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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

THURSDAY • 07.12.2018 • $2.00

TRUMP BLASTS NATO

• CALLS OUT GERMANY FOR ‘BEING CAPTIVE TO RUSSIA’ • SAYS ALLIES ARE ‘DELINQUENT’ ON MILITARY SPENDING BY MICHAEL BIRNBAUM AND SEUNG MIN KIM Washington Post

BRUSSELS • President Donald

Trump ripped into NATO allies Wednesday, slamming Germany for its dependence on Russian energy and demanding that nations double their military spending commitments. European diplomats have been worried about continued U.S. support for NATO. But even as Trump hit allies, he also signed on to efforts to strengthen the alliance against the Kremlin and other rivals, as well as a statement that the alliance does not accept Russia’s

2014 annexation of Crimea. On spending, Trump insisted in a closed-door meeting of NATO leaders that the alliance increase defense targets to 4 percent of each country’s gross domestic product — more than what the United States channels toward its military. It was not clear whether he was serious about a new standard or whether he was using the number as a negotiating tactic to get European nations to pay more. The push came hours after Trump bashed Germany for “being captive to Russia” because it imports much of its natural gas

NATO summit participants (front row, from left) German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, U.S. President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May watch a fly-by at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Wednesday.

AP

See NATO • Page A7

BUTTERFLIES LIKE BEER

AND OTHER LESSONS FROM PLANNING-TO-EXPAND LAB AT BUTTERFLY HOUSE

McCaskill: Lax oversight fuels the opioid crisis BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • Inconsistent government oversight and widely differing pharmaceutical industry compliance has contributed to a national opioid epidemic and to “significant” suspicious opioid shipments in parts of Missouri, a new report by investigators for Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., says. A spokesman for the pharmaceutical industry pushed back, saying McCaskill relied on “debunked” information and did not focus enough on doctors’ overprescribing the powerful painkillers. McCaskill told the Post-Dispatch she suspects that high levels of suspicious shipments See OPIOIDS • Page A7

PHOTOS BY TIM VIZE

A Sara longwing butterfly from Costa Rica rests last week on a flower at the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House, situated in Faust Park in Chesterfield. The butterfly house, now in its 20th year, is raising funds to double the size of its entomology lab.

Apartments in the Central West End have strong — but mixed — opinions about the new smoking ban taking effect this month in public housing across the country. By July 30, residents of public housing will have to leave their homes and even housing authority property if they want to smoke. “It’s driving people crazy,” said former smoker John Lewis, 52, of the new federal rule. Lewis said he appreciated the ban because it was still difficult for him to be around the smell of smoke. Thelma Hellems, 68, said banning smoking

CHESTERFIELD • A lot has to

See BUTTERFLY • Page A6

TODAY

92°/73°

Piece talks

See SMOKING • Page A4

Residents fight to repeal Maplewood nuisance ordinance BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A cactus longhorn beetle from Arizona peeks over a piece of cactus held by Laura Chisholm, senior manager of collections and an entomologist at the Butterfly House.

WORLD CUP FINAL IS SET

Croatia vs. France

SUNNY

TOMORROW

SPORTS

94°/75°

BY CHRISTIE L.C. ELLIS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Residents at the Parkview

BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

happen in 195 square feet at the Butterfly House in Faust Park. That’s the size of the insect lab where nearly 1 million butterflies have emerged from their chrysalises over 20 years. It’s also home to thousands of other insects used in displays and education programs, each needing special care and feeding. There’s oatmeal for the mealworms, cucumbers for the millipedes, and crickets for the tarantulas. Fruit trays are prepared for some butterflies, while others need a special brew of nectar cooked up by an entomologist using five ingredients: sugar, water, honey, Gatorade powder and one “very secret ingredient”: beer. The Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House marks its 20th anniversary in Chesterfield this year. During that time, the staff has almost tripled and annual attendance has risen to 127,000 from about 79,000. Still, the cramped lab where all the insects are cared for remains smaller than the average college dorm room. It’s hidden from visitors in a small room off the butterfly conservatory. This year, in honor of the anniversary, the institution is

Public housing to become smoke-free by end of month

Dozens of Maplewood residents gathered Wednesday to fight a city nuisance ordinance that can lead to eviction after more than two calls to 911. The meeting at the city’s Salvation Army center attracted about 100 people, including several who only recently learned of the ordinance enacted in 2006. Under the rule, more than two calls to police within 180 days for an incident of “peace disturbance or domestic violence” can trigger a revocation of the homeowner’s or renter’s occupancy permit See ORDINANCE • Page A4

Suit to oust lieutenant governor fails

MU fundraising campaign tops $1 billion

MOSTLY SUNNY

Stocks skid as trade war worsens

WEATHER B9

Offense slumbers in loss to White Sox

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

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M 1 THURSDAY • 07.12.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM INSIDE PITCH

POUR AND PLAY

UPCOMING CHATS

Will Yadi’s All-Star game appearance help his Hall of Fame chances? Columnists Ben Frederickson and Jeff Gordon discuss the Cardinals catcher’s case. stltoday.com/cardinals

Explore the Magic House after hours while tasting offerings from some of the best breweries, wineries and distilleries in the area. stltoday.com/OurEvents

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MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m.

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Talk Blues hockey, 1 p.m.

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JOE’S ST. LOUIS

Slatkin’s back! Ex-symphony leader returns to St. Louis roots JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FAMILIAR REFRAIN • Many people go to Clayton to conduct their business, so why not Leonard Slatkin? The former maestro of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra — who recently moved back to STL — was sighted ambling about the county seat earlier this week. Slatkin According to the Detroit News, Slatkin returned in late June to his “old stomping grounds.” He and his wife, composer Cindy McTee, have built a house in Clayton, the newspaper reported. The Grammy Award-winning Slatkin was music director at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra from 1979 to 1996. He left to become music director of the National Symphony Orchestra. He took the same position in 2008 with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, where he remains the director laureate and will conduct some performances in the 2018-19 season. Slatkin told the newspaper he and McTee had considered other places to live. “But ultimately,” he said, “I have some really deep, long friendships in St. Louis.” LADLING HONORS • A tip of the toque is due to chef Bob Colosimo, general manager of Eleven Eleven Mississippi restaurant.

On Tuesday, Colosimo will be inducted into the American Academy of Chefs at a ceremony set during the annual meeting of the American Culinary Federation in New Colosimo Orleans. Colosimo, who has been at the Lafayette Square dining space for 10 years, is active with the federation’s STL branch, the St. Louis Chefs de Cuisine Association. Colosimo presides over the group’s educational efforts. SHIPPING BRICKS • STL social-media sensei Chris Reimer has cranked up another project. On Monday, Reimer’s new consumer-tech products company Boosa Tech Reimer began selling its first item, a power bank (aka: portable charger). Reimer, who has given himself the title of “founder and chief power officer,” has been working since last summer to get his product on the market, he said. “I didn’t really set any first-day goals, but over the first 24 hours, I’m closing in on $2,500 in sales,” Reimer said Tuesday. That total works out to about “80 units sold on the first day, with no paid advertising; just social media.” This is not Reimer’s first dip into the entrepreneurial end of the social-media pool. In 2008, he used the medium to sell Rizzo Tees, a company he closed in 2014 to focus on the online marketing of his book, “Happywork,” which talks about finding fulfillment at your job. Reimer also has a daytime job (so he’s

doin’ all right). He is the associate director of new media at Maryville University. DRIVING MAD • Lists comparing St. Louis with other cities often make us wonder how we finished so low. The latest one from personal finance website WalletHub might have us wondering how we ever finished so high: “Best and Worst Cities To Drive In.” Out of the 100 largest cities in the U.S., our fair burg clocked in at No. 67 — meaning that driving in 33 other large cities is worse. (Clearly, no points were deducted for the percentage of drivers eternally sporting about with temporary tags.) The list took into account four main criteria: cost of ownership/maintenance; traffic and infrastructure; access to vehicles and maintenance; and safety. Guess what? We finished dead last, No. 100, in safety. The factors in that category included likelihood of accidents; traffic fatalities; seat belt use; car thefts; and thefts from vehicles. Our best finish was in the maintenance field, where we were No. 8. That category scoped out number of car dealerships; repair shops; car washes; gas stations; and parking lots/garages. To round out the results, we were No. 26 in ownership costs and No. 67 in infrastructure/traffic. The best five: Raleigh, N.C.; Corpus Christi, Texas; Orlando, Fla.; Greensboro, N.C.; and Plano, Texas. The worst, Nos. 96-100: Seattle, Philadelphia, Oakland, San Francisco and Detroit. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

Brassy Kesha outshines goofy Macklemore onstage It was hard not to root for Kesha as she hit the stage during “The Adventures of Kesha and Macklemore” tour that played Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre on Tuesday. Singer Kesha and rapper Macklemore, who performed separate sets and joined forces on one tune, aren’t very adventurous as far as adventurous pairings go. But Kesha, who closed out the evening, has proved resilient in the face of turmoil. The “Praying” pop star has suffered through the worst end of the music industry with the complicated lawsuit/ countersuit resulting from her sexual assault claims against her former producer Dr. Luke (making her an immediate part of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements). While the legalities of that continue, she keeps moving forward, proving you can’t keep her down. That spirit was evident during her near 90-minute show Tuesday night, drawing 13,000 fans. Still brassy with her special penchant for frequent F-bombs, Kesha looks as if she’s at the top of her game with her pair of recent Grammy nominations and her summer tour. Emerging kitschy-style from a foamy spaceship, Kesha hit the stage dressed as a shining galaxy goddess, and blasted off into “Woman” from her 2017 album “Rainbow.” The show continued mostly upbeat, light and uncomplicated with a set that included “Boogie Feet,” “Timber,” “Learn to Let Go” and “Blow,” but she said “first things first: Happy (expletive) Pride.

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Kesha performs at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre on Tuesday.

Personally, I think every month is Pride Month” to introduce “We R Who We R.” At one point, she said that her brother was filming the show and that was an incentive to go crazy, though it felt like an unnecessary suggestion. Her fans were already there from her strapping on a guitar for “Bastards,” inviting Macklemore out for “Good Old Days,” and giving a nod to Dolly Parton, a performer she described as a favorite singer, songwriter and woman, for “Jolene.” Closing the confetti-filled show with signature ballad “Praying” and early hit “Tik Tok,” she had fun with “Take It Off,” leading to some fans’ throwing clothing at her. “I love all my new bras,” she said, keeping one on her microphone stand.

Palin lashes out after being ‘duped’ by Baron Cohen Sarah Palin says she was “duped.” The former Republican vice presidential candidate says she fell victim to British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen during an interview for his upcoming Showtime series, “Who Is America?” In a Facebook post on Tuesday, the former Alaska governor wrote she and a daughter traveled across the country for what she thought was a legitimate interview. She said Baron Cohen had “heavily disguised himself” as a disabled U.S. veteran in a wheelchair. She is challenging Baron Cohen and Showtime to donate proceeds from the show to a veterans charity. Showtime had no comment. An email seeking comment from Baron Cohen has not been returned. The show premieres Sunday. Mellencamp receives Woody Guthrie Prize • Rocker John Mellencamp has been awarded the Woody Guthrie Prize. The Woody Guthrie Center in Tulsa, Okla., announced Wednesday that Mellencamp will be presented with the award at a ceremony on Aug. 30. He is the fifth recipient. The annual prize is given to an artist who best exemplifies the spirit and life work of Guthrie by speaking for the less fortunate and serving as a positive force for social change. Mellencamp is an Indiana native and a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Cardi B makes baby moves • Cardi B is celebrating the birth of her first child. The rapper, 25, welcomed daughter Kulture Kiari Cephus with a post on Instagram Wednesday, which her representative confirmed. The girl was born Tuesday. The announcement comes two weeks after Cardi B, whose real name is Belcalis Almanzar, confirmed she and rapper Offset, of the hip-hop group Migos, had secretly married in September.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Singer Christine McVie is 75. Actress Cheryl Ladd is 67. Actress Natalie Desselle Reid is 51. Rapper Magoo is 45. Actor Topher Grace is 40. Actress Michelle Rodriguez is 40. Actress Ta’Rhonda Jones is 30. Actress Rachel Brosnahan is 28. Actor Erik Per Sullivan is 27.

CONCERT REVIEW

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PEOPLE

Macklemore, these days minus his Grammy accomplice Ryan Lewis, remains a bit of a cornball, no matter how you look at it. And it’s unclear how he was such a winner at the Grammys in 2014, beating out names such as Kendrick Lamar, Ed Sheeran and Kacey Musgraves for Best New Artist. He continues to fall short of the hype despite some catchy songs, mostly as Macklemore & Ryan Lewis. His set was a sweaty summer party fully embracing his pop side. It came with a tropical setting, picnic table, barbecue grill and lawn chairs, complete with crowd surfing during “Can’t Hold Us.” Beginning with “Ain’t Gonna Die Tonight,” the first track on his latest album “Gemini,” he mixed his solo songs with Macklemore & Ryan Lewis hits including “Thrift Shop,” and kept it moving swiftly, if unexceptionally. Saying he wanted to do something special for St. Louis, he told fans he hid golden tickets under two seats. Those two fans were brought on stage and allowed to sit on a blow-up mattress he said he bought at Target the same day as he performed “Willy Wonka.” Two fans competed on stage during “Dance Off.” He wins for audience interaction. Pointing out that “America is divided” and fear is pushed into the masses to separate us, he said everyone was welcome at his shows regardless of race, sexual orientation, what bathroom they choose and where their passport says they’re from. This naturally led to “Same Love.” But it was mostly goofiness that reigned, exemplified when he threw hot dogs at a fan to catch.

From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday: 19-21-27-46-47 Powerball: 07 Power play: 4 Estimated jackpot: $90 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 01-17-28-56-70 Mega ball: 14 Megaplier: 3 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $340 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

LOTTO Wednesday: 13-16-17-28-34-36 Estimated jackpot: $1.7 million SHOW ME CASH Wednesday: 06-19-21-24-27 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $65,000 PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 524 Evening: 940 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 7977 Evening: 5516

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Wednesday Midday: 09-16-33-35-43 Evening: 09-15-32-41-43 LOTTO Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $7.25 million PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 438 FB: 5 Evening: 833 FB: 1 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 0864 FB: 3 Evening: 8119 FB: 7

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

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07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

LOCAL

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A3

Judge rejects lawsuit to oust lieutenant governor BY KURT ERICKSON st. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • A Cole County judge tossed out on Wednesday a Democratic challenge to Gov. Mike Parson’s appointment of a new lieutenant governor. In a scathing decision, Circuit Judge Jon Beetem said the Democratic attempt to oust former Senate Majority Floor Leader Mike Kehoe from his new job failed on multiple legal fronts, including whether private citizens can try to get rid of officeholders through the courts. “Under Missouri law, a private plaintiff lacks authority to seek the removal of a public official through litigation,” Beetem wrote. At issue is Parson’s appointment on June 18 of Kehoe, R-Jefferson City, to his new role. Parson, 62, had been lieutenant governor until June 1, when then-Gov. Eric Greitens quit after 17 scandal-plagued months in office. The lawsuit brought by the Democrats and lead plaintiff Darrell Cope of Hartville

says the lieutenant governor position can be filled only by an election. In the nine-page ruling, Beetem attempted to settle the long-running debate over a governor’s ability to appoint a lieutenant governor. He said the No. 2 post in state government was too important to leave vacant until the next election. “Given the importance of the office of Lieutenant Governor, this court is reluctant to adopt an interpretation of Missouri law that would generate such an unreasonable and anomalous result,” the judge wrote. Kehoe, 56, who has moved into the lieutenant governor’s office, said he was grateful for the decision. “When I was sworn in as lieutenant governor on June 18th, I pledged to Gov. Parson and the people of Missouri that I would work to improve the state through infrastructure and work-force development. Since then, I have visited state departments throughout central Missouri, met with community and business leaders across the state, and begun the process of integrating myself with the numerous

boards and commissions on which I will serve,” Kehoe said. Attorneys representing the state argued that the governor had the ability to fill vacancies in public office, unless there is a law specifically addressing how a vacancy should be filled. In addition, they pointed to 2000, when Roger Wilson moved from the lieutenant governor post to the governor’s office after the death of Gov. Mel Carnahan, a Democrat. Wilson then picked Joe Maxwell to fill his old position. Once Kehoe was sworn into office, the lawyers argued, he could be removed only by impeachment or through the intervention of the attorney general’s office. Beetem agreed. “First, Plaintiffs here are private parties, not government officials,” he wrote. In a statement, Parson said, “This affirms our position as well as the position of previous governors from both parties. ” The judge scoffed at the Democratic Party’s assertion that it had the ability to bring the case based on the assumption that Kehoe might run for a full term in the

office in 2020, making it harder to elect a Democratic candidate. “This allegation is conjectural, hypothetical and speculative. It is entirely unknown and unknowable whether Lt. Gov. Kehoe will decide to run for the office of Lieutenant Governor in 2020; whether he will prevail in the Republican primary if he does run; which Democratic candidates, if any, might run against him; and whether his incumbency would provide any material advantage in the election if he does run and win the primary,” Beetem noted. “This allegation piles speculation upon conjecture. It is too speculative and hypothetical to support standing. No injury in fact can arise simply from incumbency,” he added. Attorney Matt Vianello, who represented the Democratic Party and Cope, said, “My clients are disappointed in the result, and we are exploring our options for appeal.” Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Gunman stood over body in hours-long standoff Man holding gun is charged after negotiating with sheriff’s deputies BY KIM BELL AND CHRISTINE BYERS st. Louis Post-dispatch

CEDAR HILL LAKES • A five-hour standoff ended Wednesday when a gunman who had been standing over a dead woman on a porch of a home in Jefferson County surrendered to sheriff’s deputies. Later Wednesday, prosecutors charged the man, identified as Steve Earnest Treece, 62, with murder, armed criminal action and unlawful use of a weapon. He was ordered held without bail. Sheriff Dave Marshak said negotiators arrested the man after he agreed to surrender peacefully. During the ordeal, the gunman wouldn’t let officers anywhere close to the body. Marshak confirmed that the body was that of a woman. Authorities have not released her name but said earlier in the day they believed it to be the body of Treece’s wife. The couple lived at the home, in this small village south of Cedar Hill. A neighbor, Justin Colbert, said he was close friends with the son of the couple who lived at the home, in the 8400 block of Eastview Drive, east of Highway 30. He identified Treece’s wife as Donna Treece. “As close as I was to that family, I can’t imagine what happened,” said Colbert, 29. “We’re a close-knit neighborhood here. It’s nothing we would expect to hear. This is devastating.”

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Jefferson County sheriff’s deputies talk on Wednesday to distraught family members at the scene of a five-hour standoff with police at Cedar Hill Lakes. Police say the standoff began when a man allegedly shot and killed a woman believed to be his wife.

It all began when a neighbor called police after hearing gunfire on Eastview Drive about 6 a.m. The caller said she had gone outside after hearing the shots and a man had pointed a gun at her, Capt. Gary Higginbotham of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department said. The neighbor ran back into her home. Police rushed to the neighborhood and found a man, later identified as Treece, on a deck and “discovered a person un-

responsive on the deck,” Marshak said. Treece pointed a gun at officers, so they ducked for cover. Deputies tried to talk with Treece and asked for negotiators to come help. Higginbotham said police, keeping some distance, used a high-powered scope to look at the body. The victim’s body was on the porch at the feet of the gunman for the duration of the standoff, from about 6 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Dutchtown charter school will let students direct learning FROM STAFF REPORTS

ST. LOUIS • Two St. Louis millennials

say they see a big problem in American schools — they look like factories from the Industrial Revolution. In almost every public school, children are seated in rows of desks and chairs. A bell rings to let students know they must shift classes. Gavin Schiffres, 24, and Jack Krewson, 25, want to change that. In the fall of 2019, they plan to open Kairos Academies, a charter middle school — and eventually a high school — in Dutchtown with a model unlike any other St. Louis public school. At Kairos, students will decide their schedules, learn from Chromebooks and work in groups rather than listen to lectures. On Wednesday, the Missouri Charter Public School Commission, which will sponsor the school, gave Kairos the green light. More than 100 people turned out for a public forum Wednesday, most of them in support of Kairos. The name is Greek and means “the opportune time to act.” Schiffres, a Yale University graduate, and Krewson, a Washington University graduate, say they saw the “factory-like” school model take a toll on students while they taught at Jennings and Normandy high schools, respectively, as part of the Teach for America program. Krewson is St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson’s son, but he said his mother had not been involved in developing Kairos. “We saw dedicated teachers and administrators who were frustrated with these school structures that were inherited from the industrial revolution,” Schiffres said. “We taught students who were told where to be every minute of every day. The world has evolved since the industrial revolution, and unfortunately traditional schools haven’t caught up. They’re not preparing kids for the demands of a 21st-century company.” They say today’s professionals are expected to think creatively and work independently. “We want to free kids from the shackles of a traditional school structure,” Schiffres said. The organizers are still in search of a building. They also are raising money to help cover rent and Chromebooks. Among the key elements of their Kairos Academies:

Students learn from Chromebooks • Kairos will use an online curriculum and platform developed with help from Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s nonprofit, as well as researchers. The curriculum will be project-based, meaning students will apply the concepts they learn to real-life projects, such as using geometry to build a house. Teachers coach students • Teachers set productivity goals for students and make sure they are keeping up. If students meet those goals, they get more freedom to design their own schedules. No summer vacation • Kairos will ditch the traditional summer break, which often leads to “summer slide,” or a slip in academics. Teachers run the school • By relieving teachers from time-consuming work such as grading, Schiffres and Krewson say, teachers will have time to take on leadership roles. The lines between teacher and administrator will be blurred, and everybody who works at the school, including the executive director and chief administrative officer, will teach. High school looks like college • Rather than rows of desks and chairs, the school will look more like a university, or a Cortex workplace. They will work in café and library spaces, where 21st-century professionals work today, Schiffres said. Schiffres and Krewson tested a small version of their Kairos model when they were teaching in Normandy and Jennings. They said they saw students’ scores rise and discipline issues drop. “That’s what kids really want. They want to direct their own lives,” Schiffres said. The founders say their Dutchtown location will create a diverse student body. Schiffres and Krewson calculated that their school’s future targeted enrollment zone will be about 54 percent white and 37 percent black, with about 58 percent of families qualifying for free or reducedprice lunches, a measure of poverty. St. Louis charter schools are required to open enrollment to students anywhere in the city, but students tend to come from nearby. The two founders have walked Dutchtown’ streets many times over the past two years. Wearing gray T-shirts with the Kairos Academy logo, they knocked on doors and presented their ideas to residents. Schiffres plans to move to the neighborhood.

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Wednesday when Treece surrendered. Treece stayed outside the house during the entire standoff. At one point during the standoff, police reached the couple’s son, but he was uncooperative, saying he hadn’t talked to his parents in years. Then he showed up at the scene and tried to enter the area police had restricted. Officers were able to walk him back to his car. Suddenly, he drove his car toward the restricted area, narrowly missing a cameraman and some equipment that reporters had set up near the scene, Higginbotham said. The man then ran away from his car and detectives chased him, eventually arresting him in a wooded area, Higginbotham said. It’s possible he may face charges. Higginbotham said deputies searched their call logs, going back five years, and found that they hadn’t responded to any incidents at the Treece house during that time. Neighbor Terry Burgess can see the home where the standoff took place from his deck. Deputies told him to stay inside during the incident. “You think you know your neighbors a lot better than you do,” he said. Colbert, the neighbor who was friends with the couple’s son, said he was shocked at the woman’s death, allegedly at the hands of her husband. “She was the sweetest woman you would ever want to meet,” he said. “She was a saint. She deserved a lot better than that.” J.B. Forbes of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

Alderman threatens to close O’Fallon Park

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Trash lines the edge of O’Fallon Park Lake on Tuesday. Alderman John Collins-Muhammad has pledged to close the park on his own if St. Louis does not commit more resources to the park’s security. BY CELESTE BOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Alderman John Col-

lins-Muhammad says he’s spent more than a year unsuccessfully trying to get security into the parks in his ward to stem violent crime, speeding cars and garbage dumping. Now, he’s issued an ultimatum: serious movement toward full-time patrols in O’Fallon Park by Friday, or he’ll shut it down. Police and city officials say an alderman doesn’t have the authority to do that, but CollinsMuhammad doesn’t care. “When people ask me, is O’Fallon safe? I have to be hon-

est. No. It’s not a park I would take my son to,” he said. It’s a battle he’s inherited from his predecessor, former 21st Ward Alderman Antonio French. French fought for permanent park rangers in his neighborhood parks and argued that the city allocated too many resources to Forest Park and parks in south city. “Four years later, I’m fighting the same fight,” Collins-Muhammad said. Last month, the alderman initially voted against the city’s 2019 budget in the Board of Aldermen’s Ways and Means Committee, in an attempt to leverage his vote for funding for park rangers in O’Fallon and Fair-

ground parks. “We keep seeing homicides. We keep seeing car incidents. We keep seeing gang activity, illegal drug sales. We keep seeing these in north city parks,” he said at the time. With a July 1 deadline looming, Collins-Muhammad eventually voted the spending plan through, explaining that he understood it needed to pass on time to ensure money for other priorities. But he hasn’t seen much motivation to address the issue since. So he took to Facebook on Tuesday vowing to shutter O’Fallon Park, despite some pushback from its frequent visitors. “I don’t want people outside

north St. Louis to think this action is against the average every day parkgoer. It’s more so against the city government, which refuses to invest in us,” he explained. But under the city charter, the decision to close a city park rests with the parks division or police department. Either entity can opt to close a park if public safety is at risk, according to Greg Hayes, who directs the city’s Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry. Collins-Muhammad asked police to close O’Fallon Park for an evening in May, citing “complete chaos” that included littering and loud music.

Critics say law punishes victims, who are afraid to call for help ORDINANCE • FROM A1

for up to six months. Last year, the St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council and ACLU of Missouri both sued the city over the rule, which they say unfairly targets victims of violence and people with mental illness. The two groups hosted the meeting to encourage residents to contact city officials and voice their opposition to the ordinance, called “perverse and damaging” by Sandra Park, senior staff attorney for the ACLU. “In so many of these cases ... you really are punishing the victim,” she said. “You are chilling their right to seek assistance.” In a review of more than 50 cases when the city enforced the rule since 2010, the equal housing council found that more than 20 percent of the evictions were against victims of domestic violence, said Kalila Jackson, a senior staff attorney for the nonprofit. African-Americans and people with mental health problems were disproportionately represented in the enforcement actions, she added. Maplewood City Manager Mar-

tin Corcoran could not be reached for comment Wednesday. He has denied previously that the city took any of the actions based on race, religion, age or gender. Lifelong Maplewood resident Jim Higgins, 84, said he was concerned about the city’s definition of “nuisance.” Higgins has fallen twice in the last year, breaking his nose and bleeding profusely both times when he called for emergency medical assistance. Marlon Lee, a member of Maplewood Community Builders, a volunteer group established in support of the lawsuits, called the ordinance “a Jim Crow law with a different spin on it.” The lawsuit against the city by the equal housing council was dismissed on a legal technicality, Jackson said. The ACLU’s suit is still pending, with ongoing settlement discussions, Park said. Both women said their ultimate goal was a full repeal of the ordinance. At least 69 municipalities across St. Louis city and county have some type of nuisance ordinance. Some are enforced as fines against landlords, while others, such as Maplewood’s, target the occupancy permit holder. Maplewood’s ordinance is considered one of the strict-

est in the U.S. because it specifically defines domestic violence as a nuisance call, Park said. The ACLU’s suit claims that the city banned a disabled woman, Rosetta Watson, from living in Maplewood for six months after she was the victim of domestic violence four times. Watson first rented a home in the city in June 2010 with her rent subsidized by a Section 8 voucher, according to the lawsuit. She was repeatedly attacked by an ex-boyfriend while living there, the suit says. From September 2011 to February 2012, Maplewood police went to Watson’s home four times for domestic violence calls. Maplewood then enforced the nuisance ordinance against Watson based on the four police calls, the suit said. After a hearing, Watson’s occupancy permit was revoked May 30, 2012. Under some other nuisance ordinances, residents can move elsewhere in the city. In Maplewood, the rule bars residents from applying for another occupancy permit anywhere in the city for up to six months. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

A spokesman for Mayor Lyda Krewson said she was committed to working with aldermen to maintain the city’s parks, “keeping them clean and safe for all who visit them.” Collins-Muhammad said he had been in touch with both the mayor’s office and St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden this week. ‘The problem is, I’m tired of meetings. We’ve done this seven or eight times,” he said. “I think we have to as a city and as a government; we have to safeguard these two amenities of our community.” Celeste Bott • 314-340-8119 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com

DIGEST ST. LOUIS > City official moving to Washington U • Nicole Hudson, St. Louis’ deputy mayor for racial equity and priority initiatives, is leaving city government to lead Washington University’s Academy for Diversity and Inclusion, effective Aug. 27. “With the launch of the Academy for Diversity and Inclusion, we are making an important step toward creating a more inclusive, welcoming climate on our campuses,” said Henry S. Webber, executive vice chancellor and chief administrative officer, in a statement. “Under Nicole’s capable leadership, I am confident the academy will prove to be an invaluable resource for our faculty and staff as they continue the hard work of strengthening the university community.” Hudson was hired as Mayor Lyda Krewson’s senior adviser Hudson overseeing racial equity in April 2017. Before that, she served as communications director for the Ferguson Commission, formed in 2014 by then-Gov. Jay Nixon in the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson. In her new role, Hudson will advocate for staff about diversity issues, cultivate ambassadors for diversity and inclusion work across the campus, roll out programming for staff and faculty and develop and conduct diversity training programs, according to the university. From staff reports

Public housing residents share mixed reactions to smoking ban SMOKING • FROM A1

was reasonable in common areas, but added, “We pay rent, I don’t know why we can’t do what we want in our apartment.” As the deadline approaches, public housing authorities are balancing the tasks of educating residents, connecting them with health resources, and preparing to enforce the new rule. While the ban is contentious among some residents, proponents say it has significant public health and cost-saving implications. Twenty-two percent of Missourians smoke — the seventh highest statewide percentage in the country, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smokers are even more prevalent among adults living in public housing at 33.6 percent, according to the American Lung Association. First- and second-hand smoke can cause or worsen a myriad of health conditions including lung cancer, heart disease, stroke and asthma. Smoking indoors also causes costly property damage

and is the No. 1 cause of fire-related deaths in the country. The U.S.Department of Housing and Urban Development rule requires each public housing authority to adopt a smoke-free policy, banning cigarettes, cigars, pipes and hookahs from being smoked anywhere inside public housing residences or offices, and within 25 feet of these buildings. The policy must be integrated into tenants’ leases and added to the housing authority’s policies, which necessitates public meetings and input from residents. Smoking policy violations can then be enforced similar to other lease violations. The St. Louis Public Housing Authority intends to treat smoking like other lease violations, such as nonpayment of rent or disturbing the peace, both of which can lead to lease termination, said Cheryl Lovell, executive director of the authority. The Housing Authority of St. Louis County has opted for a slightly longer process including counseling about resources. Both organizations emphasized that they intend to work closely with

their residents to avoid more serious consequences. The CDC estimates that public housing agencies will save $153 million every year because of the new rule. HUD has encouraged voluntary smoking bans in public housing since 2009, but those have primarily been adopted in areas with lower overall smoking rates in the northeastern and northwestern U.S. Details on how to inform residents about the new ban, connect residents with smoking cessation resources and enforce the policy have been left up to each public housing authority. The St. Louis Public Housing Authority has about 4,000 residents, and the Housing Authority of St. Louis County has about 1,000. Both began rolling out lease addendums with the smoke-free policy for residents to sign in January. “Before we changed the policy, we visited every development and passed out information,” in addition to holding a public hearing, Lovell said. There was some push-back from residents,

she said, but “we don’t have the option of not complying with the regulatory requirements.” In St. Louis County, the tenant meetings to explain the new smoking ban “were probably the most well-attended meetings that we’ve had in a while,” said William Barry, director of public housing of the Housing Authority of St. Louis County. “Smoking can get very personal,” said Susan Rollins, executive director of the Housing Authority of St. Louis County. Residents of Parkview Apartments, a public housing development on Forest Park Avenue, are also taking the ban personally. “We shouldn’t have to go 25 feet in the heat with no designated (smoking) area,” said Garry Wilson, 47, who noted that there was no shade 25 feet away from the building. “I don’t think it’s right,” said Ethyl Doss, 73. “I’m not stopping,” she said. “They can’t stop me from smoking.” “I love it,” said Calvin Sistrunk, 60, who added: “I need a smokeless environment. That’s health-

ier for me.” Former smoker Julie Minor, 54, said that the housing authority staff gave residents flyers and told them about the ban, but it was “not enough time for those smokers to quit.” Carl Brown, 77, patted the pack of cigarettes in his breast pocket and said, “Maybe they’ll help me quit.” Many public housing authorities, including in St. Louis and St. Louis County, have partnered with the American Lung Association to provide residents with resources and information about how to quit smoking. The association also is helping to educate residents about secondhand smoke and why they can’t smoke in their own apartments. “It comes through the ventilation systems, even through the plumbing,” said Laura Turner, a specialist in health programs with The American Lung association. “They’re sharing the same air, even though there are walls.”


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Alderman threatens to close O’Fallon Park

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

Cardinals fan driving home has close call with plane on I-55

Trash lines the edge of O’Fallon Park Lake on Tuesday. Alderman John CollinsMuhammad has pledged to close the park on his own if St. Louis does not commit more resources to the park’s security. ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

BY CELESTE BOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Alderman

John Collins-Muhammad says he’s spent more than a year unsuccessfully trying to get security into the parks in his ward to stem violent crime, speeding cars and garbage dumping. Now, he’s issued an ultimatum: serious movement toward full-time patrols in O’Fallon Park by Friday, or he’ll shut it down. Police and city officials say an alderman doesn’t have the authority to do that, but Collins-Muhammad doesn’t care. “When people ask me, is O’Fallon safe? I have to be honest. No. It’s not a park I would take my son to,” he said. It’s a battle he’s inherited from his predecessor, former 21st Ward Alderman Antonio French. French fought for permanent park rangers in his neighborhood parks and argued that the city allocated too many resources to Forest Park and parks in south city. “Four years later, I’m fighting the same fight,” Collins-Muhammad said. Last month, the alder-

man initially voted against the city’s 2019 budget in the Board of Aldermen’s Ways and Means Committee, in an attempt to leverage his vote for funding for park rangers in O’Fallon and Fairground parks. “We keep seeing homicides. We keep seeing car incidents. We keep seeing gang activity, illegal drug sales. We keep seeing these in north city parks,” he said at the time. With a July 1 deadline looming, Collins-Muhammad eventually voted the spending plan through, explaining that he understood it needed to pass on time to ensure money for other priorities. But he hasn’t seen much motivation to address the issue since. So he took to Facebook on Tuesday vowing to shutter O’Fallon Park, despite some pushback from its frequent visitors. “I don’t want people outside north St. Louis to think this action is against the average every day parkgoer. It’s more so against the city government, which refuses to invest in us,” he explained. But under the city char-

ter, the decision to close a city park rests with the parks division or police department. Either entity can opt to close a park if public safety is at risk, according to Greg Hayes, who directs the city’s Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry. Co l l i n s - M u h a m m a d asked police to close O’Fallon Park for an evening in May, citing “complete chaos” that included littering and loud music. A spokesman for Mayor Lyda Krewson said she was committed to working with aldermen to maintain the city’s parks, “keeping them clean and safe for all who visit them.” Co l l i n s - M u h a m m a d said he had been in touch with both the mayor’s office and St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden this week. ‘The problem is, I’m tired of meetings. We’ve done this seven or eight times,” he said. “I think we have to as a city and as a government; we have to safeguard these two amenities of our community.” Celeste Bott • 314-340-8119 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com

STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER VIA AP

Illinois State Police investigate the scene where a small aircraft made an emergency landing Wednesday on northbound Interstate 55 near Lincoln, Ill. The plane struck a car; a man and his son in the car escaped serious injury, as did the pilot. BY RACHEL RICE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jeremy Kampwerth was driving home to O’Fallon, Ill., Wednesday with his 9-year-old son after a trip to Chicago to see the Cardinals’ 14-2 rout of the White Sox when they saw the low-flying plane. The Kampwerths were southbound on Interstate 55 near Lincoln, Ill., about 30 miles north of Springfield, about 2:40 p.m. when they spotted the aircraft, which Kampwerth said he initially assumed to be a crop duster. Seconds later, the plane struck the back of Kampwerth’s car. “It immediately shattered the back window, and glass was flying forward,” Kampwerth said Wednesday night in a phone interview. “My son was in the back right seat (and) glass was coming at him and he obviously started screaming because he didn’t know what was going on. ...

I assumed a truck had come into my lane and hit me, and I looked back at my son and I see that he’s okay, by a quick assessment. Then I looked forward to see that it was a plane that hit us.” The plane then crashed in the median of the interstate. Shaken, Kampwerth pulled over and checked on his son, who was uninjured, and then checked on the pilot of the plane, who was also uninjured but seemed to be in shock. Police said there were no serious injuries from the incident. Another motorist, Ronald Childs, who was northbound on I-55, saw the plane strike Kampwerth’s car. “He got really low, right above the cars, and we saw his wheel hit the back of the car, knocking the window out,” he said. “We were still driving, but we couldn’t see him, but knew he wasn’t in the air anymore.”

Critics say law punishes victims, who are afraid to call for help ORDINANCE • FROM A1

for up to six months. Last year, the St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council and ACLU of Missouri both sued the city over the rule, which they say unfairly targets victims of violence and people with mental illness. The two groups hosted the meeting to encourage residents to contact city officials and voice their opposition to the ordinance, called “perverse and damaging” by Sandra Park, senior staff attorney for the ACLU. “In so many of these cases ... you really are punishing the victim,” she said. “You are chilling their right to seek assistance.” In a review of more than 50 cases when the city enforced the rule since 2010, the equal housing council found that more than 20 percent of the evictions were against victims of domestic violence, said Kalila Jackson, a senior staff attorney for the nonprofit. African-Americans and people with mental health problems were disproportionately represented in the enforcement actions, she added. Maplewood City Manager Mar-

tin Corcoran could not be reached for comment Wednesday. He has denied previously that the city took any of the actions based on race, religion, age or gender. Lifelong Maplewood resident Jim Higgins, 84, said he was concerned about the city’s definition of “nuisance.” Higgins has fallen twice in the last year, breaking his nose and bleeding profusely both times when he called for emergency medical assistance. Marlon Lee, a member of Maplewood Community Builders, a volunteer group established in support of the lawsuits, called the ordinance “a Jim Crow law with a different spin on it.” The lawsuit against the city by the equal housing council was dismissed on a legal technicality, Jackson said. The ACLU’s suit is still pending, with ongoing settlement discussions, Park said. Both women said their ultimate goal was a full repeal of the ordinance. At least 69 municipalities across St. Louis city and county have some type of nuisance ordinance. Some are enforced as fines against landlords, while others, such as Maplewood’s, target the occupancy permit holder. Maplewood’s ordinance is considered one of the strict-

est in the U.S. because it specifically defines domestic violence as a nuisance call, Park said. The ACLU’s suit claims that the city banned a disabled woman, Rosetta Watson, from living in Maplewood for six months after she was the victim of domestic violence four times. Watson first rented a home in the city in June 2010 with her rent subsidized by a Section 8 voucher, according to the lawsuit. She was repeatedly attacked by an ex-boyfriend while living there, the suit says. From September 2011 to February 2012, Maplewood police went to Watson’s home four times for domestic violence calls. Maplewood then enforced the nuisance ordinance against Watson based on the four police calls, the suit said. After a hearing, Watson’s occupancy permit was revoked May 30, 2012. Under some other nuisance ordinances, residents can move elsewhere in the city. In Maplewood, the rule bars residents from applying for another occupancy permit anywhere in the city for up to six months. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

The pilot was identified by Illinois State Police as William J. Farnsley, 51, of Austin, Ind. They said he was trying to land his single-engine Cessna at the Logan County, Ill., airport when it lost power and he was forced to make an emergency landing. Hours later, Kampwerth said he was still unnerved by the bizarre incident. “I’m not settled down yet,” he said. “I’ve been talking to people on the phone and reliving the story and thinking about the story and what could have happened. Somebody called me lucky earlier, and I said ‘No, I was unlucky, I got hit by an airplane.’ But I’m very thankful everybody’s okay.” This story includes information from The Bloomington, Ill., Pantagraph. Rachel Rice • 314-340-8344 @RachelDRice on Twitter rrice@post-dispatch.com

DIGEST ST. LOUIS > City official moving to Washington U • Nicole Hudson, St. Louis’ deputy mayor for racial equity and priority initiatives, is leaving city government to lead Washington University’s Academy for Diversity and Inclusion, effective Aug. 27. “With the launch of the Academy for Diversity and Inclusion, we are making an important step toward creating a more inclusive, welcoming climate on our campuses,” said Henry S. Webber, executive vice chancellor and chief administrative officer, in a statement. “Under Nicole’s capable leadership, I am confident the academy will prove to be an invaluable resource for our faculty and staff as they continue the hard work of strengthening the university community.” Hudson was hired as Mayor Lyda Krewson’s senior adviser Hudson overseeing racial equity in April 2017. Before that, she served as communications director for the Ferguson Commission, formed in 2014 by then-Gov. Jay Nixon in the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson. In her new role, Hudson will advocate for staff about diversity issues, cultivate ambassadors for diversity and inclusion work across the campus, roll out programming for staff and faculty and develop and conduct diversity training programs, according to the university. From staff reports

Public housing residents share mixed reactions to smoking ban SMOKING • FROM A1

was reasonable in common areas, but added, “We pay rent, I don’t know why we can’t do what we want in our apartment.” As the deadline approaches, public housing authorities are balancing the tasks of educating residents, connecting them with health resources, and preparing to enforce the new rule. While the ban is contentious among some residents, proponents say it has significant public health and cost-saving implications. Twenty-two percent of Missourians smoke — the seventh highest statewide percentage in the country, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smokers are even more prevalent among adults living in public housing at 33.6 percent, according to the American Lung Association. First- and second-hand smoke can cause or worsen a myriad of health conditions including lung cancer, heart disease, stroke and asthma. Smoking indoors also causes costly property damage

and is the No. 1 cause of fire-related deaths in the country. The U.S.Department of Housing and Urban Development rule requires each public housing authority to adopt a smoke-free policy, banning cigarettes, cigars, pipes and hookahs from being smoked anywhere inside public housing residences or offices, and within 25 feet of these buildings. The policy must be integrated into tenants’ leases and added to the housing authority’s policies, which necessitates public meetings and input from residents. Smoking policy violations can then be enforced similar to other lease violations. The St. Louis Public Housing Authority intends to treat smoking like other lease violations, such as nonpayment of rent or disturbing the peace, both of which can lead to lease termination, said Cheryl Lovell, executive director of the authority. The Housing Authority of St. Louis County has opted for a slightly longer process including counseling about resources. Both organizations emphasized that they intend to work closely with

their residents to avoid more serious consequences. The CDC estimates that public housing agencies will save $153 million every year because of the new rule. HUD has encouraged voluntary smoking bans in public housing since 2009, but those have primarily been adopted in areas with lower overall smoking rates in the northeastern and northwestern U.S. Details on how to inform residents about the new ban, connect residents with smoking cessation resources and enforce the policy have been left up to each public housing authority. The St. Louis Public Housing Authority has about 4,000 residents, and the Housing Authority of St. Louis County has about 1,000. Both began rolling out lease addendums with the smoke-free policy for residents to sign in January. “Before we changed the policy, we visited every development and passed out information,” in addition to holding a public hearing, Lovell said. There was some push-back from residents,

she said, but “we don’t have the option of not complying with the regulatory requirements.” In St. Louis County, the tenant meetings to explain the new smoking ban “were probably the most well-attended meetings that we’ve had in a while,” said William Barry, director of public housing of the Housing Authority of St. Louis County. “Smoking can get very personal,” said Susan Rollins, executive director of the Housing Authority of St. Louis County. Residents of Parkview Apartments, a public housing development on Forest Park Avenue, are also taking the ban personally. “We shouldn’t have to go 25 feet in the heat with no designated (smoking) area,” said Garry Wilson, 47, who noted that there was no shade 25 feet away from the building. “I don’t think it’s right,” said Ethyl Doss, 73. “I’m not stopping,” she said. “They can’t stop me from smoking.” “I love it,” said Calvin Sistrunk, 60, who added: “I need a smokeless environment. That’s health-

ier for me.” Former smoker Julie Minor, 54, said that the housing authority staff gave residents flyers and told them about the ban, but it was “not enough time for those smokers to quit.” Carl Brown, 77, patted the pack of cigarettes in his breast pocket and said, “Maybe they’ll help me quit.” Many public housing authorities, including in St. Louis and St. Louis County, have partnered with the American Lung Association to provide residents with resources and information about how to quit smoking. The association also is helping to educate residents about secondhand smoke and why they can’t smoke in their own apartments. “It comes through the ventilation systems, even through the plumbing,” said Laura Turner, a specialist in health programs with The American Lung association. “They’re sharing the same air, even though there are walls.”


LOCAL

07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

LAW & ORDER ST. CLAIR COUNTY > Motorcyclist killed in crash • A motorcyclist was killed on Wednesday afternoon when he slammed into the back of a car stopped in traffic on southbound Interstate 55 in St. Clair County, Illinois State Police Trooper Calvin Dye Jr. said. The crash happened about 1:20 p.m. about six miles northeast of the Mississippi River near Highway 111. The motorcyclist was a 52-year-old man from Tichnor, Ark., but his name has been not released. The man swerved to avoid traffic that had come to an abrupt stop, crashed into the rear of a passenger car and was thrown from his 2015 Suzuki, Dye said. The motorcyclist was flown to St. Louis University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. He had been wearing a helmet. EAST ST. LOUIS > Financial adviser accused of milliondollar fraud • A Metro East financial consultant has been indicted in federal court here and accused of defrauding investors of more than $1 million. Douglas J. Kiffmeyer was indicted June 19 and pleaded not guilty Monday to two counts of wire fraud, 14 counts of failing to timely file tax returns and one count of engaging in a cash transaction with money derived from wire fraud. Kiffmeyer, who called himself a retirement planner, financial consultant and tax adviser, ran the Kiffmeyer Tax Advisory Group Inc. and a company called Modern Retirement Professionals, his indictment says. Kiffmeyer set up in 2001 a company called Creative Digital Inc., based in Edwardsville, to develop a “digital trigger” for the M-16 rifle, his indictment says. He then sold $827,000 in Creative Digital stock to three people, but deposited the funds in his own account and used the money for a Hummer H2, a Chevrolet Corvette, a Nissan 370, a GMC Sierra 1500 pickup and an engagement ring, the indictment claims. In late 2013, he had a woman cash in two IRA accounts and provide him with $386,471 of the proceeds in exchange for a $500,000 promissory note, the indictment says. He soon stopped making payments to her, the indictment says. He took $206,814 from a couple as an investment in a medical marijuana clinic, but used most of the money for personal expenses, the indictment says. BRENTWOOD > Ex-treasurer of PTO accused of theft • The treasurer of the Brentwood High School Parent Teacher Organization stole more than $8,000 from the group, using some of it to pay her rent, according to police. Tamara Jenkins, 44, has been charged with stealing $750 or more, a class D felony. A warrant for her arrest was issued Tuesday. She has not been taken into custody, but her bail was set at $10,000. Jenkins served as treasurer of the Brentwood High School PTO from March 2017 through the end of this school year, according to court documents. The president of the organization first sensed trouble after checks that had been issued to Brentwood seniors to use as spending money during an end-of-year trip were returned because of insufficient funds. The president then discovered numerous unauthorized withdrawals and transactions from the organization’s bank account, as well as missing cash deposits, according to the documents. Police say surveillance video showed Jenkins making some of the unauthorized withdrawals, including $939.50 that she used to pay her rent. Brentwood police interviewed Jenkins and say she confessed to taking cash from the account, using the debit card for unauthorized purchases and telling the PTO president that a deposit of about $8,000 in cash from a trivia night had been stolen from her purse while she was shopping. Jenkins lives in the 9000 block of West Swan Circle, police said.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A5

Mizzou fundraising campaign tops $1 billion Donations pledged to grow endowment, research institutes BY LEAH THORSEN st. Louis Post-dispatch

A fundraising campaign launched in 2015 by the University of Missouri has topped $1 billion in contributions, a tally aided by recordbreaking cash donations this year of $147 million, the university said Wednesday. “This is a testament that our alumni and friends believe in Mizzou and its long heritage,” said Tom Hiles, vice chancellor for advancement.

