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FBI Deputy Assistant Director Peter Strzok testifies before a joint House committee hearing that grew heated Thursday in Washington.

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FBI agent clashes with GOP critics at hearing

BY ROBERT PATRICK AND JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A St. Louis jury Thursday awarded $550 million in actual damages and $4.14 billion in punitive damages in a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson over claims its talcum powder caused ovarian cancer in women who used the company’s products for years. This trial, which began June 4 in St. Louis Circuit Court, had 22 plaintiffs making claims against the company. The jury basically awarded $25 million to each family who sued, including six plaintiffs who sued on behalf of relatives who died and other See JURY • Page A10

BY DEVLIN BARRETT AND KAROUN DEMIRJIAN Washington Post

WASHINGTON • Republicans fought bitterly Thursday with

FBI agent Peter Strzok at a congressional hearing that frequently devolved into shouting matches about political bias between supporters of President Donald Trump and defenders of the agency investigating him. The mutual contempt felt between Republicans on one side and Democrats and the star witness on the other was palpable from the very first question put to Strzok, whose conduct as the lead agent on FBI probes of Hillary Clinton and the Trump campaign has been criticized by internal Justice Department

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Plaintiff Gail Ingham (foreground), of O’Fallon, Mo., embraces her attorney Monica Cooper in St. Louis on Thursday. Among her other attorneys are (from left) Lee Cirsch, Eric Holland and Mark Lanier.

See FBI • Page A11

3 YEARS AGO, SGT. CHARLES LOWE WAS SHOT, BUT HIS VEST SAVED HIS LIFE THIS WEEKEND, HE PLANS TO LEAD AN ANTI-VIOLENCE MARCH BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Charles Lowe commemorates his birthday, his wedding anniversary, the day he joined the police department and, for the past three years, another day he calls “Alive Day.” On July 14, 2015, the St. Louis police sergeant was shot while sitting in his car working a security job in the Central West End. His vest saved his life. And from that point on, he and his wife, Kelli Lowe, have dubbed the day his “Alive Day.” Until this year, the couple have celebrated privately as

the criminal cases against those who shot Lowe dragged through the courts. And they’ve watched as the city has become further divided along racial lines as violence continues to claim more victims. This year, Lowe and his wife hope to turn their personal celebration into an annual public event known as the Code 73 Victims Against Violence Walk. It’s named after the code officers use to let police dispatchers know they are OK and back in service. For Lowe, the code can apply to all crime victims and See MARCH • Page A4

St. Louis police Sgt. Charles Lowe stands Thursday near Maryland Plaza and York Avenue in St. Louis’ Central West End, where he was shot in July 2015 while working an off-duty security shift. He celebrates July 14 each year as his “Alive Day.” RYAN MICHALESKO • rmichalesko@post-dispatch.com

AT&T-Time Warner merger is appealed BY BRIAN FUNG Washington Post

WASHINGTON • The Justice Depart-

ment on Thursday filed an appeal challenging its loss in the AT&T-Time Warner antitrust trial, according to court documents. AT&T completed its $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner a few weeks ago after a federal judge rejected the Justice Department’s argument that the deal would be anti-competitive. The case has been closely watched as an indicator of how courts would treat

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mergers of companies in different industries. AT&T is one of the country’s biggest telecommunications providers, and its purchase of Time Warner allowed it to pick up some of the biggest media brands in the United States, including HBO and CNN. AT&T said in a statement Thursday that Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia correctly decided the case. “While the losing party in litigation See AT&T • Page A10

Build-A-Bear promotion is so popular it fails

Congressional hopefuls prep for primary Less than a month out from Missouri’s 2018 primaries, two St. Louis-area congressional districts are looking at very different battlefields. Longtime U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, faces a grass-roots Democratic primary opponent, the Rev. Cori Bush, who is betting on an in-party, anti-establishment upset like the one that rocked a New York City congressional district last month. If Clay staves

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off Bush’s primary challenge, he will effectively have won his 10th term in the overwhelmingly Democratic district. For Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, the dynamics are reversed: She faces little threat in the Republican primary, where she is being challenged by a political novice whose Republican credentials have been called into question. But at least two of the five Democrats vying for the chance to take her on in the general election have mounted credible fund-

BY KEVIN MCDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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Ethics complaint could cast off state’s dark-money scourge TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In what could be the final act of his tenure as a state lawmaker, Jay Barnes declared war on dark money. On Tuesday, the Republican state representative from Jefferson City filed a 25page complaint with the Missouri Ethics Commission alleging that former Gov. Eric Greitens violated multiple campaign finance laws by using a nonprofit committee called A New Missouri to intentionally obscure the identity of his donors. The complaint is rife with testimony and documentary evidence that came out of the investigation Barnes led in the Missouri House that likely would have led to Greitens’ impeachment had he not resigned. It includes evidence that Nick Ayers, currently the chief of staff of Vice President Mike Pence, played a direct role in the process by which donors were hidden from public view. The complaint, if the Missouri Ethics Commission conducts a serious investigation, could turn the state’s political world upside down. That’s because two months ago, the commission issued an opinion adding teeth to the state’s long-standing prohibition in both statute and the constitution against trying to conceal the true source of political donations. If a nonprofit — such as A New Missouri — contributes money to a candidate or campaign with the intent to influence an election, ethics commission executive director James Klahr wrote, then the nonprofit becomes a political committee and would have to disclose its donors. Here’s why that matters so much:

Every day — every single day — somebody is spending money on political campaigns with the direct goal of trying to influence the public policy decisions that affect our daily lives. Whether it’s pocketbook issues like how much you pay for cable television or to heat your home, or more human ones, like whether it’s legal to rip immigrant children from the arms of their parents and separate them, possibly forever, decisions made by elected officials from state representatives to the president are affected by those who give money to their campaigns. Don’t take my word for it. Take President Donald Trump’s. Here’s what he said about big donors and politicians when he was running for president: “Somebody gives them money, not anything wrong, just psychologically when they go to that person, they’re going to do it,” he added. “They owe them. And by the way, they may therefore vote negatively toward the country.” He got more specific when talking about one opponent, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida: “Sheldon Adelson is looking to give big dollars to Rubio because he feels he can mold him into his perfect little puppet,” Trump tweeted. “I agree.” The man who would become president might have been a hypocrite on this issue, but he wasn’t wrong. And that’s where the big “if” comes in. If the ethics commission seeks to enforce the opinion issued in May, it’s not just A New Missouri that has something to worry about. The fact is, donors and politicians in Missouri are constantly working to conceal their identities in order to make it harder for voters to know who is trying to influence public policy. On Wednesday, a PAC called Committee for Accountable Government in Missouri gave $219,383 to the House Repub-

St. Charles man pleads guilty in attempted attack on train BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A St. Charles man pleaded guilty in federal court in Nebraska on Thursday to a charge of threatening to “wreck, derail, and disable railroad on-track equipment and a mass transportation vehicle” for an incident in October, court records show. Taylor Michael Wilson, 26, was originally indicted Jan. 17 in federal court in Lincoln, Neb., on that charge and one count claiming he attempted “to interfere with, disable, Wilson or incapacitate any locomotive engineer or railroad conductor.” That second count will be dismissed as part of the plea. He could be sentenced to up to life in prison. Wilson admitted boarding the train in California with a handgun and ammunition as well as ID cards “relating to the (National) Socialist Movement,” his plea says. On Oct. 23, in Nebraska, Wilson entered a secured engine compartment, disabled the train and cut the lights to the passenger compartment. Some panicked passengers tried to escape through the train’s windows, particularly when they discovered it was another passenger who had caused the emergency stop. Conductors struggled to subdue Wilson, who grabbed at his waistband, where

a deputy would later find the handgun. Wilson uttered racial slurs, said, “‘Human beings are a plague on the planet,’ and told a deputy he “was going to save the train from the black people,” his plea says. When FBI agents raided Wilson’s St. Charles home in December, they found National Socialist propaganda hidden in hollowed-out sections of the walls, as well as body armor and pressure plates that can be used to make an explosive device, his plea says. They also recovered guns, including a Pioneer Arms Corp. 7.62x25mm Tokarev PPS43-C, and a short-barreled rifle, a 9mm Scorpion EVO 3 pistol. They found writings containing “numerous derogatory and threatening comments about the Jewish race and African-Americans” in Wilson’s journals, the plea says. Wilson bought an airline ticket with plans to travel to Syria and fight with Isis but decided not to go, the plea says. The agreement said Wilson admitted telling a cellmate that he had “dropped acid” before loading his gun and stopping the train. As part of the plea, Wilson has agreed to plead to possession of an unregistered firearm in federal court in St. Louis. Charging documents also claim that Wilson may have been involved in a “road rage” incident in St. Charles in 2016 in which a gun was pointed at a black woman.

lican Campaign Committee, which works to elect Republicans in the Missouri House. All the money in the so-called “accountable government” PAC comes from the family of David Humphreys, the southwest Missouri roofing magnate who is one of the state’s most prolific GOP donors. In effect, his money has been washed, so when representatives do his bidding, they can say they weren’t influenced by the billionaire trying to make it harder for consumers to sue his company. Then there’s St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger. Last year, when I reported that Stenger, a Democrat, was getting around corporate donation limits by having many companies that do business with the county give large donations to an obscure fire district PAC, which then passes them on to Stenger, his spokesman scoffed. “To suggest any impropriety over $36,000 in campaign contributions is reckless and irresponsible propaganda,” Ed Rhode said. A year later, the MACFPD committee has washed the donor transparency off of more than $160,000 in donations to Stenger. It is one of several committees, some of them controlled by Stenger consultants Show Me Victories, playing the same game. The recklessness in these transactions is the intentional work by politicians of both parties to make it easier for donors to influence politicians and harder for voters to see through the fog. Thanks to Barnes’ detailed complaint, the Missouri Ethics Commission has an opportunity to hold Greitens accountable for not playing by the rules. But in doing so, it can also set the stage for a massive cleanup of the dark-money scourge that besets Missouri politics. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE Charges dropped against Daniels Charges were dropped Thursday against porn actress Stormy Daniels, just hours after she was arrested while performing at an Ohio strip club and charged with letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law. Her attorney said she was set up in a Columbus police sting operation, something police deny. Charging documents say Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, was arrested for touching a patron at a “sexually oriented” business in violation of the law commonly known as the Community Defense Act. On Thursday, city prosecutors dropped the charges, saying the Ohio illegal touching law can’t be enforced because Daniels has only appeared once at the Columbus club. The law refers to someone “who regularly appears nude or seminude” at a club. Daniels has said she had sex with President Donald Trump in 2006, when he was married, which Trump has denied. ‘The Rock’ joins advocates for those with disabilities • Dwayne Johnson plays an amputee in his latest movie. Now he’s jumping in to help people with disabilities in real life. Johnson, who plays a former FBI agent with a prosthetic leg in the new action thriller “Skyscraper,” said Thursday he’s joining the Boston-based Ruderman Family Foundation, a leading voice in calling for more inclusion and opportunities for the disabled. The actor nicknamed “The Rock” said Hollywood has excluded characters and actors with disabilities for too long.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actor Patrick Stewart is 78. Actor Harrison Ford is 76. Actor-comedian Cheech Marin is 72. Country singer Louise Mandrell is 64. Actor-director Cameron Crowe is 61. Singer Deborah Cox is 45. Actress Hayley Erin is 24. From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES

Man contemplated killing his wife for 2 months, charges say FROM STAFF REPORTS

CEDAR HILLS LAKES • Steve Earnest Treece contemplated killing his wife for two months. On Wednesday, he took action. That’s the scenario laid out in charges filed after Treece, 62, allegedly shot his wife on a porch at their home in this Jefferson County village, then stood over her body during a five-hour standoff with police. He was charged Wednesday afternoon with murder, armed criminal action and unlawful use of a weapon, a .380-caliber handgun. He was ordered held Treece without bail. Court documents and neighbors identify the dead woman as Donna June Treece, 60. A neighbor heard gunshots coming from the Treece home, in the 8400 block of Eastview Drive, about 6 a.m. Wednesday, according to police. When she went to investigate the shots, she saw Steve Treece fire a handgun at Donna Treece as he stood over her. He then pointed a gun at the witness, who retreated into her home and called police. When deputies arrived, Steve Treece pointed a gun at them as well, according to court documents. That triggered a standoff with Treece standing over his wife’s body for about five hours before surrendering about 11 a.m. He later admitted to deputies that he shot Donna Treece multiple times with a handgun, and said he had been contemplating killing her for two months, charges say. Treece had a prior felony conviction for aggravated assault in Illinois, the charges say.

POWERBALL Wednesday: 19-21-27-46-47 Powerball: 07 Power play: 4 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $100 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday’s estimated jackpot: $340 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Thursday: 04-08-14-20-26 Lucky ball: 06

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday: 13-16-17-28-34-36 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $1.7 million SHOW ME CASH Thursday: 01-08-17-26-29 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $70,000 PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 165 Evening: 843 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 4638 Evening: 5839

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CORRECTIONS • The state of Missouri settled a discrimination lawsuit with a former Department of Corrections officer for $1.6 million. Tina Gallego received $800,000. A story July 11 did not note that her attorneys will receive $800,000. • Freelance photographer Tim Vizer’s name was misspelled with Thursday’s front-page story about the Butterfly House in Chesterfield.

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LOCAL

07.13.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1

MAKING A SPLASH

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A3

Missouri GOP cheers tax cuts, but flags raised about benefit to wealthy BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Thanks to a pack-

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Jahleah Bell, 18, sprays her boyfriend, Martez Morgan, 18, on Thursday at the fountain in Pontiac Square Park in the Soulard neighborhood. With them is their 1-year-old daughter, Tezairah Morgan. Temperatures are again expected to be in the mid-90s on Friday, but with humidity levels, it will feel even warmer, according to the National Weather Service. WEATHER • C8

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Shooting victim identified • Police have identified the man who died Wednesday night after showing up at a hospital with a gunshot wound. Larry Love, 22, was shot in the chest about 5:45 p.m. Wednesday in the 7300 block of Vermont Avenue, south of Carondelet Park, police said. The shooting scene is in the Carondelet neighborhood. Love lived in the 2800 block of Osage Street in St. Louis. His death is being investigated as a homicide. Authorities asked anyone with information to contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. Tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward. ST. LOUIS > Wounded driver crashes car • A 24-year-old man crashed through a fence after he was shot and lost control of his vehicle on the northwest edge of the city Wednesday afternoon, police say. The victim was shot in the neck, head and arms. Someone opened fire on him about 3:10 p.m. Wednesday, police said. He crashed his vehicle into a fence in the 4700 block of Goodfellow Boulevard, just south of Interstate 70. The man was not conscious and not breathing when police arrived. He was in critical but stable condition at a hospital, police said on Thursday. The scene is part of the Mark Twain I-70 Industrial neighborhood, on the city’s border with Pine Lawn. About 40 minutes after that shooting, a woman was shot at the intersection of Goodfellow and Martin Luther King Drive, about two miles away. She and a man were in a vehicle stopped in a vehicle at the intersection when a man fired shots at their vehicle, police said. The woman, 28, was shot in the arm. They tried to escape by driving off, but they crashed their car, police said. The woman was stable, police said, but her

condition wasn’t released. The man in the car with her wasn’t hurt. Police say a Bi-State bus was also struck by gunfire, but no one on the bus was hurt. One bus passenger suffered minor cuts from flying glass, but that person declined to be treated by paramedics. It was not clear whether there was any connection between the shootings. ST. CLAIR COUNTY > Suspected truck thief is shot at, later arrested • A St. Clair County man fired shots at a truck thief who drove at the owner in his driveway early Tuesday. No one was injured in the shooting, and the thief ran off after crashing the truck into another vehicle, according to the St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department. An East St. Louis man, Melvin C. Benson, was later Benson arrested and charged with burglary in the incident, police say. Benson, 52, was being held in the county jail in lieu of $75,000 bail. It all began early Tuesday when a homeowner on Kingston Drive heard noises at his front door. The area is an unincorporated part of St. Clair County off Route 157 between Belleville and East St. Louis. As the resident went to investigate, he heard his truck start. He ran to the driveway, and saw a man in his truck who drove at him, police said. He fired two shots at the truck thief, but did not hit him. The man in the truck backed into another vehicle and then ran off. Deputies arrested Benson near West Main Street. He lives on North 87th Street, not far from the home where the truck was burglarized. The homeowner will not be charged. The sheriff’s department said his actions were deemed reasonable under the circumstances.

BREATHTAKING PICS See the latest work from our award-winning photographers. STLTODAY.COM/PHOTOS

age of tax cuts signed Thursday by Republican Gov. Mike Parson, Missourians will see a drop in their income tax rates starting next year. But one group says the state’s wealthiest earners will reap the most benefits, while others will see a “negligible” impact in their tax bills. Parson’s office said in a statement Thursday that because the state is meeting revenue growth goals, the state’s individual income tax rate will drop to 5.8 percent from 5.9 percent for filings in 2019, because of previous tax cuts lawmakers approved in 2014. Under a measure Parson signed in Springfield, the state’s individual income tax rate will continue to decrease. On Jan. 1, 2019, the rate will drop to 5.4 percent and then slide to 5.1 percent if the state continues to meet revenue targets. But, Traci Gleason, spokeswoman with the left-leaning Missouri Budget Project, said that at the same time the state is reducing income taxes, it is phasing out the Missouri tax deduction for federal taxes paid. Low- and middle-income earners may not notice a change if they have not claimed that deduction in the past. Other taxpayers may not see a reduction at all, Gleason says, because, “As you move up the income scale, the deduction will be reduced, and middleincome earners would see their state income taxes increase. However, that’s offset by the income tax rate reduction.” A second factor is that the income level at which Missouri’s highest income tax kicks in is dropping, she said. “The brackets are shifting downward, which means the highest rate of tax will be applied to a lower level of income,” Gleason said. “This offsets the rate reduction for many people. “The combination of the phaseout of the state deduction for federal taxes paid plus the downward shift in brackets offsets most of the tax rate reduction for most Missourians,” she added. Gleason said that the more a Missourian earns, the more likely that person is to see a noticeable reduction in his or her bill. “Those earning on average $1.4 million per year will get a tax cut of about $2,200 per year,” the Missouri Budget Project said in a statement on Thursday. Nevertheless, Parson’s office cheered the legislation, promising that it will “boost Missouri’s economy” and allow “Missouri families to keep more of their paychecks.” “This is the first step in an ongoing

process,” Parson said in a statement. “We need to continue to make the Missouri tax code simple and fair.” His office said that if the rate ultimately drops to 5.1 percent, Missouri will have the 14th-lowest income tax rate in the country. When the law is phased in by 2023, state analysts predict that state tax revenue will fall by $5.8 million, a fraction of the state’s $28 billion budget. Lawmakers, however, continually grapple with revenue that lags behind the state’s growing commitments. When asked Thursday whether he was concerned about a loss in revenue, Parson said the state is being “cautious” as Republicans rewrite the tax code. “We’re well aware of the instance that occurred in Kansas. We’re trying to make small steps,” Parson told the Post-Dispatch. “We’re being really cautious as we do this.” Rep. Elijah Haahr, R-Springfield, the incoming House speaker, has said this year’s tax slashing will be small compared to infamous Kansas tax cuts; lawmakers there had to raise taxes after dramatic reductions in state services. “The Kansas thing is such a bogeyman. It’s so annoying,” Haahr said in May when lawmakers approved the cuts. Rep. Deb Lavender, D-Kirkwood, said that she ultimately voted “no” on Haahr’s bill because Republicans had stripped out a proposed low-income earned tax credit, “so we still as a state missed an opportunity to give low-income people a break in their taxes.” Lavender said that she still has worries about Senate Bill 509, which the Legislature enacted in 2014 over a veto from then-Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat. In addition to giving Missourians their first state income tax cut in nearly a century, the legislation provided a new 25 percent deduction for business income reported on individual returns. Lavender said the provision helped “blow a hole” in Missouri’s budget, and the GOP-controlled Legislature did not go far enough in closing that hole this year when it lowered the business income deduction to 20 percent, she said. “This bill attempted to close some of that hole,” she said, “but I don’t think it did a good job in closing that.” Lawmakers this year approved a separate reduction in the state’s corporate tax rate, which former Gov. Eric Greitens signed before he left office last month. Under that plan, the corporate rate will drop to 4 percent, down from 6.25 percent, beginning in 2020. Kurt Erickson of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

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LOCAL

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Slain delivery driver ‘never Missouri GOP cheers met a stranger,’ friends say tax cuts, but flags raised

about benefit to wealthy BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Thanks to a pack-

RYAN MICHALESKO • rmichalesko@post-dispatch.com

Friends and family participate in a vigil and march for Dave Matthews on Thursday in St. Louis’ Tower Grove South neighborhood. Matthews died Sunday after being shot last week.

BY RACHEL RICE St. Louis Post-dispatch

Dozens of people gathered Thursday night to mourn a pizza deliveryman who died days after being shot on the job. Dave Matthews, 31, was remembered by mourners as a man who was always smiling and making friends. Matthews died Sunday. Police say he was shot in the 3900 block of Potomac Street in the Tower Grove South neighborhood just before midnight on the Fourth of July but have released no other details about the shooting. Friends and family say he was delivering a pizza for Imo’s at the time. Longtime friend Lisa Oldenburg said she took the photo of Matthews that has been featured in news stories about his death. “I took that photo in September of 2012, and we had no idea that six years later, it would be used to announce his murder in the city he loved,” Oldenburg said. “He never met a stranger. He’s the kind of person who, if he met the person who murdered him in different circumstances, he’d do anything for them.” The vigil and march began at Three Monkeys restaurant, 3153 Morganford Road. Matthews worked there for nine years before he began working for Imo’s earlier this year. Mourners carried candles and photos of Matthews as they walked. “He’s the guy who would come in to

cover any shift if he was called,” said Zach Rice, former general manager of Three Monkeys. “He had a good attitude, which is tough in the high-stress restaurant business.” Miles Asby, Matthews’ best friend for more than two decades, said he was as close to Matthews as a brother. The two would go fishing and kayaking, Asby recalled. “We had a bond like no other,” he said. “He was always the sweetest person — he would do everything he could for anyone.” Friends and family marched to call attention to Matthews’ death and demand justice. A reward for information leading to the arrest of Matthews’ killer is now $15,000. “We’re walking for Dave because we don’t want Dave to become another faceless statistic,” Oldenburg said. “The St. Louis mayor needs to start cleaning up this city.” Matthews loved the outdoors, skateboarding and playing guitar, friends said. And he was a natural at being at ease with new people. “He was a real social butterfly,” longtime friend Candice Krenning said. “That this would happen to him is an eye-opener. You need to tell people that you love them. I’ve been telling everyone, ‘Be safe.’” Rachel Rice • 314-340-8344 @RachelDRice on Twitter rrice@post-dispatch.com

MAKING A SPLASH

age of tax cuts signed Thursday by Republican Gov. Mike Parson, Missourians will see a drop in their income tax rates starting next year. But one group says the state’s wealthiest earners will reap the most benefits, while others will see a “negligible” impact in their tax bills. Parson’s office said in a statement Thursday that because the state is meeting revenue growth goals, the state’s individual income tax rate will drop to 5.8 percent from 5.9 percent for filings in 2019, because of previous tax cuts lawmakers approved in 2014. Under a measure Parson signed in Springfield, the state’s individual income tax rate will continue to decrease. On Jan. 1, 2019, the rate will drop to 5.4 percent and then slide to 5.1 percent if the state continues to meet revenue targets. But, Traci Gleason, spokeswoman with the left-leaning Missouri Budget Project, said that at the same time the state is reducing income taxes, it is phasing out the Missouri tax deduction for federal taxes paid. Low- and middle-income earners may not notice a change if they have not claimed that deduction in the past. Other taxpayers may not see a reduction at all, Gleason says, because, “As you move up the income scale, the deduction will be reduced, and middleincome earners would see their state income taxes increase. However, that’s offset by the income tax rate reduction.” A second factor is that the income level at which Missouri’s highest income tax kicks in is dropping, she said. “The brackets are shifting downward, which means the highest rate of tax will be applied to a lower level of income,” Gleason said. “This offsets the rate reduction for many people. “The combination of the phaseout of the state deduction for federal taxes paid plus the downward shift in brackets offsets most of the tax rate reduction for most Missourians,” she added. Gleason said that the more a Missourian earns, the more likely that person is to see a noticeable reduction in his or her bill. “Those earning on average $1.4 million per year will get a tax cut of about $2,200 per year,” the Missouri Budget Project said in a statement on Thursday. Nevertheless, Parson’s office cheered the legislation, promising that it will “boost Missouri’s economy” and allow “Missouri families to keep more of their paychecks.” “This is the first step in an ongoing

process,” Parson said in a statement. “We need to continue to make the Missouri tax code simple and fair.” His office said that if the rate ultimately drops to 5.1 percent, Missouri will have the 14th-lowest income tax rate in the country. When the law is phased in by 2023, state analysts predict that state tax revenue will fall by $5.8 million, a fraction of the state’s $28 billion budget. Lawmakers, however, continually grapple with revenue that lags behind the state’s growing commitments. When asked Thursday whether he was concerned about a loss in revenue, Parson said the state is being “cautious” as Republicans rewrite the tax code. “We’re well aware of the instance that occurred in Kansas. We’re trying to make small steps,” Parson told the Post-Dispatch. “We’re being really cautious as we do this.” Rep. Elijah Haahr, R-Springfield, the incoming House speaker, has said this year’s tax slashing will be small compared to infamous Kansas tax cuts; lawmakers there had to raise taxes after dramatic reductions in state services. “The Kansas thing is such a bogeyman. It’s so annoying,” Haahr said in May when lawmakers approved the cuts. Rep. Deb Lavender, D-Kirkwood, said that she ultimately voted “no” on Haahr’s bill because Republicans had stripped out a proposed low-income earned tax credit, “so we still as a state missed an opportunity to give low-income people a break in their taxes.” Lavender said that she still has worries about Senate Bill 509, which the Legislature enacted in 2014 over a veto from then-Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat. In addition to giving Missourians their first state income tax cut in nearly a century, the legislation provided a new 25 percent deduction for business income reported on individual returns. Lavender said the provision helped “blow a hole” in Missouri’s budget, and the GOP-controlled Legislature did not go far enough in closing that hole this year when it lowered the business income deduction to 20 percent, she said. “This bill attempted to close some of that hole,” she said, “but I don’t think it did a good job in closing that.” Lawmakers this year approved a separate reduction in the state’s corporate tax rate, which former Gov. Eric Greitens signed before he left office last month. Under that plan, the corporate rate will drop to 4 percent, down from 6.25 percent, beginning in 2020. Kurt Erickson of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

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County off Route 157 between Belleville and East St. Louis. As the resident went to investigate, he heard his truck start. He ran to the driveway, and saw a man in his truck who drove at him, police said. Benson He fired two shots at the truck thief, but did not hit him. The man in the truck backed into another vehicle and then ran off. Deputies arrested Benson near West Main Street. He lives on North 87th Street, not far from the home where the truck was burglarized. The homeowner will not be charged. The sheriff’s department said his actions were deemed reasonable under the circumstances.

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A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

Police sergeant to lead anti-violence march the witness stand. “Once again, he was boxed in by this man,” Kelli Lowe recalled. Lowe said he may never know the motive behind the attack. Wolford maintained his innocence throughout the trial. The getaway driver, Edward Davis, claimed the attackers planned to buy drugs. Lowe will forever believe they wanted to kill a police officer. A jury did not agree. It rejected a count of assaulting a law enforcement officer, but found Wolford and Davis guilty of the shooting. Wolford was sentenced earlier this year to 30 years in prison. Davis got 25.

MARCH • FROM A1

survivors who, like him, must find a way to move forward in a life forever altered by trauma. “When an officer goes back in service, it’s like letting the dispatcher know they’re OK, too,” Lowe, 42, explained. “To me it’s like saying, ‘I’m OK’ as a victim. I’m getting back after an incident, and I’m ready to take on the next assignment.” He has purposely chosen the city’s unofficial racial dividing line, Delmar Boulevard, as the location for the march. Lowe is black, and he said he wants the community to know the same violence that affects residents also affects police officers regardless of their color. He has also released the surveillance footage of his shooting to further illustrate the point. The 28-minute video shows how the attack unfolded from six different angles, captured by cameras on several businesses in the high-end residential and retail neighborhood. Four men are seen at different points with a car. About 4:43 a.m., according to time stamps on the video, the car slowly approaches Lowe’s car, which was parked at an angle on Maryland Plaza, and boxes him in. The shooter, Dale “Butch” Wolford, jumps out of the passenger seat of the car and begins firing at Lowe, who immediately returns fire through his windshield. Wolford then ducks but continues to fire with his arm extended behind him as he runs away. The car Wolford had been in pulls away, and Lowe pursues Wolford in his car. One of Wolford’s shots struck Lowe in the lower portion of his vest.

A BETTER OFFICER Becoming a victim has made him a better officer, Lowe says.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis police Officer Charles Lowe hugs Tavi Collins after she drove into the parking lot at the North Patrol police station in St. Louis to surprise him with a vehicle donated to Lowe’s family by Glik’s on July 15, 2015. The day before, Lowe was shot while sitting in his personal car working a security shift.

“When I encounter people who have just been the victim of a crime or witnessed something horrible, I can share my story with them,” he said. “And I always see a little bit of relief in their eyes like, ‘He seems like he’s OK, so I’m going to be OK, too.’” Lowe returned to duty three months after the shooting. He struggled with short-term memory loss as well as posttraumatic stress disorder in the months after the attack. His work assignments have included policing Black Lives Matter protests. At least one protester who frequently attends the anti-police violence events stood at Lowe’s shooting scene holding a sign that read “How does it feel?” Kelli Lowe took that brash gesture personally.

“I know you say ‘black lives matter,’ but why does my husband’s black life matter any less just because he wears a uniform?” she asked. At times, people remarked to Kelli Lowe that her husband wasn’t badly injured. But a permanent indentation remains in Lowe’s flesh, as do other scars most can’t see, she said. “The vest only stops a bullet, but there were wounds that came along with that,” she said. “It changed the whole dynamic in our household.”

A NEW PERSPECTIVE The experience also gave Charles Lowe a different view of the judicial system. “When I would see a witness stop cooperating, I would think to myself, ‘Why?’ but now

that I’ve been through the system, and I know how emotional and draining it is, I can see why so many people just give up and witnesses stop cooperating,” Lowe said. “Life goes on around you, except you have to go to court,” added his wife. They had to make child care arrangements for their son. And Lowe’s only brother underwent emergency brain surgery, so he and some of Lowe’s family couldn’t attend the hearings. At one point in court, the public defender asked Wolford to show the jury his tattooed arms. Lowe didn’t tell dispatchers that Wolford had tattoos, the lawyer argued, so the officer had the wrong guy. To show his tattoos, Wolford had to stand five feet in front of Lowe, who was sitting on

NEW PURPOSE Because of the ordeal, the Lowes say they have found new purpose. Both have become activists, connecting with departments in Baton Rouge, La., and elsewhere to form support networks for injured officers and their spouses. Locally, they have helped organize Project HURT for officers who have survived violence. Many of those officers also have “Alive Days.” Lowe’s walk on Saturday is expected to include relatives of several high-profile homicide victims, including Porsha Owens, David Matthews and Jaz Granderson, as well as St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden and representatives from the NAACP, the circuit attorney’s office and the Central West End Neighborhood Association. Registration will begin at 7 a.m. at 920 North Vandeventer Avenue. The walk will begin at 8 a.m. and will proceed to York Avenue and Maryland Plaza. There, organizers will release balloons, and a family event including games will follow. For more information, send email to code73walk@gmail.com or call 314-366-5299. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

Newcomers hope to unseat Missouri incumbents PRIMARY • FROM A1

raising and endorsement efforts in a historically Republican district that national Democrats view as ripe for change. Missourians go to the polls Aug. 7 for the state’s primary election to choose nominees for each party. The winners will then square off in the Nov. 6 general election. St. Louis and its surrounding suburban region on the Missouri side of the river is currently represented by Clay — whose 1st Congressional District covers all of St. Louis and part of north St. Louis County — and Wagner, whose 2nd Congressional District covers portions of St. Charles, Jefferson and St. Louis counties.

FIRST DISTRICT Clay, a nine-term incumbent in a seat previously held for decades by his father, Rep. Bill Clay, is running on a record of support for general Democratic priorities, particularly universal health care, and specific urban issues like police accountability. “The most important issue in 2018 remains achieving universal health care coverage for every American,” Clay, 61, of St. Louis, said in a statement to the Post-Dispatch. “Since my earliest entry into public service, I have advocated for health care as a human right, not a commodity.” Clay technically will face three challengers in the Democratic primary. But one them, DeMarco K. Davidson, announced this month that he has suspended his campaign (though it’s too late to remove his name from the ballot). Another, Joshua Shipp, 28, of University City, has raised no money and has no clear base of support. That leaves Bush, an ordained minister, activist during the Ferguson unrest and unsuccessful 2016 U.S. Senate candidate. Despite a financial disadvantage, Bush has generated some buzz in the community with a campaign focused on universal health care and more local issues. “Dignity and quality care for all is a must regardless of race, gender, sexuality, or ability to pay,” Bush, 41, of Florissant, said in a statement. “I will focus on issues everyday people face, advocate for their needs, and fight strongly for the goals that we experience together.” As of the end of June, Bush’s campaign has reported having a cash balance of just $12,256, to

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

U.S. Reps. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, and William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, shown in St. Louis in 2017, are running for re-election. Both face opponents in the Aug. 7 primary.

Clay’s roughly $326,800. But within those figures is a startling detail: Between April 2017 and the end of March, Bush raised more than $92,000, with every penny of it from individual contributions rather than PACs. Clay took in only about $52,000 in individual donations from January 2017 through the end of June, with the rest — more than $330,000 — coming from PACs, labor or corporations. Bush is part of an insurgent movement that includes Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the young Bronx-based Democratic Socialist and Bernie Sanders acolyte whose stunning primary defeat last month of longtime Rep. Joe Crowley, D-N.Y., has Democrats across the country debating the ideological direction of their party. Ocasio-Cortez and Bush are political allies, and Bush was one of a handful of candidates around the country whom Ocasio-Cortez specifically mentioned on her Twitter feed in the wake of her primary victory. Bush announced last week that Ocasio-Cortez will appear July 21 at an event in St. Louis in support of Bush’s campaign. Candidates seeking the GOP nomination in the 1st District are Camille Lombardi-Olive, 59, of St. Louis; Robert Vroman, 37, of St. Louis; and Edward L. Van Deventer Jr., 76, of St. Ann. As

of last week, none of them had reported raising or spending any money. Historically, Republican candidates rarely break 25 percent of the vote in 1st District general elections.

SECOND DISTRICT In the 2nd District, Wagner has been targeted by national Democrats who believe suburban districts like hers — Republican establishment strongholds — may peel away from the GOP this year out of discomfort over where President Donald Trump has taken the party. But Wagner, a three-term incumbent, former state party chair and former ambassador to Luxembourg under President George W. Bush, doesn’t appear particularly vulnerable in her own right. She won her last election with almost 60 percent of the vote and was sitting on almost $3.4 million in campaign money going into April. She has focused on supporting standard Republican economic positions, attacking sex trafficking, and has generally backed the Trump administration’s policies. “I believe that public service is a calling to protect the most vulnerable and serve a cause greater than oneself,” Wagner, 55, said in a statement. “By putting Missouri families before political games, I hope to restore faith in Congress’ work to protect our community, strengthen

the economy, and rein in government overreach.” Her only Republican primary challenger is a candidate who GOP officials have alleged isn’t a real Republican: Noga Sachs. Sachs is a political novice who, the Post-Dispatch reported in April, appears to support Democratic candidates and causes, judging from her social media footprint. Sachs denied to the newspaper at that time that she is a sabotage candidate, and the state GOP was unsuccessful in its attempt to push her off the primary ballot. In any case, campaign records indicate Sachs had raised no money as of the end of March. In a statement, Sachs vowed to hold regular “town hall” meetings with constituents. Wagner has been frequently criticized for her lack of such meetings. On the Democratic side, candidates Cort VanOstran and Mark Osmack both have garnered endorsements and conducted credible fundraising from numerous small donors — a key indicator of potential electoral support — though their funding totals remain far below Wagner’s. VanOstran, a Clayton lawyer, has focused his campaign on health care, referencing the cancer death of his mother and attacking Wagner directly for

her vote to dismantle the Affordable Care Act. “Corporate interests have drowned out the voices of this district, and this year we will take a stand,” VanOstran, 29, said in a statement. “I will represent the people of District 2, not lobbyists.” VanOstran reports raising more than $300,000 in the second quarter (April through June), an unusually high figure from a nonincumbent in a congressional primary. He reports more than $540,000 cash on hand as of the end of June, and says he has received smalldollar contributions from more than 3,000 people. Osmack trails those fundraising numbers, garnering about $77,400 in the second quarter and ending June with about $48,500 on hand. Osmack is banking in part on his backstory to propel the campaign: He’s an Army veteran with two tours in Afghanistan, now calling for universal health care and defending gun control, abortion rights and other Democratic base issues. He has garnered some endorsements from the left, including the Missouri Progressive Action Group and state Rep. Bruce Franks Jr. of St. Louis. “Congress needs to focus on policies that improve life for those who live and work here,” Osmack, 36, of Ellisville, said in a statement. “We can restore faith by demonstrating the strength to defend the Constitution, ending damaging policies, and having humility to reach across the aisle.” The other three Democrats in the race are: Bill Haas, 73, of St. Louis • A St. Louis School Board member whose $26,600 in campaign funds as of March 31 came almost entirely from his own pockets. He is calling for more early childhood education, protecting entitlement programs and infrastructure investment. J o h n M e s s m e r, 5 1 , o f Lakeshire • A political science professor at St. Louis Community College at Meramec, whose roughly $8,400 on hand at the end of March came mostly from himself or his family. He has focused his campaign on the issue of campaign finance reform. Robert W. Hazel, 70, of St. Louis • He hasn’t raised any money. He said in a statement he will “work with Sen. Bernie Sanders and others who favor Medicare for all.” Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

Police sergeant to lead anti-violence march the witness stand. “Once again, he was boxed in by this man,” Kelli Lowe recalled. Lowe said he may never know the motive behind the attack. Wolford maintained his innocence throughout the trial. The getaway driver, Edward Davis, claimed the attackers planned to buy drugs. Lowe will forever believe they wanted to kill a police officer. A jury did not agree. It rejected a count of assaulting a law enforcement officer, but found Wolford and Davis guilty of the shooting. Wolford was sentenced earlier this year to 30 years in prison. Davis got 25.

MARCH • FROM A1

survivors who, like him, must find a way to move forward in a life forever altered by trauma. “When an officer goes back in service, it’s like letting the dispatcher know they’re OK, too,” Lowe, 42, explained. “To me it’s like saying, ‘I’m OK’ as a victim. I’m getting back after an incident, and I’m ready to take on the next assignment.” He has purposely chosen the city’s unofficial racial dividing line, Delmar Boulevard, as the location for the march. Lowe is black, and he said he wants the community to know the same violence that affects residents also affects police officers regardless of their color. He has also released the surveillance footage of his shooting to further illustrate the point. The 28-minute video shows how the attack unfolded from six different angles, captured by cameras on several businesses in the high-end residential and retail neighborhood. Four men are seen at different points with a car. About 4:43 a.m., according to time stamps on the video, the car slowly approaches Lowe’s car, which was parked at an angle on Maryland Plaza, and boxes him in. The shooter, Dale “Butch” Wolford, jumps out of the passenger seat of the car and begins firing at Lowe, who immediately returns fire through his windshield. Wolford then ducks but continues to fire with his arm extended behind him as he runs away. The car Wolford had been in pulls away, and Lowe pursues Wolford in his car. One of Wolford’s shots struck Lowe in the lower portion of his vest.

A BETTER OFFICER Becoming a victim has made him a better officer, Lowe says.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis police Officer Charles Lowe hugs Tavi Collins after she drove into the parking lot at the North Patrol police station in St. Louis to surprise him with a vehicle donated to Lowe’s family by Glik’s on July 15, 2015. The day before, Lowe was shot while sitting in his personal car working a security shift.

“When I encounter people who have just been the victim of a crime or witnessed something horrible, I can share my story with them,” he said. “And I always see a little bit of relief in their eyes like, ‘He seems like he’s OK, so I’m going to be OK, too.’” Lowe returned to duty three months after the shooting. He struggled with short-term memory loss as well as posttraumatic stress disorder in the months after the attack. His work assignments have included policing Black Lives Matter protests. At least one protester who frequently attends the anti-police violence events stood at Lowe’s shooting scene holding a sign that read “How does it feel?” Kelli Lowe took that brash gesture personally.

“I know you say ‘black lives matter,’ but why does my husband’s black life matter any less just because he wears a uniform?” she asked. At times, people remarked to Kelli Lowe that her husband wasn’t badly injured. But a permanent indentation remains in Lowe’s flesh, as do other scars most can’t see, she said. “The vest only stops a bullet, but there were wounds that came along with that,” she said. “It changed the whole dynamic in our household.”

A NEW PERSPECTIVE The experience also gave Charles Lowe a different view of the judicial system. “When I would see a witness stop cooperating, I would think to myself, ‘Why?’ but now

that I’ve been through the system, and I know how emotional and draining it is, I can see why so many people just give up and witnesses stop cooperating,” Lowe said. “Life goes on around you, except you have to go to court,” added his wife. They had to make child care arrangements for their son. And Lowe’s only brother underwent emergency brain surgery, so he and some of Lowe’s family couldn’t attend the hearings. At one point in court, the public defender asked Wolford to show the jury his tattooed arms. Lowe didn’t tell dispatchers that Wolford had tattoos, the lawyer argued, so the officer had the wrong guy. To show his tattoos, Wolford had to stand five feet in front of Lowe, who was sitting on

NEW PURPOSE Because of the ordeal, the Lowes say they have found new purpose. Both have become activists, connecting with departments in Baton Rouge, La., and elsewhere to form support networks for injured officers and their spouses. Locally, they have helped organize Project HURT for officers who have survived violence. Many of those officers also have “Alive Days.” Lowe’s walk on Saturday is expected to include relatives of several high-profile homicide victims, including Porsha Owens, David Matthews and Jaz Granderson, as well as St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden and representatives from the NAACP, the circuit attorney’s office and the Central West End Neighborhood Association. Registration will begin at 7 a.m. at 920 North Vandeventer Avenue. The walk will begin at 8 a.m. and will proceed to York Avenue and Maryland Plaza. There, organizers will release balloons, and a family event including games will follow. For more information, send email to code73walk@gmail.com or call 314-366-5299. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

Newcomers hope to unseat Missouri incumbents PRIMARY • FROM A1

raising and endorsement efforts in a historically Republican district that national Democrats view as ripe for change. Missourians go to the polls Aug. 7 for the state’s primary election to choose nominees for each party. The winners will then square off in the Nov. 6 general election. St. Louis and its surrounding suburban region on the Missouri side of the river is currently represented by Clay — whose 1st Congressional District covers all of St. Louis and part of north St. Louis County — and Wagner, whose 2nd Congressional District covers portions of St. Charles, Jefferson and St. Louis counties.

FIRST DISTRICT Clay, a nine-term incumbent in a seat previously held for decades by his father, Rep. Bill Clay, is running on a record of support for general Democratic priorities, particularly universal health care, and specific urban issues like police accountability. “The most important issue in 2018 remains achieving universal health care coverage for every American,” Clay, 61, of St. Louis, said in a statement to the Post-Dispatch. “Since my earliest entry into public service, I have advocated for health care as a human right, not a commodity.” Clay technically will face three challengers in the Democratic primary. But one them, DeMarco K. Davidson, announced this month that he has suspended his campaign (though it’s too late to remove his name from the ballot). Another, Joshua Shipp, 28, of University City, has raised no money and has no clear base of support. That leaves Bush, an ordained

minister, activist during the Ferguson unrest and unsuccessful 2016 U.S. Senate candidate. Despite a financial disadvantage, Bush has generated some buzz in the community with a campaign focused on universal health care and more local issues. “Dignity and quality care for all is a must regardless of race, gender, sexuality, or ability to pay,” Bush, 41, of Florissant, said in a statement. “I will focus on issues everyday people face, advocate for their needs, and fight strongly for the goals that we experience together.” As of the end of June, Bush’s campaign has reported having a cash balance of just $12,256, to Clay’s roughly $326,800. But within those figures is a startling detail: Between April 2017 and the end of March, Bush raised more than $92,000, with every penny of it from individual contributions rather than PACs. Clay took in only about $52,000 in individual donations from January 2017 through the end of June, with the rest — more than $330,000 — coming from PACs, labor or corporations. Bush is part of an insurgent movement that includes Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the young Bronx-based Democratic Socialist and Bernie Sanders acolyte whose stunning primary defeat last month of longtime Rep. Joe Crowley, D-N.Y., has Democrats across the country debating the ideological direction of their party. Ocasio-Cortez and Bush are political allies, and Bush was one of a handful of candidates around the country whom Ocasio-Cortez specifically mentioned on her Twitter feed in the wake of her primary victory. Bush announced last week that Ocasio-Cortez will appear July 21 at an event in St. Louis in

support of Bush’s campaign. Candidates seeking the GOP nomination in the 1st District are Camille Lombardi-Olive, 59, of St. Louis; Robert Vroman, 37, of St. Louis; and Edward L. Van Deventer Jr., 76, of St. Ann. As of last week, none of them had reported raising or spending any money. Historically, Republican candidates rarely break 25 percent of the vote in 1st District general elections.

SECOND DISTRICT In the 2nd District, Wagner has been targeted by national Democrats who believe suburban districts like hers — Republican establishment strongholds — may peel away from the GOP this year out of discomfort over where President Donald Trump has taken the party. But Wagner, a three-term incumbent, former state party chair and former ambassador to Luxembourg under President George W. Bush, doesn’t appear particularly vulnerable in her own right. She won her last election with almost 60 percent of the vote and was sitting on almost $3.4 million in campaign money going into April. She has focused on supporting standard Republican economic positions, attacking sex trafficking, and has generally backed the Trump administration’s policies. “I believe that public service is a calling to protect the most vulnerable and serve a cause greater than oneself,” Wagner, 55, said in a statement. “By putting Missouri families before political games, I hope to restore faith in Congress’ work to protect our community, strengthen the economy, and rein in government overreach.” Her only Republican primary challenger is a candidate who GOP officials have alleged isn’t a real Republican: Noga Sachs. Sachs is a political novice who,

the Post-Dispatch reported in April, appears to support Democratic candidates and causes, judging from her social media footprint. Sachs denied to the newspaper at that time that she is a sabotage candidate, and the state GOP was unsuccessful in its attempt to push her off the primary ballot. In any case, campaign records indicate Sachs had raised no money as of the end of March. In a statement, Sachs vowed to hold regular “town hall” meetings with constituents. Wagner has been frequently criticized for her lack of such meetings. On the Democratic side, candidates Cort VanOstran and Mark Osmack both have garnered endorsements and conducted credible fundraising from numerous small donors — a key indicator of potential electoral support — though their funding totals remain far below Wagner’s. VanOstran, a Clayton lawyer, has focused his campaign on health care, referencing the cancer death of his mother and attacking Wagner directly for her vote to dismantle the Affordable Care Act. “Corporate interests have drowned out the voices of this district, and this year we will take a stand,” VanOstran, 29, said in a statement. “I will represent the people of District 2, not lobbyists.” VanOstran reports raising more than $300,000 in the second quarter (April through June), an unusually high figure from a nonincumbent in a congressional primary. He reports more than $540,000 cash on hand as of the end of June, and says he has received smalldollar contributions from more than 3,000 people. Osmack trails those fundrais-

ing numbers, garnering about $77,400 in the second quarter and ending June with about $48,500 on hand. Osmack is banking in part on his backstory to propel the campaign: He’s an Army veteran with two tours in Afghanistan, now calling for universal health care and defending gun control, abortion rights and other Democratic base issues. He has garnered some endorsements from the left, including the Missouri Progressive Action Group and state Rep. Bruce Franks Jr. of St. Louis. “Congress needs to focus on policies that improve life for those who live and work here,” Osmack, 36, of Ellisville, said in a statement. “We can restore faith by demonstrating the strength to defend the Constitution, ending damaging policies, and having humility to reach across the aisle.” The other three Democrats in the race are: Bill Haas, 73, of St. Louis • A St. Louis School Board member whose $26,600 in campaign funds as of March 31 came almost entirely from his own pockets. He is calling for more early childhood education, protecting entitlement programs and infrastructure investment. J o h n M e s s m e r, 5 1 , o f Lakeshire • A political science professor at St. Louis Community College at Meramec, whose roughly $8,400 on hand at the end of March came mostly from himself or his family. He has focused his campaign on the issue of campaign finance reform. Robert W. Hazel, 70, of St. Louis • He hasn’t raised any money. He said in a statement he will “work with Sen. Bernie Sanders and others who favor Medicare for all.” Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Shooting victim identified • Police have identified the man who died Wednesday night after showing up at a hospital with a gunshot wound. Larry Love, 22, was shot in the chest about 5:45 p.m. Wednesday in the 7300 block of Vermont Avenue, south of Carondelet Park, police said. The shooting scene is in the Carondelet neighborhood. Love lived in the 2800 block of Osage Street in St. Louis. His death is being investigated as a homicide. Authorities asked anyone with information to contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477.

Tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward. ST. LOUIS > Wounded driver crashes car • A 24-year-old man crashed through a fence after he was shot and lost control of his vehicle on the northwest edge of the city Wednesday afternoon, police say. The victim was shot in the neck, head and arms. Someone opened fire on him about 3:10 p.m. Wednesday, police said. He crashed his vehicle into a fence in the 4700 block of Goodfellow Boulevard, just south of Interstate 70. The man was not conscious

and not breathing when police arrived. He was in critical but stable condition at a hospital, police said on Thursday. The scene is part of the Mark Twain I-70 Industrial neighborhood, on the city’s border with Pine Lawn. About 40 minutes after that shooting, a woman was shot at the intersection of Goodfellow and Martin Luther King Drive, about two miles away. She and a man were in a vehicle stopped in a vehicle at the intersection when a man fired shots at their vehicle, police said. The woman, 28, was shot in the arm. They tried to escape by driving off, but they crashed their

car, police said. The woman was stable, police said, but her condition wasn’t released. The man in the car with her wasn’t hurt. Police say a Bi-State bus was also struck by gunfire, but no one on the bus was hurt. One bus passenger suffered minor cuts from flying glass, but that person declined to be treated by paramedics. It was not clear whether there was any connection between the shootings.


LOCAL

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Imagine Dragons shows off intergenerational appeal BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ Special to the Post-dispatch

Positivity is one of the primary characteristics of Imagine Dragons’ music. On Wednesday night at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, the chartdominating rock band got a chance to walk it like it talks it. About an hour into the concert, the sound to the front of the house cut out. The band didn’t pitch a fit but simply strolled offstage and waited a couple of minutes for repairs to be made. Drummer Daniel Platzman was sent out to test the waters with a brief solo and, when everything checked out, the group continued without a cross word or gesture. If it wasn’t already a poster, “Keep calm and carry on” could be the next Imagine Dragons radio anthem. Earlier, singer Dan Reynolds looked out at the near-capacity crowd and wondered, “How did I get this lucky?” Luck may have played a role in the Las Vegas quartet’s rise, but so did its easily accessible music, filled with power chords, pounding rhythms and singalong choruses. It has struck a rare intergenerational balance: something parents and kids can enjoy together. The place was packed with families. Another factor is the likability of Reynolds, a charismatic frontman who kept the crowd engaged and whose between-song statements had to do with being happy and refusing to be defined by others. “I will never be boxed,” he said at one point. Later, he delivered a strong suicide-prevention message, advising fans to seek help and not give in to depression and anxiety. “Your life is always worth living, always, always, always,” he said. Reynolds spent the show shirtless, wearing only gym shorts and sneakers, showing off his newly ripped body that he

CONCERT REVIEW

play spot-the-influence with some of the band’s material: “Yesterday” is an obvious nod to Queen, right down to guitarist Wayne Sermon’s Brian May-like solo. “I’ll Make It Up to You” — one of the show’s highlights — recalls Tears for Fears. “Start Over” has a tinge of Toto’s popular-once-again “Africa.” Sermon’s guitar intro to “Mouth of the River” recalls the echoing guitar stylings of U2’s the Edge. That vague (yet likely not actionable) familiarity has no doubt added to the band’s easy acceptance. But the group has also put

whipped into shape after a years-long battle with an autoimmune disease. His athleticism came across as encouraging, not boastful or threatening — more like a big brother who hangs out at the gym and less like, say, Henry Rollins. Imagine Dragons’ hourand-45-minute set didn’t hold back the hits, beginning with the Grammywinning “Radioactive” and continuing with “It’s Time” and “Whatever It Takes” before adding in some album cuts. You can pretty easily

its own stamp on top of that with lyrics that acknowledge dark emotions and regretful actions while striving to overcome them. It’s a combination that has taken Imagine Dragons to the top, making “Evolve” the most popular rock album of the year so far according to Billboard magazine. “America’s Got Talent” discovery Grace VanderWaal opened the show, though some concertgoers may have missed her performance thanks to a preshow traffic snarl on the Maryland Heights Expressway.

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons performs “Radioactive” at Scottrade Center in 2015.

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • FRIDAY • 07.13.2018

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

Show Me the animosity in Missouri’s Senate race CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • So, who

is the most authentic Missourian this week? Show Me. Ads from a group called Missouri Rising, which is reportedly spending at least $1 million running them, are ripping at Claire McCaskill again, calling the incumbent Democratic senator “dishonest” and “out for herself, not us.” An email that Attorney General Josh Hawley wrote in 2013 is circulating, saying that when he left a job in Washington earlier in his career, “part of my interest in returning to Missouri was political.” Watch Democrats seize on that in their ongoing portrayal of Hawley, McCaskill’s potential Nov. 6 Senate opponent, as a climb-the-ladder opportunist. With so much money gushing through this pivotal Missouri Senate race — perhaps as much as $200 million in the end — a lot of it can’t help but spill over into character assassination. Missourians have gotten accustomed to world-class political attacks, but this has rapidly descended into personal disrespect. And neither McCaskill nor Hawley has even won their respective nominating primaries. That Aug. 7 primary election is still more than three weeks off. “Phony” is what Hawley calls McCaskill, frequently mentioning her ritzy D.C. condo and wealthy husband. McCaskill digs at Hawley’s Yale and Stanford education in telling Politico: “I’ve never left this state. I could have gone to a fancy law school. I didn’t want to. I wanted to stay here,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., and Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley, a Republican, shown together in 2017, will likely face off in November for the Senate seat McCaskill holds.

and I had to work my way through school as a waitress.” She even had to live on a $65,000 annual salary and raise three kids after a mid1990s divorce, she said. (That was roughly twice the average median household income in Missouri at the time, according to the St. Louis Fed.) She is “pretending to be one of the people and then living completely differently,” Hawley tells Politico (which also noted McCaskill’s “Missour-uh twang” on the campaign trail). To which McCaskill responds: “My husband has done exactly what you’re supposed to do in this country. He’s worked really hard, he’s created thousands of jobs and in the process, great wealth. I married a wealthy guy! And that somehow transforms me into a different person? It’s total (expletive).” “Hawley called McCaskill’s ‘fancy’ diss a form of ‘soft bigotry’ aimed at small-town America,” Politico reports.

Show Me, indeed. McCaskill keeps getting embroiled in private plane mess-ups. Her defenders say she didn’t mislead anyone when she ended long bus-tour days with flights home on the family plane. But in the end, they’re still talking about a private plane in a state where

the median income has just recently reached the $65,000 McCaskill says she lived on in ’95. Hawley mocked politicians who “climb the ladder” — even ran a big ad on it — in his winning 2016 attorney general campaign. But that is exactly what he is trying to do less than two

years later. Adding fodder to this young-man-in-a-hurry story line is a 2013 email exchange in which Hawley tells a woman who had interviewed him at the Aspen Institute, that cradle of deep think in Aspen, that “part of my interest in returning to Missouri was political; I may try to get involved in public service here in the future.” “Clearly Josh Hawley left D.C. for Missouri for one reason: so he could run for office and go back,” said McCaskill spokeswoman Meira Bernstein. “The idea that Hawley was talked into running for Senate is political hogwash. He intended to climb the ladder from the moment he arrived.” Retorted Hawley spokeswoman Kelli Ford: “If Claire McCaskill would like to give the press all her emails from the last six years we’re sure there’d be some interesting reading about her vacations with Senator and Mrs. Chuck Schumer.” That was reference to a Post-Dispatch story about how McCaskill paid

$15,000 for vacations for Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer and Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., and their spouses, to join McCaskill’s family for a 2016 birthday celebration in Cancun, Mexico. Think you’ll be seeing that in an upcoming Hawley ad? Why the bitter, personal animus? First, the stakes are enormous — and not just for the candidates. Missouri is one of a handful of states that will determine control of the Senate in the last two years of President Donald Trump’s current term. But, more broadly, the tone of public discourse flows top down. With a president seemingly willing to say almost anything about anyone in any circumstance, a president who has made impugning the motives and authenticity of others a governing trait, the ceiling on what is normal and acceptable political discourse has been lifted in these stormy days. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A7

VP Pence scheduled to visit here next week to tout tax cuts

CONCERT REVIEW

Fans wanted Monae, and she delivered BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

Janelle Monae fans have to go back to 2011 to remember her last appearance in St. Louis, back when she was promoting her “The ArchAndroid” album and opening for Katy Perry at what was then Scottrade Center (now Enterprise Center). Before that, it was a 2010 show opening for Of Montreal at the Pageant. And a postponed 2010 show opening for Erykah Badu at the Fox Theatre was never rescheduled. So no headlining shows for the Kansas City, Kan.born Monae — until now. At long last, the dynamic Monae gave her St. Louis fans the full treatment with a show at the Pageant on Wednesday night that sold out as quickly as it went on sale. Clearly, her fans here were hungry for more Monae, and she gave it to them during the local stop of her “Dirty Computer” tour, named after her lauded new album. The 90-minute concert showcased an artist who has really come into her own as a positive and powerful force, as upfront with her political and social advocacy as she is about her sexuality, and doing her own funky thing with the occasional assist from her musical ancestors. On a mostly sparse, all-white stage set with a pair of grandstands for her band members and a crisp video screen offering a variety of images, Monae took the stage standing atop a small platform behind a bedazzled microphone stand. Long gone is the trademark pompadour hairdo and strictly black-and-white fashion sense, replaced here by more vibrant colors (most notably splashes of red) and a long fuzzy ponytail. Right out of the box, it was clear the “Tightrope” singer is here for “Dirty Computer.” “Crazy, Classic, Life” “Take a Byte,” “Screwed” and “D’Jango Jane,” all from the new album,

BY KEVIN MCDERMOTT St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Vice President

Mike Pence will appear here next week for an event touting the administration’s tax cuts. The event is being hosted by a sometimes-controversial nonprofit corporation that was founded in part by Pence’s chief of staff, Nick Ayers. Ayers previously worked with the campaign of ousted Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, and his name has come up in a recent ethics complaint against the campaign. The Pence event is scheduled for Thursday morning, at the St. Louis Marriott Grand on Washington Avenue downtown, according to a website promoting it. “Join your fellow Missourians, America First Policies, and Vice President Mike Pence to learn more about what the tax cuts mean for you and your family,” states the posting. It says the event requires online registration on a first come, first served basis. T h e eve n t s ta r ts a t 9:45 a.m., with doors opening two hours earlier. There’s no mention of a ticket price. No one could be reached Wednesday at the phone number listed on the site. The event is being conducted by America First Policies, a nonprofit organization set up last year to promote President Donald Trump’s policy agenda. It was cofounded by Ayers, who was a top Republican consultant prior to joining Pence’s staff, and who earlier worked with Greitens’ 2016 gubernatorial campaign. In that capacity, according to a complaint filed this week against the campaign with the state’s ethics commission by a Republican state lawmaker, Ayers discussed with the Greitens campaign the possibility of getting a contribution from a “restricted donor,” raising questions about whether such a donation was legal. America First Policies itself has been the subject of controversy, with several of its officials making racist, anti-Muslim or pro-Nazi comments in public forums. Several companies, including Dow Chemical, said last month they won’t donate any more money to the organization because of those incidents.

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Janelle Monae entertains a packed house at the Pageant in St. Louis on Wednesday.

were the first songs performed. She would end up performing most of the songs from the album. But it felt welcome if not necessarily the norm. New album cuts that aren’t the hit singles are often bathroom breaks for fans, though not the case here. The new songs demanded attention, including fans chanting “say it loud, I’m dirty, I’m proud” during “Screwed.” It was impossible to take your eyes — and ears — off Monae. During “D’Jango Jane,” after a partial onstage costume switcheroo, she sat upon a throne like royalty. For “Q.U.E.E.N.,” Monae effortlessly handled Erykah Badu’s lines. A small horn section was employed for “Electric Lady,” while the crowd was used again for more call and response, this time of “shock it, break it, baby.” During “I Like That,” she pointed out things about fans she liked, and “You Got That Juice”

brought on more interaction with her fans as she allowed four of them to join her on the stage to show off their moves. Taking a momentary break from the fast-moving action, she addressed the crowd, saying how much love she was feeling in the room, and wished everyone happy pride. (In a Rolling Stone interview, she described herself as a “black queen woman in America ... someone who has been in relationships with both men and woman.” She’s reportedly involved with actress Tessa Thompson.) Her happy pride message carried her into “Prime Time,” which culminated in her band delving into a welcome bit of Prince’s “Purple Rain.” Monae has always worn her Prince influences on her sleeves, having toured and recorded with him. That fact was plenty evident from her costuming, arrangements and dance moves. The in-

tro to “Make Me Feel,” where she danced while backlit, creating a silhouette, felt like a direct tribute to the Purple One, and ended with a riff on James Brown. Keeping her messages front and center, she introduced “Cold War” advocating for various human rights, and stressed the need for kindness at the top of “So Afraid,” accompanied by scenes of unrest. She took a knee, to applause, for final tune “Americans,” on which she sang of being loved for who she is. St. Beauty, a lovely-named duo consisting of Alexe Belle and Isis Valentino, opened for Monae. The beats-heavy act, part of Monae’s musical collective, played songs from its “Running to the Sun” album, along with a cover of Outkast’s “Prototype.” Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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Chuck Raasch of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com

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A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

DIGEST Kushner lacks security status to some secrets, sources say Jared Kushner, a senior White House adviser and President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, lacks the security clearance level required to review some of the government’s most sensitive secrets, according to two people familiar with his access. For the first year of the Trump administration, Kushner had nearly blanket access to highly classified intelligence, even as he held an interim security clearance and awaited the completion of his background investigation. But when White House security officials granted him a permanent clearance in late May, he was granted only “top secret” status — a level that does allow him to see some of the country’s most closely guarded intelligence, said the people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss security issues. Laws couldn’t have blocked shooter, panel hears • Florida’s gun and mental health laws likely could not have prevented school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz from buying last year the semi-automatic rifle authorities say he used to kill 17 people even if they had applied to him, the state commission investigating the shooting learned Thursday. Robin Sparkman, chief of the state’s Firearm Eligibility Bureau, told the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission that even if Cruz had been subjected to an involuntary, three-day mental health evaluation under a state law called the Baker Act, he still could have bought the AR-15 allegedly used in the Feb. 14 massacre. Under state law before the shooting, only if Cruz, 19, had been adjudicated mentally ill by a judge or convicted of a felony would he have been ineligible to buy a gun. Cruz was never committed under the Baker Act, convicted of a crime or adjudicated mentally ill. Manafort moved to new jail • Paul Manafort has moved, over his objections, to a new jail with a history of illustrious guests. Officials confirm the former Trump campaign chairman was booked Thursday morning into the Alexandria Detention Center in Virginia, a few blocks from the federal courthouse where he will be tried this month on bank and tax fraud charges. Manafort, who is being prosecuted by the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election, had asked for that trial to be continued in large part

because he was being held 100 miles away in the Northern Neck Regional Jail. But he resisted being brought to Alexandria. His lawyers argued that he was safe in the Warsaw, Va., facility, where according to prosecutors he had a private phone and laptop and did not have to wear a jumpsuit.

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

U.S. probing ‘new information’ in 1955 killing of Emmett Till ASSOCIATED PRESS

• The federal government has reopened its investigation into the slaying of Emmett Till, the black teenager whose brutal killing in Mississippi shocked the world and helped inspire the civil rights movement more than 60 years ago. The Justice Department told Congress in a report in March that it is reinvestigating Till’s slaying in Money, Miss., in 1955 after receiving “new information.” The case was closed in 2007 with authorities saying the suspects were dead; a state grand jury didn’t file any new charges. The federal report, sent annually to lawmakers under a law that bears Till’s name, does not indicate what the new information might be. But it was issued in late March after the publication last year of “The Blood of Emmett Till,” a book that says a key figure in the case acknowledged lying about events preceding the slaying of the 14-year-old youth from Chicago. A Mississippi prosecutor declined to comment Thursday on whether federal authorities had given him new information since they reopened the probe. District Attorney Dewayne Richardson,

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Officer who observed harassment resigns • An officer who was captured on video failing to intervene as a man harassed a woman for wearing a Puerto Rican flag shirt resigned on Wednesday, the Cook County Forest Preserve District Police Department said. The harassed woman, Mia Irizarry, wore a shirt that displayed the Puerto Rican flag to a picnic in Chicago. She told police that a man harassed her, getting up close and snarling, “You should not be wearing that in the United States of America.” (Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States, and its residents are U.S. citizens.) All the while, a police officer identified as Patrick Connor stood watching, ignoring Irizarry as she pleaded with him to intervene. Irizarry recorded the exchange in a Facebook Live video that has since been viewed more than 1.4 million times and drawn outcry from local leaders, members of Congress and the Puerto Rican governor himself. Several hospitalized after school bus crash • Multiple people were hospitalized after a school bus carrying a group of high school students crashed and tipped over on a rural road northeast of Denver. The Greeley-Evans School District bus was headed back from a field trip at an amusement park in Denver when it hit a truck Thursday afternoon near the small town of Hudson. District spokesman Casey Pearson tells KMGH-TV in Denver that 19 students were taken to the hospital with undisclosed injuries, and the bus driver was the most severely hurt.

whose circuit includes the community where Till was abducted, said if a case were to move forward, he and the district attorney in the county where Till’s body was found could decide who would prosecute it. The book, by Timothy B. Tyson, quotes a white woman, Carolyn Donham, as acknowledging during a 2008 interview that she wasn’t truthful when she testified that Till grabbed her, whistled and made sexual advances at a store in 1955. Two white men — Donham’s thenhusband, Roy Bryant, and his half brother, J.W. Milam — were charged with murder but acquitted in the slaying of Till, who had been staying with relatives in northern Mississippi at the time. The men later confessed to the crime in a magazine interview but weren’t retried. Both are now dead. Donham, who turns 84 this month, lives in Raleigh, N.C. A man who came to the door at her residence declined to comment about the FBI reopening the investigation. Paula Johnson, co-director of an academic group that reviews unsolved civil rights slayings, said she can’t think of anything other than Tyson’s book that could have prompted the Justice Department to reopen the Till investigation.

