cup Challenge Series: Arlington Million, NBCSN 5 p.m. SOCCER 6:25 a.m. English Premier League: Newcastle United vs. Tottenham Hotspur, NBCSN 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Huddersfield Town FC vs. Chelsea, NBCSN 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Wolverhampton Wanderers FC vs. Everton, KSDK (5) International Champions Cup: Atletico Madrid 2 p.m. vs. FC Internazionale Milano, ESPNews 2:30 p.m. NWSL: Seattle at Utah, Lifetime 7:30 p.m. USL: St. Louis FC vs. Las Vegas, KTRS (550 AM) 9:30 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC at Los Angeles FC, FSM Plus TENNIS 11:30 a.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, doubles semifinal, Tennis Channel WTA: Rogers Cup, first semifinal, ESPN2 12 p.m. USTA: National Championships, girls’ 18s semifinals, Tennis Channel 1 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, first semifinal, ESPN2 2 p.m. WTA: Rogers Cup, second semifinal, ESPN2 5 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, doubles semifinal, Tennis Channel 5 p.m. 6:30 p.m. USTA: National Championships, girls’ 16s championship, Tennis Channel 7 p.m. ATP: Rogers Cup, second semifinal, ESPN2

repurposing one of Burger King’s paper crowns. For now, though, the turnover king who emerges from each session of fall camp is simply toasted with a round of applause from his teammates and honored with a highlight-reel recap. He gets bragging rights — until a teammate snatches what he himself stole. A daily defensive challenge that has given this camp a Game of Thrones vibe started as a suggestion from Ryan Walters toward the end of last season. As the defensive coordinator’s role has expanded, so has the internal race to sharpen a dulled edge. “If you ask our guys, they will tell you the key to what we need to have in our favor is the turnover margin,” third-year Tigers coach Barry Odom said Friday. “That’s taking care of the ball offensively, being smart with it. But defensively, it’s finding ways to get it back for our offense. It goes together. If you end the game, and you are a plus in the turnover margin, you have a chance to win.” Sounds simple, right? Easier said than done. And perhaps too easily forgotten. Last season, Mizzou’s turnover margin of minus-eight ranked 111th in the nation. The Tigers turned the ball over 25 times while creating only 17 fumble recoveries and interceptions. These numbers did not sit well with a head coach who has defense in his DNA. Some of it can be blamed on bad luck. No one knows how an oblong football is going to bounce. But the more potential turnovers a team forces, the higher the number of bounces that might go your way. “Tip the ball,” Odom said. “Go intercept it. If it’s on the ground, scoop it up. Really, it’s just emphasizing it. In meetings, making it a mind-set. Somehow, some way, get the ball back. Get it back. Take it back. Get it back to our offense.” Sometimes, gimmicks work. Think naming a turnover king is tacky? Miami would like a word. The Hurricanes handed out a gaudy turnover chain on the sideline last season. Their 31 takeaways ranked third in the country. Every defensive player knows turnovers are good. Not every player looks to force them in the heat of the moment. That’s the instinct Walters and Odom have

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Defensive lineman Terry Beckner Jr. (right) tries to get past teammate Markell Utsey during Missouri’s football practice session Friday.

been working to instill. “Any time we get a tackle, try to strip the ball out,” starting defensive tackle Terry Beckner Jr. explained. “Force fumbles. Go get it.” “It’s something I need to get better at,” echoed Garrett. “Second guy in, go after the ball. If we get it back, we get to put it back in the hands of (quarterback) Drew (Lock) and our offense. That’s a big deal.” “Being more aggressive,” summarized starting cornerback Adam Sparks. “Running to the ball. If it’s all the way to the sideline, it doesn’t matter. We are all sprinting to it. That’s the only way to get a takeaway. Run to the ball.” Freshman defensive back Chris Mills forgot this last key during a portion of Friday’s practice that was open to the media. Odom had asked him to give chase to a receiver who was not within reach, because what if that ball popped out? When Mills didn’t show enough burst toward the ball, Walters dispatched the freshman on a lap around the field. Apparently not every point of emphasis is as fun as being named turnover king. The result, though, could pay dividends for a defense that returns seven starters and some key contributors who were thrust into SEC action earlier than expected last season.

“You can’t teach experience,” said Garrett, a junior. “You can’t buy it. It comes with reps, and time. The more you have, the more comfortable you are going to be. Sometimes, you have to go through it a little bit to get to where you are now.” Perhaps the best player to ask about a sharper, more aggressive defense is the quarterback who faces it daily. Lock said he has noticed an uptick in batted balls this camp. The windows an inexperienced secondary left open last season are not there as often, and they sure seem to slam shut sooner these days. “Tipped balls, they end in the defense’s favor,” Odom said. “We have the opportunity to play a little more zone coverage at times (this season). That has helped us out some. Also, the speed and understanding of what we are doing (has improved).” Twice during live portions of camp, according to observers who are not ushered out minutes in, a defensive back has intercepted one of Lock’s passes and returned it for a touchdown. “If we can stop him,” Sparks said, “we can stop anybody in the SEC.” Stop, then strip. A kingdom is up for grabs.

sixth-seeded Marin Cilic 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 and will play unseeded Karen Khachanov.

called a lower-body injury by the school. He caught 50 passes for 767 yards and seven touchdowns the year before as a freshman. (AP)

Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

SUNDAY’S HIGHLIGHTS

AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Consumers Energy 400, NBCSN BASEBALL 1:10 p.m. Mariners at Astros, TBS 1:15 p.m. Cardinals at Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7:10 p.m. Nationals at Cubs, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) GOLF 10 a.m. PGA Championship: Final round, TNT 1 p.m. PGA Championship: Final round, KMOV (4) 1 p.m. Women’s U.S. Amateur: Championship match, FS1 SOCCER 6:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: England vs. Mexico, FS1 6:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: Brazil vs. North Korea, FS2 7:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. West Ham United, NBCSN 9:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup: Netherlands vs. France, FS2 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 1:30 p.m. DFL-Supercup: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Bayern Munich, FS2 3 p.m. MLS: New York City FC at Toronto FC, ESPN 7 p.m. MLS: Orlando at D.C. United, FS1 9 p.m. MLS: Dallas at Seattle, FS1 TENNIS 12:30 p.m. WTA: Rogers Cup: Final, ESPN2 ATP: Rogers Cup: Final, ESPN2 3 p.m.

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DIGEST James, Lakers will open season Oct. 18 at Portland LeBron James will make his Los Angeles Lakers debut at Portland on Oct. 18 and play before home fans for the first time two days later. The Lakers will host Houston on Oct. 20 at Staples Center. The NBA released its complete regular-season schedule Friday, and the Lakers will play 35 times on national TV. For the 20th straight year, the Lakers will play on Christmas Day, traveling to face the defending champion Golden State Warriors. James returns to Cleveland for his lone game against the Cavaliers on Nov. 21. The Lakers’ longest road trip of the season is a five-game, 12-day stretch from Feb. 1-12 when the Grammy Awards return to Staples Center. (AP) Zverev upset at Rogers Cup • Greek teenager Stefanos Tsitsipas upset defending champion and No. 2 seed Alexander Zverev 3-6, 7-6 (11), 6-4 in the quarterfinals of the Rogers Cup in Toronto. The 19-year-old unseeded Tsitsipas earlier in the week beat seventh-seeded Dominic Thiem and ninth-seeded Novak Djokovic to reach the quarterfinals. Tsitsipas will face No. 4 seed Kevin Anderson in the semifinals. Top-seeded Rafael Nadal beat

Stephens makes semifinals • In women’s Rogers Cup play in Montreal, U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens romped into the semifinals by beating Latvia’s Anastasija Sevastova 6-2, 6-2. The American will face fifth-seeded defending champion Elina Svitolina, who beat Elise Mertens 7-5, 6-3. Top-seeded Simona Halep beat sixth-seeded Caroline Garcia 7-5, 6-1 and will face 15th-seeded Ashleigh Barty. (AP). U.S. softball team wins in Japan • Monica Abbott had 18 strikeouts and the United States defeated Australia 3-1 in the women’s world softball championship in Makuhari, Japan. The U.S. will next face Beijing Olympics gold medalist Japan in the tournament, which also doubles as a qualifier for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Japan beat Puerto Rico 7-0. (AP) Cal transfer eligible for Georgia • Wide receiver Demetris Robertson was granted a waiver by the NCAA and is eligible to play this season after transferring from Cal to Georgia. The former five-star recruit from Savannah, Ga., played only two games last season before having season-ending surgery on what was

Manchester United wins opener • Paul Pogba and Luke Shaw were on target as Manchester United launched the English Premier League season with a 2-1 victory against Leicester at Old Trafford in Manchester, England. (AP) STLFC hosts Las Vegas • With a chance to match a franchise record with a third consecutive win, St. Louis FC (7-6-8) hosts expansion Las Vegas Lights FC (7-9-5) in United Soccer League action at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Soccer Park. The only three-game win streak in STLFC history came early last season when the local side beat Ottawa and New York at home before a win in Pittsburgh for a 3-0-1 start to the season. Unfortunately, STLFC went on to finish 9-14-9 and miss the playoffs for the third straight season. With 29 points, STLFC entered the weekend in 11th place in the Western Conference, just four behind Swope Park of Kansas City and Portland 2, who are tied for seventh. The top eight teams in each conference qualify for the playoffs. The Lights beat STLFC 1-0 on July 7 in Las Vegas. (Joe Lyons)


08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 1

SPORTS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

MOTOR SPORTS

MLB NOTEBOOK

Hamlin takes pole in Michigan

Trout, Jansen go on DL

Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle Busch will start in second spot

Mike Trout has landed on the disabled list, something the Los Angeles Angels had hoped to avoid. The move announced Friday, because of an inflamed right wrist, is retroactive to Monday. That’s when he received a cortisone injection for the ailment. The two-time American League MVP last played on Aug. 1, when he was injured in a feet-first slide into third base. He missed 39 games last year after tearing a ligament in his left thumb in a headfirst slide. Meanwhile, Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen was placed on the 10-day disabled because of an irregular heartbeat. He was taken to a Denver hospital Thursday for tests and then was scheduled to be sent to Los Angeles for more evaluation. When Jansen dealt with an irregular heartbeat in 2011, he was sidelined about a month. The Dodgers used Scott Alexander to close an 8-5 victory Thursday in Denver and he is likely to remain the primary closer in Jansen’s absence. Arenado injured • Rockies All-Star third baseman Nolan Arenado left the team’s game Friday, against the Dodgers, in the top of the fifth inning because of a sore right shoulder. He apparently suffered the injury while turning a double play in the third inning. He was covering second base at the time.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Denny Hamlin watches the results during qualifying Friday at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich. He is without a win this year. ASSOCIATED PRESS

> NASCAR CUP SERIES: Consumers Energy 400, 1:30 p.m. Sunday, NBCSN

Denny Hamlin and Kyle Busch swept the front row in qualifying at Michigan International Speedway on Friday in Brooklyn, Mich. Kevin Harvick, neck-andneck with Busch all season, was right behind in third. Hamlin went 202.794 mph in Friday’s session to win a pole for the second consecutive week. The JGR veteran is winless this season, while teammate Busch has six victories and another teammate, Erik Jones, has one. His No. 11 team has clearly hit on something these past two weeks and Hamlin, a two-time Michigan winner, was fastest in all three rounds of qualifying and Friday’s first practice. But he’s still in search of a win and wants to continue his streak of at least one victory a year every season since his 2006 rookie year. “It is a very important streak; I think about it,” said Hamlin, who thought the streak was over in 2013 when he broke his back and missed a month, then didn’t win until the season finale.

“You look back at the really great drivers of NASCAR, and they had long streaks, 10 years and above, of winning in a row, and you want to keep that going for sure. It’s important.” Busch made it an all-Toyota front row for Sunday’s race with a lap at 202.731 mph. Harvick, in a Ford for Stewart-Haas Racing, went 202.100. Harvick and Busch are tied for most Cup Series victories, while Martin Truex Jr., the final member of the “Big 3,” has four wins this year. He qualified seventh in his Toyota for Furniture Row Racing. Jones qualified fourth to give JGR three of its four drivers in the front two rows. Daniel Suarez, who like Hamlin is winless this season, did not record a qualifying speed because he scraped the outside retaining wall early in the first round. Austin Dillon and Ryan Newman, in Chevrolets for Richard Childress Racing, were fifth and sixth. Penske teammates Ryan Blaney and Joey Logano rounded

out the top 10 in a pair of Fords. Kurt Busch’s name jumped into the rumor mill in the middle of qualifying when Motorsport. com reported Busch would replace Jamie McMurray at Chip Ganassi Racing. After his 12thplace qualifying effort, Busch said he was talking to several teams and doesn’t have a deal for 2019. Ganassi said he doesn’t have a deal with Busch and his only recent communication with him was a bet on a baseball game. As for McMurray’s future with the team — McMurray has won the Daytona 500, Coca-Cola 600, Brickyard 400 and Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona over the years driving for Ganassi — the team owner said: “I want Jamie McMurray back on my team.” McMurray qualified 15th, two spots ahead of teammate Kyle Larson, the defending race winner. Both Ganassi drivers are winless this season. Clint Bowyer, winner of the first stop this season at Michigan,

qualified 16th for Stewart-Haas Racing.

FORD TO RACE MUSTANGS

Ford will celebrate its iconic muscle car next year when it races the Mustang in NASCAR’s top Cup Series. The 2019 Mustang for NASCAR competition was unveiled Thursday at the Ford Motor Co. world headquarters in Dearborn, Mich. Stewart-Haas Racing co-owner Tony Stewart drove a Mustang onto a stage for the reveal with all 13 Ford Cup drivers in attendance. The Mustang has raced in the second-tier Xfinity Series since 2011. It will compete against Chevrolet’s Camaro and the Toyota Camry. The Camaro is in its first season of competition. The Mustang debuted in 1964 and is Ford’s longest running model. The 10 millionth Mustang rolled off the production line Wednesday. The Mustang was first entered in a race in 1964 when it won the Tour de France Automobile, a 4,000 mile, 10-day rally.

NFL NOTEBOOK

Redskins lose lead running back for season starting left tackle Anthony Castonzo not playing. It had been nearly 600 days since Luck was last on the field. For one night, Luck looked like his pre-surgery form. “He just kept saying how excited he was,” Indianapolis coach Frank Reich said. “ Meanwhile, Colts rookie receiver Deon Cain suffered a season-ending knee injury in the game. Cain, a sixth-round pick this year, played so well at training camp it appeared he would see significant action this season.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington Redskins rookie running back Derrius Guice will miss the entire season becuuse of a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee, a significant blow to the ground game. Guice was injured in Washington’s exhibition opener, Thursday in New England. The team announced the prognosis Friday following an MRI, saying Guice should make a full recovery and be ready to play in 2019. He was expected to be the Redskins’ starter after they selected him 59th in this year’s draft. The Louisiana State product was considered a first-round prospect and fell amid reports of character concerns before being taken late in the second. “Grabbing him in the second round was obviously a great treat for us, but character was never a concern,” coach Jay Gruden said recently, pointing to injuries and the quality of running backs as reasons for Guice falling in the draft. “He’s been great, never been late, attentive, great attitude, always happy, happy-golucky and fun to be around, quite frankly.” Washington averaged 90.5 yards rushing last season, fifthworst in the NFL. Injuries to Week 1 starter Rob Kelley and prolific third-down back Chris Thompson contributed to that, and Guice was expected to be a major part of solving the problem. In camp, Guice had been splitting first-team carries with Kelley and Samaje Perine. Gruden has said there’s competition for the No. 1 job along with Thompson, who’s coming back from a broken leg. The competition is now wide open. Kelley, a 2016 undrafted free agent who began last season as the starter, has gone from “Fat Rob” to “Fit Rob” and should be considered the front-runner.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Derrius Guice, who was expected to be Washington’s No. 1 running back this season, is tended to after being injured Thursday night in an exhibition game. He is out for the season. > Trump blasts players who demonstrate during national anthem, NEWS • PAGE A1

“I just make sure I go out there and I make a few plays that the catch the coaches’ eyes and stuff like that and put myself in a great position,” Kelley said. Beyond Kelley, Thompson and Perine, the Redskins have Kapri Bibbs, Byron Marshall and undrafted Martez Carter as running backs in camp. Team officials also announced that tight end Manasseh Garner, a long shot to make the roster, is out for the season because of a knee injury. Luck enjoys finally playing • Andrew Luck could feel the pressure building as he prepared for his first game action with Indianapolis since the final week of the 2016 season. Luck was back under center, leading the Colts on a pair of field-goal drives in just over a quarter in their 19-17 victory on the road over Seattle late Thursday night. When he let go of trying to contain his excitement, the pressure was released.

“I really enjoyed it. I didn’t quite know I’d have this much fun ... even playing football,” Luck said. “It’s a preseason game, I’m not going to blow anything out of proportion, but it’s still a game, a chance to go up against another color jersey. It was a fun step along the way.” The reintroduction of Luck as the Colts’ leader started with a 17yard swing pass to Marlon Mack on the first play. It concluded early in the second quarter when his pass intended for T.Y. Hilton was broken up. In between, Luck was bear-hugged by Seattle AllPro linebacker Bobby Wagner on a scramble run, sacked by Rasheem Green, and also showed flashes his surgically repaired right shoulder is ready to allow him to again be a premier quarterback. He completed six of nine passes for 64 yards, most of that coming on the opening drive, when he hit five of seven. Luck completed passes to five receivers and threw from a clean pocket on most of his dropbacks, even with

Darnold, Bridgewater shine • Sam Darnold sparkled in his NFL exhibition debut, Teddy Bridgewater looked sharp and healthy, and the host Jets beat sluggish Atlanta 17-0 on Friday night. Darnold, the No. 3 draft pick in April, was the Jets’ third quarterback of the game, following Josh McCown and Bridgewater. He threw a 14-yard touchdown pass to Charles Johnson late in the first half and finished 13 of 18 passing for 96 yards. Bridgewater, who suffered a serious knee injury while with Minnesota nearly two years ago, came out with the starting offense for the Jets’ second possession and led New York on a drive capped by Isaiah Crowell’s 16-yard catchand-run to the end zone. Bridgewater finished seven of eight passing for 85 yards and the TD. McCown is the incumbent and started the game but played just one series. He completed his only throw, a 4-yarder to Neal Sterling. Two 49ers banged up • San Francisco tight end George Kittle and backup running back Matt Breida each suffered a separated shoulder in the 49ers’ exhibition game Thursday and will miss the rest of the preseason. Coach Kyle Shanahan said he expects both to be ready to return in time for the season opener, Sept. 9 in Minnesota.

Cubs make moves • The Chicago Cubs signed lefthanded pitcher Jorge De La Rosa, transferred righty Yu Darvish to the 60-day disabled list and sent lefthander Randy Rosario to Triple-A Iowa. De La Rosa, a 15-year veteran, has pitched in relief the past two seasons with Arizona after being used more as a starter earlier in his career. He was 0-2 with a 4.63 ERA in 42 appearances this season before the Diamondbacks designated him for assignment last week. The Cubs plan to have Darvish throw at least one more simulated game before going on a minor-league rehab assignment. He has been sidelined since May 20 because of triceps and elbow injuries. Phils get Bour • The NL Eastleading Phillies acquired first baseman Justin Bour from the Marlins for minor-league pitcher McKenzie Mills. Bour, who is batting .227 with 19 homers and 54 RBIs, is expected to be a pinch-hitter in Philadelphia. Carlos Santana is the starting first baseman. Loaiza pleads guilty • Former All-Star pitcher Esteban Loaiza, who earned more than $43 million over 14 seasons, entered a guilty plea to federal drug charges. He acknowledged that he possessed about 44 pounds of cocaine with intent to distribute when he was arrested in February near the CaliforniaMexico border south of San Diego. He faces a minimum of 10 years in a prison and maximum of life when he is sentenced in November. Judge progresses • Yankees manager Aaron Boone is confident that outfielder Aaron Judge (broken wrist) will be able to swing a bat next week. He has been on the disabled list since July 27. “Better and better every day,” Boone said. “The range of motion is all there ... and we just want to get that pain completely out of there. “(I’m) optimistic that in the next couple of days that potentially could happen and we get a bat in his hand and hopefully it starts to progress really quickly from there.” Elsewhere • Longtime Orioles center fielder Adam Jones moved to right field to make room for rookie Cedric Mullins, yet another significant development in the overhaul of a team in full rebuilding mode. Jones has started in center for Baltimore since his arrival in 2008. • Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg (neck) is scheduled for about a 60-pitch bullpen session Saturday and will pitch in a simulated game Wednesday, then probably to go on a minorleague rehab assignment before returning to the rotation. • The Brewers put reliever Joakim Soria on the disabled list because of a strained right groin. He has a 1.59 ERA in seven games since Milwaukee acquired him two weeks ago from the White Sox. • The Braves’ Anibal Sanchez is hobbled by a bruised calf, a injury he suffered while pitching Thursday, and might not make his scheduled start Monday. • Red Sox second baseman Ian Kinsler (hamstring injury) won’t return until the end of next week at the earliest. Associated Press


08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 2

SPORTS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

MOTOR SPORTS

MLB NOTEBOOK

Hamlin takes pole in Michigan

Trout, Jansen go on DL

Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle Busch will start in second spot

Mike Trout has landed on the disabled list, something the Los Angeles Angels had hoped to avoid. The move announced Friday, because of an inflamed right wrist, is retroactive to Monday. That’s when he received a cortisone injection for the ailment. The two-time American League MVP last played on Aug. 1, when he was injured in a feetfirst slide into third base. He missed 39 games last year after tearing a ligament in his left thumb in a headfirst slide. Meanwhile, Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen was placed on the 10-day disabled because of an irregular heartbeat. He was taken to a Denver hospital Thursday for tests and then was scheduled to be sent to Los Angeles for more evaluation. When Jansen dealt with an irregular heartbeat in 2011, he was sidelined about a month. The Dodgers used Scott Alexander to close an 8-5 victory Thursday and he is likely to remain the primary closer in Jansen’s absence. Arenado injured • Rockies All-Star third baseman Nolan Arenado left the team’s game Friday, against the Dodgers, in the top of the fifth inning because of a sore right shoulder. He apparently suffered the injury while turning a double play in the third inning. He was covering second base at the time.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Denny Hamlin watches the results during qualifying Friday at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich. He is without a win this year. ASSOCIATED PRESS

> NASCAR CUP SERIES: Consumers Energy 400, 1:30 p.m. Sunday, NBCSN

Denny Hamlin and Kyle Busch swept the front row in qualifying at Michigan International Speedway on Friday in Brooklyn, Mich. Kevin Harvick, neck-andneck with Busch all season, was right behind in third. Hamlin went 202.794 mph in Friday’s session to win a pole for the second consecutive week. The JGR veteran is winless this season, while teammate Busch has six victories and another teammate, Erik Jones, has one. His No. 11 team has clearly hit on something these past two weeks and Hamlin, a two-time Michigan winner, was fastest in all three rounds of qualifying and Friday’s first practice. But he’s still in search of a win and wants to continue his streak of at least one victory a year every season since his 2006 rookie year. “It is a very important streak; I think about it,” said Hamlin, who thought the streak was over in 2013 when he broke his back and missed a month, then didn’t win until the season finale.

“You look back at the really great drivers of NASCAR, and they had long streaks, 10 years and above, of winning in a row, and you want to keep that going for sure. It’s important.” Busch made it an all-Toyota front row for Sunday’s race with a lap at 202.731 mph. Harvick, in a Ford for Stewart-Haas Racing, went 202.100. Harvick and Busch are tied for most Cup Series victories, while Martin Truex Jr., the final member of the “Big 3,” has four wins this year. He qualified seventh in his Toyota for Furniture Row Racing. Jones qualified fourth to give JGR three of its four drivers in the front two rows. Daniel Suarez, who like Hamlin is winless this season, did not record a qualifying speed because he scraped the outside retaining wall early in the first round. Austin Dillon and Ryan Newman, in Chevrolets for Richard Childress Racing, were fifth and sixth. Penske teammates Ryan Blaney and Joey Logano rounded

out the top 10 in a pair of Fords. Kurt Busch’s name jumped into the rumor mill in the middle of qualifying when Motorsport. com reported Busch would replace Jamie McMurray at Chip Ganassi Racing. After his 12thplace qualifying effort, Busch said he was talking to several teams and doesn’t have a deal for 2019. Ganassi said he doesn’t have a deal with Busch and his only recent communication with him was a bet on a baseball game. As for McMurray’s future with the team — McMurray has won the Daytona 500, Coca-Cola 600, Brickyard 400 and Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona over the years driving for Ganassi — the team owner said: “I want Jamie McMurray back on my team.” McMurray qualified 15th, two spots ahead of teammate Kyle Larson, the defending race winner. Both Ganassi drivers are winless this season. Clint Bowyer, winner of the first stop this season at Michigan,

qualified 16th for Stewart-Haas Racing.

FORD TO RACE MUSTANGS

Ford will celebrate its iconic muscle car next year when it races the Mustang in NASCAR’s top Cup Series. The 2019 Mustang for NASCAR competition was unveiled Thursday at the Ford Motor Co. world headquarters in Dearborn, Mich. Stewart-Haas Racing co-owner Tony Stewart drove a Mustang onto a stage for the reveal with all 13 Ford Cup drivers in attendance. The Mustang has raced in the second-tier Xfinity Series since 2011. It will compete against Chevrolet’s Camaro and the Toyota Camry. The Camaro is in its first season of competition. The Mustang debuted in 1964 and is Ford’s longest running model. The 10 millionth Mustang rolled off the production line Wednesday. The Mustang was first entered in a race in 1964 when it won the Tour de France Automobile, a 4,000 mile, 10-day rally.

NFL NOTEBOOK

Redskins lose lead running back for season starting left tackle Anthony Castonzo not playing. It had been nearly 600 days since Luck was last on the field. For one night, Luck looked like his pre-surgery form. “He just kept saying how excited he was,” Indianapolis coach Frank Reich said. “ Meanwhile, Colts rookie receiver Deon Cain suffered a season-ending knee injury in the game. Cain, a sixth-round pick this year, played so well at training camp it appeared he would see significant action this season.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington Redskins rookie running back Derrius Guice will miss the entire season becuuse of a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee, a significant blow to the ground game. Guice was injured in Washington’s exhibition opener, Thursday in New England. The team announced the prognosis Friday following an MRI, saying Guice should make a full recovery and be ready to play in 2019. He was expected to be the Redskins’ starter after they selected him 59th in this year’s draft. The Louisiana State product was considered a first-round prospect and fell amid reports of character concerns before being taken late in the second. “Grabbing him in the second round was obviously a great treat for us, but character was never a concern,” coach Jay Gruden said recently, pointing to injuries and the quality of running backs as reasons for Guice falling in the draft. “He’s been great, never been late, attentive, great attitude, always happy, happy-golucky and fun to be around, quite frankly.” Washington averaged 90.5 yards rushing last season, fifthworst in the NFL. Injuries to Week 1 starter Rob Kelley and prolific third-down back Chris Thompson contributed to that, and Guice was expected to be a major part of solving the problem. In camp, Guice had been splitting first-team carries with Kelley and Samaje Perine. Gruden has said there’s competition for the No. 1 job along with Thompson, who’s coming back from a broken leg. The competition is now wide open. Kelley, a 2016 undrafted free agent who began last season as the starter, has gone from “Fat Rob” to “Fit Rob” and should be considered the front-runner.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Derrius Guice, who was expected to be Washington’s No. 1 running back this season, is tended to after being injured Thursday night in an exhibition game. He is out for the season. > Trump blasts players who demonstrate during national anthem, NEWS • PAGE A1

“I just make sure I go out there and I make a few plays that the catch the coaches’ eyes and stuff like that and put myself in a great position,” Kelley said. Beyond Kelley, Thompson and Perine, the Redskins have Kapri Bibbs, Byron Marshall and undrafted Martez Carter as running backs in camp. Team officials also announced that tight end Manasseh Garner, a long shot to make the roster, is out for the season because of a knee injury. Luck enjoys finally playing • Andrew Luck could feel the pressure building as he prepared for his first game action with Indianapolis since the final week of the 2016 season. Luck was back under center, leading the Colts on a pair of field-goal drives in just over a quarter in their 19-17 victory on the road over Seattle late Thursday night. When he let go of trying to contain his excitement, the pressure was released.

“I really enjoyed it. I didn’t quite know I’d have this much fun ... even playing football,” Luck said. “It’s a preseason game, I’m not going to blow anything out of proportion, but it’s still a game, a chance to go up against another color jersey. It was a fun step along the way.” The reintroduction of Luck as the Colts’ leader started with a 17yard swing pass to Marlon Mack on the first play. It concluded early in the second quarter when his pass intended for T.Y. Hilton was broken up. In between, Luck was bear-hugged by Seattle AllPro linebacker Bobby Wagner on a scramble run, sacked by Rasheem Green, and also showed flashes his surgically repaired right shoulder is ready to allow him to again be a premier quarterback. He completed six of nine passes for 64 yards, most of that coming on the opening drive, when he hit five of seven. Luck completed passes to five receivers and threw from a clean pocket on most of his dropbacks, even with

Darnold, Bridgewater shine • Sam Darnold sparkled in his NFL exhibition debut, Teddy Bridgewater looked sharp and healthy, and the host Jets beat sluggish Atlanta 17-0 on Friday night. Darnold, the No. 3 draft pick in April, was the Jets’ third quarterback of the game, following Josh McCown and Bridgewater. He threw a 14-yard touchdown pass to Charles Johnson late in the first half and finished 13 of 18 passing for 96 yards. Bridgewater, who suffered a serious knee injury while with Minnesota nearly two years ago, came out with the starting offense for the Jets’ second possession and led New York on a drive capped by Isaiah Crowell’s 16-yard catchand-run to the end zone. Bridgewater finished seven of eight passing for 85 yards and the TD. McCown is the incumbent and started the game but played just one series. He completed his only throw, a 4-yarder to Neal Sterling. Two 49ers banged up • San Francisco tight end George Kittle and backup running back Matt Breida each suffered a separated shoulder in the 49ers’ exhibition game Thursday and will miss the rest of the preseason. Coach Kyle Shanahan said he expects both to be ready to return in time for the season opener, Sept. 9 in Minnesota.