The goal of the “Mizzou: Our Time to Lead” campaign is to raise $1.3 billion by 2020. The fundraising news last year wasn’t as good, when donations had dropped $19 million from 2016. That decrease came a year and a half after student protests centered around issues of race put the campus in the national spotlight, and two top leaders resigned amid the strife during November 2015. In the fiscal year ending June 30, 2018, the university raised nearly $162 million, including pledges, marking the third highest total in university history and an increase of $10 million from fiscal year 2017, it said. More than 43,000 donors made

nearly 77,000 donations, pledges and estate gifts during the fiscal year, which is the fifth year in a row donors made 20 or more gifts of at least $1 million. Large gifts included a $21.6 million donation by David and Wendy Novak to create the Novak Leadership Institute at the Missouri School of Journalism. David Novak is the co-founder of Yum! brands, which includes KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell. Mizzou’s Columns Society, which recognizes donors who give more than $2,500 a year, reached 3,611 members, which is the highest membership total in its fiveyear history, the university said. And this year’s Mizzou Giving Day netted 4,065 contributions

totaling more than $13.7 million, which surpassed last year’s total by more than $5 million. The fundraising campaign focuses on beefing up the university’s endowment, which it wants to increase to $1.2 billion. It has raised $1.019 billion toward that goal. The university also wants to bolster its centers and institutes that promote research, add a new School of Music building, a new Fine Arts building, a teaching winery, as well as make renovations to Lafferre Hall and fund “student success initiatives.” Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

As Butterfly House grows, lab is crowded BUTTERFLY • FROM A1

working to change that. Plans are in place to nearly double the lab’s size and open the space so visitors can watch entomologists at work as they feed venomous tarantulas, raise beetles and, of course, work with butterflies. The institution has raised $100,000 of its $350,000 goal for the project and aims to break ground in November 2019, according to assistant director Jennifer Mullix. The effort marks the largest capital campaign at the Butterfly House since it became a division of the Missouri Botanical Garden in 2001.

INSECT CENTRAL

Most of the lab is filled with stacked containers holding live insects from around the world. A red label means a box is “hot” — or holding something dangerous. There’s some counter space, and a fridge filled with preserved insects, including a beetle the size of a bar of soap where a Popsicle might otherwise sit. Three full-time entomologists work in the lab, often knocking elbows. “We have tens of thousands of mouths to feed every morning,” said one member of the team, entomologist Ted Yankoski. “So there’s always a lot to do.” Yankoski and the other entomologists manage constant shipments of butterflies that arrive at the lab through the mail in chrysalis form, most of them from a farm in Costa Rica. The Butterfly House typically gets about 40,000 butterflies a year, costing $1 to $8 each, Mullix said. After a shipment arrives, entomologists inspect it for parasites and pins or hot glues each chrysalis onto foam boards. The chrysalises are then placed in climate-controlled cabinets in the lab called “emergence cases” until butterflies appear and spread their wings. On average, they take

IF YOU GO Upcoming events at the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House, at 15193 Olive Boulevard in Chesterfield, include: Butterfly House Birthday Bash What: The Butterfly House will have food and crafts for children at this celebration to mark its 20th anniversary. When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The cost is included with admission. Evelyn E. Newman Founders Day What: Admission will be free all day in honor of the opening of the Butterfly House in 1998. When: Sept. 18

five days to emerge, though some come out within seconds while others have taken more than a year, Yankoski said. The entomology team hopes more space in the lab will allow them to rear more insects on location, rather than importing them from overseas. And not just the facility’s namesake butterflies, but all kinds of insects. “We bring them in the door with the butterflies,” Yankoski said. “But my hope is that when they leave they say something like, ‘I never knew cockroaches were so interesting,’ or ‘Wow, beetles are really cool.’ ” The team has tried to raise large beetles for the past two years, but space limitations have slowed the program, Mullix said. Work with insects can happen only in the small lab because it is the only quarantined space in the Butterfly House that meets inspection standards by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, senior manager Laura Chisholm said. The USDA requires containment for imported insects to prevent them from becoming invasive species. Plans for the expanded lab include a speaker system that will allow entomologists to call visitors over when they are working with an interesting or unusual insect. Guests would be able to ask them questions as they work. “There’s always something cool happening back here,” Mullix said. “But we’re hiding it. We want people to see everything that happens behind the scenes.” To donate to the entomology lab project, visit

support.missouribotanical garden.org/bh-entomol ogy-lab. Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

PHOTO BY TIM VIZE

Families take in the foliage and flowers on the outdoor walking trail at the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House.

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DIGEST ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Stenger appoints diversity officer • St. Louis County will soon have its first chief diversity officer in an effort to improve participation by minority- and women-owned businesses in county contracts. Jack L. Thomas Jr., who spent almost two decades in similar posts at airports in St. Louis and Thomas Jr. Mississippi, has been tapped for the job, County Executive Steve Stenger announced Wednesday. Thomas’ title at St. Louis Lambert International Airport was assistant airport director for community programs and disadvantaged business enterprises program manager. “Having a full-time chief diversity officer is a key recommendation of our recently completed disparity study,” Stenger said in a news release about the appointment. Stenger said the study analyzed county contracting data covering 2012-2015 to help establish a baseline from which to build a fair and equitable participation program for minority-, women- and veteran-owned business enterprises. “The findings clearly show a need to improve minority participation in county contracts and my administration is committed to doing that,” Stenger said. For the past 10 years,

Thomas has served as director of disadvantaged business enterprises and community development for the Jackson, Miss., Municipal Airport Authority. Before that, he worked at Lambert and had other position in St. Louis. SUNSET HILLS > Aldermen again reject plan for church in business park • Another attempt to allow a church at 10801 Sunset Office Drive failed on Tuesday night. Jubilee Church had hoped to move their temporary facility in Kirkwood to the business park. Though most of the business owners in the office park are in favor of the church, some Board of Aldermen members oppose it. Alderman Kurt Krueger believes that the property should be reserved for commercial use and that the church would be better suited in a residential neighborhood. “There are many locations in the community that are better suited for this use,” he said. But Alderman Tom Price pointed out that there are a number of vacancies in office space and that this property had been vacant long enough. Alderwoman Dee Baebler had brought the issue back to the Board after it failed in June. She voted against the project then but was in favor of it now. Although Baebler, Price, Ann McMunn and Steve Bersche voted in favor of the plan, it needed five votes to override the previous vote. From staff and correspondent reports

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NEWS

07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A7

Senate votes for more say on tariffs Resolution seen as rebuke of Trump’s trade penalties, but action is nonbinding BY KEVIN FREKING associated Press

WASHINGTON • Lawmakers went on

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Workers inside this boat add detailing at Regal Marine Industries in Orlando, Fla., on Wednesday. Some U.S. manufacturers are feeling the effects of tariffs imposed on thousands of products imported from China, Europe, Mexico, Canada, India and Russia, and of retaliatory tariffs those countries have put on U.S. exports, including boats.

nouncing a potential second round of tariffs targeting a $200 billion list of Chinese goods. Trump’s administration complains that China uses predatory practices to challenge American technological dominance. Chinese tactics, the administration says, include cybertheft and forcing U.S. companies to hand over technology in exchange for access to the Chinese market. The latest actions have fueled anxiety

Tougher enforcement needed, McCaskill says; industry official criticizes her report OPIOIDS • FROM A1

of opioids into Missouri counties to the south and southwest of St. Louis and along the Arkansas border were due to Missouri’s being the only state to not monitor shipments of prescription drugs. “These people coming over the border clearly from Arkansas or Kentucky or Tennessee or wherever they are coming from know that we have a welcome mat out for these drug dealers,” McCaskill said. Dr. Randall Williams, director of Missouri’s Department of Health and Senior Services, said that the death rate from opioid abuse had gone down in the state, and that “we are increasingly focused on educating providers and the public about the risks of opioid misuse. “While most providers prescribe appropriately, our increased surveillance efforts have resulted in a 25.4 percent increase of investigations and a 50 percent increase in referrals,” he said. The report, “Fueling an Epidemic,” was issued through McCaskill’s position as top Democrat on the Senate’s Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. It comes with a partisan hue, because Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., the committee chair, did not participate, and refused to issue subpoenas. Investigators for McCaskill focused mostly on three pharmaceutical companies — Cardinal Health, AmerisourceBergen, and McKesson — that account for about 90 percent of drug distribution revenue in the United States. Combined, these companies shipped about 1.6 billion doses to Missouri between 2012 and 2017, an average of 260 doses for every state resident, the report says. Company reporting on potential “diversions” — suspicious orders of opioids that may be diverted to illegal use — varied widely between 2012 and 2017, McCaskill’s report says. McKesson and AmerisourceBergen, for example, both shipped about 650 million doses to Missouri in this five-year period, but McKesson reported 16,714 suspicious orders to the federal Drug Enforcement Administration while AmerisourceBergen reported only 224, the report said. Although Cardinal Health shipped fewer than half of the total opioid dosage units as AmerisourceBergen distributed during the same period, it reported 5,125 suspicious orders to the DEA. McCaskill’s report blames the DEA for providing unclear reporting guidelines and for loosening enforcement on potentially suspicious shipments. Pressured by

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from there. That tirade, over breakfast with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, was rare in its bitterness. “We have to talk about the billions and billions of dollars that’s being paid to the country we’re supposed to be protecting you against,” Trump said, referring to European purchases of Russian natural gas. Trump continued his complaints after the meetings had ended, tweeting, “What good is NATO if Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars for gas and energy?” Despite the contentiousness, Trump agreed to a 23-page declaration that Stoltenberg said would guide a more robust NATO defense for years to come. Other NATO leaders welcomed the decision, even as they said Trump’s divisive approach to his allies weakened the alliance.

‘SAFER TOGETHER’

Stoltenberg sought to project unity at the conclusion of the first of two days of meetings in Brussels. “We do have disagreements, but most importantly, we have decisions that are pushing this alliance forward and making us stronger,” Stoltenberg said. “At the end of the day, we all agree that North America and Europe are safer together.” NATO leaders are still concerned that Trump will make concessions to Russian President Vladimir Putin when the two meet Monday in Helsinki. Trump has complained about Europe’s “delinquent” defense spending, saying that NATO nations are taking advantage of U.S. military largesse at the same time they are offering unfair trade terms to U.S. businesses.

Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

OFF

MADE IN

Trump, Putin set to meet next week

pharmaceutical industry lobbyists, McCaskill said, the federal agency has since 2011 been reduced in its ability to intercept suspicious orders before they are delivered. She advocates a return to tougher pre-2011 enforcement standards. “I blame DEA because they should be asking these questions,” McCaskill said, referring to the wide disparity in reporting among companies. “It shouldn’t be one senator from Missouri that is figuring this out.” McCaskill’s report draws a grim picture of opioid abuse in Missouri. “Over 3,400 Missouri residents died between 2012 and 2016 due to opioid-involved overdoses, and 664 Missourians died from prescription opioid overdoses in 2016 alone,” it says. Missouri has the 14th-highest hydrocodone and oxycodone distribution rate among the 50 states, and in St. Louis County, “physicians prescribe enough painkillers per month to provide every resident with three pills,” the report says. Acting DEA Administrator Robert W. Patterson said that his agency’s Diversion Control Division had “worked to improve communication and cooperation” with pharmaceutical companies. The agency “offers year-round training free of charge to pharmacists, distributors and manufacturers” on how to single out and report suspicious orders, he told McCaskill. A spokeswoman for Pennsylvaniabased AmerisourceBergen said that “as the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee statement indicates, we filed daily reports, providing DEA with detailed information about quantity, type and receiving pharmacy of each order of opioids, and we regularly flagged suspicious orders.” John Gray, president and CEO of the Healthcare Distribution Alliance, which represents the three companies mentioned, said McCaskill’s report “relies on debunked, inaccurate statements without acknowledging the need for broader reforms across the pharmaceutical supply chain.” He said that “it is widely recognized and acknowledged that the decades-long trend of opioid overprescribing — reinforced by federal policy — was a leading factor in the start of the opioid crisis.” This report is the latest in a series on the drug industry issued by McCaskill. Her investigators are now turning their attention to drug pricing, she said.

50%

about a trade war that could hurt U.S. farmers and manufacturers. But the Senate resolution focused on a narrower question: Should lawmakers have more say, or signoff authority, before the president imposes tariffs on national security grounds? Corker’s goal is to require congressional approval before such tariffs are enacted, but he has been unsuccessful in getting a vote on such a measure. He said Wednes-

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record Wednesday to express their frustration with the growing use of tariffs by President Donald Trump’s administration. The Senate passed a nonbinding resolution designed to give Congress more say about trade penalties imposed in the name of national security. The measure, which passed by an 88-11 vote, directs Capitol Hill negotiators trying to reconcile separate spending bills to include language giving Congress a role when such tariffs are put in place. Those negotiators are free to ignore the Senate’s guidance, and the role that Congress would play would have to be worked out down the road. Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., who pushed the tariff language, acknowledged that the effort was “a baby step.” But Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., said the vote amounted to a rebuke of Trump’s use of a national security waiver to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from China, Canada, Mexico, the European Union and other nations. “We have to rein in abuse of presidential authority and restore Congress’ constitutional authority in this regard,” Flake said. The administration ramped up on Tuesday its trade dispute with China by an-

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day’s vote told him “that people believe (Trump) is abusing his authorities.” Corker said he would keep pushing for stronger, binding legislation. The 11 senators who voted against the measure were Republicans from states where Trump has high approval ratings. Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., called on lawmakers to give the president “space” to negotiate better trade deals. “The president is taking a different approach, sometimes controversial, but I believe he’s a pragmatist. I believe he wants only one thing for America, and that’s results and a level playing field with the rest of the world,” Perdue said. Still, the resolution’s lack of teeth prompted even Sen. Sherrod Brown, DOhio, to support it. Brown has been one of the most vocal supporters of Trump’s tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. He said he would do everything in his power to defeat any efforts to rescind them but said he agreed that Congress should have a role in the imposition of tariffs. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce urged lawmakers to support Corker’s resolution but also pass “actual legislation” requiring congressional consent for the tariffs. The National Retail Federation said the Senate action showed “growing bipartisan concern over the administration’s reckless trade agenda as the real-world consequences of tariffs spread in communities across the country, according to David French, a senior vice president. On the House side, a subcommittee scheduled a hearing next week on the impact tariffs are having on U.S. agriculture and rural areas.

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PLEDGES NOT MET

Only eight of 29 NATO countries are on track to meet pledges of spending 2 percent of their GDPs on defense this year. The U.S. spent 3.6 percent last year. When he has talked about it in recent days, Trump has rounded up to 4 percent. After Wednesday’s meeting, he tweeted with a demand for countries to meet the current 2 percent target. “ P re s i d e n t Tr u m p wants to see our allies share more of the burden and at a very minimum meet their already stated obligations,” White House s p o ke swo m a n S a ra h Huckabee Sanders said in a statement. Several NATO experts dismissed the seriousness of the 4 percent proposal. “No country in the world can meet that,” said Bobo Lo, a Russia scholar who attended the summit. “He’s asking for something outrageous, not in the hope of getting it, but in getting to 2 percent or more.” An official present when Trump made the demand said “the room was aghast,” even though Trump was actually more cordial in private than in his public remarks. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity.

GERMANY TARGETED

A favorite target of Trump’s ire has been Germany, which has not met its NATO spending commitments and has granted permits for a second natural gas pipeline to Russia. Germany and other European NATO partners argue, however, that they have boosted contributions to the military alliance and plan to kick in more in coming years. Germany’s leadership has said the pipeline is a private business decision and has been reluctant to interfere. The accusation of Russian influence may have been particularly biting for German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who grew up in Communist-controlled East Germany. “I myself experienced that part of Germany that

was controlled by the Soviet Union, and I am very happy today that we are united in freedom as the Federal Republic of Germany,” Merkel said as she entered NATO headquarters. “We decide our own policies and make our own decisions.” Inside the closed-door meeting, she went further in her pushback, according to two officials who were present. Merkel told the 28 other leaders how Putin served as a KGB officer and spy in her own country, making clear that she had little tolerance for being told her nation was controlled by the Kremlin. Trump traveled to Europe saying that next week’s summit with Putin may be the easiest part of his week of diplomacy, challenging the notion that NATO should project a strong and united front against a strategic rival. Trump has preferred to take aim at allies. Even Stoltenberg — a mild-mannered former Norwegian prime minister who has cultivated a positive relationship with the president — appeared reduced to spluttering as Trump cut him off after he started to explain that allies traded with Russia even during the Cold War. “We’re supposed to protect Germany, but they’re getting their energy from Russia,” Trump said, as U.S. and NATO aides shifted in their seats. “So explain that,” Trump said. “And it can’t be explained, and you know that.” Germany’s energy relationship with Russia has long frustrated the U.S. and Eastern Europe, who fear that the Nord Stream 2 pipeline could be used to cut them off from crucial energy supplies. Trump will have more NAT O m e e t i n gs o n Thursday. After that, he will travel to England to meet with British Prime Minister Theresa May, then spend the weekend at one of his private golf clubs in Scotland. Finally, he will head to Helsinki for a summit with Putin.

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WORLD

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

Recovery continues after ‘once-in-a-lifetime rescue’ ASSOCIATED PRESS

MAE SAI, THAIL AND • As ecstatic relatives

watched and waved from behind a glass barrier, the 12 boys and their coach rescued from deep within a flooded cave in Thailand made the V-for-victory sign Wednesday from their beds in a hospital isolation ward where they are recovering from the 18-day ordeal. An American involved in the operation described the perilous zero-visibility dives that brought the boys out safely as a “once-in-alifetime rescue.” Derek Anderson, 32, a rescue specialist with the U.S. Air Force based in Okinawa, Japan, said that at times during the risky rescue, the boys had

DIGEST Fishing trawler sinks off Argentina coast A Spanish fishing trawler sank in rough weather off the coast of Argentina and at least one crew member died, Argentina’s Navy said Wednesday. Twenty-five crew members were rescued, and one was missing. The Navy said it was alerted Tuesday night that the Dorneda was in trouble. Early in the morning, another Spanish fishing trawler found two life rafts and a lifeboat with crew members from Spain, Peru, Morocco and Indonesia aboard. The Navy said it was still searching for the missing crew member. Thousands remain isolated by rain in Japan • With damage from torrential rain continuing to spread in western Japan, more than 20,000 people remain stranded in Hiroshima, Ehime and Kochi prefectures on Wednesday, as local roads have been cut off or closed because of landslides, among other reasons. As of noon Wednesday, 169 people had died in 12 prefectures and 79 people were missing in seven prefectures, according to information compiled by The Yomiuri Shimbun. Ecuador’s top court upholds ruling against Chevron • Ecuador’s highest court has upheld a $9.5 billion judgment against oil giant Chevron for decades of rainforest damage. Plaintiffs celebrated the constitutional court’s decision announced Tuesday night, saying it should pave the way for indigenous tribes to receive compensation for oil spills that contaminated groundwater and soil in their Amazon home. But the ruling is largely symbolic as Chevron no longer operates in the South American country. That means Ecuador’s government will have to pursue assets owned by the San Ramon, Calif.-based company in foreign courts.

THAILAND GOVERNMENT SPOKESMAN BUREAU VIA AP

Three of the 12 boys who were rescued along with their coach from a cave in Thailand over the past several days flash the victory sign as they recover in their hospital beds.

to be put into harnesses and high-lined across the rocky caverns. At other

Irish Senate backs bill banning Israeli settlement goods • The Irish Senate has voted in favor of a bill seeking to ban the import of West Bank settlement products — a measure that must pass several hurdles before becoming law. The bill aims to make it an offense to import or sell goods or services from Israeli settlements. If passed, Ireland would become the first European country to ban settlement goods. Senators voted 25 to 20 Wednesday in favor of the proposal, which still needs to be debated and voted on in Parliament’s Lower House. The Irish government strongly opposes the measure. Pakistani Taliban claim bombing that killed 21 • The Pakistani Taliban on Wednesday claimed responsibility for an overnight suicide bombing at a campaign rally that killed a secular politician and 20 others, two weeks before the country’s nationwide elections. Mohammad Khurasani, a spokesman for the Pakistani Taliban, confirmed the militant group targeted a rally of the Awami National Party in the city of Peshawar. The bombing killed Haroon Ahmed Bilour, a candidate for a seat in the provincial legislature. Another 65 people were wounded. Court may rule on India’s gay sex law • India’s government asked the country’s top court on Wednesday to rule on whether to repeal a law that criminalizes homosexual acts. Government attorney Tushar Mehta asked the court to rule on the issue of consensual sexual acts between two adults. The Supreme Court is hearing petitions by activists challenging the law that makes gay sex punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Over the past decade, homosexuals have gained a degree of acceptance in India, especially in big cities. From news services

times, they endured dives lasting up to half an hour in the pitch-black waters.

“The world just needs to know that what was accomplished was a once-in-

a-lifetime rescue,” Anderson said Wednesday. “We were extremely fortunate that the outcome was the way it was. It’s important to realize how complex and how many pieces of this puzzle had to come together.” He said the boys, ranging in age from 11 to 16, were “incredibly resilient.” “What was really important was the coach and the boys all came together and discussed staying strong, having the will to live, having the will to survive,” Anderson said. That gutsy determination was on display Wednesday in a video taken from the hospital isolation ward. The boys, their faces covered by green surgical masks, flashed the victory sign

as they sat up in bed and chatted with their nurses, at times responding with the customary Thai gesture of respect — hands pressed together while bowing the head. “Don’t need to worry about their physical health and even more so for their mental health,” said Chaiwetch Thanapaisal, director of Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital. The four boys and the soccer coach, 25, who were brought out Tuesday on the final day of the threeday rescue effort have recovered more quickly than the boys rescued on Sunday and Monday, Chaiwetch said. All need to be monitored in the hospital for a week and then rest at home for another 30 days, he said.

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NATION

07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

First deadline to reunite families passes with few details on progress ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO • Immigrant par-

ents who reveled after joyful reunions with their young children spoke Wednesday of the trauma of being separated from their sons and daughters for months after they were taken from them at the U.S. border. President Donald Trump’s administration has been scrambling to reunify the families this week to meet the first of two deadlines set by a federal judge in San Diego who ordered that thousands of children be given back to their immigrant parents. Scores of children separated from their families were sent to government-contracted shelters or foster care hundreds of miles away from where their parents were detained. It is still unclear how many were reunited by the first deadline, which was Tuesday, and how many remain in detention facilities. A Honduran man said he was happy to be back with his son, 4, who sat on his lap as the father spoke to reporters. The father said he was still shaken by the ordeal he had to go through just to speak to his boy while he was in government custody. The two were separated in February. He described feeling a pain in his heart after his son was taken away. The father held up his wrist and told reporters that he threatened to use a razor on himself if he couldn’t speak to his son. He spoke Wednesday at Annunciation House, an El Paso, Texas-based shelter, along with another father recently reunited with his child. They arrived there Tuesday. “I was completely traumatized,” the father said in Spanish. He added later: “Every time I spoke to him, he would start crying. Where are the rights of children? I thought children were supposed to be a priority here in the United States.” The father said he planned to live with relatives in the United States as his asylum case is processed, which could take years. Late last month, U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego set a 14-day deadline to

EL PASO TIMES VIA AP

Roger Ardino (right), 24, and his son Roger Ardino Jr., 3, pose for a photo as they sit next to Pablo Ortiz, 28, and his son Andres, 3, at the Annunciation House in El Paso, Texas, on Wednesday. The fathers, both immigrants, were reunited with their children Tuesday night.

reunite children younger than 5 with their parents and a 30-day deadline for older children. He asked the government to return to court Friday to give an update on how many families had been reunited. In trying to meet the first deadline, the government began with a list of 102 children potentially eligible to be reunited and whittled that to 75 through screening that included DNA testing done by swabbing the inside of the cheek. Of those 75, Justice Department attorneys had told the court the government would guarantee 38 would be back with their parents by the end of Tuesday. They said an additional 17 could also join their parents if DNA results arrived and a criminal background check on a parent was completed. It was not known Wednesday whether those reunions happened. Government attorneys told Sabraw that the Trump administration would not meet the deadline for 20 other children under 5 because it needed more time to track down parents who have already been deported or released into the U.S. Sabraw indicated more time would be allowed only in specific cases where the government showed good reasons for a delay. The administration defended its screening, saying it discov-

ered parents with serious criminal histories, five adults whose DNA tests showed they were not parents of the children they claimed to have, and one case of credible child abuse. The administration faces a second, bigger deadline — July 26 — to reunite more than 2,000 older children with their families. Immigration attorneys say they already are seeing barriers to those reunifications from a backlog in the processing of fingerprints. In New York, attorney Michael Avenatti— the lawyer best known for representing porn actress Stormy Daniels, who has alleged she had an affair with Trump — said it took two tries plus a series of tweets Wednesday before he was allowed to see two Honduran girls, ages 9 and 5, who were separated from family at the border in June and sent to New York. After Avenatti tweeted a complaint about not being allowed in to the Cayuga home for children in East Harlem, he said he got a call from the center assuring him he could see the girls. An attorney for the Cayuga Centers declined to comment. Avenatti wants U.S. immigration officials to allow the girls’ father, Hector Santos, to be allowed to travel to New York from Texas, where he is wearing a monitoring device.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A9

DIGEST TSA agents can’t be sued for abuse, court rules A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that Transportation Security Administration screeners who operate checkpoints at the nation’s airports can’t be sued over allegations of abuse, and as a result, passengers have limited legal options in the face of TSA misconduct. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit in Philadelphia held that TSA officers enjoy sovereign immunity because, despite their badges and titles as “officers,” they do not qualify as “investigative or law enforcement officers” who could be held legally responsible for abuses under the Federal Tort Claims Act. The case was brought by Nadine Pellegrino, who was arrested after a physical confrontation with TSA agents in Philadelphia in 2006. Loaded gun left on baby changing table to be returned • Utah police want to find the owner of a loaded gun found on a baby changing table in a women’s restroom at a suburban Salt Lake City aquarium, but said they didn’t plan to file charges. Rather, they want to return the .380-caliber pistol found Tuesday. “I believe it was somebody that just forgot their gun. But, you know, it’s not an uncommon occurrence,” Draper Police Lt. Chad Carpenter said. Parents who came to the Living Planet Aquarium with young children were angry that no one would be held accountable. Sentence for Paul’s attacker should stand, attorney says • An attorney for a man who tackled Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., at his home says the government has no legal right to appeal his client’s 30-day sentence. The Bowling Green Daily News reports Rene Boucher’s attorney argued in a motion Friday that the federal government waived its right to appeal and agreed that any sentence imposed by the judge would be appropriate. Prosecutors had sought a 21-month sentence for Boucher, who pleaded guilty to assaulting a member of Congress. U.S. Special Attorney Bradley Shepard filed a motion to appeal the sentence. Police say Boucher assaulted Paul while he was doing yard work on Nov. 3.

Escaped snake won’t let sleeping man lie • A man in central New York got a rude awakening when a large snake fell from his ceiling and landed on him while he slept. The state Department of Environmental Conservation said Wednesday that one of its officers responded to a call June 29 from a man who said a snake had fallen on him while he was sleeping in his apartment in Pulaski, N.Y. DEC officials said a 6-foot-long boa constrictor had escaped its enclosure in a different apartment. The agency says the snake then fell from the ceiling of the downstairs apartment, where it landed on the sleeping man. The man wasn’t injured. The snake has been returned to its owner. Firefighter among dead in gas explosion in Wisconsin • A massive natural gas explosion killed a firefighter and leveled portions of a city block in a southern Wisconsin town, authorities said Wednesday. The blast in Sun Prairie on Tuesday evening also injured at least a dozen people and left residents of the Madison suburb wondering how they’ll put their downtown back together. The blast happened after police got a call at 6:30 p.m. that construction workers had punctured a natural gas line. Police and firefighters arrived to investigate and were evacuating the area when the gas exploded shortly after 7 p.m. Despicable act: Man in minion costume attacked • A man has been charged with attacking a person dressed as a minion cartoon character along a popular Florida boardwalk. Police say Jamie Roehm was costumed as a yellow minion and working outside Jungle George’s on Daytona Beach’s boardwalk Sunday evening when a man started messing with him. According to the police report, Roehm says the man slammed him onto the pavement and kicked him. Police said some witnesses cheered Ryan Nihart, 25, during the alleged attack. The store owner and others helped detain Nihart until police arrived. He was charged with battery and criminal mischief. The Palm Beach Post reports Roehm declined medical treatment, saying he was mostly bruised. The store owner says the costume was destroyed. From news services

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M 1 Thursday • 07.12.2018 • a10

Stocks skid as trade war worsens By MarLEy Jay Associated Press

Global stock indexes sank Wednesday after the administration of President Donald Trump released a list of $200 billion in goods that could be hit with tariffs and China said it would retaliate. The dollar spiked, and big exporters plunged. Companies that sell computer chips, oil, basic materials and heavy machinery dropped after Trump’s administration proposed a 10 percent tax on a wide list of imports. It is scheduled to make a decision on the potential tariffs after Aug. 31. China’s government said it would take “firm and forceful measures” if the new tariffs were enacted. That response would probably include measures other than tariffs. Trump has threatened to put new

taxes almost everything the U.S. imports from China. Jack Ablin, chief investment officer for Cresset Wealth Advisors, said the tariffs could have big effects: A tariff on an import from one country can lead to broad price increases for similar items, and rising taxes and costs might lead companies to change their supply lines in less efficient ways. “When you start adding all of that together, you end up with typically higher inflation and low productivity,” he said. “Higher inflation tends to rob consumers of their income, and lower productivity tends to rob companies of their profits.” A four-day winning streak for the S&P 500 ended as the benchmark index lost 19.82 points, or 0.7 percent, to 2,774.02.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 219.21 points, or 0.9 percent, to 24,700.75. The Nasdaq composite fell 42.59 points, or 0.5 percent, to 7,716.61. The Russell 2000, an index of smaller and more U.S.-focused companies, gave up 11.96 points, or 0.7 percent, to 1,683.66. The S&P 500 had closed at a five-month high Tuesday. The new list of tariff targets from the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative includes vacuum cleaners, furniture and car and bicycle parts, but U.S.-branded smartphones and laptops were excluded. Still, chipmakers, which make large portions of their sales in China, slumped. Nvidia fell 2.3 percent to $247.53 and Micron Technology lost 2.8 percent to $54.18. Construction equipment maker Caterpillar

lost 3.2 percent to $136.76 and farm equipment maker Deere lost 2.2 percent to $141.42. The ICE U.S. dollar index jumped 0.6 percent, a large move. The dollar rose sharply against the Japanese currency, increasing to 112.04 yen from 111.28 yen. The euro fell to $1.1674 from $1.1745. The stronger dollar hurts exporters because it makes U.S. goods and commodities more expensive in other markets. Crude oil prices tumbled partly because of the rising dollar and partly because Libya has said it will start exporting oil again, a move that will increase supplies. Benchmark U.S. crude fell 5 percent to $70.38 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, plunged 6.9 percent to $73.40 a barrel in London.

Likely mall buyer’s bid is $13 million

On Friday the U.S. and China put 25 percent taxes on $34 billion in imports. China imported only $130 billion in goods from the U.S. last year, but it could retaliate against the U.S. through other means including regulatory moves and investigations of U.S. companies. The trade dispute stems from Washington’s complaint that Beijing steals or pressures companies to hand over technology and its concern that plans for state-led development of Chinese companies in robotics and other fields might erode American industrial leadership. Indexes in Europe and Asia took steeper losses as investors worried the worsening trade dispute will hamper the growth of the global economy. France’s CAC 40 and the DAX in Germany both lost

Home refinancing applications fall to lowest since 2000 rEuTErs

BRIAN FELDT • bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

The struggling Chesterfield Mall, shown here in February, last changed hands in a 2017 foreclosure. By BrIaN FELdT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Hull Property Group committed $13 million in its winning bid to buy the struggling Chesterfield Mall, according to data from research firm Trepp. Hull, which is based in Augusta, Ga., put up $2 million at the end of April. Hull has a 20-day period to close the deal while the seller, C-III Capital Partners, retains two 30-day options to extend the closing date. The Post-Dispatch reported in June that Hull, which is also behind redevelopment plans at Alton Square Mall, had emerged as the likely buyer of the mall. C-III Capital Partners, which took control of Chesterfield Mall through foreclosure in mid-2017, put Chesterfield Mall up for sale in March. Overland-based the

Staenberg Group (TSG), which in April acquired the Sears property connected to Chesterfield Mall, also made a bid to buy the mall. Chesterfield Mall is the largest in the St. Louis area at 1.3 million square feet of space but has struggled in recent years to compete with two new outlet malls that opened nearby. According to Hull’s website, the firm has more than 14.5 million square feet of retail real estate in its portfolio. Most of those properties are traditional shopping malls located in the southeastern United States. A development plan for Chesterfield Mall has not been detailed yet company representatives did not respond to requests for comment. Chesterfield officials have stressed their desire to see meaningful redevelopment of the property, with Chesterfield City Ad-

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ministrator Mike Geisel saying the city is “not looking for a Band-Aid fix and (the city wants) to see some type of transforma-

tional change.” Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

1.5 percent. Britain’s FTSE 100 index dropped 1.3 percent. Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225 fell 1.2 percent and the South Korean Kospi lost 0.6 percent while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng shed 1.3 percent. Airlines took sharp losses after American said it expected slower fare growth in the U.S. American Airlines slumped 8.1 percent to $35.96, and United Continental slid 3.4 percent to $68.88. Twenty-First Century Fox raised its offer for European pay TV service Sky. Fox already owns 39 percent of Sky and wants to buy the rest, but rival Comcast has stepped in with its own bid. Fox says the new offer values Sky at $32.5 billion. Comcast sweetened its bid Wednesday to an offer that values Sky at $34 billion.

U.S. loan applications to refinance current homes fell to their lowest in more than 17½ years even as most 30-year home borrowing costs fell last week, data from the Mortgage Bankers Association showed on Wednesday. T h e Wa s h i n g to n based industry group said its seasonally adjusted index on homeowners’ requests for refinancing fell 3.8 percent to 958.5 in the week ended July 6. This was the lowest weekly reading since December 2000. Refinancing’s share of weekly mortgage activity fell to its lowest since August 2008 at 34.8 percent of total applications. This compared with 37.2 percent the previous week, MBA said. Interest rates on 30year fixed-rate “conforming” home loans, whose balances are $453,100 or less, averaged 4.76 percent, down from 4.79 percent the week before, it said. However, the aver-

age rate on 30-year loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration, which are often used by first-time home buyers or borrowers with patchy credit, rose to 4.80 percent from 4.78 percent the prior week. Interest rates on fiveyear adjustable-rate mortgages averaged 4.13 percent, the highest level since MBA began tracking this type of loans in January 2011. Thirty-year mortgage rates generally fell in step with longer-dated U.S. bond yields last week, while adjustable-rate loan rates declined with higher shorter-dated bond yields. Meanwhile, the MBA’s seasonally adjusted gauge on loan applications to buy a home, a proxy on future housing activity, increased 6.5 percent last week to 261.5. This was its strongest weekly level since the week of April 20. The group’s seasonally adjusted barometer on total mortgage applications gained 2.5 percent to 372.6 last week.

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MARKET WATCH

07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed broadly lower Wednesday, snapping a four-day winning streak. The Trump administration released a list of more goods that could be hit with tariffs and China said it would retaliate. Utilities rose as investors sought to minimize risk.

American Airlines

45 35

A

10 DAYS

M J 52-week range

2,800

Close: 24,700.45 Change: -219.21 (-0.9%)

24,460 23,960

$50

M J 52-week range

$58.74

S&P 500

10 DAYS

Close: 2,774.02 Change: -19.82 (-0.7%)

2,680

26,400

$34.25

Futures

24,800

CHG

Corn

Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

331.25 829.75 469.75

-8.50 -22.50 -19.75

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

Aug 18 Aug 18 Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

149.40 103.85 79.77 14.21 273.35

-2.45 -1.60 +.27 +.03 -9.50

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Sep 18 Jul 18 Sep 18

84.54 109.20 26.00

-1.84 -2.75

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18

70.38 2.0614 210.08 2.829

-3.73 -.0989 -12.10 +.041

Milk Copper

2,640

24,000 J

F

M

StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 1,701 1,672 974 1837 65 49

2,904 2,997 790 2031 46 39

A

M

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

J

2,560

J

HIGH 24815.16 10721.02 721.98 12756.04 7748.17 2785.91 2004.27 29116.62 1696.02

LOW 24663.82 10413.76 714.60 12665.59 7696.58 2770.77 1988.87 28951.35 1683.10

J

F

CLOSE 24700.45 10442.47 720.56 12681.58 7716.61 2774.02 1991.48 28983.66 1683.66

M CHG. -219.21 -212.76 +6.81 -133.06 -42.59 -19.82 -16.64 -176.06 -11.96

A

M

%CHG. WK -0.88% s -2.00% s +0.95% s -1.04% s -0.55% s -0.71% s -0.83% s -0.60% s -0.71% s

J

MO QTR t s t s s s t s s s t s r s r s s s

J

Coffee

YTD -0.08% -1.60% -0.39% -0.99% +11.78% +3.76% +4.78% +4.28% +9.65%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME -6.4 12

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

31.17

39.80 31.87

-.63 -1.9 -18.0

AEGN

19.11

28.19 25.93

-.48 -1.8

+2.0 +18.1 23

2.00 General Motors

GM

... Home Depot

HD

Amdocs

DOX

61.00

71.72 67.78

-.04 -0.1

+3.5 +6.7 18

1.00 Huttig Building Prod HBP

4.43

7.75

4.53

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

64.89 61.38 +.88 +1.5

+4.1 +15.5 22

1.80

3.30

3.25 +.05 +1.6 +38.3 +73.0

42.52 41.90

+0.6 +17.9

1.83 Lee Ent 1.60 Lowes

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

ABInBev

BUD

91.70 126.50 103.06

Arch Coal

ARCH

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

Bank of America

BAC

22.75

33.05 28.68

-.15 -0.5

-2.8 +17.8 16

0.48

Belden Inc

BDC

53.65

87.15 64.64

-.27 -0.4 -16.2 -13.2 12

0.20

Boeing

BA

202.19 374.48 340.60 -6.56 -1.9 +15.5 +73.3 36

6.84

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

-.02

...

6

-3.2 26 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 68.93 102.61 77.24 -3.66 -4.5 -17.1 +17.1 7 1.60 MasterCard 5.60

7.25

11.93

11.00

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-7.6

7.14 +.55 +8.3 -12.9 -39.2 11

7.70

...

... -16.3 -23.8 27

...

CAL

22.39

37.06 33.93

-.66 -1.9

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

53.23

74.49 70.81

-.34 -0.5 +21.6 +21.5 35 1.04f

Centene Corp.

CNC

79.06 131.17 131.45 +.84 +0.6 +30.3 +61.0 21

Charter

CHTR 250.10 408.83 301.37 -4.34 -1.4 -10.3 -.32 -0.5

+1.3 +31.2 16

... McDonald’s

Caleres Inc.

0.28 ...

-9.2 98

...

-8.7 +2.8 12

1.28

Citigroup

C

64.38

80.70 67.91

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

67.42 66.39 +.11 +0.2 +18.9 +24.0 20 0.94f

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

76.76 50.69 +.23 +0.5 -14.6 -30.9 13

Emerson

EMR

57.47

74.45 69.07 -1.92 -2.7

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

64.93 62.75

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.65

Esco Technologies

ESE

50.30

Express Scripts

ESRX

55.80

85.07 80.57 +.01

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

LEE

3.28 11.32

-0.9 +22.1 26

Olin

34.50

46.76 39.30

-.79 -2.0

-4.1 +18.2 dd

1.52

-.66 -0.3

+3.9 +33.3 26

4.12

70.76 108.98 98.61

-.40 -0.4

+6.1 +30.9 22 1.92f

11.65

-.02 -0.1

-7.1 -49.9

49.12 20.96

121.82 204.00 203.84 +2.32 +1.2 +34.7 +65.0 47

MCD

146.84 178.70 158.62 -2.00 -1.2

Peabody Energy

BTU

24.93

47.84 44.29 -1.61 -3.5 +12.5 +79.3

Peak Resorts

SKIS

4.10

5.78

5.25 +.05 +1.0

Perficient

PRFT

16.70

27.51 26.62

Post Holdings

POST

70.66

88.93 86.87 +.16 +0.2

ReinsGrp

RGA

Reliv

RELV

Spire Inc

SR

3.72 60.09

13.77

-.12 -3.1 -12.8 -11.1 dd -2.6

0.13 Walgreen Boots

-2.8 17 0.24a Wells Fargo

+9.6 +13.0 53

... 2.25

SF

44.44

68.76 53.00

-.90 -1.7 -11.0 +16.3 17 0.48f

50.04

79.59 77.58

-.72 -0.9 +18.9 +61.0 14 2.56f

101.45 135.53 107.33 -1.18 -1.1 48.49

-9.9 +1.6 18

3.64

58.50 51.26

-.09 -0.2

-4.3 +0.5 14

1.20

20.89

47.64 36.28

-.25 -0.7

+3.1 +68.0 21

0.20

42.80

54.77 51.34

-3.0 +24.3

2.36

...

...

7

-.68 -0.8 -12.4 +21.9 21 2.08f

WBA

59.07

83.89 63.66 +.46 +0.7 -12.3 -16.0 13 1.76f

WFC

49.27

66.31 56.07

-.55 -1.0

-7.6 +4.7 13

1.56

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Papa John’s founder apologizes after reportedly using slur • Papa John’s founder John Schnatter is apologizing after reportedly using a racial slur during a conference call in May. Schnatter The apology Wednesday comes after Forbes cited an anonymous source saying the pizza chain’s marketing firm broke ties with the company afterward. Forbes said Schnatter used the N-word during a media training exercise. When asked how he would distance himself from racist groups, Schnatter reportedly complained that Colonel Sanders never faced a backlash for using the word. In a statement released by Louisville, Ky.-based Papa John’s, Schnatter said reports attributing use of “inappropriate and hurtful” language to him were true. “Regardless of the context, I apologize,” the statement says. The University of Louisville also said Wednesday that Schnatter resigned from its board of trustees, effective immediately. Schnatter stepped down as CEO last year after blaming slowing sales growth on the outcry surrounding football players’ kneeling during the national anthem. He remains chairman of the company he started when he turned a broom closet at his father’s bar into a pizza spot. Papa John’s shares fell nearly 5 percent Wednesday after the report, closing at $48.33. Ex-Apple engineer arrested on his way to China • For about two years, Xiaolang Zhang was privy to information to which many in the tech world can only dream of having access: the inner workings of Apple’s secretive autonomous car research. Over the weekend, the former Apple engineer was arrested by U.S. authorities at the San Jose International Airport while preparing to board a flight to China and charged with stealing proprietary information related to Apple’s self-driving car project.

At the time of his arrest, he said he was working for a Chinese startup that is also developing autonomous vehicles, according to a criminal complaint filed in federal court in San Jose on Monday by the FBI and the U.S. attorney’s office. Zhang, who started working at Apple in December 2015, was accused of downloading files that included engineering schematics and technical reports before leaving to work for Xiaopeng Motors, a Guangzhou-based company also known as XMotors, documents said. Authorities allege that Zhang had downloaded “copious pages of information” from various confidential databases. Zhang made his first court appearance Monday and was remanded in custody, according to court documents. His lawyer, Tamara Crepet, a federal public defender, could not be reached for comment. Zhang was “voluntarily terminated” on May 5, and according to the complaint, said he is now employed by XMotors at their Mountain View California office. If found guilty, Zhang could face 10 years in prison along with a $250,000 fine. Twitter to remove suspicious accounts • Twitter says it will begin removing suspicious accounts it has locked from its counts of users’ followers. Twitter users are likely to see a reduction in their follower counts in the coming days. For many, this will amount to a reduction of four followers or less. But large accounts of celebrities and public figures could see bigger drops. An account that’s been locked can’t tweet, like or retweet posts, and it won’t be shown ads. The company said Wednesday that the move would not affect its number of monthly or daily active user figures. In the first three months of the year, it had 336 million active users. Twitter has been working to remove fake accounts, bots and abusive posts from its service. From staff and wire reports

5.00 4.50 4.25

.0365 .7467 .2628 1.3265 .7622 .1506 1.1745 .0146 .2751 .008986 .052840 .0162 .0752 .000897 1.0077

PreciousMetals Silver

-11.00 -.27 -11.00

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.95 2.14 2.33 2.58 2.75 2.82 2.86 2.95

-0.01 -0.01 +0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.02 -0.01 -0.01

1.05 1.14 1.19 1.38 1.92 2.18 2.37 2.92

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

1.88 1.38 1.13

CHG

CLOSE

1242.80 15.73 831.00

Gold

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

.0365 .7377 .2579 1.3211 .7577 .1496 1.1674 .0145 .2747 .008925 .052593 .0160 .0739 .000886 1.0039

NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.86 percent Wednesday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

... ...

-3.2 +8.9 20

73.13 109.98 86.53

-.51 -3.6

-.07 -0.3 +39.6 +47.5 51

+0.2 -44.5 dd

WMT

3.81

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

0.60

-.05 -0.1

X

4.88

0.28

-.19 -3.8

VZ

16.22 13.73

-2.8 +23.2 dd

TGT UPS

... WalMart

0.80

4.78

0.32 Verizon

+7.9 +30.3 10

4.04

9

82.85 72.75

66.80 60.40

...

1.00

126.62 165.12 136.10 -2.24 -1.6 -12.7 +7.8 12 2.00f

57.05 55.35 +.50 +0.9 +22.6 +34.5 20 +0.2 +2.5 20

-7.8 +5.8 24

38.84 29.11 -1.13 -3.7 -18.2 +3.4

USB

-.40 -0.7

...

MA

27.68

Stifel Financial

... ...

LOW

OLN

... Target Corp. 1.94 UPS B

7

MNK

1.16 US Bancorp 0.44 US Steel

-.25 -0.4 +30.8 +38.2 22

-.28 -5.8 -31.9 -28.7 dd

$269.20

ExchangeRates

Platinum

144.25 207.61 196.95

J

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

Aegion Corp

M J 52-week range

Vol.: 9.2m (0.8x avg.) PE: 41.2 Mkt. Cap: $150.3 b Yield: 0.2%

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

A

$152.91

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$49.05

CLOSE

Hogs

2,720

200

J

DATE

Live cattle

25,600

M J 52-week range

CHICAGO BOT

Wheat

2,800

A

Vol.: 1.4m (7.1x avg.) PE: 99.8 Mkt. Cap: $1.5 b Yield: 0.7%

Soybeans

2,880

250

40

J

Vol.: 26.3m (9.8x avg.) PE: 25.2 Mkt. Cap: $15.7 b Yield: 2.7%

2,740

27,200

23,200

$39.79

$59.08

Vol.: 24.8m (4.1x avg.) PE: 9.4 Mkt. Cap: $16.8 b Yield: 1.1%

Dow Jones industrials

A

NVDA

Close: $247.53 -5.72 or -2.3% Chipmakers stumbled after the U.S. released a $200 billion list of Chinese imports that may be hit with tariffs. $300

45

45

J

Nvidia

AIR

Close: $43.02 -5.53 or -11.4% The airplane maintenance company reported weaker-than-expected sales in the fourth quarter.

50

40

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

AAR

FAST

Close: $54.51 4.98 or 10.1% The maker of construction and industrial fasteners had a stronger second quarter than investors expected. $55

$50

$35.90

24,960

Fastenal

AAL

Close: $35.96 -3.16 or -8.1% The airline forecast slower growth in a key measure of its revenue in the second quarter.

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.00 3.31 6.42 3.85 4.00 .73

+0.01 +0.01 -0.04 ... ... -0.01

1.67 2.60 5.74 3.78 3.23 .61

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2774.02 12417.13 7591.96 28311.69 5353.93 49025.15 21932.21 74398.57 16417.32 8682.93

CHG

CHG

YTD

-19.82 -192.72 -100.08 -370.56 -80.42 +34.23 -264.68 -463.82 -131.40 -85.98

-0.71% -1.53% -1.30% -1.29% -1.48% +0.07% -1.19% -0.62% -0.79% -0.98%

+3.76% -3.87% -1.25% -5.37% +0.78% -0.67% -3.66% -2.62% +1.28% -7.45%

Pfizer separates consumer health unit to keep options open, flexible BY MANAS MISHRA reuters

Pfizer Inc. announced on Wednesday plans to reorganize into three units, separating its consumer health care business that the U.S. drugmaker has been trying to sell since last year. The company said it still was looking for options for the lowermargin, non-core consumer health care business that makes products ranging from painkiller Advil to lip balms and is worth about $15 billion. “Given the lack of urgency, management is being rational about its divestiture,” BMO Capital Markets analyst Alex Arfaei said, adding taht the new structure would help Pfizer maintain its options for the business. The news comes a day after Pfizer deferred drug price increases for no more than six months, after criticism from President Donald Trump. Starting in 2019, Pfizer’s new units would be Innovative Medi-

cines, Established Medicines and Consumer Healthcare. The company is currently split into two units — Innovative Medicines, which includes the consumer business, and Essential Health which houses legacy drugs such as Viagra. “This design gives us a sharper focus on diverse patients in diverse markets,” COO Albert Bourla said. The innovative medicines business will include biosimilars and a new hospital business unit, and together with the consumer health care business, will account for about three-quarters of the company’s revenue. Pfizer’s 2017 annual revenue was $52.55 billion. Pfizer’s $236 million research campus that’s under construction in Chesterfield, where it will hone development of medicine and vaccines, would operate under the innovative medicines unit. The Chesterfield facility will grow Pfizer’s area presence, retaining the company’s 450 em-

ployees in the area while eventually adding 80 positions. The 295,000 square feet of laboratory and office space at 875 West Chesterfield Parkway is projected to be completed in mid-2019. The established medicines unit would include a majority of the company’s brands such as soonto-be off-patent neurological disease treatment Lyrica as well as some generic drugs. The restructuring will allow the company to evaluate its businesses better and could result in selling or spinning off its off-patent drugs, Wall Street analysts said. While the company expects the business to generate sustainable moderate revenue growth after Lyrica goes generic, Credit Suisse analyst Vamil Divan said the reorganization would allow the established medicines unit to have more autonomy. “We believe the potential for Pfizer to ultimately sell or spin the business likely remains on the table over time,” Divan said.