Latino voters seek to join Census lawsuit • Latino voters and civil rights groups have asked to join a lawsuit to defend the practice of including people in the country illegally in U.S. Census counts. The counts are used to configure congressional seats. Alabama and Congressman Mo Brooks sued the Census Bureau and the U.S. Commerce Department in May, arguing the predicted 2020 Census numbers will cause the state to lose a congressional seat and an electoral vote to a state with a “larger illegal alien population.” From news services

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NATION

07.13.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A9

Abortion debate could return to the states enact new abortion protections and repeal dormant laws that criminalize abortion. While those laws have been ignored for decades, some stretching back to the 19th century, Democrats want to erase them so they cannot be revived in the future. “As long as they are enshrined in statute, they can be picked up and used by people who do not feel the same way about women and their bodies that I would say most people in this state feel,” said Massachusetts state Senate President Harriette Chandler, a Democrat. Chandler is pushing to repeal an abortion ban from the 1800s that has remained unenforced, in part because of a 1981 state court ruling protecting access to abortion. The Massachusetts Senate approved the bill

BY DAVID A. LIEB AND STEVE LEBLANC associated Press

BOSTON • Anticipating

renewed fights over abortion, some governors and state lawmakers already are looking for ways to enhance or dismantle the right to the procedure in their own constitutions and laws. President Donald Trump’s nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court has raised both fears and hopes that a conservative court majority could weaken or overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that created a nationwide right to abortion. That could fan an already raging battle in states over what should and should not be legal. Although a complete reversal of Roe remains a long shot, some Democratic elected officials want to

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fered,” Heastie said. “But that time has passed, and now these fundamental rights are threatened like never before. We cannot afford to take this right for granted.” Seventeen states already have laws that could be used to restrict the legal status of abortions if Roe is overturned or severely limited. Of those, Massachusetts is one of 10 states that still have pre-Roe abortion bans on the books, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a national research group that supports abortion rights. The institute says nine other states have laws specifically protecting abortion rights.

unanimously in January. The House speaker, also a Democrat, said that chamber will take it up before the end of the formal legislative session July 31. In New York, Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo held rallies after Kavanaugh’s nomination this week urging the state Senate to reconvene. He wants it to strengthen the right to an abortion, a seemingly unlikely event in the Republican-led chamber. Democratic Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie said the state law legalizing abortion, passed three years before the Roe ruling, includes a ban on third-trimester abortions and offers very limited exceptions. The Assembly has passed legislation codifying Roe six consecutive times, but the Senate has repeatedly blocked it. “There may have once been a time when we felt comfortable with the protections Roe v. Wade of-

‘TIME IS RIGHT’ Lawmakers in some Republican-led states have been attempting for decades to chip away at the Roe ruling by restricting when, where and how abortions can be provided. Kavanaugh’s ap-

pointment could lead to a surge in such measures. “The time is right. We need to act on it,” said Missouri Rep. Mike Moon, who is hoping Trump’s Supreme Court appointment breathes new life into an anti-abortion state constitutional amendment that stalled earlier this year. The Missouri proposal states that “nothing in this constitution secures or protects a right to abortion or requires the funding of an abortion.” It mirrors one first adopted by Tennessee voters in 2014 and placed on this November’s ballot by Republican-led legislatures in Alabama and West Virginia. The Tennessee measure was intended to overturn a state Supreme Court determination that the state constitution provided an even greater protection for abortion than the federal one. If the Roe precedent is reversed or weakened, similar constitutional amend-

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ments in other states could erect a shield against lawsuits asserting state-based abortion rights. At the time of the Roe v. Wade decision, just four states — Alaska, Hawaii, New York and Washington — allowed abortion on demand prior to fetal viability. California also broadly interpreted a woman’s “mental health” exception to allow many abortions, according to the National Right to Life Committee. Most states had strict bans. David O’Steen, executive director of the National Right to Life Committee, said the high court’s 1973 ruling “bottled up the discussion” and imposed a nationwide policy at a time when there was no public consensus in favor of abortion rights. “We’ve had the subsequent 45 years where (the) pro-life movement has been seeking one way or the other to bring this back to the domain of elected representatives, rather than the courts,” he said. If Roe is overturned, O’Steen anticipates that some states would swiftly implement sweeping bans on abortion, some would maintain broad access to the procedure and others would plunge into legislative debate over what types of abortion laws they should have. “The idea that a reversal of Roe would end abortion — that’s simply not correct,” he said. Assertions that Kavanaugh could sway Supreme Court opinion to allow states to ban abortion are “a lot of hyperbole coming out of the left,” Florida Republican Party Chairman Blaise Ingoglia said Wednesday in a media conference call with Republican U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz. Gaetz said some abortion limitations “could receive more favorable treatment, bringing our country a more pro-life position, but it wouldn’t necessarily have to fundamentally alter the holding in Roe.” Florida politics are dominated by Republicans, yet the state also has dozens of clinics that provide abortions. Earlier this year, before Anthony Kennedy announced he was retiring from the court, Rhode Island Democratic House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello called concerns about Roe being overturned “irrelevant” and “not founded in reality.” But now, Rhode Island Democratic Rep. Edie Ajello, a longtime abortion rights advocate, said it’s important to codify the Roe decision into state law before it is further eroded at the federal level. Ajello has sponsored unsuccessful legislation that would strike several old state laws. One of those, passed shortly after the Roe decision, imposed prison sentences on those who provide aid or counsel “to procure a miscarriage” unless necessary to save a woman’s life. Ajello said such laws are insulting and demeaning to women and “ought to be off the books.”

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NEWS

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

Focus on asbestos set case apart from others JURY • FROM A1

plaintiffs who had a spouse who claimed health effects. The jury then agreed to $3.15 billion in punitive damages against Johnson & Johnson and $990,000 against Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. The trial differed from five previous talcum powder cases in St. Louis by focusing on the women’s claims their ovarian cancer was caused by exposure to asbestos allegedly found in Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder. After the trial, plaintiffs and their families lined up in the courtroom to embrace and thank the jurors. Some wiped away tears. Asked what message jurors were trying to send to the company, a female juror who did not want her name used responded, “We were just trying to find something they would feel.” She said jurors did not arrive at the $4.14 billion punitive damage amount by chance. They multiplied the roughly $70 million Johnson & Johnson earned selling baby powder in a recent year by the 43 years it’s been since the company claimed the baby powder did not contain asbestos, she said. Later, she could be overheard telling plaintiffs that as soon as she got her cellphone back after the trial, “I posted on Facebook: Do not buy.” Plaintiff Cecilia Martinez, of Dallas, said she hopes the case will make Johnson & Johnson “make changes to protect mothers and babies.” Martinez, who was diagnosed with cancer in 2011, also said she hopes the company will now operate with “honesty, integrity and do the right thing even when no one is watching.” Plaintiff Toni Roberts, who has been receiving chemotherapy in Virginia but said she is now terminal, said, “I feel like justice has been served.” In a statement, Johnson & Johnson said it was “deeply

Ingham

Hawk

disappointed” in a “fundamentally unfair process that allowed plaintiffs to present a group of 22 women, most of whom had no connection to Missouri, in a single case all alleging that they developed ovarian cancer.” “Johnson & Johnson remains confident that its products do not contain asbestos and do not cause ovarian cancer and intends to pursue all available appellate remedies. Every verdict against Johnson & Johnson in this court that has gone through the appeals process has been reversed and the multiple errors present in this trial were worse than those in the prior trials which have been reversed,” the statement says. In his own statement, lead plaintiffs’ counsel Mark Lanier, of Houston, said Johnson & Johnson “should pull talc from the market before causing further anguish, harm, and death from a terrible disease. J&J sells the same powders in a marvelously safe corn starch variety. If J&J insists on continuing to sell talc, they should mark it with a serious warning.” It’s the country’s first such talcum powder trial against Johnson & Johnson testing the asbestos claims. Lanier told the jurors they were the first to see internal company documents revealing knowledge of asbestos in products or failures to warn consumers. “Your voice is not just the voice of the community but the voice of the world,” Lanier said Wednesday in his closing argument. “You don’t jack with people’s lives like this. ... It’s just not right.” As the compensatory verdicts totaling $550 million were being

read Thursday, a sheriff’s deputy walked down the row of seats in the packed courtroom, handing out tissues to plaintiffs and their relatives. Each side was given 10 minutes to argue over the appropriate punitive award after jurors were told Johnson & Johnson was worth $63 billion in 2018 and Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. was worth $13 billion in 2017. Lanier said each unanimous verdict in the first phase of the trial was “a message in itself.” But he asked jurors to use their punitive verdict to “say something Johnson & Johnson will hear.” “You can change the world,” he told them. Morton Dubin, a Johnson & Johnson lawyer, said the first verdict “sent a very powerful message” and was “difficult to hear.” He also suggested that talk of the total worth of the company should be tempered by the fact the talcum powder business represented only a small percentage of the company. Lawyers for the plaintiffs said punitive damage awards are limited by state law to five times the amount of compensatory damages awarded and defense lawyers probably would file a motion to reduce the award. The company’s lawyers have repeatedly rejected claims of asbestos — a mineral that has been linked to mesothelioma, a type of lung cancer — in its baby powder and maintains that its products are safe. Throughout previous trials and appeals in St. Louis, the company has issued statements denying any link between talc and ovarian cancer. Johnson & Johnson lawyer Peter Bicks criticized the plaintiffs’ case and paid experts as “science for hire,” saying the company for years has exceeded industry standards in testing its talcum powder for asbestos. He said plaintiffs had failed to prove Johnson & Johnson’s products caused or contributed to the women’s cancer, citing several scientific studies and

ST. LOUIS TALCUM POWDER VERDICTS Feb. 22, 2016 • Jury finds Johnson & Johnson failed to warn public about link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer, awarding $72 million to an Alabama woman. May 2, 2016 • Jurors order Johnson & Johnson to pay $55 million to a South Dakota woman. Oct. 27, 2016 • Jury awards $70 million to California woman; it was first verdict to find against Imerys Talc, a supplier of talcum powder to Johnson & Johnson. March 3, 2017 • Jury finds in favor of Johnson & Johnson, rejecting Tennessee woman’s claims her long-term use of baby powder contributed to her ovarian cancer. May 4, 2017 • Jury returns $110.5 million for a Virginia woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2012. June 29, 2018 • Missouri appeals court tosses out $55 million verdict for South Dakota woman against Johnson & Johnson, citing U.S. Supreme Court ruling on where injury lawsuits can be filed.

conclusions by U.S. government agencies finding the company’s products safe and without asbestos. “Yes, this is terrible,” Bicks said of the women’s cancer. “But just because something terrible happened doesn’t mean Johnson & Johnson had anything to do with it.” In this case, one of Johnson & Johnson’s suppliers, Imerys SA, settled out of court for $5 million, according to a Bloomberg report. Johnson & Johnson faces lawsuits nationwide from more than 9,000 plaintiffs seeking to link talc to ovarian cancer. Five of the 22 plaintiffs in the latest trial are Missouri residents, two of whom have died. Six of the 22 plaintiffs have died of ovarian cancer. One of the surviving plaintiffs is Gail Ingham, 73, of O’Fallon, Mo., a mother of two sons who worked in payroll at Mallinckrodt for two decades before finishing her career at Boeing. She said in a recent interview that she was diagnosed with stage-3 ovarian cancer in 1985 and underwent a year’s worth of chemotherapy treatments, surgeries and drug treatments. She was declared free of cancer in the early 1990s, she said. Ingham, who used baby powder for decades, wrote a book about her experiences. She

said her fight with cancer was “earth-shaking” and that she’s grateful to have survived it, adding that she joined the lawsuit because women who use baby powder “need to know what’s in there. They need to know what’s going on. Women need to know because they’re putting it on their babies.” Another plaintiff is Karen Hawk, 67, of Kansas City, a mother of five who used baby powder most of her life. She was diagnosed with cancer in 2003 and beat it in 2008. “That’s why I feel this trial is so important for the women who are using it,” Hawk said. “I hope it gets taken off the market. People don’t know what they’re dealing with.” Previous talcum powder trials in St. Louis have ended in multimillion-dollar verdicts against Johnson & Johnson. Johnson & Johnson earned a defense verdict in one of those trials and a reversal last fall of a $72 million plaintiff’s verdict on appeal. Last year, the U.S. Supreme Court imposed limits on where injury lawsuits can be filed. In June, a Missouri appeals court threw out a $55 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson, citing the Supreme Court ruling. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

U.S. seeks to undo completed merger of AT&T and Time Warner now, it turns out the merger is anti-competitive, the DOJ could try it again,” he said. At the core of the Justice Department’s case was the assertion that AT&T could use its newfound Time Warner content as a way to harm rival TV services — both traditional cable companies as well as new, streaming video services such as Hulu. The government’s theory was that AT&T would raise the price of licensing Time Warner’s content so that other TV services would

AT&T • FROM A1

always has the right to appeal if it wishes, we are surprised that the DOJ has chosen to do so under these circumstances,” said AT&T general counsel David McAtee. “We are ready to defend the Court’s decision at the District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals.” AT&T’s stock fell by more than 1.4 percent in after-hours trading. During the trial the Justice Department argued that the merger could raise prices for consumers and for the companies’ rivals, to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars a year. In response, AT&T said that the deal would actually lead to lower prices for TV viewers. Soon after the deal closed, AT&T announced a price increase for DirecTV Now, the company’s online streaming video service. The company said it was increasing rates to bring the product in line with the rest of the market. But it is unclear how that price hike could affect the litigation. Some analysts said it could reflect negatively on Leon’s analysis of the case and possibly benefit the Justice Department. The agency did not respond when asked whether the price changes contributed to its decision to appeal.

WARNING SIGN? “My guess is that the government is going to try to show that a lot of important evidence was rejected by the judge, and the judge put too much weight on the testimony of the merging parties,” said Gene Kimmelman, a former Justice Department antitrust official who now leads Public Knowledge, a consumer advocacy group that opposed the merger. The appeal could be seen as a warning sign for companies that have pursued their own mergers in the wake of Leon’s decision, Kimmelman added. The day after Leon delivered his ruling, Comcast made a $65 billion offer for 21st Century Fox, in an attempt to outbid

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Time Warner and AT&T have completed their merger, and some experts believe it could be difficult to untangle.

Disney for Fox’s entertainment assets. The offer is now at $71.3 billion as Disney outbid Comcast for Fox. Antitrust experts are watching that potential merger closely as another example of the media consolidation that’s swept the industry. In recent years, Verizon purchased AOL and then Yahoo in an effort to create an online advertising business. No matter how the Justice Department’s appeal unfolds, AT&T’s completed acquisition of Time Warner could prove difficult to untangle. For now, little is expected to change. Although Time Warner — now renamed WarnerMedia — operates independently from AT&T’s telecommunications business, integrating the companies under one banner still requires detailed coordination, said Jeffrey Blumenfeld, an antitrust lawyer at the firm Lowenstein Sandler in Washington. The last time the Justice Department challenged a completed deal was in 2017, when the agency sued to undo a merger in the aviation fuel filtration industry. The two sides settled later that year after the company defending the suit agreed to spin off parts of its business. Even if the government loses its bid for an appeal, it could still sue AT&T in the future if it observes evidence of anti-competitive behavior, Blumenfeld said. “If a year or two from

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28 YEARS

have to pay more, passing along those extra fees to consumers. That arrangement could also indirectly benefit AT&T over the long term, the Justice Department said, because customers fed up with the extra fees would have more reason to switch to AT&T. AT&T argued in district court that the merger is necessary to help it compete against tech companies such as Netflix and Google. By marrying AT&T’s telecom network with Time Warner’s con-

tent, executives said, the merger would create a new, data-driven advertising business. Customer data has propelled Netflix and YouTube to the forefront of the media and entertainment industries, showing executives precisely what consumers like to watch and when. The results have paid off, particularly for Netflix: The company this week earned 112 Emmy Award nominations, more than HBO. HBO has sat atop the Emmy nominees’ list for the past 17 years.

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NATION

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A11

Partisan clashes on display at daylong hearing FBI • FROM A1

investigators. The daylong hearing, which featured far more heated accusations than new information, was a naked display of the animus and agitation in Washington that surrounds the ongoing investigation into whether any Trump associates conspired with Russia to interfere with the 2016 election. Republicans accused Strzok and the FBI of pursuing politically motivated probes aimed at harming Trump. Democrats called the entire hearing part of a GOP attempt to protect the president by tainting the work of special counsel Robert Mueller. Lawmakers talked over each other and the witness, in sometimes starkly personal and intemperate terms. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., chairman of the oversight committee, started the first fracas when he asked Strzok how many individuals he interviewed in the first week of the Russia probe in the summer of 2016. “I will not, based on direction of the FBI ... answer that question, because it goes to matters which are related to the ongoing investigations being undertaken by the special counsel’s office,” Strzok replied. At that point, Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, interjected, threatening Strzok with a contempt citation if he did not answer. As Republicans berated Strzok over his work on the probes, Democrats sought to defend him through a series of unsuccessful objections and parliamentary maneuvers, leading to arguments among lawmakers about Strzok while he sat listening at the witness table. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., described the FBI agent as an injured survivor. “If I could give you a Purple Heart, I would. You deserve one,” Cohen said. “It’s astonishing to me that you would be put on trial as you have today.” Purple Heart medals are

ASSOCIATED PRESS

FBI Deputy Assistant Director Peter Strzok prepares to testify before the House committees on Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform on Capitol Hill on Thursday.

awarded to military personnel wounded in combat. Strzok, a deputy assistant director at the FBI who oversaw counterintelligence cases, was removed from the Trump probe by Mueller in July 2017. At that time, investigators for the Justice Department inspector general discovered text messages between him and then-FBI lawyer Lisa Page in which they repeatedly disparaged Trump and expressed a strong desire that he not win the election.

‘NO EVIDENCE OF BIAS’ Strzok’s work at the FBI became the subject of intense political battles in Congress after The Washington Post reported in December that he and Page, who had been involved in a romantic relationship, were under investigation by the inspector general over their texts. Page left the FBI earlier this year; Strzok is the focus of an internal investigation that could lead to his firing, but he is still technically an employee of the bureau. Rep. Louie Gohmert, RTexas, indirectly raised the issue of Strzok’s extramarital affair with Page. “When I see you sitting there with your little smirk, how many times did you look so innocent-looking into your wife’s eyes?” Gohmert said. Lawmakers and the witness

then started yelling, while the chairman sought to restore order in the room, and Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, DN.J., hollered at Gohmert: “You need your medication!” Once the commotion subsided, Strzok replied, “I have always told the truth. The fact that you would accuse me otherwise ... goes more to a discussion about your character and what you stand for.” Strzok said that his political opinions did not amount to bias and that FBI personnel are trained not to let their opinions influence their work. “There is simply no evidence of bias in my professional actions,” he said, calling Thursday’s hearing “just another victory notch in (Russian President Vladimir) Putin’s belt and another milestone in our enemies’ campaign to tear America apart.” He said it was “profoundly painful to watch and even worse to play a part in.” Much of the questioning focused on the text exchanges between Strzok and Page, and their comments about Trump. In one, Page wrote in 2016: “He’s not ever going to become president, right? Right?!” Strzok replied, “No. No he won’t. We’ll stop it.” Strzok said that comment did not reflect any desire to influence an investigation. At the time, he said, he was upset

over how Trump had attacked the family of a war hero — a reference to Khizr Khan, the father of a slain U.S. soldier, who spoke at the Democratic National Convention. The text “was in response to a series of events that included then-candidate Trump insulting the immigrant family of a fallen war hero, and my presumption based on that horrible, disgusting behavior that the American population would not elect somebody demonstrating that behavior to be president of the United States,” he said. At one point in the hearing, Strzok conceded that he “detested” Trump. Some of the angriest exchanges at the hearing were between Strzok and Gowdy. At one point, Strzok accused Gowdy of twisting his words, saying: “I don’t appreciate what was originally said being changed.” Gowdy shot back: “I don’t give a damn what you appreciate, Agent Strzok. I don’t appreciate an FBI agent with an unprecedented level of animus working on two major investigations in 2016.” Strzok insisted that his superiors and colleagues “would not tolerate any improper behavior in me any more than I would tolerate it in them.” He warned lawmakers that attacks on the FBI’s credibility hurt the country. “The proposition that that is going on and might occur anywhere in the FBI deeply corrodes what the FBI is in American society, the effectiveness of their mission, and it is deeply destructive,” Strzok said, prompting cheers from Democrats in the hearing room. In a report issued last month, the Justice Department inspector general found no evidence that investigative decisions were affected by the political bias of Page, Strzok or others at the FBI, but issued a report that was nevertheless harshly critical of Page’s and Strzok’s conduct, saying the texts exhibited a willingness to take official action to prevent Trump from becoming president.

Former athletes: Creepy people, lewd atmosphere at Ohio State ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS, OHIO • It was no secret that a team doctor now being investigated for sexually abusing male athletes decades ago at Ohio State University liked to linger in the showers alongside those athletes. But he wasn’t the only one leering at young men inside the campus recreation center where many teams practiced and university employees exercised. Wrestlers from that era remember men peeking at them over bathroom stalls and through a sauna window, a culture of voyeurism and “cruising” for sex not unheard of in gyms even today. Some say the same men began showering when team practices ended and would touch themselves while watching athletes. “A gauntlet of sexual deviancy” is what one former wrestler said he and his teammates faced after practice. Another said Larkins Hall, which has since been demolished, was filled with “creepy people.” Russ Hellickson, the wrestling coach who came to Ohio State in the mid1980s, says he often caught men having sex in the team’s practice room and a nearby stairwell. His wrestlers complained about the men’s behavior, Hellickson said. “It became a real problem because it affected the mental state of a lot of our wrestlers,” he said on a video distributed by one of his former team members. “There were times when the athletes themselves would confront people.” Hellickson, who coached at Ohio State from 1986-2006, said he had numerous conversations with an official in charge of campus recreation and other university administrators. But, he said, nothing changed for years until the team moved to a new training facility near the end of his tenure. Jim Jordan, who joined Ohio State in 1986 and was assistant coach from 1987 to 1995, is now a powerful Republican congressman. Jordan has said he knew nothing about lewd behavior at Larkins Hall. He also has denied allegations by former team members that he knew about accusations that the now-dead team doctor, Richard Strauss, sexually abused dozens of student-athletes. In an interview with Fox News last week, Jordan said faculty, professors and “everyone” could shower at Larkins. “But again, never saw any type of abuse there, and never drug anyone out,” Jordan said.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 07.13.2018 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

NATO in the crosshairs President Trump seems to prefer his defense alliances shaken, not stirred.

H

alf a century ago, one of the big topics of debate in Washington and on this editorial page was: Why don’t European nations contribute more to NATO? Only back then, Republicans were the ones arguing forcefully for U.S. sacrifice on NATO’s behalf, while Democratic Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield was NATO’s fiercest critic. Today, Republican President Donald Trump is the one taking up Mansfield’s mantle. Mansfield in 1971 proposed that U.S. troop levels in Europe — 300,000 at the time — be cut in half to force European nations to pony up a fairer share for their own defense. Mansfield was correct back then, and Trump is correct on that point today. Our issue is with Trump’s insulting and undiplomatic delivery. This newspaper weighed in on the troop-reduction debate in July 1968, siding with Mansfield and noting how severe federal budget problems at home were endangering funding for the U.S. Postal Service and Federal Aviation Administration. It didn’t make sense to take billions of dollars away from U.S. domestic needs to defend a subcontinent across the Atlantic that seemed ambivalent about defending itself. Mansfield’s anti-NATO campaign came only three years after the August 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia to put down the Prague Spring breakaway reform effort. Fast forward to today, and the same debate rages only four years after Russia invaded Ukraine, shot a passenger airliner out of the sky, armed a separatist rebellion, and annexed Crimea. Moscow’s

expansionist desires haven’t diminished in 50 years, which is why NATO’s importance must never be underestimated. In 2014, all NATO member nations committed to spend 2 percent of their gross domestic product to defense spending by 2024. Trump entered the NATO summit in Brussels this week accusing members of being deadbeats. He absurdly described Germany as being “totally controlled” and “a captive of Russia.” On Thursday, Trump asserted that his browbeating tactics resulted in NATO members’ commitment to boost their defense spending. That’s simply not true, French President Emmanuel Macron said. They just reiterated the commitment they made in 2014. Trump’s insults got him nowhere. The reason why defense spending levels are relevant is no different today than they were in 1968. The less countries spend on defense, they more they can afford to pay government employees, reduce taxes or build crucial infrastructure — all of which serve to strengthen the domestic economy. Germany’s low post-World War II defense spending has helped fuel its massive domestic growth. Today, Germany is Europe’s economic powerhouse. Trump is right to suggest that such growth came at America’s expense. But that doesn’t justify his insulting approach to America’s strongest allies. His caustic demeanor only helps advance Russia’s goal of fomenting division and weakening the most important mutual-defense alliance the world has ever known. Amazing how one leader can be so right yet, at the same time, so wrong.

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Seek honest assessment of Kavanaugh, not payback

Will McCaskill make right choice for the country?

The Post-Dispatch editorial staff either doesn’t understand or doesn’t accept the big picture in today’s politics in how it advised the Democrats to obstruct Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court (“Black robes, dark days,” July 11). This politically driven, scorched-earth approach to politics is in large part to blame why we have candidates such as Donald Trump and Eric Greitens being elected to office. The general public has had it with an inefficient government that’s being driven by partisan politics. These so-called outsider candidates, who know zero about the issues nor understand the basics of government, are winning elections because of an inept government that’s more concerned about winning the next election versus doing what’s best for the country. Instead of advising obstruction for the sake of political party payback for prior perceived misdeeds, the Post-Dispatch should be advising the Senate to do everything possible to surface the key concerns and then vote yes or no based upon an honest assessment of whether senators think Kavanaugh will do a good job to uphold the precedence of law. Greg Blattner • Chesterfield

Interesting story in the Post-Dispatch about Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill’s dilemma regarding her vote on Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s nominee for Supreme Court justice (“ ‘Historic stakes’ vs. existing politics ,” July 11). Vote yes for confirmation and she risks her relationship with Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and other fellow Democrats. Vote no and she could be voted out of office in November by vindictive Missourians who supported Trump in the last election. In other words, she could lose her job. She says she will study the matter carefully and do the right thing. The question is, will it be the right thing for this country, or the right thing for Claire McCaskill? Ron Coleman • St. Louis County

Ideologue judge won’t provide safeguards for democracy

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump (right) and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg (left) gesture while speaking during their bilateral breakfast on Wednesday.

This land is our land In Trump’s America, federal property is fair game for destruction if the cause is right.

P

resident Donald Trump’s pardon of two Oregon ranchers this week for willfully destroying federal property establishes a new level of impunity for anyone who is mad as hell and thinks it’s OK to take the law into his own hands. In Trump’s America, that’s no problem as long as the vigilante is white, prone to carry guns and whose fashion sensibilities lean heavily toward cowboy hats or red caps that read,“MAGA.” The cause of Oregon cattle rancher Dwight Hammond and his son, Steven Hammond, inspired the 2016 takeover and occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. The occupation, in which militiamen geared up for war and directly defied Obama administration authority over federal lands, lasted 41 days. The Hammonds were under the mistaken impression that they should be allowed to run their business — grazing cattle for sale or slaughter — on the taxpayers’ dime using taxpayer property instead of their own 13,000 acres of land in eastern Oregon. When they were told that they had to pay up, just like everyone else, for grazing their cattle on federal property, they revolted. The Hammonds were convicted in 2001 of setting fire to more than 100 acres of federal land, and Steven Hammond was convicted of a similar offense in 2006. It was their 2012 conviction — under a 1996 anti-terrorism law passed in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing by terrorist vigilantes Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols — that ultimately sparked the Malheur protest.

A federal appeals court ruled in late 2015 that the sentence handed down for the Hammonds’ previous offenses was improperly short, considering the anti-terrorism law’s mandatory five-year minimum sentencing guideline. The court ordered them back to prison, after which the Malheur occupation began. After the 2016 siege, investigators found dozens of guns and 15,000 rounds of ammunition at the site of the protest. There was no question that the group was preparing for a gun battle. Eleven of the 27 Malheur protesters pleaded guilty, admitting that they knew their method of protest was illegal. But since their cause resonated with some of the more extremist elements among Trump’s base, the president apparently had no problem pardoning the Hammonds. Last August, he pardoned another infamous vigilante, former Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was convicted of criminal contempt for defying a court order to stop racially profiling Hispanics in his campaign to hunt down and detain undocumented immigrants. Trump labeled Arpaio “an American patriot.” Trump’s apparent image of an American hero is someone who thinks the law doesn’t apply to him, which shouldn’t be surprising considering the multiple ongoing investigations into illegal activity linked to Trump and his presidential campaign. The only problem is, when some Americans get the idea that they get to make their own laws, America steps closer to becoming a vigilante nation.

As a faith-based organization serving the interests of women, children and families, National Council of Jewish Women St. Louis is deeply concerned about Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. Kavanaugh comes from a list of potential nominees vetted and approved by hyperpartisan groups committed to using the federal court system to serve their agenda. That vetting virtually guarantees that he comes to the court with a preset policy slant rather than the fair and open mind on which the integrity of our federal courts depends. The Supreme Court, and in fact the entire federal court system, is the critical third leg of our constitutional system of checks and balances to the power of the president. It is imperative that Supreme Court nominees be independent constitutionalists rather than beholden to a certain political ideology. Kavanaugh’s appointment, indeed all federal judgeships, are for life. Therefore, our grandchildren and our great-grandchildren will be living under the policies today’s federal judges rule on. An ideologue, approved by a simple majority in an equally partisan Senate, hardly provides the safeguards that democracy requires. We see every indication that Kavanaugh’s addition to the court will threaten hard-won rights and liberties secured over many decades. These are protections Americans hold dear, including, but by no means limited to: • Women’s reproductive choice. • Comprehensive affordable health care. • Voting rights. • Racial justice and equity. • LGBTQ protection. • Safeguards for all faith traditions — not just one. With so many issues hanging in the balance, it is crucial that the Senate confirm only a fair-minded jurist who will protect the rights of all Americans. Sens. Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt must protect their Missouri constituents and the integrity of the court by rejecting Kavanaugh. Nancy Litz • Olivette Vice president of advocacy, National Council of Jewish Women St. Louis

Working together, we can solve insurmountable problems The rescue of the Thai soccer team demonstrates, once again, an undeniable fact: As it was with the Apollo 13 astronauts, when the best and brightest of us put our minds to it, there is nothing that cannot be done. I can’t help but wonder what we could accomplish if we were all working together to solve our other supposedly insurmountable problems, instead of arguing and fighting and working against each other. B. Michael Korte • Kirkwood

Joe Edwards’ tenacity on display at Tower Tee The picture in Tuesday’s Post-Dispatch of the man clearing out his trunk to fit in an impossibly giant blue rhinoceros bought from the Tower Tee auction truly made me smile and laugh. I thought, there is no way that thing is going to fit in that little trunk. Then I read the caption that said it was University City’s Joe Edwards doing the job and thought, this guy is going to get that rhino in the trunk whether it fits or not. If nothing else, you have to admire the man’s tenacity. Joe Hogan • St. Louis

ROBERT COHEN • Post-Dispatch

Joe Edwards tries to clear room in his car’s trunk for a fiberglass rhinoceros after buying it for $700 at the Tower Tee auction on Monday.

Need a local critic to guide theatergoers In response to the letter “Job of theater critic is to educate and illuminate” (July 7) by Isaiah Di Lorenzo, I write to implore the Post-Dispatch to replace Judith Newmark with someone.For me,Newmark’s reviews have been useful gauges of which plays I wanted to attend. I have read her faithfully. When the Post-Dispatch’s television critic retired, she wasn’t replaced. Since television is nationwide, the information I get from The New York Times is valid for St. Louis. But theater is local. Only a local critic can guide theatergoers. May we please have one? Emma Kafalenos • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

07.13.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1 25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

FROM BOISE TO WACO • As federal investigators probed why agents acted against the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas, a jury in Boise, Idaho, delivered a stern rebuke to similar tactics in a raid last summer. The biggest question that echoes from Boise to Waco is this: How well are federal agents trained not only in the tactics of action but in the strategy of patience? Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Tired of having to explain ourselves Many white people never question their ‘right’ to regulate African-Americans. LEONARD PITTS Miami Herald

For barbecuing. For selling bottled water. For napping in a dorm. For mowing a lawn. For smoking. Perhaps you recognize the list. If not, be advised that it represents a few of the slew of recent high-profile episodes in which police have been called out on black people for reasons so trivial, nonsensical and stupid as to beggar belief. These incidents, many captured in cellphone video, have resulted in anger, ridicule, occasional job loss for the instigators and, in one case, corporate sensitivity training. They have also provided a window, for those who need it, into the challenge of

breathing, existing, minding your own business, just trying to go about your day, while black. Not that there is anything new here. To the contrary, this behavior is as old as the Republic. The only difference is that now we see it on video and more attention is being paid. But if, for some of us, this is a trending topic, it is, for the rest of us, just life. We’ve never known a country wherein some white people did not feel they had the absolute, God-ordained prerogative to regulate us — nor the right to call police when we declined to be regulated. Why else do you think George Zimmerman felt empowered to stalk 17-year-old Trayvon Martin through a Sanford, Fla., neighborhood? He would require this unknown boy to explain himself. He would get answers. He ended up killing the child instead. Friday makes five years since a jury failed to hold him

accountable. Zimmerman, the innocent man just trying to defend his neighborhood, has since compiled a long list of runins with the law. Trayvon, the guilty boy who simply had to be up to something, is still dead. Yet too many white people still accord Zimmerman themselves the right to demand that black people explain themselves. In recent days, cops have been called on African-Americans … For working out at a gym. For shopping. For stopping for dinner at Subway. For trying to use a community pool.

For wearing socks at a community pool. The old “Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore” used to display a world map with the South Pole on top. It’s a perfectly valid view — there’s no up or down in space — but if you’ve grown used to viewing the world north-side up, it was jarring, a visual metaphor for how difficult it can be to see a familiar thing from an unfamiliar point of view. If you are white in America, the familiar thing is the idea that black equals danger. And too often, you don’t question that assumption. You barely know you’ve made it. I’m reminded of a reader who wrote to tell me what black people must do to earn his respect. That we should crave his respect was a given. That maybe he should ask how he might earn our respect did not enter into his thinking. Just as he didn’t recognize, much less question, his implicit assumptions, many white people

never question their “right” to regulate African-Americans. It never occurs to them that black people, who work, pay taxes, go to school, raise their kids and get dinner on just like normal people, deserve to expect, just like normal people, that they’ll be left the heck alone when bothering no one and minding their own business. Five years after the Zimmerman acquittal would be an excellent time for them to finally get that. Because it’s tiresome to know that on any given day, you might be stopped and required to explain yourself … For checking out of an Airbnb. For inspecting a house. For golfing. For waiting at Starbucks. For walking home in the rain. Leonard Pitts Jr. lpitts@miamiherald.com Copyright The Miami Herald Distributed by Tribune Content Agency

Competition in the market creates stronger choices for homeowners St. Louis County can’t afford to forgo innovative partnerships in clean energy. BY CALEB ARTHUR

SUSAN WALSH • Associated Press

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh (right) and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, share a laugh as they pose for a photo Tuesday.

Hypocrites for Kavanaugh Conservatives have made clear that confirmation battles are struggles for power. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

Be prepared for a festival of hypocrisy, evasion and misdirection from supporters of the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Begin with the idea that because Kavanaugh is qualified, well-educated, intelligent and likable, senators should fall in line behind him. Sorry, but Senate Republicans have already demonstrated that none of these characteristics matters. If they did, Judge Merrick Garland would be a Supreme Court justice. In blocking Garland, conservatives made clear that personal qualities have nothing to do with confirmation battles. They are struggles for power. Everything we know about Kavanaugh demonstrates he would cement a right-wing majority on the court on social issues as well as regulatory and economic questions. (That’s why he was picked.) The environment, gun safety and health care are all at stake. So are civil, voting and labor rights. Kavanaugh may be as lovely a human being as Garland is, but he would behave very differently as a justice. That’s the point. Progressives are told they should get over the shameful treatment of Garland. What an astonishing exercise in hypocrisy from conservatives who have been reliving the defeat of Robert Bork’s nomination to the Supreme Court for 31 years. And unlike Garland, Bork got a hearing and a vote. Kavanaugh will try to duck questions on Roe v. Wade, new challenges to the Affordable Care Act and President Donald Trump’s efforts to escape the investigation of Russian influence on our election. His defenders will pretend that his ideology is not a legitimate matter for senatorial examination. But these same people made conservative ideology central to their case to

Trump on Kavanaugh’s behalf. As Ashley Parker and Robert Costa reported in The Washington Post,“Former clerks fended off criticism that his record on abortion was squishy and that his rulings were too deferential to government agencies.” Kavanaugh’s champions can’t have it both ways — and neither can Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, or Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, who are supporters of abortion rights. Kavanaugh can’t simultaneously be un-squishy on abortion for Trump and squishy enough for Collins and Murkowski. Don’t count on the good judge to help

Kavanaugh will try to duck questions on Roe v. Wade, new challenges to the Affordable Care Act and President Donald Trump’s efforts to escape the investigation of Russian influence on our election. us unravel these mysteries. Kavanaugh kicked off his confirmation campaign with a statement that lacked all credibility.“No president,” he said,“has ever consulted more widely, or talked with more people from more backgrounds, to seek input about a Supreme Court nomination.” Good grief! Trump’s list of potential appointees was formulated in consultation with right-wing groups. Period. Civil rights groups, women’s organizations, labor unions and countless other sectors of our society had no part in this. Remember Kavanaugh’s wholly unnecessary whopper when he addresses other subjects. And given that the president who named him is facing legal scrutiny, the would-be justice’s sweeping views about presidential immunity are highly relevant to whether he should be put in a position to adjudicate Trump’s future. Kavanaugh can’t be let off the hook

just because his now widely read 2009 Minnesota Law Review article suggested that presidents should be protected by congressional action, not the courts. Nowhere does he say explicitly that the courts couldn’t act. His only statement on the matter is that the Supreme Court’s decision in Clinton v. Jones requiring former President Bill Clinton to testify in a civil lawsuit “may well have been entirely correct.” Hmm. That may well have been is one heck of a verbal loophole. His passion is plainly on the side of presidential power. Imagine Trump’s grin in response to these words from Kavanaugh: “The indictment and trial of a sitting president, moreover, would cripple the federal government, rendering it unable to function with credibility in either the international or domestic arenas. Such an outcome would ill serve the public interest, especially in times of financial or national security crisis. Even the lesser burdens of a criminal investigation — including preparing for questioning by criminal investigators — are time-consuming and distracting.” Rudy Giuliani couldn’t have said it better, meaning that senators have every reason to demand that Kavanaugh promise (under oath) to recuse himself on any case involving the Trump inquiry. As for Republican efforts to rush Kavanaugh through, the judge wrote in that law review article that the Senate “should consider a rule ensuring that every judicial nominee receives a vote by the Senate within 180 days of being nominated by the president.” It’s interesting that going the full 180 days would take us well past November’s election. And according to the Kavanaugh Doctrine, Garland ought to have been given a vote. Senators should ask him about that, too.

E.J. Dionne ejdionne@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

As Missouri works to position itself as a clean energy leader and meet key economic development targets, there is a little-reported bill currently moving through the St. Louis County Council that can help us accomplish both of these goals. Bill 305 would enable the Missouri Clean Energy District to operate in the county, and in turn, help further create sustainable trade jobs throughout the area and improve our aging housing stock — but only if approved by the council. Missouri Clean Energy District is a statewide initiative helping educate residents and businesses — including my own — about ways to better manage their energy use and the financing available to do so. It offers Missourians in member communities access to Property Assessed Clean Energy financing, which empowers property owners to invest in their greatest asset — their home — and make energy-saving and renewable-energy improvements, such as solar or high-efficiency HVAC systems. More than 80 communities across the state have joined the district as a means to meet energy goals and offer residents more options for improving their homes. Although the county has an active Property Assessed Clean Energy program, local property owners are being deprived of the established track record that the clean energy district brings to the table. Across the nation, the most successful PACE communities embrace an open, free-market model and welcome multiple solutions. More choices mean better choices for residents. There is far too much at stake to let special interests put up unnecessary roadblocks to keep out a great option for homeowners in St. Louis County. In just the last 18 months, Missouri Clean Energy District has helped improve more than 1,300 homes across the state through its residential financing program. These upgrades are projected to reduce emissions by over 75,000 tons — equivalent to taking over 14,000 cars off the road — while also lowering homeowners’ utility bills to the tune of millions of dollars. What’s more, this unique public-private partnership also benefits local governments. Missouri Clean Energy District’s financing program advances important policy objectives, including enhanced property values, reduced energy use and local job creation — without the use of public funds. There’s also no membership cost or fiscal risk for community partners. Head west on Interstate 70 to Kansas City, and you’ll find a community working toward similar goals. The Kansas City metro area has embraced the adoption of multiple clean energy districts in preparation for the road ahead, simultaneously maintaining both local control and diversity of choice that has led to an estimated $12.5 million in economic stimulus in just over a year. One can also look to Jackson County, which covers much of the surrounding Kansas City metro area and is also adding the Kansas City Regional Clean Energy District to supplement the state program’s blossoming success. Since the Property Assessed Clean Energy program launched in 2016, its financed improvements have created over 120 jobs in and around Jackson County — good-paying construction jobs that cannot be automated or outsourced. We should not ignore this achievement as the St. Louis metro area looks to remain a leader among its peers in both sustainability and economic development. With its headquarters office already located in Ballwin and projects underway in neighboring Franklin, Jefferson, and St. Charles counties, as well as a presence in 27 St. Louis County municipalities, Missouri Clean Energy District understands local priorities. St. Louis County can’t afford to forgo innovative partnerships that can help us meet our clean energy targets while creating jobs without tapping public coffers. As president of the Missouri Solar Energy Industries Association and a business owner who employs many Missourians across the state, I encourage the County Council to partner with Missouri Clean Energy District in the ongoing push to help grow the local economy, cut household utility bills and set us on a more sustainable path to the future. Caleb Arthur is president of the Missouri Solar Energy Industries Association.


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

U.S.: Nearly half of youngest children not rejoining families

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

Holding immigrant children now a billion-dollar industry ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN ANTONIO • Detaining im-

BY COLLEEN LONG Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The Trump

administration said Thursday all eligible small children who were separated from their families as a result of its zero-tolerance immigration policy have been reunited with their parents. But nearly half of the children under 5 remain apart from their families because of safety concerns, the deportation of their parents and other issues, the administration said. The administration was under a court mandate to reunite families separated between early May and June 20, when President Donald Trump signed an executive order that stopped separations. The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit on behalf of a woman who had been separated from her child, and U.S. District Court Judge Dana Sabraw ordered all children reunited with their parents. Fifty-seven children were reunited with their parents as of Thursday morning, administration officials said. “Throughout the reunification process, our goal has been the well-being of the children and returning them to a safe environment,” according to a statement from the heads of the three agencies responsible for the process. “Of course, there remains a tremendous amount of hard work and similar obstacles facing our teams in reuniting the remaining families. The Trump administration does not approach this mission lightly.” Most of the reunions occurred by Tuesday’s court-ordered deadline, but the government acknowledged in a court filing that 19 occurred Wednesday and one Thursday. The ACLU proposed in a court filing that the administration should be monitored closely as a July 26 deadline approaches to

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE VIA AP

Activists stage a protest Thursday at the headquarters of Management and Training Corp. in Centerville, Utah. The private prison company has contracts to hold immigrants.

reunite more than 2,000 children who are 5 and older with their parents. It asked the judge to require that all parental relations be verified and all background checks be completed by next Thursday. It also wants a daily report on how many families are reunited, starting Tuesday. The ACLU also proposed that the administration be given no more than a week to reunite 12 young children with their nowdeported parents, from whom they were separated at the border. “There is no excuse for the Trump administration’s missed deadline,” said ACLU attorney Lee Gelernt. “Children are suffering because of it. The government must get these families back together.” The administration said in its filing that it is difficult to determine how much time is needed and that reunifications should occur “on a flexible schedule.” Both sides are due back in court Friday to expand on their proposals. It will be the fourth hearing in eight days, an indication of how closely the judge is

watching his deadlines. The U.S. officials said 46 of the children were not eligible to be reunited with their parents; a dozen parents had already been deported and were being contacted by the administration. Nine were in custody of the U.S. Marshals Service for other offenses. One adult’s location was unknown, they said. Of the deported parents, officials said they had chosen to leave their children behind. One deported father, however, told the Los Angeles Times earlier this week that he didn’t realize what he was doing when he signed the paperwork to leave his child behind. It wasn’t clear if he was one of the dozen; no names have been made public. In 22 other cases, adults posed safety concerns, they said. Officials said 11 adults had serious criminal histories including child cruelty, murder or human smuggling. The 46 children will remain in the care of Health and Human Services, which will continue to seek to place them with a sponsor, such as another family member or even foster care.

OBITUARIES Beehler, Thomas J. - St. Ann Boltzman, Lenore A. - St. Louis Durbin, Matthew H. - St. Louis Heinrichs, John M. - St. Louis

migrant children has morphed into a surging industry in the U.S. that now reaps $1 billion annually — a tenfold increase over the past decade, an Associated Press analysis finds. Health and Human Services grants for shelters, foster care and other child welfare services for detained unaccompanied and separated children soared from $74.5 million in 2007 to $958 million dollars in 2017. The agency is also reviewing a new round of proposals amid a growing effort by the White House to keep immigrant children in government custody. Currently, more than 11,800 children, from a few months old to 17, are housed in nearly 90 facilities in 15 states — Arizona, California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington. They are being held while their parents await immigration proceedings or, if the children arrived unaccompanied, are reviewed for possible asylum themselves. In May, the agency issued requests for bids for five projects that could total more than $500 million for beds, foster and therapeutic care, and “secure care,” which means employing guards. More contracts are expected to come up for bids in October. HHS spokesman Kenneth Wolfe said the agency will award bids “based on the number of beds needed to provide appropriate care for minors in the program.” The agency’s current facilities include locations for what the Trump administration calls “tender age” children, typically under 5. Three shelters in Texas have been designated for toddlers and infants. Others — including in tents in Tornillo, Texas, and a tent-and-building

Celebrations of Life

Huneke, Angela "Angie" - Bellefontaine Neighbors Smith, Wanda G. - St. Charles Stacy, Juanita - Fresno, CA Stormer, John - Troy, MO

Huneke, Angela "Angie"

Beehler, Thomas J. Visitation Sunday, July 15, 4-8 p.m. at Colliers Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. (St. Ann). Service Monday, July 16, 10:00 a.m. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Boltzman, Lenore A.

temporary shelter in Homestead, Fla. — are housing older teens. Over the past decade, by far the largest recipients of taxpayer money have been Southwest Key and Baptist Child & Family Services, AP’s analysis shows. From 2008 to date, Southwest Key has received $1.39 billion in grant funding to operate shelters; Baptist Child & Family Services has received $942 million. A Texas-based organization called International Educational Services also was a big recipient, landing more than $72 million in the last fiscal year before folding amid a series of complaints about the conditions in its shelters. The recipients of the money run the gamut from nonprofits, religious organizations and for-profit entities. The organizations originally concentrated on housing and detaining at-risk youth but shifted their focus to immigrants when tens of thousands of Central American children started arriving at the U.S.Mexico border in recent years. They are essentially government contractors for the Health and Human Services Department — the federal agency that administers the program keeping immigrant children in custody. Organizations such as Southwest Key insist that the children are well cared for and that the vast sums of money they receive are necessary to house, transport, educate and provide medical care for thousands of children while complying with government regulations and court orders. President Donald Trump says cracking down on immigration ultimately can lead to spending less money and having fewer immigrants in government custody. In a recently released report, the State Department decried the principle of holding children in shelters, saying it makes them inherently vulnerable.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Wigglesworth, Lois - Valley Park Williams, Cornelia Skaggs - St. Louis

Wigglesworth, Lois

9 6 y e a r s o l d , p a s s e d a w a y 75, July 11, 2018. Wednesday afternoon, July 11, Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Sun. (7/15) 2018. Beloved wife of the late 5-8 pm. For more info see Schrader.com. Edward Huneke, Sr., for 45 years. Sh e is survived b y h er sons Williams, Cornelia Skaggs Edward, Jr. (Linda) and Dennis passed away on Tuesday, July 10, (Donna) Huneke; grand-children 2018. Predeceased by her Justin, Sean and Joseph Huneke, beloved husband Rev. E.F. T i m o t h y Forris t a l l , A n g e l a Williams, she is survived by her McGinnis. Our dear great-grandson Q u e (Betty) Purnell and mother, aunt, cousin and friend daughters Shirley Sloan, Marsha of many. Skaggs, and Linda Kimbrough as Services: Visitation at well as 8 grandchildren, 8 greatHutchen's Mortuary, Florissant, grandchildren, and a host of Friday, July 13, 2-8 p.m. Funeral Saturday, 11 a.m. at Holy Name nieces, nephews, relatives and of Jesus Catholic Church, Bellefontaine Neighbors. friends. Mrs. Huneke was one of the founders of Huneke Realty Services: Visitation 9 a.m. until Company, which operated for over 40 years in St. Louis County. funeral at 11 a.m. Mon., July 16, at New Sunny Mount M.B. Smith, Wanda G. Church, 4700 W. Florissant Ave. Arrangements by Ronald L. 84, of St. Charles, July 8, 2018. Services: Baue, 3950 W. Jones Funeral Chapels. Clay St. Visitation on Mon., July 16 from 4-7 p.m. Funeral Service on Tues., July 17 at 10 a.m. Visit Baue.com Florists

July 11, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Morry Joseph Boltzman; Stacy, Juanita dear mother and mother-in-law of Carye (Michael) Fagin and Michael (Amy) Boltzman; dear grandmother of Joshua Fagin, Alex age 90, of Fresno, CA, July 6, 2018. Contact (636) 946Fagin and Jenna Boltzman; dear sister and sister-in-law of the 7811 or visit baue.com late Earl (Jacqueline) Greenberg and the late Robert (Nancy) Greenberg; dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation Sunday, July 15 after 1:30 p.m. at Berger Stormer, John Memorial Chapel, 9430 Olive Blvd. followed by the funeral serv90, 7/10/18. Monday, 7/16/18 Visitation 1-3 p.m., ice at 2:00 p.m. Interment following service at Beth Hamedrosh service 3 pm. at McCoy-Blossom Chapel, Troy, MO. Hagodol Cemetery. Memorial contributions preferred to the www.mccoyblossomfh.com charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. “A great soul serves everyone all the time. BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.” MAYA ANGELOU

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Durbin, Matthew H. July 11, 2018 Beloved son of Nori Durbin and Stephen Durbin; dear brother of Brent Durbin; dear grandson of Nancy and the late Sheldon Sherman and the late Donald and the late Mabel Durbin; dear nephew of Jeffrey (Patty Sebastian) Sherman, the late Kathy Durbin, Nancy (Perry) Gambino, the late Mike Durbin, and Mary (John) Ampleman; dear cousin of Tyler and Hailey Sherman, Brian (Janelle) Gambino, Katie (Travis) Villiger, and Kyle Ampleman; dear second-cousin of Frank Gambino. Services: Funeral service Sunday, July 15, 9:30 a.m. at Congregation Shaare Emeth, 11645 Ladue Road at Ballas. No visitation prior to the funeral service. Private interment. Memorial contributions preferred to NCADA, 9355 Olive Boulevard, 63132. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Heinrichs, John M. August 16, 1969-July 11, 2018. Please go to www.michelfh.com for funeral service info. ARRANGEMENTS UNDER THE DIRECTION OF MICHEL FUNERAL HOME. 314-645-4241

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07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A15

Trump serves fresh criticism lobbed at May and Londoners BY JONATHAN LEMIRE AND JILL COLVIN associated Press

BLENHEIM PAL ACE , ENGLAND • Dishing up a fresh

dose of chaos on his European tour, President Donald Trump left behind a contentious NATO gathering in Brussels and moved on to Britain, where a pompfilled welcome ceremony was soon overshadowed by an interview in which Trump blasted Prime Minister Theresa May, blamed London’s mayor for terrorist attacks against the city and argued that Europe was “losing its culture” because of immigration. Trump, in an interview with The Sun newspaper, said he felt unwelcome in London because of protests, including plans to fly a giant balloon over Parliament on Friday that depicts him as an angry baby in a diaper. “I guess when they put out blimps to make me feel unwelcome, no reason for me to go to London,” he said. Trump, in the interview given before he left Brussels for the U.K., accused May of ruining what her country stands to gain from the Brexit vote to leave the European Union. He said her former foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, would make an “excellent” prime minister, speaking just days after Johnson resigned his position in protest over May’s Brexit plans. Trump added that May’s “soft” blueprint for the U.K.’s future dealings with the EU would probably “kill” any future trade deals with the United States. “If they do a deal like that, we would be dealing with the European Union instead of dealing with the U.K., so it will probably kill the deal,” Trump told the paper. Trump, who has compared his own election to the June 2016 referendum in which a majority of British voters supported leaving the EU, complained that, “The deal she is striking is a much different deal than the one the people voted on.” He also told the tabloid that he’d shared advice with May during Britain’s negotiations with the EU and she ignored it. Details from Trump’s interview with the paper became public as Trump was attending a black-tie dinner with May to welcome him to Britain with pomp and pageantry. As for Johnson, Trump said: “I think he would be a great prime minister. I think he’s got what it takes.” He added, “I think he is a great representative for your country.” On Thursday night, hundreds

BRUSSELS • While President Donald Trump’s hectoring at the NATO summit alarmed many in the West, his message was mostly embraced Thursday along the alliance’s eastern flank — the region that feels most threatened by an assertive Russia. From Poland and the tiny Baltic states down to Romania, eastern leaders welcomed Trump’s push for members of the 29-nation alliance to spend more on their militaries, something they have sought following Russian incursions in Georgia in 2008 and Ukraine in 2014. After all, they had been under Moscow’s thumb for decades after World War II. On the first day of the summit, Trump lambasted his partners for not spending their fair share on defense and asked on Twitter: “What good is NATO if Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars for gas and energy?” But by the time the summit concluded Thursday he was praising NATO as “very unified, very strong.” “He came, he saw, he conquered,” declared Poland’s state-run broadcaster TVP in an opinion piece. “Contrary to criticism and fears, Trump’s brutally sincere behavior has not broken NATO’s unity but has mobilized its members to further action that strengthened the organization.” Linas Linkevicius, the foreign minister of Lithuania, wrote on Twitter that “Once again #NATOSummit bring us closer

Trump is predicting Iran ‘escalation’ President Donald Trump on Thursday forecast an unspecified “escalation” between the United States and Iran following his withdrawal from a landmark deal that provided sanctions relief for Tehran in exchange for curbs on its nuclear program. Trump’s remarks came as his administration pressed European nations at a NATO summit to cut off all funding that Iran may use to foment instability in the Middle East and beyond. Trump asserted that Iran was now treating the U.S. with more respect, although there’s no evidence to support that, and predicted Tehran will seek negotiations as reimposed sanctions bite. Over the opposition of European allies, the president in May pulled out from the 2015 nuclear deal involving Iran, the U.S. and other world powers. Washington’s reinstating of economic penalties has worsened Iran’s alreadyhobbled economy. Syria raises flag over first city to revolt • For the first time in more than seven years, the Syrian government raised its flag Thursday over Daraa, the first city to revolt against President Bashar Assad in 2011 and plunge the country into its calamitous civil war. The display is laden with symbolism as the government moves to stamp out the last of the uprising against the 52-year-old Assad who has ruled with an iron fist over Syria for 18 years. His father, Hafez Assad, was president for three decades before him. With control over Daraa, government forces can now focus on clearing the last pockets of the opposition and, separately, the Islamic State group from the frontier at the Golan Heights, which Israel seized from Syria in a 1967 war.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

British Prime Minister Theresa May, accompanied by her husband, Philip (right), stands with U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump, before a black tie dinner at Blenheim Palace on Thursday.

of demonstrators chanted outside the U.S. ambassador’s residence where Trump was staying on the outskirts of London, providing a preview of the forceful protests expected on Friday. Trump acknowledged he didn’t feel welcome in the city, and blamed that in part on Mayor Sadiq Khan, who gave protesters permission to fly the 20-foot-tall balloon depicting Trump as an angry baby. Trump also blamed recent terrorist attacks there on Khan, who is a Muslim. The president claimed Europe is “losing its culture” because of immigration from the Middle East and Africa.

Trump’s tough NATO talk plays well on eastern flank BY VANESSA GERA associated Press

DIGEST

& stronger. We are resolute, committed to mutual defense, fair burden sharing.” NATO member Estonia noted that a Russian military aircraft even violated its airspace Thursday near the Baltic Sea island of Vaindloo, the second such alleged incident this week and the third in a month. Many in the region also welcomed Trump’s opening salvo when he lashed out at Germany’s pursuit of a gas pipeline venture with Russia, which Trump said made Berlin “captive” to Russia. That message echoed fears that have long been expressed by leaders in the Baltic states and Poland. They fear the gas pipeline will make Europe more dependent on Russian energy, giving Moscow more political leverage over the continent. Poland’s prime minister has even called it a “new hybrid weapon.” The countries on the eastern flank also stressed that, despite the divisions, the achievements of the summit in Brussels made them safer. These include opening accession talks with Macedonia and formally signing off on a plan that would improve the alliance’s ability to deploy faster in case of an attack. The plan ensures that NATO could deploy 30 land battalions, 30 ships and 30 warplane squadrons at a 30-day notice. Romanian President Klaus Iohannis, whose Black Sea nation also feels vulnerable with Russia’s resurgence, said he saw “no danger” of NATO breaking up. “There isn’t a conflict,” he said. “Trump said things plainly, as is normal between friends and allies.”

NATO DISCORD During his 28 hours in Belgium, Trump had disparaged longtime NATO allies, cast doubt on his commitment to the mutualdefense organization and sent the 29-nation pact into frenzied emergency session. Then, in a head-snapping pivot at the end, he declared the alliance a “fine-tuned machine” that had acceded to his demands to speed up increases in military spending to relieve pressure on the U.S. budget. But there was little evidence other leaders had bowed to his wishes on that front. Trump claimed member nations had agreed to boost their

defense budgets significantly and reaffirmed — after days of griping that the U.S. was being taken advantage of by its allies — that the U.S. remains faithful to the accord. Neither Trump nor NATO offered specifics on what Trump said he had achieved. French President Emmanuel Macron quickly disputed Trump’s claim that NATO allies had agreed to boost defense spending beyond their existing goal of 2 percent of gross domestic product by 2024. “There is a communique that was published yesterday; it’s very detailed,” Macron said. “It confirms the goal of 2 percent by 2024. That’s all.”

North Korean officials skip meeting on U.S. war dead BY ADAM TAYLOR Washington Post

SEOUL , SOUTH KORE A •

North Korean officials did not turn up to a meeting Thursday with the U.S. military about repatriating the remains of the war dead, according to a U.S. official with knowledge of the situation. The two sides had been expected to meet at the Korean Peninsula’s demilitarized zone and discuss the return of U.S. troop remains from the 19501953 war — an arrangement the State Department had announced after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s visit to Pyongyang last Friday and Saturday. On Thursday, however, Department of Defense and United Nations Command officials were left waiting in the DMZ’s Joint Security Area. The expected North Korean officials never arrived, according to the official who requested anonymity as he was not permitted to talk publicly about the event. “We were ready,” the official said. “It just didn’t happen. They didn’t show.” A State Department spokeswoman declined to comment but noted that Pompeo said after his talks in Pyongyang last week that the date for the meeting remained flexible. It was not immediately clear why North Korean officials did not attend the meeting on Thursday or whether they had ever confirmed their intention to.

LETTER FROM KIM Also on Thursday, President Donald Trump released a per-

sonal note from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un praising the “epochal progress” since their summit in Singapore last month, despite a series of recent setbacks that have cast doubt on denuclearization talks. In a tweet, Trump posted copies of the note — both in Korean and translated into English — in which Kim states that the summit was the “start of a meaningful journey.” “I deeply appreciate the energetic and extraordinary efforts made by Your Excellency Mr. President for the improvement of relations between the two countries,” Kim wrote, according to the letter, dated July 6. That was the day Pompeo arrived for two days of meetings with top North Korean officials, which ended on a sour note after Pyongyang blasted the U.S. side for issuing a “unilateral and gangster-like demand for denuclearization.”

HUMANITARIAN ISSUES Meanwhile, a senior U.N. official visiting North Korea said this week that about 20 percent of North Korean children are stunted because of malnutrition, and half the children in rural areas are drinking unsafe water. Much progress has been made compared with 20 years ago, but “significant humanitarian challenges” remain, Mark Lowcock, the undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs, said Wednesday at a news conference in Pyongyang. The U.N. issued a transcript of his remarks. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Rights group seeks investigation of Yemeni prisons • An international rights group on Thursday called for an investigation into alleged disappearances, torture and possible deaths in detention facilities run by the United Arab Emirates and its allied militias in southern Yemen as potential war crimes. Amnesty International’s call comes months after The Associated Press reported that the UAE and allied militias were running a network of secret detention facilities where torture and abuses were widespread, outside the control of Yemeni President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi’s government. The UAE issued a statement Thursday promptly rejecting Amnesty’s report, describing it as “politically motivated to undermine” Emirati efforts as part of the Saudi-led coalition in support of the Yemeni government. Israeli court suspends village demolition • Israel’s Supreme Court has suspended the planned demolition of a Bedouin village in the West Bank pending an appeal amid international opposition to the move. The court on Thursday extended a previous suspension of the corrugated shack encampment’s demolition until a hearing no later than Aug. 15. Israel claims Khan al-Ahmar, east of Jerusalem, was illegally built and has offered to resettle residents seven miles away. But critics say it is impossible for Palestinians to get building permits, and the removal of its roughly 180 residents is to make room for an Israeli settlement. Thousands protest services in Iraq, activist says • An activist says thousands of Iraqis in the southern Basra province have taken to the streets to protest against poor public services and unemployment. Sameer al-Maliki says the protesters fanned out on Thursday, demanding immediate action by the central government in Baghdad. They plan to block roads leading to oil fields and the nearby border with Iran on Sunday if their demands are not met. In a video posted online, an angry mob could be seen throwing stones at the guards of the West Qurna 2 oilfield, run by Russia’s Lukoil. Shots were heard in the background. From news services


NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

In a cosmic first, scientists detect ‘ghost particles’ from a distant galaxy When the sun was young and faint and the Earth was barely formed, a gigantic black hole in a distant, brilliant galaxy spat out a powerful jet of radiation. That jet contained neutrinos — subatomic particles so tiny and difficult to detect they are nicknamed “ghost particles.” Four billion years later, at Earth’s South Pole, 5,160 sensors buried more than a mile beneath the ice detected a single ghostly neutrino as it interacted with an atom. Scientists then traced the particle back to the galaxy that created it. The cosmic achievement, reported Thursday by a team of more than 1,000 researchers in the journal Science, is the first time scientists have detected a high-energy neutrino and been able to pinpoint where it came from. It heralds the arrival of a new era of astronomy in which researchers can learn about the universe using neutrinos as well as ordinary light. This is physics at its m os t m i n d - b og g l i n g and extreme. Researchers compared the breakthrough to the 2017 detection of ripples in space time caused by colliding dead stars, which added gravitational waves to scientists’ toolbox for observing the cosmos.

‘MESSENGERS’ FROM SPACE Neutrinos are so small that they seldom bump into atoms so humans can’t feel them. They don’t shed light, so our eyes can’t see them. Yet these very qualities make them invaluable for conveying information across time and space, scientists say. Light can be blocked and gravitational waves can be bent, but neutrinos are unscathed as they travel from the most violent events in the universe into a detector at the bottom of the Earth. Scientists call the kinds of signals they can detect through space, such as radio waves or gravitational waves or now neutrinos, “messengers.” If you’re trying to understand complex and chaotic phenomena happening billions of light-years away, it’s helpful to have a messenger like a neutrino: one that doesn’t get lost. “They’re very clean, they have simple interactions, and that means every single neutrino interaction tells you something,” said Heidi Schellman, a particle physicist at Oregon State University and computing coordinator for a different neutrino detection project, the Deep Underground Neu-

trino Experiment, who was not involved with the new research. Neutrinos arrive on Earth at varying energy levels, which are signatures of the processes that created them. By pairing neutrino detections with light observations, Schellman said, scientists will be able to answer questions about distant cataclysms, test theories about the composition of the universe, and refine their understanding of the fundamental rules of physics.

‘BRAND NEW VISION’ The high-energy neutrino reported Thursday was created in the fast-moving swirl of matter around a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. When this black hole generates a brilliant jet of radiation, and that jet is aimed directly at Earth, scientists call the galaxy a “blazar.” Subsequent analysis revealed this blazar had also produced a flare of more than a dozen neutrino events several years earlier. The new discovery, from the South Pole neutrino detector called IceCube, has also solved a mystery that stumped scientists for generations: What is the source of mysterious cosmic rays? These extremely energetic particles have been detected raining down from space since 1912, but researchers could not figure out what phenomenon could produce particles moving at such high speeds. Astroparticle physicist and IceCube spokesman Darren Grant said it’s as though scientists have spent 100 years listening to thunder with their eyes closed and never known what caused the booming sound. It wasn’t until they looked up and saw lightning that the spectacle finally made sense. Both sound and light — or in this case, cosmic rays and neutrinos — are coming from the same event. “That’s why this is exciting,” Grant said of the neutrino detection. “It’s a brand new vision on what’s happening in the universe.” Our universe is suffused with neutrinos, so named because they are uncharged (or “neutral”) and infinitesimally puny (about a millionth of the mass of an electron). They are created in nuclear reactions — at power plants, in the center of the sun, and amid even more extreme events — when protons accelerate, collide and then shatter in a shower of energetic particles. Neutrinos are the second most abundant type of particle in the universe, after photons (light particles). If you held your

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hand toward the sky, about a billion neutrinos from the sun would pass through it in a single second. But you wouldn’t feel their presence, because these ethereal particles rarely interact with normal matter. Unless a neutrino bumps right up against another particle, it passes through matter undisturbed and undetected.

FELIPE PEDREROS • National Science Foundation, IceCube

The IceCube lab, at the South Pole, under the stars in 2013.

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FRIDAY • 07.13.2018 • B

A CYBER HUB IN THE MAKING ‘Sharks’ gather • Program will put St. Louis cybersecurity industry on display Growing interest • Employers, universities work together to help build industry’s workforce

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Paulo Shakarian started a cybersecurity business in Tempe, Ariz., but he says recent visits to St. Louis were what really got the company off the ground.

Shakarian, founder of CYR3CON, came here this spring and summer for a business development program run by investment firm SixThirty Cyber. He’s one of a dozen cybersecurity entrepreneurs who will pitch their businesses to venture capitalists and potential corporate customers July 26 in a “Shark Tank”-style program hosted by World Wide Technology. That program will place a spotlight on a small but critical St. Louis sec-

tor that’s working to raise its visibility on the national stage. Participants will include venture capital funds from Chicago, Palm Beach, Fla., and Palo Alto, Calif., along with St. Louisbased SixThirty Cyber. Corporate “sharks” evaluating the startups will include information-security officials from Emerson, Monsanto and Spire. John True, a general See NICKLAUS • Page B5

JUST UNBEARABLE Build-A-Bear shuts down ‘Pay Your Age’ promotion amid huge crowds

Without tax credits, downtown hotel rehab in doubt Alterra delays construction until at least December BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

more than 100 people in line, extending out of the Build-ABear store into the mall’s corridor. In a Facebook post, the company said: “Based on the unprecedented response to our Pay Your Age Day event in our early opening stores, we are experiencing significantly longer than expected lines and large crowds. Local authorities are requiring us to limit the lines and crowds due to safety concerns. We understand this is disappointing. We are working to address the situation, and we will be reaching out to our valued guests soon.” Several hours later, the com-

The $104 million redevelopment of the historic Jefferson Arms building, one of downtown St. Louis’ biggest buildings, faces an uncertain future as the firm behind the project has missed out on key state tax credits it said it needed to fund the deal. Alterra Worldwide CEO Mukemmel “Mike” Sarimsakci said the company was not granted some $10 million in Missouri brownfield tax credits, which will delay construction until at least December. Brownfields are unused commercial sites that have environmental contamination. The contamination can include such problems as asbestos hazards or the use of lead. The city of St. Louis issued a $50 million construction permit this month for the project. But without the tax credits, Sarimsakci said he’s going back to the drawing board to find the additional funding. Sarimsakci said he didn’t yet know where the new financing would come from, leaving in question one of the biggest redevelopment projects in St. Louis. “All avenues are possible,” he said. “From a technical perspective, we could go pick up our permit and start construction tomorrow, but we want to make sure we have the funding to execute the project, and we can’t get started until we have 100 percent of that package together.” Otis Williams, executive

See BEAR • Page B5

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PHOTO COURTESY OF NATHAN KROMAT

Long lines form outside the Build-A-Bear store in the St. Louis Galleria on Thursday during a “Pay Your Age” sale that was later canceled.

BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Just a few hours into its heavily marketed “Pay Your Age” sales event, Build-A-Bear Workshop shut down the promotion because of large crowds and safety concerns. Officials with the Overlandbased company known for its customized stuffed toys said they closed lines in U.S. and Canada stores. The offer was also available at the chain’s stores in the United Kingdom. The line at St. Louis Galleria was enormous, according to one customer who sought to take advantage of the one-day sale. A photo posted on social media early Thursday showed

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Skylar Baughey, 8, of Clearwater, Fla., hugs her troll Thursday, moments after making it at the Build-A-Bear Workshop at Westfield Countryside Mall in Clearwater, Fla. Baughey stood in line with her family for more than four hours before gaining access to the store. Large crowds were reported throughout the U.S.

Selkirk Auctioneers moving downtown after litigation BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Selkirk Auctioneers and Appraisers, the St. Louis business whose name goes back almost 200 years, is moving from the Central West End to Washington Avenue downtown. Its first auction at its new showroom at 555 Washington Avenue will be July 21 and will feature a collection of art and artifacts collected by MacMur-

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ray College in Jacksonville, Ill. The move comes amid months of litigation between Selkirk and landlord Arlene Lilie Properties, a business affiliated with the local interior designer. Arlene Lilie sought to evict the auction house from its current gallery space at 4739 McPherson Avenue over late rent payments. But Selkirk’s parent comSee SELKIRK • Page B5

RYAN MICHALESKO • rmichalesko@post-dispatch.com

Ten years ago, on July 13, 2008, Anheuser-Busch announced it would end 156 years of independence and sell the St. Louis-based company to Belgium’s InBev. In Sunday’s Post-Dispatch Business section and on stltoday. com, read about current and former executives’ take on what has changed.

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1. FDIC insured to the maximum allowed by law. 2. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) assumes principal and interest remain on deposit for the term of the certificate. CD special rates are applicable for maximum deposit of $249,999.99 with a $1,000 minimum opening deposit. Penalty will be imposed for early withdrawal. Fees could reduce earnings. Offer only valid at St. Louis metro area U.S. Bank branches. Offer and same term apply for business CDs and Individual Retirement Accounts at U.S. Bank branches only. Not valid for brokerage deposits, institutional investors, Public Funds, or in conjunction with other promotional offers. APY accurate as of 6/14/18, is offered at the bank’s discretion, and is subject to change without prior notice. Member FDIC. ©2018 U.S. Bank 14901c 5/18 “World’s Most Ethical Companies” and “Ethisphere” names and marks are registered trademarks of Ethisphere LLC.


NETWORKING

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

KAI handles renovation work for Alberici subsidiaries KAI Design and Build was selected to renovate the offices of Alberici Corp. subsidiaries Hillsdale Fabricators and Kienlen Constructors. The project involved consolidating the employees’ workplaces on one floor with a centralized break room. The design incorporated the client’s steel fabrication expertise and featured sealed concrete floors, exposed ceilings and columns, and reclaimed wood. Among the features was a 25-footlong, nearly 5,000-pound trapezoidshaped conference room table made of steel with wood trim, which was built by Hillsdale Fabricators. Due to the weight and size of the custom furniture, cranes had to be used to place the piece in its new space.

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Erdbruegger chosen as president of Cass Bank

KAI Design and Build was selected for the renovation of two Alberici Corp. subsidiaries.

BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD

IT’S BACK!

RECEIVE 2 TICKETS TO THE BOMMARITO AUTOMOTIVE GROUP 500 INDYCAR RACE

AWARDS

Marine Solutions in St. Charles won the grand prize in the First Bank Tribute to Local Business promotion recognizing business owners and entrepreneurs for their commitment to business, employees and community.

1st Payment Paid by Audi Financial Services** 12 MODELS INCLUDED

EXPANDING Artur Express is expanding with the purchase of 145 new trucks.

See dealer for details.

2018 Audi A3 1st Payment Paid by $0 DOWN Plus Audi Financial Services

HELPING OUT The Nine Network of Public Media announced the following new officers on its board of directors: David Steward II, founder of Lion Forge LLC, will serve as chair; Mark C. Lindgren, senior vice president of corporate Steward communications and chief human resources officer for Ameren, will serve as vice chair; and Cynthia Brinkley, president and chief operating officer of Centene Corp., will serve as secretary. Kathy Barney, senior vice president group finance officer for Wells Fargo Advisors LLC, remains as treasurer.

Erdbruegger

WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE

BSR Services won the Excellence in Business award from the Snow and Ice Management Association.

**

284

$

Veteran banker Dwight D. Erdbruegger was named president of Cass Commercial Bank. Erdbruegger succeeds Robert J. Mathias, who will serve as vice chairman of the board. Erdbruegger has more than 30 years’ experience in commercial banking, the last 15 with Commerce Bank. Most recently he was chairman of CBIEF, the equipment finance subsidiary of Commerce. He was also chief administrative officer for Commerce Bank East Group, with offices in Missouri, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Tennessee. Erdbruegger earned a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from Purdue University and a master’s of business administration from Southern Methodist University.

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

10,000 miles per year

2018 Audi A4 1st Payment Paid by $999 DOWN Plus Audi Financial Services

**

299

$

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

Bergfeld

Fogarty

Patnana

Sides

Beller

Luckett

Marty

Gebhardt

Stonner

Allen

Baker

Hutter

Eaker

Jones

Schmidt

Connors

Connor

10,000 miles per year

OPENINGS

2018 Audi Q3 1st Payment Paid by $0 DOWN Plus Audi Financial Services

Kurtis B. Reeg opened Reeg Lawyers LLC: • 939 North Clay Avenue, Kirkwood

**

Exit 11 Workspace & Coffee House opened a drive-through coffee house: • 1403 Jefferson, Washington, Mo. Law firm Mathis, Marifian & Richter Ltd. opened a new office: • 17 East St. Joseph Street, Suite 102, Perryville, Mo.

PROJECTS Contegra Construction Co. teamed with Capri Pools & Aquatics on $18.5 million in improvements to the Blanchette Family Aquatic Facility and the Wapelhorst Family Aquatic Facility for the St. Charles Parks and Recreation Department.

329

$

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

10,000 miles per year

Complimentary Service Pickup And Delivery *36 month closed end lease, 10,000 miles per year, more miles available. Must qualify for all rebates. **1st payment paid by Audi Financial Services.Offers expire 7/31/18.

MISSOURI'S #1 AUDI RETAILER Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

Audi West County

RECOGNITION Insurance Agency Alliance’s Elizabeth Powers was named to Insurance Business America’s Elite Women list. Fischer Lumber Co. of East Alton was recognized for outstanding sales by Bertch Cabinet Manufacturing.

15736 MANCHESTER ROAD • EAST OF CLARKSON • 636-391-7228

Bommarito

Dr. David Campbell, founder of iFM Community Medicine, was named 2018 Family Physician of the Year by the Missouri Academy of Family Physicians.

www.audiwestcounty.com

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF

BUSINESS CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JOB FAIR • Multiple companies will participate in this hiring event hosted by JobNewsUSA.com. • 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Doubletree Hotel Westport, 1973 Craigshire, St. Louis • Free; preregister at JobNewsUSA.com

LISA BROWN

Business editor

314-340-8127

JACOB BARKER

Economic development

314-340-8291

BRIAN FELDT

Retail and financial institutions

314-340-8528

BRYCE GRAY

Energy and environment

314-340-8307

SAMANTHA LISS

Business of health

314-340-8017

DAVID NICKLAUS

Business columnist

314-340-8213

MARK SCHLINKMANN Transportation and real estate

314-340-8265

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

SUBMIT AN ITEM Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

Sports startup accelerator Stadia launches $25 million venture fund BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Stadia Ventures, the St. Louis-based business accelerator for sports startups, has started raising toward a new $25 million venture fund. According to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company has already raised at least $3.2 million of that total from 26 unidentified investors. The fund, called the Stadia Growth Fund, is being managed by Webster Groves-based Detalus, a wealth management firm that has roots in the St. Louis entrepreneurship community, including the creation of the now defunct St. Louis University Billiken Angels Network. Stadia was founded by Art Chou, a for-

Beyer

Hayden

Chou

mer Rawlings Sporting Goods executive, and Tim Hayden, SLU’s director of entrepreneurship, in 2015. The company invests up to $100,000 in each sports startup and brings the founders to St. Louis for a 12week mentoring and business develop-

ment program. It has now invested in 25 businesses, with the most recent collaboration being announced in April. This new fund would allow Stadia to continue its accelerator program and could allow for it to make follow-on investments in its current portfolio. Stadia announced in April that it will begin a separate track this fall for companies involved in esports, or competitive online gaming. It has invested in a handful of esports companies already, including Chicago-based GamerzArena, which stages daily video game contests offering cash prizes. Joe Pimmel, director of Detalus Advisors, is a partner in Stadia. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

Esse Health’s Watson Primary Care added Dr. Brian Bergfeld, Dr. Mark Fogarty and Dr. Radha Patnana. Anders CPAs + Advisors promoted Jennifer M. Sides to human resources director. In addition, the firm promoted Dan Beller, Lucas Luckett and Justin Marty to senior managers and Todd W. Gebhardt and Nathan P. Stonner to managers, all in the Tax Services group. Other promotions include Kenneth P. Allen and Zoltan Baker to supervisors in the Outsourced Accounting Services group; Erin E. Beyer and Tracy M. Hutter to supervisors in the Tax Services group; and Nicholas E. Eaker, Stephanie H. Jones and Natalie A. Schmidt to supervisors in the Audit and Advisory Services group. Reliv International Inc. promoted the following: Tom Pinnock to president of sales and marketing; R. Scott Montgomery to president of operations and international; Debra Hellweg to senior vice president and chief operating officer; Kurt Wulff to senior vice president of marketing; and Jim Lahm to vice president of information technology. Gabriel Group added Lynn Connors as director of business development. Jim Struble was appointed president and CEO of Electro Savings Credit Union. Marc Connor was named to the newly created position of chief experience officer for the Midas affiliated companies: Midas Hospitality, Midas Capital, Midas Development and MC Hotel Construction.


MARKET WATCH

07.13.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Technology companies led a rally in U.S. stocks Thursday, driving the tech-heavy Nasdaq composite index to an all-time high. The broad advance erased the market's day-earlier losses. Health care and industrial companies also posted solid gains.

CA

$36

40

34

35

32

30

A

M J 52-week range

30

J

24,960

Dow Jones industrials

24,460

Close: 24,924.89 Change: 224.44 (0.9%)

M J 52-week range

26,400

$44.00

35

45

2,740

Close: 2,798.29 Change: 24.27 (0.9%)

$30.70

DATE

CLOSE

Corn

Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

336.50 830 482.50

Wheat

M

A

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

2,720

Hogs

Aug 18 Aug 18 Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

151.02 105.02 79.95 14.30 276.80

+1.62 +1.17 +.18 +.09 +3.45

J

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Sep 18 Jul 18 Sep 18

88.54 108.70 25.66

+4.00 -.50 -.34

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18

70.33 2.0717 212.31 2.797

2,560

J

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

2,783 2,904 1748 1081 ... ...

1,872 1,701 1659 1153 105 51

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

M

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 24939.97 10531.08 722.26 12771.98 7825.67 2799.22 2000.51 29239.33 1692.43

LOW 24802.90 10414.42 717.38 12709.28 7746.76 2781.53 1986.02 29052.81 1679.26

CLOSE 24924.89 10488.62 720.88 12761.46 7823.92 2798.29 1996.73 29234.45 1690.28

CHG. +224.44 +46.15 +0.32 +79.87 +107.31 +24.27 +5.25 +250.79 +6.62

%CHG. WK +0.91% s +0.44% s +0.04% t +0.63% s +1.39% s +0.87% s +0.26% s +0.87% s +0.39% s

MO QTR t s t s s s t s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +0.83% -1.17% -0.34% -0.37% +13.33% +4.66% +5.06% +5.18% +10.08%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

31.17

39.80 32.23 +.36 +1.1 -17.1

AEGN

19.11

28.19 25.59

-.34 -1.3

+0.6 +14.4 22

Amdocs

DOX

61.00

71.72 68.75 +.97 +1.4

+5.0 +6.1 19

1.00 Huttig Building Prod HBP

4.43

7.75

4.47

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

64.89 61.37

-.01

+4.0 +17.4 22

1.80

3.30

3.25

42.52 41.53

-.37 -0.9

1.83 Lee Ent 1.60 Lowes

...

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

ABInBev

BUD

91.70 126.50 103.41 +.35 +0.3

Arch Coal

ARCH

-0.3 +18.9

6

2.00 General Motors

GM

... Home Depot

HD

-3.3 26 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 68.93 102.61 78.08 +.84 +1.1 -16.2 +7.9 7 1.60 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

5.60

BAC

22.75

33.05 28.77 +.09 +0.3

53.65

87.15 65.55 +.91 +1.4 -15.1 -13.8 12

0.20

202.19 374.48 346.03 +5.43 +1.6 +17.3 +68.2 36

6.84

Belden Inc

BDC BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

7.25

11.93

11.00

7.12

-7.3

Bank of America Boeing

-.02 -0.3 -13.2 -34.1 11 -2.5 +18.5 16

7.80 +.10 +1.3 -15.2 -23.8 27

... McDonald’s 0.48

...

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.39

37.06 32.87 -1.06 -3.1

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

53.23

74.49 71.23 +.42 +0.6 +22.4 +20.6 35 1.04f

Centene Corp.

CNC

79.06 132.06 132.68 +1.23 +0.9 +31.5 +60.3 21

Charter

CHTR 250.10 408.83 305.02 +3.65 +1.2

-1.8 +28.3 15

-9.2 -10.8 99

0.28 ... ...

Citigroup

C

64.38

80.70 68.51 +.60 +0.9

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

67.42 67.98 +1.59 +2.4 +21.7 +25.3 21 0.94f

-7.9 +3.6 12

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

76.76 51.70 +1.01 +2.0 -12.9 -30.3 13

Emerson

EMR

57.47

74.45 70.23 +1.16 +1.7

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

64.93 62.97 +.22 +0.4 +31.2 +36.0 22

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.65

57.05 54.85

Esco Technologies

ESE

LEE

50.30

Express Scripts

ESRX

55.80

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.28

FutureFuel

FF

11.32

-.50 -0.9 +21.5 +37.6 20

66.80 61.80 +1.40 +2.3 85.07 81.61 +1.04 +1.3 4.88

3.79

+0.8 +18.7 27

+2.6 +1.2 21 +9.3 +30.9 11

-.02 -0.5 -13.3

16.22 13.74 +.01 +0.1

-2.5

-6.5 dd

1.28

Olin

-.03 -0.1

-4.2 +15.3 dd

1.52

+4.4 +33.3 26

4.12

34.50

46.76 39.27

LOW

70.76 108.98 98.30 11.65

-.06 -1.3 -32.8 -33.5 dd ...

... +38.3 +71.1

-.31 -0.3

49.12 21.51 +.55 +2.6

7

... ...

+5.8 +31.5 22 1.92f -4.7 -51.3

...

MA

121.82 204.15 207.78 +3.94 +1.9 +37.3 +64.9 48

MCD

146.84 178.70 159.12 +.50 +0.3

-7.6 +5.0 24

OLN

27.68

38.84 29.29 +.18 +0.6 -17.7

47.84 44.33 +.04 +0.1 +12.6 +72.0

-0.5

1.00 4.04

9

0.80

-2.8 +20.2 dd

0.28

Peabody Energy

BTU

24.93

Peak Resorts

SKIS

4.10

Perficient

PRFT

16.70

27.51 26.90 +.28 +1.1 +41.1 +45.5 52

...

70.66

88.93 87.29 +.42 +0.5 +10.2 +12.2 53

...

Post Holdings

POST RGA

Reliv

RELV

Spire Inc

SR

Stifel Financial

... Target Corp. 1.94 UPS B

5.78

5.25

126.62 165.12 136.00 3.72 60.09

13.77

...

...

-.10 -0.1 -12.8 +7.1 12 2.00f

4.99 +.21 +4.4

+4.6 -45.8 dd

...

-3.3 +8.8 20

2.25

82.85 72.70

-.05 -0.1

-.91 -1.7 -12.5 +14.5 16 0.48f

SF

44.44

68.76 52.09

50.04

79.59 76.50 -1.08 -1.4 +17.2 +58.8 14 2.56f

101.45 135.53 108.53 +1.20 +1.1

X

20.89

47.64 35.94

-.34 -0.9

+2.1 +63.5 21

0.20

0.32 Verizon

VZ

42.80

54.77 51.24

-.10 -0.2

-3.2 +25.2

2.36

WMT

73.13 109.98 86.52

0.13 Walgreen Boots

-5.7 17 0.24a Wells Fargo

-.01

-4.1 +1.3 14

7

1.20

... -12.4 +20.6 21 2.08f

WBA

59.07

83.89 63.88 +.22 +0.3 -12.0 -15.6 14 1.76f

WFC

49.27

66.31 56.03

-.04 -0.1

-7.6 +4.7 13

1.56

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST BJC HealthCare cuts 113 IT jobs • BJC HealthCare, the area’s largest employer, laid off 113 individuals in the IT department on Wednesday. Of the 113 affected, 68 were employees and 45 were contractors. The health system said the layoffs were a result of increasing its focus on strategic priorities and aligning work and resources to support those priorities. “Reprioritizing the work towards improved system stability, strengthening of information protection, and disciplined execution requires changes in the IT staffing structure,” according to a statement from June Fowler, BJC spokeswoman. The layoffs follow the health system’s recent conversion to a new IT platform, EPIC, which supports inpatient and outpatient clinical services. “The BJC human resources team is working closely with these affected colleagues to support them through this transition. “ BJC HealthCare currently has about 31,000 employees. Commerce Bank parent posts strong first half • Commerce Bancshares, which operates the third largest retail bank in St. Louis, Commerce Bank, reported record net earnings per share of $1.01 in the second quarter, or $110 million in profit in total. That’s up more than 9 percent from the prior year period. Revenue for the quarter was $336 million, up from $313 million in the prior year period. “The U.S. economy remains strong, and our credit environment continues to be very favorable,” said Chairman and CEO David Kemper, who will step down as chief executive of the company next month. John Kemper, David Kemper’s son, was named the next CEO of the company earlier this year. John Kemper, 40, joined the bank in 2007 and was chosen as COO in 2013. For the first six months of the year, Commerce posted a $211 million profit on $648 million in

revenue, better than the $150 million profit on $586 million in revenue in the first half of last year. Total assets under management at the end of June was at $24.5 billion, with total loans coming in at $14 billion and total deposits at $20.3 billion. Mortgage rates settle in for the summer • After a big jump to start the year, mortgage rates have settled in for the summer. According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac, the 30-year fixed-rate average ticked up to 4.53 percent with an average 0.4 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1 percent of the loan amount.) It was the first increase in three weeks. The 30-year fixed rate was 4.52 percent a week ago and 4.03 percent a year ago. The 15-year fixed-rate average rose to 4.02 percent with an average 0.4 point. It was 3.99 percent a week ago and 3.29 percent a year ago. The five-year adjustable rate average jumped to 3.86 percent with an average 0.3 point. It was 3.74 percent a week ago and 3.28 percent a year ago. Mortgage rates haven’t moved much since April. The 30-year fixed rate has drifted between 4.55 percent and 4.66 percent with incremental increases and decreases each week. “The 10-year Treasury yield continues to hover along the same narrow range, as increased global trade tensions are causing investors to take a cautious approach,” Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist, said in a statement. “This in turn has kept borrowing costs at bay, which is certainly (welcome) news for those looking to buy a home before the summer ends.” Many experts don’t expect this trend to change soon. Bankrate. com, which puts out a weekly mortgage rate trend index, found that more than half the experts it surveyed say rates will remain relatively stable in the coming week. From staff and wire reports

CHG

CLOSE

1245.00 15.90 842.30

Gold Silver

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.85 percent Thursday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

+2.20 +.17 +11.30

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.00 4.50 4.25

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.95 2.16 2.34 2.59 2.75 2.82 2.85 2.95

... +0.02 +0.01 +0.01 ... ... -0.01 ...

1.04 1.13 1.19 1.34 1.88 2.14 2.33 2.88

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS 1.88 1.38 1.13

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.99 3.29 6.45 3.82 3.98 .73

-0.01 -0.02 +0.03 -0.03 -0.02 ...

1.67 2.59 5.74 3.74 3.22 .56

GlobalMarkets

3.64

USB

48.49

58.50 51.36 +.10 +0.2

-8.9 +0.7 18

1.16 US Bancorp 0.44 US Steel ... WalMart

.0365 .7377 .2579 1.3211 .7577 .1496 1.1674 .0145 .2747 .008925 .052593 .0160 .0739 .000886 1.0039

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

0.60

TGT UPS

-.05 +.0103 +2.23 -.032

PREV

.0367 .7403 .2567 1.3209 .7593 .1500 1.1670 .0146 .2743 .008892 .052820 .0160 .0751 .000889 .9970

Platinum

144.25 207.61 197.95 +1.00 +0.5

MNK

ReinsGrp

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

Aegion Corp

-7.5 12

$53.70

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

J

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$40.15

+5.25 +.25 +12.75

CHICAGO MERC

Copper

M J 52-week range

ExchangeRates

Feeder cattle

Milk

A

Vol.: 6.5m (8.8x avg.) PE: 12.0 Mkt. Cap: $5.1 b Yield: 1.9%

CHG

2,800

2,640

F

40

J $63.10

CHICAGO BOT

Soybeans

10 DAYS

24,800

J

M J 52-week range

Vol.: 14.7m (3.3x avg.) PE: 9.9 Mkt. Cap: $9.0 b Yield: 7.4%

Live cattle

24,000

A

Futures

S&P 500

25,600

23,200

$50

30

OZRK

Close: $42.12 -3.90 or -8.5% The bank’s second-quarter revenue fell short of Wall Street forecasts.

$40

J

2,880

27,200

Bank of the Ozarks

LB

Close: $32.34 -4.43 or -12.1% The retailer said sales at Victoria’s Secret decreased in June.

Vol.: 21.8m (0.8x avg.) PE: 7.1 Mkt. Cap: $158.7 b Yield: 2.2%

2,800

2,680

10 DAYS

A

$30.43

$44.20

Vol.: 76.3m (33.0x avg.) PE: 39.2 Mkt. Cap: $18.6 b Yield: 2.3%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

L Brands

CMCSA

Close: $34.55 0.78 or 2.3% The cable and internet provider raised its offer for European pay TV company Sky.

$45

$30.45

23,960

Comcast

CA

Close: $44.15 6.94 or 18.7% The IT management software company agreed to be bought by chipmaker Broadcom.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2798.29 12492.97 7651.33 28480.83 5405.90 48696.30 22187.96 75856.25 16567.42 8818.19

CHG

CHG

YTD

+24.27 +75.84 +59.37 +169.14 +51.98 -328.85 +255.75 +1457.69 +150.10 +135.26

+0.87% +0.61% +0.78% +0.60% +0.97% -0.67% +1.17% +1.96% +0.91% +1.56%

+4.66% -3.29% -0.47% -4.81% +1.76% -1.33% -2.53% -0.71% +2.21% -6.01%

Tech sector shakes off tariff tension to lead stock rally Bolstered by Apple and Microsoft, Nasdaq closes at a record high BY MARLEY JAY associated Press

Technology companies soared Thursday as major U.S. stock indexes recovered the ground they lost a day earlier. The Nasdaq composite closed at another alltime high. Big names such as Apple and Microsoft and chipmakers including Intel all made big gains as investors remain optimistic about the technology sector even though much of the market has been shaken by escalating tension between the U.S. and its trading partners, especially China. Most banks will begin reporting their second-quarter results Friday morning. Investors expect another round of strong profit growth for the whole market, but they’re especially optimistic about technology companies. They will announce their earnings later this month. “Tech has been there for them through all of these ups and downs,” said Karyn Cavanaugh, senior markets strategist at Voya Investment Management. “They’re a good wingman for investors, and that’s why investors are sticking with them.” The S&P 500 index rose 24.27 points, or 0.9 percent, to 2,798.29. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 224.44 points, or 0.9 percent, to 24,924.89. The Nasdaq jumped 107.30 points, or 1.4 percent, to 7,823.92. Its last record came on June 20. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks added 6.61 points, or 0.4 percent, to 1,690.28. Industrial companies also re-

gained much of the ground they lost Wednesday, but energy companies and basic materials makers failed to rally. Defense contractors climbed after President Donald Trump advocated for more defense spending in the U.S. and Europe. Several European leaders said NATO spending plans haven’t changed. Software maker CA made the biggest gain in the technology sector after it accepted an offer from Broadcom worth $18.9 billion, or $44.50 per share. Its stock rocketed 18.7 percent to $44.15. Broadcom investors expressed their disapproval of the deal, which involves Broadcom taking on $18 billion in debt. The stock dropped 13.7 percent to $209.98. Broadcom’s market value fell by $14.4 billion. The merry-go-round of potential media deals continued as Comcast offered to buy European pay-TV company Sky for $34 billion a day after Twenty-First Century Fox increased its own offer for Sky. Fox already owns part of Sky, and while it tangles with Comcast, Comcast and Disney are also trying to buy Fox itself. Fox recently accepted Disney’s $71 billion offer. The New York Times reported Thursday that Comcast will focus on Sky and end its pursuit of Fox. Sky’s stock rose 3.4 percent in London. In the U.S., Comcast rose 2.3 percent to $34.55 and Fox fell 0.9 percent to $47.38. Disney gained 0.2 percent to $108.25. CVS Health rose 1 percent to $67.99 and Aetna gained 1.9 percent to $191.09 after Bloomberg reported that the Depart-

ment of Justice won’t try to stop CVS from buying Aetna. AT&T fell 1.3 percent in aftermarket trading after the Justice Department appealed a court ruling that allowed AT&T to buy Time Warner. Papa John’s International jumped 11 percent to $53.67 as founder John Schnatter resigned as chairman after confirming a report that he had used a racial slur during a conference call in May. Stifel analyst Christopher Cull said Wall Street has viewed the company as a potential sale target for some time and investors feel that’s more likely without Schnatter in charge. Since Schnatter is still its largest shareholder, Cull doesn’t think a sale will happen. Schnatter owns about 29 percent of the company’s stock, and the value of his stake jumped by $50.5 million to Thursday to about $507 million in total. Benchmark U.S. crude dipped 0.1 percent to $70.33 a barrel in New York while Brent crude, used to price international oils, rose 1.4 percent to $74.45 per barrel in London. Wholesale gasoline added 0.5 percent to $2.07 a gallon. Heating oil rose 1.1 percent to $2.12 a gallon. Natural gas fell 1.1 percent to $2.80 per 1,000 cubic feet. Bond prices ticked higher. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.85 percent from 2.86 percent. Gold rose 0.2 percent to $1,246.60 an ounce. Silver gained 1 percent to $15.98 an ounce. Copper rose 1.2 percent to $2.78 a pound after it fell to an 11-month low on Wednesday.

THE BOTTOM LINE: MCKEE VS. THE CITY St. Louis leaders want to revoke Paul McKee’s redevelopment rights in North St. Louis, and McKee says the city hasn’t lived up to its obligations. Jim Gallagher and David Nicklaus sort out what the dispute means for future development. stltoday.com/watch


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

Trump’s Supreme Court Railroad CEO sees leaving pick could transform labor NAFTA as ‘disastrous’ Recent decisions have favored employers

Fritz likes Trump’s tax cuts and regulatory policies BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JEFF STEIN Washington Post

President Donald Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court may prove a crucial conservative vote in cases defining protections for gay and lesbian workers, the scope of union organizing, and the rights of workers to take their grievances to court, according to labor law experts. On Monday night, Trump announced the selection of Brett Kavanaugh, a federal judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The Supreme Court dealt two significant blows to unions in its most recent term, issuing one ruling that will weaken funding for public sector unions and another that lets companies force workers to settle complaints through private arbitration instead of the courts. Justice Anthony Kennedy, who said late last month that he would step down from the bench, sided with the conservatives in both cases. But experts said the court’s opposition to organized labor’s priorities is likely to intensify if Kavanaugh is confirmed. “This last term was horrendous for workers. If you are to have imagined a nightmare scenario for workers and workers’ rights, this would be it,” said Benjamin Sachs, a labor law expert at Harvard University. “But in those cases, the ruling justices also planted seeds that could lead to further damage against workers.” On the right, conservative policy experts expressed optimism that Trump’s nominee would continue pushing the court in the direction Chief Justice John Roberts has steered it in recent years. “The Supreme Court has shown enthusiasm for respecting the rights of individual workers and going after a constitutionally questionable status quo of forced unionism,” said Akash Chougule, policy director at Americans for Prosperity, a conservative advocacy group tied to the network run by the Koch brothers. “Where constitutional questions remain, we think that effort will continue.” An overview of Kavanaugh’s written opinions on labor law by Littler Mendelson P.C., a law firm that represents employers in labor disputes, found that the nominee’s writings “do not reveal any particular leanings that might concern the employer community.” Here are three areas where Trump’s Supreme Court pick could dramatically change U.S.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

labor law:

THE SCOPE OF THE UNION Workers can form a union with a simple majority vote. Under current labor law, the union represents all the workers in the relevant group — whether they voted for the union to be formed or not. B u t t h e S u p re m e Court’s ruling in Janus v. AFSCME said government workers cannot be forced to pay fees to a union, calling it a violation of their free speech rights. Now, labor groups fear that the court will take one step further and say public sector workers also cannot be represented by a union they did not seek to join. The court could rule that membership requires some sort of declaration from an employee that she wants to be a part of the union, which could reduce the number of workers the union represents. “It’s the cornerstone of our whole labor system since the New Deal,” said Kate Andrias, a labor law expert at the University of Michigan. “Pulling that apart represents real change — there’s no doubt, whatever side you’re on, that it would be a huge transformation of our labor relations.” Several cases have already been filed by the National Right to Work Committee that aim to limit unions’ ability to represent all the workers in a given unit, according to Sachs, the Harvard professor. One of those cases could eventually land before the Supreme Court. EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION BASED ON SEXUALITY Kavanaugh may also have to decide whether businesses can discriminate in hiring based on sexual orientation. The courts had long held that a company can reject a job application because someone is gay, bisexual or transgender. But, more recently, some lower courts — including the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit — have found that LGBTQ people are protected from hiring discrimination.

That at least raises the possibility that the Supreme Court will eventually have to weigh in. “It’s a momentous question,” said Brishen Rogers, a labor law professor at Temple Law School and visiting scholar at the Roosevelt Institute, a left-leaning think-tank. Under Kennedy, gay rights activists were optimistic they had an ally. Kennedy wrote the majority opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges, the 2015 case that found that same-sex couples have the right to marry. That ruling suggested that he could support broader employment protections for gay and lesbian workers. “Most people were pretty optimistic with Kennedy that he’d say lesbian, gay and bisexual people were protected,” Rogers said. “With a more conservative replacement, it’s less likely that would happen.” In employment discrimination cases, Kavanaugh’s decisions “over the years typically favored the employer,” the review by Littler Mendelson found. The review did not specifically cite a case about discrimination based on sexual orientation.

MAKING EMPOYEES USE ARBITRATION, NOT COURTS Organized labor is also worried that a court that includes Kavanaugh would allow more employers to force their workers to argue their complaints through arbitration, a private adjudication, rather than through the public courts. In its most recent session, the Supreme Court ruled in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis that companies can require workers to settle employment disputes through individual arbitration, finding that employees should not always have the ability to bring collective action claims through the courts. The decision, written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, a Trump appointee, could affect more than 25 million workers. Business groups celebrated the decision, arguing that it will help employers avoid expensive litigation. But liberals and labor advocates fear that the court could erode workers’ ability to pursue an independent judgment on their grievances. The Supreme Court has already suggested that it will hear one case about forced arbitration. Kavanaugh ruled last year against employees’ right to bring a lawsuit under the Occupational Safety and Health Act’s retaliation provision, the Littler Mendelson review said.

WA S H I N GTO N • In a sharp critique of Trump administration trade policies, the president and CEO of the Union Pacific Railroad said Thursday that withdrawal from the North American Free Trade Agreement would have a “disastrous” impact on the economy, and that President Donald Trump’s trade war with allies diverts the U.S. from a more pressing trade imbalance with China. Lance Fritz said at a National Press Club luncheon that new tariffs on steel have driven up the cost of a new mile of railroad track from $3 million to $3.75 million, and that tariffcaused uncertainty at U.S. ports is leaving ships sitting in docks, unloaded, for weeks at a time. He said he is worried that a withdrawal from NAFTA after ongoing negotiations between the U.S. and Canada and Mexico would be an unnecessary shock to an economy

that is booming from other Trump administration policies on taxes and trade. “The best outcome is let’s close this baby up quickly, let’s stop picking fights with some of our trade partners, and let’s focus our full attention and might on the issues at hand, which is fair and equitable trade investment with China,” Fritz said. The Union Pacific operates 32,000 miles of U.S. railroad track, and handles about 70 percent of the rail business to and from Mexico. Fritz said Trump’s tax cuts and regulatory relief have allowed his company to boost annual capital investments of around $3 billion by at least $150 million in the first year. “I have heard very positive news from our customers that say that both tax reform and the sensible approach to regulation are generating strong consumer optimism, generating demand for them, and growing their confidence in capital investment,” Fritz said. “But our potential exit from (NAFTA),

along with a growing list of tariffs and escalating trade tensions with our trade partners, threatens to undo much of our progress.” Asked if he had any allies on that position in the Trump administration, Fritz singled out Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, economic adviser Lawrence Kudlow and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. They “get the utility of trade and the end game right,” Fritz said, referring to fair trade deals for American workers, but “what I am worried about is the tactics.” On anther topic, Fritz outlined modest expectations for an upgraded high-speed passenger rail line between Chicago and St. Louis, operated by Amtrak on his company’s rails. “I don’t think ridership is going to explode” or that “it is going to replace the air service between Chicago and St. Louis,” Fritz said. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

BEST OF BUILDING BLOCKS Highlights from our real estate and development blog. stltoday.com/ buildingblocks Rise finishes Adams Grove development in Forest Park Southeast • Rise Community Development’s Adams Grove project in the Forest Park Southeast neighborhood marked the official completion of its 50 affordable rental homes Thursday. The project, which used state low income housing tax credits, built the contemporary homes and garden apartments in the 4400 blocks of Vista, Norfolk and Swan avenues, all on the south side of Manchester Road near the Grove entertainment district. The rent-restricted units are being added to a neighborhood that has quickly gentrified in recent years. The Washington University Medical Center Redevelopment Corp., which had worked to revive the neighborhood, also wanted to keep it mixed-income. It sold land it had accumulated over the years to Rise Community Development as part of the project. Unify Grove Development is building some 46 market rate homes, called the Core@ South Newstead, in the same area. (07.12)

Washington University seeks developers for corner of Kingshighway, I-64 • A Washington University real estate arm is looking for companies interested in developing the southeast corner of Kingshighway and Interstate 64 (Highway 40). Washington University Medical Center Redevelopment Corp.’s Forest West Properties recently acquired the excess right of way from the Missouri Department of Transportation. It issued a request for qualifications from developers in late June, with responses due by July 27. Final development proposals will be due Sept. 28. The 1.7-acre site is at the northwest edge of the rapidly redeveloping Forest Park Southeast neighborhood, and just south of the highway from the BJC Hospital and Washington University Medical Center campus. The Washington University real estate company acquired the property from MoDOT in early June. The request for qualifications is fairly open-ended. However, the site’s designation as a “neighborhood core” district within the neighborhood’s form-based

zoning code suggests residential development. The minimum height is three stories, or 40 feet, and the maximum height is seven stories, or 90 feet. Examples of intended building forms in that kind of district appear to be apartments. The request for qualifications also suggests affordable units should be included among market rate housing units, a strategy the university redevelopment corporation has pursued in the neighborhood. “If the proposal includes residential components, please provide a discussion of mixed income strategies that might be pursued, including opportunities for both subsidized and unsubsidized affordable units,” the request says. However, it’s no secret Drury Development, an arm of the hotel company, has been interested in the area. It owns the stretch of vacant houses along Kingshighway in between Arco and Oakland avenues as well as several properties just to the east within the Forest Park Southeast neighborhood. Charles L. Drury, the CEO of the company, also owns two properties to the north, just south of Gibson Avenue and the former MoDOT right of way. (07.12)

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BUSINESS

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

M1 Bank launching business, personal bank in Des Peres FROM STAFF REPORTS

Ken Poteet, the former bank executive who founded Sterling Bank in 2004, is launching a new financial institution called M1 Bank. The bank plans to begin offering banking services in the St. Louis region, with a branch planned at 11679 Manchester Road in Des Peres, according to materials filed with the city. According to its website, m1bank.net, the bank plans to offer both commercial and personal banking services. The bank isn’t new to Missouri. According to a 2017 regulatory filing, M1 Bancshares became

a bank holding company by acquiring 100 percent of the voting shares of the Bank of Macks Creek, in Macks Creek, Mo. The Bank of Macks Creek changed its legal name and is currently doing business as M1 Bank, according to the FDIC. Prior to resigning from Sterling in 2016, Poteet helped the company grow to $1.4 billion in assets under management. According to Poteet’s LinkedIn profile, he’s been working on the new bank since July 2017. The holding company for the bank is based in Clayton. M1 will specialize in low to moderate income housing and alternative energy tax credit lending.

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

Qualified workers are in short supply NICKLAUS • FROM B1

partner at SixThirty Cyber and Cultivation Capital, another St. Louis venture fund, says an engaged corporate customer base has been important in building a cybersecurity industry here. “It has positioned St. Louis as being a little different,” True said. “We’ve been able to coordinate all these cybersecurity experts and buyers in one place. You go to New York or San Francisco, those folks don’t communicate or collaborate nearly as much as the folks in St. Louis do.” Shakarian, whose software uses artificial intelligence to analyze communications among known hackers, was mentored in St. Louis by several people with corporate experience. By helping him think about how customers might use the product, he said, “They really helped us. We have a night-and-day difference in our sales process.” St. Louis is the headquarters of a group called the Security Advisor Alliance, whose members are the

top information security officers at large corporations. The group was founded here in 2013, and its local chapter is one of the largest. Local cybersecurity assets also include Scott Air Force Base and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. Because of such employers, the website Cyberseek.org says the concentration of data-protection jobs here is 40 percent above the national average. That so-called location quotient ranks us ahead of Chicago, about equal with Boston and slightly higher than Austin, Texas. The sector can’t keep growing, though, if it can’t find enough workers. Cyberseek says St. Louis-area employers advertised 3,995 cybersecurity jobs in the past year, and adds that the supply of qualified workers is very low. Efforts are underway to address that problem. Seven area colleges and universities have formed a consortium to work on cybersecurity education. The Midwest Cyber Center, with offices downtown and near Scott,

started an apprenticeship program last year that was the third of its kind in the nation. Executive Director Tony Bryan says the center has placed 11 apprentices at employers including Monsanto and Peabody Energy, and he plans to expand the program. Such innovation and cooperation, venture capitalist True says, make this a good place to nurture earlystage companies. SixThirty Cyber has invested in 11 companies since 2016, of which 6 were founded outside the U.S. One of them, Norwegian software firm Appsco, moved its headquarters to St. Louis. True said two Israeli startups also are looking to base North American sales offices here. From where he sits in Arizona, Shakarian can see the appeal of St. Louis as a cybersecurity hub. “It took a bit of time and expense to participate there, but I’d do it again in a heartbeat,” he says. “We got clear benefits out of it.” David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

Selkirk likes gallery feel of new downtown digs SELKIRK • FROM B1

pany, Legacy Group STL, sued, arguing that it had paid all fees and interest on late rental payments and that Arlene Lilie had accepted those payments without “even a suggestion that future late payments would be considered a default.” Selkirk’s lawyers suggested the building next door was for sale and could be a factor in Arlene Lilie’s strict enforcement of Selkirk’s lease terms. A judge sided with the landlord in January, and it moved to evict the company, whose storied name in the St. Louis art and auction business dates to 1830. Selkirk owner Jeff Jeffers said the lease had expired on its McPherson showroom. And the new space, in the building between the Missouri Athletic Club and the National Blues Museum, is about 60 percent larger than its Central West End location, he said, with “more of a gallery feel.” “We like the idea of being in the downtown in this historic building,” Jeffers said. The parking situation should also improve, he added. Litigation over the old space is wrapping up, he said. S u m m e rs C o m p ton Wells attorney Dan

Welsh, who represented Arlene Lilie, said in a statement he was “pleased that Legacy Group has decided to forgo its unsustainable positions and end its holdover occupancy. We look forward to leasing the property to a creditworthy tenant.” Jeffers, of Garth’s Auctioneers and Appraisers in Columbus, Ohio, purchased Selkirk Auctioneers in 2014, hoping to revive the company following a troubled stretch for the venerable brand. The original Selkirk family sold the company to London-based Phillips in 1998 after six generations had a hand in running it. Malcolm Ivey then bought it in 2002 and it became Ivey-Selkirk. Financial troubles became clear by 2014, and creditor LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton of Paris then foreclosed on Ivey Selkirk. The company sold its interest in Selkirk to Garth’s. Under the Garth’s ownership, the Selkirk auction house left its longtime home on Forsyth Boulevard in Clayton and reopened in the Central West End location about three years ago. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

The Jefferson Arms, at 415 North Tucker Boulevard, was built as a hotel for the 1904 World’s Fair.

Alterra looks for funding to rehab Jefferson Arms TAX CREDITS • FROM B1

director of the St. Louis Development Corp., said the city is monitoring the situation but wasn’t overly concerned about the project’s viability. “There’s always things that pop up that cause delays or other concerns, and we have confidence Alterra will sort this out,” Williams said. Alterra’s planned revamp of the vacant Jefferson Arms, a 500,000-squarefoot structure built as a

hotel for the 1904 World’s Fair, includes co-working space, retail, 240 apartments and a roughly 200room Marriott AC hotel. St. Louis officials have already offered up to $17.3 million in tax-increment financing to help with the development and additional $2.6 million generated from special sales tax districts on site. Williams said the city is not likely to provide more

public financing in light of recent events. Alterra in late December inked an agreement with the Gateway to the Midwest Investment Center, an entity affiliated with the World Trade Center St. Louis, to use the federal EB-5 program, which gives those foreign investors green cards — permanent U.S. residency — if they create enough new jobs. Sarimsakci said he hoped to raise about $50 million through that program. Williams said it’s possible Alterra could raise more through the program to make up for the absence of brownfield credits. Sarimsakci, a Turkish-

born developer, has used foreign contacts to raise overseas capital for other projects. Questions about those foreign ties and the potential conflicts they posed for President Donald Trump’s administration were at least part of the reason the Trump Organization pulled out of a hotel deal with him, the New York Times reported. Sarimsakci had said he was working with the Trump Organization to roll out the Scion hotel brand, and early plans even included the possibility of one in the Jefferson Arms. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

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pany issued a release that said it could not have predicted the overwhelming interest in the sales event where its popular bears and other toys could be purchased for as little as a dollar. “In response, we distributed vouchers to guests, who were present in lines, to be redeemed for a future purchase,” the company said in the release. “We are now making vouchers available to

our Build-A-Bear Bonus Club members in the U.S. and Canada who log into their account by midnight on July 15, 2018. Vouchers related to this event will be honored through August 31, 2018.” Under the promotion, customers were allowed to pay whatever their age was for a Build-A-Bear, with the minimum price being $1 and a $29 cap. The sale was only for July 12. Nate Kromat, a Fox Park resident who was

there with his two children, ages 1 and 12, said he arrived at the Galleria 15 minutes early, thinking he’d be one of the first in line when the Build-ABear store opened. “That was obviously not the case,” he said. “I forgot that the mall actually opens early for mall walkers, so I think a lot of people got there earlier than we did. People seemed more frustrated toward the end of the line, but most were there having a good time.”

Kromat said he and his children decided to ditch the line and head over to the Disney Store, where there was also a line to get in. B u i l d -A- Bea r ’s o ffer was only available at stores, though its website said the company would hold similar events for online customers in the future. Build-A-Bear has more than 400 stores worldwide. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

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B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

ADVANCING ST. LOUIS | RICHARD NIX SR. AND RICHARD NIX JR. OF BUTLER’S PANTRY PRODUCED BY THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT

More than Mostaccioli Butler’s Pantry has wined and dined St. Louis for 52 years. By Jennifer Mason Marketing Content Contributor

F

ounded in 1966, Butler’s Pantry was the dream of Richard Nix Sr. and his wife, Anita. It was their desire to provide the most creative and innovative catering solutions to the community in which they lived, worked and loved. During the early years, Butler’s Pantry could be credited with introducing iconic dishes such as pasta con broccoli, chicken tetrazzini and even the first upscale box lunch (known then as a Beauty Box, delivered to beauty parlors around St. Louis). “Back in 1966, we really didn’t have any premier Italian caterers in St. Louis,” said Nix Sr., 81. “The most typical Italian dish people had ever seen in those days was mostaccioli.” Fast forward 52 years, Butler’s Pantry is now in the hands of Richard “Rick” Nix Jr. As president of the company, Rick has far exceeded the dream his parents conceived. “My motto is to provide what is promised but deliver more than expected,” said Nix Jr. “We pride ourselves on delivering experiences. Everyone here is focused on trying to provide a little more than expected. The reason we are so successful is because we always provide what is promised. That’s a hard thing to do, especially for 52 years.” With over 500 employees and more than 40 venues in their portfolio, Butler’s Pantry continues to challenge industry standards. “Catering weddings, and corporate, social and nonprofit

When I was 13 years old, I ran several businesses. I had a car wash business. I had a chores business where I worked for elderly people and widows. I also had a radio repair business. I started a tinting picture business — those black and white pictures with the rosy cheeks, that was my handiwork. My love of the food industry came through an association I made at the Missouri Athletic Club, where I met Harry Pope of Pope’s Cafeteria who became one of my first mentors. I worked my way up to be the youngest vice president at Pope’s Cafeteria and the only non-Pope vice president. HOW DID BUTLER’S PANTRY START? RICHARD: As vice president of Pope’s, I traveled a lot, and I became exposed to some very fine catering companies all over the world. Through this experience, my wife, Anita Piccione and I began thinking about the St. Louis culinary market and thus, began Butler’s Pantry in 1966 at Delmar and McKnight. I learned early on in order to be successful, you must be a step ahead of the competition. We started off with the goal of having the best service in the city of St. Louis and grew from there. Today, our service is one of our defining features.

RICHARD, HOW HAVE CURRENT OPERATIONS UNDER YOUR SON EXCEEDED YOUR DREAMS? Ricky started in the business when he was 8 years old. He would wash baseboards, dishes and stock the storeroom. I tried to talk him out of going into the catering business. Feeding 1,000 people for a sit-down dinner can be stressful — not everyone can pull that off. You have - Richard Nix Jr. to love this business. President, Butler’s Pantry He grew up in those situations and develfunctions is what we do,” said Nix Jr., oped a flare for it. Ricky has also con54. “But passion for food and the people tinued with our practice of paying emwe prepare it for defines who we are.” ployees the top salary in the business and hiring people that are as dedicated RICHARD, TELL US ABOUT to the work and love the business as YOUR CAREER PATH. much as we do. We’ve always treated Growing up in the Depression inspired our employees like family, but Ricky me to become a serial entrepreneur. has taken it to a new level. I’m extreme-

“We want to provide the region with unique solutions and exceptional experiences.”

Photo courtesy of Sara Ketterer

ly proud that he has evolved Butler’s Pantry from catering into a hospitality company. HOW MANY GENERATIONS ARE WORKING FOR THE COMPANY? RICK: Two of my five children are active in the business, so that puts us in the third generation. I have a 26-yearold son and a 24-year-old daughter who are both learning the ropes and showing an affinity for the business. We also have multiple generations of families working for us both fulland part-time. We couldn’t do business without our family approach. We go into the best homes, the best businesses and the best nonprofits in the city and we have to be confident in knowing our people are representative of the Butler’s Pantry beliefs, core values and culture. We believe in providing our clients, their guests and our business family with every reason to celebrate. At Butler’s Pantry, our vision is to maintain and grow as innovators and leaders within the industry. We want to provide the region with unique solutions and exceptional experiences. HOW DOES BUTLER’S PANTRY GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY? RICHARD: When I fully retired a few years ago, I developed a charity called

Books for Newborns. The goal of the organization is to give every child born in the St. Louis area four, age-appropriate books within the first year of their birth, creating an in-home preschool. The books are distributed to new mothers of newborns at area hospitals, mainly in the city of St. Louis. It’s OK to be early; it’s never OK to be late. Reading to a child after age 3 is too late. RICK: Celebrating our 50th anniversary was a major milestone. At that point, we started the Full Pantry, Full Life program. For every 50 guests we serve, we put $5 back into our community. Last year alone, we provided over $50,000 in products and food and services to a number of organizations. The government can’t do it all — it takes businesses and individuals. If we don’t leave this place a little bit better than when we came in, it’s all for naught. We are only stewards for a certain amount of time, and it’s our job to provide for those who are less fortunate.

Advancing St. Louis highlights local leaders of small businesses and large corporations that are impacting the St. Louis region from a variety of industries. These leaders are Advancing St. Louis by inspiring change and starting conversations. Are you interested in having your story told? Contact Jennifer Mason, who coordinates marketing content, at jmason@stltoday.com.

Babies and books make McCarthy helps heavenly combination build the workforce Source: booksfornewborns.com

B

ooks for Newborns is a local nonprofit committed to bringing literacy to the newest and most malleable minds in any family. Books for Newborns Board of Directors member, Richard Nix Sr., said “While children are not born book lovers, they are born learners.” Encouraging and cultivating that cognitive ability is the passion of volunteers at Books for Newborns. Since learning begins at birth, research shows that babies learn to focus on things when shown colorful pictures. It’s proven that parents who read to their children help stimulate imagination and world-building. It also enhances vocabulary at a much faster rate than a child who grew up without the influence of books. Inspired by the statistic that two-thirds of children living in poverty have no books in their homes, the all-volunteer nonprofit has been trying to lower the number of children growing up without easy access to books and fundamental learning. They are also committed to educating mothers about how to teach and learn effectively with their children from infancy. With 80 percent of a child’s brain utilized by age 3, it is more important than ever for a baby’s mind to be curious and engaged before kindergarten even starts. Books for Newborns provides low-income mothers with free book bags that contain four age-appropriate books. With these books, mothers are encouraged to bond with their newborn babies in a productive, beneficial way. New parents are also given a plethora of useful information that includes a Mother’s Day card offering

different kinds of learning games, songs and other tools. Books for Newborns is building a presence all over the Greater St. Louis area. Their mission is to bring books to every child within the first three years of their life, free of charge. So far, the organization has partnered with several local groups and corporations, including area hospitals like St. Louis Children’s and Barnes-Jewish, providing book bags to families as they’re discharged or parents of children on extended stay in the NICU.

that builds St. Louis

McCarthy partners closely with area schools and community organizations to introduce young people to potential construction careers. Sponsored content by

MCCARTHY BUILDING COMPANIES

he cranes, bulldozers and new structures that continue to rise across the region are visible signs of a strong, healthy local economy. But behind this building boom is a stark reality: St. Louis faces a growing shortage of skilled construction workers. As a growing number of skilled tradesmen near retirement, industry leaders recognize the urgency of building a new generation of construction talent. “I’ve experienced numerous economic cycles during my construction career of over 20 years, but the latest labor shortage is one that we must take seriously — and address at every phase

T

Books for Newborns keeps a child’s best interest at heart, relieving the stress and uncertainty that can come with new parenthood. Regardless of familial income, Books for Newborns is determined to give every child in St. Louis a fair shot at a life full of learning.

of workforce development,” said Jeff Boyer, vice president, operations at McCarthy Building Companies. In a recent survey conducted by the Associated General Contractors of America, 78 percent of construction firms report having a difficult time finding qualified workers to hire, 82 percent of them expect this challenging scenario to continue throughout 2018. “Our businesses can only be as successful as the talent we attract,” said Kathy Osborn, president and CEO of the Regional Business Council, a consortium of executives representing 100 of the region’s largest employers. “McCarthy and other local companies are putting their time and resources behind unique partnerships to develop the skilled workforce pipeline that not only benefits them, but the entire region.”

Read more at STLTODAY.COM/ADVANCINGSTL


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 07.13.2018 • C

Hometown hero

Bullpen rift blown out of proportion Rookie Hicks knows Norris, others have good intentions

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals reliever Jordan Hicks, 21, made the jump from Class A to the major leagues this year. BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A few hours before a game in the Cardinals’ previous home stand, the team’s relievers filtered into the clubhouse and, with a quick twist of one wrist, the music started thumping. Bud Norris, the team’s unexpected closer and veteran presence, walked over to the speaker and turned the music down > 7:15 p.m. Friday — not off, just down — and vs. Reds, FSM returned to his locker. Jor> Martinez (6-4, 3.05) dan Hicks, the heat-seekvs. Harvey (4-5, 4.80) ing rookie, heard the mu> Series preview • C5 sic soften and walked over > Gyorko’s increased and turned it back up. This playing time has him do-si-do happened twice thinking October • C5 more: The music turned down and the music cranked up, until Norris flipped the music off and suggested Hicks put on some headphones. Dancing around clubhouse culture can be tricky. A rookie, Hicks said later, has to learn the steps. “It’s pretty much like the music thing — I’m trying to keep track and not get confused,” Hicks said. “I’m a rookie. I need guys guiding me. (Norris) actually does care about me. I know CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

See HICKS • Page C6

Celtics forward Jayson Tatum talks to kids attending the Jayson Tatum Youth Basketball ProCamp at Chaminade Thursday.

Jayson Tatum talks here about importance of hard work BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The most memorable shot of Kyle’s life came Thursday morning in the gym that made Jayson Tatum. Kyle, a soon-to-be seventh grader at Chaminade, had just watched his basketball hero miss — perhaps intentionally — a jumper from the free-throw line. Tatum took a long stride toward his rebound. Kyle let it fly. Nothing but net. If his basketball career goes nowhere from here, the kid will always have this. He dismissed Tatum in a game of knockout. The thrill came with a message that stuck.

“He’s a really good player,” gushed Kyle. “And he always went to the gym.” That second part was the takeaway Tatum hoped attendees of his youth camp treasure longer than their commemorative T-shirts. Talent’s great. How you hone it makes the difference. Before the son of Justin Tatum and godson of Larry Hughes became the latest star produced by this city’s pipeline of basketball talent, before Duke and Boston fans wore the lottery pick’s uniform, before his every move was choreographed by micromanaging handlers, it was so often just Jayson Tatum, alone, right here in the Chaminade gym he returned to Thursday. “My junior year, I was here every morning at 6 o’clock,” Tatum told campers. “I

“I had so many goals growing up, and one of them was to be the best player ever to come out of St. Louis. The bar is set pretty high ... I know I still have a long way to go.”

See FREDERICKSON • Page C6

Jayson Tatum

‘We haven’t played as well as ... hoped’ DeWitt still believes in Cards

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals owner Bill DeWitt Jr. says offense, key injuries and the bullpen have been factors.

> Watch Jayson Tatum talk about the importance of giving back to the community • STLtoday.com BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louisan steers Mariners’ bullpen Brian DeLunas is an Oakville High alum BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As he broke down in the manager’s office, Mariners bullpen coach Brian DeLunas didn’t know if his tears were normal. How could he? There’s almost no one in Major League Baseball with a similar situation. The Mariners were about to leave their spring training complex for the last time before Opening Day, and manager Scott Servais had a message for DeLunas. “You’re going to be a bigleague bullpen coach,” DeLunas remembers Servais saying.

“You’re going to do a great job.” The Mariners hired DeLunas in December, making him the only active major league coach (other than bullpen catchers) who has not played or coached in pro baseball before his current role. In Servais’ office that day, it hit DeLunas: He was about to don a major league uniform. “Up to that point, you never know,” said DeLunas, a St. Louis native and Oakville High alum. “You’re just kind of like, ‘Somebody may pinch me and I may wake up.’” Before joining the Mariners, See DELUNAS • Page C6

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN DELUNAS

Brian DeLunas poses for a picture with his Mariners jersey. He is the team’s bullpen coach.

Bill DeWitt Jr., the Cardinals’ chairman since his group bought the team after the 1995 season, is as painfully aware as almost anyone else that the first 60 percent or so of the Cardinals’ season hasn’t gone exactly to script. But, as the Cardinals prepare to finish the unofficial first half of the THE RANKINGS season with a three-game The Cardinals series here this weekend among NL teams: Offense 5th against the revived CincinDefense 8th nati Reds, he holds steadStarters 3rd fast to his preseason estiRelievers 12th mates. “I still believe in our *Offense rated with club,” said DeWitt ThursFangraphs Weighted day. “I think it’s a playoffRuns Created Plus. Pitchers rated with caliber club if we’re clickFangraphs wins above ing on all cylinders and, replacement. hopefully, that will occur. “We haven’t played as well as we had hoped. We’re above .500 (47-44), which is good, but I thought at this point, we’d be better.” Breaking down the Cardinals by areas, See DEWITT • Page C5

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

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Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 7/13 vs. Reds 7:15 p.m. FSM

Saturday 7/14 vs. Reds 3:10 p.m. FSM

Sunday 7/15 vs. Reds 1:15 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 7/17 All-Star Game 7 p.m. KTVI (2)

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

A grudge match awaits Plenty of scores to settle between France, Croatia

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 7/14 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/21 vs. Orange County 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/28 at Reno 9:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 8/4 vs. Seattle 7:30 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Fri. 7/13: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m. Sat. 7/14: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Fri. 7/20: vs. Washington, 6:35 p.m. Sat. 7/21: vs. Washington, 6:35 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 11 a.m. NASCAR: Quaker State 400, practice, NBCSN 1 p.m. NASCAR: Quaker State 400, final practice, NBCSN 4 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Alsco 300, qualifying, NBCSN 5:30 p.m. NASCAR: Quaker State 400, qualifying, NBCSN 7 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Alsco 300, NBCSN BASEBALL 6 p.m. Yankees at Indians, MLB 7:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Reds, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) BASKETBALL 3 p.m. NBA Summer League: Nets vs. Pacers, ESPNU 3:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Teams TBA, NBA 5 p.m. NBA Summer League: Wizards vs. Mavericks, ESPNU 5:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Teams TBA, NBA 6 p.m. BIG3, from Detroit, FS1 7 p.m. NBA Summer League: Timberwolves vs. Nuggets, ESPNU 7:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Teams TBA, NBA 9 p.m. NBA Summer League: Kings vs. Warriors, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Teams TBA, NBA BOXING 6 p.m. Super featherweights: Joet Gonzalez vs. Rafael Rivera, ESPN CYCLING 7 a.m. Tour de France, Stage 7, NBCSN FOOTBALL 8 p.m. CFL: Toronto at Edmonton, ESPN2 4 a.m. (Sat.) AFL Premiership: Greater Western Sydney vs. Richmond, FS2 GOLF 12:30 p.m. Senior Players Championship, second round, GOLF 2 p.m. American Century Championship, first round, NBCSN 3 p.m. PGA: John Deere Classic, second round, GOLF 6 p.m. Web.com: Utah Championship, second round, GOLF MISCELLANEOUS 8 p.m. World Series of Poker: Main event, Day 9 (of 10), ESPN SOFTBALL 5 p.m. USA International Cup: Puerto Rico vs, USA Red, ESPN2 TENNIS 7 a.m. Wimbledon, Men’s semifinals, ESPN

DIGEST Blackhawks trade Hossa, Hinostroza to Coyotes The Chicago Blackhawks traded Marian Hossa and Vinnie Hinostroza to the Arizona Coyotes on Thursday, parting with a promising young forward in order to clear out a troublesome contract. The Blackhawks also sent defenseman Jordan Oesterle and a third-round pick in the 2019 draft to the Coyotes for forwards Marcus Kruger, MacKenzie Entwistle and Jordan Maletta, defenseman Andrew Campbell and a fifth-round pick in next year’s draft. Kruger was drafted by Chicago and spent his first seven seasons with the Blackhawks before he was traded to Vegas last July. The 39-year-old Hossa did not play last season because of severe side effects from medication to treat a progressive skin disorder. He isn’t expected to play again, but he is signed through the 2020-21 season at a $5.275 million cap hit. Hossa signed a $63.3 million, 12-year deal with Chicago in July 2009, and the winger played a crucial role in the Blackhawks going from promising young team to a run of three Stanley Cup titles in six seasons. But the Blackhawks missed the playoffs last season for the first time in a decade, and there is pressure on general manager Stan Bowman to get the team back on track. The trade gets Hossa’s contract off Chicago’s books, but it comes at a cost. Hinostroza, a 24-year-old Chicago native, set career highs with seven goals and 18 assists in 50 games last season, and the 26-year-old Oesterle also showed promising signs last year. Rangers re-sign McLeod • New York re-signed enforcer Cody McLeod to a one-year deal. The 34-year-old McLeod was claimed by the Rangers off waivers in late January and played in 25 games. McLeod has skated in 738 career NHL games over 11 seasons with Colorado, Nashville, and the Rangers, registering 71 goals and 55 assists. USOC hires Hirshland • The U.S. Olympic Committee has hired Sarah Hirshland as its CEO, placing her in charge of stabilizing an organization that has been hammered by sex-abuse scandals spanning several Olympic sports. Hirshland, 43, will leave her post as the chief commercial officer for the U.S. Golf Association, where she negotiated media-rights and sponsorship deals. Another rape charge for Winslow Jr. • Former NFL tight end Kellen Winslow Jr. has been charged with raping an unconscious teenager 15 years ago in San Diego County. Other details haven’t been released. Winslow hasn’t entered a plea yet. The charge was added Thursday as Winslow was ordered to stand trial on charges of kidnapping and raping two women earlier this year in Encinitas, Calif. The women were in their 50s. Winslow is the son of Pro Football Hall of Famer and St. Louisan Kellen Winslow. Rhodes wins in Truck Series • Ben Rhodes raced to his second career NASCAR Camping World Truck Series win in front of his home state fans at Kentucky Speedway on Thursday night. Rhodes, a native of Louisville, opted not to change his tires on the final pit and the gamble paid off as he took the lead and pulled away from Stewart Friesen over the final 10 laps in Sparta, Ky. Matt Crafton, Brandon Jones and John Hunter Nemechek rounded out the Top 5. Series points leader Johnny Sauter finished 15th. Associated Press

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Croatia’s Davor Suker kicks the ball off the head of Laurent Blanc of France during a 1998 semifinal match.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOSCOW • One of the most notorious dives in soccer history took pace the last time France played Croatia in the World Cup. Les Bleus led Croatia by a goal in their 1998 semifinal at Stade de France when French defender Laurent Blanc gave Slaven Bilic a slight shove on the chest in jostling during a free kick. Bilic shouted and slammed the palm of his hand into his face, as if he had been struck on the head. Spanish referee Jose Manuel Garcia bought the act in the pre-video review age, and Blanc was ejected for the first time in his career. Despite seeing the replay afterward, FIFA refused to retract the penalty. Blanc missed the final, when France beat Brazil 3-0 for its only World Cup title. Croatia advanced to its first World Cup final with a 2-1 extra-time win over England on Wednesday night, a day after Les Bleus beat Belgium 1-0. The match two decades ago remains on the mind of current Croatia coach Zlatko Dalic. “Maybe the dear Lord is giving us an opportunity to settle a score,” he said. A victory in the final for the nation known for its red-and-white checkered jerseys would be the nation’s greatest sporting moment since breaking from Yugoslavia to become an independent state in 1991 — a year after its national soccer team started playing. France is a European soccer power, its team able to draw from a population of about 65 million.

“They have upped their game over the past several games,” Croatia’s Ivan Perisic said. Croatia has just over 4 million people, the fourth-smallest of the 32 World Cup teams ahead of Panama, Uruguay and Iceland. It has a chance to be the least-populous nation to win since Uruguay took the title in 1950, when it was a nation of just over 2 million. “We’re a small country with so many successful sports people,” defender Dejan Lovren said through a translator. “Over the last couple of days people have recognized that.” Les Blues won the European Championship at home in 1984 and in the Netherlands in 2000. But there have been no trophies since current coach Didier Deschamps lifted the World Cup as captain on July 12, 1998 — 5 months, 8 days before star striker Kylian Mbappe was born. They lost the 2016 Euro final 1-0 to Portugal at Stade de France with a roster that included nine holdovers on this year’s team. “Two years ago it was tough,” said one of the returnees, goalkeeper Hugo Lloris. “We don’t want it to happen again. We want it to end in the best way.” Croatia was under French control from 1809-14, part of the Illyrian Provinces, an autonomous area of Napoleon’s First French Empire. It has played France five times, losing three games and drawing two. The only other meeting at a tournament was in the group stage of the 2004 European Championship, when a contro-

versial referee’s call went against the Croats. Goalkeeper Tomislav Butina’s clearance was blocked at the top of the penalty area by the hand of David Trezeguet, who kicked the ball into the net for an equalizer in the 64th minute of a 2-2 draw. Danish referee Kim Milton Nielson allowed the goal to stand. Nielson had called a questionable foul for a free kick that led to Zinedine Zidane scoring the opening goal in the 48th minute. Croatia went ahead in the 1998 semifinal only 26 seconds into the second half when Aljosa Asanovic split the defense with a pass, and Davor Suker scored his fifth goal of the tournament. Lilian Thuram tied the score a minute later after stealing the ball from Zvonimir Boban near the Croat penalty area and exchanging passes with Youri Djorkaeff. Thuram scored the goahead goal with a curling shot in the 70th minute, and France won 2-1. Now Suker is the much-criticized president of the Croatian Football Federation. The national team was forced to play a European Championship qualifier against Italy in an empty stadium in Split in June 2015 because Croat fans had thrown flares on the field during a match against the Azzurri at Milan. A swastika became visible on the field of the closeddoors match, caused by a chemical agent put in the grass at Poljud Stadium. That led European soccer’s governing body to deduct a point from Croatia, ordered to play two additional games without fans and fined 100,000 euros (then $117,000).

> Final • France vs. Croatia, 10 a.m. Sunday, KTVI (2) > Third place • Belgium vs. England, 9 a.m. Saturday, KTVI (2)

WORLD CUP NOTEBOOK

FIFA official criticizes Neymar ASSOCIATED PRESS

Neymar’s play-acting at the World Cup made him the butt of plenty of jokes, and also earned the Brazil striker some criticism from FIFA technical director Marco van Basten. Van Basten, himself one of the greatest forwards in the history of the game, said Thursday that diving and faking injury is “not a good attitude” and works against Neymar and his team. “If you are acting too much I think everybody will understand that it’s not going to help you,” the Netherlands great said. “I think he (Neymar) personally should understand his situation.” Van Basten was asked about Neymar’s theatrics at a briefing with experts appointed by FIFA to analyze tactics and technical trends at the 64-game tournament. One factor they agreed could help explain Neymar’s frustration in Russia: Playmakers face more well-organized defensive lines, which are better than ever at denying them space to work. “The amount of square meters to play in is unbelievably difficult,” Van Basten said. Neymar was calculated to have spent almost 14 minutes on the turf injured or simulating injury during Brazil’s five games at the tournament. Some dramatic rolling falls before coming to a stop started a trend in online videos of youth soccer teams practicing faking injury when their coach called out Neymar’s name. Asked if Neymar had become a joke, Van Basten said “he makes people laugh so also I think that’s a positive thing. It’s always nice

if we have some humor in the game.” Once the world’s best center forward with AC Milan and the Dutch national team, Van Basten has sympathy for players in his old position at this year’s World Cup. Tight and compact defenses like Sweden and Iceland made it “very, very difficult for the No. 9 to get the ball, to make goals, to influence the game,” he said. Pitana to referee title game • FIFA has selected Nestor Pitana to referee the World Cup final between France and Croatia on Sunday. The Argentine referee will blow the final whistle at Luzhniki Stadium on a tournament he began there by handling the opening game, when Russia beat Saudi Arabia 5-0. It will be the fifth game at this World Cup for Pitana, and his second working with each of France and Croatia. Pitana handled France’s 2-0 win in the quarterfinals against Uruguay, and Croatia’s round of 16 win over Denmark. FIFA also named Alireza Faghani of Iran as referee for the third-place game. Belgium plays England in St. Petersburg on Saturday for third place. Paris preparing for big weekend • Paris is pouring police into the streets this weekend for what the French people hope will be backto-back celebrations — Bastille Day and, they’re crossing their fingers, a World Cup title. Paris police chief Michel Delpuech says 12,000 officers and 3,000 rescue workers will be mobilized in Paris and its suburbs for

France’s national day on Saturday, marked by a military parade down the Champs-Elysees Avenue, and on Sunday when France plays Croatia in the World Cup final at a stadium in the Russian capital. Should France win, revelers will pack the Champs-Elysees to celebrate. Tens of thousands can watch the match from screens in a fan zone near the Eiffel Tower. The fun will be mixed with high tension for security authorities: Delpuech says a “real terrorist threat” exists. No doping cases at World Cup • FIFA has reported no doping cases from almost 4,000 samples taken since January in a testing program for the World Cup. The last World Cup doping case involved Argentina great Diego Maradona at the 1994 tournament in the United States. The 2018 testing program includes 626 samples taken during the competition, including two players from each squad drawn to give samples after games. A total of 108 of the samples were collected on non-match days. Some players from the four teams still playing in Russia have been tested eight times this year, soccer’s world body said. Peru captain Paolo Guerrero almost missed the World Cup because of a doping suspension imposed in November after he failed a test during South American qualifying. He blamed his doping test failure on a tainted cup of tea at a Lima hotel. Helped by the captains of France, Australia and Denmark — Peru’s group rivals in Russia — Guerrero campaigned to have the suspension lifted for the tournament.


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 7/13 vs. Reds 7:15 p.m. FSM

Saturday 7/14 vs. Reds 3:10 p.m. FSM

Sunday 7/15 vs. Reds 1:15 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 7/17 All-Star Game 7 p.m. KTVI (2)

M 2 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

A grudge match awaits Plenty of scores to settle between France, Croatia

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 7/14 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/21 vs. Orange County 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/28 at Reno 9:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 8/4 vs. Seattle 7:30 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Fri. 7/13: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m. Sat. 7/14: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Fri. 7/20: vs. Washington, 6:35 p.m. Sat. 7/21: vs. Washington, 6:35 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 11 a.m. NASCAR: Quaker State 400, practice, NBCSN 1 p.m. NASCAR: Quaker State 400, final practice, NBCSN 4 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Alsco 300, qualifying, NBCSN 5:30 p.m. NASCAR: Quaker State 400, qualifying, NBCSN 7 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Alsco 300, NBCSN BASEBALL 6 p.m. Yankees at Indians, MLB 7:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Reds, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) BASKETBALL 3 p.m. NBA Summer League: Nets vs. Pacers, ESPNU 3:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Knicks vs. Pelicans, NBA 5 p.m. NBA Summer League: Wizards vs. Mavericks, ESPNU 5:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Spurs vs. Suns, NBA 6 p.m. BIG3, from Detroit, FS1 7 p.m. NBA Summer League: Timberwolves vs. Nuggets, ESPNU 7:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Magic vs. Thunder, NBA 9 p.m. NBA Summer League: Kings vs. Warriors, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Hawks vs. Clippers, NBA BOXING 6 p.m. Super featherweights: Joet Gonzalez vs. Rafael Rivera, ESPN CYCLING 7 a.m. Tour de France, Stage 7, NBCSN FOOTBALL 8 p.m. CFL: Toronto at Edmonton, ESPN2 4 a.m. (Sat.) AFL Premiership: Greater Western Sydney vs. Richmond, FS2 GOLF 12:30 p.m. Senior Players Championship, second round, GOLF 2 p.m. American Century Championship, first round, NBCSN 3 p.m. PGA: John Deere Classic, second round, GOLF 6 p.m. Web.com: Utah Championship, second round, GOLF MISCELLANEOUS 8 p.m. World Series of Poker: Main event, Day 9 (of 10), ESPN SOFTBALL 5 p.m. USA International Cup: Puerto Rico vs, USA Red, ESPN2 TENNIS 7 a.m. Wimbledon, Men’s semifinals, ESPN

DIGEST Blackhawks trade Hossa, Hinostroza to Coyotes The Chicago Blackhawks traded Marian Hossa and Vinnie Hinostroza to the Arizona Coyotes on Thursday, parting with a promising young forward in order to clear out a troublesome contract. The Blackhawks also sent defenseman Jordan Oesterle and a third-round pick in the 2019 draft to the Coyotes for forwards Marcus Kruger, MacKenzie Entwistle and Jordan Maletta, defenseman Andrew Campbell and a fifth-round pick in next year’s draft. Kruger was drafted by Chicago and spent his first seven seasons with the Blackhawks before he was traded to Vegas last July. The 39-year-old Hossa did not play last season because of severe side effects from medication to treat a progressive skin disorder. He isn’t expected to play again, but he is signed through the 2020-21 season at a $5.275 million cap hit. Hossa signed a $63.3 million, 12-year deal with Chicago in July 2009, and the winger played a crucial role in the Blackhawks going from promising young team to a run of three Stanley Cup titles in six seasons. But the Blackhawks missed the playoffs last season for the first time in a decade, and there is pressure on general manager Stan Bowman to get the team back on track. The trade gets Hossa’s contract off Chicago’s books, but it comes at a cost. Hinostroza, a 24-year-old Chicago native, set career highs with seven goals and 18 assists in 50 games last season, and the 26-year-old Oesterle also showed promising signs last year. Rangers re-sign McLeod • New York re-signed enforcer Cody McLeod to a one-year deal. The 34-year-old McLeod was claimed by the Rangers off waivers in late January and played in 25 games. McLeod has skated in 738 career NHL games over 11 seasons with Colorado, Nashville, and the Rangers, registering 71 goals and 55 assists. USOC hires Hirshland • The U.S. Olympic Committee has hired Sarah Hirshland as its CEO, placing her in charge of stabilizing an organization that has been hammered by sex-abuse scandals spanning several Olympic sports. Hirshland, 43, will leave her post as the chief commercial officer for the U.S. Golf Association, where she negotiated media-rights and sponsorship deals. Another rape charge for Winslow Jr. • Former NFL tight end Kellen Winslow Jr. has been charged with raping an unconscious teenager 15 years ago in San Diego County. Other details haven’t been released. Winslow hasn’t entered a plea yet. The charge was added Thursday as Winslow was ordered to stand trial on charges of kidnapping and raping two women earlier this year in Encinitas, Calif. The women were in their 50s. Winslow is the son of Pro Football Hall of Famer and St. Louisan Kellen Winslow. Rhodes wins in Truck Series • Ben Rhodes raced to his second career NASCAR Camping World Truck Series win in front of his home state fans at Kentucky Speedway on Thursday night. Rhodes, a native of Louisville, opted not to change his tires on the final pit and the gamble paid off as he took the lead and pulled away from Stewart Friesen over the final 10 laps in Sparta, Ky. Matt Crafton, Brandon Jones and John Hunter Nemechek rounded out the Top 5. Series points leader Johnny Sauter finished 15th. Associated Press

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Croatia’s Davor Suker kicks the ball off the head of Laurent Blanc of France during a 1998 semifinal match.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOSCOW • One of the most notorious dives in soccer history took pace the last time France played Croatia in the World Cup. Les Bleus led Croatia by a goal in their 1998 semifinal at Stade de France when French defender Laurent Blanc gave Slaven Bilic a slight shove on the chest in jostling during a free kick. Bilic shouted and slammed the palm of his hand into his face, as if he had been struck on the head. Spanish referee Jose Manuel Garcia bought the act in the pre-video review age, and Blanc was ejected for the first time in his career. Despite seeing the replay afterward, FIFA refused to retract the penalty. Blanc missed the final, when France beat Brazil 3-0 for its only World Cup title. Croatia advanced to its first World Cup final with a 2-1 extra-time win over England on Wednesday night, a day after Les Bleus beat Belgium 1-0. The match two decades ago remains on the mind of current Croatia coach Zlatko Dalic. “Maybe the dear Lord is giving us an opportunity to settle a score,” he said. A victory in the final for the nation known for its red-and-white checkered jerseys would be the nation’s greatest sporting moment since breaking from Yugoslavia to become an independent state in 1991 — a year after its national soccer team started playing. France is a European soccer power, its team able to draw from a population of about 65 million.

“They have upped their game over the past several games,” Croatia’s Ivan Perisic said. Croatia has just over 4 million people, the fourth-smallest of the 32 World Cup teams ahead of Panama, Uruguay and Iceland. It has a chance to be the least-populous nation to win since Uruguay took the title in 1950, when it was a nation of just over 2 million. “We’re a small country with so many successful sports people,” defender Dejan Lovren said through a translator. “Over the last couple of days people have recognized that.” Les Blues won the European Championship at home in 1984 and in the Netherlands in 2000. But there have been no trophies since current coach Didier Deschamps lifted the World Cup as captain on July 12, 1998 — 5 months, 8 days before star striker Kylian Mbappe was born. They lost the 2016 Euro final 1-0 to Portugal at Stade de France with a roster that included nine holdovers on this year’s team. “Two years ago it was tough,” said one of the returnees, goalkeeper Hugo Lloris. “We don’t want it to happen again. We want it to end in the best way.” Croatia was under French control from 1809-14, part of the Illyrian Provinces, an autonomous area of Napoleon’s First French Empire. It has played France five times, losing three games and drawing two. The only other meeting at a tournament was in the group stage of the 2004 European Championship, when a contro-

versial referee’s call went against the Croats. Goalkeeper Tomislav Butina’s clearance was blocked at the top of the penalty area by the hand of David Trezeguet, who kicked the ball into the net for an equalizer in the 64th minute of a 2-2 draw. Danish referee Kim Milton Nielson allowed the goal to stand. Nielson had called a questionable foul for a free kick that led to Zinedine Zidane scoring the opening goal in the 48th minute. Croatia went ahead in the 1998 semifinal only 26 seconds into the second half when Aljosa Asanovic split the defense with a pass, and Davor Suker scored his fifth goal of the tournament. Lilian Thuram tied the score a minute later after stealing the ball from Zvonimir Boban near the Croat penalty area and exchanging passes with Youri Djorkaeff. Thuram scored the goahead goal with a curling shot in the 70th minute, and France won 2-1. Now Suker is the much-criticized president of the Croatian Football Federation. The national team was forced to play a European Championship qualifier against Italy in an empty stadium in Split in June 2015 because Croat fans had thrown flares on the field during a match against the Azzurri at Milan. A swastika became visible on the field of the closeddoors match, caused by a chemical agent put in the grass at Poljud Stadium. That led European soccer’s governing body to deduct a point from Croatia, ordered to play two additional games without fans and fined 100,000 euros (then $117,000).

> Final • France vs. Croatia, 10 a.m. Sunday, KTVI (2) > Third place • Belgium vs. England, 9 a.m. Saturday, KTVI (2)

WORLD CUP NOTEBOOK

FIFA official criticizes Neymar ASSOCIATED PRESS

Neymar’s play-acting at the World Cup made him the butt of plenty of jokes, and also earned the Brazil striker some criticism from FIFA technical director Marco van Basten. Van Basten, himself one of the greatest forwards in the history of the game, said Thursday that diving and faking injury is “not a good attitude” and works against Neymar and his team. “If you are acting too much I think everybody will understand that it’s not going to help you,” the Netherlands great said. “I think he (Neymar) personally should understand his situation.” Van Basten was asked about Neymar’s theatrics at a briefing with experts appointed by FIFA to analyze tactics and technical trends at the 64-game tournament. One factor they agreed could help explain Neymar’s frustration in Russia: Playmakers face more well-organized defensive lines, which are better than ever at denying them space to work. “The amount of square meters to play in is unbelievably difficult,” Van Basten said. Neymar was calculated to have spent almost 14 minutes on the turf injured or simulating injury during Brazil’s five games at the tournament. Some dramatic rolling falls before coming to a stop started a trend in online videos of youth soccer teams practicing faking injury when their coach called out Neymar’s name. Asked if Neymar had become a joke, Van Basten said “he makes people laugh so also I think that’s a positive thing. It’s always nice

if we have some humor in the game.” Once the world’s best center forward with AC Milan and the Dutch national team, Van Basten has sympathy for players in his old position at this year’s World Cup. Tight and compact defenses like Sweden and Iceland made it “very, very difficult for the No. 9 to get the ball, to make goals, to influence the game,” he said. Pitana to referee title game • FIFA has selected Nestor Pitana to referee the World Cup final between France and Croatia on Sunday. The Argentine referee will blow the final whistle at Luzhniki Stadium on a tournament he began there by handling the opening game, when Russia beat Saudi Arabia 5-0. It will be the fifth game at this World Cup for Pitana, and his second working with each of France and Croatia. Pitana handled France’s 2-0 win in the quarterfinals against Uruguay, and Croatia’s round of 16 win over Denmark. FIFA also named Alireza Faghani of Iran as referee for the third-place game. Belgium plays England in St. Petersburg on Saturday for third place. Paris preparing for big weekend • Paris is pouring police into the streets this weekend for what the French people hope will be backto-back celebrations — Bastille Day and, they’re crossing their fingers, a World Cup title. Paris police chief Michel Delpuech says 12,000 officers and 3,000 rescue workers will be mobilized in Paris and its suburbs for

France’s national day on Saturday, marked by a military parade down the Champs-Elysees Avenue, and on Sunday when France plays Croatia in the World Cup final at a stadium in the Russian capital. Should France win, revelers will pack the Champs-Elysees to celebrate. Tens of thousands can watch the match from screens in a fan zone near the Eiffel Tower. The fun will be mixed with high tension for security authorities: Delpuech says a “real terrorist threat” exists. No doping cases at World Cup • FIFA has reported no doping cases from almost 4,000 samples taken since January in a testing program for the World Cup. The last World Cup doping case involved Argentina great Diego Maradona at the 1994 tournament in the United States. The 2018 testing program includes 626 samples taken during the competition, including two players from each squad drawn to give samples after games. A total of 108 of the samples were collected on non-match days. Some players from the four teams still playing in Russia have been tested eight times this year, soccer’s world body said. Peru captain Paolo Guerrero almost missed the World Cup because of a doping suspension imposed in November after he failed a test during South American qualifying. He blamed his doping test failure on a tainted cup of tea at a Lima hotel. Helped by the captains of France, Australia and Denmark — Peru’s group rivals in Russia — Guerrero campaigned to have the suspension lifted for the tournament.


SPORTS

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

WIMBLEDON

Tough comeback is Williams’ best ASSOCIATED PRESS

She’ll face Germany’s Kerber in tournament final

LONDON • Yes, this will be Ser-

ena Williams’ 10th Wimbledon final. Yes, it’s her 30th title match at any major. And, well, sure, she’s widely regarded as not just the best of her era, but any era. Let others shrug at this latest accomplishment, as if all it signified were merely another chance at another in a long line of trophies. Williams is not shy about saying she, for one, is impressed by this. Rightly so. For it was only about 10 months ago she was having a baby and then dealing with a serious health scare that followed. Even after all of that, even after more than a year away from the game, even in only the fourth tournament of her comeback, Williams showed she’s still capable of dominance. Especially at the All England Club, where a relatively routine 6-2, 6-4 victory over 13th-seeded Julia Goerges of Germany on Thursday put Williams one win away from an eighth championship. She’s also closing in on her 24th Grand Slam title, which would equal Margaret Court’s all-time record. “A lot of people were saying, ‘Oh, she should be in the final,’” the 36-year-old Williams said. “For me it’s such a pleasure and a joy because, you know, less than a year ago, I was going through so much stuff.” After hitting five aces with a serve that reached 119 mph, delivering 16 winners to only seven unforced errors, and covering the court so well with speed and effort, Williams will face another German, 11th-seeded Angelique Kerber, on Saturday. “Whatever happens, honestly,” Williams said, “it’s an incredible effort from me.” The left-handed Kerber, a former No. 1 and two-time major champion, beat 12th-seeded Jelena Ostapenko 6-3, 6-3 earlier Thursday. “Seeing her back, it’s great,” said Kerber, who has lost six of eight previous matches against Williams. “I know that she is always pushing you to the limits.” Kerber let 2017 French Open champion Ostapenko deter-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serena Williams returns the ball to Germany’s Julia Goerges during a semifinals match in London Thursday.

mine the outcome of nearly every point. By the end, Ostapenko had far more winners, 30-10, and far more unforced errors, 36-7. Williams vs. Kerber will be a rematch of the 2016 final. Williams won that for a second consecutive Wimbledon title, then sat out the grass-court tournament last year while pregnant, part of a 16-month gap between majors. After giving birth to daughter Olympia last September, Wil-

liams was treated for blood clots. “I lost count after, like, four surgeries,” said Williams, who has been wearing compression leggings this fortnight as a precaution. Her first Grand Slam tournament back was the French Open, where she won three matches before withdrawing last month because of an injured chest muscle. All of the time away pushed someone who’s spent more than

300 weeks ranked No. 1 down the rankings — she began Wimbledon at 181st, but was seeded 25th on account of her past success — and no one could quite be sure how the American would fare over these two weeks. Not even Williams knew. “This is not inevitable for me. I had a really tough delivery ... and almost didn’t make it, to be honest,” Williams said. “I remember I couldn’t even walk to my mailbox, so it’s definitely not ‘normal’

for me to be in a Wimbledon final.” The victory over Goerges extended Williams’ winning streak at Wimbledon to 20 matches, dating to the start of the 2015 edition. She’s also won her past 15 Grand Slam matches since the start of the 2017 Australian Open, which she won while pregnant. That title pushed her past Steffi Graf’s record of 22 majors in the half-century professional era; Court won some of her Slams during the amateur era. Williams’ match against Goerges was even until 2-all, 30all. Until then, Goerges, the first seeded player Williams faced these two weeks, showed she was capable of trading power from the baseline and big serves with Williams. There were moments when watching Goerges made it easy to wonder how it could be possible she never had been past a major’s fourth round until now. Or, more to the point on this afternoon, how such a stinging serve and groundstrokes didn’t help her avoid first-round exits each of the past five years at Wimbledon. But she couldn’t keep up with Williams, who grabbed 18 of 22 points and five consecutive games to close the first set and begin the next. “She brings her ‘A game’ in a lot of important moments,” Goerges said. “We saw that she improved every single match she’s playing here.” There was one brief blip to come: Williams got broken for the only time while serving for the match at 5-3. Immediately, though, she broke back at love to end it, placing her left fist on her chest when Goerges’ last shot landed long. Later, Williams was asked whether this has been her most trying comeback in a career that’s had its share, including an earlier bout with blood clots in her lungs. “I don’t know if it’s been the toughest, because I have Olympia. For me, I only see joy out of it,” Williams said with a smile. “In a way, it’s by far the toughest, but in a way it’s by far the best.”

TOUR DE FRANCE

A New Patriot Sunroom

Dumoulin and Bardet lose time at Tour after bikes break

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The pack rides past a burning haystack during the sixth stage of the Tour de France cycling race on Thursday. Friday’s stage will be the longest of the tour. ASSOCIATED PRESS

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times in cycling the bike can be the rider’s biggest enemy. Tour de France contenders Tom Dumoulin and Romain Bardet both lost significant time in the overall standings after spokes on their wheels snapped near the uphill end of Stage 6 on Thursday. Both title hopefuls were left behind by the rest of the top riders as they increased the pace hunting for the win that finally went to Daniel Martin of Ireland. Dumoulin said his bike broke when he knocked into Bardet near the foot of the second of two 2-kilometer ascents up the Mur de Bretagne to the finish line. “I hit the back wheel of Bardet when there was the movement in the peloton and I couldn’t avoid it,” the Dutch rider said. “I needed to change wheel and chase to the finish as hard as possible but it was very difficult.” Dumoulin and his Sunweb team compounded the mechanical mishap by getting a 20-second penalty when Dumoulin stayed too close to the team car while trying to catch the pack, thereby benefiting from its draft that pulled him along. “I knew I wouldn’t make it back so it was about limiting the time loss,” Dumoulin said. “I’m disappointed of course, I would have liked to be in a better position on (general classification) but that’s how it is.” Dumoulin and Bardet entered the threeweek race among the chosen few riders considered strong enough to challenge four-time champion Chris Froome. Dumoulin, the time trial world cham-

pion and 2017 Giro d’Italia winner, started the stage 44 seconds ahead of Froome, but finished just behind him. Froome trails race leader Greg Van Avermaet by 1:02. Dumoulin is one more second behind. Bardet was already trailing Froome, and after losing 28 seconds is now 1:45 off the leader’s pace after he broke his back wheel and had to change bikes with Tony Gallopin. “Then I had to chase and that effort was fatal. It’s never good to lose time,” said Bardet, who has finished on the podium in the past two Tours. “There are a lot of twists on the Tour and this time luck was not on our side.” Martin took the win for UAE Emirates after he broke away on the final kilometer, winning the 112-mile leg that started in the western port city of Brest in over four hours. Martin counterattacked when Richie Porte jumped ahead and nobody immediately tried to reel him in. “I saw the moment. I had really good legs and when I went my legs kept coming and coming,” Martin said. “I knew if I could get a gap it would be difficult to close from behind.” Pierre Latour crossed the line second followed by Alejandro Valverde in third. Van Avermaet, a BMC support rider for Porte, kept the yellow jersey for a third straight day. This was the first summit finish of this Tour. After the relatively flat first nine days, the race will head south and into the Alps and then the Pyrenees Mountains. Friday’s flat 144-mile leg from Fougeres to Chartes is the longest stage of this Tour.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Milwaukee

55 39 .585

AMERICAN LEAGUE GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

— 6-4

L-2

30-18

25-21

Chicago

52 38 .578

1

7-3

L-1

28-15

24-23

Cardinals

47 44 .516

4

5-5

L-1

23-22

24-22

Pittsburgh

44 49 .473 10½

8 4-6 W-2

25-24

19-25

Cincinnati

41 52 .441 13½

11 6-4

21-26 20-26

EAST

W

L

Pct

L-1

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Philadelphia 52 40 .565

7-3 W-1

30-16

22-24

Atlanta

51 40 .560

½

— 4-6 W-1

24-18

27-22

Washington

47 46 .505

5

5-5 W-1

22-24

25-22

14

5-5 W-1

21-27

18-29

17-31

20-23

Miami

39 56

New York

37 54 .407 14½

WEST

W

Los Angeles

50 42 .543

Arizona

51 43 .543

Colorado

48 45 .516

4

San Francisco 49 46 .516

San Diego

L

.411 14½ Pct

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

14 4-6

L-1

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

40 55 .421 11½

7-3 W-1

Thursday Colorado 5, Arizona 1 Philadelphia 5, Baltimore 4 Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 3 Washington 5, NY Mets 4 LA Dodgers at San Diego, late Wednesday Pittsburgh 2, Washington 0 San Francisco 5, Cubs 4, 13 inn. NY Mets 3, Philadelphia 0, 10 inn. Cleveland 19, Cincinnati 4 Miami 5, Milwaukee 4, 12 inn. Atlanta 9, Toronto 5 White Sox 4, Cardinals 0 Colorado 19, Arizona 2 LA Dodgers 4, San Diego 2

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB

Cleveland

50 42 .543

L10

Str Home Away

5-5

L-1

29-18

21-24 15-28

Minnesota

41 49 .456

8

15½

6-4

W-1

26-21

Detroit

40 55 .421 11½

19

3-7

L-4

25-23

15-32

Chicago

31 61 .337

19

26½

3-7

W-1

17-28

14-33

Kansas City

26 66 .283

24

31½

1-9

L-1

11-35

15-31

EAST

W

GB WCGB

L10

Boston

66 29 .695

New York

61 31 .663

L

Pct

Str Home Away

— 10-0 W-10

32-12

34-17

7-3

W-2

33-13

28-18

Tampa Bay

48 44 .522 16½

7-3

W-5

26-17

22-27

Toronto

42 50 .457 22½

15½

3-7

L-2

24-25

18-25

Baltimore

26 68 .277 39½

32½

2-8

L-2

14-32

12-36

WEST

W

GB WCGB

L10

Str Home Away

Houston

62 34 .646

7-3

L-2 30-20

32-14

Seattle

58 35 .624

6-4

W-1

27-18

53 41 .564

L

Pct

26-23

24-19

L-2

26-23

25-20

7-3 W-2

20-23

28-22

Oakland

8

7-3

W-2

24-21 29-20

4 4-6 W-1

30-17

19-29

Los Angeles 47 46 .505 13½

11

5-5

L-1

23-23 24-23

18½

2-8

L-3

19-28

1½ 4-6

13

3-7

L-1

20-27 20-28

Texas

40 54 .426

21

31-17

21-26

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Taillon, Mercer shine; Pirates beat Brewers

Pirates 6, Brewers 3

Nationals 5, Mets 4

Rockies 5, Diamondbacks 1

Jameson Taillon had a career-high 10 strikeouts, Jordy Mercer tied his career high with four RBIs and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the visiting Milwaukee Brewers 6-3 on Thursday night. Taillon (6-7) surrendered one run on four hits with two walks. The right-hander struck out the side twice, once in the third inning and again in the fifth, when he got out of a jam after allowing a leadoff walk to Tyler Saladino followed by a single from Erik Kratz. The Pirates have won four of their past five games to pull to 10 1/2 games back of the first-place Brewers, who have lost four of six, in the NL Central.

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames rf 5 0 1 1 0 3 .252 Cain cf 4 0 0 0 1 3 .294 Yelich lf 4 0 1 1 1 2 .289 Aguilar 1b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .307 Shaw 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Asher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Miller 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Houser p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Perez ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Saladino ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .279 Kratz c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .227 Miley p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Villar 2b 2 1 0 0 0 0 .260 Totals 36 3 9 3 4 13 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .305 Marte cf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .284 Diaz c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Freese 3b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .275 Luplow rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .100 Glasnow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bell 1b 1 3 0 0 3 0 .250 Harrison 2b 2 1 2 1 2 0 .262 Mercer ss 4 1 3 4 0 1 .253 Taillon p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 a-Moran ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Meadows rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Totals 31 6 9 6 8 6 Milwaukee 000 100 002 — 3 9 2 Pittsburgh 010 103 10x — 6 9 1 a-singled for Taillon in the 6th. b-struck out for Houser in the 8th. E: Saladino 2 (4), Mercer (6). LOB: Milwaukee 10, Pittsburgh 9. 2B: Harrison (8). HR: Aguilar (24), off Taillon. RBIs: Thames (28), Yelich (42), Aguilar (68), Marte (41), Harrison (23), Mercer 4 (30). SB: Kratz (1), Mercer (2). RLISP: Milwaukee 5 (Thames, Cain 2, Kratz, Perez); Pittsburgh 5 (Mercer, Taillon 4). LIDP: Luplow. GIDP: Aguilar, Dickerson, Luplow. DP: Milwaukee 3 (Miller), (Saladino, Villar, Aguilar), (Saladino, Villar, Aguilar); Pittsburgh 1 (Freese, Harrison, Bell). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley, L, 1-1 5 4 2 2 5 5 95 2.38 Houser 2 5 4 4 3 1 49 4.09 Asher 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon, W, 6-7 6 4 1 1 2 10 96 3.91 Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.43 Glasnow 1 1 0 0 1 2 22 4.80 1/ Feliz 1 1 0 20 5.40 3 2 2 2/ Vazquez, S, 21-25 3 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.15 Inherited runners-scored: Vazquez 3-1. WP: Houser. Umpires: Home, Scott Barry; First, Kerwin Danley; Second, Carlos Torres; Third, Paul Nauert. T: 3:00. A: 17,858 .

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Soto lf 5 1 2 0 0 2 .307 Rendon 3b 5 3 3 3 0 0 .285 Harper rf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .213 Reynolds 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .284 Murphy 2b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .256 Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .243 Wieters c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .224 Scherzer p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .256 b-Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Herrera p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 5 11 5 3 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nimmo rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Cabrera 2b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .282 Bautista 3b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .219 Conforto lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .216 Flores 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 den Dekker cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Plawecki c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .229 1-Kelly pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Reyes ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .164 Matz p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .097 Peterson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .183 Rhame p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Rosario ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Totals 32 4 7 4 4 6 Washington 201 000 200 — 5 11 0 New York 100 100 110 — 4 7 0 a-struck out for Blevins in the 7th. b-flied out for Scherzer in the 8th. c-grounded out for Familia in the 9th. 1-ran for Plawecki in the 9th. LOB: Washington 9, New York 5. 2B: Turner (15), Cabrera (20). HR: Rendon (14), off Matz; Rendon (15), off Matz; Harper (23), off Blevins; Bautista (7), off Scherzer; Plawecki (2), off Scherzer; Cabrera (17), off Herrera. RBIs: Rendon 3 (44), Harper 2 (53), Cabrera (52), Bautista 2 (25), Plawecki (10). SB: Taylor (24). S: Scherzer. RLISP: Washington 6 (Turner 4, Soto, Scherzer); New York 1 (den Dekker). GIDP: Rosario. DP: Washington 1 (Turner, Reynolds). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, W, 12-5 7 5 3 3 2 5 101 2.41 Herrera, 1 1 1 1 2 1 25 2.04 Madson, S, 4-6 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 5.13 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz, L, 4-7 61/3 8 3 3 2 4 100 3.38 Peterson 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 3.52 2/ Blevins 1 1 1 11 4.70 3 1 1 Rhame 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 6.14 Familia 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.95 Peterson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Blevins 1-1. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, John Libka; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Marvin Hudson. T: 2:48. A: 28,120 .

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay lf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .281 Ahmed ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .229 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .284 Pollock cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .287 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .176 Marte 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .241 J.Murphy c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Owings 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .193 Ray p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bracho p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chafin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Delgado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Koch p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .067 e-Lamb ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Totals 33 1 7 1 2 7 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .277 Blackmon cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Arenado 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .311 Story ss 3 1 1 1 1 2 .289 Desmond 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .224 Gonzalez rf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .275 Iannetta c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .235 Cuevas lf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .254 a-Parra ph-lf 2 1 1 1 0 0 .292 Freeland p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Tapia ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .273 Rusin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-T.Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .306 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 5 9 5 4 8 Arizona 100 000 000 — 1 7 0 Colorado 000 003 20x — 5 9 0 a-singled for Cuevas in the 6th. b-singled for Oberg in the 6th. c-flied out for Chafin in the 7th. d-grounded out for Ottavino in the 8th. e-flied out for Koch in the 9th. LOB: Arizona 9, Colorado 8. 2B: Ahmed (19), Souza Jr. (3), Arenado (20), Desmond (11). 3B: Souza Jr. (1). HR: Story (18), off Delgado. RBIs: Pollock (38), LeMahieu (34), Story (63), Gonzalez (39), Parra (40), Tapia (1). SB: Goldschmidt (3), Owings (7), LeMahieu (5), Desmond (10). SF: LeMahieu. S: Ray. RLISP: Arizona 6 (Jay, Pollock, Marte, J.Murphy, Ray 2); Colorado 3 (Story, Desmond, Freeland). GIDP: Iannetta. DP: Arizona 1 (Ahmed, Marte, Goldschmidt). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray, L, 3-2 51/3 5 2 2 3 8 102 5.03 Bracho, 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 2.30 2/ 0 0 0 13 1.59 Chafin 3 1 0 Delgado 1 2 2 2 1 0 18 5.40 Koch 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.33 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland 51/3 6 1 1 1 4 98 3.11 Oberg, W, 3-0 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.20 2/ 0 0 0 8 5.95 Rusin, 3 0 0 Ottavino, 11/3 1 0 0 1 1 18 1.69 Davis 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.93 Bracho pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Bracho 2-1, Chafin 2-2, Oberg 1-0. HBP: Freeland (Jay), Ray (Gonzalez). PB: Iannetta (3). Umpires: Home, Mike Winters; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:17. A: 41,410 .

Rockies 5, D’backs 1 • Gerardo Parra and Raimel Tapia had pinch-hit RBI singles in Colorado’s three-run sixth inning, helping the Rockies beat visiting Arizona. Trevor Story homered for the Rockies, and Kyle Freeland pitched six-hit ball into the sixth inning. DJ LeMahieu had two hits and drove in a run. Nationals 5, Mets 4 • Max Scherzer made a final pitch to start the All-Star Game on his own mound, Anthony Rendon hit two homers and Bryce Harper also connected, leading Washington in New York.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Athletics 6, Astros 4 • Mark Canha hit a two-run single in Oakland’s three-run eighth inning, helping the surging Athletics in Houston. Yankees 7, Indians 4 • Aaron Hicks drove home Didi Gregorius from first with a double in the eighth off Cleveland ace Corey Kluber, earning visiting New York the win. Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 4 • Mookie Betts fouled off seven pitches before hitting a grand slam that helped Boston beat visiting Toronto and extending their winning streak to 10 games.

INTERLEAGUE Phillies 5, Orioles 4 • Jorge Alfaro homered and drove in three runs, Nick Pivetta took a three-hitter into the seventh inning and Philadelphia won in Baltimore. Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rockies catcher Chris Iannetta holds up the ball to show the D’backs’ Steven Souza Jr. that he was tagged out.

NOTEBOOK D’backs put Miller, McFarland on DL The Diamondbacks placed right-hander Shelby Miller (right elbow inflammation) and left-hander T.J. McFarland (strained left neck) on the 10-day disabled list and recalled righthanders Matt Koch and Bracho from Triple-A. Miller left Wednesday’s loss with elbow tightness and was sent back to Arizona for further evaluation. It was Miller’s fourth start since returning from Tommy John surgery. “He’s going to get an MRI,” Lovullo said. “Holding out hope and always optimistic that it’s going to be as positive as it can be. (Wednesday) night was in a rough spot, he felt bad, but nothing he did was his fault.” Angels’ Richards chooses Tommy John surgery • Los Angeles Angels pitcher Garrett Richards said Thursday he has elected to undergo Tommy John surgery for his damaged ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow and will miss the remainder of the season. Reduced to 28 starts over the last three seasons because of injuries, including two UCL issues, Richards’ time with the Angels could effectively be finished after eight seasons and a 45-38 record with a 3.54 ERA. The free-agent-to-be expects to be ready to pitch at the start of the 2020 season. Red Sox place Devers on DL • The Boston Red Sox have placed third baseman Rafael Devers on the 10-day disabled list with left shoulder inflammation. The move was retroactive to Wednesday night. Infielder Tzu-Wei Lin was recalled from Triple-A Pawtucket to replace him on the roster. Devers was batting.241 with 14 homers and 48 RBIs this season, his first full year in the majors. Lin is batting.162 in 16 games over two call-ups to the majors this season. He was batting.308 with five homers at Pawtucket. Twins’ Morrison to DL with hip injury • The Minnesota Twins have placed designated hitter/first baseman Logan Morrison on the 10-day disabled list with a left hip injury. The move was made before Minnesota’s game on Thursday against Tampa Bay, making room for utility infielder Ehire Adrianza’s reinstatement from the 10-day disabled list. Morrison is batting just .193 in his first season with the Twins, with a .654 on-base-plus-slugging percentage and 11 home runs and 31 RBIs in 264 at-bats. He described his problem as chronic and said before the game he’s planning to return when he’s eligible on July 22. Associated Press

Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 4 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Grichuk rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .200 Gurriel Jr. ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .248 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .242 1-Granderson pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Hernandez lf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .259 Maile c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Morales dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .242 Martin c-3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .170 Pillar cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Travis 2b 4 0 4 0 0 0 .247 Diaz 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .243 a-Solarte ph-3b-1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Totals 37 4 11 4 0 10 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 1 2 5 0 0 .352 Benintendi lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .297 Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .329 Pearce 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .330 Swihart 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .205 Moreland 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Bogaerts ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .283 Holt 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282 Nunez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .259 Leon c 3 1 0 1 0 2 .246 Bradley Jr. cf 2 2 2 0 1 0 .208 Totals 32 6 8 6 1 10 Toronto 200 000 110 — 4 11 1 Boston 000 500 10x — 6 8 0 a-lined out for Diaz in the 7th. 1-ran for Smoak in the 8th. E: Travis (4). LOB: Toronto 6, Boston 4. 2B: Gurriel Jr. (3), Smoak (24), Bradley Jr. (16), Swihart (4). HR: Hernandez (14), off Price; Morales (11), off Price; Betts (23), off Happ. RBIs: Smoak (48), Hernandez 2 (37), Morales (29), Betts 5 (49), Leon (19). SB: Bradley Jr. (11). RLISP: Toronto 2 (Grichuk, Martin); Boston 3 (Martinez, Bogaerts, Nunez). GIDP: Benintendi. DP: Toronto 1 (Travis, Gurriel Jr., Smoak). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ, L, 10-6 3 2/3 5 5 0 1 6 98 4.29 Biagini 21/3 0 0 0 0 2 22 5.79 Axford 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 4.15 Oh 1 1 0 0 0 1 24 2.89 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price, W, 10-6 62/3 6 3 3 0 8 103 4.42 1/ Workman, 8 1.76 3 1 0 0 0 0 Barnes, 1 3 1 1 0 2 27 2.43 Kimbrel, S, 29-31 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 1.86 HBP: Happ (Pearce). WP: Happ, Axford, Kimbrel. Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Brian Gorman; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Adrian Johnson. T: 3:19. A: 37,182 .

Yankees 7, Indians 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 2 2 3 0 1 .257 Judge rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Gregorius ss 3 2 1 1 1 0 .260 Stanton dh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .276 Hicks cf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .255 Bird 1b 3 0 1 2 0 2 .211 Andujar 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .282 Romine c 4 0 0 0 0 4 .271 Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .194 Wade 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .156 Totals 34 7 9 7 2 11 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .297 Brantley lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .306 Ramirez 3b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .296 Encarnacion dh 3 1 1 1 1 1 .228 Alonso 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .259 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Naquin rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .274 a-Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Gomes c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .251 Allen cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .211 b-Guyer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Totals 34 4 9 4 2 4 New York 002 200 021 — 7 9 1 Cleveland 201 010 000 — 4 9 1 a-struck out for Naquin in the 9th. b-popped out for Allen in the 9th. E: Walker (2), Gomes (8). LOB: New York 4, Cleveland 5. 2B: Judge (19), Hicks (13), Bird (7), Andujar (27), Lindor (29). HR: Gardner (8), off Kluber; Gregorius (16), off Kluber; Gardner (9), off Olson; Encarnacion (21), off Severino; Ramirez (28), off Severino. RBIs: Gardner 3 (31), Gregorius (49), Hicks (43), Bird 2 (20), Ramirez 2 (67), Encarnacion (63), Alonso (52). SB: Hicks (8), Brantley (6). CS: Ramirez (3). SF: Bird. S: Hicks. RLISP: New York 1 (Stanton); Cleveland 1 (Gomes). LIDP: Walker. GIDP: Brantley. DP: New York 1 (Walker, Gregorius, Bird); Cleveland 1 (Alonso). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Severino 5 9 4 4 1 1 94 2.31 Warren 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 1.85 Robertson, W, 6-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.19 Betances, 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 2.68 Chapman, S, 25-26 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.38 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber, L, 12-5 71/3 8 6 6 2 9 114 2.76 1/ Perez 6 0.75 3 00 0 0 0 2/ Ramirez 1 9 3.32 3 00 0 0 1/ 1 1 1 0 1 9 7.64 Olson 3 1/ McAllister 3 5.65 3 00 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Perez 1-1. Umpires: Home, Chris Segal; First, Gabe Morales; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 3:07. A: 31,267 .

Thursday Oakland 6, Houston 4 Philadelphia 5, Baltimore 4 Boston 6, Toronto 4 NY Yankees 7, Cleveland 4 Tampa Bay at Minnesota, late Seattle at LA Angels, late Wednesday Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 2 Minnesota 8, Kansas City 5 NY Yankees 9, Baltimore 0 Cleveland 19, Cincinnati 4 Boston 4, Texas 2 Atlanta 9, Toronto 5 White Sox 4, Cardinals 0 Oakland 8, Houston 3 Seattle 3, LA Angels 0

Friday’s pitching matchups

Phillies 5, Orioles 4 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 1 3 0 1 0 .269 Hoskins dh 5 0 1 0 0 3 .254 Herrera cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .277 Santana 1b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .213 Williams lf 5 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Franco 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Kingery ss 4 1 3 0 0 0 .233 Altherr rf 3 1 0 0 0 0 .169 Alfaro c 4 2 3 3 0 0 .253 Totals 40 5 14 5 1 3 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .211 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Machado ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .316 Jones cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Davis dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .156 Trumbo rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Sisco c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .195 Mancini 1b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .220 Peterson lf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .197 Totals 34 4 7 4 1 9 Philadelphia 002 201 000 — 5 14 2 Baltimore 000 001 300 — 4 7 2 E: Santana (6), Kingery (9), Beckham (6), Mancini (2). LOB: Philadelphia 10, Baltimore 4. 2B: Kingery (18), Alfaro (12), Beckham (7). HR: Alfaro (6), off Gausman; Mancini (12), off Pivetta; Peterson (3), off Hunter. RBIs: Santana (52), Williams (34), Alfaro 3 (21), Machado (64), Mancini 2 (26), Peterson (19). RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Santana 2, Franco, Altherr); Baltimore 2 (Mancini 2). GIDP: Hernandez, Santana, Altherr, Beckham, Jones. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Franco, Hernandez, Santana), (Kingery, Hernandez, Santana); Baltimore 3 (Fry, Schoop, Mancini), (Machado, Schoop, Mancini), (Machado, Schoop, Mancini). Philadelphia IP HRERBBSO NP ERA Pivetta, W, 6-7 62/3 5 3 3 1 7102 4.58 1/ Hunter, 24.80 3 1 1 1 0 0 2/ Ramos, 9 1.11 3 10 0 0 0 1/ Morgan, 7 5.18 3 00 0 0 1 Dominguez, S, 9-10 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.60 Baltimore IP HRERBBSO NP ERA Gausman, L, 4-7 512 5 5 1 2 99 4.33 Fry 1 2 0 0 0 0 12 1.42 Castro 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.04 Scott 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 17 5.88 1/ Brach 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 4.58 Gausman pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Fry pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Morgan 1-0, Fry 2-0, Castro 2-0, Brach 1-0. HBP: Gausman (Altherr). WP: Pivetta, Gausman. Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Bill Welke; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 3:04. A: 20,100 .

Athletics 6, Astros 4 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Martini lf 5 0 3 2 0 2 .250 Semien ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Piscotty rf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .258 Davis dh 4 1 1 0 1 3 .250 Olson 1b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .240 Chapman 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .252 Pinder 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .253 Canha cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .262 Lucroy c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .242 Totals 38 6 11 6 3 10 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf-rf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .248 Bregman 3b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .285 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Gurriel 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .304 Reddick rf-lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .262 Gattis dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .242 Gonzalez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Stassi c 3 1 1 0 0 2 .255 a-White ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Kemp lf 2 2 1 2 1 0 .297 Marisnick cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .192 b-Tucker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 31 4 5 4 5 6 Oakland 000 030 030 — 6 11 0 Houston 002 200 000 — 4 5 1 a-struck out for Stassi in the 9th. b-grounded out for Marisnick in the 9th. E: Altuve (6). LOB: Oakland 8, Houston 5. 2B: Martini 2 (2), Semien (20), Chapman (16), Bregman (30). HR: Kemp (3), off Hatcher. RBIs: Martini 2 (3), Piscotty (44), Chapman (28), Canha 2 (36), Bregman 2 (61), Kemp 2 (17). SB: Semien (8), Kemp (7). RLISP: Oakland 5 (Olson 3, Chapman 2); Houston 1 (Reddick). GIDP: Lucroy. DP: Houston 1 (Harris, Gonzalez, Gurriel). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill 32/3 3 3 3 3 3 83 3.10 Hatcher 1 1 1 1 2 0 31 4.70 Petit, W, 3-2 21/3 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.36 Buchter, 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.93 Trivino, S, 4-5 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.31 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton 41/3 6 3 3 2 5 104 2.96 McHugh 12/3 0 0 0 1 2 31 0.99 Smith, 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.32 Devenski, L, 2-2, 1/3 4 3 3 0 0 25 2.45 Harris 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 21 3.89 Inherited runners-scored: Hatcher 1-1, Petit 1-0, McHugh 2-0, Harris 1-0. WP: Cahill. Umpires: Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Dave Rackley; Third, Nic Lentz. T: 3:21. A: 38,900 .

LATE WEDNESDAY

Dodgers 4, Padres 2 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Taylor ss 5 0 1 1 0 1 .255 Hernandez lf-2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .230 Turner 3b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .259 Kemp rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .313 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Muncy 1b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .276 Forsythe 2b 2 0 1 1 1 1 .202 a-Toles ph-lf-cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Bellinger cf-rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .244 Barnes c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .210 c-Grandal ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Maeda p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hudson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Utley ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .233 Floro p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Pederson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Totals 37 4 10 3 5 5 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jankowski cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .270 Asuaje 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .209 Myers lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .290 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .253 Renfroe rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .237 Maton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cimber p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Pirela ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Margot ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .232 Villanueva 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .228 Hedges c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .221 Lucchesi p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .059 Reyes rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .223 Totals 31 2 5 2 2 12 Los Angeles 003 000 010 — 4 10 0 San Diego 100 000 100 — 2 5 2 a-flied out for Forsythe in the 7th. b-grounded out for Cimber in the 7th. c-grounded out for Barnes in the 8th. d-doubled for Hudson in the 8th. e-grounded out for Hughes in the 9th. E: Galvis (4), Villanueva (11). LOB: Los Angeles 11, San Diego 4. 2B: Hernandez (7), Bellinger (21), Utley (8), Asuaje (5), Hedges (6). HR: Villanueva (18), off Hudson. RBIs: Taylor (39), Kemp (59), Forsythe (12), Asuaje (16), Villanueva (42). RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Bellinger, Barnes, Maeda 2, Toles); San Diego 3 (Renfroe, Galvis, Lucchesi). GIDP: Kemp, Grandal, Reyes. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Forsythe, Taylor, Muncy); San Diego 2 (Villanueva, Hosmer), (Hosmer, Villanueva, Stammen). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maeda, W, 6-5 52/3 4 1 1 1 9 92 3.13 1/ 0 0 1 3.57 Alexander, 3 0 0 0 Hudson, 1 1 1 1 0 1 14 3.50 Floro, 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.54 Jansen, S, 25-28 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 2.28 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lucchesi, L, 4-5 4 6 3 2 1 4 91 3.34 Maton 2 0 0 0 3 1 40 1.37 Cimber 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 3.18 Stammen 1 3 1 1 0 0 13 2.86 Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 5.84 Maton pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Alexander 1-0, Cimber 2-0. WP: Lucchesi. Umpires: Home, Ben May; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 3:18. A: 26,448 .

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Gennett, Cincinnati, .326; Markakis, Atlanta, .322; Almora, Chicago, .317; Freeman, Atlanta, .313; Kemp, Los Angeles, .313; Suarez, Cincinnati, .312; Arenado, Colorado, .311; Aguilar, Milwaukee, .307; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .305; Martinez, Cardinals, .301. RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 73; Blackmon, Colorado, 70; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 63; Arenado, Colorado, 61; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 61; Pham, Cardinals, 59; Gennett, Cincinnati, 58; Yelich, Milwaukee, 58; 4 tied at 57. RBI: Suarez, Cincinnati, 69; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 68; Arenado, Colorado, 66; Baez, Chicago, 66; Story, Colorado, 63; Freeman, Atlanta, 60; Markakis, Atlanta, 60; Gennett, Cincinnati, 59; Kemp, Los Angeles, 59; Rizzo, Chicago, 59. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 116; Albies, Atlanta, 113; Gennett, Cincinnati, 111; Castro, Miami, 110; Freeman, Atlanta, 110; Anderson, Miami, 105; Arenado, Colorado, 103; Story, Colorado, 102; Turner, Washington, 101; Blackmon, Colorado, 99. DOUBLES: Albies, Atlanta, 29; Markakis, Atlanta, 29; Carpenter, Cardinals, 27; Story, Colorado, 26; Rendon, Washington, 25; Freeman, Atlanta, 24; Baez, Chicago, 23; Hosmer, San Diego, 23; 3 tied at 22. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 8; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Baez, Chicago, 6; Nimmo, New York, 6; Contreras, Chicago, 5; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 5; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 5; Story, Colorado, 5; 9 tied at 4. HOME RUNS: Aguilar, Milwaukee, 24;

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Cin StL

Harvey (R) Martinez (R)

7:15

4-5 6-4

4.80 3.05

Mil Pit

Guerra (R) Kingham (R)

6:05

6-5 3-4

2.79 4.26

6:10

6-6 2-6

3.47 6.14

Was Roark (R) 3-11 NY Syndergaard (R) 6:10 4-1

4.76 3.06

Ari Atl

Godley (R) Sanchez (R)

6:35

10-6 4-2

4.80 2.72

Chi SD

Chatwood (R) Richard (L) 9:10

3-5 7-8

4.90 4.50

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tex Hamels (L) Bal Cobb (R)

4-8 6:05 2-11

4.28 6.57

NY Cle

German (R) Bieber (R)

6:10

2-4 4-1

5.06 3.47

Tor Borucki (L) Bos Porcello (R)

6:10

0-1 11-3

2.25 3.58

KC Chi

2-3 7:10 3-10

2.52 4.53

Phi Arrieta (R) Mia Chen (L)

Keller (R) Shields (R)

Det Fiers (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

7:10

6-5 6-8

3.65 3.95

TB Eovaldi (R) Min Odorizzi (R)

7:10

3-3 4-6

3.35 4.28

IL

Time W-L

ERA

Pitcher

Sea Bergman (R) 0-0 0.00 Col Senzatela (R) 7:40 3-2 5.34 LAA Pena (R) LAD Buehler (R)

9:10

1-0 4-2

3.63 3.44

Oak Jackson (R) SF Bumgarner (L) 9:15

1-0 2-3

2.45 3.09

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates. Arenado, Colorado, 23; Harper, Washington, 23; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21; Muncy, Los Angeles, 21; Albies, Atlanta, 20; Suarez, Cincinnati, 19; 5 tied at 18. STOLEN BASES: MTaylor, Washington, 24; Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 23; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 22; Turner, Washington, 22; Baez, Chicago, 17; Cain, Milwaukee, 17; Peraza, Cincinnati, 17; Dyson, Arizona, 16; 2 tied at 14. PITCHING: Nola, Philadelphia, 12-2; Scherzer, Washington, 12-5; Lester, Chicago, 11-2; Godley, Arizona, 10-6; Mikolas, Cardinals, 10-3; Greinke, Arizona, 9-5; 8 tied at 8. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.68; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.27; Scherzer, Washington, 2.41; Lester, Chicago, 2.46; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.65; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.66; Guerra, Milwaukee, 2.79; Corbin, Arizona, 3.10; Freeland, Colorado, 3.11; Matz, New York, 3.38. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 182; deGrom, New York, 149; Corbin, Arizona, 146; Nola, Philadelphia, 126; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 120; Gray, Colorado, 119; Greinke, Arizona, 117; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 113; Velasquez, Philadelphia, 110; Maeda, Los Angeles, 107.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Betts, Boston, .352; Altuve, Houston, .333; Martinez, Boston, .329; Segura, Seattle, .329; Machado, Baltimore, .316; Trout, Los Angeles, .314; Simmons, Los Angeles, .311; Duffy, Tampa Bay, .310; Brantley, Cleveland, .306; Castellanos, Detroit, .305. RUNS: Lindor, Cleveland, 83; Betts, Boston, 76; Benintendi, Boston, 68; Martinez, Boston, 68; Trout, Los Angeles, 68; Judge, New York, 65; Ramirez, Cleveland, 64; Springer, Houston, 64; Segura, Seattle, 63; 2 tied at 62. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 79; Ramirez, Cleveland, 67; Haniger, Seattle, 65; Machado, Baltimore, 64; KDavis, Oakland, 63; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 63; Gattis, Houston, 62; Lindor, Cleveland, 62; Lowrie, Oakland, 62; Bregman, Houston, 61. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 126; Segura, Seattle, 117; Machado, Baltimore, 113; Martinez, Boston, 113; Castellanos, Detroit, 112; Lindor, Cleveland, 112; Rosario, Minnesota, 107; Benintendi, Boston, 104; Merrifield, Kansas City, 104; 3 tied at 103. DOUBLES: Escobar, Minnesota, 35; Bregman, Houston, 30; Castellanos, Detroit, 29; Lindor, Cleveland, 29; Merrifield, Kansas City, 29; Abreu, Chicago, 27; Andujar, New York, 27; Ramirez, Cleveland, 26; 6 tied at 25. TRIPLES: Sanchez, Chicago, 9; Hernandez, Toronto, 6; Benintendi, Boston, 5; Moncada, Chicago, 5; Smith, Tampa Bay, 5; Jones, Detroit, 4; Moreland, Boston, 4; Profar, Texas, 4; 14 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 28; Ramirez, Cleveland, 28; Judge, New York, 25; Lindor, Cleveland, 25; Trout, Los Angeles, 25; Betts, Boston, 23; Machado, Baltimore, 23; Cruz, Seattle, 22; Stanton, New York, 22; 3 tied at 21. STOLEN BASES: Gordon, Seattle, 22; Anderson, Chicago, 21; Ramirez, Cleveland, 19; Benintendi, Boston, 17; Betts, Boston, 16; RDavis, Cleveland, 16; DeShields, Texas, 16; Merrifield, Kansas City, 16; Smith, Tampa Bay, 16; 3 tied at 14. PITCHING: Severino, New York, 14-2; Kluber, Cleveland, 12-5; Snell, Tampa Bay, 12-4; Morton, Houston, 11-2; Porcello, Boston, 11-3; Rodriguez, Boston, 11-3; 6 tied at 10. ERA: Verlander, Houston, 2.05; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.10; Sale, Boston, 2.23; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.30; Severino, New York, 2.31; Cole, Houston, 2.57; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.76; Morton, Houston, 2.96; Clevinger, Cleveland, 3.34; Sabathia, New York, 3.34. STRIKEOUTS: Sale, Boston, 188; Cole, Houston, 169; Bauer, Cleveland, 168; Verlander, Houston, 160; Paxton, Seattle, 154; Morton, Houston, 146; Severino, New York, 144; Kluber, Cleveland, 132; Snell, Tampa Bay, 132; Berrios, Minnesota, 122.

This Date In Baseball Compiled by PAUL MONTELLA July 13 1896: Philadelphia’s Ed Delahanty hit four home runs in a losing effort, a 9-8 loss to Chicago. 1934: Babe Ruth hit his 700th home run in a 4-2 victory over Tommy Bridges and the Detroit Tigers. Lou Gehrig left in the first with a severe case of lumbago, the most serious threat to his streak. He returned for one at bat the next day. 1943: The first night game in All-Star history, at Philadelphia’s Shibe Park, went to the AL, 5-3, despite a single, triple and home run by NL center fielder Vince DiMaggio of the Pittsburgh Pirates. The big blow was a threerun homer by Bobby Doerr of the Boston Red Sox, which gave the AL the lead for good. 1945: Chicago’s Pat Seerey hit three home runs, a triple and drove in eight runs to lead the White Sox in a 16-4 win over New York at Yankee Stadium. 1954: Pitcher Dean Stone did not retire a batter but received credit for the AL’s 11-9 All-Star victory at Cleveland’s Municipal Stadium. Red Schoendienst tried to steal a run for the NL after Stone was summoned in the eighth inning, but the pitcher’s throw to the plate nailed the runner for the third out.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Milwaukee

55 39 .585

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away —

— 6-4

L-2

30-18

25-21

Chicago

52 38 .578

1

7-3

L-1

28-15

24-23

Cardinals

47 44 .516

4

5-5

L-1

23-22

24-22

Pittsburgh

44 49 .473 10½

8 4-6 W-2

25-24

19-25

Cincinnati

41 52 .441 13½

11 6-4

21-26 20-26

EAST

W

L

Pct

L-1

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Philadelphia 52 40 .565

7-3 W-1

30-16

22-24

Atlanta

51 40 .560

½

— 4-6 W-1

24-18

27-22

Washington

47 46 .505

5

5-5 W-1

22-24

25-22

14

5-5 W-1

21-27

18-29

17-31

20-23

Miami

39 56

New York

37 54 .407 14½

.411 14½

WEST

W

L

Pct

14 4-6

Los Angeles

51 42 .548

51 43 .543

½

Colorado

48 45 .516

3

4

San Francisco 49 46 .516

3

40 56

L-1

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Arizona

San Diego

M 2 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

.417 12½

7-3 W-2

26-23

25-19

L-2

26-23

25-20

7-3 W-2

20-23

4 4-6 W-1

30-17

1½ 4-6

13½

3-7

Thursday Colorado 5, Arizona 1 Philadelphia 5, Baltimore 4 Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 3 Washington 5, NY Mets 4 LA Dodgers 3, San Diego 2 Wednesday Pittsburgh 2, Washington 0 San Francisco 5, Cubs 4, 13 inn. NY Mets 3, Philadelphia 0, 10 inn. Cleveland 19, Cincinnati 4 Miami 5, Milwaukee 4, 12 inn. Atlanta 9, Toronto 5 White Sox 4, Cardinals 0 Colorado 19, Arizona 2 LA Dodgers 4, San Diego 2

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB

Cleveland

50 42 .543

L10

Str Home Away

5-5

L-1

29-18

21-24 15-28

Minnesota

42 49 .462

14½

7-3

W-2

27-21

Detroit

40 55 .421 11½

18½

3-7

L-4

25-23

15-32

Chicago

31 61 .337

19

26

3-7

W-1

17-28

14-33

Kansas City

26 66 .283

24

31

1-9

L-1

11-35

15-31

GB WCGB

L10

EAST

W

Boston

66 29 .695

L

Pct

New York

61 31 .663

Tampa Bay

48 45 .516

Str Home Away

— 10-0 W-10

32-12

34-17

7-3

W-2

33-13

28-18

17

6-4

L-1

26-17

22-28

Toronto

42 50 .457 22½

15

3-7

L-2

24-25

18-25

Baltimore

26 68 .277 39½

32

2-8

L-2

14-32

12-36

WEST

W

GB WCGB

L10

Str Home Away

L

Pct

Houston

62 34 .646

7-3

L-2 30-20

32-14

Seattle

58 36 .617

3

5-5

L-1

27-19

28-22

Oakland

53 41 .564

19-29

Los Angeles 48 46

L-2 20-28 20-28

Texas

31-17

8

5

7-3

W-2

24-21 29-20

.511

13

10

5-5

W-1

24-23 24-23

40 54 .426

21

18

2-8

L-3

19-28

21-26

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Taillon, Mercer shine; Pirates beat Brewers

Pirates 6, Brewers 3

Nationals 5, Mets 4

Rockies 5, Diamondbacks 1

Jameson Taillon had a career-high 10 strikeouts, Jordy Mercer tied his career high with four RBIs and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the visiting Milwaukee Brewers 6-3 on Thursday night. Taillon (6-7) surrendered one run on four hits with two walks. The right-hander struck out the side twice, once in the third inning and again in the fifth, when he got out of a jam after allowing a leadoff walk to Tyler Saladino followed by a single from Erik Kratz.

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames rf 5 0 1 1 0 3 .252 Cain cf 4 0 0 0 1 3 .294 Yelich lf 4 0 1 1 1 2 .289 Aguilar 1b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .307 Shaw 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Asher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Miller 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Houser p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Perez ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Saladino ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .279 Kratz c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .227 Miley p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Villar 2b 2 1 0 0 0 0 .260 Totals 36 3 9 3 4 13 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .305 Marte cf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .284 Diaz c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Freese 3b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .275 Luplow rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .100 Glasnow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bell 1b 1 3 0 0 3 0 .250 Harrison 2b 2 1 2 1 2 0 .262 Mercer ss 4 1 3 4 0 1 .253 Taillon p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 a-Moran ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Meadows rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Totals 31 6 9 6 8 6 Milwaukee 000 100 002 — 3 9 2 Pittsburgh 010 103 10x — 6 9 1 a-singled for Taillon in the 6th. b-struck out for Houser in the 8th. E: Saladino 2 (4), Mercer (6). LOB: Milwaukee 10, Pittsburgh 9. 2B: Harrison (8). HR: Aguilar (24), off Taillon. RBIs: Thames (28), Yelich (42), Aguilar (68), Marte (41), Harrison (23), Mercer 4 (30). SB: Kratz (1), Mercer (2). RLISP: Milwaukee 5 (Thames, Cain 2, Kratz, Perez); Pittsburgh 5 (Mercer, Taillon 4). LIDP: Luplow. GIDP: Aguilar, Dickerson, Luplow. DP: Milwaukee 3 (Miller), (Saladino, Villar, Aguilar), (Saladino, Villar, Aguilar); Pittsburgh 1 (Freese, Harrison, Bell). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley, L, 1-1 5 4 2 2 5 5 95 2.38 Houser 2 5 4 4 3 1 49 4.09 Asher 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon, W, 6-7 6 4 1 1 2 10 96 3.91 Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.43 Glasnow 1 1 0 0 1 2 22 4.80 1/ 1 1 0 20 5.40 3 2 2 Feliz Vazquez, S, 21-25 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.15 Inherited runners-scored: Vazquez 3-1. WP: Houser. Umpires: Home, Scott Barry; First, Kerwin Danley; Second, Carlos Torres; Third, Paul Nauert. T: 3:00. A: 17,858 .

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Soto lf 5 1 2 0 0 2 .307 Rendon 3b 5 3 3 3 0 0 .285 Harper rf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .213 Reynolds 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .284 Murphy 2b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .256 Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .243 Wieters c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .224 Scherzer p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .256 b-Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Herrera p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 5 11 5 3 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nimmo rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Cabrera 2b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .282 Bautista 3b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .219 Conforto lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .216 Flores 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 den Dekker cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Plawecki c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .229 1-Kelly pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Reyes ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .164 Matz p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .097 Peterson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .183 Rhame p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Rosario ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Totals 32 4 7 4 4 6 Washington 201 000 200 — 5 11 0 New York 100 100 110 — 4 7 0 a-struck out for Blevins in the 7th. b-flied out for Scherzer in the 8th. c-grounded out for Familia in the 9th. 1-ran for Plawecki in the 9th. LOB: Washington 9, New York 5. 2B: Turner (15), Cabrera (20). HR: Rendon (14), off Matz; Rendon (15), off Matz; Harper (23), off Blevins; Bautista (7), off Scherzer; Plawecki (2), off Scherzer; Cabrera (17), off Herrera. RBIs: Rendon 3 (44), Harper 2 (53), Cabrera (52), Bautista 2 (25), Plawecki (10). SB: Taylor (24). S: Scherzer. RLISP: Washington 6 (Turner 4, Soto, Scherzer); New York 1 (den Dekker). GIDP: Rosario. DP: Washington 1 (Turner, Reynolds). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, W, 12-5 7 5 3 3 2 5 101 2.41 Herrera, 1 1 1 1 2 1 25 2.04 Madson, S, 4-6 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 5.13 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz, L, 4-7 61/3 8 3 3 2 4 100 3.38 Peterson 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 3.52 2/ Blevins 1 1 1 11 4.70 3 1 1 Rhame 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 6.14 Familia 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.95 Peterson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Blevins 1-1. Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, John Libka; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Marvin Hudson. T: 2:48. A: 28,120 .

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay lf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .281 Ahmed ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .229 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .284 Pollock cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .287 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .176 Marte 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .241 J.Murphy c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Owings 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .193 Ray p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bracho p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chafin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Delgado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Koch p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .067 e-Lamb ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Totals 33 1 7 1 2 7 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .277 Blackmon cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Arenado 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .311 Story ss 3 1 1 1 1 2 .289 Desmond 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .224 Gonzalez rf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .275 Iannetta c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .235 Cuevas lf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .254 a-Parra ph-lf 2 1 1 1 0 0 .292 Freeland p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Tapia ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .273 Rusin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-T.Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .306 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 5 9 5 4 8 Arizona 100 000 000 — 1 7 0 Colorado 000 003 20x — 5 9 0 a-singled for Cuevas in the 6th. b-singled for Oberg in the 6th. c-flied out for Chafin in the 7th. d-grounded out for Ottavino in the 8th. e-flied out for Koch in the 9th. LOB: Arizona 9, Colorado 8. 2B: Ahmed (19), Souza Jr. (3), Arenado (20), Desmond (11). 3B: Souza Jr. (1). HR: Story (18), off Delgado. RBIs: Pollock (38), LeMahieu (34), Story (63), Gonzalez (39), Parra (40), Tapia (1). SB: Goldschmidt (3), Owings (7), LeMahieu (5), Desmond (10). SF: LeMahieu. S: Ray. RLISP: Arizona 6 (Jay, Pollock, Marte, J.Murphy, Ray 2); Colorado 3 (Story, Desmond, Freeland). GIDP: Iannetta. DP: Arizona 1 (Ahmed, Marte, Goldschmidt). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray, L, 3-2 51/3 5 2 2 3 8 102 5.03 Bracho, 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 2.30 2/ Chafin 0 0 0 13 1.59 3 1 0 Delgado 1 2 2 2 1 0 18 5.40 Koch 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.33 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland 51/3 6 1 1 1 4 98 3.11 Oberg, W, 3-0 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.20 2/ Rusin, 0 0 0 8 5.95 3 0 0 Ottavino, 11/3 1 0 0 1 1 18 1.69 Davis 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.93 Bracho pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Bracho 2-1, Chafin 2-2, Oberg 1-0. HBP: Freeland (Jay), Ray (Gonzalez). PB: Iannetta (3). Umpires: Home, Mike Winters; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:17. A: 41,410 .

Rockies 5, D’backs 1 • Gerardo Parra and Raimel Tapia had pinch-hit RBI singles in Colorado’s three-run sixth inning, helping the Rockies beat visiting Arizona. Nationals 5, Mets 4 • Max Scherzer made a final pitch to start the All-Star Game on his own mound and Anthony Rendon hit two homers as Washington won in New York.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Athletics 6, Astros 4 • Mark Canha hit a two-run single in Oakland’s three-run eighth inning, helping the surging Athletics in Houston. Yankees 7, Indians 4 • Aaron Hicks drove home Didi Gregorius from first with a double in the eighth off Cleveland ace Corey Kluber, earning visiting New York the win. Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 4 • Mookie Betts fouled off seven pitches before hitting a grand slam that helped Boston beat visiting Toronto and extending their winning streak to 10 games. Twins 5, Rays 1 • Kyle Gibson allowed one run over eight innings as Minnesota beat visiting Tampa Bay. Angels 11, Mariners 2 • Albert Pujols hit two homers and tied Ken Griffey Jr. for sixth place on the all-time homer list with his 630th as Los Angeles beat visiting Seattle.