Cubs make moves • The Chicago Cubs signed lefthanded pitcher Jorge De La Rosa, transferred righty Yu Darvish to the 60-day disabled list and sent lefthander Randy Rosario to Triple-A Iowa. De La Rosa, a 15-year veteran, has pitched in relief the past two seasons with Arizona. He was 0-2 with a 4.63 ERA in 42 appearances this season before the Diamondbacks designated him for assignment last week. The Cubs plan to have Darvish throw at least one more simulated game before going on a minor-league rehab assignment. He has been sidelined since May 20 because of triceps and elbow injuries. Phils get Bour • The NL Eastleading Phillies acquired first baseman Justin Bour from the Marlins for minor-league pitcher McKenzie Mills. Bour, who is batting .227 with 19 homers and 54 RBIs, is expected to be a pinch-hitter in Philadelphia. Carlos Santana is the starting first baseman. Loaiza pleads guilty • Former All-Star pitcher Esteban Loaiza, who earned more than $43 million over 14 seasons, entered a guilty plea to federal drug charges. He acknowledged he possessed about 44 pounds of cocaine with intent to distribute when he was arrested in February near the California-Mexico border south of San Diego. He faces a minimum of 10 years in a prison and maximum of life when he is sentenced in November. Judge progresses • Yankees manager Aaron Boone is confident that outfielder Aaron Judge (broken wrist) will be able to swing a bat next week. He has been on out since July 27. “Better and better every day,” Boone said. “The range of motion is all there ... and we just want to get that pain completely out of there. “(I’m) optimistic that in the next couple of days that potentially could happen and we get a bat in his hand and hopefully it starts to progress really quickly from there.” Elsewhere • Longtime Orioles center fielder Adam Jones moved to right field to make room for rookie Cedric Mullins, yet another significant development in the overhaul of a team in full rebuilding mode. Jones has started in center for Baltimore since his arrival in 2008. • Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg (neck) is scheduled for about a 60-pitch bullpen session Saturday and will pitch in a simulated game Wednesday, then probably to go on a minorleague rehab assignment before returning to the rotation. • The Brewers put reliever Joakim Soria on the disabled list because of a strained right groin. He has a 1.59 ERA in seven games since Milwaukee acquired him two weeks ago from the White Sox. • The Braves’ Anibal Sanchez is hobbled by a bruised calf, a injury he suffered while pitching Thursday, and might not make his scheduled start Monday. • Red Sox second baseman Ian Kinsler (hamstring injury) won’t return until the end of next week at the earliest. • Indians DH Edwin Encarnacion left the third inning because of a left arm ailment. Associated Press


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Chicago

67 48 .583

AMERICAN LEAGUE GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

— 6-4 W-1 — 4-6

36-21

31-27

Milwaukee

66 53

.555

3

Cardinals

61 55 .526

7-3 W-3 29-26

32-29

Pittsburgh

60 56

5-5 W-3

33-29

27-27

Cincinnati

51 65 .440 16½

13½

3-7 W-1

27-31 24-34

EAST

W

.517

L

Pct

Philadelphia 64 50

.561

— 6-4

Atlanta

63 50 .558

½

Washington

59 57 .509

6

L-2 36-24 30-29

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away L-1

38-18

26-32

7-3 W-1

29-23

34-27

5½ 6-4

L-1 30-28 29-29

New York

48 65 .425 15½

15 4-6 W-2

24-37 24-28

Miami

47 70 .402 18½

18

27-34 20-36

WEST

W

L

Pct

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 08.11.2018

1-9

L-3

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Cubs 3, Washington 2 Cincinnati 3, Arizona 0 NY Mets 6, Miami 2 Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 1 LA Dodgers at Colorado, late Philadelphia at San Diego, late Pittsburgh at San Francisco, late Thursday Washington 6, Atlanta 3 San Diego 8, Milwaukee 4 LA Dodgers 8, Colorado 5 Pittsburgh 10, San Francisco 5

CENTRAL

W

Cleveland

64

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

51 .557

— 11

Minnesota

53 62 .461

Detroit

48 68 .414 16½

Chicago

42 73 .365

Kansas City

7-3

L-1

15 4-6

L-3

30-27

18-41

22

26

5-5 W-1

22-36

20-37

35 80 .304

29

33

3-7

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

EAST

W

L

Pct

Boston

82 35

.701

New York

72 43 .626

9

— 4-6

Tampa Bay

59 57 .509 22½

Toronto

52 63 .452

Baltimore

35 81 .302 46½

WEST

W

L

Pct

29

33-26

9½ 6-4 W-2 34-24

25-33

16 4-6 33½

3-7

5-5 W-1

31-28

33-24

Houston

73 44 .624

— 6-4

½

1

5-5

L-1

32-29

32-24

Oakland

68 47

.591

4

Colorado

60 55

32-28

6

4

3-7

L-3

28-27

5-5

L-3

32-25 25-34

San Diego

46

71 .393 18½

ROUNDUP Cubs win as Holland walks in decisive run Anthony Rizzo drew a basesloaded walk off Greg Holland in the seventh inning to break a 2-2 tie and lead the Chicago Cubs to 3-2 victory at home over Washington on Friday. Holland, who recently was dropped by the Cardinals before signing with the Nationals, came in with no outs and a man on first. He retired Willson Contreras before giving up singles to Ian Happ and Addison Russell to load the bases before walking Rizzo. Holland, who was making his third appearance for the Nationals, then was removed from the game. The Cubs didn’t get a hit against Nationals starter Jeremy Hellickson in his 52/3 innings of work, but he walked four and allowed two earned runs. Braves 10, Brewers 1 • Kevin Gausman pitched eight strong innings and Ender Inciarte drove in four runs in host Atlanta’s rout. Gausman, who recently was obtained from the Orioles, allowed six hits and no walks and struck out eight. Milwaukee has lost four of five to fall three games back of the first-place Cubs in the National League Central Division. Reds 3, Diamondbacks 0 • Anthony DeSclafani struck out nine over seven innings and scored to help host Cincinnati win. Mets 6, Marlins 2 • Amed Rosario had three hits and drove in two runs to boost visiting New York.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Red Sox 19, Orioles 12 • Xander Bogaerts and Andrew Benintendi each hit three-run homers as visiting Boston won a slugfest. After hitting for the cycle a night earlier, Red Sox outfielder Mookie Betts had three hits and three RBIs. Rangers 12, Yankees 7 • Ronald Guzman became the first rookie to hit three home runs in a game against the Yankees, powering visiting Texas to victory. Guzman grounded out his first time up, then hit solo home runs in three straight at-bats. The 23-year-old first baseman batted in the eighth with a chance to tie the big-league record for homers in a game — no rookie has ever hit four — but struck out against Chad Green. Mariners 5, Astros 2 • Nelson Cruz hit a tiebreaking two-run double in a threerun eighth inning to key Seattle’s victory on the road. Houston’s Gerrit Cole yielded six hits and four runs in 7 1/3 innings for his season-high third straight loss. Rays 7, Blue Jays 0 • Blake Snell pitched five perfect innings then was pulled, and Michael Perez hit his first career homer as visiting Tampa Bay rolled. Snell was making his second start since returning from the disabled list (shoulder fatigue). White Sox 1, Indians 0 • Daniel Palka hit a homer in the bottom of the ninth to win the game for Chicago. Cleveland designated hitter Edwin Encarnacion left the third inning because of a left arm ailment. Tigers 5, Twins 3 • Niko Goodrum and Jose Iglesias homered as host Detroit broke a losing streak at six games. Associated Press

19 4-6 W-1 20-36

26-35

28-31

24-32

L-2 20-36

L-1

15-45

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

.552

L-1

42-15 40-20 39-17

64 52

7

L-1 16-40 19-40

8-2 W-1

64 53 .547

33-24 20-38

3-7 W-1

Los Angeles

.522

27-28

20½

Arizona

San Francisco 57 59 .491

37-23

L-2

32-26

41-18

7-3 W-1

33-23

35-24

2 4-6 W-2 36-24

31-26

Seattle

67 50 .573

Los Angeles

58 58 .500 14½

10½ 4-6 W-3

32-28 26-30

Texas

52 66 .441

17½ 6-4 W-1

25-36

21½

27-30

BOX SCORES Cubs 3, Nationals 2

Mets 6, Marlins 2

White Sox 1, Indians 0

Mariners 5, Astros 2

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .302 Turner ss 5 1 1 0 0 3 .270 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Harper cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .235 Soto lf 3 0 2 1 1 1 .309 Zimmerman 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Solis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Glover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Reynolds ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Murphy 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .297 Kieboom c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .197 d-Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Hellickson p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Adams 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rizzo 1b 1 1 0 1 3 0 .264 Baez 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .296 Zobrist rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .310 Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Edwards Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Heyward cf-rf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .281 Bote 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .324 Schwarber lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .244 Almora cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .298 Contreras c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Hendricks p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .065 a-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 b-Happ ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Russell ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .263 Totals 27 3 4 3 6 5 Washington 110 000 000 — 2 9 0 Chicago 000 002 10x — 3 4 1 a-lined out for Hendricks in the 6th. b-singled for Cishek in the 7th. c-flied out for Glover in the 8th. d-flied out for Kieboom in the 9th. E: Strop (2). LOB: Washington 9, Chicago 6. 2B: Murphy (9). RBIs: Eaton (20), Soto (41), Rizzo (75), Heyward 2 (48). SB: Eaton (4). CS: Bote (4). S: Hellickson. RLISP: Washington 5 (Eaton, Turner, Rendon, Zimmerman, Murphy); Chicago 4 (Zobrist 2, Heyward, Bote). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 52/3 0 2 2 4 3 89 3.54 Hellickson 1/ 1 0 1 12 4.72 Solis, L, 1-2, 3 2 1 1/ 0 1 0 11 7.24 Holland 3 2 0 2/ 0 0 0 4 0.00 Glover 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 11 3.08 Suero IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chicago 6 8 2 2 0 5 85 4.02 Hendricks 1/ 0 0 0 8 3.27 Wilson 3 1 0 Cishek, W, 3-1 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.87 0 0 0 0 2 0 15 3.30 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.65 Edwards Jr., Strop, S, 9-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.68 Solis pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Kintzler pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Solis 3-2, Holland 1-1, Glover 3-0, Cishek 1-0, Edwards Jr. 2-0. HBP: Hendricks (Rendon). WP: Cishek. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, Nick Mahrley; Second, Alan Porter; Third,

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 5 0 3 2 0 1 .235 McNeil 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .289 Flores 1b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .273 Conforto lf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .233 Nimmo rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Frazier 3b 4 2 2 0 0 1 .216 Jackson cf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .286 Plawecki c 3 0 1 2 0 0 .222 Wheeler p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .195 b-Reyes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .185 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 6 13 6 1 9 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sierra cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Anderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .283 Realmuto c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .290 Dietrich 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .279 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Prado 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .232 Ortega lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Rojas ss 3 1 1 2 0 0 .257 Urena p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .059 Rucinski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Riddle ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .221 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 4 2 2 8 New York 001 003 020 — 6 13 1 Miami 000 000 200 — 2 4 0 a-struck out for Garcia in the 7th. b-struck out for Wheeler in the 8th. E: Rosario (10). LOB: New York 8, Miami 5. 2B: Flores (20), Jackson (11), Realmuto (25). HR: Rojas (9), off Wheeler. RBIs: Rosario 2 (31), Conforto (40), Jackson (22), Plawecki 2 (15), Rojas 2 (44). S: Urena. RLISP: New York 2 (Nimmo 2); Miami 5 (Sierra, Dietrich, Castro, Ortega, Urena). GIDP: Castro. DP: New York 1 (Smith, McNeil, Flores). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA New York Wheeler, W, 7-6 7 4 2 2 1 8 108 3.82 Lugo 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.80 Blevins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.94 Smith 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 2.25 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Urena, L, 3-12 5 1/3 8 4 4 1 3 90 4.74 2/ Rucinski 0 1 9 3.00 3 1 0 0 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.39 Guerra 1 3 2 2 0 3 21 6.32 Conley 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 3.34 Blevins pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Smith 1-0, Rucinski 2-2. HBP: Rucinski (Plawecki), Blevins (Dietrich). WP: Wheeler. Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Ramon De Jesus; Third, Gabe Morales. T: 2:43. A: 6,993.

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .298 Brantley lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .296 Encarnacion dh 0 0 0 0 1 0 .229 a-Cabrera ph-dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .239 1-Allen pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Guyer rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .206 Alonso 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Davis cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Totals 31 0 5 0 3 6 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Delmonico lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .227 b-Engel ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Sanchez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Palka dh 4 1 1 1 0 3 .238 Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Narvaez c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .285 Anderson ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .241 Moncada 2b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .219 LaMarre cf-lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .272 Totals 29 1 5 1 2 11 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Chicago 000 000 001 — 1 5 1 No outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Encarnacion in the 4th. b-struck out for Delmonico in the 8th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 9th. E: Narvaez (5). LOB: Cleveland 8, Chicago 6. 2B: Lindor (39), Ramirez (30), Anderson (18), Moncada (21). HR: Palka (18), off Ramirez. RBIs: Palka (46). SB: Lindor 2 (19), Encarnacion (2). RLISP: Cleveland 5 (Ramirez, Guyer 3, Kipnis); Chicago 2 (Sanchez, LaMarre). GIDP: Gomes. DP: Chicago 1 (Anderson, Moncada, Abreu). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bieber 62/3 3 0 0 2 8 106 4.10 Perez 1 1 0 0 0 3 19 1.45 Ramirez, L, 0-2 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 6 4.40 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodon 8 4 0 0 2 5 106 2.61 Cedeno 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 3.38 1/ 4 3.55 Minaya 3 0 0 0 0 0 2/ 1 16 4.58 Fry, W, 1-2 3 1 0 0 0 Cedeno pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Ramirez 1-0, Minaya 1-0, Fry 1-0. Umpires: Home, Carlos Torres; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Tom Woodring; Third, Scott Barry. T: 2:46. A: 18,772.

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .273 Span lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .277 Heredia lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Segura ss 3 1 0 0 0 0 .306 Cruz dh 4 0 2 2 0 1 .268 Seager 3b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .228 Zunino c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .202 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Maybin cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .254 Gordon 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .276 Totals 34 5 7 5 1 6 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kemp lf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .301 Bregman 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .278 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .265 Reddick rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 Gurriel 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Gonzalez 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .242 White dh 4 1 1 0 0 2 .279 Maldonado c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .217 a-Gattis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Marisnick cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .217 1-Fisher pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .169 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 7 Seattle 000 002 030 — 5 7 0 Houston 000 020 000 — 2 9 0 a-flied out for Maldonado in the 9th. 1-ran for Marisnick in the 7th. LOB: Seattle 4, Houston 7. 2B: Haniger 2 (23), Cruz 2 (13), Bregman (37), Marisnick (7). RBIs: Haniger (75), Span (51), Cruz 2 (75), Seager (62), Kemp (24), Bregman (72). CS: Gonzalez (3). RLISP: Seattle 3 (Seager, Zunino, Healy); Houston 3 (Correa 3). GIDP: Gurriel. DP: Seattle 1 (Segura, Gordon, Healy). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 6 8 2 2 1 4 97 4.11 Warren, W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 3.00 Colome, 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.18 Diaz, S, 44-47 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.05 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole, L, 10-5 71/3 6 4 4 1 5 93 2.75 2/ Pressly 1 0 1 15 3.40 3 1 1 McHugh 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.98 Inherited runners-scored: Pressly 2-2. HBP: Pressly (Segura). Umpires: Home, Doug Eddings; First, Joe West; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Nic Lentz. T: 2:48. A: 41,236.

Braves 10, Brewers 1

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith lf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .300 Wendle 3b 3 0 1 3 0 0 .292 Bauers 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .233 Choi dh 4 1 1 1 0 3 .226 Gomez rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .180 Lowe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Adames ss 3 3 3 0 1 0 .236 Perez c 4 2 2 2 0 0 .323 Totals 34 7 9 7 2 10 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Toronto Grichuk rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .234 Travis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Hernandez lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .244 Morales dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .244 Diaz ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Maile c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Urena 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .286 Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Totals 29 0 3 0 1 9 Tampa Bay 002 021 200 — 7 9 0 Toronto 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 LOB: Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 3. 2B: Wendle (14), Adames 2 (4). 3B: Smith (9). HR: Perez (1), off Estrada; Choi (5), off Estrada. RBIs: Smith (27), Wendle 3 (37), Choi (14), Perez 2 (4). SB: Adames (3). SF: Wendle. S: Smith. RLISP: Tampa Bay 2 (Bauers, Choi); Toronto 1 (Pillar). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tampa Bay Snell, W, 13-5 5 0 0 0 0 6 47 2.18 Faria 3 3 0 0 1 3 43 4.97 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 4.58 Schultz Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Estrada, L, 5-9 5 3 5 5 5 2 6 91 4.84 Pannone 12/3 3 2 2 0 3 30 10.80 2 1 0 0 0 1 21 6.62 Biagini HBP: Biagini (Wendle). Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Tony Randazzo; Second, Ryan Additon; Third, Bill Welke. T: 2:27. A: 23,082.

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0 0 2 .316 Yelich lf Cain cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .295 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Perez cf Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .253 Aguilar 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .272 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Shaw 2b Houser p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Kratz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .226 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Schoop ss-2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Thames rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .239 Pina c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Peralta p Lyles p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 1 0 1 0 0 0 .213 Arcia ss Totals 33 1 6 1 0 9 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 2 3 0 0 1 .270 Acuna lf 2 2 0 0 3 2 .275 Albies 2b 3 1 1 1 2 0 .318 Freeman 1b Markakis rf 3 3 2 3 1 0 .326 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Duvall rf 5 2 4 2 0 0 .262 Camargo 3b 5 0 2 4 0 1 .252 Inciarte cf Flowers c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .238 4 0 0 0 1 1 .237 Swanson ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Gausman p a-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sobotka p Totals 36 10 13 10 8 7 Milwaukee 000 001 000 — 1 6 0 302 203 00x — 10 13 0 Atlanta a-struck out for Gausman in the 8th. b-grounded out for Houser in the 9th. LOB: Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 11. 2B: Moustakas 2 (24), Acuna (16), Markakis 2 (35), Camargo 2 (17), Inciarte (18). RBIs: Aguilar (83), Freeman (71), Markakis 3 (73), Camargo 2 (52), Inciarte 4 (46). SB: Albies (12). SF: Markakis. RLISP: Milwaukee 2 (Aguilar, Peralta); Atlanta 4 (Markakis 2, Gausman, Flaherty). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milwaukee Peralta, L, 5-3 3 7 7 7 5 3 81 4.47 Lyles 21/3 3 3 3 1 3 43 4.52 Houser 22/3 3 0 0 2 1 60 3.29 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman, W, 6-9 8 6 1 1 0 8 94 4.27 Sobotka 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Peralta pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Lyles 2-1, Houser 2-1. Umpires: Home, John Tumpane; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Chad Whitson; Third, Mark Wegner. T: 2:59. A: 36,519.

Tigers 5, Twins 3 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Polanco ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .287 Forsythe 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .234 Kepler rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Garver c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .261 Morrison dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .186 Cave cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .282 Adrianza 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .249 Totals 36 3 10 2 0 1 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gerber lf 2 1 0 1 1 1 .174 Iglesias ss 4 1 1 2 0 0 .266 Castellanos rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Candelario 3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .226 Martinez dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Goodrum 2b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .231 Adduci 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 McCann c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .218 Jones cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .205 Totals 27 5 3 5 3 6 Minnesota 001 001 001 — 3 10 1 Detroit 001 220 00x — 5 3 2 E: Rosario (8), Candelario (8), Goodrum (9). LOB: Minnesota 7, Detroit 2. 2B: Polanco (8), Cave (9), Adrianza (15). 3B: Jones (5). HR: Goodrum (11), off Santana; Iglesias (5), off Santana. RBIs: Garver (26), Adrianza (21), Gerber (2), Iglesias 2 (47), Goodrum 2 (36). SF: Garver, Gerber. RLISP: Minnesota 3 (Mauer, Kepler, Adrianza). GIDP: Morrison. DP: Detroit 1 (Goodrum, Iglesias, Adduci). Minnesota IPHRERBBSONPERA Santana, L, 0-1 6 3 5 5 2 5 94 6.53 2 00 0 1 1 30 6.82 Drake IPHRERBBSONPERA Detroit 1/ Zimmermann, W, 5-46 3 8 2 0 0 1 96 3.98 2/ Wilson, 3 00 0 0 0 43.80 Jimenez, 1 00 0 0 0 13 3.28 Greene, S, 24-27 1 2 1 1 0 0 24 4.12 Inherited runners-scored: Wilson 1-0. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Bruce Dreckman; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Mike Estabrook. T: 2:37. A: 24,849.

Rays 7, Blue Jays 0

Reds 3, Diamondbacks 0 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .278 Pollock cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .278 Souza Jr. rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .254 Marte 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Ahmed ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Avila c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .175 Buchholz p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .050 Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 30 0 5 0 0 10 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .283 Votto 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .289 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Suarez 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .303 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .313 Ervin lf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .295 Williams rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .295 Barnhart c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .243 DeSclafani p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .214 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dixon 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Hamilton cf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .228 Totals 31 3 9 2 2 7 Arizona 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Cincinnati 000 001 20x — 3 9 0 a-flied out for Diekman in the 9th. E: Buchholz (1). LOB: Arizona 3, Cincinnati 7. 2B: Goldschmidt (23), Barnhart (15). RBIs: Suarez (88), Hamilton (23). SF: Suarez. RLISP: Arizona 1 (Pollock); Cincinnati 3 (Suarez, Williams 2). GIDP: Pollock, Avila, Williams. DP: Arizona 1 (Marte, Ahmed, Goldschmidt); Cincinnati 2 (Suarez, Gennett, Votto), (Gennett, Peraza, Votto). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz, L, 5-2 7 8 3 2 2 4 93 2.67 Diekman 1 1 0 0 0 3 16 3.86 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA DeSclafani, W, 6-3 7 3 0 0 0 9 94 4.46 Hughes, 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 1.37 Iglesias, S, 22-25 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.52 DeSclafani pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Hughes 1-0. Umpires: Home, Jordan Baker; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 2:30. A: 19,089. Todd Tichenor. T: 3:10. A: 41,531.

Rangers 12, Yankees 7 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 5 1 2 0 1 1 .273 Odor 2b 4 3 2 1 1 0 .275 Andrus ss 5 2 4 3 0 0 .289 5 1 2 4 0 0 .278 Beltre 3b Profar dh 5 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Guzman 1b 5 3 3 3 0 1 .245 Calhoun lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 1-Tocci pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .183 5 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Kiner-Falefa c D.Robinson cf-lf 2 2 0 0 3 2 .186 Totals 41 12 14 11 5 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hicks cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .246 3 1 0 0 2 2 .277 Stanton dh Torres 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Gregorius ss 5 2 3 0 0 0 .270 Andujar 3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .294 Voit 1b-rf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .174 Gardner lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .248 Romine c 4 1 3 3 0 0 .263 S.Robinson rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .148 a-Bird ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 37 7 10 7 3 5 Texas 000 324 120 — 12 14 0 New York 000 013 120 — 7 10 1 a-grounded out for S.Robinson in the 8th. 1-ran for Calhoun in the 7th. E: Gregorius (5). LOB: Texas 7, New York 6. 2B: Choo (24), Andrus (15), Beltre (14), Andujar (31). HR: Beltre (7), off Tanaka; Guzman (10), off Tanaka; Guzman (11), off Tanaka; Guzman (12), off Cole; Gardner (10), off Minor; Romine (7), off Butler. RBIs: Odor (45), Andrus 3 (24), Beltre 4 (40), Guzman 3 (46), Andujar (53), Voit 2 (5), Gardner (34), Romine 3 (33). SB: D.Robinson (2), Romine (1). RLISP: Texas 1 (Guzman); New York 2 (Hicks, Gregorius). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor, W, 9-6 52/3 6 4 4 1 2 84 4.61 Butler 11/3 1 1 1 1 0 24 4.67 2/ 2 0 1 27 4.55 Martin 3 3 2 1/ 0 0 0 6 3.86 Gearrin 3 0 0 Leclerc 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 2.11 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tanaka, L, 9-3 5 6 6 6 3 2 96 4.08 Cole 2 5 4 2 1 2 56 5.08 Green 1 3 2 2 0 1 21 2.98 Britton 1 0 0 0 1 3 17 3.80 Tanaka pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Butler 1-0, Gearrin 1-0. WP: Martin. Umpires: Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Ben May; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Will Little. T: 3:34. A: 45,198.

Red Sox 19, Orioles 12 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 3 3 3 2 0 .352 Benintendi lf 5 3 1 3 1 0 .303 Leon c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Moreland 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .265 Martinez dh 5 2 2 2 1 1 .332 Bogaerts ss 4 2 1 4 2 1 .272 Devers 3b 5 0 0 1 1 1 .245 Holt 2b 4 3 3 3 2 1 .262 Butler c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 a-Pearce ph-lf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .301 Bradley Jr. cf 4 4 3 1 1 0 .213 Totals 41 19 16 18 10 6 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 4 0 1 2 1 1 .266 Beckham ss 6 1 2 2 0 1 .237 Jones rf 5 0 3 2 0 0 .285 Rickard rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Trumbo dh 5 2 3 1 0 1 .270 Mancini lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .230 Davis 1b 4 2 2 2 0 2 .162 Nunez 3b 3 2 1 0 2 1 .247 Joseph c 5 2 1 0 0 2 .219 Mullins cf 4 3 3 2 1 0 .750 Totals 41 12 17 11 4 10 Boston 300 206 350 — 19 16 1 Baltimore 044 002 011 — 12 17 0 a-hit by pitch for Butler in the 8th. E: Bradley Jr. (4). LOB: Boston 7, Baltimore 8. 2B: Betts 2 (32), Moreland (17), Martinez (31), Bradley Jr. (21), Mancini (16), Mullins 2 (2). 3B: Bradley Jr. (3). HR: Bogaerts (17), off Bundy; Holt (2), off Bundy; Benintendi (15), off Hart; Davis (14), off Eovaldi; Beckham (7), off Hembree; Trumbo (17), off Barnes. RBIs: Betts 3 (62), Benintendi 3 (70), Moreland (58), Martinez 2 (101), Bogaerts 4 (72), Devers (55), Holt 3 (29), Bradley Jr. (44), Villar 2 (26), Beckham 2 (21), Jones 2 (47), Trumbo (42), Davis 2 (39), Mullins 2 (2). SB: Bogaerts (4), Jones (3). CS: Beckham (2). SF: Moreland, Davis. S: Villar. RLISP: Boston 5 (Benintendi 2, Devers 2, Butler); Baltimore 3 (Mancini, Davis, Joseph). GIDP: Martinez, Beckham. DP: Boston 1 (Holt, Bogaerts, Moreland); Baltimore 1 (Beckham, Villar, Davis). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi 22/3 10 8 4 2 0 71 3.74 Workman 11/3 1 0 0 0 3 24 2.62 Pomeranz, W, 2-5 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 6.19 1 3 2 2 1 0 27 3.83 Hembree, 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 1.23 Brasier Barnes 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 2.52 Kelly 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 4.28 IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Baltimore Bundy 5 8 8 7 4 3 93 4.70 2/ Castro, L, 2-7, 3 0 3 3 3 0 19 3.84 1/ 1 0 23 5.79 Hart 3 5 3 3 11/3 2 4 4 1 0 22 9.31 Phillips Scott 12/3 1 1 1 1 3 28 5.94 Bundy pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Hart pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Workman 1-0, Castro 2-1, Hart 3-3, Phillips 1-0, Scott 1-1. HBP: Phillips (Pearce). WP: Scott 2. PB: Butler (1), Joseph (4). Umpires: Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Adrian Johnson. T: 4:01. A: 23,649.

Friday Boston 19, Baltimore 12 Texas 12, NY Yankees 7 Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 0 Detroit 5, Minnesota 3 White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Seattle 5, Houston 2 Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Oakland at LA Angels, late Thursday Cleveland 5, Minnesota 4 NY Yankees 7, Texas 3 Toronto 8, Boston 5 Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4 Seattle 8, Houston 6

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Markakis, Atlanta, .326; Freeman, Atlanta, .318; Yelich, Milwaukee, .316; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .313; Gennett, Cincinnati, .313; Zobrist, Chicago, .310; Arenado, Colorado, .308; Peralta, Arizona, .303; Suarez, Cincinnati, .303; Almora, Chicago, .298. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 83; Albies, Atlanta, 81; Yelich, Milwaukee, 79; Arenado, Colorado, 77; Carpenter, Cardinals, 77; Baez, Chicago, 73; Harper, Washington, 72; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 71; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 71; Turner, Washington, 70. RBI: Baez, Chicago, 88; Suarez, Cincinnati, 88; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 83; Arenado, Colorado, 82; Story, Colorado, 79; Rizzo, Chicago, 75; Markakis, Atlanta, 73; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 72; Freeman, Atlanta, 71; Harper, Washington, 71. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 144; Freeman, Atlanta, 140; Gennett, Cincinnati, 132; Arenado, Colorado, 128; Peraza, Cincinnati, 128; Yelich, Milwaukee, 128; Albies, Atlanta, 127; Anderson, Miami, 127; Castro, Miami, 127; 3 tied at 126. DOUBLES: Markakis, Atlanta, 35; Albies, Atlanta, 33; Carpenter, Cardinals, 33; Baez, Chicago, 31; Story, Colorado, 31; Freeman, Atlanta, 30; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 28; Rendon, Washington, 28; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 27; 2 tied at 26. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 10; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Baez, Chicago, 7; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 6; Difo, Washington, 6; Nimmo, New York, 6; Rosario, New York, 6; 8 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Carpenter, Cardinals, 31; Arenado, Colorado, 29; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 28; Harper, Washington, 28; Suarez, Cincinnati, 26; Baez, Chicago, 25; Muncy, Los Angeles, 25; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 24; Story, Colorado, 24; Shaw, Milwaukee, 23. STOLEN BASES: Turner, Washington, 31; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 27; MTaylor, Washington, 24; Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; Cain, Milwaukee, 20; Baez, Chicago, 19; Peraza, Cincinnati, 18; Dyson, Arizona, 16; Jankowski, San Diego, 15. PITCHING: Scherzer, Washington, 15-5; Godley, Arizona, 12-6; Greinke, Arizona, 12-7; Lester, Chicago, 12-4; Mikolas, Cardinals, 12-3; Nola, Philadelphia, 12-3; Chacin, Milwaukee, 11-4; Freeland, Colorado, 10-7; Newcomb, Atlanta, 10-5; Quintana, Chicago, 10-8. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.77; Scherzer, Washington, 2.28; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.37; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.74; Greinke, Arizona, 2.89; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.98; Freeland, Colorado, 3.04; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 3.11; Corbin, Arizona, 3.15; Newcomb, Atlanta, 3.15. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 216; Corbin, Arizona, 183; deGrom, New York, 183; Greinke, Arizona, 152; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 147; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 145; Gray, Colorado, 144; Nola, Philadelphia, 144; Marquez, Colorado, 139; Godley, Arizona, 137.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Betts, Boston, .347; Martinez, Boston, .331; Altuve, Houston, .329; Machado, Los Angeles, .315; Simmons, Los Angeles, .310; Trout, Los Angeles, .309; Segura, Seattle, .306; Duffy, Tampa Bay, .304; Benintendi, Boston, .304; Merrifield, Kansas City, .300. RUNS: Lindor, Cleveland, 99; Betts, Boston, 95; Martinez, Boston, 83; Trout, Los Angeles, 82; Benintendi, Boston, 81; Ramirez, Cleveland, 78; Segura, Seattle, 78; Bregman, Houston, 75; Springer, Houston, 74; 2 tied at 73. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 99; Davis, Oakland, 88; Ramirez, Cleveland, 83; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 81; Cruz, Seattle, 75; Haniger, Seattle, 75; Lindor, Cleveland, 74; Stanton, New York, 74; Bregman, Houston, 72; Gallo, Texas, 71. HITS: Lindor, Cleveland, 139; Martinez, Boston, 139; Rosario, Minnesota, 137; Segura, Seattle, 137; Altuve, Houston, 134; Betts, Boston, 131; Merrifield, Kansas City, 130; Benintendi, Boston, 128; Castellanos, Detroit, 127; 2 tied at 124. DOUBLES: Lindor, Cleveland, 39; Bregman, Houston, 37; Escobar, Arizona, 37; Abreu, Chicago, 33; Benintendi, Boston, 32; Bogaerts, Boston, 32; Andujar, New York, 31; Castellanos, Detroit, 31; Merrifield, Kansas City, 31; Smoak, Toronto, 31. TRIPLES: Smith, Tampa Bay, 9; Sanchez, Chicago, 9; Hernandez, Toronto, 7; Benintendi, Boston, 6; Chapman, Oakland, 6; Span, Seattle, 6; 5 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 35; Ramirez, Cleveland, 33; Davis, Oakland, 32; Gallo, Texas, 31; Cruz, Seattle, 30; Trout, Los Angeles, 30; Lindor, Cleveland, 29; Stanton, New York, 28; Betts, Boston, 27; Judge, New York, 26. STOLEN BASES: Ramirez, Cleveland, 27; Gordon, Seattle, 26; Merrifield, Kansas City, 25; Smith, Tampa Bay, 25; Anderson, Chicago, 22; Betts, Boston, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 21; Benintendi, Boston, 20; Lindor, Cleveland, 19; DeShields, Texas, 18. ERA: Sale, Boston, 2.04; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.18; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.26; Verlander, Houston, 2.50; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.74; Cole, Houston, 2.75; Morton, Houston, 2.81; Severino, New York, 3.11; Clevinger, Cleveland, 3.38; Fiers, Oakland, 3.40. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 207; Sale, Boston, 207; Bauer, Cleveland, 206; Verlander, Houston, 206; Paxton, Seattle, 175; Morton, Houston, 167; Severino, New York, 167; Berrios, Minnesota, 153; Kluber, Cleveland, 153; Carrasco, Cleveland, 146.

Saturday’s pitching matchups IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

StL KC

Flaherty (R) Duffy (L)

5-6 6:15 7-10

3.27 4.70

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Was Roark (R) Chi Lester (L)

6-12 3:05 12-4

4.21 3.44

Ari Cin

Ray (L) Harvey (R)

5:40

3-2 5-7

4.92 5.37

Mil Atl

Miley (L) Teheran (R)

6:10

2-1 8-7

2.10 4.48

NY Oswalt (R) Mia Straily (R)

6:10

1-2 4-5

5.13 4.35

LA Col

Buehler (R) Freeland (L)

5-4 7:10 10-7

3.63 3.04

Phi SD

Nola (R) Lockett (R)

7:40

12-3 0-2

2.37 9.28

Pit SF

Williams (R) TBA

8:05

9-8 —

3.88 —

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tex Hutchison (R) 1-2 NY Lynn (R) 12:05 8-8

6.29 4.58

Bos Price (L) 11-6 Bal Yacabonis (R) 12:05 0-0

3.93 7.15

TB Tor

Stanek (R) Gaviglio (R)

3:07

1-3 2-4

2.56 5.08

Min Gibson (R) Det Liriano (L)

5:10

5-9 3-6

3.60 4.37

Bos TBA Bal Ramirez (R)

6:05

— 1-4

— 5.66

Cle Chi

Bauer (R) Shields (R)

11-6 6:10 4-13

2.25 4.50

Sea LeBlanc (L) Hou Morton (R)

6-2 6:10 12-2

3.81 2.81

Oak Jackson (R) LA Skaggs (L)

8:07

3-2 8-7

2.87 3.34

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This Date In Baseball Compiled by PAUL MONTELLA Aug. 11 1907: In the second game of a doubleheader, shortened by agreement, Ed Karger of the St. Louis Cardinals pitched a seven-inning perfect game, beating the Boston Braves 4-0. 1926: Tris Speaker of Cleveland hit his 700th career double but the Indians lost to the Chicago White Sox, 7-2. The double came in the third inning off Joe Edwards. 1929: Babe Ruth hit his 500th career home run in the second inning off Willis Hudlin at Cleveland’s League Park. The homer was Ruth’s 30th of the year, but it wasn’t enough as the Indians beat the Yankees 6-5. 1951: Robin Roberts of the Philadelphia Phillies beat the New York Giants 4-0, dropping the Giants 13 1/2 games behind the first-place Brooklyn Dodgers. 1961: Warren Spahn of the Milwaukee Braves scattered six hits to beat the Chicago Cubs, 2-1, for his 300th career victory. 1970: Philadelphia’s Jim Bunning beat the Houston Astros 6-5 to become the first pitcher to win 100 games in both leagues since Cy Young. 1986: Cincinnati player-manager Pete Rose, 45, singled four times and doubled to set a NL record with the 10th five-hit game of his career. Rose drove in three runs in a 13-4 loss to the San Francisco Giants, to move one ahead of Max Carey for the record. 2001: Barry Bonds hit his 50th homer of the season to lead the San Francisco Giants to a 9-4 victory over the Chicago Cubs. No player had reached 50 home runs faster than Bonds. 2002: Sammy Sosa hit a grand slam and drove in five runs in the Chicago Cubs’ 12-9 victory over Colorado to set an NL record for RBIs in consecutive games with 14. 2004: Randy Wolf homered twice and threw seven solid innings to lead Philadelphia to a 15-4 victory over Colorado. Wolf, who has four career homers, went 3-for-3 and scored three runs. 2007: Rick Ankiel homered twice and drove in three runs, the latest power display by the former pitcher, and the St. Louis Cardinals beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 6-1. Today’s birthdays: Colby Rasmus 32; Pablo Sandoval 32. LATE THURSDAY

Pirates 10, Giants 5

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier lf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .291 5 1 1 0 0 1 .282 Marte cf Polanco rf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .245 Freese 3b 5 2 2 3 0 2 .287 Diaz c 5 1 2 2 0 0 .287 Bell 1b 4 2 1 1 1 1 .263 4 1 2 0 0 0 .258 Harrison 2b Mercer ss 4 1 0 0 0 0 .257 Nova p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .023 b-Dickerson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .313 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Moran ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .268 Neverauskas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sadler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --40 10 13 10 1 6 Totals San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .258 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Johnson p Posey c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .289 3 1 0 0 1 0 .256 Longoria 3b Crawford ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .279 Slater 1b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .301 4 1 1 1 0 0 .275 Hanson lf Panik 2b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .233 Duggar cf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .259 Suarez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .061 a-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Law p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 2 0 0 0 0 0 .215 d-Pence ph-rf Totals 34 5 6 5 2 6 Pittsburgh 030 000 520 — 10 13 1 San Francisco 000 020 003 — 5 6 3 a-grounded out for Suarez in the 5th. b-grounded out for Nova in the 7th. c-singled for Rodriguez in the 8th. d-lined out for Law in the 8th. E: Bell (5), Longoria (14), Panik (4), Pence (2). LOB: Pittsburgh 5, San Francisco 4. 2B: Polanco (26), Panik (10), Duggar (7). 3B: Hanson (4). HR: Diaz (8), off Suarez; Bell (7), off Suarez; Freese (9), off Law. RBIs: Frazier 2 (16), Polanco (65), Freese 3 (40), Diaz 2 (27), Bell (51), Moran (42), Hanson (29), Panik 2 (16), Duggar 2 (10). SB: Marte (28). SF: Frazier. RLISP: Pittsburgh 1 (Freese); San Francisco 2 (McCutchen, Pence). GIDP: Bell. DP: San Francisco 1 (Crawford, Panik, Slater). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova, W, 7-6 6 3 2 2 2 3 89 4.42 Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.89 Neverauskas 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 10.47 Sadler 1 3 3 0 0 1 24 0.00 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Suarez, L, 4-8 5 7 3 3 0 4 80 4.64 Moronta 1 0 0 0 0 1 20 1.72 2/ 0 0 27 3.22 Melancon 3 2 4 0 Law 11/3 3 3 3 1 1 31 8.74 Johnson 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 5.31 Inherited runners-scored: Law 2-2. WP: Nova, Melancon. Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Brian O’Nora; Second, Shane Livensparger; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 3:00. A: 40,035.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Chicago

67 48 .583

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

— 6-4 W-1

31-27

Milwaukee

66 53

.555

3

61 55 .526

7-3 W-3 29-26

32-29

Pittsburgh

60 56

5-5 W-3

33-29

27-27

Cincinnati

51 65 .440 16½

13½

3-7 W-1

27-31 24-34

L

.517

EAST

W

63 50 .558

Pct

— 4-6

36-21

Cardinals

Atlanta

.557

— 6-4

Washington

59 57 .509

5½ 6-4

51

L-2 36-24 30-29

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

Philadelphia 64

7-3 W-1 L-2

29-23

34-27

38-18

26-33

L-1 30-28 29-29

New York

48 65 .425

15

15 4-6 W-2

24-37 24-28

Miami

47 70 .402

18

18

27-34 20-36

WEST

W

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

L

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 08.11.2018

Pct

1-9

L-3

Friday Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 Cubs 3, Washington 2 Cincinnati 3, Arizona 0 NY Mets 6, Miami 2 Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 5, LA Dodgers 4 San Diego 2, Philadelphia 0 Pittsburgh at San Francisco, late Thursday Washington 6, Atlanta 3 San Diego 8, Milwaukee 4 LA Dodgers 8, Colorado 5 Pittsburgh 10, San Francisco 5

CENTRAL

W

Cleveland

64

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

51 .557

— 11

Minnesota

53 62 .461

Detroit

48 68 .414 16½

Chicago

42 73 .365

Kansas City

5-5 W-1

22-36 20-37

35 80 .304

29

32½

3-7

L-1 16-40 19-40

GB WCGB L10

Str Home Away

EAST

W

L

Pct

Boston

82 35

.701

New York

72 43 .626

9

— 4-6

Tampa Bay

59 57 .509 22½

Toronto

52 63 .452

Baltimore

35 81 .302 46½

WEST

W

L

Pct

29

1

5-5

L-1

32-29

32-24

Houston

73 44 .624

5-5

L-1

31-28

33-25

Oakland

68 48 .586

Colorado

61 55 .526

3-7 W-1

29-27

32-28

Seattle

67 50 .573

6

San Francisco 57 59 .491

5-5

32-25 25-34

Los Angeles

59 58 .504

14

71 .398 17½

18½

21-36

Texas

52 66 .441

21½

Cubs win as Holland walks in decisive run Anthony Rizzo drew a basesloaded walk off Greg Holland in the seventh inning to break a 2-2 tie and lead the Chicago Cubs to 3-2 victory at home over Washington on Friday. Holland, who recently was dropped by the Cardinals before signing with the Nationals, came in with no outs and a man on first. He retired Willson Contreras before giving up singles to Ian Happ and Addison Russell to load the bases before walking Rizzo. Holland then was removed from the game. The Cubs didn’t get a hit against Nationals starter Jeremy Hellickson in his 52/3 innings of work, but he walked four and allowed two earned runs. Braves 10, Brewers 1 • Kevin Gausman pitched eight strong innings and Ender Inciarte drove in four runs in host Atlanta’s rout. Milwaukee has lost four of five to fall three games back of the first-place Cubs in the NL Central. Rockies 5, Dodgers 4 • Ryan McMahon hit a two-run homer in the seventh to give Colorado the lead for good as it won at home. He entered the game in the fifth after Arenado departed because of a sore shoulder. Reds 3, Diamondbacks 0 • Anthony DeSclafani struck out nine over seven innings and scored to help host Cincinnati win. Padres 2, Phillies 0 • Austin Hedges had two hits, including a homer, and scored twice to lift host San Diego. Mets 6, Marlins 2 • Amed Rosario had three hits and drove in two runs to boost visiting New York.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Red Sox 19, Orioles 12 • Xander Bogaerts and Andrew Benintendi each hit three-run homers as visiting Boston won a slugfest. After hitting for the cycle a night earlier, Red Sox outfielder Mookie Betts had three hits and three RBIs. Rangers 12, Yankees 7 • Ronald Guzman became the first rookie to hit three homer in a game against the Yankees, powering visiting Texas to victory. The first baseman batted in the eighth with a chance to tie the bigleague record for homers in a game — no rookie has ever hit four — but fanned. Mariners 5, Astros 2 • Nelson Cruz hit a tiebreaking two-run double in a threerun eighth inning to key Seattle’s victory on the road. Houston’s Gerrit Cole yielded six hits and four runs in 7 1/3 innings for his season-high third straight loss. Rays 7, Blue Jays 0 • Blake Snell pitched five perfect innings then was pulled, and Michael Perez hit his first career homer as visiting Tampa Bay rolled. White Sox 1, Indians 0 • Daniel Palka hit a homer in the bottom of the ninth to win the game for Chicago. Tigers 5, Twins 3 • Niko Goodrum and Jose Iglesias homered as host Detroit broke a losing streak at six. Angels 4, Athletics 3 • Kole Calhoun and Justin Upton hit two-run homers, Albert Pujols recorded his 1,000th career hit with the Angels, and Los Angeles beat visiting Oakland. Associated Press

8-2 W-1

42-15 40-20 33-26

9 6-4 W-2 34-24

25-33

15½ 4-6 33

3-7

L-1

18-41

39-17

GB WCGB L10

ROUNDUP

33-24 20-38

25½

26-35

L-3

27-28

22

64 53 .547

5-5 W-2

14½ 4-6

37-23 30-27

64 53 .547

47

L-1

3-7 W-1

Arizona

San Diego

7-3

20

Los Angeles

L-3

Str Home Away

28-31

24-32

L-2 20-36

L-1

15-45

Str Home Away

— 6-4

L-2

32-26

41-18

L-1

33-23

35-25

1½ 4-6 W-2 36-24

31-26

7-3

5-5 W-4

17 6-4 W-1

33-28 26-30 25-36

27-30

BOX SCORES Cubs 3, Nationals 2

Mets 6, Marlins 2

White Sox 1, Indians 0

Mariners 5, Astros 2

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .302 Turner ss 5 1 1 0 0 3 .270 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Harper cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .235 Soto lf 3 0 2 1 1 1 .309 Zimmerman 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Solis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Glover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Reynolds ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Murphy 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .297 Kieboom c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .197 d-Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Hellickson p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Adams 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rizzo 1b 1 1 0 1 3 0 .264 Baez 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .296 Zobrist rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .310 Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Edwards Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Heyward cf-rf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .281 Bote 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .324 Schwarber lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .244 Almora cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .298 Contreras c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Hendricks p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .065 a-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 b-Happ ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Russell ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .263 Totals 27 3 4 3 6 5 Washington 110 000 000 — 2 9 0 Chicago 000 002 10x — 3 4 1 a-lined out for Hendricks in the 6th. b-singled for Cishek in the 7th. c-flied out for Glover in the 8th. d-flied out for Kieboom in the 9th. E: Strop (2). LOB: Washington 9, Chicago 6. 2B: Murphy (9). RBIs: Eaton (20), Soto (41), Rizzo (75), Heyward 2 (48). SB: Eaton (4). CS: Bote (4). S: Hellickson. RLISP: Washington 5 (Eaton, Turner, Rendon, Zimmerman, Murphy); Chicago 4 (Zobrist 2, Heyward, Bote). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 52/3 0 2 2 4 3 89 3.54 Hellickson 1/ 1 0 1 12 4.72 Solis, L, 1-2, 3 2 1 1/ 0 1 0 11 7.24 Holland 3 2 0 2/ 0 0 0 4 0.00 Glover 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 11 3.08 Suero IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chicago 6 8 2 2 0 5 85 4.02 Hendricks 1/ 0 0 0 8 3.27 Wilson 3 1 0 Cishek, W, 3-1 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.87 0 0 0 0 2 0 15 3.30 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.65 Edwards Jr., Strop, S, 9-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.68 Solis pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Kintzler pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Solis 3-2, Holland 1-1, Glover 3-0, Cishek 1-0, Edwards Jr. 2-0. HBP: Hendricks (Rendon). WP: Cishek. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, Nick Mahrley; Second, Alan Porter; Third,

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 5 0 3 2 0 1 .235 McNeil 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .289 Flores 1b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .273 Conforto lf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .233 Nimmo rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Frazier 3b 4 2 2 0 0 1 .216 Jackson cf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .286 Plawecki c 3 0 1 2 0 0 .222 Wheeler p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .195 b-Reyes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .185 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 6 13 6 1 9 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sierra cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Anderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .283 Realmuto c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .290 Dietrich 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .279 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Prado 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .232 Ortega lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Rojas ss 3 1 1 2 0 0 .257 Urena p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .059 Rucinski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Riddle ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .221 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 4 2 2 8 New York 001 003 020 — 6 13 1 Miami 000 000 200 — 2 4 0 a-struck out for Garcia in the 7th. b-struck out for Wheeler in the 8th. E: Rosario (10). LOB: New York 8, Miami 5. 2B: Flores (20), Jackson (11), Realmuto (25). HR: Rojas (9), off Wheeler. RBIs: Rosario 2 (31), Conforto (40), Jackson (22), Plawecki 2 (15), Rojas 2 (44). S: Urena. RLISP: New York 2 (Nimmo 2); Miami 5 (Sierra, Dietrich, Castro, Ortega, Urena). GIDP: Castro. DP: New York 1 (Smith, McNeil, Flores). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA New York Wheeler, W, 7-6 7 4 2 2 1 8 108 3.82 Lugo 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.80 Blevins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.94 Smith 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 2.25 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Urena, L, 3-12 5 1/3 8 4 4 1 3 90 4.74 2/ Rucinski 0 1 9 3.00 3 1 0 0 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.39 Guerra 1 3 2 2 0 3 21 6.32 Conley 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 3.34 Blevins pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Smith 1-0, Rucinski 2-2. HBP: Rucinski (Plawecki), Blevins (Dietrich). WP: Wheeler. Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Ramon De Jesus; Third, Gabe Morales. T: 2:43. A: 6,993.

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .298 Brantley lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .296 Encarnacion dh 0 0 0 0 1 0 .229 a-Cabrera ph-dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .239 1-Allen pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Guyer rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .206 Alonso 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Davis cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Totals 31 0 5 0 3 6 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Delmonico lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .227 b-Engel ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Sanchez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Palka dh 4 1 1 1 0 3 .238 Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Narvaez c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .285 Anderson ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .241 Moncada 2b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .219 LaMarre cf-lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .272 Totals 29 1 5 1 2 11 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Chicago 000 000 001 — 1 5 1 No outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Encarnacion in the 4th. b-struck out for Delmonico in the 8th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 9th. E: Narvaez (5). LOB: Cleveland 8, Chicago 6. 2B: Lindor (39), Ramirez (30), Anderson (18), Moncada (21). HR: Palka (18), off Ramirez. RBIs: Palka (46). SB: Lindor 2 (19), Encarnacion (2). RLISP: Cleveland 5 (Ramirez, Guyer 3, Kipnis); Chicago 2 (Sanchez, LaMarre). GIDP: Gomes. DP: Chicago 1 (Anderson, Moncada, Abreu). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bieber 62/3 3 0 0 2 8 106 4.10 Perez 1 1 0 0 0 3 19 1.45 Ramirez, L, 0-2 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 6 4.40 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodon 8 4 0 0 2 5 106 2.61 Cedeno 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 3.38 1/ 4 3.55 Minaya 3 0 0 0 0 0 2/ 1 16 4.58 Fry, W, 1-2 3 1 0 0 0 Cedeno pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Ramirez 1-0, Minaya 1-0, Fry 1-0. Umpires: Home, Carlos Torres; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Tom Woodring; Third, Scott Barry. T: 2:46. A: 18,772.

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .273 4 1 2 1 0 0 .277 Span lf Heredia lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .227 3 1 0 0 0 0 .306 Segura ss Cruz dh 4 0 2 2 0 1 .268 4 0 0 1 0 2 .228 Seager 3b Zunino c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .202 4 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Healy 1b Maybin cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .254 3 1 0 0 1 0 .276 Gordon 2b Totals 34 5 7 5 1 6 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kemp lf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .301 Bregman 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .278 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .265 Reddick rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Gurriel 1b Gonzalez 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .242 4 1 1 0 0 2 .279 White dh Maldonado c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .217 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 a-Gattis ph Marisnick cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .217 1-Fisher pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .169 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 7 Seattle 000 002 030 — 5 7 0 Houston 000 020 000 — 2 9 0 a-flied out for Maldonado in the 9th. 1-ran for Marisnick in the 7th. LOB: Seattle 4, Houston 7. 2B: Haniger 2 (23), Cruz 2 (13), Bregman (37), Marisnick (7). RBIs: Haniger (75), Span (51), Cruz 2 (75), Seager (62), Kemp (24), Bregman (72). CS: Gonzalez (3). RLISP: Seattle 3 (Seager, Zunino, Healy); Houston 3 (Correa 3). GIDP: Gurriel. DP: Seattle 1 (Segura, Gordon, Healy). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Seattle Leake 6 8 2 2 1 4 97 4.11 Warren, W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 3.00 Colome, 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.18 Diaz, S, 44-47 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.05 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole, L, 10-5 71/3 6 4 4 1 5 93 2.75 2/ Pressly 1 0 1 15 3.40 3 1 1 McHugh 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.98 Inherited runners-scored: Pressly 2-2. HBP: Pressly (Segura). Umpires: Home, Doug Eddings; First, Joe West; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Nic Lentz. T: 2:48. A: 41,236.

Rangers 12, Yankees 7

Braves 10, Brewers 1

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith lf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .300 Wendle 3b 3 0 1 3 0 0 .292 Bauers 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .233 Choi dh 4 1 1 1 0 3 .226 Gomez rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .180 Lowe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Adames ss 3 3 3 0 1 0 .236 Perez c 4 2 2 2 0 0 .323 Totals 34 7 9 7 2 10 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Toronto Grichuk rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .234 Travis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Hernandez lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .244 Morales dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .244 Diaz ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Maile c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Urena 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .286 Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Totals 29 0 3 0 1 9 Tampa Bay 002 021 200 — 7 9 0 Toronto 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 LOB: Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 3. 2B: Wendle (14), Adames 2 (4). 3B: Smith (9). HR: Perez (1), off Estrada; Choi (5), off Estrada. RBIs: Smith (27), Wendle 3 (37), Choi (14), Perez 2 (4). SB: Adames (3). SF: Wendle. S: Smith. RLISP: Tampa Bay 2 (Bauers, Choi); Toronto 1 (Pillar). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tampa Bay Snell, W, 13-5 5 0 0 0 0 6 47 2.18 Faria 3 3 0 0 1 3 43 4.97 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 4.58 Schultz Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Estrada, L, 5-9 5 3 5 5 5 2 6 91 4.84 Pannone 12/3 3 2 2 0 3 30 10.80 2 1 0 0 0 1 21 6.62 Biagini HBP: Biagini (Wendle). Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Tony Randazzo; Second, Ryan Additon; Third, Bill Welke. T: 2:27. A: 23,082.

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .262 Hoskins lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Williams rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .260 Santana 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .217 Cabrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Herrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Franco 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .277 1-Kingery pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223 3 0 1 0 1 2 .254 Alfaro c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .133 Eflin p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .318 a-Quinn ph Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Totals 34 0 8 0 3 8 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Hosmer 1b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .254 Renfroe lf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Reyes rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .262 Strahm p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 3 2 2 1 0 1 .256 Hedges c Spangenberg 3b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .235 3 0 2 1 0 0 .237 Galvis ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .199 Asuaje 2b Nix p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Jankowski lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Totals 29 2 7 2 1 11 Philadelphia 000 000 000 — 0 8 0 San Diego 010 100 00x — 2 7 0 a-struck out for Eflin in the 7th. b-struck out for Garcia in the 9th. 1-ran for Franco in the 9th. LOB: Philadelphia 10, San Diego 4. HR: Hedges (9), off Eflin. RBIs: Hedges (25), Galvis (44). SB: Hedges (2), Galvis (5). RLISP: Philadelphia 5 (Hernandez, Hoskins 2, Herrera 2); San Diego 3 (Renfroe, Asuaje, Nix). GIDP: Cabrera, Renfroe 2. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Cabrera, Santana), (Hernandez, Santana); San Diego 1 (Asuaje, Galvis, Hosmer). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eflin, L, 8-4 6 5 2 2 1 8 90 3.57 Morgan 11/3 1 0 0 0 3 17 4.68 2/ Garcia 0 0 0 7 3.69 3 1 0 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nix, W, 1-0 6 4 0 0 2 4 88 0.00 Strahm, 1 1 0 0 1 2 24 2.30 Stammen, 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 2.33 Yates, S, 4-4 1 2 0 0 0 2 20 1.59 WP: Garcia. Umpires: Home, Mike Winters; First, Jansen Visconti; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T: 2:34. A: 26,306.

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0 0 2 .316 Yelich lf Cain cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .295 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Perez cf Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .253 Aguilar 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .272 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Shaw 2b Houser p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Kratz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .226 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Schoop ss-2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Thames rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .239 Pina c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Peralta p Lyles p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 1 0 1 0 0 0 .213 Arcia ss Totals 33 1 6 1 0 9 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 2 3 0 0 1 .270 Acuna lf 2 2 0 0 3 2 .275 Albies 2b 3 1 1 1 2 0 .318 Freeman 1b Markakis rf 3 3 2 3 1 0 .326 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Duvall rf 5 2 4 2 0 0 .262 Camargo 3b 5 0 2 4 0 1 .252 Inciarte cf Flowers c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .238 4 0 0 0 1 1 .237 Swanson ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Gausman p a-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sobotka p Totals 36 10 13 10 8 7 Milwaukee 000 001 000 — 1 6 0 302 203 00x — 10 13 0 Atlanta a-struck out for Gausman in the 8th. b-grounded out for Houser in the 9th. LOB: Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 11. 2B: Moustakas 2 (24), Acuna (16), Markakis 2 (35), Camargo 2 (17), Inciarte (18). RBIs: Aguilar (83), Freeman (71), Markakis 3 (73), Camargo 2 (52), Inciarte 4 (46). SB: Albies (12). SF: Markakis. RLISP: Milwaukee 2 (Aguilar, Peralta); Atlanta 4 (Markakis 2, Gausman, Flaherty). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milwaukee Peralta, L, 5-3 3 7 7 7 5 3 81 4.47 Lyles 21/3 3 3 3 1 3 43 4.52 Houser 22/3 3 0 0 2 1 60 3.29 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman, W, 6-9 8 6 1 1 0 8 94 4.27 Sobotka 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Peralta pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Lyles 2-1, Houser 2-1. Umpires: Home, John Tumpane; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Chad Whitson; Third, Mark Wegner. T: 2:59. A: 36,519.

Tigers 5, Twins 3 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Polanco ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .287 Forsythe 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .234 Kepler rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Garver c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .261 Morrison dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .186 Cave cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .282 Adrianza 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .249 Totals 36 3 10 2 0 1 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gerber lf 2 1 0 1 1 1 .174 Iglesias ss 4 1 1 2 0 0 .266 Castellanos rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Candelario 3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .226 Martinez dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Goodrum 2b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .231 Adduci 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 McCann c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .218 Jones cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .205 Totals 27 5 3 5 3 6 Minnesota 001 001 001 — 3 10 1 Detroit 001 220 00x — 5 3 2 E: Rosario (8), Candelario (8), Goodrum (9). LOB: Minnesota 7, Detroit 2. 2B: Polanco (8), Cave (9), Adrianza (15). 3B: Jones (5). HR: Goodrum (11), off Santana; Iglesias (5), off Santana. RBIs: Garver (26), Adrianza (21), Gerber (2), Iglesias 2 (47), Goodrum 2 (36). SF: Garver, Gerber. RLISP: Minnesota 3 (Mauer, Kepler, Adrianza). GIDP: Morrison. DP: Detroit 1 (Goodrum, Iglesias, Adduci). Minnesota IPHRERBBSONPERA Santana, L, 0-1 6 3 5 5 2 5 94 6.53 2 00 0 1 1 30 6.82 Drake IPHRERBBSONPERA Detroit 1/ Zimmermann, W, 5-46 3 8 2 0 0 1 96 3.98 2/ Wilson, 3 00 0 0 0 43.80 Jimenez, 1 00 0 0 0 13 3.28 Greene, S, 24-27 1 2 1 1 0 0 24 4.12 Inherited runners-scored: Wilson 1-0. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Bruce Dreckman; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Mike Estabrook. T: 2:37. A: 24,849.

Rays 7, Blue Jays 0

Reds 3, Diamondbacks 0 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .278 Pollock cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .278 Souza Jr. rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .254 Marte 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Ahmed ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Avila c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .175 Buchholz p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .050 Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Totals 30 0 5 0 0 10 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .283 Votto 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .289 Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Suarez 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .303 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .313 Ervin lf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .295 Williams rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .295 Barnhart c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .243 DeSclafani p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .214 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dixon 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Hamilton cf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .228 Totals 31 3 9 2 2 7 Arizona 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Cincinnati 000 001 20x — 3 9 0 a-flied out for Diekman in the 9th. E: Buchholz (1). LOB: Arizona 3, Cincinnati 7. 2B: Goldschmidt (23), Barnhart (15). RBIs: Suarez (88), Hamilton (23). SF: Suarez. RLISP: Arizona 1 (Pollock); Cincinnati 3 (Suarez, Williams 2). GIDP: Pollock, Avila, Williams. DP: Arizona 1 (Marte, Ahmed, Goldschmidt); Cincinnati 2 (Suarez, Gennett, Votto), (Gennett, Peraza, Votto). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz, L, 5-2 7 8 3 2 2 4 93 2.67 Diekman 1 1 0 0 0 3 16 3.86 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA DeSclafani, W, 6-3 7 3 0 0 0 9 94 4.46 Hughes, 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 1.37 Iglesias, S, 22-25 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.52 DeSclafani pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Hughes 1-0. Umpires: Home, Jordan Baker; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 2:30. A: 19,089. Todd Tichenor. T: 3:10. A: 41,531.

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 5 1 2 0 1 1 .273 Odor 2b 4 3 2 1 1 0 .275 Andrus ss 5 2 4 3 0 0 .289 5 1 2 4 0 0 .278 Beltre 3b Profar dh 5 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Guzman 1b 5 3 3 3 0 1 .245 Calhoun lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 1-Tocci pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .183 5 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Kiner-Falefa c D.Robinson cf-lf 2 2 0 0 3 2 .186 Totals 41 12 14 11 5 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hicks cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .246 3 1 0 0 2 2 .277 Stanton dh Torres 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Gregorius ss 5 2 3 0 0 0 .270 Andujar 3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .294 Voit 1b-rf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .174 Gardner lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .248 Romine c 4 1 3 3 0 0 .263 S.Robinson rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .148 a-Bird ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 37 7 10 7 3 5 Texas 000 324 120 — 12 14 0 New York 000 013 120 — 7 10 1 a-grounded out for S.Robinson in the 8th. 1-ran for Calhoun in the 7th. E: Gregorius (5). LOB: Texas 7, New York 6. 2B: Choo (24), Andrus (15), Beltre (14), Andujar (31). HR: Beltre (7), off Tanaka; Guzman (10), off Tanaka; Guzman (11), off Tanaka; Guzman (12), off Cole; Gardner (10), off Minor; Romine (7), off Butler. RBIs: Odor (45), Andrus 3 (24), Beltre 4 (40), Guzman 3 (46), Andujar (53), Voit 2 (5), Gardner (34), Romine 3 (33). SB: D.Robinson (2), Romine (1). RLISP: Texas 1 (Guzman); New York 2 (Hicks, Gregorius). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor, W, 9-6 52/3 6 4 4 1 2 84 4.61 Butler 11/3 1 1 1 1 0 24 4.67 2/ 2 0 1 27 4.55 Martin 3 3 2 1/ 0 0 0 6 3.86 Gearrin 3 0 0 Leclerc 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 2.11 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tanaka, L, 9-3 5 6 6 6 3 2 96 4.08 Cole 2 5 4 2 1 2 56 5.08 Green 1 3 2 2 0 1 21 2.98 Britton 1 0 0 0 1 3 17 3.80 Tanaka pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Butler 1-0, Gearrin 1-0. WP: Martin. Umpires: Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Ben May; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Will Little. T: 3:34. A: 45,198.

Red Sox 19, Orioles 12 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 3 3 3 2 0 .352 Benintendi lf 5 3 1 3 1 0 .303 Leon c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Moreland 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .265 Martinez dh 5 2 2 2 1 1 .332 Bogaerts ss 4 2 1 4 2 1 .272 Devers 3b 5 0 0 1 1 1 .245 Holt 2b 4 3 3 3 2 1 .262 Butler c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 a-Pearce ph-lf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .301 Bradley Jr. cf 4 4 3 1 1 0 .213 Totals 41 19 16 18 10 6 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 4 0 1 2 1 1 .266 Beckham ss 6 1 2 2 0 1 .237 Jones rf 5 0 3 2 0 0 .285 Rickard rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Trumbo dh 5 2 3 1 0 1 .270 Mancini lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .230 Davis 1b 4 2 2 2 0 2 .162 Nunez 3b 3 2 1 0 2 1 .247 Joseph c 5 2 1 0 0 2 .219 Mullins cf 4 3 3 2 1 0 .750 Totals 41 12 17 11 4 10 Boston 300 206 350 — 19 16 1 Baltimore 044 002 011 — 12 17 0 a-hit by pitch for Butler in the 8th. E: Bradley Jr. (4). LOB: Boston 7, Baltimore 8. 2B: Betts 2 (32), Moreland (17), Martinez (31), Bradley Jr. (21), Mancini (16), Mullins 2 (2). 3B: Bradley Jr. (3). HR: Bogaerts (17), off Bundy; Holt (2), off Bundy; Benintendi (15), off Hart; Davis (14), off Eovaldi; Beckham (7), off Hembree; Trumbo (17), off Barnes. RBIs: Betts 3 (62), Benintendi 3 (70), Moreland (58), Martinez 2 (101), Bogaerts 4 (72), Devers (55), Holt 3 (29), Bradley Jr. (44), Villar 2 (26), Beckham 2 (21), Jones 2 (47), Trumbo (42), Davis 2 (39), Mullins 2 (2). SB: Bogaerts (4), Jones (3). CS: Beckham (2). SF: Moreland, Davis. S: Villar. RLISP: Boston 5 (Benintendi 2, Devers 2, Butler); Baltimore 3 (Mancini, Davis, Joseph). GIDP: Martinez, Beckham. DP: Boston 1 (Holt, Bogaerts, Moreland); Baltimore 1 (Beckham, Villar, Davis). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi 22/3 10 8 4 2 0 71 3.74 Workman 11/3 1 0 0 0 3 24 2.62 Pomeranz, W, 2-5 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 6.19 1 3 2 2 1 0 27 3.83 Hembree, 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 1.23 Brasier Barnes 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 2.52 Kelly 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 4.28 IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Baltimore Bundy 5 8 8 7 4 3 93 4.70 2/ Castro, L, 2-7, 3 0 3 3 3 0 19 3.84 1/ 1 0 23 5.79 Hart 3 5 3 3 11/3 2 4 4 1 0 22 9.31 Phillips Scott 12/3 1 1 1 1 3 28 5.94 Bundy pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Hart pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Workman 1-0, Castro 2-1, Hart 3-3, Phillips 1-0, Scott 1-1. HBP: Phillips (Pearce). WP: Scott 2. PB: Butler (1), Joseph (4). Umpires: Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Adrian Johnson. T: 4:01. A: 23,649.

Friday Boston 19, Baltimore 12 Texas 12, NY Yankees 7 Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 0 Detroit 5, Minnesota 3 White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Seattle 5, Houston 2 Cardinals 7, Kansas City 0 LA Angels 4, Oakland 3 Thursday Cleveland 5, Minnesota 4 NY Yankees 7, Texas 3 Toronto 8, Boston 5 Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4 Seattle 8, Houston 6

Padres 2, Phillies 0

Rockies 5, Dodgers 4 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson lf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Turner 3b 3 2 2 0 0 0 .272 Grandal c 5 0 1 1 0 1 .252 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .228 Bellinger cf-rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .251 Taylor ss-cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .251 Muncy 1b 4 1 3 2 0 1 .262 Puig rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maeda p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .097 Rosscup p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Floro p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Machado ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .308 Totals 36 4 10 4 1 5 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .278 LeMahieu 2b 4 2 2 2 1 2 .271 Gonzalez rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .287 Arenado 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .307 McMahon 3b 2 1 1 2 0 0 .244 Story ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .289 Dahl lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Desmond 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .236 Iannetta c 4 0 2 0 0 2 .228 Gray p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .075 Musgrave p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Parra ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .281 McGee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Valaika ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 5 9 5 3 13 Los Angeles 100 210 000 — 4 10 2 Colorado 201 000 20x — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Musgrave in the 6th. b-struck out for Oberg in the 8th. E: Pederson (1), Muncy (11). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Colorado 9. 2B: Turner (10), Muncy 2 (15), Story (32). 3B: Gonzalez (3), Iannetta (1). HR: Muncy (26), off Gray; LeMahieu (9), off Maeda; McMahon (3), off Rosscup. RBIs: Grandal (58), Bellinger (54), Muncy 2 (52), LeMahieu 2 (36), Story (80), McMahon 2 (13). SB: Blackmon (6), Story (15), Desmond (13). S: Gray. RLISP: Los Angeles 4 (Pederson, Taylor 2, Puig); Colorado 6 (Blackmon, LeMahieu 2, Gonzalez, Dahl, Desmond). GIDP: Grandal. DP: Colorado 1 (Desmond, Arenado). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 5 1/3 6 3 3 3 7 100 3.80 Maeda Rosscup, L, 0-1, 1 2 2 2 0 3 24 12.27 2/ Floro 1 16 2.50 3 0 0 0 0 Axford 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 5.33 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray 52/3 8 4 4 1 4 109 4.81 1/ Musgrave 4 4.55 3 0 0 0 0 0 McGee, W, 2-4 12/3 1 0 0 0 0 23 6.35 1/ Oberg, 5 3.15 3 0 0 0 0 0 Ottavino, S, 5-8 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 1.60 Inherited runners-scored: Rosscup 1-0, Musgrave 1-0, Oberg 1-0. HBP: Gray 2 (Turner,Turner). WP: Oberg. Umpires: Home, James Hoye; First, Quinn Wolcott; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T: 3:31. A: 42,184.

Saturday’s pitching matchups IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

StL KC

Flaherty (R) Duffy (L)

5-6 6:15 7-10

3.27 4.70

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Was Roark (R) Chi Lester (L)

6-12 3:05 12-4

4.21 3.44

Ari Cin

Ray (L) Harvey (R)

5:40

3-2 5-7

4.92 5.37

Mil Atl

Miley (L) Teheran (R)

6:10

2-1 8-7

2.10 4.48

NY Oswalt (R) Mia Straily (R)

6:10

1-2 4-5

5.13 4.35

LA Col

Buehler (R) Freeland (L)

5-4 7:10 10-7

3.63 3.04

Phi SD

Nola (R) Lockett (R)

7:40

12-3 0-2

2.37 9.28

Pit SF

Williams (R) TBA

8:05

9-8 —

3.88 —

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tex Hutchison (R) 1-2 NY Lynn (R) 12:05 8-8

6.29 4.58

Bos Price (L) 11-6 Bal Yacabonis (R) 12:05 0-0

3.93 7.15

TB Tor

Stanek (R) Gaviglio (R)

3:07

1-3 2-4

2.56 5.08

Min Gibson (R) Det Liriano (L)

5:10

5-9 3-6

3.60 4.37

Bos TBA Bal Ramirez (R)

6:05

— 1-4

— 5.66

Cle Chi

Bauer (R) Shields (R)

11-6 6:10 4-13

2.25 4.50

Sea LeBlanc (L) Hou Morton (R)

6-2 6:10 12-2

3.81 2.81

Oak Jackson (R) LA Skaggs (L)

8:07

3-2 8-7

2.87 3.34

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Angels 4, Athletics 3 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Martini lf Chapman 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .273 4 1 1 0 0 1 .265 Lowrie 2b 3 1 1 2 0 1 .256 Davis dh Olson 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .235 Piscotty rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Canha cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Semien ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Totals 32 3 6 3 0 8 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 1 1 2 0 1 .215 Calhoun rf Fletcher 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .263 4 1 2 2 0 0 .258 Upton lf Pujols dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .254 Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .308 Marte 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Briceno c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .296 Cowart 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Young Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .214 Totals 30 4 7 4 0 5 300 000 000 — 3 6 1 Oakland Los Angeles 002 002 00x — 4 7 0 E: Chapman (13). LOB: Oakland 3, Los Angeles 2. 2B: Chapman (23). HR: Chapman (16), off Pena; Davis (33), off Pena; Calhoun (16), off B.Anderson; Upton (24), off Trivino. RBIs: Chapman (39), Davis 2 (90), Calhoun 2 (46), Upton 2 (67). RLISP: Oakland 1 (Olson); Los Angeles 1 (Pujols). GIDP: Lucroy, Simmons, Marte. DP: Oakland 2 (Chapman, Lowrie, Olson), (Semien, Lowrie, Olson); Los Angeles 1 (Fletcher, Simmons, Marte). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oakland B.Anderson 5 4 2 2 0 4 63 4.53 1 3 2 2 0 0 16 1.58 Trivino, L, 8-2, Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 3.02 Kelley 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.18 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pena 52/3 5 3 3 0 4 86 4.95 Johnson, W, 4-2 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.18 Bedrosian, 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.33 J.Anderson, 11/3 0 0 0 0 4 21 2.91 1/ Alvarez, 0 0 3 2.81 3 0 0 0 Parker, S, 11-14 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.29 Inherited runners-scored: Johnson 1-0. HBP: Pena (Davis). WP: Pena. Umpires: Home, Chris Segal; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Stu Scheurwater; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 2:22. A: 42,722.

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Markakis, Atlanta, .326; Freeman, Atlanta, .318; Yelich, Milwaukee, .316; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .313; Gennett, Cincinnati, .313; Zobrist, Chicago, .310; Arenado, Colorado, .307; Peralta, Arizona, .303; Suarez, Cincinnati, .303; Almora, Chicago, .298. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 84; Albies, Atlanta, 81; Yelich, Milwaukee, 79; Carpenter, Cardinals, 78; Arenado, Colorado, 77; Baez, Chicago, 73; Harper, Washington, 72; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 71; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 71; Turner, Washington, 70. RBI: Baez, Chicago, 88; Suarez, Cincinnati, 88; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 83; Arenado, Colorado, 82; Story, Colorado, 80; Rizzo, Chicago, 75; Markakis, Atlanta, 73; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 72; Freeman, Atlanta, 71; Harper, Washington, 71. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 144; Freeman, Atlanta, 140; Gennett, Cincinnati, 132; Arenado, Colorado, 128; Peraza, Cincinnati, 128; Yelich, Milwaukee, 128; Albies, Atlanta, 127; Anderson, Miami, 127; Castro, Miami, 127; Story, Colorado, 127. DOUBLES: Markakis, Atlanta, 35; Albies, Atlanta, 33; Carpenter, Cardinals, 33; Story, Colorado, 32; Baez, Chicago, 31; Freeman, Atlanta, 30; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 28; Rendon, Washington, 28; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 27; 2 tied at 26. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 10; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Baez, Chicago, 7; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 6; Difo, Washington, 6; Nimmo, New York, 6; Rosario, New York, 6; 8 tied at 5. HOME RUNS: Carpenter, Cardinals, 32; Arenado, Colorado, 29; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 28; Harper, Washington, 28; Muncy, Los Angeles, 26; Suarez, Cincinnati, 26; Baez, Chicago, 25; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 24; Story, Colorado, 24; Shaw, Milwaukee, 23. STOLEN BASES: Turner, Washington, 31; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 27; MTaylor, Washington, 24; Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; Cain, Milwaukee, 20; Baez, Chicago, 19; Peraza, Cincinnati, 18; Dyson, Arizona, 16; 2 tied at 15. PITCHING: Scherzer, Washington, 15-5; Godley, Arizona, 12-6; Greinke, Arizona, 12-7; Lester, Chicago, 12-4; Mikolas, Cardinals, 12-3; Nola, Philadelphia, 12-3; Chacin, Milwaukee, 11-4; Freeland, Colorado, 10-7; Newcomb, Atlanta, 10-5; Quintana, Chicago, 10-8. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.77; Scherzer, Washington, 2.28; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.37; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.74; Greinke, Arizona, 2.89; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.98; Freeland, Colorado, 3.04; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 3.11; Corbin, Arizona, 3.15; Newcomb, Atlanta, 3.15. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 216; Corbin, Arizona, 183; deGrom, New York, 183; Greinke, Arizona, 152; Gray, Colorado, 148; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 147; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 145; Nola, Philadelphia, 144; Marquez, Colorado, 139; Godley, Arizona, 137.


08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 1 CARDINALS 7, ROYALS 0 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 5 1 1 2 0 2 .280 Molina c 3 2 2 0 0 0 .288 Pena c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .206 Martinez dh 4 0 3 2 1 0 .298 Ozuna lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .269 DeJong ss 5 1 1 1 0 2 .243 Gyorko 3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .248 Wong 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .226 Munoz rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .284 a-Garcia ph-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .167 Bader cf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .273 Totals 38 7 12 7 3 9 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .297 Herrera rf 3 0 0 0 2 2 .252 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Butera c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Dozier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Duda 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .239 Bonifacio lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .211 Phillips cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .232 Mondesi ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 O’Hearn dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .105 Totals 33 0 7 0 4 5 Cardinals 050 001 100 — 7 12 1 Kansas City 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 a-singled for Munoz in the 6th. E: Wong (4). LOB: Cardinals 8, Kansas City 11. 2B: Molina 2 (16), Martinez (21), Bonifacio (10). 3B: Mondesi (1). HR: DeJong (11), off Smith; Carpenter (32), off Smith; Bader (7), off Sparkman. RBIs: Carpenter 2 (65), Martinez 2 (65), DeJong (32), Bader 2 (18). RLISP: Cardinals 4 (Ozuna, Gyorko 2, Bader); Kansas City 5 (Dozier 2, Mondesi 2, O’Hearn). GIDP: Merrifield, Perez. DP: Cardinals 2; Kansas City 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gomber 5 4 0 0 1 3 89 3.45 Shreve 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 4.10 Poncedeleon 3 2 0 0 3 1 44 1.23 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smith 1 2/3 6 5 5 1 0 46 6.97 Sparkman 4 1/3 4 2 2 1 2 68 5.06 Adam 2 1 0 0 0 4 25 5.10 Maurer 1 1 0 0 1 3 19 10.00 Sparkman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. W: Gomber 2-0. L: Smith 1-4. S: Poncedeleon 1-1. Inherited runners-scored: Sparkman 1-0, Adam 1-0. HBP: Smith (Molina), Gomber (Perez). WP: Sparkman 2. Umpires: Home, Tom Hallion; First, Ryan Blakney; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T: 3:04. A: 29,414 (37,903).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second • Paul DeJong homers to center field. Jedd Gyorko walks. Kolten Wong grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. Jedd Gyorko to second. Yairo Munoz grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. Jedd Gyorko to third. Harrison Bader singles to center field. Jedd Gyorko scores. Matt Carpenter homers to center field. Harrison Bader scores. Yadier Molina doubles to deep left center field. Jose Martinez singles to center field. Yadier Molina scores. On Glenn Sparkman’s wild pitch, Jose Martinez to second. Marcell Ozuna grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. 5 runs, 5 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Cardinals 5, Royals 0.

CARDINALS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

Visit to AL park changes lineup AVERAGES

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

KANSAS CITY • After weeks of different combinations and alterations to the lineup, a visit to an American League ballpark this weekend gives Cardinals manager Mike Shildt a chance, for the first time, to write a lineup that satisfies both offense and defense — and, just maybe, a peek at what a twist to the usual lineup might look like. Access to a designated hitter gave Shildt the ideal spot to start Jose Martinez and see what the Cardinals’ resurgent offense looks like at its current deepest. “It’s fun,” he said. “Regardless of who is in there right now, I like our lineup.” It has, after all, been the change agent as the Cardinals won four series in a row, including the first two on this three-city road trip. Since the All-Star break, the Cardinals have scored the seventh-most runs in the majors (99), hit .268 (eighth), and slugged .425 (14th). They have seen a spike in their OPS from .714 in the first half to .770 in the first 21 games of the second half. The greatest change has been in the on-base percentage, which has hopped from .315 (21st) to .345 (fifth). Shildt credited the clubhouse and how “players have really taken heed to quality atbats.” Each day, the coaches do a post-op on the previous game with acknowledgement of two-strike hits, opposite-field hits and other hits that were either timely or ideal for the situation. Whatever the cause, the result has been an offense less reliant on home runs and more relentless when it comes to generating baserunners. “We had 19 straight innings where we had somebody on base; (that’s) every inning over two games,” Shildt said before listing recent games when the Cardinals forced opponents to throw far more pitches than the league average. “I’d like to think that we have more of the ability to create runs or score runs regardless of circumstance. Clearly, we hit the ballpark and we feel pretty good about that. It’s a quick and immediate return on investment.” The second inning Friday captured the reward and riddle of revival. The Cardinals sent nine batters to the plate, scored five runs, got two homers, and also knocked Kansas City’s starter from the game with the help of a walk and two other base hits. Matt Carpenter played his usual part in the jubilee with the 32nd home run of his

Batting O’Neill J. Martinez Munoz Molina Carpenter Ozuna Bader Gyorko DeJong G. Garcia Wong Pena A. Garcia Team

AVG AB .309 55 .293 369 .286 206 .285 316 .281 398 .272 434 .269 227 .248 254 .244 258 .231 134 .229 262 .198 106 .000 4 .249 3914

Pitching Hudson Webb Poncedeleon Mikolas Norris Hicks Flaherty Shreve Mayers Brebbia Gant Gomber Weaver Team

W 2 0 0 12 3 3 5 1 2 1 4 1 6 60

L 0 0 0 3 3 3 6 0 1 3 4 0 10 55

* Prior to Friday night’s game R 10 39 21 38 77 45 39 29 41 14 30 8 0 512

ERA 0.00 0.00 1.54 2.74 2.87 3.10 3.27 3.38 3.51 3.83 3.89 4.10 4.66 3.82

G 6 4 3 23 48 53 18 4 36 33 17 19 23 115

H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 17 1 0 3 9 2 24 1 1 108 20 0 13 63 37 66 0 7 59 12 0 6 31 20 54 5 10 90 14 0 15 51 19 47 4 3 112 33 0 31 63 73 108 1 8 118 12 1 13 60 28 81 2 3 61 9 1 6 16 18 70 12 1 63 13 1 8 37 30 58 1 12 63 14 1 10 31 25 73 0 9 31 5 0 3 11 16 28 1 4 60 12 2 7 25 20 48 3 3 21 2 0 2 7 4 32 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 974 170 6 142 491 381 964 46 88 GS 0 0 1 23 0 0 18 0 0 0 10 2 23 115

SV IP 0 8.2 0 6.0 0 11.2 0 144.1 22 47.0 2 58.0 0 96.1 0 2.2 1 41.0 2 40.0 0 69.1 0 26.1 0 121.2 27 1035.0

H 2 5 2 129 39 40 73 2 39 37 54 22 127 948

R 0 0 2 48 17 22 38 1 17 17 37 14 65 485

ER 0 0 2 44 15 20 35 1 16 17 30 12 63 439

HR 0 0 1 9 5 1 14 1 4 4 6 3 16 102

BB SO 1 4 0 3 6 7 25 98 9 58 28 47 33 118 1 4 11 35 13 45 31 59 14 23 43 111 397938

season, but only the fifth with a runner on base. As the team’s entrenched leadoff hitter, Carpenter has eight leadoff homers and 19 other solo home runs. Shildt has toyed with the idea of batting the pitcher eighth for this reason – to get a position player immediately ahead of Carpenter – but recently played down his likelihood of doing it. He agreed the AL rules offer a hint of what that would look like. In the second inning, No. 9 hitter Harrison Bader extended the scoring with a two-out, RBI single, and he was on base for Carpenter’s homer. A two-run inning mushroomed into a four-run jag just like that. Shildt has canvassed his coaches for their opinion on batting the pitcher eighth, and in the coming week or so intends to talk to former manager Tony La Russa about why he did it. Until Monday, the DH is the answer. It’s a new look at a question Carpenter’s production invites. “We just keep looking at it and I can’t get my head around the overall benefit of why we would do it,” Shildt said. “When you look at what it looks like it turns out to be a relative wash. … I enjoyed the process of looking at it. Nothing has swayed me to pull the trigger.”

WAINWRIGHT HAS BRIEF STINT Adam Wainwright (elbow) faced hitters during a 20-pitch game simulation at Jupiter, Fla., on Friday and responded well to the spring training-like workout. He will increase his pitch count in a similar session before advancing toward a game appearance, possibly on the back fields at the team’s spring training complex. … Carlos Martinez (shoulder strain) has intensified his throwing program in recent days and after returning to St. Louis on Thursday will continue his strides toward throwing off the mound – possibly as early as this coming homestand. … Outfielder Tyler O’Neill (groin) officially began his rehab assignment Friday with Class AAA Memphis.

BREBBIA TO DL

Instead of joining Class AAA Memphis’ bullpen and attempting to pitch through soreness in his right forearm, John Brebbia has been placed on the 10-day disabled and his option from his past week was voided. That does keep Brebbia, officially, in the major leagues. The reliever has been experiencing discomfort near his wrist that has affected his grip and the feel he can get with his fingers. The team, according to an official, does not believe the soreness emanates from his right elbow, which would be more alarming. No significant structural damage was found, and he has been prescribed rest before he’ll resume throwing and reappear again later this season.

VISITING NEGRO LEAGUE MUSEUM

On their off day Thursday, Cardinals coach Willie McGee, three players and broadcaster Mike Claiborne took a guided tour of the Negro League Baseball Museum in Kansas City. Paul DeJong, Bader and pitcher Jack Flaherty joined McGee. The museum features artifacts stretching back to the late 1800s, and it was in those early days of the Negro Leagues that something happened that caught Bader’s ear. “You get a clear feel for how intertwined the Negro Leagues are with the importance of baseball, and it was the Negro Leagues that went to Japan — before Babe Ruth,” Bader said, referencing tours that took place in the 1920s and 1930s before Ruth’s 1934 jaunt. “Think about that and you have a sense of the reach the Negro Leagues had.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals sixth • Kolten Wong flies out to deep right center field to Brett Phillips. Adolis Garcia pinch-hitting for Yairo Munoz. Adolis Garcia strikes out swinging. Harrison Bader homers to left field. Matt Carpenter grounds out to first base to Lucas Duda. 1 run, 1 hit, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 6, Royals 0. Cardinals seventh • Yadier Molina doubles to deep left field. On Glenn Sparkman’s wild pitch, Yadier Molina to third. Jose Martinez doubles to deep right center field. Yadier Molina scores. Marcell Ozuna strikes out swinging. Paul DeJong called out on strikes. Jedd Gyorko flies out to deep right field to Rosell Herrera. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Cardinals win 7-0.

QUALITY STARTS M. Mikolas .............................16 C. Martinez ............................. 9 L. Weaver................................ 8 M. Wacha ................................ 7 J. Flaherty............................... 5 J. Gant..................................... 3 A. Gomber................................1 A. Wainwright ..........................1 D. Poncedeleon........................1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Austin Gomber throws to a batter in the first inning Friday night. Gomber earned his first victory as a starting pitcher.

Offense hums along as Cardinals beat Kansas City CARDINALS • FROM B1

gives the Cardinals their best chance yet to take a significant stride toward relevance in the playoff race, and it opened with rookie lefty Austin Gomber securing his first major-league win in a game he started. It neared a close with rookie Yairo Munoz leaving the game because of a wrist sprain. His replacement, Adolis Garcia, another rookie, looped his first major-league hit in the eighth inning. So it goes for the Cardinals – breaks here, bruises there. The Cardinals won for the fifth time in six games, and they did so with a continuation of the persistent, productive offense that has muscled them through this road trip. Carpenter’s home run came soon after Paul DeJong led off the five-run second inning with a home run. Harrison Bader had a single in that inning and homered in the sixth inning to give the Cardinals blasts from both the leadoff spot and the No. 9 spot in the order. Yadier Molina contributed two doubles, and designated hitter Jose Martinez had three hits and reached base four times. The Cardinals only went two innings without a baserunner, and that was while KC reliever

Glenn Sparkman was trying to survive innings vacated by the starter. Munoz appeared to injure his wrist during his sixth inning at-bat. On the first pitch from Sparkman, Munoz winced. That brought the Cardinals’ trainer and third base coach Jose Oquendo immediately to his side, near the batter’s box. He was lifted for Garcia. The severity of the injury was not immediately known. He was being examined at the ballpark. This weekend series sets up as the Cardinals’ best chance yet to do more than talk about or tease a compelling entry into the wildcard derby. While they visit Kansas City and the moribund Royals, who are more than 30 games out in the American League wild card race, and school supplies are still full price, the two wild-card leaders in the National League play each other. With a win at home against Milwaukee, the Atlanta Braves moved into a virtual tie atop the NL wild-card race with the Brewers. The schedule gives the Cardinals a vulnerable opponent in KC and the guarantee that if they win they’ll gain ground on some team, be it Atlanta or Milwaukee. The Cardinals entered the

weekend series trailing the Braves by 3½ games for the second wild card berth with two teams, Arizona and the Dodgers, to leapfrog. The more linear race for the Cardinals is against Milwaukee. The loss to the Braves dropped their lead on the Cardinals to 3½ games. The division rivals have six games remaining against each other, all of them at Busch Stadium. Clicking off series win after series win after series win has put the Cardinals in position to take a serious chomp into the wild-card standings with more than just another series win in Kansas City. Offense has been a good place to start. The Cardinals reached the All-Star break with an average of 4.26 runs a game. That has jumped to 4.71 runs a game in the first 21 games since the break, and a major reason isn’t the commitment to a set lineup but a devotion to approach. The Cardinals are inflating their OBP. The Cardinals have cut down their strikeouts, 8.38 per game to 7.19, and upped their walks, nudging their 21st-rated pre-break OBP of .315 to .345 in the three weeks since the break. That ranks fifth in the majors. The many ways that allow the

Cardinals to generate runs was showcased in the second inning Friday as they thumped Royals starter Burch Smith for five runs before he could get a third out. DeJong opened the inning with his 11th home run. Jedd Gyorko followed with the Cardinals’ first walk of the game. Two groundouts followed, and it took Smith eight pitches to get those. The Cardinals’ ninth hitter, Bader, represented an escape hatch for Smith, a chance to sneak free of a problematic inning with only the one run allowed. Bader singled. Smith stepped into quicksand. With Bader on base, Carpenter hit his 32nd home run of the season, but only his fifth with a runner on base. That extended the Cardinals’ lead to 4-0, and they kept pressing. Molina doubled and scored on Martinez’s two-out single. By the time the inning ended, the Cardinals had a walk, two homers, two singles, a double, and not a strikeout. Nine batters went to the plate in that inning, and a total of 18 batters would come to the plate in the game before the Cardinals struck out for the first time. By that point, they led 5-0 and had 10 baserunners. The lead gave Gomber ample elasticity to get through his five

innings. He got himself out of trouble before plunging right back in the third inning. Adalberto Mondesi opened the inning with a triple, the first hit off Gomber, and then he spectated from third as the Cardinals lefty struck out the No. 9 batter and got a shallow flyout from leadoff hitter Whit Merrifield. With two outs and Mondesi picnicking at third, Gomber walked one batter and hit another to suddenly load the bases for cleanup hitter Hunter Dozier. He reset and got a fly ball to end the inning. On his way to the win, Gomber (2-0) flashed the spectrum of pitches that hastened his rise this season and made him so interesting as a reliever during that moonlight in the bullpen earlier this season. Gomber struck out the second batter he faced on an 80 mph curveball. In the fourth inning, after two meek singles, Gomber muzzled the Royals by striking out No. 8 hitter Ryan O’Hearn with an elevated fastball. O’Hearn swung under the 88 mph offering. That was Gomber’s third and final strikeout. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 2 CARDINALS 7, ROYALS 0 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 5 1 1 2 0 2 .280 Molina c 3 2 2 0 0 0 .288 Pena c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .206 Martinez dh 4 0 3 2 1 0 .298 Ozuna lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .269 DeJong ss 5 1 1 1 0 2 .243 Gyorko 3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .248 Wong 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .226 Munoz rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .284 a-Garcia ph-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .167 Bader cf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .273 Totals 38 7 12 7 3 9 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .297 Herrera rf 3 0 0 0 2 2 .252 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Butera c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Dozier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Duda 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .239 Bonifacio lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .211 Phillips cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .232 Mondesi ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 O’Hearn dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .105 Totals 33 0 7 0 4 5 Cardinals 050 001 100 — 7 12 1 Kansas City 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 a-singled for Munoz in the 6th. E: Wong (4). LOB: Cardinals 8, Kansas City 11. 2B: Molina 2 (16), Martinez (21), Bonifacio (10). 3B: Mondesi (1). HR: DeJong (11), off Smith; Carpenter (32), off Smith; Bader (7), off Sparkman. RBIs: Carpenter 2 (65), Martinez 2 (65), DeJong (32), Bader 2 (18). RLISP: Cardinals 4 (Ozuna, Gyorko 2, Bader); Kansas City 5 (Dozier 2, Mondesi 2, O’Hearn). GIDP: Merrifield, Perez. DP: Cardinals 2; Kansas City 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gomber 5 4 0 0 1 3 89 3.45 Shreve 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 4.10 Poncedeleon 3 2 0 0 3 1 44 1.23 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smith 1 2/3 6 5 5 1 0 46 6.97 Sparkman 4 1/3 4 2 2 1 2 68 5.06 Adam 2 1 0 0 0 4 25 5.10 Maurer 1 1 0 0 1 3 19 10.00 Sparkman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. W: Gomber 2-0. L: Smith 1-4. S: Poncedeleon 1-1. Inherited runners-scored: Sparkman 1-0, Adam 1-0. HBP: Smith (Molina), Gomber (Perez). WP: Sparkman 2. Umpires: Home, Tom Hallion; First, Ryan Blakney; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T: 3:04. A: 29,414 (37,903).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second • Paul DeJong homers to center field. Jedd Gyorko walks. Kolten Wong grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. Jedd Gyorko to second. Yairo Munoz grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. Jedd Gyorko to third. Harrison Bader singles to center field. Jedd Gyorko scores. Matt Carpenter homers to center field. Harrison Bader scores. Yadier Molina doubles to deep left center field. Jose Martinez singles to center field. Yadier Molina scores. On Glenn Sparkman’s wild pitch, Jose Martinez to second. Marcell Ozuna grounds out to shortstop, Adalberto Mondesi to Lucas Duda. 5 runs, 5 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Cardinals 5, Royals 0.

CARDINALS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

Visit to AL park changes lineup WAINWRIGHT HAS BRIEF STINT

AVERAGES

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

KANSAS CITY • After weeks of different combinations and alterations to the lineup, a visit to an American League ballpark this weekend gives Cardinals manager Mike Shildt a chance, for the first time, to write a lineup that satisfies both offense and defense — and, just maybe, a peek at what a twist to the usual lineup might look like. Access to a designated hitter gave Shildt the ideal spot to start Jose Martinez and see what the Cardinals’ resurgent offense looks like at its current deepest. “It’s fun,” he said. “Regardless of who is in there right now, I like our lineup.” It has, after all, been the change agent as the Cardinals won four series in a row, including the first two on this three-city road trip. Since the All-Star break, the Cardinals have scored the seventh-most runs in the majors (99), hit .268 (eighth), and slugged .425 (14th). They have seen a spike in their OPS from .714 in the first half to .770 in the first 21 games of the second half. The greatest change has been in the on-base percentage, which has hopped from .315 (21st) to .345 (fifth). Shildt credited the clubhouse and how “players have really taken heed to quality atbats.” Each day, the coaches do a post-op on the previous game with acknowledgement of two-strike hits, opposite-field hits and other hits that were either timely or ideal for the situation. Whatever the cause, the result has been an offense less reliant on home runs and more relentless when it comes to generating baserunners. “We had 19 straight innings where we had somebody on base; (that’s) every inning over two games,” Shildt said before listing recent games when the Cardinals forced opponents to throw far more pitches than the league average. “I’d like to think that we have more of the ability to create runs or score runs regardless of circumstance. Clearly, we hit the ballpark and we feel pretty good about that. It’s a quick and immediate return on investment.” The second inning Friday captured the reward and riddle of revival. The Cardinals sent nine batters to the plate, scored five runs, got two homers, and also knocked Kansas City’s starter from the game with the help of a walk and two other base hits. Matt Carpenter played his usual part in the jubilee with the 32nd home run of his

Batting O’Neill J. Martinez Molina Munoz Carpenter Bader Ozuna Gyorko DeJong G. Garcia Wong Pena A. Garcia Team

AVG AB .309 55 .298 373 .288 319 .284 208 .280 403 .273 231 .269 439 .248 258 .243 263 .231 134 .226 265 .206 107 .167 6 .249 3952

Pitching Hudson Webb Poncedeleon Shreve Mikolas Norris Hicks Flaherty Gomber Mayers Brebbia Gant Weaver Team

W 2 0 0 1 12 3 3 5 2 2 1 4 6 61

R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 10 17 1 0 3 9 2 24 1 1 39 111 21 0 13 65 38 66 0 7 40 92 16 0 15 51 19 47 4 3 21 59 12 0 6 31 20 54 5 10 78 113 33 0 32 65 73 110 1 8 41 63 9 1 7 18 18 71 12 1 45 118 12 1 13 60 28 83 2 3 30 64 13 1 8 37 31 59 1 12 42 64 14 1 11 32 25 75 0 9 14 31 5 0 3 11 16 28 1 4 7 25 21 48 3 4 30 60 12 2 8 22 2 0 2 7 4 32 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 519 986 173 6 145 498 384 973 46 89

L ERA 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 1.23 0 2.45 3 2.74 3 2.87 3 3.10 6 3.27 0 3.45 1 3.51 3 3.83 4 3.89 10 4.66 55 3.78

G 6 4 4 5 23 48 53 18 20 36 33 17 23 116

GS SV IP 0 0 8.2 0 0 6.0 1 1 14.2 0 0 3.2 23 0 144.1 0 22 47.0 0 2 58.0 18 0 96.1 3 0 31.1 0 1 41.0 0 2 40.0 10 0 69.1 23 0 121.2 116 28 1044.0

H 2 5 4 3 129 39 40 73 26 39 37 54 127 955

R 0 0 2 1 48 17 22 38 14 17 17 37 65 485

ER 0 0 2 1 44 15 20 35 12 16 17 30 63 439

HR BB SO 0 1 4 0 0 3 1 9 8 1 1 5 9 25 98 5 9 58 1 28 47 14 33 118 3 15 26 4 11 35 4 13 45 6 31 59 16 43 111 102 401 943

season, but only the fifth with a runner on base. As the team’s entrenched leadoff hitter, Carpenter has eight leadoff homers and 19 other solo home runs. Shildt has toyed with the idea of batting the pitcher eighth for this reason – to get a position player immediately ahead of Carpenter – but recently played down his likelihood of doing it. He agreed the AL rules offer a hint of what that would look like. In the second inning, No. 9 hitter Harrison Bader extended the scoring with a two-out, RBI single, and he was on base for Carpenter’s homer. A two-run inning mushroomed into a four-run jag just like that. Shildt has canvassed his coaches for their opinion on batting the pitcher eighth, and in the coming week or so intends to talk to former manager Tony La Russa about why he did it. Until Monday, the DH is the answer. It’s a new look at a question Carpenter’s production invites. “We just keep looking at it and I can’t get my head around the overall benefit of why we would do it,” Shildt said. “When you look at what it looks like it turns out to be a relative wash. … I enjoyed the process of looking at it. Nothing has swayed me to pull the trigger.”

Adam Wainwright (elbow) faced hitters during a 20-pitch game simulation at Jupiter, Fla., on Friday and responded well to the spring training-like workout. He will increase his pitch count in a similar session before advancing toward a game appearance, possibly on the back fields at the team’s spring training complex. … Carlos Martinez (shoulder strain) has intensified his throwing program in recent days and after returning to St. Louis on Thursday will continue his strides toward throwing off the mound – possibly as early as this coming homestand. … Outfielder Tyler O’Neill (groin) officially began his rehab assignment Friday with Class AAA Memphis.

BREBBIA TO DL

Instead of joining Class AAA Memphis’ bullpen and attempting to pitch through soreness in his right forearm, John Brebbia has been placed on the 10-day disabled and his option from his past week was voided. That does keep Brebbia, officially, in the major leagues. The reliever has been experiencing discomfort near his wrist that has affected his grip and the feel he can get with his fingers. The team, according to an official, does not believe the soreness emanates from his right elbow, which would be more alarming. No significant structural damage was found, and he has been prescribed rest before he’ll resume throwing and reappear again later this season.

VISITING NEGRO LEAGUE MUSEUM

On their off day Thursday, Cardinals coach Willie McGee, three players and broadcaster Mike Claiborne took a guided tour of the Negro League Baseball Museum in Kansas City. Paul DeJong, Bader and pitcher Jack Flaherty joined McGee. The museum features artifacts stretching back to the late 1800s, and it was in those early days of the Negro Leagues that something happened that caught Bader’s ear. “You get a clear feel for how intertwined the Negro Leagues are with the importance of baseball, and it was the Negro Leagues that went to Japan — before Babe Ruth,” Bader said, referencing tours that took place in the 1920s and 1930s before Ruth’s 1934 jaunt. “Think about that and you have a sense of the reach the Negro Leagues had.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals sixth • Kolten Wong flies out to deep right center field to Brett Phillips. Adolis Garcia pinch-hitting for Yairo Munoz. Adolis Garcia strikes out swinging. Harrison Bader homers to left field. Matt Carpenter grounds out to first base to Lucas Duda. 1 run, 1 hit, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 6, Royals 0. Cardinals seventh • Yadier Molina doubles to deep left field. On Glenn Sparkman’s wild pitch, Yadier Molina to third. Jose Martinez doubles to deep right center field. Yadier Molina scores. Marcell Ozuna strikes out swinging. Paul DeJong called out on strikes. Jedd Gyorko flies out to deep right field to Rosell Herrera. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Cardinals win 7-0.

QUALITY STARTS M. Mikolas .............................16 C. Martinez ............................. 9 L. Weaver................................ 8 M. Wacha ................................ 7 J. Flaherty............................... 5 J. Gant..................................... 3 A. Gomber................................1 A. Wainwright ..........................1 D. Poncedeleon........................1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Austin Gomber throws to a batter in the first inning Friday night. Gomber earned his first victory as a starting pitcher.

Offense hums along as Cardinals beat Kansas City CARDINALS • FROM B1

in the clubhouse to sing. A cake, with “Happy Birthday, Skipper” scrawled on top, had been procured for the 50th birthday of the 50th manager in Cardinals history, and though the cake and the traditional song were a day late for Mike Shildt’s actual birthday, they still came at a time when the Cardinals have suddenly found their tune. With a fifth win in six games and another bite taken off their deficit in the wild-card race, the Cardinals have an opportunity this weekend to turn a reassuring road trip into an assertive one. Matt Carpenter added to his league lead with his 32nd home run, his sixth homer in the past seven games. The first baseman’s two-run shot was part of a fiverun second inning that pushed the Cardinals ahead for good. Austin Gomber pitched five scoreless innings for his first major-league win as a starter. Daniel Poncedeleon threw three scoreless innings to close the game for his first major-league save. Bookended by those feats, Yairo Munoz left the game with soreness in his right wrist, and his replacement, rookie Adolis Garcia, looped his first big-league hit. That was just the icing on a

rising Cardinals offense. “I use the word relentless,” Shildt said. “It just came to mind probably toward the Pittsburgh series. Look at the at-bats. Just boom, boom, wearing guys out, not giving a quarter. Wearing guys down, taking tough at-bats. Fun to watch. Now it’s just part of the habit how we’re taking atbats, one through nine.” This weekend intrastate, interleague series positions the Cardinals for their best chance yet to become relevant in the wild-card race. While they visit Kansas City and the moribund Royals, who are more than 30 games out in the American League playoff race at the same time school supplies are full price, the two wild-card leaders in the National League play each other. Atlanta downed Milwaukee on Friday night to move into a virtual tie and leave them both 3½ games ahead of the Cardinals. With a vulnerable opponent in KC and the guarantee that every win will gain ground on some team they’re chasing, the Cardinals have a gift. What they have already given is a reimagined offense that is starting to reflect the “relentlessness” described. The Cardinals averaged 4.26 runs a game

before the All-Star break and have upped that to 4.82 in the 22 games since. The fuel behind the increase has been a jolt of on-base percentage, rising from .315, the 10th lowest in baseball, to .345 since the break and the fifth-best in baseball. The Cardinals have cut their strikeouts down from 8.4 a game to 7.2 a game, and internally there has been a greater stress on devouring pitchers, forcing high pitch counts, and making contact. The Cardinals didn’t strike out Friday until the 19th batter came to the plate and by then they already had a 5-0 lead and the starter from the game. Kansas City righthander Burch Smith didn’t survive the second inning as Paul DeJong opened it with a home run, his 11th, and eight more Cardinals came to the plate. With two outs, Harrison Bader took two fastballs to gain favor in the count and then laced a curveball for a two-out, RBI single that broke the inning open. Carpenter followed with his 32nd home run of the season and only his fifth with a runner on base. “You know, just having him on base in front of me — his speed alone you’ve got to figure bought me an extra fastball or so,” Carpenter said. “The lineup is con-

structed well. You’ve got guys in the right positions. It’s got good flow to it.” In the middle, gobbling RBIs, stands Martinez. Carpenter called Martinez the team’s “first-half MVP offensively,” and still his 65 RBIs are tied for the team lead with Carpenter despite a reduced role in the second half. Access to the designated hitter gives Martinez certainty this season, and he had three hits and reached base four times Friday night. By Monday, he could be back on the bench. It’s a role that could be tough to swallow. He calls it sweet. Before joining the Cardinals, Martinez was a Class AAA batting champ for the Royals, and he’d be playing every day for a team that had its DH bat ninth Friday. In eight games against KC, Martinez has hit .333 (11 for 33) with a .455 slugging percentage. “I’ve got to respect whatever it is — a bench role, DH, right field, or whatever,” Martinez said. “I’m happy here when the team wins.” He put his plate down. “Piece of cake,” he said. The Cardinals added to their lead with a solo home run from Bader and Martinez’s RBI double. Gomber remained aggressive after one detour into trouble during the third inning. Adal-

berto Mondesi tripled to lead off the third inning. He picnicked at third while Gomber retired the next two batters and then hit one and walked another to load the bases. A fly ball ended the threat, and Gomber continued to show a variety of ways for him to thrive. He struck out a batter swinging on an 80 mph curveball and he caught another whiffing on an elevated, 88 mph fastball. That kept him out of trouble in the fourth inning and ushered the shutout to the bullpen. “He’s doing a nice job of evolving,” Shildt said. On his actual birthday, Thursday, an off day, Shildt saw a movie, “Mission Impossible: Fallout.” He noted that evidently the mission wasn’t impossible. It’s just how it got done. Kind of like the standings. After the win and after the song, Shildt took a plate of dinner back to his office. It was his late father’s birthday Friday, so the postgame celebration echoed. But he didn’t take any of what Martinez was having. Shildt cannot eat bread. He can have his cake. In this case, he just can’t eat it, too. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATURDAY • 08.11.2018

FINAU’S WILD RIDE

COME ON, ANTARCTICA!

CASEY HEADING HOME

Tony Finau played 11 holes Friday and had yet to par one. He had eight birdies, a bogey and a triple bogey. He is tied with Dustin Johnson and Charl Scwartzel for the tournament lead with 12 birdies, one ahead of leader Gary Woodland, yet Finau sits 10 shots back at even par.

Six of the seven continents are represented in the top 16 spots on the leaderboard. North America, Europe and Australia aren’t surprises, but Africa (Charl Schwartzel, Brandon Stone), Asia (Yuta Ikeda) and South America (Emiliano Grillo) presences are reminders the game truly is global.

With the cut expected to land around even par, England’s Paul Casey will see his string of eight consecutive cuts made in major championships come to an end. Casey, No. 15 in the world rankings, shot 75-73 to finish at 8 over. In those eight majors, Casey finished in the top 16 six times.

Brandon Stone

Spieth loves crowds, not the greens BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jordan Spieth’s abilities stand out most at challenging golf courses. It’s why he’s done well at the Masters — balls move fast across the greens at Augusta, and golfers have to place their shots well to hold the greens. With the receptive putting surfaces at Bellerive, Spieth is frustrated that his opponents have an easier time posting low scores. Golfers can hit onto the green and trust their shots will stick. “You just fire in, and you get away with more,” Spieth said after his round Friday. “You don’t have to be as precise. That’s frustrating in a major championship.” The 25-year-old sits at eighth in the world rankings, and the PGA Championship is the only major he hasn’t won. With a 4-under 66 Friday, Spieth put his overall score at 3 under. He will need a phenomenal final two rounds to catch the leaders. He’s currently seven strokes off Gary Woodland’s mark of 10 under. Spieth said his score wouldn’t have been lower with faster greens. The condition just isn’t what he wanted to see at a major. Though Spieth expressed frustration with the course, he

praised the fan turnout. He even gave one youngster a high-five on his first hole of the day. “Everyone’s been very respectful, fantastic sports and golf fans,” he said. “This is a great market to come to in St. Louis. … I think this has been some of the most fun golf as far as playing in front of fans that I can remember experiencing.”

PGA NOTEBOOK

D. JOHNSON NEARLY HIT BY ERRANT BALL

CROWDS FLOCKING TO PREMIER GROUPS

Fans stood multiple rows deep whenever Tiger Woods approached a shot, and most deserted holes as soon as he left. Woods was playing with defending champion Justin Thomas and four-time major winner Rory McIlroy, and cheers echoed around the Bellerive grandstands whenever they stepped onto a green. Though not to the same extreme, spectators flocked to other groups of highly-ranked players throughout the day. The trio of Brooks Koepka, Patrick Reed and Francesco Molinari — the three major winners in 2018 — highlighted the morning groupings. “It’s nice having all these fans out following that group,” Koepka said. “You’re trying to impress them a little bit.” Fans wanting a better view

“I feel like I’ve got a 63 in me tomorrow,” Scott deadpanned. Scott sits in a tie for ninth and is five strokes behind Woodland, the leader. “Everything’s kind of felt good here for the last two days,” Scott said. “I’m trying to not think about it too much and keep the good vibes going.”

PETER BAUGH • Post-Dispatch

Jackson Baker, 9, poses for a picture with his father after receiving a high-five from Jordan Spieth at No. 10 on Friday.

could track lesser-known players. As soon as the big names were away from a hole, spectators could find seats in the grandstands or stand right next to the ropes.

SCOTT MOVES INTO CONTENTION

Adam Scott might have a future in fortune telling. Following his even-par 70 Thursday, he said he had a 5-under 65 in him. Less than 24 hours later, Scott shot a 65. After his round, a reporter joked that he should have predicted a 63.

Dustin Johnson almost hit two balls on the third tee. As he brought back his club, a wild shot from the 11th hole flew across the tee box. The world’s No. 1 golfer didn’t flinch. He drove the ball 132 yards to the green on the par-3 hole and made the putt. “I made birdie, so it’s all right,” he said. The misplaced drive came from Jorge Campillo, whose shot on the 11th tee went right and into the woods. Oddly enough, the golfer from Spain still parred the hole. Johnson shot 4 under on the day. He sits at 7 under and is in a tie for fourth place. His only major win was at the 2016 U.S. Open. “I’m definitely wanting to get that second major,” he said. “I’m in a good position going into the weekend. I’m going to have to

play a good 36 holes, though, if I want to have a chance to win.”

NOTABLE GOLFERS LIKELY TO MISS CUT

John Daly’s Cardinals dress pants may have made St. Louis fans happy, but they did not make Bellerive any kinder. Daly, a twotime major winner, shot a 70 Friday to sit 3 over and will not make the cut. Since Daly is 52 years old and hasn’t won a major in more than 20 years, it’s not shocking that he fell over the projected cut line of even. Other misses were a little more surprising. Masters champion Patrick Reed shot 71 and was 3 over. Two-time Masters winner Bubba Watson shot 78 and was 8 over and also out of contention. Some other notable golfers in the group include Paul Casey, Y.E. Yang, Henrik Stenson and Martin Kaymer.

EARLY TV COVERAGE SET

Because of the suspension of play Friday, TNT will begin its Saturday television coverage of the tournament at 7 a.m., three hours earlier than planned. It begins with the conclusion of the second round, followed by the third round. Then at 1 o’clock, CBS (KMOV, Ch. 4) picks up the remainder of the day’s TV coverage.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Justin Rose shows his disappointment after missing a putt for an eagle on the 10th hole Friday during the second round of the PGA Championship.

Woodland and Kisner are on top of leaderboard PGA • FROM B1

headed for the exits. Play was suspended for the rest of the day and will resume at 7 a.m. Saturday. Approximately 30 minutes after the conclusion of the second round, groups of three will begin play in the third round on holes 1 and 10. Golfers with the top 70 scores, plus ties, will advance to the third round. The cut line figures to be around even par. The weather interrupted what was building into a breakout round by the week’s biggest attraction. After shooting par Thursday, Tiger Woods birdied three of his first five holes Friday in front of monstrous galleries that erupted at all three of his birdie putts. Play was stopped when his group — defending PGA champion Justin Thomas (2 over) and two-time PGA champion Rory McIlroy (even) — were sizing up their second shots on No. 8. “The good thing is we’re going to have the greens prepared before we go back out there to finish up our second round,” Woods said. “It would have been quite a bit different if we had to go back out this afternoon and finish it up. But the greens will be freshly cut, so it will be just like it was when we played on Thursday.”

Before the storm rolled in, Koepka and South Africa’s Charl Schwartzel tied the PGA 18-hole record, both finishing Friday’s round at 63. They’re both part of the pack chasing Woodland and Kisner, who played together the last two days, each taking turns mastering the course. Woodland’s highlight Friday came on the par-5 17, where he blasted his second shot 265 yards to the green, then sank the 5-foot putt for eagle. “For me, I’m very happy with where I’m at,” Woodland said. “I’m very comfortable with how I’m driving the golf ball. The iron game, the distance control this week has been phenomenal. And when I stand over a golf ball putting as comfortable as I am right now, I’m pretty excited.” Woodland’s career hasn’t come as easy as he made his first two rounds look. Once a college basketball player at Washburn University in his hometown of Topeka, Kan., Woodland left the hardwood for the links and enrolled at Kansas to play golf. After college he had to grind through the Hooters Tour, made it through PGA Q-School in 2008, underwent shoulder surgery and had to regain his tour card all over again in 2010. Woodland won his first

PGA event in 2011, but just two wins have followed, including the Phoenix Open in February. But none of that would compare to his first major, especially given the difficult 2017 Woodland and his wife Gabby endured. Gabby was pregnant with boy and girl twins but lost the girl to a miscarriage in March. Three months later, Jaxson Lynn Woodland was born June 24, 10 weeks early but healthy. Throughout the year, Woodland’s game never got going. He had just one top-10 finish the rest of the season and missed the cut three times. But in February of this year, Woodland snapped a five-year winless streak with a playoff victory in Phoenix. When he rolled in the winning putt, he tapped his chest, kissed his fist and pointed to the skies in honor of the daughter he never met, then embraced Gabby and Jaxson on the green. Again Friday the former Jayhawk heard his share of Mizzou chants from fans on the course but didn’t let it spoil another memorable experience in a major. “The crowds are awesome,” he said. “There’s a lot of energy out there, and it’s positive energy. It’s fun to come here. I think this area is striving for an event like this,

and it’s pretty special to get one here.” He’ll have to hold off good pal Kisner to have another heartwarming moment Sunday. Like Woodland, success didn’t come immediately for Kisner in pro golf. After an All-American career at Georgia, Kisner had to scuffle on the Hooters Tour and Web.com Tour in his 20s, then missed the PGA Tour by one stroke at qualifying school in 2009 and nearly gave up the game to join his father’s construction business. Instead, he kept grinding. Kisner lost his tour card in 2011, failed to retain it in 2012 but gradually gained traction, first with a win at the RSM Classic in 2016, then the Dean & DeLuca Invitational in 2017. At last month’s British Open, Kisner held the lead through the first round and shared the lead after Friday and Saturday before slipping into a tie for second, his best finish in a major. He held at least a share of the lead through each of the first three rounds at last year’s PGA and finished tied for seventh. Kisner credited his playing partner for raising the level of play in their morning group, which included Sergio Garcia, who shot 71 and sits 1-over through two days.