U.S. soon to pass Saudis, Russians as top oil producer BY DAVID KOENIG, associated Press

The U.S. is on pace to leapfrog both Saudi Arabia and Russia and reclaim the title of the world’s biggest oil producer for the first time since the 1970s. The latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that U.S. output will grow next year to 11.8 million barrels a day. “If the forecast holds, that would make the U.S. the world’s leading producer of crude,” says Linda Capuano, who heads the agency, a part of the Energy Department. Saudi Arabia and Russia could upend that forecast by boosting their own production. In the face of rising global oil prices, mem-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. energy gains have been driven by advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

bers of the OPEC cartel and a few non-members including Russia agreed last month to ease production caps that had contributed to the run-up in prices. The United States led the world in oil production for much

of the 20th century, but the Soviet Union surpassed America in 1974, and Saudi Arabia did the same in 1976, according to Energy Department figures. The last decade or so has seen a revolution in American energy production, however, led by techniques including hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and horizontal drilling. Those innovations — and the breakup of the Soviet Union — helped the U.S. narrow the gap, although Russia and Saudi Arabia both pumped more crude than the U.S. last year. Capuano’s agency forecast that U.S. crude output will average 10.8 million barrels a day for all of 2018 and 11.8 million barrels a day in 2019, up from 9.4 million in 2017.


MARKET WATCH

07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 2

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed broadly lower Wednesday, snapping a four-day winning streak. The Trump administration released a list of more goods that could be hit with tariffs and China said it would retaliate. Utilities rose as investors sought to minimize risk.

American Airlines

45 35

A

10 DAYS

M J 52-week range

2,800

Close: 24,700.45 Change: -219.21 (-0.9%)

24,460 23,960

$50

M J 52-week range

$58.74

S&P 500

10 DAYS

Close: 2,774.02 Change: -19.82 (-0.7%)

2,680

26,400

$34.25

Futures

24,800

CHG

Corn

Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

331.25 829.75 469.75

-8.50 -22.50 -19.75

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

Aug 18 Aug 18 Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

149.40 103.85 79.77 14.21 273.35

-2.45 -1.60 +.27 +.03 -9.50

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Sep 18 Jul 18 Sep 18

84.54 109.20 26.00

-1.84 -2.75

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18 Aug 18

70.38 2.0614 210.08 2.829

-3.73 -.0989 -12.10 +.041

Milk Copper

2,640

24,000 J

F

M

StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 1,701 1,672 974 1837 65 49

2,904 2,997 790 2031 46 39

A

M

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

J

2,560

J

HIGH 24815.16 10721.02 721.98 12756.04 7748.17 2785.91 2004.27 29116.62 1696.02

LOW 24663.82 10413.76 714.60 12665.59 7696.58 2770.77 1988.87 28951.35 1683.10

J

F

CLOSE 24700.45 10442.47 720.56 12681.58 7716.61 2774.02 1991.48 28983.66 1683.66

M CHG. -219.21 -212.76 +6.81 -133.06 -42.59 -19.82 -16.64 -176.06 -11.96

A

M

%CHG. WK -0.88% s -2.00% s +0.95% s -1.04% s -0.55% s -0.71% s -0.83% s -0.60% s -0.71% s

J

MO QTR t s t s s s t s s s t s r s r s s s

J

Coffee

YTD -0.08% -1.60% -0.39% -0.99% +11.78% +3.76% +4.78% +4.28% +9.65%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME -6.4 12

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

31.17

39.80 31.87

-.63 -1.9 -18.0

AEGN

19.11

28.19 25.93

-.48 -1.8

+2.0 +18.1 23

2.00 General Motors

GM

... Home Depot

HD

Amdocs

DOX

61.00

71.72 67.78

-.04 -0.1

+3.5 +6.7 18

1.00 Huttig Building Prod HBP

4.43

7.75

4.53

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

64.89 61.38 +.88 +1.5

+4.1 +15.5 22

1.80

3.30

3.25 +.05 +1.6 +38.3 +73.0

42.52 41.90

+0.6 +17.9

1.83 Lee Ent 1.60 Lowes

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

ABInBev

BUD

91.70 126.50 103.06

Arch Coal

ARCH

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

Bank of America

BAC

22.75

33.05 28.68

-.15 -0.5

-2.8 +17.8 16

0.48

Belden Inc

BDC

53.65

87.15 64.64

-.27 -0.4 -16.2 -13.2 12

0.20

Boeing

BA

202.19 374.48 340.60 -6.56 -1.9 +15.5 +73.3 36

6.84

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

-.02

...

6

-3.2 26 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 68.93 102.61 77.24 -3.66 -4.5 -17.1 +17.1 7 1.60 MasterCard 5.60

7.25

11.93

11.00

-.83 -0.8

-7.6

7.14 +.55 +8.3 -12.9 -39.2 11

7.70

...

... -16.3 -23.8 27

...

CAL

22.39

37.06 33.93

-.66 -1.9

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

53.23

74.49 70.81

-.34 -0.5 +21.6 +21.5 35 1.04f

Centene Corp.

CNC

79.06 131.17 131.45 +.84 +0.6 +30.3 +61.0 21

Charter

CHTR 250.10 408.83 301.37 -4.34 -1.4 -10.3 -.32 -0.5

+1.3 +31.2 16

... McDonald’s

Caleres Inc.

0.28 ...

-9.2 98

...

-8.7 +2.8 12

1.28

Citigroup

C

64.38

80.70 67.91

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

67.42 66.39 +.11 +0.2 +18.9 +24.0 20 0.94f

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

76.76 50.69 +.23 +0.5 -14.6 -30.9 13

Emerson

EMR

57.47

74.45 69.07 -1.92 -2.7

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

64.93 62.75

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.65

Esco Technologies

ESE

50.30

Express Scripts

ESRX

55.80

85.07 80.57 +.01

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

LEE

3.28 11.32

-0.9 +22.1 26

Olin

34.50

46.76 39.30

-.79 -2.0

-4.1 +18.2 dd

1.52

-.66 -0.3

+3.9 +33.3 26

4.12

70.76 108.98 98.61

-.40 -0.4

+6.1 +30.9 22 1.92f

11.65

-.02 -0.1

-7.1 -49.9

49.12 20.96

121.82 204.00 203.84 +2.32 +1.2 +34.7 +65.0 47

MCD

146.84 178.70 158.62 -2.00 -1.2

Peabody Energy

BTU

24.93

47.84 44.29 -1.61 -3.5 +12.5 +79.3

Peak Resorts

SKIS

4.10

5.78

5.25 +.05 +1.0

Perficient

PRFT

16.70

27.51 26.62

Post Holdings

POST

70.66

88.93 86.87 +.16 +0.2

ReinsGrp

RGA

Reliv

RELV

Spire Inc

SR

3.72 60.09

13.77

-.12 -3.1 -12.8 -11.1 dd -2.6

0.13 Walgreen Boots

-2.8 17 0.24a Wells Fargo

+9.6 +13.0 53

... 2.25

SF

44.44

68.76 53.00

-.90 -1.7 -11.0 +16.3 17 0.48f

50.04

79.59 77.58

-.72 -0.9 +18.9 +61.0 14 2.56f

101.45 135.53 107.33 -1.18 -1.1 48.49

-9.9 +1.6 18

3.64

58.50 51.26

-.09 -0.2

-4.3 +0.5 14

1.20

20.89

47.64 36.28

-.25 -0.7

+3.1 +68.0 21

0.20

42.80

54.77 51.34

-3.0 +24.3

2.36

...

...

7

-.68 -0.8 -12.4 +21.9 21 2.08f

WBA

59.07

83.89 63.66 +.46 +0.7 -12.3 -16.0 13 1.76f

WFC

49.27

66.31 56.07

-.55 -1.0

-7.6 +4.7 13

1.56

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Papa John’s founder resigns as board chairman over racial slur • Pizza chain Papa John’s International Inc. said Wednesday that its founder and former chief executive, John Schnatter, Schnatter had resigned as chairman of its board. The company said Olivia Kirtley would act as lead independent director, and added that it would appoint a new chairman in the coming weeks. Forbes reported that Schnatter used a racial slur on a conference call in May. Forbes said Schnatter used the N-word during a media training exercise. When asked how he would distance himself from racist groups, Schnatter reportedly complained that Colonel Sanders never faced a backlash for using the word. Forbes cited an anonymous source saying the pizza chain’s marketing firm then broke ties with the company. In a statement released by Louisville, Ky.-based Papa John’s, Schnatter said reports attributing use of “inappropriate and hurtful” language to him were true. “Regardless of the context, I apologize,” the statement says. The University of Louisville also said hat Schnatter had resigned from its board of trustees, effective immediately. Schnatter stepped down as CEO last year after blaming slowing sales growth on the outcry surrounding football players’ kneeling during the national anthem. Papa John’s shares fell nearly 5 percent Wednesday after the report, closing at $48.33. Ex-Apple engineer arrested on his way to China • For about two years, Xiaolang Zhang was privy to information to which many in the tech world can only dream of having access: the inner workings of Apple’s secretive autonomous car research. Over the weekend, the former Apple engineer was arrested by U.S. authorities at the San Jose International Airport while preparing to board a flight to China and charged with stealing

proprietary information related to Apple’s self-driving car project. At the time of his arrest, he said he was working for a Chinese startup that is also developing autonomous vehicles, according to a criminal complaint filed in federal court in San Jose on Monday by the FBI and the U.S. attorney’s office. Zhang, who started working at Apple in December 2015, was accused of downloading files that included engineering schematics and technical reports before leaving to work for Xiaopeng Motors, a Guangzhou-based company also known as XMotors, documents said. Authorities allege that Zhang had downloaded “copious pages of information” from various confidential databases. Zhang made his first court appearance Monday and was remanded in custody, according to court documents. His lawyer, Tamara Crepet, a federal public defender, could not be reached for comment. Zhang was “voluntarily terminated” on May 5, and according to the complaint, said he is now employed by XMotors at their Mountain View California office. If found guilty, Zhang could face 10 years in prison along with a $250,000 fine. Twitter to remove suspicious accounts • Twitter says it will begin removing suspicious accounts it has locked from its counts of users’ followers. Twitter users are likely to see a reduction in their follower counts in the coming days. For many, this will amount to a reduction of four followers or less. But large accounts of celebrities and public figures could see bigger drops. An account that’s been locked can’t tweet, like or retweet posts, and it won’t be shown ads. The company said Wednesday that the move would not affect its number of monthly or daily active user figures. In the first three months of the year, it had 336 million active users. Twitter has been working to remove fake accounts, bots and abusive posts from its service. From staff and wire reports

5.00 4.50 4.25

.0365 .7467 .2628 1.3265 .7622 .1506 1.1745 .0146 .2751 .008986 .052840 .0162 .0752 .000897 1.0077

PreciousMetals Silver

-11.00 -.27 -11.00

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.95 2.14 2.33 2.58 2.75 2.82 2.86 2.95

-0.01 -0.01 +0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.02 -0.01 -0.01

1.05 1.14 1.19 1.38 1.92 2.18 2.37 2.92

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

1.88 1.38 1.13

CHG

CLOSE

1242.80 15.73 831.00

Gold

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

.0365 .7377 .2579 1.3211 .7577 .1496 1.1674 .0145 .2747 .008925 .052593 .0160 .0739 .000886 1.0039

NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.86 percent Wednesday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

... ...

-3.2 +8.9 20

73.13 109.98 86.53

-.51 -3.6

-.07 -0.3 +39.6 +47.5 51

+0.2 -44.5 dd

WMT

3.81

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

0.60

-.05 -0.1

X

4.88

0.28

-.19 -3.8

VZ

16.22 13.73

-2.8 +23.2 dd

TGT UPS

... WalMart

0.80

4.78

0.32 Verizon

+7.9 +30.3 10

4.04

9

82.85 72.75

66.80 60.40

...

1.00

126.62 165.12 136.10 -2.24 -1.6 -12.7 +7.8 12 2.00f

57.05 55.35 +.50 +0.9 +22.6 +34.5 20 +0.2 +2.5 20

-7.8 +5.8 24

38.84 29.11 -1.13 -3.7 -18.2 +3.4

USB

-.40 -0.7

...

MA

27.68

Stifel Financial

... ...

LOW

OLN

... Target Corp. 1.94 UPS B

7

MNK

1.16 US Bancorp 0.44 US Steel

-.25 -0.4 +30.8 +38.2 22

-.28 -5.8 -31.9 -28.7 dd

$269.20

ExchangeRates

Platinum

144.25 207.61 196.95

J

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

Aegion Corp

M J 52-week range

Vol.: 9.2m (0.8x avg.) PE: 41.2 Mkt. Cap: $150.3 b Yield: 0.2%

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

A

$152.91

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$49.05

CLOSE

Hogs

2,720

200

J

DATE

Live cattle

25,600

M J 52-week range

CHICAGO BOT

Wheat

2,800

A

Vol.: 1.4m (7.1x avg.) PE: 99.8 Mkt. Cap: $1.5 b Yield: 0.7%

Soybeans

2,880

250

40

J

Vol.: 26.3m (9.8x avg.) PE: 25.2 Mkt. Cap: $15.7 b Yield: 2.7%

2,740

27,200

23,200

$39.79

$59.08

Vol.: 24.8m (4.1x avg.) PE: 9.4 Mkt. Cap: $16.8 b Yield: 1.1%

Dow Jones industrials

A

NVDA

Close: $247.53 -5.72 or -2.3% Chipmakers stumbled after the U.S. released a $200 billion list of Chinese imports that may be hit with tariffs. $300

45

45

J

Nvidia

AIR

Close: $43.02 -5.53 or -11.4% The airplane maintenance company reported weaker-than-expected sales in the fourth quarter.

50

40

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

AAR

FAST

Close: $54.51 4.98 or 10.1% The maker of construction and industrial fasteners had a stronger second quarter than investors expected. $55

$50

$35.90

24,960

Fastenal

AAL

Close: $35.96 -3.16 or -8.1% The airline forecast slower growth in a key measure of its revenue in the second quarter.

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.00 3.31 6.42 3.85 4.00 .73

+0.01 +0.01 -0.04 ... ... -0.01

1.67 2.60 5.74 3.78 3.23 .61

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2774.02 12417.13 7591.96 28311.69 5353.93 49025.15 21932.21 74398.57 16417.32 8682.93

CHG

CHG

YTD

-19.82 -192.72 -100.08 -370.56 -80.42 +34.23 -264.68 -463.82 -131.40 -85.98

-0.71% -1.53% -1.30% -1.29% -1.48% +0.07% -1.19% -0.62% -0.79% -0.98%

+3.76% -3.87% -1.25% -5.37% +0.78% -0.67% -3.66% -2.62% +1.28% -7.45%

Pfizer separates consumer health unit to keep options open, flexible BY MANAS MISHRA reuters

Pfizer Inc. announced on Wednesday plans to reorganize into three units, separating its consumer health care business that the U.S. drugmaker has been trying to sell since last year. The company said it still was looking for options for the lowermargin, non-core consumer health care business that makes products ranging from painkiller Advil to lip balms and is worth about $15 billion. “Given the lack of urgency, management is being rational about its divestiture,” BMO Capital Markets analyst Alex Arfaei said, adding taht the new structure would help Pfizer maintain its options for the business. The news comes a day after Pfizer deferred drug price increases for no more than six months, after criticism from President Donald Trump. Starting in 2019, Pfizer’s new units would be Innovative Medi-

cines, Established Medicines and Consumer Healthcare. The company is currently split into two units — Innovative Medicines, which includes the consumer business, and Essential Health which houses legacy drugs such as Viagra. “This design gives us a sharper focus on diverse patients in diverse markets,” COO Albert Bourla said. The innovative medicines business will include biosimilars and a new hospital business unit, and together with the consumer health care business, will account for about three-quarters of the company’s revenue. Pfizer’s 2017 annual revenue was $52.55 billion. Pfizer’s $236 million research campus that’s under construction in Chesterfield, where it will hone development of medicine and vaccines, would operate under the innovative medicines unit. The Chesterfield facility will grow Pfizer’s area presence, retaining the company’s 450 em-

ployees in the area while eventually adding 80 positions. The 295,000 square feet of laboratory and office space at 875 West Chesterfield Parkway is projected to be completed in mid-2019. The established medicines unit would include a majority of the company’s brands such as soonto-be off-patent neurological disease treatment Lyrica as well as some generic drugs. The restructuring will allow the company to evaluate its businesses better and could result in selling or spinning off its off-patent drugs, Wall Street analysts said. While the company expects the business to generate sustainable moderate revenue growth after Lyrica goes generic, Credit Suisse analyst Vamil Divan said the reorganization would allow the established medicines unit to have more autonomy. “We believe the potential for Pfizer to ultimately sell or spin the business likely remains on the table over time,” Divan said.

U.S. soon to pass Saudis, Russians as top oil producer BY DAVID KOENIG, associated Press

The U.S. is on pace to leapfrog both Saudi Arabia and Russia and reclaim the title of the world’s biggest oil producer for the first time since the 1970s. The latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that U.S. output will grow next year to 11.8 million barrels a day. “If the forecast holds, that would make the U.S. the world’s leading producer of crude,” says Linda Capuano, who heads the agency, a part of the Energy Department. Saudi Arabia and Russia could upend that forecast by boosting their own production. In the face of rising global oil prices, mem-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. energy gains have been driven by advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

bers of the OPEC cartel and a few non-members including Russia agreed last month to ease production caps that had contributed to the run-up in prices. The United States led the world in oil production for much

of the 20th century, but the Soviet Union surpassed America in 1974, and Saudi Arabia did the same in 1976, according to Energy Department figures. The last decade or so has seen a revolution in American energy production, however, led by techniques including hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and horizontal drilling. Those innovations — and the breakup of the Soviet Union — helped the U.S. narrow the gap, although Russia and Saudi Arabia both pumped more crude than the U.S. last year. Capuano’s agency forecast that U.S. crude output will average 10.8 million barrels a day for all of 2018 and 11.8 million barrels a day in 2019, up from 9.4 million in 2017.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

THURSDAy • 07.12.2018 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Misdirected attacks Missourians searching for a GOP Senate candidate of substance aren’t finding it in Hawley.

M

issouri Attorney General Josh Greitens, Hawley waited until it was politically safe to do so, after key GOP legislators Hawley, the likely GOP U.S. had already made clear their intentions to Senate nominee, miscalcupursue Greitens’ misconduct aggressively. lates by focusing his camGOP hardliners in Missouri who voted paign strategy on attacking incumbent overwhelmingly for President Donald Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill, porTrump no doubt will be delighted with traying her as a flaming leftist out of touch Hawley’s attacks on McCaskill. He is miswith Missouri’s mainstream. McCaskill’s taken, however, if he believes those hardvoting record is about as centrist as it gets, liners represent the Missouri mainstream. and Hawley knows it. The latest Axios/Survey Monkey His exaggerations, primarily aimed at poll shows pressuring her McCaskill with ahead of the 49 percent Senate confirsupport among mation vote of would-be voters Supreme Court against 47 pernominee Brett cent support for Kavanaugh, Hawley. A simimask a much lar Axios poll in more profound March showed weakness in the Hawley with young attoran 8 percentney general’s age point lead. background: Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley (left) and Hawley also his own lack of U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill. Hawley, a Republican, miscalculates experience. He hopes to challenge McCaskill for her Senate seat. that the state’s has minimal 2016 support for Trump, by a 20-point credentials with which to convince voters margin, translates into Missourians’ Senthat he can be more effective as a senator ate preferences. In that same election, than McCaskill. So his only option is to incumbent GOP Sen. Roy Blunt squeaked deflect. Missourians shouldn’t fall for it. by with 49 percent of votes against 46 Hawley, 38, was barely a year into his percent for Democrat Jason Kander. first elective office as attorney general Mainstream Missourians are far more before being tapped to run for Senate. His selective and centrist in their Senate record as attorney general has been only choices than Hawley gives them credit for. mildly impressive. He was a latecomer in “Our way of life,” as he phrases Missouri challenging the multiple abuses that put values, is far from the hard-right side of then-Gov. Eric Greitens on a track toward the political spectrum. impeachment. Hawley seemed conflicted If Missourians are souring on Hawley, on where to focus his energies — on runit probably reflects their revulsion with ning for Senate, or actually doing his job. Trump’s extremist rhetoric and Hawley’s He made up for that deficit by aggresrefusal to challenge it. They want to know sively investigating Greitens’ allegedly what he stands for. abusive 2015 affair with a St. Louis If Hawley wants to move his sagging poll hairdresser and the governor’s misuse of numbers, he’ll need to move away from charity resources to advance his political the extremist fringe and give Missouri’s campaign. Hawley soft-pedaled a third mainstream something of substance to probe, related to blatant Sunshine Law chew on. abuses, causing the case to disintegrate. Even when he was willing to go after

Enemy at the gates Trump’s embrace of Putin ignores the very real threat Russia poses.

R

ussian President Vladimir Putin must certainly be relishing his summit Monday with President Donald Trump, because never before has an American president done so much to advance Russia’s global interests the way this one has. Trump truly is Russia’s best friend. How does Putin love him? Let us count the ways. Even before his election, Trump was doing Russia’s bidding by openly encouraging Britons to vote in favor of exit from the European Union. Putin’s longtime goal has been to fracture the EU’s unity to make it easier for him to rebound from pariah status and resume his expansionist agenda. European unity is what established the bulwark against communism on the subcontinent’s eastern flank, leading to the Soviet Union’s collapse and the expansion of NATO to include former Soviet satellite states. Putin has made it his singular goal to restore Russia as a pre-eminent superpower. With Europe in political disarray, Putin is rejoicing. And Trump is egging him on. No wonder Trump views that meeting as the “easiest” part of his current Europe trip. Trump has blamed Russia’s 2014 seizure and annexation of Crimea not on Putin but on President Barack Obama.“President Obama lost Crimea. … Yeah, it’s his fault,” he told reporters in June. A reporter sought clarification by asking why Trump didn’t blame Putin for the invasion and seizure. “Because Putin didn’t respect President Obama,” Trump said.“President Obama lost Crimea because President Putin didn’t respect President Obama, didn’t respect our country and didn’t respect Ukraine.” Holding Putin accountable for this unacceptable violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty is the basis for ongoing, severe international economic sanctions on Russia. Europe, again, forms the bulwark for the success of those sanctions — exactly the kind of punishment the West must

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Passing Proposition A would lead to higher wages On Aug. 7, voters will have the chance to support worker freedom and a stronger economy for all Missourians by voting “yes” on Proposition A. Prop A prohibits workers from being forced to join a union and have fees automatically withdrawn from their paychecks. When workers have a choice to join, it makes union executives more accountable to workers who choose union membership. Passing Prop A would lead to higher wages for Missouri workers. According to data from the U.S. Commerce Department and Missouri Economic Research and Information Center, wages in states that have enacted “freedom to work” are $2,250 higher than the average for forced-unionism states. The Bureau of Economic Analysis has proved that “freedom to work” states have seen more job growth and more state GDP growth. Missouri is nearly surrounded by “freedom to work” states, and while those bordering states are benefiting, Missouri is missing out. I’ve talked to hundreds of Missouri business owners and workers who live and work near or along the border of “freedom to work” states. They tell me their communities are losing jobs as they watch factories and businesses move to states that actually protect worker freedom. Missouri deserves better. Dan Mehan • Jefferson City President and CEO, Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry

AP

mizes the alliance’s importance, dismissing its role after World War II in checking Soviet expansion and coming to America’s defense after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. When Trump publicly denigrates NATO, he encourages Putin to resume his aggressive, expansionist posture. Trump, for obvious reasons, has repeatedly dismissed the importance of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential elections — yet another example of Russian disrespect of sovereignty. In the United Kingdom, Russia is suspected of meddling in Britain’s 2016 “Brexit” vote and of deploying a nerve agent that recently killed a British citizen, sickened another, and nearly killed a former Russian spy and his daughter. Trump seems oblivious to the threat Russia poses to global security. Americans shouldn’t mistake this for smart diplomacy. This is madness.

but failed to say why such a family would be seeking asylum from such a major country as Brazil. Isn’t this a question journalists should ask and seek to answer? I might disapprove of President Donald Trump’s rhetoric or of some of his methods, but clearly there are good reasons for certain of his immigration policies. William S. Barker • Webster Groves

Preserve program that does so much to reduce hunger

So state Rep. Elijah Haahr, R-Springfield, declares this legislative session’s tax reduction bill to be one of the “capstones” of the session (“Parson to sign plan lowering income tax rates,” July 10). Republicans can proudly trumpet that they lowered taxes. Actually what they are lowering is the tax rate, while they simultaneously raise your taxable income by disallowing a deduction for federal taxes. The upshot, if all the fantasy projections were to come true, is that 6 million Missourians will pay about $6 million less in taxes in 2023. I’m already planning how I’m going to spend that windfall dollar. How stupid do politicians think we are? I suppose their answer would be “Stupid enough to elect me, I guess.” Tom Ryan • Richmond Heights

Sts. Joachim and Ann Care Service does amazing work meeting the needs of hungry families in St. Charles, Lincoln and Warren counties. More than 60 dedicated volunteers help work nine shifts; pick up supplies from more 18 locations; and sort, prepare and distribute food and household goods to about 125 families each week. Still we can only provide a short-term supply of food, so we depend on the public-private partnership of a strong Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. SNAP does so much to reduce hunger in Missouri and must be protected in the current farm bill conference committee process. The U.S. House of Representative passed a harsh and flawed farm bill on June 21 by a narrow vote of 213-211. The partisan nature of the bill was clear in that all six majority-party representatives in Missouri voted for it, and the two minority-party representatives voted against it. As the bill stands just now, tens of thousands of Missourians would lose access to SNAP. SNAP helps make sure that about 750,000 Missourians have enough to eat each month, and 70 percent of households helped include children. SNAP is a crucial tool in the fight against food insecurity, and it’s also one of the best antipoverty programs we have. Local food banks and pantries, like Sts. Joachim and Ann Care Service, are already stretched thin. We simply won’t be able to replace the wide-reaching, life-changing benefits that SNAP provides. Thankfully the U.S. Senate has passed a strong, bipartisan farm bill that protects the SNAP program. Both Sens. Roy Blunt and Claire McCaskill of Missouri voted for it. Please join us in asking our U.S. House members to support the Senate version of the bill since the House version would actually cause hunger to increase in Missouri. Jack Lipin • St. Charles Executive director, Sts. Joachim and Ann Care Service

Some good reasons for Trump’s immigration policies

Show gratitude to construction workers

There was a certain irony in the July 7 issue of the Post-Dispatch. A commentary by Ghazala Hayat, chair of the public relations committee of the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis, criticized the Supreme Court’s decision supporting the president’s travel ban of some majority-Muslim countries. On the opposite page was an article by Sinan Salaheddin of The Associated Press describing the horrific experiences of a Yazidi woman, Farida Khalaf, at the hands of the Islamic State: “Islamic State, adopting a radical interpretation of ancient Islamic texts, declared that Yazidi women and even young girls could be taken as slaves. ... She says the men would kneel and pray before raping her, convinced that it was sanctioned by religion.” Also, on page A5, a touching picture of an apparently middle-class immigrant mother from Brazil reunited with her 10-year-old son while seeking asylum identified both son and mother by name,

If you’ve spent time in St. Louis lately, you’ve probably noticed the ubiquitous cones and construction zones. However, when was the last time you thought about the people working in these zones? Whether they’re replacing pipes in the middle of the road, repairing gas mains, restoring historic buildings or supporting our city’s infrastructure in some other way, construction workers deserve our gratitude. With their hard work and sweat, they’re helping to build a better city one day at a time. Therefore, I encourage you to not only drive carefully through work zones, but to also thank construction workers if you have the opportunity. After all, without these industrious people who wear hard hats and neon vests to work every day, St. Louis and its infrastructure would be weaker. Lauren Remspecher • St. Louis

Missouri’s tax cut doesn’t really save us money

impose on any aggressive foe. Yet Trump refuses even to call Putin a foe. Rather, Russia is a “competitor.” He has spoken in favor of ending sanctions and effectively allowing Russia to get away with its territorial theft. Trump heavily criticized NATO in public before and during his trip. He mini-

President Donald Trump meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Hamburg, Germany, last year.

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook.com/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

07.12.2018 • THURSDAY • M 1 50 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

MONEY FOR MISSOURI SCHOOLS AND CITIES • The financial difficulties of government in Missouri’s metropolitan centers are going to be among the thorniest challenges facing the next governor and general assembly. St. Louis and Kansas City, two of the three largest producers of taxable wealth in the state, are going broke. Urban school districts are barely able to make ends meet. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Trump sets his sights on dismantling #MeToo movement President’s plans are an imminent threat to progress in American sexual politics. BY S.E. CUPP

JIM URQUHART • Assoicated Press

President Donald Trump waves to the audience at a rally in Great Falls, Mont., on Thursday.

Believe it or not,

Trump just told the truth President’s message: Putin is fine, but Europeans are killing us. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

I used to say that if you wanted to know whether President Donald Trump was telling the truth, flip a coin. But it turns out I overstated the odds of Trumpian truthfulness. The Washington Post’s Fact Checker reviewed all claims Trump made at his Montana rally last week and found that 76 percent of them were false or suspect. Therefore, assuming this proportion holds for all Trump utterances, the odds he is telling the truth are closer to the chance of drawing a spade at random from a 52-card deck. So what happened Tuesday morning was, by definition, improbable: Trump emerged from the White House, stood on the South Lawn — and said something quite accurate. Departing for meetings in Europe with NATO officials, British leaders and then Russian President Vladimir Putin, Trump observed: “Frankly, Putin may be the easiest of them all. Who would think?” Actually, we all would think — because Trump outlined it for us during that Montana rally. Of Europeans, he said this: “They kill us on trade. They kill us on other things. … On top of that, they kill us with NATO. They kill us.” He went on to say that “we are the schmucks that are paying for the whole thing,” using a Yiddish word for male genitals. But he said this of Putin: “I might even end up having a good relationship, but they’re going,‘Will President Trump be prepared? You know, President Putin is KGB and this and that.’ You know what? Putin’s fine. He’s fine.” So Putin is fine, but Europeans are killing us. Using this distinction, we can extrapolate a taxonomy:

Things that Trump thinks will kill us: • Free markets. • Free trade. • Democracy. • Free speech. • Free press. • Opposition parties. • Independent courts. • The rule of law. • Human rights. Things that Trump thinks are fine (from the April human rights report on Russia by Trump’s State Department): • Extrajudicial killings. • Enforced disappearances. • Torture. • Arbitrary arrest and detention. • Lack of judicial independence. • Political prisoners. • Severe restrictions on freedom of expression. • Violence against journalists and bloggers. • Blocking and filtering of internet content. • Severe restrictions on the rights of peaceful assembly. • Restrictions on freedom of movement. • Severe restrictions on the right to participate in the political process. • Widespread corruption at all levels and in all branches of government. • Thousands of fatal incidents of domestic violence, to which the government responded by reducing the penalty for domestic violence. • Institutionalization in harsh conditions of a large percentage of people with disabilities. • State-sponsored as well as societal violence against LGBT people. As we have seen for some time during the Trump era, the good guys are the bad guys, and vice versa. The world has been upside down for so long that American toilets now swirl in the opposite direction. Just a few weeks ago, Trump insulted his allies in the Group of Seven and called the leader of Canada weak

and dishonest — and then flew off to Asia to hail North Korea’s Kim Jong Un as honorable. On his European trip this week, Trump isn’t merely drawing a verbal distinction between the European killers and the fine Putin. He is acting accordingly. On the eve of his NATO meeting in Brussels, Trump kept up a steady attack on fellow members for failing to pay their share. Responding to European Council President Donald Tusk’s warning that the United States has few allies left, Trump on Tuesday dismissed the fraying NATO alliance by saying it “helps them a lot more than it helps us.” After Belgium, Trump goes to Britain, where Prime Minister Theresa May helped limit Trump’s exposure to protests (including a giant balloon of a baby Trump in a diaper) and arranged an audience with the queen. Trump repaid her Tuesday by lavishly praising Boris Johnson, the Brexit leader whose resignation as foreign secretary has brought May’s government to the verge of collapse. From there, Trump proceeds to Helsinki to meet Putin, whom Trump has already rewarded with a call for Russia to be readmitted to the G-7, a deepening rift in the trans-Atlantic alliance and an acceptance of Putin’s claim that Russia didn’t interfere in U.S. elections. The European killers will watch anxiously to see what gift Trump might bestow this time. Recognition of Russia’s annexation of Ukraine? A drawdown of U.S. troops in Europe? It is probably true that hanging out with Putin is the “easiest” thing Trump will do in Europe. But such a fine man requires fine gifts.

Dana Milbank Twitter: @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post

On Tuesday morning, many liberals woke up worried that President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court pick, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, will usher in the overturning of the decades-old Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion. Depending on whom you talk to, their fears are either wholly justified or nothing more than midterm scare tactics. Either way, too few are concerned about a far likelier and imminent threat to significant progress in American sexual politics — Trump’s plans to overturn #MeToo. He hasn’t begun his campaign in earnest, but it’s coming. He workshopped it at a rally in Montana last week, joking about throwing an ancestry testing kit to Sen. Elizabeth Warren to make her prove her claimed Native American heritage. “We are going to do it gently because we’re the #MeToo generation, so we have to be very careful,” he chided. Blink and you might have missed it. And on the Trump scale of incendiary invective, it hardly moved the needle. But the line drew laughs. And when Trump’s material works, he doubles and triples down. The expediency of Trump’s undermining the months of progress seen by a sexual harassment national reckoning, which followed decades of suffering in silence, is obvious: It discredits his own accusers by mocking the movement they would benefit from. But it’s actually far more dangerous — and brilliant — than that. It would seem to those of us who have covered #MeToo and the countless powerful men it exposed and brought down, to those of us who were prompted to share our stories, and those in industries where tectonic shifts have already taken place that Trump’s impotent, self-serving jabs at such a powerful movement would have little effect. But like everything else he has discredited — from the media to the Mueller investigation, the NFL to the FBI — the impact is all too real. And there are plenty of #MeToo skeptics, many among his base, who will happily explode his message when he gives them permission. Plenty of polls show a growing suspicion for #MeToo efforts. A recent Pew poll of 6,251 adults found 51 percent of respondents believe “the increased focus on sexual harassment and assault”would make it harder for men “to know how to interact with women in the workplace.” Likewise, a poll commissioned by The Salt Lake Tribune and the Hinckley Institute of Politics of 654 registered voters statewide found that 87 percent of respondents who identified as “very liberal” said their Cupp opinion of the movement is either very or somewhat favorable, while only 16 percent of “very conservative” respondents said the same. Trump won Utah 45.9 percent to Clinton’s 27.8 percent. But others risk providing false comfort. An NPR/Ipsos poll from December found 9 in 10 Americans believe that “a zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment is essential to bringing about change in our society.” Go to any under-employed town in America and you’re unlikely to find 1 in 10 who would answer this way. Further, go to polite suburbs where, for the same reason, Trump support was under-reported in 2016 polls. I’ve talked to numerous people who’ve said they don’t see #MeToo as progress, but would never say so publicly. Watch that change when Trump gives it his treatment at a rally. The scary simplicity of this attempt at overturning a seminal cultural movement is that he doesn’t need to appoint anyone to do it. He doesn’t need Senate confirmation. He just needs his base to help and his rivals to be complacent. For #MeToo proponents, the mistake will be in assuming Trump can’t turn back the clock. He can, and he will try. Here’s hoping they are ready. S.E. Cupp is the host of “S.E. Cupp Unfiltered” on HLN. Readers may email her at secuppdailynews@yahoo.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency

Next-gen Air Force jet trainer must take off from Missouri Boeing’s T-X is designed to ensure all of the Air Force’s capabilities and requirements are met. BY MIKE PARSON

Since McDonnell Aircraft Corp. opened its St. Louis plant in 1939, our state has been on the cutting edge of aviation. The Show-Me state built the FH-1 Phantom, the Navy’s first all-jet airplane. The F-101 Voodoo, which flew 82 missions over Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis, was built here. We helped build the AV-8B Harrier for the Marine Corps. We continue to build E/A-18 Growlers and F/A-18 Super Hornets, the backbone of the Navy’s strike fighter fleet, and the Advanced F-15 flown by U.S. allies around Parson world who depend on its next-gen capabilities. And, with the Air Force about to award a contract for the service’s new two-seat jet trainer, Missouri should again play a big role building the next major aircraft for our military. But only if the Air Force selects the only truly American-made aircraft in the competition — the Boeing T-X trainer, which calls Boeing’s St. Louis plant home.

For over 50 years, the Air Force has trained new pilots using the T-38 Talon. But, even the newest Talons are now aging since production ended in 1972, and the Air Force is finally replacing them with a new, nextgeneration trainer. The Air Force recently laid out a long list of requirements for this “T-X” aircraft and supporting training systems and asked its industry CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com partners for their most Boeing unveiled its T-X trainer aircraft last year. innovative ideas. The also help boost the economy here at home. T-X will have a chalThat is why as lieutenant governor, I lenging mission, preparing American pilots launched the “Buy Missouri” initiative to for today’s advanced fighters and bombers highlight and promote Missouri-based — such as the F-15 Eagles, F-22 Raptors, and companies that invest in our workers and F-35 Lightnings — but also the new aircraft state. And now as governor, I am fighting to we haven’t yet dreamed up. attract even more new jobs and boost our During the six years I served in the Army, economy every day. I learned first-hand just how important it is Nonetheless, when looking at the three to give our men and women in uniform the proposals to build the T-X trainer, I believe best equipment possible. In my 30 years of the choice is obvious because the fact is public service, I learned that doing so can

America’s next trainer aircraft should be made right here in the heart of America. Economically, Boeing has approximately 14,000 employees in Missouri and numerous suppliers ready to do their part in building and supplying the new T-X. More than 90 percent of the jet will be Americanmade. And the program office, engineering and final assembly line will be right here in Missouri, generating and sustaining more than 1,800 well-paying jobs. Recently, I got to see Boeing’s new T-X, a truly impressive machine. It is highly capable with maximum versatility, and it’s clear that every detail was well thought out. For example, the seating — which was designed to be stadium style, gives the instructor in the back seat the ability to see everything the trainee is doing up front. Indeed, Boeing’s T-X is the jet designed to ensure all of the Air Force’s capabilities and requirements are met. I believe the Boeing “Made in America” T-X that will take off from right here in Missouri — and carry U.S. air supremacy forward for the next generation of pilots — is the best choice for our national security and economy. Mike Parson is the governor of Missouri.


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

OBITUARIES

Beard, Rosemary Virginia - St. Louis Bergmann, Donald H. - St. Louis Black, Marie L. - Dallas, TX and St. Louis, MO Callahan, Judith "Judi" Renee - Newburgh, IN Combrevis, Veronica M. "Vera" - St. Louis Corcoran, John "Jack" - Troy, MO Hoffmann, John Francis "Jack" - St. Louis Lamb, Ann Elizabeth - St. Charles

Beard, Rosemary Virginia

Celebrations of Life

Mathews, Wilfrid P. "Sonny" - St. Louis McAndrew, Harriet V. - McHenry, IL Mengwasser, Gerald - Wentzville Morris, Rose - St. Louis Muhs, Rosemary Frances - St. Peters Neff, Kenneth G. - St. Louis Placke, Jacquelyn A. - St. Mary, MO Rebmann, William "Bill" J. - Lake Ozark, MO

McAndrew, Harriet V.

(nee Domermuth) 97, passed away July 7, 2018. She was the beloved wife of the late Charles A. Beard; mother of Charles D. (Karen) Beard; grandmother of Amy ( Michael) Gray & Christine (Steven) Wojciechowski. She was also a great-grandmother.

Harriet V. McAndrew, age 96, of McHenry, IL, passed away on Wednesday July 4, 2018 at JourneyCare Hospice in Woodstock, IL, surrounded by her loving family. Harriet was born to Harry and Helen Metzer of St. Louis, MO on September 4, 1921. Harriet was united in marriage to Joseph McAndrew on May 10, 1942.

Bergmann, Donald H.

Formerly of St. Louis, MO and Daytona Beach, FL, Harriet has been a resident of McHenry for 40 years. Harriet was a devout Catholic all her life. Harriet loved to sing, cook, and possessed the ability to give the finest advice to her children and grandchildren. Harriet will be remembered for her kind heart, laughter, and dignity.

of St. Louis Mo, died July 8th, 2018. Born June 16th, 1927 in Belleville, IL, to Frederick and Florence (Schaefer) Bergmann. Sister, Bee Clare of St. Louis MO, preceded him in death. Mourned by a special friend, Willie J. Meadows of St. Louis MO., and many friends. Mr. Bergmann graduated from Belleville Township High School in Feb. 1945, entered the Army of the United States on Sept. 5th, 1945, serving with the 7th Infantry Division in the occupation of Korea in 1946, receiving an honorable discharge on Jan. 31, 1947 with the rank of Technician 4th Grade. On June 23, 1947 he entered the employment of the Wabash Railroad CO, St. Louis, MO retiring from Norfolk Southern Railway in Atlanta in Sept. 1987. The last 20 years of his rail career were involved with the development and growth of intermodal transport of trailers and sea containers by rail. After retiring and returning to St. Louis, Mr. Bergmann was involved with historic preservation and museum activities. He served as board member and President (1988-1992) of the Campbell House Museum, past President of the Friends of Tower Grove Park, Consistory member and Treasurer of Holy Ghost United Church of Christ, board member and Counsellor of Landmarks Assn. of St. Louis and founded St. Louis Chapter of the Victorian Society in America in1977. He also served as a board member and past Vice President of the National Victorian Society headquartered in Philadelphia, PA and board member of the German American Heritage Society of St. Louis, MO. Services: Visitation Saturday July 14, 2018 9 am - 10 am Trinity Episcopal Church, 600 North Euclid Ave. St. Louis, MO. 63108. Funeral services to follow at 10:30 am. Burial in Walnut Hill Cemetery, Belleville, IL. Memorial suggested to Campbell House Museum and Landmarks Assn. of St. Louis. Condolences may be offered at www.hoffmeistercolonial.com

Black, Marie L.

(nee Schindler) Born May 1, 1927 at home in Riverview, Missouri and was the daughter of Bernard E. Schindler Sr. and of Alma E. (Alexander) Schindler. Died July 8, 2018 in McKinney, Texas. She was preceded in death by her loving husband Bobby L. Black. She had three brothers who also preceded her in death, Bernard Jr, Gilbert and Edward Schindler. She leaves behind her daughter and son-in-law Joyce and Jeremiah Vaughan, her son and daughter-in-law Gary and Sheryl Black. Four grandchildren, David and Richard Vaughan, Natalie (Black) Weems (her husband Timothy) and Nicholas Black. Two great-granddaughters, Chloe and Naomi Weems. Also, too many nieces, nephews and cousins to be named. She will be greatly missed by her many friends in Dallas, Texas and St. Louis, Missouri, especially for her legendary Christmas cookies. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Saturday, July 13, 12:00 Noon. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. Visitation Friday, 4-8 p.m.

Callahan, Judith "Judi" Renee

59, of Newburgh, IN passed away Monday, June 25, 2018 at Deaconess Gateway Hospital (Newburgh, IN). She was born in St. Louis, MO on September 7, 1958 to the late Walter and Charlotte Eckert. She loved her family and they were most important to her. Judi worked many years in the retail furniture business making many friends. She was very creative, loved decorating, and playing online games with people all over the world. She was an animal lover with five cats, Ely was her favorite. Judi was a very kind and compassionate person with a soft heart, always putting her family first. She had a great sense of humor and enjoyed watching sports, especially the St. Louis Cardinals. Judi was preceded in death by her parents; son, Sean Callahan; and four cousins. She is survived by her husband of 37 years, Patrick; sons, Neil Callahan (Shannon), Devin Callahan; daughter Paige Callahan; grandchildren, Jack, Reilly, Mia Callahan; brother, Glenn Eckert (Pat); niece, Shannon Bender (Matt); nephew, Tyson Eckert (Jaclyn); and 19 cousins. Services: Visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, July 14, 2:00 p.m. until time of service at 4:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the Humane Society of Missouri.

Harriet is survived by children Jerome (Bette) McAndrew, Patricia Lybarger, Peggy (Michael) Linton, Kathleen McAndrew; 12 grandchildren, Ernie McAndrew, Kevin McAndrew, Tami Polizzi, Cory McAndrew, Todd McAndrew, Michael McAndrew, Jennifer Nelson, James Callicott, Jeffrey Callicott, Scott Callicott, Nicole McAndrew, Suzann Walton; and 23 great-grandchildren. In addition to her parents, Harriet was preceded in death by her husband Joseph; her sons, Thomas and Dennis; her brother, Richard; and her beloved son-in-law, Robert Lybarger. The family chose a private gathering to celebrate Harriet's exceptionally full life. To those wishing to send expressions of condolences, the family suggests memorials to: JourneyCare Foundation Woodstock InPatient Unit, 2050 Claire Ct. Glenview, IL 60025-7635 or McHenry Senior Services, 3519 N. Richmond Rd. McHenry, IL 60050. Arrangements were entrusted to Justen Funeral Home & Crematory, 3700 W. Charles J. Miller Rd., McHenry, IL 60050. For information, please call the funeral home at 815-385-2400 or visit www.justenfh.com, where friends can leave an online condolence message for the family.

Mengwasser, Gerald

78, July 10, 2018. Services: Vis. Fri., July 13, 9 a.m. until Service at 11 a.m. at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Wentzville. Burial: Our Lady Cemetery. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

Morris, Rose

Rose Morris, 85, entered into rest Monday, July 9, 2018. Wife of the late Norman Morris. Loving mother of Barb (Don) Fortmeyer, Tom Morris, Karen Morris, and Linda Morris. Beloved grandmother of Erica Immel and beloved great-grandmother of Zander and Delilah Immel. Dear sister of Ninfa Siefert, dear aunt. Preceded in death by dear parents Tommaso and Rosalie DiLorenzo and dear family friend Shirley Goebel. Services: In honor of her wishes, a family only service will be held. Donations in her honor can be made to curearthritis.org/donation

Muhs, Rosemary Frances

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Monday, July 9, 2018. Loving daughter of the late Thomas W. and Anna (n ee-L u eb b ert ) D reis ew erd ; beloved wife of the late William Joseph Muhs; loving mother of William "Bill" M u h s and wife Sharon, L in d a P ois s a n t a n d husband Brad, Carolyn Krueger and husband Bill; dear grandmother of Andrew Krueger and wife Audrey, Katie Krueger, Elise Krueger, Kristen Muhs, Jenna

Muhs and Casey Muhs. Rosemary was a singer and member of The Bill Muhs Combo, participated in "Big Band Jams" in Donna, Texas and sang in local groups. Services: A memorial visitation will be held on Saturday, July 14, 2018 from 9:00 a.m. until the Memorial Mass at 10:00 a.m. at Sts. Joachim and Ann Catholic Church, 4112 McClay Rd, St. Charles. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com.

Neff, Kenneth G.

Mon., July 9, 2018. Visitation at Bethalto Church of God, 800 E. Bethalto Blvd. (62010) Sat., July 14, 12 noon until 1 p.m. service. Concludes at church. Kutis South County.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Ritchey, Mary Kathryn "Katie" - Ballwin Sanders, Steven R. - Florissant Schlichtemier, Daisy Louise - Ferguson Schneider, Thomas (Cutter) - St. Charles Siegfried-Burton, Barbara - Fort Worth, TX Smith, Rita Ann - Grover, MO Stormer, John - Troy, MO

Ritchey, Mary Kathryn "Katie"

passed away peacefully at her home in Ballwin, Mo, surrounded by loving family and friends on July 8, 2018. She was 91. Katie was born and raised in Sewickley, PA, and was one of four children of Floyd and Grace Lyon. After attending Pennsylvania College for Women, she married the love of her life, Joseph (Joe) Ritchey. The couple settled in Kirkwood, MO, in 1965, raising three sons. Katie was active in many social and civic organizations, including being a founding member of Kirkwood Pioneer Booster Club and Glendale Presbyterian Church. Joining the faculty of Rossman School in 1974, Katie became the beloved kindergarten teacher who taught literally hundreds of St. Louis children. Years after her retirement from Rossman in 1989, former teachers, students, and their children would still seek advice from Katie. Katie retired to Meramec Bluffs Senior Living Facility in 2004, where she enjoyed an active life with many great friends. Still playing bridge and rooting for the Cardinals days before her passing, she was a devoted member of St. Mark's Church in Ballwin, MO. Katie will be remembered for her loving spirit, sense of humor, loyalty to her friends and family, beloved teacher at Rossman School, commitment to her faith and love of her country. Katie was predeceased by her husband, Joe, and survived by sons: Ray (Anne), Joe (Lilian) and David (Sandy); grandchildren: Bethany, David, Blake, Matthew, Jonathan and Sarah Jane; and great-grandchildren: Walker, Bowman, Wright, Louisa, and James. Services: A Celebration of Life Service will be held on Saturday, July 14, at the Chapel at Meramec Bluffs, Ballwin, MO., at 2:30 p.m., with a reception to follow at the adjoining Fellowship Hall. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations be made in Katie Ritchey's name to The Shriners Hospital for Children: https://goo.gl/hm2r3T. www.boppchapel.com

Sanders, Steven R.

Age 59, of Florissant, passed away on Wednesday, July 4, 2018. Steve was born in Sterling Heights, MI and moved to MO in time to start 1st grade where he met his two life-long friends, Steve Overbey and Jeff Hubbard. Steve graduated from McCluer North High School and attended Southeast Missouri State University. He worked many years at and eventually became co-owner, President & CEO of InP l a n t O f f i c e s In corp ora t ed, located in South St. Louis. He loved working there and he loved the people he worked with. He said many times that he had no plans to ever retire. Steve was a rabid sports fan. He especially loved the Indiana Pacers, Atlanta Braves, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Missouri Tigers. He also liked horse racing. He is survived by his parents Bob and Ginny Sanders of Palm Coast, FL, other relatives and many friends. He was preceded in death by his brother Tom. Services: A memorial service will be held at Hutchens Mortuary, Florissant at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 14. A Celebration of Life will be held at The Locker Room at 1 p.m.

Schlichtemier, Daisy Louise

of Ferguson, MO, died at the age of 92 on Monday, July 9, 2018 in Shreveport, LA. Services: Visitation will be Saturday, July 14, 2018 at Hutchens Funeral Home, 675 Gra h a m Rd., Florissant, M O 63031 from 9-11:00 AM followed by a Memorial Service from 11 Noon. Mother loved flowers but if you prefer, donations can be made to the First Presbyterian Church of Ferguson, 401 Darst Rd., Ferguson, MO 63135. For more information please visit hutchensmortuary.com.

Schneider, Thomas (Cutter)

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on July 5, 2018. Cutter was the son of the late John and Bernadette Schneider; husband of the late G. Patricia (McBride); father of Placke, Jacquelyn A. (nee Dean), 82, Fortified with the Craig (Sheila), Douglas and Teresa and Maria (Ronald) Ingino; Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother grandpa to 9, great-grandpa to 2; brother to Robert, Claire, Church on Friday, July 6, 2018. Kenneth and Rose. The family is being served by the HutchensShe was born to the late Herbert Stygar (St. Charles). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com and Ursella Dean on February 22, 1936 in St. Louis. Siegfried-Burton, Barbara Loving wife of 63 years to Passed July 3, 2018, Our Loving Mother of two daughters, Richard Placke; beloved mother to Jeffrey P l a cke, a n d K a r a Amazing Grandmother of five grandchildren and Great-Grand(Chris) Smith; dear sister to mother of one on the way. Combrevis, Veronica M. "Vera" Beverly (Bob) Carroll; beloved Services: Memorial Service will be held at Ignite Church, 1729 (nee Monti) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother grandmother to Richard (Stacia) W. 5th Street, Eureka, MO, 63025 on Saturday, July 28, 2018, at Church Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Leonard Placke and great-grandmother to 11:00 a.m. L. Combrevis Sr.; loving mother of Linda (David) Gerheauser, Landyn and Audrey. Julie (Jim) Huegerich, Louis F., Leonard Jr. (Charlotte), Jeffrey She had retired from McDonalds. and Vincent Combrevis; dear grandmother of 6 and greatServices: Mass at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque in St. Louis, MO Smith, Rita Ann grandmother of 11; dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. on Saturday, July 14, 2018 at 10 am. Memorial Contributions (nee Anlauf) Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Vera volunteered at the Hosea House. can be made to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Parish. Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, A BASLER FUNERAL HOME service. Beloved wife of Raymond Paul Smith; Loving Mother of Bruce Friday, July 13, 9:45 a.m. to Seven Holy Founders Catholic (Charlotte) Smith, Kathy Smith, Paula (Dave) Oborsh, Judy Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. (Arron) Payne and Raelene (Mike) O'Brien; Dear Grandmother of Rebmann, William "Bill" J. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the Alzheimer's Association or a charity of one's choice appreciated. Visitation 68, of Lake Ozark, MO, 7/5/18. Passed away from a long battle Jessica (Matt), Kelly (Justin), Joeleen, Jennifer, Nicholas, Thursday, 4-8 p.m. with Diabetes. Predeceased by parents Walter and Peggy Alexandra, Allison, Erica, Christina and Andrea. Rita was reunited and embraced by Alexandra at the time of Rebmann; survived by daughter Andrea (Jeremy) Schalk; his her passing from this world. beautiful grandchildren Andrew, Claire and Jessica from Corcoran, John "Jack" Tuscon, AZ; brother Wally Rebmann; his sisters Ella Maresch Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and 07/08/2018. Beloved husband of Dolores Corcoran, beloved and Marge Lampasi; many nieces and 1 nephew. Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Saturfather to Sheila Mahler, grandfather of 8. Anyone who called Bill knew his tagline quotation "You know day, July 14 at 10:00 a.m. to St. Alban Roe Catholic Church, Services: Visitation 07/13/2018, 4 -8 p.m. McCoy-Blossom- what to do ... see yah!" Rest in peace. Bill loved cars, boats, Wildwood for 10:30 a.m. Mass. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Troy. Mass 07/14/2018, 10 a.m. Sacred Heart Troy bowling, motorcycles, blackjack, hunting and fishing with If desired, donations may be made to Nurses for Newborns or 1-636-528-8244, www.mccoyblossomfh.com Our Lady's Inn. Visitation Friday, 4-8 p.m. Friends may friends at the Lake of the Ozarks. Rest in Peace. sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com. Services: Private family service.

Hoffmann, John Francis "Jack"

Passed away July 7, 2018. Partner: Elaine Carter; Children: Kristin, Kurt, Mike. Service at Ascension Church, July 14, 10 am. Details and full obit at: http://bit.ly/jackhoffmann

“It is not length of life, but depth of life.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON

Lamb, Ann Elizabeth

Fraternal Notices

(nee Goldkamp) Passed away July 10, 2018. Services: Vis. 7/13, 10am until Serv. 11am, St Charles Borromeo Catholic Church, 601 N. 4th St. (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Mathews, Wilfrid P. "Sonny"

July 8, 2018. Services: Services will be held on Thursday, July 12, 2018 at West County Assembly of God, 13431 North Outer 40 Road, Chesterfield, MO 63017 at 11:00 a.m. Visitation with the Family will begin at 9:30 a.m. Please share condolences at https://www.stlouiscremation.com/obituary/wilfrid-psonny-mathews

Stormer, John

90, 7/10/18. Monday, 7/16/18 Visitation 1-3 p.m., service 3 pm. at McCoy-Blossom Chapel, Troy, MO. www.mccoyblossomfh.com

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07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

NATION

Ryan threatens ex-FBI lawyer with contempt of Congress Former member of Russia investigation team defies subpoena to speak this week with House committees BY MARY CLARE JALONICK AND ERIC TUCKER associated Press

WASHINGTON • House Speaker Paul

Ryan is warning former FBI lawyer Lisa Page that she must appear for a closeddoor interview with two House committees investigating the Justice Department or the House could take action against her. Page’s attorney said late Tuesday that she would not appear for a private interview Wednesday with the House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees, despite a subpoena. In response, House Judiciary Chairman Robert Goodlatte, R-Va., said that Page had known for months about an interview and that the committee would use “all tools at our disposal” to obtain it. If a witness does not respond to a subpoena, the full House can vote to hold that person in contempt of Congress. Ryan said Wednesday that the House would “do what we need to do to protect this branch of government” and that he stood behind Goodlatte. “A subpoena to testify before Congress is not optional, it’s mandatory,” Ryan said. The committees are interested in Page as part of their investigation into what they say is bias at the Justice Department. Page exchanged text messages critical of Donald Trump with FBI agent Peter Strzok before and after the 2016 presidential election. Strzok, who will testify publicly before the panels Thursday, and Page both worked on the FBI investigation into Democrat Hillary Clinton’s emails and, later, on special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. House Republicans have suggested the FBI was conspiring against Trump during and after his presidential campaign, and the two committees are investigat-

ing decisions made by the agency and the Justice Department during the election. Democrats have strongly objected to the GOP-led investigation, saying it is an attempt to undermine Mueller’s probe and sway public opinion against investigators. It’s unclear if GOP lawmakers will actually hold a contempt vote if Page continues to defy the sub- Ryan poena. Ryan and others have threatened contempt several times over the past year as other witnesses have defied subpoenas in the House intelligence committee’s now-closed Russia investigation and as the Justice Department has withheld documents, but they have yet to hold a vote on it. Page’s attorney, Amy Jeffress, said Page had offered to voluntarily appear before the committees later this month, but needed more time to prepare and clarification about what the lawmakers would be asking. Page has also been seeking access to FBI documents that the committees already had, and Jeffress said they heard late Tuesday that the request for that access had been granted. Jeffress said the two panels’ “bullying tactics here are unnecessary. We expect them to agree to another date so that Lisa can appear before the committees in the near future.” In a letter Jeffress sent to the Judiciary Committee on June 28 that was obtained by The Associated Press, she raises another issue. She mentions a referral sent to the FBI by several GOP lawmakers in April that recommends a criminal investigation of several current and former DOJ employees, including Page. Jeffress writes in the letter that she assumes the committees agree there is no legitimate basis for that investigation, because it would be “inappropriate for

the chairmen to request a voluntary interview from a subject or target of a criminal investigation relating to the same matters of that investigation.” The Judiciary and Oversight panels have already spent much of the summer holding hearings and interviews critical of the FBI and Justice Department. The committees have focused much of their ire on Strzok, who was interviewed privately by lawmakers on the two committees for 11 hours June 27. When he returns to Capitol Hill for Thursday’s hearing he will be speaking publicly about the messages for the first time. Strzok had a leading role in the Clinton investigation and was removed from the Mueller investigation after the texts were discovered a year ago. Page had already left Mueller’s team. A report by the Justice Department’s internal watchdog released last month detailed the inflammatory texts between the two, including an exchange in which Strzok wrote “we’ll stop it” in reference to a potential Trump election win. The report did not find that the conclusions in the Clinton investigation were tainted by political bias. The Judiciary Committee also held a contentious hearing June 28 with FBI Director Christopher Wray and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Democrats have called the investigation, the hearings and the interviews a farce. In a document released Wednesday, Democrats said Republicans had asked more than 200 questions in the Strzok interview about Mueller’s investigation and the FBI’s Russia investigation. The investigation is looking at Russian ties to Trump’s campaign and whether Trump obstructed justice. Lawmakers on the panels met behind closed doors Wednesday morning just after the time Page had been scheduled to show up. At the meeting, New York Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the top Democrat on the Judiciary panel, told Republicans that they “appear to want to bully Ms. Page in order to throw some red meat to your base.”

Texas professors pursue challenge of campus concealed-carry law Federal judge dismissed lawsuit last year; appeals court takes up the issue BY KEVIN MCGILL associated Press

NEW ORLEANS • Attorneys for three

University of Texas professors asked a federal appeals court Wednesday to revive their challenge of a law allowing people with concealed-handgun licenses to carry weapons on public university campuses. Two of the professors, Lisa Moore and Mia Carter, were in the front row as a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans heard the arguments. Last year, a federal judge in Texas dismissed the suit. U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel said Moore, Carter and Jennifer Glass offered “no concrete evidence” to substantiate concern that having armed students in their classroom would have a “chilling effect” on the free exchange of ideas. Yeakel said that, because they failed to clearly show they were harmed by the law, they had no legal standing to pursue the suit. Jason LaFond, arguing for the Texas Solicitor General’s Office, said Yeakel’s ruling should stand. He argued that the subjective fear of a student’s bringing a gun to the classroom didn’t give them standing to challenge the law, he said. “Lots of people fear flying,” LaFond told the panel. “That doesn’t mean it’s reasonable to think that a plane is going

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN VIA AP

Protesters gather on the University of Texas campus in Austin in 2015 to oppose a state law that allows people with concealed-handgun licenses to carry weapons on public university campuses. Three Texas professors have since filed a lawsuit.

to crash.” Renea Hicks, arguing for the professors, said they should have the freedom to control their classroom. And, he said, the law denies the professors the right to take steps against a very real danger. He mentioned campus shootings in Texas, Florida and Virginia Tech. “We’re not asking for government protection. We’re asking for self-protection,” Hicks said. “The government won’t let them protect themselves” by banning guns from their classrooms. He also said national studies and the views of national professional organizations, including the American Associa-

tion of University Professors, attested to the harm guns in a classroom can do to academic freedom. Judges Carolyn Dineen King, Leslie Southwick and James Ho heard the arguments. Ho appeared skeptical of Hicks’ arguments, questioning whether the law could be challenged because fear of guns might squelch free speech at a public park. King was nominated to the appeals court by President Jimmy Carter, Southwick by President George W. Bush and Ho by President Donald Trump. There was no indication when the appellate judges would rule.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A15

Even more threats by Parkland suspect revealed Witness accounts made public; dual 911 system caused delays, sheriff says ASSOCIATED PRESS

SUNRISE, FLA. • Florida high school

massacre suspect Nikolas Cruz allegedly told a woman months before the shooting that he might attack the school and that he might even kill her — but she never called police. Giovanna Cantone’s statement was one of many made public Wednesday as part of the prosecution of Cruz, 19, in the Valentine’s Day shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people. Also released were more accounts of students who witnessed the attacks and statements from people, including his brother Zachary, who knew Cruz. Cantone told a detective that she was at the Dollar Tree store where her daughter and Cruz worked in the summer of 2017. Cantone said she told Cruz while he was ringing up her purchases that he had other options after getting expelled from Stoneman Douglas and to put it all behind him. “He said, ‘Ah, I can go shoot them and you know I can shoot you, too,’” Cantone said. “I says this guy is like, you know, talking kind of crazy. I’m not used to those things.’” But Cantone said she never reported the conversation to authorities, although she did call an FBI hotline after the killings. “I let it go. I’m sorry I did that, you know, but then I understand that a lot of people came forward,” she said. Others told the FBI and Broward Sheriff’s Office before the massacre that Cruz might commit a school shooting, but that was never investigated. Other witnesses told investigators in statements released Wednesday they saw Cruz practicing shooting in his backyard, that he had harmed animals and was obsessed with weapons and killing. Zachary Cruz, 18, said his brother changed after their mother, Lynda, died in November. Zachary was asked why he thought Nikolas would have attacked the school. “I think just because he lost hope in life,” Zachary Cruz replied. Meanwhile, the chairman of a state commission investigating the massacre said law enforcement’s response in the crucial first minutes after the shooting began was hampered by quirks in the local 911 system that caused many calls from inside the school to be transferred. Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri said at Wednesday’s meeting to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Commission that the dual dispatch system used by the city of Parkland delayed Gualtieri getting information to police officers and sheriff’s deputies. Parkland, where the school is situated, gets police service from the Broward County Sheriff’s office, and fire service from neighboring Coral Springs, which also has a police department. Cellular 911 calls from Parkland go to Coral Springs. Callers needing police are transferred to Broward County’s 911 center. Almost all calls from the school were from cellphones, which had to be transferred. That added about 30 seconds before each reached a dispatcher. Coral Springs is one of two Broward cities that aren’t part of the countywide 911 system. Gualtieri believes that needs to change. Commissioner Max Schachter, whose son Alex died in the shooting, said the systems needed to be merged because any delays were unacceptable. The commission is examining the massacre’s causes. Cruz is charged with 17 counts of firstdegree murder. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty.

FEDERAL LAWSUIT FILED

Broward deputies at the school violated the constitutional rights of the survivors by failing to stop Cruz when he showed up on campus with murder on his mind, according to a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday by some of the victims. The lawsuit names Broward County, retired resource officer Scot Peterson, Broward Sheriff’s Office Capt. Jan Jordan and campus monitor Andrew Medina.

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THURSDAY • 07.12.2018 • B

FAMINE AFTER FEAST

Cards again follow a big night at the plate with display of futility

WORLD CUP RUSSIA 2018

Croatian rally tops England Goal in extra time good for final spot

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Croatia’s Mario Mandzukic celebrates after scoring in the 109th minute Wednesday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

M O S C OW • Croatia’s legs

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Infielder Jedd Gyorko reacts after striking out swinging during the ninth inning Wednesday night against the White Sox in Chicago.

WHITE SOX 4 CARDS

BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO • Amid several dis-

turbing trends in the Cardinals’ season is the one in which they score in double figures one night and then barely at all the next. For example, in the last two weeks and a day, the Cardinals three times have tallied 11 or more runs in a runaway victory. In the next game, they scored one run, then two runs and on Wednesday night none. Suffice to say that the Cardi-

0

> 7:15 p.m. Friday vs. Reds, FSM > Martinez (6-4, 3.05) vs. Harvey (4-5, 4.80) > Mikolas will start Sunday. B5

nals dropped all three, including a 4-0 verdict to the Chicago White Sox and impressive lefthander Carlos Rodon. Rodon and the Cardinals’ Luke Weaver, no doubt, had had this battle before. Rodon was a No. 1 pick out of North Carolina State in 2014 and Weaver the

same for Florida State, which is an Atlantic Coast Conference rival of NC State’s. Making just his seventh start since having shoulder surgery last September, Rodon held the Cardinals to three hits over 7 1/3 innings, striking out six. Weaver, who had given up just two hits in eight innings in his previous start, permitted only three in six innings this time, but one of the hits set up a run in the fifth inning and he left with nothing to show for his work, much as the Cardi-

nals had little to show for their night. The Cardinals wrapped up a 5-4 trip to three stops — Arizona, San Francisco and Chicago — and dropped back to plus-three at 47-44. Their nadir in the trip finale came in the eighth inning when they loaded the bases with one out on Paul DeJong’s bloop single, an error by White Sox second baseman Yoan Moncada and a walk to Matt Carpenter. See CARDINALS • Page B5

THE SILENT ERA The Cardinals have been held to four or fewer hits 11 times this season. Five of those games were against AL foes, meaning the Cards have been stifled offensively in 36 percent of their 14 interleague games this season. The four-or-fewer hit games: APRIL 5 Arizona L, 3-1 2 hits

APRIL 29 Pittsburgh L, 5-0 3 hits

MAY 2 White Sox W, 3-2 4 hits

MAY 7 Minnesota L, 6-0 4 hits

MAY 8 Minnesota L, 7-1 2 hits

MAY 15 Minnesota L, 4-1 2 hits

JUNE 1 Pittsburgh L, 4-0 4 hits

JUNE 22 Milwaukee L, 2-1 3 hits

JUNE 23 Milwaukee W, 3-2 4 hits

JUNE 29 Atlanta L, 5-1 4 hits

JULY 11 White Sox L, 4-0 4 hits

seemed heavy, burdened by the accumulated toll of consecutive penalty-kicks wins needed to get this far. England had gone ahead with a free kick just five minutes in, dominated play and appeared headed to its first World Cup final since 1966. Then the second half started and it was as if a different Croatian team had replaced the lethargic one. Ivan Perisic tied the score in the 68th minute, Mario Mandzukic got the go-ahead goal in the 109th and Croatia shocked England with a 2-1 victory Wednesday that advanced a nation of just over 4 million to a World Cup final against France. “Mentally strong team,” midfielder Ivan Rakitic said. “It’s just unbelievable to get back in the game in this way.” When the final whistle blew and they knew they were going to their first World Cup final, the Croatians ran to their jumping and cheering fans in their redand-white checkered jerseys. Croatia joined an exclusive club

See CUP • Page B7 > Final • France vs. Croatia, 10 a.m. Sunday, KTVI (2) > Third place • Belgium vs. England, 9 a.m. Saturday, KTVI (2)

Maroon sees special times ahead Son’s presence is a big factor

Blues are now a lot tougher

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

All those moves made by the Blues on July 1 did not go unnoticed by Patrick Maroon. “When I saw all those moves happen, I was still trying to make my decision,” Maroon said. “That kinda made my decision a lot easier.” The lobbying efforts from Blues players, coach Mike Yeo and general manager Doug Armstrong didn’t hurt, either. “They reached out and they made me feel welcome,” Maroon said. “And they made me feel wanted. That makes my decision a lot easier.” And the idea of playing for his See BLUES • Page B6

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis native and former Edmonton Oiler Patrick Maroon answers questions Wednesday.

They’d come from all over South County to the house in Highland Estates, Oakville’s version of Oakland Avenue, where the arena was the Maroon family basement and the boys would check each other like they were at the Checkerdome. The shinny hockey games in the 1990s featured “full contact, it got a little out of hand sometimes,” Phil Maroon said. “A couple holes in the wall, putting bodies through the wall. It was See HOCHMAN • Page B6

SPORTS

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

THURSDAY • 07.12.2018 • B

FAMINE AFTER FEAST

Cards again follow a big night at the plate with display of futility

WORLD CUP RUSSIA 2018

Croatian rally tops England Goal in extra time good for final spot

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Croatia’s Mario Mandzukic celebrates after scoring in the 109th minute Wednesday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

M O S C OW • Croatia’s legs

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Infielder Jedd Gyorko reacts after striking out swinging during the ninth inning Wednesday night against the White Sox in Chicago.

WHITE SOX 4 CARDS

BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO • Amid several dis-

turbing trends in the Cardinals’ season is the one in which they score in double figures one night and then barely at all the next. For example, in the last two weeks and a day, the Cardinals three times have tallied 11 or more runs in a runaway victory. In the next game, they scored one run, then two runs and on Wednesday night no runs.

0

> 7:15 p.m. Friday vs. Reds, FSM > Martinez (6-4, 3.05) vs. Harvey (4-5, 4.80) > Mikolas will start Sunday. B5

Suffice it to say that the Cardinals dropped all three, including a 4-0 verdict to the Chicago White Sox and impressive lefthander Carlos Rodon. Tommy Pham, the Cardinals’ skidding center fielder, wore his four strikeouts hard Wednesday. He was playing after miss-

ing the previous game with a sore left foot. “I know that it didn’t go how he wanted it to go, but he said he felt fine,” manager Mike Matheny said. “My foot is fine,” said Pham, whose whiff with the bases loaded and one out in the eighth was particularly key. Pham said much of the Cardinals’ inconsistency on offense starts with him, and the Cardinals’ three games after the respective big outbursts bear him out. He has gone nothing for 11

in those games with one walk. And he says it’s time to go to the doctor. Not the eye doctor. Or the foot doctor. But, during the All-Star break, he wants to visit one of his swing doctors, a Dominican known only as “Sosa,” who operates out of Miami and has worked with teammate Jose Martinez and Boston slugger J.D. Martinez. “Hands on,” said Pham, “so he can get me back to where I need to be. I know what I’m See CARDINALS • Page B5

THE SILENT ERA The Cardinals have been held to four or fewer hits 11 times this season. Five of those games were against AL foes, meaning the Cards have been stifled offensively in 36 percent of their 14 interleague games this season. The four-or-fewer hit games: APRIL 5 Arizona L, 3-1 2 hits

APRIL 29 Pittsburgh L, 5-0 3 hits

MAY 2 White Sox W, 3-2 4 hits

MAY 7 Minnesota L, 6-0 4 hits

MAY 8 Minnesota L, 7-1 2 hits

MAY 15 Minnesota L, 4-1 2 hits

JUNE 1 Pittsburgh L, 4-0 4 hits

JUNE 22 Milwaukee L, 2-1 3 hits

JUNE 23 Milwaukee W, 3-2 4 hits

JUNE 29 Atlanta L, 5-1 4 hits

JULY 11 White Sox L, 4-0 4 hits

seemed heavy, burdened by the accumulated toll of consecutive penalty-kicks wins needed to get this far. England had gone ahead with a free kick just five minutes in, dominated play and appeared headed to its first World Cup final since 1966. Then the second half started and it was as if a different Croatian team had replaced the lethargic one. Ivan Perisic tied the score in the 68th minute, Mario Mandzukic got the go-ahead goal in the 109th and Croatia shocked England with a 2-1 victory Wednesday that advanced a nation of just over 4 million to a World Cup final against France. “Mentally strong team,” midfielder Ivan Rakitic said. “It’s just unbelievable to get back in the game in this way.” When the final whistle blew and they knew they were going to their first World Cup final, the Croatians ran to their jumping and cheering fans in their redand-white checkered jerseys. Croatia joined an exclusive club

See CUP • Page B7 > Final • France vs. Croatia, 10 a.m. Sunday, KTVI (2) > Third place • Belgium vs. England, 9 a.m. Saturday, KTVI (2)

Maroon sees special times ahead Son’s presence is a big factor

Blues are now a lot tougher

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

All those moves made by the Blues on July 1 did not go unnoticed by Patrick Maroon. “When I saw all those moves happen, I was still trying to make my decision,” Maroon said. “That kinda made my decision a lot easier.” The lobbying efforts from Blues players, coach Mike Yeo and general manager Doug Armstrong didn’t hurt, either. “They reached out and they made me feel welcome,” Maroon said. “And they made me feel wanted. That makes my decision a lot easier.” And the idea of playing for his See BLUES • Page B6

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis native and former Edmonton Oiler Patrick Maroon answers questions Wednesday.

They’d come from all over South County to the house in Highland Estates, Oakville’s version of Oakland Avenue, where the arena was the Maroon family basement and the boys would check each other like they were at the Checkerdome. The shinny hockey games in the 1990s featured “full contact, it got a little out of hand sometimes,” Phil Maroon said. “A couple holes in the wall, putting bodies through the wall. It was See HOCHMAN • Page B6

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SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 7/13 vs. Reds 7:15 p.m. FSM

Saturday 7/14 vs. Reds 3:10 p.m. FSM

Sunday 7/15 vs. Reds 1:15 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 7/17 All-Star Game 6:30 p.m. KTVI (2)

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

TOUR DE FRANCE

Sagan wins a hilly Stage 5

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 7/14 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/21 vs. Orange County 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/28 at Reno 9:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 8/4 vs. Seattle 7:30 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Fri. 7/13: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m. Sat. 7/14: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Fri. 7/20: vs. Washington, 6:35 p.m. Sat. 7/21: vs. Washington, 6:35 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 4 p.m. NASCAR trucks: Buckle Up in Your Truck 225, qualifying, FS1 6:30 p.m. NASCAR trucks: Buckle Up in Your Truck 225, FS1 BASEBALL Athletics at Astros, MLB 1 p.m. 6 p.m. Yankees at Indians, MLB 7:05 p.m. Minor league: Memphis at Omaha, KTRS (550 AM) BASKETBALL NBA Summer League: Heat vs. Pelicans, NBA 3 p.m. 3:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Knicks vs. Celtics, ESPN2 5 p.m. NBA Summer League: Grizzlies vs. Thunder, NBA 5:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: 76ers vs. Suns, ESPN2 7 p.m. NBA Summer League: Spurs vs. Bucks, NBA 7:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Clippers vs. Lakers, ESPN2 9 p.m. NBA Summer League: Jazz. vs. Magic, NBA 9:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Hawks vs. Trail Blazers, ESPN2 CYCLING 6:30 a.m. Tour de France: Stage 6 (of 21), NBCSN GOLF 12:30 p.m. Senior Players Championship, first round, GOLF PGA: John Deere Classic, first round, GOLF 3 p.m. 6 p.m. Web.com: Utah Championship, first round, GOLF 4:30 a.m. (Fri.) European PGA: Scottish Open, second round, GOLF LACROSSE 8:30 a.m. FIL World Championship: Israel vs. Jamaica, ESPNU 12:30 p.m. FIL World Championship: United States vs. Iroquois Nationals, ESPN2 MISCELLANEOUS 8 p.m. World Series of Poker: Main event, Day 8 (of 10), ESPN SOFTBALL International Cup: Canada vs. USA Blue, ESPN 6 p.m. TENNIS 7 a.m. Wimbledon: Women’s semifinals, ESPN

DIGEST Former Michigan State, Lions coach Rogers dies

Darryl Rogers, who coached Michigan State to a share of the Big Ten title in 1978 and later took the helm for the Detroit Lions, has died. He was 83. The Lions said Rogers’ family confirmed his death in Fresno, Calif. Rogers coached Michigan State from 1976-79, going 24-18-2. The 1978 team, which included star flanker Kirk Gibson, won its final seven games to finish tied for first in the conference. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to Darryl Rogers and his family at this most difficult time,” Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio said in a statement. “Coach Rogers won the 1978 Big Ten championship at Michigan State and was, in many ways, an offensive pioneer in college football. I was honored to have had the opportunity to talk to him a number of times throughout my time here and he was always very supportive. He loved Michigan State and will forever be a Spartan.” Rogers also coached at Arizona State from 1980-84 before heading to the NFL. He was with the Lions from 1985-88. Tebow in Florida ring of honor • Two-time national champion and 2007 Heisman Trophy winner Tim Tebow will be inducted into Florida’s ring of honor, becoming the sixth player to get the honor. The school announced Wednesday that Tebow will be recognized during the LSU-Florida game on Oct. 6. His name will be unveiled on a wall inside Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. The display will now feature Tebow and the other five members of the program’s ring of honor: linebacker Wilber Marshall, running back Emmitt Smith, 1966 Heisman winner and famed coach Steve Spurrier, 1996 Heisman winner Danny Wuerffel and defensive end Jack Youngblood. Tebow went 35-6 in four seasons (2006-09) at Florida. Pacman attacked at airport • Police say former Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Adam “Pacman” Jones was attacked during a run-in with a facility-service employee at the airport in Atlanta. Atlanta Police spokesman Jarius Daugherty says Jones confronted ABM Industries employee Frank Ragin after Ragin made a “gesture” toward the football player Tuesday night at HartsfieldJackson Atlanta International Airport. Police say words were exchanged before Ragin struck Jones with a closed fist, causing a cut to Jones’ face. Cellphone video footage shows that Jones and Ragin traded several punches with each other. Jones ultimately knocked Ragin down to the ground with a punch to the face then hit the employee one more time before a man broke up the fight. Ragin was arrested on two counts of battery and taken to a nearby hospital to be treated for injuries. Jones, a one-time Pro Bowler and currently a free agent, spent eight seasons with the Bengals. He also played for the Tennessee Titans and Dallas Cowboys. Grizzlies sign Casspi • Memphis signed its second free agent in forward Omri Casspi. General manager Chris Wallace announced the deal Wednesday. Terms were not disclosed. The 6-foot-9 Casspi has started 145 of 552 games in his career with Sacramento, Cleveland, Houston, New Orleans, Minnesota and Golden State. Now 30, Casspi played 53 games with the Warriors last season and averaged 5.7 points and 3.8 rebounds. Sabres add Smith to staff • Buffalo coach Phil Housley has hired Steve Smith to his staff. Smith was a three-time Stanley Cup winner in Edmonton during a 16-year career, also playing for the Blackhawks and Flames. He has nine years of experience as an NHL assistant, including the past four in Carolina. Smith will oversee the Sabres defensemen, a group expected to include Rasmus Dahlin, the first pick in the draft last month. Associated Press

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Slovakia’s Peter Sagan celebrates as he crosses the finish line for Stage 5 on Wednesday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Froome avoids disaster after mechanical problems ASSOCIATED PRESS

QUIMPER, FRANCE • Peter Sagan had the yellow jersey holder to thank for his victory on Stage 5 of the Tour de France on Wednesday. Chris Froome could also thank his Team Sky colleagues for keeping him out of danger — and helping overcome a mechanical problem — in the race’s first hilly stage. Greg Van Avermaet mistimed his sprint and Sagan, the threetime reigning world champion with the Bora-Hansgrohe team, took advantage to claim his second victory in this year’s event. “I don’t know if he did it on purpose or if he wanted to drop everybody but I have to say thanks,” Sagan said. Van Avermaet still increased his overall lead over BMC teammate Tejay van Garderen to two seconds by gaining precious time in an intermediate bonus sprint. After a move from Philippe Gilbert, Van Avermaet accelerated out of the final turn with 300 meters to go but couldn’t maintain his pace. “I tried to win the stage but it was pretty complicated,” Van Avermaet said. “Phil went early and he’s still pretty close on GC (general classification) so I couldn’t let him go. I think I went too early in the sprint. I thought the corner was closer to the finish than it really was.” In a repeat of Stage 2, Sagan held off Sonny Colbrelli in the

sprint, with Gilbert finishing third. Sagan clocked nearly five hours over the undulating leg through Brittany, which contained five categorized climbs over a 127mile (204.5-kilometer) route from Lorient to Quimper, and resembled a single-day classic. Gilbert, a former world champion, moved up to third overall, three seconds off the pace. Froome, the four-time champion who trails Van Avermaet by 57 seconds in 15th spot, finished in the main pack with the other favorites. There was a nervy moment for the British rider when he had to stop due to a mechanical issue with 70 kilometers remaining. Teammate Michal Kwiatkowski attempted to fix the problem but Froome was later forced to stop again and change his bike. Kwiatkowski and two other teammates then quickly escorted Froome back to the peloton. Froome and Sky were also at the front in the finale, ceding the lead to the stage hunters only in the final kilometer. “Everyone knew that was going to be a tricky finish today, a very undulating day — never really flat — just up and down,” Froome said. “A nice day to have behind us. “It’s the kind of stage where something can be wrong and you quickly find yourself losing 30-40 seconds if you get caught out of position. It was a day to stay up

front and really stay on it.” Seven riders broke away eight kilometers into the stage. The group established a lead of about four minutes as they wound along the Atlantic coast through picturesque towns like Riec-sur-Belon — which is famous for its oysters — and Pont-Aven — which inspired artists like Paul Gauguin . While Brittany is usually rainy and windy, this time it was sunny and racing conditions were perfect. Fans waving the black-andwhite striped flag of the region swarmed the climbs. Sylvain Chavanel, the 39-yearold riding in a record 18th Tour, launched a solo attack from the breakaway with 100 kilometers remaining but didn’t get far. French rider Elie Gesbert, another member of the breakaway, crashed on a short descent, ending up in a ditch and appearing to scrape his face along a stone wall. But he got back on his bike and continued. Lilian Calmejane and Tom Skujins, the last remaining members of the breakaway, were caught by the main pack with 10 kilometers to go. The Tour remains in Brittany for Stage 6 on Thursday, another hilly leg of 112 miles from Brest to Mur-De-Bretagne Guerledan, including two climbs of the short but steep Mur-de-Bretagne. “We always see a bit of action there,” Froome said. “I sometimes prefer those stages to the fast, flat stages.”

DeChambeau back at site of first tour win ASSOCIATED PRESS

For the first time in his PGA Tour career, Bryson DeChambeau will enter a tournament looking to defend a title. DeChambeau’s breakthrough on the PGA Tour came last year at the John Deere Classic, which tees off on Thursday at TPC Deere Run in Silvis, Ill. After entering the final round four strokes off the pace, DeChambeau birdied six of his final nine holes for a one-shot win over Patrick Rodgers. DeChambeau will enter this year’s event as a strong contender to repeat. With most of golf’s big names playing the Scottish Open in preparation for next week’s British Open at Carnoustie, DeChambeau is the highest-ranked golfer in the field. The 24-year old DeChambeau is sixth in the FedEx Cup standings after winning the Memorial Tournament earlier this season. He is also 22nd in this week’s world rankings. “There has been a lot of things that have happened over the past couple years, growing a lot definitely, and just learning how to make better decisions for my body, my health, my game, and figuring out ways to execute shots better and more on demand,” DeChambeau said. Two of the most notable names in the Quad Cities event are Steve Stricker and Zach Johnson — a pair of Midwesterners who make it a point to play the TPC Deere

ASSOCIATED PRESS

No. 22 Bryson DeChambeau is the highest-ranked golfer in the field.

Run every summer. Three of Stricker’s 12 career wins came at the JDC from 200911, and he finished tied for fifth a year ago. Johnson grew up an hour west of the course in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and is so connected to the tournament that he’s on the board of directors. Johnson, who has shot 37 consecutive rounds of par or better at TPC Deere Run, tied for 12th at this year’s U.S. Open. “I feel really good. I think if my caddie was up here he would be more honest. He feels really good. When your caddie feels confident in what you’re doing you know

you got some stuff going,” Johnson said. A pair of international golfers — Joaquin Niemann of Chile and Francesco Molinari of Italy — are playing about as well as anyone in the field heading into the weekend. Niemann, just 19, has four top-10 finishes in nine PGA Tour starts and has already earned a special temporary membership after posting back-to-back top 10s earlier this season. Molinari won the last PGA event he played, the Quicken Loans National two weeks ago, by shooting 8-under in the final round. Molinari also won a European Tour event in England in May. “I think for me being European, obviously first thing was to come over here and prove myself. So to get the first win already, I think it’s a big achievement,” Molinari said. “But I’m young enough or not old enough to think that I’ve got a few years in front of me, and definitely the goal is to win more,” Molinari said. Dylan Meyer, a former AllAmerican from Illinois who finished tied for 20th at the U.S. Open, leads the list of young golfers competing on sponsor’s exemptions — a tradition that’s become a big part of the John Deere Classic. DeChambeau and Johnson competed at TPC Deere Run on exemptions early in their careers, and Jordan Spieth won his first career title while on one on in 2013.


TENNIS

07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B3

WIMBLEDON

Federer’s streak ends with 5-set loss Meanwhile, Nadal, Djokovic, Isner win ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON • Roger Federer was a point away from a rather tidy, straight-set victory in the Wimbledon quarterfinals. One lousy point. And then, slowly, over the next twoplus hours, all the way until the fifth set reached its 24th game, as the temperature dropped and the spectators’ cries of “Let’s go, Roger!” echoed through the shadows, everything came apart for the eight-time champion. Against an opponent who’d never beaten him nor made it this far at the All England Club. In a stunning turnaround in an unfamiliar setting — No. 1 Court instead of Centre Court — the top-seeded Federer blew a third-set match point and, eventually, all of his big lead in as No. 8 Kevin Anderson won 2-6, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-4, 13-11 on Wednesday in a 4-hour, 14-minute tussle. “It was just one of those days where you hope to get by somehow,” said Federer, who last played at No. 1 Court in 2015. “I almost could have. I should have.” While his tournament is over, two of his long-time rivals set up a semifinal showdown: Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic. Nadal, who’s won two of his 17 Grand Slam titles at Wimbledon, edged 2009 U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro 7-5, 6-7 (7), 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 in a wildly entertaining match that lasted 4 hours, 48 minutes. Djokovic, whose 12 major championships include three from the All England Club, got to his first Grand Slam semifinal since 2016 by beating No. 24 seed Kei Nishikori 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2. In Friday’s other men’s match, Anderson will face No. 9 John Isner, the 33-yearold American who reached his first major semifinal in his 41st try by eliminating 2016 runner-up Milos Raonic 6-7 (5), 7-6 (7), 6-4, 6-3. Isner hit 25 aces, saved the only break point he faced, and has won all 95 of his service games in the tournament. Federer hadn’t been broken until facing Anderson. Still, the 20-time major champion was leading by two sets and 5-4 in the third when, with Anderson serving, he got to Ad-Out. He could have ended

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Switzerland’s Roger Federer leaves the court after losing his quarterfinals match against Kevin Anderson of South Africa on Wednesday.

things right then and there. Federer managed to return a 134 mph serve, but on his next stroke, he shanked a backhand. Back to deuce. From there, it all began to change. Anderson held for 5-all, broke to 6-5 with a violent return winner off a 97 mph second serve, then staved off three break points and closed the set with a 133 mph ace. The comeback was beginning. “I had my chances,” Federer said, “so it’s disappointing.” This was only the third time in Federer’s 20 years of contesting Grand Slam matches that he lost after taking the opening two sets; both of the other defeats came in 2011. And, according to the ATP, it’s the fifth time Federer lost a match at a major after holding a match point, something else that last happened seven years ago. How hard was it to see this coming? First of all, Federer was 4-0 against Anderson. But there was more. Federer was

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attempting to reach his 13th semifinal at Wimbledon and move closer to title No. 9, both of which would have broken his own records. He came into the match having won 32 consecutive sets at Wimbledon, a run he stretched to 34 before faltering. “I just kept on telling myself, ‘I have to keep believing.’ I kept saying that today was going to be my day,” Anderson said, “because you really need that mindset taking the court against somebody like Roger.” Anderson was the runner-up to Nadal at last year’s U.S. Open, but he never made it beyond the fourth round at Wimbledon until this week. He hit 28 aces against Federer, saved nine of 12 break points and managed to hold his own in the rare lengthy baseline rallies. “It’s like that with the big servers,” Federer said. “You’re never really safe.” As the fifth set became as much a test of mental strength as anything, from 4-all to 6-all to 8-all to 10-all, Anderson stayed steady. It was Federer who blinked, double-faulting to face a break point at 11-all, then slapping a forehand into the net. Anderson, a 32-year-old South African who played college tennis at Illinois,

served it out, ending things with a 128 mph service winner before raising both arms. Meanwhile, Djokovic got his wish to play in the main stadium, and he showed that he might be back from elbow troubles. He’s been flashing some anger this fortnight and did so again in the second set, bouncing his racket off the turf after failing to capitalize on three break points at 1-all. That earned a code violation from chair umpire Carlos Ramos. When Nishikori let his own racket fly in the fourth set, he wasn’t chastised, which prompted Djokovic to yell “double standards” toward Ramos — drawing boos from fans. “He claims that he didn’t see what Nishikori has done, but apparently he always sees what I do,” Djokovic said afterward. Later, Ramos warned Djokovic for a time violation, but that didn’t seem to faze the Serb. Soon enough, he was on his way to the semifinals to meet Nadal. “I think with the performances I’ve had, I deserve to be in the semifinals,” said Djokovic, whose last major title came at the 2016 French Open. “I don’t want to stop here. I hope I can get a chance to fight for a trophy.” He’ll have to get past Nadal first.

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BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Milwaukee

55 38

.591

7-3

L-1

30-18

25-20

Chicago

52 38 .578

7-3

L-1

28-15

24-23

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

4

5-5

L-1

23-22

24-22

8½ 4-6 W-1

24-24

19-25

Cardinals

47 44

Pittsburgh

43 49 .467 11½

Cincinnati

41 52 .441

14

EAST

W

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

Atlanta

51 40 .560

— 4-6 W-1

24-18

27-22

Philadelphia

51 40 .560

Washington

46 46 .500

L

.516

Pct

7

11 6-4

L-1

21-26 20-26

7-3

L-1

30-16

21-24

5½ 4-6

L-1

22-24

24-22

13½

5-5 W-1

17-30

20-23

14

5-5 W-1

21-27

18-29

New York

37 53

.411 13½

Miami

39 56

.411

14

WEST

W

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away

L

Arizona

51 42 .548

— 4-6

L-1

26-23

25-19

Los Angeles

49 42 .538

1

2 6-4

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San Francisco 49 46

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Colorado

47 45

.511

San Diego

40 54 .426 11½

ROUNDUP Former SLU pitcher gets loss as Cubs fall Buster Posey singled off the right-field wall in the 13th inning for his fifth career game-ending hit, sending the San Francisco Giants past the Chicago Cubs 5-4 on Wednesday. Brandon Belt drew a two-out walk from James Norwood, a former St. Louis University standout. Andrew McCutchen then singled to bring up Posey, who ended the 4-hour, 30-minute game with San Francisco’s first run since scoring four in the first. Dereck Rodriguez (4-1) pitched three scoreless innings for the win. He also had three of San Francisco’s 16 strikeouts. Norwood worked the 12th and 13th in his major league debut. He immediately struck out Brandon Crawford on a 99 mph fastball. Cubs slugger Kris Bryant hit a two-run homer in his return from the disabled list, and All-Star Javier Baez tied the game with a solo homer to start the seventh. Pirates 2, Nationals 0 • Starling Marte hit a tworun home run and Trevor Williams combined with four relievers on a five-hitter as host Pittsburgh beat Washington. Marte homered to center field with two outs in the third off Gio Gonzalez after Jordy Mercer led off the inning with the first of his two doubles. That was enough to give the Pirates just their third win in nine games. Mets 3, Phillies 0 • Brandon Nimmo hit a three-run home run in the bottom of the 10th inning to lift New York over Philadelphia.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rays 4, Tigers 2 • C.J. Cron’s three-run home run in the seventh inning carried Tampa Bay to a win over visiting Detroit. Cron’s 18th homer came off Jordan Zimmermann after singles by Kevin Kiermaier and Matt Duffy. Cron and Kiermaier each had three hits for the Rays, who have won 14 of 18. Twins 8, Royals 5 • Brian Dozier hit a two-run home run, going deep for the second straight game to give Minnesota a boost over visiting Kansas City. Lance Lynn (7-7) recovered from a three-run homer by Salvador Perez in the first inning to win his second straight start for the Twins. Red Sox 4, Rangers 2 • Chris Sale struck out 12 in seven innings of shutout ball in his final start before the All-Star Game, and major league batting leader Mookie Betts had two more hits to lead Boston over visiting Texas. Yankees 9, Orioles 0 • Greg Bird hit his first career grand slam to back a dominating pitching performance by Sonny Gray, and New York won in Baltimore.

INTERLEAGUE

Indians 19, Reds 4 • Jose Ramirez homered twice and drove in five runs as Cleveland took out some frustrations following a brutal loss with a thumping of visiting Cincinnati. Braves 9, Blue Jays 5 • Ozzie Albies snapped a power drought with two homers, and Atlanta beat visiting Toronto to move back into a tie for the NL East lead. Associated Press

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

7-3 W-1

12½ 4-6 W-1 20-26 20-28

Wednesday White Sox 4, Cardinals 0 Pittsburgh 2, Washington 0 San Francisco 5, Cubs 4, 13 inn. Cleveland 19, Cincinnati 4 Miami 5, Milwaukee 4, 12 inn. NY Mets 3, Philadelphia 0, 10 inn. Atlanta 9, Toronto 5 Colorado 19, Arizona 2 LA Dodgers at San Diego, late Tuesday Washington 5, Pittsburgh 1 Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 4 Milwaukee 8, Miami 4 Philadelphia 7, NY Mets 3 Toronto 6, Atlanta 2 Cardinals 14, White Sox 2 Arizona 5, Colorado 3 San Diego 4, LA Dodgers 1 Cubs 2, San Francisco 0

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Cleveland

50 41 .549

— 6-4 W-1

29-17

21-24

Minnesota

41 49 .456

15 6-4 W-1

26-21

15-28

Detroit

40 55 .421

12

18½

L-4

25-23

15-32

Chicago

31 61 .337 19½

26

3-7 W-1

17-28

14-33

Kansas City

26 66 .283 24½

31

1-9

11-35

15-31

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

3-7

EAST

W

Boston

65 29 .691

New York

60

31 .659

Tampa Bay

48 44 .522

16

Toronto

42 49 .462 21½

14½ 4-6

Baltimore

26 67 .280 38½

31½

WEST

W

Houston

62 33 .653

Seattle

57 35 .620

Oakland

52 41 .559

9

Los Angeles

47 45

Texas

40 54 .426 21½

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 —

L-1

Str Home Away

9-1 W-9

31-12

— 6-4 W-1

33-13

27-18

9

26-17

22-27

L-1

24-25

18-24

L-1

14-31

12-36

7-3 W-5 2-8

GB WCGB L10

.511 13½

Str Home Away

34-17

Str Home Away

7-3

L-1

30-19

32-14

— 6-4

L-1

31-17

26-18

7-3 W-1

24-21 28-20

10 6-4 W-2

23-22

24-23

18

19-28

21-26

2-8

L-3

BOX SCORES Giants 5, Cubs 4

Pirates 2, Nationals 0

Indians 19, Reds 4

Athletics 8, Astros 3

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Zobrist rf-lf 6 0 1 0 0 1 .292 6 2 3 1 1 1 .284 Heyward cf Bryant 3b-rf 5 1 1 2 2 2 .279 Rizzo 1b 5 0 0 0 1 2 .236 6 1 1 1 0 2 .289 Baez 2b Schwarber lf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .247 Farrell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Morrow p f-Contreras ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .279 Russell ss 5 0 1 0 1 1 .278 6 0 2 0 0 2 .275 Caratini c Norwood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Montgomery p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .111 1 0 0 0 0 0 .317 a-Almora ph Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 c-Happ ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .252 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Strop p Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 La Stella 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .275 50 4 11 4 6 16 Totals San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. d’Arnaud 3b 7 1 2 1 0 1 .250 5 1 0 0 2 0 .297 Belt 1b McCutchen rf 5 1 2 0 1 1 .261 Posey c 7 0 3 1 0 2 .282 Crawford ss 5 1 1 0 1 1 .295 Hernandez lf 6 1 2 2 0 0 .277 Duggar cf 6 0 1 1 0 3 .235 6 0 2 0 0 1 .278 Hanson 2b Cueto p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .040 Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Pence ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .216 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 0 --Melancon p d-Slater ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .263 Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Sandoval ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .258 Rodriguez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Totals 51 5 14 5 6 9 001 020 100 000 0 — 4 11 2 Chicago San Francisco 400 000 000 000 1 — 5 14 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Montgomery in the 6th. b-singled for Moronta in the 6th. c-grounded out for Rosario in the 7th. d-walked for Melancon in the 8th. e-walked for Smith in the 10th. f-struck out for Morrow in the 12th. E: Zobrist (1), Strop (1). LOB: Chicago 14, San Francisco 15. 2B: d’Arnaud (1), Hernandez (10). HR: Heyward (6), off Cueto; Bryant (10), off Cueto; Baez (18), off Watson; d’Arnaud (1), off Montgomery. RBIs: Heyward (39), Bryant 2 (38), Baez (66), d’Arnaud (1), Posey (28), Hernandez 2 (29), Duggar (1). CS: Posey (2). RLISP: Chicago 5 (Zobrist 2, Rizzo 2, Baez); San Francisco 6 (d’Arnaud 2, Belt, Hernandez, Duggar 2). GIDP: Crawford. DP: Chicago 1 (Russell, Baez, Rizzo). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Montgomery 5 8 4 4 1 1 84 3.91 Rosario 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 1.38 Strop 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.41 2/ 1 1 23 2.87 Wilson 3 1 0 0 Farrell 2 0 0 0 3 2 39 3.86 Morrow 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.57 Norwood, L, 0-1 12/3 3 1 1 1 2 35 5.40 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto 5 6 3 3 3 7 86 2.36 2/ 1 19 4.54 Blach, 3 2 0 0 0 1/ 1 0 11 1.80 Moronta, 3 0 0 0 Watson, 1 2 1 1 0 2 22 1.67 Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.57 2 1 0 0 0 1 30 0.95 Smith Rodriguez, W, 4-1 3 0 0 0 2 3 42 2.89 Inherited runners-scored: Moronta 2-0. HBP: Cueto (Zobrist), Strop (McCutchen). WP: Cueto. Umpires: Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Jansen Visconti; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Laz Diaz. T: 4:30. A: 41,099 .

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Soto lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .304 Rendon 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .279 Harper cf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .213 Adams 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .283 Turner ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .270 Difo 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 Wieters c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Gonzalez p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .065 b-Goodwin ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .197 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Miller p Totals 31 0 5 0 4 8 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 1 0 0 2 .256 Harrison 2b Marte cf 3 1 1 2 1 0 .282 Polanco rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Cervelli c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Freese 3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .272 Bell 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Luplow lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Mercer ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 .246 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .074 a-Meadows ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .302 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Moran ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Crick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 29 2 7 2 1 6 Totals Washington 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Pittsburgh 002 000 00x — 2 7 0 a-struck out for Williams in the 5th. b-singled for Gonzalez in the 7th. c-struck out for Santana in the 7th. LOB: Washington 8, Pittsburgh 5. 2B: Gonzalez (1), Mercer 2 (21). HR: Marte (11), off Gonzalez. RBIs: Marte 2 (40). CS: Marte (5). S: Williams. RLISP: Washington 4 (Rendon, Harper, Adams, Wieters); Pittsburgh 2 (Harrison, Mercer). GIDP: Difo. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Mercer, Harrison, Bell). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez, L, 6-6 6 6 2 2 1 4 89 3.72 1 1 0 0 0 1 22 2.63 Kelley Miller 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.71 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, W, 7-7 5 4 0 0 3 3 81 4.36 Rodriguez, 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 2.50 Santana, 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.32 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.12 Crick, Vazquez, S, 20-24 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 3.20 Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Chris Segal; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Ed Hickox. T: 2:34. A: 21,083 .

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler rf 4 0 1 0 1 3 .279 4 0 1 1 0 1 .275 Peraza ss Votto 1b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .292 Herrera lf-3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 5 2 3 1 0 0 .326 Gennett 2b Suarez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .312 Blandino 3b-p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .224 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Winker dh-lf Barnhart c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .255 Casali c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .342 4 0 0 0 0 2 .201 Duvall lf-1b Hamilton cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .233 Totals 36 4 11 4 3 11 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cleveland Lindor ss 5 2 1 3 1 1 .295 Brantley lf 4 3 2 2 0 0 .307 2 0 0 0 0 1 .165 Guyer lf Ramirez 3b 4 2 2 5 0 0 .293 Gonzalez 3b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .295 Encarnacion dh 3 1 1 0 1 0 .227 a-Perez ph-dh 2 1 1 0 0 1 .152 Alonso 1b 4 2 2 2 1 1 .255 3 2 2 2 2 1 .223 Kipnis 2b Gomes c 4 2 1 2 1 1 .251 Naquin rf 4 2 3 3 1 0 .280 Allen cf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .215 Totals 42 19 19 19 7 6 Cincinnati 000 011 020 — 4 11 1 Cleveland 209 600 20x — 19 19 0 a-singled for Encarnacion in the 7th. E: Votto (5). LOB: Cincinnati 9, Cleveland 6. 2B: Winker (14), Naquin (7). 3B: Hamilton (5). HR: Gennett (15), off Plutko; Winker (7), off Plutko; Ramirez (26), off Mahle; Ramirez (27), off Rainey; Kipnis (9), off Rainey; Lindor (25), off Stephens. RBIs: Peraza (32), Gennett (59), Winker 2 (39), Lindor 3 (62), Brantley 2 (52), Ramirez 5 (65), Alonso 2 (51), Kipnis 2 (39), Gomes 2 (30), Naquin 3 (19). SF: Peraza. RLISP: Cincinnati 4 (Gennett, Suarez, Duvall, Hamilton); Cleveland 2 (Lindor, Perez). GIDP: Peraza, Allen, Guyer. DP: Cincinnati 2 (Peraza, Gennett, Duvall), (Peraza, Gennett, Duvall); Cleveland 1 (Gonzalez, Kipnis, Alonso). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cincinnati Mahle, L, 7-7 21/3 6 7 5 2 1 71 4.02 2/ Rainey 3 5 8 8 3 0 44 24.43 Stephens 3 3 2 2 1 2 57 3.80 Blandino 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Crockett 1 4 2 2 1 1 30 6.75 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carrasco, W, 10-5 5 5 1 1 1 7 83 4.16 Plutko, S, 1-1 4 6 3 3 2 4 79 4.87 Rainey pitched to 4 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Rainey 2-2, Stephens 1-1. WP: Carrasco, Blandino. Umpires: Home, Ryan Additon; First, Quinn Wolcott; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, James Hoye. T: 3:31. A: 22,215 .

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 6 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Semien ss 3 2 1 0 2 1 .253 Lowrie 2b 3 1 2 0 2 0 .290 Davis dh 5 1 2 3 0 1 .250 Piscotty rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Olson 1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Chapman 3b 3 2 1 1 0 1 .252 Canha 1b-lf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .258 Pinder lf-rf 3 1 2 3 2 1 .253 Phegley c 5 0 1 1 0 1 .216 Totals 36 8 10 8 7 9 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Bregman ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .285 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .334 Gurriel 3b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .304 Reddick rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Tucker lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .222 Federowicz c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .192 White 1b 2 1 1 1 1 0 .200 Totals 34 3 7 3 1 1 Oakland 300 301 001 — 8 10 0 Houston 000 210 000 — 3 7 2 E: Bregman (12), Altuve (5). LOB: Oakland 11, Houston 5. 2B: Semien (19), Davis (19). 3B: Davis (1). HR: Pinder (9), off McCullers; White (1), off Bassitt. RBIs: Davis 3 (63), Chapman (27), Pinder 3 (21), Phegley (8), Gurriel 2 (48), White (1). SB: Altuve (14). SF: Chapman. RLISP: Oakland 8 (Fowler, Semien, Davis 3, Canha, Phegley, Olson); Houston 1 (Tucker). GIDP: Davis. DP: Houston 1 (Altuve, Bregman, White). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bassitt, W, 2-3 5 5 3 3 1 1 85 3.38 Pagan 2 1 0 0 0 0 27 3.54 Dull 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.50 Buchter 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.04 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCullers, L, 10-4 4 4 6 6 5 1 86 3.77 Peacock 12/3 3 1 1 0 2 30 3.12 Sipp 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 19 2.11 Perez 12/3 2 1 1 2 2 43 5.40 1/ Harris 1 7 4.09 3 1 0 0 0 McCullers pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Peacock 2-0, Sipp 1-0, Harris 2-1. HBP: McCullers 2 (Chapman,Piscotty). WP: McCullers 2. Umpires: Home, Nic Lentz; First, Scott Barry; Second, Carlos Torres; Third, Kerwin Danley. T: 3:13. A: 41,119 .

Mets 3, Phillies 0

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 b-Pillar ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Santos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Morales ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Smoak 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .242 Loup p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Biagini p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hernandez lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .256 Grichuk cf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Gurriel Jr. 2b-ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .237 Diaz ss-3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .245 Maile c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .235 Gaviglio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Petricka p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Mayza p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Travis ph-2b 3 1 1 4 0 0 .230 Totals 34 5 8 5 2 8 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 2 1 1 1 0 0 .246 Santana cf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .185 Albies 2b 4 2 2 4 0 1 .288 F.Freeman 1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .313 Markakis rf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .322 Flowers c 3 0 1 1 2 0 .236 Camargo 3b 4 1 2 0 1 2 .252 Acuna lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .259 Swanson ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .247 Foltynewicz p 2 1 0 1 0 2 .063 S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Vizcaino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 9 12 9 4 10 Toronto 000 000 500 — 5 8 2 Atlanta 060 001 02x — 9 12 0 a-grounded out for Mayza in the 6th. b-grounded out for Granderson in the 7th. c-lined out for S.Freeman in the 7th. d-grounded out for Axford in the 8th. E: Diaz (5), Maile (6). LOB: Toronto 4, Atlanta 10. 2B: Inciarte (13), Markakis (29), Acuna (10), Santana (3). HR: Smoak (14), off Foltynewicz; Travis (6), off Foltynewicz; Albies (19), off Santos; Albies (20), off Loup. RBIs: Smoak (47), Travis 4 (23), Inciarte (34), Albies 4 (54), F.Freeman (60), Markakis (60), Flowers (17), Foltynewicz (3). SF: Albies. S: Foltynewicz. RLISP: Toronto 2 (Maile, Travis); Atlanta 5 (Flowers, Acuna 2, Santana 2). GIDP: Grichuk. DP: Atlanta 1 (Camargo, Albies, F.Freeman). Toronto IPHRERBBSONP ERA Gaviglio, L, 2-3 12/3 6 6 6 0 0 48 4.70 Petricka 11/3 0 0 0 1 2 20 4.02 Mayza 2 1 0 0 2 4 41 3.21 Santos 1 2 1 1 0 2 2110.50 Axford 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.04 2/ Loup 3 3 2 2 1 1 21 4.60 1/ Biagini 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 6.13 IPHRERBBSONP ERA Atlanta Foltynewicz, W, 7-562/3 6 5 5 2 6 98 2.66 1/ S.Freeman, 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.86 Winkler, 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.92 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 1.65 Vizcaino Inherited runners-scored: Petricka 1-0, Biagini 2-0. HBP: Gaviglio (Inciarte). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Sean Barber; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 2:58. A: 27,839 .

Twins 8, Royals 5 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield cf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .302 Bonifacio rf 5 1 1 0 0 3 .293 Moustakas 3b 5 3 3 2 0 0 .256 Perez dh 5 1 2 3 0 2 .217 Duda 1b 2 0 0 0 1 2 .238 Gordon lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .248 A.Escobar ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Mondesi 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .231 Butera c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .168 Totals 35 5 9 5 3 12 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer dh 5 0 3 0 0 1 .273 Rosario lf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .300 Dozier 2b 5 1 3 3 0 1 .229 E.Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Morrison 1b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .193 Polanco ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Kepler rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .231 Cave cf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .299 Wilson c 4 1 3 2 0 1 .169 Totals 38 8 15 7 3 8 Kansas City 301 000 001 — 5 9 1 Minnesota 020 303 00x — 8 15 1 E: Sparkman (1), Polanco (1). LOB: Kansas City 8, Minnesota 9. 2B: Wilson (7). 3B: Cave (1). HR: Perez (12), off Lynn; Moustakas (18), off Lynn; Moustakas (19), off Busenitz; Dozier (15), off Romero; Morrison (11), off Romero. RBIs: Moustakas 2 (58), Perez 3 (38), Dozier 3 (42), Morrison (31), Cave (10), Wilson 2 (13). CS: Mondesi (3). RLISP: Kansas City 4 (Merrifield 2, Bonifacio, Gordon); Minnesota 4 (Rosario 2, Morrison 2). LIDP: Mondesi. GIDP: E.Escobar. DP: Kansas City 1 (Duda); Minnesota 1 (Dozier, Morrison). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 31/3 7 4 4 1 4 71 5.83 Smith Sparkman, L, 0-1 12/3 3 1 1 2 2 37 10.80 1 3 3 3 0 1 17 9.00 Romero 1 2 0 0 0 0 19 5.81 Hill 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 4.43 Adam IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minnesota Lynn, W, 7-7 5 5 4 3 3 6 114 5.22 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.80 Pressly, 1 2 0 0 0 2 20 2.73 Duke 2 2 1 1 0 2 39 6.00 Busenitz Lynn pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Sparkman 2-2, Pressly 2-0. HBP: Lynn (Duda), Pressly (A.Escobar). Umpires: Home, Ted Barrett; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Will Little; Third, Tom Woodring. T: 3:19. A: 26,708 .

Rays 4, Tigers 2

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .225 Castellanos rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .305 Goodrum 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Hicks 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .278 4 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Martinez dh Mahtook lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .208 McCann c 4 1 2 2 0 2 .227 3 0 0 0 1 1 .167 Rodriguez ss Jones cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .218 34 2 7 2 1 14 Totals Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 5 2 3 1 0 1 .175 4 1 2 0 0 1 .310 Duffy 3b Bauers lf-1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234 Cron 1b 4 1 3 3 0 0 .253 0 0 0 0 0 0 .206 Gomez rf Choi dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .265 Adames ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Wendle 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .278 Sucre c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Smith rf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275 Totals 36 4 12 4 1 8 Detroit 000 200 000 — 2 7 0 Tampa Bay 001 000 30x — 4 12 1 E: Gomez (5). LOB: Detroit 6, Tampa Bay 9. 2B: Castellanos (29), Jones (17), Cron (17), Choi (3), Wendle (9). HR: McCann (6), off Andriese; Kiermaier (2), off Zimmermann; Cron (18), off Zimmermann. RBIs: McCann 2 (27), Kiermaier (7), Cron 3 (46). SB: Smith (16). RLISP: Detroit 4 (Candelario 2, Martinez 2); Tampa Bay 7 (Kiermaier, Choi, Adames 3, Sucre, Smith). Detroit IP HRERBBSO NPERA Zimmermann, L, 4-162/3 11 4 4 1 5105 3.71 Wilson 1 00 0 0 2 15 3.79 1/ Stumpf 3 10 0 0 1 65.40 IP HRERBBSO NPERA Tampa Bay 1 20 0 0 2 22 1.80 Wood 3 3 2 2 1 6 49 3.76 Andriese 3 10 0 0 4 38 3.62 Yarbrough, W, 8-4 1 10 0 0 0 7 1.80 Castillo, 1 00 0 0 2 12 3.95 Romo, S, 11-16 Inherited runners-scored: Wilson 1-0. WP: Zimmermann. Umpires: Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Lance Barrett; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 2:40. A: 13,922 .

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .264 Hoskins lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .255 Herrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Williams rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Kingery ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Franco 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .274 Velasquez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .214 a-Valentin ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .180 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Leiter Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Knapp c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .226 Totals 35 0 6 0 2 7 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Conforto lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .215 Bautista rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .209 Flores 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Smith 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .186 Mesoraco c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 den Dekker cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rosario ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .246 Reyes 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .168 deGrom p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .077 b-Cabrera ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Nimmo ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .258 Totals 32 3 4 3 4 4 Philadelphia 000 000 000 0 — 0 6 1 New York 000 000 000 3 — 3 4 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Velasquez in the 7th. b-pinch hit for deGrom in the 8th. c-flied out for Dominguez in the 10th. d-homered for Gsellman in the 10th. E: Hernandez (7). LOB: Philadelphia 7, New York 4. 2B: Knapp (5), Rosario (15). HR: Nimmo (13), off Leiter Jr.. RBIs: Nimmo 3 (29). SB: Herrera (5), Rosario (5). CS: Rosario (5). RLISP: Philadelphia 2 (Hernandez, Kingery); New York 1 (Conforto). GIDP: deGrom. DP: Philadelphia 1 (Hernandez). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Velasquez 6 2 0 0 1 3 85 4.39 Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 2/ Arano 2 0 15 2.45 3 0 0 0 1/ Morgan 0 0 3 5.25 3 0 0 0 Dominguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.65 Leiter Jr., L, 0-1 2/3 2 3 3 1 0 20 4.85 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA deGrom 8 5 0 0 1 7 113 1.68 Familia 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.03 Gsellman, W, 6-2 1 1 0 0 1 0 13 4.30 Inherited runners-scored: Morgan 2-0. Umpires: Home, Dan Bellino; First, Tom Hallion; Second, Jeremie Rehak; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T: 3:07. A: 22,137 .

Red Sox 4, Rangers 2 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .212 Guzman 1b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .257 Andrus ss 5 1 3 0 0 1 .259 Mazara rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .270 Beltre dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .288 Odor 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .242 Profar 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .248 Chirinos c 2 0 1 1 2 1 .206 Gallo lf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .186 Rua 1b-cf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .182 Totals 35 2 9 2 3 18 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .350 Benintendi lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .301 Martinez dh 4 1 1 2 0 2 .330 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .282 Bogaerts ss 4 1 3 1 0 0 .283 Holt 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .288 Nunez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .259 Leon c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252 Bradley Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Totals 33 4 11 3 2 6 Texas 000 000 020 — 2 9 2 Boston 010 030 00x — 4 11 0 E: Colon (3), Odor (4). LOB: Texas 9, Boston 7. 2B: Andrus 2 (8), Odor (12), Martinez (22). 3B: Bogaerts (2). RBIs: Mazara (57), Chirinos (37), Martinez 2 (79), Bogaerts (57). SB: Andrus (1). RLISP: Texas 4 (Beltre, Gallo 2, Rua); Boston 4 (Moreland, Bogaerts, Holt, Bradley Jr.). GIDP: Odor, Martinez, Holt. DP: Texas 2 (Andrus, Odor, Rua), (Odor, Andrus, Guzman); Boston 1 (Sale, Bogaerts, Moreland). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon, L, 5-7 6 9 4 3 2 3 96 4.64 Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 3 12 3.34 Chavez 1 2 0 0 0 0 10 3.62 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale, W, 10-4 7 6 0 0 1 12 110 2.23 2/ Hembree 1 2 25 3.96 3 3 2 2 Kimbrel, S, 28-30 11/3 0 0 0 1 4 23 1.91 Inherited runners-scored: Kimbrel 3-1. WP: Hembree. PB: Leon (4). Umpires: Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Bill Miller; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Alan Porter. T: 2:58. A: 36,920 .

Braves 9, Blue Jays 5

Yankees 9, Orioles 0 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 3 0 0 0 2 0 .254 Gardner lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .265 Frazier lf Judge dh 4 1 1 0 2 1 .281 Gregorius ss 6 2 1 0 0 0 .260 5 1 4 2 1 1 .276 Stanton rf Hicks cf 5 1 0 0 1 0 .254 4 1 1 4 1 1 .208 Bird 1b Andujar 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .279 Romine c 5 1 2 1 0 1 .281 Higashioka c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Wade 2b 5 1 3 1 0 1 .159 Totals 42 9 14 8 8 5 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Baltimore Beckham 3b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .209 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Jones cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Mancini lf Machado ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .314 0 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Peterson 3b Trumbo dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .158 Valencia rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .249 Rickard lf-cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .214 Joseph c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .198 Totals 32 0 5 0 1 12 New York 005 001 111 — 9 14 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 E: Hart (1). LOB: New York 14, Baltimore 6. 2B: Gregorius (18), Wade (3), Machado (21), Schoop (17). HR: Bird (7), off Bundy; Wade (1), off Wright Jr.; Romine (6), off Marinez. RBIs: Stanton 2 (54), Bird 4 (18), Romine (24), Wade (5). SB: Gardner (9). RLISP: New York 8 (Gregorius 2, Stanton, Hicks 2, Romine 3); Baltimore 6 (Machado 2, Trumbo 2, Rickard 2). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray, W, 6-7 6 3 0 0 1 8 90 5.46 Cole 2 2 0 0 0 2 25 4.97 Shreve 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 4.83 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy, L, 6-9 4 5 5 5 4 3 91 4.35 Wright Jr. 11/3 3 1 1 1 0 39 4.96 Marinez 2 4 2 1 1 1 43 4.50 12/3 2 1 1 2 1 37 4.00 Hart Inherited runners-scored: Marinez 1-0, Hart 2-1. PB: Romine (1). Umpires: Home, Jim Reynolds; First, John Tumpane; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Shane Livensparger. T: 3:22. A: 17,808 .

Marlins 5, Brewers 4 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames rf 4 3 1 0 2 2 .253 Cain cf 5 0 2 0 1 2 .299 Yelich lf 6 1 1 1 0 3 .290 5 0 3 3 1 1 .307 Aguilar 1b Shaw 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .241 Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .667 b-Miller ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Broxton ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Lopez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Saladino ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .262 Perez 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Orf 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .071 Nottingham c 5 0 1 0 0 3 .214 Peralta p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Villar 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .262 Totals 42 4 8 4 7 17 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dietrich lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Riddle ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .271 4 1 2 0 2 1 .288 Anderson rf Castro 2b 5 0 1 2 0 0 .296 Bour 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .235 Steckenrider p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Rivera ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .198 Prado 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .222 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rojas ss-1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .257 Maybin cf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .232 Holaday c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .180 Straily p 1 0 0 1 1 1 .150 a-Cooper ph-lf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .250 Totals 40 5 8 5 6 10 Milwaukee 101 000 020 000 — 4 8 1 Miami 000 301 000 001 — 5 8 1 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for Straily in the 6th. b-struck out for Jennings in the 8th. c-struck out for Knebel in the 10th. d-flied out for Conley in the 10th. E: Shaw (9), Straily (1). LOB: Milwaukee 10, Miami 9. 2B: Thames (6), Aguilar 2 (16). 3B: Anderson (3). HR: Bour (15), off Peralta. RBIs: Yelich (41), Aguilar 3 (67), Castro 2 (36), Bour (43), Holaday (11), Straily (1). SB: Maybin (6). CS: Yelich (2), Saladino (2), Anderson (4). SF: Castro. RLISP: Milwaukee 6 (Yelich 2, Shaw, Saladino, Nottingham, Lopez); Miami 4 (Dietrich 4). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milwaukee Peralta 3 2/3 3 3 3 3 4 93 2.65 2 2 1 0 1 3 36 3.50 Barnes Jennings 12/3 0 0 0 1 0 17 3.11 Williams 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.50 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 3.38 Knebel 1/ 2 3 2 1 1 1 2 26 3.24 Lopez, L, 0-1 IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miami Straily 6 4 2 1 2 7 101 4.29 Ziegler, H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 4.40 1 2 2 2 1 2 23 3.46 Steckenrider 1 0 0 0 3 3 32 1.31 Barraclough Conley 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.04 Hernndz, W, 1-5 2 1 0 0 1 3 33 6.28 Inherited runners-scored: Barnes 3-0, Jennings 2-0. HBP: Peralta (Holaday), Ziegler (Saladino). WP: Peralta. Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T: 4:23. A: 5,265 (36,742).

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Gennett, Cincinnati, .326; Markakis, Atlanta, .322; Almora, Chicago, .317; Freeman, Atlanta, .313; Suarez, Cincinnati, .312; Kemp, Los Angeles, .312; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .309; Arenado, Colorado, .309; Aguilar, Milwaukee, .302; Martinez, Cardinals, .301. RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 73; Blackmon, Colorado, 66; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 62; Arenado, Colorado, 60; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 60; Pham, Cardinals, 59; Gennett, Cincinnati, 58; 4 tied at 57. RBI: Suarez, Cincinnati, 69; Baez, Chicago, 66; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 64; Arenado, Colorado, 64; Story, Colorado, 62; Freeman, Atlanta, 60; Markakis, Atlanta, 60; Gennett, Cincinnati, 59; Rizzo, Chicago, 59; Kemp, Los Angeles, 58. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 116; Albies, Atlanta, 113; Gennett, Cincinnati, 111; Freeman, Atlanta, 110; Castro, Miami, 109; Anderson, Miami, 103; Arenado, Colorado, 100; Turner, Washington, 100; Story, Colorado, 99; 2 tied at 97. DOUBLES: Albies, Atlanta, 29; Markakis, Atlanta, 29; Carpenter, Cardinals, 27; Rendon, Washington, 25; Story, Colorado, 25; Freeman, Atlanta, 24; Baez, Chicago, 23; Hosmer, San Diego, 23; 3 tied at 22. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 8; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Baez, Chicago, 6; Nimmo, New York, 6; Contreras, Chicago, 5; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 5; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 5; Story, Colorado, 5; 9 tied at 4. HOME RUNS: Aguilar, Milwaukee, 23; Arenado, Colorado, 23; Harper, Washington, 22; Muncy, Los Angeles, 21; Albies, Atlanta, 20; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 20; Suarez, Cincinnati, 19; Baez, Chicago, 18; 7 tied at 17. STOLEN BASES: Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 23; MTaylor, Washington, 23; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 22; Turner, Washington, 22; Baez, Chicago, 17; Cain, Milwaukee, 17; Peraza, Cincinnati, 17; Dyson, Arizona, 16; 2 tied at 14. PITCHING: Nola, Philadelphia, 12-2; Lester, Chicago, 11-2; Scherzer, Washington, 11-5; Godley, Arizona, 10-6; Mikolas, Cardinals, 10-3; Greinke, Arizona, 9-5; 7 tied at 8.

Wednesday Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 2 Minnesota 8, Kansas City 5 NY Yankees 9, Baltimore 0 Boston 4, Texas 2 Cleveland 19, Cincinnati 4 Atlanta 9, Toronto 5 White Sox 4, Cardinals 0 Oakland 8, Houston 3 Seattle at LA Angels, late Tuesday Baltimore 6, NY Yankees 5 Boston 8, Texas 4 Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 4 Tampa Bay 5, Detroit 2 Toronto 6, Atlanta 2 Cardinals 14, White Sox 2 Houston 6, Oakland 5, 11 inn. Kansas City 9, Minnesota 4 LA Angels 9, Seattle 3

Thursday’s pitching matchups NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Ari Col

Ray (L) Freeland (L)

2:10

3-1 8-6

5.23 3.18

Mil Pit

Miley (L) Taillon (R)

6:05

1-0 5-7

1.42 4.05

Was Scherzer (R) NY Matz (L)

6:10

11-5 4-6

2.33 3.31

LA SD

Stripling (R) Ross (R)

9:10

7-2 5-7

2.22 4.41

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

1-2 11-2

2.77 2.83

14-2 6:10 12-4

2.12 2.49

Oak Cahill (R) Hou Morton (R) NY Cle

Severino (R) Kluber (R)

1:10

Tor Happ (L) Bos Price (L)

6:10

10-5 9-6

4.44 4.44

TB Snell (L) Min Gibson (R)

7:10

12-4 3-6

2.09 3.59

Sea Paxton (L) LA Skaggs (L)

9:07

8-3 6-5

3.41 2.64

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Phi Bal

Pivetta (R) Gausman (R)

5-7 4-6

4.62 4.11

5:05

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.68; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.27; Scherzer, Washington, 2.33; Lester, Chicago, 2.46; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.65; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.66; Guerra, Milwaukee, 2.79; Corbin, Arizona, 3.10; Freeland, Colorado, 3.18; Matz, New York, 3.31. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 177; deGrom, New York, 149; Corbin, Arizona, 146; Nola, Philadelphia, 126; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 120; Gray, Colorado, 119; Greinke, Arizona, 117; Velasquez, Philadelphia, 110; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 106; Stripling, Los Angeles, 103. LATE TUESDAY

Cubs 2, Giants 0

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Almora cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .319 4 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Heyward rf Baez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .291 Contreras c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .280 Russell ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .279 Bote 3b 2 0 2 0 0 0 .300 a-Schwarber ph-lf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .248 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 2 1 0 0 1 0 .253 Happ lf-3b Caratini 1b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .270 Quintana p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 b-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Edwards p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Wilson p Zobrist lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .295 31 2 6 1 2 12 Totals San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .276 Belt 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .302 McCutchen rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .259 Hundley c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Crawford ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .296 Pence lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .209 d’Arnaud 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .200 2 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Sandoval 3b c-Slater ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Hanson 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Holland p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .063 Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Posey ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Black p Totals 28 0 3 0 2 7 Chicago 000 000 200 — 2 6 0 San Francisco 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 a-walked for Bote in the 7th. b-grounded out for Quintana in the 7th. c-struck out for Sandoval in the 8th. d-lined out for Dyson in the 8th. E: Hundley (5). LOB: Chicago 4, San Francisco 3. 2B: Baez (23), Russell (18), Caratini (5). RBIs: Caratini (6). CS: Bote (3), Schwarber (3). RLISP: Chicago 2 (Contreras, La Stella); San Francisco 1 (Crawford). GIDP: McCutchen, Hundley. DP: Chicago 2 (Russell, Baez, Caratini), (Quintana, Baez, Caratini). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chicago Quintana, W, 8-6 6 3 0 0 2 3 86 3.96 Edwards, 1 0 0 0 0 3 12 2.70 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.92 Wilson, Cishek, S, 3-5 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 1.96 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland, L, 5-8 61/3 5 1 1 0 8 99 4.17 Dyson 12/3 1 1 1 2 2 26 3.35 Black 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 20.25 Inherited runners-scored: Dyson 1-1. WP: Dyson. Umpires: Home, Laz Diaz; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Jansen Visconti; Third, Jeff Nelson. T: 2:43. A: 39,113 .

Angels 9, Mariners 3 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .284 Segura ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .329 Haniger rf 4 1 2 3 0 0 .274 Cruz dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .264 Seager 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .239 Span lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Healy 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Herrmann c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .222 Heredia cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .235 b-Gamel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Totals 35 3 7 3 1 8 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 3 3 2 1 0 .180 Simmons ss 5 1 3 2 0 0 .312 Trout cf 4 0 2 0 1 1 .314 Upton lf 4 0 1 1 1 1 .248 Pujols 1b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .247 1-Marte pr-1b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .247 Ohtani dh 4 1 1 1 1 0 .274 Kinsler 2b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .213 Valbuena 3b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .213 a-Fletcher ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Maldonado c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .244 Totals 39 9 15 9 4 3 Seattle 300 000 000 — 3 7 2 Los Angeles 120 410 01x — 9 15 2 a-flied out for Valbuena in the 7th. b-grounded out for Heredia in the 9th. 1-ran for Pujols in the 8th. E: Gordon 2 (7), Kinsler (4), Maldonado (4). LOB: Seattle 6, Los Angeles 10. 2B: Haniger (17), Herrmann (1), Simmons (17), Pujols (15), Valbuena (8), Maldonado (14). HR: Haniger (18), off Richards; Pujols (14), off Leake; Calhoun (6), off Rumbelow. RBIs: Haniger 3 (65), Calhoun 2 (22), Simmons 2 (41), Upton (48), Pujols 2 (49), Ohtani (22), Kinsler (23). SB: Trout (14). CS: Kinsler (4). RLISP: Seattle 2 (Segura, Span); Los Angeles 5 (Pujols, Kinsler 3, Maldonado). LIDP: Span. GIDP: Upton. DP: Seattle 1 (Gordon, Healy); Los Angeles 1 (Kinsler, Simmons). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake, L, 8-6 4 11 7 5 2 1 81 4.36 2 2 1 1 1 1 33 4.82 Rumbelow Elias 2 2 1 1 1 1 37 2.60 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 2 2/3 4 3 3 1 1 42 3.66 Richards Ramirez, W, 4-3 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 25 4.41 Bedrosian 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.10 2/ 0 1 18 2.82 Alvarez 3 1 0 0 Robles 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.45 Cole 2 1 0 0 0 3 25 2.16 Alvarez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Robles 1-0. Umpires: Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Ryan Blakney; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Jim Wolf. T: 3:10. A: 33,092 .


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Milwaukee

55 38

.591

7-3

L-1

30-18

25-20

Chicago

52 38 .578

7-3

L-1

28-15

24-23

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

4

5-5

L-1

23-22

24-22

8½ 4-6 W-1

24-24

19-25

.516

47 44

Pittsburgh

43 49 .467 11½

Cincinnati

41 52 .441

14

EAST

W

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Atlanta

51 40 .560

- 4-6 W-1

24-18

27-22

Philadelphia

51 40 .560

-

Washington

46 46 .500

Pct

7

Away

Cardinals

L

11 6-4

L-1

21-26 20-26 Away

7-3

L-1

30-16

21-24

5½ 4-6

L-1

22-24

24-22

13½

5-5 W-1

17-30

20-23

14

5-5 W-1

New York

37 53

.411 13½

Miami

39 56

.411

14

21-27

18-29

WEST

W

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

L

Arizona

51 42 .548

— 4-6

L-1

26-23

25-19

Los Angeles

49 42 .538

1

2 6-4

L-1

26-23

23-19

4 4-6 W-1

30-17

19-29

19-23

28-22

San Francisco 49 46

.516

3

Colorado

47 45

.511

San Diego

40 54 .426 11½

ROUNDUP Former SLU pitcher gets loss as Cubs fall Buster Posey singled off the right-field wall in the 13th inning for his fifth career game-ending hit, sending the San Francisco Giants past the Chicago Cubs 5-4 on Wednesday. Brandon Belt drew a two-out walk from James Norwood, a former St. Louis University standout. Andrew McCutchen then singled to bring up Posey, who ended the 4-hour, 30-minute game with San Francisco’s first run since scoring four in the first. Dereck Rodriguez (4-1) pitched three scoreless innings for the win. He also had three of San Francisco’s 16 strikeouts. Norwood worked the 12th and 13th in his major league debut. He immediately struck out Brandon Crawford on a 99 mph fastball. Pirates 2, Nationals 0 • Starling Marte hit a tworun home run and Trevor Williams combined with four relievers on a five-hitter as host Pittsburgh beat Washington. Mets 3, Phillies 0 • Brandon Nimmo hit a three-run home run in the bottom of the 10th inning to lift New York over Philadelphia. Marlins 5, Brewers 4 • Jesus Aguilar got three hits and three RBIs, but the Brewers went 3 for 16 with runners in scoring position and lost in Miami. Rockies 19, D’backs 2 • Carlos Gonzalez hit two homers, and starter German Marquez also went deep for one of Colorado’s five home runs as the Rockies routed visiting Arizona.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rays 4, Tigers 2 • C.J. Cron’s three-run home run in the seventh inning carried Tampa Bay to a win over visiting Detroit. Twins 8, Royals 5 • Brian Dozier hit a two-run home run, going deep for the second straight game to give Minnesota a boost over visiting Kansas City. Lance Lynn (7-7) won his second straight start for the Twins. Red Sox 4, Rangers 2 • Chris Sale struck out 12 in seven innings of shutout ball in his final start before the All-Star Game, and major league batting leader Mookie Betts had two more hits to lead Boston over visiting Texas. Yankees 9, Orioles 0 • Greg Bird hit his first career grand slam to back a dominating pitching performance by Sonny Gray, and New York won in Baltimore. Athletics 8, Astros 3 • Chad Pinder hit a three-run homer and Khris Davis added three RBIs as Oakland jumped on Lance McCullers Jr. early and cruised to a win in Houston. Mariners 3, Angels 0 • Marco Gonzales pitched 7 stellar innings as Seattle won in Anaheim.

INTERLEAGUE

Indians 19, Reds 4 • Jose Ramirez homered twice and drove in five runs as Cleveland took out some frustrations following a brutal loss with a thumping of visiting Cincinnati. Braves 9, Blue Jays 5 • Ozzie Albies snapped a power drought with two homers, and Atlanta beat visiting Toronto to move back into a tie for the NL East lead. Associated Press

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

7-3 W-1

12½ 4-6 W-1 20-26 20-28

Wednesday White Sox 4, Cardinals 0 Pittsburgh 2, Washington 0 San Francisco 5, Cubs 4, 13 inn. NY Mets 3, Philadelphia 0, 10 inn. Cleveland 19, Cincinnati 4 Miami 5, Milwaukee 4, 12 inn. Atlanta 9, Toronto 5 Colorado 19, Arizona 2 LA Dodgers at San Diego, late Tuesday Washington 5, Pittsburgh 1 Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 4 Philadelphia 7, NY Mets 3 Milwaukee 8, Miami 4 Toronto 6, Atlanta 2 Cardinals 14, White Sox 2 Arizona 5, Colorado 3 San Diego 4, LA Dodgers 1 Cubs 2, San Francisco 0

CENTRAL

W

L

Cleveland

50 41 .549

— 6-4 W-1

29-17

21-24

Minnesota

41 49 .456

15½ 6-4 W-1

26-21

15-28

Detroit

40 55 .421

12

19

L-4

25-23

15-32

Chicago

31

61 .337 19½

26½

3-7 W-1

17-28

14-33

Kansas City

26 66 .283 24½

31½

1-9

11-35

15-31

Str Home

Away

3-7

L-1

Away

W

65 29 .691

New York

60

31 .659

Tampa Bay

48 44 .522

16

Toronto

42 49 .462 21½

15 4-6

Baltimore

26 67 .280 38½

32

WEST

W

Houston

62 33 .653

Seattle

58 35 .624

3

Oakland

52 41 .559

9

6

7-3 W-1

24-21 28-20

Los Angeles 47 46 .505

14

11

5-5

L-1

23-23

24-23

40 54 .426 21½

18½

2-8

L-3

19-28

21-26

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

Boston

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

EAST

Texas

L

Pct

9-1 W-9

31-12

— 6-4 W-1

33-13

27-18

26-17

22-27

L-1

24-25

18-24

L-1

14-31

12-36

Str Home

Away

L-1

30-19

32-14

— 6-4 W-1

31-17

27-18

7-3 W-5 2-8

GB WCGB L10 7-3

34-17

BOX SCORES Giants 5, Cubs 4

Pirates 2, Nationals 0

Indians 19, Reds 4

Athletics 8, Astros 3

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Zobrist rf-lf 6 0 1 0 0 1 .292 Heyward cf 6 2 3 1 1 1 .284 Bryant 3b-rf 5 1 1 2 2 2 .279 Rizzo 1b 5 0 0 0 1 2 .236 Baez 2b 6 1 1 1 0 2 .289 Schwarber lf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .247 Farrell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Morrow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Contreras ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .279 5 0 1 0 1 1 .278 Russell ss Caratini c 6 0 2 0 0 2 .275 Norwood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Montgomery p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .111 a-Almora ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .317 Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 c-Happ ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 La Stella 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .275 Totals 50 4 11 4 6 16 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. d’Arnaud 3b 7 1 2 1 0 1 .250 5 1 0 0 2 0 .297 Belt 1b McCutchen rf 5 1 2 0 1 1 .261 Posey c 7 0 3 1 0 2 .282 Crawford ss 5 1 1 0 1 1 .295 Hernandez lf 6 1 2 2 0 0 .277 Duggar cf 6 0 1 1 0 3 .235 Hanson 2b 6 0 2 0 0 1 .278 Cueto p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .040 Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Pence ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .216 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 0 --Melancon p d-Slater ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .263 Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Sandoval ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .258 Rodriguez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Totals 51 5 14 5 6 9 Chicago 001 020 100 000 0 — 4 11 2 San Francisco 400 000 000 000 1 — 5 14 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Montgomery in the 6th. b-singled for Moronta in the 6th. c-grounded out for Rosario in the 7th. d-walked for Melancon in the 8th. e-walked for Smith in the 10th. f-struck out for Morrow in the 12th. E: Zobrist (1), Strop (1). LOB: Chicago 14, San Francisco 15. 2B: d’Arnaud (1), Hernandez (10). HR: Heyward (6), off Cueto; Bryant (10), off Cueto; Baez (18), off Watson; d’Arnaud (1), off Montgomery. RBIs: Heyward (39), Bryant 2 (38), Baez (66), d’Arnaud (1), Posey (28), Hernandez 2 (29), Duggar (1). CS: Posey (2). RLISP: Chicago 5 (Zobrist 2, Rizzo 2, Baez); San Francisco 6 (d’Arnaud 2, Belt, Hernandez, Duggar 2). GIDP: Crawford. DP: Chicago 1 (Russell, Baez, Rizzo). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chicago Montgomery 5 8 4 4 1 1 84 3.91 Rosario 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 1.38 Strop 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.41 2/ Wilson 1 1 23 2.87 3 1 0 0 Farrell 2 0 0 0 3 2 39 3.86 Morrow 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.57 Norwood, L, 0-1 12/3 3 1 1 1 2 35 5.40 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto 5 6 3 3 3 7 86 2.36 2/ Blach, 1 19 4.54 3 2 0 0 0 1/ Moronta, 1 0 11 1.80 3 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 2 22 1.67 Watson, 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.57 Melancon 2 1 0 0 0 1 30 0.95 Smith Rodriguez, W, 4-1 3 0 0 0 2 3 42 2.89 Inherited runners-scored: Moronta 2-0. HBP: Cueto (Zobrist), Strop (McCutchen). WP: Cueto. Umpires: Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Jansen Visconti; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Laz Diaz. T: 4:30. A: 41,099 .

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Soto lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .304 Rendon 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .279 Harper cf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .213 Adams 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .283 Turner ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .270 Difo 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 Wieters c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Gonzalez p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .065 b-Goodwin ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .197 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Miller p Totals 31 0 5 0 4 8 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 1 0 0 2 .256 Harrison 2b Marte cf 3 1 1 2 1 0 .282 Polanco rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Cervelli c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Freese 3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .272 Bell 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Luplow lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Mercer ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 .246 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .074 a-Meadows ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .302 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Moran ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Crick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 29 2 7 2 1 6 Totals Washington 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Pittsburgh 002 000 00x — 2 7 0 a-struck out for Williams in the 5th. b-singled for Gonzalez in the 7th. c-struck out for Santana in the 7th. LOB: Washington 8, Pittsburgh 5. 2B: Gonzalez (1), Mercer 2 (21). HR: Marte (11), off Gonzalez. RBIs: Marte 2 (40). CS: Marte (5). S: Williams. RLISP: Washington 4 (Rendon, Harper, Adams, Wieters); Pittsburgh 2 (Harrison, Mercer). GIDP: Difo. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Mercer, Harrison, Bell). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez, L, 6-6 6 6 2 2 1 4 89 3.72 1 1 0 0 0 1 22 2.63 Kelley Miller 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.71 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, W, 7-7 5 4 0 0 3 3 81 4.36 Rodriguez, 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 2.50 Santana, 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.32 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.12 Crick, Vazquez, S, 20-24 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 3.20 Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Chris Segal; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Ed Hickox. T: 2:34. A: 21,083 .

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler rf 4 0 1 0 1 3 .279 4 0 1 1 0 1 .275 Peraza ss Votto 1b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .292 Herrera lf-3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 5 2 3 1 0 0 .326 Gennett 2b Suarez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .312 Blandino 3b-p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .224 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Winker dh-lf Barnhart c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .255 Casali c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .342 4 0 0 0 0 2 .201 Duvall lf-1b Hamilton cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .233 Totals 36 4 11 4 3 11 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cleveland Lindor ss 5 2 1 3 1 1 .295 Brantley lf 4 3 2 2 0 0 .307 2 0 0 0 0 1 .165 Guyer lf Ramirez 3b 4 2 2 5 0 0 .293 Gonzalez 3b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .295 Encarnacion dh 3 1 1 0 1 0 .227 a-Perez ph-dh 2 1 1 0 0 1 .152 Alonso 1b 4 2 2 2 1 1 .255 3 2 2 2 2 1 .223 Kipnis 2b Gomes c 4 2 1 2 1 1 .251 Naquin rf 4 2 3 3 1 0 .280 Allen cf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .215 Totals 42 19 19 19 7 6 Cincinnati 000 011 020 — 4 11 1 Cleveland 209 600 20x — 19 19 0 a-singled for Encarnacion in the 7th. E: Votto (5). LOB: Cincinnati 9, Cleveland 6. 2B: Winker (14), Naquin (7). 3B: Hamilton (5). HR: Gennett (15), off Plutko; Winker (7), off Plutko; Ramirez (26), off Mahle; Ramirez (27), off Rainey; Kipnis (9), off Rainey; Lindor (25), off Stephens. RBIs: Peraza (32), Gennett (59), Winker 2 (39), Lindor 3 (62), Brantley 2 (52), Ramirez 5 (65), Alonso 2 (51), Kipnis 2 (39), Gomes 2 (30), Naquin 3 (19). SF: Peraza. RLISP: Cincinnati 4 (Gennett, Suarez, Duvall, Hamilton); Cleveland 2 (Lindor, Perez). GIDP: Peraza, Allen, Guyer. DP: Cincinnati 2 (Peraza, Gennett, Duvall), (Peraza, Gennett, Duvall); Cleveland 1 (Gonzalez, Kipnis, Alonso). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cincinnati Mahle, L, 7-7 21/3 6 7 5 2 1 71 4.02 2/ Rainey 3 5 8 8 3 0 44 24.43 Stephens 3 3 2 2 1 2 57 3.80 Blandino 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Crockett 1 4 2 2 1 1 30 6.75 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carrasco, W, 10-5 5 5 1 1 1 7 83 4.16 Plutko, S, 1-1 4 6 3 3 2 4 79 4.87 Rainey pitched to 4 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Rainey 2-2, Stephens 1-1. WP: Carrasco, Blandino. Umpires: Home, Ryan Additon; First, Quinn Wolcott; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, James Hoye. T: 3:31. A: 22,215 .

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 6 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Fowler cf 3 2 1 0 2 1 .253 Semien ss 3 1 2 0 2 0 .290 Lowrie 2b Davis dh 5 1 2 3 0 1 .250 Piscotty rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .259 2 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Olson 1b Chapman 3b 3 2 1 1 0 1 .252 Canha 1b-lf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .258 Pinder lf-rf 3 1 2 3 2 1 .253 Phegley c 5 0 1 1 0 1 .216 36 8 10 8 7 9 Totals Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Springer cf Bregman ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .285 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .334 4 0 1 2 0 0 .304 Gurriel 3b Reddick rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Tucker lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .222 Federowicz c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .192 2 1 1 1 1 0 .200 White 1b Totals 34 3 7 3 1 1 Oakland 300 301 001 — 8 10 0 Houston 000 210 000 — 3 7 2 E: Bregman (12), Altuve (5). LOB: Oakland 11, Houston 5. 2B: Semien (19), Davis (19). 3B: Davis (1). HR: Pinder (9), off McCullers; White (1), off Bassitt. RBIs: Davis 3 (63), Chapman (27), Pinder 3 (21), Phegley (8), Gurriel 2 (48), White (1). SB: Altuve (14). SF: Chapman. RLISP: Oakland 8 (Fowler, Semien, Davis 3, Canha, Phegley, Olson); Houston 1 (Tucker). GIDP: Davis. DP: Houston 1 (Altuve, Bregman, White). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oakland 5 5 3 3 1 1 85 3.38 Bassitt, W, 2-3 2 1 0 0 0 0 27 3.54 Pagan Dull 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.50 Buchter 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.04 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCullers, L, 10-4 4 4 6 6 5 1 86 3.77 12/3 3 1 1 0 2 30 3.12 Peacock Sipp 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 19 2.11 Perez 12/3 2 1 1 2 2 43 5.40 1/ Harris 1 7 4.09 3 1 0 0 0 McCullers pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Peacock 2-0, Sipp 1-0, Harris 2-1. HBP: McCullers 2 (Chapman,Piscotty). WP: McCullers 2. Umpires: Home, Nic Lentz; First, Scott Barry; Second, Carlos Torres; Third, Kerwin Danley. T: 3:13. A: 41,119 .

Mets 3, Phillies 0

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 b-Pillar ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Santos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Morales ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Smoak 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .242 Loup p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Biagini p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hernandez lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .256 Grichuk cf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Gurriel Jr. 2b-ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .237 Diaz ss-3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .245 Maile c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .235 Gaviglio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Petricka p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Mayza p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Travis ph-2b 3 1 1 4 0 0 .230 Totals 34 5 8 5 2 8 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 2 1 1 1 0 0 .246 Santana cf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .185 Albies 2b 4 2 2 4 0 1 .288 F.Freeman 1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .313 Markakis rf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .322 Flowers c 3 0 1 1 2 0 .236 Camargo 3b 4 1 2 0 1 2 .252 Acuna lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .259 Swanson ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .247 Foltynewicz p 2 1 0 1 0 2 .063 S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Vizcaino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 9 12 9 4 10 Toronto 000 000 500 — 5 8 2 Atlanta 060 001 02x — 9 12 0 a-grounded out for Mayza in the 6th. b-grounded out for Granderson in the 7th. c-lined out for S.Freeman in the 7th. d-grounded out for Axford in the 8th. E: Diaz (5), Maile (6). LOB: Toronto 4, Atlanta 10. 2B: Inciarte (13), Markakis (29), Acuna (10), Santana (3). HR: Smoak (14), off Foltynewicz; Travis (6), off Foltynewicz; Albies (19), off Santos; Albies (20), off Loup. RBIs: Smoak (47), Travis 4 (23), Inciarte (34), Albies 4 (54), F.Freeman (60), Markakis (60), Flowers (17), Foltynewicz (3). SF: Albies. S: Foltynewicz. RLISP: Toronto 2 (Maile, Travis); Atlanta 5 (Flowers, Acuna 2, Santana 2). GIDP: Grichuk. DP: Atlanta 1 (Camargo, Albies, F.Freeman). Toronto IPHRERBBSONP ERA Gaviglio, L, 2-3 12/3 6 6 6 0 0 48 4.70 Petricka 11/3 0 0 0 1 2 20 4.02 Mayza 2 1 0 0 2 4 41 3.21 Santos 1 2 1 1 0 2 2110.50 Axford 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.04 2/ Loup 3 3 2 2 1 1 21 4.60 1/ Biagini 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 6.13 IPHRERBBSONP ERA Atlanta Foltynewicz, W, 7-562/3 6 5 5 2 6 98 2.66 1/ S.Freeman, 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.86 Winkler, 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.92 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 1.65 Vizcaino Inherited runners-scored: Petricka 1-0, Biagini 2-0. HBP: Gaviglio (Inciarte). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Sean Barber; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 2:58. A: 27,839 .

Twins 8, Royals 5 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield cf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .302 Bonifacio rf 5 1 1 0 0 3 .293 Moustakas 3b 5 3 3 2 0 0 .256 Perez dh 5 1 2 3 0 2 .217 Duda 1b 2 0 0 0 1 2 .238 Gordon lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .248 A.Escobar ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Mondesi 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .231 Butera c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .168 Totals 35 5 9 5 3 12 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer dh 5 0 3 0 0 1 .273 Rosario lf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .300 Dozier 2b 5 1 3 3 0 1 .229 E.Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Morrison 1b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .193 Polanco ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Kepler rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .231 Cave cf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .299 Wilson c 4 1 3 2 0 1 .169 Totals 38 8 15 7 3 8 Kansas City 301 000 001 — 5 9 1 Minnesota 020 303 00x — 8 15 1 E: Sparkman (1), Polanco (1). LOB: Kansas City 8, Minnesota 9. 2B: Wilson (7). 3B: Cave (1). HR: Perez (12), off Lynn; Moustakas (18), off Lynn; Moustakas (19), off Busenitz; Dozier (15), off Romero; Morrison (11), off Romero. RBIs: Moustakas 2 (58), Perez 3 (38), Dozier 3 (42), Morrison (31), Cave (10), Wilson 2 (13). CS: Mondesi (3). RLISP: Kansas City 4 (Merrifield 2, Bonifacio, Gordon); Minnesota 4 (Rosario 2, Morrison 2). LIDP: Mondesi. GIDP: E.Escobar. DP: Kansas City 1 (Duda); Minnesota 1 (Dozier, Morrison). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kansas City 31/3 7 4 4 1 4 71 5.83 Smith Sparkman, L, 0-1 12/3 3 1 1 2 2 37 10.80 Romero 1 3 3 3 0 1 17 9.00 Hill 1 2 0 0 0 0 19 5.81 Adam 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 4.43 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn, W, 7-7 5 5 4 3 3 6 114 5.22 Pressly, 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.80 Duke 1 2 0 0 0 2 20 2.73 Busenitz 2 2 1 1 0 2 39 6.00 Lynn pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Sparkman 2-2, Pressly 2-0. HBP: Lynn (Duda), Pressly (A.Escobar). Umpires: Home, Ted Barrett; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Will Little; Third, Tom Woodring. T: 3:19. A: 26,708 .

Rays 4, Tigers 2 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .225 Castellanos rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .305 Goodrum 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Hicks 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .278 4 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Martinez dh Mahtook lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .208 McCann c 4 1 2 2 0 2 .227 3 0 0 0 1 1 .167 Rodriguez ss Jones cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .218 Totals 34 2 7 2 1 14 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 5 2 3 1 0 1 .175 Duffy 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .310 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234 Bauers lf-1b Cron 1b 4 1 3 3 0 0 .253 Gomez rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .206 4 0 2 0 0 1 .265 Choi dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Adames ss Wendle 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .278 Sucre c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Smith rf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275 Totals 36 4 12 4 1 8 Detroit 000 200 000 — 2 7 0 Tampa Bay 001 000 30x — 4 12 1 E: Gomez (5). LOB: Detroit 6, Tampa Bay 9. 2B: Castellanos (29), Jones (17), Cron (17), Choi (3), Wendle (9). HR: McCann (6), off Andriese; Kiermaier (2), off Zimmermann; Cron (18), off Zimmermann. RBIs: McCann 2 (27), Kiermaier (7), Cron 3 (46). SB: Smith (16). RLISP: Detroit 4 (Candelario 2, Martinez 2); Tampa Bay 7 (Kiermaier, Choi, Adames 3, Sucre, Smith). Detroit IP HRERBBSO NPERA Zimmermann, L, 4-162/3 11 4 4 1 5105 3.71 Wilson 1 00 0 0 2 15 3.79 1/ Stumpf 3 10 0 0 1 65.40 Tampa Bay IP HRERBBSO NPERA Wood 1 20 0 0 2 22 1.80 Andriese 3 3 2 2 1 6 49 3.76 Yarbrough, W, 8-4 3 10 0 0 4 38 3.62 Castillo, 1 10 0 0 0 7 1.80 Romo, S, 11-16 1 00 0 0 2 12 3.95 Inherited runners-scored: Wilson 1-0. WP: Zimmermann. Umpires: Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Lance Barrett; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 2:40. A: 13,922 .

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .264 Hoskins lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .255 Herrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Williams rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Kingery ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Franco 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .274 Velasquez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .214 a-Valentin ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .180 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Leiter Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Knapp c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .226 Totals 35 0 6 0 2 7 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Conforto lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .215 Bautista rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .209 Flores 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Smith 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .186 Mesoraco c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 den Dekker cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rosario ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .246 Reyes 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .168 deGrom p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .077 b-Cabrera ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Nimmo ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .258 Totals 32 3 4 3 4 4 Philadelphia 000 000 000 0 — 0 6 1 New York 000 000 000 3 — 3 4 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Velasquez in the 7th. b-pinch hit for deGrom in the 8th. c-flied out for Dominguez in the 10th. d-homered for Gsellman in the 10th. E: Hernandez (7). LOB: Philadelphia 7, New York 4. 2B: Knapp (5), Rosario (15). HR: Nimmo (13), off Leiter Jr.. RBIs: Nimmo 3 (29). SB: Herrera (5), Rosario (5). CS: Rosario (5). RLISP: Philadelphia 2 (Hernandez, Kingery); New York 1 (Conforto). GIDP: deGrom. DP: Philadelphia 1 (Hernandez). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Velasquez 6 2 0 0 1 3 85 4.39 Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 2/ Arano 2 0 15 2.45 3 0 0 0 1/ Morgan 0 0 3 5.25 3 0 0 0 Dominguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.65 Leiter Jr., L, 0-1 2/3 2 3 3 1 0 20 4.85 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA deGrom 8 5 0 0 1 7 113 1.68 Familia 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.03 Gsellman, W, 6-2 1 1 0 0 1 0 13 4.30 Inherited runners-scored: Morgan 2-0. Umpires: Home, Dan Bellino; First, Tom Hallion; Second, Jeremie Rehak; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T: 3:07. A: 22,137 .

Red Sox 4, Rangers 2 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .212 Guzman 1b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .257 Andrus ss 5 1 3 0 0 1 .259 Mazara rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .270 Beltre dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .288 Odor 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .242 Profar 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .248 Chirinos c 2 0 1 1 2 1 .206 Gallo lf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .186 Rua 1b-cf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .182 Totals 35 2 9 2 3 18 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .350 Benintendi lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .301 Martinez dh 4 1 1 2 0 2 .330 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .282 Bogaerts ss 4 1 3 1 0 0 .283 Holt 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .288 Nunez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .259 Leon c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252 Bradley Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Totals 33 4 11 3 2 6 Texas 000 000 020 — 2 9 2 Boston 010 030 00x — 4 11 0 E: Colon (3), Odor (4). LOB: Texas 9, Boston 7. 2B: Andrus 2 (8), Odor (12), Martinez (22). 3B: Bogaerts (2). RBIs: Mazara (57), Chirinos (37), Martinez 2 (79), Bogaerts (57). SB: Andrus (1). RLISP: Texas 4 (Beltre, Gallo 2, Rua); Boston 4 (Moreland, Bogaerts, Holt, Bradley Jr.). GIDP: Odor, Martinez, Holt. DP: Texas 2 (Andrus, Odor, Rua), (Odor, Andrus, Guzman); Boston 1 (Sale, Bogaerts, Moreland). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon, L, 5-7 6 9 4 3 2 3 96 4.64 Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 3 12 3.34 Chavez 1 2 0 0 0 0 10 3.62 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale, W, 10-4 7 6 0 0 1 12 110 2.23 2/ Hembree 1 2 25 3.96 3 3 2 2 Kimbrel, S, 28-30 11/3 0 0 0 1 4 23 1.91 Inherited runners-scored: Kimbrel 3-1. WP: Hembree. PB: Leon (4). Umpires: Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Bill Miller; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Alan Porter. T: 2:58. A: 36,920 .

Braves 9, Blue Jays 5

Yankees 9, Orioles 0 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 3 0 0 0 2 0 .254 Gardner lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .265 Frazier lf Judge dh 4 1 1 0 2 1 .281 Gregorius ss 6 2 1 0 0 0 .260 5 1 4 2 1 1 .276 Stanton rf Hicks cf 5 1 0 0 1 0 .254 4 1 1 4 1 1 .208 Bird 1b Andujar 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .279 Romine c 5 1 2 1 0 1 .281 Higashioka c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Wade 2b 5 1 3 1 0 1 .159 Totals 42 9 14 8 8 5 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Baltimore Beckham 3b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .209 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Jones cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Mancini lf Machado ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .314 0 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Peterson 3b Trumbo dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .158 Valencia rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .249 Rickard lf-cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .214 Joseph c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .198 Totals 32 0 5 0 1 12 New York 005 001 111 — 9 14 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 E: Hart (1). LOB: New York 14, Baltimore 6. 2B: Gregorius (18), Wade (3), Machado (21), Schoop (17). HR: Bird (7), off Bundy; Wade (1), off Wright Jr.; Romine (6), off Marinez. RBIs: Stanton 2 (54), Bird 4 (18), Romine (24), Wade (5). SB: Gardner (9). RLISP: New York 8 (Gregorius 2, Stanton, Hicks 2, Romine 3); Baltimore 6 (Machado 2, Trumbo 2, Rickard 2). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray, W, 6-7 6 3 0 0 1 8 90 5.46 Cole 2 2 0 0 0 2 25 4.97 Shreve 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 4.83 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy, L, 6-9 4 5 5 5 4 3 91 4.35 Wright Jr. 11/3 3 1 1 1 0 39 4.96 Marinez 2 4 2 1 1 1 43 4.50 12/3 2 1 1 2 1 37 4.00 Hart Inherited runners-scored: Marinez 1-0, Hart 2-1. PB: Romine (1). Umpires: Home, Jim Reynolds; First, John Tumpane; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Shane Livensparger. T: 3:22. A: 17,808 .

Rockies 19, Diamondbacks 2 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 2 1 1 1 0 0 .282 Goldschmidt 1b J.Murphy c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Lamb 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .235 Pollock cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .287 Mathis 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184 4 0 1 1 0 0 .289 Peralta lf Marte ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .243 Descalso 2b-p-1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .260 Avila c-1b-p 3 0 0 0 1 1 .144 a-Ray ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Owings 2b-cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .191 Totals 32 2 6 2 3 10 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Colorado LeMahieu 2b 5 4 3 0 1 0 .274 Blackmon cf 3 4 3 3 1 0 .284 Tapia cf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Arenado 3b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .312 2 0 0 0 0 0 .146 Valaika 3b-ss Gonzalez rf 5 4 2 6 0 0 .275 Almonte p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Story ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .289 b-T.Murphy ph-c 0 0 0 0 1 0 .313 4 1 0 0 1 2 .291 Parra lf Desmond 1b 5 1 3 5 0 0 .223 Wolters c-3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .157 Marquez p 4 2 2 2 0 0 .324 Cuevas rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 43 19 19 18 6 4 Totals Arizona 100 001 000 — 2 6 0 Colorado 543 610 00x — 19 19 0 a-struck out for Miller in the 2nd. b-walked for Story in the 6th. LOB: Arizona 6, Colorado 6. 2B: LeMahieu 2 (21), Story (26), Tapia (2). 3B: Wolters (3). HR: Goldschmidt (21), off Marquez; Desmond (18), off Miller; Blackmon (18), off De La Rosa; Gonzalez (9), off De La Rosa; Gonzalez (10), off Descalso; Marquez (1), off Descalso. RBIs: Goldschmidt (52), Peralta (53), Blackmon 3 (44), Arenado 2 (66), Gonzalez 6 (38), Desmond 5 (54), Marquez 2 (4). SB: Story (12). RLISP: Arizona 3 (Jay, Descalso, Avila); Colorado 3 (Parra 2, Wolters). GIDP: Mathis. DP: Colorado 1 (Valaika, LeMahieu, Desmond). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arizona 22/3 4 3 3 1 1 36 8.10 Descalso Avila 2 1 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 1 4 5 5 2 1 37 11.40 Miller, L, 0-4 De La Rosa 12/3 5 7 7 3 2 65 4.83 1/ McFarland 5 1.81 3 1 0 0 0 0 1/ Hirano 3 4 4 4 0 0 17 2.25 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marquez, W, 8-8 6 5 2 2 2 8 101 4.81 Almonte 2 1 0 0 0 0 16 0.00 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 7.36 Shaw Umpires: Home, Chad Whitson; First, Mike Winters; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Rob Drake. T: 3:05. A: 33,919 .

Marlins 5, Brewers 4 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames rf 4 3 1 0 2 2 .253 Cain cf 5 0 2 0 1 2 .299 Yelich lf 6 1 1 1 0 3 .290 Aguilar 1b 5 0 3 3 1 1 .307 Shaw 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .241 b-Miller ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 c-Broxton ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Lopez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Saladino ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .262 Perez 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Orf 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .071 Nottingham c 5 0 1 0 0 3 .214 Peralta p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Villar 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .262 Totals 42 4 8 4 7 17 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dietrich lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Riddle ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Anderson rf 4 1 2 0 2 1 .288 Castro 2b 5 0 1 2 0 0 .296 Bour 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .235 d-Rivera ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .198 Prado 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .222 Rojas ss-1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .257 Maybin cf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .232 Holaday c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .180 Straily p 1 0 0 1 1 1 .150 a-Cooper ph-lf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .250 Totals 40 5 8 5 6 10 Milwaukee 101 000 020 000 — 4 8 1 Miami 000 301 000 001 — 5 8 1 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for Straily in the 6th. b-struck out for Jennings in the 8th. c-struck out for Knebel in the 10th. d-flied out for Conley in the 10th. E: Shaw (9), Straily (1). LOB: Milwaukee 10, Miami 9. 2B: Thames (6), Aguilar 2 (16). 3B: Anderson (3). HR: Bour (15), off Peralta. RBIs: Yelich (41), Aguilar 3 (67), Castro 2 (36), Bour (43), Holaday (11), Straily (1). SB: Maybin (6). CS: Yelich (2), Saladino (2), Anderson (4). SF: Castro. RLISP: Milwaukee 6 (Yelich 2, Shaw, Saladino, Nottingham, Lopez); Miami 4 (Dietrich 4). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peralta 32/3 3 3 3 3 4 93 2.65 Barnes 2 2 1 0 1 3 36 3.50 Jennings 11/3 0 0 0 1 0 17 3.11 Williams 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.50 Knebel 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 3.38 Lopez, L, 0-1 21/3 2 1 1 1 2 26 3.24 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily 6 4 2 1 2 7 101 4.29 Ziegler, 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 4.40 Steckenrider, 1 2 2 2 1 2 23 3.46 1 0 0 0 3 3 32 1.31 Barraclough Conley 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.04 Hernandez, W, 1-5 2 1 0 0 1 3 33 6.28 Inherited runners-scored: Barnes 3-0, Jennings 2-0. HBP: Peralta (Holaday), Ziegler (Saladino). WP: Peralta. Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T: 4:23. A: 5,265 .

Wednesday Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 2 Minnesota 8, Kansas City 5 NY Yankees 9, Baltimore 0 Cleveland 19, Cincinnati 4 Boston 4, Texas 2 Atlanta 9, Toronto 5 White Sox 4, Cardinals 0 Oakland 8, Houston 3 Seattle 3, LA Angels 0 Tuesday Baltimore 6, NY Yankees 5 Boston 8, Texas 4 Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 4 Tampa Bay 5, Detroit 2 Toronto 6, Atlanta 2 Houston 6, Oakland 5, 11 inn. Cardinals 14, White Sox 2 Kansas City 9, Minnesota 4 LA Angels 9, Seattle 3

Thursday’s pitching matchups NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Ari Col

Ray (L) Freeland (L)

2:10

3-1 8-6

5.23 3.18

Mil Pit

Miley (L) Taillon (R)

6:05

1-0 5-7

1.42 4.05

Was Scherzer (R) NY Matz (L)

6:10

11-5 4-6

2.33 3.31

LA SD

Stripling (R) Ross (R)

9:10

7-2 5-7

2.22 4.41

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

1-2 11-2

2.77 2.83

14-2 6:10 12-4

2.12 2.49

Oak Cahill (R) Hou Morton (R) NY Cle

Severino (R) Kluber (R)

1:10

Tor Happ (L) Bos Price (L)

6:10

10-5 9-6

4.44 4.44

TB Snell (L) Min Gibson (R)

7:10

12-4 3-6

2.09 3.59

Sea Paxton (L) LA Skaggs (L)

9:07

8-3 6-5

3.41 2.64

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Phi Bal

Pivetta (R) Gausman (R)

5-7 4-6

4.62 4.11

5:05

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Mariners 3, Angels 0 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .284 Segura ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .329 Haniger rf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .274 3 0 1 2 0 0 .265 Cruz dh Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Gamel lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Heredia cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .230 Freitas c 2 1 2 1 1 0 .217 Totals 31 3 6 3 1 7 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fletcher 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .262 b-Ohtani ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Simmons ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .311 Trout cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .314 Upton lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Pujols dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Kinsler 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Marte 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .242 a-Valbuena ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Calhoun rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .178 Totals 29 0 2 0 0 6 Seattle 001 200 000 — 3 6 0 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 a-grounded out for Marte in the 8th. b-struck out for Fletcher in the 9th. LOB: Seattle 5, Los Angeles 3. 2B: Segura (25). HR: Freitas (1), off Barria. RBIs: Cruz 2 (55), Freitas (4). RLISP: Seattle 3 (Seager 3); Los Angeles 2 (Pujols, Calhoun). DP: Los Angeles 2 (Barria, Simmons, Marte), (Simmons, Kinsler, Marte). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzales, W, 10-5 7 2 0 0 0 4 82 3.41 Colome 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.23 Diaz, S, 36-39 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.25 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Barria, L, 5-6 5 5 3 3 0 5 78 3.55 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.02 Robles 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.30 McGuire 1 1 0 0 1 1 25 6.10 Drake 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 7.84 Barria pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Bedrosian 2-0. HBP: Barria 2 (Haniger,Segura), McGuire (Cruz), Colome (Kinsler). WP: Barria, Colome. Umpires: Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T: 2:40. A: 35,591 (45,050).

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Gennett, Cincinnati, .326; Markakis, Atlanta, .322; Almora, Chicago, .317; Freeman, Atlanta, .313; Suarez, Cincinnati, .312; Arenado, Colorado, .312; Kemp, Los Angeles, .312; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .309; Aguilar, Milwaukee, .307; Martinez, Cardinals, .301. RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 73; Blackmon, Colorado, 70; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 62; Arenado, Colorado, 61; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 61; Pham, Cardinals, 59; Gennett, Cincinnati, 58; Yelich, Milwaukee, 58; 3 tied at 57. RBI: Suarez, Cincinnati, 69; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 67; Arenado, Colorado, 66; Baez, Chicago, 66; Story, Colorado, 62; Freeman, Atlanta, 60; Markakis, Atlanta, 60; Gennett, Cincinnati, 59; Rizzo, Chicago, 59; Kemp, Los Angeles, 58. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 116; Albies, Atlanta, 113; Gennett, Cincinnati, 111; Castro, Miami, 110; Freeman, Atlanta, 110; Anderson, Miami, 105; Arenado, Colorado, 102; Story, Colorado, 101; Turner, Washington, 100; Blackmon, Colorado, 99. DOUBLES: Albies, Atlanta, 29; Markakis, Atlanta, 29; Carpenter, Cardinals, 27; Story, Colorado, 26; Rendon, Washington, 25; Freeman, Atlanta, 24; Baez, Chicago, 23; Hosmer, San Diego, 23; 3 tied at 22. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 8; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Baez, Chicago, 6; Nimmo, New York, 6; Contreras, Chicago, 5; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 5; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 5; Story, Colorado, 5; 9 tied at 4. HOME RUNS: Aguilar, Milwaukee, 23; Arenado, Colorado, 23; Harper, Washington, 22; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21; Muncy, Los Angeles, 21; Albies, Atlanta, 20; Suarez, Cincinnati, 19; Blackmon, Colorado, 18; Baez, Chicago, 18; Desmond, Colorado, 18. STOLEN BASES: Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 23; MTaylor, Washington, 23; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 22; Turner, Washington, 22; Baez, Chicago, 17; Cain, Milwaukee, 17; Peraza, Cincinnati, 17; Dyson, Arizona, 16; 2 tied at 14. PITCHING: Nola, Philadelphia, 12-2; Lester, Chicago, 11-2; Scherzer, Washington, 11-5; Godley, Arizona, 10-6; Mikolas, Cardinals, 10-3; Greinke, Arizona, 9-5; 8 tied at 8. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.68; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.27; Scherzer, Washington, 2.33; Lester, Chicago, 2.46; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.65; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.66; Guerra, Milwaukee, 2.79; Corbin, Arizona, 3.10; Freeland, Colorado, 3.18; Matz, New York, 3.31. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 177; deGrom, New York, 149; Corbin, Arizona, 146; Nola, Philadelphia, 126; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 120; Gray, Colorado, 119; Greinke, Arizona, 117; Velasquez, Philadelphia, 110; Marquez, Colorado, 106; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 106.


CARDINALS

07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

NOTEBOOK

WHITE SOX 4, CARDINALS 0 Cardinals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Carpenter 1b

2 0 1

0

2

0 .262

Pham cf

4 0 0

0

0

4 .243

Martinez dh

4 0 1

0

0

1 .301

Ozuna lf

4 0 0

0

0

1 .271

Molina c

4 0 1

0

0

1 .274 2 .256

Gyorko 3b

4 0 0

0

0

DeJong ss

3 0 1

0

1

1 .265

Fowler rf

4 0 0

0

0

0 .170

3 0 0

0

0

0 .218

Wong 2b Totals

32 0 4 0

3 10

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Chicago Moncada 2b

3 1 1

0

1

1 .231

Sanchez 3b

4 0 2

0

0

1 .260 0 .253

Abreu 1b

4 0 0

1

0

Palka lf

4 0 0

0

0

3 .217

Engel cf

0 0 0

0

0

0 .224

Davidson dh

3 0 0

0

0

2 .220

Garcia rf

2 1 0

0

1

2 .271

Narvaez c

3 1 2

0

0

0 .280

Anderson ss

3 1 1

2

0

0 .247

Tilson cf-lf

3 0 1

1

0

1 .275

29 4 7

4

2 10

Totals

Cardinals 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 Chicago

000 010

21x — 4 7 1

E: Molina (3), Moncada (14). LOB: Cardinals 8, Chicago 3. 2B: Carpenter (27), Anderson (12). 3B: Moncada (5). RBIs: Abreu (51), Anderson 2 (37), Tilson (11). RLISP: Cardinals 4 (Martinez 3, Fowler). DP: Cardinals 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver

6 3 1

1

2

Mayers

1 3 2

2

0

1 20 3.60

Hicks

1 1 1

1

0

2

17 2.70

7 1/3 3 0

0

2

7 104 3.56

1/ 3

0 0

0

0

1

1/ 3

1 0

0

1

2 28 2.83

Minaya Soria

7 92 4.72

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Chicago Rodon

1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B5

5 3.50

W: Rodon 2-3. L: Weaver 5-8. S: Soria 13-16. H: Minaya 2. Inherited runners-scored: Minaya 3-0, Soria 3-0. Umpires: Home, Paul Nauert; First, Scott Barry; Second, Carlos Torres; Third, Kerwin Danley. T: 2:46. A: 26,319 (40,615).

HOW THEY SCORED White Sox fifth Garcia walks. Narvaez singles, Garcia to third. Anderson grounds into a force out, Garcia scores, Narvaez out at second. One run. White Sox 1, Cardinals 0. White Sox seventh Narvaez singles. Anderson triples, Narvaez scores. Tilson singles, Anderson scores. Two runs. White Sox 3, Cardinals 0. White Sox eighth Moncada triples. Abreu grounds out, Moncada scores. One run. White Sox 4, Cardinals 0.

Mikolas definitely to start Sunday That will force him to be taken off All-Star roster BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

CHICAGO • The Cardinals officially announced 10-game winner Miles Mikolas as their pitcher Sunday against the Cincinnati Reds at Busch Stadium. The game will be the Cardinals’ final one before the All-Star break and that means that officially, Mikolas won’t be on the active roster for the National League All-Star team. Any pitcher who starts the Sunday before the Tuesday All-Star Game is taken off the roster and replaced. Mikolas still will enjoy all the trappings of his first All-Star experience but will yield his spot to Los Angeles’ Ross Stripling, who is 7-2 with a 2.22 earned run average. As one of the pitchers added by the commissioner’s office and not voted onto the team by the players, Mikolas stood a good chance of not pitching in the game anyway because managers usually employ the five starters voted on, probably for the first six innings, and then turn the game over to the bullpen. Mikolas (10-3) probably would have been the extra-inning pitcher. “He understands how important it is to give us our best shot on Sunday,” manager Mike Matheny said. “He’s got to pitch. And that’s what he wants to do.” To take on the Reds, one of the hottest teams in the league, the Cardinals will send out Carlos Martinez, Jack Flaherty and Mikolas in that order, and it wouldn’t be surprising if, in the first series after the break, against the Cubs, that the Cardinals would start much the same way.

CARPENTER DIDN’T WANT TO LOBBY

The fans’ “Final Vote” for the last berth on the American and National League teams was announced Wednesday night and the Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter, one of five players listed on the National League ballot, wasn’t expecting anything. Nor did he campaign for anything. Nor was he selected. The teams of other players on the ballots put together special videos or, in the case of Los Angeles Dodgers extra man Matt Muncy, had Lakers executive Magic Johnson, who also is part of the Dodgers’ ownership group, campaign. Carpenter indulged in none of it. “That’s not me. That’s not my style,” said

Carpenter. The Cardinals didn’t do anything crazy, either. “And I’m OK with that,” Carpenter said. The difference is that Carpenter has been selected three times to the National League All-Star team. Milwaukee’s Jesus Aguilar, who was the fans’ selection for the final NL spot, Washington’s Trea Turner, San Francisco’s Brandon Belt and Muncy never had been on an All-Star team. Seattle shortstop Jean Segura was the American League’s final player. “I don’t know what’s going to happen but I’m just thrilled to be on the ballot. I’m humbled,” said Carpenter before the game. He was hitting .140 on May 15 before exploding for the next two months. ESPN, in summarizing the candidates, did run a picture of Carpenter and his dog, “I don’t know where they dug that up from,” said Carpenter, laughing. Carpenter said that even if he hadn’t made an All-Star team, he wouldn’t have wanted to be a part of a big, club-oriented campaign. “I probably would have just laid low,” he said, “and let the chips fall where they will.”

FOWLER EARNS ANOTHER START

Dexter Fowler’s grand slam Tuesday earned him another start in right field Wednesday night for the Cardinals and Tommy Pham, a late scratch Tuesday when his left foot was barking, was in center field as the two-game interleague series with the Chicago White Sox concluded. “It still bothers me,” said Pham, who fouled a ball off the top of the foot in San Francisco. “I was hoping to get him in yesterday, but he wasn’t able to run like he needed to, so I gave him another day,” said Matheny. “Everything looks pretty good today.” Harrison Bader, who might have started in right field against Chicago lefthander Carlos Rodon, still was feeling the effects of being hit in the left hamstring by a pitched ball Sunday. He said he was ready, but Matheny said Bader was not ready to play a game in the outfield yet. “It’s pretty well bruised-up still,” said Matheny. Lefthander Tyler Lyons, who had been pitching at Class AAA Memphis on the medical rehabilitation program, will have his option transferred to Class AA Springfield as he continues to recover from a left elbow strain. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

White Sox left fielder Daniel Palka catches a fly ball hit by Matt Carpenter Wednesday.

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Munoz Molina Ozuna Bader DeJong Gyorko Carpenter Garcia Pham Wong Pena Fowler Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .302 308 35 93 18 0 13 55 32 51 0 7 .285 151 16 43 5 0 5 23 12 40 4 9 .274 215 26 59 7 0 13 39 13 31 2 2 .274 336 37 92 9 1 10 48 21 71 2 3 .271 181 31 49 6 1 6 14 15 57 9 1 .263 167 29 44 8 0 8 19 17 54 0 5 .262 195 21 51 11 1 7 29 19 49 1 8 .261 307 55 80 26 0 17 41 52 88 0 8 .260 104 12 27 5 0 2 10 13 22 0 4 .246 301 59 74 9 0 13 33 38 85 9 5 .221 217 25 48 8 2 7 21 18 41 3 3 .200 100 8 20 2 0 2 7 4 31 0 1 .173 226 31 39 8 0 6 25 29 58 3 4 .247 3056 404 754 125 5 115 385 292 785 33 74

Pitching W L ERA G Hicks 3 1 2.56 41 Mikolas 10 3 2.65 18 3 2 2.87 38 Norris C. Martinez 6 4 3.05 15 Mayers 2 0 3.10 25 Tuivailala 1 3 3.25 27 3 4 3.34 13 Flaherty Cecil 0 1 3.38 23 Gant 2 3 3.80 11 Brebbia 1 3 4.13 27 Weaver 5 7 4.92 18 Holland 0 2 7.89 28 Team 47 43 3.74 90 Prior to Wednesday’s game

GS 0 18 0 15 0 0 13 0 6 0 18 0 90

SV 1 0 17 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 21

IP 45.2 115.1 37.2 85.2 29.0 27.2 70.0 21.1 45.0 32.2 97.0 21.2 814.1

H 26 99 29 73 27 30 56 20 33 32 97 30 733

R 15 37 14 34 11 11 30 10 25 15 55 23 377

ER 13 34 12 29 10 10 26 8 19 15 53 19 338

HR BB SO 1 23 39 8 18 81 4 6 49 3 45 83 3 6 26 2 9 23 10 21 82 1 15 12 3 20 39 3 8 36 13 34 89 1 19 20 80 308 745

FOUR OR FEWER Cards games in which they mustered four or fewer hits, by year: Games W-L Year 2-9 2018 11 2017 14 4-10 2-12 2016 14 2015 17 4-13 7-11 2014 18 2013 19 1-18 2012 9 2-7 8 0-8 2011 1-11 2010 12 2009 3-7 10 2008 7 2-5 0-9 2007 9 4-11 2006 15 2005 2-5 7 2004 8 3-5 2003 6 1-5 16 3-13 2002 1-16 2001 17 2000 11 2-9 Source: baseball-reference.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Cardinals right fielder Dexter Fowler breaks his bat as he hits a foul ball during the ninth inning Wednesday night against the White Sox.

Weaver gets no support as White Sox shut out the Cardinals CARDINALS • FROM B1

Rodon was lifted after his four-pitch walk to Carpenter ran him to 104 pitches and promptly punched a blower in the dugout — with his right hand. But his disgust soon turned to elation when hardthrowing Juan Minaya fanned Tommy Pham, who had four strikeouts for the night. Then veteran righthander Joakim Soria struck out Jose Martinez on a slider to quell the threat. Both clubs had some pratfalls in the White Sox’s first inning which, somehow, was scoreless. First, Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina, trying to snag a foul ball that third baseman Jedd Gyorko also could have nabbed, had the ball blow back over his head, and it dropped between the two defenders. Molina was charged with an error and Moncada turned that life into a walk. Yolmer Sanchez then a hit high hopper that first baseman Carpenter flagged down between first and second and tossed to Weaver covering first. The throw was a tad too early and Weaver, off-balance and bent like a pretzel, ended up stabbing twice at the bag. A safe call by Scott Barry was upheld through a replay review. Jose Abreu then lined to left fielder Marcell Ozuna. Moncada, perhaps seeing something that most in the Guaranteed Rate Field crowd didn’t, lit out for third and easily was doubled off second as Ozuna threw there. Weaver then got Dan-

iel Palka on a groundout. Rodon held the Cardinals to just one hit and struck out five in the first four innings as he gained his second victory in his seventh start of the season. He had allowed seven runs in four innings against the Cardinals three years ago. But Weaver was nearly as good as Rodon, using his 94 mph fastball with regularity. He also struck out five through four scoreless innings, permitting only one hit to the outfield. A leadoff walk to Leury Garcia, however, bit Weaver in the fifth. Omar Narvaez singled Garcia to third and a Tim Anderson grounder to shortstop DeJong, who made a good play to get a force at second, pushed in Garcia with the game’s first run. Carpenter doubled to right center with one out in the Cardinals’ sixth for the first extra-base hit of the game. But Pham struck out for the third time and Martinez tapped to Rodon. Mike Mayers, who had seven scoreless outings in his past eight, was touched for two runs in the seventh on a two-out single by Narvaez, a double by Anderson that chased the catcher home and a bloop single by Charlie Tilson. Jordan Hicks allowed a leadoff triple to Moncada, in the eighth and Moncada slid home onto the discarded bat of Abreu, who had tapped to Hicks. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Chicago second baseman Yoan Moncada forces out Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong during the eighth inning.


CARDINALS

07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 2

NOTEBOOK

WHITE SOX 4, CARDINALS 0 Cardinals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Carpenter 1b

2 0 1

0

2

0 .262

Pham cf

4 0 0

0

0

4 .243

Martinez dh

4 0 1

0

0

1 .301

Ozuna lf

4 0 0

0

0

1 .271

Molina c

4 0 1

0

0

1 .274 2 .256

Gyorko 3b

4 0 0

0

0

DeJong ss

3 0 1

0

1

1 .265

Fowler rf

4 0 0

0

0

0 .170

3 0 0

0

0

0 .218

Wong 2b Totals

32 0 4 0

3 10

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Chicago Moncada 2b

3 1 1

0

1

1 .231

Sanchez 3b

4 0 2

0

0

1 .260 0 .253

Abreu 1b

4 0 0

1

0

Palka lf

4 0 0

0

0

3 .217

Engel cf

0 0 0

0

0

0 .224

Davidson dh

3 0 0

0

0

2 .220

Garcia rf

2 1 0

0

1

2 .271

Narvaez c

3 1 2

0

0

0 .280

Anderson ss

3 1 1

2

0

0 .247

Tilson cf-lf

3 0 1

1

0

1 .275

29 4 7

4

2 10

Totals

Cardinals 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 Chicago

000 010

21x — 4 7 1

E: Molina (3), Moncada (14). LOB: Cardinals 8, Chicago 3. 2B: Carpenter (27), Anderson (12). 3B: Moncada (5). RBIs: Abreu (51), Anderson 2 (37), Tilson (11). RLISP: Cardinals 4 (Martinez 3, Fowler). DP: Cardinals 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver

6 3 1

1

2

Mayers

1 3 2

2

0

1 20 3.60

Hicks

1 1 1

1

0

2

17 2.70

7 1/3 3 0

0

2

7 104 3.56

1/ 3

0 0

0

0

1

1/ 3

1 0

0

1

2 28 2.83

Minaya Soria

7 92 4.72

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Chicago Rodon

1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B5

5 3.50

W: Rodon 2-3. L: Weaver 5-8. S: Soria 13-16. H: Minaya 2. Inherited runners-scored: Minaya 3-0, Soria 3-0. Umpires: Home, Paul Nauert; First, Scott Barry; Second, Carlos Torres; Third, Kerwin Danley. T: 2:46. A: 26,319 (40,615).

HOW THEY SCORED White Sox fifth Garcia walks. Narvaez singles, Garcia to third. Anderson grounds into a force out, Garcia scores, Narvaez out at second.

Mikolas definitely to start Sunday That will force him to be taken off All-Star roster BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

CHICAGO • The Cardinals officially announced 10-game winner Miles Mikolas as their pitcher Sunday against the Cincinnati Reds at Busch Stadium. The game will be the Cardinals’ final one before the All-Star break and that means that officially, Mikolas won’t be on the active roster for the National League All-Star team. Any pitcher who starts the Sunday before the Tuesday All-Star Game is taken off the roster and replaced. Mikolas still will enjoy all the trappings of his first All-Star experience but will yield his spot to Los Angeles’ Ross Stripling, who is 7-2 with a 2.22 earned run average. As one of the pitchers added by the commissioner’s office and not voted onto the team by the players, Mikolas stood a good chance of not pitching in the game anyway because managers usually employ the five starters voted on, probably for the first six innings, and then turn the game over to the bullpen. Mikolas (10-3) probably would have been the extra-inning pitcher. “He understands how important it is to give us our best shot on Sunday,” manager Mike Matheny said. “He’s got to pitch. And that’s what he wants to do.” To take on the Reds, one of the hottest teams in the league, the Cardinals will send out Carlos Martinez, Jack Flaherty and Mikolas in that order, and it wouldn’t be surprising if, in the first series after the break, against the Cubs, that the Cardinals would start much the same way.

CARPENTER DIDN’T WANT TO LOBBY

The fans’ “Final Vote” for the last berth on the American and National League teams was announced Wednesday night and the Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter, one of five players listed on the National League ballot, wasn’t expecting anything. Nor did he campaign for anything. Nor was he selected. The teams of other players on the ballots put together special videos or, in the case of Los Angeles Dodgers extra man Matt Muncy, had Lakers executive Magic Johnson, who also is part of the Dodgers’ ownership group, campaign. Carpenter indulged in none of it. “That’s not me. That’s not my style,” said

Carpenter. The Cardinals didn’t do anything crazy, either. “And I’m OK with that,” Carpenter said. The difference is that Carpenter has been selected three times to the National League All-Star team. Milwaukee’s Jesus Aguilar, who was the fans’ selection for the final NL spot, Washington’s Trea Turner, San Francisco’s Brandon Belt and Muncy never had been on an All-Star team. Seattle shortstop Jean Segura was the American League’s final player. “I don’t know what’s going to happen but I’m just thrilled to be on the ballot. I’m humbled,” said Carpenter before the game. He was hitting .140 on May 15 before exploding for the next two months. ESPN, in summarizing the candidates, did run a picture of Carpenter and his dog, “I don’t know where they dug that up from,” said Carpenter, laughing. Carpenter said that even if he hadn’t made an All-Star team, he wouldn’t have wanted to be a part of a big, club-oriented campaign. “I probably would have just laid low,” he said, “and let the chips fall where they will.”

FOWLER EARNS ANOTHER START

Dexter Fowler’s grand slam Tuesday earned him another start in right field Wednesday night for the Cardinals and Tommy Pham, a late scratch Tuesday when his left foot was barking, was in center field as the two-game interleague series with the Chicago White Sox concluded. “It still bothers me,” said Pham, who fouled a ball off the top of the foot in San Francisco. “I was hoping to get him in yesterday, but he wasn’t able to run like he needed to, so I gave him another day,” said Matheny. “Everything looks pretty good today.” Harrison Bader, who might have started in right field against Chicago lefthander Carlos Rodon, still was feeling the effects of being hit in the left hamstring by a pitched ball Sunday. He said he was ready, but Matheny said Bader was not ready to play a game in the outfield yet. “It’s pretty well bruised-up still,” said Matheny. Lefthander Tyler Lyons, who had been pitching at Class AAA Memphis on the medical rehabilitation program, will have his option transferred to Class AA Springfield as he continues to recover from a left elbow strain. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

White Sox left fielder Daniel Palka catches a fly ball hit by Matt Carpenter Wednesday.

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Munoz Molina Bader Ozuna DeJong Carpenter Garcia Gyorko Pham Wong Pena Fowler Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .301 312 35 94 18 0 13 55 32 52 0 7 .285 151 16 43 5 0 5 23 12 40 4 9 .274 219 26 60 7 0 13 39 13 32 2 3 .271 181 31 49 6 1 6 14 15 57 9 1 .271 340 37 92 9 1 10 48 21 72 2 3 .265 170 29 45 8 0 8 19 18 55 0 5 .262 309 55 81 27 0 17 41 54 88 0 8 .260 104 12 27 5 0 2 10 13 22 0 4 .256 199 21 51 11 1 7 29 19 51 1 8 .243 305 59 74 9 0 13 33 38 89 9 5 .218 220 25 48 8 2 7 21 18 41 3 3 .200 100 8 20 2 0 2 7 4 31 0 1 .170 230 31 39 8 0 6 25 29 58 3 4 .245 3088 404 758 126 5 115 385 295 795 33 75

Pitching W L 10 3 Mikolas Hicks 3 1 3 2 Norris C. Martinez 6 4 1 3 Tuivailala 3 4 Flaherty 0 1 Cecil Mayers 2 0 Gant 2 3 Brebbia 1 3 Weaver 5 8 0 2 Holland Team 47 44

ERA 2.65 2.70 2.87 3.05 3.25 3.34 3.38 3.60 3.80 4.13 4.72 7.89 3.74

G 18 42 38 15 27 13 23 26 11 27 19 28 91

IP H R ER HR BB SO GS SV 18 0 115.1 99 37 34 8 18 81 0 1 46.2 27 16 14 1 23 41 0 17 37.2 29 14 12 4 6 49 15 0 85.2 73 34 29 3 45 83 0 0 27.2 30 11 10 2 9 23 13 0 70.0 56 30 26 10 21 82 8 1 15 12 0 0 21.1 20 10 0 1 30.0 30 13 12 3 6 27 6 0 45.0 33 25 19 3 20 39 0 2 32.2 32 15 15 3 8 36 19 0 103.0 100 56 54 13 36 96 0 0 21.2 30 23 19 1 19 20 91 21 822.1 740 381 342 80 310 755

One run. White Sox 1, Cardinals 0. White Sox seventh Narvaez singles. Anderson triples, Narvaez scores. Tilson singles, Anderson scores. Two runs. White Sox 3, Cardinals 0. White Sox eighth Moncada triples. Abreu grounds out, Moncada scores. One run. White Sox 4, Cardinals 0. FOUR OR FEWER Cards games in which they mustered four or fewer hits, by year: Year

Games

W-L

2018

11

2-9

2017

14

4-10

2016

14

2-12

2015

17

4-13

2014

18

7-11

2013

19

1-18

2012

9

2-7

2011

8

0-8 1-11

2010

12

2009

10

3-7

2008

7

2-5

2007

9

0-9

2006

15

4-11

2005

7

2-5

2004

8

3-5

2003

6

1-5

2002

16

3-13

2001

17

1-16

2000

11

2-9

Source: baseball-reference.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals right fielder Dexter Fowler breaks his bat as he hits a foul ball during the ninth inning Wednesday night against the White Sox.

Weaver gets no support as White Sox shut out the Cardinals CARDINALS • FROM B1

doing. I just don’t know how to fix it. If I knew how to fix it, I would have already fixed it. “I need to figure out how to get my body back in the right position.” In fact, Pham, nothing for his last 14, is down to .243, his lowest average since he was hitting .143 seven at-bats into the season. “My swing is terrible,” said Pham, who has been wrestling with his body and swing placement for weeks. He was hitting .303 on May 21, when he stole his eighth base of the season. He has nine now because he isn’t getting on base, and he was on the phone to “Sosa” shortly after Wednesday’s game. Pham was called out on strikes again Wednesday, a regular occurrence lately. “If I was hitting, those calls won’t happen,” he said, “because last year I was hitting and I didn’t get those (negative) calls. “Early in the year, when I was hitting, we were a great team,” he said. “The numbers backed it

up.” On May 21, the Cardinals were 1½ games out of first place. Now, they are seven behind Milwaukee. “When I get on base, I’ll help out Jose,” said Pham. “He’s a great fastball hitter and pitchers will throw him more of those when I’m on base. I have to do my part to help out everyone else.” Rodon and the Cardinals’ Luke Weaver, no doubt, had had this battle before. Rodon was a No. 1 pick out of North Carolina State in 2014 and Weaver the same for Florida State, which is an Atlantic Coast Conference rival of the Wolfpack. . Making just his seventh start since having shoulder surgery in September, Rodon held the Cardinals to three hits over 7 1/3 innings, striking out seven. Weaver, who had given up just two hits in eight innings in his previous start, permitted only three in six innings this time, also striking out seven. But one of the hits set up a run in the fifth inning. “They didn’t give up a whole lot,” Matheny said. “It was going to be one of those, ‘Who flinches

first?’’’ “(Rodon) pitched a heck of a game,” said Weaver. “You’ve just got to tip your hat.” Weaver recalled “quite a few” Friday matchups in college between the two. “In my mind, it always was the most ‘fun’ matchup,” said Weaver. “I knew I always had to bring my best stuff, just like tonight. “You wanted it to be a pitchers’ duel because you knew he wasn’t going to give up many runs and I tried to do the same. “It was a lot of fun tonight. I remember winning the last (matchup) He might have got the one before. He would strike out a whole lot of hitters. I would just try to get mine here and there. “He was a big-time draft pick (No. 3), so I just tried to keep up with him.” Weaver was chosen 27th in the first round in 2014. “If I could tell him, I’d tell him, ‘Nice job.’’’ said Weaver. Rodon had faced the Cardinals once before, allowing seven runs in four innings three years ago. Kolten Wong played in that game and said that on Wednesday,

Rodon “had a lot more command of his fastball. He was able to throw it at different speeds and ... that slider was ‘on’ tonight.” The Cardinals wrapped up a 5-4 trip to three stops — Arizona, San Francisco and Chicago — and dropped back to plus-three at 47-44. Their nadir in the trip finale came in the eighth inning, when they loaded the bases with one out on Paul DeJong’s bloop single, an error by White Sox second baseman Yoan Moncada and a walk to Matt Carpenter. Rodon was lifted after his fourpitch walk to Carpenter ran him to 104 pitches and promptly punched a blower in the dugout — with his right hand. But his disgust soon turned to elation when hard-throwing Juan Minaya fanned Pham. Then veteran righthander Joakim Soria struck out Martinez on a slider to quell the threat. A leadoff walk to Leury Garcia bit Weaver in the fifth. Omar Narvaez singled Garcia to third and a Tim Anderson grounder to shortstop DeJong, who made a good play to get a force at second, pushed in Garcia with the game’s

first run. “Leadoff walks always end up haunting you a little bit,” Weaver said. “Lesson learned. Try to get ahead of the first hitter.” Carpenter doubled with one out in the Cardinals’ sixth for the first extra-base hit of the game. But Pham struck out for the third time and Martinez tapped to Rodon. Mike Mayers, who had seven scoreless outings in his past eight, was touched for two runs in the seventh on a two-out single by Narvaez, a double to left by Anderson that chased the catcher home and a bloop single by former Cardinals minor leaguer Charlie Tilson. Jordan Hicks allowed a leadoff triple to Moncada in the eighth, and Moncada slid home onto the discarded bat of Jose Abreu, who had tapped to Hicks. And the Cardinals headed home, having won the first game of this trip but not the last one. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SPORTS

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

MLB NOTEBOOK

Aguilar, Segura win All-Star roster spots Miller has been throwing off a bullpen mound, but the Indians moved his workout onto the ballpark’s main mound so the team could better use monitoring equipment to track his mechanics, velocity and location.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Milwaukee Brewers first baseman Jesus Aguilar and Seattle Mariners shortstop Jean Segura have won the final two roster spots for next week’s All-Star Game in Washington. Major League Baseball released the results of online balloting for the last slot in each league Wednesday night, with Aguilar drawing 20.2 million votes to secure his first All-Star selection. San Francisco Giants first baseman Brandon Belt finished second, followed by Max Muncy of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Trea Turner of the Washington Nationals and Matt Carpenter of the Cardinals. The 28-year-old Aguilar was tied for the National League lead with 23 home runs. Segura snagged the last American League spot with 13.6 million votes. He was followed by Boston Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi, New York Yankees slugger Giancarlo Stanton, Minnesota Twins outfielder Eddie Rosario and Los Angeles Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons. The 28-year-old Seattle shortstop was batting .329 and ranked second in the majors with 116 hits. Segura, who made the NL All-Star squad in 2013 with Milwaukee, is the first Seattle player to win the fan voting for the final spot. Home Run Derby contestants named • Washington Nationals slugger Bryce Harper will take on Atlanta Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman in an all-NL East matchup in the first round of the Home Run Derby on Mon-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Brewers’ Jesus Aguilar celebrates after getting a hit during the fourth inning of a game against the Marlins on Wednesday night.

day night. The 25-year-old Harper is the second seed at his home ballpark by virtue of his 22 homers through Tuesday’s games. Freeman, the top NL vote-getter for Tuesday night’s All-Star Game at Nationals Park, is the seventh seed with 16 homers. Milwaukee Brewers first baseman Jesus Aguilar is the top seed and faces Philadelphia Phillies slugger Rhys Hoskins. Los Angeles Dodgers rookie Max Muncy meets Chicago Cubs infielder Javier Baez, and Houston Astros third baseman Alex Bregman faces Cubs outfielder Kyle Schwarber. It’s the second Home Run Derby for Harper, and the first for the rest of the field. Harper lost

to Yoenis Cespedes in the 2013 final at Citi Field in New York. Indians’ Miller throws off mound • Cleveland Indians reliever Andrew Miller threw off the mound Wednesday at Progressive Field, a major stride in his recovery from knee inflammation. “Really well,” manager Terry Francona said describing Miller’s workout. “I think every time he throws, he takes a step in the right direction.” Miller has been on the disabled list since May 26, and the left-hander’s absence has had a detrimental effect on Cleveland’s bullpen, which entered Wednesday’s series finale against Cincinnati with the AL’s highest ERA. The Indians won, 19-4.

Patrick Maroon, who grew up watching the Blues play and attended Oakville High School, will now be playing for his childhood team.

HOCHMAN • FROM B1

Blues worked hard to get Maroon hometown team certainly was appealing. He grew up watching Hull & Oates from the cheap seats at the old Arena — Brett Hull and Adam Oates. Maroon’s father had two seats; Maroon and his brother would take turns at games — one would sit in the second seat while the other sat on Dad’s lap. Those are all good, even compelling, reasons Maroon signed a one-year, $1.75 million freeagent deal Tuesday with the Blues. But the team’s greatest recruiting tool was none other than Maroon’s 9-year-old son, Anthony. “Yeah, that was a huge factor,” Maroon said Wednesday during his introductory news conference at Enterprise Center. Since Anthony was born, Maroon has played for the Philadephia/Adirondack Phantoms, the Syracuse Crunch and the Norfolk Admirals, all of the American Hockey League. In the National Hockey League, he’s earned paychecks from Anaheim, Edmonton and New Jersey in that time. Maroon is now engaged, but during all those career stops Anthony stayed in St. Louis with his mother, who had a previous relationship with Maroon. “That takes a toll on you sometimes as a dad,” Maroon said. “It’s hard being away from your son like that.” Sure, there were the three months in the summer when Maroon spent the offseason in St. Louis, training with C.J. Jung — a former teammate on the Oakville High club hockey team — and skating with the Blues in August at the IceZone in Hazelwood. But that was it. It was tough to be away from his son. There’s a touching video of Maroon choking up during a postgame interview after a 3-2 Edmonton victory over the Blues in St. Louis on Dec. 19, 2016. Maroon teared up watching a replay of his goal in that game, a replay that also showed his son, wearing Oilers garb, celebrating the goal in the stands. The video has

Astros send down Giles • The Houston Astros have optioned reliever Ken Giles to Triple-A Fresno after he appeared to curse at manager A.J. Hinch when he lifted him from the game. The Astros were up by four to start the ninth against Oakland Tuesday night when Giles took over and gave up three straight singles which cut the lead to 4-1. Hinch came to the mound to take out Giles and the TV broadcast caught him appearing to curse at Hinch on his way off the field. It was the second major outburst of the year for the righthander, who punched himself in the face as he left the mound after another bad performance earlier in the season. Houston went on to win, 6-5,

Twins’ Reed goes on DL • The Minnesota Twins have placed righthanded reliever Addison Reed on the 10-day disabled list with tightness in his triceps. In 41 games in his first season with the Twins, Reed is 1-5 with a 4.83 ERA. He has allowed eight home runs in 41 innings. Five of those have come in his past 16 appearances, over which he has a 9.42 ERA with 24 hits allowed in 14 1/3 innings. Reed signed a twoyear, $16.75 million contract with the Twins before the season. Righthanded reliever Alan Busenitz was recalled from Triple-A Rochester for the third time this year. Mets call up two players • The New York Mets have promoted outfielder Matt den Dekker and righthander Jacob Rhame from Triple-A Las Vegas. Den Dekker hit .286 with 11 homers and 34 RBIs in 63 games with Las Vegas. He was in New York’s starting lineup for Wednesday night’s game against Philadelphia, batting sixth and playing center field in his first major league appearance since July 2, 2017, with Detroit. Rhame is beginning his sixth stint with the Mets. The 25-year old reliever is 0-1 with a 6.59 ERA and one save. He served as the 26th man for Monday’s doubleheader against Philadelphia. The Mets also optioned righthander Drew Gagnon and outfielder Kevin Kaczmarski to Las Vegas. Gagnon was charged with six runs in 4 2/3 innings Tuesday in his major league debut. Kaczmarski was 0 for 4 with a walk since being called up on June 22.

Maroon will bring Blues ‘a big, physical presence’

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • Post-Dispatch

BLUES • FROM B1

Orioles place Cashner on DL • Baltimore placed righthander Andrew Cashner on the 10-day disabled list on Wednesday with a neck strain. Baltimore manager Buck Showalter said, “It’s something he gets once a year.” Cashner received an injection on Wednesday to treat the injury. It has been a rough season for the 31-year old Cashner, who signed a two-year contract as a free agent in February. Baltimore recalled righthander Yefry Ramirez from Triple-A Norfolk. The rookie could start in Cashner’s place on Sunday against Texas.

in 11 innings.

nearly 450,000 views on YouTube. Well, after deciding to sign with the Blues, Maroon called his son to tell him it was official — he was coming home to play hockey. “We both started tearing up a little bit because it’s a special thing,” Maroon said. “I’ve been away from him for nine years and like you saw two years ago where I kind of broke down, and I haven’t seen him for five months.” For a year, at least, that changes. Anthony will get to see his dad play all kinds of games at Enterprise, hang out in warmups before those home games, maybe show up for the occasional morning skate. “It’s gonna be very special,” Maroon said. “We’re gonna remember this time.” And Maroon will get to watch Anthony play basketball and soccer — and yes, hockey — during those times when the Blues aren’t playing. “Those are the things I missed out on in his earlier ages,” Maroon said. “So I get to do those things and it’s gonna be fun. I’m going to enjoy it. Now I get to sit down and watch my kid play hockey. It’s not watching through FaceTime or watching through videos. “Now I get to go to his games and enjoy my time, and sit back and watch my son grow.” There may not have been tears shed among the Oakville club hockey team when word spread of Maroon’s signing. But it was certainly a topic of conversation among the coaches when the program held its first on-ice session of the summer Tuesday night. “A lot of those guys are contemporaries of Pat or have known him throughout the years,” said Mick O’Halloran. “They’re real happy for him and stay in touch with him at different times.” O’Hallaron, entering his 18th season on the Oakville hockey coaching staff, makes it a point to watch the program’s alums when possible after they leave the high school. Just to encourage them and let them know their hometown is still thinking of them and

still proud of them. So he has watched Maroon play for the London Knights of the Ontario Hockey League, the Philadelphia Phantoms of the AHL, and in his backyard for the old St. Louis Bandits junior team of the North American Hockey League. “It is good just to be able to let our current players know, hey, there’s no reason why you can’t continue to work hard,” O’Halloran said. “Pat’s situation was very unique. He’s got incredible God-given talent, and he has had good people that have surrounded him and have encouraged him and brought him to this level.” A Blues fan to begin with, O’Halloran added, “There’s nothing better than to see a hometown product wearing the sweater.” Maroon said Wednesday that he has been overwhelmed with texts and phone calls from hometown friends and former teammates since he became a Blue. “I haven’t had a chance to even respond to texts,” Maroon said. With a slight pause, he looked into the cameras at his news conference and added, “Sorry if I haven’t got back to you.” But he did mention O’Halloran by name, calling him “a real special guy.” Maroon also said he’ll take a bit of his St. Louis hockey heritage onto the ice every time he skates for the Blues. He’ll be wearing jersey No. 7, the number he wore with pride for the Bandits. “I thought I’d bring it out of the closet again and bring some history back,” Maroon said. “We won with that number, so hopefully it brings some good luck to St. Louis back again.” No doubt Anthony will approve.

BOKK SIGNS

The Blues signed first-round draft pick Dominik Bokk to a three-year, entry-level contract. Bokk, 18, remains under contract to play in Sweden next season. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

awesome.” Phil was four years older than his brother, Patrick. As a kid, Phil’s friends would fill up the basement, sometimes up to 15 people, but Patrick would also play. “He always battled, he took his beatings,” Phil said. “My dad would always say, ‘I’m telling you, Pat’s going to be bigger than all of you, and he’s going to beat your (butt) someday!’ … Honestly, I tell myself this — Pat always does well down low and on the boards, and I think he got so good at that from just playing down there in that small area, protecting the puck, trying to get around bigger guys. … Pat learned how to position himself in those games.” And now, you might have heard, Pat is on the actual St. Louis Blues. But for all the excitement about Maroon being from the St. Louis area, what truly matters is that this guy can help the Blues bruise. Doug Armstrong essentially signed his surname. The general manager bolstered the club with an affordable free-agent signing, a winger who has protected and complemented All-Stars wherever he went. He can both control the puck and muck. Maroon clearly isn’t the most glamorous of the Blues’ acquisitions, but he might provide the most bang for the buck. “I think I bring a big, physical presence that they’ve been missing the last couple years,” the Blues’ new No. 7 said. “I think I bring that net-front presence that I feel they’ve been lacking. I can be really good on the power play, I can be really good in front of the net, soft hands in front of the net. I can bring that physical presence down low, protecting pucks and sticking up for my teammates. “Ryan Reaves did a good job of that back in the day, and I feel like Chris Thorburn is doing a good job of that now, but I feel like I can bring another element. I play with a little bit of skill, too, so I feel like those centermen can complement me. It’s just going to be fun here.” In fact, Maroon called the Blues’ depth at center the best in the NHL. It’s July, of course. But that someone could even suggest that, following last season? The Maple Leafs might’ve won the offseason, but the Blues got the silver. On Wednesday, Maroon was formally introduced. A writer hollered this potential line at him: Pat Maroon-Ryan O’Reilly-Vladimir Tarasenko. Maroon smiled as wide as a

goalmouth. In his best season, two years ago with Edmonton, Maroon patrolled a line with the wunderkind Connor McDavid. That year, Maroon scored a career-high 27 goals, unleashed 189 hits and finished tied for 33rd in the league with 16 deflected offensive shots. No, he’s not Joe Pavelski, but the 6-foot-3, 225-pound Maroon is an occasional weapon and always a tank. Well, if we’re doing this — a Big Rig. That’s his nickname. Not a bad moniker, especially considering that even the more-creative hockey nicknames are basically just a guy’s last name with an “ie.” “When I was playing in Anaheim, one day guys were saying: ‘You look like a big rig,’” Big Rig said. “It just kind of stuck and stayed with me ever since I (set) foot in the NHL. And now it’s used. A lot.” Last November, before Maroon was traded to New Jersey to help that playoff-bound team, Maroon returned to St. Louis for an early-season game with Edmonton. “And we lost, 9-2,” he said Wednesday. To be fair, it was actually 8-3. No. 91 scored twice and also tallied two assists. Tarasenko and the Blues were 16-5-1. “We were looking around thinking, ‘This team has a chance to win the Stanley Cup,’” Maroon recalled. “They were firing on all cylinders.” The fingers have been pointed in regard to last season. Now it’s about pointing to problems the Blues have solved. “Unfortunately they didn’t make the playoffs, but I feel like they found these missing pieces that they need,” Maroon said. “I think good things are going to happen for that team this year. … (Tarasenko) is an elite player, and people have to key in on him a lot. … The little things he does are very special. Watching him first hand, playing against him — you hate to play against a guy like that who is strong on the puck, good hands, good release. You can’t really teach that. He has the whole package. I’m happy I’m on his team now.” As for the basement shinny hockey, Phil Maroon revealed that the games are still on — now just played in his uncle’s basement on Christmas. They’re a tad tamer. Walls are intact. Pat’s young son plays with the fellows, as well. “We play for, like, hours on Christmas,” Phil said. “It’s just one of those things — a childhood memory that’s never really left us.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

07.12.2018 • THURSDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

Kane had chances in semifinal England’s captain Golden Boot leader ASSOCIATED PRESS

Croatia’s Josip Pivaric celebrates after his team advanced to the World Cup final with a 2-1 victory over England in Moscow.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

England gets early goal but falls short of final CUP • FROM B1

of 13 nations that has advanced to a World Cup final in a tournament where powers Brazil, Germany, Argentina and Spain made early exits. “They’ve had an incredible route to the final. They’ve shown remarkable character,” said England coach Gareth Southgate, who for now will be remembered more for a fashionable waistcoat than ending a half-century of hurt. France, which won its only title at home in 1998, will have an extra day of rest after beating Belgium 1-0 on Tuesday. Croatia, coming off 360 intense minutes of soccer’s highest level, faces its biggest sporting moment since becoming an independent nation in 1991. Fans back home in Zagreb took to the streets to celebrate, lighting flares and waving flags in a sea of exuberance. “We are a nation of people who never give in, who are proud and who have character,” said coach Zlatko Dalic, who wore a checkered jersey to his post-match news conference. “There’s no weakness in a team that is in the final.” England was not among the top 10 in ticket sales before the tournament, but the team’s progress caused gallivanting supporters to flock to Moscow. The front of the stands behind one goal was filled with more than two dozen white banners with a red Cross of St. George, pledging support from many of the island’s clubs, from Bradford City to Wolverhampton. Back

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League ASTROS .................. -$205............................A’s RED SOX..................-$170 .................Blue Jays INDIANS ..................-$105 ...................Yankees Rays.........................-$115...................... TWINS ANGELS ...................-$120 ................. Mariners National League ROCKIES..................-$110 ................... D’backs PIRATES...................-$125 ...................Brewers Nationals.................-$210 ....................... METS Dodgers...................-$185 ...................PADRES Phillies ....................-$115...................ORIOLES TENNIS • Wimbledon A. Kerber -$160 .......... vs. J. Ostapenko +$140 S. Williams -$340 ........... vs. J. Goerges +$280 Friday J. Isner -$110..................vs. K. Anderson -$110 N. Djokovic -$120............... vs. R. Nadal +$100 SOCCER • World Cup Final, Sunday France ...................................................... -$110 Croatia ....................................................+$350 Draw: +$215 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League BALTIMORE — Placed RHP Andrew Cashner on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Yefry Ramirez from Norfolk (IL). Sent RHP Chris Tillman to Frederick (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. Signed RHP J.J. Montgomery to a minor league contract. Extended their working agreements with Norfolk, Bowie (EL), Frederick, Delmarva (SAL) and Aberdeen (NYP) through the 2020 season. BOSTON — Optioned LHP Jalen Beeks to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled LHP Robby Scott from Pawtucket. CHICAGO — Designated RHP Bruce Rondon for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP Jeanmar Gomez from Charlotte (IL). CLEVELAND — Designated RHP Rzepczynski for assignment. Reinstated LHP Tyler Olson from the 10-day DL. HOUSTON — Optioned RHP Ken Giles to Fresno (PCL). Recalled LHP Cionel Perez from Corpus Christi (TL). KANSAS CITY — Optioned RHP Jason Adam to Omaha (PCL). Reinstated RHP Ian Kennedy from the 10-day DL. LOS ANGELES — Recalled RHP Deck McGuire and OF Michael Hermosillo from Salt Lake (PCL). Placed RHP Garrett Richards on 10-day DL. MINNESOTA — Placed RHP Addison Reed on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Alan Busenitz from Rochester (IL). Sent RHP Ervin Santana to Chattanooga (SL) for a rehab assignment. Signed C LaRon Smith to a minor league contract. SEATTLE — Placed RHP Felix Hernandez on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Sunday. Optioned OF John Andreoli to Tacoma (PCL). Recalled RHP Nick Rumbelow and 2B Gordon Beckham from Tacoma. TAMPA BAY — Recalled 1B Ji-Man Choi and RHP Andrew Kittredge from Durham (IL). TEXAS — Designated OF Austin Jackson for assignment.

Uruguay

0

WORLD CUP France

France

1

Croatia

Russia

2(3)

Croatia

2(4)

Sweden

0

England

2

2

2 France vs. Croatia FINAL • Sunday, 10 a.m., KTVI

Brazil

1 Belgium

Belgium

Belgium

0

THIRD PLACE • Saturday, 9 a.m., KTVI

vs. England

2

home, a crowd of 30,000 was in London’s Hyde Park for a largescreen viewing, the British Beer and Pub Association predicted supporters would buy 10 million extra pints at pubs during the match, and No. 1 Court at Wimbledon was less than one-third full for the men’s quarterfinal match between John Isner and Milos Raonic. Promise seemed about to be fulfilled when Kieran Trippier curled in a free kick in the fifth minute for his first international goal, above leaping Dejan Lovren and Mandzukic and past the desperate dive of goalkeeper Danijel Subasic. Choruses of “God Save the Queen” began in England’s end. “We had a couple chances after that to get the second, give ourselves a bit more breathing room,” England captain Harry Kane said. And Croatia defender Sime Vrsaljko kept the score even nine minutes into extra time by clearing John Stones’ header off

National League CHICAGO — Optioned INF David Bote to Iowa (PCL). Reinstated 3B Kris Bryant from the 10-day DL. Sent LHP Brian Duensing to Tennessee (SL) for a rehab assignment. CINCINNATI — Signed LHP Carlos Diaz to a minor league contract. COLORADO — Signed LHP Jorman Aponte to a minor league contract. Reinstated RHP Bryan Shaw from the 10-day DL. Optioned LHP Jerry Vasto to Albuquerque (PCL). LOS ANGELES — Designated LHP Edward Paredes for assignment. Claimed LHP Zac Rosscup from Colorado. MILWAUKEE — Released SS Eric Sogard. NEW YORK — Optioned OF Kevin Kaczmarski and RHP Drew Gagnon to Las Vegas (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Matt den Dekker from Las Vegas. Recalled RHP Jacob Rhame from Las Vegas. Released RHP Marcos Molina. PHILADELPHIA — Optioned RHPs Jake Thompson and Enyel De Los Santos to Lehigh Valley (IL). Reinstated RHP Vince Velasquez from the 10-day DL. CARDINALS — Sent LHP Tyler Lyons to Springfield (TL) for a rehab assignment. Signed RHP Ramon Fernandez to a minor league contract. SAN DIEGO — Optioned RHP Walker Lockett to El Paso (PCL). Recalled OF Franmil Reyes from El Paso. WASHINGTON — Sent RHP Stephen Strasburg to Potomac (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. BASKETBALL | NBA MEMPHIS — Signed F Kevin Anderson to a four-year contract and F Omri Casspi. HOCKEY | National Hockey League BUFFALO — Named Steve Smith assistant coach. DETROIT — Agreed to terms with RW Anthony Mantha on a two-year contract. TAMPA BAY — Re-signed F Adam Erne to a one-year, one-way contract. SOCCER | Major League Soccer COLUMBUS — Traded F Patrick Mullins to D.C. United for targeted allocation money. United Soccer League USL — Suspended Orange County D Andrew Crognale three games and Reno M Lindo Mfeka, Charlotte D Bilal Duckett, LA Galaxy II D Geoffrey Acheampong, Swope Park D Matheus Silva and Bethlehem M Fabian Herbers one game. NEW YORK — Signed D Allen Yanes. COLLEGE NCAA — Approved a waiver request for Duke football C Jack Wohlabaugh to be eligible this season. FLORIDA GULF COAST — Announced beach volleyball sophomore Candace Lacour has transferred from FAU and freshman Kaity Reed from Southeastern (Fla.). OKLAHOMA STATE — Announced junior softball INF Sydney Springfield is transferring from LSU. RICE — Named Derek Glasser men’s basketball video coordinator. RUTGERS — Named Mike Bedford assistant women’s lacrosse coach. ST. JOSEPH’S — Named Gina McCool assistant softball coach. TENNESSEE TECH — Promoted Leveda Dexter to assistant athletic director for academics and student welfare.

England

a corner just in front of the goal line. Croatia became the first team since Argentina beat Italy in 1990 to come from behind to win a World Cup semifinal match. For England, there will be no title to match the 1966 triumph at Wembley Stadium. Kane & Co. will deal with the same disappointment that felled Shearer and Platt, Gazza and Wazza, Beckham and Gerrard. And Southgate, whose penalty-kick failure led to England’s previous semifinal loss in a major tournament, in the 1996 European Championship semifinals. “Impossible to say anything to them that is going to make them feel better at this point,” Southgate said after fourth straight loss in a major semifinal. Croatia tied the score after Rakitic switched the ball from left flank to right, where Vrsaljko crossed. Kyle Walker attempted a diving header to clear. Perisic jumped and from behind raised his left boot over Walker’s head

1

to poke the ball past goalkeeper Jordan Pickford from about 8 yards for his fourth goal in the tournament. England had its moments to come back, but Jesse Lingard failed to connect with a Kane through ball in the 78th minute, and Kane couldn’t score on a header off a free kick in stoppage time. Mandzukic scored after Walker stuck out a leg to block Josip Pivaric’s cross. The ball popped up and Perisic outjumped Trippier to head the ball toward goal. Mandzukic alertly reacted to the unexpected ball in the penalty area, splitting defenders Stones and Harry Maguire, who had taken four short steps up. The ball bounced twice, Mandzukic ran onto it and one-timed a low, leftfooted shot to Pickford’s left. Mandzukic was mobbed by teammates, who jumped on him in the corner and trapped photographers under them in the crush.

MOSCOW • Harry Kane will likely come home from the World Cup with the Golden Boot as the tournament’s top scorer and a burnished reputation as a feared forward. Had Kane added to his six goals in Russia with either of his back-to-back chances in the first half against Croatia on Wednesday, when England was dominating and led 1-0, he could have been lifting the trophy on Sunday. Or the header in stoppage time at the end of 90 minutes when the score was 1-1 and a goal would likely have brought England back to Moscow for the final against France. Rising high at the back post to meet another precise free kick from Kieran Trippier, Kane misconnected and the ball bounced wide of the goal. “It’s been great to get to this stage but we wanted to keep going. We wanted to win it all,” Kane said. “It hurts. I don’t know what else to say. It just hurts.” When Kane got his best chances in the 30th minute against Croatia, his first shot was saved by goalkeeper Danijel Subasic. The ball rebounded almost out of play, then sat up for Kane to take another shot from less than two yards at a tight angle. The ball hit the post, ricocheted off Subasic and somehow looped up to safety. Kane would not get another such opportunity with the ball at his feet. And Croatia would never let England get so close again. Mario Mandzukic shot past England goalkeeper Jordan Pickford in the 109th minute and Croatia closed out a 2-1 victory to reach its first World Cup final. “We were really comfortable in the game,” said England defender Harry Maguire, who twice rose highest at corners in the first 15 minutes to send headers wide of Croatia’s goal. “The only disappointment was that we were 1-0 up, and we should have been more.” Against Croatia, when the late chance came again, Kane could only guide it wide. “I’m sure we lacked in some areas, there are things we could’ve done better,” Kane said. “We restored some pride back into the shirt, which was an important thing for us to do.” England coach Gareth Southgate praised Kane, who is two goals ahead of Belgium striker Romelu Lukaku for the Golden Boot. Their pursuit will continue in the third-place game on Saturday in St. Petersburg. “He’s captained the team brilliantly,” Southgate said of Kane.

TENNIS

CYCLING

SOCCER

Wimbledon results

Tour de France results

Major League Soccer

United Soccer League

Results Wednesday from Wimbledon at The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club (seedings in parentheses): Men’s Singles | Quarterfinal Kevin Anderson (8), South Africa, def. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, 2-6, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-4, 13-11. John Isner (9), United States, def. Milos Raonic (13), Canada, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (7), 6-4, 6-3. Novak Djokovic (12), Serbia, def. Kei Nishikori (24), Japan, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, 7-5, 6-7 (7), 4-6, 6-4, 6-4.

Wednesday | Quimper, France Fifth Stage • A 127.1-mile ride from Lorient to Quimper, with five categorized climbs, all Category 3 and 4 1. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Bora-Hansgrohe, 4:48:06. 2. Sonny Colbrelli, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, st. 3. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step, st. 4. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, st. 5. Julian Alaphilippe, France, Quick-Step, st. 6. Daniel Martin, Ireland, UAE, st. 7. Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC, st. 8. Soren Kragh Andersen, Denmark, Sunweb, st. 9. Andrea Pasqualon, Italy, Wanty-Groupe, st. 10. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, st. 11. Julien Simon, France, Cofidis, st. 12. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, st. 13. Pierre Latour, France, AG2R, st. 14. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, st. 15. Jelle Vanendert, Belgium, Lotto Soudal, st. 16. Egan Bernal, Colombia, Sky, st. 17. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, st. 18. Richie Porte, Australia, BMC, st. 19. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, st. 20. Rafal Majka, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, st. Also 22. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R, st. 27. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, st. 31. Tejay van Garderen, U.S., BMC, st. 114. Chad Haga, U.S., Sunweb, 4:17 behind. 132. Ian Boswell, U.S., Katusha Alpecin, 7:52. 157. Taylor Phinney, U.S., EF Edu. First, 17:17. 170. Lawson Craddock, U.S., EF Edu. First, 20:56. Overall Standings | (After five stages) 1. Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC, 18:22:00. 2. Tejay van Garderen, U.S., BMC, :02. 3. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step, :03. 4. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, :05. 5. Julian Alaphilippe, France, Quick-Step, :06. 6. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step, :09. 7. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, :13. 8. Soren Kragh Andersen, Denmark, Sunweb, st. 9. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, EF Edu. First, :37. 10. Rafal Majka, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, :52. 11. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, :53. 12. Richie Porte, Australia, BMC, st. 13. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, :55. 14. Mikel Landa, Spain, Movistar, st. 15. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :57. 16. Adam Yates, Britain, Mitchelton-Scott, 1:02. 17. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, 1:08. 18. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R, 1:17. 19. Primoz Roglic, Slovenia, LottoNL, st. 20. Steven Kruijswijk, Netherlands, LottoNL, st. Also 33. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 2:10. 74. Chad Haga, U.S., Sunweb, 6:00. 139. Ian Boswell, U.S., Katusha Alpecin, 18:54. 152. Taylor Phinney, U.S., EF Edu. First, 22:03. 170. Lawson Craddock, U.S., EF Edu. First, 43:12.

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 12 4 4 40 42 23 New York City FC 11 4 4 37 38 24 New York 10 5 2 32 34 17 Columbus 8 6 6 30 24 23 New England 7 4 7 28 30 25 Montreal 8 12 0 24 24 35 Philadelphia 7 9 3 24 25 30 Chicago 6 9 5 23 32 38 Orlando City 6 11 1 19 25 41 Toronto FC 4 10 4 16 29 36 D.C. United 2 7 5 11 23 29 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 10 3 5 35 28 21 Los Angeles FC 10 4 4 34 41 28 Sporting K.C. 9 4 6 33 35 24 Real Salt Lake 9 8 2 29 27 34 Portland 8 3 5 29 26 22 Vancouver 7 7 5 26 29 37 Houston 7 6 4 25 36 26 LA Galaxy 7 7 4 25 31 28 Minnesota United 6 11 1 19 23 36 Seattle 4 9 4 16 15 22 Colorado 4 11 3 15 22 32 San Jose 2 10 6 12 29 37 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday New York City FC 3, Montreal 0 Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3 Saturday Columbus at New York City FC, 6 p.m. Sporting K.C. at New York, 6 p.m. LA Galaxy at New England, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 7 p.m. Vancouver at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 8 p.m. Sunday Seattle at Atlanta United FC, 1 p.m. Portland at Los Angeles FC, 5 p.m.

Eastern W L T Cincinnati 10 3 5 Pittsburgh 9 1 7 Louisville 8 3 5 Charleston 7 3 8 Indy 8 6 4 Nashville 7 4 6 Charlotte 7 6 6 New York 6 5 7 Penn 6 5 7 Bethlehem 6 7 5 Tampa Bay 6 7 4 Ottawa 6 8 3 North Carolina 5 8 4 Richmond 5 9 2 Atlanta 3 9 5 Toronto 0 14 3 Western W L T Salt Lake City 12 4 2 Phoenix 10 3 5 Reno 9 3 7 Sacramento 9 5 6 Kansas City 9 5 4 Orange County 9 6 3 Portland 8 8 2 Colo. Springs 7 9 4 Fresno 6 7 7 San Antonio 5 4 7 St. Louis 5 6 7 Okla. City 6 10 3 Las Vegas 5 7 5 Los Angeles 5 9 4 Rio Grande Valley 1 6 10 Tulsa 1 8 9 Seattle 3 11 2 Wednesday Atlanta 2, Bethlehem 1 Charleston 2, Indy 1 Charlotte 1, Nashville 0 Okla. City 6, Las Vegas 4 Reno at Los Angeles, late Friday Richmond at New York, 6 p.m.

vs. Muhammad Waseem, 12, for the vacant IBF flyweight title; Carlos Canizales vs. Bin Lu, 12, for Canizales’ WBA junior flyweight title; Jhack Tepora vs. Edivaldo Ortega, 12, featherweights; Muhammad Farkhan vs. Abdallah Paziwapazi, 10, light heavyweights. At Offenburg, Germany; Tyron Zeuge vs. Rocky Fielding, 12, for Zeuge’s WBA super middleweight title At London, George Groves vs. Callum Smith, 12, for Groves’ WBA super middleweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At Lakefront Arena, New Orleans (ESPN), Regis Prograis vs. Juan Jose Velasco, 12, for Prograis’ WBC interim junior welterweight title; Teofimo Lopez vs. William Silva, 10, lightweights. July 20 At WinnaVegas Casino (SHO), Sloan, Iowa, Jaron Ennis vs. Armando Alvarez, 10, welterweights. July 21 At Moscow, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Murat Gassiev, 12, for undisputed cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas (HBO), Jaime Munguia vs. Liam Smith, 12, for Munguia’s WBO junior middleweight title; Alberto Machado vs. Rafael Mensah, 12, for Machado’s WBA junior lightweight title.

July 28 At Kissimmee, Fla., Christopher Diaz vs. Masayuki Ito, 12, for vacant WBO junior lightweight title; Carlos Adames vs. Artemio Reyes, 10, welterweights. At Staples Center, Los Angeles (SHO), Mikey Garcia vs. Robert Easter Jr., 12, for Garcia’s WBC lightweight title and Easter’s IBF lightweight title; Luis Ortiz vs. Razvan Cojanu, 10, heavyweights; Mario Barrios vs. Jose Roman, 10, super lightweights. Aug. 3 At Sydney, Australia, Billy Dib vs. Tevin Farmer, 12, for the vacant IBF junior lightweight title. At Albuquerque, N.M. (ESPN2), Antonio Orozco vs. Pablo Cesar Cano, 10, junior welterweights.

BASEBALL Frontier League East W L Pct. GB Washington 30 21 .588 — Joliet 27 24 .529 3 Lake Erie 26 24 .520 3½ Schaumburg 26 24 .520 3½ Traverse City 24 26 .480 5½ Windy City 19 31 .380 10½ West W L Pct. GB Rascals 29 22 .569 — Evansville 26 23 .531 2 Southern Illinois 24 23 .511 3 Florence 25 25 .500 3½ Normal 22 26 .458 5½ Grizzlies 22 31 .415 8 Wednesday All-Star Game: Experienced 8, Rookies 3 Thursday No games Friday Schaumburg at Traverse City, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Evansville at Normal, 7:05 p.m. Rascals at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m. Joliet at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL | WNBA EASTERN W L Pct Washington 12 8 .600 Atlanta 10 9 .526 Connecticut 10 10 .500 Chicago 7 13 .350 New York 6 14 .300 Indiana 2 18 .100 WESTERN W L Pct Seattle 15 6 .714 Phoenix 14 7 .667 Los Angeles 13 8 .619 Minnesota 12 8 .600 Dallas 11 8 .579 Las Vegas 9 12 .429 Wednesday Atlanta 106, Washington 89 New York 79, Connecticut 76 Minnesota 87, Indiana 65 Thursday Dallas at Los Angeles, 2:30 p.m. Friday Phoenix at Connecticut, 6 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 6 p.m. Indiana at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Las Vegas at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

GB — 1½ 2 5 6 10 GB — 1 2 2½ 3 6

BOXING SCHEDULE Friday At Kobe, Japan, Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Vic Saludar, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title; Reiya Konishi vs. Orlie Silvestre, 12, for the WBO Asia Pacific junior flyweight title. At Los Angeles (ESPN), Joet Gonzalez vs. Rafael Rivera, 10, for the vacant NABO featherweight title. Saturday At Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Lucas Matthysse vs. Manny Pacquiao, 12, for Matthysse’s WBA World welterweight title; Moruti Mthalane

PTS GD 35 14 34 14 29 7 29 7 28 3 27 6 27 1 25 7 25 0 23 4 22 2 21 -7 19 0 17 -11 14 -19 3 -26 PTS GD 38 11 35 19 34 7 33 4 31 0 30 14 26 2 25 4 25 4 22 -1 22 -3 21 -9 20 -8 19 -2 13 -6 12 -21 11 -17

GOLF Area holes in one Acorns • Thomas White, hole No. 3, 320 yards, 3-wood, July 9. Acorns • Bill Auer, hole No. 9, 120 yards, 8-iron, July 11. Bogey Hills • John Berkowitz, hole No. 13, 147 yards, 4-wood, July 11.


SPORTS

07.12.2018 • THURSDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

Kane had chances in semifinal England’s captain Golden Boot leader ASSOCIATED PRESS

Croatia’s Josip Pivaric celebrates after his team advanced to the World Cup final with a 2-1 victory over England in Moscow.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

England gets early goal but falls short of final CUP • FROM B1

of 13 nations that has advanced to a World Cup final in a tournament where powers Brazil, Germany, Argentina and Spain made early exits. “They’ve had an incredible route to the final. They’ve shown remarkable character,” said England coach Gareth Southgate, who for now will be remembered more for a fashionable waistcoat than ending a half-century of hurt. France, which won its only title at home in 1998, will have an extra day of rest after beating Belgium 1-0 on Tuesday. Croatia, coming off 360 intense minutes of soccer’s highest level, faces its biggest sporting moment since becoming an independent nation in 1991. Fans back home in Zagreb took to the streets to celebrate, lighting flares and waving flags in a sea of exuberance. “We are a nation of people who never give in, who are proud and who have character,” said coach Zlatko Dalic, who wore a checkered jersey to his post-match news conference. “There’s no weakness in a team that is in the final.” England was not among the top 10 in ticket sales before the tournament, but the team’s progress caused gallivanting supporters to flock to Moscow. The front of the stands behind one goal was filled with more than two dozen white banners with a red Cross of St. George, pledging support from many of the island’s clubs, from Bradford City to Wolverhampton. Back

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League ASTROS .................. -$205............................A’s RED SOX..................-$170 .................Blue Jays INDIANS ..................-$105 ...................Yankees Rays.........................-$115...................... TWINS ANGELS ...................-$120 ................. Mariners National League ROCKIES..................-$110 ................... D’backs PIRATES...................-$125 ...................Brewers Nationals.................-$210 ....................... METS Dodgers...................-$185 ...................PADRES Phillies ....................-$115...................ORIOLES TENNIS • Wimbledon A. Kerber -$160 .......... vs. J. Ostapenko +$140 S. Williams -$340 ........... vs. J. Goerges +$280 Friday J. Isner -$110..................vs. K. Anderson -$110 N. Djokovic -$120............... vs. R. Nadal +$100 SOCCER • World Cup Final, Sunday France ...................................................... -$110 Croatia ....................................................+$350 Draw: +$215 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League BALTIMORE — Placed RHP Andrew Cashner on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Yefry Ramirez from Norfolk (IL). Sent RHP Chris Tillman to Frederick (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. Signed RHP J.J. Montgomery to a minor league contract. Extended their working agreements with Norfolk, Bowie (EL), Frederick, Delmarva (SAL) and Aberdeen (NYP) through the 2020 season. BOSTON — Optioned LHP Jalen Beeks to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled LHP Robby Scott from Pawtucket. CHICAGO — Designated RHP Bruce Rondon for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP Jeanmar Gomez from Charlotte (IL). CLEVELAND — Designated RHP Rzepczynski for assignment. Reinstated LHP Tyler Olson from the 10-day DL. HOUSTON — Optioned RHP Ken Giles to Fresno (PCL). Recalled LHP Cionel Perez from Corpus Christi (TL). KANSAS CITY — Optioned RHP Jason Adam to Omaha (PCL). Reinstated RHP Ian Kennedy from the 10-day DL. LOS ANGELES — Recalled RHP Deck McGuire and OF Michael Hermosillo from Salt Lake (PCL). Placed RHP Garrett Richards on 10-day DL. MINNESOTA — Placed RHP Addison Reed on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Alan Busenitz from Rochester (IL). Sent RHP Ervin Santana to Chattanooga (SL) for a rehab assignment. Signed C LaRon Smith to a minor league contract. SEATTLE — Placed RHP Felix Hernandez on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Sunday. Optioned OF John Andreoli to Tacoma (PCL). Recalled RHP Nick Rumbelow and 2B Gordon Beckham from Tacoma. TAMPA BAY — Recalled 1B Ji-Man Choi and RHP Andrew Kittredge from Durham (IL). TEXAS — Designated OF Austin Jackson for assignment.

Uruguay

0

WORLD CUP France

France

1

Croatia

Russia

2(3)

Croatia

2(4)

Sweden

0

England

2

2

2 France vs. Croatia FINAL • Sunday, 10 a.m., KTVI

Brazil

1 Belgium

Belgium

Belgium

0

THIRD PLACE • Saturday, 9 a.m., KTVI

vs. England

2

home, a crowd of 30,000 was in London’s Hyde Park for a largescreen viewing, the British Beer and Pub Association predicted supporters would buy 10 million extra pints at pubs during the match, and No. 1 Court at Wimbledon was less than one-third full for the men’s quarterfinal match between John Isner and Milos Raonic. Promise seemed about to be fulfilled when Kieran Trippier curled in a free kick in the fifth minute for his first international goal, above leaping Dejan Lovren and Mandzukic and past the desperate dive of goalkeeper Danijel Subasic. Choruses of “God Save the Queen” began in England’s end. “We had a couple chances after that to get the second, give ourselves a bit more breathing room,” England captain Harry Kane said. And Croatia defender Sime Vrsaljko kept the score even nine minutes into extra time by clearing John Stones’ header off

National League CHICAGO — Optioned INF David Bote to Iowa (PCL). Reinstated 3B Kris Bryant from the 10-day DL. Sent LHP Brian Duensing to Tennessee (SL) for a rehab assignment. CINCINNATI — Signed LHP Carlos Diaz to a minor league contract. COLORADO — Signed LHP Jorman Aponte to a minor league contract. Reinstated RHP Bryan Shaw from the 10-day DL. Optioned LHP Jerry Vasto to Albuquerque (PCL). LOS ANGELES — Designated LHP Edward Paredes for assignment. Claimed LHP Zac Rosscup from Colorado. MILWAUKEE — Released SS Eric Sogard. NEW YORK — Optioned OF Kevin Kaczmarski and RHP Drew Gagnon to Las Vegas (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Matt den Dekker from Las Vegas. Recalled RHP Jacob Rhame from Las Vegas. Released RHP Marcos Molina. PHILADELPHIA — Optioned RHPs Jake Thompson and Enyel De Los Santos to Lehigh Valley (IL). Reinstated RHP Vince Velasquez from the 10-day DL. CARDINALS — Sent LHP Tyler Lyons to Springfield (TL) for a rehab assignment. Signed RHP Ramon Fernandez to a minor league contract. SAN DIEGO — Optioned RHP Walker Lockett to El Paso (PCL). Recalled OF Franmil Reyes from El Paso. WASHINGTON — Sent RHP Stephen Strasburg to Potomac (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. BASKETBALL | NBA MEMPHIS — Signed F Kevin Anderson to a four-year contract and F Omri Casspi. HOCKEY | National Hockey League BUFFALO — Named Steve Smith assistant coach. DETROIT — Agreed to terms with RW Anthony Mantha on a two-year contract. TAMPA BAY — Re-signed F Adam Erne to a one-year, one-way contract. SOCCER | Major League Soccer COLUMBUS — Traded F Patrick Mullins to D.C. United for targeted allocation money. United Soccer League USL — Suspended Orange County D Andrew Crognale three games and Reno M Lindo Mfeka, Charlotte D Bilal Duckett, LA Galaxy II D Geoffrey Acheampong, Swope Park D Matheus Silva and Bethlehem M Fabian Herbers one game. NEW YORK — Signed D Allen Yanes. COLLEGE NCAA — Approved a waiver request for Duke football C Jack Wohlabaugh to be eligible this season. FLORIDA GULF COAST — Announced beach volleyball sophomore Candace Lacour has transferred from FAU and freshman Kaity Reed from Southeastern (Fla.). OKLAHOMA STATE — Announced junior softball INF Sydney Springfield is transferring from LSU. RICE — Named Derek Glasser men’s basketball video coordinator. RUTGERS — Named Mike Bedford assistant women’s lacrosse coach. ST. JOSEPH’S — Named Gina McCool assistant softball coach. TENNESSEE TECH — Promoted Leveda Dexter to assistant athletic director for academics and student welfare.

England

a corner just in front of the goal line. Croatia became the first team since Argentina beat Italy in 1990 to come from behind to win a World Cup semifinal match. For England, there will be no title to match the 1966 triumph at Wembley Stadium. Kane & Co. will deal with the same disappointment that felled Shearer and Platt, Gazza and Wazza, Beckham and Gerrard. And Southgate, whose penalty-kick failure led to England’s previous semifinal loss in a major tournament, in the 1996 European Championship semifinals. “Impossible to say anything to them that is going to make them feel better at this point,” Southgate said after fourth straight loss in a major semifinal. Croatia tied the score after Rakitic switched the ball from left flank to right, where Vrsaljko crossed. Kyle Walker attempted a diving header to clear. Perisic jumped and from behind raised his left boot over Walker’s head

1

to poke the ball past goalkeeper Jordan Pickford from about 8 yards for his fourth goal in the tournament. England had its moments to come back, but Jesse Lingard failed to connect with a Kane through ball in the 78th minute, and Kane couldn’t score on a header off a free kick in stoppage time. Mandzukic scored after Walker stuck out a leg to block Josip Pivaric’s cross. The ball popped up and Perisic outjumped Trippier to head the ball toward goal. Mandzukic alertly reacted to the unexpected ball in the penalty area, splitting defenders Stones and Harry Maguire, who had taken four short steps up. The ball bounced twice, Mandzukic ran onto it and one-timed a low, leftfooted shot to Pickford’s left. Mandzukic was mobbed by teammates, who jumped on him in the corner and trapped photographers under them in the crush.

MOSCOW • Harry Kane will likely come home from the World Cup with the Golden Boot as the tournament’s top scorer and a burnished reputation as a feared forward. Had Kane added to his six goals in Russia with either of his back-to-back chances in the first half against Croatia on Wednesday, when England was dominating and led 1-0, he could have been lifting the trophy on Sunday. Or the header in stoppage time at the end of 90 minutes when the score was 1-1 and a goal would likely have brought England back to Moscow for the final against France. Rising high at the back post to meet another precise free kick from Kieran Trippier, Kane misconnected and the ball bounced wide of the goal. “It’s been great to get to this stage but we wanted to keep going. We wanted to win it all,” Kane said. “It hurts. I don’t know what else to say. It just hurts.” When Kane got his best chances in the 30th minute against Croatia, his first shot was saved by goalkeeper Danijel Subasic. The ball rebounded almost out of play, then sat up for Kane to take another shot from less than two yards at a tight angle. The ball hit the post, ricocheted off Subasic and somehow looped up to safety. Kane would not get another such opportunity with the ball at his feet. And Croatia would never let England get so close again. Mario Mandzukic shot past England goalkeeper Jordan Pickford in the 109th minute and Croatia closed out a 2-1 victory to reach its first World Cup final. “We were really comfortable in the game,” said England defender Harry Maguire, who twice rose highest at corners in the first 15 minutes to send headers wide of Croatia’s goal. “The only disappointment was that we were 1-0 up, and we should have been more.” Against Croatia, when the late chance came again, Kane could only guide it wide. “I’m sure we lacked in some areas, there are things we could’ve done better,” Kane said. “We restored some pride back into the shirt, which was an important thing for us to do.” England coach Gareth Southgate praised Kane, who is two goals ahead of Belgium striker Romelu Lukaku for the Golden Boot. Their pursuit will continue in the third-place game on Saturday in St. Petersburg. “He’s captained the team brilliantly,” Southgate said of Kane.

TENNIS

CYCLING

SOCCER

Wimbledon results

Tour de France results

Major League Soccer

United Soccer League

Results Wednesday from Wimbledon at The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club (seedings in parentheses): Men’s Singles | Quarterfinal Kevin Anderson (8), South Africa, def. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, 2-6, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-4, 13-11. John Isner (9), United States, def. Milos Raonic (13), Canada, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (7), 6-4, 6-3. Novak Djokovic (12), Serbia, def. Kei Nishikori (24), Japan, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, 7-5, 6-7 (7), 4-6, 6-4, 6-4.

Wednesday | Quimper, France Fifth Stage • A 127.1-mile ride from Lorient to Quimper, with five categorized climbs, all Category 3 and 4 1. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Bora-Hansgrohe, 4:48:06. 2. Sonny Colbrelli, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, st. 3. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step, st. 4. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, st. 5. Julian Alaphilippe, France, Quick-Step, st. 6. Daniel Martin, Ireland, UAE, st. 7. Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC, st. 8. Soren Kragh Andersen, Denmark, Sunweb, st. 9. Andrea Pasqualon, Italy, Wanty-Groupe, st. 10. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, st. 11. Julien Simon, France, Cofidis, st. 12. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, st. 13. Pierre Latour, France, AG2R, st. 14. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, st. 15. Jelle Vanendert, Belgium, Lotto Soudal, st. 16. Egan Bernal, Colombia, Sky, st. 17. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, st. 18. Richie Porte, Australia, BMC, st. 19. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, st. 20. Rafal Majka, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, st. Also 22. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R, st. 27. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, st. 31. Tejay van Garderen, U.S., BMC, st. 114. Chad Haga, U.S., Sunweb, 4:17 behind. 132. Ian Boswell, U.S., Katusha Alpecin, 7:52. 157. Taylor Phinney, U.S., EF Edu. First, 17:17. 170. Lawson Craddock, U.S., EF Edu. First, 20:56. Overall Standings | (After five stages) 1. Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC, 18:22:00. 2. Tejay van Garderen, U.S., BMC, :02. 3. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step, :03. 4. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, :05. 5. Julian Alaphilippe, France, Quick-Step, :06. 6. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step, :09. 7. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, :13. 8. Soren Kragh Andersen, Denmark, Sunweb, st. 9. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, EF Edu. First, :37. 10. Rafal Majka, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, :52. 11. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, :53. 12. Richie Porte, Australia, BMC, st. 13. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, :55. 14. Mikel Landa, Spain, Movistar, st. 15. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :57. 16. Adam Yates, Britain, Mitchelton-Scott, 1:02. 17. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, 1:08. 18. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R, 1:17. 19. Primoz Roglic, Slovenia, LottoNL, st. 20. Steven Kruijswijk, Netherlands, LottoNL, st. Also 33. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 2:10. 74. Chad Haga, U.S., Sunweb, 6:00. 139. Ian Boswell, U.S., Katusha Alpecin, 18:54. 152. Taylor Phinney, U.S., EF Edu. First, 22:03. 170. Lawson Craddock, U.S., EF Edu. First, 43:12.

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 12 4 4 40 42 23 New York City FC 11 4 4 37 38 24 New York 10 5 2 32 34 17 Columbus 8 6 6 30 24 23 New England 7 4 7 28 30 25 Montreal 8 12 0 24 24 35 Philadelphia 7 9 3 24 25 30 Chicago 6 9 5 23 32 38 Orlando City 6 11 1 19 25 41 Toronto FC 4 10 4 16 29 36 D.C. United 2 7 5 11 23 29 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 10 3 5 35 28 21 Los Angeles FC 10 4 4 34 41 28 Sporting K.C. 9 4 6 33 35 24 Real Salt Lake 9 8 2 29 27 34 Portland 8 3 5 29 26 22 Vancouver 7 7 5 26 29 37 Houston 7 6 4 25 36 26 LA Galaxy 7 7 4 25 31 28 Minnesota United 6 11 1 19 23 36 Seattle 4 9 4 16 15 22 Colorado 4 11 3 15 22 32 San Jose 2 10 6 12 29 37 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday New York City FC 3, Montreal 0 Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3 Saturday Columbus at New York City FC, 6 p.m. Sporting K.C. at New York, 6 p.m. LA Galaxy at New England, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 7 p.m. Vancouver at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 8 p.m. Sunday Seattle at Atlanta United FC, 1 p.m. Portland at Los Angeles FC, 5 p.m.

Eastern W L T Cincinnati 10 3 5 Pittsburgh 9 1 7 Louisville 8 3 5 Charleston 7 3 8 Indy 8 6 4 Nashville 7 4 6 Charlotte 7 6 6 New York 6 5 7 Penn 6 5 7 Bethlehem 6 7 5 Tampa Bay 6 7 4 Ottawa 6 8 3 North Carolina 5 8 4 Richmond 5 9 2 Atlanta 3 9 5 Toronto 0 14 3 Western W L T Salt Lake City 12 4 2 Reno 10 3 7 Phoenix 10 3 5 Sacramento 9 5 6 Kansas City 9 5 4 Orange County 9 6 3 Portland 8 8 2 Colo. Springs 7 9 4 Fresno 6 7 7 San Antonio 5 4 7 St. Louis 5 6 7 Okla. City 6 10 3 Las Vegas 5 7 5 Los Angeles 5 10 4 Rio Grande Valley 1 6 10 Tulsa 1 8 9 Seattle 3 11 2 Wednesday Atlanta 2, Bethlehem 1 Charleston 2, Indy 1 Charlotte 1, Nashville 0 Okla. City 6, Las Vegas 4 Reno 4, Los Angeles 1 Friday Richmond at New York, 6 p.m.

vs. Muhammad Waseem, 12, for the vacant IBF flyweight title; Carlos Canizales vs. Bin Lu, 12, for Canizales’ WBA junior flyweight title; Jhack Tepora vs. Edivaldo Ortega, 12, featherweights; Muhammad Farkhan vs. Abdallah Paziwapazi, 10, light heavyweights. At Offenburg, Germany; Tyron Zeuge vs. Rocky Fielding, 12, for Zeuge’s WBA super middleweight title At London, George Groves vs. Callum Smith, 12, for Groves’ WBA super middleweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At Lakefront Arena, New Orleans (ESPN), Regis Prograis vs. Juan Jose Velasco, 12, for Prograis’ WBC interim junior welterweight title; Teofimo Lopez vs. William Silva, 10, lightweights. July 20 At WinnaVegas Casino (SHO), Sloan, Iowa, Jaron Ennis vs. Armando Alvarez, 10, welterweights. July 21 At Moscow, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Murat Gassiev, 12, for undisputed cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas (HBO), Jaime Munguia vs. Liam Smith, 12, for Munguia’s WBO junior middleweight title; Alberto Machado vs. Rafael Mensah, 12, for Machado’s WBA junior lightweight title.

July 28 At Kissimmee, Fla., Christopher Diaz vs. Masayuki Ito, 12, for vacant WBO junior lightweight title; Carlos Adames vs. Artemio Reyes, 10, welterweights. At Staples Center, Los Angeles (SHO), Mikey Garcia vs. Robert Easter Jr., 12, for Garcia’s WBC lightweight title and Easter’s IBF lightweight title; Luis Ortiz vs. Razvan Cojanu, 10, heavyweights; Mario Barrios vs. Jose Roman, 10, super lightweights. Aug. 3 At Sydney, Australia, Billy Dib vs. Tevin Farmer, 12, for the vacant IBF junior lightweight title. At Albuquerque, N.M. (ESPN2), Antonio Orozco vs. Pablo Cesar Cano, 10, junior welterweights.

BASEBALL Frontier League East W L Pct. GB Washington 30 21 .588 — Joliet 27 24 .529 3 Lake Erie 26 24 .520 3½ Schaumburg 26 24 .520 3½ Traverse City 24 26 .480 5½ Windy City 19 31 .380 10½ West W L Pct. GB Rascals 29 22 .569 — Evansville 26 23 .531 2 Southern Illinois 24 23 .511 3 Florence 25 25 .500 3½ Normal 22 26 .458 5½ Grizzlies 22 31 .415 8 Wednesday All-Star Game: Experienced 8, Rookies 3 Thursday No games Friday Schaumburg at Traverse City, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Evansville at Normal, 7:05 p.m. Rascals at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m. Joliet at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL | WNBA EASTERN W L Pct Washington 12 8 .600 Atlanta 10 9 .526 Connecticut 10 10 .500 Chicago 7 13 .350 New York 6 14 .300 Indiana 2 18 .100 WESTERN W L Pct Seattle 15 6 .714 Phoenix 14 7 .667 Los Angeles 13 8 .619 Minnesota 12 8 .600 Dallas 11 8 .579 Las Vegas 9 12 .429 Wednesday Atlanta 106, Washington 89 New York 79, Connecticut 76 Minnesota 87, Indiana 65 Thursday Dallas at Los Angeles, 2:30 p.m. Friday Phoenix at Connecticut, 6 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 6 p.m. Indiana at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Las Vegas at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

GB — 1½ 2 5 6 10 GB — 1 2 2½ 3 6

BOXING SCHEDULE Friday At Kobe, Japan, Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Vic Saludar, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title; Reiya Konishi vs. Orlie Silvestre, 12, for the WBO Asia Pacific junior flyweight title. At Los Angeles (ESPN), Joet Gonzalez vs. Rafael Rivera, 10, for the vacant NABO featherweight title. Saturday At Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Lucas Matthysse vs. Manny Pacquiao, 12, for Matthysse’s WBA World welterweight title; Moruti Mthalane

PTS GD 35 14 34 14 29 7 29 7 28 3 27 6 27 1 25 7 25 0 23 4 22 2 21 -7 19 0 17 -11 14 -19 3 -26 PTS GD 38 11 37 10 35 19 33 4 31 0 30 14 26 2 25 4 25 4 22 -1 22 -3 21 -9 20 -8 19 -5 13 -6 12 -21 11 -17

GOLF Area holes in one Acorns • Thomas White, hole No. 3, 320 yards, 3-wood, July 9. Acorns • Bill Auer, hole No. 9, 120 yards, 8-iron, July 11. Bogey Hills • John Berkowitz, hole No. 13, 147 yards, 4-wood, July 11.


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

RIDES

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

Acura

Chevrolet

Honda

Misc. Autos

Volkswagen

Sport Utility

'15 Acura ILX: 28K Miles, Automatic, Navigation, Sunroof, $22,490 #B9178

'12 Chevy Impala: LTZ, Auto, Sunroof, V6, Leather $9,990 #C8884A

'14 Honda Civic: Coupe, Automatic, Dyno Blue Pearl $13,990 #B8879A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'14 Volkswagen Passat: S, Navigation, 18" Wheels, VW Certified, $12,990 #V9146

'17 Chevrolet Tahoe: LT, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified PreOwned, 3rd Row, $42,100 #P9027

1-866-244-9085

Audi '16 Audi S3: 2.0 Turbo, Prestige, Quattro, 28K $34,990 #M17475B

'15 Audi S7: Sportback, Quattro, AWD $59,999 #P9378

'16 Audi S3 Prestige: AWD, Quattro, Sepang Blue Pearl $38,300 #28791A

'16 Chevy Corvette: Stingray, 2LT, White, 17K, Local Trade $48,990 #C18226B

'16 Audi A7 Premium Plus: Mythos Black, 3.0L TFSI V6, Quattro, $39,899 #P9158A

'15 Audi A8 L: 4.0T, Phantom Black Pearl, $46,100 #P9093

'15 Audi A8: Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats $37,909 #27112A

'16 Audi A7: 3.0 Prestige, AWD, Quattro, Sportback, $45,300 #P9364

'16 Audi A8 L: 3.0T, V6, Mythos Black Metallic, 20K Miles $43,600 #28171A

'17 Audi R8 5.2 V10 plus: Mythos Black Metallic, 1K Miles, $170,988 #28748A

'16 Audi S5: Prestige, Daytona Gray Pearl, 6K Miles, $49,884 #P9341

'14 Audi Q5: Prestige, Quattro, Glacier White, AWD, $31,007 #P9347

BMW '18 BMW 430i: Convertible, 2.0L I-4 Cly, RWD, $34,988 #P9269

'18 BMW 740i 3.0L I-6 Cyl, RWD, 18K Miles $58,600 #P9212

'15 BMW 6 Series: Alpina B6, Power Moonroof, V8 $56,802 #986038

'18 BMW 320i xDrive: Apline White, 23K Miles, AWD, $29,600 #11631A

'18 BMW 430i xDrive: Convertible, 23K Miles, AWD $44,884 #P9355

'16 Chevy Camaro: 1LT, Yellow/Black, ZL1 Wheels $21,990 #V18340A

'11 Chevy Cruze: LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax $7,969 #42891A

'16 Chevy Trax: LS, Crimson, Carfax 1 Owner, Fuel Efficient $13,769 #42849A

'14 Chevy Cruze: Diesel, Loaded, GM Certified, 1 Owner $13,476 #42681A

'18 Honda Accord: Touring, 2.0T, FWD, Platinum White Pearl, $30,202 #28762A

Hyundai '15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 31K, Red w/ Tan Leather $19,490 #V17800A

'11 Hyundai Sonata: SE, Limited, Clean Carfax, Auto, $7,369 #P6442A

'16 Hyundai Sonata: SE, $13,000 Stk #180695A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Infiniti '18 Infiniti Q50: 3.5L V-6, AWD, $30,600 #P9217

'17 Chevy Camaro: Convertible, 1LT, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Backup Camera $23,969 #P6492

'16 Chevy Cruze: Limited, 1LT, Blue Ray Metallic, Fuel Efficient $13,563 #P6466

'00 Chevy Corvette: Extra Clean, Tanga Tops, Only 57K Miles! $17,498 #400051B

'11 Chevy Corvette: Z16 Grand Sport w/3LT, Manual, RWD, 35K Miles $36,007 #28685B

'15 Chevy Malibu: 1LS, $13,000 Stk #P06856 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Chevy Camaro: $13,800 1LT Stk #P06852 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Cruze: 1LT, $13,424 Stock #180541B DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Cruze: LS, $12,512 Stock #P06835 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Malibu: LT, $7,506 Stock #180554B DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Aveo: 1LT $6,100 Stock #P06805 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Spark: LS, $8,046 Stock #180946A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Sonic: LT, $8,290 Stk #P06834 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Chrysler '14 Chrysler 300: All Wheel Drive, 14K, Black $22,990 #B9109

'06 Chrysler 300: Black, Chrome Wheels, Nav, Sunroof $7,990 #B9047A

'05 Chrysler Crossfire: LTD, Black, Clean Carfax, Only 65K Miles $9,469 #42825B

Buick '14 Buick Encore: Premium, FWD, Priced to sell Fast! $16,990 #C9081C

'16 Lexus LS460: Long Wheel Base, AWD, Loaded, 30K, $58,990 #B9180

Jaguar '02 Jaguar XK8: Convertible, Auto, Silver, Power Top $8,490 #B9210A

Kia '18 Kia Rio: 4 Door Hatchback, local Trade, $17,990 #V18419A

'13 Kia Optima: SXL, Leather, Auto, Sharp! $15,490 #C9265A

Lexus

'05 Buick LaCrosse: CXL, One Owner, FWD $7,676 #42760A

Dodge '15 Dodge Charger: R/T, 36K, Red, Hemi, RT Pkg $24,990 #M18085B

'13 Dodge Charger: SE, Local Trade, Chrome Wheels $13,490 #M18202B

Cadillac '09 Cadillac CTS: White Diamond, 15K Miles! 15K Miles! $18,990 #C17275A

'17 Dodge Charger: R/T 392, 16K Miles, Just Arrived $38,290 #B9157

'07 Cadillac SRX: V6, Leather, Pano Roof, Cadillac Trade $7,990 #C18111A

'13 Dodge Avenger: Loaded, Red, Full Power $9,776 #35134A

'12 Cadillac CTS-V: Sedan, Auto, Loaded, Black $36,990 #C9266

Ford

'16 Cadillac CTS: 3K, Like New, Save!! $32,990 #C16150R

'18 Cadillac XTS: Luxury, Radiant Silver Metallic, 15K Miles $35,988 #P9287

Lincoln

'11 Volkswagen GTI: Hatchback, White, Loaded $10,469 #35051A

'12 Lincoln MKZ: $12,060 Stock #P06828 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Mazda '12 Infiniti QX56: 4WD, Roof, DVD, 69K Miles $29,490 #C9112A

'17 Mazda 3: Touring, 1 Owner, Mazda Certified $16,990 #M9136

'11 Mazda 2: Sport, Lime Green!! Lime Green!! $7,490 #M17250RA

'13 Mazda Miata: Grand Touring, Hard Top, 11K, Auto, $21,490 #M9297

Honda

'04 Chevy Corvette: Convertible, Auto, Very Sharp $22,490 #C9127A

'12 Honda Accord: EX-L, V6, Auto, 39K Miles, $15,990 #B9276

'11 Jetta: SE, Sunroof, Manual $8,990 '13 GTI: 2 Door, Automatic, Heated Seats, M/R Certified 'Beetle Convertible TDI: (4) to Choose from, All Certified, Auto, Call for Details! '16 CC Sport: Pure White, 6K, Auto $21,490

Volvo

'18 Chevy Tahoe: LT, 4WD, 8 Cyl-5.3L, Black $51,999 #P9316

'12 Volvo S60: T6, AWD, Leather, Sunroof, Auto $12,990 #M18332A

Chevrolet Trucks

CADILLAC CERTIFIED 6yr/100K 1-866-244-9085 '16 SRX: Luxury Collection, 19K, Red, AWD, One Owner $31,390 '15 ATS: Luxury, AWD, White, Roof, Premium Wheels $23,990 '16 XTS: Luxury, Graphite, 26K, FWD $27,990 '16 SRX: AWD, Navigation, 7K Miles! Certified $33,990 '15 SRX: Luxury Collection, 26K, White, AWD $30,990 '16 CTS: 3.6 Performance, 8K Miles, AWD, White $47,490

17 Mercedes-Benz AMG: C 43 4MATIC, One Owner, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, $53,100 #P9060

'16 Mercedes-Benz GLE 350: 4Matic, 3.5L V-6, AWD, $38,988 #28548A

Mini Cooper '15 Mini Cooper: Countryman, Auto, "S" Pkg, Leather $20,990 #B9243

'13 Mini Cooper: S, Countryman, $11,976 #33740A

'07 Chevy Silverado: V8, Automatic, Well Maintained, $9,490 #V18388B

'16 Chevy Silverado: 4WD, Auto, 14K Miles, Double Cab, $33,990 #B9164

'18 Chevy Colorado: LT, Crew Cab, 4x4, Backup Camera, Black $27,990 #P6483

'07 Chevy Silverado 1500: Long Box, $10,126 Stock #P06869 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Ford Expedition: Limited, 3.5L V-6, 4x4 $32,600 #P9243

'11 Ford Escape: $11,970 Stk #180961A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 GMC Terrain: SLE, FWD, 35K, Black $17,990 #C18063C

'15 SRX: Performance, Certified, Just Arrived $29,490 '17 CT6: AWD, 8K Miles, Black, Loaded $50,490

Ford Trucks

'17 Escalade: Black Raven, AWD, Nav, DVD, $64,990

'09 Ford F-350: Ext Cab, White, $11,990 #B9142

'18 GMC Terrain: 1K Miles, White, Just Arrived! $26,490 #B9076B

'11 Ford F-150: Super Cab, 4x4, Loaded, Only 70K Miles $17,769 #420013A

'11 GMC Terrain: SLT, AWD, Loaded, Clean Carfax, 63K Miles $14,969 #35059A

GMC Trucks

'13 GMC Yukon: XL, SLT, Black, Loaded $19,990 #P6199A

'17 CTS: Luxury, 3.6 Motor, White, 11K Miles $35,490

'17 Genesis G80: 3.8 Sedan, Casablanca White, 3.8L V-6, AWD, 4K Miles $40,988 #40165A

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, Crew Cab, Summit White, V8, $39,300 #79578A

'17 Mitsubishi Mirage: 31K, Auto, Backup Camera, Power Pkg, $10,990 #V18220A

'11 Mitsubishi Galant: ES, White, Auto, Full Power $6,776 #42564B

'15 GMC Canyon: 4WD, SLT, Crew Cab, Cardinal Red $29,999 #79676A

'15 GMC Sierra 1500: Denali, Crew Cab, Clean Carfax One Owner, 4WD $37,999 #79661A

'17 GMC Yukon: SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4, $48,988 #P9277

'16 Honda HR-V: LX, Auto, 14K, Local Trade $19,990 #V18381A

'15 Honda CR-V: All Wheel Drive, Local Trade, 1 Owner $18,490 #C18343A

Nissan/Datsun

Misc Trucks

'15 Infiniti QX70: AWD, Moonlight White, 12K Miles $35,884 #P9329

'14 Ram 2500: 6.7 Diesel, Crew Cab Laramie, 4 New Tires, $47,490 #B9170

'08 Honda Pilot: SE, Silver, Loaded $9,776 #42634B

'08 Nissan Sentra: Automatic, Power Options, Just Arrived, $4,390 #M9044A

Nissan/Datsun Trucks

'14 Honda CR-V: EX-L, Sunroof, Leather Seats, Blue, $16,169 #42285A

'15 Nissan Titan: Pro, Crew Cab, 4WD, 1 Owner $28,990 #B9063 '13 Nissan Altima: Sunroof, Leather, Nav, Auto $9,990 #B9261

'17 Nissan Versa: S $12,900 Stk #903305 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Porsche '17 Porsche Cayenne: Platinum, 23K, Loaded, Has it All! $59,990 #B9182

'14 Porsche Boxster S: Convertible, RWD, 19K Miles, 6 Cyl-3.4L $52,800 #P9365

'12 Porsche 911 Carrera: 4S Cabriolet, White, 23K Miles $72,100 #79457A

Subaru '10 Buick Lacrosse: CXL, Loaded, Clean Carfax $9,969 #42866A

'12 Acura RDX: AWD, White, Sunroof, Turbo $18,490 #V9195A

'17 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD, Graphite Gray $57,202 #P9385

'18 Audi Q5: Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD $48,500 #28197L

'17 Audi A3 Cabriolet: Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD $34,999 #28832A

'18 Audi Q5: Premium Plus, Quattro, 10K Miles, AWD $48,500 #28330L

'15 Audi Q7: Prestige, AWD, One Owner, 3.0T S Line $37,800 #28549A

'15 Audi SQ5: Premium Plus, Florett Silver Metallic, 28K Miles $41,007 #P9345

Toyota '16 Toyota Corolla: Black Sand Pearl, Aux Audio Input, Cruise Control $14,476 #33720A

'13 Toyota Prius: $13,900 Stk #180771A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

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'15 Chevy Equinox: 1LT, $17,628 Stock #P06846 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox: 1LT, $17,500 Stk #P06842 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Equinox: $15,600 LT, Stock #P06725 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Dodge Durango: GT, Black Crystal, 36K Miles, AWD $31,884 #P9353

'09 Chevy Silverado 1500: Extended Cab, Long Box $13,934 Stk #P06868 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'12 Subaru Impreza: WRX, 47K Miles, 1 Owner $20,990 #C18110A

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP

'17 Chevy Tahoe: LT, Loaded, GM Certified, One Owner, Black $41,969 #P6521

'15 Chevy Tahoe: LTZ, 4WD, 34K Miles, Black $48,007 #P9348

'18 Tiguan: S, 5K Miles, Auto, 1 Owner $23,990

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'14 Chevy Tahoe LT: Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax $24,776 #42836A

'12 Volkswagen EOS: Convertible, $12,900 Stk #180544A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Volkswagen Passat: $11,223 Stk #P06866 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Sport Utility '15 Mazda 6 Touring: Auto, Loaded, Black $15,676 #40090A

'15 Ford Taurus: SEL, $11,900 Stk #P06655 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Honda Civic: EX-T, 17K, Local Trade $19,990 #V18243A

'13 Jetta SE: Automatic, Torndao Red, Local Trade, $6,890

'10 Volkswagen GTI: $9,990 Stk #P06862 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Mitsubishi

'17 Ford Mustang: GT Premium, Ingot Silver, Convertible, 12K Miles $33,884 #40236A

'14 Chevy Cruze: LTZ, Roof, Auto, White $13,490 #C17461D

'14 Passat "S" 31K, 18" Wheels, Navigation, Auto $12,490

'14 Lincoln MKZ: 31K, White, Nav, Local Trade $19,990 #V9185A

'13 Ford Fusion: Loaded, Very Clean $11,991 #33763A

Chevrolet

'14 Passat "S": 32K, VW Certified, Black, Auto $11,990

'12 Lexus CT 200h: Loaded, Clean Carfax $12,462 #33745B

Mercedes Benz '17 Buick Encore: Preferred Pkg, 1K Miles, Local Trade #C18058RA Call Today!

VOLKSWAGEN'S '12 Passat: SE, Automatic, Sunroof, Certified $11,990

'08 Chevy Impala: LS, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Silverstone, $7,442 #42755A '18 Audi A4: Premium Plus, Quattro, 7K Miles, AWD, Monlight Black $49,999 #28277L

'11 Honda Accord: EX-L, V6, Naviagation, White $11,990 #B9262

'15 Toyota Camry: SE, $16,700 Stk #P06867 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'14 BMW X5: xDrive 50i, AWD, 43K Miles, $37,802 #P9312

'18 Buick Envision: Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, $43,884 #P9356

'07 Hummer H2 SUT: Twilight Maroon, 4 Door, 4WD, $30,884 #P9343

'16 Hyundai Tuscon: Backup Camera, Parking Assist, FWD, Winter White $16,569 #42897A

'16 Hyundai Santa Fe: Sport, $16,600 Stk #P06857 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Infiniti QX30: Premium, AWD, White $28,990 #B9227

'15 Infiniti QX80: 4WD, Mocha Almond, 43K Miles, AWD, $48,884 #P9331

'17 Infiniti QX80: Graphite Shadow, 5.6L V-8, AWD, $47,988 #P9279

'17 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Clean Carfax 1 owner, 12K Miles, Black Obsidian $38,999 #93654L

'17 Infiniti QX60: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 11K Miles, Hermosa Blue $39,999 #96351L

'17 Infiniti QX80: Navigation, Power Moonroof, Parking Sensors $51,777 #153707

'17 Infiniti QX70: AWD, Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Automatic $37,999 #96313L

'16 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, AWD, 30K, Certified $27,490 #C8747

'17 Infiniti QX60: AWD 1 Owner, 10K Miles, , Graphite Shadow $37,999 #P9369

'18 Cadillac Escalade: Luxury Package, 4WD, 20K Miles $65,802 #P9311

'15 Infiniti QX70: 1 Owner, Black Obsidian, 13K Miles, AWD $35,500 #P9383

Volkswagen '12 Volkswagen Jetta: 2.5L, SE, FWD, Motor Trend Certified $9,490 #V18123A


07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B9

YOUR VIEWS. PUBLISHED.

Become a contributor to an ongoing conversation about the best ways to address problems, right wrongs and make our society better. Your input can generate useful ideas that catalyze positive action.

Let your view be known and voice be heard in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Write a letter to the editor at

STLtoday.com/letters

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Mini vans

'15 Infiniti QX80: 4WD, One Owner, Majestic White, 8 Cyl-5.6L $44,800 #97404A

'08 Jeep Liberty: Sport, Clean Carfax, $7,990 #35342A

'17 Lexus RX 350: F-Sport, AWD, 15K Miles $48,490 #M18226A

'18 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, Navigation, Snowflake White, 1K Miles $38,777 #12065L

'18 Nissan Murano: Platinum, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 3K Miles $36,999 #40235A

'17 Chrysler Pacifica: Touring, Black, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax $22,994 #P6522

'06 Infinti FX45: V8, AWD, $9,990 #35135A

'16 Jeep Compass Latitude: FWD, Remote Start, Heated Front Seats $13,869 #P6447

'15 Lexus RX 350: Nebula Gray Pearl, 6-Cyl 3.5L, AWD, 24K Miles $33,007 #P9346

'13 Mercedes-Benz G 63: AMG, Automatic, Black, 25K Miles $90,100 #P9126

'15 Toyota Highlander: LTD, M/R, Loaded, One Owner $30,769 #33580A

'17 Jaguar F-Pace S: British Racing Green Metallic , 3.0L V-6 Cyl $51,100 #P9109

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Limited, 27K Miles, 4WD, $29,884 #P9336

'12 Lincoln MKX: 31K Miles, Sunroof, Navigation, New Arrival $19,490 #C18251A

'17 Nissan Armada: SL, AWD, Silver $37,990 #V18235A

'11 Jeep Wrangler: Sahara, Automatic, Painted Hard Top, 2 Door $23,990 #V19000A

'17 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Freedom, 4WD, One Owner $39,999 #P9371

'13 Lincoln MKX: Loaded, Very Clean $15,990 #P6270A

'12 Jeep Grand Cherokee: SRT-8, Navigation, Pano Roof, $36,490 #B9169

'13 Land Rover Range Rover: SE, 5.0L V-8 cyl, 63K Miles, Firenze Red $44,600 #P9203

'14 Land Rover Range Rover: 5.0L V8 Supercharged, 4x4, $48,600 #P9120

'16 Jeep Cherokee: Trailhawk, 4WD, Leather, $23,990 #M18112A

'13 Land Rover Range Rover Sport, HSE, 8 Cyl, 5.0L, 4WD, $30,007 #P9349

'15 Jeep Cherokee: Latitude, 61K Miles, Leather, Auto $16,990 #V18494A

Sport Utility

'16 Toyota Highlander: Limited, AWD, Midnight Blue 6 Cyl 3.5L $35,999 #28555A

'06 Nissan Pathfinder: LE, 4WD, 3rd Row $7,890 #V18115B

'16 Honda Odyssey: 35K, Local Trade, $27,490 #V18401A

16 Toyota 4Runner: Midnight Black Metallic, 4.0L V-6, 4x4, $36,802 #97317B

'17 Maserati Levante: 7K Miles, 3.0L V-6, AWD $60,100 #P9149

'15 Nissan Murano: SL, AWD, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Moonroof $25,469 #35124A

'14 Mazda CX-5: One Owner, Local Trade $13,490 #M18323A

'15 Nissan Rogue: SV, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $18,504 #35474A

'16 Mazda CX-3: Grand Touring, AWD, 13K, Loaded $21,490 #M18170A

'13 Nissan Rogue: White, Loaded, Only 29K Miles $13,769 #35388A

'12 Honda Odyssey: EX-L, w/Navigation, Just Arrived! $19,490 #C9092A

'17 Volkswagen Tiguan: SEL, Nav, Pano Roof, Fender Audio, 10K $23,990 $V18043A

Vans '17 Chevy Express 3500: LT, 15 Passenger Van, GM Certified! $27,776 #P6535

'16 Volvo XC60: Clean Carfax One Owner, AWD, Backup Camera 22K Miles, $30,100 #96733A

'17 Ram ProMaster: Cargo Van, Local Trade $21,290 #M18052A

Trucks Rent/Lease '16 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, AWD, Certified $25,990 #M18230A

STLtoday.com/homes

'11 Dodge Grand Caravan: Mainstreet, SXT, Clean Carfax, $7,369 #P6402A

'17 Nissan Murano: Gun Metallic, 3.5L V-6, FWD, 18K Miles, $30,988 #P9278

'15 Chrysler T & C: Touring Van, Loaded, Clean Carfax $17,869 #42873B

STLtoday.com/jobs

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

WEATHER • Low 72, High 92 • Winds E 3-8 mph

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 111° Death Valley, California

Low: 33° Stanley, Idaho

Another hot day

Temperatures will be slightly above average today with highs topping out in the lower 90s under plenty of sunshine. It will still not be terribly humid though. Humidity levels will increase over the next few days with storm chances later this weekend into early next week. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

Sunny

Sunny

Sunny

Clear

75°

86°

92°

78°

97 92 94 92 95 98 99 94 95 96 98 92 94

W

partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

90s

H

65 69 66 64 64 66 67 66 68 63 66 63

88 91 89 88 88 89 90 89 92 89 89 87

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

73°/94° 75°/94°

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Chance of storms

Chance of storms

Kansas City 78 / 99

Flood Stage

Current Level

Kirksville 69 / 94

Joplin 75 / 98

Springfield 66 / 89

St. Louis 72 / 92 Poplar Bluff 72 / 92

Carbondale 69 / 91

- 0.52 - 0.66 - 0.54 - 0.65 - 0.58 - 0.60 - 0.80 - 0.90 - 0.66 - 0.30

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Wednesday, Jul 11th Weed - 11 (moderate), Mold - 14,688 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 19 Month (Total) 197 Season 1006 Year Ago 868 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.62 18 13.31 Peoria 14 13.12 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.12 Sullivan 16 2.36 Valley Park 24 20.58 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER 1.51 Union 15 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 29.27 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.98 - 0.72 - 0.52 - 0.06 - 0.88 - 0.58 0.00 - 1.20

SUN & MOON

New Jul 12 Sunrise

First Jul 19

Full Jul 27

5:47 AM Sunset

Last Aug 4 8:26 PM

Moonrise 5:14 AM Moonset 8:10 PM

Uranus was the first planet discovered with the aid of a telescope. Today, if you know where to look, Uranus can be seen in binoculars. Uranus is currently in the constellation Aries. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

358.71 360.01 498.10 659.60 705.56 659.77 916.31 839.81 602.04 406.92 604.06 446.97

- 0.22 0.00 - 0.02 - 0.02 - 0.13 - 0.24 - 0.15 - 0.05 - 0.16 - 0.02 - 0.03 - 0.13

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 90°

Jet Stream

Scattered showers and thunderstorms are expected from parts of the Carolinas back to the lower Mississippi Valley in association with a frontal boundary. Another front will trigger storms across parts of the upper Midwest, north-central Plains, and central Rockies. High pressure will remain in control from the Northeast back to the Ohio Valley and Midwest. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 56 Albuquerque 66 Anchorage 51 Atlanta 73 Atlantic City 67 Baltimore 65 Billings 61 Biloxi, Ms. 78 Birmingham 74 Bismarck 64 Boise 62 Boston 61 Buffalo 58 Burlington, Vt. 55 Charleston, S.C. 76 Charleston, W.V. 63 Charlotte 73 Cheyenne 58 Chicago 69 Cincinnati 64 Cleveland 60 Colorado Spgs. 60 Concord, N.H. 52 Dallas 76 Daytona Beach 74 Denver 64 Des Moines 73 79 Destin, Fl. 61 Detroit 71 El Paso 69 Evansville 51 Fairbanks 66 Fargo 53 Flagstaff 76 Fort Myers 54 Great Falls 64 Green Bay 58 Hartford 75 Honolulu 76 Houston 65 Indianapolis 72 Jackson, Ms. 50 Juneau 81 Key West 81 Las Vegas 76 Little Rock 71 Los Angeles 68 Louisville

82 88 66 91 81 85 86 88 91 83 92 78 86 81 95 87 91 83 90 87 82 85 81 94 91 91 95 89 84 92 89 68 84 75 94 85 85 84 89 92 88 94 59 91 99 95 87 90

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms showers thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny

60 66 53 74 62 66 62 78 73 61 65 62 62 58 75 66 71 55 71 65 63 60 56 77 75 63 73 78 66 71 67 49 63 53 76 58 71 60 75 76 66 75 47 82 82 76 71 68

83 87 66 89 82 86 96 89 92 88 98 79 86 86 91 90 89 80 93 91 88 83 83 95 90 87 92 89 88 87 92 73 88 79 93 94 85 85 89 93 92 93 66 91 102 96 87 92

sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny

City

Today L H

72 Macon 77 McAllen, Tx. 77 Memphis 78 Miami 65 Milwaukee 75 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 52 73 Mobile Montgomery 74 73 Nashville New Orleans 78 New York City 68 Norfolk, Va. 73 Oklahoma City 74 Omaha 77 Orlando 74 Palm Springs 81 Philadelphia 70 Phoenix 82 Pittsburgh 60 Portland, Me. 57 Portland, Or. 62 Providence 61 Raleigh 72 Rapid City 63 Reno 65 Richmond, Va. 69 Sacramento 59 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 70 San Antonio 73 San Diego 71 San Francisco 62 Santa Fe 59 Savannah 74 Seattle 59 75 Shreveport 75 Sioux Falls 54 Syracuse 72 Tallahassee 78 Tampa 72 Tucson 77 Tulsa 71 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 77 74 Wichita Wilmington, De. 69 80 Yuma

94 98 93 92 84 91 86 93 95 92 89 84 83 96 96 95 102 85 101 82 77 93 81 88 77 101 87 97 90 93 95 81 81 83 96 84 92 92 81 95 89 96 97 85 91 98 84 103

W

thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy

Tomorrow L H W

74 78 78 78 69 71 54 73 74 72 77 66 73 74 74 75 84 68 85 61 59 62 61 69 62 66 68 61 81 70 75 71 62 59 75 60 76 69 59 73 80 74 76 68 76 75 66 83

92 98 94 92 89 84 92 91 94 94 91 84 83 95 92 95 105 86 104 86 77 87 81 88 84 99 87 95 91 95 95 80 78 83 94 79 94 81 86 94 91 99 95 86 91 97 85 107

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

76 58 70 88 79 79 68 55 60 48 77 53 76 54 53 60

89 77 86 115 90 86 81 71 81 60 97 82 86 72 71 80

partly cloudy sunny sunny partly sunny thunderstorms partly sunny partly cloudy rain mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny mostly cloudy showers

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

57 78 72 77 64 46 68 57 70 84 54 60 59 79 55 79

80 82 87 90 83 64 96 79 90 105 75 81 79 88 67 91

W

mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly sunny thunderstorms

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.38 - 0.58 - 1.24 - 0.60 - 0.70

Very unhealthy

Good

Wintry Mix

90s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 19.25 23 14.59 Jefferson City 21 13.21 Hermann 20 10.91 Washington 25 17.54 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 17.36 Louisiana 15 16.39 Dam 24 25 26.90 Dam 25 26 26.97 Grafton 18 19.00 M.Price, Pool 419 414.30 M.Price, Tail. 21 17.97 St Louis 30 23.24 Chester 27 25.51 Cape Girardeau 32 29.89

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Snow

90s

90s

City

W

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.89” 1.47” 24.91” 22.12”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

93° 75° 89° 71° 106° 55° 101° 81°

80s

Alaska Low: 34°

Chicago 66 / 89

T-storms

80s

75°/92° 77°/90°

Mostly sunny Partly sunny, isolated storms

sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny

70s

80s

70s

80s

100s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (2:48 p.m.) Low (5:29 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1966) Record Low (1963) High Last Year Low Last Year

80s

70s

80s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

90s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

73 72 70 69 71 75 78 69 70 74 73 68 73

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

Rain

70s

100s

4-DAY FORECAST

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

80s 80s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

63 57 54 60 70 77 41 75 50 44 79 79 63 60 59 63

83 81 73 73 88 87 59 88 74 62 91 92 80 75 80 75

showers partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms


B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

S T. L O U I S

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Say Goodbye to Erectile Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction is a result of poor blood flow to the penis. Due to the narrowing of blood vessels, some men find it difficult to get and/or keep an erection. Temporary solutions like pills and needles may not be fully effective for some men. At STL Medical Solutions, we offer a breakthrough, evidence-based approach that treats the root cause of ED – called Acoustic Wave Therapy. It’s FDA cleared and uses low intensity sound waves to help open new blood vessels and stimulate nerve endings in the penis.* The Therapeutic Advances in Urology Journal concluded that “Acoustic Wave Therapy is a revolutionary treatment of ED and can rehabilitate erectile tissue.” “At age 84 it had been 10 years since I had an erection and no medications worked for me. With SwissWave, my spontaneous erections have returned.” ~ Joe R.

How Acoustic Wave Therapy Works:

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STL Medical Solutions

605 Old Ballas Rd. Ste 100, St. Louis, MO 63141

314-347-0200

www.STLMedicalSolutions.com Individual results may vary. © All rights reserved.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Thursday • 07.12.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, North deals NORTH ♠K 9 ♥A K Q 10 3 ♦9 7 3 ♣10 8 2 WEST EAST ♠Q 10 4 ♠5 2 ♥9 8 7 ♥J 6 4 2 ♦Q J 6 ♦10 8 5 2 ♣K Q J 4 ♣9 7 6 SOUTH ♠A J 8 7 6 3 ♥5 ♦A K 4 ♣A 5 3 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♥ Pass 1♠ Pass Pass 2♦* 1NT Pass 2♥ Pass 2♠ Pass 3♠ Pass 4NT Pass 5♦ Pass 6♠ All pass *Artificial game force Opening lead: King of ♣ Modern players have gotten more sophisticated when opener rebids one no trump. They use an artificial twoclub bid with invitational hands and they use a two-diamond bid with game-forcing hands. Over two diamonds, North didn’t want to bid no trump again without a stopper in either minor, so he intelligently rebid his excellent heart

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD suit. This might have deterred South, but he aggressively drove to slam once he found a spade fit. The slam is a poor one due to the loaded heart values opposite a singleton. South looked at the traditional way to play this trump suit — cash the king and then lead low to the jack. This would require a 3-2 split and for East to hold the queen. This is about a 2-1 underdog. Declarer thought he could do better by playing for a 4-3 split in hearts. He won the opening club lead with the ace and cashed dummy’s three top hearts, shedding his two remaining clubs. When hearts proved to split 4-3, he continued with a fourth heart, ruffing East’s jack with the jack of spades. This would have brought home the slam had East started with three spades to the queen. West over-ruffed and tried to cash a high club. South ruffed, cashed the ace of spades, and then led a spade to dummy’s king. When this drew the outstanding trumps, South discarded his low diamond on dummy’s 10 of hearts. Well done! (07/12/18)

Across

1 Southwest skiing locale 5 Revolting scene 9 Ancient Mexican 14 Fan fixation 15 A long time, in Mexico 16 ___ board 17 Properly 18 What’s tall when it’s young and short when it’s old? (old riddle) 19 Singer Jackson 20 Big foot spec 22 Like a winning play in the final seconds of overtime 23 Material in sheets 24 Word in a Latin 101 lesson 26 Digs in the mud 27 Colorado senator Michael 29 Bygone Ford make, informally

30 31 33 36 38

39 41 42 45 46 47 49 52 53 54 56 60 61

Plate, e.g. Horrify Bit of neckwear “Therefore …” Something you can lend without having to part with Tickle Pro choice? Stale joke Fins James who played Sonny Corleone “Ri-i-i-ight …” Remote NASCAR’s Busch or Petty Dirt in a dump truck, perhaps Since way back when Something to feed the kitty Madison Ave. industry Troubles

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If July 12 is your birthday • This year you break precedence; you might opt for a change in the status quo in some area of your life. If you are single, you are likely to meet someone who could have a major effect on your life. If you are attached, the two of you might make a major lifestyle change. A fellow Cancer is going through a similar change to what you’re experiencing.

WORD GAME July 12 WORD — ALBUMEN (ALBUMEN: al-BYOO-men: The white of an egg.) Average mark 23 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 31 or more words in ALBUMEN? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — INDELIBLY idle libel billy idly lied bind idyll lien bine illy lily bled inly lindy blend deli line blind dell liny blindly deny bell blini diel belly byline dill bend yell dine bide yield dyne bile lend bill RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

62 Fizzy wine option 63 Extended family 64 Much-reshared post on social media 65 Dice roll, say 66 Meal with storytelling 67 Fool, in British slang 68 Beauty spots

Down

1 Fab alternative 2 For two voices in unison 3 Carbonated beverage, spelled as 33-Down might suggest? 4 Knowing signs 5 Figures recorded in an experiment 6 Part of a competition 7 Carbonated beverage, spelled as 33-Down might suggest? 8 “Naughty!” 9 Carbonated beverage, spelled as 33-Down might suggest? 10 Feast that might include lomilomi salmon 11 Thin ___ 12 DVD player button 13 Eponymous cartoonist Guisewite

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Pressure pulls you in the opposite direction of where you are headed. You might feel lost as a result. A partner tries to point you toward what he or she feels is the right path. Your feelings could be soaring out of control. Tonight: Stay centered. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Do not allow another person to push you beyond your limits. Anything involving communication might prove to be a hassle. You’ll want to avoid making purchases today. Tonight: Happiest at home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Your more possessive side could emerge with a power play. Someone wants more control over your finances than you care to give. How this control game plays out could be more significant than you realize. Tonight: Say “yes.” CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You are a sign that is ruled by the Moon, and today’s solar eclipse could hit you hard. You might need to wait at least six months to understand the meaning of this event. Tonight: Do whatever suits you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH You might not understand your need to pull back. Today’s solar eclipse could be emotionally and/or physically draining. Do not push past your limits at the moment. Tonight: Continue kicking back. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH You might want to take some time to reflect on everything that has happened.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Bruce Haight

21 Something often added to a carbonated beverage 22 Baseball legend Yastrzemski 25 Anne of comedy 27 Annual celebration, for short 28 Aachen article 32 Bike 33 Rises, in a way 34 “So that’s what you mean” 35 Top

37 Carbonated beverage, spelled as 33-Down might suggest? 40 Food court regulars 43 Big name in chips 44 Bundle that might come with a bow on top 48 Like a happening party, in slang

49 Some Italian models 50 “My Dinner With ___” (1981 film) 51 Overly enthusiastic 55 Razz 57 Michigan college town 58 Shaving brand 59 Cookie containers 61 Calvin in “Calvin and Hobbes,” e.g.

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0607

WORD SCRIMMAGE

You might be heading toward a collision with a friend. Be careful not to lose sight of your priorities. Tonight: Hang out with your friends. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Tension seems to be building. You sense the push and pull of a situation, and might feel the need to change what is occurring. Try not to respond to a friend’s controlling ways. Tonight: Out till the wee hours. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You feel the energy of the solar eclipse. Your mind yearns to explore a new area or do some traveling, even if it is just being an armchair traveler. Tonight: Head to a concert. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might have a lot going on with you involving a partnership, a financial matter and/or a promotion. Though you could be highly emotional about the issue, you probably won’t understand it for several months. Tonight: With a favorite person.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Emotions run high, especially when dealing with a loved one. You might not be sure of what you want. Understand that you and this person might be somewhat out of sync. Tonight: What you feel could be amplified by a situation at work. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH With all the twists and turns of the day, you could become cranky, tired and a bit sarcastic. Understand that others around you might be off as well. Try to do your work and keep to yourself for now. Tonight: How about an early bedtime?

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH You might have difficulty controlling your thoughts. Your mind wanders from a friendship to a budding romance. You seem to be able to deal with today’s eclipse by allowing humor to take over. Tonight: Embrace the moment. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


07.12.2018 • Thursday • M 1

EVERYDAY

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Talk of remarriage triggers questions Dear Concerned • There are different types of military cemeteries in this country, 135 of which are maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs National Cemetery Administration. (None of them are located in your state.) However, there are many state and private military cemeteries nationwide, and their rules may differ from those of the national. Because you didn’t mention which category your brother-inlaw’s cemetery falls under, the best advice I can offer is to contact it and find out what its rules are in circumstances like this. Dear Abby • I tend to be a people pleaser. So when my wife wanted to buy a home for us to raise a family in, I went along with her plan to move to her hometown. I wanted her to be happy, and I was excited about the home-purchasing process. It’s almost two years later, and I regret it. I’m not happy here. I miss my hometown where all my friends and family live. It’s a beach town, a throwback to a time

when everyone knew everyone and you could walk or bike-ride anywhere. People don’t lock their doors, and homes are insulated from the streets and traffic, so kids can play freely outside. To me, it’s the perfect town. But there is no convincing my wife to try giving my hometown a shot as our full-time residence. I resent her because she got what she wants, and I just have to deal with it. Should I just accept my fate? — RESENTFUL IN NEW YORK Dear Resentful • I am sorry you are unhappy with the decision you made. Your wife may have wanted to move to her hometown because she felt her relatives could help out with your children, which is a plus. However, unless you find the strength to assert yourself, ‘‘accepting your fate” is exactly what you may have to do. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

DR. FOX

Can older cat overdose on catnip? Dear Dr. Fox • My son has an 18-year-old male cat. The other night, he gave Dinker some catnip, which he has had before, but this time he had a little more than usual. Dinker was immediately unresponsive, lying down and not moving. My son thought he was going to have to put him down. Dinker came around and has been fine ever since. Do you think the reaction was from the catnip, which he has always had without trouble? Because of his age, do you think it could have been a slight stroke or vertigo? — K.S., West Palm Beach, Fla. DEAR K.S. • The moral of your son’s saga is: All things in moderation. Soon after rolling in, and then eating, a small amount (one shredded teaspoon) of fresh catnip or catmint, my cats would often vomit, though usually keeping down the dried herbs. Then

they’d roll in what remained on the floor, and then get squiggly, maybe batting at their tails, before zoning out for a while. Catnip is the equivalent of Valium for most cats, but some show no interest. It makes for a relaxing tea for us humans, and also has some antispasmodic effects. I advise people to grow their own catnip, or only buy “Organically Certified,” since I have seen plastic packages of catnip in some stores indicating it comes from China. For Dinker, I say just a pinch or two next time. Moisten it with a little water and let stand at room temperature for a few minutes first to draw out the volatile oils. Dinker may simply roll in the aroma and get “high” that way. I say “high” not euphemistically or anthropomorphically. In the wild, many animal species — notably bears, baboons and elephants — will seek out fermented

fruits, clearly enjoying the effects altering their states of consciousness and behavior. I do not think such experiences are essential for us to provide for companion animals, but olfactory-sensitive cats and dogs do enjoy different scents. Some dogs may also appreciate catnip, and I would enjoy hearing from other readers whose dogs do. As for cannabis, which wild pigs especially relish, its use in veterinary medicine is increasing with its legalization for medical purposes. As this herb becomes accepted for recreational use in humans, companion animals should be kept away. Dogs, in particular, are often eager to eat cannabis plants or the dried herb. An overdose could cause respiratory depression and heart failure. Visit Dr. Fox’s website at DrFoxVet.net. Send mail to animaldocfox@gmail.com or to Dr. Michael Fox in care of Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

Differences: 1. Roof is smaller. 2. Railing is different. 3. Drawer is missing. 4. Sleeve is different. 5. Drip is missing. 6. Plate in sink is not showing.

Dear Abby • My brother-in-law ‘‘Charles” has earned the privilege of being buried in a military cemetery. He lost his wife, ‘‘Claire,” to cancer 10 years ago; she is buried in their plot in the military cemetery with a headstone. Their children are all adults now. Charles has been seriously dating a divorcee, ‘‘Joyce,” and they are talking about marriage. Joyce feels that for him to be committed to her in marriage, they should have a plot together. It’s our understanding that only one wife is allowed to be buried in the military cemetery. This would mean Claire would have to be exhumed and transferred to another one. I’m not sure how close Joyce is to her family, but she does have grown children. I suggested they get an outside opinion and a prenuptial agreement before they get married, which both would be agreeable to. What have others done in similar situations? — CONCERNED IN NEW HAMPSHIRE

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 07.12.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Gut health basics: How and when to take probiotics

Dear Dr. Roach • With the current focus on gut health, I have been hearing a lot about probiotic supplements. Who should take them? Does the number of bacteria matter more than the types listed on the container? Does one take them daily, for a brief time period, or for extended time periods? — K.V.S.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • Probiotics are healthy bacteria in the large intestines that aid in digestion and possibly other functions in the body. Scientists are just beginning to understand how the intestinal bacteria (called the microbiome) affect many areas of health. There are a few indications for probiotics that are well-accepted. The most important are in people with gastrointestinal conditions, especially in people with inflammation from inflammatory bowel disease. Some infections, including Clostridium difficile, may be prevented and treated with probiotics. This is not the primary treatment (which usually is antibiotics against C-diff), but it may be a useful adjunctive treatment or in recurrent cases. Gastroenterologists prescribe several different types of probiotics for these conditions. The particular type of probiotic may depend on the underlying condition and symptoms. There is very preliminary data that suggest probiotics may be helpful in young children to prevent allergies, but it’s not solid enough to recommend yet. Probiotics are generally safe, but there have been a few cases of the probiotics entering the bloodstream in people with diseased immune systems. They are fairly expensive, however. Having healthy gut bacteria may be of benefit in people with no specific problems. However, it is not necessary to take in bacteria to have a shift to healthier gut flora. A diet more based in plants, whole grains and nuts, with less dairy, meat and sweets (such as the Mediterranean diet) showed clear changes in the microbiome in a few days, compared with a typical Western diet. There are so many benefits to this type of diet, including reduction in heart disease risk, diabetes risk and obesity, that I recommend this diet or a similar one rather than taking probiotics for people who are interested in improving gut health.

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

7.12.18  

7.12.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

7.12.18  

7.12.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch