Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 06.21.2019 • $2.50

SCENT REMAINS COLD COURT STAYS IN DIG FOR CLUES BAIL AMANDA JONES’ FAMILY STILL SEARCHING FOR ANSWERS

ORDER Action comes after city complained dangerous inmates were being released BY JOEL CURRIER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Det. Lee Morris of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department watches as a backhoe shaves clay from the ground, inches at a time, as authorities dig on private property in a new search Thursday for the remains of Amanda Jones. Jones has been missing since 2005. BY CHRISTINE BYERS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HILLSBORO — A bark,a look and a wagging tail brought a backhoe and a crime scene unit to the woods here Thursday — not far from the last place anyone saw pregnant 26-year-old Amanda Jones almost 14 years ago. For about six hours, a team led by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department excavated a rectangle of land just north of the fairgrounds in Hillsboro. Dogs had told them that human remains could be nearby. The team hoped it would find a trace of Jones, who was weeks from delivering her second child, a boy, when she disappeared. Det. Lee Morris, the department’s chief evidence technician, said Jones’ family has never given up looking for answers. “They’re not giving up and we’re not giving up,” he said on Thursday.

On Aug. 14, 2005, Jones went to the Hillsboro Civic Center and fairgrounds on Highway 21 in central Jefferson County to meet the man she said was the child’s father, Bryan Westfall. She never returned. Police found her car unlocked on the Civic Center parking lot. Her purse, keys, wallet and cellphone were missing. And so was she. Westfall was never charged. About a month ago, Jones’ family returned to the fairgrounds to look again for her. A team of handlers volunteered their dogs, specially trained to find human remains, to accompany them. Several dogs alerted to two areas: One on the fairgrounds, which had been thoroughly searched by canines, heatdetection equipment and other methods when Jones first vanished, Morris said. And a second on private property to the north

St. Charles Co. woman dodges death and helps convict a killer BY ROBERT PATRICK

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES COUNTY — Carol Alford often joked about her run-in with an accused killer. With a woman who tried to lure her into her SUV with false claims about being a TV producer seeking help to reenact a 911 call. But it wasn’t until four months after that Hupp woman, Pamela Hupp, fatally shot a mentally disabled man that the jokes ended. That’s when St. Charles County Prosecuting Attorney Tim Lohmar told Alford his theory about Hupp’s plans.

“Then it started to become real because I sat there listening to Tim tell me how I was supposed to die,” Alford said. She said she lost feeling in her lower body. “I could feel my heart pounding and that was it.” Alford spoke to the Post-Dispatch Thursday, the day after Hupp admitted that prosecutors had enough to convict her of first-degree murder in the Aug. 16, 2016 death of Louis Gumpenberger, 33. As part of the plea deal, Hupp will be sentenced to life Please see HUPP, Page A4

Tony Messenger: Sheriff at odds with City Hall • A2

Please see DIG, Page A4

Civil rights groups to county: Stop stonewalling on jail deaths BY JEREMY KOHLER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON — A coalition of civil rights groups in a letter accused St. Louis County Executive Sam Page and other officials on Thursday of keeping the public in the dark about the county’s response to the deaths of four inmates of the county jail. Lawyers in the St. Page Louis County Counselor’s office have refused to release documents to the PostDispatch about the county’s investigations into the deaths, citing exemptions to the Missouri Sunshine Law that allow

Please see BAIL, Page A6

Tensions escalate after Iran shoots down US drone BY DEB RIECHMANN

Associated Press

governments to keep confidential some records about legal issues and personnel. Page has talked about changes he has ordered at the troubled jail, expressed sympathy for the family of the victims, and talked about the need for improvements. And on Thursday, he made appointments to a Justice Services Advisory Board that has been neglected for years. But the county has yet to provide an accounting for what went wrong and how officials

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump declared Thursday that “Iran made a very big mistake” by shooting down a U.S. surveillance drone over the Strait of Hormuz but suggested it was a foolish error rather than an intentional escalation of the tensions that have led to rising fears of open military conflict. Asked about a U.S. response, the president said pointedly, “You’ll soon find out.” The downing of the huge, unmanned aircraft, which Iran portrayed as a deliberate defense of its territory rather than a mistake, was a stark reminder of the risk of military conflict between U.S. and Iranian forces as

Please see JAIL, Page A4

Please see IRAN, Page A9

How sweet it is

TODAY

U.S. women dispatch rival Sweden

Maryland Heights officer shot; two charged • A3 Edwards regrets using slur in 2005 trial • A3 Museum acquires a Bible once owned by Lincoln •

that is near power lines, a small clearing and a barely visible gravel service road. Sheriff David Marshak, who worked for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department when Jones went missing, ordered his team to return to the new site. At 8 a.m. on Thursday, an anthropologist, a backhoe operator and the department’s Crime Scene Unit met in a parking lot nearby. They turned down the thin gravel road, cut through heavy bush and stopped at the clearing. The backhoe began peeling back dirt. After about two hours of digging the first section, Morris called in volunteers from the Eureka Fire Search and Rescue Team. Two handlers brought three cadaver dogs with them. Each of them seemed to ignore the

ST. LOUIS — A top city official on Thursday morning sounded alarm bells over a federal judge’s order requiring state courts to consider poverty when setting bail, arguing the rule has already forced the city to release an accused murderer, an accused rapist and an accused gunman. Then, just hours later, a federal appeals court put the order on hold, giving prosecutors, defense lawyers and judges here a temporary reprieve. Officials in the 22nd Circuit have been scrambling over the past week to hold last-minute detention hearings for hundreds of defendants. On June 11, U.S. District Judge Audrey Fleissig ruled that St. Louis has failed to comply with rules for setting bail, gave officials a week to hold new detention hearings for inmates in the city’s two jails, and said new arrestees must have a hearing within 48 hours of their arrest. Inmates can still be held, Fleissig wrote, if they are a danger to the community or if there is no other way to ensure they show up for court. But city Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards, a former St. Louis circuit judge, said on Thursday that 98% of the inmates in city jails are being held for violent crimes — not traffic violations or misdemeanors — and deserve to be locked up.

Pujols’ return is ‘going to be emotional’

SPORTS

A9

85°/76° THUNDERSTORMS

TOMORROW

93°/76° THUNDERSTORMS

WEATHER C9 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

SPORTS 1 M

St. Louis team preparing for Rustbelt Poetry Slam • GO!

Vol. 141, No. 172 ©2019

2019 VOLVO S60 T5 Momentum

Lease For

$

299

/month for 36 months

2019 VOLVO XC60 T5 AWD Momentum Lease F

VOLVO CARS WEST COUNTY 636-227-8303 14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

wcvolovocars.com

$

429

/month*

for 36 months *New 2019 Volvo S60 T5 Momentum stock #20087, MSRP $40,240, includes $1,000 conquest bonus cash. New 2019 Volvo XC60 T5 AWD Momentum stk#19990, MSRP $49,420 with $3,459 cash or trade due at signing, plus tax, title, license and dealer admin fee. Lease @7,500 miles per year. Additional miles available. No security deposit with approved credit. Offer includes available Volvo incentives. Lease through VCFS. Expires 6/30/19. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 06.21.2019 1 1 FRIDAY • 06.21.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM BIG HITTERS

BLUES ON TAP

UPCOMING CHATS

Sports columnists Ben Frederickson and Jeff Gordon talk over the Cardinals’ struggling offense and the St. Louis return of Albert Pujols. stltoday.com/watch

Come grab a beer with our columnists and writers on June 27 at Ballpark Village. Relive the St. Louis Blues’ historic championship season and get the behind-the-scenes scoop on the glorious team and season. stltoday.com/OurEvents

Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday

Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m.

TONY’S TAKE

CUSTOMER SERVICE 314-340-8888

Sheriff at odds with City Hall over increased costs of federal inmates

Customer service hours 6:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday-Friday 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday 7–10 a.m. on holidays service@stltoday.com SUBSCRIBE STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 PLACE DEATH NOTICES STLtoday.com or 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com or 314-621-6666 FAX AD INFORMATION: 314-340-8664 BUY REPRINTS: STLtoday.mycapture.com

CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch. com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday. com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301 PRICING The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. Contact at 1-314-340-8888 for additional information.

SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS All subscription offers available at STLtoday.com, including those advertised through our email promotions, on-site messaging, social media and any external means of promotion, are valid for new subscribers only. You must not have been a subscriber in the past thirty (30) days to register for a new subscription offer.

AUTO-RENEWAL, CANCELLATION, AND REFUND POLICY EZ Pay is a convenient electronic payment method that automatically renews your Digital Only or Full Access news subscription service (your “Subscription”). If you register for EZ Pay or debit banking (ACH) payments, your Subscription will continue for the length of the term you select on your plan. On the last day of your current term (your “Renewal Date”), your plan will automatically renew for the same term unless you choose to cancel more than twenty-one (21) days before your Renewal Date (your “Cancellation Date”). If you do not affirmatively cancel your Subscription before your Cancellation Date, YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR AN ADDITIONAL TERM for the plan you initially selected at the rates in effect at the time of renewal. You may cancel your subscription at any time by calling 1-314-340-8888. If you have provided us with a valid credit card number or an alternate payment method saved in your account and you have not cancelled by your Cancellation Date, your subscription will be automatically processed up to fourteen (14) days in advance of your Renewal Date and the payment method you provided to us at or after the time of your initial Subscription purchase will be charged. We reserve the right to change your Subscription rate at any time. If you are not satisfied with your Subscription rate or service, you may cancel your Subscription at any time, and receive a refund for any amounts you have prepaid beyond the date you cancel your Subscription.

FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50.The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888.

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A Baptist minister by training, St. Louis Sheriff Vernon Betts enjoys the language of Scripture. He pulls from the First Letter to Timothy in the New Testament to describe a dispute he’s having with City Hall over the transport of federal prisoners between the City Justice Center and the federal courthouse. “Do not muzzle the ox while he’s treading out the grain,” says the 18th verse of the fifth chapter. In other words, workers deserve their wages. Betts wants to make sure his deputies — and his office — get paid for the work they do. That’s why earlier this month Betts gave U.S. Marshal John D. Jordan 60 days notice that he was canceling the contract for the city’s deputies to provide transportation to federal prisoners in the city’s care. Betts isn’t upset with Jordan, but with the city’s Director of Public Safety Jimmie Edwards, Mayor Lyda Krewson, the Board of Aldermen, and, well, the city’s judges. “As you know from our conversations,” he wrote to Jordan, “I have repeatedly informed the appropriate officials in City Hall about the 671 percent increase in the transportation of federal prisoners and my desperate need for additional staff to honor the agreement between our offices. … This increase has rendered my ability to continue this mission impossible without additional deputies.” The culprit is a contract between the city and the U.S. Marshal service to increase the amount of federal prisoners being held in St. Louis. The city is paid $90 a day for each prisoner, and an additional $23 an hour for transportation costs. None of that money goes to Betts’ office, even though he’s providing the transport. Instead, 70% of it goes into a capital fund to improve city jails — including the decrepit medium security jail known as the Workhouse — and the other 30% goes to the city’s general revenue fund. Edwards has specifically targeted an increase in federal prisoners to pad the city’s budget. As of Sunday, there were 230 federal prisoners in the City Justice Center. On June 1 there were 240. A year ago the daily counts were nearly half that high. The increase — some of them due

Multistate games POWERBALL Wednesday: 04-18-21-26-38 Powerball: 01 Power play: 3 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $108 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday’s estimated jackpot: $55 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Thursday: 13-30-33-39-43 Lucky ball: 04

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Wednesday: 05-8-12-13-28-34 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.6 million SHOW ME CASH Thursday: 01-11-19-25-38 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $856,000 PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 434 Evening: 144 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 9149 Evening: 2744

to the city asking the U.S. attorney to prosecute local gun crimes — has significantly added to Betts’ workload. In 2017, his deputies transported just under 300 federal prisoners. This year, they are on pace to transport more than 3,000. But none of the money from the federal contract is flowing to his office. “After asking me to be a partner, Edwards cut a deal to share the money with the city,” Betts says. “The sheriff’s office gets nothing. I don’t think it’s fair. It’s not like I’m asking the city to cut into anybody else’s budget. This is free money.” The fiscal year 2020 budget estimates $5.1 million in revenue from the federal contract, budget director Paul Payne says. But if current federal inmate levels are maintained, the city will receive more than $7 million from the federal government just in per diem costs. Betts has met with Edwards several times, including again Wednesday morning after I started asking questions about his letter to Jordan. Betts also sent letters to the Board of Aldermen and Payne, making requests for extra deputies to handle the monstrous increase in work load. So far, Betts says, the city hasn’t budged. If that doesn’t change, “I’m not going to transport any federal prisoners,” he told me. “Period. It’s going to be a mess.” Edwards says he doesn’t disagree with Betts. Yes, the jail contract has significantly increased federal prisoners. Yes, that has led to much more work for the sher-

iff’s office. But there’s nothing he can do, Edwards says. “I don’t run his budget,” Edwards says. “I don’t have the authority to provide him more deputies.” Edwards says he has no objection to Betts’ office being compensated for its additional work transporting federal prisoners. “The city does not stand in the way of the sheriff,” Edwards says. That’s not how Betts sees it. Ever since he won an election and took over for former Sheriff Jim Murphy, the judges have been battling with him to try to take over authority for security of the courthouses. His budget has been slashed. He has 160 deputies now, where under Murphy, judges used to insist on at least 175. And when the Missouri Legislature passed a law allowing his deputies to become POST certified — they are the only deputies in the state who lack that certification — city leaders denied his request for funding to train his deputies. So Betts is trying to force the issue. Edwards says if the contract gets canceled, he’ll try to make do with city marshals and police officers. That’s hardly a good solution when the police department is also understaffed and violence is up, says Deputy Sheriff Gregg Christian. “How many kids have we lost in the past couple of weeks?” Christian asks. “And the director of public safety wants to take cops off the street?” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

THEATER REVIEW

Muny stages a fun, high-stepping ‘Kinky Boots’ BY CALVIN WILSON

LOTTERY

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

St. Louis Sheriff Vernon Betts talks to members of the media outside the Civil Courts building in 2018.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Charlie Price (Graham Scott Fleming) — a major character in the musical “Kinky Boots,” running through Tuesday at the Muny — never planned to take over his father’s shoe factory. And the last thing he wanted was to have its future in his hands. Charlie envisioned a glamorous life in London, with his fiancée, Nicola (Caroline Bowman), by his side and his dreary English hometown in his rear view. But when he’s called back to Northampton, he decides to step up. And he might be able to save the factory, if only he can identify a niche market. But who’s his target audience?

Inspiration comes in the form of Lola (J. Harrison Ghee), a drag performer who’d definitely be interested in buying more comfortable, durable boots — and even has ideas about how the footwear should be designed. But persuading Lola to spend time in Northampton takes a bit of effort. Meanwhile, Lauren (Taylor Louderman), the employee who suggested that Charlie go after niche customers, is falling in love with him. “Kinky Boots,” based on a 2005 British film of the same name, contains all the elements for a fun musical: interesting characters, an involving story and en-

‘Kinky Boots’ When: Through Tuesday Where: The Muny, 1 Theatre Drive, Forest Park How much: $15-$105, plus the free seats More info: 314-534-1111; metrotix.com tertaining songs that tie it all together. With a book by Harvey Fierstein (“Torch Song Trilogy”) and a score by Cyndi Lauper, it’s a feel-good show that fully engages the audience. The direction and choreography of the original 2013 Broadway production have been re-created by DB Bonds and Rusty Mowery,

respectively. Fleming deftly negotiates his character’s fluctuations between nice guy and control freak. Ghee turns in a terrific and frequently showstopping performance as the multifaceted Lola. And in a role that’s too small for her talent, Louderman is a sheer delight. As its storyline would suggest, “Kinky Boots” is occasionally risqué. But don’t hesitate to bring the family. There’s nothing onstage that a reasonably sophisticated 21st-century kid can’t handle. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Thursday Midday: 03-08-18-21-38 Evening: 09-17-25-32-39 LOTTO Thursday: 01-09-18-36-40-48 Extra shot: 02 Estimated jackpot: $5 million PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 060 FB: 8 Evening: 936 FB: 6 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 1878 FB: 9 Evening: 9565 FB: 2

CORRECTION Events for Make Music Day are Friday. A Best Bet in Friday’s preprinted Go! Magazine lists an incorrect date.

PEOPLE Actor Bernie Ko p e l l ( “ T h e Love Boat”) is 86. Actor Monte Markham is 84. Actress Mariette Hartley is 79. Pratt Comedian Joe Flaherty (“SCTV”) is 78. Musician Ray Davies of The Kinks is 75. Actress Meredith Baxter (“Family Ties”) is 72. Actor Michael Gross (“Family Ties”) is 72. Guitarist Joey Molland of

Badfinger is 72. Drummer Joey Kramer of Aerosmith is 69. Guitarist Nils Lofgren is 68. Cartoonist Berke Breathed Baxter (“Opus,” “Bloom County”) is 62. Actor Josh Pais (“Ray Donovan”) is 61. Country singer Kathy Mattea is 60. Actor Marc Copage (“Julia”) is 57. Actor Doug Savant (“Desperate Housewives,” “Melrose Place”)

is 55. Guitarist Porter Howell of Little Texas is 55. Actor Michael Dolan (“Hamburger Hill,” “Biloxi Blues”) is 54. Filmmaker Lana Wachowski (“The Matrix,” “Speed Racer”) is 54. Actress Carrie Preston (“The Good Wife”) is 52. Country singer Allison Moorer is 47. Actress Juliette Lewis is 46. Actress Maggie Siff (“Mad Men”) is 45. Bassist Justin Cary (Sixpence None The Richer) is 44. Guitarist Mike Einziger of Incubus is 43. Actor

Chris Pratt (“Jurassic World,” “Guardians of the Galaxy”) is 40. Singer Brandon Flowers of The Killers is 38. Actor Jussie Smollett (“Empire”) is 37. Actor Michael Malarkey (“The Vampire Diaries”) is 36. Singer Kris Allen (“American Idol”) is 34. Singer Lana Del Rey is 34. Actor Jascha Washington (“Big Momma’s House” films) is 30. Bassist Chandler Baldwin of LANCO is 27. Singer Rebecca Black is 22. — Associated Press


LOCAL

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Republican AG Schmitt builds war chest for 2020 bid Sinquefield gives $250,000 to campaign BY KURT ERICKSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

A member of the crime scene unit collects evidence where a police officer was wounded on Thursday in Maryland Heights.

Maryland Heights officer shot; 2 charged BY KIM BELL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MARYLAND HEIGHTS — A veteran Maryland Heights police officer was shot twice in the leg early Thursday when he and another officer confronted a man breaking into a car outside an apartment complex, police said. Ellis The plainclothes officer, who had been watching the complex from an unmarked police car, was shot about 3:45 a.m. in the 2100 block of Parker Gallery Drive, near Bennington Place. The wounded officer’s partner returned fire but did not hit anyone. Other officers who quickly descended on the area ran after the gunman and another suspect, arresting both. The injured officer, 38, was stable at a hospital. “He’s expected to make a full

recovery,” Maryland Heights Police Chief Bill Carson said. The suspected gunman, Menuis T. Ellis, 17, of Pine Lawn, was charged Thursday with two counts of first-degree assault, armed criminal action and stealing. His bond was set at $1 million. The other suspect, Davina E. Parker, 26, of Jennings, was charged with stealing. Her bond was set at $2,500. The unidentified officer has been with the Maryland Heights force for nine years and had been with another agency for three or four years before that. His partner, with eight years’ experience, was unhurt. Carson said the two officers were part of a special assignment in the predawn hours, working to curb a rash of car breakins in Maryland Heights. Last week alone, there were about 20 car break-ins in Maryland Heights, and guns were stolen in two of those cases, said Maryland Heights Police Officer Erica Stough. The police chief said guns left

behind in vehicles are the bounty of thieves, ramping up the danger for police. “That’s another thing that’s really scary for our officers,” Carson said. “Because we’re getting so many guns stolen out of cars, the people that we’re encountering that are breaking into cars are armed, which makes it even more scary.” The two officers, who were in a parked, unmarked police vehicle, said after they saw Ellis breaking into a car, they confronted him and identified themselves as police. “The suspect turned and opened fire on both officers,” Carson said. Carson said he didn’t know how many shots in all were fired. Total reported crime in Maryland Heights is up about 18% from the same six-month period a year ago. Erin Heffernan of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

JEFFERSON CITY — Just as Missouri Gov. Mike Parson is amassing a campaign war chest in anticipation of a run for a full term, the man he appointed attorney general also is ramping up fundraising heading toward 2020. Supporters of Republican Eric Schmitt of Glendale have raked in more than a half million dollars on his behalf, collecting cash from big money donors like retired St. Louis financier Rex Sinquefield, who wrote a check for $250,000 in February. At the helm of the fundraising efforts for the pro-Schmitt political action committee known as MO Opportunity PAC is Meredith Gibbons, who formerly raised millions of dollars for disgraced former Gov. Eric Greitens. Records show she is receiving $8,000 a month to fill the coffers. The PAC snared a $100,000 check from Herzog Contracting, a St. Joseph-based construction services company run by Stanley Herzog. Herzog is a large donor to Republican causes. In 2016, for example, the company gave $650,000 to Greitens. Other big donors include August Busch III who gave $50,000 in May. As of April 1, the PAC had $147,000. However, that doesn’t count an additional $350,000 the PAC has in a certificate of deposit that comes due in September 2019. And, that doesn’t account for the money Schmitt has raised for his own personal campaign account. The latest reports show he has $415,000 in that account. For now, the only Democrat who has announced plans to run has just $13,930 in his campaign account. St. Louis attorney Elad Gross is a political newcomer who is hop-

ing to return the seat to Democratic hands. Before 2017, the post had been held by Democrats dating to 1993. Schmitt was appointed attorney general after fellow Republican Josh Hawley vacated the office to join the U.S. Senate. He earned his law degree from the St. Louis University School of Law in 2000. He served two terms in the state Senate representing parts of west St. Louis County, and was a partner at the Lathrop Gage law firm until being sworn in as treasurer in 2017. The two men serving as treasurer and deputy treasurer are Carl Struby and Jean Paul Bradshaw, both of whom are Lathrop Gage attorneys. Attempts to discuss the fund with them were unsuccessful. The campaign fund is similar to one formed on behalf of Parson. Unlike their personal campaign accounts, which cannot receive contributions over $2,600, the separate campaign committees can take in unlimited contributions. Since Missouri voters enacted limits on campaign contributions in 2016, a growing number of candidates have set up political action committees that do not have to abide by those rules. But unlike Greitens’ use of a nonprofit to raise money, the names of donors and the amounts they contribute are publicly disclosed. During his 17 months in office, Greitens used the nonprofit group A New Missouri to promote his agenda. The use of the nonprofit, which also employed Gibbons, led to accusations that Greitens violated Missouri campaign finance law by intentionally concealing donors, and worries that his backers gained unfair influence within state government. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Edwards regrets using slur in 2005 trial Quote highlighted by group pushing to close Workhouse

Victim: He immediately told me that I’d better never ever tell anybody what had happened. Prosecutor: Did he say what would happen if you did?

FROM STAFF REPORTS

ST. LOUIS — St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards, a former circuit court judge, says language he used in a 2005 trial was “inappropriate” and regrets repeating a homophobic slur used during testimony in that case. An excerpt from the 466page trial transcript was posted on social media earlier this week by Close the Workhouse, a group that is pressing the city to shutter the St. Louis Medium Security Institution on Hall Street. According to the transcript, before pronouncing sentence, Edwards strongly disputed claims by defendant Anthony Carroll that he was not a homosexual. In his statement, Edwards used the same derogatory slurs the defendant was accused of using when he sodomized his victim: “Mr. Carroll, during the trial, I was baffled during cross-examination. The prosecutor asked you whether you were a homosexual and you were upset. You told him I believe your words were you were not a ---. I’ve consulted some of my friends that are homosexuals and they want me to let you know, whether or not you’re the giver or the givee, if you have forced a heterosexual man to ... , you are a ---.” Carroll, who pleaded guilty in 1984 to abusing a child and in 1993 to second-degree burglary, was accused of breaking into an apartment in the Dutchtown neighborhood in south St. Louis in 2003, robbing and repeatedly sodomizing the male tenant at gunpoint. During the trial, the victim described how he’d been brutalized: Victim: He just kept talking to me like an animal.

Victim: He would kill me. Prosecutor: So then what happened? Victim: He just kept telling me that over and over again. Prosecutor: Not to tell anyone? Victim: ’Cause he would kill me because he didn’t want anyone to know he was a ——. When he testified in his defense, Carroll said he didn’t have a gun, and denied sodomizing the victim. According to the trial transcript, Carroll said he’d been called a homosexual since he was incarcerated, but didn’t like “people” saying that about him. Prosecutor: You don’t want to be thought of as a homosexual? Carroll: What do you mean “thought of as a homosexual”? Prosecutor: You don’t want people to think you’re gay or anything, do you? Carroll: It wasn’t even — I’ve been through that for fourteen years. Prosecutor: Through what? Carroll: Being called that since I’ve been incarcerated. Prosecutor: Okay. But it’s certainly not anything you like people saying about you, is it? Carroll: No. Prosecutor: Certainly not anything you’re going to admit doing, is it? Carroll: I would have admitted to it, sir, if I’d done it. Prosecutor: You would have admitted you forcibly sodomized when you robbed someone? Carroll: Yes, sir, I would have if I’d done it.

In March 2005,a jury convicted Carroll of one count Prosecutor: What do you of first-degree robbery, two mean? counts of forcible sodomy, Victim: Telling me I was ba- three counts and armed sically scum, that I deserved criminal action, one count this, that I asked for this. of first-degree burglary, and one court of misdemeanor Prosecutor: So what hapstealing. pened after you got dressed? Edwards sentenced Car-

roll to consecutive terms of 160 years’ imprisonment. Carroll, 54, currently is an inmate at Southeast Correctional Center in Charleston, Mo. Asked on Wednesdayabout his comments in 2005, Edwards told the Post-Dispatch: “What I did was I just simply repeated the examination that the prosecutor had with the defendant.” But Edwards acknowledged that the comments, which were directed at the defendant, are disconcerting when taken out of context. “I probably should have said, ‘Your words were inappropriate.’ I know absolutely today I would not have repeated (those words), but I still would have sentenced” the defendant to 160 years. Edwards, in an appearance Thursday on KMOX (1120 AM), apologized again for the statement. “I regret having used the word. … It was done in the context of the case. It’s not a word I’ve used since.” Edwards, who left the bench on October 2017 to join the administration of Mayor Lyda Krewson, pointed to his record of approving adoptions by samesex couples and officiating at same-sex marriages. Krewson, in a statement Wednesday, called Edwards a “very fair-minded, impartial person.” The Close the Workhouse campaign has also shared on Twitter examples of racist or otherwise offensive Facebook posts made by current or former St. Louis police officers, which were recently disclosed by the Philadelphia-based Plain View Project. Close the Workhouse is supported primarily by three organizations: Action St. Louis, ArchCity Defenders and Bail Project St. Louis. The organization did not respond Thursday to requests for comment. Those Facebook posts identified by the Plain View Project are the subject of an internal affairs investigation by the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. Additionally, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly M.Gardner has added 22 officers identified by the Plain View Project to a list of officers banned from bringing cases to her office.

90DAYMEDS.com Exact Same Medications A Fraction of the Cost C FRE SHIPP E ING!

90Day Meds COSTS

USA COSTS

$469 $50 (Our customers save up to 90% on over 1500 prescription medications)

Compare Our Prices to What You Pay Now: Drug

Qty

US Price

Our Price

% Savings

Cialis 5mg*

30

$469

$50

89%

Viagra 100mg*

20

$1,268

$58

95%

Eliquis 5mg*

180

$1,508

$327

78%

Myrbetriq 50mg*

90

$1,387

$186

87%

Januvia 100mg*

84

$1,474

$249

83%

Advair Diskus 250/50mcg*

3 inhalers $1,504

$147

90%

Jardiance 10mg*

90

$1,842

$215

88%

Spiriva Handihaler 18mcg*

90

$1,252

$120

90%

Xarelto 20mg*

84

$1,552

$275

82%

Premarin 0.625mg*

84

$543

$65

88%

Levitra 20mg*

30

$1,880

$85

95%

Vagifem 10mcg*

24

$388

$90

77%

* Prescription required & Prices shown may be for generic equivalents if available and are subject to change without notice

• Credit Cards Accepted • No Insurance Necessary CALL TODAY & AN EXPERIENCED PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST WILL REVIEW YOUR PERSONAL MEDICATION NEEDS For a Limited Time We’ll Give You $20 Off Your First Order Over $100! Just Use Offer Code: SLPD20

1-800-828-4889 FREE Quotes & FREE Shipping On All Orders!


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 06.21.2019

Jefferson County dig site The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department on Thursday dug for a body at the fairgrounds in Hillsboro, the last place a pregnant Amanda Jones was seen alive in 1995.

prin eS us Ho

R

gs

21

College R

Jefferson College

oa

d oa

64 270 d

44 55

A 21 Dig site

St. Louis

255

MISSOURI Pioneer Ro a d

ILLINOIS

21

A

Hillsboro maps4news.com/©HERE, Lee Enterprises graphic

Dig From A1

freshly dug ground. But they barked a little and repeatedly passed through an area behind it. So the backhoe went to work again, peeling back another layer. And again, it found nothing but undis- Jones turbed solid lightbrown clay and soil. Morris, his team, and the handlers swatted away gnats and bees and picked

away ticks from their clothes. “We’re looking for any discoloration in the soil that would indicate a disturbance of some kind,” Morris said. “And I’m just not seeing it here.” “The dogs are great,” he continued. “They can lead us to an area. But they can’t pinpoint it. The question is, ‘Where do you stop?’” One of the dog handlers, who did not want to give her name, said her youngest dog, Tulsa, a 4-yearold Belgian Malinois, would likely be her last working dog. He is her third. “It gets to be too much,” she said. “Yes, we’ve found some vic-

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Gordon Fietsam works his dog, Sam, as the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department excavates land on Thursday in a search for the remains of Amanda Jones, who has been missing for 14 years. Sam is specially trained to find human remains. tims, but it’s the ones like this that will haunt you forever.” The handlers apologized to Morris and the others, saying there was no way to know what kept catching the dogs’ attention. It could have been remains that washed through from higher ground, or that dated back hundreds of years. It could even be cremated remains, they said.

“You guys did great. Thank you so much for coming out here,” Morris said, patting the 10-yearold Malinois, Biba, on the head. “And thank you, too.” He snapped pictures of the freshly excavated area, with plans to put them in the cold case file, that, for just a few hours Thursday, seemed to be heating up. “We have to chase every lead,

Hupp From A1

in prison without parole in August. Lohmar has said Alford provided an important link for investigators to figure out the story Hupp used to lure Gumpenberger to her home.

‘I knew she was up to something’ Alford was off work on medical leave for stress-induced seizures at the time. She worked for a Verizon contractor, and is now a property manager. She was cleaning house, and took her beagle, Mimzie, outside for a bathroom break when Hupp drove by. Alford thought Hupp might be a new neighbor, until she drove back by, stopped and stared. Hupp asked, “Do you babysit?” Alford recalled. Alford was puzzled, thinking, “Who in their right mind would ask a stranger in a trailer park to babysit?” “Naw, bitch, I don’t babysit,” Alford responded. Hupp switched tactics, claiming that she was a producer for NBC’s “Dateline” seeking someone to reenact a 911 call. She offered “$1,000 cash under the table.” She said she was from Chicago and that the show rented a trailer in the park to do the taping. But she had no Chicago accent and was driving an SUV with Missouri plates and no rental car sticker. Alford was intrigued by the switch in stories, and bored. She is also far from shy. Lohmar on Wednesday called her a “firecracker.” She boasts that she’s beaten cancer twice — cervical cancer in her 20s and breast cancer in her 30s, and says you only die once. She also thought of the children in the neighborhood. “I knew she was up to something. My thought was, if you’re going to hurt some-

Jail From A1

were addressing specific failures. “What little information has been released to the public about thecircumstancesofthese deathsis troubling, and suggests these men were denied necessary medical care,” the letter said. It was penned by officials from MacArthur Justice Center, ArchCity Defenders, the ACLU and other groups. Page’s advisers had no immediate answers Thursday to a reporter’s questions: how the county investigates jail deaths,where the focus is applied,what types of reports are produced and to whom they are distributed. Page’s chief of staff, Winston Calvert, was scheduled to meet on Friday with staff members from the jail, the county health department and legal staff to review all records from investigations. The national standard for investigating inmate deaths calls for an administrative review to assess the institution’s response to the death, a review of the incident and procedures used, training received by involved staff, emergency response and recommendations for changes to policies or procedures. The National Commission on Correctional Health Care recommends that a preliminary administrative review occur as soon as possible to identify any obvious areas for immediate improvement. It also calls for an assessment within 30 days of the death of the

ROBERT PATRICK, RPATRICK@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Prosecutors say Carol Alford was targeted by Pamela Hupp in 2016. Only days after asking Alford to help reenact a scene for NBC’s “Dateline,” Hupp fatally shot and killed a mentally disabled man, likely using a similar approach to lure him. body, I’m gonna make damn sure it’s not a kid.” Hupp told Alford that she could not bring her cellphone, wallet, cigarettes or keys, “because the producers don’t like clutter.” Alford did not comply. She put her dog in the house, dialed 911 and locked her phone without completing the call, before pocketing the phone and a kitchen knife. She hid a pocket knife that she slid up one sleeve of her pullover. “And then I climbed in her car. I wanted to know what she was up to,” she said. Hupp took a turn that would lead her out of the neighborhood, and now claimed to be taking Alford to a house that producers had rented near some shops in Lake Saint Louis. But Alford knew there were

clinical care provided to the patient and the circumstances leading up to the death. At least three key questions should be asked during this review: Could the medical response at the time of death be improved? Was an earlier intervention possible? Independent of the cause of death, is there a way to improve care? In other areas of the country, such reviews are not considered exempt from public review.Within days of a series of deaths at the county jail in Atlanta in 2017, the chief jailer spoke candidly and in detail about “egregious mistakes” at his institution. The only facts in the cases have been provided by outside investigations with limited scope. The medical examiner’s investigation determined the causes of death. The Clayton Police Department investigated whether crimes were committed. St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell reviewed the investigations of the deaths and said he found systemic problems in the jail, a situation he said was “troubling” and “terrible.” And he said he would have some recommendations for how the jail could improve. But none of those entities are responsible for studying the failures at the jail and making systemic changes.

no houses there. She told Hupp that she needed to go home to lock the door and get her shoes. When she got inside her home, she called her son and told Hupp that he was sick and that she needed to go pick him up. She couldn’t do the taping. Hupp tried to argue, but noticed Alford’s surveillance camera and quickly left. But it was too late, that camera captured both her license plate and a clear view of her face. Lohmar said Wednesday. After Alford called the park manager and alerted neighbors, she called police. They came out to review the video and said they would be in touch. She didn’t hear back until she got a cryptic call from police days

staffers refusing to treat very sick patients.In the death of Larry“Jay” Reavis on Jan. 18, an inmate working in the infirmary told police that he had informed a guard that Reavis said he couldn’t get up because he was having a seizure, and that the guard responded, “I don’t know about that.” John M. Shy, 29, bled to death from an intestinal hemorrhage on Feb. 23. He was transported to St. Mary’s Hospital in Richmond Heights twice that day, but the hospital released him back to the jail each time. He screamed intermittently in the infirmary for nine hours. Two nurses saw him lying in blood at least 15 minutes before anyone entered his cell. Lamar Catchings,20,of Jennings, died March 1 from acute leukemia that had never been diagnosed. A nurse accused him of faking symptoms four days before he died. He had to be wheeled to a court date a week before he died and no one asked what was wrong with him. In the most recent death, inmate Daniel Stout, 31, died on June 11 from peritonitis caused by an ulcer that perforated his intestine,an autopsy found. A source with knowledge of the case told the Post-Dispatch he had tried to seek medical care overnight in the jail but a nurse refused to come to his cell. He died the next morning less than an hour after being transported to a state prison about an hour away. A failure to provide care The county’s lawyers refused to All of the cases in St. Louis let a reporter review video from County displayed a pattern of jail Stout’s final night at the jail be-

after Gumpenberger had been shot. A St. Charles County police officer had remembered her call, and notified O’Fallon detectives.

A killer’s strategy, explained Thanks to Alford and another man Hupp approached that day, investigators learned the likely approach Hupp used to lure Gumpenberger into her car. They think Hupp told Gumpenberger a similar story, and successfully lured him to her home, where she shot him while on the phone with 911. They say she was trying to blame Russell Faria for her kidnapping in an attempt to divert attention from herself related to the 2011 fatal

fore his death. Public release of such video can be a key to accountability. In California, officials in San Luis Obispo County denied requests from The Tribune newspaper and other organizations for video of an inmate who died after spending 46 hours in a restraint chair. But the newspaper obtained the footage from another source and it contradicted county officials’ version of events leading to the death. Sheriff’s deputies watched as the man writhed on the floor,lost consciousness and died. The video showed the inmate was not “found unconscious and unresponsive” and was not in a doctor’s care as county officials had asserted. On Tuesday, Page told the County Council that the county Department of Public Health was struggling to find adequate staffing for its corrections medicine unit to deliver high-quality care. And he pointed to a high rate of chronic illness, mental illness and substance abuse among inmates. He pointed to changes he ordered, including a reorganization of jail staff, increasing mandatory inmate checks by jail guards and lowering thresholds for medical intervention. He said his staff changed many other policies to increase oversight, created a critical incident review team,and made it so both correctional officers and inmates could request medical care for inmates.And he said the county was preparing to install cameras in the infirmary.

especially on a case like this,” Morris said. “And this was definitely a lead.” Police are asking anyone with information to contact the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department Detective Bureau at 636-797-5515. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

stabbing of Faria’s wife, Elizabeth “Betsy” Faria, in their home outside of Troy, in Lincoln County. Although he had multiple alibi witnesses, Faria was convicted of his wife’s murder. That conviction was overturned amid questions about the conduct of his trial, including why Russell Faria’s lawyers weren’t permitted to blame Hupp for the murder. Hupp was the last person known to have seen Betsy Faria alive. She changed her story about the night of the murder multiple times and was the beneficiary of one of Betsy Faria’s insurance policies. Lohmar said Wednesday that O’Fallon detectives had their suspicions about Hupp’s story almost immediately. Lohmar said there was a 911 call that sounded off and Hupp’s story sounded like it had been cooked up by a schoolkid, as well as crime planning he called “sloppy.” Gumpenberger was also physically and mentally incapable of carrying out the crime because he suffered a traumatic brain injury in a vehicle crash, prosecutors said. They also found records indicating that Hupp bought the knife he purportedly used and took the $900 in cash out of the bank that was supposed to be a preliminary payoff for the kidnapping. Alford said because Hupp mentioned Lake Saint Louis, Lohmar believed that Hupp was going to kill Alford at the home where Faria was staying or dump the body there. Alford said she stopped Lohmar, not wanting to know more. “It scares the hell out of you. You lose sleep when somebody tells you how you were supposed to die,” she said. Alford vehemently denied that she was a Hupp victim, or a hero for placing herself in danger. She says she was just in the right spot at the right time. “God put her in my path because he knew she needed to be stopped,” she said.

‘Here is your chance’ The letter sent Thursday was also addressed to interim jail chief Troy Doyle and County Council member Rochelle Walton Gray. Gray chairs the council’s justice health and welfare committee. In addition to MacArthur, ArchCity and the ACLU, the letter was signed by officials from Empower Missouri, the GrassRoots Accountability Movement, Metropolitan Congregations United and the Khazaeli Wyrsch law firm. “This letter is a call for an indepth investigation into these deaths and the overall policies and procedures of the St. Louis County Justice Center,” the letter said. “It is a call for transparency in operations of the jail. And it is a call for accountability to ensure those responsible for the wellbeing of detainees at the Justice Center are complying with their constitutional obligations.” It continued: “The County has responded largely by refusing to disclose information about these four deaths.” The letter said recent events have pointed to how “corruption and toxicity can fester in the dark.” It noted that Page had pledged to make government more transparent. “Here is your chance,” the letter said. In a brief response letter, Page pointed to the actions he’s taken to improve the jail and said he would “welcome any input you can offer.”


LOCAL

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Childgarden day care and preschool to close BY BLYTHE BERNHARD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Childgarden Early Childhood Center in the Central West End will close in September, parents were informed Tuesday via email. The president of St. Louis Arc, which operates the center, cited “changes in our strategic direction” for the closure. St. Louis Arc is the local affiliate of the nonprofit that serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Childgarden day care center and preschool placed typically developing children in the same

classrooms as their peers with autism, Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities. “This decision (to close) has been made in order to redirect our resources to services that will impact a greater number of children with disabilities across the St. Louis community,” said Mark Keeley of Arc. “While the reason for this decision is ultimately to better deliver on the St. Louis Arc’s mission, we regret the disappointing burden this places on your family.” Keeley did not respond to an interview request.

Patricia Reid’s 2-year-old daughter enrolled at Childgarden in May, with no indication of any trouble. They came to the center after their last day care, Peace For Kids Child Development Center in the Central West End, closed earlier this year. Reid said she is still on wait lists at some centers from the previous search. “Now we start doing the tours again,” Reid said. “It does make me nervous for the next place we go.” Last September, Childgarden downsized from 10 classrooms to five. The center laid off nine staff

members and 20 families were told they no longer had spots. At the time, enrollment was expected to be 72. Those cuts were caused by a teacher shortage, Keeley said. A national shortage of affordable, licensed child care means nearly one-third of working parents report difficulties finding care, according to a 2018 report from business group ReadyNation. Matt Miller said his family felt lucky to find Childgarden for their daughter Penelope, now 3, when they moved to St. Louis in 2017. “To find day care for a kid under

18 months is really challenging,” Miller said. “Before Penelope was even born we had her on a waiting list.” Miller said the family is now scrambling to find an opening, after the typical cycle when preschools fill up in the spring. “I feel like the people that are making these decisions maybe don’t know how these things work,” Miller said. “Three months ago would have made things easier.” Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

LAW AND ORDER ST. CLAIR COUNTY — Man charged with shooting at officer: A Belleville man faces allegations that he shot at one Swansea police officer and bit another after being apprehended in a stolen car, according to charges filed Thursday. Darnacio Johnson, 19, listed in court documents as a homeless man from Belleville, is charged with attempted first-degree murder, aggravated discharge of a firearm, aggravated battery to a peace officer, possession of a stolen vehicle and aggravated unlawful use of a weapon. Johnson is accused of firing a semi-automatic pistol at close range in the direction of Swansea police Det. Gary Reuter. He is also is accused of biting Swansea Officer Andrew Hewitt on the arm, according to the charges. The confrontation began about 8:30 a.m. Tuesday when officers with the O’Fallon, Ill., and Shiloh police departments began tracking a stolen vehicle through the car’s OnStar GPS tracking, police said.

The tracker eventually led them to the area of Rand Lane in Swansea, according to a statement from Swansea Police Chief Steven Johnson. Police from several Metro East departments then converged on the vehicle, and, police say, Johnson got out of the car and took off running, leaving a female passenger. Eventually a Swansea police officer chased Johnson on foot to the 3200 block of Rand Lane, police said. When the officer attempted to make an arrest, police said, Johnson fired a shot, and a Swansea officer returned fire. At one point in the struggle, police allege Johnson bit another officer on the arm. Soon more officers arrived and took Johnson into custody. Johnson and the two officers were taken to a hospital with injuries that weren’t life-threatening, police said. Johnson’s bail was set at $1 million, and he was in custody Thursday at the St. Clair County Jail.

CLAYTON — Sentence is probation in fatal injury: A Breckenridge Hills man was given five years’ probation Thursday after he fatally injured a man last year by driving a pickup truck over him after a bar fight. Jordan J. Smith, 28, of the 3300 block of Sims Drive, pleaded guilty to reduced charges of involuntary manslaughter and leaving the scene of a crash, both felonies, and misdemeanor assault. Smith was originally charged with seconddegree murder. Authorities said that on Feb. 6, 2018, Smith punched Andrew Carr, 33, outside “The Office” lounge at 9612 St. Charles Rock Road, then got into his pickup truck, ran over Carr and drove off. Carr died several days later. St. Louis County Circuit Judge Brian May accepted the plea agreement and imposed several conditions of probation, including no alcohol consumption, a prohibition from going to bars, 200 hours of community service, a drug and alcohol evaluation and an anger management program.

Assistant Prosecutor Stephen O’Brien said in court Thursday that there were “evidentiary problems” with the case and a “late investigation by the police that hindered the investigation.” O’Brien said the state reached an agreement with Smith after consulting with Carr’s family. Smith’s attorney, Chris Combs, said Smith did not intentionally run down Carr but did “zoom off” after hitting him. “It’s a tragic situation but I think the state was very fair,” Combs said. Carr’s relatives spoke of their grief at Thursday’s sentencing. “Watching your child, a young, strong man, just slip away, unable to speak or walk or even understand your words, is horrific,” his mother, Lynda Carr, said in court. “And for absolutely no reason at all. Just another man’s inability to control his brutal impulses.” ST. LOUIS — Video of suspects released: Police have released surveillance video that shows two men

suspected of killing Eddie Robinson, 69, on Sunday in the Walnut Park East neighborhood. A 60-yearold woman was injured in the leg in the shooting. In the video, a man in a green jacket and a man in a gray and white jacket can be seen entering Finish Line Auto Sales, where Robinson was shot. Police say the man in the green jacket is the suspected shooter. After the shooting, the suspects fled south on Davison Avenue, police said. Police are encouraging anyone with information to call CrimeStoppers at 866371-8477. ST. LOUIS — Police car slams into restaurant building: Drivers on Chouteau Avenue slowed to gawk at a St. Louis police car with its front end crumpled into the entrance of Hamilton’s Urban Steakhouse and Bourbon Bar on Thursday evening. According to police, the car was traveling down Chouteau when another driver cut off the police vehicle and the police car swerved to avoid a colli-

sion. An officer in need of aid call was issued about 6 p.m. for the 2100 block of Chouteau. The two officers inside the cruiser suffered minor injuries, police said. No one else was injured. Hamilton’s Urban Steakhouse and Bourbon Bar was open at the time of the crash, but only a couple of customers were inside. Hamilton’s general manager, Pamela Moore, was behind the bar inside the restaurant when she heard the crash, saw flames and then got customers and employees out through a back entrance. “Good lord, it sounded like the whole building was coming down,” Moore said. “I did not expect to look up and see a car in our building.” The police car knocked a decorative pillar through the doorway of the restaurant. Co-owner Jason Arnold said he feels fortunate that no one was hurt. “In another hour, people would be coming in and out of that door, and that could have been a different story,” Arnold said.

4$$"82=;8D, 3$;C:D, @@2>> ."&B"A=216D, D O N AT E YO U R C A R Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri )0* @BB .:?="& @A=>"=;#? 5*( @BB @8DA-=>D-.":$=DA 9ADD ."$?:6=2=;"$ <'!;AD? /+50, 7"&D D'#6:?;"$? &2% 2!!6%,

!

* 100% Tax Deductible * Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE * We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not * We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs

WheelsForWishes.org

Call:(314) 499-1300

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.

Had it with dentures?

Come in and find out why our clients say,

Dental implants are more affordable than ever.

“I’m so glad I found you!”

Left: upper denture Right: upper implant

Starting at $17,500 Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

$

1

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service.

Call Now

The timeless appeal and beauty of quality hardwood floors enhances your furnishings and allows you to create the ambiance you desire whether you’re going for a warm comfortable atmosphere or a smooth contemporary feeling.

Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office (314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office (636) 200-2664

HIGH PROPERTY TAXES? WE CAN HELP! 314-454-0505 info@PARresidential.com • The largest property tax consulting firm in the metro area • Over $9 Million in tax savings since 2009!

NO SAVINGS, NO FEE!

STOP BY TODAY TO VIEW OUR WIDE SELECTION OF HARDWOOD FLOORING, CARPET, AND VINYL. 6215 Ronald Reagan Dr, Lake St Louis, MO 63367

(636) 561-5441

Since 1893

Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm Appointments & Service Available 24 Hrs. A Day, 7 Days A Week

FURNITURE REPAIRED FURNITURE REFINISHED 5 Year Workmanship Guarantee Quality Craftsmanship • Refinishing Reupholstery • Antique Restoration Repair • Custom Made Draperies Custom Made Furniture New Furniture • Antiques

314-832-1555 www.zollingerfurniture.com

4821 Fairview Ave., St. Louis, MO 63116 Just east of 3400 S. Kingshighway

We accept


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

long and shoRt tERm REntals

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

aluminum, stEEl oR wood

Ramps Front - Garage - Rear Entrance CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

CALL TODAY AND RECEIVE A FREE IN HOME QUOTE

+ vEtERan and sEnioR discounts

Inmates inside the City Workhouse in St. Louis respond to protesters in 2017 who gathered to complain about the conditions inside the jail, including the lack of air conditioning

314-325-3199 • 618-206-5963 Locally Owned, Serving the Greater St. Louis Area

From A1

“If you have a smoking gun, then I think you are a danger to our community,” Edwards said on the Charlie Brennan Show on KMOX (1120 AM). “And you do not deserve to be in our community because you have the propensity to inflict further harm on the community.” Late Thursday, however, officials didn’t yet have a full picture of who stays behind bars, and who gets out. After an estimated 160 hearings held over the past week, some defendants remain locked up. Kimberly Brown was released from jail Wednesday. Brown, 59, is awaiting trial on charges that she stabbed to death her boyfriend, Charles Patrick, 55, at their home in April 2018. Another released this week was Antione Miller, 50, accused of raping a 14-year-old girl in September 2016. Matthew A. Bowden, 36, also was released on a $500 bail this week, reduced from $75,000. He’s accused of fleeing a police traffic stop in March, speeding through a crowded Forest Park, and striking two parked cars. When police arrested him, they seized a Mac-10 gun. Fleissig’s order bars city jails from holding inmates solely because they can’t pay bail. It responded to a lawsuit filed in January on behalf of inmates who claimed they were jailed because they were too poor to pay bail, not because they are a danger to the community or posed a flight risk. The lawsuit was filed amid widespread pressure to reform cash bail practices locally and nationwide. The city and judges quickly appealed Fleissig’s ruling. Late Thursday, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals granted a temporary stay until the inmates who filed suit have a chance to respond. Defense lawyers have lauded Fleissig’s order. And while city officials have expressed concern, Mayor Lyda Krewson’s office has

(314) 236-9887 or (618) 215-7388 Air Conditioner $29 & Coil $ 1999 Service Fee Call

starting at

Top rated by a leading consumer magazine.

(Installed)

Furnace (Installed)

American Made, American Owned.

starting at

$

1499

With Repair Service

Prices shown is to connect to existing fuel lines, electrical, ducting and piping. Other sizes and configurations can be purchased at the discounted rate shown plus an additional discount upgrade fee. Picture may not represent actual equipment shown.

To be performed during normal business hours. Not valid with any other offers. One coupon per customer. Expires 6/30/19.

UNSTOPPABLE PRODUCTS. UNBELIEVABLE DEALS. Trane systems are put through the harshest testing imaginable — all so they can run through anything. And now, you can get 0% APR for 48 months† or instant rebates up to $1,000**. We never stop finding ways to bring you products that never stop.

314-236-9887 618-215-7388 $

50 OFF

Installation Tanked Water Heater OR Tank-less

†The Wells Fargo Home Projects credit card is issued by Wells Fargo Bank N.A., an Equal Housing Lender. Special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit. The special terms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. The monthly payment for this purchase will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the promotional (special terms) period. The APR for Purchases will apply to certain fees such as a late payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. For new accounts, the APR for Purchases is 28.99%. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. This information is accurate as of 1/1/2019 and is subject to change. For current information and expiration date, call us at 1-800-431-5921. **See your independent Trane Dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers OR instant rebates up to $1,000 valid on Qualifying Equipment only. Offers vary by equipment. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where prohibited.

Expires 6/30/19

Imagine your home, totally organized! Custom Closets, Garage Cabinets, Home Offices, Pantries, Laundries, and Hobby Rooms.

40% Off Plus FrEE Installation

Walk in Closet 2018 © All Rights Reserved. Closets by Design, Inc.

Bail

also said nonviolent offenders who don’t pose a danger to the public should not languish in jail. Presiding Circuit Judge Rex Burlison said Thursday that the circuit aims to hold 700 detention hearings. He said judges are scheduled to meet on Friday to evaluate the process and submit an action plan for the weeks ahead. He also said he had confidence that judges who set bail this week “were correct in their assessment of the danger that these individuals present to the community.” Brown, the woman accused of murdering her boyfriend, was ordered to house arrest at her son’s home in Northwoods. She may only leave the house for doctor’s appointments, meetings with her lawyer and court. Miller, who is charged with raping a 14-year-old girl, must wear an ankle monitor, steer clear of his alleged victim and only leave his St. Louis home for work, court or meetings with his lawyer. Bowden, who police say fled a traffic stop and was found with a gun, has no special conditions but must show up for court July 8. Starting next week, Burlison said, the court is opening a “bond review courtroom” dedicated to detention hearings. It had been scheduled to start once Missouri Supreme Court rule changes take effect July 1, but was expedited because of the judge’s order. Some defense attorneys, meanwhile, aren’t sure the new detention hearings are constitutional. “They’re not actually holding evidentiary hearings,” said lawyer Terry Niehoff. “Many of them are just rubber-stamping them and doing the same type of bond hearing they’ve always done.” The looming July 1 deadline has left prosecutors and defense lawyers little time to prepare, Niehoff said. “Nobody,” Niehoff said, “is happy about all of this.”

PLUS TAKE AN EXTRA

15% OFF

40% off any order of $1000 or more. 30% off any order of $700 or more. On any complete Closet, Garage or Home Office. take an additional 15% off on any complete system order. Not valid with any other offer. Free installation with any complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time of purchase only. Expires 6/30/19.

Bedroom Closet

Garage Cabinets

Home Office

www.closetsbydesign.com

Call for Free Estimate

SPECIAL FINANCING for up to 18 Months!

314-230-8143 • 618-433-3159

With approved credit. Call or ask your Designer for details. Not available in all areas.

LV

Follow us

Locally Owned and Operated

Four Neighborhood Locations Serving the Greater St. Louis Area *Based on visits lasting 4 hours or more. Opt for 24-hour home care for maximum benefit Services are Paid via Private Pay or Long Term Care Insurance

Joel Currier • 314-340-8132 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Caring Companionship | Experienced & Screened Caregivers | Insured & Bonded GUTTER

®

Never Clean Your Gutters Again!

S

G

ut ter Helm

Eliminate Clogged Gutters for Good!

et

TO HONOR OF THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF D-DAY

Ro

ofin

g

America Remembers SALES Event

*

18 OFF %

+ 5% OFF

38

NO MESS INSTALLATION!

SUMMER SPECTACULAR!

0 DOWN 0 INTEREST 0 PAYMENTS

YEARS

Call for a FREE Quote

Until 2020 †

Senior & Veteran Discounts

Handles

22RAIN “ of

1 DAY!

All Active & Veteran Military Members

FOR OVER

FOR GUTTER PROTECTION

Fits Your Existing Tub Space in

/ hr

SAVE 50% OFF

3 Eliminate clogged and overflowing gutters 3 LIFETIME No Clog WARRANTY, transferable 3 Installed by trained & certified technicians 3 Approved by all major roofing manufacturers

314-376-3986 618-433-3625 *Min. purchase of 50 linear feet required, offer expires 6/30/19. Offer applies to Gutter Helmet only and must be presented at time of estimate, cannot be combined with any other offers and subject to change without notice. Void where prohibited by law. †Subject to credit approval. Interest accrues during promotional period but all interest is waived if paid in full within 12 months. Lednor is neither a broker nor a lender. Financing is provided by 3rd party lenders, under terms & conditions arranged directly between the customer and such lenders, satisfactory completion of finance documents is required. Any finance terms advertised are estimates only. †Based on an independent 2014 national marketing study. MO# F001330273 - IL #71745686 © 2019 Lednor Corporation.

Installation

618-215-7379 • 314-236-9874 Incredible Financing! Lifetime Warranty! Full Senior Discounts! *Offer available with purchase of any complete bath or shower system. Offer cannot be combined with other offers, not valid on previous sales, financing available to those who qualify, see store for details. Expires: June 30th, 2019.


06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

LOCAL

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A7

DIGEST MARYLAND HEIGHTS — Highway 141 partially reopened: A section of Highway 141 that was closed after flooding had one northbound and one southbound lane reopened to traffic Thursday afternoon, according to the Missouri Department of Transportation. All lanes of the highway were closed Wednesday in both directions, from Creve Coeur Airport Road to Creve Coeur Mill Road. The immediate source of the water was Creve Coeur Lake, which had overtopped its banks. The Howard Bend Levee District and the city of Maryland Heights pumped some of the water across the road and it was reopened by about 2 p.m. Thursday. All lanes of 141 are expected to be open at some point Friday. MoDOT said crews will continue to monitor the COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM area for flooding, and if Peggy Hargarten reacts as Sweden nearly scores against the U.S. team on Thursday at a watch party for the Women’s World floodwaters rise back onto the road it may need to be Cup at Amsterdam Tavern in St. Louis. The Americans dominated in a 2-0 victory over Sweden, the rivals that stunned them in the last Olympics. Sports, B1 closed again. JEFFERSON CITY — Pot lobbyist quits lobbying after charges: A Columbia man facing federal drug charges has stopped lobbying Missouri lawmakers, according to records filed with the Missouri Ethics Commission. According to the ethics regulator, Eapen Thampy, 35, terminated his state lobbyist registration Sunday. Thampy was indicted earlier this month on a felony marijuana distribution conspiracy charge and a felony marijuana possession charge. If convicted, he would face 10 years to life in prison for the distribution charge alone. Thampy has had a presence in the Missouri Capitol since at least 2015, the year he first registered as a lobbyist. Since then, he

has donated $26,507 to Missouri candidates and causes, according to MEC records. He pleaded not guilty to the drug charges June 6 in U.S. District Court and was later released from the Cole County Jail after federal prosecutors withdrew their motion to hold him without bail. Shawn Lee, Thampy’s attorney, declined to comment on Thampy terminating his lobbyist registration. Before Sunday, Thampy lobbied for 14 entities, some of which are players in Missouri’s burgeoning cannabis industry. Among his clients were the Missouri Hemp Association, Mo Cann Pharma LLC, Pharm Labs LLC and Students for Cannabis Agriculture.

6651 Chippewa, Ste. 315 St. Louis, MO 63109

JEFFERSON CITY — Special Olympics assesses tornadorelated losses: The leader of Special Olympics Missouri says engineers have determined that the organization’s main campus was not a total loss after it was damaged by a tornado in May. The center in Jefferson City sustained significant damage when a tornado hit the city May 22. The $18.5 million campus was damaged just six months after it had been dedicated. Damages to the campus include a roof being ripped off a gymnasium and several windows and doors being blown out. The damage prompted the organization to cancel its summer games. Special Olympics employees have moved into temporary office space.

ELLISVILLE — City honors Blues: To honor the Blues for winning the Stanley Cup, Mayor Mike Roemerman and the City Council unanimously approved legislation Wednesday to temporarily rename the city’s Bluebird Park as “Blue(s) bird Park” effective immediately and for as long as the Blues retain the Cup. The park was developed in 1974 and is at 225 Kiefer Creek Road. With half the council dressed in Blues jerseys or T-shirts for the meeting, Roemerman said Councilman Dan Duffy had suggested the name change for the park. Duffy read the entire resolution language, which states that Ellisville “is home to thousands of dedicated fans” of the Blues who have been supporting the team “throughout their storied 52-year journey to the Stanley Cup.” It says city residents and visitors to the park are encouraged to “celebrate,

honor and recognize” the team, and those opportunities will start with the city’s July 4 celebration at the park, Roemerman said. Festivities for that event will start at 6 p.m. and will include a salute to the Blues, as well as a band concert, children’s activities, a display of photo contest entries and refreshments for sale, with fireworks taking place at dusk. “There will not be much of an expense to the city for the name change since we’ll be putting up a temporary signage over the existing sign and we have our own banner maker,” Roemerman said. JEFFERSON CITY — Hawley targets tech companies: U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley is doubling down on efforts to rein in big tech companies by proposing that Facebook, Twitter and other online behemoths be required to prove they’re not using political bias to filter content.

The bill follows repeated assertions by President Donald Trump and other Republicans that big tech companies have an anticonservative bias. Tech companies have denied any bias, either left or right. The freshman lawmaker’s legislation, introduced Wednesday, would require companies to prove to the Federal Trade Commission that their algorithms and other ways of filtering content are not biased against a particular party or candidate. If companies don’t do that, they would face losing protections in current law that shield them from being sued over user posts on their sites. Internet lobbying groups swiftly slammed Hawley’s bill, arguing it would discourage websites from selffiltering content, including hate speech or extremism, by opening them up to lawsuits from blocked or censored users. KANSAS CITY — Two more indicted in duck boat disaster: A federal grand jury has indicted two more employees of a company that owns a duck boat that sank on a Missouri lake last summer, killing 17 people. Curtis Lanham, the general manager at Ride the Ducks Branson, and Charles Baltzell, the operations supervisor, were charged with misconduct and neglect in a 47-count indictment that was unsealed and made public Thursday following their initial court appearances, the U.S. attorney’s office said. The boat’s captain, Kenneth Scott McKee, was indicted previously on charges alleging that he failed to properly assess the weather and failed to tell passengers to don flotation devices as conditions worsened. The amphibious vehicle he was piloting sank at Table Rock Lake near Branson after it entered the lake despite severe weather warnings. Fourteen people survived.


LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Jack in the Box employee in Union had hepatitis BY MICHELE MUNZ

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

State health officials warned Thursday that a food worker at a Jack in the Box in Union has been diagnosed with hepatitis A, and that anyone who ordered food or drinks there on certain dates should either get vaccinated immediately or take precautions. An investigation by the Franklin County Health Department determined that

the employee worked while infectious at the restaurant, located at 101 Bourbeuse River Access, on the following dates: May 26-27, June 2-3 and June 9-10. Officials said people who consumed food or beverages at the Jack in the Box on June 9 or 10, should get vaccinated by June 23. Vaccinations will be offered at no cost at the health department, 414 East Main Street in Union, from 8 a.m.

to 7 p.m. on Friday and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. Anyone who consumed food or drink at the restaurant between May 26 and June 10 is asked to look for symptoms of infection up to 50 days after exposure; wash hands with soap and warm water frequently and thoroughly; and stay at home and contact their health care provider immediately if symptoms develop.

SPARKLING STOREWIDE

SALE! Up to 30% OFF suggested retail price! 9 Months, No-Interest

FINANCING AVAILABLE 9 or 12 MONTHS NO-INTEREST FINANCING AV AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS. MINIMUM LABOR RATES APPLY. NEW CONTRACTS ONLY. CONTACT COMMERCE BANK FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. INSTALLED MATERIALS ONLY.

Clark Floor Co.

FREE TES* restrictions apply.

Expires July 4, 2019

HRS: M-W-F 9:00 to 7:30, Tues. & Thur. 9:00 to 5:00 Sat. 9:00 to 3:00

WE HAVE OUR OWN INSTALLERS Family owned and operated for Over 38 years.

7525 S. Lindbergh

314-487-0151

TRUST AMERICA’S MOST TRUSTED Offer Offer Expires Expires 04/30/2019 07/05/19

SAY GOODBYE TO CLOGGED GUTTER RS WITH OUR NO-CLOG GUARANTEE † C • Clog-Free Design • Protective Overhang/Trim • ScratchGuard® Paint Finish • Customization Options • Professional Installation • Good Housekeeping Performance Guarantee

$99 INSTALLATION *Does not include cost of material. Expires 6/30/19. CALL NOW FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE!

314-300-9959 • 618-206-5693 636-387-4049

0%

From

$89

**

APR.

36-60 Up to 72months Months

ASK ABOUT MANUFACTURER & UTILITY COMPANIES

Per Month

$2500

* MAXIMUM COMBINED AVAILABLE REBATES

RECEIVE A FREE

25

$

Lowe’s gift card with in-home estimate**

†Guaranteed not to clog for as long as you own your home, or we will clean your gutters for free. **All participants who attend an estimated 60-90 minute in-home product consultation will receive a $25 gift card. Retail value is $25. Offer sponsored by LeafGuard Holdings Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installsseamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. If married or involved with a life partner, both cohabitating persons must attend andcomplete presentation together. Participants must have a photo ID, be able to understand English, and be legally able to enter into a contract. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 10 days of receipt of the promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer not sponsored by or promoted by Lowe’s and is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 6/30/19.

314-269-0085 • 618-690-4011 Indoor Comfort Team may not offer services in all areas where this ad is distributed. **Financing available with approved credit for qualified buyers instead of manufacturer rebates. *$2500 shown in this ad is maximum rebate, your rebate may be less or none depending on equipement selected.


NEWS

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A9

Iran From A1

the Trump administration combines a “maximum pressure” campaign of economic sanctions against Iran with a buildup of American forces in the region. On Thursday, Iran called the sanctions “economic terrorism,” insisted the drone had invaded its airspace and said it was taking its case to the United Nations in an effort to prove the U.S. was lying about the aircraft being over international waters. It accused the U.S. of “a very dangerous and provocative act.” The drone — which has a wingspan wider than a Boeing 737 — entered Iranian airspace “despite repeated radio warnings” and was shot down by Iran, acting under the U.N. Charter that allows self-defense action “if an armed attack occurs,” Iran’s U.N. Ambassador Majid Takht Ravanchi said in a letter to the U.N. secretary-general. Trump, who has said he wants to avoid war and negotiate with Iran over its nuclear ambitions, appeared to play down the significance of the shootdown. He cast it as “a new wrinkle ... a new fly in the ointment.” Yet he also said that “this country will not stand for it, that I can tell you.” Shortly before Trump spoke, Air Force Lt. Gen. Joseph Guastella, commander of U.S. Central Command air forces in the region, took a more pointed view of the shootdown in an area where Trump has blamed Iran for attacking shipping vessels. “This attack is an attempt to disrupt our ability to monitor the area following recent threats to international shipping and free flow of commerce,” he said. The Trump administration has been putting increasing economic pressure on Iran for more than a year. It reinstated punishing sanctions following Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of an international agreement intended to limit Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for relief from earlier sanctions. The other world powers who remain part of the nuclear deal have set a meeting to discuss the U.S. withdrawal and Iran’s announced plans to increase its uranium stockpile for June 28, a date far enough in the future to perhaps allow tensions to cool. Citing Iranian threats, the U.S. recently sent an aircraft carrier to the Persian Gulf region and deployed additional troops alongside the tens of thousands already there. All this has raised fears that a miscalculation or further rise in tensions could push the U.S. and Iran into an open conflict 40 years after Tehran’s Islamic Revolution. “We do not have any intention for war with any country, but we are fully ready for war,” Revolutionary Guard commander Gen. Hossein Salami said in a televised address. The paramilitary Guard, which answers only to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said it shot down the drone at 4:05 a.m. Thursday when it entered Iranian airspace near the Kouhmobarak district in southern Iran’s Hormozgan province. Kouhmobarak is about 750 miles southeast of Tehran. The first U.S. reaction was Trump’s Thursday morning tweet of six words: “Iran made a very big mistake.” But later, while meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Trump said, “I would imagine it was a general or somebody that made a mistake in shooting that drone down.” He said the American drone was unarmed and unmanned and “clearly over international waters.” It would have “made a big, big difference” if someone had been inside, he said. “I find it hard to believe it was intentional, if you want to know the truth,” Trump said. “I think that it could have been somebody who was loose and stupid that did it.” Taking issue with the U.S. version of where the attack occurred, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif tweeted that his country had retrieved sections of the military drone “in OUR territorial waters where it was shot down.” He said, “We don’t seek war but will zealously defend our skies, land & waters.” Guastella, the U.S. general, disputed that contention, telling reporters that the aircraft was 21 miles from the nearest Iranian territory and flying at high altitude when struck by a surface-to-air missile. The U.S. military has not commented on the mission of the remotely piloted aircraft that can fly higher than 10 miles in altitude and stay in the air for over 24 hours at a time. One U.S. official said there was a second American aircraft in the area that was able to get video and imagery of the drone when it was shot down.

TED SCHURTER, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER VIA AP

Mike Casey, exhibits project manager at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum, moves a newly acquired Bible that belonged to Abraham Lincoln in his final year of life into an exhibit at the museum on Thursday in Springfield, Ill. Mary Lincoln gave the Bible to family friend Noyes W. Miner in 1872 and it remained in the family’s possession until they donated it to the museum.

Illinois museum acquires a newfound Bible that was once owned by Lincoln BY JOHN O’CONNOR

Associated Press

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — A Bible given to Abraham Lincoln in the final months of the Civil War ties together the 16th president’s budding views on spirituality and his belief that God was calling him to end slavery as well as his widow’s labors to solidify his religious standing, historians say. The King James Bible was eventually given by Mary Lincoln to Noyes W. Miner, a beloved Springfield neighbor and a Baptist minister whose descendants donated it to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, which unveiled it to the public on Thursday. The 18-pound volume has a cover of hand-tooled leather and gilt lettering, and is inscribed to the president from “the Ladies of the Citizens Volunteer Hospital of Philadelphia.” Historians believe Lincoln received it on June 16, 1864, the day he visited the city for a fundraiser for the U.S. Sanitary Commission, a private agency that raised money and recruited volunteers to care for the Civil War’s sick and wounded. Lincoln had donated dozens of autographed copies of the Emancipation Proclamation to the cause. The gift is a boon for the library and museum, which has been beset in recent years by a political battle for control of the institution and its fundraising foundation’s struggle to pay off a debt of $9 million that had gone toward the purchase of Lincoln memorabilia, including a stovepipe hat of

A Bible given to Abraham Lincoln in June 1864, and that was later passed on by widow Mary Lincoln to a Springfield, Ill., neighbor, went on display Thursday at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. dubious authenticity. State historian Samuel Wheeler said the Bible binds Lincoln’s developing spiritual outlook and reliance on scripture to answer the ghastly questions posed by war with his widow’s efforts after his April 1865 assassination to have him remembered as spiritual rather than as the religious skeptic he had been earlier in life. “During the Civil War, there is an evolution that takes place in Mr. Lincoln’s religious thoughts. He is searching for God’s purpose. He’s redefining his relationship with his maker, and he’s trying to figure out what is God’s purpose in this war,” Wheeler said. “He believed that God was using him to end American slavery.” It’s unlikely that Lincoln, who is known to have carried a New

Testament and kept handy a daily devotional, used the “presentation” Bible for regular meditation, Wheeler said. But multicolored ribbon markers are distributed throughout the book, which Mary Lincoln said her husband had placed when she gave Miner the book in 1872. That it ended up in Miner’s hands was likely a strategic, as well as neighborly,move,Wheeler said. Mary Lincoln was outraged when her husband’s former law partner, William Herndon, started noting in essays, lectures and finally a biography that the martyred president was an atheist. Miner was among close friends who expended considerable energy refuting that notion, writing at one point, “I never heard a word fall from his lips that gave me the re-

motest idea that his mind was ever tinctured with infidel sentiments.” The Bible was last inherited in 1994 by Miner’s great-greatgreat-grandson, William Prescott Wolcott of San Francisco. Its power as a tangible link to history was evident in the way an airline employee became teary-eyed while viewing it as it went through a private security screening while en route to Illinois, said Ian Hunt, the institution’s acquisitions chief. Landing such an intimate Lincoln artifact can help soften the edges of some of the facility’s public-relations struggles, particularly one that technically involves not the library and museum, but its fundraising foundation. The foundation announced last year it must pay off by this fall a $9 million debt from a 2007 loan to buy artifacts or face selling some of the collection. The cause has been hampered by evidence that secret efforts to authenticate a stovepipe hat purportedly belonging to Lincoln failed. Fallout over that revelation prompted executive director Alan Lowe to sever a consulting contract he had with the foundation. “I hope that people know throughout the nation and the world that we are very dedicated to what we do in terms of preserving the legacy and presenting the legacy of Abraham Lincoln — that we are good custodians of the materials that we that we oversee, that we take care of them, that we utilize them in the proper ways to teach and to inspire,” Lowe said.

Man’s serial killer boast doubted in Illinois case BY MICHAEL TARM

Associated Press

CHICAGO — A man on trial for killing a visiting scholar from China searched the internet for basic instructions for committing murder before the woman vanished, which one expert on serial killers says may be a sign that his boast to have killed 12 other people is false. Brendt Christensen’s claim came in conversations recorded by his girlfriend, Terra Christensen Bullis, who he may have been trying to impress by saying he was a serial killer. Bullis, the prosecution’s star witness who testified at the federal trial for a second day Thursday, wore an FBI wire over several weeks, once becoming so nervous recording her boyfriend-turned-suspect that she fainted. Christensen, a former University of Illinois doctoral student who is now 29, described to her how he lured Yingying Zhang into his car on June 9, 2017, as she waited for a bus and then forced the 26-year-old into his apartment. There, he raped, choked and stabbed Zhang, then beat her to death with a baseball bat and decapitated her. “Do you think you might be the next successful serial killer?” Bullis asks him in one conversation. He answers: “I already am.” He calls Zhang victim “No. 13” and says he’s been killing since around 2001 when he was 19. Christensen has pleaded not

guilty to kidnapping resulting in death, though his lawyer told jurors during opening statements he did kill Zhang. He faces a possible death sentence if convicted. For someone who purports to be a seasoned killer going back to his days as an undergraduate in physics in Wisconsin, Christensen devoted lots of time researching the topic leading up to Zhang’s disappearance. He downloaded an article,“Beyond the Grave —Understanding Human Decomposition,” and a paper on “The Criminal Mind of Serial Killers,” and he visited an “abduction 101” fetish forum. “The contents of Christensen’s internet search history demonstrate his lack of knowledge of basic things that proficient serial killers with high body counts would know,” says Enzo Yaksic, a Boston-based researcher who has studied serial killers for over 15 years. But Christensen does share some traits with convicted serial killers. He targeted a stranger, say prosecutors. Sexual fantasies underpinned his desire to kill and he idolized serial killers in history, especially Ted Bundy. A recent study co-authored by Yaksic noted serial killers often share a fondness for violent fictional characters. Christensen’s favorite novel, prosecutors say, was “American Psycho,” about a young professional who kills at night. A 2015 FBI report on serial killers said 70% percent were highly stressed before they began killing.