“I think every time that you see guys playing well it kind of drags other guys in the group along,” Kisner said. “And Sergio wasn’t having the best day, but I bet we made him hang in there just because of how well we were going. Gary and I are good buddies, had a great time out there playing, and if I could only hit it as far as he could it would be a different game.” On the course, Woodland and Kisner are nothing alike. The brawny 6-1, 195-pound Woodland is one of the game’s longest drivers off the tee, punishing his drives 313 yards on average this season. He’s been working to reinvent his putting grip but still came into the week ranked among the Tour’s worst putters in several categories. Kisner, meanwhile — hardly an imposing figure on the course at 5-10 and 165 and less so at the tee box — specializes in the short game. Through two days he’s ranked 124th in the field in driving distance but third in driving accuracy. “Kis played beautifully today,” Woodland said. “He drove the ball unbelievable, and he gets that putter rolling quite often. It was nice to feed off that energy.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

FRIDAY TICKETS NO LONGER GOOD Patrons who carried Friday tickets to the tournament but saw their experience shortened by the weather suspension will not be able to use them Saturday for the rest of the second round. The grounds cannot accommodate numbers that Friday and Saturday tickets could draw.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • Post-dispatch

Fans climb a tree to get a better view.

EAGLES LAND FRIDAY

WILL A CLUB PRO GET IN?

There were no eagles in the opening round, but Bellerive yielded four Friday. Leader Gary Woodland made the convential 3 on a par 5, but the other three were on par-4 holes. Satoshi Kodaira and Brendan Steele drove the 298-yard 11th hole, and Ted Potter Jr. holed a 137-yard shot on 14.

At even par through two rounds, Ben Kern of Abilene, Texas, will have to wait until about 10 a.m. Saturday to learn whether he’ll make the cut. Overnight, 63 players were minus-1 or better, so even might not get in. A few other club pros have a shot but would have to make big charges.

Koepka ties a tournament record U.S. Open champion races into third place; Schwartzel also fires 63 BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-dispatch

All that stood between Brooks Koepka and a bit of PGA Championship history were 17 feet on the ninth hole Friday, but despite a nearly flawless round he had no idea what awaited if he made the birdie. The putt didn’t fall, so Koepka settled for a round of 7-under 63, one stroke short of setting a tournament record. His bogey-free day allowed him to charge up the leaderboard into third place at 8 under and two strokes behind leader Gary Woodland. On a morning of low scores, Charl Schwartzel matched Koepka’s recordtying round as he jumped into a tie for fourth. “I didn’t know. I just was trying to make the (final putt) and I really thought I made it,” Koepka said. “My caddie said something. Ricky (Elliott) said something walking off on 18. I didn’t even think of it. I’ve been so in the zone you don’t know where you are or where you’re at.” Leaving the course, Koepka had placed himself in position to make a run at his third major championship after winning the U.S. Open in 2017 and ’18. One would never know that Koepka was sidelined for four months at the start of the year while rehabilitating a torn tendon in his left wrist. He has rebounded to reach No. 4 in the world rankings and No. 2 in the U.S. Ryder Cup standings. Family genes seemed to dictate that Koepka would play baseball. His great uncle is Dick Groat, who was the National League MVP in 1960 and played for the Cardinals three seasons. But he’s doing OK with the golf thing. He might be at the top of the leaderboard if the wind hadn’t caught one of his drives in the first round and left him with a double bogey. “I played really well. I feel like (Thursday) I played well, too, and sometimes you just don’t really score very well,” he said. “On the double we had, the wind just kind of switched on us and that happens. But today I drove it beautifully, my wedges distance control is very spot on, and making the putts, making those 5-, 6-footers that you need to make.” Schwartzel had eight birdies and one bogey for his 63, matching his career low

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Charl Schwartzel tees off on the 16th hole at Bellerive Country Club on Friday. Schwartzel is in a tie for fourth place at the PGA Championshkip.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Brooks Koepka lines up a putt on the 18th hole, where he had a par Friday during the second round of the PGA Championship.

round. He nearly made a 94-foot putt on No. 4 for another birdie, but he wasn’t complaining after failing to make the cut in the year’s previous three majors. “It’s a good position to be in, and there’s a lot of holes to be played,” Schwartzel said. “I think this golf course, you’re going to have to keep firing. I don’t think you can — most majors, the weekends get difficult,

but I think this course you’re going to have to keep shooting birdies.” For Koepka, it’s the continuation of a good season that just got started a little late. He announced in January that he would have to take time off for his ailing wrist to heal. Not only could he not play golf, but he wasn’t able to hit the weights as he usu-

ally does with gusto, being relegated to leg work. He targeted a return for The Masters but didn’t reach that goal. “It was disappointing not being able to play at Augusta,” he said. “But when you take four months off, you really appreciate it, and you’re eager to get back out here. Any time you can tee it up, especially only doing three majors, it makes every one a little bit more important. I kind of fell back in love with the game a little bit.” When Koepka finally returned to action, it was a gradual progression. He didn’t make the cut in New Orleans. Then he tied for 42nd and then tied for 11th at The Players Championship. Two rounds of 63 put him in second in Fort Worth. A few weeks later he repeated at the U.S. Open. Schwartzel’s fortunes in the majors have not been so good since he won The Masters in 2011. In six previous rounds this year, he failed to break 70. In 35 career appearances in the majors, he has five top-10 finishes. “It’s great. I’m looking forward to playing on the weekend and competing in a major,” he said. “It doesn’t get better than that.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Woodland wears Folds of Honor logo in support HOCHMAN • FROM B1

synchronicity. As was the time Major Dan saw the casket of Corporal Brock Bucklin. “Synchronicity is all around us — signs on the highway of life,” said Major Dan, 45 years old. “It’s the divine current of life leading us to our essence. It’s the courage to take action when that inspiration comes into your path.” When Woodland met Major Dan, they had an immediate connection — both had golfed for the University of Kansas. Woodland was infused with inspiration — he promptly promoted Major’s Dan’s foundation on his golf bag. Perhaps you’ve heard of Folds of Honor? Since 2007, Folds of Honor has donated $115 million in scholarships to the children or spouses of veterans killed or disabled in action. This year, Woodland began wearing a hat on the PGA Tour with the foundation’s logo — a folded triangle-shaped American flag, featuring the canton of blue and stars. And at 34, Woodland is having a breakout year. “It means a lot — Major Dan has been a close friend,” Woodland said after his Friday round of 66. “It’s pretty special to give back. Those men and women sacrifice so much for us so we can come out here and play golf and enjoy our dreams. They hold a special spot in my heart.” During Woodland’s two rounds in St. Louis, spectators have occasionally screamed out “Folds of Honor!” (Others, in jest, have screamed out “M-IZ!”) Woodland’s performance here has been resplendent, even transcendent, considering the history he’s made — the lowest first two-round score in PGA Championship history.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Gary Woodland hits a shot from the fairway on the 10th hole during his second-round 66 on Friday at Bellerive Country Club.

There’s been 100 of these things. Woodland set the record here in St. Louis with a searing 64 and 66, which showcased the driving style that makes him great — obliterate-but-straight. Woodland took advantage of the rain-softened zoysia grass, which set him up for short irons. With a blue flag on his head, he had the yellow flags on his mind. He confidently and consistently placed approach shots near the sticks with the yellow flags. Woodland is someone to root for, even for those who might never spend a dime in the state of Kansas. He gets it. And he gets a lot of it from Major Dan. “I think there’s a big differ-

ence between success and significance,” Major Dan explained while walking Bellerive on Friday, before the heavy stuff came down. “You come out here and you win a golf tournament for yourself, but Gary understands that life is way bigger than that. “For him to support us and ‘fly the flag on his hat,’ as I say, for what he stands for? People love it. They embrace him. … Just this Monday, Folds of Honor gave 4,176 scholarships. In the past seven years, Anheuser-Busch has donated about $14 million. And now our logo is on the product (this year), donating a dollar for every case. And Schnucks just gave us $1.1 million — so St.

Louis is one of the greatest towns in America and one of the hugest supporters of Folds of Honor. And now to have the leader in the clubhouse flying the flag? A lot of synchronicity. I say synchronicity is chance with purpose.” Folds of Honor came to be in 2007, when Major Dan was a passenger on a flight. When it landed, the captain announced passengers would wait on the plane until they removed the flag-cloaked casket of Corporal Brock Bucklin. As Major Dan watched out the window, spotting Corporal Bucklin’s twin brother, other passengers disregarded the request and scurried off the plane. Major Dan’s life

changed that moment — he decided to find a way to honor the families of those killed in action … and a way to motivate others to honor them, too. Now he has the hottest golfer on the planet spreading the word. How close are these two? Major Dan even ministered the island wedding of Gabby and Gary Woodland in 2016. The day before, Major Dan’s flight from the West Coast to Turks and Caicos was canceled, as were many other commercial flights. So Woodland had Major Dan fly to Atlanta and board the private jet of golfer Matt Kuchar. Major Dan got there safe and got a pair of “I dos.” It was a memorable night. Kuchar even did a cannonball in the pool. Now Major Dan is at Gary’s major. Like the thousands of St. Louisans stuffing the galleries at Bellerive, he witnessed some of the best golf ever played in the first 36 holes of a major. Perhaps it’s fitting — or, dare I, synchronicity? — that Woodland’s total score is 130. It takes 13 folds to bring the American flag to its triangle shape. And at Major Dan’s golf club in Oklahoma, a bell tolls 13 times daily at 1300 hours. And who knows — if the tournament is delayed more this weekend, it could be finished on Monday the 13th. “Gary may not win it,” Major Dan said. “I hope he does. But there’s a much bigger tournament called life that we’re all trying to win — and he will win that one, I promise you that.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATURDAY • 08.11.2018

100TH PGA STATISTICS

AMERICA’S LINE

THE COURSE Bellerive Country Club played to a 69.685 scoring average Friday, 1.69 strokes easier than in the opening round, and was set up 123 yards shorter, at 7,212 yards for the par-70 layout. The course yielded 48 rounds of par or better from the 78 players who played in the morning. No afternoon rounds were completed.

HOLE RANKINGS (hardest to easiest) Rk. Hole Par Yards 1 4 4 520 2 6 3 216 3 10 4 498 4 16 3 224 5 18 4 456 6 15 4 499 7 2 4 416 8 9 4 438 9 5 4 466

Avg. 4.368 3.333 4.227 3.217 4.194 4.176 4.087 4.073 4.009

Rk. 10 T-11 T-11 13 14 15 16 17 18

Hole 12 1 13 14 17 7 8 11 3

Par 4 4 3 4 5 4 5 4 3

Yards 459 415 172 422 597 384 600 298 132

Avg. 4.00 3.932 2.932 3.805 4.725 3.722 4.710 3.611 2.563

HARDEST HOLE

EASIEST HOLE

NO. 4, PAR 4, 520 YARDS Scoring average • 4.368 Eagles • 0 Birdies • 6 Pars • 66 Bogeys • 41 Others • 4

NO. 3, PAR 3, 132 YARDS Scoring average • 2.563 Eagles • 0 Birdies • 55 Pars • 71 Bogeys • 0 Others • 0

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Patrick Reed tosses his putter after missing a birdie putt on the 17th hole during the second round Friday at Bellerive Country Club.

Joseph Hood of Town and Country watches the tee shot by Brooks Koepka on the 17th hole during the second round Friday.

NFL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog BRONCOS ............... 1 .... PK .................. Vikings CARDS .................... 2....2.5 ............... Chargers SOCCER • English Premier League Tottenham ...............................................-$105 NEWCASTLE UNITED ..............................+$270 Draw: +$230 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Chelsea.....................................................-$180 HUDDERSFIELD TOWN .......................... +$500 Draw: +$280 | Over/under: 2.5 goals WATFORD................................................ +$120 Brighton & Hove ..................................... +$225 Draw: +$210 | Over/under: 2.0 goals FULHAM.................................................. +$130 Crystal Palace........................................ +$200 Draw: +$220 | Over/under: 2.5 goals BOURNEMOUTH .......................................-$115 Cardiff City..............................................+$320 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals WOLVERHAMPTON ................................. +$130 Everton ................................................... +$210 Draw: +$200 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Sunday LIVERPOOL ..............................................-$425 West Ham United.................................. +$1100 Draw: +$500 | Over/under: 3.0 goals SOUTHAMPTON ....................................... -$125 Burnley....................................................+$350 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Manchester City....................................... -$110 ARSENAL.................................................+$250 Draw: +$270 | Over/under: 3.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

SCOREBOARD Friday | Bellerive Country Club Purse: TBA ($10.5 million in 2017) Yards: 7,316 | Par: 70 Partial Second Round Gary Woodland 64-66 — Kevin Kisner 67-64 — Brooks Koepka 69-63 — Dustin Johnson 67-66 — Charl Schwartzel 70-63 — Thomas Pieters 67-66 — Brandon Stone 66-68 — Adam Scott 70-65 — Francesco Molinari 68-67 — Patrick Cantlay 68-67 — Jon Rahm 68-67 — Jason Kokrak 68-67 — Emiliano Grillo 69-67 — Justin Rose 67-69 — Zach Johnson 66-70 — Matt Wallace 71-66 — Jordan Spieth 71-66 — Andrew Putnam 68-69 — Tyrrell Hatton 71-67 — Thorbjorn Olesen 70-68 — Daniel Berger 73-65 — Mike Lorenzo-Vera 73-65 — Andrew Landry 73-65 — Chris Kirk 68-70 — Russell Henley 74-65 — Tommy Fleetwood 69-70 — Satoshi Kodaira 71-68 — Marc Leishman 68-71 — Brice Garnett 71-68 — Kevin Na 70-69 — Chez Reavie 71-68 — Russell Knox 71-68 — Joaquin Niemann 68-71 — Chris Stroud 69-70 — Kevin Chappell 69-71 — Nick Watney 75-65 — Ted Potter, Jr. 74-66 — Adrian Otaegui 73-67 — Seungsu Han 74-66 — Ben Kern 71-69 — Luke List 71-70 — Kyle Stanley 68-73 — Matt Kuchar 71-70 — Sergio Garcia 70-71 — Brendan Steele 73-68 — Whee Kim 75-67 — Alex Noren 71-71 — Shaun Micheel 73-69 — Bill Haas 72-70 — Justin Harding 72-70 — John Daly 73-70 — Patrick Reed 72-71 — Charley Hoffman 72-71 — Anirban Lahiri 70-73 — Beau Hossler 73-71 — Chris Wood 70-74 — Paul Broadhurst 74-70 — Jason Dufner 72-72 — Aaron Wise 76-68 — Ryuko Tokimatsu 73-71 — Kelly Kraft 71-74 — Zach J. Johnson 76-69 — Ryan Vermeer 73-73 — Danny Balin 72-75 — Matt Dobyns 76-71 — Y.E. Yang 73-74 — Chesson Hadley 75-73 — Bubba Watson 70-78 — Paul Casey 75-73 — Omar Uresti 75-73 — Matthew Borchert 74-74 — Si Woo Kim 72-77 — Marty Jertson 76-74 — Michael Kim 73-77 — Brian Smock 79-71 — Johan Kok 78-73 — Jaysen Hansen 76-75 — Jorge Campillo 78-74 —

United Soccer League

BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League YANKEES ................ -$230...................Rangers Red Sox .................. -$240..................ORIOLES Red Sox ...................-$150 ..................ORIOLES Rays.........................-$110 ...............BLUE JAYS Twins.......................-$135 .................... TIGERS Indians ................... -$240..............WHITE SOX ASTROS ...................-$190 ................. Mariners ANGELS ...................-$105 ............................A’s National League CUBS........................-$130 ................ Nationals D’backs................... -$140....................... REDS BRAVES ...................-$107 ...................Brewers MARLINS.................-$105 ........................ Mets Dodgers...................-$120 ..................ROCKIES Phillies ....................-$195 ...................PADRES GIANTS ....................-$110 .....................Pirates Interleague Cards.......................-$145 ................... ROYALS

HORSE RACING 130 131 132 133 133 133 134 135 135 135 135 135 136 136 136 137 137 137 138 138 138 138 138 138 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 140 140 140 140 140 140 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 146 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 149 150 150 150 151 151 152

-10 -9 -8 -7 -7 -7 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +9 +10 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Leaderboard at time of suspended play Player Score Thru Gary Woodland -10 F Kevin Kisner -9 F Brooks Keopka -8 F Dustin Johnson -7 F Charl Schwartzel -7 F Thomas Pieters -7 F Rickie Fowler -7 10 Brandon Stone -6 F

Saturday’s post time: 7:30 jockey Lopez Bailon Tavares Retana Hernandez Santiago

odds 9-2 7-2 8-1 10-1 5-1 6-5

Second: 6F, F&M IL. BRED $4,000 MCL 3&UP pp horse jockey odds 1 Midnight Lewis Diego 12-1 2 Helios Thurman 8-1 3 Purrfect Kitten Bailon 10-1 4 Codetowin Santiago 5-2 5 American Success Tavares 4-1 6 Christmas Cookie Hernandez 6-1 7 Line of Denhams Lopez 2-1 Third: 6F, F&M MAIDENS 3&UP pp horse jockey 1 Hippie Gem Molina 2 Dixie Lee Attack Tavares 3 Positionedtodance Eads 4 Allie’s Aflirt Thurman 5 Fort Lee Diego 6 Flawless Ekati Esquilin 7 Swifty Cause Lopez 8 Rosie’s Flame Bailon 9 St, Louie Woman Santiago

odds 5-1 20-1 6-1 15-1 8-1 9-2 6-1 20-1 9-5

Fourth: 6F, F&M $4,000 NWY CLM pp horse jockey odds 1 Dandy Rap Santiago 3-1 2 Run Away Gal Hernandez 8-1 3 Infinitive Bailon 6-1 4 Catherine Eugenia Lopez 9-2 5 Tryst Cat Molina 4-1 6 My Place Or Yours Eads 7-2 7 Get Mad Gracie Cunningham 6-1 Fifth: 1 Mile 70 Yds, $3,200cnd CLM pp horse jockey 1 Bold Ransom Molina 2 Shotenough to Pop Arrieta 3 Comin’ Right Up Eads 4 Taking Cheap Shots Hernandez 5 Mighty Gideon Lopez 6 Sgt. Green Diego 7 Wicked Cheer Thurman 8 Beefy Santiago Sixth: 6F, $5,000 AOC pp horse 1 Cat’s Runaway 2 Bad Moon 3 Sunny’s Storm 4 Affirmatif Song 5 Retractable 6 Great Scat 7 Go Stealth

odds 5-2 9-2 8-1 10-1 8-1 7-2 20-1 4-1

jockey odds Tavares 10-1 Lopez 6-1 Diego 5-1 Eads 4-1 Bailon 8-1 Santiago 8-5 Cunningham 6-1

Seventh: 6F, F&M $3,200cnd CLM pp horse jockey odds 1 Brass Tacks Cunningham 10-1 2 Ptaha Eads 6-1 3 Holyhoot Lopez 7-2 4 Carol’s a Case Tavares 5-1 5 My Fouroone Kplan Molina 3-1 6 Charlotteincharge Esquilin 8-1 7 Giant Sugarbaby Arrieta 6-1 8 May Be Suspect Diego 9-2

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL — Suspended San Diego minor league 3B Diego Goris (El Paso-PCL) 50 games following a second positive test for a drug of abuse in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League LOS ANGELES — Placed OF Mike Trout on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Monday, Aug. 6. OAKLAND — Activated RHP Fernando Rodney. Designated RHP Chris Hatcher for assignment. Assigned LHP Jeremy Bleich outright to Nashville (PCL). National League CHICAGO — Signed LHP Jorge De La Rosa. Transferred RHP Yu Darvish to the 60-day DL. Optioned LHP Randy Rosario to Iowa (PCL). MILWAUKEE — Placed RHP Joakim Soria on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Adrian Houser from Colorado Springs (PCL). PHILADELPHIA — Acquired 1B Justin Bour and cash from Miami for LHP McKenzie Mills. SAN FRANCISCO — optioned RHP Derek Law to Sacramento (PCL). Selected RHP Casey Kelly from Sacamento. Transferred RHP Johnny Cueto to the 60-day DL. FOOTBALL | National Football League ARIZONA — Signed CB Tim Scott to a one-year contract. CINCINNATI — Waived OT Austin Fleer and HB Ray Lawry. TAMPA BAY — Signed CB Amari Coleman, CB Aaron Davis and TE Colin Jeter. Waived DE Kiante Anderson and TE Jason Reese. Waived injured TE Donnie Ernsberger. HOCKEY | National Hockey League DETROIT — Re-signed C Dylan Larkin to a five-year contract. COLLEGE CHATTANOOGA — Named Kyle Ruschell wrestling coach. SAN FRANCISCO — Named Pat McCurry cross country and track and field coach. TENNESSEE — Signed women’s basketball coach Holly Warlick to a three-year contract extension through the 2021-22 season.

SOCCER Major League Soccer

A huge gallery lines the fairway on No. 9 as Sergio Garcia hits his second shot from a sand trap Friday.

BASEBALL Frontier League

Fairmount Park entries First: 6F, $10,000 AOC pp horse 1 Mr. Love Maker 2 Braden’s Position 3 Mutakddim Road 4 Arkrebel 5 P.O. Jet 6 W W Cookie Monster

Eastern W L T PTS GD Cincinnati 13 3 6 45 19 Pittsburgh 11 3 7 40 16 Charleston 10 3 10 40 12 Louisville 11 4 6 39 14 New York 9 7 8 35 10 Nashville 9 6 7 34 5 Bethlehem 9 9 6 33 11 Indy 9 7 5 32 2 Ottawa 9 10 4 31 -7 Charlotte 7 9 7 28 -7 North Carolina 7 8 6 27 3 Tampa Bay 7 9 6 27 0 Penn 6 7 8 26 -2 Richmond 5 13 3 18 -24 Atlanta 3 11 7 16 -23 Toronto 1 16 3 6 -27 Western W L T PTS GD Salt Lake City 15 5 2 47 15 Orange County 12 6 5 41 22 Phoenix 12 5 5 41 16 Sacramento 11 5 7 40 6 Reno 10 5 7 37 8 San Antonio 9 5 7 34 1 Portland 10 10 3 33 0 Kansas City 9 8 6 33 -6 Colo. Springs 9 12 4 31 5 Fresno 7 9 9 30 6 St. Louis 7 6 8 29 0 Okla. City 7 12 5 26 -9 Las Vegas 7 9 5 26 -11 Los Angeles 6 12 5 23 -6 Rio Grande Valley 3 7 11 20 -4 Seattle 4 14 2 14 -19 Tulsa 1 10 10 13 -26 Friday Louisville 6, New York 4 Nashville 2, Ottawa 0 Saturday Atlanta at Charleston, 6 p.m. North Carolina at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Salt Lake City at Okla. City, 7:30 p.m. Las Vegas at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Kansas City, 7:30 p.m. Colo. Springs at Tulsa, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Seattle, 9 p.m. Orange County at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Rio Grande Valley at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Sunday Pittsburgh at Bethlehem, 4 p.m. Penn at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. Richmond at Toronto, 6:30 p.m.

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 14 4 6 48 50 28 New York 14 6 2 44 44 23 New York City FC 13 5 5 44 45 29 Columbus 10 7 6 36 30 29 Montreal 9 13 2 29 30 40 New England 7 7 8 29 36 35 Philadelphia 8 11 3 27 29 37 Orlando City 7 14 2 23 35 54 Toronto FC 6 11 5 23 37 41 Chicago 6 13 5 23 35 48 D.C. United 4 9 6 18 30 36 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 12 4 6 42 36 28 Portland 10 3 7 37 33 25 Sporting K.C. 10 6 6 36 40 30 Los Angeles FC 10 6 6 36 45 37 LA Galaxy 10 8 5 35 44 38 Real Salt Lake 10 9 4 34 33 40 Vancouver 8 9 6 30 36 46 Seattle 8 9 5 29 24 25 Minnesota United 9 13 1 28 36 46 Houston 7 9 6 27 39 33 Colorado 5 12 5 20 27 37 San Jose 3 12 7 16 32 41 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday Houston at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New England, 6:30 p.m. New York at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m. Montreal at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Minnesota United at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Vancouver at Portland, 10 p.m. Sunday New York City FC at Toronto FC, 3 p.m. Orlando City at D.C. United, 7 p.m. FC Dallas at Seattle, 9 p.m.

East W L Pct. GB Washington 42 33 .560 — Joliet 42 34 .553 ½ Lake Erie 40 36 .526 2½ Schaumburg 38 38 .500 4½ Traverse City 34 41 .453 8 Windy City 32 44 .421 10½ West W L Pct. GB Normal 41 32 .562 — Florence 39 37 .513 3½ Southern Illinois 37 36 .507 4 Rascals 38 39 .494 5 Evansville 37 38 .493 5 Grizzlies 33 45 .423 10.5 Friday Traverse City 12, Lake Erie 6 Schaumburg 6, Joliet 0 Evansville 4, Florence 3 Normal 7, Rascals 4 Southern Illinois 5, Grizzlies 2 Evansville 4, Florence 3 Windy City at Washington, ppd. Saturday Windy City at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Florence at Evansville, 5:05 p.m. Traverse City at Lake Erie, 5:05 p.m. Joliet at Schaumburg, 6 p.m. Windy City at Washington, 6:35 p.m. Rascals at Normal, 7:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m. Florence at Evansville, 7:35 p.m. Sunday Joliet at Schaumburg, 1 p.m. Traverse City at Lake Erie, 1:05 p.m. Florence at Evansville, 2:05 p.m. Windy City at Washington, 4:35 p.m. Rascals at Normal, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Grizzlies, 6:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL | WNBA EASTERN W L Pct x-Atlanta 20 10 .667 x-Washington 19 11 .633 x-Connecticut 17 13 .567 Chicago 11 19 .367 New York 7 22 .241 Indiana 5 24 .172 WESTERN W L Pct x-Seattle 23 8 .742 x-Los Angeles 18 12 .600 x-Minnesota 17 13 .567 x-Phoenix 16 14 .533 Dallas 14 15 .483 Las Vegas 12 18 .400 Thursday Washington 100, Seattle 77 Atlanta 79, Los Angeles 73 Minnesota 89, Las Vegas 73 Friday Chicago 97, Connecticut 86 Indiana at Phoenix, late Saturday Dallas at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Indiana at Las Vegas, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Atlanta at New York, 1:30 p.m. Chicago at Connecticut, 2 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 2 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 6 p.m.

GB — 1 3 9 12½ 14½ GB — 4½ 5½ 6½ 8 10½

FOOTBALL NFL preseason AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England 1 0 0 1.000 NY Jets 1 0 0 1.000 Miami 0 1 0 .000 Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston 1 0 0 1.000 Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1.000 Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 0 0 1.000 West W L T Pct Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 Denver 0 0 0 .000 LA Chargers 0 0 0 .000 Oakland 0 0 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Dallas 0 1 0 .000 NY Giants 0 1 0 .000 Washington 0 1 0 .000 Philadelphia 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Carolina 1 0 0 1.000 New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Green Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Chicago 0 2 0 .000 Detroit 0 0 0 .000 Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 West W L T Pct San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 Seattle 0 1 0 .000 LA Rams 0 1 0 .000 Arizona 0 0 0 .000 Thursday New Orleans 24, Jacksonville 20 Pittsburgh 31, Philadelphia 14 Carolina 28, Buffalo 23 Cleveland 20, NY Giants 10 Tampa Bay 26, Miami 24 Cincinnati 30, Chicago 27 New England 26, Washington 17 Baltimore 33, LA Rams 7 Green Bay 31, Tennessee 17 Houston 17, Kansas City 10 Indianapolis 19, Seattle 17 San Francisco 24, Dallas 21 Friday NY Jets 17, Atlanta 0 Detroit at Oakland, late Saturday Minnesota at Denver, 8 p.m. LA Chargers at Arizona, 9 p.m.

PF 26 17 24 23 PF 17 19 20 17 PF 31 50 20 30 PF 10 0 0 0

PA 17 0 26 28 PA 10 17 24 31 PA 14 23 10 27 PA 17 0 0 0

PF 21 10 17 14 PF 28 24 26 0 PF 31 43 0 0 PF 24 17 7 0

PA 24 20 26 31 PA 23 20 24 17 PA 17 47 0 0 PA 21 19 33 0

BOXING SCHEDULE Saturday At Avalon Theater, Hollywood, Calif., Jesus Rojas vs. Joseph Diaz, Jr., 12, for Rojas’ WBA World featherweight title. Aug. 16 At Tokyo, Ryosuke Iwasa vs. T.J. Doheny, 12, for Iwasa’s IBF junior featherweight title.

GOLF Area holes in one Forest Park • Rich Lawson, hole No. 5 (Dogwood), 136 yards, 5-hybrid, Aug. 9. Arlington Greens • Noah Carroll, hole No. 13, 162 yards, 6-iron, Aug. 9. St. Louis CC • Christy Moore, hole No. 7, 88 yards, 8-iron, Aug. 8. Tapawingo • Ray Schlotterbeck, hole No. 2 (Prairie), 105 yards, 8-iron.


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SATURDAY • 08.11.2018

100TH PGA STATISTICS

AMERICA’S LINE

THE COURSE Bellerive Country Club played to a 69.685 scoring average Friday, 1.69 strokes easier than in the opening round, and was set up 123 yards shorter, at 7,212 yards for the par-70 layout. The course yielded 48 rounds of par or better from the 78 players who played in the morning. No afternoon rounds were completed.

HOLE RANKINGS (hardest to easiest) Rk. Hole Par Yards 1 4 4 520 2 6 3 216 3 10 4 498 4 16 3 224 5 18 4 456 6 15 4 499 7 2 4 416 8 9 4 438 9 5 4 466

Avg. 4.368 3.333 4.227 3.217 4.194 4.176 4.087 4.073 4.009

Rk. 10 T-11 T-11 13 14 15 16 17 18

Hole 12 1 13 14 17 7 8 11 3

Par 4 4 3 4 5 4 5 4 3

Yards 459 415 172 422 597 384 600 298 132

Avg. 4.00 3.932 2.932 3.805 4.725 3.722 4.710 3.611 2.563

HARDEST HOLE

EASIEST HOLE

NO. 4, PAR 4, 520 YARDS Scoring average • 4.368 Eagles • 0 Birdies • 6 Pars • 66 Bogeys • 41 Others • 4

NO. 3, PAR 3, 132 YARDS Scoring average • 2.563 Eagles • 0 Birdies • 55 Pars • 71 Bogeys • 0 Others • 0

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Patrick Reed tosses his putter after missing a birdie putt on the 17th hole during the second round Friday at Bellerive Country Club.

Joseph Hood of Town and Country watches the tee shot by Brooks Koepka on the 17th hole during the second round Friday.

NFL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog BRONCOS ............... 1 .... PK .................. Vikings CARDS .................... 2....2.5 ............... Chargers SOCCER • English Premier League Tottenham ...............................................-$105 NEWCASTLE UNITED ..............................+$270 Draw: +$230 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Chelsea.....................................................-$180 HUDDERSFIELD TOWN .......................... +$500 Draw: +$280 | Over/under: 2.5 goals WATFORD................................................ +$120 Brighton & Hove ..................................... +$225 Draw: +$210 | Over/under: 2.0 goals FULHAM.................................................. +$130 Crystal Palace........................................ +$200 Draw: +$220 | Over/under: 2.5 goals BOURNEMOUTH .......................................-$115 Cardiff City..............................................+$320 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals WOLVERHAMPTON ................................. +$130 Everton ................................................... +$210 Draw: +$200 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Sunday LIVERPOOL ..............................................-$425 West Ham United.................................. +$1100 Draw: +$500 | Over/under: 3.0 goals SOUTHAMPTON ....................................... -$125 Burnley....................................................+$350 Draw: +$240 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Manchester City....................................... -$110 ARSENAL.................................................+$250 Draw: +$270 | Over/under: 3.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

SCOREBOARD Friday | Bellerive Country Club Purse: TBA ($10.5 million in 2017) Yards: 7,316 | Par: 70 Partial Second Round Gary Woodland 64-66 — Kevin Kisner 67-64 — Brooks Koepka 69-63 — Dustin Johnson 67-66 — Charl Schwartzel 70-63 — Thomas Pieters 67-66 — Brandon Stone 66-68 — Adam Scott 70-65 — Francesco Molinari 68-67 — Patrick Cantlay 68-67 — Jon Rahm 68-67 — Jason Kokrak 68-67 — Emiliano Grillo 69-67 — Justin Rose 67-69 — Zach Johnson 66-70 — Matt Wallace 71-66 — Jordan Spieth 71-66 — Andrew Putnam 68-69 — Tyrrell Hatton 71-67 — Thorbjorn Olesen 70-68 — Daniel Berger 73-65 — Mike Lorenzo-Vera 73-65 — Andrew Landry 73-65 — Chris Kirk 68-70 — Russell Henley 74-65 — Tommy Fleetwood 69-70 — Satoshi Kodaira 71-68 — Marc Leishman 68-71 — Brice Garnett 71-68 — Kevin Na 70-69 — Chez Reavie 71-68 — Russell Knox 71-68 — Joaquin Niemann 68-71 — Chris Stroud 69-70 — Kevin Chappell 69-71 — Nick Watney 75-65 — Ted Potter, Jr. 74-66 — Adrian Otaegui 73-67 — Seungsu Han 74-66 — Ben Kern 71-69 — Luke List 71-70 — Kyle Stanley 68-73 — Matt Kuchar 71-70 — Sergio Garcia 70-71 — Brendan Steele 73-68 — Whee Kim 75-67 — Alex Noren 71-71 — Shaun Micheel 73-69 — Bill Haas 72-70 — Justin Harding 72-70 — John Daly 73-70 — Patrick Reed 72-71 — Charley Hoffman 72-71 — Anirban Lahiri 70-73 — Beau Hossler 73-71 — Chris Wood 70-74 — Paul Broadhurst 74-70 — Jason Dufner 72-72 — Aaron Wise 76-68 — Ryuko Tokimatsu 73-71 — Kelly Kraft 71-74 — Zach J. Johnson 76-69 — Ryan Vermeer 73-73 — Danny Balin 72-75 — Matt Dobyns 76-71 — Y.E. Yang 73-74 — Chesson Hadley 75-73 — Bubba Watson 70-78 — Paul Casey 75-73 — Omar Uresti 75-73 — Matthew Borchert 74-74 — Si Woo Kim 72-77 — Marty Jertson 76-74 — Michael Kim 73-77 — Brian Smock 79-71 — Johan Kok 78-73 — Jaysen Hansen 76-75 — Jorge Campillo 78-74 —

United Soccer League

BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League YANKEES ................ -$230...................Rangers Red Sox .................. -$240..................ORIOLES Red Sox ...................-$150 ..................ORIOLES Rays.........................-$110 ...............BLUE JAYS Twins.......................-$135 .................... TIGERS Indians ................... -$240..............WHITE SOX ASTROS ...................-$190 ................. Mariners ANGELS ...................-$105 ............................A’s National League CUBS........................-$130 ................ Nationals D’backs................... -$140....................... REDS BRAVES ...................-$107 ...................Brewers MARLINS.................-$105 ........................ Mets Dodgers...................-$120 ..................ROCKIES Phillies ....................-$195 ...................PADRES GIANTS ....................-$110 .....................Pirates Interleague Cards.......................-$145 ................... ROYALS

HORSE RACING 130 131 132 133 133 133 134 135 135 135 135 135 136 136 136 137 137 137 138 138 138 138 138 138 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 140 140 140 140 140 140 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 146 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 149 150 150 150 151 151 152

-10 -9 -8 -7 -7 -7 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +9 +10 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Leaderboard at time of suspended play Player Score Thru Gary Woodland -10 F Kevin Kisner -9 F Brooks Keopka -8 F Dustin Johnson -7 F Charl Schwartzel -7 F Thomas Pieters -7 F Rickie Fowler -7 10 Brandon Stone -6 F

Saturday’s post time: 7:30 jockey Lopez Bailon Tavares Retana Hernandez Santiago

odds 9-2 7-2 8-1 10-1 5-1 6-5

Second: 6F, F&M IL. BRED $4,000 MCL 3&UP pp horse jockey odds 1 Midnight Lewis Diego 12-1 2 Helios Thurman 8-1 3 Purrfect Kitten Bailon 10-1 4 Codetowin Santiago 5-2 5 American Success Tavares 4-1 6 Christmas Cookie Hernandez 6-1 7 Line of Denhams Lopez 2-1 Third: 6F, F&M MAIDENS 3&UP pp horse jockey 1 Hippie Gem Molina 2 Dixie Lee Attack Tavares 3 Positionedtodance Eads 4 Allie’s Aflirt Thurman 5 Fort Lee Diego 6 Flawless Ekati Esquilin 7 Swifty Cause Lopez 8 Rosie’s Flame Bailon 9 St, Louie Woman Santiago

odds 5-1 20-1 6-1 15-1 8-1 9-2 6-1 20-1 9-5

Fourth: 6F, F&M $4,000 NWY CLM pp horse jockey odds 1 Dandy Rap Santiago 3-1 2 Run Away Gal Hernandez 8-1 3 Infinitive Bailon 6-1 4 Catherine Eugenia Lopez 9-2 5 Tryst Cat Molina 4-1 6 My Place Or Yours Eads 7-2 7 Get Mad Gracie Cunningham 6-1 Fifth: 1 Mile 70 Yds, $3,200cnd CLM pp horse jockey 1 Bold Ransom Molina 2 Shotenough to Pop Arrieta 3 Comin’ Right Up Eads 4 Taking Cheap Shots Hernandez 5 Mighty Gideon Lopez 6 Sgt. Green Diego 7 Wicked Cheer Thurman 8 Beefy Santiago Sixth: 6F, $5,000 AOC pp horse 1 Cat’s Runaway 2 Bad Moon 3 Sunny’s Storm 4 Affirmatif Song 5 Retractable 6 Great Scat 7 Go Stealth

odds 5-2 9-2 8-1 10-1 8-1 7-2 20-1 4-1

jockey odds Tavares 10-1 Lopez 6-1 Diego 5-1 Eads 4-1 Bailon 8-1 Santiago 8-5 Cunningham 6-1

Seventh: 6F, F&M $3,200cnd CLM pp horse jockey odds 1 Brass Tacks Cunningham 10-1 2 Ptaha Eads 6-1 3 Holyhoot Lopez 7-2 4 Carol’s a Case Tavares 5-1 5 My Fouroone Kplan Molina 3-1 6 Charlotteincharge Esquilin 8-1 7 Giant Sugarbaby Arrieta 6-1 8 May Be Suspect Diego 9-2

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL — Suspended San Diego minor league 3B Diego Goris (El Paso-PCL) 50 games following a second positive test for a drug of abuse in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League LOS ANGELES — Placed OF Mike Trout on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Monday, Aug. 6. OAKLAND — Activated RHP Fernando Rodney. Designated RHP Chris Hatcher for assignment. Assigned LHP Jeremy Bleich outright to Nashville (PCL). National League CHICAGO — Signed LHP Jorge De La Rosa. Transferred RHP Yu Darvish to the 60-day DL. Optioned LHP Randy Rosario to Iowa (PCL). MILWAUKEE — Placed RHP Joakim Soria on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Adrian Houser from Colorado Springs (PCL). PHILADELPHIA — Acquired 1B Justin Bour and cash from Miami for LHP McKenzie Mills. SAN FRANCISCO — optioned RHP Derek Law to Sacramento (PCL). Selected RHP Casey Kelly from Sacamento. Transferred RHP Johnny Cueto to the 60-day DL. FOOTBALL | National Football League ARIZONA — Signed CB Tim Scott to a one-year contract. CINCINNATI — Waived OT Austin Fleer and HB Ray Lawry. TAMPA BAY — Signed CB Amari Coleman, CB Aaron Davis and TE Colin Jeter. Waived DE Kiante Anderson and TE Jason Reese. Waived injured TE Donnie Ernsberger. HOCKEY | National Hockey League DETROIT — Re-signed C Dylan Larkin to a five-year contract. COLLEGE CHATTANOOGA — Named Kyle Ruschell wrestling coach. SAN FRANCISCO — Named Pat McCurry cross country and track and field coach. TENNESSEE — Signed women’s basketball coach Holly Warlick to a three-year contract extension through the 2021-22 season.

SOCCER Major League Soccer

A huge gallery lines the fairway on No. 9 as Sergio Garcia hits his second shot from a sand trap Friday.

BASEBALL Frontier League

Fairmount Park entries First: 6F, $10,000 AOC pp horse 1 Mr. Love Maker 2 Braden’s Position 3 Mutakddim Road 4 Arkrebel 5 P.O. Jet 6 W W Cookie Monster

Eastern W L T PTS GD Cincinnati 13 3 6 45 19 Pittsburgh 11 3 7 40 16 Charleston 10 3 10 40 12 Louisville 11 4 6 39 14 New York 9 7 8 35 10 Nashville 9 6 7 34 5 Bethlehem 9 9 6 33 11 Indy 9 7 5 32 2 Ottawa 9 10 4 31 -7 Charlotte 7 9 7 28 -7 North Carolina 7 8 6 27 3 Tampa Bay 7 9 6 27 0 Penn 6 7 8 26 -2 Richmond 5 13 3 18 -24 Atlanta 3 11 7 16 -23 Toronto 1 16 3 6 -27 Western W L T PTS GD Salt Lake City 15 5 2 47 15 Orange County 12 6 5 41 22 Phoenix 12 5 5 41 16 Sacramento 11 5 7 40 6 Reno 10 5 7 37 8 San Antonio 9 5 7 34 1 Portland 10 10 3 33 0 Kansas City 9 8 6 33 -6 Colo. Springs 9 12 4 31 5 Fresno 7 9 9 30 6 St. Louis 7 6 8 29 0 Okla. City 7 12 5 26 -9 Las Vegas 7 9 5 26 -11 Los Angeles 6 12 5 23 -6 Rio Grande Valley 3 7 11 20 -4 Seattle 4 14 2 14 -19 Tulsa 1 10 10 13 -26 Friday Louisville 6, New York 4 Nashville 2, Ottawa 0 Saturday Atlanta at Charleston, 6 p.m. North Carolina at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Salt Lake City at Okla. City, 7:30 p.m. Las Vegas at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Kansas City, 7:30 p.m. Colo. Springs at Tulsa, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Seattle, 9 p.m. Orange County at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Rio Grande Valley at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Sunday Pittsburgh at Bethlehem, 4 p.m. Penn at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. Richmond at Toronto, 6:30 p.m.

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 14 4 6 48 50 28 New York 14 6 2 44 44 23 New York City FC 13 5 5 44 45 29 Columbus 10 7 6 36 30 29 Montreal 9 13 2 29 30 40 New England 7 7 8 29 36 35 Philadelphia 8 11 3 27 29 37 Orlando City 7 14 2 23 35 54 Toronto FC 6 11 5 23 37 41 Chicago 6 13 5 23 35 48 D.C. United 4 9 6 18 30 36 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 12 4 6 42 36 28 Portland 10 3 7 37 33 25 Sporting K.C. 10 6 6 36 40 30 Los Angeles FC 10 6 6 36 45 37 LA Galaxy 10 8 5 35 44 38 Real Salt Lake 10 9 4 34 33 40 Vancouver 8 9 6 30 36 46 Seattle 8 9 5 29 24 25 Minnesota United 9 13 1 28 36 46 Houston 7 9 6 27 39 33 Colorado 5 12 5 20 27 37 San Jose 3 12 7 16 32 41 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday Houston at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New England, 6:30 p.m. New York at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m. Montreal at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Minnesota United at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Vancouver at Portland, 10 p.m. Sunday New York City FC at Toronto FC, 3 p.m. Orlando City at D.C. United, 7 p.m. FC Dallas at Seattle, 9 p.m.

East W L Pct. GB Washington 42 33 .560 — Joliet 42 34 .553 ½ Lake Erie 40 36 .526 2½ Schaumburg 38 38 .500 4½ Traverse City 34 41 .453 8 Windy City 32 44 .421 10½ West W L Pct. GB Normal 41 32 .562 — Florence 39 37 .513 3½ Southern Illinois 37 36 .507 4 Rascals 38 39 .494 5 Evansville 37 38 .493 5 Grizzlies 33 45 .423 10.5 Friday Traverse City 12, Lake Erie 6 Schaumburg 6, Joliet 0 Evansville 4, Florence 3 Normal 7, Rascals 4 Southern Illinois 5, Grizzlies 2 Evansville 4, Florence 3 Windy City at Washington, ppd. Saturday Windy City at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Florence at Evansville, 5:05 p.m. Traverse City at Lake Erie, 5:05 p.m. Joliet at Schaumburg, 6 p.m. Windy City at Washington, 6:35 p.m. Rascals at Normal, 7:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m. Florence at Evansville, 7:35 p.m. Sunday Joliet at Schaumburg, 1 p.m. Traverse City at Lake Erie, 1:05 p.m. Florence at Evansville, 2:05 p.m. Windy City at Washington, 4:35 p.m. Rascals at Normal, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Grizzlies, 6:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL | WNBA EASTERN W L Pct x-Atlanta 20 10 .667 x-Washington 19 11 .633 x-Connecticut 17 13 .567 Chicago 11 19 .367 New York 7 22 .241 Indiana 5 25 .167 WESTERN W L Pct x-Seattle 23 8 .742 x-Los Angeles 18 12 .600 x-Minnesota 17 13 .567 x-Phoenix 17 14 .548 Dallas 14 15 .483 Las Vegas 12 18 .400 Thursday Washington 100, Seattle 77 Atlanta 79, Los Angeles 73 Minnesota 89, Las Vegas 73 Friday Chicago 97, Connecticut 86 Phoenix 94, Indiana 74 Saturday Dallas at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Indiana at Las Vegas, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Atlanta at New York, 1:30 p.m. Chicago at Connecticut, 2 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 2 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 6 p.m.

GB — 1 3 9 12½ 15 GB — 4½ 5½ 6 8 10½

FOOTBALL NFL preseason AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England 1 0 0 1.000 NY Jets 1 0 0 1.000 Miami 0 1 0 .000 Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston 1 0 0 1.000 Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1.000 Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 0 0 1.000 West W L T Pct Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 Denver 0 0 0 .000 LA Chargers 0 0 0 .000 Oakland 0 0 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Dallas 0 1 0 .000 NY Giants 0 1 0 .000 Washington 0 1 0 .000 Philadelphia 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Carolina 1 0 0 1.000 New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Green Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Chicago 0 2 0 .000 Detroit 0 0 0 .000 Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 West W L T Pct San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 Seattle 0 1 0 .000 LA Rams 0 1 0 .000 Arizona 0 0 0 .000 Thursday New Orleans 24, Jacksonville 20 Pittsburgh 31, Philadelphia 14 Carolina 28, Buffalo 23 Cleveland 20, NY Giants 10 Tampa Bay 26, Miami 24 Cincinnati 30, Chicago 27 New England 26, Washington 17 Baltimore 33, LA Rams 7 Green Bay 31, Tennessee 17 Houston 17, Kansas City 10 Indianapolis 19, Seattle 17 San Francisco 24, Dallas 21 Friday NY Jets 17, Atlanta 0 Detroit at Oakland, late Saturday Minnesota at Denver, 8 p.m. LA Chargers at Arizona, 9 p.m.

PF 26 17 24 23 PF 17 19 20 17 PF 31 50 20 30 PF 10 0 0 0

PA 17 0 26 28 PA 10 17 24 31 PA 14 23 10 27 PA 17 0 0 0

PF 21 10 17 14 PF 28 24 26 0 PF 31 43 0 0 PF 24 17 7 0

PA 24 20 26 31 PA 23 20 24 17 PA 17 47 0 0 PA 21 19 33 0

BOXING SCHEDULE Saturday At Avalon Theater, Hollywood, Calif., Jesus Rojas vs. Joseph Diaz, Jr., 12, for Rojas’ WBA World featherweight title. Aug. 16 At Tokyo, Ryosuke Iwasa vs. T.J. Doheny, 12, for Iwasa’s IBF junior featherweight title.

GOLF Area holes in one Forest Park • Rich Lawson, hole No. 5 (Dogwood), 136 yards, 5-hybrid, Aug. 9. Arlington Greens • Noah Carroll, hole No. 13, 162 yards, 6-iron, Aug. 9. St. Louis CC • Christy Moore, hole No. 7, 88 yards, 8-iron, Aug. 8. Tapawingo • Ray Schlotterbeck, hole No. 2 (Prairie), 105 yards, 8-iron.


08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

CLASSIFIED

Continued from Page A12 Honda '09 Honda Civic: LX, Manual $6,800 #185491 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Hyundai '13 Hyundai Elantra: Loaded, Very Clean, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, $9,950 #42669A

'15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 31K, Red w/ Tan Leather $19,490 #V17800A

'17 Hyundai Accent: SE, $12,200 Stock #P06901 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Infiniti '15 Infiniti Q70L: One Owner, Certified, AWD, 20K Miles $32,999 #P9382

Mini Cooper

'13 Mini Cooper S: Countryman, Black, M/R, Auto $15,575 #35020A

'15 Mini Cooper S: 37K Miles, Automatic, Pano Sunroof, White, $19,990 #B9290

'15 Mini Cooper: Countryman, Auto, "S" Pkg, Leather $20,990 #B9243

'15 Mini Cooper: Pano Roof, Automatic, Black, Leather, #V9193A $14,490

'17 Infiniti Q60: 3.0T Premium, Certified, 1 Owner $35,999 #P9393

'17 Infiniti Q50: 3.0T Premium, Black Obsidian, Carfax 1 Owner, AWD $31,617 #P9431

'16 Kia Rio: LX, $10,200 Stk #553497 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Kia Rio: LX, $10,200 Stock #P06903 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Lexus '13 Lexus GS 350: AWD, Super Clean, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Only 12K Miles $27,550 #35171A

Lincoln '11 Lincoln MKS: Nav, Pano Roof, Leather, Black $14,490 #C17217RA

Mazda '12 Infiniti QX56: 4WD, Roof, DVD, 69K Miles $29,490 #C9112A

'13 Mazda CX-9 Touring: Loaded, 3rd Row, Very Clean, $11,750 #35254A

'10 Mazda 3 S: Hatchback, 5 Speed, Loaded, Very Clean! $9,750 #35373A

'10 Mazda 3: Black, Auto, Very Clean, $4,990 #35074B

'15 Mazda 6 Touring: Auto, Loaded, Black $14,990 #40090A

'13 Mazda Miata: Grand Touring, Hard Top, 11K, Auto, $21,490 #M9297

'16 Mazda CX3 Grand Touring: AWD, Nav, Red $21,490 #M18107A

'11 Mazda 2: Sport, Lime Green!! Lime Green!! $7,490 #M17250RA

'11 Mazda 6 iTouring Plus: Automatic, Black, $11,490 #M18282B

'14 Mazda 3 iTouring: Auto, One Owner, Certified, 55k Miles, $13,990 #V19021A

Mercedes Benz

17 Mercedes-Benz AMG: C 43 4MATIC, One Owner, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, $52,999 #P9060

CADILLAC CERTIFIED 6yr/100K 1-866-244-9085

'15 ATS: Luxury, AWD, White, Roof, Premium Wheels $23,990 '16 XTS: Luxury, Graphite, 26K, FWD $27,990 '16 Escalade Platinum: AWD, 24K, Black $69,490 '15 SRX: Luxury Collection, 26K, White, AWD $30,990

'06 Mercedes-Benz E350: $6,800 #L1477-1 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'12 Honda CR-V: EX-L, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $15,850 #35221A

'17 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, Clean Carfax, 2K Miles, AWD, Certified, $33,938 #11391L

'12 Toyota Corolla: LE, 42K Miles, 1 Owner, Automatic $11,990 #M18252A

'15 Toyota Prius: $16,755 #P06894 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Toyota Prius: $16,427 #P06896 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Toyota Prius: $16,100 Stock #P06895 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Chevy Suburban: White, 4WD, 3rd Row Seating, 44K Miles $46,999 #P9026

Volvo '12 Volvo S60: T6, AWD, Leather, Sunroof, Auto $12,990 #M18332A

'17 CTS: Luxury, 3.6 Motor, White, 11K Miles $35,490

Chevrolet Trucks '07 Chevy Silverado: Reg Cab, Work, Truck, White, One Owner $9,750 #P6501B

'16 Chevy Silverado: 4WD, Auto, 14K Miles, Double Cab, $33,990 #B9164

1-866-244-9085 VOLKSWAGEN'S

'18 Chevy Silverado 2500HD: Midnight Edition, 6K Miles $43,990 #B9345

'12 Passat: SE, Automatic, Sunroof, Certified $11,990 '14 Passat "S": 32K, VW Certified, Black, Auto $11,990 '14 Passat "S" 31K, 18" Wheels, Navigation, Auto $12,490 '18 Atlas SEL: 4Motion, 13K, Local Trade, $39,490 '16 Beetle SE: 28K, Auto, White, Certified, $15,990 '15 Jetta TDI SE: w/Connecttivity, 8K, Silver, Just Arrived $15,490 'Beetle Convertible TDI: (4) to Choose from, All Certified, Auto, Call for Details! '15 Beetle: 2.0 Turbo, R-Line, 1 Owner, White, 24K, $18,990 '18 Tiguan: S, 5K Miles, Auto, 1 Owner $23,990

'17 Genesis G80: 3.8 Sedan, Casablanca White, 3.8L V-6, AWD, 4K Miles $36,999 #40165A

Mitsubishi '17 Mitsubishi Mirage: G4, $10,878 Stock #P06902 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Nissan/Datsun '15 Infiniti QX70: AWD, Moonlight White, 12K Miles $32,999 #P9329

'17 Cadillac Escalade: Premium, White Diamond, 9K Miles, Certified $73,990 #C9118

'17 Volkswagen Passat: SE $17,880 #L1460-1 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'16 SRX: Luxury, AWD, 30K, Black, Pano Roof $29,990

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'18 Cadillac Escalade: Luxury Package, 4WD, 20K Miles $62,999 #P9311

'16 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, AWD, 30K, Certified $27,490 #C8747

'13 Volvo C30: T5 R Design $15,880 #194711 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 Volvo S60: $15,000 #19206-1 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'15 ATS: AWD, Turbo, Sunroof, 31K, $23,990

'11 Buick Enclave: CXL, 49K Miles, 1 Owner, Local Trade $17,990 #C18261A

'14 Volkswagen Passat: Wolfsburg, One Owner, Clean Carfax $11,750 #42971B

'16 CTS Premium: 25K, AWD, Certified, Pano Roof, $39,490

'95 Chevy C/K 1500: $17,990 Stock #P06908 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Ford Trucks '09 Ford F-350: Ext Cab, White, $11,990 #B9142

'18 Chevy Tahoe: LT, 4WD, 8 Cyl-5.3L, Black $46,999 #P9316

'15 Chevy Tahoe: LT, 4WD, Sable Metallic $32,333 #97244A

'08 Chevy Trailblazer: Full Power, Clean CarFax, $6,450, #42107A

'07 Chevy Tahoe: LT, Gray, Loaded, Very Clean $11,950 #420023A

'17 Chevy Tahoe: LT, Loaded, GM Certified, One Owner, Black $40,850 #P6521

'13 Chevy Equinox: Loaded, Full Power $17,750 #42967A

'18 Chevy Tahoe: LT, $48,442 Stock #P06879 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Equinox: 1LT, $11,728 Stock #P06892 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Ford Expedition: Limited, 3.5L V-6, 4x4 $32,999 #P9243

GMC Trucks '15 GMC Sierra: Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax One Owner, $32,333 #79019C

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, Crew Cab, Summit White, V8, $34,999 #79578A

Misc Trucks '14 Ram 2500: 6.7 Diesel, Crew Cab Laramie, 4 New Tires, $47,490 #B9170

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '15 Nissan Titan: Pro, Crew Cab, 4WD, 1 Owner $27,990 #B9063

'08 Ford Edge: Loaded, Very Clean, $7,996 #P6472A

'15 Ford Edge: SEL, AWD, Auto, 1 Owner $23,990 #B9332

'13 Ford Explorer: AWD, V6, Tow Package, Local Trade $13,490 #B9196A

'15 Ford Explorer: Lmtd, $22,265 Stock #180965A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Ford Explorer: XL $15,000 #19558-1 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 GMC Yukon: XL, SLT, 4WD, 44K Miles, Onyx Black $44,333 #P9406

Crossovers '13 Nissan Altima: Sunroof, Leather, Nav, Auto $9,990 #B9261

'12 Nissan Juke: SL $9,780 #194311 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'15 GMC Yukon Denali: 59K Miles, 4WD, 8 Cyl 6.2L, Carfax 1 Owner, $47,565 #79759A

Sport Utility '08 Nissan Sentra: Automatic, Power Options, Just Arrived, $3,990 #M9044A

'18 Nissan 370Z: Sport Package, Manual, Just Arrived $27,990 $B9346

'16 Nissan Versa: S, $10,700 Stock #P06904 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Nissan Sentra: SV, 16K Miles $14,880 #P4322 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Pontiac '07 Pontiac Vibe: One Owner, Clean Carfax, M/R $4,950 #42495A

'12 Porsche 911 Carrera: 4S Cabriolet, White, 23K Miles $64,999 #79457A

'17 Porsche Cayenne: Platinum, 23K, Loaded, Has it All! $58,490 #B9182

Saab '15 Mercedes-Benz SLK 250: Roadster, 14K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, $31,333 #P9397

'16 Toyota Corolla: Black Sand Pearl, Aux Audio Input, Cruise Control $13,976 #33720A

'11 Volkswagen GTI: Hatchback, White, Loaded $8,450 #35051A

Porsche '16 Mercedes-Benz GLE 350: 4Matic, 3.5L V-6, AWD, $36,999 #28548A

Sport Utility

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

Kia '18 Kia Rio: 4 Door Hatchback, local Trade, $16,990 #V18419A

Sport Utility

Volkswagen

'18 XTS: FWD, 4K Miles, Bronze $38,490 '13 Infiniti G37: Auto, Navigation, Black, 38K Miles $22,990 #B9339

Sport Utility

'16 BMW x3 xDrive 28I $30,027 Stock #180928A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 BMW X3: AWD, $15,000 #195001 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '18 Buick Envision: Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, $40,999 #P9356

Misc. Autos

17 XTS: Luxury, Nav, Htd/Cooled Seats, Certified $25,490 '16 Infiniti Q70: AWD, 10K Miles, Certified, Clean Carfax $38,333 #40242A

Toyota

'10 Saab 9-3 Aero: Convertible, Auto, Loaded, Clean Carfax $10,950 #35513A

'18 Audi Q3 Quattro: 8K Miles, AWD, Utopia Blue, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $34,943 #28219L

'15 GMC Yukon Denali: 29K Miles, White Diamond, 4WD, $53,628 #79415A

'08 Honda Element: EX, Very Clean, Loaded $10,222 #33344A

'15 Honda CR-V: All Wheel Drive, Local Trade, 1 Owner $18,490 #C18343A

'14 Honda CR-V: EX, AWD, 17K Miles, $19,990 #C18230A2

'15 Infiniti QX60: 4WD, 27K Miles, Graphite Shadow, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $32,538 #P9373

'17 Infiniti QX60: AWD 1 Owner, 10K Miles, , Graphite Shadow $39,346 #P9369

\'17 Infiniti QX60: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 11K Miles, Hermosa Blue $37,333 #96351L

'17 Infiniti QX60: Variable Trans, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 11K Miles $39,147 #12358A

'15 Mercedes-Benz: 24K Miles, AWD, 4 matic, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $35,916 #40091A

'13 Mercedes-Benz G 63: AMG, Automatic, Black, 25K Miles $85,999 #P9126

'13 Nissan Rogue: White, Loaded, Only 29K Miles $12,950 #35388A

'15 Nissan Rogue: SV, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $16,250 #35474A

'06 Nissan Pathfinder: LE, 4WD, 3rd Row $7,890 #V18115B

'16 NIssan Rogue: SL, AWD, 25K, Leather $23,490 #B9348

'15 Nissan Pathfinder: $23,579 Stock #P06899 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Toyota Highlander: Limited, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $35,835 #P9440

'16 Toyota Highlander: Limited, AWD, Midnight Blue 6 Cyl 3.5L $32,999 #28555A '15 Infiniti QX80: 4WD, Mocha Almond, 43K Miles, AWD, $43,999 #P9331

'14 Infiniti QX80: AWD, Black Obsidian, 71K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $36,881 #P9432

'17 Infiniti QX80: Graphite Shadow, 5.6L V-8, AWD, $44,999 #P9279

'17 Infiniti QX30: Premium, AWD, White $27,490 #B9227

'15 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Sahara, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $33,333 #79449A

'16 Jeep Compass Latitude: FWD, Remote Start, Heated Front Seats $13,250 #P6447

'15 Jeep Cherokee: Latitude, 61K Miles, Leather, Auto $16,990 #V18494A

'11 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Loredo, 4WD, Black Wheels, Sharp $12,990 #M17417RA

'17 Jeep Patriot: Sport, $15,352 Stock #P06893 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Jeep Grand Cherokee: LTD, $30,980 #P4254 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 Jeep Grand Cherokee Loredo $12,850 #L14431 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '11 Jeep Grand Cherokee: $15,000 #P43151 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 Jeep Grand Cherokee: LTD $15,000 #L14431 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '11 Kia Sorento: 67K Miles, Certified, 1 Owner $14,990 #C18232B

'14 Land Rover Range Rover: 5.0L, V8, Supercharged, 4WD $46,999 #P9120

'07 Volvo XC90 $7,850 #L14411 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Trucks Rent/Lease '15 Chrysler T & C: Touring Van, Loaded, Clean Carfax $17,250 #42873B

Mini vans '17 Chrysler Pacifica: Touring, Black, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax $21,950 #P6522

'11 Dodge Grand Caravan: Mainstreet, SXT, Clean Carfax, $5,950 #P6402A

Vans '17 Chevy Express 3500: LT, 15 Passenger Van, GM Certified! $26,750 #P6535

'16 Ford Transit 350: XLT, Pass Van, Very Clean, $24,250 #42823A

'17 Ram ProMaster: Cargo Van, Local Trade $21,290 #M18052A

Dogs Cavapoos, Shih Tzus, Mini Goldendoodles, Havapoos, Cockalierpoos, Peekapoos, Maltese, Other Cute Poos.

CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OTHERS.

636-978-3647

lovencarepets.org DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: Puppies Ready Now

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494 '15 Audi SQ5: Premium Plus, Florett Silver Metallic, 28K Miles $36,999 #P9345

'15 Audi Q7: Prestige, AWD, One Owner, 3.0T S Line $34,333 #28549A

'18 Audi Q5: Premium Plus, Quattro, 10K Miles, AWD $45,333 #28330L

'17 GMC Yukon: SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4, $46,999 #P9277

'13 GMC Yukon: XL, SLT, Black, Loaded $19,776 #P6199A

'17 GMC Acadia: Leather, Captains, AWD, Loaded, 8K Miles! $33,950 #42762A

'13 Land Rover Range Rover: SE, 5.0L V-8 cyl, 63K Miles, Firenze Red $42,999 #P9203

'16 Land Rover Discovery: Sport HSE, Red, Loaded, 75K Miles $36,490 #B9341

sieversretrievers.com MINIATURE AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES, Reg. Ch. lines, Family raised, $600; (314) 7959041 ST BERNARDS AKC born 7/1/2018 $875 636-333-2814

Exotic Pets '16 Lexus NX 200t: 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 32K Miles $36,848 #P9488

BIRD & REPTILE FAIR

'18 Audi Q3 Quattro: 7K Miles, Utopia Blue Metallic, AWD, $39,168 #28209L

'18 Audi Q5: Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD $44,333 #28197L

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Quattro, Ibis White, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $45,488 #28326L

'17 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD, Graphite Gray $52,999 #P9385

'18 GMC Terrain: 1K Miles, White, Just Arrived! $26,490 #B9076B

'16 Lexus GX 460: 28K Miles, Nebula Gray Pearl, 4WD $40,333 #79643A

'13 GMC Terrain: SLE, FWD, 35K, Black $17,990 #C18063C

'17 Lexus RX 350: F-Sport, AWD, 15K Miles $48,490 #M18226A

'17 GMC Terrain: SLE-2, $19,318 #P06880 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 GMC Acadia: SLT-1, $25,574 Stock #P06886 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Honda CR-V: Touing, 11K Miles, Variable Trans, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner $33,653 #P9443

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

Machinists' Hall, Bridgeton, MO. Aug 25th, Saturday only. Doors open 10 am. Birds, reptiles, cages, toys, food, & more. Raffle , Silent Auction & speakers. Adults-$5, Under 13 -Free. Vendor space available. For more info: www.gatewayparrotclub.org or call 314-756-2074

Garage Sales '10 Lincoln MKX: White, AWD, Nav, Pano Roof, #M18175B $12,990

'12 Lincoln MKX: 31K Miles, Sunroof, Navigation, New Arrival $19,490 #C18251A

'18 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, Navigation, Snowflake White, 1K Miles $37,999 #12065L

'17 BMW X5 xDrive 35i: Alpine White, 25K Miles, AWD $44,333 #97307A

STLtoday.com/jobs

'08 Honda Pilot: SE, Silver, Loaded $7,750 #42634B

63005 - Saturday, August 11, 7:00AM, 1122 Greystone Manor Pkwy, Chesterfield 63112-Multi Family Sale with free snacks! Sat., 8/11 & Sun.,8/12, 7 am-3 p.m. 5597 Waterman Blvd. Big Variety!

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Personals K. Maleka Please Contact Fr. J. Strzelecki at 314-966-2255 about a Personal Matter.


WEATHER

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEATHER • Low 70, High 89 • Winds NNE 5-10 mph

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 08.11.2018

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 119° Death Valley, California

Low: 31° West Yellowstone, Montana

Dry and seasonable weekend

110s

Dry conditions along with near average temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today and Sunday. Highs will be in the upper 80s to around 90. The next chance of storms will hold off until Tuesday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

73°

DRIVE

85°

88°

BEDTIME

Patchy fog, Mostly sunny Mostly sunny mostly sunny

77°

Mostly clear

100s 90s 70s

4-DAY FORECAST

91 89 88 87 89 91 90 88 88 90 90 88 89

W

partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

50s 40s 20s

SUNDAY

69°/90°

MONDAY

TUESDAY

71°/91°

H

64 69 65 64 65 62 68 64 65 62 65 64

86 87 87 84 83 85 86 87 89 87 85 84

72°/87° 72°/88°

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy Slight chance of storms

sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny

Kansas City 69 / 90

Kirksville 63 / 88

Joplin 67 / 91

Springfield 65 / 85

St. Louis 70 / 89 Poplar Bluff 69 / 90

Carbondale 69 / 87

Flood Stage

Current Level

+ 0.20 - 0.05 + 0.27 + 0.29 + 0.15 + 0.30 + 0.19 - 0.05 - 0.09 - 0.16

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Aug 10th Weed - 9 (low), Mold - 18,885 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 18 Month (Total) 170 Season 1464 Year Ago 1370 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 11.91 18 12.13 Peoria 14 9.79 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.05 Sullivan 16 - 2.78 Valley Park 24 7.35 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.50 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 19.56 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.02 - 0.02 + 0.12 0.00 - 0.05 - 0.27 - 0.02 - 0.53

SUN & MOON

New Aug 11 Sunrise

First Aug 18

Full Aug 26

6:12 AM Sunset

Last Sep 2 8:00 PM

Moonrise 6:18 AM Moonset 8:29 PM

Neptune has 13 known moons and one still waiting on confirmation of discovery. These moons are named after sea gods and nymphs in Greek mythology.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

357.54 360.00 497.55 659.05 704.86 657.85 913.64 838.91 599.98 406.06 601.43 445.34

+ 0.20 + 0.04 + 0.01 0.00 0.00 + 0.05 + 0.03 0.00 - 0.09 - 0.04 - 0.01 - 0.07

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Lower 48 temps only

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 63 Albuquerque 63 Anchorage 54 Atlanta 72 Atlantic City 72 Baltimore 72 Billings 66 Biloxi, Ms. 75 Birmingham 71 Bismarck 63 Boise 75 Boston 69 Buffalo 60 Burlington, Vt. 57 Charleston, S.C. 75 Charleston, W.V. 67 Charlotte 72 Cheyenne 54 Chicago 65 Cincinnati 67 Cleveland 66 Colorado Spgs. 56 Concord, N.H. 60 Dallas 74 Daytona Beach 75 Denver 59 Des Moines 66 78 Destin, Fl. 62 Detroit 66 El Paso 69 Evansville 44 Fairbanks 63 Fargo 54 Flagstaff 77 Fort Myers 63 Great Falls 62 Green Bay 66 Hartford 76 Honolulu 77 Houston 67 Indianapolis 70 Jackson, Ms. 50 Juneau 78 Key West 85 Las Vegas 72 Little Rock 73 Los Angeles 71 Louisville

73 85 60 88 84 86 105 89 91 101 99 73 82 82 92 84 88 87 87 83 80 80 71 87 91 93 88 87 84 86 86 67 94 79 91 102 88 74 89 89 83 91 63 90 106 93 88 88

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms partly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny showers thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms smoke sunny showers sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms

64 62 55 72 70 71 67 76 72 66 65 67 62 61 75 66 71 53 69 64 68 54 62 75 75 59 66 78 65 65 66 48 69 51 76 61 63 65 76 77 64 73 53 79 84 73 70 67

78 86 63 90 84 85 97 90 91 102 90 75 82 83 91 83 89 87 85 84 81 82 76 86 90 89 91 89 84 90 87 69 96 79 89 89 85 78 90 93 85 91 62 90 104 90 86 88

showers partly cloudy rain thunderstorms showers showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms smoke smoke showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy smoke thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny showers sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms rain showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny

City

Today L H

72 Macon 80 McAllen, Tx. 72 Memphis 76 Miami 65 Milwaukee Minneapolis 67 Missoula, Mt. 58 74 Mobile Montgomery 73 68 Nashville New Orleans 76 New York City 71 Norfolk, Va. 75 Oklahoma City 70 Omaha 64 Orlando 76 Palm Springs 83 Philadelphia 74 Phoenix 83 Pittsburgh 66 Portland, Me. 60 Portland, Or. 63 Providence 70 Raleigh 73 Rapid City 61 Reno 66 Richmond, Va. 73 Sacramento 62 St. Petersburg 80 Salt Lake City 72 San Antonio 76 San Diego 76 San Francisco 55 Santa Fe 56 Savannah 75 Seattle 61 73 Shreveport 64 Sioux Falls 60 Syracuse 74 Tallahassee 78 Tampa 73 Tucson 72 Tulsa 72 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 76 67 Wichita Wilmington, De. 75 86 Yuma

91 102 93 91 83 90 98 92 91 90 89 79 87 91 89 93 104 84 102 79 70 76 78 89 97 99 87 95 88 101 93 85 70 82 92 71 90 87 81 92 89 95 93 86 92 92 84 106

W

thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms showers showers showers thunderstorms sunny sunny showers sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny showers partly cloudy

Tomorrow L H W

72 80 73 76 67 68 54 73 73 70 77 71 75 70 66 75 84 72 83 64 63 60 69 72 62 65 72 61 79 72 76 74 54 55 74 59 74 64 63 73 78 73 71 71 76 68 72 84

93 99 90 90 83 90 84 92 93 90 91 80 86 83 90 92 103 86 105 80 74 82 79 88 94 97 86 94 88 96 91 84 66 83 92 76 90 87 81 94 89 98 88 84 91 89 85 105

thunderstorms partly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms showers showers thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny showers partly cloudy thunderstorms showers sunny showers thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms showers sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

75 56 73 83 79 79 77 60 67 50 77 61 77 43 48 57

89 67 88 112 90 87 86 75 81 58 97 77 89 64 68 77

partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms partly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny showers partly cloudy

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

57 78 74 75 72 36 69 50 66 88 55 62 59 78 52 81

77 83 84 91 89 62 94 73 90 106 75 82 81 87 74 95

W

mostly sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.03 - 0.05 + 0.17 + 0.63 + 0.18

Very unhealthy

Good

Hawaii High: 90°

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 16.36 23 11.76 Jefferson City 21 11.45 Hermann 20 8.68 Washington 25 14.86 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 12.48 Louisiana 15 12.01 Dam 24 25 19.49 Dam 25 26 19.22 Grafton 18 15.80 M.Price, Pool 419 418.70 M.Price, Tail. 21 8.15 St Louis 30 10.46 Chester 27 13.33 Cape Girardeau 32 19.04

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Jet Stream

-10s

A frontal boundary will trigger scattered showers and thunderstorms across portions of the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Ohio Valley, central Appalachians, and Southeast. Parts of Texas and the lower Mississippi Valley will also see a few showers and storms develop. Warm and dry conditions are expected throughout the Great Lakes, Midwest, and north-central Plains with high pressure in control. City

W

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.98” 1.63” 1.04” 27.65” 25.80”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

96° 69° 89° 70° 105° 54° 91° 70°

-0s Alaska Low: 33°

Chicago 65 / 87

Wintry Mix

0s

Few storms possible

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (1:39 p.m.) Low (3:14 p.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1934) Record Low (1972) High Last Year Low Last Year

10s

WEDNESDAY

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

Snow

30s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

69 69 66 68 68 67 69 63 67 68 64 67 68

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

T-storms

60s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

80s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

51 55 56 68 73 77 43 79 56 54 79 80 65 62 62 63

68 75 80 80 91 88 77 95 73 77 88 90 79 70 82 82

partly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy showers sunny showers partly cloudy partly cloudy


! l l i r G , t e S , y d a Re

GAS APPLIANCE SERVICE LLC Westport Location 2390 Centerline Industrial Dr. St. Louis, MO 63146 Ph: 314-567-6260 Mon - Fri 8-5 • Sat 10-2

FIREPLACE & GRILL CENTER Manchester Location Limited Time Offer Free Assembly & Delivery

14224 Manchester Rd. Manchester, MO 63011 Ph 636-394-6100 Mon - Sat 10-6 • Sun 12-5

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Saturday • 08.11.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Neither vulnerable, North deals NORTH ♠A K 6 ♥10 8 7 5 4 ♦A J 6 4 ♣Q WEST EAST ♠J 10 9 7 5 4 2 ♠Q 3 ♥J ♥Q 9 6 ♦9 3 ♦Q 10 8 7 2 ♣8 3 2 ♣7 6 4 SOUTH ♠8 ♥A K 3 2 ♦K 5 ♣A K J 10 9 5 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♥ Pass 2♣ Pass 2♦ Pass 3♥ Pass 3♠ Pass 4NT Pass 5♥* Pass 7♣ All pass *Two key cards without the queen of hearts Opening lead: Jack of ♠ Key Card Blackwood told South that the queen of hearts was missing, but that didn’t deter him from bidding a grand slam. His bid of seven clubs gave partner a choice between playing in hearts or clubs. Holding weak hearts and the golden queen of clubs, North happily passed in seven clubs. South won the opening spade lead with dummy’s ace and cashed the queen of clubs.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Many players at this point would have crossed to their hand with either the king of diamonds or the ace of hearts. This South made the clairvoyant play of cashing the king of spades, discarding a heart, and then ruffing a spade. Seeing East show out on the third spade made a huge difference in the rest of the play. Two high trumps showed that West had started with three clubs along with his seven spades. When West discarded on the second high heart, that meant that he had started with exactly two diamonds. East was known to hold the queen of hearts, and he would have to keep it to protect against South’s three of hearts. All declarer needed to do was run all of his clubs and keep a lookout for the queen of hearts. He came down to a three-card ending, East had discarded down to two diamonds in order to keep his queen of hearts. The king of diamonds and a diamond to the ace was sure to drop the queen, and the jack gave South had his 13th trick. Well done!

CRYPTOQUIP

1 7 14 15 16 17 18 20 21

22 23 24 25

Across

Loud, as a radio What stars do Repeatedly hit Some petroleum Play out, as events “I wanna hear everything” Pioneer in steam engines Complete coverage? Early people who used a base-20 numerical system Sorrowful cries Rapper ___ Rhymes What closes on Sundays? Cut

WORD GAME August 11 WORD — PRANDIAL (PRANDIAL: PRAN-dee-ul: Of or relating to a meal.) Average mark 30 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 43 or more words in PRANDIAL? The list will be published Monday. YESTERDAY’S WORD — OCCIPITAL octal coal pica topi opal coat picot topic optic coati pilot topical optical coca pita alit otic coil plait alto calico cola plat atop capitol colic plot lactic capo colt politic laic cilia iota taco licit clap italic tail lotic clip pact talc clop pail tipi clot patio toil RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

27 Fun bit of trivia 32 ___ Tech (former for-profit school) 33 Olympic gymnastics gold medalist Raisman 34 “Children of the Albatross” author 35 Vietnamese soup 36 Doesn’t snap 40 Billies 41 Packing ___ 42 They may have stained-glass windows 45 Playbill bit 46 Police line? 47 Cut 48 Internet in-jokes that have gone viral, in modern lingo

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

50 Individual’s unique use of language 52 How dishes are usually sold 54 Martial arts holds that are hard to escape 55 President Bartlet on “The West Wing” 56 One waiting for the captain? 57 Invites out for

Down

1 ___-Bakr, longtime adviser to Muhammad 2 Any member of Saul’s tribe, in the Bible 3 Close friend of Hamilton, in “Hamilton” 4 Fighter of Ferocious Flea in 1960s cartoons 5 Hamilton and 3-Down, in “Hamilton” 6 Quashes 7 “Absolutely unacceptable!” 8 Cartoonist Kelly 9 Breed 10 Travel from site to site? 11 Screwballs 12 Calculus calculation

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 08.11.2018

If Aug. 11 is your birthday • This year you break past established boundaries. You seem to be able to incorporate new ideas that work well and surmount obstacles. Others admire your ability to cut past the frivolous to the relevant. A fellow Leo demonstrates the intensity and fun-loving nature of your sign. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Confusion comes up with a misunderstanding. Both sides see a situation differently. A new beginning becomes possible after you wipe away the various perspectives. Do not mull over the situation; instead, go off and pursue a favorite pastime. Tonight: Act like it’s date night. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You might be more grounded than you realize. You have been involved with so much unpredictability that you have difficulty associating your life with stability. You are likely to decide on a new beginning in your personal life. Tonight: Happiest close to home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Reach out to key friends and loved ones. You could feel differently than they do about a project or hobby. You might not want to verbalize what you are thinking and feeling about their plans. Ask questions. Tonight: You can find amusement nearby. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You see life from a new perspective. A child or loved one distracts you; he or she is so full of life and instinctively comes toward you. Be with those who delight you. Share strong feelings. Tonight: Try to stay level, even if you feel a little off. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You feel the pressure of a solar eclipse in your sign. Usually, this type of phenomena can cause a draining of energy. It also could point to a new life path. Understand where you are coming from if you are feeling difficult or grumpy. Tonight: Ask and you shall receive. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You feel as if you do not have the control you would like.

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You might feel positive. Guard against overcompensating to deal with a problem. You are likely to get a new perspective on the issue, but others could feel confused. Tonight: Not too late. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Examine what you want from a friendship as well as your long-term desires. Express your needs. Your sense of humor will carry you through a lot of what has occurred. What is clear is that you are changing your choices and direction. Tonight: Let a friend join your plans. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Beam in more of what you want. Others might be aware of your desires. Interactions could be strong and at times overwhelming. You might want to make a change in your commitments professionally or in your personal life. Tonight: A force to behold. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Your personality helps others relax or forget about a problem that is happening. Understand that you can make a difference by remaining open. You have been working on becoming more visible to others and to yourself! Tonight: Head to a happening place. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH One-on-one relating takes you to a new level of understanding. You like what a loved one shares; you could feel connected to him or her as a result. Visualize what you desire. Questions come forth that are worth discussing. Tonight: Allow a friend to come in closer. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Be playful and you’ll become more easygoing. A close friend or loved one could be doting on you, which will make you feel great. Spending time together proves good for both of you. Tonight: Respond to an invitation with enthusiasm. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You might decide to dedicate your day to accomplishing an important matter or finishing a project. You might be doing the summer’s last heavy cleaning or working on your garden. A loved one joins in because he or she cares about you. Tonight: Relax with a book.

Puzzle by Ryan McCarty

13 Multi-time WNBA All-Star ___ Delle Donne 15 Be a homebody 19 Mary Jane 21 Zayn formerly of One Direction 23 “___ chance!” 25 Bud inducted into Cooperstown in 2017 26 Belts 28 Performs some light surgery?

29 Loss of a sound at the start of a word, as “opossum” to “possum” 30 Spot in the third balcony, say 31 Trespassing and defamation 37 Chemical compounds in so-called hospital smell 38 Poisons

39 1994 Jim Carrey comedy 42 2007 #1 Alicia Keys album 43 Man of the cloth 44 Moves at a crawl? 46 Mexican bread 48 Art ___ 49 Goya subject 51 Alley-oop starter 53 Tennyson’s “You Ask Me, Why, ___ Ill at Ease”

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0707

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

WORDY GURDY

STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

08.11.2018 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Say ‘I do’ to dumping thoughtless friend

Dear Flabbergasted • You should conclude that your co-worker and “friend” is someone with no class whatsoever. Have the dress cleaned, and give HER the bill. Then distance yourself from this person. Dear Abby • I have been in a relationship with my girlfriend, who lives in her native Germany, for almost two years. We met online

Dear Abby • I am going through a rough divorce. I’ll spare you the details, but suffice it to say, I had to get an order of protection against my soon-to-be ex. I intended to keep my husband’s last name because we have a child together and I want my last name to be the same as my child’s. The thing is, I’m so disgusted with his behavior that the thought of keeping his name makes me sick. What should I do? — Single Soon in Ohio

thanks to a mutual online friend of mine and school friend of hers. My girlfriend struggles with her body image, and I’m not sure how to help other than call her beautiful often. She’s thin by “American standards,” as she puts it, but for a German she is larger than most, which is why she thinks she’s fat, despite the fact that she’s slim and pretty. What can I do to help her? — Supportive in New Hampshire Dear Supportive • Other than continuing to reassure her that in your eyes she’s beautiful, there isn’t much you can do long-distance. However, there is plenty SHE can do. She should discuss her fixation with a doctor who can explain what a healthy weight should be for someone her height and build. If her problem is all in her head, it’s possible she needs counseling for body dysmorphia, a disorder in which people of normal weight are convinced they are heavy. It’s not uncommon.

Dear Single Soon • Many parents have different names than their children. If keeping your almostex-husband’s last name makes you sick to your stomach now, in a few years you may have a major case of indigestion. Change your name when the divorce is final because the longer you wait to do it, the more complicated it may become. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Clippers are longer. 2. Ladder rung is added. 3. Gutter is not as wide. 4. Apple on ground is missing. 5. Cap is different. 6. Fence is not as wide.

Dear Abby • My co-worker and supposed friend asked if she could borrow my wedding dress because she thought it was so beautiful. I was thrilled to lend it to her and paid for the alterations ($200 plus) as her wedding present. I accompanied her to her fittings and helped her plan her wedding. The kicker: My husband and I were not invited to the wedding, and when she returned my gown, it had lipstick on it and cake down the front. It wasn’t even in a bag — she just handed it to me. What should I think about this? — Flabbergasted in Florida

TV SATURDAY

MISS MANNERS

Mockery in public is difficult to endure Dear Miss Manners • I was riding a crowded metro train at rush hour, people packed together, with no chance to move away from a group of eight people who were mocking, berating and laughing at me and other passengers. It became obvious quickly about whom they were speaking, and equally obvious that they were intending us all to hear. Except to endure the embarrassment, was there recourse? Gentle Reader • You might say, to the other innocent victims in an equally loud voice, “I do so love street theater, don’t you?” Dear Miss Manners • For various reasons, I’m estranged from my parents and, by extension, so are my husband and children. While the estrangement is irrelevant to my father, it bothers my mother, but not enough to make amends. Although she has access to her

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shocked. She said I should either give the gifts away or send them back, but I shouldn’t tell my kids they’re from me as this is quite rude and an etiquette violation. What is the etiquette for receiving gifts from estranged individuals? I intentionally do not write thank-you notes, although I would otherwise.

other grandchildren, I think the threat of embarrassment looms, as she’s the only person in her family and social circle to be denied access to relatives. So far, she has been able to conceal this fact, and I have not said anything — and will not. (My children see my in-laws, so they’re not missing out on grandparents.) As a way to get back into my good graces, my mother sends gifts for all holidays, special occasions and for no reason. Rather than explain to them why they get presents from a grandparent they’ve never met, I’ve been telling my kids the gifts are from me. My husband is none the wiser, and I do not think he cares. My children have also never inquired about my side of the family, but when they do, I have an age-appropriate explanation ready. I confided this information to a close friend, and she was

7:00

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Gentle Reader • This is not so much rude as it is fraudulent. If you are not going to acknowledge the presents, the honorable thing would be to return them. Or to send a letter saying that you do not wish to receive any more.

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METV Svengoolie: The Wolf Man. (cc) 24

Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106. Miss Manners’ son, Nicholas Ivor Martin, and her daughter, Jacobina Martin, contribute to this column.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 08.11.2018

CAROLYN HAX

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

What does asking a partner to change say about you? FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Adapted from a recent online discussion. Carolyn: Where do you draw the line between controlling behavior and wanting a relationship you are comfortable with? Example — I don’t want to be with someone who hangs out in bars on the regular. Am I being controlling by telling my significant other: “I don’t like it when you go out drinking with friends so much”? Aren’t I allowed to make that request and act accordingly? — Preference

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

Answer • You can mention it, sure, and see what comes of it, and act accordingly. That’s the easy answer. It’s not controlling just to ask something once or on occasion; control involves a combination of requests and manipulation, including punishments for “wrong” answers. I think there’s a subtler point to be made, though. Before telling your partner something like this, pragmatism demands thought first to how much you’re asking and expecting a person to change. To use this example: “I don’t want to be with someone who hangs out in bars on the regular.” That’s fine, and it’s your prerogative. Your partner might well be happy to know this about you and happy to go out less because s/he could take or leave it anyway. But if your partner is someone who hangs out in bars “on the regular” and really enjoys it, isn’t that who your partner will be, whether s/he is at a bar at the moment or not? And if you speak up and if your partner agrees not to go out as much, will s/ he be happy living that way from now on? Will it be OK in the near term but start to chafe? Will your partner revert to type when your relationship moves from new to something more comfortable — where your togetherness takes more effort and commitment? And what of the personality traits, social nature, behind enjoying bars — those will be in place regardless and might be mismatched with your nature. Maybe it’s easier to think of this in terms of realism: Should a person who balks at going to bars even be with someone who likes to hang out in bars? Either way, it seems fair only to ask for changes on the margins. Wanting bigger ones suggests changes should start with you. And of course you need to accept the response, be it words or deeds or inaction, to any such request for what it is — then respond accordingly from there. Continuing to press for change that keeps not happening is misery for you, misery for the person you’re constantly trying to correct and misery for all the people you’re complaining to about your misery about this person’s refusal to change.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

tellme@washpost.com

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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8.11.18  

8.11.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

8.11.18  

8.11.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch