7.8.18

Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

Sunday • 07.08.2018 • $4.00 • EaRLy EdITIOn

THE HOME STRETCH SELLER’S MaRKET

Inventory shortage pushes up prices, forces buyers to hustle POPuLaR PRICE RanGE

Houses under $300,000 in particularly short supply, agents say

Suburban women form key but mutable voting bloc Driven by practicality, they don’t neatly line up with one political camp By CHuCK RaaSCH and KEVIn McdERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BaLLWIn • At a McAlister’s Deli,

PHOTO BY MICHAEL B. THOMAS

Kevin and Lauren Fairlie check out a house for sale in Kirkwood this month with their daughter, Emma, 5. The 2,300-square-foot home on Wilton Lane sits on a one-acre plot and is listed for $559,900.

Levinson, president of the St. Louis Realtors trade group and a Realtor with Dielmann Sotheby’s International Realty. Houses were on the market for an average of 10 days, and the median sale price of a home here was $190,000 in May — an 8 percent spike over the $176,000 average a year earlier, according to the Realtors organization. And buying a home requires a lot of hustle. “We were willing to pay cash and couldn’t even get in to see houses,” said Cate Sauve, who had to scramble to find a new home after selling her Holly Hills

By LEaH THORSEn St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOuIS • Homes around much of the

St. Louis region, especially those listed below $300,000, are being snapped up by eager house hunters in spite of mortgage interest rates that had ticked upward for months. “Right now, we’re experiencing — and this is not only in our area, but nationwide — a real shortage of inventory. There are more buyers out there than sellers, and that has caused prices to rise,” said Marc

two-family house in February. She and her husband got five offers the first day it hit the market. Perennially popular areas such as Webster Groves and Brentwood were out of reach for their $250,000 budget, and houses in more-affordable areas fell under contract before she could tour them. They wanted a ranch house with an open floor plan, a walk-in shower and a fenced yard for their two Labradoodle dogs. See HOMES • Page a6

U.S. HOME SELLING AND BUYING INTENTIONS

MORTGAGE RATES U.S. 30-year fixed average

Many more prospective homebuyers want to buy than current owners want to sell. Next year Next five years Next 10 years Not in the forseeable future

7 percent 6

Non-homeowners: Homeowners: Plan to BUY a home Plan to SELL a home 11% 5% 34% 17% 17% 16% 37%

4.52 percent

5 4 3

1 0

2009

SOURCES: Gallup poll, May 2018; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

2011

2013

2015

2017

POST-DISPATCH/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Local gaming headphones maker under pressure from tariffs • D1 TONY MESSENGER: Photo from Arch shows long-standing racial rift

• A2

JUDITH NEWMARK: Theater critic makes exit, prepares for next stage • C1 SATURDAY

Closing time?

63°/85° SUNNY, LESS HUMID

SUNDAY

65°/88° MOSTLY SUNNY

WEATHER B11

See SuBuRBS • Page a7

Arrest shows usefulness of ‘top shooters’ list, feds say Six-month-old program uses regional approach, data to target offenders By ROBERT PaTRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

2

61%

tucked in one of the miles of strip malls that line Manchester Road among the shoulder-to-shoulder suburbs of west St. Louis County, Helen McCauley and her daughter Sara didn’t hesitate when asked recently about the coming political season. “I don’t always vote the midterm elections, but this time I definitely will,” said Helen, whose politics lean left, with a focus on women’s issues. “I don’t like the way the last elections turned out,” she said, as Sara, 18 and eager to vote for the first time, nodded. “A lot of women who don’t necessarily vote every election are more energized to vote this time.” In a nearby Lion’s Choice restaurant, sisters Jodie Green and Julie Siebert, eating with their klatch of giggling young children, expressed somewhat different views. They’re frustrated with what they see as the heavy hand of political correctness in the schools and a lack of work ethic in society. But most of their concerns are less

ST. LOuIS • Police here said that in just seven days, one man robbed six women, ranging in age from 21 to 79, at gunpoint. He kidnapped three of the women, forcing them to drive to an ATM to withdraw cash, they said. And thus, Brandon Mardell Woods, 34, earned his way onto a relatively new list of so-called “top shooters” in the area, federal prosecutors said. Woods was removed from the list, which is also called the most violent offenders program, June 21, when prosecutors charged him with a June 18 robbery. He was indicted June 28 on ad- Woods ditional charges. In the six months since U.S. Attorney Jeff Jensen announced the existence of the list, roughly 15 people on it have had their names removed because they have been charged with crimes, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeanette Graviss. See SHOOTERS • Page a10

All-Star roster may see some red

Michael Block lives the dream

Rick Hummel expects to see Miles Mikolas in Miami

He’ll play in PGA Championship when it comes here in August

SPORTS

SPORTS

1 M Vol. 140, No. 189 ©2018

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2018 S60 T5 INSCRIPTION Lease for 36 months,

$

WEST COUNTY VOLVO CARS 636-227-8303 14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

Sunday • 07.08.2018 • $4.00 • FInaL EdITIOn

THE HOME STRETCH SELLER’S MaRKET

Inventory shortage pushes up prices, forces buyers to hustle POPuLaR PRICE RanGE

Houses under $300,000 in particularly short supply, agents say

Suburban women form key but mutable voting bloc Driven by practicality, they don’t neatly line up with one political camp By CHuCK RaaSCH and KEVIn McdERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BaLLWIn • At a McAlister’s Deli,

PHOTO BY MICHAEL B. THOMAS

Kevin and Lauren Fairlie check out a house for sale in Kirkwood this month with their daughter, Emma, 5. The 2,300-square-foot home on Wilton Lane sits on a one-acre plot and is listed for $559,900.

Levinson, president of the St. Louis Realtors trade group and a Realtor with Dielmann Sotheby’s International Realty. Houses were on the market for an average of 10 days, and the median sale price of a home here was $190,000 in May — an 8 percent spike over the $176,000 average a year earlier, according to the Realtors organization. And buying a home requires a lot of hustle. “We were willing to pay cash and couldn’t even get in to see houses,” said Cate Sauve, who had to scramble to find a new home after selling her Holly Hills

By LEaH THORSEn St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOuIS • Homes around much of the

St. Louis region, especially those listed below $300,000, are being snapped up by eager house hunters in spite of mortgage interest rates that had ticked upward for months. “Right now, we’re experiencing — and this is not only in our area, but nationwide — a real shortage of inventory. There are more buyers out there than sellers, and that has caused prices to rise,” said Marc

two-family house in February. She and her husband got five offers the first day it hit the market. Perennially popular areas such as Webster Groves and Brentwood were out of reach for their $250,000 budget, and houses in more-affordable areas fell under contract before she could tour them. They wanted a ranch house with an open floor plan, a walk-in shower and a fenced yard for their two Labradoodle dogs. See HOMES • Page a6

U.S. HOME SELLING AND BUYING INTENTIONS

MORTGAGE RATES U.S. 30-year fixed average

Many more prospective homebuyers want to buy than current owners want to sell. Next year Next five years Next 10 years Not in the forseeable future

4.52 percent

5 4 3

TODAY

0

2009

2011

2013

2015

2017

POST-DISPATCH/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

• A2

Closing time?

63°/88° MOSTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

73°/91°

Six-month-old program uses regional approach, data to target offenders By ROBERT PaTRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

1

61%

Local gaming headphones maker under pressure from tariffs • D1

JUDITH NEWMARK: Theater critic makes exit, prepares for next stage • C1

Arrest shows usefulness of ‘top shooters’ list, feds say

2

SOURCES: Gallup poll, May 2018; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

TONY MESSENGER: Photo from Arch shows long-standing racial rift

See SuBuRBS • Page a7

7 percent 6

Non-homeowners: Homeowners: Plan to BUY a home Plan to SELL a home 11% 5% 34% 17% 17% 16% 37%

tucked in one of the miles of strip malls that line Manchester Road among the shoulder-to-shoulder suburbs of west St. Louis County, Helen McCauley and her daughter Sara didn’t hesitate when asked recently about the coming political season. “I don’t always vote the midterm elections, but this time I definitely will,” said Helen, whose politics lean left, with a focus on women’s issues. “I don’t like the way the last elections turned out,” she said, as Sara, 18 and eager to vote for the first time, nodded. “A lot of women who don’t necessarily vote every election are more energized to vote this time.” In a nearby Lion’s Choice restaurant, sisters Jodie Green and Julie Siebert, eating with their klatch of giggling young children, expressed somewhat different views. They’re frustrated with what they see as the heavy hand of political correctness in the schools and a lack of work ethic in society. But most of their concerns are less

Cardinals squeak past Giants

Michael Block lives the dream

Great start from Martinez carries Redbirds to win in San Francisco

He’ll play in PGA Championship when it comes here in August

SPORTS

SPORTS

ST. LOuIS • Police here said that in just seven days, one man robbed six women, ranging in age from 21 to 79, at gunpoint. He kidnapped three of the women, forcing them to drive to an ATM to withdraw cash, they said. And thus, Brandon Mardell Woods, 34, earned his way onto a relatively new list of so-called “top shooters” in the area, federal prosecutors said. Woods was removed from the list, which is also called the most violent offenders program, June 21, when prosecutors charged him with a June 18 robbery. He was indicted June 28 on ad- Woods ditional charges. In the six months since U.S. Attorney Jeff Jensen announced the existence of the list, roughly 15 people on it have had their names removed because they have been charged with crimes, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeanette Graviss. See SHOOTERS • Page a10

PARTLY CLOUDY

2 M

WEATHER B11

Croatia and England advance to World Cup semifinals

• B1

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2018 S60 T5 INSCRIPTION Lease for 36 months,

$

WEST COUNTY VOLVO CARS 636-227-8303 14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

348

per

mo*

Vol. 140, No. 189 ©2018

SIGN & DRIVE $0 DUE AT SIGNING stk# 19119

* Total due includes $0 cap cost reduction, cash or trade. Plus customer to pay first payment, tax, title, license and dealer administrative fee. Lease at 7,500 miles per year (additional miles are available). Offer includes all Volvo incentives. S60 MSRP $41,015. No security deposit with approved credit. Financing though VCFS. Expires 7/13/18. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

Sunday • 07.08.2018 • $4.00 • FInaL EdITIOn

THE HOME STRETCH SELLER’S MaRKET

Inventory shortage pushes up prices, forces buyers to hustle POPuLaR PRICE RanGE

Houses under $300,000 in particularly short supply, agents say

Suburban women form key but mutable voting bloc Driven by practicality, they don’t neatly line up with one political camp By CHuCK RaaSCH and KEVIn McdERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BaLLWIn • At a McAlister’s Deli,

PHOTO BY MICHAEL B. THOMAS

Kevin and Lauren Fairlie check out a house for sale in Kirkwood this month with their daughter, Emma, 5. The 2,300-square-foot home on Wilton Lane sits on a one-acre plot and is listed for $559,900.

Levinson, president of the St. Louis Realtors trade group and a Realtor with Dielmann Sotheby’s International Realty. Houses were on the market for an average of 10 days, and the median sale price of a home here was $190,000 in May — an 8 percent spike over the $176,000 average a year earlier, according to the Realtors organization. And buying a home requires a lot of hustle. “We were willing to pay cash and couldn’t even get in to see houses,” said Cate Sauve, who had to scramble to find a new home after selling her Holly Hills

By LEaH THORSEn St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOuIS • Homes around much of the

St. Louis region, especially those listed below $300,000, are being snapped up by eager house hunters in spite of mortgage interest rates that had ticked upward for months. “Right now, we’re experiencing — and this is not only in our area, but nationwide — a real shortage of inventory. There are more buyers out there than sellers, and that has caused prices to rise,” said Marc

two-family house in February. She and her husband got five offers the first day it hit the market. Perennially popular areas such as Webster Groves and Brentwood were out of reach for their $250,000 budget, and houses in more-affordable areas fell under contract before she could tour them. They wanted a ranch house with an open floor plan, a walk-in shower and a fenced yard for their two Labradoodle dogs. See HOMES • Page a6

U.S. HOME SELLING AND BUYING INTENTIONS

MORTGAGE RATES U.S. 30-year fixed average

Many more prospective homebuyers want to buy than current owners want to sell. Next year Next five years Next 10 years Not in the forseeable future

4.52 percent

5 4 3

TODAY

0

2009

2011

2013

2015

2017

POST-DISPATCH/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

• A2

Closing time?

63°/88° MOSTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

73°/91°

Six-month-old program uses regional approach, data to target offenders By ROBERT PaTRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

1

61%

Local gaming headphones maker under pressure from tariffs • D1

JUDITH NEWMARK: Theater critic makes exit, prepares for next stage • C1

Arrest shows usefulness of ‘top shooters’ list, feds say

2

SOURCES: Gallup poll, May 2018; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

TONY MESSENGER: Photo from Arch shows long-standing racial rift

See SuBuRBS • Page a7

7 percent 6

Non-homeowners: Homeowners: Plan to BUY a home Plan to SELL a home 11% 5% 34% 17% 17% 16% 37%

tucked in one of the miles of strip malls that line Manchester Road among the shoulder-to-shoulder suburbs of west St. Louis County, Helen McCauley and her daughter Sara didn’t hesitate when asked recently about the coming political season. “I don’t always vote the midterm elections, but this time I definitely will,” said Helen, whose politics lean left, with a focus on women’s issues. “I don’t like the way the last elections turned out,” she said, as Sara, 18 and eager to vote for the first time, nodded. “A lot of women who don’t necessarily vote every election are more energized to vote this time.” In a nearby Lion’s Choice restaurant, sisters Jodie Green and Julie Siebert, eating with their klatch of giggling young children, expressed somewhat different views. They’re frustrated with what they see as the heavy hand of political correctness in the schools and a lack of work ethic in society. But most of their concerns are less

Cardinals squeak past Giants

Michael Block lives the dream

Great start from Martinez carries Redbirds to win in San Francisco

He’ll play in PGA Championship when it comes here in August

SPORTS

SPORTS

ST. LOuIS • Police here said that in just seven days, one man robbed six women, ranging in age from 21 to 79, at gunpoint. He kidnapped three of the women, forcing them to drive to an ATM to withdraw cash, they said. And thus, Brandon Mardell Woods, 34, earned his way onto a relatively new list of so-called “top shooters” in the area, federal prosecutors said. Woods was removed from the list, which is also called the most violent offenders program, June 21, when prosecutors charged him with a June 18 robbery. He was indicted June 28 on ad- Woods ditional charges. In the six months since U.S. Attorney Jeff Jensen announced the existence of the list, roughly 15 people on it have had their names removed because they have been charged with crimes, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeanette Graviss. See SHOOTERS • Page a10

PARTLY CLOUDY

4 M

WEATHER B11

Cave rescue begins in Thailand; operation long, risky

• A13

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2018 S60 T5 INSCRIPTION Lease for 36 months,

$

WEST COUNTY VOLVO CARS 636-227-8303 14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

348

per

mo*

Vol. 140, No. 189 ©2018

SIGN & DRIVE $0 DUE AT SIGNING stk# 19119

* Total due includes $0 cap cost reduction, cash or trade. Plus customer to pay first payment, tax, title, license and dealer administrative fee. Lease at 7,500 miles per year (additional miles are available). Offer includes all Volvo incentives. S60 MSRP $41,015. No security deposit with approved credit. Financing though VCFS. Expires 7/13/18. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


M 1 SUNDAY • 07.08.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM TRUMP’S TARIFFS

LAST CALL

Layoffs at a nail maker. Pain for soybean farmers. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher describe the far-ranging effects of the president’s trade policies. stltoday.com/watch

It’s the last day to vote for the “Top Pours” in St. Louis-area wineries, breweries and distilleries. Winners will be featured in our inaugural Go! Magazine Top Pours edition.

UPCOMING CHATS Monday

Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m.

Tuesday

Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m.

Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Thursday

MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m.

Friday

Talk Blues hockey, 1 p.m.

All-white Arch photo a ‘symptom’ of long-standing racial divide TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In 1939, the city of St. Louis began clearing 486 buildings from the area near its riverfront. Some were old and rundown. Others were built in cast iron, and likely could have lasted a century longer. Most housed businesses owned and run by black St. Louisans. About 5,000 jobs were lost. The land was stolen in a fraudulent election four years earlier so that St. Louis could become the home of one of the country’s greatest monuments, the Gateway Arch. World War II got in the way, and the land sat fallow for two decades, a monument in its emptiness to the nation’s love affair with urban renewal projects gone bad. In St. Louis, we don’t learn from history, we repeat it. In 1963, as the Arch was being constructed on land stolen from blacks, activist Percy Green scaled the awe-inspiring stainless steel structure under construction to bring attention to the fact that no black contractors were being used to build the nation’s monument to westward expansion. When the Arch was completed, in 1965, a line of white community leaders stood before it to unveil its greatness to the community. On Tuesday, 53 years later, history repeated itself. A ribbon-cutting years in the making as city, county and federal officials worked with private donors and the nonprofit Gateway Arch Park Foundation to remake the Arch grounds and better connect them to St. Louis, was an all-white affair. Mayor Lyda Krewson was

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Susan Saarinen, daughter of Gateway Arch architect Eero Saarinen, cuts the ribbon Tuesday at the newly renovated Arch grounds. The ribbon-cutting’s lack of diversity sparked an outcry, and a do-over was held on Friday.

there, and St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger. U.S. Sens. Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt were all smiles, as were more than a dozen other elected officials and dignitaries, not a single one of them a person of color. Krewson tweeted out a picture of the image, calling it “a perfect example” of “what we can accomplish together ...” Black St. Louisans, including elected officials Bruce Franks, a state representative, and Tishaura Jones, the city’s treasurer, were quick to react. They weren’t happy. Franks started a hashtag, #ArchSoWhite, and on Friday organized a new ribbon cutting with a more inclusive invitation list. Krewson’s deputy mayor, Nicole Hudson, was among those who were most disappointed. “I didn’t like seeing that image as a visual representation of the last four years,” Hudson says. It represents how far the issue of racial equity “still hasn’t reached.” Almost four years ago, in the wake of the Aug. 9, 2014, killing of Michael Brown — an unarmed 18-year-old from Ferguson killed by a white police officer — Hudson was tapped to help guide the Ferguson Commission,

an unprecedented collection of community leaders called together by Gov. Jay Nixon to study the roots of the century-old racial divide in the St. Louis region. Among many recommendations, that commission called on community leaders to apply a racial equity lens to everything government touches in the St. Louis region, to help make disaffected black residents, long left out of the city’s economic initiatives, more invested in the success of the city. Krewson hired Hudson in 2017 and named her deputy mayor for racial equity and priority initiatives. She still has much work to do. “When we celebrate our shared assets,” Hudson told me in an interview, “we have to be cognizant of the racial and ethnic reality that we exist in.” That didn’t happen Tuesday. One black public official — Congressman Lacy Clay — was invited to participate in the ribbon-cutting. He couldn’t make it. Nobody in the foundation, apparently, saw that as a problem. Neither did any of the elected officials who stood in the line of whiteness smiling, unable to find the political courage to

question the image that was about to celebrate a yearslong project that is intended to better connect the Arch to the city that hosts it. Key to the project is the park built over the highway that long ago separated the Arch from downtown. The metaphor could not be more apt. St. Louisans have shoveled dirt and grass over their divide, but below the surface, the racial chasm is deep and wide. The Arch event itself was plenty diverse. There was Cardinals Hall of Famer Ozzie Smith as the master of ceremonies. Other black officials were invited to be part of the crowd; they just weren’t welcome on the main stage. For Hudson, the problem isn’t so much the photo, it’s what the incident stands for. “The photo itself is a symptom,” Hudson says. She has friends who were at the ceremony who saw in real time what was happening and knew a public relations disaster was coming. What the moment needed, Hudson says, is somebody to show the same courage shown by lawyers with the St. Louis University School of Law Legal Clinics and ArchCity Defenders last year when they walked out of a Chamber of Commerce award ceremony because every award winner in the program — including them — was white. “We don’t have a culture where that would have happened in that moment,” she says of St. Louis. The concepts of inclusion and racial equity are not yet part of the city’s muscle memory. “We know that even that very land itself holds tension and history for us. We have to ask ourselves: How did we get to a place where this is even possible?” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER

PEOPLE Black heritage sites get a boost Grants totaling $1.1 million will help support important African-American heritage sites including the homes of jazz musician John Coltrane and playwright August Wilson; a Virginia location central to the slave trade; and civil rights locations in Birmingham, a preservation group announced Friday. The money from the African-American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is part of an effort by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to preserve and promote African-American historic places. Brent Leggs, who directs the fund, says such sites have traditionally been undervalued and underfunded. The trust plans to raise a total of $25 million over five years. B-52s are celebrating anniversary — maybe • The B-52s are celebrating their 40th anniversary this year. But they also may celebrate it next year. Vocalist Fred Schneider considers 2018 as their ruby anniversary. “This is 40 years since our first single came out,” Schneider said of “Rock Lobster.” The band’s other vocalist, Kate Pierson, interprets it a bit more liberally. “We started in 1976 jamming, and we played our first show on Valentine’s Day 1977, so we can mark 40 from there or we can mark 40 from 1979 when we did our first record,” Pierson said, referring to their eponymous album.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Singer Steve Lawrence is 83. Actor Jeffrey Tambor is 74. Actress Anjelica Huston is 67. Actor Kevin Bacon is 60. Country singer Toby Keith is 57. Actor Michael Weatherly is 50. Singer Beck is 48. Actor Milo Ventimiglia is 41. Actor Jaden Smith is 20. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Sens. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Doug Jones, D-Ala.; Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America; Kay Bailey Hutchison, U.S. representative to NATO. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Sens. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, and Chris Coons, D-Del.; Hutchison. THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Leonard Leo, outside adviser to President Donald Trump on judicial nominations; Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.; Hutchison. Associated Press

LOTTERY

ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Suspect charged in fatal shooting • A St. Louis County man was charged Friday in the shooting death two days earlier of a man police say was fatally shot after trying to steal a motorcycle. Neville Wright, 28, of the 4900 block of Clayridge Drive in South County, was Wright charged with second-degree murder, armed criminal action and one count of discharging at or from a motor vehicle. Bail for Wright was set at $500,000 cash. Police said Wright fatally shot Thomas Hearst Jr., 31, on July 4. About 3 a.m., a St. Louis County police officer saw a car stopped at the side of the 4800 block of Lemay Ferry Road and found Hearst lying injured next to the car. He later died at a hospital. Charging documents say

Hearst and another person had gone to a nearby apartment complex the day before to steal a motorcycle, but the owner interrupted them as they struggled to load it onto a truck. Hearst and his accomplice returned the next night for another attempt, charges said, and were confronted by Wright and the unidentified motorcycle owner. A police spokesman said the motorcycle’s owner was related to Wright. Wright and his relative got into a car and followed the would-be thieves’ black pickup down a dead-end street, charges said. Wright got out of the car, fired a warning shot in the air and then shot Hearst through the windshield as Hearst tried to run away. Charges said the truck continued to move, and Wright kept shooting at the truck. Hearst has convictions in Jefferson and St. Louis counties in drug, assault and gun cases.

Police have not identified Hearst’s accomplice in the motorcycle theft or the owner of the motorcycle. Hearst lived in the 500 block of Apex Drive in Crestwood. JENNINGS > Man fatally shot in his apartment • A man was shot dead Thursday inside his apartment in Jennings. Police were called just before midnight to the apartment, in the 2500 block of Tyrell Drive. Police Officer Benjamin Granda said the man had been shot at least once and died at the scene. The victim has been identified as Jarrett Hammond, 23. St. Louis County homicide detectives are investigating the case. Police released no additional details. Anyone with information is asked to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. LINCOLN COUNTY > Husband is person of interest in

woman’s death • The husband of a woman found dead at the Elsberry Motel and Lodge is being held at the Franklin County Jail in connection with domestic violence charge stemming from an incident in May. The Major Case Squad, which has been deactivated, described the husband as a person of interest in the woman’s death. Megan M. Clark, 29, was found dead July 1. An autopsy showed she had multiple gunshot wounds. The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office had asked the Greater St. Louis Major Case Squad to investigate. “It does not appear this was a random act,” the Major Case Squad had said in a press release. The sheriff’s department responded to a call at 10 a.m. July 1 at the hotel at 3407 North Highway 79 about a suspicious death.

MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 02-10-46-50-56 Mega ball: 16 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $283 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $80 million

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M 2 SUNDAY • 07.08.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM TRUMP’S TARIFFS

LAST CALL

Layoffs at a nail maker. Pain for soybean farmers. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher describe the far-ranging effects of the president’s trade policies. stltoday.com/watch

It’s the last day to vote for the “Top Pours” in St. Louis-area wineries, breweries and distilleries. Winners will be featured in our inaugural Go! Magazine Top Pours edition.

UPCOMING CHATS Monday

Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m.

Tuesday

Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m.

Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Thursday

MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m.

Friday

Talk Blues hockey, 1 p.m.

All-white Arch photo a ‘symptom’ of long-standing racial divide TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In 1939, the city of St. Louis began clearing 486 buildings from the area near its riverfront. Some were old and rundown. Others were built in cast iron, and likely could have lasted a century longer. Most housed businesses owned and run by black St. Louisans. About 5,000 jobs were lost. The land was stolen in a fraudulent election four years earlier so that St. Louis could become the home of one of the country’s greatest monuments, the Gateway Arch. World War II got in the way, and the land sat fallow for two decades, a monument in its emptiness to the nation’s love affair with urban renewal projects gone bad. In St. Louis, we don’t learn from history, we repeat it. In 1963, as the Arch was being constructed on land stolen from blacks, activist Percy Green scaled the awe-inspiring stainless steel structure under construction to bring attention to the fact that no black contractors were being used to build the nation’s monument to westward expansion. When the Arch was completed, in 1965, a line of white community leaders stood before it to unveil its greatness to the community. On Tuesday, 53 years later, history repeated itself. A ribbon-cutting years in the making as city, county and federal officials worked with private donors and the nonprofit Gateway Arch Park Foundation to remake the Arch grounds and better connect them to St. Louis, was an all-white affair. Mayor Lyda Krewson was

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Susan Saarinen, daughter of Gateway Arch architect Eero Saarinen, cuts the ribbon Tuesday at the newly renovated Arch grounds. The ribbon-cutting’s lack of diversity sparked an outcry, and a do-over was held on Friday.

there, and St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger. U.S. Sens. Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt were all smiles, as were more than a dozen other elected officials and dignitaries, not a single one of them a person of color. Krewson tweeted out a picture of the image, calling it “a perfect example” of “what we can accomplish together ...” Black St. Louisans, including elected officials Bruce Franks, a state representative, and Tishaura Jones, the city’s treasurer, were quick to react. They weren’t happy. Franks started a hashtag, #ArchSoWhite, and on Friday organized a new ribbon cutting with a more inclusive invitation list. Krewson’s deputy mayor, Nicole Hudson, was among those who were most disappointed. “I didn’t like seeing that image as a visual representation of the last four years,” Hudson says. It represents how far the issue of racial equity “still hasn’t reached.” Almost four years ago, in the wake of the Aug. 9, 2014, killing of Michael Brown — an unarmed 18-year-old from Ferguson killed by a white police officer — Hudson was tapped to help guide the Ferguson Commission,

an unprecedented collection of community leaders called together by Gov. Jay Nixon to study the roots of the century-old racial divide in the St. Louis region. Among many recommendations, that commission called on community leaders to apply a racial equity lens to everything government touches in the St. Louis region, to help make disaffected black residents, long left out of the city’s economic initiatives, more invested in the success of the city. Krewson hired Hudson in 2017 and named her deputy mayor for racial equity and priority initiatives. She still has much work to do. “When we celebrate our shared assets,” Hudson told me in an interview, “we have to be cognizant of the racial and ethnic reality that we exist in.” That didn’t happen Tuesday. One black public official — Congressman Lacy Clay — was invited to participate in the ribbon-cutting. He couldn’t make it. Nobody in the foundation, apparently, saw that as a problem. Neither did any of the elected officials who stood in the line of whiteness smiling, unable to find the political courage to

question the image that was about to celebrate a yearslong project that is intended to better connect the Arch to the city that hosts it. Key to the project is the park built over the highway that long ago separated the Arch from downtown. The metaphor could not be more apt. St. Louisans have shoveled dirt and grass over their divide, but below the surface, the racial chasm is deep and wide. The Arch event itself was plenty diverse. There was Cardinals Hall of Famer Ozzie Smith as the master of ceremonies. Other black officials were invited to be part of the crowd; they just weren’t welcome on the main stage. For Hudson, the problem isn’t so much the photo, it’s what the incident stands for. “The photo itself is a symptom,” Hudson says. She has friends who were at the ceremony who saw in real time what was happening and knew a public relations disaster was coming. What the moment needed, Hudson says, is somebody to show the same courage shown by lawyers with the St. Louis University School of Law Legal Clinics and ArchCity Defenders last year when they walked out of a Chamber of Commerce award ceremony because every award winner in the program — including them — was white. “We don’t have a culture where that would have happened in that moment,” she says of St. Louis. The concepts of inclusion and racial equity are not yet part of the city’s muscle memory. “We know that even that very land itself holds tension and history for us. We have to ask ourselves: How did we get to a place where this is even possible?” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER

PEOPLE Black heritage sites get a boost Grants totaling $1.1 million will help support important African-American heritage sites including the homes of jazz musician John Coltrane and playwright August Wilson; a Virginia location central to the slave trade; and civil rights locations in Birmingham, a preservation group announced Friday. The money from the African-American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is part of an effort by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to preserve and promote African-American historic places. Brent Leggs, who directs the fund, says such sites have traditionally been undervalued and underfunded. The trust plans to raise a total of $25 million over five years. B-52s are celebrating anniversary — maybe • The B-52s are celebrating their 40th anniversary this year. But they also may celebrate it next year. Vocalist Fred Schneider considers 2018 as their ruby anniversary. “This is 40 years since our first single came out,” Schneider said of “Rock Lobster.” The band’s other vocalist, Kate Pierson, interprets it more liberally. “We started in 1976 jamming, and we played our first show on Valentine’s Day 1977, so we can mark 40 from there or we can mark 40 from 1979 when we did our first record,” Pierson said, referring to their eponymous album.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Singer Steve Lawrence is 83. Actor Jeffrey Tambor is 74. Actress Anjelica Huston is 67. Actor Kevin Bacon is 60. Country singer Toby Keith is 57. Actor Michael Weatherly is 50. Singer Beck is 48. Actor Jaden Smith is 20. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo.; Rudy Giuliani, personal attorney for President Donald Trump STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Sens. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Doug Jones, D-Ala.; Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America; Kay Bailey Hutchison, U.S. representative to NATO. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Sens. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, and Chris Coons, D-Del.; Hutchison. THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Leonard Leo, outside adviser to Trump on judicial nominations; Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.; Giuliani. Associated Press

LOTTERY

ST. LOUIS > Woman is killed in crash • Police were investigating a vehicle crash that claimed the life of a woman near West Florissant and Emerson avenues about 11:50 p.m. Friday. Police did not release the victim’s name or other details.

Joshua Black, 27, was pronounced dead about 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Black was serving a five-year prison sentence for tampering with a motor vehicle, resisting arrest, assault and other charges. He had been in prison since February 2015.

MULTISTATE GAMES

ST. LOUIS > Man fatally shot • A man was found fatally shot about 9:45 p.m. Friday on a sidewalk at West Florissant and Robin avenues near Bellefontaine Cemetery, police said. His name was not released, but he was believed to be in his 20s. Officials said bullet evidence was collected and security cameras on the side of a nearby Phillips 66 gas station would be checked.

KANSAS CITY > Grad student is killed in armed robbery • A University of Missouri-Kansas City student has died after being shot inside the restaurant where he worked. Kansas City police say Sharath Koppu, 25, was shot around 7 p.m. Friday during an armed robbery at J’s Fish and Chicken Market. Koppu was a software engineer who came to the U.S. in January to pursue his master’s degree. Police have surveillance video from the restaurant that shows the shooting suspect, but they had not announced an arrest by late Saturday afternoon.

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

ST. LOUIS COUNTY > 12-yearold drowns at apartment pool • St. Louis County police were investigating the drowning of a 12-year-old boy Saturday at

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

A man waits to learn the name of the victim at the scene of a fatal shooting at West Florissant and Robin avenues on Friday in St. Louis. He said he thought the victim might be his stepson.

an apartment complex pool in north St. Louis County. Police confirmed the drowning occurred about 6:45 p.m. at Lucas Hunt Village apartments, near Interstate 70 and Lucas and Hunt Road. After unsuccessful attempts at CPR at the scene, the boy was

transported to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. JEFFERSON CITY > Autopsy ordered in death of inmate • Authorities say an autopsy has been ordered after an inmate death last week at the Jefferson City Correctional Center.

POWERBALL Saturday: 01-10-43-45-64 Powerball: 22 Power play: 3 Estimated jackpot: $80 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 02-10-46-50-56 Mega ball: 16 Megaplier: 3 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $306 million LOTTO Saturday: 07-13-14-17-18-37 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.6 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 02-04-17-21-36 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $133,000 PICK-3 Midday: 414 Evening: 463 PICK-4 Midday: 3400 Evening: 1423

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Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $10.25, Sunday-Friday $9.75, Monday-Friday $7.75, Thursday-Sunday $8.50, Sat-Mon $7.50, Fri-Sun $7.50, Sun-Mon $7.00, Sat-Sun Only $7.00, Sunday Only $4.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 01/14/18, 02/18/18, 03/18/18, 3/25/18, 04/15/18, 04/22/18, 05/20/18, 05/27/18, 06/17/18, 06/24/18, 07/15/18, 07/22/18, 08/19/18, 08/26/18, 09/09/18, 09/23/18, 10/14/18, 11/22/18, 12/09/18, 12/23/18 and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

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SATURDAY’S BEST

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

‘FIRST INCLUSIVE’ RIBBON-CUTTING Black leaders left out of Arch reopening stage their own BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Black elected leaders held a second ribbon-cutting on Friday for the newly renovated Gateway Arch museum and visitor center after the first one earlier this week failed to include a single person of color. The event was prompted by state Rep. Bruce Franks Jr., D-St. Louis, and City Treasurer Tishaura Jones, who both took to social media to criticize a photo from Tuesday’s ceremony showing at least 19 people standing along the ribbon line. All of the participants were white. “You can’t have an event of this magnitude, with no black representation!” Franks wrote on Facebook. “So we will make it right.” On Friday, as people gathered in the heat to listen to speeches before the ribbon-cutting, Franks thanked those in attendance. “This is what St. Louis really looks like,” Franks said of the racially diverse crowd. Jones called for change in the city of St. Louis — “not polite, incremental change, but change that hurts.” Hispanic, Asian and Muslim people also stepped to the podium to speak. The outrage that came from the first ribbon-cutting grew quickly as photos of the event made their way onto social media, including a post by Mayor Lyda Krewson on Facebook and Twitter. She shared a photo of the ribbon-cutting and said the revamped Gateway Arch park and museum “are perfect examples of what we can accomplish when we work together — local, state and federal partners, private donors, and YOU the voters.” The city is 49 percent AfricanAmerican and 43 percent white, according to Census data. St. Louis County, whose voters also

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

State Rep. Bruce Franks (far left) celebrates the ribbon-cutting at the Arch on Friday with (from left) Farrakhan Shegog, candidate for state representative in Missouri’s 86th District; Cori Bush, a U.S. congressional candidate for Missouri’s 1st District; the Rev. Darryl Gray; St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson; St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards; St. Louis Aldermanic President Lewis Reed; and Democratic Committeeman Rasheen Aldridge.

are helping fund the $380 million renovation, is 23 percent African-American and 70 percent white. Krewson’s deputy mayor for racial equity, Nicole Hudson, who is African-American, was among the hundreds of people who responded to the mayor’s post, saying on Facebook: “The first step is acknowledging that we have a problem. We aren’t all there yet.” Krewson, in turn, responded to Hudson’s post: “Yes, we have a problem! This is a blunder. I was an invited guest, and did not do the planning or inviting. That is not an excuse. I should have asked who is invited, who is coming. This situation makes everything we are trying to do harder.” Jones, who ran against Krewson for mayor last year and has been a fierce critic, wrote: “Lyda is forever saying ‘shoulda coulda woulda.’ No one has time for that.” As she had on social media a few days earlier, Jones pointed

out on Friday that those participating in the first ribboncutting were facing the statue of Dred and Harriet Scott, which is situated just outside the Old Courthouse, where the couple took their legal fight for freedom from slavery 160 years ago. Friday’s ribbon-cutting also used the Arch as the background, and Jones wielded the oversize scissors. Krewson, along with St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards, who is African-American, mingled with the crowd and sat in the second row during the series of speeches. Krewson was asked by organizers to join the ribbon-cutting line, which she did. The Rev. Darryl Gray, who served as emcee of the event, stressed that it was not a do-over ceremony but the “first inclusive” ribbon-cutting. St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger was among those who participated in the ribboncutting on Tuesday. On Friday, he was asked by the Post-Dispatch to comment on the controversy

and follow-up event, which he did not attend. “The Gateway Arch Park Foundation has apologized for its mistake as the organizers of Tuesday’s event,” Stenger said in a statement. “It’s important to point out true inclusion and diversity goes beyond a photo op. We all need to make sure we are committed to equity and opportunities for all.” Tuesday’s guest list was compiled by Gateway Arch Park Foundation, which spearheaded and oversaw the Arch grounds renovation. A foundation spokeswoman gave the Post-Dispatch various answers on Thursday about the list. First, she said she could not release it, then said she didn’t have it. Finally, she said that the organization would not release the list. “We invited a lot of people, but that doesn’t take away the fact that the photo moment missed the mark,” spokeswoman Samantha Fisher said. “We feel very sorry about that. That shouldn’t

have happened for whatever reason. “I’m not going to go into who was invited or who wasn’t invited, but we didn’t do enough to ensure it accurately reflected on our project.” Friday, the executive director of the foundation, Eric Moraczewski, spoke to the crowd. “For years, we focused on making this museum the story of everyone involved in our community,” Moraczewski said. “That’s why we are so sorry the ribbon-cutting on Tuesday did not reflect this commitment. I’m thankful to be here today to participate in this important event.” The only prominent elected black leader who appears to have been invited to Tuesday’s event was Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis. His spokesman told the Post-Dispatch that Clay was unable to attend that event because of a previously planned travel commitment with his son. On Friday, Clay issued a written statement criticizing the organizers of the Tuesday event, saying their failure “to incorporate our community’s diverse strength into the ribbon-cutting was a self-inflicted, insensitive, unacceptable failure.” Other black leaders received invitations to attend the opening, which was a public event, but they were not asked to be part of the ceremony. They included St. Louis Comptroller Darlene Green. “She was invited to attend but not invited to be on the dais or invited to be part of the ribboncutting,” Green’s spokesman Tyson Pruitt said. Lewis Reed, the president of the Board of Aldermen, did not receive an invitation to the first ceremony, an office spokeswoman said. He was at the Arch event Friday; Green was not. Cori Bush, an activist running against Clay for Congress in the Democratic primary, said she was comfortable being on the stage because looking out into the crowd it represented those she wanted to represent. “This is our St. Louis,” Bush said. “We are standing together.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

FAREWELL TO FAIR ST. LOUIS Fair St. Louis closed out its return to the Gateway arch grounds on Saturday. The festival wrapped up with performances by country acts Raelynn, Michael Ray and Martina McBride and then a final dose of fireworks at the riverfront. PHOTOS BY RYAN MICHALESKO • rmichalesko@post-dispatch.com

Eli Wilson, 14, of Des Moines, Iowa, looks through a telescope Saturday during Fair St. Louis downtown.

National Park Service rangers patrol during Fair St. Louis at the Gateway Arch on Saturday.

DIGEST FESTUS > I-55 lane closures to begin this week • Northbound Interstate 55 will be reduced to one lane from two before Highway 67 for nine straight days beginning at 10 a.m. Friday, the Missouri Department of Transportation announced. That will be followed by a nine-day southbound lane reduction on the interstate in the same area starting at 8 p.m. July 27. The two closures will allow work crews to do bridge rehab work. MoDOT is switching to the two lengthy consecutive-day closures from its original plan to impose the lane reductions on up to 10 weekends. The first closure will end by 5 a.m. Monday, July 23. During that July 13-23

period, MoDOT also will shut down the northbound I-55 ramp to southbound 67 and the northbound 67 ramp to northbound I-55. There will be other ramp closures during the southbound I-55 shutdown, from July 27 to Aug. 6. ST. LOUIS > New head at transit group • June McAllister Fowler, a BJC HealthCare executive and a former St. Louis County planning director, is the new chair of Citizens for Modern Transit, a local transit

Fowler

advocacy group. Fowler succeeds Rose Windmiller, who recently stepped down when she was named to the board of the Bi-State Development Agency by Gov. Mike Parson. Bi-State operates Metro Transit. Fowler, of St. Louis, is senior vice president of communications, marketing and public affairs for BJC. She also is a member of the St. Louis Airport Commission. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Highway W closures begin Thursday • Through traffic will be barred beginning noon Thursday for up to 24 hours on Highway W between Interstate 70 and Highway 61 in northwest

St. Charles County. The Missouri Department of Transportation said the closure will allow work crews to replace underground pipes as part of an ongoing project to upgrade Highway W. Local traffic will still be allowed to go around barriers. Residents living north of Shady Creek Lane should approach from 61 and people living south of Duenke Road should approach from I-70, MoDOT said. Three other shutdowns of W to through traffic between 61 and I-70 are planned later this month — from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 17 and from 5 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 19 and July 24.

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NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

INDEPENDENT STUDY Personalized learning lets students set their own pace BY LAURA PAPPANO Special to Washington Post

DALLAS • In 1997, a sixthgrader at Dan D. Rogers Elementary School set a three-alarm fire in the library. Erin and Sean Jett, whose house is so near they hear the school bell ring, did not have school-age children at the time. But it left an impression. “My child will not go there,” Erin said. When it comes to their children’s education, test scores matter, but test scores are not the only thing that matters. Which is why now, more than 10 years later, Emma Jett will be a fifthgrader at the Dallas school this fall. And her parents are happy about it. Their changed view — and that of others who shunned Rogers and now want in — is driven by personalized learning. Amid all the bellowing about charters, school choice and vouchers, a potentially more revolutionary reform movement is bubbling up. Philanthropists, state education officials, reform advocates — even charter school leaders — are examining personalized learning.

CUSTOMIZATION So what is personalized learning? It’s a customized path so that students learn at their own pace, in the manner that resonates best with them, with content tailored to their interests, aided by their computers. It feels natural to a generation groomed to presume that everything is calibrated to their needs and wants — whether it’s online shopping, news or math homework — and raised with smartphones in their hands. It sounds benign, and wonderful, to many parents. Schools, districts and even entire states are embracing it. Teachers unions cautiously endorse it, while flagging the concern that educators could be replaced by technology. But personalized learning raises big questions about educational equity. Is it important for all children to be taught common skills and content? Could personalized learning spur an even more splintered society? Is the purpose of education to forge a thoughtful citizenry or to equip students for jobs? What does personalized learning mean to the perennial tug-of-war over the content of what is taught? Is sameness the key to equal opportunity? Concerns about the content, or even the variable pace, of personalized learning derives from a middle-class educational ideal that is outdated and misses the point, said Trace Pickering, a proponent of personalized learning and the leader of Education Reimagined and co-founder of Iowa BIG, an experience-based high school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. More important, he said, is for educators to ask, “How can we effectively self-actualize human beings?” STUDENT-LED What can that look like? When Rogers Elementary became one of five schools in the Dallas Independent School District to pilot personalized learning in the 2015-2016 school year, Principal Lisa Lovato said she and her team grappled with decisions on gran-

WASHINGTON POST

Sudhir Vasal, a fourth-grade teacher at Dan D. Rogers Elementary School in Dallas, works on math lesson pathways.

ular issues, such as, “How long should it take a kindergartner to log into a computer?” and big philosophical questions, such as, “What matters most?” But perhaps the most dramatic decision made by the school involved explicitly teaching students to lead their own learning. Students would not be recipients of lessons, but drivers of them. This basic idea matters because even given current excitement about personalized learning, much of it has been done for years. Differentiated instruction was conceived in the 1950s. Before and since, teachers have given different students different work sheets and assignments. What’s new at Rogers is that children are taking the lead — and some responsibility — not just for what they do in class, but for their growth as students, said Marissa Limon, the school’s assistant principal. They work with teachers to create learning plans, and they reflect on their progress. Even in kindergarten, teacher Pauline Hayden schedules brief conferences every few weeks with each of her 20 students. “We discuss their goals and what they are working on, and if they had an assessment, we might talk about that,” she said. They set new goals, including nonacademic ones. “They are in charge of their learning,” Hayden said. “We are teaching that in kindergarten.” Each classroom operates dif-

ferently — independence has one look in kindergarten and another in fifth grade — but students display a striking sense of academic self-awareness. “I am pretty low in multiplying and dividing by decimals,” Carlie Lovato, a fifth-grader, offered. She admitted, “I like to talk a lot,” and her conversation can slip from school to TV shows. She’s working on it. Arnav Jain, in kindergarten, aspires “to do addition really fast.” Such insight matters. It means that even though Genesis Velazquez is 11 math lessons behind David Nava in teacher Sudhir Vasal’s fourth-grade class (“My pace is super fast,” David said), Genesis has not lost an ounce of pride in her work. “I don’t like to go that fast, because then I can get some problems wrong,” she said confidently as she worked through a lesson on geometric symmetry. Her corresponding quiz scores: 100, 92, 92. Technology is a big part of the personalized learning story. Silicon Valley’s push into education has made tech spending an increasingly large line in school budgets. Smart tools that adjust to students’ responses (and automatically provide more practice when they stumble) can enable increasingly specific levels of independence. Software can also integrate student data into teacher programs to help them track progress in ways unthink-

able several years ago. In Vasal’s class, students take a test; he instantly sees their errors and can explain their mistakes. Overall, the rise of online learning makes “blended” learning that combines computer and live instruction feel normal to students. And it will follow them into the workplace and throughout their careers. So it’s no surprise that the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative — started by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan — just gave $14 million to Chicago Public Schools to develop personalized learning.

EFFECTIVENESS Does personalized learning work? That is harder to answer. A Rand Corp. study conducted for the Gates Foundation (both the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and the Gates Foundation are funders of the Hechinger Report) and published last year noted that, “while [personalized learning] is promising in theory, there are very few evaluations of students’ learning outcomes.” The study tracked math and reading test scores and compared students who got personalized learning instruction with those who got traditional instruction. It found a small but statistically significant bump in math (3 percentage points) and a “similar trend” (but “not significant”) in reading. Hardly earth-shattering results. Test scores have become the

public face of school quality. But talk to parents and you hear less about numbers and more about a child’s happiness. It’s why a fire in the library tarnishes a school’s reputation in the minds of parents, sometimes for years. At Rogers, test scores have ticked up slightly. But surveys put parent satisfaction in the 88th to 96th percentiles. Parents connect the dots between their child’s academic engagement and sense of well-being. Rogers, once shunned, now has about 200 transfers among its 520 students, Lovato says. Kristen Watkins, director of personalized learning for the Dallas Independent School District, said the concept is catching on and will be in 10 schools in the fall. But the district does not dictate a top-down recipe. “We gave autonomy to the schools,” she said. At Rogers, the Jetts said they appreciate the tone that personalized learning has brought. “In the classroom, if you want, you can sit at a table. If you want to sit at a desk, you sit at a desk. You can sit on the floor. If you want, you can sit on a ball,” Sean said. Everyone learns, said Erin, “in the way they want to learn. It is not merely tolerated. It is embraced.” This article was produced by the Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

SATURDAY’S BEST

McKee lender sues two city development offices BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Paul McKee’s lender, the Bank of Washington, sued two St. Louis economic development offices Friday in the first volley of the brewing legal battle between the city and developer. The lawsuit filed Friday in Franklin County Circuit Court accuses the city’s Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority and an affiliated branch of fraud, negligent misrepresentation and unjust enrichment. The bank is represented by the same lawyers who represent McKee: Stone, Leyton & Gershman. Litigation was expected after the city accused the controversial developer last month of defaulting under a 2009 agreement granting his NorthSide Regeneration development rights to a 1,500-acre swath of north St. Louis. The city argued that it was time to allow other developers a shot at developing the

area. McKee’s attorneys say the city wants to hand it over to “favored” developers now that the future $1.7 billion campus of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency — a development McKee helped attract — is planned there. At issue in the lawsuit is whether the city has complied with agreements executed by the LCRA and its director, Otis Williams, as the city haggled in 2015 with McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration company for land to assemble the 99-acre NGA site. The documents, known as the “Future Assurances Agreement,” committed the city to hold off on declaring default under the development agreement — a threat during the NGA land negotiations — and to give the developer more time to commence construction. In exchange, McKee agreed to deed over land for the NGA site and the Bank of Washington agreed to release its liens on the property. They also agreed

Paul McKee

to assign future revenue from a tax increment financing district, or TIF, to pay for the NGA site preparation. With the commencement of construction on a $20 million convenience store and grocery north of downtown this year, McKee’s attorneys say the developer has met his new development thresholds under the future assurances agreement.

Since the future assurances agreement among the bank, McKee and LCRA, the two sides were supposed to negotiate a new development agreement, which would have been approved by the Board of Aldermen and mayor, but a new deal was never reached. The bank, in its lawsuit, said the city falsely represented that it would agree to a second development agreement similar to the future assurances agreement and submit it to the Board of Aldermen. It also said the city falsely claimed it wouldn’t declare default if McKee met his new development thresholds under the agreement. It accuses the LCRA of falsely acting as if it had authority to negotiate the Future Assurances Agreement and says the city is now taking the position that it is not bound by those agreements. The Bank of Washington says in the lawsuit that the city’s false representations tricked it into

agreeing to release its liens on the NGA property and allowing NorthSide to transfer the TIF revenues to support the project. The bank asks the court to rescind the future assurances agreement and restore the bank’s liens and interest in the TIF revenue. It offers to return what it received from the city — $5.3 million for the NorthSide land and liens on it from other McKee lenders the city acquired for $7 million. If the court decides that the LCRA couldn’t bind the city to the promises in the Future Assurances Agreement, Bank of Washington says the court should return its liens and interest in the TIF revenue. Williams, the LCRA chief, said in an email that the city had received the lawsuit and “will thoroughly review and respond appropriately.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


NATION

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

Religious liberty is key in court choice Conservatives inside and outside the White House point to issue as a central priority BY AMY GOLDSTEIN Washington Post

Raymond Kethledge, one of the finalists President Donald Trump is considering for the Supreme Court, has never explicitly stated his views on abortion or same-sex marriage. But in April, Kethledge, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, ruled in favor of Cathedral Buffet, a church-run Ohio restaurant being sued by the government because congregants were allegedly being “spiritually coerced” by their pastor to work without pay. Kethledge went further than his fellow judges in writing that the restaurant’s Catholic affiliation shielded it from federal labor law. While liberals are working to define the president’s second nomination to the high court as an epic battle over the future of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 ruling that cemented abortion rights, judges’ sympathies in cases such as Cathedral Buffet are serving as a proving ground for conservatives inside and outside the White House who have embraced religious freedom as a central priority. One person involved in the Supreme Court nomination process said that the president “doesn’t discuss particular areas of the law” in interviews with potential nominees. But as aides have sifted through candidates’ judicial records, they have paid careful attention to whether candidates “are sensitive to ... the free exercise of religion, and the importance of conscience rights,” said the person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to disclose internal discussions. In court rulings and other writings, the final candidates for the vacancy created by the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, long a swing vote on charged social issues, have consistently taken positions broadening faith-based objections to federal and state policies, government funding of churchrun organizations, and prayer in public settings. Such deference to religious freedom has become a precondition for a spot on the White House’s list of Supreme Court contenders, people close to the process say, as conservatives have become focused in the past few years on counteracting progressive changes of President Barack Obama’s administration, including expanding gay rights and access to birth control coverage. “I can’t think of anyone who has had a cramped or narrow view of religious liberty on that list, and I suspect that any judge who had such a conception would not have made it onto the list,” said Ramesh Ponnuru, a writer and fellow at the American Enterprise Institute who studies the future of conservatism. “The Trump administration, from the top down, is very aware of the intense concern that social conservatives have about religious liberty and the great importance of social conservatives to the coalition that got it elected,” Advocates on both sides of the political spectrum say that this matter of judicial views on religion — as a shield from progressive policies for religious objectors, and on church-state boundaries — is certain to figure in a fierce confirmation fight over whoever the president chooses. To some extent, religious liberty has become a code among conservatives for the political tinder box of abortion rights, as a spotlight already

C-SPAN VIA AP

Raymond Kethledge testifies in 2008 during his confirmation hearing for the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court on Capitol Hill in Washington.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brett Kavanaugh, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2004.

SOUTH BEND TRIBUNE VIA AP

Amy Coney Barrett, a Seventh U.S. Circuit Court judge, speaks at the University of Notre Dame in May.

is trained on two Republican Senate moderates, Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, supporters of preserving Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion nationwide. “There is absolutely a strong correlation between views on religious liberty and views on abortion. That is true of judges, true of senators, true of voters,” Ponnuru said. “These things are all bound up together.” But William Bennett, a conservative commentator and former U.S. education secretary, said, “The religion thing is bigger and broader. It means [abortion], but it means more than that.” Bennett said it encompassed, for instance, a Supreme Court ruling last month in favor of a Colorado baker, opposed to same-sex marriage on religious grounds, who refused to make a wedding cake for a gay couple; as well as a 2016 case in which the court sent back to lower courts a legal effort by a group of nuns to get out from under a requirement in the Affordable Care Act to provide contraceptive coverage. It is this broader constellation of religious issues that appears in the records of jurists Trump is considering in the final lead-up to his selection, which he has said he will announce Monday. Brett Kavanaugh, a top contender, has been a judge for a dozen years on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, which tends to hear fewer cases about religion than some other circuits. Kavanaugh, a practicing Catholic, has been criticized by some social conservatives for not being sufficiently far to the right. But he wrote a strong dissent in 2015, when his fellow D.C. Circuit judges decided not to take a case involving a group of priests who objected to President Barack Obama administration’s rules on contraceptive coverage. And five years earlier, he wrote a concurring opinion in a case in which the D.C. Circuit ruled against a group of atheists who challenged the prayers and words “so help me God” at presidential inaugurations. Kavanaugh went beyond the court’s majority, who held that the group did not have standing to sue. He argued that “those longstanding practices” do not violate the Constitution’s First Amendment. Kethledge, also a leading candidate, has been a judge for a decade on the Cincinnati-based Sixth Circuit. In addition to the Cathedral Buffet case, he was part of a court majority that ruled last year in favor of a Michigan county that begins its monthly Board of Commissioners meetings with a Christian prayer and request that the audience assume a reverent position. Another apparent finalist, Amy Coney Barrett, has been on the Chicago-based Seventh Circuit for just nine months. Already, she was part of a three-judge panel that ruled in favor of a Jewish day school sued by an ill teacher who had been fired, claiming that its religious identity shielded it from the American with Disabilities Act. “Looking at the records of these potential nominees, virtually all of them seem to be far more conservative ... on religious freedom and church-state issues” than Kennedy, the retiring justice, said Alex Luchenitser, associate legal director at Americans United for Separation of Church and State, which already has begun a campaign to persuade senators to reject what it is calling a “particularly dangerous” nomination.

McCONNELL ON MISSION ‘I had to smuggle her TO RESHAPE THE COURTS into the White House’ Senator is leading the way as Trump hopes to put his imprint on federal judiciary for generations to come BY LISA MASCARO Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is working to remake the nation’s judiciary, judge by judge.

WASHINGTON • Senate Ma-

jority Leader Mitch McConnell was upbeat the night after Justice Anthony Kennedy announced he was retiring from the Supreme Court. McConnell, R-Ky., had already led the Senate in confirming more circuit court judges in the first year of Donald Trump’s presidency than in that of any other president in history. Now McConnell had the chance to confirm a second Supreme Court justice, a thrilling prospect for his party. More than any other accomplishment, including the passage of the GOP’s tax cuts, the remaking of the judiciary is fast becoming the cornerstone of the Republican leader’s legacy. It’s something he’s been working on for a long time. “Well, I think it’s a little too early to be talking about legacy,” McConnell said with a smile as he left the Senate chamber. “A year and a half ago, I said it was a top priority,” he said about confirming judges, “and it remains so.” With McConnell leading the way in the Republican-controlled Senate, Trump is seeking to put his imprint on the federal judiciary for generations to come. While the latest opening on the Supreme Court is commanding all the attention, with Trump set to announce his pick on Monday night, the nominees to the lower courts are also consequential. More than 40 federal district and circuit court judges have been confirmed to life-

time appointments so far during Trump’s term, and those judges will have enormous sway in shaping legal arguments nationwide. Nearly 100 other judicial nominees are awaiting Senate confirmation. In all, there are more than 150 vacancies on the courts. The GOP’s focus on the judiciary has been sharpened by their narrow 51-49 Senate majority, which has made passing legislation difficult. Sixty votes are normally required to advance a bill, while judges can be confirmed with a simple majority. The newcomers to the bench follow a type. An Associated Press analysis found that roughly two-thirds of the judges who have been confirmed under Trump are white men. Of the 42 confirmed nominees, including Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, none is black. Ten are women, nine of them white. Three of the judges are AsianAmerican men, and one is a Hispanic man. In contrast, during President Barack Obama’s two terms, only 37 percent of judges confirmed were white men. Nearly 42 percent were women — the highest share of female judicial appointments of any president. “What the administration is seeking is to transform the face of the entire federal judiciary,” said Nan Aron, president of Alliance for Justice, a liberal group that tracks court issues. “The nominees share one basic

characteristic — their hostility to progress that’s been made in women, workers and civil rights as well as health and safety over the past several decades,” she said. “This probably is the most extremist slate of judges we’ve ever seen.” Conservative judicial advocates say the judicial appointments are correcting the leftward tilt of the bench. They see Trump and McConnell’s revamping of the courts — in the face of Democratic filibusters that stall even popular nominees — as more important than even legislative victories. Carrie Severino, the chief counsel and policy director at the conservative Judicial Crisis Network, says, “It’s something that’s viewed across the Republican and libertarian base as a huge accomplishment.” Republicans have often been seen as taking greater interest in the judiciary than Democrats. McConnell works closely with the Federalist Society, which is at the forefront of conservative judicial thinking, and he helped the group draft Trump’s list of 25 potential Supreme Court nominees. He well understands the power of the judicial branch to shape policy and mobilize voters. McConnell laid the groundwork for this moment with a startling move just hours after Justice Antonin Scalia’s sudden death in February 2016. He announced that the Senate wouldn’t consider Obama’s nominee because it was a presidential election year. He followed through on that vow, holding the seat open until after Trump took office. Democrats remain livid over the move to this day, calling it a stolen seat. But the Republican blockade helped solidify conservative and evangelical support for Trump during the election, as many rallied to the cause of having a Republican president fill the seat. McConnell has characterized the gambit as his single greatest achievement.

Recent presidents have delighted in dramatically revealing the people they have chosen to sit on the Supreme Court BY JESSICA GRESKO Associated Press

WASHINGTON • To keep his

arrival in Washington secret, the Supreme Court nominee was driven along a back farm road and flown to the nation’s capital on a military jet. He stayed with friends, rather than at a hotel. That allowed President Donald Trump to build up the suspense until he revealed, in a 2017 prime-time address, his first pick for the high court: Neil Gorsuch. “Here they come. Here they come,” Trump said as Gorsuch and his wife entered the East Room of the White House. “So was that a surprise? Was it?” Trump isn’t the only president to delight in a dramatic revealing of a Supreme Court nominee. Recent presidents have gone to some lengths to keep their choices under wraps during interviews and before their announcements: ushering nominees into the White House through a tunnel or back door, arranging covert car rides and meeting nominees outside the Oval Office. Trump has again scheduled a prime-time address Monday to announce his second nomination to the Supreme Court, a replacement for retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. Presidents have employed a variety of strategies to keep their selections secret. To avoid press attention and potential leaks, President Bill Clinton asked his first nominee to the high court, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to come to the White House on a weekend and enter through the back door when she came for an interview. Her instructions from there: Head to the Clinton family’s private residence on the second floor, not to the Oval Office.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks Thursday in Jerusalem after the screening of “RBG,” a documentary about her.

“It tickled her that I had to smuggle her into the White House,” Clinton said of the cloak-and-dagger process. George W. Bush nominee Samuel Alito’s trip to the White House involved a car and a weekend visit. He has said his instructions were that he should “go to a particular corner at a particular time in the morning and wait for a Chrysler 300 to pull up, flash its headlights a couple of times, and then I was to get in this car.” “So I felt like a spy,” Alito said in a 2015 interview. Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s 2009 nomination also involved driving. She has said that President Barack Obama’s administration told her they “would prefer that I didn’t take a plane” to Washington. They didn’t want her being recognized. Justice Clarence Thomas flew to the announcement of his 1991 nomination, but he traveled in a government plane through Andrews Air Force Base, out of view of the public. After flying to Maine, a Secret Service detail picked Thomas up in a black SUV with heavily tinted windows. Thomas said the president “seemed to revel in outwitting the reporters.”


SATURDAY’S BEST

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Threat of HIV, hepatitis C outbreak looms in rural Missouri BY SAMANTHA STOKES, JESSICA RENDALL AND KELSIE SCHRADER Special to the Post-dispatch

DONIPHAN,

MO.

The Ripley County Public Health Center could be considered ground zero of a looming health crisis in Missouri. In 2016, Ripley and 12 other Missouri counties were identified by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as being among the U.S. counties at highest risk for an HIV or hepatitis C outbreak from sharing needles. Both HIV and hepatitis C are transmitted by sharing infected blood or bodily fluids, which often happens when people share needles to inject drugs such as heroin. These diseases can lie dormant in the body for years, and left untreated, they are killers that destroy the immune system or cause liver failure. They are preventable, but insufficient funding for public health combined with limited health care access make it difficult to prevent the preventable. Jan Morrow, director of the health department in Ripley County, has seen an increase in hepatitis C cases. She said that she couldn’t be sure whether it was due to the county’s methamphetamine problem or the nationwide opioid epidemic but that it needed to be addressed. The problem is a small public health staff — just eight full-time employees — and a “shoestring” budget. The CDC issued its warning for 220 counties nationwide after an opioidfueled HIV outbreak hit the rural town of Austin, Ind., in late 2014. Now, the risk of another outbreak looms in rural Missouri counties that, like Austin, have high poverty rates and limited health care access. Despite this risk, decreased funding for public health in Missouri has forced counties such as Ripley to do more with less.

LACK OF FUNDING At Madison County’s public health center in Fredericktown, south of St. Louis, one-fourth of the county’s population goes each month for health care. Space is limited, and some administrators share an office. This outdated facility is just one sign of an overall lack of public health funding in the state. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, which oversees statewide public health, requested an $86 million increase in funds in 2018. Then-Gov. Eric Greitens instead recommended its budget be cut by more than $54 million. The state health department receives millions of dollars in opioid-related grants each year, but most of that is earmarked for the treatment of HIV and AIDS. Sara O’Connor, a spokeswoman for DHSS, said in an email that the Bureau of HIV, STD and Hepatitis “does not currently have any state or federal funding specifically dedicated to the HIV and/or viral hepatitis implications of the ongoing opioid crisis.” Craig Highfill, the bureau’s director of field prevention services, and Bureau Chief Nicole Massey said that AIDS received the majority of funding and that it was not easy to reallocate funds to something else. “We can’t stop that work to do this work,” she said. Randall Williams, director of DHSS, said funding was not the issue. “We spend almost onefifth of our gross domestic product on health care in this country, which is far more than most other industrialized countries,” Williams said. “So the question then becomes, can we spend that money in a better way to get better outcomes? And I think we can.” Morrow said the picture was different when facing it “in the trenches” at the county level. Public health has always been a low priority in the budget, she said. And that’s a problem. LACK OF ACCESS Most of the CDC’s at-risk

warns that a small sample size and limitations in data collection make it difficult to identify trends. Testing and treatment for HIV and hepatitis C vary by county, but patients often must be referred to larger towns hours away. Teresa Francis, a registered nurse in Madison County, said she sent patients who test positive for hepatitis C to the Cape Girardeau County Public Health Center, an hour and a half away. Amber Elliott, assistant director of the St. Francois County Health Center, said many people in her county

counties are rural areas in southeastern Missouri, some of which are lucky to have a supermarket, let alone specialized health care facilities. Many people there rely on Medicaid for health coverage. According to a state report on HIV and hepatitis C vulnerability in Missouri, there has not been a significant reported increase of these diseases in CDC-identified counties. In the last five years, there have been 27 new HIV diagnoses and nine confirmed acute hepatitis C cases in the 13 counties. However, the report

were uninsured, so they are referred to St. Louis University and Washington University — a 75-minute drive. Few resources exist to improve rural access to health care. Medicaid offers some reimbursement for transportation costs. A public bus travels monthly from Butler County to Cape Girardeau, the home of the nearest HIV care clinic — on a day the clinic isn’t open.

LITTLE ACTION After the Indiana HIV outbreak, the New England Journal of Medicine pub-

lished a study suggesting that other largely rural areas at risk for an outbreak should focus on prevention, such as increasing HIV testing, access to treatment and education. However, in the two years since the CDC study was released, Missouri has taken little action to protect against the risk of an HIV or hepatitis C outbreak. Bureau officials said they had focused on strengthening current programs, such as collaborating with community health centers to increase testing. With a shrinking budget, it’s been

hard to focus on new prevention initiatives, they said. After the Post-Dispatch began reporting on the issue, Kerri Tesreau, interim division director for the DHSS Division of Community and Public Health, notified a reporter that more funding would be offered at the local level to combat a potential outbreak. She would not provide any specific information about the plan. This story was produced by students in an investigative reporting class at the University of Missouri School of Journalism taught by former PostDispatch reporter Sara Shipley Hiles.

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NATION

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

DIGEST Texas to keep tents for migrant minors A state senator from Texas says he has been told the temporary tent shelter in the far western part of the state for immigrant minors will stay open indefinitely. State Sen. Jose Rodriguez, a Democrat, told the El Paso Times that he toured the Tornillo facility Friday. More than 300 teens are being housed at Tornillo, which the U.S. government opened last month because its shelters were at capacity. More than 2,000 children have been put in government shelters after being separated from their parents under the Trump administration’s zerotolerance policy. Rodriguez says an official at the facility told him it would stay open past a previous July 13 deadline on the facility’s initial contract. Body found after California wildfire • Wildfires raged on two ends of California on Saturday, killing one person, destroying scores of homes and reminding residents of last year’s historic destruction. The northern blaze began when a resident intentionally lit a small fire on a friend’s property near the border with Oregon. The fire quickly spread to more than 20,000 acres, forcing the evacuation of small towns including Hornbrook, where an unidentified body was found Friday morning in a burnedout home. In Southern California, Santa Barbara County is burning again. The so-called Holiday fire “exploded Friday night amid 100-degree temperatures and dangerous ‘sundowner’ winds that made the blaze impossible to control,” the Los Angeles Times wrote. It was only 5 percent contained by Saturday, and had destroyed 20 buildings, according to The Associated Press. No penalty for officer who used stun gun on sitting man • A Pennsylvania mayor says a police officer seen on video using a stun gun on a man as he was sitting on a curb will not be suspended or fired. Lancaster Mayor Diane Sorace said that the officer did not violate current use of force policies but that those policies were being updated. Sean Williams, 27, who is black, has filed suit against the officer and city police department alleging excessive force and racial profiling. His attorney, Brian Mildenberg, said it was “outrageous” that the officer wasn’t suspended during the investigation. Boy, 8, survives venomous snake bite in Florida • An 8-year-old Florida boy is recovering after being bitten by a venomous snake on Independence Day. In a Daytona Beach NewsJournal report, Melissa Thomas of New Smyrna Beach said her son Casson screamed the whole way to a hospital Wednesday as his ankle swelled to the size of a softball and oozed blood from a puncture wound. Jonathan Thomas said his son was bitten roughly 20 feet from their front porch while he was picking up toys in the yard. Casson was discharged Friday after receiving 18 doses of anti-venom. Jonathan Thomas said his insurance should cover the anti-venom treatments; each vial can cost about $20,000. It wasn’t clear which species of snake bit Casson. Man, 75, charged in threat to campaign worker, Trump supporters • An angry man on Long Island nearly backed over a campaign worker moments after saying he wanted to kill supporters of President Donald Trump and U.S. Rep. Lee Zeldin, both Republicans. Martin Astrof, 75, was charged Friday with reckless endangerment and making a terroristic threat. He was jailed pending arraignment. Museum to display plane built to rescue Iran hostages • A rocket-boosted military transport plane built to rescue 52 American hostages in Iran is making its way piece-by-piece to an upstate New York museum. The fuselage of the Lockheed YMC-130H was

seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. The planned rescue was terminated when an agreement to release the hostages was signed in January 1981. The plane will be reassembled in September at the museum in Glenville, 24 miles west of Albany.

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VIA AP

The agency’s tent shelter for immigrant minors at Tornillo, Texas, will stay open indefinitely, a state senator was told.

hauled to the Empire State Aerosciences Museum in Glenville on Friday. It had been at Robins Air Force Base in Georgia. The plane is one of three

highly modified C-130 transport planes intended to rescue the hostages who were held for 444 days after students supporting the Iranian Revolution

Fatal shooting by Florida officer is scrutinized • Florida authorities are investigating the fatal shooting of a suspect by an officer responding to a family disturbance call. In a WJXT-TV report, Chris Butler, the Jacksonville sheriff’s office chief of investigations, said officers responded Saturday

morning after receiving a 911 call about a man breaking things and damaging a car. Butler said while officers were en route, the suspect himself called 911 and told the dispatcher that he did not want to live any longer. The first officer to arrive reported that a man was on the front porch with a knife. Butler said the man approached the officer with the knife and ignored commands to drop it. The officer shot the suspect, who died at a hospital. Man charged in death of kitten • A Tennessee man is charged with burying a 6-week-old kitten alive. Johnny Mack Rogers, 29,

faces a felony aggravated animal cruelty charge in a criminal complaint filed by Unicoi County Animal Shelter Director Kevin King. It says King informed authorities a man and woman brought the kitten to the shelter on June 22 and showed photos of them rescuing the animal from a shallow grave in Erwin. King said the woman told him another woman at Rogers’ home stepped on the kitten and Rogers buried the animal, adding that Rogers and that woman were drunk during the incident. The kitten later died at an animal hospital. From news services

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FROM A1

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

More millennials are expected to buy

ST. LOUIS COUNTY > The ZIP code areas with the highest median prices in the first quarter of 2018 were: 63124 (Ladue area): $885,000 63005 (Chesterfield, Clarkson Valley area): $590,000 63127 (Sunset Hills area): $562,750 63049 (far southwest St. Louis County): $459,200 63038 (Wildwood area): $447,500

HOMES • FROM A1

They found such a house in the Mehlville area and made one of the 18 offers its owners received after one day, she said. They ended up paying about $15,000 above the $214,000 asking price. Sauve, 66, thinks the seller accepted their offer because it was all cash and they waived an appraisal. “I was getting frantic,” she said, a sentiment echoed by other buyers frustrated by a competitive housing market. Brad Elsner, a Realtor with Keller Williams Realty St. Louis who specializes in mid-St. Louis County areas such as Des Peres and Kirkwood, said buyers looking to pay under $300,000 are having an especially tough time finding a house. And as has long been the case, buyers opt to move farther west, where their budget can yield a bigger house, when they get priced out parts of St. Louis County, he said. Julie Moran, a Realtor with Coldwell Banker Gundaker who specializes in St. Charles County, said houses there below $225,000 are in particularly short supply. “I do think people are still cash poor and they want to move into something that already has quartz as opposed to granite, and Shaker-style cabinets,” she said. “They want the grays and Joanna Gaines (a designer and former co-host on a popular HGTV program) look as opposed to heavy, dark gold and jewel tones. They want it current with the trends.” She’s also seeing more contracts fall apart when prospective buyers, who have often offered above asking price, ask for repairs following an inspection and are rebuffed by sellers who often have multiple offers. And some would-be sellers are reluctant to put their homes on the market because of the difficulty in finding and buying another house, Moran said. In the Metro East, houses near Scott Air Force base listed between $100,000 and $350,000 usually sell within seven days, said Cheryl Johnson, managing broker and owner of Johnson Realty. But it’s a far different market in the more affluent Edwardsville, where houses above $600,000 aren’t selling because buyers fear already-high property taxes will increase as state elections loom, she said. “I’m not seeing moveup buyers staying in the state,” Johnson said. “They’re fleeing.” Freddie Mac reported Thursday that after a rapid increase through most of the spring, mortgage rates had declined in five of the past six weeks — the average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage was 4.52 percent, down from 4.66 percent on May 24, but still above the 3.95 percent seen at the start of this year.

ST. LOUIS AREA HOUSING TRENDS

> ZIP codes with the biggest jump in median sales price over last year were: 63121 (Normandy area): 72 percent, $43,000 63127 (Sunset Hills area): 68 percent, $562,750 63042 (Hazelwood area): 60.2 percent, $100,950 63135 (Ferguson area): 49.5 percent, $44,841 63137 (Riverview area): 47.3 percent, $37,500 ST. LOUIS

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL B. THOMAS

Real estate agent Gary Wells (right) talks at an open house in Kirkwood this month with Lauren and Kevin Fairlie and their 5-year-old daughter, Emma. The Fairlies live in the Shaw neighborhood and are looking to move.

“Starting in early June, it felt like a noticeable slowdown when interest rates took a jump,” said Christopher Thiemet, a broker and salesman with Circa Properties, who specializes in selling properties in south St. Louis. Before that, he said he had seen some of the most aggressive buyer activity in his 15 years in real estate, with most listings selling the first weekend on the market — one garnered 21 offers. But he said the market remains strong, and popular areas include neighborhoods around Tower Grove Park, St. Louis Hills, Southampton, Lindenwood Park and Clifton Heights. North St. Louis County is seeing gains in its housing market after struggling to rebound as quickly as other parts of the region from the housing crash, and after drops in property value largely attributed to the unrest following the 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown. In the ZIP code area that largely covers Ferguson, the news is a mixed bag. Property values were up about 50 percent in the first quarter of this year over last year, according to MLS figures. But houses only sold for a median price of $44,841 with an average of 72 days on the market. “It’s slowly coming back. But what’s hampering it is the availability of mortgages,” said Mark Ottinger, a broker with Alexander Realty, of the North County housing market. In the area from Pagedale east to Spanish Lake, and west into parts of Ferguson and Berkeley and north to Black Jack, more than half the mortgages made from 2004 to 2007 were subprime. Three-bedroom, twobath homes in Hazelwood and Florissant listed between $135,000 and $149,000 are in short supply and sell fast, said Kevin Vaughn, a Realtor with

> ZIP codes with the highest median prices in the first quarter of 2018 were: 63108 (Central West End area): $279,000 63104 (Lafayette Square area): $240,000 63110 (Forest Park Southeast, Shaw, the Hill areas): $236,000 63105 (area west of Forest Park): $231,000 63101 (downtown): $229,950 > ZIP codes with the biggest jump in median sales price over last year were: 63143 (Ellendale area): 85 percent, $198,000 63113 (Kingsway East, the Ville areas): 53.2 percent, $18,600 63115 (Penrose, Greater Ville areas): 33.3 percent, $14,000 63110 (Forest Park Southeast, Shaw, the Hill areas): 24.2 percent, $236,000 63102 (downtown, including around Busch Stadium): 17.9 percent, $125,000

This house in the 1400 block of Wilton Lane in Kirkwood is listed for $559,900. Real estate agents say prospective buyers looking for homes under $300,000 are having a hard time finding houses.

Coldwell Banker Gundaker. He said waiting a few hours to decide whether to make an offer can mean losing a house in that price range. Mortgage applications nationwide decreased half a percent for the week ending June 29 of this year from one week earlier, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. First-time buyers represented 46 percent of Freddie Mac’s purchased loans in the first quarter of this year, the biggest portion in recent history and up from 42 percent a year ago, the agency said. And more millennials are expected to buy houses as they reach the age of settling down, getting married and starting a family, according to Freddie Mac. “I feel sorry for people looking in my price range, I really do,” said Sauve, who is staying put in her recently purchased home in south St. Louis County. “It’s hard out there.” Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com

SOURCE: MLS reports


FROM A1

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Security cited as top issue for female voters SUBURBS • FROM A1

ideological, more practical and based on issues in their own lives: education, suicide prevention, food safety. “The stuff that’s really important isn’t really being addressed,” said Green, who didn’t express the enthusiasm for November that the McCauleys did. When pressed, she blames both parties. “Instead of trying to bring people together, they’re separating people further.” Suburbs like Ballwin will be on the front lines of this year’s battle for control of Congress, political analysts and candidates themselves say — with married suburban women in particular determining the outcome. They are always a complicated bloc, driven less by partisan anger than practical concerns, and less likely than their urban or rural or male counterparts to predictably line up in one political camp or another. Adding to that unpredictability this year is a president who won’t be on the ballot, but whose problems with some women could energize those already inclined to oppose his party’s candidates, while tamping down the enthusiasm of those who might otherwise be gettable Republican votes. Since the early days of his presidential campaign, when he directed harsh rhetoric against prominent women, from actor Rosie O’Donnell to journalist Megyn Kelly, Donald Trump’s relationship with female voters has been an issue for him. Much of the “resistance” movement against his presidency, beginning with a march the day after his inauguration, is coming from women. Democratic women in particular are running and winning elections at levels heretofore unseen. The question is, will the Trump Factor influence women in November’s midterm election? “There is a group of voters with which (Trump) is really struggling that is going to be consequential in the 2018 midterms, and that is married women,” said Jim Kessler, co-founder of the centrist think tank Third Way. “They have traditionally been supporting Republicans — not by huge margins, but by margins. And this is a group that is becoming repelled by Donald Trump. There are definitely cultural aspects to it, behavioral aspects.” He said that “whether or not they are offended by the behavior, just sort of the daily drama” may be turning away former female Trump supporters. “This is a group of voters that could either stay home or vote Democratic” in the congressional elections

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Moms Demand Action, a gun control activist group, march in the Webster Groves Community Days Fourth of July parade on Wednesday.

this fall, Kessler said.

‘STORMY EFFECT’ Democratic pollster Mark Penn says there has been a “Stormy effect” on Trump from the ongoing controversy over Trump’s alleged long-ago affairs with porn actress Stormy Daniels and Playboy model Karen McDougal. In a bipartisan poll Penn helped co-direct in early May, Trump’s job approval among men rose slightly from 50 percent to 53 percent compared with a poll taken a few weeks earlier — even as it fell among women from 41 percent to 35 percent. Polling by Democrat Fred Yang and Republican Bill McInturff for the Wall Street Journal and NBC News showed that support for Republican congressional candidates among unmarried women fell from 30 percent in June 2017 to 24 percent in March of this year. Support among married women during that time was 51-41 in favor of Democrats, with support for Republicans down by 6 points from what Trump got in 2016. Any tectonic shifts among female voters this year might be felt most strongly in the suburbs, where monied, well-educated voters haven’t set into the kind of ideological rigidity seen lately among hard-left urban dwellers or hard-right rural communities. The League of Women Voters of Metro St. Louis, which encompasses much of suburbia in the region, has seen a dramatic spike in membership in the past year, adding almost 100 new members to the roughly 300 it had before. Co-president Louise T. Wilkerson attributes it largely to Trump. “The misogyny, the habitual lying and his apparent disrespect for women has certainly mobilized a number of them,” Wilker-

Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, is shown in 2017. “Women want to see change ... they want results,” she said.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill is shown in May. “There are a lot of issues where women look at the security of their family,” the Democrat said.

son said. During protests last January, “I saw women out there who said they had never demonstrated before. That may translate into votes” against Republican candidates.

thing like it,” Wasserman tweeted. Overall, according to the Center for Women and Politics at Rutgers University, 52 women — 30 Democrats and 22 Republicans — have filed to run for the United States Senate. Six Democrats and two Republicans have won primaries so far, and 36 candidates are still in the running and facing later primaries, including in Missouri on Aug. 7. A total of 350 Democratic women and 118 Republican women have filed for U.S. House seats — records in both parties. That influx of female candidates could fundamentally change the conversation in those campaigns, with less emphasis on party and ideology and more on the business of everyday living. “We are busy people,” said U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin. “Women are, by virtue of all the multitasking that we do in life … unique. We don’t have time for the shenanigans, we care about our families, we are the ones that are the kind of glue that makes things happen.” Wagner won re-election two years ago with almost 60 percent of the vote, and Trump won in her district in 2016. But Wagner has been targeted this year by national Democrats, including a campaign group affiliated with former

AN ELECTORAL FORCE In 2016, married women made up 30 percent of the votes cast in the presidential election, the largest subgroup on gender and marital status. They ended up virtually splitting between Trump, at 47 percent, and Democrat Hillary Clinton, at 49 percent, according to exit polls by major media organizations. Trump’s 47 percent support among married women was a significant drop from the 53 percent that GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney won in 2012. Since the Women’s March on Jan. 21, 2017, the day after Trump’s inauguration, Democrats have tried to capitalize on this gender gap by recruiting and promoting female candidates. Through late June, Democratic women had won 71 of 109 U.S. House primaries for open seats in which at least one woman and one man was running, according to the Cook Political Report’s congressional campaign analyst Dave Wasserman. By contrast, Republican women won 11 of 29 similar primaries. “ Neve r s e e n a ny-

> Wednesday is the deadline to register to vote in the Aug. 7 Missouri primary election. Register at sos.mo.gov/elections

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President Barack Obama called Organizing for Action, which says it will sponsor grass-roots campaigning against her. That’s because Wagner represents a prototypical suburban district, where the women’s vote could be especially unpredictable and determinative — the kind of district Democrats are focused on all over the country on the theory that Trump’s problems with women could turn votes their way. Democrat Lauren Arthur won a special election to a Missouri Senate seat last month by 20 percentage points in a suburban Kansas City district. That seat had been previously held by a Republican and was won by Trump in 2016. “Most of the people here, they’re not as concerned about the traditional conservative issues” as much as practical ones, said Missouri state Rep. Jean Evans, R-Manchester, whose 99th District includes Ballwin. She estimates about half the registered voters in her suburban district haven’t declared a party, and those who have are about evenly split. “No matter whether they have an ‘R’ or a ‘D,’ they want good schools and safe streets and economic opportunity,” said Evans. Two top elected women from both parties said recently that women tend to want one overarching thing when they consider candidates: security — not just the militarydefense kind, but security in health, education, the economy and other areas that affect families. “It was the women in my town halls that raised their hands to ask about pre-existing conditions,

and those protections,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., referring to Trump administration attempts to water down those protections in the Affordable Care Act. “It was the women that were asking about the security of their retirement, and whether or not their kids could afford to go to college,” McCaskill continued. “So I do think that there are a lot of issues where women look at the security of their family, are really concerned about them right now.” Wagner was one of a handful of Republican elected officials who, late in the 2016 campaign, temporarily abandoned Trump after evidence of the then-candidate speaking in vulgar terms about women came out in an “Access Hollywood” tape. Later, just before the election, she said she would vote for Trump and urged others to do so. “Women want to see change, they want government that is going to listen to them, and they are tired of the nonsense,” Wagner said. “They are ready to take the seat at the table, they don’t like the gridlock, they want results. That’s what I want.”

‘ELEVATING WOMEN’ Wagner maintained that Republicans, with Trump, are delivering those results, on issues including tax cuts, regulatory reform and a possible breakthrough on nuclear negotiations with North Korea. Other Trump defenders say his appointment of women to top positions in his administration, including the recent confirmation of Gina Haspel as CIA director, the first woman to head that agency, should appeal to female voters. Republicans touted Haspel as an example of women, including presidential daughter Ivanka Trump, who have influence in this administration. One of the president’s top aides, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, ran Trump’s troubled campaign to victory in the final months of the 2016 campaign. “He is also a great boss to me as a mom, as a working mother,” she told reporters at a recent Christian Science Monitor breakfast. “It is Donald Trump who elevated me to campaign manager, and counselor to the president, and women should look at that example,” Conway said. “He walks a lot of people’s talk. It is he who has been elevating women to positions of trust and power.” Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

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A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

Police, donor surprise orphaned trio BY DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-Dispatch

From the outside things looked normal for the three children as they played with toys given by an anonymous donor and delivered to them by officers with the St. Louis County Police Department. But behind the smiling faces, memories of the terrible day when their mother was shot dead in front of them replays in their minds every day, their grandmother, Yvette King, 46, said. For just a few moments Friday, the children of Porsha Owens, 28, of Castle Point, didn’t have to think about June 13, when she was accosted by a man who demanded her car keys, then shot her in front of her children. Owens was a Riverview Gardens school safety officer at Westview Middle School and was taking her three children to the car when she was attacked. Police said the gunman wanted her car but couldn’t start it and ran off, leaving her bleeding to death on the ground with her children by her side. Mark L. Haywood was charged with second-degree murder, firstdegree robbery and two counts of armed criminal action. His bail was set at $1 million, cash only. St. Louis County police Lt. Col. Troy Doyle coordinated the event Friday at the North County Recreation Center, along with the Ethical Society Of Police chapter in St. Louis County, to present the toys to the children. Ruemont Farmer, 8, Hailee Watson, 4, and Haidyen Watson, 3, walked into a room where the toys were displayed on a long narrow table. “This is something to give back to them,” Doyle said. “I’ve been doing this job 26 years plus and have seen a number of horrific crimes that have bothered me, but this is one that touched me. To sit there and to die right in front of her kids — if you don’t have any compassion for that then you’re not human.” He said he had contacted the donor who paid for the toys. “It’s not 100 toys but enough to say we are thinking about you,” Doyle said as he watched the children. Ruemont’s eyes darted to a green motorized truck. Doyle helped him get it out of the box. “It’s got a lot of details in it, and it’s big, too,” Ruemont said, smiling in a green shirt that matched the green on the truck. Hailee wanted the Luva Bella doll,

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County police Officer Lt. Col. Troy Doyle smiles as Hailee Watson, 4, hugs an Elmo doll, one of several toys bought by an anonymous donor and presented by police to Hailee and her brothers (background, from left), Ruemont Farmer, 8, and Haidyen Watson, 3, at the North County Recreation Complex on Friday. The children’s mother, Porsha Owens, was killed in front of them on June 11.

and her little brother wanted the blue riding buggy that Officer Lou Kidson and St. Louis County police Capt. Guy Means put together for him. King said her grandchildren were coping well under the circumstances. “I love my grandchildren, and my daughter always told me to keep her children together if anything ever happened to her,” King said. “I love my grandbabies, and they love me.” She said she was still in disbelief. King said Ruemont drew pictures of what he saw the day his mother was shot to death. “All three of the children have talked about” what happened, she said. “They said, ‘Pow pow Momma is dead.’” “I comfort my grandchildren, and they know that I love them.” A Gofundme account set up to raise money to pay for the children’s expenses had reached $241,000 on Friday. Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County police Officer Monte Chambers helps Haidyen Watson and Ruemont Farmer assemble one of the toys delivered to the boys and their sister by St. Louis County police at the North County Recreation Complex on Friday. County police arranged for an anonymous donor to buy the toys for the children.

Alleged water slide injury at Six Flags highlights lax regulation BY BLAKE NELSON Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY • No government officials conducted a safety inspection of a new water slide at Six Flags St. Louis before a woman said she suffered whiplash last month from the force of the “Typhoon Twister” that featured a five-story drop and a “45-foot zero-gravity wave wall.” Officials said it was no surprise that the slide didn’t have to pass a government safety review, even though an estimated 80 million people flock to about 1,000 water parks in the U.S. every year. The ride is exempt from a Missouri law regulating amusement rides passed in 2004. “If it has mechanical things to get you up … then it’s a ride,” said Mike O’Connell, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety. “If you don’t have that, and if it’s basically gravity, it doesn’t meet the definition of a ride,” he said. Representatives of other water parks around the state said they also operated with little to no state oversight. Six states don’t regulate the amusement park industry at all, according to the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions: Alabama, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming and Utah. Oversight is lax in many others. The lack of a specific Missouri law about water slides is a problem, said Ken Martin, a Virginia-based amusement park safety consultant who has been registered as a third-party inspector in Missouri. “It falls through the cracks,” he said about attractions that lack specific regulations. Eureka, where the park is situated, relies on St. Louis County to handle all inspections and permits for attractions. The permit that the Typhoon Twister received from St. Louis County’s public works department reviewed only the ride’s machinery and plumbing. “This represents the entirety of our involvement in the inspection of water rides/slides,” David Wrone, a county spokesman, wrote in an email. A county water inspection hasn’t happened yet, and even when it does, county spokesman Cordell Whitlock said: “We test water quality on rides, but not safety or construction.” A Six Flags press release promoting the Typhoon Twister said participants would “careen wildly into a 125-foot-long whirlpool bowl” before “plummeting down an enclosed five-story drop” and then shoot-

ing up a “45-ft. zero-gravity wave wall to experience moments of weightlessness.” The day after it opened on June 22, Sondra Thornhill said she was injured on the slide. Wearing a neck brace, Thornhill told KMOV (Channel 4) last week that she had whiplash after the slide flung her into the air. “My whole body came off the raft,” she said. “It threw me so far forward and back so fast, I mean, all I heard was my neck pop. I thought I broke it at first.” Thornhill wrote in a message to The Associated Press that she had since hired an attorney and would not be able to answer more questions. She declined to provide the attorney’s name. Elizabeth Gotway, a Six Flags spokeswoman, said the ride was temporarily closed. But she did not answer questions about what needed to happen for it to reopen. Gotway said Six Flags’ water rides are inspected daily by the park, and “at least annually” by several other groups, including engineers and experts from Six Flags and a “third party independent ride consulting firm.” Gotway said that same process applied to the Typhoon Twister, but gave no further details. “The safety of our guests and employees is always our top priority, and we invest the greatest amount of time and resources in our safety programs,” Gotway wrote in an email. Gotway said that the Canadian company ProSlide manufactured the Typhoon Twister. ProSlide did not respond to multiple requests for comment. The dangers of water parks’ policing themselves received national attention in 2016 when a boy was decapitated on a massive waterslide at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kan. Schlitterbahn had successfully lobbied Kansas lawmakers years earlier to allow large parks to handle their own inspections. A grand jury indictment unsealed in March concluded that the slide was a “deadly weapon” that did not meet industry safety standards. Several Schlitterbahn employees were charged with offenses including second-degree murder and endangering a child. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that there were about 5,500 public waterslide injuries treated in emergency departments last year. Those numbers can include waterslides in places other than water parks, such as cruise ships or campsites, a spokeswoman for the federal commission said.

Unknown substance at strip club in Metro East sickens six people

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Members of a hazardous-materials team exit Roxy’s strip club in Brooklyn after a substance sickened six people, including two police officers, who came into contact with it early Friday. BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CLAIR COUNTY • A substance at Roxy’s strip club made six people sick early Friday, including two Brooklyn police officers, who may have breathed or touched it when they arrived to help evacuate the club, authorities say. Officials are considering the possibility that the substance is the powerful opioid fentanyl. Roxy’s, at 210 Madison Street, was evacuated by 4 a.m. Friday and now is shut down. A hazardous-materials team and a drug unit are investigating. Simmons said a preliminary test from state police should be able to tell them fairly soon what the substance is. No new information was available Friday afternoon. The six people who became ill were treated at a hospital Friday morning for non-life threatening illnesses. All of the victims were stable and are expected to recover. One of the officers came into contact with the substance while performing CPR on a male patron of the club, said Brooklyn police Lt. Antonio White. The officer passed out. He was treated at the hospital and was back at the scene within a few hours to help investigate, White said. One of the people who felt ill was an emergency medical technician.

Police said they would be looking at surveillance video from inside the club to see if that offers any clues. Investigators in protective gear were examining a police car to see if the substance had contaminated the car, too. One of the Brooklyn police officers confiscated what he thought was the substance and put it in his patrol car to take it to the station, White said. “He didn’t go far,” White said. Coming into contact with the illicit drug fentanyl has been a concern of first responders. In 2017, a police officer in eastern Ohio suffered an accidental overdose after a drug arrest when he touched powder on his shirt without realizing it was fentanyl, according to the Associated Press. Herb Simmons, the director of St. Clair County’s emergency management, said first responders were “educated every day on the possibility” of something such as fentanyl exposure, although he noted that authorities weren’t sure what the substance was at Roxy’s. “It’s very scary because you want everyone to return back home to their families,” White said. No one had been arrested. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 2 • SUNDAY • 07.08.2018

N. KOREA CALLS U.S. ATTITUDE ‘REGRETTABLE’ ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (center) meets with Kim Yong Chol, a North Korean senior ruling party official, in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Saturday.

North rejects Pompeo’s upbeat assessment of talks’ progress BY JOHN HUDSON Washington Post

TOKYO • Hours after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo hailed his two-day visit to Pyongyang as a “productive” round of “good-faith negotiations,” North Korea on Saturday sharply criticized U.S. negotiators’ attitude during the talks as “regrettable” and “robber-like,” accusing the United States of making unilateral demands to denuclearize. The remarks exposed the fragility surrounding discussions at the center of President Donald Trump’s foreign policy, raising questions about Pyongyang’s intentions and whether the Foreign Ministry’s statement represents a temporary outburst or if it signified a deeper misunderstanding between the two negotiating teams. The statement, issued Saturday by an unnamed spokesman and shared by the state-run Korea Central News Agency, said the United States violated the spirit of the June 12 Singapore summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. It contradicted statements made earlier by Pompeo, who signaled the visit made “progress on almost all of the central issues.” At the same time, North Korea said it still wants to build on the “friendly relationship and trust” that Trump and Kim created during the Singapore gathering.

Pompeo did not meet with the North Korean leader during his visit and did not secure a shared understanding of the path to denuclearization. The secretary has come under increasing pressure to produce results, with Trump having touted the summit as a game-changing moment that eliminated North Korea’s nuclear threat. Analysts say that any final accord between the two nations to eliminate Pyongyang’s sophisticated nuclear and missile arsenal will be a long slog with no guarantee of success. “While we were hopeful there would be some sort of breakthrough, it seems both sides can’t even agree to what transpired after countless hours of talks — and that is a massive problem,” said Harry Kazianis, an Asia expert at the Center for the National Interest. Pompeo told reporters Saturday that the two countries would soon hold workinglevel talks on the destruction of Pyongyang’s missile-engine-testing facility. He also said Pentagon officials will meet with their North Korean counterparts on or near July 12 at the demilitarized zone between the Koreas to discuss the return of U.S. military personnel who died during the Korean War. Last month, Trump told a crowd of supporters that the remains of 200 service members had “been sent back,” but U.S.

military officials later said that was not the case. U.S. officials viewed the issue as an easy confidence-building measure to demonstrate North Korea’s sincerity and have been frustrated with the speed of Pyongyang’s follow-through. Pompeo said both the testing facility issue and recovering U.S. remains still needed to be finalized. “We now have a meeting set up for July 12 — it could move by one day or two — where there will be discussions between the folks responsible for the repatriation of remains,” he said. When asked if he got any closer to setting out a timeline to denuclearize, Pompeo said, “I’m not going to get into details of our conversations, but we spent a good deal of time talking ... and I think we made progress in every element of our discussions.” Pompeo’s visit to North Korea forced the United States to postpone a planned meeting of U.S. and Indian defense and foreign ministers, so expectations were high among Japanese and South Korean officials that Pompeo would meet with Kim Jong Un during the two-day visit. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert, however, said the United States had no expectation of a meeting with Kim even though White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said on July 2 that Pompeo would “meet with the North Korean leader and his team.”

Evans Revere, a former U.S. diplomat with a long history of negotiating with North Korea, said that it was evident now that talks in Pyongyang had not gone well — and that it appeared North Korea may have no intention of actually denuclearizing in the way the United States would want. “Pompeo appears to have presented the North Koreans with some demands and requirements for real moves towards denuclearization, as opposed to the symbolic steps and empty language Pyongyang has been using so far. He deserves credit for doing so,” Revere wrote in an email. “But in doing so, he has elicited North Korean ire, and he has now seen the reality of North Korea’s game plan and intentions that many of us have been describing for some time,” Revere added. “Welcome to our world, Mr. Secretary.” Ahead of the new round of talks, Kim Yong Chol, North Korea’s septuagenarian former spy chief, teased Pompeo, suggesting that the “serious” negotiations the night before may have caused Pompeo to lose sleep. “We did have very serious discussion on very important matters yesterday. So thinking about those discussions, you might have not slept well last night,” Kim said. “Director Kim, I slept just fine,” Pompeo responded.

Tariffs’ widening impact changes minds in U.S. Senate battleground

Trade dispute undercuts already unstable U.S.-China relations

BY JONATHAN MATTISE AND STEVE PEOPLES Associated Press

BY DEB RIECHMANN AND MATTHEW PENNINGTON Associated Press

NASHVILLE, TENN. • Jimmy Tosh’s

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump’s trade battle with China will exacerbate relations with Beijing that are already fraying on several fronts as the U.S. takes a more confrontational stance and an increasingly powerful China stands its ground. The gloves came off Friday as the world’s two largest economies imposed tariffs on billions of dollars of each other’s goods amid a spiraling dispute over technology. It comes at a time when Washington needs China’s help in ending its nuclear standoff with North Korea. Trump’s much-vaunted personal rapport with Chinese President Xi Jinping, whom he hosted at his Mar-a-Lago resort three months after taking office, won’t help patch up differences, experts and former officials say. “The notion that there’s a personal relationship which will somehow supersede China’s strategic interests and the wellbeing of the Communist Party — including its ability to manage its own economy consistent with its political interests — is absurd,” said Daniel Russel, top U.S. diplomat for East Asia under President Barack Obama. “There’s no scenario in which an affectionate relationship, real or imagined, is going to stay Xi’s hand,” Russel said. Troubles go beyond trade. China has chafed about the scope of U.S. relations with Taiwan; U.S. complaints about its construction of military outposts on islands in the South China Sea; tougher screening of Chinese investment in the U.S.; visa restrictions; and accusations that it’s the main source of opioids. If not new, these are now deepening sources of tension between Washington and Beijing. Even as Trump has sought to cultivate his relationship with the increasingly dominant Chinese leader, his administration has chosen to confront an increasingly defiant China on pretty much all them. It also identified China, along with Russia, as a threat in the most recent U.S. National Security Strategy. In response, Beijing is hanging tough. “China has made it abundantly clear that it will never surrender to blackmail or coercion,” Chinese state news agency Xinhua said Friday. To what extent the trade tension bleeds

sprawling hog farm in rural Tennessee is an unlikely battleground in the fight for control of the U.S. Senate. Yet his 15,000 acres two hours west of Nashville showcase the practical risks of President Donald Trump’s trade policies and the political threat to red-state Republican Senate candidates such as Tennessee’s Marsha Blackburn. Tosh, a third-generation farmer who almost always votes Republican, said he was voting this fall for Blackburn’s Democratic opponent, former Gov. Phil Bredesen, in part because Trump’s trade wars are hurting his family business — a sizable one with some 400 employees and 30,000 pigs. The cost of steel needed for new barns is up, Tosh said, and the expanding pork market stands to suffer under new tariffs. “This tariff situation has got me very, very, very concerned,” Tosh said. “I just think Bredesen would be better on that situation.” He said Blackburn has shifted “toward the center” on tariffs, “but in my opinion, it’s a little late and not far enough.” Similar concerns are roiling high-profile Senate contests in Missouri, Indiana, Pennsylvania and North Dakota and forcing GOP candidates to answer for the trade policies of a Republican president they have backed on almost every other major issue. In 2016, populist attacks against free trade defined Trump’s political rise. Now, as he sparks an international trade war four months before the midterm elections, few policies could be more problematic for Trump’s allies in pivotal Senate contests. The Trump administration imposed a 25 percent tax on $34 billion worth of Chinese imports on Friday, and China is retaliating with taxes on an equal amount of U.S. products, including soybeans, electric cars and pork. The administration has penalized steel and aluminum imports from allies such as Canada and Mexico, leading to retaliation against American-made products such as blue jeans, motorcycles and whiskey. The tension has reshaped the race to replace retiring Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn. Blackburn, an eight-term congress-

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Democratic U.S. Senate candidate and former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen (left) talks with David Womack, a farmer and former American Soybean Development Foundation president, on a visit to Farrar Farm in Flat Creek, Tenn., last month.

woman, has been one of the president’s biggest boosters for the past two years, yet with business people up in arms, she has dramatically softened her support for Trump’s trade policies, at least. “We fully appreciate that some of these countries have had a trade war against us for years, certainly China would be in that list, and it’s time that somebody really stands up,” Blackburn told AP. “But with that said, it does cause us tremendous concern, just grave concern.” Still, Blackburn opposed a proposal by Corker that would have given Congress new authority to check the president’s trade moves. She called Corker’s approach “a little bit too broad.” Instead, Blackburn helped write a letter urging Trump’s commerce secretary to reconsider broad tariffs so as to avoid harm to Tennessee’s economy. Nationwide, the U.S. Chamber reported that $75 billion in U.S. exports will soon be subject to retaliatory tariffs. Many of the hardest hit states are those that backed Trump and feature top-tier Senate races in November. Indiana, where Republican Senate candidate Mike Braun is trying to defeat Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly, has more than 812,000 jobs tied to global trade. Missouri’s Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat, has pounded her Republican opponent, Josh Hawley, for backing Trump’s trade decisions. Hawley, whose state has more than 826,000 jobs tied to global trade, says the president is right to shake up trade deals and should have time to negotiate.

ANALYSIS into other aspects of the U.S.-China relationship remains to be seen. Mike Pillsbury, director of the Center for Chinese Strategy at the Hudson Institute, said U.S.-China relations were headed into “uncharted waters.” Recently returned from a visit to China, Pillsbury said he was told by government officials and businessmen that they were confused about what the Trump administration wanted them to do. They threatened to back off assisting the U.S. nuclear talks with North Korea. “They explicitly said that,” according to Pillsbury, who has written three books on China and has advised the Trump administration. “They said, ‘We will help you (the U.S.) less with North Korea if you start a trade war with us on July 6.’ Pretty clear, huh?” China has already distanced itself somewhat from its cooperation with the U.S. on North Korea. After supporting tough U.N. sanctions and scaling back trade with the North after it ramped up nuclear and missile tests last year, Beijing has eased restrictions on its neighbor. That began after Trump abruptly decided in March to meet with Kim Jong Un. Once again, China has again focused on rekindling its alliance with Pyongyang — Xi has met Kim three times this year. Abraham Denmark, a former senior U.S. defense official on Asia, said China had welcomed Trump’s sudden shift from confrontation to diplomacy with North Korea and also his decision to halt large-scale military exercises with close U.S. ally South Korea. Yet China also views what happens with North Korea through the lens of the geopolitical rivalry between the U.S. and China, he said. North Korea long served as a buffer against America’s expanding its reach in northeastern Asia. “If the U.S. is going to engage in a trade war, which is very troubling for China, politically, it’s going to reduce their willingness to cooperate on North Korea,” he said. Russel said that ultimately the U.S. demands of China on trade and other issues could harden attitudes inside the country. “The net effect of the Trump administration’s policies is that it will create an entire generation of Chinese who believe the worst about the United States,” Russel said.


NEWS

07.08.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A9

What’s a retired justice to do? Former colleagues show the way If Anthony Kennedy is pondering how to spend his free time, he has examples 9th Circuit before joining the Supreme Court. Not all retired justices are interested in wearing judicial robes again. Stevens, who served on the federal appeals court based in Chicago before joining the Supreme Court, told an interviewer in 2011 that serving as a judge again in retirement wasn’t for him. “I kind of like not having to read a lot of briefs and get reversed by my former colleagues,” Stevens said. After Kennedy’s retirement announcement, Stevens issued a statement that said in part that Kennedy had “earned the right to enjoy a more leisurely life without the constant burden of reading briefs.”

BY JESSICA GRESKO associated Press

WASHINGTON • For more than 30 years Justice Anthony Kennedy has lived by the Supreme Court’s predictable calendar: hearing new cases beginning on the first Monday in October, arguments starting at 10 a.m. and near-weekly conferences with colleagues until the court adjourns in June. Soon, he’ll have no fixed schedule. Kennedy, 81, hasn’t said what he’ll do with all his upcoming free time. The three most recent retirees from the court — John Paul Stevens, David Souter and Sandra Day O’Connor — each charted somewhat different paths. In announcing that he was stepping down, Kennedy said he wanted to spend more time with his family. Former clerks say Kennedy, a father of three and “Papa” to nine grandchildren, is an enthusiastic grandparent, one who has attended grandchildren’s T-ball games and ballet performances. He spoke at the high school graduations of two of his grandchildren this year and has talked about seeing “Hamilton” with his grandchildren on Broadway. This summer, Kennedy is teaching at the University of the Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law’s program in Austria, a practice of his for decades. He has taught in some capacity for the California school since 1965, and the school’s dean has already offered him any teaching gig he wants after he leaves the court, though Kennedy hasn’t made any commitments. Former clerks also noted

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this photo from 2015, Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy testifies before a House committee in Washington. This summer, Kennedy is teaching at the University of the Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law’s program in Austria, a practice of his for decades. He has taught in some capacity for the California school since 1965, and the school’s dean has already offered him any teaching gig he wants after he leaves the court. Kennedy hasn’t made any commitments.

Kennedy’s longtime interest in China and said they could see him continuing to be an ambassador for the law and for civility in the legal profession. How the three most recent retirees from the court have been spending their time:

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Amendment. Stevens returned to the topic again this year. After marches following the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., in which 17 people died, Stevens wrote an essay for The New York Times calling not only for significant gun control legislation but also the Second Amendment’s repeal. What issues, if any, Kennedy might speak out on are an open question, though he has spoken harshly in the past about solitary confinement.

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DAVID SOUTER Souter, 78, never re-

JOHN PAUL STEVENS Stevens, 98, hasn’t stopped writing since he left the court in 2010 and became

a permanent resident of a state with its share of retirees: Florida. A year after leaving the court, Stevens published a memoir, “Five Chiefs,” about the five chief justices under whom he served under. A second book, “Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution,” followed in 2014. One of the amendments the liberal justice proposed revising was the Second

ally liked Washington and quickly returned to his home state of New Hampshire after leaving the court in 2009. He was just shy of 70 when he retired, more than a decade younger than Kennedy. Before joining the Supreme Court, Souter had been a judge on the federal appeals court based in Boston, and he has served on the court regularly in retirement, hearing more than 400 cases. Kennedy could also sit as a visiting judge on other courts. He was a judge on the San Francisco-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the

SANDRA DAY O’CONNOR O’Connor, 88, left the court in 2006 under unhappy circumstances. Her husband was suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, and O’Connor, then 75, retired in part to care for him. He died in 2009. Like Souter, O’Connor, an Arizona native, returned to her home state and served as a visiting appeals court judge, hearing more than 175 cases and serving with all but two of the nation’s 13 federal appeals courts. She also founded iCivics, an organization that promotes civic education in schools. In 2009, O’Connor expressed regret that some of her decisions were being “dismantled” after her departure, with Kennedy generally taking her place as the court’s crucial vote in cases where the justices split 5-4. In 2010, shortly after Kennedy authored the court’s 5-4 decision in the Citizens United campaign finance case, O’Connor told an audience: “Gosh, I step away for a couple of years, and there’s no telling what’s going to happen.”

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NEWS

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2

Midwest Democrats skirmish anew over abortion rights

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

Protest against gun violence takes over Chicago highway

National party mulls tolerance for dissenters on issue BY DAVID VON DREHLE Washington Post

Democrats in the heartland are at war among themselves over choice. As in abortion, yes — but also the choice between purity and popularity. Missouri’s Democrats skirmished at a recent meeting to adopt a party platform. As the committee was putting the finishing touches on its work, an amendment popped up and quickly passed. “We respect the conscience of each Missourian,” the amendment declared, “and recognize that members of our party have deeply held and sometimes differing positions on issues of personal conscience, such as abortion.” There was more. Not content merely to recognize differences of opinion, the amendment went on to “recognize the diversity of views as a source of strength, and welcome into our ranks all Missourians who may hold differing positions on this issue.” Abortion rights activists went ballistic. “Sickening,” said Alison Dreith, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri, speaking to the Riverfront Times of St. Louis. “I think it’s a slap in the face to the base voters of the party.” Across the state line, Kansas Democrats are divided over whether to nominate a candidate for governor who was impure on abortion rights as a state legislator. Josh Svaty hails from farm country and has a track record — rare in his party — of winning in stoutly Republican rural Kansas. That could make him formidable in a year when the GOP is split between incumbent Gov. Jeff Colyer and polarizing Secretary of State Kris Kobach. Svaty maintains that he was representing his constituents in Ellsworth when he cast the renegade votes, including one to define a fetus as a person, more than a decade ago. In interviews and debates, he says if he were governor, serving a broader constituency, he would veto any new abortion restrictions. He cites his running mate, Katrina Gier Lewison, an abortion rights supporter, as proof of his intentions. Not good enough for Laura McQuade, president and chief executive of Planned Parenthood of New York. Calling Svaty an antiabortion “extremist,” McQuade has said: “Our supporters, a list that grows by the thousands each month, will not tolerate any party or candidate whose platform does not advocate for Planned Parenthood and its patients.” Svaty could commiserate with Heath

Mello of Nebraska, which shares borders with both Kansas and Missouri. Like his Kansas counterpart, Mello is a young, dynamic Democrat trying to thrive in the political atmosphere of Trump Country. But his strong bid to unseat Omaha’s Republican mayor fell short in April after Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL ProChoice America, and others denounced him over a vote he once cast in the legislature. Democrats at the national level have been debating for years over the precise dimensions of the party’s tent and whether it has room for abortion dissenters. In 1992, the party drew a line by refusing to allow Pennsylvania’s thengovernor, Bob Casey — who had recently lost the landmark abortion rights case Planned Parenthood v. Casey in the Supreme Court — to deliver an anti-abortion speech at the national convention. Years later, in what was widely viewed as a fence-mending moment, Casey’s son, Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr., was given a featured slot at the 2008 convention. But to let the issue flare up in the Midwest so close to Election Day suggests a lack of focus on the task at hand. Many voters are looking for alternatives to the increasingly harsh and frantic Republicanism of President Donald Trump, and might be willing to take a fresh look at a Democratic Party comfortable with all types of diversity — including diversity of ideas and beliefs. Purists argue that the impending retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy will allow Trump and Senate Republicans to create a conservative majority on the court that is more hostile to abortion rights. This means war, the purists apparently believe, and there’s no room for dissent in the trenches. However, armies don’t shrink their way to victory. According to the Pew Research Center, on the abortion question most Americans are somewhere in the middle. While 25 percent favor unlimited access to abortion and 16 percent would make all abortions illegal, 57 percent believe it should be legal, but with limits. The road to new majorities runs through that 57 percent. It’s full of voters who understand that abortion is a nuanced and challenging issue, and a fair number of them — perhaps a decisive number — are looking for a party that reflects this truth through open and humane discussion. Perhaps the place to begin reaching them is in the Midwest, where Democrats have so little to lose.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Protesters march Saturday on the Dan Ryan Expressway in Chicago to prod public officials to address the gun violence that has claimed hundreds of lives in the city. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

CHICAGO • Demonstrators against gun

violence shut down a section of the Dan Ryan Expressway with a spirited march Saturday, snarling traffic and igniting a war of words between Gov. Bruce Rauner and Mayor Rahm Emanuel. The protest march, organized by the Rev. Michael Pfleger of St. Sabina Catholic Church in Chicago, was intended to call attention to the pervasiveness of gun violence in the city. The march blocked all northbound lanes of the busy expressway for about an hour. Police initially blocked off the right lanes of the Dan Ryan but ultimately relented to allow demonstrators full access to one side of the interstate after a flurry of negotiations. “We came out here to do one thing: to shut it down,” Pfleger said, as the march came to its conclusion. “We came here to get their attention. Hopefully we got their attention. … Today was the attentiongetter, but now comes the action.” Chicago police said they did not make any arrests. The march and the logistics of the expressway shutdown set off a tense exchange on social media between the Rauner and Emanuel. The fact that demonstrators eventually blocked all northbound lanes did not sit well with Rauner. The governor posted a message on Twitter expressing his displeasure at the shutdown, saying the full northbound lane closing was not what had been negotiated. “This is unacceptable,” Rauner tweeted at noon. “We had clear parameters that allowed the protesters to be heard while respecting law and order. Instead, they chose ... to cause chaos.” In a second posting, he criticized Emanuel, who said Friday that he supported the event and expressway setting. “I’m disappointed in the Mayor. There was an agreement in place,” the governor wrote. “I am calling on the Mayor to take swift and decisive action to put an end to

this kind of chaos. I will work with him in good faith and urge him to do his job so that the people of Chicago feel safe.” Emanuel responded to Rauner in a Twitter post of his own. “It was a peaceful protest. Delete your account,” the mayor posted about 50 minutes after Rauner’s post. Illinois State Police, which has jurisdiction over the expressway, initially said protesters entering the highway risked arrest. But shortly before the march began, officials announced a plan to allow demonstrators to use the right side of the road. A line of emergency vehicles, highway trucks and uniformed officers formed a barricade in the middle of the expressway. After the march ended about 12:30 p.m., Pfleger disputed there was an agreement in place for only a partial expressway shutdown. Pfleger said Rauner “tried to be an obstruction.” Pfleger said Chicago police Superintendent Eddie Johnson was an intermediary between march organizers and the state police, negotiating for protesters to have access to all lanes. “He stepped up,” Pfleger said. “We gave them three weeks’ notice of what we were doing, figure it out!” Earlier, demonstrators gathered near 79th and State streets, hoisting signs that read “NO MORE DRUG WAR” and “NO GUNS,” with an illustration of a handgun crossed out. Another sign read “They Don’t Care About Us,” with pictures of Emanuel and Rauner on each side. Some of them held up signs with the names of homicide victims. Several elected officials were also present, including U.S. Rep. Danny Davis, RIll., whose grandson Javon Wilson, 15, was shot and killed on the South Side in 2016. “The violence has to stop,” said demonstrator Natalia Barrera, who attended the march with her son. “We need to spread love, not blood. It doesn’t matter if you live on the North Side, South Side, West Side, East Side, the point is this is our city at the end of the day.”

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FROM A1

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

List risks ‘tunnel vision,’ defense attorney says SHOOTERS • FROM A1

In a June 22 interview, Graviss said 29 names currently were on the list, including one person who had been indicted but had not yet been arrested. She declined to name anyone on the list to avoid alerting them to the additional scrutiny and to protect the officers and agents who are investigating the men, she said. Graviss said those on the list “are terrorizing the community.” St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards said last week that the list allows police and federal agents to use data analysis and a regional, more proactive approach to crime to attempt to address the 2,800 nonfatal shootings in St. Louis last year. (That number includes accidental shootings and suicides, Edwards said.) “The best way to address crime in the city of St. Louis is to stop it before it happens,” he said. Edwards spoke to the Post-Dispatch before a particularly violent period surrounding the July Fourth holiday in St. Louis, including six fatal shootings reported by police between Tuesday and Thursday. That includes the shooting of 11 people, two fatally, in a 12-hour period beginning Wednesday afternoon. St. Louis police said Friday that there were 89 criminal homicides between Jan. 1 and July 5. That total excludes fatal police shootings and killings deemed justified. There were 100 at the same time last year. As of July 5, police had tallied 1,188 aggravated assaults with a gun, versus 1,197 for the same period last year, or a decrease of 0.8 percent. “It’s very, very dark right now, but there’s a lot of hope,” said James Clark, vice president of community outreach for Better Family Life. Clark said he has seen an uptick in people approaching “gun violence de-escalation centers that intervene between adversaries that have deadly intent.” Jensen said Friday that the top shooters list was only one part of the effort to combat violent crime. Jensen’s office has also doubled the number of gun prosecutions. “I hope we’ve changed the course,” he said. “It’s probably too hard to judge by day-to-day numbers, but I’m disappointed it’s not down more than it is.” Both Edwards and Graviss point to the charges Johnson against Warren Johnson, 54, as one of the most violent offender program’s big successes. Graviss said Johnson was also one of the first on the list. He earned a spot before investigators even knew his name. They only knew that someone was committing

RYAN MICHALESKO • rmichalesko@post-dispatch.com

Police work at the scene of a homicide Thursday night in the 1100 block of Dillon Drive in St. Louis.

robberies at multiple businesses. Graviss said that Johnson was identified after at least 20 robberies had been committed. He is facing federal charges in four, in St. Louis, University City, Des Peres and Overland, she said. The indictment says the targets were a Subway restaurant, two Walgreens stores and a Dollar General store. After Johnson’s arrest, Graviss said business robberies dropped “precipitously.” Edwards said, “We’re really satisfied that we were able to get him off the street.” Graviss said that people earn their way onto the list if they are a suspect in a shooting, whether or not someone was hit, or have used a gun in a robbery or carjacking in the last 12 months. They may have Hampton had charges dropped in state court. For example, William Hampton, 20, of Jennings, was indicted in federal court May 24 on a felony charge of being a drug user in possession of a firearm after state charges related to a 2016 road rage shooting that injured a toddler were

dropped. Graviss said, “Once that case was dismissed, he was a perfect fit for the list, because he’s a shooter.” Edwards said that those who continue “popping up” at shooting scenes, whether victim, observer or shooter, give investigators “pause,” and prompt them to look more closely. “Why is this person always present at the shooting scene?” He said shooting victims often won’t cooperate with police, as they are either afraid or plan to retaliate. “That’s why we look at victims. If they’re shot, they tend to shoot.” Several defense lawyers contacted by the Post-Dispatch were unaware of the existence of the list. Kristy Ridings, a defense lawyer who handles cases in state and federal courts, said it would be “concerning if they’ve created a list and labeled someone a top shooter based on … just allegations.” She said a list also risked “tunnel vision” in investigators. Lawyers for Johnson, Woods and Hampton declined to comment or did not return messages seeking comment. Graviss is in charge of efforts to focus on

the shooters and is also a supervisor in the violent crime section and coordinator for Project Safe Neighborhoods, which targets violent crime. She said investigators use wiretaps, social media, investigations and police intelligence to compile the list. Someone can be removed from the list without a death or arrest, Graviss said. The list is periodically re-evaluated to determine whether “our efforts would be better focused on other individuals,” she said. Asked who was the “worst” person on the list, Graviss mentioned one man investigators believe may be responsible for at least one murder and six other shootings. He has prior criminal cases, but the imposition of sentences were suspended by a state court judge, meaning he can’t be charged in federal court with being a felon in possession of a firearm. That’s one of the charges prosecutors have been using in their efforts to combat violence. She said top shooter cases will be charged in state and federal court. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

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07.08.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A13

Florida private schools’ textbooks questioned Some companies’ materials downplay slavery, say humans, dinosaurs lived together BY LESLIE POSTAL, BETH KASSAB AND ANNIE MARTIN Orlando Sentinel

ORLANDO, FLA. • Some private schools in Florida that rely on public funding teach students that dinosaurs and humans lived together, that God’s intervention prevented Catholics from dominating North America and that slaves who “knew Christ” were better off than free men who did not. The lessons taught at these schools come from three Christian publishing companies whose textbooks are popular on many of about 2,000 campuses that accept, and often depend on, nearly $1 billion in state scholarships, or vouchers. At the Orlando Sentinel’s request, educators from Florida colleges and school districts reviewed textbooks and workbooks from these publishers, looking at elementary reading and math, middle school social studies and high school biology materials. They found numerous instances of distorted history and science lessons that are outside mainstream academics. The books denounce evolution as untrue, for example, and one shows a cartoon of men and dinosaurs together, telling students the biblical Noah likely brought baby dinosaurs onto his ark. The science books, they added, seem to discourage students from doing experiments or even asking questions. “Students who have learned science in this kind of environment are not prepared for college experiences,” said Cynthia Bayer, a biology lecturer at the University of Central Florida who reviewed the science books. “They would be intellectually disadvantaged.” The social studies books downplay the horrors of slavery and the mistreatment of Native Americans, they said. One book, in its brief section on the civil rights movement, said that “most black and white southerners had long lived together in harmony” and that “power-hungry individuals stirred up the people.” The books are rife with religious and political opinions on topics such as abortion, gay rights and the Endangered Species Act, which one labels a “radical social agenda.” They disparage religions other than Protestant Christianity and cultures other than those descended from white Europeans. Experts said that was particularly worrisome given that about 60 percent of scholarship students are black or Hispanic. Books from all three publishers — Abeka, BJU Press and Accelerated Chris-

KAYLA O’BRIEN • Orlando Sentinel

A student at Downey Christian School, in Orlando, Fla., works on a page from an Accelerated Christian Education workbook on Feb. 7.

tian Education, or ACE — also offer easier academics compared with what Florida requires in its public schools, said the experts from UCF, the University of Florida, Rollins College and the Seminole and Volusia county school districts. The Florida Department of Education does not track the curriculum used by the 140,000 students who attend private schools on state vouchers. In fact, Florida law prohibits the department from asking about or regulating academics at these schools. The Sentinel surveyed the 151 private schools newly approved by the education department to take scholarships for the 2017-18 school year. Seventy-five of the schools provided information about their curriculum either on their websites or when contacted by phone, and 30 of those, or about 40 percent, reported Abeka, BJU or ACE was a part of their academic offerings. In October, the Sentinel published its “Schools Without Rules” series that documented problems in some scholarship schools, including campuses that hired teachers without degrees and with criminal records, that forged fire and health inspection forms, and faced eviction midyear because they failed to pay their bills. Reporters visited 35 Central Florida private schools for that series and found 65

percent used one of the three Christian curricula. Several private schools that use the curricula defend the texts, including Downey Christian School in east Orange County, which uses all three. More than 90 percent of Downey’s 275 students rely on state scholarships to pay tuition. Director Tim Dees said Abeka provides good phonics and cursive writing lessons for young students; ACE, with its selfpaced lessons, helps those who are behind; and BJU, often called Bob Jones for its affiliation with Bob Jones University, offers challenging lessons for high school students. He said parents who choose the school want church lessons to be part of their children’s education. The school’s science classes touch on evolution so students aren’t “sheltered in this little bubble,” he said, but administrators like textbooks that mostly teach what the Bible says. “We believe our way is correct,” he said. “We focus on creationism because that’s what we believe.” Neither ACE nor BJU responded to requests for comment. In an email, an Abeka official, Brent Phillips, declined to discuss the materials but wrote, “We are confident that our content is accurate, age appropriate, and academically rigorous”

and teaches students based on “our traditional, Christian philosophy of education.” The scholarships that private schools may use to purchase these academic materials are paid for either directly by the state or with tax credits — money diverted from the state budget by corporations that make scholarship donations and then write off an equivalent amount from their state tax bills. The scholarships are available to students from low-income families or to those with disabilities, and their parents are free to enroll them in any private school that accepts the state-backed vouchers. Nearly 80 percent of scholarship students attend religious schools, and most of those institutions are Christian. About 16 percent of the scholarship schools are Catholic, and those schools use their own curriculum as do some other schools including those that are Islamic or Jewish (combined they make up about 5 percent of the schools) and those without religious affiliation. With few exceptions, the Christian texts the Sentinel had reviewed focus on simple reading passages, basic math and repetitive activities, such as copying sentences, with little to demand students think critically, the experts said.

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07.08.2018 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A13

Thai officials hope to begin cave rescue Dozens of divers arrive as break in monsoon rain offers narrow window of opportunity BY TASSANEE VEJPONGSA AND KAWEEWIT KAEWJINDA associated Press

MAE SAI, THAILAND • Thai authorities asked journalists to leave the area around the entrance of the cave where 12 boys and their soccer coach have been trapped for two weeks, fueling speculation on Sunday morning that a rescue mission could be imminent. Dozens of divers arrived at the Tham Luang cave, and officials set up more tarpaulin sheets blocking off the divers’ operating area. Worried that heavy monsoon rain could soon make the job even more difficult, Thai officials said Saturday that they might need to quickly rescue the 13 from the partially flooded cave by helping them make risky dives to safety. The boys, ages 11-16, and their coach, 25, have been trapped since June 23, when they went exploring in northern Thailand’s Tham Luang Nang Non cave after a practice game. Monsoon flooding cut off their escape and prevented rescuers from finding them for almost 10 days. The only way to reach them was by navigating dark and tight passageways filled with muddy water and strong currents, as well as oxygen-depleted air. Getting out via the same route looks like the only feasible option, but a high-risk one, Thai officials say. Experienced cave rescue experts consider an underwater escape a last resort, especially with people untrained in diving, as the boys are. The path out is considered especially complicated because of twists and turns in narrow flooded passages. The local governor supervising the rescue mission said Saturday that mild weather and falling water levels in the last few days had created appropriate conditions for an underwater evacuation, but that they wouldn’t last if it rained again. If weather forecasts are correct, access to the cave could soon close again due to flooding from seasonal monsoon rains. Earlier efforts to pump out water from the cave have been

ROYAL THAI NAVY VIA AP

In this undated photo released Saturday, Thai rescue teams arrange a water pumping system at the entrance to a flooded cave complex where 12 boys and their soccer coach have been trapped since June 23.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thai soldiers try to connect water pipes Saturday to divert water away from the cave in Mae Sai, Chiang Rai province, in northern Thailand. A pause in monsoon rain may allow a rescue effort to begin.

set back every time there has been a heavy downpour. Chiang Rai acting Gov. Narongsak Osatanakorn said authorities were waiting for two big groups of volunteer foreign divers to arrive this weekend, after which they would be ready to act

quickly. Narongsak said experts told him flooding from new rain could shrink the unflooded space where the boys are sheltering to just 108 square feet. “I confirm that we are at war with water and time from the

first day up to today,” he said. “Finding the boys doesn’t mean we’ve finished our mission. It is only a small battle we’ve won, but the war has not ended. The war ends when we win all three battles — the battles to search, rescue and send them home.” The boys sounded calm and reassuring in handwritten notes to their families that were made public Saturday. The notes were sent out with divers who made an 11-hour, back-and-forth journey to act as mail carriers. One of the boys, identified as Tun, wrote: “Mom and Dad, please don’t worry, I am fine. I’ve told Yod to get ready to take me out for fried chicken. With love.” “Don’t be worried, I miss everyone. Grandpa, Uncle, Mom, Dad and siblings, I love you all. I’m happy being here inside, the navy SEALs have taken good care. Love you all,” Mick wrote. “Night loves Dad and Mom and brother, don’t worry about me. Night loves you all,” wrote Night, in the Thai manner of referring to one’s self in the third person.

The most touching note came from one whose name was not clear: “I’m doing fine, but the air is a little cold, but don’t worry. Although, don’t forget to set up my birthday party.” Another, of indistinct origin, asked their teacher not to give them a lot of homework. In a letter of his own, the coach, Ekapol Chanthawong, apologized to the boys’ parents for the ordeal. “To the parents of all the kids, right now the kids are all fine, the crew are taking good care. I promise I will care for the kids as best as possible. I want to say thanks for all the support and I want to apologize to the parents,” he wrote. An update Saturday from the Thai navy said three navy SEALs, one a doctor, were with the boys and their coach. The 13 were having health evaluations and rehabilitation and were being taught diving skills. Food, electrolyte drinks, drinking water, medicine and oxygen canisters have been delivered to them. A major concern of the rescuers is that oxygen levels in their safe space could fall dangerously low. Rescuers have been unable to extend a hose pumping oxygen all the way to where the boys are but have brought them some oxygen tanks. The death on Friday of a former Thai navy SEAL, Saman Gunan, underscored the risks of making the underwater journey. The diver, the first fatality of the rescue effort, was working in a volunteer capacity and died on a mission to place oxygen canisters along the route to where the boys and others are sheltered. Rescuers are also pursuing other options to extract the boys, hoping that finding a shaft or drilling into the mountain in which the cave is situated will lead them to a sort of backdoor entrance. Tech billionaire Elon Musk has sent a team of engineers to Thailand to see if they can help in the rescue effort. Musk’s Boring Company digs tunnels for advanced transport systems and has advanced ground-penetrating radar.

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WORLD

07.08.2018 • SunDay • M 3

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A13

Divers begin rescue of boys in Thailand Expert team moves into cave as break in rain offers narrow window of opportunity BY TASSANEE VEJPONGSA AND KAWEEWIT KAEWJINDA associated Press

MAE SAI, THAILAND • A Thai

official said Sunday morning that the operation to bring out 12 schoolboys and their soccer coach from deep inside a cave where they have been trapped for two weeks had begun. Acting Gov. Narongsak Osatanakorn of Chiang Rai said authorities had been waiting for two big groups of volunteer foreign divers to arrive. They reached the area Sunday morning, and Narongsak said that “today is D-Day,” with 13 foreign and five Thai divers taking part in the rescue. He said that the divers went in at 10 a.m. local time and that the boys would gradually come out accompanied by two divers each. He said the earliest they would emerge would be 9 p.m. Sunday local time (9 a.m. St. Louis time). The only way to bring them out is by navigating dark and tight passageways filled with muddy water and strong currents, as well as oxygen-depleted air. Experienced cave rescue experts consider an underwater escape a last resort, especially with people untrained in diving, as the boys are. The path out is considered especially complicated because of twists and turns in narrow flooded passages. Mild weather and falling water levels over the last few days improved conditions for an underwater evacuation. When monsoon rain resumes, the water level will quickly rise again. Thai authorities asked journalists to leave the area around the entrance of the Tham Luang Nang Non cave. Dozens of divers arrived at the cave, and officials set up more tarpaulin sheets blocking off the divers’ operating area. The boys, ages 11-16, and their coach, 25, have been trapped since June 23, when they went exploring in the cave in northern Thailand after a practice game. Monsoon flooding cut off their escape and prevented rescuers from finding them for almost 10 days.

ROYAL THAI NAVY VIA AP

In this undated photo released Saturday, Thai rescue teams arrange a water pumping system at the entrance to a flooded cave complex where 12 boys and their soccer coach have been trapped since June 23.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thai soldiers try to connect water pipes Saturday to divert water away from the cave in Mae Sai, Chiang Rai province, in northern Thailand. A pause in monsoon rain allowed a rescue effort to begin Sunday.

Narongsak said experts told him flooding from new rain could shrink the unflooded space where the boys are sheltering to just 108 square feet. “I confirm that we are at war with water and time from the first day up to today,” he said.

“Finding the boys doesn’t mean we’ve finished our mission. It is only a small battle we’ve won, but the war has not ended. The war ends when we win all three battles — the battles to search, rescue and send them home.” The boys sounded calm and

reassuring in handwritten notes to their families that were made public Saturday. The notes were sent out with divers who made an 11-hour, back-and-forth journey to act as mail carriers. One of the boys, identified as Tun, wrote: “Mom and Dad, please don’t worry, I am fine. I’ve told Yod to get ready to take me out for fried chicken. With love.” “Don’t be worried, I miss everyone. Grandpa, Uncle, Mom, Dad and siblings, I love you all. I’m happy being here inside, the navy SEALs have taken good care. Love you all,” Mick wrote. “Night loves Dad and Mom and brother, don’t worry about me. Night loves you all,” wrote Night, in the Thai manner of referring to one’s self in the third person. The most touching note came from one whose name was not clear: “I’m doing fine, but the air is a little cold, but don’t worry. Although, don’t forget to set up my birthday party.” Another, of indistinct origin, asked their teacher not to give them a lot of homework.

In a letter of his own, the coach, Ekapol Chanthawong, apologized to the boys’ parents for the ordeal. “To the parents of all the kids, right now the kids are all fine, the crew are taking good care. I promise I will care for the kids as best as possible. I want to say thanks for all the support and I want to apologize to the parents,” he wrote. Three navy SEALs, one a doctor, were with the boys and their coach. The 13 were having health evaluations and rehabilitation and were being taught diving skills. Food, electrolyte drinks, drinking water, medicine and oxygen canisters have been delivered to them. A major concern of the rescuers is that oxygen levels in their safe space could fall dangerously low. Rescuers have been unable to extend a hose pumping oxygen all the way to where the boys are but have brought them some oxygen tanks. The death on Friday of a former Thai navy SEAL, Saman Gunan, underscored the risks of making the underwater journey. The diver, the first fatality of the rescue effort, was working in a volunteer capacity and died on a mission to place oxygen canisters along the route to where the boys and others are sheltered. Rescuers had also pursued other options to extract the boys, hoping that finding a shaft or drilling into the mountain in which the cave is situated would lead them to a sort of backdoor entrance. Tech billionaire Elon Musk had sent a team of engineers to Thailand to see if they could help in the rescue effort. Musk’s Boring Company digs tunnels for advanced transport systems and has advanced ground-penetrating radar. A spokeswoman for the Boring Company who declined to be named said it had been talking with the Thai government and people on the ground to determine how they could best assist their efforts. It was unclear whether the engineers were able to contribute to the rescue operation.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUndAy • 07.08.2018 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Trump’s staff infection Pruitt’s departure from EPA speaks to president’s faulty hiring practices.

A

t long last, Scott Pruitt is gone as head of the Environmental Protection Agency. He departed Thursday in true Pruitt style, portraying himself as the victim of a vicious slur campaign instead of acknowledging the long list of unethical and probably illegal actions that immersed him in controversy. Pruitt was the subject of no fewer than 13 federal inquiries or formal investigations. The disrepute he repeatedly brought upon the Trump administration more than justified his dismissal long ago. But President Donald Trump kept Pruitt in place. There was even talk, ludicrous as

it sounded, that Pruitt was encouraging Trump to fire Attorney General Jeff Sessions so the EPA chief could take that job. White House officials indicated that Trump was upset that those reports became public, even though he actually had considered the idea. Adding to the White House’s anger were new allegations that Pruitt had retroactively altered his public schedule, an official document. That’s a potential federal crime. But that was just the latest of multiple infractions that made Pruitt the focus of so much controversy, nearly all selfinflicted. He used his staffers to conduct his personal business, including asking a

senior aide to help find Pruitt’s wife a job. He had a $43,000 phone booth installed in his office for super-secret communications. He hired an expensive security detail. He took his staff on a junket-style trip to Morocco. He accepted a sweetheart condominium-rental deal from the wife of a lobbyist who did business with the EPA. He billed taxpayers for multiple trips he took to his home in Oklahoma. This list goes on and on. Any one of these should have been adequate grounds for Trump to declare that Pruitt was too much of a distraction and liability, yet the president stuck with him. It’s doubtful Trump did it out of loyalty. Rather, the president has a massive ego, which has been severely bruised by the forced departures of four previous Cabinet members in addition to a long line of senior White House staffers. Trump needed to put distance between those previous embarrassments and Pruitt. Trump has long claimed that his business success was rooted in his ability to follow his gut when AP deciding whether top aides had what it takes to do the job. But the trail of firings and forced departures suggests Trump should adopt a more systematic approach — perhaps one that actually involves stuff like, say, background checks. Pruitt’s departure doesn’t mean big change is coming to the EPA. Far from it. The administration remains committed to dismantling the regulatory progress of Trump’s predecessors and denying what the rest of the world already acknowledges: that humans need to drastically curtail the dangerous practices that are contributing global climate change. Even if Pruitt’s theatrics are gone, the damaging policies at EPA will remain.

No thanks for your service Honorably serving noncitizen military recruits are getting the boot.

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expire. resident Donald Trump and his An Iranian citizen who had gone supporters might feel righteously through the program, called Military indignant about illegal border Accessions Vital to the National Interest, crossers, but the administration’s expressed pride at “pursuing everything backlash against others who are trying to immigrate the right way is charting a peril- legally and living an honorable life.” But he told The Associated Press: “It’s terrible ous new course in unfairness and cruelty. because I put my life in the line for this The Pentagon is dismissing noncitizen country, but I feel like I’m being treated like service members who joined to demontrash. If I am not eligible to become a U.S. strate patriotism and a willingness to sacrifice for the good of their adopted country. citizen, I am really scared to return to my country.” The Associated Press has been able to Fears are high for lots of recruits, who document the abrupt discharge of more face accusations of treason at home for than 40 immigrant Army reservists and having served the military interests of the recruits. The actual number is believed to United States. One such Army recruit was be much higher. These discharges come amid increasingly harsh antiimmigrant measures by the Trump administration, bolstered by the president’s unrelenting attacks on those who crossed the border illegally. But the people who volunteered for military service fit into an entirely different category. They are noncitizens who openly acknowledge their status as visitors but who hope to gain a pathway to citizenship. The federal government has long offered special incentives to lawful immigrants: In exchange for serving, they had MIKE KNAAK • Associated Press been promised a faster track to A Pakistani recruit, 22, who was recently discharged bypass the long and arduous from the U.S. Army, holds an American flag as he naturalization process that poses for a picture. The man asked his name and others must endure. location to be undisclosed for safety reasons. The AP The benefits for the country interviewed three recruits from Brazil, Pakistan and are enormous. The military Iran, all of whom said they were devastated by their has found a new way to boost unexpected discharges. recruitment, especially in times when regular citizens are Shu Luo, a highly educated Chinese citireluctant to join. Noncitizen recruits offer zen who had enlisted to serve the United valuable talents that the military often has States. Deportation could mean death back difficulty finding, such as fluency in difhome, he told National Public Radio. ficult languages like Mandarin, Farsi and Is this really how America wants to show Arabic. gratitude to those who served honorably? But last October, less than a year The repercussions could be severe in the after Trump took office, the Pentagon future, should the United States find itself announced it was tightening its vetting at war with one of those countries and and certification procedures in ways that badly need those recruits’ language skills. meant some who had already served honWho would want to serve a country that orably still might not get what the military so willingly throws its loyal servants to the promised. Without Pentagon protection, dogs? they must go home when their visas

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR REAdERS Budget comparisons in editorial are faulty

purpose — unafraid to risk a fall. If we can’t take office, we must stake claim to equity and wield our pen at the polls. If we cannot preach, we must speak our truth with courage, even amid the mundane — lifting our voice in every line, at every table, and on every street. If we have no platform, we must build one — out of hope. On Tuesday, some of our state and local leaders had an opportunity to use their pre-established public platform to unify a broken community. Instead, they chose to perpetuate our city’s racial divide. Whether intentional or otherwise, it sent a clear message to people of color: We don’t see you. We mustn’t neglect the wounds of our city. Our children are watching and so is the world. Rachel Asen • St. Louis

The editorial “Big budget, shrinking city” (July 4) regarding the size of the city’s budget cites examples such as Denver and Pittsburgh to assert that the city’s budget size is “obscene” by comparison. Unfortunately, the numbers used are not comparable and paint a seriously distorted picture. The city of Denver’s budget for 2018 is actually $2.3 billion. The billion-dollar budget cited (actually $1.4 billion in 2018) refers only to that city’s general fund. Denver’s general fund budget is well over twice the size of the city of St. Louis’ $516.6 million general fund. Should Denver’s budget be considered bloated given that St. Louis is under half the size in population? The Pittsburgh example is also fraught with issues. The budget for the city of St. Leaders’ arrogance Louis includes $232 million for enterprise dooms real progress operations of the airport and water divisions, which are city assets and funded The fact the Arch foundation found it with revenues from those operations. No necessary to apologize for the all-white similar enterprise operations are in Pittsribbon-cutting is one more symptom of burgh’s budget. the problem in our community and A better budget comparison may be found in annual report expenditures for what are known as governmental funds, which exclude enterprise and other non-discretionary type funds. The most recent reports list comparable expenditures for Denver at $2.2 billion, for Pittsburgh $618 million and for St. Louis $857 million. Of course these kinds of comparisons will A photo of the ribbon-cutting for the Gateway Arch park contain a bit of apples to on Tuesday drew backlash because it did not include oranges, but they’re a bet- any person of color. This photo was posted by Bi-State ter representation. Development on social media. The city of St. Louis does have real fiscal challenges. Slow revenue growth, high levels country. The arrogance and blatant racism of fixed commitments and low levels of is appalling. reserves have all been identified as ongoing When will supposed leaders recognize fiscal issues. diversity is a strength? The forces that Focusing on an overly simplistic metric continue to divide continue to doom real such as size of the budget and disparaging progress in our community and nation. that amount with faulty comparisons can Jerry R. Eichholz • Florissant only distort perceptions of what will actually be required to meet these challenges. Separate but equal ribbonPaul Payne • St. Louis cuttings a symbol of St. Louis City budget director Nothing symbolizes St. Louis or St. Louis history better than the separate but equal Instead of unifying, leaders ribbon-cuttings at the Gateway Arch’s perpetuate racial divide park. I was disappointed with the photo of the Terence Marlow • St. Louis ribbon-cutting ceremony at the newly renovated Gateway Arch grounds. The Nothing positive about image shows a row of 16 white faces standAmerica on July 4 op-ed page ing behind a strip of emerald fabric, the Arch anchored in the background. I was disappointed, but not surprised, to While I don’t wish to devalue the see nothing positive or uplifting about significance of the renovation project, America on the July 4 op-ed page of the I can’t help but wonder why — in a city Post-Dispatch. Couldn’t the paper suswhere race has been a source of division pend its political divisiveness for one day — neither the organizers nor participants to celebrate America’s birthday? included diversity in any shape or form. The big story over the past few weeks Nearly half of St. Louis’ residents are has involved people risking their lives to people of color, and we have no shortage of live in the U.S. Why are they trying so hard inspiring community leaders representaif America’s newspapers don’t have one tive of our black and brown demographic. good thing to say about us? Since its conception, our nation has Instead, we get a commentary with the indoctrinated its white citizens with the subheadline of “Age of Trump challenges toxic lie of superiority. White people must what it means to love our country.” What acknowledge our role in systemic oppresdoes President Donald Trump or any other sion — whether directly or otherwise. We politician have to do with loving our councreated the social constructs that preserve try? As much as the writer tried to spin the inequity, racism and injustice. article, it was just another “hate Trump” Yet we mustn’t stop there; we must piece in the Post-Dispatch. transform our awareness into action. I hope political divisiveness never gets in Many of us are intimidated by the implica- the way of loving the idea of America and tions of the word “action”; certainly the its opportunities. word suggests movement, but much like Rich Iezzi • St. Louis the parts of an orchestra, every instrument has its own unique note to play. Read more letters online If we cannot march, we must tread with at STLtoday.com/letters

TOd ROBBERSOn Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

PLATFORM • I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook.com/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

07.08.2018 • SUNDAY • M 1 25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

DOWNTOWN RESURGENCE • Downtown St. Louis appears to be poised for another period of growth. Downtown provides the bulk of the tax revenue the city needs for services to residents. Hence, if Mayor Freeman Bosley is going to improve the quality of life for all St. Louisans, he will have to make sure that city resources are used to guide and facilitate a thriving downtown. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Change the way political campaigns are conducted Move beyond 30-second hit jobs toward a more extended focus on substantive issues. BY JOHN DANFORTH

Nearly all discussion of campaign reform has been limited to ideas for reducing the influence of money in elections. Better reporting requirements, especially of what is called “dark money,” are worth pursuing, but the Supreme Court has left little room for restricting the amount of money spent on elections. The court allowed restrictions on what a candidate can raise from a single source Danforth but has held that there can be no limit on independent expenditures not coordinated with a candidate’s campaign. The bizarre result is that candidates are at a disadvantage in defining their own messages compared to interlopers who can spend whatever they please. I hope that the Supreme Court will overrule its current jurisprudence on the financing of

elections, but I am not optimistic that this will happen in the foreseeable future. So, I think it would be more fruitful for reformminded citizens to redirect their attention from the financing of elections to a more promising, and I think more important, subject: how political campaigns are conducted. Whatever their cost, modern campaigns are miserable affairs, so vapid that they deprive voters of the ability to make informed decisions about the nation’s future. They are almost entirely lacking in substance, and consist of short bursts of messaging in 30-second commercials, tweets and telemarketing calls. It is impossible to present serious policy ideas, for example about the economy or health care, in short bursts. What can be done effectively in very few words are personal attacks on the character and motives of opponents. Such attacks constitute the essence of modern campaigns. What are called “debates” are supposed to be forums for candidates to present contrasting opinions on important subjects.

However, most debates share the same characteristics as campaign advertising: They consist of brief fragments of time, typically two minutes or so, to answer whatever the questioner asks. Some questions have seemed designed more to showcase the panelist’s cleverness than to plumb the candidates’ positions. One panelist asked whether candidates prefer Coke or Pepsi. Any politician can dance around any subject for two minutes, and all candidates are happy to rely on pre-planned sound bites: “Senator, you’re no Jack Kennedy.” What candidates want to avoid is answering hard questions where answers will lose votes. But it is just such hard questions that should be answered if voters are to make informed decisions. The key to improving the content of campaigns is to provide longer periods of time for candidates to address important issues. These extended time periods would supplement, not substitute for the current short burst campaigning. There is no constitutional way to abolish tweets and

The fight against Trump is

a battle for freedom Having celebrated America’s 242nd birthday, let’s rededicate ourselves to freedom. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

people and Muslims. Freedom to work and live without discrimination, harassment and violence because of your gender, race or religion. Freedom to get medical care when you or your children are sick. Freedom to earn a living wage, to attend college or get job training, and to retire in security. Freedom from a rigged economy in which the top 1 percent own more than the bottom 90 percent combined. Freedom to marry whom you

Every 75 years or so in our history, Americans have renewed their commitment to freedom. Divide our history into thirds, and you can see, at regular intervals, a rededication to our founding doctrine. In 1789, the framers drafted the Bill of Rights. Seventy-four years later, at the turning point in the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln called for “a new birth of freedom” to honor those who died. Seventy-eight years after that, on the eve of U.S. entry into world war in 1941, Franklin D. Roosevelt declared the “four freedoms.” That was 77 years ago, and we are due for another renewal. Neither fascism nor civil war threatens us, but Americans are united in fear. Much of the country fears the loss of basic freedoms under President Donald Trump: free speech, press and religion, due process and control over their bodies. Trump, meanwhile, foments fears among his followers of crime, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1937. gangs, immigrants choose. and civil servants. And AmeriFreedom to make decisions cans of all beliefs fear they are about your own body. losing the American dream and Freedom to send your kids its promise of economic mobilto school without fear for their ity. safety. Trump’s opponents are Freedom to breathe clean air, seemingly confused about to drink clean water, to live on a how to respond in this election habitable planet. year. Do they appeal to whites Freedom to elect your leador nonwhites, progressives or ers without the rich, or foreign moderates, move to the left to governments, choosing them rally the “base” or hew to the for you. center to capture the swing And freedom to speak, to provoters? Should they make test and to publish without the an economic argument or a threat of violence. social argument, target those Not only do such ideas unify concerned about jobs or those the left (far more than quibbling angry about the president? about, say, which form of uniThese are false choices, versal health care is best or what though, because our salvation exactly should be done with will be what it always has been. U.S. Immigration and Customs Having celebrated this 242nd Enforcement), but freedom birthday of the United States, appeals broadly to Americans let’s rededicate ourselves to regardless of politics. Ask us freedom: what it means to be American, Freedom from Trump’s and you will get one answer constant attacks on women, immigrants, people of color, gay above all others: “to be free.”

Conservatives long claimed ownership of it. (Remember Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and freedom fries?) But Trump has essentially ceded the freedom agenda to his opponents. One measure, using a database of his speeches, tweets and Q&As, finds that he has used the word “freedom” 72 times this year (often dismissively, as in “we need freedom of the press, but ...”). That’s far less than he has used, say, “respect” (252), “strong” (502), “win” (306), “border” (617), “taxes” (158), “Democrat” (560), “kill” (159), “country” (1,288), “illegal” (127), “crime” (250) and “great” (2,826). This isn’t just a linguistic de-emphasis of freedom; Trump has made common cause with dictators and played down human rights abroad while starting a trade war with democratic allies. At home he has questioned due process for refugees, taken immigrant children from their parents, imposed a travel ban on several Muslim-majority nations and declared the media the enemy of the American people. He is now poised to shift the balance on the Supreme Court away from abortion rights and gay rights. In a very real sense, the fight against Trump is a battle for freedom. Rather than join Trump in the fear chamber, progressives and Democrats ought to respond with a variation of what FDR proposed for the world in a very different context in 1941, “freedom of speech and expression,” “freedom of every person to worship God in his own way,” “freedom from want” and — of new significance now — “freedom from fear.” “This nation has placed its destiny in the hands and heads and hearts of its millions of free men and women,” Roosevelt said, “and its faith in freedom under the guidance of God.” This faith sustained America through those dark times. It will not fail us in our 243rd year. Dana Milbank Twitter: @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post

30-second commercials. But longer periods would give voters better understanding of the issues. Here are three ideas for reforming the content of campaigns. 1. Last January, Washington University invited Missouri likely Senate nominees Claire McCaskill and Josh Hawley to appear on campus for one-hour, back-toback interviews in which the two candidates would respond to substantially the same questions. Jim Lehrer, formerly of “The PBS NewsHour,” agreed to be the questioner. In a non-combative setting, each candidate in turn would address subjects important to the country. As far as I know, the invitation still stands. 2. For an hour and a half, candidates could share the same stage, alternating 15-minute segments where they could address subjects of their choice. The only role of the moderator would be to act as timekeeper. This format would permit the candidates to select their own issues, and the allotted time periods would approximate the sort of debate typical in the Senate. 3. In the weeks immediately

before elections, radio and TV stations could offer candidates time blocs of 10-15 minutes to address voters. These are three ideas with the common objective of moving campaigns beyond 30-second hit jobs toward more extended focus on substantive issues. No doubt others will have better ideas for serving the same objective. Bar associations, in particular, may be an excellent source for developing better formats for campaigns, because court rules exist to focus controversies on relevant points. Would that campaign finance reform could happen. I don’t think that Supreme Court decisions make that possible. What is possible, and would greatly improve the quality of campaigns, would be to create formats where candidates would receive blocs of time to address important issues. That is a result that is possible to achieve and an objective that is worth pursuing.

John Danforth was a Republican U.S. senator from Missouri from 1976 to 1995.

Our strange relationship with the word ‘patriotism’ It is a simple concept in the abstract — ‘love of country’ — but it can be complicated in its application. JONAH GOLDBERG Los Angeles Times

struck me that the cultural prohibition against ever “questioning” someone’s patriotism tends to confuse more than it clarifies. During the George W. Bush years, it was a cliche of the left to insist that “dissent is the highest form of patriotism.” Of course, once President Obama came into office, dissent became synonymous with racism according to many of the same people. By the way: It’s simply not true that dissent is the highest form of patriotism. As my National Review colleague John O’Sullivan puts it: Dissent is the highest form of patriotism. Treason is the highest form of dissent. Ergo, treason must

There are many definitions of patriotism. Mark Twain said patriotism means supporting your country all the time and your government when it deserves it. I like this, but it’s flawed. Sometimes your country — i.e., the people — can do things that require the government to correct its citizens. That’s why we have a Bill of Rights. Sometimes “we the people” are wrong, and the individual is right. That’s what G.K. Chesterton was getting at when he said,“ ‘My country, right or wrong’ is a thing that no patriot would think of saying. It is like saying, ‘My mother, drunk or sober.’” In other words, patriotism is a simple concept in the abstract — “love of country” — but it can be complicated in its application. I love my daughter AP deeply, but that A vintage-dressed stilt walker participates in a love does not mean parade Wednesday in Las Vegas. unconditional supbe the highest form of patriotism. port for everything she does or This points to the problem with wants to do. Sometimes the greater the schizophrenic way we talk act of love is to say “No” or “You’re about patriotism. Too often it is wrong.” But I think all reasonable an anathematizing word used to people can agree that any father brand someone as a heretic or traiwho says to his daughter,“I wish tor. That’s how Sen. Joe McCarthy you were never born” does not love used it, and one finds versions of it his child. on the nationalist right every day. Which brings me to a Fourth of But since the McCarthy era, we also July essay written for Vox.com, cast the act of questioning some“Three Reasons the American one’s patriotism as somehow treaRevolution was a Mistake,” by sonous or evil, too.“How dare you Dylan Matthews. question my patriotism!?” is one of He begins: “This July 4, let’s not the great conversation stoppers. mince words: American indepenOf course, some forms of disdence in 1776 was a monumental sent are, indeed, rooted in patriotic mistake. We should be mourning love of country. But some dissent the fact that we left the United is rooted in disdain, contempt or Kingdom, not cheering it.” even hatred for this country. And Matthews’ three reasons: The some dissent is simply informed by American Revolution prolonged a kind of cosmopolitan indifference slavery; independence was bad for to American exceptionalism. These Native Americans; and we would have a better system of government attitudes are more prevalent on the left than the right, but they are if we had a parliamentary system not unknown to the right. One of like other former colonies of the my intellectual heroes, Albert Jay British crown. Nock, often commented that he’d Now, I could argue against all be just as happy to live in Belgium these propositions, but that’s not as America. the point I want to make. Instead, I think we simultaneously expect let us concede them for argument’s too much and too little of the consake. cept of patriotism. An atheist by It strikes me as incontrovertible definition has no love of Jesus or that this is an unpatriotic arguthe divine. That doesn’t mean an ment. atheist cannot be a good person. That is not to say it is an evil, Indeed, one of the best things about dishonest or treasonous argument. atheism is its honesty. We have no But if the dictionary definition of word for the person who doesn’t patriotism is “devoted love, suphave special affection for our port and defense of one’s country,” country that isn’t freighted with then dispassionately arguing that negative connotations. It seems the it would be better if the United States of America had never existed moment is ripe to coin one. strikes me as a singularly unpatriJonah Goldberg otic thing to do. goldbergcolumn@gmail.com And that’s OK. Oh, I disagree Copyright Tribune Content Agency with Matthews, but it has always


NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

® ® ® ®

®

complete

MEAL MAKEOVERS

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Is it possible to re-create comfort foods without all the calories? Yes! Here are healthy breakfast, lunch, and dinner updates that you and your family will crave. Home-cooked classics are just that for a reason: They’re the longtime favorites from Mom’s menu, served up hot on Sunday nights and many a special occasion. But those delicacies often come laden with nutritional no-nos, packed with sugar, drenched in mayo, or even deep-fried. Delicious? Of course. Healthy? Not so much. So we cut the carbs, slimmed down the slathering, and gutted the grease to create some comfort-food updates for breakfast, lunch, and dinner that will warm your heart—and maybe even Mom’s, too!

BEFORE BACON AND EGGS 749 CALORIES

BEFORE

BEFORE

BEEF TACO 449 CALORIES

FRIED CHICKEN 677 CALORIES

BREAKFAST

LUNCH

Loaded Vegetable Frittata

Black Bean & Sweet Potato Tacos

Crispy Chicken

HANDS ON 25 minutes / TOTAL TIME 30 minutes

HANDS ON 30 minutes / TOTAL TIME 30 minutes

HANDS ON 15 minutes / TOTAL TIME 35 minutes

2 slices bacon, chopped 1½ cups sliced fresh button mushrooms (4 oz) ½ cup chopped onion ½ cup chopped red sweet pepper ½ medium summer squash, quartered lengthwise and cut into ¼-inch-thick slices 1 cup fresh broccoli florets, coarsely chopped 6 eggs 4 egg whites 2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil ¼ tsp salt ¼ tsp black pepper ¼ cup shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese (1 oz)

AFTER 250 CALORIES

SAVE 499 CALORIES! Instead of bacon and eggs, enjoy a Loaded Vegetable Frittata.

Preheat broiler. In a broiler-safe 10-inch skillet cook bacon over medium heat until browned and crisp. Remove bacon to drain on a paper-towellined plate, reserving drippings. Add mushrooms, onion, and red sweet pepper to skillet; cook 3 minutes. Add summer squash and broccoli; cook 3 to 4 minutes more or until vegetables are crisp-tender. Stir in reserved bacon. In a medium bowl whisk together eggs, egg whites, basil, salt, and black pepper. Pour egg mixture over vegetables in skillet. Cook over medium heat. As mixture sets, run a spatula around edge of skillet, lifting egg mixture so uncooked portion flows flows underneath. Continue cooking and lifting edges until egg mixture is almost set (surface will be moist). Sprinkle with cheese.

2 Tbsp olive oil 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cut into ½-inch chunks (1½ cups) ½ cup chopped onion ½ cup chopped red or green sweet pepper 1 15-oz can no-saltadded black beans, rinsed and drained ¾ cup salsa ¼ tsp salt ¼ tsp black pepper 8 6-inch corn tortillas, warmed (see tip below) ½ cup crumbled queso fresco ¼ cup snipped fresh cilantro Lime wedges (optional)

DINNER

In a 10-inch skillet heat oil over medium heat. Add sweet potato, onion, and sweet pepper. Cook, covered, 5 to 7 minutes or until sweet potatoes are nearly tender, stirring occasionally. Add black beans and salsa. Cook, uncovered, 5 minutes more or until vegetables are tender and sauce thickens slightly. Season with salt and black pepper. Spoon filling into tortillas. Top with queso fresco and cilantro. Serve with lime wedges, if desired.

½ cup fat-free milk ¾ cup whole wheat panko bread crumbs ⅓ cup grated Parmesan cheese 1 tsp onion powder ½ tsp salt ½ tsp garlic powder ½ tsp paprika ¼ tsp black pepper 4 6-oz skinless, boneless chicken breast halves Nonstick cooking spray

AFTER 249 CALORIES

AFTER 355 CALORIES

SAVE 200 CALORIES!

SAVE 322 CALORIES!

Instead of greasy beef tacos, serve these Black Bean & Sweet Potato Tacos.

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Preheat oven to 425°F. Line a 15×10×1-inch baking pan with foil. Place a wire rack in the pan. Pour milk into a shallow dish. In a second shallow dish combine the next seven ingredients (through pepper). Dip a chicken breast half in milk and then in seasoned crumbs, pressing to coat both sides. Place chicken on the rack in the pan. Repeat with remaining chicken. Lightly coat chicken with nonstick cooking spray. Bake 20 minutes or until chicken is lightly browned and cooked through (165°F).

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NEWS

07.08.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A17

Indonesia gay bashing is fueling HIV epidemic Health workers struggle to reach high-risk men amid police raids, heated rhetoric BY STEPHEN WRIGHT associated Press

JAKARTA, INDONESIA • Disowned by

his father and ill-equipped to deal with the stigma of HIV/AIDS, a young man who died in the central Indonesian city of Yogyakarta early this year had “effectively committed suicide” by stopping anti-viral medication, according to a doctor familiar with the case. The 20-year-old man’s shocking death is a sign of an out-of-control but littleacknowledged epidemic of HIV among gay men in Indonesia that researchers say is being fueled by a gay hate climate whipped up by the country’s conservative political and religious leaders. After the young man died in February at a Yogyakarta shelter, no one from his immediate family took the body, said Sandeep Nanwani, a doctor and HIV outreach worker. The previous year, Nanwani had helped raise funds to move him from Jakarta, the capital, where he’d lost his job because of his deteriorating health. “The family disowned him. They didn’t want anything to do with him,” Nanwani said. “In the shelter, he felt like there’s nothing, no future. And then he started skipping his medications.” According to the United Nations, human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, affects more than a quarter of Indonesian men who have sex with other men, a dramatic increase from 5 percent in 2007. In Jakarta, the rate is 1 in 3. In common with the wider population of HIV-positive people in Indonesia, the majority are not tested for HIV until developing symptoms of illness indicating their immune system has been compromised. Only a small minority receive antiviral medications that can give people with HIV near-normal life expectancy. Condom use and testing individu-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

LGBT activists in Jakarta, Indonesia, shout slogans during a rally in February against a planned revision to Indonesia’s criminal code that would criminalize unmarried and gay sex. The death of a 20-year-old man with HIV who “effectively committed suicide” by stopping anti-viral medication is a sign of little acknowledged epidemic of HIV among gay men in Indonesia that researchers say is now being fueled by a gay hate climate.

als from high-risk groups for the virus — before it weakens the immune system causing Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS — are both crucial to curbing its spread, according to communicable disease experts. But Indonesia is failing at both and is now making it even more difficult for health workers to reach gay and bisexual men. Highly publicized police raids targeting gay men and a vicious outpouring of anti-LGBT rhetoric from officials and other influential figures since early 2016 have caused significant disruption to HIV awareness and testing programs, accord-

ing to a Human Rights Watch report released Monday. Many of the outreach workers interviewed by the rights group reported “substantial and unprecedented negative impacts on their ability to contact and counsel” gay and bisexual men, the report said. In Jakarta, raided venues such as saunas and clubs that were among the so-called “hotspots” for health workers to make contact with gay men closed. “The remaining locations are getting harder and harder to work at,” said a health worker interviewed by Human Rights Watch. “Fewer and fewer guys agree to get tested or take condoms each time.”

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Laura Nevendorff, a researcher at the HIV Research Center at Atma Jaya Catholic University, said the police practice of using condoms as evidence against gay men had had a pernicious ripple effect, turning the crucial rubber safeguard into potential grounds for criminal prosecution. Though deeply frowned upon, homosexuality is not illegal in Indonesia. Police have used an anti-pornography law to prosecute gay men. “They are afraid,” Nevendorff said. “They think if they are carrying condoms, it could jeopardize their safety.” Because of conservative morality in the world’s most populous Muslim nation and the intense LGBT backlash, Indonesia’s HIV prevention strategy does not openly target gay or bisexual men, who along with injecting drug users, female sex workers and transgender people are the high-risk groups in the Indonesian epidemic. Instead, overtaxed nongovernment organizations are trying to fill the gulf in a climate hostile to their work. The failure of that approach is clear when compared with Thailand, a neighboring developing country of similar income level to Indonesia that has addressed the epidemic more openly. About 9 percent of Thai gay and bisexual men have the HIV virus, compared with 26 percent in Indonesia, according to U.N. data. More than 90 percent of the people estimated to have HIV in Thailand have been tested and know their result, compared with only 1 in 3 in Indonesia. Differences in care between Indonesia and Thailand are also stark. Just 12 percent of people with HIV in Indonesia are taking anti-viral medication, compared with nearly 70 percent in Thailand.

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NATION

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A17

Criteria expanded for immigrant deportation process

Baby forced to go before judge to be reunited with family Migrant children face process without parent or even an attorney BY ASTRID GALVAN associated Press

PHOENIX • The 1-year-old boy in a green button-up shirt drank milk from a bottle, played with a small purple ball that lit up when it hit the ground and occasionally asked for “agua.” Then it was the child’s turn for his court appearance before a Phoenix immigration judge, who could hardly contain his unease with the situation during the portion of the hearing where he asks immigrant defendants whether they understand the proceedings. “I’m embarrassed to ask it, because I don’t know who you would explain it to, unless you think that a 1-year-old could learn immigration law,” Judge John W. Richardson told the lawyer representing the 1-year-old boy. The boy is one of hundreds of children who need to be reunited with their parents after being separated at the border, many of them split from mothers and fathers as a result of President Donald Trump’s administration’s “zero-tolerance policy.” The separations have become an embarrassment to the administration as stories of crying children separated from mothers and kept apart for weeks on end dominated the news in recent weeks. Critics have also seized on the nation’s immigration court system that requires children — some still in diapers — to have appearances before judges and go through deportation

proceedings while separated from their parents. Such children don’t have a right to a court-appointed attorney, and 90 percent of children without an attorney are returned to their home countries, according to Kids in Need of Defense, a group that provides legal representation. In Phoenix on Friday, the Honduran boy named Johan waited more than an hour to see the judge. His attorney told Richardson that the boy’s father had brought him to the U.S. but that they had been separated, although it’s unclear when. He said the father, who was now in Honduras, had been removed from the country under false pretenses that he would be able to leave with his son. For a while, the child wore dress shoes, but later he was in just socks as he waited to see the judge. He was silent and calm for most of the hearing, though he cried hysterically afterward for the few seconds that a worker handed him to another person while she gathered his diaper bag. He is in the custody of the U.S. Health and Human Services Department in Arizona. Richardson said the boy’s case raised red flags over a looming court-ordered deadline to reunite small children with their families. A federal judge in San Diego gave the agency until next Tuesday to reunite children under 5 with their parents and until July 26 for all others. Richardson repeatedly told the Immigration and Customs Enforcement attorney who was acting as the prosecutor that he should make note of the cases involving young children because of the government’s obligation to meet the reunification deadline. The attorney said that he wasn’t familiar with that deadline and that a different

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The administration of President Donald Trump has expanded the list of categories for which immigrants can be sent before immigration judges to start deportation procedures against them. Measures announced by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will tighten the Department of Homeland Security’s controls on immigrants, affecting not only undocumented foreigners, but also legal immigrants who lose their immigration benefits or status. The change is tied to Notices to Appear, a document issued to noncitizens instructing them to appear in immigration court. The notices usually are the start of deportation procedures. A USCIS announcement said its officials would issue the notices for a broader range of cases such as fraud, criminal activity or when an applicant is denied an immigration benefit. “For too long, USCIS officers uncovering instances of fraudulent or criminal activity have been limited in their ability to help ensure U.S. immigration laws are faithfully executed,” agency Director Lee Francis Cissna said in a statement. The new procedures, Cissna said, give USCIS officers more leeway and “clear guidance they need and deserve to support the enforcement priorities established by the president, keep our communities safe, and protect the integrity of our immigration system from those seeking to exploit it.” The new criteria are part of the Trump administration’s campaign to reduce legal and illegal immigration without having to obtain congressional approval. It comes at a time when its “zero-tolerance” policy is under harsh criticism for separating children from parents. USCIS said the revised policy would allow its agents to more easily refer cases to Immigration and Customs Enforcement or issue Notices to Appear. Immigrants under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program are exempt from the change.

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department within ICE handled such matters. ICE spokeswoman Jennifer Elzea said the attorney was familiar with the injunction but didn’t know the specifics of the timeline requirements off the top of his head “and did not want to misspeak about any timeline commitments without that knowledge.” In the end, Johan was granted a voluntary departure order that would allow the government to fly him to Honduras so he could be reunited with his family. An attorney with the Florence Project, an Arizona-based nonprofit that provides free legal help to immigrants, said both his mother and father were in Honduras. The boy’s case was heard on the same day that the Trump administration said it needed more time to reunite 101 children under 5, to ensure the children’s safety and to confirm their parental relationships. The two sides had a hearing on the matter Friday in San Diego and will determine over the weekend which cases merit a delay. About the same time as the San Diego hearing, other children who had been separated from their parents made their way to court in Phoenix. A boy from Guatemala dressed in a vest and tie was asked by the judge how old he was, and the child simply put five fingers up. “What do you think about going back to Guatemala?” Richardson asked the boy. The family separation issue is especially urgent for the parents of young children who are even more dependent on their mothers and fathers. Studies show that major stress at a very young age can create a lifetime of emotional and even physical problems.

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NEWS

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

Urban waterways offer fun, but there are risks Though cities want to sell their riverfronts as great places to play, pollution is a persistent problem BY SCOTT MCFETRIDGE Associated Press

DES MOINES, IOWA • As someone who has spent countless hours rowing along the Des Moines River, Tonya Logan appreciates the city’s vision to create a whitewater course that would draw kayakers to the Iowa capital. But there’s a dirty secret for Des Moines and many other U.S. cities that want to upgrade their urban waterways into scenic destinations: Much of the water is so polluted with manure that people fear it’s not safe to dip their hands in the current, let alone to swim in it. “I won’t,” said Logan, who doesn’t touch the water that passes just inches from her as she sits in her slender rowing shell, even on blistering hot days. “The last time I went into the water, I took a long shower and then scrubbed myself with peroxide.” Others have complained of intestinal problems, skin rashes and infections. The unseen but potentially dangerous pollutants threaten to undermine the efforts of dozens of cities seeking to turn rivers into urban amenities that will attract tourists and businesses and become centerpieces of downtown life. “It’s an issue in any city trying to do this,” said Rick Tollakson, a Des Moines developer who is leading the push to remove small dams along the Des Moines and Raccoon rivers to create whitewater courses as part of a larger regional “water trail” plan. “The rivers are not as clean as people would like them to be.” In fact, most U.S. rivers are far cleaner than in decades past, largely because of the federal Clean Water Act, which was approved

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pedestrians in downtown Des Moines, Iowa, walk along a path near the Iowa Women of Achievement Bridge that crosses the Des Moines River. The city wants to create a whitewater course that would draw kayakers, but many have complained of intestinal problems, skin rashes and infections. The pollution comes mainly from animal waste and chemical fertilizers that drain into the river from farmland.

in 1972. But many waterways still carry farm runoff and city sewage that contain nitrates, ammonia and E.coli bacteria, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. In Des Moines, the problem comes mainly from animal waste and chemical fertilizers that drain into the rivers from farmland. The city treats the water to make it drinkable, but that doesn’t help paddlers and swimmers who could be exposed to high bacteria levels, especially after heavy rain. “There are times you’re out there and it’s so beautiful, and then you smell the pig manure from upstream and it’s just disgusting,” said longtime kayaker Scott Bandstra, who uses antiseptic wipes liberally and has experienced only the occasional mild rash. His wife will kayak with him when they travel to Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, but she won’t get in the water in Iowa. Promoters of the Des

Moines plan say such fears are overblown, but they acknowledge that a century of pollution has created skepticism about their $117 million proposal. The plan is intended to draw new residents to Des Moines, a city with plenty of jobs but not much glamour. It’s being led by business executives, who promise to provide about a third of the funding, with the remaining coming from federal, state and local governments. City leaders have embraced the general idea but have not committed money to the project, which is at least several years away from the start of construction. The effort to improve waterways seeks to take advantage of surging interest in paddling sports such as kayaking, canoe-

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sewage system. In Los Angeles, officials are open about bacteria in the LA River, even as they encourage residents to canoe or kayak through stretches of a 51-mile waterway better known as a movie backdrop. The city samples river water twice a week and posts the results on a website with color-coded warnings of “open,” “caution” and “closed.” Department of Public Works Commissioner Heather Repenning said she hoped the growing number of kayakers would make officials care more about stopping the street runoff and removing its concrete lining to make the river more attractive. “You have to get people to have some stake in it,” Repenning said. Perhaps the waterway

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ing and rafting. An annual survey by the private Physical Activity Council found that 21.7 million Americans reported paddling in 2014, up more than 3 million from 2010. Kayaking was the most popular, especially among young adults, ages 18-24. In Columbus, Ga., thousands of people flock to a 2½-mile whitewater course built in 2013 even though raw sewage still occasionally flows into the Chattahoochee River during big rainstorms. Juliet Cohen, executive director of the environmental group Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, said the river’s popularity made it all the more important to ensure that it is free of health risks. The conservation group is pushing officials to improve the community’s

most stigmatized by pollution is Ohio’s Cuyahoga River, which famously caught fire in the 1960s because of oily industrial runoff in Cleveland. Even there officials are encouraging boating. The river is no longer flammable and is even swimmable upstream, but it’s still not pristine in Cleveland. In Denver, where the South Platte River flows out of the Rocky Mountains and through a citybuilt whitewater course, officials acknowledge that the water at times exceeds standards for E. coli. Jon Novick, a city environmental administer, said officials had a special responsibility to warn people to wash up thoroughly after a river outing because so many people were drawn to it. “It’s a huge challenge for us, especially because the city is actively developing infrastructure to use our waterways,” he said. People such as Dave Hillman are excited about Des Moines’ whitewater plans. Hillman, who has kayaked for decades along most of Iowa’s rivers, said he had had ear and sinus infections he blamed on the state’s “hot chocolate rivers.” But he still gets out on rivers nearly every weekend. He thinks kayakers’ exposing themselves to disease could help bring an answer. “This is a big issue for paddlers, and it’s a topic where there’s not an easy answer,” Hillman said. “But the water quality is not going to improve until we take ownership of it.”

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NATION

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

Trump administration halts billions in payments tied to Obamacare law

KEY HEALTH CARE QUESTIONS TO WATCH 1. How are the ACA marketplaces shaping up for next year? Insurers are still in the middle of filing their proposed 2019 rates, but the increases look less dramatic overall compared with this year, according to a recent analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. So far, we’ve seen only a handful of rate increases of more than 20 percent and a few cities — including Minneapolis, Richmond and Indianapolis — may even experience some rate decreases. Additionally, the Congressional Budget Office has projected the average premium for a mid-level ACA marketplace plan will increase by about 15 percent next year compared with an average 34 percent increase this year. None of the plan prices will be finalized until shortly before open enrollment begins Nov. 1.

Stopping ‘risk adjustment’ program draws swift protest from insurers BY AMY GOLDSTEIN Washington Post

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump’s administration took another major swipe at the Affordable Care Act, halting billions of dollars in annual payments required under the law to even out the cost to insurers whose customers need expensive medical services. In a rare Saturday afternoon announcement, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said it will stop collecting and paying out money under the ACA’s “risk adjustment” program, drawing swift protest from the health insurance industry. Risk adjustment is one of three methods built into the 2010 health care law to help insulate insurance companies from the ACA requirement that they accept all customers for the first time — healthy and sick — without charging more to those who need substantial care. The two other methods were temporary, but risk adjustment is permanent. Federal health officials are required each year to calculate which insurers with relatively low-cost consumers must chip in to a fund, and which ones with more expensive customers are owed money. This idea of pooling risk has had significant practical effects: encouraging insurers to participate in the insurance marketplaces the ACA created for Americans who cannot get affordable health benefits through a job. In its announcement, CMS said that it was not going to make $10.4 billion in payments that are due to insurers in the fall for expenses incurred by insurers last year. CMS, a branch of the Department of Health

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, listens as President Donald Trump speaks last year at a meeting on women in health care.

and Human Services that oversees much of the law, is supposed to issue an annual report on the program but has not released a report due late last month. The suspension of these payments is the most recent maneuver by the Trump administration to undercut the health care law that Trump has vowed since his campaign to demolish. A Republican-led Congress last year failed to repeal much of the ACA. The administration has been taking steps to dismantle it through executive powers. Last year, health officials halved the length of the annual sign-up period for Americans to buy ACA health plans and also slashed by 90 percent the federal funds for advertising and other outreach efforts to urge people to enroll. Last October, the president ended another important subsidy to insurers: cost-sharing reduction payments, which cushioned them from the law’s requirement to provide discounts on deductibles and other out-ofpocket costs to low-income customers. This year, the Department of Labor and HHS have worked to make it easier for people and small companies to buy two

types of insurance policies that sidestep benefits required under the ACA and some of the law’s consumer protections. The five-paragraph statement plus a timeline issued on Saturday justified the latest maneuver by tying it to a legal dispute over the fairness of the risk-adjustment formula. The dispute goes back about three years to a new type of nonprofit insurer, known as Consumer Oriented and Operated Plans (co-ops), offered by the ACA as alternatives to traditional insurance companies. Most of the co-ops found themselves in such fragile financial condition that they closed, and a few that have survived sued the government, alleging they were unfairly making contributions into the riskadjustment fund while larger, better-established insurers were receiving payments. In two cases, federal district judges in Massachusetts and New Mexico reached opposite conclusions. The Massachusetts

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3. What’s Congress going to do on health care before the midterm elections? The short answer: Probably nothing. Some conservatives are trying to infuse new life into ACA repeal-and-replace efforts, via the health care plan Heritage and Co. released last month. And Sens. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., tried to gauge their colleagues’ interest on a slew of different policy measures — many of them health care related — with a survey they recently circulated among GOP members. But lobbyists say the talk of more attempts to pass health care legislation is mostly hype. A package of measures to combat the opioid epidemic stands the best chance of final passage (the House approved a batch of bills last week), as lawmakers want to leverage the issue for political gain in November. But Democrats in the Senate would almost certainly block anything else related to Obamacare or abortion rights, and Republicans aren’t likely to venture there anyway as they try to retain control of Congress.

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judge found the HHS formula fair, but the one in New Mexico ruled that it was “arbitrary and capricious.” Federal health officials are asking that the New Mexico ruling be reconsidered. The announcement says that “ruling prevents CMS from making further collections or payments under the risk adjustment program.” CMS Administrator Seema Verma said in a statement: “As a result of this litigation, billions of dollars in risk adjustment payments and collections are now on hold.” Two major insurers’ trade groups immediately decried the move. “Risk adjustment is a mandatory program under federal law,” said Scott Serota, president of Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. “Without a quick resolution … this action will significantly increase 2019 premiums for millions of individuals and small business owners. … It will undermine Americans’ access to affordable coverage, particularly for those who need medical care the most.” Matt Eyles, president of America’s Health Insurance Plans, noted in a statement that the timing of this latest move could be particularly disruptive, because this is the season in which insurers around the country decide whether to take part in ACA marketplaces for 2019 and, if so, what rates to charge. “This decision … will create more market uncertainty and increase premiums for many health plans,” Eyles said.

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NEWS

07.08.2018 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A19

Drivers challenge license suspensions for unpaid court debt In five states, suits have been filed alleging such laws are unconstitutional BY DENISE LAVOIE associated Press

RICHMOND, VA. • It can start with a

couple of traffic tickets. Unable to pay the tickets right away, a driver becomes saddled with late fees, fines and court costs. Soon, the driver may be taken off the road indefinitely. More than 40 states allow the suspension of driver’s licenses for people with unpaid criminal or traffic court debt. But now, advocates across the country are pushing to change that, arguing that such laws are unconstitutional because they unfairly punish poor people and violate due process by not giving drivers notice or an opportunity to show they cannot afford to pay the fees. Lawsuits have been filed in at least five states in the past two years. “It’s not that I don’t want to take care of what I owe. I really wish I could,” said

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brianna Morgan poses with her son Harlem last month at their home in Petersburg, Va. Morgan, a single mother, hasn’t had a driver’s license in three years.

Brianna Morgan, a single mother from Petersburg, Va., who hasn’t had a license in three years because she owes more than $400 in traffic fines and court costs from traffic violations and a disorderly conduct citation. “I really don’t have a way to pay it,” said Morgan, who supports herself and her three children on a monthly disability check. Advocates had a victory last week in Tennessee, where a federal judge ruled

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that a law that allows the state to revoke the licenses of low-income people with unpaid court debt from past criminal convictions is unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Aleta Trauger called the law “powerfully counterproductive” and ordered Tennessee to stop revoking licenses and to reinstate the licenses of people who had theirs revoked due solely to nonpayment of court fees. “If a person has no resources to pay a debt, he cannot be threatened or cajoled into paying it; he may, however, become able to pay it in the future. But taking his driver’s license away sabotages that prospect,” Trauger wrote in her ruling Monday. In Virginia, nearly a million people currently have suspended driver’s licenses at least in part because of unpaid court debt, according to the Legal Aid Justice Center, a nonprofit that is challenging the practice in a federal lawsuit. A judge dismissed the case on jurisdictional grounds, but in a ruling in May, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals gave the case new life, sending it back to the lower court to allow the plaintiffs to revise the lawsuit. Millions of drivers nationwide have lost licenses because of such laws. In a study released in September, the justice center estimated that 4.2 million people then had suspended or revoked licenses for unpaid court debt in five states alone: Virginia, Tennessee, Michigan, North Carolina and Texas. Lawsuits are pending in North Carolina, Montana and Michigan, in addition to Virginia and Tennessee. In California, legislation enacted last year prohibits state courts from suspending driver’s licenses simply

because of unpaid traffic fines. But supporters of the laws say people who violate traffic laws must be held accountable. Virginia state Sen. Bill Carrico, a Republican, said the threat of losing a license could provide incentive to pay fines. “If we don’t suspend driver’s licenses, then people will say, ‘I’m not going to pay the fine,’” Carrico said. “That’s a slippery slope.” A separate lawsuit still pending in Tennessee challenges a law that allows the state to take away the driver’s licenses of people with unpaid traffic debt. Ashley Sprague, 27, a mother of five from Lebanon, Tenn., is a plaintiff in that case. The thought of paying $946 in traffic debt, plus $388 to get her license reinstated, was overwhelming. Her debt began in 2015 after she got a citation for speeding and failure to have proof of insurance. At the time, she made $2.13 an hour, plus tips, as a waitress at a Waffle House. Sprague said she couldn’t afford to pay and lost two jobs while her license was suspended because she had to rely on other people to get to work. In the Virginia case, Judge Roger Gregory, chief justice of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, wrote that the state’s system did not differentiate between those unable to pay and those unwilling to pay. “By suspending the licenses of those who cannot pay for reasons outside of their control, the state traps thousands of Virginians in a nightmarish spiral for which there is no apparent exit,” Gregory wrote.

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NEWS

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

Barbs for Bezos but Bill Gates largely admired in Seattle America’s two richest men represent different eras of prosperity BY SALLY HO Associated Press

SEATTLE • The Seattle region is home to

America’s two richest men, but their local legacies to date represent two very different eras for the city. While Amazon’s Jeff Bezos is blamed by some for rising rents and clogged city streets, Bill Gates is largely admired for helping lead the computing revolution and donating billions through his philanthropy. The Microsoft co-founder’s legacy here includes opening the world’s largest private charity across the street from the Space Needle, creating housing for homeless families and supporting charter schools. Microsoft was the first tech company to dramatically change the region’s economy as it grew quickly in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, Seattle is booming again with housing prices skyrocketing thanks to online retail giant Amazon’s explosive growth that has added tens of thousands of well-paid workers to the area. Bezos has been a flashpoint in the tension that has come with success. The City Council recently passed — then quickly rescinded — a tax on large employers to combat homelessness, which Amazon opposed and successfully worked to strike down. A city councilwoman organized protests in front of Amazon buildings featuring people carrying “Tax Bezos” signs. Meanwhile, Gates has largely escaped the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Amazon emerged as one of the success stories from the 1990s dot-com boom and is now Seattle’s largest private employer, with more than 45,000 workers.

criticism directed at Bezos and other tech leaders as Seattle debates how to respond to the advantages and downsides of being the United States’ fastest-growing big city. Observers say Gates benefits from being a local and the world’s leading philanthropist. Margaret O’Mara, a historian and University of Washington professor, said Gates came from a prominent Seattle family, arising in the public eye at a time when there was less anxiety about online privacy. “It’s a really, really different public persona,” O’Mara said. “He recognized the importance of this responsibility, this broader

civic responsibility, that he had great power to be incredibly influential, to deploy his intellect and persuasive powers for good.” Early on, there was some criticism that Gates and his company could be better corporate citizens. But thanks to the billions he now gives away each year, Gates has managed to shed his reputation as a sharpelbowed tech billionaire, though his controversial philanthropic work focused on changing America’s school systems hasn’t gone unnoticed at home. Microsoft has been headquartered in Seattle’s once-sleepy eastern suburbs since 1979. The company is seen as the game-

changer that allowed the region to shed its infamous “Boeing Bust” 1970s-era recession when the aircraft manufacturer laid off tens of thousands of workers. Amazon is far more visible near downtown since starting as an online book-seller in 1994. It emerged as one of the success stories from the 1990s dot-com boom and is now the city’s largest private employer, with more than 45,000 workers. Bezos, who grew up in Houston, moved to Seattle to launch his startup in part because of Washington state’s favorable tax structure. Amazon declined to comment on Bezos’ behalf. Bezos — who in the past year surpassed Gates as the world’s richest person — recently hinted he too would take on philanthropy in a big way. He said on Twitter that he would announce his plans this year. Bezos has been on the board of the Bezos Family Foundation run by his parents, which focuses on education nationally. In January, Bezos also personally gave $33 million in college scholarships for young immigrants living in the U.S. illegally. He hasn’t signed the Giving Pledge, an initiative launched by Gates encouraging billionaires to commit to giving away most of their wealth. Where Bezos has been criticized for not being present enough, Gates’ nonprofit since 2000 has dedicated resources to helping local issues. Food banks and domestic violence victims’ assistance are among the modestly funded and lesserknown work of the powerful, globally focused Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Bill Gates is also credited with delivering a Washington state charter school law through campaign contributions and his foundation’s support of the movement.

He went to fight the Japanese with his brother, but only one of them made it back By Lori Rose MARKETING CONTENT CONTRIBUTOR

Battle of Iwo Jima.

chaplain came in and he said, ‘I’ve got something I don’t want to tell you, but I have to.’”

“A All of a sudden, I saw him walking up to my tent,” K Kohler remembered. “I said, ‘What in the th world are a you doing here?’ He said, ‘I want to do what I was w trained to do. I want to fight the Japanese.”’

Today, the flag with 48 stars that draped Eddie’s coffin flies outside of his Warson Woods home.

On O Feb. 19, 1945, the brothers were part of the a amphibious assault on the volcanic island of Iwo Jiima. Eddie was a “flamethrower,” among the first w wave of Marines to make the landing.

W hen the news broke that Pearl Harbor had been attacked by the Japanese, two St. Louis brothers signed up to fight back. Only one brother came home. Charles “Charlie” Kohler, now 96, remembers driving home from hunting rabbits in St. Charles County with a buddy on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941. “When we turned on the radio, we heard ‘The Japanese have just bombed Pearl Harbor.’ We looked at each other and said, ‘Do you know where Pearl Harbor is?’ We didn’t know, can you imagine that?” Charlie Kohler was a 20-year-old young man with a promising baseball career ahead of him, and his kid brother, Edwin “Eddie” Kohler, 18, soon enlisted in the U.S. Marines Corps and found themselves fighting in the islands and atolls of the Pacific Ocean. Kohler said he had seen news reports about the tenaciousness of the Marines fighting at Wake Island and he knew it was the outfit for him. Brothers in arms “My father said, ‘Why don’t you go together and protect each other?,’” Kohler remembered. Both boys were sent to Camp Pendleton in California but were soon separated. Charlie, a gunnery sergeant, was assigned to an anti-tank group stationed in Maui that went on to help take the islands of Roi-Namur, Saipan and Tinian. Eddie found himself at a desk job in Bermuda. As soon as he could, he requested a transfer back to his brother’s unit, regrouping in Hawaii before the

C Charlie’s company followed and was soon under heavy fire as they worked their way forward. He h and four other men sought shelter in a sandy depression but could not hide from the Japanese defenders holed up in the caves above them on Mount Suribachi. “I thought I was in heaven.” “They were knocking the hell out of us,” Kohler said. “We got down in that shell hole, so maybe we could live. But the Japanese could see us from Suribachi and they dropped a bomb on our hole. We were all hit.” Kohler was knocked out cold; all four buddies were killed. “I realized I was hit. When I woke up, I looked up and saw a bright light, like a tube going up to the heavens. I thought I was in heaven,” he said. But as his head cleared, he realized the fighting was still raging around him. He started to crawl the 200 yards back to where the Navy boats were pouring more Marines onto the beach, with his right leg injured and multiple shrapnel wounds. With Japanese mortars and artillery raining down, Kohler was hit again in the other leg. A Navy coxswain motioned to him as he got closer, and Kohler inched his way up the ramp of the landing craft just before the gate closed. As the bloody battle continued on Iwo Jima, Kohler lay on a bunk on the USS Bayfield off the coast, unaware that only 40 feet away lay his brother, mortally wounded. Eddie Kohler was buried at sea Feb. 20, 1945, and his brother didn’t hear the news until days later when he was transported back to Pearl Harbor.

The Stars and Stripes Days after Kohler was injured, as he was being transferred to another ship that would take him to a hospital on Guam, he saw in the distance another American flag — the one the Marines raised atop Mount Suribachi — the iconic image that photographer Joe Rosenthal captured and shared with the world. “They were just putting it up,” Kohler said. He remembered thinking the battle must be over, but in fact, the fierce fighting continued for weeks before the Americans gained the upper hand. Kohler spent most of the next year being treated for his wounds. Though he had been a star slugger at McBride High School and played a year with a Brooklyn Dodgers minor league team, his injuries kept him from returning to the game. Back in St. Louis, Kohler went to work at his father’s printing business, which he later ran for many years. He married and raised three sons. Years later, he attended reunions of the survivors of the 23rd Regimental Weapons Company, which had served with valor in the Pacific. There, the men pledged that the last two standing would share a bottle of champagne. Kohler’s son, Keith, has spent many hours writing his father’s history and searching for the remaining members of the company in order to carry out that promise. According to his research, there are only four others remaining. “I am committed to fulfill this covenant so the last two men may make the toast,” Keith Kohler said.

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“My parents knew before I did,” Kohler said. “The

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E ach day at 4 a.m., Tony Badders begins his workday by inspecting, maintaining and repairing

military experience, that he would be able to mold me into an effective mechanic,” he said.

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The National Guard appealed to Badders because it gives him the flexibility to pursue a career and maintain an active home life. “It allows me to serve my country, have a career and still be home with my wife and son,” he said.

“I’m the first one to see a machine in the morning, inspect it and make sure everything is good to go,” he said.

In the past eight years, Badders’ military service has included deployments to Afghanistan and Honduras, as well as post-disaster recovery projects after Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav.

Badders, who joined Castle in 2010 shortly after completing basic training in the Army National Guard, credits his military background for his current career. “The person who hired me knew, based on his own

Before deploying to Afghanistan in 2014, his coworkers threw him a going-away party and presented him with an iPad so that he could stay in touch with his family via FaceTime. “The whole time I was gone, Castle was constantly in touch with my wife,

Tony Badders, a field mechanic at Castle Contracting, celebrates with his wife in 2015 after returning home from an Army National Guard deployment to Afghanistan.

making sure she was OK, and sending me care packages,” Badders said. He is finishing his second six-year contract with the National Guard, and his goal is to complete at least 20 years of service to earn full retirement benefits. “I came to work for Castle straight out of basic training, still young and green, but people recognized my drive to build a great career,” he said. “Without the military and without Castle, I wouldn’t be where I am today.”


WORLD

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

DIGEST

upcoming appearance at NATO, marching through Belgium’s capital to plead for less military spending and more public money for schools and clean energy. The march and a companion concert came as European and North American leaders prepare for an annual summit at NATO’s Brussels headquarters. Trump accuses NATO allies of not doing enough to defend themselves and wants them to increase their military budgets.

American killed, two wounded in Afghanistan One U.S. service member was killed and two were wounded Saturday in an apparent insider attack in Afghanistan, according to the U.S.led military coalition. The ambush took place in southern Afghanistan, U.S. military officials said, although they did not indicate a specific location. The two wounded Americans were in stable condition, the statement added. None of the Americans was identified. The Taliban released a statement praising an Afghan soldier for carrying out the attack, without taking credit for it themselves. The incident marks the first combat fatality for the U.S. military in Afghanistan since April 30, and the third there this year. Haiti halts fuel price increase after protests • The Haitian government suspended a fuel price increase Saturday after widespread violence broke out across the capital and in the northern city of Cap-Haitien. Prime Minister Jack Guy Lafontant had originally said the country needed to raise prices to balance the budget and gave no indication he would back down. But his administration bowed to pressure after hundreds took to the streets in protest. Trudeau apologized for groping years ago, woman says • A former newspaper reporter said that Canadian Prime Minister Justin

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Protesters in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, flee on Saturday after cars were set on fire near the Best Western hotel during protests over a fuel price increase.

Trudeau apologized to her after what she says was an inappropriate encounter nearly two decades ago. Rose Knight also confirmed she is the reporter who was referred to in an editorial 18 years ago in the Creston Valley Advance that said she was groped by Trudeau while covering a music festival in British Columbia. She said Friday that she didn’t plan to take the matter further.

British seek source of nerve poison • British authorities conducted extensive forensic tests Saturday looking for the source of a nerve agent that sickened two people thought to have handled a contaminated item from the March attack on a Russian ex-spy and his daughter. A police officer was checked for contamination related to the case, but the test was negative. The man and woman poisoned a week ago are

in critical condition at Salisbury District Hospital, where Sergei and Yulia Skripal spent months being treated after they were poisoned. Authorities have said all four were sickened by Novichok, a nerve agent weapon developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. Anti-Trump protesters rally in Brussels • European activists protested Saturday against U.S. President Donald Trump’s

Tropical storm threatens Caribbean • Beryl weakened to a tropical storm Saturday but was still expected to dump heavy rain over the Lesser Antilles at the end of the weekend on its way to the eastern Caribbean, bringing a new threat to islands still rebuilding from last year’s storms. A tropical storm warning was issued for Guadeloupe and Dominica, the latter still recovering after a battering by Hurricane Maria in September as a Category 5 storm. Egyptian media regulator must explain hospital gag order • Egyptian prosecutors have ordered the country’s top media regulator to be questioned over his decision to issue a gag order on corruption allegations made against a children’s cancer hospital. The chief public prosecutor said the decision by Makram Mohammed Ahmed, head of the Supreme Council for Media Regulation, constituted an “infringement” on judicial and executive authorities. From news services

He went to fight the Japanese with his brother, but only one of them made it back By Lori Rose MARKETING CONTENT CONTRIBUTOR

Battle of Iwo Jima.

chaplain came in and he said, ‘I’ve got something I don’t want to tell you, but I have to.’”

“A All of a sudden, I saw him walking up to my tent,” K Kohler remembered. “I said, ‘What in the th world are a you doing here?’ He said, ‘I want to do what I was w trained to do. I want to fight the Japanese.”’

Today, the flag with 48 stars that draped Eddie’s coffin flies outside of his Warson Woods home.

On O Feb. 19, 1945, the brothers were part of the a amphibious assault on the volcanic island of Iwo Jiima. Eddie was a “flamethrower,” among the first w wave of Marines to make the landing.

W hen the news broke that Pearl Harbor had been attacked by the Japanese, two St. Louis brothers signed up to fight back. Only one brother came home. Charles “Charlie” Kohler, now 96, remembers driving home from hunting rabbits in St. Charles County with a buddy on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941. “When we turned on the radio, we heard ‘The Japanese have just bombed Pearl Harbor.’ We looked at each other and said, ‘Do you know where Pearl Harbor is?’ We didn’t know, can you imagine that?” Charlie Kohler was a 20-year-old young man with a promising baseball career ahead of him, and his kid brother, Edwin “Eddie” Kohler, 18, soon enlisted in the U.S. Marines Corps and found themselves fighting in the islands and atolls of the Pacific Ocean. Kohler said he had seen news reports about the tenaciousness of the Marines fighting at Wake Island and he knew it was the outfit for him. Brothers in arms “My father said, ‘Why don’t you go together and protect each other?,’” Kohler remembered. Both boys were sent to Camp Pendleton in California but were soon separated. Charlie, a gunnery sergeant, was assigned to an anti-tank group stationed in Maui that went on to help take the islands of Roi-Namur, Saipan and Tinian. Eddie found himself at a desk job in Bermuda. As soon as he could, he requested a transfer back to his brother’s unit, regrouping in Hawaii before the

C Charlie’s company followed and was soon under heavy fire as they worked their way forward. He h and four other men sought shelter in a sandy depression but could not hide from the Japanese defenders holed up in the caves above them on Mount Suribachi. “I thought I was in heaven.” “They were knocking the hell out of us,” Kohler said. “We got down in that shell hole, so maybe we could live. But the Japanese could see us from Suribachi and they dropped a bomb on our hole. We were all hit.” Kohler was knocked out cold; all four buddies were killed. “I realized I was hit. When I woke up, I looked up and saw a bright light, like a tube going up to the heavens. I thought I was in heaven,” he said. But as his head cleared, he realized the fighting was still raging around him. He started to crawl the 200 yards back to where the Navy boats were pouring more Marines onto the beach, with his right leg injured and multiple shrapnel wounds. With Japanese mortars and artillery raining down, Kohler was hit again in the other leg. A Navy coxswain motioned to him as he got closer, and Kohler inched his way up the ramp of the landing craft just before the gate closed. As the bloody battle continued on Iwo Jima, Kohler lay on a bunk on the USS Bayfield off the coast, unaware that only 40 feet away lay his brother, mortally wounded. Eddie Kohler was buried at sea Feb. 20, 1945, and his brother didn’t hear the news until days later when he was transported back to Pearl Harbor.

The Stars and Stripes Days after Kohler was injured, as he was being transferred to another ship that would take him to a hospital on Guam, he saw in the distance another American flag — the one the Marines raised atop Mount Suribachi — the iconic image that photographer Joe Rosenthal captured and shared with the world. “They were just putting it up,” Kohler said. He remembered thinking the battle must be over, but in fact, the fierce fighting continued for weeks before the Americans gained the upper hand. Kohler spent most of the next year being treated for his wounds. Though he had been a star slugger at McBride High School and played a year with a Brooklyn Dodgers minor league team, his injuries kept him from returning to the game. Back in St. Louis, Kohler went to work at his father’s printing business, which he later ran for many years. He married and raised three sons. Years later, he attended reunions of the survivors of the 23rd Regimental Weapons Company, which had served with valor in the Pacific. There, the men pledged that the last two standing would share a bottle of champagne. Kohler’s son, Keith, has spent many hours writing his father’s history and searching for the remaining members of the company in order to carry out that promise. According to his research, there are only four others remaining. “I am committed to fulfill this covenant so the last two men may make the toast,” Keith Kohler said.

STORIES OF HONOR IS PRESENTED BY:

“My parents knew before I did,” Kohler said. “The

NOMINATE YOUR SOLDIER AT: STLtoday.com/StoriesOfHonor

VETERANS DISCOVER SUPPORTIVE WORKPLACE AT CASTLE CONTRACTING SPONSORED CONTENT AND PHOTO BY CASTLE CONTRACTING

E ach day at 4 a.m., Tony Badders begins his workday by inspecting, maintaining and repairing

military experience, that he would be able to mold me into an effective mechanic,” he said.

construction equipment on jobsites throughout the region. As field mechanic at Castle Contracting, he works to ensure construction crews have safe, productive work experiences as they complete sitework on a range of commercial construction projects.

The National Guard appealed to Badders because it gives him the flexibility to pursue a career and maintain an active home life. “It allows me to serve my country, have a career and still be home with my wife and son,” he said.

“I’m the first one to see a machine in the morning, inspect it and make sure everything is good to go,” he said.

In the past eight years, Badders’ military service has included deployments to Afghanistan and Honduras, as well as post-disaster recovery projects after Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav.

Badders, who joined Castle in 2010 shortly after completing basic training in the Army National Guard, credits his military background for his current career. “The person who hired me knew, based on his own

Before deploying to Afghanistan in 2014, his coworkers threw him a going-away party and presented him with an iPad so that he could stay in touch with his family via FaceTime. “The whole time I was gone, Castle was constantly in touch with my wife,

Tony Badders, a field mechanic at Castle Contracting, celebrates with his wife in 2015 after returning home from an Army National Guard deployment to Afghanistan.

making sure she was OK, and sending me care packages,” Badders said. He is finishing his second six-year contract with the National Guard, and his goal is to complete at least 20 years of service to earn full retirement benefits. “I came to work for Castle straight out of basic training, still young and green, but people recognized my drive to build a great career,” he said. “Without the military and without Castle, I wouldn’t be where I am today.”


07.08.2018 • SUNDAY • M 1

NEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A21

Don’t trust USB devices with unknown origins Plug-in ports are a common gateway for hackers to gather information or infect computers with malware BY HAMZA SHABAN Washington Post

Thursday, August 9 THE MAGIC HOUSE 21+ Discover the Top Pours in the area at the inaugural Pour & Play Event! Explore The Magic House after hours while tasting from some of the best breweries, wineries, and distilleries in the area. Tickets also include food samples, live music, items from local vendors and more! EVENT SPONSORS

For tickets and more info: www.STLtoday.com/ourevents

When journalists arrived in Singapore for the historic summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un last month, security experts were alarmed by what awaited those who were covering the event. Inside a welcome bag that included bottled water featuring the faces of Trump and Kim and a guide to the local area was something far more suspicious: a miniature fan that connects to a computer’s USB port. The discovery prompted a security researcher to disassemble the fan to inspect the USB. Security experts say that people should never use USB devices without knowing where they come from. Hackers and spies can use them as Trojan horses — devices that seem innocuous but are loaded with malware designed to take control of a target’s computer and steal information. The summit had attracted journalists from all over the world. Since reporters are often in contact with business and government officials and gather nonpublic information, their personal devices and newsroom networks could be enticing targets. Experts say USBs are a common way for hackers to gather information or infect devices. In 2008, Russian agents planted virus-carrying USB sticks in retail kiosks around NATO headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan, to gain access to a classified Pentagon network, according to the New Yorker. In 2013, Italian newspapers alleged that Russian operatives

Treat USB devices with a hefty dose of skepticism before plugging them into your computer.

used USB devices to try to spy on world leaders at a G-20 summit in St. Petersburg. Research suggests that average citizens can also become targets. In 2011, the Department of Homeland Security planted USBs and CDs in government parking lots to test the security practices (and susceptibility) of employees and contractors. Sixty percent of people who picked up the items plugged them into work computers, and if the disks or USBs had an official logo printed on them the rate shot up to 90 percent. In another experiment conducted at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2016, researchers dropped nearly 300 USB sticks on campus and found that nearly half the time someone would pick them up and plug them into their computer. Sergei Skorobogatov, a hardware security researcher at the University of Cambridge, tested one of the fans from the summit. In an analysis of the components, Skorobogatov said he found no malicious software functionality inside the fan. But he was quick to add that people shouldn’t let their guard down. “This does not eliminate the possibil-

ity of malicious or Trojan components wired to USB connector in other fans, lamps and other end-user USB devices,” he wrote in the analysis published on his staff website and first reported by ZDNet. In other words, it’s not a good idea to plug unknown devices into USB ports on your own devices, Skorobogatov said. He added that, as in the case of the fans, just because one USB device in a given group is safe doesn’t mean the rest of them are. Jake Williams, founder of the cybersecurity firm Rendition Infosec and a former member of the National Security Agency’s hacking group, was also circumspect about the USB fans. He said that malicious actors could have narrowly targeted one reporter who was of special interest out of 100, meaning that most fans may have appeared harmless even as some might have been used to target specific journalists. The extremely small sample size of one fan makes it hard to draw conclusions, he said. But on the general practice of using hardware given to you by strangers or found in public places, he was direct: “It’s horrendously bad.”


A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

OBITUARIES Arend, Charles Nicholas (Nick) - St. Louis Barsanti, Nancy Lee Nansen - St. Louis Berg D.O., Dr. David Leo - Chesterfield Borghesi, Diana Louise - St. Charles Brodbeck, Vernell C. - St. Louis Burns, Lee Barrett - St. Louis Cowan, Donna J. - St. Peters Cusumano, Anthony M. - Los Angeles Derickson, Gloria Jean - St. Louis DeStefano, Gerald "Jerry" J. - St. Louis Dubuque, Theodore Julien Jr., M.D. - Creve Coeur Farley, Audrey Marie - O'Fallon, MO Frank, William A. - Naples, FL and St. Louis, MO Furrer, Joseph R. Jr. "Rick" - St. Louis

Celebrations of Life

Gordon - see Dubuque Hampton, Margaret M. - St. Louis Herrmann, Kurt S. - St. Louis Howard, Jack H. - St. Louis County Hyatt, Martin Harris - St. Louis Kaltenthaler III, Henry Jacob - University City Lenzen Jr., Harry "Jack" - Warson Woods Mayhall, Phatomia Ann - St. Louis McEvoy, Thomas Patrick - St. Louis McLaughlin, Emogene P. - St. Louis McQuillen, Matthew K. "Matt" - Fenton Quiggins - see McEvoy Riegel, Mary Lee (Gerry) - St. Louis Sanguinet, Gary - Tallahassee, FL, formerly of St. Louis Schiller, Sally - Clayton

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Schmelzle, Flora Lee - Kirkwood Siegfried, Sedly Marvin - St. Louis Singsaas, Eric G. - O'Fallon, MO Steltjes - see Walesky Strubert, Kathleen "Kitty" - St. Louis Thomas, Charlotte A. - St. Louis Toner, M. James - Reno, NV, formerly St. Louis Trendley, Charles "Chuck" - O'Fallon, MO Vinyard, Patricia - St. Louis Walesky, John William - St. Louis Warren, Frank Allen - St. Louis Webb, Jr., William Arthur - St. Louis Weindel, Michael A. - Wentzville Weiner, Shaw Joel - St. Louis

Arend, Charles Nicholas (Nick)

Dubuque, Jr., Theodore J. MD

Farley, Audrey Marie

was born June 6, 1947 in St Louis, Missouri and passed away June 29, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. He is preceded in death by his parents Charles Nicholas Arend and Lois M Arend. He is survived by his fiancé Gayle Berry of Grand Junction, CO, now in Denver, CO, one sister Nancy Kaiser of St Louis, MO and one niece Emily Kaiser of St Louis, MO. Services: Services will be held at Chapel Hill Mortuary, Kirkwood, MO, on July 10, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. Interment will be immediately following at Oak Hill Cemetery in Kirkwood, MO. More info at www.stlfuneral .com

1927 - 2018 It is with great sadness that The C R U D E M Foundation reports the passing of our beloved founder, Dr. Theodore "Ted" Dubuque, Jr. on June 30, in St. Louis. When Dr. Dubuque, a highlyrega rd ed St . L ou is surgeon, recovered from a near-fatal illness in the early eighties, he looked for a way "to express my gratitude for the gift of life." Ted's extraordinary vision and compassion led to his arrival in Milot, Haiti in 1985, the beginning of The CRUDEM Foundation, and the plan for success for Hôpital Sacré Coeur. Bowled over by the intensive poverty and impressed by the dignity, resourcefulness and welcoming, good spirit of the Haitian people, Ted made it his life's calling to turn a 6-bed Milot clinic into a quality medical facility. Today, Hôpital Sacré Coeur stands as one of Haiti's premier private hospitals and most notable success stories. The 200 bed, tertiary care hospital services a community of over 250,000 adults and children with critically needed quality healthcare and is a major employer and economic driver for the region. The abundant, transformative, life-saving fruits of one St. Louisan's vision and determination are evident everywhere one looks in northern Haiti. Ted would be the first to say that he alone was not responsible for all the accomplishments; God and an everincreasing community of supporters paved the way and continue to sustain the hospital. But we all know that Ted's vision, determination and devout faith helped shape and inform this mission for over 30 years. Remarkable. Extraordinary. Inspiring. Visionary. Kind and humble beyond measure. All words that aptly describe Ted. His own faith tradition perhaps describes him best: Ted truly lived up to the Jesuit ideal of being "a man for others." We will miss him.

(nee Zottarella), 88, loving wife of the late William F. Farley of O'Fallon, MO, died Wednesday, June 20, 2018 at Mount Carmel Nursing Home in O'Fallon, MO. Born December 3, 1929 in St. Louis, MO, she was the daughter of the late Leonard Zottarella and Roma Zottarella Gershien (nee Jenkins). Audrey was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother, and aunt. Her husband and children meant everything in the world to her. William and Audrey made many sacrifices to provide their children a wonderful life. She was a wonderful homemaker. Her hobbies included working in her flower gardens and listening to music. She was a member of St. Barnabas Catholic Church. Survived by sons and daughters-in-law, Kevin (Diane), Kim (Carol), and Kolin (Robin) Farley; grandchildren Kory, Cameron, Kayla, Danielle and Andrew Farley and great-grandchild Kourtney Farley; brother James Zottarella; sisters-in-law Marlene O'Connell and Frances Zottarella, and many nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by her husband, William; parents, Leonard and Roma; stepfather Harry Gershien; brother John (Jack) Zottarella; brothers-in-law Norman Farley, Forrest Farley, Gerald Noah and Martin O'Connell; sisters-in-law Betty Farley, Mary Farley, Shirley Noah, and Evelyn Zottarella. Her anatomical donation was received by St Louis University Medical School. Services: A memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, July 21, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Barnabas the Apostle Catholic Church, 1400 N. Main St., O'Fallon, MO 63366. Luncheon to follow service at St. Barnabas. In lieu of flowers, family and friends wishing to honor Audrey's memory may contribute to St. Barnabas Catholic Church.

Barsanti, Nancy Lee Nansen was born October 30, 1928 and died peacefully on June 3, 2018. Beloved wife of the late John "Jack" Barsanti; devoted mother of Lisa (Lon) Hoyt, Bill (Christine) Barsanti, Lorisa and Lucy (Chad) Krause; loving 'Grandbear' of Lisbeth and Loren Hoyt, Leah, Brett and Brock Barsanti and Katie and Charles Krause. Nancy Lee was born in St. Louis and attended Webster Groves High School. She then spent two years a t M on t icel l o Col l ege before attending and graduating from Skidmore College. After her return to St. Louis, she worked as a medical technologist at Barnes Hospital. The centerpiece of her life was her family and opportunities to have everyone together especially for summers in Macatawa, Michigan, where she vacationed since childhood. She enjoyed reminiscing about sailing and sharing her knowledge of shells, birds, plants and trees. And, of course being a native of St. Louis she was an avid Cardinal and Blues fan. Nancy Lee was a very caring and giving person to all. The family would like to thank all the loving caregivers at McKnight Place for their gentle care of our beloved mother. Services: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:00am at First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood, 100 E. Adams Rd. St. Louis, MO 63122. In lieu of flowers, memorials gifts appreciated to Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel, www.boppchapel.com

Berg D.O., Dr. David Leo 7/4/18. Memorial Visitation: Sunday, 2:00-6:00 p.m., SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, Ballwin. On-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Borghesi, Diana Louise age 70, of Saint Charles, MO, died on July 1, 2018. Contact Cremation Society of Missouri (636) 946-9896 or visit missouricremate.com

Brodbeck, Vernell C. (nee Schaefer), 81, On Wed. July 4; Dear wife of Roger Brodbeck. Services: Vis. Sun., 3-8 p.m.; Funeral Mon., 11 a.m. at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons South County.

Burns, Lee Barrett 33, died June 9, 2018. Services: A celebration of life is scheduled for Friday, July 13, 2018 from 6-10 p.m. at VFW Hall in Overland, MO. www.archwaychapel.com

Cowan, Donna J. July 5, 2018. Services: Vis., Mon., July 9, 12-2 pm, Service following at 2 pm at Baue Cave Springs, 3950 W. Clay St. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Cusumano, Anthony M. March 23, 1975 - April 29, 2018 A Celebration Of Life will be on July 14, 2 p.m. at St Mark's UMC, 315 Graham Rd., 63031.

Derickson, Gloria Jean (nee Filipowicz), Beloved wife of Stephen; mother of Parrish (Angela), Todd (Denise), Michael (Crystal), Jennifer Searles (Allen); loving grandmother of 14; great-grandmother of 7; friend to many. Services: Visitation Mon,, July 9, 8:00-10:00 a.m. Services 10:00 a.m., Henry Funeral and Cremation Services, 2842 Meramec Street.

DeStefano, Gerald "Jerry" J. was born on February 25, 1942. He succumbed to pancreatic cancer on July 4, 2018. Jerry began his career as an electrical engineer with McDonald Douglas, but made a midlife career change to insurance brokerage, b egin n in g a t Gu a rd ia n L i f e Insurance Company, followed by Benefits Design & Consultants. In 1994, he started his own health insurance brokerage agency, DeStefano & Associates. In 2015, Jerry sold his business. Jerry was happiest when he was "putzing" around the house and with the pool. Jerry is survived by his wife, Sandy, two children Erin Shocklee (Chris) and Eric DeStefano (Heather) and four grandchildren. Services: To celebrate Jerry's life, friends and family are invited to attend a memorial tribute on July 18, 2018 at 5 p.m. at Norwood Hills CC, followed by a reception until 8 p.m.

Frank, William A.

William A. Frank of Naples, FL and St. Louis, MO. He was born in St. Louis, MO October 26, 1920 and Dubuque, Theodore Julien Jr., M.D. died July 3, 2018. He was a graduate of John B u r r o u g h s died Saturday, School and Washington University June 30, 2018. in St . L ou is and the Harvard Born in St. Louis Graduate School of Business. He December 8, 1927, he was the son served as a Lieutenant in the US of the late Theodore Sr . and Navy during WWII. Frances Dubuque. Dr. Dubuque After the war, he entered the was the beloved husband of Carol family company, Frank's Inc., Stephens Dubuque for more than founded by his great-grandfather 60 years. He is survived by his in 1849. He sold the company in 1978. children Sally G o r d o n (Fitz), He served as a Director of the Old Tower Grove Bank & Trust Charles (Tina), Philip (Patricia), Company, it's parent company, TG BANCSHARES, and after it's Paul (Lauren), and Louis Dubuque merger with St. Louis County National Bank, he served on the ( M a r y ) a n d fou rt een gra n d holding company board, County Tower Corporation. After it was children - Sarah, Lauren, Charles, Grace, Elise, Hope, Claire, Caroline, Emily, Julia, Catherine, sold to Commerce Bank, he served as a director of Commerce Anne, Teddy and Matthew. He is the brother of Frances Barrett Bank of St. Louis. Mr. Frank was a member of the Deer Creek Club and Old (the late Robert), the late Margaret Butler (Wilbur), and the late Warson Country Club in St. Louis and a member of Port Royal Elise Murray (Eugene). Dr. Dubuque graduated from St. Louis University School of Club and Naples Yacht Club in Naples. He had a home in Naples, Medicine in 1952 and completed his surgical training at the FL since 1974. University in 1957. He then served two years in the U.S. Army as He was married to Cornelia "Babe" Dooley Frank for 56 years. Chief of Surgery at Ft. Benjamin Harrison Hospital in Indiana. He is survived by his sons William A. Frank, Jr. (Lynda) of After returning to St. Louis, he practiced surgery, primarily at Ventura, CA, Peter D. Frank (Joy) of Jupiter, FL and Terrence D. St. Mary's, Cardinal Glennon and St. Louis University Hospitals. Frank of St. Louis, 7 grandchildren; 6 great-grandchildren; He was Professor of Clinical Surgery at St. Louis University cherished nieces and nephews. Brother of the late Audrey F. School of Medicine and Director of the Department of Surgery Smith. Services: Private family services. Interment Bellefontaine at St. Mary's from 1962 to 1981. He was a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Forest Park Forever, Diplomate of the American Board of Surgery, a member of 5595 Grand Drive, St. Louis 63112, John Burroughs School, Alpha Omega Honor Medical Society and the Western Surgical 755 South Price Rd., 63124 or to the charity of one's choice. A SERVICE OF Association as well as a member and past President of the St. THE LUPTON CHAPEL Louis Surgical Society. Dr. Dubuque was also a past board member of the Catholic Medical Mission Board in New York and the American Association of the Order of Malta. Furrer, Joseph R. Jr. "Rick" Between 1986-7, he spent six months as a volunteer surgeon at Hôpital Sacré Coeur in Milot, Haiti and established the Tues., July 3, 2018. Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON, Mon., 9:15 operating room there. The mission, called Project Crudem, a.m. to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Inincluded the hospital and was started by the Brothers of the terment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 3-8 p.m. Sacred Heart. When the Brothers could no longer support the hospital, Dr. Dubuque and his friend, St. Louisan Carlos Reese, Hampton, Margaret M. took over management and financial responsibility by forming nee Piontek, Baptized the charitable Crudem Foundation in 1993. The hospital has into the Hope of Christ's become a premier health care provider in Haiti, gradually Resurrection on July 4, expanding from an original six beds to more than 200. Hôpital 2018, at the age of 98. Margaret Sacré Coeur was named one of the 100 Projects of the Holy was the beloved wife of the late Father for the Year of Charity, 1999 by Pope John Paul II. Lowell Hampton; She was the Dr. Dubuque was given the Servitor Pacis Award by the dear mother, mother-in-law of Mission of the Holy See to the United Nations. He received the S t e p h e n ( C h e r y l ) H a m p t o n , Surgical Volunteerism Award by the American College of Michael (Sue) Hampton, Richard Surgeons, the Alumni Award for Service to Humankind by St. Hampton, Barbara (Bob) Tarrant, Louis University, the Peter Richard Kenrick Award by Kenrick- dear sister of Raymond Piontek, Glennon Seminary, and the Backer Award by St . Louis dear grandmother of Derrick and University High. He was a Knight of Malta and was awarded the E v a n T a r r a n t a n d H e a t h e r Grand Cross of Merit and the Cross of Grand Officer. Hampton, dear sister-in-law, aunt Services: The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Francis and cousin. In addition to her husband Lowell, Margaret is de Sales Oratory, 2653 Ohio Ave., St. Louis, on Tuesday, July 10 preceded in death by her parents, Phillip and Helen (nee at 10:00 a.m. Interment Private. Noelker) Piontek, her sisters, Bertha (Sister Phyllis Piontek, The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 S.S.N.D.) and Rosalie Jasper, her brother, Clarence Piontek and Delmar Blvd., University City, on Monday from 4:00 p.m. until her granddaughter, Michelle Hampton. She will be dearly 7:00 p.m. missed by all who knew and loved her. Memorials may be made to The Crudem Foundation, P.O. Services: Visitation: Monday, July 9, 2018 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 Box 804, Ludlow, MA 01056 (www.crudem.org) or St. p.m., Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville, MO. Service: Tuesday, Francis de Sales Oratory, 2653 Ohio Ave., St. Louis, MO July 10, 2018, 10:00 a.m. at St. Patrick's Church, Wentzville, MO. 63118. Burial: Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 1:45 p.m. at Jefferson Barracks A SERVICE OF National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made THE LUPTON CHAPEL to Masses or American Lung Association in care of Pitman Funeral Home P.O. Box 248 Wentzville, MO. 63385. Memories and condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com. The CRUDEM Foundation. P. O. Box 804, Ludlow, MA 01056 / www.crudem.org

Herrmann, Kurt S.

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July 6, 2018. Beloved husband of Dee Radman Herrmann; dear father and father-in-law of Michael (Geralyn) Herrmann, Stephen (Julie) Herrmann, Karen (Bill) Elliott; dear grandfather of Forrest, Beth, Benjamin, Addison, and Jonathan; dear step-father of Alan (Penny) Bank, Keith (Barbara) Bank, and Linda (Akiva) Katz; dear step-grandfather of Lauren (Ben) Mattson, Andrew, Molly, Kyle, Valerie, Moshe, Shuli (Itzak) Levy, Eliana (Eliezer) Kesselman, Ori (Rochela) Katz, Miki (Yitzi) Cohen, and Racheli; dear step greatgrandfather of 7; dear son of the late Jacob Julius Herrmann and the late Selma Neuburger Herrmann; dear brother of the late Eric J. Herrmann; our dear uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Services: Visitation at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, July 8 at Congregation B'nai Amoona, 324 S. Mason Road. Funeral service at 3 p.m. Interment follows at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Road. Memorial contributions preferred to Congregation B'nai Amoona or to the charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

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A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

OBITUARIES Arend, Charles Nicholas (Nick) - St. Louis Barsanti, Nancy Lee Nansen - St. Louis Bellis, Lois M. - Moscow, Idaho Berg D.O., Dr. David Leo - Chesterfield Betlach, Edward "Ed" Donald - Overland Borghesi, Diana Louise - St. Charles Brennan, Dorothy A. "Dottie" - St. Louis Brickey, James Nelson - St. Louis Brodbeck, Vernell C. - St. Louis Burch, Patrick H. - Creve Coeur Burns, Lee Barrett - St. Louis Buss - see Brennan Cowan, Donna J. - St. Peters Cusumano, Anthony M. - Los Angeles Davies, Scott E. - St. Louis Derickson, Gloria Jean - St. Louis DeStefano, Gerald "Jerry" J. - St. Louis Dubuque, Theodore Julien Jr., M.D. - Creve Coeur Farley, Audrey Marie - O'Fallon, MO Ferguson, Joseph Daniel - St. Charles Frank, William A. - Naples, FL and St. Louis, MO

Arend, Charles Nicholas (Nick)

Celebrations of Life

Furrer, Joseph R. Jr. "Rick" - St. Louis Gordon - see Dubuque Graham, Ethel V. - Cedar Hill, MO Hampton, Margaret M. - St. Louis Herrmann, Kurt S. - St. Louis Howard, Jack H. - St. Louis County Hutchins, Sidwell - Chesterfield Hyatt, Martin Harris - St. Louis Kaltenthaler III, Henry Jacob - University City Kustra, Catherine M. "Katie" - St. Louis Lenzen Jr., Harry "Jack" - Warson Woods Massler, Glenna M. - St. Louis Mayhall, Phatomia Ann - St. Louis McEvoy, Thomas Patrick - St. Louis McLaughlin, Emogene P. - St. Louis McQuillen, Matthew K. "Matt" - Fenton Meier, Allan - Lake St. Louis Quiggins - see McEvoy Rauh, Henry - St. Louis Riegel, Mary Lee (Gerry) - St. Louis Rubin, Maxine Lois - St. Louis

Borghesi, Diana Louise

was born June 6, 1947 in St Louis, Missouri and passed away age 70, of Saint Charles, MO, died on July 1, 2018. Contact June 29, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. Cremation Society of Missouri (636) 946-9896 or visit He is preceded in death by his parents Charles Nicholas Arend missouricremate.com and Lois M Arend. He is survived by his fiancé Gayle Berry of Grand Junction, CO, now in Denver, CO, one sister Nancy Kaiser Brennan, Dorothy A. "Dottie" of St Louis, MO and one niece Emily Kaiser of St Louis, MO. (nee Gantner) Fortified with the Services: Services will be held at Chapel Hill Mortuary, Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Kirkwood, MO, on July 10, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. Interment will be Church on July 4, 2018. Beloved immediately following at Oak Hill Cemetery in Kirkwood, MO. wife for 61 years of John A. More info at www.stlfuneral .com "Jack" Brennan, Jr.; dear mother of John A. III (Angela), James, Barsanti, Nancy Lee Nansen Patrick (Janet), Ann (Todd) Buss, and Christopher (Elizabeth) was born October 30, 1928 and Brennan; dear grandmother of died peacefully on June 3, 2018. Grace, Alex, Jimmy, Tori, Katie, Beloved wife of the late John Kelly, Kaitlyn, and Ellie; dear "Jack" Barsanti; devoted mother aunt, cousin, and friend to many. of Lisa (Lon) Hoyt, Bill (Christine) Dottie lit up any room with her Barsanti, Lorisa and Lucy (Chad) smile and had a lifelong passion Krause; loving 'Grandbear' of Lisbeth and Loren Hoyt, Leah, for tennis, golf, reading, and tapdancing. Many thanks to Mari Brett and Brock Barsanti and de Villa Skilled Nursing and St. Luke's Hospice. A special thanks to Dr. David Galli. Katie and Charles Krause. Nancy Lee was born in St. Louis Services: Visitation 4-8 p.m. Sunday, July 8 at KRIEGSHAUSER and attended Webster Groves WEST CHAPEL, 9450 Olive Blvd., Olivette. Mass of Christian High School. She then spent two Burial 10 a.m. Monday, July 9 at Our Lady of the Pillar Catholic years a t M on t icel l o Col l ege Church 401 S. Lindbergh Blvd. Interment Resurrection before attending and graduating from Skidmore College. After Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to St. Patrick her return to St. Louis, she worked as a medical technologist at Center appreciated. Condolences may be offered Barnes Hospital. The centerpiece of her life was her family and through www.kriegshausermortuary.com. opportunities to have everyone together especially for summers in Macatawa, Michigan, where she vacationed since childhood. Brickey, James Nelson She enjoyed reminiscing about sailing and sharing her at the age of 76, on Wednesday, July 4, 2018. Beloved knowledge of shells, birds, plants and trees. And, of course husband of the late Kathleen Fitzgerald Brickey; loving being a native of St. Louis she was an avid Cardinal and Blues brother of Phyllis Brickey Harris of Flatwoods, KY and fan. Nancy Lee was a very caring and giving person to all. The family would like to thank all the loving caregivers at McKnight the late Paul Brickey Jr., Joyce Brickey McDowell and Ronald E. Brickey (survived by Shirley); uncle, great-uncle, great-greatPlace for their gentle care of our beloved mother. Services: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:00am at First Presbyterian uncle, cousin and friend. Mr. Brickey practiced law for many years in the St. Louis Church of Kirkwood, 100 E. Adams Rd. St. Louis, MO 63122. In metropolitan area. lieu of flowers, memorials gifts appreciated to Missouri Services: A private graveside service will be held in Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110. Lexington, Kentucky. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel, www.boppchapel.com A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL Bellis, Lois M. 90, loved by many and a former s t rin g ed u ca t or in Moscow, Brodbeck, Vernell C. Idaho and St. Louis, Missouri, (nee Schaefer), 81, On Wed. July 4; Dear wife of Roger died Sunday, July 1, 2018, of Brodbeck. Services: Vis. Sun., 3-8 p.m.; Funeral Mon., 11 respiratory complications at a.m. at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons South County. Kootenai Medical Center in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Burch, Patrick H. She was born March 17, 1928, in Pacific Grove, CA, to Harold 69, Creve Coeur, passed away on July 5. Services: Vis. Tues., 3and Vertie Bailey, later moving 6 p.m., Serv. to follow, Kriegshauser West. In care of Kemperto Nampa, Idaho. She graduated Millard-Keim FH (636) 528-8221. from the University of Idaho with a B . S . i n M u s ic E d , a n d d id Burns, Lee Barrett graduate work at the University 33, died June 9, 2018. Services: A celebration of life is of Idaho and University of Missouri-St. Louis. Mrs. Bellis started the string program in Moscow schools, scheduled for Friday, July 13, 2018 from 6-10 p.m. at VFW using the Suzuki method, also directing the Sr. High orchestra Hall in Overland, MO. www.archwaychapel.com until 1969, when she married Dr. Warren Bellis and moved to St. Louis, Missouri. She continued to use the Suzuki techniques in Cowan, Donna J. a number of elementary schools (4-6) and directed Jr. High Or- July 5, 2018. Services: Vis., Mon., July 9, 12-2 pm, Service chestras and Honors Orchestras in the Normandy School following at 2 pm at Baue Cave Springs, 3950 W. Clay St. District. Lois worked for 23 years in the St. Louis All Suburban Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com Honors Orchestra serving in many capacities including conductor. She was an adjunct professor of string technique at Cusumano, Anthony M. the University of Missouri-St. Louis. She also taught violin and viola in her studio. Many of her students were inspired to go on March 23, 1975 - April 29, 2018 and become music educators themselves. A Celebration Of Life will be on July 14, 2 p.m. at St Mark's UMC, Mrs. Bellis, an accomplished violinist, played in Symphony and 315 Graham Rd., 63031. Chamber orchestras all through her career. While in Missouri she played in the St. Louis Philharmonic Orchestra, University of Davies, Scott E. Missouri-St. Louis Symphony and Chamber Orchestra, as well as age 47, passed away suddenly on the Kirkwood Symphony. She held memberships in the AmeriMonday, July 2, 2018 and has can String Teachers Association, the Music Educators National entered the Gates of Heaven to Conference, and was a life member of the music sorority Sigma be with our beloved Father. He Alpha Iota. was born October 4, 1970 in St. In 1994, she and her husband moved back to Moscow, where Louis, to the late David Davies she played in the Washington-Idaho Symphony for many years. and Sue Davies-Harper. He was a Mrs. Bellis is survived by her daughters, Lori Lyon and Lynda 1989 graduate of Mehlville Sr (Steve) James, born of her previous marriage to Cub Lyon in High School, where he played Idaho, and another daughter of Dr. Bellis, Elizabeth (John) football, basketball, and Drees. She follows her husband Dr. Bellis and her son Gary Lyon baseball. Scott also attended in death. She is also survived by two grandchildren, Susie Missouri State University and (Greg) Stone and Matthew (Gaby) James, and six great-grandreceived a bachelor's degree in children. marketing. He worked in Services: A celebration of her life will be held at the 1912 Center, 412 E. 3rd Street, Moscow, Idaho, on Sunday, July 22, at business/sales, construction, and as an umpire, as he always 1:00 p.m. Contributions in her honor could be sent to loved to be on the field. Scott truly lived life to the fullest; enjoying music, attending sporting events, chatting with friends washington-idaho-symphony.org and family, enjoying a beer and BBQ, and having the ability to make everyone laugh. Scott had an uncanny ability to reach Berg D.O., Dr. David Leo people in a deep and positive way. He is survived by his son Maclaine "MAC" Davies, brother 7/4/18. Memorial Visitation: Sunday, 2:00-6:00 p.m., Derek Davies, sisters Kelly Davies, Tiffany Davies; and nieces SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, Ballwin. Ariel and Michaela, nephew Julian Davies, stepfather William On-line guestbook at Schrader.com. Harper, grampa Don Rodgers and late Naomi Rodgers, and many uncles, aunts, and cousins. Betlach, Edward "Ed" Donald Services: Family, friends, and others whose lives Scott touched of Overland, MO, successfully completed his 80-year mission on are invited to the wake Tuesday, 7/10 at 4-9 p.m., burial 7/11 at Earth, July 5, 2018. Dear son of the late Edward Betlach and 11 a.m., all at Kutis Funeral Home, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, Geraldine (Conway) Betlach; beloved husband of the late Mehlville, MO 63129. Celebration of Life is to follow burial at Patricia (Verderber) Betlach. He is survived by his children Julie Cafe Telegraph at 2650 Telegraph Rd, St. Louis, MO 63125 Betlach, Vicki (Betlach) Ford, and Donald Betlach; siblings to have a cold one in Scott's honor, reminisce, grieve, Nancy (Betlach) Ivanko and Robert Betlach; extended family and support each other and, of course, just chat. many close friends. Services: Funeral from ORTMANN'S, 9222 Lackland Rd., Overland, Saturday, July 14, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. Visitation Friday 4-8 p.m. Pay tribute at www.osfuneralhomes.com Ortmann Funeral Home SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Sanguinet, Gary - Tallahassee, FL, formerly of St. Louis Schiller, Sally - Clayton Schmelzle, Flora Lee - Kirkwood Shanks, Deanne M. - O'Fallon, MO Sharp, James E. "Jim" - Maryland Heights Siegfried, Sedly Marvin - St. Louis Singsaas, Eric G. - O'Fallon, MO Snider, John W. - Wildwood, MO Steltjes - see Walesky Strubert, Kathleen "Kitty" - St. Louis Thomas, Charlotte A. - St. Louis Toner, M. James - Reno, NV, formerly St. Louis Trendley, Charles "Chuck" - O'Fallon, MO Vinyard, Patricia - St. Louis Walesky, John William - St. Louis Warren, Frank Allen - St. Louis Webb, Jr., William Arthur - St. Louis Weindel, Michael A. - Wentzville Weiner, Shaw Joel - St. Louis

Derickson, Gloria Jean (nee Filipowicz), 4/1/1948 - 7/3/2018. Beloved wife of Stephen; mother of Parrish (Angela), Todd (Denise), Michael (Crystal), Jennifer Searles (Allen); loving grandmother of 14; great-grandmother of 7; friend to many. Services: Visitation Mon,, July 9, 8:00-10:00 a.m. with funeral service 10:00 a.m., Henry Funeral and Cremation Services, 2842 Meramec Street.

DeStefano, Gerald "Jerry" J. was born on February 25, 1942. He succumbed to pancreatic cancer on July 4, 2018. Jerry began his career as an electrical engineer with McDonald Douglas, but made a midlife career change to insurance brokerage, b egin n in g a t Gu a rd ia n L i f e Insurance Company, followed by Benefits Design & Consultants. In 1994, he started his own health insurance brokerage agency, DeStefano & Associates. In 2015, Jerry sold his business. Jerry was happiest when he was "putzing" around the house and with the pool. Jerry is survived by his wife, Sandy, two children Erin Shocklee (Chris) and Eric DeStefano (Heather) and four grandchildren. Services: To celebrate Jerry's life, friends and family are invited to attend a memorial tribute on July 18, 2018 at 5 p.m. at Norwood Hills CC, followed by a reception until 8 p.m.

Dubuque, Jr., Theodore J. MD 1927 - 2018 It is with great sadness that The C R U D E M Foundation reports the passing of our beloved founder, Dr. Theodore "Ted" Dubuque, Jr. on June 30, in St. Louis. When Dr. Dubuque, a highlyrega rd ed St . L ou is surgeon, recovered from a near-fatal illness in the early eighties, he looked for a way "to express my gratitude for the gift of life." Ted's extraordinary vision and compassion led to his arrival in Milot, Haiti in 1985, the beginning of The CRUDEM Foundation, and the plan for success for Hôpital Sacré Coeur. Bowled over by the intensive poverty and impressed by the dignity, resourcefulness and welcoming, good spirit of the Haitian people, Ted made it his life's calling to turn a 6-bed Milot clinic into a quality medical facility. Today, Hôpital Sacré Coeur stands as one of Haiti's premier private hospitals and most notable success stories. The 200 bed, tertiary care hospital services a community of over 250,000 adults and children with critically needed quality healthcare and is a major employer and economic driver for the region. The abundant, transformative, life-saving fruits of one St. Louisan's vision and determination are evident everywhere one looks in northern Haiti. Ted would be the first to say that he alone was not responsible for all the accomplishments; God and an everincreasing community of supporters paved the way and continue to sustain the hospital. But we all know that Ted's vision, determination and devout faith helped shape and inform this mission for over 30 years. Remarkable. Extraordinary. Inspiring. Visionary. Kind and humble beyond measure. All words that aptly describe Ted. His own faith tradition perhaps describes him best: Ted truly lived up to the Jesuit ideal of being "a man for others." We will miss him. The CRUDEM Foundation. P. O. Box 804, Ludlow, MA 01056 / www.crudem.org

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07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 1

Howard, Jack H.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

Sanguinet, Gary

of Des Peres, MO, passed away on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 at the age of 89. Jack is the loving husband of Debby Howard (nee Waite); devoted father of Thomas (Mary) Howard, Patricia Howard, and Jack E. (Debbie) Howard; adoring grandfather of Jonathan, Evelyn, Benjamin, Jack L., Eric, and Emily Howard; and dear uncle, cousin, and friend to many. He is preceded in death by his parents, Pinkerton and Augusta Howard; and sister, Patricia Storch. Services: The family is being served by Alexander-White-Mullen Funeral Home, 11101 St. Charles Rock Rd, St. Ann, MO 63074, where a visitation will be held on Saturday, 7/14/18, from noon to 2 p.m. The funeral service will directly follow the visitation, starting at 2 p.m. Inurnment at Mount Lebanon Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in Jack's name to the Biome Charter School Foundation, 4471 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 63108.

Gary Sanguinet passed away on June 15, 2018 at home and in the embrace of family and the dogs he loved. He was an attorney who practiced Workers Compensation Law in St. Louis, MO. He was born in St. Louis on September 21, 1942 and was the son of Merle M. Sanguinet and Marvel Lehr Sanguinet. He served in the US Army during the Vietnam conflict and was discharged in 1969. G a r y o b t a i n e d h i s B A from Vanderbilt University and LLD from St. Louis University. He was a member of Grace Lutheran Church in Tallahassee. His primary hobbies were Tai Chi and ukulele. He both took and taught classes for several years and made many friends. Gary was preceded in death by his parents and is survived by Hyatt, Martin Harris his wife of 53 years Kathleen (Kathy) (nee Sa mu el s en ) , 91, remembered for his zest for life, passed. Son of the late daughter Amanda (Bart) Lally of San Francisco, grandchildren Marion and Alexander Hyatt, brother of Arthur (Adrienne) Hyatt Francis and Marygrace, brothers Craig (Bonnie) and Bruce and the late Norma (Jerry) Nissenbaum, father of Alan (Eve) Sanguinet of St Louis. Hyatt and Anne Shapery, friend of Eve Wood. Private SERVICES: A memorial Service will be at 6:00 p.m. on July 13, Celebration was held July 4. Contributions to charity of choice. 2018 at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 115 South 6th Street, St . Charles, MO 63301. Light refreshments will be served following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be Kaltenthaler III, Henry Jacob made to Grace Lutheran Church, 2919 Miccosukee Rd., Died May 17, 2018 at the age of 90. Beloved husband of Margaret (Peg) Kaltenthaler; loving father Tallahassee, FL 32308, Immanuel Lutheran Church, or charity of Ellen (Nathan) Schroeder, Bill (Lisa Fratianni), the late Karl, of your choice. and Alice Kaltenthaler; proud grandfather of Peter (Morgan) Schroeder, Lizzy (Adam) Baus, Lucy Schroeder, Alex and Sam Schiller, Sally Kaltenthaler, adoring great-grandfather of MaggieMae Baus, died on June 30, 2018 at the age of 90. Sally was a graduate of brother-in-law, uncle, great uncle. Henry taught biology at University City High School for 28 Clayton High School and Maryville College, where she majored years, then worked at S-F Scout Ranch for many years after he in music. While still a teenager, she sang at weddings and retired (until he was 80 years old). Active volunteer with the continued to do so for decades, often at her parish church, St. Boy Scouts, Second Presbyterian Church, St. Louis Zoo, The Joseph's in Clayton. Her extensive career took her around the world as a Travel Agent for Kirkland Travel and American Green Center. Express Travel; Manager of Women's Sales Development for Services: Memorial service Saturday, July 14, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. at Second Presbyterian Church, 4501 Westminster Pl., 63108. American Airlines; and Sales VP for El Al Israel Airlines. Sally held Executive Sales positions at the Chase Park Plaza Contributions appreciated to Boy Scouts of America - Greater and Lodge of the Four Seasons, joined the Missouri Botanical St. Louis Area Council or The Green Center. Garden as Executive Secretary of the Members, and then was employed by the St. Louis Art Museum as Executive Director, Membership. She was a Special Events Consultant to Commerce Lenzen Jr., Harry "Jack" Bancshares, helped form a Friends auxiliary for the St. Louis Fortified with the Sacraments of Cathedral, and devoted her energies to OASIS as a volunteer. Holy Mother Church on Friday, Sister of the late Nadine Schiller Mahe and Henry Frederick June 29, 2018. Beloved husband of the late Patricia Lenzen (nee Schiller; beloved aunt of Susan Switzer, Sally Mahé, Chris Sullivan); loving father of Dan Schiller, Martha Stephens, George Mahe, Tom Schiller, Eric (Ann), Anne (Steve) Disko, Abby Schiller; great-aunt of eight and great-great aunt of five. Sally was known for her keen wit, thoughtfulness, and deep (Scott) Marcouiller and the late Mike (Susan); dear grandfather love of her hometown - including the St. Louis Rams. Her ability of Megan, Jack, David, Katie, to rattle off facts prompted her nephew George to say: "Who needs Google when you have Aunt Sally?" Matt, Allie, Luke, Harry, and She will be missed by many. Sally said she received the Sarah; brother of the late Joann extraordinary gift of being part of a loving, caring family and (Skip) Jacoby. Services: Visitation Wednesday, having a host of outstanding and loyal friends. Her wish is that each be blessed with courage and serenity as they continue July 11th, 9 a.m. until time of along life's winding path. Funeral Mass beginning at 10 a.m. at Ste. Genevieve du Bois Catholic Church. Interment private. Memorial contributions preferred to Folds of Honor. Schmelzle, Flora Lee www.boppchapel.com on Wednesday, July 4, 2018. B el oved w ife of Richard A. Mayhall, Phatomia Ann Schmelzle; dear mother of Michael (Peggy) Schmelzle, Meg (nee Parker) Sunday., July 1, 2018. Visitation at KUTIS (Tom) M a h er, M a rt y (Ann) AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Wed., July 11, 9:00 a.m. Schmelzle and the late Mark until funeral service at 1:00 p.m. Interment JB National. (Rooney) Schmelzle; dear grandmother of 8 and great-grandMcEvoy, Thomas Patrick mother of 8; dear sister, aunt, July 4, 2018. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother cousin, and friend. Church. Beloved husband of the late Helen McEvoy (nee MadLee was active in the real estate igan). Dearest father of Elizabeth (Larry) Quiggins and Kevin business and was an avid potter, (Terri) McEvoy. Loving grandfather of Benjamin, James, watercolorist, and portrait paintSydnee, Macey, Patrick, Alysa, Tommy, Katie and Maura. Dear er. She wanted everyone to know brother of John McEvoy of Banagher, County Offaly Ireland, that she tried. Emily (Eamonn) Donnelly of Banagher, County Offaly Ireland Services: A memorial service will be Thursday, July 12, 11:00 and predeceased by his sister Marie (Don) Gray of Clonfert, a.m. at First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood, 100 E. Adams, County Galway. and his parents John Joseph and Emily Kirkwood, MO 63122. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions Philomena (nee Ryan) McEvoy. Our dear uncle, great-uncle, may be made to First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood, cousin and friend. The Missouri Botanical Garden or the charity of one's Tom was born in the town of Banagher, County Offaly Ireland choice. www.boppchapel.com on April 23, 1935 to John Joseph and Emily Philomena (nee Ryan) McEvoy. Tom and his wife Helen arrived in America in Siegfried, Sedly Marvin 1962 with 2 suit cases and $100.00. They settled in St. Louis. Tom was very proud to become an American and cherished the July 6, 2018 beloved husband of Doris Siegfried; dear father opportunities it afforded him and his family with a career in the and father-in-law of Barry (Pamela) , Glenn (Star), Randy, Kevin auto industry. He held his Irish Heritage close to his heart and (Judi) and Carla (Bruce Essman) Siegfried; dear grandfather of would spread his musical talents in America by singing, playing Jason (Winnie Jeng), Stefan, Hayden and Anna Siegfried, Joshua and Danielle Essman; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. and inspiring Irish Traditional music throughout St. Louis. Services: Memorial Service: 12:30 p.m. Monday, July 9, 2018 in Services: Funeral service Monday, July 9th, 11:00 a.m. at New the Chapel of Ortmann-Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Mt. Sinai Mausoleum, 8430 Gravois. No visitation prior to Blvd., Creve Coeur, MO 63141. In lieu of flowers, donations to service. Memorial contributions of your choice preferred. the Alzheimer's Association preferred. Visitation 10:00 a.m. Visit berger memorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE until time of service. Interment St. Charles Memorial Gardens cemetery. Arrangements by Kevin and Ellen O'Sullivan.

McLaughlin, Emogene P. (nee Peyton), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wednesday, July 4, 2018. Beloved wife of the late William B. McLaughlin; loving mother of Mary (Ron) Smith, Dorothy McLaughlin, William B. McLaughlin, Jr., Michael J. M c L a u g h l i n , Elizabeth M c L a u g h l i n a n d D on n a (Tom) Wesolowski; our dear grandma, great-grandma, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Services will begin on Thursday, July 12, 9:15 a.m. at STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd., then proceed to Sacred Heart Catholic Church (Florissant) for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to Alzheimers Association or Cardinal Glennon Children's Foundation appreciated. VISITATION WEDNESDAY, JULY 11TH, 4-8 p.m. Friends may share memories and express condolences at www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Singsaas, Eric G. July 5, 2018, age 50. Services: Vis. Sun., July 8, Baue St. Charles, 12-2 p.m. Memorial Service to follow at 2 p.m. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Strubert, Kathleen "Kitty" (nee Keating), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, July 5, 2018. Interment private. Check www.boppchapel.com for additional information.

Thomas, Charlotte A. On June 20, 2018. Memorial service Sat., July 28, 10:00 a.m. at Apostalic Pentecoastal Church, 901 Barracksview Rd., 63125. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

Trendley, Charles "Chuck" June 22, 2018. Services: Memorial Service will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 21 at Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, Lake Saint Louis, MO. Visit Baue.com

Vinyard, Patricia (nee Runge), 83, surrounded by her loving family on July 5, 2018. Beloved wife of 63 yrs. to Robert Vinyard; loving mother and mother-in-law of David (Karrie) Vinyard and Lisa (Jerry) Stubits; cherished grandmother of Emily (Ashton) Rone, Sara Stubits, and Hannah Stubits; dear sister, aunt, cousin and friend of many. Services: Memorial Visitation, Wed., July 11th, 11 a.m. to the time of the service 12 p.m. at First Christian Church of Florissant, 2890 Patterson Rd. Interment private.

Walesky, John William of St. Louis, Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Born- January 23, 1931, D i e d - J u n e 22, 2018 Beloved husband of Carole Ann (nee Steltjes) for 41 years. Dear son of the late Albina and Josef Walesky. Preceded in death by 1 sister and 4 brothers all of Waterbury, CT. Dear brother in law of Robert and Gerri Steltjes of Franklin, TN, Kathleen and Thomas Majewski of Glen Carbon, IL and the late Jean and John Heil of Memphis, TN. John served in the US Navy for four years. He graduated from Purdue University with a degree in electrical engineering and worked for the General Electric Company for 32 years. He retired in 1992. Our dear uncle, great uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial service at Jefferson Barracks Memorial Chapel on July 9, 2018 at 11 AM. Interment at Jefferson Barracks .Donations to the American Cancer Society would be appreciated.

Warren, Frank Allen Entered into rest on Tuesday July 3, 2018 at St. Anthony's Medical Center, St. Louis, MO. Frank was born in Goshen, New York the son of the late William and the late Gert ru d e (Gray) Warren. Frank was a US Navy veteran. He graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York and came to work for the Von H offma n n Printing Companies in St. Louis upon graduation. He was an avid golfer, gardener and craftsman. He is survived by his wife Edna A. Warren (nee Vogel) and his son Russell A. Warren; brothers Howard , Richard and Ronald as well as many nieces and nephews. Services: A memorial service will be held at Southminster Presbyterian Church (10126 E. Watson Rd., 63126) Sunday, July 15 at 3:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Salvation Army (824 Union Rd. 63123) or the M is s ou ri B ot a n ica l Garden (4344 Shaw B l vd . , 63110) appreciated.

Webb, Jr., William Arthur Dear husband of Carmen R. Webb (nee DeRienzo), beloved father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. Services: A Celebration of Life will be privately held.

Weindel, Michael A. 69, June 23, 2018. Services: Vis. Fri., July 13, 2018, 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. service, Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville. Burial Private. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

Weiner, Shaw Joel July 4, 2018. Dear son of the late Harry and the late Mary Weiner; dear brother and brother-in-law of Dr. Steven (Cheryl) Weiner and Dr. Debra (Neal Samuels) Weiner; our dear cousin and friend. Services: Visitation Sunday, July 8th, 11:30 a.m. at BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Blvd, followed by funeral service at 12:00 Noon. Interment Chesed Shel Emeth CemeteryWhite Road. Memorial contributions preferred to the American Parkinson Disease Association, 1415 Elbridge Payne Road, Suite #150, Chesterfield, MO 63017. Visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information.

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David Dillingham 49 Year Member PF/BTJ Retired July 2, 2018 Date of Death John J. O'Mara Bus. Mgr. Brian Nichols Asst. Bus. Mgr.

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Toner, M. James

James "Jim" Toner died June 28, 2018 in Reno, Nevada. Born in Sunset Memorial Park, 12 adjourning lots, Section 4, overlooks 1939 in Hettinger, ND the eldest of nine children, Jim was raised Sams Steakhouse. Call 314-631-8185 McQuillen, Matthew K. "Matt" in St. Paul, Minnesota. He lived in St. Louis from 1964 to 1972, 25, 6/29/18, father of Priscilla McQuillen, boyfriend of Peyton having moved to St. Louis for graduate school at St. Louis Unger, son of Michael and Debbie McQuillen, brother to Megan, University where he earned a Master's Degree in Social Work. Shannon, and Sean. Svcs: Vis.Thurs., 7/12, 10-11 a.m., memorial Jim married Susan Troy, in the St. Louis Cathedral January 30, Mass, 11-12 p.m. Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 17 Ann Ave., 1965. They remained married for 53 years until his death. Two Valley Park, MO. of their three daughters were born in St. John's Hospital here. While in St. Louis Jim was employed at the St. Louis City Juvenile Court, the Dismas House, and Region V of the Missouri Riegel, Mary Lee (Gerry) Law Enforcement Assistance Council. He served as Social World (née Gieringer), born October 29, Field Work Supervisor for St. Louis U, Washington U and the 1 9 2 4 , f o r t i f i e d w i t h t h e University of Missouri in Columbia. Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Jim and family moved to Reno, Nevada in 1972 where he had Church on Wednesday, June 27, a successful career with the National Council of Juvenile and 2018; beloved wife of 64 years to Family Court Judges, then later as President of Bishop Manogue the late Robert C. Riegel; loving Catholic High School. He served as President of the National mother of Robert C. (Sharon) Organization of Forensic Social Work, and earlier as the Riegel, Jr., Mary Kathleen (the President of the Nevada Chapter of the National Association of late Daniel) Kerlick, Joseph C. Social Workers. Riegel, Mary Lee "Mimi" (Glenn) Over the course of Jim's career he received numerous awards Williams, Richard T. (Darcy) from national and other state juvenile justice agencies At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our Riegel, and the late Susan J. experienced staff of floral designers (including Missouri). In 2001 he received the "Jack and Julie Riegel; cherished grandmother of is dedicated to the highest level eleven and great-grandmother of Lally Alumni Merit Award " from SLU's school of Social Service. Jim is survived by wife Susan; three daughters, Kristen, Nicole of personal service. seven. Services: Funeral Mass 12:00 noon on Saturday, July 21, at St. and Bridget; granddaughter Kailey Kathryn; siblings, in-laws and Anselm Parish/Saint Louis Priory Chapel, 530 S. Mason Rd., numerous nieces and nephews. Order 24 Hours 63141. Private burial, immediate family only, Resurrection Funeral Mass was offered in Reno, NV with internment in Resurrection Cemetery in St. Paul where both his parents and schnucksfloral.com Catholic Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations his wife's parents are buried. are appreciated to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (314) 997-2444 or (www.stjude.org/(800)805-5856) boppchapel.com

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07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

OBITUARIES

Celebrations of Life

Dubuque, Theodore Julien Jr., M.D.

Hampton, Margaret M.

died Saturday, June 30, 2018. Born in St. Louis December 8, 1927, he was the son of the late Theodore Sr . and Frances Dubuque. Dr. Dubuque was the beloved husband of Carol Stephens Dubuque for more than 60 years. He is survived by his children Sally G o r d o n (Fitz), Charles (Tina), Philip (Patricia), Paul (Lauren), and Louis Dubuque ( M a r y ) a n d fou rt een gra n d children - Sarah, Lauren, Charles, Grace, Elise, Hope, Claire, Caroline, Emily, Julia, Catherine, Anne, Teddy and Matthew. He is the brother of Frances Barrett (the late Robert), the late Margaret Butler (Wilbur), and the late Elise Murray (Eugene). Dr. Dubuque graduated from St. Louis University School of Medicine in 1952 and completed his surgical training at the University in 1957. He then served two years in the U.S. Army as Chief of Surgery at Ft. Benjamin Harrison Hospital in Indiana. After returning to St. Louis, he practiced surgery, primarily at St. Mary's, Cardinal Glennon and St. Louis University Hospitals. He was Professor of Clinical Surgery at St. Louis University School of Medicine and Director of the Department of Surgery at St. Mary's from 1962 to 1981. He was a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Diplomate of the American Board of Surgery, a member of Alpha Omega Honor Medical Society and the Western Surgical Association as well as a member and past President of the St. Louis Surgical Society. Dr. Dubuque was also a past board member of the Catholic Medical Mission Board in New York and the American Association of the Order of Malta. Between 1986-7, he spent six months as a volunteer surgeon at Hôpital Sacré Coeur in Milot, Haiti and established the operating room there. The mission, called Project Crudem, included the hospital and was started by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart. When the Brothers could no longer support the hospital, Dr. Dubuque and his friend, St. Louisan Carlos Reese, took over management and financial responsibility by forming the charitable Crudem Foundation in 1993. The hospital has become a premier health care provider in Haiti, gradually expanding from an original six beds to more than 200. Hôpital Sacré Coeur was named one of the 100 Projects of the Holy Father for the Year of Charity, 1999 by Pope John Paul II. Dr. Dubuque was given the Servitor Pacis Award by the Mission of the Holy See to the United Nations. He received the Surgical Volunteerism Award by the American College of Surgeons, the Alumni Award for Service to Humankind by St. Louis University, the Peter Richard Kenrick Award by KenrickGlennon Seminary, and the Backer Award by St . Louis University High. He was a Knight of Malta and was awarded the Grand Cross of Merit and the Cross of Grand Officer. Services: The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Francis de Sales Oratory, 2653 Ohio Ave., St. Louis, on Tuesday, July 10 at 10:00 a.m. Interment Private. The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City, on Monday from 4:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. Memorials may be made to The Crudem Foundation, P.O. Box 804, Ludlow, MA 01056 (www.crudem.org) or St. Francis de Sales Oratory, 2653 Ohio Ave., St. Louis, MO 63118. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

nee Piontek, Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on July 4, 2018, at the age of 98. Margaret was the beloved wife of the late Lowell Hampton; She was the dear mother, mother-in-law of Stephen (Cheryl) Hampton, Michael (Sue) Hampton, Richard Hampton, Barbara (Bob) Tarrant, dear sister of Raymond Piontek, dear grandmother of Derrick and Evan Tarrant and Heather Hampton, dear sister-in-law, aunt and cousin. In addition to her husband Lowell, Margaret is preceded in death by her parents, Phillip and Helen (nee Noelker) Piontek, her sisters, Bertha (Sister Phyllis Piontek, S.S.N.D.) and Rosalie Jasper, her brother, Clarence Piontek and her granddaughter, Michelle Hampton. She will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. Services: Visitation: Monday, July 9, 2018 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville, MO. Service: Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 10:00 a.m. at St. Patrick's Church, Wentzville, MO. Burial: Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 1:45 p.m. at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Masses or American Lung Association in care of Pitman Funeral Home P.O. Box 248 Wentzville, MO. 63385. Memories and condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com.

Farley, Audrey Marie (nee Zottarella), 88, loving wife of the late William F. Farley of O'Fallon, MO, died Wednesday, June 20, 2018 at Mount Carmel Nursing Home in O'Fallon, MO. Born December 3, 1929 in St. Louis, MO, she was the daughter of the late Leonard Zottarella and Roma Zottarella Gershien (nee Jenkins). Audrey was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother, and aunt. Her husband and children meant everything in the world to her. William and Audrey made many sacrifices to provide their children a wonderful life. She was a wonderful homemaker. Her hobbies included working in her flower gardens and listening to music. She was a member of St. Barnabas Catholic Church. Survived by sons and daughters-in-law, Kevin (Diane), Kim (Carol), and Kolin (Robin) Farley; grandchildren Kory, Cameron, Kayla, Danielle and Andrew Farley and great-grandchild Kourtney Farley; brother James Zottarella; sisters-in-law Marlene O'Connell and Frances Zottarella, and many nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by her husband, William; parents, Leonard and Roma; stepfather Harry Gershien; brother John (Jack) Zottarella; brothers-in-law Norman Farley, Forrest Farley, Gerald Noah and Martin O'Connell; sisters-in-law Betty Farley, Mary Farley, Shirley Noah, and Evelyn Zottarella. Her anatomical donation was received by St Louis University Medical School. Services: A memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, July 21, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Barnabas the Apostle Catholic Church, 1400 N. Main St., O'Fallon, MO 63366. Luncheon to follow service at St. Barnabas. In lieu of flowers, family and friends wishing to honor Audrey's memory may contribute to St. Barnabas Catholic Church.

Ferguson, Joseph Daniel July 4, 2018. Services: Vis. Sun., July 8, 4-8 p.m., Service Mon., July 9, 10 a.m., Baue Cave Springs, 3950 W. Clay St. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Frank, William A. William A. Frank of Naples, FL and St. Louis, MO. He was born in St. Louis, MO October 26, 1920 and died July 3, 2018. He was a graduate of John B u r r o u g h s School and Washington University in St . L ou is and the Harvard Graduate School of Business. He served as a Lieutenant in the US Navy during WWII. After the war, he entered the family company, Frank's Inc., founded by his great-grandfather in 1849. He sold the company in 1978. He served as a Director of the Old Tower Grove Bank & Trust Company, it's parent company, TG BANCSHARES, and after it's merger with St. Louis County National Bank, he served on the holding company board, County Tower Corporation. After it was sold to Commerce Bank, he served as a director of Commerce Bank of St. Louis. Mr. Frank was a member of the Deer Creek Club and Old Warson Country Club in St. Louis and a member of Port Royal Club and Naples Yacht Club in Naples. He had a home in Naples, FL since 1974. He was married to Cornelia "Babe" Dooley Frank for 56 years. He is survived by his sons William A. Frank, Jr. (Lynda) of Ventura, CA, Peter D. Frank (Joy) of Jupiter, FL and Terrence D. Frank of St. Louis, 7 grandchildren; 6 great-grandchildren; cherished nieces and nephews. Brother of the late Audrey F. Smith. Services: Private family services. Interment Bellefontaine Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Forest Park Forever, 5595 Grand Drive, St. Louis 63112, John Burroughs School, 755 South Price Rd., 63124 or to the charity of one's choice. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Furrer, Joseph R. Jr. "Rick" Tues., July 3, 2018. Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON, Mon., 9:15 a.m. to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 3-8 p.m.

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Kustra, Catherine M. "Katie" Born 10/26/1920 and passed on 7/4/2018, age 97. Services by John L. Ziegenhein & Sons, 7027 Gravois, St. Louis, MO (63116). Interment in J. B. National Cemetery.

Lenzen Jr., Harry "Jack" Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, June 29, 2018. Beloved husband of the late Patricia Lenzen (nee Sullivan); loving father of Dan (Ann), Anne (Steve) Disko, Abby (Scott) Marcouiller and the late Mike (Susan); dear grandfather of Megan, Jack, David, Katie, Matt, Allie, Luke, Harry, and Sarah; brother of the late Joann (Skip) Jacoby. Services: Visitation Wednesday, July 11th, 9 a.m. until time of Funeral Mass beginning at 10 a.m. at Ste. Genevieve du Bois Catholic Church. Interment private. Memorial contributions preferred to Folds of Honor. www.boppchapel.com

Massler, Glenna M.

(nee Miller), 99, of Chesterfield, MO, wife of the late Charles F. Massler, Sr., passed away, Friday, July 6, 2018, in Maryland Heights, MO. She was born on February 15, 1919, in North English, IA, but lived in the St. Louis area for much of her adult life. She was a Herrmann, Kurt S. founding member of Green Trails Baptist Church, now July 6, 2018. Beloved husband of Dee Radman Chesterfield Community Church, an active Beta Sigma Phi Herrmann; dear father and father-in-law of Michael sorority member and avid bridge player well into her 90s. (Geralyn) Herrmann, Stephen (Julie) Herrmann, Karen She is survived by son Richard J. Becht and wife Patricia Becht (Bill) Elliott; dear grandfather of Forrest, Beth, Benjamin, (nee Heilig) of Scheller, IL; son Charles F. Massler, Jr. and wife Addison, and Jonathan; dear step-father of Alan (Penny) Bank, Linda Massler (nee Payne) of Winston-Salem, NC; son-in-law Keith (Barbara) Bank, and Linda (Akiva) Katz; dear step-grand- Donald R. Wolff of Chesterfield, MO; beloved grandchildren: father of Lauren (Ben) Mattson, Andrew, Molly, Kyle, Valerie, Alissa F. Noblin; Andrew J. Wolff; Shannon N. Finer; and Heather Moshe, Shuli (Itzak) Levy, Eliana (Eliezer) Kesselman, Ori E. Bratland; and 7 great-grandchildren. Daughter Caroly Wolff (Rochela) Katz, Miki (Yitzi) Cohen, and Racheli; dear step great- preceded her in death. grandfather of 7; dear son of the late Jacob Julius Herrmann Services: Memorial service at The Chesterfield Community and the late Selma Neuburger Herrmann; dear brother of the Church, 14647 Ladue Road, Chesterfield, MO, 63017, Tuesday, late Eric J. Herrmann; our dear uncle, cousin, and friend to July 10, 2017 at 10:30 a.m. Private interment Sunset Memorial many. Park, Affton, MO. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made Services: Visitation at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, July 8 at Congrega- to the church. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home tion B'nai Amoona, 324 S. Mason Road. Funeral service at 3 and Crematory, Ballwin. Friends may sign the family's p.m. Interment follows at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 online guestbook at Schrader.com. White Road. Memorial contributions preferred to Congregation B'nai Amoona or to the charity of your choice. Please visit Mayhall, Phatomia Ann bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE (nee Parker) Sunday., July 1, 2018. Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Wed., July 11, 9:00 a.m. until funeral service at 1:00 p.m. Interment JB National.

Howard, Jack H.

of Des Peres, MO, passed away on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 at the age of 89. Jack is the loving husband of Debby Howard (nee Waite); devoted father of Thomas (Mary) Howard, Patricia Howard, and Jack E. (Debbie) Howard; adoring grandfather of Jonathan, Evelyn, Benjamin, Jack L., Eric, and Emily Howard; and dear uncle, cousin, and friend to many. He is preceded in death by his parents, Pinkerton and Augusta Howard; and sister, Patricia Storch. Services: The family is being served by Alexander-White-Mullen Funeral Home, 11101 St. Charles Rock Rd, St. Ann, MO 63074, where a visitation will be held on Saturday, 7/14/18, from noon to 2 p.m. The funeral service will directly follow the visitation, starting at 2 p.m. Inurnment at Mount Lebanon Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in Jack's name to the Biome Charter School Foundation, 4471 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 63108.

Hutchins, Sidwell passed away, Thursday, July 5, 2018. Beloved Husband of Phyllis Hutchins (nee McMullen); loving father of Tracie (Wayne Vicknair) Hutchins, Susan Crutcher and Melissa Hutchins; dear grandfather of Elizabeth (Adley) and Austin Lemke, Grant Crutcher, Dylan (Ally) and Adam Vicknair; great-grandfather of Teo and Luca Vicknair. Sid called Phillipsburg, Kansas his home town. This is where he met and eventually married his high school sweetheart, Phyllis McMullen with whom he was married for 63 years of marriage. He was very active in many sports, clubs and organizations there. Sid served in the army during the Korean war as a chemical, biological and radiological warfare instructor and participated in USO shows. In 1963, Sid took a job as a program manager in the creative division at Martiz Inc. in St. Louis. He worked his way up to head of the creative department for 14 years until his final promotion to Corporate Vice President. Sid served on the board of directors of the Washington University School of Art, and the "Sold on St. Louis," campaign. He helped The Missouri Botanical Gardens with advertising, was active with the Metropolitan Association of Philanthropy, The United Way and the St. Louis Arts and Education Council. Sid ran the "Be There" attendance program for St. Louis schools. In 1991, he acted as marketing director of the V.P. fair and he volunteered with CORP in retirement. Passions included golf, history, chess, bridge and dancing. Sid belonged to the Sigma Nu fraternity. He enjoyed Dixieland music, Rock and Roll and his English bulldog, Beefeater. Sid and Phyllis have been to over 60 countries. They had a cabin in Colorado. He relished driving his 1970 cream puff Cougar convertible. Sid was a wonderful storyteller and humorist. He was an avid KSU football and KU basketball fan. Services: Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Wednesday, 4-7 p.m. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to The Missouri Historical Society or The American Melanoma Foundation. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Hyatt, Martin Harris 91, remembered for his zest for life, passed. Son of the late Marion and Alexander Hyatt, brother of Arthur (Adrienne) Hyatt and the late Norma (Jerry) Nissenbaum, father of Alan (Eve) Hyatt and Anne Shapery, friend of Eve Wood. Private Celebration was held July 4. Contributions to charity of choice.

McEvoy, Thomas Patrick July 4, 2018. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Beloved husband of the late Helen McEvoy (nee Madigan). Dearest father of Elizabeth (Larry) Quiggins and Kevin (Terri) McEvoy. Loving grandfather of Benjamin, James, Sydnee, Macey, Patrick, Alysa, Tommy, Katie and Maura. Dear brother of John McEvoy of Banagher, County Offaly Ireland, Emily (Eamonn) Donnelly of Banagher, County Offaly Ireland and predeceased by his sister Marie (Don) Gray of Clonfert, County Galway. and his parents John Joseph and Emily Philomena (nee Ryan) McEvoy. Our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Tom was born in the town of Banagher, County Offaly Ireland on April 23, 1935 to John Joseph and Emily Philomena (nee Ryan) McEvoy. Tom and his wife Helen arrived in America in 1962 with 2 suit cases and $100.00. They settled in St. Louis. Tom was very proud to become an American and cherished the opportunities it afforded him and his family with a career in the auto industry. He held his Irish Heritage close to his heart and would spread his musical talents in America by singing, playing and inspiring Irish Traditional music throughout St. Louis. Services: Memorial Service: 12:30 p.m. Monday, July 9, 2018 in the Chapel of Ortmann-Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, MO 63141. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer's Association preferred. Visitation 10:00 a.m. until time of service. Interment St. Charles Memorial Gardens cemetery. Arrangements by Kevin and Ellen O'Sullivan.

McLaughlin, Emogene P. (nee Peyton), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wednesday, July 4, 2018. Beloved wife of the late William B. McLaughlin; loving mother of Mary (Ron) Smith, Dorothy McLaughlin, William B. McLaughlin, Jr., Michael J. M c L a u g h l i n , Elizabeth M c L a u g h l i n a n d D on n a (Tom) Wesolowski; our dear grandma, great-grandma, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Services will begin on Thursday, July 12, 9:15 a.m. at STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd., then proceed to Sacred Heart Catholic Church (Florissant) for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to Alzheimers Association or Cardinal Glennon Children's Foundation appreciated. VISITATION WEDNESDAY, JULY 11TH, 4-8 p.m. Friends may share memories and express condolences at www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

McQuillen, Matthew K. "Matt" 25, 6/29/18, father of Priscilla McQuillen, boyfriend of Peyton Unger, son of Michael and Debbie McQuillen, brother to Megan, Shannon, and Sean. Svcs: Vis.Thurs., 7/12, 10-11 a.m., memorial Mass, 11-12 p.m. Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 17 Ann Ave., Valley Park, MO.

Meier, Allan 81, July 5, 2018. Visitation Fri., July 13, 12 p.m. until service at 2 p.m. at PITMAN Funeral Home, Wentzville. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

Rauh, Henry 85, St. Louis. Visitation Wednesday, July 11, 11-1 p.m. at Alexander White Mullen Funeral Home, 11101 St. Charles Rock Rd., St. Ann. Burial at Jefferson Barracks.

Riegel, Mary Lee (Gerry) (née Gieringer), born October 29, 1924, fortified with the Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church on Wednesday, June 27, 2018; beloved wife of 64 years to the late Robert C. Riegel; loving mother of Robert C. (Sharon) Riegel, Jr., Mary Kathleen (the late Daniel) Kerlick, Joseph C. Riegel, Mary Lee "Mimi" (Glenn) Williams, Richard T. (Darcy) Riegel, and the late Susan J. Riegel; cherished grandmother of eleven and great-grandmother of

Kaltenthaler III, Henry Jacob Died May 17, 2018 at the age of 90. Beloved husband of Margaret (Peg) Kaltenthaler; loving father of Ellen (Nathan) Schroeder, Bill (Lisa Fratianni), the late Karl, and Alice Kaltenthaler; proud grandfather of Peter (Morgan) Schroeder, Lizzy (Adam) Baus, Lucy Schroeder, Alex and Sam Kaltenthaler, adoring great-grandfather of MaggieMae Baus, brother-in-law, uncle, great uncle. Henry taught biology at University City High School for 28 years, then worked at S-F Scout Ranch for many years after he retired (until he was 80 years old). Active volunteer with the Boy Scouts, Second Presbyterian Church, St. Louis Zoo, The Green Center. Services: Memorial service Saturday, July 14, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. at Second Presbyterian Church, 4501 Westminster Pl., 63108. Contributions appreciated to Boy Scouts of America - Greater St. Louis Area Council or The Green Center.

seven. Services: Funeral Mass 12:00 noon on Saturday, July 21, at St. Anselm Parish/Saint Louis Priory Chapel, 530 S. Mason Rd., 63141. Private burial, immediate family only, Resurrection Catholic Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations are appreciated to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (www.stjude.org/(800)805-5856) boppchapel.com

Rubin, Maxine Lois July 4, 2018. Beloved wife of Robert Burton Rubin; dear mother of Allison Rubin and Mickey (Kristi) Rubin; loving grandmother of Sydney and Jordyn Rubin; beloved sister of Susan (the late Larry) Boxerman. Services: Graveside service Monday, July 9, 12:00 p.m. at Chevra Kadisha Cemetery, 1601 North and South Road. Contributions in her memory may be made to the BarnesJewish Foundation, 1001 Highlands Plaza Drive West, Suite 140, St. Louis, MO 63110. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE

Graham, Ethel V. Saturday, July 7, 2018. 82, of Cedar Hill, MO. Services: Visit. Tues., 3-8 p.m., Service Wed., 10 a.m. at Chapel Hill Mortuary, Cedar Hill, MO.

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J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 1 SUNDAY • 07.08.2018 • A24

Pope calls for bridges, Diversity continues to make not walls, for migrants our nation and society strong FAITH PERSPECTIVES

BY NICOLE WINFIELD Associated Press

VATICAN CITY • Pope Francis

thanked aid groups that rescue migrants at sea on Friday and denounced the “sterile hypocrisy” of governments that turn a blind eye to people seeking security and dignified lives. In a direct critique of policies in parts of Europe and the United States, Francis celebrated a special Mass for migrants and the activists who care for them. The intimate service in St. Peter’s Basilica was held as Italy, the U.S. and other countries increasingly close their doors, ports and borders to asylumseekers. “Before the challenges of contemporary movements of migration, the only reasonable response is one of solidarity and mercy,” the pope said. The Mass marked the fifth anniversary of Francis’ landmark visit to Lampedusa, the Sicilian island that for years was the primary destination of migrants smuggled from Libya to Europe. During the trip, Francis’ first outside Rome after his 2013 election, the new pope denounced the “globalization of indifference” that the world showed migrants fleeing war, poverty and climate-induced natural disasters. In the years since, and especially in recent months, some governments have adopted tough antimigrant policies that fly in the face of Francis’ oft-repeated call for governments to open their hearts and doors to those in need. Italy and Malta, in particular, have closed their ports to aid groups operating migrant rescue boats in the Mediterranean Sea, while President Donald Trump’s administration imposed a now-abandoned policy to separate children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. Francis didn’t name any countries in his homily, but he said every country must consider if the responsibility for welcoming migrants is being shared equitably.

Referring to the biblical story of the good Samaritan, Francis denounced the “sterile hypocrisy of those who do not want to dirty their hands” by caring for the weakest and most marginalized members of society. “It takes the form of closing our hearts to those who have the right, just as we do, to security and dignified living conditions. It builds walls, real or virtual, rather than bridges,” he said. Speaking in his native Spanish, Francis thanked the representatives of aid groups who were attending the Mass for embodying the good Samaritan “who stopped to save the life of the poor man beaten by bandits.” “He didn’t ask where he was from, his reasons for traveling or his documents. He simply decided to care for him and save his life,” Francis said. The mention was notable given Italy’s new anti-migrant interior minister, Matteo Salvini, has accused aid groups of essentially working as “taxi services” for Libyan-based smugglers and denied them entry to Italian ports. Italian and Maltese prosecutors have opened investigations against some humanitarian groups, accusing them of complicity with traffickers. The groups deny the allegations. Among those invited to the Mass was Oscar Camps, founder of Spanish aid group Proactiva Open Arms. The group’s ship brought 60 migrants to Spain this week after Italy and Malta refused the vessel entry. Camps was angry about being turned away by the two countries when the Open Arms reached Barcelona on Wednesday. Hundreds of other migrants drowned during the ship’s four-day journey to Spain. He thanked Francis for his support, calling it “a very important recognition of the work we are doing.” “The pope has always defended the fact that human life at sea must be protected,” Camps said.

GHAZALA HAYAT Islamic foundation of Greater St. Louis

This week, we celebrated the Fourth of July with barbecue, fireworks and American flags everywhere. We take this day for granted, at times not even recalling that our democracy and its protection of human rights and diversity are an inspiration to the rest of the world. Our forefathers created our Constitution providing life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness to all. Per this cherished document, all human beings are created equal. Our nation did not become the envy of the world overnight. Our predecessors have gone through many hard times. There were many bumps on this road; we have dark chapters in our history, but we have risen from this and upheld the moral values on which our nation was built and has thrived. Recently the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 to uphold the travel ban restricting travel from several Muslim-majority countries. American Muslims are dismayed at this decision in the name of national security. This travel ban was challenged as soon as it was implemented last year. The lower courts agreed that it was targeting Muslims, which is against our laws. As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump had called for a “total Muslim ban” and reiterated it many times. After the first ban was struck down, the verbiage was changed, and it has been presented as executive order to protect our country. We are all for the most stringent vetting process to grant visitors or immigrant visas. Our government has the right to scrutinize anyone entering the country — and it should. But when we label the countries as national security threat primarily based on their faith, we are not living up to our values of diversity and respect for faiths. To most of the world, this ban was not implemented for national security but rather is discriminatory and reflective of the intolerant views of Trump as a presidential candidate. The Supreme Court’s decision starkly reminds us of the black chapter in our history contained in the Korematsu v. United States decision in 1944 justifying internment of Japanese-Americans in the name of national secu-

rity. Our Supreme Court has taken steps backwards on a path of inclusivity devised by our forefathers and envied by rest of the world as an exemplary nation. In its immigration decision, the Supreme Court also spoke against the illegality of the internment and of the court’s 1944 decision. According to Japanese-Americans, especially who were in the camps, making right one of the past’s wrongs while committing another is bittersweet. Justice Sonia Sotomayor stated in her dissenting opinion, “The United States of America is a nation built upon the promise of religious liberty. Our founders honored that core promise by embedding the principle of religious neutrality in the First Amendment.” Singling out the second-most-observed Abrahamic faiths in the world is against the concept of “religious neutrality.” Sotomayor summed up the feelings of millions over the world by describing the policy as “inexplicable by anything but animus.” Unfortunately, we have seen this “animus” toward many other groups in the last two years; fears about “others” have been fanned by leaders and fomented by followers. Children are being separated from the parents at the southern border; people crossing the border are being labeled as gang members; racist white supremacists at rallies are chanting against Jewish communities. There has been a spike in hate crimes against Muslims and Jews; many other minority groups are experiencing more prejudice and intolerance. Though many of these events can make us dejected, I know we have the best Constitution in the world, which protects its citizens and values its diversity. History has proven that our country has prospered due to the diversity and immigration. Over the last few days we have received numerous messages and statements of support from different faith groups and organizations. Seeing the people protesting separation of families cements my belief in Americans’ high moral values. For every negative voice, I hear many more positive and supportive voices. This is what has made America great and will keep it great for generations to come. So I do celebrate Independence Day with the faith that the diverse fabric of our society is strong and will remain strong. Hayat serves as chair of the public relations committee of the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis. She is a regular Faith Perspectives contributor to STLtoday.com/religion.

NEWS

Luxury tents, gourmet meals EPA’s new chief is former redefine camping on NYC island coal lobbyist, Senate staffer BY MATTHEW DALY Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The new leader of

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Staten Island Ferry and several journey tents are seen Tuesday from of one of Collective Retreats’ larger summit tents on Governor’s Island, in New York harbor.

BY DEEPTI HAJELA Associated Press

NEW YORK • Just imagine it, a luxurious room on an island, with chef-prepared meals and a view of the Statue of Liberty and the Manhattan skyline. Hotel? Not exactly. It’s actually a campground of high-end tents on New York City’s Governors Island, the latest outpost for glamping, or glamorous camping. Rates that can run more than $700 provide such creature comforts as full beds, high thread-count sheets, bathrooms, plush towels, electrical outlets, barbecue grills and an on-site restaurant offering prime cuts of meat. There isn’t a leaky tent, musty sleeping bag or can of baked beans in sight. “We’ve tried to create an experience where people can put all those concerns aside and connect to the place that they’re in, the people that they’re with and themselves,” said Peter Mack, CEO and founder of Collective Retreats, which has developed similar camps in Colorado, Montana and Texas. Visitors staying in the 27 smaller journey tents share bathroom facilities; those staying in the 10 larger summit tents have their own private, en suite bathrooms, spa robes and even a campfire s’mores kit. The location, Governors Island, is a 172-acre plot of land that sits just off the southern tip of Manhattan, with stunning views of the city’s Financial District, the

Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Formerly used by the Army and Coast Guard, a portion of it is now home to a national monument overseen by the National Park Service, while the majority was transferred to the city and state for the benefit and use of the public. It’s accessible only by ferry and currently open to the public for six months of the year, which means visitors to Collective Governors Island have specific windows to plan their stays as well as how they get to and from their tents during a visit. At night, once the ferries have stopped running, people staying there have to remain within the campgrounds, but in the mornings they have the run of the island to themselves until the boats start operating again. The goal is to turn the island into a yearround destination, said Michael Samuelian, president and CEO of The Trust for Governors Island, the organization that oversees its redevelopment. To that end, the site hosts events including musical performances and art exhibits. Collective Retreat’s pitch for a luxury camping ground on a portion of the island made perfect sense, he said. Putting up tents and communal bathrooms requires less infrastructure than building a fullscale hotel, which is on the ultimate goal list. But it allows the trust to start having overnight visitors and figure out the transportation and other needs to make it a full-time, year-round destination.

the Environmental Protection Agency is a former coal industry lobbyist who helped lead an industry fight against regulations that protect Americans’ health and address climate change. Andrew Wheeler, the No. 2 official at EPA, will take over the agency Monday now that President Donald Trump has accepted the resignation of embattled administrator Scott Pruitt. The Senate confirmed Wheeler as the agency’s deputy administrator in April. Trump tweeted that he had “no doubt that Andy will continue on with our great and lasting EPA agenda. We have made tremendous progress and the future of the EPA is very bright!” Wheeler, 53, could serve more than a year in an acting role. A Senate vote would be required if he is nominated to lead the agency permanently. Republicans say Wheeler is well-qualified to lead the EPA, having worked at the agency early in his career. He also was a top aide at the Senate Environment Committee before becoming a lobbyist nine years ago. Democrats and environmental groups decried Wheeler as a coal apologist and former top aide to a GOP senator who rejects mainstream climate science. “Andrew Wheeler’s coal credentials are without equal. He is, without question, a member of the coal industry’s Hall of Fame,” said Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass. By elevating Wheeler to replace Pruitt, he said, “the EPA is only trading one fossil fuel friend for another.” Like Pruitt, Wheeler is a conservative who will seek to roll back rules governing clean air and water and fighting against climate change. But unlike Pruitt, Wheeler is considered low-key and is a Washington insider who has spent much of his career in the nation’s capital. Pruitt, a former Oklahoma attorney general, is often aligned with the oil and gas industry, while Wheeler has focused more on coal since becoming a lobbyist a decade ago.

‘IMPECCABLE REPUTATION’ An Ohio native, Wheeler served as a special assistant in the EPA’s Pollution Prevention and Toxics office in the early 1990s before moving over to the Senate environment panel, where he eventually

became GOP staff director under Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., the panel’s former chairman and a political mentor to both Pruitt and Wheeler. Inhofe, who dismisses global warming as a hoax and famously tossed a snowball on the Senate floor to prove his point, hailed Wheeler’s ascension to EPA chief. “Andrew worked for me for 14 years, has an impeccable reputation and has the experience to be a strong leader at the EPA,” Inhofe said. Until his nomination by Trump last fall, Wheeler worked as a lobbyist with a client list that included Murray Energy, one of the nation’s largest coal mining companies. He accompanied Murray CEO Bob Murray during a series of closed-door meetings to lobby the Trump administration to kill environmental regulations affecting coal mines. Senators asked Wheeler in his confirmation hearing about the Murray meeting. Wheeler acknowledged he had attended but said he couldn’t remember any details. Markey vowed to fight against Wheeler and said, “The future of our public lands, our waterways and oceans and the very health of the entire planet rest on the continued action of all Americans to take back the EPA from Big Oil and King Coal.” Wheeler was confirmed, 53-45, despite opposition from Markey and other Democrats. Three moderate Democrats — Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Donnelly of Indiana and Joe Manchin of West Virginia — joined with Republicans to support Wheeler in April. All three face tough re-elections in states Trump won easily last fall. Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., called Wheeler a “climate denier” who “has spent much of his political career lobbying for the big polluters EPA regulates.” Widespread disgust for Pruitt “should serve as a blaring red siren for the Trump administration,” Udall said. “Americans will not tolerate another EPA administrator whose primary goal is to fight the core mission of the EPA.” Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., who chairs the Senate environment panel, said that during Pruitt’s tenure, the EPA “has rolled back punishing regulations that were hurting American workers and stifling our economy.” As acting EPA head, “Andrew Wheeler is well prepared to continue the progress already made under President Trump,” Barrasso added.


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M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Richard Richter • The founding president of Radio Free Asia, who organized and led for 10 years its broadcasts to nations in East Asia that are subjected to government news censorship, died June 29 (2018) at a hospice in Issaquah, Wash. He was 88. The cause was pneumonia, said his wife, Joan Richter. Mr. Richter, a former news producer for ABC television and WETA, the Washingtonarea PBS affiliate, organized a staff of technicians and news professionals who in 1996 commenced what became roundthe-clock coverage of radio programing in Asian languages, including Myanmar, Cantonese, Khmer, Korean, Lao, Mandarin, Wu (Shanghainese), Tibetan, Uighur and Vietnamese. Radio Free Asia also established a news website in East Asian languages and set up toll-free hotlines for callers. It specialized in local news programming and reported on such events as internal ethnic flare-ups and opposition to government policies. Bradford Smith • The NASA astronomer, who acted as planetary tour guide to the public with his interpretations of stunning images beamed back from Voyager missions, has died. Mr. Smith’s wife, Diane McGregor, said he died Tuesday (July 3, 2018) at his home in Santa Fe, N.M., of complications from myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disorder. He was 86. Mr. Smith led the NASA team that interpreted pictures taken by Voyager space probes as they passed Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune and then presented the images to the public. He was a retired professor of planetary sciences and astronomy at the University of Arizona and research astronomer at the University of Hawaii in Manoa. A 1981 People magazine profile called Mr. Smith “the nation’s tour guide” who showed the public active volcanoes on Io, violent hurricanes on Jupiter, thousands of complex rings around Saturn and other space oddities.

Steve Ditko • The Marvel Comics artist, who gave the world the woven webs and soaring red-and-blue shape of Spider-Man and the other-worldly shimmer of Doctor Strange, has died, authorities said. He was 90. Mr. Ditko was found June 29 (2018) in his Manhattan apartment and was pronounced dead at the scene, police Lt. Paul Ng said. No further details were immediately available. Mr. Ditko, along with writer Stan Lee, introduced the world to Peter Parker and his alter-ego Spider-Man in 1962 in an issue of “Amazing Fantasy.” A year later, Mr. Ditko introduced the world to surgeon-turnedmetaphysical superhero Doctor Strange. The adventures of both have been turned into blockbuster movies, and both had essential roles in the recent “Avengers: Infinity War.” Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran • The Vatican diplomat and expert in interfaith relations, who announced the election of Pope Francis to the world in 2013 with the famous phrase “habemus papam (we have a pope),” has died. The Vatican said Cardinal Tauran died Thursday (July 5, 2018) at age 75. He died at an unspecified hospital in the United States while being treated for Parkinson’s disease. He had the condition for years but continued his globe-trotting diplomacy to improve the Vatican’s relations with the Muslim world. Cardinal Tauran, who was born in Bordeaux, France, Tauran served in various Vatican embassies before being named chief Vatican archivist, foreign minister and then prefect of the Vatican office of interfaith relations. He made headlines in 2002 when he fiercely opposed the U.S. invasion of Iraq, calling it “a defeat for all humanity.” Ed Schultz • The a onetime sportscaster and conservative radio talk-show personality, who redefined himself as an outspoken liberal on radio and TV and for years hosted

OBITUARIES

one of MSNBC’s highest-rated prime-time programs, died Thursday (July 5, 2018) at his home in Washington. He was 64. His son, professional golfer Dave Schultz, announced Schultz the death. The cause was not immediately disclosed. In 1992, Mr. Schultz began a conservative political talk show on a Fargo, N.D., radio station and became a High Plains version of Rush Limbaugh. Loud and aggressive on the air, he often railed at the homeless and unemployed, saying, “How about getting a job?” In the 1990s, Mr. Schultz began a political transformation. By 2000, he had become a Democrat — although of the “gun-totin’, red meat-eatin’” variety. He considered himself a liberal, although he remained opposed to abortion rights. “The Ed Schultz Show,” his radio program originating in Fargo, went into national syndication in 2004 as one of the country’s few liberal radio talk shows. At its peak, the show had more than 3 million listeners a week on more than 150 stations. Arvid Carlsson • The a Swedish pharmacologist, whose research on chemical signals in the brain resulted in a leading treatment for Parkinson’s disease and earned him a Nobel Prize, died June 29 (2018). He was 95. The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, where Mr. Carlsson had served on the faculty since 1959, announced the death but did not say where or how he died. Mr. Carlsson shared the 2000 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine with Paul Greengard and Carlsson Eric Kandel, scientists who independently studied the molecular underpinnings of the brain, in particular the ways neural signals affect memory, mood and movement.

Celebrations of Life

Alan Diaz • The retired Associated Press photojournalist, whose photo of a terrified 6-year-old Cuban boy named Elian Gonzalez earned him the Pulitzer Prize, has died. He was 71. Mr. Diaz’s daughter, Aillette RodriguezDiaz, confirmed that he died Tuesday (July 3, 2018). The cause of death wasn’t immediately known. Mr. Diaz’s iconic image shows an armed U.S. immigration agent confronting the boy in the Little Havana home where he lived with relatives after Diaz being found floating off the Florida coast. “Alan Diaz captured, in his iconic photographs, some of the most important moments of our generation — the bitter, violent struggle over the fate of a small Cuban boy named Elian Gonzalez, the magnified eye of a Florida election official trying to make sense of hanging chads and disputed ballots in the 2000 presidential election,” AP executive editor Sally Buzbee said. Richard Swift • The musician, who played as a member of popular indie bands the Shins and the Arcs, died Tuesday (July 3, 2018) after a hospitalization for a “serious medical condition.” He was 41. A post on Mr. Swift’s Facebook page confirmed his death. Mr. Swift was a singer-songwriter and producer and playeddrums, bass, guitar and keyboards for various artists, including the Pretenders, the Barr Brothers and Ray LaMontagne. He was in the Shins from 2011 to 2016, and played drums and synthesizer Swift on the band’s most recent album, 2017’s “Heartworms,” according to AllMusic. Mr. Swift also joined the Black Keys on tour in 2014 to play bass. From news services

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Sanguinet, Gary

Siegfried, Sedly Marvin

Walesky, John William

Gary Sanguinet passed away on June 15, 2018 at home and in the embrace of family and the dogs he loved. He was an attorney who practiced Workers Compensation Law in St. Louis, MO. He was born in St. Louis on September 21, 1942 and was the son of Merle M. Sanguinet and Marvel Lehr Sanguinet. He served in the US Army during the Vietnam conflict and was discharged in 1969. G a r y o b t a i n e d h i s B A from Vanderbilt University and LLD from St. Louis University. He was a member of Grace Lutheran Church in Tallahassee. His primary hobbies were Tai Chi and ukulele. He both took and taught classes for several years and made many friends. Gary was preceded in death by his parents and is survived by his wife of 53 years Kathleen (Kathy) (nee Sa mu el s en ) , daughter Amanda (Bart) Lally of San Francisco, grandchildren Francis and Marygrace, brothers Craig (Bonnie) and Bruce Sanguinet of St Louis. SERVICES: A memorial Service will be at 6:00 p.m. on July 13, 2018 at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 115 South 6th Street, St . Charles, MO 63301. Light refreshments will be served following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Grace Lutheran Church, 2919 Miccosukee Rd., Tallahassee, FL 32308, Immanuel Lutheran Church, or charity of your choice.

July 6, 2018 beloved husband of Doris Siegfried; dear father and father-in-law of Barry (Pamela) , Glenn (Star), Randy, Kevin (Judi) and Carla (Bruce Essman) Siegfried; dear grandfather of Jason (Winnie Jeng), Stefan, Hayden and Anna Siegfried, Joshua and Danielle Essman; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral service Monday, July 9th, 11:00 a.m. at New Mt. Sinai Mausoleum, 8430 Gravois. No visitation prior to service. Memorial contributions of your choice preferred. Visit berger memorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

of St. Louis, Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Born- January 23, 1931, D i e d - J u n e 22, 2018 Beloved husband of Carole Ann (nee Steltjes) for 41 years. Dear son of the late Albina and Josef Walesky. Preceded in death by 1 sister and 4 brothers all of Waterbury, CT. Dear brother in law of Robert and Gerri Steltjes of Franklin, TN, Kathleen and Thomas Majewski of Glen Carbon, IL and the late Jean and John Heil of Memphis, TN. John served in the US Navy for four years. He graduated from Purdue University with a degree in electrical engineering and worked for the General Electric Company for 32 years. He retired in 1992. Our dear uncle, great uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial service at Jefferson Barracks Memorial Chapel on July 9, 2018 at 11 AM. Interment at Jefferson Barracks .Donations to the American Cancer Society would be appreciated.

Schiller, Sally died on June 30, 2018 at the age of 90. Sally was a graduate of Clayton High School and Maryville College, where she majored in music. While still a teenager, she sang at weddings and continued to do so for decades, often at her parish church, St. Joseph's in Clayton. Her extensive career took her around the world as a Travel Agent for Kirkland Travel and American Express Travel; Manager of Women's Sales Development for American Airlines; and Sales VP for El Al Israel Airlines. Sally held Executive Sales positions at the Chase Park Plaza and Lodge of the Four Seasons, joined the Missouri Botanical Garden as Executive Secretary of the Members, and then was employed by the St. Louis Art Museum as Executive Director, Membership. She was a Special Events Consultant to Commerce Bancshares, helped form a Friends auxiliary for the St. Louis Cathedral, and devoted her energies to OASIS as a volunteer. Sister of the late Nadine Schiller Mahe and Henry Frederick Schiller; beloved aunt of Susan Switzer, Sally Mahé, Chris Schiller, Martha Stephens, George Mahe, Tom Schiller, Eric Schiller; great-aunt of eight and great-great aunt of five. Sally was known for her keen wit, thoughtfulness, and deep love of her hometown - including the St. Louis Rams. Her ability to rattle off facts prompted her nephew George to say: "Who needs Google when you have Aunt Sally?" She will be missed by many. Sally said she received the extraordinary gift of being part of a loving, caring family and having a host of outstanding and loyal friends. Her wish is that each be blessed with courage and serenity as they continue along life's winding path.

Schmelzle, Flora Lee on Wednesday, July 4, 2018. B el oved w ife of Richard A. Schmelzle; dear mother of Michael (Peggy) Schmelzle, Meg (Tom) M a h er, M a rt y (Ann) Schmelzle and the late Mark (Rooney) Schmelzle; dear grandmother of 8 and great-grandmother of 8; dear sister, aunt, cousin, and friend. Lee was active in the real estate business and was an avid potter, watercolorist, and portrait painter. She wanted everyone to know that she tried. Services: A memorial service will be Thursday, July 12, 11:00 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood, 100 E. Adams, Kirkwood, MO 63122. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood, The Missouri Botanical Garden or the charity of one's choice. www.boppchapel.com

Singsaas, Eric G. July 5, 2018, age 50. Services: Vis. Sun., July 8, Baue St. Charles, 12-2 p.m. Memorial Service to follow at 2 p.m. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Snider, John W. 93, July 6, 2018. Service: 10 a.m. Monday, Bethel UMC, Wildwood. Visit. Sunday, 2-6 p.m., Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin. For more info see Schrader.com

Vinyard, Patricia (nee Runge), 83, surrounded by her loving family on July 5, 2018. Beloved wife of 63 yrs. to Robert Vinyard; loving mother and mother-in-law of David (Karrie) Vinyard and Lisa (Jerry) Stubits; cherished grandmother of Emily (Ashton) Rone, Sara Stubits, and Hannah Stubits; dear sister, aunt, cousin and friend of many. Services: Memorial Visitation, Wed., July 11th, 11 a.m. to the time of the service 12 p.m. at First Christian Church of Florissant, 2890 Patterson Rd. Interment private.

41, 7/5/18. Svcs: Vis. Tues., 7/10/18, 3:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., Service Wed., 7/11/18, 10:00 a.m. at Pitman Funeral Home-Wentzville. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

Saturday, July 7, 2018. Visitation Wed., July 11, 3:00 p.m. until service 7:00 p.m. at COLLIER'S Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. (St. Ann). www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Fraternal Notices Plumbers & Pipefitters

David Dillingham 49 Year Member PF/BTJ Retired July 2, 2018 Date of Death John J. O'Mara Bus. Mgr. Brian Nichols Asst. Bus. Mgr.

Florists

Shanks, Deanne M.

Sharp, James E. "Jim"

Warren, Frank Allen

Entered into rest on Tuesday July 3, 2018 at St. Anthony's Strubert, Kathleen "Kitty" Medical Center, St. Louis, MO. (nee Keating), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Frank was born in Goshen, New Church on Thursday, July 5, 2018. Interment private. Check York the son of the late William www.boppchapel.com for additional information. and the late Gert ru d e (Gray) Warren. Thomas, Charlotte A. Frank was a US Navy veteran. On June 20, 2018. Memorial service Sat., July 28, 10:00 a.m. at He graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology in Apostalic Pentecoastal Church, 901 Barracksview Rd., 63125. Tributes at jaybsmith.com Rochester, New York and came to work for the Von H offma n n Printing Companies in St. Louis Toner, M. James upon graduation. James "Jim" Toner died June 28, 2018 in Reno, Nevada. Born in He was an avid golfer, gardener and craftsman. 1939 in Hettinger, ND the eldest of nine children, Jim was raised He is survived by his wife Edna A. Warren (nee Vogel) and his in St. Paul, Minnesota. He lived in St. Louis from 1964 to 1972, son Russell A. Warren; brothers Howard , Richard and Ronald as having moved to St. Louis for graduate school at St. Louis well as many nieces and nephews. University where he earned a Master's Degree in Social Work. Services: A memorial service will be held at Southminster Jim married Susan Troy, in the St. Louis Cathedral January 30, Presbyterian Church (10126 E. Watson Rd., 63126) Sunday, July 1965. They remained married for 53 years until his death. Two 15 at 3:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may of their three daughters were born in St. John's Hospital here. be made to the Salvation Army (824 Union Rd. 63123) or the While in St. Louis Jim was employed at the St. Louis City M is s ou ri B ot a n ica l Garden (4344 Shaw B l vd . , 63110) Juvenile Court, the Dismas House, and Region V of the Missouri appreciated. Law Enforcement Assistance Council. He served as Social World Field Work Supervisor for St. Louis U, Washington U and the Webb, Jr., William Arthur University of Missouri in Columbia. Jim and family moved to Reno, Nevada in 1972 where he had Dear husband of Carmen R. Webb (nee DeRienzo), beloved a successful career with the National Council of Juvenile and father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. Family Court Judges, then later as President of Bishop Manogue Services: A Celebration of Life will be privately held. Catholic High School. He served as President of the National Organization of Forensic Social Work, and earlier as the President of the Nevada Chapter of the National Association of Weindel, Michael A. Social Workers. 69, June 23, 2018. Services: Vis. Fri., July 13, 2018, Over the course of Jim's career he received numerous awards 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. service, Pitman Funeral Home, from national and other state juvenile justice agencies Wentzville. Burial Private. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com (including Missouri). In 2001 he received the "Jack and Julie Lally Alumni Merit Award " from SLU's school of Social Service. Jim is survived by wife Susan; three daughters, Kristen, Nicole Weiner, Shaw Joel and Bridget; granddaughter Kailey Kathryn; siblings, in-laws and July 4, 2018. Dear son of the late Harry and the late Mary numerous nieces and nephews. Weiner; dear brother and brother-in-law of Dr. Steven (Cheryl) Funeral Mass was offered in Reno, NV with internment in Weiner and Dr. Debra (Neal Samuels) Weiner; our dear cousin Resurrection Cemetery in St. Paul where both his parents and and friend. his wife's parents are buried. Services: Visitation Sunday, July 8th, 11:30 a.m. at BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Blvd, followed by funeral service at 12:00 Noon. Interment Chesed Shel Emeth CemeteryTrendley, Charles "Chuck" White Road. Memorial contributions preferred to the American June 22, 2018. Services: Memorial Service will be held at Parkinson Disease Association, 1415 Elbridge Payne Road, Suite 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 21 at Episcopal Church of the #150, Chesterfield, MO 63017. Visit bergermemorialchapel.com Transfiguration, Lake Saint Louis, MO. Visit Baue.com for more information.

Dierbergs Florist

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Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

Cemeteries/Mausoleums “It is not length of life, but depth of life.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON

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Sunset Memorial Park, 12 adjourning lots, Section 4, overlooks Sams Steakhouse. Call 314-631-8185


07.08.2018 • SunDay • M 1

NEWS

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A25

Nerve agent again has U.K. town on edge Couple with no tie to Russia came into contact with poison months after attack on ex-spy

ASSOCIATED PRESS

An officer in a protective suit walks Friday on Rollestone Street in Salisbury, England. Police are searching for a container feared to be contaminated with traces of a nerve agent. ASSOCIATED PRESS

AMESBURY, ENGLAND • In this nor-

mally pleasant town of 10,000 residents a stone’s throw from the mysterious Stonehenge monument, the new reality is sinking in: Novichok, again. Four months had passed since the nerve agent attack on a former Russian spy and his daughter, and the collective nightmare seemed to be fading. No longer were forensics experts in oversize hazmat suits combing the area for an invisible killer developed by the Soviet Union in Cold War times. Eager tourists were back at Stonehenge, and England’s World Cup team was surging, buoying spirits. Then a local couple with no obvious connection to Russia or to espionage fell desperately ill, and the government said Novichok was to blame. Some are embracing the “keep calm and carry on” ethos that helped England through two world wars, but others were frightened by the seemingly random poisoning of two innocents who now lie critically ill in a local hospital. “It’s shocking, and it’s scary,” said Elaine Read, a worker at The Kings Arms pub who used to occasionally share a pint with Dawn Sturgess, one of the victims. “Nobody expected it to happen again. Everyone was saying it was Russia, but now it’s just two ... local people. They’re just like us.” She said it’s difficult to feel safe after what happened to Sturgess, 44, and Charlie Rowley, 45. Both became violently ill within hours of each other on Saturday. At first, authorities believed they had taken some bad heroin or crack cocaine, but it

turned out to be Novichok. “You don’t know where it is, that’s the trouble,” Read said of the elusive nerve agent. “You don’t know how Dawn and Charlie got it, how it crossed their paths.” The bizarre case is stoking international tension ahead of the upcoming NATO summit, which will deal in part with worsening relations between Russia and the West. Britain’s interior minister demanded Thursday that Russia explain how two people were inadvertently poisoned with the same military-grade nerve agent used to attack ex-Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the nearby town of Salisbury in March. Britain has accused Russia of being behind the attack on the Skripals, which the Kremlin vehemently denies. British Home Secretary Sajid Javid told Parliament on Thursday that it is now time for Russia to explain “exactly what has gone on.” “It is completely unacceptable for our people to be either deliberate or accidental targets, or for our streets, our parks, our towns to be dumping grounds for poison,” Javid said. In Amesbury, residents were advised to wash their clothes and take other precautions if they were at the locations believed to have been frequented by the latest victims. Some were staying inside to avoid any risk of contamination, but most were going about their business. A few parts of town remained cordoned off by police, including the Baptist Church, but activity in the town center continued unabated. “I’m not so easily scared, but there has to be more to it,” said Justin Pritchard, en-

joying a beer with a friend. “We don’t know what’s going on. First, they said it was the Russians. Now this is completely separate. Originally, we all thought it was the Russians, now it doesn’t seem quite right,” he said, noting that Sturgess and Rowley have no connection to Russia. British officials said Thursday they believe the latest victims were not deliberately targeted but came into contact with the Novichok used in the Skripal poisoning. Police said the couple were exposed to the nerve agent after handling a contaminated item, but provided no details. That isn’t convincing to Rick Bird, 65, a retired British army veteran who was trained in the handling of nerve agents. He said he never dreamed nerve agents would be deployed in Britain. “The latest case seems to be an odd one,” Bird said. “The first one in Salisbury, we thought we were all over it. This came totally out of the blue. It’s the fear factor, for everybody.” The last few days have been traumatic for some residents, particularly those who live close to areas that were shut down to the public because of possible contamination. Alex Brittany, 29, said he woke up to find the Baptist Church near his home being cordoned off. The experience left him shaky. “It is quite frightening,” he said. “What scared me this time was that the cordons were near where I live. You expect big attacks in London, Manchester. But Amesbury? Salisbury? Wow. Really?” Experts say just a few milligrams of the odorless Novichok liquid is enough to kill

a person within minutes. And finding it is the problem. Chemical weapons expert Hamish de Bretton-Gordon said the latest victims were likely collateral damage from the Skripal attack. “The Novichok gel that was smeared on the handle of the Skripals’ house was presumably transported in some device or syringe,” he said. “I think the working assumption now is that device or that syringe is what has appeared, and the residue caused these two people to become ill.” President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said Russia is concerned about the case but had nothing to do with either poisoning. “Russia has categorically denied and continues to categorically deny the possibility of any kind of involvement with what was happening there,” Peskov told reporters Thursday. Andrea Sella, professor of inorganic chemistry at University College London, said Novichok nerve agents “are designed to be quite persistent — they hang around in the environment, neither evaporating nor decomposing quickly. “That means that if a container or a surface was contaminated with this material, it would remain a danger for a long time. And it will be vital to trace the movements of this couple to identify where they might have come into contact with the source,” he said. “So, while the public at large are at very low risk from this material, until the source is found there is a remote chance that someone else might come into contact with it,” Sella said.

Europe could suffer collateral damage in U.S.-China trade war BY DAVID MCHUGH associated Press

FRANKFURT, GERMANY • European businesses are unsettled as they watch the U.S. and China collide over trade. And for good reason: The nascent global trade war could represent the biggest single threat to the economic upswing that has helped the region get past its financial crisis. In theory, some European companies could benefit, jumping into market niches if Chinese businesses are kept out of the U.S. market. But that would be only a few companies or sectors. When an entire economy is heavily dependent on trade, an overall slowdown in global commerce caused by tit-for-tat import taxes provokes fear and undermines confidence. And that’s just what’s happening in Europe. By one measure, business confidence has fallen in six of the past seven months in Germany, where exports are almost half of annual economic output. “It’s worth all our efforts to defuse this conflict, so it doesn’t become a war,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Wednesday. Europe has its own trade dispute with the U.S. After the U.S. put tariffs on steel and aluminum from many allies, including the European Union, the 28-country bloc responded with import taxes on some $3.25 billion of U.S. goods. President Donald Trump’s administration is also studying the option of putting tariffs on cars, which would significantly escalate the confrontation. The head of the EU’s executive, JeanClaude Juncker, will head to Washington in late July to try to personally persuade Trump against further measures targeting Europe. The disputes over trade threaten to spoil the good times for Europe’s economy. Growth last year was the strongest in a decade, since before the global financial crisis. Though that has eased in re-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

French President Emmanuel Macron speaks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel during a roundtable meeting at an EU summit in Brussels last month.

cent quarters, the economy is still strong enough to generate jobs. The number of unemployed fell by 125,000 in May, leaving unemployment in the 19 countries that use the euro at 8.4 percent, the lowest since 2008 and down from a high of 12.1 percent in 2013. “Trade tensions stoked by U.S. President Donald Trump are clouding the economic outlook in Europe,” analysts at Berenberg bank in London wrote. They rated the trade risk ahead of troubles from Italy’s heavy debt load or faster than expected interest rate increases from the U.S. Federal Reserve. Many European companies would suffer because they both produce and sell goods in the U.S. and China, the world’s biggest economies. For example, tariffs by China on U.S.made autos would hit German carmakers Daimler and BMW since they both make vehicles in the United States and export them to China. Daimler has already lowered its outlook for profits, citing higher-than-expected

costs from the new tariffs. BMW warned in a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross that tariffs would make it harder for it to sell in China the vehicles it builds at its factory in Spartanburg, S.C., “potentially leading to a strongly reduced export volumes and negative effects on investment and employment in the United States.” Last year, BMW exported 272,000 vehicles, more than half its total production, from the Spartanburg plant. Of those, 81,000 — worth $2.37 billion — went to China. BMW said its exports reduced the U.S. trade deficit by about $1 billion. By themselves, the U.S. tariffs won’t immediately have a dramatic impact on global trade. The fear is that retaliation will spiral, hitting the total amount of global commerce. Even if the overall effect is to harm growth, there could be benefits for some European companies and sectors. Economists Alicia Garcia Herrero and Jianwei Xu at the French bank Natixis said that European makers of cars, aircraft, chemicals, computer chips and factory machin-

ery could in theory snare market share by substituting for Chinese or American products in the two markets. But that’s only if Europe’s own trade dispute with the U.S. does not escalate — a big if. Europe is waiting to see whether the Trump administration will go ahead separately with tariffs on auto imports. European companies such as BMW, Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen’s Porsche and Audi divisions, and Fiat Chrysler send $46.6 billion worth of vehicles every year to the U.S. Some 13.3 million people, or 6.1 percent of the employed population of the EU, work in the automotive sector, according to the European Automobile Manufacturers Association. “Europe cannot win anything” on an overall basis “for one obvious reason: We are net exporters,” said Garcia Herrero, chief economist for Asia Pacific at Natixis. “But we should not understate the view that some sectors could get something out of a U.S.-China trade war.” Amid the brewing conflict, China has sought to get Europe on its side, putting on a diplomatic charm offensive during visits by Merkel and French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe. The EU and China agreed last month to deepen commercial ties and support trade rules. But the EU remains a close, longtime ally of the U.S. on a range of issues, despite the current tension with the Trump administration. One negative outcome for Europe, Herrero said, would be if Trump can push the Chinese into a trade agreement aimed at reducing the U.S. trade deficit. The additional U.S. goods to China could come at the expense of European competitors. “If China concedes to the U.S. proposed agreement, the whole situation faced by the EU would be much tougher,” she and Xu wrote in a research note. “For China to massively reduce its trade surplus with the U.S., it has to in some way substitute its imports away from the EU to the U.S., which would have a significant negative impact on the EU producers.”


NEWS

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Gillian Lynne • A mainstay of the British stage, who partnered with composer Andrew Lloyd Webber to choreograph a chowder of tail-shaking felines and a cape-twirling “phantom” in two of the most popular shows in musical theater history — “Cats” and “Phantom of the Opera” — died July 1 (2018) at a hospital in London. She was 92. The cause was pneumonia, said her Lynne husband, actor Peter Land. Ms. Lynne was among the finest choreographers in Britain, where she was a teenage soloist with the Sadler’s Wells Ballet company (now the Royal Ballet), danced the cancan at the London Coliseum, staged productions for the Royal Shakespeare Company and Royal Opera, and helped popularize a modern, jazz-based dance style in the theaters of London’s West End. Yet she was best known for her two blockbusters with Lloyd Webber, productions that have collectively grossed several billion dollars worldwide and succeeded each other as the longest-running shows on Broadway. Liliane Montevecchi • The glittering, seemingly eternal French gamin who became a cabaret star in Paris, a pal of Marlon Brando’s in Hollywood and the Tony Award-winning “muse” of director Tommy Tune on Broadway, died June 29 (2018) at her home in Manhattan. She was 85. The cause was Montevecchi colon cancer, said her manager, Kathy Olsen. Ms. Montevecchi had been ailing for about two years, she said, and during her time in the hospital had taken to wearing high heels with her medical bootees. Gudrun Burwitz • The loyal daughter of Heinrich Himmler — the architect of the Holocaust and Nazi Germany’s highest-ranking official after Adolf Hitler — died May 24 (2018) in or near Munich. She was 88. Her death was first reported by the German newspaper Bild, which also confirmed that Ms. Burwitz had worked for two years in West Germany’s foreign intelligence agency. The agency’s chief historian, Bodo Hechelhammer, told the newspaper that Burwitz worked as a secretary under an assumed name in the early 1960s. The agency does not comment on current or past employees until they have died. Ms. Burwitz, who was sometimes called a “Nazi princess” by supporters and detractors alike, remained unrepentant and loyal to her father to the end. Although she had visited a concentration camp, she denied the existence of the Holocaust and, in later years, helped provide money and comfort to former Nazis convicted or suspected of war crimes. Leo Sarkisian • The self-taught ethnomusicologist whose popular weekly radio show, “Music Time in Africa,” remains the Voice of America’s longest-running English-language program, died June 8 (2018) at an assisted-living center in Bedford, N.H. He was 97. The cause was congestive heart failure, said a nephew, Levon Andonian. Mr. Sarkisian, a decorated World War II veteran and artist, was hired by radio legend Edward R. Murrow in 1961 to work for Voice of America. Over several decades, he visited more than 38 African countries. Many people he recorded had never met an American before. Mr. Sarkisian’s show taught them and other listeners across English-speaking Africa about the music of their own countries and that of their neighbors. John Lockwood Ochsner • The worldrenowned cardiac surgeon died Friday (July 6, 2018) at age 91, Ochsner Health Systems in New Orleans announced. Dr. Ochsner was considered a pioneer in valve and coronary surgery, the use of pacemakers and early heart, lung and liver transplants. He performed Louisiana’s first heart transplant in 1970. He was the son of Alton Ochsner, who, in 1942, was one of the founders of what is now Ochsner Health Systems. Peter Firmin • The co-creator of the classic British children’s TV programs “Clangers,” “Bagpuss” and “The Basil Brush Show” has died. He was 89. Mr. Firmin’s spokesman told Britain’s Press Association that the puppet maker and artist died July 1 (2018) at his home in Kent in southeastern England after a short illness. The official Bagpuss Twitter feed posted the news with a photo Firmin honoring Mr. Firmin. Mr. Firmin’s distinctly crafted characters, puppets that came to life through stop-motion animation, captivated generations of children. From news services

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

Merkel, Macron defend a diminished vision of European values, rights ‘We are protecting our ... borders but not with the aim of simply closing ourselves off’ BY JAMES MCAULEY AND LUISA BECK Washington Post

BERLIN • German Chancel-

lor Angela Merkel, defender of the liberal order, stood alongside Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, promoter of “illiberal democracy,” at a joint news conference this past week and made a plea for the soul of Europe. “Europe’s basic principle,” she said, is “humanity. That means we are protecting our outer borders but not with the aim of simply closing ourselves off.” That’s been a common refrain of Merkel’s tenure. She and French President Emmanuel Macron have been the most prominent advocates for cosmopolitan Europe. But the vision the Franco-German power couple is defending these days is vastly diminished. Merkel welcomed nearly 1 million migrants and refugees into Germany in 2015 with the mantra, “We can do this.” Yet, this past week, the German chancellor called for more “order, control and prevention” of migration, as well as quicker deportation of asylum seekers with no legal right to stay in Germany. M a c ro n o n c e p ra i s e d Merkel’s “dignity” on the migrant question. Running for the French presidency against the far-right Marine Le Pen, he was widely seen as the candidate of multicultural tolerance. But he has adopted policies on immigration that have scandalized even his allies — most notably a restrictive asylum law to be adopted this summer. “What we are witnessing is a continuous watering down of asylum and reception standards,” said Petra Bendel, a migration expert at the University of Erlangen-Nüremberg. “It’s a giving up of European values and norms of human dignity and human rights.” As it pursues its own restrictive policies, the Macron administration publicly recoiled from President Donald Trump’s policy of separating children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. “We do not share the same model of civilization; clearly we don’t share certain values,” said Benjamin Griveaux, an Elysee Palace spokesman. Macron also replaced the French ambassador to Hungary after the latter praised Orban’s zero-tolerance immigration policy as “a model.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

French President Emmanuel Macron speaks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel during a roundtable meeting at an EU summit in Brussels last month.

France and Germany, however, largely stood by as European Union member states shut their borders. And they are not expected to confront Trump on immigration at this week’s NATO summit. The French and German leaders have retrenched their positions even as the number of asylum applications to the European Union has plummeted. Migrant arrivals have fallen back to pre-2015 levels. The crisis these leaders are responding to is almost entirely political. Images of refugee boats arriving and fears of a European culture under threat, along with a number of violent attacks linked to migrants, have fed growing nationalism and anti-migrant public opinion. Merkel’s governing coalition has been anxious about the encroachment of the far-right Alternative for Germany. In an effort to prevent losing votes in October regional elections, Merkel’s Bavarian sister party has tacked right on immigration, and her interior minister, Horst Seehofer, gave her an ultimatum that almost brought down the government this past week. Merkel ultimately consented to a plan to build “transfer centers” to house asylum seekers while their status is reviewed, to turn away people who have already applied for asylum elsewhere in Europe, and to patrol the German-Austrian border — a move that could

allow for racial profiling and jeopardize the core European principle of free movement among nations. “Whatever her beliefs are, no one in Germany knows,” said Michael Koss, a political scientist at the University of Munich. “One of course has to ask the question of how many compromises will really make her able to say, ‘I always kept my original position.’ “ In contrast to Merkel, Macron holds an absolute majority in the French Parliament. There is no comparable threat to his power. But he has an eye on what he has called the “leprosy” of nationalism that has toppled centrist governments elsewhere in Europe. Macron supports a French new law that will crack down on economic migrants, rely on deterrence mechanisms such as heavy fines and potential jail time and streamline the process by which authorities can turn asylum seekers away. “I want France and its national cohesion to remain intact,” he said, justifying the approach. But even some of his supporters see the move as an unnecessary deal with the devil. “To lose one’s soul is much more serious than to lose elections,” said Dominique Moïsi, a fellow at the Paris think tank Institut Montaigne, who once advised the Macron campaign on foreign policy. There is also the situation that already exists along

the French-Italian border, which could serve as a potential model for what might soon materialize between Germany and Austria. French authorities screen incoming trains and cars for those they suspect to be illegal immigrants, detaining overnight those they catch. Human rights watchdogs have regularly reported police abuses, especially with regard to unaccompanied minors. For immigration experts, those border checks are proof that the political right has already won significant ground on immigration, terrain that may never be reclaimed by those who favor the Schengen zone’s promise of borderless travel. When he was a presidential candidate, Macron had nothing but praise for Merkel’s migration policy. “Chancellor Merkel and German society as a whole were up to the mark of our joint values,” Macron said in early 2017. “They saved our collective dignity by taking in refugees and providing them with accommodation and education.” As they arrive in Brussels for the NATO summit, Merkel and Macron will be among few left to defend what was once a robust vision of an open, tolerant Europe. But in the summer of 2018, in a Europe under siege within and without, those “joint values” are unlikely to be trumpeted. In fact, what exactly those values are is no longer clear.

European businesses may suffer collateral damage as U.S.-China trade war heats up BY DAVID MCHUGH associated Press

FRANKFURT, GERMANY •

European businesses are unsettled as they watch the U.S. and China collide over trade. And for good reason: The nascent global trade war could represent the biggest single threat to the economic upswing that has helped the region get past its financial crisis. In theory, some European companies could benefit, jumping into market niches if Chinese businesses are kept out of the U.S. market. But that would be only a few companies or sectors. When an entire economy is heavily dependent on trade, an overall slowdown in global commerce caused by tit-fortat import taxes provokes fear and undermines confidence. And that’s just what’s happening in Europe. By one measure, business confidence has fallen in six of the past seven months in Germany, where exports are almost half of annual economic output. “It’s worth all our efforts to defuse this conflict, so it doesn’t become a war,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Wednesday. Europe has its own trade dispute with the U.S. After the U.S. put tariffs on steel and aluminum from many allies, including the European Union, the 28-country bloc responded with import taxes on some $3.25 billion of U.S. goods. President Donald Trump’s administration is also studying the option of putting tariffs on cars, which would significantly

escalate the confrontation. The head of the EU’s executive, Jean-Claude Juncker, will head to Washington in late July to try to personally persuade Trump against further measures targeting Europe. The disputes over trade threaten to spoil the good times for Europe’s economy. Growth last year was the strongest in a decade, since before the global financial crisis. Though that has eased in recent quarters, the economy is still strong enough to generate jobs. The number of unemployed fell by 125,000 in May, leaving unemployment in the 19 countries that use the euro at 8.4 percent, the lowest since 2008 and down from a high of 12.1 percent in 2013. “Trade tensions stoked by U.S. President Donald Trump are clouding the economic outlook in Europe,” analysts at Berenberg bank in London wrote. They rated the trade risk ahead of troubles from Italy’s heavy debt load or faster than expected interest rate increases from the U.S. Federal Reserve. Many European companies would suffer because they both produce and sell goods in the U.S. and China, the world’s biggest economies. For example, tariffs by China on U.S.-made autos would hit German carmakers Daimler and BMW since they both make vehicles in the United States and export them to China. Daimler has already lowered its outlook for profits, citing higher-than-expected costs from the new tariffs. BMW warned in a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross that tar-

iffs would make it harder for it to sell in China the vehicles it builds at its factory in Spartanburg, S.C., “potentially leading to a strongly reduced export volumes and negative effects on investment and employment in the United States.” Last year, BMW exported 272,000 vehicles, more than half its total production, from the Spartanburg plant. Of those, 81,000 — worth $2.37 billion — went to China. BMW said its exports reduced the U.S. trade deficit by about $1 billion. By themselves, the U.S. tariffs won’t immediately have a dramatic impact on global trade. The fear is that retaliation will spiral, hitting the total amount of global commerce. Even if the overall effect is to harm growth, there could be benefits for some European companies and sectors. Economists Alicia Garcia Herrero and Jianwei Xu at the French bank Natixis said that European makers of cars, aircraft, chemicals, computer chips and factory machinery could in theory snare market share by substituting for Chinese or American products in the two markets. But that’s only if Europe’s own trade dispute with the U.S. does not escalate — a big if. Europe is waiting to see whether the Trump administration will go ahead separately with tariffs on auto imports. European companies such as BMW, Daimler’s MercedesBenz, Volkswagen’s Porsche and Audi divisions, and Fiat Chrysler send $46.6 billion worth of vehicles every year to

the U.S. Some 13.3 million people, or 6.1 percent of the employed population of the EU, work in the automotive sector, according to the European Automobile Manufacturers Association. “Europe cannot win anything” on an overall basis “for one obvious reason: We are net exporters,” said Garcia Herrero, chief economist for Asia Pacific at Natixis. “But we should not understate the view that some sectors could get something out of a U.S.-China trade war.” Amid the brewing conflict, China has sought to get Europe on its side, putting on a diplomatic charm offensive during visits by Merkel and French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe. The EU and China agreed last month to deepen commercial ties and support trade rules. But the EU remains a close, longtime ally of the U.S. on a range of issues, despite the current tension with the Trump administration. One negative outcome for Europe, Herrero said, would be if Trump can push the Chinese into a trade agreement aimed at reducing the U.S. trade deficit. The additional U.S. goods to China could come at the expense of European competitors. “If China concedes to the U.S. proposed agreement, the whole situation faced by the EU would be much tougher,” she and Xu wrote in a research note. “For China to massively reduce its trade surplus with the U.S., it has to in some way substitute its imports away from the EU to the U.S., which would have a significant negative impact on the EU producers.”


NEWS

A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Wrong Lady Liberty on stamp to cost Postal Service $3.5 million Las Vegas sculptor Robert Davidson, who created the replica in the facade at the New-York-New York casino on the Las Vegas Strip, sued the Postal Service five years ago over its 2011 “forever” stamp design . The stamp featured the face of his Lady Liberty, which his attorneys argued

ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS • A stamp that mistakenly featured the image of a Statue of Liberty replica in Las Vegas instead of the original statue in New York will cost the U.S. Postal Service $3.5 million in a copyright infringement lawsuit.

in court filings was unmistakably different from the original — more “freshfaced” and even “sexier.” The Postal Service had been releasing the stamps for at least three months before discovering it was not an image of the New York statue. Postal Service attorneys argued Davidson’s design was too similar for him to claim copyright. Federal Judge Eric Bruggink sided with Davidson last week and agreed his work was an original de-

sign. He ordered the Postal Service to pay $3.5 million to the artist — a slice of the $70 million profit from the stamp. Postal Service spokesman Dave Partenheimer said that the agency was reviewing the decision and would comment “if and when appropriate.” Todd Bice, Davidson’s attorney, said in an emailed statement that his client was pleased. “As the court noted, Mr. Davidson’s artistic creation of the Las Ve-

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

select a photo of his work for the second ever Forever Stamp, over hundreds of other images,” he said.

gas Lady Liberty is highly unique and attractive, which is what prompted the U.S. Postal Service to

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 07.08.2018 • B

Offense fizzles, Cards tumble McCutchen’s RBI single in seventh breaks tie, propels Giants to victory BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

SAN FRANCISCO • The word Cardinals manager Mike Matheny used was “initiative,” though he could have just as easily said “directive” or “imperative.” At some point toward the end of the previous home stand and the start of this te l l - t a l e GIANTS 3 trip, the Cardinals CARDINALS 2 made it a > 3:05 p.m. Saturday point of emphasis at Giants, FSM > Martinez (5-4, 3.20) to improve vs. Samardzija their play (1-4, 6.56) in the field, even if it meant at times putting Jose Martinez in right field or on the bench with his teambest .293 batting average and 52 RBIs. It’s an approach that has kept Kolten Wong at second base in recent games and spurred the team to send Harrison Bader into the wideopen acreage of right field at AT&T Park, not Dexter Fowler or Martinez. Simply: Side with the gloves, and hope for the bats. The unspoken invitation is that they’ll face more lowscoring, tightly played games like Friday’s than the 18-hit See CARDINALS • Page B7

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

Cardinals manager Mike Matheny has overseen a team with winning percentages at home the last three seasons that are among the organization’s 20-worst since the first full season at Busch Stadium II in 1967.

CAN MATHENY

SALVAGE THIS SEASON? Once shielded by wins, the seventh-year manager can’t hide mounting problems

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For most of manager Mike Matheny’s career, his staunchest supporters have simply pointed to the wins when the critics come calling. They must hope for more of them now. What once was a thick shield reinforced by history made, and adorned with the optimism for the future, is no longer blocking a volley of concerns. Halfway through the seven-season mark, the shield is cracked. “Heat is on the Cardinals — and manager Mike Matheny feels it the most,” read a USA Today headline this week. That Matheny will be out of work if his team misses the postseason is a prediction many now feel safe making. And for the first time in his career, his bosses are responding to the drumbeat with silence. Perhaps the calm before an offseason storm. Unless wins change the tide. Matheny, under contract through 2020, will always be the first manager to lead his team to the postseason in each of his first four years with a club. His .557 winning percentage remains the best among active managers with more than See FREDERICKSON • Page B8

WORLD CUP RUSSIA 2018

Belgium eliminates Brazil

FOR

Own-goal in 13th minute sinks five-time champs ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIZZOU MAKES HEISMAN PITCH FOR DREW LOCK

Neymar used Brazil’s famed yellow jersey to shield his anguish. The Belgians, clad in red and dancing in a celebratory circle nearby, couldn’t hide their relief. Belgium reached the World Cup semifinals for the first time in 32 years, holding off five-time champion Brazil 2-1 Friday in one of the country’s greatest soccer feats. “We’ve achieved something that is really beautiful,” said Kevin De Bruyne, who scored Belgium’s second goal, “and it’s not easy.” Belgium eliminated Brazil by successfully fusing the attacking potency of De Bruyne and Romelu Lukaku with the creativity of Eden Hazard and the goalkeeping exploits of

Tigers using emojis, bobbleheads, hashtags and videos in campaign to raise his profile BY DAVE MATTER • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See WORLD CUP • Page B5 QUARTERFINALS • SATURDAY • Sweden vs. England, 9 a.m., KTVI (2) • Russia vs. Croatia, 1 p.m., KTVI (2)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Belgium’s Axel Witsel celebrates after the final whistle as Belgium defeated Brazil 2-1 in a World Cup quarterfinal match on Friday.

Johnson hoping for a big bounce-back season BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Over the course of his NHL career, the Blues’ new backup goalie has played for enough teams to have a division named after him. As such, the Chad Johnson Division has included some very good teams, most notably the 2013-14 Boston Bruins, who won the Presidents Tro-

phy with 117 points. The New York Islanders of 2014-15 were a 100-point club. The Calgary Flames of 2016-17 made the playoffs. As for the Buffalo Sabres of 2017-18? Uh, not so hot. The Sabres struggled to a 2545-12 record, for 62 points and the league’s worst record. With that as a backdrop, it’s no surprise that Johnson’s numbers weren’t so hot, either.

He won his first game Oct. 15 against Anaheim, turning aside 25 of 26 shots in a 3-1 victory. Victory No. 2 with Johnson in goal didn’t come until Jan. 22 – 99 days later. “It was embarrassing I think for every player,” he told the Post-Dispatch. “Everybody there underachieved and we all made each other look bad. See BLUES • Page B9

In eight weeks, Missouri quarterback Drew Lock kicks off the encore to his record-breaking 2017 season, when he eclipsed the likes of Danny Wuerffel, Tim Tebow, Cam Newton and Johnny Manziel with a Southeastern Conference record 44 touchdown passes. This fall, Mizzou would like to see him join their company with another honor. The Heisman Trophy. Once Lock passed on entering the 2018 NFL draft and returned to Mizzou for his senior season, the athletics department’s strategic communications office decided this spring to launch a Heisman campaign for the first-team All-SEC quarterback — once Tigers coach Barry Odom and Lock gave their OK. The promotion will be fairly cost-free — at least See MIZZOU • Page B8

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri quarterback Drew Lock threw for 44 touchdowns last season, a Southeastern Conference record.

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 07.08.2018 • B

BETTER EARLY THAN NEVER Martinez hits stride before game begins CARDINALS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Carlos Martinez was good at the plate too, driving in a run with a double in the third.

3

GIANTS

2

> 3:05 p.m. Sunday at Giants, FSM > Flaherty (3-4, 3.19) vs. Bumgarner (1-3, 2.58)

> Despite great year, Molina could miss All-Star bid. B5 > Minors: Ex-Rascal Warner tries to overcome odds. B6 > Fowler comfortable with swing, just needs timing. B7

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

SAN FRANCISCO • One of the

Quick

‘Love’ for town led to Perron’s third stint with Blues

return

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Little more than a year ago, as he was headed out the door for the second time, David Perron said St. Louis was “still going to probably be my favorite place to be always.” He must have meant it, because he’s back. Again. Maybe it’s the toasted ravioli. Or that pizza known as the Square Beyond Compare. Or the humidity. But the guy just can’t stay away. T h e re h ave b e e n plenty of hockey players over the years who have come back for a second tour of duty with the Blues. Tony Twist, Perry Turnbull, Jim Roberts, Kelly Chase, Sergio Momesso to name a few. But Perron might be the first player in franchise history to come back for a third tour. At least that’s what it says in the Blues’ media guide, where the team’s all-time roster shows no previous player with more than two stints with the club. Last Sunday, when Perron signed a four-year, $16 million free-agent contract with the Blues, general manager Doug Armstrong said the 30-year-old native of Sherbrooke, Quebec, could have commanded more money elsewhere. Perron didn’t dispute the point. “For sure. That’s exactly it,” Perron told the Post-Dispatch. “I love St. Louis. This is the biggest reason why I came back. I didn’t

The Blues drafted Perron in 2007

340 games with Blues from 2007-13

See BLUES • Page B9

< Career-best 66 points last season with Vegas

82 games with Blues in 2016-17

things pitching coach Mike Maddux noticed about the pitcher he’s charged with catapulting from garden-variety All-Star to league-leading elite was no matter how Carlos Martinez started a game, dicey or dominant, he usually finished with heat. His last inning or last pitch had bite, a lot of velocity and the tempo that the Cardinals have talked so much about for the potential ace. “So, why wait?” Maddux said. “Why wait? Why wait?” Martinez’s resurgence, which continued Saturday in a peppy seven innings against San Francisco, began with the answer to that question and an approach he’s adopted to accelerate his feel for the game before he ever throws a pitch in it. By the time he faced San Francisco in the first inning Saturday, Martinez has already thrown simulated at-bats against those hitters, at game speed, and no longer is he “slow playing” his stuff, as if saving the sizzle. The results have slingshot See CARDINALS • Page B7

Ozuna funk is partly due to sliders BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

An embattled Cardinals team that shuffled out of St. Louis after serving up a home sweep is one win away from claiming back-to-back series on a road trip for the first time this season. Another chance to grab hold of a tangible sign of progress arrives Sunday in San Francisco. A boost from the cleanup hitter would certainly help. Marcell Ozuna’s hard-to-figure first season with the Cardinals has entered its third chapter. First came the snooze, followed by the surge, and then this current skid. Ozuna is four for 25 during the trip, with three singles and one double. Zoom out and the slugger’s batting line reads .228/.253/.266 through his last 20 games. Ozuna has six more strikeouts (24) than hits (18), and just three of those hits (all doubles) have gone for more than one base. Another at-bat without a home run would make it 80 See FREDERICKSON • Page B6

St. Louisan has wild ride to Bellerive

World Cup party is over for Russia ASSOCIATED PRESS

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It was the biggest shot of his life and it couldn’t have gone worse — it went in the hole. For years, Michael Block carried his dream in his golf bag. He yearned to qualify for the 100th PGA Championship at Bellerive. Block, you see, is from St. Louis. As a teen in 1992, he wedged his way past the grown-ups at the fifth green, watching as the pros practiced with their wedges. It was the week of the previous PGA Championship to be held at Bellerive. He met Payne Stewart. Nick Price. He still has his ticket from See HOCHMAN • Page B2

PGA OF AMERICA PHOTO

Michael Block grew up in St. Louis, and will play in the PGA Championship here. PGA CHAMPIONSHIP Aug. 9-12, Bellerive Country Club Past tournaments at Bellerive: 1965 U.S. Open (Gary Player) 1992 PGA Champ. (Nick Price)

Nyet this time. Although Russia made it further at this year’s World Cup than most anyone expected, it was Croatia that advanced to the semifinals with a 4-3 shootout victory Saturday following a 2-2 draw in Sochi. The overachieving hosts, the lowest ranked team in the tournament at No. 70, were trying to make it to the World Cup semifinals for the first time since the Soviet Union finished fourth at the 1966 tournament in England. Even Russian President Vladimir Putin was taken in by the host nation’s surprising run, at least according to Russia coach Stanislav Cherchesov. “Putin called me during the day, and he called me right now,” Cherchesov See CUP • Page B3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Croatia’s Andrej Kramaric celebrates his side’s opening goal against Russia.

WORLD CUP RUSSIA 2018 > Semifinals: France vs. Belgium, 1 p.m. Tuesday • Croatia vs. England 1 p.m. Wed.

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Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 7/7 at Giants 3:05 p.m. FSM

Sunday 7/8 at Giants 3:05 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 7/10 at White Sox 7:10 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 7/11 at White Sox 7:10 p.m. FSM

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

TOUR DE FRANCE

PGA GREENBRIER

jedy jedy jedy jedy jedy Kraft leads Simpson, Lahiri by 1 in W. Virginia

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 7/7 at Las Vegas 10 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 7/14 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/21 vs. Orange County 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/28 at Reno 9:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

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FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Fri. 7/13: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m. Sat. 7/14: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

RIVER CITY RASCALS Sat. 7/7: vs. Joliet, 6:35 p.m. Sun. 7/8: vs. Joliet, 6:05 p.m.

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.VA. • Kelly Kraft is about to

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily. ASSOCIATED PRESS

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GOLF 6:30 a.m. European PGA: Irish Open, third round, GOLF 12 p.m. PGA: A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier, third round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier, third round, KMOV (4) ASSOCIATED PRESS 2 p.m. Web.com: LECOM Health Challenge, third round, GOLF 4:30 p.m. LPGA: Thornberry Creek Classic, third round, GOLF HORSE RACING 3:30 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Breeders’ Cup Challenge: Belmont Oaks, KSDK (5) 5 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Stars & Stripes Stakes, FS2 MISCELLANEOUS 5 p.m. World Series of Poker: Main event, Day 3 (of 10), ESPN2 MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 7 p.m. UFC 226: Miocic vs. Cormier prelims FS1 MOTORCYCLE RACING 2:30 p.m. AMA: Lucas Oil RedBud National, KSDK (5) RUGBY 8 p.m. Major League Rugby Championship: Teams TBA, CBSSN SOCCER 9 a.m. World Cup: Sweden vs. England, KTVI (2) 1 p.m. World Cup: Russia vs. Croatia, KTVI (2) 6:30 p.m. NWSL: Washington Spirit at Orlando Pride, ESPNews 7:30 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC vs. Toronto, FSM Plus 10 p.m. USL: St. Louis FC at Las Vegas, KPLR (11) 10 p.m. MLS: Orlando City SC at Los Angeles FC, FS1 TENNIS 7 a.m. Wimbledon: Third round, ESPN

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Four-time Tour de France cycling race winner Chris Froome of Britain leaves the team bus before a training session Friday.

Froome cleared but fans may be leery Team Sky rider looks to tie five-win record xx ASSOCIATED PRESS

subhed

This was supposed to be the year Britain’s Chris Froome was warmly welcomed into cycling royalty with an expected recordASSOCIATED PRESS tying fifth Tour de France title. Instead, the Team Sky rider finds himself only freshly cleared of doping after an asthma drug case that dragged on for 10 months and revealed divisions with Tour organizers and France’s greatest living cyclist. Froome had been racing under the cloud of a potential ban after a urine sample he provided at the Spanish Vuelta in September showed a concentration of the asthma drug salbutamol that was twice the permitted level. But the UCI announced on Monday that his sample results did not constitute an Adverse Analytical Finding. “I appreciate more than anyone else the frustration at how long the case has taken to resolve and the uncertainty this has caused. I am glad it’s finally over,” Froome said. Froome’s use of asthma medication has been well documented, and the Kenyan-born rider has often been spotted using inhalers during races. World Anti-Doping Association rules state an athlete can be cleared for excessive salbutamol use if he proves that it was due to an appropriate therapeutic dosage. Still, Froome faces the prospect of fan dissent along the roads of France. “Over the years, we have always had a small crowd who aren’t happy to see us, for

whatever reason,” Froome said last week. “We have always come up against adversity over the years. Hopefully that doesn’t interfere with the race.”

GRAND NUMBERS With one more Tour victory, Froome will match the record five shared by Jacques Anquetil, Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault and Miguel Indurain. Lance Armstrong won seven before he was stripped of them all for doping. Froome can also match Merckx’s record by winning his fourth straight Grand Tour, having followed last year’s Tour title with victories in the Vuelta and the Giro d’Italia. Furthermore, Froome can become the first rider since the late Marco Pantani in 1998 to achieve the Giro-Tour double in the same season. RIVALS The list of Froome’s rivals has grown. Colombian climbing specialist Nairo Quintana has surrounded himself with two title candidates in their own right in Mikel Landa and Alejandro Valverde on the Movistar team. “It’s probably the best squad I’ve had by my side for a Grand Tour,” said Quintana, a threetime podium finisher in the Tour. Then there’s 2014 champion Vincenzo Nibali, Dutch time trial expert Tom Dumoulin, Froome’s former teammate Richie Porte, French hope Romain Bardet, last year’s runner-up Rigoberto Uran and rising British rider Adam Yates.

DIGEST Ream agrees to two-year contract in Premier League American defender Tim Ream of St. Louis has agreed to a new two-year contract with Fulham after helping the Cottagers gain promotion to the Premier League in May. The deal announced Friday includes an option for the 2020-21 season. The 30-year-old played for Major League Soccer’s New York Red Bulls from 2010-11, then joined Bolton. He moved to Fulham in 2015 when the London club was in the second-tier League Championship and helped the Cottagers return to the Premier League after a four-season absence. Ream (St. Dominic) has made 26 appearances for the U.S. national team. Parker leaving Spurs for Hornets • Tony Parker’s time in San Antonio is over, after 17 seasons and four NBA championships. A person with knowledge of the negotiations says Parker has agreed to sign a two-year, $10 million deal with the Charlotte Hornets. Parker lost his starting role with the Spurs last season. The move to Charlotte reunites him with former Spurs assistant James Borrego, who became the head coach in Charlotte earlier this offseason. Parker averaged career-lows of 7.7 points and 19.5 minutes last season. The six-time All-Star is the No. 4 all-time scorer in Spurs history and the franchise’s career assists leader. Blue Jackets sign Duclair • The Columbus Blue Jackets have signed forward Anthony Duclair to a $650,000, one-year contract. Duclair remains unfilled potential at 22. He has been traded twice and last week became an unrestricted free agent when the Chicago Blackhawks decided not to offer him a contract to retain his rights. The 2013 third-round pick was traded by the New York Rangers to the Arizona Coyotes in 2015 and put up career highs with 20 goals, 24 assists and 44 points the next season. Arizona traded him to Chicago in January, and the Blackhawks declined to qualify him after eight points in 23 games. Dressel, Wilson SEC players of year • Florida swimmer Caeleb Dressel and South Carolina basketball player A’ja Wilson have been named the Southeastern Conference athletes of the year for 2017-18 as voted by SEC athletics directors. Wilson was named SEC women’s basketball player of the year each of the last three seasons. She swept the national player of the year awards this season. Dressel won four NCAA titles in four days and has 10 career NCAA championships. Baylor denies allegations • A former Baylor University athletic director’s claims that the school used black football players as scapegoats to cover up a school-wide sexual assault scandal are bizarre and “blatantly false,” according to the university. The school responded in court filings Thursday to allegations levied by Ian McCaw during a recent deposition in a lawsuit against the school, the Waco Tribune-Herald reported. The lawsuit was filed two years ago by 10 women who allege Baylor mishandled their sexual assault allegations. The university said the lawsuit has been overtaken by unsubstantiated allegations and “rank speculation.” Former NBA player Rozier dies • Former NBA player Clifford Rozier has died following a heart attack. He was 45. Rozier’s brother, Kobie Rozier, posted on Facebook that Clifford Rozier had been fighting for his life for the last few days but succumbed to his condition Friday. Rozier was the 16th overall pick of the 1994 NBA draft by the Golden State Warriors. Associated Press

find out whether he’s ready to handle the lead entering the weekend for the first time on the PGA Tour. Kraft shot a 7-under 63 in the second round of A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier on Friday to take a one-stroke edge over first-round leader Webb Simpson and Anirban Lahiri of India. Kraft posted his career-best round at the Old White TPC. He was at 13-under 127. Kraft is looking to turn around a season that has included missed cuts in seven of his 10 previous tournaments, including last week at the Quicken Loans National. ButASSOCIATED he has had PRESS some success in West Virginia, where he tied for fifth last year. “I’ve kind of changed my attiGOLF tude a littleROUNDUP bit starting with last week,” Kraft said. “I just feel like I’m ready to keep playing good.” ASSOCIATED PRESS Kraft made four birdies on the front nine and didn’t let a bogey on the par-5 12th derail him. He added birdies on the next two and took the lead with a six-foot birdie putt on the par-4 16th. Reminded that it’s his first time leading a PGA Tour event after 36 holes, Kraft said, “I’ve been up there before and I know I can play out here.” Lahiri shot a career-low 61 and Simpson had a 67. Both were at 12 under. Lahiri has yet to make a bogey in his first trip to The Greenbrier resort. He found just eight of 14 fairways but reached all 18 greens in regulation Friday. Four of his nine birdies were putts of 18 feet or longer. “I’ve been feeling good over the last two weeks,” Lahiri said. “I’ve seen the improvement on the golf course and I’ve tried to plug the gaps that I’ve found over the last two weeks. And I’m happy that more than anything else I haven’t dropped a shot. But I’m not thinking about that. The focus is just to put myself in the best position that I can.” After shooting 61 on Thursday, Simpson saw his chance for a very low score end quickly on Friday. Starting on the back nine, Simpson hit a tee shot out of bounds and made doublebogey on the par-5 12th, a hole he eagled the day before. He then bogeyed the par-4 13th. He made five birdies the rest of his round. Jason Kokrak shot 64 and was in fourth place at 11 under. Whee Kim of South Korea and Harold Varner III were at 10 under. Simpson is the only one among the top six players on the leaderboard with a PGA Tour win. Since its 2010 debut, the tournament has produced four first-time winners, including three rookies.

GOLF ROUNDUP Revitalized Willett in contention at Irish Open Ryan Fox of New Zealand, Matthieu Pavon of France and Dutch golfer Erik van Rooyen shared the lead after the second round of the Irish Open on Friday, while Danny Willett’s return to form catapulted him into contention at Ballyliffin Golf and Country Club in Donegal. Willett reached a career-high ranking of ninth after claiming his first major title at the 2016 U.S. Masters, but slumped to 442nd after missing his ninth cut in 12 events at last week’s French Open. The 30-year-old Englishman added a 2-under 70 to his opening 68 to lie two shots behind Fox (69), Pavon (68) and Van Rooyen (65). Joakim Lagergren is one off the lead on 7-under, with Willett joined on 6-under by Sam Horsfield and Zander Lombard. Tournament host Rory McIlroy is seven off the pace. Sei Young Kim leads LPGA Classic • Sei Young Kim birdied her first four holes to shoot a 7-under 65 and surge to the lead after the second round of the Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic in Oneida, Wisconsin. Kim was at 16-under 128 — tied for the tour’s lowest of the season — and four shots ahead of Yu Liu. Kim could have had a much bigger lead but missed birdie putts on her 14th, 16th, 17th and 18th holes. Defending champion Katherine Kirk, who had a one-shot lead after a 10-under 62 in the first round, couldn’t get her putting going, though, and settled for 71. She is one of five players who are five shots off the pace at 133. Associated Press


SPORTS

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Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 7/8 at Giants 3:05 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 7/10 at White Sox 7:10 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 7/11 at White Sox 7:10 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 7/11 at White Sox 7:10 p.m. FSM

M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

PGA GREENBRIER

Varner, Kraft are tied for lead

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 7/14 vs. Tulsa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/21 vs. Orange County 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7/28 at Reno 9:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 8/4 vs. Seattle 7:30 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Fri. 7/13: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m. Sat. 7/14: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Sun. 7/8: vs. Joliet, 6:05 p.m. Tue. 7/10: Home run derby, 8 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 8:05 a.m. Formula 1: British Grand Prix, ESPN 12 p.m. NHRA: New England Nationals, FS1 1:30 p.m. IndyCar: Iowa Corn 300, NBCSN BASEBALL 1:10 p.m. Braves at Brewers, TBS 3:05 p.m. Cardinals at Giants, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 6 p.m. MLB: All-Star Game selections announcement, ESPN 7:10 p.m. Dodgers at Angels, ESPN BASKETBALL 2 p.m. NBA Summer League: Timberwolves vs. Raptors, NBA 2:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Wizards vs. Spurs, ESPN2 4 p.m. NBA Summer League: Hornets vs. Heat, NBA 4:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Trail Blazers vs. Hawks, ESPN2 6 p.m. NBA Summer League: Mavericks vs. Bucks, NBA 6:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Warriors vs. Rockets, ESPN2 8 p.m. NBA Summer League: Jazz vs. Knicks, NBA 8:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Grizzlies vs. Magic, ESPN2 10 p.m. NBA Summer League: Kings vs. Clippers, NBA 10:30 p.m. NBA Summer League: Lakers vs. Bulls, ESPN2 CYCLING 6:30 a.m. Tour de France: Stage 2, NBCSN 3:30 p.m. Tour de France: Stage 2 (tape), KSDK (5) GOLF 6 a.m. European PGA: Irish Open, final round, GOLF 12 p.m. PGA: A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier, final round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier, final round, KMOV (4) 2 p.m. Web.com: LECOM Health Challenge, final round, GOLF 4:30 p.m. LPGA: Thornberry Creek Classic, final round, GOLF MISCELLANEOUS 1 p.m. World Series of Poker: Main event, Day 4 (of 10), ESPN OLYMPICS 1 p.m. Special Olympics: USA Games, KDNL (30) SOCCER 6 p.m. MLS: New York Red Bulls at New York City FC, FS1

DIGEST Former Kings player’s death apparent suicide A former coach and family friend says onetime Sacramento Kings and UCLA basketball player Tyler Honeycutt was found dead after a standoff with Los Angeles police. Bort Escoto, who coached Honeycutt at Sylmar High north of Los Angeles, tells the Los Angeles Times the player’s mother called him early Saturday and said her son took his own life. The Los Angeles Police Department says it responded Friday afternoon to a report of a man with a gun and during the initial encounter, the suspect fired a shot out of a residence and officers returned fire. Crisis negotiators were called and a SWAT team finally found an unresponsive man who was pronounced dead by paramedics. The department, which did not identify the man, said he appears to have died of a self-inflicted gunshot. Football Cardinals’ GM apologizes for DUI • Arizona Cardinals general manager Steve Keim is apologizing for what he calls “incredibly poor judgment and inexcusable actions” that resulted in a Fourth of July DUI arrest in a Phoenix suburb. The Cardinals said the team was gathering information and would handle the matter “appropriately and in accordance with all league policies as well as within the legal system.” Chandler police say Keim was arrested early Wednesday morning after a traffic stop and was released from custody later in the day. They did not release further details. In a statement, Keim said that he failed to meet NFL standards of behavior and that he accepts full responsibility for his actions. Keim has been the Cardinals GM since 2013. Pistons make moves • The Detroit Pistons hired Gregg Polinsky as director of player personnel. The Pistons also announced they had signed second-round draft pick Bruce Brown Jr. and waived guard Dwight Buycks. Polinsky comes to the Pistons from the Brooklyn Nets. He spent the past 19 seasons with them in various roles, most recently as director of college scouting, and was the coach at Georgia Southern from 1995-99. The 6-foot-5 Brown was taken with the 42nd pick in this year’s draft. He averaged 11.4 points a game last season at Miami. Brown was limited to 19 games during the 2017-18 season because of a left foot injury. Buycks averaged 7.4 points in 29 games for the Pistons last season. Wisconsin wrestler killed in Illinois crash • A University of Wisconsin wrestler was killed in a vehicle crash in Illinois, according to police and the school. Wrestler Eli Stickley was killed Thursday night, the university’s athletic department confirmed in a written statement. Stickley was a native of Urbana, Ohio, and wrestled in the 141-pound weight class at Wisconsin. According to Illinois State Police, Stickley died after his Nissan pickup left the roadway on Interstate 74 in Henry County. Stickley and a passenger were taken to Illini Hospital, where Stickley was pronounced dead, according to police. The passenger’s identity and injuries were not immediately disclosed. Police did not have an update on the passenger’s condition Saturday. Stickley joined the Badgers in 2015 and had a 21-14 record last season. He was an Ohio Division II state champ at 120 pounds in 2014 with a 50-3 record. Stickley’s uncle is U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, an Ohio Republican who won two national championships at Wisconsin in the mid-1980s. From wire reports

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kelly Kraft blasts out of a bunker on the 17th hole Saturday in A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier.

Both seek first PGA Tour wins ASSOCIATED PRESS

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.VA. • Harold Varner and Kelly

Kraft are looking to add to the crop of first-time winners on the PGA Tour in West Virginia. Varner shot a 4-under 66 Saturday to tie Kraft at the top entering the final round of A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier. Both are seeking their first tour wins in their 85th starts. Since this tournament debuted in 2010, there have been four first-time champions, but no third-round leader has won. “I wish we could go play right now,” Varner said. “I’m pretty hungry. This is what you work for. This is what I get so pumped up to do.” Varner had four back-nine birdies after 10 consecutive pars to catch Kraft, the second-round leader who let a four-stroke lead slip away and shot 1-under 69. Both were at 14-under 196. Varner’s best finish on tour was a tie for fifth at the OHL Classic in Mexico in 2016. He has one top10 finish in each of the past two years and won the Australian PGA Championship in 2016. “I guess this whole thing’s new to me because I’ve never had a lead going into the last day,” Varner said. “But I don’t really lack confidence. That’s never really been a problem. I just need to slow down and take it all in. Because there’s going to be something that happens tomorrow where I can learn and I can grow and I can get a lot better. So it goes back to keeping it in perspective. “That was deep. Sorry.” Kraft, who finished fifth in last

year’s tournament, refused to get down on himself despite bogeys on two of his final three holes Saturday. “I’m just going to stay patient tomorrow,” he said. “I hit a lot of good shots today.” Fifteen golfers were within five shots of the lead. The tournament has been decided by two or fewer strokes every year and has gone to a playoff three times. The 2016 tournament was canceled after devastating floods. The Old White TPC dried out on a sunny Saturday and scores weren’t as low as the first two days when rains softened the course and yielded eight rounds of 63 or better. Defending champion Xander Schauffele and Kevin Na were at 13 under. Both shot 65. Sam Saunders was alone in fifth place at 12 under after a 67. Bubba Watson shot 65 and was among three players at 11 under. Watson hopes to add this tournament to his three other wins this season. Watson wants to honor his late father, Gerry, a Green Beret who fought in the Vietnam War. Watson owns a vacation home at The Greenbrier Sporting Club. He and his wife, Angie, contributed significantly both in money and in volunteer work during local relief efforts after June 2016 floods killed 23 people statewide and forced the tournament to be canceled two weeks later. “Big day tomorrow,” Watson said. The top four players not already exempt among the top 12 finishers will earn spots in the British Open at Carnoustie starting July 19.

GOLF ROUNDUP Van Rooyen nabs 4-shot lead at Irish Open South African golfer Erik van Rooyen left behind his overnight co-leaders to grab a four-shot lead going into the final day of the Irish Open at Ballyliffin Golf and Country Club in Donegal. Van Rooyen began Saturday’s third round in a three-way tie for the lead, then stormed to the turn in just 29 shots on his way to a 6-under-par 66 that put him at 14 under. He’s four shots ahead of Joakim Lagergren of Sweden (69) and Ryan Fox of New Zealand (70). Defending champion Jon Rahm of Spain was eight shots off the lead after a 67 that included a front nine of 30, and tournament host Rory McIlroy was 13 adrift following a 72. Sei Young Kim ties 54-hole mark at 24 under • Sei Young Kim shot an 8-under-par 64 in the third round of Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic to tie the 54-hole record of 24 under and take an eight-stroke lead in Oneida, Wis. Kim got rolling with an eagle on No. 3. A birdie on No. 16 tied Annika Sorenstam’s 24 under at the Mizuno Classic in Japan in 2003. Kim will take aim at Sorenstam’s 72-hole record of 27 under par, set at the Standard Register Ping in 2001 in Phoenix. Kim will need a 4-under 68 on Sunday to break that record. Amy Yang is a distant second at 16 under after shooting a 5-under 67. Eight players are within two shots of Yang. Associated Press

Block is heading home to Bellerive HOCHMAN • FROM B1

that day. “I can barely remember what I did yesterday,” said Block, now 42, “but I still remember watching these pros for the first time in my entire life.” He went on to become the golf professional at California’s Arroyo Trabuco Golf Club. In recent years, he qualified for a U.S. Open and two other PGA Championships. But to this point, here was the biggest shot of his life — Monday, June 18, 2018 — which could determine whether he’d make the 100th PGA. Bellerive. Back home. It had been a wacky week or so. On the previous Thursday and Friday, Block played in the 2018 U.S. Open (dream!) but finished second to last (nightmare!). Except, as Block explained: “If I made the cut, I wasn’t going to be able to qualify for the PGA at Bellerive, which would’ve been the biggest bummer of all time.” Turns out, the Sunday of the U.S. Open (June 17) also was the first day of another tournament — the PGA Professional Championship. This annual four-day tournament is for club pros from across the country — in other words, it’s the coolest excuse for a trade show convention for any vocation. You get to play golf on a gorgeous course, and the top 20 finishers qualify for that year’s PGA Championship. So, yes, this was Block’s lone way of making the field for the major at Bellerive in August. After missing the cut at the U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills, he flew from New York to California. A tad weary, Block couldn’t have hit the clown’s mouth that Sunday. And then in Monday’s second

round, “I had four holes to go and I was a total of 6 over,” Block recalled. “And 5 over was the cut.” He teed off at 15 and immediately was t’d off. This shot sailed into the woods. Once he walked over there, he realized he couldn’t find his ball. Clock was ticking. Rules state you get only five minutes to locate your ball, “and we’d already been looking for four minutes,” Block said. “We had 25 people looking for it.” Suddenly, Block’s caddie got on his hands and knees near a big tree. He got out his cellphone. Turned on the flashlight. There was the ball. In the hole. “Literally, in a burrowing animal hole at the bottom of a tree,” Block said. “Two feet deep down.” But in order for the golfer to earn the “free relief drop” of the ball, and not get penalized a stroke, rules state you have to identify that it’s your ball — not just a ball. So, the caddie sprawled out on his stomach, sticking his left arm down into the hole, which was directly under the tree. He looked like George Costanza’s description of pulling the Titleist out of the whale’s blow hole on “Seinfeld.” And who knew what burrowing animal could possibly be down there. It certainly takes a certain type of impervious person to stick an arm down a hole. In this case, Block had just the man for the job — a boy. See, his 13-year-old son, Dylan, was his caddie. So the fearless teenager reached into the dark hole and pulled out his dad’s ball. Flabbergasted and resuscitated, Block later described his next shot as “playing with house money.” Shooting from the wood chips,

where he’d taken his drop, Block hit a shot to within 20 feet of the actual hole. He made the ensuing putt. “I just go from a lost ball to a birdie on the same hole!” Block said. “Then I birdie the last hole and make the cut by two. “I shoot 66 the next day — I went from 90th to third place in one day, and that’s when it set in. This could be a reality.” Final day. Top 20 qualify for Bellerive in August. But Block stumbled. He even triple-bogeyed a hole. He needed a birdie on the final hole of the final round just to get into a playoff. He putted … and … it’s in the hole! “Playoff!” Block said. “Nine guys for five spots. “The third playoff hole was a par-5, and the moment I made contact on my second shot, I go: ‘Done deal.’ It was as good a 6-iron as I’ll hit in my life. It was a laser right at it. Ten feet under the hole for eagle. “I knew a birdie would (qualify), so I did a two-putt and made it happen.” Michael Block is coming home in August to compete in the 100th PGA Championship at Bellerive. “I just got the chills hearing that,” he said. “It’s absolutely unbelievable. … For me, when I walk down to that spot by the fifth green a month from now? It’s going to be absolutely surreal. I’ll go over to those kids who want autographs and I’ll be handing them my gloves and my golf balls and whatever else they want.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


07.08.2018 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

St. Louisan Block has wild Perron quickly decided ride to his Bellerive dream to return to St. Louis BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It was the biggest shot of his life and it couldn’t have gone worse — it went in the hole. For years, Michael Block carried his dream in his golf bag. He yearned to qualify for the 100th PGA Championship at Bellerive. Block, you see, is from St. Louis. As a teen in 1992, he wedged his way past the grown-ups at the fifth green, watching as the pros practiced with wedges. It was the week of the previous PGA Championship at Bellerive. He met Payne Stewart. Nick Price. He still has his ticket from that day. “I can barely remember what I did yesterday,” said Block, now 42, “but I still remember watching these pros for the first time in my entire life.” He went on to become the golf professional at California’s Arroyo Trabuco Golf Club. In recent years, he qualified for a U.S. Open and two other PGA Championships. But to this point, here was the biggest shot of his life — Monday, June 18, 2018 — which could determine if he’d make the 100th PGA. Bellerive. Back home. It had been a wacky week or so. On the previous Thursday and Friday, Block participated in the 2018 U.S. Open (dream!) but finished second to last (nightmare!). Except, as Block explained: “If I made the cut, I wasn’t going to be able to qualify for the PGA at Bellerive, which would’ve been the biggest bummer of all-time.” Turns out, the Sunday of the U.S. Open (June 17) also t was he first day of another tournament — the 2018 PGA Professional Championship. This annual four-day tournament is for club pros from courses across the country — in other words, it’s the coolest excuse for a trade show convention for any vocation. You get to play golf on a gorgeous course, and the top20 finishers qualify for that year’s PGA Championship. So, yes, this was Block’s lone way into possibly making the field for the major at Bellerive in August. After missing the cut at the U.S. Open, played at Shinnecock Hills, he flew from New York to California. A tad weary, Block couldn’t have hit the clown’s mouth that Sunday. And then in Monday’s second round, “I had four holes to go and I was a total of six-over,” Block recalled. “And five-over was the cut.” He teed off at 15 and immediately was t’d off. This shot sailed into the woods. Once he walked over there, he realized he couldn’t find his ball. Clock was ticking. Rules state you only get five minutes to locate your ball,

“and we’d already been looking for four minutes,” Block said. “We had 25 people looking for it.” Suddenly, Block’s caddie got on his hands and knees near a big tree. He got out his cellphone. Turned on the flashlight. There was the ball. In the hole. “Literally, in a burrowing animal hole at the bottom of a tree,” Block said. “Two feet deep down.” But in order for the golfer to earn the “free relief drop” of the ball, and not get penalized a stroke, rules stat you have to identify that it’s your ball — not just a ball. So, the caddie sprawled out on his stomach, sticking his left arm down into the hole, which was directly under the tree. He looked like George Costanza’s description of pulling the Titleist out of the whale’s blow hole on “Seinfeld.” And who knew what burrowing animal could possibly be down there. It certainly takes a certain type of impervious person to stick an arm down a hole. In this case, Block had just the man for the job — a boy. See, his 13-year-old son, Dylan, was his caddie. So the fearless teenager reached in the dark hole and pulled out his dad’s ball. Flabbergasted and resuscitated, Block later described his next shot as “playing with house money.” Shooting from the wood chips, where he’d dropped the ball, Block’s shot landed within 20 feet of the actual hole. He made the ensuing putt. “I just go from a lost ball to a birdie on the same hole!” Block said. “Then I birdie the last hole and make the cut by two. “I shoot 66 the next day — I went from 90th to third place in one day, and that’s when it set in. This could be a reality.” Final day. Top 20 qualify for Bellerive in August. But Block stumbled. He even triple-bogeyed a hole. He needed a birdie on the final hole of the final round, just to get into a playoff. He putted … and … it’s in the hole! “Playoff!” Block said. “Nine guys for five spots. “The third playoff hole was a par-five, and the moment I made contact on my second shot, I go: ‘Done deal.’ It was as good a six iron as I’ll hit in my life. I was a laser right at it. Ten feet under the hole for eagle. “I knew a birdie would (qualify), so I did a two-putt and made it happen.” Michael Block is coming home in August to compete in the 100th PGA Championship at Bellerive. “I just got the chills hearing that,” he said. “It’s absolutely unbelievable. … For me, when I walk down to that spot by the fifth green in a month from now? It’s going to be absolutely surreal. I’ll go over to those kids who want autographs and I’ll be handing them my gloves and my golf balls and whatever else they want.”

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‘Love’ for town led to third stint with Blues BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Little more than a year ago, as he was headed out the door for the second time, David Perron said St. Louis was “still going to probably be my favorite place to be always.” He must have meant it, because he’s back. Again. Maybe it’s the toasted ravioli. Or that pizza known as the Square Beyond Compare. Or the humidity. But the guy just can’t stay away. There have been plenty of hockey players over the years who have come back for a second tour of duty with the Blues. Tony Twist, Perry Turnbull, Jim Roberts, Kelly Chase, Sergio Momesso to name a few. But Perron might be the first player in franchise history to come back for a third tour. At least that’s what it says in the Blues’ media guide, where the team’s all-time roster shows no previous player with more than two stints with the club. Last Sunday, when Perron signed a four-year, $16 million free-agent contract with the Blues, general manager Doug Armstrong said the 30-year-old native of Sherbrooke, Quebec, could have commanded more money elsewhere. Perron didn’t dispute the point. “For sure. That’s exactly it,” Perron told the Post-Dispatch. “I love St. Louis. This is the biggest reason why I came back. I didn’t even want to think about anywhere else.” Even though injury and illness slowed Perron late in the regular season and in the playoffs for Vegas, the forward still finished with a career-high 66 points (16 goals, 50 assists) for the Golden Knights. Perron says there was a lot of outside interest once the free agency “talking period” started two weeks ago. But when St. Louis got serious with Perron? Well, the Blues didn’t have him at “hello,” but it was pretty close. “Basically by Thursday morning (June 28) we were set and decided that I was going back there,” Perron said. “The deal was kind of done. So it was exciting to get it done early. You never know, if you wait later maybe you get more. But I didn’t want to wait. “I played there seven years so far, out of 11, and it would be great to play those next four for sure in St. Louis.” Perron also has played for Edmonton, Pittsburgh, Anaheim and Vegas, but the crazy thing about his 11-year NHL career is that the only contracts he has signed have been Blues contracts. He was drafted 26th by the Blues in 2007 and made the roster that season. Just one year after he signed his third Blues contract — in July 2012—_ he was traded to Edmonton. Subsequent trades sent him to Pittsburgh and Anaheim while still working under that contact. He returned to St. Louis as an unrestricted free agent on a two-year deal in 2016 — Blues contract No. 4 — but was exposed on the expansion list and claimed by the Golden Knights last June. For Perron it wasn’t easy leaving the Blues either time. “As you get older, you get more experience, you can turn the page quicker,” Perron said. “But the first time it was tough on me, for sure. The second time, it was tough again. But at the same time I closed the door a little bit because I never expected to go back another time.” Wrong. Make no mistake, Perron thoroughly enjoyed playing for Vegas and being part of the team’s improbable run to the Stanley Cup Finals, in which it lost to Washington in five games. “We had great chemistry,” Perron said. “I mean, it’s once-in-a-lifetime experience to go to a city like Vegas. Live there. Play hockey. And I don’t mean this in a bad way, but we were basically running the town at the end of the year.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

David Perron (left) battles Chicago’s Rene Bourque while with the Blues in 2007.

“Everyone was on board. It was absolutely unbelievable. The crowds. I mean, again, it’s not something that you can live twice. You go from an expansion team, to really, by Christmas we didn’t feel like we were an expansion team any more. We knew we had a good thing going and we were pushing every day to keep getting better. “It was a unique experience. I think when you go to the Stanley Cup Final it just gives you more juice, more energy to want to get back there the next year again already.” But when it became clear that Vegas was out of the picture in terms of resigning him, it was all St. Louis for Perron. “All I know is how much I respect the team and ‘Army’ and Tom to basically in way admit it was a mistake to expose me,” Perron said, referring to Armstrong and team owner Tom Stillman. “And trust that I’m gonna come back and be a good player for the team.” After all the moving around since the 2013 trade to Edmonton, getting a fouryear contract was an important part of the package for Perron. The end of the Vegas run was bumpy for Perron. He missed the final six games of the regular season because of an undisclosed injury. Just as he was getting back up to speed in the playoffs, he woke up with a 103-degree fever before Game 2 of the Western Conference finals, in Winnipeg. Perron was flown back to Las Vegas that morning. “They kept me away from the team because they didn’t want that to spread around to our star goalie, Marc-Andre Fleury, or something like that,” he said. He missed two games in the Jets’ series because of that illness and was a healthy scratch in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Finals. “It was a frustrating process but at the same time you’re winning games, it’s the best time of your life, so you keep grinding and you keep hoping it’s gonna come,” Perron said. As of last Sunday, that’s all behind him. With the trade for Ryan O’Reilly and the signing of Tyler Bozak, he sees the Blues loading up for another playoff run, and he’s eager to be a part of it. “Even if I didn’t come back with the Blues I wouldn’t say anything bad about them,” Perron said. “I’ve always loved the fans, the city, everything. I can’t get enough.” Obviously. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

ED is a medical condition caused by a range of medical conditions such as diabetes, prostate problems and vascular disease that requires professional attention and care like the medical treatment you’ll get from the doctors and staff at The St. Louis Men’s Clinic. At the St. Louis Men’s Clinic we create a custom treatment plan that uses state of the art medicine and technology to identify and treat what is impacting your sexual performance.

$

What we do. • Measure your testosterone and PSA levels via a blood test • Develop a customized ED treatment plan supervised by licensed Physicians • Deliver results on your first visit or no charge

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It is all we do. All day, everyday. Call/Visit our clinic today R-410A

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SINCE 1950


WORLD CUP

07.08.2018 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

NOTEBOOK Uruguay

Neymar: Brazil’s loss is saddest moment of career

0

WORLD CUP France

Brazil came to Russia with a strong team, a well-liked coach and a great star. Fans thought the Selecao would finally end its World Cup title drought. But again the five-time world champions are leaving empty handed, unable to make it to the semifinals four years after that humiliating 7-1 loss to Germany at its home World Cup. “I can say this is the saddest moment of my career,” said Neymar on Instagram. “There is a lot of pain because we knew we could go further and make history. But it wasn’t meant to be. It’s difficult to find strength to want to play soccer again, but I’m sure God will give me enough strength to face anything.” Neymar left fans the message on Saturday, a day after Brazil’s 2-1 loss to Belgium in the quarterfinals in Kazan. The 26-year-old forward, in his second World Cup, arrived with the responsibility to lead the Brazilians to the title, but the team didn’t get close. The highest paid player in the world sparkled at times on the field, scoring twice, but left the tournament marked mostly by his theatrics on the field. “I’m very happy to be a part of this team. I’m proud of everyone,” said Neymar, who hadn’t spoken publicly since the team’s elimination. “They interrupted our dream, but it lives on in our minds and hearts.” Brazil won the last of its five World Cup titles in 2002. The squad left Kazan on Saturday without talking to reporters. 48 in 2022? • The organizers of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar are open to talks about a 48-team tournament, and can see a format to host it alone. FIFA President Gianni Infantino’s wish to add 16 extra teams to the tournament was seen as pushing Qatar toward letting other states into a co-hosting plan at a time when some Persian Gulf neighbors enforced a hostile, year-long boycott of the tiny emirate. A senior Qatari official said a 48-team tournament could be staged using only the eight stadiums in and around Doha. “Yes, it’s doable, we just need to figure out how it is done,” said Nasser Al Khater. “If the format is done right, it could actually be an edition that is exciting.” A further barrier to 48 teams in Qatar is any format would add to the 28-day program already agreed to for NovemberDecember 2022, which is already a departure from the regular mid-year schedule. Europe’s top leagues have said it would be unacceptable for them to lose another weekend of play to add extra World Cup playing days. Associated Press

France

Brazil

2(3)

Croatia

2(4)

Sweden

0

England

2

Croatia

2 SEMIFINAL Tuesday, 1 p.m. KTVI

Russia

SEMIFINAL Wednesday, 1 p.m. KTVI

FINAL • Sunday, July 15, 10 a.m., KTVI

1 Belgium

England THIRD PLACE • Saturday, 9 a.m., KTVI

Belgium

2

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Croatia players race to join the party after Ivan Rakitic converted the winning penalty shot to end their match against Russia.

Croatia, England will square off in semifinal CUP • FROM B1

said. “He congratulated us on a very good game. He said what we showed on the field was great. I told him we were disappointed. He said we should have our eyes open and make the next steps.” The Croats hadn’t advanced to the semifinals at the World Cup since 1998, when the country made its first appear-

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ance. Croatia will next play England in the semifinals on Wednesday in Moscow. With the crowd silenced following an extra-time header from Croatia defender Domagoj Vida in the 101st minute, Russia defender Mario Fernandes scored with his own header in the 115th to send the match to yet another penalty shootout. Fernandes, who was born in Brazil but rejected a chance to play for that country’s national team in 2011, sent his penalty kick wide of the net in the shootout, giving Croatia the advantage. Both goalkeepers made early saves in the shootout, with an injured Danijel Subasic stopping the opening shot from Fyodor Smolov. Igor Akinfeev later blocked an attempt from Mateo Kovacic. At 1-1, Fernandes missed his shot — only the second player to miss in any of the four shootouts at this year’s World Cup. The teams then traded two scores each before Ivan Rakitic calmly converted the winning penalty. “We should have finished the job before penalties but maybe it’s written in the stars we have to go through the extra drama,” said Luka Modric, whose penalty bounced off Akinfeev’s hand and the post before entering the other side of the net. England 2, Sweden 0 • England achieved something David Beckham’s generation never managed: It reached the semifinals of the World Cup. Harry Maguire and Dele Alli scored with headers in a win over Sweden in Samara, earning England’s youthful team a semifinal berth. “We looked composed,” England captain Harry Kane said. “We looked like we controlled the game.” England’s fairly muted celebrations reflected the routine nature of the victory

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over a hard-working Swedish side that had already gone further than expected in its first major tournament without Zlatan Ibrahimovic. England’s deep run also is a surprise. Not even the side with stars like Beckham, Steven Gerrard and Wayne Rooney ever got this far at a major tournament. The 1966 World Cup champions last reached the semifinals in 1990, losing the first of a series of haunting penalty shootouts. In 2014, the team didn’t even make it out of the group stage. Yet the performances of Gareth Southgate’s squad — the second youngest at the tournament — are being celebrated wildly back home. Even at Wimbledon, the home of lawn tennis, updates of England’s goals were spread by fans watching or listening to the match on their cell phones. “I know the fans here are enjoying it,” Kane said. “The fans at home, I’m sure we’ll see some videos tonight of them enjoying it.” The chant of “On our way, on our way, to Moscow, on our way” came from England fans in one corner of the Samara Arena throughout the match, and the team’s march to the Russian capital is being fuelled by goals from set pieces. There was another against Sweden, with Maguire heading in a driven corner from Ashley Young in the 30th minute. It was England’s eighth set-piece goal of its 11 in Russia, and the center back’s first in international soccer. The standard of England’s crossing has particularly stood out this tournament, and Alli added the second goal by meeting a far-post cross from midfielder Jesse Lingard with a powerful header in the 59th. At 22, Alli became the second-youngest scorer for England at a World Cup behind Michael Owen.

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

ED is a medical condition caused by a range of medical conditions such as diabetes, prostate problems and vascular disease that requires professional attention and care like the medical treatment you’ll get from the doctors and staff at The St. Louis Men’s Clinic. At the St. Louis Men’s Clinic we create a custom treatment plan that uses state of the art medicine and technology to identify and treat what is impacting your sexual performance.

$

What we do. • Measure your testosterone and PSA levels via a blood test • Develop a customized ED treatment plan supervised by licensed Physicians • Deliver results on your first visit or no charge

10 Year Parts Warranty!

It is all we do. All day, everyday. Call/Visit our clinic today R-410A

2,895 Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of $1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

Expires Expires5/15/15 7/31/18

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

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GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM 314-993-1110

SINCE 1950


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Milwaukee

53 35 .602

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home Away

7-3 W-5

29-17

24-18

Chicago

49 36

.576

7-3

L-1

26-15

23-21

Cardinals

45 42

.517

4 4-6

L-1

23-22

22-20

Pittsburgh

40 47 .460 12½

9 4-6

L-4

21-22

19-25

Cincinnati

39 49 .443

14

7-3 W-2

21-26

18-23

EAST

W

GB WCGB L10

L

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

Pct

10½

Philadelphia 48 37 .565

Atlanta

49 38 .563

- 4-6

Washington

44 43 .506

5

5

New York

35 49

Miami

36 54 .400 14½

.417 12½

Str Home Away

7-3 W-5

30-16

18-21

L-4

23-17

26-21

3-7 W-2

21-23

23-20

12½ 4-6 W-2

15-26 20-23

14½ 4-6

19-26

17-28

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Cleveland

49 37 .570

— 6-4 W-5

Minnesota

37 48 .435

11½

17½

Detroit

39

51 .433

12

18

Chicago

30 58 .341

20

Kansas City

25 62 .287 24½ L

Pct

Str Home Away 28-13

21-24

3-7 W-2

22-20

15-28

3-7

W-1

24-22

15-29

26

3-7

L-3

16-27

14-31

30½

2-8

L-7

11-33

14-29

EAST

W

Boston

60 29 .674

GB WCGB L10 —

Str Home Away 28-12

32-17

New York

56 29 .659

2

— 6-4

L-1

33-13

23-16

Tampa Bay

43 44 .494

16

12½ 6-4

L-2

23-17

20-27

8-2 W-4

Toronto

41 46

.471

18

14½

5-5

W-1

24-23

17-23

Baltimore

24 63 .276

35

31½

1-9

L-4

12-29

12-34

WEST

W

GB WCGB L10

Houston

59

31 .656

7-3 W-4

27-17

32-14

Seattle

56 32 .636

2

9-1

30-15

26-17

W

L

Pct

Arizona

49 40

.551

— 4-6 W-1

25-22

24-18

Los Angeles

47 39 .547

½

1½ 6-4 W-4

26-23

21-16

5-5 W-1

27-15

19-29

Oakland

48 40 .545

10

8

8-2

L-1

24-21

24-19

5 6-4 W-3

18-22

26-21

Los Angeles 44 44 .500

14

12

3-7

L-1

20-21

24-23

19-25

19-27

Texas

39 50 .438 19½

17½

5-5

L-1

19-28

20-22

.511

Colorado

44 43 .506

4

San Diego

38 52 .422 11½

ROUNDUP Reds end Cubs’ ASSOCIATED PRESS six-game win streak Tyler Mahle tossed one-run ball into the seventh inning and the visiting Cincinnati Reds edged the Cubs 3-2 on Friday for their fifth straight victory over Chicago. Adam Duvall and Scooter Gennett drove in runs as the Reds won for the 14th time in 18 games and ended the Cubs’ six-game winning streak. Billy Hamilton, Cincinnati’s No. 9 hitter, had three hits and leadoff man Jose Peraza had two. Mahle (7-6) allowed five hits and struck out four over 6 2/3 innings to win his fourth straight decision. In his last seven starts, the 23-year-old has a 2.06 ERA. Raisel Iglesias, Cincinnati’s third reliever, got the final five outs for his 17th save in 20 chances. Nationals 3, Marlins 2 • Pinch-hitter Mark Reynolds led off the bottom of the ninth inning with a home run that lifted Washington past visiting Miami. Brewers 5, Braves 4 • Jesus Aguilar hit his 20th homer, rookie Freddy Peralta pitched six sharp innings and surging Milwaukee held off visiting Atlanta. Phillies 17, Pirates 5 • Odubel Herrera and Andrew Knapp hit three-run homers, rookie Scott Kingery had a career-high four hits, and Philadelphia won in Pittsburgh. D’backs 3, Padres 1 • Zack Godley pitched six effective innings in his 10th win this season, helping Arizona beat visiting San Diego.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Blue Jays 6, Yankees 2 • Justin Smoak hit a three-run homer, Yangervis Solarte reached base four times and Toronto beat visiting New York. Indians 10, Athletics 4 • Carlos Carrasco returned from the disabled list — and returned to the win column — as Jose Ramirez and Edwin Encarnacion drove in three runs apiece, leading Cleveland over visiting Oakland for their fifth straight victory. Tigers 3, Rangers 1 • Jordan Zimmermann denied Bartolo Colon’s bid at baseball history, striking out 11 batters in eight innings as Detroit beat visiting Texas. Colon was trying to become the winningest Latin-American pitcher in major league history. He remains tied with Dennis Martinez with 245 career victories. Twins 6, Orioles 2 • Lance Lynn bounced back from two poor starts, Max Kepler homered and Minnesota beat visiting Baltimore. Astros 11, White Sox 4 • Lance McCullers struck out a career-high 12 in seven strong innings and Evan Gattis hit a three-run homer as Houston beat visiting Chicago. Red Sox 10, Royals 5 • Chris Sale struck out 12 in six innings, Mookie Betts, J.D. Martinez and Xander Bogaerts homered, and Boston won in Kansas City.

INTERLEAGUE Mets 5, Rays 1 • Jose Bautista’s grand slam with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning lifted New York over visiting Tampa Bay. Associated Press

4½ 12½

3-7

Str Home Away

CENTRAL

WEST

San Francisco 46 44

GB WCGB L10

L-2

Friday San Francisco 3, Cardinals 2 Cincinnati 3, Cubs 2 Washington 3, Miami 2 Philadelphia 17, Pittsburgh 5 NY Mets 5, Tampa Bay 1 Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 4 Arizona 3, San Diego 1 LA Dodgers at LA Angels, late Colorado at Seattle, late Thursday Washington 14, Miami 12 Milwaukee 7, Atlanta 2 San Diego 6, Arizona 3 Cardinals 11, San Francisco 2

L-1

L

Pct

Str Home Away W-1

Saturday’s Sunday’s pitching matchups

BOX SCORES Brewers merged 5, Braves 4

Nationals 3, Marlins 2

Indians 10, Athletics 4

Twins 6, Orioles 2

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 2 1 0 0 2 1 .251 Albies 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .280 Freeman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .304 Markakis rf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .324 Suzuki c 2 1 0 0 2 0 .281 Camargo 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .256 Acuna lf 3 0 1 1 0 2 .264 1-Culberson pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Swanson ss 3 0 2 2 1 0 .248 Foltynewicz p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .067 a-Santana ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Biddle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 c-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Totals 31 4 9 3 5 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .243 Jeffress p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yelich cf-rf 3 1 0 0 0 1 .286 Aguilar 1b 4 1 3 3 0 1 .307 Shaw 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .236 Miller 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .268 Villar 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Pina c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .227 Saladino ss 3 1 1 2 0 0 .320 Peralta p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .667 b-Broxton ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .172 Totals 31 5 7 5 0 10 Atlanta 100 000 300 — 4 9 0 Milwaukee 005 000 00x — 5 7 2 a-struck out for Foltynewicz in the 7th. b-struck out for Jennings in the 7th. c-struck out for Biddle in the 9th. 1-ran for Acuna in the 7th. E: Yelich (3), Miller (7). LOB: Atlanta 5, Milwaukee 3. 2B: Albies (29), Freeman (22), Aguilar (14). HR: Saladino (4), off Foltynewicz; Aguilar (20), off Foltynewicz. RBIs: Acuna (19), Swanson 2 (34), Aguilar 3 (59), Saladino 2 (11). CS: Inciarte (8), Swanson (2). RLISP: Atlanta 3 (Albies 2, Suzuki); Milwaukee 1 (Shaw). GIDP: Suzuki, Camargo. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Shaw, Miller, Aguilar), (Saladino, Aguilar). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Foltynewicz, L, 6-5 6 6 5 5 0 7 105 2.37 Biddle 2 1 0 0 0 3 31 2.43 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peralta, W, 4-1 6 3 1 1 3 6 99 2.14 Barnes 0 4 3 3 1 0 12 3.27 Jennings, 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.30 Jeffress, 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 1.05 Knebel, S, 11-13 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.18 Barnes pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Jennings 2-0. HBP: Foltynewicz (Yelich). Umpires: Home, James Hoye; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T: 2:47. A: 31,452 .

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Castro 2b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .297 Anderson rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .284 Realmuto c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .305 Prado 3b 2 0 0 1 2 0 .190 Bour 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .235 Cooper lf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .300 Rojas ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .257 Maybin cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .228 Straily p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .158 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Steckenrider p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Dietrich ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .288 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 9 2 5 6 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .282 Soto lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .305 Rendon 3b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .281 Harper cf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .211 Adams 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .290 Eaton rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .304 Difo 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .249 Kieboom c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .217 b-Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Severino c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .170 Gonzalez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .034 Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Goodwin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .179 Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Reynolds ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .257 Totals 31 3 8 3 5 2 Miami 001 010 000 — 2 9 1 Washington 000 200 001 — 3 8 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Kintzler in the 7th. b-flied out for Kieboom in the 8th. c-struck out for Steckenrider in the 9th. d-homered for Doolittle in the 9th. E: Realmuto (4). LOB: Miami 8, Washington 9. 2B: Castro (21). HR: Reynolds (8), off Barraclough. RBIs: Castro (32), Prado (7), Eaton (12), Difo (23), Reynolds (14). SB: Eaton (1). CS: Anderson (2), Turner (5). S: Straily. RLISP: Miami 3 (Realmuto, Cooper 2); Washington 4 (Difo, Gonzalez, Murphy 2). GIDP: Bour, Maybin 2. DP: Washington 4 (Kieboom, Difo), (Turner, Adams), (Rendon, Adams), (Turner, Difo, Adams). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily 6 5 2 2 3 1 111 4.55 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 4.71 Steckenrider 1 1 0 0 2 0 25 3.03 Barraclough, L, 0-3 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 1.41 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez 5 8 2 2 4 4 114 3.76 Miller 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 3.42 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.93 Madson 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 4.40 Doolittle, W, 3-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 1.45 Umpires: Home, Mike DiMuro; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, John Tumpane. T: 3:13. A: 32,652 .

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 3 1 2 2 0 1 .259 a-Pinder ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Canha lf-cf 4 0 3 1 0 1 .264 Lowrie 2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .290 Davis dh 4 0 1 0 0 3 .239 Olson 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .240 Piscotty rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Chapman 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .244 Semien ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .252 Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Totals 35 4 11 4 1 11 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 3 2 0 1 0 .300 Brantley lf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .308 Ramirez 3b 4 2 2 3 0 1 .296 Encarnacion dh 2 2 2 3 0 0 .230 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .255 Kipnis 2b 1 0 1 1 2 0 .218 1-Gonzalez pr-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .288 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Naquin rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Allen cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .209 Totals 30 10 10 9 3 4 Oakland 110 010 100 — 4 11 1 Cleveland 013 020 40x — 10 10 0 a-popped out for Fowler in the 7th. 1-ran for Kipnis in the 6th. E: Lucroy (7). LOB: Oakland 6, Cleveland 2. 2B: Canha (14), Olson (15), Brantley 2 (22), Ramirez (25), Encarnacion (11). HR: Fowler (6), off Carrasco; Olson (19), off Carrasco. RBIs: Fowler 2 (19), Canha (33), Olson (45), Brantley (49), Ramirez 3 (59), Encarnacion 3 (61), Alonso (48), Kipnis (35). SB: Lindor (12), Ramirez (18), Kipnis (3), Allen (5). CS: Canha (1). SF: Encarnacion 2, Alonso. RLISP: Oakland 3 (Lowrie, Davis 2); Cleveland 1 (Allen). GIDP: Piscotty, Gomes. DP: Oakland 1 (Chapman, Lowrie, Olson); Cleveland 1 (Lindor, Alonso). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blackburn, L, 2-3 4 7 6 5 1 3 72 7.16 Petit 2 0 0 0 1 1 20 3.78 2/ Pagan 1 0 29 3.68 3 3 4 4 1/ Casilla 3 3.49 3 0 0 0 0 0 Hatcher 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 4.71 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carrasco, W, 9-5 51/3 7 3 3 0 7 96 4.28 1/ 6 7.71 Rzepczynski, 3 1 0 0 0 0 2/ McAllister, 1 0 0 14 5.82 3 2 1 1/ 6 0.79 Perez, 3 0 0 0 0 0 1/ Ramirez, 1 1 10 2.00 3 1 0 0 Otero 2 0 0 0 0 3 29 5.51 Blackburn pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Petit 1-1, Perez 2-0, Ramirez 2-1. HBP: Carrasco (Lowrie). WP: Blackburn, Pagan. Umpires: Home, Sean Barber; First, Stu Scheurwater; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Gary Cederstrom. T: 3:16. A: 34,633 .

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham 3b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .218 Jones cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Machado ss 4 1 2 0 1 0 .310 Trumbo dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .261 Davis 1b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .153 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .208 Mancini lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .227 Rickard rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Joseph c 4 1 3 0 0 1 .193 Totals 37 2 11 1 2 4 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .258 Rosario lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .310 Dozier 2b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .218 Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Morrison 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .191 Polanco ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .333 Kepler rf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .223 Cave cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .264 Garver c 2 0 2 0 1 0 .266 Totals 34 6 11 5 1 8 Baltimore 000 001 100 — 2 11 1 Minnesota 300 300 00x — 6 11 1 E: Beckham (5), Morrison (3). LOB: Baltimore 10, Minnesota 5. HR: Kepler (9), off Bundy. RBIs: Davis (25), Mauer (22), Dozier (35), Polanco (2), Kepler 2 (32). RLISP: Baltimore 5 (Machado, Trumbo, Mancini, Rickard 2); Minnesota 1 (Dozier). GIDP: Schoop, Mauer. DP: Baltimore 1 (Davis, Machado); Minnesota 1 (Polanco, Dozier, Morrison). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy, L, 6-8 31/3 9 6 5 1 2 61 4.08 Fry 21/3 0 0 0 0 4 23 0.00 Wright Jr. 11/3 2 0 0 0 2 26 4.93 Givens 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.70 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn, W, 6-7 6 6 1 1 2 3 105 5.21 Pressly 1 3 1 1 0 0 17 3.89 Belisle 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 6.52 Rodney 1 2 0 0 0 1 18 2.97 Inherited runners-scored: Fry 2-0. Umpires: Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Nick Mahrley; Second, Jordan Baker; Third, Jerry Layne. T: 2:51. A: 27,570 .

Reds 3, Cubs 2 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .277 Gennett 2b 3 1 0 1 1 1 .328 Votto 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .294 Suarez 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .308 Duvall lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .204 Schebler rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Casali c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .343 Mahle p 2 0 0 0 1 2 .111 Lorenzen p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Crockett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hamilton cf 3 1 3 0 1 0 .222 Totals 32 3 9 2 4 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Almora cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .328 Farrell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Caratini ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Heyward rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .281 Baez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .285 Rizzo 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .252 Zobrist 2b 2 0 0 1 1 0 .293 Schwarber lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .248 Contreras c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .287 Russell ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Montgomery p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .063 a-La Stella ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Edwards p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Happ ph-cf 1 0 1 0 1 0 .256 Totals 33 2 8 2 3 5 Cincinnati 000 210 000 — 3 9 1 Chicago 000 010 010 — 2 8 0 a-advanced on catcher interference for Montgomery in the 5th. b-walked for Edwards in the 7th. c-grounded out for Wilson in the 9th. E: Casali (2). LOB: Cincinnati 9, Chicago 9. 2B: Contreras (19). RBIs: Gennett (58), Duvall (54), Almora (28), Zobrist (33). SB: Peraza (15), Zobrist (2). CS: Hamilton (4). SF: Gennett, Zobrist. RLISP: Cincinnati 5 (Peraza, Votto, Suarez, Duvall, Mahle); Chicago 4 (Almora, Heyward, Schwarber, Contreras). GIDP: Schebler, Casali, Contreras. DP: Cincinnati 1 (Peraza, Gennett, Votto); Chicago 2 (Zobrist, Russell, Rizzo), (Zobrist, Russell, Rizzo). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mahle, W, 7-6 62/3 5 1 1 2 4 102 3.66 2/ Lorenzen, 3 1 1 1 0 1 11 2.36 Crockett 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2.45 2/ Iglesias, S, 17-20 1 3 1 0 0 1 0 35 2.52 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Montgomery, L, 3-3 5 6 3 3 2 2 85 3.68 Rosario 12/3 2 0 0 1 1 28 1.66 1/ 4 2.84 Edwards 3 00 0 0 1 Farrell 11/3 1 0 0 1 1 26 4.32 2/ 9 3.03 Wilson 3 00 0 0 2 Crockett pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Lorenzen 2-0, Crockett 1-0, Iglesias 2-1, Edwards 1-0, Wilson 1-0. HBP: Montgomery 2 (Suarez,Votto). Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Tripp Gibson; Third, Brian Gorman. T: 3:09. A: 41,434 .

Blue Jays 6, Yankees 2 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .251 Judge rf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .277 Hicks cf 3 1 1 2 1 0 .260 Stanton dh 3 0 0 0 1 3 .264 Gregorius ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Andujar 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .282 Bird 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .194 Romine c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .273 Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .185 Totals 33 2 5 2 5 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson dh 5 1 1 1 0 1 .246 Hernandez lf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .260 Solarte 3b 4 1 3 0 1 0 .256 Smoak 1b 3 1 2 3 1 0 .234 Pillar cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Martin c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .175 Grichuk rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .206 Diaz ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .239 Travis 2b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .232 Totals 35 6 11 6 3 5 New York 001 010 000 — 2 5 1 Toronto 050 000 01x — 6 11 1 E: Andujar (5), Solarte (5). LOB: New York 9, Toronto 9. 2B: Hernandez (20), Grichuk (10), Diaz (10). HR: Hicks (16), off Gaviglio; Smoak (12), off Gray. RBIs: Hicks 2 (42), Granderson (28), Hernandez (35), Smoak 3 (45), Travis (18). SB: Gardner (8), Pillar (11). RLISP: New York 4 (Gregorius 3, Romine); Toronto 5 (Solarte, Martin 4). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray, L, 5-7 2 6 5 5 2 4 62 5.85 Hale 52/3 5 1 1 1 1 75 4.61 1/ 0 0 0 3 4.80 Shreve 3 0 0 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Gaviglio 4 3 4 2 1 3 6 101 3.81 Biagini, W, 1-5 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 22 6.18 1/ 0 1 1 16 3.90 Loup, 3 0 0 2/ Oh, 0 0 1 12 3.15 3 0 0 Axford, 1 1 0 0 1 2 23 4.17 Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 3.02 Inherited runners-scored: Shreve 1-0, Biagini 3-0, Oh 1-0. HBP: Gray (Pillar). WP: Gray 2. Umpires: Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Lance Barrett; Second, John Libka; Third, Bill Welke. T: 3:07. A: 37,254 .

Friday Toronto 6, NY Yankees 2 NY Mets 5, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 3, Texas 1 Cleveland 10, Oakland 4 Houston 11, White Sox 4 Minnesota 6, Baltimore 2 Boston 10, Kansas City 5 LA Dodgers at LA Angels, late Colorado at Seattle, late Thursday Texas 7, Detroit 5 Minnesota 5, Baltimore 2 Houston 4, White Sox 3 Seattle 4, LA Angels 1

Mets 5, Rays 1 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .147 Duffy 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .310 Bauers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Ramos c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .287 1-Wood pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sucre c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Wendle lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Robertson 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .265 M.Smith rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .275 Adames ss 4 1 1 1 0 2 .231 Stanek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Field ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Yarbrough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Cron ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .239 Kolarek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Castillo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Gomez ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .195 Alvarado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Roe p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 1 5 1 2 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nimmo cf 4 2 0 0 1 1 .260 Bautista rf 3 1 1 4 2 0 .225 Cabrera 2b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .283 Conforto lf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .224 Flores 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Frazier 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .224 Mesoraco c 3 1 2 0 1 1 .234 Rosario ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .238 deGrom p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .081 Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-D.Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .218 Totals 32 5 6 5 5 11 Tampa Bay 000 010 000 — 1 5 2 New York 001 000 004 — 5 6 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Stanek in the 3rd. b-walked for Yarbrough in the 5th. c-hit by pitch for Castillo in the 8th. d-grounded out for Familia in the 9th. 1-ran for Ramos in the 9th. E: Duffy (7), Adames (3). LOB: Tampa Bay 7, New York 7. 2B: Kiermaier (2), Frazier (8). 3B: M.Smith (5). HR: Adames (3), off deGrom; Bautista (6), off Roe. RBIs: Adames (8), Bautista 4 (23), Cabrera (49). SB: Gomez (5), Bautista (2). CS: Robertson (2). S: Rosario. RLISP: Tampa Bay 5 (Duffy, Ramos, Adames 3); New York 3 (Flores 2, Mesoraco). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek 2 1 0 0 1 4 36 1.84 Yarbrough 2 1 1 0 2 3 35 3.75 Kolarek 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Castillo 2 1 0 0 0 2 21 1.50 2/ 0 0 1 11 2.78 3 0 0 Alvarado Roe, L, 1-2 1 2 4 4 2 0 15 3.60 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA deGrom 8 4 1 1 1 8 105 1.79 Familia, W, 4-4 1 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.19 Kolarek pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Castillo 1-0, Roe 1-0. HBP: deGrom (Gomez), Familia (Robertson). Umpires: Home, Brian Knight; First, Nic Lentz; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Gerry Davis. T: 2:43. A: 24,236 .

Tigers 3, Rangers 1 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .291 Andrus ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Mazara rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .271 Beltre 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .297 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .229 Chirinos c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .207 Guzman 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .245 Rua lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .192 DeShields cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Totals 30 1 5 1 0 12 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .221 Castellanos rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Goodrum 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .237 Martinez dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .242 Adduci 1b 3 1 0 0 0 1 .250 McCann c 3 1 1 2 0 0 .224 Rodriguez 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .194 Iglesias ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Reyes lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Totals 29 3 5 3 0 3 Texas 100 000 000 — 1 5 0 Detroit 020 000 01x — 3 5 0 LOB: Texas 3, Detroit 2. HR: Choo (17), off Zimmermann; McCann (5), off Colon; Jones (7), off Colon. RBIs: Choo (42), Jones (22), McCann 2 (25). CS: DeShields (3). S: Rua. RLISP: Texas 1 (DeShields); Detroit 1 (Jones). Texas IPHRERBBSONP ERA Colon, L, 5-6 8 5 3 3 0 3 974.65 Detroit IPHRERBBSONP ERA Zimmermann, W, 4-0 8 4 1 1 0 11 96 3.51 Jimenez, S, 3-6 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.85 Umpires: Home, Ed Hickox; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Chris Segal; Third, Gabe Morales. T: 2:05. A: 27,316 .

Red Sox 10, Royals 5 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .336 Benintendi lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .281 Swihart lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .175 Martinez dh 5 2 2 2 0 1 .328 Pearce 1b 5 2 3 1 0 0 .309 Bogaerts ss 3 2 1 2 2 0 .276 Holt 2b 5 0 2 2 0 0 .297 Nunez 3b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .256 Leon c 4 0 1 1 0 0 .248 Bradley Jr. cf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .203 Totals 41 10 15 10 2 4 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield cf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .290 Herrera rf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .250 Moustakas 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .258 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .215 Butera c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Bonifacio lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .292 Dozier dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .219 Duda 1b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .246 Escobar ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .193 Mondesi 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .217 Totals 37 5 10 5 1 12 Boston 440 000 011 — 10 15 1 Kansas City 010 000 121 — 5 10 0 E: Bradley Jr. (3). LOB: Boston 6, Kansas City 6. 2B: Pearce 2 (10), Nunez (15), Bradley Jr. (13), Merrifield (25), Bonifacio (2). 3B: Duda (1). HR: Betts (22), off Hammel; Martinez (27), off Hammel; Bogaerts (14), off Hammel; Moustakas (17), off Workman. RBIs: Betts (43), Martinez 2 (73), Pearce (18), Bogaerts 2 (49), Holt 2 (21), Leon (17), Bradley Jr. (26), Merrifield (28), Moustakas 2 (55), Escobar (19), Mondesi (5). RLISP: Boston 4 (Betts, Nunez 2, Bradley Jr.); Kansas City 2 (Herrera, Mondesi). GIDP: Nunez. DP: Kansas City 1 (Mondesi, Escobar, Duda). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale, W, 9-4 6 5 1 1 1 12 99 2.36 Thornburg 1 1 1 1 0 0 18 9.00 Workman 1 2 2 2 0 0 17 2.08 Velazquez 1 2 1 1 0 0 23 2.82 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel, L, 2-11 2 9 8 8 1 0 58 6.16 Smith 4 2 0 0 0 3 50 5.40 Flynn 21/3 4 2 2 0 1 45 4.08 2/ Maurer 1 0 15 9.00 3 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Maurer 1-0. WP: Maurer. Umpires: Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T: 2:59. A: 24,673 .

Astros 11, White Sox 4 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Moncada 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .230 Sanchez 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .258 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .262 A.Garcia rf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .279 Palka lf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .231 Davidson dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .228 Smith c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .324 L.Garcia ss 3 0 0 0 0 3 .275 Engel cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .226 Totals 31 4 5 4 1 13 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf-rf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .249 Bregman 3b 3 2 1 1 1 1 .279 Altuve 2b 4 2 3 0 1 0 .337 Gurriel 1b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .300 Reddick rf-lf 4 1 2 1 1 0 .271 Gattis dh 4 2 3 4 1 1 .253 Gonzalez ss 4 1 0 0 1 0 .226 Federowicz c 5 1 2 2 0 1 .263 Kemp lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .295 Marisnick cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Totals 35 11 13 10 6 4 Chicago 000 001 003 — 4 5 1 Houston 001 200 17x — 11 13 0 E: A.Garcia (2). LOB: Chicago 2, Houston 9. 2B: Gattis (14), Federowicz (3). HR: A.Garcia (8), off Peacock; Palka (11), off Peacock; Gattis (18), off Santiago. RBIs: Sanchez (41), A.Garcia 2 (15), Palka (29), Bregman (55), Gurriel 2 (42), Reddick (26), Gattis 4 (61), Federowicz 2 (2). SB: Reddick (5), Kemp (4). SF: Gurriel. RLISP: Houston 7 (Bregman, Gurriel, Reddick, Gonzalez 3, Federowicz). GIDP: Abreu, Gurriel. DP: Chicago 1 (L.Garcia, Moncada, Abreu); Houston 1 (Gonzalez, Altuve, Gurriel). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lopez, L, 4-6 42/3 6 3 3 5 2 97 3.77 Volstad 12/3 1 1 1 0 1 20 4.95 2/ Avilan 7 4.05 3 10 0 0 0 Santiago 1 5 7 6 1 1 24 5.29 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCullers, W, 10-3 7 3 1 1 0 12 93 3.41 Peacock, S, 2-4 2 2 3 3 1 1 37 2.84 Inherited runners-scored: Volstad 2-0, Avilan 2-1. HBP: McCullers (Smith), Lopez (Bregman), Volstad (Gurriel). Umpires: Home, Alan Porter; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Todd Tichenor. T: 2:55. A: 38,153 .

Phillies 17, Pirates 5 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 5 3 3 0 0 1 .268 c-Alfaro ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Hoskins lf 5 3 3 2 2 0 .256 Herrera cf 6 2 2 4 1 2 .277 Santana 1b 3 2 1 3 2 0 .224 N.Williams rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .238 a-Cozens ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .118 Kingery ss 5 3 4 1 1 1 .235 Knapp c 4 2 2 3 1 1 .232 Franco 3b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .263 Altherr rf 0 1 0 0 2 0 .173 Leiter Jr. p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Pivetta p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Valentin 3b-2b 4 1 1 2 0 2 .216 Totals 44 17 18 17 10 12 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bell 1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .253 Marte cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .269 Polanco rf 4 2 1 0 1 2 .231 Moran 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .262 Luplow lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 1.000 Diaz c 2 0 0 1 1 0 .297 b-Stallings ph-c 1 0 0 0 1 1 .167 Dickerson lf 4 0 3 1 0 1 .309 d-Meadows ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Harrison 2b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .265 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Freese 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .263 T.Williams p 0 0 0 0 1 0 .074 Brault p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Moroff ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Totals 39 5 12 5 4 8 Philadelphia 023 002 703 — 17 18 1 Pittsburgh 102 100 001 — 5 12 1 a-struck out for Hunter in the 7th. b-struck out for Diaz in the 7th. c-struck out for Hernandez in the 9th. d-struck out for Glasnow in the 9th. E: Kingery (8), Harrison (3). LOB: Philadelphia 13, Pittsburgh 13. 2B: Hoskins (21), Santana (17), Knapp (4), Franco (12), Valentin (4), Bell (18), Polanco (21), Harrison (7). 3B: Dickerson (4). HR: Herrera (15), off T.Williams; Knapp (4), off Smoker. RBIs: Hoskins 2 (55), Herrera 4 (51), Santana 3 (51), Kingery (25), Knapp 3 (14), Franco 2 (40), Valentin 2 (6), Marte (37), Moran (34), Diaz (23), Dickerson (34), Harrison (21). SB: Marte 3 (21), Harrison (3). SF: Santana. RLISP: Philadelphia 7 (Herrera, Knapp 2, Pivetta 3, Cozens); Pittsburgh 7 (Moran 2, Mercer 2, Moroff 2, Freese). DP: Philadelphia 1 (Santana, Kingery); Pittsburgh 1 (Bell, Mercer, T.Williams). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pivetta 22/3 5 3 1 2 2 74 4.62 Davis 12/3 3 1 1 0 1 34 4.15 2/ Ramos, W, 3-0 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.21 Hunter, H, 16 1 1 0 0 1 0 19 4.67 Neshek 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Leiter Jr. 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.72 Morgan 1 2 1 1 1 2 22 5.32 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Williams, L, 6-7 21/3 5 5 5 2 0 51 4.60 Brault 22/3 1 0 0 1 2 47 4.65 2/ Rodriguez 1 28 2.67 3 2 2 2 3 2/ 1 2 30 11.85 Neverauskas 3 3 4 4 2/ Smoker 2 1 31 11.12 3 2 3 3 Glasnow 2 5 3 3 1 6 49 5.06 Inherited runners-scored: Davis 2-0, Ramos 1-0, Brault 2-0, Neverauskas 3-0, Smoker 2-2. HBP: Pivetta (Harrison), T.Williams (Hernandez), Brault (Knapp), Leiter Jr. (Marte). WP: Brault, Pivetta, Rodriguez, Neshek, Glasnow. Umpires: Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Roberto Ortiz; Third, Chad Fairchild. T: 4:30. A: 24,846 (38,362).

Diamondbacks 3, Padres 1 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jankowski lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .278 Asuaje 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .217 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Renfroe rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .245 Villanueva 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .226 Margot cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Galvis ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Hedges c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Lucchesi p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .063 Cimber p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Myers ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Erlin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 31 1 5 1 1 8 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peralta lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Ahmed ss 4 2 2 0 0 0 .230 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .273 Pollock cf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .282 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .160 Marte 2b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .242 Murphy c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .248 Owings 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .191 Godley p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .097 Hirano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 3 6 3 3 7 San Diego 001 000 000 — 1 5 0 Arizona 000 002 01x — 3 6 1 a-grounded out for Cimber in the 7th. b-struck out for Hirano in the 7th. E: Murphy (5). LOB: San Diego 5, Arizona 8. 2B: Hedges (5), Ahmed (17), Goldschmidt (18). RBIs: Asuaje (15), Pollock (34), Souza Jr. 2 (3). SB: Villanueva (2), Souza Jr. (2). RLISP: San Diego 2 (Asuaje, Galvis); Arizona 6 (Souza Jr. 2, Murphy 2, Owings 2). GIDP: Myers. DP: Arizona 1 (Hirano, Marte, Goldschmidt). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lucchesi, L, 4-4 51/3 3 2 2 1 5 81 3.27 2/ 1 1 14 3.32 Cimber 3 00 0 Stammen 12/3 3 1 1 1 1 37 2.79 1/ Erlin 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.07 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Godley, W, 10-6 6 4 1 1 1 7 81 4.85 Hirano, 1 1 0 0 0 0 21 1.40 Bradley, 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.93 Boxberger, S, 21-25 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.45 Inherited runners-scored: Cimber 3-1, Erlin 3-0. HBP: Lucchesi 2 (Peralta,Pollock), Hirano (Hedges). Umpires: Home, Laz Diaz; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Jansen Visconti; Third, Jeff Nelson. T: 2:52. A: 25,128 .

NL

Pitcher

StL SF

Martinez (R) Samardzija (R) 3:05

Time W-L 5-4 1-4

3.20 6.56

Cin Chi

Harvey (R) Chatwood (R) 1:20

4-5 3-5

4.91 4.42

Phi Pit

Arrieta (R) Taillon (R)

5-6 5-6

3.54 4.05

Atl Mil

Sanchez (R) Wilkerson (R) 3:10

3:05

ERA

3-2 2.89 0-0 15.00

Mia Chen (L) Was Scherzer (R)

2-5 6:15 10-5

5.55 2.16

SD Ari

Ross (R) Ray (L)

9:10

5-6 3-1

3.78 4.89

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bal Gausman (R) Min Gibson (R)

1:10

4-6 2-6

4.05 3.58

NY Tor

13-2 3:07 10-4

1.98 4.03

Chi Shields (R) Hou Morton (R)

3-9 3:10 10-2

4.12 2.55

Tex Hamels (L) Det Fiers (R)

3:10

4-7 5-5

4.05 3.79

Oak Jackson (R) Cle Kluber (R)

1-0 3:10 12-4

2.13 2.64

Bos Price (L) KC Keller (R)

6:15

9-6 2-3

4.28 2.09

IL

Time W-L

ERA 3.25 3.30

Severino (R) Happ (L)

Pitcher

Col Freeland (L) Sea Paxton (L)

3:10

8-6 8-2

TB Snell (L) NYM Matz (L)

3:10

11-4 4-5

2.24 3.46

LAD Stripling (R) LAA McGuire (R)

6:15

6-2 0-1

2.27 7.56

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NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Almora, Chicago, .328; Gennett, Cincinnati, .328; Markakis, Atlanta, .324; Kemp, Los Angeles, .318; Arenado, Colorado, .312; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .309; Suarez, Cincinnati, .308; Aguilar, Milwaukee, .307; Realmuto, Miami, .305; Freeman, Atlanta, .304. RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 67; Blackmon, Colorado, 63; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 61; Pham, Cardinals, 59; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 58; Arenado, Colorado, 57; Baez, Chicago, 55; 4 tied at 54. RBI: Arenado, Colorado, 63; Suarez, Cincinnati, 63; Baez, Chicago, 61; Story, Colorado, 60; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 59; Gennett, Cincinnati, 58; Markakis, Atlanta, 58; Rizzo, Chicago, 58; Freeman, Atlanta, 57; 2 tied at 55. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 111; Albies, Atlanta, 105; Gennett, Cincinnati, 105; Castro, Miami, 104; Freeman, Atlanta, 102; Turner, Washington, 99; Anderson, Miami, 98; Arenado, Colorado, 96; Peraza, Cincinnati, 93; Story, Colorado, 93. DOUBLES: Albies, Atlanta, 29; Markakis, Atlanta, 27; Carpenter, Cardinals, 26; Rendon, Washington, 24; Story, Colorado, 23; Anderson, Miami, 22; Freeman, Atlanta, 22; McCutchen, San Francisco, 22; 6 tied at 21. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 8; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 8; Baez, Chicago, 6; Nimmo, New York, 6; Contreras, Chicago, 5; Story, Colorado, 5; 10 tied at 4. HOME RUNS: Arenado, Colorado, 22; Harper, Washington, 21; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 20; Muncy, Los Angeles, 20; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 19; Albies, Atlanta, 18; 5 tied at 17. STOLEN BASES: Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; MTaylor, Washington, 23; Turner, Washington, 22; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 21; Cain, Milwaukee, 16; Dyson, Arizona, 16; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 16; Baez, Chicago, 15; Peraza, Cincinnati, 15; Jankowski, San Diego, 14. PITCHING: Lester, Chicago, 11-2; Nola, Philadelphia, 11-2; Godley, Arizona, 10-6; Scherzer, Washington, 10-5; Greinke, Arizona, 9-5; Mikolas, Cardinals, 9-3; 5 tied at 8. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.80; Scherzer, Washington, 2.16; Lester, Chicago, 2.25; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.37; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.40; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.63; Guerra, Milwaukee, 2.88; Corbin, Arizona, 3.05; Newcomb, Atlanta, 3.11; Freeland, Colorado, 3.25. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 174; deGrom, New York, 142; Corbin, Arizona, 140; Gray, Colorado, 119; Nola, Philadelphia, 116; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 114; Greinke, Arizona, 112; Velasquez, Philadelphia, 107; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 106; Godley, Arizona, 99.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Altuve, Houston, .337; Betts, Boston, .336; Segura, Seattle, .332; Martinez, Boston, .328; Simmons, Los Angeles, .315; Machado, Baltimore, .310; Duffy, Tampa Bay, .310; Rosario, Minnesota, .310; Trout, Los Angeles, .309; Brantley, Cleveland, .308. RUNS: Lindor, Cleveland, 78; Betts, Boston, 67; Trout, Los Angeles, 67; Martinez, Boston, 62; Judge, New York, 61; Springer, Houston, 61; Ramirez, Cleveland, 60; Segura, Seattle, 60; Altuve, Houston, 59; Benintendi, Boston, 59. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 73; Haniger, Seattle, 62; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 61; Gattis, Houston, 61; Lowrie, Oakland, 59; Machado, Baltimore, 59; Ramirez, Cleveland, 59; KDavis, Oakland, 57; Judge, New York, 57; Mazara, Texas, 56. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 119; Segura, Seattle, 112; Castellanos, Detroit, 106; Martinez, Boston, 106; Lindor, Cleveland, 105; Rosario, Minnesota, 104; Machado, Baltimore, 103; AJones, Baltimore, 97; Lowrie, Oakland, 97; Ramirez, Cleveland, 96. DOUBLES: Escobar, Minnesota, 34; Bregman, Houston, 28; Abreu, Chicago, 27; Lindor, Cleveland, 27; Castellanos, Detroit, 26; Lowrie, Oakland, 25; Merrifield, Kansas City, 25; Pillar, Toronto, 25; Ramirez, Cleveland, 25; 2 tied at 24. TRIPLES: Sanchez, Chicago, 9; Hernandez, Toronto, 6; Benintendi, Boston, 5; Smith, Tampa Bay, 5; JJones, Detroit, 4; Moncada, Chicago, 4; Moreland, Boston, 4; Profar, Texas, 4; 11 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 27; Judge, New York, 24; Ramirez, Cleveland, 24; Trout, Los Angeles, 24; Lindor, Cleveland, 23; Betts, Boston, 22; Cruz, Seattle, 22; Gallo, Texas, 21; Machado, Baltimore, 21; Stanton, New York, 21. STOLEN BASES: Gordon, Seattle, 22; Anderson, Chicago, 20; Ramirez, Cleveland, 18; Benintendi, Boston, 16; RDavis, Cleveland, 16; DeShields, Texas, 16; Merrifield, Kansas City, 16; Betts, Boston, 15; Smith, Tampa Bay, 15; Segura, Seattle, 14. ERA: Severino, New York, 1.98; Verlander, Houston, 2.15; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.24; Sale, Boston, 2.36; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.45; Morton, Houston, 2.55; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.64; Skaggs, Los Angeles, 2.64; Cole, Houston, 2.70; Sabathia, New York, 3.02. STRIKEOUTS: Sale, Boston, 176; Cole, Houston, 158; Bauer, Cleveland, 156; Verlander, Houston, 154; Paxton, Seattle, 145; Severino, New York, 138; Morton, Houston, 133; Snell, Tampa Bay, 123; Kluber, Cleveland, 120; McCullers, Houston, 118.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W L

Milwaukee

53 36 .596

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away —

— 7-3 L-1

29-18

24-18 23-21

Chicago

50 36 .581 1½

— 8-2 W-1

27-15

Cardinals

46 42 .523 6½

4 4-6 W-1

23-22 23-20

Pittsburgh

40 48 .455 12½

10 3-7 L-5

21-23

19-25

Cincinnati

39 50 .438

14 11½ 6-4 L-1

21-26

18-24

EAST

W L

Philadelphia

49 37 .570

— 8-2 W-6 30-16

19-21

Atlanta

50 38 .568

— 5-5 W-1

23-17

27-21

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away

5

Washington

45 43

5 4-6 W-3

22-23 23-20

New York

35 50 .412 13½ 13½ 4-6 L-1

15-27 20-23

Miami

36 55 .396 15½ 15½ 4-6 L-3

19-26

WEST

W L

Arizona Los Angeles

49 40

M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

.511

17-29

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away .551

48 40 .545

— 4-6 W-1

25-22

½

2 6-4 W-1

26-23

24-18 22-17

Colorado

46 43

.517

3

4½ 8-2 W-5

18-22

28-21

San Francisco

46 45 .505

4

5½ 4-6 L-1

27-16

19-29

San Diego

38 52 .422 11½

13 3-7 L-1

19-25

19-27

Saturday Cardinals 3, San Francisco 2 Cubs 8, Cincinnati 7 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 Atlanta 5, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 5, Seattle 1 Tampa Bay 3, NY Mets 0 LA Dodgers 3, LA Angels 1 Washington 18, Miami 4 San Diego at Arizona, late Sunday Tampa Bay at NY Mets, 12:10 Miami at Washington, 12:35 Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 12:35 Atlanta at Milwaukee, 1:10 Cincinnati at Cubs, 1:20 Cardinals at San Francisco, 3:05 Colorado at Seattle, 3:10 San Diego at Arizona, 3:10 LA Dodgers at LA Angels, 7:05

CENTRAL

W L

Cleveland

49 38 .563

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home —

— 6-4 L-1

28-14

Away 21-24

Minnesota

38 48 .442 10½

16 4-6 W-3

23-20

15-28

Detroit

40 51 .440

11 16½ 4-6 W-2

25-22

15-29

Chicago

30 59

.337

20 25½ 2-8 L-4

16-27

14-32

Kansas City

25 62

.287

24 29½ 2-8 L-7

11-33

14-29

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

EAST

W L

Boston

60 29

— 8-2 W-4

28-12

32-17

New York

57 29 .663 1½

— 6-4 W-1

33-13

24-16

Tampa Bay

44 44 .500 15½

11 6-4 W-1

23-17

21-27

Toronto

41 47 .466 18½

14 4-6 L-1

24-24

17-23

Baltimore

24 64

.273 35½

31 1-9 L-5

12-29

12-35

WEST

W L

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

Houston

60 31 .659

Seattle

.674

— 7-3 W-5

28-17

32-14

56 34

.622 3½

— 7-3 L-2

30-17

26-17

Oakland

49 40

.551

10

6½ 8-2 W-1

24-21

25-19

Los Angeles

45 45 .500 14½

11 4-6 L-1

21-22

24-23

Texas

39 51

17 4-6 L-2

19-28

20-23

.433 20½

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Cubs rally for 4 in 8th to beat Reds

Athletics 6, Indians 3

Tigers 7, Rangers 2

Rockies 5, Mariners 1

Twins 5, Orioles 4

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 6 0 1 0 0 2 .255 Canha lf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .264 Lowrie 2b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .291 K.Davis dh 5 1 2 1 0 2 .242 Olson 1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .239 Piscotty rf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .252 Chapman 3b 4 1 4 0 1 0 .256 Semien ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Lucroy c 5 0 0 1 0 0 .249 Totals 43 6 12 6 2 5 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Allen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guyer rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .160 McAllister p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lindor ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .301 Brantley lf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .310 Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .293 Encarnacion dh-1b 4 0 0 1 1 0 .227 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .254 1-R.Davis pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Tomlin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kipnis 2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .216 Gonzalez 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Gomes c 5 1 1 0 0 1 .247 Naquin rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .264 G.Allen cf-rf-cf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .219 Totals 41 3 9 3 4 8 Oakland 000 000 030 03 — 6 12 1 Cleveland 110 001 000 00 — 3 9 1 1-ran for Alonso in the 8th. E: Jackson (2), Lindor (12). LOB: Oakland 7, Cleveland 9. 2B: Chapman 2 (14), Brantley (23), G.Allen (4). HR: Lowrie (15), off Ramirez; K.Davis (21), off Ramirez; Piscotty (8), off Tomlin. RBIs: Lowrie 2 (61), K.Davis (58), Piscotty 2 (38), Lucroy (25), Lindor (56), Encarnacion (62), G.Allen (5). SB: Chapman (1), Ramirez (19), G.Allen (6). CS: R.Davis (4). S: Semien. RLISP: Oakland 4 (Fowler, Olson, Lucroy 2); Cleveland 4 (Lindor, Alonso 3). GIDP: Fowler, Olson. DP: Cleveland 2 (Lindor, Ramirez, Alonso), (Encarnacion, Lindor). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson 52/3 5 3 2 4 3 98 2.45 Buchter 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 14 2.30 Trivino 2 3 0 0 0 3 30 1.41 Treinen, W, 5-1 2 0 0 0 0 2 24 0.81 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber 7 5 0 0 2 3 102 2.49 1/ Ramirez, 3 0 1 21 3.44 3 3 3 1/ Perez 0 0 1 0.77 3 0 0 0 McAllister 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 5.66 C.Allen 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.25 Tomlin, L, 0-5 1 3 3 3 0 0 29 6.89 Inherited runners-scored: Buchter 2-1, C.Allen 1-0. Umpires: Home, Stu Scheurwater; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Sean Barber. T: 3:49. A: 33,195 .

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .294 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Guzman 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Mazara rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .270 1-Tocci pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .069 Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .296 Kiner-Falefa 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Odor 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .234 Profar 1b-ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .247 Gallo lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .190 Chirinos c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .203 DeShields cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Totals 35 2 8 2 1 9 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mahtook lf 5 0 2 1 0 3 .211 Castellanos rf 4 1 1 1 1 2 .301 Goodrum 2b 4 1 4 0 1 0 .251 Hicks 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .284 Martinez dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .243 a-Reyes ph-dh 1 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Candelario 3b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .231 McCann c 5 0 0 0 0 3 .220 Iglesias ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .273 Jones cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .220 Totals 36 7 12 4 6 12 Texas 000 001 001 — 2 8 1 Detroit 700 000 00x — 7 12 0 a-singled for Martinez in the 8th. 1-ran for Mazara in the 8th. E: DeShields (4). LOB: Texas 7, Detroit 12. 2B: Choo 2 (20), Odor (11), Profar (23), Mahtook (4), Goodrum (18), Iglesias (21). HR: Odor (5), off Fiers; Castellanos (15), off Hamels. RBIs: Odor (23), Chirinos (36), Mahtook (5), Castellanos (55), Hicks (30), Iglesias (32). SB: Goodrum (7). RLISP: Texas 5 (Andrus, Beltre, Odor 2, Gallo); Detroit 7 (Castellanos 2, Candelario 3, McCann 2). GIDP: Martinez. DP: Texas 1 (Odor, Andrus, Profar). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels, L, 4-8 2/3 5 7 3 2 2 41 4.28 Moore 41/3 2 0 0 4 6 85 7.08 Claudio 3 5 0 0 0 4 57 4.46 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers, W, 6-5 6 5 1 1 1 6 98 3.65 Hardy 2 2 0 0 0 3 35 3.31 Wilson 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 4.05 Inherited runners-scored: Moore 1-0. HBP: Moore (Jones). WP: Moore 2. PB: McCann (4). Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Chris Segal; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Ed Hickox. T: 3:08. A: 29,174 .

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Blackmon cf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .276 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .306 Desmond 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .216 Iannetta c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .239 Gonzalez dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .274 Valaika ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .151 Parra lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .303 Cuevas rf 4 1 3 3 0 0 .267 Totals 36 5 10 5 1 11 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .333 Haniger rf 2 0 2 0 2 0 .273 Cruz dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .268 Seager 3b 2 0 2 0 2 0 .238 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Heredia cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .238 b-Span ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Andreoli lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .200 a-Gamel ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .281 Freitas c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .206 c-Gordon ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Romine 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .205 d-Herrmann ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Totals 32 1 7 1 4 9 Colorado 000 100 301 — 5 10 0 Seattle 000 010 000 — 1 7 0 a-struck out for Andreoli in the 6th. b-grounded out for Heredia in the 8th. c-flied out for Freitas in the 9th. d-grounded out for Romine in the 9th. LOB: Colorado 6, Seattle 8. 2B: Gonzalez (13). HR: Cuevas (2), off Paxton; Segura (7), off Freeland. RBIs: Gonzalez (31), Parra (39), Cuevas 3 (8), Segura (47). SB: Desmond (9). SF: Parra. RLISP: Colorado 3 (Blackmon, Arenado 2); Seattle 3 (Healy 2, Freitas). GIDP: Cruz, Span. DP: Colorado 2 (Valaika, LeMahieu, Desmond), (LeMahieu, Valaika, Desmond). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland 5 5 1 1 4 4 98 3.18 Oberg, W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.04 Ottavino, 2 2 0 0 0 3 30 1.79 Davis 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.04 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paxton, L, 8-3 7 7 4 4 1 9 98 3.49 Bradford 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.65 Nicasio 1 3 1 1 0 1 18 6.09 Umpires: Home, Marty Foster; First, Joe West; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Doug Eddings. T: 2:53. A: 36,104 .

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .217 Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Machado ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .310 Trumbo dh 2 1 0 0 2 1 .259 Davis 1b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .155 Valencia rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .262 Schoop 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .212 Sisco c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .197 Peterson lf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .197 Totals 33 4 7 4 4 11 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .259 Rosario dh-lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .306 Dozier 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .219 Escobar 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .270 Polanco ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .286 Kepler rf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .224 Grossman lf 4 2 1 0 0 1 .236 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cave cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .268 Wilson c 3 0 2 3 0 0 .134 Totals 31 5 8 4 3 8 Baltimore 300 000 001 — 4 7 1 Minnesota 000 032 00x — 5 8 0 E: Davis (4). LOB: Baltimore 6, Minnesota 5. 2B: Beckham (6), Jones (22), Schoop (13), Peterson (9), Dozier (17), Escobar (35), Grossman (11), Wilson (5). HR: Davis (8), off Gibson; Kepler (10), off Gausman. RBIs: Machado (60), Davis 2 (27), Peterson (18), Kepler (33), Wilson 3 (11). SB: Jones (1). RLISP: Baltimore 5 (Beckham 2, Davis, Valencia 2); Minnesota 3 (Dozier 2, Escobar). GIDP: Beckham, Wilson. DP: Baltimore 1 (Schoop, Machado, Davis); Minnesota 1 (Escobar, Dozier, Mauer). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman 5 5 3 3 1 5 90 4.11 Castro, L, 2-5 1 2 2 2 2 0 25 3.20 Scott 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 5.79 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.06 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 3-6 7 4 3 3 4 9 109 3.59 Hildenberger, 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 2.93 Rodney, S, 19-24 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 3.16 WP: Gausman. PB: Wilson (2). Umpires: Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 2:54. A: 25,974 .

Javier Baez homered and had four hits — including a game-tying infield single in the eighth — and the Chicago Cubs rallied from a five-run deficit for an 8-7 victory over Cincinnati Reds on Saturday. Anthony Rizzo’s RBI groundout capped a four-run eighth inning for Chicago, which has come from behind in each of its last eight wins. Eugenio Suarez homered and Billy Hamilton added three hits and three stolen bases for Cincinnati, which had its five-game winning streak against the Cubs snapped. Randy Rosario (4-0) allowed two hits in 2 1/3 innings to get the win. Brandon Marrow worked the ninth for his 20th save. Phillies 3, Pirates 2 • Nick Williams, Scott Kingery and Jorge Alfaro drove in runs on consecutive at-bats in the seventh inning to help Philadelphia win in Pittsburgh and extend the first-place Phillies’ winning streak to six games. Jake Arrieta (6-6) worked around six hits with the help of eight strikeouts to hold the Pirates to two runs over seven innings. Braves 5, Brewers 1 • Anibal Sanchez pitched effectively into the seventh and Freddie Freeman added three hits, lifting slumping Atlanta in Milwaukee. Nationals 18, Marlins 4 • Mark Reynolds homered twice and drove in a careerhigh 10 runs, Max Scherzer won for the first time since June 5, and Washington beat visiting Miami.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Twins 5, Orioles 4 • Kyle Gibson recovered from a rough start to throw seven innings, and Max Kepler homered in his second straight game to lead Minnesota past visiting Baltimore. Yankees 8, Blue Jays 5 • Luis Severino pitched five innings to earn his major league-leading 14th win, Brett Gardner and Aaron Judge each hit solo home runs, and New York won in Toronto. Tigers 7, Rangers 2 • Nicholas Castellanos homered as part of a sevenrun first inning for Detroit, and the hosting Tigers cruised to a win over Texas. Astros 12, White Sox 6 • Yuli Gurriel and Alex Bregman each homered and Charlie Morton won his 11th as Houston beat visiting Chicago. Athletics 6, Indians 3 • Stephen Piscotty hit a go-ahead, two-run homer in the 11th inning and Oakland rallied in Cleveland.

INTERLEAGUE Rays 3, Mets 0 • Blake Snell blanked the Mets over a career-high-tying 7 1/3 innings, Wilson Ramos drove in a pair of runs and Tampa Bay won in New York. Rockies 5, Mariners 1 • Noel Cuevas hit a three-run homer in the seventh among his three hits to lead Colorado in Seattle. Dodgers 3, Angels 1 • Ross Stripling struck out seven in six innings, Justin Turner hit a two-run single and Yasiel Puig homered as the Dodgers won at Angel Stadium. Associated Press

Yankees 8, Blue Jays 5 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf-cf 5 2 2 3 1 1 .254 Judge rf 3 1 1 1 2 2 .277 Stanton dh 3 1 1 0 2 1 .265 Hicks cf 1 1 0 0 2 1 .259 Frazier lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Andujar 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .280 Gregorius ss 4 1 1 1 1 1 .252 Drury 2b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .189 Wade 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .086 Higashioka c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .190 Bird 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .198 Totals 36 8 9 7 10 12 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .248 a-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .259 4 0 1 0 0 2 .227 Gurriel Jr. 2b Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .254 Smoak 1b 4 2 2 0 0 2 .237 Morales dh 4 0 1 0 0 3 .239 Pillar cf 3 1 1 3 0 0 .246 Grichuk rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .207 Maile c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Diaz ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .239 Totals 34 5 9 5 2 9 New York 403 000 001 — 8 9 0 Toronto 020 101 001 — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Granderson in the 9th. LOB: New York 11, Toronto 5. 2B: Andujar (25), Drury (2), Granderson (14), Smoak (22). 3B: Gardner (3). HR: Gardner (6), off Happ; Judge (25), off Happ; Pillar (8), off Severino; Grichuk (11), off Severino; Diaz (8), off Shreve. RBIs: Gardner 3 (24), Judge (58), Gregorius (46), Drury 2 (7), Pillar 3 (32), Grichuk (28), Diaz (20). SB: Gregorius (10). SF: Pillar. RLISP: New York 6 (Gardner, Andujar 2, Higashioka, Frazier 2); Toronto 2 (Solarte, Morales). GIDP: Solarte. DP: New York 1 (Severino, Gregorius, Bird). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Severino, W, 14-2 5 5 3 3 2 5 97 2.12 Holder 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 2.04 Robertson, 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.43 Betances, 1 0 0 0 0 2 23 2.56 1/ Chapman 1 6 1.42 3 00 0 0 2/ Shreve 1 0 1 10 4.99 3 1 1 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ, L, 10-5 22/3 4 6 6 6 5 84 4.44 Petricka 21/3 1 1 0 1 2 40 4.40 Santos 2 1 0 0 1 2 34 10.80 1/ Loup 2 3.86 3 10 0 0 0 Cruz 11/3 2 1 1 2 2 28 2.70 1/ Axford 1 3 4.14 3 00 0 0 Santos pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Petricka 2-2, Loup 1-0, Cruz 2-0. PB: Maile (3). Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, John Libka; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 3:31. A: 44,352 .

Astros 12, White Sox 6 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Moncada 2b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .232 Sanchez 3b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .258 Abreu dh 4 1 0 0 0 2 .259 Garcia rf 3 2 1 2 0 0 .281 Palka lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .227 Davidson 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .228 Narvaez c 4 0 2 3 0 1 .270 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .223 a-Tilson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Totals 34 6 7 6 2 14 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf 4 2 1 0 1 2 .249 Bregman 3b 5 3 3 2 0 1 .284 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .339 Gurriel 1b 4 2 2 4 1 1 .303 Reddick rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .269 Gattis dh 4 1 2 1 1 1 .257 Tucker lf 4 1 1 1 1 3 .250 Stassi c 5 0 3 2 0 1 .264 Gonzalez ss 5 1 2 1 0 0 .229 Totals 40 12 17 12 5 11 Chicago 000 104 010 — 6 7 0 Houston 013 022 13x — 12 17 1 a-struck out for Engel in the 9th. E: Gonzalez (6). LOB: Chicago 4, Houston 9. 2B: Sanchez (18), Narvaez (10), Bregman (29), Altuve (23), Gattis (15), Stassi (12), Gonzalez (12). HR: Garcia (9), off Giles; Gurriel (6), off Shields; Bregman (17), off Shields. RBIs: Garcia 2 (17), Davidson (38), Narvaez 3 (14), Bregman 2 (57), Gurriel 4 (46), Reddick (27), Gattis (62), Tucker (1), Stassi 2 (24), Gonzalez (35). SB: Anderson (21), Springer (6), Altuve (13). SF: Garcia. RLISP: Chicago 3 (Palka, Anderson, Engel); Houston 5 (Springer, Gurriel, Tucker 2, Gonzalez). GIDP: Gonzalez. DP: Chicago 1 (Moncada, Anderson, Davidson). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields, L, 3-10 52/3 10 8 8 2 9 99 4.53 Rondon 1 2 1 1 1 1 32 7.67 2/ Fry 3 0 1 18 3.54 3 4 3 2/ Minaya 2 0 20 3.57 3 1 0 0 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton, W, 11-2 52/3 5 5 5 2 8 101 2.83 1/ Harris, 1 5 3.98 3 0 0 0 0 McHugh, 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.88 Giles 1 1 1 1 0 1 11 4.11 Smith 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 4.98 Inherited runners-scored: Fry 2-1, Minaya 2-2, Harris 1-0. WP: Harris. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Bill Miller; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Alan Porter. T: 3:19. A: 39,568 .

Saturday Minnesota 5, Baltimore 4 NY Yankees 8, Toronto 5 Houston 12, White Sox 6 Colorado 5, Seattle 1 Detroit 7, Texas 2 Oakland 6, Cleveland 3, 11 inn. Tampa Bay 3, NY Mets 0 LA Dodgers 3, LA Angels 1 Boston at Kansas City, late Sunday NY Yankees at Toronto, 12:07 Oakland at Cleveland, 12:10 Tampa Bay at NY Mets, 12:10 Texas at Detroit, 12:10 Baltimore at Minnesota, 1:10 White Sox at Houston, 1:10 Boston at Kansas City, 1:15 Colorado at Seattle, 3:10 LA Dodgers at LA Angels, 7:05

Sunday’s pitching matchups

Braves 5, Brewers 1 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Albies 2b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .282 Freeman 1b 4 2 3 1 1 0 .310 Markakis rf 3 1 1 1 2 0 .324 Camargo 3b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .256 Culberson lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .265 Flowers c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .228 Swanson ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .246 Sanchez p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Flaherty ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Vizcaino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Minter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 5 8 5 6 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243 Yelich cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Aguilar 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .303 Shaw 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Perez lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .246 Miller 2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .269 Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 c-Braun ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Saladino ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .302 Kratz c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Wilkerson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 a-Broxton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Zagurski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Villar 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Totals 31 1 4 1 1 11 Atlanta 200 000 030 — 5 8 0 Milwaukee 000 000 100 — 1 4 0 a-lined out for Williams in the 6th. b-singled for Winkler in the 8th. c-struck out for Lopez in the 9th. LOB: Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 5. 2B: Freeman (23). 3B: Freeman (3), Markakis (1). RBIs: Freeman (58), Markakis (59), Camargo 2 (39), Flaherty (13), Miller (29). SB: Perez (7). RLISP: Atlanta 5 (Inciarte 2, Flowers, Swanson 2); Milwaukee 3 (Yelich, Perez, Braun). GIDP: Markakis. DP: Milwaukee 1 (Lopez, Saladino, Aguilar). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez, W, 4-2 62/3 2 1 1 1 8 82 2.72 1/ Winkler, 2 3.00 3 00 0 0 0 Vizcaino 1 1 0 0 0 0 22 1.71 Minter 1 1 0 0 0 3 24 2.68 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wilkerson, L, 0-1 5 4 2 2 3 5 91 7.88 Williams 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.76 Zagurski 1 3 3 3 0 2 28 63.00 Lopez 2 1 0 0 3 0 39 3.14 Zagurski pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Winkler 1-0, Lopez 1-1. HBP: Sanchez (Aguilar). WP: Vizcaino. Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, John Libka; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 3:06. A: 38,813 .

Rays 3, Mets 0 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Duffy 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .309 Robertson 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .261 Ramos c 5 0 2 2 0 1 .289 Cron 1b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .241 a-Bauers ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Hechavarria ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Gomez rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .200 Field lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .217 b-Smith ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Alvarado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Snell p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Castillo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wendle lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .272 Totals 35 3 9 3 4 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nimmo cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .261 Bautista rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .218 Cabrera 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .283 Conforto lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .224 Flores 1b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .269 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Plawecki c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .225 Rosario ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .236 Matz p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .103 Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Reyes ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .180 Swarzak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 0 7 0 3 10 Tampa Bay 000 010 011 — 3 9 0 New York 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 a-struck out for Cron in the 8th. b-grounded out for Field in the 8th. c-doubled for Gsellman in the 8th. LOB: Tampa Bay 11, New York 7. 2B: Duffy (16), Cron (14), Gomez (8), Field (9), Nimmo (11), Flores (14), Reyes (5). RBIs: Ramos 2 (47), Gomez (18). SB: Kiermaier (6). CS: Nimmo (4). RLISP: Tampa Bay 8 (Kiermaier, Duffy, Hechavarria 3, Bauers, Smith 2); New York 3 (Cabrera, Plawecki, Matz). GIDP: Duffy, Frazier, Plawecki. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Duffy, Robertson, Cron), (Snell, Robertson, Cron); New York 1 (Rosario, Cabrera, Flores). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell, W, 12-4 71/3 6 0 0 3 9 112 2.09 1/ Castillo, 0 0 0 5 1.47 3 0 0 1/ Alvarado, 0 0 0 5 2.75 3 1 0 Romo, S, 9-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.23 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz, L, 4-6 61/3 5 1 1 3 5 110 3.31 Gsellman 12/3 2 1 1 0 2 26 4.44 Swarzak 1 2 1 1 1 1 22 6.46 Alvarado pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Castillo 1-0, Alvarado 1-0, Romo 1-0, Gsellman 1-0. HBP: Matz (Snell), Gsellman (Robertson). Umpires: Home, Nic Lentz; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Brian Knight. T: 2:58. A: 32,986 .

Phillies 3, Pirates 2 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Valentin 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Hoskins lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 Herrera cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .280 C.Santana 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .222 Williams rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .239 c-Altherr ph-rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .177 Kingery ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .235 Alfaro c 4 0 1 1 0 3 .245 Franco 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .268 Arrieta p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .179 b-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 3 9 3 2 8 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Marte cf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .275 Polanco rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .231 Moran 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .261 Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Diaz c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .289 Dickerson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .308 Harrison 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .260 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .245 Taillon p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .097 E.Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Meadows ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .298 Crick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Freese 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Totals 35 2 8 2 1 12 Philadelphia 000 000 300 — 3 9 0 Pittsburgh 101 000 000 — 2 8 0 a-singled for E.Santana in the 7th. b-flied out for Arrieta in the 8th. c-doubled for Williams in the 9th. d-struck out for Dominguez in the 9th. LOB: Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 7. 2B: Alfaro (11), Altherr (7), Dickerson (19). 3B: Williams (2). HR: Marte (10), off Arrieta. RBIs: Williams (29), Kingery (26), Alfaro (18), Marte (38), Moran (35). RLISP: Philadelphia 3 (Herrera, Knapp 2); Pittsburgh 2 (Bell, Freese). GIDP: Valentin. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Harrison, Mercer, Bell). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta, W, 6-6 7 6 2 2 1 8 101 3.47 Dominguez, 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 1.82 Arano, S, 2-2 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 2.25 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon, L, 5-7 62/3 5 3 3 0 6 77 4.05 1/ E.Santana 0 0 1 3.58 3 1 0 0 Crick 1 2 0 0 0 0 21 2.25 Vazquez 1 1 0 0 2 2 25 3.47 Inherited runners-scored: E.Santana 1-1. WP: Arrieta. Umpires: Home, Larry Vanover; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T: 2:48. A: 28,150 .

Cubs 8, Reds 7 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler rf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .270 Barnhart c 5 1 1 0 0 1 .258 Votto 1b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .296 Gennett 2b 5 2 2 0 0 2 .329 Suarez 3b 3 1 2 3 2 0 .312 Winker lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .277 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Peraza ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .274 Harvey p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Duvall lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Hamilton cf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .230 Totals 37 7 11 5 4 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Zobrist rf 5 1 2 2 0 2 .296 Heyward cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Almora cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .324 Baez 2b 5 1 4 2 0 0 .294 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .248 Happ 3b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .251 Morrow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Schwarber lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .248 Caratini c 3 2 2 1 1 0 .271 Russell ss 3 2 2 1 1 0 .282 Chatwood p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Rosario p 1 0 1 1 0 0 1.000 a-Bote ph-3b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Totals 37 8 13 8 3 8 Cincinnati 203 011 000 — 7 11 1 Chicago 000 201 14x — 8 13 0 a-singled for Rosario in the 8th. E: Peraza (10). LOB: Cincinnati 7, Chicago 9. 2B: Votto (18), Zobrist (11), Caratini (4), Russell (15). HR: Suarez (18), off Chatwood; Baez (17), off Hernandez. RBIs: Votto (44), Suarez 3 (66), Winker (36), Zobrist 2 (35), Baez 2 (63), Rizzo (59), Caratini (5), Russell (28), Rosario (1). SB: Peraza (16), Hamilton 3 (19), Baez (16). RLISP: Cincinnati 5 (Barnhart 3, Winker, Harvey); Chicago 4 (Zobrist, Happ 2, Schwarber). GIDP: Winker. DP: Chicago 1 (Russell, Baez, Rizzo). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey 52/3 9 3 2 1 4 93 4.80 1/ Hernandez 1 0 0 6 2.08 3 1 1 Garrett, 1 1 3 3 2 2 27 3.43 Hughes, L, 2-3, 1 2 1 1 0 2 14 1.53 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood 52/3 9 7 7 4 4 120 5.01 Rosario, W, 4-0 21/3 2 0 0 0 2 23 1.50 Morrow, S, 20-21 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.35 Hernandez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Garrett pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Hernandez 1-0, Hughes 3-3, Rosario 1-0. HBP: Harvey (Rizzo). WP: Chatwood 2. Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T: 3:15. A: 41,538 .

Nationals 18, Marlins 4 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dietrich lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Castro 2b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .297 Realmuto c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .305 Holaday c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Bour 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .232 Cooper rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 Riddle ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .258 Rojas 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Rivera cf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .194 Chen p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Hernandez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Meyer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 32 4 7 4 2 3 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 3 1 0 1 0 .282 Soto lf 5 2 2 2 0 1 .308 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .280 b-Kieboom ph-1b 0 0 0 1 0 0 .217 Harper rf 3 4 3 0 1 0 .219 Goodwin rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .193 Reynolds 1b-3b 5 3 5 10 0 0 .292 Taylor cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .244 Difo 2b 4 2 1 0 1 0 .249 Severino c 5 1 1 3 0 1 .171 Scherzer p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .244 a-Adams ph-lf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .293 Totals 40 18 17 18 4 3 Miami 000 210 100 — 4 7 1 Washington 020 173 50x — 18 17 0 a-singled for Scherzer in the 7th. b-out on sacrifice fly for Rendon in the 7th. E: Castro (11). LOB: Miami 3, Washington 3. 2B: Soto (11), Rendon (25), Reynolds (2). 3B: Riddle (3). HR: Castro (6), off Scherzer; Realmuto (12), off Scherzer; Rivera (1), off Scherzer; Reynolds (9), off Chen; Severino (2), off Hernandez; Reynolds (10), off Hernandez. RBIs: Castro (33), Realmuto (41), Rojas (32), Rivera (7), Soto 2 (26), Rendon 2 (39), Reynolds 10 (24), Severino 3 (15), Kieboom (5). SF: Kieboom. RLISP: Miami 1 (Riddle); Washington 2 (Severino 2). GIDP: Realmuto, Rivera. DP: Washington 2 (Turner, Difo, Reynolds), (Turner, Difo, Reynolds). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen, L, 2-6 4 1/3 7 7 7 2 3 84 6.14 Hernandez 21/3 8 10 10 2 0 67 6.59 Meyer 11/3 2 1 1 0 0 23 3.86 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, W, 11-5 7 7 4 4 2 3 109 2.33 Kelley 2 0 0 0 0 0 18 2.84 Inherited runners-scored: Hernandez 2-2, Meyer 1-1. WP: Hernandez. Umpires: Home, Mark Wegner; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Mike DiMuro. T: 3:01. A: 34,364 .

Dodgers 3, Angels 1 Los Angeles (N) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson cf-lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Muncy 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .270 Turner dh 4 0 1 2 0 1 .260 Bellinger 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Kemp lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .317 Forsythe 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Grandal c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .241 Taylor ss 4 0 0 0 0 4 .257 Puig rf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .263 Hernandez 2b-cf 2 1 1 0 2 1 .235 Totals 30 3 4 3 5 14 Los Angeles (A) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .172 Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .312 Trout cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .312 Upton lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .248 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Ohtani dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .269 Valbuena 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .211 a-Fletcher ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Kinsler 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Totals 32 1 4 1 1 9 Los Angeles (N) 000 020 001 — 3 4 1 Los Angeles (A) 000 001 000 — 1 4 0 a-flied out for Valbuena in the 7th. E: Taylor (8). LOB: Los Angeles (N) 6, Los Angeles (A) 7. HR: Puig (10), off Ramirez; Trout (25), off Stripling. RBIs: Turner 2 (17), Puig (32), Trout (50). S: Pederson. RLISP: Los Angeles (N) 2 (Turner, Bellinger); Los Angeles (A) 3 (Calhoun, Upton, Pujols). Los Angeles (N) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stripling, W, 7-2 6 3 1 1 0 7 90 2.22 1/ Paredes, 4 5.87 3 0 0 0 0 0 2/ Goeddel, 1 0 11 2.96 3 0 0 0 2/ Hudson, 3 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.34 1/ Alexander, 2 3.60 3 0 0 0 0 0 Jansen, S, 24-27 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.34 Los Angeles (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McGuire 3 1 0 0 2 6 61 6.41 2/ Alvarez 1 0 10 2.87 3 0 0 0 Cole, L, 0-1 21/3 2 2 2 1 4 43 2.84 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 3.20 Parker 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.91 Ramirez 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 4.53 Inherited runners-scored: Alexander 1-0, Cole 1-0. HBP: Stripling (Simmons), Goeddel (Kinsler). Umpires: Home, Mike Winters; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:18. A: 44,409 .

NL

Pitcher

StL SF

Flaherty (R) Bumgarner (L) 3:05

3-4 1-3

3.19 2.58

Phi Pit

Eflin (R) Kingham (R)

7-2 2-4

2.97 4.70

2-5 12:35 3-10

5.26 4.60

Mia Richards (R) Was Roark (R)

Time W-L

12:35

ERA

Atl Mil

Newcomb (L) Guerra (R) 1:10

8-3 5-5

3.10 2.87

Cin Chi

Castillo (R) Lester (L)

1:20

5-8 11-2

5.53 2.25

SD Ari

Richard (L) Greinke (R)

3:10

7-8 9-5

4.46 3.36

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

NY Tor

German (R) Borucki (L)

2-4 12:07 0-1

5.37 2.77

Tex Bibens-Dirkx (R) Det Fulmer (R) 12:10

1-2 4.40 3-7 4.22

Oak Anderson (L) 0-2 Cle Bieber (R) 12:10 4-0

7.63 2.97

Bal Cobb (R) Min Odorizzi (R)

1:10

2-10 3-6

6.53 4.57

Chi Giolito (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

1:10

5-7 5-8

6.93 4.12

Bos Porcello (R) KC Junis (R)

1:15

10-3 5-10

3.57 5.13

IL

Time W-L

ERA

Pitcher

TB Eovaldi (R) NYM Flexen (R)

12:10

2-3 3.92 0-1 10.80

Col Senzatela (R) Sea LeBlanc (L) 3:10

3-1 4-0

4.44 3.19

LAD Wood (L) LAA Heaney (L)

5-5 4-6

3.94 3.94

7:05

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AL

NL

BATTING Altuve, HOU .339 Betts, BOS .336 Segura, SEA .333 Martinez, BOS .328 Simmons, LAA .315 Brantley, CLE .310 Machado, BAL .310 Duffy, TB .309 Trout, LAA .306 Rosario, MIN .306 HOME RUNS Martinez, BOS 27 Judge, NYY 25 Ramirez, CLE 24 Trout, LAA 24 Lindor, CLE 23 Betts, BOS 22 Cruz, SEA 22 Davis, OAK 21 Gallo, TEX 21 Machado, BAL 21 Stanton, NYY 21 RUNS BATTED IN Martinez, BOS 73 Encarnacion, CLE 62 Gattis, HOU 62 Haniger, SEA 62 Lowrie, OAK 61 Machado, BAL 60 Ramirez, CLE 59 Davis, OAK 58 Judge, NYY 58 Bregman, HOU 57 STOLEN BASES Gordon, SEA 22 Anderson, CHW 21 Ramirez, CLE 19 Benintendi, BOS 16 Davis, CLE 16 DeShields, TEX 16 Merrifield, KC 16 SLUGGING PERCENTAGE Betts, BOS .672 Martinez, BOS .647 Trout, LAA .619 Ramirez, CLE .595 Judge, NYY .573 Lindor, CLE .572 Machado, BAL .557 Cruz, SEA .551 Rosario, MIN .544 Bregman, HOU .523 ON-BASE PERCENTAGE Trout, LAA .452 Betts, BOS .428 Altuve, HOU .406 Choo, TEX .402 HITS Altuve, HOU 121 Segura, SEA 115 Castllnos, DET 107 Lindor, CLE 107 Martinez, BOS 106 BASES ON BALLS Trout, LAA 78 Judge, NYY 62 Choo, TEX 56 Ramirez, CLE 54 DOUBLES Escobar, MIN 35 Bregman, HOU 29 Abreu, CHW 27 Lindor, CLE 27 Castllnos, DET 26 TRIPLES Sanchez, CHW 9 Hernandez, TOR 6 Benintendi, BOS 5 Smith, TB 5 EARNED RUN AVERAGE Snell, TB 2.09 Severino, NYY 2.12 Verlndr, HOU 2.15 Sale, BOS 2.36 Bauer, CLE 2.45 Kluber, CLE 2.49 Skaggs, LAA 2.64 Cole, HOU 2.70 Morton, HOU 2.83 Sabathia, NYY 3.02 WON-LOST Severino, NYY 14-2 Kluber, CLE 12-4 Snell, TB 12-4 Morton, HOU 11-2 McCullers, HOU 10-3 Porcello, BOS 10-3 Rodriguez, BOS 10-3 Happ, TOR 10-5 6 tied 9 SAVES Diaz, SEA 34 Kimbrel, BOS 26 Chapman, NYY 24 Treinen, OAK 22 Kela, TEX 21 Greene, DET 19 Rodney, MIN 19 Allen, CLE 18 Colome, SEA 12 Giles, HOU 12 Soria, CHW 12 STRIKEOUTS Sale, BOS 176 Cole, HOU 158 Bauer, CLE 156 Paxton, SEA 154 Verlndr, HOU 154 Severino, NYY 143 Morton, HOU 141 Snell, TB 132 Kluber, CLE 123 McCullers, HOU 118

BATTING Gennett, CIN .329 Almora, CHC .324 Markakis, ATL .324 Kemp, LAD .321 Suarez, CIN .312 Freeman, ATL .310 Dickerson, PIT .308 Arenado, COL .306 Realmuto, MIA .305 Crawford, SF .300 HOME RUNS Arenado, COL 22 Harper, WAS 21 Aguilar, MIL 20 Muncy, LAD 20 Gldschmdt, ARI 19 Albies, ATL 18 Suarez, CIN 18 Bellinger, LAD 17 Baez, CHC 17 Desmond, COL 17 Schwarber, CHC 17 Villanueva, SD 17 RUNS BATTED IN Suarez, CIN 66 Arenado, COL 63 Baez, CHC 63 Story, COL 60 Aguilar, MIL 59 Markakis, ATL 59 Rizzo, CHC 59 Freeman, ATL 58 Gennett, CIN 58 Kemp, LAD 57 STOLEN BASES Inciarte, ATL 23 Taylor, WAS 23 Turner, WAS 22 Marte, PIT 21 Hamilton, CIN 19 SLUGGING PERCENTAGE Arenado, COL .587 Suarez, CIN .580 Baez, CHC .565 Kemp, LAD .556 Freeman, ATL .537 Realmuto, MIA .535 Gldschmdt, ARI .528 Story, COL .522 Gennett, CIN .520 Nimmo, NYM .517 ON-BASE PERCENTAGE Votto, CIN .428 Suarez, CIN .402 Freeman, ATL .401 Cain, MIL .394 HITS Markakis, ATL 112 Albies, ATL 107 Gennett, CIN 107 Freeman, ATL 105 Castro, MIA 104 BASES ON BALLS Harper, WAS 72 Santana, PHI 68 Votto, CIN 67 Bour, MIA 59 Hernandez, PHI 57 DOUBLES Albies, ATL 29 Markakis, ATL 27 Carpenter, STL 26 Rendon, WAS 24 TRIPLES Marte, ARI 8 Taylor, LAD 8 EARNED RUN AVERAGE deGrom, NYM 1.79 Scherzer, WAS 2.16 Lester, CHC 2.25 Foltynwcz, ATL 2.37 Nola, PHI 2.41 Mikolas, STL 2.63 Corbin, ARI 3.05 Newcomb, ATL 3.10 Freeland, COL 3.18 Matz, NYM 3.31 WON-LOST Lester, CHC 11-2 Nola, PHI 11-2 Scherzer, WAS 10-5 Godley, ARI 10-6 Mikolas, STL 9-3 Greinke, ARI 9-5 Wacha, STL 8-2 Newcomb, ATL 8-3 Suter, MIL 8-5 Freeland, COL 8-6 Stratton, SF 8-6 SAVES Davis, COL 25 Hand, SD 24 Jansen, LAD 23 Doolittle, WAS 22 Boxberger, ARI 21 Morrow, CHC 20 Iglesias, CIN 17 Norris, STL 17 Vazquez, PIT 17 Familia, NYM 16 STRIKEOUTS Scherzer, WAS 174 deGrom, NYM 142 Corbin, ARI 140 Gray, COL 119 Nola, PHI 116 Foltynwcz, ATL 114 Greinke, ARI 112 Velasquez, PHI 107 Pivetta, PHI 106 Godley, ARI 99


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE

M 3 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W L

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away

Milwaukee

53 36 .596

— 7-3 L-1

29-18

24-18 23-21

Chicago

50 36 .581 1½

— 8-2 W-1

27-15

Cardinals

46 42 .523 6½

4 4-6 W-1

23-22 23-20

Pittsburgh

40 48 .455 12½

10 3-7 L-5

21-23

19-25

Cincinnati

39 50 .438

14 11½ 6-4 L-1

21-26

18-24

EAST

W L

Philadelphia

49 37 .570

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away —

— 8-2 W-6 30-16

19-21

Atlanta

50 38 .568

— 5-5 W-1

23-17

27-21

Washington

45 43

5

5 4-6 W-3

22-23 23-20

.511

New York

35 50 .412 13½ 13½ 4-6 L-1

15-27 20-23

Miami

36 55 .396 15½ 15½ 4-6 L-3

19-26

17-29

WEST

W L

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away

Arizona

49 40

.551

— 4-6 W-1

25-22

24-18

Los Angeles

48 40 .545

½

2 6-4 W-1

26-23

22-17

Colorado

46 43

.517

3

4½ 8-2 W-5

18-22

28-21

San Francisco

46 45 .505

4

5½ 4-6 L-1

27-16

19-29

San Diego

38 52 .422 11½

13 3-7 L-1

19-25

19-27

Saturday Cardinals 3, San Francisco 2 Cubs 8, Cincinnati 7 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 Atlanta 5, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 5, Seattle 1 Tampa Bay 3, NY Mets 0 LA Dodgers 3, LA Angels 1 Washington 18, Miami 4 San Diego at Arizona, late Friday San Francisco 3, Cardinals 2 Cincinnati 3, Cubs 2 Philadelphia 17, Pittsburgh 5 Washington 3, Miami 2 NY Mets 5, Tampa Bay 1 Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 4 Arizona 3, San Diego 1 LA Angels 3, LA Dodgers 2 Colorado 7, Seattle 1

CENTRAL

W L

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Cleveland

49 38 .563

— 6-4 L-1

28-14

Away 21-24

Minnesota

38 48 .442 10½

16 4-6 W-3

23-20

15-28

Detroit

40 51 .440

11 16½ 4-6 W-2

25-22

15-29

Chicago

30 59

20 25½ 2-8 L-4

16-27

14-32

Kansas City

25 63 .284 24½

11-34

14-29

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

.337

30 1-9 L-8

EAST

W L

Boston

61 29 .678

— 8-2 W-5

28-12

33-17

New York

57 29 .663

2

— 6-4 W-1

33-13

24-16

Tampa Bay

44 44 .500

16

11 6-4 W-1

23-17

21-27

Toronto

41 47 .466

19

14 4-6 L-1

24-24

17-23

Baltimore

24 64

.273

36

31 1-9 L-5

12-29

12-35

WEST

W L

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

Houston

60 31 .659

Seattle

— 7-3 W-5

28-17

32-14

56 34

.622 3½

— 7-3 L-2

30-17

26-17

Oakland

49 40

.551

10

6½ 8-2 W-1

24-21

25-19

Los Angeles

45 45 .500 14½

11 4-6 L-1

21-22

24-23

Texas

39 51

17 4-6 L-2

19-28

20-23

.433 20½

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Cubs rally for 4 in 8th to beat Reds

Athletics 6, Indians 3

Tigers 7, Rangers 2

Rockies 5, Mariners 1

Twins 5, Orioles 4

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 6 0 1 0 0 2 .255 Canha lf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .264 Lowrie 2b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .291 K.Davis dh 5 1 2 1 0 2 .242 Olson 1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .239 Piscotty rf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .252 Chapman 3b 4 1 4 0 1 0 .256 Semien ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Lucroy c 5 0 0 1 0 0 .249 Totals 43 6 12 6 2 5 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Allen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guyer rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .160 McAllister p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lindor ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .301 Brantley lf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .310 Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .293 Encarnacion dh-1b 4 0 0 1 1 0 .227 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .254 1-R.Davis pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Tomlin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kipnis 2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .216 Gonzalez 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Gomes c 5 1 1 0 0 1 .247 Naquin rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .264 G.Allen cf-rf-cf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .219 Totals 41 3 9 3 4 8 Oakland 000 000 030 03 — 6 12 1 Cleveland 110 001 000 00 — 3 9 1 1-ran for Alonso in the 8th. E: Jackson (2), Lindor (12). LOB: Oakland 7, Cleveland 9. 2B: Chapman 2 (14), Brantley (23), G.Allen (4). HR: Lowrie (15), off Ramirez; K.Davis (21), off Ramirez; Piscotty (8), off Tomlin. RBIs: Lowrie 2 (61), K.Davis (58), Piscotty 2 (38), Lucroy (25), Lindor (56), Encarnacion (62), G.Allen (5). SB: Chapman (1), Ramirez (19), G.Allen (6). CS: R.Davis (4). S: Semien. RLISP: Oakland 4 (Fowler, Olson, Lucroy 2); Cleveland 4 (Lindor, Alonso 3). GIDP: Fowler, Olson. DP: Cleveland 2 (Lindor, Ramirez, Alonso), (Encarnacion, Lindor). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson 52/3 5 3 2 4 3 98 2.45 Buchter 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 14 2.30 Trivino 2 3 0 0 0 3 30 1.41 Treinen, W, 5-1 2 0 0 0 0 2 24 0.81 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber 7 5 0 0 2 3 102 2.49 1/ Ramirez, 3 0 1 21 3.44 3 3 3 1/ Perez 0 0 1 0.77 3 0 0 0 McAllister 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 5.66 C.Allen 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.25 Tomlin, L, 0-5 1 3 3 3 0 0 29 6.89 Inherited runners-scored: Buchter 2-1, C.Allen 1-0. Umpires: Home, Stu Scheurwater; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Sean Barber. T: 3:49. A: 33,195 .

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .294 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Guzman 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Mazara rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .270 1-Tocci pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .069 Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .296 Kiner-Falefa 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Odor 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .234 Profar 1b-ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .247 Gallo lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .190 Chirinos c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .203 DeShields cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Totals 35 2 8 2 1 9 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mahtook lf 5 0 2 1 0 3 .211 Castellanos rf 4 1 1 1 1 2 .301 Goodrum 2b 4 1 4 0 1 0 .251 Hicks 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .284 Martinez dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .243 a-Reyes ph-dh 1 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Candelario 3b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .231 McCann c 5 0 0 0 0 3 .220 Iglesias ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .273 Jones cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .220 Totals 36 7 12 4 6 12 Texas 000 001 001 — 2 8 1 Detroit 700 000 00x — 7 12 0 a-singled for Martinez in the 8th. 1-ran for Mazara in the 8th. E: DeShields (4). LOB: Texas 7, Detroit 12. 2B: Choo 2 (20), Odor (11), Profar (23), Mahtook (4), Goodrum (18), Iglesias (21). HR: Odor (5), off Fiers; Castellanos (15), off Hamels. RBIs: Odor (23), Chirinos (36), Mahtook (5), Castellanos (55), Hicks (30), Iglesias (32). SB: Goodrum (7). RLISP: Texas 5 (Andrus, Beltre, Odor 2, Gallo); Detroit 7 (Castellanos 2, Candelario 3, McCann 2). GIDP: Martinez. DP: Texas 1 (Odor, Andrus, Profar). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels, L, 4-8 2/3 5 7 3 2 2 41 4.28 Moore 41/3 2 0 0 4 6 85 7.08 Claudio 3 5 0 0 0 4 57 4.46 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers, W, 6-5 6 5 1 1 1 6 98 3.65 Hardy 2 2 0 0 0 3 35 3.31 Wilson 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 4.05 Inherited runners-scored: Moore 1-0. HBP: Moore (Jones). WP: Moore 2. PB: McCann (4). Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Chris Segal; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Ed Hickox. T: 3:08. A: 29,174 .

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Blackmon cf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .276 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .306 Desmond 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .216 Iannetta c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .239 Gonzalez dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .274 Valaika ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .151 Parra lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .303 Cuevas rf 4 1 3 3 0 0 .267 Totals 36 5 10 5 1 11 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .333 Haniger rf 2 0 2 0 2 0 .273 Cruz dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .268 Seager 3b 2 0 2 0 2 0 .238 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Heredia cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .238 b-Span ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Andreoli lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .200 a-Gamel ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .281 Freitas c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .206 c-Gordon ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Romine 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .205 d-Herrmann ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Totals 32 1 7 1 4 9 Colorado 000 100 301 — 5 10 0 Seattle 000 010 000 — 1 7 0 a-struck out for Andreoli in the 6th. b-grounded out for Heredia in the 8th. c-flied out for Freitas in the 9th. d-grounded out for Romine in the 9th. LOB: Colorado 6, Seattle 8. 2B: Gonzalez (13). HR: Cuevas (2), off Paxton; Segura (7), off Freeland. RBIs: Gonzalez (31), Parra (39), Cuevas 3 (8), Segura (47). SB: Desmond (9). SF: Parra. RLISP: Colorado 3 (Blackmon, Arenado 2); Seattle 3 (Healy 2, Freitas). GIDP: Cruz, Span. DP: Colorado 2 (Valaika, LeMahieu, Desmond), (LeMahieu, Valaika, Desmond). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland 5 5 1 1 4 4 98 3.18 Oberg, W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.04 Ottavino, 2 2 0 0 0 3 30 1.79 Davis 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.04 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paxton, L, 8-3 7 7 4 4 1 9 98 3.49 Bradford 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.65 Nicasio 1 3 1 1 0 1 18 6.09 Umpires: Home, Marty Foster; First, Joe West; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Doug Eddings. T: 2:53. A: 36,104 .

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .217 Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Machado ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .310 Trumbo dh 2 1 0 0 2 1 .259 Davis 1b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .155 Valencia rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .262 Schoop 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .212 Sisco c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .197 Peterson lf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .197 Totals 33 4 7 4 4 11 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .259 Rosario dh-lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .306 Dozier 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .219 Escobar 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .270 Polanco ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .286 Kepler rf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .224 Grossman lf 4 2 1 0 0 1 .236 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cave cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .268 Wilson c 3 0 2 3 0 0 .134 Totals 31 5 8 4 3 8 Baltimore 300 000 001 — 4 7 1 Minnesota 000 032 00x — 5 8 0 E: Davis (4). LOB: Baltimore 6, Minnesota 5. 2B: Beckham (6), Jones (22), Schoop (13), Peterson (9), Dozier (17), Escobar (35), Grossman (11), Wilson (5). HR: Davis (8), off Gibson; Kepler (10), off Gausman. RBIs: Machado (60), Davis 2 (27), Peterson (18), Kepler (33), Wilson 3 (11). SB: Jones (1). RLISP: Baltimore 5 (Beckham 2, Davis, Valencia 2); Minnesota 3 (Dozier 2, Escobar). GIDP: Beckham, Wilson. DP: Baltimore 1 (Schoop, Machado, Davis); Minnesota 1 (Escobar, Dozier, Mauer). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman 5 5 3 3 1 5 90 4.11 Castro, L, 2-5 1 2 2 2 2 0 25 3.20 Scott 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 5.79 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.06 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 3-6 7 4 3 3 4 9 109 3.59 Hildenberger, 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 2.93 Rodney, S, 19-24 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 3.16 WP: Gausman. PB: Wilson (2). Umpires: Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 2:54. A: 25,974 .

Javier Baez homered and had four hits — including a game-tying infield single in the eighth — and the Chicago Cubs rallied from a five-run deficit for an 8-7 victory over Cincinnati Reds on Saturday. Anthony Rizzo’s RBI groundout capped a four-run eighth inning for Chicago, which has come from behind in each of its last eight wins. Eugenio Suarez homered and Billy Hamilton added three hits and three stolen bases for Cincinnati, which had its five-game win streak against the Cubs snapped. Randy Rosario (4-0) allowed two hits in 2 1/3 innings to get the win. Brandon Morrow worked the ninth for his 20th save. Phillies 3, Pirates 2 • Nick Williams, Scott Kingery and Jorge Alfaro drove in runs on consecutive at-bats in the seventh inning to help Philadelphia win in Pittsburgh and extend the first-place Phillies’ winning streak to six games. Braves 5, Brewers 1 • Anibal Sanchez pitched effectively into the seventh and Freddie Freeman added three hits, lifting slumping Atlanta in Milwaukee. Nationals 18, Marlins 4 • Mark Reynolds homered twice and drove in a careerhigh 10 runs, Max Scherzer won for the first time since June 5, and Washington beat visiting Miami.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Twins 5, Orioles 4 • Kyle Gibson recovered from a rough start to throw seven innings, and Max Kepler homered in his second straight game as Minnesota beat visiting Baltimore. Yankees 8, Blue Jays 5 • Luis Severino pitched five innings to earn his major league-leading 14th win, Brett Gardner and Aaron Judge each hit solo homers, and New York won in Toronto. Tigers 7, Rangers 2 • Nicholas Castellanos homered as part of a sevenrun first inning for Detroit, and the hosting Tigers cruised to a win over Texas. Astros 12, White Sox 6 • Yuli Gurriel and Alex Bregman each homered and Charlie Morton won his 11th as Houston beat visiting Chicago. Athletics 6, Indians 3 • Stephen Piscotty hit a go-ahead, two-run homer in the 11th inning and Oakland rallied in Cleveland. Red Sox 15, Royals 4 • Andrew Benintendi homered, doubled, walked a career-high four times and scored four runs, and Boston won in Kansas City.

INTERLEAGUE Rays 3, Mets 0 • Blake Snell blanked the Mets over a career-high-tying 7 1/3 innings, Wilson Ramos drove in a pair of runs and Tampa Bay won in New York. Rockies 5, Mariners 1 • Noel Cuevas hit a three-run homer in the seventh among his three hits to lead Colorado in Seattle. Dodgers 3, Angels 1 • Ross Stripling struck out seven in six innings, Justin Turner hit a two-run single and Yasiel Puig homered as the Dodgers won at Angel Stadium. Associated Press

Yankees 8, Blue Jays 5 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf-cf 5 2 2 3 1 1 .254 Judge rf 3 1 1 1 2 2 .277 Stanton dh 3 1 1 0 2 1 .265 Hicks cf 1 1 0 0 2 1 .259 Frazier lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Andujar 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .280 Gregorius ss 4 1 1 1 1 1 .252 Drury 2b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .189 Wade 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .086 Higashioka c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .190 Bird 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .198 Totals 36 8 9 7 10 12 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .248 a-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .259 4 0 1 0 0 2 .227 Gurriel Jr. 2b Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .254 Smoak 1b 4 2 2 0 0 2 .237 Morales dh 4 0 1 0 0 3 .239 Pillar cf 3 1 1 3 0 0 .246 Grichuk rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .207 Maile c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Diaz ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .239 Totals 34 5 9 5 2 9 New York 403 000 001 — 8 9 0 Toronto 020 101 001 — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Granderson in the 9th. LOB: New York 11, Toronto 5. 2B: Andujar (25), Drury (2), Granderson (14), Smoak (22). 3B: Gardner (3). HR: Gardner (6), off Happ; Judge (25), off Happ; Pillar (8), off Severino; Grichuk (11), off Severino; Diaz (8), off Shreve. RBIs: Gardner 3 (24), Judge (58), Gregorius (46), Drury 2 (7), Pillar 3 (32), Grichuk (28), Diaz (20). SB: Gregorius (10). SF: Pillar. RLISP: New York 6 (Gardner, Andujar 2, Higashioka, Frazier 2); Toronto 2 (Solarte, Morales). GIDP: Solarte. DP: New York 1 (Severino, Gregorius, Bird). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Severino, W, 14-2 5 5 3 3 2 5 97 2.12 Holder 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 2.04 Robertson, 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.43 Betances, 1 0 0 0 0 2 23 2.56 1/ Chapman 1 6 1.42 3 00 0 0 2/ Shreve 1 0 1 10 4.99 3 1 1 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ, L, 10-5 22/3 4 6 6 6 5 84 4.44 Petricka 21/3 1 1 0 1 2 40 4.40 Santos 2 1 0 0 1 2 34 10.80 1/ Loup 2 3.86 3 10 0 0 0 Cruz 11/3 2 1 1 2 2 28 2.70 1/ Axford 1 3 4.14 3 00 0 0 Santos pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Petricka 2-2, Loup 1-0, Cruz 2-0. PB: Maile (3). Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, John Libka; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 3:31. A: 44,352 .

Astros 12, White Sox 6 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Moncada 2b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .232 Sanchez 3b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .258 Abreu dh 4 1 0 0 0 2 .259 Garcia rf 3 2 1 2 0 0 .281 Palka lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .227 Davidson 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .228 Narvaez c 4 0 2 3 0 1 .270 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .223 a-Tilson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Totals 34 6 7 6 2 14 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf 4 2 1 0 1 2 .249 Bregman 3b 5 3 3 2 0 1 .284 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .339 Gurriel 1b 4 2 2 4 1 1 .303 Reddick rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .269 Gattis dh 4 1 2 1 1 1 .257 Tucker lf 4 1 1 1 1 3 .250 Stassi c 5 0 3 2 0 1 .264 Gonzalez ss 5 1 2 1 0 0 .229 Totals 40 12 17 12 5 11 Chicago 000 104 010 — 6 7 0 Houston 013 022 13x — 12 17 1 a-struck out for Engel in the 9th. E: Gonzalez (6). LOB: Chicago 4, Houston 9. 2B: Sanchez (18), Narvaez (10), Bregman (29), Altuve (23), Gattis (15), Stassi (12), Gonzalez (12). HR: Garcia (9), off Giles; Gurriel (6), off Shields; Bregman (17), off Shields. RBIs: Garcia 2 (17), Davidson (38), Narvaez 3 (14), Bregman 2 (57), Gurriel 4 (46), Reddick (27), Gattis (62), Tucker (1), Stassi 2 (24), Gonzalez (35). SB: Anderson (21), Springer (6), Altuve (13). SF: Garcia. RLISP: Chicago 3 (Palka, Anderson, Engel); Houston 5 (Springer, Gurriel, Tucker 2, Gonzalez). GIDP: Gonzalez. DP: Chicago 1 (Moncada, Anderson, Davidson). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields, L, 3-10 52/3 10 8 8 2 9 99 4.53 Rondon 1 2 1 1 1 1 32 7.67 2/ Fry 3 0 1 18 3.54 3 4 3 2/ Minaya 2 0 20 3.57 3 1 0 0 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton, W, 11-2 52/3 5 5 5 2 8 101 2.83 1/ Harris, 1 5 3.98 3 0 0 0 0 McHugh, 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.88 Giles 1 1 1 1 0 1 11 4.11 Smith 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 4.98 Inherited runners-scored: Fry 2-1, Minaya 2-2, Harris 1-0. WP: Harris. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Bill Miller; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Alan Porter. T: 3:19. A: 39,568 .

Saturday Minnesota 5, Baltimore 4 NY Yankees 8, Toronto 5 Houston 12, White Sox 6 Colorado 5, Seattle 1 Detroit 7, Texas 2 Oakland 6, Cleveland 3, 11 inn. Tampa Bay 3, NY Mets 0 Boston 15, Kansas City 4 LA Dodgers 3, LA Angels 1 Friday Toronto 6, NY Yankees 2 Detroit 3, Texas 1 NY Mets 5, Tampa Bay 1 Cleveland 10, Oakland 4 Houston 11, White Sox 4 Minnesota 6, Baltimore 2 Boston 10, Kansas City 5 LA Angels 3, LA Dodgers 2 Colorado 7, Seattle 1

Sunday’s pitching matchups

Braves 5, Brewers 1 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Albies 2b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .282 Freeman 1b 4 2 3 1 1 0 .310 Markakis rf 3 1 1 1 2 0 .324 Camargo 3b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .256 Culberson lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .265 Flowers c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .228 Swanson ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .246 Sanchez p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Flaherty ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Vizcaino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Minter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 5 8 5 6 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243 Yelich cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Aguilar 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .303 Shaw 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Perez lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .246 Miller 2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .269 Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 c-Braun ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Saladino ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .302 Kratz c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Wilkerson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 a-Broxton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Zagurski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Villar 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Totals 31 1 4 1 1 11 Atlanta 200 000 030 — 5 8 0 Milwaukee 000 000 100 — 1 4 0 a-lined out for Williams in the 6th. b-singled for Winkler in the 8th. c-struck out for Lopez in the 9th. LOB: Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 5. 2B: Freeman (23). 3B: Freeman (3), Markakis (1). RBIs: Freeman (58), Markakis (59), Camargo 2 (39), Flaherty (13), Miller (29). SB: Perez (7). RLISP: Atlanta 5 (Inciarte 2, Flowers, Swanson 2); Milwaukee 3 (Yelich, Perez, Braun). GIDP: Markakis. DP: Milwaukee 1 (Lopez, Saladino, Aguilar). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez, W, 4-2 62/3 2 1 1 1 8 82 2.72 1/ Winkler, 2 3.00 3 00 0 0 0 Vizcaino 1 1 0 0 0 0 22 1.71 Minter 1 1 0 0 0 3 24 2.68 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wilkerson, L, 0-1 5 4 2 2 3 5 91 7.88 Williams 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.76 Zagurski 1 3 3 3 0 2 28 63.00 Lopez 2 1 0 0 3 0 39 3.14 Zagurski pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Winkler 1-0, Lopez 1-1. HBP: Sanchez (Aguilar). WP: Vizcaino. Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, John Libka; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 3:06. A: 38,813 .

Rays 3, Mets 0 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Duffy 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .309 Robertson 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .261 Ramos c 5 0 2 2 0 1 .289 Cron 1b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .241 a-Bauers ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Hechavarria ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Gomez rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .200 Field lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .217 b-Smith ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Alvarado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Snell p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Castillo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wendle lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .272 Totals 35 3 9 3 4 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nimmo cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .261 Bautista rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .218 Cabrera 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .283 Conforto lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .224 Flores 1b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .269 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Plawecki c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .225 Rosario ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .236 Matz p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .103 Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Reyes ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .180 Swarzak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 0 7 0 3 10 Tampa Bay 000 010 011 — 3 9 0 New York 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 a-struck out for Cron in the 8th. b-grounded out for Field in the 8th. c-doubled for Gsellman in the 8th. LOB: Tampa Bay 11, New York 7. 2B: Duffy (16), Cron (14), Gomez (8), Field (9), Nimmo (11), Flores (14), Reyes (5). RBIs: Ramos 2 (47), Gomez (18). SB: Kiermaier (6). CS: Nimmo (4). RLISP: Tampa Bay 8 (Kiermaier, Duffy, Hechavarria 3, Bauers, Smith 2); New York 3 (Cabrera, Plawecki, Matz). GIDP: Duffy, Frazier, Plawecki. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Duffy, Robertson, Cron), (Snell, Robertson, Cron); New York 1 (Rosario, Cabrera, Flores). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell, W, 12-4 71/3 6 0 0 3 9 112 2.09 1/ Castillo, 0 0 0 5 1.47 3 0 0 1/ Alvarado, 0 0 0 5 2.75 3 1 0 Romo, S, 9-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.23 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz, L, 4-6 61/3 5 1 1 3 5 110 3.31 Gsellman 12/3 2 1 1 0 2 26 4.44 Swarzak 1 2 1 1 1 1 22 6.46 Alvarado pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Castillo 1-0, Alvarado 1-0, Romo 1-0, Gsellman 1-0. HBP: Matz (Snell), Gsellman (Robertson). Umpires: Home, Nic Lentz; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Brian Knight. T: 2:58. A: 32,986 .

Phillies 3, Pirates 2 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Valentin 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Hoskins lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 Herrera cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .280 C.Santana 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .222 Williams rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .239 c-Altherr ph-rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .177 Kingery ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .235 Alfaro c 4 0 1 1 0 3 .245 Franco 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .268 Arrieta p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .179 b-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 3 9 3 2 8 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Marte cf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .275 Polanco rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .231 Moran 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .261 Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Diaz c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .289 Dickerson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .308 Harrison 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .260 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .245 Taillon p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .097 E.Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Meadows ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .298 Crick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Freese 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Totals 35 2 8 2 1 12 Philadelphia 000 000 300 — 3 9 0 Pittsburgh 101 000 000 — 2 8 0 a-singled for E.Santana in the 7th. b-flied out for Arrieta in the 8th. c-doubled for Williams in the 9th. d-struck out for Dominguez in the 9th. LOB: Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 7. 2B: Alfaro (11), Altherr (7), Dickerson (19). 3B: Williams (2). HR: Marte (10), off Arrieta. RBIs: Williams (29), Kingery (26), Alfaro (18), Marte (38), Moran (35). RLISP: Philadelphia 3 (Herrera, Knapp 2); Pittsburgh 2 (Bell, Freese). GIDP: Valentin. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Harrison, Mercer, Bell). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta, W, 6-6 7 6 2 2 1 8 101 3.47 Dominguez, 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 1.82 Arano, S, 2-2 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 2.25 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon, L, 5-7 62/3 5 3 3 0 6 77 4.05 1/ E.Santana 0 0 1 3.58 3 1 0 0 Crick 1 2 0 0 0 0 21 2.25 Vazquez 1 1 0 0 2 2 25 3.47 Inherited runners-scored: E.Santana 1-1. WP: Arrieta. Umpires: Home, Larry Vanover; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T: 2:48. A: 28,150 .

Cubs 8, Reds 7 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler rf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .270 Barnhart c 5 1 1 0 0 1 .258 Votto 1b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .296 Gennett 2b 5 2 2 0 0 2 .329 Suarez 3b 3 1 2 3 2 0 .312 Winker lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .277 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Peraza ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .274 Harvey p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Duvall lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Hamilton cf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .230 Totals 37 7 11 5 4 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Zobrist rf 5 1 2 2 0 2 .296 Heyward cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Almora cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .324 Baez 2b 5 1 4 2 0 0 .294 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .248 Happ 3b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .251 Morrow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Schwarber lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .248 Caratini c 3 2 2 1 1 0 .271 Russell ss 3 2 2 1 1 0 .282 Chatwood p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Rosario p 1 0 1 1 0 0 1.000 a-Bote ph-3b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Totals 37 8 13 8 3 8 Cincinnati 203 011 000 — 7 11 1 Chicago 000 201 14x — 8 13 0 a-singled for Rosario in the 8th. E: Peraza (10). LOB: Cincinnati 7, Chicago 9. 2B: Votto (18), Zobrist (11), Caratini (4), Russell (15). HR: Suarez (18), off Chatwood; Baez (17), off Hernandez. RBIs: Votto (44), Suarez 3 (66), Winker (36), Zobrist 2 (35), Baez 2 (63), Rizzo (59), Caratini (5), Russell (28), Rosario (1). SB: Peraza (16), Hamilton 3 (19), Baez (16). RLISP: Cincinnati 5 (Barnhart 3, Winker, Harvey); Chicago 4 (Zobrist, Happ 2, Schwarber). GIDP: Winker. DP: Chicago 1 (Russell, Baez, Rizzo). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey 52/3 9 3 2 1 4 93 4.80 1/ Hernandez 1 0 0 6 2.08 3 1 1 Garrett, 1 1 3 3 2 2 27 3.43 Hughes, L, 2-3, 1 2 1 1 0 2 14 1.53 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood 52/3 9 7 7 4 4 120 5.01 Rosario, W, 4-0 21/3 2 0 0 0 2 23 1.50 Morrow, S, 20-21 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.35 Hernandez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Garrett pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Hernandez 1-0, Hughes 3-3, Rosario 1-0. HBP: Harvey (Rizzo). WP: Chatwood 2. Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T: 3:15. A: 41,538 .

Nationals 18, Marlins 4 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dietrich lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Castro 2b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .297 Realmuto c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .305 Holaday c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Bour 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .232 Cooper rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 Riddle ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .258 Rojas 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Rivera cf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .194 Chen p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Hernandez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Meyer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 32 4 7 4 2 3 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 3 1 0 1 0 .282 Soto lf 5 2 2 2 0 1 .308 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .280 b-Kieboom ph-1b 0 0 0 1 0 0 .217 Harper rf 3 4 3 0 1 0 .219 Goodwin rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .193 Reynolds 1b-3b 5 3 5 10 0 0 .292 Taylor cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .244 Difo 2b 4 2 1 0 1 0 .249 Severino c 5 1 1 3 0 1 .171 Scherzer p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .244 a-Adams ph-lf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .293 Totals 40 18 17 18 4 3 Miami 000 210 100 — 4 7 1 Washington 020 173 50x — 18 17 0 a-singled for Scherzer in the 7th. b-out on sacrifice fly for Rendon in the 7th. E: Castro (11). LOB: Miami 3, Washington 3. 2B: Soto (11), Rendon (25), Reynolds (2). 3B: Riddle (3). HR: Castro (6), off Scherzer; Realmuto (12), off Scherzer; Rivera (1), off Scherzer; Reynolds (9), off Chen; Severino (2), off Hernandez; Reynolds (10), off Hernandez. RBIs: Castro (33), Realmuto (41), Rojas (32), Rivera (7), Soto 2 (26), Rendon 2 (39), Reynolds 10 (24), Severino 3 (15), Kieboom (5). SF: Kieboom. RLISP: Miami 1 (Riddle); Washington 2 (Severino 2). GIDP: Realmuto, Rivera. DP: Washington 2 (Turner, Difo, Reynolds), (Turner, Difo, Reynolds). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen, L, 2-6 4 1/3 7 7 7 2 3 84 6.14 Hernandez 21/3 8 10 10 2 0 67 6.59 Meyer 11/3 2 1 1 0 0 23 3.86 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, W, 11-5 7 7 4 4 2 3 109 2.33 Kelley 2 0 0 0 0 0 18 2.84 Inherited runners-scored: Hernandez 2-2, Meyer 1-1. WP: Hernandez. Umpires: Home, Mark Wegner; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Mike DiMuro. T: 3:01. A: 34,364 .

Dodgers 3, Angels 1 Los Angeles (N) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson cf-lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Muncy 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .270 Turner dh 4 0 1 2 0 1 .260 Bellinger 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Kemp lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .317 Forsythe 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Grandal c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .241 Taylor ss 4 0 0 0 0 4 .257 Puig rf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .263 Hernandez 2b-cf 2 1 1 0 2 1 .235 Totals 30 3 4 3 5 14 Los Angeles (A) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .172 Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .312 Trout cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .312 Upton lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .248 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Ohtani dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .269 Valbuena 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .211 a-Fletcher ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Kinsler 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Totals 32 1 4 1 1 9 Los Angeles (N) 000 020 001 — 3 4 1 Los Angeles (A) 000 001 000 — 1 4 0 a-flied out for Valbuena in the 7th. E: Taylor (8). LOB: Los Angeles (N) 6, Los Angeles (A) 7. HR: Puig (10), off Ramirez; Trout (25), off Stripling. RBIs: Turner 2 (17), Puig (32), Trout (50). S: Pederson. RLISP: Los Angeles (N) 2 (Turner, Bellinger); Los Angeles (A) 3 (Calhoun, Upton, Pujols). Los Angeles (N) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stripling, W, 7-2 6 3 1 1 0 7 90 2.22 1/ Paredes, 4 5.87 3 0 0 0 0 0 2/ Goeddel, 1 0 11 2.96 3 0 0 0 2/ Hudson, 3 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.34 1/ Alexander, 2 3.60 3 0 0 0 0 0 Jansen, S, 24-27 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.34 Los Angeles (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McGuire 3 1 0 0 2 6 61 6.41 2/ Alvarez 1 0 10 2.87 3 0 0 0 Cole, L, 0-1 21/3 2 2 2 1 4 43 2.84 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 3.20 Parker 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.91 Ramirez 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 4.53 Inherited runners-scored: Alexander 1-0, Cole 1-0. HBP: Stripling (Simmons), Goeddel (Kinsler). Umpires: Home, Mike Winters; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:18. A: 44,409 .

NL

Pitcher

StL SF

Flaherty (R) Bumgarner (L) 3:05

3-4 1-3

3.19 2.58

Phi Pit

Eflin (R) Kingham (R)

7-2 2-4

2.97 4.70

2-5 12:35 3-10

5.26 4.60

Mia Richards (R) Was Roark (R)

Time W-L

12:35

ERA

Atl Mil

Newcomb (L) Guerra (R) 1:10

8-3 5-5

3.10 2.87

Cin Chi

Castillo (R) Lester (L)

1:20

5-8 11-2

5.53 2.25

SD Ari

Richard (L) Greinke (R)

3:10

7-8 9-5

4.46 3.36

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

NY Tor

German (R) Borucki (L)

2-4 12:07 0-1

5.37 2.77

Tex Bibens-Dirkx (R) Det Fulmer (R) 12:10

1-2 4.40 3-7 4.22

Oak Anderson (L) 0-2 Cle Bieber (R) 12:10 4-0

7.63 2.97

Bal Cobb (R) Min Odorizzi (R)

1:10

2-10 3-6

6.53 4.57

Chi Giolito (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

1:10

5-7 5-8

6.93 4.12

Bos Porcello (R) KC Junis (R)

1:15

10-3 5-10

3.57 5.13

IL

Time W-L

ERA

Pitcher

TB Eovaldi (R) NYM Flexen (R)

12:10

2-3 3.92 0-1 10.80

Col Senzatela (R) Sea LeBlanc (L) 3:10

3-1 4-0

4.44 3.19

LAD Wood (L) LAA Heaney (L)

5-5 4-6

3.94 3.94

7:05

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Red Sox 15, Royals 4 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 6 2 4 1 0 2 .343 Benintendi lf 2 4 2 2 4 0 .286 Martinez dh 5 2 2 1 0 2 .329 a-Swihart ph-dh 1 1 1 1 0 0 .185 Moreland 1b 3 2 1 1 2 0 .289 Bogaerts ss 3 2 1 3 3 0 .277 Holt 2b 4 0 1 1 2 0 .296 Devers 3b 4 1 1 1 2 1 .245 Vazquez c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .213 Leon c 2 0 2 1 0 0 .260 Bradley Jr. cf 6 1 0 1 0 2 .198 Totals 40 15 16 15 13 8 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 2 2 0 1 0 .293 Bonifacio rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .296 b-Almonte ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Moustakas 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .258 Perez c 3 0 0 1 0 1 .213 Dozier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .213 Duda dh 3 1 1 2 0 2 .247 Escobar cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .194 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Mondesi ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .200 Totals 34 4 6 4 2 13 Boston 000 040 317 — 15 16 1 Kansas City 012 010 000 — 4 6 0 a-singled for Martinez in the 9th. b-popped out for Bonifacio in the 9th. E: Devers (18). LOB: Boston 12, Kansas City 9. 2B: Betts 2 (23), Benintendi (21), Martinez (21), Bogaerts (24), Bonifacio (3), Escobar (11). HR: Benintendi (14), off McCarthy; Duda (7), off Price. RBIs: Betts (44), Benintendi 2 (55), Martinez (74), Moreland (41), Bogaerts 3 (52), Holt (22), Devers (48), Vazquez 2 (14), Bradley Jr. (27), Leon (18), Swihart (4), Moustakas (56), Perez (34), Duda 2 (26). SB: Betts (16), Holt (4), Vazquez (2). SF: Moreland, Perez. RLISP: Boston 7 (Moreland, Devers 2, Bradley Jr. 4); Kansas City 4 (Moustakas, Escobar 2, Mondesi). GIDP: Devers. DP: Kansas City 1 (Keller, Mondesi, Moustakas). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price 42/3 6 4 4 1 9 102 4.44 Hembree, W, 4-1 11/3 0 0 0 1 1 22 3.58 Barnes, 1 0 0 0 0 2 19 2.39 2/ Kelly 1 6 3.41 3 00 0 0 1/ Workman 5 2.02 3 00 0 0 0 Velazquez 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.76 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Keller 42/3 6 4 4 5 2 89 2.52 1/ Hill 1 1 12 5.40 3 00 0 Adam, L, 0-2 1 1 2 2 1 3 22 4.91 Romero 1 1 1 1 2 0 16 7.71 McCarthy 1 1 1 1 1 2 22 3.38 2/ Maurer 3 5 5 5 0 0 30 12.66 1/ Butera 3 2 2 2 3 0 24 54.00 Adam pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Hembree 3-0, Hill 1-0, Romero 2-2, Butera 1-1. HBP: Price 3 (Moustakas,Perez,Duda). WP: Barnes. Umpires: Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Jim Wolf; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Ryan Blakney. T: 4:03. A: 30,347 .

This Date In Baseball Compiled by PAUL MONTELLA July 8 1912: Rube Marquard’s 19-game winning streak was stopped as the New York Giants lost 7-2 to the Chicago Cubs. 1918: Boston’s Babe Ruth lost a home run at Fenway Park when prevailing rules reduce his shot over the fence to a triple. Amos Strunk scored on Ruth’s hit for a 1-0 win over Cleveland. Ruth, who played 95 games in the season, finished tied for the American League title with 11 homers. 1935: The AL extended its All-Star winning streak to three with a 4-1 victory at Cleveland’s Municipal Stadium. New York Yankee Lefty Gomez went six innings, which prompted the NL to have the rules changed so that no pitcher could throw more than three innings, unless extra innings. 1941: Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox hit a three-run, two-out homer in the ninth to give the AL a dramatic 7-5 victory in the All-Star game at Detroit’s Briggs Stadium. Up to that point Arky Vaughn of the Pittsburgh Pirates was the NL hero with two home runs, the first player to do so in All-Star play. 1947: Frank Shea became the first winning rookie pitcher in the first 14 years of All-Star play as the AL nipped the NL 2-1 at Chicago’s Wrigley Field. 1952: The NL edged the AL 3-2 in the first rain-shortened All-Star game. The five-inning contest, at Philadelphia’s Shibe Park, featured home runs by Jackie Robinson and Hank Sauer of the Nationals. 1957: Baseball owners re-elected commissioner Ford Frick to another seven-year term when his contract is up in 1958. 1958: The 25th anniversary All-Star game, at Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium, went to the AL, 4-3 in a game that only produced 13 singles. This was the first All-Star game in which neither team got an extra-base hit. 1970: Jim Ray Hart of San Francisco hit for the cycle and became the first NL player in 59 years to drive in six runs in one inning as the Giants beat Atlanta, 13-0. 1974: New York shortstop Jim Mason tied a major-league record when he doubled four times in the Yankees’ 12-5 win over Texas. 1994: Shortstop John Valentin made the 10th unassisted triple play in baseball history in the sixth inning and then led off the bottom of the inning with a homer to lead Boston to a 4-3 victory over the Seattle Mariners.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE

M 4 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W L

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away

Milwaukee

53 36 .596

— 7-3 L-1

29-18

24-18 23-21

Chicago

50 36 .581 1½

— 8-2 W-1

27-15

Cardinals

46 42 .523 6½

4 4-6 W-1

23-22 23-20

Pittsburgh

40 48 .455 12½

10 3-7 L-5

21-23

19-25

Cincinnati

39 50 .438

14 11½ 6-4 L-1

21-26

18-24

EAST

W L

Philadelphia

49 37 .570

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away —

— 8-2 W-6 30-16

19-21

Atlanta

50 38 .568

— 5-5 W-1

23-17

27-21

Washington

45 43

5

5 4-6 W-3

22-23 23-20

.511

New York

35 50 .412 13½ 13½ 4-6 L-1

15-27 20-23

Miami

36 55 .396 15½ 15½ 4-6 L-3

19-26

17-29

WEST

W L

Pct GBWCGB L10 Str Home Away

Arizona

49 40

.551

— 4-6 W-1

25-22

24-18

Los Angeles

48 40 .545

½

2 6-4 W-1

26-23

22-17

Colorado

46 43

.517

3

4½ 8-2 W-5

18-22

28-21

San Francisco

46 45 .505

4

5½ 4-6 L-1

27-16

19-29

San Diego

38 52 .422 11½

13 3-7 L-1

19-25

19-27

Saturday Cardinals 3, San Francisco 2 Cubs 8, Cincinnati 7 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 Atlanta 5, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 5, Seattle 1 Tampa Bay 3, NY Mets 0 LA Dodgers 3, LA Angels 1 Washington 18, Miami 4 San Diego at Arizona, late Friday San Francisco 3, Cardinals 2 Cincinnati 3, Cubs 2 Philadelphia 17, Pittsburgh 5 Washington 3, Miami 2 NY Mets 5, Tampa Bay 1 Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 4 Arizona 3, San Diego 1 LA Angels 3, LA Dodgers 2 Colorado 7, Seattle 1

CENTRAL

W L

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Cleveland

49 38 .563

— 6-4 L-1

28-14

Away 21-24

Minnesota

38 48 .442 10½

16 4-6 W-3

23-20

15-28

Detroit

40 51 .440

11 16½ 4-6 W-2

25-22

15-29

Chicago

30 59

20 25½ 2-8 L-4

16-27

14-32

Kansas City

25 63 .284 24½

11-34

14-29

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

.337

30 1-9 L-8

EAST

W L

Boston

61 29 .678

— 8-2 W-5

28-12

33-17

New York

57 29 .663

2

— 6-4 W-1

33-13

24-16

Tampa Bay

44 44 .500

16

11 6-4 W-1

23-17

21-27

Toronto

41 47 .466

19

14 4-6 L-1

24-24

17-23

Baltimore

24 64

.273

36

31 1-9 L-5

12-29

12-35

WEST

W L

Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

Houston

60 31 .659

Seattle

— 7-3 W-5

28-17

32-14

56 34

.622 3½

— 7-3 L-2

30-17

26-17

Oakland

49 40

.551

10

6½ 8-2 W-1

24-21

25-19

Los Angeles

45 45 .500 14½

11 4-6 L-1

21-22

24-23

Texas

39 51

17 4-6 L-2

19-28

20-23

.433 20½

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Cubs rally for 4 in 8th to beat Reds

Athletics 6, Indians 3

Tigers 7, Rangers 2

Rockies 5, Mariners 1

Twins 5, Orioles 4

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 6 0 1 0 0 2 .255 Canha lf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .264 Lowrie 2b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .291 K.Davis dh 5 1 2 1 0 2 .242 Olson 1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .239 Piscotty rf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .252 Chapman 3b 4 1 4 0 1 0 .256 Semien ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Lucroy c 5 0 0 1 0 0 .249 Totals 43 6 12 6 2 5 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Allen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guyer rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .160 McAllister p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lindor ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .301 Brantley lf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .310 Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .293 Encarnacion dh-1b 4 0 0 1 1 0 .227 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .254 1-R.Davis pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Tomlin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kipnis 2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .216 Gonzalez 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Gomes c 5 1 1 0 0 1 .247 Naquin rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .264 G.Allen cf-rf-cf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .219 Totals 41 3 9 3 4 8 Oakland 000 000 030 03 — 6 12 1 Cleveland 110 001 000 00 — 3 9 1 1-ran for Alonso in the 8th. E: Jackson (2), Lindor (12). LOB: Oakland 7, Cleveland 9. 2B: Chapman 2 (14), Brantley (23), G.Allen (4). HR: Lowrie (15), off Ramirez; K.Davis (21), off Ramirez; Piscotty (8), off Tomlin. RBIs: Lowrie 2 (61), K.Davis (58), Piscotty 2 (38), Lucroy (25), Lindor (56), Encarnacion (62), G.Allen (5). SB: Chapman (1), Ramirez (19), G.Allen (6). CS: R.Davis (4). S: Semien. RLISP: Oakland 4 (Fowler, Olson, Lucroy 2); Cleveland 4 (Lindor, Alonso 3). GIDP: Fowler, Olson. DP: Cleveland 2 (Lindor, Ramirez, Alonso), (Encarnacion, Lindor). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson 52/3 5 3 2 4 3 98 2.45 Buchter 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 14 2.30 Trivino 2 3 0 0 0 3 30 1.41 Treinen, W, 5-1 2 0 0 0 0 2 24 0.81 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber 7 5 0 0 2 3 102 2.49 1/ Ramirez, 3 0 1 21 3.44 3 3 3 1/ Perez 0 0 1 0.77 3 0 0 0 McAllister 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 5.66 C.Allen 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.25 Tomlin, L, 0-5 1 3 3 3 0 0 29 6.89 Inherited runners-scored: Buchter 2-1, C.Allen 1-0. Umpires: Home, Stu Scheurwater; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Sean Barber. T: 3:49. A: 33,195 .

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .294 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Guzman 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Mazara rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .270 1-Tocci pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .069 Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .296 Kiner-Falefa 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Odor 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .234 Profar 1b-ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .247 Gallo lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .190 Chirinos c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .203 DeShields cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Totals 35 2 8 2 1 9 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mahtook lf 5 0 2 1 0 3 .211 Castellanos rf 4 1 1 1 1 2 .301 Goodrum 2b 4 1 4 0 1 0 .251 Hicks 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .284 Martinez dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .243 a-Reyes ph-dh 1 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Candelario 3b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .231 McCann c 5 0 0 0 0 3 .220 Iglesias ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .273 Jones cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .220 Totals 36 7 12 4 6 12 Texas 000 001 001 — 2 8 1 Detroit 700 000 00x — 7 12 0 a-singled for Martinez in the 8th. 1-ran for Mazara in the 8th. E: DeShields (4). LOB: Texas 7, Detroit 12. 2B: Choo 2 (20), Odor (11), Profar (23), Mahtook (4), Goodrum (18), Iglesias (21). HR: Odor (5), off Fiers; Castellanos (15), off Hamels. RBIs: Odor (23), Chirinos (36), Mahtook (5), Castellanos (55), Hicks (30), Iglesias (32). SB: Goodrum (7). RLISP: Texas 5 (Andrus, Beltre, Odor 2, Gallo); Detroit 7 (Castellanos 2, Candelario 3, McCann 2). GIDP: Martinez. DP: Texas 1 (Odor, Andrus, Profar). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels, L, 4-8 2/3 5 7 3 2 2 41 4.28 Moore 41/3 2 0 0 4 6 85 7.08 Claudio 3 5 0 0 0 4 57 4.46 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers, W, 6-5 6 5 1 1 1 6 98 3.65 Hardy 2 2 0 0 0 3 35 3.31 Wilson 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 4.05 Inherited runners-scored: Moore 1-0. HBP: Moore (Jones). WP: Moore 2. PB: McCann (4). Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Chris Segal; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Ed Hickox. T: 3:08. A: 29,174 .

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Blackmon cf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .276 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .306 Desmond 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .216 Iannetta c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .239 Gonzalez dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .274 Valaika ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .151 Parra lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .303 Cuevas rf 4 1 3 3 0 0 .267 Totals 36 5 10 5 1 11 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .333 Haniger rf 2 0 2 0 2 0 .273 Cruz dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .268 Seager 3b 2 0 2 0 2 0 .238 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Heredia cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .238 b-Span ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Andreoli lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .200 a-Gamel ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .281 Freitas c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .206 c-Gordon ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Romine 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .205 d-Herrmann ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Totals 32 1 7 1 4 9 Colorado 000 100 301 — 5 10 0 Seattle 000 010 000 — 1 7 0 a-struck out for Andreoli in the 6th. b-grounded out for Heredia in the 8th. c-flied out for Freitas in the 9th. d-grounded out for Romine in the 9th. LOB: Colorado 6, Seattle 8. 2B: Gonzalez (13). HR: Cuevas (2), off Paxton; Segura (7), off Freeland. RBIs: Gonzalez (31), Parra (39), Cuevas 3 (8), Segura (47). SB: Desmond (9). SF: Parra. RLISP: Colorado 3 (Blackmon, Arenado 2); Seattle 3 (Healy 2, Freitas). GIDP: Cruz, Span. DP: Colorado 2 (Valaika, LeMahieu, Desmond), (LeMahieu, Valaika, Desmond). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland 5 5 1 1 4 4 98 3.18 Oberg, W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.04 Ottavino, 2 2 0 0 0 3 30 1.79 Davis 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.04 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paxton, L, 8-3 7 7 4 4 1 9 98 3.49 Bradford 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.65 Nicasio 1 3 1 1 0 1 18 6.09 Umpires: Home, Marty Foster; First, Joe West; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Doug Eddings. T: 2:53. A: 36,104 .

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beckham 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .217 Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Machado ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .310 Trumbo dh 2 1 0 0 2 1 .259 Davis 1b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .155 Valencia rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .262 Schoop 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .212 Sisco c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .197 Peterson lf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .197 Totals 33 4 7 4 4 11 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mauer 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .259 Rosario dh-lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .306 Dozier 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .219 Escobar 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .270 Polanco ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .286 Kepler rf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .224 Grossman lf 4 2 1 0 0 1 .236 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cave cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .268 Wilson c 3 0 2 3 0 0 .134 Totals 31 5 8 4 3 8 Baltimore 300 000 001 — 4 7 1 Minnesota 000 032 00x — 5 8 0 E: Davis (4). LOB: Baltimore 6, Minnesota 5. 2B: Beckham (6), Jones (22), Schoop (13), Peterson (9), Dozier (17), Escobar (35), Grossman (11), Wilson (5). HR: Davis (8), off Gibson; Kepler (10), off Gausman. RBIs: Machado (60), Davis 2 (27), Peterson (18), Kepler (33), Wilson 3 (11). SB: Jones (1). RLISP: Baltimore 5 (Beckham 2, Davis, Valencia 2); Minnesota 3 (Dozier 2, Escobar). GIDP: Beckham, Wilson. DP: Baltimore 1 (Schoop, Machado, Davis); Minnesota 1 (Escobar, Dozier, Mauer). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman 5 5 3 3 1 5 90 4.11 Castro, L, 2-5 1 2 2 2 2 0 25 3.20 Scott 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 5.79 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.06 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 3-6 7 4 3 3 4 9 109 3.59 Hildenberger, 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 2.93 Rodney, S, 19-24 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 3.16 WP: Gausman. PB: Wilson (2). Umpires: Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 2:54. A: 25,974 .

Javier Baez homered and had four hits — including a game-tying infield single in the eighth — and the Chicago Cubs rallied from a five-run deficit for an 8-7 victory over Cincinnati Reds on Saturday. Anthony Rizzo’s RBI groundout capped a four-run eighth inning for Chicago, which has come from behind in each of its last eight wins. Eugenio Suarez homered and Billy Hamilton added three hits and three stolen bases for Cincinnati, which had its five-game win streak against the Cubs snapped. Randy Rosario (4-0) allowed two hits in 2 1/3 innings to get the win. Brandon Morrow worked the ninth for his 20th save. Phillies 3, Pirates 2 • Nick Williams, Scott Kingery and Jorge Alfaro drove in runs on consecutive at-bats in the seventh inning to help Philadelphia win in Pittsburgh and extend the first-place Phillies’ winning streak to six games. Braves 5, Brewers 1 • Anibal Sanchez pitched effectively into the seventh and Freddie Freeman added three hits, lifting slumping Atlanta in Milwaukee. Nationals 18, Marlins 4 • Mark Reynolds homered twice and drove in a careerhigh 10 runs, Max Scherzer won for the first time since June 5, and Washington beat visiting Miami.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Twins 5, Orioles 4 • Kyle Gibson recovered from a rough start to throw seven innings, and Max Kepler homered in his second straight game as Minnesota beat visiting Baltimore. Yankees 8, Blue Jays 5 • Luis Severino pitched five innings to earn his major league-leading 14th win, Brett Gardner and Aaron Judge each hit solo homers, and New York won in Toronto. Tigers 7, Rangers 2 • Nicholas Castellanos homered as part of a sevenrun first inning for Detroit, and the hosting Tigers cruised to a win over Texas. Astros 12, White Sox 6 • Yuli Gurriel and Alex Bregman each homered and Charlie Morton won his 11th as Houston beat visiting Chicago. Athletics 6, Indians 3 • Stephen Piscotty hit a go-ahead, two-run homer in the 11th inning and Oakland rallied in Cleveland. Red Sox 15, Royals 4 • Andrew Benintendi homered, doubled, walked a career-high four times and scored four runs, and Boston won in Kansas City.

INTERLEAGUE Rays 3, Mets 0 • Blake Snell blanked the Mets over a career-high-tying 7 1/3 innings, Wilson Ramos drove in a pair of runs and Tampa Bay won in New York. Rockies 5, Mariners 1 • Noel Cuevas hit a three-run homer in the seventh among his three hits to lead Colorado in Seattle. Dodgers 3, Angels 1 • Ross Stripling struck out seven in six innings, Justin Turner hit a two-run single and Yasiel Puig homered as the Dodgers won at Angel Stadium. Associated Press

Yankees 8, Blue Jays 5 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf-cf 5 2 2 3 1 1 .254 Judge rf 3 1 1 1 2 2 .277 Stanton dh 3 1 1 0 2 1 .265 Hicks cf 1 1 0 0 2 1 .259 Frazier lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Andujar 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .280 Gregorius ss 4 1 1 1 1 1 .252 Drury 2b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .189 Wade 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .086 Higashioka c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .190 Bird 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .198 Totals 36 8 9 7 10 12 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .248 a-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .259 4 0 1 0 0 2 .227 Gurriel Jr. 2b Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .254 Smoak 1b 4 2 2 0 0 2 .237 Morales dh 4 0 1 0 0 3 .239 Pillar cf 3 1 1 3 0 0 .246 Grichuk rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .207 Maile c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Diaz ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .239 Totals 34 5 9 5 2 9 New York 403 000 001 — 8 9 0 Toronto 020 101 001 — 5 9 0 a-struck out for Granderson in the 9th. LOB: New York 11, Toronto 5. 2B: Andujar (25), Drury (2), Granderson (14), Smoak (22). 3B: Gardner (3). HR: Gardner (6), off Happ; Judge (25), off Happ; Pillar (8), off Severino; Grichuk (11), off Severino; Diaz (8), off Shreve. RBIs: Gardner 3 (24), Judge (58), Gregorius (46), Drury 2 (7), Pillar 3 (32), Grichuk (28), Diaz (20). SB: Gregorius (10). SF: Pillar. RLISP: New York 6 (Gardner, Andujar 2, Higashioka, Frazier 2); Toronto 2 (Solarte, Morales). GIDP: Solarte. DP: New York 1 (Severino, Gregorius, Bird). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Severino, W, 14-2 5 5 3 3 2 5 97 2.12 Holder 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 2.04 Robertson, 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.43 Betances, 1 0 0 0 0 2 23 2.56 1/ Chapman 1 6 1.42 3 00 0 0 2/ Shreve 1 0 1 10 4.99 3 1 1 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ, L, 10-5 22/3 4 6 6 6 5 84 4.44 Petricka 21/3 1 1 0 1 2 40 4.40 Santos 2 1 0 0 1 2 34 10.80 1/ Loup 2 3.86 3 10 0 0 0 Cruz 11/3 2 1 1 2 2 28 2.70 1/ Axford 1 3 4.14 3 00 0 0 Santos pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Petricka 2-2, Loup 1-0, Cruz 2-0. PB: Maile (3). Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, John Libka; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 3:31. A: 44,352 .

Astros 12, White Sox 6 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Moncada 2b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .232 Sanchez 3b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .258 Abreu dh 4 1 0 0 0 2 .259 Garcia rf 3 2 1 2 0 0 .281 Palka lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .227 Davidson 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .228 Narvaez c 4 0 2 3 0 1 .270 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .223 a-Tilson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Totals 34 6 7 6 2 14 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf 4 2 1 0 1 2 .249 Bregman 3b 5 3 3 2 0 1 .284 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .339 Gurriel 1b 4 2 2 4 1 1 .303 Reddick rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .269 Gattis dh 4 1 2 1 1 1 .257 Tucker lf 4 1 1 1 1 3 .250 Stassi c 5 0 3 2 0 1 .264 Gonzalez ss 5 1 2 1 0 0 .229 Totals 40 12 17 12 5 11 Chicago 000 104 010 — 6 7 0 Houston 013 022 13x — 12 17 1 a-struck out for Engel in the 9th. E: Gonzalez (6). LOB: Chicago 4, Houston 9. 2B: Sanchez (18), Narvaez (10), Bregman (29), Altuve (23), Gattis (15), Stassi (12), Gonzalez (12). HR: Garcia (9), off Giles; Gurriel (6), off Shields; Bregman (17), off Shields. RBIs: Garcia 2 (17), Davidson (38), Narvaez 3 (14), Bregman 2 (57), Gurriel 4 (46), Reddick (27), Gattis (62), Tucker (1), Stassi 2 (24), Gonzalez (35). SB: Anderson (21), Springer (6), Altuve (13). SF: Garcia. RLISP: Chicago 3 (Palka, Anderson, Engel); Houston 5 (Springer, Gurriel, Tucker 2, Gonzalez). GIDP: Gonzalez. DP: Chicago 1 (Moncada, Anderson, Davidson). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields, L, 3-10 52/3 10 8 8 2 9 99 4.53 Rondon 1 2 1 1 1 1 32 7.67 2/ Fry 3 0 1 18 3.54 3 4 3 2/ Minaya 2 0 20 3.57 3 1 0 0 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton, W, 11-2 52/3 5 5 5 2 8 101 2.83 1/ Harris, 1 5 3.98 3 0 0 0 0 McHugh, 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.88 Giles 1 1 1 1 0 1 11 4.11 Smith 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 4.98 Inherited runners-scored: Fry 2-1, Minaya 2-2, Harris 1-0. WP: Harris. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Bill Miller; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Alan Porter. T: 3:19. A: 39,568 .

Saturday Minnesota 5, Baltimore 4 NY Yankees 8, Toronto 5 Houston 12, White Sox 6 Colorado 5, Seattle 1 Detroit 7, Texas 2 Oakland 6, Cleveland 3, 11 inn. Tampa Bay 3, NY Mets 0 Boston 15, Kansas City 4 LA Dodgers 3, LA Angels 1 Friday Toronto 6, NY Yankees 2 Detroit 3, Texas 1 NY Mets 5, Tampa Bay 1 Cleveland 10, Oakland 4 Houston 11, White Sox 4 Minnesota 6, Baltimore 2 Boston 10, Kansas City 5 LA Angels 3, LA Dodgers 2 Colorado 7, Seattle 1

Sunday’s pitching matchups

Braves 5, Brewers 1 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Albies 2b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .282 Freeman 1b 4 2 3 1 1 0 .310 Markakis rf 3 1 1 1 2 0 .324 Camargo 3b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .256 Culberson lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .265 Flowers c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .228 Swanson ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .246 Sanchez p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Flaherty ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Vizcaino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Minter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 5 8 5 6 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thames rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243 Yelich cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Aguilar 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .303 Shaw 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Perez lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .246 Miller 2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .269 Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 c-Braun ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Saladino ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .302 Kratz c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Wilkerson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 a-Broxton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Zagurski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Villar 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Totals 31 1 4 1 1 11 Atlanta 200 000 030 — 5 8 0 Milwaukee 000 000 100 — 1 4 0 a-lined out for Williams in the 6th. b-singled for Winkler in the 8th. c-struck out for Lopez in the 9th. LOB: Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 5. 2B: Freeman (23). 3B: Freeman (3), Markakis (1). RBIs: Freeman (58), Markakis (59), Camargo 2 (39), Flaherty (13), Miller (29). SB: Perez (7). RLISP: Atlanta 5 (Inciarte 2, Flowers, Swanson 2); Milwaukee 3 (Yelich, Perez, Braun). GIDP: Markakis. DP: Milwaukee 1 (Lopez, Saladino, Aguilar). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez, W, 4-2 62/3 2 1 1 1 8 82 2.72 1/ Winkler, 2 3.00 3 00 0 0 0 Vizcaino 1 1 0 0 0 0 22 1.71 Minter 1 1 0 0 0 3 24 2.68 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wilkerson, L, 0-1 5 4 2 2 3 5 91 7.88 Williams 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.76 Zagurski 1 3 3 3 0 2 28 63.00 Lopez 2 1 0 0 3 0 39 3.14 Zagurski pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Winkler 1-0, Lopez 1-1. HBP: Sanchez (Aguilar). WP: Vizcaino. Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, John Libka; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 3:06. A: 38,813 .

Rays 3, Mets 0 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Duffy 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .309 Robertson 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .261 Ramos c 5 0 2 2 0 1 .289 Cron 1b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .241 a-Bauers ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Hechavarria ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Gomez rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .200 Field lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .217 b-Smith ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Alvarado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Snell p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Castillo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wendle lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .272 Totals 35 3 9 3 4 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nimmo cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .261 Bautista rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .218 Cabrera 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .283 Conforto lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .224 Flores 1b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .269 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Plawecki c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .225 Rosario ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .236 Matz p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .103 Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Reyes ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .180 Swarzak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 0 7 0 3 10 Tampa Bay 000 010 011 — 3 9 0 New York 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 a-struck out for Cron in the 8th. b-grounded out for Field in the 8th. c-doubled for Gsellman in the 8th. LOB: Tampa Bay 11, New York 7. 2B: Duffy (16), Cron (14), Gomez (8), Field (9), Nimmo (11), Flores (14), Reyes (5). RBIs: Ramos 2 (47), Gomez (18). SB: Kiermaier (6). CS: Nimmo (4). RLISP: Tampa Bay 8 (Kiermaier, Duffy, Hechavarria 3, Bauers, Smith 2); New York 3 (Cabrera, Plawecki, Matz). GIDP: Duffy, Frazier, Plawecki. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Duffy, Robertson, Cron), (Snell, Robertson, Cron); New York 1 (Rosario, Cabrera, Flores). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell, W, 12-4 71/3 6 0 0 3 9 112 2.09 1/ Castillo, 0 0 0 5 1.47 3 0 0 1/ Alvarado, 0 0 0 5 2.75 3 1 0 Romo, S, 9-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.23 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz, L, 4-6 61/3 5 1 1 3 5 110 3.31 Gsellman 12/3 2 1 1 0 2 26 4.44 Swarzak 1 2 1 1 1 1 22 6.46 Alvarado pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Castillo 1-0, Alvarado 1-0, Romo 1-0, Gsellman 1-0. HBP: Matz (Snell), Gsellman (Robertson). Umpires: Home, Nic Lentz; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Brian Knight. T: 2:58. A: 32,986 .

Phillies 3, Pirates 2 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Valentin 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Hoskins lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 Herrera cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .280 C.Santana 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .222 Williams rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .239 c-Altherr ph-rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .177 Kingery ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .235 Alfaro c 4 0 1 1 0 3 .245 Franco 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .268 Arrieta p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .179 b-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 3 9 3 2 8 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Marte cf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .275 Polanco rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .231 Moran 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .261 Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Diaz c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .289 Dickerson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .308 Harrison 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .260 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .245 Taillon p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .097 E.Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Meadows ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .298 Crick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Freese 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Totals 35 2 8 2 1 12 Philadelphia 000 000 300 — 3 9 0 Pittsburgh 101 000 000 — 2 8 0 a-singled for E.Santana in the 7th. b-flied out for Arrieta in the 8th. c-doubled for Williams in the 9th. d-struck out for Dominguez in the 9th. LOB: Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 7. 2B: Alfaro (11), Altherr (7), Dickerson (19). 3B: Williams (2). HR: Marte (10), off Arrieta. RBIs: Williams (29), Kingery (26), Alfaro (18), Marte (38), Moran (35). RLISP: Philadelphia 3 (Herrera, Knapp 2); Pittsburgh 2 (Bell, Freese). GIDP: Valentin. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Harrison, Mercer, Bell). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta, W, 6-6 7 6 2 2 1 8 101 3.47 Dominguez, 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 1.82 Arano, S, 2-2 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 2.25 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon, L, 5-7 62/3 5 3 3 0 6 77 4.05 1/ E.Santana 0 0 1 3.58 3 1 0 0 Crick 1 2 0 0 0 0 21 2.25 Vazquez 1 1 0 0 2 2 25 3.47 Inherited runners-scored: E.Santana 1-1. WP: Arrieta. Umpires: Home, Larry Vanover; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T: 2:48. A: 28,150 .

Cubs 8, Reds 7 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler rf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .270 Barnhart c 5 1 1 0 0 1 .258 Votto 1b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .296 Gennett 2b 5 2 2 0 0 2 .329 Suarez 3b 3 1 2 3 2 0 .312 Winker lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .277 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Peraza ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .274 Harvey p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Duvall lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Hamilton cf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .230 Totals 37 7 11 5 4 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Zobrist rf 5 1 2 2 0 2 .296 Heyward cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Almora cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .324 Baez 2b 5 1 4 2 0 0 .294 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .248 Happ 3b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .251 Morrow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Schwarber lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .248 Caratini c 3 2 2 1 1 0 .271 Russell ss 3 2 2 1 1 0 .282 Chatwood p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Rosario p 1 0 1 1 0 0 1.000 a-Bote ph-3b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Totals 37 8 13 8 3 8 Cincinnati 203 011 000 — 7 11 1 Chicago 000 201 14x — 8 13 0 a-singled for Rosario in the 8th. E: Peraza (10). LOB: Cincinnati 7, Chicago 9. 2B: Votto (18), Zobrist (11), Caratini (4), Russell (15). HR: Suarez (18), off Chatwood; Baez (17), off Hernandez. RBIs: Votto (44), Suarez 3 (66), Winker (36), Zobrist 2 (35), Baez 2 (63), Rizzo (59), Caratini (5), Russell (28), Rosario (1). SB: Peraza (16), Hamilton 3 (19), Baez (16). RLISP: Cincinnati 5 (Barnhart 3, Winker, Harvey); Chicago 4 (Zobrist, Happ 2, Schwarber). GIDP: Winker. DP: Chicago 1 (Russell, Baez, Rizzo). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey 52/3 9 3 2 1 4 93 4.80 1/ Hernandez 1 0 0 6 2.08 3 1 1 Garrett, 1 1 3 3 2 2 27 3.43 Hughes, L, 2-3, 1 2 1 1 0 2 14 1.53 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood 52/3 9 7 7 4 4 120 5.01 Rosario, W, 4-0 21/3 2 0 0 0 2 23 1.50 Morrow, S, 20-21 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.35 Hernandez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Garrett pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Hernandez 1-0, Hughes 3-3, Rosario 1-0. HBP: Harvey (Rizzo). WP: Chatwood 2. Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T: 3:15. A: 41,538 .

Nationals 18, Marlins 4 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dietrich lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Castro 2b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .297 Realmuto c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .305 Holaday c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Bour 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .232 Cooper rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 Riddle ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .258 Rojas 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Rivera cf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .194 Chen p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Hernandez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Meyer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 32 4 7 4 2 3 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 3 1 0 1 0 .282 Soto lf 5 2 2 2 0 1 .308 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .280 b-Kieboom ph-1b 0 0 0 1 0 0 .217 Harper rf 3 4 3 0 1 0 .219 Goodwin rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .193 Reynolds 1b-3b 5 3 5 10 0 0 .292 Taylor cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .244 Difo 2b 4 2 1 0 1 0 .249 Severino c 5 1 1 3 0 1 .171 Scherzer p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .244 a-Adams ph-lf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .293 Totals 40 18 17 18 4 3 Miami 000 210 100 — 4 7 1 Washington 020 173 50x — 18 17 0 a-singled for Scherzer in the 7th. b-out on sacrifice fly for Rendon in the 7th. E: Castro (11). LOB: Miami 3, Washington 3. 2B: Soto (11), Rendon (25), Reynolds (2). 3B: Riddle (3). HR: Castro (6), off Scherzer; Realmuto (12), off Scherzer; Rivera (1), off Scherzer; Reynolds (9), off Chen; Severino (2), off Hernandez; Reynolds (10), off Hernandez. RBIs: Castro (33), Realmuto (41), Rojas (32), Rivera (7), Soto 2 (26), Rendon 2 (39), Reynolds 10 (24), Severino 3 (15), Kieboom (5). SF: Kieboom. RLISP: Miami 1 (Riddle); Washington 2 (Severino 2). GIDP: Realmuto, Rivera. DP: Washington 2 (Turner, Difo, Reynolds), (Turner, Difo, Reynolds). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen, L, 2-6 4 1/3 7 7 7 2 3 84 6.14 Hernandez 21/3 8 10 10 2 0 67 6.59 Meyer 11/3 2 1 1 0 0 23 3.86 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, W, 11-5 7 7 4 4 2 3 109 2.33 Kelley 2 0 0 0 0 0 18 2.84 Inherited runners-scored: Hernandez 2-2, Meyer 1-1. WP: Hernandez. Umpires: Home, Mark Wegner; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Mike DiMuro. T: 3:01. A: 34,364 .

Dodgers 3, Angels 1 Los Angeles (N) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson cf-lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Muncy 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .270 Turner dh 4 0 1 2 0 1 .260 Bellinger 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Kemp lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .317 Forsythe 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Grandal c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .241 Taylor ss 4 0 0 0 0 4 .257 Puig rf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .263 Hernandez 2b-cf 2 1 1 0 2 1 .235 Totals 30 3 4 3 5 14 Los Angeles (A) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .172 Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .312 Trout cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .312 Upton lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .248 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Ohtani dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .269 Valbuena 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .211 a-Fletcher ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Kinsler 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Totals 32 1 4 1 1 9 Los Angeles (N) 000 020 001 — 3 4 1 Los Angeles (A) 000 001 000 — 1 4 0 a-flied out for Valbuena in the 7th. E: Taylor (8). LOB: Los Angeles (N) 6, Los Angeles (A) 7. HR: Puig (10), off Ramirez; Trout (25), off Stripling. RBIs: Turner 2 (17), Puig (32), Trout (50). S: Pederson. RLISP: Los Angeles (N) 2 (Turner, Bellinger); Los Angeles (A) 3 (Calhoun, Upton, Pujols). Los Angeles (N) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stripling, W, 7-2 6 3 1 1 0 7 90 2.22 1/ Paredes, 4 5.87 3 0 0 0 0 0 2/ Goeddel, 1 0 11 2.96 3 0 0 0 2/ Hudson, 3 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.34 1/ Alexander, 2 3.60 3 0 0 0 0 0 Jansen, S, 24-27 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.34 Los Angeles (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McGuire 3 1 0 0 2 6 61 6.41 2/ Alvarez 1 0 10 2.87 3 0 0 0 Cole, L, 0-1 21/3 2 2 2 1 4 43 2.84 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 3.20 Parker 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.91 Ramirez 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 4.53 Inherited runners-scored: Alexander 1-0, Cole 1-0. HBP: Stripling (Simmons), Goeddel (Kinsler). Umpires: Home, Mike Winters; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:18. A: 44,409 .

NL

Pitcher

StL SF

Flaherty (R) Bumgarner (L) 3:05

3-4 1-3

3.19 2.58

Phi Pit

Eflin (R) Kingham (R)

7-2 2-4

2.97 4.70

2-5 12:35 3-10

5.26 4.60

Mia Richards (R) Was Roark (R)

Time W-L

12:35

ERA

Atl Mil

Newcomb (L) Guerra (R) 1:10

8-3 5-5

3.10 2.87

Cin Chi

Castillo (R) Lester (L)

1:20

5-8 11-2

5.53 2.25

SD Ari

Richard (L) Greinke (R)

3:10

7-8 9-5

4.46 3.36

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

NY Tor

German (R) Borucki (L)

2-4 12:07 0-1

5.37 2.77

Tex Bibens-Dirkx (R) Det Fulmer (R) 12:10

1-2 4.40 3-7 4.22

Oak Anderson (L) 0-2 Cle Bieber (R) 12:10 4-0

7.63 2.97

Bal Cobb (R) Min Odorizzi (R)

1:10

2-10 3-6

6.53 4.57

Chi Giolito (R) Hou Keuchel (L)

1:10

5-7 5-8

6.93 4.12

Bos Porcello (R) KC Junis (R)

1:15

10-3 5-10

3.57 5.13

IL

Time W-L

ERA

Pitcher

TB Eovaldi (R) NYM Flexen (R)

12:10

2-3 3.92 0-1 10.80

Col Senzatela (R) Sea LeBlanc (L) 3:10

3-1 4-0

4.44 3.19

LAD Wood (L) LAA Heaney (L)

5-5 4-6

3.94 3.94

7:05

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

Red Sox 15, Royals 4 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 6 2 4 1 0 2 .343 Benintendi lf 2 4 2 2 4 0 .286 Martinez dh 5 2 2 1 0 2 .329 a-Swihart ph-dh 1 1 1 1 0 0 .185 Moreland 1b 3 2 1 1 2 0 .289 Bogaerts ss 3 2 1 3 3 0 .277 Holt 2b 4 0 1 1 2 0 .296 Devers 3b 4 1 1 1 2 1 .245 Vazquez c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .213 Leon c 2 0 2 1 0 0 .260 Bradley Jr. cf 6 1 0 1 0 2 .198 Totals 40 15 16 15 13 8 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 2 2 0 1 0 .293 Bonifacio rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .296 b-Almonte ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Moustakas 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .258 Perez c 3 0 0 1 0 1 .213 Dozier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .213 Duda dh 3 1 1 2 0 2 .247 Escobar cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .194 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Mondesi ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .200 Totals 34 4 6 4 2 13 Boston 000 040 317 — 15 16 1 Kansas City 012 010 000 — 4 6 0 a-singled for Martinez in the 9th. b-popped out for Bonifacio in the 9th. E: Devers (18). LOB: Boston 12, Kansas City 9. 2B: Betts 2 (23), Benintendi (21), Martinez (21), Bogaerts (24), Bonifacio (3), Escobar (11). HR: Benintendi (14), off McCarthy; Duda (7), off Price. RBIs: Betts (44), Benintendi 2 (55), Martinez (74), Moreland (41), Bogaerts 3 (52), Holt (22), Devers (48), Vazquez 2 (14), Bradley Jr. (27), Leon (18), Swihart (4), Moustakas (56), Perez (34), Duda 2 (26). SB: Betts (16), Holt (4), Vazquez (2). SF: Moreland, Perez. RLISP: Boston 7 (Moreland, Devers 2, Bradley Jr. 4); Kansas City 4 (Moustakas, Escobar 2, Mondesi). GIDP: Devers. DP: Kansas City 1 (Keller, Mondesi, Moustakas). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price 42/3 6 4 4 1 9 102 4.44 Hembree, W, 4-1 11/3 0 0 0 1 1 22 3.58 Barnes, 1 0 0 0 0 2 19 2.39 2/ Kelly 1 6 3.41 3 00 0 0 1/ Workman 5 2.02 3 00 0 0 0 Velazquez 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.76 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Keller 42/3 6 4 4 5 2 89 2.52 1/ Hill 1 1 12 5.40 3 00 0 Adam, L, 0-2 1 1 2 2 1 3 22 4.91 Romero 1 1 1 1 2 0 16 7.71 McCarthy 1 1 1 1 1 2 22 3.38 2/ Maurer 3 5 5 5 0 0 30 12.66 1/ Butera 3 2 2 2 3 0 24 54.00 Adam pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Hembree 3-0, Hill 1-0, Romero 2-2, Butera 1-1. HBP: Price 3 (Moustakas,Perez,Duda). WP: Barnes. Umpires: Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Jim Wolf; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Ryan Blakney. T: 4:03. A: 30,347 .

This Date In Baseball Compiled by PAUL MONTELLA July 8 1912: Rube Marquard’s 19-game winning streak was stopped as the New York Giants lost 7-2 to the Chicago Cubs. 1918: Boston’s Babe Ruth lost a home run at Fenway Park when prevailing rules reduce his shot over the fence to a triple. Amos Strunk scored on Ruth’s hit for a 1-0 win over Cleveland. Ruth, who played 95 games in the season, finished tied for the American League title with 11 homers. 1935: The AL extended its All-Star winning streak to three with a 4-1 victory at Cleveland’s Municipal Stadium. New York Yankee Lefty Gomez went six innings, which prompted the NL to have the rules changed so that no pitcher could throw more than three innings, unless extra innings. 1941: Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox hit a three-run, two-out homer in the ninth to give the AL a dramatic 7-5 victory in the All-Star game at Detroit’s Briggs Stadium. Up to that point Arky Vaughn of the Pittsburgh Pirates was the NL hero with two home runs, the first player to do so in All-Star play. 1947: Frank Shea became the first winning rookie pitcher in the first 14 years of All-Star play as the AL nipped the NL 2-1 at Chicago’s Wrigley Field. 1952: The NL edged the AL 3-2 in the first rain-shortened All-Star game. The five-inning contest, at Philadelphia’s Shibe Park, featured home runs by Jackie Robinson and Hank Sauer of the Nationals. 1957: Baseball owners re-elected commissioner Ford Frick to another seven-year term when his contract is up in 1958. 1958: The 25th anniversary All-Star game, at Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium, went to the AL, 4-3 in a game that only produced 13 singles. This was the first All-Star game in which neither team got an extra-base hit. 1970: Jim Ray Hart of San Francisco hit for the cycle and became the first NL player in 59 years to drive in six runs in one inning as the Giants beat Atlanta, 13-0. 1974: New York shortstop Jim Mason tied a major-league record when he doubled four times in the Yankees’ 12-5 win over Texas. 1994: Shortstop John Valentin made the 10th unassisted triple play in baseball history in the sixth inning and then led off the bottom of the inning with a homer to lead Boston to a 4-3 victory over the Seattle Mariners.


SPORTS

07.08.2018 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5

WORLD CUP NOTEBOOK

No more multi-Cup winners remain ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brazil goalkeeper Alisson fails to stop Belgium’s first goal during their quarterfinal match at the 2018 World Cup at Kazan Arena in Kazan, Russia on Friday. Belgium won, 2-1.

Belgium will face France in semifinal WORLD CUP • FROM B1

Thibaut Courtois. Plus an owngoal from Brazil. It all adds up to a semifinal match against France on Tuesday in St. Petersburg. “Just treasure it and pass it down in the generations,” Belgium coach Roberto Martinez said, still seemingly in awe of what his team achieved at the Kazan Arena. Belgium took the lead after a slice of good fortune involving a pair of Manchester City teammates who were on opposing sides. Brazil midfielder Fernandinho’s trailing right arm inadvertently helped Belgium captain Vincent Kompany’s header land in his own net in the 13th minute. De Bruyne then completed a counterattack launched by Lukaku to double the lead in the 31st minute. As Belgium lost cohesiveness in the second half and Brazil’s changes stirred the team, substitute Renato Augusto reduced the deficit in the 76th with a header. But it was too late for Brazil to muster an equalizer as Courtois thwarted several efforts to force the game into extra time. While Belgium’s golden generation is finally flourishing, Neymar is leading Brazil home after failing to live up to the expectations that come with being soccer’s most expensive player. Crouching on the field, he pulled his shirt over his face while Belgium exalted in victory. Humiliated 7-1 by Germany in the semifinals fours year ago on home soil with Neymar out injured, Brazil didn’t even get that far this time. Just like defending champion Germany and Argentina before them, the Kazan Arena is where Brazil’s World Cup challenge ended. “Randomness happened and it was cruel to us,” Brazil coach Tite said. “It was hard to swallow.”

Uruguay

0

Russia

WORLD CUP France

France

2

Croatia SEMIFINAL Tuesday, 1 p.m. KTVI

Brazil

Saturday, 1 p.m., KTVI

FINAL • July 15, 10 a.m., KTVI

SEMIFINAL Wednesday, 1 p.m. KTVI Sweden

1 Belgium

Saturday, 9 a.m., KTVI THIRD PLACE • July 14, 9 a.m., KTVI

Belgium

England

2

Especially after Brazil conceded only one goal in the previous four games in Russia. But the defense was breached after 13 minutes in Tatarstan. Fernandinho’s own-goal ensured for the first time since March 2017 that Brazil was trailing in a competitive match. Unlike then — an eventual 4-1 victory over Uruguay — there was no comeback. Not when Courtois was proving to be an impenetrable barrier in the Belgium goal, denying Marcelo’s strike before the lead was extended by De Bruyne. “They were more effective,” Tite said, struggling to hold back tears. “Not a superiority in terms of performance, but in terms of effectiveness on the pitch.” Belgium held on even after Philippe Coutinho’s cross was headed in by Augusto, who managed to evade Kompany and Jan Vertonghen three minutes after replacing Paulinho. “Sometimes you have to accept that Brazil has got this finesse, that quality, and that they’re going to break you down, and (Belgium) just refused to accept that,” Martinez said. “This is something special.” Belgium, which finished fourth at the 1986 tournament and has never won the European Championship, is now on a 24-match

unbeaten streak. France 2, Uruguay 0 • A shot that flew directly at the hands of the opposing goalkeeper turned into a World Cup goal for Antoine Griezmann. The France striker scored the second goal in his team’s 2-0 quarterfinal victory over Uruguay, sending a seemingly easy-to-save shot at a waiting Fernando Muslera. But the ball hit the keeper on the palms, bounced off and looped over his head and into the net. The victory gave France a spot in the World Cup semifinals. The 1998 champions will next face Belgium on Tuesday in St. Petersburg. Griezmann didn’t celebrate what was his third goal of the tournament. “I was playing against a lot of friends,” said Griezmann, who is teammates with Uruguay defenders Diego Godin and Jose Gimenez at Atletico Madrid, “so I think it was normal not to celebrate.” Raphael Varane gave France the lead with a header in the 40th minute. Griezmann sent in a free kick from the right side and Varane raced across the area. He got his head to the ball and sent it into the far corner behind

Muslera. Griezmann scored his goal, which was similar to the one scored by Real Madrid forward Gareth Bale against Liverpool goalkeeper Loris Karius in the Champions League final, in the 61st minute. France went on to reach the World Cup final the last two times it advanced to the semifinals. They won their only World Cup in 1998 on home soil, and in 2006 lost to Italy on penalties. T h e m a tc h a t N i z h ny Novgorod Stadium pitted France’s speed against Uruguay’s stubborn defense and its occasional attacking threats. But with Uruguay striker Edinson Cavani injured and on the bench and Luis Suarez neutralized, it was France that scored the goals. Although he didn’t score, 19-year-old France forward Kylian Mbappe again looked dangerous on the attack, trying to slice in from the right wing or directing quick passes into Uruguay’s defense. Mbappe, who has modeled his game after Cristiano Ronaldo and is being compared to Zinedine Zidane, also picked up a second-half yellow card for falling to the ground as if in agony after a touch from an opponent.

Only five countries have won the World Cup more than once. None of them have a chance to win this year. Five-time champion Brazil and two-time champion Uruguay were both eliminated Friday, losing in the quarterfinals. Argentina, another twotime winner, lost in the round of 16 while four-time champion Germany couldn’t make it out of the group stage. Italy, which has won four titles, didn’t even qualify, losing to Sweden in the playoffs. This is the first time there will be a semifinals without at least one of Argentina, Brazil, Germany or Italy. That only leaves France and England as former champions still with a chance to win another title in Russia. Sweden fined • FIFA has fined Sweden’s soccer federation 70,000 Swiss francs ($70,750) for players wearing unapproved branded clothing in World Cup games. FIFA says the Sweden team defied requests “to cease the activity that led to the sanction.” The case relates to some players wearing branded socks that supplement the official team uniform. FIFA says its marketing and equipment rules were broken again when Sweden beat Switzerland 1-0 in a round of 16 game. Sweden plays England on Saturday in the quarterfinals. England’s Vardy likely out • Jamie Vardy has missed most of England’s training and appears unlikely to be fit for the World Cup quarterfinal against Sweden on Saturday. Vardy injured his groin on Tuesday after going on as a substitute in the 88th minute of England’s penalty shootout victory over Colombia in the round of 16. U.S. English-language TV ratings drop for round of 16 • U.S. English-language television viewers for the World Cup’s round of 16 in Russia were down 27 percent from four years ago, leaving the tournament 38 percent below 2014’s level. The eight second-round matches on Fox and FS averaged 4,858,000 viewers, down from 6,696,000 four years ago on ESPN and ABC, according to Nielsen Media Research. Viewers for the round of 16 were down 4 percent from the 5,042,000 average for the 2010 tournament in South Africa, which had more comparable kickoff times to this year. Associated Press

WIMBLEDON

With nothing to prove, Serena Williams keeps proving ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON • It’s hard to blame

Serena Williams for having trouble keeping track of her many titles at the All England Club. “I don’t necessarily have to win another Wimbledon in my career,” she was saying Friday, making a point about not having anything left to prove, “(because) I won — was it six times?” Um, no, Serena. It’s seven. And the way things are looking at the moment, that count could rise to No. 8 in a little more than a week. Not only is she playing like, well, her most capable self, smacking 13 aces while beating Kristina Mladenovic 7-5, 7-6 (2) for a third consecutive straight-set victory, but also the other proven contenders keep losing while she just keeps on keeping on. “I’m feeling pretty good,” Williams said. “I haven’t had any problems yet.” She is now the only woman left in the draw who has won the trophy at the All England Club, after her older sister, five-time champion Venus, lost to No. 20 Kiki Bertens 6-2, 6-7 (5), 8-6 on Friday, joining defending champion Garbine Muguruza, two-time winner Petra Kvitova and 2004 champ Maria Sharapova as Week 1 departures.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serena Williams returns the ball to France’s Kristina Mladenovic during their women’s singles match Friday at Wimbledon in London.

And the number of remaining top-10 seeds is down to two after No. 9 Venus and No. 10 Madison Keys — beaten 7-5, 5-7, 6-4 Friday by Evgeniya Rodina, a qualifier ranked only 120th — were sent home. Only No. 1 Simona Halep, who plays her thirdround match Saturday, and No. 7 Karolina Pliskova, a 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1 winner against No. 29 Mihaela Buzarnescu — are still around from the top 10. The men have had some upsets, too, but far fewer, and

eight-time champion Roger Federer continued his easy progress through the draw by running his Wimbledon streak to 29 consecutive sets. No. 8 Kevin Anderson and No. 9 John Isner — the highest-ranked American man, he’d never before reached the fourth round at the grass-court major — won in straight sets, while No. 11 Sam Querrey of the U.S. was eliminated 5-7, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2 by Gael Monfils of France. Isner next plays No. 31 Stefanos Tsitsipas, the first Greek man into

the round of 16 at a Grand Slam tournament in the 50-year professional era. Serena was seeded 25th by the All England Club, a bump from her current ranking of 181st, a spot owing to her time away from the game. This is only the fourth tournament of her return after giving birth last September. It all adds up to an easier path for Serena, who couldn’t possibly face a seeded player earlier than the semifinals. Next up for her on Monday is Rodina. “Serena,” Rodina said, “is my idol.” Plenty of players look up to her. Plenty are in awe when they stand on the other side of a net from her. Plenty do whatever they can to try to beat her, knowing it’ll usually take something special to do that. “I mean, it just gives even more props to her, honestly,” said Keys, the U.S. Open runner-up last year and a French Open semifinalist last month. “It’s definitely been a challenge that I have had to deal with, where all of a sudden, I’m the one that’s supposed to win and people are playing with nothing to lose and playing their best tennis. A lot of times you just have to weather the

storm and play better on those big points, and, I mean, the fact she’s basically done that her whole career is really impressive.” To the tune of 23 Grand Slam singles championships. (Psst, Serena. That’s 23, in all.) Serena herself is well aware that she tends to get opponents’ best. “Every single match I play — whether I’m coming back from a baby or surgery, it doesn’t matter — these young ladies, they bring a game that I’ve never seen before,” she said. “It’s interesting, because I don’t even scout as much, because when I watch them play, it’s a totally different game than when they play me. That’s what makes me great: I always play everyone at their greatest, so I have to be greater.” Venus, at 38 the oldest woman in the tournament, often has dealt with that same phenomenon. During this edition of Wimbledon, she dropped the opening set in the first round, then came back to win. Followed that exact same pattern in the second round, too. But in the third, she couldn’t quite pull off that same trick. Came close, though, even erasing a pair of match points in the final game.


07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2

BASEBALL

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

MLB INSIDER

MLB NOTEBOOK

Molina’s All-Star status sketchy

Cano apologizes for 80-game suspension

Cardinals catcher is having a big year, but he could miss out

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

The Cards’ Yadier Molina is an eight-time All-Star and stalwart behind the plate, but might not make it this year despite having his best season from a power standpoint at the plate.

BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-dispatch

While Cardinals righthander Miles Mikolas seems all-but certain to be an All-Star, the chances of eight-time All-Star Yadier Molina being named to the National League team to be announced Sunday night still are somewhat sketchy. San Francisco’s Buster Posey, like Molina a perennial All-Star, is not having an All-Star year — at five homers and 27 runs batted through Friday. But he had led the voting for catchers since the beginning of the balloting before being passed, by only about 8,200 votes, by Chicago’s Willson Contreras in the most recent returns. Molina had 13 homers (12 on the road) through Friday to lead all NL catchers as he heads toward his best power season despite being sidelined a month because of injury, will not make it through the fan-vote route. So his best chance would appear to be either to finish first or second in the players’ vote, which automatically puts him on the club. But if that doesn’t happen, he would have to depend on National League manager Dave Roberts having two reserve catchers instead of one, and Roberts then also might have to turn his back on Miami’s J.T. Realmuto, who is having the best year of any catcher at .305 with 11 homers and 36 runs batted in, with a WAR of 3.4 — well ahead of most players in the league, let alone other catchers. Miami, like every other team, has to have one selection and it would be unfair to leave off the Marlins’ best player, who never has been on an All-Star club. Given recent developments, it also would be unfair to leave off Molina. There always are some late curveballs thrown into the 32man roster and there will be some defections, mostly among pitchers who start either the Saturday or, more likely, the Sunday before the All-Star Game to be played on July 17, a Tuesday night, in Washington Here is a one guess at the National League club, keeping in mind that every team has to have at least one player. First base: Freddie Freeman, Atlanta; Brandon Belt, San Francisco; Jesus Aguilar, Milwaukee; Max Muncy, Los Angeles. The last-named is a 27-year-old rookie first baseman/third baseman who has slugged his way into the Dodgers’ regular lineup and the hearts of southern Cali-

fornia fans with 20 homers and an OPS of 1.060. And Roberts is his manager. Second base: Ozzie Albies, Atlanta; Scooter Gennett, Cincinnati; Javier Baez, Chicago. Baez, by far the Cubs’ best player of the first half, also can play shortstop. Shortstop: Brandon Crawford, San Francisco; Trevor Story, Colorado. This would be Crawford’s first All-Star start at age 31. Third base: Nolan Arenado, Colorado; Eugenio Suarez, Cincinnati. Outfield: Nick Markakis, Atlanta; Matt Kemp, Los Angeles; Bryce Harper (hitting only .213 but likely to be voted in by fans), Washington; Charlie Blackmon, Colorado; Odubel Herrera, Philadelphia; Starling Marte, Pittsburgh. Marte would be Pittsburgh’s only player. Catcher: Willson Contreras, Chicago; J.T. Realmuto, Miami; Yadier Molina, Cardinals. This presumes that Posey doesn’t win the balloting or finish first or second in the players’ vote. Starting pitchers: Max Scherzer, Washington; Jacob deGrom, New York; Jon Lester, Chicago; Aaron Nola, Philadelphia; Miles Mikolas, Cardinals; Sean Newcomb, Atlanta; Zack Greinke, Arizona. Relievers: Kenley Jansen, Los Angeles; Sean Doolittle, Washington; Brad Hand, San Diego; Josh Hader, Milwaukee; Brandon Morrow, Chicago. There will be one additional player in each league to be voted on in a special election by the fans between Sunday and next Thursday. That player likely is to be a position player. So a player such as Molina would have one more chance in that lottery.

A WASHINGTON WORLD SERIES? Until the Washington Nationals’ recent collapse, there was considerable talk that the Nats might finally make it to the World Series this year, or even win a playoff series. The Montreal-Washington franchise, which began in 1969, never has been to a World Series. The first Seattle franchise also was formed in 1969 although the Pilots became the Milwaukee Brewers the next year. But a new Seattle franchise, the Mariners, came into play in 1977 and has gone the longest in the American League without being in a World Series. But while there might be not be a World Series in the District of Columbia this year, the state of Wash-

ington could see its first. Neither Seattle nor Washington has even won a playoff series since the Mariners did in 2001, but Seattle has been going toe to toe with the defending World Series champion Houston Astros, lately, trailing the Astros by 1½ games entering the weekend and 7½ games clear of the next wild-card contender, Oakland. Longtime star Seattle pitcher Felix Hernandez never has been in a playoff game. Neither has lefthanded ace James Paxton, whose earned-run average entering the weekend was 3.39. But the other two members of the Mariners’ Big Four have been in the playoffs. You remember them. Lefthander Marco Gonzales, traded to Seattle last year, was a key reliever in the Cardinals’ 2014 playoff run, winning two games in the divisional round. Righthander Mike Leake, a member of the Cardinals’ rotation for nearly two seasons before being dealt to Seattle last August, has started in the playoffs for Cincinnati. Together, that pair is 17-10 with Gonzales the staff leading winner with nine, one more than Leake, Hernandez and Paxton. Their bullpen has a standout closer in Edwin Diaz, who leads the majors in saves with 34 and yet another Cardinal, Juan Nicasio, who is among the league leaders in holds (17). Diaz already has 86 saves at the age of 24 and has struck out 252 hitters in 163 2/3 innings while giving up just 114 hits in his career. He was the closer for the surprising Puerto Rican team that finished second last year in the World Baseball Classic and his catcher, Molina, said, “I noticed that he was one of the good ones.” “Obviously his fastball is electric. He’s got a good slider. And he’s not afraid. Sometimes when you see people with good stuff, they get nervous. This guy never gets nervous. It is something of a surprise the Mariners are challenging for first place at 24 games over .500 without their veteran elite second baseman, Robinson Cano, who ran afoul of the Major League Baseball drug policy and won’t be able to play in the postseason, even after serving his 80-game suspension. But the Mariners have speed with Dee Gordon (22 steals) and Jean Segura, 14 steals with a .331 average. They still have slugger Nelson Cruz (22 homers), who, memorably, was with the Texas Rangers when the Cardinals beat them in the 2011 World Se-

ries. But their RBI leader at 62 is one Mitch Haniger, their right fielder, who is something of a late bloomer at age 27. The Diamondbacks, who dealt Haniger to Seattle along with Segura before last season, could use that clout. At .230, they have the lowest batting average in the league. As for the perennially contending but underachieving Nationals, who had lost five in a row before rallying from nine runs down on Thursday to beat Miami and reach .500, righthander Stephen Strasburg is hurt again. And Harper, who might not be the $400 million man in offseason free agency, is hitting more 100 points under last year. But after a postgame team meeting on Wednesday, he found some unusual comfort. Harper told reporters, “We’ve never been in this position before and I think it’s an exciting time for us. In years past, we’ve won the division by a lot of games and we’re able to be behind now. I’m excited to get out and test it.”

AL CENTRAL HAS GONE SOUTH The Cleveland Indians can start drawing up their rotation for their best-of-five division series in early October. The Indians had an 11½-game lead over second-place Minnesota through Friday and no other team in the division was better than 12 games under .500. Collectively, even with Cleveland being 12 over, the division was minus-76, which would be the worst for any division since baseball split into three divisions in each league in 1994. The previous worst, not surprisingly, involved Cleveland and the AL Central in 1999 when the Indians beat out the Chicago White Sox by 21½ games when the White Sox finished second at 75-86. The division was 69 under that year. This year, while Cleveland goes into the playoffs pretty much with whatever record it wants, the wild-card game which surely will involve some combination of the New York Yankees, Boston, Houston and Seattle is likely for the first time to match two 100-win teams, one of which will be eliminated after one game. (Derrick Goold of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report). Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Mariners second baseman Robinson Cano apologized to his teammates, the organization and the fans for his 80-game suspension for violating baseball’s drug agreement. Cano tested positive for Furosemide, a diuretic that can be used to mask performanceenhancing drugs. “I wanted to apologize genuinely to the city of Seattle and to all the fans and the young baseball players in the (United) States and the (Dominican Republic) and most importantly to my teammates,” Cano said. “I wanted to show my face to you guys. I don’t think for me it’s fair to just come back and walk into the clubhouse. “I wanted to do this earlier. But I don’t want to be a distraction for the team. So I was waiting for the right time.” Cano said he couldn’t discuss details of the testing process but maintained the substance was prescribed to him in the Dominican Republic for the treatment of a medical issue. “I’ve been getting tested for the last 12 seasons and I’ve never had an issue with MLB policy,” he said. “I was treating for some medical ailments and I was being supervised by a doctor. But at the same time, I understand that everything that goes into my body, I’m responsible for that.” He said the suspension was the most difficult thing he’s dealt with in his life outside of the death of his grandfather. “I love this game so much,” Cano said. “For me, baseball is everything. You know I hate to sit in the dugout and have a day off and being away from the game and not being able to sit in the dugout and cheer for my teammates, that makes it even harder.” Mark Texeira, a former first baseman for the New York Yankees and Cano’s teammate, said on a New York radio show that he was “not surprised” Cano was suspended for PED use. Yankees G.M. Brian Cashman made comments seemingly suggesting the same. “Every time you hear a negative comment, it’s going to hurt anyone,” Cano said of his former colleagues. “But I don’t really pay attention because what I really care about (is) those who come out and say positive things like C.C. (Sabathia) and Mariano (Rivera). Because if you focus on the negative then you’re always going to live in the past. I’m one who looks ahead. I don’t really care what they said. They can say whatever they want. I hope none of them or their family go through a situation like this because it’s easy to go out and judge anyone.” Cano has remained close to the team and does workouts at Safeco Field before the team arrives each day. He leaves the stadium before his teammates get to work and watches all the games from home. He will head to his father’s academy in the Dominican Republic in the near future to begin ramping up his baseball work. Cano was hitting .287 with a .385 on-base percentage, .441 slugging percentage, 10 doubles, four home runs, 23 RBI and 21 walks for the season when the suspension was handed down in May. Cano went on the disabled list on May 14 due to a fractured bone in his right hand with the suspension being handed down the following day. The Mariners have a 34-16 record in the 50 games Cano has missed. Barring any postponements, Cano is eligible to return to the Mariners on Aug. 14. Astros call up top prospect • The Astros promoted their top prospect, outfielder Kyle Tucker from Class AAA Fresno. Tucker, who was named to the Pacific Coast League’s All Star team, was hitting .306 with 14 home runs and 66 RBIs. He went 1 for 4 with a single and run scored in the seventh and an RBI walk in the eighth to go along with three strikeouts. Houston manager AJ Hinch said “our team got better by adding him to the mix” and he plans to play Tucker every day, in left field or right field. Hinch said as the season gets into its latter stages the team needs to see what Tucker can do after his strong showing in both spring ball and the minor leagues. Tucker is ranked the No. 8 prospect in baseball by MLB.com. The Astros optioned outfielder Jake Marisnick to Fresno in a corresponding move. 2 minor-leaguers suspended • First baseman Montrell Marshall of the Reds and third baseman Sean Miller of the Twins were suspended for 50 games each under baseball’s minor-league drug program following second positive tests for drugs of abuse. There have been 48 players suspended this year under the minor-league drug program and nine suspended under the bigleague drug program. Associated Press


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BASEBALL

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

MLB INSIDER

Molina’s All-Star status is sketchy Cardinals catcher having a big year, but could miss out BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

While Cardinals righthander Miles Mikolas seems all-but certain to be an All-Star, the chances of eight-time All-Star Yadier Molina being named to the National League team to be announced Sunday night still are somewhat sketchy. San Francisco’s Buster Posey, like Molina a perennial All-Star, is not having an All-Star year — at five homers and 27 runs batted through Friday. But he had led the voting for catchers since the beginning of the balloting before being passed, by only about 8,200 votes, by Chicago’s Willson Contreras in the most recent returns. Molina had 13 homers (12 on the road) through Friday to lead all NL catchers as he heads toward his best power season despite being sidelined a month because of injury, will not make it through the fanvote route. So his best chance would appear to be either to finish first or second in the players’ vote, which automatically puts him on the club. But if that doesn’t happen, he would have to depend on National League manager Dave Roberts having two reserve catchers instead of one, and Roberts then also might have to turn his back on Miami’s J.T. Realmuto, who is having the best year of any catcher at .305 with 11 homers and 36 runs batted in, with a WAR of 3.4 — well ahead of most players in the league, let alone other catchers. Miami, like every other team, has to have one selection and it would be unfair to leave off the Marlins’ best player, who never has been on an All-Star club. Given recent developments, it also would be unfair to leave off Molina. There always are some late curveballs thrown into the 32-man roster and there will be some defections, mostly among pitchers who start either the Saturday or, more likely, the Sunday before the All-Star Game to be played on July 17, a Tuesday night, in Washington Here is a one guess at the National League club, keeping in mind that every team has to have at least one player. First base: Freddie Freeman, Atlanta; Brandon Belt, San Francisco; Jesus Aguilar, Milwaukee; Max Muncy, Los Angeles. The last-named is a 27-year-old rookie first baseman/third baseman who has slugged his way into the Dodgers’ regular lineup and the hearts of southern California fans with 20 homers and an OPS of 1.060. And Roberts is his manager. Second base: Ozzie Albies, Atlanta; Scooter Gennett, Cincinnati; Javier Baez, Chicago. Baez, by far the Cubs’ best player of the first half, also can play shortstop.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Cards’ Yadier Molina is an eight-time All-Star and stalwart behind the plate, but might not make it this year despite having his best season from a power standpoint at the plate.

Shortstop: Brandon Crawford, San Francisco; Trevor Story, Colorado. This would be Crawford’s first All-Star start at age 31. Third base: Nolan Arenado, Colorado; Eugenio Suarez, Cincinnati. Outfield: Nick Markakis, Atlanta; Matt Kemp, Los Angeles; Bryce Harper (hitting only .213 but likely to be voted in by fans), Washington; Charlie Blackmon, Colorado; Odubel Herrera, Philadelphia; Starling Marte, Pittsburgh. Marte would be Pittsburgh’s only player. Catcher: Willson Contreras, Chicago; J.T. Realmuto, Miami; Yadier Molina, Cardinals. This presumes that Posey doesn’t win the balloting or finish first or second in the players’ vote. Starting pitchers: Max Scherzer, Washington; Jacob deGrom, New York; Jon Lester, Chicago; Aaron Nola, Philadelphia; Miles Mikolas, Cardinals; Sean Newcomb, Atlanta; Zack Greinke, Arizona. Relievers: Kenley Jansen, Los Angeles; Sean Doolittle, Washington; Brad Hand, San Diego; Josh Hader, Milwaukee; Brandon Morrow, Chicago. There will be one additional player in each league to be voted on in a special election by the fans between Sunday and next Thursday. That player likely is to be a position player. So a player such as Molina would have one more chance in that lottery.

A WASHINGTON WORLD SERIES? Until the Washington Nationals’ recent collapse, there was considerable talk that the Nats might finally make it to the World Series this year, or even win a playoff series. The Montreal-Washington franchise, which began in 1969, never has been to a World Series. The first Seattle franchise also was formed in 1969 although the Pilots became the Milwaukee Brewers the next year. But a new Seattle franchise, the Mariners, came into play in 1977 and has gone the longest in the American League

without being in a World Series. But while there might be not be a World Series in the District of Columbia this year, the state of Washington could see its first. Neither Seattle nor Washington has even won a playoff series since the Mariners did in 2001, but Seattle has been going toe to toe with the defending World Series champion Houston Astros, lately, trailing the Astros by 1½ games entering the weekend and 7½ games clear of the next wild-card contender, Oakland. Longtime star Seattle pitcher Felix Hernandez never has been in a playoff game. Neither has lefthanded ace James Paxton, whose earned-run average entering the weekend was 3.39. But the other two members of the Mariners’ Big Four have been in the playoffs. You remember them. Lefthander Marco Gonzales, traded to Seattle last year, was a key reliever in the Cardinals’ 2014 playoff run, winning two games in the divisional round. Righthander Mike Leake, a member of the Cardinals’ rotation for nearly two seasons before being dealt to Seattle last August, has started in the playoffs for Cincinnati. Together, that pair is 17-10 with Gonzales the staff leading winner with nine, one more than Leake, Hernandez and Paxton. Their bullpen has a standout closer in Edwin Diaz, who leads the majors in saves with 34 and yet another Cardinal, Juan Nicasio, who is among the league leaders in holds (17). Diaz already has 86 saves at the age of 24 and has struck out 252 hitters in 1632/3 innings while giving up just 114 hits in his career. He was the closer for the surprising Puerto Rican team that finished second last year in the World Baseball Classic and his catcher, Molina, said, “I noticed that he was one of the good ones.” “Obviously his fastball is electric. He’s got a good slider. And he’s not afraid. Sometimes when you see people with

good stuff, they get nervous. This guy never gets nervous. It is something of a surprise the Mariners are challenging for first place at 24 games over .500 without their veteran elite second baseman, Robinson Cano, who ran afoul of the Major League Baseball drug policy and won’t be able to play in the postseason, even after serving his 80-game suspension. But the Mariners have speed with Dee Gordon (22 steals) and Jean Segura, 14 steals with a .331 average. They still have slugger Nelson Cruz (22 homers), who, memorably, was with the Texas Rangers when the Cardinals beat them in the 2011 World Series. But their RBI leader at 62 is one Mitch Haniger, their right fielder, who is something of a late bloomer at age 27. The Diamondbacks, who dealt Haniger to Seattle along with Segura before last season, could use that clout. At .230, they have the lowest batting average in the league. As for the perennially contending but underachieving Nationals, who had lost five in a row before rallying from nine runs down on Thursday to beat Miami and reach .500, righthander Stephen Strasburg is hurt again. And Harper, who might not be the $400 million man in offseason free agency, is hitting more 100 points under last year. But after a postgame team meeting on Wednesday, he found some unusual comfort. Harper told reporters, “We’ve never been in this position before and I think it’s an exciting time for us. In years past, we’ve won the division by a lot of games and we’re able to be behind now. I’m excited to get out and test it.”

AL CENTRAL HAS GONE SOUTH The Cleveland Indians can start drawing up their rotation for their best-of-five division series in early October. The Indians had an 11½-game lead over second-place Minnesota through Friday and no other team in the division was better than 12 games under .500. Collectively, even with Cleveland being 12 over, the division was minus-76, which would be the worst for any division since baseball split into three divisions in each league in 1994. The previous worst, not surprisingly, involved Cleveland and the AL Central in 1999 when the Indians beat out the Chicago White Sox by 21½ games when the White Sox finished second at 75-86. The division was 69 under that year. This year, while Cleveland goes into the playoffs pretty much with whatever record it wants, the wild-card game which surely will involve some combination of the New York Yankees, Boston, Houston and Seattle is likely for the first time to match two 100-win teams, one of which will be eliminated after one game. (Derrick Goold of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report).

Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

MINOR LEAGUE REPORT

From Rascal to Cards prospect Warner has overcome the odds before, attempts to do so again pick him in the 2016 major-league draft. On the third day of the draft, Warner followed each pick on the MLB draft tracker, watching names of former teammates pop onto the screen. A few majorleague teams told him to stay near his phone, but it never rang. “You’re kind of just sitting there watching the draft tracker,” he said. “That wasn’t fun at all.” A few weeks after the draft, the Rascals reached out. Not ready to give up baseball, Warner joined the team. His statistics were solid with the Rascals: a 6-1 record with a 4.11 ERA over two seasons. It was enough for the Cardinals to take notice. Warner’s pitch arsenal features a fastball, changeup, curveball and slider. His velocity reaches 92 mph, though it is normally in the 89-91 range. Warner said he’s already bounced back once this season. He had a 7.82 ERA through his first three starts with Palm Beach. Then, over his next six outings, he allowed just five runs. Now Warner is hoping for a similar turnaround in Springfield. “I want success for him, and I think he’ll have it,” Rodriguez said. “He’s the type of player that you root for.”

BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

River City Rascals manager Steve Brook gathered his players before they trudged onto the team bus in Washington, Pa., in June 2017. The St. Louis area-based independent league team was preparing to drive to Chicago for a second-consecutive road series. After debriefing the game, Brook made a surprise announcement. The Cardinals had bought the contract of pitcher Austin Warner from the Rascals, who play in the Frontier League. Warner was going from independent league baseball to the minors. “It was always kind of in the back of my head, hoping it would happen,” Warner said. “But the further I got in (independent league) ball, the less I expected it, just because I’m getting getting older.” Players erupted in cheers as Brook spoke. One dumped a jug of water on Warner’s back. A year after going undrafted out of college, the pitcher was getting a chance to prove himself to a big league team. In one calendar year with the Cardinals’ organization, Warner has moved from rookie ball all the way to Class AA Springfield, where he is in the starting rotation. He earned his most recent promotion June 23. “That’s a winning player: A guy who comes out, everybody gives up on him and then says, ‘You’re not telling me when I’m stopping,’” Springfield manager Johnny Rodriguez said. The lefty had a 3.41 earned-run average for High-A Palm Beach this year and was named to the mid-season All-Star team. In May, he earned pitcher of the month honors for the Cardinals’ organization. Gary Larocque, the Cardinals’ director of player development, said Warner earned a promotion to Class AA when Springfield needed a starter. “What we’re looking for is for him to perform at that level, use the stuff he has and be successful doing it,” Larocque said. Warner, 24, has gotten off to a slow start in Class AA. He has a 10.38 ERA in three outings, after giving up six runs (all earned) and eight hits over five innings

PALM BEACH CARDINALS

Austin Warner pitches for Cardinals High Class A minor-league affilliate Palm Beach before he recently was promoted to Class AA Springfield, for which he has struggled.

Friday might against Frisco. But Rodriguez remains confident. He sees a player with the right mentality, as well as one with pitches that can work at the higher levels of the minors. “There’s no doubt he’s going to have success,” Rodriguez said. “I don’t see how he wouldn’t. He has the stuff to pitch at AA.” Warner said he has felt a little off mechanically since coming to Springfield and has lost command of his pitches. He said he needs to trust his abilities; he knows he’s in Double A because he showed he can get outs. In his first outing with the AA club, Warner gave up six runs in six innings. Rodriguez points to the fact that all six runs

came in the second inning, and Warner calmed himself enough to follow the inning with four scoreless frames. “That showed me really good makeup,” the manager said. “I think he’s got the ability to get back in counts when he’s behind in counts. He showed me that that first outing.” Warner played college baseball at Bellarmine University, a Division II school in Louisville, his hometown. He chose it so he could play right away, and he finished his four years with a 3.37 career ERA. He also played in the Northwoods League, a top collegiate summer league, and was an All-Star in 2015. Warner hoped his pitching during his summer and college seasons would be enough for a team to

PEREZ FINDING HIS BAT Shortstop Delvin Perez, whom the Cardinals drafted with the 23rd pick in 2016, imporoved his batting average to .286 with a three-hit day Thursday for the State College Spikes, the Cardinals’ short-season class-A affiliate. With only three extra-base hits, Perez has hit for limited power. But he has only committed one error in the field. This is the 19-year-old’s first season not with a rookie-ball affiliate. VOIT’S BIG WEEK Luke Voit hit .538 in a seven-game stretch for AAA Memphis from June 29-Thursday, slugging two home runs and driving in 10. He also hit for the cycle July 1. The first baseman has earned three stints with the big-league Cardinals this season and has hit .182 for them. Peter Baugh @Peter_Baugh on Twitter pbaugh@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

MINOR LEAGUE REPORT

From Rascal to Cardinals prospect Warner has overcome the odds before, and he’s attempting to do so again

his four years with a 3.37 career ERA. He also played in the Northwoods League, a top collegiate summer league, and was an All-Star in 2015. Warner hoped his pitching during his summer and college seasons would be enough for a team to pick him in the 2016 major-league draft. On the third day of the draft, Warner followed each pick on the MLB draft tracker, watching names of former teammates pop onto the screen. A few majorleague teams told him to stay near his phone, but it never rang. “You’re kind of just sitting there watching the draft tracker,” he said. “That wasn’t fun at all.” A few weeks after the draft, the Rascals reached out. Not ready to give up baseball, Warner joined the team. His statistics were solid with the Rascals: a 6-1 record with a 4.11 ERA over two seasons. It was enough for the Cardinals to take notice. Warner’s pitch arsenal features a fastball, changeup, curveball and slider. His velocity reaches 92 mph, though it is normally in the 89-91 range. Warner said he’s already bounced back once this season. He had a 7.82 ERA through his first three starts with Palm Beach. Then, over his next six outings, he allowed just five runs. Now Warner is hoping for a similar turnaround in Springfield. “I want success for him, and I think he’ll have it,” Rodriguez said. “He’s the type of player that you root for.”

BY PETER BAUGH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

River City Rascals manager Steve Brook gathered his players before they trudged onto the team bus in Washington, Pa., in June 2017. The St. Louis area-based independent league team was preparing to drive to Chicago for a second-consecutive road series. After debriefing the game, Brook made a surprise announcement. The Cardinals had bought the contract of pitcher Austin Warner from the Rascals, who play in the Frontier League. Warner was going from independent league baseball to the minors. “It was always kind of in the back of my head, hoping it would happen,” Warner said. “But the further I got in (independent league) ball, the less I expected it, just because I’m getting getting older.” Players erupted in cheers as Brook spoke. One dumped a jug of water on Warner’s back. A year after going undrafted out of college, the pitcher was getting a chance to prove himself to a big league team. In one calendar year with the Cardinals’ organization, Warner has moved from rookie ball all the way to Class AA Springfield, where he is in the starting rotation. He earned his most recent promotion June 23. “That’s a winning player: A guy who comes out, everybody gives up on him and then says, ‘You’re not telling me when I’m stopping,’” Springfield manager Johnny Rodriguez said. The lefty had a 3.41 earned-run average for High-A Palm Beach this year and was named to the mid-season All-Star team. In May, he earned pitcher of the month honors for the Cardinals’ organization. Gary Larocque, the Cardinals’ director of player development, said Warner earned a promotion to Class AA when Springfield needed a starter. “What we’re looking for is for him to perform at that level, use the stuff he has and be successful doing it,” Larocque said. Warner, 24, has gotten off to a slow start in Class AA. He has a 10.38 ERA in three outings, after giving up six runs (all earned) and eight hits over five innings Friday might against Frisco. But Rodriguez remains confident. He

PALM BEACH CARDINALS

Austin Warner pitches for Cardinals High Class A minor-league affiliate Palm Beach before he recently was promoted to Class AA Springfield, for which he has struggled.

sees a player with the right mentality, as well as one with pitches that can work at the higher levels of the minors. “There’s no doubt he’s going to have success,” Rodriguez said. “I don’t see how he wouldn’t. He has the stuff to pitch at AA.” Warner said he has felt a little off mechanically since coming to Springfield and has lost command of his pitches. He said he needs to trust his abilities; he knows he’s in Double A because he showed he can get outs. In his first outing with the AA club,

Warner gave up six runs in six innings. Rodriguez points to the fact that all six runs came in the second inning, and Warner calmed himself enough to follow the inning with four scoreless frames. “That showed me really good makeup,” the manager said. “I think he’s got the ability to get back in counts when he’s behind in counts. He showed me that that first outing.” Warner played college baseball at Bellarmine University, a Division II school in Louisville, his hometown. He chose it so he could play right away, and he finished

PEREZ FINDING HIS BAT Shortstop Delvin Perez, whom the Cardinals drafted with the 23rd pick in 2016, imporoved his batting average to .286 with a three-hit day Thursday for the State College Spikes, the Cardinals’ short-season class-A affiliate. With only three extra-base hits, Perez has hit for limited power. But he has only committed one error in the field. This is the 19-year-old’s first season not with a rookie-ball affiliate. VOIT’S BIG WEEK Luke Voit hit .538 in a seven-game stretch for AAA Memphis from June 29-Thursday, slugging two home runs and driving in 10. He also hit for the cycle July 1. The first baseman has earned three stints with the big-league Cardinals this season and has hit .182 for them. Peter Baugh @Peter_Baugh on Twitter pbaugh@post-dispatch.com

Cards need a boost from Ozuna in second half of season FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

since his last. Remembering that Ozuna was named National League player of the week on June 18 seems like a sepia-toned dream. What happened? The slider, for starters. On Saturday, the Giants fed him slider after slider. Two different pitchers struck him out on the pitch, and his lone hit, a single, came on a slider he uncomfortably muscled to the outfield. It was a good piece of hitting. It was also the kind of hitting opposing pitchers are thrilled to allow to Ozuna. Before June 17, Ozuna was averaging .389 and slugging .556 against sliders, while swinging at them 46 percent of the time, per pitch-tracking data at BrooksBaseball.net. During the troubling stretch that has followed, he has averaged AND slugged .044 against sliders, while swinging at them 64 percent of the time. There’s a reason he’s seeing a lot more sliders lately. He’s chasing them and whiffing, instead of hammering the ones that hang. Diagnosing a problem isn’t the same as answering it, and this twist is just the latest in what so far has been a disappointing Cardinals debut. Frustrated fans who are tracking the front office’s growing list of questionable freeagent signings are itching to add the Ozuna trade to the list. So far, they have a case. Through 88 games of a season that, for the most part, can be described as an under-performing and injury-challenged offense’s daily attempt to turn a winning club into a contending one, manager Mike Matheny has cycled through countless lineups as he looks for one that sticks. Matt Carpenter and Tommy Pham have hit first through third during their ups and downs. Jose Martinez and Paul DeJong have appeared on both sides of the cleanup spot. Before Dexter Fowler was begging to hit, period, he had hit almost everywhere. When runs are scarce, the order spins. Ozuna stays. “That’s where he belongs,” Matheny said to Derrick Goold of the Post-Dispatch during the road trip. “That’s where we need him.” And it’s hard to disagree — un-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Marcell Ozuna scores on a sacrifice fly from Dexter Fowler in the fourth inning Saturday in San Francisco.

less Jose Martinez leads a successful campaign to bring the DH to the NL over the All-Star break. Saturday’s airtight 3-2 win was built upon the work of starter Carlos Martinez, the pitcher with potential no other Cardinals starter can match. Martinez can and should carry the team every fifth day. Ozuna’s bat has been counted on in that fashion, and he has a chance to break open every game. Yet as the All-Star break approaches, his batting line reads .275/.317/.401, down from the MVP-like .312/.376/.548 he achieved in Miami last season. Asking him to repeat 2017 was a tall order. But no one expected him to have an adjusted OPS of 95, five points below league av-

erage and a staggering 53 points from last season’s mark. Some interesting throws from left field have led to questions about health, but those have been batted away. A search for answers shows no remarkable change in exit velocity or launch angle. Ozuna has not gone pull-crazy or oppositefield obsessed. He is not being handcuffed by defensive shifts. His batting average on balls in play suggests no bad-luck curse. His groundball percentage has ticked up, and his line-drive percentage has dipped a bit, but he’s actually hitting the ball harder than he did last season. What stands out the most is that Ozuna’s power has been reserved for only the most advan-

tageous situations. Entering Saturday’s win, Ozuna has slashed .435/.438/.674 o n f i rs t p i tc h e s, a n d .359/.490/.692 after a pitcher fell behind 2-0. Both lines are nearly identical to the damage he did last season. But when Ozuna falls behind, his power has drained. Compared to last season, his slugging percentage after falling behind 0-1 has dropped from .459, to. 327. And his slugging percentage with two strikes has dipped from .382 to .221. Another way to look at it? Ozuna hit 15 home runs and 10 doubles after falling behind 0-1 last season. He’s hit 10 home runs and nine doubles, total, this season. Only

three of the homers and three of the doubles have come after the pitcher notches a first-pitch strike. The Cardinals might be stirring in San Francisco, but this season’s struggle advises caution, and it’s hard to imagine a consistent climb without Ozuna contributing some thump. Asking him to carry the offense alone is unfair. Expecting him to help ignite it is exactly why he’s here. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 1 GIANTS 3, CARDINALS 2 Cardinals

NOTEBOOK

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Carpenter 1b

4 0 0 0

0

0 .260

Pham cf

3 0 0 0

1

0 .251

Molina c

4 0 0 0

0

0 .278

Ozuna lf

4 0 0 0

0

1 .276

Gyorko 3b

4 0 2 0

0

1 .257

DeJong ss

3 2 1 0

0

0 .261

Wong 2b

3 0 2 2

0

0 .203

Bader rf

2 0 0 0

1

1 .271

Gant p

2 0 0 0

0

0 .000

Brebbia p

0 0 0 0

0

0 .000

b-Martinez ph

1 0 0 0

0

0 .292

0 0 0 0

0

0

30 2 5 2

2

3

Tuivailala p Totals

---

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hanson lf-2b

3 0 0 0

0

0 .273

Posey c

3 0 2 0

1

0 .290

McCutchen rf

3 0 1

1

1

1 .258

Belt 1b

4 0 0 0

0

2 .289

Crawford ss

3 1 0 0

1

1 .304

Sandoval 3b

3 1 1

1

1

0 .253

Panik 2b

2 0 1 0

0

0 .240

1-Slater pr-lf

2 0 0 0

0

0 .281

Hernandez cf

4 0 1 0

0

1 .276

Rodriguez p

2 0 0 0

0

1 .071

Moronta p

0 0 0 0

0

0 .000

a-Pence ph

1 1 1 0

0

0 .210

Watson p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

4

6

Smith p Totals

30 3 7

Cardinals

010 000 100 — 2 5 0

2

San Francisco 010 001 10x — 3 7 0 a-singled for Moronta in the 7th. b-flied out for Brebbia in the 8th. 1-ran for Panik in the 4th. LOB: Cardinals 3, San Francisco 8. 2B: Wong (7), Hernandez (8). 3B: Gyorko (1), Wong (2). HR: Sandoval (7), off Gant. RBIs: Wong 2 (19), McCutchen (38), Sandoval (29). S: Hanson. RLISP: Cardinals 2 (Bader, Gant); San Francisco 4 (Crawford, Rodriguez 3). DP: San Francisco 2 (Panik, Crawford, Belt), (Crawford, Panik, Belt). Cardinals

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Gant

6 5 2 2

3

5 96 3.80

Brebbia

1 2 1

1

1 20 3.52

Tuivailala

1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.04

1

San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodriguez

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

62/3 5 2 2

Moronta

1/ 3

2

1 90 3.09

00 0 0

1 6 1.89

Watson

1 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.56

Smith

1 00 0 0

DeJong returns, Gomber optioned AVERAGES

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

SAN FRANCISCO • When the Cardinals

made the move Friday to return lefty Austin Gomber to Class AAA Memphis and reduce their bullpen by one, they put a future concern ahead of a current one. To clear a spot on the active roster for Paul DeJong after he spent seven weeks on the disabled list with a fractured hand, the Cardinals optioned Gomber with the intent of starting him in the minors and positioning him to be the first available for when the Cardinals have the inevitable opening in the rotation. Due to injuries and a jam-packed 40-man roster, the Cardinals have been easing through the past few weeks without an obvious understudy at starter. “That’s an organizational need right now,” pitching coach Mike Maddux said. “At the end of the day, we see him as a starter. Or, we think he could be.” Although manager Mike Matheny has long preferred to carry eight relievers in the bullpen — seven plus a long-reliever, for insurance — the recent play of Yairo Munoz and Harrison Bader swayed the roster decision Friday. Bader had three hits, including a home run, in his start Thursday night, and at AT&T Park the Cardinals have wanted his defense covering the nooks, crannies and vast expanses of right field. Munoz, a rookie, took over for DeJong as he recovered, and in his 40 games as DeJong’s replacement Munoz hit .302 with a .429 slugging percentage and 18 RBIs. The Cardinals felt they could get through the coming week with an interleague series and two off days without the eighth reliever or a second lefty. They weighed that against having Gomber available as a starter. Gomber, 24, began the season in Class AAA Memphis’ rotation and went 4-3 with a 3.60 ERA in nine starts. Injuries to Tyler Lyons (elbow) and Ryan Sherriff (elbow) opened a spot in the bullpen and Gomber quickly carved out a role for himself as a late-game lefty. Matheny toyed at times with Gomber as a setup man or his seventh-inning solution. Overall, Gomber had a 3.77 ERA in that role and 10 strikeouts in 14 1/3 innings. He hit a rut during the previous home stand, but felt he found his traction this past week in Arizona. “It was big,” Gomber said of wiggling free of a bases-loaded jam. “I don’t think it has anything to do with lefthanded hitters or righthanded hitters. I just haven’t been ahead in the count. Which was something of a fo-

Batting J. Martinez Molina Ozuna Munoz Bader Carpenter Garcia DeJong Pham Gyorko Pena Wong Fowler Team

AVG AB R .293 294 35 .284 208 25 .279 319 34 .278 144 13 .274 175 29 .264 292 52 .262 103 12 .260 150 22 .253 292 59 .251 183 17 .207 92 8 .196 204 22 .171 217 30 .245 2915 377

Pitching W L ERA Hicks 3 1 2.42 Mikolas 9 3 2.63 Norris 3 2 2.95 Tuivailala 1 3 3.16 Flaherty 3 4 3.19 C. Martinez 5 4 3.20 Mayers 2 0 3.29 Brebbia 1 1 3.34 Cecil 0 1 3.79 Gant 2 3 3.92 Weaver 5 7 4.92 Holland 0 2 6.30 Team 45 41 3.69 Prior to Friday’s game

G 40 17 37 25 12 14 24 24 21 10 18 26 86

H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 86 17 0 13 52 30 49 0 7 59 7 0 13 38 12 30 2 2 89 9 1 10 46 20 68 2 3 40 5 0 4 19 9 40 3 9 48 6 1 6 14 14 54 8 1 77 26 0 16 38 51 84 0 8 27 5 0 2 10 13 21 0 4 39 8 0 8 19 16 50 0 3 74 9 0 13 33 35 82 9 5 46 10 0 7 28 16 47 1 8 19 2 0 2 6 3 28 0 0 40 6 1 6 17 18 40 2 3 37 8 0 5 20 29 55 3 4 715 120 3 111 360 275 754 30 71 GS 0 17 0 0 12 14 0 0 0 5 18 0 86

SV IP H 1 44.2 24 0 109.1 96 16 36.2 29 0 25.2 27 0 67.2 52 0 78.2 67 1 27.1 26 2 29.2 26 0 19.0 18 0 39.0 28 0 97.0 97 0 20.0 25 20 780.1 696

R ER HR BB SO 14 12 1 23 38 35 32 8 17 75 14 12 4 6 48 9 9 2 9 22 27 24 10 19 80 33 28 3 45 80 11 10 3 6 25 11 11 2 7 32 10 8 1 14 12 23 17 2 17 34 55 53 13 34 89 18 14 1 16 18 357 320 78 297 719

cal point when I’m out there. I had a stretch of pitching really well, and then seven to 10 days where it’s gone the other way. I really felt like I put the pressure on myself to do the job I know I can do.” The Cardinals have another job in mind, and another way for him to do it. During his time in the majors, as he started to see time as a lefty specialist, Gomber was encouraged to work on a slider. He has a waterfall curveball that he’s comfortable throwing at different levels. What the Cardinals wanted him to develop was a slider — the classic wipeout pitch for him to show lefties. Maddux said Gomber went around the room and got suggestions about how to hold the slider, found one that worked and has been workshopping it on the go. It worked in Arizona. “It’s a little something that goes side-toside,” Maddux said. “He’s got that big curveball. We need to try and get something that goes East to West. He had an immediate result, good result. He’s got more of a chance to build that pitch.” By shifting back to the rotation, Gomber will not only stretch out for a greater workload, he will also get the innings where he can throw that slider over and over and over. The benefit becomes twofold. Gomber could start as early as Sunday for the Triple-A Redbirds, and on the horizon the Cardinals will have need of a starter. When

the team returns from the All-Star break, they have five games in four days at Wrigley Field. They will have the choice of adding a starter to that series or needing one when they head to Cincinnati immediately after going five rounds with the Cubs. That gives Gomber a fortnight in Memphis to lengthen his stamina and be available for the call. “When he does get an opportunity to face a lefty, he’s working on that other breaking and he’s toying with that,” Matheny said. “That is something he’s focusing on, and he feels very comfortable against righties. Part of that is just experience.”

NORRIS SENT FOR SCAN OF FINGER Before the Cardinals trimmed the bullpen by a pitcher, they did send their closer to determine the cause of soreness and swelling in his right index finger. Bud Norris had a magnetic resonance imaging scan taken of his right hand Friday morning to determine if there was any structural damage or possible reason behind the pain and “zinger” he felt Wednesday. Norris said the results of the MRI were encouraging and he was given clearance to test his finger by throwing Friday night, which he did without issue. Norris was not available for Friday’s game, targeting instead a return Saturday. “At this point in this season we’re going to get every look at every guy we can,” Matheny said. “Whenever they get a runny nose I think we’ll have two different doctors check it out. It’s that kind of year. Be cautious when we can.” TWO PROSPECTS SET FOR FUTURES One of the most successful pitchers in the minors this season, Dakota Hudson, will represent the Cardinals at the annual Futures Game, and he’s taking a teammate with him. Hudson and outfielder Randy Arozarena were selected Friday for the All-Star week game that showcases some of the game’s top prospects. Hudson, 23, has gone 12-2 with a 2.33 ERA in 16 games for the Triple-A Redbirds, and he’s one of the top pitchers in the game (at any level) when it comes to getting groundballs. Arozarena, 23, has raced his way to TripleA this season after hitting .385/.418/.654 in 13 games at Class AA Springfield. The Cuban outfielder has hit .232/.322/341 in 61 games for Memphis. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

1 9 1.07

W: Moronta 5-1. L: Brebbia 1-2. S: Smith 3-4 Inherited runners-scored: Moronta 1-0. WP: Gant. Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T: 2:26. A: 37,996 (41,915).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second Gyorko triples, DeJong reaches on a fielder’s choice, Gyorko out at home. Wong doubles, DeJong scores. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 0. Giants second Crawford walks. Sandoval walks, Crawford to second. Panik lines out, Crawford to third. Crawford scores on a wild pitch. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 1. Giants sixth Sandoval homers. One run. Giants 2, Cardinals 1. Cardinals seventh DeJong singles. Wong triples, DeJong scores. One run. Giants 2, Cardinals 2. Giants seventh Pence singles. Hanson sacrifice bunts Pence to second. McCutchen singles, Pence scores. One run. Giants 3, Cardinals 2.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

San Francisco’s Joe Panik (left), completes his double-play throw over the Cardinals’ Jedd Gyorko in the fourth inning, retiring Paul DeJong at first.

Redbirds are held to five hits, are upended by Giants in see-saw contest CARDINALS • FROM B1

romp they had Thursday. Andrew McCutchen’s RBI single in the seventh inning snapped a tie game and sent San Francisco to a 3-2 victory Friday night in a contest in which the Cards were limited to five hits. The teams seesawed leads with triples from the Cardinals leading to two runs and Pablo Sandoval’s solo homer momentarily putting the Giants ahead. The Cardinals’ defense did its part, and the bet is that the offense will find its. “That’s kind of the initiative we have going on right now —bolstering our defense,” Matheny said before the game. “Let’s play a cleaner defensive game. And then hope that we get contributions offensively. Let’s figure out ways to make sure we’re catching the ball to help reinforce the great starts that we’ve been getting.” That started Friday with the return of the Cardinals’ openingday shortstop and arguably the best infield defense that the team can provide. The changes during this trip have placed Jedd Gyorko back at third base, where he was

one of the most effective fielders in the majors last season, and highlighted Wong’s glove at second base. Shortstop Paul DeJong, who returned after missing more than 40 games because of a broken hand, adds to that steadiness up the middle. And it all comes at a time when the Cardinals are leaning heavily on a groundballgreedy pitching staff. John Gant made his third start since moving into the rotation, and like clockwork the first three outs of the game didn’t leave the infield. He covered first on the first two groundouts, and through his six innings seven of the 18 outs came on groundouts. The defense was there. The offense bubbled. It came from the good-hands group. A day after racking three hits and reaching base four times, Gyorko tripled and singled in his first two at-bats. Wong, who submerged from his sub-.200 average, doubled and tripled before the eighth inning. DeJong scored the Cardinals’ first two runs. Since the recent shift to a

friendly fielding group, Wong and Gyorko have provided at the plate, too. With their four hits combined Friday they already have nine hits in the series. That’s a welcome supplement to the offense — but it was the thrust of it Friday. Giants starter Dereck Rodriguez, whose father and Hall of Famer Pudge Rodriguez was present at AT&T Park, struck out only one Cardinal. He kept them mostly grounded, too, and held the Cardinals to two runs on five hits trough 6 2/3 innings. Wong’s RBI triple that tied the game knocked Rodriguez from the game. McCutchen’s RBI single off reliever John Brebbia gave San Francisco the lead as the bullpen took over. Lefty Will Smith retired the Cardinals in order in the ninth for the save. The Cardinals inched into the lead moments after it seemed an inning was going to come undone for them because of an out on the plate. Gyorko sliced a line drive into the right-center nook where tri-

ples go, and for DeJong’s first atbat since going on the disabled list Gyorko stood at third base. DeJong did as much baseball activity as his recovery would allow him. When he could hold a bat, he stood in during pitcher bullpen sessions to track pitches. When he could swing a bat, he did even if it didn’t make contact with a ball. He allowed before Friday’s game that the work may have helped him regain — or maintain — his timing and swing in a way having to completely shut down would not have. With Gyorko at third and less than two outs, the goal for DeJong was to elevate the pitch and get the run home someway. He drilled a grounder to one of the game’s top shortstop. The contact play was on. Brandon Crawford was unfazed. He threw Gyorko out so easily at home that Gyorko had time to recognize the throw beat him, hold up his slide, and greet catcher Buster Posey standing up. What hinted at being a bigger inning now teetered — until Wong dropped a double down the left-

field line. Wong’s bloop bounced into foul territory and past left fielder Alen Hanson. That misstep gave DeJong enough time to break around third and score for a 1-0 lead. The Giants asked quickly with Gant’s help. Two walks, a fly ball to right field, and a wild pitch ushered Crawford home for a 1-1 tie. Two innings later a Giant injury gave the Cardinals a big break. Gorkys Hernandez, who snapped Luke Weaver’s perfect start to Thursday’s game with a single in the seventh, struck a double to the left-field corner. Joe Panik sped from first base and the ability to wheel around third and score to snap the 1-1 tie. He eased up after rounding second, and he had to stop at third base, clearly in some kind of discomfort. Panik was removed from the game immediately. The Giants were left with two runners in scoring position and pitcher Rodriguez up. Gant took the escape hatch and kept the game tied. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2 CARDINALS 3, GIANTS 2 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 3b-1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Pham cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .248 J.Martinez 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .291 Gyorko 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Ozuna lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .275 DeJong ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .261 Fowler rf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .168 Wong 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .209 Pena c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .211 C.Martinez p 3 0 1 1 0 0 .241 Hicks p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Munoz ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .278 Norris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 3 7 3 3 7 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .275 Hanson 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .272 McCutchen rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Belt 1b 4 0 3 2 0 0 .296 Crawford ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Sandoval 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Hundley c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Slater lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .278 1 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Samardzija p a-Pence ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Holland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Jackson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Gearrin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 2 8 2 0 5 Cardinals 001 200 000 — 3 7 1 San Francisco 000 001 010 — 2 8 0 a-lined out for Samardzija in the 5th. b-struck out for Dyson in the 7th. c-walked for Hicks in the 9th. E: Pena (1). LOB: Cardinals 7, San Francisco 6. 2B: C.Martinez (2), Belt (15). RBIs: Fowler (21), Pena (7), C.Martinez (4), Belt 2 (41). SB: Wong (3), McCutchen (7). SF: Fowler. RLISP: Cardinals 4 (Pham, DeJong 2, Martinez); San Francisco 2 (Belt, Crawford). Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Martinez 7 6 1 1 0 3 100 3.05 Hicks 1 2 1 1 0 1 25 2.56 Norris 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.87 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Samardzija 5 7 3 3 1 3 81 6.42 Holland 1 0 0 0 1 0 21 4.35 Dyson 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.12 Gearrin 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 4.20 Melancon 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 3.00 W: C.Martinez 6-4. L: Samardzija 1-5. S: Norris 17-19. H: Hicks 12. WP: Hicks. Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Brian O’Nora; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 2:51. A: 39,606 (41,915).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals third Wong singles and steals second. Pena grounds out, Wong to third. C.Martinez doubles, Wong scores. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 0.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

NOTEBOOK

Fowler’s 0-for-3 return: It’s a start Outfielder reviews at-bats, says his timing was off BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

SAN FRANCISCO • After a weeklong stretch

that included the birth of his second daughter, a pointed and unexpectedly personal criticism of him from the front office, and the social media brushfires that followed, Cardinals outfielder Dexter Fowler found some normalcy Saturday when his name appeared in the lineup. Hey, it’s a start. “It’s a step in the right direction,” Fowler said of his appearance in right field. “I got in the game. Got some at-bats. Didn’t feel bad at the plate. Just a little late on everything, which is always a timing thing. I was just late.” In his first start in 10 days, Fowler skied a sacrifice fly for his first RBI since the end of May and got tested from both sides of the plate in the Cardinals’ 3-2 victory over the Giants at AT&T Park. Immediately after the game — and before meeting up with Barry Bonds later in the evening — Fowler reviewed the video of each of his at-bats. He saw two swings from the right side of the plate that were just shy of connecting for line drives, and his pass at a pitch from the right side resulted in a soft liner to second base. A moment earlier and it’s a base hit. Fowler said he’s comfortable with his swing. He just needs timing. “That split-second,” he said. How much time he’ll get to find it is a lingering question. Fowler and manager Mike Matheny have talked recently about the veteran’s wishes to find more at-bats and how he could do that. In comments made this past week, John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations, attempted to sympathize with the bind the team had put Fowler in — asking him to produce more but not giving him the starts until he produces more. Mozeliak’s comments veered from that point to acknowledge questions of Fowler’s “effort and energy level.” Mozeliak called multiple times to apologize for the comments, and Fowler also heard from chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. The text message (or more) he received from Matheny this past week was mostly to congratulate him on the birth of his and his

wife’s second child. They both went home from the hospital Friday. Mozeliak and Fowler developed a strong rapport since his signing, and it has been Mozeliak who often talks with Fowler on how he feels, his comfort, his vibe. Asked Saturday what role he could have played this week in conveying the clubhouse’s view of Fowler or public support of Fowler, Matheny described an open-door approach. “We just have our normal conversations — giving every guy every chance every day to come in and say what’s on their mind or if they need to get anything sorted out,” Matheny said. “But that (issue has) been sorted out. I try to figure out if anything is going on with anybody whether it’s personal or professional. Usually the questions are whether it’s an issue with me, whether it’s an issue with anybody in the club, in any capacity, and what do we need to sort out? What do you need to hear? I’ll give you the truth. We’ll talk things out.” Even with the sacrifice fly, Fowler’s average slipped to .168 after his 0-for-three Saturday. The Giants have lefty Madison Bumgarner going Sunday, so it could be one start in 11 days for Fowler. Fowler works out with Bonds in the winter, and he has turned to the former MVP and home run king for hitting advice.

POSEY ON MOLINA’S POWER From behind the mask, watching peer to peer, Giants catcher Buster Posey has seen Yadier Molina’s flex so far this season with the most home runs by an NL catcher. “I’d like to pick his brain,” said Posey, a former MVP who has five homers this season to Molina’s 13. “Maybe he’s just found the slot that works as far as increased power. I noticed that he gets his foot down early at times, and then he’ll go with the big leg kick. I think it speaks to how smart he is and how high his baseball IQ is. Based on who is on the mound, I think he takes his shot at certain times against certain types of pitchers. He knows the guys he’s better off staying short with. “I would like to pick his brain a little bit about that.” Sunday may determine whether he’ll get that chance. Posey has been jockeying with Cubs catcher Willson Contreras for the lead in the fan vote for the All-Star Game, and they will find out Sunday who has been voted the starter. Molina, who missed a month due to injury, will have to rely on his peers or the commissioner’s office to select him.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Francisco Pena drives in a run with a single against the Giants on Saturday.

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Molina Munoz Ozuna Bader Garcia DeJong Gyorko Carpenter Pham Pena Wong Fowler Team

AVG AB R .291 299 35 .278 212 25 .278 144 13 .275 327 35 .271 177 29 .262 103 12 .261 157 25 .257 187 17 .256 301 52 .248 298 59 .211 95 8 .209 211 23 .168 220 30 .244 2978 382

Pitching W L Hicks 3 1 Mikolas 9 3 Norris 3 2 Tuivailala 1 3 C. Martinez 6 4 Flaherty 3 4 Mayers 2 0 Brebbia 1 2 Cecil 0 1 Gant 2 3 Weaver 5 7 Holland 0 2 Team 46 42

ERA 2.56 2.63 2.87 3.04 3.05 3.19 3.29 3.52 3.79 3.80 4.92 6.30 3.67

G 41 17 38 26 15 12 24 25 21 11 18 26 88

H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 87 17 0 13 52 30 50 0 7 59 7 0 13 38 12 30 2 2 40 5 0 4 19 10 40 3 9 90 9 1 10 46 20 71 2 3 48 6 1 6 14 15 55 8 1 27 5 0 2 10 13 21 0 4 41 8 0 8 19 16 51 0 3 48 10 1 7 28 16 48 1 8 77 26 0 16 38 51 85 0 8 74 9 0 13 33 37 83 9 5 20 2 0 2 7 4 28 0 1 44 7 2 6 19 18 41 3 3 37 8 0 5 21 29 55 3 4 727 122 5 111 365 280 764 31 72 GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 0 1 45.2 26 15 13 1 23 39 17 0 109.1 96 35 32 8 17 75 0 17 37.2 29 14 12 4 6 49 0 0 26.2 27 9 9 2 9 22 15 0 85.2 73 34 29 3 45 83 12 0 67.2 52 27 24 10 19 80 0 1 27.1 26 11 10 3 6 25 0 2 30.2 28 12 12 2 8 33 0 0 19.0 18 10 8 1 14 12 6 0 45.0 33 25 19 3 20 39 18 0 97.0 97 55 53 13 34 89 0 0 20.0 25 18 14 1 16 18 88 21 797.1 711 362 325 79 301 730

Cardinals fourth Ozuna singles. DeJong singles, Ozuna to third. Fowler hits a sacrifice fly, Ozuna scores. Wong singles, DeJong to second. Pena singles, DeJong scores. Two runs. Cardinals 3, Giants 0. Giants sixth Hernandez singles. McCutchen grounds out, Hernandez to second. Belt doubles, Hernandez scores. One run. Cardinals 3, Giants 1. Giants eighth Hanson singles and advances to second on a wild pitch. Belt singles, Hanson scores. One run. Cardinals 3, Giants 2. PITCHING IN Both the Cardinals and Cubs had pitchers drive in runs Saturdays. Uncoincidentally, the two teams are the leaders in RBIs by pitchers since the start of 2017. Team

RBI

Cardinals

39

Cubs

35

Padres

31

Rockies

27

Braves

25

Nationals

25

Giants

25

Diamondbacks

23

Dodgers

22

Mets

20

Phillies

20 BAY AREA NEWS GROUP

Carlos Martinez hits an RBI double in the third inning that put the Cardinals up 1-0 on their way to a 3-2 win over the Giants.

Martinez walks none in seven innings as he returns to form CARDINALS • FROM B1

him back to where he was before a shoulder injury and carried the Cardinals to a 3-2 victory at AT&T Park on Saturday. The wait could be over. “He was the best pitcher in baseball (before the injury) and then he came back, took a few starts before he could trust himself really, trust his health,” Maddux said. “Now that he has that, now he’s back where he was.” The Cardinals positioned themselves to win their second consecutive road series and take their most significant stride away from .500 in more than a week with the one-run victory Saturday. Martinez (6-4) held the Giants to one run on six hits and for the first time since April 26, when his ERA stood at 1.43, he did not walk a batter. The one run he did allow came only after a grounder hit a cleat divot in the infield and took what manager Mike Matheny called a “radical hop” for a single. By that point, the Cardinals had a 3-0 lead thanks to the back half of the lineup and RBIs from Dexter Fowler, Francisco Pena and Martinez. He doubled home the Cardinals’ first run then later

watched as Jordan Hicks and Bud Norris finished the game. Pitching for the first time since pain shot through his index finger Wednesday night, Norris retired the Giants in order in the ninth for his 17th save. “No hesitance,” Norris said. “Didn’t feel it whatsoever.” For several weeks, Martinez was unable to say the same thing. The righthander went on the disabled list with a muscle strain near his right shoulder. When he returned, his velocity was tepid, and he admitted after a game that he was pitching “scared” of re-injury. In his first four starts after the injury, the Cardinals went 0-4, Martinez had an 8.10 ERA, and in 162/3 innings he allowed 44 baserunners. Opponents had a .976 OPS against the two-time All-Star. He had two games where he walked at least six batters, and his and the team’s season hit a nadir in Milwaukee during a discombobulating 11-3 loss. In the three starts since, Martinez has held opponents to five runs in 21 innings (2.14 ERA), and, for the first time this season, won three consecutive starts. “I believe in myself,” Martinez said.

Such success in the games begins between the games. “The intensity. The focus. And it was the stride length,” Matheny listed as all the things Martinez had to do at gamespeed in his work outside of the game. “Get to the norm, whatever norm it is. Don’t slow-play through the first inning and try to find it all of a sudden. Find it, and then roll. Get to that stride length — whatever that stride length is — that arm slot, that intensity in the first. He’s done that. It was the focus and the intensity as if you’re in the middle of the game. What would your best stuff look like? Don’t slow-play your way into it.” Starting back in spring training, Maddux had the starters all doing similar drills during their between-start bullpen sessions. He will talk to them about the hitters they’ll be facing in the coming game, in that first inning, and then have them “shadowbox.” One of the bullpen catchers will stand in the box from the side of the plate of the hitter and take an at-bat. If Cincinnati is the opponent, then one of the catchers plays Billy Hamilton. With San Francisco, one of the

catchers stood in as Buster Posey. “That creates a mindset that he takes from bullpen to game,” Pena said. In past years, the Cardinals have done similar things to give a pitcher a head start on a game. Several pitchers, including Lance Lynn, would have such issues finding their timing in the first inning that the Cardinals would simulate the inning in the bullpen during warmups. Matheny has often talked about how Martinez searches for his “rhythm” in games — sometimes shortstriding, sometimes easing off his velocity, and often struggling to do anything as he tries to do everything until the middle innings when he gets in sync. Sometimes it’s too late to be worth the wait. “Right from the top you could see that rhythm,” Matheny said Saturday. “You could tell something he found, something in the ‘pen, that he carried right out there on the mound. It’s hard to get right back (after injury) into that kind of fine execution that you have to have to survive here. He’s in a nice place right now.” Kolten Wong’s leadoff single in the third and stolen base generated the Cardinals’ first run

when Martinez doubled down the third-base line. An inning later, Marcell Ozuna and Paul DeJong singled off Giants starter Jeff Samardzija (1-4) in his first start since shoulder trouble put him on the DL in late May. Ozuna scored on Fowler’s sacrifice fly, and Pena poked a single to right field for a 3-0 lead. The Giants tiptoed back into the game, getting their second run on Brandon Belt’s third hit — a single off Hicks’ 100-mph fastball. Belt also had the only RBI against Martinez, who had such movement on his fastball that he “was trying to throw it right in the middle” and let it veer from there. It worked almost as well as it did in his bullpen. He didn’t give up any hits there. That’s where he’ll be later this week, not satisfying a quota with so many sinkers and so many sliders but simulating what awaits him next weekend, vs. the Reds. “His next start starts now,” Maddux said leaving the clubhouse Saturday. Why wait? Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

WIMBLEDON

BASEBALLTOUR NOTEBOOK DE FRANCE

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Mejia gets another chance after ban

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

Cardinals manager Mike Matheny has the best winning percentage (.557) among managers with more than five seasons.

Matheny faces pressure as Cards struggle to contend FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

five seasons beneath their belt. Only the Dodgers (606) and Nationals (598) have won more games than the Cardinals (589) since Matheny accepted the challenge that was replacing Hall of Famer Tony La Russa in 2012. Matheny’s career highlights include three first-place finishes, a 100-win season and a World Series appearance. There’s the shield. Here are the cracks. A team’s offense and pitching are going to fluctuate by both season and roster. And debates about what Matheny, too often reactive instead of proactive, should have done in a game are too often argued with the benefit of hindsight. But cultivating a cohesive clubhouse, demanding a decent fundamental approach to the game, and making hay with the help of baseball’s best home-field advantage seem like reasonable expectations for the Cardinals. These factors should be weapons. Instead they have become thorns in the side since a decline that began in 2016. Matheny’s ability to communicate with his players, a skill that was touted when he was hired, has come under more fair fire this season. Multiple pitchers have failed to report their injuries to the team in appropriate fashion. And now Matheny and outfielder Dexter Fowler are in a public standoff over playing time, the second chapter to Fowler’s friction with president of baseball operations John Mozeliak. It was just last season when Matheny clashed with cornerstone catcher Yadier Molina. It seems as soon as Ma-

headline

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Jenrry Mejia will get another opportunity to pitch in the major leagues. Nearly 2½ years after becoming the first player to receive a lifetime suspension under Major League Baseball’s drug program, the New York Mets reliever was given conditional reinstatement Friday and could return to the big leagues in 2019. Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred said Mejia will be able to participate in non-public workouts in the team’s facilities after the All-Star break and will be eligible for a minor league rehabilitation assignment in mid-August. If Mejia meets specified conditions, such as not testing positive again for a banned substance, he would be eligible to resume all baseball activities when spring training starts in February. Mejia was suspended for life on Feb. 12, 2016, after his third positive test for a banned steroid. The drug agreement allowed him to apply a year later for reinstatement that would be effective a minimum two years after the ban started, with the decision at the commissioner’s discretion. Manfred had a meeting with Mejia in 2017, after the application to return to baseball was submitted.

theny breaks through with one player (example: Kolten Wong) he loses another. Players and managers disagree from time to time. It should not become public knowledge so often. Not in year seven. A large enough sample size is available to suggest the Cardinals’ ability to play fundamentally-sound baseball has declined under Matheny’s watch. What defense is there for big-picture trends that paint a team that has lost track of the details? Between the start of the 2016 season and the start of Friday night’s game in San Francisco, the Cardinals have committed the fourth-most errors in baseball. They have posted the sixth-worst fielding percentage. And they have ranked at, or below, the league average in defensive efficiency in each of those seasons. The Cardinals’ baserunning, as measured by FanGraphs’ Baserunning metric, has hurt an offensively-challenged club to the tune of 10 runs below average during that span. That ranks ninthworst in the majors. The Cardinals’ stolen-base percentage of 64.9 percent between the 2016 season and Friday ranked second-worst across baseball. Meanwhile the Cardinals’ once automatic home-field advantage has been reduced to dust. The team’s home winning percentages from 2016 (.469), 2017 (.543) and this season (.511) are among the organization’s 20-worst since the first full season at Busch Stadium II in 1967. The Cardinals finished 17.5 games back and in second place in 2016. They finished nine games back and in third in

Cubs’ De La Cruz suspended 80 games • Chicago Cubs pitching prospect Oscar De La Cruz has been suspended 80 games under Major League Baseball’s drug program. The commissioner’s office said Friday that the 23-year-old right-hander tested positive for Furosemide, a diuretic and masking WILD_ART agent. De La Cruz is 6-7 with a 5.24 ERA in 16 starts this season at Double-A Tennessee, and is considered among the Cubs’ top prospects. He is covered under the major leagueASSOCIATED drug program because he is on PRESS the 40-man major league roster and is on option to Tennessee. The Cubs say that while they are “disappointed” in De La Cruz, they “will support him on his journey back.” He is the ninth player suspended this year under the big league drug program.

2017. They entered Friday night’s game WILD_ART 6.5 games back and in third. A third missed postseason would mark the first skid of that kind since 1997-99. Since the start of the postseasonless slide, the Cardinals’ winning percentage has dipped to .522, below eight Mariners extend GM • The Seattle Mariners signed MLB teams, three of which call the general manager Jerry Dipoto to a multiyear National League home. Division rivals contract extension on Friday, a reward for the club can be found at the top of the list (Cubs, being on track to end the longest playoff drought in .600) and nipping at the Cardinals’ the four major professional sports in the U.S. feathers (Brewers, .513). The National The agreement comes with the Mariners 24 League Central has been surrendered, games above .500, and striving to make the and a fanbase with high expectations postseason for the first time since 2001. is drifting between frustrated and disDipoto is in his third full season with the interested. Mariners, who are 56-32 and 1½ games out of first The Cardinals entered Friday night’s place in the AL West. Since the start of the 2016 game against the Giants with a 5.6 season, his first full year, the Mariners have the percent chance of winning the divieighth-best record in the majors at 220-192. sion, and a 28.5 percent likelihood of winning a wild-card spot. The deciIndians’ Miller out until month’s end • Andrew sions of a front office are not tied to a Miller won’t help the Indians until after the All-Star FanGraphs’ postseason projection, but break. the Cardinals talking themselves into a The excellent late-inning reliever, who pushed Monster Cup-Overtonas 400 through the postseason in 2016, has win-nowNASCAR approach to theEnergy trade-deadCleveland Results line seems reckless unless a team that made progress with his right knee injury but will Sunday has not won more than five consecutive not be activated until later this month. Miller has At Chicagoland Speedway games rips off Ill. a trajectory-altering run. been sidelined with inflammation in his knee since Joliet, When Lap a manager mounting May 26, and his comeback recently stalled. length: 1.50senses miles position parentheses) pressure (Start to guide hisinteam to postseaBut he threw 31 pitches off a mound on Thursday, 1. (16) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267 laps, 40 points. son play, 2.and his bosses are slow-playand the Indians were excited and encouraged by his (18) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 267, 52. ing their 3.deadline approach, the progress. Pitching coach Carl Willis told manager (11) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 267, 50.writ4. (36) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 267, 48. ing is on the wall. Terry Francona that Miller looked better. 5. (5) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 267, 35. No decisions have been made. “Went well,” Francona said Friday before the 6. (9) Erik Jones, Toyota, 267, 32. Change hovers overhead. Indians opened a three-game series with Oakland. 7. (37) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 267, 32. 8. (12) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 33. Wins have always been Matheny’s “By Carl’s account, you can really tell the difference 9. (7) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267, never 38. best argument, and he has that he’s getting a little more sure of himself. The 10. (15) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 267, 27. needed wins more right now. good news is that he really is making strides. My 11. (10) Danielthan Suarez, Toyota, 267, 26. 12. (13) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 267, 25. goodness, if we can get him back in time to get him Ben Frederickson 13. (1) Paul Menard, Ford, 267, 24. on a roll, that’s the biggest goal.” @Ben_Fred on Twitter 14. (38) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 23. bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com 15. (17) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 22.

Associated Press

16. (20) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 266, 21. 17. (4) Kurt Busch, Ford, 266, 36. 18. (2) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 266, 29. 19. (3) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 266, 24. 20. (8) William Byron, Chevrolet, 266, 17. 21. (26) Michael McDowell, Ford, 266, 16. 22. (39) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 266, 15. 23. (22) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 266, 14. 24. (19) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 266, 13. 25. (6) Aric Almirola, Ford, 266, 22. 26. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 265, 11. 27. (24) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 264, 10. Fisher, MU’s digital media spe28. (25) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 264, 9. 29. (28) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford,heads 262, 8. a four-person staff cialist, 30. (27) Ross Chastain, 261,designers 0. ofChevrolet, graphic who con31. (29) Gray Gaulding, Toyota, 260, 6. sistently pump out eye-popping 32. (34) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 259, 5. 33. (30) Kyle Weatherman, Chevrolet, 255,posts, 4. social media while se34. (32) Corey Lajoie,nior Chevrolet, 233, 3. communications assistant 35. (33) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 227, 0. Caroline Hall1. works exclusively 36. (31) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 224, 37. (14) Austin Dillon,with Chevrolet, 189, 1.team, producthegarage, football WILD_ART 38. (23) David Ragan,ing Ford,loads 189, 1. of video content, along 39. (35) Timmy Hill, Ford, garage, 185, 0. with the Mizzou Network staff. Race Statistics In a recent poll of nearly 300 Average Speed of Race Winner: 140.638 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 50 minutes, 52 seconds. college athletics digital designMargin of Victory: 1.875 seconds. ers, Mizzou’s work ranked No. 14 Caution Flags: 5 for 23 laps. nationally Lead Changes: 24 among 10 drivers.by digital design conLap Leaders: R. Blaney 1-16; C. Bowyer 17; R. Blaney 18; sultant SkullSparks. C. Bowyer 19-38; B. Keselowski 39-46; A. Dillon 47-59; “If you want to do something PHOTO COURTESY MIZZOU ATHLETICS A. Almirola 60-86; K. Harvick 87; A. Almirola 88-122; K. that’s129; flashy and draws attention Mizzou is sending a bobblehead doll of quarterback Drew Lock to 123-128; A. Almirola Harvick R. Newman 130-132; R. Blaney 133-134; A. Almirola Kurt Busch 142-159;identity and 135-141; maintains brand season-ticket holders and select voters for the Heisman Trophy. K. Harvick 160-162; K.that Larson 163; K. Harvick Kurtyou’ve people think164-167; is cool Busch 168-169; K. Larson 170-175; K. Harvick 176-177; B. got to have top-notch designers, ” Keselowski 178-185; K. Harvick 186-208; Kyle Busch 209-267. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead,“That’s Laps Led):exactly A. Almirola Moller said. what that came with a reel of photos highlight and preview shows. 4 times for 70 laps; Kyle time team for 59 laps; Harvick AliBusch and 1her do K. for us. They quarter• Lock opens the season as the featuring the senior 6 times for 39 laps; C. Bowyer 2 times for 21 laps; Kurt keep us relevant and draw one2 of the most prolific passing quarter- back, still consideredBusch times for 20 laps; R. Blaney 3 times for 19 laps; B.eyes to Keselowski 2 times for 16 laps; A. Dillon 1 timeIt’s for 13alaps; the information. short atgiveaways back returning to the Power 5 more unique Heisman Larson 2 times 7 laps; R. Newman 1 time for 3 laps. in, and span world we’re of for tention conferences. He led the nation in in the award’s longK.history

Bodes well for Lock that quarterbacks have won Heisman 15 of last 18 years MIZZOU • FROM B1

compared to MU’s last Heisman push —and oriented around social media in the weeks leading up to Mizzou’s first game, Sept. 1 against Tennessee-Martin, featuring various videos and graphics touting Lock’s candidacy. The first element hit the internet on June 21, an 80-secASSOCIATED PRESS ond video on the team’s Twitter account, flashing the hashtag #H3ISMAN — that’s Lock’s jersey number, 3, in place of the E — with a padlock emoji. The highlight clips include a snippet from ESPN draft analyst Todd McShay endorsing Lock as the top quarterback prospect for 2019. “You throw your hat in the ring, and we felt we needed to do that to make the declaration and say, ‘Hey, he’s our guy,’” said Chad Moller, MU associate athletics director for strategic communications. “We think he’s worthy of being considered for that honor. The theory is when people see him in that realm then it’s up to what happens during the season. It takes care of itself at that point. You just have to keep people updated to make sure he’s getting the right kind of attention.” Mizzou’s marketing department is giving out bobblehead dolls of Lock’s likeness to season-ticket holders who renew their seats. As part of the Heisman campaign, select voters will receive their own model, Moller said. Sports journalists make up the bulk of the Heisman voting panel, comprising 870 of the 929 voters for the 2017 award. From Mizzou’s perspective, a Heisman campaign for the senior quarterback made sense on multiple fronts: • Quarterbacks have won the award 15 of the last 18 years, including three SEC quarterbacks since 2007. It’s the most visible position in the sport, and no league gets more media exposure than the SEC, powered by the SEC Network and its gauntlet of

touchdown passes last year, and his 3,964 passing yards is more than any returning Power 5 QB. • The NFL draft is nine months away, but Lock is already on the mind of the sport’s premier pundits and figures to be analyzed all season long. • For Mizzou, why not capitalize on all that attention? After all, when it comes to Heisman campaigns, the purpose isn’t to win the award in July or August. It’s all about pushing a brand to the forefront of the electorate’s consciousness. “Marketing campaigns for the Heisman are like any other campaign: A good one will work. A not very good one won’t,” said Heisman historian Chris Huston, formerly the publisher of HeismanPundit.com and now the editor in chief at Heisman. com, the award’s official site. “If the idea is to gain visibility for a player then these are things that can only help a candidate. I don’t think there’s any way it can hurt a candidate.” That was Mizzou’s thinking in 2008 when Moller’s department spent around $20,000 on Chase Daniel View-Masters

campaigns. Daniel had finished you have to find ways to pique fourth in the Heisman voting as people’s interest.” Of all the Heisman campaigns a junior while leading the Tigers MOTORS schools have cooked up over the to 12 wins the previous season. ROUNDUP Quarterback Paul Christman is years, Oregon is remembered for the splashiest effort. In 2001, MU’s only other player to finish PRESS ASSOCIATED among the Heisman’s top five the school paid $250,000 for a vote-getters, coming in third and 10-story poster of quarterback fifth in 1939 and 1940, respec- Joey Harrington that hung on a building in New York City’s tively. “With Chase our teams were Times Square, fashioned with in a little different situation (in the headline “Joey Heisman.” (He 2008),” Moller said. “We were finished fourth in the voting.) “That got a lot of ridicule,” preseason top five. He was a Heisman finalist coming off the Huston said, “but heck, I think previous year, so it was an abso- that thing worked. Obviously lute no-brainer. We didn’t have it generated buzz. People were to beat the drums too much go- talking about Oregon and Joey ing into that year. Chase was on Harrington. Doing something every preseason magazine cover like that shows you’re serious and every preseason All-Amer- about your player being a candiican team. We didn’t have to get date.” In 1997, Washington State too aggressive.” Daniel had a solid senior sea- memorably mailed voters a leaf son, throwing for more yards and to promote quarterback Ryan touchdowns than 2007, but the Leaf. (He finished third.) In 2005, Memphis sent voters Tigers lost four games and he didn’t finish in the voting’s top diecast stock cars featuring running back DeAngelo Williams. 10. A decade later, Moller is (He finished seventh.) In 1977, Huston noted, Texas equipped with a more digital savvy staff, a creative team took a less audacious, more cewhose work is considered among rebral approach and created the best in the industry. Ali the “yards after contact” sta-

tistic to promote running back Earl Campbell, sending voters updated numbers for the yards Campbell produced after absorbing hits from would-be tacklers. (He won the award.) “Back then that captured the imagination of Heisman voters,” Huston said. “Your audience should be the voters, not the public at large.” In Lock’s case, glitzy graphics and record-breaking statistics won’t capture the sport’s most venerated individual award if the Tigers don’t experience more success on the field. Recent voting has proven that a more educated electorate doesn’t impulsively hand the Heisman to the best player on the best team, but top vote-getters, especially at the quarterback position, come from teams that win. In the last 20 years, 51 of the 62 quarterbacks who finished in the top five voting won at least 10 games. Since the birth of the College Football Playoff in 2014, seven of the 20 top-five votegetters came from playoff teams MOTOR SPORTS and 12 of the top 20 came from Power 5 conference champions. That said, PRESS four of the last nine ASSOCIATED quarterbacks to hoist the Heisman came from good, sometimes great but not exactly elite teams: Louisville’s Lamar Jackson in 2016, Texas A&M’s Manziel in 2012, Baylor’s Robert Griffin III in 2011 and Florida’s Tebow in 2007. That year, Tebow’s prodigious production (32 passing TDs, 23 rushing TDs) overcame the fact Florida lost three regular-season games and didn’t win its division in the SEC. For Lock’s campaign, the credentials that matter most begin to shape in eight weeks. With a 13-20 record as Mizzou’s starting quarterback since midway through his freshman year in 2015, he’s hardly consumed with the individual spoils at stake. “I go about my business the same way I always have,” he said last month.


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

WIMBLEDON

TOUR DE FRANCE

‘Muscles gone,’ Halep is upset

Froome crashes on first day

No. 1 seed falls to No. 48 Hsieh

Finishes 51 seconds behind the winner

ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON • Simona Halep was

ready for a vacation. It’s going to start a week earlier than she wanted after she gave away a big lead, wasted a match point and lost at Wimbledon, joining the procession of top women on the way out. Ranked and seeded No. 1, fresh off winning her first Grand Slam title at the French Open, so sure she had figured out how to overcome the big-moment anxiety that was so problematic for so long, Halep chastised herself as “unprofessional” after bowing out in the third round at the All England Club on Saturday, dropping the last five games while being beaten 3-6, 6-4, 7-5 by 48th-ranked Hsieh Su-Wei of Taiwan. “I just was too negative to myself, talking too much. I think because I was tired, because I’m tired, I couldn’t stay focused for every ball,” Halep said. “Mentally, I was tired. Also physically, I feel tired. My muscles are gone.” For the first time in Wimbledon history, none of the top five women’s seeds reached the round of 16. Only one of the top 10 seeds will be in action in Week 2: No. 7 Karolina Pliskova. The only past champion at the grass-court tournament left is Serena Williams. Only two other women among the 16 left even own a Grand Slam singles title: Angelique Kerber has two, Jelena Ostapenko one. “I’m not surprised anymore,”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Romania’s Simona Halep pauses after losing a point to Su-Wei Hsieh of Taiwan on Saturday at Wimbledon.

said 2017 French Open champion Ostapenko, a 6-0, 6-4 winner over Vitalia Diatchenko, who eliminated five-time major champion Maria Sharapova in the first round. “Because every day, something strange is happening in the draw.” Far less so in the men’s bracket, although No. 4 seed Alexander Zverev did depart Saturday with a 7-6 (2), 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0 loss to Ernests Gulbis, a Latvian ranked 138th who is the first male qualifier since 2012 to reach Wimbledon’s fourth round. In this case, though, Gulbis already has been a major semifinalist — he made it that far at the 2014 French Open, but his ranking slid because of a series of injuries — while the up-andcoming, 21-year-old Zverev has

yet to have that sort of breakthrough. Otherwise, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Juan Martin del Potro all won on a day the English spectators were preoccupied with two things: soccer and the sun. They followed along on cell phones as England beat Sweden 2-0 in the World Cup quarterfinals in Russia — the All England Club did not put that other sport on any of the video screens — and used umbrellas, fans and lotion to deal with heat that reached 90 degrees. Asked when she thought she could win the match, Hsieh responded, “I don’t feel I can,” then leaned forward and laughed heartily. Getting to the fourth round equals her best run at a major

tournament in singles, although she does own two Grand Slam doubles championships. And she apparently enjoys the spotlight, because all three of her career victories over top-10 opponents have come at the Australian Open (two-time major champion Garbine Muguruza), the French Open (2017 Wimbledon semifinalist Johanna Konta) and, now, Wimbledon. On Monday, Hsieh will face 2014 Australian Open runnerup Dominika Cibulkova with a spot in the quarterfinals at stake. Halep will be gone, off for some sort of much-needed rest and relaxation. What will she do with the free time? “Anything but tennis,” she said.

Erik Jones wins at wreck-filled Daytona

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jimmie Johnson (48) goes low to avoid a multi-car crash involving Alex Bowman (88), Denny Hamlin (11), Chase Elliott (9), Kurt Busch (41), Joey Logano (22), Daniel Suarez (19), Austin Dillon (3) and Kasey Kahne in the NASCAR Cup Series auto race at Daytona International Speedway.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAYTONA, FLA. • It took double overtime, but Erik Jones finally won the Coke Zero Sugar 400 on Saturday night at Daytona International Speedway. It was his first NASCAR Cup Series win. Martin Truex Jr. finished second, followed by AJ Allmendinger. Earlier in the evening, Ricky Stenhouse Jr. turned Daytona into a demolition derby. Stenhouse triggered two wrecks that collected more than half the field and knocked out former Cup series champions, Daytona 500 champs and a slew of perennial race contenders. Stenhouse won this race last season. At the halfway point Saturday night, the rest of the field could only hope he stayed in front and out of the way until the final laps. “It’s been crazy partly due to a few of my issues,” Stenhouse said over the radio on NBC. Yeah, just a couple. Stenhouse, who broke up in the offseason with retired driver Danica Patrick, started the melee when he tapped and turned Brad Keselowski, who was running third. Keselowski’s No. 2 Ford slammed into the side of Kyle Busch, and more than a dozen cars were unable to slow down. Keselowski said it actually started with a “bad block” by William Byron, who cut in front of Keselowski and prompted him to lift off the gas. “The 2 got wrecked and so did everyone else,” Denny Hamlin said. “It usually happens much later in the night.” Added Joey Logano: “When one car sits sideways in front of the field at 200 mph, you can’t get through it.” Pole-sitter Chase Elliott, Keselowski and Kurt Busch, and former Daytona 500 winners Hamlin and Logano were also involved in a 25-car crash.

Stenhouse was just getting warmed up in his No. 17 Ford. He wiped out two more contenders a few laps later. Stenhouse tapped Kyle Busch and caused him to lose control. Busch’s No. 18 Toyota slid right and took out Byron. Byron and Busch were running 1-2 at the time. “Disappointing to get crashed out by the guy that caused the first crash,” Busch said. Stenhouse, driving for team owner Jack Roush, won the first two stages and needed a victory to earn an automatic spot in NASCAR’s playoffs. The Cup series has been dominated this season by The Big 3 of Busch, Kevin Harvick and Truex. Busch and Harvick had five wins entering Daytona; and Truex, the reigning series champ, has three. The 16-driver playoff field could have more drivers in on points than wins once it’s set in September. “Stenhouse gonna win this race tonight. one way or another,” the Wood Brothers tweeted. Stenhouse was outside the top 16 headed into Saturday night at Daytona — the restrictor-plate track where mayhem usually reigns. This was no exception. Hamlin, who won the closest Daytona 500 in race history in 2016, said on Friday the elements were there for the race to turn into a disaster. “I think that the cars are going to be closer together, less room for error, most likely more wrecks,” he said. “And I think this race always lends itself to being more of a wreckfest than ones in the past, which makes it very exciting.” The first wreck sent cars skidding and sparking in every direction — seven-time champ Jimmie Johnson made the save of the night when he dropped down and just survived the debris — and Hamlin was caught up in the mess. “Now it’s a total crap shoot,” he said Sat-

MOTORS ROUNDUP Power wins pole at Iowa Speedway Indianapolis 500 winner Will Power won his 52nd career pole Saturday at Iowa Speedway, with defending IndyCar champion Josef Newgarden set to start second. Ryan HunterReay was third, followed by Simon Pagenaud. Newgarden is hoping to close the gap on series leader Scott Dixon, whom he trails by 50 points despite a series-high three wins in 10 starts. Qualifying results haven’t seemed to matter much at Iowa, since no pole-sitter has gone on to win the race. Hamilton wins pole for British Grand Prix •Lewis Hamilton prevailed in a tight battle with Formula One leader Sebastian Vettel at Silverstone, England, to snatch pole position for Sunday’s British Grand Prix. Hamilton came from behind to edge Vettel by 0.044 seconds. It’s the fourth consecutive pole for Hamilton at Silverstone, his sixth overall on the track, and his 50th for Mercedes. Kimi Raikkonen of Ferrari finished third, followed by Mercedes’ Valtteri Bottas. Associated Press

urday outside the care center. “It looks like most of the contenders that battle for these races are taken out, but you never know. It could be pretty exciting at the end.” Stenhouse could have been a factor — in a race to the finish or to send more contenders to the garage. Truex decided at one point to drop back and ride in the back to avoid getting collected into another accident. “At this point I think if you just ride in the back and don’t get hit by the 17 you’ll win ????????,” tweeted Truex’s girlfriend, Sherry Pollex.

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Britain’s Chris Froome gets back on the road after crashing during the first stage. ASSOCIATED PRESS

F O N T E N AY- L E - C O M T E , FRANCE • Down in a ditch,

Chris Froome had to hoist himself and his bike back up to the road. It was a startling scene when the Team Sky rider tumbled into a grassy field in the opening stage of the Tour de France on Saturday, immediately putting his pursuit of a record-tying fifth title in peril. Froome, though, is getting used to these sort of mishaps and challenges — whether that means recovering from crashes or clearing his name of doping. “I saw a lot of crashes out there today. It’s just one of those things. We always knew the first few days were going to be tricky and going to be sketchy. It’s part of the game unfortunately,” said Froome, who went down with about 5 kilometers to go as the sprinters’ teams jockeyed for position. With grass stains on his right shoulder and blood trickling down his right arm from a gash on his elbow, Froome got back up and crossed 51 seconds behind Fernando Gaviria, the Colombian who claimed the race’s first yellow jersey with a commanding sprint victory. “I’m just grateful I’m not injured in any way and there’s a lot of road to cover before Paris obviously,” Froome said. When fans at the finish were informed of Froome’s crash, many cheered. Froome, who was cleared of doping in an asthma drug case on Monday, was also jeered at Thursday’s team presentations. Froome was fortunate he didn’t do more damage by avoiding a post near where he fell while riding at more than 50 kph. The Kenyan-born British rider also crashed on the opening day of the Giro d’Italia in May, while warming up for the Stage 1 time trial. But Froome eventually climbed back up the standings to win the Giro — his third straight Grand Tour title. Froome is now aiming to join Jacques Anquetil, Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault and Miguel Indurain as the only riders to win the Tour five times. Fellow overall contenders Richie Porte and Adam Yates were also caught behind in the Froome group. And in what was expected to be a calm day for the favorites, two-time runner-up Nairo Quintana lost 1:10 when both of his tires were punctured. The pre-race favorites who finished safely with the main pack included 2014 champion Vincenzo Nibali, Tom Dumoulin, Geraint Thomas, Mikel Landa, Alejandro Valverde and Dan Martin. “It is a tricky finish and just the typical fight between sprinters and GC guys. Everyone wants to be on the front, especially ahead of the 3K marker,” Sky sport director Nicolas Portal said. When overall or general classification contenders reach the 3K mark, they can relax because from there on in the results are neutralized in the case of crashes. Gaviria, the Quick-Step rider making his Tour debut, easily beat world champion Peter Sagan and Marcel Kittel to the line. “The yellow jersey is one that everyone dreams of wearing and to get it on the first day is amazing,” Gaviria said. He required 4 hours, 23 minutes to complete the 201-kilometer (125-mile) stage from the island of Noirmoutier-en-l’Ile on the Atlantic coast to Fontenay-le-Comte. The 23-year-old Gaviria won four stages in last year’s Giro d’Italia and is living up to his billing as the next big thing in sprinting.


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 3 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

WIMBLEDON

TOUR DE FRANCE

‘Muscles gone,’ Halep is upset

Froome crashes on first day

No. 1 seed falls to No. 48 Hsieh

Finishes 51 seconds behind the winner

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LONDON • Simona Halep was

ready for a vacation. It’s going to start a week earlier than she wanted after she gave away a big lead, wasted a match point and lost at Wimbledon, joining the procession of top women on the way out. Ranked and seeded No. 1, fresh off winning her first Grand Slam title at the French Open, so sure she had figured out how to overcome the big-moment anxiety that was so problematic for so long, Halep chastised herself as “unprofessional” after bowing out in the third round at the All England Club on Saturday, dropping the last five games while being beaten 3-6, 6-4, 7-5 by 48th-ranked Hsieh Su-Wei of Taiwan. “I just was too negative to myself, talking too much. I think because I was tired, because I’m tired, I couldn’t stay focused for every ball,” Halep said. “Mentally, I was tired. Also physically, I feel tired. My muscles are gone.” For the first time in Wimbledon history, none of the top five women’s seeds reached the round of 16. Only one of the top 10 seeds will be in action in Week 2: No. 7 Karolina Pliskova. The only past champion at the grass-court tournament left is Serena Williams. Only two other women among the 16 left even own a Grand Slam singles title: Angelique Kerber has two, Jelena Ostapenko one. “I’m not surprised anymore,”

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Romania’s Simona Halep pauses after losing a point to Su-Wei Hsieh of Taiwan on Saturday at Wimbledon.

said 2017 French Open champion Ostapenko, a 6-0, 6-4 winner over Vitalia Diatchenko, who eliminated five-time major champion Maria Sharapova in the first round. “Because every day, something strange is happening in the draw.” Far less so in the men’s bracket, although No. 4 seed Alexander Zverev did depart Saturday with a 7-6 (2), 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0 loss to Ernests Gulbis, a Latvian ranked 138th who is the first male qualifier since 2012 to reach Wimbledon’s fourth round. In this case, though, Gulbis already has been a major semifinalist — he made it that far at the 2014 French Open, but his ranking slid because of a series of injuries — while the up-andcoming, 21-year-old Zverev has

yet to have that sort of breakthrough. Otherwise, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Juan Martin del Potro all won on a day the English spectators were preoccupied with two things: soccer and the sun. They followed along on cell phones as England beat Sweden 2-0 in the World Cup quarterfinals in Russia — the All England Club did not put that other sport on any of the video screens — and used umbrellas, fans and lotion to deal with heat that reached 90 degrees. Asked when she thought she could win the match, Hsieh responded, “I don’t feel I can,” then leaned forward and laughed heartily. Getting to the fourth round equals her best run at a major

tournament in singles, although she does own two Grand Slam doubles championships. And she apparently enjoys the spotlight, because all three of her career victories over top-10 opponents have come at the Australian Open (two-time major champion Garbine Muguruza), the French Open (2017 Wimbledon semifinalist Johanna Konta) and, now, Wimbledon. On Monday, Hsieh will face 2014 Australian Open runnerup Dominika Cibulkova with a spot in the quarterfinals at stake. Halep will be gone, off for some sort of much-needed rest and relaxation. What will she do with the free time? “Anything but tennis,” she said.

Erik Jones wins at wreck-filled Daytona

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Erik Jones celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Cup Series race at Daytona International Speedway late Saturday in Daytona Beach, Fla.

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DAYTONA, FLA. • Erik Jones has won a crash-filled NASCAR race at Daytona International Speedway, passing defending series champion Martin Truex Jr. on the final lap and then wildly celebrating the first victory of his Cup Series career. Jones was involved in one of the many wrecks Saturday night, but his No. 20 Toyota was still in good enough shape to get by Truex. Truex blamed himself for failing to see Jones’ run coming in his rearview mirror. Truex finished second, followed by AJ Allmendinger, Kasey Kahne and Chris Buescher — another odd top 10 at Daytona. Ty Dillon was sixth, followed by Matt DiBenedetto, Ryan Newman and Daytona 500 champion Austin Dillon. For Jones, a 22-year-old Michigan native driving in his first season for Joe Gibbs Racing, the breakthrough victory came in his 57th career start. “Oh boy,” he said. “How about that race boys and girls? I thought we were out of it and all of a sudden we’re right back in it. My first Cup win. My first win at Daytona, My first superspeedway win. What an awesome day.” Last year’s race winner, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., had the most memorable run of the night. He started two early accidents that wrecked more than half the field and was part of two more cautions late. Stenhouse took out Kurt Busch, Kyle Busch, Brad Keselowski and others. Jones was one of the lucky ones who avoided major damage. “Definitely happy to see those guys get their first win,” said Truex, who had Jones as a teammate at Furniture Row Racing last year. “For them to get it here at a really big race was cool to see.” It also may have been a much-needed victory for NASCAR’s so-called “Young Guns,” the up-and-coming generation of drivers who had gotten most of the promotion and none of the previous wins in 2018. International Speedway Corp. President John Saunders pinned some of NASCAR’s woes on the new crop of drivers that

have failed to replace a crop of retired stars of the sport. Saunders said this week that the sport needed the stable of young drivers to come along and “start to win and build their brands.” Ryan Blaney and Darrell Wallace Jr. fired back, saying the 20-somethings were trying their best to win. Jones delivered. Truex took a jab at the critics, saying “now maybe ISC and those guys can be happier about those things.”

CEMENTED IN HISTORY Austin Dillon celebrated his Daytona 500 victory by putting his signature, hand prints and right foot on a cement block on the track’s Walk of Fame earlier Saturday. It’s been a tradition for each Daytona 500 champ since 1996. Dillon enjoyed the spoils that come with winning NASCAR’s biggest race, including a visit with retired NBA great Shaquille O’Neal. “He wrapped his hand around mine twice when I shook it,” Dillon said. “He just told me some pretty cool things, so it was cool hanging out with him because I’ve always been a great fan of him.” PIT CREW HISTORY Brehanna Daniels and Breanna O’Leary worked as tire changers for Rick Ware Racing driver Ray Black Jr. Daniels is believed to be the first female black crew member to compete in a NASCAR national series event. She had pitted in more than 25 Xfinity, Truck and ARCA races and made her Cup debut on Saturday night. “What I’m doing in NASCAR is so much bigger than me,” she said. “It’s been so rewarding to be part of history while at the same time inspiring others to take on challenges they thought might not be possible.” O’Leary made her third appearance overall in the Cup Series and second this season. O’Leary and Daniels, roommates in North Carolina, are the fifth and sixth female NASCAR Drive for Diversity crew members to reach the Cup series.

NASCAR CUP | COKE ZERO SUGAR 400 RESULTS Saturday | Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap length: 2.50 miles | (Start position in parentheses) Driver Car Laps Points 1. (29) Erik Jones Toyota 168 40 2. (13) Martin Truex Jr Toyota 168 35 3. (24) AJ Allmendinger Chevy 168 34 4. (28) Kasey Kahne Chevy 168 40 5. (25) Chris Buescher Chevy 168 32 6. (19) Ty Dillon Chevy 168 37 7. (31) Matt DiBenedetto Ford 168 30 8. (7) Ryan Newman Chevy 168 34 9. (10) Austin Dillon Chevy 168 33 10. (2) Alex Bowman Chevy 168 36 11. (34) Jeffrey Earnhardt Toyota 168 26 12. (16) Brendan Gaughan Chevy 168 25 13. (35) D.J. Kennington Toyota 168 24 14. (22) Bubba Wallace Chevy 167 23 15. (21) David Ragan Ford 167 22 16. (39) Ray Black Jr Chevy 167 0 17. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr Ford 167 40 18. (40) JJ Yeley Toyota 166 0 19. (5) Kevin Harvick Ford (a)162 18 20. (20) Trevor Bayne Ford (a)162 19 21. (33) Ross Chastain Chevy (a)162 0 22. (9) Clint Bowyer Ford (a)162 15 23. (4) Jimmie Johnson Chevy (a)162 19 24. (37) Landon Cassill Chevy 162 13 25. (36) Joey Gase Chevy (a)161 0 26. (8) Michael McDowell Ford (a)155 20 27. (26) Aric Almirola Ford (a)155 10 28. (30) Paul Menard Ford 152 9 29. (14) Kyle Larson Chevy (a)123 20 30. (27) Jamie McMurray Chevy (a)68 7 31. (38) Corey Lajoie Chevy (a)65 6 32. (18) William Byron Chevy (a)64 12 33. (15) Kyle Busch Toyota (a)64 13 34. (1) Chase Elliott Chevy (a)54 9 35. (32) Daniel Suarez Toyota (a)54 2 36. (3) Brad Keselowski Ford (a)53 4 37. (23) Kurt Busch Ford (a)53 6 38. (17) Denny Hamlin Toyota (a)53 1 39. (11) Joey Logano Ford (a)53 1 40. (12) Ryan Blaney Ford (a)53 1 a=accident RACE STATISTICS Avg. Speed of Winner: 130.425 mph. Time: 3 hrs, 13 min., 12 sec. Margin of Victory: 0.125 sec. Caution Flags: 10 for 46 laps. Lead Changes: 25 among 16 drivers. Lap Leaders: C.Elliott 1-10; R.Stenhouse 11; C.Elliott 12; R.Stenhouse 13-42; Ky.Busch 43; B.Keselowski 44-52; W.Byron 53-64; R.Stenhouse 65-69; R.Newman 70; R.Stenhouse 71-81; A.Bowman 82; A.Allmendinger 83; T.Dillon 84-86; C.Bowyer 87-88; M.McDowell 89-107; R.Stenhouse 108; J.Johnson 109-112; M.McDowell 113; J.Johnson 114-119; R.Stenhouse 120-122; K.Harvick 123; M.Truex 124-137; K.Kahne 138-154; K.Harvick 155-161; M.Truex 162-167; E.Jones 168 Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): R.Stenhouse, 6 times for 45 laps; M.McDowell, 2 times for 18 laps; M.Truex, 2 times for 18 laps; K.Kahne, 1 time for 16 laps; W.Byron, 1 time for 11 laps; C.Elliott, 2 times for 9 laps; J.Johnson, 2 times for 8 laps; B.Keselowski, 1 time for 8 laps; K.Harvick, 2 times for 6 laps; T.Dillon, 1 time for 2 laps; C.Bowyer, 1 time for 1 lap; A.Allmendinger, 1 time for 0 laps; A.Bowman, 1 time for 0 laps; Ky.Busch, 1 time for 0 laps; E.Jones, 1 time for 0 laps; R.Newman, 1 time for 0 laps. Wins: Ky.Busch, 5; K.Harvick, 5; M.Truex, 3; C.Bowyer, 2; A.Dillon, 1; E.Jones, 1; J.Logano, 1. Top 16 in Points: 1. Ky.Busch, 749; 2. K.Harvick, 692; 3. M.Truex, 629; 4. J.Logano, 618; 5. B.Keselowski, 596; 6. C.Bowyer, 594; 7. Ku.Busch, 566; 8. K.Larson, 544; 9. D.Hamlin, 538; 10. A.Almirola, 503; 11. R.Blaney, 496; 12. J.Johnson, 461; 13. E.Jones, 448; 14. C.Elliott, 444; 15. A.Bowman, 426; 16. R.Stenhouse, 407.

MOTORS ROUNDUP Power wins pole at Iowa Speedway Indianapolis 500 winner Will Power won his 52nd career pole Saturday at Iowa Speedway, with defending IndyCar champion Josef Newgarden set to start second. Ryan Hunter-Reay was third, followed by Simon Pagenaud. Newgarden is hoping to close the gap on series leader Scott Dixon, whom he trails by 50 points despite a series-high three wins in 10 starts. Qualifying results haven’t seemed to matter much at Iowa, since no pole-sitter has gone on to win the race. Hamilton wins pole for British Grand Prix • Lewis Hamilton prevailed in a tight battle with Formula One leader Sebastian Vettel at Silverstone, England, to snatch pole position for Sunday’s British Grand Prix. Hamilton came from behind to edge Vettel by 0.044 seconds. It’s the fourth consecutive pole for Hamilton at Silverstone, his sixth overall on the track, and his 50th for Mercedes. Kimi Raikkonen of Ferrari finished third, followed by Mercedes’ Valtteri Bottas. Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Britain’s Chris Froome gets back on the road after crashing during the first stage. ASSOCIATED PRESS

F O N T E N AY- L E - C O M T E , FRANCE • Down in a ditch,

Chris Froome had to hoist himself and his bike back up to the road. It was a startling scene when the Team Sky rider tumbled into a grassy field in the opening stage of the Tour de France on Saturday, immediately putting his pursuit of a record-tying fifth title in peril. Froome, though, is getting used to these sort of mishaps and challenges — whether that means recovering from crashes or clearing his name of doping. “I saw a lot of crashes out there today. It’s just one of those things. We always knew the first few days were going to be tricky and going to be sketchy. It’s part of the game unfortunately,” said Froome, who went down with about 5 kilometers to go as the sprinters’ teams jockeyed for position. With grass stains on his right shoulder and blood trickling down his right arm from a gash on his elbow, Froome got back up and crossed 51 seconds behind Fernando Gaviria, the Colombian who claimed the race’s first yellow jersey with a commanding sprint victory. “I’m just grateful I’m not injured in any way and there’s a lot of road to cover before Paris obviously,” Froome said. When fans at the finish were informed of Froome’s crash, many cheered. Froome, who was cleared of doping in an asthma drug case on Monday, was also jeered at Thursday’s team presentations. Froome was fortunate he didn’t do more damage by avoiding a post near where he fell while riding at more than 50 kph. The Kenyan-born British rider also crashed on the opening day of the Giro d’Italia in May, while warming up for the Stage 1 time trial. But Froome eventually climbed back up the standings to win the Giro — his third straight Grand Tour title. Froome is now aiming to join Jacques Anquetil, Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault and Miguel Indurain as the only riders to win the Tour five times. Fellow overall contenders Richie Porte and Adam Yates were also caught behind in the Froome group. And in what was expected to be a calm day for the favorites, two-time runner-up Nairo Quintana lost 1:10 when both of his tires were punctured. The pre-race favorites who finished safely with the main pack included 2014 champion Vincenzo Nibali, Tom Dumoulin, Geraint Thomas, Mikel Landa, Alejandro Valverde and Dan Martin. “It is a tricky finish and just the typical fight between sprinters and GC guys. Everyone wants to be on the front, especially ahead of the 3K marker,” Sky sport director Nicolas Portal said. When overall or general classification contenders reach the 3K mark, they can relax because from there on in the results are neutralized in the case of crashes. Gaviria, the Quick-Step rider making his Tour debut, easily beat world champion Peter Sagan and Marcel Kittel to the line. “The yellow jersey is one that everyone dreams of wearing and to get it on the first day is amazing,” Gaviria said. He required 4 hours, 23 minutes to complete the 201-kilometer (125-mile) stage from the island of Noirmoutier-en-l’Ile on the Atlantic coast to Fontenay-le-Comte. The 23-year-old Gaviria won four stages in last year’s Giro d’Italia and is living up to his billing as the next big thing in sprinting.


SPORTS

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 1 LATE THURSDAY

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League TWINS..................... -$140.....................Orioles Yankees...................-$185 ...............BLUE JAYS ASTROS .................. -$320................White Sox Rangers...................-$118 .................... TIGERS INDIANS ................. -$270............................A’s Red Sox .................. -$200................... ROYALS National League CUBS........................-$145 ........................ Reds GIANTS ....................-$107 .......................Cards PIRATES...................-$122 .................... Phillies BREWERS................-$120 .....................Braves NATIONALS ............ -$350....................Marlins D’BACKS ..................-$170 .....................Padres Interleague Rays.........................-$125 ....................... METS MARINERS...............-$175 ....................Rockies Dodgers...................-$168 ...................ANGELS SOCCER • World Cup England.....................................................-$115 Sweden ...................................................+$360 Draw: +$230 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Croatia .................................................... +$120 RUSSIA ....................................................+$260 Draw: +$200 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Tuesday France .....................................................+$140 Belgium................................................... +$210 Draw: +$215 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park entries Saturday’s post time: 7:30 PM First: 1 Mile 70 Yds, $5,000 SOC pp horse jockey 1 Jack N John Diego 2 Bold Ransom Bailon 3 Nafir’s Best Lopez 4 Garrison Commander Santiago

odds 4-1 7-5 6-1 6-5

Second: 6F, $4,000 NW2L CLM pp horse jockey 1 Fast Talk Giles 2 Jodynbud Santiago 3 Changn Fivehundred Molina 4 Devil Hunt Hernandez 5 Mischief N Value Bailon 6 I’mjustblowinsmoke Sebreth

odds 7-2 8-1 1-1 8-1 4-1 12-1

Third: 350 Yds, QH $12,500 OC pp horse jockey 1 Minyun Santiago 2 Mc Bet the Beach Molina 3 Tellerimfromtexas Sebreth 4 Corona Taylor TBA 5 Hr Excessive Ivory Lopez 6 Tf Jess So Special TBA 7 Captain Trick Cachu 8 Corona Pirate Diego

odds 3-1 2-1 30-1 12-1 5-1 9-2 6-1 12-1

Fourth: 6F, $10,000 AOC pp horse 1 The Gipper 2 Mias Moonbeam 3 Serious Talk 4 Wildwood Dancer

odds 3-5 9-2 5-1 3-1

jockey Hernandez Diego Bailon Santiago

Fifth: 1 Mile 70 Yds, F&M, $3,200 (B) CLM pp horse jockey odds 1 Gotta Go Back Molina 9-2 2 Ciara for Three Thurman 15-1 3 Serena’s Halo Diego 5-1 4 Causing Smiles Hernandez 3-1 5 Gotothemax Bailon 8-5 6 Alley ‘o Malley Santiago 20-1 7 Orient’s Joy Sebreth 15-1 8 The Ridge Lopez 8-1 Sixth: 6F, IL. Bred, $4,000 AOC pp horse jockey 1 Grandslamsuprise Giles 2 Forafewdollarsmore Retana 3 Hide the Green Molina 4 Even Fever Santiago 5 Ripe Attack Hernandez 6 Peacock Man Lopez

odds 6-1 6-1 3-1 7-5 10-1 3-1

Seventh: 6F, F&M, $3,200 NWY CLM pp horse jockey 1 Sing Kitty Sing Bailon 2 Royal Renaissance Thurman 3 Giant Sugarbaby Santiago 4 Run Away Gal Hernandez 5 Just Sky Diego 6 Seattle Train Molina 7 Pink for Me Lopez

odds 2-1 15-1 3-1 12-1 10-1 7-2 4-1

TRANSACTIONS Major League Baseball MLB — Granted NY Mets RHP Jenrry Mejia a conditional reinstatement for the 2019 season. Suspended Chicago Cubs minor league RHP Oscar De La Cruz (Tennessee-SL) 80 games after testing positive for furosemide, a diuretic and masking agent, in violation of MLB’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE — Reinstated RHP Dylan Bundy from the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP David Hess to Norfolk (IL). Reinstated INF Luis Sardinas from the 60-day DL and assigned him outright to Norfolk. BOSTON — Signed RHPs Chase Shugart and Chris Machamer and LHP Gregorio Reyes. CLEVELAND — Activated RHP Carlos Carrasco from the 10-day DL. Designated RHP George Kontos for assignment. Acquired RHP James Hoyt from Houston for RHP Tommy Dejuneas and assigned Hoyt to Columbus (IL). LOS ANGELES — Optioned RHP Miguel Almonte to Salt Lake (PCL). Selected RHP Oliver Drake from Salt Lake. Transferred RHP Jake Jewell to the 60-day DL. MINNESOTA — Reinstated INF-OF Taylor Motter from the 7-day DL and optioned him to Rochester (IL). NEW YORK — Recalled INF Tyler Wade from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND — Agreed to terms with C JJ Schwarz and RHP Joe Demers on minor league contracts. SEATTLE — Signed general manager Jerry Dipoto to a multiyear contract extension. TORONTO — Signed SSs Michael Arias, Orelvis Martinez and Emmanuel Sanchez; LHPs Wilgenis Alvarado, Soenni Martinez and Yaifer Perdomo; INFs Willfrann Astudillo and Adrian Montero; OFs Amell Brazoban, Yeison Jimenez, Abner King, Daniel Oliva, Juan Pizarro and Gary David; UTLs Leonel Callez and Francisco Fajardo; RHPs Juanfer Castro, Jose Garcia, Jorman Gonzalez, Pedro Guzman, Yunior Lara, Juan Martinez, Bejardi Meza and Julian Valdez; Cs Javier D’Orazio and Junior Ramos; and 2B Gustavo Gutierrez to minor league contracts. National League ATLANTA — Placed LHP Max Fried on the 10-day DL. Called up RHP Evan Phillips from Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO — Activated RHP Carl Edwards Jr. from of the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Dillon Maples to Iowa (PCL). Activated LHP Rob Zastryzny from the 10-day DL and optioned him to Iowa. MIAMI — Signed LHP Andrew Miller to a minor league contract. MILWAUKEE — Placed LHP Brent Suter on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Aaron Wilkerson from Colorado Springs (PCL). Agreed to terms with SS Brice Turang on a minor league contract. PITTSBURGH — Recalled OF Jordan Luplow from Indianapolis (IL). Optioned RHP Clay Holmes to Bradenton (FSL). CARDINALS — Announced the resignation of vice-president of communications Ron Watermon. Activated INF Paul DeJong from the 10-day DL. Optioned LHP Austin Gomber to Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO — Agreed to terms with 3B Sean Guilbe, RHP Nick Thwaits and LHP Cullen Dana. Frontier League GRIZZLIES — Released C Cam Adams. LAKE ERIE — Released RHP Donny Murray. NORMAL — Signed RHP Zach Kirby. RASCALS — Signed C James Morisano. SCHAUMBURG — Released SS Tommy Anderson. TRAVERSE CITY — Released OF Arby Fields. BASKETBALL | NBA LA LAKERS — Signed G Rajon Rondo. NEW YORK — Signed F Mario Hezonja and C Luke Kornet. ORLANDO — Signed G Guard Isaiah Briscoe. FOOTBALL | National Football League CLEVELAND — Placed OL Donald Stephenson on the reserve/retired list. HOCKEY | National Hockey League ARIZONA — Signed C Barrett Hayton to a three-year contract. COLORADO — Agreed to terms with F Matt Nieto on a two-year contract. COLUMBUS — Signed F Anthony Duclair to a one-year contract. DALLAS — Signed C Jason Dickinson to a one-year contract. FLORIDA — Agreed to terms with D Alexander Petrovic on a one-year contract. SAN JOSE — Signed F Vladislav Kotkov. TORONTO — Signed F Tyler Ennis to a one-year contract. SOCCER | Major League Soccer FC DALLAS — Signed D Marquinhos Pedroso with targeted allocation money. NY RED BULLS — Announced the resignation of coach Jesse Marsch. Promoted Chris Armas to coach. COLLEGE RUTGERS — Named Anastasia Halbig and Michael Rosso assistant gymnastics coaches.

BASEBALL Frontier League Friday Evansville 4, Washington 0 Grizzlies 5, Traverse City 2 Florence 4, Lake Erie 0 Rascals 7, Joliet 4 Normal 6, Schaumburg 5 Windy City 13, Southern Illinois 5 Saturday Florence at Lake Erie, 5:05 p.m. Windy City at Southern Illinois, 6:05 p.m. Grizzlies at Traverse City, 6:05 p.m. Evansville at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Joliet at Rascals, 6:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Normal, 7:05 p.m.

Cardinals 11, Giants 2 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 3 3 1 1 2 1 .264 Pena c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Pham cf 5 2 2 1 0 2 .253 Molina c-1b 5 1 3 0 0 1 .284 Ozuna lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .279 Fowler rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Gyorko 3b 4 1 3 5 1 1 .251 Munoz ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Wong 2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .196 Bader rf-lf 5 2 3 2 0 1 .274 Weaver p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .207 a-Martinez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Cecil p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 42 11 18 11 3 10 San Fran. AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hanson lf-ss 4 1 1 2 0 0 .279 Posey c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Hundley c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .261 McCutchen rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Jackson lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Belt 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Crawford ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .307 Holland p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .067 Sandoval 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .251 Panik 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Hernandez cf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .276 Cueto p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Blach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .040 Pence lf-rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .202 Totals 29 2 2 2 0 8 Cardinals 410 004 200 — 11 18 0 San Fran. 000 002 000 — 2 2 0 a-grounded out for Weaver in the 9th. LOB: Cardinals 8. 2B: Ozuna (9), Gyorko (10), Bader (6). HR: Gyorko (7), off Cueto; Carpenter (16), off Cueto; Bader (6), off Holland; Hanson (6), off Weaver. RBIs: Carpenter (38), Pham (33), Ozuna 2 (46), Gyorko 5 (28), Bader 2 (14), Hanson 2 (24). S: Weaver. RLISP: Cardinals 5 (Pham, Munoz 2, Wong 2). GIDP: Ozuna. DP: San Francisco 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver 8 2 2 2 0 7 93 4.92 Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.79 San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto 5 10 5 5 2 2 76 1.95 2/ Blach 4 1 1 35 4.68 3 4 4 Holland 3 1/3 4 2 2 0 7 50 4.40 W: Weaver 5-7. L: Cueto 3-1. Inherited runners-scored: Holland 1-0. Umpires: Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, CB Bucknor; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Brian O’Nora. T: 2:35. A: 38,766 (41,915). HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals first • Carpenter walks. Pham singles, Carpenter to second. Molina singles, Carpenter to third, Pham to second. Ozuna grounds out, Carpenter scores, Pham to third, Molina to second. Gyorko homers, Pham and Molina score. Four runs. Cardinals 4, Giants 0. Cardinals second • Carpenter homers. One run. Cardinals 5, Giants 0. Cardinals sixth • Bader singles. Weaver sacrifice bunts Bader to second. Carpenter walks. Pham singles, Bader scores, Carpenter to third. Ozuna singles, Carpenter scores, Pham to third. Gyorko doubles, Pham and Ozuna score. Four runs. Cardinals 9, Giants 0. Giants sixth • Hernandez singles. Hanson homers, Hernandez scores. Two runs. Cardinals 9, Giants 2. Cardinals seventh • Wong singles. Bader homers, Wong scores. Two runs. Cardinals 11, Giants 2.

SOCCER Major League Soccer Saturday Atlanta United FC at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Colorado at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Seattle at New England, 6:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Houston, 8 p.m. FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Chicago at Vancouver, 9:30 p.m. Columbus at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. San Jose at Portland, 10 p.m. Orlando City at Los Angeles FC, 10 p.m. Sunday New York at New York City FC, 6 p.m.

United Soccer League Friday New York 6, Atlanta 1 Penn 3, Bethlehem 2 Saturday Charlotte at Indy, 6 p.m. Charleston at North Carolina, 6 p.m. Louisville at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Cincinnati at Nashville, 7:30 p.m. Colo. Springs at Okla. City, 7:30 p.m. Tulsa at Rio Grande Valley, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Orange County, 9 p.m. St. Louis at Las Vegas, 10 p.m. Salt Lake City at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

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138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139

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LPGA | Thornberry Creek Friday | Oneida, Wis. Purse: $2 million | Yards: 6,624 | Par: 72 Second Round | a-denotes amateur Sei Young Kim 63-65-128 Yu Liu 69-63-132 In Gee Chun 67-66-133 Amy Yang 67-66-133 Mariah Stackhouse 66-67-133 Emma Talley 65-68-133 Katherine Kirk 62-71-133 Brittany Altomare 68-66-134 Chella Choi 68-66-134 Anna Nordqvist 67-67-134 Lydia Ko 69-66-135 Mi Jung Hur 69-66-135 Jin Young Ko 68-67-135 Bronte Law 67-68-135 Mo Martin 67-68-135 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 66-69-135 Georgia Hall 66-69-135 Dani Holmqvist 66-69-135 Ariya Jutanugarn 66-69-135 Carlota Ciganda 65-70-135 Sandra Gal 65-70-135

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Euro | Irish Open Friday | Donegal, Ireland Purse: $7 million | Yards: 7,462 | Par: 72 Second Round Ryan Fox, New Zealand 67-69— 136 Matthieu Pavon, France 68-68— 136 Erik Van Rooyen, South Africa 71-65— 136 Joakim Lagergren, Sweden 69-68— 137 Danny Willett, England 68-70— 138 Zander Lombard, South Africa 70-68— 138 Sam Horsfield, England 69-69— 138 Lee Westwood, England 68-71— 139 Peter Uihlein, United States 70-70—140 Russell Knox, Scotland 71-69—140 Christiaan Bezuidenhout, S.Africa 72-68—140 Dean Burmester, South Africa 71-70— 141 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 72-69— 141 Matthew Nixon, England 72-69— 141 Raphael Jacquelin, France 71-70— 141 Jorge Campillo, Spain 70-71— 141 Ashley Chesters, England 68-73— 141 Yusaku Miyazato, Japan 69-71— 141 Chris Wood, England 70-71— 141 Also Julian Suri, United States 76-67— 143 Rory McIlroy, Scotland 70-73— 143 Jon Rahm, Spain 74-69— 143

BASKETBALL | WNBA Friday • Seattle 95, Atlanta 86 Saturday Washington at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Connecticut at Las Vegas, 9:30 p.m.

MOTOR SPORTS

BOXING SCHEDULE Saturday At Astana, Kazakhstan: Beibut Shumenov vs. Hizni Altunkaya, 12, for the vacant WBA cruiserweight title. At Save Mart Arena, Fresno, Calif. (ESPN): Jose Ramirez vs. Danny O’Connor, 12, for Ramirez’s WBC junior welterweight title; Egidijus Kavaliauskas vs. Juan Carlos Abreu, 10, weltereweights; Andy Vences vs. Frank De Alba, 10, junior lightweights; Andy Ruiz vs. Kevin Johnson, 10, heavyweights.

TENNIS Wimbledon results Men’s Singles | Second Round Alexander Zverev, Germany, def. Taylor Fritz, United States, 6-4, 5-7, 6-7 (0), 6-1, 6-2 Third Round Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, 6-3, 7-5, 6-2. Adrian Mannarino (22), France, def. Daniil Medvedev, Russia, 6-4, 6-3, 4-6, 5-7, 6-3. Gael Monfils, France, def. Sam Querrey (11), United States, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2. Kevin Anderson (8), South Africa, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber (25), Germany, 6-3, 7-5, 7-5. Mackenzie Mcdonald, United States, def. Guido Pella, Argentina, 6-4, 6-4, 7-6 (6). John Isner (9), United States, def. Radu Albot, Moldova, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4. Stefanos Tsitsipas (31), Greece, def. Thomas Fabbiano, Italy, 6-2, 6-1, 6-4. Milos Raonic (13), Candad vs. Dennis Novak, Austria, 7-6 (5), 4-6. 6-5, susp., darkness. Women’s Singles | Third Round Karolina Pliskova (7), Czech Republic, def. Mihaela Buzarnescu (29), Romania, 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1. Kiki Bertens (20), Netherlands, def. Venus Williams (9), United States, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 8-6. Julia Goerges (13), Germany, def. Barbora Strycova (23), Czech Republic, 7-6 (3), 3-6, 10-8. Donna Vekic, Croatia, def. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 7-6 (2), 6-1. Serena Williams (25), United States, def. Kristina Mladenovic, France, 7-5, 7-6 (2). Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, def. Madison Keys (10), United States, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. Camila Giorgi, Italy, def. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 3-6, 7-6 (6), 6-2. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1.

GOLF PGA | Greenbrier Friday | White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $7.3 million | Yards: 7,286 | Par: 70 Second Round Kelly Kraft 64-63 — 127 Anirban Lahiri 67-61 — 128 Webb Simpson 61-67 — 128 Jason Kokrak 65-64 — 129 Whee Kim 62-68 — 130 Harold Varner III 66-64 — 130 Sam Saunders 68-63 — 131 Tyler Duncan 68-64 — 132 Kevin Na 69-63 — 132 Joaquin Niemann 63-69 — 132 Austin Cook 66-66 — 132 Xander Schauffele 66-66 — 132 Ollie Schniederjans 66-66 — 132 Billy Hurley III 66-66 — 132 Joel Dahmen 67-65 — 132 Ryan Armour 67-66 — 133 Brandt Snedeker 66-67 — 133 Jamie Lovemark 67-66 — 133 Scott Stallings 70-63 — 133 Tom Hoge 66-67 — 133 Steve Wheatcroft 66-67 — 133 J.J. Spaun 68-65 — 133 Ryan Moore 66-67 — 133 Nick Watney 69-65 — 134 David Lingmerth 66-68 — 134 Kevin Chappell 66-68 — 134 Wesley Bryan 69-65 — 134 Tony Finau 67-67 — 134 Chad Campbell 65-69 — 134 Jim Furyk 68-66 — 134 Bubba Watson 68-66 — 134 Keegan Bradley 65-69 — 134 George McNeill 71-64 — 135 David Hearn 68-67 — 135 J.J. Henry 65-70 — 135 William McGirt 69-66 — 135 Phil Mickelson 66-69 — 135 Kevin Kisner 69-66 — 135 Lanto Griffin 69-66 — 135 Bronson Burgoon 67-68 — 135 Steve Marino 67-68 — 135 Fabian Gomez 67-68 — 135 Robert Streb 66-69 — 135 Abraham Ancer 67-68 — 135 Cameron Percy 67-68 — 135 Jonathan Randolph 67-68 — 135 Corey Conners 67-69 — 136 Alex Cejka 68-68 — 136 Keith Mitchell 69-67 — 136 Peter Malnati 67-69 — 136 Brian Harman 67-69 — 136 Johnson Wagner 68-68 — 136 Talor Gooch 69-67 — 136 Stephan Jaeger 66-70 — 136 Richy Werenski 71-65 — 136 Charles Howell III 68-68 — 136

Mackenzie Hughes 69-67 Brian Gay 70-66 Tyrone Van Aswegen 68-68 Trey Mullinax 71-66 Zac Blair 68-69 J.T. Poston 69-68 Vijay Singh 69-68 Russell Henley 68-69 Nick Taylor 71-66 Brandon Harkins 72-65 C.T. Pan 71-66 Rory Sabbatini 69-68 John Peterson 68-69 Roberto Diaz 70-67 Denny McCarthy 67-70 Scott Brown 70-67 Scott Piercy 70-67 Blayne Barber 67-70 Ben Silverman 68-69 Rob Oppenheim 71-66 Brett Stegmaier 67-70 Failed to make the cut Tommy Gainey 70-68 Cameron Tringale 71-67 Ken Duke 71-67 Matt Jones 72-66 Nicholas Lindheim 70-68 Ethan Tracy 69-69 Chase Seiffert 73-65 Parker McLachlin 71-67 James Hahn 68-70 Aaron Wise 70-68 Jonas Blixt 70-68 Ted Potter, Jr. 73-65 Dominic Bozzelli 67-71 Kevin Streelman 72-66 Norman Xiong 69-69 T.J. Vogel 69-69 Martin Piller 68-71 Tim Herron 72-67 Ricky Barnes 73-66 J.B. Holmes 70-69 Xinjun Zhang 71-68 Tom Lovelady 70-69 Stuart Appleby 71-68 Danny Lee 67-72 Andrew Putnam 69-70 Brice Garnett 69-70 Bill Haas 69-70 Zecheng Dou 66-73 Adam Schenk 68-71 Wes Homan 69-70

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NASCAR XFINITY | Firecracker 250 results Friday | Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap: 2.50 miles | (Start pos. in parentheses) Driver Car Laps Pts 1. (7) Kyle Larson Chevy 105 0 2. (5) Elliott Sadler Chevy 105 45 3. (6) Christopher Bell Toy. 105 34 4. (2) Ryan Blaney Ford 105 0 5. (38) Kaz Grala Ford 105 32 6. (14) Shane Lee Chevy 105 31 7. (36) Timmy Hill Dodge 105 30 8. (4) Daniel Hemric Chevy 105 32 9. (9) Justin Allgaier Chevy 105 40 10. (16) Ross Chastain Chevy 105 27 11. (17) Michael Annett Chevy 105 26 12. (10) Brandon Jones Toy. 105 25 13. (12) Ryan Truex Chevy 105 25 14. (35) Chad Finchum Chevy 105 23 15. (21) Alex Labbe Chevy 105 22 16. (25) JJ Yeley Chevy 105 21 17. (30) Spencer Boyd Chevy 105 20 18. (40) Justin Haley Chevy 105 0 19. (29) Vinnie Miller Chevy 104 18 20. (13) Matt Tifft Chevy 103 25 21. (37) Mike Harmon Dodge 102 16 22. (39) Ray Black Jr Chevy 102 15 23. (31) Jeff Green Chevy (a)98 14 24. (28) Josh Williams Chevy (a)97 13 25. (3) Cole Custer Ford (a)97 15 26. (15) Ryan Reed Ford (a)97 11 27. (18) Ryan Sieg Chevy (a)97 10 28. (22) Garrett Smithley Chevy (a)94 9 29. (11) Chase Elliott Chevy (e)90 0 30. (34) Brandon Hightower Toy. (a)87 7 31. (8) Tyler Reddick Chevy (a)82 12 32. (20) Joey Gase Chevy (a)82 5 33. (23) Austin Cindric Ford (a)81 16 34. (19) Jeremy Clements Chevy (a)81 3 35. (27) David Starr Chevy (a)81 2 36. (32) BJ McLeod Chevy (a)81 1 37. (26) Blake Jones Chevy (a)75 1 38. (24) Caesar Bacarella Chevy (a)70 1 39. (1) Ryan Preece Toy. (o)51 1 40. (33) Josh Bilicki Toy. (e)33 1 a=accident. e=engine. o=overheating RACE STATISTICS Average Speed of Winner: 129.237 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 1 minute, 35 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.005 seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 29 laps. Lead Changes: 11 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: R.Preece 0; C.Custer 1-8; K.Larson 9-32; R.Blaney 33-57; K.Larson 58-63; J.Haley 64; R.Blaney 65-77; E.Sadler 78-80; R.Blaney 81; E.Sadler 82-95; K.Larson 96-104; J.Haley 105 Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): R.Blaney, 3 times for 36 laps; K.Larson, 3 times for 36 laps; E.Sadler, 2 times for 15 laps; C.Custer, 1 time for 7 laps; J.Haley, 2 times for 0 laps; R.Preece, 1 time for 0 laps. Wins: K.Larson, 3; J.Allgaier, 2; C.Bell, 1; R.Blaney, 1; R.Preece, 1; T.Reddick, 1. Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 582; 2. D.Hemric, 570; 3. C.Bell, 557; 4. C.Custer, 556; 5. J.Allgaier, 528; 6. T.Reddick, 503; 7. Br.Jones, 488; 8. R.Truex, 455; 9. M.Tifft, 425; 10. A.Cindric, 388.

NASCAR | Coke Zero Sugar 400 lineup Friday’s qualifying; race Saturday Daytona Beach, Fla. (Car number in parentheses) Driver Car 1. (9) Chase Elliott Chevy 2. (88) Alex Bowman Chevy 3. (2) Brad Keselowski Ford 4. (48) Jimmie Johnson Chevy 5. (4) Kevin Harvick Ford 6. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr. Ford 7. (31) Ryan Newman Chevy 8. (34) Michael McDowell Ford 9. (14) Clint Bowyer Ford 10. (3) Austin Dillon Chevy 11. (22) Joey Logano Ford 12. (12) Ryan Blaney Ford 13. (78) Martin Truex Jr. Toyota 14. (42) Kyle Larson Chevy 15. (18) Kyle Busch Toyota 16. (62) Brendan Gaughan Chevy 17. (11) Denny Hamlin Toyota 18. (24) William Byron Chevy 19. (13) Ty Dillon Chevy 20. (6) Trevor Bayne Ford 21. (38) David Ragan Ford 22. (43) Bubba Wallace Chevy 23. (41) Kurt Busch Ford 24. (47) AJ Allmendinger Chevy 25. (37) Chris Buescher Chevy 26. (10) Aric Almirola Ford 27. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevy 28. (95) Kasey Kahne Chevy 29. (20) Erik Jones Toyota 30. (21) Paul Menard Ford 31. (32) Matt DiBenedetto Ford 32. (19) Daniel Suarez Toyota 33. (15) Ross Chastain Chevy 34. (7) Jeffrey Earnhardt Chevy 35. (96) DJ Kennington Toyota 36. (00) Joey Gase Chevy 37. (99) Landon Cassill Chevy 38. (72) Corey LaJoie Chevy 39. (51) Ray Black II Chevy 40. (23) JJ Yeley Toyota Failed to qualify 41. (92) Timothy Peters Ford

Speed 194.045 193.046 192.802 192.361 192.345 192.164 191.812 191.669 191.445 191.298 191.152 190.981 191.209 191.140 190.913 190.900 190.876 190.868 190.832 190.819 190.634 190.565 190.396 190.339 190.042 190.034 189.777 189.649 189.434 189.203 188.336 188.001 187.371 187.324 186.312 185.361 185.033 184.976 183.146 182.730 181.068

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

MOTOR SPORTS ROUNDUP NHL NOTEBOOK

jeydjpole jeydjfor jeydjrace jeydj Elliott gains jeydj jeydj jeydj jeydj Saturday night at Daytona ASSOCIATED PRESS

Driver will be trying for his first career win and to boost Chevy’s standing ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chase Elliott turned a lap of 194.045 mph Friday to win the pole at Daytona International Speedway and give sagging Chevrolet a much-needed boost. Elliott, who sprained his right ankle earlier this week “horsing around in the pool,” had won two poles at the Daytona 500. He is set to start from the top Saturday night in the NASCAR Cup Series race as the Hendrick Motorsports driver goes for his first career victory. Hendrick teammate Alex Bowman joins Elliott on the front row for the race in Daytona Beach, Fla. Bowman won the pole for this year’s Daytona 500 in the debut race for the Chevy Camaro. Chevrolet has been mostly noncompetitive since Austin Dillon won the season-opening Daytona 500 in February. The American automaker hasn’t been to victory lane since, and hadn’t really gotten close to a checkered flag. Toyota and Ford have pulled away in the standings. Seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson starts fourth, in the No. 48 Chevrolet, giving Hendrick three of the top four spots. Martin Truex Jr. will be in the 13th slot and was the top-qualifying Toyota. Truex, Kevin Harvick and Kyle Busch have made it a three-driver race to the championship. Harvick, who starts fifth, and Busch, at 15th, each has five wins. Seven headed to Motorsports Hall •

Three-time NASCAR champion Tony Stewart, three-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dario Franchitti and NHRA legend Don Schumacher are among seven people chosen for induction into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America. The 2019 class was announced Friday at Daytona. They received the most votes from a list of 43 nominees from all walks of motorsports. The others chosen for induction are automotive and racing pioneer Augie Duesenberg, sports car engineer Phil Remington, motorcycle road-racing champion Kevin Schwantz and race queen Linda Vaughn. The class will be enshrined during a ceremony in March. Vettel sets pace in F-1 practice • Sebastian Vettel was fastest ahead of Mercedes’ Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas in second practice Friday for the British Formula One Grand Prix. Ferrari driver Vettel, who leads by one point going into the 10th of 21 races this season, was 0.187 seconds quicker than Hamilton and 0.357 ahead of Bottas in Silverstone, England. The Mercedes duo managed a one-two in first practice as they aim to bounce back after failing to finish the Austrian GP because of team errors last Sunday. “It’s going to be very, very close this weekend. The Ferraris are really fast,” Hamilton said. Hamilton is going for a fifth straight victory in his home race, and a record sixth overall, but the four-time world champion complained early on that “this track is the bumpiest I’ve ever been on.” Another practice round is set for Saturday before qualifying for the race Sunday.

XFINITY SERIES Larson wins race at Daytona after Haley makes an illegal move Kyle Larson was declared the winner of the Firecracker 250 on Friday night after Justin Haley’s late pass in overtime was ruled illegal. A full-time driver in NASCAR’s Trucks series, Haley used an aggressive and impressive move to complete a stunning pass that looked as if it would lead him to victory lane. It would have been a stellar run in just his second Xfinity Series race — if only he could have kept two tires above the double-yellow line at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway. But Haley inadvertently crossed the yellow line around the inside of the track, and NASCAR ruled it improper. “I don’t know why they’re calling me like that,” said Haley, who ended up 18th. Larson edged Elliott Sadler at the line, giving the Cup Series regular three wins in four starts this year in the second-tier series. “It’s amazing,” Larson said. “I’ve been close to win an Xfinity race here in Daytona, so it’s nice to finally get it done.” It was another heartbreaking loss for Sadler, who finished second at Daytona for the third straight time. “I felt like I was in a good spot there at the end beside Larson,” Sadler said. “It just wasn’t meant to be.” (Associated Press)

Johnson hopes to regain top form BLUES • FROM B1

“I take responsibility for that, not stepping up to make a bigger difference when I needed to. So it was a tough year, tough situation to be in as a goalie – for anyone in the organization to try and have success.” For Johnson, it showed in his final numbers: a record of 10-17-3, with a 3.55 goals-against average and a save percentage of .891. As he reviewed video, talked to coaches and team executives both during and after the season, Johnson realized that no one part of his game needed a radical change. “Obviously, I know I need to improve on everything,” he said. Because the idea, of course, is to make more saves. Always. But Johnson didn’t suddenly forget how to play the position, lose his agility and skill. “You’re only as good as your last year,” Johnson said. “And I have a lot to prove that I can still be an elite goalie, a really competitive goalie in this league like I was in Calgary and Buffalo (in an earlier stint), and especially when I was in Boston on one of the better teams I’ve been on as a whole.” The Blues are betting $1.75 million that that’s still the case, signing Johnson, 32, to a one-year deal as an unrestricted free agent. Among the Blues’ flurry of activity Sunday, capped by the Ryan O’Reilly trade, the addition of Johnson was almost an afterthought. But unless he gets beat out by young Ville Husso, Johnson figures to start 25 or so games for the Blues this coming season, maybe more if Jake Allen experiences another midseason swoon. So, yes, this is a pretty important hire. And now this: The man Johnson replaces gives his stamp of approval. “I think he’s a really good goalie,” said Carter Hutton, whose free-agent departure to Buffalo led to Johnson’s signing in St. Louis. “He doesn’t really beat himself. He’s pretty solid and square. He does a lot of things right.” Entering last season, Johnson had a 2.44 goals-against average and a .915 save percentage over a career that included 137 NHL games — all good numbers and strikingly similar to those posted by Allen and Carter. Before last season, Allen had a 2.37 goals-against and a .915 save percentage over 160 career games; Hutton had a 2.51 goals-against and a .910 save percentage over 106 career games. As he was pondering his free-agent

choices earlier this offseason, Hutton said he actually told some friends that Johnson might be a good fit in St. Louis if he left the Blues. And here we are. “For me, it wasn’t about the money, it wasn’t about anything but just an opportunity to be a part of a winning organization,” Johnson said. “Being part of a good team, a good city, a passionate city — and that’s what drew my eyes St. Louis.” For whatever reason, much of Johnson’s NHL life has featured a series of one-year deals and free agency in a career that began as a fifth-round pick (No. 125 overall) by Pittsburgh in 2006. Besides the Bruins, Flames and Sabres (twice), it’s also included stints with the New York Rangers, New York Islanders and Arizona Coyotes. His breakout year came in 2013-14 with Boston, when he posted a 17-4-3 record with a 2.10 goals-against average and .925 save percentage. Starting with that campaign, he has averaged 29 starts and 32.6 games played per season. “A lot of respect I think was lost from last year, which I’m looking to gain back with an opportunity on a better team,” Johnson said. The lost “respect” made the offseason more stressful even though Johnson said the Blues were on him early in the process. The birth of daughter Claire 11 weeks ago provided a wonderful diversion for Hudson and wife Alex. “It was nice having the baby around to kinda keep me distracted,” Johnson said. “My mind’s always thinking about hockey, and where I was gonna end up and the situation. So it was definitely an interesting summer, a different summer for me.” A summer that added another team to the Chad Johnson Division.

SUNDQVIST SIGNS Less than 24 hours after filing for salary arbitration as a restricted free agent, forward Oskar Sundqvist agreed to a one-year, $700,000 contract with the Blues. Another restricted free agent in the organization, goalie Jordan Binnington, agreed to a one-year, two-way deal with the team. But forward Beau Bennett, who played in six games for the Blues last year, is heading to Belarus after signing a oneyear deal with Minsk Dinamo of the Kontinental Hockey League. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

07.08.2018 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B9

NHL NOTEBOOK

AMERICA’S LINE

FAIRMOUNT PARK

GOLF

CYCLING

BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Yankees...................-$148 ...............BLUE JAYS INDIANS ..................-$180 ............................A’s TIGERS.....................-$115....................Rangers TWINS......................-$170 .....................Orioles ASTROS .................. -$340................White Sox Red Sox ...................-$245 ................... ROYALS National League NATIONALS .............-$180 ....................Marlins PIRATES...................-$115..................... Phillies BREWERS................-$125 .....................Braves CUBS........................-$150 ........................ Reds GIANTS ....................-$145 .......................Cards D’BACKS ..................-$190 .....................Padres Interleague Rays........................ -$140....................... METS MARINERS...............-$130 ....................Rockies Dodgers...................-$128 ...................ANGELS SOCCER • World Cup Tuesday France ..................................................... +$150 Belgium.................................................. +$200 Draw: +$210 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Wednesday England....................................................+$125 Croatia ....................................................+$220 Draw: +$210 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

Saturday’s results

PGA | Greenbrier

Tour de France

First (1m, 70y) Time: 1:46:23 Garrison Commander (Victor Santiago), 3.00, 2.40 Nafir’s Best (Uriel A. Lopez), 3.80 Jack N John (Javier Diego) Exacta (4-3) $13.20

Saturday | White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $7.3 million | Yardage: 7,286 | Par: 70 Third Round Harold Varner III 66-64-66 — 196 -14 Kelly Kraft 64-63-69 — 196 -14 Xander Schauffele 66-66-65 — 197 -13 Kevin Na 69-63-65 — 197 -13 Sam Saunders 68-63-67 — 198 -12 Bubba Watson 68-66-65 — 199 -11 Joel Dahmen 67-65-67 — 199 -11 Anirban Lahiri 67-61-71 — 199 -11 Bronson Burgoon 67-68-65 — 200 -10 Ryan Moore 66-67-67 — 200 -10 Jamie Lovemark 67-66-67 — 200 -10 Ryan Armour 67-66-67 — 200 -10 Jason Kokrak 65-64-71 — 200 -10 Keegan Bradley 65-69-67 — 201 -9 Tony Finau 67-67-67 — 201 -9 J.J. Spaun 68-65-68 — 201 -9 Ollie Schniederjans 66-66-69 — 201 -9 J.T. Poston 69-68-65 — 202 -8 David Lingmerth 66-68-68 — 202 -8 Austin Cook 66-66-70 — 202 -8 Brandon Harkins 72-65-66 — 203 -7 Mackenzie Hughes 69-67-67 — 203 -7 David Hearn 68-67-68 — 203 -7 Jim Furyk 68-66-69 — 203 -7 Wesley Bryan 69-65-69 — 203 -7 Steve Wheatcroft 66-67-70 — 203 -7 Scott Stallings 70-63-70 — 203 -7 Brandt Snedeker 66-67-70 — 203 -7 Billy Hurley III 66-66-71 — 203 -7 C.T. Pan 71-66-67 — 204 -6 Charles Howell III 68-68-68 — 204 -6 Talor Gooch 69-67-68 — 204 -6 Abraham Ancer 67-68-69 — 204 -6 J.J. Henry 65-70-69 — 204 -6 Kevin Chappell 66-68-70 — 204 -6 Joaquin Niemann 63-69-72 — 204 -6 Webb Simpson 61-67-76 — 204 -6 Scott Brown 70-67-68 — 205 -5 John Peterson 68-69-68 — 205 -5 Roberto Diaz 70-67-68 — 205 -5 Richy Werenski 71-65-69 — 205 -5 Alex Cejka 68-68-69 — 205 -5 Lanto Griffin 69-66-70 — 205 -5 Phil Mickelson 66-69-70 — 205 -5 George McNeill 71-64-70 — 205 -5 Nick Watney 69-65-71 — 205 -5 Tom Hoge 66-67-72 — 205 -5 Blayne Barber 67-70-69 — 206 -4 Denny McCarthy 67-70-69 — 206 -4 Nick Taylor 71-66-69 — 206 -4 Russell Henley 68-69-69 — 206 -4 Stephan Jaeger 66-70-70 — 206 -4 Brian Harman 67-69-70 — 206 -4 Corey Conners 67-69-70 — 206 -4 Cameron Percy 67-68-71 — 206 -4 Robert Streb 66-69-71 — 206 -4 Kevin Kisner 69-66-71 — 206 -4 Chad Campbell 65-69-72 — 206 -4 Whee Kim 62-68-76 — 206 -4 Brett Stegmaier 67-70-70 — 207 -3 Ben Silverman 68-69-70 — 207 -3 Rob Oppenheim 71-66-70 — 207 -3 Brian Gay 70-66-71 — 207 -3 Tyler Duncan 68-64-75 — 207 -3 Tyrone Van Aswegen 68-68-72 — 208 -2 Trey Mullinax 71-66-71 — 208 -2 Johnson Wagner 68-68-72 — 208 -2 Jonathan Randolph 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Steve Marino 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Fabian Gomez 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Rory Sabbatini 69-68-72 — 209 -1 Keith Mitchell 69-67-73 — 209 -1 Peter Malnati 67-69-73 — 209 -1 Scott Piercy 70-67-73 — 210 E William McGirt 69-66-75 — 210 E Vijay Singh 69-68-74 — 211 +1 Zac Blair 68-69-74 — 211 +1

Saturday | At Fontenay-le-Comte, France First Stage A 124.9-mile flat ride from Noirmoutieren-l’Ile to Fontenay-le-Comte 1. Fernando Gaviria, Colombia, Quick-Step Floors, 4:23:32. 2. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 3. Marcel Kittel, Germany, Katusha Alpecin, same time. 4. Alexander Kristoff, Norway, UAE Team Emirates, same time. 5. Christophe Leporte, France, Cofidis, same time. 6. Dylan Groenewegen, Netherlands, LottoNL-Jumbo, same time. 7. Michael Matthews, Australia, Sunweb, same time. 8. John Degenkolb, Germany, Trek-Segafredo, same time. 9. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, same time. 10. Rafal Majka, Poland, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 11. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Meruida, same time. 12. Timothy Dupont, Belgium, Wante-Groupe Gobert, same time. 13. Thomas Boudat, France, Direct Energie, same time. 14. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, same time. 15. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 16. Michael Valgren, Denmark, Astana, same time. 17. Maximiliano Richeze, Argentina, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 18. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 19. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Dimension Data, same time. 20. Sonny Colbrelli, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, same time. Also 27. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, same time. 34. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 55. Tejay van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 56. Taylor Phinney, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, same time. 91. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :51 behind. 112. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 1:15. 126. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 1:30. 153. Ian Boswell, United States, Katusha Alpecin, 2:44. 176. Lawson Craddock, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 7:50. Overall Standings (After one stage) 1. Fernando Gaviria, Colombia, Quick-Step Floors, 4:23:22. 2. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Bora-Hansgrohe, :04. 3. Marcel Kittel, Germany, Katusha Alpecin, :06. 4. Oliver Naesen, Belgium, AG2R La Mondiale, :09. 5. Alexander Kristoff, Norway, UAE Team Emirates, :10. 6. Christophe Leporte, France, Cofidis, :10. 7. Dylan Groenewegen, Netherlands, LottoNL-Jumbo, same time. 8. Michael Matthews, Australia, Sunweb, same time. 9. John Degenkolb, Germany, Trek-Segafredo, same time. 10. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, same time. 11. Rafal Majka, Poland, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 12. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Meruida, same time. 13. Timothy Dupont, Belgium, Wante-Groupe Gobert, same time. 14. Thomas Boudat, France, Direct Energie, same time. 15. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, same time. 16. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 17. Michael Valgren, Denmark, Astana, same time. 18. Maximiliano Richeze, Argentina, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 19. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 20. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Dimension Data, same time. Also 28. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, same time. 35. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 55. Tejay van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 56. Taylor Phinney, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, same time. 91. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, 1:01 behind. 112. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 1:25. 126. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 1:40. 153. Ian Boswell, United States, Katusha Alpecin, 2:54. 176. Lawson Craddock, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 8:00.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Cincinnati 1B Montrell Marshall (Dayton-MWL) and Minnesota 3B Sean Miller (Chattanooga-SL) 50 games for their violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League DETROIT TIGERS — Signed LHP Kacey Murphy and RHP Chris Farish to minor league contracts. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Sent OF Nicky Delmonico to Birmingham (SL) for a rehab assignment. DETROIT TIGERS — Signed LHP Kacey Murphy and RHP Chris Farish to minor league contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS — Optioned OF Jake Marisnick to Fresno (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Kyle Tucker from Fresno. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Optioned RHP Trevor Oaks to Omaha (PCL). Activated LHP Enny Romero. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Sent RHP Nick Tropeano to Inland Empire (Cal) for a rehab assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS — Signed OF Erick Rivera to a minor league contract. NEW YORK YANKEES — Designated RHP David Hale for assignment. Recalled OF Clint Frazier from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Placed OF Matt Joyce on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Thursday. Recalled OF Nick Martini from Nashville (PCL). Sent RHP Daniel Mengden to Nashville (PCL) for a rehab assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS — Optioned RHP Nick Rumbelow to Tacoma (PCL). Recalled OF John Andreoli from Tacoma. Signed C Cal Raleigh to a minor league contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Designated OF Jeremy Hazelbaker for assignment. Selected the contract of LHP Adam Kolarek from Durham (IL). Signed LHP Shane McClanahan to a minor league contract. Sent RHP Jake Faria to Charlotte (FSL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Optioned LHP Thomas Pannone to Buffalo (IL). Assigned RHP Preston Guilmet outright to Buffalo (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Designated RHP Fernando Salas for assignment. Optioned RHP Silvino Bracho to Reno (PCL). Reinstated RHP Randall Delgado from the 60-day DL. Reinstated C Alex Avila from the 10-day DL. CHICAGO CUBS — Assigned C Chris Gimenez outright to Iowa (PCL). Signed OF Edmond Americaan, LHP Josh Sawyer, 2B Andy Weber and RHPs Niels Stone and Jake Reindl to minor league contracts. CINCINNATI REDS — Selected the contract of 2B Dilson Herrera from Louisville (IL). Sent RHP Rookie Davis to the AZL Reds for a rehab assignment. COLORADO ROCKIES — Placed LHP Mike Dunn on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Placed C Tom Murphy on paternity leave. Recalled INF/OF Jordan Patterson and LHP Jerry Vasto from Albuquerque (PCL). Sent RHP Bryan Shaw to Albuquerque for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Signed LHP Ben Holmes to a minor league contract. Activated RHP Dylan Floro. Placed RHP Kenta Maeda on the paternity list. Recalled LHP/RHP Pat Venditte from Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed RHP Yi,i Garcia on the 10-day DL. MIAMI MARLINS — Optioned LHP Dillon Peters to New Orleans (PCL). Reinstated OF Garrett Cooper from the 60-day DL. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Optioned INF Nate Orf to Colorado Springs (PCL). Recalled RHP Jorge Lopez from Colorado Springs. NEW YORK METS — Placed LHP Jerry Blevins on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP Paul Sewald from Las Vegas (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Optioned RHP Jake Thompson to Lehigh Valley (IL). Reinstated RHP Edubray Ramos from the 10-day DL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Optioned RHP Dovydas Neverauskas and LHP Josh Smoker to Indianapolis (IL). Signed SS Zack Kone and RHP Deivy Mendez to minor league contracts. Reinstated RHP Michael Feliz from the 10-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Alex McRae from Indianapolis. CARDINALS — Sent RHP Luke Gregerson to Springfield (TL) and LHP Tyler Lyons to Memphis (PCL) for rehab assignments. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Robert Stock to El Paso (PCL). Placed LHP Jose Castillo on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Friday. Recalled RHP Kazuhisa Makita from El Paso. Reinstated RHP Kirby Yates from paternity leave and RHP Phil Hughes from the 10-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Placed 2B Joe Panik on the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Chris Stratton to Sacramento (PCL). Reinstated RHP Jeff Samardzija from the 10-day DL. Selected the contract of SS Chase d’Arnaud from Sacramento. Transferred RHP Hunter Strickland to the 60-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent RHP Koda Glover to the GCL Nationals and C Matt Wieters to Harrisburg (EL) for rehab assignments. American Association CHICAGO DOGS — Released RHP Brandon White. Signed OF Kenny Wilson. KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Sold the contract of LHP Carlos Diaz to the Cincinnati Reds. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS — Released RHP Geoff Broussard. Signed RHP Will Lamarche. SIOUX FALLS CANARIES — Signed RHP John Straka. WICHITA WINGNUTS — Released RHP Mark Haynes. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES — Signed INF Gerald Bautista and RHP Phillipe Saad. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Released UT Jeremy Scott. NORMAL CORNBELTERS — Signed RHP Thomas Nicoll. RASCALS — Signed RHP David Flattery. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DETROIT PISTONS — Named Gregg Polinsky director of player personnel. Signed G Bruce Brown Jr. Waived G Dwight Buycks. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Signed F Keita Bates-Diop. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS — Signed RW Filip Zadina to a three-year contract. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Promoted Tim Burke to assistant general manager. VEGAS GOLDEN KNIGHTS — Signed D Colin Miller to a four-year contract.

Second (6f) Time: 1:14:35 Devil Hunt (Roman Hernandez), 15.20, 6.80, 3.60 Jodynbud (Victor Santiago), 7.00, 3.60 Mischief N Value (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.40 Exacta (4-2) $71.20 Trifecta (4-2-5) $113.00 Superfecta (4-2-5-1) $342.30 Daily Double (4-4) $39.40 Third (350y) Time: 18:56 Mc Bet the Beach (Juan F. Molina, Jr.), 5.40, 3.00, 2.60 Captain Trick (Carlos Cachu), 3.80, 3.20 Hr Excessive Ivory (Uriel A. Lopez), 4.00 Exacta (2-7) $20.00 Trifecta (2-7-5) $40.40 Superfecta (2-7-5-6) $106.50 Daily Double (4-2) $33.20 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (4-4-2,3) $27.60 Scratched: Tellerimfromtexas Fourth (6f) Time: 1:12:85 Wildwood Dancer (Roman Hernandez), 6.00, 3.00 Serious Talk (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.80 Mias Moonbeam (Javier Diego), Exacta (4-3) $22.20 Daily Double (2-4) $21.20 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (4-2,3-4) $164.85 Fifth (1m, 70y) Time: 1:49:34 The Ridge (Uriel A. Lopez), 10.00, 5.00, 3.40 Gotothemax (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.00, 2.60 Gotta Go Back (Juan F. Molina, Jr.), 4.40 Exacta (8-5) $24.00 Trifecta (8-5-1) $49.90 Superfecta (8-5-1-3) $200.30 Daily Double (4-8) $90.00 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (2,3-4-8)

MOTOR SPORTS NHRA | New England Nationals pairings Saturday | Epping, N.H. Pairings based on results in qualifying, which ended Saturday. DNQs listed below pairings. Top Fuel 1. Leah Pritchett, 3.742 seconds, 324.51 mph vs. 16. Audrey Worm, 5.791, 111.38. 2. Tony Schumacher, 3.744, 330.31 vs. 15. Jim Maroney, 4.826, 153.51. 3. Steve Torrence, 3.756, 327.66 vs. 14. Dan Mercier, 4.530, 173.92. 4. Brittany Force, 3.775, 316.60 vs. 13. Mike Salinas, 4.004, 281.77. 5. Clay Millican, 3.778, 328.14 vs. 12. Antron Brown, 3.974, 276.58. 6. Dom Lagana, 3.781, 326.16 vs. 11. Shawn Reed, 3.895, 320.81. 7. Scott Palmer, 3.803, 323.97 vs. 10. Richie Crampton, 3.884, 316.97. 8. Terry McMillen, 3.857, 322.19 vs. 9. Doug Kalitta, 3.874, 303.64. Funny Car 1. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 3.932, 322.04 vs. 16. Terry Haddock, Toyota Solara, 5.873, 102.77. 2. Jack Beckman, Charger, 3.956, 320.20 vs. 15. Jeff Diehl, Toyota Camry, 4.316, 289.45. 3. Shawn Langdon, Camry, 3.976, 321.42 vs. 14. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.203, 300.26. 4. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.978, 320.89 vs. 13. Courtney Force, Chevy Camaro, 4.165, 304.46. 5. Robert Hight, Camaro, 3.979, 324.44 vs. 12. Bob Tasca III, Ford Mustang, 4.126, 281.01. 6. John Force, Camaro, 3.988, 324.75 vs. 11. Jonnie Lindberg, Mustang, 4.118, 307.93. 7. J.R. Todd, Camry, 4.021, 319.67 vs. 10. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.104, 308.35. 8. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 4.023, 322.58 vs. 9. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.044, 314.09. Did Not Qualify: 17. Mike Smith, 8.701, 102.11. Pro Stock 1. Greg Anderson, Chevy Camaro, 6.517, 212.33 vs. 16. Val Smeland, Camaro, 7.224, 148.35. 2. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.521, 212.49 vs. 15. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Dart, 6.656, 209.01. 3. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 6.528, 211.43 vs. 14. John Gaydosh Jr, Chevrolet Camaro, 6.617, 209.75. 4. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.538, 212.63 vs. 13. Fernando Cuadra, Camaro, 6.590, 210.60. 5. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.540, 212.69 vs. 12. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 6.581, 210.77. 6. Alex Laughlin, Camaro, 6.546, 211.99 vs. 11. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.564, 211.96. 7. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.546, 212.16 vs. 10. Matt Hartford, Camaro, 6.554, 212.06. 8. Jeg Coughlin, Camaro, 6.547, 212.16 vs. 9. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.547, 211.79.

IndyCar | Iowa Corn 300 lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday Newton, Iowa | Lap length: 0.894 miles Car number in parentheses 1. (12) Will Power, Chevrolet, 182.391 mph. 2. (1) Josef Newgarden, Chevrolet, 181.160. 3. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 180.681. 4. (22) Simon Pagenaud, Chevrolet, 180.313. 5. (27) Alexander Rossi, Honda, 179.801. 6. (9) Scott Dixon, Honda, 179.526. 7. (6) Robert Wickens, Honda, 178.883. 8. (10) Ed Jones, Honda, 178.720. 9. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 178.717. 10. (30) Takuma Sato, Honda, 178.708. 11. (5) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 178.478. 12. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 178.410. 13. (14) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 178.008. 14. (26) Zach Veach, Honda, 177.809. 15. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, Honda, 177.681. 16. (88) Gabby Chaves, Chevrolet, 176.466. 17. (23) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 176.245. 18. (21) Spencer Pigot, Chevrolet, 175.210. 19. (98) Marco Andretti, Honda, 174.548. 20. (19) Zachary Claman De Melo, Honda, 174.339. 21. (59) Max Chilton, Chevrolet, 173.449. 22. (4) Matheus Leist, Chevrolet, 168.724.

F1 | British Grand Prix lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday Silverstone, England Lap length: 3.66 miles 1. Lewis Hamilton, Britain, Mercedes, 1:25.892 2. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Ferrari, 1:25.936 3. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Ferrari, 1:25.990 4. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Mercedes, 1:26.217. 5. Max Verstappen, Netherlands, Red Bull Racing Tag Heuer, 1:26.602. 6. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Red Bull Racing Tag Heuer, 1:27.099. 7. Kevin Magnussen, Denmark, Haas Ferrari, 1:27.244. 8. Romain Grosjean, France, Haas Ferrari, 1:27.455. 9. Charles Leclerc, Monaco, Sauber Ferrari, 1:27.879. 10. Esteban Ocon, France, Force India Mercedes, 1:28.194. 11. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Renault, 1:27.901. 12. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Force India Mercedes, 1:27.928. 13. Fernando Alonso, Spain, McLaren Renault, 1:28.139. 14. Pierre Gasly, France, Scuderia Toro Rosso Honda, 1:28.343. 15. Marcus Ericsson, Sweden, Sauber Ferrari, 1:28.391. 16. Carlos Sainz, Spain, Renault, 1:28.456. 17. Stoffel Vandoorne, Belgium, McLaren Renault, 1:29.096. 18. Sergey Sirotkin, Russia, Williams Mercedes, 1:29.252. 19. Lance Stroll, Canada, Williams Mercedes, no time. 20. Brendon Hartley, New Zealand, Scuderia Toro Rosso Honda, no time.

BOXING SCHEDULE TENNIS Wimbledon Saturday | The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club (seedings in parentheses) Men’s Singles Third Round Karen Khachanov, Russia, def. Frances Tiafoe, United States, 4-6, 4-6, 7-6 (3), 6-2, 6-1. Novak Djokovic (12), Serbia, def. Kyle Edmund (21), Britain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, def. Alexander Zverev (4), Germany, 7-6 (2), 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0. Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Gilles Simon, France, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-1, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 7-6 (2). Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, def. Fabio Fognini (19), Italy, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Alex De Minaur, Australia, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4. Milos Raonic (13), Canada, def. Dennis Novak, Austria, 7-6, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Kei Nishikori (24), Japan, def. Nick Kyrgios, Australia (15), 6-1, 7-6(3), 6-4 Women’s Singles Third Round Su-Wei Hsieh, Taiwan, def. Simona Halep (1), Romania, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Elise Mertens (15), Belgium, 6-2, 6-2. Jelena Ostapenko (12), Latvia, def. Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, 6-0, 6-4. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Daria Gavrilova (26), Australia, 6-3, 6-1. Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, def. Anett Kontaveit (28), Estonia, 6-2, 6-3. Daria Kasatkina (14), Russia, def. Ashleigh Barty (17), Australia, 7-5, 6-3. Angelique Kerber (11), Germany, def. Naomi Osaka (18), Japan, 6-2, 6-4. Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, def. Carla Suarez-Navarro (27), Spain, 6-1, 7-6 (3).

July 13 At Kobe, Japan: Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Vic Saludar, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title; Reiya Konishi vs. Orlie Silvestre, 12, for the WBO Asia Pacific junior flyweight title. At Los Angeles (ESPN): Joet Gonzalez vs. Rafael Rivera, 10, featherweights. July 14 At Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Lucas Matthysse vs. Manny Pacquiao, 12, for Matthysse’s WBA World welterweight title; Moruti Mthalane vs. Muhammad Waseem, 12, for the vacant IBF flyweight title; Carlos Canizales vs. Bin Lu, 12, for Canizales’ WBA junior flyweight title; Jhack Tepora vs. Edivaldo Ortega, 12, featherweights; Muhammad Farkhan vs. Abdallah Paziwapazi, 10, light heavyweights. At Offenburg, Germany: Tyron Zeuge vs. Rocky Fielding, 12, for Zeuge’s WBA super middleweight title At London: George Groves vs. Callum Smith, 12, for Groves’ WBA super middleweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At Lakefront Arena, New Orleans (ESPN): Regis Prograis vs. Juan Jose Velasco, 12, for Prograis’ WBC interim junior welterweight title; Teofimo Lopez vs. William Silva, 10, lightweights. July 20 At WinnaVegas Casino (SHO): Sloan, Iowa, Jaron Ennis vs. Armando Alvarez, 10, welterweights. July 21 At Moscow: Oleksandr Usyk vs. Murat Gassiev, 12, for undisputed cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas (HBO): Jaime Munguia vs. Liam Smith, 12, for Munguia’s WBO junior middleweight title; Alberto Machado vs. Rafael Mensah, 12, for Machado’s WBA junior lightweight title.

European | Irish Open Saturday | Donegal, Ireland Purse: $7 million | Yardage: 7,462 | Par: 72 Third Round Erik Van Rooyen, S. Africa 71-65-66 — 202 Joakim Lagergren, Sweden 69-68-69 — 206 Ryan Fox, New Zealand 67-69-70 — 206 Danny Willett, England 68-70-69 — 207 Russell Knox, Scotland 71-69-68 — 208 Raphael Jacquelin, France 71-70-68 — 209 Lee Westwood, England 68-71-70 — 209 Matthieu Pavon, France 68-68-73 — 209 Andy Sullivan, England 73-72-65 — 210 Jon Rahm, Spain 74-69-67 — 210 Jorge Campillo, Spain 70-71-69 — 210 Peter Uihlein, U.S. 70-70-70 — 210 Zander Lombard, S. Africa 70-68-72 — 210 Dylan Frittelli, S. Africa 69-74-68 — 211 George Coetzee, S. Africa 71-71-69 — 211 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 72-69-70 — 211 Sam Horsfield, England 69-69-74 — 212 Adrien Saddier, France 68-76-69 — 213 Oliver Fisher, England 74-68-71 — 213 Mikko Ilonen, Finland 70-72-71 — 213 Alexander Bjork, Sweden 69-73-71 — 213 Yusaku Miyazato, Japan 69-72-72 — 213 Dean Burmester, S. Africa 71-70-72 — 213 C. Bezuidenhout, S. Africa 72-68-73 — 213 Also Rory McIlroy, Scotland 70-73-72 — 215 Julian Suri, U.S. 76-67-72 — 215

LPGA | Thornberry Creek Saturday | Oneida, Wis. Purse: $2 million | Yardage: 6,624 | Par: 72 Third Round Sei Young Kim 63-65-64— 192-24 Amy Yang 67-66-67—200 -16 Lydia Ko 69-66-66— 201 -15 Anna Nordqvist 67-67-67— 201 -15 Emma Talley 65-68-68— 201 -15 Brittany Marchand 64-72-66— 202 -14 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 66-69-67— 202 -14 Carlota Ciganda 65-70-67— 202 -14 Katherine Kirk 62-71-69— 202 -14 Yu Liu 69-63-70— 202 -14 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 72-68-63— 203 -13 Celine Boutier 69-71-63— 203 -13 Ryann O’Toole 70-66-67— 203 -13 Mi Jung Hur 69-66-68— 203 -13 Bronte Law 67-68-68— 203 -13 Ariya Jutanugarn 66-69-68— 203 -13 Sandra Gal 65-70-68— 203 -13 Chella Choi 68-66-69— 203 -13 In Gee Chun 67-66-70— 203 -13 Tiffany Joh 69-69-66—204 -12 Nasa Hataoka 69-68-67—204 -12 Thidapa Suwannapura 69-67-68—204 -12 Jin Young Ko 68-67-69—204 -12 Mo Martin 67-68-69—204 -12 Mariah Stackhouse 66-67-71—204 -12

Area holes in one Lake Forest • Jim Randall, hole No. 8, June 7. Pheasant Run • Colin Pini, hole No. 12, 100 yards, sand wedge, June 26. The Legends • Shelby Anderson, hole No. 12, 99 yards, 9-iron, June 27. Pheasant Run • Kevin Bourbon, hole No. 14, 117 yards, 9-iron, June 28. Pheasant Run • Mike Walker, hole No. 10, 106 yards, pitching wedge, July 4. Pheasant Run • Steve Nixon, hole No. 6, 101 yards, 8-iron, July 5. Pheasant Run • Tanner Rodell, hole No. 1, 157 yards, 6-iron, July 5. Wolf Hollow • Carol Graham, hole No. 5, 105 yards, 5 hybrid, July 6.

BASKETBALL WNBA EASTERN W L Pct Washington 12 6 .667 Connecticut 10 8 .556 Atlanta 8 9 .471 Chicago 7 12 .368 New York 5 13 .278 Indiana 2 17 .105 WESTERN W L Pct Phoenix 14 5 .737 Seattle 14 5 .737 Los Angeles 12 8 .600 Minnesota 11 8 .579 Dallas 9 8 .529 Las Vegas 7 12 .368 Saturday’s Games Washington 83, Los Angeles 74 Chicago 77, Minnesota 63 Connecticut at Las Vegas, late Sunday’s Games Dallas at New York, 2 p.m. Phoenix at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Washington at Seattle, 6 p.m.

GB — 2 3½ 5½ 7 10½ GB — — 2½ 3 4 7

SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 12 4 4 40 42 23 New York 10 4 2 32 34 16 New York City FC 9 4 4 31 34 24 Columbus 8 5 6 30 24 19 New England 7 4 6 27 30 25 Montreal 8 11 0 24 24 32 Chicago 6 7 5 23 27 31 Philadelphia 6 9 3 21 21 27 Orlando City 6 10 1 19 24 37 Toronto FC 4 10 3 15 27 34 D.C. United 2 7 5 11 23 29 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 10 2 5 35 28 19 Sporting K.C. 9 4 5 32 33 22 Los Angeles FC 9 4 4 31 37 27 Real Salt Lake 8 8 2 26 25 34 Portland 7 3 5 26 24 21 Vancouver 6 7 5 23 26 35 Houston 6 6 4 22 33 26 LA Galaxy 6 7 4 22 27 28 Minnesota United 6 10 1 19 23 33 Seattle 4 9 3 15 15 22 Colorado 4 11 3 15 22 32 San Jose 2 9 6 12 28 35 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday, July 7 Atlanta United FC 2, Philadelphia 0 Montreal 2, Colorado 1 Seattle 0, New England 0, tie Toronto FC at Sporting K.C., late Minnesota United at Houston, late FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, late Chicago at Vancouver, late Columbus at LA Galaxy, late Orlando City at Los Angeles FC, late San Jose at Portland, late Sunday, July 8 New York at New York City FC, 6 p.m.

BASEBALL LATE FRIDAY

Giants 3, Cardinals 2 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Pham cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .251 Molina c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Ozuna lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Gyorko 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .257 DeJong ss 3 2 1 0 0 0 .261 Wong 2b 3 0 2 2 0 0 .203 Bader rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .271 Gant p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Martinez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Tuivailala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 5 2 2 3 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hanson lf-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Posey c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .290 McCutchen rf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .258 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .289 Crawford ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .304 Sandoval 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .253 Panik 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .240 1-Slater pr-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Hernandez cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Rodriguez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Pence ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .210 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 3 7 2 4 6 Cardinals 010 000 100 — 2 5 0 San Francisco 010 001 10x — 3 7 0 a-singled for Moronta in the 7th. b-flied out for Brebbia in the 8th. 1-ran for Panik in the 4th. LOB: Cardinals 3, San Francisco 8. 2B: Wong (7), Hernandez (8). 3B: Gyorko (1), Wong (2). HR: Sandoval (7), off Gant. RBIs: Wong 2 (19), McCutchen (38), Sandoval (29). S: Hanson. RLISP: Cardinals 2 (Bader, Gant); San Francisco 4 (Crawford, Rodriguez 3). GIDP: Molina, DeJong. DP: San Francisco 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gant 6 5 2 2 3 5 96 3.80 Brebbia 1 2 1 1 1 1 20 3.52 Tuivailala 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.04 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodriguez 6 2/3 5 2 2 2 1 90 3.09 1/ Moronta 0 1 6 1.89 3 0 0 0 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.56 Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.07 W: Moronta 5-1. L: Brebbia 1-2. S: Smith 3-4. H: Watson 21. Inherited runners-scored: Moronta 1-0. WP: Gant. Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T: 2:26. A: 37,996 (41,915). HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second • Gyorko triples, DeJong reaches on a fielder’s choice, Gyorko out at home. Wong doubles, DeJong scores. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 0. Giants second • Crawford walks. Sandoval walks, Crawford to second. Panik lines out, Crawford to third. Crawford scores on a wild pitch. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 1. Giants sixth • Sandoval homers. One run. Giants 2, Cardinals 1. Cardinals seventh • DeJong singles. Wong triples, DeJong scores. One run. Giants 2, Cardinals 2. Giants seventh • Pence singles. Hanson sacrifice bunts Pence to second. McCutchen singles, Pence scores. One run. Giants 3, Cardinals 2

Frontier League East W L Pct. Washington 29 21 .580 Joliet 27 22 .551 Schaumburg 25 23 .521 Lake Erie 25 24 .510 Traverse City 23 26 .469 Windy City 17 31 .354 West W L Pct. Rascals 27 22 .551 Evansville 26 22 .542 Southern Illinois 24 21 .533 Florence 25 24 .510 Normal 21 25 .457 Grizzlies 22 30 .423 Saturday’s Games Florence 1, Lake Erie 0 Washington 8, Evansville 3 Traverse City 1, Grizzlies 0 Rascals 6, Joliet 4 Windy City at Southern Illinois, late Schaumburg at Normal, late Sunday’s Games Florence at Lake Erie, 1:05 p.m. Windy City at Southern Illinois, 3:35 p.m. Grizzlies at Traverse City, 4:05 p.m. Evansville at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Evansville at Washington, 4:35 p.m. Windy City at Southern Illinois, 6:05 p.m. Joliet at Rascals, 6:05 p.m. Schaumburg at Normal, 6:05 p.m.

GB — 1½ 3 3½ 5½ 11 GB — ½ 1 2 4½ 6½

Stanley Cup sees the World, via Ovechkin ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alex Ovechkin brought the Stanley Cup to the World Cup. The Washington Capitals captain took the NHL trophy to a fan zone in Moscow where World Cup games are screened. With the Russian National Guard providing security, Ovechkin lifted the cup above his head in front of a crowd of fans, who were allowed to take photos with the trophy. Other Russian NHL players are also interested in soccer. Evgeni Malkin of the Penguins posted a picture on Instagram showing himself on a luxury jet with Ilya Kovalchuk of the Kings and Alexander Radulov of the Stars. The caption said they were flying to Sochi, where Russia was playing. Vegas signs Miller • The Vegas Golden Knights signed defenseman Colin Miller to a four-year contract. The deal runs through the 2021-22 season and pays an average salary of $3.87 million. The 25-year-old led defensemen on the Golden Knights with a career-high 41 points (10 goals, 31 assists). He had five goals and 17 points on the power play during the regular season and added three goals and four assists during the team’s run to the Stanley Cup Final. Sharks re-sign DeMelo • The San Jose Sharks re-signed defenseman Dylan DeMelo to a two-year, $1.8 million deal. The 25-year old had a career-best 20 points — all on assists — in a career-high 63 games.

‘I’ve always loved the fans’ BLUES • FROM B1

even want to think about anywhere else.” Even though injury and illness slowed Perron late in the regular season and in the playoffs for Vegas, the forward still finished with a career-high 66 points (16 goals, 50 assists) for the Golden Knights. Perron says there was a lot of outside interest once the free agency “talking period” started two weeks ago. But when St. Louis got serious with Perron? Well, the Blues didn’t have him at “hello,” but it was pretty close.“Basically by Thursday morning (June 28) we were set and decided that I was going back there,” Perron said. “The deal was kind of done. So it was exciting to get it done early. You never know, if you wait later maybe you get more. But I didn’t want to wait. “I played there seven years so far, out of 11, and it would be great to play those next four in St. Louis.” Perron also has played for Edmonton, Pittsburgh, Anaheim and Vegas, but the crazy thing about his 11-year NHL career is that the only contracts he has signed have been Blues contracts. He was drafted 26th by the Blues in 2007 and made the roster that season. Just one year after he signed his third Blues contract — in July 2012—_ he was traded to Edmonton. Subsequent trades sent him to Pittsburgh and Anaheim while still working under that contact. He returned to St. Louis as an unrestricted free agent on a two-year deal in 2016 — Blues contract No. 4 — but was exposed on the expansion list and claimed by the Golden Knights last June. For Perron it wasn’t easy leaving. “As you get older, you get more experience, you can turn the page quicker,” Perron said. “But the first time it was tough on me. The second time, it was tough again. But at the same time I closed the door a little bit because I never expected to go back another time.” Wrong. Make no mistake, Perron thoroughly enjoyed playing for Vegas and being part of the team’s improbable run to the Stanley Cup Finals, in which it lost to Washington in five games. “We had great chemistry,” Perron said. “I mean, it’s once-in-a-lifetime experience to go to a city like Vegas. “Everyone was on board. It was absolutely unbelievable. The crowds. I mean, again, it’s not something that you can live twice. You go from an expansion team, to really, by Christmas we didn’t feel like we were an expansion team anymore. We knew we had a good thing going and we were pushing every day to keep getting better.” But when it became clear that Vegas was out of the picture in terms of re-signing him, it was all St. Louis for Perron. “All I know is how much I respect the team and ‘Army’ and Tom to basically in a way admit it was a mistake to expose me,” Perron said, referring to Armstrong and team owner Tom Stillman. “And trust that I’m gonna come back and be a good player for the team.” After all the moving around since the 2013 trade to Edmonton, getting a four-year contract was an important part of the package for Perron. The end of the Vegas run was bumpy for Perron. He missed the final six games of the regular season because of an undisclosed injury. Just as he was getting back up to speed in the playoffs, he woke up with a 103-degree fever before Game 2 of the Western Conference finals, in Winnipeg. Perron was flown back to Las Vegas that morning. “They kept me away from the team because they didn’t want that to spread around to our star goalie, Marc-Andre Fleury, or something like that,” he said. He missed two games in the Jets’ series because of that illness and was a healthy scratch in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Finals. “It was a frustrating process but at the same time you’re winning games, it’s the best time of your life, so you keep grinding and you keep hoping it’s gonna come,” Perron said. As of last Sunday, that’s all behind him. With the trade for Ryan O’Reilly and the signing of Tyler Bozak, he sees the Blues loading up for another playoff run, and he’s eager to be a part of it. “Even if I didn’t come back with the Blues I wouldn’t say anything bad about them,” Perron said. “I’ve always loved the fans, the city, everything. I can’t get enough.” Obviously.

JASKIN SIGNS Less than 48 hours after filing for salary arbitration, restricted free agent Dmitrij Jaskin has signed a oneyear deal worth $1.1 million. That leaves only Joel Edmundson unsigned among three Blues who filed for arbitration Thursday. Center Oskar Sundqvist, who also filed for arbitration, agreed to a one-year deal worth $700,000 Friday. With Jaskin’s signing, the Blues’ original list of 12 restricted free agents is down to just three unsigned players: Edmundson, and fellow defensemen Jordan Schmaltz and Petteri Lindbohm. It also shrinks the team’s cap space to just more than $5 million according to CapFriendly.com.


SPORTS

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 3

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

NHL NOTEBOOK

AMERICA’S LINE

FAIRMOUNT PARK

GOLF

CYCLING

BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Yankees...................-$148 ...............BLUE JAYS INDIANS ..................-$180 ............................A’s TIGERS.....................-$115....................Rangers TWINS......................-$170 .....................Orioles ASTROS .................. -$340................White Sox Red Sox ...................-$245 ................... ROYALS National League NATIONALS .............-$180 ....................Marlins PIRATES...................-$115..................... Phillies BREWERS................-$125 .....................Braves CUBS........................-$150 ........................ Reds GIANTS ....................-$145 .......................Cards D’BACKS ..................-$190 .....................Padres Interleague Rays........................ -$140....................... METS MARINERS...............-$130 ....................Rockies Dodgers...................-$128 ...................ANGELS SOCCER • World Cup Tuesday France ..................................................... +$150 Belgium.................................................. +$200 Draw: +$210 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Wednesday England....................................................+$125 Croatia ....................................................+$220 Draw: +$210 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

Saturday’s results

PGA | Greenbrier

Tour de France

First (1m, 70y) Time: 1:46:23 Garrison Commander (Victor Santiago), 3.00, 2.40 Nafir’s Best (Uriel A. Lopez), 3.80 Jack N John (Javier Diego) Exacta (4-3) $13.20

Saturday | White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $7.3 million | Yardage: 7,286 | Par: 70 Third Round Harold Varner III 66-64-66 — 196 -14 Kelly Kraft 64-63-69 — 196 -14 Xander Schauffele 66-66-65 — 197 -13 Kevin Na 69-63-65 — 197 -13 Sam Saunders 68-63-67 — 198 -12 Bubba Watson 68-66-65 — 199 -11 Joel Dahmen 67-65-67 — 199 -11 Anirban Lahiri 67-61-71 — 199 -11 Bronson Burgoon 67-68-65 — 200 -10 Ryan Moore 66-67-67 — 200 -10 Jamie Lovemark 67-66-67 — 200 -10 Ryan Armour 67-66-67 — 200 -10 Jason Kokrak 65-64-71 — 200 -10 Keegan Bradley 65-69-67 — 201 -9 Tony Finau 67-67-67 — 201 -9 J.J. Spaun 68-65-68 — 201 -9 Ollie Schniederjans 66-66-69 — 201 -9 J.T. Poston 69-68-65 — 202 -8 David Lingmerth 66-68-68 — 202 -8 Austin Cook 66-66-70 — 202 -8 Brandon Harkins 72-65-66 — 203 -7 Mackenzie Hughes 69-67-67 — 203 -7 David Hearn 68-67-68 — 203 -7 Jim Furyk 68-66-69 — 203 -7 Wesley Bryan 69-65-69 — 203 -7 Steve Wheatcroft 66-67-70 — 203 -7 Scott Stallings 70-63-70 — 203 -7 Brandt Snedeker 66-67-70 — 203 -7 Billy Hurley III 66-66-71 — 203 -7 C.T. Pan 71-66-67 — 204 -6 Charles Howell III 68-68-68 — 204 -6 Talor Gooch 69-67-68 — 204 -6 Abraham Ancer 67-68-69 — 204 -6 J.J. Henry 65-70-69 — 204 -6 Kevin Chappell 66-68-70 — 204 -6 Joaquin Niemann 63-69-72 — 204 -6 Webb Simpson 61-67-76 — 204 -6 Scott Brown 70-67-68 — 205 -5 John Peterson 68-69-68 — 205 -5 Roberto Diaz 70-67-68 — 205 -5 Richy Werenski 71-65-69 — 205 -5 Alex Cejka 68-68-69 — 205 -5 Lanto Griffin 69-66-70 — 205 -5 Phil Mickelson 66-69-70 — 205 -5 George McNeill 71-64-70 — 205 -5 Nick Watney 69-65-71 — 205 -5 Tom Hoge 66-67-72 — 205 -5 Blayne Barber 67-70-69 — 206 -4 Denny McCarthy 67-70-69 — 206 -4 Nick Taylor 71-66-69 — 206 -4 Russell Henley 68-69-69 — 206 -4 Stephan Jaeger 66-70-70 — 206 -4 Brian Harman 67-69-70 — 206 -4 Corey Conners 67-69-70 — 206 -4 Cameron Percy 67-68-71 — 206 -4 Robert Streb 66-69-71 — 206 -4 Kevin Kisner 69-66-71 — 206 -4 Chad Campbell 65-69-72 — 206 -4 Whee Kim 62-68-76 — 206 -4 Brett Stegmaier 67-70-70 — 207 -3 Ben Silverman 68-69-70 — 207 -3 Rob Oppenheim 71-66-70 — 207 -3 Brian Gay 70-66-71 — 207 -3 Tyler Duncan 68-64-75 — 207 -3 Tyrone Van Aswegen 68-68-72 — 208 -2 Trey Mullinax 71-66-71 — 208 -2 Johnson Wagner 68-68-72 — 208 -2 Jonathan Randolph 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Steve Marino 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Fabian Gomez 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Rory Sabbatini 69-68-72 — 209 -1 Keith Mitchell 69-67-73 — 209 -1 Peter Malnati 67-69-73 — 209 -1 Scott Piercy 70-67-73 — 210 E William McGirt 69-66-75 — 210 E Vijay Singh 69-68-74 — 211 +1 Zac Blair 68-69-74 — 211 +1

Saturday | At Fontenay-le-Comte, France First Stage A 124.9-mile flat ride from Noirmoutieren-l’Ile to Fontenay-le-Comte 1. Fernando Gaviria, Colombia, Quick-Step Floors, 4:23:32. 2. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 3. Marcel Kittel, Germany, Katusha Alpecin, same time. 4. Alexander Kristoff, Norway, UAE Team Emirates, same time. 5. Christophe Leporte, France, Cofidis, same time. 6. Dylan Groenewegen, Netherlands, LottoNL-Jumbo, same time. 7. Michael Matthews, Australia, Sunweb, same time. 8. John Degenkolb, Germany, Trek-Segafredo, same time. 9. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, same time. 10. Rafal Majka, Poland, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 11. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Meruida, same time. 12. Timothy Dupont, Belgium, Wante-Groupe Gobert, same time. 13. Thomas Boudat, France, Direct Energie, same time. 14. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, same time. 15. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 16. Michael Valgren, Denmark, Astana, same time. 17. Maximiliano Richeze, Argentina, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 18. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 19. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Dimension Data, same time. 20. Sonny Colbrelli, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, same time. Also 27. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, same time. 34. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 55. Tejay van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 56. Taylor Phinney, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, same time. 91. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :51 behind. 112. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 1:15. 126. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 1:30. 153. Ian Boswell, United States, Katusha Alpecin, 2:44. 176. Lawson Craddock, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 7:50. Overall Standings (After one stage) 1. Fernando Gaviria, Colombia, Quick-Step Floors, 4:23:22. 2. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Bora-Hansgrohe, :04. 3. Marcel Kittel, Germany, Katusha Alpecin, :06. 4. Oliver Naesen, Belgium, AG2R La Mondiale, :09. 5. Alexander Kristoff, Norway, UAE Team Emirates, :10. 6. Christophe Leporte, France, Cofidis, :10. 7. Dylan Groenewegen, Netherlands, LottoNL-Jumbo, same time. 8. Michael Matthews, Australia, Sunweb, same time. 9. John Degenkolb, Germany, Trek-Segafredo, same time. 10. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, same time. 11. Rafal Majka, Poland, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 12. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Meruida, same time. 13. Timothy Dupont, Belgium, Wante-Groupe Gobert, same time. 14. Thomas Boudat, France, Direct Energie, same time. 15. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, same time. 16. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 17. Michael Valgren, Denmark, Astana, same time. 18. Maximiliano Richeze, Argentina, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 19. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 20. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Dimension Data, same time. Also 28. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, same time. 35. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 55. Tejay van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 56. Taylor Phinney, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, same time. 91. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, 1:01 behind. 112. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 1:25. 126. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 1:40. 153. Ian Boswell, United States, Katusha Alpecin, 2:54. 176. Lawson Craddock, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 8:00.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Cincinnati 1B Montrell Marshall (Dayton-MWL) and Minnesota 3B Sean Miller (Chattanooga-SL) 50 games for their violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League DETROIT TIGERS — Signed LHP Kacey Murphy and RHP Chris Farish to minor league contracts. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Sent OF Nicky Delmonico to Birmingham (SL) for a rehab assignment. DETROIT TIGERS — Signed LHP Kacey Murphy and RHP Chris Farish to minor league contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS — Optioned OF Jake Marisnick to Fresno (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Kyle Tucker from Fresno. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Optioned RHP Trevor Oaks to Omaha (PCL). Activated LHP Enny Romero. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Sent RHP Nick Tropeano to Inland Empire (Cal) for a rehab assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS — Signed OF Erick Rivera to a minor league contract. NEW YORK YANKEES — Designated RHP David Hale for assignment. Recalled OF Clint Frazier from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Placed OF Matt Joyce on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Thursday. Recalled OF Nick Martini from Nashville (PCL). Sent RHP Daniel Mengden to Nashville (PCL) for a rehab assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS — Optioned RHP Nick Rumbelow to Tacoma (PCL). Recalled OF John Andreoli from Tacoma. Signed C Cal Raleigh to a minor league contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Designated OF Jeremy Hazelbaker for assignment. Selected the contract of LHP Adam Kolarek from Durham (IL). Signed LHP Shane McClanahan to a minor league contract. Sent RHP Jake Faria to Charlotte (FSL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Optioned LHP Thomas Pannone to Buffalo (IL). Assigned RHP Preston Guilmet outright to Buffalo (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Designated RHP Fernando Salas for assignment. Optioned RHP Silvino Bracho to Reno (PCL). Reinstated RHP Randall Delgado from the 60-day DL. Reinstated C Alex Avila from the 10-day DL. CHICAGO CUBS — Assigned C Chris Gimenez outright to Iowa (PCL). Signed OF Edmond Americaan, LHP Josh Sawyer, 2B Andy Weber and RHPs Niels Stone and Jake Reindl to minor league contracts. CINCINNATI REDS — Selected the contract of 2B Dilson Herrera from Louisville (IL). Sent RHP Rookie Davis to the AZL Reds for a rehab assignment. COLORADO ROCKIES — Placed LHP Mike Dunn on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Placed C Tom Murphy on paternity leave. Recalled INF/OF Jordan Patterson and LHP Jerry Vasto from Albuquerque (PCL). Sent RHP Bryan Shaw to Albuquerque for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Signed LHP Ben Holmes to a minor league contract. Activated RHP Dylan Floro. Placed RHP Kenta Maeda on the paternity list. Recalled LHP/RHP Pat Venditte from Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed RHP Yi,i Garcia on the 10-day DL. MIAMI MARLINS — Optioned LHP Dillon Peters to New Orleans (PCL). Reinstated OF Garrett Cooper from the 60-day DL. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Optioned INF Nate Orf to Colorado Springs (PCL). Recalled RHP Jorge Lopez from Colorado Springs. NEW YORK METS — Placed LHP Jerry Blevins on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP Paul Sewald from Las Vegas (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Optioned RHP Jake Thompson to Lehigh Valley (IL). Reinstated RHP Edubray Ramos from the 10-day DL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Optioned RHP Dovydas Neverauskas and LHP Josh Smoker to Indianapolis (IL). Signed SS Zack Kone and RHP Deivy Mendez to minor league contracts. Reinstated RHP Michael Feliz from the 10-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Alex McRae from Indianapolis. CARDINALS — Sent RHP Luke Gregerson to Springfield (TL) and LHP Tyler Lyons to Memphis (PCL) for rehab assignments. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Robert Stock to El Paso (PCL). Placed LHP Jose Castillo on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Friday. Recalled RHP Kazuhisa Makita from El Paso. Reinstated RHP Kirby Yates from paternity leave and RHP Phil Hughes from the 10-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Placed 2B Joe Panik on the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Chris Stratton to Sacramento (PCL). Reinstated RHP Jeff Samardzija from the 10-day DL. Selected the contract of SS Chase d’Arnaud from Sacramento. Transferred RHP Hunter Strickland to the 60-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent RHP Koda Glover to the GCL Nationals and C Matt Wieters to Harrisburg (EL) for rehab assignments. American Association CHICAGO DOGS — Released RHP Brandon White. Signed OF Kenny Wilson. KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Sold the contract of LHP Carlos Diaz to the Cincinnati Reds. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS — Released RHP Geoff Broussard. Signed RHP Will Lamarche. SIOUX FALLS CANARIES — Signed RHP John Straka. WICHITA WINGNUTS — Released RHP Mark Haynes. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES — Signed INF Gerald Bautista and RHP Phillipe Saad. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Released UT Jeremy Scott. NORMAL CORNBELTERS — Signed RHP Thomas Nicoll. RASCALS — Signed RHP David Flattery. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DETROIT PISTONS — Named Gregg Polinsky director of player personnel. Signed G Bruce Brown Jr. Waived G Dwight Buycks. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Signed F Keita Bates-Diop. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS — Signed RW Filip Zadina to a three-year contract. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Promoted Tim Burke to assistant general manager. VEGAS GOLDEN KNIGHTS — Signed D Colin Miller to a four-year contract.

TENNIS Wimbledon Saturday | The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club (seedings in parentheses) Men’s Singles Third Round Karen Khachanov, Russia, def. Frances Tiafoe, United States, 4-6, 4-6, 7-6 (3), 6-2, 6-1. Novak Djokovic (12), Serbia, def. Kyle Edmund (21), Britain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, def. Alexander Zverev (4), Germany, 7-6 (2), 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0. Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Gilles Simon, France, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-1, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 7-6 (2). Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, def. Fabio Fognini (19), Italy, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Alex De Minaur, Australia, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4. Milos Raonic (13), Canada, def. Dennis Novak, Austria, 7-6, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Kei Nishikori (24), Japan, def. Nick Kyrgios, Australia (15), 6-1, 7-6(3), 6-4 Women’s Singles Third Round Su-Wei Hsieh, Taiwan, def. Simona Halep (1), Romania, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Elise Mertens (15), Belgium, 6-2, 6-2. Jelena Ostapenko (12), Latvia, def. Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, 6-0, 6-4. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Daria Gavrilova (26), Australia, 6-3, 6-1. Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, def. Anett Kontaveit (28), Estonia, 6-2, 6-3. Daria Kasatkina (14), Russia, def. Ashleigh Barty (17), Australia, 7-5, 6-3. Angelique Kerber (11), Germany, def. Naomi Osaka (18), Japan, 6-2, 6-4. Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, def. Carla Suarez-Navarro (27), Spain, 6-1, 7-6 (3).

Second (6f) Time: 1:14:35 Devil Hunt (Roman Hernandez), 15.20, 6.80, 3.60 Jodynbud (Victor Santiago), 7.00, 3.60 Mischief N Value (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.40 Exacta (4-2) $71.20 Trifecta (4-2-5) $113.00 Superfecta (4-2-5-1) $342.30 Daily Double (4-4) $39.40 Third (350y) Time: 18:56 Mc Bet the Beach (Juan F. Molina, Jr.), 5.40, 3.00, 2.60 Captain Trick (Carlos Cachu), 3.80, 3.20 Hr Excessive Ivory (Uriel A. Lopez), 4.00 Exacta (2-7) $20.00 Trifecta (2-7-5) $40.40 Superfecta (2-7-5-6) $106.50 Daily Double (4-2) $33.20 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (4-4-2,3) $27.60 Scratched: Tellerimfromtexas Fourth (6f) Time: 1:12:85 Wildwood Dancer (Roman Hernandez), 6.00, 3.00 Serious Talk (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.80 Mias Moonbeam (Javier Diego), Exacta (4-3) $22.20 Daily Double (2-4) $21.20 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (4-2,3-4) $164.85 Fifth (1m, 70y) Time: 1:49:34 The Ridge (Uriel A. Lopez), 10.00, 5.00, 3.40 Gotothemax (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.00, 2.60 Gotta Go Back (Juan F. Molina, Jr.), 4.40 Exacta (8-5) $24.00 Trifecta (8-5-1) $49.90 Superfecta (8-5-1-3) $200.30 Daily Double (4-8) $90.00 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (2,3-4-8) Sixth (6f) Time: 1:12:59 Peacock Man (Uriel A. Lopez), refunded Hidethe Green (Juan F. Molina, Jr.), refunded Even Fever (Victor Santiago), refunded Exacta refunded Trifecta refunded Superfecta refunded Daily Double (8-all) $7.60 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (4-8-all) $16.85 Seventh (6f) Time: 1:13:43 Error in program — purse money only Seattle Train (Juan F. Molina,Jr.), refunded Run Away Gal (Roman Hernandez), refunded Pink for Me (Uriel A. Lopez), refunded Exacta refunded Trifecta refunded Superfecta refunded Daily Double refunded Pick 3 refunded Pick 4, 4 of 4, (4-8-ALL-ALL) $11.30 Scratched: Royal Renaissance

MOTOR SPORTS NHRA | New England Nationals pairings Saturday | Epping, N.H. Pairings based on qualifying, which ended Saturday. DNQs listed below pairings. Top Fuel 1. Leah Pritchett, 3.742 seconds, 324.51 mph vs. 16. Audrey Worm, 5.791, 111.38. 2. Tony Schumacher, 3.744, 330.31 vs. 15. Jim Maroney, 4.826, 153.51. 3. Steve Torrence, 3.756, 327.66 vs. 14. Dan Mercier, 4.530, 173.92. 4. Brittany Force, 3.775, 316.60 vs. 13. Mike Salinas, 4.004, 281.77. 5. Clay Millican, 3.778, 328.14 vs. 12. Antron Brown, 3.974, 276.58. 6. Dom Lagana, 3.781, 326.16 vs. 11. Shawn Reed, 3.895, 320.81. 7. Scott Palmer, 3.803, 323.97 vs. 10. Richie Crampton, 3.884, 316.97. 8. Terry McMillen, 3.857, 322.19 vs. 9. Doug Kalitta, 3.874, 303.64. Funny Car 1. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 3.932, 322.04 vs. 16. Terry Haddock, Toyota Solara, 5.873, 102.77. 2. Jack Beckman, Charger, 3.956, 320.20 vs. 15. Jeff Diehl, Toyota Camry, 4.316, 289.45. 3. Shawn Langdon, Camry, 3.976, 321.42 vs. 14. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.203, 300.26. 4. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.978, 320.89 vs. 13. Courtney Force, Chevy Camaro, 4.165, 304.46. 5. Robert Hight, Camaro, 3.979, 324.44 vs. 12. Bob Tasca III, Ford Mustang, 4.126, 281.01. 6. John Force, Camaro, 3.988, 324.75 vs. 11. Jonnie Lindberg, Mustang, 4.118, 307.93. 7. J.R. Todd, Camry, 4.021, 319.67 vs. 10. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.104, 308.35. 8. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 4.023, 322.58 vs. 9. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.044, 314.09. Did Not Qualify: 17. Mike Smith, 8.701, 102.11. Pro Stock 1. Greg Anderson, Chevy Camaro, 6.517, 212.33 vs. 16. Val Smeland, Camaro, 7.224, 148.35. 2. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.521, 212.49 vs. 15. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Dart, 6.656, 209.01. 3. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 6.528, 211.43 vs. 14. John Gaydosh Jr, Chevrolet Camaro, 6.617, 209.75. 4. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.538, 212.63 vs. 13. Fernando Cuadra, Camaro, 6.590, 210.60. 5. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.540, 212.69 vs. 12. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 6.581, 210.77. 6. Alex Laughlin, Camaro, 6.546, 211.99 vs. 11. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.564, 211.96. 7. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.546, 212.16 vs. 10. Matt Hartford, Camaro, 6.554, 212.06. 8. Jeg Coughlin, Camaro, 6.547, 212.16 vs. 9. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.547, 211.79.

IndyCar | Iowa Corn 300 lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday Newton, Iowa | Lap length: 0.894 miles Car number in parentheses 1. (12) Will Power, Chevrolet, 182.391 mph. 2. (1) Josef Newgarden, Chevrolet, 181.160. 3. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 180.681. 4. (22) Simon Pagenaud, Chevrolet, 180.313. 5. (27) Alexander Rossi, Honda, 179.801. 6. (9) Scott Dixon, Honda, 179.526. 7. (6) Robert Wickens, Honda, 178.883. 8. (10) Ed Jones, Honda, 178.720. 9. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 178.717. 10. (30) Takuma Sato, Honda, 178.708. 11. (5) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 178.478. 12. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 178.410. 13. (14) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 178.008. 14. (26) Zach Veach, Honda, 177.809. 15. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, Honda, 177.681. 16. (88) Gabby Chaves, Chevrolet, 176.466. 17. (23) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 176.245. 18. (21) Spencer Pigot, Chevrolet, 175.210. 19. (98) Marco Andretti, Honda, 174.548. 20. (19) Zachary Claman De Melo, Honda, 174.339. 21. (59) Max Chilton, Chevrolet, 173.449. 22. (4) Matheus Leist, Chevrolet, 168.724.

F1 | British Grand Prix lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday Silverstone, England Lap length: 3.66 miles 1. Lewis Hamilton, Britain, Mercedes, 1:25.892 2. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Ferrari, 1:25.936 3. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Ferrari, 1:25.990 4. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Mercedes, 1:26.217. 5. Max Verstappen, Netherlands, Red Bull Racing Tag Heuer, 1:26.602. 6. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Red Bull Racing Tag Heuer, 1:27.099. 7. Kevin Magnussen, Denmark, Haas Ferrari, 1:27.244. 8. Romain Grosjean, France, Haas Ferrari, 1:27.455. 9. Charles Leclerc, Monaco, Sauber Ferrari, 1:27.879. 10. Esteban Ocon, France, Force India Mercedes, 1:28.194. 11. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Renault, 1:27.901. 12. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Force India Mercedes, 1:27.928. 13. Fernando Alonso, Spain, McLaren Renault, 1:28.139. 14. Pierre Gasly, France, Scuderia Toro Rosso Honda, 1:28.343. 15. Marcus Ericsson, Sweden, Sauber Ferrari, 1:28.391. 16. Carlos Sainz, Spain, Renault, 1:28.456. 17. Stoffel Vandoorne, Belgium, McLaren Renault, 1:29.096. 18. Sergey Sirotkin, Russia, Williams Mercedes, 1:29.252. 19. Lance Stroll, Canada, Williams Mercedes, no time. 20. Brendon Hartley, New Zealand, Scuderia Toro Rosso Honda, no time.

BOXING SCHEDULE July 13 At Kobe, Japan: Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Vic Saludar, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title; Reiya Konishi vs. Orlie Silvestre, 12, for the WBO Asia Pacific junior flyweight title. At Los Angeles (ESPN): Joet Gonzalez vs. Rafael Rivera, 10, featherweights. July 14 At Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Lucas Matthysse vs. Manny Pacquiao, 12, for Matthysse’s WBA World welterweight title; Moruti Mthalane vs. Muhammad Waseem, 12, for the vacant IBF flyweight title; Carlos Canizales vs. Bin Lu, 12, for Canizales’ WBA junior flyweight title; Jhack Tepora vs. Edivaldo Ortega, 12, featherweights; Muhammad Farkhan vs. Abdallah Paziwapazi, 10, light heavyweights. At Offenburg, Germany: Tyron Zeuge vs. Rocky Fielding, 12, for Zeuge’s WBA super middleweight title At London: George Groves vs. Callum Smith, 12, for Groves’ WBA super middleweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At Lakefront Arena, New Orleans (ESPN): Regis Prograis vs. Juan Jose Velasco, 12, for Prograis’ WBC interim junior welterweight title; Teofimo Lopez vs. William Silva, 10, lightweights.

European | Irish Open Saturday | Donegal, Ireland Purse: $7 million | Yardage: 7,462 | Par: 72 Third Round Erik Van Rooyen, S. Africa 71-65-66 — 202 Joakim Lagergren, Sweden 69-68-69 — 206 Ryan Fox, New Zealand 67-69-70 — 206 Danny Willett, England 68-70-69 — 207 Russell Knox, Scotland 71-69-68 — 208 Raphael Jacquelin, France 71-70-68 — 209 Lee Westwood, England 68-71-70 — 209 Matthieu Pavon, France 68-68-73 — 209 Andy Sullivan, England 73-72-65 — 210 Jon Rahm, Spain 74-69-67 — 210 Jorge Campillo, Spain 70-71-69 — 210 Peter Uihlein, U.S. 70-70-70 — 210 Zander Lombard, S. Africa 70-68-72 — 210 Dylan Frittelli, S. Africa 69-74-68 — 211 George Coetzee, S. Africa 71-71-69 — 211 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 72-69-70 — 211 Sam Horsfield, England 69-69-74 — 212 Adrien Saddier, France 68-76-69 — 213 Oliver Fisher, England 74-68-71 — 213 Mikko Ilonen, Finland 70-72-71 — 213 Alexander Bjork, Sweden 69-73-71 — 213 Yusaku Miyazato, Japan 69-72-72 — 213 Dean Burmester, S. Africa 71-70-72 — 213 C. Bezuidenhout, S. Africa 72-68-73 — 213 Also Rory McIlroy, Scotland 70-73-72 — 215 Julian Suri, U.S. 76-67-72 — 215

LPGA | Thornberry Creek Saturday | Oneida, Wis. Purse: $2 million | Yardage: 6,624 | Par: 72 Third Round Sei Young Kim 63-65-64— 192-24 Amy Yang 67-66-67—200 -16 Lydia Ko 69-66-66— 201 -15 Anna Nordqvist 67-67-67— 201 -15 Emma Talley 65-68-68— 201 -15 Brittany Marchand 64-72-66— 202 -14 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 66-69-67— 202 -14 Carlota Ciganda 65-70-67— 202 -14 Katherine Kirk 62-71-69— 202 -14 Yu Liu 69-63-70— 202 -14 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 72-68-63— 203 -13 Celine Boutier 69-71-63— 203 -13 Ryann O’Toole 70-66-67— 203 -13 Mi Jung Hur 69-66-68— 203 -13 Bronte Law 67-68-68— 203 -13 Ariya Jutanugarn 66-69-68— 203 -13 Sandra Gal 65-70-68— 203 -13 Chella Choi 68-66-69— 203 -13 In Gee Chun 67-66-70— 203 -13 Tiffany Joh 69-69-66—204 -12 Nasa Hataoka 69-68-67—204 -12 Thidapa Suwannapura 69-67-68—204 -12 Jin Young Ko 68-67-69—204 -12 Mo Martin 67-68-69—204 -12 Mariah Stackhouse 66-67-71—204 -12

Area holes in one Lake Forest • Jim Randall, hole No. 8, June 7. Pheasant Run • Colin Pini, hole No. 12, 100 yards, sand wedge, June 26. The Legends • Shelby Anderson, hole No. 12, 99 yards, 9-iron, June 27. Pheasant Run • Kevin Bourbon, hole No. 14, 117 yards, 9-iron, June 28. Pheasant Run • Mike Walker, hole No. 10, 106 yards, pitching wedge, July 4. Pheasant Run • Steve Nixon, hole No. 6, 101 yards, 8-iron, July 5. Pheasant Run • Tanner Rodell, hole No. 1, 157 yards, 6-iron, July 5. Wolf Hollow • Carol Graham, hole No. 5, 105 yards, 5 hybrid, July 6.

BASKETBALL WNBA EASTERN W L Pct Washington 12 6 .667 Connecticut 10 8 .556 Atlanta 8 9 .471 Chicago 7 12 .368 New York 5 13 .278 Indiana 2 17 .105 WESTERN W L Pct Phoenix 14 5 .737 Seattle 14 5 .737 Los Angeles 12 8 .600 Minnesota 11 8 .579 Dallas 9 8 .529 Las Vegas 7 12 .368 Saturday’s Games Washington 83, Los Angeles 74 Chicago 77, Minnesota 63 Connecticut at Las Vegas, late Sunday’s Games Dallas at New York, 2 p.m. Phoenix at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Washington at Seattle, 6 p.m.

GB — 2 3½ 5½ 7 10½ GB — — 2½ 3 4 7

SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 12 4 4 40 42 23 New York 10 4 2 32 34 16 New York City FC 9 4 4 31 34 24 Columbus 8 5 6 30 24 19 New England 7 4 7 28 30 25 Montreal 8 11 0 24 24 32 Chicago 6 7 5 23 27 31 Philadelphia 6 9 3 21 21 27 Orlando City 6 10 1 19 24 37 Toronto FC 4 10 4 16 29 36 D.C. United 2 7 5 11 23 29 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 10 2 5 35 28 19 Sporting K.C. 9 4 6 33 35 24 Los Angeles FC 9 4 4 31 37 27 Real Salt Lake 8 8 2 26 25 34 Portland 7 3 5 26 24 21 Houston 7 6 4 25 36 26 Vancouver 6 7 5 23 26 35 LA Galaxy 6 7 4 22 27 28 Minnesota United 6 11 1 19 23 36 Seattle 4 9 4 16 15 22 Colorado 4 11 3 15 22 32 San Jose 2 9 6 12 28 35 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday, July 7 Atlanta United FC 2, Philadelphia 0 Montreal 2, Colorado 1 Seattle 0, New England 0, tie Toronto FC 2, Sporting K.C. 2, tie Houston 3, Minnesota United 0 FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, late Columbus at LA Galaxy, late Chicago at Vancouver, late Orlando City at Los Angeles FC, late San Jose at Portland, late Sunday, July 8 New York at New York City FC, 6 p.m.

BASEBALL LATE FRIDAY

Giants 3, Cardinals 2 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Pham cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .251 Molina c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Ozuna lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Gyorko 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .257 DeJong ss 3 2 1 0 0 0 .261 Wong 2b 3 0 2 2 0 0 .203 Bader rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .271 Gant p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Martinez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Tuivailala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 5 2 2 3 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hanson lf-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 3 0 2 0 1 0 .290 Posey c McCutchen rf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .258 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .289 Crawford ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .304 Sandoval 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .253 Panik 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .240 1-Slater pr-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Hernandez cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Rodriguez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Pence ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .210 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 3 7 2 4 6 Cardinals 010 000 100 — 2 5 0 San Francisco 010 001 10x — 3 7 0 a-singled for Moronta in the 7th. b-flied out for Brebbia in the 8th. 1-ran for Panik in the 4th. LOB: Cardinals 3, San Francisco 8. 2B: Wong (7), Hernandez (8). 3B: Gyorko (1), Wong (2). HR: Sandoval (7), off Gant. RBIs: Wong 2 (19), McCutchen (38), Sandoval (29). S: Hanson. RLISP: Cardinals 2 (Bader, Gant); San Francisco 4 (Crawford, Rodriguez 3). GIDP: Molina, DeJong. DP: San Francisco 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gant 6 5 2 2 3 5 96 3.80 Brebbia 1 2 1 1 1 1 20 3.52 Tuivailala 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.04 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodriguez 6 2/3 5 2 2 2 1 90 3.09 1/ Moronta 0 1 6 1.89 3 0 0 0 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.56 Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.07 W: Moronta 5-1. L: Brebbia 1-2. S: Smith 3-4. H: Watson 21. Inherited runners-scored: Moronta 1-0. WP: Gant. Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T: 2:26. A: 37,996 (41,915). HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second • Gyorko triples, DeJong reaches on a fielder’s choice, Gyorko out at home. Wong doubles, DeJong scores. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 0. Giants second • Crawford walks. Sandoval walks, Crawford to second. Panik lines out, Crawford to third. Crawford scores on a wild pitch. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 1. Giants sixth • Sandoval homers. One run. Giants 2, Cardinals 1. Cardinals seventh • DeJong singles. Wong triples, DeJong scores. One run. Giants 2, Cardinals 2. Giants seventh • Pence singles. Hanson sacrifice bunts Pence to second. McCutchen singles, Pence scores. One run. Giants 3, Cardinals 2

Frontier League East W L Pct. Washington 29 21 .580 Joliet 27 23 .540 Schaumburg 26 23 .531 Lake Erie 25 24 .510 Traverse City 23 26 .469 Windy City 17 31 .354 West W L Pct. Rascals 28 22 .560 Evansville 26 22 .542 Southern Illinois 24 21 .533 Florence 25 24 .510 Normal 21 26 .447 Grizzlies 22 30 .423 Saturday’s Games Rascals 6, Joliet 4 Traverse City 1, Grizzlies 0 Florence 1, Lake Erie 0 Washington 8, Evansville 3 Schaumburg 6, Normal 2 Windy City at Southern Illinois, late Sunday’s Games Florence at Lake Erie, 1:05 p.m. Windy City at Southern Illinois, 3:35 p.m. Grizzlies at Traverse City, 4:05 p.m. Evansville at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Evansville at Washington, 4:35 p.m. Windy City at Southern Illinois, 6:05 p.m. Joliet at Rascals, 6:05 p.m. Schaumburg at Normal, 6:05 p.m.

GB — 2 2½ 3½ 5½ 11 GB — 1 1½ 2½ 5½ 7

Stanley Cup sees the World, via Ovechkin ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alex Ovechkin brought the Stanley Cup to the World Cup. The Washington Capitals captain took the NHL trophy to a fan zone in Moscow where World Cup games are screened. With the Russian National Guard providing security, Ovechkin lifted the cup above his head in front of a crowd of fans, who were allowed to take photos with the trophy. Other Russian NHL players are also interested in soccer. Evgeni Malkin of the Penguins posted a picture on Instagram showing himself on a luxury jet with Ilya Kovalchuk of the Kings and Alexander Radulov of the Stars. The caption said they were flying to Sochi, where Russia was playing. Vegas signs Miller • The Vegas Golden Knights signed defenseman Colin Miller to a four-year contract. The deal runs through the 2021-22 season and pays an average salary of $3.87 million. The 25-year-old led defensemen on the Golden Knights with a career-high 41 points (10 goals, 31 assists). He had five goals and 17 points on the power play during the regular season and added three goals and four assists during the team’s run to the Stanley Cup Final. Sharks re-sign DeMelo • The San Jose Sharks re-signed defenseman Dylan DeMelo to a two-year, $1.8 million deal. The 25-year old had a career-best 20 points — all on assists — in a career-high 63 games.

‘I’ve always loved the fans’ BLUES • FROM B1

even want to think about anywhere else.” Even though injury and illness slowed Perron late in the regular season and in the playoffs for Vegas, the forward still finished with a career-high 66 points (16 goals, 50 assists) for the Golden Knights. Perron says there was a lot of outside interest once the free agency “talking period” started two weeks ago. But when St. Louis got serious with Perron? Well, the Blues didn’t have him at “hello,” but it was pretty close.“Basically by Thursday morning (June 28) we were set and decided that I was going back there,” Perron said. “The deal was kind of done. So it was exciting to get it done early. You never know, if you wait later maybe you get more. But I didn’t want to wait. “I played there seven years so far, out of 11, and it would be great to play those next four in St. Louis.” Perron also has played for Edmonton, Pittsburgh, Anaheim and Vegas, but the crazy thing about his 11-year NHL career is that the only contracts he has signed have been Blues contracts. He was drafted 26th by the Blues in 2007 and made the roster that season. Just one year after he signed his third Blues contract — in July 2012—_ he was traded to Edmonton. Subsequent trades sent him to Pittsburgh and Anaheim while still working under that contact. He returned to St. Louis as an unrestricted free agent on a two-year deal in 2016 — Blues contract No. 4 — but was exposed on the expansion list and claimed by the Golden Knights last June. For Perron it wasn’t easy leaving. “As you get older, you get more experience, you can turn the page quicker,” Perron said. “But the first time it was tough on me. The second time, it was tough again. But at the same time I closed the door a little bit because I never expected to go back another time.” Wrong. Make no mistake, Perron thoroughly enjoyed playing for Vegas and being part of the team’s improbable run to the Stanley Cup Finals, in which it lost to Washington in five games. “We had great chemistry,” Perron said. “I mean, it’s once-in-a-lifetime experience to go to a city like Vegas. “Everyone was on board. It was absolutely unbelievable. The crowds. I mean, again, it’s not something that you can live twice. You go from an expansion team, to really, by Christmas we didn’t feel like we were an expansion team anymore. We knew we had a good thing going and we were pushing every day to keep getting better.” But when it became clear that Vegas was out of the picture in terms of re-signing him, it was all St. Louis for Perron. “All I know is how much I respect the team and ‘Army’ and Tom to basically in a way admit it was a mistake to expose me,” Perron said, referring to Armstrong and team owner Tom Stillman. “And trust that I’m gonna come back and be a good player for the team.” After all the moving around since the 2013 trade to Edmonton, getting a four-year contract was an important part of the package for Perron. The end of the Vegas run was bumpy for Perron. He missed the final six games of the regular season because of an undisclosed injury. Just as he was getting back up to speed in the playoffs, he woke up with a 103-degree fever before Game 2 of the Western Conference finals, in Winnipeg. Perron was flown back to Las Vegas that morning. “They kept me away from the team because they didn’t want that to spread around to our star goalie, Marc-Andre Fleury, or something like that,” he said. He missed two games in the Jets’ series because of that illness and was a healthy scratch in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Finals. “It was a frustrating process but at the same time you’re winning games, it’s the best time of your life, so you keep grinding and you keep hoping it’s gonna come,” Perron said. As of last Sunday, that’s all behind him. With the trade for Ryan O’Reilly and the signing of Tyler Bozak, he sees the Blues loading up for another playoff run, and he’s eager to be a part of it. “Even if I didn’t come back with the Blues I wouldn’t say anything bad about them,” Perron said. “I’ve always loved the fans, the city, everything. I can’t get enough.” Obviously.

JASKIN SIGNS Less than 48 hours after filing for salary arbitration, restricted free agent Dmitrij Jaskin has signed a oneyear deal worth $1.1 million. That leaves only Joel Edmundson unsigned among three Blues who filed for arbitration Thursday. Center Oskar Sundqvist, who also filed for arbitration, agreed to a one-year deal worth $700,000 Friday. With Jaskin’s signing, the Blues’ original list of 12 restricted free agents is down to just three unsigned players: Edmundson, and fellow defensemen Jordan Schmaltz and Petteri Lindbohm. It also shrinks the team’s cap space to just more than $5 million according to CapFriendly.com.


SPORTS

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 4

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

NHL NOTEBOOK

AMERICA’S LINE

FAIRMOUNT PARK

GOLF

CYCLING

BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Yankees...................-$148 ...............BLUE JAYS INDIANS ..................-$180 ............................A’s TIGERS.....................-$115....................Rangers TWINS......................-$170 .....................Orioles ASTROS .................. -$340................White Sox Red Sox ...................-$245 ................... ROYALS National League NATIONALS .............-$180 ....................Marlins PIRATES...................-$115..................... Phillies BREWERS................-$125 .....................Braves CUBS........................-$150 ........................ Reds GIANTS ....................-$145 .......................Cards D’BACKS ..................-$190 .....................Padres Interleague Rays........................ -$140....................... METS MARINERS...............-$130 ....................Rockies Dodgers...................-$128 ...................ANGELS SOCCER • World Cup Tuesday France ..................................................... +$150 Belgium.................................................. +$200 Draw: +$210 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Wednesday England....................................................+$125 Croatia ....................................................+$220 Draw: +$210 | Over/under: 2.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

Saturday’s results

PGA | Greenbrier

Tour de France

First (1m, 70y) Time: 1:46:23 Garrison Commander (Victor Santiago), 3.00, 2.40 Nafir’s Best (Uriel A. Lopez), 3.80 Jack N John (Javier Diego) Exacta (4-3) $13.20

Saturday | White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $7.3 million | Yardage: 7,286 | Par: 70 Third Round Harold Varner III 66-64-66 — 196 -14 Kelly Kraft 64-63-69 — 196 -14 Xander Schauffele 66-66-65 — 197 -13 Kevin Na 69-63-65 — 197 -13 Sam Saunders 68-63-67 — 198 -12 Bubba Watson 68-66-65 — 199 -11 Joel Dahmen 67-65-67 — 199 -11 Anirban Lahiri 67-61-71 — 199 -11 Bronson Burgoon 67-68-65 — 200 -10 Ryan Moore 66-67-67 — 200 -10 Jamie Lovemark 67-66-67 — 200 -10 Ryan Armour 67-66-67 — 200 -10 Jason Kokrak 65-64-71 — 200 -10 Keegan Bradley 65-69-67 — 201 -9 Tony Finau 67-67-67 — 201 -9 J.J. Spaun 68-65-68 — 201 -9 Ollie Schniederjans 66-66-69 — 201 -9 J.T. Poston 69-68-65 — 202 -8 David Lingmerth 66-68-68 — 202 -8 Austin Cook 66-66-70 — 202 -8 Brandon Harkins 72-65-66 — 203 -7 Mackenzie Hughes 69-67-67 — 203 -7 David Hearn 68-67-68 — 203 -7 Jim Furyk 68-66-69 — 203 -7 Wesley Bryan 69-65-69 — 203 -7 Steve Wheatcroft 66-67-70 — 203 -7 Scott Stallings 70-63-70 — 203 -7 Brandt Snedeker 66-67-70 — 203 -7 Billy Hurley III 66-66-71 — 203 -7 C.T. Pan 71-66-67 — 204 -6 Charles Howell III 68-68-68 — 204 -6 Talor Gooch 69-67-68 — 204 -6 Abraham Ancer 67-68-69 — 204 -6 J.J. Henry 65-70-69 — 204 -6 Kevin Chappell 66-68-70 — 204 -6 Joaquin Niemann 63-69-72 — 204 -6 Webb Simpson 61-67-76 — 204 -6 Scott Brown 70-67-68 — 205 -5 John Peterson 68-69-68 — 205 -5 Roberto Diaz 70-67-68 — 205 -5 Richy Werenski 71-65-69 — 205 -5 Alex Cejka 68-68-69 — 205 -5 Lanto Griffin 69-66-70 — 205 -5 Phil Mickelson 66-69-70 — 205 -5 George McNeill 71-64-70 — 205 -5 Nick Watney 69-65-71 — 205 -5 Tom Hoge 66-67-72 — 205 -5 Blayne Barber 67-70-69 — 206 -4 Denny McCarthy 67-70-69 — 206 -4 Nick Taylor 71-66-69 — 206 -4 Russell Henley 68-69-69 — 206 -4 Stephan Jaeger 66-70-70 — 206 -4 Brian Harman 67-69-70 — 206 -4 Corey Conners 67-69-70 — 206 -4 Cameron Percy 67-68-71 — 206 -4 Robert Streb 66-69-71 — 206 -4 Kevin Kisner 69-66-71 — 206 -4 Chad Campbell 65-69-72 — 206 -4 Whee Kim 62-68-76 — 206 -4 Brett Stegmaier 67-70-70 — 207 -3 Ben Silverman 68-69-70 — 207 -3 Rob Oppenheim 71-66-70 — 207 -3 Brian Gay 70-66-71 — 207 -3 Tyler Duncan 68-64-75 — 207 -3 Tyrone Van Aswegen 68-68-72 — 208 -2 Trey Mullinax 71-66-71 — 208 -2 Johnson Wagner 68-68-72 — 208 -2 Jonathan Randolph 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Steve Marino 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Fabian Gomez 67-68-73 — 208 -2 Rory Sabbatini 69-68-72 — 209 -1 Keith Mitchell 69-67-73 — 209 -1 Peter Malnati 67-69-73 — 209 -1 Scott Piercy 70-67-73 — 210 E William McGirt 69-66-75 — 210 E Vijay Singh 69-68-74 — 211 +1 Zac Blair 68-69-74 — 211 +1

Saturday | At Fontenay-le-Comte, France First Stage A 124.9-mile flat ride from Noirmoutieren-l’Ile to Fontenay-le-Comte 1. Fernando Gaviria, Colombia, Quick-Step Floors, 4:23:32. 2. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 3. Marcel Kittel, Germany, Katusha Alpecin, same time. 4. Alexander Kristoff, Norway, UAE Team Emirates, same time. 5. Christophe Leporte, France, Cofidis, same time. 6. Dylan Groenewegen, Netherlands, LottoNL-Jumbo, same time. 7. Michael Matthews, Australia, Sunweb, same time. 8. John Degenkolb, Germany, Trek-Segafredo, same time. 9. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, same time. 10. Rafal Majka, Poland, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 11. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Meruida, same time. 12. Timothy Dupont, Belgium, Wante-Groupe Gobert, same time. 13. Thomas Boudat, France, Direct Energie, same time. 14. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, same time. 15. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 16. Michael Valgren, Denmark, Astana, same time. 17. Maximiliano Richeze, Argentina, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 18. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 19. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Dimension Data, same time. 20. Sonny Colbrelli, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, same time. Also 27. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, same time. 34. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 55. Tejay van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 56. Taylor Phinney, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, same time. 91. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :51 behind. 112. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 1:15. 126. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 1:30. 153. Ian Boswell, United States, Katusha Alpecin, 2:44. 176. Lawson Craddock, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 7:50. Overall Standings (After one stage) 1. Fernando Gaviria, Colombia, Quick-Step Floors, 4:23:22. 2. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Bora-Hansgrohe, :04. 3. Marcel Kittel, Germany, Katusha Alpecin, :06. 4. Oliver Naesen, Belgium, AG2R La Mondiale, :09. 5. Alexander Kristoff, Norway, UAE Team Emirates, :10. 6. Christophe Leporte, France, Cofidis, :10. 7. Dylan Groenewegen, Netherlands, LottoNL-Jumbo, same time. 8. Michael Matthews, Australia, Sunweb, same time. 9. John Degenkolb, Germany, Trek-Segafredo, same time. 10. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, same time. 11. Rafal Majka, Poland, BoraHansgrohe, same time. 12. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Meruida, same time. 13. Timothy Dupont, Belgium, Wante-Groupe Gobert, same time. 14. Thomas Boudat, France, Direct Energie, same time. 15. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, same time. 16. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 17. Michael Valgren, Denmark, Astana, same time. 18. Maximiliano Richeze, Argentina, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 19. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 20. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Dimension Data, same time. Also 28. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, same time. 35. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 55. Tejay van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 56. Taylor Phinney, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, same time. 91. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, 1:01 behind. 112. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 1:25. 126. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 1:40. 153. Ian Boswell, United States, Katusha Alpecin, 2:54. 176. Lawson Craddock, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 8:00.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Cincinnati 1B Montrell Marshall (Dayton-MWL) and Minnesota 3B Sean Miller (Chattanooga-SL) 50 games for their violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League DETROIT TIGERS — Signed LHP Kacey Murphy and RHP Chris Farish to minor league contracts. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Sent OF Nicky Delmonico to Birmingham (SL) for a rehab assignment. DETROIT TIGERS — Signed LHP Kacey Murphy and RHP Chris Farish to minor league contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS — Optioned OF Jake Marisnick to Fresno (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Kyle Tucker from Fresno. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Optioned RHP Trevor Oaks to Omaha (PCL). Activated LHP Enny Romero. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Sent RHP Nick Tropeano to Inland Empire (Cal) for a rehab assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS — Signed OF Erick Rivera to a minor league contract. NEW YORK YANKEES — Designated RHP David Hale for assignment. Recalled OF Clint Frazier from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Placed OF Matt Joyce on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Thursday. Recalled OF Nick Martini from Nashville (PCL). Sent RHP Daniel Mengden to Nashville (PCL) for a rehab assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS — Optioned RHP Nick Rumbelow to Tacoma (PCL). Recalled OF John Andreoli from Tacoma. Signed C Cal Raleigh to a minor league contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Designated OF Jeremy Hazelbaker for assignment. Selected the contract of LHP Adam Kolarek from Durham (IL). Signed LHP Shane McClanahan to a minor league contract. Sent RHP Jake Faria to Charlotte (FSL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Optioned LHP Thomas Pannone to Buffalo (IL). Assigned RHP Preston Guilmet outright to Buffalo (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Designated RHP Fernando Salas for assignment. Optioned RHP Silvino Bracho to Reno (PCL). Reinstated RHP Randall Delgado from the 60-day DL. Reinstated C Alex Avila from the 10-day DL. CHICAGO CUBS — Assigned C Chris Gimenez outright to Iowa (PCL). Signed OF Edmond Americaan, LHP Josh Sawyer, 2B Andy Weber and RHPs Niels Stone and Jake Reindl to minor league contracts. CINCINNATI REDS — Selected the contract of 2B Dilson Herrera from Louisville (IL). Sent RHP Rookie Davis to the AZL Reds for a rehab assignment. COLORADO ROCKIES — Placed LHP Mike Dunn on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Placed C Tom Murphy on paternity leave. Recalled INF/OF Jordan Patterson and LHP Jerry Vasto from Albuquerque (PCL). Sent RHP Bryan Shaw to Albuquerque for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Signed LHP Ben Holmes to a minor league contract. Activated RHP Dylan Floro. Placed RHP Kenta Maeda on the paternity list. Recalled LHP/RHP Pat Venditte from Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed RHP Yi,i Garcia on the 10-day DL. MIAMI MARLINS — Optioned LHP Dillon Peters to New Orleans (PCL). Reinstated OF Garrett Cooper from the 60-day DL. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Optioned INF Nate Orf to Colorado Springs (PCL). Recalled RHP Jorge Lopez from Colorado Springs. NEW YORK METS — Placed LHP Jerry Blevins on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP Paul Sewald from Las Vegas (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Optioned RHP Jake Thompson to Lehigh Valley (IL). Reinstated RHP Edubray Ramos from the 10-day DL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Optioned RHP Dovydas Neverauskas and LHP Josh Smoker to Indianapolis (IL). Signed SS Zack Kone and RHP Deivy Mendez to minor league contracts. Reinstated RHP Michael Feliz from the 10-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Alex McRae from Indianapolis. CARDINALS — Sent RHP Luke Gregerson to Springfield (TL) and LHP Tyler Lyons to Memphis (PCL) for rehab assignments. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Robert Stock to El Paso (PCL). Placed LHP Jose Castillo on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Friday. Recalled RHP Kazuhisa Makita from El Paso. Reinstated RHP Kirby Yates from paternity leave and RHP Phil Hughes from the 10-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Placed 2B Joe Panik on the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Chris Stratton to Sacramento (PCL). Reinstated RHP Jeff Samardzija from the 10-day DL. Selected the contract of SS Chase d’Arnaud from Sacramento. Transferred RHP Hunter Strickland to the 60-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent RHP Koda Glover to the GCL Nationals and C Matt Wieters to Harrisburg (EL) for rehab assignments. American Association CHICAGO DOGS — Released RHP Brandon White. Signed OF Kenny Wilson. KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Sold the contract of LHP Carlos Diaz to the Cincinnati Reds. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS — Released RHP Geoff Broussard. Signed RHP Will Lamarche. SIOUX FALLS CANARIES — Signed RHP John Straka. WICHITA WINGNUTS — Released RHP Mark Haynes. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES — Signed INF Gerald Bautista and RHP Phillipe Saad. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Released UT Jeremy Scott. NORMAL CORNBELTERS — Signed RHP Thomas Nicoll. RASCALS — Signed RHP David Flattery. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DETROIT PISTONS — Named Gregg Polinsky director of player personnel. Signed G Bruce Brown Jr. Waived G Dwight Buycks. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Signed F Keita Bates-Diop. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS — Signed RW Filip Zadina to a three-year contract. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Promoted Tim Burke to assistant general manager. VEGAS GOLDEN KNIGHTS — Signed D Colin Miller to a four-year contract.

TENNIS Wimbledon Saturday | The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club (seedings in parentheses) Men’s Singles Third Round Karen Khachanov, Russia, def. Frances Tiafoe, United States, 4-6, 4-6, 7-6 (3), 6-2, 6-1. Novak Djokovic (12), Serbia, def. Kyle Edmund (21), Britain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, def. Alexander Zverev (4), Germany, 7-6 (2), 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0. Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Gilles Simon, France, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-1, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 7-6 (2). Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, def. Fabio Fognini (19), Italy, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Alex De Minaur, Australia, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4. Milos Raonic (13), Canada, def. Dennis Novak, Austria, 7-6, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Kei Nishikori (24), Japan, def. Nick Kyrgios, Australia (15), 6-1, 7-6(3), 6-4 Women’s Singles Third Round Su-Wei Hsieh, Taiwan, def. Simona Halep (1), Romania, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Elise Mertens (15), Belgium, 6-2, 6-2. Jelena Ostapenko (12), Latvia, def. Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, 6-0, 6-4. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Daria Gavrilova (26), Australia, 6-3, 6-1. Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, def. Anett Kontaveit (28), Estonia, 6-2, 6-3. Daria Kasatkina (14), Russia, def. Ashleigh Barty (17), Australia, 7-5, 6-3. Angelique Kerber (11), Germany, def. Naomi Osaka (18), Japan, 6-2, 6-4. Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, def. Carla Suarez-Navarro (27), Spain, 6-1, 7-6 (3).

Second (6f) Time: 1:14:35 Devil Hunt (Roman Hernandez), 15.20, 6.80, 3.60 Jodynbud (Victor Santiago), 7.00, 3.60 Mischief N Value (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.40 Exacta (4-2) $71.20 Trifecta (4-2-5) $113.00 Superfecta (4-2-5-1) $342.30 Daily Double (4-4) $39.40 Third (350y) Time: 18:56 Mc Bet the Beach (Juan F. Molina, Jr.), 5.40, 3.00, 2.60 Captain Trick (Carlos Cachu), 3.80, 3.20 Hr Excessive Ivory (Uriel A. Lopez), 4.00 Exacta (2-7) $20.00 Trifecta (2-7-5) $40.40 Superfecta (2-7-5-6) $106.50 Daily Double (4-2) $33.20 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (4-4-2,3) $27.60 Scratched: Tellerimfromtexas Fourth (6f) Time: 1:12:85 Wildwood Dancer (Roman Hernandez), 6.00, 3.00 Serious Talk (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.80 Mias Moonbeam (Javier Diego), Exacta (4-3) $22.20 Daily Double (2-4) $21.20 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (4-2,3-4) $164.85 Fifth (1m, 70y) Time: 1:49:34 The Ridge (Uriel A. Lopez), 10.00, 5.00, 3.40 Gotothemax (Victor Jadhir Bailon), 3.00, 2.60 Gotta Go Back (Juan F. Molina, Jr.), 4.40 Exacta (8-5) $24.00 Trifecta (8-5-1) $49.90 Superfecta (8-5-1-3) $200.30 Daily Double (4-8) $90.00 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (2,3-4-8) Sixth (6f) Time: 1:12:59 Peacock Man (Uriel A. Lopez), refunded Hidethe Green (Juan F. Molina, Jr.), refunded Even Fever (Victor Santiago), refunded Exacta refunded Trifecta refunded Superfecta refunded Daily Double (8-all) $7.60 Pick 3, 3 of 3, (4-8-all) $16.85 Seventh (6f) Time: 1:13:43 Error in program — purse money only Seattle Train (Juan F. Molina,Jr.), refunded Run Away Gal (Roman Hernandez), refunded Pink for Me (Uriel A. Lopez), refunded Exacta refunded Trifecta refunded Superfecta refunded Daily Double refunded Pick 3 refunded Pick 4, 4 of 4, (4-8-ALL-ALL) $11.30 Scratched: Royal Renaissance

MOTOR SPORTS NHRA | New England Nationals pairings Saturday | Epping, N.H. Pairings based on qualifying, which ended Saturday. DNQs listed below pairings. Top Fuel 1. Leah Pritchett, 3.742 seconds, 324.51 mph vs. 16. Audrey Worm, 5.791, 111.38. 2. Tony Schumacher, 3.744, 330.31 vs. 15. Jim Maroney, 4.826, 153.51. 3. Steve Torrence, 3.756, 327.66 vs. 14. Dan Mercier, 4.530, 173.92. 4. Brittany Force, 3.775, 316.60 vs. 13. Mike Salinas, 4.004, 281.77. 5. Clay Millican, 3.778, 328.14 vs. 12. Antron Brown, 3.974, 276.58. 6. Dom Lagana, 3.781, 326.16 vs. 11. Shawn Reed, 3.895, 320.81. 7. Scott Palmer, 3.803, 323.97 vs. 10. Richie Crampton, 3.884, 316.97. 8. Terry McMillen, 3.857, 322.19 vs. 9. Doug Kalitta, 3.874, 303.64. Funny Car 1. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 3.932, 322.04 vs. 16. Terry Haddock, Toyota Solara, 5.873, 102.77. 2. Jack Beckman, Charger, 3.956, 320.20 vs. 15. Jeff Diehl, Toyota Camry, 4.316, 289.45. 3. Shawn Langdon, Camry, 3.976, 321.42 vs. 14. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.203, 300.26. 4. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.978, 320.89 vs. 13. Courtney Force, Chevy Camaro, 4.165, 304.46. 5. Robert Hight, Camaro, 3.979, 324.44 vs. 12. Bob Tasca III, Ford Mustang, 4.126, 281.01. 6. John Force, Camaro, 3.988, 324.75 vs. 11. Jonnie Lindberg, Mustang, 4.118, 307.93. 7. J.R. Todd, Camry, 4.021, 319.67 vs. 10. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.104, 308.35. 8. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 4.023, 322.58 vs. 9. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.044, 314.09. Did Not Qualify: 17. Mike Smith, 8.701, 102.11. Pro Stock 1. Greg Anderson, Chevy Camaro, 6.517, 212.33 vs. 16. Val Smeland, Camaro, 7.224, 148.35. 2. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.521, 212.49 vs. 15. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Dart, 6.656, 209.01. 3. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 6.528, 211.43 vs. 14. John Gaydosh Jr, Chevrolet Camaro, 6.617, 209.75. 4. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.538, 212.63 vs. 13. Fernando Cuadra, Camaro, 6.590, 210.60. 5. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.540, 212.69 vs. 12. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 6.581, 210.77. 6. Alex Laughlin, Camaro, 6.546, 211.99 vs. 11. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.564, 211.96. 7. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.546, 212.16 vs. 10. Matt Hartford, Camaro, 6.554, 212.06. 8. Jeg Coughlin, Camaro, 6.547, 212.16 vs. 9. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.547, 211.79.

IndyCar | Iowa Corn 300 lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday Newton, Iowa | Lap length: 0.894 miles Car number in parentheses 1. (12) Will Power, Chevrolet, 182.391 mph. 2. (1) Josef Newgarden, Chevrolet, 181.160. 3. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 180.681. 4. (22) Simon Pagenaud, Chevrolet, 180.313. 5. (27) Alexander Rossi, Honda, 179.801. 6. (9) Scott Dixon, Honda, 179.526. 7. (6) Robert Wickens, Honda, 178.883. 8. (10) Ed Jones, Honda, 178.720. 9. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 178.717. 10. (30) Takuma Sato, Honda, 178.708. 11. (5) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 178.478. 12. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 178.410. 13. (14) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 178.008. 14. (26) Zach Veach, Honda, 177.809. 15. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, Honda, 177.681. 16. (88) Gabby Chaves, Chevrolet, 176.466. 17. (23) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 176.245. 18. (21) Spencer Pigot, Chevrolet, 175.210. 19. (98) Marco Andretti, Honda, 174.548. 20. (19) Zachary Claman De Melo, Honda, 174.339. 21. (59) Max Chilton, Chevrolet, 173.449. 22. (4) Matheus Leist, Chevrolet, 168.724.

F1 | British Grand Prix lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday Silverstone, England Lap length: 3.66 miles 1. Lewis Hamilton, Britain, Mercedes, 1:25.892 2. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Ferrari, 1:25.936 3. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Ferrari, 1:25.990 4. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Mercedes, 1:26.217. 5. Max Verstappen, Netherlands, Red Bull Racing Tag Heuer, 1:26.602. 6. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Red Bull Racing Tag Heuer, 1:27.099. 7. Kevin Magnussen, Denmark, Haas Ferrari, 1:27.244. 8. Romain Grosjean, France, Haas Ferrari, 1:27.455. 9. Charles Leclerc, Monaco, Sauber Ferrari, 1:27.879. 10. Esteban Ocon, France, Force India Mercedes, 1:28.194. 11. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Renault, 1:27.901. 12. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Force India Mercedes, 1:27.928. 13. Fernando Alonso, Spain, McLaren Renault, 1:28.139. 14. Pierre Gasly, France, Scuderia Toro Rosso Honda, 1:28.343. 15. Marcus Ericsson, Sweden, Sauber Ferrari, 1:28.391. 16. Carlos Sainz, Spain, Renault, 1:28.456. 17. Stoffel Vandoorne, Belgium, McLaren Renault, 1:29.096. 18. Sergey Sirotkin, Russia, Williams Mercedes, 1:29.252. 19. Lance Stroll, Canada, Williams Mercedes, no time. 20. Brendon Hartley, New Zealand, Scuderia Toro Rosso Honda, no time.

BOXING SCHEDULE July 13 At Kobe, Japan: Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Vic Saludar, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title; Reiya Konishi vs. Orlie Silvestre, 12, for the WBO Asia Pacific junior flyweight title. At Los Angeles (ESPN): Joet Gonzalez vs. Rafael Rivera, 10, featherweights. July 14 At Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Lucas Matthysse vs. Manny Pacquiao, 12, for Matthysse’s WBA World welterweight title; Moruti Mthalane vs. Muhammad Waseem, 12, for the vacant IBF flyweight title; Carlos Canizales vs. Bin Lu, 12, for Canizales’ WBA junior flyweight title; Jhack Tepora vs. Edivaldo Ortega, 12, featherweights; Muhammad Farkhan vs. Abdallah Paziwapazi, 10, light heavyweights. At Offenburg, Germany: Tyron Zeuge vs. Rocky Fielding, 12, for Zeuge’s WBA super middleweight title At London: George Groves vs. Callum Smith, 12, for Groves’ WBA super middleweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At Lakefront Arena, New Orleans (ESPN): Regis Prograis vs. Juan Jose Velasco, 12, for Prograis’ WBC interim junior welterweight title; Teofimo Lopez vs. William Silva, 10, lightweights.

European | Irish Open Saturday | Donegal, Ireland Purse: $7 million | Yardage: 7,462 | Par: 72 Third Round Erik Van Rooyen, S. Africa 71-65-66 — 202 Joakim Lagergren, Sweden 69-68-69 — 206 Ryan Fox, New Zealand 67-69-70 — 206 Danny Willett, England 68-70-69 — 207 Russell Knox, Scotland 71-69-68 — 208 Raphael Jacquelin, France 71-70-68 — 209 Lee Westwood, England 68-71-70 — 209 Matthieu Pavon, France 68-68-73 — 209 Andy Sullivan, England 73-72-65 — 210 Jon Rahm, Spain 74-69-67 — 210 Jorge Campillo, Spain 70-71-69 — 210 Peter Uihlein, U.S. 70-70-70 — 210 Zander Lombard, S. Africa 70-68-72 — 210 Dylan Frittelli, S. Africa 69-74-68 — 211 George Coetzee, S. Africa 71-71-69 — 211 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 72-69-70 — 211 Sam Horsfield, England 69-69-74 — 212 Adrien Saddier, France 68-76-69 — 213 Oliver Fisher, England 74-68-71 — 213 Mikko Ilonen, Finland 70-72-71 — 213 Alexander Bjork, Sweden 69-73-71 — 213 Yusaku Miyazato, Japan 69-72-72 — 213 Dean Burmester, S. Africa 71-70-72 — 213 C. Bezuidenhout, S. Africa 72-68-73 — 213 Also Rory McIlroy, Scotland 70-73-72 — 215 Julian Suri, U.S. 76-67-72 — 215

LPGA | Thornberry Creek Saturday | Oneida, Wis. Purse: $2 million | Yardage: 6,624 | Par: 72 Third Round Sei Young Kim 63-65-64— 192-24 Amy Yang 67-66-67—200 -16 Lydia Ko 69-66-66— 201 -15 Anna Nordqvist 67-67-67— 201 -15 Emma Talley 65-68-68— 201 -15 Brittany Marchand 64-72-66— 202 -14 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 66-69-67— 202 -14 Carlota Ciganda 65-70-67— 202 -14 Katherine Kirk 62-71-69— 202 -14 Yu Liu 69-63-70— 202 -14 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 72-68-63— 203 -13 Celine Boutier 69-71-63— 203 -13 Ryann O’Toole 70-66-67— 203 -13 Mi Jung Hur 69-66-68— 203 -13 Bronte Law 67-68-68— 203 -13 Ariya Jutanugarn 66-69-68— 203 -13 Sandra Gal 65-70-68— 203 -13 Chella Choi 68-66-69— 203 -13 In Gee Chun 67-66-70— 203 -13 Tiffany Joh 69-69-66—204 -12 Nasa Hataoka 69-68-67—204 -12 Thidapa Suwannapura 69-67-68—204 -12 Jin Young Ko 68-67-69—204 -12 Mo Martin 67-68-69—204 -12 Mariah Stackhouse 66-67-71—204 -12

Area holes in one Lake Forest • Jim Randall, hole No. 8, June 7. Pheasant Run • Colin Pini, hole No. 12, 100 yards, sand wedge, June 26. The Legends • Shelby Anderson, hole No. 12, 99 yards, 9-iron, June 27. Pheasant Run • Kevin Bourbon, hole No. 14, 117 yards, 9-iron, June 28. Pheasant Run • Mike Walker, hole No. 10, 106 yards, pitching wedge, July 4. Pheasant Run • Steve Nixon, hole No. 6, 101 yards, 8-iron, July 5. Pheasant Run • Tanner Rodell, hole No. 1, 157 yards, 6-iron, July 5. Wolf Hollow • Carol Graham, hole No. 5, 105 yards, 5 hybrid, July 6.

BASKETBALL WNBA EASTERN W L Pct Washington 12 6 .667 Connecticut 10 9 .526 Atlanta 8 9 .471 Chicago 7 12 .368 New York 5 13 .278 Indiana 2 17 .105 WESTERN W L Pct Phoenix 14 5 .737 Seattle 14 5 .737 Los Angeles 12 8 .600 Minnesota 11 8 .579 Dallas 9 8 .529 Las Vegas 8 12 .400 Saturday’s Games Washington 83, Los Angeles 74 Chicago 77, Minnesota 63 Las Vegas 94, Connecticut 90 Sunday’s Games Dallas at New York, 2 p.m. Phoenix at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Washington at Seattle, 6 p.m.

GB — 2½ 3½ 5½ 7 10½ GB — — 2½ 3 4 6½

SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Atlanta United FC 12 4 4 40 42 23 New York 10 4 2 32 34 16 New York City FC 9 4 4 31 34 24 Columbus 8 6 6 30 24 23 New England 7 4 7 28 30 25 Montreal 8 11 0 24 24 32 Chicago 6 8 5 23 29 34 Philadelphia 6 9 3 21 21 27 Orlando City 6 10 1 19 24 37 Toronto FC 4 10 4 16 29 36 D.C. United 2 7 5 11 23 29 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 10 3 5 35 28 21 Sporting K.C. 9 4 6 33 35 24 Los Angeles FC 9 4 4 31 37 27 Real Salt Lake 9 8 2 29 27 34 Portland 7 3 5 26 24 21 Vancouver 7 7 5 26 29 37 Houston 7 6 4 25 36 26 LA Galaxy 7 7 4 25 31 28 Minnesota United 6 11 1 19 23 36 Seattle 4 9 4 16 15 22 Colorado 4 11 3 15 22 32 San Jose 2 9 6 12 28 35 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday, July 7 Atlanta United FC 2, Philadelphia 0 Montreal 2, Colorado 1 Seattle 0, New England 0, tie Toronto FC 2, Sporting K.C. 2, tie Houston 3, Minnesota United 0 Real Salt Lake 2, FC Dallas 0 LA Galaxy 4, Columbus 0 Vancouver 3, Chicago 2 Orlando City at Los Angeles FC, late San Jose at Portland, late Sunday, July 8 New York at New York City FC, 6 p.m.

BASEBALL LATE FRIDAY

Giants 3, Cardinals 2 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Pham cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .251 Molina c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Ozuna lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Gyorko 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .257 DeJong ss 3 2 1 0 0 0 .261 Wong 2b 3 0 2 2 0 0 .203 Bader rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .271 Gant p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Martinez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Tuivailala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 5 2 2 3 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hanson lf-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 3 0 2 0 1 0 .290 Posey c McCutchen rf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .258 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .289 Crawford ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .304 Sandoval 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .253 Panik 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .240 1-Slater pr-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Hernandez cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Rodriguez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Pence ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .210 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 3 7 2 4 6 Cardinals 010 000 100 — 2 5 0 San Francisco 010 001 10x — 3 7 0 a-singled for Moronta in the 7th. b-flied out for Brebbia in the 8th. 1-ran for Panik in the 4th. LOB: Cardinals 3, San Francisco 8. 2B: Wong (7), Hernandez (8). 3B: Gyorko (1), Wong (2). HR: Sandoval (7), off Gant. RBIs: Wong 2 (19), McCutchen (38), Sandoval (29). S: Hanson. RLISP: Cardinals 2 (Bader, Gant); San Francisco 4 (Crawford, Rodriguez 3). GIDP: Molina, DeJong. DP: San Francisco 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gant 6 5 2 2 3 5 96 3.80 Brebbia 1 2 1 1 1 1 20 3.52 Tuivailala 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.04 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodriguez 6 2/3 5 2 2 2 1 90 3.09 1/ Moronta 0 1 6 1.89 3 0 0 0 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.56 Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.07 W: Moronta 5-1. L: Brebbia 1-2. S: Smith 3-4. H: Watson 21. Inherited runners-scored: Moronta 1-0. WP: Gant. Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T: 2:26. A: 37,996 (41,915). HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second • Gyorko triples, DeJong reaches on a fielder’s choice, Gyorko out at home. Wong doubles, DeJong scores. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 0. Giants second • Crawford walks. Sandoval walks, Crawford to second. Panik lines out, Crawford to third. Crawford scores on a wild pitch. One run. Cardinals 1, Giants 1. Giants sixth • Sandoval homers. One run. Giants 2, Cardinals 1. Cardinals seventh • DeJong singles. Wong triples, DeJong scores. One run. Giants 2, Cardinals 2. Giants seventh • Pence singles. Hanson sacrifice bunts Pence to second. McCutchen singles, Pence scores. One run. Giants 3, Cardinals 2

Frontier League East W L Pct. Washington 29 21 .580 Joliet 27 23 .540 Schaumburg 26 23 .531 Lake Erie 25 24 .510 Traverse City 23 26 .469 Windy City 17 31 .354 West W L Pct. Rascals 28 22 .560 Evansville 26 22 .542 Southern Illinois 24 21 .533 Florence 25 24 .510 Normal 21 26 .447 Grizzlies 22 30 .423 Saturday’s Games Florence 1, Lake Erie 0 Washington 8, Evansville 3 Traverse City 1, Grizzlies 0 Rascals 6, Joliet 4 Schaumburg 6, Normal 2 Sunday’s Games Florence at Lake Erie, 1:05 p.m. Windy City at Southern Illinois, 3:35 p.m. Grizzlies at Traverse City, 4:05 p.m. Evansville at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Evansville at Washington, 4:35 p.m. Windy City at Southern Illinois, 6:05 p.m. Joliet at Rascals, 6:05 p.m. Schaumburg at Normal, 6:05 p.m.

GB — 2 2½ 3½ 5½ 11 GB — 1 1½ 2½ 5½ 7

Stanley Cup sees the World, via Ovechkin ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alex Ovechkin brought the Stanley Cup to the World Cup. The Washington Capitals captain took the NHL trophy to a fan zone in Moscow where World Cup games are screened. With the Russian National Guard providing security, Ovechkin lifted the cup above his head in front of a crowd of fans, who were allowed to take photos with the trophy. Other Russian NHL players are also interested in soccer. Evgeni Malkin of the Penguins posted a picture on Instagram showing himself on a luxury jet with Ilya Kovalchuk of the Kings and Alexander Radulov of the Stars. The caption said they were flying to Sochi, where Russia was playing. Vegas signs Miller • The Vegas Golden Knights signed defenseman Colin Miller to a four-year contract. The deal runs through the 2021-22 season and pays an average salary of $3.87 million. The 25-year-old led defensemen on the Golden Knights with a career-high 41 points (10 goals, 31 assists). He had five goals and 17 points on the power play during the regular season and added three goals and four assists during the team’s run to the Stanley Cup Final. Sharks re-sign DeMelo • The San Jose Sharks re-signed defenseman Dylan DeMelo to a two-year, $1.8 million deal. The 25-year old had a career-best 20 points — all on assists — in a career-high 63 games.

‘I’ve always loved the fans’ BLUES • FROM B1

even want to think about anywhere else.” Even though injury and illness slowed Perron late in the regular season and in the playoffs for Vegas, the forward still finished with a career-high 66 points (16 goals, 50 assists) for the Golden Knights. Perron says there was a lot of outside interest once the free agency “talking period” started two weeks ago. But when St. Louis got serious with Perron? Well, the Blues didn’t have him at “hello,” but it was pretty close.“Basically by Thursday morning (June 28) we were set and decided that I was going back there,” Perron said. “The deal was kind of done. So it was exciting to get it done early. You never know, if you wait later maybe you get more. But I didn’t want to wait. “I played there seven years so far, out of 11, and it would be great to play those next four in St. Louis.” Perron also has played for Edmonton, Pittsburgh, Anaheim and Vegas, but the crazy thing about his 11-year NHL career is that the only contracts he has signed have been Blues contracts. He was drafted 26th by the Blues in 2007 and made the roster that season. Just one year after he signed his third Blues contract — in July 2012—_ he was traded to Edmonton. Subsequent trades sent him to Pittsburgh and Anaheim while still working under that contact. He returned to St. Louis as an unrestricted free agent on a two-year deal in 2016 — Blues contract No. 4 — but was exposed on the expansion list and claimed by the Golden Knights last June. For Perron it wasn’t easy leaving. “As you get older, you get more experience, you can turn the page quicker,” Perron said. “But the first time it was tough on me. The second time, it was tough again. But at the same time I closed the door a little bit because I never expected to go back another time.” Wrong. Make no mistake, Perron thoroughly enjoyed playing for Vegas and being part of the team’s improbable run to the Stanley Cup Finals, in which it lost to Washington in five games. “We had great chemistry,” Perron said. “I mean, it’s once-in-a-lifetime experience to go to a city like Vegas. “Everyone was on board. It was absolutely unbelievable. The crowds. I mean, again, it’s not something that you can live twice. You go from an expansion team, to really, by Christmas we didn’t feel like we were an expansion team anymore. We knew we had a good thing going and we were pushing every day to keep getting better.” But when it became clear that Vegas was out of the picture in terms of re-signing him, it was all St. Louis for Perron. “All I know is how much I respect the team and ‘Army’ and Tom to basically in a way admit it was a mistake to expose me,” Perron said, referring to Armstrong and team owner Tom Stillman. “And trust that I’m gonna come back and be a good player for the team.” After all the moving around since the 2013 trade to Edmonton, getting a four-year contract was an important part of the package for Perron. The end of the Vegas run was bumpy for Perron. He missed the final six games of the regular season because of an undisclosed injury. Just as he was getting back up to speed in the playoffs, he woke up with a 103-degree fever before Game 2 of the Western Conference finals, in Winnipeg. Perron was flown back to Las Vegas that morning. “They kept me away from the team because they didn’t want that to spread around to our star goalie, Marc-Andre Fleury, or something like that,” he said. He missed two games in the Jets’ series because of that illness and was a healthy scratch in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Finals. “It was a frustrating process but at the same time you’re winning games, it’s the best time of your life, so you keep grinding and you keep hoping it’s gonna come,” Perron said. As of last Sunday, that’s all behind him. With the trade for Ryan O’Reilly and the signing of Tyler Bozak, he sees the Blues loading up for another playoff run, and he’s eager to be a part of it. “Even if I didn’t come back with the Blues I wouldn’t say anything bad about them,” Perron said. “I’ve always loved the fans, the city, everything. I can’t get enough.” Obviously.

JASKIN SIGNS Less than 48 hours after filing for salary arbitration, restricted free agent Dmitrij Jaskin has signed a oneyear deal worth $1.1 million. That leaves only Joel Edmundson unsigned among three Blues who filed for arbitration Thursday. Center Oskar Sundqvist, who also filed for arbitration, agreed to a one-year deal worth $700,000 Friday. With Jaskin’s signing, the Blues’ original list of 12 restricted free agents is down to just three unsigned players: Edmundson, and fellow defensemen Jordan Schmaltz and Petteri Lindbohm. It also shrinks the team’s cap space to just more than $5 million according to CapFriendly.com.


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STL Medical Solutions 605 Old Ballas Rd. Ste 100, St. Louis, MO 63141

314-347-0200 www.STLMedicalSolutions.com Individual results may vary. © All rights reserved.

#1 Gravois, Fenton, MO 636-343-9447 www.dennydennis.com

Tuesday - Friday 8:00am - 8:00pm Saturday 8:00am - 6:00pm

BRAVE THE ROAD CONSTRUCTION AND SAVE BIG! SALE!! *CASH AND DEBIT WITH PIN SALE PRICING DISCOUNTS FOR CASH AND PIN DEBIT CARD PURCHASES. THERE IS AN ADDITIONAL 5% CHARGE ON CREDIT CARD

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USED GUNS

ARCHERY BOWS, CROSSBOWS AND ACCESSORIES

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*EXCLUDING CONSIGNMENTS

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20% OFF BLACK POWDER FIREARMS AND BLACK POWDER ACCESSORIES Find Denny Dennis on-line at www.dennydennis.com

ALL PRICES GOOD 7/6-7/21/2018 Sale prices only good with Cash or Debit Card with pin. There will be a 5% charge if you choose Credit

*Except Sale Items and Consignment Firearms


07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B11

BEST TIME TO

St. Louis’s BUY IS NOW! Most Affordable Office Space 2 PRIME LOCATIONS

• Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $600*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $315*)

*On Select Models Only. Call for Details. **With approved credit use either financing or rebate. Expires 7/31/18

0% Financing for 18 Months**

$150 - $700 $150 - $325 $400 - $1200

skobusch@bommarito.net

From 500 to 1,100 sq. ft.

314-731-7025

Ask For Stacie Kobusch Today!

• Flexible Lease Terms Move In Ready • Primary Access to Hwy. 270, Hwy. 70, Hwy. 170 & Hwy. 40 • St. Louis' Best - Prices From $10.75 sq. ft. and $447.00 Per Month • Full Service Includes All Utilities • Minutes From St. Louis International Airport • Conveniently Located Near Post Offices • Carpeted Offices Wall To Wall • Door to Door Mail Service • Includes Janitorial Services • 24/7 Digital Video Surveillance • Great Hwy. and Major Artery Visibility • Call Today for Details And Appointment • 24/7 - On Call Management Team $ave Money On Your Next Office Space

Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16 Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace 10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTY*

3 SUITES LEFT!

Ameren MO Rebate Spire Rebate Total Comfort Rebate

REBATE STIMULUS PACKAGE $2225.00 Rebates For You! $2225.00 Potential Savings We are a locally owned & operated company with 36 years of experience behind us!

*See Bommarito Leasing Representative For Full Details.

Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

A/C SPECIAL! Make Sure Your System is Working Properly!

$

79

Reg. $115 A/C Preventative Maintenance Tune-Up

314-991-COOL (2665) 636-923-COOL (2665) 618-248-6400

Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 618-248-6400 Residential A/C only. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Expires 7/31/18.

www.totalcomfort-hvac.com

WEATHER • Low 65, High 88 • Winds E 3-8 mph

BUSINESS CENTERS - 2 LOCATIONS -

HAZELWOOD - 320 Brookes Dr. WEST COUNTY - 13610 Barrett Office Dr. Bommarito.com “Bommarito - We Make Office Space Affordable!”

National Extremes High: 121° Death Valley, California

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Low: 33° Stanley, Idaho

Warm and dry Sunday 70s

Mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies along with slightly warmer temperatures and a bit more humidity can be expected across the St. Louis area on Sunday. The summer heat and humidity will return even more early next week. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

68°

84°

87°

BEDTIME

80°

Mostly sunny Mostly sunny Partly cloudy

Partly cloudy

100s

partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

L

60 64 61 59 60 57 61 60 60 57 60 59

70s 90s

Flood Stage

Current Level

90s MONDAY

TUESDAY

72°/91°

74°/92°

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

72°/91° 69°/90°

90s

- 0.08 + 0.04 + 0.06 + 0.16 + 0.12 + 0.20 + 0.14 + 0.17 + 0.29 + 0.13

90s

80s

Wintry Mix

Partly cloudy, Partly cloudy Mostly sunny Mostly sunny isolated storms

Shown are Sunday morning’s lows and Sunday afternoon’s highs.

H

W

86 87 87 86 86 85 88 86 87 85 86 85

sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny

Chicago 61 / 87

Kansas City 66 /91

Joplin 63 / 90

Springfield 60 / 86

St. Louis 65 / 88 Carbondale 64 / 87 Poplar Bluff 65 / 88

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Jul 6th Weed - 62 (high), Mold - 35,517 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 17 Month (Total) 119 Season 928 Year Ago 759 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 16.92 18 15.57 Peoria 14 14.65 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.29 Sullivan 16 3.84 Valley Park 24 22.00 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.60 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 32.24 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

+ 0.23 - 0.10 - 0.14 - 0.04 + 0.19 + 0.13 - 0.03

SUN & MOON

Last Jul 6 Sunrise

New Jul 12

First Jul 19

5:44 AM Sunset

Full Jul 27 8:28 PM

Moonrise 1:30 AM Moonset 2:36 PM

Uranus is the 7th planet from the sun. This planet is about 1.8 billion miles from the sun, which means it takes sunlight about 165 minutes to reach Uranus.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

359.47 - 0.18 360.04 - 0.05 498.17 - 0.05 659.57 + 0.09 705.68 - 0.06 660.41 - 0.25 916.56 - 0.08 839.99 - 0.03 602.65 0.00 406.59 - 0.05 604.49 - 0.25 447.88 - 0.13

- 0.74 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Jet Stream

Scattered showers and thunderstorms are expected across portions of the Southeast, Tennessee Valley, Deep South, lower Mississippi Valley, and Gulf Coast in association with a frontal boundary. Parts of the southern Rockies could also see a few storms develop. Pleasant and dry conditions will be in place throughout the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, and Great Lakes as high pressure will be in control. City

Kirksville 58 / 87

Hawaii High: 89°

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 53 Albuquerque 67 Anchorage 56 Atlanta 72 Atlantic City 62 Baltimore 63 Billings 64 Biloxi, Ms. 76 Birmingham 71 Bismarck 70 Boise 65 Boston 60 Buffalo 56 Burlington, Vt. 52 Charleston, S.C. 75 Charleston, W.V. 62 Charlotte 71 Cheyenne 58 Chicago 59 Cincinnati 59 Cleveland 58 Colorado Spgs. 58 Concord, N.H. 47 Dallas 77 Daytona Beach 72 Denver 64 Des Moines 62 77 Destin, Fl. 57 Detroit 72 El Paso 62 Evansville 58 Fairbanks 68 Fargo 56 Flagstaff 74 Fort Myers 66 Great Falls 52 Green Bay 56 Hartford 76 Honolulu 75 Houston 58 Indianapolis 74 Jackson, Ms. 54 Juneau 82 Key West 90 Las Vegas 72 Little Rock 79 Los Angeles 63 Louisville

79 87 73 85 77 80 93 87 88 98 92 74 82 79 88 84 79 94 81 82 76 89 79 94 88 97 82 86 80 88 83 82 92 83 92 86 81 79 88 91 81 89 64 91 105 89 98 84

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny showers partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny sunny sunny showers thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms showers thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

56 66 55 70 54 61 64 76 71 68 65 61 59 57 73 60 66 59 61 62 59 59 50 76 74 65 61 77 62 72 65 60 71 56 75 54 57 52 76 75 60 72 52 82 88 70 71 66

85 87 63 83 81 84 90 86 86 88 96 82 82 85 86 87 84 92 87 86 85 91 86 92 90 95 87 85 85 89 88 69 86 83 92 88 87 85 87 87 86 88 64 89 106 89 93 89

sunny thunderstorms rain thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms

City

Today L H

72 Macon 77 McAllen, Tx. 73 Memphis 78 Miami 56 Milwaukee Minneapolis 65 Missoula, Mt. 59 72 Mobile Montgomery 73 70 Nashville New Orleans 76 New York City 61 Norfolk, Va. 75 Oklahoma City 74 Omaha 64 Orlando 73 Palm Springs 91 Philadelphia 64 Phoenix 91 Pittsburgh 55 Portland, Me. 55 Portland, Or. 59 Providence 61 Raleigh 70 Rapid City 67 Reno 65 Richmond, Va. 68 Sacramento 63 St. Petersburg 77 Salt Lake City 78 San Antonio 75 San Diego 71 San Francisco 60 Santa Fe 59 Savannah 74 Seattle 58 77 Shreveport 67 Sioux Falls 53 Syracuse 71 Tallahassee 75 Tampa 81 Tucson 73 Tulsa 65 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 75 70 Wichita Wilmington, De. 61 87 Yuma

87 94 89 90 75 85 81 89 90 86 89 78 79 91 85 90 108 81 111 78 77 80 77 79 101 97 81 96 89 98 91 84 80 84 90 73 91 86 79 90 89 105 92 80 90 93 81 111

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny showers sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny

71 76 72 78 59 68 51 72 72 71 75 62 71 69 63 75 90 63 90 56 56 57 57 65 67 63 63 60 78 76 74 69 57 58 74 57 73 68 56 71 77 79 69 63 77 66 59 86

86 96 90 90 81 89 86 87 88 88 88 83 82 91 90 92 111 85 110 83 82 85 83 84 93 98 84 96 91 99 90 82 74 84 87 77 91 88 84 90 91 102 91 83 90 92 84 111

thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy windy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny sunny showers sunny sunny sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

74 54 73 88 81 78 74 55 65 53 79 54 76 55 56 57

87 77 91 116 91 85 86 81 82 57 99 74 87 73 76 83

W

thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly sunny rain sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

59 80 69 73 68 37 66 68 64 83 57 57 56 78 51 84

84 86 85 90 89 58 94 82 90 106 79 81 74 87 70 101

W

sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.49 + 0.01 + 0.15 + 0.06 + 0.05

Snow

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 21.82 Jefferson City 23 16.61 Hermann 21 15.51 Washington 20 12.72 St. Charles 25 19.01 MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 19.34 Hannibal 15 18.19 Louisiana Dam 24 25 28.62 Dam 25 26 28.52 Grafton 18 20.15 M.Price, Pool 419 415.50 M.Price, Tail. 21 19.43 St Louis 30 24.85 Chester 27 26.46 Cape Girardeau 32 30.61

24-Hr Change

70s 80s

80s

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.64” 0.78” 24.66” 21.43”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

92° 74° 89° 71° 106° 51° 92° 73°

80s

90s

100s 110s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (1:39 p.m.) Low (5:11 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2012) Record Low (1972) High Last Year Low Last Year

T-storms

80s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

90 88 87 86 88 90 91 87 87 89 89 87 87

W

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

62 65 59 59 60 63 66 58 60 61 61 62 61

H

70s

90s

4-DAY FORECAST

SUNDAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

90s 70s

Alaska Low: 33°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

70s

80s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

62 63 58 68 72 78 41 64 56 46 81 77 59 58 63 50

81 84 80 82 86 88 61 84 71 61 91 84 77 69 82 80

partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny sunny showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny sunny


07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B11

BEST TIME TO

St. Louis’s BUY IS NOW! Most Affordable Office Space 2 PRIME LOCATIONS

• Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $600*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $315*)

*On Select Models Only. Call for Details. **With approved credit use either financing or rebate. Expires 7/31/18

0% Financing for 18 Months**

$150 - $700 $150 - $325 $400 - $1200

skobusch@bommarito.net

From 500 to 1,100 sq. ft.

314-731-7025

Ask For Stacie Kobusch Today!

• Flexible Lease Terms Move In Ready • Primary Access to Hwy. 270, Hwy. 70, Hwy. 170 & Hwy. 40 • St. Louis' Best - Prices From $10.75 sq. ft. and $447.00 Per Month • Full Service Includes All Utilities • Minutes From St. Louis International Airport • Conveniently Located Near Post Offices • Carpeted Offices Wall To Wall • Door to Door Mail Service • Includes Janitorial Services • 24/7 Digital Video Surveillance • Great Hwy. and Major Artery Visibility • Call Today for Details And Appointment • 24/7 - On Call Management Team $ave Money On Your Next Office Space

Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16 Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace 10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTY*

3 SUITES LEFT!

Ameren MO Rebate Spire Rebate Total Comfort Rebate

REBATE STIMULUS PACKAGE $2225.00 Rebates For You! $2225.00 Potential Savings We are a locally owned & operated company with 36 years of experience behind us!

*See Bommarito Leasing Representative For Full Details.

Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

A/C SPECIAL! Make Sure Your System is Working Properly!

$

79

Reg. $115 A/C Preventative Maintenance Tune-Up

314-991-COOL (2665) 636-923-COOL (2665) 618-248-6400

Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 618-248-6400 Residential A/C only. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Expires 7/31/18.

www.totalcomfort-hvac.com

WEATHER • Low 63, High 88 • Winds E 5-10 mph

BUSINESS CENTERS - 2 LOCATIONS -

HAZELWOOD - 320 Brookes Dr. WEST COUNTY - 13610 Barrett Office Dr. Bommarito.com “Bommarito - We Make Office Space Affordable!”

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 121° Death Valley, California

Low: 27° West Yellowstone, Montana

A bit more sticky and warmer Slightly warmer temperatures and a bit more humidity can be expected across the St. Louis area today. Highs will top out in the upper 80s. The heat and humidity will build further on Monday and Tuesday when a few spotty storms are also possible.

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

67°

84°

88°

79°

Sunny

Mostly sunny Mostly sunny

Partly cloudy

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

Rain

80s

90s 80s 100s

100s

80s

90s

70s 100s

90s

110s TUESDAY

73°/91°

75°/93° 70°/88° 69°/90°

80s

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

90s

88 88 88 87 88 90 90 86 87 88 89 87 87

thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

Chicago 62 / 86

H

W

59 63 62 57 58 56 60 60 59 56 59 58

86 87 86 86 86 85 87 86 87 85 86 85

sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny

Kirksville 58 / 86

Springfield 59 / 86

Kansas City 66 / 90 St. Louis 63 / 88 Joplin 60 / 90

Carbondale 63 / 87 Poplar Bluff 67 / 87

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

0.00” 0.64” 0.92” 24.66” 21.57” Current Level

- 0.37 - 0.27 - 0.19 0.00 + 0.06 + 0.10 + 0.04 + 0.02 + 0.18 - 0.02

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Jul 6th Weed - 62 (high), Mold - 35,517 (high) COOLING DEGREE DAYS 6 Yesterday 125 Month (Total) 934 Season 781 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 16.48 18 15.16 Peoria 14 14.45 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.29 Sullivan 16 3.84 Valley Park 24 22.00 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.60 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 32.24 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.44 - 0.31 - 0.20 - 0.04 + 0.19 + 0.13 - 0.03

SUN & MOON

Last Jul 6 Sunrise

New Jul 12

First Jul 19

5:44 AM Sunset

Full Jul 27 8:28 PM

Moonrise 2:03 AM Moonset 3:42 PM

During July, Mars will get brighter as we get closer to the red planet. When we are close to Mars is when backyard observers can see the surface of the red planet through a telescope. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

359.15 - 0.32 360.02 - 0.02 498.16 - 0.01 659.61 + 0.04 705.72 + 0.04 660.39 - 0.02 916.56 0.00 839.94 - 0.05 602.64 - 0.01 406.54 - 0.05 604.35 - 0.14 447.67 - 0.21

- 0.74 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Jet Stream

Albany, N.Y. 58 Albuquerque 66 Anchorage 55 Atlanta 70 Atlantic City 59 Baltimore 61 Billings 63 Biloxi, Ms. 76 Birmingham 71 Bismarck 69 Boise 66 Boston 60 Buffalo 58 Burlington, Vt. 58 Charleston, S.C. 72 Charleston, W.V. 60 Charlotte 66 Cheyenne 59 Chicago 62 Cincinnati 63 Cleveland 59 Colorado Spgs. 58 Concord, N.H. 48 Dallas 77 Daytona Beach 72 Denver 65 Des Moines 64 76 Destin, Fl. 61 Detroit 73 El Paso 64 Evansville 56 Fairbanks 72 Fargo 55 Flagstaff 74 Fort Myers 48 Great Falls 53 Green Bay 55 Hartford 76 Honolulu 75 Houston 62 Indianapolis 71 Jackson, Ms. 52 Juneau 83 Key West 86 Las Vegas 70 Little Rock 74 Los Angeles 66 Louisville

84 87 63 84 79 83 91 87 87 90 97 80 84 85 86 87 84 93 86 86 84 89 86 90 90 98 91 86 85 89 87 68 89 83 92 87 87 85 87 89 87 89 62 90 108 89 93 90

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny partly cloudy rain thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms showers thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy

60 66 54 70 59 63 64 77 72 62 67 64 63 64 73 60 65 58 67 67 64 59 56 74 75 64 67 77 64 72 72 51 63 55 76 56 64 59 75 75 68 72 52 83 86 73 72 71

89 86 60 88 85 88 95 88 88 87 101 90 88 90 89 89 89 91 92 89 87 89 90 89 90 95 92 87 90 89 89 71 86 79 93 95 87 91 89 90 89 90 59 92 105 89 90 90

sunny mostly cloudy rain thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms rain thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms

City

Today L H

71 Macon 76 McAllen, Tx. 71 Memphis 78 Miami 58 Milwaukee Minneapolis 67 Missoula, Mt. 52 71 Mobile Montgomery 72 72 Nashville New Orleans 75 New York City 62 Norfolk, Va. 71 Oklahoma City 71 Omaha 63 Orlando 74 Palm Springs 89 Philadelphia 61 Phoenix 91 Pittsburgh 57 Portland, Me. 53 Portland, Or. 56 Providence 57 Raleigh 63 Rapid City 68 Reno 67 Richmond, Va. 61 Sacramento 61 St. Petersburg 79 Salt Lake City 78 San Antonio 74 San Diego 69 San Francisco 60 Santa Fe 58 Savannah 73 Seattle 57 74 Shreveport 68 Sioux Falls 53 Syracuse 71 Tallahassee 78 Tampa 81 Tucson 69 Tulsa 65 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 76 66 Wichita Wilmington, De. 59 85 Yuma

85 95 87 90 81 90 87 88 89 86 86 83 79 90 88 92 112 84 110 83 81 87 81 83 93 99 83 96 90 99 90 85 76 84 87 78 90 89 83 90 91 102 91 82 90 92 83 112

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny

71 78 73 79 64 71 57 72 73 73 76 66 69 69 66 75 87 64 87 60 60 59 60 64 66 64 60 60 80 78 74 68 59 57 74 57 73 69 60 73 78 76 72 63 77 68 61 86

90 95 90 90 89 88 93 91 90 90 89 87 82 90 93 92 106 89 106 86 85 78 86 88 92 100 88 96 91 99 89 83 76 84 91 74 90 88 88 91 91 98 90 87 90 92 87 105

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny showers thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy windy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny thunderstorms showers partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

75 55 75 86 77 78 72 52 61 49 79 48 78 54 59 57

88 76 90 115 93 86 85 77 81 57 97 75 85 73 75 82

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms partly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

57 81 71 70 70 38 70 63 68 84 54 64 57 78 53 85

82 86 85 91 90 58 97 85 91 107 75 85 71 88 69 103

W

mostly sunny showers mostly sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly sunny mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.62 - 0.19 + 0.04 - 0.15 - 0.05

Very unhealthy

Good

Today L H

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 21.20 23 16.42 Jefferson City 21 15.55 Hermann 20 12.57 Washington 25 18.96 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 18.97 Hannibal 15 17.92 Louisiana Dam 24 25 28.43 Dam 25 26 28.52 Grafton 18 20.21 M.Price, Pool 419 415.60 M.Price, Tail. 21 19.47 St Louis 30 24.87 Chester 27 26.64 Cape Girardeau 32 30.59

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

83° 62° 89° 71° 107° 54° 97° 77°

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (3:45 p.m.) Low (4:50 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2012) Record Low (1983) High Last Year Low Last Year

Hawaii High: 87°

Scattered showers and thunderstorms are expected throughout portions of the Tennessee Valley, Ozarks, Deep South, lower Mississippi Valley, and Gulf Coast in association with a stalled frontal boundary. Another front will trigger storms across parts of North Dakota and Minnesota. Pleasant weather is expected across the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Great Lakes. Hot and dry conditions will be in place in the Intermountain West and Desert Southwest. City

L

Wintry Mix

90s

Partly cloudy, Partly cloudy, Mostly sunny Mostly sunny isolated storms isolated storms

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

Snow

80s

90s MONDAY

80s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

64 67 60 62 61 60 66 58 60 60 61 60 62

W

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

T-storms

90s

4-DAY FORECAST

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

80s

90s

Alaska Low: 38°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

80s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

58 66 57 69 68 78 39 64 54 46 81 77 63 57 60 59

84 88 78 85 90 85 61 82 77 63 91 86 80 73 79 82

sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny


B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 07.08.2018

Spirits

WRITTEN BY

JORDAN BARANOWSKI

TITO’S HANDMADE VODKA

Stop by Total Wine & More before your Independence Day celebration. Stay safe and salute America in style with these wines, beers and spirits!

After being carefully crafted in old-fashioned pot stills, each batch of Tito’s is taste-tested to make sure every detail is perfect.

1.75 L, $26.99

JACK DANIEL’S BLACK BOURBON The classic bourbon, charcoal-Zltered in Tennessee, Jack holds a sweet Yavor with hints of caramel and vanilla.

1.75 L, $36.99

CROWN ROYAL WHISKY A smooth blend of 50 di!erent whiskies matured in white oak. The oak aging blends well with vanilla for an approachable, rich whisky.

Local Beer

1.75 L, $42.29

JIM BEAM BOURBON Founded in 1795, Jim Beam is the number-one bourbon in the world. Pour yourself a glass and Znd out why.

Wine

URBAN CHESTNUT ZWICKEL

KENDALL JACKSON VINTNER’S RESERVE CHARDONNAY 2016

This unZltered German-style lager is brewed with a premium mixture of malts and hops.

Wine Enthusiast – 91 Aromas of apple and pear add depth to the citrus and tropical fruit Yavors. This Chardonnay ends on a hint of toasted oak for an excellent Znish.

4-16oz cans, $7.49

California, 750 mL, $10.97

1.75 L, $22.99

BOULEVARD UNFILTERED WHEAT Lively and refreshing, Boulevard UnZltered Wheat is a Kansas City classic with a natural citrus Yavor.

KETEL ONE VODKA Distilled three times for a smooth taste and perfectly clear color, Ketel One is a complex vodka best enjoyed neat.

MEIOMI PINOT NOIR A beautiful Pinot Noir with a rich, cherry Yavor proZle, Meiomi is an excellent pairing with turkey or salmon.

California, 750 mL, $15.77

12-12oz bottles, $12.49

1.75 L, $32.99

KIM CRAWFORD SAUVIGNON BLANC

SMIRNOFF VODKA

4 HANDS DIVIDED BY SKY RYE

Smirno! is perfect for mixing cocktails: It’s distilled three times for a pure and crisp taste.

Rye adds a spicy Yavor to the Yoral and citrus notes that make up this beer.

This exuberant New Zealand wine is brimming with stone fruit Yavor. Hints of herbaceousness lead to a zesty Znish.

1.75 L, $16.99

6-12oz cans, $6.99

New Zealand, 750 mL, $12.07

JAMESON IRISH WHISKEY

SCHLAFLY PALE ALE

A versatile sipper, Jameson is a blend of light- and medium-bodied whiskeys, triple-distilled for exceptional smoothness.

Smooth and balanced, SchlaYy has a bready malt to go with a hint of fruitiness.

12-12oz bottles, $12.99

1.75 L, $32.09

SANTA MARGHERITA PINOT GRIGIO An extremely dry white with a strong Yavor of Golden Delicious apples, Santa Margherita is a versatile Pinot Grigio Zlled with personality.

Italy, 750 mL, $16.57

Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

Manchester Meadows 13887 Manchester Road Ballwin, MO 63011 636.527.0482

Clarkson Square 1781 Clarkson Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 636.536.9869

Prices valid from 7/4/2018 through 7/11/2018 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2018 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


STLTODAY.COM/ENTERTAINMENT

SUNDAY • 07.08.2018 • C

Taking listeners for a ride BY GAIL PENNINGTON Special to the Post-Dispatch

Have you heard? Audiobooks are making noise in the publishing world. If you once tried a thriller during a boring car trip only to wind up hopelessly hooked on listening to books (wait, that’s me!), you won’t be surprised by the results of two new studies. One showed that audiobook sales are booming; the other discovered that audiobooks produce a more intense emotional response than even movies or television. Sales of audiobooks jumped 18.2 percent from

Audiobooks pull their weight on car trips by producing a strong emotional response

2015 to 2016, the Audio Publishers Association said in its annual report, released in June. Total sales for 2016 were estimated at $2.1 billion, with more than 46,000 titles produced on audio in 2017 and continuing double-digit growth forecast. Who is listening and how? The Audio Publishers Association boasted sales figures with the results of a user study in which Edison Research found: • All age groups listen, but the audiobook audience skews younger, with 54 percent under 45. See AUDIOBOOKS • Page C7

Theater critic moves on to a new stage in life JUDITH NEWMARK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The last 20-plus years have brought two towering works to the American stage: Tony Kushner’s “Angels in America,” which opened at the Fox Theatre in January 1996, and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton,” which played the Fox in April. I feel very lucky that these two shows more or less “bookended” my time as the Post-Dispatch theater critic. I stepped into the job when my predecessor, Joe Pollack, retired. Now I am the one retiring, looking forward to a new stage in life. I am about to be a grandmother, for the first time. Some longtime readers may recall that I used to write a parenting column; well, the Doodleberry is going to have a baby, and the Cupcake is getting married in September. Last Thanksgiving, when we found out about the baby, I began making plans to retire. To everything there is a season, turn, turn, turn. I am turning now. My theater season has been long and overwhelmingly happy. Before I became the theater critic, I had lots of other jobs at the Post-Dispatch, where I came to work six weeks out of college. I went to municipal council

‘Whitney’ tells the story of a ‘classic tragedy’ Director says he felt compelled to make movie BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Since Whitney Houston’s 2012 drowning death in a Beverly Hills hotel bathtub, interest in the superstar’s life continues to swell. There was a cheesy Lifetime movie based on her life; a cheesier TV One movie focusing on her and Bobby Brown’s daughter, Bobbi Kristina Brown; a touring production of “The Bodyguard,” based on Houston’s biggest hit movie; and the 2017 Showtime

documentary “Whitney: Can I Be Me.” Next up is a revealing bigscreen documentary simply titled “Whitney,” directed by Kevin Macdonald, in theaters now. “Whitney” includes neverbefore-seen archival footage, new family interviews, performance footage and even a bombshell revelation, all showing various aspects of what made up Houston. Macdonald says interest in the singer remains strong because “her life is a classic tragedy.” “You see this person who has it all — beauty, money, talent — and ends up See WHITNEY • Page C5

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Whitney Houston in the documentary “Whitney” • Bobby Brown and Whitney Houston • John Houston and Whitney Houston Photos courtesy of the estate of Whitney Houston

See NEWMARK • Page C6

HOW SETH MEYERS’ TEAM MAKES COMEDY IN THE AGE OF TRUMP. PAGE C3

WHAT-IF NOVEL IMAGINES ‘TRAITOR’ GEORGE WASHINGTON ON TRIAL. PAGE C7 A&E

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M 1 • SUNDAY • 07.08.2018 AMY BERTRAND Features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 GABE HARTWIG A&E editor • ghartwig@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8353 JANE HENDERSON book editor • jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107 DONNA BISCHOFF A&E advertising • dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529 GET YOUR EVENT LISTED events.stltoday.com • stltoday.com/pr

GET MORE AT STLTODAY.COM PIZZA PARTY!

TAKE A LOOK AROUND

MADE IN 1776

Our restaurant critic checks out five new places to grab a pie.

The view from the Arch isn’t the only one in town. Check out our list of 50 others.

A rare copy of the Declaration of Independence is on view at Washington U.

stltoday.com/offthemenu

stltoday.com/hotlist

stltoday.com/books

NEW IN THEATERS

DISNEY/MARVEL STUDIOS

“Ant-Man and the Wasp” ★★★★ • PG-13 • 1:58 • A vast improvement on “Ant-Man” (2015), this entertaining release starting Paul Rudd shows director Peyton Reed deftly balancing action and comedy. (Calvin Wilson)

Paul Rudd in “Ant-Man and the Wasp”

“Boundaries” ★★ • R • 1:44 • Proof indie flicks aren’t necessarily better than commercial fare, this offbeat comedy with Vera Farmiga and Christopher Plummer is painfully predictable. (CW) “Damsel” ★½ • R • 1:53 • Latest film from David and Nathan Zellner undermines its glib, winky self every step of the way in this “Feminism for Dummies, Old West edition” with Robert Pattinson and Mia Wasikowska. (Chicago Tribune) “The First Purge” ★★½ • R • 1:37 • The latest “Purge” is an erratic, fairly absorbing and righteously angry prequel to the politically pointed series written and produced by James DeMonaco. (Chicago Tribune) “Leave No Trace” ★★★ • PG • 1:49 • Tom (Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie) and her dad, Will (Ben Foster), are experts at living off the grid in this moody film directed by Debra Granik (“Winter’s Bone”). (CW) “Whitney” ★★★ • R • 2:02 • Documentary about singer Whitney Houston is full of big moments, some beautiful and some wretched. Directed by Kevin Macdonald. (Kevin C. Johnson)

Why the male gaze is bad for movie criticism

NEW ON DVD MOVIES Coming Tuesday • “Chappaquiddick”; “Future World”; “Hotel Salvation”; “Lean on Pete”; “The Leisure Seeker”; “A Quiet Place”; “211” Coming July 17 • “Isle of Dogs”; “You Were Never Really Here” TELEVISION Coming Tuesday • “The Exorcist,” Season 2”; “The Magicians,” Season 3; “Endeavour,” Season 5; “Mosaic”; “Rosewood,” Season 1; “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In,” Season 5

TICKET TRACKER

➥ Find more concert announcements. stltoday.com/blender THE AMBASSADOR metrotix.com • Joe, 7 p.m. Aug. 5, $30-$50. DELMAR HALL ticketmaster.com • The Nels Cline 4 with Nels Cline (guitar), Julian Lage (guitar), Tom Rainey (drums) and Jorge Roeder (bass), 8 p.m. Aug. 10, $20-$25. • Foxing, 8 p.m. Sept. 28, $15-$18. ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA

From left: Mindy Kaling, Levi Miller, Oprah Winfrey, Zach Galifianakis, Storm Reid, Deric McCabe and Reese Witherspoon in “A Wrinkle in Time,” directed by Ava DuVernay and based on the 1962 novel by Madeleine L’Engle.

“objective” and “identity politics.” When the movies depict just one race and gender as the neutral norm for 100 years — when white men have been portrayed Does movie criticism have a male gaze? as the only people capable of heroism, And is that a problem? mythic importance and compelling A debate over the question has prepersonal journeys — it becomes painfully dictably ensued since the release of a clear that the notion of objectivity itself report from USC’s Annenberg Inclusion is deeply inscribed with identity, even if Initiative finding that, based on reviews that it’s been rendered invisible by being of the 100 top movies of 2017, 77.8 mistaken for the universal. percent of movie critics are white men. But Larson’s comments also perpetuThree years ago, Meryl Streep bemoaned ate unfortunate ideas about pleasure, the “infuriating” absence of women in artistic intent and the practice of critithe top echelons of film critics. More cism itself. Just as reductive and “I do not need a 40-year-old white dude to simplistic it is to assume women like tell me what didn’t work for him about ‘A only frothy love Wrinkle in Time’; it wasn’t made for him.” stories and men like things that go Brie Larson boom, it’s insulting to suggest that a movie can make sense only to its “target” recently Brie Larson, Sandra Bullock audience, whatever that may be. and Cate Blanchett have raised similar The “Fast and Furious” movies might concerns, with Larson noting during a have started out as a franchise its prospeech earlier this month that “I do not ducers assumed would appeal to teenneed a 40-year-old white dude to tell me age boys, but they have proved popular what didn’t work for him about ‘A Wrinacross a spectrum of ages, sexual identikle in Time’; it wasn’t made for him.” ties and nationalities. The success of The pushback started almost immedi“Wonder Woman” and “Black Panther” ately, with several critics delivering huffy retorts, insisting that the understanding of have taught Hollywood that boys will happily accept a female superhero and cinematic history, technique and aesthetwhite viewers can easily relate to a story ics transcends such petty considerations rooted in and told through African signias ethnicity and gender. As one film-site fiers and symbols. commenter put it,“Objective evaluation The job of a critic isn’t to evaluate a has zip to do with identity politics.” movie on the basis of its imaginary audiTo unpack that statement is to reveal just how wrongheaded the entire conver- ence, but to try to discern what kind of story filmmakers are trying to tell, sation often is regarding representation ascertaining whether they succeeded — starting with the precise definition of BY ANN HORNADAY Washington Post

and judge whether the enterprise has merit — in terms of ambition, originality, aesthetic sophistication, technical achievement, implicit values and intellectual depth. Part of that analysis has to do with such crafts as writing, acting, cinematography, editing and sound — the fundamentals of cinematic style. But even when evaluating those elements of a movie, each critic’s individual tastes, biases and realities will inform their perception, which is why inclusion matters when it comes to making sense of popular culture. In other words, it’s not that a 40-yearold white dude can’t be fair to “A Wrinkle in Time”; it’s that critics from other groups might be able to understand more intuitively why a story about a young heroine of color — whatever its flaws and missteps — might be deeply meaningful to viewers. Each of us brings a specific, multifaceted lens to everything we see and hear — lenses that are honed by experience and education, not to mention the assumptions that take root from either being catered to as a dominant majority or being habitually marginalized, stereotyped or left out. Like everything else in culture, movies operate on a number of frequencies, and the more critics can tune into them, the more useful our analysis will be. Objective evaluation may indeed have “zip” to do with identity politics. But the ability to evaluate a movie objectively has everything to do with context, nuance and cultural fluency. In the end, perhaps the most important thing isn’t whether the gaze is male or female, but whether’s it’s curious, sensitive or even open at all.

FAMILY ARENA metrotix.com • R. Kelly, 7:30 p.m. Aug. 17, $48-$98. FOX THEATRE metrotix.com • Martin L. Mathews Awards Program & Benefit Concert with Cameo, Doug E. Fresh, Love Jones the Band, Darius Bradford, 7 p.m. Aug. 18, $25-$125. GRANDEL THEATRE metrotix.com • Herb Alpert & Lani Hall, 7 p.m. Aug. 19, $28-$35. OFF BROADWAY etix.com • Matthew Ryan, 8 p.m. Aug. 23, $15. • Ray Wylie Hubbard, 8 p.m. Oct. 5, $20-$35. • A Place to Bury Strangers, Kraus, 8 p.m. Oct. 18, $15. OLD ROCK HOUSE metrotix.com • Los Lonely Boys, 8 p.m. Oct. 7, $30. • Amy Helm, 8 p.m. Oct. 11, $20-$25. THE PAGEANT ticketmaster.com • The Mind of Jay E featuring Jay E, E-40, Mvstermind, 8 p.m. July 20, $10-$20. • Pusha-T’s “The Daytona Tour 2018” with Valee, Sheck Wes, 8 p.m. Aug. 3, $34.50$40. • Liverpool Legends, Clar & Gigi Monaco of Sandalwood Sitar, 7 p.m. Aug. 25, $40-$100. • MAX “House of Divine World Tour” with Nina Nesbitt, Ezi, 8 p.m. Oct. 27, $20-$25. • Blues Traveler, 8 p.m. Nov. 2, $30. • Turnpike Troubadours, 8 p.m. Nov. 17, $22.50-$25. THE READY ROOM ticketfly.com • Masego, 8 p.m. Oct. 29, $22.50-$75.


TV

07.08.2018 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

MAKING LATE-NIGHT TV IN THE ERA OF TRUMP How Seth Meyers’ ‘Late Night’ team turns political plot twists into comedy BY ELAHE IZADI Washington Post

NEW YORK • About 12:30 p.m., CNN flashes the news. “Ty Cobb’s out!” rings out in the writers’ room of “Late Night With Seth Meyers.” “The lawyer Ty Cobb?” another writer asks. “The mustache!” Down the hall at 30 Rockefeller Center, showrunner Mike Shoemaker pops into Meyers’ office to tell him about Cobb’s departure from President Donald Trump’s legal team. Meyers already knows. How big of a deal is this? Meh, by 2018 standards. But Meyers and his writers have learned to be on alert. “If more than five people are looking at one TV, you know something’s happening where we’re going to have to tear up our script,” Meyers later explained. We’re more than a year into the Trump presidency, and the dizzying headlines come and go so quickly that 9 a.m. reports feel irrelevant by 5 p.m. And late-night hosts, while duty-bound to entertain, have also become Anti-Trump America’s Guide to What It All Means. So, how do these shows quickly turn the latest political plot twist into comedy? To find out, we spent a day inside NBC’s “Late Night With Seth Meyers,” helmed by a host who’s become one of the most incisive critics of the administration. “We thought the campaign was the World Series,” Meyers said in an interview, “but it turned out it was just spring training for this.”

PHOTOS BY SALWAN GEORGES • Washington Post

One last pit stop for Seth Meyers before taking the stage for a taping of “Late Night With Seth Meyers.”

Writer Sal Gentile chats with colleagues as the latest Kanye West news flashes on the TV behind him.

8:30 A.M. On a Wednesday in May, Meyers arrives at work having already read the draft of the “Closer Look” segment that writer Sal Gentile emailed him overnight. This comedic deep-dive has become the show’s trademark. Today’s first draft focuses on the Iran nuclear deal and Trump’s colorful former physician, Harold Bornstein. Wearing a hoodie and sneakers, Meyers sits in his office as he adds jokes and asks Gentile if there’s a way to mention Vice President Mike Pence praising former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio as a champion of “the rule of law” — the same Arpaio who was convicted of contempt of court. Meyers is well-suited to this late-night TV moment. He spent 13 seasons down the hall at “Saturday Night Live,” including a stint as “Weekend Update” anchor. His 2011 White House correspondents’ dinner jokes mocking Trump’s presidential aspirations have since become folklore. Meyers took over Jimmy Fallon’s time slot in 2014, but the show found its voice in the crowded late-night field during the 2016 campaign, as it doubled down on politics from an unapologetically liberal point of view. Armed with Meyers’ instructions, Gentile heads to the writers’ room, where 14 other writers sit at desks around the perimeter. Some chat in pairs as they work on future sketches. Others scroll through headlines — Trump has proposed a sixth military branch, the space force — and send monologue jokes to head writer Alex Baze, who worked with Meyers on “SNL.” “So, then we’ll fight in space?” writer Ally Hord asks aloud. She laughs. “This is insane.” By 10:30 a.m., Gentile has figured out how to connect Arpaio to Bornstein in the “Closer Look” script. Mixing comedy and news has been Gentile’s lif