INTERLEAGUE Phillies 5, Orioles 4 • Jorge Alfaro homered and drove in three runs, Nick Pivetta took a three-hitter into the seventh inning and Philadelphia won in Baltimore. Associated Press

PUJOLS MILESTONE With two longballs Thursday, Albert Pujols tied Ken Griffey Jr. for sixth all-time on the career home run leaderboard. 1. Barry Bonds

762

2. Hank Aaron

755

3. Babe Ruth

714

4. A. Rodriguez 696 5. Willie Mays

660

6. Ken Griffey

630

Albert Pujols 630

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rockies catcher Chris Iannetta holds up the ball to show the D’backs’ Steven Souza Jr. that he was tagged out.

NOTEBOOK D’backs put Miller, McFarland on DL The Diamondbacks placed right-hander Shelby Miller (right elbow inflammation) and left-hander T.J. McFarland (strained left neck) on the 10-day disabled list and recalled righthanders Matt Koch and Bracho from Triple-A. Miller left Wednesday’s loss with elbow tightness and was sent back to Arizona for further evaluation. It was Miller’s fourth start since returning from Tommy John surgery. “He’s going to get an MRI,” Lovullo said. “Holding out hope and always optimistic that it’s going to be as positive as it can be. (Wednesday) night was in a rough spot, he felt bad, but nothing he did was his fault.” Angels’ Richards chooses Tommy John surgery • Los Angeles Angels pitcher Garrett Richards said Thursday he has elected to undergo Tommy John surgery for his damaged ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow and will miss the remainder of the season. Reduced to 28 starts over the last three seasons because of injuries, including two UCL issues, Richards’ time with the Angels could effectively be finished after eight seasons and a 45-38 record with a 3.54 ERA. The free-agent-to-be expects to be ready to pitch at the start of the 2020 season. Red Sox place Devers on DL • The Boston Red Sox have placed third baseman Rafael Devers on the 10-day disabled list with left shoulder inflammation. The move was retroactive to Wednesday night. Infielder Tzu-Wei Lin was recalled from Triple-A Pawtucket to replace him on the roster. Devers was batting.241 with 14 homers and 48 RBIs this season, his first full year in the majors. Lin is batting.162 in 16 games over two call-ups to the majors this season. He was batting.308 with five homers at Pawtucket. Twins’ Morrison to DL with hip injury • The Minnesota Twins have placed designated hitter/first baseman Logan Morrison on the 10-day disabled list with a left hip injury. The move was made before Minnesota’s game on Thursday against Tampa Bay, making room for utility infielder Ehire Adrianza’s reinstatement from the 10-day disabled list. Morrison is batting just .193 in his first season with the Twins, with a .654 on-base-plus-slugging percentage and 11 home runs and 31 RBIs in 264 at-bats. He described his problem as chronic and said before the game he’s planning to return when he’s eligible on July 22. Associated Press

Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 4 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Grichuk rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .200 Gurriel Jr. ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .248 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .242 1-Granderson pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Hernandez lf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .259 Maile c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Morales dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .242 Martin c-3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .170 Pillar cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Travis 2b 4 0 4 0 0 0 .247 Diaz 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .243 a-Solarte ph-3b-1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Totals 37 4 11 4 0 10 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 1 2 5 0 0 .352 Benintendi lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .297 Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .329 Pearce 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .330 Swihart 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .205 Moreland 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Bogaerts ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .283 Holt 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282 Nunez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .259 Leon c 3 1 0 1 0 2 .246 Bradley Jr. cf 2 2 2 0 1 0 .208 Totals 32 6 8 6 1 10 Toronto 200 000 110 — 4 11 1 Boston 000 500 10x — 6 8 0 a-lined out for Diaz in the 7th. 1-ran for Smoak in the 8th. E: Travis (4). LOB: Toronto 6, Boston 4. 2B: Gurriel Jr. (3), Smoak (24), Bradley Jr. (16), Swihart (4). HR: Hernandez (14), off Price; Morales (11), off Price; Betts (23), off Happ. RBIs: Smoak (48), Hernandez 2 (37), Morales (29), Betts 5 (49), Leon (19). SB: Bradley Jr. (11). RLISP: Toronto 2 (Grichuk, Martin); Boston 3 (Martinez, Bogaerts, Nunez). GIDP: Benintendi. DP: Toronto 1 (Travis, Gurriel Jr., Smoak). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ, L, 10-6 3 2/3 5 5 0 1 6 98 4.29 Biagini 21/3 0 0 0 0 2 22 5.79 Axford 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 4.15 Oh 1 1 0 0 0 1 24 2.89 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price, W, 10-6 62/3 6 3 3 0 8 103 4.42 1/ 8 1.76 Workman, 3 1 0 0 0 0 Barnes, 1 3 1 1 0 2 27 2.43 Kimbrel, S, 29-31 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 1.86 HBP: Happ (Pearce). WP: Happ, Axford, Kimbrel. Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Brian Gorman; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Adrian Johnson. T: 3:19. A: 37,182 .

Yankees 7, Indians 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 2 2 3 0 1 .257 Judge rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Gregorius ss 3 2 1 1 1 0 .260 Stanton dh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .276 Hicks cf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .255 Bird 1b 3 0 1 2 0 2 .211 Andujar 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .282 Romine c 4 0 0 0 0 4 .271 Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .194 Wade 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .156 Totals 34 7 9 7 2 11 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .297 Brantley lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .306 Ramirez 3b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .296 Encarnacion dh 3 1 1 1 1 1 .228 Alonso 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .259 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Naquin rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .274 a-Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Gomes c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .251 Allen cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .211 b-Guyer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Totals 34 4 9 4 2 4 New York 002 200 021 — 7 9 1 Cleveland 201 010 000 — 4 9 1 a-struck out for Naquin in the 9th. b-popped out for Allen in the 9th. E: Walker (2), Gomes (8). LOB: New York 4, Cleveland 5. 2B: Judge (19), Hicks (13), Bird (7), Andujar (27), Lindor (29). HR: Gardner (8), off Kluber; Gregorius (16), off Kluber; Gardner (9), off Olson; Encarnacion (21), off Severino; Ramirez (28), off Severino. RBIs: Gardner 3 (31), Gregorius (49), Hicks (43), Bird 2 (20), Ramirez 2 (67), Encarnacion (63), Alonso (52). SB: Hicks (8), Brantley (6). CS: Ramirez (3). SF: Bird. S: Hicks. RLISP: New York 1 (Stanton); Cleveland 1 (Gomes). LIDP: Walker. GIDP: Brantley. DP: New York 1 (Walker, Gregorius, Bird); Cleveland 1 (Alonso). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Severino 5 9 4 4 1 1 94 2.31 Warren 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 1.85 Robertson, W, 6-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.19 Betances, 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 2.68 Chapman, S, 25-26 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.38 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber, L, 12-5 71/3 8 6 6 2 9 114 2.76 1/ 6 0.75 Perez 3 00 0 0 0 2/ 1 9 3.32 Ramirez 3 00 0 0 1/ Olson 1 1 1 0 1 9 7.64 3 1/ 3 5.65 McAllister 3 00 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Perez 1-1. Umpires: Home, Chris Segal; First, Gabe Morales; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 3:07. A: 31,267 .

Thursday Oakland 6, Houston 4 Philadelphia 5, Baltimore 4 Boston 6, Toronto 4 NY Yankees 7, Cleveland 4 Minnesota 5, Tampa Bay 1 LA Angels 11, Seattle 2 Wednesday Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 2 Minnesota 8, Kansas City 5 NY Yankees 9, Baltimore 0 Cleveland 19, Cincinnati 4 Boston 4, Texas 2 Atlanta 9, Toronto 5 White Sox 4, Cardinals 0 Oakland 8, Houston 3 Seattle 3, LA Angels 0

Friday’s pitching matchups

Phillies 5, Orioles 4 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 1 3 0 1 0 .269 5 0 1 0 0 3 .254 Hoskins dh Herrera cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .277 Santana 1b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .213 Williams lf 5 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Franco 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Kingery ss 4 1 3 0 0 0 .233 Altherr rf 3 1 0 0 0 0 .169 Alfaro c 4 2 3 3 0 0 .253 Totals 40 5 14 5 1 3 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .211 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Machado ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .316 Jones cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Davis dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .156 Trumbo rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Sisco c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .195 Mancini 1b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .220 Peterson lf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .197 Totals 34 4 7 4 1 9 Philadelphia 002 201 000 — 5 14 2 Baltimore 000 001 300 — 4 7 2 E: Santana (6), Kingery (9), Beckham (6), Mancini (2). LOB: Philadelphia 10, Baltimore 4. 2B: Kingery (18), Alfaro (12), Beckham (7). HR: Alfaro (6), off Gausman; Mancini (12), off Pivetta; Peterson (3), off Hunter. RBIs: Santana (52), Williams (34), Alfaro 3 (21), Machado (64), Mancini 2 (26), Peterson (19). RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Santana 2, Franco, Altherr); Baltimore 2 (Mancini 2). GIDP: Hernandez, Santana, Altherr, Beckham, Jones. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Franco, Hernandez, Santana), (Kingery, Hernandez, Santana); Baltimore 3 (Fry, Schoop, Mancini), (Machado, Schoop, Mancini), (Machado, Schoop, Mancini). Philadelphia IP HRERBBSO NP ERA Pivetta, W, 6-7 62/3 5 3 3 1 7102 4.58 1/ Hunter, 24.80 3 1 1 1 0 0 2/ Ramos, 9 1.11 3 10 0 0 0 1/ Morgan, 7 5.18 3 00 0 0 1 Dominguez, S, 9-10 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.60 Baltimore IP HRERBBSO NP ERA Gausman, L, 4-7 512 5 5 1 2 99 4.33 Fry 1 2 0 0 0 0 12 1.42 Castro 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.04 Scott 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 17 5.88 1/ Brach 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 4.58 Gausman pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Fry pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Morgan 1-0, Fry 2-0, Castro 2-0, Brach 1-0. HBP: Gausman (Altherr). WP: Pivetta, Gausman. Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Bill Welke; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 3:04. A: 20,100 .

Athletics 6, Astros 4 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Martini lf 5 0 3 2 0 2 .250 Semien ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Piscotty rf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .258 Davis dh 4 1 1 0 1 3 .250 Olson 1b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .240 Chapman 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .252 Pinder 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .253 Canha cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .262 Lucroy c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .242 Totals 38 6 11 6 3 10 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf-rf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .248 Bregman 3b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .285 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Gurriel 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .304 Reddick rf-lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .262 Gattis dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .242 Gonzalez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Stassi c 3 1 1 0 0 2 .255 a-White ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Kemp lf 2 2 1 2 1 0 .297 Marisnick cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .192 b-Tucker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 31 4 5 4 5 6 Oakland 000 030 030 — 6 11 0 Houston 002 200 000 — 4 5 1 a-struck out for Stassi in the 9th. b-grounded out for Marisnick in the 9th. E: Altuve (6). LOB: Oakland 8, Houston 5. 2B: Martini 2 (2), Semien (20), Chapman (16), Bregman (30). HR: Kemp (3), off Hatcher. RBIs: Martini 2 (3), Piscotty (44), Chapman (28), Canha 2 (36), Bregman 2 (61), Kemp 2 (17). SB: Semien (8), Kemp (7). RLISP: Oakland 5 (Olson 3, Chapman 2); Houston 1 (Reddick). GIDP: Lucroy. DP: Houston 1 (Harris, Gonzalez, Gurriel). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill 32/3 3 3 3 3 3 83 3.10 Hatcher 1 1 1 1 2 0 31 4.70 Petit, W, 3-2 21/3 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.36 Buchter, 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.93 Trivino, S, 4-5 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.31 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton 41/3 6 3 3 2 5 104 2.96 McHugh 12/3 0 0 0 1 2 31 0.99 Smith, 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.32 Devenski, L, 2-2, 1/3 4 3 3 0 0 25 2.45 Harris 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 21 3.89 Inherited runners-scored: Hatcher 1-1, Petit 1-0, McHugh 2-0, Harris 1-0. WP: Cahill. Umpires: Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Dave Rackley; Third, Nic Lentz. T: 3:21. A: 38,900 .

Twins 5, Rays 1 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .171 Robertson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .260 Bauers lf 4 0 3 0 0 0 .252 Ramos c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .295 Choi dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .237 Cron 1b 4 0 1 0 0 3 .253 Wendle 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Hechavarria ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .251 a-Duffy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .309 Smith rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Totals 33 1 7 1 1 11 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Rosario lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .302 Dozier 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .229 Grossman rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .241 Polanco ss 4 0 1 1 0 2 .250 Astudillo dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Kepler cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .228 Adrianza 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .262 Wilson c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .163 Totals 31 5 7 4 3 5 Tampa Bay 000 000 010 — 1 7 1 Minnesota 012 000 20x — 5 7 0 a-struck out for Hechavarria in the 9th. E: Robertson (7). LOB: Tampa Bay 7, Minnesota 5. 2B: Bauers (11), Ramos (12), Hechavarria (7), Grossman (12), Polanco (3). HR: Rosario (19), off Hu. RBIs: Kiermaier (8), Rosario 2 (56), Grossman (27), Polanco (4). SB: Polanco (2). SF: Kiermaier. RLISP: Tampa Bay 6 (Choi 2, Cron, Wendle, Duffy 2); Minnesota 3 (Astudillo 2, Kepler). GIDP: Wilson. DP: Tampa Bay 1 (Hechavarria, Wendle, Cron). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell, L, 12-5 3 5 3 3 3 2 75 2.27 Hu 5 2 2 2 0 3 61 5.87 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 4-6 8 5 1 1 0 9 113 3.42 1/ Pressly 1 1 16 3.77 3 2 0 0 Rodney, S, 21-26 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.00 Inherited runners-scored: Rodney 3-0. WP: Gibson, Snell 2. Umpires: Home, Quinn Wolcott; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, James Hoye; Third, Ryan Additon. T: 2:50. A: 25,281 .

Angels 11, Mariners 2 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .285 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .326 Gamel rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .277 Haniger rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .272 Beckham ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Cruz dh 3 0 1 0 1 1 .266 Seager 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .236 Healy 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .241 Span lf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .270 Heredia cf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .232 Freitas c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .205 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 7 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fletcher 3b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .273 Simmons ss 4 2 1 0 1 0 .311 Trout cf 3 3 1 0 1 0 .314 Upton lf 4 1 2 3 0 2 .249 Hermosillo lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .154 Pujols dh 4 2 3 3 1 0 .251 Kinsler 2b 5 0 3 3 0 0 .218 Marte 1b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .242 a-Valbuena ph-1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .208 Maldonado c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Calhoun rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .180 Totals 37 11 15 11 3 5 Seattle 100 000 001 — 2 9 0 Los Angeles 310 014 02x — 11 15 1 a-flied out for Marte in the 3rd. E: Skaggs (2). LOB: Seattle 8, Los Angeles 8. 2B: Heredia (10). HR: Fletcher (1), off Paxton; Pujols (15), off Paxton; Upton (18), off Rumbelow; Pujols (16), off Rumbelow. RBIs: Seager (55), Heredia (11), Fletcher (7), Upton 3 (51), Pujols 3 (52), Kinsler 3 (26), Calhoun (23). SB: Trout (15), Upton (5). SF: Calhoun. RLISP: Seattle 3 (Gordon 2, Healy); Los Angeles 4 (Trout, Maldonado 2, Valbuena). DP: Seattle 1 (Beckham, Gordon, Healy); Los Angeles 2 (Kinsler, Marte), (Fletcher, Kinsler, Valbuena). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paxton, L, 8-4 2/3 3 3 3 0 1 17 3.70 Bradford 21/3 3 1 1 1 0 39 2.72 Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.95 Nicasio 1 2 1 1 1 2 21 6.17 Rumbelow 1 4 4 4 0 0 21 7.84 Elias 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.45 Romine 1 2 2 2 1 0 30 18.00 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Skaggs, W, 7-5 6 5 1 1 1 5 80 2.57 Ramirez 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 4.33 Drake 2 4 1 1 0 1 32 7.54 HBP: Bradford (Marte), Rumbelow (Trout), Ramirez (Heredia). WP: Romine. Umpires: Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Jim Wolf; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Ryan Blakney. T: 3:02. A: 44,027 (45,050).

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Cin StL

Harvey (R) Martinez (R)

7:15

4-5 6-4

4.80 3.05

Mil Pit

Guerra (R) Kingham (R)

6:05

6-5 3-4

2.79 4.26

6:10

6-6 2-6

3.47 6.14

Was Roark (R) 3-11 NY Syndergaard (R) 6:10 4-1

4.76 3.06

Ari Atl

Godley (R) Sanchez (R)

6:35

10-6 4-2

4.80 2.72

Chi SD

Chatwood (R) Richard (L) 9:10

3-5 7-8

4.90 4.50

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Tex Hamels (L) Bal Cobb (R)

4-8 6:05 2-11

4.28 6.57

NY Cle

German (R) Bieber (R)

6:10

2-4 4-1

5.06 3.47

Tor Borucki (L) Bos Porcello (R)

6:10

0-1 11-3

2.25 3.58

KC Chi

2-3 7:10 3-10

2.52 4.53

Phi Arrieta (R) Mia Chen (L)

Keller (R) Shields (R)

Det Fiers (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

7:10

6-5 6-8

3.65 3.95

TB Eovaldi (R) Min Odorizzi (R)

7:10

3-3 4-6

3.35 4.28

IL

Time W-L

ERA

Pitcher

Sea Bergman (R) 0-0 0.00 Col Senzatela (R) 7:40 3-2 5.34 LAA Pena (R) LAD Buehler (R)

9:10

1-0 4-2

3.63 3.44

Oak Jackson (R) SF Bumgarner (L) 9:15

1-0 2-3

2.45 3.09

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NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Gennett, Cincinnati, .326; Markakis, Atlanta, .322; Almora, Chicago, .317; Freeman, Atlanta, .313; Kemp, Los Angeles, .313; Suarez, Cincinnati, .312; Arenado, Colorado, .311; Aguilar, Milwaukee, .307; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .305; Martinez, Cardinals, .301. RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 73; Blackmon, Colorado, 70; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 63; Arenado, Colorado, 61; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 61; Pham, Cardinals, 59; Gennett, Cincinnati, 58; Yelich, Milwaukee, 58; 4 tied at 57. RBI: Suarez, Cincinnati, 69; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 68; Arenado, Colorado, 66; Baez, Chicago, 66; Story, Colorado, 63; Freeman, Atlanta, 60; Markakis, Atlanta, 60; Gennett, Cincinnati, 59; Kemp, Los Angeles, 59; Rizzo, Chicago, 59. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 116; Albies, Atlanta, 113; Gennett, Cincinnati, 111; Castro, Miami, 110; Freeman, Atlanta, 110; Anderson, Miami, 105; Arenado, Colorado, 103; Story, Colorado, 102; Turner, Washington, 101; Blackmon, Colorado, 99. DOUBLES: Albies, Atlanta, 29; Markakis, Atlanta, 29; Carpenter, Cardinals, 27; Story, Colorado, 26; Rendon, Washington, 25; Freeman, Atlanta, 24; Baez, Chicago, 23; Hosmer, San Diego, 23; 3 tied at 22. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 8; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Baez, Chicago, 6; Nimmo, New York, 6; Contreras, Chicago, 5; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 5; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 5; Story, Colorado, 5; 9 tied at 4. HOME RUNS: Aguilar, Milwaukee, 24; Arenado, Colorado, 23; Harper, Washington, 23; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21; Muncy, Los Angeles, 21; Albies, Atlanta, 20; Suarez, Cincinnati, 19; 5 tied at 18. STOLEN BASES: MTaylor, Washington, 24; Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 23; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 22; Turner, Washington, 22; Baez, Chicago, 17; Cain, Milwaukee, 17; Peraza, Cincinnati, 17; Dyson, Arizona, 16; 2 tied at 14. PITCHING: Nola, Philadelphia, 12-2; Scherzer, Washington, 12-5; Lester, Chicago, 11-2; Godley, Arizona, 10-6; Mikolas, Cardinals, 10-3; Greinke, Arizona, 9-5; 8 tied at 8. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.68; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.27; Scherzer, Washington, 2.41; Lester, Chicago, 2.46; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.65; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.66; Guerra, Milwaukee, 2.79; Corbin, Arizona, 3.10; Freeland, Colorado, 3.11; Matz, New York, 3.38. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 182; deGrom, New York, 149; Corbin, Arizona, 146; Nola, Philadelphia, 126; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 120; Gray, Colorado, 119; Greinke, Arizona, 117; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 113; Velasquez, Philadelphia, 110; Maeda, Los Angeles, 107.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Betts, Boston, .352; Altuve, Houston, .333; Martinez, Boston, .329; Segura, Seattle, .329; Machado, Baltimore, .316; Trout, Los Angeles, .314; Simmons, Los Angeles, .311; Duffy, Tampa Bay, .310; Brantley, Cleveland, .306; Castellanos, Detroit, .305. RUNS: Lindor, Cleveland, 83; Betts, Boston, 76; Benintendi, Boston, 68; Martinez, Boston, 68; Trout, Los Angeles, 68; Judge, New York, 65; Ramirez, Cleveland, 64; Springer, Houston, 64; Segura, Seattle, 63; 2 tied at 62. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 79; Ramirez, Cleveland, 67; Haniger, Seattle, 65; Machado, Baltimore, 64; KDavis, Oakland, 63; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 63; Gattis, Houston, 62; Lindor, Cleveland, 62; Lowrie, Oakland, 62; Bregman, Houston, 61. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 126; Segura, Seattle, 117; Machado, Baltimore, 113; Martinez, Boston, 113; Castellanos, Detroit, 112; Lindor, Cleveland, 112; Rosario, Minnesota, 107; Benintendi, Boston, 104; Merrifield, Kansas City, 104; 3 tied at 103. DOUBLES: Escobar, Minnesota, 35; Bregman, Houston, 30; Castellanos, Detroit, 29; Lindor, Cleveland, 29; Merrifield, Kansas City, 29; Abreu, Chicago, 27; Andujar, New York, 27; Ramirez, Cleveland, 26; 6 tied at 25. TRIPLES: Sanchez, Chicago, 9; Hernandez, Toronto, 6; Benintendi, Boston, 5; Moncada, Chicago, 5; Smith, Tampa Bay, 5; Jones, Detroit, 4; Moreland, Boston, 4; Profar, Texas, 4; 14 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 28; Ramirez, Cleveland, 28; Judge, New York, 25; Lindor, Cleveland, 25; Trout, Los Angeles, 25; Betts, Boston, 23; Machado, Baltimore, 23; Cruz, Seattle, 22; Stanton, New York, 22; 3 tied at 21. STOLEN BASES: Gordon, Seattle, 22; Anderson, Chicago, 21; Ramirez, Cleveland, 19; Benintendi, Boston, 17; Betts, Boston, 16; RDavis, Cleveland, 16; DeShields, Texas, 16; Merrifield, Kansas City, 16; Smith, Tampa Bay, 16; 3 tied at 14. PITCHING: Severino, New York, 14-2; Kluber, Cleveland, 12-5; Snell, Tampa Bay, 12-4; Morton, Houston, 11-2; Porcello, Boston, 11-3; Rodriguez, Boston, 11-3; 6 tied at 10. ERA: Verlander, Houston, 2.05; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.10; Sale, Boston, 2.23; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.30; Severino, New York, 2.31; Cole, Houston, 2.57; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.76; Morton, Houston, 2.96; Clevinger, Cleveland, 3.34; Sabathia, New York, 3.34.


SPORTS

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

NOTEBOOK

Gyorko’s theory: Play better, play more Simple formula paying off; next up: postseason play BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Jedd Gyorko, who never seems to have a regular job when the season begins, is back in the lineup most days recently, just as the two previous seasons have evolved for the Cardinals’ infielder. Shunted to the bench for periods of time in the first half of the season as Jose Martinez hit himself into the lineup at first base and Matt Carpenter moved back to third, Gyorko has reappeared as more or less the regular third baseman now that the Cardinals are emphasizing defense more. The 29-year-old has started 10 of the past 11 games — eight at third, one at second base and one at shortstop — and has hit .324 with eight runs batted in and six extra-base hits. He won’t finish with the 20 homers he had last year or the 30 he had in his first season with the Cardinals in 2016. But Gyorko, who has appeared in 74 of the Cardinals’ first 91 games, should surpass the 128 and 125 games he has played in his first two seasons with them. Addressing his recent increase in playing time, Gyorko said, simply, “I’m getting more starts because I’m playing better. That’s what it pretty much comes down to. “When you get your chance, you’ve got to be ready to make the most of it. When Jose had his baby (in mid-June), I got those chances and I didn’t play that well (Gyorko was three for 15) and I kind of lost those at-bats. “But those at-bats came back around and I got another chance.”

AVERAGES

SERIES PREVIEW: CARDINALS VS. REDS SCOUTING REPORT • Since firing manager Bryan Price and promoting bench coach Jim Riggleman to interim manager in April, the Reds are 38-37. Though they are still last in the NL Central with a 41-52 record, Riggleman’s squad is 6-4 in July and could give the Cardinals trouble. The Reds offense features a potent core. Scooter Gennett is hitting .326, and Joey Votto’s on-base percentage is up to .424. Eugenio Suarez has 19 home runs on the year and leads the team with 69 RBIs. They are eighth in baseball in runs scored. Reds pitchers have not fared as well. The team’s 4.74 combined ERA ranks 25th in the league. Matt Harvey will pitch Friday. The righty’s 4.80 ERA is not particularly impressive, but he has a mark of 3.79 since the Mets traded him to the Reds in May. Tyler Mahle leads the Reds in ERA but will not pitch against the Cardinals. PROBABLE PITCHERS 7:15 p.m. Friday: RH Carlos Martinez (6-4, 3.05 ERA) vs. RH Matt Harvey (4-5, 4.80) 3:10 p.m. Saturday: RH Jack Flaherty (3-4, 3.34) vs. RH Luis Castillo (5-8, 5.58) 1:15 p.m. Sunday: RH Miles Mikolas (10-3, 2.65) vs. RH Anthony DeSclafani (4-1, 4.43) Peter Baugh

Regardless of how he’s hit this year, Gyorko, with a couple of exceptions, has been solid at third, a position he hadn’t played much in the big leagues until he got here. “I always try to take pride in the defense, no matter what’s happening on the offensive side,” he said. Now that Gyorko has a job back, he

Batting J. Martinez Munoz Molina Bader Ozuna DeJong Carpenter Garcia Gyorko Pham Wong Pena Fowler Team

AVG AB R .301 312 35 .285 151 16 .274 219 26 .271 181 31 .271 340 37 .265 170 29 .262 309 55 .260 104 12 .256 199 21 .243 305 59 .218 220 25 .200 100 8 .170 230 31 .245 3088 404

Pitching Mikolas Hicks Norris C. Martinez Tuivailala Flaherty Cecil Mayers Gant Brebbia Weaver Holland Team

W 10 3 3 6 1 3 0 2 2 1 5 0 47

L 3 1 2 4 3 4 1 0 3 3 8 2 44

ERA 2.65 2.70 2.87 3.05 3.25 3.34 3.38 3.60 3.80 4.13 4.72 7.89 3.74

G 18 42 38 15 27 13 23 26 11 27 19 28 91

H 94 43 60 49 92 45 81 27 51 74 48 20 39 758

GS 18 0 0 15 0 13 0 0 6 0 19 0 91

2B 18 5 7 6 9 8 27 5 11 9 8 2 8 126

SV 0 1 17 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 21

3B 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 5

HR 13 5 13 6 10 8 17 2 7 13 7 2 6 115

RBI 55 23 39 14 48 19 41 10 29 33 21 7 25 385

BB 32 12 13 15 21 18 54 13 19 38 18 4 29 295

SO 52 40 32 57 72 55 88 22 51 89 41 31 58 795

IP 115.1 46.2 37.2 85.2 27.2 70.0 21.1 30.0 45.0 32.2 103.0 21.2 822.1

H 99 27 29 73 30 56 20 30 33 32 100 30 740

R 37 16 14 34 11 30 10 13 25 15 56 23 381

ER 34 14 12 29 10 26 8 12 19 15 54 19 342

HR 8 1 4 3 2 10 1 3 3 3 13 1 80

SB 0 4 2 9 2 0 0 0 1 9 3 0 3 33

E 7 9 3 1 3 5 8 4 8 5 3 1 4 75

BB SO 18 81 23 41 6 49 45 83 9 23 21 82 15 12 6 27 20 39 8 36 36 96 19 20 310755

wants something he’s never had before in his six big-league seasons — October baseball. He was playoff-less in three years in San Diego and, so far, without postseason at-bats with the Cardinals. “It’s been a long time coming,” Gyorko said.

PONCE DE LEON STARS Memphis righthander Daniel Ponce de Leon was the top pitching performer in the Triple-A All-Star Game on Wednesday in Columbus, Ohio. Working the third inning, the Cardinals’ farmhand struck out all three International League hitters he faced on 15 pitches as the Pacific Coast

League won 12-7. Dakota Hudson, another Memphis righthander, started the game and got the win although he allowed a run on three hits in the first inning. Hudson next will pitch in the All-Star Futures game Sunday in Washington, D.C. Memphis third baseman Patrick Wisdom was nothing for two for the PCL.

STEADY DIET OF RED AND BLUE The Cardinal are beginning a stretch of 14 games, all of them against National League Central Division rivals Cincinnati and Chicago. The Reds will be here for three games starting Friday night and then, after the All-Star break, the Cardinals will go to Chicago to play the Cubs five times and then on to Cincinnati to play the Reds three more. After that trip, the Cubs come here for a weekend set July 27-29. The Cardinals are 9-1 against Cincinnati and 5-3 against the Cubs. They are 4-5 against Central Division-leading Milwaukee and 5-5 against Pittsburgh. Among teams the Cardinals haven’t played at all this year, the club has seven games each with Colorado, Los Angeles and Washington and three with Detroit. GREGERSON READY Righthander Luke Gregerson, who had missed much of the season with an assortment of injuries, is expected to be activated to augment the Cardinals’ bullpen this weekend. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

POST-DISPATCH FILE

Cardinals chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. talks with manager Mike Matheny during spring training in Jupiter, Fla. DeWitt says Matheny has had a tough balancing act with the lineup.

Cards could use another big bat but short-term deal unlikely DEWITT • FROM C1

whether they are problem areas or not, DeWitt said, “It’s been pretty well written and documented that we’re disappointed in our offense. I thought at the start of the season, we’d be a really good offensive club. “We were hit by a couple of pretty tough injuries, with (Yadier) Molina going down and (Paul) DeJong going out. But, no matter who plays, we have the potential to be really strong offensively.” Shifting to the other side of the ball, DeWitt said, “Some have questioned the starting pitching, which I felt has been strong. “The bullpen has been inconsistent. I thought (Greg) Holland would give us a lift but his lack of spring training took its toll although, obviously, he pitched much better once he got acclimated. “From a defensive standpoint, we know we’ve made a lot of errors (the Cardinals have led the majors much of the season). I still think we have good defenders at most positions who are either average or plus defenders. Yes, we have made errors but these are things that will get minimized in the second half.” It seems clear, though, that the Cardinals will have to do at least some reshaping, if not reshuffling, as the July 31 trading deadline approaches in just more than two weeks. “It’s hard to say what might be available or what we might have to do to improve the club, whether it’s short- or long-term,” said DeWitt. DeWitt is not oblivious to

those disgruntled pockets of the fan base that would like to see changes, not only in the personnel level but at the manager’s level and even the front office. Historically, he has not addressed those latter two areas much in-season because he has had only two managers in Tony La Russa and Mike Matheny and only three general managers in Walt Jocketty, John Mozeliak and Michael Girsch, with Mozeliak now president of baseball operations. Matheny, in his seventh season, has drawn the most heat but DeWitt, in a half-hour conversation about the team, did not mention any dissatisfaction toward him. “I’m disappointed and I’m sure, he is, too,” said DeWitt. “It’s easy to say that we could have done this or we could have done that, whether it’s the pitching, the hitting or the way we’re playing.” Matheny has had to wrestle with how to get veteran Dexter Fowler untracked while still offering the playing time that young Harrison Bader has earned in the outfield. “It’s a balancing act for him,” said DeWitt. “Who you play and when you play them. We have some players who have established themselves and have track records of good performances historically. “Mike has a tough job and he and his staff work very hard to get the best possible results,” said DeWitt. “We can all look at a lot of different aspects of our baseball operations and wonder what would happen if we’d done this or done that.

“I don’t want to get into specifics. I don’t want to predict the future on how our team does or what we might do in terms of players or anyone else. “Where we are is where I am currently focused. I’ve made this comment many times — that I look at the future very much, but I’m also consumed by tonight’s ball game.” DeWitt does not normally get involved in daily activities but he felt the need to get in touch with Fowler after the recent kerfuffle about his “energy level.” “I did send him a text,” said DeWitt. “I told him baseball can be a humbling game for all of us, whether it’s me or baseball operations or a manager’s decision or the players. In the end, talent and perseverance can be the commodities that will prevail and he’s got that package. “He’s been successful. He’s had a long major league career. He’s still young by major league standards at 32. He should believe in himself. And we believe in him or we wouldn’t have signed him (to a five-year contract). “I feel he had an excellent year for us last year. He was a force offensively (18 homers and .363 onbase percentage).” DeWitt thought he would have that and more from outfielder Marcell Ozuna, who was acquired from Miami for four prospects when Giancarlo Stanton turned them down. Ozuna had 37 homers, 124 runs batted in, hit .312 and slugged .548 in 2017 for Miami. This year, he has nine doubles, 10 homers and a clubhigh 72 singles while slugging .391.

“He had a superb year last year,” said DeWitt. “I know you can’t count on that every year. But he’s got a lot more in the tank and I’m sure he would say the same. “From a power standpoint, I think he’ll do better in the second half and be more of a cleanup man in the order than he has been so far.” The chatter is strong that the Cardinals, even with a top-shelf Ozuna, need another impactful hitter. “You could always say that,” DeWitt said. “If our hitters play to their capabilities, we should have a very good offense but we could always use another big bat in the lineup. “Going into the season, I thought our offense was an improvement over the prior year. We thought it would be a real asset but it hadn’t worked out that way.” There isn’t likely to be any short-term renting by the Cardinals before the end of the month, though. “Historically, we haven’t done that,” DeWitt said. “Rentals are hard things to do. Every single night, these games are gut-wrenching, whether you win or lose. But to look down the road ... I’ve never been a believer that going all in on an individual player for a month or two (Manny Machado?) and giving up a big part of your future makes a lot of sense. You’re just setting yourself up for failure although you never rule out making a move depending on who’s available and the asking price. But this hasn’t been our experience and I don’t think

it’s changed.” The Cardinals have been to the postseason 13 times in DeWitt’s previous 22 seasons of ownership and, contrary to the lay of the baseball land these days, he doesn’t ever see a need for a “tank” or total rebuild to regain prominence after missing the playoffs for two years, perhaps headed for a third. “I never believe in windows,” he said. “Our goal is to try to win every year. Baseball is a fickle game and we’re not going to win every year. We try to win, we want to win and we plan to win but there are too many things that can happen in the game that preclude everybody from winning every year.” The two words DeWitt used next, “wild card,” aren’t necessarily the words fans want to hear but he is looking at the reality of a jumbled National League when he said, “We’re right there in the hunt for a wild card. We’re not leading or anything, but it goes back and forth. “We just need to play better — get our offense untracked, our bullpen solidified and let our starters do their thing. “I still think we have a good club. Hindsight is 20-20 and I think if our bullpen had been stronger and if our hitting had been as anticipated and if our starting pitching had been very good, which it has, for the most part, we’d be right there among the leaders. “But there’s no reason why we can’t turn it around.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

Hicks still learning big-league ways HICKS • FROM C1

that. There are times, though, when he or anyone basically says, ‘You should know better.’” The dynamic between Norris, Hicks and the Cardinals’ clubhouse stirred conversation Thursday when an online story illustrated Norris’ role as bullpen leader and described how he “mercilessly rides” Hicks. The 33-year-old Norris and the 21-year-old Hicks have been thrust, together, into prominent roles with the Cardinals — one the late addition and surprise closer and the other a cherished platinum-level prospect with a 104-mph fastball. They also, as manager Mike Matheny told reporters in San Francisco, represent different ends of the modern roster: old-school bite from “a different generation of players” and a new-school greenhorn. The article, which appeared on The Athletic and had a headline about Norris’ “divisive approach,” aimed to explore that contrast. Hicks declined to comment in it. The reaction to the story in social media raised questions of bullying and hazing, both of which Hicks quickly dismissed when talking to the Post-Dispatch on Thursday. “He has the best intentions for me,” Hicks said, by phone. “I think he’s nudging me in the right direction. That’s the best way to put it. … It’s a collective group doing it. You have to learn 10 times faster in the big leagues. You have to adjust 10 times faster. You have to be mentally stronger than you have ever been before. You have to make all of that happen faster. I have no problem with anybody getting on me. I get that. I have to listen. “Bud is not bad at all,” Hicks added. “He’s getting on me because he wants me to be a better player, and I know it’s to make me a better teammate. That can happen.” Major League Baseball and its union have adopted policies recently to ban rookie hazing in the clubhouse. The widespread, lateseason dress-up days that used to wedge rookies into cheerleader outfits, for example, have been eliminated, and any actions that might ostracize or ridicule a young player are subject to review and penalty. Service time still has its privileges — better seats on the plane, for example — but not at the expense of a teammate’s comfort. John Mozeliak, the Cardinals’ president of baseball operations, spoke with both Norris and Hicks on Thursday about their relationship. He was assured by both players. “I feel comfortable,” said Hicks, who intended to talk to Norris on Thursday. “Any time you read the initial headline, you have to be concerned,” Mozeliak said. “There is a hierarchy in any clubhouse, but we don’t want there to be any time where a young player feels he is not welcome or that he cannot be himself. That cannot happen. There are expectations. There are rules. … Jordan is learning and growing, and it’s all at this level.” Hicks was a last-minute addition to the major league roster out of spring training, and all the Cardinals were asking the righthander to do was vault from Class A to the majors. He didn’t have an inning in between. The Cardinals conceded at the time — and officials did again Thursday — that the learning curve would be steep for the nascent talent. Some of the lessons players learned as they advanced in the minors — or heard from former big-leaguers in Class AAA — Hicks skipped. The Cardinals put support structures in place for Hicks at the beginning of the year to help him acclimate and to accelerate his comfort level. Part of that was driven by the fact that he missed report times and meetings during spring training enough that he was demoted, abruptly, to the minor league camp. Teammates taped the schedule to his locker. One took to social media to publicly chide Hicks for not being on time. He arrived one day to find his things packed and relocated to the minor-league side. Lesson learned. Hard. “He’s got some guys staying on him,” Matheny said this past weekend in San Francisco. “You need leadership at each little subculture that we have out here, and that bullpen is its own little subculture. We need a guy who can be a stickler. … Bud is going to continue to do what’s right as a veteran. You respect that. I’ve already had conversations with Jordan: ‘Listen, that’s how he’s invested into you. That’s how he gets it.’” The music jockeying was one example, and that day was not the first that Norris and Hicks had a similar exchange. Hicks said he tries to pay attention. Sometimes he just pays a fine. On the most recent road trip, Hicks came to the ballpark wearing shorts — a violation of a team rule agreed upon during spring training. He was fined $100. (The money went to Cardinals Care, the club’s charitable arm.) Norris and Hicks often sit by each other during games and talk through approaches with hitters, or when and how they and other relievers might be used. They’ve talked prep. They’ve talked hair products. Norris, and others, have stressed being on time. And Hicks made Norris a bet recently. A Houston kid, Hicks bet Norris that his Rockets would defeat Norris’ Golden State Warriors in the NBA Western Conference. If Norris, a Bay Area native, won the bet, Hicks agreed to wear a Ronald McDonald outfit. If Hicks’ team won, the rookie got to go to Norris’ wedding this offseason. The Warriors won. Norris isn’t sure he’ll hold Hicks to the bet. Maybe he’ll come to the bachelor party, the veteran mused. After all, they have reached agreement on clubhouse music. “I’m off the whole music duty,” Hicks admitted. He has some headphones. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Celtics forward Jayson Tatum answers questions during the Jayson Tatum Youth Basketball ProCamp at Chaminade on Thursday.

Tatum pays visit to his basketball camp FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

had the keys, so I could drive to school without my mom taking me.” He would start near the basket, making a stream of easy shots before taking two steps out. Make. Move. Again and again, slowly working away from the hoop. He would reach the high school 3-point line. Then he would step beyond it. Then he would step beyond that. “Six was a late day for him,” said Chaminade coach Frank Bennett, the man who handed Tatum the gym keys. “One day, I showed up at 5, to see if he was here. And he was here. He literally took two days off in four years of high school. And those were the two days after we won state.” Justin Tatum pleaded the fifth when his son told campers he had been beating his dad in one-on-one since he turned 13, but he did confirm that accounts of the early-morning workouts were not exaggerated. “He was destined to be what he wanted to be,” Justin Tatum said from the sideline of the camp. “He didn’t want to wake up and go drive through McDonald’s. He wanted to work on himself. He wanted to do what he knows he can do. He would not take a day off. And he still doesn’t.” Among NBA rookies, Tatum’s pergame averages ranked fourth in minutes (30.5), fifth in blocked shots (0.73 average), sixth in points (13.9), seventh in rebounds (5) and 10th in assists (1.6). He finished first among rookies (and eighth among all players) in 3-point percentage (.434), second among rookies in free-throw percentage (.826) and third among rookies in field-goal percentage (.475). He became the first Celtics player since Larry Bird to record a double-double in his NBA debut, then did it three more times. He scored 20-plus points 22 times during the regular season and playoffs. He threw down a dunk over LeBron James in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals that was so vicious, Frank Bennett nearly fell off his couch as he watched from St. Louis. Yes, it was a pretty good season for Tatum and a Celtics team that was supposed to be down and out when Gordon Hayward suffered a devastating ankle injury in the season’s first game. Tatum started all of the Celtics’ 19 play-

Tatum said of the end of the Celtics’ season, when they came up one win short of the finals, “I wasn’t upset, because we left it all on the floor. We gave everything we had.”

off games and averaged a team-high 18.5 points while shooting .471 from the field. One more win, and the Celtics would have faced the Golden State Warriors in the finals. “I wasn’t upset, because we left it all on the floor,” Tatum said during a sitdown with the Post-Dispatch and KTRS (550 AM). “We gave everything we had. Everybody gave maximum effort. But at the same time, it left a bad taste in my mouth. We were playing the best player in the world, and we were two minutes away from going to the championship. What a season, what a story, that would have been.” Then Tatum said something that is almost hard to believe. He thinks he could have been so much better last season. The grind of the NBA’s travel-packed schedule shocked his body. He hurt a finger and hit a skid before the All-Star break. There were nights he forgot plays and felt like he forgot how to dribble. On top of it all, he was balancing basketball with the ups and downs of fatherhood. His son, Jayson Christopher Tatum Jr., was born on Dec. 6. The seven-monthold spent Thursday hanging with his grandpa. For the first time in a long time, Tatum

forced himself to rest after the Celtics’ season ended. He traveled, played with his son and visited friends in town. But now, the itch is being scratched again. Bennett received a text the day Tatum’s camp started. Tatum was coming in for a workout. “I had so many goals growing up, and one of them was to be the best player ever to come out of St. Louis,” Tatum said. “The bar is set pretty high. Jo Jo White. Anthony Bonner. David Lee. Larry (Hughes) and Brad (Beal). Darius Miles. There are so many guys that had such great careers, and went to the NBA and won championships and All-Stars. Ever since I can remember, I’ve always wanted to be known — up for no debate — when it’s all said and done, that I will be the best player, ever, to come out of here. I know I still have a long way to go. Those guys set the bar high. I’m trying to catch up.” So, he starts near the basket, then moves deeper and deeper, polishing the shot that was crafted here, while other talented players with big dreams were sound asleep. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

Mariners ’pen has been solid under DeLunas DELUNAS • FROM C1

DeLunas founded P3, a pitching academy in St. Louis. He frequently worked with high-level pitchers at P3, which opened in 2014, including the Mariners’ David Phelps and the Twins’ Jake Odorizzi. Phelps underwent elbow surgery in September, and Mariners assistant general manager Jeff Kingston called DeLunas to check on the pitcher’s offseason progress. DeLunas thought the call would take about 15 minutes. It lasted an hour. Before hanging up, Kingston asked DeLunas if he ever considered working in professional baseball. The pitching instructor was honest: No, he hadn’t. The two talked about what it would take for DeLunas to join the Mariners, and the team flew him to Seattle for an interview. “It was in the matter of about a week’s time,” DeLunas said. “I think they had a pretty good idea of what they wanted in the bullpen coach role, and I think I checked a lot of those things off the list.” The Mariners offered DeLunas the job, but the decision to accept was far from a no-brainer. He thought about his wife and kids and what the move would mean. He was able to live with his family and drive his 8-year-old son, Rory, to school while working at P3, and that wasn’t easy to give up. DeLunas’ wife, Johannah, was confident the family could adjust. She said

DeLunas feels more passionate about coaching baseball than she has ever felt toward a job, so she has been willing to make sacrifices. She and Rory are spending the summer in Seattle, and their 18-year-old daughter, Maren, has visited. If the Mariners’ job continues to go well for DeLunas, Johannah foresees moving west full time. While debating whether or not to take the job, DeLunas reflected on what it would mean to those around him. He’s worked at the high school and college level and thought about the players he’s coached. “It was more about the people I’ve worked with, the guys who have not been afforded this opportunity,” he said. “For me to turn it down, at the end of the day, I thought it would have been incredibly selfish.” As bullpen coach, DeLunas attends planning meetings with the Mariners’ coaches before every game, and they discuss what relievers should pitch in certain situations. He sits in the bullpen during the game and relays information to relievers. He occasionally reminds pitchers of mechanics as they get loose, but he said he stays quiet when they are throwing well. “I kind of view myself as somebody who just kind of steers the ship and lets those guys do what they need to do,” he said. The Mariners’ bullpen has been solid under DeLunas’ watch. They have a 3.75 combined ERA, 12th best in baseball,

and closer Edwin Diaz earned a spot on the American League All-Star squad. Diaz has already collected 36 saves this season, two more than he had all of 2017, and his ERA is down from 3.27 to 2.25. The closer credits DeLunas with reminding him to keep his weight over the rubber longer so he doesn’t rush his delivery to the plate. “Every time, when I’m warming up, I like for him to step behind me,” Diaz said in a phone interview. “When I’m doing something badly, he lets me know quick. That’s what I like. He looks at me, he tries to improve me sometimes, and I feel happy about his work and how he works with us.” Two days after his emotional talk with Servais in spring training, DeLunas heard his name called in Opening Day introductions. He wore a pearly white Mariners jersey with the No. 40 on his back. As the National Anthem played, a few tears returned to his eyes. He couldn’t savor the moment for long. Mariners starter Felix Hernandez was pitching against Corey Kluber of the Indians — a battle of former Cy Young Award winners — and DeLunas peered from the bullpen as Hernandez hurled an 89 mph four-seamer to open the game. “It became very real, very quickly,” DeLunas said. Peter Baugh @Peter_Baugh on Twitter pbaugh@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

Wheatcroft leads John Deere

GOLF ROUNDUP

List matches course record to lead Scottish Open by 1

Defending champ DeChambeau withdraws

American golfer Luke List equaled the Gullane course record with a 7-under-par 63 to start the Scottish Open on Thursday. List moved into the lead with his ninth birdie on the 15th hole and held it to finish the round ahead by one stroke. He was followed by five players in a tie for second; Rickie Fowler, Lee Westwood, Robert Rock, Scott Fernandez of Spain and Jens Dantorp of Sweden. Masters champion Patrick Reed was part of an eight-strong group a shot further back following a 65, with Danny Willett continuing his resurgence with a 66, and Olympic champion Justin Rose returning a 67. On a day when almost 100 players broke par, five-time major champion Phil Mickelson, who won the 2013 British Open at nearby Muirfield, could only manage a level-par 70. Fowler raised the prospect of recording the first 59 in European Tour history after five birdies and an eagle took him to 7 under after 12 holes. But a bogey on the 13th was followed by five straight pars as the inward nine played much harder back into the wind. “I love playing links golf and being able to use your imagination and hit different shots,” said Fowler, whose victory at Gullane in 2015 prompted the members to rename the clubhouse bar in his honor. “I feel like this golf course, you go around and you hit pretty much every club in your bag.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SILVIS, ILL. • Steve Wheatcroft shot a career-best 9-under 62 on Thursday to take a one-shot lead in the John Deere Classic. Wheatcroft birdied seven of the last nine holes to finish a shot ahead of Michael Kim. Johnson Wagner, Nick Taylor, Andres Romero and Joel Dahmen shot opening-round 64s. Francesco Molinari, who won the Quicken Loans National two weeks ago, was among a group of players three strokes back. Zach Johnson shot 69 and three-time John Deere winner Steve Stricker finished at 1-under 70. Defending champion Bryson DeChambeau, the highestranked player in the field, withdrew because of a right shoulder injury. DeChambeau, who won the Memorial Tournament earlier this season, first tweaked his shoulder on a shot out of the rough on the second hole. He pulled out after an awkward tee shot on No. 16. “Look, I’m 24. I’m not that old. But I’ve used my body quite a bit. I’ve hit a lot of golf balls,” DeChambeau said. “I’ve just got to take care of my body a little better.” Wheatcroft hasn’t had a top10 finish this season, and he’s 209th in the FedEx Cup standings. But Wheatcroft caught fire on the back nine, finishing with six straight birdies — including a 13-foot putt on the par-4 18th — for just his third round in the 60s this season. Wheatcroft’s previous best scores on the PGA Tour were 64s at the 2012 Greenbrier Classic and the 2016 Canadian Open. “I tried to keep the round going. I asked if we could just go to the first tee and start round two,” Wheatcroft said. “No, I don’t know if I’ve ever done that to finish a round. It was great. Yeah, I would just try to keep

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League Rangers...................-$115...................ORIOLES Yankees...................-$118 .................. INDIANS RED SOX..................-$210 .................Blue Jays Rays.........................-$107 ..................... TWINS WHITE SOX..............-$115...................... Royals ASTROS .................. -$260...................... Tigers National League Brewers...................-$110 .................. PIRATES METS .......................-$138 ................ Nationals Phillies ................... -$140.................MARLINS BRAVES ...................-$130 ................... D’backs CARDS .....................-$165 ........................ Reds Cubs ........................-$130 ...................PADRES Interleague ROCKIES..................-$125 ................. Mariners DODGERS ................-$165 ..................... Angels GIANTS ....................-$170 ............................A’s TENNIS • Wimbledon J. Isner -$120.............vs.......K. Anderson even N. Djokovic -$110 ......vs.............R. Nadal -$110 Saturday S. Williams -$220......vs......... A. Kerber +$180 SOCCER • World Cup Final, Sunday France ...................................................... -$110 Croatia ....................................................+$350 Draw: +$220 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League BOSTON — Placed 3B Rafael Devers on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Recalled INF Tzu-Wei Lin from Pawtucket (IL). DETROIT — Optioned RHP Victor Alcantara to Toledo (IL). LOS ANGELES — Optioned RHP Jaime Barria to Inland Empire (Cal). Reinstated LHP Tyler Skaggs from the 10-day DL. MINNESOTA — Placed DH/1B Logan Morrison on the 10-day DL. Reinstated SS Ehire Adrianza from the 10-day DL. NEW YORK — Signed LHP Miguel Vargas; OFs Kevin Alcantara, Mauro Bonifacio, Christoper Familia and D’Vaughn Knowles; SSs Marcos Cabrera, Jose Colmenares, Maikol Escotto and Dayro Perez; Cs Kevyn Camacho, Nicolas Garcia, Agustin Ramirez and Jesus Rodriguez; and RHPs Juan Carela, Starling Perez, Ignacio Radney, Rafael Severino and Tyrone Yulie to minor league contracts. OAKLAND — Optioned RHP Chris Bassitt to Nashville (PCL). Reinstated RHP Trevor Cahill from the 10-day DL. TAMPA BAY — Optioned SS Willy Adames to Durham (IL). Recalled RHP Chih-Wei Hu from Durham. Sent 3B Christian Arroyo and RHP Jake Faria to Durham for rehab assignments. TORONTO — Sent LHP Jaime Garcia to Dunedin (FSL) for a rehab assignment. National League ARIZONA — Placed LHP T.J. McFarland and RHP Shelby Miller on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHPs Silvino Brach and Matt Koch from Reno (PCL). ATLANTA — Optioned LHP Luiz Gohara to Gwinnett (IL). MIAMI — Optioned C Chad Wallach to New Orleans (PCL). Reinstated C J.T. Realmuto from paternity leave. MILWAUKEE — Released INF Eric Sogard. Optioned INF Nate Orf and RHP Jorge Lopez to Colorado Springs (PCL) and RHP Freddy Peralta to Wisconsin (MWL). Assigned LHP Mike Zagurski outright to Colorado Springs. Reinstated LHP Wade Miley from the 60-day DL. Recalled RHPs Alec Asher and Adrian Houser from Colorado Springs. Signed SSs Angel Bautista, Eduardo Garcia, Joneiker Ponce De Leon and Carlos Roa; OFs Erys Bautista, Eduarqui Fernandez, Rafael Martinez and Bryan Nino; C Jhonnys Cabrera; RHPs Jose Espiritu, Mario Perez and Abner Uribe; and 3B Branlyn Jaraba to minor league contracts. PITTSBURGH — Sent 2B Sean Rodriguez to Indianapolis (IL) for a rehab assignment. BASKETBALL | NBA CHICAGO — Waived G Sean Kilpatrick. GOLDEN STATE — Signed F Jonas Jerebko. OKLAHOMA CITY — Re-signed G Raymond Felton. WASHINGTON — Signed C Dwight Howard. FOOTBALL | National Football League NY GIANTS — Waived G Ethan Cooper. Signed G Zac Kerin. HOCKEY | National Hockey League CAROLINA — Agreed to terms with F Lucas Wallmark on a two-year contract and F Greg McKegg a one-year contract. CHICAGO — Traded Fs Marian Hossa and Vinnie Hinostroza, D Jordan Oesterle and a 2019 third-round draft pick to Arizona for D Andrew Campbell, Fs Marcus Kruger, MacKenzie Entwistle and Jordan Maletta and a 2019 fifth-round draft pick. DALLAS — Signed G Philippe Desrosiers to a one-year, two-way contract. NASHVILLE — Named Greg Rallo assistant coach of Milwaukee (AHL).

a tie for 18th three weeks ago in Arkansas. Seven players, including defending champion I.K. Kim and former No. 1 Yani Tseng, were a stroke behind at 66. Sei Young Kim, who shot an LPGA Tour record 31-under 257 to win last week’s event in Wisconsin, was four shots back.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE DISPATCH-THE ROCK ISLAND ARGUS

Steve Wheatcroft tees off on the 16th hole during the first-round of the John Deere Classic golf tournament on Thursday in Silvis, Ill.

doing what I’m doing.” Although he hasn’t done it on the PGA Tour, the 40-year-old Wheatcroft has a history of going low. He shot an 11-under 60 and set what was then the 72hole Web.com Tour scoring record in his runaway 2011 victory at the Melwood Prince George’s County Open. Kim, who like Wheatcroft is buried deep in the standings at 161st, notched six birdies on the back nine. The 24-year-old former Cal star is also seeking his first career win. “Been struggling with the putter a little bit, but (I) got a good mental note from the

NY RANGERS — Agreed to terms with F Cody McLeod on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY — Named Derek Lalonde assistant coach.

morning warmup (Thursday) and rolled it great,” said Kim, who holed three putts of at least 20 feet, including a 41-footer on No. 18. Johnson completed his 38th straight round of par or better at TPC Deere Run. But he knows he’ll need to do better than 2 under on Friday at a course known for low scores. “I mean, I can’t take this course for granted. That’s the one thing I don’t ever want to do. Just because I’ve had success here or I’ve had low rounds here, doesn’t mean it’s just going to happen,” Johnson said.

Major League Soccer

OLYMPIC SPORTS USOC — Named Sarah Hirshland CEO. SOCCER | Major League Soccer LOS ANGELES FC — Transferred D Omar Gaber to Pyramids FC (Premier League-Egypt). COLLEGE DAYTON — Named Donnie Jones assistant men’s basketball coach. MICHIGAN — Agreed to terms with women’s basketball coach Kim Barnes Arico on a contract extension through the 2022-23 season. MONMOUTH (N.J.) — Named Josh James director of men’s basketball operations. NEW MEXICO — Announced junior men’s basketball G Zane Martin is transferring from Towson. PENNSYLVANIA — Named Dr. Andrea Wieland associate athletic director for sports performance.

TENNIS Wimbledon results Results Thursday from Wimbledon at The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club (seedings in parentheses): Women’s Singles | Semifinal Angelique Kerber (11), Germany, def. Jelena Ostapenko (12), Latvia, 6-3, 6-3. Serena Williams (25), United States, def. Julia Goerges (13), Germany, 6-2, 6-4.

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 12 4 4 40 42 23 New York City FC 11 4 4 37 38 24 New York 10 5 2 32 34 17 Columbus 8 6 6 30 24 23 New England 7 4 7 28 30 25 Montreal 8 12 0 24 24 35 Philadelphia 7 9 3 24 25 30 Chicago 6 9 5 23 32 38 Orlando City 6 11 1 19 25 41 Toronto FC 4 10 4 16 29 36 D.C. United 2 7 5 11 23 29 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 10 3 5 35 28 21 Los Angeles FC 10 4 4 34 41 28 Sporting K.C. 9 4 6 33 35 24 Real Salt Lake 9 8 2 29 27 34 Portland 8 3 5 29 26 22 Vancouver 7 7 5 26 29 37 Houston 7 6 4 25 36 26 LA Galaxy 7 7 4 25 31 28 Minnesota United 6 11 1 19 23 36 Seattle 4 9 4 16 15 22 Colorado 4 11 3 15 22 32 San Jose 2 10 6 12 29 37 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday Columbus at New York City FC, 6 p.m. Sporting K.C. at New York, 6 p.m. LA Galaxy at New England, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 7 p.m. Vancouver at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 8 p.m.

CYCLING

BASEBALL

Tour de France results

Frontier League

Thursday | Mur de Bretagne, France Sixth Stage • A 112.5-mile ride in Brittany from Brest to Mur de Bretagne, with four categorized climbs: a Category 4 and three Category 3s, including one at the finish 1. Dan Martin, Ireland, UAE, 4:13:43. 2. Pierre Latour, France, AG2R, :01. 3. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, :03. 4. Julian Alaphilippe, France, Quick-Step, st. 5. Rafal Majka, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, st. 6. Adam Yates, Britain, Mitchelton-Scott, st. 7. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Trek, st. 8. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Bora-Hansgrohe, st. 9. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, st. 10. Primoz Roglic, Slovenia, LottoNL, st. 11. Richie Porte, Australia, BMC, st. 12. Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC, st. 13. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, st. 14. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, st. 15. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, st. 16. Mikel Landa, Spain, Movistar, st. 17. Tejay van Garderen, U.S., BMC, :06. 18. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :08. 19. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, Edu. First, :11. 20. Warren Barguil, France, Fortuneo, :12. Also 33. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R, :31. 46. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, :53. 85. Chad Haga, U.S., Sunweb, 3:09. 104. Ian Boswell, U.S., Katusha Alpecin, 5:45. 162. Taylor Phinney, U.S., Edu. First, 14:30. 168. Lawson Craddock, U.S., Edu. First, st. Overall Standings (After six stages) 1. Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC, 22:35:46. 2. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, :03. 3. Tejay van Garderen, U.S., BMC, :05. 4. Julian Alaphilippe, France, Quick-Step, :06. 5. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step, :12. 6. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step, :18. 7. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, Edu. First, :45. 8. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, :51. 9. Rafal Majka, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, :52. 10. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, :53. 11. Richie Porte, Australia, BMC, st. 12. Mikel Landa, Spain, Movistar, :55. 13. Adam Yates, Britain, Mitchelton, 1:02. 14. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, st. 15. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, 1:03. 16. Soren Kragh Andersen, Denmark, Sunweb, st. 17. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain, 1:08. 18. Primoz Roglic, Slovenia, LottoNL, 1:17. 19. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Trek, 1:18. 20. Steven Kruijswijk, Netherlands, LottoNL, 1:26. Also 23. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R, 1:45. 27. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 2:10. 68. Chad Haga, U.S., Sunweb, 9:06. 128. Ian Boswell, U.S., Katusha, 24:36. 159. Taylor Phinney, U.S., Edu. First, 36:30. 170. Lawson Craddock, U.S., Edu. First, 57:39.

East W L Pct. GB Washington 30 21 .588 — Joliet 27 24 .529 3 Lake Erie 26 24 .520 3½ Schaumburg 26 24 .520 3½ Traverse City 24 26 .480 5½ Windy City 19 31 .380 10½ West W L Pct. GB Rascals 29 22 .569 — Evansville 26 23 .531 2 Southern Illinois 24 23 .511 3 Florence 25 25 .500 3½ Normal 22 26 .458 5½ Grizzlies 22 31 .415 8 Wednesday All-Star Game: Experienced 8, Rookies 3 Thursday • No games Friday Schaumburg at Traverse City, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Evansville at Normal, 7:05 p.m. Rascals at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m. Joliet at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL | WNBA EASTERN W L Washington 12 8 Atlanta 10 9 Connecticut 10 10 Chicago 7 13 New York 6 14 Indiana 2 18 WESTERN W L Seattle 15 6 Phoenix 14 7 Los Angeles 13 8 Minnesota 12 8 Dallas 11 8 Las Vegas 9 12 Wednesday Atlanta 106, Washington 89 New York 79, Connecticut 76 Minnesota 87, Indiana 65 Thursday Dallas 92, Los Angeles 77 Friday Phoenix at Connecticut, 6 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 6 p.m. Indiana at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Las Vegas at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Saturday Dallas at Seattle, 8 p.m.

Pct .600 .526 .500 .350 .300 .100 Pct .714 .667 .619 .600 .579 .429

SOCCER United Soccer League Friday • Richmond at New York, 6 p.m. Saturday Penn at Ottawa, 1 p.m. North Carolina at Bethlehem, 4 p.m. Louisville at Charleston, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Colo. Springs, 7 p.m. Las Vegas at Rio Grande Valley, 7:30 p.m. Tulsa at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Fresno, 9 p.m. San Antonio at Orange County, 9 p.m. Kansas City at Portland, 9 p.m. Seattle at Salt Lake City, 9 p.m.

GB — 1½ 2 5 6 10 GB — 1 2 2½ 3 6

GOLF PGA | John Deere Classic Thursday | Silvis, Ill. Purse: $5.8M | Yards: 7,268; Par: 71 (35-36) First Round Steve Wheatcroft 33-29 — 62 Michael Kim 33-30 — 63 Johnson Wagner 32-32 — 64 Nick Taylor 31-33 — 64 Andres Romero 33-31 — 64 Joel Dahmen 35-29 — 64

-9 -8 -7 -7 -7 -7

Scott Brown Francesco Molinari Whee Kim Denny McCarthy Patrick Rodgers Kelly Kraft Tyler Duncan Parker McLachlin Corey Conners Fabian Gomez Chad Campbell Matt Atkins Nick Hardy John Merrick Chris Kirk David Hearn Kevin Streelman Sam Ryder Lanto Griffin Keith Mitchell Ryan Blaum Harold Varner III Zac Blair Ryan Palmer Brett Stegmaier Broc Everett Conrad Shindler Billy Hurley III Vaughn Taylor Stuart Appleby C.T. Pan Matt Jones Nick Watney Hudson Swafford Chris Stroud Brandon Harkins Tim Herron Brendon de Jonge Richy Werenski J.J. Henry Nicholas Lindheim Bronson Burgoon Seamus Power Derek Fathauer D.J. Trahan Robert Garrigus Sean McCarty Jonathan Randolph Dylan Meyer J.T. Poston Joaquin Niemann D.A. Points Chesson Hadley Zach Johnson Charlie Beljan Kevin Tway Ken Duke Talor Gooch Stephan Jaeger Xinjun Zhang Brian Davis Scott Stallings Andrew Putnam Blayne Barber Bill Haas Austin Cook Brian Stuard Jason Bohn George McNeill Cameron Percy Tyrone Van Aswegen Arjun Atwal Patton Kizzire Aaron Baddeley Steve Stricker Tommy Gainey Tom Lovelady Hunter Mahan Michael Thompson Ricky Barnes Danny Lee Ben Crane Brian Gay Scott Piercy Ryan Moore Dominic Bozzelli John Huh Adam Schenk Vince India Martin Piller William McGirt Peter Malnati Wesley Bryan Dicky Pride David Berganio, Jr. Roberto Diaz Will Claxton Mark Wilson Andrew Landry David Lingmerth Kris Blanks Norman Xiong Troy Matteson Rob Oppenheim Kyle Thompson Andrew Yun Cody Gribble Jonathan Byrd John Senden Troy Merritt Harris English Ethan Tracy Trey Mullinax Sean O’Hair Sam Saunders Brice Garnett Mackenzie Hughes Daniel Chopra Shawn Stefani Martin Flores Ben Silverman

Perry, Small share 1-stroke lead at Senior Players • Kenny Perry and Mike Small shot 7-under 65s to share a one-stroke lead in the first round of the Constellation Senior Players Championship in Highland Park, Illinois. Bart Bryant, Glen Day and 2015 U.S. Senior Open champion Jeff Maggert were one stroke back in the fourth of five majors on the PGA Tour Champions schedule. Defending champion Scott McCarron was in a pack at 5 under, while three-time Senior Players winner Bernhard Langer and Vijay Singh were another shot back at Exmoor Country Club. David Toms, coming off a win at the U.S. Senior Open, shot 2 over. The 57-year-old Perry made eight birdies and one bogey to put himself in contention for his fifth senior major. Small is the longtime golf coach at Illinois and has never won on the PGA Tour Champions. Elaine Crosby leads Senior Women’s Open • Elaine Crosby shot a 3-under-par 70 Thursday at Chicago Golf Club for the lead after one round of the inaugural U.S. Senior Women’s Open in Wheaton, Illinois. A winner of two tournaments in 17 LPGA seasons, the 60-yearold owns a one-shot advantage over Trish Johnson, Laura Davies and Liselotte Neumann. Crosby started on the back nine with a 3-under-par 34 and made just one bogey on the day at one of the oldest 18-hole courses in the U.S. St. Louisan Ellen Port sits in a group of eight players tied for 50th, at 6-over 79.

Suwannapura leads LPGA Marathon Classic • Thidapa Suwannapura shot a 6-under-par 65 to take the first-round lead at the Marathon Classic in Sylvania, Ohio. Suwannapura, who has three top-10 finishes in 117 career LPGA Tour events, birdied five of the final six holes, including the par-5 18th at Highland Meadows. The Thai player had her last top-10 finish in 2014 at the Kingsmill Invitational. Her best performance this season was

32-33 32-33 33-32 30-35 32-34 33-33 34-32 34-32 32-34 31-35 34-32 31-35 33-33 31-35 35-31 33-33 32-34 35-31 32-34 34-33 32-35 34-33 32-35 32-35 34-33 32-35 34-33 32-35 32-35 34-33 35-33 34-34 34-34 33-35 33-35 32-36 34-34 33-35 34-34 33-35 35-33 32-36 34-34 34-34 34-34 33-35 35-33 34-34 34-34 37-32 33-36 34-35 37-32 32-37 34-35 36-33 36-33 34-35 36-33 33-36 34-35 33-36 34-35 33-36 35-34 35-34 37-32 32-37 32-37 33-36 33-36 37-32 32-38 32-38 35-35 35-35 34-36 34-36 34-36 34-36 34-36 34-36 33-37 32-38 35-35 36-34 35-35 38-32 34-36 34-37 35-36 36-35 36-35 35-36 34-37 35-36 34-37 33-38 33-38 35-36 35-36 35-36 34-37 35-36 39-32 32-39 36-36 34-38 34-38 39-33 37-35 37-35 36-36 36-36 39-33 36-36 33-39 34-38 37-35 37-35 38-34

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Omar Uresti 36-36 Aaron Wise 37-36 Si Woo Kim 37-36 Zecheng Dou 36-37 Manav Shah 36-37 Doug Ghim 38-35 Chad Proehl 34-39 Davis Love III 39-34 Chez Reavie 39-34 Robert Allenby 36-37 Charlie Wi 35-38 Steven Bowditch 37-36 Dru Love 37-36 Cameron Tringale 36-38 Matt Every 38-36 John Rollins 34-40 Jason Gore 37-37 Kyle Stanley 39-35 Brian Bullington 37-37 Chris Couch 37-38 Cameron Beckman 35-40 Daniel Summerhays 37-39 Carl Pettersson 37-39 Sung Kang 35-41 Robert Streb 37-39 Craig Barlow 37-39 Brendon Todd 39-38 Bryson DeChambeau WD

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72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 77

+1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6

LPGA | Marathon Classic Thursday | Sylvania, Ohio Purse: $1.6M | Yards: 6,541 | Par: 71 (34-37) First Round | (a-amateur) Thidapa Suwannapura 33-32 — 65 -6 Caroline Hedwall 33-33 — 66 -5 In Gee Chun 32-34 — 66 -5 Mirim Lee 32-34 — 66 -5 In-Kyung Kim 34-32 — 66 -5 Yani Tseng 33-33 — 66 -5 Jacqui Concolino 33-33 — 66 -5 Katelyn Dambaugh 32-34 — 66 -5 Allison Emrey 31-36 — 67 -4 Christina Kim 33-34 — 67 -4 Brooke M. Henderson 33-34 — 67 -4 Annie Park 32-35 — 67 -4 Caroline Inglis 31-36 — 67 -4 Kris Tamulis 33-34 — 67 -4 Wichanee Meechai 34-33 — 67 -4 Xiyu Lin 33-34 — 67 -4 Sandra Changkija 34-34 — 68 -3 Wei-Ling Hsu 36-32 — 68 -3 Emma Talley 35-33 — 68 -3 Brittany Lincicome 32-36 — 68 -3 a-Jennifer Kupcho 31-37 — 68 -3 Cindy LaCrosse 33-35 — 68 -3 Mina Harigae 33-35 — 68 -3 Emily Pedersen 36-32 — 68 -3 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 32-36 — 68 -3 Austin Ernst 35-33 — 68 -3 Stacy Lewis 32-36 — 68 -3 Chella Choi 34-34 — 68 -3 Marina Alex 34-34 — 68 -3 Katherine Perry 33-35 — 68 -3

Champions | Senior Players Championship Thursday | Highland Park, Ill. Purse: $2.8M | Yards: 7,149 | Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Kenny Perry 32-33 — 65 -7 Mike Small 33-32 — 65 -7 Bart Bryant 32-34 — 66 -6 Glen Day 33-33 — 66 -6 Jeff Maggert 33-33 — 66 -6 Tom Byrum 35-32 — 67 -5 Wes Short, Jr. 35-32 — 67 -5 Scott Parel 36-31 — 67 -5 Scott McCarron 33-34 — 67 -5 Brandt Jobe 33-34 — 67 -5 Tommy Tolles 34-34 — 68 -4 Vijay Singh 34-34 — 68 -4 Bernhard Langer 34-34 — 68 -4 Rocco Mediate 33-35 — 68 -4 Clark Dennis 34-34 — 68 -4 Jerry Kelly 34-35 — 69 -3 Woody Austin 37-32 — 69 -3 Larry Mize 35-34 — 69 -3 Bob Estes 35-34 — 69 -3 Ken Tanigawa 33-36 — 69 -3 Stephen Ames 35-34 — 69 -3 Tom Lehman 35-34 — 69 -3 Rod Spittle 35-34 — 69 -3 Scott Dunlap 35-35 — 70 -2 Tim Petrovic 37-33 — 70 -2 Lee Janzen 36-34 — 70 -2 Jeff Sluman 36-34 — 70 -2 Jerry Smith 34-36 — 70 -2 Jay Haas 33-37 — 70 -2 David Frost 35-35 — 70 -2 Duffy Waldorf 37-33 — 70 -2 Corey Pavin 35-35 — 70 -2

Euro | Scottish Open Thursday | East Lothian, Scotland Purse: $7M | Yards: 7,133 | Par: 70 (35-35) First Round Luke List, United States 31-32 — Robert Rock, England 31-33 — Rickie Fowler, United States 30-34 — Scott Fernandez, Spain 31-33 — Jens Dantorp, Sweden 31-33 — Lee Westwood, England 31-33 — Richard Sterne, South Africa 33-32 — Matthew Southgate, England 30-35 — Julien Guerrier, France 31-34 — Peter Whiteford, Scotland 32-33 — Tyrrell Hatton, England 32-33 —

63 64 64 64 64 64 65 65 65 65 65

Patrick Reed, United States Dylan Frittelli, South Africa Robert Karlsson, Denmark Marcel Siem, Germany Haotong Li, China Scott Hend, Australia Peter Hanson, Sweden Justin Walters, South Africa Danny Willett, England Richie Ramsay, Scotland Russell Knox, Scotland Ian Poulter, England Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark Clement Sordet, France

29-36 32-33 30-35 32-34 31-35 31-35 32-34 34-32 33-33 32-34 32-34 34-32 33-33 34-32

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65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66

U.S. Senior Women’s Open Thursday | Wheaton, Ill. Purse: $1M | Yards: 6,279 | Par: 73 (36-37) First Round | (a-amateur) Elaine Crosby 36-34 — 70 Trish Johnson 36-35 — 71 Liselotte Neumann 35-36 — 71 Laura Davies 37-34 — 71 Helen Alfredsson 35-37 — 72 Jean Bartholomew 36-37 — 73 Juli Inkster 36-37 — 73 Marilyn Lovander 40-33 — 73 Alicia Dibos 36-37 — 73 Susie Redman 37-37 — 74 Suzanne Strudwick 37-37 — 74 Martha Nause 37-37 — 74 Barb Mucha 38-36 — 74 Kay Cockerill 37-37 — 74 Jamie Fischer 36-38 — 74 Lisa Grimes 37-37 — 74 Nancy Taylor 36-38 — 74 Danielle Ammaccapane 37-38 — 75 a-Kathy Kurata 37-38 — 75 a-Patricia Ehrhart 37-38 — 75 Suzy Green-Roebuck 37-38 — 75 Tammie Green Parker 38-38 — 76 Lorie Kane 39-37 — 76 Christa Johnson 39-37 — 76 Barb Moxness 37-39 — 76 Missie Berteotti 38-38 — 76 Yuko Saito 36-40 — 76 a-Marie-Therese Torti 40-36 — 76

-3 -2 -2 -2 -1 E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Trucks | Buckle Up in Your Truck 225 results Thursday | Sparta, Ky. Lap: 1.5 miles | (Post pos. in parentheses) Driver Car Laps 1. (3) Ben Rhodes Ford 150 2. (14) Stewart Friesen Chevy 150 3. (30) Matt Crafton Ford 150 4. (6) Brandon Jones Toyota 150 5. (17) John H. Nemechek Chevy 150 6. (5) Grant Enfinger Ford 150 7. (2) Todd Gilliland Toyota 150 8. (1) Noah Gragson Toyota 150 9. (9) Dalton Sargeant Chevy 150 10. (10) Justin Haley Chevy 150 11. (4) Chris Eggleston Toyota 149 12. (11) Cody Coughlin Chevy 149 13. (15) Korbin Forrister Toyota 149 14. (18) Austin Self Chevy 149 15. (7) Johnny Sauter Chevy 148 16. (12) Austin Hill Chevy 148 17. (19) Justin Fontaine Chevy 148 18. (13) Brett Moffitt Toyota 148 19. (20) Jordan Anderson Chevy 146 20. (22) Bo LeMastus Toyota 146 21. (21) Clay Greenfield Chevy 145 22. (23) Robby Lyons Chevy 143 23. (26) Josh Reaume Chevy 143 24. (28) Wendell Chavous Chevy 139 25. (31) Norm Benning Chevy 138 26. (32) Myatt Snider Ford 137 27. (8) Parker Kligerman Chevy (a)133 28. (16) Tate Fogleman Chevy (s)103 29. (29) Jennifer Jo Cobb Chevy (o)28 30. (27) Bayley Currey Chevy (v)22 31. (25) Camden Murphy Chevy (e)11 32. (24) Tyler Matthews Chevy (a)1 a=accident. s=suspension. o=overheating. v=vibration. e=electrical Race Statistics Average Speed of Winner: 146.739 mph. Time of Race: 1 Hour, 32 Minutes, 00 Seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.922 Seconds. Caution Flags: 3 for 14 laps. Lead Changes: 11 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders: N. Gragson 1-26; B. Rhodes 27; N. Gragson 28-32; B. Rhodes 33-42; N. Gragson 43-73; P. Kligerman 74-83; S. Friesen 84-85; P. Kligerman 86-87; S. Friesen 88-122; B. Rhodes 123-125; T. Gilliland 126; B. Rhodes 127-150. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): N. Gragson 3 times for 62 laps; B. Rhodes 4 times for 38 laps; S. Friesen 2 times for 37 laps; P. Kligerman 2 times for 12 laps; T. Gilliland 1 time for 1 lap.


BASKETBALL

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

NBA NOTEBOOK

Wizards hope Howard is a big addition WIRE SERVICES

The days of waiting for an “athletic big” are over. On Thursday morning, the Washington Wizards announced the signing of center Dwight Howard and with this act, their roster and locker room have officially become one of the most intriguing story lines of the 201819 NBA season. Howard, 32, joins the Wizards on a one-and-one contract — after the conclusion of the season, he has an option to return or seek a new team in free agency — as the most decorated center the team has employed in years. Howard has earned eight All-Star appearances and won the defensive player of the year award in three consecutive years from 2009-2011. On the flip side, as the big-

rebounds. (AP)

the rim, all areas that we needed to improve heading into next season,” Wizards President of Basketball Operations Ernie Grunfeld said in a statement. “His inside presence and athleticism will give us a much different look and will open up opportunities for us on both ends of the floor.” During the 2017-18 season with the Charlotte Hornets, Howard averaged 16.6 points and 12.5 rebounds per game for one of his most productive statistical seasons in years. (The Washington Post)

man era has faded, Howard has been passed around the league. Washington will become his fourth team in the past four seasons. Along the way, Howard has bumped heads with superstar teammates Kobe Bryant and James Harden and his former point guard, Dennis Schroder of the Atlanta Hawks, questioned his effort level on a nightly basis, saying, “He always plays great against his former team ... but that’s like four games each year, you know?” Howard still appealed to the Wizards, who expect him to complete the starting lineup as the athletic big they’ve been searching for since John Wall specifically called for one at the end of last season. “Dwight has been known throughout his career as one of the league’s best defenders, rebounders and finishers around

Bulls release Kilpatrick • Chicago waived guard Sean Kilpatrick. Signed in late March, Kilpatrick averaged 15.4 points in nine games for Chicago after spending time last season with the Brooklyn Nets, Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Clippers. He has averaged 10.3 points in four seasons after going undrafted out of Cincinnati. (AP) Thunder re-sign Felton • Oklahoma City re-signed guard Raymond Felton. The Thunder made the announcement Thursday without details on the deal. Felton appeared in all 82 games last season and averaged 6.9 points, 2.5 assists and 1.9 rebounds as Russell Westbrook’s backup. (AP)

Warriors sign Jerebko • Free agent forward Jonas Jerebko signed with the two-time defending champion Golden State. A native of Sweden, Jerebko has played nine NBA seasons with Utah, Boston and Detroit, and averaged 6.2 points and 4.0

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Hot and slightly more humid

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

76°

90°

94°

83°

Sunny

Sunny

Sunny

Mostly clear

95 94 96 93 96 96 97 95 95 95 96 95 94

W

partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

Flood Stage

Current Level

80s

4-DAY FORECAST

80s 90s

75°/94° Partly cloudy, isolated storms

SUNDAY

MONDAY

100s 90s 80s

TUESDAY

76°/91° 76°/90° 71°/88° Chance of storms

Chance of storms

Chicago 71 / 93

W

67 67 71 66 65 66 65 68 71 67 66 65

92 93 93 90 90 93 93 93 96 92 92 90

sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny

Kirksville 71 / 95

Springfield 66 / 92

Kansas City 78 / 97 St. Louis 73 / 95 Joplin 74 / 96

Carbondale 67 / 93 Poplar Bluff 71 / 94

- 0.57 - 0.46 - 0.49 - 0.61 - 0.59 - 0.60 - 0.87 - 1.00 - 0.86 - 0.66

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, Jul 12th Weed - 11 (moderate), Mold - 9,417 (moderate) COOLING DEGREE DAYS 18 Yesterday 215 Month (Total) 1024 Season 894 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 12.95 Peoria 18 12.40 Beardstown 14 12.55 MERAMEC RIVER Sullivan 15 2.13 16 1.49 Valley Park 24 19.65 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.49 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 28.05 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.67 - 0.91 - 0.57 + 0.01 - 0.87 - 0.93 - 0.02

SUN & MOON

First Jul 19 Sunrise

Full Jul 27

Last Aug 4

5:47 AM Sunset

New Aug 12 8:26 PM

Moonrise 5:14 AM Moonset 8:10 PM

If you have not heard, some local libraries have telescopes you can check out like you would a book. For more information visit slasonline.org/ library-telescope or librarytelescope.org. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

358.68 - 0.03 360.00 - 0.01 498.05 - 0.05 659.72 + 0.12 705.49 - 0.07 659.62 - 0.15 916.18 - 0.13 839.77 - 0.04 601.85 - 0.19 406.87 - 0.05 603.86 - 0.20 446.85 - 0.12

- 1.22 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 90°

Jet Stream

A slow moving cold front will bring showers and thunderstorms across the upper Mississippi Valley. South of this slow moving front, a surge of warm, moist air has made its way from the Gulf of Mexico and across much of the central United States. This has led to excessively hot and humid conditions. Widespread storms will continue across much of the Desert Southwest and southern Rockies as monsoonal moisture continues to move northward. City

H

Wintry Mix

90s

Mostly sunny

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

L

Snow

90s

80s

SATURDAY

70s

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 62 Albuquerque 65 Anchorage 53 Atlanta 73 Atlantic City 60 Baltimore 65 Billings 62 Biloxi, Ms. 78 Birmingham 75 Bismarck 64 Boise 64 Boston 62 Buffalo 64 Burlington, Vt. 58 Charleston, S.C. 76 Charleston, W.V. 65 Charlotte 72 Cheyenne 56 Chicago 71 Cincinnati 66 Cleveland 62 Colorado Spgs. 63 Concord, N.H. 54 Dallas 76 Daytona Beach 74 Denver 63 Des Moines 73 79 Destin, Fl. 67 Detroit 70 El Paso 66 Evansville 50 Fairbanks 63 Fargo 54 Flagstaff 76 Fort Myers 57 Great Falls 71 Green Bay 59 Hartford 75 Honolulu 76 Houston 63 Indianapolis 75 Jackson, Ms. 47 Juneau 83 Key West 83 Las Vegas 77 Little Rock 72 Los Angeles 68 Louisville

86 86 65 88 82 86 95 89 92 87 98 78 88 87 90 90 88 82 93 91 89 82 83 97 92 88 92 88 91 88 92 74 88 74 93 95 86 85 89 92 91 94 68 91 99 96 89 94

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

65 67 53 73 62 68 65 78 74 64 68 62 71 64 74 68 70 56 74 70 70 59 56 78 75 63 72 78 71 71 70 52 64 54 76 58 69 62 75 77 70 75 48 82 85 77 70 72

86 86 62 87 86 90 93 89 90 91 98 78 86 82 89 92 89 88 89 95 90 87 81 98 92 93 85 89 91 92 94 71 89 76 94 74 84 86 89 93 94 93 64 90 103 97 88 96

thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

Today L H

73 Macon 78 McAllen, Tx. 78 Memphis 77 Miami 70 Milwaukee 71 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 54 75 Mobile Montgomery 76 71 Nashville New Orleans 77 New York City 67 Norfolk, Va. 72 Oklahoma City 74 Omaha 76 Orlando 75 Palm Springs 84 Philadelphia 66 Phoenix 83 Pittsburgh 62 Portland, Me. 58 Portland, Or. 63 Providence 59 Raleigh 70 Rapid City 63 Reno 68 Richmond, Va. 66 Sacramento 61 St. Petersburg 80 Salt Lake City 72 San Antonio 75 San Diego 70 San Francisco 62 Santa Fe 58 Savannah 75 Seattle 60 76 Shreveport 69 Sioux Falls 60 Syracuse 73 Tallahassee 79 Tampa 74 Tucson 76 Tulsa 67 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 77 75 Wichita Wilmington, De. 64 80 Yuma

93 98 95 92 90 84 92 92 94 95 89 85 83 96 89 95 105 86 104 86 77 89 81 87 85 100 87 96 92 95 97 80 79 83 94 81 95 77 86 96 92 97 98 86 91 97 85 107

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

74 78 78 77 73 69 55 74 74 73 77 68 69 75 72 75 86 68 85 67 58 58 61 68 65 68 65 61 80 71 75 70 61 59 74 59 76 66 66 74 79 76 76 69 77 76 67 82

90 97 94 92 83 86 88 92 92 95 91 88 84 98 87 94 106 88 105 89 75 89 81 89 91 99 88 97 91 96 98 79 75 84 91 83 95 84 86 95 91 95 99 90 91 97 88 109

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy showers thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

76 56 68 86 79 78 73 60 61 49 77 54 78 50 57 59

89 75 90 112 89 85 82 80 82 62 95 83 88 57 74 84

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny showers partly cloudy sunny

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

57 77 72 75 64 42 67 59 68 85 52 63 60 77 54 80

83 82 87 90 83 61 97 79 91 106 75 86 77 86 69 89

W

mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny sunny sunny sunny partly sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly sunny thunderstorms

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.14 - 0.32 - 0.31 - 0.46 - 0.49

T-storms

90s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 19.11 Jefferson City 23 14.27 Hermann 21 12.90 Washington 20 10.45 St. Charles 25 17.06 MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 16.79 Hannibal 15 15.93 Louisiana Dam 24 25 26.41 Dam 25 26 26.36 Grafton 18 18.41 M.Price, Pool 419 413.70 M.Price, Tail. 21 17.10 St Louis 30 22.24 Chester 27 24.65 Cape Girardeau 32 29.23

24-Hr Change

80s

80s

100s

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.89” 1.61” 24.91” 22.26”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

92° 74° 89° 71° 110° 56° 103° 79°

Rain

70s

90s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:59 p.m.) Low (5:39 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1954) Record Low (1975) High Last Year Low Last Year

Low: 36° Stanley, Idaho

90s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

72 69 72 68 73 74 78 71 71 73 74 69 70

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

National Extremes High: 115° Death Valley, California

Residential A/C only. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Expires 7/31/18.

80s 100s

80s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 618-248-6400

70s

Alaska Low: 35°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

79

Reg. $115 A/C Preventative Maintenance Tune-Up

www.totalcomfort-hvac.com

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Plenty of sunshine along with light winds and hot temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today. It will also be a little more humid. Highs will top out in the middle 90s. Storms will enter the forecast later this weekend.

24-HOUR FORECAST

314-991-COOL (2665) 636-923-COOL (2665) 618-248-6400

8307 Manchester Rd.

WEATHER • Low 73, High 95 • Winds SE 3-8 mph

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Oakley arrested at casino • Former New York Knicks star Charles Oakley is being accused of gambling fraud after a wager at a Las Vegas casino last weekend, casino regulators said Thursday. Oakley was arrested Sunday at the Cosmopolitan casino-resort on the Las Vegas Strip on suspicion of committing or attempting to commit a fraudulent act in a gaming establishment, the Nevada Gaming Control Board said in a statement. The agency said Oakley is suspected of “adding to or reducing his wager” on a game after the outcome was known. Oakley was booked and later released from jail. The regulatory agency would not release details of the circumstances surrounding the arrest. The felony count carries between one and six years in prison and a $10,000 fine. (AP)

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

61 59 58 62 70 77 39 75 52 43 79 75 68 60 60 57

81 84 78 76 88 88 64 89 79 63 93 92 82 74 82 74

showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly sunny


07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

CLASSIFIED All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Resort, Lake and River Property 47 ac borders Coffeen Lake State Fish & Wildlife Area! 26.8 Ac in CRP ($7,200 income) 3br/2ba, 1,940 Sf home with 40X60 outbldg. Montgomery County Realty, Inc. 217-440-4663 N e w H o m e (adj) Lake of the O z a r k s , " A D A " C o m p lia n t. * 3 BDRM, 2 BA, 1-level + 1K sq ft 3car garage * open concept * Priced at only $239,950 for quick sale. O w n e r/ B u ild e r (573)3925052

Homes for Sale-MO Benton Park FOR SALE BY OWNER SOUTH COUNTY 3 BR, 3 Baths, Many updates. Call Alan at 314-974-2021. NO Agents • NO Investors. . St. Francis County 801 Hunt St., Leadwood, MO. 3 bdrm/1 bath, living room, kitchen, utility rm, full bsmt, mostly fenced yard. Needs some TLC. Make offer. Call 573-747-5824.

Land for Sale 2 1 5 a c r e s farmland, Ar a b M O, mixed pasture & hardwood timber, good hunting, creek, road front, easy access, 35 miles from Cape Girardeau. $3300/ac (573)239-8903 Income producing property near Trenton, MO. Multiple streams of income. Conservative 5% return. For more information go to 904422-5824 www.trentonmo.land

Rental-MO

DON'T RENT! RENT TO OWN! We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs.

For more information call or go online at

314-447-1800 nhba.com ********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $121.00/wk 205 N 9th Street, St. Louis, MO 63101

314-421-2980 *********

Rental-IL Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments Applicants must be 62 or older. Rent based on income. All 1 bdrm units, great location & located on bus route. Call 618-465-1444, Mon-Fri 9-5. 3113 Washington, Alton, IL

For Sale By Owner: 5 acres of a spectacular 5-star view of Table Rock Lake in Branson, MO. Restaurant, 2br/2ba Bed & Breakfast, near Silver Dollar City. See to appreciate! $1.2 million. Call 417-331-0511.

Mobile Home Lots 2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes off Hwy W at Mansion Road Estates AND Farmview Est. on Hwy Y. Both located between Troy & Winfield 636-566-6456

Public Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS:

Notice of Change in Control of a State Member Bank or Bank Holding Company

Puppies Ready Now

Each of Kenneth Edward Poteet, of Huntleigh, Missouri, Corey Kenneth Poteet, of Brentwood, Missouri, and McLane Ray Poteet, of St. Louis, Missouri (collectively, the "Poteet Family Group") intend to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission for the Poteet Family Group to acquire 25 percent or more of the shares and thereby control of M1 Bancshares, I nc ., of Clay ton, M issouri. M 1 Ba n c s h a r e s , I nc . controls M 1 Bank, of Macks Creek, Missouri. The Federal Reserve considers a n u mb e r o f factors in deciding whether to approve the notice.

Notice is hereby given that the City of O’Fallon will conduct a Public Hearing before the Planning and Zoning Commission on August 2, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the O’Fallon Municipal Centre located at 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, Missouri and before the City Council on August 9, 2018 at 7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the O’Fallon Municipal Centre located at 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, Missouri, concerning the following request for Zoning per Chapter 400, Article XVI, of the Municipal Code:

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com German Shepherd Pups, $700 taking deposits now, NAPR reg., farm raised, avail August 1st, (217)663-2296 Schnoodle Pups (REG) Hypoallergenic & do not shed. UTD on vaccinations. Can meet in the St.Larea. $600 573-205-0504 Standard Poodle Puppy, Red, AKC, M ale(s) Champ.lines, Sundown Standards on Facebook $1500 (573)842-8280

Weimaraner Club of Gtr St. Louis: Free Info, Breed Referral & Adoptions. Ask about activities. Research before you buy: 618-236-1466 Demand AKCPapers.com or weimaranerclubofamerica.org Yorkie Chihuahua Puppies 3F, 2M - 2 blk and 3 silver 9 weeks old, $400 each Call 314-973-7587

You are invited to submit comments in writing on this notice to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, P.O. Box 442, St. Louis, MO 63166-0442. Comments may also be submitted electronically to c o m m e n t s .a p p lic a t io n s @ stls.frb.org. The comment period will not end before August 2, 2018 and may be somewhat longer. The Board's procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board's procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the notice, contact David Hubbard, Senior Manager, at (314) 444-7303. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the notice if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period.

Garage Sales Evergreen Real Estate, LLC

Dogs Out Of Area Property

Dogs

Border Collie Puppies: Medium, Registered, DOB:4/4/18 , Rough C o a t , Bla c k/ Wh it e , 1 s t s h o t s /wormed. , $350; (217)370-2951

Bull Mastiff Puppies, Fawn Color, Home Raise d, S hots, Wormed, C hampions hip Bac kground, Ready Now!Call (573)378-6383 Cavapoos, Wheaten Terriers, Shih Tzus, Boxers, Bermidoodles, Other Cute Poos.

CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OTHERS.

636-240-3647

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Rental-MO Beautiful Ballwin home for rent in R ockw ood SD 3 bdrm 2.5 bath, finished lower level, fenced yd, and more! Avail Aug 6. $1600 314882-3320

@stltoday STLtoday.com/readerrewards ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

63122 - Neighborhood Yard Sale Across from Kirkwood High Ga briel Dr, Gabriel Ct, ElmTree Ln, 7am - Noon 63138, Francis Farm Comm. Garage Sale, Bellefontaine North, left onto Prendergast - Sat. 7/14, 8a - 3p.

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Misc. Merchandise For Sale Restaurant $8,500 Firm (Columbia, Mo) **Complete restaurant set-up package including these items and more: Chairs, tables, silverware, glasses, plates, fryers, 6 burner gas Stove/ C h e e s e M e lt e r c o mb o , pots, pans, skillets, utensils (all kinds), Slicer, Alto Sham Cook & Hold, 6 tap beer cooler, all kinds and sizes of metal and plastic kitchen pans both storage and cook line, metal shelving, stainless steel tables, food processor, paging system, sound sy stem, Complete Aloha Point of Sale Computer System ($15,000 brand new) a Nice Oak Cabinet and other furnishings. $ 8 , 5 0 0 P r i c e is F ir m, Se r io u s inquires only! Please contact Dustin @ 573-356-8044 Call or Text

P U B L IC N O T IC E: C e l l c o Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) proposes to build a 180-foot Self-Support C ommunications Towe r. Anticipated lighting application is medium intensity dual red/white strobes. The Site location is 3135 Fosterburg Road, Alton, Madison County, IL 6 2 0 0 2 (3 8 ° 5 5 ' 1 .7 7 " North and 9 0 ° 0 6 ' 3 0 .7 0 " West). The Fe de ral C ommunications Commission (FCC) Antenna Struct u r e Registration (ASR, Form 854) filing number is A1087445. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS - Interested persons may review the application (www.fcc.gov/asr/applications) by entering the filing number. Environmental concerns may be raised by filing a Request fo r En viro n me n ta l Re vie w (www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalre q u e s t ) and online filings are strongly encouraged. The mailing address to file a paper copy is: FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: R a mo n Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554.

Request for Zoning Name of Owner/Applicant: Michael Santel/Point West Properties, LLC Present Zoning Classification: I-1/Light Industrial District Proposed Zoning Classification: I-2/Heavy Industrial District Proposed Use: Manufacturing Facility Location of Property: 601 Pearl Drive

(Seal) ________________________________ Pamela L. Clement, City Clerk City of O’Fallon, Missouri

Bids/Proposals CITY OF O’FALLON 100 North Main Street O’Fallon, Missouri 63366 NOTICE OF ELECTION SUBMITTING TO THE QUALIFIED VOTERS OF THE CITY OF O ’ F A L L O N , MI SSO U R I , F O R THEIR CONSIDERA TION A T THE GENERA L MUNICIPA L ELECTION TO BE HELD ON AUGUST 7, 2018. A Proposition authorizing and directing the submission of a ballot proposition to the qualified voters of the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, to consider imposing a local use tax at the same rate as the local sales tax of the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, for purchase from out-of-state vendors that exceed a total of two thousand dollars a year. /s/__________________ Pamela L. Clement, CMC/MRCC - S City Clerk

Kiewit Infrastructure Co. is seeking S ubcontractors, S uppliers, and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises who are interested in the St. Louis Union S tation Tunne l Rehabilitation Project. DBE's certified by the Missouri Regional Certification Committee (MRCC), are encouraged to contact Kiewit to be included in future bidding opportunities for the Project. If you are interested in the project or would like additional information please email us at STLUnionStation @ k ie w it.c o m . Kiew it Infrastructure Co. is An Equal Opportunity Employer.

The Fox C-6 School District is soliciting qualified bids to contract for procurement and administering of influenza vaccinations for the fall period of 2018. For further details please refer to the R F P on our w e b s i t e a t: h t t p : / / w w w . fox.k12.mo.us

SUNDAY COUPONS THEY JUST MAKE CENTS Whether you use a couple or couple dozen every week, you end up with more groceries in your cart and change in your pocket. And that Sunday newspaper you just bought? It has paid for itself. Now that is what we call savvy shopping. SUBSCRIBE TODAY at STLtoday.com/subscribe


C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

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STLMedicalSolutions.com Permanent Fix for Erectile Dysfunction Address: 605 Ballas Road, Suite 100, St. Louis, MO 63141

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Bath Fitter Franchise. Independently owned and operated by Ideal Bathroom Solutions LLC *Special offer good on the purchase of a bathtub or shower, wall and faucet kit. One offer per customer. May not be combined with any other offer. Offer must be presented at the time of estimate. Discount applies to same day purchases only. Previous orders and estimates excluded. Offer valid only at the above location. **Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. † For as long as you own your home. Subject to certain limitations.

Expires 07/27/2018


Friday, July 13, 2018

72ND ANNIVERSARY SALE MCBRIDE HOMES PERFECT SUMMER SOIREE

BACK

WINDOW TREATMENTS At Prices You Can Afford Sponsored Content and Photos by Windo Van Go

“Plantation Shutters are a product you buy once and will love forever” says Julie Tolmais, owner of Windo Van Go. Now serving parts of Illinois!

N

ow is a great time to freshen up your decor with new window treatments that will make your room warm and inviting. There are a variety of window treatments from which to choose, each offering its own set of advantages.

PLANTATION SHUTTERS Shutters add so much style to your room and their function is unmatched by any other window treatment. Shutters are great insulators and give owners maximum flexibility on usage. A simple tilt of the louver can control light and privacy.

Plantation shutters are one of the few treatments that allow the bottom to close for privacy and leave the top open for light. Shutters come in vinyl, composite and wood. Vinyl and composite are designed to look like wood but are more maintenance free than wood and come in various whites and off whites. Wood shutters come in a variety of paint colors and many rich stains. Shutters come in 2 1/2, 3 1/2 and 4 1/2 louver sizes and offer various frame styles for every window. Shutters can also be made for specialty windows such as arches, angled windows, French doors and sliders. (Window Treatments Continued on Page 2)

The Rise of Thoughtful Design for Active Families Sponsored Content by Denise McDonald-Dorman

I

t’s the little things we take for granted that can have the greatest impact on how comfortably we live and move in our homes. Take the kitchen triangle, for example. The kitchen triangle refers to the work station triangle of three points with imaginary lines between them, where the cooktop, sink and refrigerator all work in concert. This layout makes the chef’s job more efficient, while minimizing the unnecessary steps between the three points. As recently as February of this year, an Architectural Digest headline deemed the kitchen triangle “Still the Best Way to Design a Kitchen.” Industrial psychologist and designer Lillian Moller Gilbreth was the genius behind this concept, irst unveiling her “kitchen practical” design at a Women’s Exposition in 1929 to prove how her design saved on human motion. When Consort Homes combines smart kitchen design with meeting the needs of today’s active families, the kitchen triangle is a prominent facet, central to their layout. Said marketing coordinator Dawn Thurman, “We strive to make the best use of every inch of the home, especially in the kitchen. We look at the trends of families, and we are seeing focused family time centered around eating meals together.” Underscoring their emphasis on functionality,

Consort Homes adds features like walk-in pantries to “help reduce the number of trips to the grocery store and add more time to bonding over a great meal.” Most of Consort Homes’ plans feature kitchens with islands opening to the breakfast room. This gives the family chef space to prep meals and engage with their family while cooking, without disruption. They ind kids prefer to do their homework there as adults prep

the meals. Optional features offered by Consort Homes can turn regular kitchens into gourmet kitchens – these upgrades include built-in double ovens, cooktops and islands with prep sinks. One of the home design terms buyers will regularly request is the “drop zone.” The drop zone is basically replacing the mudroom, with a nicer name and nicer features. Pinterest and Houzz boards are inundated with family friendly drop zone designs. The drop zone movement arose from the need to ind a place to hide clutter, since today’s open loor plan trend means that the eye sweeps across the irst loor and sees everything, all at once. Drop zone designs are intended to keep families organized, by placing all of the grab-and-go items of daily life -- like backpacks, jackets, umbrellas, keys, charged electronic devices, boots and sports gear -- near the exit door. This prevents the clutter from overtaking the home’s visible living spaces. Consort Homes offers several optional (The Rise of Thoughtful Design Continued on Page 2)

HOT ON THE MARKET

MUIRIFIELD MANOR 22 SULJAK COURT O’FALLON, MO $545,380 WITH $23,480 IN SAVINGS! PLUS, UP TO $5,000 IN CLOSING COSTS! TIM KNOCHE 636-379-6880 Tknoche@mckelveyhomes.com

CHANDLER RIDGE 12738 CHANDLER RIDGE CT DES PERES, MO $949,416 WITH $35,589 IN SAVINGS! PLUS, UP TO $5,000 IN CLOSING COST! CLYDE OLIVER coliver@mckelveyhomes.com 314-378-2186

505 UPPER RIDGEPOINTE COURT LAKE ST. LOUIS, MO $485,016

ESSEX AT CARLTON GLEN 806 ELLIS PARK PLACE WENTZVILLE, MO $399,900

ASHTON AT MISTY HOLLOW 5422 MISTY CROSSING CT. FLORISSANT, MO $228,725

OPEN SUNDAY 2-4 PM

OPEN SUNDAY 1-3PM

Beautiful new home ready for your family OPEN 11-5 or by Appointment

JEAN EWELL 636-777-7073 jewell@consort-homes.com

JIM WANNSTEDT 314-503-5500 jwannstedt@cbgundaker.com

636-265-2646 www.KempHomes.com


P2 WINDOW TREATMENTS

ROLLER SHADES

Continued from Page 1

Roller screen shades are a popular option for shielding out sun when you don’t need privacy. They are also a great exterior option for screen porches as they are able to withstand the elements.

PLANTATION SHUTTERS Shutters are one of Windo Van Go’s most popular products. They provide so many aspects to your window--great decor, superb insulation, flexibility of light control from room darkening to light and open. Composite/vinyl shutters come in white and off-white and are easy to clean and care for, and are more cost efficient. Wood shutters come in a variety of paints and warm stains. All of their shutters come with a variety of frame styles that work with your window.

Windo Van Go Current Promotions: Free sales tax (8% value) on all plantation shutters and free cordless lift and lock on all honeycomb shades. All promotions good until the end of May. Windo Van Go is in its 28th year of covering windows in St. Louis and prides itself in offering quality, long lasting products at affordable prices.

BLINDS Like shutters, blinds give you the flexibility to control your light with just the tilt of the louvers. Still popular and maintenance free, they come standard with a decorative valance to finish off your window and are cost friendly.

HONEYCOMB SHADES Honeycomb shades offer a soft, light look to your window and give you excellent insulation and privacy at the same time. There are many configurations to honeycomb shades: standard raised from the bottom or a top down/bottom up gives the choice of stacking the shade at the bottom or the top or anywhere in between. These are great for bathrooms and bedrooms where many would like privacy at the bottom and openness at the top. Cordless shades are a great option to keep the cords away from the children, and motorized are great for the hard to reach windows.

636-394-3411 WindoVanGoSTL.com Now serving parts of Illinois!

laundry room is one of the most soughtafter elements by homebuyers and is a great idea to include for resale value.

THE RISE OF THOUGHTFUL DESIGN Continued from Page 1 features, including the following: • Charging stations for electronic devices • Hooks for coats and backpacks • Benches for easy shoe removal with storage space underneath • Laundry area or attached laundry room The laundry room adjacent to the drop zone allows for those muddy

For a first-hand look at today’s kitchen and drop zone design trends, please visit any of the Consort Homes model homes, as featured on their website at consort-homes.com.

baseball and paintball-splattered uniforms to be dropped at the washer quickly, without tracking the mess throughout the home. A well-appointed

How to Use Comparable Sales to Price Your Home Sponsored Content by National Association of REALTORS® HouseLogic

B

efore you put your home up for sale, it’s crucial to understand how the right comparable sales help you and your agent find the perfect price. How much can you sell your home for? Probably about as much as the neighbor received, as long as they sold their house in recent memory and their home was just like yours. Knowing how much homes similar to yours sold for, called comparable sales (or in real estate lingo — comps) gives you the best idea of the current estimated value of your home. The trick is finding sales that closely match. 1.What makes a good comparable sale? Your best comparable sale is the same model as your house in the same subdivision —and it closed escrow last week. If you can’t find that, here are other factors that count. Location: The closer to your house the better, but don’t just use any comparable sale within a mile radius. A good comparable sale is a house in your neighborhood, your subdivision, on the same type of street as your house, and in your school district. Home type: Try to find comparable sales that are like your home in style, construction material, square footage, number of bedrooms and baths, basement (having one and whether it’s finished), finishes, and yard size. Amenities and upgrades: Is the kitchen new? Does the comparable sale house have full A/C? Is there crown molding, a deck, or a pool? Does your community have the same amenities (pool, workout room, walking trails, etc.) and homeowner’s association fees?

Date of sale: You may want to use a comparable sale from two years ago when the market was high, but that won’t fly. Most buyers use governmentguaranteed mortgages, and those lending programs say comparable sales can be no older than 90 days. Sales sweeteners: Did the comparable-sale sellers give the buyers down payment assistance, closing costs, or a free television? You have to reduce the value of any comparable sale to account for any deal sweeteners. 2.Agents can help adjust price based on insider insights Even if you live in a subdivision, your home will always be different from your neighbors. Evaluating those differences — like the fact that your home has one more bedroom than the comparable or a basement office — is one of the ways real estate agents add value. An active agent has been inside a lot of homes in your neighborhood and knows all sorts of details about comparable sales. They have read the comments selling agents put into the MLS, seen the ugly wallpaper, and heard what other Realtors, lenders, closing agents and appraisers said about the comparable sale. 3. More ways to pick a home listing price If you’re still having trouble picking out a listing price for your home, look at the current competition. Ask your real estate agent to be honest about your home and the other homes on the market (and then listen without taking the criticism personally). Next, put your comparable sales into two

piles: more expensive and less expensive. What makes your home more valuable than the cheaper comparable sales and less valuable than the pricier comparable sales? 4.Are foreclosures and short sales comparable? If one or more of your comparable sales was a foreclosed home or a short sale (a home that sold for less money than the owners owed on the mortgage), ask your real estate agent how to treat those comps. A foreclosed home is usually in poor condition because owners who can’t pay their mortgage can’t afford to pay for upkeep. Your home is in great shape, so the foreclosure should be priced lower than your home. Short sales are typically in good condition, although they are still distressed sales. The owners usually have to sell because they’re divorcing, or their employer is moving them out of state. How much short sales are discounted from their market value varies among local markets. The average short-sale home in Omaha in recent years was discounted by 8.5 percent, according to a University of Nebraska at Omaha study. In suburban Washington, D.C., sellers typically discount short-sale homes by 3 to 5 percent to get them quickly sold, real estate agents report. In other markets, sellers price short sales the same as other homes in the neighborhood. This article provided through a partnership between The St.Louis Post-Dispatch and St.Louis REALTORS®.

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Ways to Set the Stage for the Perfect

Summer Soiree

T

he backyard barbecue is a staple of The American Summer. Long days filled with sun, fun, family and friends are what make lifelong memories. Before you fire up the grill though, ensure your backyard is prepped to host with these tips to create the perfect setting for a patio party:

3. Light up the night

1. Lay the groundwork The first step to setting any stage is to lay the groundwork. Unfortunately, many deck or patio surfaces become uncomfortably hot in direct sun. The problem affects dark-colored deck boards which absorb heat throughout the day, as well as composite boards that hold heat. An overly hot deck is especially problematic for young children and pets, whose feet are more heat sensitive. “Many people tell us they love the beauty and durability of their composite deck, but not the heat,� said Brent Gwatney, vice president of MoistureShield Decking. His company has developed a solution they call CoolDeck technology. The boards are engineered to absorb up to 35

Sponsored Content and Photo by Brandpoint

percent less heat than other composites, for a noticeably lower surface temperature on hot summer days.

2. Create shade Shield the rest of your body from the summer sun with a pergola or gazebo. These stylish coverings provide a refreshing shady area for guests to enjoy themselves. Turn this area into the ultimate relaxation zone by adding hammocks, hanging chairs or climbing vines for added beauty and extra protection.

Once the sun sets, the temperature drops. While tiki torches offer a temporary aesthetic solution, a more permanent outdoor fireplace can provide heat and ambiance to keep your guests happy into the night. There are many style options, from woodburning designs to more modern styles that burn gas or propane. A custom-built fireplace will typically cost more, but will allow for more personalized features, like an outdoor pizza oven. For more budget-friendly options, you can always pick up a wood-burning fire pit from your local home improvement store, starting as low as $200. Whether you are designing a completely new backyard or just giving your existing one a facelift, these three tips will help you to create a stylish space that will keep you and your guests comfortable and happy during your indelible summer events.


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO 07.13.18–07.19.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

CHEERS TO HERITAGE BREWERS FESTIVAL Page 30

HOFBRÄUHAUS: WORTH THE WAIT? Page 28

CHRISSIE HYNDE IS STILL GREAT PRETENDER Page 6

LIGHTS, , A R E M CA ACTION! uce Local teens prod s for record number of film

MAKERS ST. LOUIS FILM SHOWCASE Page 15 BY AI SH A SU LTAN


07.13.18–07.19.18 ▼

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30

Visit EnterpriseCenter.com for the complete upcoming events schedule.

Sean Kim, 17, made a short film called “Farm 2029.”

Cover story

BECOME A PROUD MEMBER OF THE BLUES FAMILY WITH A BE

2018-19 SEASON TICKET PLAN!

Area teens talk about the challenges of making their St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase entries. PAGE 15

FULL SEASON · HALF SEASON · 12-GAME DEPOSITS AS LOW AS $100 · STLOUISBLUES.COM/TICKETS

Adult film star Ron Jeremy is on phase 2 of his career: comedy. PAGE 8

“Hotel Transylvania 3” is an animated vampire film that doesn’t suck. PAGE 21

Ticket Tracker. PAGE 10

Recently reviewed movies. PAGE 22

St. Louis gospel group God’s Chosen is shocked to find itself on Billboard charts. PAGE 11

See & Do

Datebook Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Chris Stapleton at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, “Annie” at the Muny and Let Them Eat Art in Maplewood. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks. PAGES 4-5

ON SALE TODAY AT 11AM!

A local artist hopes to inspire kids with his 3D art paintings at the Magic House. PAGE 12

Natalie Portman-narrated “Eating Animals” shows the dark side of eating meat. PAGE 21

St. Louis band the People’s Key switches gears on its new album. PAGE 7

2018-19 BROADWAY SEASON: SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM!

TV Q&A. PAGE 27

Screens

A confident Chrissie Hynde shows she’s still a Pretender. PAGE 6

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18

Seth Green —and all his voices — is perfect for Bobcat Goldthwait’s “Misfits & Monsters.” PAGE 26

The charismatic Dwayne Johnson isn’t enough to save “Skyscraper.” PAGE 20

Music & Clubs FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16

Four stars: “Sorry to Bother You” is brilliant. PAGE 23

Fuel Much-anticipated, muchdelayed Hofbräuhaus shows many Bavarias of concern. PAGE 28 The St. Louis Brewers Heritage Festival features something old, something new. PAGE 30

BEST MUSICAL 2005 TONY AWARD

ON THE COVER • Gabe Sheets, 16, directed a short film “Fugue.” Photo by Robert Cohen, Post-Dispatch

TM

&

© 1957, 2018 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, LP.

SPAM is a registered trademark of Hormel Foods, LLC, used with permission here.

Visit PeabodyOperaHouse.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. EnterpriseCenter.com StLouisBlues.com PeabodyOperaHouse.com Enterprise Center Group Sales: 314-622-5454 | Peabody Opera House Group Sales: 314-499-7676 Ticketmaster: 800-745-3000

2

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 07.13.18-07.19.18

WHAT’S HOT AT STLTODAY.COM ➨ Find a farmers market near you with our interactive map. stltoday.com/farmersmarket ➨ Make a splash! Find a swimming pool near you. stltoday.com/pools ➨ Show your St. Louis pride with these T-shirts. stltoday.com/lifestyles ➨ Theater critic Judith Newmark takes her final bow. stltoday.com/arts

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P H O T O S : H A N D O U T ( K I M ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( S TA P L E T O N ) ; A N N A P U R N A P I C T U R E S ( “ S O R R Y T O B O T H E R Y O U ” ) ; R YA N M I C H A L E S K O / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( H O F B R Ä U H A U S

THURSDAY, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER FEBRUARY 513


HERE’S WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS WEEK ▼

“I’m hoping to catch ‘Jersey Boys’ at the Muny.” • “Taking a little road/rail trip to Kansas City.” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com

“I’m looking forward to episode 2 of ‘Sharp Objects’ on HBO. Amy Adams playing a St. Louis newspaper reporter with a heavy drinking problem? COOL!” •

Hillary Levin • photo editor, 314-340-8118, hlevin@post-dispatch.com Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com Emily Tintera • event and sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischoff • Post-Dispatch vice president of sales and marketing, 314-340-8529, dbischoff@post-dispatch.com

CONTRIBUTORS

“We’ll keep exploring different water parks in the area — I helped create a handy pool guide earlier this summer. Check it out at stltoday. com/pools.” •

“The St. Louis Brewers Heritage Festival in Forest Park!” •

Emma Baker • features intern Cara DeMichele • designer Brian Feldt • beer writer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Dylan Kiefer • features intern Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Judith Newmark • theater critic Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • arts writer

“Wishing a very happy ‘un-birthday’ to my sister!” •

“My vacation to the Portland area and Crater Lake!” •

CONTACT US Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • stltoday.com/events Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise “Call me a sucker … but I have to check out ‘Skyscraper’ this weekend.” •

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Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us ae@post-dispatch.com Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

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@gostlouis

“Checking out the local talent at the St. Louis Filmmakers’ Showcase.” •

@gostl

@gostl

COPYRIGHT 2018 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

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07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


STLTODAY.COM/EVENTS ▼

Queen is of course known for songs such as “Somebody to Love,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “We Are the Champions” and “Another One Bites the Dust.” BY

BEST BETS

KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Scarface, DJ Quik’s “The Last of a Dying Breed” show

FRIDAY Let Them Eat Art WHEN 6-11 p.m. Friday • WHERE Downtown Maplewood • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO cityofmaplewood.com

Celebrate Maplewood and art at the city’s whimsical tribute to Bastille Day. The 13th annual party includes live music, artists from around the region, live art demonstrations, and food and drink from Maplewood establishments. BY

A dancer with Aalim Belly Dance takes part in the STL 250 Cake Walk parade during the 2015 Let Them Eat Art festival in Maplewood.

VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Dr. Zhivegas Performs Purple Rain WHEN 9 p.m. Friday • WHERE Old Rock House, 1200 South Seventh Street • HOW MUCH $20-$60 • MORE INFO metrotix.com

Chris Stapleton’s “2018 American Road Show” with Marty Stuart, Brent Cobb

music you’re playing.”

Popular St. Louis cover band Dr. Zhivegas debuted a well-received Prince tribute show at the Old Rock House in 2017 and brings it back this weekend with “Dr. Zhivegas Performs Purple Rain.” The band will perform all the hits from the blockbuster album and classic film of the same name.

WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $89.75 (single tickets only) with platinum level seats also available $152-$206 • MORE INFO livenation.com

WHEN 7:30 p.m. FridaySaturday • WHERE Atomic Cowboy Pavilion and the Bootleg, 4140 Manchester Avenue • HOW MUCH $10 for a one-day pass, $15 for a two-day pass, ticketweb.com

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

It may look as if country music superstar Chris Stapleton rose to the top just like that, but he actually was a well-known songwriter first, penning tunes for Kenny Chesney, Luke Bryan, Tim McGraw, Darius Rucker, Dierks

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Mound City Music Fest

Chris Stapleton Bentley and even Adele. He debuted with “Traveller” (2015) followed by “From a Room: Volume 1” and “From a Room: Volume 2.” He told NPR his fans may connect with his music because “hopefully they know what we do is authentically us, and that goes over no matter what kind of

Mound City Music Fest has shows at both the outdoor pavilion and at the Bootleg. The event begins Friday with Common Jones (7:30 p.m. at the pavilion), Guerrilla Theory (9:30 p.m. at the pavilion) and the Driftaways (11 p.m. in the Bootleg). DJ DCUPP

opens the evening and spins between sets. Saturday brings Monkh and the People (7 p.m. at the pavilion), the Scandaleros (8:30 p.m at the pavilion), Brother Francis and the Soultones (10 p.m. at the pavilion) and Break Night (11 p.m. at the Bootleg). DJ Trouble will open the night and performs between sets. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SATURDAY Travis Tritt WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • River City Casino, 777 River City Casino Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$55 • MORE

INFO ticketmaster.com

Killer Queen

Having Chris Stapleton and Travis Tritt in St. Louis on consecutive nights opens up all sorts of possibilities in the heads of country music fans who hope the performers could cross paths on stage. But there’s no doubt each show will be great on its own if that doesn’t happen. “It’s Great to Be Alive” and “Here’s a Quarter Call Someone Who Cares” singer Tritt released a two-disc album and DVD in 2016, “A Man and His Guitar — Live From the Franklin Theatre,” shot in Tennessee. BY

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $30-$58 • MORE INFO metrotix.com

KEVIN C. JOHNSON

A year after last playing Family Arena, Queen tribute band Killer Queen is back to continue to prove “We Will Rock You.” The group bills itself as Europe’s top Queen tribute. Singer Patrick Myers said: “The whole thing is a party, celebration. We’re delivering Christmas through rock ’n’ roll. If you want to dance the night away, that’s what we’re about.”

Hip-hop veterans Scarface and DJ Quik are joining forces for a show this weekend and have teamed up to work together on a new EP. DJ Quik told XXL magazine: “We’re actually recording every show that we do into Protools. We’re going to listen back to it after the tour is done, and in the interim, we’re writing lyrics and music on the bus. It just makes sense to make an EP. Not just to sell and have a record out, but to make this whole experience and give it to people to feel a vibe.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Rob Zombie, Marilyn Manson’s “Twins of Evil: The Second Coming Tour” WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights HOW MUCH $29.50-$125 MORE INFO livenation.com

FAST FORWARD Kenny Chesney, July 21 at Busch Stadium: No Shoes Nation gears up as the country superstar comes to the big stage. • World Naked Bike Ride, July 21, starting in the Grove: The 11th annual “as bare as you dare” ride through St. Louis includes parties before and after • “Gypsy,” July 27-Aug. 2 at the Muny: The musical-theater classic, with music by Jule Styne and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, tells the story of the ultimate overbearing stage mother • Missouri and Illinois state fairs, Aug. 9-19 in Sedalia and Springfield: Head to a state fair to get your fill of butter sculptures, livestock, live music and every deep-fried thing imaginable

4

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 07.13.18-07.19.18

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ stltoday.com/events stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : C R I S T I N A M . F L E T E S / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( C A K E WA L K ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( S TA P L E T O N , Z O M B I E ) ; J O N G I T C H O F F ( N A K E D B I K E R I D E )

WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE the Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$45 MORE INFO ticketmaster.com


There probably couldn’t be a better title for a Rob Zombie and Marilyn Manson co-headlining tour than “Twins of Evil,” though they were anything but brotherly the last time they toured together in 2012. The pair famously got into it in Detroit when Manson claimed Zombie cut his set short by going over the allotted time, leading to some bad words exchanged. Where was Alice Cooper to rein it all in?

has been embraced by no less a star than Jay Z. Those tunes and more will be showcased on the Muny stage.

Rob Zombie

BY CALVIN WILSON

THURSDAY Sound of Music Sing-a-Long WHEN 7-10 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Das Bevo, 4749 Gravois Avenue • HOW MUCH • MORE INFO dasbevo. com, 314-832-2251

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

The Amazing Taco Race: A Scavenger Hunt WHEN 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday • WHERE restaurants, bars and shops along Cherokee Street • HOW MUCH $20-$35 • surveymonkey. com/r/3Q6M8MQ

This first scavengerhunt style taco tour of south St. Louis’ Cherokee Street gives you the excuse you need to feed your face with tacos, learn more about the area, solve mysteries along the way and benefit Casa de Salud, a nonprofit that delivers health services to the uninsured and underinsured. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

MONDAY Oh Wonder WHEN 8 p.m. Monday • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard HOW MUCH $25 MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

London pop duo Oh Wonder, made up of Josephine Vander Gucht and Anthony West, was never looking to tour the world off of its music, but that’s what happened. The act is touring with its album “Ultralife.” “We’ve never pushed this project. It has always felt like it’s pulling us along. We initially put our songs on Soundcloud hoping to pitch them to other artists. What happened next surprised us as much as anyone. Almost from the moment we began, we felt a

stltoday.com/go

connection with fans.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

TUESDAY Courtney Barnett “Tell Me How You Really Feel, Vagabond WHEN 8 p.m. Tuesday WHERE the Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard HOW MUCH $27-$30 MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

Indie rocker Courtney Barnett follows up her 2015 effort “Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit” with the new “Tell Me How You Really Feel.” The new record undoubtedly caused more thinking and sitting on Barnett’s part.

Jim DeFelice WHEN 7 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-994-3300

Author DeFelice, who co-authored “American Sniper” with Chris Kyle, now turns to the 19th century with his new book, “West Like Lightning: The Brief, Legendary Ride of the Pony Express.” Considering the romantic legend of the cross-country riders who carried mail through the tough West, it’s hard to believe that the enterprise only lasted 18 months. DeFelice will talk about the Pony Express’ creation and demise. BY JANE HENDERSON

WEDNESDAY Foreigner: “Jukebox Heroes” WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $20-$350 • MORE INFO livenation.com

Classic rock band Foreigner, whose latest project is “40 — Forty Hits From Forty Years,” makes its regular trek back to Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, bringing along hits like “Cold as Ice,” “Hot Blooded,” “Waiting for a Girl Like You” and “Double Vision.” Also, the Central High School choir from Park Hills, Mo., will perform with the band on “I Want to Know What Love Is.” Foreigner will donate $500 to the choir, and the choir will sell Foreigner CDs at the concert to raise funds for Foreigner’s charity partner, the Grammy Foundation. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

“Annie” WHEN Wednesday through July 25 • WHERE The Muny, 1 Theatre Drive in Forest Park • HOW MUCH $15$100, plus the free seats • MORE INFO muny.org

As orphans go, perhaps only Harry Potter is as famous as Little Orphan Annie, and this musical puts her center stage. The song “Tomorrow” is so popular that it’s turned up in TV commercials, and “It’s the Hard Knock Life”

There will be no lonely goatherds in the biergarten or bar at the first Sound of Music Sing-a-Long at Das Bevo, commonly known as the Bevo Mill. They’ll show the movie with subtitles and encourage you to wear your best lederhosen or curtains. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

“The Importance of Being Earnest” WHEN Thursday-Sunday through July 22 • WHERE Grandel Theater, 3610 Grandel Square in Grand Center • HOW MUCH $15-$35 • MORE INFO insighttheatrecompany.com

Oscar Wilde’s comedy about misunderstandings and malapropisms gets a revival by the Insight Theatre Company. If you’re into classic wit, this show is a must-see. And few playwrights in the history of theater have been as witty as Wilde. BY CALVIN WILSON

A Midsummer Night’s Creep WHEN 7 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-367-6731

Four authors of novels with grim, strange or even deadly goingson talk about their books during this evening event with Josh Woods (“The Black Palace”), Kea Wilson (“We Eat Our Own”), Fred Venturini (“The Heart Does Not Grow Back”) and Jedidah Ayres (“Peckerwood”). BY JANE HENDERSON

07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

5


STLTODAY.COM/MUSIC

Having left her hometown of Akron, Ohio, and arriving on the London scene at the birth of British punk, Hynde “had forgotten all about melody and the timelessness of records that get played on the radio. Being a kid from Hereford, which is on the border near Wales, Jimmy wasn’t interested in all the anger and the angst that was going on in a scene he had nothing to do with.” Of the original quartet, only Hynde and drummer Martin Chambers survive. Chambers hasn’t appeared on a Pretenders album since “Loose Screw” in 2002, but he continues to play in Hyde’s live band. “The thing is, if all four of us were still alive, there’s every chance we wouldn’t be playing together now, or we would have split up and come back together,” she says. “It’s hard to keep the raft afloat. I’ve just tried to keep the music alive as best I can, very much in the original sound.” To that end, Hynde released the Pretenders’ latest album, “Alone,” in 2016. The title track is about being single and not having any restrictions placed on her time or her desires. “Who’s up for a movie? I am!” she enthuses in the song. “I know many people who aren’t in relationships, and they lead perfectly normal lives,” she says. “You have to be OK on your own because you’re going to be alone a lot. “But I wouldn’t call it a manifesto,” she adds. “I’m not trying to gather troops.” Hynde made the album with Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys and the

Chrissie Hynde with The Pretenders performs at the Orpheum Theater in Boston.

Chrissie Hynde: still the great Pretender Singer and guitarist says about being single: ‘You have to be OK on your own’ BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ | SPECIAL TO GO! MAGAZINE

few years ago, Chrissie Hynde published a memoir, and more recently, the BBC produced a documentary film about her. That’s a lot of retrospection for Hynde, the singer/songwriter and guitarist of the Pretenders, who has never had a particular fondness for looking backward. “It’s more about putting stuff behind you in a nice tidy package and getting rid of it,” she says by phone from a tour stop in Louisville, Ky. She hasn’t seen the documentary

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(“Alone With Chrissie Hynde”), she says, and only read the book (“Reckless: My Life as a Pretender”), “you know, because I wrote it.” But the book allowed her to underline how important the Pretenders’ late guitarist James Honeyman-Scott had been to her and to her music. “He’s one of the great guitar heroes,” she says. “He wasn’t really recognized, and that always bothered me.” Honeyman-Scott and bassist Pete Farndon both died drug-related deaths after just two Pretenders albums, both of them classics. “Musically, we really hit the sweet spot,” Hynde says of her partnership with Honeyman-Scott.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 07.13.18-07.19.18

Arcs, who is a much-in-demand producer these days. “I had just admired him from afar,” Hynde says. “I’d seen the Black Keys play. I think he’s a great singer and guitar player. But in looking for a producer, I don’t listen to their work to see what they do. I just kind of get their vibe and if I like them. That’s the only way you can tell if you want to spend time with them.” Prior to “Alone,” Hynde made the album “Stockholm,” which is credited as a solo album, something she somewhat regrets. “My work has always been the same,” she says. “Mainly, I was tired of trying to justify that I work with the band, because every time I put a record out, everyone says, ‘Yeah, but it’s just you.’ “The thing is, I’ve always been a band person.” Currently, Hynde is working with producer Marius de Vries on a project that had been on the back burner for years. She classifies it as a “jazz/dub” album featuring cover songs, “but not standards,” she cautions, “and done with an orchestra and a jazz band; kind of a trance-y, dub thing.” She’s also writing songs with her guitarist James Walbourne for a new Pretenders album. “Really, I just keep doing the same thing,” she says. “But every day is different.” Hynde, 66, insists she’s at a good place in her life, “because I got my domestic stuff, like looking after the kids” — she has two daughters, both grown — “out of the way. So there’s a new freedom. And I quit smoking. Stuff like that makes me feel young again. “There’s all this stuff you get addicted to by the time you’re 30, and you get till you’re 50 to start thinking, ‘I’m really in bad shape.’ Then you have another 20 years to figure it out. And that’s where I’m at. And I did figure it out, and I feel (expletive) great.” WHAT The Pretenders • WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $29.50-$129.50 • MORE INFO Ticketmaster.com

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P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S


The People’s Key

Q&A ▼

The People’s Key is ‘Unlocking Doors’ BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

PHOTO: HANDOUT

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t. Louis band the People’s Key, known for performing music and releasing albums that are jazzy-soul twists on the music of Michael Jackson, Jay Z, the Beatles, Pink Floyd and Jimi Hendrix, switches gears on its new album. “Unlocking Doors” is the first People’s Key album of original music. “We call this a feelgood album,” says Ryan Marquez (organ, bass, keyboards). He’s joined in the band by Matt Rowland (guitar), Charlie Cerpa (saxophone) and Mike Murano (drums). “We love groups like Snarky

kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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Puppy and Hiatus Kaiyote, Kamasi Washington, Robert Glasper. We put all of that into the sound.” Q • How would you describe the tunes on “Unlocking Doors?” A • There’s really a marriage between jazz and funk, different aspects and flavors, a bit of everyone’s influences in the band. There’s a lot of love in the group for that funky New Orleans, the Meters, Dumpstaphunk vibe going on. The culture of St. Louis is rich in funk and blues, so you can hear a lot of that. And being that we’ve played a lot of jazz and went to school for jazz, there’s things in there that are swinging. There’s also things that are a melting pot. You might hear some gospel or folk, or us doing things with odd time signatures. Q • How long has doing an all-original album been on the band’s bucket list? A • I think the seeds were always there, and the timing was right. Everyone in the band is really a writer and a leader in their own right, so it was always simmering underneath the surface. Matt presented tunes a couple of times to the band early on that we played at gigs, but it wasn’t the main focus. In the past few years, we’ve done tribute shows and theme shows and feel like we’ve established our brand. I had gone through a big creativity period with my own jazz trio

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(Ryan Marquez Trio) so I’d been writing more material. We had tunes sitting around that needed a home. We put our heads together and borrowed tunes from Matt’s catalog and things from the trio and things with People’s Key in mind. Q • What makes now the time to release an original album? A • The timing is right because a lot of the members in the group are involved in other projects with original flavor, and creativity is high. Right now in our community, there’s a lot of artists putting out more original content, and we wanted to be a part of that. Q • Does the album represent the band showing who it really is? A • I think we’re multifaceted. The idea (is to) connect the popular music of today in a jazzy way that inspires the next generation of listeners. Q • Will the People’s Key continue doing original music moving forward or is putting twists on others’ music still in the plans? A • It will be a combination of both, and we’ll do our best to let the audience know what it’s going to be. We definitely want to continue to enjoy arranging popular material. That’s still part of our mission. But we also want to slide our original music in there. Like a true jazz band, our players are open to the possibility that anything can happen. WHAT The People’s Key • WHEN 7:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE The Stage at KDHX, 3524 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $15 • MORE INFO ticketfly.com

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HOT HOT SUMMER SUMMER SAVINGS EVENT!!!

Don’t miss this chance to save throughout the store. Many mark downs have been taken to make way for incoming treasures! Plan to stay a while, much to see!!

287 Lamp and Lantern Village Town and Country, MO 63017 636-220-9092 • www.encorestl.net Open Monday-Friday 10am - 6pm Saturday 9am - 6pm • Sunday 11am - 4pm 8

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 07.13.18-07.19.18

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

Ron Jeremy

econd acts aren’t a given in the entertainment industry, especially when the first act is as an adult film superstar. But Ron Jeremy, part of the golden age of porn going back to the ’70s and ’80s and a Guinness Book of World Records holder for Most Appearances in Adult Films (over 2,000), has taken his fame into a different lane, this time as a stand-up comedian. He headlines the “XL Comedy Tour” coming to Fubar on Friday night. The comedy turn looks like an eyebrow raiser for many who didn’t know that’s where he is these days. But Jeremy’s interest in comedy actually goes back to when he was 18 and performing on stages in the Catskill Mountains, where Lenny Bruce, Rodney Dangerfield and Jackie Mason performed. This was all before the adult film industry was even a thought for him. “I would go up there on stage at night, for the late late night crowd, do my schtick and it worked out great. I would watch the other comedians and it looked like a lot of fun,” says Jeremy. (Last week, Jeremy was the subject of

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kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

a sexual assault lawsuit filed by a Washington state woman. She sued after local authorities decided not to file criminal charges against him. Jeremy says his hands are clean in this situation, and if she wants to continue pursuing it, “what are you gonna do?”) After his initial stabs at comedy as a teenager, Jeremy was advised by his father to figure out a plan B with his life in case comedy didn’t work out. He worked as a school teacher and did an unsuccessful stint Off Broadway before conquering adult films. Even during that latter period, which enabled him to release his memoir “Ron Jeremy: The Hardest (Working) Man in Showbiz” (2007) and star in the documentary “Porn Star: The Legend of Ron Jeremy” (2001), he never forgot his comedy roots. Still, he recognizes there’s a certain stigma that comes with being an adult film star and then wanting to cross over into general entertainment. “There’s sometimes a little stigma, but it didn’t affect anything. It made some people want to check out the show,” says

Jeremy, who opened for Gabriel Iglesias recently. “It was great, and it was nerve wracking. I tried to make Spanish jokes. It wasn’t easy. But I did OK,” he says. He also says he once managed to impress Sinbad. They ran into each other at one of Sinbad’s gigs. “He said he heard I was doing comedy, and told me to hit him with something. I gave him one of my good ones, a circumcision joke. He said I was funny. He was very sweet.” He adds, “I’m not trying to brag, but my fans are very happy. I’ve never had a complaint once, which I’m surprised.” Jeremy says he does comedy five or six months out of the year, “getting more work than I want.” Jeremy, who calls Andrew Dice Clay a friend as well as the late comedian Sam Kinison, says one of his biggest comedy influences is Charlie Chaplin for his timing. Jeremy is looking forward to returning to St. Louis, which could include a stop at Blueberry Hill, where he says “the legends play.” But there’s a particular piece of history here dating to 2004 he mentions first — a commercial he shot to promote an appearance at adult business Very Intimate Playthings. The commercial parodied Becky’s Carpet & Tile Superstore, and it didn’t go over well. “Becky was annoyed at the satire.” WHAT “XL Comedy Tour” featuring Ron Jeremy, Peter Daniels, Brandon Judd, Max Price • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Fubar, 3108 Locust Street • HOW MUCH $18-$22 • MORE INFO ticketfly.com

@kevincjohnson

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P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

Offering home decor worthy of a repeat performance...

Former adult film star Jeremy crosses over to comedy


Now Open! Free admission

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The Muny Archive

Forest Park • 314.746.4599 • mohistory.org

HIDDEN FIGURES

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THE NEVERENDING STORY

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$67.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

The Firebird ticketfly.com

Bettye LaVette

Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com • Bettye LaVette, 8 p.m. Nov. 2, $35$37.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • The Glorious Sons, 8 p.m. Sept. 24, $12-$15. • Joey Gracetta, 7 p.m. Oct. 20, $43.50 with VIP options available, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Duck Room at Blueberry Hill ticketmaster.com

• Local H: The Pack Up the Cats Tour, 8 p.m. Oct. 14, $15-$18, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Off Broadway • JD McPherson (and his band), 8 p.m. Sept. 14, $20.

• David Cook, 8 p.m. Oct. 25, $18-$29.

• Melodime, 8 p.m. Oct. 26, $15.

Enterprise Center (formerly Scottrade Center) livenation.com • Twenty One Pilots’ “The Bandito Tour, 7 p.m. Oct. 19, $36.50-$76.50, on sale at 10 a.m. July 20.

Event Center at River City Casino ticketmaster.com • Charlie Daniels Band, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 4, $37.50-

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• Never Shout Never, 8 p.m. Sept. 23, $25.

• Strung Out, MakeWar, 8 p.m. Aug. 23, $18-$20, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

• Rozwell Kid, Prince Daddy and the Hyenas, 8 p.m. Nov. 13, $12-$14

VANS WARPED TOUR• JULY 3 • HOLLYWOOD CASINO AMPHITHEATRE 1 Audreona Johnson and Lars Simpson, both of Republic, Mo. 2 From left: Tierney Carron, Hannah Berg and Casara Heaton, all of St. Louis 3 Baylea Gregory of Fulton and Kale Russum of Columbia, Mo. 4 Colin Houghland and Michelle Woodside, both of Pinckneyville, Ill. 5 Jairamy and Christina Loyd of Herrin, Ill. 6 David Mangum and Hailey Guffy, both of Louisville, Ky. EVANESCENCE • JULY 7 • HOLLYWOOD CASINO AMPHITHEATRE 7 Ellyn Grassmuck (left) of Chicago and Madison Everson of St. Louis 8 Kayla Ferguson (left) and Kerston Walsh, both of Collinsville 9 Courtney Brooks (left) and Sarah Davis, both of St. Charles 10 Echo Adhikari of Maryland Heights and Jack Vaughan of Mehlville 11 Ciara Bohlen (left) of St. Peters and Danielle Ulinski of Litchfield 12 Samantha Heberer (left) of Overland and Haley Patterson of Florissant

etix.com

• Los Straitjackets, 8 p.m. Oct. 25, $20.

• Slothrust, 8 p.m. Oct. 19, $16, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

• Black Moth Super Rainbow, 8 p.m. Nov. 1, $17$20, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

• Joe Pera, Jo Firestone, Connor O’Malley, Dan Licata, 8 p.m. Aug. 8, $15.

• Sunflower Bean, 8 p.m. Sept. 23, $12-$15, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

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• The Spill Canvas, Punchline, Selfish Things, 8 p.m. Sept. 29, $16-$18, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

SEEN ON THE SCENE

Old Rock House metrotix.com

• Old Salt Union, 9 p.m. Sept. 15, $15-$18.

The Pageant ticketmaster.com • Henry Rollins’ “Travel Slideshow 2018,” 8 p.m. Oct. 2, $29.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Tall Heights, Old Sea Brigade, Frances Cone, 8 p.m. Oct. 23, $14-$16, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday

Peabody Opera House ticketmaster.com

P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( S E E N ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( L AV E T T E )

TICKET TRACKER

• Vince Gill, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16, $56.50-$72, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday.

The Ready Room ticketfly.com • An Evening with Shelby Lynne, 8 p.m. Aug. 24, $32-$35, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Find more photos from these events and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/photos

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THE BLENDER ▼

God’s Chosen

Album’s success stuns God’s Chosen

PHOTO: AG PHOTOGRAPHY

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

Three albums deep into its recording career, St. Louisrooted gospel group God’s Chosen has landed a milestone — a hit album on Billboard’s Top Gospel Albums chart. God’s Chosen’s Zebrina Anderson, Nikeisha Whittier and Sarah Benibo landed at No. 11 with their new selftitled album. It’s the first Billboard chart placement for the group (also known as GC3). Anderson was so shocked with disbelief she went to this week’s Billboard chart online to see for herself. “I said, ‘Let me verify this,’” she says. “I’m in awe and just grateful. People don’t have to support us. People don’t have to listen to our music.” Benibo, who now lives in Dallas (her group mates are in St. Louis), says the accomplishment feels surreal, coming after “1&6” in 2013 and “Love Ever After” in 2006. “It’s not like it’s our first album. We love those other albums. Now we’re on the third album, which we thought was another good album, but national attention? Whoa. That’s different. It feels unreal,” she says. Whittier says the group has always been excited about its music and prospects, though “sometimes it doesn’t go as far as you think. We wrote songs from the heart last time and just knew it was going to happen. We’re excited people are recognizing the songs, but God has been good to us from the first album. And it’s really about timing, God’s timing, what God

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wants us to do and where he wants us to go next.” Anderson says the group never put making the Billboard charts on its bucket list, but “we know those are the things that can come along. We define success in different ways — being booked, traveling, Stellar Awards ... hint hint.” Benibo also notes that new partnerships with G. Favored Entertainment in conjunction with Dream Gospel/Capitol Christian Distribution are a huge boost. They describe the album as an acoustic-laced praise and worship album centered around the Children of Israel’s experiences, which the group says are “models for all believers why we are God’s chosen people.” Award-winning gospel producer Ayron Lewis and contemporary Christian music producer and artist John Strandell worked on the album, which marries the gospel sound with contemporary Christian music. Bringing the two together is something the group sought, wanting to kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

present something as inclusive as possible. “We have relationships with multiple types of people from all types of life. We want our music to be able to be performed at any church, be easily taught and to be reflective of what we love,” says Whittier. Their songs work not only for various churches, but they also work for the group’s members, who are worship leaders at different churches. Anderson says they sat with their producers to write, thinking “we want people to be able to worship together.” Among the songs of interest on the 10-track album, “We’re Ready” is a favorite “for the way it feels,” Anderson says. “We’re talking about sending a revival to our city and healing a nation.” Benibo turns to “Redeemed,” repackaged and revamped from an earlier God’s Chosen album. “I love the direction we went. We got what we wanted in terms of instrumentation, and it’s the perfect song as far as a worship song that gets everyone involved.” God’s Chosen unveiled the album in June at Grace Church in Maryland Heights. “We were up in the green room, and we could hear our producer, John, our opening act, and the crowd was so ready. We came out in the dark, and as soon as we came out everyone was already on their feet,” Whittier says. “They stayed the entire concert. It was a wonderful experience, just what we wanted. We had people from different churches, different races, people we didn’t know.”

stltoday.com/blender

Friday, July 13 6 to 11 PM Historic Downtown Maplewood

L I V E A RT ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC CityOfMaplewood.com

@kevincjohnson

INSTRUMENT RENTAL 10% OFF! • Largest assortment of marching band instruments • Rent by day, month, or year available

6235 N liNdbergh blvd. • Hazelwood, Mo 63042

314-764-2222 07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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STLTODAY.COM/ARTS ▼

A new dimension of art comes to the Magic House Steven Walden of High Ridge hopes to inspire families with a 3D painting demonstration BY DYLAN KIEFER | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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ibrant bursts of color, pop culture icons and St. Louis landmarks inform Steven Walden’s signature painting

style — and some of those colors even seem to jump off the paper. If the viewer is wearing 3D glasses, that is. This weekend, the local artist will bring a 3D painting demonstration to the Magic House. The drop-in event is free with museum admission.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 07.13.18-07.19.18

Any 3D image can be magical, but the real magic of Walden’s paintings is that you can enjoy them with or without 3D glasses. They simply shift your perception of color. “The technique I use is called ChromaDepth,” Walden, who lives in High Ridge, explains. “It’s based around color rather than overlaying images like in 3D movies. Without glasses, the art looks normal.” ChromaDepth glasses are patented. Unlike many professional artists, Walden’s passion for painting began later in his life. While attending graduate school at Webster University with

WHAT 3D Painting With Steven Walden • WHEN 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday • WHERE The Magic House, 516 South Kirkwood Road • HOW MUCH Free with museum admission • MORE INFO 314-822-8900; magichouse.org

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PHOTO: BRENDAN JOYCE

Artist Steven Walden

the hope of becoming a therapist, Walden, now 43, took an art therapy class for fun and discovered a hidden talent. It was an accident that changed his life. “I was going through a tough time when I started painting,” Walden says. “I was broke, recently divorced and extremely depressed. My art reflected those feelings.” One day, Walden decided he was fed up with being sad, so he went to an art store and bought every color he thought a happy person would paint with. “I adopted the mantra ‘fake it until you make it,’ and I painted joyful moments with joyful colors. It pulled me out of my depression and into a passion for helping people.” After graduate school, Walden went straight into a professional art career and used his creations, often of sports figures, to help others. He is proud of his charity work, which raised almost $200,000 in bids for groups such as Make-A-Wish and the Muscular Dystrophy Association. His next steps are performance art and public speaking. Walden hopes his 3D painting workshop will help children perceive themselves as artists. “I want to instill wonder in the kids by merging art with science,” Walden says. “I hope they leave the workshop feeling as though they have permission to be artists.”


Presented by ALTON LITTLE THEATER

Box Office 618-462-3205 • altonlittletheater.org • Metrotix, too!

Mark Ballas in “Jersey Boys” at the Muny.

‘H.M.S. Pinafore’ WHEN Through Saturday • WHERE Union Avenue Christian Church, 733 North Union Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30 to $55 • MORE INFO 314-361-2881; unionavenueopera.org

“Pinafore” is 140 years old and still timelessly delightful. The Gilbert and Sullivan operetta

poking fun at the melodramas of the day and a few cherished British institutions abounds in tonguein-cheek silliness, which is played to the hilt by Union Avenue Opera. The voices are all strong and sturdy, with Leann Schuering a standout as the innocent Josephine and fine work from the chorus. BY DANIEL NEMAN

‘Jersey Boys’ WHEN 8:15 p.m. nightly, through Monday • WHERE The Muny, 1 Theatre Drive, Forest Park • HOW MUCH $15-$100, plus the free seats • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

“Jersey Boys,” about Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons, is the kind of show that’s made for the Muny, the first theater to stage the Tony-winning musical since Broadway. It’s filled with songs we

already know and tells a compelling story with heart. Mark Ballas (“Dancing With the Stars”) as Frankie leads a powerhouse cast that also includes Nicolas Dromard as songwriting prodigy Bob Gaudio. BY GABE HARTWIG

Liberty Bank Amphitheater

Find more events and performances in our new calendar. stltoday.com/events

Go Wild With Missouri Natives Looking for a specific cuisine, price range or location? Check Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s guide to essential St. Louis restaurants.

Saturday, August 18th, 2018 Showtime 7:00pm

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

eNewsletters Dining & Entertainment

dining g& entertainment

RECENTLY REVIEWED THEATER

What’s happening in St. Louis? We tell you where to go, o, how to get there and what to eat. • Feast • Let’s Eat • Contests & Promotions • Go! Sneak Peek • Go! Movie Lounge Native plants require less water, less fertilizer and less work, yet reward you with luscious gardens overflowing with blossoms spring till frost.

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Over 2,000 varieties of plants 1011 N. Woodlawn • Kirkwood, MO 314-965-3070

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VOTED #1 BEST GARDEN CENTER stltoday.com/go

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Saturdays, at 6:30

Thursday, July 26th

| SOUNDS OF SUMMER | See our summer line-up!

| MOVIES UNDER THE STARS

Bring your friends and family to one of the area’s best outdoor venues and enjoy the sounds of regional and national acts performing onstage at the beautiful Chesterfield Amphitheater. Featured acts begin at 7:30 pm. and opening acts start at 6:45 pm. Grab a fixed seat or bring a blanket or a chair for lawn seating; any way you choose there’s not a bad seat in the house!

Experience the unique atmosphere of watching a movie outdoors on the giant inflatable screen at the Chesterfield Amphitheater! A perfect FREE family event for all ages! There is a combination of fixed and lawn seating. Bring your own blankets for lawn seating in the grass areas. You can bring your own refreshments and the concession stand will be open during the movie (NO GLASS, please). A tobacco-free facility.

Chesterfield Amphitheater - 631 Veterans Place Dr. St. Louis, Chesterfield, MO 63017

Chesterfield Amphitheater - 631 Veterans Place Dr. St. Louis, Chesterfield, MO 63017

www.chesterfieldamphitheater.com/FREE-Sounds-of-Summer-Concert-Series.html

www.chesterfieldamphitheater.com/detail.html?event_id=299

Saturday, August 6th

Saturday, July 14th - 6pm

| FAMILY FUN DAY AT THE BALLPARK

| PETTY CASH JUNCTION | Free!

Bring the family out for a day of summer fun before the school year begins! For more details about the event, visit chesterfield.mo.us. We will feature the amazing Safety Zone brought to you by the Monarch Fire Dept. and Chesterfield Police Dept.. Plan for an exciting day of sports, games, and crafts while also exploring the Safety Zone. Our baseball fields will have filled such as knocker ball, wiffleball, inflatables, kickball, and much more.

Fantastic Tom Petty / Johnny Cash Tribute - Sing along to the hits you love! Bring your friends and family to to the beautiful Chesterfield Amphitheater. Each concert will feature PM BBQ and select Food Trucks with dessert options. The bar will have an extended drink menu, as well. Our opening acts, Big Rigs start at 6:30 p.m. Featured acts at 7:30 p.m. Grab a fixed seat, bring a blanket or a chair for lawn seating;

Chesterfield Valley Athletic Complex - 17925 N Outer 40 Rd., Chesterfield, MO 63017

Chesterfield Valley Athletic Complex - 17925 N Outer 40 Rd., Chesterfield, MO 63017

www.chesterfield.mo.us/family-fun-day-at-the-ballpark.html

www.chesterfieldamphitheater.com/detail.html?event_id=304

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 07.13.18-07.19.18

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Gabe Sheets, 16, directed the short film ‘Fugue’ that includes scenes of the Old Post Office building in downtown St. Louis.

P H O T O : R O B E R T C O H E N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

FUTURE FILMMAKERS ST. LOUIS-AREA TEENS PRODUCE RECORD NUMBER OF FILMS FOR SHOWCASE BY AISHA SULTAN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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ost teenagers will make a plan to go to the movies this summer. • A few local teens decided to make the movies instead. • They were part of a record number of submissions in the St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase, which shows films written, edited, directed or produced by St. Louis-area residents. The event will show documentaries, shorts, features and experimental films over two weekends this month at Brown Hall on the Washington University campus. ➦

07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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NOW, “THINGS THAT COME ON A STANDARD PHONE ARE GOOD ENOUGH TO LOOK GOOD ON A BIG SCREEN.” CHRIS CLARK, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR OF CINEMA ST. LOUIS

rant with this teenager and talk about films with him, and it was like talking to an adult,” Weed says. “You realize he’s a kid when you have to drive him home.” When Gabe asked him to work on his short, Weed believed Gabe could pull it off. “Working with him personally was good because he always kept his cool and always kept his focus. But the shoot was grueling. Everything that could go wrong, did. The weather was hot. There was unexpected noise. Equipment failed. The logistics of the shoot were incredibly difficult. But, he finished it and did it with quality.” Directors have to make snap creative decisions in the heat of the moment. It can be an overwhelming experience for an adolescent. We talked to Gabe and each of the teen filmmakers involved in the St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase about how they did it and what they learned.

JARED GOUDSMIT

P H O T O S : A L L F I L M S C R E E N S H O T S C O U R T E S Y O F C I N E M A S T. L O U I S

A jury selected 107 out of 141 films that were submitted, according to Chris Clark, artistic director of Cinema St. Louis. It was the largest number of submissions in the showcase’s 18-year history, which will also feature a record number of teenage filmmakers. Clark was impressed by the quality of the projects the teens submitted. “It wasn’t just a phone in my backyard. It was way more sophisticated than that,” he said. He recalls a time when movies could only be made on cost-prohibitive film. Now, “things that come on a standard phone are good enough to look good on a big screen.” Plus, the YouTube generation has grown up knowing anyone can create video. Making a quality film — even a short — is an entirely different endeavor. Wyatt Weed, a partner in Pirate Production, a video production company in St. Charles, has more than 30 years of experience. He agreed to serve as first assistant director in Gabe Sheets’ first film, which he shot when he was 15. Gabe was 13 or 14 when Weed met him. “I could sit in a restau-

Age • 17 Hometown • Kirkwood; senior at Kirkwood High School Film title and logline • “Diluted Fear.” Four psychopathic murderers must overcome their personal differences to succeed as a team. Run time • 4 minutes 59 seconds How long was production • We had one day of writing, two days of filming; and a few two-hour periods of editing. The four to five days of work were spread over two months when everyone could get together.

Budget • None. The costumes came out of my closet. We wrote the script based around what we had. Cast and crew • 4 actors and 4 crew members How many films made

prior to this • I’ve been making films since eighth grade. I’ve probably made eight decent to good ones. They’ve been accepted into 49 festivals, the majority of which were free to enter.

Earlier this year, we won best student film at the Kansas City Film Festival. When I was around 11 years old, I made a stop-motion animation video called “Superpig” about a super hero pig.

Social media • @Jared. Goudsmit on Instagram Future career goals • I’m nervous about pursuing film school. It’s a risk, so I’m undecided about my future career right now. Filmmaking

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GABE SHEETS Age • 16 Hometown • Lake Saint Louis; freshman at St. Charles Community College Title and logline • “Fugue.” Daniel suffers amnesia after a violent car accident. This leaves him to uncover who he really is amid a mess of contradictory evidence that appears to link him to criminal behavior. As he races to put the puzzle back together while fleeing police, Daniel discovers that without a past, his

is fun even if nothing professionally comes of it. Lesson learned • I learned quite a bit about scriptwriting. This script is very talky, which works better in theater. In film, it can get boring. The actors made it very entertaining despite my script, not because of it. Describe a challenging moment while making this film • On the second day, we were so close to getting it wrapped up. It was near the festival deadline, and we only had one day left to film. We had a drone shot, and we wanted it to be sleeklooking. It was very windy, and the drone was having difficulty staying still. A lot of footage was looking jittery. We just needed two to four seconds. The wind blew the drone into a tailspin. The wind spun it in a smooth fashion. The trees were spinning. It ended up becoming the title shot. I think it’s the best shot in the film. And it was a total accident.

reality begins to fall apart. Run time • 30 minutes 30 seconds How long was production • We shot for eight days in June, pre-production was scattered over two years; post-production was over a year. I wrote the screenplay in January 2016 when I was 13. Budget • $12,000 (Mostly funded by his parents, partly funded by a job.) Cast and crew • Up to 100 people How many films made prior to this • I have

directed and written shorts that I posted on YouTube. This is the first to be shown at a festival. Social media • @ gabe_sheets on Instagram Future career goals • I want to write and direct studio films in LA. Lesson learned • Perseverance. It’s a neverending battle getting a film done. When you think you have a film done, you still have another 100 miles to walk. And there’s so much insecurity that comes with a creative medium, trying to

lead more than 100 people toward a single vision, you have to get over the insecurity and push through. I was 15 when I was directing. For me, $12,000 is a lot of money, and we only had 8 days to get it right. As soon as the filming is done, it’s all going to fall on my shoulders. Describe a challenging moment while making this film • That was about every day on set. The first day went amazing. I was overjoyed with what directing felt like. Then Day 2 came around. Both actors showed up unprepared.

SHANE DIONEDA Age • 19 Hometown • Webster Groves; sophomore at Columbia College in Chicago Film title and logline • “2.0.” An old custodian robot encounters his new replacement in this animated short. Run time • 3 minutes 20 seconds How long was production • Approximately two months Budget • $50 Cast and crew • 2 people How many films made prior to this • I had made films for high school, maybe

It was a very big dialogue scene, and I had seven shots planned. I realized that I was not going to get all my shots. I saw how easy it is for a movie to go from very good to very bad just from the decision making. I went home that night, and I was super stressed about how it was going to cut together. The next day was Day 3, and I had a full panic attack about going on set. I tried to my best to keep it under wraps and take a moment to breathe in between takes. It can make you insecure, but it builds your confidence, too.

four or five shorts. This is the first to be shown at a festival. Social media • @shaneedioneda on Instagram Future career goals • To get a degree focusing on visual effects, minoring in animation. My goal is to work at a post-production house on visual effects. Lesson learned • Animation takes a lot of patience. It’s not a fast process, and you have to take your time. Describe a challenging moment while making this film • With 3D animation, rendering everything and exporting animation can take a really long time. I only had a laptop. It would have taken months to render it all. I found an online service that uses cloud rendering. That’s where I spent my $50. I was able to render the animation over the internet, and it took about a week.

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SEAN KIM Age • 17 Hometown • Clayton; senior, Clayton High School Title and logline • “Farm 2029.” In a future where crops have become inedible, two brothers must scavenge in rural Missouri to survive. Run time • 8 minutes How long was production • We spent three weeks of writing, on and off; one day shooting; and five days editing. In all, it took about a month. Budget • $300 Cast and crew • 8 people How many films made prior to this • We’ve

made about 30 skits, PSAs in a video production program. This is my first serious film. Social media • @ SeenKim on Instagram Future career goals • I know film isn’t realistic. It’s kind of risky. It’s definitely something I would pursue alongside something else. My parents want me to go the practical route, maybe medical school. I would do filmmaking on the side. Lesson learned • Take your time. We had to shoot it all in one day. Describe a challenging moment while making this film • During shooting, for two-thirds of the time, it was going really well. During the last third, one of our key actors had to leave. We had to rush through an important action scene that we had planned for and was really complicated to do. It was definitely something pretty stressful. ➦

WHAT St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase • WHEN Friday to Sunday, July 13—July 15; and July 20-22; the teen showcase is 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE Brown Hall, Washington University, Centennial Greenway • HOW MUCH $13 per screening block • MORE INFO 314-2894150, cinemastlouis.org/st-louis-filmmakers-showcase

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STEPHEN AND JOSEPH TRONICEK Age • 18 (fraternal twins) Hometown • Maplewood; Stephen is a sophomore at Webster University; Joseph is a sophomore at St. Louis Community College at Meramec Title and logline • “The Lullaby.” A man must protect his dying wife from creatures that come to take her away. Run time • 7 minutes 41 seconds How long was production

• We started planning in January and shot over two days in March. Post production took two months mainly because of sound and color grading. It took four months from start to finish. Budget • $350 Cast and crew • 4 in cast; 15 in crew How many films made prior to this one • None Social media • @stronicek on Twitter Future career goals • We want to write and make movies. We love the idea of putting people in a dark room and having them feel some sort of catharsis. Lesson learned • Stephen: If you are going to do a lowbudget movie, it’s better if you don’t have a constantly moving camera because of the length of time it takes

to get specific shots and the amount of precision that is needed. Joey: Storyboards are your best friend when planning. You have the movie planned out in front of you. Describe a challenging moment when making this film • Stephen: We got to midnight on the first night of shooting and realized we didn’t have what we needed. We were there until 2 a.m. I remember feeling overwhelmed the moment I realized we weren’t getting what we needed, but I let it go because it was my first time directing. Joey: When I had to tell people when were going to have to redo a shot. Thankfully our crew was really cool with us, and they worked well. As directors, we tend to try to be pretty precise, because we have a clear vision in our heads.

ELEANOR LINHARDT Age • 13 Hometown • Creve Coeur; eighth grade, Parkway Northeast Middle School Title and logline • “The Ball.” A young girl learns a situation isn’t always what it seems. Run time • 3 minutes How long was production • We took a week to write it out, a day of

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filming then editing. It took about three weeks to complete the project from beginning to end. Budget • None Cast and crew • 7 people. My father directed the film. How many films made prior to this • This is my first. Social media • Private Future career goals • To become an actress. I always wanted to be an actress. I’m very passionate about it. Lesson learned • It’s a lot of hard work. This film was part of a school project. Describe a challenging moment while making this film • When we were writing the script, it was hard to come up with a problem in the story. And I had to turn it in by a certain time.

Age • 15 Hometown • Herculaneum; sophomore at Herculaneum High School Title and logline • “The Reckoning.” A Star Wars fan film in which the sith kills the jedi’s kindred soul and comes to finish the job and takes on more than he can handle. Run time • 6 minutes 30 seconds How long was production • We filmed for 24 days over six months, mostly on weekends. We shot at Elephant Rocks State Park, which is an hour and a half hour away. It took about a year from concept to creation. Budget • Less than $200 Cast and crew • 5 people. My father shot the entire film on his drone. How many films made prior to this • Nothing to this level. I was making smaller films with friends. Back when I was 11, I entered a horror short in the

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Maxwell Tippetts, second entry

Dave Glover Halloween film festival, and it made it into the finals. Social media • @itsstrips_ on Instagram Future career goals • I want to be a film director. Lesson learned • For bigger projects, you’ll need a lot more help and you can’t do

everything on your own. Describe a challenging moment while making this film • I felt overwhelmed when I was editing. I was editing all these special effects. It was so tedious and taking so long, I almost ended up scrapping the film, but I finally ended up finishing.

Title and logline • “Valentine’s Promise.” Glen and Dakota’s Valentine plans end abruptly, so they make a promise for next year. Run time • 7 minutes How long was production • Three months. I wrote an outline and brought in a writer to write the script. We shot the film in six days. Budget • $500 Cast and crew • Up to 15 people Have you made any film prior to this • “The Reckoning.” Lesson learned • You

need a lot more people to make better quality films. This second film is better than my first. It has more emotional appeal. I directed, edited and scored the music. Describe a challenging moment while making this film • There was a point when we were supposed to be inside a location, and at the last minute they said we could only shoot outside the location. But we made it work. It was in a florist shop. We rewrote the scene. So instead of him buying the flowers, we show him outside with the flowers already.

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STLTODAY.COM/MOVIES ▼

‘Skyscraper’ hits the height of absurdity Action flick that’s a ‘Die Hard’ wannabe squanders the charm of Dwayne Johnson ★★ BY CALVIN WILSON | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ill Sawyer (Dwayne Johnson) lost a career as a special ops agent — and a leg — when he misjudged a hostage situation. But he gained a wife and family, and a new calling: Working as a security consultant. And his

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expertise has not gone unnoticed. Prevailing over formidable competition, Will won the contract to ensure the safety and security of the Pearl, a Hong Kong skyscraper three times the height of the Empire State Building. He’s a bit nervous about meeting with billionaire Zhao Long Ji (Chin Han), the building’s owner. But with the support of spouse Sarah (Neve Campbell) and their two young

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children, Will musters the confidence. Zhao seems to be more than forthcoming about the building and its secrets. But he neglects to share information about his business dealings involving nasty individuals more than capable of taking the shine off the Pearl. The next thing Will knows, he’s fighting for the lives of his family, who are trapped inside the building as a good portion of it is engulfed in flames. And the police think that Will is responsible for the mayhem. Can he save Sarah and the kids? Or himself? “Skyscraper” clearly aspires to be a 21st-century update of “Die Hard” (1988), one of the best action thrillers ever made. Instead, it’s just another film that squanders the movie-star

charisma of Johnson, who should consider lending his box-office clout to more worthy projects. Working from his own screenplay, director Rawson Marshall Thurber (“Central Intelligence”) relies far too much on special effects that are so absurdly unconvincing that there’s never any sense of real danger. And unlike “Die Hard,” in which the late Alan Rickman delivered an iconic performance as the villainous Hans Gruber, “Skyscraper” lacks a memorable bad guy. None of this will probably matter to audiences who just want to see Johnson pretending to perform feats of heroism against a computer-generated background. But it should. WHAT “Skyscraper” • RUN TIME 1:42 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Gun violence and strong language

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

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Neve Campbell and Dwayne Johnson in “Skyscraper.”


Frank R. Reese Jr. is the proprietor of Good Shepherd Poultry Ranch, where he raises chickens and turkeys humanely.

Ericka Van Helsing (voiced by Kathryn Hahn) and Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) in “Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation.”

Documentary shows dark origins of our food ★★★ BY MICHAEL O’SULLIVAN WASHINGTON POST

here are many disturbing phrases bandied about in “Eating Animals,” the Natalie Portman-narrated documentary about the morality of meat-eating, based on the 2009 nonfiction bestseller by Jonathan Safran Foer. Some involve wonkspeak, such as “CAFO,” an acronym for “concentrated animal feeding operation.” (The name itself is less upsetting than the inhumane reality.) Others terms, such as “fecal marinade” — a reference to what one interview subject calls the PeptoBismol-pink “hog lagoons” that dot the countryside where pork is produced, and where lakes of animal waste bake in the sun — are simply disgusting. That visceral reaction,

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I suspect, will not be an uncommon one to this provocative — and ultimately persuasive — film, which aims to make viewers re-evaluate their relationship to carnivorism not merely by shocking, but by positing that there may be an ethical middle ground between vegan abolitionism and the mindless scarfingdown of burgers from factory-farmed cows. Reading sometimesportentous texts taken from Foer’s book, Portman, a vegan, is the main tour guide to this challenging excursion to the world of slaughterhouses and CAFOs, which one commentator likens to petri dishes for antibioticresistant bacteria. But it’s wordsmiths like that commentator and others who appear throughout

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent stltoday.com/go

the film (such as veterinarian and animalwelfare whistleblower Jim Keen, who once worked at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center) that make the film’s strongest and most eloquent points. At once a history and critique of American farming, as well as a philosophical examination of the potential for human kindness to trump our love of bacon, “Eating Animals,” at its core, poses two hard questions, the latter of which might seem intractable: “How did we get here?” and “How do we go somewhere else?” If you’re a barbecue lover with the stomach to see it, “Eating Animals” may not stop you from ordering the house special. But it could cause you to think twice about where those chicken wings — and those ribs, that brisket — came from. WHAT “Eating Animals” • RUN TIME 94 minutes • RATING Unrated • CONTENT Contains brief strong language and disturbing images of slaughterhouses and suffering animals.

‘Hotel Transylvania 3’ is a little short on the zing factor ★★★ BY RICK BENTLEY TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

t’s all about the zing. If you are not up on monster speak, the term zing refers to what happens once in the life of a vampire, mummy, werewolf, etc. It’s when they find the one true love in their life. In the case of “Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation,” Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) learns it’s possible to zing more than once as he meets a new once-in-a-lifetime love of his life during a monster sea cruise. While Dracula zings again, this third offering in the offbeat look at the world of ghouls and monsters doesn’t come close to having the same zing as the first or second offering. It’s fun, and director Genndy Tartakovsky (“The Powerpuff Girls”) knows

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how to keep the action moving because of his work in TV animation, but the change of approach when dealing with Dracula coupled with the setting switch leaves the production just a little light on zing. “Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation” picks up with the getaway destination for creatures doing booming business. Things are going so well that a break is needed and the group books passage on the first monster cruise, which will take them from the Bermuda Triangle to the found city of Atlantis. The trip becomes a monster version of “The Love Boat” as Dracula does what he thought was impossible: He falls in love again. The problem is she’s the last in the long line of Van Helsings, who have made it their life’s

work to kill Dracula. The most enjoyable part of the first two films was how every nerve in Dracula’s batty body was stretched to the limit by being a single father and grandfather. In “Hotel Transylvania,” the problem was that a human who had found the spa for the supernatural fell in love with Dracula’s daughter, Mavis (voiced by Selena Gomez). The follow-up film had Dracula and his buddies trying to bring out the monster in his half-human, halfvampire grandson as a way of keeping Mavis from leaving the hotel. The latest version, “Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation,” doesn’t suck. It is a visual splendor, from the fun way the creatures are portrayed to the pacing. Keeping Tartakovsky as director of all three films creates a fluid sense of comedy and look. WHAT “Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation” • RUN TIME 97 minutes • RATING PG • CONTENT action scenes, rude humor.

07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ ★★½ Lex Scott Davis in “The First Purge.”

R • 2:02 • Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro star in this inferior sequel to the 2015 action drama about government operatives bending the law at the U.S./ Mexico border. Directed by Stefano Sollima. CW

‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:15 • Alden Ehrenreich takes over from Harrison Ford as Han Solo in this unnecessary but fun space romp. With Donald Glover. Directed by Ron Howard. CW

‘Tag’ ★★½ R • 1:40 • Jon Hamm and Jeremy Renner star in this comedy about grown men who are still obsessed with the children’s game. Directed by Jeff Tomsic. STAR TRIBUNE

‘Truth or Dare’ ★½ ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ ★★★★

PG-13 • 1:58 • A vast improvement on “Ant-Man” (2015), this entertaining release starting Paul Rudd shows director Peyton Reed deftly balancing action and comedy. CALVIN WILSON

‘Action Point’ R • 1:25 • Johnny Knoxville stars as the proprietor of a safety-challenged theme park threatened by the arrival of a nearby mega-amusement park. With Chris Pontius, Dan Bakkedahl, Matt Schulze, Eleanor Worthington-Cox. Written by John Altschuler and Dave Krinsky; story by Knoxville, Derek Freda, Altschuler, Krinsky, Mike Judge. Directed by Tim Kirkby. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Adrift’ PG-13 • 2:00 • Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin star as a pair of bohemian lovers whose sailing adventure leads into a catastrophic hurricane. Written by Aaron Kandell, Jordan Kandell, David Branson Smith; based on a book by Tami Oldham Ashcraft with Susea McGearhart. Directed by Baltasar Kormakur. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘American Animals’ ★★ R • 1:56 • Bart Layton wrote and directed this crime drama (with true life link) about four guys planning to pull off a heist. With Blake Jenner and Ann Dowd. ASSOCIATED PRESS

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‘Avengers: Infinity War’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:29 • The superheroes must cope with a global existential threat in what’s said to be the penultimate film in the franchise. Thrilling but preposterous. Directed by Anthony and Joe Russo. CW

‘Black Panther’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 2:15 • Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan and Lupita Nyong’o star in this thrilling tale of an African king, his adventures and his adversaries. A huge step forward for black cinema and a terrific time at the movies. Directed by Ryan Coogler (“Creed”). CW

‘Book Club’ ★½ PG-13 • 1:44 • Jane Fonda and Diane Keaton deserve better than this anemic feature-length sitcom about a group of women who regularly gather to discuss a popular erotic novel. CW

‘Boundaries’ ★★ R • 1:44 • Proof indie flicks aren’t necessarily better than commercial fare, this offbeat comedy with Vera Farmiga and Christopher Plummer is painfully predictable. CW

‘Damsel’ ★½ R • 1:53 • Latest film from David and Nathan Zellner undermines its glib, winky self every step of the way in this “Feminism for Dummies, Old West edition” with Robert Pattinson and Mia Wasikowska. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Deadpool 2’ ★★★ R • 1:59 • Ryan Reynolds is back as the superantihero. Not as good as the original, but that’s to be expected. With Josh Brolin and Zazie Beetz. CW

‘The First Purge’ ★★½ R • 1:37 • The latest “Purge” is an erratic, fairly absorbing and righteously angry prequel to the politically pointed series written and produced by James DeMonaco. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘First Reformed’ ★★★½ R • 1:53 • Ethan Hawke is outstanding as a pastor facing a crisis of

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faith in this provocative and mesmerizing drama from writerdirector Paul Schrader (“American Gigolo”). CW

‘Hearts Beat Loud’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 1:37 • Nick Offerman is a guitar-playing record-store owner, and Kiersey Clemons is his daughter and reluctant bandmate in this funny, poignant ode to the liberating power of rock. Directed by Brett Haley. CW

‘Hereditary’ ★★★½ R • 2:07 • Toni Collette is attracting Oscar buzz for her performance in this horror flick about a cursed family. Directed by Ari Aster. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘The Incredibles 2’ ★★★½ PG • 1:58 • Holly Hunter and Catherine Keener are among the voice talent in this fine sequel to the 2004 film about a super-powered family. Directed by Brad Bird. CW

‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ ★★★½

PG-13 • 2:08 • Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard star in the latest installment of the long-

running dinosaur franchise. A solid adventure with plenty of thrills. Directed by J.A. Bayona. CW

‘Leave No Trace’ ★★★ PG • 1:49 • Tom (Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie) and her dad, Will (Ben Foster), are experts at living off the grid in this moody film directed by Debra Granik (“Winter’s Bone”). CW

‘Life of the Party’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:45 • Melissa McCarthy is the only reason to see this lackluster comedy about a mom who returns to college. Directed by Ben Falcone (“Tammy”). CW

‘Ocean’s 8’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:50 • Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett and Anne Hathaway star in this intermittently engaging but curiously joyless spinoff of the “Ocean’s” crime comedy franchise. Directed by Gary Ross. CW

‘A Quiet Place’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 1:30 • Emily Blunt and John Krasinski star in this tale of a family stalked by terrifying creatures. Horror of the first order. Directed by Krasinski. CW

‘RBG’ ★★★ PG • 1:37 • Betsy West and Julie Cohen directed this engrossing, entertaining and unabashedly adoring documentary about Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The Seagull’ ★½ PG-13 • 1:38 • Annette Bening and Saoirse Ronan can’t save this mediocre adaptation of Chekhov’s classic play. Directed by Michael Mayer. CW

‘Sherlock Gnomes’ PG • 1:26 • Garden gnomes Gnomeo and Juliet and their family and friends return, aided by the famous detective in this animated sequel. Voiced by James McAvoy, Emily Blunt, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Maggie Smith, Michael Caine, Johnny Depp. Directed by John Stevenson. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Show Dogs’ ★★½ PG • 1:30 • Will Arnett stars in this comedy about a cop and a Rottweiler who go undercover at a dog show. WASHINGTON POST

PG-13 • 1:40 • A humorless horror flick about college kids trapped in a deadly game. With Lucy Hale. Directed by Jeff Wadlow. WASHINGTON POST

‘Uncle Drew’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:43 • Charles Stone III directed this sports comedy about old-school streetball stars who reunite to compete in a tournament. With Lil Rel Howery (“Get Out”). TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Whitney’ ★★★ R • 2:02 • Documentary about singer Whitney Houston is full of big moments, some beautiful and some wretched. Directed by Kevin Macdonald. KEVIN C. JOHNSON

‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 1:34 • Morgan Neville directed this documentary about Fred Rogers and his children’s program, “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” Engaging and enlightening. CW Use our new calendar to find theaters and showtimes near you. stltoday.com/events

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Lakeith Stanfield (left) and Armie Hammer in “Sorry To Bother You.”

‘Sorry to Bother You’ is unapologetically brilliant ★★★★ BY CALVIN WILSON ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

assius “Cash” Green (Lakeith Stanfield) is so broke that he can only afford to put 40 cents’ worth of gas into the clunker that gets him to his job as a telemarketer. Stuck in a cubicle and surrounded by co-workers who are as desperate to land a sale as he is, his prospects for a better life look bleak. It doesn’t help that Cash is African-American. Just the sound of his voice prompts some prospective customers to hang up. So on the advice of a fellow telemarketer (Danny Glover), he tries a different approach. Instead of speaking naturally, Cash puts on his “white voice” (supplied

PHOTO: ANNAPURNA PICTURES

C

by comedian David Cross) and immediately begins to rack up previously unimaginable sales. In no time, Cash has joined the ranks of the “power callers” who have their own elevator. But the timing couldn’t be worse: His co-workers are on the verge of picketing the company, and his artist girlfriend Detroit (Tessa Thompson) is uncomfortable with the idea of sleeping with a sellout. Cash’s success earns him an introduction to Steve Lift (Armie Hammer), a high-rolling but morally problematic entrepreneur. Lift admires his style and offers him a unique but shocking business opportunity. That’s when things get really crazy. Subversive, irreverent

calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

@calvinwilsonstl

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent stltoday.com/go

and outrageously hilarious, “Sorry to Bother You” is arguably the first great comedy of the Trump era. Writerdirector Boots Riley incorporates elements of satire, science fiction and horror to create a film that’s as unpredictable as it is provocative. And with his hip-hop combo, the Coup, Riley has come up with a soundtrack that’s likely to be a huge hit in its own right. Stanfield, who played the character who yelled “Get out!” in “Get Out,” is perfectly cast as a guy who sincerely wants to get ahead but can’t help wrestling with his conscience. And Thompson (“Thor: Ragnarok”) turns in another firstrate performance. “Sorry to Bother You” is an uncompromising and timely film of unapologetic brilliance. WHAT “Sorry to Bother You” RUN TIME 105 minutes • RATING R • CONTENT Contains pervasive language, some strong sexual content, graphic nudity and drug use

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07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

23


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5. ‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’

Sony, $7,624,500, 3,055 locations, $2,496 average, $35,626,570, 2 weeks

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters July 6 through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by comScore:

1. ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ Disney, $75,812,205, 4,206 locations, $18,025 average, $75,812,205, 1 week

2. ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ Universal, $28,632,375, 4,349 locations, $6,584 average, $333,390,040, 3 weeks

3. ‘Incredibles 2’ Disney, $28,406,423, 4,113 locations, $6,906 average, $503,767,837, 4 weeks

4. ‘The First Purge’ Universal, $17,374,280, 3,031 locations, $5,732 average, $31,280,225, 1 week

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 07.13.18-07.19.18

6. ‘Uncle Drew’ Lionsgate, $6,606,643, 2,742 locations, $2,409 average, $29,930,263, 2 weeks.

7. ‘Ocean’s 8’ Warner Bros., $5,067,750, 2,604 locations, $1,946 average, $126,533,978, 5 weeks

8. ‘Tag’ Warner Bros., $3,029,790, 2,157 locations, $1,405 average, $48,255,471, 4 weeks

9. ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ Focus Features, $2,571,210, 893 locations, $2,879 average, $12,362,937, 5 weeks

10. ‘Deadpool 2’ 20th Century Fox, $1,675,074, 1,267 locations, $1,322 average, $314,546,474, 8 weeks

11. ‘Sanju’ Fox International Productions, $1,281,466, 359 locations, $3,570 average, $5,995,791, 2 weeks

12. ‘Whitney’ Roadside Attractions, $1,274,051, 451 locations, $2,825 average, $1,274,051, 1 week

13. ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’ Disney, $1,071,432, 778 locations, $1,377 average, $210,931,529, 7 weeks

14. ‘Hereditary’ A24, $1,025,174, 744 locations, $1,378 average, $41,885,804, 5 weeks

17. ‘Three Identical Strangers’ Neon Rated, $684,773, 51 locations, $13,427 average, $1,009,720, 2 weeks

18. ‘Superfly’ Sony, $626,383, 535 locations, $1,171 average, $19,834,783, 4 weeks

19. ‘Book Club’ Paramount, $433,208, 374 locations, $1,158 average, $67,172,334, 8 weeks

20. ‘Leave No Trace’ Bleecker Street, $403,010, 37 locations, $10,892 average, $781,675, 2 weeks ASSOCIATED PRESS

15. ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Disney, $936,335, 506 locations, $1,850 average, $674,865,809, 11 weeks

16. ‘Sorry to Bother You’ Annapurna Pictures, $727,266, 16 locations, $45,454 average, $727,266, 1 week

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

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Walk-through tours are $15 for adults and $5 for children 12 yrs. and younger. Bomber Flight Experiences in the B-17 or B-24 are $450. B-25 flights are $400. Get some “stick time” in the world’s greatest fighter! P-51 Mustang Flight Training: (Full Dual Control TF-51D Mustang fighter) are $2200 for a half hour or $3200 for a full hour. Call for flight reservations.

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For tickets and more info: www.STLtoday.com/ourevents 07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

25


Seth Green does double duty with ‘Misfits & Monsters’ Actor does it all, including the voices, in first episode of Bobcat Goldthwait’s series BY RICK BENTLEY | TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE (TNS)

obcat Goldthwait wasn’t thinking of Seth Green when he wrote “Bubba the Bear,” the opening episode of his new truTV anthology series, “Bobcat Goldthwait’s Misfits & Monsters.” The episode, which airs Wednesday, follows a voice-over actor who begins to question his career and sanity when his popular animated cartoon creation becomes his real-life stalker.

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That’s not a slight at Green. Goldthwait didn’t have anyone in mind for the eight scripts he wrote that will make up the series’ first season, which will feature a mashup of wildly different genres to tell stories with funny and creative twists. Once Green was cast, Goldthwait knew he had the right actor. “Seth is perfect because he’s so great with voices,” Goldthwait says. “I love that people don’t realize that he’s both voices. The fact that Seth is also a director meant he came with a lot of ideas.” The experience Green brings comes from all the acting the 44-year-old Philadelphia native has been doing since he was 7. Starring in the “Austin Powers” films plus roles in “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” “Dads” and “The Byrds of Paradise” have made him a familiar face, but Green has a far more extensive career as a voice actor with “Batman Beyond,” “Robot Chicken,” “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” and “Family Guy.” It’s not as easy to connect Green to the animated projects — unless you read the credits — because he does such a wide variety of voices. In the case of Bubba the Bear, who sounds like a love child of Porky Pig and one of the

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 07.13.18-07.19.18

performers in Disneyland’s Country Bear Jamboree, the right sound came after long talks between Green and Goldthwait. “We had a phone conversation and Bobcat said he liked that the character would have a stutter, but we talked in detail about what kind of stutter he would have,” Green says. “I have found that animated characters who stutter are borderline offensive to people who have a stutter. “That’s why you see the pain Bubba is going through when he tries to speak.” Green has long wanted to work with Goldthwait and once he landed the role, found the process as enjoyable an experience as he could have imagined, describing the filming as having a “summer camp vibe.” Green points out one big reason for that came from Goldthwait having such a clear vision and a willingness to listen to and use ideas from his actors. Joining Green as guest stars throughout the first season are Michael Ian Black, Bridget Everett, Dave Foley, Melissa Joan Hart, David Koechner and Danny Pudi. Another reason Green enjoyed working on “Misfits & Monsters” is he grew

PHOTO: TRUTV

Seth Green in “Bobcat Goldthwait’s Misfits & Monsters” on TruTV.

up a big fan of anthology shows, including “The Twilight Zone,” “Amazing Stories” and “Friday the 13th.” His love of a collection of stories presented under one banner was another reason he jumped at the chance to do the series. Goldthwait promises Green if there are future seasons of the show, he will bring him back the way William Shatner starred in more than one episode of “The Twilight Zone.” There’s no guarantee Green would get to do another episode that features him playing both a live-action character and voicing an animated one. Either way, Green is always just happy to get to continue the career he started decades ago. “I definitely enjoy performing in all mediums,” Green says. “Voice-over acting has you working with two other performers. You provide the voice and then someone else designs the character you play. And, another person animates that character so you all have to be together. If you are thinking of yourself as anything else but that team, you may be misguided. “As an actor, you make the whole thing with your face and your feelings.” “Bubba the Bear” is the story of an actor who’s so closely associated with a character that he can’t escape it. Goldthwait didn’t realize when he was writing the script that the tale could be autobiographical because he’s so closely associated with the loud and frantic persona he plays on stage and screen. The characters always with Green are Scott Evil from the “Austin Powers” films or Oz from his werewolf days on “Buffy.” Unlike his character in the anthology episode, Green never has had a problem with being approached by those who want to talk about Scott or any other character he has played. “To have someone remember a character you have played is wonderful,” Green says. “You should enjoy the fact that the one thing you set out to do worked, and the audience liked it. People who watched ‘Buffy’ when they were young are now showing it to their kids and sharing that experience.” WHAT “Bobcat Goldthwait’s Misfits & Monsters” WHEN 9 p.m. Wednesday WHERE truTV

stltoday.com/go


Sarah Ramos and Francois Arnaud in “Midnight, Texas.”

TV Q&A ▼

Q • My question is not so much an entertainment question as a technical one. When a movie has the actors in a car, the glass seems so clear — no streaks, etc. How do they do this? I would sure love to get the glass in my car to look that good.

PHOTO: NBC

A • While you can find some complicatedsounding explanations, independent filmmaker J.R. Bookwalter says the answer is “an easy one, and fairly inexpensive, too.” The man behind the classic “The Dead Next Door” and many other movies says the process “just requires a polarizing filter on the camera lens, which does all kind of cool things like remove glare and reflections from windows as well as increase contrast in the sky. Similar technology is used in modern eyeglasses to cut down on glare.” Q • Can you tell me if “Midnight, Texas,” will be back? I love the books and was really enjoying the show.

stltoday.com/go

A • The series based on the books by Charlaine Harris begins its second season Oct. 26. There will be some changes. Sarah Ramos and Yul Vazquez, who co-starred in the first season, will not be regulars in the second. They may be back as guest stars. The series will also have new showrunners in Eric Charmelo and Nicole Snyder, who had been consulting producers on the first season. Q • Please let CBS know that there are many followers for “Code Black,” and we will be heartbroken if it is canceled. It is such a good show and the thought of it being canceled is so sad. A • Sorry, but I must break your heart. The series is coming to an end, with the finale set for Wednesday. But the show will try to wrap things up in that last episode. Showrunner Michael Seitzman said on Twitter that “We always suspected this would be the last season. We wrote it to end that way.” Fans of the show have already been asking me if another network

might pick up the show. I don’t know of any plans at this writing. That sort of thing happens just often enough to get fans’ hopes up (this year, “Last Man Standing,” “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” and “Lucifer” have found new homes at Fox, NBC and Netflix respectively), but many shows are done when their networks say so. Q • In our local newspaper, there was an article about a Berlin bomb squad concerned with World War II-era unexploded bombs. I seem to recall there was a TV show about a squad of men who defused bombs in London after World War II. I believe the show was called “UXB.” Am I correct? A • First, thank you for still reading a newspaper. As to your question, you are probably remembering “Danger UXB,” which aired on “Masterpiece Theatre” in 1981. (UXB, of course, is shorthand for “unexploded bomb.”) The 13-episode drama concerned a bomb disposal unit in England during, not after, World War

II. There was a DVD release of it, but you can also see the old episodes on YouTube. Q • When is Dreamworks’ “How To Train Your Dragon 3” going to be released? According to the DVD of the second movie, the story is a trilogy, so there should be one more installment. A • There is. “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World,” to use the official title, is currently scheduled for release on March 1, 2019. Here’s one description: “Now chief and ruler of Berk alongside Astrid, Hiccup has created a gloriously chaotic dragon utopia. When the sudden appearance of female Light Fury coincides with the darkest threat their village has ever faced, Hiccup and Toothless must leave the only home they’ve known and journey to a hidden world thought only to exist in myth.” BY RICH HELDENFELS, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Send questions to Rich Heldenfels, P.O. Box 417, Mogadore, OH 44260, or brenfels@gmail.com.

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Looking for something to do this summer? Check out Go! Magazine’s Summer Fun Guide. It’s filled with festivals, concerts, museums, water parks, outdoor experiences, road trips, great patios and more.

STLtoday.com/summerfun 07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

27


STLTODAY.COM/DINING ▼

Bavarias of concern The much-anticipated and much-delayed Hofbräuhaus in Belleville is a disappointment. BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH FOOD CRITIC

y memories of the few days I spent in Munich, Germany, 20 years ago are hazy. An attack of claustrophobia inside the

M

ifroeb@post-dispatch.com

28

Deutsches Museum’s dark, seemingly endless mining exhibit. Someone dressed as a one-euro coin dancing in the historic city center, drawing attention to the then-imminent common currency. The American dude at my hostel who claimed to be a professional skateboarder and an amateur country-music producer — or maybe it was the other way around. For some reason, I did track down a movie theater showing the abysmal “Star Trek Insurrection” in English. For some reason, I didn’t go to the Hofbräuhaus, which dates to the 16th century and can without exaggeration call itself “the world’s most famous tavern.” This week, at least, it’s for the best I didn’t visit the original Hofbräuhaus. I

stltoday.com/offthemenu

@ianfroeb

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can only imagine how much greater my disappointment in its Belleville satellite would be. Hofbräuhaus began opening franchises in the United States in 2003. Father-son developers Chuck and Chane Keller had targeted 2016 to debut Hofbräuhaus St. Louis–Belleville (as it’s officially known), but delays pushed the opening to this March. The building is a behemoth of gleaming white set in the middle of an otherwise undeveloped tract on the other side of Illinois Route 15 from the National Shrine of Our Lady of Snows, as incongruous as a crashed UFO. Inside is Bavaria by way of Disney World. Female servers in dirndls and male servers in lederhosen heft glass beer steins over communal tables. The dining hall is long and wide, and

the ceiling is high, but oompah music, either recorded or live, manages to fill the space. Like what you see? You’re in luck. There’s a gift shop. I would describe the menu as traditional Bavarian cuisine, but I don’t want to assume that the people of Bavaria like their food served warmer than room temperature but nowhere near piping hot, a problem that occurred with almost every dish I ate here. The temperature issues and the relatively quick time between ordering a dish and its arrival suggest an assembly-line kitchen more concerned with turnover than quality. The menu is pork-heavy, but to its credit there are many shades of swine. Among the sausage specialties alone are Nuremberg bratwurst, Munich

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ stltoday.com/go Extraordinary

P H O T O S : R YA N M I C H A L E S K O / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Jägerschnitzel with creamy mushroom sauce, served with spätzle at Hofbräuhaus.


The Wurstplatte sausage plate at Hofbräuhaus.

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included) Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 8/10/18

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weisswürste and kielbasa-ish Krainer sausages. The bratwurst ($15) and weisswürste (a pork-veal combination also available poached rather than grilled, $15) displayed grill marks, but neither snapped properly. The bratwurst sat on mounds of mashed potatoes and sauerkraut, the former airflavored, the latter drowned in a gravy possibly meant for the former. The Krainer sausages are served as currywurst ($17), two grilled sausages sliced over french fries and topped with curry sauce. The curry flavor was mild, but the sauce was hot, the sausages showed a pleasantly spongy chew and the fries were crisp. (All prices listed here are for dinner. Each dish is also available at lunch for $1-$4 less. My visits were during lunch.) My order of jägerschnitzel ($18) was a travesty. The pork cutlet, though pounded thin, was tough. Its “creamy” mushroom sauce was thin, lukewarm and bland, its flavor rescued only by its garnishes of crumbled bacon and fried onion. All of this sat atop a spill of spaetzle with all the gummy appeal of packing material. The schweinebraten ($16), the “famous” Munich pork roast, fared a little better. The meat was tender and tasted of, well, roasted pork — or, rather,

maybe warmed-up leftover roasted pork, in a negligible dark-beer sauce with roughly chopped carrots and celery and a bread dumpling the size of a baseball with the consistency of raw cookie dough. One dish not served below the ideal temperature was a burger from the kids’ menu, which the kitchen burned. I enjoyed better luck with appetizers like the thin, crisp potato pancakes ($11) with applesauce and sour cream. A pretzel is a must-order, either a single serving ($3) with a side of beer cheese ($3) or the riesenbrezen combo ($14), an oversized pretzel with sweet and onion mustards and obatzda, a cheese spread made from brie, cream cheese and butter. Think pub cheddar, but not as sharp. The pretzels pair well with Hofbräuhaus’ beers, brewed on the premises. The standard line up is the house lager, a dunkel and a hefeweizen, each a pleasant, if unmemorable example of the style. With its beer, at least, Hofbräuhaus might have impressed St. Louis 20 years ago. We know better now.

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07.13.18-07.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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SINGLE HOPS ▼

New craft brewery planned in St. Charles County • Brothers Jonathan and Michael Corwell are planning a new brew pub and microbrewery in O’Fallon, Mo. The 3,000-square-foot brewery, named Petrichor Brewing, will be located at 2900 Highway K, a former bank in the Crossroads Plaza shopping center. A quick dictionary glance defines petrichor as a pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of

HIP HOPS ▼

Heritage Festival promises a twist Best-selling craft brews will be a little different BY BRIAN FELDT | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

I adopted a strategy a few years back when it comes to buying beer at the store: something new, something old. Something new for the exciting, exotic new beers that are hitting retail shelves at an increasingly rapid pace. And something old for if the new ones don’t work out. bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

30

The policy has proved useful. Because the beauty of the plan is that all beers get consumed regardless. This weekend at the St. Louis Brewers Heritage Festival, I won’t have to deploy the tactic. That’s because the fine people at St. Louis Hop Shop and Beer Outside have come up with a system to offer me — and anyone who has a ticket to the festival — the best of both worlds. St. Louis Hop Shop, the Cherokee Street staple that serves as one of the best bottle shops in the area, has curated about a dozen local breweries that will pour some of their bestselling beers (something old), but with a twist (something new). Instead of 4 Hands’ Single Speed, you’ll get a chance to taste Vanilla Single Speed. Instead of Urban Chestnut’s Kudaam, you’ll be able to try Blueberry Kudaam. A Hibiscus Tart with blueberries in lieu of the standard Hibiscus Tart made popular by Old Bakery Beer Co. You get the idea. Other breweries participating include 2nd Shift Brewing, Narrow Gauge Brewing, Earthbound Beer,

stltoday.com/hiphops

@bfeldt

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Rockwell Brewery, Mark Twain Brewing Co. and Alpha Brewing, among others. All the beers will be poured on Beer Outside’s traveling beer truck — a 20tap trailer that would fit in perfectly at any food truck party. It’s actually the second year the two locally owned companies have teamed up for the Heritage Festival. But last year, they focused on super-hard-toget beers, which more often than not means a stout-heavy selection. “We had amazing stuff, but it’s tough for people to get into an imperial stout on a 110-degree day,” said Justin Harris, who along with his brother Ryan Griffin owns the Hop Shop. “So this year we switched up the goal to really spotlight the local favorites that are readily available and can get lost in the shuffle — but as a one-off.” The Hop Shop, which has been open on Cherokee Street for three years but in its current location at 2606 Cherokee Street (the corner of Cherokee and Jefferson Avenue) since last October, stands as one of the biggest fans of St. Louis craft beer. Harris and Griffin founded the store out of necessity as they couldn’t find

Liefbrau Brewery now open in Red Bud • Lieferbräu Brewery, at 118 East Market Street in Red Bud, Ill., opened at the end of June. Kris Liefer is the head brewer and will focus on Germanstyle beers, which include an IPA, pilsner, blonde, Kolsch, raspberry wheat, hefewiezen, stout and brown ale.

the latest and greatest brews at any other store within the city’s limits. Harris said he sees the store as a conduit for beer lovers to discover as many St. Louis brands as possible. “We’re really this bridge for so many amazing breweries, and our plan is to really highlight them as best we can,” he said. Beer Outside, meanwhile, stands as one of the more unique offshoot ventures of the craft boom. Founded by beer veterans Luke Oldham, who has worked at breweries including Schlafly and 2nd Shift Brewery, and Tyler Thompson, who’s put in time at Morgan Street Brewery and Urban Chestnut Brewing Company, Beer Outside bills itself as a pop-up beer garden on wheels. The duo custombuilt the trailer, which is designed to pour each draft line at its optimal temperature. Of course, aside from the one-offs available on the Beer Outside trailer, there’ll be tons of other great beer to try, too, at the Heritage Festival, which is now in its 12th iteration. WHEN 2-6 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Foot of the Grand Basin in Forest Park • HOW MUCH Tickets, which cost $40, include a commemorative tasting glass and access to samples of all beers being poured by more than 50 brewers from across the region • MORE INFO stlbeer.org

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : P O S T- D I S PAT C H

More than 50 brewers from around the area will have samples at the St. Louis Brewers Heritage Festival.

warm, dry weather. Lawmakers with the city of O’Fallon approved a conditional use permit and a site plan for the brewery on July 5. It’s unclear when the brewery will open.


RECENTLY REVIEWED RESTAURANTS ▼

1764 Public House ★½ WHERE 39 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314-405-8221; 1764pub. com • MENU Upscale St. Louis- and New Orleansinfluenced fare • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Billie-Jean ★★★½ WHERE 7610 Wydown Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7978484; billiejeanstl.com • MENU Contemporary American and Southeast Asian cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

Bing Bing ★★ WHERE 567A Melville Avenue, University City • MORE INFO 314-669-9229; facebook.com/bingbingstl • MENU Jianbing and other Chinese fare • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. daily

Cafe Piazza ★★

Del Pietro’s ★★½ WHERE 1059 South Big Bend Boulevard, Richmond Heights • MORE INFO 314-224-5225; mikedelpietros.com • MENU Traditional Italian fare • HOURS Dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

El Toluco Taqueria & Grocery ★★ WHERE 14234 Manchester Road, Manchester • MORE INFO 636-6865444; facebook.com/ eltolucotaqueria • MENU Tacos, tortas and more taqueria fare • HOURS 9 a.m.-9 p.m. MondaySaturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (no restaurant service on Tuesday)

Grace Meat + Three ★★★ WHERE 4270 Manchester Avenue • MORE INFO 314-533-2700; stlgrace. com • MENU Traditional Southern main dishes and sides • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday and Tuesday)

Iron Barley High Hog Ridge ★★½

WHERE 1900 Arsenal Street • MORE INFO 314343-0294; cafepiazza. com • MENU Pizza as well as panini and breakfast fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

WHERE 3367 High Ridge Boulevard, High Ridge • MORE INFO 636-671-9911; ironbarleyshighhogridge. com • MENU Hearty comfort fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

The Clover and the Bee ★★

Knead Bakehouse + Provisions ★★½

WHERE 100 West Lockwood Avenue, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-9421216; thecloverandthebee. com • MENU Casual bistro fare • HOURS Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wednesday-Sunday

WHERE 3467 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314376-4361; kneadbakehouse. com • MENU Breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. SaturdaySunday (closed Monday)

Cork & Barrel Chophouse ★½ WHERE 7337 Mexico Road, St. Peters • MORE INFO 636387-7030; corkandbarrel. com • MENU Steaks, chops and pizza • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sunday

Das Bevo ★★ WHERE 4749 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314832-2251; dasbevo.com • MENU German fare with contemporary flair HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

L’Acadiane ★½ WHERE 1915 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-8750108; lacadiane.com • MENU Creole- and Cajuninspired fare • HOURS Lunch Wednesday-Friday, dinner Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Like Home French Cafe & Pastry ★★½ WHERE 3855 Lindell Boulevard • MORE INFO 314319-0099; likehomecommeal amaison.com • MENU French cafe fare and pastries • HOURS 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday,

9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Louie ★★★ WHERE 706 DeMun Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314300-8188; louiedemun.com • MENU Rustic Italian fare • HOURS Dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

The Mad Crab ★★ WHERE 8080 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-801-8698; facebook.com/madcrabstl • MENU Seafood boils featuring shrimp, crab and crawfish • HOURS 3-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Nippon Tei ★★★ WHERE 14025 Manchester Road • MORE INFO 636386-8999; nippon.teistl. com • MENU Sushi and other traditional Japanese fare • HOURS Lunch TuesdayFriday, dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Nudo House ★★★ WHERE 11423 Olive Boulevard, Creve Coeur • MORE INFO 314-2748046; facebook.com/ nudohousestl • MENU Ramen and pho • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

One Way Mexican Restaurant ★★ WHERE 5912 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314833-5550; onewaycafeandbar. business.site • MENU Traditional Mexican fare • HOURS 10 a.m.-10 p.m. daily

Pangea ★★½ WHERE 3245 Rue Royale, St. Charles • MORE INFO 636-757-3579; pangeaworldfusion.com • MENU Contemporary bistro fare with global accents • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Pizza Head ★★ WHERE 3196 South Grand Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-266-5400; pizzaheadstl. com • MENU New York-style pizza by the slice or whole pie • HOURS Lunch TuesdaySaturday, dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Polite Society ★★★ WHERE 1923 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-3252553; politesocietystl.com • MENU Contemporary

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary stltoday.com/go

and classic bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

PRESENTED BY:

Privado ★★★★ WHERE 6665 Delmar Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-899-9221; privadostl.com • MENU A ticketed tasting menu of progressive American cuisine • HOURS Dinner Friday and Saturday

HOME OF THE BEST PLACES TO LIVE IN ILLINOIS

Simba Uganda Restaurant ★★ WHERE 8531 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-475-5630; facebook.com/ simbaugandanrestaurant • MENU Traditional Ugandan fare • HOURS Lunch buffet and dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Squatter’s Cafe ★★½ WHERE 3524 Washington Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-925-7556; squatterscafe. com • MENU Creative modern breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday (limited menu available 2-4 p.m.)

Vicia ★★★★ WHERE 4260 Forest Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-553-9239; viciarestaurant.com • MENU Modern, progressive cuisine with an emphasis on vegetables • HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Saturday

VP Square ★★½ WHERE 3611 Juniata Street • MORE INFO 314-833-4838; facebook.com/vpsquarestl • MENU Pan-Asian cuisine, including Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese dishes • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

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The Wood Shack ★★½ WHERE 1862 South 10th Street • MORE INFO 314-8334770; thewoodshacksoulard. com • MENU Sandwiches featuring smoked meats • HOURS 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

SPONSORED BY:

BY IAN FROEB

Search Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s interactive guide, to find the best restaurants in St. Louis.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT:

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JULY 13, 2018 • STLTODAY.COM/RIDES

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SPECIAL FEATURE

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FEATURES

AS SEEN ON THE COVER

2018 Subaru WRX STI SPECIAL FEATURE______________

DRIVE THE ACTION With its snarling, 305-horsepower turbocharged SUBARU BOXER® engine, the 2018 WRX STI combines track-day talents with rally roots to create something truly electrifying. It’s the best-handling, best-performing WRX STI. Ever.

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2018 Subaru WRX STI

DRIVING WITH DAN By DAN WIESE Contributing Automotive Writer

Type RA is hot-rod version of STI hot rod Subaru's WRX seems to have the automotive equivalent of what boating enthusiasts call "two-footitis." Typically afflicting recreational sailors and fishermen, "two-footitis" is the unshakable conviction that a boat just two feet longer will make everything right with the world. Alas, the malady usually returns after one summer with the new craft that was supposed to be the cure. ("Gee, if my boat was just two feet longer . . .") With WRX, it's not feet -- it's horses. Using the Impreza as its canvas, Subaru back in 2015 whipped up a hot-rod version of that practical, 148-hp compact family sedan in the form of the 268-hp WRX. Cool. But, the speed merchants at Subaru seemingly concluded, "Gee, if only my WRX had just a few more horses . . ." Voila, Subaru came up with the 305-hp WRX STI. Cool. But, then, engineers must have mumbled, "Gee, if only my WRX STI had just a few more horses . . ." Voila, we get the 310-hp, 2018 WRX STI Type RA. It is, you might say, the hot-rod version of the STI, which is the hot-rod version of the WRX, which is the hot-rod version of Impreza. (Mmmmm. Can't wait to see what these guys do with the next-generation WRX, now under development for a probable 2020 model-year debut.) Eye-poppingly priced at just under 50 grand (ouch!) -- and, like WRX and WRX STI, still riding the platform of the previous-generation Impreza -- the limited-edition WRX STI Type RA rings the register at nearly 13 grand more

drivingwithdan@gmail.com

2018 Subaru WRX STI Type RA DRIVE FORMAT: All-wheel drive BASE PRICE: $49,855 PRICE AS DRIVEN: $49,855 ENGINE: 2.5L horizontally opposed turbo 4 HORSEPOWER: 310 at 6000 rpm TORQUE: 290 lb.-ft. at 4000 rpm REQUIRED FUEL: Premium TRANSMISSION: Six-speed manual EPA MPG: 16 city/22 hwy/18 combined WHERE BUILT: Gunma, Japan WHEELBASE: 104.3 inches LENGTH: 181.3 inches TRUNK: 12.0 cu. ft. Limited to just 500 copies for U.S. consumption, the 2018 Subaru WRX STI Type RA improves a tad on the performance of the already formidable WRX STI.

than a base STI. But there are performance goodies galore. In addition to the slight bump in power, RA gets Bilstein struts and monotube dampers, beefy Brembo brake calipers, a chin spoiler for sticking the nose to the tarmac at high speed and, for weight savings, feather-light, 19-inch forged BBS wheels and a roof panel and towering rear wing that are crafted from carbon fiber. Oh, and Type RA dispenses with an onboard spare tire, too -- again, to reduce weight. Among its WRX performance highlights, this rally rocket includes three limited-slip dif04

RIDES MAGAZINE

SUSPENSION: Independent, sport tuned BRAKES: Four-wheel vented disc

Brembo Performance Brake System ferentials -- front, rear and center -- along CURB WEIGHT (est.): 3,300 lbs. with Active Torque Vectoring, which can briefly clamp a single front brake rotor to ing during routine driving, snarling under reduce understeer. There's also Subaru's SI-Drive system, provocation. At the same time, the speed-ratwhich allows the driver to tailor throttle re- ed tires send plenty of pavement descriptions sponse to taste -- “Intelligent” for daily driv- to the cabin, providing a loud and jarring ride ing; “Sport” for increased throttle sensitivity; ill-suited to daily commuting. Coupled with a and “Sport-Sharp,” which makes the skinny low ride height and buckboard-stiff suspenpedal so sensitive it seems a light breeze over sion, this car's raucous interior -- suede-andleather Recaro sport buckets notwithstanding the gas pedal would launch the car forward. RA's short-throw six-speed manual trans- -- will put off the faint-of-heart. This is no fammission gets a revised third-gear ratio, too, to ily compact. But those with a sense of adventure -- not boost forward thrust a tad. With 290 lb.-ft. of torque added to the other go-fast goodies, RA to mention deep pockets -- will find that WRX launches to 60 mph in less than 5 seconds as STI Type RA takes the phrase "pocket rocket" to new heights. the engine howls with delight. And it’s delighted a lot, constantly growl-

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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Starting problem likely has the easy solution of a loose cable

CAR TALK By RAY MAGLIOZZI Contributing Automotive Writer cartalk@gmail.com

DEAR CAR TALK: Buzz, our 2011 Toyota RAV4, let us down. Following a 65th wedding anniversary celebration, Buzz refused to start. As I beckoned to my favorite nephew with my crooked finger, he came over, smiled, popped the hood and said he would jumpstart Buzz. Alas, after three attempts, Buzz did nothing. Favorite Nephew then looked more carefully, popped open a small cover next to the battery, pulled a wrench from his toolbox ... smiled again and announced that he would restart the computer. It worked! He sent me on my 200-mile drive home with the wrench just in case! When I called the Toyota service department the next day, I was told that Favorite Nephew did the right thing. So I reset the clock and radio, and will mail the wrench back to Favorite Nephew -- after I purchase a replacement to carry in the glove box. The question: Is it normal for a car to act like this? Are there precautions I should take, other than purchasing my own wrench that fits? -- Claire DEAR CLAIRE: You should consider forcing favorite nephew into indentured servitude, Claire. Tell him if he plays his cards right, he might inherit a 2011 RAV4 someday. I’m actually confused by his use of the phrase “restarting the computer.” But here’s what I’m guessing happened: The car wouldn’t start because there was a loose connection coming off the battery. There are two cables attached to the battery. One is a ground cable that goes to the chassis, and the other cable goes to the power distribution box. If either cable doesn’t have a good, tight connection, the battery’s power will be unable to get to the rest of the car. So a jump-start, which just boosts the battery, might not help either. So, what your favorite nephew probably did was remove the little black plastic cover on the battery terminal and tighten up the

loose cable with his wrench. That reconnected the battery to the rest of the car, and everything worked fine. You had to reset your clock and radio presets because the battery had effectively been disconnected while you were boozing it up at the anniversary party, Claire. The connection simply may have shaken itself loose over the six years you’ve been driving the car. Or corrosion may have built up to the point that it was interfering in the transfer of electricity. Or maybe you had the 05

RIDES MAGAZINE

battery changed at some point more recently, and the mechanic just didn’t tighten everything up correctly. In any case, unless the terminals are badly corroded, I doubt you’ll need to perform the same procedure again anytime soon. But keep the wrench in your car anyway. Maybe you’ll be able to help another damsel in distress in a 2011 RAV4, Claire. *** Used cars can be a great bargain, and reliable, too! Find out why by ordering Tom

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and Ray’s pamphlet “How to Buy a Great Used Car: Secrets Only Your Mechanic Knows.” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Car Talk/Used Car, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803. Got a question about cars? Write to Ray in care of King Features, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, or email by visiting www.cartalk.com. (c) 2018 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


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PRE-OWNED VEHICLES

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BEST OF ST. CHARLES 3 YEARS IN A ROW BOMMARITO ST. PETERS Winner St. Charles County Reader's Choice Poll

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2013 Chrysler 200 Limited

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2013 Ford Fusion SE

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2011 Kia Soul +

2014 Chevy Cruze LS

2013 Ford Escape SE

2013 Hyundai Veloster

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RIDES MAGAZINE

4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs

(636) 928-2300 Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers. ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

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2014 Honda Civic CVT LX

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2014 VW Passat S

2017 Mazda 3 Touring

2012 Honda Accord EX-L

2010 Chevy Silverado 1500

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2016 Chevy Malibu LS

2014 Cadillac SRX Performance

2010 Infiniti QX56

2017 Chevy Impala LT

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St. Peters Pre-Owned Super Center

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Bommaritostpeters.com 09

$17,890

RIDES MAGAZINE

4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs

(636) 928-2300 Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers. ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$18,490 IT’S BACK!

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25,082

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26,216

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30,393

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5120 N Service Rd. St. Peters, MO RIDES MAGAZINE

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2004 Chevrolet Colorado

2010 Jeep Patriot Sport

2012 Ford Edge SEL PLUS

2009 Volkswagen Jetta

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Stk# 79018A

Stk# 79671B

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4,777

4,833

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5,899

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6,414

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6,800

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6,800

2006 Mazda MX-5 Gr. Touring

2002 Lexus LS

2009 Toyota Camry LE

2008 Dodge Ram 1500 ST

2007 Acura RDX Tech Pkg.

2011 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE Ext Cab

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SALE PRICE

$

7,899

SALE PRICE

$

8,777

SALE PRICE

$

8,833

2003 Mazda MX-5 Miata

2013 Toyota Corolla LE

2011 Kia Soul +

2010 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS

2011 Nissan Murano S

2014 Chevrolet Cruze 2LT

Stk# 11507A

Stk# 28800B

Stk# 12158A

Stk# 79651A

Stk# 97228A

Stk# 40131A

SALE PRICE

$

8,889

SALE PRICE

$

8,899

SALE PRICE

$

8,899

SALE PRICE

$

9,899

SALE PRICE

$

9,899

$

SALE PRICE

10,414

2010 Toyota RAV4 Ltd.

2011 Lincoln MKS EcoBoost

2008 Infiniti EX35 Journey

2012 Chevrolet Equinox

2013 Ford Taurus SEL

2012 Lincoln MKZ

Stk# P9300A

Stk# P9133A

Stk# 96597A

Stk# P9310

Stk# 11670A

Stk# P9114B

SALE PRICE

$

10,500

SALE PRICE

$

10,833

2014 Ford Taurus Limited

2015 Toyota Camry SE Sedan

Stk# 7847B

Stk# 78658A

SALE PRICE

$

11,909

SALE PRICE

$

12,833

SALE PRICE

$

11,414

2016 Ford Fusion SE Stk# 28559A

SALE PRICE

$

13,777

SALE PRICE

$

11,802

2015 Ford Escape Titanium Stk# 79412B

SALE PRICE

$

13,833

$

SALE PRICE

11,833

$

SALE PRICE

11,833

2014 Buick Regal 4 Dr

2015 Chevrolet Equinox LT

Stk# 79019B

Stk# P9332

SALE PRICE

$

14,141

$

SALE PRICE

14,414

2008 Toyota FJ Cruiser

2016 Nissan Altima 2.5 S

2014 Chevrolet Equinox LT

2013 Volvo C70 T5

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport ES

2008 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited

Stk# P9321

Stk# P9351

Stk# P9340

$

$

Stk# #96346A

Stk# #12330A

Stk# P9176

SALE PRICE

$

14,800

SALE PRICE

15,899

SALE PRICE

16,414

SALE PRICE

$

16,777

SALE PRICE

$

16,899

• We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition.

SALE PRICE

$

16,909

*Excludes model year 2008 and older and any vehicle with 80,000 or more miles.

Bommarito

2007 Dodge Charger R/T

West County Pre-Owned Center

WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE

TO THE BOMMARITO AUTOMOTIVE GROUP 500 INDYCAR RACE

RECEIVE 2 TICKETS IT’S BACK!

2004 Toyota Sienna XLE

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 636-391-7200 11

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2004 TOYOTA COROLLA

2013 BUICK VERANO Stk. #50984-1

2007 DODGE CHARGER Stk. #50480-1, R/T

2014 KIA FORTE Stk. #68558-1, EX

2014 FORD FOCUS

$

4,995

Stk. #48981-3, S

Stk. #50074-1, SE

10,995

2007 VOLKSWAGEN GTI

10,995

2013 NISSAN QUEST

$

2013 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT $

$

10,995

Stk. #68528-1, 2.5 S

$

2013 CHRYSLER 300

$

2013 FORD ESCAPE

8,397

Stk. #50917-5

8,995

Stk. #50742-1, S

$

6,995

2015 DODGE JOURNEY $

2010 HYUNDAI GENESIS$

$

8,995

2012 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE $

2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE $

Stk. #68148-1, 2WD

12,397

12,397

Stk. #50965-1, 4WD, LAREDO

ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

Stk. #95666-1, 4.6

Stk. #50441-1, LS

11,995

8,995

370

70 270

HYUNDAI 40/64

12

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$

9,997

Stk. #49614-1, C

$

9,995

Stk. #95115-1, SEL, FWD

2014 FORD FOCUS

$

Stk. #50057-1, SE HATCH

10,397

2003 SUBARU FORESTER $ Stk. #51014-1, 2.5X

4,995


844-467-9452

StCharlesHyundai.com

Family Owned and Operated Since 1979!

2015 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE Stk. #69204-1, 4WD

$9,597

2009 TOYOTA COROLLA S Stk. #95251-6

$6,397

2008 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR

2013 GMC TERRAIN SLE Stk. #50542-1,AWD

$12,897

Stk. #95595-1, 4WD

2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT

2013 GMC TERRAIN FWD SLE

$9,697

Stk. #50183-1

Stk. #69269-1

$12,995

Stk. #69566-1

$8,397

Stk. #69311-1, 2WD

$7,995

2011 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5 S

2013 HYUNDAI TUCSON LIMITED Stk. #68742-1, 2WD

$7,995

2009 LINCOLN MKX

2011 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS Stk. #50006-1

$5,995

2002 BMW Z3 2.5I ROADSTER

2011 BMW 535I Stk. #68780-2

$10,995

$12,397

Stk. #51000-2

$8,397

844-467-9452

StCharlesHyundai.com 2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS Stk. #68358-1, FWD

$8,995

2012 NISSAN ROGUE SV Stk. #67380-1,AWD

5701 Veterans Memorial Pkwy Saint Peters, MO 63376

2010 LINCOLN TOWN CAR LIMITED

$12,995 13

#50624-2, SIGNITURE

RIDES MAGAZINE

$8,997

2015 FORD ESCAPE SE Stk. #95647-1, 4WD

2007 NISSAN ARMADA SE Stk. #50319-1, 2WD

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

$7,995

$12,995

2015 HYUNDAI ELANTRA SE Stk. #69625-1

stltoday.com/RIDES

$12,995


SUNTRUP PRE-OWNED Visit us online for complete inventory

www.SuntrupBuickGMC.com

SAVE $1,000’S ON YOUR NEXT PRE-OWNED VEHICLE!!! 11,400

8,922

$

$

2015 CHRYSLER 200

2012 BUICK LACROSSE

2014 FORD FOCUS

95,181 Miles, Stk # 49307-1

111,224 Miles, Stk # 49724-1

60,586 Miles, Stk # 24883-1

14,079

$

13,854

$

13,115

$

2011 DODGE DURANGO

2017 FORD FOCUS

2015 KIA OPTIMA

111,212 Miles, Stk # 24736-1

28,360 Miles, Stk # P3905-7

56,415 Miles Stk # 48740-2

15,768

16,388

$

15,900

$

$

2016 FORD FUSION

2016 CHEVROLET CRUZE LIMITED

2014 GMC TERRAIN

40,976 Miles, Stk # P3885

19,300 Miles, Stk # P3874

53,767 Miles Stk # 49711-1

18,322

18,719

$

17,790

$

WEY BUU SED!!

11,877

$

$

12,500

$

2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX 72,248 Miles, Stk # 49506-1

14,961

$

2015 TOYOTA COROLLA 40,862 Miles, Stk # P3868

17,019

$

2017 NISSAN ALTIMA 18,228 Miles, Stk # 49540-1

$

19,116

2016 JEEP CHEROKEE

2017 FORD ESCAPE

2016 MAZDA CX-5

2016 NISSAN ALTIMA

34,187 Miles, Stk # P3798-1

34,735 Miles Stk # P3860

39,455 Miles Stk # P3889

15,577 Miles Stk # P3866

NEARLY 500 NEW & USED VEHICLES TO CHOOSE FROM!

S

CAR

* With down payment of $2,500 cash or trade, With Approved Credit, based on 4.9% APR for 72 months.

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636-939-0800

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W BUE Y

US CARESD !!


Bommarito

RECEIVE 2 TICKETS

South County

IT’S BACK!

TO THE BOMMARITO AUTOMOTIVE GROUP 500 INDYCAR RACE

Pre-Owned Center

WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE

2018 Chevy Impala LT

2017 Chevy Camaro 1LT

2016 Chevy Cruze 1LT

Stk. #P6476, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified

Stk. #P6492, 17K Miles, Convertible, GM Certified

Stk. #P6466, 24K Miles, GM Certified

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$22,789

$23,969

$13,563

2015 Chevy Equinox LT

2015 Nissan Murano

2016 Chevrolet Malibu LS

Stk. #P6517, 35K Miles, GM Certified

Stk. #35124A, Clean Carfax , GM Certified

Stk. #P6533, Clean Carfax, GM Certified

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$25,469

$16,969

2016 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #42570A. SALE PRICE $14,576 2017 Jeep Patiot Sport Stk. #P6527 SALE PRICE $14,676 2011 GMC Terrain SLT Stk. #35059A SALE PRICE $14,969

2015 Mazda 3 s Touring Stk. #35376A SALE PRICE $18,993 2015 Mazda 3 s Touring Stk. #35376A SALE PRICE $18,993 2016 Mazda 6 i Touring Stk. #35100A SALE PRICE $18,993 2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #42587A ...... SALE PRICE $19,969 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6458 SALE PRICE $19,970 2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #42373A .. SALE PRICE $19,989 2013 GMC Yukon XL Stk. #P6199A ..... SALE PRICE $19,990 2016 GMC Terrain SLE Stk. #P6548. SALE PRICE $19,990

$17,890 UNDER $10,000 2011 Mitsubishi Galant Stk. #42564B .. SALE PRICE $6,776 2011 Dodge Grnd Caravan Stk. #P6402A SALE PRICE $7,369 2008 Chevy Impala LS Stk. #42755A.... SALE PRICE $7,442 2005 Buick LaCrosse CXL Stk. #42760A SALE PRICE $7,676 2011 Chevrolet Cruze Stk.#42891A ...... SALE PRICE $7,969 2008 Jeep Liberty Sport Stk. #35342A SALE PRICE $7,990 2012 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #42841A..... SALE PRICE $8,442 2008 Honda Pilot Stk. #42634B ................. SALE PRICE $9,776 2013 Dodge Avenger SE Stk. #35134A. SALE PRICE $9,776

UNDER $15,000 2016 Chevy Spark LS Stk. #40437A...... SALE PRICE $9,756 2013 Dodge Avenger Stk. #35134A............ SALE PRICE $9,776 2010 Buick LaCrosse CXL Stk. #42866A .... SALE PRICE $9,969 2011 Ford Escape XLT Stk. #P6494C SALE PRICE $11,469 2013 Mini Cooper S Stk. #33740A...... SALE PRICE $11,976 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid Stk. #42345A SALE PRICE $11,990 2013 Ford Fusion Stk. #33763A ........... SALE PRICE $11,991 2012 Lexus CT 200h Stk. #33745B .... SALE PRICE $12,462 2015 Jeep Patriot Stk. #42912A .......... SALE PRICE $12,776 2007 Chevy Tahoe LT Stk. #420023A. SALE PRICE $12,990 2013 Mazda CX-9 Gr. Touring Stk. #35042A SALE PRICE $13,469 2014 Chevy Cruze Diesel Stk. #42681A. SALE PRICE $13,476 2016 Chevy Cruze LT Stk. #P6466 .... SALE PRICE $13,563 2013 Nissan Rogue Stk. #35388A ...... SALE PRICE $13,769 2016 Jeep Compass Stk. #P6447...... SALE PRICE $13,868 2014 Ford Escape SE Stk. #35112A.. SALE PRICE $14,253 2016 Toyota Corolla LE Stk. #33720A SALE PRICE $14,476 2015 Mazda 6 Stk. #P6538..................... SALE PRICE $14,493

UNDER $20,000 2015 Mazda6 i Touring Stk.#40090A SALE PRICE $15,676 2015 Kia Optima EX Stk. #35049B..... SALE PRICE $15,969 2015 Nissan Altima Stk. #P6511 ........ SALE PRICE $15,970 2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #P6408A.. SALE PRICE $15,990 2013 Lincoln MKX Stk. #P6270A......... SALE PRICE $15,990 2015 Chevy Trax LS Stk. #P6540 ....... SALE PRICE $15,990 2014 Honda CR-V EX-L Stk. #42285A SALE PRICE $16,169 2016 Hyundai Tucson Stk. #42897A.. SALE PRICE $16,569 2017 Dodge Journey SXT Stk. #P6498. SALE PRICE $16,692 2014 Mazda 3 Stk. #P6537..................... SALE PRICE $16,793 2016 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #P6533.. SALE PRICE $16,969 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6516 SALE PRICE $16,976 2000 Chevy Corvette Stk. #400051B . SALE PRICE $17,498 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6514 SALE PRICE $17,776 2015 Chrysler T&C Van Stk. #42873B.. SALE PRICE $17,869 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6518 SALE PRICE $17,872 2011 Ford F-150 Stk. #420013A............ SALE PRICE $17,969 2016 Mazda 6 Stk. #P6542..................... SALE PRICE $17,973 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6510 SALE PRICE $17,981 2012 Dodge Ram 1500 Stk. #42644A SALE PRICE $17,990 2017 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #P6489 SALE PRICE $17,990 2015 Nissan Rogue SV Stk. #35474A SALE PRICE $18,504 2015 Buick Regal Stk. #P6550 ............ SALE PRICE $18,569 2013 Mazda MX-5 Miata Stk. #35129A SALE PRICE $18,763 2014 Mazda CX-5 Gr. Touring Stk. #33602A SALE PRICE $18,963

UNDER $25,000 2016 GMC Terrain SLE Stk. #P6546. SALE PRICE $20,569 2015 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #P6427A SALE PRICE $20,990 2017 Mazda 6 Touring Stk. #35107A SALE PRICE $20,993 2017 Nissan Pathfinder Stk. #P6528...... SALE PRICE $21,367 2017 Mazda CX-5 Gr. Touring Stk. #35486A SALE PRICE $21,593 2015 Chevy Impala Stk. #P6475........... SALE PRICE $22,789 2007 Chrysler Pacifica Stk. #P6522. SALE PRICE $22,994 2017 Nissan Maxima S Stk. #P6496 ... SALE PRICE $22,996 2017 Chevy Camaro LT Stk. #P6492 SALE PRICE $23,969

OVER $25,000

2014 Chevy Tahoe LT Stk #42836A SALE PRICE $24,776 2017 Mazda 6 Gr. Touring Stk. #33618A SALE PRICE $25,363 2015 Nissan Murano SL Stk. #35124A SALE PRICE $25,469 2018 Chevy Impala Premier Stk. #P6501 SALE PRICE $25,990 2017 Mazda CX-5 Stk. #33692A .......... SALE PRICE $27,493 2018 Chevy Colorado Stk. #P6483 SALE PRICE $27,990 2014 Chevy Suburban LTZ Stk. #P6555 SALE PRICE $29,769 2015 Toyota Highlander Stk. #33580A SALE PRICE $30,769 2016 Mazda CX-9 Stk. #310178A........... SALE PRICE $34,973 2017 Chevy Tahoe LT Stk. #P6521 .... SALE PRICE $41,969

6127 S. Lindbergh Blvd. • BommaritoChevy.com • 314-487-9800 15

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14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011 SALES (636) 200-2822 SERVICE (877) 589-2738 • PARTS (877) 606-3265 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE

Suntrup 100K Warranty 0.9% Financing On All 2013 & 2014 Certified Volvos

$7,850

$8,990

$9,850

$10,000

2007 VOLVO XC90 3.2 SUV

2004 ACURA MDX 3.5L W/TOURING PACKAGE/RES SUV

2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA SS SEDAN

2008 VOLVO XC90 V8 SUV

Stk # L14411

Stk # 194031

Stk # 194362

Stk # L14561

$11,750

$12,855

$12,880

$15,000

2015 NISSAN SENTRA SV SEDAN

2014 FORD ESCAPE S SUV

2013 VOLVO S60 T5 SEDAN

Stk # 194782

2011 SAAB 9-5 TURBO4 PREMIUM SEDAN

Stk # 193421

Stk # P4312

Stk # 189522

$15,500

$16,880

$17,850

$19,880

2015 NISSAN ROGUE SELECT S SUV

2010 BMW X5 XDRIVE30I SAV

2014 FORD ESCAPE TITANIUM SUV

2013 BMW 328I CONVERTIBLE

Stk # P4301

Stk # L14391

Stk # 192372

Stk # 187721

$25,000

$28,875

$30,895

$31,850

2012 FORD F-150 TRUCK SUPERCREW CAB

2016 VOLVO S60 T5 PLATINUM INSCRIPTION SEDAN

2015 VOLVO XC60 T6 (2015.5) SUV

2016 VOLKSWAGEN GOLF R 4-DOOR HATCHBACK

Stk # 194531

Stk # L1459

Stk # L1436

Stk # 195401

www.wcvolvo.com 16

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To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2012 MAZDA MIATA GRAND TOURING

2006 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER

7,500

$

Stk# 40093A

SALE PRICE

2007 CADILLAC ESCALADE EXT Stk# 79551A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

19,988

$

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

16,777

$

30,444

$

Stk# 28692B

SALE PRICE

7,884

$

48,000

SALE PRICE

27,777

$

Stk# P9328

SALE PRICE

$

8,884

2010 GMC YUKON DENALI

Stk# 11524L

SALE PRICE

28,777

$

2014 BUICK REGAL

$

Stk# 28721A

2009 MAZDA MAZDA6 S TOURING

2017 MAZDA CX-5 GRAND SELECT

2015 INFINITI QX80

Stk# P9331

Stk# 11582A

2007 GMC ACADIA SLT SLT-2

2015 AUDI Q5 PREMIUM PLUS Stk# P9317

2016 AUDI Q3 PRESTIGE

Stk# 79618A

SALE PRICE

20,444

$

2015 AUDI S3 PREMIUM PLUS

Stk# 79019B

SALE PRICE

14,141

$

Stk# P9304

SALE PRICE

28,802

$

BommaritoWest County PRE-OWNED CENTER

15736 MANCHESTER AT CLARKSON RD. TOLL

View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritowestcounty.com FREE 17

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To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2016 MAZDA MAZDA6 I TOURING Stk# M9229

SALE PRICE

2013 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED

$

19,390

2013 FORD FUSION SE

Stk# M18264A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

9,990

SALE PRICE

9,490

Stk# B9180

SALE PRICE

$

23,490

Stk# V17797A

SALE PRICE

58,990

$

17,990

Stk# M9205

SALE PRICE

$

SALE PRICE

56,990

Stk# B9182

SALE PRICE

$

58,990

$

14,490

2015 NISSAN ALTIMA S

15,490

$

2016 MAZDA CX-5 SPORT

$

Stk# B8560

2017 PORSCHE CAYENNE

2016 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT SE

2013 GMC TERRAIN SLE SLE-1 Stk# C18063C

SALE PRICE

$

2016 LEXUS LS 460 L

2017 NISSAN ROGUE SL

Stk# B9213

Stk# V18324A

2016 GMC YUKON DENALI

Stk# V18168A

SALE PRICE 2010 NISSAN FRONTIER SE

19,890

$

Stk# B9247

SALE PRICE

$

10,990

BommaritoSt. Peters PRE-OWNED CENTER 4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritostpeters.com 18

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TOLL FREE

1-866-244-9085

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PREOWNED VEHICLES 2014 HD TRI GLIDE ULTRA

2017 Audi A4

2015 Audi A8

2018 Audi Q5

2016 Audi S3

2018 BMW 430i xDrive

COLLECTORS ED. 2,860 Miles must see/ drive

2.0Turbo Premium Plus, S-Line, Quattro #V18351A

Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats #27112A

2.0 Turbo Premium, Quattro, Black #B9265

2.0 Turbo, Prestige, Quattro, 28K #M17475B

Convertible, 23K Miles, AWD #P9355

$26,000

$32,490

$37,909

$40,990

$34,990

$44,884

636-285-9989

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2015 Acura ILX

2016 Audi A7

2017 Audi Q3

2015 Audi Q7

2016 Audi S5

2018 BMW 430i

28K Miles, Automatic, Navigation, Sunroof, #B9178

3.0 Prestige, AWD, Quattro, Sportback, #P9364

#P06705

$24,900

Prestige, AWD, One Owner, 3.0T S Line #28549A

Prestige, Daytona Gray Pearl, 6K Miles, #P9341

Convertible, 2.0L I-4 Cyl, RWD, #P9269

$49,884

$34,988

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$37,800

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2013 Acura MDX

2016 Audi A7 Premium Plus

2014 Audi Q5

2017 Audi Q7

2015 Audi S7

2018 BMW 740i

AWD, 67K Miles, Tech Package Stk #B9123

Mythos Black, 3.0L TFSI V6, Quattro, #P9158A

Prestige, Quattro, Glacier White, AWD, #P9347

Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD, Graphite Gray #P9385

Sportback, Quattro, AWD #P9378

3.0L I-6 Cyl, RWD, 18K Miles #P9212

$22,490

$45,300

$31,007

$57,202

$59,999

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2017 Audi A3 Cabriolet

2016 Audi A8 L

2018 Audi Q5

2017 Audi R8 5.2 V10 plus

2015 Audi SQ5

2015 BMW 6 Series

Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #28832A

3.0T, V6, Mythos Black Metallic, 20K Miles #28171A

Premium Plus, Quattro, 10K Miles, AWD #28330L

Mythos Black Metallic, 1K Miles, #28748A

Premium Plus, Florett Silver Metallic, 28K Miles #P9345

Alpina B6, Power Moonroof, V8 #986038

$22,490

$39,899

$48,500

$170,988

$41,007

$58,600

$56,802

$34,999

$43,600

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2018 Audi A4

2015 Audi A8 L

2018 Audi Q5

2016 Audi S3 Prestige

2017 BMW 320i xDrive

2010 BMW X3 M

Premium Plus, Quattro, 7K Miles, AWD, Monlight Black #28277L

4.0T, Phantom Black Pearl, #P9093

Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD #28197L

AWD, Quattro, Sepang Blue Pearl #28791A

Apline White, 23K Miles, AWD, #11631A

Sport #P42501

$49,999

$46,100

$48,500

$38,300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

19

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$29,600 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES

$13,800 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2014 BMW X5

2005 Buick LaCrosse

2018 Cadillac Escalade

2018 Cadillac XTS

2011 Chevy Camaro

2018 Chevy Colorado

xDrive 50i, AWD, 43K Miles, #P9312

CXL, One Owner, FWD #42760A

Luxury Package, 4WD, 20K Miles #P9311

Luxury, Radiant Silver Metallic, 15K Miles #P9287

1LT Stock #P06815

$15,877

LT, Crew Cab, 4x4, Backup Camera, Black #P6483

$37,802

$7,676

$65,802

$35,988

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2017 Buick Cascada

2010 Buick Lacrosse

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2015 Cadillac XTS

2010 Chevy Camaro

2011 Chevy Corvette

Convertible, Stock #P06758

CXL, Loaded, Clean Carfax #42866A

ESU, Platinum Edition #C8832A

Stock #P06795

1LT Stk #P06852

$27,000

$24,490

$13,800

Z16 Grand Sport w/3LT, Manual, RWD, 35K Miles #28685B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$21,985

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2014 Buick Encore

2016 Cadillac CTS

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2017 Chevrolet Tahoe

2010 Chevy Camaro

2004 Chevy Corvette

Premium, FWD, Priced to sell Fast! #C9081C

3K Miles, Savings #C16150R

White Diamond, 55K, Loaded, 1 Owner #C9143A

LT, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth GM Certified Pre-Owned, #P9027

1LT, Stock #195752

$42,100

$13,800

Convertible, 53K Miles, Automatic #C9127A Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$16,990

$9,969

$27,990

$36,007

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$32,990

$35,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2018 Buick Envision

2009 Cadillac CTS

2012 Cadillac SRX

2011 Chevy Aveo

2013 Chevy Camaro

2000 Chevy Corvette

Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, #P9356

15K Miles, White Diamond, Like New! #C17275A

49K, Pano Roof, Mocha, Certified #C17416RA

1LT Stock #P06805

$6,100

LT, Low Miles, Backup Camera, Heated Leather Seats #C18009FIT

Extra Clean, Tanga Tops, Only 57K Miles! #400051B

$43,884

$17,892

$22,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$18,990

$18,490

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2016 Buick Envision

2012 Cadillac CTS-V

2007 Cadillac SRX

2017 Chevy Camaro

2010 Chevy Camaro

2014 Chevy Cruze

Premium, AWD, 23K Miles, #49406-1

Loaded, Auto, 50K, Roof/Nav #C9266

V6, Leather, Pano Roof, Cadillac Trade #C18111A

1LT, Convertible, Clean Carfax, One Owner, Backup Camera #P6492

2LT, RS Package, Leather #49021-1

$7,990

$17,700

Diesel, Loaded, GM Certified, 1 Owner #42681A

$36,990

$23,969

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$26,900 Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

20

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$17,498

$13,476 Bommarito South 866-721-7269


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Chevy Cruze

2018 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Equinox

2015 Chevy Equinox

2013 Chevy Impala

2013 Chevy Malibu LS

Limited, 1LT, Blue Ray Metallic, Fuel Efficient #P6466

LS Stock #180632

1LT, Stock #P06846

Stock #P06777

$13,563

$17,628

LT, Black, 44K Miles Clean Carfax One Owner #C11625P

#P06747

$14,590

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$10,000

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2011 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Cruze

2016 Chevy Equinox

2015 Chevy Equinox

2018 Chevy Impala

2011 Chevy Malibu

LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax #42891A

Premier, Red Hot, 19K Miles, Certified #C11694P

LT, Stock #P06725

LT, Only 16K Miles #P3833

LT Stock #P06796

LT, Stock #180554B

$17,253

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2014 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Express 3500

2018 Chevy Impala

2018 Chevy Malibu

LS, Stock #P06835

1LT, Stock #P06842

Stock #P06681

$17,602

LT, 15 Passenger Van, GM Certified! #P6535

LT, Stock #P06797

$17,500

1LT, Stock #P06689

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$27,776 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Equinox

2008 Chevy Impala

2008 Chevy Impala

2015 Chevy Malibu

LT, Stock #P06845

1LT, Stock #P06814

LT, Stk #P06847

$18,114

$17,100

LS, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Silverstone, #42755A

SS, 66K, #194362

$15,900

1LS, Stk #P06856

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$7,442

$9,850

$13,000

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2015 Chevy Cruze

2016 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Impala

2015 Chevy Malibu

2010 Chevy Malibu

1LT, Stock #180541B

LT Stock # P06725

$13,424

$15,600

LT, 23K Miles, Black, Backup Camera #C11677P

LS, Stock #P06767

Black, Automatic, Certified #M17474C

LT, New Rear Brakes, Fuel Efficient #C181137M

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

$7,969

$12,512

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

21

$15,600

$18,426

RIDES MAGAZINE

$16,444

$17,899

$16,262 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

$22,700

$22,700

$10,300

$7,506

$18,879

$15,990

$5,564

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Chevy Malibu

2018 Chevy Silverado 1500

2018 Chevy Tahoe

2013 Chevy Tahoe

2011 Chrysler 300C

2013 Dodge Avenger

LT, Low Miles, Certified, One Owner #C11687P

Crew Cab, Stock #P06757

LT, 4WD, 8 Cyl-5.3L, Black #P9316

LTZ, Sunroof, DVD, Leather #49049-2

Stock #P06752

$30,888

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$51,999

$13,650

Loaded, Red, Full Power #35134A

$15,176

$32,639

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2007 Chevy Silverado

2013 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Tahoe

2013 Chevy Traverse

2005 Chrysler Crossfire

2014 Dodge Avenger

V8, Automatic, Well Maintained, #V18388B

3500 Diesel, LTZ, C/C, 63K Miles #P3818

LT, Loaded, GM Certified, One Owner, Black #P6521

LTZ, One Owner, Crystal Red, FWD #C180712A

LTD, Black, Clean Carfax, Only 65K Miles #42825B

SE, Stock #P06791

$9,490

$40,900

$41,969

$15,579

$9,469

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2009 Chevy Silverado 1500

2013 Chevy Sonic

2014 Chevy Tahoe LT

2016 Chevy Traverse

2017 Chrysler Pacifica

2015 Dodge Challenger

Extended Cab, Long Box Stock #P06868

LT, Stk #P06834

Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax #42836A

FWD, LT, 11K Miles, Certified, One Owner #C181665A

Touring, Black, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax #P6522

R/T, 5-speed #P3836

$13,934

$8,290 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$26,884

$22,994

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

2018 Chevy Silverado

2013 Chevy Spark

2010 Chevy Tahoe

2016 Chevy Trax

2015 Chrysler T & C

2017 Dodge Charger

1500, LT Stock #P06798

LS, Stock #180946A

1500, LT Stock #180853A

$34,000

$8,046

$17,982

LS, Crimson, Carfax One Owner, Fuel Efficient #42849A

Touring Van, Loaded, Clean Carfax #42873B

R/T 392, 16K Miles, Just Arrived #B9157

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,769

$17,869

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2007 Chevy Silverado 1500

2015 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Tahoe

2006 Chrysler 300

1955 Crown Victoria

2013 Dodge Charger

Long Box, Stock #P06869

LTZ, 4WD, 34K Miles, Black #P9348

Stock #P06790

$10,126

Black, Chrome Wheels, Nav, Sunroof #B9047A

Torch red/Colonial white, rebuilt 272, V8, 6 volt. Dual exhaust.

SE, Local Trade, Chrome Wheels #M18202B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$48,007

$42,565 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$7,990

$32,000 obo.

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

573 213-5123

22

$24,776

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$9,776

$9,994

$29,477

$38,290

$13,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2014 Dodge Charger

2004 Dodge Neon

2015 Ford Escape

2001 Ford Explorer

2017 Ford Mustang

2017 Genesis G80

SE Stock #P06812

$11,977

Low Miles, SXT, One Owner, Fuel Efficient #C181269A

Titanium #194821

XLT, Oxford White, 4WD, Multi-point & Emissions Inspected #C180633A

GT Premium, Ingot Silver, Convertible, 12K Miles #40236A

3.8 Sedan, Casablanca White, 3.8L V-6, AWD, 4K Miles #40165A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$4,568

$19,700 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$3,256

$33,884

$40,988

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2016 Dodge Charger

2016 Ford Edge

2013 Ford Escape

2011 Ford F-150

2010 Ford Mustang

2015 GMC Acadia

SXT, Stock #P06851

$18,000

39K Miles, AWD, Leather, Sunroof #V17115A

Leather, 52K, #194061

Super Cab, 4x4, Loaded, Only 70K Miles #420013A

GT #P06592A

SLT-1, Stock #P06775

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$27,990

$15,500

$17,769

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2013 Dodge Dart

2013 Ford Edge

2017 Ford Expedition

2009 Ford F-350

2015 Ford Taurus

2015 GMC Canyon

SE, 60K Miles, Black, Auto #B8988A

SE, Stock #P06849

Ext Cab, White, Great Work Truck #B9142

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$11,990

$11,900

4WD, SLT, Crew Cab, Cardinal Red #79676A

$9,990

Limited, 3.5L V-6, 4x4 #P9243

SEL, #P06655

$12,858

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2017 Dodge Durango

2010 Ford Edge

2017 Ford Explorer

2014 Ford Focus

2017 Ford Taurus

2015 GMC Sierra 1500

GT, Black Crystal, 36K Miles, AWD #P9353

Limited, Leather #P3825-1

Titanium, Sunroof, Leather #24883-1

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$11,888

$19,500

Denali, Crew Cab, Clean Carfax One Owner, 4WD #79661A

$31,884

XLT, FWD, 9K, Local Trade #B8963A

#P06744

$10,900

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2011 Dodge Grand Caravan

2015 Ford Escape

2016 Ford Explorer

2013 Ford Fusion

2014 Ford Taurus

2016 GMC Sierra 1500

Mainstreet, SXT, Clean Carfax, #P6402A

SE, AWD #48576-2

XLT, FWD, Black w/ Black Wheels #B8557A

Loaded, Very Clean #33763A

SE #48869-2

$7,369

$14,900

SLT, Crew Cab, Summit White, V8, #79578A

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$32,600

$29,490

$28,490

23

RIDES MAGAZINE

$11,888

$11,991 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

$19,000

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

stltoday.com/RIDES

$25,700

$29,999

$37,999

$39,300 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 GMC Sierra 1500

2016 GMC Terrain

2018 Honda Accord

2009 Honda Civic

2008 Honda Pilot

2015 Hyundai Sonata

Stock #P06766

Denali, Nav, S/roof, #49321-1

Limited, 31K, Red, Local Trade #V17800A

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$30,202

$6,800

SE, Silver, Loaded #42634B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$24,800

Touring, 2.0T, FWD, Platinum White Pearl, #28762A

LX, Manual #185491

$21,899

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$9,776

$19,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2013 GMC Terrain

2017 GMC Yukon

2011 Honda Accord

2005 Honda CR-V

2007 Hummer H2 SUT

2009 Hyundai Sonata

SLE, FWD, Black, 35K Miles #C18063C

SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4,#P9277

EX-L, V6, Navigation #B9262

EX, AWD, Local Trade, New Arrival #B9263A

Twilight Maroon, 4 Door, 4WD, #P9343

Limited, Auto, Sunroof, 1 Owner #V18142B

$30,884

$17,990

$48,988

$11,990

$6,490

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2018 GMC Terrain

2013 GMC Yukon

2012 Honda Accord

2014 Honda CR-V

2013 Hyundai Elantra

2011 Hyundai Sonata

1K Miles, FWD, White #B9076B

XL, SLT, Black, Loaded #P6199A

EX-L, V6, Auto, 39K Miles, #B9276

EX-L, Sunroof, Leather Seats, Blue, #42285A

GLS Stock #P06810

$9,988

SE, Limited, Clean Carfax, Auto, #P6442A

$19,990

$6,290

$16,169

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$15,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2011 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon

2014 Honda Civic

2016 Honda HR-V

2016 Hyundai Santa Fe

2016 Hyundai Sonata

SLT, AWD, Loaded, Clean Carfax, 63K Miles #35059A

XL, SLE, Stock #P06727

Coupe, Automatic, Dyno Blue Pearl #B8879A

LX, Auto, 14K, Local Trade #V18381A

Sport, Stk #P06857

SE, Stk #180695A

$26,490

$36,000

$16,600

$13,990

$19,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2015 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon

2016 Honda Civic

2016 Honda Odyssey

2015 Hyundai Santa Fe

SLE, Low Miles, Certified #C11688P

XL, SLE, #P06729

$37,000

EX-T, 17K, Local Trade #V18243A

35K Miles, Local Trade, 1 Owner #V18401A

Sport, AWD, #49571-1

$16,617

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$19,990

$26,990

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$14,969

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

24

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

RIDES MAGAZINE

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

$20,900

stltoday.com/RIDES

$7,369

$13,000 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2013 Hyundai Sonata

GLS, Stock #P06738

$8,134 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Hyundai Sonata

2017 Infiniti QX60

2015 Infiniti QX70

2006 Infinti FX45

2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Stock #P06804

One Owner, 10K Miles, AWD, Graphite Shadow #P9369

AWD, Moonlight White, 12K Miles #P9329

Limited, 4WD, White w/ Tan Leather #M18175A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$37,999

$35,884

V8, AWD, #35135A

LTD #L14431

$15,000

$25,890

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2016 Hyundai Tuscon

2017 Infiniti QX60

2017 Infiniti QX80

2017 Jaguar F-Pace S

2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2008 Jeep Liberty

Backup Camera, Parking Assist, FWD, Winter White #42897A

Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 11K Miles, Hermosa Blue #96351L

Navigation, Power Moonroof, Parking Sensors #153707

British Racing Green Metallic , 3.0L V-6 Cyl #P9109

SRT-8, Navigation, Pano Roof, #B9169

Sport, Clean Carfax, #35342A

$9,990

$16,569

$39,999

$51,777

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2013 Hyundai Veloster

2017 Infiniti QX60

2015 Infiniti QX80

2004 Jaguar Vanden

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2011 Jeep Patriot

Sunroof, Manual, Premium Sound, 64K Miles #M18259A

AWD, Clean Carfax 1 owner, 12K Miles, Black Obsidian #93654L

4WD, Mocha Almond, 43K Miles, AWD, #P9331

White, Loaded, Well Serviced #C8785A

Stock #P06715

Latitude, Heated Front Seats, Low Miles #C11704Q

$8,990

$51,100

$36,490

$15,000

$20,800

$7,990

$38,999

$48,884

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2012 Infiniti FX35

2017 Infiniti QX70

2017 Infiniti QX80

2016 Jeep Compass Latitude

2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Jeep Wrangler

44xxx Miles, #L4131

$23,855

Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated Front Seats, Automatic #96313L

Graphite Shadow, 5.6L V-8, AWD, #P9279

Limited, One Owner, Nav, Backup Camera #C181619A

$47,988

Unlimited, Freedom, 4WD, One Owner #P9371

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$37,999

FWD, Remote Start, Heated Front Seats #P6447

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2018 Infiniti Q50

2015 Infiniti QX70

2015 Infiniti QX80

2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2013 Kia Optima

3.5L V-6, AWD, #P9217

1 Owner, Black Obsidian, 13K Miles, AWD #P9383

One Owner, 4WD, Majestic White, 8 Cyl-5.6L #97404A

Limited, 27K Miles, 4WD, #P9336

LTD, #P4254

$29,884

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

SXL, Leather, Chromes, Nav #C9265A

$11,290

$30,600 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$35,500

$44,800

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

25

RIDES MAGAZINE

$13,869

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

$22,921

$30,980

stltoday.com/RIDES

$9,823 Lou Fusz Chewy (866) 602-1770

$39,999

$15,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Kia Optima

2013 Land Rover

2015 Lexus RX 350

LX, #48740-2

Range Rover, SE, 5.0L V-8 cyl, 63K Miles, Firenze Red Metallic #P9203

Nebula Gray Pearl, 6-Cyl 3.5L, AWD, 24K Miles #P9346

Stock #P06828

$14,079 Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$33,007

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2014 Kia Sorento

LX Stock #P06816

2016 Mazda CX-5

2013 Mazda Mazda3

$12,060

FWD, Certified, 1 Owner, #M9233

Sky Active, Manual, 1 Owner #V18381B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$20,490

$11,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2014 Land Rover

2017 Lexus RX 350

2012 Lincoln MKZ

2014 Mazda CX-5

2017 Mazda 6 Touring

Range Rover, 5.0L V8 Supercharged, 4x4, #P9120

F-Sport, AWD, 15K Miles, Local Trade #M18226A

Stock #P06828

$12,500

Touring, One Owner, Local Trade #M18323A

3K Miles, Automatic, Great Sale Price, #M17209R

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$48,490

$12,060

$20,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2014 Kia Sorento

2012 Lexus CT 200h

2012 Lincoln MKX

2004 Lincoln Town Car

2018 Mazda CX-9

2017 Mazda 3

SX, Stock #P06818

$18,000

Loaded, Clean Carfax #33745B

31K Miles, Sunroof, Navigation, New Arrival #C18251A

great condition. Low miles! Non-smoker car!

Grand Touring, Navigation, 1K Miles, Snowflake White, #12065L

Touring, 1 Owner, Mazda Certified #M9136

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$12,462

$19,490

Call for Price

$38,777

$16,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Chad (636) 385-0481

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2016 Kia Sorento

2016 Lexus GS-F

2013 Lincoln MKX

2017 Maserati Levante

2014 Mazda 3

2015 Mazda 6 Touring

SX, Navigation, Sunroof, Leather #P3814

20K Miles, Molten Pearl, Loaded #B9059

Loaded, Very Clean #P6270A

7K Miles, 3.0L V-6, AWD #P9149

iSport, 42K Miles, Automatic, Certified #V17159B

Auto, Loaded, Black #40090A

$56,490

$44,600

$48,600

2012 Lincoln MKZ

$60,100

$12,990

$15,676

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2013 Land Rover

2014 Lexus IS 350

2016 Lincoln MKX

2016 Mazda CX-3

2014 Mazda Mazda3

2008 Mazda Tribute

Range Rover Sport, HSE, 8 Cyl, 5.0L, 4WD, #P9349

AWD #192852

GTA, 21K, #193041

Grand Touring, AWD, 13K, Loaded #M18170A

i Touring, Automatic, Certified #M9255

#L14571

$30,007

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$21,490

$13,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$23,777

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$25,000

26

$15,990

$35,820 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$5,850


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Mercedes-Benz AMG

2015 Mini Cooper

2017 Mitzubishi Mirage

2018 Nissan Murano

2015 Nissan Rogue

2008 Pontiac Grand Prix

C 43 4MATIC, One Owner, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, #P9060

S, Auto, John Cooper Extra's #B9203

31K, Auto, Backup Camera, Power Pkg, #V18220A

Platinum, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 3K Miles #40235A

SV, One Owner, Clean Carfax, #35474A

Remote Start, Clean Carfax, Dark Slate #C180179A

$53,100

$22,490

$10,990

$36,999

$18,504

$5,466

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2013 Mercedes-Benz G63

2015 Mini Cooper

2011 Nissan Altima S

2017 Nissan Murano

2008 Nissan Sentra

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera

AMG, Automatic, Black, 25K Miles #P9126

Countryman, Auto, "S" Pkg, Leather #B9243

2.5S, New Arrival #C181592A

Gun Metallic, 3.5L V-6, FWD, 18K Miles, #P9278

Automatic, Power Options, Just Arrived, #M9044A

4S Cabriolet, White, 23K Miles #79457A

$90,100

$20,990

$8,997

$30,988

$72,100

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$4,390

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2016 Mercedes-Benz GLE

2015 Mini Cooper

2017 Nissan Armada

2015 Nissan Murano

2006 Nissan Sentra

2014 Porsche Boxster S

350, 4Matic, 3.5L V-6, AWD, #28548A

Manual, Pano Sunroof, 31K Miles #B9204

SL, AWD, Silver #V18235A

SL, AWD, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Moonroof #35124A

Local Trade, Clean Carfax, Black #C180860M

Convertible, RWD, 19K Miles, 6 Cyl-3.4L #P9365

$25,469

$52,800

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$4,386

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2009 Merc Grand Marquis

2013 Mini Cooper

2010 Nissan Frontier

2006 Nissan Pathfinder

2015 Nissan Titan

2014 Ram 2500

LS Stock #P06668

$6,000

S, Countryman, #33740A

Extended Cab, 4WD, 1 Owner #B9247

LE, 4WD, 3rd Row #V18115B

4 Door, Crew Cab, 4WD, 52K Miles, #B9063

6.7 Diesel, Crew Cab Laramie, 4 New Tires, #B9170

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$7,890

$28,990

$47,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

'77 MGB Convertible

2011 Mitsubishi Galant

2012 Nissan Juke

2013 Nissan Rogue

2017 Nissan Versa

2017 Ram ProMaster

Good Condition

ES, White, Auto, Full Power #42564B

SL #194311

White, Loaded, Only 29K Miles #35388A

S #903305

Cargo Van, Local Trade #M18052A

$6,776

Call (314)623-1358

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$13,769

$12,900

Best Offer

$9,780

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$38,988

$16,990

$11,976

27

$39,990

$10,990

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$21,490


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2018 Ram Promaster

2015 Toyota Avalon

2013 Toyota Prius

2012 VERANO CONV PK

2010 Volkswagen GTI

2018 Volkswagen Tiguan

Cargo Van, Stock #P06838

Limited, Nav, S/roof #P3842

Stock #180771A

80K MI, Very Good Cond., FWD, Silver

Stk #P06862

$13,990

S, 7K Miles, Time to Save! #V8873

$8,950

$9,990

$22,300

$24,900

$21,490

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

314-537-1258

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2012 Subaru Impreza

2015 Toyota Camry

2013 Toyota Prius

2007 Volkswagen Beetle

2014 Volkswagen Passat

2012 Volvo S60

WRX, 47K Miles, 1 Owner #C18110A

SE, Stk #P06867

Stk #180771A

$13,900

56K Miles, Automatic #V18135A

S, Navigation, 18" Wheels, VW Certified, #V9146

T6, AWD, Leather, Sunroof, Auto #M18332A

$20,990

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$8,490

$12,990

$12,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Subaru Impreza

2016 Toyota Corolla

2013 Toyota Prius

2016 Volkswagen CC

2015 Volkswagen Passat

2010 VOLVO T-5 Wagon

Limited Stock #P06746A

Black Sand Pearl, Aux Audio Input, Cruise Control #33720A

62K Miles, #L14531

$10,000

2.0Turbo Sport, 6K, White #V8362

Stock #P06866

$22,744

$22,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

63K mi., Ice White, Black, loaded, Very Nice,

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$11,223

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Call (618)467-0789

2016 Toyota 4Runner

2016 Toyota Highlander

2012 Toyota Tacoma

2012 Volkswagen EOS

2014 Volkswagen Passat

2016 Volvo XC60

Midnight Black Metallic, 4.0L V-6, 4x4, #97317B

Limited, AWD, Midnight Blue 6 Cyl 3.5L #28555A

Double Cab, 4WD, 43K Miles #B8945

Convertible, Stock #180544A

Stock #P06806

$35,999

$11,500

Clean Carfax One Owner, AWD, Backup Camera 22K Miles, #96733A

$36,802

$16,700

$14,476

$24,990

$12,900

$10,600

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2013 Toyota 4Runner SR5

2015 Toyota Highlander

2015 Toyota Yaris

2011 Volkswagen GTI

2013 Volkswagen Passat

2013 Volvo XC90

68xxx Miles, #L4131

LTD, M/R, Loaded, One Owner #33580A

LE #P06726

$9,994

Hatchback, White, Loaded #35051A

SE, Black #P3843

AWD, 100K Warranty #192241

$30,769

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$10,469

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$26,850 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

28

RIDES MAGAZINE

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

$13,614

stltoday.com/RIDES

$30,100

$20,000 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352


2007 Volvo XC90

$1000 OFF INSTALLATION

#L14411

$7,850

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2017 VW Tiguan

5K Miles, FWD, Like New, Save, #V8226

$21,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

1996 17' Bass Tracker Boat

40HP, Trailer, Built-in Fuel Tank, 2 Depth Finders, in Paris MO

$5600. Call (636)379-0011 or (636)697-0842

2005 C-Class Toy-Hauler

NEVER REPLACE YOUR ROOF AGAIN! 29ft – 65K milesautomatic/gas V10 -

$16,500 or best offer. Mike @ 314-775-5626

1988 Peterson

A select number of homeowners in the area will be given the opportunity to have a lifetime ProCraft Exteriors metal roof installed on their home at a reasonable cost. Call today to see if you qualify for these great savings. IL roofing license number: #104.015632

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New orders only. Minimum purchase required. Other restrictions may apply. Offer expires 07/31/2018.

29

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


Save your hair

and save money $ OFF 750 any Hair solution for a limited time only OFFER EXPIRES 7/31/18

Call for a freee hair and scalp analysis consultation Plea mention coupon when scheduling appointment. Please Restrictions Apply. Offer Good for Non-Medical Solutions Only.

314-230-8121 • 618-206-5945 • 636-203-9876 “Technology meets the art of hair restoration”

30

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


2012 LINCOLN MKZ

2012 VW EOS

Convertible, Executive, Leather, Clean Carfax, 81K Miles

Hybrid, Clean Carfax, 74K Miles

*

$12,060

STK #P06828

*

STK #180544A

2011 CHEVY CAMARO 1LT

2015 FORD MUSTANG

V6, One Owner, 55K Miles

Fastback Ecoboost, 45K Miles

*

$15,871

STK #P06815

STK #180732A

2015 CHEVY EQUINOX 1LT

$18,100* 2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 5 Speed Manual 4.6L V8, 32K Miles

V6, Clean Carfax, 36K Miles

*

$18,225

STK #P06814

$12,900

STK #P06592A

$19,000*

2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

2017 AUDI Q3

Limited, 4WD, 70K Miles

One Owner, 21K Miles

*

$20,800

STK #P06705

$

2017 BUICK CASCADA

Bluetooth STK #P06758

*Tax, Title, License Fees Extra. Photos may not be actual representation.

866-883-8841 2244 S. KINGSHIGHWAY. “At The Entrance To The Hill”

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RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

07-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

*

HWY 40

HWY 44

ILLINOIS

/70

$25,700*

Convertible, Clean Carfax

HWY 55

2015 GMC ACADIA SLT-1 Heated & Cooled Seats, STK #P06775

24,900*

HAMPTON

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KINGSHIGHWAY

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2011 FORD FIESTA SE

2012 FORD FOCUS SE

$

9,959

$

7,676

STK #48187A

STK #48147A

2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING

$ STK #48003A

10,250

$

11,106

$

10,396

STK #47980A

2017 HYUNDAI ACCENT SE

9,995

2013 SCION XB

11,562

$ STK #47697A

10,420

STK #48208A

2013 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SPORT ES

11,839

$

10,995

2014 TOYOTA COROLLA LE

$

$ STK #48088A

10,000

2010 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED HYBRID

$ STK #P9186

$ STK #P9198

2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE LS

$ STK #48150A

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE

2008 INFINITI G35 SEDAN X

STK #47779A

2013 CHEVROLET SONIC LS

STK #P9187

11,904

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

FridaY • 07.13.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠K J 10 ♥J 6 3 ♦K J ♣9 8 7 6 2 WEST EAST ♠Void ♠8 7 6 5 4 2 ♥A K Q 8 4 2 ♥10 9 7 ♦9 6 4 3 ♦10 7 ♣K J 5 ♣Q 10 SOUTH ♠A Q 9 3 ♥5 ♦A Q 8 5 2 ♣A 4 3 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♦ 1♥ Dbl* Pass 4♠ All pass *Negative, values with no clear bid Opening lead: Ace of ♥ Hard Luck Louie was a little disturbed that his partner made a negative double with only three spades, even though it was partner’s only sensible call. After some thought, Louie decided that he could bring the contract home as long as the spades and the diamonds broke no worse than 4-2. The key would be to maintain control in the trump suit, so he discarded a club when West continued hearts at trick two. He shed another club when West

led a third heart. West, who knew that the trumps were splitting poorly, continued with a fourth round of hearts in an effort to attack Louie’s trump holding. Louie ruffed in dummy, discarding a diamond from his hand, and cashed dummy’s king of spades. He was crestfallen when West showed out. He ended up down two, complaining all the way about his bad luck. Lucky Larry played the same contract, with the same opening lead. He was completely happy with the dummy, and he took a different view about his chances. Larry ruffed the heart continuation at trick two and led a low diamond to dummy’s king. He overtook the jack of diamonds with his ace and ruffed a diamond in dummy. A club to his ace was followed by another diamond ruff, and a heart ruff back to his hand allowed him to ruff his last diamond in dummy. Larry made his contract with seven trump tricks, two diamonds, and one club. Nicely played! (07/13/18)

Across 1 Brand of headphones 11 Sellers of buckets 15 Brought about 16 Smooth 17 Annual fashion event since 1948 18 ___ torch 19 Put in the trash 20 One hanging around in a deli? 22 Queen Elizabeth spells her name with one 23 Romanian currency units 24 Use Venmo, say 25 Mozart’s “Le ___ di Figaro”

27 Imprecise stats: abbr. 29 File folder part 30 One taking a survey 31 Taking on a new identity, in a way 34 Once-standard subject no longer taught in most schools 36 “That must be the case” 37 One of 32 for Beethoven 39 Harmless 40 Daytime star 41 Temper tantrum outbursts 45 To whom “Matchmaker, Matchmaker” is sung 46 Abbr. on old Eurasian maps

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If July 13 is your birthday • This year could be extraordinary, especially if you flow with the stellar energy. If you are single, you will attract many potential suitors. If you are attached, the two of you might volley for center stage. Leo urges you to be more self-centered.

WORD GAME July 13 WORD — INNUENDOS (INNUENDOS: in-yoo-EN-doze: Indirect or subtle expressions, usually derogatory.) Average mark 29 words. Time limit 45 minutes. Can you find 41 or more words in INNUENDOS? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — ALBUMEN maul balm able meal bane album mean beam alum menu bean amble mule beau amen elan blame lamb name blue lame nebula ulna lane numb unable lean male lune mane bale RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

47 Play-___ 48 Health abbr. 49 Measure the length of again 52 Game in which it’s illegal to play left-handed 53 Crushed cacao beans used to make chocolate 55 Leave one’s drawers in the drawer, say 57 Posthuman race of literature 58 Secret society invoked in many conspiracy theories 59 Match up 60 Participates in combat Puzzle by Caleb Madison

Down 1 Fifth place? 2 Offers a similar opinion to 3 Nails a test 4 Hats in the Highlands 5 Navigation abbr. 6 Parts of an “SNL” audition 7 Athleisure wear 8 Police department resources 9 Something no one person can run 10 Eponymous Dutch town 11 Baby skunk 12 Makes curly

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ You breeze into the afternoon ready for the weekend and feeling unusually creative. Others are drawn to you. Expect the unexpected later in the day. Run with whatever happens. Tonight: Be wild! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★ You might feel pressured by a loved one and/or a domestic situation. As a result, you could act out and say or do something shocking. Understand what this action or statement means. Tonight: Head home at a reasonable hour. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ Handle your finances and other serious matters in the morning, when you naturally are more attentive. As the afternoon approaches, you might be overwhelmed by calls and emails. Tonight: Decide to do something very different. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ You could be in the right mindset to begin the weekend — that is, until a financial matter becomes a higher priority. You might have to change your plans. Tonight: Count your change.

29 Something to do to a shoulder or the brakes 30 Corolla part 32 Someone who’s really too good to be competing 33 Hu-u-uge 34 With alacrity 35 Seller of calorific pastries 38 Anvil, hammer or stirrup 39 James F. ___,

42 43 44 46 50 51 52 54 56

Truman secretary of state God, in Hebrew Maintain, as standards Sure winner Fancy wrap Protection: var. Stone that’s cast Gasp Word usually written in brackets ___ drop

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0608

WORD SCRIMMAGE

of plans. You might not want to disclose all your news to those around you. Tonight: Be spontaneous. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ Clear out work obligations as quickly as possible. Make calls and confirm plans. A partner or associate could drop some unexpected news on you. Tonight: Enjoy every moment, especially as you are surrounded by friends. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ Follow through on plans to get out of town for the weekend. You might find that a partner or friend creates some uproar about the trip, or perhaps other problems appear. Tonight: Celebrate the weekend well.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You could be in the mood to take off on an adventure of sorts. If you can take off early, even better. A change of scenery can only benefit you. Tonight: Listen to your inner yearnings. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Defer to a partner who has strong ideas that he or she would like you to go along with. Try to let go of your bias and listen carefully. A child suddenly might decide to act up. Get into the moment without making anything heavier than need be. Tonight: Curb being too spontaneous. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ You will let others run with the ball. You have a lot of loved ones who have a better sense of what works than you do. You could be surprised by what occurs. You will not have to go far from home. Be careful with a secret. You could let the cat out of the bag. Tonight: At home.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ You might feel off in the morning. Decide to do something just for you. Don’t let a mood change your plans. In the afternoon, you’ll be energized and ready to go for what you want. Tonight: Do your own thing!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ Your high energy and spunkiness might dissolve as the day goes on. Others drop some last-minute work on you. You know you are going to have to work late or during the weekend. Free yourself up to do something that you find relaxing. Tonight: Join a friend, even if it is late.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ Reach out to someone at a distance who is a dear friend. You could have a surprise coming toward you and a change

STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

13 Soda debut of 2005 14 Baseball Hall of Famer Duke 21 Privy to a practical joke, say 26 “Don’t count your chickens before they hatch,” e.g. 28 Tough situation

WORDY GURDY

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

07.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Crush on boss causes heartache

Dear Really Confused • Because you are excelling in this retail job, consider asking your beautiful, funny, married boss to write a positive letter of recommendation for you so you can find another job in retail — one that won’t make you ache every time you clock in.

Dear Abby • My husband and I have been asked to be in his sister’s wedding. We said yes, mostly out of obligation. There will be three married couples in the procession. I recently learned that my sister-inlaw plans to have the couples split up and walk with others. I think it’s extremely weird and rude, so much so that we want to back out. Neither of us cares to be in a memory book with us posing with other people. It’s not that either of us is jealous; we have been married for 24 years. — FEELING OBLIGATED IN THE EAST Dear Feeling Obligated • I think that before you take offense and back out, you should ask your sister-in-law why she wants to do this. It could be something as simple as variations in the height of the participants and not weird or rude. Between you and me, unless you and your husband feel so strongly about this that you are willing to create a rift in the family, you should go along with his sister’s fantasy of her perfect day.

Dear Abby • I can’t do anything for my 70-something-year-old mom without her thanking me so much it makes me uncomfortable. A recent example: She moved to a new apartment, and I bought her some gift certificates as a housewarming gift. She thanked me profusely via email when she received them. She thanked me again over the phone when I next spoke with her. When my sister and I paid for a trip for her, she bought us expensive gifts as thank-yous. The gifts cost far more than she could afford, which kind of negated the idea of us paying for the trip. Should I say or do anything, or just let it be? — THANKS-FULL SON IN SEATTLE Dear Son • If you say something, you risk embarrassing your mother or hurting her feelings. I vote for just letting it be. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Bottom of shirt is different. 2. Man is moved. 3. Tent rope is missing. 4. Backpack strap is different. 5. Mirror is larger. 6. Tree is missing.

Dear Abby • I’m 20 years old and have a job in retail. I have been working here for a few years and am in a higher position than most associates. I’m in a relationship with my high school sweetheart, whom I truly love, but I am also crazy about my boss. She’s beautiful, funny, and to be honest, I jumped at my promotion so I could get closer to her. I feel terrible because, while I love my girlfriend, if I were given the chance to be with my boss, I’d have a hard time saying no. Thankfully, my boss is in a longterm marriage, so I know in my head I have no chance, but it hurts to go on every day thinking about her. — REALLY CONFUSED IN RETAIL

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Keep your swishing to yourself

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Dear Miss Manners • Is it OK to swish wine or water in your mouth in the company of others? Gentle Reader • Only if you are at a wine-tasting — or your own bathroom sink — and there is a suitable depository at the ready. Dear Miss Manners • My longtime companion and I have been making a couple of trips each year to visit his daughter and her controlling husband, who live 400 miles away. We always stay in a hotel but are invited to their home for dinners. After our last visit, I stated that I would never go to their home again. The daughter is a nice person, and she and I get along great. The problem is her husband. I’ve put up with his repulsive manners, but I no longer wish to subject myself to his belligerent rudeness. On our most recent visit, while

I was in the kitchen alone, the husband strolled in and paused as he came near me, then proceeded to let out the loudest belch I have ever heard in my entire life. I felt that he was daring me to say something, but I acted as if I hadn’t even noticed what he had done. But inside, I was fuming! Gentle Reader • With your most sincere and concerned voice, say to his wife, “My dear, I am afraid that there might be something medically wrong with your husband. He makes the most extraordinary sounds and I fear that his digestive system is failing him. You might want to get him checked.” If your companion’s daughter does not choke on her own food with laughter, Miss Manners feels that she will take the hint and address at least that specific problem — if not his rudeness altogether.

Dear Miss Manners • I am looking for guidance as to the best way to deal with a deceased father of the bride in an upcoming wedding. The bride’s father committed suicide 10 years ago, and the devastation to his children and family is still very apparent. The wedding is being paid for by the bride’s mother and her now-husband of seven years. We are in the midst of writing a wedding speech for the mother of the bride, and are wondering the best way to mention him in the speech and honor his name in spite of how he passed. Gentle Reader • “Harvey would have so loved to have given this wedding with me, and to be toasting our daughter today.” Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

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FOX The Resident The staff The Orville: Krill. Ed 2 must perform three and Gordon must get surgeries. the Krill bible. (cc)

FOX 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

CBS Whistleblower Kool 4 Smiles; Bristol-Myers Squibb. (N) (cc)

Blue Bloods: Legacy. Danny investigates a man’s death.

Hawaii Five-0 A diamond smuggler’s corpse is stolen.

NBC American Ninja Warrior: Minneapolis City 5 Qualifiers. Minneapolis qualifiers. (cc) PBS Washing9 ton Week (N) (cc) CW 11

Breaking Father Brown A direc- The Great British BakBig (N) (cc) tor is murdered. (cc) ing Show: Pies. (N) (cc)

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

Dateline NBC (N) (cc)

The Andy Griffith Show

Masters of Masters Penn & Teller: Fool Illusion (N) of Illusion Us: Penn & Teller Get Loopy. (cc) (cc) (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

What Would You Do? ABC Quantico The team 30 goes on high alert. (N) (8:01) (N) (cc) (cc)

20/20 (9:01) (N) (cc)

CSI: Crime Scene Inves- CSI: Crime Scene InION CSI: Crime Scene In46 vestigation: Young Man tigation Connection to a vestigation Grissom is With a Horn. serial killer. leaving.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 07.13.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Reasons for trouble with diabetes control FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • I hope you can shed some light on an issue that I have not seen you address: the dawn phenomenon. I am having trouble controlling my diabetes. I am 67 years old, and my mother was a “brittle” Type 2 diabetic who ultimately needed insulin twice a day. I have been on glipizide (10 mg) for three months now; before that, I was on 5 mg for about nine months. I tried metformin for a short time, but it did not agree with me (cramps and diarrhea). I am overweight but working on it. I will admit that I love carbs, eat out often and I am known as a good Italian cook, hence, pasta and more carbs. My morning readings usually are 170 to 200. My bedtime readings are 130 to 150. I take my glipizide with my evening meal. Two hours after breakfast, my readings are in the normal range. My A1c is 6.9. My husband is critically ill. He is significantly older than me, with COPD, congestive heart failure and lung cancer. Can the added stress of caretaking affect blood sugars? — B.P.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • I am sorry to hear about your husband. Indeed, stress of any kind (and being a caregiver to a very ill loved one usually is extremely stressful) can make diabetes control worse. The stress itself can increase hormones (including cortisol and epinephrine), which act against insulin. Caregivers also routinely get poor sleep, which compounds the problem. As far as the high sugars in the morning go, it could be due to the dawn phenomenon. This is a response to the surge in hormones that work against insulin (in this case, especially glucagon) that happens in the morning. Insulin resistance is higher at this time, so blood sugars tend to be high as well. However, there are other causes. One is the Somogyi effect, which is what happens after the blood sugar gets too low at night. The body responds by increasing those same anti-insulin hormones — cortisol, glucagon, epinephrine and growth hormone — to counteract the low blood sugar, resulting in a high blood sugar in the morning. The way to tell whether high blood sugars in the morning are due to dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is to check the blood sugar early in the morning (around 3 a.m.), or to use a continuous glucose monitor. Fortunately, your A1c level of 6.9 percent is in the range of acceptable for a 67-year-old. Even so, too many processed carbohydrates, like most pasta and white bread, is not the healthiest choice. I would recommend making some small changes by eating fewer starches and more vegetables and legumes.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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7.13.18  

7.13.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

7.13.18  

7.13.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch