7.26.16

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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

TUESDAY • 07.26.2016 • $1.50

TUMULT IS CALMED In strong endorsement of Clinton, Sanders highlights economic similarities

Experience, command of issues are touted by Michelle Obama

Bernie Sanders

Michelle Obama

High-wattage speakers help ease earlier tension from Sanders’ supporters

Elizabeth Warren

Sarah Silverman

AP PHOTOS

ANGLING FOR A SEAT Favored in general election, Democratic candidates in 1st District try to get their pet issues before voters ahead of primary

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Rep. William Lacy Clay heads to a visit Monday with campers at Camp Sun Splash in Fairground Park. Clay has served eight terms.

BY KORAN ADDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

With a week remaining until the Aug. 2 primary, the Democratic candidates running for the 1st Congressional District seat are making their final push to convince voters to send them to Washington.

New Ferguson code keeps lid on conduct BY STEPHEN DEERE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FERGUSON • For nearly two

years, Ferguson City Council meetings have featured gag gifts, props, banners, shouts, rants, curses and “unwelcome” physical contact. To restore order, the City Council unanimously approved a Code of Conduct ordinance last month. The three-page, 1,140word law prohibits props, obscene language and approaching the dais without See FERGUSON • Page A5

Federal judge approves monitor for consent decree • A5

TODAY

Incumbent Rep. William Lacy Clay is making the pitch that his advocacy on behalf of low-income Missourians, his efforts to redevelop north St. Louis and his track record of bringing federal dollars back to Missouri, make him worthy of a ninth term in Congress. His main challenger, state

Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal is campaigning on the idea that persistent challenges, including socioeconomic inequality, health concerns related to radioactive waste and a lack of quality education choices for district residents have gone unanswered for too long. A long shot in the race, St.

See CANDIDATES • Page A5

See DEMOCRATS • Page A7

SAGAMIHARA, JAPAN • At least 19 people were killed and about 20 wounded in a knife attack Tuesday at a home for people with mental disabilities in a city just outside Tokyo in the worst mass killing in generations in Japan. Police said they responded to a call about 2:30 a.m. from an employee saying something horrible was happening at the facility in the city of Sagamihara, 30 miles west of Tokyo. A man turned himself in at a police station about two hours later, police in Sagamihara said. He left a knife in his car when he entered the station. He has been arrested on sus-

WASHINGTON • The FBI

Satoshi Uematsu and said he had worked at the facility until February. Japanese media re-

said Monday that it was investigating how thousands of Democratic National Committee emails were hacked, a breach that Hillary Clinton’s campaign maintains was committed by Russia to benefit Donald Trump. A statement from the FBI confirmed that it was “investigating a cyber intrusion involving the DNC,” adding that “a compromise of this nature is something we take very seriously.” Wikileaks posted emails Friday that suggested the DNC was favoring Clinton over her rival Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., during the primary season. Clinton’s campaign pointed to a massive hacking of DNC computers in June that cybersecurity firms linked to the Russian government.

See JAPAN • Page A4

See FBI • Page A7

KYODO NEWS VIA AP

At least 19 people were killed in a knife attack Tuesday at this home for mentally disabled adults in Sagamihara, outside Tokyo.

picion of attempted murder and trespassing. Officials in Kanagawa prefecture, which borders Tokyo, identified the suspect as

UMSL ends year on positive note

ADVANTAGE: CUBS SPORTS

FBI will try to unravel DNC email hacking BY VIVIAN SALAMA AND JACK GILLUM Associated Press

BY MARI YAMAGUCHI Associated Press

MOSTLY CLOUDY

CHANCE OF STORMS

Louis School Board member Bill Haas considers himself the candidate with the most ambitious ideas, therefore the most likely to bring about sweeping change. His platform includes improving third-grade reading levels, brokering a lasting peace

At least 19 killed, more injured in knife attack near Tokyo

87°/73° 88°/73°

PHILADELPHIA • Ending months of animosity, Bernie Sanders robustly embraced his former rival Hillary Clinton Monday night as a champion for the same economic causes that enlivened his supporters, signaling it was time for them, too, to rally behind the D e m o c ra t i c Full coverage nominee in A6-7 the campaign against Republican Donald Trump. “Any objective observer will conclude that — based on her ideas and her leadership — Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States,” he declared in a headlining address on the opening night of the Democratic convention. President Bill Clinton, watching from the audience, leapt to his feet and applauded, as did most of the delegates filling the convention arena. Sanders joined a highwattage line-up of speakers, including Michelle Obama, who delivered a forceful, impassioned defense of the Democratic nominee. Obama’s address all but wiped away earlier tumult in the convention hall that had exposed lingering tension be-

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal canvasses in Olivette this month. The 1st District is heavily Democratic.

Opening night

TOMORROW

BY JULIE PACE AND KEN THOMAS Associated Press

Why Yahoo no longer matters

• A2

• A10

Big insurer drops ‘gatekeepers’

• A10

1 M

WEATHER A16 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

CARDS-METS POSTPONED, DOUBLEHEADER PLANNED

Cards can’t aford a rental player

• B1

Vol. 138, No. 208 ©2016


M 1 TUESDAY • 07.26.2016 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

LAST-MINUTE GETAWAY? TRY THESE MISSOURI BEACHES

KIM ANDERSON Q-&-A: ‘I HAVE TO SET THE TONE.’

YOUR VACATION PHOTO COULD BE WORTH $1 MILLION

Dr. Beach listed earlier this year his top 10 beaches in the U.S. But what about land-locked Missouri?

The Mizzou coach discusses various topics as the Tigers prepare for a trip to Italy and the upcoming season.

Send us your best vacation photos now for a chance to win up to $1,000 in our Destinations Photo Contest.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

WHAT’S UP

Weather forecasters change as quickly as the St. Louis weather

SEWER EXPLODES The Mill Creek sewer, inundated by high river water and oil and gas from a recent fire, explodes beneath Chouteau Avenue, killing four people..

JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WEATHER, INCOMING • One thing you can say about Ballwin native Craig Moeller, the new chief meteorologist at KSDK (Channel 5): He knows how to get of to a good start. Moeller started Monday at KSDK, but not before posting a video to the station’s Facebook page that shows him taking off a Moeller road-gray Cardinals jersey and donning a home-white version. “St. Louis, it is so good to be home,” Moeller said as he stood in front of the Stan Musial statue on the west side of Busch Stadium. He grew up in Ballwin and graduated from Lafayette High and the University of Missouri-Columbia. For the last 19 years, Moeller has been the morning-afternoon weather personality at WVEC (Channel 13) in Norfolk, Va. Until Moeller arrived, KSDK’s weather bureau had been running without a chief

since Cindy Preszler (and Mike Roberts) retired in April. Since then, the bulk of the forecasting fell to Scott Connell, Jessica Quick, Katie Horner and Ric Kearbey. WEATHER, OUTGOING • Self-proclaimed “weather nerd” Mark J. Zinn has landed his dream job — becoming the weekend weather man at KNPN-TV (Channel 26) in St. Joseph, Mo. Zinn, 27, will ankle his job producing KTVI (Channel 2) sportscaster Martin Kilcoyne’s morning radio show on KTRS-AM 550 to start his screen career on Aug. 4. He also will work as a reporter three Zinn days a week. He is a 2007 graduate of St. Louis University High and a 2011 grad of St. Louis University, where he earned a degree in urban afairs. He also is the founder and managing editor of StormAlert STL (@ stormalert) which ofers weather updates on social media sites. GATEWAY GRADES • A poignant moment in “The Godfather Part II” comes when the doomed Fredo painfully pleads to brother Michael: “I can handle things. I’m smart. Not like everybody says, like dumb.”

Is that STL talking? The ever-generating list machine at marketing site WalletHub now tackles the sure-to-ruffle-feathers subject of “Most and Least Educated Cities.” Armed with nine “relevant metrics,” the listers rank St. Louis at No. 33 out of the largest 150 metropolitan areas in the U.S. — which is the top 22 percent. We finished just behind Salt Lake City and just ahead of Anchorage. Kansas City registered at No. 41, and Springfield checked in at No. 94. The major factor in the rankings, 80 percent of the total, has to do with how high of a degree residents have attained. The 20 other percent is based on quality of public schools, number of colleges and racial and gender gaps in education. The top 10 metro areas when it comes to education attained are: Ann Arbor, Mich.; Washington; San Jose, Calif.; Durham-Chapel Hill, N.C.; Madison, Wis.; Boston; San Francisco; Provo, Utah; Austin, Texas; and Seattle. On the bottom end, Nos. 146-148 belong to three metros in California (Modesto, Bakersfield and Visalia-Porterville), while the bottom two areas are both in Texas, Brownsville and McAllen. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

UMSL awards record number of degrees, ends tough inancial year on positive note BY KORAN ADDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The University of Missouri-St. Louis closed out its fiscal year on a positive note, setting a record for the number of degrees awarded and posting its thirdhighest fundraising total in school history. A record 3,199 students received degrees during the 2016 fiscal year in graduation ceremonies in May, August and December. Among those who graduated were 632 underrepresented minority students — also an UMSL record. In making the announcement, Chancellor Thomas George called it a proud moment. For the school of roughly 16,000 students, graduating 3,000 students a year has been a goal UMSL leaders have been working toward. They first hit that number during the 2013-14 school year, then followed it up with 3,146 students last year. “This has just been an all-out efort,” George said. He attributes much of the success to what he calls, “Finish Your De-

gree” scholarships the school has been providing students. “We’ve been awarding them to second-semester seniors who’ve run out of funds,” he said. “It’s a common problem, so those scholarships make a big diference.” UMSL also recorded a strong fundraising year, bringing in $27 million. The high of $31 million was recorded several years ago, George said. The robust fundraising is one indication that alumni are generally willing to stick by a school even in the face of controversy. UMSL spent much of the school year reeling from an unexpected drop in enrollment. School leaders were expecting a 2 percent increase but instead got a 4 percent decrease. As a result, UMSL spent the majority of the school year bracing for an estimated $15 million budget shortfall for the fiscal year that began July 1. In April, George announced a series of cost-cutting measures — including the elimination of 85 positions over the next two years — in order to build a sustainable budget for the future.

Meanwhile, UMSL’s sister school, the University of Missouri-Columbia, posted a record fundraising year, bringing in $171 million. Mizzou’s previous high of $164.5 million was set in 2014. Mizzou’s record fundraising year caught many industry watchers by surprise, considering last fall’s race-related protests and the ensuing national notoriety. UMSL’s positive numbers caught the attention of the St. Louis Regional Chamber. Greg Laposa, the chamber’s vice president of education strategies, described being delighted upon hearing of the record number of degrees awarded. “The achievements at UMSL are striking, Laposa said in a statement. “We know that the benefits of having a degree significantly enhances the economic opportunities for both the individual and community in which they live.” Founded in 1963, UMSL boasts more than 95,000 alumni, including 72 percent who live and work in the St. Louis region. Koran Addo • 314-340-8305 @KoranAddo on Twitter kaddo@post-dispatch.com

THIS DAY IN 1892

HEADS UP TEMPORAL CITIES Temporal Cities, part of Benton Park Summer Event Series, returns for its second year from 2 to 8 p.m. Saturday. It is a collectively built interactive environment constructed by neighbors, artists and participants. Themed blanket forts feature activities from puppetry to costume brigades, art boats, workshops, yoga and a music festival. Admission is free at Benton Park, 3100 S. Jeferson, St. Louis. For more information, go to www.bpnastl.org To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS ‘BRING IT ON’ When • 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday Where • McLeod Theater, Communications Building, 1100 Lincoln Drive on the Southern Illinois University Campus, Carbondale How much • $20 for adults, $10 for students, $8 for children More info • 618-453-6000 or playhouse.siu.edu McLeod Summer Playhouse wraps its 2016 season with “Bring It On,” the Broadwaypop, hip-hop cheerleading musical. The production features area high-school talent and is an annual collaboration with Carbondale Community Arts under the title All Southern High School Theater Project. Tickets may be purchased in person Monday-Friday noon-4:30 at the McLeod Theater or 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the SIU Arena Box oice, online or by phone. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $422 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $15 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Monday: 15-20-32-36-47 Lucky ball: 05

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.5 million SHOW ME CASH Monday: 01-08-21-25-38 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $65,000 PICK-3 Midday: 324 Evening: 672 PICK-4 Midday: 0290 Evening: 8418

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Monday Midday: 02-20-31-38-41 Evening: 03-05-14-38-43 LOTTO Monday: 06-11-23-28-34-51 Extra shot: 23 Estimated jackpot: $16 million PICK-3 Monday Midday: 462 FB: 8 Evening: 697 FB: 2 PICK-4 Monday Midday: 8783 FB: 1 Evening: 3506 FB: 0

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

FIND THE CHEAPEST GAS IN TOWN

CORRECTIONS

Check gas prices and see real-time traic conditions.

The estimated employment population of downtown St. Louis is 80,000. A chart accompanying a story about Clayton’s growth, published Sunday, was incorrect.

STLTODAY.COM/TRAFFIC

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LOCAL

07.26.2016 • TuEsday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Couple shot at store are improving Girl, 13, in custody; GoFundMe page seeks to help victims pay bills BY ASHLEY JOST st. Louis Post-dispatch

BELLEFONTAINE NEIGHBORS • A couple critically injured in

a shooting at their daughter’s beauty supply store in north St. Louis County are improving, a family friend said. The man and woman, both in their 70s, were shot last Tuesday while working at King’s Beauty Supply Store, 10073 Lewis and Clark Boulevard. The suspect, a 13-year-old girl, turned herself in the following day, surrounded by family members. Joo Lim, a long-time family

friend, said the female victim of the shooting — the store owner’s mother — has moved out of the intensive care unit and is stable. The store owner’s father, the second shooting victim, is still in critical condition, but Lim said doctors are saying he will likely survive. “They’re looking on the bright side,” she said, adding that that wasn’t the case last week when it came to the man’s injuries. He has had at least three surgeries since the shooting. Lim set up a GoFundMe page with the goal of raising $5,000 for the O’Fallon, Mo., couple’s medi-

cal bills and to support the family, because no one is working at the beauty supply store and probably won’t for a while, Lim said. The store owner is “scared to work there now,” Lim said. The page passed the $5,000 goal, but Lim said she was hoping to collect more donations, because the couple could be hospitalized for weeks more. The teen suspect is in proceedings with the St. Louis Family Court, meaning all of the information about her and her case are private, Det. Lt. Shawn Applegate of the Bellefontaine Neighbors Police Department said.

Applegate said it could take 90 days or more before the court will decide if the girl can be certified as an adult to face charges in the case. He said they would look at the child’s history with the court and behavioral issues at school, among other things, before a decision was made. He said the girl declined to make a statement to police when she surrendered Wednesday. Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis ireighters douse an apparently vacant home in the 3800 block of Greer Avenue on Monday. Spreading lames set two adjacent vacant homes ablaze before the ire was contained in the late evening.

injured in the crash. EAST ST. LOUIS > Driver who plowed into crowd gets probation • A driver who plowed into a crowd of people on an East St. Louis street last summer, hitting four pedestrians, pleaded guilty Thursday and was sentenced to probation. St. Clair County Judge John Baricevic put Moesha Allen on two years’ probation for each of the four counts of aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. She pleaded guilty of those charges Thursday after prosecutors agreed to drop ive other charges, including failure to report an accident and aggravated battery in a public place. Allen, 19, must be supervised by an electronic

monitoring device while on probation, according to the St. Clair County state’s attorney. A hearing to determine restitution is set for Sept. 22. Allen lives in the 1200 block of McCasland Avenue in East St. Louis. The June 27, 2015, incident was in the 500 block of 15th Street near Lincoln Park. Four people, with their backs to the car, lew up onto the hood as the car sped into them. The people hit escaped serious injury, police say. Police say the altercation stemmed from an incident earlier in the day among a group of girls at the St. Clair Square Mall in Fairview Heights, police say.

EAST ST. LOUIS > One dead, two wounded in shooting • A shooting left one dead and two others, including a child, injured in East St. Louis Sunday night. Illinois State Police said two adults and two children were walking in the 2100 block of Martin Luther King Drive about 11:15 p.m. when someone opened ire. Asante McCoy, 20, was killed. It’s unclear if he died at the scene or later at a hospital. Another adult and one of the two children were shot. Their conditions were not available. The second child wasn’t injured, police said. Anyone with information about the shooting should contact the East St. Louis Police Department at 618482-6767, CrimeStoppers

at 866-371-8477 or Illinois Special Agent Travis Irwin at 618-346-3769. DELLWOOD > Burglars hit restaurant • Smash-andgrab burglars hit one of the locations of soul-food restaurant and realitytelevision subject Sweetie Pie’s late Sunday. Police in Dellwood were called after someone shattered the front glass door at the restaurant, 9841 West Florissant Avenue. St. Louis County Police Oicer Benjamin Granda said money was taken, but he didn’t reveal how much. Granda said county police were investigating the break-in. A surveillance video shows a burglar throwing the cash register repeatedly to the ground.

Veterans panel meets on chief’s future after $2.8 million verdict BY KURT ERICKSON st. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • A

$2.8 million jury verdict against Missouri’s top veterans oicial has left a commission that oversees the agency scrambling to decide what comes next. Just days after a Cole County jury sided against Missouri Veterans Commission Executive Director Larry Kay for sexual discrimination and harassment of a former employee, members of the commission met behind closed doors for nearly two hours Monday to discuss Kay’s future. After the meeting, the commission had no public comment. At least one member wants Kay to resign. Others want to hear what the commission’s attorneys think before outlining a plan. “The director serves at the pleasure of the commission. We’re waiting for the analysis to be done,” said Scott Englund of Jefferson City, who chairs the nine-member panel that includes veterans advocates and state lawmakers. The commission had

not been scheduled to meet until August, but the jury’s decision on Thursday in favor of former commission employee Pat Rowe Kerr triggered the emergency meeting. Although the Missouri attorney general’s office, which defended Kay, said appeals may be possible, Sen. Scott Sifton, D-Affton, swiftly called for Kay’s resignation, saying the commission’s 1,750 workers “need and deserve a work environment free from the kind of hostility the jury found occurred.” The commission consults the governor and the Legislature regarding the oversight of programs for veterans, including cemeteries and nursing homes. K a y, w h o e a r n s $105,300 annually, joined the commission as deputy director in 2006 and was promoted to executive director two years later. Kerr, the commission’s former senior adviser of veterans outreach, claimed in a lawsuit that she lost her job in 2009 because Kay has a problem with older, successful women. She was 56 when she was fired.

In the nearly two-weeklong trial in Jeferson City, Kerr’s attorneys argued that Kay not only showed favoritism to men and younger employees in his role as commission director, but interfered with Kerr’s attempts to help veterans after she was fired and showed similar discrimination toward women during his career as a military officer. She also alleged a hostile work environment. Kay contended that he fired Kerr because of budget cuts after the economic strain of the Great Recession. The jury took four hours to award Kerr $1.3 million in actual damages and $1.575 in punitive damages. Missouri Attorney General spokeswoman Nanci Gonder declined to comment on the case. After issuing his call for Kay to step down Friday, Sifton declined comment on Monday. Commissioner Bill Wallace of St. Louis also deferred questions to Englund. “We’re in the process of legal counsel, so we have no comment at this time,”

Wallace said. Kay could not be reached for comment Monday. A sign in the veterans commission headquarters in Jefferson City

He could still face indictment in another death BY ROBERT PATRICK st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A St. Louis

LAW & ORDER

ST. LOUIS > Go kart rider hurt in crash with police SUV • A man was injured Saturday after running a red light in his go kart and crashing into a marked police SUV. The crash took place abiut 11:30 p.m. Saturday at the intersection of North Kingshighway Boulevard and St. Louis Avenue in the Kingsway East neighborhood. Police said the unidentiied man was driving west on St. Louis Avenue in a go kart when he drove through a red light and hit the driver-side panel of a southbound St. Louis police Chevrolet Tahoe. The go kart driver was initially in unstable condition but was upgraded to critical but stable by Monday. The police oicer was not

Plea deal rejected by man charged in killings

showed he was out of the office when the meeting was underway. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

man accused of a role in three murders rejected on Monday a plea deal for a life term in prison, despite a risk of additional charges in another death and a shooting. Jacobi R. Temple, 24, is currently facing a sixcount indictment that accuses him of a heroin distribution conspiracy and a role in three deaths. The indictment against Temple, Demante Syms and Samuel Spires claims that they were involved in the March 27, 2015, fatal shootings of James “Jimmy” Lacey, 47, and Paige Schaefer, 23, in the 4400 block of Itaska Street in the Bevo Mill neighborhood, as well as the death of Schaefer’s mother, Tammie Thurmond, 54. Thurmond died two days after being found in an alley behind the 4200 block of South 37th Street, near South Grand Boulevard in Dutchtown. Another woman was shot and left for dead, but survived, police said. In court Monday, Temple’s attorneys and Assistant U.S. Attorney Cristian Stevens said that he was rejecting a plea deal that would result in the recommendation of a life sentence in prison. He was also warned that if convicted of all charges at trial, he could face more prison time and federal prosecutors may charge him or others with new crimes. Among those crimes are the April 1, 2013, shooting death of Glenda Jackson, 39; a nonfatal shooting on Dec. 20, 2012; and an attempt to influence testimony, according to court testimony. “I comprehend,” he said several times. Police at the time said that Jackson, of the 2000 block of East John Avenue, was shot in the chest in a home in the 4300 block of Warne Avenue when she tried to intervene in a robbery. A new charge related to the murder would automatically trigger a review by the attorney general about whether Temple should face the death penalty. The attorney general declined to seek the death penalty for the other murders. As a relative of Temple’s rocked back and forth in her seat, Temple insisted that he understood the consequences of rejecting the deal. A photo of Temple was not available. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

Silver Restoration Event Are you proud to use & display your family silver… or do you hide it away because it’s old or broken?

Before

SAVE 20% 4 Days Only! No appointment necessary See Store Schedule Below

For four days only, Silver Restora tio n Expert DaNeen Bryan will be at our stores to provide free recommendations and estimates on bringing new life back to your old sterling & silverplated heirlooms. Missing parts replaced. Broken pieces repaired. Sterling silver polished. Replating too! You’ll love entertaining again with your family silver or just having it restored to pass along to the next generation. So gather up your old silver today and come Save 20% Off!

Huelsman Jewelers Tue, July 26 • 10:00 - 5:00 3828 S Lindbergh Blvd (Sunset Village) Sunset Hills • 314-842-1000

Blust’s Jewelers Wed, July 27 • 10:00 - 5:00 12716 Olive Blvd. (Bellerive Plaza) Creve Coeur • 314-878-6003

After

Byron Cade, Inc. Thu & Fri, July 28 & 29 • 10:00 - 4:00 13474 Clayton Rd (Mason Woods Village) Town and Country • 314-721-4701

25-Year Warranty on Replating


NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

Two dead in shooting at Florida nightclub said at a news conference in Fort Myers. He said gun laws were not to blame. “The Second Amendment has never shot anybody. The evil did this.” Fort Myers interim police Chief Dennis Eads said the shooting was not an act of terror. Police detained three people and were searching for others, he added. He declined to give a motive for the shooting or discuss details, saying the investigation is ongoing. Hours after the shooting, police had marked more than two dozen shell casings in the parking lot outside the club. The shooting happened about 12:30 a.m. Monday, just as the club was closing and parents were picking up their children. Se c u r i ty g u a rd B ra n dy Mclaughlin, who was hired for the event, said she saw someone with a semiautomatic rifle open fire, with the attack sounding like “firecrackers.” Her car was hit in the spray of bullets. “The rapper was upset, someone not being able to perform,” she said. “It wasn’t targeted, terrorist or gays, or anything like that. It wasn’t a black or white situation. It was an idiot. An idiot with a firearm.”

Incident that left 17 injured started with argument, police say ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORT MYERS, FLA. • With the

Orlando massacre still fresh on everyone’s mind, the mother of a young man who was slain at a nightclub early Monday had warned her son about what to do if there were a shooting: “Hit the floor, find a table.” But when gunfire erupted at the Club Blu parking lot, Stef’an Strawder, 18, had nowhere to hide. He was killed along with a boy, 14. Seventeen other people ranging in age from 12 to 27 were wounded at a swimsuit-themed party for teens. “I told him to look for all the exits if any kind of shooting would go off, to hit the floor, find a table and get out of the way ... because I thought about the people in Orlando. That was a big thing,” Strawder’s mother, Stephanie White, said. Because the shooting happened in the parking lot, “He didn’t have that chance,” she said. Florida is again reeling from a mass shooting at a nightclub, but instead of being committed by a terrorist spouting Islamist

NEWS-PRESS VIA AP

People embrace Monday after a fatal shooting at a theme party for teens at Club Blu in Fort Myers, Fla.

ideology, this rampage may have started with an argument over a rap performance. Police have not yet released a motive. The shooting also left Sean Archilles, 14, dead, and a state and its governor grappling with

another horror. The massacre at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub last month killed 49 and wounded dozens of others. “The positive is we are at a 45year low in our crime rate. The negatives — I can’t imagine this

Future is blank for VCRs TOKYO • Japanese electronics maker Funai Electric Co. says it’s yanking the plug on the world’s last video cassette recorder. A company spokesman, who requested anonymity citing company practice, confirmed Monday that production will end sometime this month, although he would not give a date. He said the company would like to continue production to meet customer requests, but can’t because key component makers are pulling out due to shrinking demand for VCRs. Many families and libraries have content stored in the VHS format and want to convert the tapes to DVD or other digital disks. They can do so using VHS/DVD converters, known as “combos” in Japan. Funai will be rolling out such products later this month, the spokesman said. Funai’s VCR factory, which is in China, is offlimits to media coverage for security reasons be-

cause other products are made at the same plant, he said. Funai began making videotape players in 1983, and videotape recorders in 1985. The company says they were among its alltime hit products. Last year, Funai made 750,000 VHS machines that played or recorded cassette tapes. In 2000, it made 15 million, 70 percent for the U.S. market, according to the company, based in Osaka, central Japan. Other products have also grown outdated with the advance of digital and other technology. That includes film cameras and floppy disks once used to store computer content, which were displaced by smaller memory devices with larger capacity and by cloud storage. Owners of VCRs are not as emotionally attached to their machines as are owners of Sony Corp.’s discontinued robotic dog Aibo, or the Boombox, the portable cassette player, with its deeply resonating speakers and cool designs, said No-

At least 19 are killed in kniing in Japan JAPAN • FROM A1

ports said he was 26. He entered the building about 2:10 a.m. by breaking a glass window on the first floor of a residential building at the facility, Shinya Sakuma, head of prefectural health and welfare division, said at a news conference. Kanagawa Gov. Yuji Kuroiwa expressed his condolences to the victims. The Sagamihara City fire department said 19 people were confirmed dead in the attack. The fire department said doctors at the scene had confirmed the deaths. The death toll could make this the worst mass killing in Japan in the postWorld War II era. A woman who lives across from the facility told Japanese broadcaster NHK that she saw police cars enter the facility about 3:30 a.m. “I was told by a policeman to stay inside my house, as it could be dangerous,” she said. “Then ambulances began arriving, and blood-covered people were taken away.” Japanese broadcaster NTV reported that Uematsu was upset because he had been fired, but that could not be independently confirmed. The facility, called the

Tsukui Yamayuri-en, is home to about 150 adult residents who have mental disabilities, Japan’s Kyodo News service said. Te l ev i s i o n fo o ta ge showed a number of ambulances parked outside, with medical and other rescue workers running in and out. Mass killings are relatively rare in Japan, which has extremely strict guncontrol laws. In 2008, seven people were killed by a man who slammed a truck into a crowd of people in central Tokyo’s Akihabara electronics district and then stabbed passersby. Fourteen were injured in 2010 by an unemployed man who stabbed and beat up passengers on two public buses outside a Japanese train station in Ibaraki Prefecture, about 25 miles northeast of Tokyo. A man who lives near the site of the latest attack said he was astonished such an attack happened in the quiet, semi-rural area near Mount Takao, a mountain popular with hikers. “Serious crimes happen around the world,” said Chikara Inabayashi, who was tending his watermelon patch. “We have to lock up the house when we go out, even in the countryside.”

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LOCAL

07.26.2016 • TuEsday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

ACLU lawsuit rebukes U. City mayor BY ROBERT PATRICK st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • In a federal lawsuit filed Monday, the American Civil Liberties Union says that University City Mayor Shelley Welsch should not have ordered police to eject a citizen who was speaking at a contentious meeting earlier this year. The suit says that on Jan. 11, 2016, Andrew Roberts was trying to read a prepared statement calling for the censure of Welsch over a proposed resolution that would itself have censured council member Terry Crow. The statement, the suit says, took up only one double-spaced page. Roberts began reading it when it was his turn during the public comment portion of the

meeting and was not disruptive, the suit says. According to an audio recording of the meeting, Welsch interrupted after Roberts said that she made “decisions out of pettiness and vindictiveness.” Welsch interrupted Roberts’ statement and ordered police to remove him from the building for making “personal” attacks on her, the suit says. He was also banned from speaking at meetings, although that ban has since been rescinded, the suit says. Roberts’ suit says that his statements were protected by the First Amendment and his ejection and speaking ban violated his due process rights. The lawsuit asks a judge to ban the city from restricting the speech of citizens based on the

content of that speech. It also asks for “compensatory and nominal damages” and for attorneys’ fees and costs. It names the city, but not Welsch. “The Constitution protects free speech and due process for all citizens, even when those in positions of power do not like the content of what is being said or the viewpoints expressed,” said Jefrey A. Mittman, executive director of the ACLU of Missouri, in a prepared statement announcing the suit. ACLU legal director Tony Rothert accused Welsch of misusing her powers “to intimidate and remove an individual exercising his right to free speech as protected by the First Amendment.” Welsch, reached Monday af-

ternoon by phone, said “I don’t want to comment on a lawsuit I haven’t seen.” In an email, she provided a copy of remarks she makes before most meetings, including repeated warnings against personal attacks. She wrote that she did not call Roberts to the podium when asked to speak on Jan. 25 and March 28, but council member Paulette Carr read a statement from him on two occasions. Welsch said Roberts had since made comments at three meetings. Welsch was seeking to censure Crow for forwarding an email containing what she claimed was a confidential legal opinion on political campaigning by public employees, one of a series of recent disputes.

The conflict at the heart of the suit started with the 2014 municipal election, in which five uniformed firefighters appeared in photographs supporting opponents of Welsch and two other incumbents. The firefighters were suspended, and Welsch and others later started a process that resulted in the privatization of emergency ambulance services in the city. After Roberts was ejected, the council went on to pass the resolution censuring Crow in a 4-3 vote. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

Clay’s fundraising has dwarfed his two opponents’ CANDIDATES • FROM A1

in the Middle East and ending animal cruelty on factory farms. The 1st District is heavily Democratic, so the winner of this three-way race is expected to have a clear path to victory in November’s general election. The district spans St. Louis, north St. Louis County and parts of the central corridor. On the Republican ballot, Steven G. Bailey, a business professor at the University of MissouriSt. Louis, is facing off against Paul Berry III, a bail bondsman and consultant. So far, Clay looks to be wellpositioned to win a seat he’s won eight times. On Monday, he secured a coveted endorsement from President Barack Obama. The president won St. Louis — which makes up a large part of the 1st District — by 82 percent of the vote four years ago. Obama is also currently enjoying an approval rating hovering near 50 percent.

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Rep. William Lacy Clay talks with campers Monday at Camp Sun Splash in Fairgrounds Park. A voters forum will be held Tuesday at 7 p.m.

A LOOK AT THE DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES

in this election to go to D.C. and be a voice for the people in this community.”

WILLIAM LACY CLAY Age: 59 Home: University City Elected to Missouri House, 1983; Missouri Senate, 1991; Congress since 2001.

MONEY MATTERS In more good news for Clay, his fundraising has dwarfed his opponents’. He started this election cycle with more than $300,000 in his campaign accounts. Over the last 19 months, he’s added nearly $500,000. After operating costs and other expenditures, Clay is approaching next week’s primary with more than $400,000 in campaign cash. Mea nwh i l e , C h a p p e l l e Nadal, started this cycle with no money in the bank. Since then, she’s raised $67,000 and spent $40,000. By mid-July, she had $26,920 in campaign dollars. Even with a clear financial disadvantage, Chappelle-Nadal believes this is the year of the antiestablishment candidate. With the rise of Donald Trump and the better-than-expected showing by Bernie Sanders, Chappelle-Nadal said there was proof that establishment candidates could no longer coast into office solely on name recognition. “When is Congressman Clay ever in St. Louis?” she asked. “When people were out in the

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal stops to pet Dusty as she speaks to Jack Muirhead, 69, while canvassing in Olivette this month.

MARIA CHAPELLE-NADAL Age: 41 Home: University City Elected to Missouri House, 2004; Missouri Senate, 2010. BILL HAAS Age: 71 Home: St. Louis Elected to St. Louis School Board, 1997, 2001 and 2010. (State appointed board began governing the school system in 2007.)

streets of Ferguson, no one knew where he was. There’s no playbook or script on how you respond to a human disaster, you just show up. The congressman didn’t show up.” The charge that Clay was absent during the Ferguson protests is one that has dogged him since the police killing of Michael Brown in August 2014. Clay bristles at that attack. He maintains that he did show up in Ferguson, but more importantly, he was a force behind the scenes pushing the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate Brown’s death.

That investigation, he said, has changed the way Ferguson and its police force operate today. “My political opponents see a tragedy like the death of Michael Brown, and they try to make political hay out of it,” he said. “I find that kind of rhetoric does not match my record of service to this community.” Last week, as temperatures inched near 100 degrees, the congressman canvassed North County, chatting with undecided voters at strip malls and talking up his political achievements. Speaking to a reporter, Clay pointed to his seat on the House Financial Services Committee where he worked on the DoddFrank Wall Street reform before later helping create the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. He also spoke about working with the Obama administration to secure $500 million for Missouri as part of the 2009 stimulus program and also pushing to keep the National GeospatialIntelligence Agency in St. Louis. Clay said he was also proud of his eforts to get St. Louis named as one of 22 national economic “promise zones” in which the federal government works with local leaders to boost job growth and reduce crime. “All anyone has to do is look at my record,” he said. “After that, I would ask them if they think there is a better person running

THE CHALLENGERS As for Chappelle-Nadal, she’s been striking out on foot every morning for months, wearing her neon green campaign shirt, hoping a persistent door-to-door campaign will pay of. She mostly talks about the radioactive West Lake landfill, the burning Bridgeton landfill and a number of other lesser-known underground waste-dumping sites that she says are leading to cancer-clusters. She has dozens of stories memorized, reciting off the top of her head people’s names, what kind of cancer they have, when they contracted it and where they live. “The same silence that allowed Ferguson to occur has allowed Bridgeton to occur,” she said. “This is my crusade. It is inhumane that nothing has been done. This is something our elected oicials should have been fighting for a long time ago.” Chappelle-Nadal believes she’s earned a reputation as a fighter. “I scare some people, but I get a lot done,” she said. “There are a lot of people who tell me to be quiet, but that’s what the oppressive system wants. I am not going to apologize for who I am.” Also unapologetic is Haas, the

Ferguson to implement rules of conduct at meeting Tuesday FERGUSON • FROM A1

permission. It limits the size of signs and banners to 18 inches by 18 inches and forbids attendees from putting their feet on seats to block the aisles. It also bans knitting during meetings. On Tuesday evening, the ordinance will be put to the test for the first time. Ferguson city leaders say they had to do something to address the lack of respect and dignity after several residents — black and white — complained that the unruly meetings made them uncomfortable. “We had one meeting where Councilwoman (Laverne) Mitchom was trying to say something, and people in the audience were yelling and screaming back at her,” said City Manager De’Carlon Seewood. “It was just getting out of control.” But without disruptive protests, including those at council meetings, after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in August 2014, Ferguson’s Police Department would still be ticketing impoverished residents to keep City Hall afloat, activists said. “This is how we forced change,” said Emily Davis, a member of the Ferguson Collaborative group. “And (they) are doing everything in (their) power to shut down people’s ability to make change.” Some activists said that the Code of Conduct would provoke the very behavior it’s intended to suppress and that provisions in the ordinance seem to target individual protesters. One activist often wears a clown nose when she speaks to the council. Another often asks Mayor James Knowles III and other council members direct questions. And yet another

sits in the audience and knits during council meetings. The new ordinance forbids anything but writing materials at the podium where citizens address the council. It says comments should be directed at the entire council, not just the mayor, and places “knitting needles” among a long list of items not allowed in the council’s chambers. “I am purposely bringing my biggest, bulkiest, non-threatening knitting that I’m currently working on,” said resident Angelique Kidd. “Are they going to arrest me for knitting? ... They are literally making the same mistake over and over again.” The ordinance also stipulates that anyone in the “audience will refrain from creating, provoking or participating in any type of disturbance involving unwelcome physical contact.” Some activists have interpreted the provision to mean that they would be guilty of a violation if they say something that provokes someone else to hit them. Seewood said that was not the case. Despite the ordinance’s specificity, it’s unlikely that it was drafted with particular Ferguson protesters in mind. In fact, cities and other organizations across the country have adopted virtually identical versions of it as far back as 2008. The ordinance specifically says the council may place restrictions on the “time, place and manner” for interactions between the public and City Council, echoing language in Supreme Court decisions over the past half century, said Ken Paulson, president of the First Amendment Center and dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University. “Time, place and manner is a honored phrase in First Amendment law,” Paulson

said. “Although we are always free to say what we wish, the time, place and manner in which we say it can be controlled if government has an overriding and rational public interest in doing so.” Paulson said Ferguson’s new ordinance contained restrictions already established under the First Amendment. “The conduct ordinance is just to make sure that everybody feels that they can come to their City Council meeting and get information, be part of the process, speak if they want to speak without feeling intimidated,” Councilwoman Laverne Mitchom. “It’s not to violate anybody’s First Amendment rights. ... Whether we disagree on something or not, we need to come together. ... Ferguson is trying to heal and move forward.” The council will consider two amendments to the ordinance on Tuesday. One changes a prohibition on using cellphones during meetings to only requiring residents to silence them and refrain from taking calls. Another repeals a restriction on clapping. Seewood said the council may consider allowing knitting needles as well. He also said that Gerry Jasper, the activist who addresses the council wearing a clown nose, could continue to do so, because it was part of her presentation. Jasper turns 65 on Tuesday. She plans to celebrate her birthday at the meeting and to bring more than just the red nose. She’ll take cupcakes along with Q-tips — symbolizing the command Quit Taking It Personal — wrapped in bows to pass out, she said. “If that’s thought of as a weapon, I’ll be in trouble,” she said. “I think I’ll be fine. We’ll find out.”

third Democrat in the race. He estimates that’s he’s run for office 20 times in the last 28 years, winning five races. It’s given him his own type of name recognition, he said. “If you give up on your dream of public service because winning is too difficult, then you must not want it very much,” he said. Haas sees improving early childhood reading levels as the most pressing issue facing the community. “It solves your crime problem and at the same time you’re training the employees of the future,” he said. “Job development and rebuilding cities all stems from having an educated workforce.” Although conventional wisdom says Haas doesn’t have much of a chance, the candidate said he couldn’t forgive himself if he didn’t run — he has ideas he needs to share. “I run for public oice because I believe I have a contribution to make,” he said. “I’m not going to die with my song still inside my heart.” All three candidates are expected to participate in a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Christ Church Cathedral, 1210 Locust Street. Koran Addo • 314-340-8305 @KoranAddo on Twitter kaddo@post-dispatch.com

Monitor team for Ferguson decree is OK’d BY JEREMY KOHLER st. Louis Post-dispatch

FERGUSON • A federal judge

has approved the team that will serve as independent monitor of the consent decree for the city of Ferguson. Squire Patton Boggs, an international law firm based in Cleveland, was picked from four finalists to make sure reforms are adequate. The Ferguson City Council in March approved a proposal with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul the city’s police department, an agreement the city had in efect rejected six weeks earlier, provoking a federal lawsuit. Ferguson officials say the cost of the monitoring will not exceed $1.25 million over the first five years, or $350,000 for any single year. The team will be led by Clark Kent Ervin, a partner in the firm’s Government Investigations & White Collar Practice Group. Previously, he served under President George W. Bush as inspector general of the Department of State and the Department of Homeland Security.


LOCAL

07.26.2016 • TuEsday • M 2

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

ACLU lawsuit rebukes U. City mayor BY ROBERT PATRICK st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • In a federal lawsuit filed Monday, the American Civil Liberties Union says that University City Mayor Shelley Welsch should not have ordered police to eject a citizen who was speaking at a contentious meeting earlier this year. The suit says that on Jan. 11, 2016, Andrew Roberts was trying to read a prepared statement calling for the censure of Welsch over a proposed resolution that would itself have censured council member Terry Crow. The statement, the suit says, took up only one double-spaced page. Roberts began reading it when it was his turn during the public comment portion of the

meeting and was not disruptive, the suit says. According to an audio recording of the meeting, Welsch interrupted after Roberts said that she made “decisions out of pettiness and vindictiveness.” Welsch interrupted Roberts’ statement and ordered police to remove him from the building for making “personal” attacks on her, the suit says. He was also banned from speaking at meetings, although that ban has since been rescinded, the suit says. Roberts’ suit says that his statements were protected by the First Amendment and his ejection and speaking ban violated his due process rights. The lawsuit asks a judge to ban the city from restricting the speech of citizens based on the

content of that speech. It also asks for “compensatory and nominal damages” and for attorneys’ fees and costs. It names the city, but not Welsch. “The Constitution protects free speech and due process for all citizens, even when those in positions of power do not like the content of what is being said or the viewpoints expressed,” said Jefrey A. Mittman, executive director of the ACLU of Missouri, in a prepared statement announcing the suit. ACLU legal director Tony Rothert accused Welsch of misusing her powers “to intimidate and remove an individual exercising his right to free speech as protected by the First Amendment.” Welsch, reached Monday af-

ternoon by phone, said “I don’t want to comment on a lawsuit I haven’t seen.” In an email, she provided a copy of remarks she makes before most meetings, including repeated warnings against personal attacks. She wrote that she did not call Roberts to the podium when asked to speak on Jan. 25 and March 28, but council member Paulette Carr read a statement from him on two occasions. Welsch said Roberts had since made comments at three meetings. Welsch was seeking to censure Crow for forwarding an email containing what she claimed was a confidential legal opinion on political campaigning by public employees, one of a series of recent disputes.

The conflict at the heart of the suit started with the 2014 municipal election, in which five uniformed firefighters appeared in photographs supporting opponents of Welsch and two other incumbents. The firefighters were suspended, and Welsch and others later started a process that resulted in the privatization of emergency ambulance services in the city. After Roberts was ejected, the council went on to pass the resolution censuring Crow in a 4-3 vote. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

Clay’s fundraising has dwarfed his two opponents’ CANDIDATES • FROM A1

in the Middle East and ending animal cruelty on factory farms. The 1st District is heavily Democratic, so the winner of this three-way race is expected to have a clear path to victory in November’s general election. The district spans St. Louis, north St. Louis County and parts of the central corridor. On the Republican ballot, Steven G. Bailey, a business professor at the University of MissouriSt. Louis, is facing off against Paul Berry III, a bail bondsman and consultant. So far, Clay looks to be wellpositioned to win a seat he’s won eight times. On Monday, he secured a coveted endorsement from President Barack Obama. The president won St. Louis — which makes up a large part of the 1st District — by 82 percent of the vote four years ago. Obama is also currently enjoying an approval rating hovering near 50 percent.

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Rep. William Lacy Clay talks with campers Monday at Camp Sun Splash in Fairground Park. A voters forum will be held Tuesday at 7 p.m.

A LOOK AT THE DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES

in this election to go to D.C. and be a voice for the people in this community.”

WILLIAM LACY CLAY Age: 59 Home: University City Elected to Missouri House, 1983; Missouri Senate, 1991; Congress since 2001.

MONEY MATTERS In more good news for Clay, his fundraising has dwarfed his opponents’. He started this election cycle with more than $300,000 in his campaign accounts. Over the last 19 months, he’s added nearly $500,000. After operating costs and other expenditures, Clay is approaching next week’s primary with more than $400,000 in campaign cash. Mea nwh i l e , C h a p p e l l e Nadal, started this cycle with no money in the bank. Since then, she’s raised $67,000 and spent $40,000. By mid-July, she had $26,920 in campaign dollars. Even with a clear financial disadvantage, Chappelle-Nadal believes this is the year of the antiestablishment candidate. With the rise of Donald Trump and the better-than-expected showing by Bernie Sanders, Chappelle-Nadal said there was proof that establishment candidates could no longer coast into office solely on name recognition. “When is Congressman Clay ever in St. Louis?” she asked. “When people were out in the

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal stops to pet Dusty as she speaks to Jack Muirhead, 69, while canvassing in Olivette this month.

MARIA CHAPELLE-NADAL Age: 41 Home: University City Elected to Missouri House, 2004; Missouri Senate, 2010. BILL HAAS Age: 71 Home: St. Louis Elected to St. Louis School Board, 1997, 2001 and 2010. (State appointed board began governing the school system in 2007.)

streets of Ferguson, no one knew where he was. There’s no playbook or script on how you respond to a human disaster, you just show up. The congressman didn’t show up.” The charge that Clay was absent during the Ferguson protests is one that has dogged him since the police killing of Michael Brown in August 2014. Clay bristles at that attack. He maintains that he did show up in Ferguson, but more importantly, he was a force behind the scenes pushing the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate Brown’s death.

That investigation, he said, has changed the way Ferguson and its police force operate today. “My political opponents see a tragedy like the death of Michael Brown, and they try to make political hay out of it,” he said. “I find that kind of rhetoric does not match my record of service to this community.” Last week, as temperatures inched near 100 degrees, the congressman canvassed North County, chatting with undecided voters at strip malls and talking up his political achievements. Speaking to a reporter, Clay pointed to his seat on the House Financial Services Committee where he worked on the DoddFrank Wall Street reform before later helping create the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. He also spoke about working with the Obama administration to secure $500 million for Missouri as part of the 2009 stimulus program and also pushing to keep the National GeospatialIntelligence Agency in St. Louis. Clay said he was also proud of his eforts to get St. Louis named as one of 22 national economic “promise zones” in which the federal government works with local leaders to boost job growth and reduce crime. “All anyone has to do is look at my record,” he said. “After that, I would ask them if they think there is a better person running

THE CHALLENGERS As for Chappelle-Nadal, she’s been striking out on foot every morning for months, wearing her neon green campaign shirt, hoping a persistent door-to-door campaign will pay of. She mostly talks about the radioactive West Lake landfill, the burning Bridgeton landfill and a number of other lesser-known underground waste-dumping sites that she says are leading to cancer-clusters. She has dozens of stories memorized, reciting off the top of her head people’s names, what kind of cancer they have, when they contracted it and where they live. “The same silence that allowed Ferguson to occur has allowed Bridgeton to occur,” she said. “This is my crusade. It is inhumane that nothing has been done. This is something our elected oicials should have been fighting for a long time ago.” Chappelle-Nadal believes she’s earned a reputation as a fighter. “I scare some people, but I get a lot done,” she said. “There are a lot of people who tell me to be quiet, but that’s what the oppressive system wants. I am not going to apologize for who I am.” Also unapologetic is Haas, the

Ferguson to implement rules of conduct at meeting Tuesday FERGUSON • FROM A1

permission. It limits the size of signs and banners to 18 inches by 18 inches and forbids attendees from putting their feet on seats to block the aisles. It also bans knitting during meetings. On Tuesday evening, the ordinance will be put to the test for the first time. Ferguson city leaders say they had to do something to address the lack of respect and dignity after several residents — black and white — complained that the unruly meetings made them uncomfortable. “We had one meeting where Councilwoman (Laverne) Mitchom was trying to say something, and people in the audience were yelling and screaming back at her,” said City Manager De’Carlon Seewood. “It was just getting out of control.” But without disruptive protests, including those at council meetings, after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in August 2014, Ferguson’s Police Department would still be ticketing impoverished residents to keep City Hall afloat, activists said. “This is how we forced change,” said Emily Davis, a member of the Ferguson Collaborative group. “And (they) are doing everything in (their) power to shut down people’s ability to make change.” Some activists said that the Code of Conduct would provoke the very behavior it’s intended to suppress and that provisions in the ordinance seem to target individual protesters. One activist often wears a clown nose when she speaks to the council. Another often asks Mayor James Knowles III and other council members direct questions. And yet another

sits in the audience and knits during council meetings. The new ordinance forbids anything but writing materials at the podium where citizens address the council. It says comments should be directed at the entire council, not just the mayor, and places “knitting needles” among a long list of items not allowed in the council’s chambers. “I am purposely bringing my biggest, bulkiest, non-threatening knitting that I’m currently working on,” said resident Angelique Kidd. “Are they going to arrest me for knitting? ... They are literally making the same mistake over and over again.” The ordinance also stipulates that anyone in the “audience will refrain from creating, provoking or participating in any type of disturbance involving unwelcome physical contact.” Some activists have interpreted the provision to mean that they would be guilty of a violation if they say something that provokes someone else to hit them. Seewood said that was not the case. Despite the ordinance’s specificity, it’s unlikely that it was drafted with particular Ferguson protesters in mind. In fact, cities and other organizations across the country have adopted virtually identical versions of it as far back as 2008. The ordinance specifically says the council may place restrictions on the “time, place and manner” for interactions between the public and City Council, echoing language in Supreme Court decisions over the past half century, said Ken Paulson, president of the First Amendment Center and dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University. “Time, place and manner is a honored phrase in First Amendment law,” Paulson

said. “Although we are always free to say what we wish, the time, place and manner in which we say it can be controlled if government has an overriding and rational public interest in doing so.” Paulson said Ferguson’s new ordinance contained restrictions already established under the First Amendment. “The conduct ordinance is just to make sure that everybody feels that they can come to their City Council meeting and get information, be part of the process, speak if they want to speak without feeling intimidated,” Councilwoman Laverne Mitchom. “It’s not to violate anybody’s First Amendment rights. ... Whether we disagree on something or not, we need to come together. ... Ferguson is trying to heal and move forward.” The council will consider two amendments to the ordinance on Tuesday. One changes a prohibition on using cellphones during meetings to only requiring residents to silence them and refrain from taking calls. Another repeals a restriction on clapping. Seewood said the council may consider allowing knitting needles as well. He also said that Gerry Jasper, the activist who addresses the council wearing a clown nose, could continue to do so, because it was part of her presentation. Jasper turns 65 on Tuesday. She plans to celebrate her birthday at the meeting and to bring more than just the red nose. She’ll take cupcakes along with Q-tips — symbolizing the command Quit Taking It Personal — wrapped in bows to pass out, she said. “If that’s thought of as a weapon, I’ll be in trouble,” she said. “I think I’ll be fine. We’ll find out.”

third Democrat in the race. He estimates that’s he’s run for office 20 times in the last 28 years, winning five races. It’s given him his own type of name recognition, he said. “If you give up on your dream of public service because winning is too difficult, then you must not want it very much,” he said. Haas sees improving early childhood reading levels as the most pressing issue facing the community. “It solves your crime problem and at the same time you’re training the employees of the future,” he said. “Job development and rebuilding cities all stems from having an educated workforce.” Although conventional wisdom says Haas doesn’t have much of a chance, the candidate said he couldn’t forgive himself if he didn’t run — he has ideas he needs to share. “I run for public oice because I believe I have a contribution to make,” he said. “I’m not going to die with my song still inside my heart.” All three candidates are expected to participate in a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Christ Church Cathedral, 1210 Locust Street. Koran Addo • 314-340-8305 @KoranAddo on Twitter kaddo@post-dispatch.com

Monitor team for Ferguson decree is OK’d BY JEREMY KOHLER st. Louis Post-dispatch

FERGUSON • A federal judge

has approved the team that will serve as independent monitor of the consent decree for the city of Ferguson. Squire Patton Boggs, an international law firm based in Cleveland, was picked from four finalists to make sure reforms are adequate. The Ferguson City Council in March approved a proposal with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul the city’s police department, an agreement the city had in efect rejected six weeks earlier, provoking a federal lawsuit. Ferguson officials say the cost of the monitoring will not exceed $1.25 million over the first five years, or $350,000 for any single year. The team will be led by Clark Kent Ervin, a partner in the firm’s Government Investigations & White Collar Practice Group. Previously, he served under President George W. Bush as inspector general of the Department of State and the Department of Homeland Security.


TUESDAY • 07.26.2016 • A6

TRUMP’S BIG BOUNCE

MONDAY AT A GLANCE

How, given all of the mistakes, gafes and other issues that have dogged Donald Trump’s campaign, can he be tied or even ahead of Hillary Clinton?

• Sanders: Choice is ‘not even close’

STLTODAY.COM/ELECTION2016

• FBI investigating hacking of DNC

QUOTE OF DAY ‘Like millions of Americans, I am living with mental illness. But I am lucky. I had the resources and support to get treatment. ... Unfortunately, too many Americans don’t get help, whether they fear the stigma or cannot aford treatment.’ DEMI LOVATO

Sanders backers in Missouri cool toward Clinton Some Missouri delegates to the Democratic National Convention who supported the presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders remained reluctant Monday to heed his call to now back Hillary Clinton. Sanders spoke to his supporters Monday before the opening of the convention in Philadelphia. He was booed by many when he declared, “we have got to elect Hillary Clinton” to defeat Republican nominee Donald Trump. “It really sucked the energy out of the room,” said Brent Welder, a St. Louis lawyer who is a Sanders delegate. Sanders is sticking by his endorsement of Clinton, despite recently leaked emails from the Democratic National Committee that appear to show party leaders favoring Clinton over Sanders during the primary campaign Welder joined in the booing, chanting in reference to Sanders’ endorsement of Clinton: “take it back.” Some other Sanders delegates from Missouri also were displeased, though not all as vocally. Jackson Thompson, a software engineer from St. Charles County, said he refrained from booing the suggestion to support Clinton. “I looked at the person next to me and held my nose,” said Thompson, also a Sanders delegate. But he said he would reluctantly support Clinton, “only out of necessity” to defeat Trump.

Clinton seeks veterans’ support Hillary Clinton appealed for veterans’ support Monday during a speech at the VFW Convention in Charlotte, N.C., where she also repeatedly criticized rival Donald Trump’s statements and positions without mentioning his name. Speaking before a near-capacity crowd in a room set up to hold 6,000, the former secretary of state recalled her father’s service in the navy during World War II and her work with veterans while serving as a senator from New York. She said the nation’s memorials were built in large part because of the eforts of veterans. “Those memorials might not exist if not for you,” Clinton said. “So thank you, and thank you for standing up today and everyday for veteran’s health, for veteran’s education.” It was potentially a tough crowd: Active service members favor Trump, according to a recent Military Times poll. The poll found 49 percent backed Trump and only 21 percent supported Clinton. That poll also found 82 percent dissatisfied or strongly dissatisfied with Clinton. Sixty-one percent were dissatisfied or strongly dissatisfied with Trump.

Ousted DNC chair in tough race in Congress The furor over leaked emails not only got Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., heckled out of her speaking role Monday at the Democratic National Convention; it’s also providing fodder for her congressional primary opponent. Her opponent in Florida’s Aug. 30 congressional primary is Tim Canova, a law professor at Nova Southeastern University who tweeted Monday that “DWS must be defeated in this election and removed from Congress. It’s time to end her political career for good.” From news services

WHERE TO WATCH BROADCAST • ABC, CBS and NBC will air live coverage beginning at 9 p.m. PBS coverage begins at 7 p.m. CABLE • The cable news channels all will ofer continuing coverage. STREAMING • The DNC website (demconvention.com/watch-live/) and its YouTube channel will ofer live streaming; CBS News will provide live coverage on Twitter.

• Is Bill Clinton an asset or a liability? • Sanders supporters protest, are cited • Wasserman’s primary road gets rough

Convention will test viability of Bill Clinton’s magic touch

HUY MACH • hmach@post-dispatch.com

Former President Bill Clinton, husband of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, campaigns for her in March at the District Nine Machinists Hall in Bridgeton.

BY WILLIAM DOUGLAS McClatchy Washington Bureau

P H I L A D E L P H I A • Selling Barack Obama was easy. Tuesday, Bill Clinton faces a more difficult challenge: selling his wife, Hillary Clinton, as a future president. Former President Clinton will headline the second night of the Democratic National Convention facing a nation with lingering doubts about Hillary Clinton’s trustworthiness. He speaks as those doubts about her have fueled alarmingly high polling negatives, anger among supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign and a throbbing hangover from leaked Democratic National Committee emails that many Sanders backers say confirms that the system was “rigged” against their candidate. Aggravating the challenge: The 42nd president may prove more of a liability than a help as Hillary Clinton’s top surrogate against the fiery campaign style of Republican candidate Donald Trump. “The trouble this time is, the rules are broken,” said Patrick Maney, a Boston College history professor who’s the author of “Bill Clinton: New Gilded Age

President.” “I just think Trump has just changed the rules.” Four years ago, Bill Clinton gave such a popular convention speech pitching the re-election of President Barack Obama that Obama said he should be the “secretary of explaining stuff.” But Republicans such as Mitt Romney didn’t really push back. Trump and GOP oicials now seek to blunt Bill Clinton’s efectiveness by attacking the Clinton Foundation, the nonprofit organization he established post-presidency, for accepting millions of dollars in donations from foreign governments while his wife served as secretary of state. Trump also has aggressively gone after Bill Clinton for his sexual misdeeds, using his afair with Monica Lewinsky to brand Hillary Clinton as an enabler who has hurt women to protect her husband’s career. “He’s had to keep his head in the foxhole because he doesn’t want to overshadow Hillary,” Maney said “They’re trying to neutralize him as a powerful, positive weapon he might be for Hillary, and to also get under his skin.” By doing so, Trump and Republicans are hoping that Bill Clinton will implode as Hillary Clinton’s main surrogate and

devolve into the angry spokesman he was during the 2008 South Carolina Democratic primary. The former president alienated many of the state’s AfricanAmerican voters when he compared Obama’s campaign to a “fairy tale.” He also recalled that Greenville native Jesse Jackson had won the Palmetto State’s Democratic contests in 1984 and 1988 but didn’t win the Democratic presidential nomination, which many African-American voters in the state took as a racial swipe at Obama.

‘SOMETHING STRANGE’ “There is something strange that happens when Bill Clinton campaigns for his wife,” said John Carroll, an assistant professor of mass communication at Boston University. “For some reason, he loses some of his political equilibrium and political sure-footedness when he campaigns for her.” Paul Begala, who was a strategist for Bill Clinton’s 1992 campaign, said the former president wasn’t mentally ready in 2008 to take on the chief surrogate role. “He was out there for her, but the attacks on her really upset him, hurt him,” said Begala, a senior adviser for Priorities

USA, a pro-Hillary Clinton super PAC. “We have all seen that he’s armored up in a way that he hadn’t in ’08. He’s more psychologically prepared for that now.” As Trump attacks intensify through the general election campaign, Begala predicts, they will backfire, as they did during Clinton’s impeachment over the Lewinsky afair. “The political graveyards are littered with corpses of people who thought personal attacks on Bill Clinton would work. They never have; they never will,” said Begala. “If they want to continue to do it, I can guarantee you it will fail. Ask Ken Starr. Ask Henry Hyde.” Starr, the independent counsel whose investigation of Clinton’s afair with Lewinsky led to the president’s impeachment, was ousted as president of Baylor University in May amid a sexual assault scandal involving the Baptist school’s football team. Hyde, R-Ill., who died in 2007, was the chair of the House Judiciary Committee during Clinton’s impeachment. He acknowledged that he’d had an affair with a married woman in the 1960s.

VIEW FROM THE FLOOR

Leaked emails make party unity a top priority AMANDA KELLEY

PHILADELPHIA • We arrived in

Philadelphia on Sunday morning, excited about kicking off the Democratic National Convention on Monday in a show of party unity. I’m still confident that we’ll ultimately be able to do that. But my first hours on the ground in Philly illustrated that it’s going to take some work. The story broke Friday about the leaked emails that showed members of the Democratic National Committee disparaging Bernie Sanders, and by Sunday morning it was the talk of the

town here. The bus that was to take us from the airport to our hotel in downtown Philadelphia ended up stopping about a block and a half short of the destination, blocked by a protest march of Sanders supporters, and we had to walk the rest of the way. I’m a Hillary Clinton delegate, and I was wearing some Clinton paraphernalia. One of my fellow passengers wore Sanders’ name on a sash. We walked together through the protesters with no trouble. Still, there’s no denying the discord here, though it does seem to be worse in some other state delegations. We Missourians are a little battle weary, after Ferguson and some other things. There are some of our people on Bernie’s side who are very up-

set but still ready to talk. Some other states’ delegations aren’t where we are on that. One thing both the Clinton and Sanders factions of our delegation seemed to agree upon was that DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz should resign her post right away, and not wait after the convention, as she had already announced. (And by the end of the day, that’s exactly what happened.) This was the sense from all sides during our first delegate breakfast meeting Monday morning — and that was even before we heard that Wasserman Schultz had been booed and jeered that morning at her own Florida delegation breakfast elsewhere in Philly. Our breakfast was calmer. U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill,

D-Mo., a Clinton supporter, spoke to the group, and turned immediately to the Bernie people in the room and said she was here to represent them, too. Robin Smith, candidate for Missouri secretary of state, told of her brother’s experiences registering voters in the South during the Civil Rights era, which is an issue we could all get behind. Michael Eric Dyson, the Georgetown sociologist and radio host, talked to us about the importance of unity. That’s what we’re hoping for as we head into the first night of the convention — unity — but there’s still some work to do. Missouri delegate Amanda Kelley of St. Charles is sharing her thoughts from the floor of the Democratic National Convention this week. She is a St. Charles County Democratic committeewoman.


ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

07.26.2016 • TUESDAY • M 1

Sanders goes all in for Clinton

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Elizabeth Warren. D-Mass., speaks Monday, the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

DEMOCRATS • FROM A1

tween Clinton and Sanders supporters. “I want someone with the proven strength to persevere, someone who knows this job and takes it seriously, someone who understands the issues a president faces are not black and white,” Obama said. Referring to Trump’s penchant for tweeting, she said of the presidency: “It cannot be boiled down to 140 characters.” Though Sanders had endorsed Clinton previously, his remarks Monday marked his most vigorous and detailed praise of her qualifications for the presidency. It came at a crucial moment for Clinton’s campaign, on the heels of leaked emails suggesting the party had favored the former secretary of state through the primaries despite a vow of neutrality. Sanders scored the resignation of party chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a nemesis in the primaries, but that wasn’t enough to quell the anger of supporters. As the convention opened, they

still erupted in chants of “Bernie” and booed Clinton the first several times her name was mentioned. Outside the convention hall, several hundred marched down Philadelphia’s sweltering streets with signs carrying messages such as “Never Hillary.”

ANGER DISSOLVES By the time Sanders took the stage for the night’s closing address, much of the anger had been overshadowed by speeches promoting party unity. Sanders did his part, imploring his supporters to consider a country under Trump’s leadership. “If you don’t believe this election is important, if you think you can sit it out, take a moment to think about the Supreme Court justices that Donald Trump would nominate and what that would mean to civil liberties, equal rights and the future of our country,” he said. Sanders spoke just after Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a favorite of liberals who has emerged as one of the Democrats’ toughest critics of Trump. Warren kept up her attacks on his

character and business record as she delivered the night’s keynote address. “Donald Trump has no real plans for jobs, for college kids, for seniors,” she said. “No plans to make anything great for anyone except rich guys like Donald Trump.” Obama was one of the night’s standouts. While she has often avoided overt politics during her nearly eight years in the White House, her frustration with Trump’s rise was evident. She warned that the White House couldn’t be in the hands of someone with “a thin skin or a tendency to lash out” or someone who tells voters the country can be great again. “This right now, is the greatest country on Earth,” she said. Clinton’s campaign hoped the nighttime line-up would overshadow a tumultuous start to the four-day convention. The hacked DNC emails fed the suspicion of Sanders’ supporters and sapped Clinton’s campaign of some of its energy after a wellreceived rollout Saturday of her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim

Hacking enrages Sanders supporters FBI • FROM A1

Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta added fuel to the debate Monday, saying there was “a kind of bromance going on” between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Trump. The Clinton campaign says Russia favors Trump’s views, especially on NATO. Trump on Monday dismissed as a “joke” claims by Hillary Clinton’s campaign that Russia is trying to help Trump by leaking thousands of emails from the Democratic National Committee. “The new joke in town is that Russia leaked the disastrous DNC emails, which should have never been written (stupid), because Putin likes me,” Trump wrote as part of a series of Tweets. “Hillary was involved in the email scandal because she is the only one with judgement (sic) so bad that such a thing could have happened.” The hacking enraged die-hard Sanders supporters who have long claimed that the DNC had its finger on the scale throughout the primaries. The disclosures prompted the resignation of DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz on the eve of the party’s convention in Philadelphia, where Clinton is expected to oicially accept the nomination for president. It wasn’t immediately clear how WikiLeaks received copies of the internal Democratic emails. Democratic Party officials learned in late April that their systems had been attacked after they discovered malicious software on their computers. A cybersecurity firm they employed found traces of at least two sophisticated hacking groups on

the Democrats’ network — both of which have ties to the Russian government. Those hackers took at least one year’s worth of detailed chats, emails and research on Donald Trump, according to a person knowledgeable of the breach. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has said U.S. officials have seen indications of foreign hackers spying on the presidential candidates, and that they expect more cyberthreats against the campaigns.

RUSSIA NOT COMMENTING Russian presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov would not comment on allegations that Russia is behind the leaked emails, instead pointing to statements by Trump’s son Donald Trump Jr., dismissing the claims. The White House declined to point the finger at Russia, and said it would be up to the FBI to determine whether to publicly name the culprit after the investigation. White House spokesman Josh Earnest said he couldn’t confirm assessments by private cyber experts accusing Russia that Clinton’s campaign has cited. Clinton’s campaign stood firmly behind their claims of Russian involvement Monday. “There is a consensus among experts that it is indeed Russia that is behind this hack of the DNC,” Clinton campaign spokesman Brian Fallon told CNN. On Sunday, Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook said that it was “concerning last week that Donald Trump changed the Republican platform to become what some experts would regard as pro-Russian.” Trump’s senior policy adviser

Paul Manafort called statements by the Clinton campaign “pretty desperate.” “It’s a far reach, obviously,” Manafort told reporters. “To lead their convention with that tells me they really are trying to move away from what the issues are going to be in this campaign. It’s pretty absurd.” Trump told The New York Times last week that he would decide whether to protect America’s NATO allies against Russian aggression based on whether those countries “have fulfilled their obligations to us,” hinting that he might pivot away from the decades-old agreement. Some Republicans opposed to Trump have indeed sought to cast him as pro-Putin, a position that would put him at odds with Republican and Democratic foreign policy and also diverge from the current GOP party platform adopted at the convention last week. Trump supporters succeeded in preventing a reference to arming Ukraine from getting into this year’s platform, but the manifesto itself is demonstrably not pro-Russia. It accuses “current oicials in the Kremlin” of eroding the “personal liberty and fundamental rights” of the Russian people. “We will meet the return of Russian belligerence with the same resolve that led to the collapse of the Soviet Union,” the Republican platform says. “We will not accept any territorial change in Eastern Europe imposed by force, in Ukraine, Georgia, or elsewhere, and will use all appropriate constitutional measures to bring to justice the practitioners of aggression and assassination.”

Kaine.

‘CRAZY BERNIE’S GOING CRAZY’ Campaigning in North Carolina, Trump seemed to revel in the Democrats’ commotion, telling supporters that Clinton had made a mistake by not choosing a more liberal running mate to appease Sanders’ base. “Crazy Bernie’s going crazy right now,” he said. But in Philadelphia, delegates waved “Love Trumps Hate” signs and cheered as immigration supporters, gay rights advocates and labor leaders took the stage. Comedian-turned-Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota, a Clinton supporter, and actress Sarah Silverman, a Sanders supporter, made a joint appearance to promote party unity. “I am proud to be part of Bernie’s movement,” Silverman said as the crowd roared. “And a vital part of that movement is making absolutely sure Hillary Clinton is our next president of the United States.” Trump was a frequent target throughout the night, though

the jabs were often more mocking than mean. The tone was a sharp contrast to the Republican convention, where the attacks against Clinton were bitingly personal, including chants of “Lock her up.”

WASSERMAN SCHULTZ STAYS OFF STAGE Wasserman Schultz had planned to be among those taking the stage, despite the email hacking controversy. But she stepped aside, bowing to pressure from Democrats who feared the mere sight of her on stage would prompt strong opposition. The outgoing chairwoman did watch the gathering from a private suite at the arena. Discussions between the Clinton and Sanders camps prompted him to send emails and text messages to supporters asking them not to protest. “Our credibility as a movement will be damaged by booing, turning of backs, walking out or other similar displays,” Sanders wrote.

Pro-Sanders protesters are cited by police ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHILADELPHIA • Police briefly detained more than 50 people after they tried to storm the barricades outside the Democratic convention Monday evening in a show of anger over Bernie Sanders’ treatment by party leaders, even as he urged his supporters to fall in line behind Hillary Clinton. Several hundred Sanders supporters and other demonstrators converged in the sweltering heat on Broad Street and made their way four miles to the convention site as the gathering was being gaveled to order, chanting “Nominate Sanders or lose in November!” and “Hey, hey, ho, ho, the DNC has got to go!” They carried signs reading, “Never Hillary,” “Just Go to Jail Hillary” and “You Lost Me at Hillary.” As tension mounted outside the Wells Fargo Center, police moved metal fences into place and closed the nearest subway station to arriving trains. Fiftyfive people were issued citations for disorderly conduct when protesters tried to climb over police barricades at the edge of the security zone surrounding the convention, police said. The anger reflected the widening rift inside the Democratic Party and the convention hall itself between Sanders’ supporters and Clinton’s. Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned as Democratic Party chairwoman Sunday over leaked emails suggesting the supposedly neutral Democratic National Committee played favorites during the primaries by siding with Clinton and bad-mouthing Sanders. Speaking to delegates Monday morning, Sanders implored

them to vote for Clinton, generating a chorus of boos. “Brothers and sisters, this is the real world that we live in,” Sanders said. Donald Trump “is a bully and a demagogue.” The protests took shape amid a punishing heat wave, with oppressive humidity and temperatures in the mid-90s, along with the possibility of severe thunderstorms in the evening. The Fire Department handed out bottled water, and a few protesters were treated for heat-related problems. The citations capped a day of demonstrations around the city on the opening day of the convention. About 100 Sanders supporters made their way into Philadelphia by marching across the Ben Franklin Bridge from Camden, N.J. Among them was Jim Glidden, a salesman from Batavia, N.Y. He carried a big sign saying the DNC stands for “Dishonest Nefarious Corrupt.” “Only one guy is telling the truth out there,” he said, referring to Sanders. “And the DNC shut him up with lies and cheating.” Another participant in the bridge march, Deborah Armstrong, of Spokane, Wash., said she and her husband went bankrupt because of his health problems, which required a heart transplant. “I’m Bernie or bust,” she said. “I’m not going to have Trump held up to our head like a gun.” The demonstrators espoused a variety of causes, including economic justice, socialism and marijuana legalization.


NEWS

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAY • 07.26.2016

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, produced by the Niche Division of the Suburban Journals, LLC

STLmomsanddads.com

READING CORNER

Literary animals make fine pets Story by Krista Rakers CONTRIBUTOR

Release of the new Disney movie, “The Secret Life of Pets,” got me thinking about pets during these dog days of summer. I love animals and funny stories and the movie combines both. If you loved the movie and want to spend more time with a fantasy pet, here are appealing books you might want to cover. For anyone reading to babies, Llama Llama Sand & Sun by Anna Dewdney is a good choice. All Llama Llama books are good for younger children, but this one is on board pages with textured sections that are fun to touch. Llama Llama and his mama spend a happy day at the beach. With a simple story and engaging illustrations, this is perfect for toddlers. Flora and the Peacocks by Molly Idle is a beautiful story about a little girl who wants to dance with two peacocks. This wordless book with flaps allows children to tell adults the story, a useful skill for a child preparing to read. Illustrations are simple but lovely and the flaps help make this book exciting and entertaining. Companion stories, Flora and the Penguin and Flora and the Flamingo, are equally charming. Jerry Pinkney’s exquisite illustrations are always standouts. He has two enjoyable books about cats which will suit different ages. Pinkney’s version of Three Little Kittens is perfect for toddlers and younger preschool children while Puss in Boots ideally fits older preschool through early elementary ages. These books are based on rhymes and stories we all know and love. Beginning readers will enjoy Biscuit Feeds the Pets by Alyssa Capucilli. Every animal gets his own type of food but Biscuit may have trouble with animals that want to play instead of eat. Any story featuring lovable dog Biscuit becomes a favorite, so this newly published book definitely will be a hit. Readers who are just getting ready for chapter books will love My Pet Human by Yasmine Surovec. Told from a stray cat’s point of view, the cat doesn’t see any reason to have a pet human unless the human is everything he wants. All his friends are sure the cat will never find the perfect human, but this cat may surprise them all. Some illustrations and a lot of white space encourages the slightly younger reader. A short and appealing story makes this book a great choice for newly independent readers, but also works as a read-aloud.

More online SOS FROM SUBURBIA: Pathways to Independence grows confidence for older teens with complex learning disabilities. bit.ly/SOS-Pathways-to-Independence

CHRONICLE BOOKS

Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer by Kelly Jones is awesome for chapter book readers. Sophie, who just moved with her parents to her uncle’s farm, finds a chicken that seems to have strange powers. Sophie wants to protect this chicken and others that appear but is worried that someone else is trying to steal them. This story about loss has humor and magical realism – and even a ghost. For older children who like stories a little scary, Kenneth Oppel’s The Nest is much creepier. Steve’s baby brother is sick. In a series of dreams, a wasp promises to help his brother. Although Steve wants his brother to be well, he is not sure the wasp’s definition of “help” is the same as his. A Handful of Stars by Cynthia Lord is about friendship beginning when Lily’s dog escapes. Lily, a local girl, finds much in common with Salma, daughter of migrant workers. Salma’s decision to enter a local contest tests their new friendship. Use this time of year to add these and many other books from a local library to your bag while you vacation, spend time at a pool or beach or fill long and lazy summer days. A stop at a St. Louis Public Library or another local library yields more suggestions from friendly librarians. Time remains to finish reading and claim prizes in St. Louis Public Library’s Summer Reading Club, but note that Saturday, July 30, is the last day to pick up rewards. Other local libraries are approaching the end of summer reading time and prizes left in their book bags, too. Krista Rakers is regional youth librarian at Buder Public Library. She loves to share her enjoyment of books and reading with children.

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Recipes for apple pie and dessert contest due Sept. 2 Ready to set the eating pleasure pace with apple desserts? Do we have a contest for you! The 8th Annual Apple Pie and Dessert Contest is accepting recipes for apple recipes in two categories – pies and desserts – through Friday, Sept. 2. Please submit just one favorite recipe per category. The main requirement is that a recipe submitted include fresh apple as a major ingredient. Six pie and six dessert recipes will be chosen to compete at the Builders Home and Remodeling Show at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25, at the Saint Charles Convention Center. Submit recipes, with name, address and contact information on each one, by email to News@ STLMomsandDads.com or post by mail to Apple Dessert Contest, STLMomsandDads, Third Floor, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101. The Home and Remodeling Show is a weekend event sponsored by Home Builders Association of St. Louis. Dr. Lori, antiques appraiser whose information about arts and antiques occasionally appears online at STLtoday.com, will be featured along with Walter Knoll fall floral seminars, a sampling of party flavors, and pumpkin painting, crafts and games for the kids. More show information is found at bit.ly/homeshow_0916.

How ‘grand’ is full-time grandparenting? The University of Missouri-Columbia wants to know. Karen Traylor-Adolph, a doctoral candidate in the psychology department of the College of Education, and her advisor, Keith Herman, professor of counseling psychology, want grandparents who are raising grandchildren to register their joys, concerns and challenges by Dec. 11, 2016, at bit.ly/grandparent_questions. The researcher last year requested grandfamilies with children ages 3 to 17 around the country to respond. “In Missouri, nearly 121,000 children live with a grandparent or other relative,” she said. “Of those children, approximately 17,000 live with their grandparents without a biological parent present.” These caregivers may not have legal custody of children in their care, making it difficult to apply for or enroll in school and other support programs. They may lack child support from any parent. Their own physical and economic challenges, both present and long-term, add to everyday concerns, said Traylor-Adolph, who also coordinates Missouri Grand Family Coalition and is a family support specialist with ParentLink, a University of Missouri program providing resources and services for Missouri families. After completing the brief survey, participants receive a Kinship Care Resource Guide and are entered in drawings for gift cards.


WORLD

07.26.2016 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

Disgruntled Syrian in Germany blows self up

Russian military partnership seems dubious, Carter says

He had been refused asylum, pledged allegiance to Islamic State

Aim is to combat ISIS inside Syria, but prolonging civil war may be outgrowth ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Defense Sec-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Special police oicers arrive Monday at the scene of a fatal explosion in Ansbach, Germany. Bavaria’s top security oicial said a man who blew himself up after being turned away from an open-air music festival in the southern German city was a Syrian, 27, who had been denied asylum. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANSBACH, GERMANY • A Syrian man who tried unsuccessfully to claim asylum in Germany pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group and vowed that the nation’s people “won’t be able to sleep peacefully anymore” before blowing himself up outside a wine bar, wounding 15 people, authorities said Monday. The assailant set off a backpack laden with explosives and shrapnel Sunday night after being refused entry to a music festival in the Bavarian city of Ansbach because he had no ticket. It was the fourth attack to shake Germany in a week, and the second claimed by Islamic State. Three of the attacks were carried out by recent immigrants, rekindling concern about Germany’s ability to cope with the estimated 1 million migrants registered entering the country

last year, an influx that has since dwindled as the flow of newcomers slowed. Bavarian Interior Minister Joachim Herrmann said a laptop with extremist videos had been found at the apartment of the suspect, a Syrian, 27, identified only as Mohammad D in line with German laws. A video on his cellphone showed him declaring loyalty to Islamic State and announcing a “revenge act against Germans because they are standing in the way of Islam.” The suspect also declared Germans “won’t be able to sleep peacefully anymore,” Herrmann said. “I think after this video there’s no doubt that the attack was a terror attack with an Islamist motivation.” In its claim of responsibility, the extremist group said the attack had been carried out by “one of the soldiers of the Islamic State.”

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The Islamic State-linked Aamaq news agency said the attacker had acted in response to the extremist group’s call to target countries of the U.S.-led coalition fighting it in Iraq and Syria. Germany is not involved in combat operations but has contributed reconnaissance aircraft to the efort. After the Islamic State connection surfaced, federal prosecutors in Karlsruhe, who investigate all suspected terrorism, took over the case, saying they would seek to “determine if thus-far unknown accomplices or backers were involved in the crime.” The suspect came to Germany two years ago and applied for asylum in August 2014, Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said. He had already registered in Bulgaria and later in Austria, so Germany rejected his request and ordered him deported to Bulgaria — most recently on July 13.

retary Ash Carter cast doubt Monday on prospects for a military partnership with Russia to combat the Islamic State inside Syria. At a Pentagon news conference with Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Carter was asked his view of Secretary of State John Kerry’s eforts to establish military cooperation in Syria. He said the problem was that Russia was focused mainly on supporting the Syrian government, which he said had had the efect of prolonging the civil war. “We had hoped that they would promote a political solution and transition to put an end to the civil war, which is the beginning of all this violence in Syria, and then combat extremists rather than moderate opposition, which has to be part of that transition,” Carter said. “So they’re a long way from doing that.” When a reporter told Carter that he sounded unenthusiastic about Kerry’s efort, Carter said, “No, I’m very enthusiastic about the idea of the Russians getting on side and doing the right thing. And I think that would be a good thing if they did. I think we’re a ways from getting that frame of mind in Russia. But that’s what Secretary Kerry is working toward.” Kerry has been talking to Russian officials about a proposal in which the U.S. would share intelligence and targeting information with the Russians. In exchange Moscow would use its influence with the Syrian regime to in effect ground the Syrian air force and to promote a political solution to a civil war that has killed as many as a half a million people.

CLIFF OWEN

Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks this month at the close of the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL Meeting at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.

Carter and Dunford said any arrangement with the Russians to coordinate military action in Syria would be transactional and not based on trust. Kerry’s talks with Moscow 10 days ago came after a leaked proposal showed the U.S. offering Russia a broad new military partnership against Islamic State and the Nusra Front, which is al-Qaida’s Syrian ailiate. Several conditions would apply, including Russia committing to grounding Syria’s bombers and starting a long-sought political transition process. Dunford denied reports that U.S.-backed opposition forces coordinated with Nusra in some cases. “We don’t have any indication that the forces that we are providing support to in Syria are cooperating or intermingled with al-Nusra,” the general said.

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Do you suffer from these Eight Symptoms of Neuropathy? Tens of millions suffer, and often don’t know where to turn… Dear Friend,

Here’s what some of your neighbors have to say:

Neuropathy is often misdiagnosed, or not diagnosed at all. More than likely have been told there is nothing that can be done. However, it affects the lives of between 10 and 20 million Americans.

“I’ve had neuropathy for 5 years and been to at least 8-10 doctors. All said they can’t do anything. I was very skeptical because I had tried everything. Since I’ve started the pain has diminished tremendously. I’m not lying in bed crying anymore! You need and go see Dr. Lewis!” (Peggy)

This problem can cause: 1. Numbness 2. Burning pain 3. Cramping 4. Sharp, electric pain 5. Pins and Needles 6. Dificulty sleeping from leg/foot pain 7. Pricking/tingling feelings 8. Balance problems If you suffer from one or more of these symptoms, you may have peripheral neuropathy. And, if you do, you’re not alone. Often, many people have been frustrated by the traditional care they’ve received for these terrible problems, and are still seeking help.

Over 100 Causes These problems can be caused by many problems, such as; diabetes, hereditary disorders, inlammation, medications such as cholesterol lowering (statin) drugs, cancer drugs and more. For the past 10 years, I’ve studied extensively the conditions, collectively known as “peripheral neuropathy.” In fact, helping people with these problems has become a primary focus of mine. It’s not unusual for me to hear stories from patients who’ve suffered for years with terrible symptoms. For many, they are missing out on the things they love to do and things they used to take for granted.

Life Stealing Condition Unfortunately, on a regular basis in my clinic a patient describes a frightening experience they had when driving their car and didn’t know if their foot was on the gas pedal or the brake pedal. They aren’t enjoying life as they once did. They are losing their quality of life…and for some their independence. If that describes you, then perhaps I can help.

IF you’ve got 35 minutes… I Guarantee to Open Your Eyes about Neuropathy Relief After more than a decade of evaluating and working with hundreds of patients that suffer with neuropathy, I’ve developed a drugless, non-invasive therapy program called the NerveFit® for anyone suffering from the symptoms of neuropathy and related balance problems. Others describe not being able to take part in normal everyday activities like: walking their dog, walking for exercise, attending church, gardening, bowling, golf or how about just walking safely, all because of their balance problem from peripheral neuropathy.

Get Your Life Back And the beautiful thing is that when these health situations improved, people are much happier with their quality of life. . In many cases, they inally can live pain free, with peace and joy in their lives again. I have unique set of knowledge and tools that have been tested, researched, and found to be effective. “At the end of the 30 day trial, all 49 subjects had partial restoration of feeling in their feet” – Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association “98%of patientsreportedhavingasigniicantreduction in pain” – Journal of Diabetes and its Complications

“This affected my life so badly that I couldn’t sleep at night, sit or stand and it hurt when I drove. I thought what was I going to do? This has taken away, just taken away all the quality of my life. With Dr. Lewis I am now 90% better than when I irst started. Now I can drive without pain and I’m sleeping well! Thanks Dr. Lewis!” (Eva)

Innovative Care – Powerful Results The NerveFit® was developed with countless neuropathy cases and 10 years of trial and error. And this therapy plan has helped a whole slew of people get their life back.

Do You Qualify For This New Program? When you call and make an appointment, I will perform a highly specialized neuropathy evaluation of the peripheral nervous system to see if we may be able to help. But, please call right away because we can take only the irst 27 callers. If you are one of these 27 callers, I’ll do this Evaluation and Qualifying Process completely FREE (normally $140). So, please call my ofice at 314-925-0150. I don’t want you to miss out on this golden opportunity! Due to the nature of this offer, it will end on July 29, 2016. Add some peace to your life or the life of someone you love. Call me today to make an appointment. We can help you. Thank You. Dr. Ryan K. Lewis, DC P.S. Don’t let numbness, tingling and pain hold you back from enjoying life!


M 1 TUESDAY • 07.26.2016 • A10

UnitedHealthcare drops ‘gatekeepers’

How Yahoo became an internet also-ran DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Patients should not need referrals, regulators say BY SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Some UnitedHealthcare patients no longer will have to obtain a referral from a primary care physician in order to see a specialist, Missouri’s top insurance regulator announced Monday. UnitedHealthcare will stop imposing referral requirements on non-HMO (health maintenance organization) group plan members starting in October, and the insurer will agree to pay for claims that were previously denied or reduced. UnitedHealthcare, the nation’s largest health insurance company, also has agreed to pay a fine of $150,000, according to the settlement announced by the Missouri Department of Insurance. “Consumers should not have to incur the extra time, cost, delay and hassle of going through a ‘gatekeeper’ just to get access to their very own doctor already in their very own network,” John Huf, Missouri’s top insurance regulator, said in a statement. Huff blocked last year two UnitedHealthcare group plans from being sold in the state because of the gatekeeper requirement, a term used to describe the need for a referral to see a specialist. The plans were known as exclusive provider organizations, or EPOs, which typically do not offer any outof-network benefits. They’re seen as an off-shoot of PPOs (preferred provider organizations), which give patients the option to use both in- or outof-network doctors. By cutting back on out-of-network access, EPOs provide a way to

ASSOCIATED PRESS

UnitedHealth Group Inc., based in Minnetonka, Minn., has agreed to drop its requirement for referrals in order to see specialists.

offer less expensive plans to consumers. Currently, Missouri law allows only HMO plans to have gatekeepers. Because HMOs operate a tightly contained network of doctors with no access to out-of-network doctors, additional consumer protections are in place. For patients with complex needs, gatekeeper requirements can get convoluted, health experts say. “They’re really a hassle for patients and doctors,” said Sidney Watson, health law professor at St. Louis University Law School. EPOs, which first began operating in Missouri in 2014, lack the same consumer protections even though they mirror HMOs in terms of plan design. EPO plans are not permitted in Illinois. State insurance regulators also alleged that UnitedHealthcare made false entries in statements used in the investigation “by providing the department with transcripts

of two call recordings relating to a member complaint that did not accurately reflect the content of the calls.” The transcripts allegedly “omitted material facts,” a violation of state law, according to the settlement agreement. The state also alleged that UnitedHealthcare made inaccurate statements during the investigation regarding member complaints. Some letters relating to member complaints “contained inaccuracies or omissions of material fact.” The department also alleged that UnitedHealthcare failed to maintain call recordings relating to the handling of claims in violation. In the settlement, the two agreed to develop policies and procedures to ensure the department receives complete and accurate information. However, UnitedHealthcare did deny all of the allegations outlined by the department, according to the settlement.

Combining Yahoo and AOL would have been a blockbuster deal back in the late 1990s. Now, the deal is being greeted more with shrugged shoulders than loud applause. Verizon, having acquired AOL off the scrapheap last year, is buying the core parts of Yahoo for $4.8 billion. This is a business that was briefly worth $140 billion during the dotcom bubble. It was an early leader in email, search, photo sharing and other technologies that today’s internet users take for granted. Instead of being remembered as a pioneer, Yahoo will become a businessschool case study of squandered advantages, missed opportunities and old-fashioned bloat. The missed opportunities include two huge ones: Talks to buy Google in 2002 and Facebook in 2006 fell apart over price. In hindsight, Yahoo could have paid double what the sellers were asking and still had a couple of historic bargains. When Yahoo did make acquisitions, it overpaid. This year, it has written of $712 million of the $1.1 billion it paid for blogging site Tumblr in 2013. “They spent about $3 billion on acquisitions in the last four years, and it’s really hard to see how any of them benefitted Yahoo shareholders,” says Eric Jackson, managing director at SpringOwl Asset Management in New York. Jackson created a blistering slide presentation last year in which he criticized Yahoo for missing the mobile computing revolution. As a percentage of revenue, he pointed out, Yahoo spends more than Google on research and development but has little to show for it. Jackson also criticized Yahoo for having too many employees, for overpaying Chief Executive Melissa Mayer, and even for the free food it provides to stafers. At a time when other shareholders were pushing

the company to sell its core business, he said the company could turn itself around by slashing costs and focusing on a few content areas, such as finance and sports. Yahoo’s board chose to sell, but Jackson isn’t disappointed. “Considering where they were, it’s better that they sold now rather than keep floundering,” he said Monday. Yahoo will continue to exist, under a different name, as a holding company for stakes in Alibaba, a Chinese internet company, and Yahoo Japan, along with some patents. The Asian assets account for most of Yahoo’s current market capitalization of $37 billion. That number brings to mind another missed opportunity: Microsoft ofered to buy the company in 2008 for $45 billion. Yahoo said no. Chief Executive Jerry Yang, a Yahoo co-founder, quit a few months later, and the company has had three CEOs since then. Norman Conley, chief investment oicer at JAG Capital Management in Ladue, thinks the turnover was damaging. “Repeated CEO changes usually connote some sort of problem with the board, some sort of disagreement on strategy,” he said. Each boss had a vague idea of what Yahoo should be — a media company, an e-commerce site or, under Mayer, simply a company that addressed people’s “daily habits.” None of them succeeded in turning around a company whose revenue peaked eight years ago. Verizon will try, probably by cutting costs and making it easier for advertisers to spend money across its portfolio of sites, including AOL. “Yahoo has a lot of strength of assets,” says Roger Entner, an analyst at Recon Analytics in Dedham, Mass. “It just does an extremely poor job of monetizing them.” Despite its prominence, Yahoo was the internet’s perpetual adolescent. It never figured out what it wanted to be when it grew up. Now the grown-ups at Verizon will decide for it. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

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MARKET WATCH

07.26.2016 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS U.S. stocks fell Monday as investors pulled back after four weeks of gains that lifted the market to record highs. Energy companies took the biggest losses by far as oil prices slumped to a three-month low. Bond yields were little changed.

Sprint

50

38

50

40

36

40

3

30

34

M J 52-week range

Dow Jones industrials

18,440

Close: 18,493.06 Change: -77.79 (-0.4%)

J

$73.00

Vol.: 2.7m (4.7x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.96 b

PE: ... Yield: ...

18,400

2,160

Close: 2,168.48 Change: -6.55 (-0.3%)

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

A

J

NYSE

NASD

2,985 2,969 1121 1888 173 10

1,714 1,589 1185 1657 119 23

HIGH 18555.69 7969.09 720.39 10787.57 5100.72 2173.71 1551.82 22514.70 1212.84

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

334.75 983.75 429

-.25 -22.75 +3.75

CLOSE

CHG

2,000

Hogs

141.70 112.95 75.67 15.30 221.60

+4.50 +3.00 +.40 +.03 -1.80

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Oct 16 Sep 16 Sep 16

72.12 141.10 28.00

-.40 -.80 +.38

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Sep 16 Aug 16 Aug 16 Aug 16

43.13 1.3336 132.28 2.747

-1.06 -.0279 -3.42 -.030

Copper

1,800

J

Sep 16 Aug 16 Sep 16 DATE

F

M

A

M

J

J

Coffee

StocksRecap Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

M

CHG

Aug 16 Aug 16 Aug 16 Jul 16 Jul 16

Milk

M

CLOSE

Feeder cattle

1,900

LOW 18452.62 7886.40 715.19 10725.14 5082.66 2161.95 1544.36 22413.84 1207.19

CLOSE 18493.06 7892.95 719.59 10752.43 5097.63 2168.48 1546.80 22476.47 1209.82

CHG. -77.79 -73.03 -0.86 -52.60 -2.53 -6.55 -5.54 -60.19 -3.07

%CHG. WK -0.42% t -0.92% t -0.12% s -0.49% t -0.05% s -0.30% s -0.36% s -0.27% s -0.25% s

MO QTR s s s t s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +6.13% +5.12% +24.54% +6.00% +1.80% +6.09% +10.60% +6.18% +6.51%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

Aegion

AEGN

15.97

Allied Health

AHPI

0.50

Amdocs

DOX

50.06

61.46 58.31

-.11 -0.2

Ameren

AEE

38.15

54.08 52.70

-.17 -0.3 +21.9 +41.1 21

American Railcar

ARII

33.02

57.93 38.73 -1.32 -3.3 -16.3

Belden Inc

BDC

36.51

75.71 72.89 +.39 +0.5 +52.9 +0.6 16

10.74

21.69 13.90

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

22.41 20.20 +.05 +0.2 1.70

.60

...

+4.6 +15.9 22

... -46.3 -62.5 dd +6.9 +5.0 19

-6.9

8

-.11 -0.8 +13.6 -25.1 15

... FutureFuel

TKR

52-WK LO HI

FF

9.11

... Huttig Building Prod HBP

2.99

16.08 11.08 7.00

5.53

-.36 -3.1 -17.9

-3.5 10

-.11 -1.9 +45.5 +74.5

21.43 18.67 +.15 +0.8 +34.0

5

...

-3.8 16

...

0.78 Isle of Capri

ISLE

10.62

1.70 LMI Aerospace

LMIA

7.51

12.25

7.94

-.05 -0.6 -21.2 -21.2 dd

...

1.60 Lee Ent

LEE

1.15

3.13

1.92

-.01 -0.5 +14.3 -37.5

...

0.20 Mallinckrodt

MNK

50.90 125.35 66.81 +.32 +0.5 -10.5 -47.4

... Monsanto Co

MON

81.22 114.26 105.26

-.42 -0.4

4

+6.8 +2.4 31

2.16

-1.0 -19.2 13

0.28 Olin

OLN

-9.4 27

0.80

CassInfo

CASS

43.78

55.73 52.43 -1.70 -3.1

+1.9

-3.3 25

0.88 Panera Bread

PNRA 165.17 221.44 216.99 +1.45 +0.7 +11.4 +17.2 36

...

Centene

CNC

47.36

75.57 75.26

-.13 -0.2 +14.4 +5.6 24

... Peak Resorts

4.90 +.04 +0.8 -18.5 -25.0 dd

0.55

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

37.44

49.44 47.51

Edgewell

EPC

67.94

Emerson

EMR

Energizer Holdings

12.29

26.46 20.84 +.20 +1.0 +20.7

...

33.73 26.56 +.37 +1.4

SKIS

2.60

-.49 -1.0 +11.7 +6.8 17 0.90b Perficient

PRFT

14.90

22.00 21.90

-.03 -0.1 +27.9 +35.5 30

...

97.00 83.13

-.01

POST

50.93

88.15 86.10 -1.25 -1.4 +39.5 +61.8 dd

...

41.25

56.82 55.61

-.20 -0.4 +16.3 +11.5 18

1.90 ReinsGrp

RGA

76.96

99.83 96.21

ENR

28.86

53.41 49.74

-.07 -0.1 +46.0 +21.0

1.00 Reliv

RELV

0.37

Enterprise Financial EFSC

22.91

30.73 27.25

-.30 -1.1

31.50

42.80 42.16

-.27 -0.6 +16.7 +11.7 25

Express Scripts

ESRX

65.55

94.22 77.39 -1.47 -1.9 -11.5 -16.2 20

First Clover Leaf

FCLF

8.90

Foresight Energy

FELP

1.07

12.37 12.36 9.28

1.93

...

... Post Holdings

-3.9 +20.7 14 0.40f Spire Inc

ESE

... +33.0 +38.0 12

SR

0.32 Stereotaxis

49.66

STXS

... Stifel Financial

SF

0.24 SunEdison Semi

-.03 -1.5 -45.3 -71.1 dd 0.68m WldPntTm

0.54 25.00

SEMI

3.24

WPT

11.79

7.70

1.31

.61

71.21 69.56 2.53

1.34

-.24 -0.2 +12.5 -.03 -4.5

... 11

CHG

CLOSE

1319.30 19.61 1085.00

Gold Silver

-3.80 -.05 -.60

+5.3 -47.1

-2.1 dd

...

56.23 34.23 +.05 +0.1 -19.2 -40.5 14

...

14.84

6.18 +.07 +1.1 -21.2 -59.2

16.49 16.11

-.04 -0.2 +20.2 +8.4 17

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.28 .43 .54 .76 1.14 1.57 2.29

-0.04 ... +0.01 +0.06 +0.02 ... +0.01

.03 .13 .31 .68 1.62 2.26 2.96

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

Barclays LongT-BdIdx

2.08 +0.01 2.81

Bond Buyer Muni Idx

3.81

... 4.41

Barclays USAggregate

1.95

... 2.40

Barclays US High Yield 6.57 -0.01 6.82

.38 .38 .13

3.50 3.50 3.25

LAST

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.34 -0.01 4.08

Barclays CompT-BdIdx

1.18 +0.02 1.96

Barclays US Corp

2.82 +0.01 3.39

GlobalMarkets

...

-.06 -0.1 +17.1 +33.0 21 1.96f -.05 -3.6 +80.3

The yield on the 10-year Treasury remained unchanged at 1.57 percent on Monday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

TREASURIES

1.48

... 1.20

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

INDEX

LAST

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE NATIONWIDE WARRANTY WITH EVERY NEW CHEVROLET PURCHASE

A BOMMARITO EXCLUSIVE

2016 CRUZE

.0671 .7465 .3053 1.3093 .7606 .1497 1.0961 .0149 .2603 .009419 .053963 .0154 .0701 .000879 1.0118

PreciousMetals

0.24

21.27

Esco Technologies

PREV

.0669 .7467 .3042 1.3127 .7564 .1496 1.0989 .0148 .2600 .009447 .053274 .0153 .0696 .000875 1.0139

NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

CAL

+6.1 -12.4 21

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Platinum

Caleres

...

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Interestrates Interestrates

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

NAME

$82.87

Vol.: 8.6m (15.7x avg.) PE: 18.6 Mkt. Cap: $900.54 m Yield: 4.6%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

LocalStocks 52-WK LO HI

J

ExchangeRates

DATE

CHICAGO MERC

16,800

M J 52-week range

$24.81

PE: ... Yield: ...

2,100

Live cattle

F

$39.58

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OUTR

Close: $52.19 5.28 or 11.3% The parent of Coinstar coin kiosks agreed to be bought by Apollo Global Management for $52 per share, or $895 million. $60

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Close: $38.32 -1.06 or -2.7% Verizon agreed to buy Yahoo’s internet business for $4.83 billion, leaving Yahoo as an investment company. $40

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Vol.: 125.8m (7.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $23.45 b

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Yahoo

GIII

Close: $42.95 -7.21 or -14.4% The owner of Bass shoes and Vilebrequin clothing agreed to buy the Donna Karan and DKNY brands from LMVH for $650 million. $60

Close: $5.90 1.28 or 27.7% The wireless carrier’s losses were smaller than expected and its revenue came in above analyst projections. $6

$2.18

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2168.48 10198.24 6710.13 21993.44 4388.00 47130.41 16620.29 56872.73 14498.10 8194.41

CHG

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-6.55 +50.78 -20.35 +29.17 +6.90 -406.87 -6.96 -129.35 -102.56 -0.32

-0.30% +0.50% -0.30% +0.13% +0.16% -0.86% -0.04% -0.23% -0.70% ...%

+6.09% -5.07% +7.49% +0.36% -6.18% +9.66% -12.68% +31.19% +11.44% -7.07%

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BUSINESS DIGEST Express Scripts 2Q revenue, claims decline • Express Scripts Holding Co., the nation’s largest pharmacy beneit manager, reported prescriptions fell slightly during the second quarter along with revenue. Total adjusted claims declined to 315 million for the quarter ended June 30, compared with 321 million during the yearearlier period. Revenue dipped to $25.2 billion compared with $25.4 billion during the year-earlier period. However, net income increased 20 percent to about $721 million, or $1.13 per share, compared with $600 million, or 88 cents per share, during the year-earlier period. The company, based in north St. Louis County, narrowed its guidance for 2016. The company now expects total adjusted claims to be between a range of 1.26 billion and 1.29 billion for the full year, and diluted earnings per share to be between $6.33 and $6.43. LVMH sells Donna Karan brand • French luxury giant LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton is selling its Donna Karan and DKNY clothing brands to G-III Apparel in a $650 million deal. According to the transaction announced Monday, G-III will acquire Donna Karan International Inc., in late 2016 or early 2017. Brands already owned by New York-based G-III include Bass shoes and Vilebrequin clothing. Designer Donna Karan stepped down from her signature collection last year. Redbox owner to be acquired • Outerwall Inc., the owner of Redbox video rental kiosks, said Monday it had agreed to be taken private by ailiates of private equity irm Apollo Global Management LLC in a deal valued at about $1.6 billion. The deal comes about four months after Outerwall, under pressure form activist investor Engaged Capital LLC, said it would explore strategic and inancial alternatives. Outerwall, previously known as Coinstar, gets most of its revenue from the Redbox business it acquired in 2008. AMC ofers $1.2 billion for Carmike • AMC Entertainment Holdings Inc. agreed to buy Carmike Cinemas Inc. for $1.2 billion in

cash and stock, sweetening its ofer after some shareholders spurned an earlier bid. Carmike stockholders can choose $33.06 a share in cash or 1.0819 of an AMC share, the Leawood, Kan.-based AMC said in a statement Monday. AMC is majority owned by billionaire Wang Jianlin’s Dalian Wanda Group Co. ETrade to buy OptionsHouse • ETrade Financial Corp. said Monday it will buy the parent of online brokerage OptionsHouse for $725 million in cash, as the company looks to better compete in derivatives trading. ETrade, which operates a discount broker-dealer and a bank, said it intended to help inance the deal by issuing up to $400 million of preferred stock. Sprint grows subscriber base • Sprint Corp. added more wireless subscribers than expected in the iscal irst quarter, a sign of progress in Chief Executive Oicer Marcelo Claure’s plan to turn around the struggling wireless carrier that has been through nine straight years of losses. Sprint added 180,000 monthly subscribers, according to a statement Monday from the Overland Park, Kan.-based company. That beat the 112,000 average of six analyst estimates collected by Bloomberg. Free training at SLCC • St. Louis Community College is ofering a free ive-week training course for people wanting to be warehouse, logistics and distribution specialists. More information and an application are online at workforcesolutions.stlcc.edu. Deutsche Bank must face subprimedisclosure lawsuit • A U.S. judge said Monday that Deutsche Bank AG must face part of a lawsuit claiming it deceived investors who bought more than $5.4 billion of preferred securities by concealing its exposure to the fast-deteriorating subprime mortgage market. From staf and wire reports

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In Wyoming, Peabody staf works at landscaping amid mining downturn St. Louis-based coal miner is speeding up reclamation eforts to reduce its liability for future cleanup costs REUTERS

GILLETTE, WYO. • About 10 Peabody Energy Corp. miners clad in steel-toed boots and hard hats climbed into massive bulldozers on a recent morning, ready to create rolling hills of grass over former pits at the Rawhide coal mine in Wyoming. In the midst of a deep coal downturn and widespread layofs, the staf that remains at Rawhide is spending more time in 2016 on landscaping than on mining. “We’re probably going to do four times the amount this year than we would normally do,” said Mary DeRudder, a 30-year veteran coal miner at Rawhide, which saw its workforce cut by more than half to 95 since jobs peaked at 225 in 2012. Improving the environment with acres of prairie is a plus, but placing greater resources toward reclaiming stripped land is part of an efort by St. Louis-based Peabody — the largest U.S. coal miner — to reduce its $1.2 billion liability for future environmental cleanup costs. The more quickly Peabody can recreate native grass and sagebrush, the sooner it can cut costs, free up cash and make its mines more attractive to potential buyers. It can also help Peabody meet a target of emerging from bankruptcy by next April. “We’re doing everything we can to reduce our liability to a minimum,” said Phil Dinsmoor, Peabody director of environmental services in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin, where Rawhide sits. Before Peabody can exit bankruptcy, it must first overcome a $1 billion dispute between creditors over claims on the coal

producer’s assets. In addition to planting grass, Peabody is also accelerating applications to regulators seeking approval of the reclamation of roughly 8,000 acres of land at its 28,000 acre North Antelope Rochelle, a mine adjacent to national parkland 50 miles south of Rawhide that produces more coal every day than anywhere else in the world. If its application is approved, Peabody will be able to remove millions of dollars of liabilities from its books. Under U.S. law, mine operators are required to clean up pits and restore vegetation after minerals have been extracted. Like other coal companies, Peabody has participated in a federal program called “self-bonding” that exempts healthy companies from posting collateral to cover environmental liabilities, essentially guaranteeing them with little more than a promise. There were $3.9 billion in self-bonds across the U.S. as of June 1, including $2.2 billion in the hands of bankrupt coal miners, according to federal mining regulator Oice of Surface Mining and Reclamation Enforcement. Compared with other bankrupt miners, Peabody has the most self-bonds at $1.2 billion followed by the second-largest U.S. coal producer, Arch Coal, with $458 million. The Creve Coeur-based company declined to comment on whether it was taking steps similar to Peabody’s.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

TuEsday • 07.26.2016 • a12

BEAR ATTACK

Our view • Just what the roiled Democrats needed: a Russian cyberattack.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Protesters yell as DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., arrives for a Florida delegation breakfast on Monday in Philadelphia.

The great American humorist Will Rogers would have killed on Twitter. “I don’t belong to an organized political party. I’m a Democrat.” Just 63 characters. The political party known for its chaos was at its finest during this year’s primary season. The party favorite and heiress apparent, Hillary Clinton, found herself fighting a rear-guard action against Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, the favorite of what the late Sen. Paul Wellstone of Minnesota called “the Democratic wing of the Democratic Party.” Peace wasn’t officially declared until July 12, when Sanders endorsed Clinton. The peace lasted precisely 10 days. On Friday, WikiLeaks dumped 20,000 emails stolen from Democratic National Committee servers, some of which seemed to support what Sanders’ supporters had been saying for months: The DNC was in the bag for Clinton. Three observations: • The Democrats needed this, on the eve of the opening Monday of their convention in Philadelphia, like they needed the “police riot” in Chicago in 1968. • Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida, the self-aggrandizing head of the DNC, said she’d take the bullet, but not until the convention. Good luck with that. Monday was to be “liberal night” at the convention, with Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts scheduled to speak. The party needed to demonstrate that it had its act together. Wasserman Schultz wouldn’t help. • The revelations in the emails were

embarrassing and showed the DNC to be rife with hacks. But the bigger problem was the other kind of hacks, particularly the timing of their release and evidence that they originated with Russian intelligence agencies. Americans, whatever their political leanings, should be concerned that a foreign government would interfere with our presidential elections. To be sure, U.S. hands aren’t clean. The CIA has been accused of tampering with elections in Iran, southeast Asia, Central and South America. What goes around, comes around. Cyberwarfare experts, within and without government, have traced the DNC hack to two Russian intelligence agencies. The same operators are believed to have snooped in computers at the White House, the State Department and the Joint Chiefs of Staff last year. It defies belief to think that Russian President Vladimir Putin doesn’t know what’s going on. The question is his motivation. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has said nice things about Putin, but Putin could have ordered a kind of third-rate cyberburglary of the DNC just to demonstrate the reach of the Russian bear. Thus does this strangest of all political years continue to get stranger. If Clinton and her supporters can keep their convention on the rails, it will say a lot about her ability to manage a crisis. If she then goes on to election, it will be time to manage the Russians.

Carl for circuit attorney Our view • Only one ‘county’ oice should be elective. Because St. Louis is both a city and a county, St. Louis city voters will see races for three of the “county” offices on the Aug. 2 ballot. The longtime incumbent circuit attorney and sheriff are not seeking re-election. Incumbent Treasurer Tishaura Jones is. We have editorialized about the need to make all of the county offices, except for the circuit attorney, appointive rather than elective. The circuit attorney’s office is the only one that is not purely administrative. We also have written that for other offices, the only candidates we would endorse are those with solid qualifications who also promise to work to eliminate the office. State law has not been changed to make that possible, so we are endorsing only in the circuit attorney’s race.

CIRCuIT aTTORNEy Four Democratic candidates are vying to replace Jennifer Joyce, the city’s longestserving circuit attorney, who is stepping down after 16 years. No Republicans have filed for the job. The city’s next circuit attorney will face a continuing increase in public scrutiny over the justice system’s handling of police shootings in the wake of the shooting death of Michael Brown in 2014. The prosecutor must also focus on fighting violent crime while restoring public trust and providing information on how judges dispose of criminal cases. The job pays $162,500 a year. Joyce endorsed Mary Pat Carl, 39, lead homicide prosecutor in the circuit attorney’s office, where she has worked for 13 years. Carl’s experience and dedication to the job makes her the choice over Kimberly Gardner, Patrick Hamacher and Steven Harmon.

sHERIFF

Candidates for St. Louis circuit attorney are (clockwise from top left) Mary Pat Carl, Kim Gardner, Patrick Hamacher and Steve Harmon.

who has held the job since 1989, opened the door for a field of five Democratic candidates and one Republican. Democrats in alphabetical order are: Vernon Betts, Johnnie Chester, Jimmie Matthews, Joe Vaccaro and Charley Williams Sr. The Republican candidate is John Castellano III. The sheriff’s job not only carries a sixfigure salary, but control over 173 patronage jobs. The office’s sole job is serving the circuit court by transporting prisoners to and from court, providing courthouse security and serving legal papers. The Legislature should allow the circuit judges to appoint the sheriff, as it did in 2012 with the circuit clerk, once the most powerful patronage office in the city. Current employees should keep their jobs, but as vacancies occur, they should be filled through civil service.

TREasuRER Treasurer Tishaura Jones, a Democrat, is unopposed in the primary. Darren Grant, a Republican, also is unopposed. Jerome Bauer and Don De Vivo have filed as Green Party candidates.

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Lincoln’s name, ideals missing from Republican Convention Amid all the talk of the ex-presidents, senators and candidates who chose to skip the Republican National Convention, it took me awhile to notice another odd absence. Abraham Lincoln, the greatest Republican ex of them all, was barely mentioned. When I was growing up, Lincoln was everywhere Republicans were. His portrait adorned everything from local campaign oices to national convention halls. He was regularly quoted on posters and in speeches. In short, if you knew one thing about the Republican Party, you knew that it was the Party of Lincoln. Lincoln’s ideals were missing, too. The compassion that defined the man and the personal growth that made him a great president were nowhere to be found. Neither was his willingness to forgive his enemies, nor his ability to rise above horrible national divisions and outline an inspiring vision of the future in simple but deeply moving appeals to “the better angels of our nature.” Instead, all we got was anger and vitriol. Jim Mason • University City

Media complicit in Democratic Party’s promotion of Clinton Amazing that the front page story concerning hacked emails makes no mention of what those hacked emails contain (“Hacked emails complicate Democratic Convention,” July 25). For those loyal readers of the Post-Dispatch who will never read the truth, I suggest you find alternative news sources. Here’s a teaser: The Democrats conspired to promote Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders. To further complicate things, the media was in on it, but you won’t read about that in our town’s newspaper. Ric Armbruster • Arnold

Conventions are a preview to high-stakes election

The retirement of Sheriff Jim Murphy,

THE PLATFORM TM

yOuR VIEWs • LETTERs FROM OuR REadERs

Well, one down and one to go when it comes to major-party political conventions. While it seems that each night the Republicans managed to stub their toe, they did put on a compelling show. Even CNN and MSNBC commentators appeared a bit in awe at the significance of a nonpolitician receiving the nomination. And now come the Democrats. Hillary Clinton’s choice for vice president won’t matter much; their gathering will be all about what a bum Donald Trump is and how wonderful Clinton will be for the United States. And by this time next week, the horses will begin their stretch run. So much at stake, and may God guide us all in our choice. Tom Anselm • Cottleville

Government of the dollar, by the dollar, for the dollar Regarding Tony Messenger’s column “Campaign finance: absurd to obscene” (July 24): Yes, the rot runs deep in Missouri and throughout our country. As can be seen from this column and many others over the past year, we have the best politicians money can buy. Our government is now of the dollar, by the dollar, and for the dollar. Americans should wake up and demand campaign financing reform. We are all puppets to the big-dollar contributors. And the status quo guys are not going to bite the hand that feeds them. Stanley F. Ebersohl • Florissant

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR

diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days. Additional letters are posted online at STLtoday.com/letters.

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101

Endorsement of Hanaway is surprising I’m surprised that the Post-Dispatch has given such a strong endorsement of Catherine Hanaway for Missouri governor (“Hanaway the choice in GOP,” July 24). The article is in the same issue that Tony Messenger writes about corruption in our Missouri government because of obscene amounts of campaign contributions (“Campaign finance: absurd to obscene,” July 24). Hanaway has taken millions of dollars fom Rex Sinquefield. Remember him? He keeps trying to take away the St. Louis earning tax. All the Missouri GOP candidates for governor are against government help for health care, helpful voting laws and many good environmental projects. They are for right-to-work laws. If you think Hanaway is going to work for sensible gun laws, you’re kidding yourself. Remember 2005, when Hanaway was the majority leader in the House of Representatives? She was responsible for hundreds of thousands of poor people losing their health insurance. Rea Kleeman • Clayton

Candidates ight each other, and it’s not for our beneit Thank you! Dan Martin’s “Postcard from Mound City” cartoon in Saturday’s paper summed up my question of the last few weeks. We’ve been hammered with ads telling us that people are fighting for us, but we are never told for whom they are fighting. Most of us know that they’ve been chiefly fighting each other verbally. I suggest that anyone paying attention to these ads relax. You’re probably safe from attack. Joseph J. Komadina • St. Louis

Homeless shelter is proper use for Biddle House property I was very happy to see Darlene Green give the final vote for the Biddle House for the homeless in St. Louis (“City approves 24-hour shelter for homeless,” July 23). The property was given to the city of St. Louis to be used for the benefit of the St. Louis population and that includes the homeless. Ann Mullanphy Biddle, my great-aunt, gave the property to be used for a public market, where people could buy and sell their goods. She was a most generous individual to the city and was known for her charity and gifts to unwed mothers, orphans, schools, immigrants, and the first hospital in St. Louis (founded by her father, John Mullanphy). This is the proper use for this property in light of who gave it to the city of St. Louis in the first place. I wish the Biddle House well and hope it helps people in their dire need and gets them the help they need to have a decent life. Shouldn’t we all wish that for the homeless? Elizabeth Mullanphy Boland Barbieri • Brentwood Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

PLATFORM • I know that my retirement will make no

WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS AND E-MAIL

Catherine Hanaway is running for the Republican nomination for governor.

E-MAIL letters@post-dispatch.com FAX 314-340-3139

TOd ROBBERsON trobberson@post-dispatch.com Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGaN khorrigan@post-dispatch.com Deputy Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8135 FRaNK REusT freust@post-dispatch.com Letters Editor • 314-340-8356 dEBORaH PETERsON dpeterson@post-dispatch.com Editorial writer • 314-340-8276


07.26.2016 • TUESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

OTHER VIEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

UNEARNED INCREMENT IN THE CARIBBEAN • We are again negotiating for the purchase of the St. Thomas group of islands in the Caribbean. The islands are of much greater value to us than to Denmark. The only point of doubt as to the proposed treaty is the price. This is placed in the early reports at the incredible sum of $25,000,000. Access the full item and more at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Much work to be done for Americans with disabilities Health care • Lack of government funding leaves many parents struggling to care for kids with special needs. BY BRIAN ROY

The 26th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act is certainly something to celebrate. But it also highlights how much work still needs to be done. A recent article in the Washington Post pointed out a paradox that the parents of children with special needs are all too familiar with: while the federal government has for decades required states to accommodate the special needs of people with disabilities like cerebral palsy and autism, Congress has never provided the money to do so. This leaves funding up to state and local governments, and oftentimes, there are no dollars to be found at these levels, either.

the other has to be a full-time When you combine the lack caregiver. But even families with of government funding with two salaries can find it hard to pay reduced private insurance covfor a $40,000 power wheelchair, erage and higher co-pays, it especially when the child conbecomes obvious that parents stantly needs a new one as s/he of kids with special needs, those gets bigger and taller. with physical and develOn top of the wheelopmental disabilities, are chairs and walkers, the up a creek with not only hearing aids, van lifts, and no paddle, but a very dicey endless hours of therapy, flotation device. the everyday expenses we Recent estimates sugall incur are more expengest about one in six sive for parents of kids children between the ages Brian Roy with special needs. After of 3 and 17 have one or all, a child with disabilities can’t more developmental disabilities, be accommodated by just any and that the average cost, the daycare facility. Or go to just any average, of caring for such a child summer camp. Or find the kind of is $15,000-30,000 a year. That’s specialized bike they need on sale like buying a new car every year. at the big-box toy store. Many of these families rely That’s why the existence of on the income of one parent, as

Variety the Children’s Charity of St. Louis is so vital. Through funding that comes almost exclusively from corporate and individual donations, Variety provides what government and insurance cannot, or will not. If you’re a keen student of advertising and marketing, you know companies selling things like cars, and clothes, and computers are selling more than just those physical items. They’re selling prestige, hipness, excitement. Similarly, when Variety helps almost 10,000 kids and their families obtain medical equipment and therapy, or a week of summer camp, or the chance to perform in a top-notch musical production, we’re also providing important intangibles like

self-reliance, self-esteem, and socialization. But even an independent entity like Variety can come up short of meeting the needs of these amazing kids and their equally amazing families. It gives us no pleasure to report that, sometimes, when demand is unexpectedly great, we end up with kids on a waiting list. But just like the families we help, we at Variety never give up hope. After all, St. Louis is the most-charitable city in the country, and for all of our 85 years, its citizens have been steadfast in their belief that giving our kids the chance to live life to the fullest is an investment worth making. Brian Roy is interim executive director of Variety the Children’s Charity.

Herr Trumpf Politics • here are reasons for the comparisons between tyrants and Trump. KATHLEEN PARKER Washington Post

CLEVELAND • Donald

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Donald Trump takes the stage Thursday during the final day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

No longer a contest of ideas Politics • he deining clash of our time is reason versus unreason. LEONARD PITTS Miami Herald

Well, that was sure ugly. Last week’s Republican conclave in Cleveland came across less as a nominating convention than as a four-day nervous breakdown, a moment of fracture and bipolarity from a party that no longer has any clear idea what it stands for or what it is. Everywhere you turned there was something that made you embarrassed for them, something so disconnected from fact, logic or decency as to suggest those things no longer have much meaning for the party faithful. Did the convention really earn rave reviews from white supremacists, with one tweeting approvingly that the GOP “is becoming the de facto white party?” Did Florida Gov. Rick Scott really say he could remember “when terrorism was something that happened in foreign countries” — as if four little girls were never blown to pieces in a Birmingham church, and an NAACP lawyer and his wife were never killed by a bomb in Scott’s own state? Did Silicon Valley entrepreneur Peter Thiel really say, “It’s time to end the era of stupid wars,” as if it were Democrats who dragged Republicans into Iraq with promises of flowers strewn beneath American

tanks? Did Ben Carson really link Hillary Clinton to Satan? Did the crowd really chant, repeatedly and vociferously, for her to be jailed? Did at least two Republicans actually call for her execution? No, you weren’t dreaming. The answer is yes on all counts. Then there was the party’s nominee. Donald Trump’s “acceptance speech” was a 75-minute scream as incoherent as everything that preceded it. He vowed to protect the LGBTQ community from “a hateful foreign ideology,” as if his party’s platform did not commit it to support so-called “conversion therapy,” an offensive bit of quackery that purports to “cure” homosexuality. He accused President Obama of dividing the nation, as if he were not the one recycling Richard Nixon’s racist Southern strategy with unsubtle cries of “law and order,” and George H.W. Bush’s infamous Willie Horton ad with tales of “illegals” out to kill us. Trump painted a bleak picture of a nation in decline and under siege, and he offered a range of responses: fear or fright, fury or rage. But glory be, he promised to fix everything that ails us, down to and including long lines at the airport. Trump gave few specifics, mind you, beyond a guarantee that he can do all this “quickly.” Any resemblance to a guy hawking magical elixir from the back of a wagon was surely unintentional. This gathering made one thing clear, if it had not been already. The

battle between left and right is no longer a contest of ideas, no longer about low taxes versus higher ones, small government versus big government, intervention versus isolation. No, the defining clash of our time is reason versus unreason, reason versus an inchoate fear and fury growing like weeds on the cultural, class, religious and racial resentments of people who cling to an idealized 1954 and wonder why the country is passing them by. The Republicans, as presently constituted, have no ideas beyond fear and fury. And Lord help us, the only thing standing between us and that is a grandmother in pantsuits. The Democrats have their gathering this week in Philadelphia. Ordinarily, you’d call on them to present a competing vision, but the GOP has set the bar so low you’d be happy to see the Democrats just present a vision, period, just appeal to something beyond our basest selves, just remind us that we can be better and our politics higher than what we saw last week. This has to happen. Because, you see, the Republicans were right on at least one point: The nation does face a clear and present danger, a menace to our values, our hopes and our future. If the GOP wants to see this threat, there’s no need to look outward. Any good mirror will do. Leonard Pitts Jr. pitts@miamiherald.com Copyright The Miami Herald Distributed by Tribune Content Agency LLC

Trump was a man in full Thursday night as he accepted the Republican nomination: Fullthroated, full of fury and full of himself: “I am your voice”; “I alone can fix it (the system)”; “I am the law and order candidate.” And the teeming throng of red-, whiteand blue-bedecked patriots loved all 75 minutes of an acceptance speech in which the candidate promised to — stop me if you’ve heard this — make America great again. Personally, I’d settle for a smile, an expression that rarely bothered Trump’s facial features, and a national day of noyelling. All week, there was so much shouting and pointing. So much posturing and clenching of fists. So much anger as the crowd roared in unison: “Lock her up, lock her up, lock her up.” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, serving as a prosecutor/ provocateur, enumerated her crimes. “Guilty or not guilty?” he shouted from the dais, at least once struggling to keep a straight face. “Guilty!!!!” the crowd screamed with the bloodlust of Romans waiting for Nero’s thumb. Ah, but it’s just politics, giddy commentators reminded us the day after. This is what conventions are all about, riling the ready for the final slog. Nothing to see here but faith in the promise of a better, stronger, safer America — all made possible by a red-faced, ham-fisted, copper-coiffed casino broker who until very recently was a reality show celebrity who jabbed his finger toward trembling wannabes and decreed: “You’re fired!” Heads will roll, we can presume, but whose? If I were Ted Cruz, I’d keep mine down. The grandest of marketeers, Trump has cast a spell over a swath of America, inspiring them not with soaring rhetoric but with dark harbingers of worse to come. In the familiar way of despots, tyrants and kings, he has made the many feel better by singling out the few to fault. It is not for nothing that many have compared Trump’s brand of rhetoric to some of humankind’s worst, including, unavoidably, Adolf Hitler. Observing the convention, I was taken back to my uncommon childhood when I was exposed

to Hitler’s speeches. My father, a World War II Army Air Corps pilot, was also a kitchen historian who, post-war, studied Hitler in an effort to better understand him. This involved listening to his recorded speeches, which, in the dark, B.A. (Before Apple) era, meant we all listened to them. They made a lasting impression. Without understanding a word of German, it wasn’t difficult to translate Hitler’s message. The ferocious shouts of thousands of citizens, inflamed by and enamored of this strange little man, merged into a solid note — a deafening roar freighted with the fears and furies of mankind’s primeval past. “Lock her up” sounds a lot like “To the stockades.” We affirm that such a thing could never happen here. Our Constitution and our system of checks and balances protect against totalitarianism. I share the faith that America yet remains too good and too strong for a complete breakdown of our ordered liberty. However. There are reasons for the comparisons between tyrants and Trump that transcend mere politics. There is also good reason that so many have accepted Trump as their leader. As one Republican loyalist explained to me: “He’s a tough guy. They think he’s going to punch (bad) people in the face.” Indeed, Trump promised to end the Islamic State and to protect the LGBTQ community from “the violence and oppression of a hateful foreign ideology,” just as he has promised to bring back jobs and renegotiate trade deals. The how of these several vows remains a mystery. More pressing, meanwhile: What will be required of America in the process? How much freedom does law and order cost? We don’t know because Trump probably doesn’t know. What I do know is that the sound and fury I recall from my father’s records are similar to what I heard in Cleveland from decent people who would recoil at the comparison. But imagine you’re the person about whom thousands are chanting with the cadence of a lynch mob, “Lock her up!” How frightening that would be, even to a tough pro like Hillary Clinton. How horrifying it should be to all of us that the next president of the United States could be the man who inspired it. Kathleen Parker kathleenparker@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

Geeting, David "Dave"

To Our Readers To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book.

Death Notice Index Barlbort, Gilbert R. "Gib" - Florissant Black, Donald R. - St. Louis Bohlmann, Ralph Arthur - St. Louis Brown, Richard M. - St. Louis Carden, Lindsey "Lin" C. - Granite City Dammer, John "Jack" - St. Peters Dunlap, William T. - Creve Coeur, MO Geeting, David "Dave" - St. Louis Govro - see Walker Greenlaw - see Black Hallums, Fleta Mae - Ballwin Harvey - see Walker Hauk, Yvette E. - Saint Peters Jones, John M., Jr. - St. Louis

Death Notice Index Kerckhoff - see Renkins McMahan, Arlene F. - St. Louis Meyer, Carole F. - St. Charles Mourton, Christyne Frodyma - St. Peters Pike - see Renkins Renkins, Frank Jr. - St. Louis Schmidt, Beatrice - St. Louis

Shovlin - see Renkins Terovich, Loretta M. - St. Louis

Walker, Gerald R. - St. Louis Wallach, Ellen Ruth - St. Louis Wolter, Flora - St. Louis Woodward, Bobby Leon - High Ridge, MO

Expressing your thoughtfulness respectfully & gracefully Barlbort, Gilbert R. "Gib" asleep in Jesus, Friday, July 22, 2016 at the age of 86 in Mt. Vernon, MO. Beloved husband of the late Lwana J. Barlbort (Smith) and the late Marie E. Barlbort (Depung); loving father of Annette (Michael) Stillings and Pamela (the late Marshall) Haerther; dear father-in-law of the late Richard Burg; dear grandfather of Margaret (Kevin) Koop, Martha (Adam) Koontz, Graham (Kelsey) Haerther, Samantha (James) Bland, Shady Stillings, and Cheyenne Stillings; dear great grandfather of Caleb Burg, Kyler Bland, Brooklyn Bland and Darias Stillings; dear brother of Vertress Hood; dear step-father of Judy (Jerry) Davis, Jane (Gary) Faherty, and the late Joyce (Bob) Valenzuela; dear uncle, brother-in-law, stepgrandfather, cousin, and good friend of many. Gib was a lifelong member of Salem Lutheran Church, a Christian man who lived his faith, the epitomy of a true gentleman and a man whose character was above reproach. Services: Visitation 10 a.m. until funeral service at 11 a.m. Thursday, July 28 at Salem Lutheran Church, 5180 Parker Rd, Black Jack, MO 63033. Interment Salem Lutheran Cemetery. Visitation 2-8 p.m. Wednesday at Hutchens Mortuary. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions appreciated to the Salem General Fund. www.hutchensmortuary.com

Black, Donald R. on Monday, July 25, 2016 at age 95. Beloved husband of Melba " Jane" (nee Greenlaw) Black; devoted father of Cheryl Keller (Larry); loving grandfather to Erin Yoffie (Sam) and Craig Keller; great-grandfather to Ben, Lucas and Andrew Yoffie; brother-inlaw to Paul (Jean) Greenlaw: uncle to Jim (Linda) and Richard (Luisa) Greenlaw; great-uncle to John and Robert Greenlaw; and good friend to many. Long-time employee of Boeing and Emerson Electric. Services: Visitation 12 p.m. until time of service at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at Kriegshauser West Mortuary 9450 Olive Blvd. Interment Lake Charles Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are suggested to American Cancer Society or American Heart Association. Condolences may be placed online at www.kriegshausermortuary.com

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Brown, Richard M.

Bohlmann, Ralph Arthur

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on 7/23/16. Husband of Carole Brown; father of Nancy (Keven) Baker, Joyce (James) Triska, Robin Brown and the late Kathleen Vinson; grandfather, great grandfather, brother, cousin and friend. Services: Funr Svc 9:30am, Wed. 7/27 Saints Mary & Joseph Chapel, 6304 Minnesota Ave 63111. Interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Vis 4-8pm, Tues 7/26, Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Road, 63125. Condolences may be offered at www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com.

died unexpectedly at home on Saturday, July 23, 2016 in St. Louis at the age of 44. Dave is survived by his parents, Dan and Susan of St. Louis; wife, Julie of St. Louis; children, Allison, Caroline and Jane; siblings, Jonathan and James. He is preceded in death by his sister Sarah Nelson. Dave was born on March 8, 1972 to Dan and Susan. He graduated from the University of Missouri in 1994 with a degree in accounting. He married Julie in 2000. Dave began working as an accountant, started a successful small business and then worked as an investment banker. While Dave had many interests, nothing brought him more joy or pride than his three wonderful daughters. Services: We will gather at BOPP Chapel from 5-8 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27. A funeral is scheduled for 5 p.m. Thursday, July 28 at First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood. All are welcome to attend and celebrate Dave's life. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to tinyurl.com/Geeting, At the request of the Geeting family, there will be no receiving line at Bopp Chapel.

Hallums, Fleta Mae

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of Granite City, died on Sunday, July 24, 2016 at John Cochran VA Hospital in St. Louis. He was born in 1944 to Robert L. and Mildred (nee Hobbs) Carden and grew up on the south side of Chicago. Lin married his childhood friend, Candise Isobel, in Granite City, IL. The U.S. Air Force veteran served proudly in the Vietnam war and was foreman at Granite City Steel for 33 years. The loving husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather loved to coach Little League baseball in Granite City. His favorite hobby was critiquing his son's and grandson's athletic performances. Besides his loving wife of 49 years, Lin is survived by his best friend and son: Christopher (Joanne) Carden of Fairview Heights, IL; 3 grandchildren: Erica, Esq., (Mark) Thurman, Jonathan "Jony" Carden and Ian "Nails" Carden; 1 great-grandchild: Rowan Thurman and 1 sister: Deannie Williams of TN. Lin is preceded in death by his parents and sister: Robbie Southard. Special thanks to Washington University & St. Louis University doctors who had cared for him. Services will be private. Professional services entrusted to the care of Wojstrom Funeral Home & Crematory of Granite City. Online obituary and guestbook available at www.wojstrom.com.

Died July 24, 2016 at age of 79. Beloved husband of 56 yrs. to Pat (Nee Gidcomb), dear father of Pam Morgan (John), Jill Schulze (Dennis), and John Dammer (Pam). Grandfather of Ashley, Brittany, Courtney, Brandon, Brooke, Ethan, and Adrien. Great grandfather of Jasper. Brother of George and Jerry (Jan). Brother in law of Bill Gidcomb (Pat). Uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at St. Stephens Episcopal Church, 33 N Clay, Ferguson, MO, 63135 on Saturday, July 30, 2016 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions to church appreciated.

Dunlap, William T. 94 years old passed away, Monday, July 25, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Johanna Dunlap (nee: Glitsos). Dear father of Jim (Karen) Dunlap and Anna Marie (Jim) Brown. Dearest Papou of John and Katherine Dunlap and Rachel and Mike Brown. Our dear uncle, Godfather, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Thursday, 10:00 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church Family Life Center. Visitation Wednesday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

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Mourton, Christyne Frodyma Age 57, of St. Peters, MO, died on Sunday, July 24, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Renkins, Frank Jr. Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection on Friday, July 22, 2016. Beloved husband of Kathleen Renkins (nee Pike); dear father of Catherine Renkins (Stephen Platte), Francis J. (Hathaiwan) Renkins, Jennifer Shovlin and Nancy (Drew) Kerckhoff; loving grandfather of Olivia, Abigail, Emma, Allison, Namitta, Madalynne and A.J.; dear son of the late Frank and Stella Renkins (nee Urban); dearest brother of Mary (the late James) Duffe and the late Josephine and John Renkins; dear friend of Roger Hessling; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, greatuncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, July 26, 8:30 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Contributions to St. Anthony's Hospital appreciated. Visitation Monday, 3-9 p.m. On Mon., July 25, 2016. Viewing Wed., 4-8 pm and Funeral Thur., 10 am at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY. Burial J.B. Cemetery.

Terovich, Loretta M.

Ballwin, MO (nee Scott) ex-wife of John Fyke Hallums passed away on July 24th 2016 at the age of 88. Graduated from Washington University in 1948. Mother of John Scott (Sara Burton) Hallums, Lisa Anne (Juan) Bertolino and Lance Fyke (Tonia) Hallums. Grandmother of Michael, Alex, Allison, Madeline and Katherine Hallums. Former president, American Association University Women St. Louis Branch. Implemented District-wide Volunteer Program, Parkway School District. Director of Volunteer Services at Malcolm Bliss Mental Center in St. Louis. Training of County Court Judicial Personnel. Supervisor of Files and Records at the St. Louis County Courthouse. Services: Visitation at SCHRADER Funeral Home & Crematory; 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, MO 63011 Friday 10 a.m. -12 p.m. Private burial in Mammoth Spring, Arkansas. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Third Baptist Church of St. Louis; 620 N Grand Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63103. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Hauk, Yvette E. age 88, of Saint Peters, MO, died Sunday, July 24, 2016. Contact (636) 240-2242 or visit baue.com

Jones, John M., Jr. Dammer, John "Jack"

Wallach, Ellen Ruth

(nee: Frick), of St. Charles, MO, died on Saturday, July 23, 2016, at the age of 78. Beloved husband of 52 years to Donald E. Meyer; cherished daughter of the late Clarence and Wilhelmina "Min" Frick; devoted mother of Douglas (Rebecca) Meyer and Bradley (Laura) Meyer; loving grandmother of Aidan, Anna, Joel, and Charles Meyer; treasured sister of Susan (Bill) Meyers; dear sister-inlaw of Rev. Gordon Gross and Robert (Jean) Meyer; loving aunt, cousin, and friend to many. Carole was also preceded in death by her sister, Evelyn Gross. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral Home, 620 Jefferson Street, St. Charles, MO. Visitation: Friday, July 29, 2016 from 9:30 am - 11:30 a.m. at St. John United Church of Christ in St. Charles, MO. Memorial Service: Friday, July 29, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. at St. John United Church of Christ. Memorials: St. John United Church of Christ, Salvation Army, or the American Red Cross. Visit Baue.com

Schmidt, Beatrice

Carden, Lindsey "Lin" C. a former president of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod and of Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, passed from this life on Sunday, July 24 2016. He was 84. Ralph was born February 20, 1932 in Palisade, Nebraska, the second child of Rev. Arthur E. and Anne F. (Weeke) Bohlmann. He graduated from St. John's College in Winfield, Kansas in 1951 and from Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri in 1956. He studied at the University of Heidelberg, Germany as a Fulbright Scholar from 1956 to 1957 and taught at Concordia College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from 1957 to 1958. Ralph was ordained on June 28, 1958 and served as pastor of Mt. Olive Lutheran Church in Des Moines, Iowa from 1958 to 1960. There he met Patricia Anne McCleary, daughter of Carl and Aileen McCleary of Perry, Iowa; they were married on April 19, 1959 and spent over 53 years together as husband and wife. Ralph joined the Concordia Seminary faculty in St. Louis in 1960 and taught there for many years, earning an S.T.M. degree from the seminary in 1966 and a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1968. He was named Acting President of the seminary on May 20, 1974, and on May 3, 1975, he was elected as its seventh President. During his seminary career, Ralph was also an assistant pastor at Grace Lutheran Church in Pagedale, Missouri from 1961 to 1971, and he served in several roles with the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, including a 1965 appointment to its Commission on Theology and Church Relations, which he served as Secretary from 1967 to 1971. Ralph was elected as the ninth President of the Lutheran ChurchMissouri Synod on July 5, 1981 and served in that office until 1992, when he was named President emeritus. Ralph is preceded in death by his parents Arthur (May 15, 1975) and Anne (December 29, 2002), his brother Victor (July 14, 2004), and his wife Patricia (September 14, 2012). Ralph is survived by his two children, Paul (born February 18, 1960), who lives in New York, New York and has recently been an Assistant Dean at Columbia University, and Lynn (born May 24, 1963), who lives in Jacksonville, Illinois and is pastor of the Congregational United Church of Christ. Lynn is the mother of his two grandchildren, Lucas, age 16, and Jesse, age 12. Ralph is also survived by his sister Gloria Stigge, of Iowa City, Iowa; his brother John (Mary), of Indian Shores, Florida; his brother Mark (Becky), of Columbus, Ohio; his sister-in-law Rebekah Williams, of Dunnellon, Florida; and many friends in the U.S. and abroad who have enriched his life. Services: Visitation will be at the Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus at Concordia Seminary in Clayton, Missouri (801 Seminary Place) on Wednesday, July 27, from 12:00 noon to 2:00 p.m., followed by a funeral service at the chapel at 2:00 p.m. Memorial gift suggestions are Concordia Lutheran Church in Kirkwood, Concordia Seminary Student Aid Fund, and Lutheran Senior Service Benevolence Fund. www.boppchapel.com

Meyer, Carole F.

Sat. July 23, 2016. Loving partner of Sheryl Goff. Dear son of John M., Sr., and Dixie L. (nee Worthing) Jones. Services: Visitation Wed. July 27, 2016, 10-11:00 am, service 11:00 am at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr. Fenton, MO. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

McMahan, Arlene F. July 23, 2016 Visitation 7/27, 4-8 p.m. Service 7/28, 11:00 a.m. www.alexanderstlouis.com

(nee Harlow), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Monday, July 25, 2016. Beloved wife of the late George P. Terovich; loving mother of Donald (Jana) and Mark (Debra) Terovich, Ruth Champion and Paula (Marty) Lawson; our dearest grandmother of 4; great-grandmother of 3; aunt, great-aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS CITY Chapel, 2906 Gravois, Thursday, July 28 at 1 p.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Memorials to Alzheimer's research preferred. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m .

July 23, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Dr. Elliot A. Wallach; dear mother and motherin-law of Suzanne Jo Wallach (Robert Drier), John S. (Cindy) Wallach and Peter T. Wallach; dear grandmother of Julia Drier, Laura (Scott) Ressler and Dylan and Abby Wallach; dear sister and sister-in-law of the late Daniel (late Rose) Siegel and the late Stanley (late Bertha) Siegel; dear sister-in-law of the late Robert (Roberta) Wallach and Henry (late Arleen) Wallach; Ellen was a Stage and Television Actress and a noted International Artist. Special thanks to Helene Frankel & the caregivers of Sunrise on Clayton and SSM Hospice for their loving care. Services: Funeral Service 10:00 a.m. Tuesday, July 26 at Berger Memorial Chapel, 9430 Olive Blvd. Interment follows at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery, 9125 Ladue Rd. Memorial contributions preferred to the Alzheimer's Association or Washington University School of Art. For more info visit bergermemorialchapel.com. BERGER MEMORIAL

Wolter, Flora Saturday July 23, 2016. Dear wife of the late Harold Wolter; dear mother of Diana Wolter and David (Helen) Wolter; dear grandmother of Shannon, Colleen, Erin, Eric, Ron, Paula, Kelley and Mandy; dear great grandmother. Services: Visitation Thursday July 28, 2016, 8:30 a.m. until 9:30 a.m. at the Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd. then to St. Martin of Tours Catholic Church, 610 W. Ripa, St. Louis, MO. For funeral mass celebrated at 10:00 a.m. lnterment National Cemetery. Share your condolences at www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Woodward, Bobby Leon Mon. July 25, 2016. 77, of High Ridge, MO. Vis Thurs 4-8pm at Chapel Hill Mortuary. Service Fri., 10 a.m. at Murphy Baptist Church

LOCAL 1 I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Gerald R. Walker Journeyman Wireman Member 59 Years Retired July 22, 2016 Visitation, Thurs, July 28th 4:00-8:00 pm Kutis South County 5255 Lemay Ferry Funeral, Fri, July 29th 10:00 am St. Paul Church Fenton Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

Walker, Gerald R.

Dierbergs Florist Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, July 22, 2016. Beloved husband of Yvonne Walker (nee Molly); dear father of Lisa (Ervin) Govro, Ronald (Kim) Walker, Susan (Scott) Harvey and Michael (Susan) Walker; dear grandfather of Anthony Bertolini, Benjamin and Bradley Walker, Ashley and Julie Harvey and Rebecca and Cody Walker; dear brother of James E. Walker; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, greatuncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, July 29, 9:15 a.m. to St. Paul Church, Fenton, for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment National Cemetery. Contributions to the Carmelite Sisters DCJ appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

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07.26.2016 • TueSday • M 1

NEWS

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

EPA plans limits on airliner pollution Finding on health consequences from emissions is expected to result in regulations ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Jet engine exhaust from airliners endangers human health and adds to climate change, the government said Monday in taking the first step toward regulating those emissions. The Environmental Protection Agency said it would use its authority under the Clean Air Act to impose limits on aircraft emissions. Jet engines spew significant amounts of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and methane, into the upper atmosphere, where they trap heat from the sun. But proposed rules such as imposing fuel-eiciency

standards have faced stiff opposition from aircraft makers and commercial airlines. Aircraft emissions were not addressed as part of the landmark global climate agreement agreed to in Paris in December. “Addressing pollution from aircraft is an important element of U.S. eforts to address climate change,” said Janet McCabe, EPA’s acting assistant administrator for air and radiation. McCabe said aircraft were the third largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. transportation sector, and that is expected to increase. Cars and trucks already are regulated.

The EPA’s findings do not apply to small pistonengine planes or to military aircraft. A U.N. panel in February recommended new emissions standards for international flights that require an average 4 percent reduction in fuel consumption during the cruising phase of flight. The new regulations from the International Civil Aviation Organization require that new aircraft designs meet the standards beginning in 2020, and that designs already in production comply by 2023. Environmental groups have criticized those new international standards as too weak to actually slow

global warming. Planes burn the most fuel during takeoffs and landings. Cruising at high altitudes is the most fuel-efficient period. Environmentalists say aviation accounts for about 5 percent of global greenhouse emissions, though the U.N. and EPA cite studies concluding it’s actually less than 2 percent. The EPA finding announced Monday is expected to result in fuelefficiency standards for domestic carriers, which critics call long overdue. The EPA acted after a coalition of environmental organizations filed notice of their intent to sue the agency over its inaction.

Evacuation holdouts hinder efort to contain wildire in California

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A ireighter battles a wildire Sunday near Placenta Canyon Road in Santa Clarita, Calif. Thousands of homes remained evacuated Sunday as two massive wildires raged in tinder-dry California hills and canyons.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARITA, CALIF. • A raging wildfire that

forced thousands from their homes on the edge of Los Angeles continued to burn out of control Monday as frustrated fire oicials said residents reluctant to heed evacuation orders made conditions more dangerous and destructive for their neighbors. The smoky fire tore through drought-ravaged brush that hadn’t burned in decades amid a sweltering heat wave and exploded over the weekend. It burned more than 51 square miles and destroyed at least 18 residences. Firefighters were unable to battle some of the blaze because of evacuation holdouts they had to spend time helping to safety instead of putting out destructive flames, County Fire Chief Daryl Osby said.

Some firefighters “felt that they lost additional structures because they had to stop what they were doing to help citizens evacuate,” Osby said. U.S. Forest Service spokesman Justin Correll urged residents to leave quickly when evacuation orders are issued because their “property becomes secondary.” “We don’t want firemen to become traffic directors,” he said. The fire was one of two destructive infernos burning in California. A blaze in the scenic Big Sur region of the Central Coast had destroyed 20 homes and threatened 1,650 others by Monday as it burned 23 square miles. In Santa Clarita, 30 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles, a fire broke out Friday near a highway and quickly spread through arid vegetation in rugged

mountains before making its way down into canyons with sprawling subdivisions of large homes. By Monday, about 10 percent of Santa Clarita’s 200,000 residents had been ordered out of their homes. The wind-driven fire kicked up Saturday like a “crazy storm,” said Kara Franklin, who said sand driven by heavy wind hit her in the face as she tried to get a horse and donkey into a trailer so she could tow the animals away. From a ridgetop, she saw flames engulf a neighborhood. When the blaze appeared to die down, she thought the worst was over and returned. Then it flared up again and she and her son used a garden hose to put out embers that ignited spot fires on her property before fleeing. “The heat was so in-

tense,” Franklin said Monday from a high school that had been turned into an evacuation center. “It was an inferno that was blazing ... just coming over the ridge.” Three Forest Service firefighters lost their homes at a remote fire station in the San Gabriel Mountains, including two who were fighting the fire at the time. The fire destroyed film sets at Sable Ranch in Santa Clarita, which has Old West-style buildings used for movie locations. It also forced a nonprofit sanctuary for rescued exotic creatures to evacuate 340 of its more than 400 animals, including Bengal tigers and a mountain lion. Nearly 3,000 firefighters were trying to put the Santa Clarita blaze out.

copies worldwide, bringing Christian prophecy and the apocalypse into mainstream bookstores. The Rev. Mr. LaHaye was a Baptist minister who started an Atlanta-area church and several Christian schools, and wrote dozens of noniction and advice books. He was active in conservative political groups and instrumental in the establishment of the Moral Majority.

While carbon emissions from land-based sources are largely in decline, pollution from airplanes is projected to triple by 2050 without stricter limits. A spokeswoman for the aviation industry said U.S. air carriers have already been making strides to burn less fuel and generate less harmful exhaust. “It is critical that aircraft emissions standards be set at the international level and not imposed unilaterally by one country or set of countries,” said Jean Medina of the group Airlines for America.

NATION DIGEST Indianapolis oicer shot, suspect killed Indianapolis police said an oicer was shot and another oicer injured after a chase and exchange of gunire with a suspect, who was killed. Indianapolis Police Chief Troy Riggs said Monday evening that the oicer who was shot had been taken to a hospital and was expected to make a full recovery. He said the second oicer had “very minor injuries.” Riggs said the incident began on the city’s northwest side when the oicers tried to stop a suspicious vehicle. The driver led police on a chase and began shooting. The chief said the chase came to an end and police and the suspect exchanged gunire. The suspect was fatally struck. He was not immediately identiied. Police said a passenger who led the suspect’s car was in custody. Texas oicer killed in buglary attempt • A Texas sherif’s deputy was shot and killed at his home north of Austin before dawn on Monday in what authorities said appeared to be an attempted burglary. Sgt. Craig Hutchinson of the Travis County Sherif’s Oice used his police radio about 1:30 a.m. to report people prowling behind his house. Investigators arriving moments later found Hutchinson lying on the ground in his backyard in Round Rock, about 15 miles from Austin. He was pronounced dead at a hospital. Travis County Sherif Greg Hamilton said at a news conference that no arrests had been made but that authorities were seeking an unknown number of suspects. He said there was evidence that the incident was an attempted burglary of Hutchinson’s backyard shed, rather than someone targeting a law enforcement oicer. Hastert wants victim’s suit tossed • An attorney for Dennis Hastert has asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit brought by one of the former U.S. House speaker’s sexual abuse victims. The victim is seeking $1.8 million in outstanding hushmoney payments from the imprisoned Illinois Republican, though the court didn’t immediately rule on the request at a hearing Monday.

The iling this month in Kendall County, Ill., Circuit Court argues, among other things, that the accuser not only missed a deadline by which he needed to take legal action but also that he violated a verbal agreement with Hastert by speaking to federal investigators about the molestation. The judge overseeing the civil case asked for written responses on Hastert’s motion to dismiss by Aug. 29, and the court will hold a hearing regarding the matter on Oct. 13, said Kristi Browne, an attorney for the victim, in a brief email statement Monday. Hastert is serving a 15-month sentence at a federal prison in Rochester, Minnesota, for violating federal banking law as he attempted to pay a total of $3.5 million to silence the victim, who isn’t named in the state lawsuit and was referred to only as “Individual A” in the federal criminal case. Prizer against Arkansas execution drug • An execution drug obtained by the Arkansas prison system this month appears to have been made by a subsidiary of Pizer, even though the pharmaceutical giant has said it doesn’t want its drugs to be used in executions. The sale of the vecuronium bromide by an unknown third party may show how diicult it could be for manufacturers to prevent such sales in states such as Arkansas that have execution secrecy laws. The Associated Press obtained on Monday redacted photos of the vecuronium bromide label from the Arkansas Department of Correction. It matches labels submitted to the National Institutes of Health by Hospira, Inc., which Pizer bought last year. The AP also obtained the purchase orders for the drug, but the name of the third party that sold the drug to the department was redacted, in compliance with the state’s execution secrecy law. Pizer announced in May it had put in place sweeping controls to make sure its distributors would not sell its drugs for use in executions. In an email Monday, company spokeswoman Rachel Hooper reiterated that position. Associated Press

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DEATHS ELSEWHERE Rev. Mr. Tim LaHaye • The author of the best-selling “Left Behind” novels about the return of Jesus and the rapture has died. A publicist for the Rev. Mr. LaHaye says the novelist died Monday (July 25, 2016) in San Diego, days after sufering a stroke. He was 90. The Rev. Mr. LaHaye and his partner Jerry B. Jenkins wrote 16 volumes in the “Left Behind” series, which sold more than 80 million

“People should not have to choose between mobility and a healthy climate,” said Marcie Keever, legal director for the environmental group Friends of the Earth. “Now it’s time for the ... administration [of President Barack Obama] to issue a strong rule, to hold the aviation industry accountable.” Though environmental groups are pushing EPA to adopt stricter standards, the airlines and aircraft manufacturers want to U.S. to adopt the more modest reductions proposed for international routes. U.S.-owned airliners account for nearly one-third of all aircraft pollution worldwide.

Marni Nixon • The woman whose singing was heard in place of the leading actresses in such classic movie musicals as “West Side Story,” “The King and I” and “My Fair Lady,” has died. The Hollywood voice double was 86. Michael Kirsten, senior vice president of Ms. Nixon’s talent agency, Harden-Curtis Associates, says she died Sunday (July 24, 2016) in New York. Ms. Nixon had a

wide-ranging music and theater career. But her biggest audiences of the 1950s and ’60s never saw her face. Instead, they heard singing as they saw nonsinging stars such as Natalie Wood in “West Side Story.” Ms. Nixon was also Deborah Kerr’s singing voice in “The King and I” and Audrey Hepburn’s in “My Fair Lady.” Associated Press

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NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

WEATHER • LOW 74, HIGH 87 • WINDS ENE 3-7 MPH

WORLD DIGEST

Seasonable and unsettled

U.N. calls for 48-hour pause in ighting in Aleppo

Seasonable temperatures along with spotty storms can be expected across the St. Louis area during much of this week. Highs will generally be in the upper 80s. Most of the storms today should be to the south of the St. Louis area. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

76°

82°

86°

78°

Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy, Mostly cloudy, isolated storms isolated storms

4-DAY FORECAST

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

H

90 89 88 87 90 91 90 87 88 89 89 88 87

W

thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

72 73 70 72 72 72 72 67 70 72 68 71 71

SATURDAY

73°/87°

Slight chance of storms

Few storms Partly sunny, Slight chance possible isolated storms of storms

72°/86° 70°/87°

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

FRIDAY

73°/88°

L

H

W

66 72 68 66 67 65 70 66 68 64 66 66

87 87 87 87 87 85 87 87 88 86 88 86

sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

Chicago 68 / 87

Kirksville 67 / 87 Kansas City 72 / 90

Springfield 66 / 88

St. Louis 74 / 87 Carbondale 72 / 87

Joplin 72 / 91

Poplar Bluff 73 / 90

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 90° 74° 89° 71° 108° 59° 92° 79°

1.37” 8.16” 3.35” 22.50” 24.00”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (2:44 p.m.) Low (5:38 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2012) Record Low (1911) High Last Year Low Last Year

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Monday, Jul 25th Weed - 11 (moderate), Mold - 22,237 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 16 Month (Total) 415 Season 1104 Year Ago 990

SUN & MOON

Last Jul 26 Sunrise

New Aug 2

First Aug 10

5:58 AM Sunset

Full Aug 18

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 12.47 23 10.85 Jefferson City 21 12.12 Hermann 20 9.57 Washington 25 16.37 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 14.10 Louisiana 15 12.94 Dam 24 25 23.00 Dam 25 26 22.79 Grafton 18 16.13 M.Price, Pool 419 415.20 M.Price, Tail. 21 14.26 St Louis 30 18.68 Chester 27 20.34 Cape Girardeau 32 24.48

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

The International Astronomical Union officially recognizes 88 constellations in the sky. The sun passes through 13 of these constellations, which are known as the zodiac.

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 18.58 18 13.52 Peoria 14 11.36 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.14 Sullivan 16 1.26 Valley Park 24 16.02 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.91 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 21.62

- 0.30 - 0.75 - 0.60 - 0.93 - 1.37 + 0.13 + 0.07 + 0.25 + 0.53 + 0.50 - 0.40 + 0.35 + 0.42 + 0.93 + 1.26

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 0.53 + 0.21 + 0.11 0.00 + 3.33 + 0.95 + 0.20

Current Level

24-Hr Change

358.54 360.19 498.01 658.44 707.10 660.53 915.71 839.41 600.10 407.06 607.54 445.71

+ 0.06 - 0.01 0.00 0.00 + 0.09 + 0.02 0.00 + 0.08 + 0.03 - 0.04 - 0.15 - 0.10

+ 1.57

Maps and weather data provided by:

Israeli warplanes hit Syrian target after mortar ire • The Israeli military said its warplanes hit a position in Syria from where mortars were ired into the Israeliheld Golan Heights. The army said Monday that the mortars were probably errant ire from the ighting in neighboring Syria.

8:17 PM

Moonrise ————- Moonset 1:11 PM

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Weekly 48-hour humanitarian pauses are urgently needed in Syria’s Aleppo city where ighting has left more than a quarter of a million people trapped and in desperate need of aid, the U.N. humanitarian chief said Monday. Stephen O’Brien told the Security Council that he could not stress enough “how critical the situation is” in the eastern part of Aleppo, which risks becoming the largest besieged area in the country. Food supplies are expected to run out in mid-August and many medical facilities continue to be attacked, he said. “This is medieval and shameful,” O’Brien said. “We must not allow this to happen. But the clock is ticking.”

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

First baby with Zika-linked microcephaly born in Spain • Health oicials in Barcelona say a woman has given birth to a baby boy with microcephaly associated with the Zika virus — the irst detected case in Spain. The defect was detected in May, and the Vall d’Hebron University Hospital announced Monday that the mother and infant were in stable condition. The mother, who was not identiied, had traveled this year to South America where she contracted Zika.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Suicide bomber kills 14 at Iraq checkpoint • A suicide bomber rammed his explosives-laden car into a

OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the RELOCATION OF VETERANS LOUNGE, MEYER LIBRARY will be received at the Ofice of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on AUGUST 9, 2016 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certiied check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of ive percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted.

Associated Press

heels For Wishes

Plans and speciications can be obtained from the Ofice of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $25.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of speciications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder’s expense. Electronic sets of plans and speciications are also available at www.plans.missouristate.edu.

enefiting

Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the speciications.

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

MSU is an AA/EO institution.

National Extremes High: 122° Death Valley, California

Turkey issues warrants for 42 journalists • Turkey on Monday issued warrants for the detention of 42 journalists suspected of links to the alleged organizers of a failed military uprising, intensifying concerns that a sweeping crackdown on alleged coup plotters could target media for any news coverage critical of the government.

Cranes ready to drop aid into Syrian camps await Jordan’s OK • U.N. aid agencies have procured cranes to hoist large amounts of food and other supplies over an earthen barrier to tens of thousands of Syrians stranded on the border with Jordan, but are still waiting for Jordan’s promised go-ahead, an oicial said Monday. The cranes are to drop a one-of shipment of 30 days’ worth of food in two large encampments along a remote desert stretch on the border — an area known as the berm because of two parallel earthen mounds that roughly mark the frontier. Jordan agreed to the shipment in mid-July, but has failed to give the inal go-ahead for the operation, said a senior aid oicial.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

checkpoint outside a Shiite town north of Baghdad on Monday, killing at least 14 people, Iraqi oicials said, while a string of bombings in the Iraqi capital killed nine more people. Monday’s checkpoint bombing took place at one of the busy entrances to the town of Khalis, about 50 miles north of the Iraqi capital, a police oicer said. The town is a Shiite enclave surrounded by Sunni areas in the restive Diyala province.

No injuries were reported from the mortars, which hit an open area near Israel’s frontier fence. Israel’s army said that the Syrian government was responsible and that it would “continue to act” to preserve Israel’s sovereignty. In another development, a leading Israeli human rights group said Israel had demolished more Palestinian homes in the West Bank this year than it did nearly every other year in the last decade. Israeli defense oicials had no immediate comment.

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PRESENTED BY 90s Jet Stream

Alaska Low: 36°

Hawaii High: 90°

A stalled frontal boundary will trigger scattered showers and thunderstorms across portions of the central Appalachians, Ohio Valley, and Ozarks. Clusters of showers and storms are also expected along the Gulf Coast. High pressure will keep seasonable and dry conditions in place throughout the Midwest, Great Lakes, and Northeast. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 66 Albuquerque 68 Anchorage 56 Atlanta 74 Atlantic City 76 Baltimore 77 Billings 63 Biloxi, Ms. 78 Birmingham 76 Bismarck 65 Boise 67 Boston 72 Buffalo 67 Burlington, Vt. 67 Charleston, S.C. 77 Charleston, W.V. 72 Charlotte 75 Cheyenne 59 Chicago 68 Cincinnati 72 Cleveland 69 Colorado Spgs. 60 Concord, N.H. 67 Dallas 79 Daytona Beach 75 Denver 64 Des Moines 66 79 Destin, Fl. 67 Detroit 79 El Paso 74 Evansville 54 Fairbanks 67 Fargo 54 Flagstaff 76 Fort Myers 56 Great Falls 62 Green Bay 68 Hartford 77 Honolulu 77 Houston 69 Indianapolis 74 Jackson, Ms. 53 Juneau 82 Key West 87 Las Vegas 75 Little Rock 71 Los Angeles 75 Louisville

89 90 67 93 94 94 91 87 94 85 98 95 82 85 95 87 95 89 87 86 86 86 91 97 91 94 88 89 88 99 87 72 84 83 93 89 87 95 90 91 86 93 59 89 110 96 92 90

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms rain partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms

62 68 56 74 74 75 64 79 76 62 65 72 66 64 78 70 75 59 69 70 65 59 60 79 75 63 68 78 68 77 72 56 62 53 76 57 66 67 78 76 68 73 53 82 87 76 68 74

91 93 65 93 90 92 88 88 92 79 98 89 85 90 96 89 95 84 87 88 89 89 90 97 93 91 86 90 89 98 88 74 79 85 93 86 83 93 89 91 87 88 60 89 112 93 91 90

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City

sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms rain partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy

City

Today L H

74 Macon 79 McAllen, Tx. 78 Memphis 80 Miami 68 Milwaukee Minneapolis 69 Missoula, Mt. 52 76 Mobile Montgomery 74 75 Nashville New Orleans 80 New York City 74 Norfolk, Va. 79 Oklahoma City 75 Omaha 63 Orlando 74 Palm Springs 88 Philadelphia 76 Phoenix 89 Pittsburgh 72 Portland, Me. 67 Portland, Or. 61 Providence 70 Raleigh 74 Rapid City 64 Reno 59 Richmond, Va. 78 Sacramento 61 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 73 San Antonio 77 San Diego 66 San Francisco 55 Santa Fe 61 Savannah 75 Seattle 59 76 Shreveport 67 Sioux Falls 68 Syracuse 76 Tallahassee 77 Tampa 80 Tucson 77 Tulsa 79 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 80 71 Wichita Wilmington, De. 75 86 Yuma

96 100 95 90 85 89 92 86 95 94 90 93 94 92 87 94 110 94 109 86 90 82 93 96 91 101 96 104 91 101 92 77 73 87 95 76 95 86 84 92 92 104 93 94 90 91 94 110

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

74 80 77 81 69 69 56 75 75 75 78 73 78 74 66 75 90 75 89 65 64 61 70 76 62 61 75 64 80 74 77 67 55 60 77 58 76 65 63 75 78 79 76 77 81 71 73 88

96 101 92 90 85 82 91 90 93 92 88 90 95 91 86 94 112 93 112 87 85 85 90 96 85 103 94 103 93 101 94 77 71 90 97 80 90 82 89 93 93 106 92 93 90 91 92 112

partly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy very hot partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

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H

W

89 72 95 115 93 86 91 81 88 52 95 73 90 58 68 79

thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy showers showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers showers showers

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

61 83 71 77 69 44 71 56 68 84 55 67 61 81 54 81

82 88 86 91 91 54 98 74 95 108 79 82 84 91 74 91

W

showers thunderstorms partly sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

74 57 73 82 79 79 73 68 67 50 77 54 78 51 52 64

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

62 56 62 68 68 78 35 77 57 48 79 72 65 61 68 64

73 78 82 84 92 89 65 88 79 65 92 81 84 76 84 85

partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms showers sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms showers

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NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

WEATHER • LOW 74, HIGH 87 • WINDS ENE 3-7 MPH

WORLD DIGEST

Seasonable and unsettled

Bangladesh police say 9 militants killed in raid

Seasonable temperatures along with spotty storms can be expected across the St. Louis area during much of this week. Highs will generally be in the upper 80s. Most of the storms today should be to the south of the St. Louis area. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

76°

82°

86°

78°

Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy, Mostly cloudy, isolated storms isolated storms

4-DAY FORECAST

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

H

90 89 88 87 90 91 90 87 88 89 89 88 87

W

thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

72 73 70 72 72 72 72 67 70 72 68 71 71

SATURDAY

73°/87°

Slight chance of storms

Few storms Partly sunny, Slight chance possible isolated storms of storms

72°/86° 70°/87°

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

FRIDAY

73°/88°

L

H

W

66 72 68 66 67 65 70 66 68 64 66 66

87 87 87 87 87 85 87 87 88 86 88 86

sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

Chicago 68 / 87

Kirksville 67 / 87 Kansas City 72 / 90

Springfield 66 / 88

St. Louis 74 / 87 Carbondale 72 / 87

Joplin 72 / 91

Poplar Bluff 73 / 90

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 90° 74° 89° 71° 108° 59° 92° 79°

1.37” 8.16” 3.35” 22.50” 24.00”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (2:44 p.m.) Low (5:38 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2012) Record Low (1911) High Last Year Low Last Year

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Monday, Jul 25th Weed - 11 (moderate), Mold - 22,237 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 16 Month (Total) 415 Season 1104 Year Ago 990

SUN & MOON

Last Jul 26 Sunrise

New Aug 2

First Aug 10

5:58 AM Sunset

Full Aug 18

The International Astronomical Union officially recognizes 88 constellations in the sky. The sun passes through 13 of these constellations, which are known as the zodiac.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 12.47 23 10.85 Jefferson City 21 12.12 Hermann 20 9.57 Washington 25 16.37 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 14.10 Louisiana 15 12.94 Dam 24 25 23.00 Dam 25 26 22.79 Grafton 18 16.13 M.Price, Pool 419 415.20 M.Price, Tail. 21 14.26 St Louis 30 18.68 Chester 27 20.34 Cape Girardeau 32 24.48

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 18.58 18 13.52 Peoria 14 11.36 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.14 Sullivan 16 1.26 Valley Park 24 16.02 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.91 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 21.62

- 0.30 - 0.75 - 0.60 - 0.93 - 1.37 + 0.13 + 0.07 + 0.25 + 0.53 + 0.50 - 0.40 + 0.35 + 0.42 + 0.93 + 1.26

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 0.53 + 0.21 + 0.11 0.00 + 3.33 + 0.95 + 0.20

Current Level

24-Hr Change

358.54 360.19 498.01 658.44 707.10 660.53 915.71 839.41 600.10 407.06 607.54 445.71

+ 0.06 - 0.01 0.00 0.00 + 0.09 + 0.02 0.00 + 0.08 + 0.03 - 0.04 - 0.15 - 0.10

+ 1.57

Maps and weather data provided by:

Police in Bangladesh’s capital raided a ive-story building Tuesday and killed nine suspected Islamic militants, the country’s police chief said. Inspector General of Police A.K.M. Shahidul Hoque said the raid took place in Dhaka’s Kalyanpur area and one suspect was arrested, and he was being treated with injuries in a hospital. Hoque said oicials were still investigating to see which group the men belonged to, but their clothing and other evidence showed it was likely that they belonged to local banned group Jumatul Mujahedeen Bangladesh, or JMB. The group is blamed for a July 1 attack in Dhaka’s Gulshan diplomatic area, when 20 people, including Italians and Japanese, were killed when armed gunmen attacked a restaurant.

Israeli warplanes hit Syrian target after mortar ire • The Israeli military said its warplanes hit a position in Syria from where mortars were ired into the Israeliheld Golan Heights. The army said Monday that the mortars were probably errant ire from the ighting in neighboring Syria. No injuries were reported from the mortars, which hit an open area near Israel’s frontier fence. Israel’s army said that the Syrian government was responsible and that it would “continue to act” to preserve Israel’s sovereignty. In another development, a leading Israeli human rights group said Israel had demolished more Palestinian homes in the West Bank this year than it did nearly every other year in the last decade. Israeli defense oicials had no immediate comment.

U.N. calls for 48-hour pause in ighting in Aleppo • Weekly 48-hour humanitarian pauses are urgently needed in Syria’s Aleppo city where ighting has left more than a quarter of a million people trapped

8:17 PM

Moonrise ————- Moonset 1:11 PM

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the RELOCATION OF VETERANS LOUNGE, MEYER LIBRARY will be received at the Ofice of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on AUGUST 9, 2016 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certiied check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of ive percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted.

Associated Press

enefiting

Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the speciications.

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

MSU is an AA/EO institution.

National Extremes High: 122° Death Valley, California

Suicide bomber kills 14 at Iraq checkpoint • A suicide bomber rammed his explosives-laden car into a checkpoint outside a Shiite town north of Baghdad on Monday, killing at least 14 people, Iraqi oicials said, while a string of bombings in the Iraqi capital killed nine more people. Monday’s checkpoint bombing took place at one of the busy entrances to the town of Khalis, about 50 miles north of the Iraqi capital, a police oicer said. The town is a Shiite enclave surrounded by Sunni areas in the restive Diyala province.

heels For Wishes

Plans and speciications can be obtained from the Ofice of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $25.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of speciications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder’s expense. Electronic sets of plans and speciications are also available at www.plans.missouristate.edu.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Cranes ready to drop aid into Syrian camps await Jordan’s OK • U.N. aid agencies have procured cranes to hoist large amounts of food and other supplies over an earthen barrier to tens of thousands of Syrians stranded on the border with Jordan, but are still waiting for Jordan’s promised go-ahead, an oicial said Monday. The cranes are to drop a one-of shipment of 30 days’ worth of food in two large encampments along a remote desert stretch on the border — an area known as the berm because of two parallel earthen mounds that roughly mark the frontier. Jordan agreed to the shipment in mid-July, but has failed to give the inal go-ahead for the operation, said a senior aid oicial.

and in desperate need of aid, the U.N. humanitarian chief said Monday. Stephen O’Brien told the Security Council that he could not stress enough “how critical the situation is” in the eastern part of Aleppo, which risks becoming the largest besieged area in the country. Food supplies are expected to run out in mid-August and many medical facilities continue to be attacked, he said. “This is medieval and shameful,” O’Brien said. “We must not allow this to happen. But the clock is ticking.”

GO! MAGAZINE’S

Low: 27° Gould, Colorado

70s Rain

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Sweepstakes

T-storms

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WEHRE NBERG THEAT

P LA Y TO W IN RES

Snow

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90s

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90s

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Imo’s Retail New Store

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PRESENTED BY 90s Jet Stream

Alaska Low: 36°

Hawaii High: 90°

A stalled frontal boundary will trigger scattered showers and thunderstorms across portions of the central Appalachians, Ohio Valley, and Ozarks. Clusters of showers and storms are also expected along the Gulf Coast. High pressure will keep seasonable and dry conditions in place throughout the Midwest, Great Lakes, and Northeast. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 66 Albuquerque 68 Anchorage 56 Atlanta 74 Atlantic City 76 Baltimore 77 Billings 63 Biloxi, Ms. 78 Birmingham 76 Bismarck 65 Boise 67 Boston 72 Buffalo 67 Burlington, Vt. 67 Charleston, S.C. 77 Charleston, W.V. 72 Charlotte 75 Cheyenne 59 Chicago 68 Cincinnati 72 Cleveland 69 Colorado Spgs. 60 Concord, N.H. 67 Dallas 79 Daytona Beach 75 Denver 64 Des Moines 66 79 Destin, Fl. 67 Detroit 79 El Paso 74 Evansville 54 Fairbanks 67 Fargo 54 Flagstaff 76 Fort Myers 56 Great Falls 62 Green Bay 68 Hartford 77 Honolulu 77 Houston 69 Indianapolis 74 Jackson, Ms. 53 Juneau 82 Key West 87 Las Vegas 75 Little Rock 71 Los Angeles 75 Louisville

89 90 67 93 94 94 91 87 94 85 98 95 82 85 95 87 95 89 87 86 86 86 91 97 91 94 88 89 88 99 87 72 84 83 93 89 87 95 90 91 86 93 59 89 110 96 92 90

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Tomorrow L H W

sunny mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms rain partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms

62 68 56 74 74 75 64 79 76 62 65 72 66 64 78 70 75 59 69 70 65 59 60 79 75 63 68 78 68 77 72 56 62 53 76 57 66 67 78 76 68 73 53 82 87 76 68 74

91 93 65 93 90 92 88 88 92 79 98 89 85 90 96 89 95 84 87 88 89 89 90 97 93 91 86 90 89 98 88 74 79 85 93 86 83 93 89 91 87 88 60 89 112 93 91 90

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sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms rain partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy

City

Today L H

74 Macon 79 McAllen, Tx. 78 Memphis 80 Miami 68 Milwaukee Minneapolis 69 Missoula, Mt. 52 76 Mobile Montgomery 74 75 Nashville New Orleans 80 New York City 74 Norfolk, Va. 79 Oklahoma City 75 Omaha 63 Orlando 74 Palm Springs 88 Philadelphia 76 Phoenix 89 Pittsburgh 72 Portland, Me. 67 Portland, Or. 61 Providence 70 Raleigh 74 Rapid City 64 Reno 59 Richmond, Va. 78 Sacramento 61 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 73 San Antonio 77 San Diego 66 San Francisco 55 Santa Fe 61 Savannah 75 Seattle 59 76 Shreveport 67 Sioux Falls 68 Syracuse 76 Tallahassee 77 Tampa 80 Tucson 77 Tulsa 79 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 80 71 Wichita Wilmington, De. 75 86 Yuma

96 100 95 90 85 89 92 86 95 94 90 93 94 92 87 94 110 94 109 86 90 82 93 96 91 101 96 104 91 101 92 77 73 87 95 76 95 86 84 92 92 104 93 94 90 91 94 110

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Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

74 80 77 81 69 69 56 75 75 75 78 73 78 74 66 75 90 75 89 65 64 61 70 76 62 61 75 64 80 74 77 67 55 60 77 58 76 65 63 75 78 79 76 77 81 71 73 88

96 101 92 90 85 82 91 90 93 92 88 90 95 91 86 94 112 93 112 87 85 85 90 96 85 103 94 103 93 101 94 77 71 90 97 80 90 82 89 93 93 106 92 93 90 91 92 112

partly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy very hot partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

Play Go! Magazine’s Summer Fun Bingo sweepstakes for a chance to win awesome prizes! Look for Bingo cards online at STLtoday.com/contests and visit our sponsors’ locations (no purchase necessary) to mark off the spaces. The better your Bingo, the more bang-up the prize! TRADITIONAL BINGO: • Entered in drawing for two Wehrenberg Theatres tickets or a $25 gift card to Ballpark Village

H

W

89 72 95 115 93 86 91 81 88 52 95 73 90 58 68 79

thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy showers showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers showers showers

City

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Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

61 83 71 77 69 44 71 56 68 84 55 67 61 81 54 81

82 88 86 91 91 54 98 74 95 108 79 82 84 91 74 91

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showers thunderstorms partly sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers

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74 57 73 82 79 79 73 68 67 50 77 54 78 51 52 64

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Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

62 56 62 68 68 78 35 77 57 48 79 72 65 61 68 64

73 78 82 84 92 89 65 88 79 65 92 81 84 76 84 85

partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms showers sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms showers

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07.26.2016 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A17

stltoday.com/rides

T H E E A S I E S T WAY T O F I N D A V E H I C L E

Acura

4025 Chevrolet

'08 Acura TL 3.2: 3.2L V6, FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Leather Seats, Sunroof, Navigation/GPS, $11,990 #26705A

Audi

4040

'06 Audi A6 3.2: 3.1L V6, AWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Heated Leather Front Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #26188M

BMW

4050

'12 BMW 650xi Convertible, Spt Pkg, 41K, Black, #B7997, $48,990

Buick

4055

'15 Buick Regal: 4 Door, Sunroof, Leather, 15K Miles, GMCertified, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'15 Verano, 4 Door, 4 Cyl, Alloys, 15xxx Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Buick Verano: 32K Miles, Sunroof, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Cadillac

4060

'13 Cad CTS Coupe Performance: 19K, Roof & Nav., $30,490

'11 Cadillac CTS: 4 Dr, AWD, Sunroof, Black, Local Trade, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'09 Cadillac CTS: Performance, Leather, Dual Moonroof, Red Pearl Metallic, 53K Mi, Bose, Bluetooth, Sirius, $14,799 #H161274

Chevrolet

'14 Chevy Impala LS: Limited, V6, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Remote Start, OnStar, Alloy Wheels, $14,990 #P8650

'15 Chevy Impala 2LT: V6, 12K Miles, GMCertified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Impala LS: 19K Miles, GMCertified, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Impala LT: Limited, Sunroof, 18K Miles, GMCertified, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '10 Chevy Malibu LS Front Bucket Seats, Keyless Entry CALL TODAY! $8,490 #P8559B

'11 Chevy Malibu LT: Auto, FWD, Satellite Radio, Clean CARFAX, Keyless Entry, CALL TODAY! $9,990 #10250C

'11 Chevy Malibu LTZ: FWD, V6, Clean Carfax, GM Certified, Low Miles, Leather Heated Front Seats, $13,990 #38000A

'15 Chevy Malibu LT: 4 Cyl, 14K Miles, GMCertified, One Owner, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Volt: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, Premium Sound System, Keyless Entry, $13,990 #26148A

'13 Camaro ZL1 10K Mi., Loaded, Fresh Tires, Local Trade, $43,490

'15 Camaro LT V6, Black, 31xxx Miles, GM Certified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '08 Chevy Cobalt LT: Clean CARFAX, FWD, Motor Trend Certified, Sunroof/Moonroof, Low Miles, $7,990 #10908B

'11 Chevy Cruze 1LT: Clean Carfax, 4 Cyl, FWD, Keyless Entry, Turbocharged, Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $10,990 #38138B

'12 Chevy Cruze 1LT 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth, Remote Start CALL TODAY, $11,990 #P8494A

'12 Chevy Cruze LS: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Motor Trend Certified, Bluetooth, $11,790 #P8574A

'13 Chevy Cruze LT: Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Motor Trend Certified, Balance of Factory Warranty, $12,990 #95063B

'14 Chevy Cruze 1LT: Auto, Red Hot Red, 50K Mi, Clean Carfax, Low Payment Car, Priced Right At $12,499 #X2862A

'15 Chevy Cruze 2LT: Leather, 15K Miles, GM Certified, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '06 Chevy Impala LS: 3.5L V6, FWD, Clean CARFAX, OnStar, Keyless Entry, Premium Sound Syst, $5,990 #75966A

4070

'12 Chrysler 200 LX: Motor Trend Certified, 4 Cyl, FWD, Low Miles, Premium Sound, Warranty, Call Today, $10,990 #25748C

'14 Chrysler 200: 4 Door, Limited, white, Heated Pwr Lthr Seats, 20K Mi, Remote Start, Alloys, Fog Lights, $13,899 #SC1142

Dodge

'15 Chevy Camaro SS: 3K Miles, A Must See, $37,990

4120 Hyundai

'07 Honda Accord Sedan, V6, Auto, 68K Mi., $13,490 '09 Honda Accord EX-L: Low Miles, Leather Heated Front Seats, Mud Guards, Sunroof/Moonroof, $10,990 #94784C

'08 Honda Accord EXL: I4, Silver Metallic, Only 68K Miles, Heated Power Leather Seats, Moonroof, Call Today, $12,299 #H161029B

'09 Honda Accord EXL: V6, Crystal Black, Loaded, 83K Mi, Htd Pwr Lthr Seats, Moonrf, Clean Carfax,

'09 Accord EX: V6, Bold Beige Metallic, 112K Mi, One Owner Clean Carfax, Moonroof, Timing Belt Serv Done, $11,488 #H161733A

'12 Honda Civic LX 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified $12,990 #26420M

'15 Honda Civic LX: Dyno Blue, Bluetooth, Camera, 25K Miles, Honda Certified, Best Civic Deal On The Lot, $14,999 #X2888

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'13 Chevy Volt: Premium, Navigation, Leather, 22K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

4065 Chrysler

'10 Chevy Camaro 2LT, Leather & Roof, Auto, #B7830A, $20,990

4065 Honda

'06 Chevy Impala LS: FWD, Clean Carfax, Flex Fuel, Spoiler, V6, Keyless Entry, Premium Sound Syst, $6,990 #P8450A

4085

'08 Dodge Avenger SE: 2.4L, 4 Cyl, Auto, FWD, Power Windows & Locks, Remote Keyless Entry, Call Today, $8,990 #P8346B

'15 Dodge Charger SE: 4 Dr, V6, Black, 30K Miles, One Owner, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Dodge Dart GT: Ltd, Maximum Steel Metallic, Nav, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Camera, CALL TODAY $12,999 #SC1078

Ford

4110

'15 Ford Festiva SE: 4 Dr, 32K Miles, One Owner, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '11 Ford Fiesta SES Hatchback, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Call Today, $9,990 #77014C

'15 Ford Focus SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Balance of Factory Warranty, $14,990 #P8655

'13 Ford Fusion Hybrid: 46K Mi., Sunroof, #V15493B, $18,490

LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN MIDWEST! 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '13 Accord EXL: Coupe, Crystal Black, Only 28K Mi, Htd Pwr Lthr Seats, Mooroof, Bluetooth, Camera, $20,499 #H161510B '12 Accord SE: Special Edition, Alloys, Pwr Htd Lthr Seat, Black, 61K Mi $14,499 #H161784A '13 CR-V EX: AWD, Crystal Black Pearl, Only 33K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, BU Camera, Moonroof, $20,999 #SC1060 '14 Accord EXL: 4 Cyl, Hematite Metallic, 20K Miles, Push Button Start, 2 Cameras, Bluetooth, Dual Power, Heated Leather, Moonroof, $20,999 #H161600A '13 Civic LX's: 10 Remain, Hurry In Starting At $13,699 #X2927 Largest Selection of Certified Civic's in the Midwest!! '12 CRV EXL: Twighlight Blue, Only 19K Miles, Htd Leather, Moonroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $22,999 #H161351A '15 Odyssey: Touring, Rear DVD, Nav, Alabaster Silver, Only 20K Miles, Loaded, Display Audio, 2 Cameras, $34,999 #H160846A '14 Accord EXL: 4 Cyl, Crystal Black, 21K Mi, SmartKey, Lthr, Roof, Bluetooth, $20,999 #H161358A '13 Civic EX: Kona Coffee Metallic, Moonroof, Alloys, Back Up Camera, Bluetooth, 2 To Choose, Starting at $14,999 #X2930 '13 Civic EX: Coupe, Black, Moonroof, Alloy Whls, Bluetooth, Camera, 43K Miles, $15,499 #X2940 '14 Odyssey EX: Dark Cherry Pearl, 26K Miles, Premium Display Audio, Push Button Start w/Smart Key, Power Doors, 2 Camera, One Owner Clean Carfax, $25,999 #H161587A

Hyundai

4125

'12 Ford Fusion SE: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Remote Start, Alloy Wheels, $11,990 #95218A

'13 Hyundai Veloster: 3 Door Coupe, Manual, Triathlon Grey, 6 Speed, RE:MIX, Hatchback, $13,999 #H161544A

'12 Ford Fusion Hybrid: Clean CARFAX, Navigation/GPS, Lthr Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $12,990 #27009B

'15 Hyundai Accent GS: Hatchback, Ironman Silver, 32K Miles, Balance of Factory Wrnty, Low Payment, $11,999 #SC1191

Honda

4120

'11 Honda Fit: Sport, 5 Dr, 1.5L, 4 Cyl, 78K Miles, One Owner, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

4125 Mazda

'13 Hyundai Elantra GLS Sedan, 1 Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified CALL TODAY! $11,990 #77231A

'13 Hyundai Elantra GLS Auto, White, Only 31k Miles. Call Now, Just Reduced to $12,999 #SC1157

'13 Hyundai Elantra: 4 Door Limited, Lthr, Moonroof, Bluetooth, BackUp Camera, Clean Carfax, 2 To Choose, $13,999 #SC1096

'15 Hyundai Sonata SE: One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, Spoiler, Alloy Wheels, CALL TODAY! $15,990 #P8656

'13 Hyundai Sonata GLS: Ruby Red, 44K Mi, Bluetooth, Power Driver Seat, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, $13,499 #SC1151

Jeep

4145

'14 Jeep Compass: 4 Dr Sport, FWD, 23K Mi, One Owner, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '08 Jeep Liberty Lmtd: 3.7L V6, Auto, 4x4, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Sunroof/Moonroof, $12,490 #77439C

'14 Jeep Patriot: Latitude Edition, 4WD, Only 16K Mi, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, Alloys, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, $16,999 #SC1085

4185 Range Rover/Land Rover

'11 Mazda Mazda6 i: Sport, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Auto, FWD, Premium Sound System, Keyless Entry, $10,490 #10243A

Mercedes Benz

'06 Mercedes Benz E350: V6, FWD, Navigation/GPS, Leather Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $10,990 #94563A

'04 Mercedes Benz S500: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Navigation/GPS, Leather Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #95237A

4207

'08 MINI Cooper: Hatchback, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $8,990 #10785A

Misc. Autos

4210

'09 Harley Road King, 8K Mi., Stock #C16153C1, $11,990

Bommarito St. Peters 1-866-2449085

'15 Kia Cadenza: Premium, Navigation, Moonroof, Loaded, Silver Metallic, Only 18K Miles, One Owner, $21,999 #AT1304

'05 Porsche 911: 600 Miles, Sunroof, Navigation, Call!

'13 Kia Forte SX: Gray Pearl, Only 30K Miles, Alloys, Bluetooth, Spoiler, Super Fun! $12,999 #SC1120

'15 Kia Optima LX: FWD, White Pearl, Bluetooth, SmartKey, One Owner Clean Carfax, Alloy Wheels, #SC1092 $14,999

'15 Kia Optima LX: Alloys, 10K Miles, One Owner, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Kia Rio LX: 4 Door, Auto, Urban Blue Metallic, Only 17K Miles, Balance of Factory Warranty, $12,999 #AT1306

'16 Kia Soul +: Auto, Inferno Red, One Owner Clean Carfax, 20K Miles, Bluetooth, Camera, SiriusXM, $14,299 #AT1308

Lexus

4165

'11 Lexus GX460: Premium, Navigation, Sunroof, Sharp, Local Trade, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'13 Lexus LX570 Loaded!! Nav., DVD, 4X4, $56,900

'05 Lexus ES 330: Base, FWD, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Leather, Sunroof, $11,990 #26314A

Mazda

4185

'14 Mazda 2: Sport, 4 Dr, One Owner, 36K Miles, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'12 Mazda Mazdaspeed3: 43K Mi, Like New, Cared For, $19,490 #M8077

Saab

4275

'08 Saab 9-3 2.0T: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $6,990 #26631A

Saturn

4280

'03 Saturn ION: Level 3, Lthr, Moonrf, Alloys, 101K Mi, State & Emissions Included, Value Priced At $4,499 #H161099B

'13 Yukon Denali: White, w/Tan, Loaded, One Owner '12 VW EOS, Candy White, Auto, $17,990 '12 Mazdaspeed3: 43K Miles, Like New, Cared For, $19,490 '14 Land Rover Range Rover: Supercharged, White, Loaded, Call! '13 Infiniti FX37: Navigation, Roof, AWD, $31,990 '11 Mazda Miata: Hard Top, Grand Touring, 8K Mi., $21,990 '13 Mercedes CLS550: 4MATIC, Black on Black, Loaded, Call! '15 CAD Escalade ESV: Platinum, Local Trade, Like New '13 Subaru Outback LED: 35K Miles, Navigation, Roof '88 Ford Mustang: McClaren Convertible, Auto, Black, 19K Mi,

Nissan/Datsun

4220

'13 Nissan Altima 2.5: Pearl White, Only 25K Miles, One Owner, Bluetooth, Push Button Start, Smart Key Entry $14,899 #SC1228

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5 S: Bluetooth, Push Button Start, One Owner Clean Carfax, 59K Miles, Saharan Beige, $11,999 #H161283A

'12 Nissan Juke SV: Moonroof, Black, 33K Mi, Push Button Start, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Alloys, $14,499 #H160306A

'09 Nissan Murano AWD, Low Miles, Clean Carfax $12,990 #27060A

'10 Nissan Sentra: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Mud Guards, Premium Sound System, $7,990 #8786A

4250

'04 Pontiac G70 Yellow, Runs Strong, #B7944A, $10,990

'15 Chevy 1500 LT: Double Cab, 4x4, V6, 11K Miles, GM Certified, $29,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy 3500: Heavy Duty, Reg Cab, 4x4, 6.0 V8, 37K Miles, GM Certified, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy 3500 LT: Crew Cab, 4x4, Diesel, 45K Miles, Black, GM Certified, $41,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'12 Chevy 1500 LS: Reg Cab, V6, 30K Miles, One Owner, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335 '04 Dakota SXT, Reg. Cab, V6, 63K Mi., Local Trade, $8,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '04 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT: Quad Cab, 4.7L V8, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Bed Liner, Remote Start, $7,990 #76017C

'15 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT: Quad Cab, Hemi, 24K Miles, 4x2, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet '13 Scion XD: White, Only 1-866-883-8841 27K Miles, Auto, 5 Door Hatchback, Bluetooth, One Owner GMC Trucks 4345 Clean Carfax, $11,699 #SC1113 '15 GMC Sierra 1500: Reg Cab, 4x2, White, Only 14K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, 5.3L V8, Bedliner, $20,999 #SC1196

4300

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'15 Chevy Equinox LT: FWD, White, Onlu 12K Miles, Bal of Fact Wrnty, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Affordable, $21,499 #SC1069

'13 Chevy Equinox LS: 4 Cyl, 29K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox LTZ: AWD, V6, Nav, 12K Miles, GM Certified, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'13 Chevy Suburban LTZ: 22" Chromes, Nav, DVD, 31K Mi, $45,990 #B8081

'15 Chevy Suburban: 24k mi., 4x4, Snrf, Heated Leather, Dual DVD, GM Certified, $49,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'08 Chevy Tahoe LT: V8, 20" Wheels, Local Trade, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4x4, Sunroof, DVD, 22K Miles, GM Certified, $47,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'13 Chevy Traverse LTZ: AWD, Loaded, $32,490 #B8065

'12 Chevy Traverse LT: AWD, 63K Mi, $20,990 #B8053

'08Toyota

Matrix XR: Crossovers 4387 Local Trade , 5 8 K, #M16432A, $9,990 '07 Ford Edge SEL Plus, AWD, White, $9,400 '12 Toyota Avalon Limited: Has It All!, Certified, $19,400

'15 Toyota Camry LE: Silver, 24K Miles, Bluetooth, Camera, Fog Lamps, One Owner Clean Carfa, $16,299 #SC1170

'14 Corolla LE Plus: Auto, 4 Dr, Black, 27K Mi, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, Touch Screen, $13,499 #SC1101

Volkswagen

4310

'12 VW EOS Komfort: Auto, Candy White, $17,990

'09 VW EOS Luxury, Auto, Black, $13,490

Bommarito ST. PETERS Volkswagen 1-866-2449085 '15 Passat: Roof, Navigation, Leather, $20,990 '15 Jetta TDI: Connectivity, Auto, $19,990 '13 Jetta: Manual, Sunroof, Certified, $12,490

'13 Ford Edge SEL AWD, Roof, Nav, White, $28,490

'14 Nissan Murano AWD, Roof, Local Trade, $26,990

Sport Utilitiy

'12 Passat: Leather, Navigation, Roof, 39K Mi, $14,990 '12 EOS Komfort: Candy White, Auto, $17,990

'10 Chevy Traverse LS: One Owner Clean CARFAX, 3.6L V6, FWD, Spoiler, Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $10,990 #94385M

'13 Chevy Traverse LS: V6, 33K Mi, One Owner, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Dodge Nitro SXT: 3.7L V6, Auto, 4x4, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Premium Sound, $12,990 #77410A

'12 Subaru Tribeca: Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, 33K 4390 Miles, $23,600

'14 Acura RDX AWD, White w/Tan, 26K Mi., $30,990

'13 GMC Terrain Denali: 27K Miles, Loaded, Local Caddy Trade, $26,990 #C17017A

'08 Chevy Tlailblazer LT: V6, 4x4, Roof Rack, Low Miles, Remote Start, Roof Luggage Rack, Tow Hitch, $8,990 #77132B

'15 Chevy Trax LT: FWD, 4 Cyl, 11K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Buick Encore: Leather, 27K Miles, GM Certified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Captiva 2LS: Sport, 19K Miles, GM Certified, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'14 Chevy Equinox Local Trade, Like New!! #C136122RB, $18,990

'13 Passat: 23K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $13,290

'12 Dodge Caliber SE: Hatchback, FWD, 4 Cyl, Spoiler, One Owner Clean Carfax, Keyless Entry, $8,990 #94830C

'15 Dodge Journey SXT: V6, Black, 18K Miles, 3rd row, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '07 Ford Edge SEL: 3.5L V6, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Call ASAP! $11,990 #95179B

'10 Ford Escape XLT: 4x4, 4 Cyl, Clean CARFAX, AWD, Low Miles, Roof Rack, Premium Sound Syst, $10,990 #10268B

'16 Ford Escape: 4WD Titanium Level, White Pearl, Absolutely Loaded, Only 4,711 Miles! REDUCED! $26,999 H160663A

'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Roof, Quad Seats, $32,989 #B8066

'05 Chevy Equinox LS: V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Spoiler, Roof Luggage Rack, Call Today, $5,490 #75870A

'10 GMC Acadia SLE: Backup Camera, Remote Start, Spoiler, Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $11,990 #77155A

'10 Chevy Equinox LTZ: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Mi, Leather Heated Front Seats, Surnoof, $15,990 #77496A

'10 GMC Terrain SLE-2: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, BackUp Camera, Heated Front Seats, $11,990 #26566A

'12 Chevy Equinox 2LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Remote Start, $14,990 #26062M

'11 GMC Terrain SLT-2: Clean CARFAX, Leather Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Remote Start, Call Today, $15,990 #25689M

'15 Passat: Limited Edition, One Owner, Certified, $18,490 '14 Jetta TDI: Wagon, Auto, One Owner, $20,490

Pontiac

4330 Sport Utilitiy

'15 Chevy Spark LT: 5 Door, Alloys, 12K Miles, GM Certified, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

4283

Toyota

4155

'11 Kia Forte EX: 60K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $9,490 #M16413A

'12 Land Rover Range Rover: Sport, 41K Mi., Black, $40,990

Scion

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'14 Land Rover Range Rover: Supercharged, White, Loaded, $83,400

4190

'13 M/B CLS500 4matic, Loaded, Black on Black, Call

Mini Cooper

Chevrolet Trucks 4260

'14 Jetta TDI: Wagon, Roof, Navigation, $20,990 '15 Jetta TDI: Roof, Auto, $21,990 '13 GTI: 4 Door, Roof & Nav, $19,490 '13 Beetle 2.0T: Convertible, 33K Miles, $21,490

'06 Mazda Mazda6 i: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Premium Sound System, Keyless Entry, $3,990 #P8420A

'06 Pontiac G6: 3.5L V6, Auto, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Fuel Efficient, $6,990 #27023B

'11 Hyundia Elantra: Limited, V6, RWD, Heated Front Seats, Navigation/GPS, Sunroof/Moonroof, $10,990 #10580A

'07 Mazda 3i One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles $6,490 #10796A

'05 Porsche 911 Roof, Nav, 600 Miles, $52,490

'11 Volvo XC60 T6: White, AWD, Roof, 68K Miles, $22,990 #B8096

'15 Passat SE: Roof & Nav, 1 Owner, $20,990 '13 Beetle 2.0T: Black, Like New,

'12 Chevy Equinox LS: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Remote Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $10,990 77269A

'12 GMC Terrain SLT-1: Clean CARFAX, SRoof, Leather Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Remote Start, $15,990 #77080B

'15 Chevy Equinox LT: 4 Cyl, 15K Miles, GMCertified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'15 GMC Terrain SL2: AWD, V6, Sunroof, 17K Miles, GM Certified, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'15 CHRYSLER TOWN & CNTRY

'11 LEXUS GX460 PREM.

'13 CHEVY 3500 H D REG CAB

'15 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT

'15 CHEVY IMPALA LTD LT

'13 CHEVY VOLT PREMIUM

'15 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4X4

4DR., GM CERT., SNRF, 32K MI., STK# P05614

4X4, 6.0L, V8, GM CERT., 38K MI., STK# 160831A

4X4, S/R, DVD, 24K, GM CERT., #P05670

SNRF, 17K MI., GM CERT., STK# P05535

5 DR., NAV., LTHR., GM CERT., 22K, #P05627

22K, SNRF, DVD, GM CERT., STK# P05669

TOURING, 29K MI, DVD, STK# P05563

NAV., SNRF, LTHR, SHARP! STK# 160004A

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'15 BUICK REGAL

'13 CHEVY TRAVERSE LS

'15 CHEVY TRAX LT

'15 CHEVY IMPALA LS

'15 CHEVY MALIBU LS

'15 CHEVY SPARK LT

'15 DODGE JOURNEY SXT

4DR., SNRF, LTHR.,17K, GM CERT., #P05594

FWD, V6, GM CERT., LTHR., 8K, STK# P05655

FWD, 4 CYL., GM CERT., 11K, #P05574

4 CYL., 19K MI., GM CERT., STK# P05583

4 CYL., 19K MI., GM CERT., STK# P05586

5 DR., 12K MI., GM CERT., STK# P05537

V6, 3RD ROW, 18K MI., STK# P05645

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'11 CADILLAC CTS AWD

'13 CHEVY CAPTIVA 2 LS

'15 CHEVY EQUINOX LTZ

'15 CHEVY CRUZE LT

'15 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT

'15 CHEVY IMPALA 2LT

'11 HONDA FIT SPORT

'14 SENTRA SV

SNRF, LTHR, 79K MI., LOADED, STK# 160165A

SPORT, 19K MI., GM CERT., STK# 160706A

AWD, V6, NAV., 12K, GM CERT., #P05587

TURBO, 14K MI., GM CERT., STK# P05598

FWD, 22K MI., GM CERT., STK# P05629

V6, 11K MI., GM CERT., STK# P05544

5DR., 1.5L, 4 CYL., 1 OWNR, STK# P05600A

4 DR., 32K MI., STK# P05530

$15,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 1-866-883-8841

$26,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 1-866-883-8841

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'08 Honda CR-V EX-L: Clean CARFAX, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Surnoof/ Moonroof, Call Today, $12,370 #10967A

'13 Honda Pilot EXL: Nav, Roof, 4WD, $30,990 '13 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, Auto, Hard Top, #B7990, $33,990

'13 Jeep Wrangler 2 Door, Manual, Geko Green!! $25,990

'14 Mazda XC-5 Touring: AWD, Certified, $22,990 '12 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring: AWD, $26,490

'14 Nissan Pathfinder: Platinum, AWD, #B7995, $33,990

'10 Nissan Pathfinder: 4X4, 3rd Row, Certified, #B7898, $19,490

'12 Nissan Rogue S: One Owner Clean CARFAX, AWD, Spoiler, Keyless Entry, Tow Hooks - Front, $11,990 #P8660

'13 Nissan Rogue S: AWD, Silver, Only 23K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today! $16,899 #SC1214

'08 Toyota Rav 4 4 Cy, FWD, Great MPG, #B7991, $12,990

'13 Toyota Highlander SE: V6, Htd Leather, Moonroof, Silver Metallic, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Clean Carfx, $27,499 #SC1202

'11 Toyota Highlander: AWD, V6, Leather Roof, 67K Mi, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Toyota Rav4: AWD, Ltd, Nav, Htd Pwr Lthr, Moonroof, Shoreline Blue, Loaded, SmartKey, Clean Carfx $21,999 #H161425A

'14 Toyota RAV4: Limited, AWD, 41K Miles, Shart, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Mini vans

4420

'15 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, Nav, Leather, DVD, 29K Miles, One Owner, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'12 Ford Transit Connect: 49K Mi., Red, Auto, Air, $16,490 '07 Honda Odyssey EXL: Nav/GPS, DVD, Silver Metallic, 134K Mi, New Timing Belt & Water Pump, Htd Lthr, $10,499 #DL1071

LOCAL DEALS ON LOCAL WHEELS.

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'07 Honda CR-V EXL AWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sun/Moonroof $12,990 #38147A

'15 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT HEMI, 24K MI., 4X2, STK# P05550

$22,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 1-866-883-8841


NEWS

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PEOPLE

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

JOIN STLTODAY ON FACEBOOK

Singer battles cancer Preparing to go on stage for the irst time in months after intensive rounds of chemotherapy, an atypically nervous Sharon Jones sat backstage at New York’s Beacon Theatre, clutching a cup and shaking. “Then they announce her — ‘Miss Sharon Jones!’ — and she goes like a prizeighter onto the stage,” recalls Barbara Kopple, the Oscarwinning moviemaker. “And she just kills it.” It’s one of the many moments in Kopple’s documentary “Miss Sharon Jones!” that captures the stark diference between life on and of stage for the dynamic soul singer most often compared to James Brown. In 2013, Jones was diagnosed with stage-two pancreatic cancer. The movie documents her transformation into cancer

patient and, ultimately, back into a full-throated force. Original Jersey boy going back to Broadway • The Broadway hit “Jersey Boys” is going to get some competition from an original Jersey boy. Frankie Valli, 82, whose falsetto fuels The Four Seasons’ music, will return to Broadway for seven shows Oct. 21-29 at the LuntFontanne Theatre. That will put him in competition with the behindthe-music musical about the doo-wop group that plays at the August Wilson Theatre. Famous tree gone • A tree that became a popular attraction for its role in the movie “The Shawshank Redemption” has fallen. Jodie Snavely, of the Mansield and Richland County, Ohio, Convention and Visitors Bureau,

says high wind last week apparently downed the tree, which had split during a storm in 2011. The tree is featured in one of the inal scenes of the 1994 movie. Based on a Stephen King novella, it stars Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman. It’s underneath the tree that Freeman’s character inds an important letter buried by Robbins’ character.

Singer Mick Jagger is 73. Actress Helen Mirren is 71. Actor Kevin Spacey is 57. Actress Sandra Bullock is 52. Actor Jeremy Piven is 51. Host Chris Harrison is 45. Actress Kate Beckinsale is 43. Actress and singer Taylor Momsen is 23.

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Grooms Will Dive Into Wedding Cake @ Busch Stadium

Saturday, September 10th - just prior to the baseball game! Register for a chance to dive into St. Louis’ largest groom’s wedding cake! Twelve soon-to-be grooms will battle for valuable prizes by diving face-first into a multi-tiered Lubeley’s groom’s wedding cake. Prizes include packages for a vacation, photography, videography, gown, catering, tuxedos, cake, rehearsal dinner, flowers and more. Plus, each contestant receives four tickets to the game in a party room! Fun!

HERE’S HOW TO ENTER: 1. Upload couples photo from your engagement or another occasion to STLtoday.com/contests. Readers will vote for their favorite couples. Top 12 with the most votes earn a spot for the groom-to-be at the dive. Submit photos through Sunday, August 14, 2016. Every couple who registers receives a special gift from St. Louis’ Best Bridal. 2. Get your friends and family members to vote once a day between Monday, August 15, and Sunday, August 28, 2016. The top 12 with the most votes earn a spot to dive! 3. Each of the 12 contestants competes for a wedding prize at the dive. Plus, each couple receives 2 tickets to the game in a party room!

Purchase tickets today, enjoy what’s best in Southwestern Illinois and be the first to know the winners at our inaugural 2016 People’s Choice of Southwest Illinois! WHEN: JULY 26 FROM 6:00 - 9:00 PM WHERE: GATEWAY CLASSIC CAR SHOWROOM 1237 CENTRAL PARK DR. • O’FALLON, IL 62269 HOW MUCH: $10.00 IN ADVANCE ($15.00 AT THE DOOR) MUST BE 21+ TO ENTER

Tickets include specialty drink tastings, live music, complimentary tastings from: • Andria’s Steak House • Beast Craft BBQ Co. • Bella Milano • Cleveland-Heath Event sponsors:

• Flamentco’s The Place American Eatery • J. Fires’ Market Bistro • Righteous Pig BBQ • Live music by the Whiskey Raccoons • AND MORE!

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BRIDAL

Rose of the Hill


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 07.26.2016 • B

DOUBLEHEADER TUESDAY Monday’s game against the Mets in New York was postponed by rain. GAME 1 > 3:10 p.m., FSM > Martinez (9-6, 2.83) vs. Syndergaard (9-4, 2.43)

GAME 2 > Following Game 1, FSM > Garcia (7-6, 3.98) vs. Colon (8-5, 3.48)

REST FOR THE WEARY

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A rainbow appears over Citi Field, which is partially covered with a tarp, after Monday night’s game between the Cardinals and the Mets was postponed because of rain in New York.

Timely rain postpones game for the worn-out Cardinals

Redbirds have chips they can cash in for help But they’re not in position to trade for a rental player

Chapman gives Cubs big boost in the arms race Cardinals haven’t scored against him since 2011

JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak has assets to dangle as the waivers-free trade deadline nears. His big league roster is overcrowded when healthy. He has a stockpile of young power arms. High-potential hitters populate his teams in the lower minor leagues. Mozeliak is positioned to add proven relief help to stabilize his bullpen for the playoff push. At the very least he can add a middle innings manager to assist The Final Boss, Seung Hwan Oh. But his bigger challenge is long term: How can the Cardinals compete with the Chicago Cubs for seasons to come? Years of deliberate losing helped the Cubs amass incredible young talent. They have elite prospects to burn, which is why they won the bidding for impending free agent Aroldis Chapman. The Cardinals are playing catch-up to the Cubs. Looming sanctions for the “Hackgate” scandal could cost them dearly in the draft and/or the international market, making their chase even tougher. So Mozeliak must take the long view while pondering big trades. For example, sacrificing elite prospects for Yankees reliever Andrew Miller, who is under contract for two more seasons, could make sense. See GORDON • Page B5

TH

E M A ST E R S

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitcher Carlos Martinez was to have worked Monday night but will start the first game of Tuesday’s doubleheader instead.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NEW YORK • Although the fore-

cast for lingering severe weather proved wrong as the storm clouds left Queens soon after the teams did, Monday’s postponement was just right for the Cardinals. The heavy rain never came. The needed respite did. A rigorous week that has already seen a doubleheader and a 16-inning game took a red-eye twist Sunday when the Cardinals were unable to leave the

St. Louis area until after 3 a.m. Their plane landed in New York around 6:30 a.m. local time, and once their team bus had threaded through rush hour traic and into Manhattan it was 8:30 a.m., less than 11 hours before scheduled first pitch of an 11-day road trip. Just in time for breakfast. “Just in time for bed,” manager Mike Matheny said. “It’s how things are going right now. … The dog days of August got here a little bit early.” See CARDINALS • Page B3

This has to be one of the Cardinals’ worst nightmares. We’re talking Fredbird breaking out in cold sweats kind of scary. Not only is Aroldis Chapman back in the N.L. Central, the “Cuban Missile” now fires for the Cubs. That Cubs team the Cardinals keep telling us they can catch went all-in Monday. The North Siders sent three prospects, most notably a celebrated shortstop named Gleyber Torres, plus relief pitcher Adam Warren to the Yankees in exchange for the most dominant reliever on the market. And they did it after they had already added some bullpen assistance in Joe Nathan and Mike Montgomery. This is the kind of move you make when you are hell-bent on winning your first World Series in 108 years, when you refuse to find comfort in a 7½-game lead over the secondplace Cardinals. See FREDERICKSON • Page B5

VIDEO Aroldis Chapman, the Cardinal killer, to the Cubs? Say it ain’t so. Ben Frederickson discusses Chapman’s dominance against the Redbirds and how the Cardinals could counter. stltoday.com/watch

ON GOLF • BY DAN O’NEILL • @wwdod on Twitter • doneil@post-dispatch.com

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The PGA Championship takes place at this week. It’s a major championship. No, really. From a scheduling standpoint, the fact it comes just two weeks after the British Open might make it feel a little like an LPGA major. But trust me, it’s one of the four men’s majors. And speaking of the “impregnable quadrilateral,” it’s been a terrific year where the venues are concerned. The weather was good at Augusta National, where Jordan Spieth’s bubble burst on Sunday and Danny Willett won a shocking Masters. Oakmont played host to an unusual U.S. Open, where Dustin Johnson conquered

the storied grounds and a belated penalty to capture a long-expected major. Two weeks ago, the British Open played out at historic Royal Troon, where Henrik Stenson’s sensational 63 defeated a reincarnation of Phil Mickelson. Like Willett, like Johnson, Stenson is new to golf’s major championship club. Now the game goes to Baltusrol, which sits some 20 miles west of the Big Apple. The club opened in 1895, named after the farmer who originally owner the land — Baltus Roll. You can’t make that up. See GOLF • Page B2

PGA CHAMPIONSHIP • Round 1, noon Thursday, TNT | Tee times, B5 | Associated Press photos

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 07.26.2016 • B

DOUBLEHEADER TUESDAY Monday’s game against the Mets in New York was postponed by rain. GAME 1 > 3:10 p.m., FSM > Martinez (9-6, 2.83) vs. Syndergaard (9-4, 2.43)

GAME 2 > Following Game 1, FSM > Garcia (7-6, 3.98) vs. Colon (8-5, 3.48)

REST FOR THE WEARY

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A rainbow appears over Citi Field, which is partially covered with a tarp, after Monday night’s game between the Cardinals and the Mets was postponed because of rain in New York.

Timely rain postpones game for the worn-out Cardinals

Redbirds have chips they can cash in for help But they’re not in position to trade for a rental player

Chapman gives Cubs big boost in the arms race Cardinals haven’t scored against him since 2011

JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak has assets to dangle as the waivers-free trade deadline nears. His big league roster is overcrowded when healthy. He has a stockpile of young power arms. High-potential hitters populate his teams in the lower minor leagues. Mozeliak is positioned to add proven relief help to stabilize his bullpen for the playoff push. At the very least he can add a middle innings manager to assist The Final Boss, Seung Hwan Oh. But his bigger challenge is long term: How can the Cardinals compete with the Chicago Cubs for seasons to come? Years of deliberate losing helped the Cubs amass incredible young talent. They have elite prospects to burn, which is why they won the bidding for impending free agent Aroldis Chapman. The Cardinals are playing catch-up to the Cubs. Looming sanctions for the “Hackgate” scandal could cost them dearly in the draft and/or the international market, making their chase even tougher. So Mozeliak must take the long view while pondering big trades. For example, sacrificing elite prospects for Yankees reliever Andrew Miller, who is under contract for two more seasons, could make sense. See GORDON • Page B5

TH

E M A ST E R S

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitcher Carlos Martinez was to have worked Monday night but will start the first game of Tuesday’s doubleheader instead.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NEW YORK • Although the fore-

cast for lingering severe weather proved wrong as the storm clouds left Queens soon after the teams did, Monday’s postponement was just right for the Cardinals. The heavy rain never came. The needed respite did. A rigorous week that has already seen a doubleheader and a 16-inning game took a red-eye twist Sunday when the Cardinals were unable to leave the

St. Louis area until after 3 a.m. Their plane landed in New York around 6:30 a.m. local time, and once their team bus had threaded through rush hour traic and into Manhattan it was 8:30 a.m., less than 11 hours before scheduled first pitch of an 11-day road trip. Just in time for breakfast. “Just in time for bed,” manager Mike Matheny said. “It’s how things are going right now. … The dog days of August got here a little bit early.” See CARDINALS • Page B3

This has to be one of the Cardinals’ worst nightmares. We’re talking Fredbird breaking out in cold sweats kind of scary. Not only is Aroldis Chapman back in the N.L. Central, the “Cuban Missile” now fires for the Cubs. That Cubs team the Cardinals keep telling us they can catch went all-in Monday. The North Siders sent three prospects, most notably a celebrated shortstop named Gleyber Torres, plus relief pitcher Adam Warren to the Yankees in exchange for the most dominant reliever on the market. And they did it after they had already added some bullpen assistance in Joe Nathan and Mike Montgomery. This is the kind of move you make when you are hell-bent on winning your first World Series in 108 years, when you refuse to find comfort in a seven-game lead over the second-place Cardinals. See FREDERICKSON • Page B5

VIDEO Aroldis Chapman, the Cardinal killer, to the Cubs? Say it ain’t so. Ben Frederickson discusses Chapman’s dominance against the Redbirds and how the Cardinals could counter. stltoday.com/watch

ON GOLF • BY DAN O’NEILL • @wwdod on Twitter • doneil@post-dispatch.com

BR

ITISH O PEN

PGA Championship has a strange feel to it this year U. S. O P E N

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The PGA Championship takes place at this week. It’s a major championship. No, really. From a scheduling standpoint, the fact it comes just two weeks after the British Open might make it feel a little like an LPGA major. But trust me, it’s one of the four men’s majors. And speaking of the “impregnable quadrilateral,” it’s been a terrific year where the venues are concerned. The weather was good at Augusta National, where Jordan Spieth’s bubble burst on Sunday and Danny Willett won a shocking Masters. Oakmont played host to an unusual U.S. Open, where Dustin Johnson conquered

the storied grounds and a belated penalty to capture a long-expected major. Two weeks ago, the British Open played out at historic Royal Troon, where Henrik Stenson’s sensational 63 defeated a reincarnation of Phil Mickelson. Like Willett, like Johnson, Stenson is new to golf’s major championship club. Now the game goes to Baltusrol, which sits some 20 miles west of the Big Apple. The club opened in 1895, named after the farmer who originally owner the land — Baltus Roll. You can’t make that up. See GOLF • Page B2

PGA CHAMPIONSHIP • Round 1, noon Thursday, TNT | Tee times, B5 | Associated Press photos

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SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Tuesday 7/26 at NY Mets 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 7/27 at NY Mets 6:10 p.m. FSM

Thursday 7/28 at Miami 6:10 p.m. FSM

Friday 7/29 at Miami 6:10 p.m. FSM

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

7 Russian swimmers barred Ruling keeps athletes who have served doping bans out of Olympics

OTHER EVENTS UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS FC (home games: KTRS-550) Sat. 7/30: vs. Okla. City, 7:30 p.m. Wed. 8/3: vs. Kansas City, 7 p.m. FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY: Tue. 7/26: vs. Schaumburg, 7:05 Wed. 7/27: vs. Schaumburg, 7:05 RIVER CITY: Tue. 7/26: vs. Lake Erie, 6:35 Wed. 7/27: vs. Lake Erie, 11:05 a.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays and 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR TUESDAY BASEBALL 9 a.m.

National Youth Championships, irst round, CBSSN

12 p.m.

National Youth Championships, irst round, CBSSN

3:10 p.m. Cardinals at Mets, doubleheader, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 6 p.m.

Cubs at White Sox, ESPN

9 p.m.

Rays at Dodgers, MLB

BASKETBALL 9 p.m.

USA Showcase: China vs. United States, NBA ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOFTBALL 7 p.m.

National Pro Fastpitch: Pennsylvania at Chicago, CBSSN

TENNIS 10 a.m.

ATP: ATP/WTA Rogers Cup, Tennis Channel

6 p.m.

ATP: ATP/WTA Rogers Cup, Tennis Channel

Russia’s Yulia Eimova prepares for a practice session ahead of the 2012 Summer Olympics. Swimming governing body FINA has ruled seven Russian swimmers ineligible for the Olympics, including Eimova.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOSCOW • Seven Russian swim-

DIGEST Earnhardt still wondering when he will return Dale Earnhardt Jr. warned Monday that his return to NASCAR could take longer than planned. NASCAR’s most popular driver is scheduled to miss his third consecutive race this Sunday with concussion-like symptoms. On his weekly podcast, he said he will have another evaluation soon to see “what kind of gains we’ve made and get in front of my doctors ... and let them tell me where they think I’m at and that will help us make the decision on what we’re going to do for Watkins Glen.” Jef Gordon came out of retirement to drive for Earnhardt on Sunday at Indianapolis, and Gordon will race the No. 88 car again this weekend at Pocono. No decision has been made by Hendrick Motorsports about next month’s race at Watkins Glen. Earnhardt said on last week’s podcast he was struggling with balance and nausea, and said Monday doctors have given him daily exercises to improve his balance. “That stuf takes about two hours, two and a half hours,” he said. “I’ve got to do it every day. There’s worse things to have to do. Some of it is tedious. Some of it is pretty tough. Some of the visual stuf is pretty tough. “You can race with some ailments. You can race with a bad wrist ... there’s been some guys that have done some pretty incredible things. I’ve raced with a broken shoulder blade. There’s certain things you can race through, but one of the things you cannot race through is concussion-like symptoms. The balance deal is a critical part of being able to drive a race car.” Flyers sign Schenn • The Philadelphia Flyers avoided arbitration with Brayden Schenn, signing the forward to a $20.5 million, fouryear contract. Schenn will count $5.125 million against the salary through the 2019-20 season. Agent Don Meehan conirmed the terms. The 24-year-old had 26 goals and 33 assists for 59 points last season. Schenn has 84 goals and 109 assists for 193 points in 354 regular-season games for the Los Angeles Kings and Flyers. Acquired in the 2011 trade that sent Mike Richards to Los Angeles, Schenn blossomed from a highly touted prospect into a top-six forward for the Flyers. He was a restricted free agent and had his arbitration hearing scheduled for Monday. McCollum lands big contract • CJ McCollum agreed to a four-year, $106 million contract extension with the Portland Trail Blazers, a person familiar with the deal said. The deal was irst reported by Yahoo Sports. McCollum was voted the NBA’s most improved player after averaging 20.8 points, 3.2 rebounds and 4.3 assists during the regular season. He raised his scoring average by more than 14 points over the previous season. Extension for Lue • Along with a sparkling diamond ring, Tyronn Lue’s getting another reward for an NBA title. Cleveland’s easygoing coach has agreed to a multiyear contract extension with the Cavaliers, a person familiar with the deal told the Associated Press. Lue, who took over when David Blatt was ired in January, agreed to the deal Monday. Athletic commission criticized • A probe launched by New York’s inspector general after a pro ighter sufered nearly fatal injuries says the state boxing commission has been plagued by deicient practices, limited oversight and conlicts of interest. Inspector General Catherine Leahy Scott said her oice’s investigation into the New York State Athletic Commission was prompted by the severe brain injuries and poor post-ight treatment sufered by heavyweight Magomed Abdusalamov in 2013 at Madison Square Garden. Scott said the “lack of appropriate emergency medical protocols and oversight procedures, as well as clear conlicts of interest among senior staf, relect a systemic breakdown of its most basic operations.” Gators quarterback leaving • Florida quarterback Treon Harris has decided to transfer, looking for a fresh start after two tumultuous seasons in Gainesville. The Gators conirmed that Harris has been granted his release from scholarship. He is the seventh quarterback to leave Florida in the last four years, following Jacoby Brissett (North Carolina State), Tyler Murphy (Boston College), Max Staver (Houston Baptist), Jef Driskel (Louisiana Tech), Skyler Mornhinweg (Columbia) and Will Grier (West Virginia). It’s unknown where Harris will land. His time in Gainesville included three suspensions. Associated Press

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mers have been barred from the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, including three linked to recent allegations of a major doping cover-up by Russian authorities, world swimming’s governing body FINA said Monday. Reigning world 100-meter breaststroke champion Yulia Efimova is among four Russian swimmers withdrawn by the Russian swimming federation because they previously served doping bans, FINA said. The others are Natalya Lovtsova, Anastasia Krapivina and Mikhail Dovgalyuk. The International Olympic Committee on Sunday said Russian athletes with previous doping bans would be banned from the Rio Games. That followed the IOC’s decision not to ban the entire Russian team over allegations of state-sponsored doping. FINA said three more swimmers were identified by World AntiDoping Agency investigator Richard McLaren when he examined evidence that Russian government officials ordered the cover-up of hundreds of doping tests. They are 2008 Olympic silver and 2012 bronze medalist Nikita Lobintsev, bronze medalist Vladimir Morozov and world junior record holder Daria Ustinova. Russia’s top Olympic official, Alexander Zhukov, told Russian agency R-Sport that he now believed a total of 13 Russians would be ineligible because of previous doping bans. They would be withdrawn from the team, he added.

The 13 are likely to include athletes in swimming, cycling, weightlifting, wrestling and rowing. On Sunday, the IOC’s executive board asked individual global sports federations to decide on the entry of Russian athletes, and announced new eligibility criteria. The rules prohibit Russia from sending to the Rio Games any athletes who have previously served doping bans. Sports federations can also reject Russian entries if they have not undergone enough international drug testing. Results of Russian tests will not be accepted following allegations of routine cover-ups at Moscow’s anti-doping laboratory. It remains unclear whether there could be legal challenges to the IOC criteria. A similar IOC measure, known as the Osaka Rule, which would have prohibited any athletes who had received doping bans from competing in the subsequent Olympics, was declared invalid by the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Zhukov said the IOC’s latest criteria violated the “principle of equality” because they only applied to Russia, although he has previously ruled out legal action. However, Russian Swimming Federation president Vladimir Salnikov told the state Tass agency that the four swimmers cut from its team “have the chance to appeal to CAS.” Efimova’s agent, Andrei Mitkov, told Russia’s Sportbox website that she intended to file an appeal if she was not allowed to compete. Russia’s track and field athletes

remain barred from the games by the IAAF, a decision upheld last week by CAS and accepted by the IOC. Now, with the Aug. 5 opening ceremony approaching, it is up to the remaining 27 international sports federations to vet Russian athletes on an individual basis. The International Weightlifting Federation said Monday it was seeking “further clarification” from the IOC and WADA before making a decision on which Russian athletes can be cleared to compete at Rio. The Budapest-based IWF said “some points might lead to confusion” regarding the IOC ruling giving individual sports federations the responsibility of deciding who can compete in Rio. The IWF said no Russian weightlifter sanctioned for doping will be allowed to compete — even if they had already served their suspension — and that it was waiting for evidence from the Russian athletes entered for Rio before making its decision. The archery federation said Monday it had approved the entry of three Russian archers after determining they have no links to doping. World Archery said it was satisfied that the three female Russian archers nominated for the games had been tested “extensively” and have never been sanctioned for doping. They were listed as Tuiana Dashidorzhieva, Ksenia Perova and Inna Stepanova. Archery was not implicated in the World Anti-Doping Agency report released last week by Canadian lawyer Richard McLaren.

PGA’s early arrival gives it diferent feel GOLF • FROM B1

Like Troon, Baltusrol is conducting a major championship for the ninth time, a log that started with a U.S. Open in 1903. The most recent major played at old Baltus’ place was the 2005 PGA, won by Mickelson. So while the surroundings share lots of special memories, including Jack Nicklaus’ 1-iron in 1967, most of today’s top players have little or no history with Baltusrol. Perhaps this week will produce yet another first-time winner. Maybe it will have an old-time winner like Mickelson. Whatever develops, it feels a bit odd. The PGA always has had an identity issue, the fourth wheel to a more prestigious trifecta. The Masters has Augusta National, Bobby Jones, piano music, romance. It comes when we are craving it, when we have gone eight months without a major. The U.S. Open is the national championship, available to all comers, accommodating to none. The greens are fast, the rough is thick, the reputation is imposing. The British Open is where it all began, where the links and the weather combine for old-world charm. But the PGA has no signature characteristic, no personality to call its own. There’s no questioning the worthiness of its venues, the depth and quality of its fields. But try is it might, it always will be perceived in a subsidiary manner, last to the party, least to be appreciated. This PGA is especially disorienting. Majors are supposed to come once a month during the summer, not twice. This one is supposed to be in mid-August, not late July. The PGA has forfeited what little cachet it carries

to get out of the way of this year’s ridiculous schedule. That is, the Olympic golf competition will be played in the midAugust slot. Because if there was one thing the world needed, it was another “major” golf event, so players who compete against each other weekly for thousands and thousands of dollars, can compete against each other for national pride ... before they do it again at the Ryder Cup … or the Presidents Cup … or the Walker Cup … or a World Golf Championship events. No doubt you have heard of the Zika virus, which has caused many of the top-ranked players to pull out of the Olympic golf, the mosquito-borne infection that has turned the men’s portion of the Olympic golf championship into a satellite tour event? Well, by the time the PGA, the Olympics, the FedExCup Playofs and the Ryder Cup are all played over the next 11 or so weeks, another epidemic will sweep through the golf community – the Sick-a virus. Most people will be Sick-a golf for some time. So, it’s a little hard to get emotionally charged and intellectually engaged for this last major of the year in late July. Frankly, it’s hard to know what to expect. Certainly, Mickelson offers a stirring narrative. As mentioned, he won in ’05, and the way Mickelson played at Troon suggests he can be a serious threat this week. On the other hand, Mickelson likes to prepare for the majors by playing the week before. Because of the compressed schedule, he did not play last week. “Phil the Thrill” hasn’t won anything since his 2013 British Open championship. Was Troon just a another British Open thing, or is he for real at age 46?

The world was expecting Jordan Spieth and Jason Day to trade majors this year, but that hasn’t happened. That said, Spieth finished the British Open with a 68, his first major championship round in the 60s since an opening 66 at Augusta. Short game will be huge at Baltusrol and Spieth still leads the PGA Tour in putting. For him, the timing of this PGA couldn’t be better. Then there is Johnson, who has the ability to overpower courses, a length that might favor his cause this week. Over his last six starts, Johnson has finished third, fifth, first, first, T9 and T2 at last week’s Canadian Open. How do you not pick him? Jason Day still holds the No. 1 ranking and still has the game that makes it feasible for him to be the first repeat PGA winner since Tiger Woods (2006-07). Rory McIlroy has demonstrated he can win on PGA setups (2012, 2014). If he has his driver game going at Baltusrol, watch out. That’s to day nothing of Stenson, who just completed one of the most remarkable ball-striking performances in golf history. You don’t need to know a lot about a golf course or the game in general to know superior ball-striking is an asset. But remember, including Day’s PGA last year, the last four majors have been won by first-timers. So names like J.B. Holmes, Sergio Garcia and Matt Kuchar come to the forefront, players who have suggested they could be next. In short, it’s the usual cast of characters at the PGA Championship this week. It’s just an unusual PGA. Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

07.26.2016 • TuEsday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

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NOTEBOOK

BIG SCORE

Cards will have to face Chapman again

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DODGERS 9, CARDINALS 6 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Utley 2b 5 1 1 0 1 1 .261 Seager ss 5 1 2 0 0 0 .306 Turner 3b 4 2 2 0 1 0 .272 Gonzalez 1b 5 2 3 4 0 1 .284 Kendrick lf 5 2 2 2 0 0 .274 Grandal c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .209 Toles rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .333 Pederson cf 3 1 2 0 2 0 .235 Kazmir p 3 0 1 2 0 2 .118 Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Van Slyke ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Liberatore p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Blanton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Taylor ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .237 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 38 9 13 8 7 7 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Grichuk lf-cf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .225 Diaz ss 3 0 0 1 0 0 .315 Piscotty rf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .295 Holliday 1b-lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .238 Gyorko 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Molina c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .261 Bowman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Adams ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Pham cf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .238 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wong 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .234 Mayers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maness p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Garcia ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .311 Rosenthal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rosario c 1 1 0 0 1 1 .214 Totals 34 6 8 6 2 8 Los Angeles 630 000 000 — 9 13 0 Cardinals 120 000 300 — 6 8 1 a-singled for Maness in the 5th. b-grounded out for Baez in the 7th. c-flied out for Bowman in the 8th. d-walked for Blanton in the 9th. E: Piscotty (4). LOB: Los Angeles 10, Cardinals 4. 2B: Turner (19), Kendrick (16), Piscotty (24), Holliday (17), Molina (17). HR: Gonzalez (9), off Mayers; Kendrick (6), off Mayers; Pham (6), off Kazmir. RBIs: Gonzalez 4 (51), Kendrick 2 (24), Kazmir 2 (2), Diaz (53), Piscotty 2 (58), Holliday (56), Pham 2 (9). SB: Pederson (5). SF: Diaz. RLISP: Los Angeles 6 (Utley, Seager 2, Kendrick 2, Grandal); Cardinals 2 (Holliday, Gyorko). GIDP: Van Slyke. DP: Cardinals 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kazmir 5 6 3 3 0 3 96 4.35 Baez 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.87 1/ Liberatore 3 2 1 20 1.35 3 1 3 Blanton 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 27 2.06 Jansen 1 0 0 0 0 2 19 1.44 Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mayers 1 1/3 8 9 9 2 1 62 60.75 Maness 3 2/3 3 0 0 0 3 53 3.91 Rosenthal 1 2 0 0 3 2 32 5.13 Bowman 2 0 0 0 1 0 25 3.05 Oh 1 0 0 0 1 1 27 1.79 Rosenthal pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. W: Kazmir 9-3. L: Mayers 0-1. S: Jansen 29-34. Inherited runners-scored: Blanton 3-3, Bowman 3-0. HBP: Oh (Grandal). Umpires: Home, Greg Gibson; First, Dana DeMuth; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Ramon De Jesus. T: 3:49. A: 41,423 (43,975).

HOW THEY SCORED Dodgers irst. • Chase Utley singles to center. • Corey Seager singles. Utley to 2nd. • Justin Turner walks. Seager to 2nd. Utley to 3rd. • Adrian Gonzalez homers to center Turner, Seager and Utley score. • Howie Kendrick doubles to center. • Andrew Toles grounds out. Kendrick to third. • Joc Pederson walks. • With Scott Kazmir batting, Pederson steals 2nd. • Kazmir singles to center. Pederson, Kendrick score. 6 runs, 5 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Dodgers lead 6-0 Cardinals irst. • Stephen Piscotty singles to center. • Matt Holliday doubles to left. Piscotty scores. 1 run, 2 hits, 1 left on. Dodgers lead 6-1 Dodgers second. • Justin Turner singles to left ield. • Gonzalez singles to right, adv. to 3rd. Turner scores. Piscotty error. • Kendrick homers. Gonzalez scores. 3 runs, 3 hits, 1 error. Dodgers 9, Cardinals 1. Cardinals second. • Yadier Molina doubles to center. • Tommy Pham homers to right. Molina scores. 2 runs, 3 hits, 1 left on. Dodgers lead 9-3 Cardinals 7th. • Kolten Wong singles. • Alberto Rosario walks. Wong to 2nd. • Grichuk walks. Rosario to second. Wong to third. • Diaz out on a sacriice ly. Rosario to third. Wong scores. • Piscotty doubles to left. Grichuk and Rosario score. 3 runs, 2 hits, 1 left on. Dodgers win 9-6

AVERAGES Batting Fryer Diaz G.Garcia Carpenter Piscotty Molina Adams Gyorko Moss Hazelbaker Holliday Pham Wong Grichuk Peralta Rosario Tejada Pena McKenry Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB .368 38 7 14 2 0 0 5 3 .315 330 61 104 23 3 13 53 34 .311 90 24 28 6 0 2 11 20 .298 285 56 85 25 5 14 53 58 .295 359 58 106 24 2 14 58 34 .261 318 34 83 17 1 3 29 30 .260 223 28 58 14 0 12 41 15 .257 187 28 48 3 1 12 29 16 .256 219 40 56 13 2 17 40 24 .246 134 20 33 5 2 7 19 7 .238 323 38 77 17 1 17 56 29 .238 80 13 19 5 0 6 9 7 .234 201 26 47 4 3 1 10 22 .225 258 38 58 13 2 12 35 21 .221 113 11 25 7 0 5 13 6 .214 14 3 3 0 0 0 1 2 .176 34 6 6 2 0 0 3 2 .125 8 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .259 3393 504 879 185 23 136 483 336

Pitching Oh Socolovich Siegrist Martinez Bowman Lyons Broxton Maness J.Garcia Wainwright Leake Wacha Rosenthal Kiekhefer Tuivailala Tejada Mayers Team

W L 2 1 0 0 5 2 9 6 1 2 2 0 2 2 1 2 7 6 9 5 7 8 5 7 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 52 46

ERA 1.79 2.46 2.65 2.83 3.05 3.18 3.89 3.91 3.98 4.09 4.24 4.37 5.13 5.73 13.50 18.00 60.75 3.84

G 50 2 40 18 33 28 43 23 19 20 20 20 40 11 3 1 1 98

GS 0 0 0 18 0 0 0 0 19 20 20 20 0 0 0 0 1 98

SV 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 19

IP 50.1 3.2 37.1 114.1 41.1 45.1 39.1 25.1 113.0 125.1 123.0 115.1 33.1 11.0 2.0 1.0 1.1 882.1

H R 29 13 1 1 24 12 92 36 31 16 32 16 27 19 28 12 114 54 127 58 135 66 127 64 41 21 12 7 3 3 2 2 8 9 833 409

ER 10 1 11 36 14 16 17 11 50 57 58 56 19 7 3 2 9 377

SO SB E 7 0 0 48 4 15 19 1 3 61 0 10 67 4 4 38 3 1 59 0 7 40 0 4 75 0 3 49 4 4 60 0 0 32 1 0 33 4 6 71 3 0 24 0 2 2 0 0 8 0 4 2 0 1 1 0 765 24 74 HR 2 1 6 8 3 9 2 2 11 8 16 11 3 2 0 2 2 88

BB 14 2 14 37 10 13 19 7 40 31 17 39 27 2 1 0 2 275

BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

NEW YORK • A longstanding riddle the Cardinals have avoided all season long because of his relocation to the American League is returning to the National League Central and will play a role in deciding how — and if — the Cardinals reach October. Flamethrower Aroldis Chapman, a ghost from ninth innings past, is back in the division and will be closing for the Chicago Cubs after a trade announced Monday. Mike Matheny has never seen his team score on the lefty. “I think we’re really due to get him, to be honest,” Matheny said. The Cubs acquired Chapman and his 105 mph fastball from the Yankees as an opening blockbuster to the next week of reliever movement in advance of Monday’s non-waiver trade deadline. The All-Star closer came at a high cost. For a two-month rental of Chapman, the Cubs sent their top shortstop prospect, Gleyber Torres, dual-purpose pitcher Adam Warren, and two minor-league outfielders to the Yankees. The deal helps frame the market for relievers this month, and it could also inspire other teams to sell if that’s the kind of return possible. The Cardinals remain in the market for a reliever, though every indication from sources was that they did not pursue Chapman. They have had past interest in the Yankees’ other lefty, Andrew Miller. The Cardinals have also looked at a next-tier group of relievers. That group, so far, has probably included Will Smith in Milwaukee, Daniel Hudson or Tyler Clippard in Arizona, and other options that will become clearer in the coming days. Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak has often said he avoids trading to respond to the moves of rivals, preferring instead to stick to an internal plan. Chapman, 28, and the Cubs both issued statements Monday to address an incident this past October where he allegedly choked his girlfriend. He served a suspension for the incident, though the suspension was not long enough to keep him from becoming a free agent at season’s end. The Yankees granted Cubs oicials time to talk with Chapman before finalizing the trade. The lefty, who routinely blisters hit-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cubs executive Theo Epstein talks to reporters Monday about acquiring closer Aroldis Chapman.

ters with a 100 mph fastball and hit 105 mph this season, began his career with Cincinnati, and since the start of 2012 has bedeviled the Cardinals. The Cardinals have not scored a run against Chapman since Sept. 2, 2011, and in his 25 games against a Mathenyled Cardinals team, Chapman has allowed six hits and struck out 46. He has allowed only 13 of the 88 batters he’s faced to reach base. The Reds were 20-5 in those games. Chapman had 15 saves against the Cardinals. “One those things — and you know my typical answer — where we’re not too concerned with what we can’t control,” Matheny said. “And that we can’t control until we face him. We’ll deal with that then.”

WILLIAMS ARRIVES With a pink glove nearby — the one that symbolizes why he still pursues the game — Jerome Williams sat at his locker Monday awaiting the arrival of his new teammates. Williams, a 10-year veteran, had his contract purchased by the Cardinals and he was added to the active roster to bring needed depth to the bullpen. To make room on the 40man roster for the righthander, the Cardinals moved misplaced reliever Jordan Walden to the 60-day disabled list. Williams returns to the majors with his eighth team, arriving from Class AAA Memphis, where he signed recently after recovering from an ofseason Achilles’ tendon rupture. “Coming up as a young guy and then getting traded and then designated and all of sudden I’m in independent ball and going overseas (to Taiwan) and independent ball again,” said Williams, who pitched last season with Philadelphia. “The only thing I can think of is just fighting through everything. I still

deal with it today, with the glove – that’s the only reason I’m still playing.” The glove, the pink glove, is for his mother. “A tribute,” he said. Five years ago he started wearing the glove for his mother, Deborah, who died of cancer in 2001. He has gone through at least 12 of them in the past few years. On Mother’s Day he volunteers to catch the first pitch and gives the pink glove to the mother who usually throws it. This year he wasn’t with a team on Mother’s Day, rehabbing from the injury and later auditioning for teams like the Cardinals in California. The Cardinals signed Williams, 34, to provide depth for the Class AAA rotation, and through a series of strenuous games this past week they now need him to do so in the majors. Williams threw a shutout in his second start for the Triple-A Redbirds, his second time facing hitters since the end of last season. He has had two starts with at least seven runs allowed to inflate his ERA to 4.89 in nine starts and 57 innings. “I was the older guy there helping out some young guys, leading by example,” he said. “I was rusty. Once I got it going everything was clicking.”

MAYERS LEARNS Williams took the spot on the active roster last occupied by rookie Mike Mayers, who started Sunday’s game and did not survive a second inning. The 24-year-old rookie allowed nine runs on eight hits through 1 1/3 innings in his major-league debut; 10 of the 14 batters he faced reached base. It was an unforgiving welcome for the Ole Miss righthander, and it reminded Matheny of another bruising debut. A year ago lefty Tim Cooney allowed seven hits and three earned runs in an abbreviated 2 1/3-inning debut. Cooney returned to the minors, pitched with a new frame of reference, and by the end of the season had the Cardinals looking for innings to give him. The Cardinals urged Mayers to take the same lesson. “I talked to him for a little while after the game and reinforced the kind of season that he’s having,” said Matheny, referring to Mayers’ 2.62 ERA in 18 starts at two levels this summer. “I reminded him, too, don’t forget you started in Class AA this year. Right in the middle of things you come in and make a start for us with all the talent that we have and you’re the guy. Don’t forget that.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

SO 68 5 38 96 29 44 31 14 93 99 91 101 48 9 2 0 1 769

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jerome Williams, who was with the Phillies last season, is the latest addition to the Cardinals’ pitching staf.

Rain lets Cards catch up on rest after late arrival CARDINALS • FROM B1

With the threat of relentless rain and possibly flooding, the Mets postponed Monday’s game and scheduled a straight, one-ticket doubleheader for Tuesday. Carlos Martinez, the planned starter for Monday, will start Tuesday’s 3:10 p.m. game, and Jaime Garcia will follow, as scheduled, for the second game. The Mets will counter with two All-Star pitchers: Noah Syndergaard in the first game and Bartolo Colon at night. The doubleheader will be the Cardinals’ second in seven days. If both games last nine innings Tuesday, they will have played 79 innings in the span of seven days and eight games. It’s a trying way to start a seven-game stretch leading into the non-waiver trade deadline and featuring two series against teams ahead of them in the wild-card race. “These are (times) that you see a team’s character,” Matheny said. “I love these. I

don’t necessarily want them but I love to see how guys respond. It’s one of those hard tests and they’ve been answering the bell, and I couldn’t be happier.” Though, Matheny acknowledged, he was OK if they hit the snooze button a bit Monday. The manager urged his players to take the second bus — the later bus — over to Citi Field after their early-morning arrival. The travel delay was caused by a confluence of events: the late start caused by ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball, an engine issue on the Cardinals’ charter plane, and weather issues that delayed the arrival of a new plane. The Cardinals spent most of the night at Busch Stadium awaiting word that the replacement plane had arrived. To buy additional time at their New York hotel after the dawn flight, Matheny had the second bus leave at 4 p.m. The meetings and scouting reports could be pushed back, or they had already happened on the flight to Queens. Matheny even took a later bus to the ballpark, arriving he said later than he ever has since becoming manager. With the exception of new addition Jerome Williams, the players did not arrive until after 4 p.m. “Most everyone would have a recordlate arrival,” Matheny said. Williams, a righthander, joined the

roster Monday as the latest in a series of moves prompted by the schedule and the extra-inning game played this past weekend. Williams replaced rookie Mike Mayers on the active roster a day after Mayers made a truncated spot start for the team Sunday night. The Cardinals will need to fiddle with the rotation again this week because of Tuesday’s doubleheader. With Martinez and Garcia throwing back-toback games Tuesday, the Cardinals will need a starter Saturday unless one of the doubleheader starters returns on short rest. The Cardinals could turn to Williams, a starter at Class AAA, for the appearance, or they could try to save lefty Tyler Lyons. Any intentions to have Sunday’s start come from a reliever were scuttled after the long relievers had to be used before Sunday’s game arrived. The games played out like the Cardinals’ itinerary. “There are a lot of things that didn’t necessarily go as scheduled,” Matheny said. The Cardinals begin a 10-game, 11-day road trip that will surround Monday’s non-waiver trade deadline with two series against the Mets and Marlins, respectively. The Cardinals dropped two of three to the Los Angeles Dodgers this past weekend to allow LA to increase its lead to three games

ahead of the Cardinals in the wild-card race. The two teams sandwiched between the Dodgers and the Cardinals are the Mets (half a game ahead of the Cardinals) and the Marlins (a game ahead of the Cardinals). While still curiously inefective at home against winning teams, the Cardinals have been hearty on the road. They’ve won 12 of their past 16 games, and series victories at Citi Field and this coming weekend in Miami would vault them into, at least, the lead for the second wild card. The road has just been more comfy for the Cardinals, prompting Matheny to even joke Monday that he wondered why the team didn’t just nap on the plane before easing over to nearby Citi Field. He said during the rain he expected some napping in the clubhouse. The postponement gives them a break to catch up before starting a road trip that will determine if they can catch up on their own. “You do what you do,” Matheny said, “and show up and get ready to do it again.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

BIG SCORES Brought to you by:


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE L

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

Chicago

59 39 .602

Cardinals

52 46 .531

7

Pittsburgh

51 47 .520

8

Milwaukee

42 55 .433 16½

Cincinnati

38 60 .388

EAST

W

Washington

58 41 .586

— 5-5

New York

52 45 .536

5

— 5-5 W-1 26-20 26-25

Miami

53 46 .535

5

— 5-5

Philadelphia

46 55 .455

13

Atlanta

33 66 .333

25

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

L

L

Pct

Pct

Pct

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

21

7-3

½ 6-4

L-1 30-16 29-23 L-2 25-30

1½ 5-5 W-2

27-16

28-22

23-25

10 4-6 W-1 25-24

17-31

14½ 6-4

L-1 24-28

14-32

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away L-1 L-2

31-20

27-21

25-22 28-24

8 4-6 W-1 23-28

23-27

20 2-8 L-5 14-36 19-30

WEST

W

San Francisco

58 40 .592

Los Angeles

56 44 .560

3

— 6-4 W-2 30-18 26-26

Colorado

47 52 .475 11½

San Diego

43 57 .430

Arizona

41 58 .414 17½

16

3-7

6 6-4 10½ 4-6 12

3-7

L-1

29-17 29-23

L-1 25-24

22-28

L-1

23-25 20-32

L-1

17-35 24-23

Monday Cardinals at NY Mets, ppd. Baltimore 3, Colorado 2, (10) Toronto 4, San Diego 2 Philadelphia 4, Miami 0 Milwaukee 7, Arizona 2 White Sox 5, Cubs 4 Cincinnati at San Francisco, (n) Sunday LA Dodgers 9, Cardinals 6 NY Yankees 5, San Francisco 2 Arizona 9, Cincinnati 8 NY Mets 3, Miami 0 Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 4 San Diego 10, Washington 6 Cubs 6, Milwaukee 5 Colorado 7, Atlanta 2

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Cleveland

56 41

.577

Detroit

52 48 .520

4

5-5 W-1

26-19 26-29

Chicago

49 50 .495

8

3-7 W-3

27-24

22-26

Kansas City

48 50 .490

7

3-7

L-3

31-18

17-32

Minnesota

37 61 .378 19½

18

5-5

L-1 20-29

17-32

EAST

W

Baltimore

58 40 .592

Boston

55 42 .567

Toronto

56 44 .560

3

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 — 4-6

GB WCGB L10

Str Home Away 37-14

L-1

34-23

21-19

— 6-4 W-2

29-22

27-22

51 48

.515

38 60 .388

20

7-3 W-2

GB WCGB L10

17 4-6

L-3

21-26

29-22

22-26

19-30

19-30

WEST

W

Texas

58 42 .580

30-15

28-27

Houston

54 45 .545

1½ 6-4

L-1

31-20

23-25

Seattle

50 48 .510

7

5 6-4

L-1

25-23

25-25

Oakland

45 55 .450

13

11 6-4

L-1

24-29

21-26

11½ 6-4 W-1

22-26

22-29

Los Angeles 44 55 .444 13½

Str Home Away

— 4-6 W-3

ROUNDUP

Tuesday’s pitching matchups

Yankees survive irst test after trading Chapman Austin Romine hit a tiebreaking double in the eighth inning to make a winner of Michael Pineda, and the visiting New York Yankees’ bullpen did just ine Monday night without star closer Aroldis Chapman in a 2-1 victory over the Houston Astros. Hours after New York traded Chapman to the Chicago Cubs, AllStar relievers Dellin Betances and Andrew Miller closed out the Astros to help the fourth-place Yankees (5148) move three games above .500 for the irst time this season. Tigers 4, Red Sox 2 • Jose Iglesias hit a two-run homer in the sixth inning, Justin Verlander pitched six solid

innings and visiting Detroit spoiled Drew Pomeranz’s second start with Boston. Victor Martinez and James McCann also drove in runs for the Tigers. Detroit pulled within 5 1/2 games of idle AL Central-leading Cleveland.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Phillies 4, Marlins 0 • Jeremy Hellickson dominated host Miami for a second straight start, allowing one hit in six innings to help Philadelphia to the road win. Tommy Joseph hit a two-out RBI double in the top of the eighth to break a scoreless tie, and David Hernandez (2-3) pitched an inning in relief to earn the victory.

Brewers 7, Diamondbacks 2 • Martin Maldonado hit a three-run homer and host Milwaukee went deep four times, spoiling the major league debut of Arizona pitching prospect Braden Shipley. Scooter Gennett, Jonathan Villar and pinch-hitter Andy Wilkins also connected for the Brewers in the opener of a four-game series. Chase Anderson went ive innings to beat his former team for his irst win since June 8.

INTERLEAGUE Orioles 3, Rockies 2 • Adam Jones scored the winning run in the 10th inning on a low throw to the plate by pitcher Jordan Lyles, and Baltimore beat visiting Colorado for its ifth straight victory.

Jones reached on a one-out single of the third-base bag and took third on a single by Jonathan Schoop. Manny Machado followed with a comebacker to Lyles. He fumbled the ball and then threw to catcher Nick Hundley, who lost the handle while attempting to tag the sliding Jones. Blue Jays 4, Padres 2 • Aaron Sanchez pitched seven shutout innings to win his 10th consecutive decision, Kevin Pillar contributed three hits and host Toronto beat San Diego. Sanchez (11-1) became the irst Blue Jays pitcher to win 10 straight since Roy Halladay won 15 decisions in a row in 2003. Associated Press

NOTEBOOK

BOX SCORES

Sale to make start Thursday vs. Cubs

Phillies 4, Marlins 0

Orioles 3, Rockies 2

Yankees 2, Astros 1

Angels 6, Royals 2

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Hernandez 2b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .285 Herrera cf 5 0 0 1 0 2 .286 Franco 3b 2 1 1 0 3 0 .260 Joseph 1b 5 0 2 1 0 2 .267 Rupp c 2 0 0 0 3 0 .274 Galvis ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .232 Asche lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .222 1-Goeddel pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .211 Bourjos rf 3 1 0 0 0 2 .250 Hellickson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .067 b-Howard ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .165 D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Paredes ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 4 6 3 7 13 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Realmuto c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .307 Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .319 Yelich lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .322 Stanton rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Ozuna cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Dietrich 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Kelly 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .045 Cosart p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Phelps p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 a-Gillespie ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Suzuki ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .335 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McGowan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 0 2 0 1 3 Philadelphia 000 000 013 — 4 6 1 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 2 3 a-popped out for Phelps in the 6th. b-struck out for Hellickson in the 7th. c-grounded out for Rodney in the 8th. d-out on sacrifice bunt for Neris in the 9th. 1-ran for Asche in the 9th. E: Joseph (5), Hechavarria (7), Kelly (1), Barraclough (1). LOB: Philadelphia 11, Miami 3. 2B: Franco (15), Joseph (8). RBIs: C.Hernandez (25), Herrera (36), Joseph (25). SB: C.Hernandez (10), Herrera (15). S: Bourjos, Paredes. RLISP: Philadelphia 6 (Joseph, Galvis 3, Howard 2); Miami 1 (Ozuna). LIDP: Kelly. DP: Philadelphia 1 (Herrera, Joseph); Miami 1 (Kelly, Prado). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hellickson 6 1 0 0 1 1 70 3.65 D.Hernandez W, 2-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 4.24 Neris 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.61 Gomez 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 2.70 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cosart 5 3 0 0 1 3 92 5.95 Phelps 1 0 0 0 1 3 20 2.84 Barraclough 1 1 0 0 1 3 20 3.21 Rodney L, 1-3 1 1 1 1 2 2 23 4.50 2/ 1 1 1 22 2.21 Ramos 3 1 3 1/ 1 1 9 2.89 McGowan 3 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: McGowan 2-0. PB: off Ramos (Franco). HBP: Ramos (Asche). Umpires: Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 3:03. A: 19,465 .

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .300 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .325 Arenado 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .289 Gonzalez rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .318 Story ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .272 Dahl lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .250 Reynolds 1b 2 0 1 1 1 0 .275 Descalso dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .322 Hundley c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .252 Totals 33 2 6 2 2 11 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .265 Schoop 2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .296 Machado 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .312 Trumbo 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .279 Davis dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .224 Wieters c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Hardy ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .276 Reimold lf 3 1 0 0 0 0 .248 D.Alvarez rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 a-P.Alvarez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Totals 35 3 6 2 3 4 Colorado 000 100 100 0 — 2 6 3 Baltimore 010 000 100 1 — 3 6 0 a-grounded out for D.Alvarez in the 10th. E: Arenado 2 (3), Lyles (1). LOB: Colorado 4, Baltimore 8. 2B: Schoop (28), D.Alvarez (1). HR: Arenado (26), off Gallardo. RBIs: Arenado (77), Reynolds (42), Jones 2 (56). CS: Gonzalez (2), Reynolds (2).RLISP: Colorado 2 (Descalso, Hundley); Baltimore 3 (Schoop, Wieters 2). GIDP: LeMahieu, Schoop, Davis. DP: Colorado 2 (Story, LeMahieu, Reynolds), (Story, Reynolds); Baltimore 2 (Wieters, Schoop), (Schoop, Trumbo). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA De La Rosa 61/3 4 2 1 3 4 101 5.70 Ottavino 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 20 0.00 1/ Logan 0 0 0 2 2.57 3 0 0 Motte 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.66 1/ Lyles L, 2-3 0 0 0 13 6.03 3 2 1 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo 62/3 5 2 2 2 6 108 5.37 Givens 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 20 3.42 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.63 Roe W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.86 Inherited runners-scored: Ottavino 2-1, Givens 1-0. HBP: Gallardo (Reynolds), De La Rosa (Reimold). WP: Gallardo, Roe. T: 3:14. A: 19,361 .

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Refsnyder lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .248 a-Gardner ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Beltran dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .308 1-Torreyes pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .236 S.Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .259 Teixeira 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .184 Gregorius ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .296 Headley 3b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .253 Romine c 3 0 2 1 0 0 .265 Hicks rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .191 Totals 33 2 7 2 0 5 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .263 Tucker lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .186 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .359 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .269 Valbuena 1b 3 0 3 0 1 0 .261 2-Marisnick pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Bregman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .220 Gomez cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .209 J.Castro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Totals 33 1 6 1 2 12 New York 000 010 010 — 2 7 0 Houston 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 a-flied out for Refsnyder in the 8th. 1-ran for Beltran in the 9th. 2-ran for Valbuena in the 9th. LOB: New York 4, Houston 7. 2B: Beltran (21), Gregorius (21), Romine (10). HR: Springer (22), off Pineda. RBIs: Headley (31), Romine (18), Springer (60). SB: Torreyes (1), Valbuena (1), Gomez (11). RLISP: New York 3 (Gregorius 2, Gardner); Houston 5 (Springer, Bregman 3, Gomez). GIDP: Hicks, Gomez. DP: New York 1 (Gregorius, S.Castro, Teixeira); Houston 1 (Bregman, Altuve, Valbuena). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineda W, 5-9 7 5 1 1 2 8 103 5.00 Betances 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 2.52 Miller S, 8-10 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 1.42 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Keuchel L, 6-10 72/3 6 2 2 0 5 105 4.57 Gregerson 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 12 3.16 Inherited runners-scored: Gregerson 1-0. WP: Pineda 2. Umpires: Home, Dana DeMuth; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Ramon De Jesus; Third, Greg Gibson. T: 2:41. A: 30,628 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .316 Calhoun rf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .281 Trout cf 2 2 0 0 3 0 .313 Pujols dh 5 1 3 4 0 0 .254 Nava lf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .239 a-Marte ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Cunningham lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .148 Simmons ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Choi 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .175 C.Perez c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .206 Giavotella 2b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .261 Petit 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Totals 33 6 9 6 5 5 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Escobar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .259 Cuthbert 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .296 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .291 Morales dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 S.Perez c 4 1 1 2 0 2 .274 Gordon lf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .202 Orlando cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .317 Eibner rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Colon 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Totals 31 2 5 2 4 10 Los Angeles 400 000 101 — 6 9 1 Kansas City 000 200 000 — 2 5 1 a-grounded out for Nava in the 7th. E: Santiago (1), Cuthbert (6). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Kansas City 6. 2B: Choi (4). HR: S.Perez (15), off Santiago. RBIs: Pujols 4 (76), Nava (13), C.Perez (24), S.Perez 2 (45). SF: Nava. S: C.Perez. RLISP: Los Angeles 4 (Y.Escobar, Simmons, Giavotella, Cunningham); Kansas City 3 (Morales 2, Eibner). GIDP: Y.Escobar, Marte, Cuthbert. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Y.Escobar, Giavotella, Choi); Kansas City 2 (Colon, A.Escobar, Hosmer), (A.Escobar, Colon, Hosmer). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santiago W, 9-4 51/3 5 2 2 4 5 100 4.28 2/ Ramirez 0 0 1 7 2.46 3 0 0 Salas 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.87 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 0.97 Street 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.79 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy L, 6-9 5 6 4 4 3 3 106 4.41 Moylan 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.07 Flynn 2 1 1 1 1 1 27 3.13 Wang 1 2 1 1 1 0 20 3.73 Kennedy pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Ramirez 1-0, Moylan 1-0. HBP: Kennedy (Nava). WP: Flynn. Umpires: Home, Adam Hamari; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 3:05. A: 33,828 .

White Sox ace Chris Sale will start Thursday against the crosstown Cubs in his irst appearance since he was suspended for ive days for destroying collared throwback uniforms the team was scheduled to wear. Manager Robin Ventura says he isn’t sure of Sale’s plans while he is away from the team, but he expects him to be ready for the outing at Wrigley Field. The White Sox announced Sale’s punishment Sunday after the lefthander was scratched from his scheduled start and sent home the previous night. The suspension cost Sale $250,000 of his $9.15 million salary. He was also ined about $12,700. The 27-year-old Sale is 14-3 with a 3.18 ERA this year. There is a possibility he could be traded before the Aug. 1 non-waiver deadline, though it would take quite an ofer to get the White Sox to move him. Sierra gets huge bonus • Cuban shortstop Anibal Sierra will receive a $1.5 million signing bonus as part of his minor league contract with the Houston Astros. The 22-year-old played for Avispas de Santiago from 2012-14 in Cuba. He appeared in 91 games, playing 47 games at second base and 26 games at shortstop. “Anibal is an athletic shortstop who can hit and play multiple positions, and possesses the intelligence, work ethic, and baseball instincts to succeed at the highest levels,” Astros international director Oz Ocampo said. Sierra’s deal, which was announced Saturday, calls for him to receive the bonus within ive days of the deal’s approval by the commissioner’s oice. Fielder to have surgery • Texas Rangers slugger Prince Fielder is expected to have season-ending neck surgery for the second time in three years. Fielder got a second opinion Monday, and general manager Jon Daniels said Dr. Drew Dossett recommended surgery. That was the same as Dr. Robert Watkins in Los Angeles said last week after an MRI showed a herniation. Middlebrooks to DL • The Milwaukee Brewers have put Will Middlebrooks on the 15-day disabled list after the third baseman left Sunday’s game against the Cubs with a strained lower right leg. He was hitting .111 with no homers and one RBI in 10 games since being called up from Triple-A on July 4. Associated Press

Monday Baltimore 3, Colorado 2, 10 innings Toronto 4, San Diego 2 Detroit 4, Boston 2 Texas 7, Oakland 6 NY Yankees 2, Houston 1 LA Angels 6, Kansas City 2 White Sox 5, Cubs 4 Sunday NY Yankees 5, San Francisco 2 Toronto 2, Seattle 0 Baltimore 5, Cleveland 3 Boston 8, Minnesota 7 White Sox 4, Detroit 3 Houston 13, LA Angels 3 Texas 2, Kansas City 1 White Sox 5, Detroit 4 Oakland 3, Tampa Bay 2

26-16 30-25

— 6-4

Tampa Bay

Pct

L-3

— 6-4 W-5

New York

L

Str Home Away

Brewers 7, Diamondbacks 2 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 5 0 1 1 0 0 .315 Gosselin 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .279 Collmenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Owings ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 3 0 0 1 .294 Lamb 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .284 Weeks lf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .239 Tomas rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .259 Gosewisch c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .217 Shipley p 3 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Leone p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Drury 2b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .264 Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 Totals 36 2 9 2 3 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 5 2 2 1 0 1 .296 Gennett 2b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .260 Braun lf 2 0 2 1 2 0 .323 Elmore lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Lucroy 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .301 Nieuwenhuis cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .210 Perez 3b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .274 Flores rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .212 Maldonado c 3 1 2 3 1 1 .178 Anderson p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Wilkins ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .100 Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Marinez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Carter ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 7 12 7 4 8 Arizona 001 100 000 — 2 9 0 Milwaukee 101 014 00x — 7 12 0 a-homered for Knebel in the 6th. b-struck out for Marinez in the 8th. c-flied out for Collmenter in the 9th. LOB: Arizona 10, Milwaukee 7. 2B: Tomas (19), Shipley (1), Villar (22). HR: Gennett (9), off Shipley; Villar (8), off Shipley; Maldonado (4), off Shipley; Wilkins (1), off Leone. RBIs: Segura (39), Tomas (37), Villar (36), Gennett (30), Braun (46), Maldonado 3 (8), Wilkins (1). SB: Braun (12). RLISP: Arizona 5 (Lamb 2, Weeks, Bourn 2); Milwaukee 4 (Gennett, Lucroy, Nieuwenhuis, Perez). GIDP: Lucroy. DP: Arizona 2 (Shipley, Gosselin), (Segura, Gosselin, Goldschmidt). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shipley L, 0-1 5 1/3 8 6 6 4 4 101 10.12 2/ Leone 1 0 1 23 6.23 3 3 1 Collmenter 2 1 0 0 0 3 28 4.84 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson W, 5-10 5 7 2 2 1 5 93 5.40 Knebel 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 5.40 Torres 1 2 0 0 0 0 14 2.90 Marinez 1 0 0 0 2 3 22 2.84 Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.71 PB: Gosewisch (1). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Jim Wolf; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:09. A: 25,347 .

Blue Jays 4, Padres 2 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jankowski cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Myers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Kemp rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .260 Solarte 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .294 Dickerson lf 4 1 3 2 0 1 .280 Schimpf 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Wallace dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Norris c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .201 Totals 31 2 5 2 2 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bautista rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .231 Donaldson 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .301 Encarnacion dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Saunders lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .287 Carrera lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Tulowitzki ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .248 Martin c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .226 Pillar cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .265 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .235 Travis 2b 2 1 2 1 1 0 .287 Totals 30 4 9 4 4 4 San Diego 000 000 002 — 2 5 0 Toronto 000 120 01x — 4 9 0 LOB: San Diego 5, Toronto 7. 2B: Kemp (24), Dickerson (4), Tulowitzki (11), Pillar 2 (23), Travis (12). 3B: Saunders (3). HR: Dickerson (4), off Schultz. RBIs: Dickerson 2 (13), Donaldson (71), Tulowitzki (48), Pillar (38), Travis (24). SB: Pillar (8). SF: Tulowitzki.RLISP: San Diego 2 (Dickerson, Wallace); Toronto 7 (Encarnacion, Saunders 2, Smoak 4). GIDP: Myers, Bautista, Donaldson.DP: San Diego 2 (Ramirez, Schimpf, Myers), (Myers, Schimpf, Dominguez); Toronto 1 (Travis, Smoak). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rea L, 5-5 6 5 3 3 4 4 103 4.98 Dominguez 1 2 0 0 0 0 9 4.32 Thornton 1 2 1 1 0 0 14 6.46 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 11-1 7 3 0 0 2 7 97 2.72 Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.04 1/ Schultz 2 0 0 13 3.27 3 2 2 Osuna S, 21-23 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.03 HBP: Grilli (Jankowski). WP: Sanchez. T: 2:41. A: 41,483 .

Tigers 4, Red Sox 2 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Iglesias ss 4 2 2 2 0 0 .258 Cabrera 1b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .296 Martinez dh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .290 Castellanos 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .296 Collins rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Upton lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .235 Aviles rf-3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .203 McCann c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .195 Romine cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .233 Totals 34 4 8 4 2 8 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .305 Bogaerts ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .332 Ortiz dh 5 1 1 0 0 1 .330 Ramirez 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .282 Bradley Jr. cf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .303 Shaw 3b 3 0 1 1 0 2 .262 a-Brentz ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Leon c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .400 Holt lf-3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .261 Totals 37 2 10 2 3 8 Detroit 000 002 110 — 4 8 0 Boston 010 000 010 — 2 10 0 LOB: Detroit 5, Boston 11. 2B: Castellanos (22), Shaw (27). 3B: Upton (2). HR: Iglesias (4), off Pomeranz. RBIs: Iglesias 2 (23), Martinez (57), McCann (24), Shaw (55), Leon (16). RLISP: Detroit 1 (McCann); Boston 6 (Betts 2, Bogaerts, Ortiz, Shaw, Leon). GIDP: Martinez. DP: Boston 1 (Shaw, Pedroia, Ramirez). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander W, 10-6 6 5 1 1 2 5 110 3.64 Greene 1 1 0 0 1 0 17 4.25 2/ Wilson 1 0 2 28 3.55 3 4 1 Rodriguez S, 28-30 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 20 2.70 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz L, 8-8 6 4 2 2 2 7 99 7.00 Kelly 1 2 1 1 0 0 21 8.49 Buchholz 2 2 1 1 0 1 20 6.06 Inherited runners-scored: Rodriguez 3-0. PB: Leon (5). T: 3:27. A: 37,479 .

Rangers 7, Athletics 6 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lowrie 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .278 Smolinski cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .319 Reddick rf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .293 Valencia 1b 4 2 2 3 0 0 .302 Alonso 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Davis lf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .250 Butler dh 4 0 3 1 0 0 .268 1-Muncy pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Healy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Semien ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .233 McBride c 4 1 2 0 0 2 .231 Totals 37 6 12 6 2 5 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Profar 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Mazara rf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .285 2-Rua pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .269 Desmond cf 5 1 1 1 0 3 .310 Beltre 3b 5 3 4 3 0 0 .281 Odor dh 4 0 2 2 0 1 .280 Andrus ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .290 Moreland 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Wilson c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .244 a-Hoying ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 DeShields lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .227 Chirinos c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Totals 37 7 11 7 3 10 Oakland 203 000 100 — 6 12 0 Texas 100 120 102 — 7 11 2 Two outs when winning run scored. a-lined out for Wilson in the 8th. 1-ran for Butler in the 8th. 2-ran for Mazara in the 9th. E: Andrus (9), DeShields (3). LOB: Oakland 6, Texas 7. 2B: Lowrie (12), Valencia (12), Davis (13), Butler (14), Wilson (4). HR: Valencia (13), off Perez; Desmond (19), off Mengden; Beltre (15), off Axford; Beltre (16), off Madson. RBIs: Reddick (24), Valencia 3 (37), Davis (64), Butler (25), Desmond (60), Beltre 3 (63), Odor 2 (51), Wilson (21). SB: Odor (9). RLISP: Oakland 3 (Smolinski, Healy, Semien); Texas 4 (Andrus, Moreland, DeShields 2). GIDP: Lowrie, Smolinski, Healy. DP: Texas 3 (Andrus, Profar, Moreland), (Andrus, Moreland), (Beltre, Profar, Moreland). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mengden 42/3 7 4 4 3 5 90 5.73 1/ 0 0 0 3 3.26 Rzepczynski 3 0 0 Hendriks 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 4.76 Axford 1 2 1 1 0 3 23 5.05 Dull 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.09 Madson L, 3-4 2/3 2 2 2 0 1 14 3.77 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perez 6 9 5 3 1 3 84 4.38 Bush 2 3 1 0 0 1 24 2.01 Diekman W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 2.50 Inherited runners-scored: Rzepczynski 2-0. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Ryan Blakney; Third, Brian Knight. T: 2:58. A: 27,292 .

SUNDAY BOX SCORES

Rockies 7, Braves 2 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peterson 2b 2 0 0 0 3 1 .264 d’Arnaud 3b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .260 Freeman 1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .275 Markakis rf 2 0 0 1 2 1 .262 Francoeur lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Inciarte cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .243 Pierzynski c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Aybar ss 2 0 2 0 2 0 .214 Jenkins p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 De La Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 a-Snyder ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Cervenka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Beckham ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Alvarez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 5 2 9 7 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 5 1 1 0 0 3 .300 LeMahieu 2b 4 2 3 1 1 0 .329 Arenado 3b 5 2 2 3 0 0 .290 Gonzalez rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .318 Story ss 4 2 2 2 0 0 .275 Raburn lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .220 Barnes lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Reynolds 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .273 Hundley c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .258 Chatwood p 2 0 0 0 1 0 .176 Germen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Adames ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .190 McGee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 7 11 7 5 6 Atlanta 000 000 200 — 2 5 1 Colorado 400 300 00x — 7 11 1 a-struck out for De La Cruz in the 6th. b-grounded out for O’Flaherty in the 8th. c-flied out for Oberg in the 8th. E: Francoeur (3), Gonzalez (3). LOB: Atlanta 10, Colorado 8. 2B: Freeman (23), Arenado (25), Story (21), Hundley (14). HR: Arenado (25), off Jenkins; LeMahieu (6), off Jenkins; Story (27), off Jenkins. RBIs: Freeman (36), Markakis (49), LeMahieu (34), Arenado 3 (76), Story 2 (69), Hundley (23). SB: Inciarte (11), Blackmon (12). CS: Peterson (4). RLISP: Atlanta 4 (Peterson, Francoeur 2, Snyder); Colorado 5 (Blackmon 4, Arenado). GIDP: Beckham, Story. DP: Atlanta 1 (d’Arnaud, Freeman); Colorado 1 (LeMahieu, Story, Reynolds). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jenkins L, 0-2 31/3 8 7 7 5 2 87 6.17 De La Cruz 12/3 0 0 0 0 3 27 4.82 Cervenka 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 3.03 O’Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 6.35 Alvarez 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 3.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood W, 9-6 5 1 0 0 8 6 97 3.65 Germen 2 2 2 1 1 1 37 5.79 Oberg 1 2 0 0 0 0 14 3.52 McGee 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.59 WP: Germen. Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mike Winters; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Mark Wegner. T: 2:56. A: 34,695 .

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

StL NY

Martinez (R) 10-6 Syndergaard (R) 3:10 9-4

2.82 2.43

StL NY

Garcia (L) Colon (R)

6:00

7-6 8-5

3.98 3.48

Phi Eickhoff (R) Mia Koehler (R)

6:10

6-11 7-8

3.98 4.42

Ari Mil

Corbin (L) Garza (R)

7:10

4-9 1-4

5.23 5.95

Cin SF

Reed (L) Cain (R)

9:15

0-4 1-6

6.75 5.88

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

3-9 6:10 12-5

4.78 2.67

4-9

5.49

Det Pelfrey (R) Bos Wright (R) Oak Gray (R) Tex TBA NY Sabathia (L) Hou Fister (R)

5-8 4.04 7:10 10-6 3.42

LA KC

Skaggs (L) Gee (R)

7:15

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Col Bal

Bettis (R) Tillman (R)

8-6 6:05 14-2

5.31 3.18

Sea Hernandez (R) 4-4 Pit Liriano (L) 6:05 6-9

3.23 4.96

SD Tor

0-0 0.00 3-3 4.19

Cashner (R) Stroman (R)

6:07

4-7 8-4

4.79 4.90

Was Gonzalez (L) Cle Salazar (R)

6:10

6-8 11-3

4.53 2.75

Atl Harrell (R) Min Santana (R)

7:10

1-2 3-8

4.24 3.93

ChC Hendricks (R) 9-6 CWS Shields (R) 7:10 4-12

2.27 4.99

TB Archer (R) LAD Norris (R)

6-15 7-7

4.60 9:10 4.56

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Pirates 5, Phillies 4 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .286 Herrera cf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .290 Blanco 3b 2 1 1 1 0 1 .271 Franco 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Howard 1b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .166 c-Joseph ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Ruiz c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .260 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Asche lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .220 Bourjos rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .253 Velasquez p 2 1 1 0 0 0 .241 a-Paredes ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Goeddel lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 35 4 10 4 2 9 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jaso 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .265 Polanco lf-rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .283 Freese 3b-1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Marte cf 4 2 3 0 0 1 .316 Joyce rf 2 2 2 2 1 0 .285 Kang 3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Harrison 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Diaz c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .000 Rodriguez ss-lf 2 0 1 1 1 1 .254 Taillon p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Frazier ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .359 Mercer ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Totals 30 5 9 5 4 9 Philadelphia 102 001 000 — 4 10 0 Pittsburgh 020 002 10x — 5 9 0 a-lined out for Velasquez in the 7th. b-homered for Feliz in the 7th. c-out on fielder’s choice for Howard in the 8th. LOB: Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 5. 2B: Ruiz (5), Polanco (25), Marte (22), Rodriguez (13). 3B: Hernandez (7). HR: Blanco (4), off Taillon; Herrera (11), off Taillon; Joyce (10), off Velasquez; Frazier (1), off Ramos. RBIs: Hernandez (24), Herrera 2 (35), Blanco (21), Joyce 2 (33), Diaz (1), Rodriguez (32), Frazier (4). SB: Marte (34). CS: Hernandez (6), Polanco (6), Marte (8). RLISP: Philadelphia 2 (Herrera, Asche); Pittsburgh 2 (Taillon 2). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Velasquez 6 7 4 4 4 5 107 3.34 Ramos L, 1-1 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 4.97 2/ 1 13 2.66 3 1 0 0 0 Neris 1/ 1 6 4.94 Bailey 3 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon 6 8 4 4 0 7 84 3.82 Feliz W, 4-0 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 2.98 Watson 1 1 0 0 1 1 25 2.66 Melancon S, 30-33 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 1.51 WP: Velasquez.T: 3:08. A: 32,439 .

Cubs 6, Brewers 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. La Stella 2b 3 1 3 1 1 0 .294 Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Fowler ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .293 Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bryant 3b 3 2 1 0 2 1 .284 Rizzo 1b 5 1 1 3 0 0 .287 Zobrist rf-2b 3 0 2 2 1 1 .274 Contreras lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .277 Heyward cf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Russell ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Baez ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .285 Ross c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .225 a-Montero ph-c 2 1 1 0 0 0 .196 Lester p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .077 Richard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Szczur ph-cf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .292 Totals 33 6 11 6 6 4 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 4 1 1 0 1 2 .295 Perez rf 2 1 0 1 2 0 .280 Braun lf 5 2 2 0 0 3 .319 Lucroy c 4 0 1 0 1 2 .301 Carter 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .218 d-Flores ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Gennett 2b 5 0 1 2 0 2 .257 Middlebrooks 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .111 Nieuwenhuis cf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .209 Elmore cf-3b 3 0 1 0 2 1 .158 Guerra p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .214 Wilkins 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 35 5 8 5 8 16 Chicago 000 001 500 — 6 11 0 Milwaukee 200 020 001 — 5 8 2 E: Gennett (8), Elmore (1). LOB: Chicago 6, Milwaukee 12. 2B: La Stella (9), Rizzo (27), Braun (17), Elmore (1). 3B: Villar (2). HR: Nieuwenhuis (8), off Rondon. RBIs: La Stella (8), Rizzo 3 (75), Zobrist 2 (49), Perez (27), Carter (55), Gennett 2 (29), Nieuwenhuis (31). SB: Villar 2 (36), Perez 2 (14), Braun 2 (11). CS: Zobrist 2 (4), Szczur (3), Elmore (2). SF: Perez. RLISP: Chicago 3 (Rizzo, Zobrist, Heyward); Milwaukee 10 (Villar 2, Lucroy 2, Carter 2, Elmore 2, Guerra 2). GIDP: Rizzo, Contreras, Montero.DP: Milwaukee 4 (Gennett, Villar, Carter), (Villar, Gennett, Carter), (Lucroy, Gennett), (Gennett, Villar, Wilkins). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester 4 4 4 4 5 7 100 3.09 1/ 0 1 4 5.06 3 0 0 0 Grimm 2/ 1 0 12 6.43 Richard 3 1 0 0 Nathan W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 1 3 29 0.00 Wood 1 1 0 0 1 1 22 2.88 Strop 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.87 Rondon S, 18-22 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 1.95 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guerra 61/3 5 1 0 4 2 97 2.85 Smith L, 1-3 0 3 5 4 1 0 22 3.86 2/ 0 1 10 2.29 Thornburg 3 1 0 0 Boyer 2 2 0 0 1 1 30 3.50 Lester pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Smith pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Grimm 3-0, Richard 3-2, Thornburg 1-1. PB: off Richard (Elmore), off Smith (Bryant). WP: Lester. PB: Ross (2). T: 4:08. A: 43,310 .


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE L

Pct

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

Chicago

59 39 .602

Cardinals

52 46 .531

7

Pittsburgh

51 47 .520

8

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Milwaukee

7-3

½ 6-4

L-1 30-16 29-23 L-2 25-30

23-25

42 55 .433 16½

10 4-6 W-1 25-24

17-31

Cincinnati

39 60 .394 20½

14 6-4 W-1 24-28

15-32

EAST

W

Washington

58 41 .586

— 5-5

New York

52 45 .536

5

— 5-5 W-1 26-20 26-25

Miami

53 46 .535

5

— 5-5

Philadelphia

46 55 .455

13

Atlanta

33 66 .333

25

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

L

Pct

Pct

1½ 5-5 W-2

27-16

28-22

L

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away L-1 L-2

31-20

27-21

25-22 28-24

8 4-6 W-1 23-28

23-27

20 2-8 L-5 14-36 19-30

WEST

W

San Francisco

58 41 .586

Los Angeles

56 44 .560

Colorado

47 52 .475

11

6 6-4

San Diego

43 57 .430 15½

10½ 4-6

Arizona

41 58 .414

3-7

L-2

29-18 29-23

— 6-4 W-2 30-18 26-26

17

12

3-7

L-1 25-24

22-28

L-1

23-25 20-32

L-1

17-35 24-23

Monday Cardinals at NY Mets, ppd. Baltimore 3, Colorado 2, (10) Toronto 4, San Diego 2 Philadelphia 4, Miami 0 Milwaukee 7, Arizona 2 White Sox 5, Cubs 4 Cincinnati 7, San Francisco 5 Sunday LA Dodgers 9, Cardinals 6 NY Yankees 5, San Francisco 2 Arizona 9, Cincinnati 8 NY Mets 3, Miami 0 Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 4 San Diego 10, Washington 6 Cubs 6, Milwaukee 5 Colorado 7, Atlanta 2

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Cleveland

56 41

.577

Detroit

52 48 .520

4

5-5 W-1

26-19 26-29

Chicago

49 50 .495

8

3-7 W-3

27-24

22-26

Kansas City

48 50 .490

7

3-7

L-3

31-18

17-32

Minnesota

37 61 .378 19½

18

5-5

L-1 20-29

17-32

EAST

W

Baltimore

58 40 .592

Boston

55 42 .567

Toronto

56 44 .560

3

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 — 4-6

GB WCGB L10

Str Home Away 37-14

L-1

34-23

21-19

— 6-4 W-2

29-22

27-22

51 48

.515

38 60 .388

20

7-3 W-2

GB WCGB L10

17 4-6

L-3

21-26

29-22

22-26

19-30

19-30

WEST

W

Texas

58 42 .580

30-15

28-27

Houston

54 45 .545

1½ 6-4

L-1

31-20

23-25

Seattle

50 48 .510

7

5 6-4

L-1

25-23

25-25

Oakland

45 55 .450

13

11 6-4

L-1

24-29

21-26

11½ 6-4 W-1

22-26

22-29

Los Angeles 44 55 .444 13½

Str Home Away

— 4-6 W-3

ROUNDUP

Tuesday’s pitching matchups

Yankees survive irst test after trading Chapman Austin Romine hit a tiebreaking double in the eighth inning to make a winner of Michael Pineda, and the visiting New York Yankees’ bullpen did just ine Monday night without star closer Aroldis Chapman in a 2-1 victory over the Houston Astros. Hours after New York traded Chapman to the Chicago Cubs, AllStar relievers Dellin Betances and Andrew Miller closed out the Astros to help the fourth-place Yankees (5148) move three games above .500 for the irst time this season. Tigers 4, Red Sox 2 • Jose Iglesias hit a two-run homer in the sixth inning, Justin Verlander pitched six solid

innings and visiting Detroit spoiled Drew Pomeranz’s second start with Boston. Victor Martinez and James McCann also drove in runs for the Tigers. Detroit pulled within 5 1/2 games of idle AL Central-leading Cleveland. Angels 6, Royals 2 • Albert Pujols drove in four runs as Los Angeles won at Kansas City. He has 26 RBIs in July. Rangers 7, Athletics 6 • Adrian Beltre hit his second home run of the game with two outs in the bottom of the ninth to rally Texas.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Hellickson dominated host Miami for a second straight start, allowing one hit in six innings to help Philadelphia to the road win. Tommy Joseph hit a two-out RBI double in the top of the eighth to break a scoreless tie, and David Hernandez (2-3) pitched an inning in relief to earn the victory. Brewers 7, Diamondbacks 2 • Martin Maldonado hit a three-run homer and host Milwaukee went deep four times, spoiling the major league debut of Arizona pitching prospect Braden Shipley. Scooter Gennett, Jonathan Villar and pinch-hitter Andy Wilkins also connected for the Brewers in the opener of a four-game series.

INTERLEAGUE Orioles 3, Rockies 2 • Adam Jones scored the winning run in the 10th inning on a low throw to the plate by pitcher Jordan Lyles, and Baltimore beat visiting Colorado for its ifth straight victory. White Sox 5, Cubs 4 • Tyler Saladino hit a game-ending RBI single for the White Sox.

Ari Mil

Corbin (L) Garza (R)

7:10

4-9 1-4

5.23 5.95

Cin SF

Reed (L) Cain (R)

9:15

0-4 1-6

6.75 5.88

Blue Jays 4, Padres 2 • Aaron Sanchez pitched seven shutout innings to win his 10th consecutive decision, Kevin Pillar contributed three hits and host Toronto beat San Diego.

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

3-9 6:10 12-5

4.78 2.67

4-9

5.49

Associated Press

Orioles 3, Rockies 2

White Sox 5, Cubs 4 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler dh 5 1 1 1 0 2 .291 Bryant 3b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .286 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 1 1 2 .287 1-Szczur pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Zobrist rf-2b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .271 Contreras lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .282 Heyward cf-rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Russell ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .247 Montero c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .204 Baez 2b-1b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .292 Totals 38 4 12 4 4 10 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .277 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Cabrera lf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .303 Abreu 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .274 Morneau dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 Frazier 3b 4 1 1 3 0 2 .211 Shuck cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .240 Navarro c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Saladino 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .269 Totals 32 5 8 5 3 9 Chicago 000 000 202 — 4 12 0 Chicago 001 003 001 — 5 8 2 One out when winning run scored. 1-ran for Rizzo in the 9th. E: Eaton (3), Frazier (7). LOB: Chicago 11, Chicago 6. 2B: Heyward (16), Montero (4), Baez (14), Cabrera (21), Saladino (4). HR: Baez (10), off Gonzalez; Frazier (29), off Arrieta. RBIs: Fowler (32), Rizzo (76), Baez 2 (35), Eaton (35), Frazier 3 (67), Saladino (21). SB: Baez (9). S: Navarro. RLISP: Chicago 5 (Heyward, Russell 3, Montero); Chicago 2 (Frazier, Shuck). DP: Chicago 1 (Saladino, Anderson, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta 6 5 4 4 2 6 101 2.76 Grimm 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 20 4.86 2/ Edwards 1 1 13 1.84 3 00 0 Montgomery L, 3-5 1/3 2 1 1 0 0 12 27.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez 62/3 7 2 2 2 8 104 4.28 1/ Duke 1 0 13 2.70 3 00 0 Albers 11/3 3 2 2 1 1 25 5.06 2/ Jennings W, 4-2 3 2 0 0 0 1 20 1.64 Duke pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Edwards 1-0, Albers 1-0, Jennings 1-1. WP: Arrieta. Umpires: Home, Scott Barry; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Jerry Layne. T: 3:23. A: 39,510 .

Middlebrooks to DL • The Milwaukee Brewers have put Will Middlebrooks on the 15-day disabled list after the third baseman left Sunday’s game against the Cubs with a strained lower right leg. He was hitting .111 with no homers and one RBI in 10 games since being called up from Triple-A on July 4. Associated Press

Tigers 4, Red Sox 2 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Iglesias ss 4 2 2 2 0 0 .258 Cabrera 1b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .296 Martinez dh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .290 Castellanos 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .296 Collins rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Upton lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .235 Aviles rf-3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .203 McCann c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .195 Romine cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .233 Totals 34 4 8 4 2 8 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .305 Bogaerts ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .332 Ortiz dh 5 1 1 0 0 1 .330 Ramirez 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .282 Bradley Jr. cf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .303 Shaw 3b 3 0 1 1 0 2 .262 a-Brentz ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Leon c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .400 Holt lf-3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .261 Totals 37 2 10 2 3 8 Detroit 000 002 110 — 4 8 0 Boston 010 000 010 — 2 10 0 LOB: Detroit 5, Boston 11. 2B: Castellanos (22), Shaw (27). 3B: Upton (2). HR: Iglesias (4), off Pomeranz. RBIs: Iglesias 2 (23), Martinez (57), McCann (24), Shaw (55), Leon (16). RLISP: Detroit 1 (McCann); Boston 6 (Betts 2, Bogaerts, Ortiz, Shaw, Leon). GIDP: Martinez. DP: Boston 1 (Shaw, Pedroia, Ramirez). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander W, 10-6 6 5 1 1 2 5 110 3.64 Greene 1 1 0 0 1 0 17 4.25 2/ Wilson 1 0 2 28 3.55 3 4 1 Rodriguez S, 28-30 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 20 2.70 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz L, 8-8 6 4 2 2 2 7 99 7.00 Kelly 1 2 1 1 0 0 21 8.49 Buchholz 2 2 1 1 0 1 20 6.06 Inherited runners-scored: Rodriguez 3-0. PB: Leon (5). T: 3:27. A: 37,479 .

Angels 6, Royals 2 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .316 Calhoun rf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .281 Trout cf 2 2 0 0 3 0 .313 Pujols dh 5 1 3 4 0 0 .254 Nava lf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .239 a-Marte ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Cunningham lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .148 Simmons ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Choi 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .175 C.Perez c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .206 Giavotella 2b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .261 Petit 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Totals 33 6 9 6 5 5 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Escobar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .259 Cuthbert 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .296 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .291 Morales dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 S.Perez c 4 1 1 2 0 2 .274 Gordon lf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .202 Orlando cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .317 Eibner rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Colon 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Totals 31 2 5 2 4 10 Los Angeles 400 000 101 — 6 9 1 Kansas City 000 200 000 — 2 5 1 a-grounded out for Nava in the 7th. E: Santiago (1), Cuthbert (6). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Kansas City 6. 2B: Choi (4). HR: S.Perez (15), off Santiago. RBIs: Pujols 4 (76), Nava (13), C.Perez (24), S.Perez 2 (45). SF: Nava. S: C.Perez. RLISP: Los Angeles 4 (Y.Escobar, Simmons, Giavotella, Cunningham); Kansas City 3 (Morales 2, Eibner). GIDP: Y.Escobar, Marte, Cuthbert. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Y.Escobar, Giavotella, Choi); Kansas City 2 (Colon, A.Escobar, Hosmer), (A.Escobar, Colon, Hosmer). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santiago W, 9-4 51/3 5 2 2 4 5 100 4.28 2/ Ramirez 0 0 1 7 2.46 3 0 0 Salas 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.87 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 0.97 Street 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.79 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy L, 6-9 5 6 4 4 3 3 106 4.41 Moylan 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.07 Flynn 2 1 1 1 1 1 27 3.13 Wang 1 2 1 1 1 0 20 3.73 Kennedy pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Ramirez 1-0, Moylan 1-0. HBP: Kennedy (Nava). WP: Flynn. Umpires: Home, Adam Hamari; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 3:05. A: 33,828 .

Rangers 7, Athletics 6 Oakland AB R H BI BB Lowrie 2b 4 1 2 0 1 Smolinski cf 5 0 0 0 0 Reddick rf 5 1 1 1 0 Valencia 1b 4 2 2 3 0 Alonso 1b 0 0 0 0 0 Davis lf 3 1 1 1 1 Butler dh 4 0 3 1 0 1-Muncy pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 Healy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 Semien ss 4 0 1 0 0 McBride c 4 1 2 0 0 Totals 37 6 12 6 2 Texas AB R H BI BB Profar 2b 5 1 1 0 0 Mazara rf 4 1 1 0 1 2-Rua pr 0 1 0 0 0 Desmond cf 5 1 1 1 0 Beltre 3b 5 3 4 3 0 Odor dh 4 0 2 2 0 Andrus ss 2 0 0 0 2 Moreland 1b 4 0 0 0 0 Wilson c 3 0 1 1 0 a-Hoying ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 DeShields lf 4 0 1 0 0 Chirinos c 0 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 11 7 3 Oakland 203 000 100 — Texas 100 120 102 — Two outs when winning run scored. a-lined out for Wilson in the 8th. 1-ran for Butler in the 8th. 2-ran

Garcia (L) Colon (R)

3.98 4.42

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .300 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .325 Arenado 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .289 Gonzalez rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .318 Story ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .272 Dahl lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .250 Reynolds 1b 2 0 1 1 1 0 .275 Descalso dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .322 Hundley c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .252 Totals 33 2 6 2 2 11 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .265 Schoop 2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .296 Machado 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .312 Trumbo 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .279 Davis dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .224 Wieters c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Hardy ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .276 Reimold lf 3 1 0 0 0 0 .248 D.Alvarez rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 a-P.Alvarez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Totals 35 3 6 2 3 4 Colorado 000 100 100 0 — 2 6 3 Baltimore 010 000 100 1 — 3 6 0 a-grounded out for D.Alvarez in the 10th. E: Arenado 2 (3), Lyles (1). LOB: Colorado 4, Baltimore 8. 2B: Schoop (28), D.Alvarez (1). HR: Arenado (26), off Gallardo. RBIs: Arenado (77), Reynolds (42), Jones 2 (56). CS: Gonzalez (2), Reynolds (2).RLISP: Colorado 2 (Descalso, Hundley); Baltimore 3 (Schoop, Wieters 2). GIDP: LeMahieu, Schoop, Davis. DP: Colorado 2 (Story, LeMahieu, Reynolds), (Story, Reynolds); Baltimore 2 (Wieters, Schoop), (Schoop, Trumbo). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA De La Rosa 61/3 4 2 1 3 4 101 5.70 Ottavino 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 20 0.00 1/ Logan 0 0 0 2 2.57 3 0 0 Motte 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.66 1/ Lyles L, 2-3 0 0 0 13 6.03 3 2 1 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo 62/3 5 2 2 2 6 108 5.37 Givens 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 20 3.42 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.63 Roe W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.86 Inherited runners-scored: Ottavino 2-1, Givens 1-0. HBP: Gallardo (Reynolds), De La Rosa (Reimold). WP: Gallardo, Roe. T: 3:14. A: 19,361 .

Fielder to have surgery • Texas Rangers slugger Prince Fielder is expected to have season-ending neck surgery for the second time in three years. Fielder got a second opinion Monday, and general manager Jon Daniels said Dr. Drew Dossett recommended surgery. That was the same as Dr. Robert Watkins in Los Angeles said last week after an MRI showed a herniation.

StL NY

6-11 7-8

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Hernandez 2b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .285 Herrera cf 5 0 0 1 0 2 .286 Franco 3b 2 1 1 0 3 0 .260 Joseph 1b 5 0 2 1 0 2 .267 Rupp c 2 0 0 0 3 0 .274 Galvis ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .232 Asche lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .222 1-Goeddel pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .211 Bourjos rf 3 1 0 0 0 2 .250 Hellickson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .067 b-Howard ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .165 D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Paredes ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 4 6 3 7 13 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Realmuto c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .307 Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .319 Yelich lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .322 Stanton rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Ozuna cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Dietrich 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Kelly 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .045 Cosart p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Phelps p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 a-Gillespie ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Suzuki ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .335 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McGowan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 0 2 0 1 3 Philadelphia 000 000 013 — 4 6 1 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 2 3 a-popped out for Phelps in the 6th. b-struck out for Hellickson in the 7th. c-grounded out for Rodney in the 8th. d-out on sacrifice bunt for Neris in the 9th. 1-ran for Asche in the 9th. E: Joseph (5), Hechavarria (7), Kelly (1), Barraclough (1). LOB: Philadelphia 11, Miami 3. 2B: Franco (15), Joseph (8). RBIs: C.Hernandez (25), Herrera (36), Joseph (25). SB: C.Hernandez (10), Herrera (15). S: Bourjos, Paredes. RLISP: Philadelphia 6 (Joseph, Galvis 3, Howard 2); Miami 1 (Ozuna). LIDP: Kelly. DP: Philadelphia 1 (Herrera, Joseph); Miami 1 (Kelly, Prado). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hellickson 6 1 0 0 1 1 70 3.65 D.Hernandez W, 2-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 4.24 Neris 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.61 Gomez 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 2.70 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cosart 5 3 0 0 1 3 92 5.95 Phelps 1 0 0 0 1 3 20 2.84 Barraclough 1 1 0 0 1 3 20 3.21 Rodney L, 1-3 1 1 1 1 2 2 23 4.50 2/ 1 1 1 22 2.21 Ramos 3 1 3 1/ 1 1 9 2.89 McGowan 3 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: McGowan 2-0. PB: off Ramos (Franco). HBP: Ramos (Asche). Umpires: Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 3:03. A: 19,465 .

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 5 0 1 1 0 0 .315 Gosselin 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .279 Collmenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Owings ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 3 0 0 1 .294 Lamb 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .284 Weeks lf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .239 Tomas rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .259 Gosewisch c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .217 Shipley p 3 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Leone p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Drury 2b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .264 Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 Totals 36 2 9 2 3 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 5 2 2 1 0 1 .296 Gennett 2b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .260 Braun lf 2 0 2 1 2 0 .323 Elmore lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Lucroy 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .301 Nieuwenhuis cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .210 Perez 3b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .274 Flores rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .212 Maldonado c 3 1 2 3 1 1 .178 Anderson p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Wilkins ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .100 Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Marinez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Carter ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 7 12 7 4 8 Arizona 001 100 000 — 2 9 0 Milwaukee 101 014 00x — 7 12 0 a-homered for Knebel in the 6th. b-struck out for Marinez in the 8th. c-flied out for Collmenter in the 9th. LOB: Arizona 10, Milwaukee 7. 2B: Tomas (19), Shipley (1), Villar (22). HR: Gennett (9), off Shipley; Villar (8), off Shipley; Maldonado (4), off Shipley; Wilkins (1), off Leone. RBIs: Segura (39), Tomas (37), Villar (36), Gennett (30), Braun (46), Maldonado 3 (8), Wilkins (1). SB: Braun (12). RLISP: Arizona 5 (Lamb 2, Weeks, Bourn 2); Milwaukee 4 (Gennett, Lucroy, Nieuwenhuis, Perez). GIDP: Lucroy. DP: Arizona 2 (Shipley, Gosselin), (Segura, Gosselin, Goldschmidt). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shipley L, 0-1 5 1/3 8 6 6 4 4 101 10.12 2/ Leone 1 0 1 23 6.23 3 3 1 Collmenter 2 1 0 0 0 3 28 4.84 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson W, 5-10 5 7 2 2 1 5 93 5.40 Knebel 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 5.40 Torres 1 2 0 0 0 0 14 2.90 Marinez 1 0 0 0 2 3 22 2.84 Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.71 PB: Gosewisch (1). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Jim Wolf; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:09. A: 25,347 .

2.82 2.43

6:10

Phillies 4, Marlins 0

Brewers 7, Diamondbacks 2

ERA

Phi Eickhoff (R) Mia Koehler (R)

Sale to make start Thursday vs. Cubs

Sierra gets huge bonus • Cuban shortstop Anibal Sierra will receive a $1.5 million signing bonus as part of his minor league contract with the Houston Astros. The 22-year-old played for Avispas de Santiago from 2012-14 in Cuba. He appeared in 91 games, playing 47 games at second base and 26 games at shortstop. “Anibal is an athletic shortstop who can hit and play multiple positions, and possesses the intelligence, work ethic, and baseball instincts to succeed at the highest levels,” Astros international director Oz Ocampo said. Sierra’s deal, which was announced Saturday, calls for him to receive the bonus within ive days of the deal’s approval by the commissioner’s oice.

Time W-L

Martinez (R) 10-6 Syndergaard (R) 3:10 9-4

3.98 3.48

BOX SCORES

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jankowski cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Myers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Kemp rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .260 Solarte 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .294 Dickerson lf 4 1 3 2 0 1 .280 Schimpf 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Wallace dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Norris c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .201 Totals 31 2 5 2 2 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bautista rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .231 Donaldson 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .301 Encarnacion dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Saunders lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .287 Carrera lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Tulowitzki ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .248 Martin c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .226 Pillar cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .265 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .235 Travis 2b 2 1 2 1 1 0 .287 Totals 30 4 9 4 4 4 San Diego 000 000 002 — 2 5 0 Toronto 000 120 01x — 4 9 0 LOB: San Diego 5, Toronto 7. 2B: Kemp (24), Dickerson (4), Tulowitzki (11), Pillar 2 (23), Travis (12). 3B: Saunders (3). HR: Dickerson (4), off Schultz. RBIs: Dickerson 2 (13), Donaldson (71), Tulowitzki (48), Pillar (38), Travis (24). SB: Pillar (8). SF: Tulowitzki.RLISP: San Diego 2 (Dickerson, Wallace); Toronto 7 (Encarnacion, Saunders 2, Smoak 4). GIDP: Myers, Bautista, Donaldson.DP: San Diego 2 (Ramirez, Schimpf, Myers), (Myers, Schimpf, Dominguez); Toronto 1 (Travis, Smoak). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rea L, 5-5 6 5 3 3 4 4 103 4.98 Dominguez 1 2 0 0 0 0 9 4.32 Thornton 1 2 1 1 0 0 14 6.46 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 11-1 7 3 0 0 2 7 97 2.72 Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.04 1/ Schultz 2 0 0 13 3.27 3 2 2 Osuna S, 21-23 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.03 HBP: Grilli (Jankowski). WP: Sanchez. T: 2:41. A: 41,483 .

Pitcher

StL NY

7-6 8-5

Phillies 4, Marlins 0 • Jeremy

Blue Jays 4, Padres 2

NL

6:00

NOTEBOOK

White Sox ace Chris Sale will start Thursday against the crosstown Cubs in his irst appearance since he was suspended for ive days for destroying collared throwback uniforms the team was scheduled to wear. Manager Robin Ventura says he isn’t sure of Sale’s plans while he is away from the team, but he expects him to be ready for the outing at Wrigley Field. The White Sox announced Sale’s punishment Sunday after the lefthander was scratched from his scheduled start and sent home the previous night. The suspension cost Sale $250,000 of his $9.15 million salary. He was also ined about $12,700. The 27-year-old Sale is 14-3 with a 3.18 ERA this year. There is a possibility he could be traded before the Aug. 1 non-waiver deadline, though it would take quite an ofer to get the White Sox to move him.

Monday Baltimore 3, Colorado 2, 10 innings Toronto 4, San Diego 2 Detroit 4, Boston 2 Texas 7, Oakland 6 NY Yankees 2, Houston 1 LA Angels 6, Kansas City 2 White Sox 5, Cubs 4 Sunday NY Yankees 5, San Francisco 2 Toronto 2, Seattle 0 Baltimore 5, Cleveland 3 Boston 8, Minnesota 7 White Sox 4, Detroit 3 Houston 13, LA Angels 3 Texas 2, Kansas City 1 White Sox 5, Detroit 4 Oakland 3, Tampa Bay 2

26-16 30-25

— 6-4

Tampa Bay

Pct

L-3

— 6-4 W-5

New York

L

Str Home Away

SO Avg. 1 .278 0 .319 1 .293 0 .302 0 .253 0 .250 0 .268 0 .257 0 .250 1 .233 2 .231 5 SO Avg. 0 .286 2 .285 0 .269 3 .310 0 .281 1 .280 1 .290 1 .229 0 .244 0 .241 2 .227 0 .196 10 6 12 0 7 11 2

for Mazara in the 9th. E: Andrus (9), DeShields (3). LOB: Oakland 6, Texas 7. 2B: Lowrie (12), Valencia (12), Davis (13), Butler (14), Wilson (4). HR: Valencia (13), off Perez; Desmond (19), off Mengden; Beltre (15), off Axford; Beltre (16), off Madson. RBIs: Reddick (24), Valencia 3 (37), Davis (64), Butler (25), Desmond (60), Beltre 3 (63), Odor 2 (51), Wilson (21). SB: Odor (9). RLISP: Oakland 3 (Smolinski, Healy, Semien); Texas 4 (Andrus, Moreland, DeShields 2). GIDP: Lowrie, Smolinski, Healy. DP: Texas 3 (Andrus, Profar, Moreland), (Andrus, Moreland), (Beltre, Profar, Moreland). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mengden 42/3 7 4 4 3 5 90 5.73 1/ Rzepczynski 0 0 0 3 3.26 3 0 0 Hendriks 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 4.76 Axford 1 2 1 1 0 3 23 5.05 Dull 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.09 Madson L, 3-4 2/3 2 2 2 0 1 14 3.77 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perez 6 9 5 3 1 3 84 4.38 Bush 2 3 1 0 0 1 24 2.01 Diekman W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 2.50 Inherited runners-scored: Rzepczynski 2-0. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Ryan Blakney; Third, Brian Knight. T: 2:58. A: 27,292 .

Yankees 2, Astros 1 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Refsnyder lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .248 a-Gardner ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Beltran dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .308 1-Torreyes pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .236 S.Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .259 Teixeira 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .184 Gregorius ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .296 Headley 3b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .253 Romine c 3 0 2 1 0 0 .265 Hicks rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .191 Totals 33 2 7 2 0 5 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .263 Tucker lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .186 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .359 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .269 Valbuena 1b 3 0 3 0 1 0 .261 2-Marisnick pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Bregman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .220 Gomez cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .209 J.Castro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Totals 33 1 6 1 2 12 New York 000 010 010 — 2 7 0 Houston 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 a-flied out for Refsnyder in the 8th. 1-ran for Beltran in the 9th. 2-ran for Valbuena in the 9th. LOB: New York 4, Houston 7. 2B: Beltran (21), Gregorius (21), Romine (10). HR: Springer (22), off Pineda. RBIs: Headley (31), Romine (18), Springer (60). SB: Torreyes (1), Valbuena (1), Gomez (11). RLISP: New York 3 (Gregorius 2, Gardner); Houston 5 (Springer, Bregman 3, Gomez). GIDP: Hicks, Gomez. DP: New York 1 (Gregorius, S.Castro, Teixeira); Houston 1 (Bregman, Altuve, Valbuena). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineda W, 5-9 7 5 1 1 2 8 103 5.00 Betances 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 2.52 Miller S, 8-10 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 1.42 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 2/ Keuchel L, 6-10 7 3 6 2 2 0 5 105 4.57 Gregerson 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 12 3.16 Inherited runners-scored: Gregerson 1-0. WP: Pineda 2. T: 2:41. A: 30,628 .

SUNDAY BOX SCORES

Rockies 7, Braves 2 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peterson 2b 2 0 0 0 3 1 .264 d’Arnaud 3b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .260 Freeman 1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .275 Markakis rf 2 0 0 1 2 1 .262 Francoeur lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Inciarte cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .243 Pierzynski c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Aybar ss 2 0 2 0 2 0 .214 Jenkins p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 De La Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 a-Snyder ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Cervenka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Beckham ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Alvarez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 5 2 9 7 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 5 1 1 0 0 3 .300 LeMahieu 2b 4 2 3 1 1 0 .329 Arenado 3b 5 2 2 3 0 0 .290 Gonzalez rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .318 Story ss 4 2 2 2 0 0 .275 Raburn lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .220 Barnes lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Reynolds 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .273 Hundley c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .258 Chatwood p 2 0 0 0 1 0 .176 Germen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Adames ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .190 McGee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 7 11 7 5 6 Atlanta 000 000 200 — 2 5 1 Colorado 400 300 00x — 7 11 1 a-struck out for De La Cruz in the 6th. b-grounded out for O’Flaherty in the 8th. c-flied out for Oberg in the 8th. E: Francoeur (3), Gonzalez (3). LOB: Atlanta 10, Colorado 8. 2B: Freeman (23), Arenado (25), Story (21), Hundley (14). HR: Arenado (25), off Jenkins; LeMahieu (6), off Jenkins; Story (27), off Jenkins. RBIs: Freeman (36), Markakis (49), LeMahieu (34), Arenado 3 (76), Story 2 (69), Hundley (23). SB: Inciarte (11), Blackmon (12). CS: Peterson (4). RLISP: Atlanta 4 (Peterson, Francoeur 2, Snyder); Colorado 5 (Blackmon 4, Arenado). GIDP: Beckham, Story. DP: Atlanta 1 (d’Arnaud, Freeman); Colorado 1 (LeMahieu, Story, Reynolds). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jenkins L, 0-2 31/3 8 7 7 5 2 87 6.17 De La Cruz 12/3 0 0 0 0 3 27 4.82 Cervenka 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 3.03 O’Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 6.35 Alvarez 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 3.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood W, 9-6 5 1 0 0 8 6 97 3.65 Germen 2 2 2 1 1 1 37 5.79 Oberg 1 2 0 0 0 0 14 3.52 McGee 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.59 WP: Germen. T: 2:56. A: 34,695 .

Det Pelfrey (R) Bos Wright (R) Oak Gray (R) Tex TBA NY Sabathia (L) Hou Fister (R)

5-8 4.04 7:10 10-6 3.42

LA KC

Skaggs (L) Gee (R)

7:15

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Col Bal

Bettis (R) Tillman (R)

8-6 6:05 14-2

5.31 3.18

Sea Hernandez (R) 4-4 Pit Liriano (L) 6:05 6-9

3.23 4.96

SD Tor

0-0 0.00 3-3 4.19

Cashner (R) Stroman (R)

6:07

4-7 8-4

4.79 4.90

Was Gonzalez (L) Cle Salazar (R)

6:10

6-8 11-3

4.53 2.75

Atl Harrell (R) Min Santana (R)

7:10

1-2 3-8

4.24 3.93

ChC Hendricks (R) 9-6 CWS Shields (R) 7:10 4-12

2.27 4.99

TB Archer (R) LAD Norris (R)

6-15 7-7

4.60 9:10 4.56

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

Pirates 5, Phillies 4 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .286 Herrera cf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .290 Blanco 3b 2 1 1 1 0 1 .271 Franco 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Howard 1b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .166 c-Joseph ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Ruiz c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .260 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Asche lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .220 Bourjos rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .253 Velasquez p 2 1 1 0 0 0 .241 a-Paredes ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Goeddel lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 35 4 10 4 2 9 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jaso 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .265 Polanco lf-rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .283 Freese 3b-1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Marte cf 4 2 3 0 0 1 .316 Joyce rf 2 2 2 2 1 0 .285 Kang 3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Harrison 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Diaz c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .000 Rodriguez ss-lf 2 0 1 1 1 1 .254 Taillon p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Frazier ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .359 Mercer ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Totals 30 5 9 5 4 9 Philadelphia 102 001 000 — 4 10 0 Pittsburgh 020 002 10x — 5 9 0 a-lined out for Velasquez in the 7th. b-homered for Feliz in the 7th. c-out on fielder’s choice for Howard in the 8th. LOB: Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 5. 2B: Ruiz (5), Polanco (25), Marte (22), Rodriguez (13). 3B: Hernandez (7). HR: Blanco (4), off Taillon; Herrera (11), off Taillon; Joyce (10), off Velasquez; Frazier (1), off Ramos. RBIs: Hernandez (24), Herrera 2 (35), Blanco (21), Joyce 2 (33), Diaz (1), Rodriguez (32), Frazier (4). SB: Marte (34). CS: Hernandez (6), Polanco (6), Marte (8). RLISP: Philadelphia 2 (Herrera, Asche); Pittsburgh 2 (Taillon 2). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Velasquez 6 7 4 4 4 5 107 3.34 Ramos L, 1-1 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 4.97 2/ Neris 1 13 2.66 3 1 0 0 0 1/ Bailey 1 6 4.94 3 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon 6 8 4 4 0 7 84 3.82 Feliz W, 4-0 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 2.98 Watson 1 1 0 0 1 1 25 2.66 Melancon S, 30-33 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 1.51 WP: Velasquez.T: 3:08. A: 32,439 .

Cubs 6, Brewers 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. La Stella 2b 3 1 3 1 1 0 .294 Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Fowler ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .293 Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bryant 3b 3 2 1 0 2 1 .284 Rizzo 1b 5 1 1 3 0 0 .287 Zobrist rf-2b 3 0 2 2 1 1 .274 Contreras lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .277 Heyward cf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Russell ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Baez ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .285 Ross c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .225 a-Montero ph-c 2 1 1 0 0 0 .196 Lester p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .077 Richard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Szczur ph-cf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .292 Totals 33 6 11 6 6 4 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 4 1 1 0 1 2 .295 Perez rf 2 1 0 1 2 0 .280 Braun lf 5 2 2 0 0 3 .319 Lucroy c 4 0 1 0 1 2 .301 Carter 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .218 d-Flores ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Gennett 2b 5 0 1 2 0 2 .257 Middlebrooks 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .111 Nieuwenhuis cf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .209 Elmore cf-3b 3 0 1 0 2 1 .158 Guerra p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .214 Wilkins 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 35 5 8 5 8 16 Chicago 000 001 500 — 6 11 0 Milwaukee 200 020 001 — 5 8 2 E: Gennett (8), Elmore (1). LOB: Chicago 6, Milwaukee 12. 2B: La Stella (9), Rizzo (27), Braun (17), Elmore (1). 3B: Villar (2). HR: Nieuwenhuis (8), off Rondon. RBIs: La Stella (8), Rizzo 3 (75), Zobrist 2 (49), Perez (27), Carter (55), Gennett 2 (29), Nieuwenhuis (31). SB: Villar 2 (36), Perez 2 (14), Braun 2 (11). CS: Zobrist 2 (4), Szczur (3), Elmore (2). SF: Perez. RLISP: Chicago 3 (Rizzo, Zobrist, Heyward); Milwaukee 10 (Villar 2, Lucroy 2, Carter 2, Elmore 2, Guerra 2). GIDP: Rizzo, Contreras, Montero.DP: Milwaukee 4 (Gennett, Villar, Carter), (Villar, Gennett, Carter), (Lucroy, Gennett), (Gennett, Villar, Wilkins). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester 4 4 4 4 5 7 100 3.09 1/ Grimm 0 1 4 5.06 3 0 0 0 2/ Richard 1 0 12 6.43 3 1 0 0 Nathan W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 1 3 29 0.00 Wood 1 1 0 0 1 1 22 2.88 Strop 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.87 Rondon S, 18-22 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 1.95 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guerra 61/3 5 1 0 4 2 97 2.85 Smith L, 1-3 0 3 5 4 1 0 22 3.86 2/ Thornburg 0 1 10 2.29 3 1 0 0 Boyer 2 2 0 0 1 1 30 3.50 Lester pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Smith pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Grimm 3-0, Richard 3-2, Thornburg 1-1. PB: off Richard (Elmore), off Smith (Bryant). WP: Lester. PB: Ross (2). T: 4:08. A: 43,310 .


SPORTS

07.26.2016 • TueSday • M 1

Cubs acquire Chapman from Yanks FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

“I cannot wait to take the mound at Wrigley Field and look forward to helping my teammates deliver a championship to Chicago,” Chapman said in a release. The four-time All-Star arrives from New York with a 2.01 ERA, 20 saves in 21 opportunities this season and a reputation for dominating opposing hitters, especially ones who wear birds on the bat, but we’ll get to that in a bit. Through the past five seasons the 28-year-old lefty, who just last week hurled a 105 mph fastball, led all relievers in strikeouts (500), opponent batting average (.156) and fielding independent pitching (1.77). He ranks third in saves (165), fourth in save percentage (91.2) and fifth in ERA (1.91). These are the kind of numbers that make you justify signing a man who started the season by serving a 29-game suspension under Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy because he was accused of choking his girlfriend, then repeatedly firing a gun in his garage after the incident. Chapman admitted to pulling the trigger. The stories on the choking difered. He was never charged. On Monday, he expressed “regret that he did not exercise better judgement.” His statement didn’t specify if he regretted the alleged choking, or the admitted gunplay. Hopefully both. Yes, the Cubs’ fuzzy, feel-good narrative just took a substantial blow. Yes, it becomes harder for the world to pull for this fascinating cast of characters — wacky manager Joe Maddon, pilates-practicing ace Jake Arrieta and heartthrobs Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo — when the club’s major trade-deadline acquisition comes with such big character concerns. Yes, the Cubs are banking on what has been proven true time and time again: Win enough and people overlook your warts. Instead of telling the uncomfortable truth, Cubs Chairman Tom Ricketts instead made it sound like the deal hinged on a meeting he had with Chapman before things became oicial. “I shared with him the high expectations we set for our players and staf both on and of the field,” Ricketts said, as if he would have reversed course if Chapman didn’t say the right thing during the sit-down. Winning trumps all. Always. And every team just realized it’s going to be harder beating the Cubs. Maddon can use Chapman in a variety of ways: for multiple in-

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Mozeliak has wherewithal to deal

nings, as a lefty specialist, as a closer. Chapman’s power combined with his career strikeout rate of 42.4 percent can thrive in any role. Against the Cardinals especially. The cheers that echoed from St. Louis when Chapman’s six-season run with the Reds ended with a ticket to the American League have returned as curses. The Cardinals haven’t scored a run of him since a Rafael Furcal single on Sept. 2, 2011. That’s 25 consecutive scoreless appearances. He’s saved 15 of 16 opportunities against the Cardinals. He’s held them to an .099 batting average, and that drops to .086 at Busch Stadium. His lifetime ERA against the Cardinals is 2.01. But since 2012, when the former starter transitioned to the Reds’ full-time closer, that ERA sinks to zero. The Cardinals have totaled six hits, six walks and 46 strikeouts during the drought. Current Cardinals are two for 38 against Chapman. Matt Carpenter (one for eight) and Matt Holliday (one for eight) have both knocked singles. Twenty-two of the other at-bats ended in a strikeout. The third-place Pirates feel the Cardinals’ pain. Chapman has a lifetime ERA of 0.90 against them. The Pirates have hit .145 when he’s on the mound. Perhaps the Cardinals and Pirates could donate money to an American League ally that can recruit Chapman’s services after this season. He’s scheduled to be a free agent then. He might also be a World Series champion with an extension from the Cubs. The Cardinals’ lone roster move Monday didn’t help ease a palpable sense of angst in Cardinal Nation. In the midst of Chapmania, a club with a glaring need for bullpen assistance purchased the contract of Class AAA pitcher Jerome Williams. Yes, that same Jerome Williams who made his first start for the Giants back in 2003. The innings-eater is 34 now, with a 52-66 record and a 5.80 ERA during his time with the Phillies in 2015. General manager John Mozeliak is searching for some help before Monday’s non-waiver trade deadline. But there isn’t an arm out there like Chapman’s. The Cubs tanked because they thought their rebuild could eventually lead to their first World Series since 1908. They just traded for the piece that might close the deal, one triple-digit fastball after another. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

some home runs. Tommy Pham and Jeremy Hazelbaker can play center, too, and both have produced in spurts. Then there are speedy Charlie Tilson, a 2011 second-round pick who stole 46 bases at Springfield last season, and fast-rising Harrison Bader. In his first 150 minor league games, Bader has hit .298 with 28 doubles, seven triples, 25 homers and 73 RBIs. There is a clear surplus Mozeliak can deal from. Despite losing starting pitchers Tim Cooney (shoulder) and Marco Gonzales (elbow) to injuries this spring, the Cardinals still have top prospect Alex Reyes at Memphis, along with Mike Mayers — who ofers far more potential than he showed Sunday. Reyes is untouchable. So is catcher Carson Kelly, a converted third baseman who broke out defensively at Palm Beach last season and offensively at Springfield and Memphis this year. High 2014 draft picks Luke Weaver (Springfield), Andrew Morales (Springfield), Austin Gomber (Palm Beach), Jack Flaherty (Palm Beach) and Ronnie Williams (State College) have all pitched well when healthy. The same goes for the rotation that opened at Peoria: Junior Fernandez (now at Palm Beach), Ryan Helsey, Jake Woodford, Sandy Alcantara and Derian Gonzalez. Meanwhile, Mozeliak controls his entire big league rotation for next season, counting Jaime Garcia with a team option clause. He also has Lance Lynn and Gonzales coming back from Tommy John surgery. So he has pieces he can move, particularly with elite teenage pitching prospects like Alvaro Seijas from Venezuela and Johan Oviedo moving into development behind all the others. The potential of shortstops Delvin Perez, Allen Cordoba and Edmundo Sosa ofers comfort, as does the promise of outfielders Magneuris Sierra, Victor Garcia, Nick Plummer, Jonatan Machado and Carlos Soler. Surely Mozeliak can make a trade or two to make the Cardinals’ long haul smoother.

GORDON • FROM B1

Mortgaging the future to rent Chapman would not have made sense. It’s on the younger Cardinals to keep the team’s competitive window open, not veterans Matt Holliday, Yadier Molina and Adam Wainwright. This team is transitioning toward a new team nucleus featuring Carlos Martinez, Stephen Piscotty and Aledmys Diaz. Can Michael Wacha, Randal Grichuk, Matt Adams, Kolten Wong, Trevor Rosenthal, Seth Maness and Kevin Siegrist play key roles moving forward? Perhaps, but slumps, injuries and illness have marred their campaigns and muddled the team picture. Mozeliak must assess that group while deciding where to add or subtract. Consider the case of Adams. A back injury derailed him earlier this season, but he still had 12 homers and 41 RBIs in his first 223 at bats. Through the weekend he was hitting .362 with runners in scoring position. He doesn’t reach free agency until 2019, so his price is right. Fans enjoy packaging Adams into hypothetical trade proposals, since teammate Brandon Moss set the tone for this season’s power surge with 17 homers. When healthy, Moss deserves to play at first base or left field. The same goes for Holliday, who had 17 homers and 56 RBIs entering Monday’s play. He slimmed down, regained his power and added defensive versatility while trying to persuade Mozeliak to pick up his 2017 contract option. What’s a GM to do? Depth is great, but as you’ve seen, roster clutter can lead to lineup juggling and disjointed play. Consider the case of Wong. Mozeliak regarded him as a long-term asset when he signed him through the 2020 season, when Kolten will make $10.25 million. But through his own struggles and the success of others, Wong’s role is limited when the team is at full strength. Diaz’s breakout bumped Jhonny Peralta to third base, forcing Matt Carpenter over to second base. When Peralta and Carpenter got hurt, Jedd Gyorko stepped up to produce at both positions. Wong got reacquainted with center field, hoping to find more work, but the outfield is crowded too. Piscotty is a cornerstone in right field. At worst, Grichuk can cover center field and hit

Jef Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

SOCCER • MLS

GOLF

POLITICAL REPORT Odds to win the 2016 Presidential election Hillary Clinton ½ Donald Trump 2/1 BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League RED SOX -$190 Tigers RANGERS -$125 A’s ASTROS -$145 Yankees ROYALS -$125 Angels National League METS -$108 Cards MARLINS -$150 Phillies BREWERS -$120 D’backs GIANTS -$140 Reds Interleague PIRATES -$107 Mariners ORIOLES -$220 Rockies BLUE JAYS -$225 Padres INDIANS -$142 Nationals Cubs -$155 WHITE SOX TWINS -$180 Braves DODGERS -$125 Rays

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Agreed to terms with LHP Tom Gorzelanny on a minor league contract. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Sent LHP Carlos Rodon to Charlotte (IL) for a rehab assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS — Designated INF Danny Worth for assignment. Selected the contract of INF Alex Bregman from Fresno (PCL). NEW YORK YANKEES — Traded LHP Aroldis Chapman to the Chicago Cubs for RHP Adam Warren, SS Gleyber Torres and OFs Billy McKinney and Rashad Crawford. Assigned McKinney to Trenton (EL) and Torres and Crawford to Tampa (FSL). Recalled RHP Luis Severino from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned RHP Jesse Hahn to Nashville (PCL). Recalled INF/OF Max Muncy from Nashville. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with RHP Josh Winckowski on a minor league contract. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Sent OF Enrique Hernandez to Rancho Cucamonga (Cal) for a rehab assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Recalled RHP Jarred Cosart from New Orleans (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Placed 3B Will Middlebrooks on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Keon Broxton from Colorado Springs (PCL). Named Kellen Kasper associate general counsel. CARDINALS — Optioned RHP Mike Mayers to Memphis (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Jerome Williams from Memphis (PCL). Transferred RHP Jordan Walden to the 60-day DL. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Kevin Quackenbush to El Paso (PCL). Recalled LHP Keith Hessler from El Paso. BASKETBALL • NBA CHARLOTTE HORNETS — Named Noel Gillespie coach of Greensboro (NBADL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Signed G Brandon Paul. FOOTBALL • NFL NFL — Reinstated Cleveland WR Josh Gordon conditionally and reduced his indefinite suspension to four games. GREEN BAY PACKERS — WR Greg Jennings announced his retirement. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Placed OT Phil Loadholt on the reserve/retired list. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Promoted senior personnel executive Tom Gamble to assistant general manager. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Waived-failed physical DB Kyshoen Jarrett. HOCKEY • NHL MINNESOTA WILD — Agreed to terms with C Jordan Schroeder on a one-year, two-way contract. OLYMPIC SPORTS USADA — Announced American karate athlete Gino Bough has accepted a one-year suspension for failure to properly file whereabouts information. COLLEGE AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — Named Bill Potter senior director of communications and digital media. ASSUMPTION — Named Benjamin Ilg equipment/events manager. FLORIDA — Announced junior QB Treon Harris will transfer. FURMAN — Named Kaleb Davis pitching coach. GETTYSBURG — Named Kaleigh Boreman women’s assistant basketball coach. MEMPHIS — Announced RB Jamarius Henderson is leaving the football program.

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York City FC 9 7 6 33 35 39 New York 9 9 4 31 36 28 Philadelphia 8 7 6 30 35 33 Montreal 7 5 8 29 35 30 Toronto FC 7 7 6 27 25 23 New England 6 7 8 26 27 33 Orlando City 4 5 11 23 32 35 D.C. United 5 8 7 22 19 25 Columbus 3 7 10 19 26 32 Chicago 4 10 5 17 17 25 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 12 6 5 41 35 31 Colorado 10 2 8 38 23 14 Los Angeles 9 3 8 35 34 19 Sporting K.C. 9 10 4 31 27 25 Real Salt Lake 8 6 7 31 30 31 Vancouver 8 8 6 30 33 35 Portland 7 7 8 29 33 33 San Jose 6 6 8 26 22 23 Seattle 6 12 2 20 20 27 Houston 4 9 7 19 23 26 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday Colorado at New York City FC, 2 p.m. Sunday Portland at Sporting K.C., 1 p.m. Los Angeles at Seattle, 3 p.m. Vancouver at FC Dallas, 5 p.m. Montreal at D.C. United, 5:30 p.m. New York at Chicago, 6 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Columbus at Toronto FC, 6:30 p.m. New England at Orlando City, 6:30 p.m.

LPGA • Money leaders

PGA Championship Tee Times

Through July 17 1. Lydia Ko 2. Ariya Jutanugarn 3. Brooke M. Henderson 4. Anna Nordqvist 5. Brittany Lang 6. Sei Young Kim 7. Haru Nomura 8. Amy Yang 9. Lexi Thompson 10. Stacy Lewis 11. Ha Na Jang 12. Gerina Piller 13. In Gee Chun 14. Minjee Lee 15. So Yeon Ryu 16. Hyo Joo Kim 17. Jenny Shin 18. Mirim Lee 19. Eun-Hee Ji 20. Charley Hull 21. Suzann Pettersen 22. Pornanong Phatlum 23. Carlota Ciganda 24. Lee-Anne Pace 25. Candie Kung 26. Jessica Korda 27. Hee Young Park 28. Chella Choi 29. Na Yeon Choi 30. Morgan Pressel 31. Christina Kim 32. Mo Martin 33. Shanshan Feng 34. Jodi Ewart Shadoff 35. Moriya Jutanugarn

At Baltsurol Golf Club | Springfield, N.J. | Yardage: 7,492 | Par: 70

OLYMPICS Odds to win the Men’s Basketball Gold Medal Country Odds USA 1/12 Spain 10/1 France 12/1 Brazil 20/1 Argentina 25/1 Serbia 28/1 Lithuania 30/1 Croatia 50/1 Australia 200/1 China 500/1 Nigeria 1000/1 Venezuela 1000/1 SOCCER International Champions Cup | Australia Juventus +$160 Tottenham +$170 Draw +$240 Over/under 2.5 goals Wednesday | Columbus, OH Paris Saint-Germain+$150 Real Madrid +$160 Draw +$250 Over/under 2.5 goals Wednesday | Chicago, IL Bayern Munich -$145 AC Milan +$380 Draw +$290 Over/under 3.0 goals Wednesday | Pasadena, CA Chelsea +$135 Liverpool +$200 Draw +$240 Over/under 2.5 goals GOLF Odds to win the PGA Dustin Johnson 8/1 Jason Day 9/1 Rory McIlroy 10/1 Jordan Spieth 12/1 Henrik Stenson 15/1 Phil Mickelson 20/1 Sergio Garcia 25/1 Adam Scott 25/1 Bubba Watson 30/1 Rickie Fowler 35/1 Justin Rose 35/1 Matt Kuchar 40/1 Patrick Reed 40/1 Brandon Grace 50/1 Brandt Snedeker 50/1 Brooks Koepka 50/1 Charl Schwartzel 50/1 Zach Johnson 50/1 Martin Kaymer 50/1 Hideki Matsuyama 60/1 Louis Oosthuizen 60/1 J.B. Holmes 60/1 Jim Furyk 60/1 Danny Willett 65/1 Lee Westwood 70/1 Jason Dufner 80/1 Steve Stricker 100/1 Shane Lowry 100/1 Paul Casey 125/1 Kevin Na 125/1 Jhonattan Vegas 150/1 Graeme McDowell 150/1 Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

FAIRMOUNT PARK Tuesday’s graded entries Post: 1 p.m. By: John Scully First: 6 furlongs, allowance nw other than mdn, clm, str, or $4,000 claiming, purse $8,600 pp horse jockey rec. odds 3 Dr. Clark DeLeon 4-0-1-1 8-5 4 Ask Simon Molina 9-2-1-1 7-2 2 Lazy Lovin Stillion 6-1-0-2 9-2 5 Toro Grande Bielby 7-3-0-2 3-1 6 Azeg Santiago 9-3-0-1 8-1 1 Mankind Tavares 6-2-2-2 10-1 DR. CLARK was just claimed by FP’s top trainer for $12,500 in Chicago, and comes down here for what should be a relatively easy score; ASK SIMON hard hitting runner is a definite threat; LAZYLOVIN got too far back in his first start for these connections, has the ability to upset.

BASEBALL Frontier League East W L Pct. GB Joliet 31 28 .525 — Washington 29 29 .500 1½ Windy City 29 31 .483 2½ Lake Erie 27 30 .474 3 Schaumburg 27 34 .443 5 Traverse City 25 35 .417 6½ West W L Pct. GB Southern Illinois 42 17 .712 — Evansville 34 25 .576 8 Grizzlies 30 32 .484 13½ Normal 29 31 .483 13½ Rascals 28 30 .483 13½ Florence 25 34 .424 17 Sunday Evansville 14, Schaumburg 3 Traverse City 8, Rascals 2 Normal 6, Lake Erie 4 Windy City 4, Grizzlies 3 Joliet 7, Florence 4 Southern Illinois 12, Washington 10 Tuesday Rascals at Lake Erie, 4:05 p.m. Normal at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Florence at Traverse City, 6:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Rascals, 6:35 p.m. Evansville at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Windy City at Southern Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Schaumburg at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL • WNBA EASTERN New York Atlanta Indiana Chicago Washington Connecticut WESTERN Los Angeles Minnesota Phoenix Seattle Dallas San Antonio

W 18 13 12 11 9 8 W 21 21 10 9 9 5

L 8 12 12 13 15 16 L 3 4 14 15 16 18

Pct .692 .520 .500 .458 .375 .333 Pct .875 .840 .417 .375 .360 .217

GB — 4½ 5 6 8 9 GB — ½ 11 12 12½ 15½

Second: 1 mile 70 yards, $4,000 nw 2 races, f-m, purse $5,200 pp horse jockey rec. odds 2 This Minute Molina 2-0-0-0 4-1 5 Classical Sky Bielby 5-0-2-2 5-2 4 Arknsastravler Santiago 5-1-0-0 3-1 6 Prime Stillion 5-0-1-1 7-2 1 Orient’s Joy Lopez 9-1-1-0 6-1 7 AlleyO’Malley Velazquz 9-1-1-1 15-1 3 Fearlessbypass DeLeon 4-0-0-020-1 THIS MINUTE has had problems at the start in both of his races this year in Chicago, now comes down here to take on less; CLASSICAL SKY stretch runner has been consistently good, this year; ARKANSAS TRAVELER nice win in breaking her maiden, two weeks ago, now tries a longer distance.

Money $2,255,376 $1,327,386 $1,303,912 $1,112,590 $1,078,873 $1,004,416 $986,477 $812,895 $737,219 $734,891 $723,625 $696,903 $673,478 $652,663 $574,563 $511,806 $490,790 $488,290 $436,091 $434,487 $397,613 $389,425 $389,218 $385,186 $384,693 $378,721 $364,842 $361,305 $337,138 $336,687 $332,943 $328,236 $323,169 $321,096 $314,196

PGA • FedEx Cup leaders Through July 24 Points 1. Dustin Johnson 2,701 2. Jason Day 2,405 3. Adam Scott 2,011 4. Jordan Spieth 1,904 5. Brandt Snedeker 1,541 6. Phil Mickelson 1,498 7. Russell Knox 1,457 8. Kevin Chappell 1,422 9. Patrick Reed 1,409 10. Kevin Kisner 1,371 11. Justin Thomas 1,346 12. Kevin Na 1,345 13. Sergio Garcia 1,306 14. Matt Kuchar 1,298 15. Henrik Stenson 1,293 16. William McGirt 1,283 17. Jason Dufner 1,220 18. Bubba Watson 1,184 19. Smylie Kaufman 1,181 20. Hideki Matsuyama 1,179 21. Daniel Berger 1,157 22. Brooks Koepka 1,143 23. Charl Schwartzel 1,101 24. Jhonattan Vegas 1,075 25. Bill Haas 1,072 26. Scott Piercy 1,071 27. Branden Grace 1,060 28. Rickie Fowler 1,053 29. Graeme McDowell 1,049 30. Emiliano Grillo 1,047 31. Charley Hoffman 1,045 32. Harris English 1,001 33. Rory McIlroy 973 34. J.B. Holmes 956 35. Charles Howell III 931

YTD Money $7,210,435 $6,482,028 $5,005,406 $4,636,770 $3,242,761 $3,600,470 $3,191,575 $3,472,720 $3,178,684 $2,945,248 $3,160,545 $2,869,729 $3,155,365 $3,188,242 $3,072,923 $3,086,597 $2,416,265 $2,953,270 $2,424,647 $2,926,635 $2,597,194 $2,651,041 $2,327,010 $2,073,921 $2,258,923 $2,735,421 $2,396,396 $2,316,091 $2,376,580 $2,143,633 $2,128,380 $1,906,938 $2,655,615 $2,431,877 $1,888,171

> Thursday-Friday • First hole-10th hole 6 a.m.-11:15 a.m. — Mark Brown, USA 6:10 a.m.-11:25 a.m. — Tommy Sharp, USA 6:20 a.m.-11:35 a.m. — Josh Speight, USA 6:30 a.m.-11:45 a.m. — Daniel Berger, USA 6:40 a.m.-11:55 a.m. — Aaron Baddely, AUS 6:50 a.m.-12:05 p.m. — Vijay Singh, Fiji 7 a.m.-12:15 p.m. — V. Dubuisson, FRA 7:10 a.m.-12:25 p.m. — Soren Kjeldsen, DEN 7:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m. — C. Hoffman, USA 7:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. — Robert Streb, USA 7:40 a.m.-12:55 p.m. — Roberto Castro, USA 7:50 a.m.-1:05 p.m. — Omar Uresti, USA 8 a.m.-1:15 p.m. — David Muttitt, USA 11:15 a.m.-6 p.m. — Colt Knost, USA 11:25 a.m.-6:10 p.m. — Ryan Palmer, USA 11:35 a.m.-6:20 p.m. — Scott Piercy, USA 11:45 a.m.-6:30 p.m. — Rocco Mediate, USA 11:55 a.m.-6:40 p.m. — Anirban Lahiri, IND 12:05 p.m.-6:50 a.m. — Luke Donald, ENG 12:15 p.m.-7 a.m. — FRAsco Molinari, ITA 12:25 p.m.-7:10 a.m. — Sergio Garcia, ESP 12:35 p.m.-7:20 a.m. — Justin Rose, ENG 12:45 p.m.-7:30 a.m. — Danny Willett, ENG 12:55 p.m.-7:40 a.m. — G. McDowell, NIRE 1:05 p.m.-7:50 a.m. — Ben Polland, USA 1:15 p.m.-8 a.m. — Mitch Lowe, USA > Thursday-Friday • 10th hole-First hole 6 a.m.-11:15 a.m. — Chris Kirk, USA 6:10 a.m.-11:25 a.m. — Brian Gaffney, USA 6:20 a.m.-11:35 a.m. — J.B. Holmes, USA 6:30 a.m.-11:45 a.m. — Matt Dobyns, USA 6:40 a.m.-11:55 a.m. — Ernie Els, SAF 6:50 a.m.-12:05 p.m. — Jimmy Walker, USA 7 a.m.-12:15 p.m. — R. Cabrera-Bello, ESP 7:10 a.m.-12:25 p.m. — Brandt Snedeker, USA 7:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m. — Keegan Bradley, USA 7:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. — Phil Mickelson, USA 7:40 a.m.-12:55 p.m. — Bill Haas, USA 7:50 a.m.-1:05 p.m. — Rod Perry, USA 8 a.m.-1:15 p.m. — Nicolas Colsaerts, BEL 11:15 a.m.-6 p.m. — Michael Block, USA 11:25 a.m.-6:10 p.m. — Johan Kok, USA 11:35 a.m.-6:20 p.m. — T. Olesen, DEN 11:45 a.m.-6:30 p.m. — David Toms, USA 11:55 a.m.-6:40 p.m. — James Morrison, ENG 12:05 p.m.-6:50 a.m. — Jason Dufner, USA 12:15 p.m.-7 a.m. — Brendan Steele, USA 12:25 p.m.-7:10 a.m. — Marc Leishman, AUS 12:35 p.m.-7:20 a.m. — T. Jaidee, THA 12:45 p.m.-7:30 a.m. — Soomin Lee, SKO 12:55 p.m.-7:40 a.m. — K.T. Kim, SKO 1:05 p.m.-7:50 a.m. — D. Summerhays, USA 1:15 p.m.-8 a.m. — Bryce Molder, USA

Patton Kizzire, USA Jon Curran, USA Kristoffer Broberg, SWE Darren Clarke, NIRE Kevin Kisner, USA John Daly, USA Marcus Fraser, AUS Scott Hend, AUS Matt Jones, AUS Vaughn Taylor, USA Jonas Blixt, SWE Greg Chalmers, AUS Smylie Kaufman, USA Joe Summerhays, USA Rob Labritz, USA Alex Noren, SWE Rich Berberian Jr., USA Tony Finau, USA Matt Kuchar, USA Shane Lowry, IRE Jordan Spieth, USA Patrick Reed, USA Dustin Johnson, USA Webb Simpson, USA Ryan Moore, USA Younghan Song, SKO

Bradley Dredge, Wales K.J. Choi, SKO Jason Kokrak, USA David Lingmerth, SWE Emiliano Grillo, ARG P. Harrington, IRE James Hahn, USA Billy Hurley III, USA Rikard Karlberg, SWE Kevin Na, USA Gregory Bourdy, FRA Ross Fisher, ENG Zac Blair, USA Yuta Ikeda, JAP Gary Woodland, USA Andrew Johnston, USA Shaun Micheel, USA M. Fitzpatrick, ENG Danny Lee, NZ Jim Furyk, USA Bubba Watson, USA Charl Schwartzel, SAF Henrik Stenson, SWE Louis Oosthuizen, SAF Kyle Reifers, USA Kevin Streelman, USA

Wyatt Worthington, USA Jeunghun Wang, SKO Brian Stuard, USA Tyrrell Hatton, ENG Rickie Fowler, USA Chris Wood, ENG Justin Thomas, USA Brooks Koepka, USA Adam Scott, AUS Rory McIlroy, NIRE Andy Sullivan, ENG George Coetzee, SAF Ryan Helminen, USA John Senden, AUS Troy Merritt, USA Fabian Gomez, ARG Rich Beem, USA Brandon Stone, SAF Y.E. Yang, SKO Bernd Wiesberger, AUS Russell Knox, SCT Jim Herman, USA Joost Luiten, NET Brad Lardon, USA Rich Schuller, USA Brad Ott, USA

Freddie Jacobson, SWE Jason Bohn, USA H. Matsuyama, JAP Harris English, USA Zach Johnson, USA Branden Grace, SAF Paul Casey, ENG Lee Westwood, ENG J. Donaldson, Wales Jason Day, AUS. Jamie Lovemark, USA Hideto Tanihara, JAP Jhonattan Vegas, VEN Harold Varner III, USA Kevin Chappell, USA Russell Henley, USA Steve Stricker, USA Billy Horschel, USA Martin Kaymer, GER Byeong Hun An, SKO K. Aphibarnrat, THA Thomas Pieters, BEL William McGirt, USA Peter Malnati, USA C. Tringale, USA Si Woo Kim, SKO

HOLES IN ONE Wentzville • Tony Shannon, hole No. 12, 130 yards, 9-iron.

MOTOR SPORTS • POINT STANDINGS

TENNIS WTA money leaders 1. Serena Williams 2. Angelique Kerber 3. Garbine Muguruza 4. Victoria Azarenka 5. Simona Halep 6. Agnieszka Radwanska 7. Carla Suarez Navarro 8. Venus Williams 9. Elena Vesnina 10. Dominika Cibulkova 11. Svetlana Kuznetsova 12. Madison Keys

Trn 15 17 20 17 18 16 18 14 14 17 11 16 12 18 15 18 17 15 16 14 13 17 16 17 16 15 17 19 16 16 15 18 13 16 18

ATP money leaders $6,815,638 $4,757,492 $2,694,936 $2,651,080 $2,047,289 $1,587,545 $1,526,660 $1,517,382 $1,461,031 $1,384,387 $1,349,075 $1,192,392

1. Novak Djokovic 2. Andy Murray 3. Milos Raonic 4. Rafael Nadal 5. Kei Nishikori 6. Dominic Thiem 7. Tomas Berdych 8. Stan Wawrinka 9. Gael Monfils 10. Nicolas Mahut 11. Roger Federer 12. David Goffin

Third: 1 mile 70 yards, $3,200 claiming, nw 3 races since 7-26-15, or nw 2 since 4-1-2016, f-m, purse $5,000 pp horse jockey rec. odds 6 Oh Wise One Santiago 3-1-0-0 4-5 7 Whatsinaname Bielby 8-0-1-3 8-1 3 Hold Me Sue Molina 6-2-0-0 6-1 1 Tac Rap DeLeon 6-1-1-0 3-1 2 Terrace Lopez 3-0-0-1 20-1 4 Nutty Fudge Stillion 10-2-0-1 15-1 5 Precious Wish Velazquz 6-1-2-0 30-1 OH WISE ONE comes into this race off of two turf races at Arlington Park against much better, should be hard to beat; WHAT’S IN A NAME held on well at this distance in last; HOLD ME SUE went wire to wire in her only route race.

$8,476,566 $7,105,979 $3,269,513 $2,336,095 $2,136,121 $1,976,760 $1,850,229 $1,762,203 $1,549,983 $1,542,635 $1,527,269 $1,440,485

Sprint Cup

XFINITY

Camping World Truck IndyCar

1. Kaevin Harvick..................... 671 2. Brad Keselowski ..................647 3. Kurt Busch ...........................627 4. Joey Logano........................ 606 5. Kyle Busch............................601 6. Carl Edwards........................593 7. Martin Truex Jr..................... 573 8. Jimmie Johnson................... 552 9. Matt Kenseth .......................545 10. Denny Hamlin ....................542

1. Daniel Suarez...................... 608 2. Elliott Sadler ........................594 3. Ty Dillon ...............................558 4. Justin Allgaier......................542 5. Erik Jones.............................539 6. Brendan Gaughan ............... 535 7. Brandon Jones .....................520 8. Brennan Poole..................... 519 9. Darrell Wallace Jr................ 486 10. Ryan Reed..........................433

1. William Byron.......................282 2. Matt Crafton ........................ 273 3. Daniel Hemric.......................271 4. Johnny Sauter ..................... 253 5. Timothy Peters .................... 252 6. Christopher Bell ..................245 7. Tyler Reddick........................243 8. John Hunter Nemechek ...... 232 9. Ben Kennedy........................ 225 10. Cameron Hayley ................220

Fourth: 1 mile, allowance nw other than mdn, clm, str, or $4,000 claiming, purse $8,600 pp horse jockey rec. odds 4 Nafir’s Best Lopez 5-0-3-1 5-2 3 Part’n Parcel Santiago 4-1-2-0 9-5 5 Beefy Bielby 4-0-0-1 10-1 6 Gretsie James 7-1-1-0 6-1 2 Jack n John DeLeon 5-1-2-2 5-1 1 Susan’s Rap Molina 4-2-0-0 6-1 NAFIR’S BEST has been racing well this year without winning, this should be the time for that; PART’N PARCEL will be trying to lead all the way, as he finished second, three weeks ago in a front running try, when narrowly defeating the top one; BEEFY not much in his first start in four months, but has the background that says he fits well with these.

Fifth: 6 furlongs, $4,000 claiming, nw of 2 races, f-m, purse $5,200 pp horse jockey rec. odds 1 Snow Advisory Stillion 3-1-0-0 5-1 7 Youremyfavrite Lopez 7-0-2-1 5-2 5 Lyndashootnpar Bielby 7-0-1-2 3-1 6 Victorius Tavares 7-0-2-0 4-1 4 Just Sky Molina 4-1-2-1 7-2 3 Stacey’sWager DeLeon 4-0-0-0 20-1 2 Tiny Tenant Velazquz 4-0-0-0 30-1 SNOW ADVISORY has the gas that could prove tough to catch; YOU’RE MY FAVORITE has been second best in her past two races, and is the one to beat; LYNDAS SHOOTIN PAR has been consistently close in all of her races, and figures to do so, again.

Sixth: 6 furlongs, allowance, nw other than mdn, clm, str, or nw 3 races, f-m, purse $8,600 pp horse jockey rec. odds 3 Kipper Doodle Lopez 3-2-1-0 8-5 6 Rosie’s Relish Chen 5-3-0-2 8-1 7 Bella Carmella Bielby 5-2-1-1 7-2 2 Sterling Effort Tavares 7-2-0-2 4-1 1 Cocoa Bandita DeLeon 4-1-0-0 4-1 4 Mrs. Appeal Stillion 3-1-1-1 10-1 5 Elizabethsfevr Molina 9-1-1-2 15-1 KIPPER DOODLE has been most impressive in winning her last two races, and should make it three in a row; ROSIE’S RELISH moves from bottom claimers all the way to allowance, but I think she can handle the class rise; BELLA CARMELLA had all kinds of problems in her latest race, and has the talent to give the top one a run for the money.

1. Simon Pagenaud.................432. 2. Will Power...........................384. 3. Helio Castroneves...............358. 4. Scott Dixon .........................349. 5. Josef Newgarden ............... 344. 6. Tony Kanaan.......................339. 7. Alexander Rossi ................. 300. 8. James Hinchcliffe ...............299. 9. Charlie Kimball ...................294. 10. Carlos Munoz ....................293.

Seventh: 5 ½ furlongs, $4,000 claiming, nw 2 races, purse $5,200 pp horse jockey rec. odds 1 Shining Air Velazquz 3-0-1-0 3-1 3 Giant Dragon Tavares 7-0-2-1 8-1 6 Aish Tamid Chen 2-0-1-0 6-1 5 WWspringstrm Santiago 1-1-0-0 9-5 7 Greenmeansgo Bielby 2-0-0-0 15-1 8 Tizawish Molina 5-0-3-0 8-1 2 Pirate’s Online James 0-0-0-0 10-1 4 Van Lier Lopez 6-0-0-1 12-1 9 Another Afleet Arrieta 2-0-0-1 30-1 SHINING AIR was second best to a quick winner, two weeks ago; GIANT DRAGON also ran a nice race to finish right behind the top one in last; AISH TAMID had a big zero in last as the odds on favorite, but did break slowly, give him another chance. Best Bet: Oh Wise One (3rd) Long Shot: Snow Advisory (5th)


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

NFL NOTEBOOK Manning cleared in HGH probe The NFL says it found no credible evidence that Peyton Manning was provided with human growth hormone or other prohibited substances as alleged in a documentary by Al-Jazeera America last year. The league said the quarterback and his wife, Ashley, fully cooperated in the seven-month investigation, providing interviews and access to all records sought by investigators. The NFL is continuing its investigation into allegations made against other NFL players in the documentary, which the league said involves “diferent lines of inquiry and witnesses.” Those other players provided the league with sworn aidavits, but the NFL wants to interview them in person. In December, Al-Jazeera reported that an intern at an Indianapolis anti-aging clinic was secretly recorded suggesting that Manning’s wife received deliveries of HGH in 2011 while the quarterback was recovering from neck fusion surgery. The intern, Charles Sly, recanted his statements, which were recorded without his knowledge. Aldon Smith investigated • The NFL is investigating whether a video linked to an account from suspended Oakland Raiders linebacker Aldon Smith, who played for Mizzou, shows him using illegal drugs. A video on a Periscope account that has shown Smith in the past features an unidentiied man of camera discussing a rolled cigarette with an unidentiied woman. It’s not clear what’s in the cigarette and who the man is. Smith sent out a tweet Monday after CSNBayArea.com reported on the video, saying, “Good try, not me.”

New concussion protocol • The NFL and the players association have announced a new policy regarding game-day concussion protocol and discipline for clubs that violate the procedure. Under the new policy jointly announced Monday, the NFL and NFLPA “will follow a strict and fair process to investigate incidents and determine appropriate discipline, including club ines and possible forfeiture of draft picks.” Gordon reinstated • Josh Gordon’s curious and complicated career has taken a new turn. The talented but troubled Cleveland wide receiver has been reinstated on a conditional basis by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, who met face to face with Gordon last week and said he believes the 25-year-old can “make the right choices” going forward. Gordon has been banned since February 2015 for multiple violations of the league’s drug policies. Watt goes on PUP list • The Houston Texans have put star defensive end J.J. Watt on the physically unable to perform list less than a week before training camp begins. The move, which was expected, comes after Watt recently had back surgery. The NFL sacks leader last season, with 17½, is expected to be ready for the season opener. Jennings will retire • Receiver Greg Jennings is retiring after a decade in the National Football League. Jennings, in a video posted Monday on social media, says “football is over. I’m done.” The 32-year-old inishes his career with 571 catches for 8,291 yards and 64 touchdowns.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Tuesday • 07.26.2016 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Neither vulnerable, South deals. NORTH ♠Q 4 3 ♥J 9 6 4 2 ♦K Q ♣Q J 5 WEST EAST ♠J 9 8 5 ♠A 10 6 2 ♥10 ♥K Q 5 ♦J 10 9 7 ♦5 2 ♣K 9 8 4 ♣10 7 3 2 SOUTH ♠K 7 ♥A 8 7 3 ♦A 8 6 4 3 ♣A 6 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1NT Pass 2♦* Pass 3♥ Pass 4♥ All pass *Transfer to hearts Opening lead: Jack of ♦ Should you open the South hand one diamond, there would be serious rebid problems after a one-spade response by partner. To avoid this, Hard Luck Louie opened one no trump, as would many good players today. This deal came up in a team match between Louie’s team and a team led by Lucky Larry. Louie won the opening diamond lead in dummy and made the normal play of a heart to his ace, followed by another heart. When the hearts split as they did, and the king of clubs proved to be

ofside, Louie had to settle for down one. “Horrid luck, as usual,” said Louie. “2-2 hearts, or three hearts on my left, or the club king on my right, and I would have made it. This has got to stop!” Lucky Larry also found himself declarer in a fourheart contract, with the same opening lead. He won this in dummy and paused to think. Larry saw this deal as an opportunity for an avoidance play. He wanted to keep East off lead until the diamonds were ready for club discards. He led a low heart at trick two, but when East played the five, Larry just covered with the seven. West was surprised to win this trick with his 10, but he took his gift and led another diamond to the dummy. Larry led a heart to his ace and ruffed a diamond in dummy. East overrufed and shifted to a club, but to no avail. Larry rose with his ace and discarded dummy’s two remaining clubs on the ace and eight of diamonds. He conceded a spade and claimed 10 tricks for his contract. (07/26/16)

Across 1 Bakery attraction 6 Mate 9 Muslim holy site 14 Source of supposed extraordinary health benefits 16 Shades of blue 17 They need signatures 18 Paavo ___, 1920s Olympic gold medalist 19 Designer Oscar de la ___ 20 Justice who died in 2016 21 James Bond, e.g.: abbr. 24 Big part of a ship’s rigging 26 Easily damaged 28 Sacker of ancient Rome 29 ___-pitch 32 Spanish soccer star Sergio ___

33 Of mind, body and spirit 35 Basic rhyme scheme 36 “Scram!” 38 Fast time? 39 Where Reagan was born 41 Jessica with two Oscars 42 Poor grade 43 Gobble up 44 Said quickly and angrily 46 Makes amends for 48 Nordic airline 49 Reconfigures, as a book to a screenplay 52 “Enough, Enrico!” 54 Well-founded 55 Band frontman, often 59 Feminist author Jong 60 God-awful 61 Brazen

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME July 26 WORD — BOLLARD (BOLLARD: BAHL-erd: A thick post on a ship or wharf, used for securing lines.) Average mark 17 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 23 or more words in BOLLARD? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — COAMING mango camion manic coin manioc coma mano coming mica conga moan acing icon agon imago among gain anomic gnomic magic main RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

62 Correspondent’s afterthoughts, briefly 63 L’eggs shade

Down 1 Deadly Egyptian slitherer 2 Kick oneself for 3 Go (for) 4 Israel’s fourth prime minister 5 Apollo’s twin sister 6 Baby’s footwear 7 “Brooklyn” actress Saoirse ___ 8 Some ER cases 9 “Moon River” composer 10 50-50 11 Ringlet 12 Victoria’s Secret buy, informally 13 Where the 27-Down is 15 Biggest determinant of a school grade, often 20 ___ Ste. Marie 21 Terror-stricken 22 1940s pinup Betty 23 Steaming Mexican treat 25 “Scram!” 27 Desert that ancient traders crossed 29 Shorthand takers

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

far right now. You know how to tell someone that you have had enough. Your sense of humor and depth allow you to communicate what you are seeing in a way that is palatable to others. Tonight: Enjoy some great music.

If July 26 is your birthday • This year you seem to connect with others naturally. You experience some tension when dealing with those in charge. You might ind others’ lifestyles to be quite diferent from yours. If you are single, you could meet someone special when traveling. If you are attached, you will not complain of boredom. Taurus believes that he or she knows more than you do.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ One-on-one relating is highlighted. Others seem to be much more responsive than usual, and you like what you are hearing. Still, a close friend or associate could shock you with his or her actions and ideas. Tonight: Accept an invitation.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ You often respond to your inner voice, which takes you into new and sometimes unpredictable situations. You could surprise yourself with your choices, and others are likely to be reactive. Tonight: Treat yourself! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ You might decide to be more active. You will get a great response from others as a result. Follow what you feel is the best path, and you will be OK with the results. Tonight: Do what you have been putting of. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★ Listen to your inner voice with a particular issue that arises. This matter could involve a friend, and/or might emerge during a meeting, which is likely to catch you of guard. Tonight: Take of. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Focus on the long term and walk away from instability, especially if it does not beneit you directly. You will be a lot happier if you do. Tonight: Find your friends. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Be willing to move in a new direction. Others might ask you for something that you refuse to give. A discussion will help, but in general, people seem to be in an either/or type of mood. Tonight: Up late. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★★ Your ine-tuned ability to detach will take you

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ You could be too tired to continue at your present pace, especially as others seem to demand more and more. You might decide to throw in the towel. Tonight: Know that you don’t have to agree with someone.

Puzzle by Julie Bérubé

30 ___ franca (common tongue) 31 Some jazz groups 33 Syllables from Santa 34 Blind part 36 Melodramatic shows 37 Queens’ ___ Field 40 Overnight

41 Denouement 44 Way up or way down 45 Linguine sauce 46 Heroic tales 47 Borders 49 D.C.’s New York and Pennsylvania 50 Five-time Olympian Torres

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0621

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ Throw yourself into work or whatever responsibilities demand your attention. A new friend is quirky, and he or she might decide to do the unexpected. Tonight: Squeeze in some exercise. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★★ You have a twinkle in your eye that lets others know that you might not be as serious as you seem. A matter in your domestic life pops up that you must handle immediately. Tonight: Ever playful. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★ Try as you might to stay calm, you still could be overwhelmed by what falls into your lap. Tension builds, as you feel you must handle a situation that seems to be going south. Tonight: Call it an early night.

51 Father-anddaughter boxing family 53 Met solo 55 ___ year (precollege experience) 56 Promising letters? 57 Have dinner 58 Market for Jap. shares

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ Reach out to a friend who has been lying low as of late. Recognize how much this person appreciates your time. Make calls, return emails and get a sense of what others desire before making plans. Tonight: Favorite spot, favorite people. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

07.26.2016 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Counseling can’t save this marriage an address to curb this situation, but no luck. These calls come as late as 9 p.m. Thank you for any advice. — STRESSED OUT IN ILLINOIS

friends. (And no, I don’t think she’s a lesbian.) Any love that existed between us is nearly gone at this point, so am I justified in getting a separation? We have been to counseling, and that is what the therapist recommended. — FEELING UNLOVED IN UTAH

Dear Stressed Out • I agree that telemarketing calls are invasive when they come in multiples. The USA.gov Consumer Action Handbook includes a number you can call to restrict telemarketing calls permanently by registering your phone number. It is 1-888382-1222. This can also be done online at donotcall.gov. If you receive telemarketing calls after your number has been in the national registry for 31 days, you can file a complaint using the same web page and tollfree number. Political organizations, charities and telephone surveyors with which you have a relationship can still get through.

Dear Abby • I receive at least two or three telemarketing calls a day — and sometimes even more on Sundays. Can you please tell me what to do to put a stop to this? I have written once before to

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

MISS MANNERS

TV TUESDAY

If pair are dating, they’ll let you know

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

more in both time and money to engage a service. Why people assume they come out ahead by farming out such a simple task, Miss Manners cannot imagine.

found a job yet?” She asks you to be patient; your friends will either tell you, or they will not.

Dear Miss Manners • In our group of friends, we have two guys that we assume are dating but who aren’t confirming anything, even though their affection toward each other is really obvious. Is it rude if we ask them about their relationship? Or do we just keep quiet and wait until they admit it themselves?

Dear Miss Manners • I have found websites where I can generate my own thank-you notes (I pick out the card, type the message, etc.), and the website prints the cards with my message and mails it directly to the recipient. It may start out electronic, but the recipient ends up with a printed card with my personal message, even if it is not in my own handwriting. Do you feel this is still personal enough, or should I stick with the traditional note cards in my own handwriting?

Gentle Reader • Why do you need to know? Especially as they do not feel the need to tell you? At best, anticipating other people’s announcements deprives them of the pleasure of doing so themselves. At worst, wrong guesses cause embarrassment. Therefore, Miss Manners bans all such questions, including “Are you pregnant?” “Did you get into your first-choice college?” “When are you two getting married?” and “Haven’t you

Dear Miss Manners • Is it acceptable to talk at the dinner table? Gentle Reader • In fact, it is obligatory, if others are present. Dinner is a social ritual, not just a feeding time. Miss Manners considers that the ability to alternate talking and chewing, without ever mixing the two, is one of the basic skills of civilization. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106. Miss Manners’ son, Nicholas Ivor Martin, and her daughter, Jacobina Martin, contribute to this column.

Gentle Reader • As you realize, this is not quite as personal as it would be if you wrote your thanks in your own hand on a piece of paper and mailed it. It doubtless also costs slightly

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Dear Feeling Unloved • Assuming you brush your teeth, use deodorant and shower regularly, I’m as mystified about your wife’s behavior as you are. I know people who treat their dogs and cats better than this woman has been treating you. That you have tolerated it this long is surprising. Your therapist has advised a separation, but I would go further than that. Because you don’t have a marriage, I think you should make it oicial.

Diferences: 1. Pole is shorter. 2. Arm is moved. 3. Picture on wall is higher. 4. Mouth is not opened as wide. 5. Fish is reversed. 6. Doors are added to cabinet.

Dear Abby • I have been married for almost three years to a woman who refuses to share the same bed with me. It started on our honeymoon when, after having sex, she chose to sleep in a different bed whenever there were two beds in the room. She’s in her late 40s and had never been married before. We have been intimate only twice in the last year. Moreover, she doesn’t let me sit next to her while we watch TV, and there is no kissing, no touching, no afection of any kind, physical or verbal. I have wracked my brain trying to figure out why she treats me like this, and I have a few suspicions. She’s applying for permanent residence status and may have married me only for that, although she denies it. She can no longer bear children, so she may think there is no point in having sex or being intimate. She may have an aversion to being touched, although she doesn’t show that when we’re out in public. She likes to hug her female


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 07.26.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Cluster headaches come in waves Dear Dr. Roach • I was diagnosed with cluster headache at age 20. Now, at age 65, I have endured these excruciating headaches for some 45 years. In my particular situation, I can have once- or twice-daily headaches for anywhere from two to four months. My symptoms include a throbbing in my left temple, with the pain then traveling to my left eye. My left eye tears, my left nostril stuffs up and my mouth becomes dry. On occasion, I also experience nausea. There are some days during these times when I might not have any. The cluster of headaches then disappears for anywhere from three to eight years, only to return. I have found verapamil to be somewhat helpful. I read that these headaches tend to occur less frequently and with less severity as one gets older. That does not seem to be the case for me. — K.B.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin

Answer • Yours is an excellent description of cluster headaches, which commonly affects young men (at least, they are young when they first get the condition). Tearing of one eye is classic, as is the description of several headaches over weeks to months followed by prolonged freedom from the very painful headaches. People who experience so classic a presentation as yours usually have no trouble getting the correct diagnosis; however, this headache syndrome often is misdiagnosed, especially before the clustering becomes clear. There are two types of headache treatment: The first stops a headache once it occurs (abortive) and the second keeps it from coming on in the first place (preventive). Cluster headaches often respond quickly and completely to oxygen, but the response is incomplete for some. Most other headaches do not respond to oxygen, so oxygen treatment sometimes is used to help make the diagnosis. Some medicines used for migraine, such as sumatriptan, can be used to stop a cluster headache. Octreotide can be given as an injection to abort a headache. As soon as a cluster starts, beginning a preventive medicine is important. Verapamil, usually used as a blood pressure medicine, is probably the best-studied and may be the most efective. Steroids, lithium and methysergide are drugs with significant toxicities, and are less commonly used. Many headache questions reach me on a regular basis. For a general explanation of headaches and their treatment, consider the booklet on that topic. It presents a comprehensive view. To order a copy, write: Dr. Roach Book No. 901, 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery.

NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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