In 2016, Christensen’s marriage was unraveling.The once straightA student began getting Fs in all his classes and he abandoned his quest for a doctorate. He also shared a longing for infamy, texting two weeks before Zhang went missing that,“I don’t care how I will be remembered, just that I am.” Choking is also a marker for some serial killers, said Yaksic, because it satisfies their craving for control. Christensen told Bullis he choked Zhang for 10 minutes. “She was stronger than any victim I’ve ever had,” he says, adding that some of his victims “were gone in one punch.” Killers have been known to exaggerate their number of victims, possibly in a bid to become yet more notorious. Before he was executed in 1989, Bundy claimed to have killed 100 women after saying it was 30. The claims often can’t be proven or disproven, so it’s likely no one will ever be able to say with complete certainty Christensen is lying. Prosecutors dangled the possibility Christensen killed before during opening arguments last week. Under most circumstances, mention of previous, unproven crimes would lead to a mistrial. But prosecutors seem to want to illustrate, not that Christensen actually killed others, but that homicidal fantasies motivated his killing of Zhang, whose body was never found. Agent Andrew Huckstadt told jurors this week that the FBI con-

tinues to investigate Christensen’s claims. He said that acknowledging they’ve been unable to corroborate them is “not the same as saying it’s completely impossible.” The investigation likely involves checking if Christensen’s DNA matches DNA found at the scenes of unsolved homicides in Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, and got his degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison before moving to the Champaign-Urbana in 2013. Government filings say there’s evidence of at least one previous assault. They say a woman, referred to as “M.D.,” told the FBI after Christensen’s arrest the she met him for a date in 2013. After meeting for coffee, she says he drove her to a cemetery, choked her and sexually assaulted her. Defense lawyers say Christensen was in a drunken stupor when he spoke about other victims and that it isn’t true. They’ve also denied M.D.’s allegations. Actual serial killers, explained Yaksic, demonstrated more patience than Christensen, who only happened upon Zhang and pulled up to her during the day along streets lined with surveillance cameras. Yaksic says he thinks there’s only “a minuscule chance” Christensen killed before, categorizing him as “wannabe serial killer.” “Wannabes,” he said,“are often compelled by a mixture of emotions and hubris ... aspects of their personality that lead to their apprehension before they come close to achieving their goals.”


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , M 1 8 17 8• FrIDAy • 06.21.2019 A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAy • 06.21.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PrESIDENT & PUBLISHEr

GILBERT BAILON EDITOr •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITOrIAL PAGE EDITOr

Goaded into a fight

STAFF SGT. RAMON A. ADELAN/U.S. AIR FORCE VIA AP

Iran’s Revolutionary Guard shot down a U.S. RQ-4 Global Hawk on Thursday amid heightened tensions between Tehran and Washington.

Trump is edging closer toward war with Iran — for all the wrong reasons.

S

ome wars are necessary and unavoidable. A U.S. war against Iran doesn’t even remotely qualify as a just cause. President Donald Trump’s hawkish advisers are trying hard to manipulate him into launching yet another Persian Gulf war, one whose consequences would make the eight-year war in Iraq pale in comparison. As with all things Trump, his massive ego plays a big role in the steps he now contemplates following Iran’s downing of a U.S. military drone. Would he actually immerse the United States in yet another debilitating and unwinnable war simply to assuage his own ego? Of course he would. Does his newly launched bid for reelection in 2020 influence his decision-making? Of course it does. The president is not rational. And that’s why this situation is so dangerous. Iranian and U.S. leaders spent Thursday arguing over whether the drone was in neutral territory or had violated Iran’s airspace. So far, it appears Iran was in the wrong — just as the United States was in the wrong in 1988 when the USS Vincennes shot down an Iranian passenger jet inside Iran’s territorial airspace, killing all 290 aboard. Iran exercised uncharacteristic restraint then, as the United States should now. Both sides have major grievances that previously might have warranted military confrontation. The CIA engineered a coup in 1953 that ousted Iran’s democratically elected prime minister. Iran engineered multiple kidnappings of U.S. hostages in Beirut during the

1980s. Iran’s heavily armed proxy militias are deployed in Syria, Lebanon, Gaza and Yemen, wreaking havoc. If Trump decides to escalate this confrontation, those same militias have the ability to ignite a regional conflagration. In other words, catastrophe lurks at every turn. Trump ominously tweeted Thursday that “Iran made a very big mistake.” But he also has made big mistakes. His first was naming John Bolton as his national security adviser. Bolton was a chief architect behind the erroneous “weapons of mass destruction” argument that led to the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq. No such weapons were found, but more than 4,000 American service members lost their lives in the prolonged occupation prompted by Bolton’s blunder. Another Trump mistake was unilaterally canceling the multinational accord that suspended Iran’s uraniumenrichment program. Even though Trump heavily criticized the accord throughout his 2016 campaign, he now is using Iran’s resumption of enrichment to argue that it has violated the accord — thus another provocation for U.S. military retaliation. A president who campaigned on extricating America from its multiple military policing roles in the region, and who insisted in December that “the United States cannot continue to be the policeman of the world,” appears poised to take a swan dive into a Persian Gulf hornet’s nest — for all the wrong reasons.

When enemies become allies Pride organizers letting cops march is a sign of progress, not capitulation.

O

rganizers of St. Louis’ annual Pride parade have wisely reversed their demand that uniformed law enforcement officers stay out of the event. Pride St. Louis had previously told city and county police they weren’t welcome to march in uniform in the June 30 parade, as they have in recent years, due to “sensitivities” about this year’s 50th anniversary of the Stonewall police raid and subsequent riots in New York City, which helped create the modern gay-rights movement. That painful history is real, and no one denies that some officers today are still abusive or unresponsive to gay citizens. But tarring every officer with that brush — even those eager to march as allies — would have displayed exactly the kind of intolerance the movement has worked to end. As we pointed out in an editorial last week, the very fact that police today want to march in the parade, in uniform, shows how successful that movement has been. Such a display of support from cops would have been unthinkable on June 28, 1969, when New York police violently stormed the Stonewall Inn, a Greenwich Village gay bar, enforcing draconian laws against same-sex dancing and wielding other cudgels of oppression. The days of rioting and decades of work and change that followed built today’s still-imperfect but far more accepting landscape, in which same-sex marriage is fully legal and routine. An openly gay man is making a serious presidential bid. We know from the flurry of

impassioned reaction from both sides to our earlier editorial that there is deep division within the activist community over the question of letting uniformed police march. Pride St. Louis, assessing that divide, on Tuesday came down on the side of welcoming them, a reversal of its previously announced position. “Many people in our community still feel unsafe and targeted and marginalized by the systems that are here to protect us,” said Pride official Jordan Braxton. But organizers ultimately decided that “it’s an opportunity for change.” Angry dissent, however, surfaced from activists who want to keep the original ban in place. Alderman Megan Green, D-15th Ward, savaged the change as a capitulation to “the comfort of white cisgender folks,” providing a timely reminder that intolerance and exclusion aren’t solely the purview of the political right. As that debate raged, police — perhaps some of the very officers Green and others want to exclude from expressing themselves in the parade — tracked and arrested an Overland man who’d allegedly emailed Pride organizers a threat to come to the parade and “kill every gay person I can.” He won’t be doing that, because he’s in jail on terrorist-threat charges. To the extent that Stonewall is a continuing struggle today, what says more about who’s winning than the sight of uniformed police officers participating in a Pride parade? Pride organizers should stand by their latest decision and welcome them as allies.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

St. Louis celebrities should come home more often The Stanley Cup playoff run brought with it an abundance of civic pride for the city of St. Louis. We saw our beloved (albeit former) residents-turnedcelebrities return to St. Louis to cheer on our Blues. The two who seemed to grab the most attention were Jon Hamm and Jenna Fischer. Both stars were born and raised in St. Louis and both are, for lack of a better term, expats. That’s the problem. We waste our time ogling over those many celebrities who once lived here but have since moved far away, not even bothering to maintain a residence in the Mound City. I am not writing to tear down those (former) St. Louisans but rather to call for them to come home. St. Louis deserves much more than biannual visits for sporting events. Will Kernell • St. Louis

Old Man River slighted in Blues celebration coverage I really enjoyed watching the Blues’ season, Stanley Cup win and all the celebrations. I may have missed this, but television news channels kept talking about the celebration on the Arch grounds and the Arch, but I don’t recall them mentioning the Mississippi River. I think a very important part of their description of who and where we are was left out. Last summer our family took a downtown riverboat cruise at the Arch and a visitor on the boat from Utah asked me if this was the Missouri River. I told him this was the Mississippi, but the Missouri flows into it upriver by Alton. The Mississippi River has been around a lot longer than St. Louis, the Arch and the Blues, but it should not be left out of the complete picture. Bob Eilerman • Bridgeton

Laws and cooperation, not rhetoric, are key to security It is time we put an end to boasts and threats. We understand and know the consequences of bullying as do farmers, financiers, diplomats and voters. We cannot build for the future with meaningless rhetoric and sales pitches and “deals” that never happen. Our tax dollars should not be a piggy bank for foreign interests. We need the support and cooperation of other nations. We should not allow our sons and daughters to be used as skin in the game of national and international policymaking. This country’s priorities need to maintain and incorporate governmental processes to ensure fair and equitable individual, communitywide and national security based on laws, not on the arrogance or authority of one person. And voters need to do all this in a thoughtful respectful manner toward each other as we continue the long, deliberative process before us. Beverly D. Rehfeld • University City

Stop portraying ‘pro-life’ movement in derisive way We are weary of the Post-Dispatch and its editorial writers for their derisive allusion to so-called pro-lifers. The liberal media constantly attacks pro-lifers as being “pro-birth,” as if the mother is abandoned after childbirth. In our years of being active in the movement against the termination of life in the womb, we are joined by many support organizations, including Birthright, Our Lady’s Inn, Our Little

Haven and Covenant House. One of the major societal problems today is that we project a certain persona on those we disagree with. Tom and Doreen Gilliam • Ballwin

Missouri’s drug bust policy needed to combat epidemic U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once described how states “serve as a laboratory and try novel social and economic experiments without risk to the rest of the country.” States have done this in the area of civil forfeiture, which allows police to seize the proceeds of drug sales. Statutes vary from state to state. The benefit is that, if a particular provision works well in one state, it can be adopted in others. The problem is that journalists may use evidence from other states to attack the practice in Missouri. In “Taken: Despite reforms, burden still heavy on owners of seized property” (June 16 ), the authors cite statistics and horror stories from California, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Ohio and Texas. Then they suggest Missouri’s statute is flawed. The only Missouri facts they cite is that $9 million was seized statewide and “in St. Louis, law enforcement agencies in two counties each seized $1 million under civil asset forfeiture laws in 2017.” Only one of the two mentioned counties, St. Charles, is part of the St. Louis metropolitan area. The other is Phelps County, and it has something in common with St. Charles County. Both are on major east-west interstate highways used by drug traffickers to transport drugs and return proceeds to the drug cartels, who are, no doubt, applauding efforts to restrict law enforcement efforts. If we think taking their drug money is an injustice, those families who have lost loved ones to the opioid epidemic must be wondering about our priorities. Steve Ehlmann • St. Charles St. Charles County executive

Avoiding future floods requires giving river wide berth As this season’s floodwaters slowly recede and cleanup begins, this is definitely not the time to take our eyes off the ball. Any relief should be tempered by the certainty of future floods just as large and coming sooner than we would like. Yet before the mud has even dried, policymakers are poised to make the problem worse. When the folks upstream start asking for “flood control,” what they really mean is “flood displacement.” At the bottom of the Missouri River is exactly where that displaced water ends up. But our state and federal representatives insist on pushing the Corps of Engineers to get more water downstream more quickly. Did anybody in Jefferson City or Washington, D.C., bother to consider the impact on St. Charles and St. Louis County? Can we please listen to professionals who understand rivers and weather? We should be figuring out ways of preserving economic activity near rivers by giving those rivers a buffer. Instead of treating a milewide channel system as a sacrifice, think of that buffer as a less-expensive way to preserve several other miles of farmland and towns. As a bonus, that approach preserves wildlife and recreation at no extra cost. Seventy years of river mismanagement has finally run its course. Ward Silver • St. Charles Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


06.21.2019 • FRIDAY • M 1

75 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

OTHER VIEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11

WE NEED A STRENGTHENED CHINA • China, waging its seventh year of war, stands in its greatest danger at this moment. We who lend-lease to nearly

all the free world, and who like to think of ourselves as givers rather than needers of assistance, now depend utterly upon our Asian ally for the major Far Eastern bases from which our planes can fly. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Israel builds the president a Potemkin village Other nations know how to manage the vanity-license-plate presidency. Trump Heights. Netanyahu, the U.S. ambassador and other dignitaries met on a barren patch in the middle of nowhere, rolled out a strip of artificial turf and Finally, the long-antic- erected a sign with the U.S. ipated Trump Middle East president’s name just as he Peace Plan is taking shape. likes it — in gilded letters. Naturally, Trump was Under terms of the propleased. “Thank you PM @ posal, President Donald Netanyahu and the State Trump agrees that Israel of Israel for this great gets whatever it wants: honor!” Trump tweeted. all of Jerusalem, all of the But it quickly emerged Golan Heights, the West Bank, Gaza — you name it. that the Israeli government had approved no such In exchange, Israel agrees plan, had dedicated no to name a village after funds to it and had estabTrump. lished no specific location. And not even a real The cabinet resolution village. More like a sign says the place will be called marking where a village Trump Heights “if it is might be. Someday. founded.” This week, Prime MinThe founder of the ister Benjamin Netanyahu Golan caucus in Israel’s decided to thank Trump Knesset called the whole for supporting Israel’s thing an “Israbluff” and claims to the occupied territories by naming a vil- compared it to a welllage after him in the Golan known Israeli satire. The Heights: Ramat Trump, or Haaretz newspaper called DANA MILBANK Washington Post

Trump Heights “a mythological town that exists only in the imagination.” Now, a week after we learned that the “friendship tree” the French president gave Trump has died, we discover that the Israeli prime minister has given Trump a Potemkin village? This was a shrewd move by Netanyahu, who correctly recognized that Trump can be bought with just a bit of ego-stroking. No substantive concessions necessary! North Korea’s dictator sends Trump love letters and is allowed to keep his nuclear program. Saudi Arabia spends millions of dollars at Trump properties and is allowed to buy U.S. weapons and to murder a Washington Post contributing columnist. Japan’s prime minister nominates Trump for a Nobel Prize and is largely spared in the trade war. Trump is running what might be called the vanitylicense-plate presidency. He gives medals to people

he likes (Arthur Laffer on Wednesday, Tiger Woods before that) and pardons other favorites (former sheriff Joe Arpaio). Foreign governments and lobbyists pour money into his hotel and golf properties. And he has attempted to turn various holidays — Veterans Day, Memorial Day, D-Day and now Independence Day — into celebrations of him. Visiting Mount Vernon with the French president, Trump reportedly said George Washington should have “put his name on it,” because “you’ve got to put your name on stuff or no one remembers you.” Unfortunately for Trump, people are currently taking his name off things — six Trump Place buildings in New York have all shed his name — so Netanyahu’s gesture should be particularly welcome. At the naming ceremony, Trump’s ambassador to Israel, David Friedman, announced that the designation was “well deserved” by Trump.

Friedman boasted that the only other sitting president to have an Israeli town named for him was Harry S. Truman (but Truman’s town actually exists). Israel’s resolution proposing Trump Heights specifically mentioned the desire to strengthen ties with the United States. (Like Trump, it makes no distinction between things that honor him and things that honor the United States.) Therefore, it might wish to construct Trump Heights with features that will please its eponymous president. Netanyahu should subsidize construction of a Trump International Hotel and Spa at Trump Heights and commit to funneling enough official Israeli government business to the property to keep it at 90 percent occupancy. The prime minister should also launch construction of the Trump National Golf Club at Trump Heights, with a bylaws provision stipulating that Trump

will be declared winner of its annual golf tournament every year. Merchants in Trump Heights will be required to sell Trump wine and any remaining odd lots of Trump mattresses and steaks and Ivanka Trump clothing. Netanyahu had better hurry, lest others outflatter him. I hear China is already negotiating an agreement under which the United States would import all Chinese goods tariff-free in exchange for China naming a section of its Great Wall the Donald J. Trump Great Wall of China. And Iran has already floated a plan under which the United States would allow it to develop nuclear weapons. In exchange, Tehran’s landmark structure, Milad Tower, would be renamed Trump Tower. Royalties to the Trump Organization would be paid — in barrels of cash. Dana Milbank @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post

Read a little and learn a lot over the summer Books offer diverse experiences for children outside of school. BY SAMUEL YANG

vice president for public affairs and a veteran of the Clinton administration, told me. He vigorously defended both the Clinton and Obama presidencies, dismissing as “preposterous” the idea that they were failures. Nonetheless, he added: “We have to own some of the mistakes of the New Democrats” of the Clinton era. Among them, he said, was underestimating the impact of trade liberalization on a significant number of blue-collar workers and “the speed and ferocity with which technology would decimate certain sectors of the American workforce.” A particularly negative effect of this was the “concentration of opportunity” in certain regions as large parts of the country were left behind. “We need to be working to tame capitalism at this moment because it is not functioning well,” he concluded. “We need to do in this century what the progressives and New Dealers did in the last century.” No wonder that Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., is getting far better reviews from Third Wayers these days than she did a few years ago. As some of the sharp-edged comments from Cowan and others about the dangers of an inward-looking (and Twitter-inspired) Democratic debate suggested, the party’s ideological tensions have not been miraculously healed. Most here still leaned toward presidential candidates other than Warren and, especially, Sanders. But Bennett’s mea culpa pointed toward a new, implicit party consensus: You don’t have to be a democratic socialist to believe that today’s capitalism needs a spell in the repair shop.

Many people have nanas, grannies or mee-maws. I have a poh-poh. That’s the Cantonese term for a maternal grandmother, and I came across it recently while reading Roseanne Thong’s storybook, “Round Is a Mooncake,” to preschoolers at the Missouri History Museum. Thinking of my young listeners, I hesitated mid-sentence. I told myself that I was concerned about confusing them. “Poh-poh” is pronounced using one of Cantonese’s nine “tones,” potentially a big leap for new readers. But the real reason I paused was more personal: I got nervous. As an Asian-American, I’m not used to being a main character, to seeing such treasured things in a picture book. Calling attention to cultural differences like poh-pohs and mooncakes often causes discomfort, and I paused because I was scared. During a team training with Julius Anthony, the president of St. Louis Black Authors of Children’s Literature, my History Museum coworkers and I heard some statistics that put those feelings in perspective. Children’s literature with multicultural characters, content and/or authors is a growing but still underrepresented slice of the publishing industry. For many kids of color, it can be easier to find books about animals or cars than to find books with characters that look like them. That matters for kids of all backgrounds, because it shapes how they see, learn about and navigate the world. As we head into the summer months, parents and educators rightfully worry about the learning loss that happens while kids are out of school. But we need to make sure not to overlook another kind of learning loss, one in which kids miss out on the fullness and richness of the world around them. Fortunately, summer is the perfect time for exciting new experiences and exposures — and I’m not talking about road trips and resorts. Right here in St. Louis, there are countless opportunities to build cultural literacy. For example, the children’s library at the History Clubhouse is full of books with styles, languages and cultural references that are new and exhilarating. On Thursday, we’ll have a morning of activities built around “Milo’s Museum,” a book about the importance of diverse representation in museums. Of course, teaching your kids about the world through books also builds reading literacy. During our training, Julius Anthony explained that literacy starts with skills like viewing and listening. Before kids read, they see and hear. They learn from playing and exploring. That’s probably why, despite my nervousness, none of the kids noticed when I took a deep breath and said “poh-poh” in what was essentially a different language. They were wrapped up in Grace Lin’s big, bright, beautiful illustrations in their lap. As their teachers and parents sat and talked with them, we deciphered the similarities and differences between the things in the book and the things around them. These are important conversations to have with kids, and all of us — educators, family members, mentors and more — have to be intentional about them. Whether it’s summer vacation or a school night, take time to read. Don’t shy away from books that have unfamiliar characters and circumstances. Help kids recognize and build common ground while celebrating differences. And if that sounds like a lot, don’t worry — your museums, libraries and other public spaces are eager to help. That goes for everyone from our newest readers to our wisest nanas, grannies and poh-pohs.

E.J. Dionne @EJDionne Copyright The Washington Post

Samuel Yang was a museum educator with the Early Childhood and Family Programs team at the Missouri History Museum.

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Bill Clinton, accompanied by sixth grade students from Thomas Jefferson Middle School in Arlington, Va., in late 1995, discusses spending bills he vetoed.

So much for a rising tide Democrats seem to have learned from past mistakes: Today’s capitalism is in need of a tuneup. places, but falls short everywhere else.” This is broadly what you might expect from a group that has long E.J. DIONNE battled the party’s democratic socialist Washington Post wing and, in particular, supporters of Bernie Sanders. The Vermont senator’s loyalists return the favor, denouncing Third Wayers as a coterie of corporate Democrats — especially, of course, on Former Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., argued that Democrats need to Twitter. But what came later in Cowan’s pay far more attention to rural America if they ever want to take back the Sen- speech may have been the larger and more important revelation: that the ate. Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., urged group is not offering “a warmed-over his party to be more open to people of 1990s centrism.” Cowan’s critique of faith. Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., what were, after all, the years of Bill spoke for new members of Congress Clinton’s presidency was not hedged: from swing districts in insisting that “the loudest voices” are not represen- “Back then,” he said, “we placed too much trust in the market’s ability to tative of voters “working two or three provide a reliable and realistic path to jobs.” prosperity for most Americans. In the And Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, last 30 years, we have seen the impact D-N.M., had this advice: “Don’t keep of globalization and automation on reacting to (President) Trump. Show there are things we can run on and win our workers. And it is clear that a rising tide will not lift all boats.” on.” Those sentences speak to a quiet Thus went the counsel of the Demorevolution in the thinking of Democratic pragmatists of Third Way, a crats across the board since the 2008 leading middle-of-the-road think tank at a meeting in Charleston, South economic downturn, and especially since Trump’s election. It can fairly Carolina, this week that was, in part, a running critique of the baleful influ- be described as a leftward movement ence of Twitter on the political debate. in the entire party. Sanders is often Jim Kessler and Lanae Erickson, senior credited with moving the party left, officials of the group, devoted separate and his proposals such as Medicare for All and free college (which came presentations to showing that Democratic voters who use Twitter regularly under sharp criticism here this week) have entered the mainstream converare much more left-wing than the sation. But the language of “left” and party’s primary electorate as a whole. Democrats, in Third Way’s view, could “center” is imperfect in capturing the change. The new attitude toward the tweet themselves into oblivion. economy’s shortcomings is as much Jon Cowan, the group’s president, about the realities on the ground as it brought the point home by warning is about any ideological awakening. that outside “cobalt blue districts and “After 2016, it was imperative for states, we can’t afford a strategy aimed mainly at the furthest-left Democrats. everyone in the party to sit back and ask: What have we done wrong?” … The danger is that we pursue an approach that runs up the score in blue Matt Bennett, Third Way’s executive


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

U.S. SENATE

Suit against artist Chihuly is tossed

Saudi arms sales blocked

SEATTLE — A federal judge in Seattle has thrown out a lawsuit by a man who claimed to have contributed to paintings by the glass artist Dale Chihuly. Michael Moi worked for years as a handyman at Chihuly’s studio, for which he was paid. But he claimed Chihuly owed him more than $20 million for work he did on 285 paintings from 1999 to 2014. Chihuly said he had no recollection or record of Moi working on any paintings. U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik ruled Thursday that Moi had failed to demonstrate what his contributions to any paintings were or that he should be considered a co-author of them. Moi said Chihuly promised to “take care” of him for his contributions to the paintings.

President vows to veto measures, saying they would abandon allies SUSANNAH GEORGE

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Senate on Thursday voted to block the Trump administration from selling arms to Saudi Arabia, launching a new challenge to President Donald Trump’s alliance with the country amid rising tensions in the Middle East. Trump has promised to veto the measures. The White House said stopping the sales “would send a message that the United States is abandoning its partners and allies at the very moment when threats to them are increasing.”

While all the resolutions of disapproval are likely to pass the House, supporters fell well short of a veto-proof margin. Two of the resolutions passed with 53 votes, while another group was approved narrowly, with 51 votes. Overturning a veto requires a two-thirds majority in both the House and Senate. Overall, there were 22 resolutions, one for each of the individual sales. But most of the resolutions were considered as a package to avoid tying up the Senate with lengthy debates over each of them. Seven Republicans broke with Trump to reject at least some of the arms sales: Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, Mike Lee of Utah, Jerry Moran of Kansas, Lisa

Murkowski of Alaska, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Todd Young of Indiana. The votes came against the backdrop of heightened U.S. tensions with Iran. Iran shot down a U.S. drone Thursday, a move Trump declared “a very big mistake.” Congressional leaders received a closed-door briefing on the situation at the Capitol and were invited to the White House in the afternoon the meet with Trump. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo cited threats from Iran when declaring an emergency to approve the weapons sales in May. The Saudis have recently faced a number of attacks from Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen. “To reject these sales at this time and under these circumstances is

to reward recent Iranian aggression and to encourage further Iranian escalation,” said Sen. Jim Risch of Idaho, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Risch added that blocking the sale would also “encourage miscalculation on the part of Iranians which will be disastrous.” The arms sales, worth an estimated $8 billion, included precision guided munitions, other bombs and ammunition and aircraft maintenance support. Opposition in Congress to close U.S. Saudi ties escalated after the killing of U.S.-based columnist Jamal Khashoggi by agents of the kingdom last year. But a small group of lawmakers has been voicing concern about the Saudi-led coalition’s war in Yemen for years.

Putin pessimistic, but willing to talk MOSCOW — Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that he’s open for a meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump but doesn’t expect quick progress on easing tensions with Washington. The Russian leader also strongly warned the United States against using force on Iran, saying it would trigger a “catastrophe.” Trump said he would meet with Putin on the sidelines of next week’s G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, but the Kremlin said the White House hasn’t formally requested the meeting. Speaking during a live marathon call-in show that lasted more than four hours, Putin said he’s ready to hold more talks with Trump. “Dialogue is always good and necessary,” Putin said. “If the American side shows interest in that, we are naturally ready for a dialogue as much as our partners are.” BRIEFLY TRADE DEAL: President Donald Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sought to demonstrate a united front Thursday in the uphill effort to get a replacement for the North American Free Trade Agreement over the finish line. IMPEACHMENT: Four Democrats have joined a slowly growing group calling for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump, including Illinois Rep. Jan Schakowsky, a close ally of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. UK POLITICS: Either Boris Johnson or Jeremy Hunt, the two finalists selected Thursday in a race to lead the governing Conservative Party, will be Britain’s next prime minister. The winner of the runoff is due to be announced the week of July 22. CONGRESSIONAL PAY: Top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell says the GOP-controlled chamber won’t go along with a bipartisan plan by House leaders to have lawmakers receive their first cost-of-living pay increase in a decade. McConnell said in a statement Thursday that “we’re not doing a COLA adjustment in the Senate,” a position that likely kills the $4,500 pay raise. NORTH SUED: The National Rifle Association has sued its former president, Oliver North, for what it called “conduct harmful to the NRA” as turmoil that was exposed publicly when North resigned two months ago continued Thursday when the organization also turned against its longtime chief lobbyist. The lawsuit said he “departed office after a widely publicized, failed coup attempt.” NAVY SEAL TRIAL: A witness called to testify against a decorated Navy SEAL charged with murder said Thursday that he killed the victim, a bombshell admission he described as an act of mercy for the wounded Islamic State fighter. Special Operator 1st Class Corey Scott said he asphyxiated the adolescent prisoner in Iraq two years ago after Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher unexpectedly stabbed him. Prosecutors have alleged that the stabbing killed the boy. — Associated Press

ELIZABETH ROBERTSON, THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER VIA AP

STORMS WREAK HAVOC AND LEAVE 2 DEAD ACROSS SOUTHERN, EASTERN US Storms were blamed for two deaths and left hundreds of thousands of people without power across the southern United States, forecasters said. Fallen trees caused damage along a line from Texas to Alabama overnight and into Thursday morning, the national Storm Prediction Center reported. Similar damage continued Thursday in parts of Georgia, the Carolinas and southeast Virginia. Straight-line winds of up to 85 mph damaged roofs Wednesday in the northeast Texas city of Greenville. The rain also caused travel problems, flooding commuter train stations and forcing service to be suspended between Philadelphia and New Jersey. Above, a man waits for rescuers Thursday after overnight thunderstorms flooded much of Westville, N.J.

Kim awaits desired US response North Korean leader talks denuclearization with China’s Xi KEN MORITSUGU

Associated Press

BEIJING — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, meeting in Pyongyang with Chinese President Xi Jinping, said Thursday that his country is waiting for a desired response in stalled nuclear talks with the United States. “North Korea would like to remain patient, but it hopes the relevant party will meet halfway with North Korea to explore resolution plans that accommodate each other’s reasonable concerns,”

he said, according to Chinese state broadcaster CCTV. Xi’s trip to North Korea, the first by a Chinese president in 14 years, raises the possibility that China could help break a monthslong impasse in talks between the U.S. and North Korea over the North’s nuclear weapons. Describing the issue as “highly complex and sensitive,” Xi said his government is willing to play a constructive role in the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. “The international community expects the U.S. and North Korea to continue to talk and achieve results,” he said, according to CCTV. The summit comes as both countries are locked in separate disputes with the United States —

‘Inhumanity’ cited at border facility Lawyers say children held without adequate food, water, sanitation CEDAR ATTANASIO, GARANCE BURKE AND MARTHA MENDOZA

Associated Press

EL PASO, Texas — A traumatic and dangerous situation is unfolding for some 250 infants, children and teens locked up for up to 27 days without adequate food, water and sanitation, according to a legal team that interviewed dozens of children at a Border Patrol station in Texas. The attorneys who recently visited the facility near El Paso told The Associated Press that three girls, ages 10 to 15, said they had been taking turns watching over a sick 2-year-old boy because there was no one else to look after him.

When the lawyers saw the boy, he wasn’t wearing a diaper and had wet his pants, and his shirt was smeared in mucus. They said at least 15 children at the facility had the flu, and some were kept in medical quarantine. The children told lawyers that they were fed uncooked frozen food or rice and had gone weeks without bathing or a clean change of clothes at the facility in Clint, about 25 miles southeast of El Paso. “In my 22 years of doing visits with children in detention I have never heard of this level of inhumanity,” said Holly Cooper, an attorney who represents detained youth. “Seeing our country at this crucible moment where we have forsaken children and failed to see them as human is hopefully a wake up for this country to move toward change.”

China over trade and North Korea over its nuclear weapons. With Xi due to meet President Donald Trump next week in Japan, analysts say Kim may ask the Chinese leader to pass on a message that could revive the talks with the U.S. Xi’s two-day state visit to North Korea, announced just three days ago, began with the synchronized pomp of all major events in the country. About 10,000 cheering people and a 21-gun salute greeted Xi and senior Chinese officials at an arrival ceremony at Pyongyang’s airport. The CCTV evening news showed Xi and his wife Peng Liyuan waving to the crowd after emerging from their Air China

plane, then being greeted by Kim and his wife, Ri Sol Ju before receiving flowers and watching goose-stepping troops march by. The crowd stood in tight formations, waving flowers and chanting slogans to welcome Xi. Other people lined the roads and cheered from overpasses as Xi’s motorcade traveled to central Pyongyang. Standing in the car, they waved to crowds as they rode to the square where the embalmed bodies of Kim’s grandfather and father, the first two leaders of North Korea, lie in state. The Korean Central News Agency, which is an arm of the North Korean government, said newspapers in the country are praising Xi’s visit.

Supreme Court upholds cross on public land in Maryland BY JESSICA GRESKO

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A 40-foottall, World War I memorial cross can continue to stand on public land in Maryland, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday in an important decision about the use of religious symbols in American life. The justices said preserving a long-standing religious monument is very different from allowing the building of a new one. And the court concluded that the nearly 100-year-old memorial’s presence on a grassy highway median doesn’t violate the Constitution’s prohibition on the government favoring one religion over others. Seven of the court’s nine justices sided with the cross’ backers, a lineup that crossed ideological lines. The case had been closely watched for its potential impact on other monuments. Defend-

ers of the cross in Bladensburg, a suburb of the nation’s capital, had argued that a ruling against them could doom hundreds of war memorials that use crosses to commemorate soldiers who died. But the case was also seen as an indication of how far the court’s conservative majority would be willing to go in approving of religious symbols in public life. In the end, a majority of the justices signed on to a relatively narrow ruling, declining to go as far as they had been urged to by some of the cross’ defenders. Justice Samuel Alito wrote in a majority opinion for himself and four colleagues that “when time’s passage imbues a religiously expressive monument, symbol or practice with this kind of familiarly and historical significance, removing It may no longer appear neutral.”


06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A13

MISSOURI’S LARGEST

MAZDA INVENTORY

$

VOTED BEST OF ST. CHARLES 4 YEARS IN A ROW

0

DA vO W N ailable*

Winner Of 2015, 2016, 2017 & 2018. St. Charles County Reader’s Choice Poll

WE’rE UndEr COnSTrUCTIOn

WE MUST MOVE VEHICLES COME IN FOR THE SAVINGS!

HUGE SAVINGS ON 2018 MODEL YEAR INVENTORY 2018 Mazda3

2018 Mazda3

SEDAN

5-DOOR

SPORT, AUTOMATIC

4,500

$

SPORT, AUTOMATIC

5,000

$

OFF MSRP***

2019 Mazda3 now available in AWD

OFF MSRP***

2019 Mazda CX-3

$0 DOWN “The 2019 Mazda3 & Mazda CX-3 was named a 2019 Top Safety Pick by the IIHS –Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

FWD

309

$

LEASE FOR

$

4,500

36 MONTH LEASE

LEASE FOR

289 0.

$

2018 Mazda6

OFF MSRP

FWD, SPORT

9for%72

with

/mo*

5,500

$

months

OFF MSRP

GRAND TOURING RESERVE & SIGNATURE MODELS

GRAND TOURING, TOURING AND SPORT

2019 Mazda CX-5

299

$

**

MAKE IT AN AWD

$

309

“The 2019 Mazda CX-5 was named a 2019 Top Safety Pick by the IIHS when equipped with available Adaptive Front-lighting System.” –Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

36 MONTH LEASE

FWD, SPORT

*On select models. See dealer for details. **$2,499 due at signing. Monthly payments include $595 acquistion fee. No security deposit required. Excludes taxes, title and fees. ***2018 Mazda3 Includes all applicable rebates.†Based on 2018 sales summary Mazda Motor Division of North America. Photos for illustration purposes only. See dealer for complete details. Must take retail delivery for dealer stock by 6/30/19.

1,000 TRADE-IN BONUS CASH

Bommarito Mazda St. Peters $ Exclusive Offer

THIS MONTH ONLY! GET AN ADDITIONAL

Bommarito MAZDA ST. PETERS A

Bommarito

SALES - SERVICE - PARTS - COLLISION REPAIR

Exclusive

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE NATIONWIDE WARRANTY WITH EVERY NEW MAZDA PURHASE

4190 N. Service Road • 636.928.2300

MISSOURI’S LARGEST SELECTION †

(I-70 & Cave Springs Exit) • Toll Free 1.800.620.0029

B o m m a ri to M a z d a S t Pe te rs . c o m COME SEE "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS" EVERYDAY


NEWS

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

More cash in lost wallet means you’re likelier to get it back BY MALCOLM RITTER

Associated Press

NEW YORK — People are more likely to return a lost wallet if it contains money — and the more cash, the better. That’s the surprising conclusion from researchers who planted more than 17,000 “lost wallets” across 355 cities in 40 countries, and kept track of how often somebody contacted the supposed owners. The presence of money — the equivalent of about $13 in local currency — boosted this response rate to about 51%, versus 40% for wallets with no cash. That trend showed up in virtually every nation, although the actual numbers varied. Researchers raised the stakes in the U.S., the United Kingdom and Poland. The response jumped to 72% for wallets containing the equivalent of about $94, versus 61% for those containing $13. If no money was enclosed, the rate was 46%. How can this be? “The evidence suggests that people tend to care about the welfare of others, and they have an aversion to seeing themselves as a thief,” said Alain Cohn of the University of Michigan, one author who reported the results Thursday in the journal Science. Another author, Christian Zuend of the University of Zurich, said “it suddenly feels like stealing” when there’s money in the wallet. “And it feels even more like stealing when the money in the wallet increases,” he added. That idea was supported by the results of polls the researchers did in the U.S., the U.K. and Poland, he told reporters. The wallets in the study were actually transparent business card cases, chosen so that people could see any money inside without opening them. A team of 13 research assistants posed as people who had just found the cases and turned them in at banks, theaters, museums or other cultural es-

CHRISTIAN ZUEND VIA AP

This undated photo provided by researchers in June 2019 shows an example of the contents of a transparent wallet used in an experiment to test how likely people are to return a lost wallet. tablishments, post offices, hotels and police stations or other public offices. The key question was whether the employee receiving each

case would contact its supposed owner, whose name and email address were displayed on three identical business cards within.

The business cards were crafted to make the supposed owner appear to be a local person, as was a grocery list that was also enclosed. Some cases also contained a key, and they were more likely to get a response than cases without a key. That led the researchers to conclude that concern for others was playing a role, since — unlike money — a key is valuable to its owner but not a stranger. The effect of enclosed money appeared in 38 of the 40 countries, with Mexico and Peru the exceptions. Nations varied widely in how often the wallet’s “owner” was contacted. In Switzerland the rate was 74% for wallets without money and 79% with it, while in China the rates were 7% and 22%. The U.S.

figures were 39% and 57%. The study measured how employees act when presented with a wallet at their workplaces. But would those same people act differently if they found a wallet on a sidewalk? “We don’t know,” said Michel Marechal, an author from the University of Zurich. But he said other analyses suggest the new results reflect people’s overall degree of honesty. Shaul Shalvi of the University of Amsterdam, who wrote a commentary that accompanied the study, told The Associated Press that he suspected the study does shed light on how people would act with a wallet found on the street. He said the results “support the idea that people care about others as well as caring about being honest.”

Robert Feldman, psychology professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who didn’t participate in the work, said he suspected the experiment might have turned out differently if involved “everyday people” rather than employees acting in an official capacity. But Feldman called the study impressive and said it seems like “a very real result.” Dan Ariely, a psychology professor at Duke University who didn’t participate in the research, said the conclusions fit with research that indicates keeping a larger amount of money would be harder for a person to rationalize. “It very much fits with the way social scientists think about dishonesty,” he said.

Estate Liquidation & Evaluation Where Qualityy CCounts... Since 1977 SAVE

50% OFF INSTALLATION! • Antique & Estate Jewelry • Gold, Silver & Platinum Fine Jewelry • Scrap Gold - Broken Chains, Class Rings, Old Wedding Bands, • Certified Diamonds • Gold & Silver Bullion Bars & Coins • Sterling Silver - Flatware, Hollowware, Candlesticks & Old Jewelry Trusted Estate Jewelry Buyers for over 35 Years

For a FREE ESTIMATE

Text a Photo 314-974-6699

Call Now For Your Free Estimate

314-236-9883 • 618-215-7381

Used Jewelry Buyer 122 North Main Street • St. Charles, MO 63301 usedjewelrybuyer.com • (636) 896-4117

Call today to connect with a SENIOR LIVING ADVISOR INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE

*Financing available for those who qualify, minimums apply, cannot combine with other offers, see store for details. Expires June 30 2019

AT TENTION: Hearing Aid Field Trial You or your family member may be a ds at eligible for hearingg aids little or no cost to you! y ! you

UNDERSTAND YOUR OPTIONS — Learn the different types of senior care available LOCAL KNOWLEDGE — Our Advisors have the local knowledge to help you hand-pick communities in your area SIMPLIFY — Your dedicated Advisor will simplify your search and help schedule tours

• Are you experiencing hearing difficulties? • Do people mumble? • Do you feel like a bother to others due to your problems hearing?

EXPERIENCE — Our Advisors help thousands of families understand their options every day

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may qualify for hearing aids at little or no cost to you.

SUPPORT — Our team is happy to provide additional support from movers to attorneys and much more

If you live with a hearing problem, you are needed to participate in a special consumer trial program.

There’s no cost to you! St. Louis (314) 202-6110 Southern IL (618) 206-5955 Missouri (636) 203-9884 !We’re paid by our partner communities

A Place for Mom has helped over a million find families fi nd senior living solutions that meet their unique needs. Our Advisors are trusted, local experts who can help you understand your options.

Speak One-on-One with our licensed friendly hearing professionals. We are experts in hearing loss, and will work with you to help find the best DAY RISK solution for FREE TRIAL your hearing difficulties.

30

We are seeking 100 people to outhwestern try a new, completely invisible Hearing Centers hearing aid, designed to improve hearing in noisy places, eliminate feedback, and make listening to family and friends enjoyable again. Call Immediately! At the conclusion of this program, the first 100 participants to qualify may keep these hearing aids and enjoy tremendous savings. DON’T WAIT - Please take a moment and call now. Even if you are not sure if you need hearing aids, don’t miss this chance to receive a FREE hearing screening that will determine if this program is right for you... Call Southwestern now to participate!

Call to be Connected to one of our 30 Locations

(314) 230-8119 (618) 206-5940 (636) 203-9842

Joan Lunden former host of Good Morning America and senior living advocate. You Tube

All hearing tests are conducted by a licensed hearing instrument specialist.


ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A15

cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com

NEW 2019 CHRYSLER PACIFICA LIMITED

NEW 2019 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING PLUS

STk#19F455

MSRP $37,520 SAVINGS $6,925

Cassens Price

STk#19F444

$30,595

*

NEW 2019 JEEP CHEROKEE LATITUDE PLUS 4X4

STk#19S254

MSRP $32,475 SAVINGS $6,980

MSRP $53,840 SAVINGS $7,438

Cassens Price

STk#19S510

$25,495

*

MSRP SAVINGS

$49,325 $12,838

MSRP $41,335 SAVINGS $7,475

Cassens Price

$33,860*

NEW 2019 RAM 1500 BIG HORN/LONE STAR CREW CAB

Cassens Price

STk#19T246

$46,402

*

NEW 2019 RAM 1500 CLASSIC BIG HORN CREW CAB 4X4

STk#19T529T

$41,197*

NEW JEEP CHEROKEE OVERLAND 4X4

NEW 2019 RAM 1500 LARAMIE CREW CAB 4X4

STk#19T596

MSRP $48,930 SAVINGS $7,733

Cassens Price

MSRP $45,215 SAVINGS $9,304

$35,911*

NEW 2019 RAM 1500 TRADESMAN CREW CAB 4X2

Cassens Price

STk#19T544

$36,487

Cassens Price

*

MSRP $40,035 SAVINGS $6,491

Cassens Price

$33,544* CASSENS

YOUR AUTOMOTIVE SUPERSTORE 2 Miles North of I-270 on Hwy. 159

cassenscan.com 618-656-6070

6

*Vehicles based on inventory. Price includes rebates and discounts. Everyone qualifies for Cassens price, customers may qualify for additional rebates. See dealer for details. Tax, title license & doc fees extra. Expires 6/30/19

cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com

cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com

cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1


NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Republicans line up to oppose Moore’s new Senate bid BY COLBY ITKOWITZ AND PAUL KANE

Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans greeted Roy Moore’s entry Thursday into Alabama’s next Senate race by vowing to block the former judge, whose Senate bid in 2017 fell short amid allegations of sexual misconduct with teenage girls Moore in the 1970s. From the party leader to former presidential candidates, Republicans said Moore has no place in the national GOP or in the Senate, expressing fear that his candidacy would distract from President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign and their own races next year. “We’ll be opposing Roy Moore vigorously,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Thursday afternoon, less than two hours after Moore formally entered the race after weeks of hinting at the campaign. But Moore, who had already heard the complaints from Trump and Republicans, ignored them and declared that he would go on to defeat Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., in the conservative-leaning state.

“I will run for the U.S. Senate in 2020,” Moore said at his launch in Montgomery. “Can I win? Yes, I can win. They know I can. That’s why there’s so much opposition.” Jones narrowly defeated Moore in the December 2017 special election to fill the vacancy created when Trump tapped Jeff Sessions to be attorney general. About a month before that election, The Washington Post published accounts from four women who said Moore pursued them romantically when they were between the ages of 14 and 18 in the 1970s. Moore has acknowledged contact with the women but denied any sexual contact. Trump, who has faced his own allegations of sexual misconduct, wavered on whether to support Moore. He initially supported the appointed replacement for Sessions, Luther Strange, who lost to Moore in a GOP primary runoff. As the special election approached, Trump defied other Republicans and threw his support to Moore, only to see Jones become the first Democrat in 27 years to win a U.S. Senate seat in the state. Republicans in Washington fear a Moore candidacy would cost them what is their most likely pickup opportunity in 2020, with

Trump at the top of the ticket in a state that he won by nearly 30 percentage points in 2016. “Roy Moore has no place in a Republican primary,” said Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, the party’s 2012 presidential nominee. “He has no place as a candidate in our party. He ought to find another occupation where he has better prospects. I do not want to see him as our nominee, and I know our president doesn’t either.” Moore blamed his 2017 loss on a misinformation campaign called “Project Birmingham,” which was created to help Jones, who was unaware of the effort. He said that he would have beaten Jones otherwise and that the allegations against him had “very little” to do with his loss. Democrats treated Moore’s decision as an example of a Republican Party that is deep into the ideological fringe. “So it looks like my opponent will either be extremist Roy Moore or an extremist handpicked by Mitch McConnell to be part of his legislative graveyard team,” Jones tweeted an hour after Moore’s event. After Jones’ victory, Trump worked to support McConnellbacked challengers to Democrats in conservative-leaning states,

OBITUARIES Buchanan - See Walsh De Santis, Jr., James A. "Jimmy" - St. Louis Harlan - See Walsh Hays, Jim - O'Fallon, MO Jacobs, Lucille Alma - Florissant Kelly, William Martin - St. Louis

leading to a surprise gain of two Senate seats for the GOP in a midterm election in which Republicans were routed almost everywhere else. Last month, Trump warned Alabama Republicans not to back Moore, tweeting that he had “NOTHING against Moore” but considered him a loser. “Roy Moore cannot win, and the consequences will be devastating,” Trump tweeted. Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., said Thursday that Moore would make so many controversial statements that it would cause trouble for GOP candidates across the country. “If he were to be nominated or were to win that race, I don’t think it would help the president,” Shelby said.“I don’t think it would help anybody running. In his own way, he’d take a lot of oxygen out of the air.” Despite Shelby’s hope that Sessions might run for his old Senate seat, other Republicans said he was happy to be on the political sidelines after a rocky tenure as attorney general on the receiving end of Trump’s criticism for his handling of the Russia investigation. “He doesn’t seem to be interested in coming back to the Sen-

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Kiely, Kathleen Elinor (Orzel) - St. Charles Kuhlenschmidt, Phyllis Ann - St. Charles Lattrace, Maria Guadalupe - St. Louis McCarty, Theresa A. - St. Louis Miller, John - Labadie, MO Newman - See Walsh

Pirtle, J.W. - Champaign, IL, formerly St. Louis Plattner, Millicent - St. Louis Walsh, James Patrick - St. Louis Wilson, William R. - Warrenton, MO

Florists

Miller, John 89, June 18, 2019. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m.; Funeral Monday 10 a.m. at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin. For more info, see Schrader.com

Pirtle, J.W. passed on June 15, 2019. Services at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 22, 2019, at Salem Baptist Church (500 E. Park St. Champaign, IL) Visitation will be held from 9:30 to 11 a.m. at the church.

Plattner, Millicent

De Santis, Jr., James A. "Jimmy" on Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Beloved son of the late Dorothy De Santis (nee Dorsey) and James De Santis Sr.; dearest brother of Kimberly "Kim" Vallero; dear uncle of Lauren (Jack) Williamson; great-uncle of Dominic, Maks and Henry Williamson; our dear nephew, cousin and friend of many. Jimmy was an avid jet skier and loved four wheelers and cars. Services: Memorial visitation Sunday, June 23, 5:30 p.m. until Memorial service at 6:45 p.m. at STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd., Florissant. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Marygrove or Partner for Pets. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Hays, Jim age 78, of O'Fallon, Missouri c r u i s e d a w a y t o h ea ven on Wednesday, June 19, 2019. He was born in Illinois on July 30, 1940. Jim was a Carpenter and retired from General Motors. He was married to Tina Hays. Jim is survived by his Wife, Tina M Hays of O Fallon, MO; Children, Randy Hays, Brian Hays, Tobey Hays, Darin Hays, Lindsay Schreacke, Rob Hynes, and Mark Hynes; Siblings, Mike Hays, and Donna Hays; dozens of grandkids and greatgrandkids; along with many other family members and friends. Additionally, Jim leaves behind his son, 1949 Ford Pickup, and daughter, 1949 Ford Coupe. He was preceded in death by his Sister, Judy Hays; and his other daughter, 1957 Chevy. Services: Interment will be private. To share a memory of Jim or l e a v e a s p e c i a l mes s a ge f o r h is fa mil y, p l ea s e vis it www.newcomerstlouis.com

Jacobs, Lucille Alma age 89. Mother of Michelle Gale. Vis. Sun. 1-4, Archway Mem. Chapel; Mon. Vis. 9:30 a.m. w/ service at 10:30 a.m., Bethel Fellowship, Flor. Int. JB. www.archwaychapel.com

Kelly, William Martin 90, Monday, June 17, 2019. Visitation Sunday, June 23 from 3:00 until time of service at 6:30, Buchholz Mortuaries, Inc., 2211 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield, MO Funeral Monday, June 24; meet at 12:15 in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Kiely, Kathleen Elinor (Orzel) passed away on 6/18/19 vis 6/23/19 3-7 pm at Hutchens-Stygar Funeral Home 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. Mass 6/24/19 11 am at St Joseph Catholic Church 1355 Motherhead Rd, Cottleville www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Kuhlenschmidt, Phyllis Ann June 19, 2019, age 75. Services: All held at Baue-O'Fallon; Visitation Saturday, June 22 from 4-8 p.m. Funeral service Sunday, June 23 at 11:30 a.m. Visit baue.com

Lattrace, Maria Guadalupe Mon., 6/17/2019. Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Mon., 6/24, 9:45 am to Seven Holy Founders Church for 10 am Mass. Interment Sts. Peter & Paul Cem. Vis. Sun., 4-9 pm.

McCarty, Theresa A. Wednesday, June 19, 2019. Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON, 10151 Gravois, Monday, June 24, 12 noon. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m. “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen, nor touched, but are felt in the heart.” HELEN KELLER

June 20, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Maurie Plattner; dear mother and mother-in-law of Mark Gubernik (Lisa); loving grandmother of Melanie and Amanda Gubernik; dear daughter of the late Rosalie and the late Martin Simon. Services: Graveside service Sunday, June 23, 1:00 p.m. at B'nai Amoona Cemetery, 930 North and South Road. Memorial contributions preferred to the Humane Society of Missouri, Attn: Donations, 1201 Macklind Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110 or to an animal rescue organization of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

ate,” Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said Thursday. Several Republicans have already announced bids, including Rep. Bradley Byrne, Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill, state Rep. Arnold Mooney and former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville. The primary will be held March 3, in conjunction with the state’s presidential primary. If no candidate gets 50% of the vote, the top two will advance to an April 14 runoff election. Moore accused establishment figures such as McConnell and his deputies running the National Republican Senatorial Committee, the GOP’s campaign arm, of pushing Trump to oppose his candidacy. “President Trump has every right to voice his opinion,” Moore said Thursday. “I believe he’s being pushed by the NRSC. I don’t know what he’s thinking, but I don’t disagree with him in lots of his policies.” Donald Trump Jr., the president’s son, almost immediately responded on Twitter: “I can assure everyone that by running, Roy Moore is going against my father and he’s doing a disservice to all conservatives across the country in the process.”

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 “To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits

Walsh, James Patrick Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, June 18, 2019. Beloved husband of Elizabeth "Cooky" Walsh (nee Ruemker); dear father of Brett (Paula) Buchanan and Paula (Philip) Newman (nee Harlan); dear grandfather of Jacob, Eleanor, Alexandria, Katherine and Danica; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, June 22, 9:30 a.m. to St. John Paul II Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Private Interment at J.B. National Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers contributions to Backstoppers appreciated. Visitation Friday, 3-8 p.m.

Wilson, William R. 67, June 19, 2019. Funeral Mon., June 24, 10:00 a.m. Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Warrenton; Visitation Sun. 2:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. at Pitman Funeral Home-Wentzville; Interment: Holy Rosary Cemetery, Warrenton, MO

Fraternal Notices

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Reginald O. Morris Journeyman Wireman Member 11 Years - June 10, 2019 Visitation; Sat. June 22, 2019 10-11am Funeral; Sat. June 22, 2019 11am Graceland/Fairlawn Funeral Home 2091 N. Oakland Avenue Decatur, IL. 62526 Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. David A. Roth, F.S.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


NEWS

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A17

Boy Scouts to use videos as tactic to fight sex abuse BY DAVID CRARY

Associated Press

NEW YORK — Under financial pressure from sex-abuse litigation, the Boy Scouts of America are seeking to bolster their abuse-prevention efforts with a new awareness program featuring cartoon-style videos that will be provided to more than 1.2 million Cub Scouts across the nation. Targeted at children from kindergarten to sixth grade, the series of six videos aims to teach children how to recognize potentially abusive behavior and what to do if confronted by it. The initiative, announced Thursday, comes as the Boy Scouts face a potentially huge wave of abuse-related lawsuits after sev-

eral states enacted laws this year making it easier for victims of long-ago abuse to file claims. The Boy Scouts acknowledge that the litigation poses a financial threat and have not ruled out seeking bankruptcy protection. The bulk of the newly surfacing abuse cases date to the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s; the BSA says there were only five known abuse victims in 2018 out of 2.2 million youth members. The BSA credits the change to an array of prevention policies adopted since the mid-1980s, including mandatory criminal background checks and abuse-prevention training for all staff and volunteers, and a rule that two or more adult leaders be present with youth at all times

during scouting activities. The Boy Scouts’ youth protection director, former police investigator Mike Johnson, decided to add the videos to the prevention program after vetting them with parents of Cub Scout-age children and with children themselves. “Parents told me they’re having these conversations with their kids,and they felt the videos would help them have a better, richer conversation,” Johnson said. “The kids are engaged. ... There’s some heavy topics discussed in a childspecific way.” Previous BSA prevention videos featured real people, not animated characters. “The power and magic of animation, and its ability to com-

municate with kids — I underestimated it,” Johnson said. The videos and related learning materials were developed in 2015-16 by psychologists and other experts recruited by the Barbara Sinatra Children’s Center, a nonprofit in Rancho Mirage, California, that specializes in helping children affected by abuse. Jon Conte, a University of Washington professor emeritus who helped develop the videos, summarized their purpose this way: “Providing children with the knowledge and skills to identify risk situations and to avoid, escape or disclose abuse before it happens or after it happens once.” The videos target two age groups: kindergarten through third grade

and fourth through sixth grade. Each series features a boy and girl who talk about experiencing abusive situations — for example, with a neighbor or coach — and explain how they used a set of “Protect Yourself Rules” to avoid harm. One of the rules, in case of abuse: “Shout, run, tell.” Another rule is “Safe touch, unsafe touch” — being wary of anyone touching the child on a part of the body that their bathing suit would cover. “Unsafe touches are scary and confusing, because they can seem playful or gentle,” says a character in the video for kindergarteners. The videos for older children extend beyond sex abuse, addressing bullying, domestic violence and online dangers.

Asian nations scramble to contain pig disease BY HAU DINH AND SAM MCNEIL

Associated Press

NASA

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin stands next to the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission July 20, 1969. A new poll shows most Americans prefer focusing on potential asteroid impacts over a return to the moon.

Most Americans over the moon, see asteroids as next space frontier BY MARCIA DUNN AND EMILY SWANSON

Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a new poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, released Thursday, one month before the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, lists asteroid and comet monitoring as the No. 1 desired objective for the U.S. space program. About two-thirds of Americans call that very or extremely important, and about a combined nine in 10 call it at least moderately important. The poll comes as the White House pushes to get astronauts back on the moon, but only about a quarter of Americans said moon or Mars exploration by astronauts should be among the space pro-

gram’s highest priorities. About another third called each of those moderately important. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on July 20, 1969, became the first humans to walk on another celestial body. In all, 12 NASA astronauts stepped on the moon. Jan Dizard, 78, a retired environmental studies professor living in Chico, California, acknowledges there’s more to learn on the moon and it would be “miraculous” to send astronauts to Mars. But now’s not the time, he stressed. “There are all kinds of other things, not the least of which is climate change, that deserve our attention,” Dizard told the AP. “This other stuff can wait.” After asteroid and comet monitoring, scientific research to expand knowledge of Earth and the rest of the solar system and universe came next on the list of Americans’ space priorities — about six in 10 said that was very or extremely important. Close to half said the same about send-

ing robotic probes, rather than astronauts, to explore space, and about four in 10 said the same about continued funding of the International Space Station. Searching for life on other planets came in fifth with 34% rating it at least very important, followed by 27% for human Mars expeditions and 23% for crewed moonshots. In a dead heat for last place among the nine listed goals: setting up permanent human residences on other planets, with 21% ranking it as a very high priority, and establishing a U.S. military presence in space with 19%. While other goals were considered at least moderately important by majorities of Americans, about half called a military presence and space colonies unimportant. Toni Dewey, 71, a retired clerical worker in Wilmington, North Carolina, said space exploration should benefit life on Earth and the explorers should be machines versus humans. “It would cost a lot of money to

send somebody to Mars,” she said, “and we have roads and bridges that need repaired here.” As for the moon, Dewey noted, “We’ve been there.” But Alan Curtis, 47, of Pocatello, Idaho, considers moon and Mars trips a top priority, especially if the U.S. is to remain a world leader in space. Compared with its feats of the 1960s and 1970s, the U.S. space program is now a second thought, he said. “It’s pretty bad that we have to rent a spot on a Russian spacecraft to get to the space station,” said Curtis, a store cashier who says he’s an occasional bounty hunter. He pointed to the firstever landing by a spacecraft on the far side of the moon, by China in January. The survey asked Americans to directly choose between the moon and Mars for exploration by U.S. astronaut. The red planet was the winner by about double: 37% compared with 18%. However, 43% said neither destination was a priority.

HANOI, Vietnam — Asian nations are scrambling to contain the spread of highly contagious African swine fever, with Vietnam culling 2.5 million pigs and China reporting more than a million dead in an unprecedentedly huge epidemic some fear is out of control. Smaller outbreaks have been reported in Hong Kong, Taiwan, North Korea, Cambodia and Mongolia after cases were first reported in China’s northeast in August. With pork supplies dwindling as leading producer China and hard-hit Vietnam destroy huge numbers of hogs and tighten controls on shipments, prices have soared by up to 40% globally and caused shortages in other markets. “This is the largest animal disease outbreak in history,” said Dirk Pfieffer, a veterinary epidemiologist at the City University of Hong Kong. “We’ve never had anything like it.” In South Korea, where diets rely heavily on pork, there is concern an outbreak could hurt an industry with 6,300 farms raising more than 11 million pigs. African swine fever is harmless to people but fatal and highly contagious for pigs, with no known cure or vaccine. Since China first reported an outbreak in early August, 1 million pigs have been culled. It has reported 139 outbreaks all but two of its 34 provinces, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization says. The U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasts China’s total hog herd will shrink by 18% this year to 350 million animals, the lowest level since the 1980s. This year’s Chinese pork output might fall by up to 35%, according to Rabobank, a Dutch bank. In Vietnam, the government reported in mid-May that 1.2 million pigs, or about 5% of its total herds, had died or been destroyed. Vietnamese officials said this week that number has risen to 2.5 million and military and police officers were mobilized to help contain the outbreak. Rabobank expects Vietnamese pork production to fall 10% this year from 2018. The mass culling in Vietnam could sink many farmers deeper into poverty, said Wantanee Kalpravidh, a regional coordinator of the FAO’s Emergency Center for Transboundary Animal Disease. Last month, Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc urged authorities to prevent the disease, which has spread to 56 of 63 provinces, from escalating into an epidemic.

Trump continues with his plans for a Fourth of July address BY JUSTIN SINK

Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump’s revamped Fourth of July celebration on the National Mall will include a presidential address from the Lincoln Memorial and a military display with plane flyovers and demonstrations by all five branches of the armed services. The annual fireworks display will also be relocated to a site near the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial, the Interior Department said in a statement this week. That will allow more people to gather closer to the site of the president’s speech

but will create new logistical challenges for the decades-old event that draws thousands of Americans to downtown Washington. Trump will be the first president to address the nation on Independence Day from the Mall in recent memory. “For the first time in many years, the World War II Memorial and areas around the Reflecting Pool will be open for the public to enjoy a stunning fireworks display and an address by our Commander-inChief,” the Interior Department said in the statement. “We are excited to open these new areas so that more visitors may experience

this year’s Independence Day celebration in our nation’s capital.” Trump sought to revamp the annual July Fourth celebration after his plans for a military parade on Veteran’s Day were stymied by complaints about the cost. The president has been enamored of the idea of a Washington celebration with a military component since attending the 2017 Bastille Day parade in Paris, which included an aerial display, thousands of marching soldiers and hundreds of military vehicles. But the effort has drawn criticism from Trump’s political opponents, who say the president is

recasting a traditionally nonpartisan national celebration to revolve around himself. And Washington’s mayor, Muriel Bowser, told The Washington Post that the president’s attendance and re-positioning of the fireworks could create security and logistical concerns. “If we have to put more police to cover his movements, more police for the fireworks and an additional location for police where the fireworks are going to get set off, that puts a strain on us,” Bowser said. It is unclear how much the changes will cost the federal and local governments.

Trump criticized District officials when his initial plans for a military parade were derailed. Bowser responded by saying the event would have cost the city $21.6 million, and mocked Trump as “the reality star in the White House.” Trump plans to speak at the “Salute of America” event at the Lincoln Memorial at 6:30 p.m. The traditional “Capitol Fourth” concert on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol will take place from 8 to 9:30 p.m., coinciding with a 20-minute firework display that will run from 9:07 p.m. to 9:27 p.m. (All times Eastern.)


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Best of St. Charles 4 years in a row. Bommarito St. Peters Winner of 2015, 2016, 2017 & 2018 St. Charles County reader’s choice poll

2019 XT5 STaNdaRd

UlTRa-lOW MIleage leaSeS fOR Well-qUalIfIed leSSeeS

$

% 0 409/39/ 2,579 for 60 months for

$

PeR MONTh

MONThS

or

dUe aT SIgNINg afTeR all OffeRS

qualified buyers

No security deposit required. Tax, title, license extra. Mileage charge of $.25 per mile over 32,500 miles. Payments are for a 2019 XTS Standard with an MSRP of $42,690. 0% apr for 60 months = $16.67 per $1,000 financed. Must take delivery by 7/1/2019. See dealer for details.

2019 XT5 PReMIUM, lUXURy

$

12,700

BeST CTa PRICe MSRP $57,015 Sale PRICe $44,315

COURTESY TRANSPORTATION VEHICLE

SavINgS

Courtesy Transportation vehicle #C19033R with 3740 miles. Includes all rebates and private offers. See dealer for details.

Bommarito CADILLAC BommaritoCadillac.com LOCATION 4190 I-70 North Outer Road St. Peters, MO 63376

SALES 636-928-2300 Saturday full service available 7am-3pm by appointment only.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 06.21.2019 • B

INVESTORS BRUSH OFF JITTERS S&P closes at record high amid rally BY ALEX VEIGA

Associated Press

Wall Street capped a broad rally for stocks Thursday by driving the S&P 500 index to an all-time high. The milestone, which eclipsed the benchmark index’s last record close on April 30, underscores a swift rebound for the market in June that has erased the losses from a 6.6% dive in May. The ma-

jor U.S. stock indexes are up more than 7% so far this month. Thursday’s rally came as investors balanced optimism over the possibility that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates in response to a slowing global economy with jitters about the prospects of dimmer corporate profits should a severe slowdown take hold.

Those worries prompted traders to shift money into safe-haven assets this week, such as gold and U.S. government bonds. The yield on the 10-year Treasury briefly slid Thursday as low as 1.97% after falling a day earlier to 2.02%. The yield, which is used to set interest rates on mortgages and other loans, is the lowest it’s been since November 2016.

The price of gold, meanwhile, jumped 3.6%. “If the Fed is going to cut rates it means that the economic environment is slowing down,” said Lindsey Bell, investment strategist at CFRA. “You have investors looking to bonds to hide out in. You’re also seeing a big move up in gold on the back of the Fed’s decision as well.” Investors’ jitters over escalating tension between the U.S. and Iran sent the price of U.S. crude oil 5.4% higher. Crude prices had

PEN COLLECTORS HELP MAKE THINGS WRITE Enthusiasts are gathering for show in St. Louis

been in a bear market just weeks ago, what Wall Street calls a drop of 20% or more. The S&P 500 climbed 27.72 points, or 0.9%, to 1,954.18, a record high. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 249.17 points, or 0.9%, to 26,753.17. The Nasdaq gained 64.02 points, or 0.8%, to 8,051.34. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies picked up 7.92 points, or 0.5%, to 1,563.49. Please see STOCKS, Page B5

Law firm bankruptcy case quietly nears end Hearing should be it for Popkin & Stern after 27 years DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRISTINE TANNOUS PHOTOS, CTANNOUS@POST-DISPATCH.COM

An Tran, owner of Tran’s Vintage Pens, showcases his pens at the St. Louis Pen Show at the Sheraton Westport Plaza Hotel on Thursday. The pen show runs through Sunday.

BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For Ken Crooker, it all started at Staples. A rack of fountain pens caught his eye as he walked through the office supply store five years ago. He bought one on a whim. He now owns 200. Crooker, 48, of Chesterfield, started researching the oldfashioned writing instrument and subsequently developed a fascination for inks — their tints, shading and sheen. Like many Bexley Pens, co-owned by Jack Leone, are among converts, he soon became an those on display at the St. Louis Pen Show. evangelist, starting a blog and attending collectors’ meetups. Two years ago, he made a pilgrimage to Little Rock, Arkansas, for his first pen show. He was sold. Crooker, who works for Boeing when he’s not blogging about the pros and cons of iron gall ink, joined the board of the St. Louis Pen Show. The volunteerrun nonprofit had just begun planning for its inaugural event, which was held last summer. David Oscarson holds a pen from his Koi pen Please see PENS, Page B4 collection at the St. Louis Pen Show on Thursday.

Robert Bader, owner of the Pen Shop of Memphis, examines a pen at the St. Louis Pen Show on Thursday.

David Oscarson exhibits his Golden Spike pen collection at the St. Louis Pen Show.

Peabody, Arch create juggernaut Companies join up in rich coal region BY BRYCE GRAY

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The two largest coal companies in the U.S. — both headquartered in the St. Louis area — announced a landmark deal Wednesday that would unite the country’s two largest coal mines and other assets into a joint venture, run by a single operator. There’s no question that the combination of Peabody and Arch Coal’s assets in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin and in Colorado will produce an J.B. FORBES JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM overnight coal juggernaut, if approved by regulators. But the A dragline shovel picks up a load of dirt, rock and clay, called overburden, to get to the buried coal at Arch Coal’s Black Thunder mine Please see COAL, Page B5 near Wright, Wyoming, in 2010.

The 1991 collapse of Popkin & Stern may be a distant memory, but the onetime Clayton law firm lives on in U.S. Bankruptcy Court at least until Wednesday. That’s when a hearing is scheduled to terminate the firm’s liquidating trust. Trustee Robert Blackwell, an O’Fallon, Missouri, attorney, plans one last distribution of $36,705 to the law firm’s unsecured creditors, who will ultimately have collected about 55 percent of the $2.5 million the court said they were owed. Then, according to a court filing, Blackwell will spend $9,340 to wind down the trust, pay himself a final commission of $1,135 and close Popkin & Stern’s books for good. It’s a low-key final act for a case that produced high drama almost from the day in March 1992 when creditors forced the defunct firm into bankruptcy. There was a 12-hour court session when 40 former partners, each of whom could have been held liable for the firm’s debts, agreed to make payments toward a settlement with creditors. One partner’s 3,000-bottle wine collection had to be auctioned off. Ronald Lurie, the firm’s former managing partner, was convicted of perjury and sent to prison after lying to a judge about the proceeds from the sale of a house. At least five sets of litigation followed as the trustee sought to track down and seize Lurie’s assets, with some cases lasting for years and going to federal appeals court. One dispute involved a $200,000 painting called “Apache Renegades.” Lurie’s wife and sons wanted some money from the painting’s sale, but the appellate court turned them down in 2003. The court docket shows no big disputes in recent years. After Please see NICKLAUS, Page B4

‘Virtual visits’ provide care from the comfort of home BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If you’re under the weather because of a suspected sinus infection, allergies or heartburn, a new program through SSM Health could put you on the road to recovery without you ever stepping out the door. The St. Louis-based health care system officially launched its “virtual visits” program last month for residents of Missouri, Southern Illinois, Wisconsin and Oklahoma after a soft rollout in February. The web-based service offers treatment for acute, nonurgent medical conditions. Patients create an online profile and fill out a questionnaire about their

medical history and symptoms. Within an hour, they receive a video chat or phone call from an SSM nurse practitioner. “A lot has been done with virtual health and telehealth across the region,” said Erin Powell, the system director of retail health for SSM. “But no one else in St. Louis is doing this kind of acute care visit platform.” UnitedHealthcare, the nation’s largest commercial health insurer, offers a virtual visit program that is available only to its clients and uses third-party providers, the telemedicine apps Doctor on Demand and Amwell. SSM’s program can be accessed Please see VIRTUAL, Page B4

BUSINESS

1 M


BUSINESS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Mortgage rates poised to drop after Fed announcement 30-year fixed-rate average edged up, but inflation fears may reverse that BY KATHY ORTON, THE WASHINGTON POST

Mortgage rates showed little change heading into the Federal Reserve meeting. But now that the central bank has revised its stance, they could be headed lower. According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac, the 30-year fixed-rate average edged up to 3.84% with an average 0.5 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1% of the loan amount and are in addition to the interest rate.) It was 3.82% a week ago and 4.57% a year ago. The 15-year fixed-rate average slipped to 3.25% with an average 0.4 point. It was 3.26% a week ago and 4.04% a year ago. The five-year adjustable rate average dipped to 3.48% with an average 0.4 point. It was 3.51% a week ago and 3.83% a year ago. The Federal Reserve concluded its meeting Wednesday leaving its benchmark rate untouched. However, it expressed concern about inflation, slowing global growth and a trade war. Over the past several months, the central bank has swung from steadily increasing its benchmark rate to a more patient stance to considering a rate cut. The bond market reacted sharply after the Fed’s announcement. The yield on the 10-year Treasury sank to 2.03%, its lowest level in more than two years. The drop in long-term bond yields came too late in the week to factor into Freddie Mac’s survey. The federally chartered mortgage investor aggregates current rates weekly from 125 lenders from across the country to come up with a national average mortgage rate. “Mortgage rates were largely flat for the week but have started to fall after blockbuster announcements from central banks on each side of the Atlantic,” said Matthew Speakman, a Zillow economist. “Markets hotly anticipated this week’s meeting of the (Federal Reserve), but it was the European Central Bank that first jolted rates from their generally sideways movement this week. On Tuesday, ECB President Mario Draghi suggested that more stimulus was likely in the coming months, in comments that sent bond yields sharply downward. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell followed suit on Wednesday, holding the federal funds rate steady but suggesting that the Fed would be open to cutting rates in the coming months should the current

economic outlook fail to improve. Bond yields fell sharply again, hitting their lowest levels since the 2016 election day. Mortgage rates are likely to follow in tow for the short term, although it’s unclear how long these low rates will last.” Bankrate.com, which puts out a weekly mortgage rate trend index, found that more than half of experts surveyed expect rates to move lower in the coming week. “At the conclusion of their June meeting, the Federal Reserve did not disappoint markets that were expecting a dovish statement,” said Michael Becker, branch manager at Sierra Pacific Mortgage in White Marsh, Maryland. “The Fed hinted at a July cut, dropped their ‘patient’ on rates statement and added that ‘uncertainties’ around its outlook have increased. This was a key statement and markets took it as a sign the Fed will cut rates in either July or September with STEVE HELBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS one more cut in 2019 and a third in 2020. A new home is shown for sale in Mechanicsville, Va., earlier this month. Mortgage rates had Bonds are rallying on this news and mortstayed virtually flat this week, but are expected to drop lower. gage rates are improving.” Meanwhile, mortgage applications pulled back. According to the latest data from the Mortgage Bankers Association, the market composite index — a measure of total loan application volume — decreased 3.4% from a week earlier. The refinance index fell 4% from the previous week, while the purchase index also dropped 4%. The refinance share of mortgage activity accounted for 50.2 % of all applications. “Mortgage rates increased last week but are still considerably lower than last summer, which is why lenders continue to report that they are busier,” said Bob Broeksmit, MBA president and CEO. “Despite a 3.4% decline in applications, refinances were up 79.5% from a year ago and purchase activity was up 4%.”

0 DOWN

$

NEW 2019

INFINITI Q50 LUXE

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Danforth Center picks new director of microscopy research site

AWD, REMOTE START, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF LEASE FOR

379

$

*

A MONTH

$0 DOWN 2 or More At This Price VIN JN1EV7AR9KM559414

NEW 2019

INFINITI QX50 LUXE

AWD, SUNROOF, HEATED SEATS

LEASE FOR

HSHS St. Elizabeth’s Hospital opened a new and expanded therapy facility at the McKendree Metro Rec Plex in O’Fallon, Ill.

New therapy center opens in Illinois for HSHS St. Elizabeth’s HSHS St. Elizabeth’s Hospital opened a new and expanded therapy facility at the McKendree Metro Rec Plex in O’Fallon, Ill. St. Elizabeth’s relocated the outpatient therapy services located at 1512 North Green Mount Road into the 5,500-square-foot addition. The primary focus at the location will be athletic injuries and orthopedic care. The new space features four private physical therapy treatment rooms, an occupational therapy room to assist with activities of daily living, and expanded gym space. The second floor of the new twostory addition will be used by the Metro Rec Plex to accommodate additional group fitness programs.

$0 DOWN 2 or More At This Price VIN 3PCAJ5M39KF106521

399

$

* A MONTH

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2018.

* 39 mo. lease, 10,000 miles per year, $0 security deposit, first payment due at signing. Excludes tax, title & license. Subject to credit approval. Call for details. Offers expire 6/30/19.

Bommarito

Kirk J. Czymmek joined the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center as director of the Integrated Microscopy Facility and principal investigator. Czymmek, who has more than 30 years of advanced microscopy experience, succeeds R. Howard Berg Czymmek who retired after 19 years. Most recently, Czymmek served as vice president of Global ZEISS Microscopy Customer Centers. His work has focused on developing and applying cutting-edge microscopy tools for imaging cells, tissues and biomaterials. He received his doctorate in botany and plant pathology from Michigan State University. Founded in 1998, the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center is a nonprofit research institute whose mission is to improve the human condition through plant science.

INFINITI WEST COUNTY

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. (636) 391-9400

BommaritoINFINITI.com POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF Business editor

314-340-8127

JACOB BARKER

Economic development

314-340-8291

BRYCE GRAY

Energy and environment

314-340-8307

DAVID NICKLAUS

Business columnist

314-340-8213

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

EXPANDING SWT Design is expanding into Kentucky with the opening of a new studio in Louisville led by senior associate Paul Toenjes. HELPING OUT The American Water Charitable Foundation donated $7,000 to The Open Space Council for 660 willow trees to be planted along the riverbank in Lower Meramec Park to enhance water quality and wildlife habitat. The Electrical Connection is partnering with the St. Louis Cardinals and PLANLED to donate new LED lighting to three St. Louis Public schools. PLANLED is a Seattle-based, minority-owned LED lighting company specializing in research applied lighting solutions. PLANLED completed the installation of LED field lights at Busch Stadium in March. The Associated General Contractors of Missouri donated a total of $51,000 in scholarships to 24 stuMILESTONES dents pursuing advanced studies in construction, enHollyberry Baking and Catering is celebrating gineering, architecture, science, technology and the 20 years in business. construction trades. OPENING Operation Food Search received a $25,000 grant American Eagle Outfitters and PUMA Outlets from the Food Research and Action Center and the opened stores at St. Louis Premium Outlets: Walmart Foundation. • 18521 Outlet Boulevard, Chesterfield Julie Zuick, senior consultant for executive search PROJECTS firm Grant Cooper, was elected to serve on the 2019 Impact Strategies completed the renovation of a 7,500-square-foot building in Belleville to house offices board of directors of MERS/Goodwill.

Yorg

Kulatunga

Weirich

Fuchs

Chatman

Sandoval

Evitts

Schneider

SUBMIT AN ITEM

LISA BROWN

BULLETIN BOARD

Lenox

Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@postdispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

Shoppers walk through the shops at the St. Louis Premium Outlets in Chesterfield on Aug. 22, 2013. DAVID CARSON, P-D

for Hospice of Southern Illinois. Impact collaborated on the project with Hurford Architects and Thouvenot, Wade & Moerchen Inc. Knoebel Construction completed construction of new Marshalls and Burlington retail stores at Indio Towne Center in Indio, Calif. RECOGNITION Mark E. Stallion of Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale was inducted into the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater St. Louis Alumni Hall of Honor.

Jared Schneider joined Audubon Associates LLC as chief operating officer. Grant Evitts was named vice president of operations for Missouri American Water. BancorpSouth added Jenefer Weirich as senior vice president and commercial lender in the St. Louis market. Murphy Co. hired the following: Chuck Helms as a service account manager, Holly Yorg as an accounts receivable billing specialist, and Heather Chatman as receptionist. Andrew Kulatunga joined Kwame Building Group Inc. as project manager. Vessel Architecture and Design added Arno Sandoval as senior architect. Rachel Fuchs joined Weber Shandwick as a media relations associate. Jayson Lenox, attorney and partner at Beck Estate Planning & Elder Law, was named the Elder Law Committee Chair for the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis.


MARKET WATCH

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks rose Thursday, with the S&P 500 hitting a record. Investors balanced optimism over the possibility the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates in response to a slowing economy with jitters about the prospects of dimmer corporate profits.

Oracle

55

120

30

50

115

25

45

45

110

M

A M 52-week range

$57.47

A M 52-week range

J

$45.64

$67.69

Close: 2,954.18 Change: 27.72 (0.9%)

2,840

26,000

10 DAYS

$95.83

25,000

DATE

CLOSE

Corn

Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19

450 915.50 526.50

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Aug 19 Jun 19 Jul 19 Jun 19 Jun 19

134.70 108.17 79.25 16.29 271.55

-1.82 -.33 -2.37 +.01 +3.10

Hogs Copper

2,400

D

J

F

M

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

NASD 2,003 1,959 1718 1205 200 42

3,775 3,169 1963 768 301 23

M

2,200

J

D

J

F

M

A

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

J

Cotton

YTD +14.69% +13.55% +15.28% +15.01% +21.34% +17.84% +16.65% +18.04% +15.94%

Sugar

Jul 19 Jul 19 Sep 19

63.21 101.05 26.45

-2.17 +4.80 -.05

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

Crude oil

Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19

56.88 1.7863 188.43 2.185

M

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

A

HIGH 26798.63 10462.59 824.54 13094.80 8088.88 2958.06 1946.15 30438.56 1570.74

LOW 26539.69 10345.84 812.42 12954.08 7996.87 2931.50 1926.97 30128.96 1556.08

CLOSE 26753.17 10412.66 821.88 13081.54 8051.34 2954.18 1939.94 30394.60 1563.49

CHG. +249.17 +71.03 +4.20 +127.46 +64.02 +27.72 +12.99 +265.64 +7.91

%CHG. WK +0.94% s +0.69% s +0.51% s +0.98% s +0.80% s +0.95% s +0.67% s +0.88% s +0.51% s

MO QTR s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.30 32.54 +.13 +0.4 +14.0 +6.3

2.04 General Motors

GM

Aegion Corp

AEGN

14.12

26.80 16.94 +.33 +2.0

+3.8 -36.9 22

... Home Depot

HD

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.43

1.82 +.02 +1.3

-0.2 -28.3 dd

... Huttig Building Prod HBP

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

70.31 62.37 +.09 +0.1

77.55 77.36 +.46 +0.6 +18.6 +35.2 27

3.05

+6.5

6

-9.0 17

1.14 Lee Enterprises 1.90 Lowes

LEE

52-WK LO HI 30.56

41.50 36.96 +.18 +0.5 +10.5

-9.4 dd

1.52 5.44

1.57

5.75

2.49 +.01 +0.4 +38.3 -50.4 dd

...

1.84

3.69

2.18

...

-.15 -6.4

+3.3 +3.6

AEE

58.74

64.55 106.86 89.74 +1.82 +2.1 +36.4

MNK

Arch Coal

ARCH

75.09 101.92 94.35

MA

171.89 269.85 266.79 +6.92 +2.7 +41.4 +30.7 62

MCD

153.13 206.39 205.12 +.57 +0.3 +15.5 +26.7 31

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

BAC

22.66

31.91 28.27

-.05 -0.2 +14.7

-1.2 11

0.60

Belden Inc

BDC

37.79

76.39 59.99 +.36 +0.6 +43.6

-3.8 11

0.20

Boeing

BA

292.47 446.01 374.88 +6.32 +1.7 +16.2 +10.3 35

8.22

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

7.61

3.75

9.35

2.79

5.82

-.20 -6.7

+8.1 -59.8 dd

-.02 -0.3 +47.3 -24.2 dd

... McDonald’s

...

Caleres Inc.

CAL

18.01

41.09 18.42 +.10 +0.5 -33.8 -45.0

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.35

62.08 45.81 +.37 +0.8 -13.4 -20.9 14 1.04b

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 55.38

... -10.7 16

...

Charter

CHTR 271.56 400.00 398.77 +1.02 +0.3 +39.9 +35.8 79

...

Cigna

CI

Citigroup

C

141.95 226.61 159.75 48.42

-.08 -0.1

-.45 -0.3 -11.2

9

0.28

Olin

Post Holdings

POST

83.88 113.73 104.20 -1.22 -1.2 +16.9 +23.2 11

...

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

127.84 155.06 155.28 +2.44 +1.6 +10.7 +9.6 14

2.40

RELV SR

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

Stifel Financial

53.40

72.55 58.17

-.12 -0.2

28.18

59.16 28.57

-.51 -1.8 -23.5 -40.5 15

Emerson

EMR

55.39

Energizer Holdings

ENR

38.31

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.09

1.96 US Bancorp 65.57 40.43 +1.23 +3.1 -10.5 -34.6 27 1.20f US Steel 58.15 40.67 -.47 -1.1 +8.1 -24.8 11 0.60f Verizon

Esco Technologies

56.65

78.32 77.90 +.54 +0.7 +18.3 +32.7 21

FELP

0.60 10.22

4.10

.77

-7.3 21

-.01 -1.7 -78.0 -76.4 dd

4.64

20.92

Reliv

0.32 WalMart 0.13 Walgreen Boots

19.31 11.02 +.10 +0.9 -30.5 -21.4 13 0.24a Wells Fargo

Club Fitness expands with 24th location: The locally based Club Fitness chain is expanding in the St. Louis region with a new gym in Maplewood opening Saturday at 7 a.m. Club Fitness invested $3 million on the 40,000-square-foot gym at Deer Creek Shopping Center at 3256 Laclede Station Road. The gym has 60 employees and plans to hire additional employees. Fresh Thyme grocery chain adding Midtown store: The Fresh Thyme grocery chain is opening a new store at City Foundry STL, a mixed-use development being built on the site of the former Century Electric Foundry complex in Midtown St. Louis. The 30,000-square-foot store in the redeveloped Byco building at the southwest corner of Forest Park Avenue and Spring Avenue will open in the fall of 2020. It’ll be Chicagobased Fresh Thyme’s seventh store in the St. Louis region. “Adding Fresh Thyme to the tenant mix at City Foundry STL is exciting for many reasons,” Steve Smith, principal owner of City Foundry STL and CEO of Lawrence Group said in a statement. “Convenient access to fresh, affordable food is one of the most important assets of any neighborhood. It was a major goal of ours to offer this to the community.” The $210 million first phase of City Foundry STL is slated to include 122,000 square feet of restaurant and entertainment space, 105,000 square feet of shops and 107,000 square feet of office space. Walmart to pay $282 million in corruption probes: The Securities and Exchange Commission says it has reached a $144 million settlement with Walmart for failing to stem corruption in its overseas units in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico. That settlement is in addition to a $138 million criminal payment finalized Thursday in

federal court for paying more than $500,000 to a Brazilian intermediary nicknamed the “sorceress” for her ability to expedite construction permits. Walmart said Thursday the deals constitute a global settlement of all federal investigations into violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The company says it now has strong anti-corruption programs in place. Walmart’s overseas practices have been under investigation since at least 2012. The SEC said Walmart allowed its foreign subsidiaries to employ third-party intermediaries who made payments to foreign government officials. Olive Garden’s sales, traffic fell in quarter: Darden Restaurants Inc., whose biggest chain is Olive Garden, reported samestore sales rose 1.6% in the period that ended May 26, trailing projections. The company also forecast comparable sales growth for the year of 1% to 2%, while analysts had estimated 2.7%, according to Consensus Metrix. While Olive Garden has focused on everyday value on its menu to attract customers, that failed to boost visitors to the chain. Traffic last quarter dropped 0.4%. Like other restaurant companies, Darden, which also owns LongHorn Steakhouse, may be seeing higher food costs. A swine fever outbreak in Asia has crimped pork supplies globally and driven up prices for chicken and beef, too. On a positive note, LongHorn’s same-store sales topped projections last quarter and the chain saw traffic rise. Darden is facing heightened competition from rivals such as Chili’s, which has revamped its loyalty program and partnered with DoorDash for delivery. Darden, meanwhile, has mostly shunned delivery, opting instead to promote takeout options. From staff reports

CHG

CLOSE

1392.90 15.47 805.60

Gold Silver

3.80 70.25

0.28

33.89 33.82 +.38 +1.1 +51.9 +23.1 42

...

-.30 -5.8 +14.8 +9.1 dd

...

87.13 85.34 +.59 +0.7 +15.2 +24.7 19

2.37 0.60

5.89

4.86

SF

38.39

59.93 56.33 +.34 +0.6 +36.0

TGT

60.15

90.39 86.21 +.05 +0.1 +30.4 +15.0 14 2.64f

UPS

89.89 125.09 103.40 +1.84 +1.8

+6.0

-0.6 18

-8.3 17

+48.30 +.52 -.20

43.14

55.56 52.16 +.04 +0.1 +14.1 +3.6 13

1.48

X

11.67

38.89 14.55

-.62 -4.1 -20.2 -56.3

8

0.20

VZ

49.01

61.58 57.34

-.29 -0.5

7

2.41

WMT

83.40 109.96 110.32 +.70 +0.6 +18.4 +33.6 63 2.12f

WBA

49.31

86.31 52.88

WFC

43.02

59.53 45.86 +.21 +0.5

-.02

... -22.6 -15.4 10 -0.5 -13.9 10

1.76 1.80

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.13 2.03 1.90 1.73 1.73 1.86 2.00 2.53

-0.05 -0.09 -0.07 -0.03 -0.03 -0.02 -0.02 -0.01

1.93 2.13 2.35 2.57 2.79 2.89 2.94 3.07

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.50 5.50 5.00

2.38 2.38 1.88

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.51 2.53 5.96 3.39 3.26 .22

-0.02 -0.07 -0.08 -0.01 -0.05 -0.10

1.99 3.32 6.26 3.94 4.01 .81

GlobalMarkets

3.84

USB

+2.0 +23.8

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2% on Thursday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

0.56f

3.92 +.07 +1.8 -16.2 -17.4 dd

5.55

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST

.0231 .6889 .2603 1.2667 .7522 .1448 1.1245 .0144 .2781 .009262 .052474 .0157 .0698 .000853 1.0079

PreciousMetals

0.80

PRFT

EPC

FF

5

Perficient

CBSH

Foresight Energy

46.27 23.51 +.19 +0.8 -22.9 -44.3

+4.3 -26.4

3.75

Edgewell

FutureFuel

32.00 20.98 +.39 +1.9

21.42

Commerce Banc.

ESE

17.87

... 1.32

BTU

0.04

+9.6

+9.8 +2.5 23 2.20f

9.58 +.19 +2.0 -39.4 -53.5

SKIS

1.80

79.70 65.51 +2.03 +3.2

36.65

Peabody Energy

-7.6 15 -6.0 15

8.42

Peak Resorts

75.24 68.10 +.51 +0.8 +30.8 +3.9 10 +3.2

84.75 118.23 101.44 +2.71 +2.7

OLN

Spire Inc

PREV

.0231 .6923 .2605 1.2701 .7580 .1459 1.1295 .0144 .2792 .009323 .052663 .0159 .0699 .000864 1.0197

Platinum

158.09 215.43 211.25 +3.31 +1.6 +22.9 +6.8 21

BUD

Bank of America

$43.70

NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

Ameren Corp

LOW

$20.99

Interestrates Interestrates

ABInBev

-6.7 22 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc -.06 -0.1 +13.7 +21.0 6 1.80 MasterCard

CHG

+3.12 +.0508 +5.49 -.091

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest

J

Vol.: 638.2k (3.1x avg.) PE: 9.6 Mkt. Cap: $998.3 m Yield: 1.6%

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

22,000 21,000

A M 52-week range

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

+9 +12.25 +4.25

CHICAGO MERC

Milk

M

ExchangeRates CHG

Feeder cattle Live cattle

2,600

23,000

20

J $125.33

CHICAGO BOT

Wheat

2,800

24,000

A M 52-week range

Vol.: 4.0m (2.9x avg.) PE: 21.9 Mkt. Cap: $14.6 b Yield: 2.5%

Soybeans

3,000

27,000

M

Futures

S&P 500

2,900

10 DAYS

M

Vol.: 18.5m (4.8x avg.) PE: 11.1 Mkt. Cap: $25.7 b Yield: 4.1%

2,960

Close: 26,753.17 Change: 249.17 (0.9%)

25,760

J

MEI

Close: $26.99 0.27 or 1.0% The electrical component maker missed Wall Street’s quarterly forecasts and gave investors a weak annual outlook. $35

50

Dow Jones industrials

26,280

Methode Electronics

DRI

Close: $118.67 1.26 or 1.1% The restaurant chain behind Olive Garden reported weaker-than-expected sales growth during its fiscal fourth quarter. $125

55

Vol.: 50.0m (4.4x avg.) PE: 20.7 Mkt. Cap: $194.8 b Yield: 1.7%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Darden Restaurants

CCL

Close: $48.80 -4.04 or -7.7% The cruise line cut its profit outlook because of a problem with a ship and the U.S. ban on cruises to Cuba. $60

$60

$42.40

26,800

Carnival

ORCL

Close: $56.99 4.31 or 8.2% The software maker beat Wall Street’s fiscal third quarter profit and revenue forecasts.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2954.18 12355.39 7424.44 28550.43 5535.57 43645.11 21462.86 100303.41 16574.83 9978.52

CHG

CHG

YTD

+27.72 +46.86 +20.90 +348.29 +17.13 +269.44 +128.99 +899.02 +63.04 +16.87

+0.95% +0.38% +0.28% +1.24% +0.31% +0.62% +0.60% +0.90% +0.38% +0.17%

+17.84% +17.01% +10.35% +10.58% +17.01% +4.81% +7.24% +14.13% +15.72% +18.38%

Boeing eyes new 737 Max sales following post-crash drought BY ANGELA CHARLTON AND CATHERINE GASCHKA

Associated Press

Boeing’s post-crash business slump may be coming to an end. The plane maker said Thursday that it’s in negotiations with several customers interested in buying the 737 Max jet, as it tries to rebuild trust in the plane and its own reputation after two Max crashes that killed 346 people. But rival Airbus is keeping up the pressure, seeking to win over the one and only Max customer Boeing has landed so far

since the accidents. While the Max remains grounded pending regulatory approval of a software fix, Boeing Senior Vice President Ihssane Mounir said that several companies around the world are considering new 737 Max orders because “it’s a long-term game, and people would like to get ahead of their plans.” At the Paris Air Show this week, Boeing won its first endorsement of the 737 since an Ethiopian Airlines crash in March and a Lion Air crash in October in Indone-

sia. IAG, owner of British Airways and several other carriers, signed a letter of intent for a mammoth purchase: 200 Max aircraft worth $24 billion at list prices. While the deal is subject to final agreement, it was a vote of confidence in Boeing as it struggles to win back trust from airlines, pilots, regulators and the traveling public. Overall, Airbus secured more firm orders or promises from customers than Boeing, notably of the newly launched A321XLR singleaisle, long-range plane.

St. Louis County gets $400,000 from EPA BY BRYCE GRAY

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis County’s Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority will receive $400,000 in additional funding from the Environmental Protection Agency, according to a Thursday announcement. The sum is part of $9.3 million in supplemental funding that the agency distributed to “24 current successful Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) grantees,” the EPA announcement said.

“The funds will be used to continue their progress in reusing vacant and abandoned properties and turning them into community assets such as housing, recreation and open space, health facilities, social services, and commerce opportunities,” the agency said. St. Louis County is one of two Missouri recipients for the funding, with an equal portion directed to Kansas City’s municipal government. “Kansas City, Mo., and St.

Louis County, Mo., are excellent candidates for Brownfields supplemental funding,” said EPA Region 7 Administrator Jim Gulliford, in a statement. “Kansas City and St. Louis County will use these funds to assist some of the most disadvantaged communities within their jurisdiction by mitigating contamination to protect human health and the environment, making these properties ready for reuse, attracting public and private investment for redevelopment, and creating jobs.”

Mercy hospital system announces job cuts BY ANNIKA MERRILEES

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Mercy hospital system announced Thursday that the company will be cutting jobs. “We are restructuring this week, reducing targeted positions and moving some co-workers into new roles,” the Chesterfield-based company said in a statement. The company cited reduced reimbursement for services under Medicare and Medicaid,“which do

not fully cover the costs of care.” Increased expenses for labor and rising costs for drugs and supplies were also referenced as factors. Mercy has hospitals in the St. Louis area, Springfield and other cities across the state, as well as in Arkansas, Kansas and Oklahoma. A spokesperson said that the impact of Thursday’s announcement is spread out over the states. The changes are expected to affect less than 1% of the company’s

45,000-member workforce. “Our hearts and prayers go out to our affected co-workers and their families. They will receive help finding new jobs and a severance package including compensation and benefits based on their position and length of service,” Mercy said in a statement. The company has been notifying the affected employees over the past two weeks, according to a spokesperson.


BUSINESS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Pens From B1

Crooker took it upon himself to commission a “signature ink” in medium teal for the St. Louis show. “I wanted something interesting, but still dark enough to show up,” he said. Turns out, great minds ink alike. The Poland-produced pigment sold out before the pen show closed its doors. This year’s custom color? Butterscotch. Pens and inks aren’t the only draws of the second annual St. Louis Pen Show, said organizer Anne Morgan, 76, of Ballwin. The show, which runs Friday through Sunday at the Sheraton Westport Plaza Hotel, features more than 150 vendors from across the country and several international ones. There will be modern and vintage fountain pens and ballpoints, pencils, paper and journals, plus repair services, ink testing and an auction. About 1,400 people attended

Virtual From B1

regardless of insurance, for a cost of $25 per virtual visit. Anyone 18 and older can create an account; children’s visits must be completed by a parent or guardian. If a prescription is needed, it’s called in to a pharmacy.For patients who are directed to their primary physician or urgent care for further treatment, no fee is charged. The service can be used for people ages 2 to 75, unless they have a pre-existing condition such as

Nicklaus From B1

the bankruptcy case was administratively closed in 2004, the trust made a series of payments to creditors, the most recent of which was for $29,879 in 2009. Blackwell did not return calls seeking comment on the case. Wendi Alper-Pressman, who filed the involuntary bankruptcy

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

versary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad. The clip is a golden spike, a miniature version of the one that connected the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads in Utah. Oscarson won’t be selling his $6,000 pens at the show — they are available locally at Clarkson Jewelers — but he’ll have them on display while he explains the creation process and talks about their history. “It’s just like a ring or watch or anything else,” he said. “It’s an art form.” For visitors who aren’t looking for quite that substantial of an investment, the pen show has an array of writing tools for anyone who likes to put pen to paper. “You can go in with $5 and come out with a pen,” Oscarson said. “A great pen makes a statement. It’s a conversation piece.”

last year’s show, and Morgan expects bigger crowds this year. The show has been written up in the Pennant, the publication of the Pen Collectors of America, and Pen World Magazine. “There are a lot of people excited about pens,” she said. “With St. Louis in the middle of the country, people come from all over.” Morgan’s husband is the collector in the family. She’s the organizer. The retired couple are representative of the more prolific members of the pen-collecting community, who have the time and disposable income to indulge their hobby. But Morgan said she has also seen an uptick in younger collectors. Pens don’t take up a lot of space. They come in every price range. And they are a way to express your individuality at work or school. A resurgence in journaling, led by millennials and their Instagram-ready bullet journals, have made decorative pens popular by association. According to NPD Group, a market re-

search company, sales of notebooks and journals were up 18% last year over the year before. People who purchased bullet journals were also more likely to buy specialty pens and other writing instruments. This year’s show includes classes on journaling, sketching, calligraphy, cursive and grinding your own ink. There will also be scavenger hunts for children and adults. Morgan said that last year’s St. Louis show brought in more children than any of the other 16 pen shows held in the United States. For young people accustomed to typing or swiping, pens are a novelty. “There might be a desire for people to get back to handson, analog hobbies because everything is digital today,” said Crooker, who has two young sons. “Plus, everybody likes to talk pens. The best part of a pen show is the people.” Wildwood artist David Oscarson, 52, is one of the show’s sponsors and will be sharing his expertise from 20 years of de-

signing high-end pens. Oscarson, who grew up in Stockholm, works with goldsmiths in England to create limited-edition, hand-crafted collections that commemorate historical people and events. The penmaking process involves a pattern-carving technique called guilloche, which refracts light. Layers of enamel are applied and fired in a thousand-degree furnace. The pieces are then ground to their desired shape with a diamond file. Oscarson’s most recent design celebrates the 150th anni-

cancer or HIV or are taking immunosuppression drugs. “We were very purposeful in making the decision of what is the appropriate patient to see with this care,” said Powell.She stressed that the program could be an alternative to urgent care but is not meant to replace the role of a primary care physician. But it allows common ailments such as the flu, colds, bladder infections and pink eye to be addressed without requiring a trip to a physician’s office or urgent care center. “One of the things that isn’t

considered is how much transportation and mobility in health care affects treatment,” Powell said. “This is a convenient service for people who would struggle to get care otherwise, including patients in rural communities. We’re trying to close the loop on health care.” Since February, about 150 patients a month have accessed SSM’s virtual visit program in the St. Louis region. “I really do like that they’re getting skin in the game, because the fact of the matter is it improves health care access,” said Janine Garcy of the Heartland Telehealth

Resource Center, an agency based out of the University of Kansas Medical Center. “It helps the patient save time and travel costs. They can avoid missing work and school.” Heartland offers free assistance to smaller health care providers in Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma to implement or expand telehealth services in rural and underserved areas. Garcy said that telemedicine options have expanded as doctors and patients have become more comfortable with technology and insurers have broadened their re-

imbursement policies. Virtual visits are among the newer platforms in telemedicine. Research done last year by JAMA Internal Medicine found that there were six virtual care visits per 1,000 customers with private health insurance, up from virtually zero in 2008. “Someday we’re just going to call telemedicine health care. It’s just a different way of providing it,” she said. “It’s done a great job of improving access.”

petition on behalf of creditors in 1992, said she thought the litigation with Lurie was the main reason why the case took so long to resolve. “In the best of all worlds, this would have taken six or seven years,” she said. “Why it took 27 years, I can’t tell you, but this would have to be up there with the longest cases.” Spencer Desai, another attorney who was involved in the case’s early years, can’t remem-

ber any other case of similar duration. “In this district, to my knowledge it’s the longest,” he said. “I don’t think anyone anticipated it would stretch out this long.” Law firm bankruptcies tend to last longer than other cases, Washington University law professor Dan Keating says. The concept of joint and several liability can mean fights with partners over assets, and the firm itself can claim income from un-

resolved cases. Still, 27 years is extraordinary. “Law firm assets are the kind of thing that it might take awhile to collect,” Keating says. “That explains the first 10 years of the case but it doesn’t really explain the next 15. At some point in time, maybe there just wasn’t much money there and nobody cared.” Of all the courtroom drama, the happiest moment may have been during the long partner-

liability hearing in 1993. Norman Pressman, a former Popkin & Stern partner, stepped to the lectern and asked Wendi Alper, the creditors’ attorney, to marry him. She said yes. Someday soon, they may finally be able to say their marriage has lasted longer than the case that included their engagement.

If you go WHAT St. Louis Pen Show WHEN 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday WHERE Sheraton Westport Plaza Hotel, 900 Westport Plaza HOW MUCH $5 MORE INFO stlpenshow.com

Colleen Schrappen • 314-340-8072 @cschrappen on Twitter cschrappen@post-dispatch.com

Colleen Schrappen • 314-340-8072 @cschrappen on Twitter cschrappen@post-dispatch.com

David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

COMMEMORATIVE

BOOK

BACK COVER

GLORIOUS! THE ST. LOUIS BLUES’ HISTORIC QUEST FOR THE 2019 STANLEY CUP The St. Louis Blues’ run to the 2019 Stanley Cup was filled with the kinds of twists and turns that defy belief. Near the bottom of the standings in November, the Blues replaced head coach Mike Yeo with Craig Berube. Led by captain Alex Pietrangelo, Ryan O’Reilly and rookie goaltender Jordan Binnington, St. Louis went from last place in January to winning 30 of their final 45 games to secure a playoff berth. In a thrilling postseason, the Blues prevailed in hard-fought series against the Winnipeg Jets, Dallas Stars, and San Jose Sharks to reach the Stanley Cup Final. Packed with stunning photography and expert analysis from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Glorious! takes fans through this unbelievable journey, from the fractured state of the team in November to the whirlwind push to save the season to the final exhilarating minutes against the Boston Bruins. This special commemorative book also includes in-depth profiles of Binnington, Pietrangelo, O’Reilly, Perron and other Blues stars.

$14.95 TO ORDER: 128 PAGES, 8.5 X 11; PAPERBACK

triumphbooks.com/BluesWin OR CALL 1-800-888-4741 BETWEEN 9:00 A.M. AND 5:00 P.M. CT.


BUSINESS

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

Coal From B1

announcement — which took at least some experts by surprise — does raise natural questions about its broader significance and what it could mean for the two companies, moving forward. Under terms of the agreement, Peabody would control 66.5% of the joint venture, with a 33.5% stake going to Arch Coal. The deal is expected to “unlock synergies” of approximately $820 million, according to the companies. The centerpiece of the move, the companies said, is the combination of Peabody’s North Antelope Rochelle Mine and Arch Coal’s Black Thunder mine — adjacent surface-mining operations near Wright, Wyoming, that share a property line. The two coal mines are the most prolific in the U.S. by far, respectively accounting for 101 million tons and 70 million tons of production in 2017, according to the latest government data. For comparison, the country’s third-most productive coal mine — also in Wyoming — produced 28 million tons that year. Of course, Wyoming’s Powder River Basin is known for more than simply the massive size of its mines. Mining in the region is more cost-effective, thanks to thick coal seams relatively close to the surface, and coal from the geologic formation is lower in sulfur compared to that from other regions, like Appalachia — putting it in greater demand for wide swaths of coal-burning power companies looking to comply with air pollution standards.

Following the announcement, Peabody said the deal arose after conditions aligned on a variety of fronts, according to company spokesman Vic Svec. Peabody “has a pretty rich set of experiences with joint ventures,” Svec said, explaining that at its operations in Australia, for instance, it is relatively common for the company to partner with nearby miners, or even large customers at times. But the announced partnership with longtime neighbor and competitor Arch Coal is a first, he said. While some have speculated that an alliance between Peabody and Arch could make sense, other outside experts said the news was a bit unexpected. “I didn’t foresee it between Arch and Peabody,” said Rob Godby, a University of Wyoming professor of energy economics, noting that some other coal companies have sought partnerships since the wave of bankruptcies that rippled through the industry in recent years. But he said the deal makes sense on a variety of levels — particularly for reasons stemming from control and reduced competition. “This creates one operator that controls almost a third of U.S. coal production and two-thirds of Powder River Basin coal production,” said Godby. “If they avoid competition with one another, that’s better for both companies. … You don’t want two giants hammering one another. That’s bad for both.” Godby doesn’t think the move is necessarily the prelude to a merger or something more — noting that the companies run much larger enterprises than just their coal operations in Wyoming and Colorado.

But he said the joint venture essentially provides all the benefits of a merger without any of the messy sticking points that can often derail such a deal — like who would acquire whose debt. In the meantime, he explained, the companies can benefit from cutting costs and coordinating deliveries at their nearby or adjacent operations. “In some ways, it might be better than a merger,” Godby said. “They’re getting the best of all worlds.” Godby said the arrangement reminded him and some colleagues of an old tactic used elsewhere in the fossil fuel industry: the practice of “unitization” employed in oil fields. Instead of competing to draw oil from the same oil patch and driving down costs during an oil boom, producers historically devised strategies to “put the field under one operator, allow them to avoid competition and share profit,” Godby said. “This looks a lot like that. It’s almost like they unitized a good chunk of the Powder River Basin,” said Godby, adding that unitization was first used at an oil field near Midwest, Wyoming — only about 50 miles west of the giant Powder River Basin coal mines. “We’re not used to seeing that in coal.” Despite the maneuver to reduce competition, Godby thinks the companies can assuage any concerns from antitrust regulators by arguing that it is a needed move, given the intense competition faced within the basin and across the industry. Some, though, may see otherwise. “I’m sure it will raise some eyebrows,” he said. “There could be some people who think they’re trying to cor-

We Specialize in Area Rugs! More Selection at Sale Prices!

Over 8,400 Rugs!

60-70% Off Suggested retail

Volume Rug Gallery

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

ner the market for Powder River Basin coal.” Peabody, meanwhile, said it has a high level of confidence that the deal will be approved within multiple months, according to Svec. Arch Coal did not respond to a request for comment. It is not immediately clear what the impact of a deal could be for workers, or how many employees may get roped into the “synergies” touted by Peabody and Arch. Wednesday’s announcement indicated that the assets involved in the joint venture “are operated by a workforce of approximately 3,300.” Svec said workforce reductions are not a main focus of the companies’ costcutting aspirations. “This is about mine sequencing, planning, purchasing, economies of scale and things such as blending and other elements,” Svec said. Godby added that while some people in Wyoming could be nervous about the move shedding jobs, others are optimistic and believe “it gives the company a little more strength, which keeps those jobs a little more stable.” In the end, though, the move may be unlikely to change the long-term outlook for the companies and the market for coal used in power generation. “It’s pretty clear that the Powder River Basin looks like it’s in a long-term structural decline,” Godby said. Instead, he sees the move as consistent with the companies’ post-bankruptcy behavior. Whereas the coal giants used to be more willing to gamble on expansion or aggressive moves for growth, this deal reflects a new attitude geared more toward careful profit maximization, he said. “Both companies — but particularly Peabody — since their bankruptcy, have been clear about that,” said Godby. “You could argue it was that growth strategy that led both companies to bankruptcy.”

St. Louis’ Best Kept Secret

8994 Manchester (2 blocks West of Brentwood) VolumeCarpet.com

314-963-7847

Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

Stocks From B1

Major stock indexes in Europe also finished higher. Despite uncertainty over the global economy, the lingering U.S. trade war with China and the prospect of geopolitical conflict with Iran, stock investors have been in a buying mood this month. That’s been a marked reversal from May, when jitters over the escalating trade conflict between Washington and Beijing derailed the market’s strong start to the year. The market’s recovery gained momentum this week after the central bank said on Wednesday that it stands ready to cut interest rates. Traders also grew more hopeful that trade talks between the U.S. and China may make progress this month. The top U.S. trade negotiator is scheduled to meet with his Chinese counterpart to discuss a trade dispute between the world’s two biggest economies before a summit next week in Japan between Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping of China. The market has rallied in the past and then dipped again because of seemingly good news on trade talks that did not result in any concrete progress. Technology stocks accounted for a big share of Thursday’s gains. Oracle led the sector, and all stocks in the S&P 500, jumping 8.2% after the software company reported solid financial results. Industrial companies also notched solid gains. United Rentals climbed 3.4%. The spike in oil prices sent energy sector stocks broadly higher. Noble Energy gained 6.2%. Benchmark crude oil rose 5.4% to settle at $56.65 a barrel. Brent crude oil, the international standard, rose 4.3% to close at $64.45 a barrel. Crude prices surged as tension between the U.S. and Iran intensified, stoking fears that oil shipments through the Strait of Hormuz could be compro-

mised. Iran’s Revolutionary Guard said it shot down a U.S. drone on Thursday over Iranian airspace. The drone shooting follows last week’s attack on two oil tankers near the Gulf of Oman. Bond yields continued to slide a day after the Federal Reserve signaled that it is prepared to cut its benchmark interest rate if needed to shield the U.S. economy from trade conflicts or other threats. While the central bank left interest rates unchanged, investors are betting on at least one interest rate cut this year. After sliding for much of the day, the yield on the 10year Treasury note inched up to 2.03% from 2.02% late Wednesday. “That’s kind of confirming investors’ nervousness and search for safety,” Bell said. “At the same time, you have the stock market rallying because history has shown once the Fed starts cutting rates, six to 12 months after that you do get a rally in the equity market.” Another factor driving demand for U.S. Treasurys is that government bonds in Germany and other countries are returning negative yields, making U.S. bonds more attractive. Shares in work messaging platform Slack surged in their stock market debut. The company’s shares opened trading at $38.25 and closed 48.5% higher. Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft, video conferencing company Zoom Video Communications and digital scrapbooking site Pinterest have all gone public in recent weeks. In other commodities trading, wholesale gasoline rose 2.9% to $1.79 per gallon. Heating oil climbed 3% to $1.88 per gallon. Natural gas fell 4% to $2.19 per 1,000 cubic feet. Gold rose 3.6% to $1,396.90 per ounce, silver also rose 3.6% to $15.49 per ounce and copper rose 1.2% to $2.71 per pound. The dollar fell to 107.27 Japanese yen from 107.97 yen on Wednesday. The euro rose to $1.1295 from $1.1245.

A beautiful new bathtub right over your old one!

ASK US ABOUT OUR SHOWER OPTIONS!

SAVE

$

UP TO

900 *

OR

48

MONTHS NO INTEREST FINANCING**

CALL NOW FOR YOUR

+

FREE MOEN SHOWER HEAD WITH PURCHASE!

Call for your FREE in-home CONSULTATION

618-207-2140 314-227-9009 Bath Fitter Franchise. Independently owned and operated by Ideal Bathroom Solutions LLC

®Registered trademark of Bath Fitter Franchising Inc.

*Special offer good on the purchase of a bathtub or shower, wall and faucet kit. One offer per customer. 20% off up to $900. May not be combined with any other offer. Offer must be presented at the time of estimate. Discount applies to same day purchases only. Previous orders and estimates excluded. Offer valid only at the above location. ** Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. Subject to certain limitations. Offer expires on 2019-06-30.


BUSINESS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Home projects suffer from worker shortage

EasyEntry Shower

BY KAREN D’SOUZA

St Louis local and Veteran owned - VA Certified

OUR QUALITY IS TIMELESS. THIS HEARING AID PRICE ISN’T!

the kids, especially if they go to bed early. Making dinner and doing homework can take up all your quality time. Zillow also found that parents are more likely to have an offer or mortgage financing package fall through and they attend more open houses. Despite the extra effort, two-thirds of these buyers with children say they ultimately made sacrifices to stay within their budget. About a third of them sacrificed a shorter commute (34.1%), a larger home (31.2%) or their desired finishes (32.7%), according to a nationwide survey of recent homebuyers. For the record, renters with children also have it rough. They fill out 1.9 times as many applications as renters without kids and it takes them a month longer to find their home. Many renters with children also are financially vulnerable, with more than half (54.1%) saying in a survey that they couldn’t afford a $1,000 unexpected expense. The good news is that 94.6% of parents who recently bought a home say they love it, which is actually slightly higher than those without kids. A softening home market might help too. “As markets cool, parents will have more time to breathe and reflect on what tradeoffs they’re willing to make,” says Olsen. “With interest rates back down, they’re be more able to lock in an affordable monthly payment that will last through college. The trick is finding the home that still fills the family’s needs as toddlers turn into kids, kids into teenagers, and teenagers into the young adults in your basement.”

Save On Premium Quality Hearing Aids! OFFERS Hearing is believing! Right now, for a very limited time, you can get EXPIRE a full digital, genuine Miracle-Ear®hearing aid at HUGE SAVINGS!. 6/30/2019 This is one of our smallest, most discreet hearing solutions. Complete with Miracle-Ear sound quality, custom fitting and acomprehensive service and warranty program. Don’t wait. Getting Started. It’s Free and Easy. At Miracle-Ear, we make our process comfortable and convenient. We also offer you a variety of valuable services** at no charge*.

Look inside your ear canal…It could just be wax! But more importantly, it might help you to understand why you may be experiencing problems like: • Hearing but not being able to distinguish certain words? • Frequently asking people to repeat themselves • Difficulty hearing on the phone?

We can check for: • Excessive wax build-up • Damage to the eardrum • Fluid accumulation in the middle ear • Other conditions* Now you can get a picture of what’s happening inside your ear – literally. It won’t cost you a penny. • Free Hearing Test* • Free Video Otoscope Exam* • Free Consultation*

Why Wait? Take Advantage of This Offer Today! Call Today! Appointments Will Fill Quickly!

FEDERAL & STATE WORKERS: NO COST HEARING AIDS!

CALL BEFORE 6/30/2019. SCHEDULE YOUR ANNUAL HEARING EXAM CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE HEARING TEST* THAT’S RIGHT…NO CO-PAY, NO EXAM FEE, NO ADJUSTMENT FEE! Plus special factory pricing available to non-qualifiers.

Mention Promo Code: Save0605N

Hear A Better Day

TM

Federal and state workers and retirees may qualify for no cost hearing aids. Insurance pays total cost of two Miracle-Ear™ Audiotone Pro series aids. **Most Federal Government employees and retirees are eligible. You may even be covered if you have other non-federal insurance coverage. All candidates must go through a free evaluation and bring insurance information to verify eligibility.

All Health Insurances Accepted.

*Hearing tests are always free. Not a medical exam. Audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. **BlueCross BlueShield Insurance pays total cost of two Miracle-Ear Audiotone Pro series aids. Health insurance plans may vary by insurer, see store for details. 1 year warranty. If you have a basic plan, we have factory pricing for non-qualifiers.

Fully Programmable 24-Channel Hearing System

SAVE UP TO

$

595

• BTE and custom styles S TH I TH • Advanced options: feedback cancellation, N alerting tones, programmable telecoil MO LY! N and direct audio input O Offer valid on ME 3 Models only.Valid at participating Miracle-Ear™ locations. Limit one coupon per purchase. May not be combined with other offers and does not apply to prior sales. See store for details. Cash value 1/20 cent. Offer expires 6/30/2019.

FREE

South County 314-222-7368 Crystal City 314-714-4780 Saint Charles 636-552-9387 Arsenal 314-272-3475 Chesterfield 314-266-5487 Union Mention Promo Code: 30 Day 314-732-0961 Arnold 314-485-2614 West-Creve Coeur 314-485-2614 O’Fallon 636-552-9354 Florissant 314-403-7387 St. Peters 636-552-9309

Trial**

Save0605N

FREE

Mention Promo Code: Save0605N

BATTERY CHARGER

3

LIM

School’s out for summer. That means many kids are scrambling to have as much fun as possible — and many parents are hustling to move into a new home before school is back in session. Buying a home is tricky for anybody, especially if it’s your first one, but parents have a far more stressful time than those without kids, according to Zillow research. Parents with kids under 18 are far more likely to bust their budget and make smaller down payments. Sadly, they are also more likely to end up with crushing commutes and smaller homes than they wanted. “Having kids is a major destabilizer in life — their needs are constantly changing and seemingly impossible to anticipate,” said Skylar Olsen, Zillow’s director of economic research. “Combine all that uncertainty with a massive financial decision that inevitably requires tough trade offs among a limited set of options and has to be wrapped up in time to move before school starts and you’ve got one of the biggest challenges around.” For starters, parents tend to have a longer wish list. Things that may be negotiable for people without kids seem mandatory for parents. Think about things like safety, enrichment and community. They also place a higher importance on having the right number of bedrooms and bathrooms, private outdoor space and community amenities. Location is always key but it’s a deal breaker for parents, who need easy access to day care, schools and work. An endless commute means less time with

314-758-0594 618-857-3458

Fresh • Effortless Modern • Safe • Stylish

Zillow: Homebuyers with kids face greater struggles Tribune News Service

Call Today

IT E

yr

®

Y**

FORT COLLINS, Colo. — Lynn Osborne has been remodeling two homes. They are different styles, in different states, with different contractors. But there has been one constant: delays due to a shortage of skilled labor. The two-year remodel of her primary home in Fort Collins was to update and upgrade the 1990s house, and it included a small extension. It was completed last year, except for the landscaping, which is still underway. That general contractor relied heavily on subcontractors, she said, and sometimes they wouldn’t show, or would arrive days late, or did shoddy work and were fired. Her remodel of an old family beach retreat in New England took a Sears kit home down to the studs. The completion date was June 2018, but it’s still not done because the contractor, who has been doing most of the work himself, is stretched and unattentive. “He’d say,‘I’ll be out there next week,’ and next week would turn into next month, and next month would be six months,” she said. Current estimates indicate there are about 300,000 unfilled jobs in the construction industry, and the industry is expected to need an additional 747,000 workers by 2026, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. An August survey of nearly 375 members of the National Kitchen and Bath Association found that almost two-thirds of the respondents said they had difficulties hiring skilled workers in the previous year, and nearly 70% felt the problem had gotten worse since 2016. “Labor shortages have impacted start dates and completion dates on construction and renovation projects, with NKBA members citing delays on 30% of jobs,” said Bill Darcy, chief executive officer of the trade association. A look at 15 different

dirty or physically demand- well as underserved high ing, or mistakenly think the schools. jobs don’t use much techLowe’s last year started nology, Lattoz said. offering employees tuition “There’s definitely some and other incentives to train kind of stigma tied to this,” for jobs such as carpentry, she said. plumbing, and appliance Players in the industry repair. More than 1,350 asare ramping up efforts to sociates were enrolled in the address the impending cri- Track to the Trades program sis, launching incentives to this spring, Lowe’s spokestry to recruit new workers, woman Jennifer L. Weber especially young people, to said. the trades. In April, Lowe’s and 60 The Home Depot Foun- of its suppliers and partdation announced last year ners debuted a new program it was committing $50 mil- called Generation T , an onlion to skilled trades train- line marketplace for jobs, ing, with plans to attract apprenticeships and education programs in construcSUBMITTED TO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 20,000 people by 2028. “We want to bring shop tion. It’s also on Twitter and This photo provided by The Home Depot shows students training in Ft. Stewart, Ga. The class back, from coast to Facebook. Home Depot Foundation announced last year that it was committing $50 million to skilled coast,” Shannon Gerber, “If we don’t fill the extrades training with plans to attract 20,000 people by 2028. executive director of the isting skilled trade gap, foundation, said in a re- our businesses, homes and trades found shortages in Younger people aren’t in- reers because they think the lease. The program focuses communities will suffer,” them all, Darcy said in a terested in construction ca- jobs don’t pay well, are too on supporting veterans, as Weber said. telephone interview from NKBA headquarters in Hackettstown, New Jersey. For a FREE Estimate And as with previous years, he said, one of the greatest needs was for carpenters, who do rough-in work and framing, and finish carpenters, who hang cabinets, do millwork, flooring and install molding. Finding a quality finishing carpenter was one of the biggest frustrations in Osborne’s Fort Collins remodel. “One guy got started on the basement and just left, so to find somebody to pick up where he left off was hard,” she said. The seeds of the current labor shortage were planted during the Great Recession, when a lack of construction jobs prompted many workers to leave the industry. “Not enough of them have returned to help us close the gap,” Darcy said. Compounding the problem is the graying of the remaining workforce, with the median age for a construction worker at 42.5 years, according to January figures from the Labor Bureau. It’s estimated that for every five workers retiring from the industry, only one is entering it, said Silvia Lattoz, Governance and Global Relations Senior Manager at NKBA.

NT

BY KAREN SCHWARTZ

Associated Press

D WARR

A

• Battery charge lasts all-day! • No Batteries to buy or replace

Free battery charger with the purchase of a pair of select ME-1 or ME-2 hearing aids. May not be combined with other offers. Not valid on previous purchases. Must present coupon to receive offer. Offer expires 6/30/2019.

To receive your FREE pack of premium hearing aid batteries , go to: HEARING AID www.FreeOnlineBatteries.com Enter the Promo Code Save0605N If you don’t have access † BATTERIES ! to the internet simply call our office and make sure to reference Promo Code Save0605N. †

**If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 30 days of the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 06.21.2019 • C

‘A little bit left

Cardinals vs. Angels

in the tank’

7:15 p.m. Friday, FSM 1:15 p.m. Saturday, FSM 6:05 p.m. Sunday, ESPN

Pujols hopes to show he’s still a threat BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When the Los Angeles Angels come here to play the Cardinals this weekend for the first time in nine years, there will be story lines aplenty. There will be a reunion of the catching Molina brothers for the first time since they coached a Puerto Rican youth team together last November in Colombia. Yadier still catches for the Cardinals, former catcher Jose is a coach for the Angels, and former catcher Bengie is a broadcaster for the Cardinals. There will be the first appearance here, sort of, by Shohei Ohtani, the Angels’ talented pitcher-hitter who can’t throw this year after having elbow surgery but who can hit. Last week at Tampa Bay, he became the first Japanese-born player to hit for the cycle. There is no DH in these interleague games, so Please see PUJOLS, Page C6

It’s time to say thanks for the memories

Cards fall in 11 innings to Marlins

BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY DERRICK GOOLD

Cheer him. Stand up, clap, raise your overpriced beer. Whichever way you choose to show respect and appreciation at a Cardinals game, choose to do that when Albert Pujols comes to the plate. Remember the good times, of which there are too many to count. And be honest about the bad times, the ones St. Louis sidestepped when Pujols decided to depart. That second realization, perhaps more than anything else, is the one too often absent in the conversation that has continued as this weekend’s long-awaited baseball reunion neared. How will Pujols be received? The roar will be thunderous, and there will be tears, and the pregame ceremony will be remembered long after the outcome of this series fades. Yet in quiet pockets of that wall of sound at Busch Stadium, some will choose to abstain.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

With their better-late-thannever offense spurred by rookie infielder Tommy Edman, the Cardinals had a chance to wring three wins from a series against Miami by, for only the second time in five games against the forever routinely reeling Marlins, scoring five runs. It took eight, however, to win. A night after an extra-inning walk-off homer for the Cardinals, Miami held on after an 11th-inning homer snapped a tie game. No. 8 hitter J.T. Riddle pulled a two-run homer into the left-field seats to send Miami to a 7-6 victory Thursday at Busch Stadium. The Cardinals never led in the game, twice rallied to tie it, and didn’t take advantage of getting the winning run on base in the ninth and 10th innings. Riddle’s Please see CARDINALS, Page C5

Marlins 7, Cardinals 6, 11 innings Friday’s probables: Wacha (4-3, 6.00) vs. Canning (2-3, 3.93)

Please see FREDERICKSON, Page C6

Blues must dig deep in draft

U.S GETS REVENGE VS. SWEDEN

BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ALESSANDRA TARANTINO, AP PHOTO

The United States’ Tobin Heath, right, celebrates with her teammates after their second goal against Sweden on Thursday. Americans blank the team that beat them in the Olympics. C3 Up next: 11 a.m. Monday vs. Spain, FS1

When he met with his amateur scouts early in the Stanley Cup Final series, Blues general manager Doug Armstrong had a simple message: no excuses. Just nine days after the Blues became Stanley Cup champions with their Game 7 victory over the Boston Bruins, the 2019 NHL draft begins Friday in Vancouver, British Columbia. Never mind that the Blues don’t have a firstround pick. Never mind that they have only four picks overall. “We need to find players,” Armstrong said. “The guys have done a great job finding a player like Vince Dunn, Colton Parayko in the second, third rounds. That’s the task that we’ve given them now.”

While Armstrong was making a pit stop in Las Vegas for the NHL Awards show Tuesday and Wednesday, he said the Blues’ personnel department already had set up shop in Vancouver “going over their list a second and third time and trying to get a sense of what might and might not be available.” The first round of the draft takes place Friday, starting at 7 p.m. Rounds 2-7 are selected Saturday, starting at noon. As Stanley Cup champions, the Blues pick last in every round. So barring a move, they must wait until the end of the second round DAVID CARSON, POST-DISPATCH — No. 62 overall — to make their first pick of the draft early Satur- Blues defenseman Vince Dunn is day afternoon. Their other picks among numerous contributing players the Blues have found in the Please see BLUES, Page C8 middle rounds of the draft.

SPORTS

Join us as we relive the St. Louis Blues’ historic championship season!

June 27, 2019 | 5:30pm-8:00pm BLUES EDITION

Ballpark Village TICKETS: $10 - $35 TICKETS ON SALE NOW: STLTODAY.COM/OUREVENTS

PRESENTED BY

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 06.21.2019 • C

‘A little bit left

Cardinals vs. Angels

in the tank’

7:15 p.m. Friday, FSM 1:15 p.m. Saturday, FSM 6:05 p.m. Sunday, ESPN

Pujols hopes to show he’s still a threat BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When the Los Angeles Angels come here to play the Cardinals this weekend for the first time in nine years, there will be story lines aplenty. There will be a reunion of the catching Molina brothers for the first time since they coached a Puerto Rican youth team together last November in Colombia. Yadier still catches for the Cardinals, former catcher Jose is a coach for the Angels, and former catcher Bengie is a broadcaster for the Cardinals. There will be the first appearance here, sort of, by Shohei Ohtani, the Angels’ talented pitcher-hitter who can’t throw this year after having elbow surgery but who can hit. Last week at Tampa Bay, he became the first Japanese-born player to hit for the cycle. There is no DH in these interleague games, so Please see PUJOLS, Page C6

It’s time to say thanks for the memories

Cards fall in 11 innings to Marlins

BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Cheer him. Stand up, clap, raise your overpriced beer. Whichever way you choose to show respect and appreciation at a Cardinals game, choose to do that when Albert Pujols comes to the plate. Remember the good times, of which there are too many to count. And be honest about the bad times, the ones St. Louis sidestepped when Pujols decided to depart. That second realization, perhaps more than anything else, is the one too often absent in the conversation that has continued as this weekend’s long-awaited baseball reunion neared. How will Pujols be received? The roar will be thunderous, and there will be tears, and the pregame ceremony will be remembered long after the outcome of this series fades. Yet in quiet pockets of that wall of sound at Busch Stadium, some will choose to abstain.

Even with an early start and an overrun time of two innings, the Cardinals and Marlins overstuffed their series finale with everything from a big-league debut to a first big-league homer, from stolen signs to heated exchanges. And if all that wasn’t enough the game ended when Cardinals pitcher Jack Flaherty, the tying run, dove back to second base only to find a tag waiting for him for the final out. A game that ran long and then longer ended only when Flaherty came up short in the 11th inning. Sergio Romo’s pickoff of Flaherty secured Miami’s 7-6 victory Thursday at Busch Stadium, split a four-game series, and left the Cardinals to wonder about a game where they rallied twice, had 16 hits, and yet never led. Please see CARDINALS, Page C5

Marlins 7, Cardinals 6 (11) Friday’s probables: Wacha (4-3, 6.00) vs. Canning (2-3, 3.93)

Please see FREDERICKSON, Page C6

Blues must dig deep in draft

U.S GETS REVENGE VS. SWEDEN

BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ALESSANDRA TARANTINO, AP PHOTO

The United States’ Tobin Heath, right, celebrates with her teammates after their second goal against Sweden on Thursday. Americans blank the team that beat them in the Olympics. C3 Up next: 11 a.m. Monday vs. Spain, FS1

When he met with his amateur scouts early in the Stanley Cup Final series, Blues general manager Doug Armstrong had a simple message: no excuses. Just nine days after the Blues became Stanley Cup champions with their Game 7 victory over the Boston Bruins, the 2019 NHL draft begins Friday in Vancouver, British Columbia. Never mind that the Blues don’t have a firstround pick. Never mind that they have only four picks overall. “We need to find players,” Armstrong said. “The guys have done a great job finding a player like Vince Dunn, Colton Parayko in the second, third rounds. That’s the task that we’ve given them now.”

While Armstrong was making a pit stop in Las Vegas for the NHL Awards show Tuesday and Wednesday, he said the Blues’ personnel department already had set up shop in Vancouver “going over their list a second and third time and trying to get a sense of what might and might not be available.” The first round of the draft takes place Friday, starting at 7 p.m. Rounds 2-7 are selected Saturday, starting at noon. As Stanley Cup champions, the Blues pick last in every round. So barring a move, they must wait until the end of the second round DAVID CARSON, POST-DISPATCH — No. 62 overall — to make their first pick of the draft early Satur- Blues defenseman Vince Dunn is day afternoon. Their other picks among numerous contributing players the Blues have found in the Please see BLUES, Page C8 middle rounds of the draft.

SPORTS

Join us as we relive the St. Louis Blues’ historic championship season!

June 27, 2019 | 5:30pm-8:00pm BLUES EDITION

Ballpark Village TICKETS: $10 - $35 TICKETS ON SALE NOW: STLTODAY.COM/OUREVENTS

PRESENTED BY

2 M


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 6/21 vs. Angels 7:15 p.m. FSM

Saturday 6/22 vs. Angels 1:15 p.m. FSM

Sunday 6/23 vs. Angels 6:05 p.m. ESPN

Tuesday 6/25 vs. Athletics 7:15 p.m. FSM

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 6/22 vs. North Carolina 7:30 p.m.

Sunday 6/30 at Kansas City 4 p.m.

Saturday 7/6 vs. Loudoun 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 7/10 U.S. Open Cup at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m.

M 1 • FRIDAY • 06.21.2019

MEDIA VIEWS

Ex-Blues broadcaster Wilson relishes title

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Wed. 6/26: vs. Gateway, 5:05 p.m. Sat. 6/29: vs. So. Illinois, 7:05 p.m. Thu. 6/27: vs. Gateway, 6:35 p.m. Sun. 6/30: vs. So. Illinois, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 7:55 a.m. Formula One: French Grand Prix, practice 2, ESPNU 4:30 p.m. NASCAR: Toyota/Save Mart 350, final practice, FS1 4:55 a.m. (Sat.) Formula One: French Grand Prix, practice 3, ESPN2 BASEBALL 1 p.m. College World Series: Michigan vs. Texas Tech, ESPN 1:20 p.m. Mets at Cubs, MLB Network 6 p.m. College World Series: Vanderbilt vs. Louisville, ESPN 6 p.m. Astros at Yankees, MLB Network 7:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Angels, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) BASKETBALL 9:30 p.m. WNBA: Los Angeles at Seattle, CBSSN BOXING 9 p.m. Super welterweights: Sebastian Fundora vs. Hector Zepeda, Showtime FOOTBALL 8 p.m. CFL: BC at Edmonton, ESPN2 10:30 p.m. AFL Premiership: Melbourne vs. Fremantle, FS2 GOLF 8:30 a.m. European PGA: BMW International Open, second round, GOLF 11 a.m. Champions: American Family Insurance Championship, first round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Travelers Championship, second round, GOLF 5 p.m. Women’s PGA Championship, second round, GOLF 11 p.m. Asian Tour: Korea Open, third round, GOLF HOCKEY 7 p.m. NHL: Draft, first round, NBCSN HORSE RACING 7:30 a.m. Thoroughbreds: Royal Ascot, NBCSN SOCCER 6 p.m. CONCACAF Gold Cup: El Salvador vs. Jamaica, FS1 8:30 p.m. CONCACAF Gold Cup: Honduras vs. Curacao, FS1

DIGEST Murray wins doubles match in return to tennis That familiar fist pump. That indomitable spirit. It was as if Andy Murray had never been away. The three-time Grand Slam champion enjoyed a winning return to competitive tennis Thursday after five months away from the sport, combining with Feliciano Lopez to beat topseeded Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah in doubles at the Queen’s Club in London. Murray was taking the first steps of his tentative comeback from what he hopes was career-saving hip surgery 143 days ago. It was even longer ago that he was breaking down in tears at the Australian Open in January, saying he was planning to retire after Wimbledon because of the severe pain he felt on a daily basis. Yet Murray moved well, served well and, crucially, stayed pain-free throughout the 7-6 (5), 6-3 win in front of an excitable crowd on Center Court at the grass-court event. “It was brilliant, I enjoyed it a lot,” the former top-ranked Murray said. “I was a bit slow at the beginning but got better as the match went along. I’m really fortunate to be playing tennis again. Earlier in the singles, defending champion Marin Cilic, former winner Grigor Dimitrov and 2018 Wimbledon finalist Kevin Anderson all lost. Cilic and Anderson were knocked out in the second round, while Dimitrov didn’t make it past the first round having waited four days to play his opening match. Top-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas played two matches in one day as the rain-hit event tried to catch up, and he won both against Kyle Edmund and then Jeremy Chardy. He came from behind to beat Chardy 4-6, 7-6 (0), 7-6 (4). Outspoken Australian player Nick Kyrgios swore at officials and accused them of “rigging” his first-round match against Roberto Carballes Baena, which he won 7-6 (4), 6-3. Kyrgios lost his second-round match a few hours later, though, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (3), 7-5 to Auger-Aliassime. (AP) Other tennis: Roger Federer survived a scare in his bid for a record-extending 10th Halle Open title with a 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-5 win over Jo-Wilfried Tsonga on Thursday in Halle, Germany. Federer, who lost last year’s final to Borna Coric, next faces Roberto Bautista Agut in the quarterfinals of the Wimbledon warmup tournament. The Spaniard defeated Richard Gasquet 6-1, 6-4. Also Thursday, home favorite Alexander Zverev defeated American Steve Johnson 6-3, 7-5, and Stuttgart Open champion Matteo Berrettini beat Italian compatriot Andreas Seppi 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. ... Naomi Osaka lost in straight sets at the Birmingham Classic grass-court tournament on Thursday in England — and could soon lose her No. 1 ranking, too. The two-time Grand Slam champion from Japan never looked comfortable in a 6-2, 6-3 loss to Yulia Putintseva in the second round, choosing to sit on the court instead of her chair at changes of ends. No. 2 Ashleigh Barty and Venus Williams, a five-time Wimbledon champion, reached the quarterfinals. (AP) USOC changing name: The U.S. Olympic Committee is changing its name to include the Paralympic movement. The organization will be known as the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee under a change approved Thursday by the board of directors. The name will be seen immediately on social media platforms and soon in signs at the U.S. training center in Colorado Springs, Colo., along with other properties. CEO Sarah Hirshland says the decision reflects a “continuation of our long-standing commitment to create an inclusive environment for Team USA athletes.” Andrew Parsons, the president of the International Paralympic Committee, called it a “historic moment” for the Paralympic movement in the U.S. (AP)

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO BY CHRIS LEE

Ken Wilson sorts through notes before broadcasting a game between the Blues and the Edmonton Oilers on March 30, 2004 at Savvis Center in St. Louis. That was his final season in the Blues’ booth.

DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Oh, baby, Ken Wilson holds no grudges. Wilson, who spent 20 years as a Blues announcer before being unceremoniously dumped a decade and a half ago, certainly could be bitter about how things ended in St. Louis and have a disdain for the team. Wilson, now 71, never has had another sportscasting job and is living in Hawaii, where he got his start in broadcasting and returned to after his ouster. It’s been a far different path than he walked in St. Louis. The circumstances certainly could have soured Wilson on the Blues, but it has been quite the opposite. He said he was gleeful as he saw the Final on television and let out one or two of his signature “Oh, Baby!” exclamations while watching the team finally win the Stanley Cup last week. “It was exciting for me,” he said this week from Hawaii. “I had my first big screaming ‘Oh, Baby!’ when they got the second goal in Game 5 to make it 2-0 (in a 2-1 victory), then the goal in Game 7 that made it 3-0 that told us all they were going to win the Cup. My wife said she couldn’t believe how loud I screamed. I seems to me I was screaming ‘Oh, Baby!’ and it seemed rather natural. “I was absolutely thrilled, I could not have been any more excited. I didn’t cry much, but I cried a little bit in happiness (after they won). I was happy for the fans. This is what it’s all about anyway. It’s not about administrators and owners, broadcasters, writers. It’s really about the fans, and we’ve all been fans. That’s where the real joy is.” There wasn’t any joy for Wilson in 2004, when he was fired. Blues officials said the move was made in part because Wilson didn’t attend practices or socialize much, which Wilson has said was irrelevant to his job. Management at what now is Fox Sports Midwest wanted to keep him, but the team overruled that. “We felt we could be more electric, more energetic than we have been on television in recent years,” Blues vice president Jim Woodcock said then.

MAN ABOUT TOWN It was a rough way to leave for a guy who was a fixture in St. Louis sports for more than two decades. He not only broadcast the Blues, but also was a Cardinals announcer in the latter half of the 1980s and was a co-owner of the Frontier League’s River City Rascals and Gateway Grizzlies in the early years of those independent baseball clubs. He was replaced by John Kelly, son of legendary Blues announcer Dan Kelly, and Wilson said he was

FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch. com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-744-5725

The time frame for Albert Pujols’ return to St. Louis hasn’t been as long as the city’s justended 52-year wait for a Stanley Cup championship, but the once-beloved Cardinals slugger finally is set to play in town this weekend. It’s been eight seasons since he left for the Los Angeles Angels, after arguably the best 11-year start to a career in MLB history, and the media hype that just died down from the Blues’ celebrations will amp back up this weekend for Pujols-aloosa. KMOX (1120 AM) — the flagship station of the team’s radio network — already has been running clips of some of his Cardinals highlights. Fox Sports Midwest televises the first two games of the Cardinals-Angels series, at 7:15 p.m. Friday and 1:15 p.m. Saturday, and is going all out in its coverage plans. There was a lot of anger when he left, though time seemed to soothe most of that. But some fans again were riled by some comments Pujols made this spring to Graham Bensinger for his “In Depth” syndicated TV show. “I believe I made the right decision,” he said. convinced team executives didn’t want him passing Dan Kelly to become the club’s longest-tenured broadcaster — which he would have done with another season of work. “With the Blues’ ownership and upper management, there seems to be some dislike for Ken Wilson and a strong agenda to keep Dan Kelly’s name alive and to keep the Kelly name something like royalty in the world of the St. Louis Blues,” Wilson said at the time. “I am unable to fully explain their disdain for me other than to assume their agenda overwhelmed any and all reasonable thinking when it came to Ken Wilson.” Wilson didn’t exactly have a warm relationship with John Kelly when they shared Blues play-byplay duties before Kelly left in 1992 to be the No. 1 announcer with Tampa Bay. Wilson said then, and says now, that his biggest gripe was how things were handled. A fullseason NHL lockout was looming the next year, and he already had planned to move his family to Hawaii. He said he would have offered to cut his schedule to about 15 games on the West Coast, and if that wasn’t acceptable he simply would have announced his retirement. But instead he was fired and verbal shots were taken by both sides. All Blues executives at that time no longer are with the team.

But in a recent interview with the Post-Dispatch, Pujols said Cardinals supporters are “the best fans in baseball. No doubt.” Rick Horton, who will be the analyst on the FSM telecasts, has estimated that 90-95 percent of fans will cheer Pujols. And Dan McLaughlin, who will be calling those games, predicts an unprecedented positive reception. “I expect an amazing reception from the fans, a reception that no visiting player has ever received,” he said Thursday. “… Will there be some fans that don’t cheer for him? Probably. I would guess there won’t be many. It will be huge.” He is geared up for the calls. “Am I pumped? Sure,” he said. “… I’m more curious about how he reacts and his emotions.” The key moment will come when Pujols steps to the plate for the first time, and McLaughlin already is thinking about how he’ll handle that. “I have never scripted a call or moment,” he said. “ I let what happens on the field dictate what I might say.” ESPN has the series finale, at 6:05 p.m. Sunday. Its coverage starts at 5 o’clock. — Dan Caesar

Wilson said he moved on long ago. “Does it make sense that I’m not bitter?” he asked. “I never had any bitterness, and I have no bitterness today. All I’ve ever thought was it could have been handled better.”

LIFE AFTER BLUES After his messy exit from St. Louis, he spent a year as a television news reporter in Honolulu, then owned a pizza parlor there for nearly three years before moving to the Pacific Northwest for about a decade to run a pair of college baseball summer leagues, as well as a team. He lived in Portland, Ore., before recently returning to Hawaii. He’s not working now, but said he isn’t retired. “I’m between endeavors, I just don’t know quite what I want to do,” he said. In the end, the Blues’ accomplishment provided Wilson a time to reflect. “My memories of my time in St. Louis are the fondest of my life,” he said. “I never worked anywhere longer, or lived anywhere longer, than I did in St. Louis. I really, really enjoyed doing the Cardinals and obviously enjoyed doing the Blues. That’s the greatest connection I have anywhere in sports, the St. Louis Blues. It means a lot, and it always will mean a lot.” Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

McKernan in discussions to buy KFNS BY DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER

FSM set to showcase Pujols’ return to town

The on-again, off-again talk of Tim McKernan buying what once was St. Louis’ top sports-talk radio station, KFNS, from Randy Markel is heating up again. McKernan has made multiple business deals with Markel over the last three years that have included him running the operation for a time and having the right to match any offer for the station. Two years ago, Markel offered the station to McKernan — for what Markel said was $2.5 million. The sale never happened, and McKernan went back to focusing on his

successful “The Morning After” show and a podcast. But now Markel says he’s ready to sell 590 AM to McKernan. “The day we started, the plan was for him to buy me out somewhere from three to five years,” he said. “We now are coming up on the third year, we’ve turned things around. We now are in the black.” McKernan said the timing is right from his standpoint. “When I went to Randy in January of 2017 to let him know that I wanted to step away from operating the station, my wife had just found out she was pregnant with our first child, and we had

endured a major scare early in the pregnancy after dealing with multiple issues in trying to have a baby the previous three years.” McKernan said. “Fortunately, our son was born healthy later that year.” It is believed a sale of the station would get Markel, at best, about half the $2.5 million he previously sought. Markel estimates if he gets the price he seeks, he’ll have lost about $1 million with the station . “I’ve had a blast in radio,” said Markel, who recently sold his Chucks Boots stores for what he said is much more than he’d lose with KFNS.


SOCCER

06.21.2019 • FRIDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C3

FIFA WOMEN’S WORLD CUP

U.S. aces its final group test

COMMENTARY

Never a doubt U.S. wanted this grudge match BY MICHELLE KAUFMAN

Miami Herald

CHRISTOPHE ENA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The United States’ Megan Rapinoe, center, celebrates after teammate Tobin Heath’s shot deflected off a defender and into the net Thursday.

Victory over Sweden wraps up Group F in record style BY ANNE M. PETERSON

Associated Press

LE HAVRE, France — The defending champion U.S. national team faced its toughest opponent of the Women’s World Cup and remained dominant Thursday night, beating Sweden 2-0 to serve up a measure of revenge against the team that stunned the confident Americans in the last Olympics. Lindsey Horan scored within the first three minutes, the fastest goal of this tournament. The United States went up 2-0 on an own goal off Jonna Andersson in the 50th minute that gave the Americans a tournament-record 18 goals in the group stage. The U.S. did not concede a goal in its first three matches. “We needed this next level and we responded to that. That’s the ignition we needed,” U.S. coach

Jill Ellis said. Already assured a spot in the round of 16 before the game, the United States finished atop its group and will head to Reims to face Spain on Monday. Sweden will play Canada in Paris. The meeting was the first tournament game between the two teams since the quarterfinals of the 2016 Olympics. The Swedes bunkered in on defense and advanced on penalties after a 1-1 draw, handing the United States its earliest-ever exit from the Olympic tournament. Former U.S. goalkeeper Hope Solo called the Swedes “cowards” for the defensive stand, a comment that effectively ended her time with the U.S. team. “We’ve been part of some very big games against them, and we haven’t beaten them in a major tournament in a while. So it feels good that we can go into this tournament and we can play well against a quality side and get a result,” defender Becky Sauerbrunn said.

The United States pounced on Thailand in its opener, winning 13-0 and drawing criticism for celebrating every goal even when the game was well in hand. The Americans had a more staid performance against Chile on Sunday in Paris, winning 3-0 with more muted celebrations, including a golf clap from Carli Lloyd, who scored a pair of goals in that game. The victory gives the topranked United States a potentially more challenging path to the final. If the team can get by Spain, that could set up a quarterfinal clash against No. 4 France in front of its home fans in Paris, and then a possible meeting with No. 3 England in the semifinals. Ellis made seven lineup changes for the game against Chile but for Sweden she went back to a lineup similar to the one she used in the opener. Lloyd, who played every minute of the 2015 World Cup, came in off the bench to start the second half.

She replaced Alex Morgan, who was involved in a couple of collisions in the first half and at one point held her right knee. A hip contusion kept defensive midfielder Julie Ertz out of the game after she started in the first two and scored her first World Cup goal against Chile. Ninth-ranked Sweden, which opened with a 2-0 victory over Chile and followed with a 5-1 win over Thailand, made seven lineup changes for the game against their rivals. The U.S. was on the attack from the start and went ahead early when Horan scored on a corner kick from Megan Rapinoe that bounced twice past two defenders and deflected off Samantha Mewis just 2:40 into the game. It was Horan’s second goal in France and the earliest goal of the tournament so far. American goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher didn’t face her first challenge until the 21st minute, when she stopped a shot from Kosovare Asllani.

STANDINGS GROUP A ak-France ak-Norway ak-Nigeria South Korea

GROUP STAGE W L T GF GA Pts 3 0 0 7 1 9 2 1 0 6 3 6 1 2 0 2 4 3 0 3 0 1 8 0

GROUP B ak-Germany ak-Spain ak-China South Africa

W 3 1 1 0

L 0 1 1 3

T GF GA Pts 0 6 0 9 1 3 2 4 1 1 1 4 0 1 8 0

GROUP C ak-Italy ak-Australia ak-Brazil Jamaica

W 2 2 2 0

L 1 1 1 3

T GF GA Pts 0 7 2 6 0 8 5 6 0 6 3 6 0 1 12 0

GROUP D ak-England ak-Japan Argentina Scotland

W 3 1 0 0

L 0 1 1 2

T GF GA Pts 0 5 1 9 1 2 3 4 2 3 4 2 1 5 7 1

GROUP E ak-Netherlands ak-Canada ak-Cameroon New Zealand

W 3 2 1 0

L 0 1 2 3

T GF GA Pts 0 6 2 9 0 4 2 6 0 3 5 3 0 1 5 0

GROUP F W L T GF GA Pts ak-United States 3 0 0 18 0 9 ak-Sweden 2 1 0 7 3 6 Chile 1 2 0 2 5 3 Thailand 0 3 0 1 20 0 ak-advanced to knockout stage THURSDAY’S RESULTS Cameroon 2, New Zealand 1 Netherlands 2, Canada 1 United States 2, Sweden 0 Chile 2, Thailand 0 KNOCKOUT STAGE Saturday-Tuesday, single-elimination round of 16 QUARTERFINALS • June 27-29 SEMIFINALS • July 2-3 THIRD PLACE • July 6 CHAMPIONSHIP • July 7

UPCOMING GAMES Saturday

Sunday

At Grenoble Germany vs. Nigeria 10:30 a.m.

At Valenciennes England vs. Cameroon 10:30 a.m.

At Nice Norway vs. Australia 2 p.m.

At Le Havre France vs. Brazil 2 p.m.

CLAUDE PARIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cameroon’s Ajara Nchout, center, celebrates after scoring her side’s decisive second goal in stoppage time during their 2-1 victory over New Zealand on Thursday.

Last-gasp goal lifts Cameroon Chile eliminated after missing late penalty kick

top four third-place teams. Cameroon has now qualified for the knockout stage in its first two World Cup appearances.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MONTPELLIER, France — Ajara Nchout Njoya scored the second of her two goals in the fifth minute of stoppage time and Cameroon beat New Zealand 2-1 on Thursday night to advance to the round of 16 in the Women’s World Cup. Nchout Njoya slipped past New Zealand defender Ria Percival to curl the winning goal into the bottom right corner. She had also scored in the 57th minute to give Cameroon a 1-0 lead. Cameroon’s Aurelle Awona made it 1-1 in the 80th minute when she turned the ball into her own goal. Both Group E teams entered needing a victory to have any chance of finishing as one of the

CHILE 2, THAILAND 0: Francisca Lara hit the crossbar on a penalty that would have sent victorious Chile through from Group F to the round of 16 in Rennes. Chile, scoreless in the tournament entering the match, needed to win by three goals to advance. Chile was ahead 2-0 when it was awarded a penalty in stoppage time after video review showed Thailand goalkeeper Waraporn Boonsing had committed a foul just before Maria Jose Urrutia’s was cleared off the line by Natthakarn Chinwong. Urrutia’s header 10 minutes before the end of regulation gave Chile a chance at qualifying for the knockout stage in its first World Cup appearance.

NETHERLANDS 2, CANADA 1: The Netherlands overcame Christine Sinclair’s 182nd international goal to beat Canada at Reims and earn a round of 16 matchup against Japan. Lineth Beerensteyn scored the tiebreaking goal in the 75th minute.The European champions won Group E with a 3-0 record.Canada also advances and will play Sweden. Anouk Dekker put the Dutch ahead in the 54th minute and Sinclair tied the score in the 60th with her 10th World Cup goal. She needs just two goals to tie the world record of 184 international goals set by American Abby Wambach. Stephanie Frappart, who in April became the first woman to referee a men’s Ligue 1 match, signaled for a penalty kick in the first minute after the Netherlands’ Desiree van Lunteren fouled Janine Beckie. But a video review determined the foul was outside the penalty area.

Sandbagging? The U.S. Women’s World Cup team? No way. Not Thursday. Not ever. Definitely not against its biggest rival on the world’s biggest stage. Anybody who wondered whether the United States would ease off against Sweden and accept second place in the group for an easier path in the knockout rounds got their answer in the first three minutes of Thursday’s game in La Havre, France. The Americans came out flying from the opening whistle, strung together pinpoint passes at breakneck pace and wasted no time finding the back of the net. Lindsey Horan slipped behind the Swedish defense and knocked in a Megan Rapinoe corner kick in the third minute. It was the quickest goal at this World Cup. Horan was immediately mobbed by her teammates; and this time, nobody would argue the exuberant celebration was warranted. The U.S. went on to win 2-0, finished atop the group and will face Spain on Monday in the Round of 16. Thursday’s victory surely was extra sweet for the U.S. players because Swedish goalkeeper Hedvig Lindahl had been doing some trash talking. When you think Sweden, you think ABBA, Ikea, Volvo and meatballs, not trash-talking; but the rivalry between Sweden and the United States is as spicy as it gets in women’s soccer. The teams have met five times in the World Cup, and their match in the 2016 Rio Olympics ended on a sour note. Hope Solo called the Swedish players “a bunch of cowards” after they hunkered down on defense, packed the back and used defensive tactics to disarm the U.S. attack and boot the Americans from the Olympics in the quarterfinal. It was the earliest U.S. exit from a major tournament, and neither team had forgotten it heading into Thursday’s game. Several U.S. players said they were eager to erase that bad memory with a win over Sweden, and Lindahl offered the Americans some locker room fodder when she said: “They can play the game in the press area if they want. We want to play in the field, and we’ll see what happens. Let them talk. We will play.” This time, the Swedes did not hang back. Although they maintained their shape and played organized defense, as they always do, they made plenty of runs and had chances to score. Sofia Jakobsson was especially dangerous, but the U.S. back line fended her off. It was the first time the U.S. defense was tested this World Cup after a 13-0 rout over Thailand and a 3-0 win over Chile that was not as close as the score indicates. U.S. goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher, who must have been getting bored back there, had to be on her toes against the Swedes. Defenders Becky Sauerbrunn, Abby Dahlkemper, Kelly O’Hara and Crystal Dunn were steady. But the most impressive group on the field was the U.S. midfield. Sam Mewis, Rose Lavelle and Horan were in sync and razor sharp. Their decision-making and ball distribution were beautiful to watch. Whether on short, quick passes or long balls, they were spot on. Had the forwards made better choices on a few chances, there probably would have scored more than two goals. Now, things will get really interesting. The United States is favored to beat a young Spanish team on Monday, and if that happens, a quarterfinal game against France or Brazil awaits. A very talented England team is also on the U.S. side of the bracket and would face the Americans in the semifinal. Sweden, meanwhile, faces Canada on Monday. The winner of that game likely gets a weakerthan-usual German team, and either Netherlands, Japan, China or Italy in the semis. On paper, it looks like Sweden has an easier road to the final than the United States. But the U.S. team is too proud to tank a game, so they’ll happily take Thursday’s win and a challenging path in the knockout rounds. They’re good enough to handle it, and they know it.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THURSDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Atlanta Philadelphia Washington New York Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee Cardinals Cincinnati Pittsburgh West Los Angeles Colorado San Diego Arizona San Francisco

W 44 39 36 35 27 W 41 40 38 35 33 W 50 40 38 38 31

L 31 35 38 40 46 L 33 35 36 38 40 L 25 34 37 38 41

Pct .587 .527 .486 .467 .370 Pct .554 .533 .514 .479 .452 Pct .667 .541 .507 .500 .431

GB — 4½ 7½ 9 16 GB — 1½ 3 5½ 7½ GB — 9½ 12 12½ 17½

WC _ ½ 3½ 5 12 WC _ — 1½ 4 6 WC _ — 2 2½ 7½

L10 8-2 2-8 7-3 3-7 4-6 L10 4-6 3-7 6-4 7-3 3-7 L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 4-6 5-5

Str W-1 L-4 W-4 L-2 W-1 Str W-2 L-4 L-1 W-5 W-1 Str W-2 W-3 W-4 L-4 L-2

Home Away 24-17 20-14 23-14 16-21 20-17 16-21 20-14 15-26 13-25 14-21 Home Away 26-12 15-21 22-14 18-21 22-15 16-21 19-17 16-21 14-1919-211 Home Away 30-9 20-16 22-15 18-19 21-20 17-17 14-19 24-19 15-21 16-20

Wednesday’s results Cincinnati 3, Houston 2 Atlanta 7, N.Y. Mets 2 Washington 6, Philadelphia 2, 1st Chicago Cubs 7, Chi. White Sox 3 San Diego 8, Milwaukee 7 St. Louis 2, Miami 1, 11 innings Pittsburgh 8, Detroit 7 Colorado 6, Arizona 4 Washington 2, Philadelphia 0, 2nd L.A. Dodgers 9, San Francisco 2 Thursday’s results Colorado 6, Arizona 4, (10) Cubs 7, NY Mets 4 Washington 7, Philadelphia 4 Cincinnati 7, Milwaukee 1 Miami 7, Cardinals 6, (11) San Francisco at LA Dodgers, (n) Today’s games N.Y. Mets (Vargas 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-3), 1:20 p.m. Atlanta (Keuchel 0-0) at Washington (Strasburg 7-4), 6:05 p.m. Miami (Alcantara 3-6) at Philadelphia (Nola 6-1), 6:05 p.m. San Diego (Lauer 5-6) at Pittsburgh (Musgrove 4-7), 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Gray 3-5) at Milwaukee (Anderson 3-1), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Canning 2-3) at St. Louis (Wacha 4-3), 7:15 p.m. San Francisco (Samardzija 3-6) at Arizona (Clarke 1-2), 8:40 p.m. Colorado (Marquez 7-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Buehler 7-1), 9:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 46 43 41 27 21 W 48 39 35 26 26 W 48 40 39 38 32

L 27 31 35 48 53 L 26 35 37 44 49 L 27 35 36 38 46

Pct .630 .581 .539 .360 .284 Pct .649 .527 .486 .371 .347 Pct .640 .533 .520 .500 .410

GB — 3½ 6½ 20 25½ GB — 9 12 20 22½ GB — 8 9 10½ 17½

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

WC — — — 13½ 19 WC — 1 4 12 14½ WC — ½ 1½ 3 10

L10 7-3 3-7 7-3 4-6 1-9 L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 3-7 6-4 L10 4-6 5-5 7-3 7-3 5-5

Str W-5 L-3 W-1 W-1 L-8 Str L-2 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 Str L-4 W-1 W-3 L-1 W-1

Home 25-13 20-18 17-17 13-25 9-28 Home 24-13 20-17 20-17 11-24 15-23 Home 27-11 26-14 22-17 19-18 14-24

Away 21-14 23-13 24-18 14-23 12-25 Away 24-13 19-18 15-20 15-20 11-26 Away 21-16 14-21 17-19 19-20 18-22

Rockies cap sweep of Diamondbacks ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOENIX — Chris Iannetta’s two-run, bases-loaded single in the 10th inning lifted the Colorado Rockies to a 6-4 victory Thursday that completed a three-game sweep of the Arizona Diamondbacks. Iannetta, a former Diamondbacks catcher, singled off the center-field wall against Yoshihisa Hirano with one out to drive in Ian Desmond and Brendan Rodgers. The Rockies had tied it at 4 on Tony Wolters’ pinch-hit RBI single in the ninth off Arizona closer Greg Holland. Scott Oberg got the win with two scoreless innings in relief, but had to pitch out of jam in the bottom of the 10th when the Diamondbacks loaded the bases with one out. He got Ildemaro Vargas to fly out, and then struck out David Peralta swinging to end the game. Charlie Blackmon and Desmond homered for the Rockies, who have won eight in a row over the Diamondbacks. Nolan Arenado left with a bruised left big toe after fouling a ball off his foot. Christian Walker’s tworun, pinch-hit homer keyed a three-run sixth for the Di-

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

The Rangers’ Danny Santana steals third ahead of the throw to the bag in the first inning against the Indians on Thursday in Arlington, Texas. amondbacks. Ketel Marte had four hits and tied a club record for consecutive three-hit games with his fourth. BLUE JAYS 7, ANGELS 5 (10): Billy McKinney hit a tworun home run in the 10th inning to lift host Toronto over Los Angeles. RANGERS 4, INDIANS 2: Elvis Andrus homered and had an RBI triple to back another impressive home start by Mike Minor as the

host Rangers topped Cleveland to earn a series split in Arlington. Minor limited the Indians to three hits and one run over eight innings after they had scored 10 runs each of the last two nights. The lefty struck out four and walked three while throwing 70 of 110 pitches for strikes. Danny Santana went deep in the Rangers’ eighth, his third homer in the four-game series and seventh overall. Andrus immediately followed with his seventh homer, his first

since May 12 at Houston. They also teamed up for the first two Texas runs. Andrus tripled to rightcenter in the first inning after Santana had doubled and stolen third base. Andrus raced home on a wild pitch by Shane Bieber. NATIONALS 7, PHILLIES 4: Anthony Rendon and Victor Robles homered in a fourrun sixth inning, and host Washington beat Philadelphia to complete a sweep of their rain-shortened series.

BOX SCORES

Wednesday’s results Cincinnati 3, Houston 2 L.A. Angels 11, Toronto 6 N.Y. Yankees 12, Tampa Bay 1 Chicago Cubs 7, Chi. White Sox 3 Oakland 8, Baltimore 3 Cleveland 10, Texas 4 Seattle 8, Kansas City 2 Boston 9, Minnesota 4 Pittsburgh 8, Detroit 7 Thursday’s results Texas 4, Cleveland 2 Tampa Bay at Oakland, (n) Toronto 7, L.A. Angels 5 (10) Houston at N.Y. Yankees, (n) Kansas City 4, Minnesota 1 Baltimore at Seattle, (n) Today’s games Houston (Peacock 6-4) at N.Y. Yankees (Paxton 4-3), 6:05 p.m. Detroit (Boyd 5-5) at Cleveland (Bauer 5-6), 6:10 p.m. Toronto (Thornton 2-5) at Boston (Sale 3-7), 6:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Lopez 4-7) at Texas (Jurado 4-3), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Canning 2-3) at St. Louis (Wacha 4-3), 7:15 p.m. Minnesota (Perez 7-3) at Kansas City (Junis 4-6), 7:15 p.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Oakland (Anderson 0-1), 9:07 p.m. Baltimore (Means 6-4) at Seattle (Leake 6-6), 9:10 p.m.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Rays given OK to look at Montreal NEW YORK — The Ex-Rays? Starved for fans despite success on the field, the Tampa Bay Rays have been given the go-ahead by Major League Baseball to look into playing a split season in Montreal. No timetable for the possible plan was announced. An idea under consideration is for the Rays to play early in the season in Tampa Bay and later in Montreal. Commissioner Rob Manfred made the announcement Thursday at the end of the owners’ meetings, saying the executive council had granted the Rays “broad permission to explore what’s available.” Manfred said it’s too soon to detail the particulars — as in, where the team would play postseason games, or in what stadiums. He did not address whether this would be a step toward a full move. The Montreal Expos existed from 1969-2004 before they moved to Washington and became the Nationals.

Regan, 82, among Mets’ new staff CHICAGO — The New York Mets fired pitching coach Dave Eiland and bullpen coach Chuck Hernández and named Phil Regan interim pitching coach, Ricky Bones interim bullpen coach and Jeremy Accardo pitching strategist. New York announced the moves Thursday before its game against the Chicago Cubs. The 82-year-old Regan has been the Mets’ minor league assistant pitching coordinator since 2016 after spending 2009-15 as the pitching coach for St. Lucie of the Florida State League. The former pitcher managed the Baltimore Orioles during the 1995 season. BRIEFLY ROCKIES: Colorado placed shortstop Trevor Story on the 10-day injured list with a sprained right thumb. DODGERS: Los Angeles put right-hander Rich Hill (forearm strain) on the IL. ROYALS: The team placed shortstop Adalberto Mondesi (groin) on the 10-day IL. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

Umpire Angel Hernandez ducks as Rockies third baseman Pat Valaika corrals a high throw Thursday in Phoenix. Diamondbacks baserunner David Peralta advanced to third on a hit by Adam Jones in the sixth inning. Rangers 4, Indians 2 Cleveland Lindor ss Mercado lf C.Santana dh Luplow rf Naquin ph Ramirez 3b Kipnis 2b Plawecki c Freeman ph Bauers 1b L.Martin cf Totals Texas Choo dh D.Santana rf Andrus ss Cabrera 3b Forsythe 3b Calhoun lf Odor 2b DeShields cf Guzman 1b Mathis c Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 1 3 4 3 1 3 3 31 AB 4 4 4 3 1 4 3 3 2 3 31

R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 R 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 2 3 5 H BI BB SO 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 3 1 10

Cleveland 000 001 001 Texas 200 000 02x

50

Manager Dave Roberts and the Los Angeles Dodgers became the first 50-win team in the majors Wednesday night, improving to 30-9 at home. It’s the first time since 1977 — and just the second time overall — the team (50-25) has compiled 50 wins by its 75th game.

— —

Avg. .293 .316 .292 .260 .275 .201 .227 .173 .246 .230 .199 Avg. .280 .312 .303 .242 .268 .333 .173 .238 .214 .150

2 5 1 4 8 0

E — Bauers (2). LOB — Cleveland 5, Texas 4. 2B — D.Santana (11), Calhoun (2), DeShields (7), Guzman (15). 3B — Andrus (3). HR — C.Santana (15), off Kelley; D.Santana (7), off Cole; Andrus (7), off Cole. RBIs — C.Santana (44), Luplow (22), D.Santana (21), Andrus 2 (43). SB — Ramirez (17), D.Santana (9). CS — DeShields (3). DP — Texas 1. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bieber, L, 6-3 6 5 2 2 0 8 3.86 Clippard 1 1 0 0 1 1 3.26 1 Cole /3 2 2 2 0 0 3.77 2 Hand /3 0 0 0 0 1 0.86 Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Minor, W, 7-4 8 3 1 1 3 4 2.52 Kelley, S, 9-13 1 2 1 1 0 1 2.81 T — 2:35. Att. — 18,531

Nationals 7, Phillies 4

Rockies 6, Diamondbacks 4

Blue Jays 7, Angels 5

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harper rf 5 0 1 1 0 3 .243 Hoskins 1b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .264 Bruce lf 3 1 3 2 1 0 .242 Realmuto c 2 0 0 0 2 0 .269 Segura ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Kingery cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .338 Hernandez 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .264 Franco 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .206 Pivetta p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .100 Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Totals 33 4 9 4 5 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .276 Eaton rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Rendon 3b 3 2 2 1 1 0 .314 Soto lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .295 Kendrick 2b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .339 Adams 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .246 Suzuki c 4 1 1 2 0 0 .273 Robles cf 3 1 2 3 1 1 .241 Taylor ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .232 Sanchez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Parra ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Totals 30 7 10 7 5 2

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon rf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .336 Desmond cf 4 2 1 1 1 2 .271 Arenado 3b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .328 Rodgers ss 1 1 1 0 0 0 .258 Dahl lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .332 Iannetta c 4 0 2 2 1 0 .264 McMahon 2b-3b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .273 Reynolds 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .167 Tapia ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .262 Valaika ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .063 Wolters ph-2b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .311 Hoffman p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Bettis p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Murphy 1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Totals 33 6 7 6 9 11 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte cf-ss 6 1 4 0 0 0 .305 Vargas 2b 4 1 1 0 2 1 .263 Peralta lf 5 0 1 1 1 2 .291 Jones rf 4 0 2 0 1 1 .273 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 1 1 2 .282 Cron 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .217 Dyson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Ahmed ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Locastro cf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 0 3 .130 C.Kelly ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Ray p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .037 Walker ph-1b 2 1 1 2 1 1 .258 Totals 37 4 10 4 8 14 Colorado 100 110 001 2 — 6 7 1 Arizona 100 003 000 0 — 4 10 0 E — Hoffman (1). LOB — Colorado 6, Arizona 14. 2B — McMahon (11), Marte 2 (17), Jones (16). HR — Blackmon (17), off Ray; Desmond (10), off Ray; Walker (13), off Bettis. RBIs — Blackmon (48), Desmond (39), Iannetta 2 (17), McMahon (33), Wolters (21), Peralta (40), Escobar (59), Walker 2 (29). SB — Jones (2). CS — Arenado (2). SF — Escobar. S — Joseph. DP — Colorado 1; Arizona 3. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hoffman 22/3 3 1 1 4 5 6.75 Bettis 22/3 2 2 2 1 3 4.36 2 Estevez /3 3 1 1 1 1 4.15 McGee 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.42 Diaz 1 0 0 0 1 0 4.60 Oberg, W, 5-0 2 2 0 0 1 3 1.50 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ray 6 4 3 3 5 9 3.87 Chafin, H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.33 Lopez, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.24 Holland, BS, 2-12 1 1 1 1 2 0 2.28 Hirano, L, 3-4 1 2 2 2 2 1 5.13 T — 4:08. Att. — 23,294

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fletcher lf-3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .299 Trout cf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .302 Upton dh 5 0 0 0 0 3 .214 Calhoun rf 3 1 0 0 2 2 .236 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .231 La Stella 3b-2b 5 1 3 0 0 0 .301 Rengifo 2b-ss 5 2 3 3 0 1 .254 Garneau c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .300 Bour ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Lucroy c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Tovar ss 2 0 0 1 0 0 .195 Ohtani ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Goodwin lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .290 Totals 40 5 12 5 3 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sogard dh 3 2 3 1 2 0 .303 Guerrero Jr. 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .249 Gurriel Jr. lf 5 2 3 1 0 1 .280 Biggio 2b 3 0 0 1 1 2 .203 Hernandez cf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .208 Grichuk rf 5 1 2 0 0 2 .221 Tellez 1b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .218 McKinney pr-1b 1 1 1 2 0 0 .227 Galvis ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .258 Maile c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .180 Totals 36 7 12 7 6 12 Los Angeles 020 011 100 0 — 5 12 0 Toronto 310 010 000 2 — 7 12 1 E — Guerrero Jr. (7). LOB — Los Angeles 9, Toronto 9. 2B — Trout (18), Garneau (2), Sogard (10), Gurriel Jr. (10), Grichuk (12). HR — Rengifo (2), off Richard; Hernandez (7), off Suarez; Sogard (7), off Suarez; Gurriel Jr. (9), off Suarez; McKinney (4), off Buttrey. RBIs — Pujols (40), Rengifo 3 (14), Tovar (2), Sogard (20), Gurriel Jr. (25), Biggio (11), Hernandez 2 (24), McKinney 2 (11). SB — Trout (8). CS — Tellez (1). SF — Pujols, Biggio. DP — Los Angeles 1 ; Toronto 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA Suarez 5 8 5 5 3 6 5.57 Cole 1 1 0 0 1 0 4.86 Garcia 1 1 0 0 1 2 4.67 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 1 1 2.48 Robles 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.06 Buttrey, L, 4-4 0 2 2 2 0 0 2.52 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Richard 5 6 4 4 2 2 7.46 Law 0 1 0 0 0 0 5.16 1 Biagini, H, 8 /3 1 0 0 0 1 3.41 Mayza, H, 8 1 1 1 1 1 1 4.44 Hudson, BS, 1-2 12/3 2 0 0 0 2 3.03 Giles 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.04 Inherited runners-scored — Bedrosian 2-0, Law 1-0, Biagini 3-1, Mayza 3-0, Hudson 2-1. T — 3:34. Att. — 24,291

Philadelphia 000 210 100 Washington 120 004 00x

— —

4 9 0 7 10 0

LOB — Philadelphia 7, Washington 5. 2B — Rendon (20), Soto (14). HR — Segura (7), off Grace; Bruce (20), off Rainey; Suzuki (8), off Pivetta; Rendon (17), off Pivetta; Robles (11), off Ramos. RBIs — Harper (50), Bruce 2 (43), Segura (28), Rendon (51), Soto (43), Suzuki 2 (32), Robles 3 (32). SB — Kingery (3). S — Fedde. DP — Philadelphia 2; Washington 1. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Pivetta, L, 4-2 51/3 7 6 6 3 2 5.54 2 Ramos /3 1 1 1 0 0 4.26 Garcia 1 1 0 0 1 0 6.61 Hammer 1 1 0 0 1 0 3.52 Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fedde 32/3 5 2 2 5 1 3.79 Grace 11/3 3 1 1 0 0 6.44 Guerra, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.07 Rainey 1 1 1 1 0 2 2.51 Suero, H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.93 Doolittle, S, 16-19 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.23 T — 3:05. Att. — 31,329


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THURSDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Atlanta Philadelphia Washington New York Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh West Los Angeles Colorado San Diego Arizona San Francisco

W 44 39 36 35 27 W 41 40 38 35 33 W 50 40 38 38 31

L 31 35 38 40 46 L 33 35 36 38 40 L 25 34 37 38 41

Pct .587 .527 .486 .467 .370 Pct .554 .533 .514 .479 .452 Pct .667 .541 .507 .500 .431

GB — 4½ 7½ 9 16 GB — 1½ 3 5½ 7½ GB — 9½ 12 12½ 17½

WC — ½ 3½ 5 12 WC — — 1½ 4 6 WC — — 2 2½ 7½

L10 8-2 2-8 7-3 3-7 4-6 L10 4-6 3-7 6-4 7-3 3-7 L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 4-6 5-5

Str W-1 L-4 W-4 L-2 W-1 Str W-2 L-4 L-1 W-5 W-1 Str W-2 W-3 W-4 L-4 L-2

Home 24-17 23-14 20-17 20-14 13-25 Home 26-12 22-14 22-15 19-17 14-19 Home 30-9 22-15 21-20 14-19 15-21

Away 20-14 16-21 16-21 15-26 14-21 Away 15-21 18-21 16-21 16-21 19-21 Away 20-16 18-19 17-17 24-19 16-20

Wednesday’s results Cincinnati 3, Houston 2 Atlanta 7, N.Y. Mets 2 Washington 6, Philadelphia 2, 1st Chicago Cubs 7, Chi. White Sox 3 San Diego 8, Milwaukee 7 St. Louis 2, Miami 1, 11 innings Pittsburgh 8, Detroit 7 Colorado 6, Arizona 4 Washington 2, Philadelphia 0, 2nd L.A. Dodgers 9, San Francisco 2 Thursday’s results Colorado 6, Arizona 4 (10) Chicago Cubs 7, N.Y. Mets 4 Washington 7, Philadelphia 4 Cincinnati 7, Milwaukee 1 Miami 7, St. Louis 6 (11) San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, (n) Today’s games N.Y. Mets (Vargas 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-3), 1:20 p.m. Atlanta (Keuchel 0-0) at Washington (Strasburg 7-4), 6:05 p.m. Miami (Alcantara 3-6) at Philadelphia (Nola 6-1), 6:05 p.m. San Diego (Lauer 5-6) at Pittsburgh (Musgrove 4-7), 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Gray 3-5) at Milwaukee (Anderson 3-1), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Canning 2-3) at St. Louis (Wacha 4-3), 7:15 p.m. San Francisco (Samardzija 3-6) at Arizona (Clarke 1-2), 8:40 p.m. Colorado (Marquez 7-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Buehler 7-1), 9:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 47 43 41 27 21 W 48 39 35 26 26 W 48 40 39 38 32

L 27 31 35 48 53 L 26 35 37 44 49 L 28 35 36 38 46

Pct .635 .581 .539 .360 .284 Pct .649 .527 .486 .371 .347 Pct .632 .533 .520 .500 .410

GB — 4 7 20½ 26 GB — 9 12 20 22½ GB — 7½ 8½ 10 17

WC — — — 13½ 19 WC — 1 4 12 14½ WC — ½ 1½ 3 10

L10 7-3 3-7 7-3 4-6 1-9 L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 3-7 6-4 L10 4-6 5-5 7-3 7-3 5-5

Str W-6 L-3 W-1 W-1 L-8 Str L-2 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 Str L-5 W-1 W-3 L-1 W-1

Home 26-13 20-18 17-17 13-25 9-28 Home 24-13 20-17 20-17 11-24 15-23 Home 27-11 26-14 22-17 19-18 14-24

Away 21-14 23-13 24-18 14-23 12-25 Away 24-13 19-18 15-20 15-20 11-26 Away 21-17 14-21 17-19 19-20 18-22

Wednesday’s results Cincinnati 3, Houston 2 L.A. Angels 11, Toronto 6 N.Y. Yankees 12, Tampa Bay 1 Chicago Cubs 7, Chi. White Sox 3 Oakland 8, Baltimore 3 Cleveland 10, Texas 4 Seattle 8, Kansas City 2 Boston 9, Minnesota 4 Pittsburgh 8, Detroit 7 Thursday’s results Texas 4, Cleveland 2 N.Y. Yankees 10, Houston 6 Toronto 7, L.A. Angels 5 (10) Tampa Bay at Oakland, (n) Kansas City 4, Minnesota 1 Baltimore at Seattle, (n) Today’s games Houston (Peacock 6-4) at N.Y. Yankees (Paxton 4-3), 6:05 p.m. Detroit (Boyd 5-5) at Cleveland (Bauer 5-6), 6:10 p.m. Toronto (Thornton 2-5) at Boston (Sale 3-7), 6:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Lopez 4-7) at Texas (Jurado 4-3), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Canning 2-3) at St. Louis (Wacha 4-3), 7:15 p.m. Minnesota (Perez 7-3) at Kansas City (Junis 4-6), 7:15 p.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Oakland (Anderson 0-1), 9:07 p.m. Baltimore (Means 6-4) at Seattle (Leake 6-6), 9:10 p.m.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Rays given OK to look at Montreal NEW YORK — The Ex-Rays? Starved for fans despite success on the field, the Tampa Bay Rays have been given the go-ahead by Major League Baseball to look into playing a split season in Montreal. No timetable for the possible plan was announced. An idea under consideration is for the Rays to play early in the season in Tampa Bay and later in Montreal. Commissioner Rob Manfred made the announcement Thursday at the end of the owners’ meetings, saying the executive council had granted the Rays “broad permission to explore what’s available.” Manfred said it’s too soon to detail the particulars — as in, where the team would play postseason games, or in what stadiums. He did not address whether this would be a step toward a full move. The Montreal Expos existed from 1969-2004 before they moved to Washington and became the Nationals.

Regan, 82, among Mets’ new staff CHICAGO — The New York Mets fired pitching coach Dave Eiland and bullpen coach Chuck Hernández and named Phil Regan interim pitching coach, Ricky Bones interim bullpen coach and Jeremy Accardo pitching strategist. New York announced the moves Thursday before its game against the Chicago Cubs. The 82-year-old Regan has been the Mets’ minor league assistant pitching coordinator since 2016 after spending 2009-15 as the pitching coach for St. Lucie of the Florida State League. The former pitcher managed the Baltimore Orioles during the 1995 season. BRIEFLY ROCKIES: Colorado placed shortstop Trevor Story on the 10-day injured list with a sprained right thumb. DODGERS: Los Angeles put right-hander Rich Hill (forearm strain) on the IL. ROYALS: The team placed shortstop Adalberto Mondesi (groin) on the 10-day IL. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

50

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Manager Dave Roberts and the Los Angeles Dodgers became the first 50-win team in the majors Wednesday night, improving to 30-9 at home. It’s the first time since 1977 — and just the second time overall — the team (50-25) has compiled 50 wins by its 75th game.

Cubs rookie provides dazzling relief ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Cubs top pitching prospect Adbert Alzolay tossed four innings of dazzling relief in his major league debut and the offense broke through with a six-run third as Chicago beat the New York Mets 7-4 on Thursday night. Javier Báez homered and tripled, and Anthony Rizzo hit a two-run double as the NL Central leaders improved to 26-12 at Wrigley Field. Rookie slugger Pete Alonso hit his 25th homer and Todd Frazier connected for the 200th of his career for the Mets. Alonso tied Dodgers star Cody Bellinger (2017) for most homers by an NL rookie before the All-Star break. Alonso also is one shy of the Mets’ rookie mark set by Darryl Strawberry in 1983. YANKEES 10, ASTROS 6: Gary Sánchez, Gleyber Torres and DJ LeMahieu homered in a hurry, connecting in a six-run fourth inning that powered host New York past Houston for a sixth straight win. Edwin Encarnación hit his AL-leading 23rd home run as the Yankees handed Houston its season-worst fifth loss in a row.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Rangers’ Danny Santana steals third ahead of the throw to the bag in the first inning against the Indians on Thursday in Arlington, Texas. gle and Lucas Duda added an RBI single as host Kansas City jumped on Jake Odorizzi in the first inning and beat Minnesota. Glenn Sparkman gave up just one run and five hits in a season high-tying seven innings. He walked one and struck out three. Duda had two hits and scored a run to help the Royals win for the fourth time in five games.

REDS 7, BREWERS 1: Jose Iglesias homered and drove in four runs, Tanner Roark allowed one run — a homer by major league leader ChrisROYALS 4, TWINS 1: Alex tian Yelich — over six solid Gordon had a two-run sin- innings and Cincinnati beat

host Milwaukee for a fifth nights. The lefty struck out straight victory. four and walked three while throwing 70 of 110 pitches ROCKIES 6, DIAMONDBACKS for strikes. Danny Santana 4 (10): Chris Iannetta’s went deep in the Rangers’ two-run, bases-loaded sin- eighth, his third homer in gle in the 10th lifted Colo- the four-game series. rado over host Arizona. NATIONALS 7, PHILLIES 4: RANGERS 4, INDIANS 2: Anthony Rendon and Victor Elvis Andrus homered and Robles homered in a fourhad an RBI triple to back run sixth inning, and host another impressive home Washington beat Philadelstart by Mike Minor as the phia to complete a sweep of host Rangers topped Cleve- their rain-shortened series. land to earn a series split in Arlington. Minor limited BLUE JAYS 7, ANGELS 5 (10): the Indians to three hits Billy McKinney hit a twoand one run over eight in- run home run in the 10th nings after they had scored inning to lift host Toronto 10 runs each of the last two over Los Angeles.

BOX SCORES Rangers 4, Indians 2

Blue Jays 7, Angels 5

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Mercado lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .316 C.Santana dh 3 1 2 1 1 0 .292 Luplow rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .260 Naquin ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .201 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .227 Plawecki c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .173 Freeman ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Bauers 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .230 L.Martin cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .199 Totals 31 2 5 2 3 5 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 D.Santana rf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .312 Andrus ss 4 2 2 2 0 1 .303 Cabrera 3b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .242 Forsythe 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Calhoun lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .173 DeShields cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Guzman 1b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .214 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .150 Totals 31 4 8 3 1 10 Cleveland 000 001 001 — 2 5 1 Texas 200 000 02x — 4 8 0 E — Bauers (2). LOB — Cleveland 5, Texas 4. 2B — D.Santana (11), Calhoun (2), DeShields (7), Guzman (15). 3B — Andrus (3). HR — C.Santana (15), off Kelley; D.Santana (7), off Cole; Andrus (7), off Cole. RBIs — C.Santana (44), Luplow (22), D.Santana (21), Andrus 2 (43). SB — Ramirez (17), D.Santana (9). CS — DeShields (3). DP — Texas 1. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bieber, L, 6-3 6 5 2 2 0 8 3.86 Clippard 1 1 0 0 1 1 3.26 1 Cole /3 2 2 2 0 0 3.77 2 /3 0 0 0 0 1 0.86 Hand Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Minor, W, 7-4 8 3 1 1 3 4 2.52 Kelley, S, 9-13 1 2 1 1 0 1 2.81 T — 2:35. Att. — 18,531

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fletcher lf-3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .299 Trout cf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .302 Upton dh 5 0 0 0 0 3 .214 Calhoun rf 3 1 0 0 2 2 .236 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .231 La Stella 3b-2b 5 1 3 0 0 0 .301 Rengifo 2b-ss 5 2 3 3 0 1 .254 Garneau c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .300 Bour ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Lucroy c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Tovar ss 2 0 0 1 0 0 .195 Ohtani ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Goodwin lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .290 Totals 40 5 12 5 3 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sogard dh 3 2 3 1 2 0 .303 Guerrero Jr. 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .249 Gurriel Jr. lf 5 2 3 1 0 1 .280 Biggio 2b 3 0 0 1 1 2 .203 Hernandez cf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .208 Grichuk rf 5 1 2 0 0 2 .221 Tellez 1b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .218 McKinney pr-1b 1 1 1 2 0 0 .227 Galvis ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .258 Maile c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .180 Totals 36 7 12 7 6 12 Los Angeles 020 011 100 0 — 5 12 0 Toronto 310 010 000 2 — 7 12 1 E — Guerrero Jr. (7). LOB — Los Angeles 9, Toronto 9. 2B — Trout (18), Garneau (2), Sogard (10), Gurriel Jr. (10), Grichuk (12). HR — Rengifo (2), off Richard; Hernandez (7), off Suarez; Sogard (7), off Suarez; Gurriel Jr. (9), off Suarez; McKinney (4), off Buttrey. RBIs — Pujols (40), Rengifo 3 (14), Tovar (2), Sogard (20), Gurriel Jr. (25), Biggio (11), Hernandez 2 (24), McKinney 2 (11). SB — Trout (8). CS — Tellez (1). SF — Pujols, Biggio. DP — Los Angeles 1 ; Toronto 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA Suarez 5 8 5 5 3 6 5.57 Cole 1 1 0 0 1 0 4.86 Garcia 1 1 0 0 1 2 4.67 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 1 1 2.48 Robles 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.06 Buttrey, L, 4-4 0 2 2 2 0 0 2.52 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Richard 5 6 4 4 2 2 7.46 Law 0 1 0 0 0 0 5.16 1 /3 1 0 0 0 1 3.41 Biagini, H, 8 Mayza, H, 8 1 1 1 1 1 1 4.44 Hudson, BS, 1-2 12/3 2 0 0 0 2 3.03 Giles 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.04 Inherited runners-scored — Bedrosian 2-0, Law 1-0, Biagini 3-1, Mayza 3-0, Hudson 2-1. T — 3:34. Att. — 24,291

Nationals 7, Phillies 4

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harper rf 5 0 1 1 0 3 .243 Hoskins 1b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .264 Bruce lf 3 1 3 2 1 0 .242 Realmuto c 2 0 0 0 2 0 .269 Segura ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Kingery cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .338 Hernandez 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .264 Franco 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .206 Pivetta p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .100 Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Totals 33 4 9 4 5 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .276 Eaton rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Rendon 3b 3 2 2 1 1 0 .314 Soto lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .295 Kendrick 2b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .339 Adams 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .246 Suzuki c 4 1 1 2 0 0 .273 Robles cf 3 1 2 3 1 1 .241 Taylor ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .232 Sanchez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Parra ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Totals 30 7 10 7 5 2 Philadelphia 000 210 100 — 4 9 0 Washington 120 004 00x — 7 10 0 LOB — Philadelphia 7, Washington 5. 2B — Rendon (20), Soto (14). HR — Segura (7), off Grace; Bruce (20), off Rainey; Suzuki (8), off Pivetta; Rendon (17), off Pivetta; Robles (11), off Ramos. RBIs — Harper (50), Bruce 2 (43), Segura (28), Rendon (51), Soto (43), Suzuki 2 (32), Robles 3 (32). SB — Kingery (3). S — Fedde. DP — Philadelphia 2; Washington 1. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Pivetta, L, 4-2 51/3 7 6 6 3 2 5.54 2 /3 1 1 1 0 0 4.26 Ramos Garcia 1 1 0 0 1 0 6.61 Hammer 1 1 0 0 1 0 3.52 Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fedde 32/3 5 2 2 5 1 3.79 Grace 11/3 3 1 1 0 0 6.44 Guerra, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.07 Rainey 1 1 1 1 0 2 2.51 Suero, H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.93 Doolittle, S, 16-19 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.23 T — 3:05. Att. — 31,329

Rockies 6, Diamondbacks 4 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon rf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .336 Desmond cf 4 2 1 1 1 2 .271 Arenado 3b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .328 Rodgers ss 1 1 1 0 0 0 .258 Dahl lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .332 Iannetta c 4 0 2 2 1 0 .264 McMahon 2b-3b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .273 Reynolds 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .167 Tapia ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .262 Valaika ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .063 Wolters ph-2b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .311 Hoffman p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Bettis p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Murphy 1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Totals 33 6 7 6 9 11 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte cf-ss 6 1 4 0 0 0 .305 Vargas 2b 4 1 1 0 2 1 .263 Peralta lf 5 0 1 1 1 2 .291 Jones rf 4 0 2 0 1 1 .273 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 1 1 2 .282 Cron 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .217 Dyson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Ahmed ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Locastro cf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 0 3 .130 C.Kelly ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Ray p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .037 Walker ph-1b 2 1 1 2 1 1 .258 Totals 37 4 10 4 8 14 Colorado 100 110 001 2 — 6 7 1 Arizona 100 003 000 0 — 4 10 0 E — Hoffman (1). LOB — Colorado 6, Arizona 14. 2B — McMahon (11), Marte 2 (17), Jones (16). HR — Blackmon (17), off Ray; Desmond (10), off Ray; Walker (13), off Bettis. RBIs — Blackmon (48), Desmond (39), Iannetta 2 (17), McMahon (33), Wolters (21), Peralta (40), Escobar (59), Walker 2 (29). SB — Jones (2). CS — Arenado (2). SF — Escobar. S — Joseph. DP — Colorado 1; Arizona 3. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hoffman 22/3 3 1 1 4 5 6.75 Bettis 22/3 2 2 2 1 3 4.36 2 /3 3 1 1 1 1 4.15 Estevez McGee 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.42 Diaz 1 0 0 0 1 0 4.60 Oberg, W, 5-0 2 2 0 0 1 3 1.50 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ray 6 4 3 3 5 9 3.87 Chafin, H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.33 Lopez, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.24 Holland, BS, 2-12 1 1 1 1 2 0 2.28 Hirano, L, 3-4 1 2 2 2 2 1 5.13 T — 4:08. Att. — 23,294

Umpire Angel Hernandez ducks as Rockies third baseman Pat Valaika corrals a high throw Thursday in Phoenix. Diamondbacks baserunner David Peralta advanced to third on a hit by Adam Jones in the sixth inning. Reds 7, Brewers 1

Royals 4, Twins 1

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .252 Votto 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .256 Suarez 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .249 Dietrich 2b 3 2 1 0 0 0 .232 Senzel cf 4 1 2 3 1 0 .266 Puig rf 4 1 2 0 0 2 .234 Farmer ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 J.Iglesias ss 5 1 2 4 0 0 .291 Barnhart c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .196 Roark p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Ervin rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Totals 36 7 10 7 4 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Yelich rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .348 Braun lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Moustakas 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .276 Grandal c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .270 Thames 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Shaw 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .171 Arcia ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .237 Nelson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .201 Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Gamel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Totals 30 1 5 1 1 7 Cincinnati 300 020 200 — 7 10 1 Milwaukee 000 100 000 — 1 5 1 E — Suarez (9), Nelson (1). LOB — Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 6. 3B — Winker (1), Puig (1). HR — J.Iglesias (5), off Nelson; Senzel (7), off Peralta; Yelich (28), off Roark. RBIs — Senzel 3 (22), J.Iglesias 4 (28), Yelich (59). SB — Puig (10). DP — Cincinnati 3; Milwaukee 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Roark, W, 5-6 6 3 1 1 0 7 3.47 Hughes 2 1 0 0 0 0 3.09 Duke 1 1 0 0 1 0 4.57 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Nelson, L, 0-2 5 7 5 5 4 5 9.75 Peralta 2 3 2 2 0 3 5.68 Claudio 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.83 Albers 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.06 HBP — Nelson (Dietrich), Roark 3 (Grandal,Cain,Grandal), Claudio (Winker), Albers (Dietrich). T — 2:58. Att. — 28,898

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Polanco dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .325 Garver c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Sano 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Cron 1b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .280 Arraez ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .375 Schoop 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Cave rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Astudillo 3b-c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Totals 32 1 5 1 1 5 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .300 Lopez 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .240 Gordon lf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .260 Soler dh 3 0 2 0 1 0 .247 1-Gore pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Cuthbert 3b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .282 Duda 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .161 Arteaga ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Maldonado c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .215 Hamilton cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .225 Totals 31 4 10 4 1 3 Minnesota 100 000 000 — 1 5 3 Kansas City 300 100 00x — 4 10 0 E — Schoop (6), Astudillo 2 (2). LOB — Minnesota 5, Kansas City 5. 2B — Merrifield (19), Gordon (17), Maldonado (9). HR — Polanco (11), off Sparkman. RBIs — Polanco (38), Gordon 2 (44), Duda (10), Maldonado (13). SB — Hamilton (14), Gore 2 (10). S — Arteaga. LIDP — Duda. DP — Minnesota 4. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Odorizzi, L, 10-3 4 8 4 4 1 2 2.58 Stewart 4 2 0 0 0 1 4.50 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Sparkman, W, 2-3 7 5 1 1 1 3 3.62 Diekman, H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.35 Kennedy, S, 9-11 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.60 T — 2:37. Att. — 22,683

Yankees 10, Astros 6

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bregman ss 3 1 1 1 2 1 .265 Brantley lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .319 Altuve 2b 5 2 1 0 0 1 .235 Alvarez dh 5 1 2 2 0 2 .343 Gurriel 3b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .262 Reddick rf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .295 Chirinos c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .238 White 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Marisnick cf 4 2 3 2 0 0 .248 Totals 39 6 12 6 2 7 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 3b 4 1 1 2 1 1 .314 Voit dh 5 0 1 0 0 3 .269 Sanchez c 5 1 2 1 0 2 .269 Stanton rf 5 2 3 0 0 2 .294 Encarnacion 1b 3 3 1 2 2 0 .238 Torres 2b 4 2 2 3 0 0 .287 Gregorius ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Maybin lf 3 1 1 2 1 2 .308 Gardner cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .234 Totals 36 10 12 10 5 10 Houston 000 021 012 — 6 12 0 New York 000 620 20x — 10 12 0 LOB — Houston 9, New York 7. 2B — Alvarez (2), Stanton (1), Maybin (7). HR — Marisnick (7), off Cortes Jr.; Bregman (21), off Cortes Jr.; Alvarez (5), off Kahnle; Marisnick (8), off Hale; Sanchez (22), off Valdez; Torres (17), off Valdez; LeMahieu (9), off Devenski; Encarnacion (23), off Armenteros. RBIs — Bregman (51), Alvarez 2 (11), Reddick (26), Marisnick 2 (19), LeMahieu 2 (48), Sanchez (50), Encarnacion 2 (53), Torres 3 (43), Maybin 2 (14). SB — Maybin (6). Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Valdez, L, 3-3 31/3 4 5 5 3 3 3.61 2 /3 2 1 1 0 0 4.60 Devenski James 1 2 2 2 1 1 4.93 Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 3 2.54 Armenteros 2 4 2 2 1 3 3.60 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Green 2 1 0 0 0 3 6.93 Cortes Jr., W, 2-0 3 3 2 2 1 1 4.09 Kahnle 1 1 1 1 0 2 3.14 Hale 22/3 7 3 3 1 1 3.60 Chapman, S, 20-22 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 1.29 Inherited runners-scored — Devenski 1-1, Chapman 2-0. HBP — Hale (Chirinos). WP — James, Hale. T — 3:31. Att. — 41,030

Cubs 7, Mets 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .339 Alonso 1b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .275 Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Conforto rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Frazier 3b 3 2 1 1 0 1 .256 Ramos c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .271 Rosario ss 3 0 1 0 1 2 .250 Gomez cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .210 Lockett p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Hechavarria ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .341 Totals 32 4 7 3 3 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .234 Bryant 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .281 Rizzo 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .277 Baez ss 4 2 2 2 0 1 .286 Contreras c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .292 Heyward cf-rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Gonzalez rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .209 Almora Jr. cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Alzolay p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Descalso 2b 4 1 1 1 0 3 .189 Totals 30 7 7 6 5 11 New York 012 000 001 — 4 7 0 Chicago 006 000 10x — 7 7 1 E — Chatwood (1). LOB — New York 5, Chicago 5. 2B — Rizzo (12), Contreras (11). 3B — Baez (3). HR — Alonso (25), off Chatwood; Frazier (7), off Alzolay; Baez (18), off Gsellman. RBIs — Alonso 2 (59), Frazier (25), Bryant (39), Rizzo 2 (53), Baez 2 (48), Descalso (15). S — Chatwood. DP — Chicago 3. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lockett, L, 0-1 21/3 5 6 6 1 2 23.14 2 /3 0 0 0 1 2 0.00 Pounders Font 3 1 0 0 3 5 4.58 Gsellman 1 1 1 1 0 1 4.91 Nogosek 1 0 0 0 0 1 10.80 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Chatwood 4 6 3 2 1 1 3.69 Alzolay, W, 1-0 4 1 1 1 2 5 2.25 Cishek, S, 7-9 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.16 Alzolay pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored — Pounders 1-1, Cishek 1-0. HBP — Chatwood (Frazier). WP — Pounders. PB — Ramos (8). T — 2:59. Att. — 38,956

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1916 — Rube Foster of the Red Sox pitched a 2-0 no-hitter against the New York Yankees. Foster struck out three and walked three and pitched the first no-hitter at Fenway Park. 1938 — Pinky Higgins of the Boston Red Sox extended his consecutive hit string to 12, with eight hits in a doubleheader split with the Detroit Tigers. He went 4 for 4 in an 8-3 win in the opener and 4 for 4 in a 5-4 loss in the nightcap. The next day, Higgins struck out against Vern Kennedy in his first at-bat to end the streak. 1939 — The New York Yankees announced Lou Gehrig’s retirement, based on the report that he has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The 36-yearold star remained as the team as captain. 1941 — Lefty Grove’s 20game consecutive win streak at Fenway Park ended with a 13-9 loss to the St. Louis Browns. The streak spanned from May 3, 1938, to May 12, 1941. 1956 — In a rare double one-hitter, Chicago’s Jack Harshman outdueled Connie Johnson and George Zuverink of Baltimore as the White Sox beat the Orioles 1-0. 1964 — Jim Bunning of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched a 6-0 perfect game against the New York Mets in the opener of a Father’s Day doubleheader. Bunning threw 89 pitches and struck out 10, including John Stephenson to end the game. The no-hitter gave Bunning one in each league — each with catcher Gus Triandos. 1970 — Detroit Tigers shortstop Cesar Gutierrez had seven hits in seven times at bat in a 9-8, 12-inning victory over the Cleveland Indians.


CARDINALS

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

Marlins 7, Cardinals 6 Miami Rojas ss-1b Ramirez lf Garcia p Romo p Cooper 1b Rivera 1b-ss B.Anderson 3b Castro 2b Alfaro c Holaday c Puello rf Riddle cf Gallen p Brice p b-Granderson ph Chen p N.Anderson p Quijada p Guerrero p c-Dean ph-lf Totals Cardinals Carpenter 3b DeJong ss Goldschmidt 1b Ozuna lf J.Martinez rf Molina c 1-Flaherty pr Wong 2b Webb p Hicks p d-Ravelo ph Gant p Miller p e-Wieters ph Bader cf Wainwright p Gallegos p a-Fowler ph Brebbia p Edman 2b Totals Miami Cardinals

000 000

AB 5 5 1 0 2 3 4 4 4 1 3 5 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 42 AB 6 6 5 6 6 5 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 2 0 1 0 2 48

R H 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 11 R H 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 1 1 3 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 6 16

102 010

110 220

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 BI 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 02 01

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 — —

SO 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 11 SO 2 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9 7 6

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

NOTEBOOK Avg. .275 .316 .000 --.313 .077 .246 .232 .261 .250 .378 .200 .000 --.182 .000 ------.209

Avg. .220 .276 .259 .252 .290 .261 .136 .239 ----.167 .000 --.210 .218 .167 .000 .241 1.000 .364

11 16

0 1

a-grounded out for Gallegos in the 6th. b-reached on error, advanced to 2nd for Brice in the 7th. c-grounded out for Guerrero in the 9th. d-out on fielder’s choice for Hicks in the 9th. e-pinch hit for Miller in the 11th. 1-ran for Molina in the 11th. E: Ozuna (2). LOB: Miami 7, Cardinals 12. 2B: Cooper (4), B.Anderson (14), Castro (7), DeJong (19), Goldschmidt (7), Molina (16). HR: B.Anderson (9), off Brebbia; Riddle (3), off Miller; Edman (1), off Guerrero. RBIs: Rojas (21), B.Anderson 2 (32), Castro (30), Puello (13), Riddle 2 (6), DeJong (35), Goldschmidt (31), Ozuna (57), Molina (35), Edman 2 (2). CS: Alfaro (3). Runners left in scoring position: Miami 3 (Alfaro, Riddle 2); Cardinals 6 (Ozuna, Wong 2, Bader 2, Fowler). GIDP: Castro, J.Martinez. DP: Miami 1 ; Cardinals 1. Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallen 5 5 1 1 2 6 99 1.80 Brice, H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 2.51 Chen, H, 2 1/3 1 1 1 0 1 10 7.62 N.Anderson, H, 4 1/3 3 1 1 0 0 16 4.75 Quijada, H, 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.08 Guerrero, BS, 3-3 1 2 2 2 0 1 18 3.68 Garcia, W, 1-0 2 2 0 0 0 1 36 4.67 Romo, S, 13-14 1 2 1 1 0 0 8 4.94 Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wainwright 5 1/3 6 3 3 1 6 86 4.50 Gallegos 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.70 Brebbia 1 2/3 4 2 1 0 2 35 3.32 Webb 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 1 4.44 Hicks 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.96 Gant 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 1.54 Miller, L, 3-3 1 1 2 2 1 2 23 4.38 Inherited runners-scored: N.Anderson 1-1, Quijada 2-0, Gallegos 3-1, Webb 1-0. HBP: Gallegos (Puello), Brice (Bader), Miller (Rojas). WP: Gallen, Garcia. Umpires: Home, Tom Hallion; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T: 4:31. A: 42,446 (45,538).

Ponce de Leon back to Memphis Pitcher was solid in start Wednesday vs. Marlins BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In his finest start yet of the season, Cardinals righthander Daniel Ponce de Leon did everything within his power Wednesday to earn a right to stay in the rotation, from assertive use of multiple pitches and the efficiency that followed to a grip on the opponents’ timing. The only thing he couldn’t command was the calendar. The Cardinals returned Ponce de Leon to Class AAA Memphis on Thursday to clear a roster spot for that night’s starter, Adam Wainwright, and signal what could be a downshift to a four-man rotation for the coming weeks. The Cardinals do not need a fifth starter until the final days before the All-Star break, and they could use three off days in the coming 11 days to rearrange, adjust, or shrink the rotation. “We’ll probably be rolling down to four,” general manager Michael Girsch said. “We’ll manage around that. Ponce will be back at some point. That’s just part of the process.” The Cardinals will have to make another roster move on Friday as they ready for the Los Angeles Angels visit to Busch Stadium. Yairo Munoz’s travel from the Dominican Republic was delayed in New York, and he was not scheduled to reach St. Louis until after game time. The Cardinals had to move him off the paternity-leave list and onto the restricted list. (He won’t be paid for Thursday, by rule.) On Friday, the Cardinals can move Munoz to the active roster and reset their bench. Manager Mike Shildt said they’ll continue to carry 13 pitchers on the roster through the weekend, but with off days Monday and Thursday of next week, that could invite an addition to the bench. All Ponce de Leon did to merit the demotion was pitch well enough to assure a return – and another start in the majors. After 90 pitches, six innings, a quality start, and six strikeouts Wednesday night, Ponce de Leon would not be available to pitch again until Sunday, at the earliest. He had options and because the Cardinals next have a possible opening for a starter in early July the schedule worked against Ponce de Leon. Michael Wacha, who starts Friday against the Angels, is trying to reearn a solidified spot in the rotation, and his performance will influence the use of a four-man rotation in the near future. Ponce de Leon could sub-in if the Cardinals want to use the break to get young starters Jack Flaherty or Dakota Hudson an extra day of rest.

TRADE TALK There has already been one trade of significance – Edwin Encarnacion going from Seattle to the Yankees, with other teams interested in the slugger – and talks have

BRIAN MUNOZ, BMUNOZ@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals starting pitcher Daniel Ponce de Leon delivers Wednesday against the Marlins.

AVERAGES Prior to Thursday’s game Batting AVG AB J.Martinez .283 180 DeJong .275 269 Goldschmidt .256 273 Ozuna .254 268 Molina .253 221 Fowler .243 202 Wong .239 234 Carpenter .225 253 Edman .222 9 Bader .217 161 Wieters .210 62 Ravelo .200 5 Team .242 2438

R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 23 51 8 0 4 26 19 40 1 2 50 74 18 1 13 34 34 57 5 3 43 70 6 0 14 30 35 76 0 4 49 68 13 0 18 56 27 65 7 1 20 56 15 0 4 34 8 25 4 1 27 49 9 0 8 26 28 56 4 4 28 56 10 1 7 30 28 42 13 7 39 57 11 1 10 26 42 73 5 6 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 22 35 8 2 6 19 22 57 3 1 5 13 2 0 3 10 2 21 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 336 590 109 5 91 315 257 619 51 37

their bullpen or shedding depth, such as last year when they traded Tommy Pham and Luke Voit to AL East teams. The Cardinals expect to be buyers; price is the question. “We expect to continue to play well and be in this thing,” Girsch said. “We’re in it now. Why would we say anything else?”

GORMAN PROMOTED

Nolan Gorman, the Cardinals’ slugging prospect from the first round of the 2018 draft, received his first promotion of the season Friday, advancing to High-A Palm Pitching W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO Beach. After a raucous start to the seaGant 7 0 1.58 33 0 3 40.0 20 7 7 3 9 37 Gallegos 1 0 2.76 27 0 0 32.2 19 10 10 4 6 47 son that included six homers and a .650 Hicks 2 2 3.08 27 0 14 26.1 15 9 9 1 11 29 slugging percentage in April, Gorman has Brebbia 1 3 3.22 33 0 0 36.1 27 14 13 4 13 44 cooled and slumped, batting three-for-37 C.Martinez 1 0 3.38 12 0 2 13.1 10 6 5 1 4 12 Hudson 5 3 3.55 15 14 1 78.2 84 39 31 9 36 54 (.081) with 16 strikeouts in his final 10 Miller 3 2 3.80 32 0 1 23.2 22 14 10 5 11 34 games for the Low-A Peoria. The promoFlaherty 4 4 4.24 15 15 0 80.2 69 39 38 15 26 89 tion was scheduled more than it was forced, Wainwright 5 6 4.46 13 13 0 70.2 68 36 35 9 31 61 Mikolas 5 7 4.48 15 15 0 84.1 87 43 42 14 15 61 as the Cardinals wanted Gorman to get half Webb 0 1 4.50 28 0 0 24.0 15 12 12 3 13 21 a season at Peoria and then advance, with Wacha 4 3 6.00 13 11 0 60.0 69 44 40 14 35 56 the possible look late this year at Class AA Cabrera 0 2 6.54 4 2 0 11.0 15 11 8 2 6 8 Team 38 35 4.18 73 73 21 645.2 578 324 300 95 252 620 Springfield. “It made sense to keep moving him forbeen percolating throughout baseball, but ward,” Girsch said. it’s unclear, Girsch said, if the hard July 31st deadline will nudge the market earlier. INJURY UPDATES “I’ve had some conversations with Mike Mayers (shoulder) and Ryan Helsley teams and I know (John Mozeliak) has,” (shoulder) threw bullpen sessions ThursGirsch said. “It doesn’t feel a lot more than day and will face hitters in a simulated normal. It sort of feels like it’s 10 days af- game situation Sunday before taking a ter the draft and everybody’s got most of stride toward returns. Their rehab assigntheir draft signings done. We all start call- ments could start the next week. Mayers, ing each other. None of the conversations who said he welcomes the feedback from I’ve had have had a lot of urgency on either big-league hitters that will follow Sunside with one way. My sense is there’s not day’s throws, will have to start a lengthier a dramatic difference.” rehab assignment than Helsley because The timing of the talks means the Cardi- he’s missed more time. … Austin Gomber nals have not narrowed their shopping list (shoulder) has relocated his rehab to Jupior targeted any specific players. The Car- ter, Fla., where he’s going through a throwdinals entered the season expecting to keep ing program that puts him a week to 10 days tabs on the market for top-tier starting away from facing hitters. He will have to pitching, should any, like San Francisco’s build arm strength before being returned Madison Bumgarner, prove healthy, pro- to the Class AAA rotation. ductive, and become available via trade. Derrick Goold The Cardinals have not been active acquir- @dgoold on Twitter ers in recent deadlines, often fine-tuning dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals From C1

homer came off veteran lefty Andrew Miller as he faced the bottom of the Marlins order and walked the second batter he faced. The series split came at the end of a game when former Cardinals’ farmhand Zac Gallen made his major-league debut against his first club, and Adam Wainwright made his return to the rotation from the injured list. Gallen got ahead often in the count, and the Marlins kept ahead every time the Cardinals threatened. In the eighth inning, Edman, part of a double-switch in that inning, hit his first bigleague homer to tie the game, 5-5. Yadier Molina’s two-out double in the 11th inning got the tying run to second base, but pinch-runner Jack Flaherty was picked off at second base to end the game. The Cardinals binge-andcringe offense that became an agent of their May struggles has been less binge and more cringe in June. Manager Mike Shildt insisted that the overhaul of the lineup Wednesday was not to offer a new look, yet throughout June the lineup continues to look lethargic. At the start of Thursday’s game, the Cardinals had the lowest team batting average in June (.215). They did not have the lowest on-base percentage in the state of Missouri, just the lowest on-base percentage (.281) in the National League, and only Baltimore had a worse slugging percentage in the majors than the Cardinals’ .368. All month offense has been intermittent with spasms of production. The Cardinals did open the month against two of the topfive pitching staffs in the National League, but since they’ve helped two lower-half pitching teams improve. Gallen is the latest in a conga line of young pitchers who have had impressive outings for Miami this season – including a handful against the Cardinals. In the past 10 days, the Cardinals have faced Miami seven times and been shut out twice. They entered the

BRIAN MUNOZ, BMUNOZ@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Cardinals’ Tommy Edman, left, and Harrison Bader celebrate in the eighth inning Thursday night after Edman hit a two-run home run to tie the game. season series finale with 18 runs against the Marlins in the first six games, and until Edman’s home run they were on brand with three runs. A root cause of their ongoing offensive issues has been how they perform in situational moments. On Wednesday, with a chance to tie the game by putting the ball in play or getting the ball into Miami’s two-man outfielder, Harrison Bader swung at three sliders, none of them in the strike zone. The inning unraveled. The Cardinals never took advantage of the Marlins using five infielders – and instead hit into it. In the seventh inning Thursday, the Cardinals got the tying run to third base with less than two outs. A ball to the outfield and the game is knotted for a second game. Yadier Molina skied a ball to shortstop that didn’t allow the runner to advance. The inning petered out.

Opportunities came and became spoiled. A walk-off homer by Paul Goldschmidt rescued the Cardinals on Wednesday, and it was Edman’s homer that did the same in the eighth inning Thursday. Marlins infielder Brian Anderson led off the eighth with a solo homer that pushed the Marlins lead up to two runs. The missed opportunity in the bottom of the seventh had now become a wider lead for the Marlins. Bader preceded Edman with a single to set up the game-tying homer. The Cardinals played from behind all night. A third-round pick by the Cardinals in 2016, Gallen was the classic Cardinals college pick, right out of central casting in the mold of Luke Weaver. He was consistent in college. He would rise consistently through the minors. He would eventually arrive in the majors and, likely,

be consistent. That’s why the Marlins wanted him in exchange for Marcell Ozuna. The Cardinals’ depth is why they could part with him. While not headliner in the package of prospects the Cardinals sent to Miami – that honor went to power righthander Sandy Alcantara, another starter for the Marlins – Gallen offered an element of certainty. At Class AAA New Orleans this season, he was 9-1 with a 1.77 ERA in 14 starts – certainly pushing his way to the majors, and when he got his debut it came Thursday against the team that drafted him. Gallen pitched five solid innings and held the Cardinals to one run – scored by opposing pitcher Wainwright – on five hits. Through four innings he had allowed three this total, and two of them belonged to Jose Martinez. Gallen struck out six, and in the fifth inning when Ozuna had a chance to put the

Cardinals ahead with a runner at second base, Gallen got the hitter he’ll always be tied to out. Fittingly that ended his start. Moments before the Marlins took their first lead, Wainwright appeared to suggest they had filched something else – his signs. With Garrett Cooper at second base after a double and former Cubs infielder Starlin Castro at the plate, Wainwright paused his duel with Castro to step off the mound and walk toward Cooper. Back on the mound, Wainwright paused again, and eventually he beckoned Molina to the mound for a conversation. The series of events usually leads to changing the signs, or Molina has been known to abandon them all together, especially with Wainwright given their 254 starts together. The pitch Wainwright eventually delivered to Castro – a 91mph sinker – either was exactly what Castro expected or wasn’t as far inside and low as Wainwright wanted. Miami’s second baseman lifted it for a double and a 1-0 lead. Wainwright played a part in leveling the game with a one-out single the fifth and then scoring from first on DeJong’s two-out double. The ball pinballed in the left field corner to allow Wainwright, freshly back from a hamstring injury, to round third and score the Cardinals’ first run. He didn’t hold the tie for long. Immediately after circling the bases, Wainwright allowed two singles to open the sixth inning, and the rally that would usher him from the game was afoot. A courtesy popup bunt gave Wainwright an exit he needed from trouble, but it closed when Brian Anderson lashed a double down the left-field line. Wainwright’s last act was his first walk of his start – and he did so without throwing a pitch. Castro knew what was coming then too – nothing. He took his intentional walk. Giovanny Gallegos took over with the bases loaded, hit one batter to bring home the third and final run on Wainwright’s line, and then ended the inning. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 2

Marlins 7, Cardinals 6 Miami Rojas ss-1b Ramirez lf Garcia p Romo p Cooper 1b Rivera 1b-ss B.Anderson 3b Castro 2b Alfaro c Holaday c Puello rf Riddle cf Gallen p Brice p b-Granderson ph Chen p N.Anderson p Quijada p Guerrero p c-Dean ph-lf Totals Cardinals Carpenter 3b DeJong ss Goldschmidt 1b Ozuna lf J.Martinez rf Molina c 1-Flaherty pr Wong 2b Webb p Hicks p d-Ravelo ph Gant p Miller p e-Wieters ph Bader cf Wainwright p Gallegos p a-Fowler ph Brebbia p Edman 2b Totals Miami Cardinals

000 000

AB 5 5 1 0 2 3 4 4 4 1 3 5 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 42 AB 6 6 5 6 6 5 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 2 0 1 0 2 48

R H 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 11 R H 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 1 1 3 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 6 16

102 010

110 220

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 BI 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 02 01

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 — —

SO 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 11 SO 2 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9 7 6

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

NOTEBOOK Avg. .275 .316 .000 --.313 .077 .246 .232 .261 .250 .378 .200 .000 --.182 .000 ------.209

Avg. .220 .276 .259 .252 .290 .261 .136 .239 ----.167 .000 --.210 .218 .167 .000 .241 1.000 .364

11 16

0 1

a-grounded out for Gallegos in the 6th. b-reached on error, advanced to 2nd for Brice in the 7th. c-grounded out for Guerrero in the 9th. d-out on fielder’s choice for Hicks in the 9th. e-pinch hit for Miller in the 11th. 1-ran for Molina in the 11th. E: Ozuna (2). LOB: Miami 7, Cardinals 12. 2B: Cooper (4), B.Anderson (14), Castro (7), DeJong (19), Goldschmidt (7), Molina (16). HR: B.Anderson (9), off Brebbia; Riddle (3), off Miller; Edman (1), off Guerrero. RBIs: Rojas (21), B.Anderson 2 (32), Castro (30), Puello (13), Riddle 2 (6), DeJong (35), Goldschmidt (31), Ozuna (57), Molina (35), Edman 2 (2). CS: Alfaro (3). Runners left in scoring position: Miami 3 (Alfaro, Riddle 2); Cardinals 6 (Ozuna, Wong 2, Bader 2, Fowler). GIDP: Castro, J.Martinez. DP: Miami 1; Cardinals 1. Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallen 5 5 1 1 2 6 99 1.80 Brice, H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 2.51 1 Chen, H, 2 1 0 1 10 7.62 /3 1 1 1/3 3 1 N.Anderson, H, 4 1 0 0 16 4.75 1 Quijada, H, 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.08 Guerrero, BS, 3-3 1 2 2 2 0 1 18 3.68 Garcia, W, 1-0 2 2 0 0 0 1 36 4.67 Romo, S, 13-14 1 2 1 1 0 0 8 4.94 Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wainwright 5 1/3 6 3 3 1 6 86 4.50 2/3 0 0 Gallegos 0 0 1 10 2.70 Brebbia 1 2/3 4 2 1 0 2 35 3.32 1/3 0 0 Webb 0 0 0 1 4.44 Hicks 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.96 Gant 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 1.54 Miller, L, 3-3 1 1 2 2 1 2 23 4.38 Inherited runners-scored: N.Anderson 1-1, Quijada 2-0, Gallegos 3-1, Webb 1-0. HBP: Gallegos (Puello), Brice (Bader), Miller (Rojas). WP: Gallen, Garcia. Umpires: Home, Tom Hallion; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T: 4:31. A: 42,446 (45,538).

How they scored MARLINS FOURTH Harold Ramirez grounds out to shortstop, Paul DeJong to Paul Goldschmidt. Garrett Cooper doubles to left field. Brian Anderson grounds out to shallow infield, Yadier Molina to Paul Goldschmidt. Starlin Castro doubles to deep left center field. Garrett Cooper scores. Jorge Alfaro strikes out swinging. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Marlins 1, Cardinals 0. CARDINALS FIFTH Harrison Bader pops out to shallow right field to Starlin Castro. Adam Wainwright singles to center field. Matt Carpenter strikes out swinging. Paul DeJong doubles to deep left field. Adam Wainwright scores. Paul Goldschmidt walks. Marcell Ozuna lines out to right field to Cesar Puello. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Marlins 1, Cardinals 1. MARLINS SIXTH Miguel Rojas singles to right center field. Harold Ramirez singles to shallow center field. Miguel Rojas to second. Yadiel Rivera pops out to shallow infield to Adam Wainwright. Brian Anderson doubles to shallow left field. Harold Ramirez to third. Miguel Rojas scores. Starlin Castro is intentionally walked. Jorge Alfaro strikes out swinging. Cesar Puello hit by pitch. Starlin Castro to second. Brian Anderson to third. Harold Ramirez scores. JT Riddle grounds out to second base, Kolten Wong to Paul Goldschmidt. 2 runs, 3 hits, 0 errors, 3 left on. Marlins 3, Cardinals 1. MARLINS SEVENTH Curtis Granderson pinch-hitting for Austin Brice. Curtis Granderson reaches on error to deep left center field, advances to 2nd. Fielding error by Marcell Ozuna. Miguel Rojas singles to shallow center field, tagged out at second, Harrison Bader to Yadier Molina to Paul Goldschmidt. Curtis Granderson scores. Harold Ramirez strikes out swinging. Yadiel Rivera flies out to center field to Harrison Bader. 1 run, 1 hit, 1 error, 0 left on. Marlins 4, Cardinals 1. CARDINALS SEVENTH Matt Carpenter strikes out swinging. Paul DeJong singles to deep left field. Paul Goldschmidt doubles to deep left field. Paul DeJong scores. Marcell Ozuna singles to center field. Paul Goldschmidt scores. Jose Martinez singles to shallow center field. Marcell Ozuna to third. Yadier Molina pops out to shallow left field to Miguel Rojas. Kolten Wong reaches on a fielder’s choice to second base. Jose Martinez out at second. 2 runs, 4 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Marlins 4, Cardinals 3. MARLINS EIGHTH Brian Anderson homers to left field. Starlin Castro strikes out swinging. Jorge Alfaro singles to right center field. With Cesar Puello batting, Jorge Alfaro caught stealing second. Cesar Puello singles to left field. JT Riddle flies out to center field to Harrison Bader. 1 run, 3 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Marlins 5, Cardinals 3. CARDINALS EIGHTH Harrison Bader singles to left field. Tommy Edman homers to center field. Harrison Bader scores. Matt Carpenter pops out to third base to Brian Anderson. Paul DeJong flies out to center field to JT Riddle. Paul Goldschmidt called out on strikes. 2 runs, 2 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. Marlins 5, Cardinals 5. MARLINS ELEVENTH Bryan Holaday flies out to deep center field to Harrison Bader. Cesar Puello walks. JT Riddle homers to right field. Cesar Puello scores. Austin Dean strikes out swinging. Miguel Rojas hit by pitch. Jarlin Garcia called out on strikes. 2 runs, 1 hit, 0 errors, 1 left on. Marlins 7, Cardinals 5. CARDINALS ELEVENTH Paul Goldschmidt singles to center field. Marcell Ozuna reaches on a fielder’s choice to shortstop. Paul Goldschmidt out at second. Jose Martinez reaches on a fielder’s choice to shortstop. Marcell Ozuna out at second. Yadier Molina doubles to left field. Jose Martinez scores. Jack Flaherty pinch-running for Yadier Molina. Matt Wieters pinch-hitting for Andrew Miller. With Matt Wieters batting, Jack Flaherty picked off. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. Marlins 7, Cardinals 6.

Ponce de Leon back to Memphis Pitcher was solid in start Wednesday vs. Marlins BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In his finest start yet of the season, Cardinals righthander Daniel Ponce de Leon did everything within his power Wednesday to earn a right to stay in the rotation, from assertive use of multiple pitches and the efficiency that followed to a grip on the opponents’ timing. The only thing he couldn’t command was the calendar. The Cardinals returned Ponce de Leon to Class AAA Memphis on Thursday to clear a roster spot for that night’s starter, Adam Wainwright, and signal what could be a downshift to a four-man rotation for the coming weeks. The Cardinals do not need a fifth starter until the final days before the All-Star break, and they could use three off days in the coming 11 days to rearrange, adjust, or shrink the rotation. “We’ll probably be rolling down to four,” general manager Michael Girsch said. “We’ll manage around that. Ponce will be back at some point. That’s just part of the process.” The Cardinals will have to make another roster move on Friday as they ready for the Los Angeles Angels visit to Busch Stadium. Yairo Munoz’s travel from the Dominican Republic was delayed in New York, and he was not scheduled to reach St. Louis until after game time. The Cardinals had to move him off the paternity-leave list and onto the restricted list. (He won’t be paid for Thursday, by rule.) On Friday, the Cardinals can move Munoz to the active roster and reset their bench. Manager Mike Shildt said they’ll continue to carry 13 pitchers on the roster through the weekend, but with off days Monday and Thursday of next week, that could invite an addition to the bench. All Ponce de Leon did to merit the demotion was pitch well enough to assure a return – and another start in the majors. After 90 pitches, six innings, a quality start, and six strikeouts Wednesday night, Ponce de Leon would not be available to pitch again until Sunday, at the earliest. He had options and because the Cardinals next have a possible opening for a starter in early July the schedule worked against Ponce de Leon. Michael Wacha, who starts Friday against the Angels, is trying to reearn a solidified spot in the rotation, and his performance will influence the use of a four-man rotation in the near future. Ponce de Leon could sub-in if the Cardinals want to use the break to get young starters Jack Flaherty or Dakota Hudson an extra day of rest.

TRADE TALK There has already been one trade of significance – Edwin Encarnacion going from Seattle to the Yankees, with other teams interested in the slugger – and talks have

BRIAN MUNOZ, BMUNOZ@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals starting pitcher Daniel Ponce de Leon delivers Wednesday against the Marlins.

AVERAGES Batting Edman J.Martinez DeJong Molina Goldschmidt Ozuna Fowler Wong Carpenter Bader Wieters Ravelo Team

AVG AB .364 11 .290 186 .276 275 .261 226 .259 278 .252 274 .241 203 .239 238 .220 259 .218 165 .210 62 .167 6 .244 2486

R H 4 4 24 54 51 76 20 59 44 72 49 69 27 49 28 57 39 57 23 36 5 13 0 1 342 606

2B 1 8 19 16 7 13 9 10 11 8 2 0 112

3B 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 5

HR 1 4 13 4 14 18 8 7 10 6 3 0 92

RBI 2 26 35 35 31 57 26 30 26 19 10 0 321

BB 0 19 34 9 36 27 28 28 42 22 2 1 259

SO 2 40 59 25 79 66 56 42 75 57 21 1 628

SB 2 1 5 4 0 7 4 13 5 3 1 0 51

E 0 2 3 1 4 2 4 7 6 1 0 0 38

their bullpen or shedding depth, such as last year when they traded Tommy Pham and Luke Voit to AL East teams. The Cardinals expect to be buyers; price is the question. “We expect to continue to play well and be in this thing,” Girsch said. “We’re in it now. Why would we say anything else?”

GORMAN PROMOTED

Nolan Gorman, the Cardinals’ slugging prospect from the first round of the 2018 draft, received his first promotion of the Pitching W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO season Friday, advancing to High-A Palm Gant 7 0 1.54 34 0 3 41.0 20 7 7 3 10 37 Beach. After a raucous start to the seaGallegos 1 0 2.70 28 0 0 33.1 19 10 10 4 6 48 Hicks 2 2 2.96 28 0 14 27.1 15 9 9 1 11 29 son that included six homers and a .650 Brebbia 1 3 3.32 34 0 0 38.0 31 16 14 5 13 46 slugging percentage in April, Gorman has C.Martinez 1 0 3.38 12 0 2 13.1 10 6 5 1 4 12 cooled and slumped, batting three-for-37 Hudson 5 3 3.55 15 14 1 78.2 84 39 31 9 36 54 Flaherty 4 4 4.24 15 15 0 80.2 69 39 38 15 26 89 (.081) with 16 strikeouts in his final 10 Miller 3 3 4.38 33 0 1 24.2 23 16 12 6 12 36 games for the Low-A Peoria. The promoWebb 0 1 4.44 29 0 0 24.1 15 12 12 3 13 21 tion was scheduled more than it was forced, Mikolas 5 7 4.48 15 15 0 84.1 87 43 42 14 15 61 Wainwright 5 6 4.50 14 14 0 76.0 74 39 38 9 32 67 as the Cardinals wanted Gorman to get half Mayers 0 1 5.40 8 0 0 8.1 10 5 5 2 5 8 a season at Peoria and then advance, with Wacha 4 3 6.00 13 11 0 60.0 69 44 40 14 35 56 the possible look late this year at Class AA Cabrera 0 2 6.54 4 2 0 11.0 15 11 8 2 6 8 Team 38 36 4.19 74 74 21 656.2 589 331 306 97 255 631 Springfield. “It made sense to keep moving him forbeen percolating throughout baseball, but ward,” Girsch said. it’s unclear, Girsch said, if the hard July 31st deadline will nudge the market earlier. INJURY UPDATES “I’ve had some conversations with Mike Mayers (shoulder) and Ryan Helsley teams and I know (John Mozeliak) has,” (shoulder) threw bullpen sessions ThursGirsch said. “It doesn’t feel a lot more than day and will face hitters in a simulated normal. It sort of feels like it’s 10 days af- game situation Sunday before taking a ter the draft and everybody’s got most of stride toward returns. Their rehab assigntheir draft signings done. We all start call- ments could start the next week. Mayers, ing each other. None of the conversations who said he welcomes the feedback from I’ve had have had a lot of urgency on either big-league hitters that will follow Sunside with one way. My sense is there’s not day’s throws, will have to start a lengthier a dramatic difference.” rehab assignment than Helsley because The timing of the talks means the Cardi- he’s missed more time. … Austin Gomber nals have not narrowed their shopping list (shoulder) has relocated his rehab to Jupior targeted any specific players. The Car- ter, Fla., where he’s going through a throwdinals entered the season expecting to keep ing program that puts him a week to 10 days tabs on the market for top-tier starting away from facing hitters. He will have to pitching, should any, like San Francisco’s build arm strength before being returned Madison Bumgarner, prove healthy, pro- to the Class AAA rotation. ductive, and become available via trade. Derrick Goold The Cardinals have not been active acquir- @dgoold on Twitter ers in recent deadlines, often fine-tuning dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals From C1

“There’s a lot going on in this game,” manager Mike Shildt said. “At the end of the day we got beat. There is no really balancing it out.” With two outs and the Cardinals trailing by two because of J.T. Riddle’s 11th-inning homer, Yadier Molina drove a double to left field that scored Jose Martinez and put the tying run in scoring position. As he did this past week in New York and has before, Shildt turned to the swiftest of his available starting pitchers to run for Molina. He had catcher Matt Wieters set to pinch-hit, so the swap was natural, and Flaherty offered a better chance at scoring the tying run from second. Wieters never saw a pitch. Flaherty took his lead off second, dropped his head however briefly, and Romo, the savvy former closer, spun and threw, catching Flaherty clean. Shildt took the bruise. “I put him in that spot,” Shildt said. “I have to take responsibilities for it. It’s the right move. The reality is he wasn’t prepped well enough and I take responsibility of that. Put him in a spot where he wasn’t able to have success. I’ll take responsibility.” Although the Cardinals scored more than two runs for only the second time in the past five games against the Marlins and had their sweet 16 hits, those two bright spots in the box score masked a persisting agent of trouble in the Cardinals’ lineup. For the second time in as many days, home runs overcome missed moments of situation hitting. On Wednesday, a strkeout by Harrison Bader gave Miami a pass in the ninth inning only to have Paul Goldschmidt’s walk-off homer rescue the Cardinals later. On Thursday, the Cardinals had the tying run at third with less than two outs in the seventh. Molina popped up and the inning unraveled. The next inning rookie Tommy Edman hit a two-run homer to tie the game, 5-5, and earn the first curtain call of his career. That swing also put the two teams even at 23 runs apiece through their seven games in 10 days. The Cardinals entered the game as one of the least-threatening offenses this month. The binge-or-cringe lineup of May has become less binge, more cringe in June. The Cardinals’ .215 average in June ranks last in the majors, their onbase percentage (.281) was not the lowest in Missouri but the lowest in the National League, and only lowly Baltimore had a slimmer slugging percentage in the majors than the Cardinals’ .368. Games against top pitching staffs like Cincinnati and the Cubs hasn’t helped this month, but the Cardinals have helped Miami crack the top

BRIAN MUNOZ, BMUNOZ@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals pinch runner Jack Flaherty takes a knee after he was stranded on second base to end Thursday’s game. half of the NL. One key to unlocking the offense would be better situational hitting. Only one of their six runs came on a hit with a runner in scoring position. “I agree with that,” Shildt said. “Every at-bat is a situation. We like home runs, clearly. It was a big home run by Tommy. Tie the game. Great at-bat. We love the home run. We love the extra-base hits. We love doing damage. But we need to be able to attack from different angles.” The obvious angle on the game was Marlins starter Zac Gallen making his majorleague debut against the team that traded him for Marcell Ozuna. Opposite veteran Adam Wainwright, back from a brief stay on the injured list, Gallen worked five innings and allowed one run and struck out six. Staked to an early 1-0 lead, Gallen was often like his team – ahead of the Cardinals’ hitters. When Ozuna had a chance to put the Cardinals ahead with a runner at second base in the fifth inning, Gallen got the former Marlin that made him a former Cardinal out on the final pitch of his start. Wainwright, who scored the lone run vs. Gallen to tie the game, got into the sixth before the Marlins frustrated his line with a few fizzy singles for a two-run rally and an inning Giovanny Gallegos had to finish. In the fourth, right before Starlin Castro’s RBI double, Wainwright took issue with Garrett Cooper at second base. It appeared as if Cooper was relaying Molina’s signs to Castro. Wainwright confronted him. Cooper said he wasn’t, Wainwright said. “I’m not calling him a liar,” the pitcher said. “Sure seemed like they were being very blatant about it.”

Shildt was blunt: “I’m surprised more pitchers don’t take exception.” Molina did in the 10th as a caustic exchange about a check-swing brought Molina out of his crouch and into Brian Anderson’s face. The teams converged at home, Castro with a grin, and the situation was defused. So was the inning, and that left the 11th to Andrew Miller. The lefty walked a batter ahead of Riddle on four pitches and then tried to get a slider by Riddle, the No. 8 hitter. Miller called it “a slider right down the middle.” “I think we win that game if I put up a zero,” Miller said. A zero and Molina’s double wins the game. A zero and Flaherty never sees the field. But a zero didn’t happen, so there Flaherty was, on the field, minutes after the final out. This was the second time in a week he had entered the game to pinch-run as the tying run, and the second time he had been thrown out to end the game. Flaherty remained near second, on one knee, during the 38-second review of the play. He was there during and after the Marlins high-five and handshake line ended and trickled back to the clubhouse. When coach Stubby Clapp emerged from the dugout and approached the firstbase line, Flaherty waved him away. First and third base had been uprooted by the grounds crew, but not second as the workers kept a respectful distance. Eventually Flaherty stood and second base was there for someone else to take. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BASEBALL

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Pujols From C1

Ohtani will be reduced to pinch hitting. “But those at-bats are definitely worth watching,” said the Angels’ Mike Trout. “He’s something special.” Speaking of something special, this will be the first appearance here of Angels center fielder Trout, widely regarded as the game’s best player the last few years. This is the only city in which Trout, also the highest-paid player in the game now ($426,500,000), has not played. Angels manager Brad Ausmus, longtime catcher with Houston, says, “My guess is that Cardinals fans, being the very good, respectful baseball fans that they are, are probably very excited to see a guy like Mike Trout. He’s an extreme talent. Power, speed, and the best part about him is that he’s a great guy in the clubhouse. To a ‘T,’ he’s a regular guy who just happens to be extremely talented.” Teammate Albert Pujols said, “He always asks me about the fans (in St. Louis) and asks about the stadium. It’ll be exciting because they deserve to see the best player in the game playing in that stadium.” But seeing Trout, who knocked in seven runs in a game in Toronto two nights ago, won’t nearly provide the most excitement this weekend. That will come when Pujols comes to bat for the first time Friday night as a visiting player at Busch after what should be some compelling pre-game ceremonies. Pujols spent 11 record-setting years as a Cardinal and has achieved numerous offensive milestones in eight seasons with the Angels. However you feel about his departure for Anaheim for 10 years after the Cardinals’ World Series championship in 2011 … or why it happened … doesn’t really matter anymore. Former teammate Adam Wainwright said, “I hope he gets the ovation of a lifetime. Had he stayed here, he probably would have been the greatest Cardinal who ever lived. “As great as Stan (Musial) is and Bob (Gibson) and Ozzie (Smith) and all those great Cardinals, I think Albert would be at least in the conversation,” said Wainwright. “He’s already in the conversation, but he probably would have passed all of them because he was doing so many amazing things.” Yadier Molina shares two World Series championships with Pujols and was his teammate for eight seasons. They still are very close, but Molina joked, “I’m going to try to strike him out four times — if he plays. He’s too old (39) to play.” Pujols shook his head and smiled when he heard this. “That’s my little brother,” he said. Chances are good that Molina, who traditionally walks out in front of the plate to allow — and encourage — a loud ovation for a former Cardinal, will remain there until the last fan standing has sat down. “We’ll have to see what happens,” said Molina, a gleam in his eye. Pujols, who sat for an interview with the Post-Dispatch a week ago in St. Petersburg, Fla., said he didn’t quite know what to expect this weekend. “That’s the million-dollar question, I guess,” he said. “I’m sure it’s going to be emotional. Eight years is a long time. “I’m really excited for it. My family is going to be there and some friends. I bought three suites (for every day). I spent a lot of money (some $35,000) for tickets. That’s going to cost me,” he said. “But I’m really pumped up.” Trout, a two-time MVP in the American League, compared to Pujols’ three such awards in the

Frederickson From C1

It’s their right. But they’re wrong. Pujols should be celebrated for his remarkable impact on and off the field during his 11 splendid seasons with the Cardinals. To those who disagree, a question: Would you be celebrating him if he stayed? In an era obsessed with immediacy bias and dictated by whathave-you-done-for-me-lately expectations, a case can be made that Pujols did as much to secure his legacy in St. Louis by leaving for California as he would have by re-signing here. Seriously. Between his first season with the Cardinals (2001) and his last (2011), Pujols led all of baseball in average (.328) while ranking third in on-base percentage (.420) and second in slugging percentage (.617). He had more doubles (455)

CHRIS CARLSON, AP PHOTO

Albert Pujols watches his two-run home run against the Giants last season. National League, said, “It’s going to be very special for him, obviously. It’s special because you like to go to a ballpark for the first time, but to be able to do it when it’s Albert’s first time coming back is pretty cool.” Pujols’ first at-bat in St. Louis was a two-run homer off Colorado’s Denny Neagle on April 9, 2001, at Busch Stadium II. Pujols’ final at-bat in a Cardinals uniform was in the seventh inning of the seventh game of the 2011 World Series when he struck out against Texas’ Mike Adams at the current stadium. So much has happened in between that home run and strikeout. “I was just a little kid when I went into that city,” Pujols said. “I left as a grown man — with a lot of experience and a lot of memories. “At the end of the day, that’s the stuff that nobody can take away from you, no matter what kind of success you have — the memories with players, the whole city and the fans. “To me, they’re the best fans in baseball. No doubt.” Wainwright has many lasting memories of Pujols, and not just on the field. “I can’t say enough about him and how much he did for me as a player, teaching me about pitching in big situations and gameplanning with me, talking through things,” said Wainwright. Off the field, Wainwright recalls seeing a painting by Opie Otterstad, who paints sports figures and events, one of which was reliever Wainwright raising his arms after getting the final strikeout of the Cardinals’ 2006 World Series championship. “I said, ‘That’s a great painting, Opie, I’d like to buy it from you,’” said Wainwright. He asked how much and the artist’s response was $5,000. One season removed from being a rookie and a new father, Wainwright determined that price tag was too rich for his blood. Pujols said, according to Wainwright, “You’re going to buy that, right?” Wainwright reiterated that he wasn’t, but Pujols persisted and said he wanted to buy it for Wainwright. Wainwright again demurred, but he then recounted Pujols saying, “You’ve got to let me buy that painting for you … or you’re going to Triple-A.” Too well-bred to refuse, Wainwright said, “Thanks a lot, man.” The painting remains above the

desk in Wainwright’s office. “One of my pride and joys,” he said. Ausmus has seen Pujols from two angles — as only the third big-league manager for whom Pujols has played (Tony La Russa, Mike Scioscia) — and as Houston’s longtime catcher. As the closest man to impact, Ausmus still can hear the sound of Pujols’ bat connecting with reliever Brad Lidge’s pitch, resulting in a monstrous home run at Minute Maid Park that kept the Cardinals alive in the 2005 National League Championship Series. “There are two ways I can describe Albert,” said Ausmus. “He’s a professional, a complete professional. And he’s a warrior. He can walk out on one leg and play. “And even, after 18-plus years, he goes about his business exactly the same way. He’s always prepared. He’s easy to manage because he manages himself.” Ausmus, not surprisingly, says that Trout is the best player in the game now. As for Pujols … “For a 10-year period, and we (the Astros) were playing against each other quite a bit, Albert was the best player in the game,” Ausmus said. Pujols chose not to get into the specifics of his leaving St. Louis. “It’s business,” he said. “I’m not going to get into details of why it didn’t happen. I’m real excited where we are. The Cardinals are real excited where they are. “It was a tough adjustment, but I think it was the right move, especially looking back and seeing the injuries that I’ve had. There’s nothing that I can change. “I really respect the (Angels) organization. I really respect (owner) Arte Moreno and (wife) Carole. And, hopefully, before this contract is over, my goal is to help this club win. That’s been my mindset since I came here in 2012.” There’s been a big difference in October baseball between the Cardinals and Angels. In Pujols’ 11 seasons here, the Cardinals were in the postseason seven times. In Anaheim, he has been in the postseason once, in 2014, when they were swept in three games by Kansas City in the divisional round. Pujols doesn’t play every day anymore and sometimes serves as the DH. But he hopes to play first base all three games in this series as Ausmus already has given him three days off on the club’s 11game, 12-day trip. “I’m only going to come once to

St. Louis — unless we play in the “But … I’ve been blessed. World Series,” said Pujols. Nothing to be ashamed of. Nothing where I would say, ‘I wish I would have changed this.’ First, THE HONOR ROLL Before games of Thursday, Pujols that would be disrespecting God ranked 20th in career hits at 3,133, and the blessings he has given me. sixth in homers at 649 and fourth And, it’s just not fair.” in RBIs at 2,021. “The first 10 years (in St. Louis) SEEING OLD FRIENDS were the best start by anybody in Pujols will be delighted to see the baseball. But nothing is going to few old teammates he has left, replace winning the World Series, plus those who work in the orwinning the ring,” he said. ganization. La Russa and former Time, a bad left knee and plan- Cardinals general manager Walt tar fasciitis in his left ankle have Jocketty are expected to be here taken their toll. Pujols’ career av- to honor Pujols. Others he won’t erage, not helped by his .235 mark ever be able to see again, or they this year, has dipped to .301 now. just won’t be here. “For me, it doesn’t matter to “I really miss Stan,” Pujols said. me whether you hit .300 or you “I miss Red (Schoendienst), too, hit .280 or .290,” he said. “Inju- sitting in the Jacuzzi with him ries have slowed me down a little and him telling me when he first to the extent that I can’t perform started that they only used one the way I once did, but I don’t re- baseball or two and, especially, if ally focus on it. You have so many you’re a rookie, there was no batguys in the Hall of Fame with av- ting practice for you. erages less than .300.” “Gibson would give me all that Pujols is not oblivious to his ex- crap that if I would have taken cellent Hall of Fame chances. him deep and looked at it, he “The numbers are there,” he would have thrown me one up and said. “I think I’ve had an unbe- in, and the next at-bat he would lievable career. But it’s hard when hit me.” you’re doing your job and you’re From Brock, Pujols learned the still involved to think about ‘what importance of getting from home if?’ to home. “This game is already tough “I led the league three times in enough.” runs scored,” said Pujols. “He told The numbers — 600 (homers), me, ‘Albert, you don’t have to be a 3,000 (hits) and 2,000 (RBIs) — fast runner. You just have to be the are not on everybody’s resume. smartest runner.’” Two hundred homers in each Pujols has two more years left league. He has reached all those on his contract and then the opmileposts with the Angels. tion of a 10-year personal services “The last couple of years, it’s contract with the Angels after been pretty nuts,” said Trout. that. But, asked if he would like to “It’s either hitting 600 homers or take one more at-bat as a Cardipassing Babe Ruth. It seems like nal, he laughed. every game, he adds a milestone.” “It would be a cool experience,” he said, “but I respect the relationship that I have here with WHAT HAT WOULD HE the Angels. We’ll see what I have WEAR ON HOF PLAQUE? when I’m done playing.” Ausmus is expected to write the This has crossed Pujols’ mind. “I don’t want to speak ahead of name Pujols into his lineup as the itself … yeah, I think about it,” he No. 4 hitter for Friday’s game and said. “When that moment comes, then let the excitement begin. “Certainly, I want the Cardinals hopefully, when that call comes, I will celebrate it and enjoy it. Then fans to see Albert play and honor I will have about … what is it, Albert. He’s one of the greatest three months? They don’t make Cardinals that ever lived,” said Ausmus. “He’s more than likely you decide right away.” Pujols well could reach 700 the best righthanded hitter I’ve homers for his career, which ever seen.” Not limping as much as in past would leave him fourth. He is seasons, Pujols says, “This is the likely to finish third in RBIs. Then, he asks, rhetorically, best I’ve felt for the last four or “Can you imagine if I had just five years. “I’ve still got a little bit left in stayed healthy these 19 years? “I wonder sometimes. I wonder the tank.” if I had just been healthy, I would Rick Hummel have overshadowed pretty much @cmshhummel on Twitter everything. rhummel@post-dispatch.com

and home runs (445) than any other player during that span. His adjusted on-base plus slugging percentage read 170. (League average is 100.) Here, Pujols was a rookie of the year, a batting title owner, a twotime World Series champion, a two-time Gold Glove winner, a three-time National League MVP, a six-time Silver Slugger, a nine-time All-Star. He was the best hitter breathing during the peak of his Cardinals career. He was what Hall of Fame manager Tony La Russa often called “perfect.” He was the spring training sensation who never stumbled, the Houston wrecking ball, the man who was compared to “The Man” until he humbly requested that Stan Musial’s nickname stand alone. Pujols, like Musial, deserves a statue outside of Busch. And I would not be surprised if he gets one someday. Even though he went to the Angels. Perhaps in part because he went to the Angels.

Most Cardinals fans know Pujols has not played well lately. I’m not sure many realize how fast the decline came and how drastic it is now. Between Pujols’ first season with the Angels (2012) and the start of Thursday’s games, he ranked 136th in average (.258), 176th in on-base percentage (.315) and 69th in slugging percentage (.453). He doesn’t crack the top 50 in doubles and falls outside of the top 10 in home runs. Pujols has averaged 14 fewer games played per season with the Angels compared to with the Cardinals, and that’s with a designated hitter spot available in the American League lineup, where he has taken more than half of his at-bats. He’s been an All-Star once, in 2015. His adjusted OPS as an Angel reads 112, and 88 since the start of the 2017 season. (Again, league average is 100.) He has more strikeouts than

runs since 2016. He entered Thursday’s game against the Blue Jays with a slash line of .235/.310/.447. He is owed more than $60 million after this season ends. Perhaps Pujols, 39 now, would have aged better beneath the Arch. Perhaps the Cardinals’ realization that they were wise to let Pujols walk has, over time, turned into the fear factor that keeps a declining organization on the outside looking in every time a premier free agent hits the market. It’s easy to wonder what the Pujols-led Cardinals might have accomplished, but that daydream ignores the reality of the player Pujols has been postCardinals. Eight years into his 10-year, $240 million contract is enough time to say, definitively, that the panic that gripped the Cardinals in December 2011 has turned into something resembling relief. Ask Adam Wainwright how fast past success can be forgotten

in St. Louis. Matt Holliday had a startling amount of critics by his end with the Cardinals, and his contract was a rare long-term relationship that produced exceptional value. Ray Lankford’s experience comes to mind. Does anyone think things would have been different for a declining Pujols? Perhaps. But imagine him playing for the Cardinals now, without the designated hitter option available, struggling to stay healthy, fighting to swing a league-average bat. That’s not the Pujols St. Louis remembers. It will never be the Pujols St. Louis knows. There is some beauty in that. On Friday, a rare moment will occur. Fans have a chance to welcome back a player they knew only in his prime, a hero who, around here, will always be frozen in time. That’s worth cheering, now more than ever before. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

BASKETBALL | NBA DRAFT FIRST ROUND, FIRST PICK OVERALL

NO QUESTION

Zion Williamson Power forward | Duke The 6-foot-7, 285-pounder crammed a career’s worth of highlights into just one season. The New Orleans selection averaged 22.6 points and 8.9 rebounds for Duke. SECOND PICK

As expected, Pelicans select Duke’s Zion Williamson at No. 1

Ja Morant Point guard | Murray State

BRIAN MAHONEY

Associated Press

NEW YORK — Zion Williamson plays with force and ferocity, a Hulk in hightops who looks like he’d never show a soft side. Draft night proved otherwise. Williamson was the No. 1 pick of the New Orleans Pelicans — a surprise to nobody who watched basketball this past season. But afterward he couldn’t hide his emotions, even though he along with everyone else knew what would happen Thursday night. “Because I love the game of basketball,” he said. “You can hear people say things like, ‘Oh, that it was likely I was going to go No. 1.’ But I guess you don’t know until you actually go through it. Hearing my name called and I was able to make it on stage without a tear, shake the commissioner’s hand, but in the interview my mom was standing beside me, and my emotions just took over.” There might be tears of joy in New Orleans, too, after the Pelicans were able to get the Duke powerhouse who is considered one of the most exciting prospects in years. The 6-foot-7, 285-pounder compiled a career’s worth of highlights into just one season, becoming the third freshman to be voted player of the year by The Associated Press. His assault on the rims made him a favorite of college basketball fans, but his game is more than just dunks. Williamson averaged 22.6 points and 8.9 rebounds while shooting 68% from the field. Wearing a white suit,

A likely replacement for Mike Conley, Morant Led Division I with 10 assists per game as a sophomore while averaging 24.5 points. THIRD PICK

RJ Barrett Shooting guard | Duke Williamson teammate led Atlantic Coast Conference with 22.6 points per game, shooting 45.4% from the field. FOURTH PICK

De’Andre Hunter Point guard | Vanderbilt Technically picked by the Lakers, Hunter will go to Atlanta as part of the Anthony Davis trade.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Duke’s Zion Williamson greets fans as he is introduced at the NBA draft Thursday in New York. he hugged members of his family and NBA Commissioner Adam Silver after his name was called first at Barclays Center. Williamson will step into an open position in New Orleans, which recently agreed to trade All-Star Anthony Davis, the previous freshman to win the AP award, to the Los Angeles Lakers. “I’m going to do anything to win. I’m just going to do anything to win,” Williamson said. The Memphis Grizzlies also quickly addressed a positional need by taking Murray State’s Ja Morant with the No. 2 pick. The Grizzlies agreed to trade Mike Conley, their longtime point guard, to Utah a day earlier. They got a good replacement in Morant, who led Division I with 10 assists per game as a sophomore while averaging 24.5 points.

“I have some big shoes to fill in Mike Conley,” Morant said. “He’s a great player. I wish him the best. Like I said before, it just means the Grizzlies see a lot in me.” RJ Barrett then made it two Duke freshmen within the top three picks when the New York Knicks took the guard who actually edged out Williamson to lead the Atlantic Coast Conference in scoring. Knicks fans hoped they would get Williamson after finishing with the worst record in the league but seemed happy to end up with Barrett, loudly cheering and chanting “RJ! RJ!” when the pick was announced. Barrett also was in tears after landing with the team he hoped would pick him. De’Andre Hunter of national champion Virginia was taken fourth but won’t be teaming up with Williamson. The Pelicans

acquired the rights to the pick in the Davis deal but agreed to trade it shortly before the draft to Atlanta. The original trade can’t be made official until July 6, so Hunter was outfitted with a Lakers hat and the draft board behind the stage listed the pick as belonging to the Lakers. The ACC had a record six players go in the lottery section of the first 14 picks. Meanwhile, Duke joined Florida in 2007 as the only programs with three top-10 picks in the same year. The Cleveland Cavaliers then took Vanderbilt guard Darius Garland, who played in just five games because of a knee injury. Then it was another pick who won’t be playing for the team that made it, with Jarrett Culver taken at No. 6 by Phoenix with a pick that the Suns agreed to trade to Minnesota.

5. Cleveland, Darius Garland, g, Vanderbilt. 6. b-Phoenix, Jarrett Culver, f, Texas Tech. 7. Chicago, Coby White, g, North Carolina. 8. c-Atlanta, Jaxson Hayes, c, Texas. 9. Washington, Rui Hachimura, f, Gonzaga. 10. Atlanta (from Dallas), Cam Reddish, f, Duke. 11. d-Minnesota, Cameron Johnson, f, North Carolina. 12. Charlotte, PJ Washington Jr., f, Kentucky. 13. Miami, Tyler Herro, g, Kentucky. 14. Boston (from Sac through Phil), Romeo Langford, f, Indiana. 15. Detroit, Sekou Doumbouya, f, Limoges (France). 16. Orlando, Chuma Okeke, f, Auburn. 17. e-Brooklyn, Nickeil Alexander-Walker, g, Virginia Tech. 18. Indiana, Goga Bitadze, c, Buducnost (Montenegro). 19. San Antonio, Luka Samanic, f, Olimpija (Slovenia). 20. f-Boston (from L.A. Clippers through Memphis), Matisse Thybulle, f, Washington. 21. g-Oklahoma City, Brandon Clarke, f, Gonzaga. 22. Boston, Grant Williams, f, Tennessee. 23. h-Utah, Darius Bazley, f, Princeton HS (Ohio). 24. i-Philadelphia, Ty Jerome, g, Virginia. 25. Portland, Nassir Little, f, North Carolina. 26. Cleveland (from Houston), Dylan Windler, f, Belmont. 27. j-Brooklyn (from Denver), Mfiondu Kabengele, c, Florida State. 28. Golden State, Jordan Poole, g, Michigan. 29. San Antonio (from Toronto), Keldon Johnson, f, Kentucky. 30. k-Milwaukee, Kevin Porter Jr., g, Southern Cal. Proposed Trades b-Minnesota from Phoenix. h-Oklahoma City from Utah c-New Orleans from Atlanta. through Memphis. i-Phoenix from Philadelphia d-Phoenix from Minnesota. e-New Orleans from Brooklyn through Boston. j-L.A. Clippers from Brooklyn. through Atlanta. k-Cleveland from Milwaukee f-Philadelphia from Boston. through Detroit. g-Memphis from Okla. City.

Rockets deny problems between Paul, Harden Houston Rockets guard Chris Paul shoots over Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green during the playoffs. MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY DES BIELER

The Washington Post

The Houston Rockets’ season may have ended with a Game 6 loss to the Golden State Warriors in their second-round playoff series, but accounts of tension between James Harden and Chris Paul had only begun. With the latest report, claiming that the high-profile teammates’ relationship was “unsalvageable,” causing ripples this week, both Paul and Rockets general manager Daryl Morey took it upon themselves to deny that there was any rift between Houston’s star players. Morey went so far as to ask the Houston Chronicle to “convey my disdain” in refuting a report that Paul had demanded a trade, say-

ing, “It’s so annoying at this point.” The alleged trade demand and the eye-opening description of the relationship between Harden and Paul were both featured in a report by Yahoo Sports, one that included a source telling the website, “There’s no respect at all, on either side.” “They need to get away from one another,” the source said. “Chris doesn’t respect James’ standing in the league, and James doesn’t respect the work Chris has put in to this point.” In reply to an Instagram post highlighting the “unsalvageable” line, Paul wrote, “D---! That’s news to me.” According to Yahoo Sports, per a source, Harden and Paul “went

nearly two months without speaking to each other during the season.” The source also claimed that Harden “hasn’t returned Paul’s repeated attempts at communicating this offseason.” Morey told the Chronicle that, as an example of communication and a positive relationship between the two players, they joined him for an offseason FaceTime discussion of “50 free agents” the Rockets might consider. The general manager said he hoped that would provide “a sense of how tightly they are tied together.” However, the Yahoo Sports story sparked only the latest round of negative headlines involving the Rockets’ pair of ballhandling playmakers.

Sterk: MU has regained fans’ trust BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. — As Mizzou’s offseason of uncertainty over the NCAA appeals case drags along and gets closer to resolution, Jim Sterk approaches his fourth year as athletics director bullish as ever about the direction of his most visible program — and enthused about a revitalized fan base. It’s officially the offseason for all Tigers sports, but it’s prime appeals season for Sterk and MU’s team of lawyers and compliance officials, who are preparing for their in-person hearing with the NCAA Infractions Appeals Committee, expected to happen sometime next month. Meanwhile, donations to Mizzou athletics continue to set records, while football season ticket renewals are surpassing the last few seasons. On the field, Sterk has seen an uptick in results under Barry Odom, also heading into his fourth season in charge, matched by a subtle swell of support from the fans. “What we’ve done is gained back trust,” Sterk said. Attendance at Memorial Stadium has dropped every season since 2014, reflecting a national trend that has athletics directors brainstorming for new ways to engage fans and drive up revenue. But more than two months away from the Sept. 7 home opener, MU’s season ticket renewals stand at 82 percent, Sterk said. That’s up from 76 last year and already MU’s highest renewal rate since 2015, Gary Pinkel’s final season as head coach, after which fan support unraveled when campus protests led to a brief team boycott. Under Sterk and Odom, Mizzou has rebooted, and despite the NCAA sanctions that could keep the Tigers out of the postseason this year — MU has appealed the

ban, plus other penalties that came from the academic misconduct case — Sterk can point to signs of growth. The athletic department’s annual fund raised a record $11.4 million last year. MU expects to push its annual donor base past 10,000 this year, surpassing the Tiger Scholarship Fund’s record membership of 9,200 from 2013. For the first time since 2015, the university’s licensing department is seeing revenue growth from items sold bearing the Tigers’ logo. “We have an opportunity to really grow (the fan support) back stronger and get more people involved,” Sterk said. “I’m excited about that.” He feels especially strong about the case Mizzou will present to the NCAA appeals committee in July. Mizzou will argue that the sanctions against the baseball, football and softball teams go against NCAA case precedent, exceed the severity of the violations and, perhaps most interesting, could have a “chilling effect” on future NCAA enforcement cases. The NCAA Committee on Infractions lauded Mizzou for the way it cooperated with investigators but still slapped the school with heavy sanctions, including one-year postseason bans for all three programs. “Anyone that’s been in intercollegiate athletics understands there has to be cooperation,” Sterk said. “There has to be that buy-in by the membership. What has really shocked people and caused them to step back is we did all that and got (praised for) exemplary cooperation and they went above and beyond any kind of precedent in the decision.” “That’s what I’m concerned about as a member and working a long time in the NCAA at NCAA institutions for 30 years,” he added. “I’ve always been one that my

philosophy is we’re going to win it right and do it the right way, but that decision doesn’t encourage that.” Otherwise, Sterk has been impressed with Odom’s leadership while preparing for a season with an uncertain finish line. As part of the sanctions, Mizzou seniors are allowed to transfer without having to sit out the 2019 season, but none has entered the NCAA transfer portal. “The student athletes believe in (Odom),” Sterk said. “They care about him. A couple years ago when he was under fire, that’s what I saw in the locker room with those players. It’s continued to get stronger with the leaders that went through that and are now seniors. There’s a pretty dang good group of seniors on this team. You sprinkle in some talented transfers and it really makes it exciting what they can do.” Sterk has other business this summer besides the NCAA appeal, starting with MU’s efforts to sell beer and wine in general seating areas at sporting events as part of the Southeastern Conference’s newly approved rule allowing alcohol sales. Sterk has met with several committees of campus leaders to discuss the plans but is still working out logistics to make the change possible for the upcoming football season. MU Police Chief Doug Schwandt, probably the most important ally in the cause, supports selling alcohol at games, Sterk said. So far, Sterk said, the only opposition is from some fans who “like the college or SEC model versus the pro model.” One solution is to offer alcohol-free sections of the stadium, Sterk said. He hopes to have plans finalized and ready for final approval by July. Sterk described the recent decision to fire longtime cheerleading coach Suzy Thompson and Golden Girls coach Shannon Fry and condense their roles into one

PHELAN M. EBENHACK, AP PHOTO

Missouri athletic director Jim Sterk leaves the field after a football game against Florida last season in Gainesville, Fla. position as “the best model to create unity and support and direction and best experience for both programs.” „ Once the football team moves into the new south end zone complex at Memorial Stadium, the women’s soccer and men’s and women’s track and field teams will take up the office space that belonged to the football team at the Mizzou Athletics Training Complex. The track teams will move into the football team’s locker room at the MATC after some renovations. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

BASKETBALL | NBA DRAFT FIRST ROUND, FIRST PICK OVERALL

NO QUESTION

Zion Williamson Power forward | Duke The 6-foot-7, 285-pounder crammed a career’s worth of highlights into just one season. The New Orleans selection averaged 22.6 points and 8.9 rebounds for Duke. SECOND PICK

As expected, Pelicans select Duke’s Zion Williamson at No. 1

Ja Morant Point guard | Murray State

BRIAN MAHONEY

Associated Press

NEW YORK — Zion Williamson plays with force and ferocity, a Hulk in hightops who looks like he’d never show a soft side. Draft night proved otherwise. Williamson was the No. 1 pick of the New Orleans Pelicans — a surprise to nobody who watched basketball this past season. But afterward he couldn’t hide his emotions, even though he along with everyone else knew what would happen Thursday night. “Because I love the game of basketball,” he said. “You can hear people say things like, ‘Oh, that it was likely I was going to go No. 1.’ But I guess you don’t know until you actually go through it. Hearing my name called and I was able to make it on stage without a tear, shake the commissioner’s hand, but in the interview my mom was standing beside me, and my emotions just took over.” There might be tears of joy in New Orleans, too, after the Pelicans were able to get the Duke powerhouse who is considered one of the most exciting prospects in years. The 6-foot-7, 285-pounder compiled a career’s worth of highlights into just one season, becoming the third freshman to be voted player of the year by The Associated Press. His assault on the rims made him a favorite of college basketball fans, but his game is more than just dunks. Williamson averaged 22.6 points and 8.9 rebounds while shooting 68% from the field. Wearing a white suit,

A likely replacement for Mike Conley, Morant Led Division I with 10 assists per game as a sophomore while averaging 24.5 points. THIRD PICK

RJ Barrett Shooting guard | Duke Williamson teammate led Atlantic Coast Conference with 22.6 points per game, shooting 45.4% from the field. FOURTH PICK

De’Andre Hunter Point guard | Vanderbilt Technically picked by the Lakers, Hunter will go to Atlanta as part of the Anthony Davis trade.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Duke’s Zion Williamson greets fans as he is introduced at the NBA draft Thursday in New York. he hugged members of his family and NBA Commissioner Adam Silver after his name was called first at Barclays Center. Williamson will step into an open position in New Orleans, which recently agreed to trade All-Star Anthony Davis, the previous freshman to win the AP award, to the Los Angeles Lakers. “I’m going to do anything to win. I’m just going to do anything to win,” Williamson said. The Memphis Grizzlies also quickly addressed a positional need by taking Murray State’s Ja Morant with the No. 2 pick. The Grizzlies agreed to trade Mike Conley, their longtime point guard, to Utah a day earlier. They got a good replacement in Morant, who led Division I with 10 assists per game as a sophomore while averaging 24.5 points.

“I have some big shoes to fill in Mike Conley,” Morant said. “He’s a great player. I wish him the best. Like I said before, it just means the Grizzlies see a lot in me.” RJ Barrett then made it two Duke freshmen within the top three picks when the New York Knicks took the guard who actually edged out Williamson to lead the Atlantic Coast Conference in scoring. Knicks fans hoped they would get Williamson after finishing with the worst record in the league but seemed happy to end up with Barrett, loudly cheering and chanting “RJ! RJ!” when the pick was announced. Barrett also was in tears after landing with the team he hoped would pick him. De’Andre Hunter of national champion Virginia was taken fourth but won’t be teaming up with Williamson. The Pelicans

acquired the rights to the pick in the Davis deal but agreed to trade it shortly before the draft to Atlanta. The original trade can’t be made official until July 6, so Hunter was outfitted with a Lakers hat and the draft board behind the stage listed the pick as belonging to the Lakers. The ACC had a record six players go in the lottery section of the first 14 picks. Meanwhile, Duke joined Florida in 2007 as the only programs with three top-10 picks in the same year. The Cleveland Cavaliers then took Vanderbilt guard Darius Garland, who played in just five games because of a knee injury. Then it was another pick who won’t be playing for the team that made it, with Jarrett Culver taken at No. 6 by Phoenix with a pick that the Suns agreed to trade to Minnesota.

5. Cleveland Darius Garland PG | Vanderbilt

18. Indiana Goga Bitadze C | KK Mega Leks (Serbia)

6. Minnesota Jarrett Culver SF | Texas Tech

19. San Antonio Luka Samanic PF | KK Olimpija (Slovenia)

7. Chicago Coby White PG | North Carolina

20. Philadelphia Matisse Thybulle SF | Washington

8. New Orleans Jaxson Hayes C | Texas

21. Memphis Brandon Clarke PF | Gonzaga

9. Washington Rui Hachimura PF | Gonzaga

22. Boston Grant Williams SF | Tennessee

10. Atlanta Cam Reddish SF | Duke

23. Oklahoma City Darius Bazley PF | Princeton H.S. (OH)

11. Phoenix Cameron Johnson SF | North Carolina

24. Phoenix Ty Jerome PG | Virginia

12. Charlotte PJ Washington PF | Kentucky

25. Portland Nassir Little SF | North Carolina

13. Miami Tyler Herro SG | Kentucky

26. Cleveland Dylan Windler SF | Belmont

14. Boston Romeo Langford SF | Indiana

27. LA Clippers Mfiondu Kabengele C | Florida State

15. Detroit Sekou Doumbouya SF | Limoges (France)

28. Golden State Jordan Poole SG | Michigan

16. Orlando Chuma Okeke PF | Auburn

29. San Antonio Keldon Johnson SF | Kentucky

17. New Orleans N. Alexander-Walker SG | Virginia Tech.

30. Cleveland Kevin Porter Jr. SG | USC

After knee injuries, MU’s Porter undrafted BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

POST-DISPATCH FILE

Missouri forward Jontay Porter runs through a timed agility test at a practice last season.

All 60 picks in Thursday’s NBA draft came and went without a team selecting Missouri’s Jontay Porter, the latest setback in a career that seemed so promising two years ago. After a knee injury wrecked his sophomore season at Missouri and a re-injury this spring, Porter might not play in another official game until 2020 — whether that’s in the NBA, the G League or somewhere overseas. Porter, the Southeastern Conference’s co-sixth man of the year as a freshman in 2017-18, explored his draft stock last year but pulled out of the draft shortly after the NBA Combine, even though he later insisted he would have been a first-round pick based on feedback he received. By the fall Porter recovered from a nag-

ging case of knee tendinitis and appeared poised for a monster sophomore year as Mizzou’s best returning player. But just weeks before the start of the season, he tore two knee ligaments during a closed preseason exhibition, costing him the entire year. It was just the latest injury to strike the Porter family that proved costly in the NBA draft. Older brother and former Mizzou teammate Michael Porter Jr. sat out his rookie year with the Denver Nuggets this past season while recovering from a back injury that sidelined him for most of his lone season at Mizzou and dropped him to the 14th pick last summer. In March, after announcing plans to enter the draft, Jontay re-tore his anterior cruciate ligament during a pickup game with his brother before he was medically cleared to return to the court. He might

need another year to recover from a second major knee surgery, perhaps keeping him sidelined until the 2020-21 season. Despite the injuries to his knee, he was widely projected to be taken in the second round Thursday. His stock seemed secure when Auburn’s Chuma Okeke, who suffered a similar knee injury in March, was taken in the first round by the Orlando Magic with the 16th pick. But Porter’s name was never called. He was in position to become the fourth straight Mizzou player drafted after playing just one season for the Tigers, following Alex Oriakhi (2013), Jordan Clarkson (2014) and Michael Porter Jr. (2018). Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

> Second-round selections. C8

Sterk: MU has regained fans’ trust BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. — As Mizzou’s offseason of uncertainty over the NCAA appeals case drags along and gets closer to resolution, Jim Sterk approaches his fourth year as athletics director bullish as ever about the direction of his most visible program — and enthused about a revitalized fan base. It’s officially the offseason for all Tigers sports, but it’s prime appeals season for Sterk and MU’s team of lawyers and compliance officials, who are preparing for their in-person hearing with the NCAA Infractions Appeals Committee, expected to happen sometime next month. Meanwhile, donations to Mizzou athletics continue to set records, while football season ticket renewals are surpassing the last few seasons. On the field, Sterk has seen an uptick in results under Barry Odom, also heading into his fourth season in charge, matched by a subtle swell of support from the fans. “What we’ve done is gained back trust,” Sterk said. Attendance at Memorial Stadium has dropped every season since 2014, reflecting a national trend that has athletics directors brainstorming for new ways to engage fans and drive up revenue. But more than two months away from the Sept. 7 home opener, MU’s season ticket renewals stand at 82 percent, Sterk said. That’s up from 76 last year and already MU’s highest renewal rate since 2015, Gary Pinkel’s final season as head coach, after which fan support unraveled when campus protests led to a brief team boycott. Under Sterk and Odom, Mizzou has rebooted, and despite the NCAA sanctions that could keep the Tigers out of the postseason this year — MU has appealed the

ban, plus other penalties that came from the academic misconduct case — Sterk can point to signs of growth. The athletic department’s annual fund raised a record $11.4 million last year. MU expects to push its annual donor base past 10,000 this year, surpassing the Tiger Scholarship Fund’s record membership of 9,200 from 2013. For the first time since 2015, the university’s licensing department is seeing revenue growth from items sold bearing the Tigers’ logo. “We have an opportunity to really grow (the fan support) back stronger and get more people involved,” Sterk said. “I’m excited about that.” He feels especially strong about the case Mizzou will present to the NCAA appeals committee in July. Mizzou will argue that the sanctions against the baseball, football and softball teams go against NCAA case precedent, exceed the severity of the violations and, perhaps most interesting, could have a “chilling effect” on future NCAA enforcement cases. The NCAA Committee on Infractions lauded Mizzou for the way it cooperated with investigators but still slapped the school with heavy sanctions, including one-year postseason bans for all three programs. “Anyone that’s been in intercollegiate athletics understands there has to be cooperation,” Sterk said. “There has to be that buy-in by the membership. What has really shocked people and caused them to step back is we did all that and got (praised for) exemplary cooperation and they went above and beyond any kind of precedent in the decision.” “That’s what I’m concerned about as a member and working a long time in the NCAA at NCAA institutions for 30 years,” he added. “I’ve always been one that my

philosophy is we’re going to win it right and do it the right way, but that decision doesn’t encourage that.” Otherwise, Sterk has been impressed with Odom’s leadership while preparing for a season with an uncertain finish line. As part of the sanctions, Mizzou seniors are allowed to transfer without having to sit out the 2019 season, but none has entered the NCAA transfer portal. “The student athletes believe in (Odom),” Sterk said. “They care about him. A couple years ago when he was under fire, that’s what I saw in the locker room with those players. It’s continued to get stronger with the leaders that went through that and are now seniors. There’s a pretty dang good group of seniors on this team. You sprinkle in some talented transfers and it really makes it exciting what they can do.” Sterk has other business this summer besides the NCAA appeal, starting with MU’s efforts to sell beer and wine in general seating areas at sporting events as part of the Southeastern Conference’s newly approved rule allowing alcohol sales. Sterk has met with several committees of campus leaders to discuss the plans but is still working out logistics to make the change possible for the upcoming football season. MU Police Chief Doug Schwandt, probably the most important ally in the cause, supports selling alcohol at games, Sterk said. So far, Sterk said, the only opposition is from some fans who “like the college or SEC model versus the pro model.” One solution is to offer alcohol-free sections of the stadium, Sterk said. He hopes to have plans finalized and ready for final approval by July. Sterk described the recent decision to fire longtime cheerleading coach Suzy Thompson and Golden Girls coach Shannon Fry and condense their roles into one

PHELAN M. EBENHACK, AP PHOTO

Missouri athletic director Jim Sterk leaves the field after a football game against Florida last season in Gainesville, Fla. position as “the best model to create unity and support and direction and best experience for both programs.” „ Once the football team moves into the new south end zone complex at Memorial Stadium, the women’s soccer and men’s and women’s track and field teams will take up the office space that belonged to the football team at the Mizzou Athletics Training Complex. The track teams will move into the football team’s locker room at the MATC after some renovations. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Blues From C1

come in the third, fifth and seventh rounds. What happened to those three other picks? — This year’s first-rounder went to the Buffalo Sabres as part of the Ryan O’Reilly trade last July 1. (The Blues also sent Patrik Berglund, Vladimir Sobotka, Tage Thompson and a secondround pick in 2021 to the Sabres for O’Reilly.) Certainly no one’s complaining about the trade terms. Not after O’Reilly led the Blues in scoring in the regular season, won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, and then took home the Selke Trophy as the NHL’s top defensive forward Wednesday in Vegas. — The Blues’ fourth-round pick went to the Toronto Maple Leafs on Feb. 15, 2018, for forward Nikita Soshnikov. The injury-plagued Soshnikov played only 12 games for the 2017-18 Blues, and just five this season. A restricted free agent in terms of his Blues rights, Soshnikov recently signed a two-year deal to play in the Kontinental Hockey League. — The team’s sixth-round pick went to the Anaheim Ducks in a Feb. 25, 2019, trade deadline deal for defenseman Michael Del Zotto. Del Zotto appeared in seven games for the Blues, recording three assists, but did not play in the playoffs. He’s scheduled for unrestricted free agency July 1. Even without those picks, the Blues need to restock the organi-

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES...............-$142 ....................Astros RED SOX................-$340 ...............Blue Jays INDIANS................-$190 .................... Tigers RANGERS ..............-$142 ..............White Sox Twins ....................-$145 ................. ROYALS ATHLETICS ............-$120 ...................... Rays MARINERS ............-$135 .................. Orioles National League CUBS .....................-$148 ...................... Mets PHILLIES ...............-$210 ..................Marlins NATIONALS ...........-$135 ................... Braves PIRATES ................-$110 ...................Padres BREWERS..............-$122 ...................... Reds DBACKS.................-$130 ....................Giants DODGERS..............-$175 ..................Rockies Interleague Angels...................-$110 ................... CARDS FOOTBALL | CFL Favorite Open/Current Underdog EDMONTON.............4/4 ............ Br Columbia Saturday Hamilton..............3.5/3.5............. TORONTO Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Reinstated OF Dwight Smith, Jr. from the 10-day IL. Designated RHP Dan Straily for assignment. Placed LHP John Means on the 10-day IL, retroactive to June 17. Recalled RHP Evan Phillips from Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX: Signed OF Jacob Scavuzzo to a minor league contract. DETROIT TIGERS: Optioned OF Victor Reyes to Toledo (IL). Reinstated RHP Jordan Zimmermann from the 10-day IL. LOS ANGELES ANGELS: Placed C Kevan Smith on 10-day IL, retroactive to June 19. Selected the contract of C Dustin Garneau from Salt Lake (PCL). Announced RHP Cody Allen cleared waivers and was unconditionally released. MINNESOTA TWINS: Optioned RHP Sean Poppen to Rochester (IL). Recalled RHP Kohl Stewart from Rochester. NEW YORK YANKEES: Released RHP Danny Farquhar. TAMPA BAY RAYS: Placed 3B Yandy Diaz on the 10-day IL. Recalled 3B Daniel Robertson from Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS: Optioned LHP Joe Palumbo to Nashville (PCL). Designated LHP Drew Smyly for assignment. Selected the contract of LHP Locke St. John from Nashville. Recalled LHP Kyle Bird from Nashville. TORONTO BLUE JAYS: Reinstated RHP Ken Giles from the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Justin Shafer to Buffalo (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS: Signed OF Corbin Carroll; SS Glenallen Hill Jr.; C Oscar Santos, LHPs Blake Walston, Andrew Saalfrank and Nick Snyder; and RHPs Brennan Malone, Drey Jameson, Ryne Nelson, Conor Grammes, Bobby Ay and Austin Pope to minor league contracts. ATLANTA BRAVES: Placed LHP Sean Newcomb on the 7-day IL. Recalled RHP Huascar Ynoa from Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS: Recalled RHP Adbert Alzolay from Iowa (PCL). Designated LHP Tim Collins for assignment. Signed 2B Bryce Windham; 3B Ryan Reynolds; INFs Jacob Olson and Grayson Byrd; LHPs Bryan King, Adam Laskey and Davidjohn Herz; OFs Manny Collier, Zac Taylor, Nelson Maldonado and Darius Hill; and RHPs Cayne Ueckert; Chris Kachmar, Alex Moore, Tanner Dalton, Hunter Bigge, Brad Deppermann, Josh Burgmann and Chris Clarke to minor league contracts. COLORADO ROCKIES: Placed INF Trevor Story on the 10-day IL. Recalled INF Brendan Rogers from Albuquerque (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS: Sent OF Peter O’Brien to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment. NEW YORK METS: Fired pitching coach Dave Eiland and bullpen coach Chuck Hernández. Named Phil Regan interim pitching coach, Ricky Bones interim bullpen coach and Jeremy Accardo pitching strategist. Recalled RHP Walker Lockett from Syracuse (IL). Optioned LHP Daniel Zamora to Syracuse. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES: Sent LHP Adam Morgan to Reading (EL) for a rehab assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES: Signed OF Jase Bowen and RHP Ryan Harbin to minor league contracts. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS: Activated RHP Adam Wainwright from the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Daniel Ponce de Leon to Memphis (PCL). Removed INF Yairo Muñoz from the paternity list and placed him on the restricted list. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS: Signed LHP Chris Wright; Cs Brandon Martorano and Matt Malkin; 1B Garrett Frechette and Connor Cannon; 2B Carter Aldrete and Nolan Dempsey; SSs Dilan Rosario, Simon Whiteman and Jeff Houghtby; 3B Jorge Samuel and Tyler Wyatt; OFs Grant McCray, Armani Smith, Harrison Freed, Najee Gaskins and Javeyan Williams; and RHPs Nick Morreale, Cole Waites, Kanoa Pagan, Taylor Rashi, Evan Lumbert, Nick Avila, Brooks Crawford and Justin Crump to minor league contracts. WASHINGTON NATIONALS: Returned RHP Austin Voth to Fresno (PCL). Signed RHP Jackson Rutledge to a minor league contract. American Association KANSAS CITY T-BONES: Released RHP Dustin Hurlbutt. ST. PAUL SAINTS: Sold the contract of RHP Nick Belzer to the Milwaukee Brewers. SIOUX FALLS CANARIES: Claimed LHP Will Solomon off waivers from Fargo-Moorhead. BASKETBALL ATLANTA HAWKS: Traded the 41st pick in Thursday’s draft to Golden State for a 2024 second-round pick and cash. FOOTBALL CHICAGO BEARS: Signed DB Duke Shelley. HOCKEY ANAHEIM DUCKS: Signed G Ryan Miller, D Korbinian Holzer and C Derek grant to oneyear contracts. VANCOUVER CANUCKS: Signed D Alex Edler to a two-year contract extension. SOCCER Major League Soccer PHILADELPHIA UNION: Signed F Andrew Wooten. COLLEGE EAST CAROLINA: Named Christa Saunders assistant swimming and diving coach. MISSOURI-KANSAS: Accepted an invitation to rejoin the Summit League.

JONATHAN HAYWARD, CANADIAN PRESS

Top prospect Jack Hughes speaks to the media during an NHL draft press conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, on Thursday. He’s expected to be the No. 1 overall pick.

Blues draft picks Round 2, No. 62 overall Round 3, No. 93 overall Round 5, No. 155 overall Round 7, No. 217 overall zational shelves. So the goal over the weekend is to make every pick count. “You get picks, you want players,” said Bill Armstrong, the Blues’ assistant general manager and director of amateur scouting. “We tell our staff that all the time.” Bill Armstrong, no relation to Doug Armstrong, spoke Friday

from Vancouver. This isn’t the first time the Armstrongs have gone through a draft without a first-rounder. “We’ve kind of been through the drill before,” Bill Armstrong said. “So it’s one of those things where I think it probably helps us that we’ve done it before. We kind of know what to expect because one of the tricky things is we have to anticipate basically what 61 picks are going to be (before the Blues pick).” The Blues last went without a first-rounder in 2015, when Dunn was the team’s first pick at No. 56 overall in the second round. It also happened in 2013 when they took defenseman Tommy

SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 9 4 4 31 31 20 Montreal 8 7 3 27 21 28 D.C. United 7 4 6 27 23 18 Atlanta 8 5 2 26 19 11 New York 7 6 3 24 27 19 New York City FC 5 1 8 23 23 17 Toronto FC 5 6 4 19 26 25 Orlando City 5 7 3 18 22 21 Chicago 4 6 6 18 24 23 Columbus 5 9 2 17 16 24 New England 4 8 4 16 17 33 Cincinnati 3 11 2 11 14 33 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 11 1 4 37 39 13 LA Galaxy 9 6 1 28 22 19 Seattle 7 4 5 26 26 21 Houston 7 3 3 24 21 14 FC Dallas 6 6 4 22 22 22 Minnesota United 6 7 3 21 23 25 Real Salt Lake 6 8 1 19 21 27 San Jose 5 6 4 19 23 27 Vancouver 4 6 6 18 17 20 Sporting K.C. 3 5 7 16 26 27 Colorado 4 9 3 15 25 34 Portland 4 7 2 14 19 26 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday LA Galaxy at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 7 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Houston at Portland, 10 p.m. Sunday Sporting K.C. at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.

USL Championship Eastern W L T Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 8 1 6 30 22 8 New York Red Bulls II 9 3 2 29 31 15 Nashville 8 3 4 28 27 13 Indy 8 2 3 27 20 9 North Carolina 7 2 5 26 24 11 Louisville 7 5 3 24 23 19 Ottawa 6 2 5 23 19 11 Charleston 5 3 6 21 19 17 STLFC 5 3 4 19 14 11 Pittsburgh 3 2 7 16 20 15 Bethlehem Steel 4 7 4 16 22 31 Atlanta 2 3 7 4 13 13 26 Loudoun 3 6 3 12 16 19 Charlotte 2 7 6 12 17 26 Birmingham 3 8 3 12 11 27 Memphis 2 7 5 11 12 20 Hartford 2 10 3 9 14 32 Swope Park Rangers 1 8 5 8 17 31 Western W L T Pts GF GA Phoenix 8 2 5 29 37 14 El Paso 7 2 5 26 21 12 New Mexico 6 3 7 25 32 27 Portland II 6 2 6 24 30 22 Reno 6 4 5 23 30 24 Fresno 5 2 7 22 23 15 OKC Energy 5 4 7 22 22 22 Sacramento 6 5 2 20 18 17 Austin 5 5 5 20 17 18 Rio Grande Valley 5 6 4 19 29 28 Las Vegas 5 6 4 19 24 24 Orange County 4 4 7 19 24 24 LA Galaxy II 4 6 6 18 24 35 Tulsa 4 6 5 17 24 28 San Antonio 4 7 4 16 20 24 Real Monarchs 4 6 3 15 26 27 Colorado Springs 4 9 2 14 14 24 Tacoma 2 11 4 10 14 44 Friday San Antonio at Fresno, 9:30 p.m. Saturday North Carolina at STLFC, 7:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Bethlehem Steel, 4 p.m. Atlanta 2 at Indy, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Louisville, 6 p.m. New York Red Bulls II at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Swope Park Rangers at Charleston, 6:30 p.m. Hartford at Birmingham, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Nashville, 7 p.m. Austin at Rio Grande Valley, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at OKC Energy, 8 p.m. Real Monarchs at Colorado Springs, 8 p.m. Las Vegas at El Paso, 8:30 p.m. New Mexico at LA Galaxy II, 9 p.m. Portland II at Orange County, 9 p.m. Tulsa at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

CONCACAF Gold Cup GROUP A GP W D L GF GA Pts Mexico 2 2 0 0 10 0 6 Canada 2 1 0 1 5 3 3 Martinique 2 1 0 1 3 4 3 Cuba 2 0 0 2 0 10 0 Wednesday, Denver Martinique 3, Cuba 0 Mexico 3, Canada 1 Sunday, Charlotte, N.C. Canada vs. Cuba, 5 p.m. Martinique vs. Mexico, 7 p.m. GROUP B GP W D L GF GA Pts Haiti 2 2 0 0 4 1 6 Costa Rica 1 1 0 0 4 0 3 Bermuda 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 Nicaragua 2 0 0 2 0 6 0 Thursday, Frisco, Texas Haiti 2, Bermuda 1 Costa Rica vs. Bermuda, (n) Monday, Harrison, N.J. Bermuda vs. Nicaragua, 5:30 p.m. Haiti vs. Costa Rica, 7:30 p.m. GROUP C GP W D L GF GA Pts Jamaica 1 1 0 0 3 2 3 El Salvador 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 Honduras 1 0 0 1 2 3 0 Curacao 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 Friday, Houston El Salvador vs. Jamaica, 6 p.m. Honduras vs. Curacao, 8 p.m. Tuesday, Los Angeles Jamaica vs. Curacao, 7 p.m. Honduras vs. El Salvador, 9 p.m. GROUP D GP W D L GF GA Pts United States 1 1 0 0 4 0 3 Panama 1 1 0 0 2 0 3 Guyana 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 Trinidad 1 0 0 1 0 4 0 Saturday, Cleveland Guyana vs. Panama, 4:30 p.m. United States vs. Trinidad and Tobago, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 26, Kansas City, Kan. Trinidad and Tobago vs. Guyana, 5:30 p.m. Panama vs. United States, 7:30 p.m. QUARTERFINALS: June 29-30 SEMIFINALS: July 2-3 CHAMPIONSHIP: July 7, Chicago

Vannelli — who’s no longer with the organization and never played in an NHL game — at No. 47 overall in the second round with their first pick. And in 2011, the Blues made forward Ty Rattie their first pick as the second player taken in the second round, No. 32 overall. Rattie has played only 99 NHL games since then — just 30 with the Blues, but 50 with the Edmonton Oilers last season. Can the Blues somehow trade into the first round Friday? Doug Armstrong has been known to do the unexpected, but he concedes such a move is unlikely. “I don’t envision it right now,” he said earlier in the week.

“There’s nothing on our roster that we’re looking to move out (in exchange) for picks. You never say never in this industry. But as I sit here … I don’t see a way. But that could change on Friday.” The Vannelli and Rattie picks notwithstanding, the Blues have had plenty of success with picks taken outside the first round. Seven players on their playoff roster this season were draft picks taken after Round 1. There was Dunn in 2015. Ivan Barbashev in the second round and Sammy Blais in Round 6 in 2014. Parayko and Mackenzie MacEachern both were taken in Round 3 in 2013. In 2011, Joel Edmundson was taken in Round 2 and Jordan Binnington in Round 3. “You never know,” Bill Armstrong said. “They’re going to be guys lingering around the third round. They might take a little bit longer (to develop), but they might just be as good as some of the guys you could’ve picked at 20 or 15. “The draft, it’s one of those things that’s unpredictable. You’re dealing with human beings. There’s some ones that you’d think would never make it and they make it. And there’s guys that are a sure thing and they don’t make it. “You try and do your best job with the knowledge of your scouts, your analytics, and your information from your doctors and your trainers. You’re putting the odds in your favor by having the most information and being able to process it the right way.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

GOLF Women’s PGA Championship At Hazeltine National GC, Chaska, Minn. Purse: $3.85M | Yards: 6,741; Par 36-36—72 First Round, Thursday Hannah Green 34-34—68 -4 Hyo Joo Kim 33-36—69 -3 Mel Reid 35-34—69 -3 Annie Park 34-36—70 -2 Ariya Jutanugarn 33-37—70 -2 Xi Yu Lin 35-35—70 -2 In Kyung Kim 35-35—70 -2 Sung Hyun Park 34-36—70 -2 Amy Yang 33-37—70 -2 Angel Yin 35-36—71 -1 Mirim Lee 36-35—71 -1 Lydia Ko 37-34—71 -1 Soyeon Ryu 35-36—71 -1 Chella Choi 36-35—71 -1 Carlota Ciganda 37-34—71 -1 Moriya Jutanugarn 36-35—71 -1 Kendall Dye 36-36—72 E Haeji Kang 38-34—72 E Yu Liu 37-35—72 E Jenny Shin 36-36—72 E Shanshan Feng 36-36—72 E Pornanong Phatlum 35-37—72 E Pernilla Lindberg 36-36—72 E Inbee Park 37-35—72 E Lexi Thompson 37-35—72 E Caroline Masson 37-35—72 E Wichanee Meechai 36-36—72 E Lizette Salas 36-36—72 E Nelly Korda 36-36—72 E Lauren Stephenson 37-35—72 E Caroline Hedwall 36-36—72 E Tiffany Joh 35-38—73 +1 Pavarisa Yoktuan 37-36—73 +1 Dana Finkelstein 36-37—73 +1 Nuria Iturrioz 35-38—73 +1 Sei Young Kim 34-39—73 +1 Jeongeun Lee6 38-35—73 +1 Maria Fassi 36-37—73 +1 Wei-Ling Hsu 35-38—73 +1 Tiffany Chan 36-37—73 +1 Ashleigh Buhai 37-36—73 +1 Azahara Munoz 37-36—73 +1 Brittany Lang 38-35—73 +1 Celine Boutier 36-37—73 +1 Jimin Kang 38-35—73 +1 Su Oh 37-37—74 +2 Kristen Gillman 37-37—74 +2 Eun-Hee Ji 38-36—74 +2 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 37-37—74 +2 Mi Hyang Lee 36-38—74 +2 Min Jee Lee 36-38—74 +2 Jessica Korda 37-37—74 +2 Pajaree Anannarukarn 37-37—74 +2 Sandra Gal 38-36—74 +2 Kris Tamulis 38-36—74 +2 Megan Khang 36-38—74 +2 Angela Stanford 37-37—74 +2 Jennifer Song 36-38—74 +2 Pei-Yun Chien 36-38—74 +2 In Gee Chun 37-37—74 +2 Cheyenne Knight 38-36—74 +2 Gaby Lopez 37-38—75 +3 37-38—75 +3 Catriona Matthew Ally McDonald 39-36—75 +3 Charley Hull 39-36—75 +3 Austin Ernst 39-36—75 +3 Jasmine Suwannapura 34-41—75 +3 Jeong Eun Lee 36-39—75 +3 Gemma Dryburgh 40-35—75 +3 Luna Sobron 39-36—75 +3 Lee-Anne Pace 38-37—75 +3 Daniela Darquea 38-37—75 +3 Sakura Yokomine 36-39—75 +3 Jaye Marie Green 39-36—75 +3 Stephanie Meadow 36-39—75 +3 Sarah Schmelzel 38-37—75 +3 Mariajo Uribe 36-39—75 +3 Karine Icher 36-39—75 +3 Danielle Kang 36-39—75 +3 Marissa Steen 36-39—75 +3 Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras38-37—75 +3 Mina Harigae 40-36—76 +4 Ryann O’Toole 38-38—76 +4 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 36-40—76 +4 Marina Alex 35-41—76 +4 Linnea Strom 39-37—76 +4 Nasa Hataoka 37-39—76 +4 Brooke M. Henderson 38-38—76 +4 Madelene Sagstrom 38-38—76 +4 Katherine Perry 38-38—76 +4 Elizabeth Szokol 38-38—76 +4 Karen Chung 38-38—76 +4 Dani Holmqvist 41-35—76 +4 Hee Young Park 38-38—76 +4 Georgia Hall 40-36—76 +4 Anna Nordqvist 38-38—76 +4 Cristie Kerr 38-38—76 +4 39-37—76 +4 Brittany Altomare Anne Van Dam 35-41—76 +4 Dottie Ardina 41-35—76 +4 Na Yeon Choi 39-37—76 +4 Laura Gonzalez Escallon 38-39—77 +5 Clariss Guce 38-39—77 +5 Amy Olson 39-38—77 +5 Laetitia Beck 38-39—77 +5 Jane Park 36-41—77 +5 Emma Talley 39-38—77 +5 Klara Spilkova 36-41—77 +5 Morgan Pressel 38-39—77 +5 Alena Sharp 39-38—77 +5 Stacy Lewis 38-39—77 +5 Nicole Broch Larsen 37-40—77 +5 Jin Young Ko 38-39—77 +5 Aditi Ashok 39-38—77 +5 Lee Lopez 37-40—77 +5 Sarah Burnham 38-40—78 +6 Paula Creamer 39-39—78 +6 Katherine Kirk 36-42—78 +6 Leona Maguire 37-41—78 +6 Mariah Stackhouse 43-35—78 +6 Charlotte Thomas 39-39—78 +6 Giulia Molinaro 40-39—79 +7 P.K. Kongkraphan 40-39—79 +7 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 39-40—79 +7 Emily Pedersen 39-40—79 +7 Sarah Kemp 40-39—79 +7 Laura Davies 39-40—79 +7 Bronte Law 38-41—79 +7 Jing Yan 39-40—79 +7 Kim Kaufman 37-42—79 +7 Karrie Webb 40-39—79 +7 Lindsey Weaver 39-40—79 +7 Jaclyn Lee 40-39—79 +7 Suzuka Yamaguchi 41-38—79 +7 Brianna Do 41-39—80 +8 Alison Lee 41-39—80 +8 Seul-Ki Park 42-38—80 +8 Louise Ridderstrom 38-42—80 +8 Ayako Uehara 38-42—80 +8 Lindy Duncan 39-41—80 +8 Jacqui Concolino 43-37—80 +8 Stephanie Connelly Eiswerth 40-41—81 +9 Joanna Coe 40-41—81 +9 Isi Gabsa 42-39—81 +9 Ashley Grier 41-41—82+10 Christina Kim 40-42—82+10

Nicole Jeray Gerina Piller Maria Torres Michelle Wie Jennifer Kupcho Brittany Kelly Wendy Doolan Alison Curdt Mi Jung Hur Haru Nomura

BASEBALL 41-41—82+10 43-40—83+11 41-42—83+11 43-41—84+12 44-40—84+12 41-44—85+13 45-41—86+14 47-41—88+16 WD WD

Travelers Championship At TPC River Highlands, Cromwell, Conn. Purse: $7.2M | Yards: 6,841; Par 35-35—70 First Round, Thursday Ryan Armour 32-32 — 64 -6 Bronson Burgoon 31-33 — 64 -6 Kyoung-Hoon Lee 31-33 — 64 -6 Abraham Ancer 30-34 — 64 -6 Mackenzie Hughes 32-32 — 64 -6 Zack Sucher 33-31 — 64 -6 Chez Reavie 33-32 — 65 -5 Keegan Bradley 30-35 — 65 -5 Paul Casey 32-33 — 65 -5 Robert Streb 33-32 — 65 -5 Scott Langley 31-34 — 65 -5 Brady Schnell 31-34 — 65 -5 Peter Malnati 35-31 — 66 -4 Cameron Tringale 33-33 — 66 -4 Adam Long 34-32 — 66 -4 Patrick Cantlay 35-31 — 66 -4 Andrew Putnam 34-32 — 66 -4 Nick Watney 32-34 — 66 -4 Brandon Harkins 32-34 — 66 -4 Seamus Power 32-34 — 66 -4 Tommy Fleetwood 32-34 — 66 -4 Marc Leishman 31-35 — 66 -4 Louis Oosthuizen 35-31 — 66 -4 Collin Morikawa 33-33 — 66 -4 Sam Burns 34-33 — 67 -3 Sam Ryder 32-35 — 67 -3 Emiliano Grillo 35-32 — 67 -3 C.T. Pan 32-35 — 67 -3 Tom Hoge 32-35 — 67 -3 Martin Laird 33-34 — 67 -3 Scott Brown 32-35 — 67 -3 Richy Werenski 34-33 — 67 -3 Viktor Hovland 33-34 — 67 -3 Jim Herman 35-32 — 67 -3 Andrew Landry 33-34 — 67 -3 Kyle Stanley 34-33 — 67 -3 Phil Mickelson 33-34 — 67 -3 Ryan Blaum 34-33 — 67 -3 Kevin Streelman 34-33 — 67 -3 Sam Saunders 34-33 — 67 -3 Tyler Duncan 36-31 — 67 -3 Ryan Moore 34-34 — 68 -2 Wyndham Clark 33-35 — 68 -2 Alex Prugh 34-34 — 68 -2 Sung Kang 34-34 — 68 -2 Kevin Tway 34-34 — 68 -2 Brandt Snedeker 36-32 — 68 -2 Justin Thomas 34-34 — 68 -2 Patrick Reed 35-33 — 68 -2 Vaughn Taylor 33-35 — 68 -2 Padraig Harrington 34-34 — 68 -2 Sangmoon Bae 32-36 — 68 -2 J.J. Spaun 35-33 — 68 -2 Josh Teater 33-35 — 68 -2 Sungjae Im 33-35 — 68 -2 Shawn Stefani 33-35 — 68 -2 Daniel Berger 33-35 — 68 -2 Bryson DeChambeau 33-35 — 68 -2 Brian Gay 32-36 — 68 -2 Seth Reeves 35-33 — 68 -2 Hank Lebioda 35-34 — 69 -1 Matt Jones 35-34 — 69 -1 Alex Cejka 36-33 — 69 -1 Chris Stroud 34-35 — 69 -1 Cody Gribble 34-35 — 69 -1 Francesco Molinari 34-35 — 69 -1 Bubba Watson 35-34 — 69 -1 Beau Hossler 34-35 — 69 -1 J.T. Poston 33-36 — 69 -1 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 34-35 — 69 -1 Joaquin Niemann 34-35 — 69 -1 Harold Varner III 34-35 — 69 -1 Kyle Jones 35-34 — 69 -1 Chip McDaniel 34-35 — 69 -1 Michael Miller 35-34 — 69 -1 Adam Schenk 34-35 — 69 -1 Nick Taylor 34-35 — 69 -1 Chesson Hadley 34-35 — 69 -1 Boo Weekley 35-34 — 69 -1 Sebastian Munoz 34-35 — 69 -1 Michael Kim 35-34 — 69 -1 Russell Knox 34-35 — 69 -1 Kevin Kisner 34-35 — 69 -1 J.B. Holmes 35-34 — 69 -1 Roberto Diaz 36-33 — 69 -1 Ryan McCormick 34-35 — 69 -1 Fabian Gomez 35-35 — 70 E Chad Collins 36-34 — 70 E Kelly Kraft 34-36 — 70 E Byeong Hun An 36-34 — 70 E Troy Merritt 34-36 — 70 E Freddie Jacobson 35-35 — 70 E Stephan Jaeger 34-36 — 70 E Curtis Luck 36-34 — 70 E Dylan Frittelli 34-36 — 70 E Kramer Hickok 34-36 — 70 E Trey Mullinax 32-38 — 70 E Satoshi Kodaira 32-38 — 70 E Max Homa 35-35 — 70 E Jason Day 33-37 — 70 E Brice Garnett 33-37 — 70 E Si Woo Kim 36-34 — 70 E Adam Hadwin 35-35 — 70 E J.J. Henry 35-35 — 70 E Aaron Baddeley 35-35 — 70 E Joel Dahmen 35-35 — 70 E Hunter Mahan 36-34 — 70 E Jim Knous 36-34 — 70 E Sepp Straka 36-34 — 70 E Matthew Wolff 37-33 — 70 E Cameron Davis 36-34 — 70 E Carlos Ortiz 35-36 — 71 +1 Ollie Schniederjans 35-36 — 71 +1 Denny McCarthy 36-35 — 71 +1 Patton Kizzire 34-37 — 71 +1 Jonas Blixt 36-35 — 71 +1 Brooks Koepka 36-35 — 71 +1 Tony Finau 36-35 — 71 +1 Brendan Steele 36-35 — 71 +1 Lucas Glover 36-35 — 71 +1 Nicholas Lindheim 36-35 — 71 +1 Cameron Smith 36-35 — 71 +1 Anders Albertson 35-36 — 71 +1 Joey Garber 37-34 — 71 +1 John Chin 34-37 — 71 +1 Wes Roach 33-38 — 71 +1 Brian Harman 34-38 — 72 +2 Cameron Champ 35-37 — 72 +2 Rod Pampling 35-37 — 72 +2 Scott Stallings 37-35 — 72 +2 Chris Thompson 36-36 — 72 +2 Anirban Lahiri 34-38 — 72 +2 Bud Cauley 34-38 — 72 +2 Harris English 35-37 — 72 +2 Julian Etulain 34-38 — 72 +2 Austin Cook 37-36 — 73 +3 Ben Silverman 36-37 — 73 +3

Chase Wright Jordan Spieth Danny Lee Adam Svensson Justin Suh Dominic Bozzelli Russell Henley Charley Hoffman Brian Stuard Roger Sloan Martin Trainer Jose de Jesus Rodriguez Jason Kokrak Jim Renner Peter Uihlein Whee Kim Morgan Hoffmann Brandon Hagy Chris Tallman

39-34 34-39 36-37 37-36 36-37 38-36 36-38 35-39 37-37 37-37 36-38 38-36 36-39 37-38 35-41 38-39 36-41 39-39 36-42

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 76 77 77 78 78

+3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8

Euro International Open Munich, Germany Purse: $2.24M | Yardage: 7,235; Par: 72 Partial First Round, Thursday Andrea Pavan, Italy 35-31 — 66 Oliver Wilson, England 34-33 — 67 Martin Kaymer, Germany 35-32 — 67 Jeff Winther, Denmark 35-33 — 68 Lee Westwood, England 33-35 — 68 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 36-33 — 69 Dimitrios Papadatos, Australia 36-33 — 69 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 34-35 — 69 Alvaro Quiros, Spain 34-35 — 69 Haydn Porteous, South Africa 34-35 — 69 Richard McAvoy, England 34-35 — 69 Andy Sullivan, England 37-32 — 69 Matt Wallace, England 35-34 — 69 Pedro Figueiredo, Portugal 34-35 — 69 Callum Shinkwin, England 35-34 — 69 Sebastian Soderberg, Sweden 34-35 — 69 Romain Wattel, France 36-33 — 69 Darius van Driel, Netherlands 35-34 — 69 Gavin Green, Malaysia 36-33 — 69 Also Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain 35-36 — 71 Kurt Kitayama, United States 36-35 — 71 Paul Peterson, United States 37-36 — 73 Sergio Garcia, Spain 37-36 — 73 Julian Suri, United States 38-35 — 73 John Catlin, United States 36-37 — 73 David Lipsky, United States 38-36 — 74 Sean Crocker, United States 35-40 — 75 Leaderboard Par Thru Andrea Pavan, Italy -6 18 Oliver Wilson, England -5 18 Martin Kaymer, Germany -5 18 Jeff Winther, Denmark -4 18 Lee Westwood, England -4 18 Also Alex Noren, Sweden -3 16 Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain -1 18 Kurt Kitayama, United States -1 18 Sihwan Kim, United States E 14 Paul Peterson, United States +1 18 Sergio Garcia, Spain +1 18 Julian Suri, United States +1 18 John Catlin, United States +1 18 David Lipsky, United States +2 18 Matthew Fitzpatrick, England +2 17 Sean Crocker, United States +3 18

Area hole in one Innsbrook: Ken Seitz, hole No. 17, 130 yards, 3-wood, June 20.

PRO HOCKEY NHL Draft Order Friday | Rogers Arena, Vancouver First Round 1. New Jersey Devils 2. New York Rangers 3. Chicago Blackhawks 4. Colorado Avalanche (from Ottawa) 5. Los Angeles Kings 6. Detroit Red Wings 7. Buffalo Sabres 8. Edmonton Oilers 9. Anaheim Ducks 10. Vancouver Canucks 11. Philadelphia Flyers 12. Minnesota Wild 13. Florida Panthers 14. Arizona Coyotes 15. Montreal Canadiens 16. Colorado Avalanche 17. Vegas Golden Knights 18. Dallas Stars 19. Ottawa Senators (from Columbus) 20. Winnipeg Jets (from NY Rangers) 21. Pittsburgh Penguins 22. Los Angeles Kings (from Toronto M) 23. New York Islanders 24. Nashville Predators 25. Washington Capitals 26. Calgary Flames 27. Tampa Bay Lightning 28. Carolina Hurricanes 29. Anaheim Ducks (from San Jose via Buffalo) 30. Boston Bruins 31. Buffalo Sabres (from St. Louis)

BOXING Fight Schedule Friday At Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Tyrone McKenna vs. Darragh Foley, 12, for the vacant WBC International super lightweight title. At WinnaVegas Casino & Resort, Sloan, Iowa (SHO), Sebastian Fundora vs. Hector Zepeda, 10, super welterweights; Rene Tellez Giron vs. Michel Rivera, 10, lightweights. At Indio, Calif., Andrew Cancio vs. Alberto Machado, 12, for Cancio’s WBA junior lightweight title; Angel Acosta vs. Elwin Soto, 12, for Acosta’s WBO junior flyweight title; Genaro Gamez vs. Ezequiel Aviles, 10, junior welterweights. Saturday At Wolstein Center, Cleveland (CBSSN), Dewayne Beamon vs. Froilan Saludar, 12, for the vacant WBC United States (USNBC) super flyweight title; Cody Crowley vs. Navid Mansouri, 12, for the vacant WBC United States (USNBC) super welterweight title. Sunday At Mandalay Bay Resorts & Casino, Las Vegas (FOX), Jermell Charlo, vs. Jorge Cota, 12, for junior middleweights; Guillermo Rigondeaux vs. Julio Ceja, 12, super bantamweights. At Temecula, Calif. (ESPN), Richard Commey vs. Ray Beltran, 12, for Commey’s IBF lightweight title.

Frontier League East Schaumburg Lake Erie Windy City Washington Joliet West Florence Southern Illinois Evansville Rascals Grizzlies

W L Pct. GB 19 17 .528 17 16 .515 .5 17 18 .486 1.5 13 23 .361 6 12 24 .333 7 W L PCT GB 22 12 .647 21 12 .636 .5 20 15 .571 2.5 18 17 .514 4.5 15 20 .429 7.5 Thursday Schaumburg 4, Joliet 3 Southern Illinois 4, Windy City 2, 7 inn. Southern Illinois at Windy City, (n) Florence 5, Rascals 2, 8 inn. Florence 5, Rascals 2, 7 inn. Gateway at Lake Erie, ppd. Evansville at Washington, susp. Friday Grizzlies at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Evansville at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Rascals at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

College World Series At TD Ameritrade Park, Omaha, Neb. (Double Elimination; x-if necessary) Wednesday Louisville 5, Auburn 3, Auburn eliminated Vanderbilt 6, Mississippi State 3 Texas Tech 4, Florida State 1, FSU eliminated Thursday Louisville 5, Mississippi State 4, Mississippi State eliminated Friday Game 11: Michigan (47-20) vs. Texas Tech (46-19), 1 p.m. Game 12: Vanderbilt (56-11) vs. Louisville (51-17) , 6 p.m. Saturday x-Game 13: Michigan vs. Texas Tech, 1 p.m. x-Game 14: Vanderbilt vs. Louisville, 6 p.m. Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday: TBD, 6 p.m. Tuesday: TBD, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday: TBD, 6 p.m.

Major League leaders NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Bellinger, Los Angeles, .359; Yelich, Milwaukee, .345; McNeil, New York, .336; Blackmon, Colorado, .336; Dahl, Colorado, .332; Arenado, Colorado, .328; Bell, Pittsburgh, .315; Freeman, Atlanta, .315; Rendon, Washington, .314; KMarte, Arizona, .305. RBI: Bell, Pittsburgh, 66; Arenado, Colorado, 60; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 60; Escobar, Arizona, 59; Yelich, Milwaukee, 58; Alonso, New York, 57; Ozuna, Cardinals, 56; Freeman, Atlanta, 55; Rendon, Washington, 51; Rizzo, Chicago, 51. DOUBLES: Bell, Pittsburgh, 27; Harper, Philadelphia, 21; Seager, Los Angeles, 21; Ahmed, Arizona, 20; Dahl, Colorado, 20; Peralta, Arizona, 20; Rendon, Washington, 20; Story, Colorado, 20; 3 tied at 19. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 6; Escobar, Arizona, 5; Dahl, Colorado, 4; Frazier, Pittsburgh, 4; Rosario, New York, 4; Tapia, Colorado, 4; Tatis Jr., San Diego, 4; 10 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Yelich, Milwaukee, 27; Alonso, New York, 24; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 24; Renfroe, San Diego, 23; Freeman, Atlanta, 21; Moustakas, Milwaukee, 21; Bell, Pittsburgh, 20; KMarte, Arizona, 20; Reyes, San Diego, 20; 2 tied at 19. PITCHING: Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-1; Fried, Atlanta, 8-3; Greinke, Arizona, 8-3; Soroka, Atlanta, 8-1; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 8-2; 11 tied at 7. ERA: Ryu, Los Angeles, 1.26; Soroka, Atlanta, 2.12; Castillo, Cincinnati, 2.26; Scherzer, Washington, 2.62; Eflin, Philadelphia, 2.83; Hamels, Chicago, 2.85; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 2.85; Greinke, Arizona, 2.91; Buehler, Los Angeles, 3.06; Davies, Milwaukee, 3.06. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 146; Ray, Arizona, 115; Strasburg, Washington, 115; deGrom, New York, 112; Castillo, Cincinnati, 103; Marquez, Colorado, 103; Wheeler, New York, 103; Corbin, Washington, 102; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 102; Gray, Colorado, 97. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Polanco, Minnesota, .326; Brantley, Houston, .321; LeMahieu, New York, .315; Anderson, Chicago, .312; Meadows, Tampa Bay, .308; Devers, Boston, .307; Mancini, Baltimore, .304; Andrus, Texas, .303; Trout, Los Angeles, .302; Merrifield, Kansas City, .301. RBI: Trout, Los Angeles, 56; Abreu, Chicago, 54; Santana, Seattle, 54; Rosario, Minnesota, 53; Soler, Kansas City, 52; Encarnacion, New York, 51; Bregman, Houston, 50; Kepler, Minnesota, 50; Bogaerts, Boston, 49; Sanchez, New York, 49. DOUBLES: Bogaerts, Boston, 24; Castellanos, Detroit, 23; Brantley, Houston, 21; Buxton, Minnesota, 21; Polanco, Minnesota, 21; Abreu, Chicago, 19; 8 tied at 18. TRIPLES: Mondesi, Kansas City, 8; Merrifield, Kansas City, 7; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 5; Polanco, Minnesota, 5; Gardner, New York, 4; 12 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Encarnacion, New York, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; Sanchez, New York, 21; Bregman, Houston, 20; Soler, Kansas City, 20; Kepler, Minnesota, 19; Rosario, Minnesota, 19; Vogelbach, Seattle, 18; 4 tied at 17. PITCHING: Giolito, Chicago, 10-2; Odorizzi, Minnesota, 10-2; German, New York, 9-2; Montas, Oakland, 9-2; Verlander, Houston, 9-3; Berrios, Minnesota, 8-3; Gonzales, Seattle, 8-6; Lynn, Texas, 8-4; Morton, Tampa Bay, 8-1; Rodriguez, Boston, 8-4. ERA: Odorizzi, Minnesota, 2.24; Morton, Tampa Bay, 2.37; Minor, Texas, 2.52; Verlander, Houston, 2.59; Giolito, Chicago, 2.74; Montas, Oakland, 2.85; Berrios, Minnesota, 2.86; Chirinos, Tampa Bay, 3.00; Tanaka, New York, 3.23. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 148; Verlander, Houston, 133; Sale, Boston, 130; Bauer, Cleveland, 117; Bieber, Cleveland, 116; Boyd, Detroit, 112; Morton, Tampa Bay, 107; Giolito, Chicago, 104; Minor, Texas, 103; Lynn, Texas, 102.


SPORTS

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Blues From C1

come in the third, fifth and seventh rounds. What happened to those three other picks? — This year’s first-rounder went to the Buffalo Sabres as part of the Ryan O’Reilly trade last July 1. (The Blues also sent Patrik Berglund, Vladimir Sobotka, Tage Thompson and a secondround pick in 2021 to the Sabres for O’Reilly.) Certainly no one’s complaining about the trade terms. Not after O’Reilly led the Blues in scoring in the regular season, won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, and then took home the Selke Trophy as the NHL’s top defensive forward Wednesday in Vegas. — The Blues’ fourth-round pick went to the Toronto Maple Leafs on Feb. 15, 2018, for forward Nikita Soshnikov. The injury-plagued Soshnikov played only 12 games for the 2017-18 Blues, and just five this season. A restricted free agent in terms of his Blues rights, Soshnikov recently signed a two-year deal to play in the Kontinental Hockey League. — The team’s sixth-round pick went to the Anaheim Ducks in a Feb. 25, 2019, trade deadline deal for defenseman Michael Del Zotto. Del Zotto appeared in seven games for the Blues, recording three assists, but did not play in the playoffs. He’s scheduled for unrestricted free agency July 1. Even without those picks, the Blues need to restock the organi-

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES...............-$142 ....................Astros RED SOX................-$340 ...............Blue Jays INDIANS................-$190 .................... Tigers RANGERS ..............-$142 ..............White Sox Twins ....................-$145 ................. ROYALS ATHLETICS ............-$120 ...................... Rays MARINERS ............-$135 .................. Orioles National League CUBS .....................-$148 ...................... Mets PHILLIES ...............-$210 ..................Marlins NATIONALS ...........-$135 ................... Braves PIRATES ................-$110 ...................Padres BREWERS..............-$122 ...................... Reds DBACKS.................-$130 ....................Giants DODGERS..............-$175 ..................Rockies Interleague Angels...................-$110 ................... CARDS FOOTBALL | CFL Favorite Open/Current Underdog EDMONTON.............4/4 ............ Br Columbia Saturday Hamilton..............3.5/3.5............. TORONTO Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Reinstated OF Dwight Smith, Jr. from the 10-day IL. Designated RHP Dan Straily for assignment. Placed LHP John Means on the 10-day IL, retroactive to June 17. Recalled RHP Evan Phillips from Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX: Signed OF Jacob Scavuzzo to a minor league contract. DETROIT TIGERS: Optioned OF Victor Reyes to Toledo (IL). Reinstated RHP Jordan Zimmermann from the 10-day IL. LOS ANGELES ANGELS: Placed C Kevan Smith on 10-day IL, retroactive to June 19. Selected the contract of C Dustin Garneau from Salt Lake (PCL). Announced RHP Cody Allen cleared waivers and was unconditionally released. MINNESOTA TWINS: Optioned RHP Sean Poppen to Rochester (IL). Recalled RHP Kohl Stewart from Rochester. NEW YORK YANKEES: Released RHP Danny Farquhar. TAMPA BAY RAYS: Placed 3B Yandy Diaz on the 10-day IL. Recalled 3B Daniel Robertson from Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS: Optioned LHP Joe Palumbo to Nashville (PCL). Designated LHP Drew Smyly for assignment. Selected the contract of LHP Locke St. John from Nashville. Recalled LHP Kyle Bird from Nashville. TORONTO BLUE JAYS: Reinstated RHP Ken Giles from the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Justin Shafer to Buffalo (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS: Signed OF Corbin Carroll; SS Glenallen Hill Jr.; C Oscar Santos, LHPs Blake Walston, Andrew Saalfrank and Nick Snyder; and RHPs Brennan Malone, Drey Jameson, Ryne Nelson, Conor Grammes, Bobby Ay and Austin Pope to minor league contracts. ATLANTA BRAVES: Placed LHP Sean Newcomb on the 7-day IL. Recalled RHP Huascar Ynoa from Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS: Recalled RHP Adbert Alzolay from Iowa (PCL). Designated LHP Tim Collins for assignment. Signed 2B Bryce Windham; 3B Ryan Reynolds; INFs Jacob Olson and Grayson Byrd; LHPs Bryan King, Adam Laskey and Davidjohn Herz; OFs Manny Collier, Zac Taylor, Nelson Maldonado and Darius Hill; and RHPs Cayne Ueckert; Chris Kachmar, Alex Moore, Tanner Dalton, Hunter Bigge, Brad Deppermann, Josh Burgmann and Chris Clarke to minor league contracts. COLORADO ROCKIES: Placed INF Trevor Story on the 10-day IL. Recalled INF Brendan Rogers from Albuquerque (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS: Sent OF Peter O’Brien to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment. NEW YORK METS: Fired pitching coach Dave Eiland and bullpen coach Chuck Hernández. Named Phil Regan interim pitching coach, Ricky Bones interim bullpen coach and Jeremy Accardo pitching strategist. Recalled RHP Walker Lockett from Syracuse (IL). Optioned LHP Daniel Zamora to Syracuse. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES: Sent LHP Adam Morgan to Reading (EL) for a rehab assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES: Signed OF Jase Bowen and RHP Ryan Harbin to minor league contracts. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS: Activated RHP Adam Wainwright from the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Daniel Ponce de Leon to Memphis (PCL). Removed INF Yairo Muñoz from the paternity list and placed him on the restricted list. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS: Signed LHP Chris Wright; Cs Brandon Martorano and Matt Malkin; 1B Garrett Frechette and Connor Cannon; 2B Carter Aldrete and Nolan Dempsey; SSs Dilan Rosario, Simon Whiteman and Jeff Houghtby; 3B Jorge Samuel and Tyler Wyatt; OFs Grant McCray, Armani Smith, Harrison Freed, Najee Gaskins and Javeyan Williams; and RHPs Nick Morreale, Cole Waites, Kanoa Pagan, Taylor Rashi, Evan Lumbert, Nick Avila, Brooks Crawford and Justin Crump to minor league contracts. WASHINGTON NATIONALS: Returned RHP Austin Voth to Fresno (PCL). Signed RHP Jackson Rutledge to a minor league contract. American Association KANSAS CITY T-BONES: Released RHP Dustin Hurlbutt. ST. PAUL SAINTS: Sold the contract of RHP Nick Belzer to the Milwaukee Brewers. SIOUX FALLS CANARIES: Claimed LHP Will Solomon off waivers from Fargo-Moorhead. BASKETBALL ATLANTA HAWKS: Traded the 41st pick in Thursday’s draft to Golden State for a 2024 second-round pick and cash. FOOTBALL CHICAGO BEARS: Signed DB Duke Shelley. HOCKEY ANAHEIM DUCKS: Signed G Ryan Miller, D Korbinian Holzer and C Derek grant to oneyear contracts. VANCOUVER CANUCKS: Signed D Alex Edler to a two-year contract extension. SOCCER Major League Soccer PHILADELPHIA UNION: Signed F Andrew Wooten. COLLEGE EAST CAROLINA: Named Christa Saunders assistant swimming and diving coach. MISSOURI-KANSAS: Accepted an invitation to rejoin the Summit League.

JONATHAN HAYWARD, CANADIAN PRESS

Top prospect Jack Hughes speaks to the media during an NHL draft press conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, on Thursday. He’s expected to be the No. 1 overall pick.

Blues draft picks Round 2, No. 62 overall Round 3, No. 93 overall Round 5, No. 155 overall Round 7, No. 217 overall zational shelves. So the goal over the weekend is to make every pick count. “You get picks, you want players,” said Bill Armstrong, the Blues’ assistant general manager and director of amateur scouting. “We tell our staff that all the time.” Bill Armstrong, no relation to Doug Armstrong, spoke Friday

from Vancouver. This isn’t the first time the Armstrongs have gone through a draft without a first-rounder. “We’ve kind of been through the drill before,” Bill Armstrong said. “So it’s one of those things where I think it probably helps us that we’ve done it before. We kind of know what to expect because one of the tricky things is we have to anticipate basically what 61 picks are going to be (before the Blues pick).” The Blues last went without a first-rounder in 2015, when Dunn was the team’s first pick at No. 56 overall in the second round. It also happened in 2013 when they took defenseman Tommy

SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 9 4 4 31 31 20 Montreal 8 7 3 27 21 28 D.C. United 7 4 6 27 23 18 Atlanta 8 5 2 26 19 11 New York 7 6 3 24 27 19 New York City FC 5 1 8 23 23 17 Toronto FC 5 6 4 19 26 25 Orlando City 5 7 3 18 22 21 Chicago 4 6 6 18 24 23 Columbus 5 9 2 17 16 24 New England 4 8 4 16 17 33 Cincinnati 3 11 2 11 14 33 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 11 1 4 37 39 13 LA Galaxy 9 6 1 28 22 19 Seattle 7 4 5 26 26 21 Houston 7 3 3 24 21 14 FC Dallas 6 6 4 22 22 22 Minnesota United 6 7 3 21 23 25 Real Salt Lake 6 8 1 19 21 27 San Jose 5 6 4 19 23 27 Vancouver 4 6 6 18 17 20 Sporting K.C. 3 5 7 16 26 27 Colorado 4 9 3 15 25 34 Portland 4 7 2 14 19 26 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday LA Galaxy at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 7 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Houston at Portland, 10 p.m. Sunday Sporting K.C. at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.

USL Championship Eastern W L T Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 8 1 6 30 22 8 New York Red Bulls II 9 3 2 29 31 15 Nashville 8 3 4 28 27 13 Indy 8 2 3 27 20 9 North Carolina 7 2 5 26 24 11 Louisville 7 5 3 24 23 19 Ottawa 6 2 5 23 19 11 Charleston 5 3 6 21 19 17 STLFC 5 3 4 19 14 11 Pittsburgh 3 2 7 16 20 15 Bethlehem Steel 4 7 4 16 22 31 Atlanta 2 3 7 4 13 13 26 Loudoun 3 6 3 12 16 19 Charlotte 2 7 6 12 17 26 Birmingham 3 8 3 12 11 27 Memphis 2 7 5 11 12 20 Hartford 2 10 3 9 14 32 Swope Park Rangers 1 8 5 8 17 31 Western W L T Pts GF GA Phoenix 8 2 5 29 37 14 El Paso 7 2 5 26 21 12 New Mexico 6 3 7 25 32 27 Portland II 6 2 6 24 30 22 Reno 6 4 5 23 30 24 Fresno 5 2 7 22 23 15 OKC Energy 5 4 7 22 22 22 Sacramento 6 5 2 20 18 17 Austin 5 5 5 20 17 18 Rio Grande Valley 5 6 4 19 29 28 Las Vegas 5 6 4 19 24 24 Orange County 4 4 7 19 24 24 LA Galaxy II 4 6 6 18 24 35 Tulsa 4 6 5 17 24 28 San Antonio 4 7 4 16 20 24 Real Monarchs 4 6 3 15 26 27 Colorado Springs 4 9 2 14 14 24 Tacoma 2 11 4 10 14 44 Friday San Antonio at Fresno, 9:30 p.m. Saturday North Carolina at STLFC, 7:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Bethlehem Steel, 4 p.m. Atlanta 2 at Indy, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Louisville, 6 p.m. New York Red Bulls II at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Swope Park Rangers at Charleston, 6:30 p.m. Hartford at Birmingham, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Nashville, 7 p.m. Austin at Rio Grande Valley, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at OKC Energy, 8 p.m. Real Monarchs at Colorado Springs, 8 p.m. Las Vegas at El Paso, 8:30 p.m. New Mexico at LA Galaxy II, 9 p.m. Portland II at Orange County, 9 p.m. Tulsa at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

CONCACAF Gold Cup GROUP A GP W D L GF GA Pts Mexico 2 2 0 0 10 0 6 Canada 2 1 0 1 5 3 3 Martinique 2 1 0 1 3 4 3 Cuba 2 0 0 2 0 10 0 Wednesday, Denver Martinique 3, Cuba 0 Mexico 3, Canada 1 Sunday, Charlotte, N.C. Canada vs. Cuba, 5 p.m. Martinique vs. Mexico, 7 p.m. GROUP B GP W D L GF GA Pts Costa Rica 2 2 0 0 6 1 6 Haiti 2 2 0 0 4 1 6 Bermuda 2 0 0 2 2 4 0 Nicaragua 2 0 0 2 0 6 0 Thursday, Frisco, Texas Haiti 2, Bermuda 1 Costa Rica 4, Nicaragua 0 Monday, Harrison, N.J. Bermuda vs. Nicaragua, 5:30 p.m. Haiti vs. Costa Rica, 7:30 p.m. GROUP C GP W D L GF GA Pts Jamaica 1 1 0 0 3 2 3 El Salvador 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 Honduras 1 0 0 1 2 3 0 Curacao 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 Friday, Houston El Salvador vs. Jamaica, 6 p.m. Honduras vs. Curacao, 8 p.m. Tuesday, Los Angeles Jamaica vs. Curacao, 7 p.m. Honduras vs. El Salvador, 9 p.m. GROUP D GP W D L GF GA Pts United States 1 1 0 0 4 0 3 Panama 1 1 0 0 2 0 3 Guyana 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 Trinidad 1 0 0 1 0 4 0 Saturday, Cleveland Guyana vs. Panama, 4:30 p.m. United States vs. Trinidad and Tobago, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 26, Kansas City, Kan. Trinidad and Tobago vs. Guyana, 5:30 p.m. Panama vs. United States, 7:30 p.m. QUARTERFINALS: June 29-30 SEMIFINALS: July 2-3 CHAMPIONSHIP: July 7, Chicago

Vannelli — who’s no longer with the organization and never played in an NHL game — at No. 47 overall in the second round with their first pick. And in 2011, the Blues made forward Ty Rattie their first pick as the second player taken in the second round, No. 32 overall. Rattie has played only 99 NHL games since then — just 30 with the Blues, but 50 with the Edmonton Oilers last season. Can the Blues somehow trade into the first round Friday? Doug Armstrong has been known to do the unexpected, but he concedes such a move is unlikely. “I don’t envision it right now,” he said earlier in the week.

“There’s nothing on our roster that we’re looking to move out (in exchange) for picks. You never say never in this industry. But as I sit here … I don’t see a way. But that could change on Friday.” The Vannelli and Rattie picks notwithstanding, the Blues have had plenty of success with picks taken outside the first round. Seven players on their playoff roster this season were draft picks taken after Round 1. There was Dunn in 2015. Ivan Barbashev in the second round and Sammy Blais in Round 6 in 2014. Parayko and Mackenzie MacEachern both were taken in Round 3 in 2013. In 2011, Joel Edmundson was taken in Round 2 and Jordan Binnington in Round 3. “You never know,” Bill Armstrong said. “They’re going to be guys lingering around the third round. They might take a little bit longer (to develop), but they might just be as good as some of the guys you could’ve picked at 20 or 15. “The draft, it’s one of those things that’s unpredictable. You’re dealing with human beings. There’s some ones that you’d think would never make it and they make it. And there’s guys that are a sure thing and they don’t make it. “You try and do your best job with the knowledge of your scouts, your analytics, and your information from your doctors and your trainers. You’re putting the odds in your favor by having the most information and being able to process it the right way.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

GOLF Women’s PGA Championship

At Hazeltine National GC, Chaska, Minn. Purse: $3.85M | Yards: 6,741; Par 36-36—72 First Round, Thursday Hannah Green 34-34—68 -4 Hyo Joo Kim 33-36—69 -3 Mel Reid 35-34—69 -3 Annie Park 34-36—70 -2 Ariya Jutanugarn 33-37—70 -2 Xi Yu Lin 35-35—70 -2 In Kyung Kim 35-35—70 -2 Sung Hyun Park 34-36—70 -2 Amy Yang 33-37—70 -2 Angel Yin 35-36—71 -1 Mirim Lee 36-35—71 -1 Lydia Ko 37-34—71 -1 Soyeon Ryu 35-36—71 -1 Chella Choi 36-35—71 -1 Carlota Ciganda 37-34—71 -1 Moriya Jutanugarn 36-35—71 -1 Kendall Dye 36-36—72 E Haeji Kang 38-34—72 E Yu Liu 37-35—72 E Jenny Shin 36-36—72 E Shanshan Feng 36-36—72 E Pornanong Phatlum 35-37—72 E Pernilla Lindberg 36-36—72 E Inbee Park 37-35—72 E Lexi Thompson 37-35—72 E Caroline Masson 37-35—72 E Wichanee Meechai 36-36—72 E Lizette Salas 36-36—72 E Nelly Korda 36-36—72 E Lauren Stephenson 37-35—72 E Caroline Hedwall 36-36—72 E Tiffany Joh 35-38—73 +1 Pavarisa Yoktuan 37-36—73 +1 Dana Finkelstein 36-37—73 +1 Nuria Iturrioz 35-38—73 +1 Sei Young Kim 34-39—73 +1 Jeongeun Lee6 38-35—73 +1 Maria Fassi 36-37—73 +1 Wei-Ling Hsu 35-38—73 +1 Tiffany Chan 36-37—73 +1 Ashleigh Buhai 37-36—73 +1 Azahara Munoz 37-36—73 +1 Brittany Lang 38-35—73 +1 Celine Boutier 36-37—73 +1 Jimin Kang 38-35—73 +1 Su Oh 37-37—74 +2 Kristen Gillman 37-37—74 +2 Eun-Hee Ji 38-36—74 +2 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 37-37—74 +2 Mi Hyang Lee 36-38—74 +2 Min Jee Lee 36-38—74 +2 Jessica Korda 37-37—74 +2 Pajaree Anannarukarn 37-37—74 +2 Sandra Gal 38-36—74 +2 Kris Tamulis 38-36—74 +2 Megan Khang 36-38—74 +2 Angela Stanford 37-37—74 +2 Jennifer Song 36-38—74 +2 Pei-Yun Chien 36-38—74 +2 In Gee Chun 37-37—74 +2 Cheyenne Knight 38-36—74 +2 Gaby Lopez 37-38—75 +3 Catriona Matthew 37-38—75 +3 Ally McDonald 39-36—75 +3 Charley Hull 39-36—75 +3 Austin Ernst 39-36—75 +3 Jasmine Suwannapura 34-41—75 +3 Jeong Eun Lee 36-39—75 +3 Gemma Dryburgh 40-35—75 +3 Luna Sobron 39-36—75 +3 Lee-Anne Pace 38-37—75 +3 Daniela Darquea 38-37—75 +3 Sakura Yokomine 36-39—75 +3 Jaye Marie Green 39-36—75 +3 Stephanie Meadow 36-39—75 +3 Sarah Schmelzel 38-37—75 +3 Mariajo Uribe 36-39—75 +3 Karine Icher 36-39—75 +3 Danielle Kang 36-39—75 +3 Marissa Steen 36-39—75 +3 Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras38-37—75 +3 Mina Harigae 40-36—76 +4 Ryann O’Toole 38-38—76 +4 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 36-40—76 +4 Marina Alex 35-41—76 +4 Linnea Strom 39-37—76 +4 Nasa Hataoka 37-39—76 +4 Brooke M. Henderson 38-38—76 +4 Madelene Sagstrom 38-38—76 +4 Katherine Perry 38-38—76 +4 Elizabeth Szokol 38-38—76 +4 Karen Chung 38-38—76 +4 Dani Holmqvist 41-35—76 +4 Hee Young Park 38-38—76 +4 Georgia Hall 40-36—76 +4 Anna Nordqvist 38-38—76 +4 Cristie Kerr 38-38—76 +4 Brittany Altomare 39-37—76 +4 Anne Van Dam 35-41—76 +4 Dottie Ardina 41-35—76 +4 Na Yeon Choi 39-37—76 +4 Laura Gonzalez Escallon 38-39—77 +5 Clariss Guce 38-39—77 +5 Amy Olson 39-38—77 +5 Laetitia Beck 38-39—77 +5 Jane Park 36-41—77 +5 Emma Talley 39-38—77 +5 Klara Spilkova 36-41—77 +5 Morgan Pressel 38-39—77 +5 Alena Sharp 39-38—77 +5 Stacy Lewis 38-39—77 +5 Nicole Broch Larsen 37-40—77 +5 Jin Young Ko 38-39—77 +5 Aditi Ashok 39-38—77 +5 Lee Lopez 37-40—77 +5 Sarah Burnham 38-40—78 +6 Paula Creamer 39-39—78 +6 Katherine Kirk 36-42—78 +6 Leona Maguire 37-41—78 +6 Mariah Stackhouse 43-35—78 +6 Charlotte Thomas 39-39—78 +6 Giulia Molinaro 40-39—79 +7 P.K. Kongkraphan 40-39—79 +7 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 39-40—79 +7 Emily Pedersen 39-40—79 +7 Sarah Kemp 40-39—79 +7 Laura Davies 39-40—79 +7 Bronte Law 38-41—79 +7 Jing Yan 39-40—79 +7 Kim Kaufman 37-42—79 +7 Karrie Webb 40-39—79 +7 Lindsey Weaver 39-40—79 +7 Jaclyn Lee 40-39—79 +7 Suzuka Yamaguchi 41-38—79 +7 Brianna Do 41-39—80 +8 Alison Lee 41-39—80 +8 Seul-Ki Park 42-38—80 +8 Louise Ridderstrom 38-42—80 +8 Ayako Uehara 38-42—80 +8 Lindy Duncan 39-41—80 +8 Jacqui Concolino 43-37—80 +8 Stephanie Connelly Eiswerth 40-41—81 +9 Joanna Coe 40-41—81 +9 Isi Gabsa 42-39—81 +9 Ashley Grier 41-41—82+10 Christina Kim 40-42—82+10 Nicole Jeray 41-41—82+10 Gerina Piller 43-40—83+11

Maria Torres Michelle Wie Jennifer Kupcho Brittany Kelly Wendy Doolan Alison Curdt Mi Jung Hur Haru Nomura

PRO HOCKEY 41-42—83+11 43-41—84+12 44-40—84+12 41-44—85+13 45-41—86+14 47-41—88+16 WD WD

Travelers Championship

At TPC River Highlands, Cromwell, Conn. Purse: $7.2M | Yards: 6,841; Par 35-35—70 First Round, Thursday Ryan Armour 32-32 — 64 -6 Bronson Burgoon 31-33 — 64 -6 Kyoung-Hoon Lee 31-33 — 64 -6 Abraham Ancer 30-34 — 64 -6 Mackenzie Hughes 32-32 — 64 -6 Zack Sucher 33-31 — 64 -6 Chez Reavie 33-32 — 65 -5 Keegan Bradley 30-35 — 65 -5 Paul Casey 32-33 — 65 -5 Robert Streb 33-32 — 65 -5 Scott Langley 31-34 — 65 -5 Brady Schnell 31-34 — 65 -5 Peter Malnati 35-31 — 66 -4 Cameron Tringale 33-33 — 66 -4 Adam Long 34-32 — 66 -4 Patrick Cantlay 35-31 — 66 -4 Andrew Putnam 34-32 — 66 -4 Nick Watney 32-34 — 66 -4 Brandon Harkins 32-34 — 66 -4 Seamus Power 32-34 — 66 -4 Tommy Fleetwood 32-34 — 66 -4 Marc Leishman 31-35 — 66 -4 Louis Oosthuizen 35-31 — 66 -4 Collin Morikawa 33-33 — 66 -4 Sam Burns 34-33 — 67 -3 Sam Ryder 32-35 — 67 -3 Emiliano Grillo 35-32 — 67 -3 C.T. Pan 32-35 — 67 -3 Tom Hoge 32-35 — 67 -3 Martin Laird 33-34 — 67 -3 Scott Brown 32-35 — 67 -3 Richy Werenski 34-33 — 67 -3 Viktor Hovland 33-34 — 67 -3 Jim Herman 35-32 — 67 -3 Andrew Landry 33-34 — 67 -3 Kyle Stanley 34-33 — 67 -3 Phil Mickelson 33-34 — 67 -3 Ryan Blaum 34-33 — 67 -3 Kevin Streelman 34-33 — 67 -3 Sam Saunders 34-33 — 67 -3 Tyler Duncan 36-31 — 67 -3 Ryan Moore 34-34 — 68 -2 Wyndham Clark 33-35 — 68 -2 Alex Prugh 34-34 — 68 -2 Sung Kang 34-34 — 68 -2 Kevin Tway 34-34 — 68 -2 Brandt Snedeker 36-32 — 68 -2 Justin Thomas 34-34 — 68 -2 Patrick Reed 35-33 — 68 -2 Vaughn Taylor 33-35 — 68 -2 Padraig Harrington 34-34 — 68 -2 Sangmoon Bae 32-36 — 68 -2 J.J. Spaun 35-33 — 68 -2 Josh Teater 33-35 — 68 -2 Sungjae Im 33-35 — 68 -2 Shawn Stefani 33-35 — 68 -2 Daniel Berger 33-35 — 68 -2 Bryson DeChambeau 33-35 — 68 -2 Brian Gay 32-36 — 68 -2 Seth Reeves 35-33 — 68 -2 Hank Lebioda 35-34 — 69 -1 Matt Jones 35-34 — 69 -1 Alex Cejka 36-33 — 69 -1 Chris Stroud 34-35 — 69 -1 Cody Gribble 34-35 — 69 -1 Francesco Molinari 34-35 — 69 -1 Bubba Watson 35-34 — 69 -1 Beau Hossler 34-35 — 69 -1 J.T. Poston 33-36 — 69 -1 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 34-35 — 69 -1 Joaquin Niemann 34-35 — 69 -1 Harold Varner III 34-35 — 69 -1 Kyle Jones 35-34 — 69 -1 Chip McDaniel 34-35 — 69 -1 Michael Miller 35-34 — 69 -1 Adam Schenk 34-35 — 69 -1 Nick Taylor 34-35 — 69 -1 Chesson Hadley 34-35 — 69 -1 Boo Weekley 35-34 — 69 -1 Sebastian Munoz 34-35 — 69 -1 Michael Kim 35-34 — 69 -1 Russell Knox 34-35 — 69 -1 Kevin Kisner 34-35 — 69 -1 J.B. Holmes 35-34 — 69 -1 Roberto Diaz 36-33 — 69 -1 Ryan McCormick 34-35 — 69 -1 Fabian Gomez 35-35 — 70 E Chad Collins 36-34 — 70 E Kelly Kraft 34-36 — 70 E Byeong Hun An 36-34 — 70 E Troy Merritt 34-36 — 70 E Freddie Jacobson 35-35 — 70 E Stephan Jaeger 34-36 — 70 E Curtis Luck 36-34 — 70 E Dylan Frittelli 34-36 — 70 E Kramer Hickok 34-36 — 70 E Trey Mullinax 32-38 — 70 E Satoshi Kodaira 32-38 — 70 E Max Homa 35-35 — 70 E Jason Day 33-37 — 70 E Brice Garnett 33-37 — 70 E Si Woo Kim 36-34 — 70 E Adam Hadwin 35-35 — 70 E J.J. Henry 35-35 — 70 E Aaron Baddeley 35-35 — 70 E Joel Dahmen 35-35 — 70 E Hunter Mahan 36-34 — 70 E Jim Knous 36-34 — 70 E Sepp Straka 36-34 — 70 E Matthew Wolff 37-33 — 70 E Cameron Davis 36-34 — 70 E Carlos Ortiz 35-36 — 71 +1 Ollie Schniederjans 35-36 — 71 +1 Denny McCarthy 36-35 — 71 +1 Patton Kizzire 34-37 — 71 +1 Jonas Blixt 36-35 — 71 +1 Brooks Koepka 36-35 — 71 +1 Tony Finau 36-35 — 71 +1 Brendan Steele 36-35 — 71 +1 Lucas Glover 36-35 — 71 +1 Nicholas Lindheim 36-35 — 71 +1 Cameron Smith 36-35 — 71 +1 Anders Albertson 35-36 — 71 +1 Joey Garber 37-34 — 71 +1 John Chin 34-37 — 71 +1 Wes Roach 33-38 — 71 +1 Brian Harman 34-38 — 72 +2 35-37 — 72 +2 Cameron Champ Rod Pampling 35-37 — 72 +2 Scott Stallings 37-35 — 72 +2 Chris Thompson 36-36 — 72 +2 Anirban Lahiri 34-38 — 72 +2 Bud Cauley 34-38 — 72 +2 Harris English 35-37 — 72 +2 Julian Etulain 34-38 — 72 +2 Austin Cook 37-36 — 73 +3 Ben Silverman 36-37 — 73 +3 Chase Wright 39-34 — 73 +3 Jordan Spieth 34-39 — 73 +3 Danny Lee 36-37 — 73 +3

Adam Svensson Justin Suh Dominic Bozzelli Russell Henley Charley Hoffman Brian Stuard Roger Sloan Martin Trainer Jose de Jesus Rodriguez Jason Kokrak Jim Renner Peter Uihlein Whee Kim Morgan Hoffmann Brandon Hagy Chris Tallman

37-36 36-37 38-36 36-38 35-39 37-37 37-37 36-38 38-36 36-39 37-38 35-41 38-39 36-41 39-39 36-42

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 76 77 77 78 78

+3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8

Euro International Open

Munich, Germany Purse: $2.24M | Yardage: 7,235; Par: 72 Partial First Round, Thursday Andrea Pavan, Italy 35-31 — 66 Oliver Wilson, England 34-33 — 67 Martin Kaymer, Germany 35-32 — 67 Jeff Winther, Denmark 35-33 — 68 Lee Westwood, England 33-35 — 68 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 36-33 — 69 Dimitrios Papadatos, Australia 36-33 — 69 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 34-35 — 69 Alvaro Quiros, Spain 34-35 — 69 Haydn Porteous, South Africa 34-35 — 69 Richard McAvoy, England 34-35 — 69 Andy Sullivan, England 37-32 — 69 Matt Wallace, England 35-34 — 69 Pedro Figueiredo, Portugal 34-35 — 69 Callum Shinkwin, England 35-34 — 69 Sebastian Soderberg, Sweden 34-35 — 69 Romain Wattel, France 36-33 — 69 Darius van Driel, Netherlands 35-34 — 69 Gavin Green, Malaysia 36-33 — 69 Also Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain 35-36 — 71 Kurt Kitayama, United States 36-35 — 71 Paul Peterson, United States 37-36 — 73 Sergio Garcia, Spain 37-36 — 73 Julian Suri, United States 38-35 — 73 John Catlin, United States 36-37 — 73 David Lipsky, United States 38-36 — 74 Sean Crocker, United States 35-40 — 75 Leaderboard Par Thru Andrea Pavan, Italy -6 18 Oliver Wilson, England -5 18 Martin Kaymer, Germany -5 18 Jeff Winther, Denmark -4 18 Lee Westwood, England -4 18 Also Alex Noren, Sweden -3 16 Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain -1 18 Kurt Kitayama, United States -1 18 Sihwan Kim, United States E 14 Paul Peterson, United States +1 18 Sergio Garcia, Spain +1 18 Julian Suri, United States +1 18 John Catlin, United States +1 18 David Lipsky, United States +2 18 Matthew Fitzpatrick, England +2 17 Sean Crocker, United States +3 18

Area hole in one Innsbrook: Ken Seitz, hole No. 17, 130 yards, 3-wood, June 20.

BASEBALL Frontier League

East Schaumburg Lake Erie Windy City Washington Joliet West Florence Southern Illinois Evansville Rascals Grizzlies

W L Pct. GB 19 17 .528 17 16 .515 .5 17 18 .486 1.5 13 23 .361 6 12 24 .333 7 W L PCT GB 22 12 .647 21 12 .636 .5 20 15 .571 2.5 18 17 .514 4.5 15 20 .429 7.5 Thursday Schaumburg 4, Joliet 3 Southern Illinois 4, Windy City 2, 7 inn. Southern Illinois at Windy City, (n) Florence 5, Rascals 2, 8 inn. Florence 5, Rascals 2, 7 inn. Gateway at Lake Erie, ppd. Evansville at Washington, susp. Friday Grizzlies at Florence, 6:05 p.m. Evansville at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Rascals at Joliet, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Windy City, 7:05 p.m.

College World Series

At TD Ameritrade Park, Omaha, Neb. (Double Elimination; x-if necessary) Thursday Louisville 5, Mississippi State 4, Mississippi State eliminated Friday Game 11: Michigan (47-20) vs. Texas Tech (46-19), 1 p.m. Game 12: Vanderbilt (56-11) vs. Louisville (51-17) , 6 p.m. Saturday x-Game 13: Michigan vs. Texas Tech, 1 p.m. x-Game 14: Vanderbilt vs. Louisville, 6 p.m. Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday: TBD, 6 p.m. Tuesday: TBD, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday: TBD, 6 p.m.

Major League leaders

NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Bellinger, Los Angeles, .359; Yelich, Milwaukee, .348; McNeil, New York, .339; Blackmon, Colorado, .336; Dahl, Colorado, .332; Arenado, Colorado, .328. RBI: Bell, Pittsburgh, 66; Arenado, Colorado, 60; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 60; Alonso, New York, 59; Escobar, Arizona, 59; Yelich, Milwaukee, 59; Ozuna, Cardinals, 57. HOME RUNS: Yelich, Milwaukee, 28; Alonso, New York, 25; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 24; Renfroe, San Diego, 23; Freeman, Atlanta, 21; Moustakas, Milwaukee, 21. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Polanco, Minnesota, .325; Brantley, Houston, .319; LeMahieu, New York, .314; Anderson, Chicago, .312; Meadows, Tampa Bay, .308; Devers, Boston, .307. RBI: Trout, Los Angeles, 56; Abreu, Chicago, 54; Santana, Seattle, 54; Encarnacion, New York, 53; Rosario, Minnesota, 53; Soler, Kansas City, 52; Bregman, Houston, 51. HOME RUNS: Encarnacion, New York, 23; Sanchez, New York, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; Bregman, Houston, 21; Soler, Kansas City, 20; Kepler, Minnesota, 19; Rosario, Minnesota, 19; Vogelbach, Seattle, 18.

NHL Draft Order Friday | Rogers Arena, Vancouver First Round 1. New Jersey Devils 2. New York Rangers 3. Chicago Blackhawks 4. Colorado Avalanche (from Ottawa) 5. Los Angeles Kings 6. Detroit Red Wings 7. Buffalo Sabres 8. Edmonton Oilers 9. Anaheim Ducks 10. Vancouver Canucks 11. Philadelphia Flyers 12. Minnesota Wild 13. Florida Panthers 14. Arizona Coyotes 15. Montreal Canadiens 16. Colorado Avalanche 17. Vegas Golden Knights 18. Dallas Stars 19. Ottawa Senators (from Columbus) 20. Winnipeg Jets (from NY Rangers) 21. Pittsburgh Penguins 22. Los Angeles Kings (from Toronto M) 23. New York Islanders 24. Nashville Predators 25. Washington Capitals 26. Calgary Flames 27. Tampa Bay Lightning 28. Carolina Hurricanes 29. Anaheim Ducks (from San Jose via Buffalo) 30. Boston Bruins 31. Buffalo Sabres (from St. Louis)

BASKETBALL NBA Draft Thursday | Brooklyn, N.Y. SECOND ROUND 31. Brooklyn (from New York through Philadelphia), Nicolas Claxton, c, Georgia. 32. l-Phoenix, KZ Okpala, f, Stanford. 33. m-Philadelphia (from Cleveland through Orlando and New York), Carsen Edwards, g, Purdue. 34. Philadelphia (from Chicago through L.A. Lakers), Bruno Fernando, c, Maryland. 35. c-Atlanta, Marcos Louzada Silva, g, Franca (Brazil). 36. Charlotte (from Washington through Orlando through Denver through Atlanta), Cody Martin, f, Nevada. 37. Dallas, Deividas Sirvydis, f, Rytas (Lithuania). 38. Chicago (from Memphis), Daniel Gafford, f, Arkansas. 39. n-New Orleans, Alen Smailagic, f, Santa Cruz (NBA G League) 40. Sacramento (from Minnesota through Portland and Cleveland), Justin James, g, Wyoming. 41. Golden State (from L.A. Lakers through Cleveland, Indiana at Atlanta), Eric Paschall, f, Villanova. 42. o-Philadelphia (from Sacramento through Brooklyn and Milwaukee), Admiral Schofield, f, Tennessee. 43. Minnesota (from Miami through Charlotte), Jaylen Nowell, g, Washington. 44. p-Miami (from Charlotte through Atlanta), Bol Bol, c, Oregon. 45. Detroit, Isaiah Roby, f, Nebraska. 46. q-Orlando (from Brooklyn through Memphis and Charlotte), Talen Horton-Tucker, g, Iowa State. 47. Sacramento (from Orlando through New York), Ignas Brazdeikis, f, Michigan. 48. L.A. Clippers, Terance Mann, f, Florida State. 49. San Antonio, Quinndary Weatherspoon, g, Mississippi State. 50. Indiana, Jarrell Brantley, f, College of Charleston. 51. Boston, Tremont Waters, g, LSU. 52. Charlotte (from Oklahoma City), Jalen McDaniels, f, San Diego State. 53. Utah, Justin Wright-Foreman, g, Hofstra. 54. Philadelphia, Marial Shayok, f, Iowa State. 55. New York (from Houston), Kyle Guy, g, Virginia. 56. r-L.A. Clippers (from Portland through Detroit and Orlando), Jaylen Hands, g, UCLA. 57. s-New Orleans (from Denver through Milwaukee), Jordan Bone, g, Tennessee. 58. Golden State, Miye Oni, g, Yale. 59. Toronto, Dewan Hernandez, f, Miami. 60. Sacramento (from Milwaukee), Vanja Marinkovic, g, Serbia. Proposed Trades l-Miami from from Phoenix through Indiana. m-Boston from Philadelphia. n-Golden State from New Orleans. o-Washington from Philadlephia. p-Denver from Miami. q-L.A. Lakers from Orlando. r-Brooklyn from L.A. Clippers. s-Atlanta from New Orleans.

BOXING Fight Schedule Friday At Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Tyrone McKenna vs. Darragh Foley, 12, for the vacant WBC International super lightweight title. At WinnaVegas Casino & Resort, Sloan, Iowa (SHO), Sebastian Fundora vs. Hector Zepeda, 10, super welterweights; Rene Tellez Giron vs. Michel Rivera, 10, lightweights. At Indio, Calif., Andrew Cancio vs. Alberto Machado, 12, for Cancio’s WBA junior lightweight title; Angel Acosta vs. Elwin Soto, 12, for Acosta’s WBO junior flyweight title; Genaro Gamez vs. Ezequiel Aviles, 10, junior welterweights. Saturday At Wolstein Center, Cleveland (CBSSN), Dewayne Beamon vs. Froilan Saludar, 12, for the vacant WBC United States (USNBC) super flyweight title; Cody Crowley vs. Navid Mansouri, 12, for the vacant WBC United States (USNBC) super welterweight title. Sunday At Mandalay Bay Resorts & Casino, Las Vegas (FOX), Jermell Charlo, vs. Jorge Cota, 12, for junior middleweights; Guillermo Rigondeaux vs. Julio Ceja, 12, super bantamweights. At Temecula, Calif. (ESPN), Richard Commey vs. Ray Beltran, 12, for Commey’s IBF lightweight title.


GOLF

06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

Six-way tie atop the Travelers’ leaderboard

WOMEN’S PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

former UCLA star, who was just 19 years old when he shot a 60 on this course during the second round in 2011, setting a PGA Tour record for amateurs. “I definitely feel comfortable around here,” he said. “It’s one of the only golf courses I think I get on the first tee at the beginning of the day and think I can birdie every hole.” Defending champion Bubba Watson opened with a 69 in his bid for his fourth Travelers title. That would put him in the company of Billy Casper, the only golfer to win four times at Connecticut’s PGA Tour stop. Watson, who came from sixshots back on the final day to win a year ago, seemed relaxed as he participated in an afternoon whiffle ball game with a group of players’ children outside the new clubhouse. “Around this golf course, you’ve got to just know there’s going to be birdies out there,” he said.“Today was a little more difficult because a little bit of mist here and there just made the ball react different on the greens with some shots.” Two-time champion Phil Mickelson, playing in Connecticut for the first time since 2003, shot a 67. “I didn’t hurt myself any,” Mickelson said. “I made a few mistakes out there that I have to clean up tomorrow. I feel like the round should have been three or four lower, and if I can do that tomorrow and shoot three or four lower, I’ll be right in it for the weekend.”

BY PAT EATON_ROBB

Associated Press

CROMWELL, Conn. — Zack Sucher made a 9-foot birdie putt in the last group of the day on the par-4 18th for a 6-under 64 and a share of a six-way tie for the lead Thursday in the Travelers Championship. Ryan Armour and Bronson Burgoon set the mark during the morning at TPC River Highlands and the others matched them in the afternoon. MacKenzie Hughes sank an 18-foot birdie putt on his final hole, Abraham Ancer shot a 30 on his back nine, and Kyoung-Hoon Lee shot his lowest round on the PGA Tour. Burgoon birdied four of his first six holes, and Armour, who has missed the cuts in four of his past five starts, tied his lowest round of the season. “I gave myself a lot of opportunities, which I hadn’t been doing lately, Armour said. “I hadn’t been hitting a lot of greens, wasn’t shaping the golf ball the way I want to shape it. We worked really hard the last few days.” Paul Casey, who gave up a four-shot lead in the final round a year ago, missed a 17-foot par putt on the 18th and finished in a group of six at 65. Memorial champion Patrick Cantlay was part of a group of 12 at 66. Cantlay started on the back nine and was tied for the lead when his tee shot landed in water on the par-3 eighth hole, leading to a double bogey. But that did not affect the confidence of the

CHARLIE NEIBERGALL, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Australian Hannah Green takes cover under her umbrella as she walks on the 18th green during the first round of the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship on Thursday in Chaska, Minn.

Green putts way to lead just 244 yards short of the Pebble Beach scorecard last week at the U.S. Open. It was long enough that Ariya Jutanugarn not only carried a driver for the first time all year, she hit it — twice. “Made bogey” she said with a laugh after her 70. And it was tough enough — especially with a mixture of rain, wind, a drop in temperatures, sunshine and more rain — that only 16 players broke par and 20 players shot 80 or high. One of them was Michelle Wie, who returned from two months off with an injured right wrist and matched her highest score as a pro with an 84. She was happy to be playing golf again, which made her score feel even worse. “I’m not entirely sure how much left I have in me,” Wie said as she began to cry. “I love being out here.” Green had everything going her way except for being prepared for the elements. She opened with a 15-foot par putt. She followed with a 20-foot birdie putt on the par-5 11th, which played so long in these conditions — 557 yards — that she had 7-iron for her third shot. Most of the pars she saved were in the 6-foot range. “I don’t really think I ever had a

BY DOUG FERGUSON

Associated Press

CHASKA, Minn. — Hannah Green got just about everything wrong in the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship except what mattered: Her score. The Australian didn’t have wet weather gear when she teed off Thursday at Hazeltine as it started to rain — she doesn’t like rain pants, anyway, because they make too much noise. On a long, tough course at Hazeltine National, she missed nine greens and never had a tap-in for par. No matter. She took 23 putts, none on the par-5 seventh when she holed a bunker shot, and she kept bogeys off her card for a 4-under 68 for a one-shot lead over Hyo Joo Kim and Mel Reid. “I guess I just had a lot of luck today with putts going in and getting good bounces,” Green said. Kim set small goals to help her on a big course. She wanted to hit 12 greens and take no more than 30 putts, and she accomplished both in her 69. Reid played in one of the final groups and finished strong, hitting just inside the hazard right of the 16th fairway, taking her shot over a tree and grandstand and onto the green. Hazeltine was as tough as advertised, playing at 6,831 yards —

tap-in putt for my par putts when I missed the green,” she said. “I made all of them. Very happy with that.” She also had her own cheering section. Karrie Webb, Australia’s most prolific major champion, has been offering scholarships to two amateurs for the past several years. They are with Webb this week, and followed along with Green. They’re all staying in the same house, cooking and working on a 2,000-piece puzzle they wanted to finish in time for their barbecue Saturday. This is meaningful to Green because she was a Karrie Webb scholarship winner four years ago, coming over to America for the U.S.Women’s Open — the first golf tournament she saw as a spectator. Jutanugarn is so powerful off the tee that she typically doesn’t carry a driver. The Thai is just as effective with a 3-wood or a 2-iron. Hazeltine made her change. “I hit my driver twice today — pretty good,” Jutanugarn said. Defending champion Sung Hyun Park and I.K. Kim also were in the group at 70 with Jutanugarn. The group at 71 included major champions So Yeon Ryu and Lydia Ko.

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

BRAD HORRIGAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Abraham Ancer opened with a 64 and shares the lead with five others after Thursday’s first round of the Travelers in Cromwell, Conn.

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

Showers will gradually clear the Northeast today, being replaced by drier and less humid air which will also sweep down into the mid-Atlantic. Sweltering heat and humidity surging into the central Plains will help fuel severe weather in and around the region. Gusty winds will heighten the fire danger in the desert Southwest.

TODAY

TONIGHT

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

A strong thunderstorm WIND SE 8-16 mph

Partly cloudy, a t-storm WIND SSE 6-12 mph

A thunderstorm in spots WIND SSW 7-14 mph

Partly sunny, a t-storm WIND SSW 8-16 mph

Showers, heavy t-storms WIND SSW 8-16 mph

Humid with clouds and sun WIND WNW 7-14 mph

85°

76°

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Watch for quick-hitting thunderstorms today. Severe weather is a possible with gusts of wind and hail as the main threat. This will be a fast-moving system, so stay alert of the fast-changing conditions.

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 75/65 73/66 Bloomington Urbana 75/63 75/66

Kirksville 81/72

Quincy 79/69

Decatur 75/67 Springfield 57 76/68 Effingham 70 55 77/67

35

Joplin 92/74

Columbia 70 89/75 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 85/76 City 83/73 90/77 Union 55 86/74 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 88/73 85/75 Farmington 86/74 Cape Girardeau 89/77 Springfield 93/73 Poplar Bluff West Plains 90/76 55 90/75

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

26.78 26.84 28.27 24.88 31.92

19.65 19.35 22.93

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

-0.24 -1.02 -0.76 -0.85 -0.53

16 21.69 +0.51 15 20.50 -0.38 25 30.85 -0.97 26 33.98 -0.56 18 30.06 -0.59 419 429.78 -0.53 21 35.34 none 30 40.67 -0.58 27 42.60 -0.74 32 44.34 -0.19 20 18 14

-0.55 -0.25 -0.17

15 16 24

4.25 +0.62 18.94 -0.59 37.38 -0.55

15

4.08 +0.69

40

48.35 +0.65 359.20 362.89 498.81 659.60 734.87 684.98 917.20 864.34 605.87 409.34 619.11 449.09

-0.41 -0.67 -0.06 -0.09 +0.01 +0.19 +0.01 -0.25 +0.57 -0.04 -0.39 +0.30

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature

Average High

100

93 86

80

86

77

75 69

60

84

73

71

69

80 71

83

85 76

76

65

89

71

Average Low 85

69

91

71

92

72

Statistics through 5 p.m. Thursday Temperature High/low 83°/65° Normal high/low 87°/68° Last year high/low 92°/72° Record high 103° (1953) Record low 52° (1980) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Thu. Trace Month to date (normal) 2.62” (2.97”) Year to date (normal) 28.99” (19.34”) Record for this date 2.66” (1885)

72

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

Denver 69/45

Toronto 72/55 Detroit 76/55

New York 77/64 Washington 84/64

Kansas City 90/74

Los Angeles 72/61 Atlanta 93/74 El Paso 99/71 Chihuahua 99/65

Houston 95/81 Miami 92/77

Monterrey 99/75

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Absent - 0 Low - 7 Low - 4 High - 14176 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Thursday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

9 181 196 393 368

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

71° 8 a.m.

76° noon

85° 4 p.m.

79° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

77/58/sh 90/59/s 67/54/pc 93/74/pc 98/81/pc 84/60/pc 94/76/t 68/45/pc 73/62/sh 94/73/s 77/59/pc 89/68/s 71/56/pc 79/64/pc 73/55/pc 95/76/pc 95/74/t 69/45/sh 76/68/t 88/81/pc 76/55/pc 79/60/pc 89/75/pc 95/81/pc 78/65/pc 90/74/t 95/71/s 93/77/pc

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

78/58/pc 85/56/s 65/56/pc 90/74/t 94/80/c 82/60/s 91/75/t 77/54/pc 78/64/pc 94/74/pc 77/61/c 92/68/pc 73/63/t 79/68/c 74/58/pc 93/74/pc 92/74/pc 60/44/t 83/68/t 89/80/pc 76/58/pc 80/60/s 90/76/pc 93/81/pc 79/69/c 90/68/pc 90/71/s 95/76/pc

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

72/61/sh 84/70/pc 93/77/t 92/77/pc 68/54/pc 73/58/sh 95/76/pc 91/74/pc 94/81/pc 77/64/sh 94/72/pc 82/69/t 95/73/t 80/63/sh 102/75/s 73/53/pc 72/58/sh 74/55/pc 91/61/s 66/50/pc 96/79/pc 67/62/sh 73/54/pc 73/54/pc 91/75/pc 100/69/s 84/64/pc 97/74/s

73/59/pc 86/75/c 93/76/pc 93/77/pc 66/58/r 73/65/t 94/74/t 91/76/t 94/79/pc 79/64/s 88/70/t 80/66/c 92/73/pc 80/61/s 98/74/s 75/55/pc 77/58/pc 75/56/pc 94/60/s 67/51/s 94/79/c 69/62/pc 77/55/s 69/54/pc 91/76/s 97/65/s 82/64/s 89/68/t

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

National Extremes Thursday in the 48 contiguous states

Today’s Air Quality

High: 108 Needles, Calif.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Rise

Sun Moon

Set

5:37 a.m. 11:51 p.m.

8:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

Jun 25

Jul 2

Jul 9

Jul 16

Low: 25 Sunrise Mountain, Ariz.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

55

Montreal 76/60

Minneapolis 73/58

Chicago 71/56

San Francisco 73/54

92

40

F

Billings 60/47

93° 76° 89° 71° 85° 69° 91° 71°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 90/74

Winnipeg 75/57

Seattle 73/54

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

65/50/pc 88/72/s 105/78/s 95/80/t 91/68/pc 76/57/t 62/52/pc 97/73/s 90/81/pc 60/49/pc 93/85/t 83/65/s 63/38/s 68/52/pc 84/59/pc 115/85/s

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

69/56/s 90/72/s 107/81/s 96/80/t 93/71/s 75/55/pc 66/58/sh 97/73/s 90/82/t 61/53/pc 93/83/t 81/64/s 64/41/s 70/55/pc 90/63/pc 115/84/s

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

78/58/t 76/60/pc 84/68/c 89/80/pc 71/55/pc 110/85/pc 72/53/pc 78/68/pc 83/67/s 90/79/s 62/41/pc 79/65/t 58/47/pc 80/69/pc 72/55/s 70/54/s

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

77/59/t 79/59/pc 88/66/c 89/80/pc 73/58/pc 113/83/pc 76/61/pc 80/67/s 85/65/pc 90/77/s 67/43/pc 84/64/s 58/49/sh 78/66/sh 76/56/pc 69/55/c

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

If a picture is worth a thousand words, our photo galleries say it all.

Check them out online at

STLtoday.com/photos

CLASSIFIED Meadow Woods 710 E. Woods • 636-456-0895 Village of Warrenton Southside Court • 636-456-7243 Warrenton I & II N. West & Oak Street • 636-456-7243

Audi

Chevrolet

Hyundai

Kia

'18 Audi A5 sportback premium plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 7k mi., #27849L $41,000

'05 Chevy Aveo, SV, only 51k mi., clean carfax, #44591A $3,990

'18 Kia Soul, stk# P07215 $14,445 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, 7K Miles, quattro, awd, clean carfax, #28209L $32,899

'03 Chevy Corvette, loaded, very clean, clean carfax, #44452B $16,952

'18 Hyundai Elantra SEL, stk# P07221 $13,743 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, stk# P07186 $17,941 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Audi Q7 3.0T Prem Plus, quattro, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 39k mi., #P9933 $29,000

2018 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9619 $46,899

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27845L $41,000 All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Condos/Townhomes 3 1 2 9 E d w a r d s Pla c e #2 0 2 , Maryland Heights 63043, by owner. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths condo. Many update s , no ste ps. Must see!Call 314-623-4146.

Open Sunday, June 23, 12-2 pm 334 Couch Ave, Kirkwood

Near Kirkwood Park Luxury, Sophistication & Location are yours in this NEW 4 bdr, 3.5 bath home. Upgrades & custom amenities include 42" Shaker cabinets w/ under cabinet lighting, gorgeous quartz counters, subway tile; & walk in pantry. Also featured: Butler's pantry, mudroom with custom cubbies, Job finished hardwood floors, custom mouldings & gas fireplace w/ custom mantle. Spacious Master Suite w/ 2 generous walk in closets & luxurious bath. Guest suite w/private bath & walk in closet. Bdrs 3 & 4 share Jack 'n Jill bath. Other features: large sodded yard, deck & basement w/ 10 ft pour. Offered @ $675,000. Nikki Mahn Cottage & Castle 314-799-2050 ï314-909-1156 smmahn@att.net

Audi '18 Audi Q5 Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 7k mi., #27838L $41,000

'17 Audi Q7 Prestige, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9934 $47,000

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, #27848L $41,000

'15 Audi Q7 3.0T Premium Plus, quattro, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 38k mi., #P9922A $30,000

'16 Audi S6 Prestige, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P1122 $46,963

'16 Audi S6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 32k mi., #29179A $46,000

'18 Audi A5 quattro sportback premium plus, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 7k mi., #27851L $41,000

'17 Audi Q5, Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 45k mi., #P9953 $32,000

'18 Audi Q5 Prem/Tech Prem, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 21k, #P9675 $31,899

Land for Sale 520 ACRE HUNTING PRESERVE 90 MILES NORTH OF ST. LOUIS. LARGE LODGE, OUTBUILDINGS, PAVILION, SKEET/ TRAP FIELDS, LAKE/ PONDS, CAMPER HOOKUPS, ETC. SECLUDED OFF HIGHWAY 61. VIEW ONLINE KATONKAGAMEPRESERVE.COM. STARTING $3,200/ACRE. 573-248-4184.

'18 Audi S5 Prestige, quattro sportback, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 9k mi., #13062A $53,350

********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $121.00/wk 205 N 9th Street, St. Louis, MO 63101

314-421-2980 ********* Nice and clean 1 br apartment in North City. 4119 W. Carter, 63115. $500/mo. Sec. 8 welcome. $42 app. fee. Call 314-503-8763.

Acura

'18 Audi A6, Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, grey, #28600L $40,899

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $38,899 #28140L

'17 Audi A8 L Sport, quattro LWB Sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 50k mi., #P9999 $49,752

'17 Audi A3 Cabriolet, Premium Plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 30k mi., #P9986 $30,350

'15 Audi S4 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 50k mi., #P9687 $28,899

BMW

'18 Audi Q5 Tech Prem Plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 12k mi., #28330L $40,899

'11 Chevy Cruze Eco, loaded, only 60k mi., #37265A $8,750

'18 Chevy Cruze, silver, 19k mi., #P07263 $17,057 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Cruze, stk# 190757A $16,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Impala LTZ 2LZ, loaded, full power, clean carfax, #44523A $17,969

'11 Chevy Impala LS, black, loaded, clean carfax, #44576B $7,450

'19 Chevy Impala LT, black, 16k mi., #P07207 $22,879 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Malibu, loaded, clean carfax, very clean, #44673A $10,990

'15 Chevy Malibu, stk# 190697A $11,250 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Malibu 1LT, gray, 33k mi., #P07243 $17,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Malibu, Premier, black, #190490A $20,427 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chevy Traverse LT, leather, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 20k mi., #P6798 $37,550

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black 50k, #29142A $38,000

'17 Chevy Spark, hatch, LS, auto, stk# P07222 $10,475 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 BMW M3 4dr sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, manual, white, 29k mi., #P9684 $39,899

'16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29KMi, AWD, Sedan, $30,899 #12382A

Corvette '17 Chevy Corvette Z06 1LZ coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, gray, 7k mi., #P1116 $66,350

Buick

'15 Chevy Corvette Z51 3LT, convertible, 8 cyl., RWD, 7spd manual, 51k, #44573A $41,990

'18 Buick Enclave Avenir, SUV, 6 cyl., awd, auto, metallic, 31k mi., #41230A $38,350

'17 Infiniti Q50, 3.0t Premium, Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, platinum, 12k mi., #96195L $28,899

Lincoln '17 Infiniti QX80 AWD, 8 cyl., auto, blue, 8k mi., $61,899 #95548L

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 19k mi., #P1114 $51,963

'19 Infiniti Q50 3.0t LUXE, sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, auto, black, 16k mi., #P9984 $28,350

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 16k mi., #P9886 $36,000

'15 Infiniti QX80 4wd, 4 dr., sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 97k mi., #98388A $30,000

'17 Infiniti QX80 auto, awd, blue, #95533L $61,899

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 17k mi., #P9968 $51,899

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27853L $41,000

'17 Acura RDX w/Tech Pkg., sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, silver, 33k mi., #P9918 $29,963

STLtoday.com/homes

Jaguar 2016 Lexus GS 350 4 door, 34k miles, clean carfax #P9588 $31,750

'18 Jaguar XF 35t R-Sport, 9k mi., sedan, auto, awd, #P9821 $43,899

Jeep '18 Jeep Renegade Latitude FWD, stk# P07266 $17,250 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 30k, #P9926 $27,000

'15 Jeep Wrangler Unlmtd Rubicon, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 50k, #97397M $31,899

'14 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 4WD, stk# 181219A $23,487 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Buick Enclave, leather, stk# 190319A $27,750 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Buick Cascada Convertible, stk# 190515A $23,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Dodge Journey GT AWD, #P07271 $20,750 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Kia Niro LX, FWD, white, 37k mi., #P07249 $18,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Hyundai Tucson SEL, awd, gray, 27k mi., #P07191 $19,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Kia Optima LX, auto, white, 33k mi., #P07236 $16,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Kia Soul Plus, H/B, loaded, clean carfax, #37184A $11,250

STLtoday.com/jobs

'18 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, red, 10k mi., #35288A $37,963

'18 Mazda CX-9 Sport, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 2k mi., #12044L $30,899

Mercedes Benz

'19 Mazda CX-9 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #13014L $37,963

'13 Dodge Challenger SRT8, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, black, 9k mi., #12808A $28,899

Chevrolet

'14 Mazda CX-5 Touring, loaded, clean carfax, #44699A $11,990

'09 S550 4Matic: Black, Only 55xxx Miles, #44675A, $20,950

'18 Buick Enclave Essence, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 2k mi., $35,899, #41129A

'15 Chevy Sonic Hatch LT, auto, stk# 190415A $13,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, gray, 13k mi., #35472A $28,473

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 13k mi., #P9801 $52,899

Kia '18 Audi A5 Sportback Prem Plus, quattro sportback, 4 cyl., awd, white, 6k, #27841L $43,000

Mazda '18 GMC Acadia Denali, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 21k mi., #97319A $35,000

'16 Mercedes Benz AMG C 63 S, Sedan, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, red, 15k mi., #P9961 $51,899

Dodge '18 Audi Q52.0T Premium Plus, quattro, clean carfax, 1 owner, awd, #28649L $40,899

'16 Lincoln MKZ: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $16,990 #44323A

'15 Mercedes Benz GLA 250, stk# 190322A $23,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $34,000 #P9651

Chrysler '16 Chrysler 300S, stk# P07264 $23,525 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chrysler 300, stk# P07210 $26,970 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 BMW 3 Series Gran Turismo 335i xDrive, hatchback, 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 37k mi., #P9790 $24,899

'18 Audi Q5 Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 9k, #27847L $41,000

Rental-MO 2 Bedroom 1 Bath, Corner lot with many trees. Carport and oversized garage. Discount for 3 year lease and seniors. Call (314)471-7858 saintlouis2009@yahoo.com

'17 Audi Q7 Prestige, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 15k mi., #29168A $49,880

'15 Chevy Cruze LT, auto, loaded, clean carfax, #44369 $10,750

Infiniti

Lexus '18 Lexus LC 500h coupe, 6 cyl., RWD, silver, 10k mi., #P9941 $73,000

Ford '18 Ford Ecosport Titanium FWD, stk# P07049 $18,424 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Ford Focus SE, stk# P07231 $12,450 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Ford Taurus 4dr Sdn Limited FWD, #P07241A $14,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Mitsubishi '18 Mitsubishi Outlander SE FWD, gray, 40k mi., #P07267 $16,640 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Nissan/Datsun '18 Nissan Altima 2.5 SL Sedan, silver, 44k mi., #P07208 $17,290 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Nissan Juke, 5 dr. wgn CVT, S, FWD, yellow, 31k mi., #P07009A $14,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Nissan Pathfinder 4wd, 4 dr., SV, red, #P07150A $11,875 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Nissan Versa 4 dr., sdn, CVT, 1.6sv, black, #190403A $5,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Porsche '15 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S, Cabriolet, 6 cyl., RWD, 7 spd, black, 3k mi., #P9962 $94,000

Subaru '18 Subaru WRX STI Type RA, sedan, 4 cyl., awd, manual, blue, 4k mi., #P9947 $43,000

'17 Subaru Outback 2.5i prem, blue, 48k mi., #P07265 $21,350 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

STLtoday.com/readerrewards


06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C11 Crossovers

'17 RX350: Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $37,899, #P9626

Dogs

Public Notices

Public Notices

Bids/Proposals

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS:

In the Circuit Court of St . Louis County, Missouri

STATE OF INDIANA IN THE MARION SUPERIOR COURT COUNTY OF Marion

REQUEST FOR BID(S) /PROPOSAL(S) BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE CITY OF ST LOUIS MUNICIPAL LIBRARY DISTRICT DBA ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY (SLPL) RFP 19-06218 BENEFITS BROKER/CONSULTANT RFB 19-06219 PURCHASE AND INSTALLATION OF FURNITURE & EQUIPMENT

Puppies Ready Now ! '18 Toyota Sequoia Platinum, sport utility, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 7k mi., #29502A, $57,000

Sport Utility '18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $40,899 #28175L

Volkswagen '13 Volkswagen GTI, H/B, loaded, auto, only 54K mi., #44623B $13,496

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $38,899 #P9665

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com

'12 Volkswagen Tiguan SE, loaded, clean carfax, #44683A $9,750

'15 Volkswagen Passat 4 dr sdn 2.0L, #P07258 $16,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'11 Buick Enclave, loaded, clean carfax, only 28k mi.!#44729A $22,990

'07 CHEVY EQUINOX LS: AWD, Loaded, Only 53xxx Miles, #44685A, $7,750

Volvo '16 Volvo XC90 SUV #L1591 $35,810 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Chevrolet Trucks '16 CREW CAB DUALLY 4x4: Loaded, Only 37xxx Miles! #44410A, $59,997

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 High Country pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 22k mi., #80596A $39,963

'18 Chevy Equinox, white, 39k mi., #P07232 $18,168 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox FWD 1LT, stk# 190639A $16,650 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Equinox, black, 20k mi., #P07278 $17,450 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Equinox FWD LT, silver, 41k mi., #P07234 $18,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Suburban LT, sport utility vehicle, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 31k mi., #P6873 $45,990

'16 Chevy Colorado 4wd Z71 crew cab pickup, 6 cyl., 4wd, orange, 27k, #44245A $30,991

'16 Chevy Colorado 4wd Z71 crew cab pickup, 6 cyl., 4wd, orange, 27k, #44245A $29,996

'19 Chevy Colorado, 4wd, LT, white, 17k mi., #P07212 $29,450 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, crew cab, 8 cyl., 4 WD, 2k mi., $37,990 #42936A

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, 8 cyl., 4WD, a uto, bla ck, 28k mi., $28,990 #P 6784

'18 Chevy Suburban 4wd, 1500 LT, #P07183 $47,416 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 103k mi., #79492B $28,899

'19 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 25k mi., #P6867 $47,990

'17 GMC Terrain SLT, #L15981 $21,833 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Dodge Durango R/T, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 35k mi., #P9927 $30,000

Hungarian Vizsla male pups. AKC, 7 w k s .Great pedigree. Gr.Ch.Sired. socialized, Springfield, IL $1500, 217-725-8038 Labradoodles F1b Ready 6/26/19. 4 males, 5 females. HawthorneDoodles.com for more info $1200. 217-5728148 Sheltie AKC Puppies Farm raised, great markings, Pick out now. $800 ea. (573)819-9547 S h i h T z u & Bo s to n Te rrie rs puppies. Brown & white. Shots & Reg. Call (636)699-5911 Standard Poodles, AKC, 8 wks. C r e a m , Wh i t e , B l u e , Silv e r Genetictested parents/champ. ped. $700 5736315190

Auctions MEDLEY ESTATE AUCTION Saturday, June 22, 2019 9:00 A.M. 913 Salem Way, Ellisville, MO 63021 3 bdrm brick ranch home, 2.5 baths in a great neighborhood. Minimum opening bid of $165,000. Furniture, antiques, collectibles, firearms and tools. For full listing, pictures and payment terms, see MRClarkAuction.com Or call Mike at 314-650-7317

Garage Sales 63010 - R ockw ood Forest Subd . Sale, June 22, 8am-Noon, Many H o m e s , F r e e Snow C one from Kona Ice w/ Registers at 3444 Rockwood Forest Ct. 63026-2243 Branch Rd., Fenton, MO. 8-1 p.m., Sat. 6/22. Follow signs and keep going. 63034 Moving!14701 Faon Ct. Sat. 6/22, 8am. Everything must go-40 yrs of accumulation 63122: 336 McCullough Ave, Sat., 6/22, 7 a m , H o u s e h o l d I t e ms , Toys, 12 mos.-2T Boys, Teen Girl & Adult Clothing, etc.

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

'18 Chevy Silverado, 1500 LT, double cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, metallic, 4k, #420200A $34,990

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, p/u crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 3k mi., #P6799 $38,990

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, pu crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 4k mi., #44061A $39,990

'16 Chevy Silverado, 1500 LT, p/u crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 35k mi., #P6803 $30,950

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 51k mi., #P6797 $39,990

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '13 Ram Sport Crew, 4x4, loaded, clean carfax, #44452B $25,969

'18 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT, 4x4 crew cab, #P07240 $28,500 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Ford Trucks '17 Ford F150, stk# 181220A $31,850 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

GMC Trucks '18 GMC Yukon STL SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 26k mi., #80333B $47,200

'16 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE double cab pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 34k mi., #P6806 $29,450

'18 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT, pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, red, 14k mi., #41163A $37,899

'15 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE, pickup crew cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 39k mi., #44728A $30,990

'17 GMC Acadia Limited, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, silver, 26k mi., #P9951 $30,000

'17 GMC Acadia, stk# 190724A $32,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 GMC Yukon Denali, sport utility vehicle, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 17k mi., #29272A $53,000

'17 GMC Yukon XL Denali, white, auto, 4wd, 19k mi., #79897A $54,899

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $61,000

'17 GMC Terrain FWD SLE-1, #P07247 $18,650 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 GMC Yukon SLT, suv, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 122k mi., #97246M $28,000

'14 Honda CRV-EXL, only 52k mi., #37262A $18,990

Golf Clubs, I'm 83, have 3 sets, $125 /set, plus some singles. 314741-9237

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $40,899 #79760A

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, white, 5k mi., #35139A $29,973

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, red, 5k mi., #35396A $31,443

'16 Toyota Highlander XLE, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 14k mi., #P9914 $32,000

Mini vans '11 Honda Odyssey EX-L: Loaded, Full Power, Clean Carfax, #42365A, $10,990

Help Wanted Data Scientist for Chesterfield, MO to develop & apply machine learning and stochastic optimization algorithms for genomics, imaging, natural language & pipeline management; develop cloud-based a n a l y t i c s infras tructure , we b frameworks, REST APIs & reusable data libraries; build algorithms to integrate genomic datasets, design hypotheses for testing & improve data access; collaborate with scientists to design, develop & solve data analysis problems; maintain Laboratory Information Management systems (LIMS) database. Requires Ph.D. in Bioinformatics, Computational Biology or closely related field & 3 yrs experience programming in C , C ++, Java, Scala, Clojure, Go, .NET/C# and/or LabWare LIMS Basic; designing relational & NoSQL databases; developing data analysis tools, pipelines & algorithms using Python, R and/or JavaScript; working with DNA sequencing & molecular biology data analysis processes; managing & modeling big data; developing applications to support life sciences research using S hiny, R and/or Python; and working in a cloud-based environment. Mail resume to Cascinda Fischbeck, Monsanto Company, 800 N. Lindbergh Blvd. E2NE, St. Louis, MO 63167.

Dogs AKC Champion Bred Standard Poodle Puppies. Health guarantee. $900/$1200 (859)707.7139 Cane Corsa Bull Mastiff puppies, male, black, white markings, 8 wks, tail docked, shots, wormed AKC $1500 314-688-5458 Critters Animal Rescue, handsome male Box er/Shep. mix, 3yrs, 80lbs, shots/fixed in training at Kennelwood, lovely disp., must have fenced yard, no kids under 6, veterinarian recommendation, reasonable adoption fee.

A pair beautiful colored Calico Cats, must go together, gentle souls. 314-475-5479.

CAUSE NUMBER: 49D15-1810-JC-002641

vs. Andre Monroe Defendant(s) Date 5/2/2019 19SL-DR00362 Case Number NOTICE UPON ORDER FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION The State of Missouri to Respondent/Defendant: Andre Monroe. You are hereby notified that an action has been commenced against y ou in the Circuit Couty of St. Louis County, Missouri, the object and general nature of which: Petition for Dissolution and which affects the following described property: Non-marital property and property in each party's possession. The names of all parties to said action are stated above in the capt io n a n d t h e n a me ( s ) and ad dress(es) of the attorney(s) for petitioner(s)/plaintiff(s) are Susan Burger, 105 Willards Ferry Road, Jonesboro, IL 62952. You are further notified that unless you file an answer or other pleading or shall otherwise appear and defend against the aforesaid petition within 45 days after the date of first publication of this notice, which date is Monday, August 5th, 2019, or judgment by default will be rendered against you. Witness may hand and the seal of the Circuit Court this day ———————————, 2019. The costs of Publication shall be paid by: Susan Burger, 105 Willards Ferry Road, Jonesboro, IL 62952 (618) 833-8677 /s/ Susan Burger Signature of Attorney Requesting Publication Prepared by : Susan Burger, Attorney Joan M. Gilmer, Circuit Clerk.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED BUDGET FOR THE VILLAGE OF PONTOON BEACH A public he aring purs uant to 65ILCS 5 /8 -2 -9 on the Tentative Bu d g e t a n d Ap p ro p ria tio n Ordinance for the Village of Pontoon Beach, Illinois for the fiscal year beginning on May 1st, 2019 and ending on April 30th, 2020 will be held at Pontoon Beach Municip a l C o mp le x lo c a te d a t #1 Re ge ncy Parkway, Pontoon Beach, Illinois 62040 on Tuesday, July 16th, 2019 beginning promptly at 6:30pm. Th e Te n ta tive Bu d g e t a n d Appropriation Ordinance will be available for public examination at the Pontoon Beach Municipal Complex located at #1 Regency Parkway, Pontoon Beach, Illinois 6 2 0 4 0 be ginning on July 9 th, 2019.

'10 Mazda CX-7 sport, loaded, only 77K mi., #37241A $8,990

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Public Notices CITATION AND NOTICE OF HEARING Case No.: 18AD000204 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF ORANGE 341 The City Drive Orange, Ca 92868 In the matter of the Adoption Petition of: GREGORY C GUEST AND VALERIE K. GUEST Adopting Parents THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO: JOSEPH DEHOFF By order of this court you are hereby advised that you may appear before the judge presiding in Department L611 of this Court on JUNE 28, 2019 AT 1:30 P.M. to show cause, if any you have, why JA COB CHA RLES D EH O F F should not be declared free from your custody and control for the purpose of freeing J A C O B C H A R L E S D E H O F F for placement for adoption. The following information concerns rights and procedures that relate to this proceeding for the termination of custody and control of said minor as set forth in Family Code Section 7860 et seq.: (1) At the beginning of the proceeding the court will consider whether or not the interests of the minor child require the appointment of counsel. If the court finds that the interest of the minor do require such protection, the court will appoint counsel to represent him/her, whether or not he/she is able to afford counsel. The minor will not be present in court unless he/she requests or the court orders so. (2) If a parent of the minor appears without counsel and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless the parent knowingly and intelligently waives the right to be represented by counsel. The court will not appoint the same counsel to represent both the minor and her parent. (3) The court may appoint either the public defender or private counsel. If private counsel is appointed, he or she will receive a reasonable sum for the compensation and expenses, the amount of which will be determined by the court. That amount must be paid by the real parties in interest, but not by the minor, in such proportions as the court believes to be just. If, however, the court finds t h a t a n y o f t h e real parties in interest cannot afford counsel, the amount will be paid by the county. (4) The court may continued the proceeding for not more than thirty(30) days as necessary to appoint counsel to become acquainted with the case. Dated: 2/22/2019 David H. Yamasaki, Executive Officer/Clerk By: /s/ Diane Ruiz, Deputy Clerk Indu Srivastav, Esq. DBN 208438 CERTIFIED FAM I LY LAW SPECIALIST Law Offices of Indu Srivastav *A Professional Law Corporation 1400 N. Harbor Blvd., Suite 601 Fullerton, California 92835 (714) 447-9695 Fax (714) 515-8338 6/14, 6/17, 6/21, 6/26/19 CNS-3235547# POST DISPATCH

If you have any questions about this notice or hearing, please call the C lerk's office at (6 1 8 )9 3 1 6100, ext. 3.

Sealed bids for Roof Replacement, Fredericktown Readiness Center, Fredericktown, Missouri, Project No. T1832-01 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, June 18, 2019. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov /facilities

You Only List Once STLtoday.com/homes

@stltoday

IN THE MATTER OF: TD D (1 4 4 9 0 3 ) - DOB 5 /2 7 /2 002 AGE 16 years A CHILD ALLEGED TO BE A CHILD IN NEED OF SERVICES AND ANDREA MICHELLE DESHAZIER (MOTHER) TRACY SUTTLE (ALLEGED FATHER) AND ANY UNKNOWN ALLEGED FATHERS S UMMONS FOR S ERVIC E BY PUBLIC ATION & NOTIC E OF CHILD IN NEED OF SERVICES HEARING TO:Tracy Suttle and Any Unknown Alleged Father Whereabouts unknown NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the a b o ve n o te d p a re n t wh o s e whereabouts are unknown, as well as Any Unknown Alleged Fathers, whose whereabouts are also unknown, that the Indiana Department of Child Services has filed its Verified Petition Alleging the child to be in Need of Services, in accordance with I.C. 31-34-9-3, and that an adjudication hearing has be e n s che dule d with the Court. YO U A RE HEREB Y COMMANDED to appear before the Judge of the Marion Superior Court, 2451 N. Keystone Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46218, 317-3278392 for a(n) Default Hearing on 8/7/2019 at 9:30 AM in JUVENILE COURT ROOM 0 1 4 th Floor At said hearing, the Court will conside r the Pe tition and e vide nce thereon and will render its decision as to whether the above named minor child is child in need of services and shall enter adjudication accordingly. Your failure to appear after lawful notice will be deemed as your default and waiver to be present at said hearing. U P O N EN T R Y O F S A ID A DJ UDIC A TIO N, A DISPOSITIONAL HEARING will be held in which the Court will consider (1) Alternatives for the care, treatment, or rehabilitation for the child; (2 ) The necessity, nature, and extent of your participation in the program of care, treatment, or rehabilitation for the child; and (3) Your financial responsibility for any s e rvice s provided for the parent, guardian or custodian of the child including child support. YO U MU S T R ES P O N D b y appearing in person or by an attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on s aid petition, judgment by default, may be entered against you, or the court may proceed in your absence, without further notice. /s/ Myla Eldridge Ordered, Myla Eldridge Clerk of said Court, this 5/22/19 Brandi-Janai Nicole Carter, 32535-49 Attorney, Indiana Department of Child Services 4150 N. Keystone Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46205 Fax: 317-542-1323 Work: 317-968-4300

SLPL is requesting bid/proposal submissions from qualified suppliers for RFP 19-06218 and RFB 19-06219. Sealed bid/ proposal packets will be received by the Purchasing Manager, SLPL, 1415 Olive St, St. Louis, MO, 63103, until 4:00 p.m., Monday, July 8, 2019. At that time & location, bids/ proposals will be read aloud at a public opening reflecting bid/proposal receipt in accordance with Library procurement policy. To obtain a copy of the Request for Bid/Proposal, please contact Don Gillum during regular business hours by phone, 314.539.0312, email, dgillum@slpl.org , or at the above address.

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI #19-053 O’FALLON CITY MUNICIPAL CENTRE RENOVATION DESIGN Notice is hereby given that the City of O’Fallon will receive Statements of Qualifications clearly marked O’FALLON MUNICIPAL CENTRE RENOVATION DESIGN on or before 12:00 PM CDT, July 11, 2019 to City of O’Fallon Attn, Julie Moellering, Purchas ing Age nt 1 0 0 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 . The re will be no public opening of the statements of qualifications. S pecifications are available at h t t p : / / w w w. o f a llo n.m o . u s / b id opportunities. This includes: The work to complete a renovation design of the existing facility and provide design related construction period servic e s ne c e s s ary through the completion of the project. The City reserves the right to reject any and all submittals, or to advertise for new submittals if deemed necessary.

Saint Louis Zoo South Welcome Desk Signage Project 2019 RFP Th e s c o p e o f t h e p ro je c t includes: The goal of this project is to install digital signage above our Welcome Desk located at the South Entrance of the Saint Louis Zoo. Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting & Site Inspection - On June 27th at 10 am Meet at the S outh Entrance Welcome Desk. S ealed bids marked with project name will be accepted on or before 7/10/2019 at 2:00PM. Documents can be found on 6/20/2019 at: https://www. stlzoo.org/about/contact/vendoropportunities/

Sansone Group, LLC invites contractors to submit bids for the following jobs to be completed for the Housing Authority of St. Louis County: Full Bathroom Remodel Full Roof Replacement Interior Door Replacement HVAC Overhaul Window Replacement For more information about where and how to place your bid, please contact Jessica Cugley at jcugley@ sansonegroup.com.

STLtoday.com/readerrewards St. Louis Treatment Court 22nd Judicial Circuit City of St. Louis, Missouri

Bids/Proposals ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Sealed bids will be received by Wentzville R-IV School District, at the Wentzville Central Office, 280 Interstate Drive, Wentzville, MO 63385, until THURSDA Y, JULY 18, 2019 AT 2 P.M. CDT, for the Pearce Hall Addition. Bids will be opened publicly at that time. Drawings and specifications for this project are on file at the office of the Architect, Hoener Associates, Inc., 6 7 0 7 Pla in v ie w Av e n u e , St . Louis, M O 63109, (314) 7819855, FAX (314) 781-0163. Information as to bidding instructions and requirements for procuring bidding documents may be obtained from the Architect. Not less than the prevailing hourly wage rates, as determined by the State of Missouri, Division of Labor Standards, shall be paid all workers employed on this project. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive technicalities, to select any contractor filing a proposal, and to reject any or all bids. THERE IS NO PRE-BID MEETING SCHEDULED FOR THIS PROJECT.

INVITATION TO BID #19-020 ñ 2019 ASPHALT SURFACE ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is accepting sealed bids for the 2019 asphalt surface enhancement program. The Contract Documents, including specifications, are on file at the office of Drex el Te chnologie s at http://planroom. drexeltech.com and are open for public inspection. Copies of documents may be obtained from Drexel Technologies for the fee listed online. Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ì190 2 0 2 0 1 9 Asphalt Surface Enhancement Program“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 by 1 0 : 0 0 A. M. CDT, July 9, 2019. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Public Works Conference Room.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP

Toyota Trucks '18 Toyota 4Runner, loaded, clean carfax, only 22k mi., #44131A $35,590

Bargain Box

Twana A Monroe Plaintiff(s)

YOLO O

Toyota '15 Toyota 4Runner Trail, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, red, 10k mi., #P9804A $32,000

The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) The St. Louis Treatment Court is s e e kin g p ro p o s a ls fo r th e following opportunity to work with participants of the St. Louis Adult Treatment Court and/or Veteran's Treatment Court: ï"In te n s ive C as e M a n a g e r / Counselor A c o p y o f th e Re q u e s t fo r Proposals can be obtained by writing to: Kate Mansfield, Room 526, 1114 Market Street, St. Louis, MO, 63101, or calling 314-589-6702 for a mail out copy. Interested providers may obtain the proposal specifications by accessing the www.stlcitycircuitcourt.com. On that website, click on Treatment Court to find the RFP. Proposals should be submitted no later than 4:00 pm on Friday, June 28, 2019 in Room 526, 1114 market Street, St. Louis, MO 63101. Ple a s e b e a d vis e d th a t any questions must be communicated in written form before 4:00 pm on Thursday, June 27, 2019, and the answers to all timely submitted questions will be supplied to all potential vendors who expressly request information about this RFP in accordance with details of the RFP.

WIOA SERVICE PROVIDERS The City of St. Louis Workforce Development Board, Inc. is seeking service providers to deliver career services for Adult and Dislocated Workers, program services for Out-of-School Youth and OneStop Operator services under the W o rkfo rc e In n o va tio n a n d Opportunity Act (WIOA) at the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (S LATE). Please see the following links for the full RFPs and related information. t t p s : / / w w w. s t l o u i s - m o . g o v / s la t e / d o c u me n t s / w io a - o u t - o f school-youth-rfp.cfm h t t p s : / / w w w . s t l o u i s - m o. g o v / slate/documents/wioa-title-i-careerservices-rfp.cfm

@stltoday

Search “stltoday” in your App Store ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH


BASEBALL

C12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

COLLEGE WORLD SERIES

Florida State’s Martin coaches his last game ASSOCIATED PRESS

OMAHA, Neb. — When Texas Tech’s Taylor Floyd struck out Reese Albert to end the game — and Mike Martin’s career — the Florida State coach walked up the dugout steps, took off his glasses and strode across the field to shake hands with the opposing coach one more time on Wednesday night. While the fans at TD Ameritrade Park showered Martin in applause, his wife of 55 years, Carol, greeted well-wishers in the stands. Martin then waved to and thanked fans who gathered above the dugout. After the 4-1 loss in the elimination game, Martin heads into retirement with 2,029 career wins — most by any coach in any college sport. Each of his 40 teams won at least 40 games and played in the NCAA Tournament. But, he never won a national championship. “I can fake a smile with the best of them and I’ll get through the rest of this night with a smile because I got to watch young men grow up,” Martin said. “I got to work for Florida State for 45 years and I’ll never forget the times I’ve had out here in Omaha.” Brian Klein broke a 1-1 tie in the sixth with his second homer

CHRIS MACHIAN, OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

Florida State coach Mike Martin tips his hat and thanks the crowd after the team’s loss to Texas Tech on Wednesday, ending Martin’s career after 2,029 wins. in three games, and third of the season, and Texas Tech (46-19) won a second game at a CWS for the first time in its four appearances.

“In the back of your mind, obviously, you’re thinking about ‘11’ a little bit,” Tech coach Tim Tadlock said, referring to Martin by his nickname. “All the respect in

REBATE STIMULUS PACKAGE $2225.00 Rebates For You!

the world for him. Love him, and just appreciate everything he’s done for college baseball.” FSU (42-23) had no trouble scoring while sweeping through

$150 - $700

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $325

Spire Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

$2,225

a regional in Athens, Georgia, and a super regional at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to earn Martin his 17th trip to the CWS. The Seminoles beat Arkansas 1-0 here Saturday, but lost 2-0 to Michigan before the Red Raiders eliminated them. Martin’s last team was one of the final four squads awarded atlarge bids to the 64-team national tournament after struggling for stretches of the regular season. “To have the success we’ve had the last three years, the ACC championships, two trips to Omaha, 40 wins every year,” third baseman Drew Mendoza said. “To experience that with him and be part of his legacy is a dream come true.” The Seminoles batted .124 in Omaha (11 of 89) and their two runs in three games tied a CWS record low. Their 0-for-17 batting with runners in scoring position was the lowest by a team in at least 20 years, according to ESPN. Florida State also struck out 15 times against Texas Tech. “Who would have ever thought six weeks ago that we would even get to Omaha?” Martin said. “The young men are disappointed now. What they accomplished will not go unnoticed — to get to Omaha and have an opportunity.”

*ADDITIONAL DISCOUNT:

$300-$500 OFF A Complete Heating & A/C System

Potential Savings

Offer Expires 6/30/19

Summer Maintenance & Specials Start Now. Brought to you by SHINE TIME AUTO DETAIL-shinetime314.com

SPORTS TALK 314-880-0808 WE ENCOURAGE LISTENERS TO CALL

DON’T WAIT! • Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $700*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $340*) Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16 Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace 10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTY*

0% Financing for 18 Months**

*On Select Models Only Call for Details **With approved credit use either financing or rebate. Expires 6/30/19

We are a locally owned & operated company with 39 years of experience behind us! Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

920 AM-WGNU * 4 pm - 6 pm M-F Listen/Watch live at www.wgnu920am.com

314-754-8772 636-373-7307 THE POST-DISPATCH STORE

SPLASH INTO SUMMER

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS SIGNATURE TROPHY $59.99

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS TWO-TONE COIN $99.99

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS SILVER MINT COIN ORNAMENT $19.99

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS TICKET & BRONZE COIN ACRYLIC DESK TOP $49.99

5 lucky winners will win a Family 4 Pack to Raging Rivers WaterParks for the 2019 season!

STANLEY AND GLORIA EST 2019 T-SHIRT $15.00

CHECK OUT MORE BLUES GEAR AT

thepost-dispatchstore.com PRICES ABOVE DO NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING AND HANDLING.

FRONT PAGE POSTER FOR JUNE 13 EXTRA EXTRA EDITION $14.99

Enter DAILY through June 27: STLtoday.com/contests

SHOP 24/7 ONLINE

O R D E R O N L I N E O R CA L L 1- 8 7 7- P O S T- S T L (1- 8 7 7-7 6 7- 8 7 8 5 ) M O N DAY - F R I DAY 9 A . M . - 5 P. M .


BASEBALL

C12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

COLLEGE WORLD SERIES

Louisville rallies for win, spot in semifinals ASSOCIATED PRESS

OMAHA, Neb. — Drew Campbell’s single off Cole Gordon drove in Danny Oriente for the winning run in the bottom of the ninth inning, and Louisville eliminated Mississippi State with a 4-3 victory in the College World Series on Thursday night. The Cardinals (51-17) made up a three-run deficit to advance past a third game for the first time in their five CWS appearances. They’ll play No. 2 national seed Vanderbilt in the Bracket 2 final on Friday. Mississippi State (52-15) had been 47-0 when leading after eight innings, but closer Gordon struggled after having allowed no runs over his last seven appearances. Louisville, which entered the night 1-16 when trailing after eight innings, tied it at 3 in the ninth after Jake Snider walked leading off against Gordon (5-1) and took second on the reliever’s pickoff attempt in the dirt. Oriente singled into left center, and Jake Mangum came up throwing. Snider slid in headfirst ahead of Dustin Skelton’s tag attempt and the Mississippi State catcher couldn’t hold onto the ball. Oriente took second on the throw home.

Campbell then sent Gordon’s 2-2 pitch into center field, cracking a smile as he left the batter’s box on his way to first. Oriente scored easily, and Campbell sprinted past second base, threw his batting helmet into the grass and prepared to be mobbed by teammates in left field. Reid Detmers (13-4) got the win after getting one out in the top of the ninth. Freshman JT Ginn had limited Louisville to three hits over six shutout innings. MSU built a 3-0 lead, with Rowdey Jordan doubling in a run and Landon Jordan following with an RBI single in the fourth and Tanner Allen singling in a run in the seventh. The Cardinals cut into the deficit against Jared Liebelt, who relieved Ginn to start the seventh. Liebelt issued two straight walks and an infield single before Campbell singled, and Justin Lavey’s RBI groundout made it a one-run game.

UP NEXT Louisville would have to beat Vanderbilt on Friday and again Saturday to reach the best-ofthree finals next week against NATI HARNIK, ASSOCIATED PRESS Michigan or Texas Tech. Louisville’s Danny Oriente celebrates after scoring the winning run in the ninth inning Thursday.

REBATE STIMULUS PACKAGE $2225.00 Rebates For You!

$150 - $700

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $325

Spire Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

$2,225

*ADDITIONAL DISCOUNT:

$300-$500 OFF A Complete Heating & A/C System

Potential Savings

Offer Expires 6/30/19

Summer Maintenance & Specials Start Now. Brought to you by SHINE TIME AUTO DETAIL-shinetime314.com

SPORTS TALK 314-880-0808 WE ENCOURAGE LISTENERS TO CALL

DON’T WAIT! • Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $700*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $340*) Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16 Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace 10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTY*

0% Financing for 18 Months**

*On Select Models Only Call for Details **With approved credit use either financing or rebate. Expires 6/30/19

We are a locally owned & operated company with 39 years of experience behind us! Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

920 AM-WGNU * 4 pm - 6 pm M-F Listen/Watch live at www.wgnu920am.com

314-754-8772 636-373-7307 THE POST-DISPATCH STORE

SPLASH INTO SUMMER

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS SIGNATURE TROPHY $59.99

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS TWO-TONE COIN $99.99

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS SILVER MINT COIN ORNAMENT $19.99

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS TICKET & BRONZE COIN ACRYLIC DESK TOP $49.99

5 lucky winners will win a Family 4 Pack to Raging Rivers WaterParks for the 2019 season!

STANLEY AND GLORIA EST 2019 T-SHIRT $15.00

CHECK OUT MORE BLUES GEAR AT

thepost-dispatchstore.com PRICES ABOVE DO NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING AND HANDLING.

FRONT PAGE POSTER FOR JUNE 13 EXTRA EXTRA EDITION $14.99

Enter DAILY through June 27: STLtoday.com/contests

SHOP 24/7 ONLINE

O R D E R O N L I N E O R CA L L 1- 8 7 7- P O S T- S T L (1- 8 7 7-7 6 7- 8 7 8 5 ) M O N DAY - F R I DAY 9 A . M . - 5 P. M .


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO 06.21.19–06.27.19 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

What’s hot on TV this summer?

Page 22

Sol Azteca, Wok O Taco broaden Mexican-food spectrum Page 24 ‘Toy Story 4’ is the sequel we didn’t know we needed Page 16

CONNECTING

PEOPLE THROUGH POETRY More than 100 spoken word poets will compete in the 20th annual Rustbelt Poetry Slam Page 13 BY HANNA HOLTHAUS

Louis “Conphliction” McGee performs “Government’s Plan” outside UrbArts in St. Louis


10.05.19–10.15.19 ▼

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

Louis “Conphliction” McGee (left) practices June 12 for the Rustbelt Poetry Slam at UrbArts in St. Louis.

Visit EnterpriseCenter.com for the complete upcoming events schedule.

Recently reviewed movies. Page 19

Cover story Teams from across the country will be in St. Louis this weekend to compete in the 20th annual Rustbelt Poetry Slam at UrbArts. Page 13

Datebook Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including “Weird Al” Yankovic at the Fox Theatre, Foreigner at Family Arena, “1776” at the Muny and Goo Goo Dolls at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks. Page 4

Music & Clubs ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

Béla Fleck celebrates 30 years with his “league of extraordinary gentlemen.” Page 6 Jimmy Eat World says its tour with Third Eye Blind just fell into the band’s lap. Page 7

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25

That scene about political jokes in “Late Night” is probably too real for actual late-night hosts. Page 20 Singer-songwriter John Paul White wants his music to touch listeners. Page 8 Ticket Tracker. Page 10 Kranzberg Arts Foundation hopes to push boundaries of jazz with new residency. Page 11

TV Q&A. Page 21 10 new TV shows to watch this summer, not one of them about a throne. Page 22

Fuel

See & Do “Indecent,” a timely tale of long ago, strikes a chord with audiences. Page 12 Recently reviewed theater. Page 12

Screens In the joyous “Toy Story 4,” the toys evolve too. Page 16 “The Last Black Man in San Francisco,” like the city of its title, is big, bold and beautiful. Page 17 “Pavarotti” accentuates the positives of one of opera’s great talents. Page 18

Sol Azteca and Wok O Taco broaden the St. Louis Mexicanfood spectrum. Page 24 Recently reviewed restaurants. Page 26 At the Bellwether, the acclaimed Polite Society team wants to reach even higher. Page 27

ON THE COVER • Poet Louis “Conphliction” McGee rehearses outside UrbArts in St. Louis. Photo by Christine Tannous, Post-Dispatch

SATURDAY, JUNE 29

SUNDAY, JULY 7

MONDAY, JULY 8

Visit StifelTheatre.com for the complete upcoming events schedule.

EnterpriseCenter.com StLouisBlues.com StifelTheatre.com Enterprise Center Group Sales: 314-622-5454 | Stifel Theatre Group Sales: 314-499-7676

2

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

WHAT’S HOT AT STLTODAY.COM ➨ Nelly may have put St. Louis hip-hop on the map, but the genre’s roots here run much deeper. stltoday.com/music ➨ Planning a weekend road trip? Check out nine Missouri festivals that are worth the drive. stltoday.com/travel ➨ The troubled World Aquarium on Laclede’s Landing has been condemned by the city. stltoday.com/cultureclub ➨ Phil Dunphy, Dan Conner, Mufasa — let’s hear it for 14 of the best pop culture fathers. stltoday.com/hotlist

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : C H R I S T I N E TA N N O U S , P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( C O N P H L I C T I O N ) ; A LY S S E G A F K J E N ( W H I T E ) ; H I L L A R Y L E V I N , P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( S O L A Z T E C A )

SUNDAY, JUNE 30


HERE’S WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS WEEK

FREE PARKING & ADMISSION

“I’ve never seen ‘1776,’ so I’m excited for the Muny production, which opens Thursday.” •

“Teaching area high school students attending the Media Now journalism camp at Webster University.” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Norma Klingsick • production editor, 314-340-8103, nklingsick@post-dispatch.com Gary Hairlson • photo editor, 314-340-8279, ghairlson@post-dispatch.com

PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO

WALKER HAYES

Jon Naso • photo editor, 314-340-8775, jnaso@post-dispatch.com Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com “STL Sports on Tap — Blues Edition on Thursday at Ballpark Village! Get your tickets now at stltoday. com/ourevents.” •

“The annual Center Stage concert at Opera Theatre of St. Louis features the company’s young artists in music that shows them to their best advantage. It’s always a treat.” •

Emily Tintera • event and sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com

“’Weird Al’ Yankovic on Saturday night at the Fox! I expose my children to nothing but the best of today’s pop culture.” •

Donna Bischoff • Post-Dispatch vice president of sales and marketing, 314-340-8529, dbischoff@post-dispatch.com

CONTRIBUTORS Danielle Drake-Flam • features intern Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Hanna Holthaus • features intern Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Kayla Steinberg • features intern Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • theater critic

O’FALLON, MO  Ozzie Smith Sports Complex

CONTACT US Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • stltoday.com/events

SIDESHOWS PARADE

Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise

July 4th at 9:30 a.m.

Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe

FREE KIDS’ ZONE

stltoday.com/apps

@gostlouis

@gostl

@gostl

COPYRIGHT 2019 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

stltoday.com/go

Family Night

CARNIVAL “I need to get HBO back so I can watch Season 2 of ‘Big Little Lies’ and also try out the new series ‘Euphoria.’” •

Write to us ae@post-dispatch.com Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

stltoday.com/go

4–10 p.m.

FIREWORKS

Carnival, vendors and sideshow entertainment

4–11 p.m. 4:45 6:45 8:30 10:15

Noah Guthrie Filmore Walker Hayes Fireworks

12–10 p.m. 2:30 4:30 6:30 8:15 9:30

Apex Shrine Queens Blvd. Gabby Barrett Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo Fireworks

heritageandfreedomfest.com heritageandfreedomfest. 06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


STLTODAY.COM/EVENTS ▼

Make Music Day Allen Stone performs at Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival

Ready to kick off summer solstice the right way? Follow the music to the Delmar Loop, Central West End, Grand Center and other St. Louisarea destinations for Make Music Day. Participants can make music or just sit back and enjoy the celebration, which began in 1982 in France as the Fête de la Musique. Now it’s a global event, held on the same day in more than 800 cities across 120 countries. Find a list of participating locations at makemusicstl. org. BY DANIELLE DRAKE-FLAM

BEST BETS FRIDAY Six Flags Solar Plunge WHEN 10 a.m. Friday • WHERE Hurricane Harbor at Six Flags St. Louis, 4900 Six Flags Road, Eureka • HOW MUCH $25 registration fee • MORE INFO sixflags.com/stlouis

Take the plunge into a swimming pool filled with chunks of ice to celebrate the summer solstice and to raise money for Special Olympics. Participants who raise at least $100 can receive free park admission on the day of the event. BY

‘The Mueller Report: Read, Sing, Resist’

SATURDAY ‘Risk! Live’

This isn’t the first rodeo in St. Louis for “Risk!” — it’s the third time the live show has visited, giving local storytellers a chance to share sad, hilarious and even risqué stories onstage. The live show, which provides fodder for the “Risk!” podcast, will feature host Kevin Allison and guests Susanna Lee, Amy Brooks, Cynthia Lloyd and Rafe Williams. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Train, Goo Goo Dolls, Allen Stone WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland

Heights • HOW MUCH $22-$125 • MORE INFO livenation.com

Goo Goo Dolls and Train are joining forces for a co-headlining tour this weekend at Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre. Train’s latest is its retrospective package “Greatest Hits.” Goo Goo Dolls have been celebrating the 20th anniversary of “Dizzy Up the Girl.” Despite the number of hits the two acts have at their fingertips, we’re most excited about seeing opening act Allen Stone, who sold out Delmar Hall late last year. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Missouri Chamber Music Festival: Festival Finale WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue, University City • HOW MUCH $30; free for children under 12 • MORE INFO 314-8820053; mochambermusic.org

The Missouri Chamber Music Festival wraps up its ninth season of outstanding performances with a program featuring three works by the internationally noted composer-harpist Hannah Lash. Lash’s music has been performed by ensembles ranging from the Los Angeles Philharmonic to the New York City Opera, the Boston Symphony Chamber Players and others. Also

on the program: music by Schumann (arranged by Lash) and Debussy. As always, the performers are a talented group of instrumentalists from St. Louis and around the country, led by the festival’s husband-and-wife founders, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra principal clarinet Scott Andrews and pianist Nina Ferrigno.

weekend’s big tribute shows is the double bill of Big Love and Silver Bullet at Family Arena. Big Love is a tribute to Fleetwood Mac and encompasses different eras of the legendary band, as envisioned by Midwest musicians. Silver Bullet STL tackles the songs of Bob Seger and is led by Steve Tinnon. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: ‘Psycho’

Big Love, Silver Bullet WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $10 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Another week, another tribute band. One of this

WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$65 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

Some part of us loves to be terrified, and when it comes to sophisticated horror,

few did it better than film director Alfred Hitchcock. On Saturday night, check into the Bates Motel as conductor Norman Huynh and the SLSO provide live accompaniment to the black-and-white classic “Psycho” as it plays on the big screen. The shrieking strings in Bernard Herrmann’s score are even more frightening when you hear them in person. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $49-$149 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Looks like “Weird Al”

Yankovic is trying to class up the joint. On his new “Strings Attached Tour,” the parody pro plays his hits with a full symphony orchestra amounting to a high-energy production with costumes, props, video and background singers. Expect weird classics such as “Eat It,” “Like a Surgeon,” “Smells Like Nirvana,” “Amish Paradise,” “White & Nerdy” and “Word Crimes.” Yankovic’s last album, “Mandatory Fun,” was his first to hit No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and earned him another Grammy Award. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

If you haven’t heard enough about, or gotten around to reading, the Mueller Report, here’s a whole new way to experience it. Artists, activists and others are scheduled to read excerpts from, and summaries of, the report at this free event. There will also be voter registration, refreshments and music. The event is organized by That Uppity Theatre Company and Project+Gallery. BY CALVIN WILSON

SUNDAY Summer Solstice Sunrise Observance WHEN 5:20-6:20 a.m. Sunday • WHERE 30 Ramey Drive, Collinsville • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 618-346-5161; cahokiamounds.org

Welcome summer in the most official way by attending the summer solstice sunrise service at Chadwick Boseman in “Black Panther”

FAST FORWARD “Candide,” July 5-13 at Union Avenue Opera: The company’s season of three operas opens with Leonard Bernstein’s classic comic operetta, performed in English with English subtitles • Mr. Gay America 2019, July 6-7 at Hamburger Mary’s: Judas Elliot will pass the crown in this national competition from the producers of Miss Gay America • “Black Panther,” July 12 on Art Hill: The St. Louis Art Museum’s annual Art Hill Film Series honors “dream teams” this summer with a lineup that also includes “Anchorman,” “Ocean’s 8” and “The Goonies” • World Naked Bike Ride, July 20 in the Grove: Cycling buffs will strip down for a ride through various neighborhoods in protest of fuel dependency and in support of body positivity 4

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ stltoday.com/events stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : A M Y H A R R I S / I N V I S I O N /A P ( A L L E N S T O N E ) ; M A R V E L S T U D I O S / D I S N E Y V I A A P ( B L A C K PA N T H E R )

WHEN 2-5 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Projects+Gallery, 4733 McPherson Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO uppityco.com

VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $20 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

WHEN Saturday • WHERE Multiple locations in St. Louis • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO makemusicstl.org


Kelly Hansen (left) and Mick Jones of Foreigner

Cahokia Mounds World Heritage Site. Meet at the Woodhenge reconstruction, just west of the interpretive center, where archaeologist Bill Iseminger will talk about the discovery of the ancient calendar, its significance and how it works. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: ‘Casablanca’

PHOTO: MICHELE EVE , AP (FOREIGNER)

WHEN 2 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $38-$67 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

Here’s looking at you: When appealing stars, cynicism and romance collide with Nazis and a really good, really quotable screenplay, the result is a cinematic classic. On Sunday, you can take in “Casablanca” at Powell Hall, with conductor Norman Huynh and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra performing Max Steiner’s evocative score. Winner of multiple Academy Awards, including best picture, it takes on a whole new dimension on the big screen with live accompaniment. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

TUESDAY Foreigner WHEN 7:30 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $29-$89 • MORE INFO

stltoday.com/go

314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Fans of Foreigner still want to know what love is — in a big way. The classic rock band continues to make regular visits to area arenas and amphitheaters, including its upcoming show next week at Family Arena. Lead singer Kelly Hansen is still on the job — the fourth lead singer of the group that used to include singer Lou Gramm. “There’s a high standard and a history of hits with this band and with Lou singing them,” Hansen told the Post-Dispatch in 2014. “I put my own thing on them, but I’m also representing the band. I’m not going to sing them so incredibly different so it’s like ‘Hey, look at me, I’m different.’ I’m here to serve the song.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Opera Theatre of St. Louis: Center Stage WHEN 8 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$65 • MORE INFO 314-961-0644; opera-stl.org

Now that all four operas in the 2019 festival season at Opera Theatre of St. Louis have opened, it’s time for the annual Center Stage concert. Most of the time the young singers in OTSL’s Gerdine Young Artist and Richard Gaddes Festival Artist programs serve in supporting roles. This night, however, belongs to them. It’s a good place to hear some of the opera stars of tomorrow. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

WEDNESDAY St. Louis Sound Competition WHEN 7:30 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $20 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

The St. Louis Sound Competition, in its second year, gives a creative boost to one fortunate St. Louis act. The live contest features performances, with the best determined by judges’ votes. “I just wanted to give back in some shape or form,” says Will DeWitt, presenter of the event with the Sheldon. “My mom and I were talking about it and came up with the idea to do it.” DeWitt is the son of Cardinals president Bill DeWitt and Notifi Records CEO Ira DeWitt. Tickets for the original June 6 date will be honored Wednesday. Proceeds benefit the nonprofit HEAL Center for the Arts. Last year’s contest winner was the Grooveliner. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

THURSDAY ‘1776’ WHEN 8:15 p.m. Thursday through July 3 • WHERE The Muny, 1 Theatre Drive, Forest Park • HOW MUCH $15-$105, plus the free seats • MORE INFO muny.org

The Muny presents “1776,” a well-regarded musical about the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The cast includes St. Louis favorite Adam Heller as Benjamin

Franklin, Robert Petkoff as John Adams and Keith Hines as Thomas Jefferson. The production is directed by Rob Ruggiero. BYCALVINWILSON

Southern Avenue, Dragondeer WHEN 8 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Old Rock House, 1200 South Seventh Street • HOW MUCH $12-$15 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

The band Southern Avenue is helping push the classic Memphis label Stax Records into the future. The young musicians making up Southern Avenue come from different backgrounds and musical interests but fuse it all together. The band’s latest album, “Keep On,” was recorded at Sam Phillips Recording and includes a guest appearance by Stax Records legend William Bell. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Megan Thee Stallion WHEN 9 p.m. Thursday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

There was a long period when the only female rapper whose name registered on a big scale was Nicki Minaj. That era is over. Other female rappers, led by Cardi B, are making a lot of noise these days. One that’s quickly rising is the brash Megan Thee Stallion, whose new album is “Fever.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Watch for updates on weather-related event cancellations. stltoday.com/go

06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

5


STLTODAY.COM/MUSIC

From left: Roy “Futureman” Wooten, Howard Levy, Béla Fleck and Victor Wooten of Béla Fleck & the Flecktones

Béla Fleck and his ‘league of extraordinary gentlemen’ For 30th anniversary anniversary tour, Béla Fleck & the Flecktones dust off tunes they haven’t played in a while BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ | SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

hirty years ago, before forming the Flecktones, innovative banjo player Béla Fleck tried putting together other combinations of musicians to produce the music he was writing as a sidelight to his work in the progressive bluegrass outfit New Grass Revival. But it didn’t work. “It wasn’t the right chemistry,” Fleck says by phone from his home in Nashville, Tenn. “What I needed,” he says, “were people that were kind of freaks.” Of course, he means that in the nicest possible way. “Each person had to be an equal or more, and that’s what made it work when I ran into these guys and we started playing together.” “These guys” are bassist Victor Wooten, drumitar inventor and player Roy “Futureman” Wooten, and multi-instrumentalist

T 6

Howard Levy. Fleck and the Flecktones are celebrating their 30th anniversary with a tour that stops Thursday at Powell Symphony Hall. The band has no new album or anything else to plug right now. “It’s like we’re promoting a tour with nothing,” Fleck says with a laugh. “We’re just playing because we love to play together. We’re not trying to make new music right now because everybody is busy. It’s just the sheer love of playing and celebrating our friendship. That’s why we get together these days.” Fleck likens the band to the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, the comic-book superhero collective. “It’s hard to say that about yourself, but I can certainly say it about everybody else,” he says. Wooten, according to Fleck, “has redefined the electric bass in a lot of ways. People talk about the guy who has shaped it

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

and changed it the most in the last 20 years: It’s got to be Victor.” He calls Futureman “a mathematical genius” for his ability to play crazy combinations of time signatures and also because he invented his own instrument — the drumitar — which is a drum machine that can be played like a guitar. “Not only did he fulfill that vision, but he sounds good on it, which is maybe the hardest part,” Fleck says. He calls Levy “the man with two brains.” “He can play piano backwards, facing away from the instrument,” Fleck marvels. “He can play piano with one hand and harmonica with the other.” And he’s known for finding a way to get chromatic notes from a standard blues harmonica. “There’s so much expressiveness in these bends that he plays. It’s like magic, what he can do with the instrument.” Fleck, of course, has no need to be modest about his own abilities. In addition to the body of groundbreaking jazz and bluegrass of the Flecktones, he has written, performed and recorded work from all over the musical spectrum, including collaborations with bassist and composer Edgar Meyer; jazz great Chick Corea; a host of elite African musicians; and his wife and fellow banjo player Abigail Washburn among many, many others. And it’s not like people haven’t noticed. Fleck has been nominated for Grammy

Awards in more categories than any other musician. “I know that I bring my share to (the Flecktones),” he says. “But I’ve always called myself the common man of the group.” Amid the music’s complexity and his bandmates’ virtuosity, Fleck wants to make sure his compositions have, first and foremost, a melody and a hook. “I’m the focuser,” he says. “I’m the prism that all these guys have to shine through. It’s my job to balance them.” For this tour, the band is playing plenty of fan favorites such as “Flight of the Cosmic Hippo,” “Blu-Bop” and “Sinister Minister” — songs they know so well that they scarcely have to practice them. But it was Levy, Fleck says, who suggested they dust off more ambitious fare like “Jekyll and Hyde (And Ted and Alice)” to challenge themselves a bit. “It’s a complicated tune,” Fleck says, “but that makes it fun for us. As the tour goes on, we’re digging out more and more old ones that we haven’t done in a long time.” Besides the anniversary tour, Fleck has plenty of other projects in the works. There’s an upcoming album with Meyer, tabla player Zakir Hussain and flautist Rakesh Chaurasia, as well as a new banjo concerto and a sequel to his “Bluegrass Sessions” series, this time featuring guests including Sam Bush, Chris Thile and Billy Contreras, among others. Also on the schedule is the re-release of the 2008 film “Throw Down Your Heart,” which chronicles Fleck’s African adventures that resulted in his album of the same name. The reissue will include an extra hour of footage and an extra CD of music and will also spin off a stand-alone live album with Malian kora master Toumani Diabate. That’s a heavy collection of commitments, especially considering that Fleck is 60, and he and Washburn have two children, ages 6 and 1. “I don’t recommend this for the low of energy,” he says with a laugh. “I don’t think I would have been mature enough before now to (have a family) because I had so much I was trying to accomplish on my own,” he adds. “But now I don’t want to stop, and I’m just as fanatic as I ever was. “It’s OK to be a little less out there and make sure my family is getting everything it needs from me.” WHAT Béla Fleck & the Flecktones • WHEN 7:30 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $40-$70 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700

stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE KURLAND AGENCY


Jimmy Eat World

Q&A ▼

‘Summer gods’ benefit from overlapping fanbases on ‘intense’ rock tour BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

P H O T O : C O U R T E S Y O F J I M G I A N N AT T I

T

he new “Summer Gods Tour” couldn’t have come at a better time for Jimmy Eat World. The rock band co-headlines the trek with Third Eye Blind. “Everything came together at the right time,” says frontmanguitarist Jim Adkins. “We’d just got done making our new record, and this fell into our laps. We had the time open, and they asked us to come out. We thought it sounded amazing. It seemed like we would get done making the album and then tour right after that, so it was cool.” The tour, which also includes Ra Ra Riot and visits Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre on Tuesday, benefits from overlapping fanbases. But Adkins says there’s still room to attract new listeners. Fans, he says, will “want to see something a little different kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

stltoday.com/go

from what (they) expect.” An upcoming album by Jimmy Eat World will follow “Integrity Blues” (2016), which included “Sure and Certain” and “Get Right.” Since then, the band released “Love Never” and “half heart” in 2018.

Q • What makes this tour a great summer package? A • The stage show is going to be intense. There’s going to be explosions, fireworks, caged tigers, marching bands, and snake handling. I don’t think any other summer tour has all that in one place. (He’s joking — we think.) Q • Had you toured with Third Eye Blind in the past? A • There’s lots of mutual bands we both know, but for some reason, we’ve never done dates together. We were friends of friends. We don’t know them personally. We may have done a festival or two and worked with some stltoday.com/blender

of the same crew members. Our fans, Third Eye Blind fans, Ra Ra Riot fans are similar, but there’s still room to get new people.

Q • How did the “Summer Gods Tour” title come about? A • I just play guitar. I don’t know where the name came from. But we were joking around, wondering which gods we’re going to be. Q • Give some insight into the set list. A • We have nine albums’ worth of material and 25 years of touring experience. We just try to do a big mix of things from each album that we think fans are going to want to hear and try to throw in a brand-new song. Q • What can you say about the upcoming album? A • I think it’s a little more guitar-rock than “Integrity Blues.” The songs are immediate and directfeeling — not a ton of time spent in scenic construction. It’s more in-your-face. WHAT Third Eye Blind, Jimmy Eat World, Ra Ra Riot • WHEN 7 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $25-$89.50, four lawn tickets for $59, four select reserved for $75 • MORE INFO livenation.com

Creve Coeur Days Charity Carnival June 20-23 Rides, Games, Food Entertainment on De Smet Jesuit High School Campus

5K Run Saturday, June 22nd Details at

CreveCoeurDays.com

@kevincjohnson

06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

7


A Volcano Awakens • A City Vanishes

Singer-songwriter John Paul White wants his music to touch people SPECIAL EXHIBITION

BY AMANDA ST. AMAND | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NOW OPEN—LIMITED TIME SPONSORED BY:

! A I R O L G IA!

GLOR

! S N O I T A L U CONGRAT P CHAMPIONS! U an Cleaners C Y E L N A T S ric 2019 r fans at Ame From you

www.americancleanersstl.com

hen an artist releases new music, he often tells himself he doesn’t care what people think of it. “And a small part of that is true,” says John Paul White, who released “The Hurting Kind” in April. “My M.O. is to please myself. I used to write songs for the Nashville market and tried to put on someone else’s hat, and I just failed miserably. “And every time I did something to please me, it clicked, and action happened.” White, a solo artist since 2016, was half of the Grammywinning duo the Civil Wars in his earlier years. The Alabama native (who, for the record, co-wrote the Jason Aldean song “Relentless”) is touring in support of the new album and plays Delmar Hall on Wednesday. His new album has won critical acclaim as well as positive feedback from fans and friends. “People have known me for a while and have seen the Americana duo iteration of me and all points in between,” he says. “I’m thrilled to have folks in my corner who are

W

astamand@post-dispatch.com

8

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

willing to follow me.” One of those people is Lee Ann Womack, who is featured on the song “This Isn’t Gonna End Well.” The collaboration stemmed from both singers performing as part of the Cayamo Cruise, an annual event that features Americana and other music artists. White says they had discussed doing something together (“If you do this for a living, it’s a small world, and you get to know folks, and you say that all time time”), but it fell into place during the cruise. The two wound up at an unannounced party together, playing Western swing and older songs. “I realized how versed she is in that stuff, more than honkytonk stuff,” he says. “I said, ‘One of these days, we are going to sing together, and it’s going to be something from that world.’” The result means a soaring, aching ballad of love and potential loss, co-written by White and Bobby Braddock. The latter is the brain behind Nashville classics such as “He Stopped Lovin’ Her Today” and “D-I-V-O-R-C-E.” Having Braddock as his co-writer, White says, was his ace up the sleeve. “That gave me a little bit more confidence to ask her

out, as it were, and she jumped in with both feet,” he says. The song, like much of White’s music, isn’t easy to label. Is it a ballad? A country song? Tough to say, though White doesn’t seem to fall into “mainstream.” But he doesn’t dis acts who do get that label. “Partly because I know some of those folks, and I know what they are doing is 100 percent who they are, and they feel really strongly about it. I’m like, ‘Go ahead and make your art.’ It ain’t my thing, it’s not in my discography, and sometimes it makes me scratch my head, but I don’t think you’re doing the world a service by making fun of it,” he says. That’s the kind of thing fans expect to hear from White, who comes across as a true Southern gentleman and proud family man. His song “The Long Way Home,” on the new album, has made his children cry. And he’s proud of that. He wants his songs to touch people. “I just hope I make you feel something, whether it’s happiness or longing — I’m here for that,” White says. “When I wrote that song, I knew it touched me.” White considers himself “an album guy” who likes the storytelling arc. But he also understands the power of a knockout single. “I see the value in that stand-alone song blowing people away. I take it as a challenge for every 3½ minutes that I have that I can make someone a lifelong fan within that time frame, and they’ll come back around” for more, he says. So for music lovers heading to White’s show, he offers one piece of advice: “Prepare to cry. By the end of the song, I hope you’re feeling something big.” WHAT John Paul White, the Prescriptions • WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $20-$25 • MORE INFO delmarhall.com

@mandystlpd

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : A LY S S E G A F K J E N

John Paul White


– AUGUST 3

Temperature-Controlled Storage Buy or Rent Equipment • Flexible Terms & Rates

Coldtainer Portable Storage Refrigerated, frozen, or heated storage with DC or AC power options. Purchase Coldtainer equipment, or try before you buy with our rental program.

Refrigerated & Frozen Storage Trailers

Refrigerated Vans Refrigerated vans for delivery or transport. Plug in onsite or vehicle powered. Flexible rental and mileage rates. Or, talk to the CSTK sales team about custom van purchase options.

Refrigerated or frozen storage trailers parked onsite for your event. We deliver or you pickup.

Call Now To Reserve • (314) 771-6666 • www.cstk.com

SAVE BILLS. CALL MILLS! WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS

• BEST WINDOW VALUE • FREE, NO PRESSURE ESTIMATES • FREE 18mon/No Interest FINANCING*

40% OFF SIDING Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details.

Expires 7/20/19.

$200 OFF WINDOWS Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details.

*with approved credit

314-429-7000

millswindow.com

Spirit of St. Louis Air Show & STEM Expo

Expires 7/20/19.

25+ yEA

18 MONTHS *

FREE

RWINDOWS S

FINANCING

IT’S AN

AIRSHOW LIKE NO OTHER

BUY NOW WHILE YOU CAN! TICKETS ARE LIMITED AND SOME AREAS ARE ALREADY SOLD OUT

SEPTEMBER 7 - 8 SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS AIRPORT CHESTERFIELD, MO 63005

One of only 3 shows in the world featuring BOTH the Blue Angels and Red Arrows!

spirit-airshow.com PRICES WILL INCREASE CLOSER TO THE EVENT stltoday.com/go

06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

9


TICKET TRACKER

Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre

livenation.com

ticketmaster.com • The Catching “Temporary Headspace Tour,” 8 p.m. July 26, $10-$12. • Dinosaur Pile Up, 8 p.m. Aug. 10, $15, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Ones to Watch Presents “Ashe: Your Mom’s First Headline Tour” with Ashe, Craig Burg, 8 p.m. Sept. 23, $15-$18. • Griffin House, 8 p.m. Oct. 1, $18-$20.

Chesterfield Amphitheater ticketmaster.com • Celebration Day: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 14, $20.

Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com • The Cadillac Three “Country Fuzz Tour,” 8 p.m. July 26, $20-$22.50. • Kishi Bashi, 9 p.m. Oct. 26, $20-$23. • Crumb, Divino Nino, Shormey, 8 p.m. Nov. 10, $18-$21.

• Hot 104.1’s Super Jam with Meek Mill and Future, YG, Megan Thee Stallion, DJ Mustard, 7:30 p.m. Aug. 28, $35-$99.50, four-pack of lawn tickets for $99 while supplies last, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

SEEN ON THE SCENE ▼

THE O’JAYS • JUNE 15 • FOX THEATRE 1 Gloria Wagner and Daryl Loving, both of St. Louis 2 Kendra and Anthony Holmes of St. Louis 3 Nickole Booker and Chuck Collier, both of Cincinnati 4 Sarah Redmond (left) and Vicky Long, both of St. Louis 5 Rosie and Steve Keltz of Florissant 6 Bennie Holt (left) and Lamont Macon, both of St. Louis PHISH • JUNE 11 • CHAIFETZ ARENA 7 Ryan and Stella Knights of Chicago 8 Lindsay Menard of Eugene, Ore., and Sean Herberg of Jacksonville, Ore. 9 John Kolacz and Lindsey McLelland, both of Indianapolis 10 Erik Benson and Neva Archuleta, both of Pueblo, Colo. 11 Eric Schamel of St. Louis and Thelma Vazquez of Maplewood 12 Shannon and Travis Overschmidt of St. Charles

Off Broadway etix.com • Slaughter Beach, Dog, Cave People, Early Animator, 8 p.m. Sept. 12, $13-$15.

Old Rock House metrotix.com • Elliott Pearson & the Passing Lane, Great Peacock, 8 p.m. July 19, $10-$12.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

• Jack Shimabukuro as part of the Listening Room Series, 8 p.m. Aug. 3, $35-$45. • Smooth Hound Smith, 8 p.m. Oct. 16, $12-$15.

The Pageant ticketmaster.com • Periphery, Veil of Maya, Covet, 7 p.m. Oct. 3, $27.50-$30.

• Helmet, 8 p.m. Nov. 26, $20-$25.

• Illenium, 8 p.m. Nov. 6, $45-$47.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

The Grandel

Stifel Theatre

metrotix.com

ticketmaster.com

• Todd Snider, 8 p.m. Sept. 19, $25$35.

• Roy Orbison & Buddy Holly — The Rock ’n’ Roll Dream Tour, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23, $26.50$96.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Trisha Yearwood, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 25, $46.50-$124.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Roy Orbison

PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF (SEEN ON THE SCENE); COURTESY OF BASE HOLOGRAM (ROY OBISON)

Blueberry Hill Duck Room

Find more photos from these events and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/photos

10

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

stltoday.com/go


Front row, from left: Andrew Stephen, Janet Evra, Kaleb Kirby and Katarra Parson. Back row: Ben Wheeler, Ryan Marquez, Brianna Brown, Carlos Brown Jr., Brady Lewis and Mark Harris II, members of the Kranzberg Arts Foundation Music Artist in Residence Program.

THE BLENDER ▼

New artists in residency will push jazz boundaries Kranzberg Arts Foundation director says second batch of artists bring something unique to the program

P H O T O : C O U R T E S Y O F K R A N Z B E R G A R T S F O U N D AT I O N

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

The Kranzberg Arts Foundation hopes the sophomore class of its Music Artist in Residence Program will push the boundaries of St. Louis-honed jazz. The 10 members of the foundation’s second 18-month residency are Andrew Stephen, Ben Wheeler, Brady Lewis, Brianna “Be.Be” Brown, Carlos Brown Jr., Janet Evra, Kaleb Kirby, Katarra, Mark Harris II and Ryan Marquez. The program provides tools for area jazz artists to expand their skills, brands and more with space for offices, rehearsals and performances, recording studio time and kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

stltoday.com/go

marketing support. The artists also have the chance to perform at Kranzberg Arts Foundation venues — primarily the Grandel and the Dark Room — and appear on a compilation album at the end of the program. “The Sound of St. Louis — Jazz Compilation Volume 1” was released in March with selections from the first batch of artists. KAF executive director Chris Hansen says each of this year’s artists brings something unique to the program. “We’re excited about all of them,” he says. Brianna Brown, an up-and-coming St. Louis R&B singer, has studied jazz at Webster University and joins the residency. “I thought I had enough of a background in jazz to be in line with what the Kranzberg Arts Foundation does, and I saw they were open-

stltoday.com/blender

@kevincjohnson

ing it up more,” Brown says. “I can really grow into that opportunity, come up with my own stuff and work on the music I want to focus on, jazz included. It seems like the perfect fit.” Brown fronts Be.Be and the Neo Souls, which performs June 28 at the Dark Room. “I’m expanding my sound. I love jazz, and it influences me a lot, especially when I’m making R&B. I’m using it to make the music more relatable on both sides — adding R&B to jazz and jazz to R&B.” Hansen says he’s excited to see what Brown will do as a result of the residency. “She’s got this energy where she’s fusing jazz and soul, bringing this young, funky but disciplined band to the table, making that sound more accessible.” Hansen also points to Andrew Steven, who joins the residency as a producer, engineer and pianist. “He’s really at the center of this burgeoning new jazz scene, identifying a new jazz sound coming out of this market,” Hansen says. “It’ll be exciting to see the community he brings together. He’s got a modern jazz project he’s focused on.” Hansen says participants in the residency can get out of it as much as they put in. “We saw great growth in all of the artists in year 1, though we take no credit for that,” he says. “They seized the opportunities and took ownership in their careers.” Bob DeBoo, Mo Egeston, Jesse Gannon, Anita Jackson, Ben Reece, Owen Ragland,

Tonina Saputo, Kasimu Taylor and Ptah Williams made up the residency’s inaugural class. Hansen says the residency helped Reece step up his game from sideman to bandleader, “commanding stages for his original work.” And Jackson, he says, was able to find her voice and connect with audiences. “She’s on a journey of recording original material and really tackling her career.” The new class, Hansen says, has more youthful energy, with artists working on defining their careers. The first batch was more focused on redefining. “It doesn’t mean they’re any less of a musician or beneath anybody — there’s just this new kind of young energy I like that’s a nice representation of modern jazz,” he says. “You don’t have Ptah Williams with decades and decades of experience or Anita Jackson with decades and decades of experience.” More than 50 artists applied to participate in the program’s second year. “There was no applicant who wasn’t worthy,” Hansen says. “The lion’s share of the applicants were unbelievable — some of the most amazing artists in the market.” While the first class was selected by the foundation, the new class was selected by a body of peers who looked at professionalism, dedication, commitment, diversity, leadership and originality. “We wanted to make sure opportunities were spread out holistically,” Hansen says.

06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

11


RECENTLY REVIEWED THEATER ▼

‘The Boy From Oz’

Philadelphia. A • It’s having a very good life. There are over 20 productions this season. I don’t know all of the productions, but I know it’s doing well. Q • Why do you think the play, which includes musical interludes, has struck such a chord with audiences? A • I think one of the drives for audiences is to remember who we were as a country — so that we can re-identify ourselves, as who we are in this moment. Very specifically, of course, this deals with the Yiddish legacy. But regardless of that, this play looks at the gift we’ve received from our immigrant ancestors. I’ve been getting a lot of response from people who are experiencing a period of not being welcome in America, and this play deals with a time when we were trying to close our borders. But it’s also a love song to our ancestors and to theater — and how theater makes us a community. Q • How did you become aware of “God of Vengeance” and the controversy surrounding it? A • I read the play when I was 22 years old. One of the things that moved me so much about Sholem Asch’s play is that he supported and stood behind — at a time of great anti-Semitism, at a time of great social tension — the love between two women. A lot of married women, and women with children, over the decades performed the roles of these two women. And that moves me. Q • To what extent is “Indecent” historically accurate? A • There’s no documentation on the women actors, but Sholem Asch is highly documented. And I did a lot of research about Yiddish theater. One of the things that have happened to us is that we are now living in a great Paula Vogel’s play, inspired by a Yiddish production whose 1923 cast age of documentaries, and we expect a kind of historical fact rather than an emotional truth. was arrested, is ‘a love song to our ancestors and to theater’ But the great documentaries actually make emotional truths as well. nominated for three Tony Awards includBY CALVIN WILSON | POST-DISPATCH THEATER CRITIC Q • What was it like to have one of ing best play, won for its direction (by your Rebecca Taichman) and lighting deod of Vengeance,” a yo plays produced on Broadway after a long career in which that sign (by Christopher Akerlind). Yiddish play by Sholem hadn’t happened? Recently, Vogel — who is perAsch that had successfully A • It was fun. It’s not that I was haps best known for the Pulitzer toured Europe, caused a writing work that I didn’t think Prize-winning drama “How I sensation on Broadway would appeal to larger audiences. Learned to Drive” — spoke with in 1923 — because it included a scene Paula Vogel But I’ve always been aware, as a gay Go! Magazine about “Indecent” in which two women kiss. The cast was woman, of not being thought of as a and her career. The interview has arrested on grounds of obscenity. Broadway playwright. been edited for length and clarity. That chapter in history is the inspiration Q • “Indecent” was your first play to be for playwright Paula Vogel’s “Indecent,” preWHAT “Indecent” • WHEN Friday through June 30; various sented by Max & Louie Productions. The play, produced on Broadway. And it’s having a performance times (discussions will follow performances on which was produced on Broadway in 2017 and significant post-Broadway life, with produc- Friday, Sunday, Thursday and June 30) • WHERE The Grandel, 3610 tions not only in St. Louis but also in numer- Grandel Square • HOW MUCH $40-$60; $200-$300 for orchestra and balcony boxes • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com ous cities including Boston, Los Angeles and cwilson@post-dispatch.com @calvinwilsonstl

The cast and musicians of Max & Louie Productions’ “Indecent”

‘Indecent,’ a timely tale of long ago, strikes a chord

‘G 12

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

WHEN Through June 30 • WHERE Stages St. Louis, Robert G. Reim Theatre, Kirkwood Civic Center, 111 South Geyer Road • HOW MUCH $25-$65 • MORE INFO stagesstlouis.org

David Elder is spectacular as singersongwriter Peter Allen in this thrilling jukebox musical presented by Stages St. Louis. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘The Coronation of Poppea’ WHEN Through June 28 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

Monteverdi’s “The Coronation of Poppea” represents the triumph of vice over virtue, as the beautiful, ambitious Poppea sets her cap for a crown. Opera Theatre of St. Louis presents an unusually effective update by director Tim Albery. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Fire Shut Up in My Bones’ WHEN Through June 29 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

Like his first opera, “Champion,” composer Terence Blanchard’s jazz-infused “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” takes on a true story of trauma and reconciliation. The notably strong, all African American cast is led by four superb singers: soprano Julia Bullock, bass-baritone Davóne Tines, soprano Karen Slack and tenor Chaz-men Williams-Ali. James Robinson directs; William Long conducts. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Love’s Labors Lost’ WHEN Through Sunday • WHERE Shakespeare Glen on Fine Arts Drive in Forest Park • HOW MUCH Free; $10-$40 for reserved seats • MORE INFO sfstl.com

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis presents the Bard’s

comedy about romance among royals. It’s a fun production that’s relatable even to folks who aren’t particularly into Shakespeare. Directed by Tom Ridgely. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘The Marriage of Figaro’ WHEN Through June 29 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro” is one of the greatest operas ever written, a profound work with both great comedy and great humanity. Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ fine production is directed by Mark Lamos and conducted by Christopher Allen. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Travels With My Aunt’ WHEN Through Sunday • WHERE J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts, Lindenwood University, 2300 West Clay Street, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $20 • MORE INFO actincstl.com

Graham Greene’s novel about a retired bank manager and his eccentric aunt inspired this comedy-drama set in the world of international intrigue. Brilliantly staged and performed, it’s an ACT INC production. Directed by Emily Jones. BY CALVIN WILSON

Verdi’s ‘Rigoletto’ WHEN Through June 30 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

Giuseppe Verdi’s “Rigoletto” is one of the standards of the operatic repertoire. The production at Opera Theatre of St. Louis has a superb cast. Roberto Kalb conducts idiomatically; Bruno Ravella is the imaginative director. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Find more performances in our calendar, and add your own group’s upcoming events. stltoday.com/events

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : G E R R Y L O V E ( C A S T ) ; M I C H A E L Z O R N , I N V I S I O N /A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( PA U L A V O G E L )

STLTODAY.COM/ARTS


Louis “Conphliction” McGee rehearses his poem “Crazy In Love” at UrbArts in St. Louis.

P H O T O : C H R I S T I N E TA N N O U S , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

CONNECTING PEOPLE THROUGH

POETRY St. Louis team prepares for Rustbelt Poetry Slam BY HANNA HOLTHAUS | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

stltoday.com/go

“My city refuse to perish, but my city be dying. My city been dying. My city be bullets and bullets and bullets and bullets and bodies and bodies and bodies, and my America be the smoking gun.” James Watford of St. Louis stood on the corner outside UrbArts in front of four other men one night last week reciting his poem “My City” with gusto, quickly capturing their attention and quieting their chatter. Throughout the night, Watford and the members of his St. Louis Poetry Slam team took turns rehearsing their own works on the street, speaking over the sounds of rainfall and passersby. On Friday, the group will represent their city — the one Watford critiqued — in the biggest slam poetry competition in the Midwest. MK Stallings founded UrbArts, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting various art forms in the St. Louis community, in 2001. His organization is hosting the 20th annual Rustbelt Poetry Slam on Friday and Saturday; teams from Michigan, California and even Canada will be in town to compete, and the public is invited to watch. Slam poetry began in the 1980s as a way to entice the public to engage in poetry and with writers. The art form includes writing and performing the poems, and topics can range from personal feelings and experiences to social justice causes. Judges evaluate the performances and declare a winner.

06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

13


James Watford (aka “Jayluvve”) rehearses “A City of Bullets and Bodies” outside UrbArts.

CHECK OUT THESE OPEN-MIC EVENTS ▼

Hartford Coffee Co. • 7:30 p.m. Fridays; 3974 Hartford Street; hartfordcoffee.com/artists/open-mic-night Lyrical Therapy • 7:30 p.m. Sundays; 2600 North 14th Street; $5 entry

Poetry at the Point • Fourth Tuesday of each month; 2720 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood; stlouispoetrycenter.org/poetry-at-the-point; email poetry.point@stlouispoetrycenter.org to register

Word Up • 7 p.m. Tuesdays; 1833 Dunn Road; $5 before 8 p.m., $10 after; wordupopenmic@gmail.com

Poetry is education for team member Hameed. He is the youngest member of the group and only began attending open mics seriously in December. Since then, he says, he has participated in more than 30 of them. Earlier this year, Hameed won the St. Louis Poetry Slam competition, which allowed him to join the Rustbelt team. For Hameed, slam provides an opportunity to express himself while maintaining a competitive edge — a side of himself he doesn’t show often. Poetry also allows him an outlet for his anger. He feels passive in his daily life, but onstage, he lets everything out, sometimes even surprising those closest to him, he says. Recently, he wrote and has performed a trilogy based on the movie “Black Panther.” Because of his ability to express his feelings through stories that may not be his own, he considers himself not only a poet but also a storyteller. “Everybody wants to have their moment where they can say whatever’s on their mind and nobody can interrupt them,” Hameed says. “My friends know I talk a lot, but when I’m onstage, it’s unfiltered — just expression. It’s like energy in its raw form.” Hameed says competitions offer a different opportunity than open mics for performances without judgment. This is his opportunity to receive constructive criticism and to progress as a writer in the respectful but competitive

atmosphere of the event. Conphliction says judges may score poems differently because of what they see on YouTube or how they think slam poetry should sound. But the art form allows each person to be organically themselves. The best poets balance the art of poetry and genuineness with rhetoric, Stallings says. Many of them speak about their own trauma, dragging it out again and again for others to critique. Great poets, he says, are able to stay true to themselves while staying relevant, especially in a competitive setting. “I don’t know if the poet really ever intends to reveal as much as she, he, they do in the work, but sometimes the nature of the work requires that you reach a place of authenticity — of truth,” Stallings says. “Once that place is found, it can connect powerfully with audiences. It’s that emotional thread that connects us as human beings.” The St. Louis team has only met to rehearse once, but Conphliction isn’t worried. He says he and his teammates want to make St. Louis a place all artists feel they should visit by representing the city in the best way they can, with powerful poetry and good sportsmanship. “Our team, we understand opposition, and when you can do that, can you really ever measure where you’re gonna go?” Conphliction says. “It’s going to be an up and down, but we’re OK with the journey.” WHAT Rustbelt Poetry Slam • WHEN 7 and 9 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday; individual final is 4 p.m. Saturday, team final is 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE .ZACK, 3224 Locust Street • HOW MUCH Free for preliminary rounds; final rounds are $20 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

SEVEN SHOW SEASON TICKET PACKAGE ON SALE NOW

P H O T O S : C H R I S T I N E TA N N O U S , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

This year’s St. Louis Poetry Slam team is made up of four men from the region: Watford, Zaid Hameed, Louis “Conphliction” McGee and Calvin Rogers (“Abby the Truth”). Stallings chose the team members based on past competition performances. More than 100 spoken word poets — 20 slam poetry teams and 16 individual poets — are registered to compete at Rustbelt. Calvin Rogers (aka “Abby While Stallings says he values the platform the Truth”) slam presents for networking writers, he also rehearses his thinks poets should recognize the difference poem “Sin” between competition and their art. outside UrbArts in St. Louis. “There’s another element of poetry slam, and that’s just poetry,” Stallings says. “There’s a desire by the poets not to debase Louis poetry scene 10 years ago at age 19. He the art of poetry any further than you have to since has traveled the country, headlining poby making it this really crass competition beetry readings and open-mic events. He says tween individuals who are engaging in some he hasn’t participated in a slam competition form of one-upsmanship.” in almost five years; he felt poets sometimes The Rustbelt Poetry Slam gives poets an lost themselves in the competition, becoming opportunity to meet artists from across the country, Stallings says, because it is one of the disingenuous. “I’d rather us completely go down in flames biggest regional competitions. The winning being ourselves than go down in flames trying team earns $1,500, and the winning solo perto be something else and regretting it for the former gets $600. rest of the time,” Conphliction says. Events like Rustbelt create a pathway When listening to his team’s poems, Confor poets to monetize their talents, even if phliction says, some natural themes arose. that means “kind of feeding their souls, if it This is the first time the team has consisted doesn’t actually feed their stomachs,” Stallings says. solely of black men from the St. Louis Groups of four teams apiece area, he says; it lacks the diversity of some of the opposing groups. will compete for three rounds, or What the St. Louis team brings, bouts, speaking on undetermined however, is a sense of unity in a topics. In each bout, teams can group that can speak for a comchoose to send members indimunity that doesn’t always have the vidually or as groups, and each opportunity, Conphliction says. team will present four poems in MK Stallings “Regardless of whatever any of us each bout. says on that stage at any given time, we’re Each round is scored by a panel of still coming from the perspective of a black judges randomly selected from the audience, man,” Conphliction says. “I’m fine with that.” and scores will accumulate as rounds progProblems can arise, he says, when poets ress. Winning teams will proceed to the final, stray from their own experiences or present which has the same format. narratives written to please judges or audiStallings says he asked Conphliction, the ences. When traveling to places such as Louiteam’s leader, to coach, knowing he had the experience to make quick decisions, as well as siana and New York and hearing people speak the same way, he says, he leaves without a a love for the art and the city. sense of the community’s identity. Conphliction became involved in the St.

The St. Louis Poetry Slam team meets for a rehearsal at UrbArts in St. Louis.

!

314-535-1700

!

FabulousFox.com/subscribe

TM© 1981 RUG LTD

Fox Box Office

14

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

stltoday.com/go

stltoday.com/go

SWAP FOR ONE OF THESE WICKED ESCAPE TO MARGARITAVILLE STOMP JERSEY BOYS CIRQUE DREAMS HOLIDAZE RENT 20 TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR RIVERDANCE 06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

15


STLTODAY.COM/MOVIES ▼

In joyous ‘Toy Story 4,’ the playthings also evolve Woody reunites with a long-lost pal in this sequel that provides the closure we didn’t know we needed ★★★ BY LINDSEY BAHR | ASSOCIATED PRESS

t’s futile to ask “why more?” in the movie business, but it’s hard not to go in a little suspicious of a fourth “Toy Story.” The trilogy was so perfect. What more could we ask of Woody and Buzz? What more did we as an audience need? If we got another, would it live up to the unbridled joy and emotional satisfaction of the first three? And if it was bad, would it tarnish the others? Sure, it might sound a little dramatic to get this emotionally invested in the legacy of an animated series about anthropomorphic toys, but Pixar and Disney did this to themselves by creating something so precious and lasting. But I’m delighted to report that the fears were unwarranted. “Toy Story 4” is a blast, and it’s great to be back with the gang. It took a herculean effort behind the scenes to get here too, nine years after “Toy Story 3” left many of us sobbing in

I 16

our seats. Ousted Pixar head John Lasseter, who directed the first two, was supposed to direct, and the screenplay switched hands three years into development (which helps explain why eight writers get “story by” credits). Eventually the project was handed over to animator, sometimes voice actor and first-time feature director Josh Cooley to bring it home. None of that disorder is apparent on the screen, however. A flashback tells us what happened to Bo Peep (Annie Potts) all those years ago and reminds us where we left off: with Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz (Tim Allen), Jessie (Joan Cusack) and the rest of the toys being passed on to a new kid, Bonnie, as their beloved Andy heads off to college. But it turns out Andy’s talk with Bonnie about his favorite toy, Woody, didn’t have much of an impact on the fickle 5-year-old. At playtime she prefers Jessie and often leaves Woody in the closet with the rest of the toys she’s outgrown. “Remember house,” a forlorn kid’s chair (Carol Burnett)

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

says wistfully, as they all notice Woody has picked up his first dust bunny. This sends him into a panic spiral as he grasps for anything that will make him essential to Bonnie’s life. When she decides that a deranged arts-and-crafts project made of a spork she calls Forky is her new favorite toy, Woody becomes his protector. Tony Hale provides the perfect voice for this insane but charming addition who keeps trying to jump in the trash. (It’s his destiny as a disposable utensil.) Indeed, “Toy Story 4” introduces a whole batch of fun new characters, like the Canadian stuntman Duke Caboom (Keanu Reeves), the 1950s antique and all-around head case Gabby Gabby (Christina Hendricks) and her creepy ventriloquistdummy henchmen. There’s also Combat Carl (Carl Weathers), Bunny (Jordan Forky Peele) and Ducky (voiced by (Keegan-Michael Tony Hale) Key). If you pay close attention, you might also spot Melephant Brooks (Mel Brooks) and Carl Reineroceros (Carl Reiner). A family RV trip takes all the toys to a new location,

where Woody encounters Bo Peep for the first time in almost a decade. She relishes her freedom as a lost toy and leads a happy, rag-tag existence wandering around and meeting new kids everywhere. It’s enough to make even the most loyal toy question his purpose. And they go on some enormously fun and inventive adventures trying to get Forky back to Bonnie. The signature “Toy Story” wit and irreverence might not be quite as sharp as it was before, but there are enough truly inspired moments to keep you smiling as you savor the unexpected fun. Cooley and the writers even brilliantly play on some kid-friendly horror movie tropes, adding a fresh dimension to this journey. If there is a complaint, it’s that Woody and Bo’s quest takes us away from most of the original toys for a large part of the movie, although Buzz still finds a way to be part of it. It doesn’t exactly reach the emotional heights of the previous films, but the conclusion is still effective and well executed. Let this be a lesson to all franchise cynics: Sometimes more is actually good. Woody needed some closure he couldn’t even comprehend. And, it turns out, so did we. WHAT “Toy Story 4” • RUN TIME 1:40 • RATING G • CONTENT Nothing objectionable

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

P H O T O S : D I S N E Y/ P I X A R

From left: Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen), Bunny (Jordan Peele), Ducky (KeeganMichael Key), Woody (Tom Hanks), Giggle McDimples (Ally Maki) and Bo Peep (Annie Potts).


Jimmie Fails (left) and Jonathan Majors in “The Last Black Man in San Francisco”

‘The Last Black Man in San Francisco’ is big, bold, beautiful Film is a visually stunning tone poem to loss, lies, reclamation and making peace with the past ★★★★ BY ANN HORNADAY | WASHINGTON POST

PHOTOS: A24

S

ome movies tell you a story. Others invite you into a dream. “The Last Black Man in San Francisco,” an extraordinary debut from best friends and collaborators Jimmie Fails and Joe Talbot, obeys the intuitive rhythms of a reverie, leading viewers on a graceful journey through the collective memory of a city and the deeply personal aspirations of one of its dispossessed. A lyrical, visually stunning tone poem to loss, lies, reclamation and making peace with the past, “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” virtually defies conventional description. To see it is to believe it, even when it doesn’t strictly make sense. “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” opens with the strains of a lilting woodwind musical score (composed with exquisite delicacy by Emile Mosseri), as a little girl — missing two front teeth, holding a lollipop — skips past a street preacher who has

stltoday.com/go

climbed onto a milk crate to inveigh against the pollution poisoning the San Francisco Bay. Beholding the scene are Fails — playing a character named Jimmie Fails — and his best friend, Mont (Jonathan Majors), an aspiring playwright who lives with his grandfather (Danny Glover) in the city’s Hunter’s Point neighborhood. Fails is staying with them for the time being while he nurses his life’s ambition: to move back into the glorious, slightly shabby Victorian home in the Fillmore district that his grandfather James Fails designed and built in the 1940s. “I want to drink coffee and scratch my eyes while I read the paper,” Jimmie says longingly, in one of the film’s simplest and most touching soliloquies. When the house’s owners are away, Jimmie and Mont surreptitiously sneak in to fix the place up, making small repairs and repainting its crimson-colored trim. Meanwhile, the immediate and extended Fails family that once lived there has scattered to the four winds: Jimmie’s father (Rob Morgan) is living in an SRO hotel (the two were

Danny Glover (left) and Jonathan Majors in “The Last Black Man in San Francisco”

once homeless and living in their car); his aunt has decamped for the suburbs, and he has no contact with his mother. Slender and endowed with an open, expressive face the camera loves, Fails is a natural on the screen, exuding a beatific presence that earns immediate empathy. He and Majors enjoy an easy camaraderie, as Jimmie and Mont respond to circumstances that put the house enticingly within their reach. Talbot — who grew up with Fails in San Francisco, and who won a prize at Sundance for directing “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” — blends a documentarian’s feel for the realities of his hometown with dashes of surrealism and playful affection

reminiscent of Spike Lee and Charles Burnett. Within the life story of one young man trying to rescue his past and claim a right of return, the filmmaker finds an epic history that encompasses postwar migration, the flourishing of the “Harlem of the West,” the Haight Ashbury in the 1960s, redlining, gentrification, environmental racism and the chronic policing of black masculinity. That specific form of social control is exerted by outside forces but also from within the African American community itself. Five neighborhood guys continually tease and harass Jimmie and Mont, forming a sometimes funny, sometimes frightening Greek chorus. Jimmie and Mont aren’t tough enough for the group — they’re gentle, funny and tender with one another. (One of the film’s most memorable scenes involves Mont defusing a violent outburst with a hilariously effective workaround). But “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” makes space for the trauma that lies beneath even the most aggressive macho posturing. “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” unfolds episodically, in gauzy, poetic images and vignettes that can be heartbreaking at one moment and quirkily comic the next. Thematically, it’s of a piece with such recent films as “Blindspotting,” “Sorry to Bother You” and “Roman Israel, Esq.,” evoking real estate as patrimony, protection and solid purchase in a world of constant precariousness and contingency. But “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” is a far more eccentric and stylized film, one that’s less interested in seamless narrative than developing its own heightened visual vocabulary: Just when viewers think they know where the story is going, Talbot inserts a montage set to Joni Mitchell’s “Blue,” or stages an awkward play-withina-play. Nearly every scene has its own amusing counterpoint. Through it all, Fails maintains a serene and poignant presence, skateboarding from situation to situation with (usually) impenetrable calm. There’s one whopper of a twist in “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” that lifts an already elevated enterprise into something heady and more provocative. “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” is about many, many things, but ultimately it’s about having the courage to transcend history, with all of its burdens, gifts and most consoling myths. Even when Talbot and Fails risk unraveling the film’s most cherished verities, they do so with the mesmerizing grace of a skateboard gliding down Lombard Street. WHAT ”The Last Black Man in San Francisco” • RUN TIME 2:00 • RATING R • CONTENT Strong language, brief nudity and drug use

06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

17


‘Pavarotti’ accentuates star’s positives but skims past flaws Documentary directed by Ron Howard is engaging but doesn’t deliver a full portrait of the opera icon ★★★ BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER | POST-DISPATCH CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC

uciano Pavarotti stands out among opera singers in the late 20th century. A big man with an amazing voice, a lack of discipline undermined his oversized abilities; internationally famous, he had little interest in bringing new audiences to the opera house, instead going for the big bucks in arena concerts. “Pavarotti,” Ron Howard’s new documentary, sticks mostly to the positives while skimming over the negatives of the tenor’s life and career. It’s an engaging film, filled with vintage snapshots, interviews with friends and former colleagues, and, most of all, that marvelously distinctive voice, with all the emotion it could convey. The lovable teddybear persona is on full display, too, the en-

L 18

dearing, enduring joy at being who and where he was. Among the best moments are interviews with his first wife, Adua Veroni, and their three daughters, speaking feelingly of both the joys and difficulties of their family life. The section about his stillborn son, Riccardo, by his second wife, Nicoletta Mantovani, is touching. There are curious omissions, though, such as the very existence of the remarkably bad 1982 motion picture “Yes, Giorgio.” We learn how Herbert Breslin, Pavarotti’s longtime manager, helped make him a star (responsible for “Giorgio,” he blamed others for its flopping), but not how they broke up, or the tell-all book Breslin wrote with critic Anne Midgette (who contributes some of the most cogent observations in the movie). Breslin does get in some digs at the man

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

Luciano Pavarotti, seen in “Pavarotti”

he blames for that breakup, the impresario Tibor Rudas, whose surname he childishly mispronounces. I sang on the stage of Lyric Opera of Chicago with Pavarotti many times as a member of the regular chorus. Pavarotti was generous about autographing photos (he even brought a supply of color headshots with him to the theater), but more difficult

in other ways, including making advances on female colleagues. Gluttony was among his sins. He gobbled up food prepared as props for operas and was known for asking his dinner companions, “Are you going to eat this?” as he impaled delectables from their plates on his fork, whether he was dining with an opera staffer or the Princess of Wales. Pavarotti, who didn’t read music, was lazy about learning it, and, as a result, cancellation-prone. The great soprano Joan Sutherland, who helped the tenor greatly in his early career, complained about it. Ardis Krainik, general director of the Lyric, made international headlines in 1989 when she fired Pavarotti from the company after he missed 26 of 41 scheduled performances. Late in his career he erred in competing with his younger self, singing roles for which he was no longer vocally suited. That all goes unmentioned, too. Howard could have given a fuller portrait of his subject without diminishing his stature. For all his faults — the badly dyed hair, the constant demands on others — Pavarotti was one of the greats. To hear that golden voice is to forgive almost all. WHAT “Pavarotti” • RUN TIME 2:50 • RATING PG13 • CONTENT Language, thematic material

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : M I C H E L E N A Z Z A R O ( PAVA R O T T I ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F T H E PAVA R O T T I FA M I LY ( H O R S E )

“Pavarotti,” directed by Ron Howard


From left: Jessie Usher, Samuel L. Jackson and Richard Roundtree in “Shaft”

ALSO IN THEATERS ▼

‘Aladdin’ ★★ PG • 2:08 • Guy Ritchie,

who directs and is a coscreenwriter, has taken the 1992 film’s structure, added elements from the Broadway musical and made some nice script tweaks. Starring Will Smith, Mena Massoud and Naomi Scott. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Anna’

P H O T O : K Y L E K A P L A N , WA R N E R B R O S . P I C T U R E S

R • 1:58 • A beautiful young woman lives a secret life as a top assassin. With Sasha Luss, Helen Mirren, Luke Evans, Cillian Murphy. Written and directed by Luc Besson. Not reviewed.

‘Booksmart’ ★★★★

‘Dark Phoenix’ ★½

R • 1:42 • For her directorial

PG-13 • 1:53 • The directorial

debut, actress-turneddirector Olivia Wilde comes out swinging with not only one of the best movies of the year, but one of the best high school movies of all time. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

debut of writer Simon Kinberg is the dud of all duds, a boring, flat film that doesn’t seem to even start before it’s over. With this final installment, the X-Men franchise goes out with a resounding thud.

‘Breakthrough’ ★★½

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

PG • 1:50 • The remarkable

true story of St. Charles’ John Smith is a miraculous tale that could make a wonderful and inspirational 30-minute film. Instead, “Breakthrough” is more like an overlong — and bad — Lifetime movie. Starring Chrissy Metz (“This Is Us”), Topher Grace and Marcel Ruiz. DANIEL NEMAN

LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Child’s Play’

‘Avengers: Endgame’ ★★★★

R • 2:00 • The murderous

PG-13 • 3:02 • The final movie

in Marvel’s Infinity Saga focuses on the efforts of Captain America (Chris Evans) and the remaining Avengers to rewind the effects of Thanos’ “Infinity War” snap. As high as the stakes are, “Endgame” is also a very funny movie.

doll Chucky is back in this revival of the 1988 horror classic. With Aubrey Plaza, Gabriel Bateman, Brian Tyree Henry, voice of Mark Hamill. Written by Tyler Burton Smith; based on characters created by Don Mancini. Directed by Lars Klevberg. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

WASHINGTON POST

★stltoday.com/go Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent

‘The Dead Don’t Die’ ★½ R • 1:44 • The absurdism

wears gratingly thin in this zombie comedy, whose deadpan tone gives way to tiresome, grindingly repetitive inertia. WASHINGTON POST

‘A Dog’s Journey’ ★★½ PG • 1:48 • The second film adapted from W. Bruce Cameron’s novels and a follow-up to “A Dog’s Purpose,” offers up an interesting, complex story into which we can sink our teeth. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Godzilla: King of the Monsters’ ★★½ PG-13 • 2:11 • A sequel in the loosest possible sense, this Godzilla installment requires minimal recall of just what went down in Tokyo and San Francisco back in 2014. Focus has shifted to a family of scientists

who lived through the attack. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The Hustle’ PG-13 • 1:43 • Anne Hathaway

and Rebel Wilson play con women who join forces for revenge. Written by Stanley Shapiro, Paul Henning, Dale Launer, Jac Schaeffer; story by Shapiro, Henning, Launer. Directed by Chris Addison. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘The Intruder’ ½ PG-13 • 1:42 • Cheesy thriller

stars Michael Ealy and Meagan Good as a young couple who discover there’s someone else inside their new dream home. WASHINGTON POST

writer (Mindy Kaling, who also wrote the script) tries to shake things up and make the disengaged host more relevant. ASSOCIATED PRESS

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Little’ ★★★

‘Pet Sematary’ ★★

PG-13 • 1:48 • Marsai Martin,

R • 1:41 • The mean roads and mangy cats of Stephen King’s 1983 novel are back from the dead in Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer’s vividly acted, blandly condensed remake of Mary Lambert’s 1989 movie. ASSOCIATED PRESS

the 14-year-old star of “Black-ish,” pitched, produced and stars in this hilarious, empowering movie that is like a reverse “Big.” Also starring Regina Hall and Issa Rae. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Long Shot’ ★★★ R • 2:05 • A winning pair,

sprinkled with sci-fi, this “MIB” reboot has a few secret weapons stashed. Directed by F. Gary Gray.

Pokémon Detective Pikachu’ ★½

‘John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum’ ★★★

Seth Rogen and Charlize Theron put the rom into the com of Machiavellian Washington, D.C., political machinations. It’s “Veep” but less acid-tongued and a lot more swoony.

R • 2:10 • Third installment

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

PG • 1:44 • Film adaptations of video games have proved a dicey proposition in the past, and this one just feels like a money grab. You’ve played Pokémon Go? Call this one Pokémon Don’t Go. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Ma’ ★★½

‘Poms’ ★★

R • 1:39 • Octavia Spencer

PG-13 • 1:31 • Diane Keaton stars as a woman in her 70s who, prompted by a dire cancer diagnosis, acts on a repressed dream of being a cheerleader. It’s “Bring It On” in a senior living facility — but less witty. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

— light on exposition but easily the best so far — picks up moments after “John Wick 2” ended, with a $14 million bounty on our man John’s head, and everyone in Manhattan after him. Starring Keanu Reeves. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Late Night’ ★★½ R • 1:42 • Emma Thompson

plays a Letterman-like latenight figure whose TV show is in jeopardy — until a new

turns in a brilliantly campy performance in an otherwise serviceable high school horror flick. Directed by Tate Taylor. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Men in Black: International’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:54 • In what could

otherwise be just another bland action comedy

‘Rocketman’ ★★½ R • 2:01 • Glittery Elton John biopic is a more-or-less true, authorized account but one that frequently breaks free of stubborn things like chronology and gravity. Starring Taron Egerton. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The Secret Life of Pets 2’ ★★★ PG • 1:26 • If the sweet, animated 2016 film “The Secret Life of Pets” was mostly for kids, its sequel might be for another segment of the audience altogether — whoever is buying the tickets. Featuring the voices of Kevin Hart, Eric Stonestreet, Lake Bell, Jenny Slate and Patton Oswalt. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Shaft’ ★★½ R • 1:51 • Sequel embraces the

camp of its predecessors while adding a timely new depth: The generational and cultural differences between Shaft (Samuel L. Jackson) and his son, JJ (Jessie T. Usher), are largely about what it means to be a black man today. WASHINGTON POST

‘UglyDolls’ ★★ PG • 1:28 • Animated film

about outlandishly kooky dolls is flat and narratively

bland — nothing more than a merchandising opportunity. The thin story is padded out with pop songs, and characters are voiced almost entirely by music superstars: Kelly Clarkson, Janelle Monáe, Nick Jonas, Blake Shelton, Pitbull. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Us’ ★★½ R • 1:56 • Jordan Peele’s (“Get

Out”) ’70s-inspired horror flick wears its references on its sleeve, grapples with big ideas and crawls with creepy tension, lightened with dashes of well-earned humor. A jaw-dropping performance by Lupita Nyong’o makes for a whipsmart modern horror classic. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Wonder Park’ ★★ PG • 1:25 • Animated

film takes place in an amusement park dreamed up by a mother and daughter who whisper ideas into the ear of a stuffed chimp. But all the movie’s wonder disappears when there’s an illness in the family. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Use our calendar to find theaters and showtimes near you. stltoday.com/events

06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

19


“WE’RE TOLD THAT KATHERINE DOESN’T DO ANY POLITICAL HUMOR ... BUT WHAT LATE-NIGHT NETWORK HOST DOESN’T TOUCH ON POLITICS THESE DAYS? HOW DID SHE SURVIVE THIS LONG WITHOUT BEING CANCELED LONG AGO?”

Emma Thompson in “Late Night”

One ‘Late Night’ storyline seems very true to real life A scene about political jokes in Mindy Kaling’s new movie is probably way too real for actual late-night hosts BY EMILY YAHR | WASHINGTON POST

indy Kaling’s new movie “Late Night” may operate in a strange world where a woman (gasp!) actually gets a slot as a late-night host, but one of its storylines seems very true to life. Emma Thompson stars as that host, a comic who has been

M 20

telling inoffensive, middle-of-the-road jokes for nearly 30 years — but now has to decide whether to get political. The issue comes up as a network executive coldly informs Katherine that it’s her last season. The show has been failing for a long time, and it’s time to replace her with a younger, buzzier male comedian. Katherine, who can’t imagine an existence where she is not on the air anymore, turns to her writing staff for

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

help. All of her writers are fairly lame, except for new hire Molly (Kaling), who hears Katherine go on an entertaining rant about why she hates beauty pageants and comes up with an idea: Katherine clearly has a point of view, so why doesn’t she branch out into some mild political humor? Molly pitches her on a riff about abortion — about how the men who want to police women’s bodies are generally the ones who are having the least amount of sex, and how the whole debate makes Katherine grateful she’s going through menopause. But the show’s producer, Brad (Denis O’Hare), is unnerved about going so topical: Perhaps they could start at fracking and “work their way up” to abortion, he suggests. The scene calls to mind conversations that may have played out in late-night writing rooms, well, about three years ago, before the Trump era entirely enmeshed

politics with pop culture. In a review of “Late Night,” the Houston Chronicle argued that Katherine’s avoidance of politics is a reason that “the premise of the movie seems a bit off in 2019.” “We’re told that Katherine doesn’t do any political humor — a plot point is will she/ won’t she do a tepid abortion joke Molly has written for her — but what late-night network host doesn’t touch on politics these days?” wrote reporter Cary Darling. “How did she survive this long without being canceled long ago?” During the run-up to the 2016 presidential election, Stephen Colbert had no problem diving right into politics — neither did Trevor Noah or Seth Meyers. Meanwhile, Jimmy Fallon steered clear. His friendly, softball interview with Trump in 2016, in which he ruffled the candidate’s hair and asked no tough questions, prompted a career-scarring backlash. Fallon later told the Hollywood Reporter that the torrent of criticism made him “depressed.” “I don’t want to make anyone angry — I never do, and I never will,” he said. “It’s all in the fun of the show. I made a mistake. I’m sorry if I made anyone mad. And looking back, I would do it differently.” Unsurprisingly, Trump lashed out at Fallon for apologizing, tweeting that the host had called him later to crow over the episode’s “massive ratings.” Fallon went on air to deny he ever called Trump. “By the way, Donald. I don’t know if you’ve seen my ratings the past two years — you didn’t help my ratings,” he added. “But really, thanks a lot. Thanks for nothing.” It’s true: Fallon’s ratings have dropped, while Colbert’s shot upward as he doubled down on politics and Trump. Jimmy Kimmel also experienced a ratings uptick after he spoke candidly and emotionally about the Affordable Care Act after his newborn son underwent heart surgery. However, he told O Magazine that being so open “cost me commercially,” according to polls he saw. “That’s not ideal,” he admitted. “But I wouldn’t change anything I said.” In the end, although Katherine initially gets cold feet over Molly’s political bit, she eventually tells the joke — and, as you might suspect, the audience loves it. stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : E M I LY A R A G O N E S , A M A Z O N S T U D I O S

HOUSTON CHRONICLE WRITER CARY DARLING


NOW SHOWING TV Q&A ▼

Q • Here’s something I’ve always wondered about television: Why is there no Channel 1?

Q • When will “Succession” come back for Season 2? A • The HBO comedydrama about a family and its business conflicts will resume Aug. 11. The current trailer suggests plenty more twisty fun.

PHOTO: 123RF

Q • I heard “Whiskey Cavalier” is not being renewed for a second season. It took me about three episodes to get into all the characters’ roles, but once I did, it was a really good show with action, mystery and humor. Anything I can do to maybe support it on Netflix or Hulu? A • ABC did indeed cancel the series after a single season, as its ratings declined and, according to TVLine, the network and the studio could not work

stltoday.com/go

“HERE’S SOMETHING I’VE ALWAYS WONDERED ABOUT TELEVISION: WHY IS THERE NO CHANNEL 1?”

Saint Louis Science Center

OMNIMAX® Theater SPONSORED BY:

A

PREFERRED PARTNERS:

F I L M

B Y

R O N

HEAR THE MAESTRO out a cheaper deal. The studio, Warner Bros., is reportedly trying to save “Whiskey,” and there is a #SaveWhiskeyCavalier campaign on Twitter. (That said, enough shows have been revived that seemingly every canceled show gets a “save” campaign these days.) You could also make sure to watch the episodes rerunning on Hulu, to encourage the streaming service to make more. Q • In the season finale of “NCIS” we saw Ziva was back. Is she real or a ghost? A • My guess is, even if Gibbs were hallucinating during other parts of that episode, Ziva (played by Cote de Pablo) is back for

real. There have been other hints this season, after all. But we don’t know how long her return will be. The “NCIS” showrunners reportedly said after her big reveal it was “just the beginning” — though they added only that de Pablo will guest star in next season’s premiere “as Ziva’s warning to Gibbs unfolds.” Q • I would like to know the name of the song in the Range Rover commercial that goes “I found a place in my heart, I found a light in the dark, I found my heaven.” A • The song, tied to a dog daydreaming, is called both “I Found a Place in My Heart” and “Find Your Heaven” on the website of Dom James, who co-wrote the song with Tommy An-

tonio specifically for Range Rover’s ads. The vocalist is Emma Smith. In April, James said on his website that he hopes a full-length version of the song will be released “soonish.” Q • I bought a movie on TV named “Wind River” with Jeremy Renner. Now I can’t find it anywhere. Where can I find it again? It was a great movie! A • The must-see drama with Renner, Elizabeth Olsen and Gil Birmingham is on DVD, Blu-ray and digital, with all those formats available on Amazon. It is also streaming on Netflix. BY RICH HELDENFELS, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Send questions to Rich Heldenfels, P.O. Box 417, Mogadore, OH 44260, or brenfels@gmail.com.

Ron Howard hits it out of the “ park with this penetrating and EMOTIONALLY POWERFUL portrait of the Italian tenor who became an INTERNATIONAL SUPERSTAR. This is a NO-HOLDS BARRED portrait of the artist and the man... encompassing every aspect of a COMPLEX and CELEBRATED LIFE.

” – DEADLINE / Pete Hammond

H O W A R D

PAVAROTTI

A • We’re getting into some vintage television here. Modern viewers have seen a Channel 1 — it’s on my cable lineup and used for a news service. But many of us remember the days when analog TV sets came with a channel dial for broadcast VHF Channels 2 through 13, then a UHF dial for higher numbers, and no Channel 1 either place. The reason goes back to 1948, according to Les Brown’s Encyclopedia of Television, which says the channel’s frequency “was assigned to land-mobile and two-way radio service.” Snopes.com notes there are false rumors the channel is reserved for military use. Instead, the site points out, before 1948, TV and radio had shared some frequencies. The postWorld War II TV boom then made the problem of radioTV interference more likely. The Federal Communications Commission said TV had to give up one of the 13 available VHF channels, and the industry picked Channel 1, which was reserved for low-power community television anyway and so the least important to commercial broadcasters.

THE VOICE THE MAN THE DRAMA THE LEGEND

GENIUS IS FOREVER

Special Engagement Starts

June 21 Hi-Pointe Backlot 06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

21


Original cast members from “Beverly Hills, 90210” will star in “BH90210,” a revival of the 1990s teen drama. From left: Gabrielle Carteris, Tori Spelling, Brian Austin Green, Jason Priestley, Shannen Doherty, Jennie Garth and Ian Ziering.

are drawn from Lothar-Günther Buchheim’s 1973 novel — allowing “Das Boot” to broaden its action well beyond the Uboat. Will I be shot on sight if I say it lends the story more depth? ‘THE LAVENDER SCARE’ PBS (premiered June 18; repeats Friday-Saturday on Nine Network)

There’s plenty of LGBTQ pride this summer, the 50th anniversary of Stonewall, but Josh Howard’s compelling onehour documentary “The Lavender Scare” (based on David K. Johnson’s book) examines an earlier outrage from the 1950s, when the U.S. government began purging its federal employee ranks of any man or woman suspected of being homosexual. The policy, approved by President Dwight Eisenhower, was rooted in the ugly idea that gay men and lesbians could be easily blackmailed and turned into communist spies — paranoia in full effect. The purge inspired a nascent gay rights movement, spearheaded by a strong-willed employee of the U.S. Army’s Map Service named Frank Kameny, whose letters are voiced by actor David Hyde Pierce. A ban on security clearances for gay workers remained in effect until 1995. ‘WHAT JUST HAPPENED??!’ 8:30 p.m. June 30 on Fox

10 new shows to watch — none of them about a throne Networks, cable and streaming services aren’t launching anything huge just yet, but here’s what to watch for in the meantime

because it seems like just the kind of TV show he’d wind up in — Terry O’Quinn (“Lost”) plays a Texas ranger working the situation from another angle. “Perpetual Grace, LTD” is created by Steve Conrad, whose quirky Amazon espionage puzzler “Patriot” won admirers for its slowsimmered, reverse-engineered plots and extra-dry humor. Here it’s even dryer. ‘DAS BOOT’ Hulu (premiered June 17)

BY HANK STUEVER | WASHINGTON POST

‘PERPETUAL GRACE, LTD’ 9 p.m. Sundays on Epix (premiered June 2)

A

fter all those warnings that a chill was coming, there’s still a noticeable void of summer TV offerings, in the wake of the conclusion of “Game of Thrones.” We’ll have to consider this summer a rebuilding season, as the networks, cable channels and streaming services hold off on unrolling any big-tent premieres just yet. But not to worry — it’s not so desolate that you’ll be forced to, like, read a book or go outside. I’ve picked 10 new shows that, I hope, will keep us occupied and enlightened (perhaps even entertained) until we collectively fall head over heels for that next big thing. 22

A languid yet artfully envisioned 10-episode drama for viewers who are most at home in remote locations (in this case, rural New Mexico) with neo-noir characters who act and speak as if they belong in a never-made Coen brothers film. (That, or they’re all future clients of Saul Goodman.) Jimmi Simpson (“Westworld”) stars as a guilt-ridden drifter who gets conned into a life-insurance scheme that involves kidnapping a church pastor and his wife (Ben Kingsley and Jacki Weaver) and faking their deaths, only to learn the hard way that the pair are master criminals themselves. Luis Guzman co-stars as a Mexican sheriff who agrees to help with the plan and —

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

Wolfgang Petersen’s classic (and classically claustrophobic) 1981 film about a Nazi U-boat gets a sequel of sorts in this stern but satisfying eight-episode, German-made TV series. It’s 1942 and the newly manufactured U-612 is set to launch from the French port of La Rochelle, with an untested captain (Rick Okon) who has qualms about living up to his late father’s legend, and a young radio technician (Leonard Schleicher) who is ordered to join the sub’s 40-man crew as a last-minute replacement. Problem is, the kid had secret plans with the French Resistance and must now rely on his big sister (Vicky Krieps, “Phantom Thread”) to keep an important rendezvous in his place, even though she’s being closely watched by an inspector. Both the movie and the series

Fox wasn’t quite ready to share preview episodes yet, but I’m going to at least enthusiastically endorse the concept: A spoof of those inane, live after-shows such as AMC’s “Talking Dead,” where guests excitedly deconstruct what just happened on the previous episode of their favorite, direly complex drama — in this case, a show called “The Flare.” Fred Savage plays himself as the host and a huge fanboy of the “Flare” source material, a nonexistent novel by nonexistent author T.J. Whitford called “The Moon Is the Sun at Night,” which is a post-apocalyptic tale about a small town and the aftermath of a solar event. Comedian Taylor Tomlinson joins Savage as co-host, and Best Coast will appear as the show’s house band. The whole thing hinges, of course, on “clips” from “The Flare” — whose “cast” includes Guillermo Díaz (“Scandal”) and Shiri Appleby (“UnReal”) — and the degree to which Savage and company are willing to make fun of modern fandom. ‘THE LOUDEST VOICE’ 9 p.m. June 30 on Showtime

Russell Crowe stars in this seven-part miniseries as the late Roger Ailes, the Fox News impresario whom history will record as reshaping American politics and the way conservative voters receive information. stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: BRIAN BOWEN SMITH, FOX

SUMMER TV GUIDE


‘I LOVE YOU, NOW DIE: THE COMMONWEALTH V. MICHELLE CARTER’ 7 p.m. July 9 and July 10 on HBO

Filmmaker Erin Lee Carr has become the go-to documentarian of some of the stickiest legal conundrums of this decade — such as the case of the cop who fantasized in chat rooms about cannibalizing his wife. The two-night “I Love You, Now Die” chronicles the trial of Michelle Carter, a young Massachusetts woman accused of urging her boyfriend to kill himself through persistent texts and calls. (They had only met in person a handful of times.) How responsible is she for his death? Carr relies on interviews, testimony and text-message transcripts to create a narrative tension that transcends the case’s sensationalism. Her work once again asks how modern communication can capitalize on some of our darkest personality disorders. Even if you know how it ends, you can’t help but be riveted (and heartbroken) by what happened and why — and what it could mean for the consequences of what we say to one another online. ‘SOUTH SIDE’ 9:30 p.m. July 24 on Comedy Central

When someone says they’re making a show about life on Chicago’s South Side, the words “Comedy Central” may not leap to mind — but that’s just the problem that “South Side,” written by Bashir Salahuddin (“GLOW”) and Diallo Riddle (“Marlon”), seeks to solve: Can’t a notoriously violent neighborhood — so often described in hellish terms — also be funny as hell? Loosely organized around the dreams of recent community college grads Simon James (Sultan Salahuddin) and Kareem “K” Odom (Kareme Young), the series follows them through one hustle after another, seen through their jobs delivering (and repossessing) household goods from the interest-gouging Rent-TOwn. The show is produced by and stars people who know this world intimately; rather than turn a blind eye to poverty and violence, “South Side” follows the tradition of history’s great humorists to find laughter amid the chaos. ‘FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL’ July 31 on Hulu

This anthology series’ resemblance to the 1994 British rom-com is so slight that they also could have called it “Return to Notting Hill” or “More Love Actually” and not been any more or less off the mark. It’s too soon to get super picky about the unfinished peek I’ve watched of this show (created by Mindy Kaling and Matt Warburton) about four American friends who are all 30 — three of whom settled in London after college. Nathalie Emmanuel (“Game of Thrones”) stltoday.com/go

stars as Maya, a political strategist for a philandering New York senator. After a disastrous revelation, Maya hops the pond to attend the wedding of her friend Ainsley (Rebecca Rittenhouse) to investment banker Kash (Nikesh Patel), where complications — unrequited love in all directions, paternity secrets, etc. — accompany some second thoughts at the altar. “Four Weddings and a Funeral” could use more polish and panache, especially if it wants to please those who vicariously adore upper-class British love stories. ‘BH90210’ 8 p.m. Aug. 7 on Fox

Every summer needs its own “Sharknado”-like TV event, where the rules of standard criticism (and viewer discernment) need not apply. Fox’s six-episode “BH90210,” which is currently in production, more than fills that order, as original cast members (Shannen Doherty, Jennie Garth, Tori Spelling, Gabrielle Carteris, Jason Priestley, Brian Austin Green and Ian Ziering — everyone but Luke Perry, who died this year) return to play “heightened versions” of themselves: actors who have been convinced to come back and resume the roles that made them super-famous nearly 30 years ago. I don’t think the word “meta” works anymore, since we all know it when we see it. What else will we see? The network has said this show-within-a-show will be a drama about what happens when actors of a certain age have to bury old conflicts as they attempt to launch a reboot. May the bridges they’ve burned light the way, as Perry’s Dylan would have said. ‘THE DARK CRYSTAL: AGE OF RESISTANCE’ Aug. 30 on Netflix

Although it landed with a bit of a thud when it was released at the end of 1982, Jim Henson and Frank Oz’s serious-toned fantasy quietly found and retained generations of loyal fans in the years since. This prequel series, subtitled “Age of Resistance,” takes advantage of four decades of technological advancements in movie magic, blending puppetry with CGI to give the planet Thra and its inhabitants a more dazzling look. The plot involves three elflike Gelflings from different clans (voiced by Taron Egerton, Anya Taylor-Joy and Nathalie Emmanuel) who start a revolution against the reptilianlike rulers known as the Skeksis. I know, I know: The what and the huh? That’s what people said when they first watched “Game of Thrones.” This won’t rival that, but it’s a good reminder that the fantasy genre is about taking a step toward something unfamiliar and then letting it take you away.

Returning favorites include ‘Stranger Things,’ ‘Succession,’ ‘Orange Is the New Black’ Summer’s returning crop includes some high hopes (teenage shopping mall angst on “Stranger Things,” more scion suffering on “Succession”) as well as final bows for some stalwarts (“Orange Is the New Black,” “Power” and “The Affair”). I’m also looking forward to another season of the underappreciated surfellecutal “Lodge 49.” Among this pile of premiere dates, I’ve highlighted some that are worth a look. Fluff up the couch cushions and sink in.

“Big Brother,” 7 p.m. June 25 on CBS

“The $100,000 Pyramid,” 8 p.m. Sundays on ABC (returned June 9)

“Celebrity Family Feud” 7 p.m. Sundays on ABC (returned June 9)

“Absentia,” Amazon Prime (returned June 14)

“Chopped Junior,” 8 p.m. June 25 on Food

“Krypton,” 9 p.m. Wednesdays on Syfy (returned June 12)

★ “The Affair,” 8 p.m. Aug. 25 on Showtime

“Chrisley Knows Best,” 9 p.m. Tuesdays on USA (returned May 28)

★ “Legion,” 9 p.m. June 24 on FX

“Alone,” 9 p.m. Thursdays on History (returned June 6) “America’s Got Talent,” 7 p.m. Tuesdays on NBC (returned May 28) “American Greed,” 9 p.m. Aug. 12 on CNBC ★ “American Ninja Warrior,” 7 p.m. Wednesdays on NBC (returned May 29) “Animal Kingdom,” 8 p.m. Tuesdays on TNT (returned May 28) “Ancient Aliens,” 8 p.m. Fridays on History (returned May 31)

★ “Big Little Lies,” 8 p.m. Sundays on HBO (returned June 9) “Black Ink Crew: Chicago,” 7 p.m. Tuesdays on VH1 (returned June 4) “Black Mirror,” Netflix (returned June 5) “Bridezillas,” 9 p.m. Fridays on WE TV (returned June 14) “Burden of Truth,” 7 p.m. Sundays on the CW (returned June 2) “Catfish: The TV Series,” 7 p.m. Wednesdays on MTV (returned June 12)

★ “Claws,” 8 p.m. Sundays on TNT (returned June 9) “Cops,” 9 p.m. Mondays on Paramount (returned June 3) “Dance Moms,” 7 p.m. Tuesdays on Lifetime (returned June 4) “Deal or No Deal,” 8 p.m. Wednesdays on CNBC (returned June 12) “Designated Survivor,” on Netflix (returned June 7) “The Detour,” 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays on TBS (returned June 18)

★ “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Wednesdays on Hulu (returned June 5) “Harlots,” July 10 on Hulu “Hollywood Game Night,” 8 p.m. July 11 on NBC “Ink Master,” 9 p.m. Tuesdays on Paramount (returned June 11) “Instinct,” 8 p.m. Sundays on CBS (returned June 16) “Jay Leno’s Garage,” 9 p.m. Aug. 28 on CNBC “Kevin Hart Presents: Hart of the City,” 10 p.m. Fridays on Comedy Central (returned June 14) “Killjoys,” 9 p.m. July 19 on Syfy

“Marvel’s Jessica Jones,” on Netflix (returned June 14)

“Final Space,” 10:30 p.m. June 24

★ “Below Deck Mediterranean,” 8 p.m. Mondays on Bravo (returned June 3)

“The Missing,” on Netflix (returned June 17) “Most Expensivest,” 9 p.m. Tuesdays on Viceland (returned June 11)

★ “GLOW,” Aug. 9 on Netflix

“Grown-ish,” 7 p.m. Wednesdays on Freeform (returned June 5)

“Rosehaven,” on Sundance TV (returned June 20) “Siren,” 7 p.m. July 11 on Freeform ★ “Snowfall,” 9 p.m. July 10 on FX “So You Think You Can Dance,” 8 p.m. Mondays on Fox (returned June 3)

“Sunday Best,” 7 p.m. June 30 on BET

“Bachelor in Paradise,” 7 p.m. July 29 on ABC

“BattleBots,” 7 p.m. Fridays on Discovery (returned June 7)

“Riviera,” on Sundance Now (returned June 20)

“Married at First Sight,” 8 p.m. Wednesdays on Lifetime (returned June 12)

“Fear the Walking Dead,” 8 p.m. Sundays on AMC (returned June 2)

“Growing Up Hip Hop Atlanta,” 8 p.m. Thursdays on WE TV (returned June 13)

“The Real World,” on Facebook Watch (returned June 13)

★ “Succession,” in August (TBA) on HBO

“Axios,” 5 p.m. Sundays on HBO (returned June 2)

“Grantchester,” 8 p.m. July 14 on PBS

“Queen Sugar,” 8 p.m. Wednesdays on OWN (returned June 12)

“Man v. Food,” 9 p.m. July 2 on Cooking Channel

“Are You the One?,” 8 p.m. June 26 on MTV

★ “Baskets,” 9 p.m. Thursdays on FX (returned June 13)

“Queen of the South,” 9 p.m. Thursdays on USA (returned June 6)

★ “Stranger Things,” July 4 on Netflix

“Match Game,” 9 p.m. Wednesdays on ABC (returned June 12)

“Good Trouble,” 7 p.m. Tuesdays on Freeform (returned June 18)

“Pure,” 9 p.m. Tuesdays on WGN (returned May 28)

“Luther,” 7 p.m. Sundays on BBC America (returned June 2)

★ “Drunk History,” 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays on Comedy Central (returned June 18)

“Basketball Wives,” 7 p.m. Wednesdays on VH1 (returned June 19)

“Preacher,” 8 p.m. Aug. 4 on AMC

★ “Strange Angel,” Thursdays on CBS All Access (returned June 13)

“Masters of Illusion,” 7 p.m. Fridays on the CW (returned June 7)

“The Good Witch,” 7 p.m. Sundays on Hallmark (returned June 9)

★ “Power,” 7 p.m. Aug. 25 on Starz

★ “Lodge 49,” 9 p.m. Aug. 12 on AMC

★ “Dr. Pimple Popper,” 8 p.m. July 11 on TLC

“Bad Blood,” Netflix (returned May 31)

★ “Pose,” 9 p.m. Tuesdays on FX (returned June 11)

“Southern Charm New Orleans,” 8 p.m. Sundays on Bravo (returned June 2)

★ “Divorce,” 9 p.m. July 1 on HBO

“Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader?,” 6 p.m. Mondays on Nickelodeon (returned June 10)

“Penn & Teller: Fool Us,” 7 p.m. June 17 on the CW

“Lip Sync Battle,” 9 p.m. Thursdays on Paramount (returned May 30)

“MasterChef,” 7 p.m. Wednesdays on Fox (returned May 29)

★ “Archer: 1999,” 9 p.m. Wednesdays on FXX (returned May 29)

“The Outpost,” 8 p.m. July 11 on the CW

“Mountain Men,” 8 p.m. Thursdays on History (returned June 6) ★ “My Next Guest Needs No Introduction,” on Netflix (returned May 31) “Naked and Afraid XL,” 7 p.m. Sundays on Discovery (returned June 2)

“Suits,” 8 p.m. July 17 on USA “Sweet Home Sextuplets,” 9 p.m. Tuesdays on TLC (returned May 28) “Sweetbitter,” 7 p.m. July 14 on Starz “The Terror: Infamy,” 8 p.m. Aug. 12 on AMC “To Tell the Truth,” 9 p.m. Sundays on ABC (returned June 9) ★ The Wall,” 7 p.m. Thursdays on NBC (returned June 20) “Wedding Cake Championship,” 9 p.m. Mondays on Food Network (returned June 3) “Whose Line Is It Anyway?,” 8 p.m. Mondays on the CW (returned June 17) “Yellowstone,” 9 p.m. Wednesdays on Paramount (returned June 19) “Young Justice: Outsiders,” July 2 on DC Universe

★ “Orange Is the New Black,” July 26 on Netflix

★ “Younger,” 9 p.m. Wednesdays on TV Land (returned June 12)

“Outdaughtered,” 8 p.m. Tuesdays on TLC (returned June 11)

BY HANK STUEVER, WASHINGTON POST

06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

23


STLTODAY.COM/DINING

Pulled pork, chorizo and steak tacos at Sol Azteca in St. Louis

Two new spots broaden spectrum of Mexican food

A quesadilla with chicken, chorizo and steak, served with two salsas, at Sol Azteca in St. Louis

BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

T

his week, in lieu of a full review, I’m opening up my critic’s notebook to highlight two small, relatively new Mexican restaurants I’ve enjoyed visiting.

SOL AZTECA

I can’t remember when — if ever — I have begun a review talking about a quesadilla, but here we are this week at Sol Azteca, which opened in December in a shopping plaza in the city’s Mount Pleasant neighborhood and ifroeb@post-dispatch.com

24

where you should absolutely order a quesadilla. Sol Azteca’s quesadilla, owner Jesus Rojas told me, is a quesadilla in the style of his native Mexico City: a corn tortilla, rather than a flour one, which is loosely folded over its filling and served as a single, long oblong. The aptly named Big Quesadilla ($9.99) isn’t especially cheesy, either. The cheese is in balance with the meat of your choice and a garnish of lettuce and sour cream, and the thin tortilla yields a satisfying crunch. Your choices of meat include steak, chicken and chorizo, but the strongest play at Sol Az-

stltoday.com/offthemenu

@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

teca is cochinita pibil. The orange-juice tang imparted to the tender pork by its marinade pops against the more muted flavors of the cheese and tortilla.

Cochinita pibil can also top a taco ($2.25) or a huarache ($9.99). The corn tortilla that serves as the base of Sol Azteca’s huarache is thicker than the quesadilla’s tortilla, but not stltoday.com/go ★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary

P H O T O S : H I L L A R Y L E V I N , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Sol Azteca in St. Louis and Wok O Taco in Overland serve familiar dishes but in unconventional ways


E D S I TION E U L B Sweet-and-spicy chicken at Wok O Taco in Overland

overwhelmingly thick — just right to support a smear of refried beans, avocado slices, queso fresco, lettuce, your choice of meat, salsa verde and sour cream. If one meat is not enough for your quesadilla or huarache, Sol Azteca presents the Quesadilla Azteca ($10.99) and the Huarache Azteca ($10.99), both of which come with chicken, steak and choirzo. I opted for the Torta Azteca ($9.50), which delivers chicken, steak, chorizo and hot dog slices and egg along with traditional torta garnishes on a telera roll. The sandwich is daunting, though maybe not as daunting as it sounds. Now a fifth meat — say, that cochinita pibil — would make this a torta to reckon with any other in St. Louis. WHERE Sol Azteca, 4232 South Broadway, Suite A • MORE INFO 314-449-1505 • MENU Mexican cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner Monday-Saturday (closed Sunday)

P H O T O : I A N F R O E B , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

WOK O TACO

The twist to Wok O Taco is evident in its name. This 6-month-old Overland restaurant features both Mexican and Chinese fare, mostly independent of each other, but occasionally, more intriguingly, fused together. Owners Abel and Marcos Cervantes, brothers and natives of the Mexican state of Michoacán, have previously worked at several Chinese restaurants in St. Louis, and with Abel’s wife, Bianca, and Marcos’ wife, Brenda, they opened Wok O Taco to address an everyday dilemma. “You know how some people, whenever they try to choose somewhere to eat, one says, ‘Oh, I want Mexican,’ (and) the other one says, ‘Oh, I want Chinese food’?” Brenda Cervantes told me in a phone interview. “That’s why we try to put both stltoday.com/go

together in the same place.” The Chinese half of the menu, titled From the Wok, offers Americanized Chinese fare, from crab rangoon ($5.99) to the General Tso’s-esque sweet-and-spicy chicken ($10.99). The latter impresses with the crispness of the fried chicken and the precise calibration of sweetness and chile heat. Any order from the selection of Mexican fare must include the choriqueso ($7.50), a creamy cheese sauce thickened and brightened by chorizo and further sharpened by pico de gallo. Tacos are the featured dish. (Burritos, quesadillas and tortas are also available.) The range of taco fillings is modest: carne asada, al pastor pork, chorizo, chicken tinga, shrimp and fried fish. The outlier (fusion, if not exactly Chinese-Mexican fusion) is the chicken teriyaki taco, which takes the straightforward pleasure of teriyaki sauce — tangy, salty, sweet — and complicates it with pico de gallo, a chipotle mayo and queso fresco. I liked the taco, though as far as the broader taco menu goes, I preferred the spicy chicken tinga and the al pastor pork. For my fusion fix, I will return to Wok O Taco for fried rice with al pastor pork ($8.50). The pork’s smoky chile flavor is an ideal complement to the rice and vegetables. The kitchen garnishes the dish as you would a taco, with cilantro, onion and lime wedges, but be sure to ask for a cup of the restaurant’s tomatillo salsa as well. Its heat and tang turn the dish into something that feels complete in and of itself — not simply fusion, but Wok O Taco’s own brilliant creation. WHERE Wok O Taco, 10633 Page Avenue, Overland • MORE INFO 314473-1027 • MENU Chinese and Mexican fare • HOURS 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Wednesday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday (closed Sunday)

Thursday, June 27, 2019 5:30pm-8:00pm TICKETS: $10-$35

Ballpark Village 601 CLARK AVE, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Join us as we relive the St. Louis Blues’ historic championship season! Hear behind- the-scenes stories from throughout the Blues’ playoff run and Stanley Cup Final, ask your most sought-after hockey questions and more!

ALL LIVE

from the writers who covered it from the beginning:

JIM THOMAS TOM TIMMERMANN BEN FREDERICKSON

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN JEFF GORDON ROGER HENSLEY

TICKETS ON SALE NOW: STLTODAY.COM/OUREVENTS 06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

25


Han Lao ★★½ WHERE 1250 Strassner Drive, Brentwood • MORE INFO 314932-1354; hanlaostl.com • MENU Lao and Thai cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

Hugo’s Pizzeria ★★½ WHERE 3135 Olive Street • MORE INFO 314-896-4846; hugospizzeria.com • MENU Pizzas both conventional and creative • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Iron Barley High Hog Ridge ★★½ WHERE 3367 High Ridge Boulevard, High Ridge • MORE INFO 636-6719911; ironbarleyshighhogridge. com • MENU Hearty comfort fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySaturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

RECENTLY REVIEWED RESTAURANTS ▼

1764 Public House ★½ WHERE 39 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314-405-8221; 1764pub.com • MENU Upscale St. Louis- and New Orleans-influenced fare • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch MondayFriday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

58Hundred ★★ WHERE 5800 Southwest Avenue • MORE INFO 314-279-5799; 58hundred.com • MENU Bar-andgrill, comfort-food fare • HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday, lunch Monday-Friday (closed Sunday)

808 Maison ★★★ WHERE 808 Geyer Avenue • MORE INFO 314-594-4505; 808maison.com • MENU Classic French fare • HOURS Dinner Wednesday-Saturday

Bakers & Hale ★★½ WHERE 7120 Montclaire Avenue, Godfrey • MORE INFO 618-4339748; bakershale.com • MENU Seasonal American fare, with pizza, tacos and more • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Saturday, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Balkan Treat Box ★★★ WHERE 8103 Big Bend Boulevard, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-733-5700; balkantreatbox. com • MENU Bosnian, Turkish and other Balkan-inspired fare • HOURS 11 a.m.-3 p.m. (or until sold out) Wednesday-Sunday

The Benevolent King ★★★

HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday, brunch Saturday and Sunday

Cork & Barrel Chophouse ★½

WHERE 7268 Manchester Road, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-8990440; thebenevolentking.com • MENU Moroccan-inspired cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

The Chocolate Pig ★★

WHERE 7337 Mexico Road, St. Peters • MORE INFO 636-387-7030; corkandbarrel.com • MENU Steaks, chops and pizza • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sunday

Billie-Jean ★★★½ WHERE 7610 Wydown Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7978484; billiejeanstl.com • MENU Contemporary American and Southeast Asian cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

The Boathouse at Forest Park ★★ WHERE 6101 Government Drive, Forest Park • MORE INFO 314366-1555; boathousestl.com • MENU Sandwiches, flatbread pizzas and more casual American fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Saturday, brunch Sunday

Brasswell ★★ WHERE Rockwell Beer Co., 1320 South Vandeventer Avenue • MORE INFO 314-256-1657; rockwellbeer. com • MENU Burgers, beer brats, chicken sandwiches and fries • HOURS 11 a.m.-10 p.m. TuesdayThursday, 11 a.m.-midnight FridaySaturday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday

Brick River Cider Co. ★★ WHERE 2000 Washington Avenue • MORE INFO 314-224-5046; brickrivercider.com • MENU Brewpub fare and cider made on site • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

Carnivore ★★

WHERE 4220 Duncan Avenue • MORE INFO 314-272-3230; thechocolatepig.com • MENU Gastropub fare and an extensive dessert program • HOURS Lunch and dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

Cibare Italian Kitchen ★½ WHERE 777 River City Casino Boulevard • MORE INFO 314388-3777; www.rivercity.com/ dining/cibare-italian-kitchen • MENU Pasta, pizza and more Italian fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

Cinder House ★★★ WHERE Four Seasons Hotel St. Louis, 999 North Second Street • MORE INFO 314-881-5759; cinderhousestl.com • MENU Brazilian dishes and wood-grilled meats • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

Club Taco ★½ WHERE 200 North Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • MORE INFO 314-858-1488; clubtacostl.com • MENU Tacos with a variety of fillings drawn from various cuisines • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Cocina Latina ★★½ WHERE 508 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314-696-2294; facebook.com/cocinaslatina • MENU Peruvian and other South American fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

WHERE 5257 Shaw Avenue • MORE INFO 314-449-6328; carnivore-stl.com • MENU Steaks, with Italian-American dishes •

26

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

The Curry Club ★★ WHERE 1635 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield • MORE INFO 636778-7777; stlcurryclub.com • MENU Southern Indian fare in a fast-casual setting • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Elmwood ★★★ WHERE 2704 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314261-4708; elmwoodstl.com • MENU Contemporary American fare from a coal-fired kitchen • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

The Frisco Barroom ★★½ WHERE 8110 Big Bend Boulevard, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-455-1090; thefriscostl. com • MENU Classic pub fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Grand Tavern ★★ WHERE 626 North Grand Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-405-3399; grandtavernstl.com • MENU Contemporary American fare • HOURS Dinner and breakfast daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Hamilton’s Urban Steakhouse & Bourbon Bar ★★½ WHERE 2101 Chouteau Avenue • MORE INFO 314-241-2333; hamiltonsteak.com • MENU Steaks and other chops • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

J. Devoti Trattoria ★★★ WHERE 5100 Daggett Avenue • MORE INFO 314-7735553; jdevoti.com • MENU Contemporary American fare, with Italian influences • HOURS Dinner Wednesday-Saturday (closed Sunday-Tuesday)

J. Smugs GastroPit ★★½ WHERE 2130 Macklind Avenue • MORE INFO 314-499-7488; jsmugsgastropit.com • MENU Barbecue, including pork ribs and beef brisket • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday, noon-7 p.m. Sunday

Jerk Soul ★★½ WHERE 2016 Salisbury Street • MORE INFO 314-601-3871; facebook.com/jerksoulstl • MENU Jerk chicken and more Caribbean fare • HOURS Noon-8 p.m. Sunday-Friday (carryout only; closed Saturday)

Kalbi Taco Shack ★★ WHERE 2301 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314-240-5544; kalbitacoshack.com • MENU Korean-Mexican fusion • HOURS 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

Knead Bakehouse + Provisions ★★½ WHERE 3467 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314-376-4361; kneadbakehouse.com • MENU Breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday- Sunday (closed Monday)

L’Acadiane ★½ WHERE 1915 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-875-0108; lacadiane.com • MENU Creole- and Cajun-inspired

fare • HOURS Lunch WednesdayFriday, dinner Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Like Home French Cafe & Pastry ★★½ WHERE 3855 Lindell Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-319-0099; likehomestl.com • MENU French cafe fare and pastries • HOURS 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Liliana’s Italian Kitchen ★★ WHERE 11836 Tesson Ferry Road • MORE INFO 314-729-1800; lilianasitalinakitchen.com • MENU Pizza, pasta and sandwiches • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday, closed Monday

Louie ★★★ WHERE 706 DeMun Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-3008188; louiedemun.com • MENU Rustic Italian fare • HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday (closed Sunday)

Majeed Mediterranean Restaurant ★★ WHERE 4658 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-282-0981; facebook.com/majeed mediterraneanrestaurant • MENU Syrian cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

The Midwestern Eat & Drink ★★½ WHERE 900 Spruce Street • MORE INFO 314-696-2573; midwesternstl. com • MENU Barbecue, plus burgers, toasts and more • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily (closed Tuesday except during major sporting events and concerts)

Morning Glory Diner ★★ WHERE 2609 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO No listed phone number • MENU Classic American diner fare • HOURS 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

Nippon Tei ★★★ WHERE 14025 Manchester Road • MORE INFO 636-386-8999; nippon. teistl.com • MENU Sushi and other traditional Japanese fare • HOURS Lunch Tuesday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Pangea ★★½ WHERE 3245 Rue Royale, St. Charles • MORE INFO 636757-3579; pangeaworldfusion. com • MENU Contemporary bistro fare with global accents • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Pie Guy Pizza ★★ WHERE 4189 Manchester Avenue • MORE INFO 314-899-0444; pieguystl.com • MENU New York-style pizza • HOURS 4:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesday-Thursday, 4:30 p.m.-3:30 a.m. Friday, noon-3:30 a.m. Saturday

Pizza Head ★★ WHERE 3196 South Grand Boulevard • MORE INFO 314266-5400; pizzaheadstl.com • MENU New York-style pizza by the slice or whole pie • HOURS Lunch Tuesday-Saturday, dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Polite Society ★★★ WHERE 1923 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-325-2553; politesocietystl. com • MENU Contemporary and classic bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Sardella ★★★½

Sultan Mediterranean Restaurant ★★★ WHERE 4200 Manchester Avenue • MORE INFO 314-390-2020 • MENU A wide range of Mediterranean and Levantine dishes • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday

The Taco & Ice Cream Joint ★★½ WHERE 2738 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314224-5799; facebook.com/ tacoandicecreamjoint • MENU Tacos and other taqueria fare, ice cream and popsicles • HOURS 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday

Thai Table ★★ WHERE 7403 Manchester Road, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-4496919; thaitablestl.com • MENU Thai cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily (closed Tuesday)

Union 30 ★½

WHERE 7734 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7737755; sardellastl.com • MENU Contemporary fare with Italian and Californian influences • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday

WHERE Hotel St. Louis, 705 Olive Street • MORE INFO 314-241-4300; hotelsaintlouis.com/union30 • MENU Casual, contemporary American fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

Savage ★★★½

Vicia ★★★★

WHERE 2655 Ann Avenue • MORE INFO 314-354-8488; savagestl. com • MENU Often-changing tasting menus of local ingredients • HOURS Dinner ThursdaySunday (open at noon for drinks and limited a-la-carte menu)

WHERE 4260 Forest Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-553-9239; viciarestaurant.com • MENU Modern, progressive cuisine with an emphasis on vegetables • HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Saturday

Simba Ugandan Restaurant ★★ WHERE 8531 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-475-5630; facebook.com/ simbaugandanrestaurant • MENU Traditional Ugandan fare • HOURS Lunch buffet and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Sister Cities Cajun ★★½ WHERE 3550 South Broadway • MORE INFO 314-405-0447; sistercitiescajun.com • MENU Gumbo, po’boys and more • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

The Stellar Hog ★★ WHERE 5623 Leona Street • MORE INFO 314-481-8448; thestellarhog. com • MENU Barbecue featuring beef brisket and pork ribs • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Wednesday)

VP Square ★★½ WHERE 3611 Juniata Street • MORE INFO 314-833-4838; facebook.com/vpsquarestl • MENU Pan-Asian cuisine, including Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese dishes • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

The Wood Shack ★★½ WHERE 1862 South 10th Street • MORE INFO 314-833-4770; thewoodshacksoulard.com • MENU Sandwiches featuring smoked meats • HOURS 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

Yellowbelly ★★½ WHERE 4659 Lindell Boulevard • MORE INFO yellowbellystl.com • MENU Seafood and rum-focused cocktails • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Wednesday-Sunday BY IAN FROEB

The Stone Turtle ★★ WHERE 6355 Clayton Avenue • MORE INFO 314-349-1933; stoneturtlestl.com • MENU Gastropub fare • HOURS Lunch Monday-Saturday, dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Search Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s interactive restaurant guide. stltoday.com/stl100

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : C H R I S T I A N G O O D E N , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

(closed Sunday and Monday)

Smoked pastrami at the Midwestern Meat & Drink


The dining room of the Bellwether

Looking for a specific cuisine, price range or location? Check Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s guide to essential St. Louis restaurants.

OFF THE MENU ▼

Polite Society team wants to reach higher at the Bellwether

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included)

BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

he Bellwether is now open inside the City Hospital power plant building at 1419 Carroll Street in the Peabody Darst Webbe neighborhood. This is the second restaurant from the team that runs Polite Society in nearby Lafayette Square: owners Brian Schmitz and Jonathan Schoen, executive chef Thomas Futrell and beverage director Travis Hebrank. At Polite Society, Schoen tells Off the Menu, “our intent was to have a neighborhood restaurant that kind of overachieves.” (For this restaurant critic, at least, Polite Society did just that. I awarded it three stars in 2017 and have included it in the 2018 and 2019 editions of the STL 100.) As to the Bellwether, Schoen says, “here it’s going to end up being a little bit more of a destination place.” The Bellwether has taken over the second- and third-floor spaces in the power plant building previously occupied by the restaurant Element, which ended its five-year run in October. Element housed its kitchen and dining room on the second floor and used the third floor for its bar and lounge. At the Bellwether, the third floor features both the bar and the dining room. The kitchen remains on the second floor. This floor as a whole is a work in progress, but it will become the Reference Room, a librarythemed venue that can host private events or ticketed dinners from visiting chefs. Back on the third floor, diners will find a menu from Futrell that features small plates (lamb meatballs, mushroom-ginger dumplings), fresh housemade pasta and chops (filet mignon, rib-eye steak, pork steak). The Bellwether is open for dinner daily, with bar service beginning at 4:30 p.m. and dinner service at 5 p.m. The phone number is 314-380-3086.

Us Join ebrate l & Ce e Mayo! D Cinco

P H O T O : I A N F R O E B , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

T

stltoday.com/go

R JOIN US FOON SPECIALS

Margarita Monday

120 W Jefferson Ave Kirkwood, MO 63122 (314) 821-0877

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 4/1/19.

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 4/1/19.

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, • 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway. SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd • 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

Go Wild With Missouri Natives

Native plants require less water, less fertilizer and less work, yet reward you with luscious gardens overflowing with blossoms spring till frost. Over 2,000 varieties of plants 1011 N. Woodlawn • Kirkwood, MO

314-965-3070 www.sugarcreekgardens.com

VOTED #1 BEST GARDEN CENTER 06.21.19-06.27.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

27


PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF (KIEFER SUTHERLAND); DANNY MOLOSHOK, AP (FRANCE)

28

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.21.19-06.27.19

stltoday.com/go


THEY JUST MAKE CENTS Whether you use a couple or couple dozen every week, you end up with more groceries in your cart and change in your pocket. And that Sunday newspaper you just bought? It has paid for itself.

SUNDAYCOUPONS

SUBSCRIBE TODAY at STLtoday.com/subscribe

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Friday • 06.21.2019 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

SUDOKU


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES

CRYPTOQUIP

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign.

WORD GAMES

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

Make it personal and cozy.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) HHH Pace yourself; follow

your routine. You want to clear out whatever you must. Stay more upbeat and positive than you have been until now. You’ll see the power of positive thinking once HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR more. Tonight: Pushing until you’re FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2019: This year, you might be unusu- too tired to continue. ally buoyant and happy. Never- LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) theless, your constant search for HHHH A child or friend new information keeps your mind often ser ves as a muse for alert. You’ll also always have a you. Once you and this person sensitive and caring side. If sin- start talking and sharing some gle, you often feel challenged by thoughts, ideas flash across your the people you date. You like and mind. Brainstorm with the perencourage openness but cannot son you’re with. Tonight: Don’t always handle the negative side hold back. of this trait. Try to appreciate SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. the comments for what they of21) fer. If you’re attached, you and Stay close to home or HHH your partner connect on many at least readily available. Expect different levels and add to the to create a great rapport among excitement that seems to exist you and your roommates or fambetween you. Give each other space to grow and evolve, but ily. In the next few days, news remain close. AQUARIUS can be might come forth from someone from afar. Tonight: Go for a drive. a challenging friend.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) HHHH A friend at a distance

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22DEC. 21) HHH Break past a problem

often revives your energy when you speak to each other. Today is no different. You feel lucky to have this person in your life. He or she also helps you keep your mind open to new ideas. Tonight: Where the action is.

by not being restrained due to a possible change of direction. You might not be sure which way is the most feasible. Brainstorm with a dear friend. Then you’ll know what to do. Tonight: Hang out.

ally tired and withdrawn. You’ve been quite social and seem to be a lot freer with your energy. An energy sag might not surprise anyone who has been around you this week. Tonight: A loved one attempts to perk you up.

about a personal matter, but you also might be choosing not to share what’s going on. Others wonder what’s ailing you. Use caution around a financial investment. Tonight: Make sure that your budget can meet this weekend’s demands.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) 20) HHHH You could be uptight HHHH You could be unusu-

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) HHHH You have mixed feelings about a career matter or your role in a key project. You’ll handle whatever you must and do it well. Eye your long-term professional goals. Tonight: Treat a dear friend or loved one to dinner.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) HHHH You could be on top of an issue; however, is this your opinion? An event or conversation could suggest otherwise. Try to lose your rose-colored shades and take a hard look at what’s happening. Tonight: Spend it with your favorite person.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) HHHHH You could be in

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) HHHHH Others seek you out. You might wonder why you’re the subject of so much attention. Nevertheless, don’t get thrown off by that attention; just continue with your plans. Tonight: You might have a reason for celebration.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) HHHH Pressure builds, at least in your mind. You want to cover or protect a certain area that won’t be touched by potential uproar. Because you have a lot of ground to cover, you could be tired. Tonight: Make it early.

the position of trying another apBORN TODAY proach or doing something very Philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre different. A child or loved one might try to get your attention. (1905), Duke of Cambridge Prince Before you know it, you’ve tum- William (1982), American whistlebled into an old routine. Tonight: blower Edward Snowden (1983)

.com „ Find more free

games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday. com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

VRYUC UCONE DHOYSD LIRMED ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

CROSSWORD

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: BRISK GRAPH JURIST METHOD Answer: He didn’t win the wine competition, and his remarks afterward were — SOUR GRAPES


06.21.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

Brother erupts over waiter’s blunder Dear Abby • Last week I was out with my family of 13 for dinner. My sister-in-law was sitting relaxed in her chair, stretching her back and extending her stomach. The waiter came over and, trying to make small talk, asked her, “What’s the occasion? Are you pregnant?” My sisterin-law isn’t pregnant, but her posture may have suggested it. Well, my brother, her husband, went off on the man, calling him names, swearing, and causing a loud, uncomfortable scene. We all agreed the waiter was stupid to ask the question, but wasn’t my brother wrong here? He embarrassed all of us, and I don’t think there was any malicious intent on the part of the waiter. My brother stands behind his outburst and insists he wasn’t wrong. This has happened before, and I’m sure it will happen in the future. What’s your suggestion for a better way to handle a situation like this, so maybe I can get through to my brother? — Lost My Appetite in Georgia Dear Lost • The waiter should have quit talking after he asked

if your party of 13 was celebrating a special occasion. To have asked whether your SIL was pregnant was a blunder, which I am betting was reflected in his tip. While I appreciate your brother’s desire to “protect” his wife, he accomplished nothing positive by creating a scene and embarrassing the family. Because you mentioned that this has happened before and may happen in the future, it’s time for “the family” to suggest he get professional help for his anger issues. If this is how he behaves in public, I shudder to imagine what he’s like in private. Dear Abby • When my son was 9 he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. He is now a college grad. Because I couldn’t fix his diabetes, I have tried to fix everything else in his life, and it hasn’t been pretty. He was home for a visit the day his graduate school application was due. I bulldozed him into taking some punctuation advice on his letter of intent that turned out to be wrong. A few months later a rejection letter arrived, and I’m afraid my

grammatical error caused it. I’m afraid his dreams were dashed because he trusted me. He doesn’t think the mistake had anything to do with the rejection, but I suspect he’s trying to protect my feelings because he’s such a nice person. How important is perfect grammar on a grad school letter of intent? If my son has an above-average GPA, research experience, above-average GRE scores, but a grammatical error in his essay, could that one error put him out of contention? — Trying to Meddle No More Dear Trying • I seriously doubt that a misplaced comma would cause your son to be rejected from graduate school if he had all the other necessary qualifications. Listen to what he’s telling you, stop flogging yourself and, from now on, quit trying to bulldoze him and let him fly on his own. There is nothing to feel guilty about. With practice, you’ll get the hang of it. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

TV FRIDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

MISS MANNERS

Neighbors’ guests keep blocking driveway

6/21/19

Dear Miss Manners • I love my neighbors, and would like to solve a recurring problem with their guests, as it creates hard feelings and frustration on my side, and likely for my neighbors as well. They live across the street, and we are located at the end of our street. When their guests come, they invariably park directly in front of the neighbors’ house, which puts their car at the entrance to my driveway, so I can neither pull in nor back out of my driveway. Sometimes there are two cars there. Their driveway is large enough to allow six cars to park comfortably. There is plenty of space in front of my house to park, on my side of the street, but no one ever parks there. And there are plenty of places to park even if the two

CBS 4

spaces in front of their house at the end of my driveway were not used. What do you recommend as a solution? My neighbor has helped to direct people to park in other places, as have I. I’ve thought of creating signs that could be put out. Gentle Reader • It is time for a polite demonstration. Next time the problem recurs, ring the doorbell and explain that you need to get out — and cannot. Your neighbors, and their guests, will then need to interrupt the festivities to extricate you. This is likely to be memorable enough that it will discourage future occurrences. Dear Miss Manners • When, if ever, is it permissible to cut one’s food into multiple smaller bites at the same time?

I find it much more efficient to cut an entree into several pieces at once, eat them individually with my fork, then cut some more. Gentle Reader • Detaching two mouthfuls at a time is allowed. The rule is not so much that every single bite be detached in a separate operation, but rather that the result not be Lego-like mounds of hot dog, Brussels sprouts and polenta. Dietitians and nutritionists will, like Miss Manners, remind you that, as a nation, our eating habits are a good deal too efficient already. Send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX Beat Shazam New York MasterChef Chefs com- FOX 2 News at 9:00pm 2 City musicians compete. pete in a culinary boot (N) (cc) camp. (cc) (cc) Blue Bloods Danny goes Whistleblower (N) (cc) Hawaii Five-0 A renowned urban vigilante against a direct order. (cc) is killed. (cc)

NBC American Ninja Warrior: Oklahoma City City 5 Qualifiers. Barclay Stockett and more. (cc) PBS Washing9 ton Week (N) (cc) CW 11

Donnybrook

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Inescap30 able. (N) (cc) ION 46

Dateline NBC (N) (cc)

Father Brown The hunt Jamestown ÍJamestown (9:44) for a fugitive. (cc) (8:55) The Big Masters of Masters Illusion (N) of Illusion Stage (N) (cc) (cc) (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Green Acres (cc)

The Big Stage (cc)

Hogan’s Hogan’s Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

20/20 (cc)

NCIS: Los Angeles Cal- NCIS: Los Angeles Ter- NCIS: Los Angeles A len’s ex-partner takes rorists kill a plastic retired Army sergeant is surgeon. (cc) hostages. (cc) murdered.

WIN A FAIR SAINT LOUIS

VIP

EXPERIENCE

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch & Go! Magazine want YOU to be our Fair Saint Louis VIP. Our winner and their guest receive: • 1 - Night Hotel Stay • 2 - VIP Reviewing Stand Tickets for America’s Birthday Parade on July 4 • 1 - VIP Parking Pass • 2 - VIP Passes which include: - 2 locations to watch the concert - VIP Lounge includes: • Casual dinner served at 5:00 p.m. • Cash bar with Anheuser-Busch and Pepsi products and spirits • Private executive style restrooms • Free cell phone charging stations • Comfortable atmosphere with a combination of soft seating, table seating and open areas with moveable seating • Designated area in front of stage for VIPs only • BACKSTAGE MEET AND GREET FOR ARTIST OF WINNER’S CHOOSING

ENTER DAILY THROUGH JUNE 23 AT:

STLtoday.com/contests

(314) 236-3349 (314) 376-3234 (618) 206-5699


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.21.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

DR. KEITH ROACH

The problem with playing pharmacist Dear Dr. Roach • My wife has been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. Doctors tried an electrical cardioversion, but it came back after a few days. She is taking metoprolol and Eliquis. We have read about the supplements red clover, turmeric, omega-3 and hawthorn. Should she discontinue the pharmaceuticals and take supplements instead? — J.C. Answer • Please don’t do that, and let me explain why. Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heart rhythm. The goal of treating it is first to relieve symptoms, such as fast heart rate and dizziness, and second, to reduce the risk of stroke. Blood clots can form inside the heart when the atria are fibrillating (a chaotic, noncoordinated muscle movement). Those clots can break off and go into the blood vessels of the brain, causing cell death and loss of function in that part of the brain. That’s a stroke. Your wife is taking metoprolol to slow the heart rate. Atrial fibrillation causes the ventricles to go too fast, causing a sensation of fast heart rate and palpitations. Metoprolol, a beta blocker, protects the heart from damage from a too-fast heart rate, in addition to relieving symptoms. Apixaban (Eliquis) is a powerful anticoagulant, reducing the risk of clot formation. Red clover is usually used in herbal medicine for its estrogen-like activities. Unfortunately, estrogens INCREASE clot risk, so this herbal medicine absolutely should not be used by someone at risk for clots. Turmeric is an antioxidant that does have some mild anticoagulant properties. However, it is not remotely powerful enough to do the job of protecting your wife adequately from stroke. Omega-3 fish oils were once thought to reduce risk of atrial fibrillation; unfortunately, a 2013 study showed no benefit. Hawthorn has two potential benefits: To a slight extent, it acts as a beta blocker (like metoprolol) as well as an anticoagulant. However, no trials have proven its effectiveness. It may interfere with both her medicines. The metoprolol and Eliquis have much more safety data. Dr. Roach writes • In a recent column, a reader noted she had a history of irritable bowel syndrome and described intermittent sharp rectal pain. My answer discussed control of her IBS. When I saw the column printed in the newspaper, weeks after I wrote it, I realized instantly that the diagnosis was probably proctalgia fugax, which is a spasm of the muscles of the anus. It is thought to be related to nerve compression. Sitting on a baseball or tennis ball can sometimes stop the pain instantly, and creams and sometimes oral or inhaled medications can be effective in harder-to-treat cases.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell. edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

Profile for stltoday.com

6.21.19  

6.21.19 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

6.21.19  

6.21.19 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Profile for dmsgroup

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded